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Sample records for cfrp composite laminates

  1. Wireless Damage Monitoring of Laminated CFRP Composites using Electrical Resistance Change

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-02-25

    Final report Project Title: Wireless Damage Monitoring of Laminated CFRP composites using Electrical Resistance Change Project number...07 NOV 2007 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Wireless Damage Monitoring of Laminated CFRP composites using Electrical...strain measuring sensors into laminated composite structures [12, 13]. This approach, however, may cause reductions in static and fatigue strengths

  2. Feasibility on fiber orientation detection on unidirectional CFRP composite laminates using nondestructive evaluation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, In-Young; Kim, Ji-Hoon; Cha, Cheon-Seok; Lee, Kil-Sung; Hsu, David K.; Im, Kwang-Hee

    2007-07-01

    In particular, CFRP (carbon fiber reinforced plastics) composite materials have found wide applicability because of their inherent design flexibility and improved material properties. CFRP composites were manufactured from uni-direction prepreg sheet in this paper. It is important to assess fiber orientation, material properties and part defect in order to ensure product quality and structural integrity of CFRP because strength and stiffness of composites depend on fiber orientation. It is desirable to perform nondestructive evaluation which is very beneficial. An new method for nondestructively determining the fiber orientation in a composite laminate is presented. A one-sided pitch-catch setup was used in the detection and evaluation of flaws and material anomalies in the unidirectional CFRP composite laminates. Two Rayleigh wave transducers were joined head-to-head and used in the pitch-catch mode on the surface of the composites. The pitch-catch signal was found to be more sensitive than normal incidence backwall echo of longitudinal wave to subtle flaw conditions in the composite. Especially, ultrasonic waves were extensively characterized in the CFRP composite laminates both normal to fiber and along to fiber with using a one-sided direction of Rayleigh wave transducers. Also, one-sided ultrasonic measurement was made with using a Rayleigh wave transducers and a conventional scanner was used in an immersion tank for extracting fiber orientation information from the ultrasonic reflection in the unidirectional laminate. Therefore, it is thought that the proposed method is useful to evaluate integrity of CFRP laminates.

  3. Effect of temperatures on impact damage and residual strength of CFRP composite laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Im, Kwang-Hee; Cha, Cheon-Seok; Park, Jae-Woung; Cha, Yong-Hun; Yang, In-Young; Jung, Jong-An

    2000-05-01

    In this paper, the effect of temperature variations (low and high temperatures) was experimentally studied on the impact damages of CFRP laminates. Composite laminates used for this experiment are CF/EPOXY orthotropic laminated plates with two-interfaces [06/906]s and [04/904]s, and CF/PEEK orthotropic laminated plates with two-interfaces [06/906]s. A steel ball launched by the air gun collides against CFRP laminates to generate impact damages. With impact-damaged specimens, nondestructive evaluation (NDE) technique, such as a scanning acoustic microscope (SAM) was performed on the delamination-damaged samples to characterize damage growth using the SAM after impact damages according to the temperatures. Therefore, this study aims experimentally to present the interrelations between the impact energy and impact damages (i.e. delamination area and matrix) of CFRP laminates. (CF/EPOXY, CF/PEEK) subjected to FOD (foreign object damages) under low and high temperatures.

  4. Optimization-Based Monitoring of Laminated CFRP Composites using Electrical Resistance Changes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-11-09

    ABSTRACT Impact load like a tool drop easily causes a delamination crack in a laminated Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer ( CFRP ). The delamination crack...Reinforced Polymer ( CFRP ). The delamination crack causes deterioration of structural reliability of a laminated CFRP . Monitoring of delamination is...Monitoring, Optimization Introduction Laminated Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer ( CFRP ) has been increasingly applied to the aerospace primary

  5. One-Sided Measurement Approach on Ultrasonic Beam Path Analysis in CFRP Composite Laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Im, K. H.; Hsu, D. K.; Kim, H. J.; Song, S. J.; Dayal, V.; Barnard, D.; Park, J. W.; Lee, K. S.; Yang, Y. J.; Yang, I. Y.

    2008-02-01

    Composite materials are attractive for a wide range of applications because of high performance engineering structures. In particular, the importance of carbon-fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) has been generally recognized in both space and civil aircraft industries; so, CFRP composite laminates are widely used. It is very important to detect defects in composite laminates because they cause the mechanical properties (stiffness, strength) of the laminate to be reduced. As well known for ultrasonic technique for evaluating the defect of CFRP composite laminates, a pitch-catch technique was found to be more practical than normal incidence backwall echo of longitudinal wave to arbitrary flaws in the composite, including fiber orientation, low level porosity, ply waviness, and cracks. The measurement depth using Rayleigh probes can be increased by increasing the separation distance of the transmitting and receiving probes. Also, with the aid of the automatic scanner, the one-sided pitch-catch probe was used to produce C-scan images for mapping out the images with beam profiles. Especially pitch-catch beam path was nondestructively characterized for the specimens when measuring a peak-to-peak amplitude and time-of-flight in order to build the beam profile modeling in the unidirectional CFRP composite laminates. Also, the pitch-catch simulation was performed to predict the beam profile trend of wave propagation in the unidirectional CF/Epoxy composite laminates. Therefore, it is found that the experimentally Rayleigh wave variation of pitch-catch ultrasonic signal was consistent with simulated results and one-side ultrasonic measurement might be very useful to detect the defects in CFRP composites.

  6. Influence of terahertz waves on the fiber direction of CFRP composite laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Im, Kwang-Hee; Hsu, David K.; Chiou, Chien-Ping; Barnard, Daniel J.; Yang, In-Young; Park, Je-Woong

    2013-01-01

    The importance of Carbon-fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) are widely utilized due to more high performance in engineering structures. It was well known that a nondestructive technique would be very beneficial. A new terahertz radiation has been recognized for their importance in technological applications. Recently, T-ray (terahertz ray) advances of technology and instrumentation has provided a probing field on the electromagnetic spectrum. The THz-TDS can be considered as a useful tool using general non-conducting materials; however it is quite limited to conducting materials. In order to solve various material properties, the index of refraction (n) and the absorption coefficient (α) are derived in reflective and transmission configuration using the terahertz time domain spectroscopy. However, the T-ray is limited in order to penetrate a conducting material to some degree. Here, the T-ray would not go through easily the CFRP composite laminates since carbon fibers are electrically conducting while the epoxy matrix is not. So, investigation of terahertz time domain spectroscopy (THz TDS) was made and reflection and transmission configurations were studied for a 48-ply thermoplastic PPS (poly-phenylene sulfide)-based CFRP solid laminate. It is found that the electrical conductivity of CFRP composites depends on the direction of unidirectional fibers. Also, the T-ray could penetrate a CFRP composite laminate a few ply based on the E-filed (Electrical field) of carbon fibers. The terahertz scanning images were made at the angles ranged from 0° to 180° with respect to the nominal fiber axis. So, the images were mapped out based on the electrical field (E-field) direction in the CFRP solid laminates. Also, using two-dimensional spatial Fourier transform, interface C-scan images were transformed into quantitatively angular distribution plots to show the fiber orientation information therein and to predict the orientation of the ply.

  7. Damage Assessment of CFRP [90/±45/0] Composite Laminates over Fatigue Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadzadeh, G. R.; Shirazi, A.; Varvani-Farahani, A.

    2011-12-01

    The present paper develops a stiffness-based model to characterize the progressive fatigue damage in quasi-isotropic carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) [90/±45/0] composite laminates with various stacking sequences. The damage model is constructed based on (i) cracking mechanism and damage progress in matrix (Region I), matrix-fiber interface (Region II) and fiber (Region III) and (ii) corresponding stiffness reduction of unidirectional plies of 90°, 0° and angle-ply laminates of ±45° as the number of cycles progresses. The proposed model accumulates damages of constituent plies constructing [90/±45/0] laminates by means of weighting factor η 90, η 0 and η 45. These weighting factors were defined based on the damage progress over fatigue cycles within the plies 90°, 0° and ±45° of the composite laminates. Damage model has been verified using CFRP [90/±45/0] laminates samples made of graphite/epoxy 3501-6/AS4. Experimental fatigue damage data of [90/±45/0] composite laminates have fell between the predicted damage curves of 0°, 90° plies and ±45°, 0/±45° laminates over life cycles at various stress levels. Predicted damage results for CFRP [90/±45/0] laminates showed good agreement with experimental data. Effect of stacking sequence on the model of stiffness reduction has been assessed and it showed that proposed fatigue damage model successfully recognizes the changes in mechanism of fatigue damage development in quasi-isotropic composite laminates.

  8. Effects of the shock duration on the response of CFRP composite laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gay, Elise; Berthe, Laurent; Boustie, Michel; Arrigoni, Michel; Buzaud, Eric

    2014-11-01

    Shock loads induce a local tensile stress within a sample. The location and amplitude of this high strain rate stress can be monitored respectively by the duration and intensity of the shock. The process is applied to carbon fibre reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites, involved in aeronautic or defense industry. This paper describes the response of CFRP laminates of different thicknesses to a shock load normal to the fibres direction. The effects of the shock duration on the wave propagation are key issues of this work. Experiments have been performed on high power laser facilities and on a high power pulsed generator to get a wide range of pulse duration from fs to µs. Numerical simulation provides a comprehensive approach of the wave propagation and tensile stress generation within these complex materials. The main result concerns the relation between the load duration, the tensile stress and the induced delamination within 1, 4 and 8 ply composite laminates.

  9. Detection of Fiber Layer-Up Lamination Order of CFRP Composite Using Thermal-Wave Radar Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fei; Liu, Junyan; Liu, Yang; Wang, Yang; Gong, Jinlong

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, thermal-wave radar imaging (TWRI) is used as a nondestructive inspection method to evaluate carbon-fiber-reinforced-polymer (CFRP) composite. An inverse methodology that combines TWRI with numerical optimization technique is proposed to determine the fiber layer-up lamination sequences of anisotropic CFRP composite. A 7-layer CFRP laminate [0°/45°/90°/0°]_{{s}} is heated by a chirp-modulated Gaussian laser beam, and then finite element method (FEM) is employed to calculate the temperature field of CFRP laminates. The phase based on lock-in correlation between reference chirp signal and the thermal-wave signal is performed to obtain the phase image of TWRI, and the least square method is applied to reconstruct the cost function that minimizes the square of the difference between the phase of TWRI inspection and numerical calculation. A hybrid algorithm that combines the simulation annealing with Nelder-Mead simplex research method is employed to solve the reconstructed cost function and find the global optimal solution of the layer-up sequences of CFRP composite. The result shows the feasibility of estimating the fiber layer-up lamination sequences of CFRP composite with optimal discrete and constraint conditions.

  10. Strengthening and repair of steel-concrete composite girders using CFRP laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavakkolizadeh, Mohammadreza

    The use of advanced composite materials for rehabilitation and repair of deteriorating infrastructure has been embraced worldwide. The conventional techniques for strengthening of substandard bridges are costly, time consuming and labor intensive. A total of 38 specimens made of steel and carbon fibers were prepared and tested to investigate the possibility of galvanic corrosion. Two simulated aggressive environments and three different amounts of epoxy coating were used. Potentiodynamic polarization and galvanic corrosion tests were conducted. The results of the experiments showed the existence of galvanic corrosion however the rate of such corrosion could be decreased significantly by epoxy coating. A total of 21 specimens made of S 5 x 10 A36 steel beams were prepared and tested to determine the effectiveness of CFRP patch on fatigue life of notched beam. The results showed that not only CFRP patch tends to extend the fatigue life of a detail more than three times, but also it decreases the crack growth rate significantly. To investigate the effectiveness of the epoxy bonded CFRP sheets in repair and retrofit of composite girders, a total of six large-scale steel-concrete composite girders made of W 14 x 30 A36 steel beam and 7.5 cm. thick by 91 cm wide concrete slab were prepared and tested. Three different numbers of CFRP layers and three different damage level in Range were considered. The retrofitting test results showed that epoxy bonded CFRP Sheet increased the ultimate load carrying capacity of composite girders and the behavior can be conservatively predicted by traditional methods. The repair test results showed that epoxy bonded CFRP sheet could restore the ultimate load carrying capacity and stiffness of damaged steel-concrete composite girders. The ultimate capacity of the repaired beam was predicted by traditional methods of analysis of steel-concrete composite beams, which was fairly conservative. Guidelines and procedures for design of Steel-Concrete-CFRP

  11. Imaging of Fatigue Damage in CFRP Composite Laminates Using Nonlinear Harmonic Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattei, Christophe; Marty, Pierre

    2003-03-01

    In this paper, experimental evidence is presented that suggests a strong nonlinear interaction between acoustic wave and micro-structural damage before the onset of delaminations in fatigued CFRP samples. Sample used were 32 plies quasi-isotropic graphite/epoxy laminate fatigued with a four point bending fatigue. First harmonic images were constructed from the amplitude of the first harmonic normalized by the amplitude of the fundamental. Harmonic imaging technique (HIT) shows a much higher sensitivity to micro-damage than amplitude C-scan. Correlations are established between the image zone where the nonlinear parameter is high and the region where a high density of micro-delamination and matrix cracks is observed.

  12. Damage in woven CFRP laminates under impact loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullah, H.; Harland, A. R.; Silberschmidt, V. V.

    2012-08-01

    Carbon fibre-reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites used in sports products can be exposed to different in-service conditions such as large dynamic bending deformations caused by impact loading. Composite materials subjected to such loads demonstrate various damage modes such as matrix cracking, delamination and, ultimately, fabric fracture. Damage evolution affects both in-service properties and performance of CFRP that can deteriorate with time. These failure modes need adequate means of analysis and investigation, the major approaches being experimental characterisation and numerical simulations. This research deals with a deformation behaviour and damage in composite laminates due to dynamic bending. Experimental tests are carried out to characterise the behaviour of a woven CFRP material under large-deflection dynamic bending in impact tests carried out to obtain the force-time and absorbed energy profiles for CFRP laminates. Damage in the impacted laminates is analysed using optical microscopy. Numerical simulations are performed to study the deformation behaviour and damage in CFRP for cases of large-deflection bending based on three-dimensional finite-element models implemented in the commercial code Abaqus/Explicit. Multiple layers of bilinear cohesive-zone elements are employed to model the initiation and progression of inter-ply delamination observed in the microscopy studies. The obtained results of simulations show good agreement with experimental data.

  13. Machinability of drilling T700/LT-03A carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) composite laminates using candle stick drill and multi-facet drill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Cheng-Dong; Qiu, Kun-Xian; Chen, Ming; Cai, Xiao-Jiang

    2015-03-01

    Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastic (CFRP) composite laminates are widely used in aerospace and aircraft structural components due to their superior properties. However, they are regarded as difficult-to-cut materials because of bad surface quality and low productivity. Drilling is the most common hole making process for CFRP composite laminates and drilling induced delamination damage usually occurs severely at the exit side of drilling holes, which strongly deteriorate holes quality. In this work, the candle stick drill and multi-facet drill are employed to evaluate the machinability of drilling T700/LT-03A CFRP composite laminates in terms of thrust force, delamination, holes diameter and holes surface roughness. S/N ratio is used to characterize the thrust force while an ellipse-shaped delamination model is established to quantitatively analyze the delamination. The best combination of drilling parameters are determined by full consideration of S/N ratios of thrust force and the delamination. The results indicate that candle stick drill will induce the unexpected ellipse-shaped delamination even at its best drilling parameters of spindle speed of 10,000 rpm and feed rate of 0.004 mm/tooth. However, the multi-facet drill cutting at the relative lower feed rate of 0.004 mm/tooth and lower spindle speed of 6000 rpm can effectively prevent the delamination. Comprehensively, holes quality obtained by multi-facet drill is much more superior to those obtained by candle stick drill.

  14. Fabrication of CFRP/Al Active Laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asanuma, Hiroshi; Haga, Osamu; Ohira, Junichiro; Takemoto, Kyosuke; Imori, Masataka

    This paper describes fabrication and evaluation of the active laminate. It was made by hot-pressing of an aluminum plate as a high CTE material, a unidirectional CFRP prepreg as a low CTE material and an electric resistance heater, a KFRP prepreg as a low CTE material and an insulator between them, and copper foils as electrodes. In this study, fabricating conditions and performances such as curvature change and output force were examined. Under optimized fabricating conditions, it became clear that 1) the curvature of the active laminate linearly changes as a function of temperature, between room temperature and its hot pressing temperature without hysteresis by electric resistance heating of carbon fiber in the CFRP layer and cooling, and 2) the output force against a fixed punch almost linearly increases with increasing temperature during heating from 313K up to around the glass transition temperature of the epoxy matrix.

  15. Time Domain Reflectometry for Damage Detection of Laminated CFRP plate

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-18

    Final Report PROJECT ID: AOARD-10-4112 Title: Time Domain Reflectometry for damage detection of laminated CFRP plate Researcher: Professor Akira...From July/2010 To July/2011 Abstract Recently, high toughness Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer ( CFRP ) laminates are used to primary structures. The...tough CFRP yields small fiber breakages when delamination crack is made in many cases. This requires a detection system of fiber breakages at low cost for

  16. Damage in woven CFRP laminates subjected to low velocity impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullah, H.; Abdel-Wahab, A. A.; Harland, A. R.; Silberschmidt, V. V.

    2012-08-01

    Carbon fabric-reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites used in sports products can be exposed to different in-service conditions such as large dynamic bending deformations caused by impact loading. Composite materials subjected to such loads demonstrate various damage modes such as matrix cracking, delamination and, ultimately, fabric fracture. Damage evolution in these materials affects both their in-service properties and performance that can deteriorate with time. These processes need adequate means of analysis and investigation, the major approaches being experimental characterisation and non-destructive examination of internal damage in composite laminates. This research deals with a deformation behaviour and damage in woven composite laminates due to low-velocity dynamic out-of-plane bending. Experimental tests are carried out to characterise the behaviour of such laminates under large-deflection dynamic bending in un-notched specimens in Izod tests using a Resil Impactor. A series of low-velocity impact tests is carried out at various levels of impact energy to assess the energy absorbed and force-time response of CFRP laminates. X-ray micro computed tomography (micro-CT) is used to investigate material damage modes in the impacted specimens. X-ray tomographs revealed that through-thickness matrix cracking, inter-ply delamination and intra-ply delamination, such as tow debonding and fabric fracture, were the prominent damage modes.

  17. Analysis of nonlinear deformations and damage in CFRP textile laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullah, H.; Harland, A. R.; Lucas, T.; Price, D.; Silberschmidt, V. V.

    2011-07-01

    Carbon fibre-reinforced polymer (CFRP) textile composites are widely used in aerospace, automotive and construction components and structures thanks to their relatively low production costs, higher delamination and impact strength. They can also be used in various products in sports industry. These products are usually exposed to different in-service conditions such as large bending deformation and multiple impacts. Composite materials usually demonstrate multiple modes of damage and fracture due to their heterogeneity and microstructure, in contrast to more traditional homogeneous structural materials like metals and alloys. Damage evolution affects both their in-service properties and performance that can deteriorate with time. These damage modes need adequate means of analysis and investigation, the major approaches being experimental characterisation, numerical simulations and microtomography analysis. This research deals with a deformation behaviour and damage in composite laminates linked to their quasi-static bending. Experimental tests are carried out to characterise the behaviour of woven CFRP material under large-deflection bending. Two-dimensional finite element (FE) models are implemented in the commercial code Abaqus/Explicit to study the deformation behaviour and damage in woven CFRP laminates. Multiple layers of bilinear cohesive-zone elements are employed to model the onset and progression of inter-ply delamination process. X-ray Micro-Computed Tomography (MicroCT) analysis is carried out to investigate internal damage mechanisms such as cracking and delaminations. The obtained results of simulations are in agreement with experimental data and MicroCT scans.

  18. Enhancement of Gas Barrier Properties of CFRP Laminates Fabricated Using Thin-Ply Prepregs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    横関, 智弘; 高木, 智宏; 吉村, 彰記; Ogasawara, Toshio; 荻原, 慎二

    Composite laminates manufactured using thin-ply prepregs are expected to have superior resistance properties against microcracking compared to those using standard prepregs. In this study, comparative investigations are presented on the microcrack accumulation and gas leakage characteristics of CFRP laminates fabricated using standard and thin-ply prepregs, consisting of high-performance carbon fiber and toughened epoxy, as a fundamental research on the cryogenic composite tanks for future space vehicles. It was shown that laminates using thin-ply prepregs exhibited much higher strain at microcrack initiation compared to those using standard prepregs at room and cryogenic temperatures. In addition, helium gas leak tests using CFRP laminated tubular specimens subjected to quasi-static tension loadings were performed. It was demonstrated that CFRP laminates using thin-ply prepregs have higher gas barrier properties than those using standard prepregs.

  19. Damage Detection of Laminated CFRP Structures using Electric Pulse Wave Transmission

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-05

    SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT For laminated CFRP structures, it is quite difficult to detect internal damage such as delamination, matrix cracks, and...unclassified Abstract. Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer ( CFRP ) laminates are applied to many aerospace structures. For these laminated CFRP ...Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer ( CFRP ) has been increasingly applied to the aerospace primary structures because of its high specific strength and

  20. Development of a Fully Automated Guided Wave System for In-Process Cure Monitoring of CFRP Composite Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, Tyler B.; Hou, Tan-Hung; Grimsley, Brian W.; Yaun, Fuh-Gwo

    2016-01-01

    A guided wave-based in-process cure monitoring technique for carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites was investigated at NASA Langley Research Center. A key cure transition point (vitrification) was identified and the degree of cure was monitored using metrics such as amplitude and time of arrival (TOA) of guided waves. Using an automated system preliminarily developed in this work, high-temperature piezoelectric transducers were utilized to interrogate a twenty-four ply unidirectional composite panel fabricated from Hexcel (Registered Trademark) IM7/8552 prepreg during cure. It was shown that the amplitude of the guided wave increased sharply around vitrification and the TOA curve possessed an inverse relationship with degree of cure. The work is a first step in demonstrating the feasibility of transitioning the technique to perform in-process cure monitoring in an autoclave, defect detection during cure, and ultimately a closed-loop process control to maximize composite part quality and consistency.

  1. Homogenized Creep Behavior of CFRP Laminates at High Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuta, Y.; Matsuda, T.; Kawai, M.

    In this study, creep behavior of a CFRP laminate subjected to a constant stress is analyzed based on the time-dependent homogenization theory developed by the present authors. The laminate is a unidirectional carbon fiber/epoxy laminate T800H/#3631 manufactured by Toray Industries, Inc. Two kinds of creep analyses are performed. First, 45° off-axis creep deformation of the laminate at high temperature (100°C) is analyzed with three kinds of creep stress levels, respectively. It is shown that the present theory accurately predicts macroscopic creep behavior of the unidirectional CFRP laminate observed in experiments. Then, high temperature creep deformations at a constant creep stress are simulated with seven kinds of off-axis angles, i.e., θ = 0°, 10°, 30°, 45°, 60°, 75°, 90°. It is shown that the laminate has marked in-plane anisotropy with respect to the creep behavior.

  2. Development of High Performance CFRP/Metal Active Laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asanuma, Hiroshi; Haga, Osamu; Imori, Masataka

    This paper describes development of high performance CFRP/metal active laminates mainly by investigating the kind and thickness of the metal. Various types of the laminates were made by hot-pressing of an aluminum, aluminum alloys, a stainless steel and a titanium for the metal layer as a high CTE material, a unidirectional CFRP prepreg as a low CTE/electric resistance heating material, a unidirectional KFRP prepreg as a low CTE/insulating material. The aluminum and its alloy type laminates have almost the same and the highest room temperature curvatures and they linearly change with increasing temperature up to their fabrication temperature. The curvature of the stainless steel type jumps from one to another around its fabrication temperature, whereas the titanium type causes a double curvature and its change becomes complicated. The output force of the stainless steel type attains the highest of the three under the same thickness. The aluminum type successfully increased its output force by increasing its thickness and using its alloys. The electric resistance of the CFRP layer can be used to monitor the temperature, that is, the curvature of the active laminate because the curvature is a function of temperature.

  3. Numerical Simulation for Predicting Fatigue Damage Progress in Notched CFRP Laminates by Using Cohesive Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okabe, Tomonaga; Yashiro, Shigeki

    This study proposes the cohesive zone model (CZM) for predicting fatigue damage growth in notched carbon-fiber-reinforced composite plastic (CFRP) cross-ply laminates. In this model, damage growth in the fracture process of cohesive elements due to cyclic loading is represented by the conventional damage mechanics model. We preliminarily investigated whether this model can appropriately express fatigue damage growth for a circular crack embedded in isotropic solid material. This investigation demonstrated that this model could reproduce the results with the well-established fracture mechanics model plus the Paris' law by tuning adjustable parameters. We then numerically investigated the damage process in notched CFRP cross-ply laminates under tensile cyclic loading and compared the predicted damage patterns with those in experiments reported by Spearing et al. (Compos. Sci. Technol. 1992). The predicted damage patterns agreed with the experiment results, which exhibited the extension of multiple types of damage (e.g., splits, transverse cracks and delaminations) near the notches.

  4. Experimental and Analytical Evaluation of the Notched Tensile Fracture of CFRP Woven Laminates at 77 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumagai, S.; Shindo, Y.

    2004-06-01

    The cryogenic fracture behavior of carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) woven laminates was studied. Experiments and a finite element analysis were conducted on single edge notched CFRP woven laminates subjected to in-plane loading. Damage processes were identified by acoustic emission measurement and digital microscopy.

  5. Effect of anisotropy on fatigue properties of notched CFRP laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Ri-Ichi; Yamanaka, Keisi; Inaba, Tatsuichi; Takaichi, Hiroshi; Shibayama, Muneaki

    1993-04-01

    The effect of anisotropy on fatigue properties of notched carbon fiber reinforced plastic laminates has been studied. The off-axis angle of carbon fiber was varied from 0 to 45 deg. The ultimate tensile strength and the tensile elastic modulus drastically decreased when the off-axis angle of carbon fiber increased to 30 deg. When the-off axis angle of carbon fiber increased over 30 deg, these values approached approximately constant values. The maximum tensile strain also increased and saturated to a constant value when the off-axis angle of the carbon fiber increased. The fatigue strength of notched CFRP laminates showed a similar dependence of ultimate tensile strength on the off-axis angle. The decrease of fatigue strength results from the fatigue damage in relation to the off-axis angle. The fatigue damage process was analyzed in terms of AE measurement and fractography. These results indicate that the fatigue damage process of CFRP laminates was significantly affected by the off-axis angle of carbon fiber.

  6. Aluminium/lithium alloy-CFRP hybrid laminate: Fabrication and properties

    SciTech Connect

    Freischmidt, G.; Coutts, R.S.P.; Janardhana, M.N.

    1993-12-31

    Hybrid composite laminates of aluminum and aluminum/lithium alloy sheeting with unidirectional carbon fiber/epoxy plies have been fabricated to produce sheet materials of high strength, low density and reduced fatigue crack growth rate. In an arrangement of one layer of unidirectional carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) and 2 sheets of 2090-T3 aluminum alloy was used to give a material with a density of 2.20g/cm{sup 3}. Tensile test results gave an ultimate strength of 803MPa, a modulus of 75.7GPa and a 2% offset yield strength of 497MPa. Preliminary fatigue crack growth rate determinations on single edge notch (SEN) specimens show a marked reduction compared to monolithic 2090-T3. Other hybrid laminates using 2024-T3 alloy have also been made and tested. These laminates show reduced tensile properties, however, they appear to have lower fatigue crack growth rates than when using 2090T3 in hybrid form. The fabrication of hybrid laminates included the use of unsupported adhesive film to bond the precured unidirectional carbon fiber composite plies to the aluminum sheeting. This has left a distinct interphase region between the alloy and CFRP which is thought to improve properties through an effective load transfer.

  7. Long Life Durability of Electrodes of Electrical Resistance Change Method for Damage Monitoring of CFRP Composite Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    to measure fatigue limit of the CFRP laminates. Figure 12 shows the results of the fatigue tests. The abscissa is the number of cycles to failure and...monitoring of CFRP composite structures 2007 April – 2008 March Professor Akira Todoroki Department of Mechanical Sciences and Engineering Tokyo...monitoring of CFRP composite structures 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA48690714039 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Akira Todoroki 5d

  8. Hybrid composite laminate structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Lark, R. F. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    An invention which relates to laminate structures and specifically to essentially anisotropic fiber composite laminates is described. Metal foils are selectively disposed within the laminate to produce increased resistance to high velocity impact, fracture, surface erosion, and other stresses within the laminate.

  9. Damage Behavior and Life Prediction in CFRP Cross-Ply Laminates under Fatigue Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tohgo, Keiichiro; Nakagawa, Shuji; Araki, Hiroyasu

    This paper deals with fatigue damage and life prediction of CFRP cross-ply laminates. Fatigue tests are carried out on CFRP unidirectional and cross-ply laminates under the on-axis and off-axis directions. On the unidirectional laminate, fiber breakage and fiber-peeling develop before the final fracture under on-axis fatigue, while the final fracture suddenly occurs by cracking along the fiber direction under off-axis fatigue. On the cross-ply laminates, ply-cracking in 90° plies and fiber-peeling in 0° plies develop under on-axis fatigue, while ply-cracking and delamination lead to the final fracture under off-axis fatigue. Based on the comparison of damage behavior and S-N curves between unidirectional and cross-ply laminates, possibility of fatigue life prediction of CFRP cross-ply laminates is discussed.

  10. Verification of Accelerated Testing Methodology for Long-Term Durability of CFRP Laminates for Marine Use

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-30

    ones and the measured data. 4. ATM-2 for the fatigue life prediction of CFRP laminates was expanded to MMF /ATM method for the fatigue life...TECHNICAL APPROACH 1. The procedure of MMF /ATM method combined with our advanced ATM and the micromechanics of failure ( MMF ) developed by Professor...Sung-Kyu Ha and others is proposed for the fatigue life prediction of the structures made of CFRP laminates. 2. The master curves of MMF /ATM

  11. Delamination Monitoring of Quasi-Isotropic CFRP Laminate Using Electric Potential Change Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueda, Masahito; Todoroki, Akira

    Real-time detection of delamination in carbon fiber reinforce plastic (CFRP) laminates has been requiring to maintain the structural reliability of aircraft. In this paper, electric potential change method (EPCM) was applied to monitor delaminations in quasi-isotropic CFRP laminate. As the coefficient of thermal expansion and mold shrinkage factor of carbon fiber and epoxy matrix is different, residual stress is developed in the laminate during the fabrication process of curing. The local strain variation due to delaminations was measured by EPCM utilizing the piezoresistivity of the laminate itself. Finite element simulation was performed to investigate the applicability of the method.

  12. Numerical Prediction of Fatigue Damage Progress in Holed CFRP Laminates Using Cohesive Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yashiro, Shigeki; Okabe, Tomonaga

    This study presents a numerical simulation to predict damage progress in notched composite laminates under cyclic loading by using a cohesive zone model. A damage-mechanics concept was introduced directly into the fracture process in the cohesive elements in order to express crack growth by cyclic loading. This approach then conformed to the established damage mechanics and facilitated understanding the procedure and reducing computation costs. We numerically investigated the damage progress in holed CFRP cross-ply laminates under tensile cyclic loading and compared the predicted damage patterns with experiment results. The predicted damage patterns agreed with the experiment results that exhibited the extension of multiple types of damage (splits, transverse cracks, and delamination) near the hole. A numerical study indicated that the change in the distribution of in-plane shear stress due to delamination induced the extension of splits and transverse cracks near the hole.

  13. Development of damage suppression system using embedded SMA foil in CFRP laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogisu, Toshimichi; Nomura, Masato; Ando, Norio; Takaki, Junji; Kobayashi, Masakazu; Okabe, Tomonaga; Takeda, Nobuo

    2001-07-01

    Some recent studies have suggested possible applications of Shape Memory Alloy (SMA) for a smart health monitoring and suppression of damage growth. The authors have been conducting research and development studies on applications of embedded SMA foil actuators in CFRP laminates as the basic research for next generation aircrafts. First the effective surface treatment for improvement of bonding properties between SMA and CFRP was studied. It was certified that the anodic oxide treatment by 10% NaOH solution was the most effective treatment from the results of peel resistance test and shear strength test. Then, CFRP laminates with embedded SMA foils were successfully fabricated using this effective surface treatment. The damage behavior of quasi-isotropic CFRP laminates with embedded SMA foils was characterized in both quasi-static load-unload and fatigue tests. The relationship between crack density and applied strain was obtained. The recovery stress generated by embedded SMA foils could increase the onset strain of transverse cracking by 0.2%. The onset strain of delmination in CFRP laminates was also increased accordingly. The shear-lag analysis was also conducted to predict the damage evolution in CFRP laminates with embedded SMA foils. The adhesive layers on both sides of SMA foils were treated as shear elements. The theoretical analysis successfully predicted the experimental results.

  14. Cryogenic mechanical response of multilayer satin weave CFRP composites with cracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, S.; Shindo, Y.; Takeda, T.; Narita, F.

    2008-07-01

    We deal with the thermomechanical response of multilayer satin weave carbon-fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) laminates with internal and/or edge cracks and temperature-dependent material properties subjected to tensile loading at cryogenic temperatures. The composite material is assumed to be under the generalized plane strain. Cracks are located in the transverse fiber bundles and extend to the interfaces between two fiber bundles. A finite-element model is employed to study the influence of residual thermal stresses on the mechanical behavior of multilayer CFRP woven laminates with cracks. Numerical calculations are carried out, and Young's modulus and stress distributions near the crack tip are shown graphically.

  15. An application of a neural network to damage identification in CFRP laminates

    SciTech Connect

    Byon, O.I.; Fujikawa, Y.

    1994-12-31

    For the wider use of CFRP, the damage specially in the laminated direction such as transverse cracking, delamination or fiber-matrix debonding should be easily and economically searched and a reasonable non-destructive test method should be also fixed. This paper presents the application of the hierarchical neural network to the damage identification in the CFRP laminated beam and discusses the accuracy and the efficiency of this method. As a result, it is found that the neural network is the very useful and practical non-destructive method as the first approximation of damage identification in the CFRP laminated beam. Even the network is developed through the iterative calculation, this network is fitted for the field measuring because the damage can be identified by the simpler operations of summations and multiplications.

  16. Interlaminar damage of carbon fiber reinforced polymer composite laminate under continuous wave laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yan-Chi; Wu, Chen-Wu; Huang, Yi-Hui; Song, Hong-Wei; Huang, Chen-Guang

    2017-01-01

    The interlaminar damages were investigated on the carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composite laminate under laser irradiation. Firstly, the laminated T700/BA9916 composites were exposed to continuous wave laser irradiation. Then, the interface cracking patterns of such composite laminates were examined by optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Finally, the Finite Element Analysis (FEA) was performed to compute the interface stress of the laminates under laser irradiation. And the effects of the laser parameters on the interlaminar damage were discussed.

  17. Interaction between pulsed infrared laser and carbon fiber reinforced polymer composite laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yan-Chi; Wu, Chen-Wu; Song, Hong-Wei; Huang, Chen-Guang

    2016-10-01

    The Laser drilling processes, in particular the interaction between the pulsed infrared Laser and the target materials were investigated on the CFRP composite laminate. The incremental freezing method was designed to reveal experimentally the temporal patterns of the ablation profiles in the CFRP composite laminates subjected to pulsed Laser irradiation. The temperature characteristics of the specimens were analyzed with Finite Element Method (FEM) and the phase change history studied. The theoretical results match well with the experimental outcome.

  18. Damage assessment in CFRP laminates exposed to impact fatigue loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsigkourakos, George; Silberschmidt, Vadim V.; Ashcroft, I. A.

    2011-07-01

    Demand for advanced engineering composites in the aerospace industry is increasing continuously. Lately, carbon fibre reinforced polymers (CFRPs) became one of the most important structural materials in the industry due to a combination of characteristics such as: excellent stiffness, high strength-to-weight ratio, and ease of manufacture according to application. In service, aerospace composite components and structures are exposed to various transient loads, some of which can propagate in them as cyclic impacts. A typical example is an effect of the wind gusts during flight. This type of loading is known as impact fatigue (IF); it is a repetition of low-energy impacts. Such loads can cause various types of damage in composites: fibre breaking, transverse matrix cracking, de-bonding between fibres and matrix and delamination resulting in reduction of residual stiffness and loss of functionality. Furthermore, this damage is often sub-surface, which reinforces the need for more regular inspection. The effects of IF are of major importance due its detrimental effect on the structural integrity of components that can be generated after relatively few impacts at low force levels compared to those in a standard fatigue regime. This study utilises an innovative testing system with the capability of subjecting specimens to a series of repetitive impacts. The primary subject of this paper is to assess the damaging effect of IF on the behaviour of drilled CFRP specimens, exposed to such loading. A detailed damage analysis is implemented utilising an X-ray micro computed tomography system. The main findings suggested that at early stages of life damage is governed by o degree splits along the length of the specimens resulting in a 20% reduction of stiffness. The final failure damage scenario indicated that transverse crasks in the 90 degree plies are the main reason for complete delamination which can be translated to a 50% stiffness reduction.

  19. Honeycomb-laminate composite structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilwee, W. J., Jr.; Parker, J. A. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A honeycomb-laminate composite structure was comprised of: (1) a cellular core of a polyquinoxaline foam in a honeycomb structure, and (2) a layer of a noncombustible fibrous material impregnated with a polyimide resin laminated on the cellular core. A process for producing the honeycomb-laminate composite structure and articles containing the honeycomb-laminate composite structure is described.

  20. Post-Impact Fatigue Behavior of Woven and Knitted Fabric CFRP Laminates for Marine Use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimpara, Isao; Saito, Hiroshi

    In this study, the damage evolution behavior was evaluated. Damage observation was conducted by the integration of non-destructive and direct observation methods. Target reinforcements were T300-3k plain woven fabric (PW) and T700S-12k multi-axial knitted fabric (MA). Impact damage distribution in the CFRP laminate was observed precisely, and three-dimensional damage model was constructed. Compression after impact (CAI) and post impact fatigue (PIF) performances were evaluated. The effect of water absorption on these performances was also evaluated. The effect of water absorption on CAI and PIF performances were small in PW CFRP laminates. Conversely, PIF properties of water-absorbed MA drastically decreased than that of dry ones. CAI strength was not affected by water absorption. PIF performance of dry MA CFRP was fairly higher than that of the others. From the precise observation, some evidences of interfacial deterioration caused by water absorption were confirmed in both PW and MA CFRP laminates.

  1. Fatigue damage development of various CFRP-laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulte, K.; Baron, CH.

    1988-01-01

    The chronic strength and fatigue behavior of a woven carbon-fiber reinforced laminate in a balanced eight-shaft satin weave style was compared to nonwoven laminates with an equivalent cross-ply layup. Half the fibers were arranged in the direction of the load and the other half perpendicular to it. Two types of nonwoven laminates consisting of continuous fibers and aligned discontinuous fibers, both produced from carbon fiber prepregs, were studied. The cross-ply laminate with continuous fiber showed the best characteristics with regard to both static strength and fatigue. The similarities and differences in damage mechanisms in the laminates are described.

  2. Fatigue Crack Propagation Behavior According Tofiber Arraying Direction for Load Direction Inwoven CFRP Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jung-Hun; Kang, Min-Sung; Koo, Jae-Mean; Seok, Chang-Sung; Kim, Hyung-Ick

    The fatigue crack propagation of CFRP (carbon fiber reinforced composite material) laminates is of current interest, particularly with regard to their durability under fatigue loading. Recently, carbon fiber reinforced composite materials (Woven fabric) are widely used in various fields of engineering because of its advanced properties. Then, many researchers have studied woven fabric CFRP materials but fatigue crack propagation behaviors for composites have not been still standardized . It shows the different crack propagation behavior according to load and fiber direction. Therefore, there is a need to consider fatigue crack propagation behavior in conformity with fiber arraying direction to load direction at designing structure using woven CFRP materials. In this study, therefore, the fatigue crack propagation for plain woven CFRP composite materials was investigated under two different fiber array direction (fiber arraying direction to load : 0°, 45°). Fatigue crack propagation tests of the woven CFRP composite were conducted under sinusoidal wave-form with stress ratios of 0.3 at a frequency of 10Hz, respectively. As a result of test, fatigue crack propagation rates (da/dN) were plotted against the stress-intensity factor amplitude (ΔK) and other factor. Also we compared ΔK with other factor that considering in-plain anisotropy. All of tests of fatigue crack propagation were carried out under mode I opening loading by using compact tension specimens.

  3. NDE and SHM Simulation for CFRP Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leckey, Cara A. C.; Parker, F. Raymond

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound-based nondestructive evaluation (NDE) is a common technique for damage detection in composite materials. There is a need for advanced NDE that goes beyond damage detection to damage quantification and characterization in order to enable data driven prognostics. The damage types that exist in carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites include microcracking and delaminations, and can be initiated and grown via impact forces (due to ground vehicles, tool drops, bird strikes, etc), fatigue, and extreme environmental changes. X-ray microfocus computed tomography data, among other methods, have shown that these damage types often result in voids/discontinuities of a complex volumetric shape. The specific damage geometry and location within ply layers affect damage growth. Realistic threedimensional NDE and structural health monitoring (SHM) simulations can aid in the development and optimization of damage quantification and characterization techniques. This paper is an overview of ongoing work towards realistic NDE and SHM simulation tools for composites, and also discusses NASA's need for such simulation tools in aeronautics and spaceflight. The paper describes the development and implementation of a custom ultrasound simulation tool that is used to model ultrasonic wave interaction with realistic 3-dimensional damage in CFRP composites. The custom code uses elastodynamic finite integration technique and is parallelized to run efficiently on computing cluster or multicore machines.

  4. Fracture Analysis of Competing Failure Modes of Aluminum-CFRP Joints Using Three-Layer Titanium Laminates as Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woizeschke, P.; Vollertsen, F.

    2015-09-01

    The structural properties of lightweight constructions can be adapted to specific local requirements using multi-material designs. Aluminum alloys and carbon fiber-reinforced plastics (CFRP) are materials of great interest requiring suitable joining techniques in order to transfer the advantages of combining the materials to structural benefits. Thus, the research group "Schwarz-Silber" investigates novel concepts to enable frontal aluminum-CFRP joints using transition structures. In the foil concept titanium foils are used as transition elements. Specimens have been produced using three-layer titanium laminates. In tensile tests, three failure locations have been observed: (1) Al-Ti seam, (2) Ti-CFRP hybrid laminate, and (3) CFRP laminate. In this paper, the fracture mechanisms of these failure modes are investigated by analyzing metallographic micrographs and fracture surfaces as well as by correlating load-displacement curves to video imaging of tensile tests. The results show that the cracking of the CFRP layers can be traced back to an assembly error. The laminate character of the titanium part tends to reduce the Al-Ti seam strength. However, two sub-joint tests demonstrate that the Al-Ti seam can endure loads up to 9.5 kN. The ductile failure behavior of the Ti-CFRP hybrid laminates is caused by plastic deformations of the titanium laminate liners.

  5. The effect of the impactor diameter and temperature on low velocity impact behavior of CFRP laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evci, C.; Uyandıran, I.

    2017-02-01

    Impact damage is one of the major concerns that should be taken into account with the new aircraft and spacecraft structures which employ ever-growing use of composite materials. Considering the thermal loads encountered at different altitudes, both low and high temperatures can affect the properties and impact behavior of composite materials. This study aims to investigate the effect of temperature and impactor diameter on the impact behavior and damage development in balanced and symmetrical CFRP laminates which were manufactured by employing vacuum bagging process with autoclave cure. Instrumented drop-weight impact testing system is used to perform the low velocity impact tests in a range of temperatures ranged from 60 down to -50 °C. Impact tests for each temperature level were conducted using three different hemispherical impactor diameters varying from 10 to 20 mm. Energy profile method is employed to determine the impact threshold energies for damage evolution. The level of impact damage is determined from the dent depth on the impacted face and delamination damage detected using ultrasonic C-Scan technique. Test results reveal that the threshold of penetration energy, main failure force and delamination area increase with impactor diameter at all temperature levels. No clear influence of temperature on the critical force thresholds could be derived. However, penetration threshold energy decreased as the temperature was lowered. Drop in the penetration threshold was more obvious with quite low temperatures. Delamination damage area increased while the temperature decreased from +60 °C to -50 °C.

  6. Damage suppression system using embedded SMA (shape memory alloy) foils in CFRP laminate structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogisu, Toshimichi; Shimanuki, Masakazu; Kiyoshima, Satoshi; Takaki, Junji; Takeda, Nobuo

    2003-08-01

    This paper presents an overview of the demonstrator program with respect to the damage growth suppression effects using embedded SMA foils in CFRP laminates. The damage growth suppression effects were demonstrated for the technical verification in order to apply to aircraft structure. In our previous studies, the authors already confirmed the damage growth suppression effects of CFRP laminates with embedded pre-strained SMA foils through both coupon and structural element tests. It was founded that these effects were obtained by the suppression of the strain energy release rate based on the suppression of the crack opening displacement due to the recovery stress of SMA foils through the detail observation of the damage behavior. In this study, these results were verified using the demonstrator test article, which was 1/3-scaled model of commercial airliner fuselage structure. For the demonstration of damage growth suppression effects, the evaluation area was located in the lower panel, which was dominated in tension load during demonstration. The evaluation area is the integrated stiffened panel including both "smart area" (CFRP laminate with embedded pre-strained SMA foils) and "conventional area" (standard CFRP laminate) for the direct comparison. The demonstration was conducted at 80 degree Celsius in smart area and room temperature (RT) in conventional area during quasi-static load-unload test method. As the test results, the demonstrator test article presented that the damage onset strain in the smart area was improved by 30% for compared with the conventional area. Therefore, the successful technical verification of the damage onset/growth suppression effect using the demonstrator presented the feasibility of the application of smart material and structural system to aircraft structures.

  7. Effect of Circular Hole Notch Size on Strength Characteristics of CFRP/AL7075 Hybrid Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Han Ki; Park, Joon Soo; Lee, Sang Pill; Park, Yi Hyun; Kong, Yu Sik; Park, Won Jo

    As for the properties on both the aluminum and the CFRP which are used to make CFRP/AL7075 hybrid composites, CARALL (carbon reinforced aluminum laminate). In the CARALL specimen for rule of mixture, we were analyzed notched strength by finite element method. The results obtained from FEM notched strength analysis and experimental are as follows; In the unnotch CARALL specimen, the stresses imposed CFRP, epoxy, A17075 obtained by finite element method strength solution for A/C9991, when strain 0.48%, are 392 Mpa, 26 Mpa and 321 Mpa, respectively. The slope of the stress-strain curve by FEM increase in keeping with the hole size and the yield strain decrease to 36% and 55% for A/C9993 and A/C9991 respectively. And an agreement is found between the experimental results and the FEM analytical prediction results.

  8. Some remarks on static, creep and fatigue flexural strength of satin woven CFRP laminates

    SciTech Connect

    Miyano, Y.; McMurry, M.K.; Muki, R.

    1995-12-31

    This paper deals with the time-temperature dependent flexural strength of a satin-woven CFRP laminate having a matrix resin with a high glass transition temperature of T{sub g} = 236/C under static, creep and fatigue loading by 3-point bending tests. Static tests were conducted at various points in a wide range of deflection rates and temperatures. The creep and fatigue tests were carried out at various constant temperatures; the fatigue test was conducted at two frequencies. The results of the experimental study are as follows. The flexural strength of the CFRP laminates for all three loading types is time-temperature dependent even near room temperature well below T{sub g}. The time and temperature superposition principle for the matrix resin also holds for the flexural strength of the CFRP laminates. The fracture modes are almost the same for the three loading types under all conditions tested. Finally, we propose a method for predicting the flexural fatigue strength for a given number of cycles to failure at an arbitrary temperature, frequency and stress ratio based on the current experimental findings and considering the relationships among the static, creep and fatigue flexural strengths.

  9. Experimental Observation on Low Cycle Fatigue Behavior of Symmetric Angle-Ply CFRP Laminate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Masahiro; Uda, Nobuhide; Kunoo, Kazuo

    Cyclic zero-tension tests for symmetric angle-ply CFRP laminated specimens were carried out to investigate the low cycle fatigue behavior of graphite/epoxy and graphite/PEEK composites. Two types of stacking sequences were tested: [+θ/-θ]4s (Distributed ply) and [+θ4/-θ4]s (Blocked ply), where θ was 30º or 45º. Stress-strain curves of specimens under cyclic loadings were obtained by means of an extensometer. A mechanical ratcheting, which means progressive increase in plastic strain at each cycle, was observed on the cyclic stress-strain curves. Comparing the stress-strain curve of static tensile test with one of the cyclic zero-tension test, we made the assumption that the fatigue failure occurred when the ratcheting strain by cyclic loadings reached the static failure strain. Results of an ultrasonic scanning test revealed that the distributed ply specimens differed from the blocked ply specimens in an internal fatigue damage progress.

  10. A Two-Way Shape Change Polymeric Laminate with Fast, Large and Controllable Deformation in Response to Joule Heat

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-12

    ABSTRACT In this project a polymeric laminate composite was fabricated from a carbon fiber reinforced plastic ( CFRP ) plate and a polyvinylchloride...PVC). The PVC- CFRP laminate worked as a bimorph actuator. Bending behavior of the PVC- CFRP laminate was tested by fully submerging the laminate in a...water bath and also changing the environmental temperature. It is observed that the PVC- CFRP laminate has a number of advantages compared to other

  11. Characteristic evaluation of CFRP composites under falling weight impact loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Im, K. H.; Park, N. S.; Hsu, D. K.; Kim, S. K.; Park, J. W.; Yang, I. Y.

    2002-05-01

    This paper describes a method for a falling weight impact test to estimate the impact energy absorbing characteristics and impact strength of carbon-fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) laminate plates based on considerations of stress wave propagation theory, which were converted to measurements of load and displacement verses time. The delamination area of impacted specimens for the different ply orientations was measured with an ultrasonic C-scanner to determine the correlation between impact energy and delamination area. The energy absorbed by a quasi-isotropic specimen having four interfaces was higher than that of orthotropic laminates with two interfaces. The more interfaces, the greater the energy absorbed. The absorbed energy of a hybrid specimen containing a CFRP layer was higher than that of normal specimens. Also, a falling weight impact tester was built to evaluate the characteristics and impact strength of CFRPs.

  12. a Region of Interest Computed Tomography Technique for Inspection of CFRP Laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, S.; Amos, M.; Cooper, I.; Withers, P.

    2011-06-01

    Region of Interest (ROI) Computed Tomography (CT) is a radiographic inspection technique that inspects only part of a sample. However, ROI images normally suffer from reconstruction artefacts that can affect the inspection by obscuring defects. This paper describes the development of two data completion methods which minimise the reconstruction artefacts, allowing the technique to be applied without compromising defect detection. The techniques were developed for specific application to inspection of Carbon Fibre Reinforced Plastic (CFRP) laminate panels. The results presented include both fan-beam and cone-beam system geometries.

  13. Three-Dimensional Analysis of the Effect of Material Randomness on the Damage Behaviour of CFRP Laminates with Stochastic Cohesive-Zone Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khokhar, Zahid R.; Ashcroft, Ian A.; Silberschmidt, Vadim V.

    2014-02-01

    Laminated carbon fibre-reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites are already well established in structural applications where high specific strength and stiffness are required. Damage in these laminates is usually localised and may involve numerous mechanisms, such as matrix cracking, laminate delamination, fibre de-bonding or fibre breakage. Microstructures in CFRPs are non-uniform and irregular, resulting in an element of randomness in the localised damage. This may in turn affect the global properties and failure parameters of components made of CFRPs. This raises the question of whether the inherent stochasticity of localised damage is of significance in terms of the global properties and design methods for such materials. This paper presents a numerical modelling based analysis of the effect of material randomness on delamination damage in CFRP materials by the implementation of a stochastic cohesive-zone model (CZM) within the framework of the finite-element (FE) method. The initiation and propagation of delamination in a unidirectional CFRP double-cantilever beam (DCB) specimen loaded under mode-I was analyzed, accounting for the inherent microstructural stochasticity exhibited by such laminates via the stochastic CZM. Various statistical realizations for a half-scatter of 50 % of fracture energy were performed, with a probability distribution based on Weibull's two-parameter probability density function. The damaged area and the crack lengths in laminates were analyzed, and the results showed higher values of those parameters for random realizations compared to the uniform case for the same levels of applied displacement. This indicates that deterministic analysis of composites using average properties may be non-conservative and a method based on probability may be more appropriate.

  14. Improvement of Mechanical and Thermal Properties of CFRP Laminates Using Micro-Fibrillated Cellulose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyojin; Suzuki, Tadashi; Takemura, Kenichi

    The aim of this study is improvement of mechanical and thermal properties of plain woven carbon fiber (CF) reinforced epoxy with addition of MFC as the additive. Carbon fiber/epoxy laminates with addition 0.3, 0.5, 0.7 and 1wt% of MFC were characterized by flexural test, DSC and TMA. The result represented that the flexural strength improved slightly at 0.3 and 0.5 wt% of MFC, but flexural modulus was not changed, respectively. The glass transition temperature of MFC-CFRP laminates showed the increase according to increase of MFC addition at 0.7 and 1.0 wt%. The coefficient of thermal expansion was decrease by 0.7 wt% of MFC addition.

  15. Study on three dimensional transient thermal stress analysis for laminated composite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, Kin`ya; Zako, Masaru

    1995-11-01

    Transient heat conduction and thermal stress analysis of laminated composite materials are very important because they are hated during manufacturing process. Anisotropy of thermal conductivity has to be considered for heat conduction analysis of composite materials such as FRP. Assuming that heat conducts uniformly in normal direction in thin structures, laminated plates can be modeled as single layers with the equivalent heat conductivities. With this assumption, FEM three dimensional transient heat conduction and thermal stress analysis programs for laminated composite materials are developed. As numerical examples, the heat conduction and thermal stresses of laminated CFRP structure are investigated.

  16. TEA CO2 laser machining of CFRP composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salama, A.; Li, L.; Mativenga, P.; Whitehead, D.

    2016-05-01

    Carbon fibre-reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites have found wide applications in the aerospace, marine, sports and automotive industries owing to their lightweight and acceptable mechanical properties compared to the commonly used metallic materials. Machining of CFRP composites using lasers can be challenging due to inhomogeneity in the material properties and structures, which can lead to thermal damages during laser processing. In the previous studies, Nd:YAG, diode-pumped solid-state, CO2 (continuous wave), disc and fibre lasers were used in cutting CFRP composites and the control of damages such as the size of heat-affected zones (HAZs) remains a challenge. In this paper, a short-pulsed (8 μs) transversely excited atmospheric pressure CO2 laser was used, for the first time, to machine CFRP composites. The laser has high peak powers (up to 250 kW) and excellent absorption by both the carbon fibre and the epoxy binder. Design of experiment and statistical modelling, based on response surface methodology, was used to understand the interactions between the process parameters such as laser fluence, repetition rate and cutting speed and their effects on the cut quality characteristics including size of HAZ, machining depth and material removal rate (MRR). Based on this study, process parameter optimization was carried out to minimize the HAZ and maximize the MRR. A discussion is given on the potential applications and comparisons to other lasers in machining CFRP.

  17. A General Study of Hybrid Composite Laminates.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-12-01

    appeared to have little effect on the overall properties of a laminate. Hybrid composite laminates obey classical laminate theory and can, in certain ply configurations, develop considerable free edge effect stresses. (Author)

  18. An experimental study of permeability within an out-of-autoclave vacuum-bag-only CFRP laminate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, Landon F.

    The out-of-autoclave vacuum-bag-only (OOA-VBO) manufacturing process is a process that eliminates an autoclave when manufacturing aerospace quality carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP). OOA-VBO pre-impregnated resin tow systems rely on air channel networks that guide unwanted voids out of the laminate. The air path networks can be characterized by measuring the permeability of a pre-cured laminate. Permeability results were successfully obtained for a laminate with a compaction similar to that found in a typical vacuum bagging setup. A study was done to find the relationship between compaction of the laminate and permeability. Permeability was measured as the laminate cured, using a constant temperature ramp rate. An experimental nodal analysis was performed to find the permeability at the midpoint of the in-plane direction.

  19. Integration and reliability of active fiber composite (AFC) sensors/actuators in carbon/epoxy laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnykowycz, Mark M.; Belloli, Alberto; Ermanni, Paolo; Barbezat, Michel

    2006-03-01

    In the current study Active Fiber Composites (AFC) utilizing Lead-Zirconate-Titanate (PZT) fibers with Kapton (R) screen printed interdigitated electrodes (IDE) were integrated into carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) laminates to investigate integration issues associated with smart structures and host laminate integrity. To aid in this goal surrogate or "dummy" AFC (DAFC) using a composite core and Kapton (R) outer layers (to match the longitudinal mechanical and interface properties of the AFC) were employed. These DAFC were used in place of real AFC to expedite test specimen manufacture and evaluation. This allowed efficient investigation of the impact of an integrated AFC-like inclusion on laminate mechanical integrity. Laminates with integrated AFC were additionally tested with signal monitoring to assess AFC health during the test. Investigation into laminate failure was accomplished via a finite element model of the system which was created in ANSYS to investigate failure in the composite plies. Tsai-Wu failure criterion was calculated to investigate laminate failure characteristics. Integration of AFC into CFRP laminates degraded laminate strength by 13.3% using insertion integration and 7.8% using the interlacing integration technique. The finite element model showed that interlacing integration enabled distribution of critical forces over the entire laminate while insertion integration led to critical forces concentrating over the integration region.

  20. Time and temperature dependence on flexural fatigue behavior of unidirectional CFRP laminates using pitch-based carbon fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Miyano, Yasushi; Daichou, Noboru; Nakada, Masayuki; Mohri, Michihiro

    1996-12-31

    The flexural fatigue behavior of two kinds of unidirectional pitch-based CFRP laminates, which have different types of matrix resin, were evaluated at several levels of frequency and temperature. The fatigue behavior of both CFRPs was found to be remarkably dependent on time and temperature. The time-temperature superposition principle for the viscoelastic behavior of the matrix resin holds for the fatigue strength as well as the static strength of the CFRPs. The master curves of fatigue strength for the CFRPs can be divided into three distinct groups of curves, each corresponding to a different mode of fracture. The time and temperature dependence of the fatigue behavior of the CFRP laminates is not only controlled by the viscoelastic behavior of the matrix resin, even though the static behavior is dominated by the viscoelastic behavior of matrix resin.

  1. Numerical and experimental assessments of nonlinear bearing strength properties of CFRP laminates

    SciTech Connect

    Kisielewicz, L.T.; Ando, K.; Kenmochi, K.

    1994-12-31

    Pin connectors are commonly used in a variety of applications using a variety of materials and have attracted a great number of researches both in technological and analytical fields. While for metallic materials both the rheological and structural phenomena of such connectors are well understood and allow to proceed to design and optimization based on analytical methods, the situation is not the same for new materials such as CFRP or other composites. The paper approaches the assessment of bearing strength of such connectors both from the experimental and numerical standpoints and show the capability of the latter to predict this structural strength.

  2. The performance of integrated active fiber composites in carbon fiber laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnykowycz, M.; Brunner, A. J.

    2011-07-01

    Piezoelectric elements integrated into fiber-reinforced polymer-matrix laminates can provide various functions in the resulting adaptive or smart composite. Active fiber composites (AFC) composed of lead zirconate titanate (PZT) fibers can be used as a component in a smart material system, and can be easily integrated into woven composites. However, the impact of integration on the device and its functionality has not been fully investigated. The current work focuses on the integration and performance of AFC integrated into carbon-fiber-reinforced plastic (CFRP) laminates, focusing on the strain sensor performance of the AFC-CFRP laminate under tensile loading conditions. AFC were integrated into cross-ply CFRP laminates using simple insertion and interlacing of the CFRP plies, with the AFC always placed in the 90° ply cutout area. Test specimens were strained to different strain levels and then cycled with a 0.01% strain amplitude, and the resulting signal from the AFC was monitored. Acoustic emission monitoring was performed during tensile testing to provide insight to the failure characteristics of the PZT fibers. The results were compared to those from past studies on AFC integration; the strain signal of AFC integrated into CFRP was much lower than that for AFC integrated into woven glass fiber laminates. However, the profiles of the degradations of the AFC signal resulting from the strain were nearly identical, showing that the PZT fibers fragmented in a similar manner for a given global strain. The sensor performance recovered upon unloading, which is attributed to the closure of cracks between PZT fiber fragments.

  3. Experimental investigation of CNT effect on curved beam strength and interlaminar fracture toughness of CFRP laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arca, M. A.; Coker, D.

