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Sample records for cgmp signaling activates

  1. Internal calcium release and activation of sea urchin eggs by cGMP are independent of the phosphoinositide signaling pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Whalley, T; McDougall, A; Crossley, I; Swann, K; Whitaker, M

    1992-01-01

    We show that microinjecting cyclic GMP (cGMP) into unfertilized sea urchin eggs activates them by stimulating a rise in the intracellular free calcium ion concentration ([Ca2+]i). The increase in [Ca2+]i is similar in both magnitude and duration to the transient that activates the egg at fertilization. It is due to mobilization of calcium from intracellular stores but is not prevented by the inositol trisphosphate (InsP3) antagonist heparin. Furthermore, cGMP does not stimulate the eggs Na+/H+ antiport when the [Ca2+]i transient is blocked by the calcium chelator bis-(O-aminophenoxy)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (BAPTA), suggesting that cGMP does not activate eggs by interacting with the their phosphoinositide signaling pathway. However, the [Ca2+]i increase and activation are prevented in eggs in which the InsP3-sensitive calcium stores have been emptied by the prior microinjection of the InsP3 analogue inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphorothioate. These data indicate that cGMP activates eggs by stimulating the release of calcium from an InsP3-sensitive calcium store via a novel, though unidentified, route independent of the InsP3 receptor. PMID:1320962

  2. cGMP Signaling, Phosphodiesterases and Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Reierson, Gillian W; Guo, Shuyu; Mastronardi, Claudio; Licinio, Julio; Wong, Ma-Li

    2011-01-01

    Deficits in neuroplasticity are hypothesized to underlie the pathophysiology of major depressive disorder (MDD): the effectiveness of antidepressants is thought to be related to the normalization of disrupted synaptic transmission and neurogenesis. The cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) signaling cascade has received considerable attention for its role in neuroplasticity and MDD. However components of a closely related pathway, the cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) have been studied with much lower intensity, even though this signaling transduction cascade is also expressed in the brain and the activity of this pathway has been implicated in learning and memory processes. Cyclic GMP acts as a second messenger; it amplifies signals received at postsynaptic receptors and activates downstream effector molecules resulting in gene expression changes and neuronal responses. Phosphodiesterase (PDE) enzymes degrade cGMP into 5’GMP and therefore they are involved in the regulation of intracellular levels of cGMP. Here we review a growing body of evidence suggesting that the cGMP signaling cascade warrants further investigation for its involvement in MDD and antidepressant action. PMID:22654729

  3. cGMP and NHR Signaling Co-regulate Expression of Insulin-Like Peptides and Developmental Activation of Infective Larvae in Strongyloides stercoralis

    PubMed Central

    Stoltzfus, Jonathan D.; Bart, Stephen M.; Lok, James B.

    2014-01-01

    The infectious form of the parasitic nematode Strongyloides stercoralis is a developmentally arrested third-stage larva (L3i), which is morphologically similar to the developmentally arrested dauer larva in the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. We hypothesize that the molecular pathways regulating C. elegans dauer development also control L3i arrest and activation in S. stercoralis. This study aimed to determine the factors that regulate L3i activation, with a focus on G protein-coupled receptor-mediated regulation of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) pathway signaling, including its modulation of the insulin/IGF-1-like signaling (IIS) pathway. We found that application of the membrane-permeable cGMP analog 8-bromo-cGMP potently activated development of S. stercoralis L3i, as measured by resumption of feeding, with 85.1±2.2% of L3i feeding in 200 µM 8-bromo-cGMP in comparison to 0.6±0.3% in the buffer diluent. Utilizing RNAseq, we examined L3i stimulated with DMEM, 8-bromo-cGMP, or the DAF-12 nuclear hormone receptor (NHR) ligand Δ7-dafachronic acid (DA)—a signaling pathway downstream of IIS in C. elegans. L3i stimulated with 8-bromo-cGMP up-regulated transcripts of the putative agonistic insulin-like peptide (ILP) -encoding genes Ss-ilp-1 (20-fold) and Ss-ilp-6 (11-fold) in comparison to controls without stimulation. Surprisingly, we found that Δ7-DA similarly modulated transcript levels of ILP-encoding genes. Using the phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase inhibitor LY294002, we demonstrated that 400 nM Δ7-DA-mediated activation (93.3±1.1% L3i feeding) can be blocked using this IIS inhibitor at 100 µM (7.6±1.6% L3i feeding). To determine the tissues where promoters of ILP-encoding genes are active, we expressed promoter::egfp reporter constructs in transgenic S. stercoralis post-free-living larvae. Ss-ilp-1 and Ss-ilp-6 promoters are active in the hypodermis and neurons and the Ss-ilp-7 promoter is active in the intestine and a

  4. Role of cGMP in hydrogen sulfide signaling.

    PubMed

    Bibli, Sofia-Iris; Yang, Guangdong; Zhou, Zongmin; Wang, Rui; Topouzis, Stavros; Papapetropoulos, Andreas

    2015-04-30

    The importance of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) in physiology and disease is being increasingly recognized in recent years. Unlike nitric oxide (NO) that signals mainly through soluble guanyl cyclase (sGC)/cGMP, H2S is more promiscuous, affecting multiple pathways. It interacts with ion channels, enzymes, transcription factors and receptors. It was originally reported that H2S does not alter the levels of cyclic nucleotides. More recent publications, however, have shown increases in intracellular cGMP following exposure of cells or tissues to exogenously administered or endogenously produced H2S. Herein, we discuss the evidence for the participation of cGMP in H2S signaling and reconcile the seemingly divergent results presented in the literature on the role of this cyclic nucleotide in the biological actions of H2S. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Aberrant cGMP signaling persists during recovery in mice with oxygen-induced pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Cardona, Herminio J.; Taylor, Joann M.; Robbins, Mary E.; Waypa, Gregory B.; Berkelhamer, Sara K.; Farrow, Kathryn N.

    2017-01-01

    Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), a common complication of preterm birth, is associated with pulmonary hypertension (PH) in 25% of infants with moderate to severe BPD. Neonatal mice exposed to hyperoxia for 14d develop lung disease similar to BPD, with evidence of associated PH. The cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) signaling pathway has not been well studied in BPD-associated PH. In addition, there is little data about the natural history of hyperoxia-induced PH in mice or the utility of phosphodiesterase-5 (PDE5) inhibition in established disease. C57BL/6 mice were placed in room air or 75% O2 within 24h of birth for 14d, followed by recovery in room air for an additional 7 days (21d). Additional pups were treated with either vehicle or sildenafil for 7d during room air recovery. Mean alveolar area, pulmonary artery (PA) medial wall thickness (MWT), RVH, and vessel density were evaluated at 21d. PA protein from 21d animals was analyzed for soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) activity, PDE5 activity, and cGMP levels. Neonatal hyperoxia exposure results in persistent alveolar simplification, RVH, decreased vessel density, increased MWT, and disrupted cGMP signaling despite a period of room air recovery. Delayed treatment with sildenafil during room air recovery is associated with improved RVH and decreased PA PDE5 activity, but does not have significant effects on alveolar simplification, PA remodeling, or vessel density. These data are consistent with clinical studies suggesting inconsistent effects of sildenafil treatment in infants with BPD-associated PH. PMID:28792962

  6. Correlative intravital imaging of cGMP signals and vasodilation in mice

    PubMed Central

    Thunemann, Martin; Schmidt, Kjestine; de Wit, Cor; Han, Xiaoxing; Jain, Rakesh K.; Fukumura, Dai; Feil, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) is an important signaling molecule and drug target in the cardiovascular system. It is well known that stimulation of the vascular nitric oxide (NO)-cGMP pathway results in vasodilation. However, the spatiotemporal dynamics of cGMP signals themselves and the cGMP concentrations within specific cardiovascular cell types in health, disease, and during pharmacotherapy with cGMP-elevating drugs are largely unknown. To facilitate the analysis of cGMP signaling in vivo, we have generated transgenic mice that express fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based cGMP sensor proteins. Here, we describe two models of intravital FRET/cGMP imaging in the vasculature of cGMP sensor mice: (1) epifluorescence-based ratio imaging in resistance-type vessels of the cremaster muscle and (2) ratio imaging by multiphoton microscopy within the walls of subcutaneous blood vessels accessed through a dorsal skinfold chamber. Both methods allow simultaneous monitoring of NO-induced cGMP transients and vasodilation in living mice. Detailed protocols of all steps necessary to perform and evaluate intravital imaging experiments of the vasculature of anesthetized mice including surgery, imaging, and data evaluation are provided. An image segmentation approach is described to estimate FRET/cGMP changes within moving structures such as the vessel wall during vasodilation. The methods presented herein should be useful to visualize cGMP or other biochemical signals that are detectable with FRET-based biosensors, such as cyclic adenosine monophosphate or Ca2+, and to correlate them with respective vascular responses. With further refinement and combination of transgenic mouse models and intravital imaging technologies, we envision an exciting future, in which we are able to “watch” biochemistry, (patho-)physiology, and pharmacotherapy in the context of a living mammalian organism. PMID:25352809

  7. Angiotensin II increases phosphodiesterase 5A expression in vascular smooth muscle cells: A mechanism by which angiotensin II antagonizes cGMP signaling

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dongsoo; Aizawa, Toru; Wei, Heng; Pi, Xinchun; Rybalkin, Sergei D.; Berk, Bradford C.; Yan, Chen

    2014-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) and nitric oxide (NO)/natriuretic peptide (NP) signaling pathways mutually regulate each other. Imbalance of Ang II and NO/NP has been implicated in the pathophysiology of many vascular diseases. cGMP functions as a key mediator in the interaction between Ang II and NO/NP. Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase 5A (PDE5A) is important in modulating cGMP signaling by hydrolyzing cGMP in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). Therefore, we examined whether Ang II negatively modulates intracellular cGMP signaling in VSMC by regulating PDE5A. Ang II rapidly and transiently increased PDE5A mRNA levels in rat aortic VSMC. Upregulation of PDE5A mRNA was associated with a time-dependent increase of both PDE5 protein expression and activity. Increased PDE5A mRNA level was transcription-dependent and mediated by the Ang II type 1 receptor. Ang II-mediated activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2) was essential for Ang II-induced PDE5A upregulation. Pretreatment of VSMC with Ang II inhibited C-type NP (CNP) stimulated cGMP signaling, such as cGMP dependent protein kinase (PKG)-mediated phosphorylation of vasodilator-stimulated-phosphoprotein (VASP). Ang II-mediated inhibition of PKG was blocked when PDE5 activity was decreased by selective PDE5 inhibitors, suggesting that upregulation of PDE5A expression is an important mechanism for Ang II to attenuate cGMP signaling. PDE5A may also play a critical role in the growth promoting effects of Ang II because inhibition of PDE5A activity significantly decreased Ang II-stimulated VSMC growth. These observations establish a new mechanism by which Ang II antagonizes cGMP signaling and stimulates VSMC growth. PMID:15623434

  8. Nocturnal accumulation of cyclic 3',5'-guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) in the chick pineal organ is dependent on activation of guanylyl cyclase-B.

    PubMed

    Olcese, J; Majora, C; Stephan, A; Müller, D

    2002-01-01

    The role of cGMP in the avian pineal is not well understood. Although the light-sensitive secretion of melatonin is a well-known output of the circadian oscillator, pharmacologically elevated cGMP levels do not result in altered melatonin secretory amplitude or phase. This suggests that pineal cGMP signalling does not couple the endogenous circadian oscillator to the expression of melatonin rhythms. Nonetheless, the free-running rhythm of cGMP signalling implies a link to the circadian oscillator in chick pinealocytes. As the circadian rhythm of cGMP levels in vitro is not altered by pharmacological inhibition of phosphodiesterase activity, we infer that the synthesis, rather than the degradation of cGMP, is under circadian control. In vitro experiments with the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor NG-nitro-L-arginine as well as with an inhibitor of the NO-sensitive soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC), showed that the NOS-sGC pathway does not play a major role in the circadian control of cGMP generation. In organ culture experiments, we demonstrated that C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP), but not atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), elevated daytime levels of cGMP. As CNP acts on the membrane guanylyl cyclase isoform B (GC-B), which is expressed at very high levels in mammalian pineals, we investigated the effect of the membrane GC-specific inhibitor HS-142 on chick pineal cGMP levels. CNP-induced daytime cGMP levels were reduced by HS-142. More importantly, 'spontaneously' high nocturnal levels of cGMP in vitro were reduced to daytime levels by acute addition of HS-142. These data implicate endogenous nocturnal CNP release and subsequent activation of GC-B as the major input driving cGMP synthesis in the chick pineal organ.

  9. Conformation Changes N-terminal Involvement and cGMP Signal Relay in the Phosphodiesterase-5 GAF Domain

    SciTech Connect

    H Wang; H Robinson; H Ke

    2011-12-31

    The activity of phosphodiesterase-5 (PDE5) is specific for cGMP and is regulated by cGMP binding to GAF-A in its regulatory domain. To better understand the regulatory mechanism, x-ray crystallographic and biochemical studies were performed on constructs of human PDE5A1 containing the N-terminal phosphorylation segment, GAF-A, and GAF-B. Superposition of this unliganded GAF-A with the previously reported NMR structure of cGMP-bound PDE5 revealed dramatic conformational differences and suggested that helix H4 and strand B3 probably serve as two lids to gate the cGMP-binding pocket in GAF-A. The structure also identified an interfacial region among GAF-A, GAF-B, and the N-terminal loop, which may serve as a relay of the cGMP signal from GAF-A to GAF-B. N-terminal loop 98-147 was physically associated with GAF-B domains of the dimer. Biochemical analyses showed an inhibitory effect of this loop on cGMP binding and its involvement in the cGMP-induced conformation changes.

  10. Conformation changes, N-terminal involvement and cGMP signal relay in phosphodiesterase-5 GAF domain

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, H.; Robinson, H.; Ke, H.

    2010-12-03

    The activity of phosphodiesterase-5 (PDE5) is specific for cGMP and is regulated by cGMP binding to GAF-A in its regulatory domain. To better understand the regulatory mechanism, x-ray crystallographic and biochemical studies were performed on constructs of human PDE5A1 containing the N-terminal phosphorylation segment, GAF-A, and GAF-B. Superposition of this unliganded GAF-A with the previously reported NMR structure of cGMP-bound PDE5 revealed dramatic conformational differences and suggested that helix H4 and strand B3 probably serve as two lids to gate the cGMP-binding pocket in GAF-A. The structure also identified an interfacial region among GAF-A, GAF-B, and the N-terminal loop, which may serve as a relay of the cGMP signal from GAF-A to GAF-B. N-terminal loop 98-147 was physically associated with GAF-B domains of the dimer. Biochemical analyses showed an inhibitory effect of this loop on cGMP binding and its involvement in the cGMP-induced conformation changes.

  11. PDE2 at the crossway between cAMP and cGMP signalling in the heart.

    PubMed

    Weber, Silvio; Zeller, Miriam; Guan, Kaomei; Wunder, Frank; Wagner, Michael; El-Armouche, Ali

    2017-10-01

    The cyclic nucleotides cAMP and cGMP are central second messengers in cardiac cells and critical regulators of cardiac physiology as well as pathophysiology. Consequently, subcellular compartmentalization allows for spatiotemporal control of cAMP/cGMP metabolism and subsequent regulation of their respective effector kinases PKA or PKG is most important for cardiac function in health and disease. While acute cAMP-mediated signalling is a mandatory prerequisite for the physiological fight-or-flight response, sustained activation of this pathway may lead to the progression of heart failure. In contrast, acute as well as sustained cGMP-mediated signalling can foster beneficial features, e.g. anti-hypertrophic and vasodilatory effects. These two signalling pathways seem to be intuitively counteracting and there is increasing evidence for a functionally relevant crosstalk between cAMP and cGMP signalling pathways on the level of cyclic nucleotide hydrolysing phosphodiesterases (PDEs). Among this diverse group of enzymes, PDE2 may fulfill a unique integrator role. Equipped with dual substrate specificity for cAMP as well as for cGMP, it is the only cAMP hydrolysing PDE, which is allosterically activated by cGMP. Recent studies have revealed strongly remodelled cAMP/cGMP microdomains and subcellular concentration profiles in different cardiac pathologies, leading to a putatively enhanced involvement of PDE2 in cAMP/cGMP breakdown and crosstalk compared to the other cardiac PDEs. This review sums up the current knowledge about molecular properties and regulation of PDE2 and explains the complex signalling network encompassing PDE2 in order to better understand the functional role of PDE2 in distinct cell types in cardiac health and disease. Moreover, this review gives an outlook in which way PDE2 may serve as a therapeutic target to treat cardiac disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The hypotriglyceridemic effect of biotin supplementation involves increased levels of cGMP and AMPK activation.

    PubMed

    Aguilera-Méndez, Asdrúbal; Fernández-Mejía, Cristina

    2012-01-01

    In addition to its role as a carboxylase cofactor, biotin modifies gene expression and has manifold effects on systemic processes. Several studies have shown that biotin supplementation reduces hypertriglyceridemia. We have previously reported that this effect is related to decreased expression of lipogenic genes. In the present work, we analyzed signaling pathways and posttranscriptional mechanisms involved in the hypotriglyceridemic effects of biotin. Male BALB/cAnN Hsd mice were fed a control or a biotin-supplemented diet (1.76 or 97.7 mg of free biotin/kg diet, respectively for 8 weeks after weaning. The abundance of mature sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP-1c), fatty-acid synthase (FAS), total acetyl-CoA carboxylase-1 (ACC-1) and its phosphorylated form, and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) were evaluated in the liver. We also determined the serum triglyceride concentrations and the hepatic levels of triglycerides and cyclic GMP (cGMP). Compared to the control group, biotin-supplemented mice had lower serum and hepatic triglyceride concentrations. Biotin supplementation increased the levels of cGMP and the phosphorylated forms of AMPK and ACC-1 and decreased the abundance of the mature form of SREBP-1c and FAS. These data provide evidence that the mechanisms by which biotin supplementation reduces lipogenesis involve increased cGMP content and AMPK activation. In turn, these changes lead to augmented ACC-1 phosphorylation and decreased expression of both the mature form of SREBP-1c and FAS. Our results demonstrate for the first time that AMPK is involved in the effects of biotin supplementation and offer new insights into the mechanisms of biotin-mediated hypotriglyceridemic effects.

  13. Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase-mediated integration of cGMP and cAMP signaling in cells of the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Maurice, Donald H

    2005-05-01

    Numerous pharmacological and physiological agents acting via either cAMP- or cGMP-mediated impact the activities of cells of the cardiovascular system. While most define cAMP and cGMP signaling systems as separate and independent, recent advances in our understanding of cyclic nucleotide signaling, and more specifically, of the roles which cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs) play in these events, have altered this view. In this short chapter, I will review the data identifying expression of several PDEs in cells of the cardiovascular system. In addition, I will review the data that identify PDEs as enzymes capable of allowing integration between cAMP and cGMP signaling in cells, and propose that cAMP and cGMP signaling systems can represent parallel and interdependent signaling systems. Moreover, I will propose that cGMP-mediated effects on the activities of variants of the Phosphodiesterase 2 (PDE2), PDE3 and PDE5 families may act to coordinate linkage between cAMP and cGMP signaling in these cells.

  14. A novel role for a Drosophila homologue of cGMP-specific phosphodiesterase in the active transport of cGMP

    PubMed Central

    Day, Jonathan P.; Houslay, Miles D.; Davies, Shireen-A.

    2005-01-01

    cGMP was first discovered in urine, demonstrating that kidney cells extrude this cyclic nucleotide. Drosophila Malpighian tubules provide a model renal system in which a homologue of mammalian PDE (phosphodiesterase) 6 is expressed. In humans, this cG-PDE (cGMP-specific PDE) is specifically expressed in the retinal system, where it controls visual signal transduction. In order to gain insight into the functional role of DmPDE6 (Drosophila PDE6-like enzyme) in epithelial function, we generated transgenic animals with targeted expression of DmPDE6 to tubule Type I (principal) cells. This revealed localization of DmPDE6 primarily at the apical membranes. As expected, overexpression of DmPDE6 resulted in elevated cG-PDE activity and decreased tubule cGMP content. However, such targeted overexpression of DmPDE6 creates a novel phenotype that manifests itself in inhibition of the active transport and efflux of cGMP by tubules. This effect is specific to DmPDE6 action, as no effect on cGMP transport is observed in tubules from a bovine PDE5 transgenic line which display reduced rates of fluid secretion, an effect not seen in DmPDE6 transgenic animals. Specific ablation of DmPDE6 in tubule principal cells, via expression of a targeted DmPDE6 RNAi (RNA interference) transgene, conferred increased active transport of cGMP, confirming a direct role for DmPDE6 in regulating cGMP transport in tubule principal cells. Pharmacological inhibition of DmPDE6 in wild-type tubules using the cG-PDE inhibitor, zaprinast, similarly results in stimulated cGMP transport. We provide the first demonstration of a novel role for a cG-PDE in modulating cGMP transport and efflux. PMID:16232123

  15. The rhodopsin-guanylyl cyclase of the aquatic fungus Blastocladiella emersonii enables fast optical control of cGMP signaling.

    PubMed

    Scheib, Ulrike; Stehfest, Katja; Gee, Christine E; Körschen, Heinz G; Fudim, Roman; Oertner, Thomas G; Hegemann, Peter

    2015-08-11

    Blastocladiomycota fungi form motile zoospores that are guided by sensory photoreceptors to areas of optimal light conditions. We showed that the microbial rhodopsin of Blastocladiella emersonii is a rhodopsin-guanylyl cyclase (RhGC), a member of a previously uncharacterized rhodopsin class of light-activated enzymes that generate the second messenger cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP). Upon application of a short light flash, recombinant RhGC converted within 8 ms into a signaling state with blue-shifted absorption from which the dark state recovered within 100 ms. When expressed in Xenopus oocytes, Chinese hamster ovary cells, or mammalian neurons, RhGC generated cGMP in response to green light in a light dose-dependent manner on a subsecond time scale. Thus, we propose RhGC as a versatile tool for the optogenetic analysis of cGMP-dependent signaling processes in cell biology and the neurosciences. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  16. Multiple Pathways Mediate Luteinizing Hormone Regulation of cGMP Signaling in the Mouse Ovarian Follicle1

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xueqing; Xie, Fang; Zamah, Alberuni Musa; Cao, Binyun; Conti, Marco

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Luteinizing hormone (LH) regulation of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) network is critical for oocyte maturation and the ovulatory process. Recent studies have indicated that C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) and its receptor natriuretic peptide receptor B (NPR2) play an important role in the control of meiotic arrest. Here, we investigated the involvement of the EGF network in the LH-dependent regulation of the CNP/NPR2 axis and cGMP accumulation. LH/hCG treatment causes a major decrease in both cGMP and the CNP precursor (natriuretic peptide precursor C [Nppc]) mRNA accumulation in vivo and in vitro. However, the cGMP downregulation precedes the decrease in Nppc mRNA by more than 1 h. Amphiregulin, an EGF-like factor, suppresses Nppc mRNA levels in cultured follicles to the same extent as LH, and this effect is completely prevented by the EGF receptor (EGFR) kinase inhibitor AG1478. However, the LH-dependent suppression of Nppc is insensitive to AG1478. Similarly, Nppc suppression by LH occurs in follicles from EGFR null mice. These findings document that EGFR signaling is sufficient to downregulate CNP, but is not necessary for LH action. When cGMP concentration in the follicle is measured, the short-term, but not long-term, LH effects on cGMP are prevented by AG1478, suggesting that ligand availability may be responsible for the late response. Human CG decreases the CNP-dependent cGMP synthesis in wild-type and EGFR knockdown cumulus-oocyte complexes. These findings demonstrate that redundant pathways are involved in the regulation of cGMP. EGFR-dependent events are involved in the short-term regulation of cGMP, whereas the long-term effects may involve regulation of the CNP. PMID:24740605

  17. cGMP and Brown Adipose Tissue.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Linda S; Larson, Christopher J; Pfeifer, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    The second messenger cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) is a key mediator in physiological processes such as vascular tone, and its essential involvement in pathways regulating metabolism has been recognized in recent years. Here, we focus on the fundamental role of cGMP in brown adipose tissue (BAT) differentiation and function. In contrast to white adipose tissue (WAT), which stores energy in the form of lipids, BAT consumes energy stored in lipids to generate heat. This so-called non-shivering thermogenesis takes place in BAT mitochondria, which express the specific uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1). The energy combusting properties of BAT render it a promising target in antiobesity strategies in which BAT could burn the surplus energy that has accumulated in obese and overweight individuals. cGMP is generated by guanylyl cyclases upon activation by nitric oxide or natriuretic peptides. It affects several downstream molecules including cGMP-receptor proteins such as cGMP-dependent protein kinase and is degraded by phosphodiesterases. The cGMP pathway contains several signaling molecules that can increase cGMP signaling, resulting in activation and recruitment of brown adipocytes, and hence can enhance the energy combusting features of BAT. In this review we highlight recent results showing the physiological significance of cGMP signaling in BAT, as well as pharmacological options targeting cGMP signaling that bear a high potential to become BAT-centered therapies for the treatment of obesity.

  18. cGMP Signalling Mediates Water Sensation (Hydrosensation) and Hydrotaxis in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Qin, Li-Wei; Wu, Tai-Hong; Ge, Chang-Li; Wu, Ya-Qian; Zhang, Qiang; Song, Yan-Xue; Chen, Yuan-Hua; Ge, Ming-Hai; Wu, Jing-Jing; Liu, Hui; Xu, Yao; Su, Chun-Ming; Li, Lan-Lan; Tang, Jing; Li, Zhao-Yu; Wu, Zheng-Xing

    2016-01-01

    Animals have developed the ability to sense the water content in their habitats, including hygrosensation (sensing humidity in the air) and hydrosensation (sensing the water content in other microenvironments), and they display preferences for specific water contents that influence their mating, reproduction and geographic distribution. We developed and employed four quantitative behavioural test paradigms to investigate the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying sensing the water content in an agar substrate (hydrosensation) and hydrotaxis in Caenorhabditis elegans. By combining a reverse genetic screen with genetic manipulation, optogenetic neuronal manipulation and in vivo Ca2+ imaging, we demonstrate that adult worms avoid the wetter areas of agar plates and hypo-osmotic water droplets. We found that the cGMP signalling pathway in ciliated sensory neurons is involved in hydrosensation and hydrotaxis in Caenorhabditis elegans. PMID:26891989

  19. cGMP Signalling Mediates Water Sensation (Hydrosensation) and Hydrotaxis in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Qin, Li-Wei; Wu, Tai-Hong; Ge, Chang-Li; Wu, Ya-Qian; Zhang, Qiang; Song, Yan-Xue; Chen, Yuan-Hua; Ge, Ming-Hai; Wu, Jing-Jing; Liu, Hui; Xu, Yao; Su, Chun-Ming; Li, Lan-Lan; Tang, Jing; Li, Zhao-Yu; Wu, Zheng-Xing

    2016-02-19

    Animals have developed the ability to sense the water content in their habitats, including hygrosensation (sensing humidity in the air) and hydrosensation (sensing the water content in other microenvironments), and they display preferences for specific water contents that influence their mating, reproduction and geographic distribution. We developed and employed four quantitative behavioural test paradigms to investigate the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying sensing the water content in an agar substrate (hydrosensation) and hydrotaxis in Caenorhabditis elegans. By combining a reverse genetic screen with genetic manipulation, optogenetic neuronal manipulation and in vivo Ca(2+) imaging, we demonstrate that adult worms avoid the wetter areas of agar plates and hypo-osmotic water droplets. We found that the cGMP signalling pathway in ciliated sensory neurons is involved in hydrosensation and hydrotaxis in Caenorhabditis elegans.

  20. In vivo genetic dissection of O2-evoked cGMP dynamics in a Caenorhabditis elegans gas sensor

    PubMed Central

    Couto, Africa; Oda, Shigekazu; Nikolaev, Viacheslav O.; Soltesz, Zoltan; de Bono, Mario

    2013-01-01

    cGMP signaling is widespread in the nervous system. However, it has proved difficult to visualize and genetically probe endogenously evoked cGMP dynamics in neurons in vivo. Here, we combine cGMP and Ca2+ biosensors to image and dissect a cGMP signaling network in a Caenorhabditis elegans oxygen-sensing neuron. We show that a rise in O2 can evoke a tonic increase in cGMP that requires an atypical O2-binding soluble guanylate cyclase and that is sustained until oxygen levels fall. Increased cGMP leads to a sustained Ca2+ response in the neuron that depends on cGMP-gated ion channels. Elevated levels of cGMP and Ca2+ stimulate competing negative feedback loops that shape cGMP dynamics. Ca2+-dependent negative feedback loops, including activation of phosphodiesterase-1 (PDE-1), dampen the rise of cGMP. A different negative feedback loop, mediated by phosphodiesterase-2 (PDE-2) and stimulated by cGMP-dependent kinase (PKG), unexpectedly promotes cGMP accumulation following a rise in O2, apparently by keeping in check gating of cGMP channels and limiting activation of Ca2+-dependent negative feedback loops. Simultaneous imaging of Ca2+ and cGMP suggests that cGMP levels can rise close to cGMP channels while falling elsewhere. O2-evoked cGMP and Ca2+ responses are highly reproducible when the same neuron in an individual animal is stimulated repeatedly, suggesting that cGMP transduction has high intrinsic reliability. However, responses vary substantially across individuals, despite animals being genetically identical and similarly reared. This variability may reflect stochastic differences in expression of cGMP signaling components. Our work provides in vivo insights into the architecture of neuronal cGMP signaling. PMID:23940325

  1. [Effect of the active nitrogen and oxygen metabolities on the level of cGMP in uterus myocytes].

    PubMed

    Danylovych, Iu V; Tuhaĭ, V A

    2006-01-01

    The level of cGMP in myocytes of uterus of rats at an action active metabolities of nitrogen and oxygen (NO, NO2- and H2O2) in the conditions of influence of progesteron on myocytes was studied. Cell suspension was selected with the use of collagenase and soy-bean inhibitor of tripsin. Determining the amount of cGMP was conducted with the use of standard kit produced by "Amersham" (Great Britain). The basal level of cGMP in unactivated myocytes made 1.5 +/- 0.17 pmol cGMP/mg of protein (n = 5). It is shown that incubation of myocytes with 0.1 mM acetylcholin during 1 hour resulted in 2 times growth of cGMP content in suspension approximately, this increase is fully supressed in the presenced 0.1 mM methilene blue, that specifies activity of soluble cGMP in myocytes. Treatment of cells with 10 nM progesteron during 1 hour did not cause substantial changes in the level of cGMP. At the same time addition of 0.1 mM sodium nitroprussid or 10 nM H2O2 to suspension resulted in such conditions in the increase of level of cGMP to 3.1 +/- 0.6 and 6.8 +/- 0.4 pmol cGMP/mg of protein. Poor penetration of NO2- (10 nM) to the cells did not cause changes in the level of cGMP. The results got by us testify that the long-term influence of active metabolities of nitrogen and oxygen, instead of progesteron, provides the increase of the level of cGMP in the myometrium.

  2. Compartmentalized cGMP Responses of Olfactory Sensory Neurons in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Shidara, Hisashi; Hotta, Kohji; Oka, Kotaro

    2017-04-05

    Cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) plays a crucial role as a second messenger in the regulation of sensory signal transduction in many organisms. In AWC olfactory sensory neurons of Caenorhabditis elegans, cGMP also has essential and distinctive functions in olfactory sensation and adaptation. According to molecular genetic studies, when nematodes are exposed to odorants, a decrease in cGMP regulates cGMP-gated channels for olfactory sensation. Conversely, for olfactory adaptation, an increase in cGMP activates protein kinase G to modulate cellular physiological functions. Although these opposing cGMP responses in single neurons may occur at the same time, it is unclear how cGMP actually behaves in AWC sensory neurons. A hypothetical explanation for opposing cGMP responses is region-specific behaviors in AWC: for odor sensation, cGMP levels in cilia could decrease, whereas odor adaptation is mediated by increased cGMP levels in soma. Therefore, we visualized intracellular cGMP in AWC with a genetically encoded cGMP indicator, cGi500, and examined spatiotemporal cGMP responses in AWC neurons. The cGMP imaging showed that, after odor exposure, cGMP levels in AWC cilia decreased transiently, whereas levels in dendrites and soma gradually increased. These region-specific responses indicated that the cGMP responses in AWC neurons are explicitly compartmentalized. In addition, we performed Ca(2+) imaging to examine the relationship between cGMP and Ca(2+) These results suggested that AWC sensory neurons are in fact analogous to vertebrate photoreceptor neurons.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) plays crucial roles in the regulation of sensory signal transduction in many animals. In AWC olfactory sensory neurons of Caenorhabditis elegans, cGMP also has essential and distinctive functions involving olfactory sensation and adaptation. Here, we visualized intracellular cGMP in AWC neurons with a genetically encoded cGMP indicator and examined how

  3. cGMP inhibition of type 3 phosphodiesterase is the major mechanism by which C-type natriuretic peptide activates CFTR in the shark rectal gland

    PubMed Central

    De Jonge, Hugo R.; Tilly, Ben C.; Hogema, Boris M.; Pfau, Daniel J.; Kelley, Catherine A.; Kelley, Megan H.; Melita, August M.; Morris, Montana T.; Viola, Ryan M.

    2013-01-01

    The in vitro perfused rectal gland of the dogfish shark (Squalus acanthias) and filter-grown monolayers of primary cultures of shark rectal gland (SRG) epithelial cells were used to analyze the signal transduction pathway by which C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) stimulates chloride secretion. CNP binds to natriuretic receptors in the basolateral membrane, elevates cellular cGMP, and opens cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channels in the apical membrane. CNP-provoked chloride secretion was completely inhibitable by the nonspecific protein kinase inhibitor staurosporine and the PKA inhibitor H89 but insensitive to H8, an inhibitor of type I and II isoforms of cGMP-dependent protein kinase (cGKI and cGKII). CNP-induced secretion could not be mimicked by nonhydrolyzable cGMP analogs added alone or in combination with the protein kinase C activator phorbolester, arguing against a role for cGK or for cGMP-induced PKC signaling. We failed to detect a dogfish ortholog of cGKII by molecular cloning and affinity chromatography. However, inhibitors of the cGMP-inhibitable isoform of phosphodiesterase (PDE3) including milrinone, amrinone, and cilostamide but not inhibitors of other PDE isoenzymes mimicked the effect of CNP on chloride secretion in perfused glands and monolayers. CNP raised cGMP and cAMP levels in the SRG epithelial cells. This rise in cAMP as well as the CNP and amrinone-provoked chloride secretion, but not the rise in cGMP, was almost completely blocked by the Gαi-coupled adenylyl cyclase inhibitor somatostatin, arguing against a role for cGMP cross-activation of PKA in CNP action. These data provide molecular, functional, and pharmacological evidence for a CNP/cGMP/PDE3/cAMP/PKA signaling cascade coupled to CFTR in the SRG. PMID:24259420

  4. Nitric oxide and cGMP signaling in calcium-dependent development of cell polarity in Ceratopteris richardii.

    PubMed

    Salmi, Mari L; Morris, Kacey E; Roux, Stanley J; Porterfield, D Marshall

    2007-05-01

    Single-celled spores of the fern Ceratopteris richardii undergo gravity-directed cell polarity development that is driven by polar calcium currents. Here we present results that establish a role for nitric oxide (NO)/cGMP signaling in transducing the stimulus of gravity to directed polarization of the spores. Application of specific NO donors and scavengers inhibited the calcium-dependent gravity response in a dose-dependent manner. The effects of NO donor exposure were antagonized by application of NO scavenger compounds. Similarly, the guanylate cyclase inhibitors 6-anilino-5,8-quinolinedione and 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin, and the phosphodiesterase inhibitor Viagra, which modulate NO-dependent cGMP levels in the cells, disrupted gravity-directed cell polarity in a dose-dependent manner. Viagra effects were antagonized by application of NO scavengers, consistent with the postulate that NO and cGMP are linked in the signaling pathway. To identify other components of the signaling system we analyzed gene expression changes induced by Viagra treatment using microarrays and quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Preliminary microarray analysis revealed several genes whose expression was significantly altered by Viagra treatment. Three of these genes had strong sequence similarity to key signal transduction or stress response genes and quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was used to more rigorously quantify the effects of Viagra on their expression in spores and to test how closely these effects could be mimicked by treatment with dibutyryl cGMP. Taken together our results implicate NO and cGMP as downstream effectors that help link the gravity stimulus to polarized growth in C. richardii spores. Sequence data from this article can be found in the GenBank/EMBL data libraries under accession numbers BE 640669 to BE 643506, BQ 086920 to BQ 087668, and CV 734654 to CV 736151.

  5. Direct Activation of cGMP-Dependent Channels of Retinal Rods by the cGMP Phosphodiesterase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Nelly; Ildefonse, Michele; Crouzy, Serge; Chapron, Yves; Clerc, Armel

    1989-05-01

    The cationic conductances of purified bovine retinal rod membranes were studied by incorporation of vesicles into planar lipid bilayers. When the membranes were stripped of all peripheral proteins [guanine nucleotide-binding protein (G protein) and cGMP phosphodiesterase (3',5'-cyclic-GMP 5'-nucleotidohydrolase), EC 3.1.4.35], sodium and calcium fluxes were almost only observed in the presence of cGMP. Reconstitution experiments in which purified cGMP phosphodiesterase alone or with G protein were reassociated to the vesicles in proportions similar to those found in the native rod provide evidence for a direct interaction between the cGMP-dependent channel protein and the phosphodiesterase. (i) In its inhibited state, phosphodiesterase markedly stimulates the activity of the channels in the presence of cGMP (situation in the dark-adapted rod) but is not capable of activating the channels in the absence of cGMP. (ii) In the absence of cGMP, activation of the phosphodiesterase by G protein with GTP bound (equivalent to photoexcitation) induces the opening of cation channels that have the same conductance for sodium ions as cGMP-activated channels (20-22 pS, with two sublevels of about 7 pS and 13 pS).

  6. Receptors and cGMP signalling mechanism for E. coli enterotoxin in opossum kidney

    SciTech Connect

    Forte, L.R.; Krause, W.J.; Freeman, R.H. Harry S. Truman Memorial Veterans Medical Center, Columbia, MO )

    1988-11-01

    Receptors for the heat-stable enterotoxin produced by Escherichia coli were found in the kidney and intestine of the North American opossum and in cultured renal cell lines. The enterotoxin markedly increased guanosine 3{prime},5{prime}-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP) production in slices of kidney cortex and medulla, in suspensions of intestinal mucosa, and in the opossum kidney (OK) and rat kangaroo kidney (PtK-2) cell lines. In contrast, atrial natriuretic factor elicited much smaller increases in cGMP levels of kidney, intestine, or cultured kidney cell lines. The enterotoxin receptors in OK cells had a molecular mass of approximately 120 kDa when measured by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of receptors crosslinked with {sup 125}I-enterotoxin. The occurrence of receptors for the E. coli peptide in OK implies that these receptors may be involved in the regulation of renal tubular function in the opossum. E. coli enterotoxin caused a much larger increase in urine cGMP excretion than did atrial natriuretic factor when these peptides were injected intravenously into opossums. However, atrial natriuretic factor elicited a marked diuresis, natriuresis, and increased urinary excretion of calcium, phosphate, potassium, and magnesium. In contrast, the enterotoxin did not acutely influence OK fluid and electrolyte excretion. Thus the substantial increase in cGMP synthesis produced by the bacterial peptide in OK cortex and medulla in vitro and the increased renal excretion of cGMP in vivo were not associated with changes in electrolyte or water excretion. Whether cGMP represents a second messenger molecule in the kidney is an interesting question that was raised but not answered in this series of experiments.

  7. The GTP binding protein-dependent activation and deactivation of cGMP phosphodiesterase in rod photoreceptors

    SciTech Connect

    Yamazaki, Akio.

    1989-01-01

    Cyclic GMP (cGMP) has a crucial role in visual transduction. Recent electrophysiological studies clearly indicate the existence of cGMP-activated conductance in photoreceptor plasma membranes. In darkness, Na{sup +}, Ca{sup ++}, and Mg{sup ++} enter rod outer segments (ROS) through cGMP-activated channels while light closes channels by lowering cGMP concentrations through activation of cGMP phosphodiesterase (PDE). Many excellent reviews reference the mechanism of PDE activation in photoreceptors. However, recent progress in understanding the mechanisms regulating cGMP hydrolysis has raised an important question in the PDE-regulation: how does the three-dimensional movement of a subunit of transducin (retinal G protein) relate to the PDE activation Associated with that question, the mechanism of PDE regulation appears to vary at different stages of evolution, for example, frog and bovine photoreceptors. This review examines recent progress of the cGMP hydrolysis mechanism by focusing on the subunit interactions between transducin and PDE. 36 refs., 2 figs.

  8. Systemic Induction of NO-, Redox-, and cGMP Signaling in the Pumpkin Extrafascicular Phloem upon Local Leaf Wounding

    PubMed Central

    Gaupels, Frank; Furch, Alexandra C. U.; Zimmermann, Matthias R.; Chen, Faxing; Kaever, Volkhard; Buhtz, Anja; Kehr, Julia; Sarioglu, Hakan; Kogel, Karl-Heinz; Durner, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    Cucurbits developed the unique extrafascicular phloem (EFP) as a defensive structure against herbivorous animals. Mechanical leaf injury was previously shown to induce a systemic wound response in the EFP of pumpkin (Cucurbita maxima). Here, we demonstrate that the phloem antioxidant system and protein modifications by NO are strongly regulated during this process. Activities of the central antioxidant enzymes dehydroascorbate reductase, glutathione reductase and ascorbate reductase were rapidly down-regulated at 30 min with a second minimum at 24 h after wounding. As a consequence levels of total ascorbate and glutathione also decreased with similar bi-phasic kinetics. These results hint toward a wound-induced shift in the redox status of the EFP. Nitric oxide (NO) is another important player in stress-induced redox signaling in plants. Therefore, we analyzed NO-dependent protein modifications in the EFP. Six to forty eight hours after leaf damage total S-nitrosothiol content and protein S-nitrosylation were clearly reduced, which was contrasted by a pronounced increase in protein tyrosine nitration. Collectively, these findings suggest that NO-dependent S-nitrosylation turned into peroxynitrite-mediated protein nitration upon a stress-induced redox shift probably involving the accumulation of reactive oxygen species within the EFP. Using the biotin switch assay and anti-nitrotyrosine antibodies we identified 9 candidate S-nitrosylated and 6 candidate tyrosine-nitrated phloem proteins. The wound-responsive Phloem Protein 16-1 (PP16-1) and Cyclophilin 18 (CYP18) as well as the 26.5 kD isoform of Phloem Protein 2 (PP2) were amenable to both NO modifications and could represent important redox-sensors within the cucurbit EFP. We also found that leaf injury triggered the systemic accumulation of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) in the EFP and discuss the possible function of this second messenger in systemic NO and redox signaling within the EFP. PMID:26904092

  9. Gating of long-term depression by Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II through enhanced cGMP signalling in cerebellar Purkinje cells

    PubMed Central

    Kawaguchi, Shin-ya; Hirano, Tomoo

    2013-01-01

    Long-term depression (LTD) at parallel fibre synapses on a cerebellar Purkinje cell has been regarded as a cellular basis for motor learning. Although Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) has been implicated in the LTD induction as an important Ca2+-sensing molecule, the underlying signalling mechanism remains unclear. Here, we attempted to explore the potential signalling pathway underlying the CaMKII involvement in LTD using a systems biology approach, combined with validation by electrophysiological and FRET imaging experiments on a rat cultured Purkinje cell. Model simulation predicted the following cascade as a candidate mechanism for the CaMKII contribution to LTD: CaMKII negatively regulates phosphodiesterase 1 (PDE1), subsequently facilitates the cGMP/protein kinase G (PKG) signalling pathway and down-regulates protein phosphatase 2A (PP-2A), thus supporting the LTD-inducing positive feedback loop consisting of mutual activation of protein kinase C (PKC) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). This model suggestion was corroborated by whole-cell patch clamp recording experiments. In addition, FRET measurement of intracellular cGMP concentration revealed that CaMKII activation causes sustained increase of cGMP, supporting the signalling mechanism of LTD induction by CaMKII. Furthermore, we found that activation of the cGMP/PKG pathway by nitric oxide (NO) can support LTD induction without activation of CaMKII. Thus, this study clarified interaction between NO and Ca2+/CaMKII, two important factors required for LTD. PMID:23297306

  10. Neuronal nitric oxide contributes to neuroplasticity-associated protein expression through cGMP, protein kinase G, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase.

    PubMed

    Gallo, Eduardo F; Iadecola, Costantino

    2011-05-11

    Nitric oxide (NO) synthesized by neuronal NO synthase (nNOS) has long been implicated in brain plasticity. However, it is unclear how this short-lived mediator contributes to the long-term molecular changes underlying neuroplasticity, which typically require activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathway and gene expression. To address this issue, we used a neuroplasticity model based on treatment of neuronal cultures with bicuculline and a model of experience-dependent plasticity in the barrel cortex. In neuronal cultures, NOS inhibition attenuated the bicuculline-induced activation of ERK and the expression of c-Fos, Egr-1, Arc, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), proteins essential for neuroplasticity. Furthermore, inhibition of the NO target soluble guanylyl cyclase or of the cGMP effector kinase protein kinase G (PKG) reduced both ERK activation and plasticity-related protein expression. NOS inhibition did not affect phosphorylation of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), a well-established ERK nuclear target, but it attenuated the nuclear accumulation of the CREB coactivator TORC1 and suppressed the activation of Elk-1, another transcription factor target of ERK. Consistent with these in vitro observations, induction of c-Fos, Egr-1, and BDNF was attenuated in the D1 cortical barrel of nNOS(-/-) mice subjected to single whisker experience. These results establish nNOS-derived NO as a key factor in the expression of proteins involved in neuroplasticity, an effect mediated through cGMP, PKG, and ERK signaling. These actions of NO do not depend on CREB phosphorylation but may involve TORC1 and Elk-1. Our data unveil a previously unrecognized link between neuronal NO and the molecular machinery responsible for the sustained synaptic changes underlying neuroplasticity.

  11. Activated G-protein releases cGMP from high affinity binding sites on PDE from toad rod outer segments (ROS)

    SciTech Connect

    Yuen, P.S.T.; Walseth, T.F.; Panter, S.S.; Sundby, S.R.; Graeff, R.M.; Goldberg, N.D.

    1987-05-01

    cGMP binding proteins in toad ROS were identified by direct photoaffinity labeling (PAL) with /sup 32/P-cGMP and quantified by retention of complexes on nitrocellulose filters. By PAL, high affinity sites were present on the ..cap alpha.. and ..beta.. subunits of the cGMP-specific phosphodiesterase (PDE) which have MW/sub app/ of 94 and 90 kDa. A doublet was deduced from its photolabeling properties to represent PDE/sub ..gamma../ photocrosslinked with PDE/sub ..cap alpha../ or PDE/sub ..beta../, respectively. cGMP prebound to these high affinity sites was released by light-activated G-protein or its ..cap alpha.. subunit complexed with GTP..gamma..S; this inhibition of cGMP binding to PDE did not result from decreased cGMP availability due to enhanced hydrolysis. A low affinity cGMP binding component identified by PAL is tightly associated with ROS membranes. Apparent ATP/light-dependent stimulation of cGMP binding was shown to result from light activated cGMP hydrolysis in conjunction with ATP-promoted conversion of GMP to GDP/GTP and increased GDP/GTP binding. These findings coincide with a model for light-related regulation of cGMP binding and metabolism predicted from intact and cellfree kinetic measurements: in the dark state the cGMP hydrolic rate is constrained by the availability of cGMP because of its binding to high affinity sites on PDE. Light activated G-protein releases cGMP from these sites and allows for its redistribution to lower affinity sites represented by PDE catalytic site(s) and possible cGMP-dependent membrane cation channels.

  12. Angiotensin-(1-7) Downregulates Diabetes-Induced cGMP Phosphodiesterase Activation in Rat Corpus Cavernosum

    PubMed Central

    Benter, Ibrahim F.

    2017-01-01

    Molecular mechanisms of the beneficial effects of angiotensin-(1-7), Ang-(1-7), in diabetes-related complications, including erectile dysfunction, remain unclear. We examined the effect of diabetes and/or Ang-(1-7) treatment on vascular reactivity and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) phosphodiesterase (PDE) in corpus cavernosum. Male Wistar rats were grouped as (1) control, (2) diabetic (streptozotocin, STZ, treated), (3) control + Ang-(1-7), and (4) diabetic + Ang-(1-7). Following 3 weeks of Ang-(1-7) treatment subsequent to induction of diabetes, rats were sacrificed. Penile cavernosal tissue was isolated to measure vascular reactivity, PDE gene expression and activity, and levels of p38MAP kinase, nitrites, and cGMP. Carbachol-induced vasorelaxant response after preincubation of corpus cavernosum with PE was significantly attenuated in diabetic rats, and Ang-(1-7) markedly corrected the diabetes-induced impairment. Gene expression and activity of PDE and p38MAP kinase were significantly increased in cavernosal tissue of diabetic rats, and Ang-(1-7) markedly attenuated STZ-induced effects. Ang-(1-7) significantly increased the levels of nitrite and cGMP in cavernosal tissue of control and diabetic rats. Cavernosal tissue of diabetic rats had significantly reduced cGMP levels and Ang-(1-7) markedly prevented the STZ-induced cGMP depletion. This study demonstrates that attenuation of diabetes-induced PDE activity might be one of the key mechanisms in the beneficial effects of Ang-(1-7). PMID:28299329

  13. Inhibition of PDE5A1 guanosine cyclic monophosphate (cGMP) hydrolysing activity by sildenafil analogues that inhibit cellular cGMP efflux.

    PubMed

    Subbotina, Anna; Ravna, Aina W; Lysaa, Roy A; Abagyan, Ruben; Bugno, Ryszard; Sager, Georg

    2017-06-01

    To determine the ability of 11 sildenafil analogues to discriminate between cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (cnPDEs) and to characterise their inhibitory potencies (Ki values) of PDE5A1-dependent guanosine cyclic monophosphate (cGMP) hydrolysis. Sildenafil analogues were identified by virtual ligand screening (VLS) and screened for their ability to inhibit adenosine cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) hydrolysis by PDE1A1, PDE1B1, PDE2A1, PDE3A, PDE10A1 and PDE10A2, and cGMP hydrolysis by PDE5A, PDE6C, PDE9A2 for a low (1 nm) and high concentration (10 μm). Complete IC50 plots for all analogues were performed for PDE5A-dependent cGMP hydrolysis. Docking studies and scoring were made using the ICM molecular modelling software. The analogues in a low concentration showed no or low inhibition of PDE1A1, PDE1B1, PDE2A1, PDE3A, PDE10A1 and PDE10A2. In contrast, PDE5A and PDE6C were markedly inhibited to a similar extent by the analogues in a low concentration, whereas PDE9A2 was much less inhibited. The analogues showed a relative narrow range of Ki values for PDE5A inhibition (1.2-14 nm). The sildenafil molecule was docked in the structure of PDE5A1 co-crystallised with sildenafil. All the analogues had similar binding poses as sildenafil. Sildenafil analogues that inhibit cellular cGMP efflux are potent inhibitors of PDE5A and PDE6C. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmacology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  14. Intracellular photoactivation of caged cGMP induces myosin II and actin responses in motile cells.

    PubMed

    Pfannes, Eva K B; Anielski, Alexander; Gerhardt, Matthias; Beta, Carsten

    2013-12-01

    Cyclic GMP (cGMP) is a ubiquitous second messenger in eukaryotic cells. It is assumed to regulate the association of myosin II with the cytoskeleton of motile cells. When cells of the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum are exposed to chemoattractants or to increased osmotic stress, intracellular cGMP levels rise, preceding the accumulation of myosin II in the cell cortex. To directly investigate the impact of intracellular cGMP on cytoskeletal dynamics in a living cell, we released cGMP inside the cell by laser-induced photo-cleavage of a caged precursor. With this approach, we could directly show in a live cell experiment that an increase in intracellular cGMP indeed induces myosin II to accumulate in the cortex. Unexpectedly, we observed for the first time that also the amount of filamentous actin in the cell cortex increases upon a rise in the cGMP concentration, independently of cAMP receptor activation and signaling. We discuss our results in the light of recent work on the cGMP signaling pathway and suggest possible links between cGMP signaling and the actin system.

  15. NO regulates the strength of synaptic inputs onto hippocampal CA1 neurons via NO-GC1/cGMP signalling.

    PubMed

    Neitz, A; Mergia, E; Neubacher, U; Koesling, D; Mittmann, T

    2015-06-01

    GABAergic interneurons are the predominant source of inhibition in the brain that coordinate the level of excitation and synchronization in neuronal circuitries. However, the underlying cellular mechanisms are still not fully understood. Here we report nitric oxide (NO)/NO-GC1 signalling as an important regulatory mechanism of GABAergic and glutamatergic synaptic transmission in the hippocampal CA1 region. Deletion of the NO receptor NO-GC1 induced functional alterations, indicated by a strong reduction of spontaneous and evoked inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs), which could be compensated by application of the missing second messenger cGMP. Moreover, we found a general impairment in the strength of inhibitory and excitatory synaptic inputs onto CA1 pyramidal neurons deriving from NO-GC1KO mice. Finally, we disclosed one subpopulation of GABAergic interneurons, fast-spiking interneurons, that receive less excitatory synaptic input and consequently respond with less spike output after blockage of the NO/cGMP signalling pathway. On the basis of these and previous findings, we propose NO-GC1 as the major NO receptor which transduces the NO signal into cGMP at presynaptic terminals of different neuronal subtypes in the hippocampal CA1 region. Furthermore, we suggest NO-GC1-mediated cGMP signalling as a mechanism which regulates the strength of synaptic transmission, hence being important in gating information processing between hippocampal CA3 and CA1 region.

  16. Nitric Oxide and cGMP Signaling in Calcium-Dependent Development of Cell Polarity in Ceratopteris richardii[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Salmi, Mari L.; Morris, Kacey E.; Roux, Stanley J.; Porterfield, D. Marshall

    2007-01-01

    Single-celled spores of the fern Ceratopteris richardii undergo gravity-directed cell polarity development that is driven by polar calcium currents. Here we present results that establish a role for nitric oxide (NO)/cGMP signaling in transducing the stimulus of gravity to directed polarization of the spores. Application of specific NO donors and scavengers inhibited the calcium-dependent gravity response in a dose-dependent manner. The effects of NO donor exposure were antagonized by application of NO scavenger compounds. Similarly, the guanylate cyclase inhibitors 6-anilino-5,8-quinolinedione and 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin, and the phosphodiesterase inhibitor Viagra, which modulate NO-dependent cGMP levels in the cells, disrupted gravity-directed cell polarity in a dose-dependent manner. Viagra effects were antagonized by application of NO scavengers, consistent with the postulate that NO and cGMP are linked in the signaling pathway. To identify other components of the signaling system we analyzed gene expression changes induced by Viagra treatment using microarrays and quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Preliminary microarray analysis revealed several genes whose expression was significantly altered by Viagra treatment. Three of these genes had strong sequence similarity to key signal transduction or stress response genes and quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was used to more rigorously quantify the effects of Viagra on their expression in spores and to test how closely these effects could be mimicked by treatment with dibutyryl cGMP. Taken together our results implicate NO and cGMP as downstream effectors that help link the gravity stimulus to polarized growth in C. richardii spores. PMID:17351052

  17. An emerging role of cGMP in the treatment of schizophrenia: A review.

    PubMed

    Shim, Seong; Shuman, Michael; Duncan, Erica

    2016-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a progressive psychotic disorder with devastating effects on the broad aspects of human emotion, perception, thought, and psychosocial interactions. Although treatment with antipsychotic drugs, the mainstay in the treatment of schizophrenia, the large number of patients with schizophrenia respond poorly to the pharmacological and, the large number of patients with schizophrenia poorly respond to the pharmacological treatment. Although a variety of novel therapeutics have long been tested, to date, no drugs clinically efficacious for schizophrenia are available. The multiple lines of evidence strongly suggest that the modulation of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) is a promising target in promoting the novel therapeutic strategies of schizophrenia beyond the "receptor-dependent" psychopharmacology. cGMP is modulated via regulating its synthesis by N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) and nitric oxide (NO), which regulate guannylyl cyclase (GC), the enzyme producing cGMP. cGMP is also regulated by phosphodiesterase (PDE), the enzyme hydrolyzing cGMP. In this review, we critically evaluate the therapeutic potential of agents modulating cGMP activity by regulating cGMP synthesis including NMDAR enhancers, NO enhancers, NO inhibitors including minocycline with anti-inflammatory properties and PDE inhibitors in improving the negative, cognitive and positive symptoms of schizophrenia. We also discuss the possible mechanisms by which these agents produce therapeutic effects on schizophrenia including cGMP signaling pathways, oxidative stress, and neuroinflammation.

  18. Calcium/calmodulin-dependent nitric oxide synthase activity in the CNS of Aplysia californica: biochemical characterization and link to cGMP pathways.

    PubMed

    Bodnárová, Michaela; Martásek, Pavel; Moroz, Leonid L

    2005-04-01

    We characterized enzymatic activity of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) in the central nervous system of Aplysia californica, a popular experimental model in cellular and system neuroscience, and provided biochemical evidence for NO-cGMP signaling in molluscs. Aplysia NOS (ApNOS) activity, determined as citrulline formation, revealed its calcium-/calmodulin-(Ca/CaM) and NADPH dependence and it was inhibited by 50% with 5mM of W7 hydrochloride (a potent Ca/CaM-dependent phosphodiesterase inhibitor). A representative set of inhibitors for mammalian NOS isoforms also suppressed NOS activity in Aplysia. Specifically, the ApNOS was inhibited by 65-92% with 500 microM of L-NAME (a competitive NOS inhibitor) whereas d-NAME at the same concentration had no effect. S-Ethylisothiourea hydrobromide (5mM), a selective inhibitor of all NOS isoforms, suppressed ApNOS by 85%, l-N6-(1-iminoethyl)lysine dihydrochloride (L-NIL, 5mM), an iNOS inhibitor, by 78% and L-thiocitrulline (5mM) (an inhibitor of nNOS and iNOS) by greater than 95%. Polyclonal antibodies raised against rat nNOS hybridized with a putative purified ApNOS (160 kDa protein) from partially purified central nervous system homogenates in Western blot studies. Consistent with other studies, the activity of soluble guanylyl cyclase was stimulated as a result of NO interaction with its heme prosthetic group. The basal levels of cGMP were estimated by radioimmunoassay to be 44.47 fmol/microg of protein. Incubation of Aplysia CNS with the NO donors DEA/NONOate (diethylammonium (Z)-1-(N,N-diethylamino) diazen-1-ium-1,2-diolate - 1mM) or S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (1mM) and simultaneous phosphodiesterase inhibition with 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (1mM) prior to the assay showed a 26-80 fold increase in basal cGMP levels. Addition of ODQ (1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a] quinoxaline-1-one - 1mM), a selective inhibitor of soluble guanylyl cyclase, completely abolished this effect. This confirms that NO may indeed function as a

  19. A novel sulindac derivative that potently suppresses colon tumor cell growth by inhibiting cGMP phosphodiesterase and β-catenin transcriptional activity.