    2014-06-01

    High mechanical properties and light weight structures of composite materials and advances in manufacturing processes have increased the use of composite materials in the aerospace and wind energy industries as a primary load carrying structures in complex shapes. However, use of composite materials in complex geometries such as L-shaped laminates creates weakness at the radius which causes delamination. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is preferred as a toughening materials in composite matrices due to their high mechanical properties and aspect ratios. However, effect of CNTs on curved beam strength (CBS) is not investigated in literature comprehensively. The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of CNT on Mode I and Mode II fracture toughness and CBS. L-shaped beams are fabric carbon/epoxy composite laminates manufactured by hand layup technique. Curved beam composite laminates were subjected to four point bending loading according to ASTM D6415/D6415M-06a. Double cantilever beam (DCB) tests and end notch flexure (ENF) tests were conducted to determine mode-I and mode-II fracture toughness, respectively. Preliminary results show that 3% CNT addition to the resin increased the mode-I fracture toughness by %25 and mode-II fracture toughness by %10 compared to base laminates. In contrast, no effect on curved beam strength was found.

  4. Mechanical Characterization of CFRP Woven Laminates between Room Temperature and 4K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumagai, Susumu; Shindo, Yasuhide; Horiguchi, Katsumi; Takeda, Tomo

    In order to evaluate the mechanical properties of T800H/3633 CFRP woven laminates for cryogenic tankage in RLV, tensile and in-plane shear tests were performed at room temperature, liquid nitrogen temperature (77K) and liquid helium temperature (4K). The tensile tests were conducted in accordance with ASTM D 3039 and JIS K 7073. Tensile strength and modulus were evaluated for both the warp and fill directions. A problem was encountered with obtaining acceptable failure of the specimens. We could not achieve failure in the test section. This problem was avoided by using dogbone shaped specimens. A two-dimensional finite element analysis was also used to study the stress distributions within the specimens and to interpret the experimental measurements. The in-plane shear modulus and shear strength were measured by tensile tests on the ±45° specimens (ASTM D 3518 and JIS K 7079). The effects of temperature on the stress-strain responses in tension and in-plane shear are examined. Fracture topography of specimens is also investigated and interpreted.

  5. Effect of a Thin Soft Core on the Impact Behaviour of CFRP Laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caprino, Giancarlo; Lopresto, Valentina; Riccio, Massimo; Leone, Claudio

    2012-04-01

    Low-velocity impact tests were carried out on sandwich plates having CFRP facings and thin rubbery core. Two types of cores, differing in the material nature and thickness, were used. For comparison, similar tests were performed on the monolithic laminate. Various impact parameters, among which indentation, first failure energy, perforation energy, absorbed energy and maximum contact force, were analyzed, to highlight the effect of the core on the material response. The influence of the core on the macroscopic behaviour of the panels was quite limited, except in the elastic phase, where the lower stiffness of the sandwich configurations resulted in a higher energy at first failure. More relevant differences were found from the study of failure modes, carried out combining ultrasonic C-scan and a limited number of microscopic observations. In particular, in correspondence of the energy for barely visible impact damage, besides considerable facing-core debonding, both the facings of the sandwich structures exhibited fibre breakage at their back side.

  6. Rotary ultrasonic machining of CFRP composites: a study on power consumption.

    PubMed

    Cong, W L; Pei, Z J; Deines, T W; Srivastava, Anil; Riley, L; Treadwell, C

    2012-12-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) composites are very difficult to machine. A large number of holes need to be drilled in CFRP for many applications. Therefore, it is important to develop cost-effective drilling processes. CFRP has been drilled by rotary ultrasonic machining (RUM) successfully. The literature has reports about the effects of input variables on output variables (including cutting force, torque, surface roughness, tool wear, and workpiece delamination) in RUM of CFRP. However, there are no reports on power consumption in RUM of CFRP. This paper reports the first study on power consumption in RUM of CFRP. It reports an experimental investigation on effects of input variables (ultrasonic power, tool rotation speed, feedrate, and type of CFRP) on power consumption of each component (including ultrasonic power supply, spindle motor, coolant pump, and air compressor) and the entire RUM system.

  7. CFRP composite thin-shelled mirrors for future space telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romeo, Robert C.; Chen, Peter C.

    2002-12-01

    The need for extremely large aperture telescopes drives the requirement for new materials and novel approaches to mirror production. Many lightweight mirror concepts are currently being persued, some with promise for extending their ability to facilitate 100-meter and larger space telescope primaries. These concepts include some rather unorthodox materials in unique configurations. Past experience in producing extremely thin CFRP composite mirrors, using unidirectional CFRP prepreg tape, has led us to a more novel CFPR material, which could further reduce the mass and cost of their predecessors. We present a carbon-based, ultra-lightweight fleece material, which have been shown to exhibit high specularity and extremely low areal density, 200 grams/m2, at 2-plies, in contrast to more typical unidirectional CFPR material.

  8. Thermal-Mechanical Response of Cracked Satin Weave CFRP Composites at Cryogenic Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, S.; Shindo, Y.; Narita, F.; Takeda, T.

    2008-03-01

    This paper examines the thermal-mechanical response of satin weave carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) laminates with internal and/or edge cracks subjected to uniaxial tension load at cryogenic temperatures. Cracks are considered to occur in the transverse fiber bundles and extend through the entire thickness of the fiber bundles. Two-dimentional generalized plane strain finite element models are developed to study the effects of residual thermal stresses and cracks on the mechanical behavior of CFRP woven laminates. A detailed examination of the Young's modulus and stress distributions near the crack tip is carried out which provides insight into material behavior at cryogenic temperatures.

  9. THERMAL-MECHANICAL RESPONSE OF CRACKED SATIN WEAVE CFRP COMPOSITES AT CRYOGENIC TEMPERATURES

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, S.; Shindo, Y.; Narita, F.; Takeda, T.

    2008-03-03

    This paper examines the thermal-mechanical response of satin weave carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) laminates with internal and/or edge cracks subjected to uniaxial tension load at cryogenic temperatures. Cracks are considered to occur in the transverse fiber bundles and extend through the entire thickness of the fiber bundles. Two-dimentional generalized plane strain finite element models are developed to study the effects of residual thermal stresses and cracks on the mechanical behavior of CFRP woven laminates. A detailed examination of the Young's modulus and stress distributions near the crack tip is carried out which provides insight into material behavior at cryogenic temperatures.

  10. Guided Wave Propagation Study on Laminated Composites by Frequency-Wavenumber Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tian, Zhenhua; Yu, Lingyu; Leckey, Cara A. C.

    2014-01-01

    Toward the goal of delamination detection and quantification in laminated composites, this paper examines guided wave propagation and wave interaction with delamination damage in laminated carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites using frequency-wavenumber (f-kappa) analysis. Three-dimensional elastodynamic finite integration technique (EFIT) is used to acquire simulated time-space wavefields for a CFRP composite. The time-space wavefields show trapped waves in the delamination region. To unveil the wave propagation physics, the time-space wavefields are further analyzed by using two-dimensional (2D) Fourier transforms (FT). In the analysis results, new f-k components are observed when the incident guided waves interact with the delamination damage. These new f-kappa components in the simulations are experimentally verified through data obtained from scanning laser Doppler vibrometer (SLDV) tests. By filtering the new f-kappa components, delamination damage is detected and quantified.

  11. Impact Damage Detection of Toughened CFRP Laminates with Time Domain Reflectometry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-30

    matching with the coaxial cable is cumbersome for actual CFRP structures. CFRP Copper mesh 0 GFRP Directional Coupler Waveform Generator Microstrip ...manufactured by Mini- Circuits (N.Y., USA). The input pulse was 5 Vp-p (peak-to-peak voltage) and the half-band width was 4 ns. 4. Results and discussion

  12. Symmetries in laminated composite plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, A. K.

    1976-01-01

    The different types of symmetry exhibited by laminated anisotropic fibrous composite plates are identified and contrasted with the symmetries of isotropic and homogeneous orthotropic plates. The effects of variations in the fiber orientation and the stacking sequence of the layers on the symmetries exhibited by composite plates are discussed. Both the linear and geometrically nonlinear responses of the plates are considered. A simple procedure is presented for exploiting the symmetries in the finite element analysis. Examples are given of square, skew and polygonal plates where use of symmetry concepts can significantly reduce the scope and cost of analysis.

  13. Spatial Evolution of the Thickness Variations over a CFRP Laminated Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davila, Yves; Crouzeix, Laurent; Douchin, Bernard; Collombet, Francis; Grunevald, Yves-Henri

    2017-01-01

    Ply thickness is one of the main drivers of the structural performance of a composite part. For stress analysis calculations (e.g., finite element analysis), composite plies are commonly considered to have a constant thickness compared to the reality (coefficients of variation up to 9% of the mean ply thickness). Unless this variability is taken into account reliable property predictions cannot be made. A modelling approach of such variations is proposed using parameters obtained from a 16-ply quasi-isotropic CFRP plate cured in an autoclave. A discrete Fourier transform algorithm is used to analyse the frequency response of the observed ply and plate thickness profiles. The model inputs, obtained by a mathematical representation of the ply thickness profiles, permit the generation of a representative stratification considering the spatial continuity of the thickness variations that are in good agreement with the real ply profiles spread over the composite part. A residual deformation FE model of the composite plate is used to illustrate the feasibility of the approach.

  14. Damage of hybrid composite laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haery, Haleh A.; Kim, Ho Sung

    2013-08-01

    Hybrid laminates consisting of woven glass fabric/epoxy composite plies and woven carbon fabric/epoxy composite plies are studied for fatigue damage and residual strength. A theoretical framework based on the systems approach is proposed as a guide to deal with the complexity involving uncertainties and a large number of variables in the hybrid composite system. A relative damage sensitivity factor expression was developed for quantitative comparisons between non-hybrid and hybrid composites. Hypotheses derived from the theoretical framework were tested and verified. The first hypothesis was that the difference between two different sets of properties produces shear stress in interface between carbon fibre reinforced plastics (CRP) and glass fibre reinforced plastics (GRP), and eventually become a source for CRP/GRP interfacial delamination or longitudinal cracking. The second hypothesis was that inter-fibre bundle delamination occurs more severely to CRP sub-system than GRP sub-system.

  15. Machining of fiber-reinforced composite laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Won, Myong-Shik

    As fiber-reinforced composite laminates are becoming considerably popular in a wide range of applications, the necessity for machining such materials is increasing rapidly. Due to their microscopical inhomogeneity, anisotropy, and highly abrasive nature, composite laminates exhibit some peculiar types of machining damage. Consequently, the machining of composite laminates requires a different approach from that used for metals and offers a challenge from both an academic and application point of view. In the present work, the drilling of composite laminated plates and the edge trimming of tubular composite laminates were investigated through theoretical analyses and their experimental verification. First, a drilling process model using linear elastic fracture mechanics and classical plate bending theory was developed to predict the critical thrust value responsible for the onset of delamination during the drilling of composite laminates with pre-drilled pilot holes. Experiments using stepped drills, which can utilize the effectiveness of such pilot holes, were conducted on composite laminates. Reasonably good agreement was found between the results of the process model and the tests. Second, the development of a model-based intelligent control strategy for the efficient drilling of composite laminates was explored by experiments and analyses. In this investigation, mathematical models were created to relate the drilling forces to cutting parameters and to identify the different process stages. These models predicted the degree of thrust force regulation to prevent delamination. Third, the edge trimming of thin-walled tubular composite laminates was modeled and analyzed for estimating the critical cutting force at the initiation of longitudinal cracking. A series of full-scale edge trimming tests were conducted on tubular composite specimens to assess the current approach and to obtain basic machining data for various composite laminates. The present study provides

  16. Comparison of experimental and analytical results for free vibration of laminated composite plates

    SciTech Connect

    Maryuama, Koichi; Narita, Yoshihiro; Ichinomiya, Osamu

    1995-11-01

    Fibrous composite materials are being increasingly employed in high performance structures, including pressured vessel and piping applications. These materials are usually used in the form of laminated flat or curved plates, and the understanding of natural frequencies and the corresponding mode shapes is essential to a reliable structural design. Although many references have been published on analytical study of laminated composite plates, a limited number of experimental studies have appeared for dealing with vibration characteristics of the plates. This paper presents both experimental and analytical results for the problems. In the experiment, the holographic interferometry is used to measure the resonant frequencies and corresponding mode shapes of six-layered CFRP (carbon fiber reinforced plastic) composite plates. The material constants of a lamina are calculated from fiber and matrix material constants by using some different composite rules. With the calculated constants, the natural frequencies of the laminated CFRP plates are theoretically determined by the Ritz method. From the comparison of two sets of the results, the effect of choosing different composite rules is discussed in the vibration study of laminated composite plates.

  17. Damage Modes Recognition and Hilbert-Huang Transform Analyses of CFRP Laminates Utilizing Acoustic Emission Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    WenQin, Han; Ying, Luo; AiJun, Gu; Yuan, Fuh-Gwo

    2016-04-01

    Discrimination of acoustic emission (AE) signals related to different damage modes is of great importance in carbon fiber-reinforced plastic (CFRP) composite materials. To gain a deeper understanding of the initiation, growth and evolution of the different types of damage, four types of specimens for different lay-ups and orientations and three types of specimens for interlaminar toughness tests are subjected to tensile test along with acoustic emission monitoring. AE signals have been collected and post-processed, the statistical results show that the peak frequency of AE signal can distinguish various damage modes effectively. After a AE signal were decomposed by Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD) method, it may separate and extract all damage modes included in this AE signal apart from damage mode corresponding to the peak frequency. Hilbert-Huang Transform (HHT) of AE signals can clearly illustrate the frequency distribution of Intrinsic Mode Functions (IMF) components in time-scale in different damage stages, and can calculate accurate instantaneous frequency for damage modes recognition to help understanding the damage process.

  18. On impact damage detection and quantification for CFRP laminates using structural response data only

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sultan, M. T. H.; Worden, K.; Pierce, S. G.; Hickey, D.; Staszewski, W. J.; Dulieu-Barton, J. M.; Hodzic, A.

    2011-11-01

    The overall purpose of the research is to detect and attempt to quantify impact damage in structures made from composite materials. A study that uses simplified coupon specimens made from a Carbon Fibre-Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) prepreg with 11, 12 and 13 plies is presented. PZT sensors were placed at three separate locations in each test specimen to record the responses from impact events. To perform damaging impact tests, an instrumented drop-test machine was used and the impact energy was set to cover a range of 0.37-41.72 J. The response signals captured from each sensor were recorded by a data acquisition system for subsequent evaluation. The impacted specimens were examined with an X-ray technique to determine the extent of the damaged areas and it was found that the apparent damaged area grew monotonically with impact energy. A number of simple univariate and multivariate features were extracted from the sensor signals recorded during impact by computing their spectra and calculating frequency centroids. The concept of discordancy from the statistical discipline of outlier analysis is employed in order to separate the responses from non-damaging and damaging impacts. The results show that the potential damage indices introduced here provide a means of identifying damaging impacts from the response data alone.

  19. Indentation law for composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, S. H.

    1981-01-01

    Static indentation tests are described for glass/epoxy and graphite/epoxy composite laminates with steel balls as the indentor. Beam specimens clamped at various spans were used for the tests. Loading, unloading, and reloading data were obtained and fitted into power laws. Results show that: (1) contact behavior is not appreciably affected by the span; (2) loading and reloading curves seem to follow the 1.5 power law; and (3) unloading curves are described quite well by a 2.5 power law. In addition, values were determined for the critical indentation, alpha sub cr which can be used to predict permanent indentations in unloading. Since alpha sub cr only depends on composite material properties, only the loading and an unloading curve are needed to establish the complete loading-unloading-reloading behavior.

  20. Detection of delamination in composite laminates using small-diameter FBG sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Shin-ichi; Okabe, Yoji; Takeda, Nobuo

    2002-07-01

    This paper presents delamination monitoring techniques in composite laminates using small-diameter fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors that was developed for embedding in the laminates without inducing any structural defects. First, this FBG sensor was embedded in carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) cross-ply laminates. The reflection spectra from the FBG sensor were measured at various delamination sizes through a static four-point bending test. From experimental results, the spectrum was found to have two peaks due to the initiation of the delamination. The intensity ratio of these two peaks changed as the delamination size increased. In order to confirm the deformation of the measured spectra, the spectra were calculated theoretically. The calculated result reproduced the change in the measured spectrum very well. Thus, we proposed the intensity ratio of the two peaks as an effective indicator for evaluation of the delamination size. Secondly, detection of the edge delamination in quasi-isotropic CFRP laminates was conducted using the FBG sensor. The reflection spectra were measured at various delamination sizes through fatigue test. The form of the spectrum changed sensitively by growth of the edge delamination. Hence the small-diameter FBG sensor could also be applied to detect the edge delamination in quasi-isotropic composite laminates under cyclic loading.

  1. Effects of Temperature on Mode II Fracture Toughness of Multidirectional CFRP Laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyoung Soo; Wang, Wen Xue; Takao, Yoshihiro; Ben, Goichi

    End notched flexure (ENF) tests were performed to investigate the effects of temperature and fiber orientation on Mode II interlaminar fracture behavior, GIIC (GII at the crack initiation), of carbon fiber-reinforced epoxy composites, T800H/#3631. The values of GIIC for three kinds of laminates, [012//012], [22.5/-22.5/08/-22.5/22.5//-22.5/22.5/08/22.5/-22.5] and [45/-45/08/-45/45//-45/45/08/45/-45], with a pre-cracked interface, that is // in each laminate, were obtained at three temperatures, i.e. -100°C, 25°C and 150°C. It is shown that GIIC is obviously affected by the temperature and fiber orientation. The scanning electron microscope (SEM) observation was also carried out to investigate the fracture surface. SEM analysis suggested that the decreased Mode II interlaminar fracture toughness for all kinds of specimens at high temperature could be attributed to temperature-induced matrix property change or fiber-matrix interfacial weakening.

  2. Low-cycle and high-cycle fatigue failure process characterization of CFRP cross-ply laminates

    SciTech Connect

    Takeda, N.; Ogihara, S.; Kobayashi, A.

    1994-12-31

    Damage progress in toughened-type CFRP cross-ply laminates under tensile fatigue loading was measured by the replica technique. The damage parameters, the transverse crack density and the delamination ratio, were presented. Based on above data, simple shear-lag analysis combined with the modified Paris law model was conducted to model the damage progress. In addition, a novel power-law model was proposed, which related the cyclic strain range and the number of cycles. The loading-unloading tests were also performed to obtain the Young`s modulus reduction and the permanent strain as functions of the damage state. The shear-lag predictions of the Young`s modulus reduction and the permanent strain showed good agreement with the experimental data, when the interaction between transverse cracking and delamination were taken into account.

  3. Modeling Unidirectional Composite Laminates Using XFEM

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-30

    unlimited. 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Fiber-reinforced polymers (FRPs)—composites consisting of a thermoset or thermoplastic polymer ...dimensional BK Benzeggagh-Kenane CFRP Carbon-fiber-reinforced polymer CZM Cohesive zone method DCB Double cantilever beam ECT Edge crack torsion...ENF End-notched flexure FEM Finite-element method FRP Fiber-reinforced polymer GPa Gigapascal ksi Kilopound per square inch LEFM Linear elastic

  4. Poly-m-aramid nanofiber mats: Production for application as structural modifiers in CFRP laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzocchetti, Laura; D'Angelo, Emanuele; Benelli, Tiziana; Belcari, Juri; Brugo, Tommaso Maria; Zucchelli, Andrea; Giorgini, Loris

    2016-05-01

    Poly(m-phenylene isophtalamide) electrospun nanofibrous membranes were produced to be used as structural reinforcements for carbon fiber reinforced composites production. In order for the polymer to be electrospun, it needs however to be fully solubilized, so the addition of some salts is required to help disrupt the tight macromolecular packing based on intra- and inter-molecular hydrogen bonding. Such salts may also contribute to the electrospinnability of the overall solution, since the provide it with a higher conductivity, whatever the solvent might be. The salt haobwever stays in the final nanofibrous mat. The membranes containing the salt are also observed to be highly hygroscopic, with a water content up to 26%, in the presence of 20%wt LiCl in the nanofibrous mat. When those membranes were interleaved among prepregs to produce a laminates, the obtained composite displayed thermal properties comparable to those of a reference nanofiber-free composite, though the former showed also easier delamination. Hence the removal of the hygroscopic salt was performed, that lead to thinner membranes, whose water content matched that of the pristine polymer. The washing step induced a thinning of the layers and of the fibers diameters, though no fiber shrinking nor membrane macroscopic damages were observed. These preliminary encouraging results thus pave the way to a deeper study of the optimized condition for producing convenient poly(m-phenylene isophtalamide) electrospun nanofibrous membranes to be used for carbon fiber reinforced composites structural modification.

  5. Nonlinear finite element analysis of mechanical characteristics on CFRP composite pressure vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dong-xia; Liang, Li; Li, Ming

    2010-06-01

    CFRP(Carbon Fibre Reinforced Plastic) composite pressure vessel was calculated using finite element program of ANSYS for their mechanical characteristics in this paper. The elastic-plastic model and elements of Solid95 were selected for aluminium alloys of gas cylinder. Also liner-elastic model and layer elements of Shell99 were adopted for carbon fibre/epoxy resin. The stress state of CFRP composite pressure vessel was calculated under different internal pressures include pre-stressing pressures, working pressures, test hydraulic pressures, minimum destructive pressures etcetera to determine the size of gas cylinder and layer parameter of carbon fibre. The mechanical characteristics CFRP composite vessel could were using to design and test of gas cylinder. Numerical results showed that finite element model and calculating method were efficient for study of CFRP gas cylinder and useful for engineering design.

  6. Strain measurements inside thick CFRP laminates at the vicinity of bolted joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menendez, Jose M.; Guemes, J. Alfredo

    1999-05-01

    Intracore fiber Bragg gratings have been extensively used as longitudinal strain sensors both bonded and embedded in numerous applications, fulfilling the same task as conventional resistive strain gages. Comparative results obtained in composite laminates with both types of sensors show an excellent correlation in those places where the strain distributions are smooth. In this case, optical sensors offer additional advantages: unnecessary calibration, multiplexing capability, small size, embedding ability, etc. But optical sensors reveal all their potential in those locations where the anisotropy of the composite structural element promotes strong strain distributions, and complex stress fields. In these cases, the analysis of the distorted spectrum of a grating submitted to an intense strain gradient offers a big amount of information, even without using spectrum integration methods. Furthermore, the knowledge of the optical behavior of fiber Bragg gratings submitted to transverse loads allows having additional information about the residual stress field promoted during the manufacturing process, and the stress release due to the machining of the part. This paper demonstrates theoretically and experimentally that fiber Bragg gratings can be valuable tools not only to monitor complete composite structures in service, but to analyze the stress and strain state of those particular configurations in which any kind of information, due to their complexity and high requirements, is essential.

  7. Fatigue crack growth in aluminum laminate composites

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, P.B.; Carpenter, R.D.; Gibeling, J.C.

    1996-12-31

    Fatigue crack growth has been measured in a laminated metal composite (LMC) consisting of alternating layers of AA6090/SiC/25p metal matrix composite (MMC) and AA5182 alloy. This material was tested in both as-pressed (F temper) and aged (T6 temper) conditions. Corresponding crack growth measurements were made in self-laminates of both the MMC and AA5182 materials to examine the role of the interfaces.

  8. Simulation of Lightning-Induced Delamination in Un-protected CFRP Laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naghipour, P.; Pineda, E. J.; Arnold, S. M.

    2016-08-01

    Lightning is a major cause of damage in laminated composite aerospace structures during flight. The most significant failure mode induced by lightning is delamination, which might extend well beyond the visible damage zone, and requires sophisticated techniques and equipment to detect. Therefore, it is crucial to develop a numerical tool capable of predicting the damage zone induced from a lightning strike to minimize costly repair acreage and supplement extremely expensive lightning experiments. Herein, a detailed numerical study consisting of a multidirectional composite with user-defined, temperature-dependent, interlaminar elements subjected to a lightning strike is designed, and delamination/damage expansion is studied under specified conditions. It is observed both the size and shape of the delamination zone are strongly dependent on the assumed temperature-dependent fracture toughness; the primary parameter controlling lightning-induced delamination propagation. An accurate estimation of the fracture toughness profile is crucial in order to have a reliable prediction of the delamination zone and avoid sub-critical structural failures.

  9. Shear response and design of RC beams strengthened using CFRP laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Shamsher B.

    2013-12-01

    The present investigation addresses the shear strengthening of deficient reinforced concrete (RC) beams using carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) sheets. The effect of the pattern and orientation of the strengthening fabric on the shear capacity of the strengthened beams were examined. Three beams with various lay-ups of strengthening fabric, 45°, 0°/90°, and 0°/90°/45° were examined, in addition to an unstrengthened control beam. Principal and shear strains were measured at different locations at the critical sections of the strengthened beams corresponding to each applied shear force. Experimental results showing the advantage of beam strengthened using the various lay-ups of CFRP sheets are discussed. It is concluded that Beam-45°, Beam-0°/90°, and Beam-0°/90°/45° show about 25%, 19%, and 40% increases in shear-load carrying capacity in comparison to the control beam, respectively. Also, there exists a critical value of shear force up to which there is no appreciable shear strain in the CFRP sheets/beam. This shear force marks the ultimate shear resistance of the control beam. However, the strengthened beams exhibited significant strength and stiffness even beyond the critical value of the shear force. A design example for shear strengthening shows that the design equations available in the literature underestimate the actual shear strength of the beams.

  10. Direct Composite Laminate Veneers: Three Case Reports

    PubMed Central

    Korkut, Bora; Yanıkoğlu, Funda; Günday, Mahir

    2013-01-01

    Re-establishing a patient’s lost dental esthetic appearance is one of the most important topics for contemporary dentistry. New treatment materials and methods have been coming on the scene, day by day, in order to achieve such an aim. Most dentists prefer more conservative and aesthetic approaches, such as direct and indirect laminate veneer restorations, instead of full-ceramic crowns for anteriors where aesthetics is really important. Laminate veneers are restorations which are envisioned to correct existing abnormalities, esthetic deficiencies and discolo-rations. Laminate veneer restorations may be processed in two different ways: direct or indirect. Direct laminate veneers have no need to be prepared in the laboratory and are based on the principle of application of a composite material directly to the prepared tooth surface in the dental clinic. Indirect laminate veneers may be produced from composite materials or ceramics, which are cemented to the tooth with an adhesive resin. In this case report, direct composite laminate veneer technique used for three patients with esthetic problems related to fractures, discolorations and an old prolapsed restoration, is described and six-month follow-ups are discussed. As a conclusion, direct laminate veneer restorations may be a treatment option for patients with the esthetic problems of anterior teeth in cases similar to those reported here. PMID:23875090

  11. Method for fabricating laminated uranium composites

    DOEpatents

    Chapman, L.R.

    1983-08-03

    The present invention is directed to a process for fabricating laminated composites of uranium or uranium alloys and at least one other metal or alloy. The laminated composites are fabricated by forming a casting of the molten uranium with the other metal or alloy which is selectively positioned in the casting and then hot-rolling the casting into a laminated plate in or around which the casting components are metallurgically bonded to one another to form the composite. The process of the present invention provides strong metallurgical bonds between the laminate components primarily since the bond disrupting surface oxides on the uranium or uranium alloy float to the surface of the casting to effectively remove the oxides from the bonding surfaces of the components.

  12. Thermal buckling of laminated composite shells

    SciTech Connect

    Thangaratnam, R.K.; Palaninathan, R.; Ramachandran, J. )

    1990-05-01

    The linear buckling analysis of laminated composite cylindrical and conical shells under thermal load using the finite element method is reported here. Critical temperatures are presented for various cases of cross-ply and angly-ply laminated shells. The effects of radius/thickness ratio, number of layers, ratio of coefficients of thermal expansion, and the angle of fiber orientation have been studied. The results indicate that the buckling behavior of laminated shell under thermal load is different from that of mechanically loaded shell with respect to the angle of fiber orientation. 6 refs.

  13. Flexural Upgrading of Steel-Concrete Composite Girders Using Externally Bonded CFRP Reinforcement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabir, Mohammad Z.; Eshaghian, M.

    2010-04-01

    This study focuses on the flexural performance of composite steel-concrete beam girders retrofitted with CFRP. The current work is a numerical study of the load carrying capacity of a section which is strengthened by externally bonding of CFRP to the tension flange. At the primarily stage of the work, the model is verified by published experimental data. The three dimensional interactive failure Tsai-Wu criteria was implemented to retrofitted composite girder in order to identify the failure mode. Then a detailed parametric study is carried out to investigate the effects of geometry parameters and material characteristics on flexural performance of a composite section.

  14. Experimental approach on the collapse mechanism of CFRP composite tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y. N.; Im, K. H.; Park, J. W.; Yang, I. Y.

    2001-04-01

    This study is to investigate the energy absorption characteristics of CFRP(Carbon-Fiber Reinforced Plastics) tubes on static and dynamic tests. Axial static compression tests have been carried out using the static testing machine(Shin-gang buckling testing machine) and dynamic compression tests have been utilized using an vertical crushing testing machine. When such tubes are subjected to crushing loads, the response is complex and depends on the interaction between the different mechanisms that could control the crushing process. The collapse characteristics and energy absorption have been examined for various tubes. Energy absorption of the tubes are increased as changes in the lay-up which may increase the modulus of tubes. The results have been varied significantly as a function of ply orientation and interlaminar number. In general, the stacking sequence [0/90] CFRP tubes absorbed more energy than the [15/-15] CFRP tubes.

  15. Composite Laminate With Coefficient of Thermal Expansion Matching D263 Glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, David; Rodini, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    The International X-ray Observatory project seeks to make an X-ray telescope assembly with 14,000 flexible glass segments. The glass used is commercially available SCHOTT D263 glass. Thermal expansion causes the mirror to distort out of alignment. A housing material is needed that has a matching coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) so that when temperatures change in the X-ray mirror assembly, the glass and housing pieces expand equally, thus reducing or eliminating distortion. Desirable characteristics of this material include a high stiffness/weight ratio, and low density. Some metal alloys show promise in matching the CTE of D263 glass, but their density is high compared to aluminum, and their stiffness/weight ratio is not favorable. A laminate made from carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) should provide more favorable characteristics, but there has not been any made with the CTE matching D263 Glass. It is common to create CFRP laminates of various CTEs by stacking layers of prepreg material at various angles. However, the CTE of D263 glass is 6.3 ppm/ C at 20 C, which is quite high, and actually unachievable solely with carbon fiber and resin. A composite laminate has been developed that has a coefficient of thermal expansion identical to that of SCHOTT D263 glass. The laminate is made of a combination of T300 carbon fiber, Eglass, and RS3C resin. The laminate has 50% uni-T300 plies and 50% uni-E-glass plies, with each fiber-layer type laid up in a quasi-isotropic laminate for a total of 16 plies. The fiber volume (percent of fiber compared to the resin) controls the CTE to a great extent. Tests have confirmed that a fiber volume around 48% gives a CTE of 6.3 ppm/ C. This is a fairly simple composite laminate, following well established industry procedures. The unique feature of this laminate is a somewhat unusual combination of carbon fiber with E-glass (fiberglass). The advantage is that the resulting CTE comes out to 6.3 ppm/ C at 20 C, which matches D

  16. Detection of CFRP Composite Manufacturing Defects Using a Guided Wave Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, Tyler B.; Hou, Tan-Hung; Grimsley, Brian W.; Yuan, Fuh-Gwo

    2015-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center is investigating a guided-wave based defect detection technique for as-fabricated carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites. This technique will be extended to perform in-process cure monitoring, defect detection and size determination, and ultimately a closed-loop process control to maximize composite part quality and consistency. The overall objective of this work is to determine the capability and limitations of the proposed defect detection technique, as well as the number and types of sensors needed to identify the size, type, and location of the predominant types of manufacturing defects associated with laminate layup and cure. This includes, porosity, gaps, overlaps, through-the-thickness fiber waviness, and in-plane fiber waviness. The present study focuses on detection of the porosity formed from variations in the matrix curing process, and on local overlaps intentionally introduced during layup of the prepreg. By terminating the cycle prematurely, three 24-ply unidirectional composite panels were manufactured such that each subsequent panel had a higher final degree of cure, and lower level of porosity. It was demonstrated that the group velocity, normal to the fiber direction, of a guided wave mode increased by 5.52 percent from the first panel to the second panel and 1.26 percent from the second panel to the third panel. Therefore, group velocity was utilized as a metric for degree of cure and porosity measurements. A fully non-contact guided wave hybrid system composed of an air-coupled transducer and a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) was used for the detection and size determination of an overlap By transforming the plate response from the time-space domain to the frequency-wavenumber domain, the total wavefield was then separated into the incident and backscatter waves. The overlap region was accurately imaged by using a zero-lag cross-correlation (ZLCC) imaging condition, implying the incident and backscattered

  17. Guided Wave and Damage Detection in Composite Laminates Using Different Fiber Optic Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fucai; Murayama, Hideaki; Kageyama, Kazuro; Shirai, Takehiro

    2009-01-01

    Guided wave detection using different fiber optic sensors and their applications in damage detection for composite laminates were systematically investigated and compared in this paper. Two types of fiber optic sensors, namely fiber Bragg gratings (FBG) and Doppler effect-based fiber optic (FOD) sensors, were addressed and guided wave detection systems were constructed for both types. Guided waves generated by a piezoelectric transducer were propagated through a quasi-isotropic carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) laminate and acquired by these fiber optic sensors. Characteristics of these fiber optic sensors in ultrasonic guided wave detection were systematically compared. Results demonstrated that both the FBG and FOD sensors can be applied in guided wave and damage detection for the CFRP laminates. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of guided wave signal captured by an FOD sensor is relatively high in comparison with that of the FBG sensor because of their different physical principles in ultrasonic detection. Further, the FOD sensor is sensitive to the damage-induced fundamental shear horizontal (SH0) guided wave that, however, cannot be detected by using the FBG sensor, because the FOD sensor is omnidirectional in ultrasound detection and, in contrast, the FBG sensor is severely direction dependent. PMID:22412347

  18. Guided wave and damage detection in composite laminates using different fiber optic sensors.

    PubMed

    Li, Fucai; Murayama, Hideaki; Kageyama, Kazuro; Shirai, Takehiro

    2009-01-01

    Guided wave detection using different fiber optic sensors and their applications in damage detection for composite laminates were systematically investigated and compared in this paper. Two types of fiber optic sensors, namely fiber Bragg gratings (FBG) and Doppler effect-based fiber optic (FOD) sensors, were addressed and guided wave detection systems were constructed for both types. Guided waves generated by a piezoelectric transducer were propagated through a quasi-isotropic carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) laminate and acquired by these fiber optic sensors. Characteristics of these fiber optic sensors in ultrasonic guided wave detection were systematically compared. Results demonstrated that both the FBG and FOD sensors can be applied in guided wave and damage detection for the CFRP laminates. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of guided wave signal captured by an FOD sensor is relatively high in comparison with that of the FBG sensor because of their different physical principles in ultrasonic detection. Further, the FOD sensor is sensitive to the damage-induced fundamental shear horizontal (SH(0)) guided wave that, however, cannot be detected by using the FBG sensor, because the FOD sensor is omnidirectional in ultrasound detection and, in contrast, the FBG sensor is severely direction dependent.

  19. Application of Desalination with CFRP Composite Electrode to Concrete Deteriorated by Chloride Attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Keisuke; Ueda, Takao; Nanasawa, Akira

    As a new rehabilitation technique for recovery both of loading ability and durability of concrete structures deteriorated by chloride attack, desalination (electrochemical chloride removal technique from concrete) using CFRP composite electrode bonding to concrete has been developed. In this study, basic application was tried using small RC specimens, and also application to the large-scale RC beams deteriorated by the chloride attack through the long-term exposure in the outdoors was investigated. As the result of bending test of treated specimens, the decrease of strengthening effect with the electrochemical treatment was observed in the case of small specimens using low absorption rate resin for bonding, on the other hand, in the case of large-scale RC beam using 20% absorption rate resin for bonding CFRP composite electrode, enough strengthening effect was obtained by the bending failure of RC beam with the fracture of CFRP board.

  20. Finite element analysis when orthogonal cutting of hybrid composite CFRP/Ti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jinyang; El Mansori, Mohamed

    2015-07-01

    Hybrid composite, especially CFRP/Ti stack, is usually considered as an innovative structural configuration for manufacturing the key load-bearing components in modern aerospace industry. This paper originally proposed an FE model to simulate the total chip formation process dominated the hybrid cutting operation. The hybrid composite model was established based on three physical constituents, i.e., Ti constituent, interface and CFRP constituent. Different constitutive models and damage criteria were introduced to replicate the interrelated cutting behaviour of the stack material. The CFRP/Ti interface was modelled as a third phase through the concept of cohesive zone (CZ). Particular attention was made on the comparative studies of the influence of different cutting-sequence strategies on the machining responses induced in hybrid stack cutting. The numerical results emphasized the pivotal role of cutting-sequence strategy on the various machining induced responses including cutting-force generation, machined surface quality and induced interface damage.

  1. Lamination residual stresses in fiber composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniel, I. M.; Liber, T.

    1975-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to determine the magnitude of lamination residual stresses in angle-ply composites and to evaluate their effects on composite structural integrity. The materials investigated were boron/epoxy, boron/polyimide, graphite/low modulus epoxy, graphite/high modulus epoxy, graphite/polyimide and s-glass/epoxy. These materials were fully characterized. Static properties of laminates were also determined. Experimental techniques using embedded strain gages were developed and used to measure residual strains during curing. The extent of relaxation of lamination residual stresses was investigated. It was concluded that the degree of such relaxation is low. The behavior of angle-ply laminates subjected to thermal cycling, tensile load cycling, and combined thermal cycling with tensile load was investigated. In most cases these cycling programs did not have any measurable influence on residual strength and stiffness of the laminates. In the tensile load cycling tests, the graphite/polyimide shows the highest endurance with 10 million cycle runouts at loads up to 90 percent of the static strength.

  2. Experimental micromechanical approach to failure process in CFRP cross-ply laminates

    SciTech Connect

    Takeda, N.; Ogihara, S.; Kobayashi, A.

    1994-12-31

    The microscopic failure process of three different types of cross-ply laminates, (0/90{sub n}/0) (n = 4, 8, 12), was investigated at R.T. and 80 C. Progressive damage parameters, the transverse crack density and the delamination ratio, were measured. A simple modified shear-lag analysis including the thermal residual strains was conducted to predict the transverse crack density as a function of laminate strain, considering the constraint effect, as well as the strength distribution of the transverse layer. The analysis was also extended to the system containing delamination to predict the delamination length. A prediction was also presented for the transverse crack density including the effect of the delamination growth. The prediction showed good agreement with the experimental results.

  3. Preliminary evaluation of hybrid titanium composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, J. L.; Progar, D. J.; Johnson, W. S.; St.clair, T. L.

    1994-01-01

    In this study, the mechanical response of hybrid titanium composite laminates (HTCL) was evaluated at room and elevated temperatures. Also, the use of an elastic-plastic laminate analysis program for predicting the tensile response from constituent properties was verified. The improvement in mechanical properties achieved by the laminates was assessed by comparing the results of static strength and constant amplitude fatigue tests to those for monolithic titanium sheet. Two HTCL were fabricated with different fiber volume fractions, resin layer thicknesses, and resins. One panel was thicker and was more poorly bonded in comparison to other. Consequently, the former had a lower tensile strength, while fewer cracks grew in this panel and at a slower rate. Both panels showed an improvement in fatigue life of almost two orders of magnitude. The model predictions were also in good agreement with the experimental results for both HTCL panels.

  4. Micro-Cracking Detection in Laminated Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Tsuchin; Leyte, Alma; DiGregorio, Anthony; Russell, Samuel S.; Walker, James L.; Thom, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Porosity and fatigue cracking are two critical factors that affect the performance and safety of cryogenic fuel tanks and feedlines made from unlined laminated or weaved carbon/epoxy materials. This paper presents the experiments to induce fatigue cracking of laminated composites through thermal cycling as well as the feasibility of using Thermography and Ultrasound Spectroscopy technology (UT) to detect and measure such micro-cracking. Carbon/epoxy laminated composite panels were built and cut into strips. These specimens were partially submerged in liquid nitrogen while subjected to various loads on a test machine. Edges of some specimens were polished and etched to determine the degree of micro-cracking. The rest of specimens were then examined with Thermography and Ultrasound Spectroscopy NDE systems to investigate the feasibility of finding such micro-cracking in the laminated composites. Thermography is utilized to determine changes in thermal diffusivity. The degree of cracking may reduce the apparent thermal diffusivity and therefore change the thermal response on the surface. Thermography testing was conducted on a group of specimens where it is desired to have some correlation between the predetermined stress and the thermography data. Ultrasound Spectroscopy was used to determine peak changes between the pre-stressed and stressed samples. Data from the inspections were analyzed and the results are presented in this paper.

  5. Digital holographic nondestructive testing of laminate composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karray, Mayssa; Christophe, Poilane; Gargouri, Mohamed; Picart, Pascal

    2016-09-01

    Optical digital holographic techniques can be used for nondestructive testing of materials. Digital holographic nondestructive testing essentially measures deformations on the surface of the object. However, there is sufficient sensitivity to detect subsurface and internal defects in metallic and composite specimens. We investigate and discuss the vibration analysis of laminated composite glass-epoxy using time averaging in digital Fresnel holography to visualize the modes of vibration and to test the integrity of the structures of studied materials.

  6. Modeling Composite Laminate Crushing for Crash Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, David C.; Jones, Lisa (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Crash modeling of composite structures remains limited in application and has not been effectively demonstrated as a predictive tool. While the global response of composite structures may be well modeled, when composite structures act as energy-absorbing members through direct laminate crushing the modeling accuracy is greatly reduced. The most efficient composite energy absorbing structures, in terms of energy absorbed per unit mass, are those that absorb energy through a complex progressive crushing response in which fiber and matrix fractures on a small scale dominate the behavior. Such failure modes simultaneously include delamination of plies, failure of the matrix to produce fiber bundles, and subsequent failure of fiber bundles either in bending or in shear. In addition, the response may include the significant action of friction, both internally (between delaminated plies or fiber bundles) or externally (between the laminate and the crushing surface). A figure shows the crushing damage observed in a fiberglass composite tube specimen, illustrating the complexity of the response. To achieve a finite element model of such complex behavior is an extremely challenging problem. A practical crushing model based on detailed modeling of the physical mechanisms of crushing behavior is not expected in the foreseeable future. The present research describes attempts to model composite crushing behavior using a novel hybrid modeling procedure. Experimental testing is done is support of the modeling efforts, and a test specimen is developed to provide data for validating laminate crushing models.

  7. A hybrid method based upon nonlinear Lamb wave response for locating a delamination in composite laminates.

    PubMed

    Yelve, Nitesh P; Mitra, Mira; Mujumdar, P M; Ramadas, C

    2016-08-01

    A new hybrid method based upon nonlinear Lamb wave response in time and frequency domains is introduced to locate a delamination in composite laminates. In Lamb wave based nonlinear method, the presence of damage is shown by the appearance of higher harmonics in the Lamb wave response. The proposed method not only uses this spectral information but also the corresponding temporal response data, for locating the delamination. Thus, the method is termed as a hybrid method. The paper includes formulation of the method and its application to locate a Barely Visible Impact Damage (BVID) induced delamination in a Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) laminate. The method gives the damage location fairly well. It is a baseline free method, as it does not need data from the pristine specimen.

  8. Methods for Preparing Nanoparticle-Containing Thermoplastic Composite Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gruber, Mark B. (Inventor); Jensen, Brian J. (Inventor); Cano, Roberto J. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    High quality thermoplastic composites and composite laminates containing nanoparticles and/or nanofibers, and methods of producing such composites and laminates are disclosed. The composites comprise a thermoplastic polymer and a plurality of nanoparticles, and may include a fibrous structural reinforcement. The composite laminates are formed from a plurality of nanoparticle-containing composite layers and may be fused to one another via an automated process.

  9. Exploration on surrogate models for inverse identification of delamination cracks in CFRP composites using Electrical Resistance Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz Montiel, Paulina

    Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) materials are used in aerospace structures due to their superior mechanical properties and reduced weight. Non-destructive evaluation (NDE) techniques are needed for such materials to detect and measure intra-ply matrix cracking and inter-ply delamination damage without harming or altering their initial configuration. The aim of NDE techniques is to use the composite material as a sensor itself, and to use its intrinsic material properties as measure of damage. Previous literature has shown that CFRP composites are electrically conductive in the fibers direction, and that the fiber-to-fiber contact due to waviness provides electrical conduction in the direction normal to the fibers. When matrix cracking or delamination defects are introduced in the composite, they break the fiber contact network, and this increases the local resistivity of the material. The Electrical Resistance Tomography (ERT) provides a NDE technique that uses these inherent changes in conductive properties of the composite to map its internal damage state. As opposed to other NDE methods, this technique allows the in-situ monitoring and detection on damage, which is particularly desirable for large and complex aerospace structures. This research investigates efficient numerical modeling techniques for inverse identification of delamination damage location and size in composite laminates using ERT based NDE. Identification of damage in composites requires solving the inverse problem that minimizes the difference between the model predicted and the measured change in resistance at specified electrode locations. The direct use of numerical finite element models of the laminate in the inverse identification is computationally expensive and it requires the development of accurate surrogate models. The use of Response Surfaces and Kriging approximations for single-response surrogate modeling is investigated in this work. Since the electrical resistance changes

  10. Progressive delamination in polymer matrix composite laminates: A new approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Murthy, P. L. N.; Minnetyan, L.

    1992-01-01

    A new approach independent of stress intensity factors and fracture toughness parameters has been developed and is described for the computational simulation of progressive delamination in polymer matrix composite laminates. The damage stages are quantified based on physics via composite mechanics while the degradation of the laminate behavior is quantified via the finite element method. The approach accounts for all types of composite behavior, laminate configuration, load conditions, and delamination processes starting from damage initiation, to unstable propagation, and to laminate fracture. Results of laminate fracture in composite beams, panels, plates, and shells are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness and versatility of this new approach.

  11. Residual stresses in polymer matrix composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahn, H. T.

    1976-01-01

    Residual stresses in composites are induced during fabrication and by environmental exposure. The theory formulated can describe the shrinkage commonly observed after a thermal expansion test. Comparison between the analysis and experimental data for laminates of various material systems indicates that the residual stress-free temperature can be lower than the curing temperature, depending on the curing process. Effects of residual stresses on ply failure including the acoustic emission characteristics are discussed.

  12. Delamination stresses in semicircular laminated composite bars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.

    1988-01-01

    Using anisotropic elasticity theory, delamination stresses in a semicircular laminated composite curved bar subjected to end forces and end moments were calculated, and their radial locations determined. A family of design curves was presented, showing variation of the intensity of delamination stresses and their radial locations with different geometry and different degrees of anisotropy of the curved bar. The effect of anisotropy on the location of peak delamination stress was found to be small.

  13. Characterization of impact damage in composite laminates using guided wavefield imaging and local wavenumber domain analysis.

    PubMed

    Rogge, Matthew D; Leckey, Cara A C

    2013-09-01

    Delaminations in composite laminates resulting from impact events may be accompanied by minimal indication of damage at the surface. As such, inspections are required to ensure defects are within allowable limits. Conventional ultrasonic scanning techniques have been shown to effectively characterize the size and depth of delaminations but require physical contact with the structure and considerable setup time. Alternatively, a non-contact scanning laser vibrometer may be used to measure guided wave propagation in the laminate structure generated by permanently bonded transducers. A local Fourier domain analysis method is presented for processing guided wavefield data to estimate spatially dependent wavenumber values, which can be used to determine delamination depth. The technique is applied to simulated wavefields and results are analyzed to determine limitations of the technique with regards to determining defect size and depth. Based on simulation results, guidelines for application of the technique are developed. Finally, experimental wavefield data is obtained in quasi-isotropic carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) laminates with impact damage. The recorded wavefields are analyzed and wavenumber is measured to an accuracy of up to 8.5% in the region of shallow delaminations. These results show the promise of local wavenumber domain analysis to characterize the depth of delamination damage in composite laminates. The technique can find application in automated vehicle health assurance systems with potential for high detection rates and greatly reduced operator effort and setup time.

  14. Acousto-Optic Measurements in CFRP Laminates Using Fiber Bragg Grating Sensors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    level. The main objective of this paper is to describe the results of an acousto - optic experiment using FBG sensors and present FR as a potential way of determining accumulated damage in a carbon composite structure.

  15. Residual stress characterization for laminated composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shao-Chun

    With increasing applications of advanced laminated composites, process-induced residual stress has drawn more and more attention in recent years. Efforts have been devoted to understanding residual stress both quantitatively and qualitatively. In the current study, a novel technique called the Cure Referencing Method was developed which has the capability for measuring the residual stress on the symmetric laminated composite plates. It can also differentiate residual stress into two components: one is due to the mismatch of the coefficient of thermal expansion, the other is caused by the matrix chemical curing shrinkage. The chemical curing shrinkage of the polymer matrix was investigated in further detail. A technique was developed to measure the post-gel chemical curing shrinkage which is the portion of curing shrinkage that really induces the residual stress in the polymer matrix composites. Time-dependent material property is another issue associated with polymer matrix composite materials. The data of several short-term tensile creep tests run at different temperature were used to construct a linear viscoelastic: model for describing the behavior of the composites over a long period of time. It was found that physical aging of the polymer matrix needs to be taken into account in order to have a more accurate representation of the long-term behavior. A fair agreement was obtained between the result of the long-term creep test and the master curve constructed from several momentary creep tests.

  16. Interlaminar interaction in paper thermoplastic laminate composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prambauer, M.; Paulik, C.; Burgstaller, C.

    2016-07-01

    Bio-based composites are a research topic since several decades, which aims for sustainable and durable materials. In the scope of this research, many different sources for biobased reinforcements have been investigated. Typical issues associated with the use of such are property variations due to cultivation area and climate, besides the influences of the type, pretreatment and fibre geometry. Another issue can be the availability of such natural fibres. Due to these reasons, we started using paper sheets as reinforcements in laminate composites with thermoplastic materials. In preliminary studies with polypropylene composites, we found good mechanical properties, even higher than could be expected by estimating the composite properties from the constituents by applying simple rule of mixtures type models. We suspect, besides some effect of paper compaction, interlaminar effects to be the reason for this. Therefore, the aim of this work is to investigate the effects of the interfacial interaction on the different paper laminate properties due to different matrix polymers. For this work, we used polypropylene, polyamide 6 and 12 as well as polystyrene. Composites were produced via compression moulding and samples for mechanical testing and density evaluation were cut from the moulded plates. The results from mechanical tests show, that there is a reinforcing effect, regardless of matrix polymer used. Simple rule of mixtures evaluations show, that the different matrices exhibit different degrees of interaction, based on their chemical structure. In addition, also influences due to processing were found.

  17. An accurate method to predict the stress concentration in composite laminates with a circular hole under tensile loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, A.; Zuccarello, B.

    2007-07-01

    The paper presents a theoretical-numerical hybrid method for determining the stresses distribution in composite laminates containing a circular hole and subjected to uniaxial tensile loading. The method is based upon an appropriate corrective function allowing a simple and rapid evaluation of stress distributions in a generic plate of finite width with a hole based on the theoretical stresses distribution in an infinite plate with the same hole geometry and material. In order to verify the accuracy of the method proposed, various numerical and experimental tests have been performed by considering different laminate lay-ups; in particular, the experimental results have shown that a combined use of the method proposed and the well-know point-stress criterion leads to reliable strength predictions for GFRP or CFRP laminates with a circular hole.

  18. Impact Damage Tolerance of a Carbon Fibre Composite Laminate.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-05-01

    design of composite structures. 8 CONCLUSIONS These carbon fibre/ epoxy resin laminates are susceptible :: low e ;rt., - .. impact damage, especially...ROYAL AIRCRAFT ESTABLISHMENT0 Technical Report 84049 May 1984 GARTEUR/TP-007 IMPACT DAMAGE TOLERANCE OF A CARBON FIBRE COMPOSITE LAMINATE by DTIC G...007 Received for printing 3 May 1984 IMPACT DAMAGE TOLERANCE OF A CARBON FIBRE COMPOSITE LAMINATE by G. Dorey P. Sigety* K. Stellbrink** W. G. J. ’t

  19. High-power picosecond laser drilling/machining of carbon fibre-reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salama, A.; Li, L.; Mativenga, P.; Sabli, A.

    2016-02-01

    The large differences in physical and thermal properties of the carbon fibre-reinforced polymer (CFRP) composite constituents make laser machining of this material challenging. An extended heat-affected zone (HAZ) often occurs. The availability of ultrashort laser pulse sources such as picosecond lasers makes it possible to improve the laser machining quality of these materials. This paper reports an investigation on the drilling and machining of CFRP composites using a state-of-the-art 400 W picosecond laser system. Small HAZs (<25 µm) were obtained on the entry side of 6-mm-diameter hole drilled on sample of 6 mm thickness, whereas no HAZ was seen below the top surface on the cut surfaces. Multiple ring material removal strategy was used. Furthermore, the effect of laser processing parameters such as laser power, scanning speed and repetition rate on HAZ sizes and ablation depth was investigated.

  20. Micromechanics of composite laminate compression failures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guynn, E. Gail; Bradley, Walter L.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this annual progress report is to summarize the work effort and results accomplished from July 1987 through July 1988 on NASA Research Grant NAG1-659 entitled Micromechanics of Composite Laminate Compressive Failure. The report contains: (1) the objective of the proposed research, (2) the summary of accomplishments, (3) a more extensive review of compression literature, (4) the planned material (and corresponding properties) received to date, (5) the results for three possible specimen geometries, experimental procedures planned, and current status of the experiments, and (6) the work planned for the next contract year.

  1. Integration of sensing networks into laminated composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghezzo, Fabrizia; Rye, Patrick; Huang, Yi; Nemat-Nasser, Sia

    2008-03-01

    We summarize the methodology that we have used to address integrating sensing network into composite materials for structural self diagnosis. First, we have examined the effect of stress concentration that arises due to the embedment of sensors and external devices on the strength and endurance of laminated glass fiber composites. To analyze the mechanical response of the composite material under study subjected to in-plane or impact loads, we have fabricated a series of samples, with and without embedded (dummy) sensors/micro-processors, using S2 glass fiber/epoxy, and have characterized their response by acoustic emission. Guided by the corresponding results, we can select sensors and other necessary components in such way as to minimize the impact of the embedded electronics on the material integrity and, at the same time, to implement acoustic sensing monitoring functionalities within the material. A 4-tree hierarchical network of PVDF sensors capable of acquiring signals typically related to resin micro cracking phenomena has been developed and partially integrated into a cross ply laminate. The achieved results and ongoing research will be discussed.

  2. A Graphical Method Predicting the Compressive Strength of Toughened Unidirectional Composite Laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jumahat, Aidah; Soutis, Constantinos; Hodzic, Alma

    2011-02-01

    The in-plane shear and compressive properties of unidirectional (UD) HTS40/977-2 carbon fibre-toughened resin (CF/TR) laminates are investigated. Scanning Electron microscopy (SEM) and optical microscopy are used to reveal the failure mechanisms developed during compression. It is found that damage initiates by fibre microbuckling (a fibre instability failure mode) which then is followed by yielding of the matrix to form a fibre kink band zone that leads to final fracture. Analytical models are briefly reviewed and a graphical method, based on the shear response of the composite system, is described in order to estimate the UD compressive strength. Predictions for the HTS40/977-2 system are compared to experimental measurements and to data of five other unidirectional carbon fibre reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites that are currently used in aerospace and other structural applications. It is shown that the estimated values are in a good agreement with the measured results.

  3. Prediction of Composite Laminate Fracture: Micromechanics and Progressive Fracture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gotsis, P. K.; Chamis, C. C.; Minnetyan, L.

    1996-01-01

    This report describes an investigation to predict first-ply failure and final fracture in selected composite laminates subjected to inplane loads. The laminates were composed of glass fiber and graphite fibers in epoxy matrices. Failure envelopes based on first-ply failure and laminate fracture were generated for combined loading of these laminates. Predictions were evaluated by micromechanics-based theory and progressive fracture. The results show that, for most cases, combined tensile loading significantly enhanced the laminate fracture stress in comparison to the uniaxial loading.

  4. Nonlinear laminate analysis for metal matrix fiber composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Sinclair, J. H.

    1981-01-01

    A nonlinear laminate analysis is described for predicting the mechanical behavior (stress-strain relationships) of angleplied laminates in which the matrix is strained nonlinearly by both the residual stress and the mechanical load and in which additional nonlinearities are induced due to progressive fiber fractures and ply relative rotations. The nonlinear laminate analysis (NLA) is based on linear composite mechanics and a piece wise linear laminate analysis to handle the nonlinear responses. Results obtained by using this nonlinear analysis on boron fiber/aluminum matrix angleplied laminates agree well with experimental data. The results shown illustrate the in situ ply stress-strain behavior and synergistic strength enhancement.

  5. Residual stress and crack propagation in laminated composites

    SciTech Connect

    Yttergren, R.M.F.; Zeng, K.; Rowcliffe, D.J.

    1994-12-31

    Residual stress distributions in several laminated ceramic composites were measured by an indentation technique. The material included alumina-zirconia laminated composites, containing strong interfaces, and alumina-porcelain laminated composites with both weak and strong interfaces. The residual stress in these material originates from the mismatch of the thermal properties, differences in elastic properties, and different shrinkage of the laminates during sintering. An experimental technique is presented which gives a direct view of the residual stress state in the materials. Values of residual tensile stress are presented as a function of position relative to the interface in each material.

  6. Galvanic interaction between carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) composites and steel in chloride contaminated concretes

    SciTech Connect

    Torres-Acosta, A.A.; Sagues, A.A.; Sen, R.

    1998-12-31

    Experiments were performed to determine the possible extent of galvanic corrosion when CFRP and steel are in contact in chloride contaminated concrete. Three concrete environments (water-to-cement (w/c) ratio of 0.41) at relative humidities (RH) of {approx}60%, {approx}80% and {approx}95%, and 14 kg/m{sup 3} chloride were investigated. The CFRP composite potential reached between {minus}180 and {minus}590 mV (vsCSE) when it was in contact with steel at these environments. Results showed significant galvanic action in the 80% RH chloride contaminated concrete (nominal steel current densities as high as 0.3 {micro}A/cm{sup 2}).

  7. The Effects of Debonding on the Low-Velocity Impact Response of Steel-CFRP Fibre Metal Laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pärnänen, T.; Vänttinen, A.; Kanerva, M.; Jokinen, J.; Saarela, O.

    2016-12-01

    The effect of metal-composite debonding on low-velocity impact response, i.e. on contact force-central deflection response, deformation profiles and strains on the free surfaces was studied. We focused on type 2/1 fibre metal laminate specimens made of stainless steel and carbon fibre epoxy layers, and tested them with drop-weight impact and quasi-static indentation loadings. Local strains were measured with strain gauges and full-field strains with a 3-D digital image correlation method. In addition, finite element simulations were performed and the effects of debonding were studied by exploiting cohesive elements. Our results showed that debonding, either the initial debonding or that formed during the loading, lowers the slope of the contact force-central deflection curve during the force increase. The debonding formation during the rebound phase was shown to amplify the rebound of the impact side, i.e. to lower the ultimate post-impact deflection. The free surface strains were studied on the laminate's lower surface at the area outside the debond damage. In terms of in-plane strains, debonding formation during impact and indentation, as well as the initial debonding, lowered the peripheral strain and resulted in a positive change in the radial strain.

  8. Permeability After Impact Testing of Composite Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, A.T.; Munafo, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Since composite laminates are beginning to be identified for use in reusable launch vehicle propulsion systems, an understanding of their permeance is needed. A foreign object impact event can cause a localized area of permeability (leakage) in a polymer matrix composite and it is the aim of this study to assess a method of quantifying permeability-after-impact results. A simple test apparatus is presented and variables that could affect the measured values of permeability-after-impact were assessed. Once it was determined that valid numbers were being measured, a fiber/resin system was impacted at various impact levels and the resulting permeability measured, first with a leak check solution (qualitative) then using the new apparatus (quantitative). The results showed that as the impact level increased, so did the measured leakage. As the pressure to the specimen was increased, the leak rate was seen to increase in a non-linear fashion for almost all of the specimens tested.

  9. Permeability After Impact Testing of Composite Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, Alan T.

    2003-01-01

    Since composite laminates are beginning to be identified for use in reusable launch vehicle propulsion systems, an understanding of their permeance is needed. A foreign object impact event can cause a localized area of permeability (leakage) in a polymer matrix composite and it is the aim of this study to assess a method of quantifying permeability-after-impact results. A simple test apparatus is presented and variables that could affect the measured values of permeability-after-impact were assessed. Once it was determined that valid numbers were being measured, a fiber/resin system was impacted at various impact levels and the resulting permeability measured, first with a leak check solution (qualitative) then using the new apparatus (quantitative). The results showed that as the impact level increased, so did the measured leakage. As the pressure to the specimen was increased, the leak rate was seen to increase in a non-linear fashion for almost all of the specimens tested.

  10. Failure and deformation analyses of smart laminated composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, Z.; Muliana, A.

    2012-09-01

    The present study focuses on the failure analysis and shape control of smart composite laminates under coupled thermal (hygro), electric, and mechanical stimuli. A linear thermo(hygro)electroelastic constitutive model for transversely isotropic materials is used for each ply in the composite laminate and for the piezoelectric materials that are integrated with laminates of the composite. Piezoelectric materials, such as lead zirconate titanate, and piezoelectric fiber composites, such as an active fiber composite or a microfiber composite, are considered as actuators for controlling unwanted bending deformations to avoid failure in such composite laminates. Due to the high stress concentrations at the interfaces between an active layer and the host structure, which may cause debonding, embedded actuators in which the active material is placed as part of the plies to form geometrically continuous plies are considered in order to minimize the stress concentration while improving the actuation capability. The first-ply failure and the ultimate laminate failure criteria of composite laminates are used to predict the failure stress and mode of the smart composite laminates, where commonly known macroscopic failure criteria, such as the Tsai-Hill, Tsai-Wu, and maximum stress criteria, are employed for each lamina. Piezoelectric materials can be used to prevent the failure from hygrothermal and mechanical loadings by applying an electric voltage in order to counteract laminate deformations. Based on the deformation and failure analyzes of smart composite laminates having various stacking sequences, fiber and matrix constituents, and piezoelectric materials, we could estimate the overall properties and failure envelopes of the laminates, which is useful in the preliminary design of smart composite structures.

  11. Vibration suppression of composite laminated plate with nonlinear energy sink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ye-Wei; Zhang, Hao; Hou, Shuai; Xu, Ke-Fan; Chen, Li-Qun

    2016-06-01

    The composite laminated plate is widely used in supersonic aircraft. So, there are many researches about the vibration suppression of composite laminated plate. In this paper, nonlinear energy sink (NES) as an effective method to suppress vibration is studied. The coupled partial differential governing equations of the composite laminated plate with the nonlinear energy sink (NES) are established by using the Hamilton principle. The fourth-order Galerkin discrete method is used to truncate the partial differential equations, which are solved by numerical integration method. Meanwhile study about the precise effectiveness of the nonlinear energy sink (NES) by discussing the different installation location of the nonlinear energy sink (NES) at the same speed. The results indicate that the nonlinear energy sink (NES) can significantly suppress the severe vibration of the composite laminated plate with speed wind loadings in to protect the composite laminated plate from excessive vibration.

  12. Effect of Impact Damage and Open Hole on Compressive Strength of Hybrid Composite Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hiel, Clement; Brinson, H. F.

    1993-01-01

    Impact damage tolerance is a frequently listed design requirement for composites hardware. The effect of impact damage and open hole size on laminate compressive strength was studied on sandwich beam specimens which combine CFRP-GFRP hybrid skins and a syntactic foam core. Three test specimen configurations have been investigated for this study. The first two were sandwich beams which were loaded in pure bending (by four point flexure). One series had a skin damaged by impact, and the second series had a circular hole machined through one of the skins. The reduction of compressive strength with increasing damage (hole) size was compared. Additionally a third series of uniaxially loaded open hole compression coupons were tested to generate baseline data for comparison with both series of sandwich beams.

  13. Effect of Impact Damage and Open Hole on Compressive Strength of Hybrid Composite Laminates

    SciTech Connect

    Hiel, C.; Brinson, H.F.

    1993-05-01

    Impact damage tolerance is a frequently listed design requirement for composites hardware. The effect of impact damage and open hole size on laminate compressive strength was studied on sandwich beam specimens which combine CFRP-GFRP hybrid skins and a syntactic foam core. Three test specimen configurations have been investigated for this study. The first two were sandwich beams which were loaded in pure bending (by four point flexure). One series had a skin damaged by impact, and the second series had a circular hole machined through one of the skins. The reduction of compressive strength with increasing damage (hole) size was compared. Additionally a third series of uniaxially loaded open hole compression coupons were tested to generate baseline data for comparison with both series of sandwich beams.

  14. Effect of laminate edge conditions on the formation of microvoids in composite laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, J. P.; Altan, M. C.

    2015-05-01

    Manufacturing defects such as microvoids are common in thermoset composite components and are known to negatively affect their strength. The resin pressure developed in and the resin flow out from the laminates during cure have been reported to be the primary factors influencing the final void content of a composite component. In this work, the effect of laminate edge conditions during the cure process on the formation of microvoids was experimentally investigated. This was achieved by fabricating eight-ply laminates from TenCate® BT250/7781 prepreg in a hot-press at a constant cure pressure of 170 kPa while limiting the laminate perimeter available for resin flow by 0%, 25%, 50%, 75%, and 100%. The individual plies of these five laminates were conditioned at 99% relative humidity before curing to maximize the moisture present in the lay-up before fabrication. The presence of moisture in the lay-ups was expected to promote void formation and allow the effect of restricting flow at the edges of a laminate to be better identified. The restriction of resin outflow was found to cause the average characteristic void diameter to decrease by 17% and void content to rise by 33%. This phenomenon was identified to be a result of the outflow restriction increasing the number of voids trapped within the laminate and indicates that for laminates cured at low pressures resin outflow is the dominant mechanism for void reduction.

  15. Micromechanical Modeling of Impact Damage Mechanisms in Unidirectional Composite Laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Qinghua; Wang, Zhenqing

    2016-12-01

    Composite laminates are susceptible to the transverse impact loads resulting in significant damage such as matrix cracking, fiber breakage and delamination. In this paper, a micromechanical model is developed to predict the impact damage of composite laminates based on microstructure and various failure models of laminates. The fiber and matrix are represented by the isotropic and elastic-plastic solid, and their impact failure behaviors are modeled based on shear damage model. The delaminaton failure is modeling by the interface element controlled by cohesive damage model. Impact damage mechanisms of laminate are analyzed by using the micromechanical model proposed. In addition, the effects of impact energy and laminated type on impact damage behavior of laminates are investigated. Due to the damage of the surrounding matrix near the impact point caused by the fiber deformation, the surface damage area of laminate is larger than the area of ​​impact projectile. The shape of the damage area is roughly rectangle or elliptical with the major axis extending parallel to the fiber direction in the surface layer of laminate. The alternating laminated type with two fiber directions is more propitious to improve the impact resistance of laminates.

  16. Characterization of Thermo-Elastic Properties and Microcracking Behaviors of CFRP Laminates Using Cup-Stacked Carbon Nanotubes (CSCNT) Dispersed Resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokozeki, Tomohiro; Iwahori, Yutaka; Ishiwata, Shin

    This study investigated the thermo-elastic properties and microscopic ply cracking behaviors in carbon fiber reinforced nanotube-dispersed epoxy laminates. The nanocomposite laminates used in this study consisted of traditional carbon fibers and epoxy resin filled with cup-stacked carbon nanotubes (CSCNTs). Thermo-mechanical properties of unidirectional nanocomposite laminates were evaluated, and quasi-static and fatigue tension tests of cross-ply laminates were carried out in order to observe the damage accumulation behaviors of matrix cracks. Clear retardation of matrix crack onset and accumulation was found in composite laminates with CSCNT compared to those without CSCNT. Fracture toughness associated with matrix cracking was evaluated based on the analytical model using the experimental results. It was concluded that the dispersion of CSCNT resulted in fracture toughness improvement and residual thermal strain decrease, and specifically, the former was the main contribution to the retardation of matrix crack formation.

  17. Reliability analysis of ceramic matrix composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, David J.; Wetherhold, Robert C.

    1991-01-01

    At a macroscopic level, a composite lamina may be considered as a homogeneous orthotropic solid whose directional strengths are random variables. Incorporation of these random variable strengths into failure models, either interactive or non-interactive, allows for the evaluation of the lamina reliability under a given stress state. Using a non-interactive criterion for demonstration purposes, laminate reliabilities are calculated assuming previously established load sharing rules for the redistribution of load as the failure of laminae occur. The matrix cracking predicted by ACK theory is modeled to allow a loss of stiffness in the fiber direction. The subsequent failure in the fiber direction is controlled by a modified bundle theory. Results using this modified bundle model are compared with previous models which did not permit separate consideration of matrix cracking, as well as to results obtained from experimental data.

  18. The structural response of unsymmetrically laminated composite cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, T. A.; Hyer, M. W.

    1989-01-01

    The responses of an unsymmetrically laminated fiber-reinforced composite cylinder to an axial compressive load, a torsional load, and the temperature change associated with cooling from the processing temperature to the service temperature are investigated. These problems are considered axisymmetric and the response is studied in the context of linear elastic material behavior and geometrically linear kinematics. Four different laminates are studied: a general unsymmetric laminate; two unsymmetric but more conventional laminates; and a conventional quasi-isotropic symmetric laminate. The responses based on closed-form solutions for different boundary conditions are computed and studied in detail. Particular emphasis is directed at understanding the influence of elastic couplings in the laminates. The influence of coupling decreased from a large effect in the general unsymmetric laminate, to practically no effect in the quasi-isotropic laminate. For example, the torsional loading of the general unsymmetric laminate resulted in a radial displacement. The temperature change also caused a significant radial displacement to occur near the ends of the cylinder. On the other hand, the more conventional unsymmetric laminate and the quasi-isotropic cylinder did not deform radially when subjected to a torsional load. From the results obtained, it is clear the degree of elastic coupling can be controlled and indeed designed into a cylinder, the degree and character of the coupling being dictated by the application.

  19. Laminated sheet composites reinforced with modular filament sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reece, O. Y.

    1968-01-01

    Aluminum and magnesium composite sheet laminates reinforced with low density, high strength modular filament sheets are produced by diffusion bonding and explosive bonding. Both processes are accomplished in normal atmosphere and require no special tooling or cleaning other than wire brushing the metal surfaces just prior to laminating.

  20. Accurate stress resultants equations for laminated composite deep thick shells

    SciTech Connect

    Qatu, M.S.

    1995-11-01

    This paper derives accurate equations for the normal and shear force as well as bending and twisting moment resultants for laminated composite deep, thick shells. The stress resultant equations for laminated composite thick shells are shown to be different from those of plates. This is due to the fact the stresses over the thickness of the shell have to be integrated on a trapezoidal-like shell element to obtain the stress resultants. Numerical results are obtained and showed that accurate stress resultants are needed for laminated composite deep thick shells, especially if the curvature is not spherical.

  1. Damage growth in composite laminates with interleaves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goree, James G.

    1987-01-01

    The influence of placing interleaves between fiber reinforced plies in multilayered composite laminates is investigated. The geometry of the composite is idealized as two dimensional, isotropic, linearly elastic media made of a damaged layer bonded between two half planes and separated by thin interleaves of low extensional and shear moduli. The damage in the layer is taken in the form of a symmetric crack perpendicular to the interface and may extend up to the interface. The case of an H-shaped crack in the form of a broken layer with delamination along the interface is also analyzed. The interleaves are modeled as distributed shear and tension springs. Fourier integral transform techniques are used to develop solutions in terms of singular integral equations. An asymptotic analysis of the integral equations based on Muskhelishvili's techniques reveals logarithmically singular axial stresses in the half plane at the crack tips for the broken layer. For the H shaped crack, similar singularities are found to exist in the axial stresses at the interface crack tips in the layer and the half plane. The solution of the equations is found numerically for the stresses and displacements by using the Hadamard's concept of direct differentiation of Cauchy integrals as well as Gaussian integration techniques.

  2. Design of composite laminates by a Monte Carlo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Chin; Springer, George S.

    1993-01-01

    A Monte Carlo procedure was developed for optimizing symmetric fiber reinforced composite laminates such that the weight is minimum and the Tsai-Wu strength failure criterion is satisfied in each ply. The laminate may consist of several materials including an idealized core, and may be subjected to several sets of combined in-plane and bending loads. The procedure yields the number of plies, the fiber orientation, and the material of each ply and the material and thickness of the core. A user friendly computer code was written for performing the numerical calculations. Laminates optimized by the code were compared to laminates resulting from existing optimization methods. These comparisons showed that the present Monte Carlo procedure is a useful and efficient tool for the design of composite laminates.

  3. Investigation on mechanical behavior of filament-wound CFRP tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Liangquan; Li, Hui

    2011-04-01

    Firstly, two types of CFRP tubes are designed using the filament-wound forming technology. These tubes are winded by carbon fibers with a filament winding pattern of [(900/00)2]S. The compression and tensile test are also carried out to investigate the stress-strain relationship, ultimate strength and macroscopic failure mode of the former CFRP tube. The results demonstrate that the former CFRP tube has a much larger ultimate tensile stress and strain than compressive stress and strain. However, the elastic modules of CFRP tubes under tension and compression are similar and the failure mode of these CFRP tubes is brittle under compression and tension. Secondly, the stress and strain analysis method of filament-wound CFRP tube is investigated according to anisotropic elasticity theory and lamination theory of composite material. Then, the strength of carbon-fiber-reinforced plastic tubes is obtained. In addition, the comparison of theoretical analysis results and experimental results shows that the theoretical analysis results are reliable.

  4. Fracture behavior of thick, laminated graphite/epoxy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, C. E.; Morris, D. H.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of laminate thickness on the fracture behavior of laminated graphite epoxy (T300/5208) composites was studied. The predominantly experimental research program included the study of the 0/+ or - 45/90 sub ns and 0/90 sub ns laminates with thickness of 8, 32, 64, 96 and 120 plies and the 0/+ or - 45 sub ns laminate with thickness of 6, 30, 60, 90 and 120 plies. The research concentrated on the measurement of fracture toughness utilizing the center-cracked tension, compact tension and three point bend specimen configurations. The development of subcritical damage at the crack tip was studied nondestructively using enhanced X-ray radiography and destructively using the laminate deply technique. The test results showed fracture toughness to be a function of laminate thickness. The fracture toughness of the 0 + or - 45/90 sub ns and 0/90 sub ns laminates decreased with increasing thickness and asymptotically approached lower bound values of 30 ksi square root of in. (1043 MPa square root of mm and 25 ksi square root of in (869 MPa square root of mm respectively. In contrast to the other two laminates, the fracture toughness of the 0/+ or - 45 sub ns laminate increased sharply with increasing thickness but reached an upper plateau value of 40 ksi square root of in (1390 MPa square root of mm) at 30 plies. Fracture toughness was independent of crack size for both thin and thick laminates for all three laminate types except for the 0/90 sub 2s laminate which spilt extensively. The center cracked tension, three point bend and compact tension specimens gave comparable results.

  5. Design of laminated composite plates for maximum shear buckling loads

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, R.R.; Chu, K.H.; Kam, T.Y.

    1993-12-01

    The optimal lamination arrangements of laminated composite plates with maximum shear buckling loads are studied via a multi-start global optimization technique. A previously proposed shear deformable finite element is used to evaluate the positive and negative shear buckling loads of laminated composite plates in the optimal design process. Optimal lay-ups of thin as well as moderately thick composite plates with global maximum positive or negative shear buckling loads are determined utilizing the multi-start global optimal design technique. A number of examples of the optimal shear buckling design of symmetrically and antisymmetrically laminated composite plates with various material properties, length-to-thickness ratios, aspect ratios and different numbers of layer groups are given to illustrate the trends of optimal layer orientations of the plates. Since the existence of in-plane axial force is possible, the effects of axial compressive load on the optimal layer orientations for maximum shear buckling load are also investigated.

  6. Laminated metals composites fracture and ballistic impact behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Lesuer, D.R.; Syn, C.K.; Sherby, O.D.; Wadsworth, J.

    1998-01-20

    Recent advances in the fracture and ballistic impact response of laminated metal composites (LMCs) are reviewed. The laminate structure can provide significant improvements to these properties relative to the component materials. Typical fracture and ballistic impact properties in LMCs are illustrated for systems containing Al alloys and Al matrix composites. The unique mechanisms operating in a layered structure that contribute to fracture or ballistic impact resistance are discussed. The influence of laminate architecture, component material properties and interface strength on mechanisms and properties are briefly reviewed for these Al-based LMCs.

  7. Support Assembly for Composite Laminate Materials During Roll Press Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Catella, Luke A.

    2011-01-01

    A composite laminate material is supported during the roll press processing thereof by an assembly having: first and second perforated films disposed adjacent to first and second opposing surfaces of a mixture of uncured resin and fibers defining the composite laminate material, a gas permeable encasement surrounding the mixture and the first and second films, a gas impervious envelope sealed about the gas permeable encasement, and first and second rigid plates clamped about the gas impervious envelope.

  8. Stress analysis in laminated composites with fastener holes

    SciTech Connect

    Iarve, E.V.

    1995-12-31

    Spline approximation approach has been extended for three-dimensional stress analysis in composite laminates with elastic fastener holes. Contact problem describing the interaction between laminated composite and an elastic bolt has been solved by using variational approach and Lagrangian multiplier method. Rigorous criterion for definition of the contact zone size is derived from variational principle. Representative problems such as: bearing loading with zero and 4% clearance rigid bolt and filled hole tension problems were solved for homogeneous plates.

  9. Progressive Fracture of Laminated Composite Stiffened Plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gotsis, Pascalis K.; Chamis, Christos C.; David, Kostantinos; Abdi, Frank

    2007-01-01

    Laminated fiber-reinforced composite stiffened plate with [0/90/plus or minus 45]s plies made of S-Glass/epoxy are evaluated via computational simulation to study damage and fracture progression. The loads are pressure and temperature which varies from 21 to 65.5 C (case I) and from 143.3 to 21 C (case II). An integrated computer code is used for the simulation of the damage progression. Results show that damage initiation begins at low load level, with matrix cracking at the 0 deg. (bottom and top) plies, fiber fracture at the bottom (0 deg.) ply and interply delamination at the top (0 deg. ) ply. Increasing the applied pressure, the damage growth is expended resulting in fracture through the thickness of the structure. At this stage, 90 percent of the plies damage at applied pressure 15.306 MPa for the case I and 15.036 MPa for the case II. After this stage the cracks propagate rapidly and the structure collapses.

  10. Residual stresses and their effects in composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahn, H. T.; Hwang, D. G.

    1983-01-01

    Residual stresses in composite laminates are caused by the anisotropy in expansional properties of constituent unidirectional plies. The effect of these residual stresses on dimensional stability is studied through the warping of unsymmetric (0 sub 4/90 sub 4)sub T graphite/epoxy laminates while their effect on ply failure is analyzed for (0/90)sub 2s Kevlar 49/epoxy laminate. The classical laminated plate theory is used to predict the warping of small and large panels. The change of warping does not indicate a noticeable stress relaxation at 75 C while it is very sensitive to moisture content and hence to environment. A prolonged gellation at the initial cure temperature reduces residual stresses while postcure does not. The matrix/interface cracking in dry (0/90)sub 2s Kevlar 49/epoxy laminate is shown to be the result of the residual stress exceeding the transverse strength.

  11. The strength of laminated composite materials under repeated impact loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rotem, Assa

    1988-01-01

    When low velocity and energy impact is exerted on a laminated composite material, in a perpendicular direction to the plane of the laminate, invisible damage may develop. It is shown analytically and experimentally that the invisible damage occurs during the first stage of contact between the impactor and the laminate and is a result of the contact stresses. However, the residual flexural strength changes only slightly, because it depends mainly on the outer layers, and these remain undamaged. Repeated impact intensifies the damage inside the laminate and causes larger bending under equivalent impact load. Finally, when the damage is most severe, even though it is still invisible, the laminate fails because of bending on the tension side. If the repeated impact is halted before final fracture occurs the residual strength and modulus would decrease by a certain amount.

  12. Matrix cracking in laminated composites under monotonic and cyclic loadings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, David H.; Lee, Jong-Won

    1991-01-01

    An analytical model based on the internal state variable (ISV) concept and the strain energy method is proposed for characterizing the monotonic and cyclic response of laminated composites containing matrix cracks. A modified constitution is formulated for angle-ply laminates under general in-plane mechanical loading and constant temperature change. A monotonic matrix cracking criterion is developed for predicting the crack density in cross-ply laminates as a function of the applied laminate axial stress. An initial formulation for a cyclic matrix cracking criterion for cross-ply laminates is also discussed. For the monotonic loading case, a number of experimental data and well-known models are compared with the present study for validating the practical applicability of the ISV approach.

  13. Progressive Failure Analysis Methodology for Laminated Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sleight, David W.

    1999-01-01

    A progressive failure analysis method has been developed for predicting the failure of laminated composite structures under geometrically nonlinear deformations. The progressive failure analysis uses C(exp 1) shell elements based on classical lamination theory to calculate the in-plane stresses. Several failure criteria, including the maximum strain criterion, Hashin's criterion, and Christensen's criterion, are used to predict the failure mechanisms and several options are available to degrade the material properties after failures. The progressive failure analysis method is implemented in the COMET finite element analysis code and can predict the damage and response of laminated composite structures from initial loading to final failure. The different failure criteria and material degradation methods are compared and assessed by performing analyses of several laminated composite structures. Results from the progressive failure method indicate good correlation with the existing test data except in structural applications where interlaminar stresses are important which may cause failure mechanisms such as debonding or delaminations.

  14. Computational Modeling of Micro-Crack Induced Attenuation in CFRP Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, R. A.; Leckey, C. A. C.

    2012-01-01

    A computational study is performed to determine the contribution to ultrasound attenuation in carbon fiber reinforced polymer composite laminates of linear elastic scattering by matrix micro-cracking. Multiple scattering approximations are benchmarked against exact computational approaches. Results support linear scattering as the source of observed increased attenuation in the presence of micro-cracking.

  15. Computational modeling of micro-crack induced attenuation in CFRP composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, R. A.; Leckey, C. A. C.

    2013-01-01

    A computational study is performed to determine the contribution to ultrasound attenuation in carbon fiber reinforced polymer composite laminates of linear elastic scattering by matrix micro-cracking. Multiple scattering approximations are benchmarked against exact computational approaches. Results support linear scattering as the source of observed increased attenuation in the presence of micro-cracking.

  16. Axisymmetric vibrations of laminated composite conical shells with varying thickness

    SciTech Connect

    Shikanai, G.; Suzuki, K.; Kojima, M.

    1995-11-01

    An exact solution procedure is presented for solving axisymmetric free vibrations of laminated composite conical shells with varying thickness. Based on the classical lamination theory neglecting shear deformation and rotary inertia, equations of motion and boundary conditions are obtained from the stationary conditions of the Lagrangian. The equations of motion are solved exactly by using a power series expansion for symmetrically laminated, cross-ply conical shells. Numerical studies are made for conical shells having both ends clamped to show the effects of the number of laminae, stacking sequences and other parameters upon the frequencies.

  17. Vibration analysis of rotating thin laminated composite shell of revolution

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, K.; Shikanai, G.; Takayama, K.

    1995-11-01

    An exact solution procedure is presented for solving free vibrations of a rotating thin laminated composite shell of revolution having meridionally constant curvature. Based on the classical lamination theory, equations of motion and boundary conditions are obtained from the stationally conditions of the Lagrangian. The equations of motion are solved exactly by using a power series expansion for symmetrically laminated, cross-ply shells. Frequencies and mode shapes of the shells having both ends clamped and both ends freely supported are presented showing their variations with rotating angular velocity, number of laminae and other parameters.

  18. Nonlinear analysis of laminated fibrous composites. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Renieri, G. D.; Herakovich, C. T.

    1976-01-01

    A computerized analysis of the nonlinear behavior of fibrous composite laminates including axial loading, thermal loading, temperature dependent properties, and edge effects is presented. Ramberg-Osgood approximations are used to represent lamina stress-strain behavior and percent retention curves are employed to model the variation of properties with temperature. Balanced, symmetric laminates comprised of either boron/epoxy, graphite/epoxy, or borsic-aluminum are analyzed using a quasi-three-dimensional finite element analysis. Results are presented for the interlaminar stress distributions in cross-ply, angle-ply, and more complex laminates. Nonlinear stress-strain curves for a variety of composite laminates in tension and compression are obtained and compared to other existing theories and experimental results.

  19. Fatigue of notched fiber composite laminates. Part 1: Analytical model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclaughlin, P. V., Jr.; Kulkarni, S. V.; Huang, S. N.; Rosen, B. W.

    1975-01-01

    A description is given of a semi-empirical, deterministic analysis for prediction and correlation of fatigue crack growth, residual strength, and fatigue lifetime for fiber composite laminates containing notches (holes). The failure model used for the analysis is based upon composite heterogeneous behavior and experimentally observed failure modes under both static and fatigue loading. The analysis is consistent with the wearout philosophy. Axial cracking and transverse cracking failure modes are treated together in the analysis. Cracking off-axis is handled by making a modification to the axial cracking analysis. The analysis predicts notched laminate failure from unidirectional material fatique properties using constant strain laminate analysis techniques. For multidirectional laminates, it is necessary to know lamina fatique behavior under axial normal stress, transverse normal stress and axial shear stress. Examples of the analysis method are given.

  20. Design and Ballistic Performance of Hybrid Composite Laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ćwik, Tomasz K.; Iannucci, Lorenzo; Curtis, Paul; Pope, Dan

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents an initial design assessment of a series of novel, cost-effective, and hybrid composite materials for applications involving high velocity impacts. The proposed hybrid panels were designed in order to investigate various physical phenomenon occurring during high velocity impact on compliant laminates from a previous study on Dyneema® and Spectra®. In the first, screening phase of the study twenty different hybrid composite laminates were impacted with 20 mm Fragment Simulating Projectiles at 1 km/s striking velocity. The best performing concepts were put forward to phase II with other hybrid concepts involving shear thickening fluids, commonly used in low velocity impacts. The results indicated that it is possible to design hybrid laminates of similar ballistic performance as the reference Dyneema® laminate, but with lower material costs. The optimal hybrid concept involves a fibre reinforced Polypropylene front and a Dyneema® backing.

  1. Fracture behavior of hybrid composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    The tensile fracture behavior of 15 center-notched hybrid laminates was studied. Three basic laminate groups were tested: (1) a baseline group with graphite/epoxy plies, (2) a group with the same stacking sequence but where the zero-deg plies were one or two plies of S-glass or Kevlar, and (3) a group with graphite plies but where the zero-deg plies were sandwiched between layers of perforated Mylar. Specimens were loaded linearly with time; load, far field strain, and crack opening displacement (COD) were monitored. The loading was stopped periodically and the notched region was radiographed to reveal the extent and type of damage (failure progression). Results of the tests showed that the hybrid laminates had higher fracture toughnesses than comparable all-graphite laminates. The higher fracture toughness was due primarily to the larger damage region at the ends of the slit; delamination and splitting lowered the stress concentration in the primary load-carrying plies. A linear elastic fracture analysis, which ignored delamination and splitting, underestimated the fracture toughness. For almost all of the laminates, the tests showed that the fracture toughness increased with crack length. The size of the damage region at the ends of the slit and COD measurements also increased with crack length.

  2. Damage Tolerance of Composite Laminates from an Empirical Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, Alan T.

    2009-01-01

    Damage tolerance consists of analysis and experimentation working together. Impact damage is usually of most concern for laminated composites. Once impacted, the residual compression strength is usually of most interest. Other properties may be of more interest than compression (application dependent). A damage tolerance program is application specific (not everyone is building aircraft). The "Building Block Approach" is suggested for damage tolerance. Advantage can be taken of the excellent fatigue resistance of damaged laminates to save time and costs.

  3. Nonlinear effects on composite laminate thermal expansion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hashin, Z.; Rosen, B. W.; Pipes, R. B.

    1979-01-01

    Analyses of Graphite/Polyimide laminates shown that the thermomechanical strains cannot be separated into mechanical strain and free thermal expansion strain. Elastic properties and thermal expansion coefficients of unidirectional Graphite/Polyimide specimens were measured as a function of temperature to provide inputs for the analysis. The + or - 45 degrees symmetric Graphite/Polyimide laminates were tested to obtain free thermal expansion coefficients and thermal expansion coefficients under various uniaxial loads. The experimental results demonstrated the effects predicted by the analysis, namely dependence of thermal expansion coefficients on load, and anisotropy of thermal expansion under load. The significance of time dependence on thermal expansion was demonstrated by comparison of measured laminate free expansion coefficients with and without 15 day delay at intermediate temperature.

  4. Electron radiation effects on Mode II interlaminar fracture toughness of GFRP and CFRP composites

    SciTech Connect

    Takeda, N.; Tohdoh, M.; Takahashi, K.

    1989-01-01

    The degradation properties of epoxy-based fiber-reinforced-plastics (FRP) composites irradiated by high-energy electrons were studied using the Mode II interlaminar fracture toughness G/sub IIc/, measured by end-notched flexure tests. The radiation-induced degradation mechanisms were investigated through G/sub IIc/ and the scanning electron micrographs of fracture surfaces. For GFRP, the significant decrease in G/sub IIc/ was found. Debonding of glass fibers and epoxy matrix (or degradation of silane coupling agents) plays an important role in degradation in addition to resin degradation. Thus, the improvement of the radiation resistance of fiber-resin interfaces as well as matrix itself is of supreme importance in order to increase the radiation resistance of GFRP. For CFRP, on the other hand, no degradation in fiber-resin interfaces was found and the slight decrease in G/sub IIc/ seems to be due to the resin degradation. 18 references, 6 figures.

  5. Interlaminate Deformation in Thermoplastic Composite Laminates: Experimental-Numerical Correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, M.; Tong, J.; Wang, S.; Fang, Y.

    2010-06-01

    The interlaminar deformation behaviors of thermoplastic AS4/PEEK composite laminates subjected to static tensile loading are investigated by means of microscopic moiré interferometry with high spatial resolution. The fully threedimensional orthotropic elastic-plastic analysis of interlaminar deformation for the thermoplastic laminates is developed in this paper, and used to simulate the stress-strain curves of tensile experiment for its angle-ply laminates. Under uniaxial tensile loading, the 3D orthotropic elastic-plastic FE analysis and microscopic moiré interferometry of interlaminar deformations are carried out for the [±25]S4 laminates. The quantitative local-filed experimental results of interlaminar shear strain and displacements at freeedge surface of the laminate are compared with corresponding numerical results of the orthotropic elastic-plastic FE model. It is indicated that the numerical tensile stressstrain curves of angle-ply laminates computed with 3D orthotropic elastic-plastic model are agree with experimental results. The numerical interlaminar displacement U and shear strain γxz are also consistent with the experimental results obtained by moiré interferometry. It is expected the elastic-plastic interlaminar stresses and deformations analysis for the optimal design and application of AS4/PEEK laminates and its structures.

  6. Structural Diagnostics of CFRP Composite Aircraft Components by Ultrasonic Guided Waves and Built-In Piezoelectric Transducers

    SciTech Connect

    Matt, Howard M.

    2006-01-01

    To monitor in-flight damage and reduce life-cycle costs associated with CFRP composite aircraft, an autonomous built-in structural health monitoring (SHM) system is preferred over conventional maintenance routines and schedules. This thesis investigates the use of ultrasonic guided waves and piezoelectric transducers for the identification and localization of damage/defects occurring within critical components of CFRP composite aircraft wings, mainly the wing skin-to-spar joints. The guided wave approach for structural diagnostics was demonstrated by the dual application of active and passive monitoring techniques. For active interrogation, the guided wave propagation problem was initially studied numerically by a semi-analytical finite element method, which accounts for viscoelastic damping, in order to identify ideal mode-frequency combinations sensitive to damage occurring within CFRP bonded joints. Active guided wave tests across three representative wing skin-to-spar joints at ambient temperature were then conducted using attached Macro Fiber Composite (MFC) transducers. Results from these experiments demonstrate the importance of intelligent feature extraction for improving the sensitivity to damage. To address the widely neglected effects of temperature on guided wave base damage identification, analytical and experimental analyses were performed to characterize the influence of temperature on guided wave signal features. In addition, statistically-robust detection of simulated damage in a CFRP bonded joint was successfully achieved under changing temperature conditions through a dimensionally-low, multivariate statistical outlier analysis. The response of piezoceramic patches and MFC transducers to ultrasonic Rayleigh and Lamb wave fields was analytically derived and experimentally validated. This theory is useful for designing sensors which possess optimal sensitivity toward a given mode-frequency combination or for predicting the frequency dependent

  7. A higher order theory of laminated composite cylindrical shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishna Murthy, A. V.; Reddy, T. S. R.

    1986-01-01

    A new higher order theory has been proposed for the analysis of composite cylindrical shells. The formulation allows for arbitrary variation of inplane displacements. Governing equations are presented in the form of a hierarchy of sets of partial differential equations. Each set describes the shell behavior to a certain degree of approximation. The natural frequencies of simply-supported isotropic and laminated shells and stresses in a ring loaded composite shell have been determined to various orders of approximation and compared with three dimensional solutions. These numerical studies indicate the improvements achievable in estimating the natural frequencies and the interlaminar shear stresses in laminated composite cylinders.

  8. Three dimensional inelastic finite element analysis of laminated composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, O. H., Jr.; Kamat, M. P.

    1980-01-01

    Formulations of the inelastic response of laminated composites to thermal and mechanical loading are used as the basis for development of the computer NALCOM (Nonlinear Analysis of Laminated Composites) computer program which uses a fully three dimensional isoparametric finite element with 24 nodes and 72 degrees of freedom. An incremental solution is performed with nonlinearities introduced as pseudoloads computed for initial strains. Equilibrium iteration may be performed at every step. Elastic and elastic-plastic response of boron/epoxy and graphite/epoxy graphite/epoxy and problems of curing 0/90 sub s Gr/Ep laminates with and without circular holes are analyzed. Mechanical loading of + or - 45sub s Gr/Ep laminates is modeled and symmetry conditions which exist in angle-ply laminates are discussed. Results are compared to experiments and other analytical models when possible. All models are seen to agree reasonably well with experimetnal results for off-axis tensile coupons. The laminate analyses show the three dimensional effects which are present near holes and free corners.

  9. Contact analysis for riveted and bolted joints of composite laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Tian-Qi; Li, Wei; Shen, Guanqing

    The computational strategy and numerical technique developed are demonstrated to be efficient for the analysis of riveted and bolted joints of composite laminates. The 3D contact analysis provides more accurate results for the evaluation of strength of the mechanically fastened joints in the composite structures. The method described can be extended to multibody contact problems, it has been implemented in the computer codes.

  10. Hybrid Titanium Composite Laminates: A New Aerospace Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. S.; Cobb, Ted Q.; Lowther, Sharon; St.Clair, T. L.

    1998-01-01

    In the realm of aerospace design and performance, there are few boundaries in the never-ending drive for increased performance. This thirst for ever-increased performance of aerospace equipment has driven the aerospace and defense industries into developing exotic, extremely high-performance composites that are pushing the envelope in terms of strength-to-weight ratios, durability, and several other key measurements. To meet this challenge of ever-increasing improvement, engineers and scientists at NASA-Langley Research Center (NASA-LaRC) have developed a high-temperature metal laminate based upon titanium, carbon fibers, and a thermoplastic resin. This composite, known as the Hybrid Titanium Composite Laminate, or HTCL, is the latest chapter in a significant, but relatively short, history of metal laminates.

  11. Mechanisms of compressive failure in woven composites and stitched laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, B. N.; Dadkhah, M. S.; Inman, R. V.; Morris, W. L.; Schroeder, S.

    1992-01-01

    Stitched laminates and angle interlock woven composites have been studied in uniaxial, in-plane, monotonic compression. Failure mechanisms have been found to depend strongly on both the reinforcement architecture and the degree of constraint imposed by the loading grips. Stitched laminates show higher compressive strength, but are brittle, possessing no load bearing capacity beyond the strain for peak load. Post-mortem inspection shows a localized shear band of buckled and broken fibers, which is evidently the product of an unstably propagating kink band. Similar shear bands are found in the woven composites if the constraint of lateral displacements is weak; but, under strong constraint, damage is not localized but distributed throughout the gauge section. While the woven composites tested are weaker than the stitched laminates, they continue to bear significant loads to compressive strains of approx. 15 percent, even when most damage is confined to a shear band.

  12. Investigating Delamination Migration in Composite Tape Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratcliffe, James G.; DeCarvalho, Nelson V.

    2014-01-01

    A modification to a recently developed test specimen designed to investigate migration of a delamination between neighboring ply interfaces in tape laminates is presented. The specimen is a cross-ply laminated beam consisting of 40 plies with a polytetrafluoroethylene insert spanning part way along its length. The insert is located between a lower 0-degree ply (specimen length direction) and a stack of four 90-degree plies (specimen width direction). The modification involved a stacking sequence that promotes stable delamination growth prior to migration, and included a relocation of the insert from the specimen midplane to the interface between plies 14 and 15. Specimens were clamped at both ends onto a rigid baseplate and loaded on their upper surface via a piano hinge assembly, resulting in a predominantly flexural loading condition. Tests were conducted with the load-application point positioned at various locations along a specimen's span. This position affected the sequence of damage events during a test.

  13. Laminated structures and methods and compositions for producing same

    DOEpatents

    Fumei, Giancarlo J.; Karabedian, James A.

    1977-04-05

    Methods for bonding two substrates, one of which is polymeric, which comprise coating the surface of at least one substrate with an adhesive composition comprising a major component which is an adhesive for the first substrate and a minor disperse phase which is a solution of a polymer in a solvent for the polymeric substrate and contacting the coated surface of the one substrate with the surface of the other substrate, together with adhesive compositions useful for joining such substrates, laminates so formed, and articles comprised of such laminates.

  14. Ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation of graphite epoxy composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, James G.

    1990-01-01

    Quantitative ultrasonic techniques are summarized with applications to the measurement of frequency-dependent attenuation and backscatter and to the NDE of composite laminates. Results are listed for the ultrasonic NDE of graphite-epoxy composite laminates including impact and fatigue damage as well as porosity. The methods reviewed include transmission measurements of attenuation, reconstructive tomography based on attenuation, estimating attenuation from backscattered ultrasound, and backscatter approaches. Phase-sensitive and -insensitive detection techniques are mentioned such as phase cancellation at piezoelectric receiving transducers and acoustoelectric effects. The techniques permit the NDE of the parameters listed in inhomogeneous media and provide both images from the transmission mode and in the reflection mode.

  15. Test Methods for Measuring Material Properties of Composite Materials in all Three Material Axes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-24

    materials. Hara et al. [4] studied the out-of-plane tensile strength of CFRP laminates using the direct tensile method with specimens of various size...Composite Structures (35) (1996): 5-20. 3. Nielsen, A., Ibsen, J., & Thomsen, O. “Through-Thickness Tensile and Compressive Properties of Stitched CFRP ...Strength of Aligned CFRP Determined by Direct Tensile Method”. Composites Part A: Applied Science and Manufacturing (41) (10) (2010): 1425-1433. 6

  16. Bending Boundary Layers in Laminated-Composite Circular Cylindrical Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Michael P.; Smeltzer, Stanley S., III

    2000-01-01

    An analytical, parametric study of the attenuation of bending boundary layers or edge effects in balanced and unbalanced, symmetrically and unsymmetrically laminated thin cylindrical shells is presented for nine contemporary material systems. The analysis is based on the linear Sanders-Koiter shell equations and specializations to the Love-Kirchhoff shell equations and Donnell's equations are included. Two nondimensional parameters are identified that characterize and quantify the effects of laminate orthotropy and laminate anisotropy on the bending boundary-layer decay length in a very general and encompassing manner. A substantial number of structural design technology results are presented for a wide range of laminated-composite cylinders. For all the laminate constructions considered, the results show that the differences between results that were obtained with the Sanders-Koiter shell equations, the Love-Kirchhoff shell equations, and Donnell's equations are negligible. The results also show that the effect of anisotropy in the form of coupling between pure bending and twisting has a negligible effect on the size of the bending boundary-layer decay length of the balanced, symmetrically laminated cylinders considered. Moreover, the results show that coupling between the various types of shell anisotropies has a negligible effect on the calculation of the bending boundary-layer decay length in most cases. The results also show that in some cases neglecting the shell anisotropy results in underestimating the bending boundary-layer decay length and in other cases it results in an overestimation.

  17. Compression and compression fatigue testing of composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, T. R.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of moisture and temperature on the fatigue and fracture response of composite laminates under compression loads were investigated. The structural laminates studied were an intermediate stiffness graphite-epoxy composite (a typical angle ply laimna liminate had a typical fan blade laminate). Full and half penetration slits and impact delaminations were the defects examined. Results are presented which show the effects of moisture on the fracture and fatigue strength at room temperature, 394 K (250 F), and 422 K (300 F). Static tests results show the effects of defect size and type on the compression-fracture strength under moisture and thermal environments. The cyclic tests results compare the fatigue lives and residual compression strength under compression only and under tension-compression fatigue loading.

  18. Micromechanical modeling of laminated composites with interfaces and woven composites using the boundary element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Robert K.; Hopkins, Dale A.

    1993-01-01

    The boundary element method is utilized to analyze the effects of fiber/matrix interfaces on the micromechanical behavior of laminated composites as well as the elastic behavior of woven composites. Effective composite properties are computed for laminated SiC/RBSN and SiC/Ti-15-3 composites, as well as a woven SiC/SiC composite. The properties calculated using the computerized tool BEST-CMS match the experimental results well.

  19. Self-sensing and self-actuating CFRP structure using partially flexible composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumagai, Keisuke; Todoroki, A.; Matsuzaki, Ryosuke

    2008-03-01

    For Unmanned aerial vehicles, a morphing wing is desired to improve the maneuverability and reduce the total weight of structures. Our research group has developed a foldable composite structure for a morphing wing skin plate by using Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastics (CFRP). The material system is called Partially Flexible Composites (PFC). In the present paper, PFC is introduced and a self-sensing system of the PFC is investigated. Since carbon fibers have electrical conductivity, damages of the PFC can be detected by monitoring electrical resistance changes of the PFC. This method is called Electrical Resistance Changes Method. An electrical resistance model of the PFC is built and a relationship of ratio of fiber fractures and electrical resistance changes is obtained. Then, to investigate the performance of the PFC, cyclic-bending tests are conducted. Damages of the PFC caused by cyclic-bending are detected by using ERCM. As a result, the PFC with more than 10mm-long flexible part has almost no damage; the stiffness of the structure remains unchanged. After that, a McKibben pneumatic artificial muscles actuator is made and it is founded that this can be applied to the PFC as an actuator. This actuator consists of a silicon rubber and a carbon fiber that are the same as the material of flexible part of the PFC. This enables us to make actuator-integrated composite structures. In the present study, the applicability of the McKibben pneumatic artificial muscles actuator is investigated.

  20. Current Distribution Characteristics of CFRP Panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Kazuo

    CFRP (Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastic) is widely used in the structures of aircrafts, automobiles, wing turbines, and rockets because of its qualities of high mechanical strength, low weight, fatigue resistance, and dimensional stability. However, these structures are often at risk of being struck by lightning. When lightning strikes such structures and lightning current flows through the CFRP, it may be structurally damaged because of the impact of the lightning strike or ignitions between layers. If there are electronic systems near the CFRP, they may break down or malfunction because of the resulting electromagnetic disturbance. In fact, the generation mechanisms of these breakdowns and malfunctions depend on the current distribution in the CFRP. Hence, it is critical to clarify the current distribution in various kinds of CFRPs. In this study, two kinds of CFRP panels—one composed of quasi-isotropic lamination layers and the other composed of 0°/90° lamination layers of unidirectional CFRP prepregs—are used to investigate the dependence of current distribution on the nature of the lamination layers. The current distribution measurements and simulations for CFRP panels are compared with those for a same-sized aluminum plate. The knowledge of these current distribution characteristics would be very useful for designing the CFRP structures of aircrafts, automobiles, wing turbines, rockets, etc. in the future.

  1. Fatigue Damage in CFRP Woven Fabric Composites through Dynamic Modulus Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Chiaki Miyasaka; K. L. Telschow

    2004-07-01

    Advanced fiber reinforced composite materials offer substantial advantages over metallic materials for the structural applications subjected to fatigue loading. With the increasing use of these composites, it is required to understand their mechanical response to cyclic loading (1)-(4). Our major concern in this work is to macroscopically evaluate the damage development in composites during fatigue loading. For this purpose, we examine what effect the fatigue damage may have on the material properties and how they can be related mathematically to each other. In general, as the damage initiates in composite materials and grows during cyclic loading, material properties such as modulus, residual strength and strain would vary and, in many cases, they may be significantly reduced because of the progressive accumulation of cracks. Therefore, the damage can be characterized by the change in material properties, which is expected to be available for non-destructive evaluation of the fatigue damage development in composites. Here, the tension-tension fatigue tests are firstly conducted on the plain woven fabric carbon fiber composites for different loading levels. In the fatigue tests, the dynamic elastic moduli are measured on real-time, which will decrease with an increasing number of cycles due to the degradation of stiffness. Then, the damage function presenting the damage development during fatigue loading is determined from the dynamic elastic moduli thus obtained, from which the damage function is formulated in terms of a number of cycles and an applied loading level. Finally, the damage function is shown to be applied for predicting the remaining lifetime of the CFRP composites subjected to two-stress level fatigue loading.

  2. Laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepedat, Karin; Wagner, Robert; Lang, Jürgen

    The use of phenolic resin for the impregnation of a carrier material such as paper or fabric based on either organic or inorganic fibers was and still is one of the most important application areas for liquid phenolic resins. Substrates like paper, cotton, or glass fabric impregnated with phenolic resins are used as core layers for decorative and technical laminates and for many other different industrial applications. Nowadays, phenolic resins for decorative laminates used for furniture, flooring, or in the construction and transportation industry have gained significant market share. The Laminates chapter mainly describes the manufacture of decorative laminates especially the impregnation and pressing process with special emphasis to new technological developments and recent trends. Moreover, the different types of laminates are introduced, combined with some brief comments as they relate to the market for decorative surfaces.

  3. Analysis of damage in composite laminates under bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuriakose, Sunil

    The focus of this research was damage formation in composite laminates subjected to bending. Matrix cracking and internal delamination are common damage modes before final failure for a composite laminate under thermo-mechanical loading. Two configurations of cross-ply laminates, namely [0m/90 n]s and [90m/0n]s, were considered for the study. Approximate analytical solutions for the stress states in the two laminates subjected to constant bending moment, with matrix cracks in the 90° layers, were derived using a variational approach. The evolution of matrix cracking under monotonically increasing load was studied for a number of composite materials. The analytical predictions showed an initial stage of rapid matrix crack multiplication followed by a slowing down in the crack multiplication. In the case of [0m/90n] s laminate, 0° ply failure in tension or compression was found to be likely even at the initial stages of matrix cracking for laminates with thin 90° layer. The 0° ply failure is delayed for laminates with thicker 90° layer. The analytical model for the stress state in the [90m/0 n]s laminate was extended to include delamination from the matrix crack-tip along the 0/90 interface. The bending moment required to initiate crack-tip delamination was computed as a function of the crack density. By comparing this result with matrix crack evolution, the relative dominance of the two modes of damage could be determined. The critical crack density beyond which delamination dominates matrix cracking is obtained from the analysis. The critical crack density is interpreted as the stage beyond which growth of delamination rather than matrix cracking is likely to occur. Parametric studies conducted by varying the laminate configuration showed that the critical crack density for delamination onset strongly depends on the thickness of the 90° layer and the distance of the 90° layer from the laminate mid-plane. Quasi-static growth of delamination under monotonic

  4. Effect of tubing material on conventional and thin FBG sensor for embedded environment impact monitoring of CFRP composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Yurim; Shrestha, Pratik; Kwon, Hyunseok; Kim, Jin-Hyuk; Kwon, Heejung; Kim, Chun-Gon

    2016-04-01

    Applications of composite materials in aerospace structures is increasing due to the outstanding properties, however, monitoring such composite structures exposed to harsh environments is still a posing issue. Low Earth orbit space structures are exposed to property degradation and damage from high-degree vacuum, ultraviolet radiation, thermal cycling, and atomic oxygen attack which are detrimental to composite materials. In this study, FBG sensors for embedding in CFRP composite plates in different thickness locations to provide health and damage monitoring of the material exposed to such environments regarding the overall health of the material with a focus on the exposed surface are explored in comparison to conventional FBG sensors.

  5. A physically-based continuum damage mechanics model for numerical prediction of damage growth in laminated composite plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Kevin Vaughan

    Rapid growth in use of composite materials in structural applications drives the need for a more detailed understanding of damage tolerant and damage resistant design. Current analytical techniques provide sufficient understanding and predictive capabilities for application in preliminary design, but current numerical models applicable to composites are few and far between and their development into well tested, rigorous material models is currently one of the most challenging fields in composite materials. The present work focuses on the development, implementation, and verification of a plane-stress continuum damage mechanics based model for composite materials. A physical treatment of damage growth based on the extensive body of experimental literature on the subject is combined with the mathematical rigour of a continuum damage mechanics description to form the foundation of the model. The model has been implemented in the LS-DYNA3D commercial finite element hydrocode and the results of the application of the model are shown to be physically meaningful and accurate. Furthermore it is demonstrated that the material characterization parameters can be extracted from the results of standard test methodologies for which a large body of published data already exists for many materials. Two case studies are undertaken to verify the model by comparison with measured experimental data. The first series of analyses demonstrate the ability of the model to predict the extent and growth of damage in T800/3900-2 carbon fibre reinforced polymer (CFRP) plates subjected to normal impacts over a range of impact energy levels. The predicted force-time and force-displacement response of the panels compare well with experimental measurements. The damage growth and stiffness reduction properties of the T800/3900-2 CFRP are derived using published data from a variety of sources without the need for parametric studies. To further demonstrate the physical nature of the model, a IM6

  6. Interface fracture and composite deformation of model laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Matthew R.

    Model laminates were studied to improve the understanding of composite mechanical behavior. NiAl/Mo and NiAl/Cr model laminates, with a series of interfaces, were bonded at 1100°C. Reaction layers were present in all laminates, varying in thickness with bonding conditions. Interface fracture strengths and resistances were determined under primarily mode II loading conditions using a novel technique, the asymmetrically-loaded shear (ALS) test, in which one layer of the laminate was loaded in compression, producing a stable interface crack. The NiAl/Mo interface was also fractured in four-point bending. A small amount of plasticity was found to play a role in crack initiation. During steady-state mode II interface fracture of NiAl/Mo model laminates, large-scale slip was observed near the crack tip in the NiAl adjacent to the interface. After testing, the local slope and curvature of the interface were characterized at intervals along the interface and at slip locations to qualitatively describe local stresses present at and just ahead of the crack tip. The greatest percentage of slip occurred where closing forces on the crack tip were below the maximum value and were decreasing with crack growth. A mechanism for crack propagation is presented describing the role of large-scale slip in crack propagation. The mechanical response of structural laminates in 3-D stress states, as would be present in a polycrystalline aggregate composed of lamellar grains, are lacking. In order to understand the response of laminates composed of hard and soft phases, Pb/Zn laminates were prepared and tested in compression with varying lamellar orientation relative to the loading axis. A model describing the mechanical response in a general state assuming elastic-perfectly plastic isotropic layers was developed. For the 90° laminate, a different approach was applied, using the friction hill concepts used in forging analyses. With increasing ratios of cross-sectional radius to layer

  7. Design, fabrication, and characterization of laminated hydroxyapatite-polysulfone composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Clifford Adams, II

    There exists a need to develop devices that can be used to replace hard tissues, such as bone, in load-bearing areas of the body. An ideal hard tissue replacement device is one that stimulates growth of natural tissues, and is slowly resorbed by the body. The implant is also required to have elastic modulus, strength, and toughness values similar to the tissues being replaced. Hydroxyapatite (HA) is the primary mineral phase of bone and has the potential for use in biomedical applications because it stimulates cell growth and is resorbable. Unfortunately, HA is a relatively low strength, low toughness material, which limits its application to only low load-bearing regions of the body. In order to apply HA to greater load-bearing areas of the body, strength and toughness must be improved through the formation of a composite structure. The goal of this study to show that a composite structure formed from HA and a biocompatible polymer can be fabricated with strength and toughness values that are within the range necessary for load-bearing biomedical applications. Therefore, Polysulfone-HA composites were developed and tested. Polysulfone (PSu) is a hard, glassy polymer that has been shown to be biocompatible. Composites were fabricated through a combination of tape casting, solvent casting, and lamination. Monolithic HA and laminate specimens were tested in biaxial flexure. A unique laminate theory solution was developed to characterize stress distributions for laminates. Failure loads, failure stress, work of fracture, and apparent toughness were compared for the laminates against monolithic HA specimens. Initial testing results showed that laminates had a failure stress of 60 +/- 10, which is a 170% improvement over the 22 +/- 2 MPa failure stress for monolithic HA. The work of fracture was improved by 5500% from 11 +/- 2 for the monolithic HA to 612 +/- 240 for the laminates. Work of fracture values gave the laminates an apparent fracture toughness of 7.2 MPa•m1

  8. Multiscale modeling of damage in multidirectional composite laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Chandra Veer

    The problem of damage accumulation in laminated composite materials has received much attention due to their widespread application in the aerospace, automotive, civil, and sports industries. In the aerospace industry, composites are used to make light weight and efficient structural components. In the Boeing 787, for example, more than 50% of the structure is made of composite materials. Although there have been significant developments in analyzing cross-ply laminates, none of the present approaches provides reasonable predictions for multidirectional laminates in which intralaminar cracks may form in multiple orientations. Nevertheless, the prediction of damage accumulation and its effect on structural performance is a very difficult problem due to complexity of the cracking processes. This study presents a synergistic damage mechanics (SDM) methodology to analyze damage behavior in multidirectional composite laminates with intralaminar cracks in plies of multiple orientations. SDM combines the strengths of micro-damage mechanics (MDM) and continuum damage mechanics (CDM) in predicting the stiffness degradation due to these cracks. The micromechanics is performed on a representative unit cell using a three-dimensional finite element analysis to calculate the crack opening displacement accounting for the influence of the surrounding plies, the so-called constraint effect. This information is then incorporated in the CDM formulation dealing with laminates containing cracks in different ply orientations through a 'constraint parameter'. Following CDM, a separate damage mode is defined for each type of crack and the expressions for engineering moduli of the damaged laminate are then derived in terms of crack density and the constraint parameter. The SDM methodology is implemented for [0 m/+/- thetan/0 m/2]s laminates containing cracks in +/-theta plies. It is then extended to [0m /+/- thetan/90 r]s and [0m/90 r/+/- thetan] s laminates with cracks additionally in the

  9. High resolution imaging of impacted CFRP composites with a fiber-optic laser-ultrasound scanner.

    PubMed

    Pelivanov, Ivan; Ambroziński, Łukasz; Khomenko, Anton; Koricho, Ermias G; Cloud, Gary L; Haq, Mahmoodul; O'Donnell, Matthew

    2016-06-01

    Damage induced in polymer composites by various impacts must be evaluated to predict a component's post-impact strength and residual lifetime, especially when impacts occur in structures related to human safety (in aircraft, for example). X-ray tomography is the conventional standard to study an internal structure with high resolution. However, it is of little use when the impacted area cannot be extracted from a structure. In addition, X-ray tomography is expensive and time-consuming. Recently, we have demonstrated that a kHz-rate laser-ultrasound (LU) scanner is very efficient both for locating large defects and evaluating the material structure. Here, we show that high-quality images of damage produced by the LU scanner in impacted carbon-fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites are similar to those produced by X-ray tomograms; but they can be obtained with only single-sided access to the object under study. Potentially, the LU method can be applied to large components in-situ.

  10. The fatigue behavior of composite laminates under various mean stresses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rotem, A.

    1991-01-01

    A method is developed for predicting the S-N curve of a composite laminate which is subjected to an arbitrary stress ratio, R (minimum stress/maximum stress). The method is based on the measuring of the S-N behavior of two distinct cases, tension-tension and compression-compression fatigue loadings. Using these parameters, expressions are formulated that estimate the fatigue behavior under any stress ratio loading. Experimental results from the testing of graphite/epoxy laminates, with various structures, are compared with the predictions and show good agreement.

  11. Tension fatigue analysis and life prediction for composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obrien, T. K.; Rigamonti, M.; Zanotti, C.

    1988-01-01

    A tension fatigue life prediction methodology for composite laminates is presented. Tension fatigue tests were conducted on quasi-isotropic and orthotropic glass epoxy, graphite epoxy, and glass/graphite epoxy hybrid laminates. Edge delamination onset data were used to generate plots of strain energy release rate as a function of cycles to delamination onset. These plots were then used along with strain energy release rate analyses of delaminations initiating at matrix cracks to predict local delamination onset. Stiffness loss was measured experimentally to account for the accumulation of matrix cracks and for delamination growth. Fatigue failure was predicted by comparing the increase in global strain resulting from stiffness loss to the decrease in laminate failure strain resulting from delaminations forming at matrix cracks through the laminate thickness. Good agreement between measured and predicted lives indicated that the through-thickness damage accumulation model can accurately describe fatigue failure for laminates where the delamination onset behavior in fatigue is well characterized, and stiffness loss can be monitored in real time to account for damage growth.

  12. Bending Boundary Layers in Laminated-Composite Circular Cylindrical Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Michael P.; Smeltzer, Stanley S., III

    2000-01-01

    A study of the attenuation of bending boundary layers in balanced and unbalanced, symmetrically and unsymmetrically laminated cylindrical shells is presented for nine contemporary material systems. The analysis is based on the linear Sanders-Koiter shell equations and specializations to the Love-Kirchhoff shell equations and Donnell's equations are included. Two nondimensional parameters are identified that characterize the effects of laminate orthotropy and anisotropy on the bending boundary-layer decay length in a very general manner. A substantial number of structural design technology results are presented for a wide range of laminated-composite cylinders. For all laminates considered, the results show that the differences between results obtained with the Sanders-Koiter shell equations, the Love-Kirchhoff shell equations, and Donnell's equations are negligible. The results also show that the effect of anisotropy in the form of coupling between pure bending and twisting has a negligible effect on the size of the bending boundary-layer decay length of the balanced, symmetrically laminated cylinders considered. Moreover, the results show that coupling between the various types of shell anisotropies has a negligible effect on the calculation of the bending boundary-layer decay length in most cases. The results also show that, in some cases, neglecting the shell anisotropy results in underestimating the bending boundary-layer decay length and, in other cases, results in an overestimation.

  13. Transient response of a laminated composite plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Datta, S. K.; Ju, T. H.; Bratton, R. L.; Shah, A. H.

    1992-01-01

    Results are presented from an investigation of the effect of layering on transient wave propagation in a laminated cross-ply plate, giving attention to the case of 2D plane strain in the case where a line vertical force is applied on a free surface of the plate; the line may be either parallel or perpendicular to the fibers in a ply. The results are in both the time and frequency domains for the normal stress component in the x direction, at a point on the surface of the plate on which the force is applied. Comparative results are also presented for a homogeneous plate whose properties are the static effective ones, when the number of plies is large.

  14. Laminated thermoplastic composite material from recycled high density polyethylene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Ping; Waskom, Tommy L.

    1994-01-01

    The design of a materials-science, educational experiment is presented. The student should understand the fundamentals of polymer processing and mechanical property testing of materials. The ability to use American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standards is also necessary for designing material test specimens and testing procedures. The objectives of the experiment are (1) to understand the concept of laminated composite materials, processing, testing, and quality assurance of thermoplastic composites and (2) to observe an application example of recycled plastics.

  15. A Design Tool for Robust Composite Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    related goal is to compare the blast response of Dyneema® laminates with that of a carbon fiber reinforced polymer ( CFRP ) composite. (iii) To identify...embedded Dyneema® composite layers, both below and above the ballistic limit. 16 6. Hybrid Dyneema®/Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer Matrix Composites...of Dyneema® fibers to carbon fiber reinforced polymer ( CFRP ) composites. The study focuses specifically on 3D orthogonal weaves with carbon employed

  16. Bolted joints in a laminated composite strut design expert system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, C. M. L.

    A knowledge-based expert system for the design and analysis of composite laminated struts with bolted joints is described. This system is part of a Composite Design Expert System aimed at performing analysis and design of composite laminated plates and struts and at assessing designs. The system uses a minimum weight optimization that satisfies the failure criteria of local and overall buckling, and a stress/strain failure criterion. Emphasis is placed on the formulation for the minimum weight optimization of struts with bolted joints. Attention is also given to a procedure for optimizing a strut to be fitted in a given length of a gap and the assessment of competing strut designs.