    PubMed

    Whitt, Jason D; Li, Nan; Tinsley, Heather N; Chen, Xi; Zhang, Wei; Li, Yonghe; Gary, Bernard D; Keeton, Adam B; Xi, Yaguang; Abadi, Ashraf H; Grizzle, William E; Piazza, Gary A

    2012-06-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been widely reported to inhibit tumor growth by a COX-independent mechanism, although alternative targets have not been well defined or used to develop improved drugs for cancer chemoprevention. Here, we characterize a novel sulindac derivative referred to as sulindac benzylamine (SBA) that does not inhibit COX-1 or COX-2, yet potently inhibits the growth and induces the apoptosis of human colon tumor cells. The basis for this activity appears to involve cyclic guanosine 3',5',-monophosphate phosphodiesterase (cGMP PDE) inhibition as evident by its ability to inhibit cGMP hydrolysis in colon tumor cell lysates and purified cGMP-specific PDE5, increase intracellular cGMP levels, and activate cGMP-dependent protein kinase G at concentrations that suppress tumor cell growth. PDE5 was found to be essential for colon tumor cell growth as determined by siRNA knockdown studies, elevated in colon tumor cells as compared with normal colonocytes, and associated with the tumor selectivity of SBA. SBA activation of PKG may suppress the oncogenic activity of β-catenin as evident by its ability to reduce β-catenin nuclear levels, Tcf (T-cell factor) transcriptional activity, and survivin levels. These events preceded apoptosis induction and appear to result from a rapid elevation of intracellular cGMP levels following cGMP PDE inhibition. We conclude that PDE5 and possibly other cGMP degrading isozymes can be targeted to develop safer and more efficacious NSAID derivatives for colorectal cancer chemoprevention.

  20. A Novel Sulindac Derivative that Potently Suppresses Colon Tumor Cell Growth by Inhibiting cGMP Phosphodiesterase and β-Catenin Transcriptional Activity

    PubMed Central

    Whitt, Jason D.; Li, Nan; Tinsley, Heather N.; Chen, Xi; Zhang, Wei; Li, Yonghe; Gary, Bernard D.; Keeton, Adam B.; Xi, Yaguang; Abadi, Ashraf H.; Grizzle, William E.; Piazza, Gary A.

    2013-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been widely reported to inhibit tumor growth by a COX-independent mechanism, although alternative targets have not been well defined or used to develop improved drugs for cancer chemoprevention. Here, we characterize a novel sulindac derivative referred to as sulindac benzylamine (SBA) that does not inhibit COX-1 or COX-2, yet potently inhibits the growth and induces the apoptosis of human colon tumor cells. The basis for this activity appears to involve cyclic guanosine 3′,5′,-monophosphate phosphodiesterase (cGMP PDE) inhibition as evident by its ability to inhibit cGMP hydrolysis in colon tumor cell lysates and purified cGMP-specific PDE5, increase intracellular cGMP levels, and activate cGMP-dependent protein kinase G at concentrations that suppress tumor cell growth. PDE5 was found to be essential for colon tumor cell growth as determined by siRNA knockdown studies, elevated in colon tumor cells as compared with normal colonocytes, and associated with the tumor selectivity of SBA. SBA activation of PKG may suppress the oncogenic activity of β-catenin as evident by its ability to reduce β-catenin nuclear levels, Tcf (T-cell factor) transcriptional activity, and survivin levels. These events preceded apoptosis induction and appear to result from a rapid elevation of intracellular cGMP levels following cGMP PDE inhibition. We conclude that PDE5 and possibly other cGMP degrading isozymes can be targeted to develop safer and more efficacious NSAID derivatives for colorectal cancer chemoprevention. PMID:22556201

  1. In vivo blockade of α1-adrenergic receptors mitigates stress-disturbed cAMP and cGMP signaling in Leydig cells.

    PubMed

    Stojkov, Natasa J; Baburski, Aleksandar Z; Bjelic, Maja M; Sokanovic, Srdjan J; Mihajlovic, Aleksandar I; Drljaca, Dragana M; Janjic, Marija M; Kostic, Tatjana S; Andric, Silvana A

    2014-01-01

    The molecular mechanism of stress-associated reproductive dysfunction is complex and largely unknown. This study was designed to systematically analyze molecular effects of systemic in vivo blockade of α1-adrenergic receptors (α1-ADRs) on stress-induced disturbance of cAMP/cGMP signaling in testosterone-producing Leydig cells using the following parameters (i) level of circulating stress hormones, LH and testosterone; (ii) level of main molecular markers of Leydig cell functionality (testosterone, Insl3, cAMP); (iii) expression of cAMP signaling (cAMP 'producers'/'effectors'/'removers') and (iv) expression of NO-cGMP signaling (NO-cGMP 'producers'/'effectors'/'removers'). The results showed that oral administration of α1-ADR blocker before stress increased cGMP and diminished stress-reduced cAMP production in Leydig cells. In the same cells, stress-induced effects on cAMP/cGMP signaling pathways elements were changed. Sustained in vivo α1-ADR blockade completely abolished stress-increased transcription of most abundantly expressed phosphodiesterase that remove cAMP (Pde4b) and potentiated stress-increased expression of PRKA, the main stimulator of Leydig cell steroidogenesis. In the same Leydig cells, stress-decreased NOS3 expression was abolished, while stress-increased GUCY1 (cGMP 'producer') and PRKG1 (cGMP 'effector') were potentiated. It is possible that all molecules mentioned could contribute, at least in part, in recovery of Leydig cell testosterone production. Presented data provide new role of α1-ADRs in stress-triggered disturbance of cAMP/cGMP signaling, and new molecular insights into the relationship between stress and mammalian reproduction. Regardless of whether the effects of α1-blocker + stress are direct or indirect, the results are important in terms of human reproductive health and the wide use of α1-ADR antagonists, alone or in combination, to treat post-traumatic stress disorders, hypertension, benign prostatic hyperplasia symptoms and

  2. Effects of Biotin Supplementation in the Diet on Adipose Tissue cGMP Concentrations, AMPK Activation, Lipolysis, and Serum-Free Fatty Acid Levels.

    PubMed

    Boone-Villa, Daniel; Aguilera-Méndez, Asdrubal; Miranda-Cervantes, Adriana; Fernandez-Mejia, Cristina

    2015-10-01

    Several studies have shown that pharmacological concentrations of biotin decrease hyperlipidemia. The molecular mechanisms by which pharmacological concentrations of biotin modify lipid metabolism are largely unknown. Adipose tissue plays a central role in lipid homeostasis. In the present study, we analyzed the effects of biotin supplementation in adipose tissue on signaling pathways and critical proteins that regulate lipid metabolism, as well as on lipolysis. In addition, we assessed serum fatty acid concentrations. Male BALB/cAnN Hsd mice were fed a control or a biotin-supplemented diet (control: 1.76 mg biotin/kg; supplemented: 97.7 mg biotin/kg diet) over 8 weeks postweaning. Compared with the control group, biotin-supplemented mice showed an increase in the levels of adipose guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP) (control: 30.3±3.27 pmol/g wet tissue; supplemented: 49.5±3.44 pmol/g wet tissue) and of phosphorylated forms of adenosine 5'-monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK; 65.2%±1.06%), acetyl-coenzyme A (CoA), carboxylase-1 (196%±68%), and acetyl-CoA carboxylase-2 (78.1%±18%). Serum fatty acid concentrations were decreased (control: 1.12±0.04 mM; supplemented: 0.91±0.03 mM), and no change in lipolysis was found (control: 0.29±0.05 μmol/mL; supplemented: 0.33±0.08 μmol/mL). In conclusion, 8 weeks of dietary biotin supplementation increased adipose tissue cGMP content and protein expression of the active form of AMPK and of the inactive forms of acetyl-CoA carboxylase-1 and acetyl-CoA carboxylase-2. Serum fatty acid levels fell, and no change in lipolysis was observed. These findings provide insight into the effects of biotin supplementation on adipose tissue and support its use in the treatment of dyslipidemia.

  3. Phosphodiesterase 9A Controls Nitric-oxide Independent cGMP and Hypertrophic Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dong I.; Zhu, Guangshuo; Sasaki, Takashi; Cho, Gun-Sik; Hamdani, Nazha; Holewinski, Ronald; Jo, Su-Hyun; Danner, Thomas; Zhang, Manling; Rainer, Peter P.; Bedja, Djahida; Kirk, Jonathan A.; Ranek, Mark J.; Dostmann, Wolfgang R.; Kwon, Chulan; Margulies, Kenneth B.; Van Eyk, Jennifer E.; Paulus, Walter J.; Takimoto, Eiki; Kass, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) is a second messenger molecule that transduces nitric oxide (NO) and natriuretic peptide (NP) coupled signaling, stimulating phosphorylation changes by protein kinase G (PKG). Enhancing cGMP synthesis or blocking its degradation by phosphodiesterase type 5A (PDE5A) protects against cardiovascular disease1,2. However, cGMP stimulation alone is limited by counter-adaptions including PDE upregulation3. Furthermore, though PDE5A regulates NO-generated cGMP4,5, NO-signaling is often depressed by heart disease6. PDEs controlling NP-coupled cGMP remain uncertain. Here we show that cGMP-selective PDE9A7,8 is expressed in mammalian heart including humans, and is upregulated by hypertrophy and cardiac failure. PDE9A regulates NP rather than NO-stimulated cGMP in heart myocytes and muscle, and its genetic or selective pharmacological inhibition protects against pathological responses to neuro-hormones, and sustained pressure-overload stress. PDE9A inhibition reverses pre-established heart disease independent of NO-synthase (NOS) activity, whereas PDE5A inhibition requires active NOS. Transcription factor activation and phospho-proteome analyses of myocytes with each PDE selectively inhibited reveals substantial differential targeting, with phosphorylation changes from PDE5A inhibition being more sensitive to NOS activation. Thus, unlike PDE5A, PDE9A can regulate cGMP signaling independent of the NO-pathway, and its role in stress-induced heart disease suggests potential as a therapeutic target. PMID:25799991

  4. cGMP-Dependent Protein Kinases and cGMP Phosphodiesterases in Nitric Oxide and cGMP Action

    PubMed Central

    Busch, Jennifer L.; Corbin, Jackie D.

    2010-01-01

    To date, studies suggest that biological signaling by nitric oxide (NO) is primarily mediated by cGMP, which is synthesized by NO-activated guanylyl cyclases and broken down by cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs). Effects of cGMP occur through three main groups of cellular targets: cGMP-dependent protein kinases (PKGs), cGMP-gated cation channels, and PDEs. cGMP binding activates PKG, which phosphorylates serines and threonines on many cellular proteins, frequently resulting in changes in activity or function, subcellular localization, or regulatory features. The proteins that are so modified by PKG commonly regulate calcium homeostasis, calcium sensitivity of cellular proteins, platelet activation and adhesion, smooth muscle contraction, cardiac function, gene expression, feedback of the NO-signaling pathway, and other processes. Current therapies that have successfully targeted the NO-signaling pathway include nitrovasodilators (nitroglycerin), PDE5 inhibitors [sildenafil (Viagra and Revatio), vardenafil (Levitra), and tadalafil (Cialis and Adcirca)] for treatment of a number of vascular diseases including angina pectoris, erectile dysfunction, and pulmonary hypertension; the PDE3 inhibitors [cilostazol (Pletal) and milrinone (Primacor)] are used for treatment of intermittent claudication and acute heart failure, respectively. Potential for use of these medications in the treatment of other maladies continues to emerge. PMID:20716671

  5. C33(S), a novel PDE9A inhibitor, protects against rat cardiac hypertrophy through upregulating cGMP signaling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pan-Xia; Li, Zhuo-Ming; Cai, Si-Dong; Li, Jing-Yan; He, Ping; Huang, Yi; Feng, Guo-Shuai; Luo, Hai-Bin; Chen, Shao-Rui; Liu, Pei-Qing

    2017-09-01

    Phosphodiesterase-9A (PDE9A) expression is upregulated during cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure. Accumulating evidence suggests that PDE9A might be a promising therapeutic target for heart diseases. The present study sought to investigate the effects and underlying mechanisms of C33(S), a novel selective PDE9A inhibitor, on cardiac hypertrophy in vitro and in vivo. Treatment of neonatal rat cardiomyocytes (NRCMs) with PE (100 μmol/L) or ISO (1 μmol/L) induced cardiac hypertrophy characterized by significantly increased cell surface areas and increased expression of fetal genes (ANF and BNP). Furthermore, PE or ISO significantly increased the expression of PDE9A in the cells; whereas knockdown of PDE9A significantly alleviated PE-induced hypertrophic responses. Moreover, pretreatment with PDE9A inhibitor C33(S) (50 and 500 nmol/L) or PF-7943 (2 μmol/L) also alleviated the cardiac hypertrophic responses in PE-treated NRCMs. Abdominal aortic constriction (AAC)-induced cardiac hypertrophy and ISO-induced heart failure were established in SD rats. In ISO-treated rats, oral administration of C33(S) (9, 3, and 1 mg·kg(-1)·d(-1), for 3 consecutive weeks) significantly increased fractional shortening (43.55%±3.98%, 54.79%±1.95%, 43.98%±7.96% vs 32.18%±6.28%), ejection fraction (72.97%±4.64%, 84.29%±1.56%, 73.41%±9.37% vs 49.17%±4.20%) and cardiac output (60.01±9.11, 69.40±11.63, 58.08±8.47 mL/min vs 48.97±2.11 mL/min) but decreased the left ventricular internal diameter, suggesting that the transition to heart failure was postponed by C33(S). We further revealed that C33(S) significantly elevated intracellular cGMP levels, phosphorylation of phospholamban (PLB) and expression of SERCA2a in PE-treated NRCMs in vitro and in ISO-induced heart failure model in vivo. Our results demonstrate that C33(S) effectively protects against cardiac hypertrophy and postpones the transition to heart failure, suggesting that it is a promising agent in the treatment of

  6. Transgenic Mice for cGMP Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Thunemann, Martin; Wen, Lai; Hillenbrand, Matthias; Vachaviolos, Angelos; Feil, Susanne; Ott, Thomas; Han, Xiaoxing; Fukumura, Dai; Jain, Rakesh K.; Russwurm, Michael; de Wit, Cor; Feil, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Cyclic GMP (cGMP) is an important intracellular signaling molecule in the cardiovascular system, but its spatiotemporal dynamics in vivo is largely unknown. Objective To generate and characterize transgenic mice expressing the fluorescence resonance energy transfer–based ratiometric cGMP sensor, cGMP indicator with an EC50 of 500 nmol/L (cGi500), in cardiovascular tissues. Methods and Results Mouse lines with smooth muscle–specific or ubiquitous expression of cGi500 were generated by random transgenesis using an SM22α promoter fragment or by targeted integration of a Cre recombinase–activatable expression cassette driven by the cytomegalovirus early enhancer/chicken β-actin/β-globin promoter into the Rosa26 locus, respectively. Primary smooth muscle cells isolated from aorta, bladder, and colon of cGi500 mice showed strong sensor fluorescence. Basal cGMP concentrations were <100 nmol/L, whereas stimulation with cGMP-elevating agents such as 2-(N,N-diethylamino)-diazenolate-2-oxide diethylammonium salt (DEA/NO) or the natriuretic peptides, atrial natriuretic peptide, and C-type natriuretic peptide evoked fluorescence resonance energy transfer changes corresponding to cGMP peak concentrations of ≈3 µmol/L. However, different types of smooth muscle cells had different sensitivities of their cGMP responses to DEA/NO, atrial natriuretic peptide, and C-type natriuretic peptide. Robust nitric oxide–induced cGMP transients with peak concentrations of ≈1 to >3 µmol/L could also be monitored in blood vessels of the isolated retina and in the cremaster microcirculation of anesthetized mice. Moreover, with the use of a dorsal skinfold chamber model and multiphoton fluorescence resonance energy transfer microscopy, nitric oxide–stimulated vascular cGMP signals associated with vasodilation were detected in vivo in an acutely untouched preparation. Conclusions These cGi500 transgenic mice permit the visualization of cardiovascular cGMP signals in live

  7. β-catenin nuclear translocation in colorectal cancer cells is suppressed by PDE10A inhibition, cGMP elevation, and activation of PKG

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kevin; Lindsey, Ashley S.; Li, Nan; Gary, Bernard; Andrews, Joel; Keeton, Adam B.; Piazza, Gary A.

    2016-01-01

    Phosphodiesterase 10A (PDE10) is a cGMP and cAMP degrading PDE isozyme that is highly expressed in the brain striatum where it appears to play an important role in cognition and psychomotor activity. PDE10 inhibitors are being developed for the treatment of schizophrenia and Huntington's disease and are generally well tolerated, possibly because of low expression levels in most peripheral tissues. We recently reported high levels of PDE10 in colon tumors and that genetic silencing of PDE10 by siRNA or inhibition with small molecule inhibitors can suppress colon tumor cell growth with a high degree of selectivity over normal colonocytes (Li et al., Oncogene 2015). These observations suggest PDE10 may have an unrecognized role in tumorigenesis. Here we report that the concentration range by which the highly specific PDE10 inhibitor, Pf-2545920 (MP-10), inhibits colon tumor cell growth parallels the concentration range required to increase cGMP and cAMP levels, and activates PKG and PKA, respectively. Moreover, PDE10 knockdown by shRNA reduces the sensitivity of colon tumor cells to the growth inhibitory activity of Pf-2545920. Pf-2545920 also inhibits the translocation of β-catenin to the nucleus, thereby reducing β-catenin mediated transcription of survivin, resulting in caspase activation and apoptosis. PDE10 mRNA was also found to be elevated in colon tumors compared with normal tissues. These findings suggest that PDE10 can be targeted for cancer therapy or prevention whereby inhibition results in cGMP elevation and PKG activation to reduce β-catenin-mediated transcription of survival proteins leading to the selective apoptosis of cancer cells. PMID:26713600

  8. β-catenin nuclear translocation in colorectal cancer cells is suppressed by PDE10A inhibition, cGMP elevation, and activation of PKG.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kevin; Lindsey, Ashley S; Li, Nan; Gary, Bernard; Andrews, Joel; Keeton, Adam B; Piazza, Gary A

    2016-02-02

    Phosphodiesterase 10A (PDE10) is a cGMP and cAMP degrading PDE isozyme that is highly expressed in the brain striatum where it appears to play an important role in cognition and psychomotor activity. PDE10 inhibitors are being developed for the treatment of schizophrenia and Huntington's disease and are generally well tolerated, possibly because of low expression levels in most peripheral tissues. We recently reported high levels of PDE10 in colon tumors and that genetic silencing of PDE10 by siRNA or inhibition with small molecule inhibitors can suppress colon tumor cell growth with a high degree of selectivity over normal colonocytes (Li et al., Oncogene 2015). These observations suggest PDE10 may have an unrecognized role in tumorigenesis. Here we report that the concentration range by which the highly specific PDE10 inhibitor, Pf-2545920 (MP-10), inhibits colon tumor cell growth parallels the concentration range required to increase cGMP and cAMP levels, and activates PKG and PKA, respectively. Moreover, PDE10 knockdown by shRNA reduces the sensitivity of colon tumor cells to the growth inhibitory activity of Pf-2545920. Pf-2545920 also inhibits the translocation of β-catenin to the nucleus, thereby reducing β-catenin mediated transcription of survivin, resulting in caspase activation and apoptosis. PDE10 mRNA was also found to be elevated in colon tumors compared with normal tissues. These findings suggest that PDE10 can be targeted for cancer therapy or prevention whereby inhibition results in cGMP elevation and PKG activation to reduce β-catenin-mediated transcription of survival proteins leading to the selective apoptosis of cancer cells.

  9. Potentiation of slow component of delayed rectifier K+ currentby cGMP via two distinct mechanisms: inhibition of phosphodiesterase 3 and activation of protein kinase G

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Kentaro; Shintani, Yutaka; Ding, Wei-Guang; Matsuura, Hiroshi; Bamba, Tadao

    2002-01-01

    Regulation of the slowly activating component of delayed rectifier K+ current (IKs) by intracellular guanosine 3′5′ cyclic monophosphate (cGMP) was investigated in guinea-pig sino-atrial (SA) node cells using the whole-cell patch-clamp method. When a cell was dialyzed with pipette solution containing 100 μM cGMP, IKs started to gradually increase and reached a maximum increase of a factor of 2.37±0.39 (n=4) about 10–15 min after rupture of patch membrane. Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP, 100 nM) also potentiated IKs, consistent with intracellular cGMP-induced enhancement of IKs. Bath application of a selective blocker of the cGMP-inhibited phosphodiesterase (PDE3) milrinone (100 μM) enhanced IKs by a factor of 1.50±0.09 (n=4) but failed to further enhance IKs after a maximum stimulation by intracellular cGMP (100 μM), suggesting that blockade of PDE3 activity is involved in the enhancement of IKs. A potent but nonspecific PDE inhibitor 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX, 100 μM) further increased IKs stimulated by 100 μM milrinone, indicating that PDE subtypes other than PDE3 are also involved in the regulation of basal IKs in guinea-pig SA node cells. Bath application of 100 μM 8-bromoguanosine 3′5′ cyclic monophosphate (8-Br-cGMP) increased IKs by a factor of 1.48±0.11 (n=5) and this stimulatory effect was totally abolished by cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) inhibitor KT-5823 (500 nM), suggesting that the activation of PKG also mediates cGMP-induced potentiation of IKs. These results strongly suggest that intracellular cGMP potentiates IKs not only by blocking PDE3 but also by activating PKG in guinea-pig SA node cells. PMID:12183338

  10. Multiple roles of the messenger molecule cGMP in testicular function.

    PubMed

    Middendorff, R; Davidoff, M S; Behrends, S; Mewe, M; Miethens, A; Müller, D

    2000-01-01

    The messenger molecule cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) is produced by different isoforms of the enzyme guanylate cyclase (GC). Natriuretic peptides (ANP and CNP) bind to and activate particulate GCs, whereas NO and CO activate a soluble form of GC. The specific relevance of the cGMP system for reproductive functions has been recently demonstrated by the successful use of sildenafil (Viagra), an inhibitor of cGMP-specific phosphodiesterase type 5, for the treatment of erectile dysfunction. In the testis, cGMP signal transduction pathways are involved in a variety of local functions, based on autocrine or paracrine effects. In particular, cGMP has been suggested to influence motility in spermatozoa, development of testicular germ cells, relaxation of peritubular lamina propria cells, testosterone synthesis in Leydig cells and dilatation of testicular blood vessels. The physiological significance of cGMP accumulation in Scrtoli cells is not yet clear. Taken as a whole, the evidence suggests that cGMP-mediated processes might influence both the potentia coeundi within the penis and the potentia generandi at various levels within the testis.

  11. Cinaciguat, a soluble guanylate cyclase activator, augments cGMP after oxidative stress and causes pulmonary vasodilation in neonatal pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Chester, Marc; Seedorf, Gregory; Tourneux, Pierre; Gien, Jason; Tseng, Nancy; Grover, Theresa; Wright, Jason; Stasch, Johannes-Peter; Abman, Steven H

    2011-11-01

    Although inhaled NO (iNO) therapy is often effective in treating infants with persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN), up to 40% of patients fail to respond, which may be partly due to abnormal expression and function of soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC). To determine whether altered sGC expression or activity due to oxidized sGC contributes to high pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) and poor NO responsiveness, we studied the effects of cinaciguat (BAY 58-2667), an sGC activator, on pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMC) from normal fetal sheep and sheep exposed to chronic intrauterine pulmonary hypertension (i.e., PPHN). We found increased sGC α(1)- and β(1)-subunit protein expression but lower basal cGMP levels in PPHN PASMC compared with normal PASMC. To determine the effects of cinaciguat and NO after sGC oxidation in vitro, we measured cGMP production by normal and PPHN PASMC treated with cinaciguat and the NO donor, sodium nitroprusside (SNP), before and after exposure to 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ, an sGC oxidizer), hyperoxia (fraction of inspired oxygen 0.50), or hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)). After treatment with ODQ, SNP-induced cGMP generation was markedly reduced but the effects of cinaciguat were increased by 14- and 64-fold in PPHN fetal PASMC, respectively (P < 0.01 vs. controls). Hyperoxia or H(2)O(2) enhanced cGMP production by cinaciguat but not SNP in PASMC. To determine the hemodynamic effects of cinaciguat in vivo, we compared serial responses to cinaciguat and ACh in fetal lambs after ductus arteriosus ligation. In contrast with the impaired vasodilator response to ACh, cinaciguat-induced pulmonary vasodilation was significantly increased. After birth, cinaciguat caused a significantly greater fall in PVR than either 100% oxygen, iNO, or ACh. We conclude that cinaciguat causes more potent pulmonary vasodilation than iNO in experimental PPHN. We speculate that increased NO-insensitive sGC may

  12. cGMP levels in chronic cadmium disease and osteoarthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Kagamimori, S.; Williams, W. R.; Watanabe, M.

    1986-01-01

    To investigate the effect of cadmium on guanyl cyclase activity, urine levels of the nucleotide cGMP were measured in patients with bone and renal lesions resulting from chronic cadmium exposure, in patients with osteoarthritis and in a normal age-matched control population. The effects of cadmium, zinc and mercury salts on blood mononuclear cell cGMP production were also studied in vitro. The two patient groups exhibited clear differences in cGMP excretion. Lower urine cGMP (59%, P less than 0.01) and creatinine values (43%, P less than 0.01) were found in cadmium-exposed patients and higher cGMP values (56%, P less than 0.05) in patients with osteoarthritis, compared to the control group. Creatinine adjusted cGMP values were also lower in cadmium-exposed patients (28%, P less than 0.05) and higher in patients with osteoarthritis (130%, P less than 0.01). In vitro, a 10 h exposure of mononuclear cells to cadmium or mercury salts depressed guanyl cyclase activity in most experiments. At 10(-4) M, mercury was consistently more inhibitory in all cultures (95%, P less than 0.01). As cadmium has a potential for inhibiting guanyl cyclase activity in human tissue, the low urine cGMP values found in patients with cadmium disease may be attributable to chronic cadmium exposure. High guanyl cyclase activity in patients with osteoarthritis may be associated with inflammation. PMID:2874827

  13. [Phosphodiesterase 3 mediates cross-talk between the protein kinase- and cGMP- dependent pathways and cyclic AMP metabolism].

    PubMed

    Makuch, Edyta; Matuszyk, Janusz

    2012-07-20

    PDE3 is a dual-substrate phosphodiesterase responsible for hydrolyzing both cAMP and cGMP whilst being simultaneously inhibited by cGMP. This feature is related to presence of the 44 amino acid insert in the catalytic domain, which determines the mechanism of introduction of the cyclic nucleotide into the catalytic pocket of the enzyme. Once bound in the catalytic site cGMP results in steric hindrance for cAMP to enter the site. The regulatory domain of PDE3 consists of two hydrophobic regions: NHR1 and NHR2. Their presence defines the enzyme's intracellular localization, thus determining its participation in particular signaling cascades. Due to the properties of PDE3 this enzyme has exceptional importance for the cross-talk between cAMP-dependent signaling and other cascades. There are two different mechanisms of action of PDE3 enzymes in cell signaling pathways. In many signaling cascades assembly of a signalosome is necessary for phosphorylation and activation of the PDE3 proteins. In response to certain hormones and growth factors, PDE3 merges the metabolism of cAMP with protein kinase-dependent signaling pathways. PDE3 also controls the level of cAMP with regard to the alternating concentration of cGMP. This effect occurs in signaling cascades activated by natriuretic peptide.

  14. Cyclic GMP signaling in cardiovascular pathophysiology and therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Emily J.; Kass, David A.

    2009-01-01

    Cyclic guanosine 3′,5′-monophosphate (cGMP) mediates a wide spectrum of physiologic processes in multiple cell types within the cardiovascular system. Dysfunctional signaling at any step of the cascade--- cGMP synthesis, effector activation, or catabolism--- have been implicated in numerous cardiovascular diseases, ranging from hypertension to atherosclerosis to cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure. In this review, we outline each step of the cGMP signaling cascade and discuss its regulation and physiologic effects within the cardiovascular system. In addition, we illustrate how cGMP signaling becomes dysregulated in specific cardiovascular disease states. The ubiquitous role cGMP plays in cardiac physiology and pathophysiology presents great opportunities for pharmacologic modulation of the cGMP signal in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. We detail the various therapeutic interventional strategies that have been developed or are in development, summarizing relevant preclinical and clinical studies. PMID:19306895

  15. Functional analysis of the rod photoreceptor cGMP phosphodiesterase alpha-subunit gene promoter: Nrl and Crx are required for full transcriptional activity.

    PubMed

    Pittler, Steven J; Zhang, Youwen; Chen, Shiming; Mears, Alan J; Zack, Donald J; Ren, Zhiyong; Swain, Prabodh K; Yao, Suxia; Swaroop, Anand; White, J Brandon

    2004-05-07

    To understand the factors controlling expression of the cGMP phosphodiesterase type 6 (PDE6) genes, we have characterized the promoter of the human PDE6A gene that encodes the catalytic alpha-subunit. In vivo DNase I hypersensitivity assays revealed two sites immediately upstream of the PDE6A core promoter region. Transient transfection assay in Y79 cells of constructs containing varying lengths of the promoter region showed a decrease in promoter activity with increasing length. The most active segment contained a 177-bp upstream sequence including apparent Crx and Nrl transcription factor binding sites. Both Crx and Nrl transactivated the PDE6A promoter in HEK293 cells and showed a >100-fold increase when coexpressed. Coexpression of a dominant negative inhibitor of Nrl abolished Nrl transactivation but had no effect on Crx. DNase I footprinting assays identified three potential Crx binding sites within a 55-bp segment beginning 29 bp upstream of the transcription start point. Mutation of two of these sites reduced reporter gene activity by as much as 69%. Gel shifts showed that all three Crx sites required a TAAT sequence for efficient binding. Consistent with a requirement for Crx and Nrl in Pde6a promoter activity, Pde6a mRNA is reduced by 87% in the retina of Crx(-/-) mice and is undetectable in Nrl(-/-) mice at postnatal day 10. These results establish that both Nrl and Crx are required for full transcriptional activity of the PDE6A gene.

  16. Potentiation of ‘on’ bipolar cell flash responses by dim background light and cGMP in dogfish retinal slices

    PubMed Central

    Shiells, R A; Falk, G

    2002-01-01

    The high sensitivity of the vertebrate visual system results from amplification inherent in phototransduction in rods and from the amplification of rod signals on their synaptic transfer at the first synapse with ‘on’ bipolar cells. These cells possess a metabotropic glutamate receptor linked via a cGMP cascade to the control of cGMP-activated channels. In the study presented here, we show that very dim background light, isomerising only one rhodopsin in 1 out of 10 rods per second, potentiates ‘on’ bipolar cell responses to superimposed flashes. Responses to dim flashes, which were undetectable above the noise in the dark, were boosted above the increased noise level induced by the background. This potentiation could be reproduced by elevating cGMP, which increases with light, or by dialysing the cells with a non-hydrolysable cGMP analogue. Inhibition of tyrosine kinase activity also reproduced the effect and induced a speeding up of the rising phase of the flash response, similar to the action of dim background light. Conversely, inhibition of tyrosine phosphatase activity blocked the potentiation. These results suggest that cGMP promotes tyrosine-site dephosphorylation of ‘on’ bipolar cell cGMP-activated channels, resulting in a rise in the sensitivity to cGMP, as has recently been demonstrated for rod cGMP-activated channels. This constitutes a positive feedback mechanism such that as cGMP increases with light, the sensitivity of the channels to cGMP increases and boosts the signal above background noise. This mechanism would allow stochastic resonance to occur, facilitating single-photon detection when dark-adapted, and may therefore lead to improved discrimination. PMID:12096062

  17. Design of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based cGMP indicators: a systematic approach.

    PubMed

    Russwurm, Michael; Mullershausen, Florian; Friebe, Andreas; Jäger, Ronald; Russwurm, Corina; Koesling, Doris

    2007-10-01

    The intracellular signalling molecule cGMP regulates a variety of physiological processes, and so the ability to monitor cGMP dynamics in living cells is highly desirable. Here, we report a systematic approach to create FRET (fluorescence resonance energy transfer)-based cGMP indicators from two known types of cGMP-binding domains which are found in cGMP-dependent protein kinase and phosphodiesterase 5, cNMP-BD [cyclic nucleotide monophosphate-binding domain and GAF [cGMP-specific and -stimulated phosphodiesterases, Anabaena adenylate cyclases and Escherichia coli FhlA] respectively. Interestingly, only cGMP-binding domains arranged in tandem configuration as in their parent proteins were cGMP-responsive. However, the GAF-derived sensors were unable to be used to study cGMP dynamics because of slow response kinetics to cGMP. Out of 24 cGMP-responsive constructs derived from cNMP-BDs, three were selected to cover a range of cGMP affinities with an EC50 between 500 nM and 6 microM. These indicators possess excellent specifity for cGMP, fast binding kinetics and twice the dynamic range of existing cGMP sensors. The in vivo performance of these new indicators is demonstrated in living cells and validated by comparison with cGMP dynamics as measured by radioimmunoassays.

  18. Design of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based cGMP indicators: a systematic approach

    PubMed Central

    Russwurm, Michael; Mullershausen, Florian; Friebe, Andreas; Jäger, Ronald; Russwurm, Corina; Koesling, Doris

    2007-01-01

    The intracellular signalling molecule cGMP regulates a variety of physiological processes, and so the ability to monitor cGMP dynamics in living cells is highly desirable. Here, we report a systematic approach to create FRET (fluorescence resonance energy transfer)-based cGMP indicators from two known types of cGMP-binding domains which are found in cGMP-dependent protein kinase and phosphodiesterase 5, cNMP-BD [cyclic nucleotide monophosphate-binding domain and GAF [cGMP-specific and -stimulated phosphodiesterases, Anabaena adenylate cyclases and Escherichia coli FhlA] respectively. Interestingly, only cGMP-binding domains arranged in tandem configuration as in their parent proteins were cGMP-responsive. However, the GAF-derived sensors were unable to be used to study cGMP dynamics because of slow response kinetics to cGMP. Out of 24 cGMP-responsive constructs derived from cNMP-BDs, three were selected to cover a range of cGMP affinities with an EC50 between 500 nM and 6 μM. These indicators possess excellent specifity for cGMP, fast binding kinetics and twice the dynamic range of existing cGMP sensors. The in vivo performance of these new indicators is demonstrated in living cells and validated by comparison with cGMP dynamics as measured by radioimmunoassays. PMID:17516914

  19. The role of NO and cGMP in antispasmodic activity of Ruta chalepensis leaf extract on rat ileum.

    PubMed

    Moazedi, A A; Dabir, N; Naseri, M K Gharib; Zadkarami, M R

    2010-01-15

    The aim of present study was to investigate the effect of hydroalcoholic extract of Ruta chalepensis (Rutaceae) leaves on rat ileum contractility and possible mechanism(s) involved. Ruta chalepensis extract was prepared by maceration method (ethanol 70%). Terminal portion of ileum (2 cm) was dissected out from male Wistar rats and mounted in an organ bath containing air bubbled Tyrode solution with 1 g initial tension and ileal contraction induced by KCl (60 mM) was recorded. The spasmolytic effect of the cumulative concentrations of extracts (0.01-0.07 mg mL(-1)) was reduced after tissue incubation with L-NAME (100 microM, 20 min). Methylene blue (30 microM) reduced the extracts (0.01-0.07 mg mL(-1)) spasmolytic effect (p < 0.001). Furthermore, it seems that the portion relaxatory effect of Rue extract on the rat ileum may be due to nitric oxide and the antispasmodic activity of the extract was mainly through a cGMP-dependent mechanism.

  20. cGMP regulates hydrogen peroxide accumulation in calcium-dependent salt resistance pathway in Arabidopsis thaliana roots.

    PubMed

    Li, Jisheng; Wang, Xiaomin; Zhang, Yanli; Jia, Honglei; Bi, Yurong

    2011-10-01

    3',5'-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) is an important second messenger in plants. In the present study, roles of cGMP in salt resistance in Arabidopsis roots were investigated. Arabidopsis roots were sensitive to 100 mM NaCl treatment, displaying a great increase in electrolyte leakage and Na(+)/K(+) ratio and a decrease in gene expression of the plasma membrane (PM) H(+)-ATPase. However, application of exogenous 8Br-cGMP (an analog of cGMP), H(2)O(2) or CaCl(2) alleviated the NaCl-induced injury by maintaining a lower Na(+)/K(+) ratio and increasing the PM H(+)-ATPase gene expression. In addition, the inhibition of root elongation and seed germination under salt stress was removed by 8Br-cGMP. Further study indicated that 8Br-cGMP-induced higher NADPH levels for PM NADPH oxidase to generate H(2)O(2) by regulating glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) activity. The effect of 8Br-cGMP and H(2)O(2) on ionic homeostasis was abolished when Ca(2+) was eliminated by glycol-bis-(2-amino ethyl ether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA, a Ca(2+) chelator) in Arabidopsis roots under salt stress. Taken together, cGMP could regulate H(2)O(2) accumulation in salt stress, and Ca(2+) was necessary in the cGMP-mediated signaling pathway. H(2)O(2), as the downstream component of cGMP signaling pathway, stimulated PM H(+)-ATPase gene expression. Thus, ion homeostasis was modulated for salt tolerance.

  1. Identification of four candidate cGMP targets in Dictyostelium

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Jonathan M.; Bosgraaf, Leonard; Van Haastert, Peter J. M.; Smith, Janet L.

    2002-01-01

    In Dictyostelium, a transient increase in intracellular cGMP is important for cytoskeletal rearrangements during chemotaxis. There must be cGMP-binding proteins in Dictyostelium that regulate key cytoskeletal components after treatment with chemoattractants, but to date, no such proteins have been identified. Using a bioinformatics approach, we have found four candidate cGMP-binding proteins (GbpA–D). GbpA and -B have two tandem cGMP-binding sites downstream of a metallo β-lactamase domain, a superfamily that includes cAMP phosphodiesterases. GbpC contains the following nine domains (in order): leucine-rich repeats, Ras, MEK kinase, Ras guanine nucleotide exchange factor N-terminal (RasGEF-N), DEP, RasGEF, cGMP-binding, GRAM, and a second cGMP-binding domain. GbpD is related to GbpC, but is much shorter; it begins with the RasGEF-N domain, and lacks the DEP domain. Disruption of the gbpC gene results in loss of all high-affinity cGMP-binding activity present in the soluble cellular fraction. GbpC mRNA levels increase dramatically 8 h after starvation is initiated. GbpA, -B, and -D mRNA levels show less dramatic changes, with gbpA mRNA levels highest 4 h into starvation, gbpB mRNA levels highest in vegetative cells, and gbpD levels highest at 8 h. The identification of these genes is the first step in a molecular approach to studying downstream effects of cGMP signaling in Dictyostelium. PMID:12011437

  2. cGMP Binding Sites on Photoreceptor Phosphodiesterase: Role in Feedback Regulation of Visual Transduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cote, Rick H.; Deric Bownds, M.; Arshavsky, Vadim Y.

    1994-05-01

    A central step in vertebrate visual transduction is the rapid drop in cGMP levels that causes cGMP-gated ion channels in the photoreceptor cell membrane to close. It has long been a puzzle that the cGMP phosphodiesterase (PDE) whose activation causes this decrease contains not only catalytic sites for cGMP hydrolysis but also noncatalytic cGMP binding sites. Recent work has shown that occupancy of these noncatalytic sites slows the rate of PDE inactivation. We report here that PDE activation induced by activated transducin lowers the cGMP binding affinity for noncatalytic sites on PDE and accelerates the dissociation of cGMP from these sites. These sites can exist in three states: high affinity (K_d = 60 nM) for the nonactivated PDE, intermediate affinity (K_d ≈ 180 nM) when the enzyme is activated in a complex with transducin, and low affinity (K_d > 1 μM) when transducin physically removes the inhibitory subunits of PDE from the PDE catalytic subunits. Activation of PDE by transducin causes a 10-fold increase in the rate of cGMP dissociation from one of the two noncatalytic sites; physical removal of the inhibitory subunits from the PDE catalytic subunits further accelerates the cGMP dissociation rate from both sites >50-fold. Because PDE molecules lacking bound cGMP inactivate more rapidly, this suggests that a prolonged cGMP decrease may act as a negative feedback regulator to generate the faster, smaller photoresponses characteristic of light-adapted photoreceptors.

  3. Insulin, cGMP, and TGF-beta signals regulate food intake and quiescence in C. elegans: a model for satiety.

    PubMed

    You, Young-jai; Kim, Jeongho; Raizen, David M; Avery, Leon

    2008-03-01

    Despite the prevalence of obesity and its related diseases, the signaling pathways for appetite control and satiety are not clearly understood. Here we report C. elegans quiescence behavior, a cessation of food intake and movement that is possibly a result of satiety. C. elegans quiescence shares several characteristics of satiety in mammals. It is induced by high-quality food, it requires nutritional signals from the intestine, and it depends on prior feeding history: fasting enhances quiescence after refeeding. During refeeding after fasting, quiescence is evoked, causing gradual inhibition of food intake and movement, mimicking the behavioral sequence of satiety in mammals. Based on these similarities, we propose that quiescence results from satiety. This hypothesized satiety-induced quiescence is regulated by peptide signals such as insulin and TGF-beta. The EGL-4 cGMP-dependent protein kinase functions downstream of insulin and TGF-beta in sensory neurons including ASI to control quiescence in response to food intake.

  4. Light regulation of cGMP metabolism in toad rod outer segments (ROS) deduced from intact photoreceptor and cellfree kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Dawis, S.M.; Graeff, R.M.; Heyman, R.A.; Walseth, T.F.; Butz, E.A.

    1987-05-01

    The rate of cGMP hydrolysis by phosphodiesterase (PDE) in intact ROS, monitored in dark-adapted isolated toad retina by the rate of /sup 18/O appearance in guanine nucleotide ..cap alpha..-phosphoryls, is 1/360th of that observed in disrupted ROS at a substrate concentration equivalent to the total (cGMP) in ROS. Low to moderate photic stimuli increase this cGMP hydrolytic rate up to 10-fold in intact ROS with little or no change in total (cGMP). G-protein activation determined in intact ROS by the fraction of GDP labeled with /sup 18/O corresponds with light-related increases in cGMP flux. In contrast, relatively high intensities and extended illumination cause attenuation of maximal cGMP hydrolysis with proportionate reductions in total (cGMP). From these observations combined with the effects of activated G-protein on kinetics and cGMP binding of ROS PDE the following model for light-regulation of cGMP metabolism was deduced: cGMP flux in intact ROS is severely restricted in the dark state because approximately 99% of the cGMP is bound to high affinity sites on the non-stimulated form of PDE. This constraint is relieved when activated G-protein converts the cGMP-binding form of PDE to a high K/sub m/ catalytic form. cGMP is then redistributed to a dynamic pool where it is available to PDE catalytic sites and lower affinity allosteric sites. The (cGMP) in the dynamic pool is maintained or further increased or decreased by modulating the activity of an apparently light-sensitive guanylyl cyclase.

  5. Design of CGMP production of 18F- and 68Ga-radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Chi, Yen-Ting; Chu, Pei-Chun; Chao, Hao-Yu; Shieh, Wei-Chen; Chen, Chuck C

    2014-01-01

    Radiopharmaceutical production process must adhere to current good manufacturing process (CGMP) compliance to ensure the quality of precursor, prodrug (active pharmaceutical ingredient, API), and the final drug product that meet acceptance criteria. We aimed to develop an automated system for production of CGMP grade of PET radiopharmaceuticals. The hardware and software of the automated synthesizer that fit in the hot cell under cGMP requirement were developed. Examples of production yield and purity for (68)Ga-DOTATATE and (18)F-FDG at CGMP facility were optimized. Analytical assays and acceptance criteria for cGMP grade of (68)Ga-DOTATATE and (18)F-FDG were established. CGMP facility for the production of PET radiopharmaceuticals has been established. Radio-TLC and HPLC analyses of (68)Ga-DOTATATE and (18)F-FDG showed that the radiochemical purity was 92% and 96%, respectively. The products were sterile and pyrogenic-free. CGMP compliance of radiopharmaceuticals has been reviewed. (68)Ga-DOTATATE and (18)F-FDG were synthesized with high radiochemical yield under CGMP process.

  6. Design of CGMP Production of 18F- and 68Ga-Radiopharmaceuticals

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Pei-Chun; Chao, Hao-Yu; Shieh, Wei-Chen; Chen, Chuck C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. Radiopharmaceutical production process must adhere to current good manufacturing process (CGMP) compliance to ensure the quality of precursor, prodrug (active pharmaceutical ingredient, API), and the final drug product that meet acceptance criteria. We aimed to develop an automated system for production of CGMP grade of PET radiopharmaceuticals. Methods. The hardware and software of the automated synthesizer that fit in the hot cell under cGMP requirement were developed. Examples of production yield and purity for 68Ga-DOTATATE and 18F-FDG at CGMP facility were optimized. Analytical assays and acceptance criteria for cGMP grade of 68Ga-DOTATATE and 18F-FDG were established. Results. CGMP facility for the production of PET radiopharmaceuticals has been established. Radio-TLC and HPLC analyses of 68Ga-DOTATATE and 18F-FDG showed that the radiochemical purity was 92% and 96%, respectively. The products were sterile and pyrogenic-free. Conclusion. CGMP compliance of radiopharmaceuticals has been reviewed. 68Ga-DOTATATE and 18F-FDG were synthesized with high radiochemical yield under CGMP process. PMID:25276810

  7. Optogenetic manipulation of cGMP in cells and animals by the tightly light-regulated guanylyl-cyclase opsin CyclOp.

    PubMed

    Gao, Shiqiang; Nagpal, Jatin; Schneider, Martin W; Kozjak-Pavlovic, Vera; Nagel, Georg; Gottschalk, Alexander

    2015-09-08

    Cyclic GMP (cGMP) signalling regulates multiple biological functions through activation of protein kinase G and cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channels. In sensory neurons, cGMP permits signal modulation, amplification and encoding, before depolarization. Here we implement a guanylyl cyclase rhodopsin from Blastocladiella emersonii as a new optogenetic tool (BeCyclOp), enabling rapid light-triggered cGMP increase in heterologous cells (Xenopus oocytes, HEK293T cells) and in Caenorhabditis elegans. Among five different fungal CyclOps, exhibiting unusual eight transmembrane topologies and cytosolic N-termini, BeCyclOp is the superior optogenetic tool (light/dark activity ratio: 5,000; no cAMP production; turnover (20 °C) ∼17 cGMP s(-1)). Via co-expressed CNG channels (OLF in oocytes, TAX-2/4 in C. elegans muscle), BeCyclOp photoactivation induces a rapid conductance increase and depolarization at very low light intensities. In O2/CO2 sensory neurons of C. elegans, BeCyclOp activation evokes behavioural responses consistent with their normal sensory function. BeCyclOp therefore enables precise and rapid optogenetic manipulation of cGMP levels in cells and animals.

  8. Nitric Oxide Mediates Glutamate-Linked Enhancement of cGMP Levels in the Cerebellum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bredt, David S.; Snyder, Solomon H.

    1989-11-01

    Nitric oxide, which mediates influences of numerous neurotransmitters and modulators on vascular smooth muscle and leukocytes, can be formed in the brain from arginine by an enzymatic activity that stoichiometrically generates citrulline. We show that glutamate and related amino acids, such as N-methyl-D-aspartate, markedly stimulate arginine-citrulline transformation in cerebellar slices stoichiometrically with enhancement of cGMP levels. Nω-monomethyl-L-arginine blocks the augmentation both of citrulline and cGMP with identical potencies. Arginine competitively reverses both effects of Nω-monomethyl-L-arginine with the same potencies. Hemoglobin, which complexes nitric oxide, prevents the stimulation by N-methyl-D-aspartate of cGMP levels, and superoxide dismutase, which elevates nitric oxide levels, increases cGMP formation. These data establish that nitric oxide mediates the stimulation by glutamate of cGMP formation.

  9. Nitric oxide mediates glutamate-linked enhancement of cGMP levels in the cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Bredt, D S; Snyder, S H

    1989-11-01

    Nitric oxide, which mediates influences of numerous neurotransmitters and modulators on vascular smooth muscle and leukocytes, can be formed in the brain from arginine by an enzymatic activity that stoichiometrically generates citrulline. We show that glutamate and related amino acids, such as N-methyl-D-aspartate, markedly stimulate arginine--citrulline transformation in cerebellar slices stoichiometrically with enhancement of cGMP levels. N omega-monomethyl-L-arginine blocks the augmentation both of citrulline and cGMP with identical potencies. Arginine competitively reverses both effects of N omega-monomethyl-L-arginine with the same potencies. Hemoglobin, which complexes nitric oxide, prevents the stimulation by N-methyl-D-aspartate of cGMP levels, and superoxide dismutase, which elevates nitric oxide levels, increases cGMP formation. These data establish that nitric oxide mediates the stimulation by glutamate of cGMP formation.

  10. Nitric oxide mediates glutamate-linked enhancement of cGMP levels in the cerebellum

    SciTech Connect

    Bredt, D.S.; Snyder, S.H. )

    1989-11-01

    Nitric oxide, which mediates influences of numerous neurotransmitters and modulators on vascular smooth muscle and leukocytes, can be formed in the brain from arginine by an enzymatic activity that stoichiometrically generates citrulline. The authors show that glutamate and related amino acids, such as N-methyl-D-aspartate, markedly stimulate arginine-citrulline transformation in cerebellar slices stoichiometrically with enhancement of cGMP levels. N{sup {omega}}-monomethyl-L-arginine blocks the augmentation both of citrulline and cGMP with identical potencies. Arginine competitively reverses both effects of N{sup {omega}}-monomethyl-L-arginine with the same potencies. Hemoglobin, which complexes nitric oxide, prevents the stimulation by N-methyl-D-aspartate of cGMP levels, and superoxide dismutase, which elevates nitric oxide levels, increases cGMP formation. These data establish that nitric oxide mediates the stimulation by glutamate of cGMP formation.

  11. Solution Structure of the cGMP Binding GAF Domain from Phosphodiesterase 5: Insights into Nucleotide Specificity, Dimerization, and cGMP-Dependent Conformational Change

    SciTech Connect

    Heikaus, Clemens C.; Stout, Joseph R.; Sekharan, Monica R.; Eakin, Catherine M.; Rajagopal, Ponni; Brzovic, Peter S.; Beavo, Joseph A.; Klevit, Rachel E.

    2008-08-15

    Phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) controls intracellular levels of cGMP through its regulation of cGMP hydrolysis. Hydrolytic activity of the C-terminal catalytic domain is increased by cGMP binding to the N-terminal GAF A domain. We present the NMR solution structure of the cGMP-bound PDE5A GAF A domain. The cGMP orientation in the buried binding pocket was defined through 37 intermolecular NOEs.

  12. cGMP in mouse rods: the spatiotemporal dynamics underlying single photon responses

    PubMed Central

    Pugh Jr., Edward N.; Burns, Marie E.

    2015-01-01

    Vertebrate vision begins when retinal photoreceptors transduce photons into electrical signals that are then relayed to other neurons in the eye, and ultimately to the brain. In rod photoreceptors, transduction of single photons is achieved by a well-understood G-protein cascade that modulates cGMP levels, and in turn, cGMP-sensitive inward current. The spatial extent and depth of the decline in cGMP during the single photon response (SPR) have been major issues in phototransduction research since the discovery that single photons elicit substantial and reproducible changes in membrane current. The spatial profile of cGMP decline during the SPR affects signal gain, and thus may contribute to reduction of trial-to-trial fluctuations in the SPR. Here we summarize the general principles of rod phototransduction, emphasizing recent advances in resolving the spatiotemporal dynamics of cGMP during the SPR. PMID:25788876

  13. KMUP-1 inhibits H441 lung epithelial cell growth, migration and proinflammation via increased NO/CGMP and inhibited RHO kinase/VEGF signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Wu, B N; Chen, H Y; Liu, C P; Hsu, L Y; Chen, I J

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates whether KMUP-1 protects soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) and inhibits vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in lung epithelial cells in hypoxia, therapeutically targeting epithelial proinflammation. H441 cells were used as a representative epithelial cell line to examine the role of sGC and VEGF in hypoxia and the anti-proinflammatory activity of KMUP-1 in normoxia. Human H441 cells were grown in hypoxia for 24-72 h. KMUP-1 (1, 10, 100 microM) arrested cells at the G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle, reduced cell survival and migration, increased p21/p27, restored eNOS, increased soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) and PKG and inhibited Rho kinase II (ROCK-II). KMUP-1 (0.001-0.1 microM) concentration dependently increased eNOS in normoxia and did not inhibit phosphodiesterase-5A (PDE-5A) in hypoxic cells. Hypoxia-induced factor-1alpha (HIF-1alpha) and VEGF were suppressed by KMUP-1 but not by L-NAME (100 microM). The PKG inhibitor Rp-8-CPT-cGMPS (10 microM) blunted the inhibition of ROCK-II by KMUP-1. KMUP-1 inhibited thromboxane A2-mimetic agonist U46619-induced PDE-5A, TNF-alpha (100 ng/ml)-induced iNOS, and ROCK-II and associated phospho-p38 MAPK, suggesting multiple anti-proinflammatory activities. In addition, increased p21/p27 by KMUP-1 at higher concentrations might contribute to an increased Bax/Bcl-2 and active caspase-3/procaspase-3 ratio, concomitantly causing apoptosis. KMUP-1 inhibited ROCK-II/VEGF in hypoxia, indicating its anti-neoplastic and anti-inflammatory properties. KMUP-1 inhibited TNF-alpha-induced iNOS and U46619-induced PDE-5A and phospho-p38 MAPK in normoxia, confirming its anti-proinflammatory action. KMUP-1 could be used as an anti-proinflammatory to reduce epithelial inflammation.

  14. Biophysical techniques for detection of cAMP and cGMP in living cells.

    PubMed

    Sprenger, Julia U; Nikolaev, Viacheslav O

    2013-04-12

    Cyclic nucleotides cAMP and cGMP are ubiquitous second messengers which regulate myriads of functions in virtually all eukaryotic cells. Their intracellular effects are often mediated via discrete subcellular signaling microdomains. In this review, we will discuss state-of-the-art techniques to measure cAMP and cGMP in biological samples with a particular focus on live cell imaging approaches, which allow their detection with high temporal and spatial resolution in living cells and tissues. Finally, we will describe how these techniques can be applied to the analysis of second messenger dynamics in subcellular signaling microdomains.

  15. Hindlimb-suspension and spaceflight both alter cGMP levels in rat choroid plexus.

    PubMed

    Carcenac, C; Herbute, S; Masseguin, C; Mani-Ponset, L; Maurel, D; Briggs, R; Guell, A; Gabrion, J B

    1999-10-01

    Effects of actual and simulated weightlessness on choroidal guanylate cyclase activity were evaluated by assaying the production of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), a second messenger involved in mechanisms regulating the secretion of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in choroid plexus. Cyclic cGMP was measured, using radio-immunoassay, in choroidal extracts of hindlimb-suspended rats (HLS rats), adapted to an anti-orthostatic restraint for 30 min., or for 3, 9 or 14 days and after a 17-day spaceflight (Life and Microgravity SpaceLab experiment; LMS). Basal cGMP levels were slightly but significantly decreased in the first 30 min. of the HLS experiment, whereas they were significantly increased in rats adapted to longer anti-orthostatic restraints. LMS flight rats demonstrated a similar increase in the choroidal cGMP baseline. After natriuretic peptide stimulation, i.e. using ANP (atrial natriuretic peptide) or BNP (brain natriuretic peptide), choroidal cGMP contents were typically increased (by 1.5-2 times; p<0.05) in control rats (LMS and HLS experiments), but not significantly elevated in suspended rats, except for those adapted to HLS for 14 days. In these animals the ANP-dependent cGMP production was significantly increased (by about 3 times; p<0.005). The ANP- or BNP-dependent responses were similarly abolished in LMS flight rats, which were dissected 4-6 hours after return to Earth's gravity. The role of corticosteroids was also investigated during the LMS experiment. Results on choroidal functions revealed a lack of significant change of cGMP levels between adrenalectomized and sham-operated rats. For the first time, it is reported that both basal and ANP- stimulated cGMP levels are dramatically changed over the first 14 days of suspension, i.e. with experiments known to simulate some effects of weightlessness. Basal choroidal cGMP levels are also increased after 17 days in space, suggesting that space adaptation also impacts choroidal guanylate cyclase

  16. cGMP Accumulation Causes Photoreceptor Degeneration in CNG Channel Deficiency: Evidence of cGMP Cytotoxicity Independently of Enhanced CNG Channel Function

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jianhua; Morris, Lynsie; Thapa, Arjun; Ma, Hongwei; Michalakis, Stylianos; Biel, Martin; Baehr, Wolfgang; Peshenko, Igor V.; Dizhoor, Alexander M.

    2013-01-01

    Photoreceptor cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channels regulate Ca2+ influx in rod and cone photoreceptors. cGMP, the native ligand of the photoreceptor CNG channels, has been associated with cytotoxicity when its levels rise above normal due to defects in photoreceptor phosphodiesterase (PDE6) or regulation of retinal guanylyl cyclase (retGC). We found a massive accumulation of cGMP in CNGA3-deficient retina and investigated whether cGMP accumulation plays a role in cone degeneration in CNG channel deficiency. The time course study showed that the retinal cGMP level in Cnga3−/−;Nrl−/− mice with CNGA3 deficiency on a cone-dominant background was sharply increased at postnatal day 8 (P8), peaked around P10–P15, remained high through P30–P60, and returned to near control level at P90. This elevation pattern correlated with photoreceptor apoptotic death, which peaked around P15–P20. In Cnga3−/−;Gucy2e−/− mice lacking retGC1, cone density and expression levels of cone-specific proteins were significantly increased compared with Cnga3−/−, consistent with a role of cGMP accumulation as the major contributor to cone death caused by CNG channel deficiency. The activity and expression levels of cGMP-dependent protein kinase G (PKG) were significantly increased in Cnga3−/−;Nrl−/− retina compared with Nrl−/−, suggesting an involvement of PKG regulation in cell death. Our results indicate that cGMP accumulation in photoreceptors can itself exert cytotoxic effect in cones, independently of CNG channel activity and Ca2+ influx. PMID:24027293

  17. Compartmentalization of extracellular cGMP determines absorptive or secretory responses in the rat jejunum

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xiao-Hong; Siragy, Helmy M.; Guerrant, Richard L.; Carey, Robert M.