  17. Exact solutions for laminated composite cylindrical shells in cylindrical bending

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuan, F. G.

    1992-01-01

    Analytic elasticity solutions for laminated composite cylindrical shells under cylindrical bending are presented. The material of the shell is assumed to be general cylindrically anisotropic. Based on the theory of cylindrical anisotropic elasticity, coupled governing partial differential equations are developed. The general expressions for the stresses and displacements in the laminated composite cylinders are discussed. The closed form solutions based on Classical Shell Theory (CST) and Donnell's (1933) theory are also derived for comparison purposes. Three examples illustrate the effect of radius-to-thickness ratio, coupling and stacking sequence. The results show that, in general, CST yields poor stress and displacement distributions for thick-section composite shells, but converges to the exact elasticity solution as the radius-to-thickness ratio increases. It is also shown that Donnell's theory significantly underestimates the stress and displacement response.

  18. Contact law and impact responses of laminated composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, C. T.; Yang, S. H.

    1980-01-01

    Static identation tests were performed to determine the law of contact between a steel ball and glass/epoxy and graphite/epoxy laminated composites. For both composites the power law with an index of 1.5 was found to be adequate for the loading curve. Substantial permanent deformations were noted after the unloading. A high order beam finite element was used to compute the dynamic contact force and response of the laminated composite subjected to the impact of an elastic sphere. This program can be used with either the classical Hertzian contact law or the measured contact law. A simple method is introduced for estimating the contact force and contact duration in elastic impacts.

  19. Methods of making metallic glass foil laminate composites

    DOEpatents

    Vianco, P.T.; Fisher, R.W.; Hosking, F.M.; Zanner, F.J.

    1996-08-20

    A process for the fabrication of a rapidly solidified foil laminate composite. An amorphous metallic glass foil is flux treated and coated with solder. Before solidification of the solder the foil is collected on a take-up spool which forms the composite into a solid annular configuration. The resulting composite exhibits high strength, resiliency and favorable magnetic and electrical properties associated with amorphous materials. The composite also exhibits bonding strength between the foil layers which significantly exceeds the bulk strength of the solder alone. 6 figs.

  20. Methods of making metallic glass foil laminate composites

    DOEpatents

    Vianco, Paul T.; Fisher, Robert W.; Hosking, Floyd M.; Zanner, Frank J.

    1996-01-01

    A process for the fabrication of a rapidly solidified foil laminate composite. An amorphous metallic glass foil is flux treated and coated with solder. Before solidification of the solder the foil is collected on a take-up spool which forms the composite into a solid annular configuration. The resulting composite exhibits high strength, resiliency and favorable magnetic and electrical properties associated with amorphous materials. The composite also exhibits bonding strength between the foil layers which significantly exceeds the bulk strength of the solder alone.

  1. 3D Guided Wave Motion Analysis on Laminated Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tian, Zhenhua; Leckey, Cara; Yu, Lingyu

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasonic guided waves have proved useful for structural health monitoring (SHM) and nondestructive evaluation (NDE) due to their ability to propagate long distances with less energy loss compared to bulk waves and due to their sensitivity to small defects in the structure. Analysis of actively transmitted ultrasonic signals has long been used to detect and assess damage. However, there remain many challenging tasks for guided wave based SHM due to the complexity involved with propagating guided waves, especially in the case of composite materials. The multimodal nature of the ultrasonic guided waves complicates the related damage analysis. This paper presents results from parallel 3D elastodynamic finite integration technique (EFIT) simulations used to acquire 3D wave motion in the subject laminated carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites. The acquired 3D wave motion is then analyzed by frequency-wavenumber analysis to study the wave propagation and interaction in the composite laminate. The frequency-wavenumber analysis enables the study of individual modes and visualization of mode conversion. Delamination damage has been incorporated into the EFIT model to generate "damaged" data. The potential for damage detection in laminated composites is discussed in the end.

  2. The lightweight structure design of a CFRP mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Jiaoteng; Xu, Liang; Ma, Zhen; Xie, Yongjie; Luo, Yao; Wang, Yongjie; Pang, Zhihai

    2016-10-01

    The advantage of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) is obvious as a common space material for low density, low thermal expansion coefficient and high specific stiffness characteristics, it is the ideal material choice for space optical reflector. Mirror structure with honeycomb can achieve high rates of lightweight, as well as high specific stiffness. For Φ300mm CFRP mirror, accounting of the actual process properties of CFRP, mirror panels laminated based on thermal stability design, honeycomb fabricated using one innovative inlaying-grafting design method. Finally, lightweight structure design of the CFRP primary mirror completed, the thermal stability result of the Φ300mm CFRP mirror achieved is 10nm°C.

  3. On the mechanics of thin-walled laminated composite beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbero, Ever J.; Lopez-Anido, Roberto; Davalos, Julio F.

    1993-01-01

    A formal engineering approach of the mechanics of thin-walled laminated beams based on kinematic assumptions consistent with Timoshenko beam theory is presented. Thin-walled composite beams with open or closed cross section subjected to bending and axial load are considered. A variational formulation is employed to obtain a comprehensive description of the structural response. Beam stiffness coefficients, which account for the cross section geometry and for the material anisotropy, are obtained. An explicit expression for the static shear correction factor of thin-walled composite beams is derived from energy equivalence. A numerical example involving a laminated I-beam is used to used to demonstrate the capability of the model for predicting displacements and ply stresses.

  4. Delamination failure in a unidirectional curved composite laminate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Roderick H.

    1990-01-01

    Delamination failure in a unidirectional curved composite laminate was investigated. The curved laminate failed unstably by delaminations developing around the curved region of the laminate at different depths through the thickness until virtually all bending stiffness was lost. Delamination was assumed to initiate at the location of the highest radial stress in the curved region. A closed form curved beam elasticity solution and a 2-D finite element analysis (FEA) were conducted to determine this location. The variation in the strain energy release rate, G, with delamination growth was then determined using the FEA. A strength-based failure criteria adequately predicted the interlaminar tension failure which caused initial delamination onset. Using the G analysis the delamination was predicted to extend into the arm and leg of the laminate, predominantly in mode I. As the initial delamination grew arould the curved region, the maximum radial stress in the newly formed inner sublaminate increased to a level sufficient to cause a new delamination to initiate in the sublaminate with no increase in applied load. This failure progression was observed experimentally.

  5. Permeability of Impacted Coated Composite Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. S.; Findley, Benjamin

    2002-01-01

    Composite materials are being considered for use on future generations of Reusable Launch Vehicles (RLVs) for both fuel tanks and fuel feedlines. Through the use of composite materials NASA can reduce the overall weight of the vehicle dramatically. This weight savings can then be translated into an increase in the weight of payload sent into orbit, reducing the cost per pound of payload. It is estimated that by switching to composite materials for fuel tanks the weight of the tanks can be reduced by 40 percent, which translates to a total vehicle weight savings of 14 percent. In this research, carbon/epoxy composites were studied for fuel feedline applications. There are concerns about using composite materials for feedlines and fuel tanks because these materials are extremely vulnerable to impact in the form of inadvertent bumping or dropped tools both during installation and maintenance. Additionally, it has been found that some of the sample feedlines constructed have had leaks, and thus there may be a need to seal preexisting leaks in the composite prior to usage.

  6. A life prediction model for laminated composite structural components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, David H.

    1990-01-01

    A life prediction methodology for laminated continuous fiber composites subjected to fatigue loading conditions was developed. A summary is presented of research completed. A phenomenological damage evolution law was formulated for matrix cracking which is independent of stacking sequence. Mechanistic and physical support was developed for the phenomenological evolution law proposed above. The damage evolution law proposed above was implemented to a finite element computer program. And preliminary predictions were obtained for a structural component undergoing fatigue loading induced damage.

  7. Flexible matrix composite laminated disk/ring flywheel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, B. P.; Hannibal, A. J.

    1984-01-01

    An energy storage flywheel consisting of a quasi-isotropic composite disk overwrapped by a circumferentially wound ring made of carbon fiber and a elastometric matrix is proposed. Through analysis it was demonstrated that with an elastomeric matrix to relieve the radial stresses, a laminated disk/ring flywheel can be designed to store a least 80.3 Wh/kg or about 68% more than previous disk/ring designs. at the same time the simple construction is preserved.

  8. Nonlinear probabilistic finite element models of laminated composite shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engelstad, S. P.; Reddy, J. N.

    1993-01-01

    A probabilistic finite element analysis procedure for laminated composite shells has been developed. A total Lagrangian finite element formulation, employing a degenerated 3-D laminated composite shell with the full Green-Lagrange strains and first-order shear deformable kinematics, forms the modeling foundation. The first-order second-moment technique for probabilistic finite element analysis of random fields is employed and results are presented in the form of mean and variance of the structural response. The effects of material nonlinearity are included through the use of a rate-independent anisotropic plasticity formulation with the macroscopic point of view. Both ply-level and micromechanics-level random variables can be selected, the latter by means of the Aboudi micromechanics model. A number of sample problems are solved to verify the accuracy of the procedures developed and to quantify the variability of certain material type/structure combinations. Experimental data is compared in many cases, and the Monte Carlo simulation method is used to check the probabilistic results. In general, the procedure is quite effective in modeling the mean and variance response of the linear and nonlinear behavior of laminated composite shells.

  9. A single fracture toughness parameter for fibrous composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poe, C. C., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    A general fracture toughness parameter Qc was previously derived and verified to be a material constant, independent of layup, for centrally cracked boron aluminum composite specimens. The specimens were made with various proportions of 0 and + or - 45 degree plies. A limited amount of data indicated that the ratio Qc/epsilon tuf' where epsilon tuf is the ultimate tensile strain of the fibers, might be a constant for all composite laminates, regardless of material and layup. In that case, a single value of Qc/epsilon tuf could be used to predict the fracture toughness of all fibrous composite laminates from only the elastic constants and epsilon tuf. Values of Qc/epsilon tuf were calculated for centrally cracked specimens made from graphite/polyimide, graphite/epoxy, E glass/epoxy, boron/epoxy, and S glass graphite/epoxy materials with numerous layups. Within ordinary scatter, the data indicate that Qc/epsilon tuf is a constant for all laminates that did not split extensively at the crack tips or have other deviate failure modes.

  10. Resin infusion of layered metal/composite hybrid and resulting metal/composite hybrid laminate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cano, Roberto J. (Inventor); Grimsley, Brian W. (Inventor); Weiser, Erik S. (Inventor); Jensen, Brian J. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A method of fabricating a metal/composite hybrid laminate is provided. One or more layered arrangements are stacked on a solid base to form a layered structure. Each layered arrangement is defined by a fibrous material and a perforated metal sheet. A resin in its liquid state is introduced along a portion of the layered structure while a differential pressure is applied across the laminate structure until the resin permeates the fibrous material of each layered arrangement and fills perforations in each perforated metal sheet. The resin is cured thereby yielding a metal/composite hybrid laminate.

  11. Evaluation of micro-damage accumulation in holed plain-woven CFRP composite under fatigue loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying, Jia; Nishikawa, Masaaki; Hojo, Masaki

    2014-03-01

    Fluorescence method was used to detect the micro-damage caused by fatigue in a plain-woven carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP). Fluorescence measurement is a method which estimates micro-damage by measuring fluorescent intensity change inside materials. The principle is, larger micro-damage means larger plastic strain, thus more space in that damaged spot which allows more fluorescent dyes coming in the material. By detecting fluorescent intensity in CFRP layer by layer using confocal laser microscopy, micro-damage can be estimated. Results show that there's a good relationship between micro-damage and fluorescent intensity gradient.

  12. Finite Element Analysis of Laser-Induced Damage to Mechanically Loaded Laminated Composites in Helicopters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-06-07

    strength of laminated composite structure was composed by P.Y. Tang , for the Naval Ocean Systems Center, San Diego in 1989.2 The researcher deduced that...of ’P. Y. Tang , Development of a Progressive Failure Model for Strength of Laminated Composite Structure (San Diego: Naval Oceans System Center, 1989...macromechanics, composite material behavior is studied ssP, y. Tang , Development of a Progressive Failure Model for Strength. of Laminated Composite Structure

  13. Ballistic damage in hybrid composite laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phadnis, Vaibhav A.; Pandya, Kedar S.; Naik, Niranjan K.; Roy, Anish; Silberschmidt, Vadim V.

    2015-07-01

    Ballistic damage of hybrid woven-fabric composites made of plain-weave E-glass- fabric/epoxy and 8H satin-weave T300 carbon-fabric/epoxy is studied using a combination of experimental tests, microstructural studies and finite-element (FE) analysis. Ballistic tests were conducted with a single-stage gas gun. Fibre damage and delamination were observed to be dominating failure modes. A ply-level FE model was developed, with a fabric-reinforced ply modelled as a homogeneous orthotropic material with capacity to sustain progressive stiffness degradation due to fibre/matrix cracking, fibre breaking and plastic deformation under shear loading. Simulated damage patterns on the front and back faces of fabric-reinforced composite plates provided an insight into their damage mechanisms under ballistic loading.

  14. Thermoviscoelastic characterization and predictions of Kevlar/epoxy composite laminates

    SciTech Connect

    Gramoll, K.C.

    1988-01-01

    This study consisted of two main parts, the thermoviscoelastic characterization of Kevlar 49/Fiberite 7714A epoxy composite lamina and the development of a numerical procedure to predict the viscoelastic response of any general laminate constructed from the same material. The four orthotropic material properties, S{sub 11}, S{sub 12}, S{sub 22}, and S{sub 66}, were characterized by 20-minute static creep tests on unidirectional ((0){sub s}, (10){sub s}, and (90){sub 16}) lamina specimens. A new numerical procedure to predict long-term laminate properties from lamina properties (obtained experimentally) was developed. Numerical instabilities and time constraints associated with viscoelastic numerical techniques were discussed and solved. The numerical procedure was incorporated into a user-friendly microcomputer program called Viscoelastic Composite Analysis Program (VCAP), which is available for IBM PC type computers. The program was designed for ease of use and includes graphics, menus, help messages, etc. The final phase of the study involved testing actual laminates constructed from the characterized material, Kevlar/epoxy, at various temperature and load levels for 4 to 5 weeks.

  15. Analysis of shear test method for composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergner, H. W., Jr.; Davis, J. G., Jr.; Herakovich, C. T.

    1977-01-01

    An elastic plane stress finite element analysis of the stress distributions in four flat test specimens for in-plane shear response of composite materials subjected to mechanical or thermal loads is presented. The shear test specimens investigated include: slotted coupon, cross beam, losipescu, and rail shear. Results are presented in the form of normalized shear contour plots for all three in-plane stess components. It is shown that the cross beam, losipescu, and rail shear specimens have stress distributions which are more than adequate for determining linear shear behavior of composite materials. Laminate properties, core effects, and fixture configurations are among the factors which were found to influence the stress distributions.

  16. Pulse propagation in a laminated composite plate and nondestructive evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ju, T. H.; Datta, S. K.

    1992-01-01

    The surface response of a laminated composite plate with delamination cracks has been studied in this paper. The objective of this study is to analyze the surface response both in the time and frequency domains due to delamination cracks at different depths in a cross-ply composite plate. For reasons of simplicity, attention has been focused here on two-dimensional (plane-strain) motions. The source of excitation is taken to be a line vertical force acting perpendicular to the fibers in a lamina. Numerical results are presented, showing peak responses at certain resonance frequencies. A comparison of these results with those for a uniaxial graphite epoxy plate shows characteristic differences.

  17. Analysis of delamination growth in compressively loaded composite laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tratt, Matthew D.

    The present analytical and empirical study of composite structure delamination has attempted to predict the threshold stress for the initiation of delamination growth in compressively loaded composite laminates. The strain-energy release-rate distributions around circular delaminations are computed via MSC/NASTRAN analysis in conjunction with a virtual crack-opening technique. Static compression tests were conducted on specimens of graphite fiber-reinforced epoxy having circular delaminations of various sizes. Computed delamination growth threshold-stress prediction results were at substantial variance with the test data, but confirmed trends and gave qualitative insight into quasi-static delamination growth.

  18. Design of multiple-ply laminated composite tapered beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, P.

    1993-01-01

    A study of a special case of symmetric laminated composite cantilever beams is presented. The approach models beams that are tapered both in depth and width and investigates the effect of the ply layup angle and the ply taper on bending and interlaminar shearing stresses. For the determination of stresses and deflections, the beam stiffness matrices are expressed as linear functions of the beam length. Using classical lamination theory (CLT) the stiffness matrices are determined and assembled at strategic locations along the length of the beam. They are then inverted and necessary stiffness parameters are obtained numerically and extracted for determination of design information at each location chosen. Several ply layup configurations are investigated, and design considerations are presented based on the findings. Finally, recommendations for the design of these beams are presented, and a means for anticipating the location of highest stresses is offered.

  19. Iosipescu shear properties of graphite fabric/epoxy composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walrath, D. E.; Adams, D. F.

    1985-01-01

    The Iosipescu shear test method is used to measure the in-plane and interlaminar shear properties of four T300 graphite fabric/934 epoxy composite materials. Different weave geometries tested include an Oxford weave, a 5-harness satin weave, an 8-harness satin weave, and a plain weave with auxiliary warp yarns. Both orthogonal and quasi-isotropic layup laminates were tested. In-plane and interlaminar shear properties are obtained for laminates of all four fabric types. Overall, little difference in shear properties attributable to the fabric weave pattern is observed. The auxiliary warp material is significantly weaker and less stiff in interlaminar shear parallel to its fill direction. A conventional strain gage extensometer is modified to measure shear strains for use with the Iosipescu shear test. While preliminary results are encouraging, several design iterations failed to produce a reliable shear transducer prototype. Strain gages are still the most reliable shear strain transducers for use with this test method.

  20. Failure analysis of composite laminates including biaxial compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tennyson, R. C.; Elliott, W. G.

    1983-01-01

    This report describes a continued effort on the development and application of the tensor polynomial failure criterion for composite laminate analysis. In particular, emphasis is given to the design, construction and testing of a cross-beam laminate configuration to obtain "pure' biaxial compression failure. The purpose of this test case was to provide to permit "closure' of the cubic form of the failure surface in the 1-2 compression-compression quadrant. This resulted in a revised set of interaction strength parameters and the construction of a failure surface which can be used with confidence for strength predictions, assuming a plane stress state exists. Furthermore, the problem of complex conjugate roots which can occur in some failure regions is addressed and an "engineering' interpretation is provided. Results are presented illustrating this behavior and the methodology for overcoming this problem is discussed.

  1. On the enhancement of impact damage tolerance of composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, A. T.; Lance, D. G.

    1993-01-01

    This paper examines the use of a thin layer of Ultra High Molecular Weight Polyethylene (UHMWPE) on the outer surface of carbon/epoxy composite materials as a method of improving impact resistance and damage tolerance through hybridization. Flat 16-ply laminates as well as honeycomb sandwich structures with eight-ply facesheets were tested in this study. Instrumented drop-weight impact testing was used to inflict damage upon the specimens. Evaluation of damage resistance included instrumented impact data, visual examination, C-scanning and compression after impact (CAI) testing. The results show that only one lamina of UHMWPE did not improve the damage tolerance (strength retention) of the 16-ply flat laminate specimens or the honeycomb sandwich beams, however, a modest gain in impact resistance (detectable damage) was found for the honeycomb sandwich specimens that contained an outer layer of UHMWPE.

  2. Experimental determination of material constants of a hybrid composite laminate

    SciTech Connect

    Ihekweazu, S.N.; Lari, S.B.; Unanwa, C.O.

    1999-07-01

    This paper discusses the results of the experimental study that was conducted in order to determine the material properties of a hybrid composite laminate made from Fiberite material MXM-7714/120 (a fabric prepreg consisting of woven Kevlar{reg_sign} 49 reinforcement impregnated with Fiberite 250 F (121 C) curing 7714 epoxy resin) and HYE-2448AIE (a 250 F (121 C) curing epoxy resin impregnated unidirectional graphite tape). First, each of the materials that comprise the hybrid laminate was fabricated separately according to ASTM-D-3039 specification in order to determine their material properties. The materials were then hybridized and the properties were determined. Data from this experiment reveal that a new class of material that can meet desired specifications can be created through hybridization. The data also revealed that the properties of the materials bonded together as a hybrid complement the properties of the constituent members of the hybrid.

  3. Smart damping of laminated fuzzy fiber reinforced composite shells using 1-3 piezoelectric composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundalwal, S. I.; Kumar, R. Suresh; Ray, M. C.

    2013-10-01

    This paper deals with the investigation of active constrained layer damping (ACLD) of smart laminated continuous fuzzy fiber reinforced composite (FFRC) shells. The distinct constructional feature of a novel FFRC is that the uniformly spaced short carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are radially grown on the circumferential surfaces of the continuous carbon fiber reinforcements. The constraining layer of the ACLD treatment is considered to be made of vertically/obliquely reinforced 1-3 piezoelectric composite materials. A finite element (FE) model is developed for the laminated FFRC shells integrated with the two patches of the ACLD treatment to investigate the damping characteristics of the laminated FFRC shells. The effect of variation of the orientation angle of the piezoelectric fibers on the damping characteristics of the laminated FFRC shells has been studied when the piezoelectric fibers are coplanar with either of the two mutually orthogonal vertical planes of the piezoelectric composite layer. It is revealed that radial growth of CNTs on the circumferential surfaces of the carbon fibers enhances the attenuation of the amplitude of vibrations and the natural frequencies of the laminated FFRC shells over those of laminated base composite shells without CNTs.

  4. Metal-ceramic laminate composite magnetoelectric gradiometer.

    PubMed

    Bedekar, V; Bichurin, M I; Ivanov, S N; Pukinski, Y J; Priya, S

    2010-03-01

    Gradiometer resembles in functionality a magnetic field sensor where it measures the magnetic field gradient and its sensitivity is determined by the ability to quantify differential voltage change with respect to a reference value. Magnetoelectric (ME) gradiometer designed in this study is based upon the nickel (Ni)-Pb(Zr,Ti)O(3) (PZT) composites and utilizes the ring-dot piezoelectric transformer structure working near the resonance as the basis. The samples had the ring-dot electrode pattern printed on the top surface of PZT, where ring acts as the input while dot acts as the output. There is an insulation gap between the input and output section of 1.2 mm. The generated magnetic field due to converse ME effect interacts with the external applied magnetic field producing flux gradient, which is detected through the frequency shift and output voltage change in gradiometer structure. The measurements of output voltage dependence on applied magnetic field clearly illustrate that the proposed design can provide high sensitivity and bandwidth.

  5. On Poisson's ratio for metal matrix composite laminates. [aluminum boron composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herakovich, C. T.; Shuart, M. J.

    1978-01-01

    The definition of Poisson's ratio for nonlinear behavior of metal matrix composite laminates is discussed and experimental results for tensile and compressive loading of five different boron-aluminum laminates are presented. It is shown that there may be considerable difference in the value of Poisson's ratio as defined by a total strain or an incremental strain definition. It is argued that the incremental definition is more appropriate for nonlinear material behavior. Results from a (0) laminate indicate that the incremental definition provides a precursor to failure which is not evident if the total strain definition is used.

  6. The effects of embedded internal delaminations on composite laminate compression strength; an experimental review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, Alan T.

    1994-01-01

    Delaminations in laminated composite materials can degrade the compressive strength of these materials. Delaminations can form as a result of impact damage or processing flaws. In order to better understand the effects of these delaminations on the compressive behavior of laminated composite plates, programs have been conducted to assess the criticality of prescribed delaminations of known size, shape, and location on the compression strength of laminated composites. A review of these programs is presented along with highlights of pertinent findings from each.

  7. An experimental investigation on orthogonal cutting of hybrid CFRP/Ti stacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jinyang; El Mansori, Mohamed

    2016-10-01

    Hybrid CFRP/Ti stack has been widely used in the modern aerospace industry owing to its superior mechanical/physical properties and excellent structural functions. Several applications require mechanical machining of these hybrid composite stacks in order to achieve dimensional accuracy and assembly performance. However, machining of such composite-to-metal alliance is usually an extremely challenging task in the manufacturing sectors due to the disparate natures of each stacked constituent and their respective poor machinability. Special issues may arise from the high force/heat generation, severe subsurface damage and rapid tool wear. To study the fundamental mechanisms controlling the bi-material machining, this paper presented an experimental study on orthogonal cutting of hybrid CFRP/Ti stack by using superior polycrystalline diamond (PCD) tipped tools. The utilized cutting parameters for hybrid CFRP/Ti machining were rigorously adopted through a compromise selection due to the disparate machinability behaviors of the CFRP laminate and Ti alloy. The key cutting responses in terms of cutting force generation, machined surface quality and tool wear mechanism were precisely addressed. The experimental results highlighted the involved five stages of CFRP/Ti cutting and the predominant crater wear and edge fracture failure governing the PCD cutting process.

  8. Effect of laminate thickness and specimen configuration on the fracture of laminated composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, C. E.; Morris, D. H.

    1986-01-01

    Attention is given to the effect of laminate thickness on graphite/epoxy laminates in the present measurements of fracture toughness in center cracked tension specimens, compact tension specimens, and three-point bend specimens. Crack tip damage development prior to fracture is also studied. The results obtained show fracture toughness to be a function of laminate thickness, being in all cases independent of crack size. The fracture surface of all thick laminates was uniform in the interior and self-similar with the starter notch. With only one exception, the fracture toughness of the thicker laminates was relatively independent of specimen configuration.

  9. Numerical Modeling of Combined Matrix Cracking and Delamination in Composite Laminates Using Cohesive Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Deepak; Roy, Rene; Kweon, Jin-Hwe; Choi, Jin-ho

    2016-06-01

    Sub-laminate damage in the form of matrix cracking and delamination was simulated by using interface cohesive elements in the finite element (FE) software ABAQUS. Interface cohesive elements were inserted parallel to the fiber orientation in the transverse ply with equal spacing (matrix cracking) and between the interfaces (delamination). Matrix cracking initiation in the cohesive elements was based on stress traction separation laws and propagated under mixed-mode loading. We expanded the work of Shi et al. (Appl. Compos. Mater. 21, 57-70 2014) to include delamination and simulated additional [45/-45/0/90]s and [02/90n]s { n = 1,2,3} CFRP laminates and a [0/903]s GFRP laminate. Delamination damage was quantified numerically in terms of damage dissipative energy. We observed that transverse matrix cracks can propagate to the ply interface and initiate delamination. We also observed for [0/90n/0] laminates that as the number of 90° ply increases past n = 2, the crack density decreases. The predicted crack density evolution compared well with experimental results and the equivalent constraint model (ECM) theory. Empirical relationships were established between crack density and applied stress by linear curve fitting. The reduction of laminate elastic modulus due to cracking was also computed numerically and it is in accordance with reported experimental measurements.

  10. Low velocity impact analysis of composite laminated plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Daihua

    2007-12-01

    In the past few decades polymer composites have been utilized more in structures where high strength and light weight are major concerns, e.g., aircraft, high-speed boats and sports supplies. It is well known that they are susceptible to damage resulting from lateral impact by foreign objects, such as dropped tools, hail and debris thrown up from the runway. The impact response of the structures depends not only on the material properties but also on the dynamic behavior of the impacted structure. Although commercial software is capable of analyzing such impact processes, it often requires extensive expertise and rigorous training for design and analysis. Analytical models are useful as they allow parametric studies and provide a foundation for validating the numerical results from large-scale commercial software. Therefore, it is necessary to develop analytical or semi-analytical models to better understand the behaviors of composite structures under impact and their associated failure process. In this study, several analytical models are proposed in order to analyze the impact response of composite laminated plates. Based on Meyer's Power Law, a semi-analytical model is obtained for small mass impact response of infinite composite laminates by the method of asymptotic expansion. The original nonlinear second-order ordinary differential equation is transformed into two linear ordinary differential equations. This is achieved by neglecting high-order terms in the asymptotic expansion. As a result, the semi-analytical solution of the overall impact response can be applied to contact laws with varying coefficients. Then an analytical model accounting for permanent deformation based on an elasto-plastic contact law is proposed to obtain the closed-form solutions of the wave-controlled impact responses of composite laminates. The analytical model is also used to predict the threshold velocity for delamination onset by combining with an existing quasi

  11. Ultrasonic condition monitoring of CFRP and GRP plates using a surface-mounted source and an embedded optical fibre sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philp, Wayne R.; Pierce, S. Gareth; Gachagan, Anthony; McNab, Alistair; Hayward, Gordon; Culshaw, Brian

    1996-04-01

    Glass reinforced plastic (GRP) and carbon fibre reinforced plastic (CF'RP) laminates are durable, versatile and light-weight materials which are progressively replacing metals traditionally used in aerospace, automobile, rail, gas-storage and many other industries. If these composite structures were to debond, fracture or seriously degrade whilst in-service, public injury or catastrophic failure could result. Therefore, in-service condition monitoring techniques for composite structures are most significant and are of immediate importance.

  12. a Study of 954-2A/IM7 Composite Laminates Containing a Central Hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyungwon

    Predicting microcracking properties of the composite laminates in nonuniform stress conditions was the subject in this paper. The uniform stress field meant the stresses were independent of the width direction. The material was the 954-2A/IM7 laminates containing a central hole. Microcracks initiated at the edge of the hole and propagated into the laminate. Because the tensile stress concentration decreased with distance, the microcracks were arrested before the edge of the laminate. Because carbon fiber composites were opaque, a x-ray method was used to detect the length of the propagating microcracks. The microcracking at the near edge of the hole could be reasonably predicted by considering the local laminate stresses and the microcracking toughness measured in unnotched laminates. However, the data away from the hole did not agree with the predictions. The local microcrack density was always much higher than that predicted by the local laminate stress.

  13. Time and temperature dependence on the flexural fatigue strength in the transverse direction of unidirectional CFRP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakada, Masakazu; Maeda, M.; Hirohata, T.; Morita, M.; Miyano, Y.

    1997-03-01

    A prediction method of fatigue strength of polymer composites for an arbitrary frequency, stress ratio and temperature was proposed. The method is based upon the four hypotheses, (A) same failure mechanism for static, creep and fatigue failure, (b) same time-temperature superposition principle for all failure strengths, (C) linear cumulative damage law for monotone loading and (D) linear dependence of fatigue strength upon stress ratio. Flexural static, creep and fatigue tests at various temperatures were conducted in the transverse direction of two kinds of unidirectional CFRP laminates, which are T300/2500 and T300/PEEK. The validity of the prediction method and the applicability of the hypotheses for the flexural fatigue strength in the transverse direction of unidirectional CFRP laminates were discussed.

  14. Coupled mixed-field laminate theory and finite element for smart piezoelectric composite shell structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saravanos, Dimitris A.

    1996-01-01

    Mechanics for the analysis of laminated composite shells with piezoelectric actuators and sensors are presented. A new mixed-field laminate theory for piezoelectric shells is formulated in curvilinear coordinates which combines single-layer assumptions for the displacements and a layerwise representation for the electric potential. The resultant coupled governing equations for curvilinear piezoelectric laminates are described. Structural mechanics are subsequently developed and an 8-node finite-element is formulated for the static and dynamic analysis of adaptive composite structures of general laminations containing piezoelectric layers. Evaluations of the method and comparisons with reported results are presented for laminated piezoelectric-composite plates, a closed cylindrical shell with a continuous piezoceramic layer and a laminated composite semi-circular cantilever shell with discrete cylindrical piezoelectric actuators and/or sensors.

  15. Ancient and Modern Laminated Composites - From the Great Pyramid of Gizeh to Y2K

    SciTech Connect

    Wadsworth, J.; Lesuer, D.R.

    2000-03-14

    Laminated metal composites have been cited in antiquity; for example, a steel laminate that may date as far back as 2750 B.C., was found in the Great Pyramid in Gizeh in 1837. A laminated shield containing bronze, tin, and gold layers, is described in detail by Homer. Well-known examples of steel laminates, such as an Adze blade, dating to 400 B.C. can be found in the literature. The Japanese sword is a laminated composite at several different levels and Merovingian blades were composed of laminated steels. Other examples are also available, including composites from China, Thailand, Indonesia, Germany, Britain, Belgium, France, and Persia. The concept of lamination to provide improved properties has also found expression in modern materials. Of particular interest is the development of laminates including high carbon and low carbon layers. These materials have unusual properties that are of engineering interest; they are similar to ancient welded Damascus steels. The manufacture of collectable knives, labeled ''welded Damascus'', has also been a focus of contemporary knifemakers. Additionally, in the Former Soviet Union, laminated composite designs have been used in engineering applications. Each of the above areas will be briefly reviewed, and some of the metallurgical principles will be described that underlie improvement in properties by lamination. Where appropriate, links are made between these property improvements and those that may have been present in ancient artifacts.

  16. Prediction of Degraded Strength in Composite Laminates with Matrix Cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kime, Yolanda J.

    1997-01-01

    Composite laminated materials are becoming increasingly important for aerospace engineering. As the aerospace industry moves in this direction, it will be critical to be able to predict how these materials fail. While much research has been done in this area, both theoretical and experimental, the field is still new enough that most computer aided design platforms have not yet incorporated damage prediction for laminate materials. There is a gap between the level of understanding evident in the literature and what design tools are readily available to engineers. The work reported herein is a small step toward filling that gap for NASA engineers. A computer program, LAMDGRAD, has been written which predicts how some of the materials properties change as damage is incurred. Specifically, the program calculates the Young's moduli E(sub x) and E(sub y) the Poisson's ratio v(sub xy) and the shear modulus G(sub xy) as cracks developing the composite matrix. The changes in the Young's moduli are reported both as a function of mean crack separation and in the form of a stress-versus-strain curve. The program also calculates the critical strain for delamination growth and predicts the strain at which a quarter-inch diameter delaminated area will buckle. The stress-versus-strain predictions have been compared to experiment for two test structures, and good agreement has been found in each case.

  17. Experimental Verification of Computational Models for Laminated Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Charles E.; Coats, Timothy W.; Glaessgen, Edward H.

    1999-01-01

    The objective of the research reported herein is to develop a progressive damage methodology capable of predicting the residual strength of continuous fiber-reinforced, laminated, polymer matrix composites with through-penetration damage. The fracture behavior of center-notch tension panels with thin crack-like slits was studied. Since fibers are the major load-carrying constituent in polymer matrix composites, predicting the residual strength of a laminate requires a criterion for fiber fracture. The effects on fiber strain due to other damage mechanisms such as matrix cracking and delaminations must also be modeled. Therefore, the research herein examines the damage mechanisms involved in translaminate fracture and identifies the toughening mechanisms responsible for damage growth resistance in brittle epoxy matrix systems. The mechanics of matrix cracking and fiber fracture are discussed as is the mathematical framework for the progressive damage model developed by the authors. The progressive damage analysis algorithms have been implemented into a general purpose finite element code developed by NASA, the Computational Structural Mechanics Testbed (COMET). Damage growth is numerically simulated and the analytical residual strength predictions are compared to experimental results for a variety of notched panel configurations and materials systems.

  18. Tensile and impact behavior of laminated composites based on ultrahigh carbon steel

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.

    1988-01-01

    The goal was to develop metal-laminated composites for high strength and high strength and high toughness and centered on three major objectives. The first one was to develop a laminated composite, based on ultrahigh carbon steel (UHCS), which can be selectively heat treated to achieve alternating hard UHCS and soft interleaf layers. The second was to maintain sharp and discrete interlayer boundaries in the UHCS laminated composite after selective heat treatment with no interdiffusion of carbon. The third was to achieve high notch-impact toughness in the selectively heat-treated laminated composite. Five laminated composites were investigated. They are UHCS/Fe-3%Si, UHCS/Hadfield manganese steel (HMS), UHCS/9%Ni-2%Si steel, UHCS/brass and UHCS/304 stainless steel (304ss). All five laminated composites were selectively heat treated to achieve the desired objective of alternating hard and soft layers. Charpy V-notch impact tests were performed on the first four laminates. Each laminate showed a lower ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) than those obtained in the monolithic UHS and the monolithic interleaf material making up the laminate.

  19. Microcracking in composite laminates under thermal and mechanical loading. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maddocks, Jason R.

    1995-01-01

    Composites used in space structures are exposed to both extremes in temperature and applied mechanical loads. Cracks in the matrix form, changing the laminate thermoelastic properties. The goal of the present investigation is to develop a predictive methodology to quantify microcracking in general composite laminates under both thermal and mechanical loading. This objective is successfully met through a combination of analytical modeling and experimental investigation. In the analysis, the stress and displacement distributions in the vicinity of a crack are determined using a shear lag model. These are incorporated into an energy based cracking criterion to determine the favorability of crack formation. A progressive damage algorithm allows the inclusion of material softening effects and temperature-dependent material properties. The analysis is implemented by a computer code which gives predicted crack density and degraded laminate properties as functions of any thermomechanical load history. Extensive experimentation provides verification of the analysis. AS4/3501-6 graphite/epoxy laminates are manufactured with three different layups to investigate ply thickness and orientation effects. Thermal specimens are cooled to progressively lower temperatures down to -184 C. After conditioning the specimens to each temperature, cracks are counted on their edges using optical microscopy and in their interiors by sanding to incremental depths. Tensile coupons are loaded monotonically to progressively higher loads until failure. Cracks are counted on the coupon edges after each loading. A data fit to all available results provides input parameters for the analysis and shows them to be material properties, independent of geometry and loading. Correlation between experiment and analysis is generally very good under both thermal and mechanical loading, showing the methodology to be a powerful, unified tool. Delayed crack initiation observed in a few cases is attributed to a

  20. Fiber optic sensor for continuous health monitoring in CFRP composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rippert, Laurent; Papy, Jean-Michel; Wevers, Martine; Van Huffel, Sabine

    2002-07-01

    An intensity modulated sensor, based on the microbending concept, has been incorporated in laminates produced from a C/epoxy prepreg. Pencil lead break tests (Hsu-Neilsen sources) and tensile tests have been performed on this material. In this research study, fibre optic sensors will be proven to offer an alternative for the robust piezoelectric transducers used for Acoustic Emission (AE) monitoring. The main emphasis has been put on the use of advanced signal processing techniques based on time-frequency analysis. The signal Short Time Fourier Transform (STFT) has been computed and several robust noise reduction algorithms, such as Wiener adaptive filtering, improved spectral subtraction filtering, and Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) -based filtering, have been applied. An energy and frequency -based detection criterion is put forward to detect transient signals that can be correlated with Modal Acoustic Emission (MAE) results and thus damage in the composite material. There is a strong indication that time-frequency analysis and the Hankel Total Least Squares (HTLS) method can also be used for damage characterization. This study shows that the signal from a quite simple microbend optical sensor contains information on the elastic energy released whenever damage is being introduced in the host material by mechanical loading. Robust algorithms can be used to retrieve and analyze this information.

  1. Suppression of interlaminar damage in carbon/epoxy laminates by use of interleaf layers

    SciTech Connect

    Tanimoto, Toshio . Dept. of Materials Science Ceramic Technology)

    1994-10-15

    Carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) have been widely used as a structural material. In general, fiber orientation angle of each lamina in these laminates is variously chosen in order to taylor a material which meets the particular requirement for the material properties in arbitrary direction of laminate. Quasi-isotropic lamination, in which the laminate consisted of laminae with fiber orientation of 0[degree], +45[degree], [minus]45[degree] and 90[degree] to loading axis, is most commonly employed in the actual application. However, quasi-isotropic carbon/epoxy laminates are known to develop the interlaminar stress concentrations near the free edge region. These laminates have a strong tendency to delaminate near the edges when subjected to axial in-plane loading. Such a free edge delamination under loading in the plane of the laminate is a unique problem to laminated composites. This paper summarizes the author's investigation which was performed to reduce the free edge interlaminar stresses in the laminate by incorporating interleaf films between plies and thus to improve the mechanical properties of these materials. In their previous work, the authors have shown that these laminates exhibit a high vibration damping capability. Loss factor values for these CFRP/interleaf laminates which were measured in cantilever beam tests, are 5 to 50 times as large as that for conventional CFRP. In this paper, discussion will be provided on the mechanical properties of the interleaved quasi-isotropic carbon/epoxy laminate, [0/[+-]45/90][sub s], with a special emphasis on the optimum design of interply locations to incorporate the interleaf films for the particular requirement such as static strength, elastic modulus, fatigue resistance and so on.

  2. Linear versus nonlinear theories for laminated composite plates and shells

    SciTech Connect

    Qatu, M.S.

    1995-11-01

    Linear and nonlinear shear-deformation theories for laminated composite plates and shells are discussed in this paper. The emphasis here is on the range of validity for each class of theories. The finite element method is used to determine the maximum stresses for a wide range of statically loaded plate and shell panels with various thickness ratios. This paper concludes that for the vast majority of composite materials and for moderately thick plates and shells, stresses normally reach the maximum allowable stress before nonlinear terms can become important. This has been demonstrated by showing that for the limiting case of shear deformation theories (in which the minimum span length (or radius) to thickness ratio is 20), the material usually fails before the maximum deflection reaches the magnitude of the thickness (where nonlinear terms start to become significant).

  3. Esthetic Rehabilitation of Anterior Teeth with Laminates Composite Veneers

    PubMed Central

    Riva, Giancarlo

    2014-01-01

    No- or minimal-preparation veneers associated with enamel preservation offer predictable results in esthetic dentistry; indirect additive anterior composite restorations represent a quick, minimally invasive, inexpensive, and repairable option for a smile enhancement treatment plan. Current laboratory techniques associated with a strict clinical protocol satisfy patients' restorative and esthetic needs. The case report presented describes minimal invasive treatment of four upper incisors with laminate nanohybrid resin composite veneers. A step-by-step protocol is proposed for diagnostic evaluation, mock-up fabrication and trial, teeth preparation and impression, and adhesive cementation. The resolution of initial esthetic issues, patient satisfaction, and nice integration of indirect restorations confirmed the success of this anterior dentition rehabilitation. PMID:25013730

  4. Analysis of laminated composite shells under internal pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuan, F. G.

    1991-01-01

    A closed form solution is presented that predicts the response of filament wound composite shells subjected to internal pressure. The material of the shell is assumed to be general cylindrically anisotropic. Based on the theory of cylindrical anisotropic elasticity coupled differential equations are developed using Lekhnitskii's stress function approach. Two composite systems, graphite/epoxy and glass/epoxy, are selected to demonstrate the influence of degree of material anisotropy and fiber orientations on the axial and induced twisting deformation. Detailed stress distributions of (45) off-axis unidirectional and (45/-45)s symmetric angle-ply fiber-reinforced laminated shells are shown to illustrate the effect of radius-to-thickness ratio and stacking sequence.

  5. Damage mechanisms characterization of carbon fiber/epoxy composite laminates by both electrical resistance measurements and acoustic emission analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ceysson, O.; Salvia, M.; Vincent, L.

    1996-04-15

    Carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) offer high specific mechanical properties (performance vs weight ratio). Since carbon fibers are electrical conductors ({rho} = 2.10{sup {minus}5} {Omega}.m), the measurement of the variations of electrical resistance appears to be a valuable technique for damage detection. In the case of CFRP samples, conductivity is not isotropic but depends on the orientation of the carbon fibers. The electrical conduction of (0{degree}) unidirectional (UD) CFRP parallel to the fibers is due to the current flow along the fibers. This can be modeled using the parallel resistance approach. In this present work, the variation of the electrical conductivity can be taken as an indicator of the evolution of various types of damage in classical longitudinal UD but also in ({+-} 45{degree}) CFRP laminates. By comparison with a more classical non-destructive technique such as Acoustic Emission, it has been shown that it is possible that the electrical resistance measurement allows one to monitor in-situ the evolution of various internal damage nucleation and growth in CFRP such as fiber fractures, intraply matrix cracks and interply delaminations.

  6. Fatigue Life Methodology for Tapered Composite Flexbeam Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murri, Gretchen B.; OBrien, T. Kevin; Rousseau, Carl Q.

    1997-01-01

    The viability of a method for determining the fatigue life of composite rotor hub flexbeam laminates using delamination fatigue characterization data and a geometric non-linear finite element (FE) analysis was studied. Combined tension and bending loading was applied to non-linear tapered flexbeam laminates with internal ply drops. These laminates, consisting of coupon specimens cut from a full-size S2/E7T1 glass-epoxy flexbeam were tested in a hydraulic load frame under combined axial-tension and transverse cyclic bending. The magnitude of the axial load remained constant and the direction of the load rotated with the specimen as the cyclic bending load was applied. The first delamination damage observed in the specimens occurred at the area around the tip of the outermost ply-drop group. Subsequently, unstable delamination occurred by complete delamination along the length of the specimen. Continued cycling resulted in multiple delaminations. A 2D finite element model of the flexbeam was developed and a geometrically non-linear analysis was performed. The global responses of the model and test specimens agreed very well in terms of the transverse displacement. The FE model was used to calculate strain energy release rates (G) for delaminations initiating at the tip of the outer ply-drop area and growing toward the thick or thin regions of the flexbeam, as was observed in the specimens. The delamination growth toward the thick region was primarily mode 2, whereas delamination growth toward the thin region was almost completely mode 1. Material characterization data from cyclic double-cantilevered beam tests was used with the peak calculated G values to generate a curve predicting fatigue failure by unstable delamination as a function of the number of loading cycles. The calculated fatigue lives compared well with the test data.

  7. Fatigue Life Methodology for Tapered Composite Flexbeam Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murri, Gretchen B.; O''Brien, T. Kevin; Rousseau, Carl Q.

    1997-01-01

    The viability of a method for determining the fatigue life of composite rotor hub flexbeam laminates using delamination fatigue characterization data and a geometric non-linear finite element (FE) analysis was studied. Combined tension and bending loading was applied to nonlinear tapered flexbeam laminates with internal ply drops. These laminates, consisting of coupon specimens cut from a full-size S2/E7T1 glass-epoxy flexbeam were tested in a hydraulic load frame under combined axial-tension and transverse cyclic bending loads. The magnitude of the axial load remained constant and the direction of the load rotated with the specimen as the cyclic bending load was applied. The first delamination damage observed in the specimens occurred at the area around the tip of the outermost ply-drop group. Subsequently, unstable delamination occurred by complete delamination along the length of the specimen. Continued cycling resulted in multiple delaminations. A 2D finite element model of the flexbeam was developed and a geometrically non-linear analysis was performed. The global responses of the model and test specimens agreed very well in terms of the transverse flexbeam tip-displacement and flapping angle. The FE model was used to calculate strain energy release rates (G) for delaminations initiating at the tip of the outer ply-drop area and growing toward the thick or thin regions of the flexbeam, as was observed in the specimens. The delamination growth toward the thick region was primarily mode 2, whereas delamination growth toward the thin region was almost completely mode 1. Material characterization data from cyclic double-cantilevered beam tests was used with the peak calculated G values to generate a curve predicting fatigue failure by unstable delamination as a function of the number of loading cycles. The calculated fatigue lives compared well with the test data.

  8. A new approach of FEM for laminated composite plates and shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Zhicheng; Li, Rufeng; Dong, Chunying; Qian, Zhendong

    1991-03-01

    A new approach of FEM for modeling laminated composite plates and shells is developed by extending the Mindlin theory, overcoming difficulties usually encountered in studies of these structures. The new model uses the in-plane displacements, the deflection of the film, and the shear strains in a k-th ply as independent variables. It is shown that the model avoids the 'shear locking' in thin plates and shells and yields more accurate results on the distribution of transverse shear stress through the thickness than can be obtained by previous theories. Numerical examples are presented of laminated plates, axisymmetric laminated composite shells under arbitrary loads, and delamination buckling of laminated plates.

  9. Laminate behavior for SiC fiber-reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.; Phillips, Ronald E.

    1990-01-01

    The room temperature mechanical properties of SiC fiber reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride matrix composite laminates (SiC/RBSN) have been measured. The laminates contained approx 30 volume fraction of aligned 142-micron diameter SiC fiber in a porous RBSN matrix. Three types of laminate studied were unidirectional: (1) (0) sub 8, (2) (10) sub 8, and (3) (45) sub 8, and (90) sub 8; cross plied laminates (0 sub 2/90 sub 2); and angle plied laminates: (+45 sub 2/-45 sub 2). Each laminate contained eight fiber plies. Results of the unidirectionally reinforced composites tested at various angles to the reinforcement direction indicate large anisotropy in in-plane properties. In addition, strength properties of these composites along the fiber direction were independent of specimen gage length and were unaffected by notches normal to the fiber direction. Splitting parallel to the fiber at the notch tip appears to be the dominant crack blunting mechanism responsible for notch insensitive behavior of these composites. In-plane properties of the composites can be improved by 2-D laminate construction. Mechanical property results for (0 sub 2/90 sub 2) sub s and (+45/-45 sub 2) sub s laminates showed that their matrix failure strains were similar to that for (0) sub 8 laminates, but their primary elastic moduli, matrix cracking strengths, and ultimate composite strengths were lower. The elastic properties of unidirectional, cross-ply, and angle-ply composites can be predicted from modified constitutive equations and laminate theory. Further improvements in laminate properties may be achieved by reducing the matrix porosity and by optimizing the bond strength between the SiC fiber and RBSN matrix.

  10. Laminate behavior for SiC fiber-reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhatt, R. T.; Phillips, R. E.

    1988-01-01

    The room temperature mechanical properties of SiC fiber reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride matrix composite laminates (SiC/RBSN) have been measured. The laminates contained approx 30 volume fraction of aligned 142-micron diameter SiC fiber in a porous RBSN matrix. Three types of laminate studied were unidirectional: (1) (0) sub 8, (2) (10) sub 8, and (3) (45) sub 8, and (90) sub 8; cross plied laminates (0 sub 2/90 sub 2); and angle plied laminates: (+45 sub 2/-45 sub 2). Each laminate contained eight fiber plies. Results of the unidirectionally reinforced composites tested at various angles to the reinforcement direction indicate large anisotropy in in-plane properties. In addition, strength properties of these composites along the fiber direction were independent of specimen gage length and were unaffected by notches normal to the fiber direction. Splitting parallel to the fiber at the notch tip appears to be the dominant crack blunting mechanism responsible for notch insensitive behavior of these composites. In-plane properties of the composites can be improved by 2-D laminate construction. Mechanical property results for (0 sub 2/90 sub 2)sub s and (+45/-45 sub 2) sub s laminates showed that their matrix failure strains were similar to that for (0) sub 8 laminates, but their primary elastic moduli, matrix cracking strengths, and ultimate composite strengths were lower. The elastic properties of unidirectional, cross-ply, and angle-ply composites can be predicted from modified constitutive equations and laminate theory. Further improvements in laminate properties may be achieved by reducing the matrix porosity and by optimizing the bond strength between the SiC fiber and RBSN matrix.

  11. A New Approach to Fibrous Composite Laminate Strength Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart-Smith, L. J.

    1990-01-01

    A method of predicting the strength of cross-plied fibrous composite laminates is based on expressing the classical maximum-shear-stress failure criterion for ductile metals in terms of strains. Starting with such a formulation for classical isotropic materials, the derivation is extended to orthotropic materials having a longitudinal axis of symmetry, to represent the fibers in a unidirectional composite lamina. The only modification needed to represent those same fibers with properties normalized to the lamina rather than fiber is a change in axial modulus. A mirror image is added to the strain-based lamina failure criterion for fiber-dominated failures to reflect the cutoffs due to the presence of orthogonal fibers. It is found that the combined failure envelope is now identical with the well-known maximum-strain failure model in the tension-tension and compression-compression quadrants but is truncated in the shear quadrants. The successive application of this simple failure model for fibers in the 0/90 degree and +/- 45 degree orientations, in turn, is shown to be the necessary and sufficient characterization of the fiber-dominated failures of laminates made from fibers having the same tensile and compressive strengths. When one such strength is greater than the other, the failure envelope is appropriately truncated for the lesser direct strain. The shear-failure cutoffs are now based on the higher axial strain to failure since they occur at lower strains than and are usually not affected by such mechanisms as microbuckling. Premature matrix failures can also be covered by appropriately truncating the fiber failure envelope. Matrix failures are excluded from consideration for conventional fiber/polymer composites but the additional features needed for a more rigorous analysis of exotic materials are covered. The new failure envelope is compared with published biaxial test data. The theory is developed for unnotched laminates but is easily shrunk to incorporate

  12. Irradiation effects in tungsten-copper laminate composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrison, L. M.; Katoh, Y.; Snead, L. L.; Byun, T. S.; Reiser, J.; Rieth, M.

    2016-12-01

    Tungsten-copper laminate composite has shown promise as a structural plasma-facing component as compared to tungsten rod or plate. The present study evaluated the tungsten-copper composite after irradiation in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at temperatures of 410-780 °C and fast neutron fluences of 0.02-9.0 × 1025 n/m2, E > 0.1 MeV, 0.0039-1.76 displacements per atom (dpa) in tungsten. Tensile tests were performed on the composites, and the fracture surfaces were analyzed with scanning electron microscopy. Before irradiation, the tungsten layers had brittle cleavage failure, but the overall composite had 15.5% elongation at 22 °C. After only 0.0039 dpa this was reduced to 7.7% elongation, and no ductility was observed after 0.2 dpa at all irradiation temperatures when tensile tested at 22 °C. For elevated temperature tensile tests after irradiation, the composite only had ductile failure at temperatures where the tungsten was delaminating or ductile.

  13. Irradiation effects in tungsten-copper laminate composite

    SciTech Connect

    Garrison, L. M.; Katoh, Y.; Snead, L. L.; Byun, T. S.; Reiser, J.; Rieth, M.

    2016-12-01

    Tungsten-copper laminate composite has shown promise as a structural plasma-facing component as compared to tungsten rod or plate. The present study evaluated the tungsten-copper composite after irradiation in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at temperatures of 410-780°C and fast neutron fluences of 0.02-9.0×1025 n/m2, E>0.1 MeV, 0.0039-1.76 displacements per atom (dpa) in tungsten. Tensile tests were performed on the composites, and the fracture surfaces were analyzed with scanning electron microscopy. Before irradiation, the tungsten layers had brittle cleavage failure, but the overall composite had 15.5% elongation at 22°C. After only 0.0039 dpa this was reduced to 7.7% elongation, and no ductility was observed after 0.2 dpa at all irradiation temperatures when tensile tested at 22°C. For elevated temperature tensile tests after irradiation, the composite only had ductile failure at temperatures where the tungsten was delaminating or ductile.

  14. Irradiation effects in tungsten-copper laminate composite

    SciTech Connect

    Garrison, L. M.; Katoh, Yutai; Snead, Lance L.; Byun, Thak Sang; Reiser, Jens; Rieth, Michael

    2016-09-19

    Tungsten-copper laminate composite has shown promise as a structural plasma-facing component as compared to tungsten rod or plate. The present study evaluated the tungsten-copper composite after irradiation in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at temperatures of 410–780 °C and fast neutron fluences of 0.02–9.0 × 1025 n/m2, E > 0.1 MeV, 0.0039–1.76 displacements per atom (dpa) in tungsten. Tensile tests were performed on the composites, and the fracture surfaces were analyzed with scanning electron microscopy. Before irradiation, the tungsten layers had brittle cleavage failure, but the overall composite had 15.5% elongation at 22 °C. After only 0.0039 dpa this was reduced to 7.7% elongation, and no ductility was observed after 0.2 dpa at all irradiation temperatures when tensile tested at 22 °C. In conclusion, tor elevated temperature tensile tests after irradiation, the composite only had ductile failure at temperatures where the tungsten was delaminating or ductile.

  15. Irradiation effects in tungsten-copper laminate composite

    DOE PAGES

    Garrison, L. M.; Katoh, Yutai; Snead, Lance L.; ...

    2016-09-19

    Tungsten-copper laminate composite has shown promise as a structural plasma-facing component as compared to tungsten rod or plate. The present study evaluated the tungsten-copper composite after irradiation in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at temperatures of 410–780 °C and fast neutron fluences of 0.02–9.0 × 1025 n/m2, E > 0.1 MeV, 0.0039–1.76 displacements per atom (dpa) in tungsten. Tensile tests were performed on the composites, and the fracture surfaces were analyzed with scanning electron microscopy. Before irradiation, the tungsten layers had brittle cleavage failure, but the overall composite had 15.5% elongation at 22 °C. After only 0.0039 dpa thismore » was reduced to 7.7% elongation, and no ductility was observed after 0.2 dpa at all irradiation temperatures when tensile tested at 22 °C. In conclusion, tor elevated temperature tensile tests after irradiation, the composite only had ductile failure at temperatures where the tungsten was delaminating or ductile.« less

  16. Influence of residual stresses on the tensile strength of composite-metal sandwich laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herakovich, C. T.; Wong, D. M.

    1977-01-01

    The tensile strength of boron-epoxy/aluminum sandwich laminates is discussed relative to the residual thermal stresses generated by curing and bonding at elevated temperatures. It is shown that the sandwich laminates investigated exhibit three dinstinct modes of failure, depending upon the fiber orientation of the composite. Sandwich laminates with moderate to high percentage of 0-deg fibers exhibit early failures initiated by edge effect; laminates with moderate to high percentage of 90-deg fibers fail according to a first-ply failure criterion; laminates with moderate to high percentages of plus or minus 45 deg plies fail at strains equal to or greater than the failure strain of the corresponding all-composite laminate.

  17. Influence of Layup and Curing on the Surface Accuracy in the Manufacturing of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) Composite Space Mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhiyong; Zhang, Jianbao; Xie, Yongjie; Zhang, Boming; Sun, Baogang; Guo, Hongjun

    2017-03-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced polymer, CFRP, composite materials have been used to fabricate space mirror. Usually the composite space mirror can completely replicate the high-precision surface of mould by replication process, but the actual surface accuracy of replicated space mirror is always reduced, still needed further study. We emphatically studied the error caused by layup and curing on the surface accuracy of space mirror through comparative experiments and analyses, the layup and curing influence factors include curing temperature, cooling rate of curing, method of prepreg lay-up, and area weight of fiber. Focusing on the four factors, we analyzed the error influence rule and put forward corresponding control measures to improve the surface figure of space mirror. For comparative analysis, six CFRP composite mirrors were fabricated and surface profile of mirrors were measured. Four guiding control measures were described here. Curing process of composite space mirror is our next focus.

  18. Composite laminates with negative through-the-thickness Poisson's ratios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herakovich, C. T.

    1984-01-01

    A simple analysis using two dimensional lamination theory combined with the appropriate three dimensional anisotropic constitutive equation is presented to show some rather surprising results for the range of values of the through-the-thickness effective Poisson's ratio nu sub xz for angle ply laminates. Results for graphite-epoxy show that the through-the-thickness effective Poisson's ratio can range from a high of 0.49 for a 90 laminate to a low of -0.21 for a + or - 25s laminate. It is shown that negative values of nu sub xz are also possible for other laminates.

  19. Composite laminates with negative through-the-thickness Poisson's ratios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herakovich, C. T.

    1984-01-01

    A simple analysis using two-dimensional lamination theory combined with the appropriate three-dimensional anisotropic constitutive equation is presented to show some rather surprising results for the range of values of the through-the-thickness effective Poisson's ratio nu sub xz for angle ply laminates. Results for graphite-epoxy show that the through-the-thickness effective Poisson's ratio can range from a high of 0.49 for a 90 laminate to a low of -0.21 for a + or - 25s laminate. It is shown that negative values of nu sub xz are also possible for other laminates.

  20. Experimental investigation of defect criticality in FRP laminate composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joyce, Peter James

    1999-11-01

    This work examines the defect criticality of fiber reinforced polymer Composites. The objective is to determine the sensitivity of the finished composite to various process-induced defects. This work focuses on two different classes of process-induced defects; (1) fiber waviness in high performance carbon-fiber reinforced unidirectional composites and (2) void volume in low cost glass-fabric reinforced composites. The role of fiber waviness in the compressive response of unidirectional composites has been studied by a number of other investigators. Because of difficulties associated with producing real composites with varying levels of fiber waviness, most experimental studies of fiber waviness have evaluated composites with artificially induced fiber waviness. Furthermore, most experimental studies have been concentrated on the effects of out-of-plane fiber waviness. The objective of this work is to evaluate the effects of in-plane fiber waviness naturally occurring in autoclave consolidated thermoplastic laminates. The first phase of this project involved the development of a simple technique for measuring the resulting fiber waviness levels. An experimental investigation of the compression strength reduction in composites with in-plane fiber waviness followed. The experimental program included carbon-fiber reinforced thermoplastic composites manufactured from prepreg tape by hand layup, and carbon-fiber and glass-fiber reinforced composites manufactured from an experimental powder towpreg by filament winding and autoclave consolidation. The compression specimens exhibited kink band failure in the prepreg composite and varying amounts of longitudinal splitting and kink banding in the towpreg composites. The compression test results demonstrated the same trend as predicted by microbudding theory but the overall quantitative correlation was poor. The second thrust of this research evaluated void effects in resin transfer molded composites. Much of the existing

  1. A physically based failure criterion for laminated composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroll, L.; Hufenbach, W.

    1999-07-01

    The stress and strain fields in laminated composites can be described realistically with the help of a refined theory of elasticity for anisotropic materials. In contrast, the respective failure characteristics cannot be predicted satisfactorily based on the commonly used failure criteria. The main disadvantage of these generalized failure criteria, such as the quadratic failure criteria of Sakharov, Azzi/Tsai, Tsai/Wu, etc., is that they combine fundamentally different fracture mechanisms of the homogenized UD layer in one approximation by an interpolation polynomial. A completely different method for the formulation of realistic failure criteria, taking into account the heterogeneous anisotropic material structure relevant to the fracture, is based on the Mohr hypothesis for brittle materials that in fact only the stresses in the fracture plane induce failure. This physically based failure criterion not only considers the decisive eifference between the fiber fracture and the interfiber fracture, but also characterizes further fracture types in the plane parallel to the fibers.

  2. The nonlinear viscoelastic response of resin matrix composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hiel, C.; Cardon, A. H.; Brinson, H. F.

    1984-01-01

    Possible treatments of the nonlinear viscoelastic behavior of materials are reviewed. A thermodynamic based approach, developed by Schapery, is discussed and used to interpret the nonlinear viscoelastic response of a graphite epoxy laminate, T300/934. Test data to verify the analysis for Fiberite 934 neat resin as well as transverse and shear properties of the unidirectional T300/934 composited are presented. Long time creep characteristics as a function of stress level and temperature are generated. Favorable comparisons between the traditional, graphical, and the current analytical approaches are shown. A free energy based rupture criterion is proposed as a way to estimate the life that remains in a structure at any time.

  3. Fatigue damage mechanisms in boron-aluminium composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dvorak, G. J.; Johnson, W. S.

    1980-01-01

    The relationship between fatigue and shakedown in metal matrix composites is investigated theoretically and experimentally for unidirectional and laminated 6061 Al-B materials. It is shown that no fatigue damage takes place if the applied stress range is such that the material remains elastic, or shakes down, i.e., resumes elastic cyclic straining after a small number of plastic strain cycles. Fatigue damage occurs only in specimens subjected to stress ranges which cause sustained cyclic plastic straining in the aluminum matrix. If the applied stress range is smaller than that required for fatigue failure, after about 10 to the 6th cycles a saturation damage state is reached which remains essentially unchanged with increasing number of cycles.

  4. Synthesis and characterization of laminated Si/SiC composites

    PubMed Central

    Naga, Salma M.; Kenawy, Sayed H.; Awaad, Mohamed; Abd El-Wahab, Hamada S.; Greil, Peter; Abadir, Magdi F.

    2012-01-01

    Laminated Si/SiC ceramics were synthesized from porous preforms of biogenous carbon impregnated with Si slurry at a temperature of 1500 °C for 2 h. Due to the capillarity infiltration with Si, both intrinsic micro- and macrostructure in the carbon preform were retained within the final ceramics. The SEM micrographs indicate that the final material exhibits a distinguished laminar structure with successive Si/SiC layers. The produced composites show weight gain of ≈5% after heat treatment in air at 1300 °C for 50 h. The produced bodies could be used as high temperature gas filters as indicated from the permeability results. PMID:25685404

  5. Factors Influencing Progressive Failure Analysis Predictions for Laminated Composite Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Norman F., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Progressive failure material modeling methods used for structural analysis including failure initiation and material degradation are presented. Different failure initiation criteria and material degradation models are described that define progressive failure formulations. These progressive failure formulations are implemented in a user-defined material model for use with a nonlinear finite element analysis tool. The failure initiation criteria include the maximum stress criteria, maximum strain criteria, the Tsai-Wu failure polynomial, and the Hashin criteria. The material degradation model is based on the ply-discounting approach where the local material constitutive coefficients are degraded. Applications and extensions of the progressive failure analysis material model address two-dimensional plate and shell finite elements and three-dimensional solid finite elements. Implementation details are described in the present paper. Parametric studies for laminated composite structures are discussed to illustrate the features of the progressive failure modeling methods that have been implemented and to demonstrate their influence on progressive failure analysis predictions.

  6. Static aeroelastic behavior of an adaptive laminated piezoelectric composite wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisshaar, T. A.; Ehlers, S. M.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of using an adaptive material to modify the static aeroelastic behavior of a uniform wing is examined. The wing structure is idealized as a laminated sandwich structure with piezoelectric layers in the upper and lower skins. A feedback system that senses the wing root loads applies a constant electric field to the piezoelectric actuator. Modification of pure torsional deformaton behavior and pure bending deformation are investigated, as is the case of an anisotropic composite swept wing. The use of piezoelectric actuators to create an adaptive structure is found to alter static aeroelastic behavior in that the proper choice of the feedback gain can increase or decrease the aeroelastic divergence speed. This concept also may be used to actively change the lift effectiveness of a wing. The ability to modify static aeroelastic behavior is limited by physical limitations of the piezoelectric material and the manner in which it is integrated into the parent structure.

  7. On the strain energy of laminated composite plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atilgan, Ali R.; Hodges, Dewey H.

    1991-01-01

    The present effort to obtain the asymptotically correct form of the strain energy in inhomogeneous laminated composite plates proceeds from the geometrically nonlinear elastic theory-based three-dimensional strain energy by decomposing the nonlinear three-dimensional problem into a linear, through-the-thickness analysis and a nonlinear, two-dimensional analysis analyzing plate formation. Attention is given to the case in which each lamina exhibits material symmetry about its middle surface, deriving closed-form analytical expressions for the plate elastic constants and the displacement and strain distributions through the plate's thickness. Despite the simplicity of the plate strain energy's form, there are no restrictions on the magnitudes of displacement and rotation measures.

  8. An Enriched Shell Element for Delamination Simulation in Composite Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McElroy, Mark

    2015-01-01

    A formulation is presented for an enriched shell finite element capable of delamination simulation in composite laminates. The element uses an adaptive splitting approach for damage characterization that allows for straightforward low-fidelity model creation and a numerically efficient solution. The Floating Node Method is used in conjunction with the Virtual Crack Closure Technique to predict delamination growth and represent it discretely at an arbitrary ply interface. The enriched element is verified for Mode I delamination simulation using numerical benchmark data. After determining important mesh configuration guidelines for the vicinity of the delamination front in the model, a good correlation was found between the enriched shell element model results and the benchmark data set.

  9. Interlocked fabric and laminated fabric Kevlar 49/epoxy composites

    SciTech Connect

    Guess, T.R.; Reedy, E.D. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The mechanical behavior of a novel interlocked fabric reinforced Kevlar 49/epoxy composite has been measured and compared to those of a laminated Kevlar 49 fabric composite (which served as a reference material). Both composites were 5.0 mm thick, contained the same 50% in-plane fiber volume fraction and were fabricated in a similar manner using the same Dow DER 332 epoxy, Jeffamine T403-hardened resin system. The reference material (Material 1) was reinforced with seven plies of Dupont style 1033 Kevlar 49 fabric. A photomicrograph of a section polished parallel to one of the fiber directions is shown. The interlocked fabric was designed and woven for Sandia National Laboratories by Albany International Research Co., Dedham, MA. The main design criterion was to duplicate a sewn through-the-thickness fabric used in preliminary studies. The interlocked fabric composite (Material 2) contains roughly 4% by volume of through-the-thickness fiber reinforcement for the purpose of improving interlaminar strength. A photomicrograph of a section showing the warp-aligned binder yarns interlocking the six fabric plies together is shown. 2 refs., 8 figs.

  10. Experimental Design on Laminated Veneer Lumber Fiber Composite: Surface Enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meekum, U.; Mingmongkol, Y.

    2010-06-01

    Thick laminate veneer lumber(LVL) fibre reinforced composites were constructed from the alternated perpendicularly arrayed of peeled rubber woods. Glass woven was laid in between the layers. Native golden teak veneers were used as faces. In house formulae epoxy was employed as wood adhesive. The hand lay-up laminate was cured at 150° C for 45 mins. The cut specimen was post cured at 80° C for at least 5 hours. The 2k factorial design of experimental(DOE) was used to verify the parameters. Three parameters by mean of silane content in epoxy formulation(A), smoke treatment of rubber wood surface(B) and anti-termite application(C) on the wood surface were analysed. Both low and high levels were further subcategorised into 2 sub-levels. Flexural properties were the main respond obtained. ANOVA analysis of the Pareto chart was engaged. The main effect plot was also testified. The results showed that the interaction between silane quantity and termite treatment is negative effect at high level(AC+). Vice versa, the interaction between silane and smoke treatment was positive significant effect at high level(AB+). According to this research work, the optimal setting to improve the surface adhesion and hence flexural properties enhancement were high level of silane quantity, 15% by weight, high level of smoked wood layers, 8 out of 14 layers, and low anti termite applied wood. The further testes also revealed that the LVL composite had superior properties that the solid woods but slightly inferior in flexibility. The screw withdrawn strength of LVL showed the higher figure than solid wood. It is also better resistance to moisture and termite attack than the rubber wood.

  11. Fatigue Damage Mechanisms in Advanced Hybrid Titanium Composite Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. Steven; Rhymer, Donald W.; St.Clair, Terry L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Hybrid Titanium Composite Laminates (HTCL) are a type of hybrid composite laminate with promise for high-speed aerospace applications, specifically designed for improved damage tolerance and strength at high-temperature (350 F, 177 C). However, in previous testing, HTCL demonstrated a propensity to excessive delamination at the titanium/PMC interface following titanium cracking. An advanced HTCL has been constructed with an emphasis on strengthening this interface, combining a PETI-5/IM7 PMC with Ti-15-3 foils prepared with an alkaline-perborate surface treatment. This paper discusses how the fatigue capabilities of the "advanced" HTCL compare to the first generation HTCL which was not modified for interface optimization, in both tension-tension (R = 0.1) and tension-compression (R=-0.2). The advanced HTCL under did not demonstrate a significant improvement in fatigue life, in either tension-tension or tension-compression loading. However, the advanced HTCL proved much more damage tolerant. The R = 0.1 tests revealed the advanced HTCL to increase the fatigue life following initial titanium ply damage up to 10X that of the initial HTCL at certain stress levels. The damage progression following the initial ply damage demonstrated the effect of the strengthened PMC/titanium interface. Acetate film replication of the advanced HTCL edges showed a propensity for some fibers in the adjacent PMC layers to fail at the point of titanium crack formation, suppressing delamination at the Ti/PMC interface. The inspection of failure surfaces validated these findings, revealing PMC fibers bonded to the majority of the titanium surfaces. Tension compression fatigue (R = -0.2) demonstrated the same trends in cycles between initial damage and failure, damage progression, and failure surfaces. Moreover, in possessing a higher resistance to delamination, the advanced HTCL did not exhibit buckling following initial titanium ply cracking under compression unlike the initial HTCL.

  12. On the role of CFRP reinforcement for wood beams stiffness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ianasi, A. C.

    2015-11-01

    In recent years, carbon fiber composites have been increasingly used in different ways in reinforcing structural elements. Specifically, the use of composite materials as a reinforcement for wood beams under bending loads requires paying attention to several aspects of the problem such as the number of the composite layers applied on the wood beams. Study consolidation of composites revealed that they are made by bonding fibrous material impregnated with resin on the surface of various elements, to restore or increase the load carrying capacity (bending, cutting, compression or torque) without significant damage of their rigidity. Fibers used in building applications can be fiberglass, aramid or carbon. Items that can be strengthened are concrete, brick, wood, steel and stone, and in terms of structural beams, walls, columns and floors. This paper describes an experimental study which was designed to evaluate the effect of composite material on the stiffness of the wood beams. It proposes a summary of the fundamental principles of analysis of composite materials and the design and use. The type of reinforcement used on the beams is the carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) sheet and plates and also an epoxy resin for bonding all the elements. Structural epoxy resins remain the primary choice of adhesive to form the bond to fiber-reinforced plastics and are the generally accepted adhesives in bonded CFRP-wood connections. The advantages of using epoxy resin in comparison to common wood-laminating adhesives are their gap-filling qualities and the low clamping pressures that are required to form the bond between carbon fiber plates or sheets and the wood beams. Mechanical tests performed on the reinforced wood beams showed that CFRP materials may produce flexural displacement and lifting increases of the beams. Observations of the experimental load-displacement relationships showed that bending strength increased for wood beams reinforced with CFRP composite plates

  13. Validation of the CQUAD4 element for vibration and shock analysis of thin laminated composite plate structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lesar, Douglas E.

    1992-01-01

    The performance of the NASTRAN CQUAD4 membrane and plate element in the analysis of undamped natural vibration modes of thin fiber reinforced composite plates was evaluated. The element provides natural frequency estimates that are comparable in accuracy to alternative formulations, and, in most cases, deviate by less than 10 percent from experimentally measured frequencies. The predictions lie within roughly equal accuracy bounds for the two material types treated (GFRP and CFRP), and for the ply layups considered (unidirectional, cross-ply, and angle-ply). Effective elastic lamina moduli had to be adjusted for fiber volume fraction to attain this level of frequency. The lumped mass option provides more accurate frequencies than the consistent mass option. This evaluation concerned only plates with L/t ratios on the order of 100 to 150. Since the CQUAD4 utilizes first-order corrections for transverse laminate shear stiffness, the element should provide useful frequency estimates for plate-like structures with lower L/t. For plates with L/t below 20, consideration should be given to idealizing with 3-D solid elements. Based on the observation that natural frequencies and mode shapes are predicted with acceptable engineering accuracy, it is concluded that CQUAD4 should be a useful and accurate element for transient shock and steady state vibration analysis of naval ship

  14. Effects of changes in composite lamina properties on laminate coefficient of thermal expansion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tompkins, Stephen S.; Funk, Joan G.

    1992-01-01

    An analytical study of the effects of changes in composite lamina properties on the laminate coefficient of thermal expansion, CTE, has been made. Low modulus graphite/epoxy (T300/934) and high modulus graphite/epoxy (P75/934, P100/934, P120/934), graphite/aluminum (P100/Al), and graphite/glass (HMS/Gl) composite materials were considered in quasi-isotropic and near-zero CTE laminate configurations. The effects of changes in lamina properties on the laminate CTE strongly depend upon the type of composite material as well as the laminate configuration. A 10 percent change in the lamina transverse CTE resulted in changes as large as 0.22 ppm/C in the laminate CTE of a quasi-isotropic Gr/934 laminates. No significant differences were observed in the sensitivities of the laminate CTEs of the P100/934 and P120/934 composite materials due to identical changes in lamina properties. Large changes in laminate CTE can also result from measured temperature and radiation effects on lamina properties.

  15. Failure mode interaction in fiber reinforced laminated composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhakar, Pavana

    A novel computational modeling framework to predict the compressive strength of fiber reinforced polymer matrix composite (FRPC) laminates has been presented. The model development has been motivated by a set of experimental results on the compression response of two different FRPCs. The model accounts for failure mode interaction between kink-banding and interface fracture (or delamination), which are observed in the experimental results. To reduce the size of the computational model, those interfaces that are most susceptible to delamination are first determined through a free-edge stress analysis. Furthermore, 0-axis layers, which are passive in the failure process are represented through an equivalent homogenized model, but the microstructural features of the on-axis layers (zero plies) are retained in the computational model. The predictions of the model matched well with the experimental observations, and they were found to accurately account for failure mechanism interactions. Therefore, this model has the potential to replace the need to carry out large numbers of tests to obtain the compressive strength allowable for FRPC laminates, the latter allowable being an essential element in the design of lightweight FRPC aerostructures. Furthermore, the thesis presents a new computational model to predict fiber/matrix splitting failure, a failure mode that is frequently observed in in-plane tensile failure of FRPC's. By considering a single lamina, this failure mechanism was seamlessly modeled through the development of a continuum-decohesive nite element (CDFE). The CDFE was motivated by the variational multiscale cohesive method (VMCM) presented earlier by Rudraraju et al. (2010) at the University of Michigan. In the CDFE, the transition from a continuum to a non-continuum is modeled directly (physically) without resorting to enrichment of the shape functions of the element. Thus, the CDFE is a natural merger between cohesive elements and continuum elements. The

  16. Simplified sensor design for temperature-strain discrimination using fiber Bragg gratings embedded in laminated composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez-Cobo, L.; Marques, A. T.; Lopez-Higuera, J. M.; Santos, J. L.; Frazão, O.

    2013-05-01

    Several easy-to-manufacture designs based on a pair of Fiber Bragg Gratings structure embedded in Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastic (CFRP) have been explored. These smart composites can be used for strain and temperature discrimination. A Finite Elements Analysis and Matlab software were used to study the mechanical responses and its optical behaviors. The results exhibited different sensitivity and using a matrix method it is possible to compensate the thermal drift in a real application keeping a simple manufacture process.

  17. Behavior of curved laminated composite panels and shells under axial compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramovich, H.; Bisagni, C.

    2015-10-01

    The buckling and post-buckling behavior of curved cylindrical stringer-stiffened laminated composite and metal panels had been investigated both numerically and experimentally. The results were compared to those of cylindrical stringer-stiffened laminated composite shells to yield a way of determining the optimal structure to be used for axial compression loading. For the present tested structures, the composite panels showed the best load-weight ratio.

  18. Development of a realistic stress analysis for fatigue analysis of notched composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphreys, E. A.; Rosen, B. W.

    1979-01-01

    A finite element stress analysis which consists of a membrane and interlaminar shear spring analysis was developed. This approach was utilized in order to model physically realistic failure mechanisms while maintaining a high degree of computational economy. The accuracy of the stress analysis predictions is verified through comparisons with other solutions to the composite laminate edge effect problem. The stress analysis model was incorporated into an existing fatigue analysis methodology and the entire procedure computerized. A fatigue analysis is performed upon a square laminated composite plate with a circular central hole. A complete description and users guide for the computer code FLAC (Fatigue of Laminated Composites) is included as an appendix.

  19. Experimental verification of tapping sound analysis for the inspection of laminated composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Joon S.; Kim, Seung J.

    2002-06-01

    In this paper, an experimental study was performed to investigate the possibility of a new NDE system - Tapping Sound Analysis (TSA). The tapping sound and contact force of healthy laminated composite structure and defective laminated composite structure were measured using tapping device. The feature extraction method based on the wavelet packet transform was used to extract features from the tapping sound. Comparing the feature of the tapping sound of healthy structure and defective structure, a feature index could be derived, which indicates the existence of defect inside the laminated composite structure. Using the feature index, the difference between the tapping sound data of the present specimens could be expressed as a single value.

  20. The experimental behavior of spinning pretwisted laminated composite plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosmatka, John B.; Lapid, Alex J.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of the research is to gain an understanding of the material and geometric couplings present in advanced composite turbo-propellers. Twelve pre-twisted laminated composite plates are tested. Three different ply lay-ups (2 symmetric and 1 asymmetric) and four different geometries (flat and 30x pre-twist about the mid-chord, quarter-chord, and leading edge) distinguish each plate from one another. Four rotating and non-rotating tests are employed to isolate the material and geometric couplings of an advanced turbo propeller. The first series of tests consist of non-rotating static displacement, strain, and vibrations. These tests examine the effects of ply lay-up and geometry. The second series of tests consist of rotating displacement, strain, and vibrations with various pitch and sweep settings. These tests utilize the Dynamic Spin Rig Facility at the NASA Lewis Research Center. The rig allows the spin testing of the plates in a near vacuum environment. The tests examine how the material and plate geometry interact with the pitch and sweep geometry of an advanced turbo-propeller.

  1. Buckling characteristic of multi-laminated composite elliptical cylindrical shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassegne, Samuel Kinde; Chun, Kyoung-Sik

    2015-03-01

    Fiber-reinforced composite materials continue to experience increased adoption in aerospace, marine, automobile, and civil structures due to their high specific strength, high stiffness, and light weight. This increased use has been accompanied by applications involving non-traditional configurations such as compression members with elliptical cross-sections. To model such shapes, we develop and report an improved generalized shell element called 4EAS-FS through a combination of enhanced assumed strain and the substitute shear strain fields. A flat shell element has been developed by combining a membrane element with drilling degree-of-freedom and a plate bending element. We use the element developed to determine specifically buckling loads and mode shapes of composite laminates with elliptical cross-section including transverse shear deformations. The combined influence of shell geometry and elliptical cross-sectional parameters, fiber angle, and lay-up on the buckling loads of an elliptical cylinder is examined. It is hoped that the critical buckling loads and mode shapes presented here will serve as a benchmark for future investigations.

  2. Integration of active fiber composite (AFC) sensors/actuators into glass/epoxy laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnykowycz, Mark M.; Kornmann, Xavier; Huber, Christian; Brunner, Andreas J.; Barbezat, Michel

    2005-05-01

    In the current study Active Fiber Composites (AFC) utilizing Lead-Zirconate-Titanate (PZT) fibers with Kapton screen printed interdigitated electrodes (IDE) were integrated into orthotropic glass fiber reinforced plastic (GFRP) laminates to investigate integration issues associated with smart structures and host laminate integrity. To aid in this goal surrogate or "Dummy" AFC (DAFC) were designed using a GFRP core and Kapton outer layers to match the longitudinal mechanical and interface properties of the AFC. These DAFC were used in place of real AFC to expedite test specimen manufacture and evaluation. This allowed efficient investigation of the impact of an integrated AFC-like inclusion on laminate mechanical integrity. Two integration techniques, cutout and simple insertion were investigated using DAFC, with little difference seen between the integrity of laminates prepared using these two methods. Using this testing scheme the influence of device placement in relation to position extending away from the laminate symmetric axis was found to have an effect on laminate integrity in tensile loading. As the DAFC were placed far from the laminate symmetry axis, the ultimate tensile strength and strain of the laminates decreased in a linear manner while the Young's modulus of the laminates remained constant. Similar trends were observed with integrated AFC specimens. The performance of integrated AFC was characterized using monotonic cyclic tensile loading with increasing strain levels. A transition region was observed between strains of 0.05%-0.50%, with a dramatic decrease in AFC sensitivity from a maximum to minimum value.

  3. Graphite/epoxy Composite Laminates with Co-cured Interlaminar Damping Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pereira, J. Michael

    1993-01-01

    Damped composite laminates were fabricated by co-curing viscoelastic damping film with graphite/epoxy prepreg plies. The dynamic response of the damped plates was measured using an impulse response technique and compared with the response of similar undamped laminates. Modal damping was computed from the frequency response data. Micrographs of the damped laminates showed that the damping layers retained their integrity during the fabrication process. The layers significantly increased the damping in the composite laminates. The use of the constrained viscoelastic film as an integral part of composite structures appears to be a feasible approach to passive vibration control. Composite plates manufactured with co-cured damping layers may have commercial applications in cases where light weight, strength, and vibration and noise reduction are important considerations.

  4. Superplasticity in an ultrahigh carbon steel-aluminum bronze laminated composite

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, H.C.; Higashi, K.; Sherby, O.D.

    1993-12-31

    Metal laminated composites based on ultrahigh carbon steel (UHCS) and aluminum bronze can be readily prepared by solid state bonding procedures at relatively low temperatures (670 to 700{degree}C). This is attributed to the fine grain size present in each component. No apparent interdiffusion occurs between the UHCS and aluminum bronze layers either during the solid state bonding steps or during superplastic flow below the transformation temperature of UHCS (770{degree}C). Interdiffusion does occur between the UHCS and aluminum bronze layers when the laminated composite is heated above 770{degree}C as a result of the dissolution of the iron carbides to form austenite. It is shown that a high strain-rate-sensitivity exponent (m = 0.5) can be achieved in the UHCS/bronze laminated composite at elevated temperatures (750 to 850{degree}C) and at low strain rates. High elongations are observed in the laminated composite under these conditions, with a maximum elongation of 650% noted at 750{degree}C. The UHCS/bronze laminated composite shows different mechanical characteristics from a UHCS/brass laminated composite. Brass readily cracks at elevated temperature and prevents the achievement of high elongations in a UHCS/brass composite even when the strain-rate-sensitivity is high. The aluminum bronze is fine-grained and does not form cracks during elevated temperature deformation.

  5. Nonlinear vibrations of thin arbitrarily laminated composite plates subjected to harmonic excitations using DKT elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiang, C. K.; Xue, David Y.; Mei, Chuh

    1993-01-01

    A finite element formulation is presented for determining the large-amplitude free and steady-state forced vibration response of arbitrarily laminated anisotropic composite thin plates using the Discrete Kirchhoff Theory (DKT) triangular elements. The nonlinear stiffness and harmonic force matrices of an arbitrarily laminated composite triangular plate element are developed for nonlinear free and forced vibration analyses. The linearized updated-mode method with nonlinear time function approximation is employed for the solution of the system nonlinear eigenvalue equations. The amplitude-frequency relations for convergence with gridwork refinement, triangular plates, different boundary conditions, lamination angles, number of plies, and uniform versus concentrated loads are presented.

  6. Composite laminates with spatially varying fiber orientations - 'Variable stiffness panel concept'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guerdal, Zafer; Olmedo, Reynaldo

    1992-01-01

    A solution has been obtained to the plane elasticity problem for a symmetrically laminated composite panel with spatially varying fiber orientations. Since variation of the fiber angles along the length of a composite laminate results in stiffness properties that change as a function of location, the laminates are called variable stiffness panels. An analysis of the stiffness variation and its effect on the elastic response of the panel is presented here. A numerical solution has been obtained using an iterative collocation technique. Corresponding closed-form solutions are given for three different sets of boundary conditions. Two of the cases considered have exact solutions and thus serve to validate the numerical model.

  7. Evaluation of a Progressive Failure Analysis Methodology for Laminated Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sleight, David W.; Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Wang, John T.

    1997-01-01

    A progressive failure analysis methodology has been developed for predicting the nonlinear response and failure of laminated composite structures. The progressive failure analysis uses C plate and shell elements based on classical lamination theory to calculate the in-plane stresses. Several failure criteria, including the maximum strain criterion, Hashin's criterion, and Christensen's criterion, are used to predict the failure mechanisms. The progressive failure analysis model is implemented into a general purpose finite element code and can predict the damage and response of laminated composite structures from initial loading to final failure.

  8. The compact tension, C(T), specimen in laminated composite testing

    SciTech Connect

    Minnetyan, L.; Chamis, C.C.

    1997-12-31

    Use of the compact tension, C(T), specimens in laminated composites testing is investigated by considering two examples. A new computational methodology that scales up constituent material properties, stress, and strain limits to the structure level is used to evaluate damage propagation stages as well as the structural fracture load. Damage initiation, growth, accumulation, progressive fracture, and ultimate fracture modes are identified. Specific dependences of C(T) specimen test characteristics on laminate configuration and composite constituent properties are quantified.

  9. Improvement of Delamination Resistance in Composite Laminates with Nano-Interlayers (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    AFRL-ML-WP-TP-2006-409 IMPROVEMENT OF DELAMINATION RESISTANCE IN COMPOSITE LAMINATES WITH NANO - INTERLAYERS (PREPRINT) Sangwook Sihn, Jin W...IMPROVEMENT OF DELAMINATION RESISTANCE IN COMPOSITE LAMINATES WITH NANO -INTERLAYERS (PREPRINT) 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 62102F 5d. PROJECT NUMBER...is a nano -interlayer which can be fabricated in the form of either a thin film of nano -modified epoxy reinforced with vapor grown nanofibers or a

  10. A new analysis for the static strength of bolted joint in composite laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ping; Zhang, Kaida

    1992-04-01

    A new finite element program was developed for analyzing the static strength of bolted joint in composite laminates. Two fracture models were introduced in estimating the failure of mechanical joints. Theoretical results of ultimate stress as well as failure propagation were given for 21 different orientations of T300/648 Carbon/epoxy composite laminates. These results are in satisfactory agreement with the test data.

  11. Mesophase pitch-based carbon fiber for improved inflammability of CFRP

    SciTech Connect

    Nakagoshi, Akira; Tomonoh, Shigeki; Sakamoto, Yosihiro

    1995-10-01

    Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastics (CFRP) are extensively used because of their favorable physical properties such as high strength-to-weight ratio and small thermal expansion. However, flammability of CFRP has limited their application especially in the transportation and industrial field. Exposed to flame, CFRP laminates made of PAN-based carbon fibers burst into flame in short time, while CFRP laminates made from mesophase pitch-based carbon fibers don`t burst into flame. This paper describes the experimental results of local heating test by gas burner. When the flame temperature was 1,000 C, a CFRP laminate made from PAN-based carbon fiber burned within 40 sec. Under the same condition, a CFRP laminate made from mesophase pitch-based carbon fiber didn`t burn in 10 min. The matrix resin of both laminates was 250 F curable epoxy resin. This behavior mainly depends upon the thermal conductivity of the carbon fibers. The mesophase pitch-based carbon fibers have high thermal conductivity, so they can diffuse thermal energy and lower laminate surface temperature. On the other hand, PAN-based carbon fibers have low thermal conductivity, so they can`t diffuse thermal energy enough, and the laminates made from them burn easily. Mechanical properties of CFRP during local heating test in comparison with Aluminum plate are also discussed.

  12. Refined Zigzag Theory for Laminated Composite and Sandwich Plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tessler, Alexander; DiSciuva, Marco; Gherlone, Marco

    2009-01-01

    A refined zigzag theory is presented for laminated-composite and sandwich plates that includes the kinematics of first-order shear deformation theory as its baseline. The theory is variationally consistent and is derived from the virtual work principle. Novel piecewise-linear zigzag functions that provide a more realistic representation of the deformation states of transverse-shear-flexible plates than other similar theories are used. The formulation does not enforce full continuity of the transverse shear stresses across the plate s thickness, yet is robust. Transverse-shear correction factors are not required to yield accurate results. The theory is devoid of the shortcomings inherent in the previous zigzag theories including shear-force inconsistency and difficulties in simulating clamped boundary conditions, which have greatly limited the accuracy of these theories. This new theory requires only C(sup 0)-continuous kinematic approximations and is perfectly suited for developing computationally efficient finite elements. The theory should be useful for obtaining relatively efficient, accurate estimates of structural response needed to design high-performance load-bearing aerospace structures.

  13. Transverse cracking and stiffness reduction in composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuan, F. G.; Selek, M. C.

    1993-01-01

    A study of transverse cracking mechanism in composite laminates is presented using a singular hybrid finite element model. The model provides the global structural response as well as the precise local crack-tip stress fields. An elasticity basis for the problem is established by employing Lekhnitskii's complex variable potentials and method of eigenfunction expansion. Stress singularities associated with the transverse crack are obtained by decomposing the deformation into the symmetric and antisymmetric modes and proper boundary conditions. A singular hybrid element is thereby formulated based on the variational principle of a modified hybrid functional to incorporate local crack singularities. Axial stiffness reduction due to transverse cracking is studied. The results are shown to be in very good agreement with the existing experimental data. Comparison with simple shear lag analysis is also given. The effects of stress intensity factors and strain energy density on the increase of crack density are analyzed. The results reveal that the parameters approach definite limits when crack densities are saturated, an evidence of the existence of characteristic damage state.

  14. The influence of hole size in static strength and fatigue for CFRP composite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Yip, M.C.; Perng, T.B.

    1993-12-31

    The influence of hole size in static strength and fatigue property will be investigated. Carbon/Epoxy laminate is selected as testing materials which are widely used in aircraft industry. The arrangement of fiber orientation is [0{sup 0}/+45{sup 0}/{minus}45{sup 0}/90{sup 0}]{sub 2s}. The basic mechanical properties of smooth and notched specimens were detected. The strength of notched specimens are applied to compare with Whitney-Nuismer stress criterion. For average stress criteria, the theoretical value is in good agreement with experimental data for the parameter a{sub 0} is chosen 1.5 mm. For point stress criteria, the best choice of parameter do is 2.4 mm, but the agreement of experimental data is poorer than the average stress one. The characteristic curve of tension-tension fatigue for smooth and notched laminate were investigated. The notched specimens has a 1 mm diameter circular hole at the center, the stress ratio of fatigue test is 0.1. It is obvious that the data distribution of smooth specimens is more scatter than notched specimens. On the other hand, the reduction of modulus during fatigue process was inspected. After fatigue damage, the influence of hole size on residual strength for a quasi-isotropic laminate was investigated. It is found that residual strength of damaged specimens are higher than undamaged one in some fatigue damage range. When the maximum applied load of fatigue test is chosen 90 percent of static strength, it is seen that the influence is obviously in residual strength. The increment of strength decreases with hole size increasing. When the maximum applied load of fatigue test is chosen 80 percent of static strength, the influence is less than the previous case. The Whitney-Nuismer Average Stress Criteria is extended to predict the residual strength after fatigue. A good prediction can be shown by using the extended criteria.

  15. A tension-mode fracture model for bolted joints in laminated composites

    SciTech Connect

    Schulz, K.C.; Packman, P.F.; Eisenmann, J.R.

    1995-06-01

    A failure prediction model for bolted joints in generally orthotropic laminated composite plates that fail in the tension mode under bearing loading conditions has been developed. The plate is analyzed as a bulk orthotropic plate whose material properties are determined through the application of classical lamination theory to facilitate practical application of the model. Ply-by-ply laminated analysis is not required. Fracture mechanics concepts are applied to a pseudo-flaw which is related to the physical cracking of the laminate at the joint. The maximum circumferential stress concept is extended to orthotropic materials where both the fracture toughness and stress intensity vary with orientation. Excellent correlation between experimental tests conducted on single-bolt joints for two laminate layups and analytical prediction was found.

  16. Compression strength failure mechanisms in unidirectional composite laminates containing a hole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Eric R.

    1993-01-01

    Experiments on graphite-epoxy laminated plates containing unloaded small holes show that these laminates are notch insensitive. That is, the uniaxial strength of these laminates with small holes exceeds the strength predicted by a point stress criterion using the stress concentration factor for the in-plane stress field. Laminates containing large holes exhibit notch sensitive behavior and consequently their strength is reasonably well predicted by the stress concentration effect. This hole size effect is manifested both in tension and in compression. Apparently, some mechanism must cause in-plane stress relief for laminates containing small holes. The purpose of this research was to study the influence of geometric nonlinearity on the micromechanical response of a filamentary composite material in the presence of a strain gradient caused by a discontinuity such as a hole. A mathematical model was developed at the micromechanical level to investigate this geometrically nonlinear effect.

  17. A Higher-Order Bending Theory for Laminated Composite and Sandwich Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Geoffrey M.

    1997-01-01

    A higher-order bending theory is derived for laminated composite and sandwich beams. This is accomplished by assuming a special form for the axial and transverse displacement expansions. An independent expansion is also assumed for the transverse normal stress. Appropriate shear correction factors based on energy considerations are used to adjust the shear stiffness. A set of transverse normal correction factors is introduced, leading to significant improvements in the transverse normal strain and stress for laminated composite and sandwich beams. A closed-form solution to the cylindrical elasticity solutions for a wide range of beam aspect ratios and commonly used material systems. Accurate shear stresses for a wide range of laminates, including the challenging unsymmetric composite and sandwich laminates, are obtained using an original corrected integration scheme. For application of the theory to a wider range of problems, guidelines for finite element approximations are presented.

  18. Tensile stress-strain behavior of hybrid composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    A study was made of the stress-strain response of several hybrid laminates, and the damage was correlated with nonlinear stress-strain response and ultimate strength. The fibers used in the laminates were graphite, S-glass, and Kevlar. Some laminates with graphite fibers had perforated Mylar film between plies, which lowered the interlaminar bond strength. The laminate configurations were chosen to be like those of buffer strips in large panels and fracture coupons. Longitudinal and transverse specimens were loaded in tension to failure. Some specimens were radiographed to reveal damage due to edge effects. Stress-strain response is discussed in terms of damage shown by the radiographs. Ultimate strengths are compared with simple failure criteria, one of which account for damage.

  19. Characterization of delamination onset and growth in a composite laminate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obrien, T. K.

    1981-01-01

    The onset and growth of delaminations in unnotched (+ or - 30/+ or - 30/90/90 bar) sub S graphite epoxy laminates is described quantitatively. These laminates, designed to delaminate at the edges under tensile loads, were tested and analyzed. Delamination growth and stiffness loss were monitored nondestructively. Laminate stiffness decreased linearly with delamination size. The strain energy release rate, G, associated with delamination growth, was calculated from two analyses. A critical G for delamination onset was determined, and then was used to predict the onset of delaminations in (+45 sub n/-45 sub n/o sub n/90 sub n) sub s (n=1,2,3) laminates. A delamination resistance curve (R curve) was developed to characterize the observed stable delamination growth under quasi static loading. A power law correlation between G and delamination growth rates in fatigue was established.

  20. Development and Application of Optimization Techniques for Composite Laminates.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-09-01

    Table Page 1. Algorithm Performance ............. 40 2. Material Properties .............. 51 3. Comparison of Approximate Strain-Sphere to Tsai-Wu...constraint, based on "smeared" laminate properties . The optimization routines are coupled to a finite element code to update the stress state as the...failure criteria with a 4 ,- _ . ~ . - -. - ° - .l ’ ’ • -_ , . ,- .. - ,c." . . -. -.- : . . . . . . . .• r -"- - - complete set of laminate property

  1. Compression response of thick layer composite laminates with through-the-thickness reinforcement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, Gary L.; Smith, Barry T.; Maiden, Janice

    1992-01-01

    Compression and compression-after-impact (CAI) tests were conducted on seven different AS4-3501-6 (0/90) 0.64-cm thick composite laminates. Four of the seven laminates had through-the-thickness (TTT) reinforcement fibers. Two TTT reinforcement methods, stitching and integral weaving, and two reinforcement fibers, Kevlar and carbon, were used. The remaining three laminates were made without TTT reinforcements and were tested to establish a baseline for comparison with the laminates having TTT reinforcement. Six of the seven laminates consisted of nine thick layers whereas the seventh material was composed of 46 thin plies. The use of thick-layer material has the potential for reducing structural part cost because of the reduced part count (layers of material). The compression strengths of the TTT reinforced laminates were approximately one half those of the materials without TTT reinforcements. However, the CAI strengths of the TTT reinforced materials were approximately twice those of materials without TTT reinforcements. The improvement in CAI strength is due to an increase in interlaminar strength produced by the TTT reinforcement. Stitched laminates had slightly higher compression and CAI strengths than the integrally woven laminates.

  2. Probabilistic and structural reliability analysis of laminated composite structures based on the IPACS code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sobel, Larry; Buttitta, Claudio; Suarez, James

    1993-01-01

    Probabilistic predictions based on the Integrated Probabilistic Assessment of Composite Structures (IPACS) code are presented for the material and structural response of unnotched and notched, 1M6/3501-6 Gr/Ep laminates. Comparisons of predicted and measured modulus and strength distributions are given for unnotched unidirectional, cross-ply, and quasi-isotropic laminates. The predicted modulus distributions were found to correlate well with the test results for all three unnotched laminates. Correlations of strength distributions for the unnotched laminates are judged good for the unidirectional laminate and fair for the cross-ply laminate, whereas the strength correlation for the quasi-isotropic laminate is deficient because IPACS did not yet have a progressive failure capability. The paper also presents probabilistic and structural reliability analysis predictions for the strain concentration factor (SCF) for an open-hole, quasi-isotropic laminate subjected to longitudinal tension. A special procedure was developed to adapt IPACS for the structural reliability analysis. The reliability results show the importance of identifying the most significant random variables upon which the SCF depends, and of having accurate scatter values for these variables.

  3. Laminated exfoliated graphite composite-metal compositions for fuel cell flow field plate or bipolar plate applications

    DOEpatents

    Zhamu, Aruna; Shi, Jinjun; Guo, Jiusheng; Jang, Bor Z

    2014-05-20

    An electrically conductive laminate composition for fuel cell flow field plate or bipolar plate applications. The laminate composition comprises at least a thin metal sheet having two opposed exterior surfaces and a first exfoliated graphite composite sheet bonded to the first of the two exterior surfaces of the metal sheet wherein the exfoliated graphite composite sheet comprises: (a) expanded or exfoliated graphite and (b) a binder or matrix material to bond the expanded graphite for forming a cohered sheet, wherein the binder or matrix material is between 3% and 60% by weight based on the total weight of the first exfoliated graphite composite sheet. Preferably, the first exfoliated graphite composite sheet further comprises particles of non-expandable graphite or carbon in the amount of between 3% and 60% by weight based on the total weight of the non-expandable particles and the expanded graphite. Further preferably, the laminate comprises a second exfoliated graphite composite sheet bonded to the second surface of the metal sheet to form a three-layer laminate. Surface flow channels and other desired geometric features can be built onto the exterior surfaces of the laminate to form a flow field plate or bipolar plate. The resulting laminate has an exceptionally high thickness-direction conductivity and excellent resistance to gas permeation.

  4. A novel damage index for fatigue damage detection in a laminated composites using Lamb waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seki, Daigo

    A well-established structural health monitoring (SHM) technique, the Lamb wave based approach, is used for fatigue damage identification in a laminated composite. A novel damage index, 'normalized correlation moment' (NCM) which is composed of the nth moment of the cross correlation of the baseline and comparison waves, was used as damage index for monitoring damage in composites and compared with the signal difference coefficient (SDC) which is one of the most commonly used damage indices. Composite specimens were fabricated by the hand layup method by followed by compression. Piezo electric disks mounted on composite specimens were used as actuators and sensors. Three point bending fatigue tests were carried out on an intact composite laminate and a delaminated composite laminate with [06/904/06] orientation. Finite element analysis was performed to test the validity of SDC and NCM for fatigue damage.

  5. Effects of Delaminations on the Damped Dynamic Characteristics of Composite Laminates: Mechanics and Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saravanos, D. A.; Hopkins, D. A.

    1995-01-01

    Analytical and experimental work is presented on the damped free-vibration of delaminated laminates and beams. A laminate theory is developed where the unknown kinematic perturbations induced by a delamination crack are treated as additional degrees of freedom. The generalized stiffness, inertia and damping matrices of the laminate are formulated. An analytical solution is developed for the prediction of natural frequencies, modes and modal damping in composite beams with delamination cracks. Evaluations of the mechanics on various cantilever beams with a central delamination are performed. Experimental results for the modal frequencies and damping of composite beams with a single delamination are also presented and correlations between analytical predictions and measured data are shown. The effects of delamination vary based on crack size, laminate configuration, and mode order. The implications of the mechanics in developing delamination detection techniques are also discussed.

  6. Implementation of Laminate Theory Into Strain Rate Dependent Micromechanics Analysis of Polymer Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Robert K.

    2000-01-01

    A research program is in progress to develop strain rate dependent deformation and failure models for the analysis of polymer matrix composites subject to impact loads. Previously, strain rate dependent inelastic constitutive equations developed to model the polymer matrix were implemented into a mechanics of materials based micromechanics method. In the current work, the computation of the effective inelastic strain in the micromechanics model was modified to fully incorporate the Poisson effect. The micromechanics equations were also combined with classical laminate theory to enable the analysis of symmetric multilayered laminates subject to in-plane loading. A quasi-incremental trapezoidal integration method was implemented to integrate the constitutive equations within the laminate theory. Verification studies were conducted using an AS4/PEEK composite using a variety of laminate configurations and strain rates. The predicted results compared well with experimentally obtained values.

  7. Fracture behavior of unidirectional boron/aluminum composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goree, J. G.; Jones, W. F.

    1983-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to verify the results of mathematical models which predict the stresses and displacements of fibers and the amount of damage growth in a center-notched lamina as a function of the applied remote stress and the matrix and fiber material properties. A brittle lacquer coating was used to detect the yielding in the matrix while X-ray techniques were used to determine the number of broken fibers in the laminate. The notched strengths and the amounts of damage found in the specimens agree well with those predicted by the mathematical model. It is shown that the amount of damage and the crack opening displacement does not depend strongly on the number of plies in the laminate for a given notch width. By heat-treating certain laminates to increase the yield stress of the alumina matrix, the effect of different matrix properties on the fracture behavior was investigated. The stronger matrix is shown to weaken the notched laminate by decreasing the amount of matrix damage, thereby making the laminate more notch sensitive.

  8. Effect of stacking sequence on the coefficients of mutual influence of composite laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupir (Hudișteanu, I.; Țăranu, N.; Axinte, A.

    2016-11-01

    Fiber reinforced polymeric (FRP) composites are nowadays widely used in engineering applications due to their outstanding features, such as high specific strength and specific stiffness as well as good corrosion resistance. A major advantage of fibrous polymeric composites is that their anisotropy can be controlled through suitable choice of the influencing parameters. The unidirectional fiber reinforced composites provide much higher longitudinal mechanical properties compared to the transverse ones. Therefore, composite laminates are formed by stacking two or more laminas, with different fiber orientations, as to respond to complex states of stresses. These laminates experience the effect of axial-shear coupling, which is caused by applying normal or shear stresses, implying shear or normal strains, respectively. The normal-shear coupling is expressed by the coefficients of mutual influence. They are engineering constants of primary interest for composite laminates, since the mismatch of the material properties between adjacent layers can produce interlaminar stresses and/or plies delamination. The paper presents the variation of the in-plane and flexural coefficients of mutual influence for three types of multi-layered composites, with different stacking sequences. The results are obtained using the Classical Lamination Theory (CLT) and are illustrated graphically in terms of fiber orientations, for asymmetric, antisymmetric and symmetric laminates. Conclusions are formulated on the variation of these coefficients, caused by the stacking sequence.

  9. Design Optimization of Laminated Composite Structures Using Explicit Finite Element Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mika, Krista

    Laminated composite materials are used in aerospace, civil and mechanical structural systems due to their superior material properties compared to the constituent materials as well as in comparison to traditional materials such as metals. Laminate structures are composed of multiple orthotropic material layers bonded together to form a single performing part. As such, the layup design of the material largely influences the structural performance. Optimization techniques such as the Genetic Algorithm (GA), Differential Evolution (DE), the Method of Feasible Directions (MFD), and others can be used to determine the optimal laminate composite material layup. In this thesis, sizing, shape and topology design optimization of laminated composites is carried out. Sizing optimization, such as the layer thickness, topology optimization, such as the layer orientation and material and the number of layers present, and shape optimization of the overall composite part contribute to the design optimization process of laminates. An optimization host program written in C++ has been developed to implement the optimization methodology of both population based and numerical gradient based methods. The performance of the composite structural system is evaluated through explicit finite element analysis of shell elements carried out using LS-DYNA. Results from numerical examples demonstrate that optimization design processes can significantly improve composite part performance through implementation of optimum material layup and part shape.

  10. Effect of angle-ply orientation on compression strength of composite laminates

    SciTech Connect

    DeTeresa, S J; Hoppel, C P

    1999-03-01

    An experimental program was initiated to investigate the effect of angle-ply orientations on the compressive strength (X{sub 1C}) of 0{degree} plies in fiber reinforced composite laminates. Graphite fiber-reinforced epoxy test coupons with the generic architecture [0{sub 2}/{+-}{theta}] (where {theta} varied between 0{degree} and 90{degree}) and for the quasi-isotropic architecture were evaluated. The effective compressive strength of the 0{degree} plies varied considerably. The results were related to the Poisson's ratios of the laminates with high Poisson's ratios leading to high transverse tensile strains in the test coupons and lower than expected strengths. Specimens with the [O{sub 2}/{+-}30] architecture had both the highest Poisson's ratio and the lowest calculated ply-level compression strength for the 0{degree} plies. This work has implications in the selection of composite failure criterion for compression performance, design of test coupons for acceptance testing, and the selection of laminate architectures for optimum combinations of compressive and shear behavior. Two commonly used composite failure criteria, the maximum stress and the Tsai-Wu, predict significantly different laminate strengths depending on the Poisson's ratio of the laminate. This implies that the biaxial stress state in the laminate needs to be carefully considered before backing out unidirectional properties.

  11. Active control of geometrically nonlinear vibrations of functionally graded laminated composite plates using piezoelectric fiber reinforced composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panda, Satyajit; Ray, M. C.

    2009-08-01

    This paper deals with the geometrically nonlinear dynamic analysis of functionally graded (FG) laminated composite plates integrated with a patch of active constrained layer damping (ACLD) treatment. The constraining layer of the ACLD treatment is considered to be made of the piezoelectric fiber reinforced composite (PFRC) material. Each layer of the substrate FG laminated composite plate is made of fiber-reinforced composite material in which the fibers are longitudinally aligned in the plane parallel to the top or bottom surface of the layer and the layer is assumed to be graded in the thickness direction by way of varying the fiber orientation angle across its thickness according to a power-law. The novelty of the present work is that, unlike the traditional laminated composite plates, the FG laminated composite plates are constructed in such a way that the continuous variation of material properties and stresses across the thickness of the plates is achieved. The constrained viscoelastic layer of the ACLD treatment is modeled using the Golla-Hughes-McTavish (GHM) method. Based on the first-order shear deformation (FSDT) theory, a finite element model has been developed to model the open-loop and closed-loop nonlinear dynamics of the overall FG laminated composite plates. Both symmetric and asymmetric FG laminated composite plates are considered as the substrate plates for presenting the numerical results. The analysis suggests the potential use of the ACLD treatment with its constraining layer made of the PFRC material for active control of geometrically nonlinear forced vibrations of FG laminated composite plates. The effect of piezoelectric fiber orientation in the active constraining PFRC layer on the damping characteristics of the overall FG plates is also investigated.

  12. Sensitivity of the coefficients of thermal expansion of selected graphite reinforced composite laminates to lamina thermoelastic properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tompkins, S. S.; Funk, J. G.

    1992-01-01

    An analytical study of the sensitivity of the laminate coefficient of thermal expansion, CTE, to changes in lamina elastic properties has been made. High modulus graphite/epoxy (P75/934, P100/934, P120/934), graphite/aluminum (P100/Al), and graphite/glass (HMS/Gl) composite materials were considered in quasi-isotropic, low thermal stress, and 'near-zero' thermal expansion laminate configurations. The effects of a positive or negative 10 percent change in lamina properties on laminate CTE is strongly dependent upon both the composite material and the laminate configuration. A 10 percent change in all of the lamina properties had very little effect on the laminate CTE of the HMS/Gl composite laminates investigated. The sensitivity and direction of change in the laminate CTE of Gr/934 depended very strongly on the fiber properties. A 10 percent change in the lamina transverse CTE resulted in changes as large as 0.216 ppm/C in the laminate CTE of a quasi-isotropic Gr/934 laminate. No significant difference was observed in the sensitivity of the laminate CTE of the P100/934 and P120/934 composite materials due to changes in lamina properties. Large changes in laminate CTE can result from measured temperature and radiation effects on lamina properties.

  13. Effect of ultrasonic versus manual cementation on the fracture strength of resin composite laminates.

    PubMed

    Ozcan, M; Mese, A

    2009-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of conventional versus ultrasonic cementation techniques on the fracture strength of resin composite laminates. In addition, the failure modes were assessed. Window-type preparations 1 mm above the cemento-enamel junction were made on intact human maxillary central incisors (N=60) of similar size with a depth cutting bur. All the prepared teeth were randomly assigned to six experimental groups (10/per group). Using a highly filled polymeric material (Estenia), laminates were produced and finished. The standard thickness of laminates in original tooth form was achieved using the impression molds made prior to tooth preparation. A three-step bonding procedure and dual polymerized resin composite cement (Panavia F 2.0) was employed. The cementation surfaces of the laminates were conditioned (CoJet-Sand, 30 microm SiO2) and silanized (ESPE-Sil). Laminates in Groups 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 were cemented by five different operators under finger pressure and Group 6 was cemented ultrasonically (Amdent). After excess removal, the laminates were light polymerized. The specimens were stored in water at 37 degrees C for one month prior to the fracture test (universal testing machine, 1 mm/minute). Failure types were classified as: a) Cohesive failure within the composite laminate (Type A), b) Adhesive failure between the tooth and laminate (Type B) and c) Chipping of the laminate with enamel exposure (Type C). No significant difference was found among the mean fracture strength values of the laminates in all the experimental groups (ANOVA, p=0.251). The mean fracture strength values in descending order were: 513 +/- 197, 439 +/- 125, 423 +/- 163, 411 +/- 126, 390 +/- 94, 352 +/- 117 N for Groups 2, 5, 4, 3, 1 and 6, respectively. The majority of failure types was Type A (30/60). While Type B failure was not observed in Group 6 (0/10), Group 1 presented a more frequent incidence of this failure (6/10). The two cementation techniques did not effect the

  14. Reinforcement of composite laminate free edges with U-shaped caps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, W. E.; Gossard, T., Jr.; Jones, R. M.

    1986-01-01

    Generalized plane strain finite element analysis is used to predict reduction of interlaminar normal stresses when a U-shaped cap is bonded to the edge of a laminate. Three-dimensional composite material failure criteria are used in a progressive laminate failure analysis to predict failure loads of laminates with different edge cap designs. In an experimental program, symmetric 11-layer graphite-epoxy laminates with a one-layer cap of Kevlar-epoxy cloth are shown to be 130 to 140 percent stronger than uncapped laminates under static tensile and tension-tension fatigue loading. In addition, the coefficient of variation of the static tensile failure load decreases from 24 to 8 percent when edge caps are added. The predicted failure load calculated with the finite element results is 10 percent lower than the actual failure load. For both capped and uncapped laminates, actual failure loads are much lower than those predicted using classical lamination theory stresses and a two-dimensional failure criterion. Possible applications of the free edge reinforcement concept are described, and future research is suggested.

  15. Progressive Failure Analysis of Laminated Composite Plates with Elliptical or Circular Cutout Using Finite Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakshminarayana, A.; Vijayakumar, R.; Krishnamohana Rao, G.

    2016-09-01

    The progressive failure analysis of symmetrically laminated composite plate [0°/+45°/-45°/90°]2s with circular or elliptical cutout under uniform uniaxial compression loading is carried out using finite element method. Hashin's failure criterion is used to predict the lamina failure. A parametric study has been carried out to study the effect of elliptical / circular cutout orientation, cutout size and plate thickness on the ultimate failure load of laminated composite plate under uni-axial compression loading. It is noticed that elliptical cutout orientation has influence on the strength of the notched composite plates. It is observed that the laminate size of the elliptical/circular cutout and plate thickness has substantial influence on the ultimate failure load of notched composite plates.

  16. Elasticity solutions for a class of composite laminate problems with stress singularities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, S. S.

    1983-01-01

    A study on the fundamental mechanics of fiber-reinforced composite laminates with stress singularities is presented. Based on the theory of anisotropic elasticity and Lekhnitskii's complex-variable stress potentials, a system of coupled governing partial differential equations are established. An eigenfunction expansion method is introduced to determine the orders of stress singularities in composite laminates with various geometric configurations and material systems. Complete elasticity solutions are obtained for this class of singular composite laminate mechanics problems. Homogeneous solutions in eigenfunction series and particular solutions in polynomials are presented for several cases of interest. Three examples are given to illustrate the method of approach and the basic nature of the singular laminate elasticity solutions. The first problem is the well-known laminate free-edge stress problem, which has a rather weak stress singularity. The second problem is the important composite delamination problem, which has a strong crack-tip stress singularity. The third problem is the commonly encountered bonded composite joints, which has a complex solution structure with moderate orders of stress singularities.

  17. Nonlinear Temperature Dependent Failure Analysis of Finite Width Composite Laminates.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-12-01

    tangent modulii obtained by Ramberg-Osgood parameters. It is shown that a’ring stresses and stresses due to tensile loading are significant as edge ... effect in all types of laminate studies. The tensor polynomial failure criterion is used to predict the initiation of failure. The mode of failure is

  18. Experimental method for determination of bending and torsional rigidities of advanced composite laminates

    SciTech Connect

    Maeda, Takenori

    1995-11-01

    This paper presents an experimental method for the determination of the bending and torsional rigidities of advanced fiber composite laminates with the aid of laser holographic interferometry. The proposed method consists of a four-point bending test and a resonance test. The bending rigidity ratio (D{sub 12}/D{sub 22}) can be determined from the fringe patterns of the four-point bending test. The bending rigidities (D{sub 11} and D{sub 22}) and the torsional rigidity (D{sub 66}) are calculated from the natural frequencies of cantilever plates of the resonance test. The test specimens are carbon/epoxy cross-ply laminates. The adequacy of the experimental method is confirmed by comparing the measured rigidities with the theoretical values obtained from classical lamination theory (CLT) by using the measured tensile properties. The results show that the present method can be used to evaluate the rigidities of orthotropic laminates with reasonably good accuracy.

  19. Effect of preload on the fatigue and static strength of composite laminates with defects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, T. R.; Smith, G. T.

    1977-01-01

    The effect of a preload cycle on the structural performance of three graphite/epoxy composite laminates was studied. The layups studied were a laminate typical of general purpose structures (L1), a laminate representative of a filament wound tank (L2), and a laminate representative of turboengine fan blades. The effects of three sizes of simulated initial defects were studied. The tests developed static strength data, fatigue to failure data, and residual static data after application of a predetermined number of fatigue cycles. For L1 specimens, there was a slight trend for the static strength to be greater for preloaded specimens. After application of cyclic loading, however, the influence of preloading was insignificant. In L2 and L3 specimens there was no consistent difference in the static or fatigue results between preloaded and nonpreloaded specimens.

  20. Prediction of Composite Laminate Strength Properties Using a Refined Zigzag Plate Element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barut, Atila; Madenci, Erdogan; Tessler, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    This study presents an approach that uses the refined zigzag element, RZE(exp2,2) in conjunction with progressive failure criteria to predict the ultimate strength of composite laminates based on only ply-level strength properties. The methodology involves four major steps: (1) Determination of accurate stress and strain fields under complex loading conditions using RZE(exp2,2)-based finite element analysis, (2) Determination of failure locations and failure modes using the commonly accepted Hashin's failure criteria, (3) Recursive degradation of the material stiffness, and (4) Non-linear incremental finite element analysis to obtain stress redistribution until global failure. The validity of this approach is established by considering the published test data and predictions for (1) strength of laminates under various off-axis loading, (2) strength of laminates with a hole under compression, and (3) strength of laminates with a hole under tension.

  1. Embedding Piezoresistive Pressure Sensors to Obtain Online Pressure Profiles Inside Fiber Composite Laminates

    PubMed Central

    Kahali Moghaddam, Maryam; Breede, Arne; Brauner, Christian; Lang, Walter

    2015-01-01

    The production of large and complex parts using fiber composite materials is costly due to the frequent formation of voids, porosity and waste products. By embedding different types of sensors and monitoring the process in real time, the amount of wastage can be significantly reduced. This work focuses on developing a knowledge-based method to improve and ensure complete impregnation of the fibers before initiation of the resin cure. Piezoresistive and capacitive pressure sensors were embedded in fiber composite laminates to measure the real-time the pressure values inside the laminate. A change of pressure indicates resin infusion. The sensors were placed in the laminate and the resin was infused by vacuum. The embedded piezoresistive pressure sensors were able to track the vacuum pressure in the fiber composite laminate setup, as well as the arrival of the resin at the sensor. The pressure increase due to closing the resin inlet was also measured. In contrast, the capacitive type of sensor was found to be inappropriate for measuring these quantities. The following study demonstrates real-time monitoring of pressure changes inside the fiber composite laminate, which validate the use of Darcy’s law in porous media to control the resin flow during infusion. PMID:25825973

  2. Embedding piezoresistive pressure sensors to obtain online pressure profiles inside fiber composite laminates.

    PubMed

    Moghaddam, Maryam Kahali; Breede, Arne; Brauner, Christian; Lang, Walter

    2015-03-27

    The production of large and complex parts using fiber composite materials is costly due to the frequent formation of voids, porosity and waste products. By embedding different types of sensors and monitoring the process in real time, the amount of wastage can be significantly reduced. This work focuses on developing a knowledge-based method to improve and ensure complete impregnation of the fibers before initiation of the resin cure. Piezoresistive and capacitive pressure sensors were embedded in fiber composite laminates to measure the real-time the pressure values inside the laminate. A change of pressure indicates resin infusion. The sensors were placed in the laminate and the resin was infused by vacuum. The embedded piezoresistive pressure sensors were able to track the vacuum pressure in the fiber composite laminate setup, as well as the arrival of the resin at the sensor. The pressure increase due to closing the resin inlet was also measured. In contrast, the capacitive type of sensor was found to be inappropriate for measuring these quantities. The following study demonstrates real-time monitoring of pressure changes inside the fiber composite laminate, which validate the use of Darcy's law in porous media to control the resin flow during infusion.