    1999-01-01

    We examined potential mechanisms by which angiotensin subtype-2 (AT2) receptor stimulation induces net fluid absorption and serosal guanosine cyclic 3′,5′-monophosphate (cGMP) formation in the rat jejunum. l-arginine (l-ARG) given intravenously or interstitially enhanced net fluid absorption and cGMP formation, which were completely blocked by the nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitor, N-nitro-l-arginine methylester (l-NAME), but not by the specific AT2 receptor antagonist, PD-123319 (PD). Dietary sodium restriction also increased jejunal interstitial fluid cGMP and fluid absorption. Both could be blocked by PD or l-NAME, suggesting that the effects of sodium restriction occur via ANG II at the AT2 receptor. l-ARG–stimulated fluid absorption was blocked by the soluble guanylyl cyclase inhibitor 1-H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,2-α]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ). Cyclic GMP–specific phosphodiesterase in the interstitial space decreased extracellular cGMP content and prevented the absorptive effects of l-ARG. Angiotensin II (ANG II) caused an increase in net Na+ and Cl– ion absorption and 22Na+ unidirectional efflux (absorption) from the jejunal loop. In contrast, intraluminal heat-stable enterotoxin of Escherichia coli (STa) increased loop cGMP and fluid secretion that were not blocked by either l-NAME or ODQ. These findings suggest that ANG II acts at the serosal side via AT2 receptors to stimulate cGMP production via soluble guanylyl cyclase activation and absorption through the generation of NO, but that mucosal STa activation of particulate guanylyl cyclase causes secretion independently of NO, thus demonstrating the opposite effects of cGMP in the mucosal and serosal compartments of the jejunum. PMID:9916128

  18. Auxin-induced nitric oxide, cGMP and gibberellins were involved in the gravitropism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Weiming; Hu, Liwei; Hu, Xiangyang; Cui, Dayong; Cai, Weiming

    Gravitropism is the asymmetric growth or curvature of plant organs in response to gravistimulation. There is a complex signal transduction cascade which involved in the differential growth of plants in response to changes in the gravity vector. The role of auxin in gravitropism has been demonstrated by many experiments, but little is known regarding the molecular details of such effects. In our studies before, mediation of the gravitropic bending of soybean roots and rice leaf sheath bases by nitric oxide, cGMP and gibberellins, are induced by auxin. The asymmetrical distribution of nitric oxide, cGMP and gibberellins resulted from the asymmetrical synthesis of them in bending sites. In soybean roots, inhibitions of NO and cGMP synthesis reduced differential NO and cGMP accumulation respectively, which both of these effects can lead to the reduction of gravitropic bending. Gibberellin-induced OsXET, OsEXPA4 and OsRWC3 were also found involved in the gravitropic bending. These data indicated that auxin-induced nitric oxide, cGMP and gibberellins were involved in the gravitropism. More experiments need to prove the more detailed mechanism of them.

  19. Cardioprotective cGMP favors exogenous fatty acid incorporation into tyiglycerides over direct beta-oxidation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    While cardiac hypertrophy has been associated with a shift in substrate selection for energy production from fatty acids (FA) to carbohydrates (CHO), it remains controversial whether this shift is adaptive or maladaptive. Since enhanced cGMP signalling can prevent hypertrophy, we hypothesized that t...

  20. Dephosphorylation and inactivation of NPR2 guanylyl cyclase in granulosa cells contributes to the LH-induced decrease in cGMP that causes resumption of meiosis in rat oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Egbert, Jeremy R.; Shuhaibar, Leia C.; Edmund, Aaron B.; Van Helden, Dusty A.; Robinson, Jerid W.; Uliasz, Tracy F.; Baena, Valentina; Geerts, Andreas; Wunder, Frank; Potter, Lincoln R.; Jaffe, Laurinda A.

    2014-01-01

    In mammals, the meiotic cell cycle of oocytes starts during embryogenesis and then pauses. Much later, in preparation for fertilization, oocytes within preovulatory follicles resume meiosis in response to luteinizing hormone (LH). Before LH stimulation, the arrest is maintained by diffusion of cyclic (c)GMP into the oocyte from the surrounding granulosa cells, where it is produced by the guanylyl cyclase natriuretic peptide receptor 2 (NPR2). LH rapidly reduces the production of cGMP, but how this occurs is unknown. Here, using rat follicles, we show that within 10 min, LH signaling causes dephosphorylation and inactivation of NPR2 through a process that requires the activity of phosphoprotein phosphatase (PPP)-family members. The rapid dephosphorylation of NPR2 is accompanied by a rapid phosphorylation of the cGMP phosphodiesterase PDE5, an enzyme whose activity is increased upon phosphorylation. Later, levels of the NPR2 agonist C-type natriuretic peptide decrease in the follicle, and these sequential events contribute to the decrease in cGMP that causes meiosis to resume in the oocyte. PMID:25183874

  1. Exclusion of five subunits of cGMP phosphodiesterase in Leber's congenital amaurosis.

    PubMed

    Perrault, I; Châtelin, S; Nancy, V; Rozet, J M; Gerber, S; Ghazi, I; Souied, E; Dufier, J L; Munnich, A; de Gunzburg, J; Kaplan, J

    1998-03-01

    Leber's congenital amaurosis (LCA) is the earliest and most severe of all inherited retinal dystrophies. Recently, we mapped an LCA gene to chromosome 17p13.1 (LCA1) and ascribed the disease to mutations of the retinal guanylate cyclase (ret GC) gene in a subset of families of North African ancestry. Owing to the genetic heterogeneity of LCA and considering that LCA1 results from an impaired production of cGMP in the retina (with permanent closure of cGMP-gated cation channels), we hypothesized that the activation of the cGMP phosphodiesterase (PDE) could trigger the disease by lowering the intracellular cGMP level in the retina. The rod and cone cGMP-PDE inhibitory subunits were regarded therefore as candidate genes in LCA. Here, we report the exclusion of five rod and cone cGMP-PDE subunits in LCA families unlinked to chromosome 17p13.

  2. Signal focusing through active transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godec, Aljaž; Metzler, Ralf

    2015-07-01

    The accuracy of molecular signaling in biological cells and novel diagnostic devices is ultimately limited by the counting noise floor imposed by the thermal diffusion. Motivated by the fact that messenger RNA and vesicle-engulfed signaling molecules transiently bind to molecular motors and are actively transported in biological cells, we show here that the random active delivery of signaling particles to within a typical diffusion distance to the receptor generically reduces the correlation time of the counting noise. Considering a variety of signaling particle sizes from mRNA to vesicles and cell sizes from prokaryotic to eukaryotic cells, we show that the conditions for active focusing—faster and more precise signaling—are indeed compatible with observations in living cells. Our results improve the understanding of molecular cellular signaling and novel diagnostic devices.

  3. Sildenafil citrate increases myocardial cGMP content in rat heart, decreases its hypertrophic response to isoproterenol and decreases myocardial leak of creatine kinase and troponin T

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Madiha AH; Ketat, Amal F

    2005-01-01

    Background Cardiac hypertrophy is a major risk factor for morbidity and mortality in a number of cardiovascular diseases. Consequently, the signaling pathways that inhibit cardiac hypertrophy are currently receiving much interest. Among them, nitric oxide (NO), signaling via cGMP and cGMP-dependent protein kinase I, has been recognized as a negative regulator of cardiac hypertrophy. The present study investigated the in-vivo effect of sildenafil as a phosphodiestrase-5A (PDE-5A) inhibitor on the hypertrophic response of rat heart to isoproterenol and the relation of this effect to the level of myocardial cGMP and integrity of the constitutive nitric oxide synthase (cNOS) activity. Results The results showed that daily intraperitoneal administration of sildenafil per se for 10 days was without noticeable adverse effects on survival or myocardium. Conversely, daily subcutaneous administration of isoproterenol for 10 days caused significant myocardial hypertrophy, cell injury and decline in survival. When sildenafil was injected daily, one hour before isoproterenol, survival was significantly improved and the myocardium didn't show significant hypertrophy or cell injury. Interestingly, sildenafil was accompanied by significant rise in myocardial cGMP level, a parameter which was found in the present study to possess a significant negative correlation with cardiac hypertrophy and leak of cardiac troponin T into serum. At the same time, cGMP was found to possess a positive correlation with myocardial creatine kinase activity that reflects the efficiency of the energy utilization processes in the myocardium. However, in rats given Nω-nitro-L-arginine (L-NNA) as a competitive inhibitor of cNOS, sildenafil failed to show any favorable effect on survival or the myocardial injury parameters used to assess isoproterenol-induced injury. Conclusion The present study suggests that increased cardiac cGMP level by sildenafil have a cardioprotective effect probably through acting

  4. Intercellular signaling via cyclic GMP diffusion through gap junctions restarts meiosis in mouse ovarian follicles.

    PubMed

    Shuhaibar, Leia C; Egbert, Jeremy R; Norris, Rachael P; Lampe, Paul D; Nikolaev, Viacheslav O; Thunemann, Martin; Wen, Lai; Feil, Robert; Jaffe, Laurinda A

    2015-04-28

    Meiosis in mammalian oocytes is paused until luteinizing hormone (LH) activates receptors in the mural granulosa cells of the ovarian follicle. Prior work has established the central role of cyclic GMP (cGMP) from the granulosa cells in maintaining meiotic arrest, but it is not clear how binding of LH to receptors that are located up to 10 cell layers away from the oocyte lowers oocyte cGMP and restarts meiosis. Here, by visualizing intercellular trafficking of cGMP in real-time in live follicles from mice expressing a FRET sensor, we show that diffusion of cGMP through gap junctions is responsible not only for maintaining meiotic arrest, but also for rapid transmission of the signal that reinitiates meiosis from the follicle surface to the oocyte. Before LH exposure, the cGMP concentration throughout the follicle is at a uniformly high level of ∼2-4 μM. Then, within 1 min of LH application, cGMP begins to decrease in the peripheral granulosa cells. As a consequence, cGMP from the oocyte diffuses into the sink provided by the large granulosa cell volume, such that by 20 min the cGMP concentration in the follicle is uniformly low, ∼100 nM. The decrease in cGMP in the oocyte relieves the inhibition of the meiotic cell cycle. This direct demonstration that a physiological signal initiated by a stimulus in one region of an intact tissue can travel across many layers of cells via cyclic nucleotide diffusion through gap junctions could provide a general mechanism for diverse cellular processes.

  5. Intercellular signaling via cyclic GMP diffusion through gap junctions restarts meiosis in mouse ovarian follicles

    PubMed Central

    Shuhaibar, Leia C.; Egbert, Jeremy R.; Norris, Rachael P.; Lampe, Paul D.; Nikolaev, Viacheslav O.; Thunemann, Martin; Wen, Lai; Feil, Robert; Jaffe, Laurinda A.

    2015-01-01

    Meiosis in mammalian oocytes is paused until luteinizing hormone (LH) activates receptors in the mural granulosa cells of the ovarian follicle. Prior work has established the central role of cyclic GMP (cGMP) from the granulosa cells in maintaining meiotic arrest, but it is not clear how binding of LH to receptors that are located up to 10 cell layers away from the oocyte lowers oocyte cGMP and restarts meiosis. Here, by visualizing intercellular trafficking of cGMP in real-time in live follicles from mice expressing a FRET sensor, we show that diffusion of cGMP through gap junctions is responsible not only for maintaining meiotic arrest, but also for rapid transmission of the signal that reinitiates meiosis from the follicle surface to the oocyte. Before LH exposure, the cGMP concentration throughout the follicle is at a uniformly high level of ∼2–4 μM. Then, within 1 min of LH application, cGMP begins to decrease in the peripheral granulosa cells. As a consequence, cGMP from the oocyte diffuses into the sink provided by the large granulosa cell volume, such that by 20 min the cGMP concentration in the follicle is uniformly low, ∼100 nM. The decrease in cGMP in the oocyte relieves the inhibition of the meiotic cell cycle. This direct demonstration that a physiological signal initiated by a stimulus in one region of an intact tissue can travel across many layers of cells via cyclic nucleotide diffusion through gap junctions could provide a general mechanism for diverse cellular processes. PMID:25775542

  6. Cyclic GMP is involved in auxin signalling during Arabidopsis root growth and development

    PubMed Central

    Nan, Wenbin; Wang, Xiaomin; Bi, Yurong

    2014-01-01

    The second messenger cyclic guanosine 3′,5′-monophosphate (cGMP) plays an important role in plant development and responses to stress. Recent studies indicated that cGMP is a secondary signal generated in response to auxin stimulation. cGMP also mediates auxin-induced adventitious root formation in mung bean and gravitropic bending in soybean. Nonetheless, the mechanism of the participation of cGMP in auxin signalling to affect these growth and developmental processes is largely unknown. In this report we provide evidence that indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) induces cGMP accumulation in Arabidopsis roots through modulation of the guanylate cyclase activity. Application of 8-bromo-cGMP (a cell-permeable cGMP derivative) increases auxin-dependent lateral root formation, root hair development, primary root growth, and gene expression. In contrast, inhibitors of endogenous cGMP synthesis block these processes induced by auxin. Data also showed that 8-bromo-cGMP enhances auxin-induced degradation of Aux/IAA protein modulated by the SCFTIR1 ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Furthermore, it was found that 8-bromo-cGMP is unable to directly influence the auxin-dependent TIR1-Aux/IAA interaction as evidenced by pull-down and yeast two-hybrid assays. In addition, we provide evidence for cGMP-mediated modulation of auxin signalling through cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG). Our results suggest that cGMP acts as a mediator to participate in auxin signalling and may govern this process by PKG activity via its influence on auxin-regulated gene expression and auxin/IAA degradation. PMID:24591051

  7. Cyclic GMP is involved in auxin signalling during Arabidopsis root growth and development.

    PubMed

    Nan, Wenbin; Wang, Xiaomin; Yang, Lei; Hu, Yanfeng; Wei, Yuantao; Liang, Xiaolei; Mao, Lina; Bi, Yurong

    2014-04-01

    The second messenger cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cGMP) plays an important role in plant development and responses to stress. Recent studies indicated that cGMP is a secondary signal generated in response to auxin stimulation. cGMP also mediates auxin-induced adventitious root formation in mung bean and gravitropic bending in soybean. Nonetheless, the mechanism of the participation of cGMP in auxin signalling to affect these growth and developmental processes is largely unknown. In this report we provide evidence that indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) induces cGMP accumulation in Arabidopsis roots through modulation of the guanylate cyclase activity. Application of 8-bromo-cGMP (a cell-permeable cGMP derivative) increases auxin-dependent lateral root formation, root hair development, primary root growth, and gene expression. In contrast, inhibitors of endogenous cGMP synthesis block these processes induced by auxin. Data also showed that 8-bromo-cGMP enhances auxin-induced degradation of Aux/IAA protein modulated by the SCF(TIR1) ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Furthermore, it was found that 8-bromo-cGMP is unable to directly influence the auxin-dependent TIR1-Aux/IAA interaction as evidenced by pull-down and yeast two-hybrid assays. In addition, we provide evidence for cGMP-mediated modulation of auxin signalling through cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG). Our results suggest that cGMP acts as a mediator to participate in auxin signalling and may govern this process by PKG activity via its influence on auxin-regulated gene expression and auxin/IAA degradation.

  8. Guanylyl cyclase/natriuretic peptide receptor-A signaling antagonizes phosphoinositide hydrolysis, Ca2+ release, and activation of protein kinase C

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Kailash N.

    2014-01-01

    Thus far, three related natriuretic peptides (NPs) and three distinct sub-types of cognate NP receptors have been identified and characterized based on the specific ligand binding affinities, guanylyl cyclase activity, and generation of intracellular cGMP. Atrial and brain natriuretic peptides (ANP and BNP) specifically bind and activate guanylyl cyclase/natriuretic peptide receptor-A (GC-A/NPRA), and C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) shows specificity to activate guanylyl cyclase/natriuretic peptide receptor-B (GC-B/NPRB). All three NPs bind to natriuretic peptide receptor-C (NPRC), which is also known as clearance or silent receptor. The NPRA is considered the principal biologically active receptor of NP family; however, the molecular signaling mechanisms of NP receptors are not well understood. The activation of NPRA and NPRB produces the intracellular second messenger cGMP, which serves as the major signaling molecule of all three NPs. The activation of NPRB in response to CNP also produces the intracellular cGMP; however, at lower magnitude than that of NPRA, which is activated by ANP and BNP. In addition to enhanced accumulation of intracellular cGMP in response to all three NPs, the levels of cAMP, Ca2+ and inositol triphosphate (IP3) have also been reported to be altered in different cells and tissue types. Interestingly, ANP has been found to lower the concentrations of cAMP, Ca2+, and IP3; however, NPRC has been proposed to increase the levels of these metabolic signaling molecules. The mechanistic studies of decreased and/or increased levels of cAMP, Ca2+, and IP3 in response to NPs and their receptors have not yet been clearly established. This review focuses on the signaling mechanisms of ANP/NPRA and their biological effects involving an increased level of intracellular accumulation of cGMP and a decreased level of cAMP, Ca2+, and IP3 in different cells and tissue systems. PMID:25202235

  9. Guanylyl cyclase/natriuretic peptide receptor-A signaling antagonizes phosphoinositide hydrolysis, Ca(2+) release, and activation of protein kinase C.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Kailash N

    2014-01-01

    Thus far, three related natriuretic peptides (NPs) and three distinct sub-types of cognate NP receptors have been identified and characterized based on the specific ligand binding affinities, guanylyl cyclase activity, and generation of intracellular cGMP. Atrial and brain natriuretic peptides (ANP and BNP) specifically bind and activate guanylyl cyclase/natriuretic peptide receptor-A (GC-A/NPRA), and C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) shows specificity to activate guanylyl cyclase/natriuretic peptide receptor-B (GC-B/NPRB). All three NPs bind to natriuretic peptide receptor-C (NPRC), which is also known as clearance or silent receptor. The NPRA is considered the principal biologically active receptor of NP family; however, the molecular signaling mechanisms of NP receptors are not well understood. The activation of NPRA and NPRB produces the intracellular second messenger cGMP, which serves as the major signaling molecule of all three NPs. The activation of NPRB in response to CNP also produces the intracellular cGMP; however, at lower magnitude than that of NPRA, which is activated by ANP and BNP. In addition to enhanced accumulation of intracellular cGMP in response to all three NPs, the levels of cAMP, Ca(2+) and inositol triphosphate (IP3) have also been reported to be altered in different cells and tissue types. Interestingly, ANP has been found to lower the concentrations of cAMP, Ca(2+), and IP3; however, NPRC has been proposed to increase the levels of these metabolic signaling molecules. The mechanistic studies of decreased and/or increased levels of cAMP, Ca(2+), and IP3 in response to NPs and their receptors have not yet been clearly established. This review focuses on the signaling mechanisms of ANP/NPRA and their biological effects involving an increased level of intracellular accumulation of cGMP and a decreased level of cAMP, Ca(2+), and IP3 in different cells and tissue systems.

  10. Ca2+ signaling by plant Arabidopsis thaliana Pep peptides depends on AtPepR1, a receptor with guanylyl cyclase activity, and cGMP-activated Ca2+ channels

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Zhi; Verma, Rajeev; Gehring, Chris; Yamaguchi, Yube; Zhao, Yichen; Ryan, Clarence A.; Berkowitz, Gerald A.

    2010-01-01

    A family of peptide signaling molecules (AtPeps) and their plasma membrane receptor AtPepR1 are known to act in pathogen-defense signaling cascades in plants. Little is currently known about the molecular mechanisms that link these signaling peptides and their receptor, a leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinase, to downstream pathogen-defense responses. We identify some cellular activities of these molecules that provide the context for a model for their action in signaling cascades. AtPeps activate plasma membrane inwardly conducting Ca2+ permeable channels in mesophyll cells, resulting in cytosolic Ca2+ elevation. This activity is dependent on their receptor as well as a cyclic nucleotide-gated channel (CNGC2). We also show that the leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinase receptor AtPepR1 has guanylyl cyclase activity, generating cGMP from GTP, and that cGMP can activate CNGC2-dependent cytosolic Ca2+ elevation. AtPep-dependent expression of pathogen-defense genes (PDF1.2, MPK3, and WRKY33) is mediated by the Ca2+ signaling pathway associated with AtPep peptides and their receptor. The work presented here indicates that extracellular AtPeps, which can act as danger-associated molecular patterns, signal by interaction with their receptor, AtPepR1, a plasma membrane protein that can generate cGMP. Downstream from AtPep and AtPepR1 in a signaling cascade, the cGMP-activated channel CNGC2 is involved in AtPep- and AtPepR1-dependent inward Ca2+ conductance and resulting cytosolic Ca2+ elevation. The signaling cascade initiated by AtPeps leads to expression of pathogen-defense genes in a Ca2+-dependent manner. PMID:21088220

  11. Meeting report of the 8(th) International Conference on cGMP "cGMP: generators, effectors, and therapeutic implications" at Bamberg, Germany, from June 23 to 25, 2017.

    PubMed

    Friebe, Andreas; Sandner, Peter; Schmidtko, Achim

    2017-10-10

    Although the Nobel Prize for the discovery of nitric oxide (NO) dates back almost 20 years now, the knowledge about cGMP signaling is still constantly increasing. It looks even so that our understanding of the role of the soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) and particulate guanylyl cyclase (pGC) in health and disease is in many aspects at the beginning and far from being understood. This holds even true for the therapeutic impact of innovative drugs acting on both the NO/sGC and the pGC pathways. Since cGMP, as second messenger, is involved in the pathogenesis of numerous diseases within the cardiovascular, pulmonary, renal, and endocrine systems and also plays a role in neuronal, sensory, and tumor processes, drug applications might be quite broad. On the 8th International Conference on cGMP, held in Bamberg, Germany, world leading experts came together to discuss these topics. All aspects of cGMP research from the basic understanding of cGMP signaling to clinical applicability were discussed in depth. In addition, present and future therapeutic applications of cGMP-modulating pharmacotherapy were presented ( http://www.cyclicgmp.net/index.html ).

  12. Nitric Oxide Participates in Cold-Inhibited Camellia sinensis Pollen Germination and Tube Growth Partly via cGMP In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Zhu-Ge, Qiang; Jiang, Xin; Wang, Wei-Dong; Fang, Wan-Ping; Chen, Xuan; Li, Xing-Hui

    2012-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) plays essential roles in many biotic and abiotic stresses in plant development procedures, including pollen tube growth. Here, effects of NO on cold stress inhibited pollen germination and tube growth in Camellia sinensis were investigated in vitro. The NO production, NO synthase (NOS)-like activity, cGMP content and proline (Pro) accumulation upon treatment with NO scavenger cPTIO, NOS inhibitor L-NNA, NO donor DEA NONOate, guanylate cyclase (GC) inhibitor ODQ or phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitor Viagra at 25°C (control) or 4°C were analyzed. Exposure to 4°C for 2 h reduced pollen germination and tube growth along with increase of NOS-like activity, NO production and cGMP content in pollen tubes. DEA NONOate treatment inhibited pollen germination and tube growth in a dose-dependent manner under control and reinforced the inhibition under cold stress, during which NO production and cGMP content promoted in pollen tubes. L-NNA and cPTIO markedly reduced the generation of NO induced by cold or NO donor along with partly reverse of cold- or NO donor-inhibited pollen germination and tube growth. Furthermore, ODQ reduced the cGMP content under cold stress and NO donor treatment in pollen tubes. Meanwhile, ODQ disrupted the reinforcement of NO donor on the inhibition of pollen germination and tube growth under cold condition. Additionally, Pro accumulation of pollen tubes was reduced by ODQ compared with that receiving NO donor under cold or control condition. Effects of cPTIO and L-NNA in improving cold-treated pollen germination and pollen tube growth could be lowered by Viagra. Moreover, the inhibitory effects of cPTIO and L-NNA on Pro accumulation were partly reversed by Viagra. These data suggest that NO production from NOS-like enzyme reaction decreased the cold-responsive pollen germination, inhibited tube growth and reduced Pro accumulation, partly via cGMP signaling pathway in C. sinensis. PMID:23272244

  13. Disrupted pulmonary artery cyclic guanosine monophosphate signaling in mice with hyperoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Lee, Keng Jin; Berkelhamer, Sara K; Kim, Gina A; Taylor, Joann M; O'Shea, Kelly M; Steinhorn, Robin H; Farrow, Kathryn N

    2014-02-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) occurs in 25 to 35% of premature infants with significant bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). Neonatal mice exposed to 14 days of hyperoxia develop BPD-like lung injury and PH. To determinne the impact of hyperoxia on pulmonary artery (PA) cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) signaling in a murine model of lung injury and PH, neonatal C57BL/6 mice were placed in room air, 75% O2 for 14 days (chronic hyperoxia [CH]) or 75% O2 for 24 hours, followed by 13 days of room air (acute hyperoxia with recovery [AHR]) with or without sildenafil. At 14 days, mean alveolar area, PA medial wall thickness (MWT), right ventricular hypertrophy (RVH), and vessel density were assessed. PA protein was analyzed for cGMP, soluble guanylate cyclase, and PDE5 activity. CH and AHR mice had RVH, but only CH mice had increased alveolar area and MWT and decreased vessel density. In CH and AHR PAs, soluble guanylate cyclase activity was decreased, and PDE5 activity was increased. In CH mice, sildenafil attenuated MWT and RVH but did not improve mean alveolar area or vessel density. In CH and AHR PAs, sildenafil decreased PDE5 activity and increased cGMP. Our results indicate that prolonged hyperoxia leads to lung injury, PH, RVH, and disrupted PA cGMP signaling. Furthermore, 24 hours of hyperoxia causes RVH and disrupted PA cGMP signaling that persists for 13 days. Sildenafil reduced RVH and restored vascular cGMP signaling but did not attenuate lung injury. Thus, hyperoxia can rapidly disrupt PA cGMP signaling in vivo with sustained effects, and concurrent sildenafil therapy can be protective.

  14. A historical perspective on the lateral diffusion model of GTPase activation and related coupling of membrane signaling proteins

    PubMed Central

    Liebman, Paul A

    2014-01-01

    Aspects of our discovery of lateral diffusion of the G protein coupled receptor (GPCR) rhodopsin and that a single activated rhodopsin can non-covalently catalyze GTP binding to thousands of GTPases per second on rod disk membranes via this diffusion are summarized herein. Rapid GTPase coupling to membrane-bound phosphodiesterase (PDE) further amplifies the signal via cGMP hydrolysis, essential to visual transduction. Important generalizations from this work are that biomembranes can uniquely concentrate, orient for reaction and provide a solvent appropriate to rapid, powerful and appropriately controlled sequential interaction of signaling proteins. Of equal importance to function is timely control and termination of such powerful amplification via receptor phosphorylation (quenching) and arrestin binding. Downstream kinetic modulation by GTPase activating proteins (GAPs) and regulators of G protein signaling (RGS) and related mechanisms as well as limitations set by membrane domain fencing, structural protein binding etc. can be essential in relevant systems. PMID:25279248

  15. Systems Pharmacology and Rational Polypharmacy: Nitric Oxide−Cyclic GMP Signaling Pathway as an Illustrative Example and Derivation of the General Case

    PubMed Central

    Garmaroudi, Farshid S.; Handy, Diane E.; Liu, Yang-Yu; Loscalzo, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Impaired nitric oxide (NO˙)-cyclic guanosine 3', 5'-monophosphate (cGMP) signaling has been observed in many cardiovascular disorders, including heart failure and pulmonary arterial hypertension. There are several enzymatic determinants of cGMP levels in this pathway, including soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) itself, the NO˙-activated form of sGC, and phosphodiesterase(s) (PDE). Therapies for some of these disorders with PDE inhibitors have been successful at increasing cGMP levels in both cardiac and vascular tissues. However, at the systems level, it is not clear whether perturbation of PDE alone, under oxidative stress, is the best approach for increasing cGMP levels as compared with perturbation of other potential pathway targets, either alone or in combination. Here, we develop a model-based approach to perturbing this pathway, focusing on single reactions, pairs of reactions, or trios of reactions as targets, then monitoring the theoretical effects of these interventions on cGMP levels. Single perturbations of all reaction steps within this pathway demonstrated that three reaction steps, including the oxidation of sGC, NO˙ dissociation from sGC, and cGMP degradation by PDE, exerted a dominant influence on cGMP accumulation relative to other reaction steps. Furthermore, among all possible single, paired, and triple perturbations of this pathway, the combined perturbations of these three reaction steps had the greatest impact on cGMP accumulation. These computational findings were confirmed in cell-based experiments. We conclude that a combined perturbation of the oxidatively-impaired NO˙-cGMP signaling pathway is a better approach to the restoration of cGMP levels as compared with corresponding individual perturbations. This approach may also yield improved therapeutic responses in other complex pharmacologically amenable pathways. PMID:26985825

  16. Regulation of cGMP levels by guanylate cyclase in truncated frog rod outer segments

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    Cyclic GMP is the second messenger in phototransduction and regulates the photoreceptor current. In the present work, we tried to understand the regulation mechanism of cytoplasmic cGMP levels in frog photoreceptors by measuring the photoreceptor current using a truncated rod outer segment (tROS) preparation. Since exogenously applied substance diffuses into tROS from the truncated end, we could examine the biochemical reactions relating to the cGMP metabolism by manipulating the cytoplasmic chemical condition. In tROS, exogenously applied GTP produced a dark current whose amplitude was half-maximal at approximately 0.4 mM GTP. The conductance for this current was suppressed by light in a fashion similar to when it is activated by cGMP. In addition, no current was produced in the absence of Mg2+, which is known to be necessary for the guanylate cyclase activity. These results indicate that guanylate cyclase was present in tROS and synthesized cGMP from exogenously applied GTP. The enzyme activity was distributed throughout the rod outer segment. The amount of synthesized cGMP increased as the cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration of tROS decreased, which indicated the activation of guanylate cyclase at low Ca2+ concentrations. Half-maximal effect of Ca2+ was observed at approximately 100 nM. tROS contained the proteins involved in the phototransduction mechanism and therefore, we could examine the regulation of the light response waveform by Ca2+. At low Ca2+ concentrations, the time course of the light response was speeded up probably because cGMP recovery was facilitated by activation of the cyclase. Then, if the cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration of a photoreceptor decreases during light stimulation, the Ca2+ decrease may explain the acceleration of the light response during light adaptation. In tROS, however, we did observe an acceleration during repetitive light flashes when the cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration increased during the stimulation. This result suggests the

  17. Light-dependent channels from excised patches of Limulus ventral photoreceptors are opened by cGMP.

    PubMed Central

    Bacigalupo, J; Johnson, E C; Vergara, C; Lisman, J E

    1991-01-01

    The identity of the second messenger that directly activates the light-dependent conductance in invertebrate photoreceptors remains unclear; the available evidence provides some support for cGMP and Ca2+. To resolve this issue we have applied these second messengers to membrane patches excised from the light-sensitive lobe of Limulus ventral photoreceptors. Our results show that these patches contain channels that can be opened by cGMP, but not by Ca2+. These cGMP-activated channels closely resemble the channels activated by light in cell-attached patches. This evidence suggests that cGMP is the messenger that opens the light-dependent channel in invertebrate photoreceptors. PMID:1716765

  18. Acylcarnitines activate proinflammatory signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Rutkowsky, Jennifer M; Knotts, Trina A; Ono-Moore, Kikumi D; McCoin, Colin S; Huang, Shurong; Schneider, Dina; Singh, Shamsher; Adams, Sean H; Hwang, Daniel H

    2014-06-15

    Incomplete β-oxidation of fatty acids in mitochondria is a feature of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Previous studies revealed that plasma concentrations of medium- and long-chain acylcarnitines (by-products of incomplete β-oxidation) are elevated in T2DM and insulin resistance. In a previous study, we reported that mixed D,L isomers of C12- or C14-carnitine induced an NF-κB-luciferase reporter gene in RAW 264.7 cells, suggesting potential activation of proinflammatory pathways. Here, we determined whether the physiologically relevant L-acylcarnitines activate classical proinflammatory signaling pathways and if these outcomes involve pattern recognition receptor (PRR)-associated pathways. Acylcarnitines induced the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 in a chain length-dependent manner in RAW 264.7 cells. L-C14 carnitine (5-25 μM), used as a representative acylcarnitine, stimulated the expression and secretion of proinflammatory cytokines in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, L-C14 carnitine induced phosphorylation of JNK and ERK, common downstream components of many proinflammatory signaling pathways including PRRs. Knockdown of MyD88, a key cofactor in PRR signaling and inflammation, blunted the proinflammatory effects of acylcarnitine. While these results point to potential involvement of PRRs, L-C14 carnitine promoted IL-8 secretion from human epithelial cells (HCT-116) lacking Toll-like receptors (TLR)2 and -4, and did not activate reporter constructs in TLR overexpression cell models. Thus, acylcarnitines have the potential to activate inflammation, but the specific molecular and tissue target(s) involved remain to be identified.

  19. Acylcarnitines activate proinflammatory signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Rutkowsky, Jennifer M.; Knotts, Trina A.; Ono-Moore, Kikumi D.; McCoin, Colin S.; Huang, Shurong; Schneider, Dina; Singh, Shamsher; Hwang, Daniel H.

    2014-01-01

    Incomplete β-oxidation of fatty acids in mitochondria is a feature of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Previous studies revealed that plasma concentrations of medium- and long-chain acylcarnitines (by-products of incomplete β-oxidation) are elevated in T2DM and insulin resistance. In a previous study, we reported that mixed d,l isomers of C12- or C14-carnitine induced an NF-κB-luciferase reporter gene in RAW 264.7 cells, suggesting potential activation of proinflammatory pathways. Here, we determined whether the physiologically relevant l-acylcarnitines activate classical proinflammatory signaling pathways and if these outcomes involve pattern recognition receptor (PRR)-associated pathways. Acylcarnitines induced the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 in a chain length-dependent manner in RAW 264.7 cells. l-C14 carnitine (5–25 μM), used as a representative acylcarnitine, stimulated the expression and secretion of proinflammatory cytokines in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, l-C14 carnitine induced phosphorylation of JNK and ERK, common downstream components of many proinflammatory signaling pathways including PRRs. Knockdown of MyD88, a key cofactor in PRR signaling and inflammation, blunted the proinflammatory effects of acylcarnitine. While these results point to potential involvement of PRRs, l-C14 carnitine promoted IL-8 secretion from human epithelial cells (HCT-116) lacking Toll-like receptors (TLR)2 and -4, and did not activate reporter constructs in TLR overexpression cell models. Thus, acylcarnitines have the potential to activate inflammation, but the specific molecular and tissue target(s) involved remain to be identified. PMID:24760988

  20. Glutamine inhibits ammonia-induced accumulation of cGMP in rat striatum limiting arginine supply for NO synthesis.

    PubMed

    Hilgier, Wojciech; Freśko, Inez; Klemenska, Emilia; Beresewicz, Andrzej; Oja, Simo S; Saransaari, Pirjo; Albrecht, Jan; Zielińska, Magdalena

    2009-07-01

    Brain L-glutamine (Gln) accumulation and increased activity of the NO/cGMP pathway are immediate consequences of acute exposure to ammonia. This study tested whether excess Gln may influence NO and/or cGMP synthesis. Intrastriatal administration of the glutaminase inhibitor 6-diazo-5-oxo-L-norleucine or the system A-specific Gln uptake inhibitor methylaminoisobutyrate increased microdialysate Gln concentration and reduced basal and ammonia-induced NO and cGMP accumulation. Gln applied in vivo (via microdialysis) or in vitro (to rat brain cortical slices) reduced NO and cGMP accumulation in the presence and/or absence of ammonia, but not cGMP synthesis induced by the NO donor sodium nitroprusside. Attenuation of cGMP synthesis by Gln was prevented by administration of L-arginine (Arg). The L-arginine co-substrates of y(+)LAT2 transport system, L-leucine and cyclo-leucine, mimicked the effect of exogenous Gln, suggesting that Gln limits Arg supply for NO synthesis by interfering with y+LAT2-mediated Arg uptake across the cell membrane.

  1. Aging has the opposite effect on cAMP and cGMP circadian variations in rat Leydig cells.

    PubMed

    Baburski, Aleksandar Z; Sokanovic, Srdjan J; Andric, Silvana A; Kostic, Tatjana S

    2017-05-01

    The Leydig cell physiology displays a circadian rhythm driven by a complex interaction of the reproductive axis hormones and circadian system. The final output of this regulatory process is circadian pattern of steroidogenic genes expression and testosterone production. Aging gradually decreases robustness of rhythmic testosterone secretion without change in pattern of LH secretion. Here, we analyzed effect of aging on circadian variation of cAMP and cGMP signaling in Leydig cells. Results showed opposite effect of aging on cAMP and cGMP daily variation. Reduced amplitude of cAMP circadian oscillation was probably associated with changed expression of genes involved in cAMP production (increased circadian pattern of Adcy7, Adcy9, Adcy10 and decreased Adcy3); cAMP degradation (increased Pde4a, decreased Pde8b, canceled rhythm of Pde4d, completely reversed circadian pattern of Pde7b and Pde8a); and circadian expression of protein kinase A subunits (Prkac/PRKAC and Prkar2a). Aging stimulates expression of genes responsible for cGMP production (Nos2, Gucy1a3 and Gucy1b3/GUCYB3) and degradation (Pde5a, Pde6a and Pde6h) but the overall net effect is elevation of cGMP circadian oscillations in Leydig cells. In addition, the expression of cGMP-dependent kinase, Prkg1/PRKG1 is up-regulated. It seems that aging potentiate cGMP- and reduce cAMP-signaling in Leydig cells. Since both signaling pathways affect testosterone production and clockwork in the cells, further insights into these signaling pathways will help to unravel disorders linked to the circadian timing system, aging and reproduction.

  2. Basal cGMP regulates the resting pacemaker potential frequency of cultured mouse colonic interstitial cells of Cajal.

    PubMed

    Shahi, Pawan Kumar; Choi, Seok; Jeong, Yu Jin; Park, Chan Guk; So, Insuk; Jun, Jae Yeoul

    2014-07-01

    Cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cGMP) inhibited the generation of pacemaker activity in interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs) from the small intestine. However, cGMP role on pacemaker activity in colonic ICCs has not been reported yet. Thus, we investigated the role of cGMP in pacemaker activity regulation by colonic ICCs. We performed a whole-cell patch-clamp and Ca(2+) imaging in cultured ICCs from mouse colon. 1H-[1,2,4]Oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ, an inhibitor of guanylate cyclase) increased the pacemaker potential frequency, whereas zaprinast (an inhibitor of phosphodiesterase) and cell-permeable 8-bromo-cGMP decreased the pacemaker potential frequency. KT-5823 (an inhibitor of protein kinase G [PKG]) did not affect the pacemaker potential. L-N(G)-nitroarginine methyl ester (L-NAME, an inhibitor of nitric oxide [NO] synthase) increased the pacemaker potential frequency, whereas (±)-S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP, a NO donor) decreased the pacemaker potential frequency. Glibenclamide (an ATP-sensitive K(+) channel blocker) did not block the effects of cell-permeable 8-bromo-cGMP and SNAP. Recordings of spontaneous intracellular Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]i) oscillations revealed that ODQ and L-NAME increased [Ca(2+)]i oscillations. In contrast, zaprinast, 8-bromo cGMP, and SNAP decreased the [Ca(2+)]i oscillations. Basal cGMP levels regulate the resting pacemaker potential frequency by the alteration on Ca(2+) release via a PKG-independent pathway. Additionally, the endogenous release of NO seems to be responsible maintaining basal cGMP levels in colonic ICCs.

  3. Extracellular cGMP Modulates Learning Biphasically by Modulating Glycine Receptors, CaMKII and Glutamate-Nitric Oxide-cGMP Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Cabrera-Pastor, Andrea; Malaguarnera, Michele; Taoro-Gonzalez, Lucas; Llansola, Marta; Felipo, Vicente

    2016-01-01

    It has been proposed that extracellular cGMP modulates the ability to learn a Y maze task, but the underlying mechanisms remained unknown. Here we show that extracellular cGMP, at physiological concentrations, modulates learning in the Y maze in a biphasic way by modulating the glutamate-nitric oxide-cGMP pathway in cerebellum. Extracellular cGMP reduces glycine receptors activation inducing a voltage-dependent calcium-channels-mediated increase of calcium in Purkinje neurons. This calcium increase modulates CaMKII phosphorylation in a biphasic way. When basal calcium concentration is low extracellular cGMP reduces CaMKII phosphorylation, increasing nitric oxide synthase activity, the glutamate-NO-cGMP pathway function and learning ability. When basal calcium is normal extracellular cGMP increases CaMKII phosphorylation, reducing nitric oxide synthase activity, the pathway function and learning. These data unveil new mechanisms modulating learning in the Y maze and likely other learning types which may be therapeutic targets to improve learning in pathological situations associated with altered cGMP levels. PMID:27634333

  4. Hypergravity differentially modulates cGMP efflux in human melanocytic cells stimulated by nitric oxide and natriuretic peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanova, K.; Stieber, C.; Lambers, B.; Block, I.; Krieg, R.; Wellmann, A.; Gerzer, R.

    Nitric oxide NO plays a key role in many patho physiologic processes including inflammation and skin cancer The diverse cellular effects of NO are mainly mediated by activation of the soluble guanylyl cyclase sGC isoform that leads to increases in intracellular cGMP levels whereas the membrane-bound isoforms serve as receptors for natriuretic peptides e g ANP In human skin epidermal melanocytes represent the principal cells for skin pigmentation by synthesizing the pigment melanin Melanin acts as a scavenger for free radicals that may arise during metabolic stress as a result of potentially harmful effects of the environment In previous studies we found that long-term exposure to hypergravity stimulated cGMP efflux in normal human melanocytes NHMs and non-metastatic melanoma cells at least partly by an enhanced expression of the multidrug resistance proteins MRP and cGMP transporters MRP4 5 The present study investigated whether hypergravity generated by centrifugal acceleration may modulate the cGMP efflux in NO-stimulated NHMs and melanoma cells MCs with different metastatic potential The NONOates PAPA-NO and DETA-NO were used as direct NO donors for cell stimulation In the presence of 0 1 mM DETA-NO t 1 2 sim 20 h long-term application of hypergravity up to 5 g for 24 h reduced intracellular cGMP levels by stimulating cGMP efflux in NHMs and non-metastatic MCs in comparison to 1 g whereas exposure to 5 g for 6 h in the presence of 0 1 mM PAPA-NO t 1 2 sim 30 min was not effective The hypergravity-stimulated

  5. Activation of the cGMP/nitric oxide signal transduction system by nicotine in the retina.

    PubMed

    Blute, Todd A; Strang, Christianne; Keyser, Kent T; Eldred, William D

    2003-01-01

    Acetylcholine is one of the primary excitatory neurotransmitters/neuromodulators in the retina, but little is known about the downstream signaling pathways it can activate. The present study immunocytochemically examines the potential sources of acetylcholine and the location of the nicotinic cholinergic receptors in the turtle retina. It also examines how activation of these receptors can influence the nitric oxide (NO)/cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) signal-transduction pathways. Photoreceptors, amacrine cells, and potentially ganglion cells contain choline acetyltransferase-like immunoreactivity (LI). Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors are immunocytochemically localized on photoreceptors, horizontal, bipolar, and ganglion cells. Nitric oxide imaging indicates that stimulation with nicotine increases NO production primarily in photoreceptors, horizontal, Muller, bipolar, and ganglion cells. In turn, very select populations of amacrine cells respond to this NO with increased levels of cGMP-LI. Selective inhibitors reveal that nitric oxide synthase is involved in most, but not all, of these increases in cGMP-LI. These results show that acetylcholine can activate the NO/cGMP signal-transduction pathways in both the inner and outer retina. This indicates that both of the major excitatory retinal transmitters, glutamate and acetylcholine, can stimulate NO production that increases levels of cGMP-LI in overlapping populations of retinal cells.

  6. Transduction heats in retinal rods: tests of the role of cGMP by pyroelectric calorimetry.

    PubMed Central

    Hagins, W A; Ross, P D; Tate, R L; Yoshikami, S

    1989-01-01

    The sensory dark current of vertebrate retinal rods is believed to be controlled by light activation of a chain of coupled biochemical cycles that finally regulate the cationic conductance of the plasma membrane by hydrolytically reducing the level of cGMP in rod outer segment cytoplasm. The scheme has been tested by measuring heat production by live frog retinas when stimulated with sequences of light flashes of progressively increasing energy. Using pyroelectric poly(vinylidene 1,1-difluoride) detectors that simultaneously measure transretinal voltage and retinal temperature change, four heat effects assignable to known biochemical cycles in rods have been found. As the dark current shuts down after a flash causing 180-1800 rhodopsin photoisomerizations per rod, a heat burst, q1, raises the retinal temperature 1-2 microK. q1 is closely regulated in size and slightly precedes dark current shutdown. Isobutylmethylxanthine slows and enlarges q1, delaying the dark-current response. Increasing cytoplasmic Ca2+ stops the dark current without affecting q1. Although rod heat production is consistent with splitting of 1-3 microM of free cytoplasmic cGMP during transduction, the kinetics of the two processes do not match the predictions of current cGMP control models. PMID:2537492

  7. Notch activation augments nitric oxide/soluble guanylyl cyclase signaling in immortalized ovarian surface epithelial cells and ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    El-Sehemy, Ahmed; Chang, Alex C; Azad, Abul Kalam; Gupta, Nidhi; Xu, Zhihua; Steed, Helen; Karsan, Aly; Fu, YangXin

    2013-12-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is generated by tumor, stromal and endothelial cells and plays a multifaceted role in tumor biology. Many physiological functions of NO are mediated by soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) and NO/sGC signaling has been shown to promote proliferation and survival of ovarian cancer cells. However, how NO/sGC signaling is modulated in ovarian cancer cells has not been studied. The evolutionarily conserved Notch signaling pathway plays an oncogenic role in ovarian cancer. Here, we report that all three ovarian cancer cell lines we examined express a higher level of GUCY1B3 (the β subunit of sGC) compared to non-cancerous immortalized ovarian surface epithelial (IOSE) cell lines. Interestingly, the highest expression of GUCY1B3 in ovarian cancer OVCAR3 cells is concurrent with the expression of Notch3. In IOSE cells, forced activation of Notch3 increases the expression of GUCY1B3, NO-induced cGMP production, and the expression of cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG), thereby enhancing NO- and cGMP-induced phosphorylation of vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP, a direct PKG substrate protein). In contrast, inhibition of Notch by DAPT reduces GUCY1B3 expression and NO-induced cGMP production and VASP phosphorylation in OVCAR3 cells. Finally, we confirmed that inhibition of sGC by ODQ decreases growth of ovarian cancer cells. Together, our work demonstrates that Notch is a positive regulator of NO/sGC signaling in IOSE and ovarian cancer cells, providing the first evidence that Notch and NO signaling pathways interact in IOSE and ovarian cancer cells. © 2013.

  8. A new nonhydrolyzable reactive cGMP analogue, (Rp)-Guanosine-3′, 5′-cyclic-S-(4-bromo-2, 3-dioxobutyl)monophosphorothioate, which targets the cGMP binding site of human platelet PDE3A

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Su H.; Liu, Andy H.; Pixley, Robin A.; Francis, Penelope; Williams, LaTeeka D.; Matsko, Christopher M.; Barnes, Karine D.; Sivendran, Sharmila; Colman, Roberta F.; Colman, Robert W.

    2008-01-01

    The amino acids involved in substrate (cAMP) binding to human platelet cGMP-inhibited cAMP phosphodiesterase (PDE3A) are identified. Less is known about the inhibitor (cGMP) binding site. We have now synthesized a nonhydrolyzable reactive cGMP analog, Rp-guanosine-3′, 5′-cyclic-S-(4-bromo-2, 3-dioxobutyl)monophosphorothioate (Rp-cGMPS-BDB). Rp-cGMPS-BDB irreversibly inactivates PDE3A (KI = 43.4 ± 7.2 μM and kcart = 0.007 ± 0.0006 min−1). The effectiveness of protectants in decreasing the rate of inactivation by Rp-cGMPS-BDB is: Rp-cGMPS (Kd = 72 μM) > Sp-cGMPS (124), Sp-cAMPS (182) > GMP (1517), Rp-cAMPS (3762), AMP (4370 μM). NAD+, neither a substrate nor an inhibitor of PDE3A, does not protect. Nonhydrolyzable cGMP analogs exhibit greater affinity than the cAMP analogs. These results indicate that Rp-cGMPS-BDB targets favorably the cGMP binding site consistent with a docking model of PDE3A-Rp-cGMPS-BDB active site. We conclude that Rp-cGMPS-BDB is an effective active site-directed affinity label for PDE3A with potential for other cGMP-dependent enzymes. PMID:18394675

  9. A new nonhydrolyzable reactive cGMP analogue, (Rp)-guanosine-3',5'-cyclic-S-(4-bromo-2,3-dioxobutyl)monophosphorothioate, which targets the cGMP binding site of human platelet PDE3A.

    PubMed

    Hung, Su H; Liu, Andy H; Pixley, Robin A; Francis, Penelope; Williams, LaTeeka D; Matsko, Christopher M; Barnes, Karine D; Sivendran, Sharmila; Colman, Roberta F; Colman, Robert W

    2008-06-01

    The amino acids involved in substrate (cAMP) binding to human platelet cGMP-inhibited cAMP phosphodiesterase (PDE3A) are identified. Less is known about the inhibitor (cGMP) binding site. We have now synthesized a nonhydrolyzable reactive cGMP analog, Rp-guanosine-3',5'-cyclic-S-(4-bromo-2, 3-dioxobutyl)monophosphorothioate (Rp-cGMPS-BDB). Rp-cGMPS-BDB irreversibly inactivates PDE3A (K(I)=43.4+/-7.2muM and k(cart)=0.007+/-0.0006 min(-1)). The effectiveness of protectants in decreasing the rate of inactivation by Rp-cGMPS-BDB is: Rp-cGMPS (K(d)=72 microM)>Sp-cGMPS (124), Sp-cAMPS (182)>GMP (1517), Rp-cAMPS (3762), AMP (4370 microM). NAD(+), neither a substrate nor an inhibitor of PDE3A, does not protect. Nonhydrolyzable cGMP analogs exhibit greater affinity than the cAMP analogs. These results indicate that Rp-cGMPS-BDB targets favorably the cGMP binding site consistent with a docking model of PDE3A-Rp-cGMPS-BDB active site. We conclude that Rp-cGMPS-BDB is an effective active site-directed affinity label for PDE3A with potential for other cGMP-dependent enzymes.

  10. Alternative Wnt Signaling Activates YAP/TAZ

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyun Woo; Kim, Young Chul; Yu, Bo; Moroishi, Toshiro; Mo, Jung-Soon; Plouffe, Steven W.; Meng, Zhipeng; Lin, Kimberly C.; Yu, Fa-Xing; Alexander, Caroline M.; Wang, Cunyu; Guan, Kun-Liang

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The transcriptional co-activators YAP and TAZ are key regulators of organ size and tissue homeostasis, and their dysregulation contributes to human cancer. Here we discover YAP/TAZ as bona fide downstream effectors of the alternative Wnt signaling pathway. Wnt5a/b and Wnt3a induce YAP/TAZ activation independent of canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Mechanistically, we delineate the ‘alternative Wnt-YAP/TAZ signaling axis’ that consists of Wnt - FZD/ROR - Gα12/13 - Rho GTPases -Lats1/2 to promote YAP/TAZ activation and TEAD-mediated transcription. YAP/TAZ mediate the biological functions of alternative Wnt signaling including gene expression, osteogenic differentiation, cell migration, and antagonism of Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Together, our work establishes YAP/TAZ as critical mediators of alternative Wnt signaling. PMID:26276632

  11. Signaling during platelet adhesion and activation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhenyu; Delaney, M. Keegan; O’Brien, Kelly A.; Du, Xiaoping

    2011-01-01

    Upon vascular injury, platelets are activated by adhesion to adhesive proteins like von Willebrand factor and collagen, or by soluble platelet agonists like ADP, thrombin, and thromboxane A2. These adhesive proteins and soluble agonists induce signal transduction via their respective receptors. The various receptor-specific platelet activation signaling pathways converge into common signaling events, which stimulate platelet shape change, granule secretion, and ultimately induce the “inside-out” signaling process leading to activation of the ligand binding function of integrin αIIbβ3. Ligand binding to integrin αIIbβ3 mediates platelet adhesion and aggregation and triggers “outside-in” signaling, resulting in platelet spreading, additional granule secretion, stabilization of platelet adhesion and aggregation, and clot retraction. It has become increasingly evident that agonist-induced platelet activation signals also crosstalk with integrin “outside-in” signals to regulate platelet responses. Platelet activation involves a series of rapid positive feedback loops that greatly amplify initial activation signals, and enable robust platelet recruitment and thrombus stabilization. Recent studies have provided novel insight into the molecular mechanisms of these processes. PMID:21071698

  12. CDPK Activation in PRR Signaling.

    PubMed

    Seybold, Heike; Boudsocq, Marie; Romeis, Tina

    2017-01-01

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases undergo a rapid biochemical activation in response to an intracellular Ca increase induced by the PRR-dependent perception of a pathogen-related stimulus. Based on SDS gel resolution, the in-gel kinase assay allows the analysis of multiple in vivo protein samples in parallel, combining the advantage of protein separation according to molecular mass with the activity read-out of a protein kinase assay. It thus enables to follow the transient CDPK activation and inactivation in response to in vivo elicitation with a time-wise resolution. In addition, changes of CDPK phosphorylation activity often correlate with slight shifts in the enzyme's apparent molecular mass, indicating posttranslational modifications and a conformational change of the active enzyme compared to its inactive resting form. These band shifts can be detected by a simple immunoblotting to monitor CDPK activation.

  13. Defining specificity determinants of cGMP mediated gustatory sensory transduction in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Smith, Heidi K; Luo, Linjiao; O'Halloran, Damien; Guo, Dagang; Huang, Xin-Yun; Samuel, Aravinthan D T; Hobert, Oliver

    2013-08-01

    Cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) is a key secondary messenger used in signal transduction in various types of sensory neurons. The importance of cGMP in the ASE gustatory receptor neurons of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans was deduced by the observation that multiple receptor-type guanylyl cyclases (rGCs), encoded by the gcy genes, and two presently known cyclic nucleotide-gated ion channel subunits, encoded by the tax-2 and tax-4 genes, are essential for ASE-mediated gustatory behavior. We describe here specific mechanistic features of cGMP-mediated signal transduction in the ASE neurons. First, we assess the specificity of the sensory functions of individual rGC proteins. We have previously shown that multiple rGC proteins are expressed in a left/right asymmetric manner in the functionally lateralized ASE neurons and are required to sense distinct salt cues. Through domain swap experiments among three different rGC proteins, we show here that the specificity of individual rGC proteins lies in their extracellular domains and not in their intracellular, signal-transducing domains. Furthermore, we find that rGC proteins are also sufficient to confer salt sensory responses to other neurons. Both findings support the hypothesis that rGC proteins are salt receptor proteins. Second, we identify a novel, likely downstream effector of the rGC proteins in gustatory signal transduction, a previously uncharacterized cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) ion channel, encoded by the che-6 locus. che-6 mutants show defects in gustatory sensory transduction that are similar to defects observed in animals lacking the tax-2 and tax-4 CNG channels. In contrast, thermosensory signal transduction, which also requires tax-2 and tax-4, does not require che-6, but requires another CNG, cng-3. We propose that CHE-6 may form together with two other CNG subunits, TAX-2 and TAX-4, a gustatory neuron-specific heteromeric CNG channel complex.

  14. Effects of Kaempferia parviflora Wall. Ex. Baker and sildenafil citrate on cGMP level, cardiac function, and intracellular Ca2+ regulation in rat hearts.

    PubMed

    Weerateerangkul, Punate; Palee, Siripong; Chinda, Kroekkiat; Chattipakorn, Siriporn C; Chattipakorn, Nipon

    2012-09-01

    Although Kaempferia parviflora extract (KPE) and its flavonoids have positive effects on the nitric oxide (NO) signaling pathway, its mechanisms on the heart are still unclear. Because our previous studies demonstrated that KPE decreased defibrillation efficacy in swine similar to that of sildenafil citrate, the phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitor, it is possible that KPE may affect the cardiac NO signaling pathway. In the present study, the effects of KPE and sildenafil citrate on cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) level, modulation of cardiac function, and Ca transients in ventricular myocytes were investigated. In a rat model, cardiac cGMP level, cardiac function, and Ca transients were measured before and after treatment with KPE and sildenafil citrate. KPE significantly increased the cGMP level and decreased cardiac function and Ca transient. These effects were similar to those found in the sildenafil citrate-treated group. Furthermore, the nonspecific NOS inhibitor could abolish the effects of KPE and sildenafil citrate on Ca transient. KPE has positive effect on NO signaling in the heart, resulting in an increased cGMP level, similar to that of sildenafil citrate. This effect was found to influence the physiology of normal heart via the attenuation of cardiac function and the reduction of Ca transient in ventricular myocytes.

  15. Scaffolds are 'active' regulators of signaling modules.

    PubMed

    Alexa, Anita; Varga, János; Reményi, Attila

    2010-11-01

    Signaling cascades, in addition to proteins with obvious signaling-relevant activities (e.g. protein kinases or receptors), also employ dedicated 'inactive' proteins whose functions appear to be the organization of the former components into higher order complexes through protein-protein interactions. The core function of signaling adaptors, anchors and scaffolds is the recruitment of proteins into one macromolecular complex. Several recent studies have demonstrated that the recruiter and the recruited molecules mutually influence each other in a scaffolded complex. This yields fundamentally novel properties for the signaling complex as a whole. Because these are not merely additive to the properties of the individual components, scaffolded signaling complexes may behave as functionally distinct modules.

  16. Nitric Oxide-cGMP Signaling Stimulates Erythropoiesis through Multiple Lineage-Specific Transcription Factors: Clinical Implications and a Novel Target for Erythropoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Ikuta, Tohru; Sellak, Hassan; Odo, Nadine; Adekile, Adekunle D.; Gaensler, Karin M. L.

    2016-01-01

    Much attention has been directed to the physiological effects of nitric oxide (NO)-cGMP signaling, but virtually nothing is known about its hematologic effects. We reported for the first time that cGMP signaling induces human γ-globin gene expression. Aiming at developing novel therapeutics for anemia, we examined here the hematologic effects of NO-cGMP signaling in vivo and in vitro. We treated wild-type mice with NO to activate soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC), a key enzyme of cGMP signaling. Compared to untreated mice, NO-treated mice had higher red blood cell counts and total hemoglobin but reduced leukocyte counts, demonstrating that when activated, NO-cGMP signaling exerts hematopoietic effects on multiple types of blood cells in vivo. We next generated mice which overexpressed rat sGC in erythroid and myeloid cells. The forced expression of sGCs activated cGMP signaling in both lineage cells. Compared with non-transgenic littermates, sGC mice exhibited hematologic changes similar to those of NO-treated mice. Consistently, a membrane-permeable cGMP enhanced the differentiation of hematopoietic progenitors toward erythroid-lineage cells but inhibited them toward myeloid-lineage cells by controlling multiple lineage-specific transcription factors. Human γ-globin gene expression was induced at low but appreciable levels in sGC mice carrying the human β-globin locus. Together, these results demonstrate that NO-cGMP signaling is capable of stimulating erythropoiesis in both in vitro and vivo settings by controlling the expression of multiple lineage-specific transcription factors, suggesting that cGMP signaling upregulates erythropoiesis at the level of gene transcription. The NO-cGMP signaling axis may constitute a novel target to stimulate erythropoiesis in vivo. PMID:26727002

  17. Regulation of cGMP synthesis in cultured podocytes by vasoactive hormones.

    PubMed

    Lewko, B; Gołos, M; Latawiec, E; Angielski, S; Stepinski, J

    2006-12-01

    The podocytes are highly differentiated cells playing a key role in glomerular filtration. Vasoactive factors including angiotensin II (Ang II) and cyclic guanosine 5' monophosphate (cGMP) are synthesized by these cells upon stimulation as well as in the basal state. In this study we have tested whether angiotensin II affects the total synthesis of cGMP in primary culture of rat podocytes. The cells were stimulated with atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and/or a nitric oxide (NO) donor, S-nitroso-N-acetyl penicillamine (SNAP), in the absence or presence of Ang II. The cGMP synthesis was determined by radioimmunoassay (RIA). ANP or SNAP alone increased the cGMP synthesis in podocytes although the effects were not additive unless Ang II was present in the medium. Ang II suppressed the ANP-dependent cGMP synthesis whereas SNAP-dependent cGMP production remained unaffected. These effects were prevented by a non-specific antagonist of Ang II receptors (AT), saralasin. Adversely, PD123319, a specific inhibitor of AT2 receptors, augmented inhibition of ANP-dependent and enhanced the NO-dependent cGMP production. Probenecid, an inhibitor of cGMP extrusion from the cells, suppressed the cGMP generation by both ANP and SNAP. We conclude that cGMP synthesis in cultured podocytes is modulated by angiotensin II and that two adversely acting receptors, AT1 and AT2 are involved in this effect. Additionally, production of cGMP might be intrinsically inhibited by cGMP accumulating inside the cells.

  18. Nitric-oxide inhibits nyctinastic closure through cGMP in Albizia lophantha leaflets.

    PubMed

    Bergareche, Carmen; Moysset, Luisa; Angelo, Alcira Paola; Chellik, Samira; Simón, Esther

    2014-09-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a highly reactive radical that acts as a direct or indirect cellular signalling molecule in plant growth, development and environmental responses. Here we studied the contribution of NO to the control of leaflet movements during nyctinastic closure. For this purpose, we tested the effect of NO donors and an NO scavenger, all supplied in light, on Albizia lophantha leaflet closure after transferral to darkness. Exogenous NO, applied as four donors [sodium nitroprusside (SNP), diethylammonium (Z)-1-(N,N-diethylamino) diazen-1-ium-1,2-diolate (DEA-NONOate), S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP) and S-nitrosoglutathione (GS-NO)], inhibited nyctinastic leaflet closure while the application of an NO scavenger [2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (cPTIO)] plus SNP cancelled the effect of the latter. The inclusion of Nω-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME) or sodium tungstate in the incubation media enhanced nyctinastic closure and also resulted in a decrease in the nitrate plus nitrite released by leaflets into the incubation solution. These results support the notion that NO is involved in regulating the nyctinastic closure of A. lophantha leaflets. Cellular perception of NO did not appear to be mediated by calcium. Pharmacological application of inhibitors of soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) [1H-[1,2,4]-oxadiazole-[4,3-a]-quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ) and 6-anilino-5,8-quinolinequinone (Ly83583)], phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) (Sildenafil) and the cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) analogue 8-bromoguanosine-3',5'-cyclomonophosphate sodium salt (8-Br-cGMP) indicated that cGMP was downstream of the NO signalling cascade during nyctinastic closure.

  19. Brassinosteroid nuclear signaling recruits HSP90 activity.

    PubMed

    Samakovli, Despina; Margaritopoulou, Theoni; Prassinos, Constantinos; Milioni, Dimitra; Hatzopoulos, Polydefkis

    2014-08-01

    Heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) controls a number of developmental circuits, and serves a sophisticated and highly regulatory function in signaling pathways. Brassinosteroids (BRs) control many aspects of plant development. Genetic, physiological, cytological, gene expression, live cell imaging, and pharmacological approaches provide conclusive evidence for HSP90 involvement in Arabidopsis thalianaBR signaling. Nuclear-localized HSP90s translocate to cytoplasm when their activity is blocked by the HSP90 inhibitor geldanamycin (GDA). GDA treatment promoted the export of BIN2, a regulator of BR signaling, from the nucleus into the cytoplasm, indicating that active HSP90 is required to sustain BIN2 in the nucleus. HSP90 nuclear localization was inhibited by brassinolide (BL). HSP90s interact with BIN2 in the nucleus of untreated cells and in the cytoplasm of BL-treated cells, showing that the site-specific action of HSP90 on BIN2 is controlled by BRs. GDA and BL treatments change the expression of a common set of previously identified BR-responsive genes. This highlights the effect of active HSP90s on the regulation of BR-responsive genes. Our observations reveal that HSP90s have a central role in sustaining BIN2 nuclear function. We propose that BR signaling is mediated by HSP90 activity and via trafficking of BIN2-HSP90 complexes into the cytoplasm. © 2014 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2014 New Phytologist Trust.

  20. Methylene blue blocks cGMP production and disrupts directed migration of microglia to nerve lesions in the leech CNS.

    PubMed

    Duan, Yuanli; Haugabook, Sharie J; Sahley, Christie L; Muller, Kenneth J

    2003-11-01

    Migration and accumulation of microglial cells at sites of injury are important for nerve repair. Recent studies on the leech central nervous system (CNS), in which synapse regeneration is successful, have shown that nitric oxide (NO) generated immediately after injury by endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) stops migrating microglia at the lesion. The present study obtained results indicating that NO may act earlier, on microglia migration, and aimed to determine mechanisms underlying NO's effects. Injury induced cGMP immunoreactivity at the lesion in a pattern similar to that of eNOS activity, immunoreactivity, and microglial cell accumulation, which were all focused there. The soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) inhibitor methylene blue (MB) at 60 microM abolished cGMP immunoreactivity at lesions and blocked microglial cell migration and accumulation without interfering with axon conduction. Time-lapse video microscopy of microglia in living nerve cords showed MB did not reduce cell movement but reduced directed movement, with significantly more cells moving away from the lesion or reversing direction and fewer cells moving toward the lesion. The results indicate a new role for NO, directing the microglial cell migration as well as stopping it, and show that NO's action may be mediated by cGMP. Copyright 2003 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Signal transduction activated by cannabinoid receptors.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Laviada, Inés; Ruiz-Llorente, Lidia

    2005-07-01

    Since the discovery that cannabinoids exert biological actions through binding to specific receptors, signal mechanisms triggered by these receptors have been focus of extensive study. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the signalling events produced by cannabinoids from membrane receptors to downstream regulators. Two types of cannabinoid receptors have been identified to date: CB(1) and CB(2) both belonging to the heptahelichoidal receptor family but with different tissue distribution and signalling mechanisms. Coupling to inhibitory guanine nucleotide-binding protein and thus inhibition of adenylyl cyclase has been observed in both receptors but other signal transduction pathways that are regulated or not by these G proteins are differently activated upon ligand-receptor binding including ion channels, sphingomyelin hydrolysis, ceramide generation, phospholipases activation and downstream targets as MAP kinase cascade, PI3K, FAK or NOS regulation. Cannabinoids may also act independently of CB(1)or CB(2) receptors. The existence of new unidentified putative cannabinoid receptors has been claimed by many investigators. Endocannabinoids activate vanilloid TRPV1 receptors that may mediate some of the cannabinoid effects. Other actions of cannabinoids can occur through non-receptor-mediated mechanisms.

  2. White to beige conversion in PDE3B KO adipose tissue through activation of AMPK signaling and mitochondrial function

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Youn Wook; Ahmad, Faiyaz; Tang, Yan; Hockman, Steven C.; Kee, Hyun Jung; Berger, Karin; Guirguis, Emilia; Choi, Young Hun; Schimel, Dan M.; Aponte, Angel M.; Park, Sunhee; Degerman, Eva; Manganiello, Vincent C.

    2017-01-01

    Understanding mechanisms by which a population of beige adipocytes is increased in white adipose tissue (WAT) reflects a potential strategy in the fight against obesity and diabetes. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) is very important in the development of the beige phenotype and activation of its thermogenic program. To study effects of cyclic nucleotides on energy homeostatic mechanisms, mice were generated by targeted inactivation of cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase 3b (Pde3b) gene, which encodes PDE3B, an enzyme that catalyzes hydrolysis of cAMP and cGMP and is highly expressed in tissues that regulate energy homeostasis, including adipose tissue, liver, and pancreas. In epididymal white adipose tissue (eWAT) of PDE3B KO mice on a SvJ129 background, cAMP/protein kinase A (PKA) and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling pathways are activated, resulting in “browning” phenotype, with a smaller increases in body weight under high-fat diet, smaller fat deposits, increased β-oxidation of fatty acids (FAO) and oxygen consumption. Results reported here suggest that PDE3B and/or its downstream signaling partners might be important regulators of energy metabolism in adipose tissue, and potential therapeutic targets for treating obesity, diabetes and their associated metabolic disorders. PMID:28084425

  3. Effect of sildenafil on platelet function and platelet cGMP of patients with erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Akand, M; Gencer, E; Yaman, Ö; Erişgen, G; Tekin, D; Özdiler, E

    2015-12-01

    To investigate the effect of sildenafil on platelet function and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) levels in patients with erectile dysfunction, we evaluated the association between erectile function and platelet responses after administration of 100 mg sildenafil. Erectile responses were monitored after 8 daily doses of the drug. Adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and collagen-induced platelet aggregation and simultaneous adenosine triphosphate (ATP) release and cGMP levels were determined before and after sildenafil therapy. Basal levels for platelet aggregation, ATP release and cGMP were compared with age-matched controls. There was no difference among basal levels of platelet responses between patients and controls, except for ADP-induced platelet aggregation (P = 0.04). It was significantly higher in the patient group. Analysis of the responses to sildenafil revealed that for the patients who showed a positive erectile response, there was a significant increase in platelet cGMP (P = 0.028) and a decrease in ADP-induced platelet aggregation (P = 0.04). However, for those who showed a negative or poor erectile response, there was no change in platelet cGMP levels and platelet functions. Sildenafil did not affect collagen-induced platelet responses although cGMP levels of the responders increased. It is concluded that sildenafil increases platelet cGMP in the patients with positive erectile response. Therefore, it has been speculated that platelet cGMP may be used as an index for erectile response.

  4. Oxidized LDL activates blood platelets through CD36/NOX2–mediated inhibition of the cGMP/protein kinase G signaling cascade

    PubMed Central

    Magwenzi, Simbarashe; Woodward, Casey; Wraith, Katie S.; Aburima, Ahmed; Raslan, Zaher; Jones, Huw; McNeil, Catriona; Wheatcroft, Stephen; Yuldasheva, Nadira; Febbriao, Maria; Kearney, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) promotes unregulated platelet activation in dyslipidemic disorders. Although oxLDL stimulates activatory signaling, it is unclear how these events drive accelerated thrombosis. Here, we describe a mechanism for oxLDL-mediated platelet hyperactivity that requires generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Under arterial flow, oxLDL triggered sustained generation of platelet intracellular ROS, which was blocked by CD36 inhibitors, mimicked by CD36-specific oxidized phospholipids, and ablated in CD36−/− murine platelets. oxLDL-induced ROS generation was blocked by the reduced NAD phosphate oxidase 2 (NOX2) inhibitor, gp91ds-tat, and absent in NOX2−/− mice. The synthesis of ROS by oxLDL/CD36 required Src-family kinases and protein kinase C (PKC)-dependent phosphorylation and activation of NOX2. In functional assays, oxLDL abolished guanosine 3′,5′-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP)-mediated signaling and inhibited platelet aggregation and arrest under flow. This was prevented by either pharmacologic inhibition of NOX2 in human platelets or genetic ablation of NOX2 in murine platelets. Platelets from hyperlipidemic mice were also found to have a diminished sensitivity to cGMP when tested ex vivo, a phenotype that was corrected by infusion of gp91ds-tat into the mice. This study demonstrates that oxLDL and hyperlipidemia stimulate the generation of NOX2-derived ROS through a CD36-PKC pathway and may promote platelet hyperactivity through modulation of cGMP signaling. PMID:25710879

  5. cGMP transport by vesicles from human and mouse erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    de Wolf, Cornelia J F; Yamaguchi, Hiroaki; van der Heijden, Ingrid; Wielinga, Peter R; Hundscheid, Stefanie L; Ono, Nobuhito; Scheffer, George L; de Haas, Marcel; Schuetz, John D; Wijnholds, Jan; Borst, Piet

    2007-01-01

    cGMP secretion from cells can be mediated by ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters ABCC4, ABCC5, and ABCC11. Indirect evidence suggests that ABCC4 and ABCC5 contribute to cGMP transport by erythrocytes. We have re-investigated the issue using erythrocytes from wild-type and transporter knockout mice. Murine wild-type erythrocyte vesicles transported cGMP with an apparent Km that was 100-fold higher than their human counterparts, the apparent Vmax being similar. Whereas cGMP transport into human vesicles was efficiently inhibited by the ABCC4-specific substrate prostaglandin E1, cGMP transport into mouse vesicles was inhibited equally by Abcg2 and Abcc4 inhibitors/substrates. Similarly, cGMP transport into vesicles from Abcc4-/- and Abcg2-/- mice was 42% and 51% of that into wild-type mouse vesicles, respectively, whereas cGMP transport into vesicles from Abcc4(-/-)/Abcg2(-/-) mice was near background. The knockout mice were used to show that Abcg2-mediated cGMP transport occurred with lower affinity but higher Vmax than Abcc4-mediated transport. Involvement of Abcg2 in cGMP transport by Abcc4-/- erythrocyte vesicles was supported by higher transport at pH 5.5 than at pH 7.4, a characteristic of Abcg2-mediated transport. The relative contribution of ABCC4/Abcc4 and ABCG2/Abcg2 in cGMP transport was confirmed with a new inhibitor of ABCC4 transport, the protease inhibitor 4-(2-aminoethyl)benzenesulfonyl fluoride.

  6. Modulation of Compartmentalised Cyclic Nucleotide Signalling via Local Inhibition of Phosphodiesterase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Brescia, Marcella; Zaccolo, Manuela

    2016-01-01

    Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs) are the only enzymes that degrade the cyclic nucleotides cAMP and cGMP, and play a key role in modulating the amplitude and duration of the signal delivered by these two key intracellular second messengers. Defects in cyclic nucleotide signalling are known to be involved in several pathologies. As a consequence, PDEs have long been recognized as potential drug targets, and they have been the focus of intense research for the development of therapeutic agents. A number of PDE inhibitors are currently available for the treatment of disease, including obstructive pulmonary disease, erectile dysfunction, and heart failure. However, the performance of these drugs is not always satisfactory, due to a lack of PDE-isoform specificity and their consequent adverse side effects. Recent advances in our understanding of compartmentalised cyclic nucleotide signalling and the role of PDEs in local regulation of cAMP and cGMP signals offers the opportunity for the development of novel strategies for therapeutic intervention that may overcome the current limitation of conventional PDE inhibitors. PMID:27706091

  7. Timosaponin AIII induces antiplatelet and antithrombotic activity via Gq-mediated signaling by the thromboxane A2 receptor

    PubMed Central

    Cong, Yue; Wang, Limei; Peng, Renjun; Zhao, Yang; Bai, Fan; Yang, Chao; Liu, Xiaolan; Wang, Daqian; Ma, Baiping; Cong, Yuwen

    2016-01-01

    The thromboxane (Tx) A2 pathway is a major contributor to the amplification of initial platelet activation and is therefore a key drug target. To identify potent small-molecule inhibitors of the thromboxane prostaglandin (TP) receptor, we screened a small steroidal saponin library using U46619-induced rat platelet aggregation assays. Timosaponin AIII (TAIII) was identified as a potent inhibitor of U46619-induced rat platelet aggregation and exhibited superior selectivity for the TP receptor versus other G protein-coupled receptors and a PKC activator. TAIII inhibited U46619-induced rat platelet aggregation independent of increases in cAMP and cGMP and the inhibition of TxA2 production. Both PKC and PLC activators restored TAIII-inhibited platelet aggregation, whereas TAIII did not inhibit platelet aggregation induced by co-activation of the G12/13 and Gz pathways. Furthermore, TAIII did not affect the platelet shape change or ROCK2 phosphorylation evoked by low-dose U46619. In vivo, TAIII prolonged tail bleeding time, reduced the mortality of animals with acute pulmonary thromboembolism and significantly reduced venous thrombus weight. Our study suggests that TAIII, by preferentially targeting Gq-mediated PLC/PKC signaling from the TP receptor, induces stronger in vitro antiplatelet activity and in vivo antithrombotic effects and may be an excellent candidate for the treatment of thrombotic disorders. PMID:27934923

  8. Heparin activates Wnt signaling for neuronal morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Colombres, Marcela; Henríquez, Juan Pablo; Reig, Germán F; Scheu, Jessica; Calderón, Rosario; Alvarez, Alejandra; Brandan, Enrique; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C

    2008-09-01

    Wnt factors are secreted ligands that affect different aspects of the nervous system behavior like neurodevelopment, synaptogenesis and neurodegeneration. In different model systems, Wnt signaling has been demonstrated to be regulated by heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs). Whether HSPGs modulate Wnt signaling in the context of neuronal behavior is currently unknown. Here we demonstrate that activation of Wnt signaling with the endogenous ligand Wnt-7a results in an increased of neurite outgrowth in the neuroblastoma N2a cell line. Interestingly, heparin induces glycogen synthase kinase-3beta (GSK-3beta) inhibition, beta-catenin stabilization and morphological differentiation in both N2a cells and in rat primary hippocampal neuronal cultures. We also show that heparin modulates Wnt-3a-induced stabilization of beta-catenin. Several extracellular matrix and membrane-attached HSPGs were found to be expressed in both in vitro neuronal models. Changes in the expression of specific HSPGs were observed upon differentiation of N2a cells. Taken together, our findings suggest that HSPGs may modulate canonical Wnt signaling for neuronal morphogenesis.

  9. Activation of intestinal CFTR Cl- channel by heat-stable enterotoxin and guanylin via cAMP-dependent protein kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Chao, A C; de Sauvage, F J; Dong, Y J; Wagner, J A; Goeddel, D V; Gardner, P

    1994-01-01

    Heat-stable enterotoxins (STa) produced by pathogenic bacteria induce profound salt and water secretion in the gut, leading to diarrhea. Recently, guanylin, an endogenous peptide with properties similar to STa, was identified. While STa and guanylin bind to the same receptor guanylyl cyclase and raise cell cGMP, the signaling mechanism distal to cGMP remains controversial. Here we show that STa, guanylin and cGMP each activate intestinal Cl- secretion, and that this is abolished by inhibitors of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA), suggesting that PKA is a major mediator of this effect. These agents induce Cl- secretion only in cells expressing the wild-type CFTR, indicating that this molecule is the final common effector of the signaling pathway. The involvement of CFTR suggests a possible cystic fibrosis heterozygote advantage against STa-induced diarrhea. PMID:7510634

  10. Roles of phosphodiesterases in the regulation of the cardiac cyclic nucleotide cross-talk signaling network.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Claire Y; Greenstein, Joseph L; Winslow, Raimond L

    2016-02-01

    The balanced signaling between the two cyclic nucleotides (cNs) cAMP and cGMP plays a critical role in regulating cardiac contractility. Their degradation is controlled by distinctly regulated phosphodiesterase isoenzymes (PDEs), which in turn are also regulated by these cNs. As a result, PDEs facilitate communication between the β-adrenergic and Nitric Oxide (NO)/cGMP/Protein Kinase G (PKG) signaling pathways, which regulate the synthesis of cAMP and cGMP respectively. The phenomena in which the cAMP and cGMP pathways influence the dynamics of each other are collectively referred to as cN cross-talk. However, the cross-talk response and the individual roles of each PDE isoenzyme in shaping this response remain to be fully characterized. We have developed a computational model of the cN cross-talk network that mechanistically integrates the β-adrenergic and NO/cGMP/PKG pathways via regulation of PDEs by both cNs. The individual model components and the integrated network model replicate experimentally observed activation-response relationships and temporal dynamics. The model predicts that, due to compensatory interactions between PDEs, NO stimulation in the presence of sub-maximal β-adrenergic stimulation results in an increase in cytosolic cAMP accumulation and corresponding increases in PKA-I and PKA-II activation; however, the potentiation is small in magnitude compared to that of NO activation of the NO/cGMP/PKG pathway. In a reciprocal manner, β-adrenergic stimulation in the presence of sub-maximal NO stimulation results in modest cGMP elevation and corresponding increase in PKG activation. In addition, we demonstrate that PDE2 hydrolyzes increasing amounts of cAMP with increasing levels of β-adrenergic stimulation, and hydrolyzes increasing amounts of cGMP with decreasing levels of NO stimulation. Finally, we show that PDE2 compensates for inhibition of PDE5 both in terms of cGMP and cAMP dynamics, leading to cGMP elevation and increased PKG activation

  11. Optogenetic activation of intracellular adenosine A2A receptor signaling in the hippocampus is sufficient to trigger CREB phosphorylation and impair memory.

    PubMed

    Li, P; Rial, D; Canas, P M; Yoo, J-H; Li, W; Zhou, X; Wang, Y; van Westen, G J P; Payen, M-P; Augusto, E; Gonçalves, N; Tomé, A R; Li, Z; Wu, Z; Hou, X; Zhou, Y; IJzerman, A P; PIJzerman, Ad; Boyden, E S; Cunha, R A; Qu, J; Chen, J-F

    2015-11-01

    Human and animal studies have converged to suggest that caffeine consumption prevents memory deficits in aging and Alzheimer's disease through the antagonism of adenosine A2A receptors (A2ARs). To test if A2AR activation in the hippocampus is actually sufficient to impair memory function and to begin elucidating the intracellular pathways operated by A2AR, we have developed a chimeric rhodopsin-A2AR protein (optoA2AR), which retains the extracellular and transmembrane domains of rhodopsin (conferring light responsiveness and eliminating adenosine-binding pockets) fused to the intracellular loop of A2AR to confer specific A2AR signaling. The specificity of the optoA2AR signaling was confirmed by light-induced selective enhancement of cAMP and phospho-mitogen-activated protein kinase (p-MAPK) (but not cGMP) levels in human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells, which was abolished by a point mutation at the C terminal of A2AR. Supporting its physiological relevance, optoA2AR activation and the A2AR agonist CGS21680 produced similar activation of cAMP and p-MAPK signaling in HEK293 cells, of p-MAPK in the nucleus accumbens and of c-Fos/phosphorylated-CREB (p-CREB) in the hippocampus, and similarly enhanced long-term potentiation in the hippocampus. Remarkably, optoA2AR activation triggered a preferential p-CREB signaling in the hippocampus and impaired spatial memory performance, while optoA2AR activation in the nucleus accumbens triggered MAPK signaling and modulated locomotor activity. This shows that the recruitment of intracellular A2AR signaling in the hippocampus is sufficient to trigger memory dysfunction. Furthermore, the demonstration that the biased A2AR signaling and functions depend on intracellular A2AR loops prompts the possibility of targeting the intracellular A2AR-interacting partners to selectively control different neuropsychiatric behaviors.

  12. cGMP reduces the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ loading in airway smooth muscle cells: a putative mechanism in the regulation of Ca2+ by cGMP.

    PubMed

    Bazán-Perkins, Blanca

    2012-03-01

    Ca(2+) and cGMP have opposite roles in many physiological processes likely due to a complex negative feedback regulation between them. Examples of opposite functions induced by Ca(2+) and cGMP are smooth muscle contraction and relaxation, respectively. A main Ca(2+) storage involved in contraction is sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR); nevertheless, the role of cGMP in the regulation of SR-Ca(2+) has not been completely understood. To evaluate this role, intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) was determinated by a ratiometric method in isolated myocytes from bovine trachea incubated with Fura-2/AM. The release of Ca(2+) from SR induced by caffeine was transient, whereas caffeine withdrawal was followed by a [Ca(2+)]i undershoot. Caffeine-induced Ca(2+) transient peak and [Ca(2+)]i undershoot after caffeine were reproducible in the same cell. Dibutyryl cGMP (db-cGMP) blocked the [Ca(2+)]i undershoot and reduced the subsequent caffeine peak (SR-Ca(2+) loading). Both, the opening of SR channels with ryanodine (10 μM) and the blockade of SR-Ca(2+) ATPase with cyclopiazonic acid inhibited the [Ca(2+)]i undershoot as well as the SR-Ca(2+) loading. The addition of db-cGMP to ryanodine (10 μM) incubated cells partially restored the SR-Ca(2+) loading. Cyclic GMP enhanced [Ca(2+)]i undershoot induced by the blockade of ryanodine channels with 50 μM ryanodine. In conclusion, the reduction of SR-Ca(2+) content in airway smooth muscle induced by cGMP can be explained by the combination of SR-Ca(2+) loading and the simultaneous release of SR-Ca(2+). The reduction of SR-Ca(2+) content induced by cGMP might be a putative mechanism limiting releasable Ca(2+) in response to a particular stimulus.

  13. Plant Cyclic Nucleotide Signalling

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Atienza, Juliana; Van Ingelgem, Carl; Roef, Luc

    2007-01-01

    The presence of the cyclic nucleotides 3′,5′-cyclic adenyl monophosphate (cAMP) and 3′,5′-cyclic guanyl monophosphate (cGMP) in plants is now generally accepted. In addition, cAMP and cGMP have been implicated in the regulation of important plant processes such as stomatal functioning, monovalent and divalent cation fluxes, chloroplast development, gibberellic acid signalling, pathogen response and gene transcription. However, very little is known regarding the components of cyclic nucleotide signalling in plants. In this addendum, the evidence for specific mechanisms of plant cyclic nucleotide signalling is evaluated and discussed. PMID:19704553

  14. Role of nitric oxide and cyclic GMP signaling in melanocyte response to hypergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanova, Krassimira; Lambers, Britta; Tsiockas, Wasiliki; Block, Ingrid; Gerzer, Rupert

    Nitric oxide (NO) has a prominent role in many (patho)physiological processes in the skin including erythema, inflammation, and cancerogenesis. The soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC), a key transducer in NO signaling, catalyzes the formation of the second messenger guanosine 3´,5´-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic cGMP or cGMP). For human melanocytes, which are responsible for skin pigmentation by synthesizing the pigment melanin, it has been reported that the NO/sGC/cGMP pathway is involved in UVB-induced melanogenesis. Melanin acts as a scavenger for free radicals that may arise during metabolic stress. It may also act as a photosensitizer that generates active oxygen species upon UV irradiation, which may initiate hypopigmentary disorders (e.g., vitiligo) as well as UV-induced oncogene cell transformation. In addition, melanoma, a deadly skin cancer, which arises from transformed melanocytes, is characterized by a resistance to chemotherapy. In our studies we have shown that NO can induce perturbation of melanocyte-extracellular matrix component interactions, which may contribute to loss of melanocytes or melanoma metastasis. Such NO effects appear to be modulated partly via cGMP. Moreover, we found that different guanylyl cyclase isoforms are responsible for cGMP synthesis in melanocytic cells. Normal human melanocytes and nonmetastatic melanoma cells predominantly express sGC, which appears to be associated with melanogenesis, whereas absence of NO-sensitive GC, but up-regulated activities of the natriuretic peptide-sensitive membrane guanylyl cyclase isoforms were found in highly metastatic phenotypes. Due to the growing interest in the regulation of signaling activities in normal and transformed cells under altered gravity conditions, we have further investigated whether the NO/cGMP signaling is involved in melanocyte response to gravitational stress. We found that normal human melanocytes and non-metastatic melanoma cell lines, but not highly metastatic cells

  15. Sleep Loss Activates Cellular Inflammatory Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Irwin, Michael R.; Wang, Minge; Ribeiro, Denise; Cho, Hyong Jin; Olmstead, Richard; Breen, Elizabeth Crabb; Martinez-Maza, Otoniel; Cole, Steve

    2008-01-01

    Background Accumulating evidence suggests that sleep disturbance is associated with inflammation and related disorders including cardiovascular disease, arthritis, and diabetes mellitus. This study was undertaken to test the effects of sleep loss on activation of nuclear factor (NF) -κB, a transcription factor that serves a critical role in the inflammatory signaling cascade. Methods In 14 healthy adults (7 females; 7 males), peripheral blood mononuclear cell NF-κB was repeatedly assessed, along with enumeration of lymphocyte subpopulations, in the morning after baseline sleep, partial sleep deprivation (awake from 23:00 h to 03:00 h), and recovery sleep. Results In the morning after a night of sleep loss, mononuclear cell NF-κB activation was significantly greater compared with morning levels following uninterrupted baseline or recovery sleep, in which the response was found in females but not in males. Conclusions These results identify NF-κB activation as a molecular pathway by which sleep disturbance may influence leukocyte inflammatory gene expression and the risk of inflammation-related disease. PMID:18561896

  16. Heat dissipation guides activation in signaling proteins.

    PubMed

    Weber, Jeffrey K; Shukla, Diwakar; Pande, Vijay S

    2015-08-18

    Life is fundamentally a nonequilibrium phenomenon. At the expense of dissipated energy, living things perform irreversible processes that allow them to propagate and reproduce. Within cells, evolution has designed nanoscale machines to do meaningful work with energy harnessed from a continuous flux of heat and particles. As dictated by the Second Law of Thermodynamics and its fluctuation theorem corollaries, irreversibility in nonequilibrium processes can be quantified in terms of how much entropy such dynamics produce. In this work, we seek to address a fundamental question linking biology and nonequilibrium physics: can the evolved dissipative pathways that facilitate biomolecular function be identified by their extent of entropy production in general relaxation processes? We here synthesize massive molecular dynamics simulations, Markov state models (MSMs), and nonequilibrium statistical mechanical theory to probe dissipation in two key classes of signaling proteins: kinases and G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Applying machinery from large deviation theory, we use MSMs constructed from protein simulations to generate dynamics conforming to positive levels of entropy production. We note the emergence of an array of peaks in the dynamical response (transient analogs of phase transitions) that draw the proteins between distinct levels of dissipation, and we see that the binding of ATP and agonist molecules modifies the observed dissipative landscapes. Overall, we find that dissipation is tightly coupled to activation in these signaling systems: dominant entropy-producing trajectories become localized near important barriers along known biological activation pathways. We go on to classify an array of equilibrium and nonequilibrium molecular switches that harmonize to promote functional dynamics.

  17. Heat dissipation guides activation in signaling proteins

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Jeffrey K.; Shukla, Diwakar; Pande, Vijay S.

    2015-01-01

    Life is fundamentally a nonequilibrium phenomenon. At the expense of dissipated energy, living things perform irreversible processes that allow them to propagate and reproduce. Within cells, evolution has designed nanoscale machines to do meaningful work with energy harnessed from a continuous flux of heat and particles. As dictated by the Second Law of Thermodynamics and its fluctuation theorem corollaries, irreversibility in nonequilibrium processes can be quantified in terms of how much entropy such dynamics produce. In this work, we seek to address a fundamental question linking biology and nonequilibrium physics: can the evolved dissipative pathways that facilitate biomolecular function be identified by their extent of entropy production in general relaxation processes? We here synthesize massive molecular dynamics simulations, Markov state models (MSMs), and nonequilibrium statistical mechanical theory to probe dissipation in two key classes of signaling proteins: kinases and G-protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs). Applying machinery from large deviation theory, we use MSMs constructed from protein simulations to generate dynamics conforming to positive levels of entropy production. We note the emergence of an array of peaks in the dynamical response (transient analogs of phase transitions) that draw the proteins between distinct levels of dissipation, and we see that the binding of ATP and agonist molecules modifies the observed dissipative landscapes. Overall, we find that dissipation is tightly coupled to activation in these signaling systems: dominant entropy-producing trajectories become localized near important barriers along known biological activation pathways. We go on to classify an array of equilibrium and nonequilibrium molecular switches that harmonize to promote functional dynamics. PMID:26240354

  18. Active voltammetric microsensors with neural signal processing.

    SciTech Connect

    Vogt, M. C.

    1998-12-11

    Many industrial and environmental processes, including bioremediation, would benefit from the feedback and control information provided by a local multi-analyte chemical sensor. For most processes, such a sensor would need to be rugged enough to be placed in situ for long-term remote monitoring, and inexpensive enough to be fielded in useful numbers. The multi-analyte capability is difficult to obtain from common passive sensors, but can be provided by an active device that produces a spectrum-type response. Such new active gas microsensor technology has been developed at Argonne National Laboratory. The technology couples an electrocatalytic ceramic-metallic (cermet) microsensor with a voltammetric measurement technique and advanced neural signal processing. It has been demonstrated to be flexible, rugged, and very economical to produce and deploy. Both narrow interest detectors and wide spectrum instruments have been developed around this technology. Much of this technology's strength lies in the active measurement technique employed. The technique involves applying voltammetry to a miniature electrocatalytic cell to produce unique chemical ''signatures'' from the analytes. These signatures are processed with neural pattern recognition algorithms to identify and quantify the components in the analyte. The neural signal processing allows for innovative sampling and analysis strategies to be employed with the microsensor. In most situations, the whole response signature from the voltammogram can be used to identify, classify, and quantify an analyte, without dissecting it into component parts. This allows an instrument to be calibrated once for a specific gas or mixture of gases by simple exposure to a multi-component standard rather than by a series of individual gases. The sampled unknown analytes can vary in composition or in concentration, the calibration, sensing, and processing methods of these active voltammetric microsensors can detect, recognize, and

  19. The Gyc76C Receptor Guanylyl Cyclase and the Foraging cGMP-Dependent Kinase Regulate Extracellular Matrix Organization and BMP Signaling in the Developing Wing of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Schleede, Justin; Blair, Seth S.

    2015-01-01

    The developing crossveins of the wing of Drosophila melanogaster are specified by long-range BMP signaling and are especially sensitive to loss of extracellular modulators of BMP signaling such as the Chordin homolog Short gastrulation (Sog). However, the role of the extracellular matrix in BMP signaling and Sog activity in the crossveins has been poorly explored. Using a genetic mosaic screen for mutations that disrupt BMP signaling and posterior crossvein development, we identify Gyc76C, a member of the receptor guanylyl cyclase family that includes mammalian natriuretic peptide receptors. We show that Gyc76C and the soluble cGMP-dependent kinase Foraging, likely linked by cGMP, are necessary for normal refinement and maintenance of long-range BMP signaling in the posterior crossvein. This does not occur through cell-autonomous crosstalk between cGMP and BMP signal transduction, but likely through altered extracellular activity of Sog. We identify a novel pathway leading from Gyc76C to the organization of the wing extracellular matrix by matrix metalloproteinases, and show that both the extracellular matrix and BMP signaling effects are largely mediated by changes in the activity of matrix metalloproteinases. We discuss parallels and differences between this pathway and other examples of cGMP activity in both Drosophila melanogaster and mammalian cells and tissues. PMID:26440503

  20. The Gyc76C Receptor Guanylyl Cyclase and the Foraging cGMP-Dependent Kinase Regulate Extracellular Matrix Organization and BMP Signaling in the Developing Wing of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Schleede, Justin; Blair, Seth S

    2015-10-01

    The developing crossveins of the wing of Drosophila melanogaster are specified by long-range BMP signaling and are especially sensitive to loss of extracellular modulators of BMP signaling such as the Chordin homolog Short gastrulation (Sog). However, the role of the extracellular matrix in BMP signaling and Sog activity in the crossveins has been poorly explored. Using a genetic mosaic screen for mutations that disrupt BMP signaling and posterior crossvein development, we identify Gyc76C, a member of the receptor guanylyl cyclase family that includes mammalian natriuretic peptide receptors. We show that Gyc76C and the soluble cGMP-dependent kinase Foraging, likely linked by cGMP, are necessary for normal refinement and maintenance of long-range BMP signaling in the posterior crossvein. This does not occur through cell-autonomous crosstalk between cGMP and BMP signal transduction, but likely through altered extracellular activity of Sog. We identify a novel pathway leading from Gyc76C to the organization of the wing extracellular matrix by matrix metalloproteinases, and show that both the extracellular matrix and BMP signaling effects are largely mediated by changes in the activity of matrix metalloproteinases. We discuss parallels and differences between this pathway and other examples of cGMP activity in both Drosophila melanogaster and mammalian cells and tissues.

  1. Activation of NO-cGMP Signaling Rescues Age-Related Memory Impairment in Crickets

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Yukihisa; Matsumoto, Chihiro S.; Takahashi, Toshihumi; Mizunami, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Age-related memory impairment (AMI) is a common feature and a debilitating phenotype of brain aging in many animals. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying AMI are still largely unknown. The cricket Gryllus bimaculatus is a useful experimental animal for studying age-related changes in learning and memory capability; because the cricket has relatively short life-cycle and a high capability of olfactory learning and memory. Moreover, the molecular mechanisms underlying memory formation in crickets have been examined in detail. In the present study, we trained male crickets of different ages by multiple-trial olfactory conditioning to determine whether AMI occurs in crickets. Crickets 3 weeks after the final molt (3-week-old crickets) exhibited levels of retention similar to those of 1-week-old crickets at 30 min or 2 h after training; however they showed significantly decreased levels of 1-day retention, indicating AMI in long-term memory (LTM) but not in anesthesia-resistant memory (ARM) in olfactory learning of crickets. Furthermore, 3-week-old crickets injected with a nitric oxide (NO) donor, a cyclic GMP (cGMP) analog or a cyclic AMP (cAMP) analog into the hemolymph before conditioning exhibited a normal level of LTM, the same level as that in 1-week-old crickets. The rescue effect by NO donor or cGMP analog injection was absent when the crickets were injected after the conditioning. For the first time, an NO donor and a cGMP analog were found to antagonize the age-related impairment of LTM formation, suggesting that deterioration of NO synthase (NOS) or molecules upstream of NOS activation is involved in brain-aging processes. PMID:27616985

  2. In vivo cGMP levels in frog photoreceptor cells as a function of light exposure.

    PubMed

    Barbehenn, E K; Klotz, K L; Noelker, D M; Nelson, R; Chader, G J; Passonneau, J V

    1986-11-01

    By employing a combination of highly sensitive radioimmunoassays and histochemical techniques, an in vivo time course of cGMP levels has been determined in the outer segment, photoreceptor cell and outer plexiform layers of frog retina. Frogs (Rana pipiens) were dark-adapted overnight and either frozen rapidly (approximately 3 sec) in liquid nitrogen or exposed to periods of light varying between 0.1 sec and 2 hr before freezing. Frozen retinal sections were cut, freeze-dried, and samples of individual layers dissected out and analysed for cGMP. In the outer plexiform layer, there was a 42% drop in cGMP concentration after 2 sec of light (250 ft candles) followed by a 34% rise after 2 min; a steep concentration gradient formed around the layer after the 2 min exposure. In both the outer-segment layer and photoreceptor-cell layer (which includes outer segments, inner segments and outer nuclear layers), cGMP levels declined from a dark value of 56 mumol kg-1 (dry) to 9 mumol kg-1 (dry) as a result of increasing exposure to several types of light source: levels appear to be primarily a function of total ft candle min. Cyclic GMP concentrations at the longest exposures (2 min with a fiber optic light source or 2 hr with fluorescent room light) reached identical minimum levels. In the outer segments, a 15% decrease in cGMP was observed after 0.1 sec of light exposure. Although the freezing time is too long to be able to say whether the 15% decrease in cGMP at the 0.1 sec exposure is involved in transduction, the low identical levels reached gradually after longer exposures appear to indicate that a light-induced biochemical adjustment in cGMP metabolism occurs over a relatively long time period separate from the msec time course of the transduction process.

  3. Development of a whole cell pneumococcal vaccine: BPL inactivation, cGMP production, and stability.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Viviane M; Dias, Waldely O; Campos, Ivana B; Liberman, Celia; Sbrogio-Almeida, Maria E; Silva, Eliane P; Cardoso, Celso P; Alderson, Mark; Robertson, George; Maisonneuve, Jean-François; Tate, Andrea; Anderson, Porter; Malley, Richard; Fratelli, Fernando; Leite, Luciana C C

    2014-02-19

    Pneumococcal infections impose a large burden of disease on the human population, mainly in developing countries, and the current pneumococcal vaccines offer serotype-specific protection, but do not cover all pathogenic strains, leaving populations vulnerable to disease caused by non-vaccine serotypes. The pneumococcal whole cell vaccine is a low-cost strategy based on non-capsular antigens common to all strains, inducing serotype-independent immunity. Therefore, we developed the process for the cGMP production of this cellular vaccine. Initially, three engineering runs and two cGMP runs were performed in 60-L bioreactors, demonstrating the consistency of the production process, as evaluated by the growth curves, glucose consumption and metabolite formation (lactate and acetate). Cell recovery by tangential filtration was 92 ± 13 %. We optimized the conditions for beta-propiolactone (BPL) inactivation of the bacterial suspensions, establishing a maximum cell density of OD600 between 27 and 30, with a BPL concentration of 1:4000 (v/v) at 150 rpm and 4 °C for 30 h. BPL was hydrolyzed by heating for 2h at 37 °C. The criteria and methods for quality control were defined using the engineering runs and the cGMP Lots passed all specifications. cGMP vaccine Lots displayed high potency, inducing between 80 and 90% survival in immunized mice when challenged with virulent pneumococci. Sera from mice immunized with the cGMP Lots recognized several pneumococcal proteins in the extract of encapsulated strains by Western blot. The cGMP whole cell antigen bulk and whole cell vaccine product lots were shown to be stable for up to 12 and 18 months, respectively, based upon survival assays following i.p. challenge. Our results show the consistency and stability of the cGMP whole cell pneumococcal vaccine lots and demonstrate the feasibility of production in a developing country setting.

  4. Alterations in adipocytokines and cGMP homeostasis in morbid obesity patients reverse after bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Felipo, Vicente; Urios, Amparo; García-Torres, Maria L; El Mlili, Nisrin; del Olmo, Juan A; Civera, Miguel; Ortega, Joaquin; Ferrandez, Antonio; Martínez-Valls, Jose; Cassinello, Norberto; Montoliu, Carmina

    2013-02-01

    Obesity-associated nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), covering from simple steatosis to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), is a common cause of chronic liver disease. Aberrant production of adipocytokines seems to play a main role in most obesity-associated disorders. Changes in adipocytokines in obesity could be mediated by alterations in cyclic GMP (cGMP) homeostasis. The aims of this work were: (1) to study the role of altered cGMP homeostasis in altered adipocytokines in morbid obesity, (2) to assess whether these alterations are different in simple steatosis or NASH, and (3) to assess whether these changes reverse in obese patients after bariatric surgery. In 47 patients with morbid obesity and 45 control subjects, the levels in blood of adipocytokines, cGMP, nitric oxide (NO) metabolites, and atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) were studied. Whether weight loss after a bariatric surgery reverses the changes in these parameters was evaluated. NO metabolites and leptin increase (and adiponectin decreases) similarly in patients with steatosis or NASH, suggesting that these changes are due to morbid obesity and not to liver disease. Inflammation and cGMP homeostasis are affected both by morbid obesity and by liver disease. The increases in interleukin 6 (IL-6), interleukin 18 (IL-18), plasma cGMP, ANP, and the decrease in cGMP in lymphocytes are stronger in patients with NASH than with steatosis. All these changes reverse completely after bariatric surgery and weight loss, except IL-18. Altered cGMP homeostasis seems to contribute more than inflammation to changes in leptin and adiponectin in morbid obesity. Copyright © 2012 The Obesity Society.

  5. Melatonin receptor agonist-induced reduction of SNP-released nitric oxide and cGMP production in isolated human non-pigmented ciliary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Dortch-Carnes, Juanita; Tosini, Gianluca

    2013-02-01

    The present study was designed to determine the effects of melatonin and its receptor agonists on SNP-released nitric oxide (NO) and cGMP production in aqueous humor producing cells of the ciliary body because these effects may play a role in melatonin receptor-mediated regulation of intraocular pressure (IOP). NO release protocols were carried out using human non-pigmented ciliary epithelial (hNPCE) cells treated in dye free DMEM containing l-arginine (10(-3) M). The cGMP experimental protocols were performed using dye free DMEM containing 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX, 10(-4) M). The effects of varying concentrations (10(-13), 10(-11), 10(-9), 10(-7), and 10(-5) M) of melatonin, 5-MCA-NAT (putative MT(3) agonist), N-butanoyl-2-(2-methoxy-6H-isoindolo[2, 1-a]indol-11-yl)ethanamine (IIK7; selective MT(2) agonist) or S-27633-1 (selective MT(1) agonist) on sodium nitroprusside (SNP)-released NO or cGMP production were determined in separate experiments. NO and cGMP levels were measured using a colorimetric assay or enzyme immunoassay (EIA), respectively. Melatonin receptor selectivity was evaluated using luzindole (LUZ; nonselective MT(1)/MT(2) antagonist) or 4-phenyl-2-propionamidotetralin (4P-PDOT; selective MT(2) antagonist). Melatonin, 5-MCA-NAT, and IIK7 all caused concentration-dependent reduction of SNP-released NO and cGMP production. The inhibitory actions of melatonin, 5-MCA-NAT and IIK7 were either completely blocked at 10(-13), 10(-11), and 10(-9) M concentrations of the agonists or partially at 10(-7) and 10(-5) M in the presence of luzindole or 4P-PDOT. Results from this study suggest that melatonin and its analogs, 5-MCA-NAT and IIK7 inhibit SNP-released NO and cGMP production via activation of MT(2) receptors in human NPCE cells. These actions may play a role in melatonin agonist-induced regulation of aqueous humor secretion and IOP. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Melatonin Receptor Agonist-Induced Reduction of SNP-Released Nitric Oxide and cGMP Production in Isolated Human Non-pigmented Ciliary Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Dortch-Carnes, Juanita; Tosini, Gianluca

    2012-01-01

    The present study was designed to determine the effects of melatonin and its receptor agonists on SNP-released nitric oxide (NO) and cGMP production in aqueous humor producing cells of the ciliary body because these effects may play a role in melatonin receptor-mediated regulation of intraocular pressure (IOP). NO release protocols were carried out using human non-pigmented ciliary epithelial (hNPCE) cells treated in dye free DMEM containing L-arginine (10−3 M). The cGMP experimental protocols were performed using dye free DMEM containing 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX, 10−4 M). The effects of varying concentrations (10−13, 10−11, 10−9, 10−7, and 10−5 M) of melatonin, 5-MCA-NAT (putative MT3 agonist), N-butanoyl-2-(2-methoxy-6H-isoindolo[2, 1-a]indol-11-yl)ethanamine (IIK7; selective MT2 agonist) or S-27633-1 (selective MT1 agonist) on sodium nitroprusside (SNP)-released NO or cGMP production were determined in separate experiments. NO and cGMP levels were measured using a colorimetric assay or enzyme immunoassay (EIA), respectively. Melatonin receptor selectivity was evaluated using luzindole (LUZ; nonselective MT1/MT2 antagonist) or 4-phenyl-2-propionamidotetralin (4P-PDOT; selective MT2 antagonist). Melatonin, 5-MCA-NAT, and IIK7 all caused concentration-dependent reduction of SNP-released NO and cGMP production. The inhibitory actions of melatonin, 5-MCA-NAT and IIK7 were either completely blocked at 10−13, 10−11, and 10−9 M concentrations of the agonists or partially at 10−7 and 10−5 M in the presence of luzindole or 4P-PDOT. Results from this study suggest that melatonin and its analogues, 5-MCA-NAT and IIK7 inhibit SNP-released NO and cGMP production via activation of MT2 receptors in human NPCE cells. These actions may play a role in melatonin agonist-induced regulation of aqueous humor secretion and IOP. PMID:23201027

  7. Subcellular trafficking of guanylyl cyclase/natriuretic peptide receptor-A with concurrent generation of intracellular cGMP.

    PubMed

    Mani, Indra; Garg, Renu; Tripathi, Satyabha; Pandey, Kailash N

    2015-09-15

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) activates guanylyl cyclase/natriuretic peptide receptor-A (GC-A/NPRA), which lowers blood pressure and blood volume. The objective of the present study was to visualize internalization and trafficking of enhanced GFP (eGFP)-tagged NPRA (eGFP-NPRA) in human embryonic kidney-293 (HEK-293) cells, using immunofluorescence (IF) and co-immunoprecipitation (co-IP) of eGFP-NPRA. Treatment of cells with ANP initiated rapid internalization and co-localization of the receptor with early endosome antigen-1 (EEA-1), which was highest at 5 min and gradually decreased within 30 min. Similarly, co-localization of the receptor was observed with lysosome-associated membrane protein-1 (LAMP-1); however, after treatment with lysosomotropic agents, intracellular accumulation of the receptor gradually increased within 30 min. Co-IP assays confirmed that the localization of internalized receptors occurred with subcellular organelles during the endocytosis of NPRA. Rab 11, which was used as a recycling endosome (Re) marker, indicated that ∼20% of receptors recycled back to the plasma membrane. ANP-treated cells showed a marked increase in the IF of cGMP, whereas receptor was still trafficking into the intracellular compartments. Thus, after ligand binding, NPRA is rapidly internalized and trafficked from the cell surface into endosomes, Res and lysosomes, with concurrent generation of intracellular cGMP. © 2015 Authors.

  8. Hydralazine decreases sodium nitroprusside-induced rat aortic ring relaxation and increased cGMP production by rat aortic myocytes.

    PubMed

    Vidrio, Horacio; González-Romo, Pilar; Alvarez, Ezequiel; Alcaide, Carlos; Orallo, Francisco

    2005-10-28

    Association of hydralazine with nitrova-sodilators has long been known to be beneficial in the vasodilator treatment of heart failure. We previously found that hydralazine appeared to reduce the increase in cGMP induced by sodium nitroprusside in cultured rat aortic myocytes. In order to further explore this seemingly paradoxical interaction, we extended our initial observations in rat aortic myocytes and also determined the influence of hydralazine on sodium nitroprusside-induced relaxation of rat aortic rings. Hydralazine produced a concentration-dependent inhibition of sodium nitroprusside stimulation of cGMP production and caused a rightward shift of concentration-relaxation curves in aortic rings. A possible mechanism of the hydralazine-nitroprusside interaction could be the interference with bioactivation of the nitro-vasodilator to release nitric oxide. Recent evidence indicates that vascular NADH oxidase, an enzyme known to be inhibited by hydralazine, could be involved in this process. Accordingly, hydralazine was found to inhibit NADH oxidase activity in rat aortic myocytes at concentrations similar to those reducing sodium nitroprusside responses. It was concluded that antagonism of sodium nitroprusside action by hydralazine could be a consequence of interference with bioactivation of the former, apparently through inhibition of vascular NADH oxidase.

  9. Optogenetic activation of Gq signalling modulates pacemaker activity of cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Beiert, Thomas; Bruegmann, Tobias; Sasse, Philipp

    2014-06-01

    Investigation of Gq signalling with pharmacological agonists of Gq-coupled receptors lacks spatio-temporal precision. The aim of this study was to establish melanopsin, a light-sensitive Gq-coupled receptor, as a new tool for the investigation of spatial and temporal effects of Gq stimulation on pacemaking in cardiomyocytes at an early developmental stage. A vector for ubiquitous expression of melanopsin was tested in HEK293FT cells, which showed light-induced production of inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate and elevation of intracellular Ca(2+) concentration. Mouse embryonic stem cells were stably transfected with this plasmid and differentiated into spontaneously beating embryoid bodies (EBs). Cardiomyocytes within EBs showed melanopsin expression and illumination (60 s, 308.5 nW/mm(2), 470 nm) of EBs increased beating rate within 10.2 ± 1.7 s to 317.1 ± 16.3% of baseline frequency. Illumination as short as 5 s was sufficient for generating the maximal frequency response. After termination of illumination, baseline frequency was reached with a decay constant of 27.1 ± 2.5 s. The light-induced acceleration of beating frequency showed a sigmoid dependence on light intensity with a half maximal effective light intensity of 41.7 nW/mm(2). Interestingly, EBs showed a high rate of irregular contractions after termination of high-intensity illumination. Local Gq activation by illumination of a small region in a functional syncytium of cardiomyocytes led to pacemaker activity within the illuminated area. Light-induced Gq activation in melanopsin-expressing cardiomyocytes increases beating rate and generates local pacemaker activity. We propose that melanopsin is a powerful optogenetic tool for the investigation of spatial and temporal aspects of Gq signalling in cardiovascular research. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2014. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. In vivo administration of extracellular cGMP normalizes TNF-α and membrane expression of AMPA receptors in hippocampus and spatial reference memory but not IL-1β, NMDA receptors in membrane and working memory in hyperammonemic rats.

    PubMed

    Cabrera-Pastor, Andrea; Hernandez-Rabaza, Vicente; Taoro-Gonzalez, Lucas; Balzano, Tiziano; Llansola, Marta; Felipo, Vicente

    2016-10-01

    Patients with hepatic encephalopathy (HE) show working memory and visuo-spatial orientation deficits. Hyperammonemia is a main contributor to cognitive impairment in HE. Hyperammonemic rats show impaired spatial learning and learning ability in the Y maze. Intracerebral administration of extracellular cGMP restores learning in the Y-maze. The underlying mechanisms remain unknown. It also remains unknown whether extracellular cGMP improves neuroinflammation or restores spatial learning in hyperammonemic rats and if it affects differently reference and working memory. The aims of this work were: Spatial working and reference memory were assessed using the radial and Morris water mazes and neuroinflammation by immunohistochemistry and Western blot. Membrane expression of NMDA and AMPA receptor subunits was analyzed using the BS3 crosslinker. Extracellular cGMP was administered intracerebrally using osmotic minipumps. Chronic hyperammonemia induces neuroinflammation in hippocampus, with astrocytes activation and increased IL-1β, which are associated with increased NMDA receptors membrane expression and impaired working memory. This process is not affected by extracellular cGMP. Hyperammonemia also activates microglia and increases TNF-α, alters membrane expression of AMPA receptor subunits (increased GluA1 and reduced GluA2) and impairs reference memory. All these changes are reversed by extracellular cGMP. These results show that extracellular cGMP modulates spatial reference memory but not working memory. This would be mediated by modulation of TNF-α levels and of membrane expression of GluA1 and GluA2 subunits of AMPA receptors.

  11. Signal Destruction Tunes the Zone of Activation in Spatially Distributed Signaling Networks.

    PubMed

    Silva, Kalinga Pavan; Chellamuthu, Prithiviraj; Boedicker, James Q

    2017-03-14

    Diverse microbial communities coordinate group behaviors through signal exchange, such as the exchange of acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs) by Gram-negative bacteria. Cellular communication is prone to interference by neighboring microbes. One mechanism of interference is signal destruction through the production of an enzyme that cleaves the signaling molecule. Here we examine the ability of one such interference enzyme, AiiA, to modulate signal propagation in a spatially distributed system of bacteria. We have developed an experimental assay to measure signal transduction and implement a theoretical model of signaling dynamics to predict how the system responds to interference. We show that titration of an interfering strain into a signaling network tunes the spatial range of activation over the centimeter length scale, quantifying the robustness of the signaling network to signal destruction and demonstrating the ability to program systems-level responses of spatially heterogeneous cellular networks.

  12. Phenylephrine activates eNOS Ser 1177 phosphorylation and nitric oxide signaling in renal hypertensive rat aorta.

    PubMed

    Silva, Bruno R; Pernomian, Laena; Grando, Marcella D; Bendhack, Lusiane M

    2014-09-05

    The endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) plays an important role in the control of the vascular tone. This work aimed to evaluate the role of an α1-adrenoceptor agonist phenylephrine (PE) on eNOS activity and downstream signaling pathway activation in normotensive (2K) and renal hypertensive (2K-1C) intact-endothelium rat aortas. Concentration-effect curves were performed for PE in intact-endothelium aortas from 2K and 2K-1C rats, in the absence of or in the presence of NOS or soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) inhibitor. Intact endothelium aortas were stimulated with PE in organ chambers and eNOS Ser(1177)/Thr(495) phosphorylation expression was evaluated by western blot. Nitric Oxide (NO) production was evaluated in isolated endothelial cells from 2K and 2K-1C rat aortas by flow-cytometry using NO selective fluorescent probe, DAF-2DA. The sGC activity/expression was also evaluated. PE-induced contractile response is lower in 2K-1C than in 2K intact-endothelium rat aorta. This is due to higher eNOS Ser(1177) phosphorylation in 2K-1C, which induces the eNOS overactivation. It was abolished by NOS or sGC inhibition. Phenylephrine reduces NO production in 2K as compared to the basal level, but it is not modified in 2K-1C. In PE-stimulated endothelial cells, the NO production is higher in 2K-1C than in 2K. Phenylephrine induces higher cGMP production in 2K-1C than in 2K, despite the lower expression of sGC in 2K-1C. Our results suggest that alpha1-adrenoceptor activation contributes to the increased activity of the enzyme eNOS by Ser(1177) phosphorylation in 2K-1C intact-endothelium aorta, which consequently decreases PE-induced contractile response.

  13. Nicotine inhibits large conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels and the NO/-cGMP signaling pathway in cultured human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Kuhlmann, Christoph Rüdiger Wolfram; Trümper, Jan Rasmus Friedrich Carl; Tillmanns, Harald; Alexander Schaefer, Christian; Erdogan, Ali

    2005-12-01

    The effects of nicotine on endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation mediated by nitric oxide (NO) are controversial. Since endothelial NO synthesis has been shown to depend on the activity of large conductance Ca(2 + )-activated K(+) channels (BK(Ca)), the present study investigated whether nicotine alters BK(Ca) single channel activity induced by the K(+) channel opener NS1619, and to examine a possible interaction with the endothelial NO generation. The patch-clamp technique was used to examine the BK(Ca) activity. NO production was measured indirectly using a [(3)H]-cGMP-radioimmunoassay. All experiments were performed using cultured endothelial cells derived from human umbilical cord veins. The BK(Ca) opener NS1619 (10 micromol/l) significantly increased the BK(Ca) open-state probability (NPo) from 0.011+/-0.007 (control) to 0.052+/-0.019. Co-perfusion with nicotine (1 micromol/l) significantly decreased NS1619 induced NPo (n = 14, p < 0.05). Intracellular cGMP levels were significantly increased, if cells were stimulated with NS1619 (+ 225%; n = 10, p < 0.05), which was blocked by Nicotine (1 micromol/l). The results of the present study demonstrate that BK(Ca) activation by NS1619 plays an important role in the regulation of the NO-/cGMP-signaling-pathway. Endothelial dysfunction caused by nicotine may be connected with a decrease in BK(Ca)-activity.

  14. Platelet hemostasis in patients with metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes mellitus: cGMP- and NO-dependent mechanisms in the insulin-mediated platelet aggregation.

    PubMed

    Suslova, Tatiana E; Sitozhevskii, Alexei V; Ogurkova, Oksana N; Kravchenko, Elena S; Kologrivova, Irina V; Anfinogenova, Yana; Karpov, Rostislav S

    2014-01-01

    Patients with metabolic syndrome (MetS) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) have high risk of microcirculation complications and microangiopathies. An increase in thrombogenic risk is associated with platelet hyperaggregation, hypercoagulation, and hyperfibrinolysis. Factors leading to platelet activation in MetS and T2DM comprise insulin resistance, hyperglycemia, non-enzymatic glycosylation, oxidative stress, and inflammation. This review discusses the role of nitric oxide (NO) in the regulation of platelet adhesion and aggregation processes. NO is synthesized both in endotheliocytes, smooth muscle cells, macrophages, and platelets. Modification of platelet NO-synthase (NOS) activity in MetS patients can play a central role in the manifestation of platelet hyperactivation. Metabolic changes, accompanying T2DM, can lead to an abnormal NOS expression and activity in platelets. Hyperhomocysteinemia, often accompanying T2DM, is a risk factor for cardiovascular accidents. Homocysteine can reduce NO production by platelets. This review provides data on the insulin effects in platelets. Decrease in a number and sensitivity of the insulin receptors on platelets in T2DM can cause platelet hyperactivation. Various intracellular mechanisms of anti-aggregating insulin effects are discussed. Anti-aggregating effects of insulin are mediated by a NO-induced elevation of cGMP and upregulation of cAMP- and cGMP-dependent pathways. The review presents data suggesting an ability of platelets to synthesize humoral factors stimulating thrombogenesis and inflammation. Proinflammatory cytokines are considered as markers of T2DM and cardiovascular complications and are involved in the development of dyslipidemia and insulin resistance. The article provides an evaluation of NO-mediated signaling pathway in the effects of cytokines on platelet aggregation. The effects of the proinflammatory cytokines on functional activity of platelets are demonstrated.