  3. Lightning Strike Ablation Damage Characteristic Analysis for Carbon Fiber/Epoxy Composite Laminate with Fastener

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, J. J.; Li, S. L.; Yao, X. L.; Chang, F.; Li, L. K.; Zhang, X. H.

    2016-08-01

    In order to analyze the lightning strike ablation damage characteristic of composite laminate with fastener, based on the energy-balance relationship in lightning strike, mathematical analysis model of ablation damage of composite laminate with fastener was constructed. According to the model, an effective three dimensional thermal-electrical coupling analysis finite element model of composite laminate with fastener suffered from lightning current was established based on ABAQUS, and lightning strike ablation damage characteristic was analyzed. Analytical results reveal that lightning current could conduct through the thickness direction of the laminate due to the existence of metallic fastener, and then distribute to all layers, finally conducted in-the-plane of each layer, conductive ability of different layup orientations depend on potential distribution and in-the-plane electrical conductivity along potential gradient declining direction; different potential boundaries correspond to different potential distribution in each layer, and result in conductive ability of different layup orientations was changed, then caused different lightning strike ablation damage distribution. According to the investigation in this paper, we can recognize the lightning strike ablation damage characteristic of composite laminate with fastener qualitatively.

  4. Micromechanics-Based Progressive Failure Analysis of Composite Laminates Using Different Constituent Failure Theories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moncada, Albert M.; Chattopadhyay, Aditi; Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Arnold, Steven M.

    2008-01-01

    Predicting failure in a composite can be done with ply level mechanisms and/or micro level mechanisms. This paper uses the Generalized Method of Cells and High-Fidelity Generalized Method of Cells micromechanics theories, coupled with classical lamination theory, as implemented within NASA's Micromechanics Analysis Code with Generalized Method of Cells. The code is able to implement different failure theories on the level of both the fiber and the matrix constituents within a laminate. A comparison is made among maximum stress, maximum strain, Tsai-Hill, and Tsai-Wu failure theories. To verify the failure theories the Worldwide Failure Exercise (WWFE) experiments have been used. The WWFE is a comprehensive study that covers a wide range of polymer matrix composite laminates. The numerical results indicate good correlation with the experimental results for most of the composite layups, but also point to the need for more accurate resin damage progression models.

  5. Equivalent circuit method for resonant magnetoelectric effect in disk-shaped laminated composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ru; Wu, Gaojian; Zhang, Ning

    2015-01-01

    A theoretical model based on equivalent circuit analytical method has been presented for the magnetoelectric (ME) effect in disk-shaped laminated composites. The derived expressions for the ME voltage coefficient can be used to describe the frequency response of ME effect under both open circuit and finite electrical resistance load conditions. It was shown that the resonance frequency and resonant ME voltage coefficient increase with the increase in electrical resistance load in disk-shaped ME laminated composite, which is consistent with the observations for plate-shaped one. The theoretical results show good agreement with the experimental results in Tb0.3Dy0.7Fe1.92 (Terfenol-D)/Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 (PZT)/Terfenol-D disk-shaped sandwich laminated composite. This work is significant for designing ME devices and their signal-processing and electronic circuits.

  6. Analytical method for analyzing c-channel stiffener made of laminate composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumton, Tattchapong

    Composite materials play the important role in the aviation industry. Conventional materials such as aluminum were replaced by composite material on the main structures. The objective of this study focuses on development of analytical method to analyze the laminated composite structure with C-channel cross-section. A lamination theory base closed-form solution was developed to analysis ply stresses on the C-channel cross-section. The developed method contains the effects of coupling due to unsymmetrical of both laminate and structural configuration levels. The present method also included the expression of the sectional properties such as centroid, axial and bending stiffnesses of cross-section. The results obtain from analytical method showed an excellent agreement with finite element results.

  7. Constructing of cure monitoring system with piezoelectric ceramics for composite laminate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshima, Nobuo; Inoue, Kouichi; Motogi, Shinya; Fukuda, Takehito

    2003-08-01

    The cure monitoring system with piezoelectric ceramics is constructed. An embedded type piezoelectric ceramics sensor with flat lead wires is developed. And the piezoelectric ceramics is embedded into composite laminate. A dummy piezoelectric ceramics is set in the autoclave oven. The impedance of the piezoelectric ceramics which is embedded in the composite laminate and that of the dummy piezoelectric ceramics are measured by a LCR meter. The piezoelectric ceramics have strong temperature dependency. The temperature dependency of the impedance of piezoelectric ceramics is corrected by the information from the dummy piezoelectric ceramics. A dielectric sensor is also embedded in the composite laminate as a reference sensor for the degree of cure. The change in calculated cure index shows good correspondence with change in the log ion viscosity which is measured by the dielectric cure monitoring sensor.

  8. Buckling of Carbon Nanotube-Reinforced Polymer Laminated Composite Materials Subjected to Axial Compression and Shear Loadings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riddick, J. C.; Gates, T. S.; Frankland, S.-J. V.

    2005-01-01

    A multi-scale method to predict the stiffness and stability properties of carbon nanotube-reinforced laminates has been developed. This method is used in the prediction of the buckling behavior of laminated carbon nanotube-polyethylene composites formed by stacking layers of carbon nanotube-reinforced polymer with the nanotube alignment axes of each layer oriented in different directions. Linking of intrinsic, nanoscale-material definitions to finite scale-structural properties is achieved via a hierarchical approach in which the elastic properties of the reinforced layers are predicted by an equivalent continuum modeling technique. Solutions for infinitely long symmetrically laminated nanotube-reinforced laminates with simply-supported or clamped edges subjected to axial compression and shear loadings are presented. The study focuses on the influence of nanotube volume fraction, length, orientation, and functionalization on finite-scale laminate response. Results indicate that for the selected laminate configurations considered in this study, angle-ply laminates composed of aligned, non-functionalized carbon nanotube-reinforced lamina exhibit the greatest buckling resistance with 1% nanotube volume fraction of 450 nm uniformly-distributed carbon nanotubes. In addition, hybrid laminates were considered by varying either the volume fraction or nanotube length through-the-thickness of a quasi-isotropic laminate. The ratio of buckling load-to-nanotube weight percent for the hybrid laminates considered indicate the potential for increasing the buckling efficiency of nanotube-reinforced laminates by optimizing nanotube size and proportion with respect to laminate configuration.

  9. Three-Dimensional Elastoplastic Finite Element Analysis of Laminated Composites.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-11-01

    effect near an edge is known as the free edge effect . In an effort to evaluate interlaminar stresses and the influence of the stacking sequence on...addition, the interlaminar normal stress was found to be an edge effect , restricted to a region near the free edge approximately equal to the laminate...noted that the presence of interlaminar stresses might be considered an edge effect restricted to a small region near the free edge. In their work of

  10. Fracture Analysis of Matrix Cracking in Laminated Composites.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-01-01

    several Interfaces. For the laminate shown here, however, onset of edge delamination at 90% of the laminte ,iltimate strength appeir3 t’ be the first...situated ii the laminte mid-plane, the initial delamination growth is primarily of mode-I. To predict the associated delamination onset, it is necessary to...ang) ................................................ 1 E. I. DuPONT COMPANY, Textile Fibers Department, Chestnut Run Location/CR701), Wilmington, DE

  11. Carbon laminates with RE doped optical fibre sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miluski, Piotr; Kochanowicz, Marcin; Żmojda, Jacek; Silva, AbíLio P.; Reis, Paulo N. B.; Dorosz, Dominik

    2016-11-01

    A new type of luminescent optical fibre sensor for structural health monitoring of composite laminates (CFRP) is proposed. The Nd3+ doped multi-core doubleclad fibre incorporated in composite structure was used as a distributed temperature sensor. The change of luminescence intensity (Nd3+ ions) at the wavelength of 880 nm (4F3/2 → 4I9/2) and 1060 nm (4F3/2 → 4I11/2) was used for internal temperature monitoring. The special construction of optical fibre was used as it assures an efficient pumping mechanism and, at same time, it increases the measuring sensitivity. The linear response with relative sensitivity 0.015 K-1 was obtained for temperature range from 30 up to 75ºC. The manufacturing process of CFRP with embedded optical fibre sensor is also discussed.

  12. On the elastic properties of fiber composite laminates with statistically dispersed ply orientations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, E. Y.

    1972-01-01

    Structural application of advanced composite filamentary materials requires lamination of the basic orthotropic plies into angle-ply laminates. The resulting elastic and strength properties depend on the pattern of orientation and are influenced by inevitable errors and inaccuracy in placement of the angle plies. Reviewed is the effect on elastic properties of orientation dispersion. The conventional constitutive relations are recast in a homologous form to account for orientation dispersion by addition of a single parameter. Graphical results are presented to show the behavior of the most important advanced composite materials. The results are directly useful for estimating effects of manufacturing inaccuracy and for design of partially oriented reinforced structures.

  13. On the elastic properties of fiber composite laminates with statistically dispersed fiber and ply orientations.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, E. Y.

    1973-01-01

    Structural application of advanced composite filamentary materials requires lamination of the basic orthotropic plies into angle-ply laminates. This article reviews the effect on elastic properties of orientation dispersion. The conventional constitutive relations are recast in a homologous form to account for uniform orientation dispersion by addition of a single parameter. Graphical results are presented to show the behavior of the most important advanced composite materials. The results are directly useful for estimating effects of manufacturing inaccuracy and for design of partially oriented reinforced structures.

  14. A spectral element for laminated composite beams: theory and application to pyroshock analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruotolo, R.

    2004-02-01

    In this article a spectral element for anisotropic, laminated composite beams is developed. Firstly, the axial-bending coupled equations of motion are derived under the assumptions of the First order Shear Deformation Theory, then the spectral element matrix is formulated. The proposed spectral element is validated by comparing, with corresponding results from the scientific literature, natural frequencies of a number of both orthotropic and anisotropic laminated composite beams and the dynamic response of an anisotropic cantilever beam to high frequency transients. Finally, the application of the proposed element to the evaluation of the dynamic response to a simulated pyroshock of an idealized satellite structure made of sandwich beams is shown.

  15. Microcracking in Composite Laminates: Simulation of Crack-Induced Ultrasound Attenuation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leckey, C. A. C.; Rogge, M. D.; Parker, F. R.

    2012-01-01

    Microcracking in composite laminates is a known precursor to the growth of inter-ply delaminations and larger scale damage. Microcracking can lead to the attenuation of ultrasonic waves due to the crack-induced scattering. 3D elastodynamic finite integration technique (EFIT) has been implemented to explore the scattering of ultrasonic waves due to microcracks in anisotropic composite laminates. X-ray microfocus computed tomography data was directly input into the EFIT simulation for these purposes. The validated anisotropic 3D EFIT code is shown to be a useful tool for exploring the complex multiple-scattering which arises from extensive microcracking.

  16. A {3,2}-Order Bending Theory for Laminated Composite and Sandwich Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Geoffrey M.; Tessler, Alexander

    1998-01-01

    A higher-order bending theory is derived for laminated composite and sandwich beams thus extending the recent {1,2}-order theory to include third-order axial effect without introducing additional kinematic variables. The present theory is of order {3,2} and includes both transverse shear and transverse normal deformations. A closed-form solution to the cylindrical bending problem is derived and compared with the corresponding exact elasticity solution. The numerical comparisons are focused on the most challenging material systems and beam aspect ratios which include moderate-to-thick unsymmetric composite and sandwich laminates. Advantages and limitations of the theory are discussed.

  17. Dual mode fracture of composite laminates penetrated by spherical projectiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czarnecki, G. J.

    The basic for delamination initiation and propagation within an impacted laminate was studied, with an explanation provided for the fracture mode transformation along the projectile's path. Post-impact observations of graphite/epoxy (AS4/3501-6) laminates penetrated by steel spheres (0.5-inch diameter) reveal a fracture mode, similar to shear plugging adjacent to the impacted surface. This fracture mode is contrasted with that of delamination adjacent to the rear surface. The sudden transition from shear plugging to delamination is believed to occur when the projectile interacts with the returning impact-generated tensile wave. To demonstrate the transition, results are presented from ballistically impacted laminates containing a series of imbedded carbon stress and constantan strain gages. Results are based on impact velocities of 1300, 1850, and 2380 f/s. Transverse stress waves are shown capable of creating delamination until attenuated by a local zone of compressed material associated with the on-coming projectile. Based on experimental results, the location of the fracture mode transition plane is predicted both graphically and through a simple equation of motion.

  18. Buckling Analysis of Anti-Symmetric Cross-Ply Laminated Composite Plates Under Different Boundary Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adim, B.; Daouadji, T. Hassaine; Abbes, B.

    2016-11-01

    The buckling analysis of anti-symmetric cross-ply laminated composite plates under different boundary conditions is examined by using a refined higher order exponential shear deformation theory. The theory, which has strong similarity with classical plate theory in many aspects, accounts for a quadratic variation of the transverse shear strains across the thickness and satisfies the zero traction boundary conditions on the top and bottom surfaces of the plate without using shear correction factors. The number of independent unknowns in the present theory is four, as against five in other shear deformation theories. In this investigation, the equations of motion for simply supported thick laminated rectangular plates are derived and obtained through the use of Hamilton's principle. The closed-form solutions of anti-symmetric cross-ply and angle-ply laminates are obtained using Navier solution. Numerical results for critical buckling loads anti-symmetric cross-ply laminated composite plates are presented. The validity of the present study is demonstrated by comparison with other higher-order solutions reported in the literature. It can be concluded that the proposed theory is accurate and simple in solving the buckling behaviors of anti-symmetric cross-ply laminated composite plates under different boundary conditions

  19. Impedance-based structural health monitoring for composite laminates in cryogenic environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, Kevin K.; Tinker, Michael L.; Lassiter, John O.; Eckel, Justin T.

    2003-08-01

    An important way of increasing the payload in a reusable launch vehicle (RLV) is to replace heavy metallic materials by lightweight composite laminates. Compared to metallic materials, composite laminates are a relatively new class of materials and therefore require more attention to ensure the safety and reliability when they are used. Among various parts and systems of the RLV, this study focuses on tanks containing cryogenic fuel. Historically, aluminum alloys have been used as the materials to construct fuel tanks for launch vehicles. To replace aluminum alloys with composite laminates or honeycomb materials, engineers have to make sure that the composites are free of defects before, during, and after launch. In addition, the performance of the composite structures needs to be evaluated constantly. In recent years, the impedance-based health monitoring technique has shown its promise in many applications. A major advantage of this technique is that the procedure is nondestructive in nature and does not perturb the properties and performance of the materials and structures. This paper reports the results of applying the impedance-based nondestructive testing technique to the damage identification of composite laminates at cryogenic temperature. These materials have potential application for fuel tanks in future RLV"s. Regular and single-crystal piezoceramic sensor/actuators are tested to assess their performance under cryogenic temperature.

  20. Performance of smart piezoelectric transducers for structural health monitoring on composite laminates in cryogenic environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, Kevin K.; Tinker, Michael L.; Lassiter, John O.; Wang, Liangsheng

    2004-07-01

    An important way of increasing the payload in a reusable launch vehicle (RLV) is to replace heavy metallic materials by lightweight composite laminates. Engineers and scientists have studied many metallic materials thoroughly, due to the long history of practical usage in many aerospace and aeronautical structures. Compared to metallic materials, composite laminates are a relatively new material and therefore require more attention to ensure the safety and reliability. Among various parts and systems of the RLV, this study focuses on tanks containing cryogenic fuel. Historically, aluminum alloys have been used as the materials to construct fuel tanks for launch vehicles. To replace aluminum alloys with composite laminates or honeycomb materials, engineers have to make sure that the composites are free of defects before, during, and after launch. In addition to robust design and manufacturing procedures, the performance of the composite structures needs to be evaluated constantly. In recent years, the impedance-based health monitoring technique has shown its promise in many applications. This technique makes use of the special properties of smart piezoelectric materials to identify the change of material properties due to the nucleation and progression of damage. A major advantage of this technique is that the procedure is nondestructive in nature and does not perturb the properties and performance of the materials and structures. This paper reports the results of applying the impedance-based nondestructive testing technique to the damage identification of composite laminates at cryogenic temperature. These materials have potential application for fuel tanks in future RLV"s.

  1. The high velocity impact loading on symmetrical and woven hybrid composite laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Martin; Richardson, Mel; Zhang, Zhong Yi

    2007-07-01

    Space structures use fibre composite materials, due to their lightweight. This paper examines the impact response of symmetrical and hybrid composite laminates. Special attention is given to the stacking sequences used. The experimental study of structures has always provided a major contribution to our understanding. Even with the formidable growth in the use and capacity of computing power the need for experimental measurement is as compelling as ever. The design of hybrid composite structures is complicated by the number of design variables and the interaction of the constituents is the composite system. Since it is desirable to experimentally test the design and it is not practical to test a full scale model, the structural/material similitude concept is used to create a small scale model with a similar structural response. In the current study, experimental investigations were carried out to determine the response of four different combinations of hybrid laminates to low-velocity impact loading using an instrumented impact testing machine. Hybrid laminates were fabricated with twill weave carbon fabric and plain weave S2-glass fabric using vacuum assisted resin molding process with SC-15 epoxy resin system. Response of carbon/epoxy and glass/epoxy laminates was also investigated to compare with that of hybrid samples. Square laminates of size 100 mm and nominal thickness of 3 mm were subjected to low-velocity impact loading at four energy levels of 10, 20, 30 and 40 J. Results of the study indicate that there is considerable improvement in the load carrying capability of hybrid composites as compared to carbon/epoxy laminates with slight reduction in stiffness.

  2. Stochastic-Strength-Based Damage Simulation of Ceramic Matrix Composite Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Noel N.; Mital, Subodh K.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Pineda, Evan J.; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.; Arnold, Steven M.

    2016-01-01

    The Finite Element Analysis-Micromechanics Analysis Code/Ceramics Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures (FEAMAC/CARES) program was used to characterize and predict the progressive damage response of silicon-carbide-fiber-reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride matrix (SiC/RBSN) composite laminate tensile specimens. Studied were unidirectional laminates [0] (sub 8), [10] (sub 8), [45] (sub 8), and [90] (sub 8); cross-ply laminates [0 (sub 2) divided by 90 (sub 2),]s; angled-ply laminates [plus 45 (sub 2) divided by -45 (sub 2), ]s; doubled-edge-notched [0] (sub 8), laminates; and central-hole laminates. Results correlated well with the experimental data. This work was performed as a validation and benchmarking exercise of the FEAMAC/CARES program. FEAMAC/CARES simulates stochastic-based discrete-event progressive damage of ceramic matrix composite and polymer matrix composite material structures. It couples three software programs: (1) the Micromechanics Analysis Code with Generalized Method of Cells (MAC/GMC), (2) the Ceramics Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures Life Prediction Program (CARES/Life), and (3) the Abaqus finite element analysis program. MAC/GMC contributes multiscale modeling capabilities and micromechanics relations to determine stresses and deformations at the microscale of the composite material repeating-unit-cell (RUC). CARES/Life contributes statistical multiaxial failure criteria that can be applied to the individual brittle-material constituents of the RUC, and Abaqus is used to model the overall composite structure. For each FEAMAC/CARES simulation trial, the stochastic nature of brittle material strength results in random, discrete damage events that incrementally progress until ultimate structural failure.

  3. Short-wavelength buckling and shear failures for compression-loaded composite laminates. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuart, M. J.

    1985-01-01

    The short-wavelength buckling (or the microbuckling) and the interlaminar and inplane shear failures of multi-directional composite laminates loaded in uniaxial compression are investigated. A laminate model is presented that idealizes each lamina. The fibers in the lamina are modeled as a plate, and the matrix in the lamina is modeled as an elastic foundation. The out-of-plane w displacement for each plate is expressed as a trigonometric series in the half-wavelength of the mode shape for laminate short-wavelength buckling. Nonlinear strain-displacement relations are used. The model is applied to symmetric laminates having linear material behavior. The laminates are loaded in uniform end shortening and are simply supported. A linear analysis is used to determine the laminate stress, strain, and mode shape when short-wavelength buckling occurs. The equations for the laminate compressive stress at short-wavelength buckling are dominated by matrix contributions.

  4. Development and utilization of composite honeycomb and solid laminate reference standards for aircraft inspections.

    SciTech Connect

    Roach, Dennis Patrick; Rackow, Kirk A.

    2004-06-01

    The FAA's Airworthiness Assurance NDI Validation Center, in conjunction with the Commercial Aircraft Composite Repair Committee, developed a set of composite reference standards to be used in NDT equipment calibration for accomplishment of damage assessment and post-repair inspection of all commercial aircraft composites. In this program, a series of NDI tests on a matrix of composite aircraft structures and prototype reference standards were completed in order to minimize the number of standards needed to carry out composite inspections on aircraft. Two tasks, related to composite laminates and non-metallic composite honeycomb configurations, were addressed. A suite of 64 honeycomb panels, representing the bounding conditions of honeycomb construction on aircraft, was inspected using a wide array of NDI techniques. An analysis of the resulting data determined the variables that play a key role in setting up NDT equipment. This has resulted in a set of minimum honeycomb NDI reference standards that include these key variables. A sequence of subsequent tests determined that this minimum honeycomb reference standard set is able to fully support inspections over the full range of honeycomb construction scenarios found on commercial aircraft. In the solid composite laminate arena, G11 Phenolic was identified as a good generic solid laminate reference standard material. Testing determined matches in key velocity and acoustic impedance properties, as well as, low attenuation relative to carbon laminates. Furthermore, comparisons of resonance testing response curves from the G11 Phenolic NDI reference standard was very similar to the resonance response curves measured on the existing carbon and fiberglass laminates. NDI data shows that this material should work for both pulse-echo (velocity-based) and resonance (acoustic impedance-based) inspections.

  5. Novel method for joining CFRP to aluminium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möller, F.; Thomy, C.; Vollertsen, F.; Schiebel, P.; Hoffmeister, C.; Herrmann, A. S.

    The current state of the art in joining of carbon-fibre reinforced composites (CFRP) to metals such as aluminium is - for the case of aircraft structures, e.g.- riveting or bolting. However, to reduce structural weight and improve structural performance, integral, load-bearing aluminium-CFRP-structures are desirable. To produce such structures, a novel joint configuration together with an appropriate thermal, laser-based joining process is suggested by the authors. In this paper, the joint configuration (based on CFRP-Ti-aluminium joints) and the laser beam conduction welding process will be presented, and first specimens obtained will be discussed with respect to their properties. It will be shown that the novel approach is in principle suitable to produce load-bearing CFRP-aluminium structures.

  6. Tensile and compressive failure modes of laminated composites loaded by fatigue with different mean stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rotem, Assa

    1990-01-01

    Laminated composite materials tend to fail differently under tensile or compressive load. Under tension, the material accumulates cracks and fiber fractures, while under compression, the material delaminates and buckles. Tensile-compressive fatigue may cause either of these failure modes depending on the specific damage occurring in the laminate. This damage depends on the stress ratio of the fatigue loading. Analysis of the fatigue behavior of the composite laminate under tension-tension, compression-compression, and tension-compression had led to the development of a fatigue envelope presentation of the failure behavior. This envelope indicates the specific failure mode for any stress ratio and number of loading cycles. The construction of the fatigue envelope is based on the applied stress-cycles to failure (S-N) curves of both tensile-tensile and compressive-compressive fatigue. Test results are presented to verify the theoretical analysis.

  7. Predicting the Failure Behavior of Textile Composite Laminates by Using a Multi-Scale Correlating Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Yan; Chen, Xiuhua; Wang, Hai

    2015-12-01

    This paper investigates the elastic and failure behavior of textile composite laminates by using an analytical multi-scale correlating approach. The analyses are performed under the four scale levels, i.e. the laminate scale, representative unit cell (RUC) scale, tow architecture scale and fiber/matrix scale levels. The correlation between different scales is derived based on the continuum mechanics and homogenization method from which the stress and strain fields in multiple scales can be obtained concurrently. Effective modulus and ultimate failure strengths of different textile composite (plain weave, twill weave and satin weave) laminates are predicted solely from the corresponding constituent properties, braid geometrical parameters and lay-up. The damage and failure mechanisms at the constituent level are also determined by the micromechanical failure criteria. All the predicted results compare favorably with available experimental data. Parametric studies are also performed to examine the effect of various mechanical and geometrical parameters on the resulting mechanical properties.

  8. Fracture and cyclic-fatigue behavior of ductile phase reinforced brittle matrix laminated composites: Effect of laminate orientation and reinforcement layer thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloyer, Donald Ray, Jr.

    The fracture and cyclic fatigue properties of ductile phase reinforced brittle matrix laminated composites have been investigated through the examination of the effect of layer orientation and reinforcement layer thickness on niobium metal reinforced Nbsb3Al intermetallic laminates. Two laminate orientations, the crack arrester and crack divider, were prepared with layer thickness combinations of 50 mum Nb/200 mum Nbsb3Al, 125 mum Nb/500 mum Nbsb3Al, and 250 mum Nb/1000 mum Nbsb3A1. This gave a nominally constant reinforcement volume fraction of 0.2. The fracture and resistance-curve behavior of these laminates has been compared with similarly reinforced in situ particulate and microlaminate composites. The high aspect ratio of the Nb laminates led to improved toughness in the Nbsb3Al matrix by a factor of 10-20. Laminate orientation had a small effect on crack growth resistance, and properties were optimal in the arrester as compared to the divider orientation. In addition, thicker Nb layers yielded improved fracture toughness. The high fracture toughness observed in these laminates resulted from large crack tip shielding zones formed by bridging Nb layers in the crack wake. These zones were of sufficient size that large scale bridging conditions generally dominated. R-curve modeling using weight function methods allowed simple approximations of the bridging traction functions which were then used to make small scale bridging predictions of the steady state toughness for each laminate. Promising fatigue crack growth resistance properties were observed for the Nb/Nbsb3Al laminates evaluated under cyclic loading conditions. The laminates provided significantly better fatigue resistance than both Nbsb3Al and Nb/Nbsb3Al particulate composites. For a given composite layer thickness, the arrester orientation showed improved cyclic crack growth resistance as compared to divider orientation. The enhanced fatigue behavior of these composites resulted from extrinsic

  9. Simulation Based Investigation of Hidden Delamination Damage Detection in CFRP Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leckey, Cara A. C.; Parker, F. Raymond

    2013-01-01

    Guided wave (GW) based damage detection methods have shown promise in structural health monitoring (SHM) and hybrid SHM-nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques. Much previous GW work in the aerospace field has been primarily focused on metallic materials, with a growing focus on composite materials. The work presented in this paper demonstrates how realistic three-dimensional (3D) GW simulations can aid in the development of GW based damage characterization techniques for aerospace composites. 3D elastodynamic finite integration technique is implemented to model GW interaction with realistic delamination damage. A local wavenumber technique is applied to simulation data in order to investigate the detectability of hidden delamination damage to enable accurate characterization of damage extent.

  10. Off-Axis Ratcheting Behavior of Unidirectional Carbon/Epoxy Laminate under Asymmetric Cyclic Loading at High Temperature

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-11-01

    Development of an engineering model for predicting the off-axis ratcheting behavior of a unidirectional CFRP laminate has been attempted. For this purpose...accumulation of ratcheting strain occurs in the unidirectional CFRP laminate, regardless of fiber orientation, and the off-axis ratcheting behavior is similar...allows adequately predicting the off-axis ratcheting behavior of the unidirectional CFRP laminate for different stress ratios as well as for different

  11. Laminate Analyses, Micromechanical Creep Response, and Fatigue Behavior of Polymer Matrix Composite Materials.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-12-01

    FATIGUE BEHAVIOR of POLYMER MATRIX COMPOSITE MATERIALS , 4 " .’* .. . . ". ... .. ... . . ~December 1982 41 .. FINAL REPORT .Army Research Office I I...DEPARTMENT REPORT UWME-DR-201-108-1 LAMINATE ANALYSES, MICROMECHANICAL CREEP RESPONSE, AND FATIGUE BEHAVIOR OF POLYMER MATRIX COMPOSITE MATERIALS...Behavior of Polymer Matrix Composite 16 Sept. 1979 - 30 Nov. 1982 Materials 6 PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER UWME-DR-201-108-1 7. AUTHOR(.) S. CONTRACT

  12. Three-dimensional hybrid-stress finite element analysis of composite laminates with cracks and cutouts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, S. S.

    1985-01-01

    A three-dimensional hybrid-stress finite element analysis of composite laminates containing cutouts and cracks is presented. Fully three-dimensional, hexahedral isoparametric elements of the hybrid-stress model are formulated on the basis of the Hellinger-Reissner variational principle. Traction-free edges, cutouts, and crack surfaces are modeled by imposition of exact traction boundary conditions along element surfaces. Special boundary and surface elements are constructed by introducing proper constraints on assumed stress functions. The Lagrangian multiplier technique is used to enforce ply-interface continuity conditions in hybrid bimaterial composite elements for modeling the interface region in a composite laminate. Two examples are given to illustrate the capability of the present method of approach: (1) the well-known delamination problem in an angle-ply laminate, and (2) the important problem of a composite laminate containing a circular hole. Results are presented in detail for each case. Implications of interlaminar and intralaminar crack initiation, growth and fracture in composites containing cracks and cutouts are discussed.

  13. Evaluation of shear-compressive strength properties for laminated GFRP composites in electromagnet system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Jun Hee; Kim, Hak Kun; Kim, Sam Yeon

    2014-07-01

    Laminated fiber-reinforced composites can be applied to an insulating structure of a nuclear fusion device. It is necessary to investigate the interlaminar fracture characteristics of the laminated composites for the assurance of design and structural integrity. The three methods used to prepare the glass fiber reinforced plastic composites tested in this study were vacuum pressure impregnation, high pressure laminate (HPL), and prepreg laminate. We discuss the design criteria for safe application of composites and the shear-compressive test methods for evaluating mechanical properties of the material. Shear-compressive tests could be performed successfully using series-type test jigs that were inclined 0°, 30°, 45°, 60°, and 75° to the normal axis. Shear strength depends strongly on the applied compressive stress. The design range of allowable shear stress was extended by use of the appropriate composite fabrication method. HPL had the largest design range, and the allowable interlaminar shear stress was 0.254 times the compressive stress.

  14. The behavior of elastic anisotropic laminated composite flat structures subjected to deterministic and random loadings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Librescu, Liviu

    1990-01-01

    Within this research project, the following topics were studied: (1) foundation of the refined theory of flat cross-ply laminated composite flat and curved panels as well as their static and dynamic response analysis; (2) foundation of a geometrically-nonlinear shear-deformable theory of composite laminated flat panels including the effect of initial geometric imperfections and its application in the postbuckling analysis; (3) the study of the dynamic response of shear deformable elastic laminated composite panels to deterministic time-dependent external excitations as the sonic boom and explosive blast type-loadings; (4) the study of the dynamic response of shear deformable elastic laminated composite panels to random excitation as e.g. the one produced by a jet noise or by any time-dependent external excitation whose characteristics are expressed in a statistical sense; and (5) the dynamic stability of fiber-reinforced composite flat panels whose materials (due to e.g. an ambient high temperature field) exhibit a time-dependent physical behavior.

  15. Effect of Electrospun Nanofibers on the Short Beam Strength of Laminated Fiberglass Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinde, Dattaji K.

    High specific modulus and strength are the most desirable properties for the material used in structural applications. Composite materials exhibit these properties and over the last decade, their usage has increased significantly, particularly in automotive, defense, and aerospace applications. The major cause of failures in composite laminates is due to delaminations. Delamination in composite laminates can occur due to fatigue, low velocity impact and other loadings modes. Conventional methods like "through-the-thickness stitching" or "Z-Pinning" have limitations for improving flexural and interlaminar properties in woven composites due to the fact that while improving interlaminar properties, the presence of stitches or Z pins affects in-plane properties. This study investigates the flexural behavior of fiberglass composites interleaved with non-woven Tetra Ethyl Orthosilicate (TEOS) electrsopsun nanofibers (ENFs). TEOS ENFs were manufactured using an electrospinning technique and then sintered. Nanoengineered beams were fabricated by interleaving TEOS ENFs between the laminated fiberglass composites to improve the flexural properties. TEOS ENFs, resin film, and failed fiberglass laminated composites with and without nanofibers were characterized using SEM Imaging and ASTM standard testing methods. A hybrid composite was made by interleaving a non-woven sheet of TEOS ENFs between the fiberglass laminates with additional epoxy resin film and fabricated using the out of autoclave vacuum bagging method. Four commonly used stacking sequences of fiberglass laminates with and without nanofibers were used to study the progressive failure and deformation mechanics under flexural loadings. The experimental study has shown significant improvements in short beam strength and strain energy absorption in the nanoengineered laminated fiberglass composites before complete failure. The modes were investigated by performing detailed fractographic examination of failed specimens

  16. Micromechanics, Fracture Mechanics and Gas Permeability of Composite Laminates for Cryogenic Storage Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sukjoo; Sankar, Bhavani; Ebaugh, Newton C.

    2005-01-01

    A micromechanics method is developed to investigate microcrack propagation in a liquid hydrogen composite tank at cryogenic temperature. The unit cell is modeled using square and hexagonal shapes depends on fiber and matrix layout from microscopic images of composite laminates. Periodic boundary conditions are applied to the unit cell. The temperature dependent properties are taken into account in the analysis. The laminate properties estimated by the micromechanics method are compared with empirical solutions using constituent properties. The micro stresses in the fiber and matrix phases based on boundary conditions in laminate level are calculated to predict the formation of microcracks in the matrix. The method is applied to an actual liquid hydrogen storage system. The analysis predicts micro stresses in the matrix phase are large enough to cause microcracks in the composite. Stress singularity of a transverse crack normal to a ply-interface is investigated to predict the fracture behavior at cryogenic conditions using analytical and finite element analysis. When a transverse crack touches a ply-interface of a composite layer with same fiber orientation, the stress singularity is equal to 1/2. When the transverse crack propagates to a stiffer layer normal to the ply-direction, the singularity becomes less than 1/2 and vice versa. Finite element analysis is performed to predict the fracture toughness of a laminated beam subjected to fracture loads measured by four-point bending tests at room and cryogenic temperatures. As results, the fracture load at cryogenic temperature is significantly lower than that at room temperature. However, when thermal stresses are taken into consideration, for both cases of room and cryogenic temperatures, the difference of the fracture toughness becomes insignificant. The result indicates fracture toughness is a characteristic property, which is independent to temperature changes. The experimental analysis is performed to

  17. A higher-order theory for geometrically nonlinear analysis of composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, J. N.; Liu, C. F.

    1987-01-01

    A third-order shear deformation theory of laminated composite plates and shells is developed, the Navier solutions are derived, and its finite element models are developed. The theory allows parabolic description of the transverse shear stresses, and therefore the shear correction factors of the usual shear deformation theory are not required in the present theory. The theory also accounts for the von Karman nonlinear strains. Closed-form solutions of the theory for rectangular cross-ply and angle-ply plates and cross-ply shells are developed. The finite element model is based on independent approximations of the displacements and bending moments (i.e., mixed finite element model), and therefore, only C sup o -approximation is required. The finite element model is used to analyze cross-ply and angle-ply laminated plates and shells for bending and natural vibration. Many of the numerical results presented here should serve as references for future investigations. Three major conclusions resulted from the research: First, for thick laminates, shear deformation theories predict deflections, stresses and vibration frequencies significantly different from those predicted by classical theories. Second, even for thin laminates, shear deformation effects are significant in dynamic and geometrically nonlinear analyses. Third, the present third-order theory is more accurate compared to the classical and firt-order theories in predicting static and dynamic response of laminated plates and shells made of high-modulus composite materials.

  18. Effect of High Temperature on the Tensile Behavior of CFRP and Cementitious Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toutanji, Houssam A.

    1999-01-01

    Concrete and other composite manufacturing processes are continuing to evolve and become more and more suited for use in non-Earth settings such as the Moon and Mars. The fact that structures built in lunar environments would experience a range of effects from temperature extremes to bombardment by micrometeorites and that all the materials for concrete production exist on the Moon means that concrete appears to be the most feasible building material. it can provide adequate shelter from the harshness of the lunar environment and at the same time be a cost effective building material. With a return to the Moon planned by NASA to occur after the turn of the century, it will be necessary to include concrete manufacturing as one of the experiments to be conducted in one of the coming missions. Concrete's many possible uses and possibilities for manufacturing make it ideal for lunar construction. The objectives of this research are summarized as follows: i) study the possibility of concrete production on the Moon or other planets, ii) study the effect of high temperature on the tensile behavior of concrete, and iii) study the effect of high temperature on the tensile behavior of carbon fiber reinforced with inorganic polymer composites. Literature review indicates that production of concrete on the Moon or other planets is feasible using the indigenous materials. Results of this study has shown that both the tensile strength and static elastic modulus of concrete decreased with a rise in temperature from 200 to 500 C. The addition of silica fume to concrete showed higher resistance to high temperatures. Carbon fiber reinforced inorganic polymer (CFRIP) composites seemed to perform well up to 300 C. However, a significant reduction in strength was observed of about 40% at 400 C and up to 80% when the specimens were exposed to 700 C.

  19. The engineering of construction specifications for externally bonded FRP composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xinbao

    This dissertation, consisting of six technical papers, presents the results of research on the theme of developing engineering and the construction specifications for externally bonded FRP composites. For particular, the work focuses on three critical aspects of the performance of FRP systems: fiber misalignment, corner radius, and lap splice length. Based on both experimental and theoretical investigations, the main contribution of this work is the development of recommendations on fiber misalignment limit, minimum corner radius, lap splice length to be used as guidance in the construction practice of FRP strengthening of concrete structures. The first three papers focus on the strength and stiffness degradation of CFRP laminates from fiber misalignment. It was concluded that misalignment affects strength more than stiffness. In practice, when all fibers in a laminate can be regarded as through fibers, it is recommended to use a reduction factor for strength and no reduction factor for stiffness to account for fiber misalignment. Findings from concrete beams strengthened with misaligned CFRP laminates verified these recommendations. The fourth and fifth papers investigate the effect of corner radius on the mechanical properties of CFRP laminates wrapped around a rectangular cross section. A unique reusable test device was fabricated to determine fiber stress and radial stress of CFRP laminates with different corner radii. Comparison performed with finite element analyses shows that the test method and the reusable device were viable and the stress concentration needs to be considered in FRP laminate wrapped corners. A minimum of 1.0 in. corner radius was recommended for practice. The sixth paper summarizes the research on the lap splice length of FRP laminates under static and repeated loads. Although a lap splice length of 1.5 in. is sufficient for CFRP laminates to develop the ultimate static tensile strength, a minimum of 4.0 in. is recommended in order to

  20. Composite laminate free-edge reinforcement with U-shaped caps. I - Stress analysis. II - Theoretical-experimental correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, W. E.; Gossard, Terry, Jr.; Jones, Robert M.

    1989-01-01

    The present generalized plane-strain FEM analysis for the prediction of interlaminar normal stress reduction when a U-shaped cap is bonded to the edge of a composite laminate gives attention to the highly variable transverse stresses near the free edge, cap length and thickness, and a gap under the cap due to the manufacturing process. The load-transfer mechanism between cap and laminate is found to be strain-compatibility, rather than shear lag. In the second part of this work, the three-dimensional composite material failure criteria are used in a progressive laminate failure analysis to predict failure loads of laminates with different edge-cap designs; symmetric 11-layer graphite-epoxy laminates with a one-layer cap of kevlar-epoxy are shown to carry 130-140 percent greater loading than uncapped laminates, under static tensile and tension-tension fatigue loading.

  1. Low-speed impact damage in filament-wound CFRP composite pressure vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Matemilola, S.A.; Stronge, W.J.

    1997-11-01

    Quasi-static and impact tests were conducted on filament-wound carbon fiber composite pressure vessels to study factors that affect burst pressure. Observed damage included fiber microbuckling, matrix cracking, and delamination. Fiber microbuckling of the outer surface layer near the impact point was the main factor that reduced the burst pressure of the vessels. This type of damage was visually detectable on the surface. For similar levels of missile kinetic energy, the impact damage to filament-wound composite pressure vessels depends on size and shape of the colliding body in the contact area. Burst pressure for a damaged vessel decreases with the ratio of axial length of damaged fibers 1, to vessel wall thickness h, up to a ratio l/h = 3; beyond this length of damaged section the burst pressure was independent of length of damage. Strain measurements near the region of loading showed that damage related to fiber microbuckling is sensitive to strain rate. At locations where impact damage was predominantly due to fiber microbuckling, the failure strain was about six times the strain for microbuckling during quasi-static loading.

  2. Buckling and postbuckling of isogrid-stiffened fiber-composite laminate shells: Analyses and experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, S.S.; Srinivasan, S.; Su, K.B.; Dunham, M.G.

    1994-12-31

    Recent advances in fiber-composites manufacturing and structural efficiency requirements have led to the consideration of large isogrid-stiffened fiber-composite laminate shells for various aeronautical and space structural applications. Very little information, if any, on buckling and postbuckling of these grid-stiffened shells is currently available in the literature. In this paper, a combined analytical and experimental study is reported on the buckling and postbuckling behavior of these filament-wound fiber-composite laminate shells constructed with continuous-filament isogrid stiffeners made of the same composite material system. Solutions from linear bifurcation and geometric nonlinear postbuckling analyses have been obtained for stiffened composite shells, monocoque shells and isogrid stiffeners. Experiments have been conducted in parallel to the analyses, and buckling loads and postbuckling deformation characteristics have been studied for these structures.

  3. Acoustic emission monitoring of unstable damage growth in CFRP composites under tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills-Dadson, B.; Tran, D.; Asamene, K.; Whitlow, T.; Sundaresan, M.

    2017-02-01

    Composite structural members experience extensive and complex damage that accumulate in a relatively steady pace as the structure is quasi-statically loaded. This damage progression which starts as matrix cracks, delaminations, and random fiber breaks, turns unstable when groups of adjacent fibers, ranging from four to ten fibers fail together, after about 85% of ultimate strength, as reported in the literature. Identifying this critical damage that precedes the final fracture has been difficult even in laboratory specimens. There is little consensus on successful use of AE signals to differentiate failure modes. The inability of AE patterns to identify failure modes is likely caused by the limited frequency bandwidth of available AE sensors, and the high attenuation seen in AE signals particularly in the frequency range likely to be associated with fiber fractures. As a part of this study new acoustic emission sensors capable of measuring frequencies to 2 MHz were developed. In addition, composite specimens were instrumented with sufficient number of sensors to capture high frequency signals before they are attenuated. Unidirectional, cross-ply, and quasi-isotropic carbon-epoxy composite tensile specimens were monitored while they were statically loaded to failure. Distinctly different signals corresponding to the three failure modes could be observed. High frequency acoustic emission signals with frequencies well in excess of 1MHz, mostly seen in the last 20% of the loading cycle. Signals with frequencies in the range of 300 kHz to 700 kHz and duration of the order of 50 microseconds, were observed in cross ply and quasi-isotropic specimens, and are believed to be from matrix cracks. Fewer events with frequencies below 300 kHz and duration that exceeded about 200 microseconds are believed to be from delaminations. An important observation in this study is the appearance of groups of near identical waveforms, which are believed to be from clusters of adjacent

  4. Analysis of laminated, composite, circular cylindrical shells with general boundary conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivas, S.

    1974-01-01

    This report develops: (1) a refined approximate theory for the static and dynamic analyses of finite, laminated, composite, circular cylindrical shells with general boundary conditions; (2) an exact three-dimensional analysis of simply supported, laminated, composite, circular cylindrical shells, and (3) a thin-shell theory for laminated, composite, circular cylindrical shells. In the refined approximate theory the displacements are assumed piecewise linear across the thickness and the effects of transverse shear deformations and transverse normal stress are included. A variational approach is followed to obtain the governing differential equations and boundary conditions. A general solution of the governing differential equations is also presented. The results obtained by using the refined approximate theory and the thin-shell theory are compared with the exact results for the case of free vibrations of simply supported, laminated, composite, circular cylindrical shells. The refined approximate theory is very accurate, even for thick shells with short nodal distances, whereas thin-shell theory is reasonably accurate only for thin shells at moderate nodal distances and wave number less than 2.

  5. Lamination residual stresses in hybrid composites, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniel, I. M.; Liber, T.

    1976-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to study lamination residual stresses for various material and loading parameters. The effects of hybridization on residual stresses and residual properties after thermal cycling under load were determined in angle-ply graphite/Kevlar/epoxy and graphite/S-glass/epoxy laminates. Residual strains in the graphite plies are not appreciably affected by the type and number of hybridizing plies. Computed residual stresses at room temperature in the S-glass plies reach values up to seventy-five percent of the transverse strength of the material. Computed residual stresses in the graphite plies exceed the static strength by approximately ten percent. In the case of Kevlar plies, computed residual stresses far exceed the static strength indicating possible early failure of these plies. Static testing of the hybrids above indicates that failure is governed by the ultimate strain of the graphite plies. In thermally cycled hybrids, in general, residual moduli were somewhat lower and residual strengths were higher than initial values.

  6. Structural properties of laminated Douglas fir/epoxy composite material

    SciTech Connect

    Spera, D.A. . Lewis Research Center); Esgar, J.B. ); Gougeon, M.; Zuteck, M.D. )

    1990-05-01

    This publication contains a compilation of static and fatigue and strength data for laminated-wood material made from Douglas fir and epoxy. Results of tests conducted by several organizations are correlated to provide insight into the effects of variables such as moisture, size, lamina-to-lamina joint design, wood veneer grade, and the ratio of cyclic stress to steady stress during fatigue testing. These test data were originally obtained during development of wood rotor blades for large-scale wind turbines of the horizontal-axis (propeller) configuration. Most of the strength property data in this compilation are not found in the published literature. Test sections ranged from round cylinders 2.25 in. in diameter to rectangular slabs 6 in. by 24 in. in cross section and approximately 30 ft long. All specimens were made from Douglas fir veneers 0.10 in. thick, bonded together with the WEST epoxy system developed for fabrication and repair of wood boats. Loading was usually parallel to the grain. Size effects (reduction in strength with increase in test volume) are observed in some of the test data, and a simple mathematical model is presented that includes the probability of failure. General characteristics of the wood/epoxy laminate are discussed, including features that make it useful for a wide variety of applications. 9 refs.

  7. Structural properties of laminated Douglas fir/epoxy composite material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spera, David A.; Esgar, Jack B.; Gougeon, Meade; Zuteck, Michael D.

    1990-01-01

    This publication contains a compilation of static and fatigue strength data for laminated-wood material made from Douglas fir and epoxy. Results of tests conducted by several organizations are correlated to provide insight into the effects of variables such as moisture, size, lamina-to-lamina joint design, wood veneer grade, and the ratio of cyclic stress to steady stress during fatigue testing. These test data were originally obtained during development of wood rotor blades for large-scale wind turbines of the horizontal-axis (propeller) configuration. Most of the strength property data in this compilation are not found in the published literature. Test sections ranged from round cylinders 2.25 in. in diameter to rectangular slabs 6 by 24 in. in cross section and approximately 30 ft. long. All specimens were made from Douglas fir veneers 0.10 in. thick, bonded together with the WEST epoxy system developed for fabrication and repair of wood boats. Loading was usually parallel to the grain. Size effects (reduction in strength with increase in test volume) are observed in some of the test data, and a simple mathematical model is presented that includes the probability of failure. General characteristics of the wood/epoxy laminate are discussed, including features that make it useful for a wide variety of applications.

  8. Process-induced residual stresses and dimensional distortions in advanced laminated composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Xiaokai

    Process induced residual stresses can degrade the performance of composite structures by consuming a significant portion of the strength in certain plies. Cracking due to overload of these plies can then lead to degradation by environmental effects. A technique called cure referencing method (CRM) has been developed for determining the residual stresses in flat laminated composites. In this technique a diffraction grating used for moire interferometry is transferred onto a composite laminate from a master autoclave tool during the curing process. This transfer takes place at the cure temperature where the matrix solidifies from the liquid state. After cure and upon cooling, the deformation of the composite is recorded with moire interferometry using the tool grating as the reference. The deformation of the composite is then a function of the thermal contraction due to the temperature difference from the cure temperature to room temperature and the deformation caused by chemical shrinkage. These measurements are first conducted on a unidirectional lamina. Using a specially designed oven, the thermal contraction component of the deformation is separated from the overall deformation. For flat multidirectional symmetrical laminates, the residual stresses in each layer and the in-plane dimensional distortions of the laminate are then calculated from the unidirectional information, constitutive equations, equilibrium equations, and compatibility conditions. Several assumptions, which are similar to those used in laminate theory, are also adopted. An independent method called shadow moire is used to validate CRM. The shadow moire method is used to measure the curvature of asymmetrical laminates while the lamination theory is used to calculate the curvature from lamina strain information measured with CRM. Good agreement validates the CRM. In addition, process induced strains on multi-directional composites were measured with the CRM. The validation of CRM and the

  9. Conditions for Symmetries in the Buckle Patterns of Laminated-Composite Plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Michael P.

    2012-01-01

    Conditions for the existence of certain symmetries to exist in the buckle patterns of symmetrically laminated composite plates are presented. The plates considered have a general planform with cutouts, variable thickness and stiffnesses, and general support and loading conditions. The symmetry analysis is based on enforcing invariance of the corresponding eigenvalue problem for a group of coordinate transformations associated with buckle patterns commonly exhibited by symmetrically laminated plates. The buckle-pattern symmetries examined include a central point of inversion symmetry, one plane of reflective symmetry, and two planes of reflective symmetry.

  10. Boundary-layer effects in composite laminates: Free-edge stress singularities, part 6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wanag, S. S.; Choi, I.

    1981-01-01

    A rigorous mathematical model was obtained for the boundary-layer free-edge stress singularity in angleplied and crossplied fiber composite laminates. The solution was obtained using a method consisting of complex-variable stress function potentials and eigenfunction expansions. The required order of the boundary-layer stress singularity is determined by solving the transcendental characteristic equation obtained from the homogeneous solution of the partial differential equations. Numerical results obtained show that the boundary-layer stress singularity depends only upon material elastic constants and fiber orientation of the adjacent plies. For angleplied and crossplied laminates the order of the singularity is weak in general.

  11. Simulating Initial and Progressive Failure of Open-Hole Composite Laminates under Tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Zhangxin; Zhu, Hao; Li, Yongcun; Han, Xiaoping; Wang, Zhihua

    2016-12-01

    A finite element (FE) model is developed for the progressive failure analysis of fiber reinforced polymer laminates. The failure criterion for fiber and matrix failure is implemented in the FE code Abaqus using user-defined material subroutine UMAT. The gradual degradation of the material properties is controlled by the individual fracture energies of fiber and matrix. The failure and damage in composite laminates containing a central hole subjected to uniaxial tension are simulated. The numerical results show that the damage model can be used to accurately predicte the progressive failure behaviour both qualitatively and quantitatively.

  12. Thermally-induced, geometrically nonlinear response of symmetrically laminated composite plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyers, C. A.; Hyer, M. W.

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses the thermally-induced geometrically nonlinear response of symmetrically laminated composite plates. The plate response is due to a temperature increase that is uniform in the plane of the plate but has a slight gradient through the thickness. The case of a completely uniform temperature increase but with an initial out-of-plane imperfection in the plate is also considered. Because they are closely allied problems, thermal buckling and postbuckling are discussed. Using variational methods in conjunction with a Rayleigh-Ritz formulation, these responses are investigated for two laminates, a (+/- 45/0/90)s and a (+/- 45/02)s, under two different simple support conditions.

  13. ANISAP: A three-dimensional finite element program for laminated composites subjected to mechanical loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, S. W.; Mathison, S.; Herakovich, C. T.

    1986-01-01

    ANISAP is a 3-D finite element FORTRAN 77 computer code for linear elastic, small strain, analysis of laminated composites with arbitrary geometry including free edges and holes. Individual layers may be isotropic or transversely isotropic in material principal coordinates; individual layers may be rotated off-axis about a global z-axis. The laminate may be a hybrid. Three different isoparametric elements, variable order of gaussian integration, calculation of stresses at element boundaries, and loading by either nodal displacement of forces are included in the program capability. Post processing capability includes failure analysis using the tensor polynominal failure criterion.

  14. Impact damage and burst of filament-wound CFRP composite pressure vessel

    SciTech Connect

    Matemilola, S.A.; Stronge, W.J.

    1996-12-31

    Quasi-static and impact tests were conducted on filament-wound carbon fiber composite pressure vessels to study factors that affect burst pressure. Observed damage include fiber microbuckling, matrix cracking, and delamination. For vessels that were not pressurized during test, both the matrix cracking and fiber breakage were restricted to the outer layer, whereas in the case of an internally pressurized vessel struck by a wedge nose shaped impactor these cracks extended into the second layer. Fiber microbuckling of the outer surface layer near the impact point was the main factor that degraded the burst pressure of the vessels. This type of damage was visually detectable on the surface. For an unpressurized vessel it appeared as a pair of cracks radiating from the periphery of contact region. On the other hand, for a pressurized vessel circumferential microbuckling developed within the contact region. The burst pressure for a damaged vessel decreased as the ratio of axial length of the buckled fibers l, to vessel thickness h, increased, up to a ratio {ell}/h {approx} 3, beyond which the burst pressure became constant. Strain measurements near the region of loading showed that fiber microbuckling occurred, the failure strain value at a strain rate of 104 s{sup {minus}1} was about six times the microbuckling strain for quasi-static loading.

  15. A mechanistic ultrasonic vibration amplitude model during rotary ultrasonic machining of CFRP composites.

    PubMed

    Ning, Fuda; Wang, Hui; Cong, Weilong; Fernando, P K S C

    2017-04-01

    Rotary ultrasonic machining (RUM) has been investigated in machining of brittle, ductile, as well as composite materials. Ultrasonic vibration amplitude, as one of the most important input variables, affects almost all the output variables in RUM. Numerous investigations on measuring ultrasonic vibration amplitude without RUM machining have been reported. In recent years, ultrasonic vibration amplitude measurement with RUM of ductile materials has been investigated. It is found that the ultrasonic vibration amplitude with RUM was different from that without RUM under the same input variables. RUM is primarily used in machining of brittle materials through brittle fracture removal. With this reason, the method for measuring ultrasonic vibration amplitude in RUM of ductile materials is not feasible for measuring that in RUM of brittle materials. However, there are no reported methods for measuring ultrasonic vibration amplitude in RUM of brittle materials. In this study, ultrasonic vibration amplitude in RUM of brittle materials is investigated by establishing a mechanistic amplitude model through cutting force. Pilot experiments are conducted to validate the calculation model. The results show that there are no significant differences between amplitude values calculated by model and those obtained from experimental investigations. The model can provide a relationship between ultrasonic vibration amplitude and input variables, which is a foundation for building models to predict other output variables in RUM.

  16. Characteristics of magnetic force control device with magnetostrictive and piezoelectric laminate composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueno, Toshiyuki; Qiu, Jinhao; Tani, Junji

    2003-08-01

    A magnetic force control device with laminate composite of giant magnetostrictive material (GMM) and piezo-electric material (PZT) is proposed. This magnetic force control is based on inverse magnetostrictive effect of a magnetic material, whereby the variation of stress applied on the material is converted to that of magnetic force via magnetic circuits. For the purpose of realizing the method in practical applications, disks of GMM and PZT are laminated to control the stress of GMM by electric field on PZT. Due to the capacitive properties of PZT, the device requires little electric energy hence generates no heat to maintain constant force. Furthermore compared with conventional electromagnetics, the device can be fabricated easily and in small size to be suitable for microactuators. This paper presents the principle of the magnetic force control by the lamination of GMM and PZT and investigates the static and dynamic characteristics of several devices to demonstrate their capabilities of the magnetic force control.

  17. Free edge strain concentrations in real composite laminates: Experimental-theoretical correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herakovich, C. T.; Post, D.; Buczek, M. B.; Czarnek, R.

    1984-01-01

    The magnitude of the maximum shear strain at the free edge of axially loaded theta (2)/-theta(2)(s) and (+ or - theta(2) (s) composite laminates was investigated experimentally and numerically to ascertain the actual value of strain concentration in resin matrix laminates and to determine the accuracy of finite element results. Experimental results using moire interferometry show large, but finite, shear strain concentrations at the free edge of graphite-epoxy and graphite-polyimide laminates. Comparison of the experimental results with those obtained using several different finite element representations showed that a four node isoparametric finite element provided the best and most trouble free numerical results. The results indicate that the ratio of maxium shear strain at the free edge to applied axial strain varies with fiber orientation and does not exceed nine for the most critical angle which is 15 deg.

  18. An approximate solution for interlaminar stresses in laminated composites: Applied mechanics program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rose, Cheryl A.; Herakovich, Carl T.

    1992-01-01

    An approximate solution for interlaminar stresses in finite width, laminated composites subjected to uniform extensional, and bending loads is presented. The solution is based upon the principle of minimum complementary energy and an assumed, statically admissible stress state, derived by considering local material mismatch effects and global equilibrium requirements. The stresses in each layer are approximated by polynomial functions of the thickness coordinate, multiplied by combinations of exponential functions of the in-plane coordinate, expressed in terms of fourteen unknown decay parameters. Imposing the stationary condition of the laminate complementary energy with respect to the unknown variables yields a system of fourteen non-linear algebraic equations for the parameters. Newton's method is implemented to solve this system. Once the parameters are known, the stresses can be easily determined at any point in the laminate. Results are presented for through-thickness and interlaminar stress distributions for angle-ply, cross-ply (symmetric and unsymmetric laminates), and quasi-isotropic laminates subjected to uniform extension and bending. It is shown that the solution compares well with existing finite element solutions and represents an improved approximate solution for interlaminar stresses, primarily at interfaces where global equilibrium is satisfied by the in-plane stresses, but large local mismatch in properties requires the presence of interlaminar stresses.

  19. Micromechanics, fracture mechanics and gas permeability of composite laminates for cryogenic storage systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Sukjoo

    A micromechanics method is developed to investigate microcrack propagation in a liquid hydrogen composite tank at cryogenic temperature. The unit cell is modeled using square and hexagonal shapes depends on fiber and matrix layout from microscopic images of composite laminates. Periodic boundary conditions are applied to the unit cell. The temperature dependent properties are taken into account in the analysis. The laminate properties estimated by the micromechanics method are compared with empirical solutions using constituent properties. The micro stresses in the fiber and matrix phases based on boundary conditions in laminate level are calculated to predict the formation of microcracks in the matrix. The method is applied to an actual liquid hydrogen storage system. The analysis predicts micro stresses in the matrix phase are large enough to cause microcracks in the composite. Stress singularity of a transverse crack normal to a ply-interface is investigated to predict the fracture behavior at cryogenic conditions using analytical and finite element analysis. When a transverse crack touches a ply-interface of a composite layer with same fiber orientation, the stress singularity is equal to ½. When the transverse crack propagates to a stiffer layer normal to a ply-direction, the singularity becomes less than ½ and vice versa. Finite element analysis is performed to evaluate fracture toughness of a laminated beam subjected to the fracture load measured by the fracture experiment at room and cryogenic temperatures. As results, the fracture load at cryogenic temperature is significantly lower than that at room temperature. However, when thermal stresses are taken into consideration, for both cases of room and cryogenic temperatures, the variation of fracture toughness becomes insignificant. The result indicates fracture toughness is a characteristic property which is independent to temperature changes. The experimental analysis is performed to investigate the

  20. Wave propagation in fiber composite laminates, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniel, I. M.; Liber, T.

    1976-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to determine the wave propagation characteristics, transient strains and residual properties in unidirectional and angle-ply boron/epoxy and graphite/epoxy laminates impacted with silicone rubber projectiles at velocities up to 250 MS-1. The predominant wave is flexural, propagating at different velocities in different directions. In general, measured wave velocities were higher than theoretically predicted values. The amplitude of the in-plane wave is less than ten percent of that of the flexural wave. Peak strains and strain rates in the transverse to the (outer) fiber direction are much higher than those in the direction of the fibers. The dynamics of impact were also studied with high speed photography.

  1. Buckling of Laminated Composite Plates and Shell Panels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-06-01

    3.51) 1~~ ~ 2 A nB 28i , 4k rD2 b zA s o 2-A, sinh s in sB + II -s cosh -9Cos 8 + 28a asih D 2 [ABA) 1 2 2 1 1 2- 2A 1 B1 (after changing the sign of... Nb 2 . 12h 2 20 Z~Nj LB ER OF LAYER~S 10 O2 40 :.S’: .25 0 I 0 15 30 4s LAMINATION ANGLE Figure 6.8. Comparions of antisymmetrical and orthotropic...deformation a _theory b .6688 .6233 0.33 1 .6919 .6490 0.5 1 . 9497 .8878 1 1 4.2236 3.7641 2 1 17.6561 14.2650 3 1 2.7681 2.1091 1 .2 3.7988 2.9783 2 2

  2. Characterization of Degradation Progressive in Composite Laminates Subjected to Thermal Fatigue and Moisture Diffusion by Lamb Waves.