  15. Effect of ethacrynic acid, a glutathione-S-transferase inhibitor, on nitroglycerin-mediated cGMP elevation and vasorelaxation of rabbit aortic strips.

    PubMed

    Kenkare, S R; Benet, L Z

    1993-07-20

    The effects of ethacrynic acid (ECA), an inhibitor of glutathione-S-transferase, on both the pharmacologic and biochemical responses of aortic tissue to nitroglycerin (GTN) were evaluated. Using the rabbit aortic strip model, relaxation responses to 0.6 microM GTN were measured with and without ECA (0.2 mM) pretreatment. These same strips were frozen, and the concentrations of cGMP in the strips were measured using a 3H-labeled radioimmunoassay. Both the relaxation response and the increase in cGMP upon GTN treatment were reduced significantly by pretreatment of the strips with ECA. A correlation was observed between the decreases in the pharmacodynamic and biochemical responses upon ECA pretreatment. cGMP levels in strips treated with sodium nitroprusside, which generates nitric oxide by mechanisms distinct from that for organic nitrates, were not decreased by ECA pretreatment. These observations suggest that the mechanism of GTN action involves a glutathione-S-transferase-mediated metabolic step for GTN and that the isozyme(s) involved in this activation process may be inhibited by ECA.

  16. Human ECG signal parameters estimation during controlled physical activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maciejewski, Marcin; Surtel, Wojciech; Dzida, Grzegorz

    2015-09-01

    ECG signal parameters are commonly used indicators of human health condition. In most cases the patient should remain stationary during the examination to decrease the influence of muscle artifacts. During physical activity, the noise level increases significantly. The ECG signals were acquired during controlled physical activity on a stationary bicycle and during rest. Afterwards, the signals were processed using a method based on Pan-Tompkins algorithms to estimate their parameters and to test the method.

  17. Damage-associated molecular pattern activated Toll-like receptor 4 signalling modulates blood pressure in L-NAME-induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Sollinger, Daniel; Eißler, Ruth; Lorenz, Steffen; Strand, Susanne; Chmielewski, Stefan; Aoqui, Cristiane; Schmaderer, Christoph; Bluyssen, Hans; Zicha, Josef; Witzke, Oliver; Scherer, Elias; Lutz, Jens; Heemann, Uwe; Baumann, Marcus

    2014-03-01

    Recent publications have shed new light on the role of the adaptive and innate immune system in the pathogenesis of hypertension. However, there are limited data whether receptors of the innate immune system may influence blood pressure. Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), a pattern recognition receptor, is a key component of the innate immune system, which is activated by exogenous and endogenous ligands. Hypertension is associated with end-organ damage and thus might lead to the release of damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs), which are endogenous activators of TLR4 receptors. The present study aimed to elucidate whether TLR4 signalling is able to modulate vascular contractility in an experimental model of hypertension thus contributing to blood pressure regulation. NG-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME)-induced hypertension was blunted in TLR4(-/-) when compared with wild-type mice. Treatment with l-NAME was associated with a release of DAMPs, leading to reactive oxygen species production of smooth muscle cells in a TLR4-dependent manner. As oxidative stress leads to an impaired function of the NO-sGC-cyclic GMP (cGMP) pathway, we were able to demonstrate that TLR4(-/-) was protected from sGC inactivation. Consequently, arterial contractility was reduced in TLR4(-/-). Cell damage-associated TLR4 signalling might act as a direct mediator of vascular contractility providing a molecular link between inflammation and hypertension.

  18. Altered cGMP Dynamics at the Plasma Membrane Contribute to Diarrhea in Ulcerative Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Kavisha; Sinha, Chandrima; Zhang, Weiqiang; Moon, Chang Suk; Ren, Aixia; Yarlagadda, Sunitha; Dostmann, Wolfgang R.; Adebiyi, Adebowale; Haberman, Yael; Denson, Lee A.; Wang, Xusheng; Naren, Anjaparavanda P.

    2016-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) belongs to inflammatory bowel disorders, a group of gastrointestinal disorders that can produce serious recurring diarrhea in affected patients. The mechanism for UC- and inflammatory bowel disorder-associated diarrhea is not well understood. The cystic fibrosis transmembrane-conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel plays an important role in fluid and water transport across the intestinal mucosa. CFTR channel function is regulated in a compartmentalized manner through the formation of CFTR-containing macromolecular complexes at the plasma membrane. In this study, we demonstrate the involvement of a novel macromolecular signaling pathway that causes diarrhea in UC. We found that a nitric oxide-producing enzyme, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), is overexpressed under the plasma membrane and generates compartmentalized cGMP in gut epithelia in UC. The scaffolding protein Na+/H+ exchanger regulatory factor 2 (NHERF2) bridges iNOS with CFTR, forming CFTR-NHERF2-iNOS macromolecular complexes that potentiate CFTR channel function via the nitric oxide-cGMP pathway under inflammatory conditions both in vitro and in vivo. Potential disruption of these complexes in Nherf2−/− mice may render them more resistant to CFTR-mediated secretory diarrhea than Nherf2+/+ mice in murine colitis models. Our study provides insight into the mechanism of pathophysiologic occurrence of diarrhea in UC and suggests that targeting CFTR and CFTR-containing macromolecular complexes will ameliorate diarrheal symptoms and improve conditions associated with inflammatory bowel disorders. PMID:26261085

  19. Activation of DNA damage response signaling by condensed chromatin.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Rebecca C; Burman, Bharat; Kruhlak, Michael J; Misteli, Tom

    2014-12-11

    The DNA damage response (DDR) occurs in the context of chromatin, and architectural features of chromatin have been implicated in DNA damage signaling and repair. Whereas a role of chromatin decondensation in the DDR is well established, we show here that chromatin condensation is integral to DDR signaling. We find that, in response to DNA damage chromatin regions transiently expand before undergoing extensive compaction. Using a protein-chromatin-tethering system to create defined chromatin domains, we show that interference with chromatin condensation results in failure to fully activate DDR. Conversely, forced induction of local chromatin condensation promotes ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM)- and ATR-dependent activation of upstream DDR signaling in a break-independent manner. Whereas persistent chromatin compaction enhanced upstream DDR signaling from irradiation-induced breaks, it reduced recovery and survival after damage. Our results demonstrate that chromatin condensation is sufficient for activation of DDR signaling and is an integral part of physiological DDR signaling.

  20. Activity Dependent Signal Transduction in Skeletal Muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, Susan L.

    1999-01-01

    The overall goals of this project are: 1) to define the initial signal transduction events whereby the removal of gravitational load from antigravity muscles, such as the soleus, triggers muscle atrophy, and 2) to develop countermeasures to prevent this from happening. Our rationale for this approach is that, if countermeasures can be developed to regulate these early events, we could avoid having to deal with the multiple cascades of events that occur downstream from the initial event. One of our major findings is that hind limb suspension causes an early and sustained increase in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca (2+)](sub i)). In most cells the consequences of changes in ([Ca (2+)](sub i))depend on the amplitude, frequency and duration of the Ca(2+) signal and on other factors in the intracellular environment. We propose that muscle remodeling in microgravity represents a change in the balance among several CA(2+) regulated signal transduction pathways, in particular those involving the transcription factors NFAT and NFkB and the pro-apoptotic protein BAD. Other Ca(2+) sensitive pathways involving PKC, ras, rac, and CaM kinase II may also contribute to muscle remodeling.

  1. Activity Dependent Signal Transduction in Skeletal Muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, Susan L.

    1999-01-01

    The overall goals of this project are: 1) to define the initial signal transduction events whereby the removal of gravitational load from antigravity muscles, such as the soleus, triggers muscle atrophy, and 2) to develop countermeasures to prevent this from happening. Our rationale for this approach is that, if countermeasures can be developed to regulate these early events, we could avoid having to deal with the multiple cascades of events that occur downstream from the initial event. One of our major findings is that hind limb suspension causes an early and sustained increase in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca (2+)](sub i)). In most cells the consequences of changes in ([Ca (2+)](sub i))depend on the amplitude, frequency and duration of the Ca(2+) signal and on other factors in the intracellular environment. We propose that muscle remodeling in microgravity represents a change in the balance among several CA(2+) regulated signal transduction pathways, in particular those involving the transcription factors NFAT and NFkB and the pro-apoptotic protein BAD. Other Ca(2+) sensitive pathways involving PKC, ras, rac, and CaM kinase II may also contribute to muscle remodeling.

  2. Signal processing by its coil zipper domain activates IKKγ

    PubMed Central

    Bloor, Stuart; Ryzhakov, Grigor; Wagner, Sebastian; Butler, P. Jonathan G.; Smith, David L.; Krumbach, Rebekka; Dikic, Ivan; Randow, Felix

    2008-01-01

    NF-κB activation occurs upon degradation of its inhibitor I-κB and requires prior phosphorylation of the inhibitor by I-κB kinase (IKK). Activity of IKK is governed by its noncatalytic subunit IKKγ. Signaling defects due to missense mutations in IKKγ have been correlated to its inability to either become ubiquitylated or bind ubiquitin noncovalently. Because the relative contribution of these events to signaling had remained unknown, we have studied mutations in the coil-zipper (CoZi) domain of IKKγ that either impair signaling or cause constitutive NF-κB activity. Certain signaling-deficient alleles neither bound ubiquitin nor were they ubiquitylated by TRAF6. Introducing an activating mutation into those signaling-impaired alleles restored their ubiquitylation and created mutants constitutively activating NF-κB without repairing the ubiquitin-binding defect. Constitutive activity therefore arises downstream of ubiquitin binding but upstream of ubiquitylation. Such constitutive activity reveals a signal-processing function for IKKγ beyond that of a mere ubiquitin-binding adaptor. We propose that this signal processing may involve homophilic CoZi interactions as suggested by the enhanced affinity of CoZi domains from constitutively active IKKγ. PMID:18216269

  3. Bovine cone photoreceptor cGMP phosphodiesterase structure deduced from a cDNA clone.

    PubMed Central

    Li, T S; Volpp, K; Applebury, M L

    1990-01-01

    A full-length cDNA clone encoding the alpha' subunit of cGMP phosphodiesterase (PDE) from bovine cone photoreceptors was selected by probing a retinal library with a DNA fragment encoding the catalytic core of the rod cGMP PDE alpha subunit. Identity of the clone was confirmed by comparing its deduced sequence with cone PDE peptide sequences determined by Charbonneau et al. [Charbonneau, H., Prusti, R. K., LeTrong, H., Sonnenburg, W. K., Mullaney, P. J., Walsh, K. A. & Beavo, J. A. (1990) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, pp. 288-292]. The cone PDE alpha' and the rod PDE alpha and beta subunits are encoded by distinct genes. cGMP PDE subunits share a common ancestry with cAMP PDEs and cyclic nucleotide-binding proteins. Sequence comparisons predict the presence of a catalytic core and possible secondary sites for noncatalytic cGMP binding. The presence of a C-terminal CAAX (Cys-aliphatic-aliphatic-Xaa) motif suggests the cone enzyme may be posttranslationally modified by proteolysis, methylation, and isoprenylation. Images PMID:2153291

  4. A short history of cGMP, guanylyl cyclases, and cGMP-dependent protein kinases.

    PubMed

    Kots, Alexander Y; Martin, Emil; Sharina, Iraida G; Murad, Ferid

    2009-01-01

    Here, we review the early studies on cGMP, guanylyl cyclases, and cGMP-dependent protein kinases to facilitate understanding of development of this exciting but complex field of research encompassing pharmacology, biochemistry, physiology, and molecular biology of these important regulatory molecules.

  5. cGMP modulates responses to queen mandibular pheromone in worker honey bees

    PubMed Central

    Fussnecker, Brendon L.; McKenzie, Alexander M.; Grozinger, Christina M.

    2013-01-01

    Responses to social cues, such as pheromones, can be modified by genotype, physiology, or environmental context. Honey bee queens produce a pheromone (queen mandibular pheromone; QMP) which regulates aspects of worker bee behavior and physiology. Forager bees are less responsive to QMP than young bees engaged in brood care, suggesting that physiological changes associated with behavioral maturation modulate response to this pheromone. Since 3′, 5′-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) is a major regulator of behavioral maturation in workers, we examined its role in modulating worker responses to QMP. Treatment with a cGMP analog resulted in significant reductions in both behavioral and physiological responses to QMP in young caged workers. Treatment significantly reduced attraction to QMP and inhibited the QMP-mediated increase in vitellogenin RNA levels in the fat bodies of worker bees. Genome-wide analysis of brain gene expression patterns demonstrated that cGMP has a larger effect on expression levels than QMP, and that QMP has specific effects in the presence of cGMP, suggesting that some responses to QMP may be dependent on an individual bees' physiological state. Our data suggest that cGMP-mediated processes play a role in modulating responses to QMP in honey bees at the behavioral, physiological, and molecular levels. PMID:21626397

  6. A Short History of cGMP, Guanylyl Cyclases, and cGMP-Dependent Protein Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Kots, Alexander Y.; Martin, Emil; Sharina, Iraida G.

    2014-01-01

    Here, we review the early studies on cGMP, guanylyl cyclases, and cGMP-dependent protein kinases to facilitate understanding of development of this exciting but complex field of research encompassing pharmacology, biochemistry, physiology, and molecular biology of these important regulatory molecules. PMID:19089322

  7. Sub-Nanomolar Sensitivity of Nitric Oxide Mediated Regulation of cGMP and Vasomotor Reactivity in Vascular Smooth Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Held, Kara F.; Dostmann, Wolfgang R.

    2012-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a potent dilator of vascular smooth muscle (VSM) by modulating intracellular cGMP ([cGMP]i) through the binding and activation of receptor guanylyl cylases (sGC). The kinetic relationship of NO and sGC, as well as the subsequent regulation of [cGMP]i and its effects on blood vessel vasodilation, is largely unknown. In isolated VSM cells exposed to both pulsed and clamped NO we observed transient and sustained increases in [cGMP]i, with sub-nanomolar sensitivity to NO (EC50 = 0.28 nM). Through the use of pharmacological inhibitors of sGC, PDE5, and PKG, a comprehensive VSM-specific modeling algorithm was constructed to elucidate the concerted activity profiles of sGC, PDE5, phosphorylated PDE5, and PDE1 in the maintenance of [cGMP]i. In small pressure-constricted arteries of the resistance vasculature we again observed both transient and sustained relaxations upon delivery of pulsed and clamped NO, while maintaining a similarly high sensitivity to NO (EC50 = 0.42 nM). Our results propose an intricate dependency of the messengers and enzymes involved in cGMP homeostasis, and vasodilation in VSM. Particularly, the high sensitivity of sGC to NO in primary tissue indicates how small changes in the concentrations of NO, irrespective of the form of NO delivery, can have significant effects on the dynamic regulation of vascular tone. PMID:22807915

  8. Activation of endothelial β-catenin signaling induces heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, Akito; Naito, Atsuhiko T.; Sumida, Tomokazu; Nomura, Seitaro; Shibamoto, Masato; Higo, Tomoaki; Okada, Katsuki; Sakai, Taku; Hashimoto, Akihito; Kuramoto, Yuki; Oka, Toru; Lee, Jong-Kook; Harada, Mutsuo; Ueda, Kazutaka; Shiojima, Ichiro; Limbourg, Florian P.; Adams, Ralf H.; Noda, Tetsuo; Sakata, Yasushi; Akazawa, Hiroshi; Komuro, Issei

    2016-01-01

    Activation of β-catenin-dependent canonical Wnt signaling in endothelial cells plays a key role in angiogenesis during development and ischemic diseases, however, other roles of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in endothelial cells remain poorly understood. Here, we report that sustained activation of β-catenin signaling in endothelial cells causes cardiac dysfunction through suppressing neuregulin-ErbB pathway in the heart. Conditional gain-of-function mutation of β-catenin, which activates Wnt/β-catenin signaling in Bmx-positive arterial endothelial cells (Bmx/CA mice) led to progressive cardiac dysfunction and 100% mortality at 40 weeks after tamoxifen treatment. Electron microscopic analysis revealed dilatation of T-tubules and degeneration of mitochondria in cardiomyocytes of Bmx/CA mice, which are similar to the changes observed in mice with decreased neuregulin-ErbB signaling. Endothelial expression of Nrg1 and cardiac ErbB signaling were suppressed in Bmx/CA mice. The cardiac dysfunction of Bmx/CA mice was ameliorated by administration of recombinant neuregulin protein. These results collectively suggest that sustained activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in endothelial cells might be a cause of heart failure through suppressing neuregulin-ErbB signaling, and that the Wnt/β-catenin/NRG axis in cardiac endothelial cells might become a therapeutic target for heart failure. PMID:27146149

  9. cGMP phosphodiesterase inhibition improves the vascular and metabolic actions of insulin in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Genders, A J; Bradley, E A; Rattigan, S; Richards, S M

    2011-08-01

    There is considerable support for the concept that insulin-mediated increases in microvascular blood flow to muscle impact significantly on muscle glucose uptake. Since the microvascular blood flow increases with insulin have been shown to be nitric oxide-dependent inhibition of cGMP-degrading phosphodiesterases (cGMP PDEs) is predicted to enhance insulin-mediated increases in microvascular perfusion and muscle glucose uptake. Therefore, we studied the effects of the pan-cGMP PDE inhibitor zaprinast on the metabolic and vascular actions of insulin in muscle. Hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamps (3 mU·min(-1)·kg(-1)) were performed in anesthetized rats and changes in microvascular blood flow assessed from rates of 1-methylxanthine metabolism across the muscle bed by capillary xanthine oxidase in response to insulin and zaprinast. We also characterized cGMP PDE isoform expression in muscle by real-time PCR and immunostaining of frozen muscle sections. Zaprinast enhanced insulin-mediated microvascular perfusion by 29% and muscle glucose uptake by 89%, while whole body glucose infusion rate during insulin infusion was increased by 33% at 2 h. PDE2, -9, and -10 were the major isoforms expressed at the mRNA level in muscle, while PDE1B, -9A, -10A, and -11A proteins were expressed in blood vessels. Acute administration of the cGMP PDE inhibitor zaprinast enhances muscle microvascular blood flow and glucose uptake response to insulin. The expression of a number of cGMP PDE isoforms in skeletal muscle suggests that targeting specific cGMP PDE isoforms may provide a promising avenue for development of a novel class of therapeutics for enhancing muscle insulin sensitivity.

  10. Cellular Cholesterol Directly Activates Smoothened in Hedgehog Signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Pengxiang; Nedelcu, Daniel; Watanabe, Miyako; Jao, Cindy; Kim, Youngchang; Liu, Jing; Salic, Adrian

    2016-08-01

    In vertebrates, sterols are necessary for Hedgehog signaling, a pathway critical in embryogenesis and cancer. Sterols activate the membrane protein Smoothened by binding its extracellular, cysteine-rich domain (CRD). Major unanswered questions concern the nature of the endogenous, activating sterol and the mechanism by which it regulates Smoothened. We report crystal structures of CRD complexed with sterols and alone, revealing that sterols induce a dramatic conformational change of the binding site, which is sufficient for Smoothened activation and is unique among CRD-containing receptors. We demonstrate that Hedgehog signaling requires sterol binding to Smoothened and define key residues for sterol recognition and activity. We also show that cholesterol itself binds and activates Smoothened. Furthermore, the effect of oxysterols is abolished in Smoothened mutants that retain activation by cholesterol and Hedgehog. We propose that the endogenous Smoothened activator is cholesterol, not oxysterols, and that vertebrate Hedgehog signaling controls Smoothened by regulating its access to cholesterol.

  11. N-3-Oxo-Decanoyl-l-Homoserine-Lactone Activates Auxin-Induced Adventitious Root Formation via Hydrogen Peroxide- and Nitric Oxide-Dependent Cyclic GMP Signaling in Mung Bean1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Xuegui; Todd, Christopher D.; Desikan, Radhika; Yang, Yongping; Hu, Xiangyang

    2012-01-01

    N-Acyl-homoserine-lactones (AHLs) are bacterial quorum-sensing signaling molecules that regulate population density. Recent evidence demonstrates their roles in plant defense responses and root development. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), nitric oxide (NO), and cyclic GMP (cGMP) are essential messengers that participate in various plant physiological processes, but how these messengers modulate the plant response to N-acyl-homoserine-lactone signals remains poorly understood. Here, we show that the N-3-oxo-decanoyl-homoserine-lactone (3-O-C10-HL), in contrast to its analog with an unsubstituted branch chain at the C3 position, efficiently stimulated the formation of adventitious roots and the expression of auxin-response genes in explants of mung bean (Vigna radiata) seedlings. This response was mimicked by the exogenous application of auxin, H2O2, NO, or cGMP homologs but suppressed by treatment with scavengers or inhibitors of H2O2, NO, or cGMP metabolism. The 3-O-C10-HL treatment enhanced auxin basipetal transport; this effect could be reversed by treatment with H2O2 or NO scavengers but not by inhibitors of cGMP synthesis. Inhibiting 3-O-C10-HL-induced H2O2 or NO accumulation impaired auxin- or 3-O-C10-HL-induced cGMP synthesis; however, blocking cGMP synthesis did not affect auxin- or 3-O-C10-HL-induced H2O2 or NO generation. Additionally, cGMP partially rescued the inhibitory effect of H2O2 or NO scavengers on 3-O-C10-HL-induced adventitious root development and auxin-response gene expression. These results suggest that 3-O-C10-HL, unlike its analog with an unmodified branch chain at the C3 position, can accelerate auxin-dependent adventitious root formation, possibly via H2O2- and NO-dependent cGMP signaling in mung bean seedlings. PMID:22138973

  12. Nitric oxide/cGMP pathway signaling actively down-regulates α4β1-integrin affinity: an unexpected mechanism for inducing cell de-adhesion

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Integrin activation in response to inside-out signaling serves as the basis for rapid leukocyte arrest on endothelium, migration, and mobilization of immune cells. Integrin-dependent adhesion is controlled by the conformational state of the molecule, which is regulated by seven-transmembrane Guanine nucleotide binding Protein-Coupled Receptors (GPCRs). α4β1-integrin (CD49d/CD29, Very Late Antigen-4, VLA-4) is expressed on leukocytes, hematopoietic progenitors, stem cells, hematopoietic cancer cells, and others. VLA-4 conformation is rapidly up-regulated by inside-out signaling through Gαi-coupled GPCRs and down-regulated by Gαs-coupled GPCRs. However, other signaling pathways, which include nitric oxide-dependent signaling, have been implicated in the regulation of cell adhesion. The goal of the current report was to study the effect of nitric oxide/cGMP signaling pathway on VLA-4 conformational regulation. Results Using fluorescent ligand binding to evaluate the integrin activation state on live cells in real-time, we show that several small molecules, which specifically modulate nitric oxide/cGMP signaling pathway, as well as a cell permeable cGMP analog, can rapidly down-modulate binding of a VLA-4 specific ligand on cells pre-activated through three Gαi-coupled receptors: wild type CXCR4, CXCR2 (IL-8RB), and a non-desensitizing mutant of formyl peptide receptor (FPR ΔST). Upon signaling, we detected rapid changes in the ligand dissociation rate. The dissociation rate after inside-out integrin de-activation was similar to the rate for resting cells. In a VLA-4/VCAM-1-specific myeloid cell adhesion system, inhibition of the VLA-4 affinity change by nitric oxide had a statistically significant effect on real-time cell aggregation. Conclusions We conclude that nitric oxide/cGMP signaling pathway can rapidly down-modulate the affinity state of the VLA-4 binding pocket, especially under the condition of sustained Gαi-coupled GPCR signaling

  13. N-Methyl-D-aspartate receptor stimulation activates tyrosinase and promotes melanin synthesis in the ink gland of the cuttlefish Sepia officinalis through the nitric Oxide/cGMP signal transduction pathway. A novel possible role for glutamate as physiologic activator of melanogenesis.

    PubMed

    Palumbo, A; Poli, A; Di Cosmo, A; d'Ischia, M

    2000-06-02

    The tyrosinase-catalyzed conversion of l-tyrosine to melanin represents the most distinctive biochemical pathway in the ink gland of the cuttlefish Sepia officinalis; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying its activation have remained so far largely uncharted. In this paper we demonstrate for the first time that l-glutamate can stimulate tyrosinase activity and promote melanin synthesis in Sepia ink gland via the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor/NO/cGMP signal transduction pathway. Incubation of intact ink glands with either l-glutamate or NMDA resulted in an up to 18-fold increase of tyrosinase activity and a more than 6-fold elevation of cGMP levels. Comparable stimulation of tyrosinase was induced by an NO donor and by 8-bromo-cGMP. An NMDA receptor antagonist, NO synthase (NOS) inhibitors, and a guanylate cyclase blocker suppressed NMDA-induced effects. Immunohistochemical evidence indicated that enhanced cGMP production was localized largely in the mature part of the ink gland. Increased de novo synthesis of melanin was demonstrated in NMDA- and NO-stimulated ink glands by a combined microanalytical approach based on spectrophotometric determination of pigment levels and high performance liquid chromatography quantitation of pyrrole-2,3, 5-tricarboxylic acid, a specific melanin marker, in melanosome-containing fractions. These results fill a longstanding gap in the understanding of the complex biochemical mechanisms underlying activation of melanogenesis in the mature ink gland cells of S. officinalis and disclose a novel physiologic role of the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate mediated by the NMDA receptor/NO/cGMP signaling pathway.

  14. Activating Cell Death Ligand Signaling Through Proteasome Inhibition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-01

    Activating Cell Death Ligand Signaling Through Proteasome Inhibition PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Steven R Schwarze...SUBTITLE Activating Cell Death Ligand Signaling Through 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Proteasome Inhibition 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-08-1-0392 5c...proteasome inhibition can act as an anti-neoplastic agent in vivo by sensitizing cancer cells to cell death ligands in the tumor microenvironment

  15. Effects of hydrazine derivatives on vascular smooth muscle contractility, blood pressure and cGMP production in rats: comparison with hydralazine.

    PubMed

    Vidrio, Horacio; Fernández, Gabriela; Medina, Martha; Alvarez, Ezequiel; Orallo, Francisco

    2003-01-01

    Hydralazine is a hydrazine derivative used clinically as a vasodilator and antihypertensive agent. Despite numerous studies with the drug, its mechanism of action has remained unknown; guanylate cyclase activation and release of endothelial relaxing factors are thought to be involved in its vasodilator effect. Other hydrazine derivatives are known to stimulate guanylate cyclase and could therefore share the vasodilator activity of hydralazine, although such possibility has not been assessed systematically. In the present study, hydralazine, hydrazine, phenylhydrazine, and isoniazid were evaluated for vascular smooth muscle relaxation in rat aortic rings with and without endothelium, as well as after incubation with the guanylate cyclase inhibitor methylene blue. They were also tested for enhancement of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) production by cultured rat aortic smooth muscle cells and for hypotension in the anesthetized rat. All hydrazines relaxed aortic rings, an action unaffected by endothelium removal and, in all cases except hydralazine, antagonized by methylene blue. Only phenylhydrazine increased cGMP production and only hydralazine markedly lowered blood pressure. It was concluded that hydralazine vascular relaxation is independent of endothelium and is not related to guanylate cyclase activation. The other hydrazines studied also elicit endothelium-independent relaxation, but the effect is related to guanylate cyclase. The marked hypotensive effect of hydralazine contrasts with its modest relaxant activity and is not shared by the other hydrazines. The fact that hydrazine and isoniazid produce methylene blue-sensitive relaxation, yet do not enhance cGMP production suggests the need for activating factors present in aortic rings but not in isolated cells.

  16. Antagonism of ethanol ataxia by intracerebellar nicotine: possible modulation by mouse cerebellar nitric oxide and cGMP.

    PubMed

    Al-Rejaie, Salim; Dar, M Saeed

    2006-03-31

    We have reported previously that intracerebellar nicotine attenuates ethanol ataxia via nicotinic-cholinergic receptors. We report now that attenuation of ethanol ataxia by intracerebellar nicotine is modulated by cerebellar nitric oxide-guanylyl cyclase (GC) messenger system. Intracerebellar microinfusion of SNP (sodium nitroprusside, a nitric oxide donor; 15, 30, and 60 pg) and SMT (S-methylisothiourea; 70, 140, and 280 fg; an inhibitor of inducible nitric oxide synthase), significantly enhanced and reduced, respectively, intracerebellar nicotine-induced attenuation of ethanol ataxia in a dose-related manner. Similarly, intracerebellar isoliquiritigenin (an activator of GC; 1, 2, and 4 pg) and ODQ (1H [1,2,4]oxadiazolo-[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one, an inhibitor of GC; 375, 750, and 1500 fg), significantly enhanced and reduced, respectively, intracerebellar nicotine-induced attenuation of ethanol ataxia in a dose-related fashion. These results suggest that the functional interaction between nicotine and ethanol may involve modulation by cerebellar nitric oxide and cGMP. Intracerebellar microinfusion of isoliquiritigenin (4, 8, and 16 pg) in the absence of nicotine significantly attenuated ethanol ataxia dose-dependently indicating a tonic involvement of cGMP in ethanol ataxia. Finally, intracerebellar nicotine (5 ng) significantly increased and ethanol 2 g/kg i.p. decreased levels of total cerebellar nitrite+nitrate (NOx) which were functionally correlated with ethanol ataxia and its attenuation by intracerebellar nicotine. The ethanol-induced decrease in NOx was significantly antagonized by intracerebellar nicotine. The NOx data further supported an involvement of nitric oxide in the behavioral interaction between nicotine and ethanol. Overall, the results of the present investigation demonstrate a functional correlation between cerebellar nitric oxide messenger system and the behavioral interaction between nicotine and ethanol.

  17. Hub-activated signal transmission in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahnke, Sven; Memmesheimer, Raoul-Martin; Timme, Marc

    2014-03-01

    A wide range of networked systems exhibit highly connected nodes (hubs) as prominent structural elements. The functional roles of hubs in the collective nonlinear dynamics of many such networks, however, are not well understood. Here, we propose that hubs in neural circuits may activate local signal transmission along sequences of specific subnetworks. Intriguingly, in contrast to previous suggestions of the functional roles of hubs, here, not the hubs themselves, but nonhub subnetworks transfer the signals. The core mechanism relies on hubs and nonhubs providing activating feedback to each other. It may, thus, induce the propagation of specific pulse and rate signals in neuronal and other communication networks.

  18. Translating neuronal activity into dendrite elaboration: signaling to the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Redmond, Lori

    2008-01-01

    Growth and elaboration of neuronal processes is key to establishing neuronal connectivity critical for an optimally functioning nervous system. Neuronal activity clearly influences neuronal connectivity and does so via intracellular calcium signaling. A number of CaMKs and MAPKs convey the calcium signal initiated by neuronal activity. Several of these kinases interact with substrates in close proximity to the plasma membrane and alter dendrite structure locally via these local interactions. However, many calcium-activated kinases, such as Ras-MAPK and CaMKIV, target proteins in the nucleus, either by activating a downstream substrate that is a component of a signaling cascade or by directly acting within the nucleus. It is the activation of nuclear signaling and gene transcription that is thought to mediate global changes in dendrite complexity. The identification of calcium-sensitive transcription factors and transcriptional coactivators provides substantial evidence that gene transcription is a prevalent mechanism by which neuronal activity is translated into changes in dendrite complexity. The present review presents an overview of the role of neuronal activity in the development of neuronal dendrites, the signaling mechanisms that translate neuronal activity into gene transcription, and the transcribed effectors that regulate dendrite complexity. (c) 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Signal peptides are allosteric activators of the protein translocase

    PubMed Central

    Gouridis, Giorgos; Karamanou, Spyridoula; Gelis, Ioannis; Kalodimos, Charalampos G.; Economou, Anastassios

    2010-01-01

    Extra-cytoplasmic polypeptides are usually synthesized as “preproteins” carrying aminoterminal, cleavable signal peptides1 and secreted across membranes by translocases. The main bacterial translocase comprises the SecYEG protein-conducting channel and the peripheral ATPase motor SecA2,3. Most proteins destined for the periplasm and beyond are exported post-translationally by SecA2,3. Preprotein targeting to SecA is thought to involve signal peptides4 and chaperones like SecB5,6. Here we reveal that signal peptides have a novel role beyond targeting: they are essential allosteric activators of the translocase. Upon docking on their binding groove on SecA, signal peptides act in trans to drive three successive states: first, “triggering” that drives the translocase to a lower activation energy state; then “trapping” that engages non-native preprotein mature domains docked with high affinity on the secretion apparatus and, finally, “secretion” during which trapped mature domains undergo multiple turnovers of translocation in segments7. A significant contribution by mature domains renders signal peptides less critical in bacterial secretory protein targeting than currently assumed. Rather, it is their function as allosteric activators of the translocase that renders signal peptides essential for protein secretion. A role for signal peptides and targeting sequences as allosteric activators may be universal in protein translocases. PMID:19924216

  20. Molecular mechanisms of gravity-dependent signaling in human melanocytic cells involve cyclic GMP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanova, Krassimira; Lambers, Britta; Block, Ingrid; Bromeis, Birgit; Das, Pranab K.; Gerzer, Rupert

    2005-08-01

    Gravity alteration (micro- and hypergravity) is known to influence cell functions. As guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP) is an important messenger in melanocyte signaling we have compared the regulation of cGMP levels in human melanocytes and melanoma cells with different metastatic potential under hypergravity conditions. We were able to demonstrate that long-term exposure to hypergravity stimulates cGMP efflux in cultured human melanocytes and non- metastatic melanoma cells, whereas highly metastatic melanoma cells appear to be insensitive to hypergravity, most probably, due to an up-regulated cGMP efflux at 1g. Here we report that these effects are associated with the expression of the multidrug resistance proteins 4 and 5 known to act as selective export pumps for amphiphilic anions like cGMP. Thus, an altered gravity vector may induce cGMP-dependent signaling events in melanocytic cells that could be important for malignant transformation.

  1. Nitric oxide synthetic pathway and cGMP levels are altered in red blood cells from end-stage renal disease patients.

    PubMed

    Di Pietro, Natalia; Giardinelli, Annalisa; Sirolli, Vittorio; Riganti, Chiara; Di Tomo, Pamela; Gazzano, Elena; Di Silvestre, Sara; Panknin, Christina; Cortese-Krott, Miriam M; Csonka, Csaba; Kelm, Malte; Ferdinandy, Péter; Bonomini, Mario; Pandolfi, Assunta

    2016-06-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) enzymatically produce nitric oxide (NO) by a functional RBC-nitric oxide synthase (RBC-NOS). NO is a vascular key regulatory molecule. In RBCs its generation is complex and influenced by several factors, including insulin, acetylcholine, and calcium. NO availability is reduced in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and associated with endothelial dysfunction. We previously demonstrated that, through increased phosphatidylserine membrane exposure, ESRD-RBCs augmented their adhesion to human cultured endothelium, in which NO bioavailability decreased. Since RBC-NOS-dependent NO production in ESRD is unknown, this study aimed to investigate RBC-NOS levels/activation, NO production/bioavailability in RBCs from healthy control subjects (C, N = 18) and ESRD patients (N = 27). Although RBC-NOS expression was lower in ESRD-RBCs, NO, cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), RBC-NOS Serine1177 phosphorylation level and eNOS/Calmodulin (CaM)/Heat Shock Protein-90 (HSP90) interaction levels were higher in ESRD-RBCs, indicating increased enzyme activation. Conversely, following RBCs stimulation with insulin or ionomycin, NO and cGMP levels were significantly lower in ESRD- than in C-RBCs, suggesting that uremia might reduce the RBC-NOS response to further stimuli. Additionally, the activity of multidrug-resistance-associated protein-4 (MRP4; cGMP-membrane transporter) was significantly lower in ESRD-RBCs, suggesting a possible compromised efflux of cGMP across the ESRD-RBCs membrane. This study for the first time showed highest basal RBC-NOS activation in ESRD-RBCs, possibly to reduce the negative impact of decreased NOS expression. It is further conceivable that high NO production only partially affects cell function of ESRD-RBCs maybe because in vivo they are unable to respond to physiologic stimuli, such as calcium and/or insulin.

  2. Signaling Components of Redox Active Endosomes: The Redoxosomes

    PubMed Central

    Oakley, Fredrick D.; Abbott, Duane; Li, Qiang

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Subcellular compartmentalization of reactive oxygen species (ROS) plays a critical role in transmitting cell signals in response to environmental stimuli. In this regard, signals at the plasma membrane have been shown to trigger NADPH oxidase-dependent ROS production within the endosomal compartment and this step can be required for redox-dependent signal transduction. Unique features of redox-active signaling endosomes can include NADPH oxidase complex components (Nox1, Noxo1, Noxa1, Nox2, p47phox, p67phox, and/or Rac1), ROS processing enzymes (SOD1 and/or peroxiredoxins), chloride channels capable of mediating superoxide transport and/or membrane gradients required for Nox activity, and novel redox-dependent sensors that control Nox activity. This review will discuss the cytokine and growth factor receptors that likely mediate signaling through redox-active endosomes, and the common mechanisms whereby they act. Additionally, the review will cover ligand-independent environmental injuries, such as hypoxia/reoxygenation injury, that also appear to facilitate cell signaling through NADPH oxidase at the level of the endosome. We suggest that redox-active endosomes encompass a subset of signaling endosomes that we have termed redoxosomes. Redoxosomes are uniquely equipped with redox-processing proteins capable of transmitting ROS signals from the endosome interior to redox-sensitive effectors on the endosomal surface. In this manner, redoxosomes can control redox-dependent effector functions through the spatial and temporal regulation of ROS as second messengers. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 11, 1313–1333. PMID:19072143

  3. Noncatalytic cGMP-binding sites of amphibian rod cGMP phosphodiesterase control interaction with its inhibitory gamma-subunits. A putative regulatory mechanism of the rod photoresponse.

    PubMed

    Arshavsky, V Y; Dumke, C L; Bownds, M D

    1992-12-05

    The cGMP phosphodiesterase (PDE) of retinal rods plays a central role in phototransduction. Illumination leads to its activation by a rod G-protein (Gt, transducin), thus causing a decrease in intracellular cGMP concentration, closure of plasma membrane cationic channels gated by cGMP, and development of the photoresponse. The PDE holoenzyme is an alpha beta gamma 2 tetramer. The alpha- and beta-subunits each contain one catalytic and one, or possibly two, noncatalytic cGMP-binding sites. Two identical gamma-subunits serve as protein inhibitors of the enzyme. Their inhibition is removed when they bind to Gt-GTP during PDE activation. Here we report that the noncatalytic cGMP-binding sites regulate the binding of PDE alpha beta with PDE gamma and as a result determine the mechanism of PDE activation by Gt. If the noncatalytic sites are empty, Gt-GTP physically removes PDE gamma from PDE alpha beta upon activation. Alternatively, if the noncatalytic sites are occupied by cGMP, Gt-GTP releases PDE gamma inhibitory action but remains bound in a complex with the PDE heterotetramer. The kinetic parameters of activated PDE in these two cases are indistinguishable. This mechanism appears to have two implications for the physiology of photoreceptor cells. First, the tight binding of PDE gamma with PDE alpha beta when the noncatalytic sites are occupied by cGMP may be responsible for the low level of basal PDE activity observed in dark-adapted cells. Second, occupancy of the noncatalytic sites ultimately controls the rate of PDE inactivation (cf. Arshavsky, V. Yu., and Bownds, M. D. (1992) Nature 357, 416-417), for the GTPase activity that terminates PDE activity is slower when these sites are occupied and Gt stays in a complex with PDE holoenzyme. In contrast GTPase acceleration is maximal when the noncatalytic sites are empty and Gt-PDE gamma dissociates from PDE alpha beta. Because cGMP levels are known to decrease upon illumination over a concentration range

  4. cGMP modulates stem cells differentiation to neurons in brain in vivo.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Pinedo, U; Rodrigo, R; Cauli, O; Herraiz, S; Garcia-Verdugo, J-M; Pellicer, B; Pellicer, A; Felipo, V

    2010-02-17

    During brain development neural stem cells may differentiate to neurons or to other cell types. The aim of this work was to assess the role of cGMP (cyclic GMP) in the modulation of differentiation of neural stem cells to neurons or non-neuronal cells. cGMP in brain of fetuses was reduced to 46% of controls by treating pregnant rats with nitroarginine-methylester (L-NAME) and was restored by co-treatment with sildenafil.Reducing cGMP during brain development leads to reduced differentiation of stem cells to neurons and increased differentiation to non-neuronal cells. The number of neurons in the prefrontal cortex originated from stem cells proliferating on gestational day 14 was 715+/-14/mm(2) in control rats and was reduced to 440+/-29/mm(2) (61% of control) in rats treated with L-NAME. In rats exposed to L-NAME plus sildenafil, differentiation to neurons was completely normalized, reaching 683+/-11 neurons/mm(2). In rats exposed to sildenafil alone the number of cells labelled with bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) and NeuN was 841+/-16/mm(2). In prefrontal cortex of control rats 48% of the neural stem cells proliferating in gestational day 14 differentiate to neurons, but only 24% in rats exposed to L-NAME. This was corrected by sildenafil, 40% of cells differentiate to neurons. Similar results were obtained for neurons proliferating during all developmental period. Treatment with L-NAME did not reduce the total number of cells labelled with BrdU, further supporting that L-NAME reduces selectively the differentiation of stem cells to neurons. Similar results were obtained in hippocampus. Treatment with L-NAME reduced the differentiation of neural stem cells to neurons, although the effect was milder than in prefrontal cortex. These results support that cGMP modulates the fate of neural stem cells in brain in vivo and suggest that high cGMP levels promote its differentiation to neurons while reduced cGMP levels promote differentiation to non-neuronal cells.

  5. Glc-TOR signalling leads transcriptome reprogramming and meristem activation

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Yan; McCormack, Matthew; Li, Lei; Hall, Qi; Xiang, Chengbin; Sheen, Jen

    2013-01-01

    Meristems encompass stem/progenitor cells that sustain postembryonic growth of all plant organs. How meristems are activated and sustained by nutrient signalling remains enigmatic in photosynthetic plants. Combining chemical manipulations and chemical genetics at the photoautotrophic transition checkpoint, we reveal that shoot photosynthesis-derived glucose drives target-of-rapamycin (TOR) signalling relays through glycolysis and mitochondrial bioenergetics to control root meristem activation, which is decoupled from direct glucose sensing, growth-hormone signalling, and stem-cell maintenance. Surprisingly, glucose-TOR signalling dictates transcriptional reprogramming of remarkable gene sets involved in central and secondary metabolism, cell cycle, transcription, signalling, transport and folding. Systems, cellular and genetic analyses uncover TOR phosphorylation of E2Fa transcription factor for an unconventional activation of S-phase genes, and glucose-signalling defects in e2fa root meristems. Our findings establish pivotal roles of glucose-TOR signalling in unprecedented transcriptional networks wiring central metabolism and biosynthesis for energy and biomass production, and integrating localized stem/progenitor-cell proliferation through inter-organ nutrient coordination to control developmental transition and growth. PMID:23542588

  6. Irsogladine maleate potentiates the effects of nitric oxide on activation of cAMP signalling pathways and suppression of mesangial cell mitogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Yao, J; Zhu, Y; Sun, W; Sawada, N; Hiramatsu, N; Takeda, M; Kitamura, M

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: Deficiency in nitric oxide (NO) is a major factor leading to deterioration and progression of certain glomerular diseases. Agents enhancing NO availability and potentiality are renoprotective. Irsogladine maleate (IM), an anti-ulcer drug, is reported to improve gastric blood flow via NO-dependent mechanisms. We, therefore, asked whether and how IM interacted with NO on glomerular mesangial cells. Experimental approach: Mesangial cells were exposed to IM and NO donors. Activation of cAMP signalling pathways was assessed by intracellular cAMP, phosphorylation of VASP, activation of the cAMP response element (CRE) and expression of CRE-regulated proteins. Key results: IM alone did not affect cell proliferation. However, it greatly enhanced the growth-inhibitory effect of NO donor S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP). IM acted synergistically with NO on suppression of mitogen-activated protein kinase activation, induction of gap junction protein connexin43, increase of intracellular cAMP, and phosphorylation of VASP. With the use of the CRE-SEAP-based reporting system, IM and SNAP cooperatively activated cAMP response elements (CRE). A similar activation of cAMP was induced by IM with two different NO donors, the sGC activator Bay 41-2272 and the cGMP analogue 8-bromo-cGMP. The effects of SNAP and IM on cAMP activation were mimicked by phosphodiesterase 3 (PDE3) and PDE4 inhibitors. In addition, IM markedly augmented cytokine-induced expression of iNOS, production of NO and activation of CRE. Conclusion and implications: The effects of NO were greatly potentiated by IM through synergistic activation of cAMP pathway. Combined therapy with IM and NO may be developed for certain renal diseases. PMID:17435794

  7. Phosphodiesterase-5 Inhibitors: Action on the Signaling Pathways of Neuroinflammation, Neurodegeneration, and Cognition

    PubMed Central

    Peixoto, Christina Alves; Nunes, Ana Karolina Santana; Garcia-Osta, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors (PDE5-Is) have recently emerged as a potential therapeutic strategy for neuroinflammatory, neurodegenerative, and memory loss diseases. Mechanistically, PDE5-Is produce an anti-inflammatory and neuroprotection effect by increasing expression of nitric oxide synthases and accumulation of cGMP and activating protein kinase G (PKG), the signaling pathway of which is thought to play an important role in the development of several neurodiseases, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), and multiple sclerosis (MS). The aim of this paper was to review present knowledge of the signaling pathways that underlie the use of PDE5-Is in neuroinflammation, neurogenesis, learning, and memory. PMID:26770022

  8. Cytoskeletal forces during signaling activation in Jurkat T-cells

    PubMed Central

    Hui, King Lam; Balagopalan, Lakshmi; Samelson, Lawrence E.; Upadhyaya, Arpita

    2015-01-01

    T-cells are critical for the adaptive immune response in the body. The binding of the T-cell receptor (TCR) with antigen on the surface of antigen-presenting cells leads to cell spreading and signaling activation. The underlying mechanism of signaling activation is not completely understood. Although cytoskeletal forces have been implicated in this process, the contribution of different cytoskeletal components and their spatial organization are unknown. Here we use traction force microscopy to measure the forces exerted by Jurkat T-cells during TCR activation. Perturbation experiments reveal that these forces are largely due to actin assembly and dynamics, with myosin contractility contributing to the development of force but not its maintenance. We find that Jurkat T-cells are mechanosensitive, with cytoskeletal forces and signaling dynamics both sensitive to the stiffness of the substrate. Our results delineate the cytoskeletal contributions to interfacial forces exerted by T-cells during activation. PMID:25518938

  9. Coco is a dual activity modulator of TGFβ signaling

    PubMed Central

    Deglincerti, Alessia; Haremaki, Tomomi; Warmflash, Aryeh; Sorre, Benoit; Brivanlou, Ali H.

    2015-01-01

    The TGFβ signaling pathway is a crucial regulator of developmental processes and disease. The activity of TGFβ ligands is modulated by various families of soluble inhibitors that interfere with the interactions between ligands and receptors. In an unbiased, genome-wide RNAi screen to identify genes involved in ligand-dependent signaling, we unexpectedly identified the BMP/Activin/Nodal inhibitor Coco as an enhancer of TGFβ1 signaling. Coco synergizes with TGFβ1 in both cell culture and Xenopus explants. Molecularly, Coco binds to TGFβ1 and enhances TGFβ1 binding to its receptor Alk5. Thus, Coco acts as both an inhibitor and an enhancer of signaling depending on the ligand it binds. This finding raises the need for a global reconsideration of the molecular mechanisms regulating TGFβ signaling. PMID:26116664

  10. Coco is a dual activity modulator of TGFβ signaling.

    PubMed

    Deglincerti, Alessia; Haremaki, Tomomi; Warmflash, Aryeh; Sorre, Benoit; Brivanlou, Ali H

    2015-08-01

    The TGFβ signaling pathway is a crucial regulator of developmental processes and disease. The activity of TGFβ ligands is modulated by various families of soluble inhibitors that interfere with the interactions between ligands and receptors. In an unbiased, genome-wide RNAi screen to identify genes involved in ligand-dependent signaling, we unexpectedly identified the BMP/Activin/Nodal inhibitor Coco as an enhancer of TGFβ1 signaling. Coco synergizes with TGFβ1 in both cell culture and Xenopus explants. Molecularly, Coco binds to TGFβ1 and enhances TGFβ1 binding to its receptor Alk5. Thus, Coco acts as both an inhibitor and an enhancer of signaling depending on the ligand it binds. This finding raises the need for a global reconsideration of the molecular mechanisms regulating TGFβ signaling.

  11. Cannabinoids Activate Monoaminergic Signaling to Modulate Key C. elegans Behaviors.

    PubMed

    Oakes, Mitchell D; Law, Wen Jing; Clark, Tobias; Bamber, Bruce A; Komuniecki, Richard

    2017-03-15

    Cannabis sativa, or marijuana, a popular recreational drug, alters sensory perception and exerts a range of potential medicinal benefits. The present study demonstrates that the endogenous cannabinoid receptor agonists 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) and anandamide (AEA) activate a canonical cannabinoid receptor in Caenorhabditis elegans and also modulate monoaminergic signaling at multiple levels. 2-AG or AEA inhibit nociception and feeding through a pathway requiring the cannabinoid-like receptor NPR-19. 2-AG or AEA activate NPR-19 directly and cannabinoid-dependent inhibition can be rescued in npr-19-null animals by the expression of a human cannabinoid receptor, CB1, highlighting the orthology of the receptors. Cannabinoids also modulate nociception and locomotion through an NPR-19-independent pathway requiring an α2A-adrenergic-like octopamine (OA) receptor, OCTR-1, and a 5-HT1A-like serotonin (5-HT) receptor, SER-4, that involves a complex interaction among cannabinoid, octopaminergic, and serotonergic signaling. 2-AG activates OCTR-1 directly. In contrast, 2-AG does not activate SER-4 directly, but appears to enhance SER-4-dependent serotonergic signaling by increasing endogenous 5-HT. This study defines a conserved cannabinoid signaling system in C. elegans, demonstrates the cannabinoid-dependent activation of monoaminergic signaling, and highlights the advantages of studying cannabinoid signaling in a genetically tractable whole-animal model.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENTCannabis sativa, or marijuana, causes euphoria and exerts a wide range of medicinal benefits. For years, cannabinoids have been studied at the cellular level using tissue explants with conflicting results. To better understand cannabinoid signaling, we have used the Caenorhabditis elegans model to examine the effects of cannabinoids on behavior. The present study demonstrates that mammalian cannabinoid receptor ligands activate a conserved cannabinoid signaling system in C. elegans and also

  12. Facilitation of corticostriatal transmission following pharmacological inhibition of striatal phosphodiesterase 10A: role of nitric oxide-soluble guanylyl cyclase-cGMP signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Padovan-Neto, Fernando E; Sammut, Stephen; Chakroborty, Shreaya; Dec, Alexander M; Threlfell, Sarah; Campbell, Peter W; Mudrakola, Vishnu; Harms, John F; Schmidt, Christopher J; West, Anthony R

    2015-04-08

    The striatum contains a rich variety of cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs), which play a critical role in the regulation of cAMP and cGMP signaling. The dual-substrate enzyme PDE10A is the most highly expressed PDE in striatal medium-sized spiny neurons (MSNs) with low micromolar affinity for both cyclic nucleotides. Previously, we have shown that systemic and local administration of the selective PDE10A inhibitor TP-10 potently increased the responsiveness of MSNs to cortical stimulation. However, the signaling mechanisms underlying PDE10A inhibitor-induced changes in corticostriatal transmission are only partially understood. The current studies assessed the respective roles of cAMP and cGMP in the above effects using soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) or adenylate cyclase (AC) specific inhibitors. Cortically evoked spike activity was monitored in urethane-anesthetized rats using in vivo extracellular recordings performed proximal to a microdialysis probe during local infusion of vehicle, the selective sGC inhibitor ODQ, or the selective AC inhibitor SQ 22536. Systemic administration of TP-10 (3.2 mg/kg) robustly increased cortically evoked spike activity in a manner that was blocked following intrastriatal infusion of ODQ (50 μm). The effects of TP-10 on evoked activity were due to accumulation of cGMP, rather than cAMP, as the AC inhibitor SQ was without effect. Consistent with these observations, studies in neuronal NO synthase (nNOS) knock-out (KO) mice confirmed that PDE10A operates downstream of nNOS to limit cGMP production and excitatory corticostriatal transmission. Thus, stimulation of PDE10A acts to attenuate corticostriatal transmission in a manner largely dependent on effects directed at the NO-sGC-cGMP signaling cascade. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/355781-11$15.00/0.

  13. Tactile signals transmitted by the vibrissa during active whisking behavior

    PubMed Central

    Huet, Lucie A.; Schroeder, Christopher L.

    2015-01-01

    The rodent vibrissal-trigeminal system is one of the most widely used models for the study of somatosensation and tactile perception, but to date the field has been unable to quantify the complete set of mechanical input signals generated during natural whisking behavior. In this report we show that during whisking behavior of awake rats (Rattus norvegicus), the whisker will often bend out of its plane of rotation, generating sizeable mechanical (tactile) signals out of the plane. We then develop a model of whisker bending that allows us to compute the three-dimensional tactile signals at the vibrissal base during active whisking behavior. Considerable information can be lost if whisking motions are considered only in two dimensions, and we offer some suggestions for experimentalists concerned with monitoring the direction of bending. These data represent the first quantification of the physical signals transmitted to the mechanoreceptors in the follicle during active whisking behavior. PMID:25867739

  14. Tac-beta1 inhibits FAK activation and Src signaling.

    PubMed

    Berrier, Allison L; Jones, Christopher W; LaFlamme, Susan E

    2008-03-28

    The binding of integrins to extracellular matrix triggers signals that promote cell spreading. We previously demonstrated that expression of the integrin beta1 cytoplasmic domain in the context of a chimeric transmembrane receptor with the Tac subunit of the interleukin-2 receptor (Tac-beta1) inhibits cell spreading. To study the mechanism whereby Tac-beta1 inhibits cell spreading, we examined the effect of Tac-beta1 on early signaling events following integrin engagement namely FAK and Src signaling. We infected primary fibroblasts with adenoviruses expressing Tac or Tac-beta1 and found that Tac-beta1 prevented FAK activation by inhibiting the phosphorylation of FAK at Tyr-397. In contrast, Src activation was maintained, as phosphorylation of Src at Tyr-419 and Tyr-530 were not responsive to expression of Tac-beta1. Importantly, adhesion-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of the Src substrates p130Cas and paxillin was inhibited, indicating that Src signaling was blocked by Tac-beta1. These Src-dependent signaling events were found to require FAK signaling. Our results suggest that Tac-beta1 inhibits cell spreading, at least in part, by preventing the phosphorylation of FAK at Tyr-397 and the assembly of signaling complexes necessary for phosphorylation of p130Cas and other downstream effectors.

  15. Mislocalized activation of oncogenic RTKs switches downstream signaling outcomes.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Chunaram; Olsen, Jesper V; Brandts, Christian; Cox, Jürgen; Reddy, Pavankumar N G; Böhmer, Frank D; Gerke, Volker; Schmidt-Arras, Dirk-E; Berdel, Wolfgang E; Müller-Tidow, Carsten; Mann, Matthias; Serve, Hubert

    2009-10-23

    Inappropriate activation of oncogenic kinases at intracellular locations is frequently observed in human cancers, but its effects on global signaling are incompletely understood. Here, we show that the oncogenic mutant of Flt3 (Flt3-ITD), when localized at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), aberrantly activates STAT5 and upregulates its targets, Pim-1/2, but fails to activate PI3K and MAPK signaling. Conversely, membrane targeting of Flt3-ITD strongly activates the MAPK and PI3K pathways, with diminished phosphorylation of STAT5. Global phosphoproteomics quantified 12,186 phosphorylation sites, confirmed compartment-dependent activation of these pathways and discovered many additional components of Flt3-ITD signaling. The differential activation of Akt and Pim kinases by ER-retained Flt3-ITD helped to identify their putative targets. Surprisingly, we find spatial regulation of tyrosine phosphorylation patterns of the receptor itself. Thus, intracellular activation of RTKs by oncogenic mutations in the biosynthetic route may exploit cellular architecture to initiate aberrant signaling cascades, thus evading negative regulation.

  16. [Aging reduces contents of endogenous CO, cAMP and cGMP in rat penile tissues].

    PubMed

    Qin, Wen-Bo; Wang, Shu-Qiu; Li, Ming; Kang, Yu-Ming; Gui, Shi-Liang; Chi, Bao-Jin

    2009-02-01

    To explore the relationship of aging with the changes of endogenous carbon monoxide (CO), cGMP and cAMP contents in the penile tissues of rats. Twenty-four male rats were equally divided into an 8-month, a 16-month and a 24-month group, and their penile erection was detected by injecting apomorphine, their penile cavernous body harvested, and the contents of CO, cAPM and cGMP detected by improved dual wavelength spectrophotometry. The contents of CO, cAPM and cGMP were reduced with the increase of age, with statistically significant differences between the three age groups (P < 0.01). Aging significantly decreased the contents of CO, cAMP and cGMP in the penile tissues of the rats, which suggests that aging might play an important role in erectile dysfunction.

  17. Enhanced Multistatic Active Sonar via Innovative Signal Processing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-30

    DATES COVERED (From - To) Oct. 01. 2013-Sept. 30, 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Enhanced Multistatic Active Sonar via Innovative Signal Processing 5a...DISTRIBUTION AVAILABILITY STATEMENT Approved for Public Release; Distribution is Unlimited. 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Pulsed active sonar ...PAS) and continuous active sonar (CAS) in the presence of strong direct blast are studied for the Doppler-tolerant linear frequency modulation

  18. Establishing a cGMP pancreatic islet processing facility: the first experience in Iran.

    PubMed

    Larijani, Bagher; Arjmand, Babak; Amoli, Mahsa M; Ao, Ziliang; Jafarian, Ali; Mahdavi-Mazdah, Mitra; Ghanaati, Hossein; Baradar-Jalili, Reza; Sharghi, Sasan; Norouzi-Javidan, Abbas; Aghayan, Hamid Reza

    2012-12-01

    It has been predicted that one of the greatest increase in prevalence of diabetes will happen in the Middle East bear in the next decades. The aim of standard therapeutic strategies for diabetes is better control of complications. In contrast, some new strategies like cell and gene therapy have aimed to cure the disease. In recent years, significant progress has occurred in beta-cell replacement therapies with a progressive improvement of short-term and long term outcomes. In year 2005, considering the impact of the disease in Iran and the promising results of the Edmonton protocol, the funding for establishing a current Good Manufacturing Practice (cGMP) islet processing facility by Endocrinology and Metabolism Research Center was approved by Tehran University of Medical Sciences. Several islet isolations were performed following establishment of cGMP facility and recruitment of all required equipments for process validation and experimental purpose. Finally the first successful clinical islet isolation and transplantation was performed in September 2010. In spite of a high cost of the procedure it is considered beneficial and may prevent long term complications and the costs associated with secondary cares. In this article we will briefly describe our experience in setting up a cGMP islet processing facility which can provide valuable information for regional countries interested to establish similar facilities.

  19. The implementation of tissue banking experiences for setting up a cGMP cell manufacturing facility.

    PubMed

    Arjmand, Babak; Emami-Razavi, Seyed Hassan; Larijani, Bagher; Norouzi-Javidan, Abbas; Aghayan, Hamid Reza

    2012-12-01

    Cell manufacturing for clinical applications is a unique form of biologics manufacturing that relies on maintenance of stringent work practices designed to ensure product consistency and prevent contamination by microorganisms or by another patient's cells. More extensive, prolonged laboratory processes involve greater risk of complications and possibly adverse events for the recipient, and so the need for control is correspondingly greater. To minimize the associate risks of cell manufacturing adhering to international quality standards is critical. Current good tissue practice (cGTP) and current good manufacturing practice (cGMP) are examples of general standards that draw a baseline for cell manufacturing facilities. In recent years, stem cell researches have found great public interest in Iran and different cell therapy projects have been started in country. In this review we described the role of our tissue banking experiences in establishing a new cGMP cell manufacturing facility. The authors concluded that, tissue banks and tissue banking experts can broaden their roles from preparing tissue grafts to manufacturing cell and tissue engineered products for translational researches and phase I clinical trials. Also they can collaborate with cell processing laboratories to develop SOPs, implement quality management system, and design cGMP facilities.

  20. White - cGMP Interaction Promotes Fast Locomotor Recovery from Anoxia in Adult Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that the white (w) gene in Drosophila possesses extra-retinal functions in addition to its classical role in eye pigmentation. We have previously shown that w+ promotes fast and consistent locomotor recovery from anoxia, but how w+ modulates locomotor recovery is largely unknown. Here we show that in the absence of w+, several PDE mutants, especially cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP)-specific PDE mutants, display wildtype-like fast locomotor recovery from anoxia, and that during the night time, locomotor recovery was light-sensitive in white-eyed mutant w1118, and light-insensitive in PDE mutants under w1118 background. Data indicate the involvement of cGMP in the modulation of recovery timing and presumably, light-evoked cGMP fluctuation is associated with light sensitivity of locomotor recovery. This was further supported by the observations that w-RNAi-induced delay of locomotor recovery was completely eliminated by upregulation of cGMP through multiple approaches, including PDE mutation, simultaneous overexpression of an atypical soluble guanylyl cyclase Gyc88E, or sildenafil feeding. Lastly, prolonged sildenafil feeding promoted fast locomotor recovery from anoxia in w1118. Taken together, these data suggest that a White-cGMP interaction modulates the timing of locomotor recovery from anoxia. PMID:28060942

  1. Stra13 regulates satellite cell activation by antagonizing Notch signaling

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hong; Li, Li; Vercherat, Cécile; Gulbagci, Neriman Tuba; Acharjee, Sujata; Li, Jiali; Chung, Teng-Kai; Thin, Tin Htwe; Taneja, Reshma

    2007-01-01

    Satellite cells play a critical role in skeletal muscle regeneration in response to injury. Notch signaling is vital for satellite cell activation and myogenic precursor cell expansion but inhibits myogenic differentiation. Thus, precise spatial and temporal regulation of Notch activity is necessary for efficient muscle regeneration. We report that the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor Stra13 modulates Notch signaling in regenerating muscle. Upon injury, Stra13−/− mice exhibit increased cellular proliferation, elevated Notch signaling, a striking regeneration defect characterized by degenerated myotubes, increased mononuclear cells, and fibrosis. Stra13−/− primary myoblasts also exhibit enhanced Notch activity, increased proliferation, and defective differentiation. Inhibition of Notch signaling ex vivo and in vivo ameliorates the phenotype of Stra13−/− mutants. We demonstrate in vitro that Stra13 antagonizes Notch activity and reverses the Notch-imposed inhibition of myogenesis. Thus, Stra13 plays an important role in postnatal myogenesis by attenuating Notch signaling to reduce myoblast proliferation and promote myogenic differentiation. PMID:17502421

  2. Platelet-activating factor: receptors and signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Chao, W; Olson, M S

    1993-06-15

    During the past two decades, studies describing the chemistry and biology of PAF have been extensive. This potent phosphoacylglycerol exhibits a wide variety of physiological and pathophysiological effects in various cells and tissues. PAF acts, through specific receptors and a variety of signal transduction systems, to elicit diverse biochemical responses. Several important future directions can be enumerated for the characterization of PAF receptors and their attendant signalling mechanisms. The recent cloning and sequence analysis of the gene for the PAF receptor will allow a number of important experimental approaches for characterizing the structure and analysing the function of the various domains of the receptor. Using molecular genetic and immunological technologies, questions relating to whether there is receptor heterogeneity, the precise mechanism(s) for the regulation of the PAF receptor, and the molecular details of the signalling mechanisms in which the PAF receptor is involved can be explored. Another area of major significance is the examination of the relationship between the signalling response(s) evoked by PAF binding to its receptor and signalling mechanisms activated by a myriad of other mediators, cytokines and growth factors. A very exciting recent development in which PAF receptors undoubtedly play a role is in the regulation of the function of various cellular adhesion molecules. Finally, there remain many incompletely characterized physiological and pathophysiological situations in which PAF and its receptor play a crucial signalling role. Our laboratory has been active in the elucidation of several tissue responses in which PAF exhibits major autocoid signalling responses, e.g. hepatic injury and inflammation, acute and chronic pancreatitis, and cerebral stimulation and/or trauma. As new experimental strategies are developed for characterizing the fine structure of the molecular mechanisms involved in tissue injury and inflammation, the

  3. Protein and Signaling Networks in Vertebrate Photoreceptor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Karl-Wilhelm; Dell’Orco, Daniele

    2015-01-01

    Vertebrate photoreceptor cells are exquisite light detectors operating under very dim and bright illumination. The photoexcitation and adaptation machinery in photoreceptor cells consists of protein complexes that can form highly ordered supramolecular structures and control the homeostasis and mutual dependence of the secondary messengers cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) and Ca2+. The visual pigment in rod photoreceptors, the G protein-coupled receptor rhodopsin is organized in tracks of dimers thereby providing a signaling platform for the dynamic scaffolding of the G protein transducin. Illuminated rhodopsin is turned off by phosphorylation catalyzed by rhodopsin kinase (GRK1) under control of Ca2+-recoverin. The GRK1 protein complex partly assembles in lipid raft structures, where shutting off rhodopsin seems to be more effective. Re-synthesis of cGMP is another crucial step in the recovery of the photoresponse after illumination. It is catalyzed by membrane bound sensory guanylate cyclases (GCs) and is regulated by specific neuronal Ca2+-sensor proteins called guanylate cyclase-activating proteins (GCAPs). At least one GC (ROS-GC1) was shown to be part of a multiprotein complex having strong interactions with the cytoskeleton and being controlled in a multimodal Ca2+-dependent fashion. The final target of the cGMP signaling cascade is a cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channel that is a hetero-oligomeric protein located in the plasma membrane and interacting with accessory proteins in highly organized microdomains. We summarize results and interpretations of findings related to the inhomogeneous organization of signaling units in photoreceptor outer segments. PMID:26635520

  4. Receptor tyrosine kinases: mechanisms of activation and signaling

    PubMed Central

    Hubbard, Stevan R.; Miller, W. Todd

    2008-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) are essential components of signal transduction pathways that mediate cell-to-cell communication. These single-pass transmembrane receptors, which bind polypeptide ligands — mainly growth factors — play key roles in processes such as cellular growth, differentiation, metabolism and motility. Recent progress has been achieved towards an understanding of the precise (and varied) mechanisms by which RTKs are activated by ligand binding and by which signals are propagated from the activated receptors to downstream targets in the cell. PMID:17306972

  5. Cytokinin Signaling Activates WUSCHEL Expression during Axillary Meristem Initiation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jin; Tian, Caihuan; Zhang, Cui; Shi, Bihai; Cao, Xiuwei; Zhang, Tian-Qi; Zhao, Zhong; Wang, Jia-Wei; Jiao, Yuling

    2017-06-01

    The homeodomain transcription factor WUSCHEL (WUS) defines the shoot stem cell niche, but the mechanisms underlying the establishment of WUS expression remain unclear. Here, we show that cytokinin signaling precedes WUS expression in leaf axils and activates WUS expression de novo in the leaf axil to promote axillary meristem initiation. Furthermore, type-B Arabidopsis response regulator proteins, which are transcriptional activators in the cytokinin signaling pathway, directly bind to the WUS promoter and activate its expression. Finally, we show that cytokinin activation of WUS in the leaf axil correlates with increased histone acetylation and methylation markers associated with transcriptional activation, supporting the fact that WUS expression requires a permissive epigenetic environment to restrict it to highly defined meristematic tissues. Taken together, these findings explain how cytokinin regulates axillary meristem initiation and establish a mechanistic framework for the postembryonic establishment of the shoot stem cell niche. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  6. Notch signaling promotes osteoclast maturation and resorptive activity

    PubMed Central

    Ashley, Jason W; Ahn, Jaimo; Hankenson, Kurt D

    2015-01-01

    The role of Notch signaling in osteoclast differentiation is controversial with conflicting experimental evidence indicating both stimulatory and inhibitory roles. Differences in experimental protocols and in vivo versus in vitro models may explain the discrepancies between studies. In this study, we investigated cell autonomous roles of Notch signaling in osteoclast differentiation and function by altering Notch signaling during osteoclast differentiation using stimulation with immobilized ligands Jagged1 or Delta-like1 or by suppression with γ-secretase inhibitor DAPT or transcriptional inhibitor SAHM1. Stimulation of Notch signaling in committed osteoclast precursors resulted in larger osteoclasts with a greater number of nuclei and resorptive activity whereas suppression resulted in smaller osteoclasts with fewer nuclei and suppressed resorptive activity. Conversely, stimulation of Notch signaling in osteoclast precursors prior to induction of osteoclastogenesis resulted in fewer osteoclasts. Our data support a mechanism of context-specific Notch signaling effects wherein Notch stimulation inhibits commitment to osteoclast differentiation, but enhances the maturation and function of committed precursors. PMID:25914241

  7. Zinc modulates PPARgamma signaling and activation of porcine endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Meerarani, Purushothaman; Reiterer, Gudrun; Toborek, Michal; Hennig, Bernhard

    2003-10-01

    Dietary zinc has potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties and is a critical component of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) gene expression and regulation. To assess the protective mechanisms of PPARgamma in endothelial cell dysfunction and the role of zinc in the modulation of PPARgamma signaling, cultured porcine pulmonary artery endothelial cells were exposed to the membrane-permeable zinc chelator N,N,N'N'-tetrakis (2-pyridylmethyl)-ethylene diamine (TPEN), thiazolidinedione (TZD; PPARgamma agonist) or bisphenol A diglycidyl ether (BADGE; PPARgamma antagonist). Subsequently, endothelial cells were activated by treatment with linoleic acid (90 micro mol/L) for 6 h. Zinc chelation by TPEN increased the DNA binding activity of nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB and activator protein (AP)-1, decreased PPARgamma expression and activation as well as up-regulated interleukin (IL)-6 expression and production. These effects were fully reversed by zinc supplementation. In addition, exposure to TZD down-regulated linoleic acid-induced DNA binding activity of NF-kappaB and AP-1, whereas BADGE further induced activation of these oxidative stress-sensitive transcription factors. Most importantly, the TZD-mediated down-regulation of NF-kappaB and AP-1 and reduced inflammatory response were impaired during zinc chelation. These data suggest that zinc plays a critical role in PPARgamma signaling in linoleic acid-induced endothelial cell activation and indicate that PPARgamma signaling is impaired during zinc deficiency.

  8. Luteinizing Hormone Reduces the Activity of the NPR2 Guanylyl Cyclase in Mouse Ovarian Follicles, Contributing to the Cyclic GMP Decrease that Promotes Resumption of Meiosis in Oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Jerid W.; Zhang, Meijia; Shuhaibar, Leia C.; Norris, Rachael P.; Geerts, Andreas; Wunder, Frank; Eppig, John J.; Potter, Lincoln R.; Jaffe, Laurinda A.

    2012-01-01

    In preovulatory ovarian follicles of mice, meiotic prophase arrest in the oocyte is maintained by cyclic GMP from the surrounding granulosa cells that diffuses into the oocyte through gap junctions. The cGMP is synthesized in the granulosa cells by the transmembrane guanylyl cyclase natriuretic peptide receptor 2 (NPR2) in response to the agonist C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP). In response to luteinizing hormone (LH), cGMP in the granulosa cells decreases, and as a consequence, oocyte cGMP decreases and meiosis resumes. Here we report that within 20 minutes, LH treatment results in decreased guanylyl cyclase activity of NPR2, as determined in the presence of a maximally activating concentration of CNP. This occurs by a process that does not reduce the amount of NPR2 protein. We also show that by a slower process, first detected at 2 hours, LH decreases the amount of CNP available to bind to the receptor. Both of these LH actions contribute to decreasing cGMP in the follicle, thus signaling meiotic resumption in the oocyte. PMID:22546688

  9. Wnt signaling and the activation of myogenesis in mammals.

    PubMed Central

    Cossu, G; Borello, U

    1999-01-01

    In the amniote embryos, specification of skeletal myoblasts occurs in the paraxial mesoderm in response to a number of signaling molecules produced by neighboring tissues such as neural tube, notochord and dorsal ectoderm. Candidate molecules for this complex signaling activity include Sonic hedgehog, Wnts and Noggin as positive activators and BMP4 as a possible inhibitor. Recently, the receptors and the post-receptor pathways for Sonic hedgehog and Wnts have been characterized, and this has opened up the possibility of linking these signaling events to the activation of myogenic regulatory factor genes such as Myf5 and MyoD and functionally related genes such as Pax3. Here we focus on the role of Wnts, their putative receptors Frizzled and the soluble antagonist Frzb1 in regulating mammalian myogenesis. Although it is becoming evident that the signaling downstream of Frizzled receptors is much more complex than anticipated, it is conceivable that it may lead to transcriptional activation of Myf5 and MyoD and to initiation of myogenesis. However, the fact that both Wnts and Sonic hedgehog have a strong effect on cell proliferation and survival suggests that they may contribute to the overall process of myogenesis by a combination of these different biological activities. PMID:10601008

  10. Wnt signaling and the activation of myogenesis in mammals.

    PubMed

    Cossu, G; Borello, U

    1999-12-15

    In the amniote embryos, specification of skeletal myoblasts occurs in the paraxial mesoderm in response to a number of signaling molecules produced by neighboring tissues such as neural tube, notochord and dorsal ectoderm. Candidate molecules for this complex signaling activity include Sonic hedgehog, Wnts and Noggin as positive activators and BMP4 as a possible inhibitor. Recently, the receptors and the post-receptor pathways for Sonic hedgehog and Wnts have been characterized, and this has opened up the possibility of linking these signaling events to the activation of myogenic regulatory factor genes such as Myf5 and MyoD and functionally related genes such as Pax3. Here we focus on the role of Wnts, their putative receptors Frizzled and the soluble antagonist Frzb1 in regulating mammalian myogenesis. Although it is becoming evident that the signaling downstream of Frizzled receptors is much more complex than anticipated, it is conceivable that it may lead to transcriptional activation of Myf5 and MyoD and to initiation of myogenesis. However, the fact that both Wnts and Sonic hedgehog have a strong effect on cell proliferation and survival suggests that they may contribute to the overall process of myogenesis by a combination of these different biological activities.

  11. Plant cyclic nucleotide signalling: facts and fiction.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Atienza, Juliana; Van Ingelgem, Carl; Roef, Luc; Maathuis, Frans Jm

    2007-11-01

    The presence of the cyclic nucleotides 3',5'-cyclic adenyl monophosphate (cAMP) and 3',5'-cyclic guanyl monophosphate (cGMP) in plants is now generally accepted. In addition, cAMP and cGMP have been implicated in the regulation of important plant processes such as stomatal functioning, monovalent and divalent cation fluxes, chloroplast development, gibberellic acid signalling, pathogen response and gene transcription. However, very little is known regarding the components of cyclic nucleotide signalling in plants. In this addendum, the evidence for specific mechanisms of plant cyclic nucleotide signalling is evaluated and discussed.

  12. The role of cyclic nucleotide signaling pathways in cancer: targets for prevention and treatment.

    PubMed

    Fajardo, Alexandra M; Piazza, Gary A; Tinsley, Heather N

    2014-02-26

    For more than four decades, the cyclic nucleotides cyclic AMP (cAMP) and cyclic GMP (cGMP) have been recognized as important signaling molecules within cells. Under normal physiological conditions, cyclic nucleotides regulate a myriad of biological processes such as cell growth and adhesion, energy homeostasis, neuronal signaling, and muscle relaxation. In addition, altered cyclic nucleotide signaling has been observed in a number of pathophysiological conditions, including cancer. While the distinct molecular alterations responsible for these effects vary depending on the specific cancer type, several studies have demonstrated that activation of cyclic nucleotide signaling through one of three mechanisms-induction of cyclic nucleotide synthesis, inhibition of cyclic nucleotide degradation, or activation of cyclic nucleotide receptors-is sufficient to inhibit proliferation and activate apoptosis in many types of cancer cells. These findings suggest that targeting cyclic nucleotide signaling can provide a strategy for the discovery of novel agents for the prevention and/or treatment of selected cancers.

  13. The Role of Cyclic Nucleotide Signaling Pathways in Cancer: Targets for Prevention and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Fajardo, Alexandra M.; Piazza, Gary A.; Tinsley, Heather N.

    2014-01-01

    For more than four decades, the cyclic nucleotides cyclic AMP (cAMP) and cyclic GMP (cGMP) have been recognized as important signaling molecules within cells. Under normal physiological conditions, cyclic nucleotides regulate a myriad of biological processes such as cell growth and adhesion, energy homeostasis, neuronal signaling, and muscle relaxation. In addition, altered cyclic nucleotide signaling has been observed in a number of pathophysiological conditions, including cancer. While the distinct molecular alterations responsible for these effects vary depending on the specific cancer type, several studies have demonstrated that activation of cyclic nucleotide signaling through one of three mechanisms—induction of cyclic nucleotide synthesis, inhibition of cyclic nucleotide degradation, or activation of cyclic nucleotide receptors—is sufficient to inhibit proliferation and activate apoptosis in many types of cancer cells. These findings suggest that targeting cyclic nucleotide signaling can provide a strategy for the discovery of novel agents for the prevention and/or treatment of selected cancers. PMID:24577242

  14. 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase signaling in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Beale, Elmus G

    2008-01-01

    5'-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has been called "the metabolic master switch" because of its central role in regulating fuel homeostasis. AMPK, a heterotrimeric serine/threonine protein kinase composed of alpha, beta, and gamma subunits, is activated by upstream kinases and by 5'-AMP in response to various nutritional and stress signals. Downstream effects include regulation of metabolism, protein synthesis, cell growth, and mediation of the actions of a number of hormones, including leptin. However, AMPK research represents a young and growing field; hence, there are many unanswered questions regarding the control and action of AMPK. This review presents evidence for the existence of AMPK signaling pathways in Caenorhabditis elegans, a genetically tractable model organism that has yet to be fully exploited to elucidate AMPK signaling mechanisms.

  15. Gating Kinetics of the Cyclic-GMP-Activated Channel of Retinal Rods: Flash Photolysis and Voltage-Jump Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpen, Jeffrey W.; Zimmerman, Anita L.; Stryer, Lubert; Baylor, Denis A.

    1988-02-01

    The gating kinetics of the cGMP-activated cation channel of salamander retinal rods have been studied in excised membrane patches. Relaxations in patch current were observed after two kinds of perturbation: (i) fast jumps of cGMP concentration, generated by laser flash photolysis of a cGMP ester (``caged'' cGMP), and (ii) membrane voltage jumps, which perturb activation of the channel by cGMP. In both methods the speed of activation increased with the final cGMP concentration. The results are explained by a simple kinetic model in which activation involves three sequential cGMP binding steps with bimolecular rate constants close to the diffusion-controlled limit; fully liganded channels undergo rapid open-closed transitions. Voltage perturbs activation by changing the rate constant for channel closing, which increases with hyperpolarization. Intramolecular transitions of the fully liganded channel limit the kinetics of activation at high cGMP concentrations (>50 μ M), whereas at physiological cGMP concentrations (<5 μ M), the kinetics of activation are limited by the third cGMP binding step. The channel appears to be optimized for rapid responses to changes in cytoplasmic cGMP concentration.

  16. Aversive Behavior in the Nematode C. elegans Is Modulated by cGMP and a Neuronal Gap Junction Network

    PubMed Central

    Krzyzanowski, Michelle C.; Wood, Jordan F.; Brueggemann, Chantal; Bowitch, Alexander; Bethke, Mary; L’Etoile, Noelle D.; Ferkey, Denise M.

    2016-01-01

    All animals rely on their ability to sense and respond to their environment to survive. However, the suitability of a behavioral response is context-dependent, and must reflect both an animal’s life history and its present internal state. Based on the integration of these variables, an animal’s needs can be prioritized to optimize survival strategies. Nociceptive sensory systems detect harmful stimuli and allow for the initiation of protective behavioral responses. The polymodal ASH sensory neurons are the primary nociceptors in C. elegans. We show here that the guanylyl cyclase ODR-1 functions non-cell-autonomously to downregulate ASH-mediated aversive behaviors and that ectopic cGMP generation in ASH is sufficient to dampen ASH sensitivity. We define a gap junction neural network that regulates nociception and propose that decentralized regulation of ASH signaling can allow for rapid correlation between an animal’s internal state and its behavioral output, lending modulatory flexibility to this hard-wired nociceptive neural circuit. PMID:27459302

  17. Redundant group a streptococcus signaling peptides exhibit unique activation potentials.

    PubMed

    LaSarre, Breah; Chang, Jennifer C; Federle, Michael J

    2013-09-01

    All bacterial quorum sensing (QS) systems are based on the production, secretion, and detection of small signaling molecules. Gram-positive bacteria typically use small peptides as QS effectors, and each QS circuit generally requires the interaction of a single signaling molecule with a single receptor protein. The recently described Rgg2 and Rgg3 (Rgg2/3) regulatory circuit of Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococcus [GAS]) is one of only a few QS circuits known to utilize multiple signaling peptides. In this system, two distinct, endogenously produced peptide pheromones (SHP2 and SHP3) both function to activate the QS circuit. The aim of this study was to further define the roles of SHP2 and SHP3 in activation of the Rgg2/3 QS system, specifically with regard to shp gene identity and dosage. Results from our studies using transcriptional reporters and isogenic GAS mutants demonstrate that shp gene dosage does contribute to Rgg2/3 system induction, as decreased gene dosage results in decreased or absent induction. Beyond this, however, data indicate that the shp genes possess distinct potentials for supporting system activation, with shp3 more readily able to support system activation than shp2. Studies using synthetic peptides and shp gene mutants indicate that the disparate activities of endogenous SHPs are due to production, rather than signaling, differences and are conferred by the N-terminal regions rather than the C-terminal signaling regions of the peptides. These data provide evidence that the N-terminal, noneffector sequences of SHP pheromones influence their production efficiencies and thereby the relative activation potentials of endogenous SHPs.

  18. Metabolic signals and innate immune activation in obesity and exercise.

    PubMed

    Ringseis, Robert; Eder, Klaus; Mooren, Frank C; Krüger, Karsten

    2015-01-01

    The combination of a sedentary lifestyle and excess energy intake has led to an increased prevalence of obesity which constitutes a major risk factor for several co-morbidities including type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. Intensive research during the last two decades has revealed that a characteristic feature of obesity linking it to insulin resistance is the presence of chronic low-grade inflammation being indicative of activation of the innate immune system. Recent evidence suggests that activation of the innate immune system in the course of obesity is mediated by metabolic signals, such as free fatty acids (FFAs), being elevated in many obese subjects, through activation of pattern recognition receptors thereby leading to stimulation of critical inflammatory signaling cascades, like IκBα kinase/nuclear factor-κB (IKK/NF- κB), endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-induced unfolded protein response (UPR) and NOD-like receptor P3 (NLRP3) inflammasome pathway, that interfere with insulin signaling. Exercise is one of the main prescribed interventions in obesity management improving insulin sensitivity and reducing obesity- induced chronic inflammation. This review summarizes current knowledge of the cellular recognition mechanisms for FFAs, the inflammatory signaling pathways triggered by excess FFAs in obesity and the counteractive effects of both acute and chronic exercise on obesity-induced activation of inflammatory signaling pathways. A deeper understanding of the effects of exercise on inflammatory signaling pathways in obesity is useful to optimize preventive and therapeutic strategies to combat the increasing incidence of obesity and its comorbidities. Copyright © 2015 International Society of Exercise and Immunology. All rights reserved.

  19. Biased signaling by peptide agonists of protease activated receptor 2.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yuhong; Yau, Mei-Kwan; Kok, W Mei; Lim, Junxian; Wu, Kai-Chen; Liu, Ligong; Hill, Timothy A; Suen, Jacky Y; Fairlie, David P

    2017-02-07

    Protease activated receptor 2 (PAR2) is associated with metabolism, obesity, inflammatory, respiratory and gastrointestinal disorders, pain, cancer and other diseases. The extracellular N-terminus of PAR2 is a common target for multiple proteases, which cleave it at different sites to generate different N-termini that activate different PAR2-mediated intracellular signaling pathways. There are no synthetic PAR2 ligands that reproduce the same signaling profiles and potencies as proteases. Structure-activity relationships here for 26 compounds spanned a signaling bias over 3 log units, culminating in three small ligands as biased agonist tools for interrogating PAR2 functions. DF253 (2f-LAAAAI-NH2) triggered PAR2-mediated calcium release (EC50 2 μM) but not ERK1/2 phosphorylation (EC50 > 100 μM) in CHO cells transfected with hPAR2. AY77 (Isox-Cha-Chg-NH2) was a more potent calcium-biased agonist (EC50 40 nM, Ca2+; EC50 2 μM, ERK1/2), while its analogue AY254 (Isox-Cha-Chg-A-R-NH2) was an ERK-biased agonist (EC50 2 nM, ERK1/2; EC50 80 nM, Ca2+). Signaling bias led to different functional responses in human colorectal carcinoma cells (HT29). AY254, but not AY77 or DF253, attenuated cytokine-induced caspase 3/8 activation, promoted scratch-wound healing and induced IL-8 secretion, all via PAR2-ERK1/2 signaling. Different ligand components were responsible for different PAR2 signaling and functions, clues that can potentially lead to drugs that modulate different pathway-selective cellular and physiological responses.

  20. Epidermal growth factor receptor signaling-dependent calcium elevation in cumulus cells is required for NPR2 inhibition and meiotic resumption in mouse oocytes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yakun; Kong, Nana; Li, Na; Hao, Xiaoqiong; Wei, Kaiwen; Xiang, Xi; Xia, Guoliang; Zhang, Meijia

    2013-09-01

    In preovulatory ovarian follicles, the oocyte is maintained in meiotic prophase arrest by natriuretic peptide precursor C (NPPC) and its receptor natriuretic peptide receptor 2 (NPR2). LH treatment results in the decrease of NPR2 guanylyl cyclase activity that promotes resumption of meiosis. We investigated the regulatory mechanism of LH-activated epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor signaling on NPR2 function. Cumulus cell-oocyte complex is cultured in the medium with 30 nM NPPC to prevent oocyte spontaneous maturation. In this system, EGF could stimulate oocyte meiotic resumption after 4 hours of incubation. Further study showed that EGF elevated intracellular calcium concentrations of cumulus cells and decreased cGMP levels in cumulus cells and oocytes, and calcium-elevating reagents ionomycin and sphingosine-1-phosphate mimicked the effects of EGF on oocyte maturation and cGMP levels. EGF-mediated cGMP levels and meiotic resumption could be reversed by EGF receptor inhibitor AG1478 and the calcium chelator bis-(o-aminophenoxy)-ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid, tetra(acetoxymethyl)-ester. EGF also decreased the expression of Npr2 mRNA in cumulus cells, which may not be involved in meiotic resumption, because the block of NPR2 protein de novo synthesis by cycloheximide had no effect on NPPC and EGF-mediated oocyte maturation. However, EGF had no effect on oocyte maturation when meiotic arrest was maintained in the present of cGMP analog 8-bromoadenosine-cGMP. These results suggest that EGF receptor signaling induces meiotic resumption by elevating calcium concentrations of cumulus cells to decrease NPR2 guanylyl cyclase activity.

  1. Activation of multiple angiogenic signaling pathways in hemangiopericytoma.

    PubMed

    Pierscianek, Daniela; Michel, Anna; Hindy, Nicolai El; Keyvani, Kathy; Dammann, Philipp; Oezkan, Neriman; Mueller, Oliver; Sure, Ulrich; Zhu, Yuan

    2016-07-01

    Hemangiopericytoma (HPC) is a highly vascularized mesenchymal tumor. Local recurrence and distant metastasis are common features of HPC. Considering the remarkable hyper-vasculature phenotype of HPC, we assumed that dysregulated angiogenic signaling pathways were involved in HPC. The key components of angiogenic signaling pathways including VEGF-VEGF-R2, EphrinB2-EphB4 and DLL4-Notch were examined by real-time RT-PCR, Western blotting and immunostaining in 17 surgical specimens of HPC patients and in 6 controls. A significant upregulation of VEGF and VEGF-R2 associated with elevated levels of p-Akt and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) was detected in HPC. Moreover, a dramatic increase in the mRNA and protein expression of EphB4 and its downstream factor p-Erk1/2 was found in HPC. A massive activation of core-components of DLL4-Notch signaling was detected in HPC. Double-immunofluorescent staining confirmed the expression of these upregulated key factors in the endothelial cells of tumor vessels. The present study identified the activation of multiple and crucial angiogenic signaling pathways, which could function individually and/or synergistically to stimulate angiogenesis in HPC and eventually contribute to tumor growth and progression. Our findings emphasize the importance to target multiple angiogenic signaling pathways when an anti-angiogenic therapy is considered for this highly vascularized tumor.

  2. Balance between S-nitrosylation and denitrosylation modulates myoblast proliferation independently of soluble guanylyl cyclase activation.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Aline M S; Ancillotti, Maryana T C; Rangel, Luciana P; Fontenele, Marcio; Figueiredo-Freitas, Cicero; Possidonio, Ana C; Soares, Carolina P; Sorenson, Martha M; Mermelstein, Claudia; Nogueira, Leonardo

    2017-07-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) contributes to myogenesis by regulating the transition between myoblast proliferation and fusion through cGMP signaling. NO can form S-nitrosothiols (RSNO), which control signaling pathways in many different cell types. However, neither the role of RSNO content nor its regulation by the denitrosylase activity of S-nitrosoglutathione reductase (GSNOR) during myogenesis is understood. Here, we used primary cultures of chick embryonic skeletal muscle cells to investigate whether changes in intracellular RSNO alter proliferation and fusion of myoblasts in the presence and absence of cGMP. Cultures were grown to fuse most of the myoblasts into myotubes, with and without S-nitrosocysteine (CysNO), 8-Br-cGMP, DETA-NO, or inhibitors for NO synthase (NOS), GSNOR, soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC), or a combination of these, followed by analysis of GSNOR activity, protein expression, RSNO, cGMP, and cell morphology. Although the activity of GSNOR increased progressively over 72 h, inhibiting GSNOR (by GSNOR inhibitor - GSNORi - or by knocking down GSNOR with siRNA) produced an increase in RSNO and in the number of myoblasts and fibroblasts, accompanied by a decrease in myoblast fusion index. This was also detected with CysNO supplementation. Enhanced myoblast number was proportional to GSNOR inhibition. Effects of the GSNORi and GSNOR knockdown were blunted by NOS inhibition, suggesting their dependence on NO synthesis. Interestingly, GSNORi and GSNOR knockdown reversed the attenuated proliferation obtained with sGC inhibition in myoblasts, but not in fibroblasts. Hence myoblast proliferation is enhanced by increasing RSNO, and regulated by GSNOR activity, independently of cGMP production and signaling. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  3. The commonly used cGMP-dependent protein kinase type I (cGKI) inhibitor Rp-8-Br-PET-cGMPS can activate cGKI in vitro and in intact cells.

    PubMed

    Valtcheva, Nadejda; Nestorov, Peter; Beck, Alexander; Russwurm, Michael; Hillenbrand, Matthias; Weinmeister, Pascal; Feil, Robert

    2009-01-02

    Small-molecule modulators of cGMP signaling are of interest to basic and clinical research. The cGMP-dependent protein kinase type I (cGKI) is presumably a major mediator of cGMP effects, and the cGMP analogue Rp-8-Br-PET-cGMPS (Rp-PET) (chemical name: beta-phenyl-1,N2-etheno-8-bromoguanosine-3',5'-cyclic monophosphorothioate, Rp-isomer) is currently considered one of the most permeable, selective, and potent cGKI inhibitors available for intact cell studies. Here, we have evaluated the properties of Rp-PET using cGKI-expressing and cGKI-deficient primary vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), purified cGKI isozymes, and an engineered cGMP sensor protein. cGKI activity in intact VSMCs was monitored by cGMP/cGKI-stimulated cell growth and phosphorylation of vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein. Unexpectedly, Rp-PET (100 microm) did not efficiently antagonize activation of cGKI by the agonist 8-Br-cGMP (100 microm) in intact VSMCs. Moreover, in the absence of 8-Br-cGMP, Rp-PET (100 microm) stimulated cell growth in a cGKIalpha-dependent manner. Kinase assays with purified cGKI isozymes confirmed the previously reported inhibition of the cGMP-stimulated enzyme by Rp-PET in vitro. However, in the absence of the agonist cGMP, Rp-PET partially activated the cGKIalpha isoform. Experiments with a fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based construct harboring the cGMP binding sites of cGKI suggested that binding of Rp-PET induces a conformational change similar to the agonist cGMP. Together, these findings indicate that Rp-PET is a partial cGKIalpha agonist that under certain conditions stimulates rather than inhibits cGKI activity in vitro and in intact cells. Data obtained with Rp-PET as cGKI inhibitor should be interpreted with caution and not be used as sole evidence to dissect the role of cGKI in signaling processes.

  4. Activation of B cells by non-canonical helper signals.

    PubMed

    Cerutti, Andrea; Cols, Montserrat; Puga, Irene

    2012-09-01

    Cognate interaction between T and B lymphocytes of the adaptive immune system is essential for the production of high-affinity antibodies against microbes, and for the establishment of long-term immunological memory. Growing evidence shows that--in addition to presenting antigens to T and B cells--macrophages, dendritic cells and other cells of the innate immune system provide activating signals to B cells, as well as survival signals to antibody-secreting plasma cells. Here, we discuss how these innate immune cells contribute to the induction of highly diversified and temporally sustained antibody responses, both systemically and at mucosal sites of antigen entry.

  5. Molecular hydrogen suppresses activated Wnt/β-catenin signaling

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yingni; Ohkawara, Bisei; Ito, Mikako; Misawa, Nobuaki; Miyamoto, Kentaro; Takegami, Yasuhiko; Masuda, Akio; Toyokuni, Shinya; Ohno, Kinji

    2016-01-01

    Molecular hydrogen (H2) is effective for many diseases. However, molecular bases of H2 have not been fully elucidated. Cumulative evidence indicates that H2 acts as a gaseous signal modulator. We found that H2 suppresses activated Wnt/β-catenin signaling by promoting phosphorylation and degradation οf β-catenin. Either complete inhibition of GSK3 or mutations at CK1- and GSK3-phosphorylation sites of β-catenin abolished the suppressive effect of H2. H2 did not increase GSK3-mediated phosphorylation of glycogen synthase, indicating that H2 has no direct effect on GSK3 itself. Knock-down of adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) or Axin1, which form the β-catenin degradation complex, minimized the suppressive effect of H2 on β-catenin accumulation. Accordingly, the effect of H2 requires CK1/GSK3-phosphorylation sites of β-catenin, as well as the β-catenin degradation complex comprised of CK1, GSK3, APC, and Axin1. We additionally found that H2 reduces the activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in human osteoarthritis chondrocytes. Oral intake of H2 water tended to ameliorate cartilage degradation in a surgery-induced rat osteoarthritis model through attenuating β-catenin accumulation. We first demonstrate that H2 suppresses abnormally activated Wnt/β-catenin signaling, which accounts for the protective roles of H2 in a fraction of diseases. PMID:27558955

  6. Regulation of Chemokine Signal Integration by Activator of G-Protein Signaling 4 (AGS4)

    PubMed Central

    Robichaux, William G.; Branham-O’Connor, Melissa; Hwang, Il-Young; Vural, Ali; Kehrl, Johne H.

    2017-01-01

    Activator of G-protein signaling 4 (AGS4)/G-protein signaling modulator 3 (Gpsm3) contains three G-protein regulatory (GPR) motifs, each of which can bind Gαi-GDP free of Gβγ. We previously demonstrated that the AGS4-Gαi interaction is regulated by seven transmembrane-spanning receptors (7-TMR), which may reflect direct coupling of the GPR-Gαi module to the receptor analogous to canonical Gαβγ heterotrimer. We have demonstrated that the AGS4-Gαi complex is regulated by chemokine receptors in an agonist-dependent manner that is receptor-proximal. As an initial approach to investigate the functional role(s) of this regulated interaction in vivo, we analyzed leukocytes, in which AGS4/Gpsm3 is predominantly expressed, from AGS4/Gpsm3-null mice. Loss of AGS4/Gpsm3 resulted in mild but significant neutropenia and leukocytosis. Dendritic cells, T lymphocytes, and neutrophils from AGS4/Gpsm3-null mice also exhibited significant defects in chemoattractant-directed chemotaxis and extracellular signal-regulated kinase activation. An in vivo peritonitis model revealed a dramatic reduction in the ability of AGS4/Gpsm3-null neutrophils to migrate to primary sites of inflammation. Taken together, these data suggest that AGS4/Gpsm3 is required for proper chemokine signal processing in leukocytes and provide further evidence for the importance of the GPR-Gαi module in the regulation of leukocyte function. PMID:28062526

  7. G Protein Activation Stimulates Phospholipase D Signaling in Plants.

    PubMed Central

    Munnik, T.; Arisz, S. A.; De Vrije, T.; Musgrave, A.

    1995-01-01

    We provide direct evidence for phospholipase D (PLD) signaling in plants by showing that this enzyme is stimulated by the G protein activators mastoparan, ethanol, and cholera toxin. An in vivo assay for PLD activity in plant cells was developed based on the use of a "reporter alcohol" rather than water as a transphosphatidylation substrate. The product was a phosphatidyl alcohol, which, in contrast to the normal product phosphatidic acid, is a specific measure of PLD activity. When 32P-labeled cells were treated with 0.1% n-butanol, 32P-phosphatidyl butanol (32P-PtdBut) was formed in a time-dependent manner. In cells treated with any of the three G protein activators, the production of 32P-PtdBut was increased in a dose-dependent manner. The G protein involved was pertussis toxin insensitive. Ethanol could activate PLD but was itself consumed by PLD as transphosphatidylation substrate. In contrast, secondary alcohols (e.g., sec-butyl alcohol) activated PLD but did not function as substrate, whereas tertiary alcohols did neither. Although most of the experiments were performed with the green alga Chlamydomonas eugametos, the relevance for higher plants was demonstrated by showing that PLD in carnation petals could also be activated by mastoparan. The results indicate that PLD activation must be considered as a potential signal transduction mechanism in plants, just as in animals. PMID:12242371

  8. Signaling Mechanisms for Activation of Extracytoplasmic Function (ECF) Sigma Factors

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Benjamin E.; Buchanan, Susan K.

    2008-01-01

    Summary A variety of mechanisms are used to signal extracytoplasmic conditions to the cytoplasm. These mechanisms activate extracytoplasmic function (ECF) sigma factors which recruit RNA-polymerase to specific genes in order to express appropriate proteins in response to the changing environment. The two best understood ECF signaling pathways regulate σE-mediated expression of periplasmic stress response genes in Escherichia coli and FecI-mediated expression of iron-citrate transport genes in E. coli. Homologues from other Gram-negative bacteria suggest that these two signaling mechanisms and variations on these mechanisms may be the general schemes by which ECF sigma factors are regulated in Gram-negative bacteria. PMID:17673165

  9. Levodopa-induced dyskinesias are associated with transient down-regulation of cAMP and cGMP in the caudate-putamen of hemiparkinsonian rats: reduced synthesis or increased catabolism?

    PubMed

    Sancesario, Giuseppe; Morrone, Luigi Antonio; D'Angelo, Vincenza; Castelli, Valentina; Ferrazzoli, Davide; Sica, Francesco; Martorana, Alessandro; Sorge, Roberto; Cavaliere, Federica; Bernardi, Giorgio; Giorgi, Mauro

    2014-12-01

    Second messenger cAMP and cGMP represent a key step in the action of dopamine that modulates directly or indirectly their synthesis. We aimed to verify whether levodopa-induced dyskinesias are associated with changes of the time course of levodopa/dopamine stimulated cAMP and cGMP levels, and/or with changes of their catabolism by phosphodiesterase activity in rats with experimental hemiparkinsonism. Microdialysis and tissue homogenates of the striatal tissues demonstrated that extracellular and intracellular cAMP/cGMP levels were lower in dyskinetic animals during the increasing phase of dyskinesias compared to eukinetic animals, but cAMP/cGMP levels increased in dyskinetic animals during the phase of decreasing and extinction of dyskinesias. Dyskinesias and the abnormal lowering of striatal cGMP and cAMP after levodopa were prevented by pretreatment with the multipotent drug amantadine, outlining the inverse relationship of cAMP/cGMP to dyskinesias. Moreover, dyskinetic animals showed higher striatal hydrolyzing cGMP-phosphodiesterase but not hydrolyzing cAMP-phosphodiesterase activity, suggesting that low cGMP but not cAMP levels could be due to increased catabolism. However, expressions of isozyme phosphodiesterase-1B and -10A highly and specifically located in the basal ganglia were not changed after levodopa in dyskinetic and eukinetic animals: accordingly, selective inhibitors of phosphodiesterase-1B and -10A were ineffective on levodopa dyskinesias. Therefore, the isozyme(s) expressing higher cGMP-phosphodiesterase activity in the striatum of dyskinetic animal should be determined. These observations suggest that dopamine-mediated processes of synthesis and/or degradation of cAMP/cGMP could be acutely impaired in levodopa dyskinesias, opening new ways to understanding physiopathology and treatment.

  10. Dynamic Hedgehog signalling pathway activity in germline stem cells.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Z; Szczepny, A; McLaughlin, E A; Meistrich, M L; Zhou, W; Ustunel, I; Loveland, K L

    2014-03-01

    Although the contribution of Hedgehog (Hh) signalling to stem cell development and oncogenesis is well recognised, its importance for spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) has not been established. Here we interrogate adult rat SSCs using an established model in which only undifferentiated spermatogonial cells remain in the testis at 15 weeks following irradiation, and spermatogonial differentiation is induced within 4 weeks by gonadotrophin-releasing hormone antagonist (GnRH-ant) administration. Synthesis of Hh pathway components in untreated adult rat testes was compared with that in irradiated testes prior to and after GnRH-ant exposure using in situ hybridization. In adult testes with complete spermatogenesis, the Desert Hedgehog ligand transcript, Dhh, was detected in Sertoli cells, some spermatogonia and in spermatocytes by in situ hybridization. Spermatogenic cells were identified as sites of Hh signalling through detection of transcripts encoding the Hh receptor, Ptc2 transcripts and proteins for the key downstream target of Hh signalling, Gli1 and the Hh transcriptional activator, Gli2. Remarkably, the undifferentiated spermatogonia present in irradiated adult rat testes contained Dhh in addition to Ptc2, Gli1 and Gli2, revealing the potential for an autocrine Hh signalling loop to sustain undifferentiated spermatogonial cells. These transcripts became undetectable by in situ hybridization following GnRH-ant induction of spermatogonial differentiation, however, detection of Gli1 protein in spermatogonia in all groups indicates that Hh signalling is sustained. This is the first evidence of active Hh signalling in mammalian male germline stem cells, as has been documented for some cancer stem cells.

  11. Sensory signaling-dependent remodeling of olfactory cilia architecture in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, Saikat; Lu, Yun; Shaham, Shai; Sengupta, Piali

    2008-05-01

    Nonmotile primary cilia are sensory organelles composed of a microtubular axoneme and a surrounding membrane sheath that houses signaling molecules. Optimal cellular function requires the precise regulation of axoneme assembly, membrane biogenesis, and signaling protein targeting and localization via as yet poorly understood mechanisms. Here, we show that sensory signaling is required to maintain the architecture of the specialized AWB olfactory neuron cilia in C. elegans. Decreased sensory signaling results in alteration of axoneme length and expansion of a membraneous structure, thereby altering the topological distribution of a subset of ciliary transmembrane signaling molecules. Signaling-regulated alteration of ciliary structures can be bypassed by modulation of intracellular cGMP or calcium levels and requires kinesin-II-driven intraflagellar transport (IFT), as well as BBS- and RAB8-related proteins. Our results suggest that compensatory mechanisms in response to altered levels of sensory activity modulate AWB cilia architecture, revealing remarkable plasticity in the regulation of cilia structure.

  12. Energetics of neuronal signaling and fMRI activity.

    PubMed

    Maandag, Natasja J G; Coman, Daniel; Sanganahalli, Basavaraju G; Herman, Peter; Smith, Arien J; Blumenfeld, Hal; Shulman, Robert G; Hyder, Fahmeed

    2007-12-18

    Energetics of resting and evoked fMRI signals were related to localized ensemble firing rates (nu) measured by electrophysiology in rats. Two different unstimulated, or baseline, states were established by anesthesia. Halothane and alpha-chloralose established baseline states of high and low energy, respectively, in which forepaw stimulation excited the contralateral primary somatosensory cortex (S1). With alpha-chloralose, forepaw stimulation induced strong and reproducible fMRI activations in the contralateral S1, where the ensemble firing was dominated by slow signaling neurons (SSN; nu range of 1-13 Hz). Under halothane, weaker and less reproducible fMRI activations were observed in the contralateral S1 and elsewhere in the cortex, but ensemble activity in S1 was dominated by rapid signaling neurons (RSN; nu range of 13-40 Hz). For both baseline states, the RSN activity (i.e., higher frequencies, including the gamma band) did not vary upon stimulation, whereas the SSN activity (i.e., alpha band and lower frequencies) did change. In the high energy baseline state, a large majority of total oxidative energy [cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen consumption (CMR(O2))] was devoted to RSN activity, whereas in the low energy baseline state, it was roughly divided between SSN and RSN activities. We hypothesize that in the high energy baseline state, the evoked changes in fMRI activation in areas beyond S1 are supported by rich intracortical interactions represented by RSN. We discuss implications for interpreting fMRI data where stimulus-specific DeltaCMR(O2) is generally small compared with baseline CMR(O2).

  13. Cherry Valley Ducks Mitochondrial Antiviral-Signaling Protein-Mediated Signaling Pathway and Antiviral Activity Research

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ning; Hong, Tianqi; Li, Rong; Wang, Yao; Guo, Mengjiao; Cao, Zongxi; Cai, Yumei; Liu, Sidang; Chai, Tongjie; Wei, Liangmeng

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial antiviral-signaling protein (MAVS), an adaptor protein of retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I)-like receptors (RLRs)-mediated signal pathway, is involved in innate immunity. In this study, Cherry Valley duck MAVS (duMAVS) was cloned from the spleen and analyzed. duMAVS was determined to have a caspase activation and recruitment domain at N-terminal, followed by a proline-rich domain and a transmembrane domain at C-terminal. Quantitative real-time PCR indicated that duMAVS was expressed in all tissues tested across a broad expression spectrum. The expression of duMAVS was significantly upregulated after infection with duck Tembusu virus (DTMUV). Overexpression of duMAVS could drive the activation of interferon (IFN)-β, nuclear factor-κB, interferon regulatory factor 7, and many downstream factors (such as Mx, PKR, OAS, and IL-8) in duck embryo fibroblast cells. What is more, RNA interference further confirmed that duMAVS was an important adaptor for IFN-β activation. The antiviral assay showed that duMAVS could suppress the various viral replications (DTMUV, novel reovirus, and duck plague virus) at early stages of infection. Overall, these results showed that the main signal pathway mediated by duMAVS and it had a broad-spectrum antiviral ability. This research will be helpful to better understanding the innate immune system of ducks. PMID:27708647

  14. Small molecule activation of NOTCH signaling inhibits acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Qi; Jiang, Jue; Zhan, Guanqun; Yan, Wanyao; Huang, Liang; Hu, Yufeng; Su, Hexiu; Tong, Qingyi; Yue, Ming; Li, Hua; Yao, Guangmin; Zhang, Yonghui; Liu, Hudan

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant activation of the NOTCH signaling pathway is crucial for the onset and progression of T cell leukemia. Yet recent studies also suggest a tumor suppressive role of NOTCH signaling in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and reactivation of this pathway offers an attractive opportunity for anti-AML therapies. N-methylhemeanthidine chloride (NMHC) is a novel Amaryllidaceae alkaloid that we previously isolated from Zephyranthes candida, exhibiting inhibitory activities in a variety of cancer cells, particularly those from AML. Here, we report NMHC not only selectively inhibits AML cell proliferation in vitro but also hampers tumor development in a human AML xenograft model. Genome-wide gene expression profiling reveals that NMHC activates the NOTCH signaling. Combination of NMHC and recombinant human NOTCH ligand DLL4 achieves a remarkable synergistic effect on NOTCH activation. Moreover, pre-inhibition of NOTCH by overexpression of dominant negative MAML alleviates NMHC-mediated cytotoxicity in AML. Further mechanistic analysis using structure-based molecular modeling as well as biochemical assays demonstrates that NMHC docks in the hydrophobic cavity within the NOTCH1 negative regulatory region (NRR), thus promoting NOTCH1 proteolytic cleavage. Our findings thus establish NMHC as a potential NOTCH agonist that holds great promises for future development as a novel agent beneficial to patients with AML. PMID:27211848

  15. Different activation signals induce distinct mast cell degranulation strategies

    PubMed Central

    Sibilano, Riccardo; Marichal, Thomas; Reber, Laurent L.; Cenac, Nicolas; McNeil, Benjamin D.; Dong, Xinzhong; Hernandez, Joseph D.; Sagi-Eisenberg, Ronit; Hammel, Ilan; Roers, Axel; Valitutti, Salvatore; Tsai, Mindy

    2016-01-01

    Mast cells (MCs) influence intercellular communication during inflammation by secreting cytoplasmic granules that contain diverse mediators. Here, we have demonstrated that MCs decode different activation stimuli into spatially and temporally distinct patterns of granule secretion. Certain signals, including substance P, the complement anaphylatoxins C3a and C5a, and endothelin 1, induced human MCs rapidly to secrete small and relatively spherical granule structures, a pattern consistent with the secretion of individual granules. Conversely, activating MCs with anti-IgE increased the time partition between signaling and secretion, which was associated with a period of sustained elevation of intracellular calcium and formation of larger and more heterogeneously shaped granule structures that underwent prolonged exteriorization. Pharmacological inhibition of IKK-β during IgE-dependent stimulation strongly reduced the time partition between signaling and secretion, inhibited SNAP23/STX4 complex formation, and switched the degranulation pattern into one that resembled degranulation induced by substance P. IgE-dependent and substance P–dependent activation in vivo also induced different patterns of mouse MC degranulation that were associated with distinct local and systemic pathophysiological responses. These findings show that cytoplasmic granule secretion from MCs that occurs in response to different activating stimuli can exhibit distinct dynamics and features that are associated with distinct patterns of MC-dependent inflammation. PMID:27643442

  16. Postreplication gaps at UV lesions are signals for checkpoint activation

    PubMed Central

    Callegari, A. John; Clark, Emily; Pneuman, Amanda; Kelly, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    Exposure of eukaryotic cells to UV light induces a checkpoint response that delays cell-cycle progression after cells enter S phase. It has been hypothesized that this checkpoint response provides time for repair by signaling the presence of structures generated when the replication fork encounters UV-induced DNA damage. To gain insight into the nature of the signaling structures, we used time-lapse microscopy to determine the effects of deficiencies in translesion DNA polymerases on the checkpoint response of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. We found that disruption of the genes encoding translesion DNA polymerases Polκ and Polη significantly prolonged the checkpoint response, indicating that the substrates of these enzymes are signals for checkpoint activation. Surprisingly, we found no evidence that the translesion polymerases Rev1 and Polζ repair structures that are recognized by the checkpoint despite their role in maintaining viability after UV irradiation. Quantitative flow cytometry revealed that cells lacking translesion polymerases replicate UV-damaged DNA at the same rate at WT cells, indicating that the enhanced checkpoint response of cells lacking Polκ and Polη is not the result of stalled replication forks. These observations support a model in which postreplication DNA gaps with unrepaired UV lesions in the template strand act both as substrates for translesion polymerases and as signals for checkpoint activation. PMID:20404181

  17. Dynorphin Activates Quorum Sensing Quinolone Signaling in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Zaborina, Olga; Lepine, Francois; Xiao, Gaoping; Valuckaite, Vesta; Chen, Yimei; Li, Terry; Ciancio, Mae; Zaborin, Alex; Petroff, Elaine; Turner, Jerrold R; Rahme, Laurence G; Chang, Eugene; Alverdy, John C

    2007-01-01

    There is now substantial evidence that compounds released during host stress directly activate the virulence of certain opportunistic pathogens. Here, we considered that endogenous opioids might function as such compounds, given that they are among the first signals to be released at multiple tissue sites during host stress. We tested the ability of various opioid compounds to enhance the virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa using pyocyanin production as a biological readout, and demonstrated enhanced virulence when P. aeruginosa was exposed to synthetic (U-50,488) and endogenous (dynorphin) κ-agonists. Using various mutants and reporter strains of P. aeruginosa, we identified involvement of key elements of the quorum sensing circuitry such as the global transcriptional regulator MvfR and the quorum sensing-related quinolone signaling molecules PQS, HHQ, and HQNO that respond to κ-opioids. The in vivo significance of κ-opioid signaling of P. aeruginosa was demonstrated in mice by showing that dynorphin is released from the intestinal mucosa following ischemia/reperfusion injury, activates quinolone signaling in P. aeruginosa, and enhances the virulence of P. aeruginosa against Lactobacillus spp. and Caenorhabditis elegans. Taken together, these data demonstrate that P. aeruginosa can intercept opioid compounds released during host stress and integrate them into core elements of quorum sensing circuitry leading to enhanced virulence. PMID:17367209

  18. Cyclic Nucleotide Signaling in Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaofang; Ward, Christopher J.; Harris, Peter C.; Torres, Vicente E.

    2013-01-01

    Increased levels of 3’–5’-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) stimulate cell proliferation and fluid secretion in polycystic kidney disease (PKD). Since hydrolytic capacity of phosphodiesterases (PDE) far exceeds maximum rate of synthesis by adenylyl cyclases (AC), cellular levels of cAMP are more sensitive to PDE inhibition than to AC activity changes. We have used enzymatic, western blot, immunohistochemistry, PCR and biochemical assays to study activity and expression of PDE families and isoforms and expression of downstream effectors of cAMP signaling in wildtype and PKD rat and mouse kidneys. The results indicate: 1) Species specific differences in PDE expression; higher PDE activity in kidneys from mice compared to rats; higher contribution of PDE1, relative to PDE4 and PDE3, to total PDE activity of kidney lysate and lower PDE1, PDE3 and PDE4 activities in murine cystic compared to wildtype kidneys. 2) Reduced levels of several PDE1, PDE3 and PDE4 proteins despite mRNA upregulation, possibly due to increased protein degradation. 3) Increased cGMP levels in polycystic kidneys, suggesting in vivo downregulation of PDE1 activity. 4) Additive stimulatory effect of cAMP and cGMP on cystogenesis in vitro. 5) Upregulation of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) subunits Iα and IIβ, PKare, CREB-1 mRNA, and CREM, ATF-1 and ICER proteins in cystic compared to wildtype kidneys. In summary, the results of this study suggest that alterations in cyclic nucleotide catabolism may render the cystic epithelium particularly susceptible to factors acting on Gs coupled receptors, account at least in part for the upregulation of cyclic nucleotide signaling in PKD, and contribute substantially to the progression of this disease. PMID:19924104

  19. Plant PRRs and the activation of innate immune signaling.

    PubMed

    Macho, Alberto P; Zipfel, Cyril

    2014-04-24

    Despite being sessile organisms constantly exposed to potential pathogens and pests, plants are surprisingly resilient to infections. Plants can detect invaders via the recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs). Plant PRRs are surface-localized receptor-like kinases, which comprise a ligand-binding ectodomain and an intracellular kinase domain, or receptor-like proteins, which do not exhibit any known intracellular signaling domain. In this review, we summarize recent discoveries that shed light on the molecular mechanisms underlying ligand perception and subsequent activation of plant PRRs. Notably, plant PRRs appear as central components of multiprotein complexes at the plasma membrane that contain additional transmembrane and cytosolic kinases required for the initiation and specificity of immune signaling. PRR complexes are under tight control by protein phosphatases, E3 ligases, and other regulatory proteins, illustrating the exquisite and complex regulation of these molecular machines whose proper activation underlines a crucial layer of plant immunity.

  20. Structure-activity analysis of the Pseudomonas quinolone signal molecule.

    PubMed

    Hodgkinson, James; Bowden, Steven D; Galloway, Warren R J D; Spring, David R; Welch, Martin

    2010-07-01

    We synthesized a range of PQS (Pseudomonas quinolone signal; 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolone) analogues and tested them for their ability to stimulate MvfR-dependent pqsA transcription, MvfR-independent pyoverdine production, and membrane vesicle production. The structure-activity profile of the PQS analogues was different for each of these phenotypes. Certain inactive PQS analogues were also found to strongly synergize PQS-dependent pyoverdine production.

  1. Chemical Signaling and Functional Activation in Colloidosome-Based Protocells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shiyong; Li, Mei; Dong, Faqin; Wang, Shengjie; Tian, Liangfei; Mann, Stephen

    2016-04-13

    An aqueous-based microcompartmentalized model involving the integration of partially hydrophobic Fe(III)-rich montmorillonite (FeM) clay particles as structural and catalytic building blocks for colloidosome membrane assembly, self-directed membrane remodeling, and signal-induced protocell communication is described. The clay colloidosomes exhibit size- and charge-selective permeability, and show dual catalytic functions involving spatially confined enzyme-mediated dephosphorylation and peroxidase-like membrane activity. The latter is used for the colloidosome-mediated synthesis and assembly of a temperature-responsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)(PNIPAM)/clay-integrated hybrid membrane. In situ PNIPAM elaboration of the membrane is coupled to a glucose oxidase (GOx)-mediated signaling pathway to establish a primitive model of chemical communication and functional activation within a synthetic "protocell community" comprising a mixed population of GOx-containing silica colloidosomes and alkaline phosphatase (ALP)-containing FeM-clay colloidosomes. Triggering the enzyme reaction in the silica colloidosomes gives a hydrogen peroxide signal that induces polymer wall formation in a coexistent population of the FeM-clay colloidosomes, which in turn generates self-regulated membrane-gated ALP-activity within the clay microcompartments. The emergence of new functionalities in inorganic colloidosomes via chemical communication between different protocell populations provides a first step toward the realization of interacting communities of synthetic functional microcompartments.