    PubMed

    Li, Weibin; Xu, Chunguang; Cho, Younho

    2016-02-19

    Laminate composites which are widely used in the aeronautical industry, are usually subjected to frequency variation of environmental temperature and excessive humidity in the in-service environment. The thermal fatigue and moisture absorption in composites may induce material degradation. There is a demand to investigate the coupling damages mechanism and characterize the degradation evolution of composite laminates for the particular application. In this paper, the degradation evolution in unidirectional carbon/epoxy composite laminates subjected to thermal fatigue and moisture absorption is characterized by Lamb waves. The decrease rate of Lamb wave velocity is used to track the degradation evolution in the specimens. The results show that there are two stages for the progressive degradation of composites under the coupling effect of thermal cyclic loading and moisture diffusion. The present work provides an alternative to monitoring the degradation evolution of in-service aircraft composite Laminates.

  3. Characterization of Degradation Progressive in Composite Laminates Subjected to Thermal Fatigue and Moisture Diffusion by Lamb Waves

    PubMed Central

    Li, Weibin; Xu, Chunguang; Cho, Younho

    2016-01-01

    Laminate composites which are widely used in the aeronautical industry, are usually subjected to frequency variation of environmental temperature and excessive humidity in the in-service environment. The thermal fatigue and moisture absorption in composites may induce material degradation. There is a demand to investigate the coupling damages mechanism and characterize the degradation evolution of composite laminates for the particular application. In this paper, the degradation evolution in unidirectional carbon/epoxy composite laminates subjected to thermal fatigue and moisture absorption is characterized by Lamb waves. The decrease rate of Lamb wave velocity is used to track the degradation evolution in the specimens. The results show that there are two stages for the progressive degradation of composites under the coupling effect of thermal cyclic loading and moisture diffusion. The present work provides an alternative to monitoring the degradation evolution of in-service aircraft composite Laminates. PMID:26907283

  4. Torque Limit for Bolted Joint for Composites. Part A; TTTC Properties of Laminated Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhao, Yi

    2003-01-01

    The existing design code for torque limit of bolted joints for composites at Marshall Space Flight Center is MSFC-STD-486B, which was originally developed in 1960s for metallic materials. The theoretical basis for this code was a simplified mechanics analysis, which takes into account only the bolt, nut and washers, but not the structural members to be connected. The assumption was that metallic materials would not fail due to the bearing stress at the contact area between washer and the mechanical member. This is true for metallic materials; but for composite materials the results could be completely different. Unlike most metallic materials, laminated composite materials have superior mechanical properties (such as modulus and strength) in the in-plane direction, but not in the out-of-plane, or through-the-thickness (TTT) direction. During the torquing, TTT properties (particularly compressive modulus and compressive strength) play a dominant role in composite failure. Because of this concern, structural design engineers at Marshall are currently using a compromised empirical approach: using 50% of the torque value for composite members. Companies like Boeing is using a similar approach. An initial study was conducted last summer on this topic to develop theoretical model(s) that takes into consideration of composite members. Two simplified models were developed based on stress failure criterion and strain failure criterion, respective. However, these models could not be used to predict the torque limit because of the unavailability of material data, specifically, through-the-thickness compression (TTTC) modulus and strength. Therefore, the task for this summer is to experimentally determine the TTTC properties. Due to the time limitation, only one material has been tested: IM7/8552 with [0 degrees,plus or minus 45 degrees, 90 degree ] configuration. This report focuses the test results and their significance, while the experimentation will be described in a

  5. Development of Composite Honeycomb and Solid Laminate Reference Standards to Aid Aircraft Inspections

    SciTech Connect

    Dorrell, L.; Roach, D.

    1999-03-04

    The rapidly increasing use of composites on commercial airplanes coupled with the potential for economic savings associated with their use in aircraft structures means that the demand for composite materials technology will continue to increase. Inspecting these composite structures is a critical element in assuring their continued airworthiness. The FAA's Airworthiness Assurance NDI Validation Center, in conjunction with the Commercial Aircraft Composite Repair Committee (CACRC), is developing a set of composite reference standards to be used in NDT equipment calibration for accomplishment of damage assessment and post-repair inspection of all commercial aircraft composites. In this program, a series of NDI tests on a matrix of composite aircraft structures and prototype reference standards were completed in order to minimize the number of standards needed to carry out composite inspections on aircraft. Two tasks, related to composite laminates and non-metallic composite honeycomb configurations, were addressed. A suite of 64 honeycomb panels, representing the bounding conditions of honeycomb construction on aircraft, were inspected using a wide array of NDI techniques. An analysis of the resulting data determined the variables that play a key role in setting up NDT equipment. This has resulted in a prototype set of minimum honeycomb reference standards that include these key variables. A sequence of subsequent tests determined that this minimum honeycomb reference standard set is able to fully support inspections over the fill range of honeycomb construction scenarios. Current tasks are aimed at optimizing the methods used to engineer realistic flaws into the specimens. In the solid composite laminate arena, we have identified what appears to be an excellent candidate, G11 Phenolic, as a generic solid laminate reference standard material. Testing to date has determined matches in key velocity and acoustic impedance properties, as well as, low attenuation relative

  6. Laminated composite of magnetic alloy powder and ceramic powder and process for making same

    DOEpatents

    Moorhead, Arthur J.; Kim, Hyoun-Ee

    1999-01-01

    A laminated composite structure of alternating metal powder layers, and layers formed of an inorganic bonding media powder, and a method for manufacturing same are discosed. The method includes the steps of assembling in a cavity alternating layers of a metal powder and an inorganic bonding media of a ceramic, glass, and glass-ceramic. Heat, with or without pressure, is applied to the alternating layers until the particles of the metal powder are sintered together and bonded into the laminated composite structure by the layers of sintered inorganic bonding media to form a strong composite structure. The method finds particular application in the manufacture of high performance magnets wherein the metal powder is a magnetic alloy powder.

  7. Structural Design and Analysis of a Light-Weight Laminated Composite Heat Sink for Spaceflight PWBs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fan, Mark S.; Niemeyer, W. Lee

    1997-01-01

    In order to reduce the overall weight in spaceborne electronic systems, a conventional metallic heat sink typically used for double-sided printed wiring boards was suggested to be replaced by light-weight and high-strength laminated composite materials. Through technology validation assurance (TVA) approach, it has been successfully demonstrated that using laminated composite heat sink can not only reduce the weight of the heat sink by nearly 50%, but also significantly lower the internal thermally-induced stresses that are largely responsible for potential delamination under cyclic temperature variations. With composite heat sink, both thermal and dynamic performance of the double-sided printed wiring board (PWB) exceeds that of its counterpart with metallic heat sink. Also included in this work is the original contribution to the understanding of creep behavior of the worst-case leadless chip carrier (LCC) surface mount solder joint. This was identified as the interconnection most susceptible to thermal fatigue damage in the PWB assembly.

  8. Laminated composite of magnetic alloy powder and ceramic powder and process for making same

    SciTech Connect

    Moorhead, A.J.; Kim, H.

    1999-08-10

    A laminated composite structure of alternating metal powder layers, and layers formed of an inorganic bonding media powder, and a method for manufacturing same are disclosed. The method includes the steps of assembling in a cavity alternating layers of a metal powder and an inorganic bonding media of a ceramic, glass, and glass-ceramic. Heat, with or without pressure, is applied to the alternating layers until the particles of the metal powder are sintered together and bonded into the laminated composite structure by the layers of sintered inorganic bonding media to form a strong composite structure. The method finds particular application in the manufacture of high performance magnets wherein the metal powder is a magnetic alloy powder. 9 figs.

  9. New method in experimental damage study of AS4/PEEK composite laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shibin; Tong, Jingwei; Yue, C.; Li, Linan; Shen, Min

    2002-06-01

    AS4/PEEK [0/+/- 45/90]7s composite laminates were subjected to a bending moment. We have obtained the displacement fields by moire interferometry with the aid of Long Distance Microscope. Based on wavelet analysis, the digital moire images were processed and analyzed. The special algorithms of unconstrained nonlinear minimization and the scale parameter were used to eliminate the influence of the noise in the digital image processing. Tension tests were carried out on AS4/PEEK [ 0/+/- 45/90 ]2s composites. When AS4/PEEK composite laminates were deformed, the images of natural surface of the AS4/PEEK specimen were recorded to study the damage initiation and growth. The experimental results show that the considerable interlaminal stresses between different plies, and these places were more prone to delaminate. The paper presents the microscopic damages and matrix crack growth observed by an optical microscope and the CCD camera.

  10. Convergence of strain energy release rate components for edge-delaminated composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, I. S.; Crews, J. H., Jr.; Aminpour, M. A.

    1987-01-01

    Strain energy release rates for edge delaminated composite laminates were obtained using quasi 3 dimensional finite element analysis. The problem of edge delamination at the -35/90 interfaces of an 8-ply composite laminate subjected to uniform axial strain was studied. The individual components of the strain energy release rates did not show convergence as the delamination tip elements were made smaller. In contrast, the total strain energy release rate converged and remained unchanged as the delamination tip elements were made smaller and agreed with that calculated using a classical laminated plate theory. The studies of the near field solutions for a delamination at an interface between two dissimilar isotropic or orthotropic plates showed that the imaginary part of the singularity is the cause of the nonconvergent behavior of the individual components. To evaluate the accuracy of the results, an 8-ply laminate with the delamination modeled in a thin resin layer, that exists between the -35 and 90 plies, was analyzed. Because the delamination exists in a homogeneous isotropic material, the oscillatory component of the singularity vanishes.

  11. Convergence of strain energy release rate components for edge-delaminated composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, I. S.; Crews, J. H., Jr.; Aminpour, M. A.

    1988-01-01

    Strain energy release rates for edge delaminated composite laminates were obtained using quasi 3 dimensional finite element analysis. The problem of edge delamination at the -35/90 interfaces of an 8-ply composite laminate subjected to uniform axial strain was studied. The individual components of the strain energy release rates did not show convergence as the delamination tip elements were made smaller. In contrast, the total strain energy release rate converged and remained unchanged as the delamination tip elements were made smaller and agreed with that calculated using a classical laminated plate theory. The studies of the near field solutions for a delamination at an interface between two dissimilar isotropic or orthotropic plates showed that the imaginary part of the singularity is the cause of the nonconvergent behavior of the individual components. To evaluate the accuracy of the results, an 8-ply laminate with the delamination modeled in a thin resin layer, that exists between the -35 and 90 plies, was analyzed. Because the delamination exists in a homogeneous isotropic material, the oscillatory component of the singularity vanishes.

  12. A procedure for utilization of a damage-dependent constitutive model for laminated composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lo, David C.; Allen, David H.; Harris, Charles E.

    1992-01-01

    Described here is the procedure for utilizing a damage constitutive model to predict progressive damage growth in laminated composites. In this model, the effects of the internal damage are represented by strain-like second order tensorial damage variables and enter the analysis through damage dependent ply level and laminate level constitutive equations. The growth of matrix cracks due to fatigue loading is predicted by an experimentally based damage evolutionary relationship. This model is incorporated into a computer code called FLAMSTR. This code is capable of predicting the constitutive response and matrix crack damage accumulation in fatigue loaded laminated composites. The structure and usage of FLAMSTR are presented along with sample input and output files to assist the code user. As an example problem, an analysis of crossply laminates subjected to two stage fatigue loading was conducted and the resulting damage accumulation and stress redistribution were examined to determine the effect of variations in fatigue load amplitude applied during the first stage of the load history. It was found that the model predicts a significant loading history effect on damage evolution.

  13. Delamination identification of laminated composite plates using a continuum damage mechanics model and subset selection technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Shen; Yun, Gun Jin; Qiao, Pizhong

    2010-05-01

    In this paper, a new model-based delamination detection methodology is presented for laminated composite plates and its performance is studied both numerically and experimentally. This methodology consists of two main parts: (1) modal analysis of an undamaged baseline finite element (FE) model and experimental modal testing of panels with delamination damage at single or multiple locations and (2) a sensitivity based subset selection technique for single or multiple delamination damage localizations. As an identification model, a higher-order finite element model is combined with a rational micromechanics-based CDM model which defines the delamination damage parameter as a ratio of delaminated area to entire area. The subset selection technique based on sensitivity of the dynamic residual force has been known to be capable of detecting multiple damage locations. However, there has been no experimental study specifically for the applications in laminated composite structures. To implement the methodology, a sensitivity matrix for the laminated composite plate model has been derived. Applications of the proposed methodology to an E-glass/epoxy symmetric composite panel composed of 16 plies [CSM/UM1208/3 layers of C1800]s = [CSM/0/(90/0)3]s with delamination damage are demonstrated both numerically and experimentally. A non-contact scanning laser vibrometer (SLV), a lead zirconate titanate (PZT) actuator and a polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) sensor are used to conduct experimental modal testing. From the experimental example, capabilities of the proposed methodology for damage identification are successfully demonstrated for a 2D laminated composite panel. Furthermore, various damage scenarios are considered to show its performance and detailed results are discussed for future improvements.

  14. Mechanical Response of Stitched T300 Mat/Urethane 420 IMR Composite Laminates: Property/Orientation Dependence and Damage Evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, S.; Weitsman, Y.J.

    2000-03-01

    This report presents experimental and analytical results of investigations on the mechanical response of stitched T300 mat/urethane 420 IMR composite laminates with three different lay-up configurations. Tensile tests and short-term creep and recovery tests were conducted on the laminate coupons at various orientations. The X-ray photographic technique was adopted to detect the internal damage due to external loading history. The tensile data of laminates with antisymmetric and symmetric lay-ups indicated that lay- up sequences of cross-ply laminates do not have much influence on their tensile properties. However, misalignments within the stitch-bonded plies disturb the symmetry of intended quasi-isotropic laminates and thereby cause the mechanical properties to exhibit a certain amount of angular dependence. Classic lamination theory was found to be able to provide a very good prediction of tensile properties for the stitched laminates within linear range. Creep and recovery response of laminate coupons is greatly dependent on loading angles and load levels. The internal damage of laminate coupons is also directly related to loading angles and load levels as well as loading history.

  15. Micromechanics of compression failures in open hole composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guynn, E. Gail; Bradley, Walter L.

    1987-01-01

    The high strength-to-weight ratio of composite materials is ideally suited for aerospace applications where they already are used in commercial and military aircraft secondary structures and will soon be used for heavily loaded primary structures. One area impeding the widespread application of composites is their inherent weakness in compressive strength when compared to the tensile properties of the same material. Furthermore, these airframe designs typically contain many bolted or riveted joints, as well as electrical and hydraulic control lines. These applications produce areas of stress concentration, and thus, further complicate the compression failure problem. Open hole compression failures which represent a typical failure mode for composite materials are addressed.

  16. Development of ferrous laminated composites with unique microstructures by control of carbon diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kum, D. W.; Oyama, T.; Ruano, O. A.; Sherby, O. D.

    1986-09-01

    A novel method is described for preparing ferrous laminated composites, containing ultrahigh carbon steel as one of the components, which results in hard and soft layers bounded by sharp and discrete interfaces. The method is based on increasing the activity of carbon in iron by silicon addition; in this manner, the carbon is made to segregate into specific layers by heat treatment at low temperatures (˜770 °C). The results are ferrous laminated composites with discrete and sharp interfaces that consist of hard layers containing spherical carbide particles embedded in a matrix of ultrafine martensite or ferrite adjoining soft layers of a coarse grained iron alloy. In addition, the high activity of carbon is shown to result in total depletion of carbon in a silicon containing UHC steel ribbon bonded to mild steel.

  17. Characterization of E-glass/polyester woven fabric composite laminates and tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Guess, T.R.; Reedy, E.D. Jr.; Stavig, M.E.

    1995-12-01

    This report describes an experimental study that supported the LDRD program ``A General Approach for Analyzing Composite Structures``. The LDRD was a tightly coupled analytical / experimental effort to develop models for predicting post-yield progressive failure in E-glass fabric/polyester composites subjected to a variety of loading conditions. Elastic properties, fracture toughness parameters, and failure responses were measured on flat laminates, rings and tubes to support the development and validation of material and structural models. Test procedures and results are presented for laminates tested in tension, compression, flexure, short beam shear, double cantilever beam Mode I fracture toughness, and end notched flexure Mode II fracture toughness. Structural responses, including failure, of rings loaded in diametral compression and tubes tested in axial compression, are also documented.

  18. Damping measurements of laminated composite materials and aluminum using the hysteresis loop method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramovich, H.; Govich, D.; Grunwald, A.

    2015-10-01

    The damping characteristics of composite laminates made of Hexply 8552 AGP 280-5H (fabric), used for structural elements in aeronautical vehicles, have been investigated in depth using the hysteresis loop method and compared to the results for aluminum specimens (2024 T351). It was found that the loss factor, η, obtained by the hysteresis loop method is linearly dependent only on the applied excitation frequency and is independent of the preloading and the stress amplitudes. For the test specimens used in the present tests series, it was found that the damping of the aluminum specimens is higher than the composite ones for longitudinal direction damping, while for bending vibrations the laminates exhibited higher damping values.

  19. Characterization of Delaminations and Transverse Matrix Cracks in Composite Laminates Using Multiple-Angle Ultrasonic Inspection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Patrick H.; Appleget, Chelsea D.; Odarczenko, Michael T.

    2012-01-01

    Delaminations and transverse matrix cracks often appear concurrently in composite laminates. Normal-incidence ultrasound is excellent at detecting delaminations, but is not optimum for matrix cracks. Non-normal incidence, or polar backscattering, has been shown to optimally detect matrix cracks oriented perpendicular to the ultrasonic plane of incidence. In this work, a series of six composite laminates containing slots were loaded in tension to achieve various levels of delamination and ply cracking. Ultrasonic backscattering was measured over a range of incident polar and azimuthal angles, in order to characterize the relative degree of damage of the two types. Sweptpolar- angle measurements were taken with a curved phased array, as a step toward an array-based approach to simultaneous measurement of combined flaws.

  20. Shear Strength of Single Lap Joint Aluminium-Thermoplastic Natural Rubber (Al-TPNR) Laminated Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muzakkar, M. Z.; Ahmad, S.; Yarmo, M. A.; Jalar, A.; Bijarimi, M.

    2013-04-01

    In this work, we studied the effect of surface treatment on the aluminium surface and a coupling agent to improve adhesion between aluminium with organic polymer. Thermoplastic natural rubber (TPNR) matrix was prepared by melt blending of natural rubber (NR), liquid natural rubber (LNR) compatibilizer, linear low density polyethylene (LLDPE) and polyethylene grafted maleic anhydride (PE-g-MAH). The PEgMAH concentration used was varied from 0% - 25%. In addition, the aluminium surface was pre-treated with 3-glycidoxy propyl trimethoxy silane (3-GPS) to enhance the mechanical properties of laminated composite. It was found that the shear strength of single lap joint Al-TPNR laminated composite showing an increasing trend as a function of PE-g-MAH contents for the 3-GPS surface treated aluminium. Moreover, the scanning electron microscope (SEM) revealed that the strength improvement was associated with the chemical state of the compound involved.

  1. Low pressure process for continuous fiber reinforced polyamic acid resin matrix composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Druyun, Darleen A. (Inventor); Hou, Tan-Hung (Inventor); Kidder, Paul W. (Inventor); Reddy, Rakasi M. (Inventor); Baucom, Robert M. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A low pressure processor was developed for preparing a well-consolidated polyimide composite laminate. Prepreg plies were formed from unidirectional fibers and a polyamic acid resin solution. Molding stops were placed at the sides of a matched metal die mold. The prepreg plies were cut shorter than the length of the mold in the in-plane lateral direction and were stacked between the molding stops to a height which was higher than the molding stops. The plies were then compressed to the height of the stops and heated to allow the volatiles to escape and to start the imidization reaction. After removing the stops from the mold, the heat was increased and 0 - 500 psi was applied to complete the imidization reaction. The heat and pressure were further increased to form a consolidated polyimide composite laminate.

  2. Characterization of delaminations and transverse matrix cracks in composite laminates using multiple-angle ultrasonic inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Patrick H.; Appleget, Chelsea D.; Odarczenko, Michael T.

    2013-01-01

    Delaminations and transverse matrix cracks often appear concurrently in composite laminates. Normal-incidence ultrasound is excellent at detecting delaminations, but is not optimum for matrix cracks. Non-normal incidence, or polar backscattering, has been shown to optimally detect matrix cracks oriented perpendicular to the ultrasonic plane of incidence. In this work, a series of six composite laminates containing slots were loaded in tension to achieve various levels of delamination and ply cracking. Ultrasonic backscattering was measured over a range of incident polar and azimuthal angles, in order to characterize the relative degree of damage of the two types. Sweptpolar-angle measurements were taken with a curved phased array, as a step toward an array-based approach to simultaneous measurement of combined flaws.

  3. New design for temperature-strain discrimination using fiber Bragg gratings embedded in laminated composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez-Cobo, L.; Marques, A. T.; López-Higuera, J. M.; Santos, J. L.; Frazão, O.

    2013-10-01

    A new smart structure based on fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) embedded into composite laminates for temperature and strain simultaneous measurement has been designed and experimentally tested. Two holes have been drilled at preset locations in the composite plate to create different strain sensitivities at different locations. The proposed design has been compared to three reference sensing heads also based on embedding FBGs into composite materials. Experimental results agree remarkably well with mechanical simulations and validate all the tested designs for the temperature-strain discrimination. Based on the same principle, another sensing head with a long single FBG embedded has also been designed and experimentally tested, obtaining temperature independent strain measurement.

  4. Numerical Analysis of the Edge Effect in a Composite Laminate with Compressed Reinforcement Plies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bystrov, V. M.; Dekret, V. A.; Zelenskii, V. S.

    2015-09-01

    A piecewise-homogeneous material model is used to numerically determine the edge effect length in a composite laminate with reinforcement plies subject to unidirectional longitudinal compression. Consideration is given to mixed boundary conditions (regularity of the material structure and symmetry of the surface load) on the sides of the composite specimen and boundary conditions for stresses on the stress-free sides of the specimen. The dependence of the edge effect length on the ratio of the mechanical characteristics of the composite components is studied

  5. Design and manufacturing of skins based on composite corrugated laminates for morphing aerodynamic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Airoldi, Alessandro; Fournier, Stephane; Borlandelli, Elena; Bettini, Paolo; Sala, Giuseppe

    2017-04-01

    The paper discusses the approaches for the design and manufacturing of morphing skins based on rectangular-shaped composite corrugated laminates and proposes a novel solution to prevent detrimental effects of corrugation on aerodynamic performances. Additionally, more complex corrugated shapes are presented and analysed. The manufacturing issues related to the production of corrugated laminates are discussed and tests are performed to compare different solutions and to assess the validity of analytical and numerical predictions. The solution presented to develop an aerodynamically efficient skin consists in the integration of an elastomeric cover in the corrugated laminate. The related manufacturing process is presented and assessed, and a fully nonlinear numerical model is developed and characterized to study the behaviour of this skin concept in different load conditions. Finally, configurations based on combinations of individual rectangular-shaped corrugated panels are considered. Their structural properties are numerically investigated by varying geometrical parameters. Performance indices are defined to compare structural stiffness contributions in non-morphing directions with the ones of conventional panels of the same weight. Numerical studies also show that the extension of the concept to complex corrugated shapes may improve both the design flexibility and some specific performances with respect to rectangular shaped corrugations. The overall results validate the design approaches and manufacturing processes to produce corrugated laminates and indicate that the solution for the integration of an elastomeric cover is a feasible and promising method to enhance the aerodynamic efficiency of corrugated skins.

  6. Photo-induced bending in a light-activated polymer laminated composite.

    PubMed

    Mu, Xiaoming; Sowan, Nancy; Tumbic, Julia A; Bowman, Christopher N; Mather, Patrick T; Qi, H Jerry

    2015-04-07

    Light activated polymers (LAPs) have attracted increasing attention since these materials change their shape and/or behavior in response to light exposure, which serves as an instant, remote and precisely controllable stimulus that enables non-contact control of the material shape and behavior through simple variation in light intensity, wavelength and spatially controlled exposure. These features distinguish LAPs from other active polymers triggered by other stimuli such as heat, electrical field or humidity. Previous examples have resulted in demonstrations in applications such as surface patterning, photo-induced shape memory behavior, and photo-origami. However, in many of these applications, an undesirable limitation has been the requirement to apply and maintain an external load during light irradiation. In this paper, a laminated structure is introduced to provide a pre-programmed stress field, which is then used for photo-induced deformation. This laminated structure is fabricated by bonding a stretched elastomer (NOA65) sheet between two LAP layers. Releasing the elastomer causes contraction and introduces a compressive stress in the LAPs, which are relaxed optically to trigger the desired deformation. A theoretical model is developed to quantitatively examine the laminated composite system, allowing exploration of the design space and optimum design of the laminate.

  7. Damage states in laminated composite three-point bend specimens: An experimental-analytical correlation study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starbuck, J. Michael; Guerdal, Zafer; Pindera, Marek-Jerzy; Poe, Clarence C.

    1990-01-01

    Damage states in laminated composites were studied by considering the model problem of a laminated beam subjected to three-point bending. A combination of experimental and theoretical research techniques was used to correlate the experimental results with the analytical stress distributions. The analytical solution procedure was based on the stress formulation approach of the mathematical theory of elasticity. The solution procedure is capable of calculating the ply-level stresses and beam displacements for any laminated beam of finite length using the generalized plane deformation or plane stress state assumption. Prior to conducting the experimental phase, the results from preliminary analyses were examined. Significant effects in the ply-level stress distributions were seen depending on the fiber orientation, aspect ratio, and whether or not a grouped or interspersed stacking sequence was used. The experimental investigation was conducted to determine the different damage modes in laminated three-point bend specimens. The test matrix consisted of three-point bend specimens of 0 deg unidirectional, cross-ply, and quasi-isotropic stacking sequences. The dependence of the damage initiation loads and ultimate failure loads were studied, and their relation to damage susceptibility and damage tolerance of the mean configuration was discussed. Damage modes were identified by visual inspection of the damaged specimens using an optical microscope. The four fundamental damage mechanisms identified were delaminations, matrix cracking, fiber breakage, and crushing. The correlation study between the experimental results and the analytical results were performed for the midspan deflection, indentation, damage modes, and damage susceptibility.

  8. Effect of Transversely Low-Velocity Impact on Graphite/Epoxy Laminated Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-09-30

    VELOCITY IMPACT ON GRAPHITE/EPOXY LAMINATED COMPOSITES FINAL REPORT BY I- YUNG -YUN CHOI AND FU-KUO CHANG SEPTEMIBER 31, 1990 U.S. ARMlY RESEARCH OFFICE ,~*n...0.10000003-03 OENTZR TIHE X1_-OC lTz or Porn NO. 1 7 0.10000003-03 *DlTER THE XI-COOlrNAT Or Po011" NO. 1 ? 0.10000009-05 TIE DiSnAJUIMS AND VELOC’T:ES

  9. Finite Element Modeling of Fragment Penetration of Thin Structural Composite Laminates

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-12-01

    his direction and assistance provided during the program. The following are registered trade names: Kevlar-29, 3M Co., Scotchply, Owens Corning Fiberglass...grains, are used. Composite laminates such as Owens Corning Fiberglass (R) panels, 3M Scotchply 1002 (R) panels and Kevlar-29 (R) reinforced plastic...results [2]: 1. Owens Corning Fiberglass (OCF) Structural Panels. Woven S-2 glass and a typical resin type, contert, sizing, and cure cycle at 220

  10. Numerical analysis of edge effects in laminated composites under uniaxial loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokhanenko, Yu. V.

    2010-11-01

    Edge effects in a laminated composite with two isotropic components are analyzed. An exact approach (exact models and a quantitative criterion to assess the edge-effect zone) is used to solve the edge-effect problem. An analytic solution is found, and the nonperturbed stress state is determined. The edge-effect problem is solved approximately using a modified variational difference method and the concept of base scheme. Numerical results are presented and analyzed

  11. Influence of the Geometric Parameters on the Mechanical Behaviour of Fabric Reinforced Composite Laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Axinte, Andrei; Taranu, Nicolae; Bejan, Liliana

    2016-10-01

    A polymer fabric reinforced composite is a high performance material, which combines strength of the fibres with the flexibility and ductility of the matrix. For a better drapeability, the tows of fibres are interleaved, resulting the woven fabric, used as reinforcement. The complex geometric shape of the fabric is of paramount importance in establishing the deformability of the textile reinforced composite laminates. In this paper, an approach based on Classical Lamination Theory ( CLT), combined with Finite Element Methods ( FEM), using Failure Analysis and Internal Load Redistribution, is utilised, in order to compare the behaviour of the material under specific loads. The main goal is to analyse the deformability of certain types of textile reinforced composite laminates, using carbon fibre satin as reinforcement and epoxy resin as matrix. This is accomplished by studying the variation of the in-plane strains, given the fluctuation of several geometric parameters, namely the width of the reinforcing tow, the gap between two consecutive tows, the angle of laminae in a multi-layered configuration and the tows fibre volume fraction.

  12. Laser bendability of SUS430/C11000/SUS430 laminated composite and its constituent layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossein Seyedkashi, S. M.; Gollo, Mohammad Hoseinpour; Biao, Jin; Moon, Young Hoon

    2016-05-01

    Laminated composites are of great interest in different industries while having the advantages of all base metals. In this research, the laser bending of a three-layered SUS430/C11000/SUS430 laminated composite is characterized both experimentally and numerically. This composite can be used in the microelectronics industry since it has the anti-corrosion and strength capability of stainless steel, and the electrical superiority of copper. The specimens are bent using a Ytterbium fiber laser irradiated on a straight path along the sheet width. The effects of bending parameters including the number of passes, scanning velocity, beam diameter, laser power and delay time between passes are examined for a three-layered laminated sheet, and compared with its constituent steel and copper layers. It is found that the thin copper mid-layer strongly affects the rate of bending per pass. Heat distribution and plastic strain along the thickness during the process are characterized by using the finite element method. The Cu mid-layer decreases the bending angle, but also postpones the onset of melting, and thus can be compensated by the application of higher laser powers. It is shown that the bending angle increases with an increase in laser power and delay time, and a decrease in laser velocity and beam diameter.

  13. Extended layerwise method for laminated composite plates with multiple delaminations and transverse cracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, D. H.; Zhang, X.; Sze, K. Y.; Liu, Y.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, the extended layerwise method (XLWM), which was developed for laminated composite beams with multiple delaminations and transverse cracks (Li et al. in Int J Numer Methods Eng 101:407-434, 2015), is extended to laminated composite plates. The strong and weak discontinuous functions along the thickness direction are adopted to simulate multiple delaminations and interlaminar interfaces, respectively, whilst transverse cracks are modeled by the extended finite element method (XFEM). The interaction integral method and maximum circumferential tensile criterion are used to calculate the stress intensity factor (SIF) and crack growth angle, respectively. The XLWM for laminated composite plates can accurately predicts the displacement and stress fields near the crack tips and delamination fronts. The thickness distribution of SIF and thus the crack growth angles in different layers can be obtained. These information cannot be predicted by using other existing shell elements enriched by XFEM. Several numerical examples are studied to demonstrate the capabilities of the XLWM in static response analyses, SIF calculations and crack growth predictions.

  14. Fabrication of Thermoplastic Composite Laminates Having Film Interleaves By Automated Fiber Placement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hulcher, A. B.; Tiwari, S. N.; Marchello, J. M.; Johnston, Norman J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Experiments were carried out at the NASA Langley Research Center automated Fiber placement facility to determine an optimal process for the fabrication of composite materials having polymer film interleaves. A series of experiments was conducted to determine an optimal process for the composite prior to investigation of a process to fabricate laminates with polymer films. The results of the composite tests indicated that a well-consolidated, void-free laminate could be attained. Preliminary interleaf processing trials were then conducted to establish some broad guidelines for film processing. The primary finding of these initial studies was that a two-stage process was necessary in order to process these materials adequately. A screening experiment was then performed to determine the relative influence of the process variables on the quality of the film interface as determined by the wedge peel test method. Parameters that were found to be of minor influence on specimen quality were subsequently held at fixed values enabling a more rapid determination of an optimal process. Optimization studies were then performed by varying the remaining parameters at three film melt processing rates. The resulting peel data were fitted with quadratic response surfaces. Additional specimens were fabricated at levels of high peel strength as predicted by the regression models in an attempt to gage the accuracy of the predicted response and to assess the repeatability of the process. The overall results indicate that quality laminates having film interleaves can be successfully and repeatably fabricated by automated fiber placement.

  15. Porosity Measurement in Laminated Composites by Thermography and FEA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Tsuchin Philip; Russell, Samuel S.; Walker, James L.; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents the correlation between the through-thickness thermal diffusivity and the porosity of composites. Finite element analysis (FEA) was used to determine the transient thermal response of composites that were subjected to laser heating. A series of finite element models were built and thermal responses for isotropic and orthographic materials with various thermal diffusivities subjected to different heating conditions were investigated. Experiments were conducted to verify the models and to estimate the unknown parameters such as the amount of heat flux. The analysis and experimental results show good correlation between thermal diffusivity and porosity in the composite materials. They also show that both laser and flash heating can be used effectively to obtain thermal diffusivity. The current infrared thermography system is developed for use with flash heating. The laser heating models and the FEA results can provide useful tools to develop practical thermal diffusivity measurement scheme using laser heat.

  16. Investigations on Buckling Behaviour of Laminated Curved Composite Stiffened Panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, N. Jeevan; Babu, P. Ramesh; Pandu, Ratnakar

    2014-04-01

    In Industrial applications structural efficiency is primary concern, this brings about the need of strong and lightweight materials. Due to their high specific strength, fibre reinforced polymers find wide application in these areas. Panels made of composite materials are widely used in aerospace structures, automobile, civil, marine and biomedical industries because of their good mechanical properties, impact resistance, excellent damage tolerance and also low fabrication cost. In this Paper, buckling and post-buckling analysis was performed on composite stiffened panel to obtain the critical load and modes of failures, with different parameters like ply-orientation, different composite materials, and stiffeners and by changing the number of stiffeners was derived. To analyze the post buckling behaviour of composite stiffened panels the nonlinear finite element analysis is employed and substantial investigations are undertaken using finite element (FE) model. Effect of critical parameters on buckling behaviour is studied and parametric studies were conducted with analytical tool to understand the structural behaviour in the post buckling range.

  17. Nondestructive inspection in adhesive-bonded joint CFRP using pulsed phase thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, P. H.; Webb, S. C.; Peters, K. J.

    2013-05-01

    Many forms of damages in fiber reinforcement polymer (FRP) composites are difficult to detect because they occurs in subsurface layers of the composites. One challenging need for inspection capabilities is in adhesively bonded joints between composite components, a common location of premature failure in aerospace structures. This paper investigates pulsed phase thermography (PPT) imaging of fatigue damage in these adhesively bonded joints. Simulated defects were created to calibrate parameters for fatigue loading conditions, PPT imaging parameters, and a damage sizing algorithm for carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) single lap joints. Afterwards, lap joint specimens were fabricated with varying quality of manufacturing. PPT imaging of the pristine specimens revealed defects such as air bubbles, adhesive thickness variations, and weak bonding surface between the laminate and adhesive. Next, fatigue testing was performed and acquired PPT imaging data identified fatigue induced damage prior to final failure cycles. After failure of each sample, those images were confirmed by visual inspections of failure surface.

  18. Carbon-Fiber Reinforced Plastic Passive Composite Damper by Use of Piezoelectric Polymer/Ceramic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanimoto, Toshio

    2002-11-01

    In this study, the passive damping of carbon-fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) cantilever beams is examined using (1) interleaving of viscoelastic thermoplastic films, (2) piezoelectric polymer (PVDF) film interlayers and (3) surface-bonded piezoelectric ceramics. Introducing polyethylene-based film interlayers between composite plies resulted in a significant increase in the vibration loss factor. It is also shown that the vibration damping of CFRP laminates can be improved passively by means of PVDF film interlayers and resistively shunted, surface-bonded piezoelectric ceramic, PbZrO3-PbTiO3 (PZT) sheets. This paper also discusses the enhanced vibration damping of CFRP laminates with dispersed PZT particle interlayers. All these damping methods, interleaving of thermoplastic films, interlayers of PVDF films or dispersed PZT particles between composite plies, and resistively shunted, surface-bonded PZT sheets, can be jointly used to improve the damping of CFRP laminates/structures. The use of CFRP beams in combination with several damping concepts discussed here is promising for application in structures where light weight and improved vibration damping are desired.

  19. Development and characterization of ordered, highly oriented, composite laminates using supercritical carbon dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caskey, Terrence Colin

    This thesis describes the development and subsequent characterization of a series of oriented, highly ordered laminated composite materials. These laminated composite materials all possess order over varying length-scales from angstrom level molecular chain orientation to macro-scale order in woven fabrics. In each case, supercritical carbon dioxide (SC CO2) is used as a unique reaction medium and processing aid allowing for the development of structures not previously attainable with standard techniques. The goal of this research is two-fold, the first goal involves the proof of concept, exhibiting the ability to attain novel composite structures using unique SC CO2 chemistries and processes. The second goal of this research is aimed at developing a thorough understanding of how these unique structures and morphologies translate into an overall mechanical response for the material. This work will be divided into three distinct but interrelated projects. The first project involves the development of a unique SC CO2 assisted solvent welding technique. This technique is then applied towards the fabrication of a quasi-isotropic laminate comprised of a series of solvent-welded uniaxially-oriented linear low density polyethylene films (LLDPE). The geometry of this laminate is designed to exploit the improved strength and rigidity of uniaxially oriented LLDPE films while suppressing undesireable transverse properties. The second project to be addressed in this project involves the development of fiber-reinforced composites with unique nano-scale morphologies. The long-range order in these composites has profound effects on both the individual fiber properties as well as the overall composite properties. The final project of interest in this work involves the development of intercalated silicate nano-composites with high clay content. In order to achieve the desired morphologies it is necessary to create polymer/clay nano-composites with very high clay content

  20. Damage accumulation in closed cross-section, laminated, composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bucinell, Ronald B.

    1996-01-01

    The need for safe, lightweight, less expensive, and more reliable launch vehicle components is being driven by the competitiveness of the commercial launch market. The United States has lost 2/3 of the commercial lunch market to Europe. As low cost Russian and Chinese vehicles become available, the US market share could be reduced even further. This international climate is driving the Single Stage To Orbit (SSTO) program at NASA. The goal of the SSTO program is to radically reduce the cost of safe, routine transportation to and from space with a totally reusable launch vehicle designed for low-cost aircraft-like operations. Achieving this goal will require more efficient uses of materials. Composite materials can provide this program with the material and structural efficiencies needed to stay competitive in the international launch market place. In satellite systems the high specific properties, design flexibility, improved corrosion and wear resistance, increased fatigue life, and low coefficient of thermal expansion that are characteristic of composite materials can all be used to improve the overall satellite performance. Some of the satellites that may be able to take advantage of these performance characteristics are the Tethered Satellite Systems (TOSCIFER, AIRSEDS, TSS2, SEDS1, and SEDS2), AXAF, GRO, and the next generation Hubble Space Telescope. These materials can also be utilized in projects at the NASAIMSFC Space Optics Technology and System Center of Excellence. The successful implementation of composite materials requires accurate performance characterization. Materials characterization data for composite materials is typically generated using flat coupons of finite width. At the free edge of these coupons the stress state is exacerbated by the presence of stiffness and geometric discontinuities. The exacerbated stress state has been shown to dominate the damage accumulation in these materials and to have a profound affect on the material constants

  1. Ultrasonic tracking of ply drops in composite laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Robert A.; Nelson, Luke J.; Mienczakowski, Martin J.; Wilcox, Paul D.

    2016-02-01

    As the shapes of composite components become more adventurous, tracking internal locations of ply drops and detecting any tape gaps or overlaps will be crucial to assure conformance to design. The true potential of ultrasound has yet to be exploited for this objective due to the apparent complexity of the ultrasonic response and the assumption that interference between signals from plies is random, confusing and of little use. As a result, most ultrasonic inspection of composites targets defects that either attenuate or reflect ultrasound, regarding ply reflections as undesirable `noise'. The work presented here extends the ply-orientation mapping of the last two decades by introducing a systematic approach to optimizing the ultrasonic response from the plies, minimizing interference between plies and demonstrating that accurate maps of plies through ply-drop regions can be produced. The key to this method is understanding the ultrasonic analytic signal and how it interacts with plies and the resin-rich layers between them. In certain circumstances of frequency and bandwidth, the instantaneous phase locks onto the resin-rich layers and the instantaneous amplitude indicates the validity of this condition. Analytical modelling is used to explain the interaction between ultrasound and composite plies in various ply-drop scenarios, with reference to experimental results. Optimization of ultrasonic data acquisition is also discussed and demonstrated experimentally.

  2. Multimode model based defect characterization in composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, R.; Holland, S.; Gregory, E.

    2016-02-01

    A newly-initiated research program for model-based defect characterization in CFRP composites is summarized. The work utilizes computational models of the interaction of NDE probing energy fields (ultrasound and thermography), to determine 1) the measured signal dependence on material and defect properties (forward problem), and 2) an assessment of performance-critical defect properties from analysis of measured NDE signals (inverse problem). Work is reported on model implementation for inspection of CFRP laminates containing delamination and porosity. Forward predictions of measurement response are presented, as well as examples of model-based inversion of measured data for the estimation of defect parameters.

  3. Model based defect characterization in composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, R.; Holland, S.

    2017-02-01

    Work is reported on model-based defect characterization in CFRP composites. The work utilizes computational models of the interaction of NDE probing energy fields (ultrasound and thermography), to determine 1) the measured signal dependence on material and defect properties (forward problem), and 2) an assessment of performance-critical defect properties from analysis of measured NDE signals (inverse problem). Work is reported on model implementation for inspection of CFRP laminates containing multi-ply impact-induced delamination, with application in this paper focusing on ultrasound. A companion paper in these proceedings summarizes corresponding activity in thermography. Inversion of ultrasound data is demonstrated showing the quantitative extraction of damage properties.

  4. Strengthening Bridges with Prestressed CFRP Strips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siwowski, Tomasz; Żółtowski, Piotr

    2012-06-01

    Limitation of bridge's carrying bearing capacity due to aging and deterioration is a common problem faced by road administration and drivers. Rehabilitation of bridges including strengthening may be applied in order to maintain or upgrade existing bridge parameters. The case studies of strengthening of two small bridges with high modulus prestressed CFRP strips have been presented in the paper. The first one - reinforced concrete slab bridge - and the other - composite steel-concrete girder bridge - have been successfully upgraded with quite new technology. In both cases the additional CFRP reinforcement let increasing of bridge carrying capacity from 15 till 40 metric tons. The CFRP strip prestressing system named Neoxe Prestressing System (NPS), developed by multi-disciplinary team and tested at full scale in Rzeszow University of Technology, has been also described in the paper.

  5. Failure analysis of laminated composites by using iterative three-dimensional finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, W. C.; Sun, C. T.

    1989-05-01

    A failure analysis of laminated composites is accomplished by using an iterative three-dimensional finite element method. Based on Tsai-Wu failure theory, three different modes of failure are proposed: fiber breakage, matrix cracking, and delamination. The first ply failure load is then evaluated. As the applied load exceeds the first ply failure load, localized structural failure occurs and the global structural stiffness should change. The global stiffness matrix is modified by taking nonlinearity due to partial failures within a laminate into consideration. The first ply failure load is analyzed by using a iterative mixed field method in solving the linear part of the finite element equations. The progressive failure problem is solved numerically by using Newton-Raphson iterative schemes for the solution of nonlinear finite element equations. Numerical examples include angle-ply symmetric Thornel 300 graphite/934 resin epoxy laminates under uniaxial tension. First ply failure loads as well as the final failure loads are evaluated. Good correlation between analytical results and experimental data are observed. Numerical results also include the investigation of composite specimens with a centered hole, under uniaxial tension. Excellent correlation with the experimental data is observed.

  6. Characterization and analysis of carbon fibre-reinforced polymer composite laminates with embedded circular vasculature.

    PubMed

    Huang, C-Y; Trask, R S; Bond, I P

    2010-08-06

    A study of the influence of embedded circular hollow vascules on structural performance of a fibre-reinforced polymer (FRP) composite laminate is presented. Incorporating such vascules will lead to multi-functional composites by bestowing functions such as self-healing and active thermal management. However, the presence of off-axis vascules leads to localized disruption to the fibre architecture, i.e. resin-rich pockets, which are regarded as internal defects and may cause stress concentrations within the structure. Engineering approaches for creating these simple vascule geometries in conventional FRP laminates are proposed and demonstrated. This study includes development of a manufacturing method for forming vascules, microscopic characterization of their effect on the laminate, finite element (FE) analysis of crack initiation and failure under load, and validation of the FE results via mechanical testing observed using high-speed photography. The failure behaviour predicted by FE modelling is in good agreement with experimental results. The reduction in compressive strength owing to the embedding of circular vascules ranges from 13 to 70 per cent, which correlates with vascule dimension.

  7. Effect of laminate thickness on moisture diffusion of polymer matrix composites in artificial seawater ageing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Ratna; Narasimha Murthy, H. N.; Sreejith, M.; Vishnu Mahesh, K. R.; Krishna, M.; Sharma, S. C.

    2012-09-01

    The influence of laminate thickness of polymer matrix composites on moisture diffusion in seawater immersion, as well as the resulting mechanical property degradation for composites of glass/isopolyester (G/IPE), carbon/isopolyester (C/IPE), glass/vinylester (G/VE) and carbon/vinylester (C/VE), was investigated in this paper. Laminates 3 and 10mm in thickness, fabricated using the wet hand lay-up technique, were characterized for moisture absorption in artificial seawater medium, and their flexural strength and interlaminar shear strength (ILSS) degradations were studied. Moisture diffusion was observed to be anamolous to the Fick's law for both 3 and 10mm thick samples in the later stage of diffusion. Moisture permeability of 10mmthick samples was two to three order greater than that of 3mm thick ones, while the time to moisture saturation remained unchanged. With the increase of laminate thickness, moisture saturation increased by 1.4% for C/VE and 7% for G/IPE. The residual flexural strength and ILSS were greater in case of 10mm thick specimens after 200 days of exposure. SEM examination of the fractured specimens showed greater levels of fibre/matrix debonding in 10mm thick specimens.

  8. Delamination behavior of carbon fiber/epoxy composite laminates with short fiber reinforcement

    SciTech Connect

    Sohn, M.S.; Hu, X.Z. . Dept. of Mechanical and Materials Engineering)

    1994-06-01

    Delamination in laminated materials is one major mode of damage and failure encountered in application. Fracture mechanics is often used to characterize the interlaminar fracture behavior. The interlaminar fracture energies, G[sub I], G[sub II] and G[sub I/II] are the major concerns to characterize the interlaminar toughness of the composite laminates. Typical mode-I fracture is caused by normal tension, and typical mode-II fracture by shear in the direction of crack extension. The objective of the present study is to compare and discuss the mode-I and mode-II interlaminar fracture energies, G[sub I] and G[sub II] of carbon fiber/epoxy composite laminates with and without the reinforcement of short Kevlar fibers (5--7 mm in length) and to identify the microfracture features of the Kevlar fibers under those two delamination modes through SEM observations. Double cantilever beam (DCB) specimens and end notched flexure (ENF) specimens are used for the mode-I and -II delamination experiments.

  9. Characterization and analysis of carbon fibre-reinforced polymer composite laminates with embedded circular vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Huang, C.-Y.; Trask, R. S.; Bond, I. P.

    2010-01-01

    A study of the influence of embedded circular hollow vascules on structural performance of a fibre-reinforced polymer (FRP) composite laminate is presented. Incorporating such vascules will lead to multi-functional composites by bestowing functions such as self-healing and active thermal management. However, the presence of off-axis vascules leads to localized disruption to the fibre architecture, i.e. resin-rich pockets, which are regarded as internal defects and may cause stress concentrations within the structure. Engineering approaches for creating these simple vascule geometries in conventional FRP laminates are proposed and demonstrated. This study includes development of a manufacturing method for forming vascules, microscopic characterization of their effect on the laminate, finite element (FE) analysis of crack initiation and failure under load, and validation of the FE results via mechanical testing observed using high-speed photography. The failure behaviour predicted by FE modelling is in good agreement with experimental results. The reduction in compressive strength owing to the embedding of circular vascules ranges from 13 to 70 per cent, which correlates with vascule dimension. PMID:20150337

  10. Prediction of impact force and duration during low velocity impact on circular composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shivakumar, K. N.; Elber, W.; Illg, W.

    1983-01-01

    Two simple and improved models--energy-balance and spring-mass--were developed to calculate impact force and duration during low velocity impact of circular composite plates. Both models include the contact deformation of the plate and the impactor as well as bending, transverse shear, and membrane deformations of the plate. The plate was transversely isotropic graphite/epoxy composite laminate and the impactor was a steel sphere. Calculated impact forces from the two analyses agreed with each other. The analyses were verified by comparing the results with reported test data.

  11. Field-incidence transmission of treated orthotropic and laminated composite panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koval, L. R.

    1983-01-01

    In an effort to improve understanding of the phenomenon of noise transmission through the sidewalls of an aircraft fuselage, an analytical model was developed for the field incidence transmission loss of an orthotropic or laminated composite infinite panel with layers of various noise insulation treatments. The model allows for four types of treatments, impervious limp septa, orthotropic trim panels, porous blankets, and air spaces, while it also takes into account the effects of forward speed. Agreement between the model and transmission loss data for treated panels is seen to be fairly good overall. In comparison with transmission loss data for untreated composite panels, excellent agreement occurred.

  12. An Enriched Shell Finite Element for Progressive Damage Simulation in Composite Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McElroy, Mark W.

    2016-01-01

    A formulation is presented for an enriched shell nite element capable of progressive damage simulation in composite laminates. The element uses a discrete adaptive splitting approach for damage representation that allows for a straightforward model creation procedure based on an initially low delity mesh. The enriched element is veri ed for Mode I, Mode II, and mixed Mode I/II delamination simulation using numerical benchmark data. Experimental validation is performed using test data from a delamination-migration experiment. Good correlation was found between the enriched shell element model results and the numerical and experimental data sets. The work presented in this paper is meant to serve as a rst milestone in the enriched element's development with an ultimate goal of simulating three-dimensional progressive damage processes in multidirectional laminates.

  13. Progressive Fracture of Laminated Fiber-Reinforced Composite Stiffened Plate Under Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gotsis, Pascalis K.; Abdi, Frank; Chamis, Christos C.; Tsouros, Konstantinos

    2007-01-01

    S-Glass/epoxy laminated fiber-reinforced composite stiffened plate structure with laminate configuration (0/90)5 was simulated to investigate damage and fracture progression, under uniform pressure. For comparison reasons a simple plate was examined, in addition with the stiffened plate. An integrated computer code was used for the simulation. The damage initiation began with matrix failure in tension, continuous with damage and/or fracture progression as a result of additional matrix failure and fiber fracture and followed by additional interply delamination. Fracture through the thickness began when the damage accumulation was 90%. After that stage, the cracks propagate rapidly and the structures collapse. The collapse load for the simple plate is 21.57 MPa (3120 psi) and for the stiffened plate 25.24 MPa (3660 psi).

  14. Buckling and Failure of Compression-Loaded Composite Laminated Shells With Cutouts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilburger, Mark W.

    2007-01-01

    Results from a numerical and experimental study that illustrate the effects of laminate orthotropy on the buckling and failure response of compression-loaded composite cylindrical shells with a cutout are presented. The effects of orthotropy on the overall response of compression-loaded shells is described. In general, preliminary numerical results appear to accurately predict the buckling and failure characteristics of the shell considered herein. In particular, some of the shells exhibit stable post-local-buckling behavior accompanied by interlaminar material failures near the free edges of the cutout. In contrast another shell with a different laminate stacking sequence appears to exhibit catastrophic interlaminar material failure at the onset of local buckling near the cutout and this behavior correlates well with corresponding experimental results.

  15. A fracture mechanics analysis of impact damage in a thick composite laminate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poe, C. C., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Graphite/epoxy filament-wound cases (FWC) for the solid rocket motors of the space shuttle are being made by NASA. The FWC cases are wound with AS4W graphite fiber impregnated with an epoxy resin and are about 1.4 inches or more thick. Graphite-epoxy composite laminates, unlike metals, can be damaged easily by low velocity impacts of objects like dropped tools. The residual tension strength of the FWC laminate, after impact, is being studied at Langley Research Center. The conditions that give minimum visual evidence of damage are being emphasized. A fracture mechanics analysis was developed to predict the residual strength, after impact, using radiographs to measure the size of the damage and an equivalent surface crack to represent the damage.

  16. Thermal and ultrasonic evaluation of porosity in composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Patrick H.; Winfree, William P.; Long, Edward R., Jr.; Kullerd, Susan M.; Nathan, N.; Partos, Richard D.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of porosity on damage incurred by low-velocity impact are investigated. Specimens of graphite/epoxy composite were fabricated with various volume fractions of voids. The void fraction was independently determined using optical examination and acid resin digestion methods. Thermal diffusivity and ultrasonic attenuation were measured, and these results were related to the void volume fraction. The relationship between diffusivity and fiber volume fraction was also considered. The slope of the ultrasonic attenuation coefficient was found to increase linearly with void content, and the diffusivity decreased linearly with void volume fraction, after compensation for an approximately linear dependence on the fiber volume fraction.

  17. Post Buckling Progressive Failure Analysis of Composite Laminated Stiffened Panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anyfantis, Konstantinos N.; Tsouvalis, Nicholas G.

    2012-06-01

    The present work deals with the numerical prediction of the post buckling progressive and final failure response of stiffened composite panels based on structural nonlinear finite element methods. For this purpose, a progressive failure model (PFM) is developed and applied to predict the behaviour of an experimentally tested blade-stiffened panel found in the literature. Failure initiation and propagation is calculated, owing to the accumulation of the intralaminar failure modes induced in fibre reinforced composite materials. Hashin failure criteria have been employed in order to address the fiber and matrix failure modes in compression and tension. On the other hand, the Tsai-Wu failure criterion has been utilized for addressing shear failure. Failure detection is followed with the introduction of corresponding material degradation rules depending on the individual failure mechanisms. Failure initiation and failure propagation as well as the post buckling ultimate attained load have been numerically evaluated. Final failure behaviour of the simulated stiffened panel is due to sudden global failure, as concluded from comparisons between numerical and experimental results being in good agreement.

  18. Ultrasonic and mechanical characterizations of fatigue states of graphite epoxy composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. H., Jr.; Yuce, H.; Lee, S. S.

    1982-01-01

    Eight-ply (0, + or - 45, 0)s laminates of Hercules AS/3501-6 graphite epoxy composite are fabricated using various cure pressures ranging from 0.52 to 0.86 MPa and cure temperatures ranging from 150 C to 200 C. In general, the minimum composite void volume fraction is obtained at a cure temperature of 175 C and a cure pressure of 0.86 MPa, or at 200 C and 0.86 MPa. The ultrasonic attenuation at 4 MHz was found to correlate with the composite void volume fraction. Composite specimens were tested in flexural fatigue. Beyond 10,000 fatigue cycles, the ultrasonic attenuation at 4 MHz was found to increase and the flexural stiffness was found to decrease. The ultrasonic attenuation at 4 MHz of the as-fabricated composite can be correlated with the number of fatigue cycles to failure.

  19. Impedance-Based Structural Health Monitoring for Composite Laminates at Cryogenic Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tseng, Kevin

    2003-01-01

    One of the important ways of increasing the payload in a reusable launch vehicle (RLV) is to replace heavy metallic materials by lightweight composite laminates. Among various parts and systems of the RLV, this project focuses on tanks containing cryogenic fuel. Historically, aluminum alloys have been used as the materials to construct fuel tanks for launch vehicles. To replace aluminum alloys with composite laminates or honeycomb materials, engineers have to make sure that the composites are free of defects before, during, and after launch. In addition to robust design and manufacturing procedures, the performance of the composite structures needs to be monitored constantly.In recent years, the impedance-based health monitoring technique has shown its promise in many applications. This technique makes use of the special properties of smart piezoelectric materials to identify the change of material properties due to the nucleation and progression of damage. The piezoceramic patch serves as a sensor and an actuator simultaneously. The piezoelectric patch is bonded onto an existing structure or embedded into a new structure and electrically excited at high frequencies. The signature (impedance or admittance) is extracted as a function of the exciting frequency and is compared with the baseline signature of the healthy state. The damage is quantified using root mean square deviation (RMSD) in the impedance signatures with respect to the baseline signature. A major advantage of this technique is that the procedure is nondestructive in nature and does not perturb the properties and performance of the materials and structures. This project aims at applying the impedance-based nondestructive testing technique to the damage identification of composite laminates at cryogenic temperature.

  20. Displacement and stress analysis of laminated composite plates using an eight-node quasi-conforming solid-shell element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu; Shi, Guangyu; Wang, Xiaodan

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents the efficient modeling and analysis of laminated composite plates using an eightnode quasi-conforming solid-shell element, named as QCSS8. The present element QCSS8 is not only lockingfree, but highly computational efficiency as it possesses the explicit element stiffness matrix. All the six components of stresses can be evaluated directly by QCSS8 in terms of the 3-D constitutive equations and the appropriately assumed element strain field. Several typical numerical examples of laminated plates are solved to validate QCSS8, and the resulting values are compared with analytical solutions and the numerical results of solid/solidshell elements of commercial codes computed by the present authors in which fine meshes were used. The numerical results show that QCSS8 can give accurate displacements and stresses of laminated composite plates even with coarse meshes. Furthermore, QCSS8 yields also accurate transverse normal strain which is very important for the evaluation of interlaminar stresses in laminated plates. Since each lamina of laminated composite plates can be modeled naturally by one or a few layers of solidshell elements and a large aspect ratio of element edge to thickness is allowed in solid-shell elements, the present solid-shell element QCSS8 is extremely appropriate for the modeling of laminated composite plates.

  1. Analysis of a hybrid balanced laminate as a structural material for thick composite beams with axial stiffeners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modak, Partha; Hossain, M. Jamil; Ahmed, S. Reaz

    2016-07-01

    An accurate stress analysis has been carried out to investigate the suitability of a hybrid balanced laminate as a structural material for thick composite beams with axial stiffeners. Three different balanced laminates composed of dissimilar ply material as well as fiber orientations are considered for a thick beam on simple supports with stiffened lateral ends. A displacement potential based elasticity approach is used to obtain the numerical solution of the corresponding elastic fields. The overall laminate stresses as well as individual ply stresses are analysed mainly in the perspective of laminate hybridization. Both the fiber material and ply angle of individual laminas are found to play dominant roles in defining the design stresses of the present composite beam.

  2. Simple Formulas and Results for Buckling-Resistance and Stiffness Design of Compression-Loaded Laminated-Composite Cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Michael P.; Mikulas, Martin M., Jr.

    2009-01-01

    Simple formulas for the buckling stress of homogeneous, specially orthotropic, laminated-composite cylinders are presented. The formulas are obtained by using nondimensional parameters and equations that facilitate general validation, and are validated against the exact solution for a wide range of cylinder geometries and laminate constructions. Results are presented that establish the ranges of the nondimensional parameters and coefficients used. General results, given in terms of the nondimensional parameters, are presented that encompass a wide range of geometries and laminate constructions. These general results also illustrate a wide spectrum of behavioral trends. Design-oriented results are also presented that provide a simple, clear indication of laminate composition on critical stress, critical strain, and axial stiffness. An example is provided to demonstrate the application of these results to thin-walled column designs.