  2. Implications of mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling in glioma.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Vimal; Bhaskara, Vasantha Kumar; Babu, Phanithi Prakash

    2016-02-01

    Gliomas are the most common primary central nervous system tumors. Gliomas originate from astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, and neural stem cells or their precursors. According to WHO classification, gliomas are classified into four different malignant grades ranging from grade I to grade IV based on histopathological features and related molecular aberrations. The induction and maintenance of these tumors can be attributed largely to aberrant signaling networks. In this regard, the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) network has been widely studied and is reported to be severely altered in glial tumors. Mutations in MAPK pathways most frequently affect RAS and B-RAF in the ERK, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and p38 pathways leading to malignant transformation. Also, it is linked to both inherited and sequential accumulations of mutations that control receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK)-activated signal transduction pathways, cell cycle growth arrest pathways, and nonresponsive cell death pathways. Genetic alterations that modulate RTK signaling can also alter several downstream pathways, including RAS-mediated MAP kinases along with JNK pathways, which ultimately regulate cell proliferation and cell death. The present review focuses on recent literature regarding important deregulations in the RTK-activated MAPK pathway during gliomagenesis and progression.

  3. Miltefosine Suppresses Hepatic Steatosis by Activating AMPK Signal Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yaqin; Tong, Xing; Li, Kexue; Bai, Hui; Li, Xiaoyu; Ben, Jingjing; Zhang, Hanwen; Yang, Qing; Chen, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose It has been accepted that AMPK (Adenosine monophosphate–activated protein kinase) activation exhibits many beneficial effects on glucolipid metabolism. Lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) is an important lysophospholipid which can improve blood glucose levels in diabetic mice and attenuate inflammation by activating AMPK signal pathway in macrophages. Synthetic alkylphospholipids (ALPs), such as miltefosine, is used as an alternate of LPC for the clinical application. Here, we investigated whether miltefosine could have an impact on hepatic steatosis and related metabolic disorders. Experimental Approach Mice were fed with high fat diet (HFD) for 16 weeks to generate an obese model. Next, the obese mice were randomly divided into three groups: saline-treated and miltefosine-treated (2.5 or 5 mg/kg/d) groups. Miltefosine was intraperitoneally administrated into mice for additional 4 weeks plus HFD treatment. Key Results It was shown that miltefosine treatment could substantially improve glucose metabolism, prevented hepatic lipid accumulation, and inhibited liver inflammation in HFD-fed mice by activating AMPK signal pathway. In vitro, miltefosine stimulated AMPKα phosphorylation both in time and dose dependent manner and decreased lipid accumulation in liver cells. When a specific AMPK inhibitor compound C was used to treat mice, the antagonistic effects of miltefosine on HFD-induced mouse hyperlipidaemia and liver steatosis were abolished. Treatment with miltefosine also dramatically inhibited the HFD-induced liver inflammation in mice. Conclusions and Implications Here we demonstrated that miltefosine might be a new activator of AMPK signal pathway in vivo and in vitro and be useful for treatment of hepatic steatosis and related metabolic disorders. PMID:27681040

  4. Sodium depletion enhances renal expression of (pro)renin receptor via cyclic GMP-protein kinase G signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jiqian; Siragy, Helmy M

    2012-02-01

    (Pro)renin receptor (PRR) is expressed in renal vasculature, glomeruli, and tubules. The physiological regulation of this receptor is not well established. We hypothesized that sodium depletion increases PRR expression through cGMP- protein kinase G (PKG) signaling pathway. Renal PRR expressions were evaluated in Sprague-Dawley rats on normal sodium or low-sodium diet (LS) and in cultured rat proximal tubular cells and mouse renal inner medullary collecting duct cells exposed to LS concentration. LS augmented PRR expression in renal glomeruli, proximal tubules, distal tubules, and collecting ducts. LS also increased cGMP production and PKG activity. In cells exposed to normal sodium, cGMP analog increased PKG activity and upregulated PRR expression. In cells exposed to LS, blockade of guanylyl cyclase with 1H-(1,2,4)oxadiazolo(4,3-a)quinoxalin-1-one decreased PKG activity and downregulated PRR expression. PKG inhibition decreased phosphatase protein phosphatase 2A activity; suppressed LS-mediated phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase, c-Jun N-terminal kinase, c-Jun, and nuclear factor-κB p65; and attenuated LS-mediated PRR upregulation. LS also enhanced DNA binding of cAMP response element binding protein 1 to cAMP response elements, nuclear factor-κB p65 to nuclear factor-κB elements, and c-Jun to activator protein 1 elements in PRR promoter in proximal tubular cells. We conclude that sodium depletion upregulates renal PRR expression via the cGMP-PKG signaling pathway by enhancing binding of cAMP response element binding protein 1, nuclear factor-κB p65, and c-Jun to PRR promotor.

  5. Coordinated Regulation of Signaling Pathways during Macrophage Activation.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Toby

    2016-10-01

    The functional and phenotypic diversity of macrophages has long been appreciated, and it is now clear that it reflects a complex interplay between hard-wired differentiation pathways and instructive signals in specific tissues (Lawrence T, Natoli G. 2011, Nat Rev Immunol11:750-761). Recent studies have begun to unravel the molecular basis for the integration of these intrinsic developmental pathways with extracellular signals from the tissue microenvironment that confer the distinct phenotypes of tissue-resident macrophages (Lavin Y et al. 2014. Cell159:1312-1326; Gosselin D et al. 2014. Cell159:1327-1340). Macrophage phenotype and function is particularly dynamic during inflammation or infection, as blood monocytes are recruited into tissues and differentiate into macrophages, and depending on the nature of the inflammatory stimulus, they may acquire distinct functional phenotypes (Xue J et al. 2014. Immunity40:274-288; Murray PJ et al. 2014. Immunity41:14-20). Furthermore, these functional activation states can be rapidly modified in response to a changing microenvironment. Here we will discuss several key signaling pathways that drive macrophage activation during the inflammatory response and discuss how these pathways are integrated to "fine-tune" macrophage phenotype and function.

  6. Glucocorticoid receptor signalling activates YAP in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sorrentino, Giovanni; Ruggeri, Naomi; Zannini, Alessandro; Ingallina, Eleonora; Bertolio, Rebecca; Marotta, Carolina; Neri, Carmelo; Cappuzzello, Elisa; Forcato, Mattia; Rosato, Antonio; Mano, Miguel; Bicciato, Silvio; Del Sal, Giannino

    2017-01-01

    The Hippo pathway is an oncosuppressor signalling cascade that plays a major role in the control of cell growth, tissue homoeostasis and organ size. Dysregulation of the Hippo pathway leads to aberrant activation of the transcription co-activator YAP (Yes-associated protein) that contributes to tumorigenesis in several tissues. Here we identify glucocorticoids (GCs) as hormonal activators of YAP. Stimulation of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) leads to increase of YAP protein levels, nuclear accumulation and transcriptional activity in vitro and in vivo. Mechanistically, we find that GCs increase expression and deposition of fibronectin leading to the focal adhesion-Src pathway stimulation, cytoskeleton-dependent YAP activation and expansion of chemoresistant cancer stem cells. GR activation correlates with YAP activity in human breast cancer and predicts bad prognosis in the basal-like subtype. Our results unveil a novel mechanism of YAP activation in cancer and open the possibility to target GR to prevent cancer stem cells self-renewal and chemoresistance. PMID:28102225

  7. Signal integration by Ca2+ regulates intestinal stem cell activity

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Hansong; Gerencser, Akos A.; Jasper, Heinrich

    2015-01-01

    Summary Somatic stem cells (SCs) maintain tissue homeostasis by dynamically adjusting proliferation and differentiation in response to stress and metabolic cues. Here, we identify Ca2+ signaling as a central regulator of intestinal SC (ISC) activity in Drosophila. We find that dietary L-glutamate stimulates ISC division and gut growth. The metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) is required in ISCs for this response and for an associated modulation of cytosolic Ca2+ oscillations that results in sustained high cytosolic Ca2+ concentrations. High cytosolic Ca2+ induces ISC proliferation by regulating Calcineurin and CREB - regulated transcriptional co-activator (CRTC). In response to a wide range of dietary and stress stimuli, ISCs reversibly transition between Ca2+ oscillation states that represent poised or activated modes of proliferation, respectively. We propose that the dynamic regulation of intracellular Ca2+ levels allows effective integration of diverse mitogenic signals in ISCs to tailor their proliferative activity to the needs of the tissue. PMID:26633624

  8. Robust Indoor Human Activity Recognition Using Wireless Signals

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi; Jiang, Xinli; Cao, Rongyu; Wang, Xiyang

    2015-01-01

    Wireless signals–based activity detection and recognition technology may be complementary to the existing vision-based methods, especially under the circumstance of occlusions, viewpoint change, complex background, lighting condition change, and so on. This paper explores the properties of the channel state information (CSI) of Wi-Fi signals, and presents a robust indoor daily human activity recognition framework with only one pair of transmission points (TP) and access points (AP). First of all, some indoor human actions are selected as primitive actions forming a training set. Then, an online filtering method is designed to make actions’ CSI curves smooth and allow them to contain enough pattern information. Each primitive action pattern can be segmented from the outliers of its multi-input multi-output (MIMO) signals by a proposed segmentation method. Lastly, in online activities recognition, by selecting proper features and Support Vector Machine (SVM) based multi-classification, activities constituted by primitive actions can be recognized insensitive to the locations, orientations, and speeds. PMID:26184231

  9. Regulation of Hippocampal cGMP Levels as a Candidate to Treat Cognitive Deficits in Huntington’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Saavedra, Ana; Giralt, Albert; Arumí, Helena; Alberch, Jordi; Pérez-Navarro, Esther

    2013-01-01

    Huntington’s disease (HD) patients and mouse models show learning and memory impairment associated with hippocampal dysfunction. The neuronal nitric oxide synthase/3',5'-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (nNOS/cGMP) pathway is implicated in synaptic plasticity, and in learning and memory processes. Here, we examined the nNOS/cGMP pathway in the hippocampus of HD mice to determine whether it can be a good therapeutic target for cognitive improvement in HD. We analyzed hippocampal nNOS and phosphodiesterase (PDE) 5 and 9 levels in R6/1 mice, and cGMP levels in the hippocampus of R6/1, R6/2 and HdhQ7/Q111 mice, and of HD patients. We also investigated whether sildenafil, a PDE5 inhibitor, could improve cognitive deficits in R6/1 mice. We found that hippocampal cGMP levels were 3-fold lower in 12-week-old R6/1 mice, when they show deficits in object recognition memory and in passive avoidance learning. Consistent with hippocampal cGMP levels, nNOS levels were down-regulated, while there were no changes in the levels of PDE5 and PDE9 in R6/1 mice. A single intraperitoneal injection of sildenafil (3 mg/Kg) immediately after training increased cGMP levels, and improved memory in R6/1 mice, as assessed by using the novel object recognition and the passive avoidance test. Importantly, cGMP levels were also reduced in R6/2 mouse and human HD hippocampus. Therefore, the regulation of hippocampal cGMP levels can be a suitable treatment for cognitive impairment in HD. PMID:24040016

  10. Pathway connectivity and signaling coordination in the yeast stress-activated signaling network

    PubMed Central

    Chasman, Deborah; Ho, Yi-Hsuan; Berry, David B; Nemec, Corey M; MacGilvray, Matthew E; Hose, James; Merrill, Anna E; Lee, M Violet; Will, Jessica L; Coon, Joshua J; Ansari, Aseem Z; Craven, Mark; Gasch, Audrey P

    2014-01-01

    Stressed cells coordinate a multi-faceted response spanning many levels of physiology. Yet knowledge of the complete stress-activated regulatory network as well as design principles for signal integration remains incomplete. We developed an experimental and computational approach to integrate available protein interaction data with gene fitness contributions, mutant transcriptome profiles, and phospho-proteome changes in cells responding to salt stress, to infer the salt-responsive signaling network in yeast. The inferred subnetwork presented many novel predictions by implicating new regulators, uncovering unrecognized crosstalk between known pathways, and pointing to previously unknown ‘hubs’ of signal integration. We exploited these predictions to show that Cdc14 phosphatase is a central hub in the network and that modification of RNA polymerase II coordinates induction of stress-defense genes with reduction of growth-related transcripts. We find that the orthologous human network is enriched for cancer-causing genes, underscoring the importance of the subnetwork's predictions in understanding stress biology. PMID:25411400

  11. Modafinil Activates Phasic Dopamine Signaling in Dorsal and Ventral Striata.

    PubMed

    Bobak, Martin J; Weber, Matthew W; Doellman, Melissa A; Schuweiler, Douglas R; Athens, Jeana M; Juliano, Steven A; Garris, Paul A

    2016-12-01

    Modafinil (MOD) exhibits therapeutic efficacy for treating sleep and psychiatric disorders; however, its mechanism is not completely understood. Compared with other psychostimulants inhibiting dopamine (DA) uptake, MOD weakly interacts with the dopamine transporter (DAT) and modestly elevates striatal dialysate DA, suggesting additional targets besides DAT. However, the ability of MOD to induce wakefulness is abolished with DAT knockout, conversely suggesting that DAT is necessary for MOD action. Another psychostimulant target, but one not established for MOD, is activation of phasic DA signaling. This communication mode during which burst firing of DA neurons generates rapid changes in extracellular DA, the so-called DA transients, is critically implicated in reward learning. Here, we investigate MOD effects on phasic DA signaling in the striatum of urethane-anesthetized rats with fast-scan cyclic voltammetry. We found that MOD (30-300 mg/kg i.p.) robustly increases the amplitude of electrically evoked phasic-like DA signals in a time- and dose-dependent fashion, with greater effects in dorsal versus ventral striata. MOD-induced enhancement of these electrically evoked amplitudes was mediated preferentially by increased DA release compared with decreased DA uptake. Principal component regression of nonelectrically evoked recordings revealed negligible changes in basal DA with high-dose MOD (300 mg/kg i.p.). Finally, in the presence of the D2 DA antagonist, raclopride, low-dose MOD (30 mg/kg i.p.) robustly elicited DA transients in dorsal and ventral striata. Taken together, these results suggest that activation of phasic DA signaling is an important mechanism underlying the clinical efficacy of MOD. Copyright © 2016 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  12. Chemical cross-linking of bovine retinal transducin and cGMP phosphodiesterase.

    PubMed

    Hingorani, V N; Tobias, D T; Henderson, J T; Ho, Y K

    1988-05-15

    The bifunctional reagents para-phenyldimaleimide and maleimidobenzoyl-N-hydroxysuccinimide ester were used to chemically cross-link the subunits of the transducin and cGMP phosphodiesterase (PDE) complexes of bovine rod photoreceptor cells. The cross-linked products were identified by Western immunoblotting using antisera against purified subunits of transducin (T alpha and T beta gamma) and PDE. Oligomeric cross-linked products of transducin subunits as large as (T alpha beta gamma)3 were observed in the latent form of transducin with bound GDP. In addition to the expected T alpha beta and T beta gamma cross-linked products, a (T alpha gamma)2 structure was detected. The close proximity of T alpha and T gamma suggests that T gamma may play a role in conferring the specificity of the interaction between T alpha and rhodopsin. Most of the oligomeric cross-linked structures between T alpha and T beta gamma were diminished in the activated form of transducin, with guanosine 5'-(beta, gamma-imidotriphosphate) (Gpp(NH)p) bound. However, cross-linking between T beta and T gamma was not altered. These results suggest that transducin exists as an oligomer in solution which dissociates upon the binding of Gpp(NH)p. To identify the possible interacting domains between the T alpha, T beta, and T gamma subunits, the cross-linked products were subjected to limited tryptic proteolysis. Several cross-linked tryptic peptides of transducin subunits were found and include the cross-linked products of the N terminus 15-kDa fragment of T beta and the C terminus 5-kDa fragment of T alpha, T gamma and the 12-kDa fragment of T alpha, T gamma and the 15-kDa as well as the 23-kDa fragments of T beta, and an intra-T alpha cross-linked product of the 2- and 21-kDa fragments. These results have allowed the construction of a topographical model for the transducin subunits. The organization of the subunits of PDE (P alpha, P beta, and P gamma) was also studied. The formation of the high

  13. Nucleophosmin leukemogenic mutant activates Wnt signaling during zebrafish development

    PubMed Central

    Barbieri, Elisa; Deflorian, Gianluca; Pezzimenti, Federica; Valli, Debora; Saia, Marco; Meani, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    Nucleophosmin (NPM1) is a ubiquitous multifunctional phosphoprotein with both oncogenic and tumor suppressor functions. Mutations of the NPM1 gene are the most frequent genetic alterations in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and result in the expression of a mutant protein with aberrant cytoplasmic localization, NPMc+. Although NPMc+ causes myeloproliferation and AML in animal models, its mechanism of action remains largely unknown. Here we report that NPMc+ activates canonical Wnt signaling during the early phases of zebrafish development and determines a Wnt-dependent increase in the number of progenitor cells during primitive hematopoiesis. Coherently, the canonical Wnt pathway is active in AML blasts bearing NPMc+ and depletion of the mutant protein in the patient derived OCI-AML3 cell line leads to a decrease in the levels of active β-catenin and of Wnt target genes. Our results reveal a novel function of NPMc+ and provide insight into the molecular pathogenesis of AML bearing NPM1 mutations. PMID:27486814

  14. Visualizing how T cells collect activation signals in vivo.

    PubMed

    Moreau, Hélène D; Bousso, Philippe

    2014-02-01

    A decade ago the first movies depicting T cell behavior in vivo with the help of two-photon microscopy were generated. These initial experiments revealed that T cells migrate rapidly and randomly in secondary lymphoid organs at steady state and profoundly alter their behavior during antigen recognition, establishing both transient and stable contacts with antigen-presenting cells (APCs). Since then, in vivo imaging has continuously improved our understanding of T cell activation. In particular, recent studies uncovered how T cells may be guided in their search for the best APCs. Additionally, the development of more sophisticated fluorescent tools has permitted not only to visualize T cell-APC contacts but also to probe their functional impact on T cell activation. These recent progresses are providing new insights into how T cells sense antigen, collect activation signals during distinct types of interaction and integrate information over successive encounters.

  15. Mitogen Activated Protein kinase signal transduction pathways in the prostate

    PubMed Central

    Maroni, Paul D; Koul, Sweaty; Meacham, Randall B; Koul, Hari K

    2004-01-01

    The biochemistry of the mitogen activated protein kinases ERK, JNK, and p38 have been studied in prostate physiology in an attempt to elucidate novel mechanisms and pathways for the treatment of prostatic disease. We reviewed articles examining mitogen-activated protein kinases using prostate tissue or cell lines. As with other tissue types, these signaling modules are links/transmitters for important pathways in prostate cells that can result in cellular survival or apoptosis. While the activation of the ERK pathway appears to primarily result in survival, the roles of JNK and p38 are less clear. Manipulation of these pathways could have important implications for the treatment of prostate cancer and benign prostatic hypertrophy. PMID:15219238

  16. p21-activated kinase signaling in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gururaj, Anupama E; Rayala, Suresh K; Kumar, Rakesh

    2005-01-01

    The p21-activated kinases signal through a number of cellular pathways fundamental to growth, differentiation and apoptosis. A wealth of information has accumulated at an impressive pace in the recent past, both with regard to previously identified targets for p21-activated kinases that regulate the actin cytoskeleton and cellular stress pathways and with regard to newly identified targets and their role in cancer. Emerging data also provide new clues towards a previously unappreciated link between these various cellular processes. The present review attempts to provide a quick tutorial to the reader about the evolving significance of p21-activated kinases and small GTPases in breast cancer, using information from mouse models, tissue culture studies, and human materials. PMID:15642175

  17. Digital signaling and hysteresis characterize Ras activation in lymphoid cells

    PubMed Central

    Das, Jayajit; Ho, Mary; Zikherman, Julie; Govern, Christopher; Yang, Ming; Weiss, Arthur; Chakraborty, Arup K.; Roose, Jeroen P.

    2009-01-01

    Activation of Ras proteins underlies functional decisions in diverse cell types. Two molecules, RasGRP and SOS, catalyze Ras activation in lymphocytes. Binding of active Ras to SOS′ allosteric pocket markedly increases SOS′ activity establishing a positive feedback loop for SOS-mediated Ras activation. Integrating in silico and in vitro studies, we demonstrate that digital signaling in lymphocytes (cells are “on” or “off”) is predicated upon feedback regulation of SOS. SOS′ feedback loop leads to hysteresis in the dose-response curve, which can enable a capacity to sustain Ras activation as stimuli are withdrawn and exhibit “memory” of past encounters with antigen. Ras activation via RasGRP alone is analog (graded increase in amplitude with stimulus). We describe how complementary analog (RasGRP) and digital (SOS) pathways act on Ras to efficiently convert analog input to digital output. Numerous predictions regarding the impact of our findings on lymphocyte function and development are noted. PMID:19167334

  18. Nitric oxide stimulates human sperm motility via activation of the cyclic GMP/protein kinase G signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Miraglia, Erica; De Angelis, Federico; Gazzano, Elena; Hassanpour, Hossain; Bertagna, Angela; Aldieri, Elisabetta; Revelli, Alberto; Ghigo, Dario

    2011-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO), a modulator of several physiological processes, is involved in different human sperm functions. We have investigated whether NO may stimulate the motility of human spermatozoa via activation of the soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC)/cGMP pathway. Sperm samples obtained by masturbation from 70 normozoospermic patients were processed by the swim-up technique. The kinetic parameters of the motile sperm-rich fractions were assessed by computer-assisted sperm analysis. After a 30-90  min incubation, the NO donor S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) exerted a significant enhancing effect on progressive motility (77, 78, and 78% vs 66, 65, and 62% of the control at the corresponding time), straight linear velocity (44, 49, and 48 μm/s vs 34, 35, and 35.5 μm/s), curvilinear velocity (81, 83, and 84 μm/s vs 68 μm/s), and average path velocity (52, 57, and 54 μm/s vs 40, 42, and 42 μm/s) at 5 μM but not at lower concentrations, and in parallel increased the synthesis of cGMP. A similar effect was obtained with the NO donor spermine NONOate after 30 and 60  min. The GSNO-induced effects on sperm motility were abolished by 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo-[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (a specific sGC inhibitor) and mimicked by 8-bromo-cGMP (8-Br-cGMP; a cell-permeating cGMP analog); the treatment with Rp-8-Br-cGMPS (an inhibitor of cGMP-dependent protein kinases) prevented both the GSNO- and the 8-Br-cGMP-induced responses. On the contrary, we did not observe any effect of the cGMP/PRKG1 (PKG) pathway modulators on the onset of hyperactivated sperm motility. Our results suggest that NO stimulates human sperm motility via the activation of sGC, the subsequent synthesis of cGMP, and the activation of cGMP-dependent protein kinases.

  19. Tribotronic Tuning Diode for Active Analog Signal Modulation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Tao; Yang, Zhi Wei; Pang, Yaokun; Xu, Liang; Zhang, Chi; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2017-01-24

    Realizing active interaction with external environment/stimuli is a great challenge for current electronics. In this paper, a tribotronic tuning diode (TTD) is proposed by coupling a variable capacitance diode and a triboelectric nanogenerator in free-standing sliding mode. When the friction layer is sliding on the device surface for electrification, a reverse bias voltage is created and applied to the diode for tuning the junction capacitance. When the sliding distance increases from 0 to 25 mm, the capacitance of the TTD decreases from about 39 to 8 pF. The proposed TTD has been integrated into analog circuits and exhibited excellent performances in frequency modulation, phase shift, and filtering by sliding a finger. This work has demonstrated tunable diode and active analog signal modulation by tribotronics, which has great potential to replace ordinary variable capacitance diodes in various practical applications such as signal processing, electronic tuning circuits, precise tuning circuits, active sensor networks, electronic communications, remote controls, flexible electronics, etc.

  20. Signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM) regulates T cellular cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Henning, G; Kraft, M S; Derfuss, T; Pirzer, R; de Saint-Basile, G; Aversa, G; Fleckenstein, B; Meinl, E

    2001-09-01

    Signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM) is a CD2-related surface receptor expressed by activated T cells and B cells. SLAM is a self ligand and enhances T cellular proliferation and IFN-gamma production. A defective SLAM associated protein (SAP) causes X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome (XLP), a frequently lethal mononucleosis based on the inability to control EBV. We report that SLAM augments TCR-mediated cytotoxicity. In normal CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, SLAM enhanced TCR-mediated cytotoxicity. In CD4(+) and CD8(+) Herpesvirus saimiri (H.saimiri) infected T cells, SLAM engagement alone triggered cytotoxicity. Using H.saimiri-transformed T cells as a model system we found that SLAM-engagement promotes the release of lytic granules and a CD95-independent killing that requires extracellular Ca(2+), cytoskeletal rearrangements, and signaling mediated by mitogen-activated protein kinase kinases MEK1/2. SLAM-enhanced cytotoxicity implies an immunoregulatory function by facilitating the elimination of APC and a role in overcoming infections with pathogens requiring a cytotoxic immune response.

  1. Digital signaling decouples activation probability and population heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Kellogg, Ryan A; Tian, Chengzhe; Lipniacki, Tomasz; Quake, Stephen R; Tay, Savaş

    2015-01-01

    Digital signaling enhances robustness of cellular decisions in noisy environments, but it is unclear how digital systems transmit temporal information about a stimulus. To understand how temporal input information is encoded and decoded by the NF-κB system, we studied transcription factor dynamics and gene regulation under dose- and duration-modulated inflammatory inputs. Mathematical modeling predicted and microfluidic single-cell experiments confirmed that integral of the stimulus (or area, concentration × duration) controls the fraction of cells that activate NF-κB in the population. However, stimulus temporal profile determined NF-κB dynamics, cell-to-cell variability, and gene expression phenotype. A sustained, weak stimulation lead to heterogeneous activation and delayed timing that is transmitted to gene expression. In contrast, a transient, strong stimulus with the same area caused rapid and uniform dynamics. These results show that digital NF-κB signaling enables multidimensional control of cellular phenotype via input profile, allowing parallel and independent control of single-cell activation probability and population heterogeneity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08931.001 PMID:26488364

  2. Diminution of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 signaling inhibits vascular permeability and anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Hox, Valerie; O'Connell, Michael P; Lyons, Jonathan J; Sackstein, Paul; Dimaggio, Thomas; Jones, Nina; Nelson, Celeste; Boehm, Manfred; Holland, Steven M; Freeman, Alexandra F; Tweardy, David J; Olivera, Ana; Metcalfe, Dean D; Milner, Joshua D

    2016-07-01

    During IgE-mediated immediate hypersensitivity reactions, vascular endothelial cells permeabilize in response to mast cell mediators. We have demonstrated previously that patients and mice with signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) mutations (autosomal dominant hyper-IgE syndrome [AD-HIES]) are partially protected from anaphylaxis. We sought to study the mechanism by which STAT3 contributes to anaphylaxis and determine whether small-molecule inhibition of STAT3 can prevent anaphylaxis. Using unaffected and STAT3-inhibited or genetic loss-of-function samples, we performed histamine skin prick tests, investigated the contribution of STAT3 to animal models of anaphylaxis, and measured endothelial cell permeability, gene and protein expression, and histamine receptor-mediated signaling. Although mouse mast cell degranulation was minimally affected by STAT3 blockade, mast cell mediator-induced anaphylaxis was blunted in Stat3 mutant mice with AD-HIES and in wild-type mice subjected to small-molecule STAT3 inhibition. Histamine skin prick test responses were diminished in patients with AD-HIES. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells derived from patients with AD-HIES or treated with a STAT3 inhibitor did not signal properly through Src or cause appropriate dissolution of the adherens junctions made up of the proteins vascular endothelial-cadherin and β-catenin. Furthermore, we found that diminished STAT3 target microRNA17-92 expression in human umbilical vein endothelial cells from patients with AD-HIES is associated with increased phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) expression, which inhibits Src, and increased E2F transcription factor 1 expression, which regulates β-catenin cellular dynamics. These data demonstrate that STAT3-dependent transcriptional activity regulates critical components for the architecture and functional dynamics of endothelial junctions, thus permitting vascular permeability. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Malarial Hemozoin Is a Nalp3 Inflammasome Activating Danger Signal

    PubMed Central

    Dostert, Catherine; Menu, Philippe; Gross, Olaf; Tardivel, Aubry; Suva, Mario-Luca; Stehle, Jean-Christophe; Kopf, Manfred; Stamenkovic, Ivan; Corradin, Giampietro; Tschopp, Jurg

    2009-01-01

    Background Characteristic symptoms of malaria include recurrent fever attacks and neurodegeneration, signs that are also found in patients with a hyperactive Nalp3 inflammasome. Plasmodium species produce a crystal called hemozoin that is generated by detoxification of heme after hemoglobin degradation in infected red blood cells. Thus, we hypothesized that hemozoin could activate the Nalp3 inflammasome, due to its particulate nature reminiscent of other inflammasome-activating agents. Methodology/Principal Findings We found that hemozoin acts as a proinflammatory danger signal that activates the Nalp3 inflammasome, causing the release of IL-1β. Similar to other Nalp3-activating particles, hemozoin activity is blocked by inhibiting phagocytosis, K+ efflux and NADPH oxidase. In vivo, intraperitoneal injection of hemozoin results in acute peritonitis, which is impaired in Nalp3-, caspase-1- and IL-1R-deficient mice. Likewise, the pathogenesis of cerebral malaria is dampened in Nalp3-deficient mice infected with Plasmodium berghei sporozoites, while parasitemia remains unchanged. Significance/Conclusions The potent pro-inflammatory effect of hemozoin through inflammasome activation may possibly be implicated in plasmodium-associated pathologies such as cerebral malaria. PMID:19652710

  4. Conservation of capa peptide-induced nitric oxide signalling in Diptera.

    PubMed

    Pollock, Valerie P; McGettigan, James; Cabrero, Pablo; Maudlin, Ian M; Dow, Julian A T; Davies, Shireen-A

    2004-11-01

    In D. melanogaster Malpighian (renal) tubules, the capa peptides stimulate production of nitric oxide (NO) and guanosine 3', 5'-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP), resulting in increased fluid transport. The roles of NO synthase (NOS), NO and cGMP in capa peptide signalling were tested in several other insect species of medical relevance within the Diptera (Aedes aegypti, Anopheles stephensi and Glossina morsitans) and in one orthopteran out-group, Schistocerca gregaria. NOS immunoreactivity was detectable by immunocytochemistry in tubules from all species studied. D. melanogaster, A. aegypti and A. stephensi express NOS in only principal cells, whereas G. morsitans and S. gregaria show more general NOS expression in the tubule. Measurement of associated NOS activity (NADPH diaphorase) shows that both D. melanogaster capa-1 and the two capa peptides encoded in the A. gambiae genome, QGLVPFPRVamide (AngCAPA-QGL) and GPTVGLFAFPRVamide (AngCAPA-GPT), all stimulate NOS activity in D. melanogaster, A. aegypti, A. stephensi and G. morsitans tubules but not in S. gregaria. Furthermore, capa-stimulated NOS activity in all the Diptera was inhibited by the NOS inhibitor l-NAME. All capa peptides stimulate an increase in cGMP content across the dipteran species, but not in the orthopteran S. gregaria. Similarly, all capa peptides tested stimulate fluid secretion in D. melanogaster, A. aegypti, A. stephensi and G. morsitans tubules but are either without effect or are inhibitory on S. gregaria. Consistent with these results, the Drosophila capa receptor was shown to be expressed in Drosophila tubules, and its closest Anopheles homologue was shown to be expressed in Anopheles tubules. Thus, we provide the first demonstration of physiological roles for two putative A. gambiae neuropeptides. We also demonstrate neuropeptide modulation of fluid secretion in tsetse tubule for the first time. Finally, we show the generality of capa peptide action, to stimulate NO/cGMP signalling and

  5. Role of nitric oxide signaling components in differentiation of embryonic stem cells into myocardial cells

    PubMed Central

    Mujoo, Kalpana; Sharin, Vladislav G.; Bryan, Nathan S.; Krumenacker, Joshua S.; Sloan, Courtney; Parveen, Shanaz; Nikonoff, Lubov E.; Kots, Alexander Y.; Murad, Ferid

    2008-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is involved in number of physiological and pathological events. Our previous studies demonstrated a differential expression of NO signaling components in mouse and human ES cells. Here, we demonstrate the effect of NO donors and soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) activators in differentiation of ES cells into myocardial cells. Our results with mouse and human ES cells demonstrate an increase in Nkx2.5 and myosin light chain (MLC2) mRNA expression on exposure of cells to NO donors and a decrease in mRNA expression of both cardiac-specific genes with nonspecific NOS inhibitor and a concomitant increase and decrease in the mRNA levels of sGC α1 subunit. Although sGC activators alone exhibited an increase in mRNA expression of cardiac genes (MLC2 and Nkx2.5), robust inductions of mRNA and protein expression of marker genes were observed when NO donors and sGC activators were combined. Measurement of NO metabolites revealed an increase in the nitrite levels in the conditioned media and cell lysates on exposure of cells to the different concentrations of NO donors. cGMP analysis in undifferentiated stem cells revealed a lack of stimulation with NO donors. Differentiated cells however, acquired the ability to be stimulated by NO donors. Although, 3-(4-amino-5-cyclopropylpyrimidin-2-yl)-1-(2-fluorobenzyl)-1H-pyrazolo [3,4-b]pyridine (BAY 41-2272) alone was able to stimulate cGMP accumulation, the combination of NO donors and BAY 41-2272 stimulated cGMP levels more than either of the agents separately. These studies demonstrate that cGMP-mediated NO signaling plays an important role in the differentiation of ES cells into myocardial cells. PMID:19020077

  6. PKG-1α mediates GATA4 transcriptional activity.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yanlin; Wang, Jun; Yu, Yanhong; Schwartz, Robert J

    2016-06-01

    GATA4, a zinc-finger transcription factor, is central for cardiac development and diseases. Here we show that GATA4 transcriptional activity is mediated by cell signaling via cGMP dependent PKG-1α activity. Protein kinase G (PKG), a serine/tyrosine specific kinase is the major effector of cGMP signaling. We observed enhanced transcriptional activity elicited by co-expressed GATA4 and PKG-1α. Phosphorylation of GATA4 by PKG-1α was detected on serine 261 (S261), while the C-terminal activation domain of GATA4 associated with PKG-1α. GATA4's DNA binding activity was enhanced by PKG-1α via by both phosphorylation and physical association. More importantly, a number of human disease-linked GATA4 mutants exhibited impaired S261 phosphorylation, pointing to defective S261 phosphorylation in the elaboration of human heart diseases. We showed S261 phosphorylation was favored by PKG-1α but not by PKA, and several other kinase signaling pathways such as MAPK and PKC. Our observations demonstrate that cGMP-PKG signaling mediates transcriptional activity of GATA4 and links defective GATA4 and PKG-1α mutations to the development of human heart disease.

  7. Calcium-Oxidant Signaling Network Regulates AMP-activated Protein Kinase (AMPK) Activation upon Matrix Deprivation*

    PubMed Central

    Sundararaman, Ananthalakshmy; Amirtham, Usha; Rangarajan, Annapoorni

    2016-01-01

    The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has recently been implicated in anoikis resistance. However, the molecular mechanisms that activate AMPK upon matrix detachment remain unexplored. In this study, we show that AMPK activation is a rapid and sustained phenomenon upon matrix deprivation, whereas re-attachment to the matrix leads to its dephosphorylation and inactivation. Because matrix detachment leads to loss of integrin signaling, we investigated whether integrin signaling negatively regulates AMPK activation. However, modulation of focal adhesion kinase or Src, the major downstream components of integrin signaling, failed to cause a corresponding change in AMPK signaling. Further investigations revealed that the upstream AMPK kinases liver kinase B1 (LKB1) and Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase β (CaMKKβ) contribute to AMPK activation upon detachment. In LKB1-deficient cells, we found AMPK activation to be predominantly dependent on CaMKKβ. We observed no change in ATP levels under detached conditions at early time points suggesting that rapid AMPK activation upon detachment was not triggered by energy stress. We demonstrate that matrix deprivation leads to a spike in intracellular calcium as well as oxidant signaling, and both these intracellular messengers contribute to rapid AMPK activation upon detachment. We further show that endoplasmic reticulum calcium release-induced store-operated calcium entry contributes to intracellular calcium increase, leading to reactive oxygen species production, and AMPK activation. We additionally show that the LKB1/CaMKK-AMPK axis and intracellular calcium levels play a critical role in anchorage-independent cancer sphere formation. Thus, the Ca2+/reactive oxygen species-triggered LKB1/CaMKK-AMPK signaling cascade may provide a quick, adaptable switch to promote survival of metastasizing cancer cells. PMID:27226623

  8. MECHANISM OF INHIBITION OF TUBULOGLOMERULAR FEEDBACK (TGF) BY CARBON MONOXIDE AND cGMP

    PubMed Central

    Ren, YiLin; D’Ambrosio, Martin A.; Garvin, Jeffrey L.; Wang, Hong; Carretero, Oscar A.

    2013-01-01

    Tubuloglomerular feedback (TGF) is a mechanism that senses NaCl in the macula densa (MD) and causes constriction of the afferent arteriole (Af-Art). Carbon monoxide (CO), either endogenous or exogenous, inhibits TGF at least in part via cGMP. We hypothesize that CO in the MD, acting via both cGMP-dependent and - independent mechanisms, attenuates TGF by acting downstream from depolarization and Ca entry into the MD cells. In vitro, microdissected rabbit Af-Arts and their MD were simultaneously perfused and TGF was measured as the decrease in Af-Art diameter. MD depolarization was induced with ionophores, while adding the CO-releasing molecule CORM-3 to the MD perfusate at non-toxic concentrations. CORM-3 blunted depolarization-induced TGF at 50 μM, from 3.6±0.4 to 2.5±0.4 μm (P<0.01), and abolished it at 100 μM, to 0.1±0.1 μm (P<0.001, n=6). When cGMP generation was blocked by guanylyl cyclase inhibitor LY-83583 added to the MD, CORM-3 no longer affected depolarization-induced TGF at 50 μM (2.9±0.4 vs. 3.0±0.4 μm), but partially inhibited TGF at 100 μM (to 1.3±0.2 μm, P<0.05, n=9). Experiments using ETYA and indomethacin suggest arachidonic acid metabolites do not mediate the cGMP-independent effect of CO. We then added the calcium ionophore A23187 to the macula densa, which caused TGF (4.1±0.6 μM); A23187-induced TGF was inhibited by CORM-3 at 50 μM (1.9±0.6 μM, P<0.01) and 100 μM (0.2±0.5 μM, P<0.001, n=6). We conclude that CO inhibits TGF acting downstream from depolarization and calcium entry, acting via cGMP at low concentrations, but additional mechanisms of action may be involved at higher concentrations. PMID:23648700

  9. The plant natriuretic peptide receptor is a guanylyl cyclase and enables cGMP-dependent signaling.

    PubMed

    Turek, Ilona; Gehring, Chris

    2016-06-01

    The functional homologues of vertebrate natriuretic peptides (NPs), the plant natriuretic peptides (PNPs), are a novel class of peptidic hormones that signal via guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP) and systemically affect plant salt and water balance and responses to biotrophic plant pathogens. Although there is increasing understanding of the complex roles of PNPs in plant responses at the systems level, little is known about the underlying signaling mechanisms. Here we report isolation and identification of a novel Leucine-Rich Repeat (LRR) protein that directly interacts with A. thaliana PNP, AtPNP-A. In vitro binding studies revealed that the Arabidopsis AtPNP-A binds specifically to the LRR protein, termed AtPNP-R1, and the active region of AtPNP-A is sufficient for the interaction to occur. Importantly, the cytosolic part of the AtPNP-R1, much like in some vertebrate NP receptors, harbors a catalytic center diagnostic for guanylyl cyclases and the recombinant AtPNP-R1 is capable of catalyzing the conversion of guanosine triphosphate to cGMP. In addition, we show that AtPNP-A causes rapid increases of cGMP levels in wild type (WT) leaf tissue while this response is significantly reduced in the atpnp-r1 mutants. AtPNP-A also causes cGMP-dependent net water uptake into WT protoplasts, and hence volume increases, whereas responses of the protoplasts from the receptor mutant are impaired. Taken together, our results suggest that the identified LRR protein is an AtPNP-A receptor essential for the PNP-dependent regulation of ion and water homeostasis in plants and that PNP- and vertebrate NP-receptors and their signaling mechanisms share surprising similarities.

  10. The determination of total cGMP levels in rod outer segments from intact toad photoreceptors in response to light superimposed on background and to consecutive flashes: a second light flash accelerates the dark recovery rate of cGMP levels in control media, but not in Na(+)-free, low Ca2+ medium.

    PubMed

    Cohen, A I; Blazynski, C

    1993-01-01

    In previous experiments we established that a light flash reduced cGMP levels of toad rod outer segments within the transduction time interval, but that recovery of the dark level of cGMP occurred more slowly than reported electrophysiological recovery of membrane potential. We now report that a second light flash accelerates the recovery rate of total cGMP following an initial flash, but that this acceleration is blocked in a medium which is both sodium and calcium deficient. We also noted that calcium deficiency only elevated cGMP levels when sodium was present. For other experiments, we recorded ERG or aspartate isolated PIII responses from eyecups or retinas mounted on our quick-freeze apparatus, the light stimuli originating from the double light-bench of the latter. Whereas background illumination depressed cGMP, no detectable further cGMP loss accompanied the electrical response to a flash superimposed on the background.

  11. Activated platelets signal chemokine synthesis by human monocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Weyrich, A S; Elstad, M R; McEver, R P; McIntyre, T M; Moore, K L; Morrissey, J H; Prescott, S M; Zimmerman, G A

    1996-01-01

    Human blood monocytes adhere rapidly and for prolonged periods to activated platelets that display P-selectin, an adhesion protein that recognizes a specific ligand on leukocytes, P-selectin glycoprotein-1. We previously demonstrated that P-selectin regulates expression and secretion of cytokines by stimulated monocytes when it is presented in a purified, immobilized form or by transfected cells. Here we show that thrombin-activated platelets induce the expression and secretion of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 and IL-8 by monocytes. Enhanced monokine synthesis requires engagement of P-selectin glycoprotein-1 on the leukocyte by P-selectin on the platelet. Secretion of the chemokines is not, however, directly signaled by P-selectin; instead, tethering of the monocytes by P-selectin is required for their activation by RANTES (regulated upon activation normal T cell expressed presumed secreted), a platelet chemokine not previously known to induce immediate-early gene products in monocytes. Adhesion of monocytes to activated platelets results in nuclear translocation of p65 (RelA), a component of the NF-kappaB family of transcription factors that binds kappaB sequences in the regulatory regions of monocyte chemotactic protein-1, IL-8, and other immediate-early genes. However, expression of tissue factor, a coagulation protein that also has a kappaB sequence in the 5' regulatory region of its gene, is not induced in monocytes adherent to activated platelets. Thus, contact of monocytes with activated platelets differentially affects the expression of monocyte products. These experiments suggest that activated platelets regulate chemokine secretion by monocytes in inflammatory lesions in vivo and provide a model for the study of gene regulation in cell-cell interactions. PMID:8617886

  12. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α signaling in hepatocarcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Misra, Parimal; Viswakarma, Navin; Reddy, Janardan K

    2013-01-01

    Peroxisomes are subcellular organelles that are found in the cytoplasm of most animal cells. They perform diverse metabolic functions, including H2O2-derived respiration, β-oxidation of fatty acids, and cholesterol metabolism. Peroxisome proliferators are a large class of structurally dissimilar industrial and pharmaceutical chemicals that were originally identified as inducers of both the size and the number of peroxisomes in rat and mouse livers or hepatocytes in vitro. Exposure to peroxisome proliferators leads to a stereotypical orchestration of adaptations consisting of hepatocellular hypertrophy and hyperplasia, and transcriptional induction of fatty acid metabolizing enzymes regulated in parallel with peroxisome proliferation. Chronic exposure to peroxisome proliferators causes liver tumors in both male and female mice and rats. Evidence indicates a pivotal role for a subset of nuclear receptor superfamily members, called peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), in mediating energy metabolism. Upon activation, PPARs regulate the expression of genes involved in lipid metabolism and peroxisome proliferation, as well as genes involved in cell growth. In this review, we describe the molecular mode of action of PPAR transcription factors, including ligand binding, interaction with specific DNA response elements, transcriptional activation, and cross talk with other signaling pathways. We discuss the evidence that suggests that PPARα and transcriptional coactivator Med1/PBP, a key subunit of the Mediator complex play a central role in mediating hepatic steatosis to hepatocarcinogenesis. Disproportionate increases in H2O2-generating enzymes generates excess reactive oxygen species resulting in sustained oxidative stress and progressive endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress with activation of unfolded protein response signaling. Thus, these major contributors coupled with hepatocellular proliferation are the key players of peroxisome proliferators

  13. Psoralen stimulates osteoblast differentiation through activation of BMP signaling.

    PubMed

    Tang, De-Zhi; Yang, Feng; Yang, Zhou; Huang, Jian; Shi, Qi; Chen, Di; Wang, Yong-Jun

    2011-02-11

    Osteoporosis is a systemic skeletal disease characterized by low bone mass and microarchitectural deterioration of bone tissue, with a consequent increase in bone fragility and susceptibility to fracture. In order to improve the treatment of osteoporosis, identification of anabolic and orally available agents with minimal side effects is highly desirable. Psoralen is a coumarin-like derivative extracted from Chinese herbs, which have been used to treat bone diseases for thousands of years. However, the role of Psoralen in osteoblast function and the underlying molecular mechanisms remain poorly understood. In this study, we found that Psoralen promoted osteoblast differentiation in primary mouse calvarial osteoblasts in a dose-dependent manner, demonstrated by up-regulation of expressions of osteoblast-specific marker genes including type I collagen, osteocalcin and bone sialoprotein and enhancement of alkaline phosphatase activity. We further demonstrated that Psoralen up-regulated the expression of Bmp2 and Bmp4 genes, increased the protein level of phospho-Smad1/5/8, and activated BMP reporter (12xSBE-OC-Luc) activity in a dose-dependent manner, as well as enhanced the expression of Osx, the direct target gene of BMP signaling. Deletion of the Bmp2 and Bmp4 genes abolished the stimulatory effect of Psoralen on the expression of osteoblast marker genes, such as Col1, Alp, Oc and Bsp. Our results suggest that Psoralen acts through the activation of BMP signaling to promote osteoblast differentiation and demonstrate that Psoralen could be a potential anabolic agent to treat patients with bone loss-associated diseases such as osteoporosis.

  14. Kilogram-scale prexasertib monolactate monohydrate synthesis under continuous-flow CGMP conditions.

    PubMed

    Cole, Kevin P; Groh, Jennifer McClary; Johnson, Martin D; Burcham, Christopher L; Campbell, Bradley M; Diseroad, William D; Heller, Michael R; Howell, John R; Kallman, Neil J; Koenig, Thomas M; May, Scott A; Miller, Richard D; Mitchell, David; Myers, David P; Myers, Steven S; Phillips, Joseph L; Polster, Christopher S; White, Timothy D; Cashman, Jim; Hurley, Declan; Moylan, Robert; Sheehan, Paul; Spencer, Richard D; Desmond, Kenneth; Desmond, Paul; Gowran, Olivia

    2017-06-16

    Advances in drug potency and tailored therapeutics are promoting pharmaceutical manufacturing to transition from a traditional batch paradigm to more flexible continuous processing. Here we report the development of a multistep continuous-flow CGMP (current good manufacturing practices) process that produced 24 kilograms of prexasertib monolactate monohydrate suitable for use in human clinical trials. Eight continuous unit operations were conducted to produce the target at roughly 3 kilograms per day using small continuous reactors, extractors, evaporators, crystallizers, and filters in laboratory fume hoods. Success was enabled by advances in chemistry, engineering, analytical science, process modeling, and equipment design. Substantial technical and business drivers were identified, which merited the continuous process. The continuous process afforded improved performance and safety relative to batch processes and also improved containment of a highly potent compound. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  15. Dynamic neural activity during stress signals resilient coping

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Rajita; Lacadie, Cheryl M.; Constable, R. Todd; Seo, Dongju

    2016-01-01

    Active coping underlies a healthy stress response, but neural processes supporting such resilient coping are not well-known. Using a brief, sustained exposure paradigm contrasting highly stressful, threatening, and violent stimuli versus nonaversive neutral visual stimuli in a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study, we show significant subjective, physiologic, and endocrine increases and temporally related dynamically distinct patterns of neural activation in brain circuits underlying the stress response. First, stress-specific sustained increases in the amygdala, striatum, hypothalamus, midbrain, right insula, and right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) regions supported the stress processing and reactivity circuit. Second, dynamic neural activation during stress versus neutral runs, showing early increases followed by later reduced activation in the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC), dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC), left DLPFC, hippocampus, and left insula, suggested a stress adaptation response network. Finally, dynamic stress-specific mobilization of the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (VmPFC), marked by initial hypoactivity followed by increased VmPFC activation, pointed to the VmPFC as a key locus of the emotional and behavioral control network. Consistent with this finding, greater neural flexibility signals in the VmPFC during stress correlated with active coping ratings whereas lower dynamic activity in the VmPFC also predicted a higher level of maladaptive coping behaviors in real life, including binge alcohol intake, emotional eating, and frequency of arguments and fights. These findings demonstrate acute functional neuroplasticity during stress, with distinct and separable brain networks that underlie critical components of the stress response, and a specific role for VmPFC neuroflexibility in stress-resilient coping. PMID:27432990

  16. Dynamic neural activity during stress signals resilient coping.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Rajita; Lacadie, Cheryl M; Constable, R Todd; Seo, Dongju

    2016-08-02

    Active coping underlies a healthy stress response, but neural processes supporting such resilient coping are not well-known. Using a brief, sustained exposure paradigm contrasting highly stressful, threatening, and violent stimuli versus nonaversive neutral visual stimuli in a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study, we show significant subjective, physiologic, and endocrine increases and temporally related dynamically distinct patterns of neural activation in brain circuits underlying the stress response. First, stress-specific sustained increases in the amygdala, striatum, hypothalamus, midbrain, right insula, and right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) regions supported the stress processing and reactivity circuit. Second, dynamic neural activation during stress versus neutral runs, showing early increases followed by later reduced activation in the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC), dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC), left DLPFC, hippocampus, and left insula, suggested a stress adaptation response network. Finally, dynamic stress-specific mobilization of the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (VmPFC), marked by initial hypoactivity followed by increased VmPFC activation, pointed to the VmPFC as a key locus of the emotional and behavioral control network. Consistent with this finding, greater neural flexibility signals in the VmPFC during stress correlated with active coping ratings whereas lower dynamic activity in the VmPFC also predicted a higher level of maladaptive coping behaviors in real life, including binge alcohol intake, emotional eating, and frequency of arguments and fights. These findings demonstrate acute functional neuroplasticity during stress, with distinct and separable brain networks that underlie critical components of the stress response, and a specific role for VmPFC neuroflexibility in stress-resilient coping.

  17. 76 FR 14024 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Non-Penicillin Beta-Lactam Risk Assessment: A CGMP Framework...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-15

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry on Non-Penicillin Beta-Lactam... guidance for industry entitled ``Non-Penicillin Beta-Lactam Risk Assessment: A CGMP Framework.'' This... non- penicillin beta-lactam antibiotics. The draft guidance is intended to assist manufacturers...

  18. Pharmacological Prevention and Reversion of Erectile Dysfunction after Radical Prostatectomy, By Modulation of Nitric Oxide/Cgmp Pathways

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    Reversion of Erectile Dysfunction after Radical Prostatectomy, By Modulation of Nitric Oxide/Cgmp Pathways...in the rat, as an experimental model for erectile dysfunction subsequent to radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer. This condition seriously...clinic, once the appropriate dosing is established, as a treatment to prevent or counteract erectile dysfunction after radical prostatectomy. 15

  19. Activation of the epidermal growth factor signalling pathway by tissue plasminogen activator in pancreas cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Hurtado, Mariano; Lozano, Juan José; Castellanos, Elisabeth; López‐Fernández, Luis A; Harshman, Keith; Martínez‐A, Carlos; Ortiz, Angel R; Thomson, Timothy M; Paciucci, Rosanna

    2007-01-01

    Background Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is the major activator of plasminogen in plasma. This serine protease is overexpressed by exocrine pancreas tumour cells, where it promotes tumour cell proliferation, growth, and invasion. Here we have explored the signalling pathways used by tPA to activate the proliferation of pancreatic cancer cells. Methods Transcriptional profiling on cDNA micro arrays was used to analyse the pattern of gene expression in response to tPA compared to the response to epidermal growth factor (EGF) and platelet derived growth factor (PDGF). Results were confirmed using different biochemical assays in which specific kinase inhibitors or RNA interference were used. Results Transcriptional profiling showed that tPA modulates the expression of a set of genes commonly regulated by EGF, but distinct from the major set of genes modulated by PDGF. This suggested that tPA and EGF share common signalling pathways, a conclusion supported by further experimental evidence. Firstly, we found that tPA induced a rapid and transient phosphorylation of the EGFR. Secondly, specific EGFR kinase inhibitors, but not PDGFR kinase inhibitors, abolished the tPA induced phosphorylation of the ERK1/2 kinases and cell proliferation. The mitogenic activity of tPA was also inhibited by siRNA depletion of EGFR, thus confirming the involvement of this receptor in tPA triggered signalling. Thirdly, we show that the signalling and mitogenic effects of tPA require its proteolytic activity, the activity of the metalloprotease‐9 and active hb‐EGF. Conclusion Our results suggest that tPA induces proliferation by triggering a proteolytic cascade that sequentially activates plasmin, metalloprotease‐9 (MMP‐9) and hb‐EGF. These events are required to activate the EGFR signalling pathway and cell proliferation. PMID:17452424

  20. Signal-to-noise ratio in neuro activation PET studies

    SciTech Connect

    Votaw, J.R.

    1996-04-01

    It has become commonplace to compare scanner sensitivity characteristics by comparing noise equivalent count rate curves. However, because a 20-cm diameter uniform phantom is drastically difference from a human brain, these curves give misleading information when planning a neuro activation PET experiment. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) calculations have been performed using measured data (Siemens 921 scanner) from the three-dimensional (3-D) Hoffman brain phantom for the purpose of determining the optimal injection and scanning protocol for [{sup 15}O] labeled activation experiments. Region of interest (ROI) values along with the variance due to prompt (trues plus randoms) and random events were determined for various regions and radioactivity concentrations. Calculated attenuation correction was used throughout. Scatter correction was not used when calculating the SNR in activation studies because the number of scattered events is almost identical in each data acquisition and hence cancels. The results indicate that randoms correction should not be performed and that rather than being limited by the scanner capabilities, neuro activation experiments are limited by the amount of radioactivity that can be injected and the length of time the patient can stay in the scanner.

  1. Oxymatrine inhibits microglia activation via HSP60-TLR4 signaling.

    PubMed

    Ding, Feijia; Li, Yunhong; Hou, Xiaolin; Zhang, Rui; Hu, Shuting; Wang, Yin

    2016-11-01

    Oxymatrine (OMT) is an alkaloid extracted from Sophora flavescens, which has broad anti-inflammatory, antitumor and immunosuppressant actions. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms have remained elusive. Heat shock protein 60 (HSP60) has recently been shown to have an important role in autoimmune reactions. The present study aimed to investigate whether OMT exerts its anti-inflammatory effects by inhibiting microglial activation and examined the role of HSP60 in this process. Western blot analysis and ELISA showed that OMT decreased the expression and release of HSP60 by LPS-activated BV2 cells. The expression of heat shock factor 1, the transcription factor of HSP60, was also suppressed by OMT. Extracellular HSP60 has been previously indicated to induce microglial apoptosis through the Toll-like receptor (TLR)-4 pathway. Flow cytometric analysis demonstrated that LPS treatment induced apoptosis of BV2 cells, which was inhibited by OMT in parallel with inhibition of LPS-induced expression of TLR-4. Furthermore, OMT was shown to suppress the levels of myeloid differentiation factor (MYD)88, nuclear factor (NF)-κB, caspase-3, inducible nitric oxide synthase, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6. In light of these results, it was concluded that OMT may exert its neuroprotective effects via HSP60/TLR-4/MYD88/NF-κB signaling pathways to inhibit microglial activation. OMT may therefore offer substantial therapeutic potential for treating neurodegenerative diseases associated with microglial activation.

  2. Oxymatrine inhibits microglia activation via HSP60-TLR4 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Feijia; Li, Yunhong; Hou, Xiaolin; Zhang, Rui; Hu, Shuting; Wang, Yin

    2016-01-01

    Oxymatrine (OMT) is an alkaloid extracted from Sophora flavescens, which has broad anti-inflammatory, antitumor and immunosuppressant actions. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms have remained elusive. Heat shock protein 60 (HSP60) has recently been shown to have an important role in autoimmune reactions. The present study aimed to investigate whether OMT exerts its anti-inflammatory effects by inhibiting microglial activation and examined the role of HSP60 in this process. Western blot analysis and ELISA showed that OMT decreased the expression and release of HSP60 by LPS-activated BV2 cells. The expression of heat shock factor 1, the transcription factor of HSP60, was also suppressed by OMT. Extracellular HSP60 has been previously indicated to induce microglial apoptosis through the Toll-like receptor (TLR)-4 pathway. Flow cytometric analysis demonstrated that LPS treatment induced apoptosis of BV2 cells, which was inhibited by OMT in parallel with inhibition of LPS-induced expression of TLR-4. Furthermore, OMT was shown to suppress the levels of myeloid differentiation factor (MYD)88, nuclear factor (NF)-κB, caspase-3, inducible nitric oxide synthase, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6. In light of these results, it was concluded that OMT may exert its neuroprotective effects via HSP60/TLR-4/MYD88/NF-κB signaling pathways to inhibit microglial activation. OMT may therefore offer substantial therapeutic potential for treating neurodegenerative diseases associated with microglial activation. PMID:27882228

  3. Accelerated Lactate Dehydrogenase Activity Potentiates Osteoclastogenesis via NFATc1 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Man; Kwon, So Hyun; Lee, Seoung Hoon; Lee, Soo Young; Jeong, Daewon

    2016-01-01

    Osteoclasts seem to be metabolic active during their differentiation and bone-resorptive activation. However, the functional role of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), a tetrameric enzyme consisting of an A and/or B subunit that catalyzes interconversion of pyruvate to lactate, in RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation is not known. In this study, RANKL treatment induced gradual gene expression and activation of the LDH A2B2 isotype during osteoclast differentiation as well as the LDH A1B3 and B4 isotypes during osteoclast maturation after pre-osteoclast formation. Glucose consumption and lactate production in growth media were accelerated during osteoclast differentiation, together with enhanced expression of H+-lactate co-transporter and increased extracellular acidification, demonstrating that glycolytic metabolism was stimulated during differentiation. Further, oxygen consumption via mitochondria was stimulated during osteoclast differentiation. On the contrary, depletion of LDH-A or LDH-B subunit suppressed both glycolytic and mitochondrial metabolism, resulting in reduced mature osteoclast formation via decreased osteoclast precursor fusion and down-regulation of the osteoclastogenic critical transcription factor NFATc1 and its target genes. Collectively, our findings suggest that RANKL-induced LDH activation stimulates glycolytic and mitochondrial respiratory metabolism, facilitating mature osteoclast formation via osteoclast precursor fusion and NFATc1 signaling. PMID:27077737

  4. cGMP decreases surface NKCC2 levels in the thick ascending limb: role of phosphodiesterase 2 (PDE2)

    PubMed Central

    Ares, Gustavo R.; Caceres, Paulo; Alvarez-Leefmans, Francisco J.; Ortiz, Pablo A.