  3. Design guidelines for high dimensional stability of CFRP optical bench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desnoyers, Nichola; Boucher, Marc-André; Goyette, Philippe

    2013-09-01

    In carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) optomechanical structures, particularly when embodying reflective optics, angular stability is critical. Angular stability or warping stability is greatly affected by moisture absorption and thermal gradients. Unfortunately, it is impossible to achieve the perfect laminate and there will always be manufacturing errors in trying to reach a quasi-iso laminate. Some errors, such as those related to the angular position of each ply and the facesheet parallelism (for a bench) can be easily monitored in order to control the stability more adequately. This paper presents warping experiments and finite-element analyses (FEA) obtained from typical optomechanical sandwich structures. Experiments were done using a thermal vacuum chamber to cycle the structures from -40°C to 50°C. Moisture desorption tests were also performed for a number of specific configurations. The selected composite material for the study is the unidirectional prepreg from Tencate M55J/TC410. M55J is a high modulus fiber and TC410 is a new-generation cyanate ester designed for dimensionally stable optical benches. In the studied cases, the main contributors were found to be: the ply angular errors, laminate in-plane parallelism (between 0° ply direction of both facesheets), fiber volume fraction tolerance and joints. Final results show that some tested configurations demonstrated good warping stability. FEA and measurements are in good agreement despite the fact that some defects or fabrication errors remain unpredictable. Design guidelines to maximize the warping stability by taking into account the main dimensional stability contributors, the bench geometry and the optical mount interface are then proposed.

  4. Static and dynamic strain energy release rates in toughened thermosetting composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cairns, Douglas S.

    1992-01-01

    In this work, the static and dynamic fracture properties of several thermosetting resin based composite laminates are presented. Two classes of materials are explored. These are homogeneous, thermosetting resins and toughened, multi-phase, thermosetting resin systems. Multi-phase resin materials have shown enhancement over homogenous materials with respect to damage resistance. The development of new dynamic tests are presented for composite laminates based on Width Tapered Double Cantilevered Beam (WTDCB) for Mode 1 fracture and the End Notched Flexure (ENF) specimen. The WTDCB sample was loaded via a low inertia, pneumatic cylinder to produce rapid cross-head displacements. A high rate, piezo-electric load cell and an accelerometer were mounted on the specimen. A digital oscilloscope was used for data acquisition. Typical static and dynamic load versus displacement plots are presented. The ENF specimen was impacted in three point bending with an instrumented impact tower. Fracture initiation and propagation energies under static and dynamic conditions were determined analytically and experimentally. The test results for Mode 1 fracture are relatively insensitive to strain rate effects for the laminates tested in this study. The test results from Mode 2 fracture indicate that the toughened systems provide superior fracture initiation and higher resistance to propagation under dynamic conditions. While the static fracture properties of the homogeneous systems may be relatively high, the apparent Mode 2 dynamic critical strain energy release rate drops significantly. The results indicate that static Mode 2 fracture testing is inadequate for determining the fracture performance of composite structures subjected to conditions such as low velocity impact. A good correlation between the basic Mode 2 dynamic fracture properties and the performance is a combined material/structural Compression After Impact (CAI) test is found. These results underscore the importance of

  5. NDT evaluation of long-term bond durability of CFRP-structural systems applied to RC highway bridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, Kenneth C.

    2016-06-01

    The long-term durability of CFRP structural systems applied to reinforced-concrete (RC) highway bridges is a function of the system bond behavior over time. The sustained structural load performance of strengthened bridges depends on the carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) laminates remaining 100 % bonded to concrete bridge members. Periodic testing of the CFRP-concrete bond condition is necessary to sustain load performance. The objective of this paper is to present a non-destructive testing (NDT) method designed to evaluate the bond condition and long-term durability of CFRP laminate (plate) systems applied to RC highway bridges. Using the impact-echo principle, a mobile mechanical device using light impact hammers moving along the length of a bonded CFRP plate produces unique acoustic frequencies which are a function of existing CFRP plate-concrete bond conditions. The purpose of this method is to test and locate CFRP plates de-bonded from bridge structural members to identify associated deterioration in bridge load performance. Laboratory tests of this NDT device on a CFRP plate bonded to concrete with staged voids (de-laminations) produced different frequencies for bonded and de-bonded areas of the plate. The spectra (bands) of frequencies obtained in these tests show a correlation to the CFRP-concrete bond condition and identify bonded and de-bonded areas of the plate. The results of these tests indicate that this NDT impact machine, with design improvements, can potentially provide bridge engineers a means to rapidly evaluate long lengths of CFRP laminates applied to multiple highway bridges within a national transportation infrastructure.

  6. The Effect of Delamination on Damage Path and Failure Load Prediction for Notched Composite Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Satyanarayana, Arunkumar; Bogert, Philip B.; Chunchu, Prasad B.

    2007-01-01

    The influence of delamination on the progressing damage path and initial failure load in composite laminates is investigated. Results are presented from a numerical and an experimental study of center-notched tensile-loaded coupons. The numerical study includes two approaches. The first approach considers only intralaminar (fiber breakage and matrix cracking) damage modes in calculating the progression of the damage path. In the second approach, the model is extended to consider the effect of interlaminar (delamination) damage modes in addition to the intralaminar damage modes. The intralaminar damage is modeled using progressive damage analysis (PDA) methodology implemented with the VUMAT subroutine in the ABAQUS finite element code. The interlaminar damage mode has been simulated using cohesive elements in ABAQUS. In the experimental study, 2-3 specimens each of two different stacking sequences of center-notched laminates are tensile loaded. The numerical results from the two different modeling approaches are compared with each other and the experimentally observed results for both laminate types. The comparisons reveal that the second modeling approach, where the delamination damage mode is included together with the intralaminar damage modes, better simulates the experimentally observed damage modes and damage paths, which were characterized by splitting failures perpendicular to the notch tips in one or more layers. Additionally, the inclusion of the delamination mode resulted in a better prediction of the loads at which the failure took place, which were higher than those predicted by the first modeling approach which did not include delaminations.

  7. A Numerical and Experimental Study of Damage Growth in a Composite Laminate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McElroy, Mark; Ratcliffe, James; Czabaj, Michael; Wang, John; Yuan, Fuh-Gwo

    2014-01-01

    The present study has three goals: (1) perform an experiment where a simple laminate damage process can be characterized in high detail; (2) evaluate the performance of existing commercially available laminate damage simulation tools by modeling the experiment; (3) observe and understand the underlying physics of damage in a composite honeycomb sandwich structure subjected to low-velocity impact. A quasi-static indentation experiment has been devised to provide detailed information about a simple mixed-mode damage growth process. The test specimens consist of an aluminum honeycomb core with a cross-ply laminate facesheet supported on a stiff uniform surface. When the sample is subjected to an indentation load, the honeycomb core provides support to the facesheet resulting in a gradual and stable damage growth process in the skin. This enables real time observation as a matrix crack forms, propagates through a ply, and then causes a delamination. Finite element analyses were conducted in ABAQUS/Explicit(TradeMark) 6.13 that used continuum and cohesive modeling techniques to simulate facesheet damage and a geometric and material nonlinear model to simulate core crushing. The high fidelity of the experimental data allows a detailed investigation and discussion of the accuracy of each numerical modeling approach.

  8. A Progressive Damage Model for Predicting Permanent Indentation and Impact Damage in Composite Laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Zhaojie; Guan, Zhidong; Li, Zengshan

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, a progressive damage model was established on the basis of ABAQUS software for predicting permanent indentation and impact damage in composite laminates. Intralaminar and interlaminar damage was modelled based on the continuum damage mechanics (CDM) in the finite element model. For the verification of the model, low-velocity impact tests of quasi-isotropic laminates with material system of T300/5228A were conducted. Permanent indentation and impact damage of the laminates were simulated and the numerical results agree well with the experiments. It can be concluded that an obvious knee point can be identified on the curve of the indentation depth versus impact energy. Matrix cracking and delamination develops rapidly with the increasing impact energy, while considerable amount of fiber breakage only occurs when the impact energy exceeds the energy corresponding to the knee point. Predicted indentation depth after the knee point is very sensitive to the parameter μ which is proposed in this paper, and the acceptable value of this parameter is in range from 0.9 to 1.0.

  9. Mechanical properties and failure mechanisms of carbon fiber reinforced epoxy laminated composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards Thissell, W.; Zurek, Anna K.; Addessio, Frank

    1996-05-01

    The mechanical behavior of quasi-isotropic and unidirectional epoxy-matrix carbon-fiber laminated composites subjected to compressive loading at strain rates of 10-3 and 2000 s-1 are described. Failure in the studied composites was dominated by delamination which proceeded by brittle fracture of the epoxy-matrix. The matrix-fiber bonding in these composites is very strong and prevented the occurrence of significant fiber-pullout. The mode I delamination strain energy release rate of the unidirectional composites was determined using the double cantilever beam and hole in plate compression method. The DCB method indicated a significant R curve effect attributed to fiber bridging while the presently available hole in plate analytical methods show questionable validity for highly anisotropic materials.

  10. Phased Array Beamforming and Imaging in Composite Laminates Using Guided Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tian, Zhenhua; Leckey, Cara A. C.; Yu, Lingyu

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the phased array beamforming and imaging using guided waves in anisotropic composite laminates. A generic phased array beamforming formula is presented, based on the classic delay-and-sum principle. The generic formula considers direction-dependent guided wave properties induced by the anisotropic material properties of composites. Moreover, the array beamforming and imaging are performed in frequency domain where the guided wave dispersion effect has been considered. The presented phased array method is implemented with a non-contact scanning laser Doppler vibrometer (SLDV) to detect multiple defects at different locations in an anisotropic composite plate. The array is constructed of scan points in a small area rapidly scanned by the SLDV. Using the phased array method, multiple defects at different locations are successfully detected. Our study shows that the guided wave phased array method is a potential effective method for rapid inspection of large composite structures.

  11. Environmental effects and viscoelastic behavior of laminated graphite/epoxy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dillard, D. A.; Morris, D. H.; Brinson, H. F.

    1983-01-01

    Primarily because of the polymeric matrix, graphite/epoxy composites are viscoelastic materials which exhibit creep and delayed failures. Guided by the time-temperature superposition principle, the authors are developing accelerated characterization techniques to predict the long term compliance behavior and creep rupture strength of composite materials based on short term tests at elevated temperatures. The effect of a post-cure cycle on the compliance and creep rupture strength of composite materials is discussed. The Zhurkov type failure law is applied to experimental creep rupture data of a typical laminate and is shown to correlate the data. A beneficial mechanical strengthening effect is described which significantly affects the failure strengths of specimens which have been under creep loading for a period of time. This aging effect is reversible if the specimen is allowed to recover before being loaded to failure. Other environmental aspects of composite materials are also reviewed.

  12. Mechanical properties and failure mechanisms of carbon fiber reinforced epoxy laminated composites

    SciTech Connect

    Thissell, W.R.; Zurek, A.K.; Addessio, F.

    1995-09-01

    The mechanical behavior of quasi-isotropic and unidirectional epoxy-matrix carbon-fiber laminated composites subjected compressive loading at strain rates of 10{sup {minus}3} and 2000 s{sup {minus}1} are described. Failure in the studied composites was dominated by delamination which proceeded by brittle fracture of the epoxy-matrix. The matrix-fiber bonding in these composites is very strong and prevented the occurrence of significant fiber-pullout. The mode I delamination strain energy release rate of the unidirectional composites was determined using the double cantilever beam and hole in plate compression method. The DCB method indicated a significant R curve effect attributed to fiber bridging while the presently available hole in plate analytical methods show questionable validity for highly anisotropic materials.

  13. Autoclave processing for composite material fabrication. 1: An analysis of resin flows and fiber compactions for thin laminate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hou, T. H.

    1985-01-01

    High quality long fiber reinforced composites, such as those used in aerospace and industrial applications, are commonly processed in autoclaves. An adequate resin flow model for the entire system (laminate/bleeder/breather), which provides a description of the time-dependent laminate consolidation process, is useful in predicting the loss of resin, heat transfer characteristics, fiber volume fraction and part dimension, etc., under a specified set of processing conditions. This could be accomplished by properly analyzing the flow patterns and pressure profiles inside the laminate during processing. A newly formulated resin flow model for composite prepreg lamination process is reported. This model considers viscous resin flows in both directions perpendicular and parallel to the composite plane. In the horizontal direction, a squeezing flow between two nonporous parallel plates is analyzed, while in the vertical direction, a poiseuille type pressure flow through porous media is assumed. Proper force and mass balances have been made and solved for the whole system. The effects of fiber-fiber interactions during lamination are included as well. The unique features of this analysis are: (1) the pressure gradient inside the laminate is assumed to be generated from squeezing action between two adjacent approaching fiber layers, and (2) the behavior of fiber bundles is simulated by a Finitely Extendable Nonlinear Elastic (FENE) spring.

  14. Development and verification of global/local analysis techniques for laminated composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Danniella Muheim; Griffin, O. Hayden, Jr.

    1991-01-01

    A two-dimensional to three-dimensional global/local finite element approach was developed, verified, and applied to a laminated composite plate of finite width and length containing a central circular hole. The resulting stress fields for axial compression loads were examined for several symmetric stacking sequences and hole sizes. Verification was based on comparison of the displacements and the stress fields with those accepted trends from previous free edge investigations and a complete three-dimensional finite element solution of the plate. The laminates in the compression study included symmetric cross-ply, angle-ply and quasi-isotropic stacking sequences. The entire plate was selected as the global model and analyzed with two-dimensional finite elements. Displacements along a region identified as the global/local interface were applied in a kinematically consistent fashion to independent three-dimensional local models. Local areas of interest in the plate included a portion of the straight free edge near the hole, and the immediate area around the hole. Interlaminar stress results obtained from the global/local analyses compares well with previously reported trends, and some new conclusions about interlaminar stress fields in plates with different laminate orientations and hole sizes are presented for compressive loading. The effectiveness of the global/local procedure in reducing the computational effort required to solve these problems is clearly demonstrated through examination of the computer time required to formulate and solve the linear, static system of equations which result for the global and local analyses to those required for a complete three-dimensional formulation for a cross-ply laminate. Specific processors used during the analyses are described in general terms. The application of this global/local technique is not limited software system, and was developed and described in as general a manner as possible.

  15. CNT reinforced epoxy foamed and electrospun nano-fiber interlayer systems for manufacturing lighter and stronger featherweight(TM) composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drakonakis, Vasileios M.

    Multiple works have been performed in improving carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites especially in terms of strength so delamination, which is the major defect in laminated composites, is prevented. Nevertheless, there is not much focus on improving conventional CFRP systems in terms of weight especially when these are used in primary structures. This work questions whether lighter and at the same time stronger CFRP composites can be manufactured in order to replace conventional CFRP systems in major applications. Under this perspective, this study demonstrates that inducing controlled porosity may offer a systemic approach for manufacturing light weight carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) matrix composites. Additionally, towards this scope, this work has focused on analyzing and describing the related matrix systems utilizing mostly classic viscoelastic theory. An in-depth characterization of the thermosetting matrix systems viscoelasticity kinetics as well as of the impregnation process towards its improvement in terms of lower cost is explored. Overall, this work makes an effort to establish the fundamentals for creating the next generation of light weight structural composites, the featherweight composites, by introducing porosity through several controlled reinforcements in a systemic and reproducible manner at the macro- micro- and nano- scales in the interlayer. By extensively describing the matrix system and the manufacturing processes and focusing on analytically testing the interlayer reinforcement systems, it is expected that featherweight CFRP will achieve lighter weight and at the same time higher mechanical properties.

  16. Development, characterization, and modeling of ballistic impact on composite laminates under compressive pre-stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerr-Anderson, Eric

    Structural composite laminates were ballistically impacted while under in-plane compressive pre-stress. Residual properties, damage characterization, and energy absorption were compared to determine synergistic effects of in-plane compressive pre-stress and impact velocity. A fixture was developed to apply in-plane compressive loads up to 30 tons to structural composites during an impact event using a single-stage light-gas gun. Observed failure modes included typical conical delamination, the development of an impact initiated shear crack (IISC), and the shear failure of a pre-stressed composite due to impact. It was observed that the compressive failure threshold quadratically decreased in relation to the impact velocity up to velocities that caused partial penetration. For all laminates impacted at velocities causing partial or full penetration up to 350 ms-1, the failure threshold was consistent and used as an experimental normalization. Samples impacted below 65% of the failure threshold witnessed no significant change in damage morphology or residual properties when compared to typical conical delamination. Samples impacted above 65% of the failure threshold witnessed additional damage in the form of a shear crack extending perpendicular to the applied load from the point of impact. The presence of an IISC reduced the residual properties and even caused failure upon impact at extreme combinations. Four failure envelopes have been established as: transient failure, steady state failure, impact initiated shear crack, and conical damage. Boundaries and empirically based equations for residual compressive strength have been developed for each envelope with relation to two E-glass/vinyl ester laminate systems. Many aspects of pre-stressed impact have been individually examined, but there have been no comprehensive examinations of pre-stressed impact. This research has resulted in the exploration and characterization of compressively pre-stressed damage for impact

  17. Mixed-mode fracture in unidirectional graphite epoxy composite laminates with central notch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binienda, Wieslaw K.; Reddy, E. S.

    1992-01-01

    Mixed-mode matrix fracture in central notched off-axis unidirectional composite laminates was investigated. A limited number of unidirectional tensile type specimens with a central, horizontal, notch were tested. Crack initiation and propagation were examined under various local stress fields that were controlled by fiber orientations. The tested specimens were simulated using a two dimensional finite element method with constant strain loading. The strain energy release rates along the crack were evaluated via crack closure technique. The variation of critical strain energy rates with off-axis angle was studied. The results from single (one-sided) and double (two-sided) crack simulations were presented and compared.

  18. Hybrid Finite Element Analysis of Free Edge Effect in Symmetric Composite Laminates

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-06-01

    ANALYSIS OF FREE EDGE EFFECT IN L AUTHOR(S 61102F S.W. Lee237B J.J. Rhiu S.C. Won,, I ~ 7. PENOAMnG ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADORES4 S) L. PERFORMING...ANALYSIS OF FREE EDGE EFFECT IN SYMMETRIC COMPOSITE LAMINATES S. W. Lee I 3. Phi S. C. Wong Department of Aerospace Engineering University of Maryland...collocation method. In this report, we present an efficient hybrid finite element method for analysis of interlaminar stress or free edge effect in

  19. Implementation of Higher Order Laminate Theory Into Strain Rate Dependent Micromechanics Analysis of Polymer Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Heung Soo; Zhu, Linfa; Chattopadhyay, Aditi; Goldberg, Robert K.

    2004-01-01

    A procedure has been developed to investigate the nonlinear response of composite plates under large strain and high strain rate loading. A recently developed strain dependent micromechanics model is extended to account for the shear effects during impact. Four different assumptions of shear deformation effects are investigated to improve the development strain rate dependent micromechanics model. A method to determine through the thickness strain and transverse Poisson's ratio is developed. The revised micromechanics model is implemented into higher order laminate theory. Parametric studies are conducted to investigate transverse shear effects during impact.

  20. Shear-flexible finite-element models of laminated composite plates and shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, A. K.; Mathers, M. D.

    1975-01-01

    Several finite-element models are applied to the linear static, stability, and vibration analysis of laminated composite plates and shells. The study is based on linear shallow-shell theory, with the effects of shear deformation, anisotropic material behavior, and bending-extensional coupling included. Both stiffness (displacement) and mixed finite-element models are considered. Discussion is focused on the effects of shear deformation and anisotropic material behavior on the accuracy and convergence of different finite-element models. Numerical studies are presented which show the effects of increasing the order of the approximating polynomials, adding internal degrees of freedom, and using derivatives of generalized displacements as nodal parameters.

  1. LOW VELOCITY IMPACT RESPONSE OF A LAMINATED COMPOSITE TUBE WITH A METALLIC BUMPER LAYER

    SciTech Connect

    Ibekwe, S.I.; Li, G.; Pang, S.S.; and Smith, B. H.

    2006-07-01

    A thin metallic sheet was bonded to the outer surface of a laminated composite curved beam as a bumper layer. It was believed that a metallic bumper layer such as an aluminum thin sheet would be able to intercept any lateral impacting force and absorb impact energy through plastic deformation. Since aluminum is comparatively light weight, a thin sheet will not result in a significant increase in structural weight. Results showed that impact damage occurred primarily in the bumper layer, thereby resulting in a much higher residual bending strength compared to the control specimen.

  2. Optimal cure cycle design for autoclave processing of thick composites laminates: A feasibility study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hou, Jean W.

    1985-01-01

    The thermal analysis and the calculation of thermal sensitivity of a cure cycle in autoclave processing of thick composite laminates were studied. A finite element program for the thermal analysis and design derivatives calculation for temperature distribution and the degree of cure was developed and verified. It was found that the direct differentiation was the best approach for the thermal design sensitivity analysis. In addition, the approach of the direct differentiation provided time histories of design derivatives which are of great value to the cure cycle designers. The approach of direct differentiation is to be used for further study, i.e., the optimal cycle design.

  3. Development of design allowable data for Celion 6000/LARC-160, graphite/polyimide composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehret, R. M.; Scanlan, P. R.; Rosen, C. D.

    1982-01-01

    A design allowables test program was conducted on Celion 6000/LARC-160 graphite polyimide composite to establish material performance over a 116 K (-250 F) to 589 K (600 F) temperature range. Tension, compression, in-plane shear and short beam shear properties were determined for uniaxial, quasi-isotropic and + or - 45 deg laminates. Effects of thermal aging and moisture saturation on mechanical properties were also evaluated. Celion 6000/LARC-160 graphite/polyimide can be considered an acceptable material system for structural applications to 589 K (600 F).

  4. A Novel Multiscale Physics Based Progressive Failure Methodology for Laminated Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pineda, Evan J.; Waas, Anthony M.; Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Collier, Craig S.; Yarrington, Phillip W.

    2008-01-01

    A variable fidelity, multiscale, physics based finite element procedure for predicting progressive damage and failure of laminated continuous fiber reinforced composites is introduced. At every integration point in a finite element model, progressive damage is accounted for at the lamina-level using thermodynamically based Schapery Theory. Separate failure criteria are applied at either the global-scale or the microscale in two different FEM models. A micromechanics model, the Generalized Method of Cells, is used to evaluate failure criteria at the micro-level. The stress-strain behavior and observed failure mechanisms are compared with experimental results for both models.

  5. Simultaneous application of fibrous piezoresistive sensors for compression and traction detection in glass laminate composites.

    PubMed

    Nauman, Saad; Cristian, Irina; Koncar, Vladan

    2011-01-01

    This article describes further development of a novel Non Destructive Evaluation (NDE) approach described in one of our previous papers. Here these sensors have been used for the first time as a Piecewise Continuous System (PCS), which means that they are not only capable of following the deformation pattern but can also detect distinctive fracture events. In order to characterize the simultaneous compression and traction response of these sensors, multilayer glass laminate composite samples were prepared for 3-point bending tests. The laminate sample consisted of five layers of plain woven glass fabrics placed one over another. The sensors were placed at two strategic locations during the lay-up process so as to follow traction and compression separately. The reinforcements were then impregnated in epoxy resin and later subjected to 3-point bending tests. An appropriate data treatment and recording device has also been developed and used for simultaneous data acquisition from the two sensors. The results obtained, under standard testing conditions have shown that our textile fibrous sensors can not only be used for simultaneous detection of compression and traction in composite parts for on-line structural health monitoring but their sensitivity and carefully chosen location inside the composite ensures that each fracture event is indicated in real time by the output signal of the sensor.

  6. Mathematical Modeling of Three-Dimensional Delamination Processes of Laminated Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasser, Thomas C.; Holzapfel, Gerhard A.

    The mathematical modeling of 3D delamination failure of laminated composites is discussed. Strong discontinuities are considered in the kinematically framework, which provides the basis for the embedded representation of discontinuities in finite elements. Suitable expressions for a transversely isotropic traction law in form of a displacement-energy function are derived to describe the constitutive response of the interface of laminated composites. Softening phenomena of interfaces are modeled by an isotropic damage law, while the continuous bulk material is modeled as an elastic fiber-reinforced composite. The variational formulation is based on a three-field Hu-Washizu functional which is accompanied with the enhanced assumed strain method. Three different finite element formulations are delineated. A biomechanical example investigates the dissection of the middle layer of a healthy artery, and compares the numerical results of the different finite element formulations obtained from regular and distorted meshes. Soft tissue dissection occurs, for example, during balloon angioplasty, which is a mechanical procedure frequently performed to reduce the severity of atherosclerotic stenoses. Physical and numerical analyses of delamination processes are of pressing scientific and clinical need.

  7. Detecting closing delaminations in laminated composite plates using nonlinear structural intensity and time reversal mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamberti, Alfredo; Semperlotti, Fabio

    2013-12-01

    Closing delaminations in composite laminated structures exhibit a nonlinear dynamic response when excited by high frequency elastic waves. The contact acoustic nonlinear effects taking place at the damage interface act as a mechanism of energy redistribution from the driving frequency to the nonlinear harmonic frequencies. In this paper, we extend the concept of nonlinear structural intensity (NSI) to the analysis of closing delaminations in composite laminated plates. NSI is calculated using a method based on a combination of finite element and finite difference techniques, which is suitable for processing both numerical and experimental data. NSI is proven to be an effective metric to identify the presence and location of closing delaminations. The highly directional nature of orthotropic composites results in vibrational energy propagating in a different direction from that of the initial elastic wave. This aspect reduces the ability to effectively interrogate the damage and, therefore, the sensitivity to the damage. The time reversal mirror technique is explored as a possible approach to overcome the effect of the material directionality and increase the ability to interrogate the damage. Numerical simulations show that this technique is able to overcome the material directionality and to drastically enhance the ability to interrogate the damage.

  8. Simultaneous Application of Fibrous Piezoresistive Sensors for Compression and Traction Detection in Glass Laminate Composites

    PubMed Central

    Nauman, Saad; Cristian, Irina; Koncar, Vladan

    2011-01-01

    This article describes further development of a novel Non Destructive Evaluation (NDE) approach described in one of our previous papers. Here these sensors have been used for the first time as a Piecewise Continuous System (PCS), which means that they are not only capable of following the deformation pattern but can also detect distinctive fracture events. In order to characterize the simultaneous compression and traction response of these sensors, multilayer glass laminate composite samples were prepared for 3-point bending tests. The laminate sample consisted of five layers of plain woven glass fabrics placed one over another. The sensors were placed at two strategic locations during the lay-up process so as to follow traction and compression separately. The reinforcements were then impregnated in epoxy resin and later subjected to 3-point bending tests. An appropriate data treatment and recording device has also been developed and used for simultaneous data acquisition from the two sensors. The results obtained, under standard testing conditions have shown that our textile fibrous sensors can not only be used for simultaneous detection of compression and traction in composite parts for on-line structural health monitoring but their sensitivity and carefully chosen location inside the composite ensures that each fracture event is indicated in real time by the output signal of the sensor. PMID:22163707

  9. A low cost method of testing compression-after-impact strength of composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, Alan T.

    1991-01-01

    A method was devised to test the compression strength of composite laminate specimens that are much thinner and wider than other tests require. The specimen can be up to 7.62 cm (3 in) wide and as thin as 1.02 mm (.04 in). The best features of the Illinois Institute of Technology Research Institute (IITRI) fixture are combined with an antibuckling jig developed and used at the University of Dayton Research Institute to obtain a method of compression testing thin, wide test coupons on any 20 kip (or larger) loading frame. Up to 83 pct. less composite material is needed for the test coupons compared to the most commonly used compression-after-impact (CAI) tests, which calls for 48 ply thick (approx. 6.12 mm) test coupons. Another advantage of the new method is that composite coupons of the exact lay-up and thickness of production parts can be tested for CAI strength, thus yielding more meaningful results. This new method was used to compression test 8 and 16 ply laminates of T300/934 carbon/epoxy. These results were compared to those obtained using ASTM standard D 3410-87 (Celanese compression test). CAI testing was performed on IM6/3501-6, IM7/SP500 and IM7/F3900. The new test method and associated fixture work well and is a valuable asset to MSFC's damage tolerance program.

  10. Effects of edge grinding and sealing on mechanical properties of machine damaged laminate composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asmatulu, Ramazan; Yeoh, Jason; Alarifi, Ibrahim M.; Alharbi, Abdulaziz

    2016-04-01

    Fiber reinforced composites have been utilized for a number of different applications, including aircraft, wind turbine, automobile, construction, manufacturing, and many other industries. During the fabrication, machining (waterjet, diamond and band saws) and assembly of these laminate composites, various edge and hole delamination, fiber pullout and other micro and nanocracks can be formed on the composite panels. The present study mainly focuses on the edge grinding and sealing of the machine damaged fiber reinforced composites, such as fiberglass, plain weave carbon fiber and unidirectional carbon fiber. The MTS tensile test results confirmed that the composite coupons from the grinding process usually produced better and consistent mechanical properties compared to the waterjet cut samples only. In addition to these studies, different types of high strength adhesives, such as EPON 828 and Loctite were applied on the edges of the prepared composite coupons and cured under vacuum. The mechanical tests conducted on these coupons indicated that the overall mechanical properties of the composite coupons were further improved. These processes can lower the labor costs on the edge treatment of the composites and useful for different industrial applications of fiber reinforced composites.

  11. Novel MRE/CFRP sandwich structures for adaptive vibration control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlowska, J.; Boczkowska, A.; Czulak, A.; Przybyszewski, B.; Holeczek, K.; Stanik, R.; Gude, M.

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this work was the development of sandwich structures formed by embedding magnetorheological elastomers (MRE) between constrained layers of carbon fibre-reinforced plastic (CFRP) laminates. The MREs were obtained by mechanical stirring of a reactive mixture of substrates with carbonyl-iron particles, followed by orienting the particles into chains under an external magnetic field. Samples with particle volume fractions of 11.5% and 33% were examined. The CFRP/MRE sandwich structures were obtained by compressing MREs samples between two CFRP laminates composed. The used A.S.SET resin was in powder form and the curing process was carried out during pressing with MRE. The microstructure of the manufactured sandwich beams was inspected using SEM. Moreover, the rheological and damping properties of the examined materials with and without a magnetic field were experimentally investigated. In addition, the free vibration responses of the adaptive three-layered MR beams were studied at different fixed magnetic field levels. The free vibration tests revealed that an applied non-homogeneous magnetic field causes a shift in natural frequency values and a reduction in the vibration amplitudes of the CFRP/MRE adaptive beams. The reduction in vibration amplitude was attributed mainly to the stiffening effect of the MRE core and only a minor contribution was made by the enhanced damping capacity, which was evidenced by the variation in damping ratio values.

  12. Application of the Refined Zigzag Theory to the Modeling of Delaminations in Laminated Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groh, Rainer M. J.; Weaver, Paul M.; Tessler, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    The Refined Zigzag Theory is applied to the modeling of delaminations in laminated composites. The commonly used cohesive zone approach is adapted for use within a continuum mechanics model, and then used to predict the onset and propagation of delamination in five cross-ply composite beams. The resin-rich area between individual composite plies is modeled explicitly using thin, discrete layers with isotropic material properties. A damage model is applied to these resin-rich layers to enable tracking of delamination propagation. The displacement jump across the damaged interfacial resin layer is captured using the zigzag function of the Refined Zigzag Theory. The overall model predicts the initiation of delamination to within 8% compared to experimental results and the load drop after propagation is represented accurately.

  13. Stress analysis of a rectangular implant in laminated composites using 2-D and 3-D finite elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chow, Wai T.; Graves, Michael J.

    1992-01-01

    An analysis method using the FEM based on the Hellinger-Reissner variation principle has been developed to determine the 3-D stresses and displacements near a rectangular implant inside a laminated composite material. Three-dimensional elements are employed in regions where the interlaminar stress is considered to be significant; 2-D elements are used in other areas. Uniaxially loaded graphite-epoxy laminates have been analyzed; the implant was modeled as four plies of 3501/6 epoxy located in the middle of the laminate. It is shown that the interlaminar stresses are an order of magnitude lower than the stress representing the applied far-field load. The stress concentration factors of both the interlaminar and in-plane stresses depend on the stacking sequence of the laminate.

  14. Co-Curing of CFRP-Steel Hybrid Joints Using the Vacuum Assisted Resin Infusion Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streitferdt, Alexander; Rudolph, Natalie; Taha, Iman

    2017-01-01

    This study focuses on the one-step co-curing process of carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) joined with a steel plate to form a hybrid structure. In this process CFRP laminate and bond to the metal are realized simultaneously by resin infusion, such that the same resin serves for both infusion and adhesion. For comparison, the commonly applied two-step process of adhesive bonding is studied. In this case, the CFRP laminate is fabricated in a first stage through resin infusion of Non Crimp Fabric (NCF) and joined to the steel plate in a further step through adhesive bonding. For this purpose, the commercially available epoxy-based Betamate 1620 is applied. CFRP laminates were fabricated using two different resin systems, namely the epoxy (EP)-based RTM6 and a newly developed fast curing polyurethane (PU) resin. Results show comparable mechanical performance of the PU and EP based CFRP laminates. The strength of the bond of the co-cured samples was in the same order as the samples adhesively bonded with the PU resin and the structural adhesive. The assembly adhesive with higher ductility showed a weaker performance compared to the other tests. It could be shown that the surface roughness had the highest impact on the joint performance under the investigated conditions.

  15. Mechanically fastened composite laminates subjected to combined bearing-bypass and shear loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madenci, Erdogan

    1993-01-01

    Bolts and rivets provide a means of load transfer in the construction of aircraft. However, they give rise to stress concentrations and are often the source and location of static and fatigue failures. Furthermore, fastener holes are prone to cracks during take-off and landing. These cracks present the most common origin of structural failures in aircraft. Therefore, accurate determination of the contact stresses associated with such loaded holes in mechanically fastened joints is essential to reliable strength evaluation and failure prediction. As the laminate is subjected to loading, the contact region, whose extent is not known, develops between the fastener and the hole boundary through this contact region, which consists of slip and no-slip zones due to friction. The presence of the unknown contact stress distribution over the contact region between the pin and the composite laminate, material anisotropy, friction between the pin and the laminate, pin-hole clearance, combined bearing-bypass and shear loading, and finite geometry of the laminate result in a complex non-linear problem. In the case of bearing-bypass loading in compression, this non-linear problem is further complicated by the presence of dual contact regions. Previous research concerning the analysis of mechanical joints subjected to combined bearing-bypass and shear loading is non-existent. In the case of bearing-bypass loading only, except for the study conducted by Naik and Crews (1991), others employed the concept of superposition which is not valid for this non-linear problem. Naik and Crews applied a linear finite element analysis with conditions along the pin-hole contact region specified as displacement constraint equations. The major shortcoming of this method is that the variation of the contract region as a function of the applied load should be known a priori. Also, their analysis is limited to symmetric geometry and material systems, and frictionless boundary conditions. Since the

  16. Analysis of composite laminates with multiple fasteners by boundary collocation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeev, Boris Anatolievich

    Mechanical fasteners remain the primary means of load transfer between structural components made of composite laminates. As, in pursuit of increasing efficiency of the structure, the operational load continues to grow, the load carried by each fastener increases accordingly. This accelerates initiation of fatigue-related cracks near the fasteners holes and increases probability of failure. Therefore, the assessment of the stresses around the fastener holes and the stress intensity factors associated with edge cracks becomes critical for damage-tolerant design. Because of the presence of unknown contact stresses and the contact region between the fastener and the laminate, the analysis of a pin-loaded hole becomes considerably more complex than that of a traction-free hole. The accurate prediction of the contact stress distribution along the hole boundary is critical for determining the stress intensity factors and is essential for reliable strength evaluation and failure prediction. This study concerns the development of an analytical methodology, based on the boundary collocation technique, to determine the contact stresses and stress intensity factors required for strength and life prediction of bolted joints with many fasteners. It provides an analytical capability for determining the non-linear contact stresses in mechanically fastened composite laminates while capturing the effects of finite geometry, presence of edge cracks, interaction among fasteners, material anisotropy, fastener flexibility, fastener-hole clearance, friction between the pin and the laminate, and by-pass loading. Also, the proposed approach permits the determination of the fastener load distribution, which significantly influences the failure load of a multi-fastener joint. The well known phenomenon of the fastener tightening torque (clamping force) influence on the load distribution among the different fastener in a multi-fastener joints is taken into account by means of bi

  17. Edge delamination of composite laminates subject to combined tension and torsional loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooper, Steven J.

    1990-01-01

    Delamination is a common failure mode of laminated composite materials. Edge delamination is important since it results in reduced stiffness and strength of the laminate. The tension/torsion load condition is of particular significance to the structural integrity of composite helicopter rotor systems. Material coupons can easily be tested under this type of loading in servo-hydraulic tension/torsion test stands using techniques very similar to those used for the Edge Delamination Tensile Test (EDT) delamination specimen. Edge delamination of specimens loaded in tension was successfully analyzed by several investigators using both classical laminate theory and quasi-three dimensional (Q3D) finite element techniques. The former analysis technique can be used to predict the total strain energy release rate, while the latter technique enables the calculation of the mixed-mode strain energy release rates. The Q3D analysis is very efficient since it produces a three-dimensional solution to a two-dimensional domain. A computer program was developed which generates PATRAN commands to generate the finite element model. PATRAN is a pre- and post-processor which is commonly used with a variety of finite element programs such as MCS/NASTRAN. The program creates a sufficiently dense mesh at the delamination crack tips to support a mixed-mode fracture mechanics analysis. The program creates a coarse mesh in those regions where the gradients in the stress field are low (away from the delamination regions). A transition mesh is defined between these regions. This program is capable of generating a mesh for an arbitrarily oriented matrix crack. This program significantly reduces the modeling time required to generate these finite element meshes, thus providing a realistic tool with which to investigate the tension torsion problem.

  18. Analytical Modelling of Transverse Matrix Cracking of [plus or minus Theta/90(sub n)](sub s) Composite Laminates Under Multiaxial Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayugo, J A.; Camanho, P. P.; Maimi, P.; Davila, C. G.

    2010-01-01

    An analytical model based on the analysis of a cracked unit cell of a composite laminate subjected to multiaxial loads is proposed to predict the onset and accumulation of transverse matrix cracks in the 90(sub n) plies of uniformly stressed [plus or minus Theta/90(sub n)](sub s) laminates. The model predicts the effect of matrix cracks on the stiffness of the laminate, as well as the ultimate failure of the laminate, and it accounts for the effect of the ply thickness on the ply strength. Several examples describing the predictions of laminate response, from damage onset up to final failure under both uniaxial and multiaxial loads, are presented.

  19. Rotary ultrasonic machining of CFRP: A comparison with grinding.

    PubMed

    Ning, F D; Cong, W L; Pei, Z J; Treadwell, C

    2016-03-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) composites have been intensively used in various industries due to their superior properties. In aircraft and aerospace industry, a large number of holes are required to be drilled into CFRP components at final stage for aircraft assembling. There are two major types of methods for hole making of CFRP composites in industry, twist drilling and its derived multi-points machining methods, and grinding and its related methods. The first type of methods are commonly used in hole making of CFRP composites. However, in recent years, rotary ultrasonic machining (RUM), a hybrid machining process combining ultrasonic machining and grinding, has also been successfully used in drilling of CFRP composites. It has been shown that RUM is superior to twist drilling in many aspects. However, there are no reported investigations on comparisons between RUM and grinding in drilling of CFRP. In this paper, these two drilling methods are compared in five aspects, including cutting force, torque, surface roughness, hole diameter, and material removal rate.

  20. Development and verification of local/global analysis techniques for laminated composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, O. Hayden, Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Analysis and design methods for laminated composite materials have been the subject of considerable research over the past 20 years, and are currently well developed. In performing the detailed three-dimensional analyses which are often required in proximity to discontinuities, however, analysts often encounter difficulties due to large models. Even with the current availability of powerful computers, models which are too large to run, either from a resource or time standpoint, are often required. There are several approaches which can permit such analyses, including substructuring, use of superelements or transition elements, and the global/local approach. This effort is based on the so-called zoom technique to global/local analysis, where a global analysis is run, with the results of that analysis applied to a smaller region as boundary conditions, in as many iterations as is required to attain an analysis of the desired region. Before beginning the global/local analyses, it was necessary to evaluate the accuracy of the three-dimensional elements currently implemented in the Computational Structural Mechanics (CSM) Testbed. It was also desired to install, using the Experimental Element Capability, a number of displacement formulation elements which have well known behavior when used for analysis of laminated composites.

  1. Finite element analysis of the non-linear vibrations of moderately thick unsymmetrically laminated composite plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Gajbir; Venkateswara Rao, G.; Iyengar, N. G. R.

    1995-03-01

    The influence of finite amplitudes on the free flexural vibration response of moderately thick laminated plates is investigated. For this purpose, a simple higher order theory involving only four unknowns and satisfying the stress free conditions at the top and bottom surface of the composite plate is proposed. The proposed theory eliminates the use of shear correction factors which are otherwise required in Mindlin's plate theory. A rectangular four-node[formula]continuous finite element is developed based on this theory. The non-linear finite element equations are reduced to two non-linear ordinary differential equations governing the response of positive and negative deflection cycles. Direct numerical integration method is then employed to obtain the periods or non-linear frequencies. The finite element developed and the direct numerical integration method employed are validated for the case of isotropic rectangular plates. It is found that unsymmetrically laminated rectangular plates with hinged-hinged edge conditions oscillate with different amplitudes in the positive and negative deflection cycles. Furthermore, such plates would oscillate with a frequency less than the fundamental frequency for finite small amplitudes of oscillation. It is shown that this behaviour is strongly influenced by the boundary conditions. Results are presented for many configurations of composite plates.

  2. Acoustic emission evaluation of reinforced concrete bridge beam with graphite composite laminate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Dan E.; Shen, H. Warren; Finlayson, Richard D.

    2001-07-01

    A test was recently conducted on August 1, 2000 at the FHwA Non-Destructive Evaluation Validation Center, sponsored by The New York State DOT, to evaluate a graphite composite laminate as an effective form of retrofit for reinforced concrete bridge beam. One portion of this testing utilized Acoustic Emission Monitoring for Evaluation of the beam under test. Loading was applied to this beam using a two-point loading scheme at FHwA's facility. This load was applied in several incremental loadings until the failure of the graphite composite laminate took place. Each loading culminated by either visual crack location or large audible emissions from the beam. Between tests external cracks were located visually and highlighted and the graphite epoxy was checked for delamination. Acoustic Emission data was collected to locate cracking areas of the structure during the loading cycles. To collect this Acoustic Emission data, FHwA and NYSDOT utilized a Local Area Monitor, an Acoustic Emission instrument developed in a cooperative effort between FHwA and Physical Acoustics Corporation. Eight Acoustic Emission sensors were attached to the structure, with four on each side, in a symmetrical fashion. As testing progressed and culminated with beam failure, Acoustic Emission data was gathered and correlated against time and test load. This paper will discuss the analysis of this test data.

  3. Anomalous Buckling Characteristics of Laminated Metal-Matrix Composite Plates with Central Square Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.

    1998-01-01

    Compressive buckling analysis was performed on metal-matrix composite (MMC) plates with central square holes. The MMC plates have varying aspect ratios and hole sizes and are supported under different boundary conditions. The finite-element structural analysis method was used to study the effects of plate boundary conditions, plate aspect ratio, hole size, and the composite stacking sequence on the compressive buckling strengths of the perforated MMC plates. Studies show that by increasing the hole sizes, compressive buckling strengths of the perforated MMC plates could be considerably increased under certain boundary conditions and aspect ratios ("anomalous" buckling behavior); and that the plate buckling mode could be symmetrical or antisymmetrical, depending on the plate boundary conditions, aspect ratio, and the hole size. For same-sized plates with same-sized holes, the compressive buckling strengths of the perforated MMC plates with [90/0/0/90]2 lamination could be as much as 10 percent higher or lower than those of the [45/- 45/- 45/45]2 laminations, depending on the plate boundary conditions, plate aspect ratios, and the hole size. Clamping the plate edges induces far stronger "anomalous" buckling behavior (enhancing compressive buckling strengths at increasing hole sizes) of the perforated MMC plates than simply supporting the plate edges.

  4. Modeling the kinematics of multi-axial composite laminates as a stacking of 2D TIF plies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibañez, Ruben; Abisset-Chavanne, Emmanuelle; Chinesta, Francisco; Huerta, Antonio

    2016-10-01

    Thermoplastic composites are widely considered in structural parts. In this paper attention is paid to sheet forming of continuous fiber laminates. In the case of unidirectional prepregs, the ply constitutive equation is modeled as a transversally isotropic fluid, that must satisfy both the fiber inextensibility as well as the fluid incompressibility. When the stacking sequence involves plies with different orientations the kinematics of each ply during the laminate deformation varies significantly through the composite thickness. In our former works we considered two different approaches when simulating the squeeze flow induced by the laminate compression, the first based on a penalty formulation and the second one based on the use of Lagrange multipliers. In the present work we propose an alternative approach that consists in modeling each ply involved in the laminate as a transversally isotropic fluid - TIF - that becomes 2D as soon as incompressibility constraint and plane stress assumption are taken into account. Thus, composites laminates can be analyzed as a stacking of 2D TIF models that could eventually interact by using adequate friction laws at the inter-ply interfaces.

  5. Smart damping of geometrically nonlinear vibrations of laminated composite beams using vertically reinforced 1-3 piezoelectric composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarangi, S. K.; Ray, M. C.

    2010-07-01

    This paper deals with the analysis of active constrained layer damping (ACLD) of geometrically nonlinear transient vibrations of laminated composite beams using vertically reinforced 1-3 piezoelectric composite material as the material of the constraining layer of the ACLD treatment. A nonlinear finite element model has been developed for analyzing the ACLD of laminated symmetric and antisymmetric cross-ply and angle-ply composite beams integrated with such ACLD treatment. The von Kármán-type nonlinear strain-displacement relations and the first-order shear deformation theory are used for deriving this coupled electromechanical nonlinear finite element model. The Golla-Hughes-McTavish (GHM) method has been used to model the constrained viscoelastic layer of the ACLD treatment in the time domain. The backbone curves of such a class of nonlinear systems are plotted to determine the excitation levels for causing geometrical nonlinearity. The numerical results reveal that the ACLD treatment significantly improves the damping characteristics of the cross-ply and antisymmetric angle-ply beams for suppressing the geometrically nonlinear transient vibrations of the beams.

  6. Development of a Higher Order Laminate Theory for Modeling Composites with Induced Strain Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chattopadhyay, Aditi; Seeley, Charles E.

    1996-01-01

    A refined higher order plate theory is developed to investigate the actuation mechanism of piezoelectric materials surface bonded or embedded in composite laminates. The current analysis uses a displacement field which accurately accounts for transverse shear stresses. Some higher order terms are identified by using the conditions that shear stresses vanish at all free surfaces. Therefore, all boundary conditions for displacements and stresses are satisfied in the present theory. The analysis is implemented using the finite element method which provides a convenient means to construct a numerical solution due to the discrete nature of the actuators. The higher order theory is computationally less expensive than a full three dimensional analysis. The theory is also shown to agree well with published experimental results. Numerical examples are presented for composite plates with thicknesses ranging from thin to very thick.

  7. Analysis of metal-matrix composite structures. I - Micromechanics constitutive theory. II - Laminate analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arenburg, R. T.; Reddy, J. N.

    1991-01-01

    The micromechanical constitutive theory is used to examine the nonlinear behavior of continuous-fiber-reinforced metal-matrix composite structures. Effective lamina constitutive relations based on the Abouli micromechanics theory are presented. The inelastic matrix behavior is modeled by the unified viscoplasticity theory of Bodner and Partom. The laminate constitutive relations are incorporated into a first-order deformation plate theory. The resulting boundary value problem is solved by utilizing the finite element method. Attention is also given to computational aspects of the numerical solution, including the temporal integration of the inelastic strains and the spatial integration of bending moments. Numerical results the nonlinear response of metal matrix composites subjected to extensional and bending loads are presented.

  8. Permeability Testing of Impacted Composite Laminates for Use on Reusable Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, A. T.

    2001-01-01

    Since composite laminates are beginning to be identified for use in reusable launch vehicle propulsion systems, an understanding of their permeance is needed. A foreign object impact event can cause a localized area of permeability (leakage) in a polymer matrix composite, and it is the aim of this study to assess a method of quantifying permeability-after-impact results. A simple test apparatus is presented, and variables that could affect the measured values of permeability-after-impact were assessed. Once it was determined that valid numbers were being measured, a fiber/resin system was impacted at various impact levels and the resulting permeability measured, first with a leak check solution (qualitative) then using the new apparatus (quantitative). The results showed that as the impact level increased, so did the measured leakage. As the pressure to the specimen was increased, the leak rate was seen to increase in a nonlinear fashion for almost all the specimens tested.

  9. The Behavior of Translucent Composite Laminates under Highly Energetic Laser Irradiations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allheily, Vadim; Merlat, Lionel; Lacroix, Fabrice; Eichhorn, Alfred; L'Hostis, Gildas

    With the emergence of composite materials in the last decades, the interaction between light and diffusive materials has become a challenging topic in many key manufacturing areas (laser welding, laser surface treatment, engraving, etc.). In this paper, the behavior of laminated glass fiber-reinforced plastic composites (GFRP) under 1.07 μm-wavelength irradiations is investigated. Optical parameters are first assessed to build up a basic analytical interaction model involving internal refraction and reflection. The scattering effect due to the presence of oriented glass fibers is also a topic of interest. A thermodynamic analysis is then carried out from the induced volume heat source until the degradation temperature of the material is reached out. The study finally results in a one-dimensional model describing the optical and thermo-dynamical behavior of GFRP under high-power laser irradiations up to ignition of the chemical degradation phenomena.

  10. Assessment of FGPM shunt damping for vibration reduction of laminated composite beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lezgy-Nazargah, M.; Divandar, S. M.; Vidal, P.; Polit, O.

    2017-02-01

    This work addresses theoretical and finite element investigations of functionally graded piezoelectric materials (FGPMs) for shunted passive vibration damping of laminated composite beams. The properties of piezoelectric patches are assumed to vary through the thickness direction following the exponent or power law distribution in terms of the volume fractions of the constituent materials. By employing Hamilton's principle, the governing differential equations of motion are derived. The resulting system of equations of vibration is solved by employing an efficient three-nodded beam element which is based on a refined sinus piezoelectric model. The effects of effective electromechanical coupling coefficients (EEMCCs), different electric shunt circuits and different material compositions on the shunted damping performance are investigated. The optimal values of the electric components belonging to each shunt circuit are numerically determined.

  11. Damage prognosis of adhesively-bonded joints in laminated composite structural components of unmanned aerial vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Farrar, Charles R; Gobbato, Maurizio; Conte, Joel; Kosmatke, John; Oliver, Joseph A

    2009-01-01

    The extensive use of lightweight advanced composite materials in unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) drastically increases the sensitivity to both fatigue- and impact-induced damage of their critical structural components (e.g., wings and tail stabilizers) during service life. The spar-to-skin adhesive joints are considered one of the most fatigue sensitive subcomponents of a lightweight UAV composite wing with damage progressively evolving from the wing root. This paper presents a comprehensive probabilistic methodology for predicting the remaining service life of adhesively-bonded joints in laminated composite structural components of UAVs. Non-destructive evaluation techniques and Bayesian inference are used to (i) assess the current state of damage of the system and, (ii) update the probability distribution of the damage extent at various locations. A probabilistic model for future loads and a mechanics-based damage model are then used to stochastically propagate damage through the joint. Combined local (e.g., exceedance of a critical damage size) and global (e.g.. flutter instability) failure criteria are finally used to compute the probability of component failure at future times. The applicability and the partial validation of the proposed methodology are then briefly discussed by analyzing the debonding propagation, along a pre-defined adhesive interface, in a simply supported laminated composite beam with solid rectangular cross section, subjected to a concentrated load applied at mid-span. A specially developed Eliler-Bernoulli beam finite element with interlaminar slip along the damageable interface is used in combination with a cohesive zone model to study the fatigue-induced degradation in the adhesive material. The preliminary numerical results presented are promising for the future validation of the methodology.

  12. Multifunctional Composites through Inkjet-printed Architectures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-27

    areas where higher damage resistance is required, such as holes , joints and other stress concentration areas. In this work, PMMA micro- droplets...toughen composite areas where higher damage resistance is required, such as holes , joints and other stress concentration areas. In this work, PMMA...Unfortunately, the black background and fibrous texture of CFRP make the observation of printed polymer deposition between laminate plies extremely

  13. Influence of large deflection and transverse shear on random response of rectangular symmetric composite laminates to acoustic loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mei, Chuh; Prasad, C. B.

    1987-01-01

    Nonlinear equations of motion of symmetrically laminated anisotropic plates are derived accounting for von Karman strains. The effect of transverse shear is included in the formulation and the rotatory inertia effect is ignored. Using a single-mode Galerkin procedure the nonlinear modal equation is obtained. Direct equivalent linearization is employed. The response of acoustic excitation on moderately thick composite panels is studied. Further, the effects of transverse shear on large deflection vibration of laminates under random excitation are studied. Mean-square deflection and mean-square inplane stresses are obtained for some symmetric graphite-epoxy laminates. Using equilibrium equations and the continuity requirements, the mean-square transverse shear stresses are calculated. The results obtained will be useful in the sonic fatigue design of composite aircraft panels. The analysis is presented in detail for simply supported plate. The analogous equations for a clamped case are given in the appendix.

  14. Porcelain laminate veneer restorations bonded with a three-liquid silane bonding agent and a dual-activated luting composite.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, Hideo; Aida, Yukiko; Ishikawa, Yumi; Tanoue, Naomi

    2006-12-01

    This clinical report describes the fabrication and bonding of porcelain laminate veneer restorations in a patient with anterior open spaces. Laminate veneer restorations made of feldspathic porcelain were etched with 5% hydrofluoric acid, rinsed under tap water, ultrasonically cleaned with methanol, and primed with a chemically activated three-liquid silane bonding agent (Clearfil Porcelain Bond). The enamel surfaces were etched with 40% phosphoric acid, rinsed with water, and primed with a two-liquid bonding agent (Clearfil New Bond) that contained a hydrophobic phosphate (10-methacryloyloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate; MDP). The restorations were bonded with a dual-activated luting composite (Clapearl DC). The veneers have been functioning satisfactorily for an observation period of one year. Combined use of the Clearfil bonding agents and Clapearl DC luting composite is an alternative to conventional materials for seating porcelain laminate veneer restorations, although the system is inapplicable to dentin bonding.

  15. Simultaneous and sequential multi-site impact response of composite laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartus, Shane D.

    The unique feature in this study was the investigation of the response of polymer composite material to impact by multiple high velocity projectiles. Energy absorption, new surface creation, and failure mechanisms from both sequential and near-simultaneous multi-site, high velocity impact were compared to assess synergistic and cumulative effects. A single-stage light-gas gun capable of launching three projectiles with controlled impact location and velocity in both near-simultaneous and sequential impact modes was developed to study these effects. Two test programs were conducted to evaluate these impact scenarios on thin S-2 glass/epoxy laminates. In the first program, the effect of laminate thickness was investigated using .30 caliber steel spherical projectiles. The material response near and above the ballistic limit at constant incident velocity was studied with respect to two and three projectile impacts. It was found that specimens subjected to sequential impact absorbed 10.1% more impact energy and exhibited increases of 23.0% (two projectile) and 10.5% (three projectile) in delamination damage over specimens subjected to simultaneous impact. The second test program involved a study assessing projectile mass effects for .50 caliber spherical Al 2O3 (3.94 g), steel (8.38 g), and tungsten carbide (16.08 g) projectiles at constant incident energy. A factor of four increase in projectile mass corresponded to 22.4% (sequential impact) and 12.8% (simultaneous impact) increases in delamination damage. Energy absorption increased 11.9% (sequential impact) and 8.7% simultaneous impact for laminates subjected to tungsten carbide projectiles over Al2O3 projectiles. Energy absorption in laminates subjected to sequential impact was 20.0% higher (average) than those impacted simultaneously. In contrast to the .30 caliber impact study, delamination damage increased 14.6% (average) for specimens subjected to simultaneous impact. In both studies, impact energy absorption

  16. Analysis of interlaminar stresses in thick composite laminates with and without edge delamination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitcomb, J. D.; Raju, I. S.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of laminate thickness on the interlaminar stresses in rectangular quasi-isotropic laminates under uniform axial strain was studied. Laminates from 8-ply to infinitely thick were analyzed. Thick laminates were synthesized by stacking (45/0/-45/90) ply groups, rather than grouping like plies. Laminates with and without delaminations were studied. In laminates without delaminations, the free-edge interlaminar normal stress distribution in the outer ply groups was insensitive to total laminate thickness. The interlaminar normal stress distribution for the interior ply groups was nearly the same as for an infinitely thick laminate. In contrast, the free-edge inter-laminar shear stress distribution was nearly the same for inner and outer ply groups and was insensitive to laminate thickness. In laminates with delaminations those delaminations near the top and bottom surfaces of a thick laminate have much larger total strain-energy-release rates (G sub t) and mode I-to-total (G sub t/G sub t) ratios than delaminations deep in the interior. Therefore, delaminations can be expected to grow more easily near the surfaces of a laminate than in the interior.

  17. Analysis of interlaminar stresses in thick composite laminates with and without edge delamination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitcomb, J. D.; Raju, I. S.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of laminate thickness on the interlaminar stresses in rectangular quasi-isotropic laminates under uniform axial strain was studied. Laminates from 8-ply to infinitely thick were analyzed. Thick laminates were synthesized by stacking (45/0/-45/90) ply groups, rather than grouping like plies. Laminates with and without delaminations were studied. In laminates without delaminations, the free-edge interlaminar normal stress distribution in the outer ply groups was insensitive to total laminate thickness. The interlaminar normal stress distribution for the interior ply groups was nearly the same as for an infinitely thick laminate. In contrast, the free-edge inter-laminar shear stress distribution was nearly the same for inner and outer ply groups and was insensitive to laminate thickness. In laminates with delaminations those delaminations near the top and bottom surfaces of a thick laminate have much larger total strain-energy-release rates (G sub t) and mode I-to-total (G sub t/G sub t) ratios than delaminations deep in the interior. Therefore, delaminations can be expected to grow more easily near the surfaces of a laminate than in the interior.

  18. Finite Element Modeling of Laminated Composite Plates with Locally Delaminated Interface Subjected to Impact Loading

    PubMed Central

    Abo Sabah, Saddam Hussein; Kueh, Ahmad Beng Hong

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates the effects of localized interface progressive delamination on the behavior of two-layer laminated composite plates when subjected to low velocity impact loading for various fiber orientations. By means of finite element approach, the laminae stiffnesses are constructed independently from their interface, where a well-defined virtually zero-thickness interface element is discreetly adopted for delamination simulation. The present model has the advantage of simulating a localized interfacial condition at arbitrary locations, for various degeneration areas and intensities, under the influence of numerous boundary conditions since the interfacial description is expressed discretely. In comparison, the model shows good agreement with existing results from the literature when modeled in a perfectly bonded state. It is found that as the local delamination area increases, so does the magnitude of the maximum displacement history. Also, as top and bottom fiber orientations deviation increases, both central deflection and energy absorption increase although the relative maximum displacement correspondingly decreases when in contrast to the laminates perfectly bonded state. PMID:24696668

  19. Failure analysis of composite laminated plates with circular holes under bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradshaw, R. D.; Pang, S. S.

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the failure of composite laminated plates with centrally located circular holes under bending. The stress state at any point in an orthotropic lamina with a circular hole was developed in terms of a stress concentration factor matrix multiplied by the stress vector at a point far from the hole. Classical lamination theory was applied to determine the ply-level stresses under bending. By applying the Tsai-Wu failure criterion to each ply at the hole edge, the crack modes were determined for various plate configurations. Knowledge of the crack direction and the stress concentration factor matrix led to a failure criterion based upon the ply-level hoop stress at some distance away from the hole. Point stress and average stress criteria were developed to determine the failure loading for any hole size, based on an experimental data point. Both criteria predicted the average failure load for other experimental points within 3 percent, but the point stress criteria was the more accurate of the two. The material used was a T650-42 graphite fiber with EYMYD polyimide resin system. Three stacking sequences were studied under four-point bending. In each case, three hole sizes were analyzed.

  20. Microstructural Evolution and Fracture Behavior of Friction-Stir-Welded Al-Cu Laminated Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beygi, R.; Kazeminezhad, Mohsen; Kokabi, A. H.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we attempt to characterize the microstructural evolution during friction stir butt welding of Al-Cu-laminated composites and its effect on the fracture behavior of the joint. Emphasis is on the material flow and particle distribution in the stir zone. For this purpose, optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images, energy-dispersive spectroscopy EDS and XRD analyses, hardness measurements, and tensile tests are carried out on the joints. It is shown that intermetallic compounds exist in lamellas of banding structure formed in the advancing side of the welds. In samples welded from the Cu side, the banding structure in the advancing side and the hook formation in the retreating side determine the fracture behavior of the joint. In samples welded from the Al side, a defect is formed in the advancing side of the weld, which is attributed to insufficient material flow. It is concluded that the contact surface of the laminate (Al or Cu) with the shoulder of the FSW tool influences the material flow and microstructure of welds.