    2008-01-01

    NaCl absorption in the medullary thick ascending limb of the loop of Henle (THAL) is mediated by the apical Na/K/2Cl cotransporter (NKCC2). Hormones that increase cGMP, such as nitric oxide (NO) and natriuretic peptides, decrease NaCl absorption by the THAL. However, the mechanism by which cGMP decreases NaCl absorption in THALs is not known. We hypothesized that cGMP decreases surface NKCC2 levels in the THAL. We used surface biotinylation to measure surface NKCC2 levels in rat THAL suspensions. We tested the effect of the membrane-permeant cGMP analog dibutyryl-cGMP (db-cGMP) on surface NKCC2 levels. Incubating THALs with db-cGMP for 20 min decreased surface NKCC2 levels in a concentration-dependent manner (basal = 100%; db-cGMP 100 μM = 77 ± 7%; 500 μM = 54 ± 10% and 1,000 μM = 61 ± 8%). A different cGMP analog 8-bromo-cGMP (8-Br-cGMP) also decreased surface NKCC2 levels by 25%, (basal = 100%; 8-Br-cGMP = 75 ± 5%). Incubation of isolated, perfused THALs with db-cGMP decreased apical surface NKCC2 labeling levels as measured by immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy. cGMP-stimulated phosphodiesterase 2 (PDE2) mediates the inhibitory effect of NO on NaCl absorption by THALs. Thus we examined the role of PDE2 and found that PDE2 inhibitors blocked the effect of db-cGMP on surface NKCC2. Also, a nonstimulatory concentration of db-cAMP blocked the cGMP-induced decrease in surface NKCC2. Finally, db-cGMP inhibited THAL net Cl absorption by 48 ± 4%, and this effect was completely blocked by PDE2 inhibition. We conclude that cGMP decreases NKCC2 levels in the apical membrane of THALs and that this effect is mediated by PDE2. This is an important mechanism by which cGMP inhibits NaCl absorption by the THAL. PMID:18684888

  5. Multiple stress signals activate mutant p53 in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Young-Ah; Post, Sean M.; Elizondo-Fraire, Ana C.; Maccio, Danela R.; Jackson, James G.; El-Naggar, Adel K.; Van Pelt, Carolyn; Terzian, Tamara; Lozano, Guillermina

    2012-01-01

    p53 levels are tightly regulated in normal cells, and thus the wild-type p53 protein is nearly undetectable until stimulated through a variety of stresses. In response to stress, p53 is released from its negative regulators, mainly Mdm2, allowing p53 to be stabilized to activate cell cycle arrest, senescence, and apoptosis programs. Many of the upstream signals that regulate wild type p53 are known; however, limited information for the regulation of mutant p53 exists. Previously, we demonstrated that wild-type and mutant p53R172H are regulated in a similar manner in the absence of Mdm2 or p16. Additionally, this stabilization of mutant p53 is responsible for the gain-of-function metastatic phenotype observed in the mouse. In this report, we examined the role of oncogenes, DNA damage, and reactive oxygen species, signals that stabilize wild type p53, on the stabilization of mutant p53 in vivo and the consequences of this expression on tumor formation and survival. These factors stabilized mutant p53 protein which often times contributed to exacerbated tumor phenotypes. These findings, coupled with the fact that patients carry p53 mutations without stabilization of p53, suggest that personalized therapeutic schemes may be needed for individual patients depending on their p53 status. PMID:21983037

  6. Betulin inhibits lung carcinoma proliferation through activation of AMPK signaling.

    PubMed

    Li, Xian-Dong; Zhang, Yi-Jie; Han, Ji-Chang

    2014-11-01

    Betulin (lup-20(29)-ene-3β, 28-diol) is an abundant, naturally occurring triterpene. It is commonly isolated from the bark of birch trees and forms up to 30% of the dry weight of the extractive. In the present study, we revealed its antiproliferative effects and mechanisms using two lung carcinoma cells (A549 and NCI-292). By 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) and bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation assays, we found that betulin could efficiently inhibit cell growth and proliferation. Besides, several key genes of cell-cycle regulators were also affected by betulin treatment. At the molecular level, our results demonstrated that treatment with betulin was also associated with activation of AMP kinase and inhibition of mTOR/p70S6K/pS6 signaling in these cells. In agreement, inhibition of AMPK signaling largely reversed the antiproliferative roles of betulin. Taken together, these data provide evidence for a mechanism that may contribute to the antineoplastic effects of betulin and justify further work to explore its potential roles in lung cancer prevention and treatment.

  7. The effect of resveratrol on beta amyloid-induced memory impairment involves inhibition of phosphodiesterase-4 related signaling

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Gang; Chen, Ling; Pan, Xiaoyu; Chen, Jiechun; Wang, Liqun; Wang, Weijie; Cheng, Ruochuan; Wu, Fan; Feng, Xiaoqing; Yu, Yingcong; Zhang, Han-Ting; O'Donnell, James M.; Xu, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Resveratrol, a natural polyphenol found in red wine, has wide spectrum of pharmacological properties including antioxidative and antiaging activities. Beta amyloid peptides (Aβ) are known to involve cognitive impairment, neuroinflammatory and apoptotic processes in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Activation of cAMP and/or cGMP activities can improve memory performance and decrease the neuroinflammation and apoptosis. However, it remains unknown whether the memory enhancing effect of resveratrol on AD associated cognitive disorders is related to the inhibition of phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4) subtypes and subsequent increases in intracellular cAMP and/or cGMP activities. This study investigated the effect of resveratrol on Aβ1-42-induced cognitive impairment and the participation of PDE4 subtypes related cAMP or cGMP signaling. Mice microinfused with Aβ1-42 into bilateral CA1 subregions displayed learning and memory impairment, as evidenced by reduced memory acquisition and retrieval in the water maze and retention in the passive avoidance tasks; it was also significant that neuroinflammatory and pro-apoptotic factors were increased in Aβ1-42-treated mice. Aβ1-42-treated mice also increased in PDE4A, 4B and 4D expression, and decreased in PKA level. However, PKA inhibitor H89, but not PKG inhibitor KT5823, prevented resveratrol's effects on these parameters. Resveratrol also reversed Aβ1-42-induced decreases in phosphorylated cAMP response-element binding protein (pCREB), brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and anti-apoptotic factor BCl-2 expression, which were reversed by H89. These findings suggest that resveratrol reversing Aβ-induced learning and memory disorder may involve the regulation of neuronal inflammation and apoptosis via PDE4 subtypes related cAMP-CREB-BDNF signaling. PMID:26980711

  8. Signaling pathways regulating cartilage growth plate formation and activity.

    PubMed

    Samsa, William E; Zhou, Xin; Zhou, Guang

    2017-02-01

    The growth plate is a highly specialized and dynamic cartilage structure that serves many essential functions in skeleton patterning, growth and endochondral ossification in developing vertebrates. Major signaling pathways initiated by classical morphogens and by other systemic and tissue-specific factors are intimately involved in key aspects of growth plate development. As a corollary of these essential functions, disturbances in these pathways due to mutations or environmental factors lead to severe skeleton disorders. Here, we review these pathways and the most recent progress made in understanding their roles in chondrocyte differentiation in growth plate development and activity. Furthermore, we discuss newly uncovered pathways involved in growth plate formation, including mTOR, the circadian clock, and the COP9 signalosome.

  9. Innate Immune Signaling Activated by MDR Bacteria in the Airway

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Dane; Ahn, Danielle; Cohen, Taylor; Prince, Alice

    2015-01-01

    Health care-associated bacterial pneumonias due to multiple-drug resistant (MDR) pathogens are an important public health problem and are major causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. In addition to antimicrobial resistance, these organisms have adapted to the milieu of the human airway and have acquired resistance to the innate immune clearance mechanisms that normally prevent pneumonia. Given the limited efficacy of antibiotics, bacterial clearance from the airway requires an effective immune response. Understanding how specific airway pathogens initiate and regulate innate immune signaling, and whether this response is excessive, leading to host-induced pathology may guide future immunomodulatory therapy. We will focus on three of the most important causes of health care-associated pneumonia, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Klebsiella pneumoniae, and review the mechanisms through which an inappropriate or damaging innate immune response is stimulated, as well as describe how airway pathogens cause persistent infection by evading immune activation. PMID:26582515

  10. Innate Immune Signaling Activated by MDR Bacteria in the Airway.

    PubMed

    Parker, Dane; Ahn, Danielle; Cohen, Taylor; Prince, Alice

    2016-01-01

    Health care-associated bacterial pneumonias due to multiple-drug resistant (MDR) pathogens are an important public health problem and are major causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. In addition to antimicrobial resistance, these organisms have adapted to the milieu of the human airway and have acquired resistance to the innate immune clearance mechanisms that normally prevent pneumonia. Given the limited efficacy of antibiotics, bacterial clearance from the airway requires an effective immune response. Understanding how specific airway pathogens initiate and regulate innate immune signaling, and whether this response is excessive, leading to host-induced pathology may guide future immunomodulatory therapy. We will focus on three of the most important causes of health care-associated pneumonia, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Klebsiella pneumoniae, and review the mechanisms through which an inappropriate or damaging innate immune response is stimulated, as well as describe how airway pathogens cause persistent infection by evading immune activation.

  11. Multidimensional Ultrasound Doppler Signal Analysis for Fetal Activity Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Ribes, Sophie; Girault, Jean-Marc; Perrotin, Franck; Kouamé, Denis

    2015-12-01

    Fetal activity parameters such as movements, heart rate and the related parameters are essential indicators of fetal wellbeing, and no device provides simultaneous access to and sufficient estimation of all of these parameters to evaluate fetal health. This work was aimed at collecting these parameters to automatically separate healthy from compromised fetuses. To achieve this goal, we first developed a multi-sensor-multi-gate Doppler system. Then we recorded multidimensional Doppler signals and estimated the fetal activity parameters via dedicated signal processing techniques. Finally, we combined these parameters into four sets of parameters (or four hyper-parameters) to determine the set of parameters that is able to separate healthy from other fetuses. To validate our system, a data set consisting of two groups of fetal signals (normal and compromised) was established and provided by physicians. From the estimated parameters, an instantaneous Manning-like score, referred to as the ultrasonic score, was calculated and was used together with movements, heart rate and the associated parameters in a classification process employing the support vector machine method. We investigated the influence of the sets of parameters and evaluated the performance of the support vector machine using the computation of sensibility, specificity, percentage of support vectors and total classification error. The sensitivity of the four sets ranged from 79% to 100%. Specificity was 100% for all sets. The total classification error ranged from 0% to 20%. The percentage of support vectors ranged from 33% to 49%. Overall, the best results were obtained with the set of parameters consisting of fetal movement, short-term variability, long-term variability, deceleration and ultrasound score. The sensitivity, specificity, percentage of support vectors and total classification error of this set were respectively 100%, 100%, 35% and 0%. This indicated our ability to separate the data into two

  12. Sulindac selectively inhibits colon tumor cell growth by activating the cGMP/PKG pathway to suppress Wnt/β-catenin signaling.

    PubMed

    Li, Nan; Xi, Yaguang; Tinsley, Heather N; Gurpinar, Evrim; Gary, Bernard D; Zhu, Bing; Li, Yonghe; Chen, Xi; Keeton, Adam B; Abadi, Ashraf H; Moyer, Mary P; Grizzle, William E; Chang, Wen-Chi; Clapper, Margie L; Piazza, Gary A

    2013-09-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) display promising antineoplastic activity for colorectal and other cancers, but toxicity from COX inhibition limits their long-term use for chemoprevention. Previous studies have concluded that the basis for their tumor cell growth inhibitory activity does not require COX inhibition, although the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. Here, we report that the NSAID sulindac sulfide inhibits cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate phosphodiesterase (cGMP PDE) activity to increase intracellular cGMP levels and activate cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) at concentrations that inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis of colon tumor cells. Sulindac sulfide did not activate the cGMP/PKG pathway, nor affect proliferation or apoptosis in normal colonocytes. Knockdown of the cGMP-specific PDE5 isozyme by siRNA and PDE5-specific inhibitors tadalafil and sildenafil also selectively inhibited the growth of colon tumor cells that expressed high levels of PDE5 compared with colonocytes. The mechanism by which sulindac sulfide and the cGMP/PKG pathway inhibits colon tumor cell growth involves the transcriptional suppression of β-catenin to inhibit Wnt/β-catenin T-cell factor transcriptional activity, leading to downregulation of cyclin D1 and survivin. These observations suggest that safer and more efficacious sulindac derivatives can be developed for colorectal cancer chemoprevention by targeting PDE5 and possibly other cGMP-degrading isozymes.

  13. Sustained nitric oxide (NO)-releasing compound reverses dysregulated NO signal transduction in priapism.

    PubMed

    Lagoda, Gwen; Sezen, Sena F; Hurt, K Joseph; Cabrini, Marcelo R; Mohanty, Dillip K; Burnett, Arthur L

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the therapeutic potential of a sustained nitric oxide (NO)-releasing compound to correct the molecular hallmarks and pathophysiology of priapism, an important but poorly characterized erectile disorder. 1,5-Bis-(dihexyl-N-nitrosoamino)-2,4-dinitrobenzene (C6') and an inactive form of the compound [1,5-bis-(dihexylamino)-2,4-dinitrobenzene (C6)] were tested in neuronal cell cultures and penile lysates for NO release (Griess assay) and biological activity (cGMP production). The effect of local depot C6' or C6 was evaluated in mice with a priapic phenotype due to double neuronal and endothelial NO synthase deletion (dNOS(-/-)) or human sickle hemoglobin transgenic expression (Sickle). Changes in NO signaling molecules and reactive oxygen species (ROS) surrogates were assessed by Western blot. The physiological response after C6' treatment was assessed using an established model of electrically stimulated penile erection. C6' generated NO, increased cGMP, and dose dependently increased NO metabolites. C6' treatment reversed abnormalities in key penile erection signaling molecules, including phosphodiesterase type 5, phosphorylated endothelial nitric oxide synthase, and phosphorylated vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein. In Sickle mice, C6' also attenuated the increased ROS markers gp91(phox), 4-hydroxynonenal, and 3-nitrotyrosine. Finally, C6' corrected the excessive priapic erection response of dNOS(-/-) mice. Exogenous sustained NO release from C6' corrects pathological erectile signaling in mouse models of priapism and suggests novel approaches to human therapy.

  14. [Signal transudation pathways in parietal cells of the gastric mucosa in experimental stomach ulcer].

    PubMed

    Ostapchenko, L I; Drobins'ka, O V; Chaĭka, V O; Bohun, L I; Bohdanova, O V; Kot, L I; Haĭda, L M

    2009-01-01

    The goal of the presented work was the research of signal transduction mechanism in the rat gastric parietal cells under stomach ulcer conditions. In these cells activation of adenylate cyclase (increase of cAMP level and proteinkinase A activity) and phosphoinositide (increases [Ca2+]i; cGMP and phoshatidylinocitole levels; proteinkinase C, proteinkinase G, and calmodulin-dependent-proteinkinase activity) of signals pathway was shown. An increase of plasma membrane phospholipids (PC, PS, PE, PI, LPC) level was shown. Under conditions of influence of the stress factor the membran enzymes activity (H+, K+ -ATPase, 5'-AMPase, Na+, K+ -ATPase, Ca2+, Mg2+ -ATPase and H+, K+ -ATPase) was considerably increased. The intensification of lipid peroxidation processes in rats was demonstrated.

  15. Hedgehog/GLI Signaling Activates Suppressor of Cytokine Signaling 1 (SOCS1) in Epidermal and Neural Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Laner-Plamberger, Sandra; Wolff, Florian; Kaser-Eichberger, Alexandra; Swierczynski, Stefan; Hauser-Kronberger, Cornelia; Frischauf, Anna-Maria; Eichberger, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Sustained hedgehog (Hh) signaling mediated by the GLI transcription factors is implicated in many types of cancer. Identification of Hh/GLI target genes modulating the activity of other pathways involved in tumor development promise to open new ways for better understanding of tumor development and maintenance. Here we show that SOCS1 is a direct target of Hh/GLI signaling in human keratinocytes and medulloblastoma cells. SOCS1 is a potent inhibitor of interferon gamma (IFN-y)/STAT1 signaling. IFN-у/STAT1 signaling can induce cell cycle arrest, apoptosis and anti-tumor immunity. The transcription factors GLI1 and GLI2 activate the SOCS1 promoter, which contains five putative GLI binding sites, and GLI2 binding to the promoter was shown by chromatin immunoprecipitation. Consistent with a role of GLI in SOCS1 regulation, STAT1 phosphorylation is reduced in cells with active Hh/GLI signaling and IFN-у/STAT1 target gene activation is decreased. Furthermore, IFN-у signaling is restored by shRNA mediated knock down of SOCS1. Here, we identify SOCS1 as a novel Hh/GLI target gene, indicating a negative role of Hh/GLI pathway in IFN-y/STAT1 signaling. PMID:24058673

  16. The Satiety Signaling Neuropeptide Perisulfakinin Inhibits the Activity of Central Neurons Promoting General Activity

    PubMed Central

    Wicher, Dieter; Derst, Christian; Gautier, Hélène; Lapied, Bruno; Heinemann, Stefan H.; Agricola, Hans-Jürgen

    2007-01-01

    The metabolic state is one of the determinants of the general activity level. Satiety is related to resting or sleep whereas hunger correlates to wakefulness and activity. The counterpart to the mammalian satiety signal cholecystokinin (CCK) in insects are the sulfakinins. The aim of this study was to resolve the mechanism by which the antifeedant activity of perisulfakinin (PSK) in Periplaneta americana is mediated. We identified the sources of PSK which is used both as hormone and as paracrine messenger. PSK is found in the neurohemal organ of the brain and in nerve endings throughout the central nervous system. To correlate the distributions of PSK and its receptor (PSKR), we cloned the gene coding for PSKR and provide evidence for its expression within the nervous system. It occurs only in a few neurons, among them are the dorsal unpaired median (DUM) neurons which release octopamine thereby regulating the general level of activity. Application of PSK to DUM neurons attenuated the spiking frequency (EC50=11pM) due to reduction of a pacemaker Ca2+ current through cAMP-inhibited pTRPγ channels. PSK increased the intracellular cAMP level while decreasing the intracellular Ca2+ concentration in DUM neurons. Thus, the satiety signal conferred by PSK acts antagonistically to the hunger signal, provided by the adipokinetic hormone (AKH): PSK depresses the electrical activity of DUM neurons by inhibiting the pTRPγ channel that is activated by AKH under conditions of food shortage. PMID:18946521

  17. Normoxic Cyclic GMP-independent Oxidative Signaling by Nitrite Enhances Airway Epithelial Cell Proliferation and Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ling; Frizzell, Sheila A.; Zhao, Xuejun; Gladwin, Mark T.

    2013-01-01

    The airway epithelium provides important barrier and host defense functions. Recent studies reveal that nitrite is an endocrine reservoir of nitric oxide (NO) bioactivity that is converted to NO by enzymatic reductases along the physiological oxygen gradient. Nitrite signaling has been described as NO dependent activation mediated by reactions with deoxygenated redox active hemoproteins, such as hemoglobin, myoglobin, neuroglobin, xanthine oxidoreductase (XO) and NO synthase at low pH and oxygen tension. However, nitrite can also be readily oxidized to nitrogen dioxide (NO2•) via heme peroxidase reactions, suggesting the existence of alternative oxidative signaling pathways for nitrite under normoxic conditions. In the present study we examined normoxic signaling effects of sodium nitrite on airway epithelial cell wound healing. In an in vitro scratch injury model under normoxia, we exposed cultured monolayers of human airway epithelial cells to various concentrations of sodium nitrite and compared responses to NO donor. We found sodium nitrite potently enhanced airway epithelium wound healing at physiological concentrations (from 1uM). The effect of nitrite was blocked by the NO and NO2• scavenger 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl 3-oxide (c-PTIO). Interestingly, nitrite treatment did not increase cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) levels under these normoxic conditions, even in the presence of a phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitor, suggesting cGMP independent signaling. Consistent with an oxidative signaling pathway requiring hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)/heme peroxidase/NO2• signaling, the effects of nitrite were potentiated by superoxide dismutase (SOD) and low concentration H2O2, whereas inhibited completely by catalase, followed by downstream extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 activation. Our data represent the first description of normoxic nitrite signaling on lung epithelial cell proliferation and wound healing and suggest

  18. Deriving stellar inclination of slow rotators using stellar activity signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumusque, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Stellar inclination is an important parameter for many astrophysical studies. In the context of exoplanets, this allows us to derive the true obliquity of a system if the projected stellar spin-planetary orbit angle can measured via the Rossiter-Mclaughlin effect. Although different techniques allow us to estimate stellar inclination for fast rotators, it becomes much more difficult when stars are rotating slower than 2-2.5 km.s-1. By using the new activity simulation SOAP 2.0 that can reproduce the photometric and spectroscopic variations induced by stellar activity, we are able to fit the activity variation of solar-type stars and derive their inclination. The case of the equator-on star HD189733 will be presented, as well as the case of Alpha Centauri B, which present an inclination of 45+9-19 degrees, implying that the earth-mass orbiting planet is not transiting if aligned with its host star. Other exemples will also demonstrate the power of the technique, that can infer a stellar inclination, even for slow rotators like Alpha Centauri B, that present a projected rotational velocity smaller than 1.15 km.s-1. In addition, the SOAP 2.0 simulation can be used to correct for the effect of activity when one major active region is dominating the RV signal. This could enhance the detection of small mass exoplanets orbiting slightly active stars.This project is funded by ETAEARTH (European Union Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under Grant Agreement n. 313014), a transnational collaboration between European countries and the US (the Swiss Space Office, the Harvard Origin of Life Initiative, the Scottish Universities Physics Alliance, the University of Geneva, the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, the Italian National Astrophysical Institute, the University of St. Andrews, Queens University Belfast, and the University of Edinburgh) setup to optimize the synergy between space-and ground-based data whose scientific potential for the characterization of

  19. Thermodynamics of Activation Gating in Olfactory-Type Cyclic Nucleotide-Gated (CNGA2) Channels

    PubMed Central

    Nache, Vasilica; Kusch, Jana; Biskup, Christoph; Schulz, Eckhard; Zimmer, Thomas; Hagen, Volker; Benndorf, Klaus

    2008-01-01

    Olfactory-type cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) ion channels open by the binding of cyclic nucleotides to a binding domain in the C-terminus. Employing the Eyring rate theory, we performed a thermodynamic analysis of the activation gating in homotetrameric CNGA2 channels. Lowering the temperature shifted the concentration-response relationship to lower concentrations, resulting in a decrease of both the enthalpy ΔH and entropy ΔS upon channel opening, suggesting that the order of an open CNGA2 channel plus its environment is higher than that of the closed channel. Activation time courses induced by cGMP concentration jumps were used to study thermodynamics of the transition state. The activation enthalpies ΔH‡ were positive at all cGMP concentrations. In contrast, the activation entropy ΔS‡ was positive at low cGMP concentrations and became then negative at increasing cGMP concentrations. The enthalpic and entropic parts of the activation energies approximately balance each other at all cGMP concentrations, leaving the free enthalpy of activation in the range between 19 and 21 kcal/mol. We conclude that channel activation proceeds through different pathways at different cGMP concentrations. Compared to the unliganded channel, low cGMP concentrations generate a transitional state of lower order whereas high cGMP concentrations generate a transitional state of higher order. PMID:18567637

  20. Activation of cGMP-Dependent Protein Kinase Stimulates Cardiac ATP-Sensitive Potassium Channels via a ROS/Calmodulin/CaMKII Signaling Cascade

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Yongping; Zhang, Dai-Min; Lin, Yu-Fung

    2011-01-01

    Background Cyclic GMP (cGMP)-dependent protein kinase (PKG) is recognized as an important signaling component in diverse cell types. PKG may influence the function of cardiac ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels, an ion channel critical for stress adaptation in the heart; however, the underlying mechanism remains largely unknown. The present study was designed to address this issue. Methods and Findings Single-channel recordings of cardiac KATP channels were performed in both cell-attached and inside-out patch configurations using transfected human embryonic kidney (HEK)293 cells and rabbit ventricular cardiomyocytes. We found that Kir6.2/SUR2A (the cardiac-type KATP) channels were activated by cGMP-selective phosphodiesterase inhibitor zaprinast in a concentration-dependent manner in cell-attached patches obtained from HEK293 cells, an effect mimicked by the membrane-permeable cGMP analog 8-bromo-cGMP whereas abolished by selective PKG inhibitors. Intriguingly, direct application of PKG moderately reduced rather than augmented Kir6.2/SUR2A single-channel currents in excised, inside-out patches. Moreover, PKG stimulation of Kir6.2/SUR2A channels in intact cells was abrogated by ROS/H2O2 scavenging, antagonism of calmodulin, and blockade of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), respectively. Exogenous H2O2 also concentration-dependently stimulated Kir6.2/SUR2A channels in intact cells, and its effect was prevented by inhibition of calmodulin or CaMKII. PKG stimulation of KATP channels was confirmed in intact ventricular cardiomyocytes, which was ROS- and CaMKII-dependent. Kinetically, PKG appeared to stimulate these channels by destabilizing the longest closed state while stabilizing the long open state and facilitating opening transitions. Conclusion The present study provides novel evidence that PKG exerts dual regulation of cardiac KATP channels, including marked stimulation resulting from intracellular signaling mediated by ROS (H2O2 in

  1. Nebivolol dilates human penile arteries and reverses erectile dysfunction in diabetic rats through enhancement of nitric oxide signaling.

    PubMed

    Angulo, Javier; Wright, Harold M; Cuevas, Pedro; González-Corrochano, Rocío; Fernández, Argentina; Cuevas, Begoña; La Fuente, José M; Gupta, Sandeep; Sáenz de Tejada, Iñigo

    2010-08-01

    Traditional beta-blockers have sometimes been associated with erectile dysfunction (ED). Nebivolol is a cardioselective β(1)-adrenoceptor antagonist that promotes vasodilation through a nitric oxide (NO)-dependent mechanism. We evaluated the effects of nebivolol on the NO/cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) signaling pathway, on erectile function and dysfunction, and in human penile vascular tissues. Erectile response to cavernosal nerve electrical stimulation in control and diabetes-induced ED rats were evaluated, along with serum nitrite/nitrate (NOx) concentration and plasma/tissue cGMP levels. Endothelium-dependent and sildenafil-induced relaxation of isolated human corpus cavernosum (HCC) and human penile resistance arteries (HPRA) were also determined. The effects of nebivolol on erectile function and dysfunction and on NO/cGMP-mediated responses. Treatment with nebivolol significantly potentiated erectile response in control rats, regardless of its effects on blood pressure. Nebivolol increased NOx and plasma cGMP by 3-fold and 2.75-fold, respectively, and significantly augmented the elevation of plasma cGMP produced by sildenafil. Nebivolol enhanced endothelium-dependent and sildenafil-induced relaxations of HCC tissue, and produced endothelium-dependent vasodilation of HPRA. Nebivolol, but not atenolol, significantly improved erectile response in diabetic rats (51.6%, 53.2%, and 87.1% of response at 3 Hz in nondiabetic rats, for vehicle-treated, atenolol-treated, and nebivolol-treated diabetic rats, respectively); after sildenafil administration, ED was completely reversed in nebivolol-treated diabetic rats (69.6% and 112% for diabetic rats treated with sildenafil and nebivolol plus sildenafil, respectively). Accordingly, nebivolol restored systemic NOx levels and cGMP content in penile tissue from these animals. Nebivolol in vivo activated the NO/cGMP pathway, enhanced erectile response and reversed ED in diabetic rats. Moreover, nebivolol in vitro

  2. Inhibition of constitutive signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 activation by novel platinum complexes with potent antitumor activity.

    PubMed

    Turkson, James; Zhang, Shumin; Palmer, Jay; Kay, Heidi; Stanko, Joseph; Mora, Linda B; Sebti, Said; Yu, Hua; Jove, Richard

    2004-12-01

    DNA-alkylating agents that are platinum complexes induce apoptotic responses and have wide application in cancer therapy. The potential for platinum compounds to modulate signal transduction events that contribute to their therapeutic outcome has not been extensively examined. Among the signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) proteins, Stat3 activity is frequently up-regulated in many human tumors. Various lines of evidence have established a causal role for aberrant Stat3 activity in malignant transformation and provided validation for its targeting in the development of small-molecule inhibitors as novel cancer therapeutics. We report here that platinum-containing compounds disrupt Stat3 signaling and suppress its biological functions. The novel platinum (IV) compounds, CPA-1, CPA-7, and platinum (IV) tetrachloride block Stat3 activity in vitro at low micromolar concentrations. In malignant cells that harbor constitutively activated Stat3, CPA-1, CPA-7, and platinum (IV) tetrachloride inhibit cell growth and induce apoptosis in a manner that reflects the attenuation of persistent Stat3 activity. By contrast, cells that do not contain persistent Stat3 activity are marginally affected or are not affected by these compounds. Moreover, CPA-7 induces the regression of mouse CT26 colon tumor, which correlates with the abrogation of persistent Stat3 activity in tumors. Thus, the modulation of oncogenic signal transduction pathways, such as Stat3, may be one of the key molecular mechanisms for the antitumor effects of platinum (IV)-containing complexes.

  3. PTEN controls immunoreceptor (immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif) signaling and the activation of Rac.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong Suk; Peng, Xiaodong; De, Pradip K; Geahlen, Robert L; Durden, Donald L

    2002-01-15

    Fcgamma receptor-mediated phagocytosis is a model for the study of immunoreceptor (immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif [ITAM]) signaling and involves the activation of protein tyrosine kinases, protein tyrosine phosphatases, and downstream effectors including phosphatidylinositol-3 (PI-3) kinase. Relatively little is known of the role of lipid phosphatases in the control of ITAM signaling and inflammation. A heterologous COS7 cell system was used to examine the roles played by PI-3 kinase and the dual-specificity phosphatase, phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN), in the signal transduction pathway leading to Fcgamma receptor IIA-mediated phagocytosis and the activation of Rac. The expression of wildtype PTEN completely abrogated the phagocytosis of immunoglobulin-G-sensitized sheep red blood cells, as compared with the catalytically inactive mutant of PTEN, which had no effect. This is the first direct evidence that PTEN, an inositol 3' phosphatase, regulates Fcgamma receptor-mediated phagocytosis, an ITAM-based signaling event. The data suggest that PTEN exerts control over phagocytosis potentially by controlling the downstream conversion of guanosine diphosphate-Rac to guanosine triphosphate-Rac following ITAM stimulation.

  4. Constitutive cyclic GMP accumulation in Arabidopsis thaliana compromises systemic acquired resistance induced by an avirulent pathogen by modulating local signals.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Jamshaid; Chen, Jian; Locato, Vittoria; Sabetta, Wilma; Behera, Smrutisanjita; Cimini, Sara; Griggio, Francesca; Martínez-Jaime, Silvia; Graf, Alexander; Bouneb, Mabrouk; Pachaiappan, Raman; Fincato, Paola; Blanco, Emanuela; Costa, Alex; De Gara, Laura; Bellin, Diana; de Pinto, Maria Concetta; Vandelle, Elodie

    2016-11-04

    The infection of Arabidopsis thaliana plants with avirulent pathogens causes the accumulation of cGMP with a biphasic profile downstream of nitric oxide signalling. However, plant enzymes that modulate cGMP levels have yet to be identified, so we generated transgenic A. thaliana plants expressing the rat soluble guanylate cyclase (GC) to increase genetically the level of cGMP and to study the function of cGMP in plant defence responses. Once confirmed that cGMP levels were higher in the GC transgenic lines than in wild-type controls, the GC transgenic plants were then challenged with bacterial pathogens and their defence responses were characterized. Although local resistance was similar in the GC transgenic and wild-type lines, differences in the redox state suggested potential cross-talk between cGMP and the glutathione redox system. Furthermore, large-scale transcriptomic and proteomic analysis highlighted the significant modulation of both gene expression and protein abundance at the infection site, inhibiting the establishment of systemic acquired resistance. Our data indicate that cGMP plays a key role in local responses controlling the induction of systemic acquired resistance in plants challenged with avirulent pathogens.

  5. Constitutive cyclic GMP accumulation in Arabidopsis thaliana compromises systemic acquired resistance induced by an avirulent pathogen by modulating local signals

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Jamshaid; Chen, Jian; Locato, Vittoria; Sabetta, Wilma; Behera, Smrutisanjita; Cimini, Sara; Griggio, Francesca; Martínez-Jaime, Silvia; Graf, Alexander; Bouneb, Mabrouk; Pachaiappan, Raman; Fincato, Paola; Blanco, Emanuela; Costa, Alex; De Gara, Laura; Bellin, Diana; de Pinto, Maria Concetta; Vandelle, Elodie

    2016-01-01

    The infection of Arabidopsis thaliana plants with avirulent pathogens causes the accumulation of cGMP with a biphasic profile downstream of nitric oxide signalling. However, plant enzymes that modulate cGMP levels have yet to be identified, so we generated transgenic A. thaliana plants expressing the rat soluble guanylate cyclase (GC) to increase genetically the level of cGMP and to study the function of cGMP in plant defence responses. Once confirmed that cGMP levels were higher in the GC transgenic lines than in wild-type controls, the GC transgenic plants were then challenged with bacterial pathogens and their defence responses were characterized. Although local resistance was similar in the GC transgenic and wild-type lines, differences in the redox state suggested potential cross-talk between cGMP and the glutathione redox system. Furthermore, large-scale transcriptomic and proteomic analysis highlighted the significant modulation of both gene expression and protein abundance at the infection site, inhibiting the establishment of systemic acquired resistance. Our data indicate that cGMP plays a key role in local responses controlling the induction of systemic acquired resistance in plants challenged with avirulent pathogens. PMID:27811978

  6. Regulators of G-protein Signaling accelerate GPCR signaling kinetics and govern sensitivity solely by accelerating GTPase activity

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, Nevin A.; Johnston, Christopher A.; Cappell, Steven D.; Kuravi, Sudhakiranmayi; Kimple, Adam J.; Willard, Francis S.; Siderovski, David P.

    2010-01-01

    G-protein heterotrimers, composed of a guanine nucleotide-binding Gα subunit and an obligate Gβγ dimer, regulate signal transduction pathways by cycling between GDP- and GTP-bound states. Signal deactivation is achieved by Gα-mediated GTP hydrolysis (GTPase activity) which is enhanced by the GTPase-accelerating protein (GAP) activity of “regulator of G-protein signaling” (RGS) proteins. In a cellular context, RGS proteins have also been shown to speed up the onset of signaling, and to accelerate deactivation without changing amplitude or sensitivity of the signal. This latter paradoxical activity has been variably attributed to GAP/enzymatic or non-GAP/scaffolding functions of these proteins. Here, we validated and exploited a Gα switch-region point mutation, known to engender increased GTPase activity, to mimic in cis the GAP function of RGS proteins. While the transition-state, GDP·AlF4 −-bound conformation of the G202A mutant was found to be nearly identical to wild-type, Gαi1(G202A)·GDP assumed a divergent conformation more closely resembling the GDP·AlF4 −-bound state. When placed within Saccharomyces cerevisiae Gα subunit Gpa1, the fast-hydrolysis mutation restored appropriate dose–response behaviors to pheromone signaling in the absence of RGS-mediated GAP activity. A bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) readout of heterotrimer activation with high temporal resolution revealed that fast intrinsic GTPase activity could recapitulate in cis the kinetic sharpening (increased onset and deactivation rates) and blunting of sensitivity also engendered by RGS protein action in trans. Thus Gα-directed GAP activity, the first biochemical function ascribed to RGS proteins, is sufficient to explain the activation kinetics and agonist sensitivity observed from G-protein–coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling in a cellular context. PMID:20351284

  7. Oocyte maturation and fertilization in marine nemertean worms: using similar sorts of signaling pathways as in mammals, but often with differing results.

    PubMed

    Stricker, Stephen A; Cline, Cory; Goodrich, David

    2013-08-01

    In marine worms belonging to the phylum Nemertea, oocyte maturation and fertilization are regulated by the same general kinds of signals that control such processes in mammals. However, unlike mammalian oocytes that develop within follicles, nemertean oocytes characteristically lack a surrounding sheath of follicle cells and often respond differently to maturation-related cues than do mammalian oocytes. For example, elevators of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) or cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) levels promote the resumption of meiotic maturation (=germinal vesicle breakdown, GVBD) in nemertean oocytes, whereas increasing intraoocytic cAMP and cGMP typically blocks GVBD in mammals. Similarly, AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) signaling keeps nemertean oocytes from maturing, but in mouse oocytes, AMPK activation triggers GVBD. In addition, protein kinase C (PKC) activity is required for seawater-induced GVBD in nemerteans, whereas some PKCs have been shown to inhibit GVBD in mammals. Furthermore, although fertilization causes both types of oocytes to reorganize their endoplasmic reticulum and generate calcium oscillations that can involve soluble sperm factor activity and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate signaling, some discrepancies in the spatiotemporal patterns and underlying mechanisms of fertilization are also evident in nemerteans versus mammals. Thus, to characterize differences and similarities in gamete biology more fully, aspects of oocyte maturation and fertilization in marine nemertean worms are reviewed and briefly compared with related findings that have been published for mammalian oocytes. In addition, possible causes of the alternative responses displayed by oocytes in these two animal groups are addressed.

  8. Nitric oxide/cyclic guanosine monophosphate signaling in the central complex of the grasshopper brain inhibits singing behavior.

    PubMed

    Wenzel, Beate; Kunst, Michael; Günther, Cornelia; Ganter, Geoffrey K; Lakes-Harlan, Reinhard; Elsner, Norbert; Heinrich, Ralf

    2005-07-25

    Grasshopper sound production, in the context of mate finding, courtship, and rivalry, is controlled by the central body complex in the protocerebrum. Stimulation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in the central complex has been demonstrated to stimulate specific singing in various grasshoppers including the species Chorthippus biguttulus. Sound production elicited by stimulation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in the central complex is inhibited by co-applications of various drugs activating the nitric oxide/cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) signaling pathway. The nitric oxide-donor sodium nitroprusside caused a reversible suppression of muscarine-stimulated sound production that could be blocked by 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo-[4,3-a]quinoxaline-1-one (ODQ), which prevents the formation of cGMP by specifically inhibiting soluble guanylyl cyclase. Furthermore, injections of both the membrane-permeable cGMP analog 8-Br-cGMP and the specific inhibitor of the cGMP-degrading phosphodiesterase Zaprinast reversibly inhibited singing. To identify putative sources of nitric oxide, brains of Ch. biguttulus were subjected to both nitric oxide synthase immunocytochemistry and NADPH-diaphorase staining. Among other areas known to express nitric oxide synthase, both procedures consistently labeled peripheral layers in the upper division of the central body complex, suggesting that neurons supplying this neuropil contain nitric oxide synthase and may generate nitric oxide upon activation. Exposure of dissected brains to nitric oxide and 3-(5'hydroxymethyl-2'-furyl)-1-benzyl indazole (YC-1) induced cGMP-associated immunoreactivity in both the upper and lower division. Therefore, both the morphological and pharmacological data presented in this study strongly suggest a contribution of the nitric oxide/cGMP signaling pathway to the central control of grasshopper sound production.

  9. Treponema denticola activates mitogen-activated protein kinase signal pathways through Toll-like receptor 2.

    PubMed

    Ruby, John; Rehani, Kunal; Martin, Michael

    2007-12-01

    Treponema denticola, a spirochete indigenous to the oral cavity, is associated with host inflammatory responses to anaerobic polymicrobial infections of the root canal, periodontium, and alveolar bone. However, the cellular mechanisms responsible for the recognition of T. denticola by the innate immune system and the underlying cell signaling pathways that regulate the inflammatory response to T. denticola are currently unresolved. In this study, we demonstrate that T. denticola induces innate immune responses via the utilization of Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) but not TLR4. Assessment of TLR2/1 and TLR2/6 heterodimers revealed that T. denticola predominantly utilizes TLR2/6 for the induction of cellular responses. Analysis of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway in T. denticola-stimulated monocytes identified a prolonged up-regulation of the MAPK extracellular signal-related kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and p38, while no discernible increase in phospho-c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1/2 (JNK1/2) levels was observed. With the aid of pharmacological inhibitors selectively targeting ERK1/2 via the mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-related kinase 1/2 kinase and p38, we further demonstrate that ERK1/2 and p38 play a major role in T. denticola-mediated pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine production.

  10. Agonist-Biased Signaling via Proteinase Activated Receptor-2: Differential Activation of Calcium and Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, Rithwik; Mihara, Koichiro; Mathur, Maneesh; Rochdi, Moulay Driss; Bouvier, Michel; DeFea, Kathryn

    2009-01-01

    We evaluated the ability of different trypsin-revealed tethered ligand (TL) sequences of rat proteinase-activated receptor 2 (rPAR2) and the corresponding soluble TL-derived agonist peptides to trigger agonist-biased signaling. To do so, we mutated the proteolytically revealed TL sequence of rPAR2 and examined the impact on stimulating intracellular calcium transients and mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase. The TL receptor mutants, rPAR2-Leu37Ser38, rPAR2-Ala37–38, and rPAR2-Ala39–42 were compared with the trypsin-revealed wild-type rPAR2 TL sequence, S37LIGRL42—. Upon trypsin activation, all constructs stimulated MAP kinase signaling, but only the wt-rPAR2 and rPAR2-Ala39–42 triggered calcium signaling. Furthermore, the TL-derived synthetic peptide SLAAAA-NH2 failed to cause PAR2-mediated calcium signaling but did activate MAP kinase, whereas SLIGRL-NH2 triggered both calcium and MAP kinase signaling by all receptors. The peptides AAIGRL-NH2 and LSIGRL-NH2 triggered neither calcium nor MAP kinase signals. Neither rPAR2-Ala37–38 nor rPAR2-Leu37Ser38 constructs recruited β-arrestins-1 or -2 in response to trypsin stimulation, whereas both β-arrestins were recruited to these mutants by SLIGRL-NH2. The lack of trypsin-triggered β-arrestin interactions correlated with impaired trypsin-activated TL-mutant receptor internalization. Trypsin-stimulated MAP kinase activation by the TL-mutated receptors was not blocked by inhibitors of Gαi (pertussis toxin), Gαq [N-cyclohexyl-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,4-dihydro-6-methylindeno[1,2-c]pyrazole-3-carboxamide (GP2A)], Src kinase [4-amino-5-(4-methylphenyl)-7-(t-butyl)pyrazolo[3,4-d]-pyrimidine (PP1)], or the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor [4-(3′-chloroanilino)-6,7-dimethoxy-quinazoline (AG1478)], but was inhibited by the Rho-kinase inhibitor (R)-(+)-trans-N-(4-pyridyl)-4-(1-aminoethyl)-cyclohexanecarboxamide, 2HCl (Y27362). The data indicate that the proteolytically revealed TL sequence(s) and the mode

  11. CD28 costimulatory signals in T lymphocyte activation: Emerging functions beyond a qualitative and quantitative support to TCR signalling.

    PubMed

    Porciello, Nicla; Tuosto, Loretta

    2016-04-01

    CD28 is one of the most important co-stimulatory receptors necessary for full T lymphocyte activation. By binding its cognate ligands, B7.1/CD80 or B7.2/CD86, expressed on the surface of professional antigen presenting cells (APC), CD28 initiates several signalling cascades, which qualitatively and quantitatively support T cell receptor (TCR) signalling. More recent data evidenced that human CD28 can also act as a TCR-independent signalling unit, by delivering specific signals, which regulate the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokine/chemokines. Despite the enormous progresses made in identifying the mechanisms and molecules involved in CD28 signalling properties, much remains to be elucidated, especially in the light of the functional differences observed between human and mouse CD28. In this review we provide an overview of the current mechanisms and molecules through which CD28 support TCR signalling and highlight recent findings on the specific signalling motifs that regulate the unique pro-inflammatory activity of human CD28. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Signal Activation and Inactivation by the Gα Helical Domain: A Long-Neglected Partner in G Protein Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Dohlman, Henrik G.; Jones, Janice C.

    2013-01-01

    Heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide–binding proteins (G proteins) are positioned at the top of many signal transduction pathways. The G protein α subunit is composed of two domains, one that resembles Ras and another that is composed entirely of α helices. Historically, most attention has focused on the Ras-like domain, but emerging evidence reveals that the helical domain is an active participant in G protein signaling. PMID:22649098

  13. NMDA receptor activation regulates sociability by its effect on mTOR signaling activity

    PubMed Central

    Burket, Jessica A.; Benson, Andrew D.; Tang, Amy H.; Deutsch, Stephen I.

    2017-01-01

    Tuberous Sclerosis Complex is one example of a syndromic form of autism spectrum disorder associated with disinhibited activity of mTORCl in neurons (e.g., cerebellar Purkinje cells). mTORCl is a complex protein possessing serine/threonine kinase activity and a key downstream molecule in a signaling cascade beginning at the cell surface with the transduction of neurotransmitters (e.g., glutamate and acetylcholine) and nerve growth factors (e.g., Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor). Interestingly, the severity of the intellectual disability in Tuberous Sclerosis Complex may relate more to this metabolic disturbance (i.e., overactivity of mTOR signaling) than the density of cortical tubers. Several recent reports showed that rapamycin, an inhibitor of mTORCl, improved sociability and other symptoms in mouse models of Tuberous Sclerosis Complex and autism spectrum disorder, consistent with mTORCl overactivity playing an important pathogenic role. NMDA receptor activation may also dampen mTORCl activity by at least two possible mechanisms: regulating intraneuronal accumulation of arginine and the phosphorylation status of a specific extracellular signal regulating kinase (i.e., ERK1/2), both of which are “drivers” of mTORCl activity. Conceivably, the prosocial effects of targeting the NMDA receptor with agonists in mouse models of autism spectrum disorders result from their ability to dampen mTORC1 activity in neurons. Strategies for dampening mTORC1 overactivity by NMDA receptor activation may be preferred to its direct inhibition in chronic neurodevelopmental disorders, such as autism spectrum disorders. PMID:25703582

  14. Heparanase Enhances the Insulin Receptor Signaling Pathway to Activate Extracellular Signal-regulated Kinase in Multiple Myeloma*

    PubMed Central

    Purushothaman, Anurag; Babitz, Stephen K.; Sanderson, Ralph D.

    2012-01-01

    ERK signaling regulates proliferation, survival, drug resistance, and angiogenesis in cancer. Although the mechanisms regulating ERK activation are not fully understood, we previously demonstrated that ERK phosphorylation is elevated by heparanase, an enzyme associated with aggressive behavior of many cancers. In the present study, myeloma cell lines expressing either high or low levels of heparanase were utilized to determine how heparanase stimulates ERK signaling. We discovered that the insulin receptor was abundant on cells expressing either high or low levels of heparanase, but the receptor was highly phosphorylated in heparanase-high cells compared with heparanase-low cells. In addition, protein kinase C activity was elevated in heparanase-high cells, and this enhanced expression of insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1), the principle intracellular substrate for phosphorylation by the insulin receptor. Blocking insulin receptor function with antibody or a small molecule inhibitor or knockdown of IRS-1 expression using shRNA diminished heparanase-mediated ERK activation in the tumor cells. In addition, up-regulation of the insulin signaling pathway by heparanase and the resulting ERK activation were dependent on heparanase retaining its enzyme activity. These results reveal a novel mechanism whereby heparanase enhances activation of the insulin receptor signaling pathway leading to ERK activation and modulation of myeloma behavior. PMID:23048032

  15. Harnessing Evolutionary Toxins for Signaling: Reactive Oxygen Species, Nitric Oxide and Hydrogen Sulfide in Plant Cell Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Hancock, John T.

    2017-01-01

    During the early periods of evolution, as well as in niche environments today, organisms have had to learn to tolerate the presence of many reactive compounds, such as reactive oxygen species, nitric oxide, and hydrogen sulfide. It is now known that such compounds are instrumental in the signaling processes in plant cells. There are enzymes which can make them, while downstream of their signaling pathways are coming to light. These include the production of cGMP, the activation of MAP kinases and transcription factors, and the modification of thiol groups on many proteins. However, organisms have also had to tolerate other reactive compounds such as ammonia, methane, and hydrogen gas, and these too are being found to have profound effects on signaling in cells. Before a holistic view of how such signaling works, the full effects and interactions of all such reactive compounds needs to be embraced. A full understanding will be beneficial to both agriculture and future therapeutic strategies. PMID:28239389

  16. Akt1 signaling coordinates BMP signaling and β-catenin activity to regulate second heart field progenitor development.

    PubMed

    Luo, Wen; Zhao, Xia; Jin, Hengwei; Tao, Lichan; Zhu, Jingai; Wang, Huijuan; Hemmings, Brian A; Yang, Zhongzhou

    2015-02-15

    Second heart field (SHF) progenitors exhibit continued proliferation and delayed differentiation, which are modulated by FGF4/8/10, BMP and canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling. PTEN-Akt signaling regulates the stem cell/progenitor cell homeostasis in several systems, such as hematopoietic stem cells, intestinal stem cells and neural progenitor cells. To address whether PTEN-Akt signaling is involved in regulating cardiac progenitors, we deleted Pten in SHF progenitors. Deletion of Pten caused SHF expansion and increased the size of the SHF derivatives, the right ventricle and the outflow tract. Cell proliferation of cardiac progenitors was enhanced, whereas cardiac differentiation was unaffected by Pten deletion. Removal of Akt1 rescued the phenotype and early lethality of Pten deletion mice, suggesting that Akt1 was the key downstream target that was negatively regulated by PTEN in cardiac progenitors. Furthermore, we found that inhibition of FOXO by Akt1 suppressed the expression of the gene encoding the BMP ligand (BMP7), leading to dampened BMP signaling in the hearts of Pten deletion mice. Cardiac activation of Akt also increased the Ser552 phosphorylation of β-catenin, thus enhancing its activity. Reducing β-catenin levels could partially rescue heart defects of Pten deletion mice. We conclude that Akt signaling regulates the cell proliferation of SHF progenitors through coordination of BMP signaling and β-catenin activity.

  17. A Active Micromachined Scalp Electrode Array for Eeg Signal Recording.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alizadeh-Taheri, Babak

    This thesis describes the design, microfabrication, and testing of an active scalp EEG (electroencephalograph) electrode that has several distinct advantages over existing technologies. These advantages are: (1) no electrolyte used, (2) no skin preparation, (3) significantly reduced sensor size, and (4) compatibility with EEG monitoring systems. The active electrode array is an integrated system made of an array of capacitive sensors with local integrated circuitry housed in a package with batteries to power the circuitry. This level of integration was required to achieve the functional performance obtained by the electrode. The electrode consists of a silicon sensor substrate fabricated at UCD and a custom circuit substrate fabricated at Orbit Semiconductors, using a 2 μm analog CMOS technology. The circuitry was designed for low 1/f noise. One side of the sensor substrate holds four capacitive sensors with rm Si_3N _4 as the dielectric material. The opposite side holds aluminum pads for bonding to the circuit substrate. A via hole technology was developed to make electrical contact to both sides of the sensor substrate. The via holes are 200 μm square openings etched through the silicon by a reactive ion etching (RIE) process using an rm SF_6/O_2 gas mixture, oxidized, and then filled with sputtered aluminum for contacts through the substrate. The via holes have an aspect ratio of 2:1 (length of opening to depth of hole). Silicon RIE etch rates of up to 18 mu/hr were obtained under optimum conditions, using a 0.8 μm aluminum mask. The circuit and sensor substrates were bonded with silver adhesive, and wire bonding was used to make electrical contacts between the substrates. The two substrates were then integrated in a custom package for testing. The electrode was tested on an electrical test bench and on human subjects in four modalities of EEG activity, namely: (1) spontaneous EEG, (2) sensory event-related potentials, (3) brain stem potentials, and (4

  18. Increasing susceptibility of nitric oxide-mediated inhibitory platelet signaling during storage of apheresis-derived platelet concentrates.

    PubMed

    Kobsar, Anna; Klinker, Erdwine; Kuhn, Sabine; Koessler, Angela; Yilmaz, Pinar; Boeck, Markus; Koessler, Juergen

    2014-07-01

    Storage of platelets (PLTs) affects PLT integrity and functionality, a process named the PLT storage lesion. Normal PLT function essentially depends on the balanced interaction of activating and inhibitory signaling pathways. As there are poor data on the alterations of inhibitory signaling during storage of PLT concentrates, this study investigates the modulation capability of the cyclic nucleotide-mediated inhibitory pathways by use of the nitric oxide donor diethylamine diazenium diolate (DEA/NO). PLTs were obtained from whole blood (WB) and from apheresis-derived PLT concentrates (APCs) stored for 0, 2, and 5 days. Vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) phosphorylation, cyclic nucleotide concentrations, fibrinogen binding, and agonist-induced aggregation were measured without or after stimulation with DEA/NO. DEA/NO-induced VASP phosphorylation was significantly higher in PLTs from APCs on Days 2 and 5 compared to WB, conditioned by a stronger increase of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), but not cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), in stored PLTs. A quantity of 5 nmol/L DEA/NO neither influenced thrombin receptor activator peptide 6 and collagen-induced aggregation nor fibrinogen binding in freshly collected PLTs, whereas it significantly inhibited both in stored PLTs. Stored PLTs showed an impairment of intracellular cGMP regulation, resulting in exceeding inhibition of agonist-induced aggregation and fibrinogen binding in the course of storage. The observed effects could be an important mechanism contributing to the storage lesion with reduced activating potential of PLTs. © 2014 AABB.

  19. The Nitric oxide/CGMP/KATP pathway mediates systemic and central antinociception induced by resistance exercise in rats.

    PubMed

    Galdino, Giovane S; Xavier, Carlos H; Almeida, Renato; Silva, Grazielle; Fontes, Marcos A; Menezes, Gustavo; Duarte, Igor D; Perez, Andrea C

    2015-01-01

    Resistance exercise (RE) is characterized to increase strength, tone, mass, and/or muscular endurance and also for produces many beneficial effects, such as blood pressure and osteoporosis reduction, diabetes mellitus control, and analgesia. However, few studies have investigated endogenous mechanisms involved in the RE-induced analgesia. Thus, the aim of this study was evaluate the role of the NO/CGMP/KATP pathway in the antinociception induced by RE. Wistar rats were submitted to acute RE in a weight-lifting model. The nociceptive threshold was measured by mechanical nociceptive test (paw-withdrawal). To investigate the involvement of the NO/CGMP/KATP pathway the following nitric oxide synthase (NOS) non-specific and specific inhibitors were used: N-nitro-l-arginine (NOArg), Aminoguanidine, N5-(1-Iminoethyl)-l-ornithine dihydrocloride (l-NIO), Nω-Propyl-l-arginine (l-NPA); guanylyl cyclase inhibitor, 1H-[1,2,4]oxidiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ); and KATP channel blocker, Glybenclamide; all administered subcutaneously, intrathecally and intracerebroventricularly. Plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) nitrite levels were determined by spectrophotometry. The RE protocol produced antinociception, which was significantly reversed by NOS specific and unspecific inhibitors, guanylyl cyclase inhibitor (ODQ) and KATP channel blocker (Glybenclamide). RE was also responsible for increasing nitrite levels in both plasma and CSF. These finding suggest that the NO/CGMP/KATP pathway participates in antinociception induced by RE.

  20. New fluorescent analogs of cAMP and cGMP available as substrates for cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase.

    PubMed

    Hiratsuka, T

    1982-11-25

    The synthesis of fluorescent derivatives of cAMP and cGMP, by reaction with isatoic anhydride in aqueous solution at mild pH and temperature, yielding 2'-O-anthraniloyl derivatives of cyclic nucleotides, is here described. 2'-O-(N-Methylanthraniloyl) derivatives were also synthesized by reaction with N-methylisatoic anhydride. Upon excitation at 330-350 nm, these derivatives exhibited maximum fluorescence emission at 430-445 nm in aqueous solution with quantum yields of 0.11-0.26. Their fluorescence was sensitive to the polarity of solvent; in N,N-dimethylformamide quantum yields of 0.8-0.95. The major differences between the two fluorophores were the longer wavelength of the emission maximum of the N-methylanthraniloyl group and its greater quantum yield. The derivatives were substrates for beef heart cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase, 15-24% as effective as the natural substrate cAMP. When combined with thin layer chromatography techniques, two apparent Km values (3-4 microM and 36-76 microM) for the cAMP derivatives and one value (10-18 microM) for the cGMP derivatives were obtained. The results indicate that these 2'-hydroxyl-modified cAMP and cGMP can be useful fluorescent substrate analogs for cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase.

  1. Effects of Na/sup +/ on ultraviolet light-induced photorelaxation and c-GMP levels in rabbit aorta

    SciTech Connect

    Aceto, J.F.; Raffa, R.B.; Tallarida, R.J.

    1986-03-05

    Isolated strips of rabbit aorta in a state of drug-induced contraction relax reversibly when irradiated with ultraviolet light. The authors previously found that the magnitude of the photorelaxation progressively diminished as the extracellular Na/sup +/ ion concentration was reduced from 145 mM to 85 mM. At 85 mM Na/sup +/, there was minimal photorelaxation, even though the preparation continued to respond to vasoconstricting agents. The reduction in photosensitivity is not an osmotic effect because restoration of osmolarity did not restore photosensitivity. Neither the mechanism underlaying photorelaxation nor its modification by Na/sup +/ is precisely known. In order to examine these further the authors measured cyclic GMP levels in the absence and presence of UV light at both normal and reduced Na/sup +/ levels. At 145 mM Na/sup +/, irradiation resulted in an increase of cGMP from 0.299 to 0.717 fmole/..mu..g protein. At 85 mM Na/sup +/, the corresponding levels were 0.541 and 1.24 fmole/..mu..g protein. Thus, cGMP levels increase (approximately double) with UV irradiation at both reduced and normal Na/sup +/ concentrations even though there is little or no photorelaxation in the reduced Na/sup +/ environment. The reduction in Na/sup +/ may uncouple a link between cGMP elevation and cytoplasmic calcium in the aortic cell.

  2. Nitric Oxide–Soluble Guanylyl Cyclase–Cyclic GMP Signaling in the Striatum: New Targets for the Treatment of Parkinson's Disease?

    PubMed Central

    West, Anthony R.; Tseng, Kuei Y.

    2011-01-01

    Striatal nitric oxide (NO)-producing interneurons play an important role in the regulation of corticostriatal synaptic transmission and motor behavior. Striatal NO synthesis is driven by concurrent activation of NMDA and dopamine (DA) D1 receptors. NO diffuses into the dendrites of medium-sized spiny neurons which contain high levels of NO receptors called soluble guanylyl cyclases (sGC). NO-mediated activation of sGC leads to the synthesis of the second messenger cGMP. In the intact striatum, transient elevations in intracellular cGMP primarily act to increase neuronal excitability and to facilitate glutamatergic corticostriatal transmission. NO–cGMP signaling also functionally opposes the inhibitory effects of DA D2 receptor activation on corticostriatal transmission. Not surprisingly, abnormal striatal NO–sGC–cGMP signaling becomes apparent following striatal DA depletion, an alteration thought to contribute to pathophysiological changes observed in basal ganglia circuits in Parkinson's disease (PD). Here, we discuss recent developments in the field which have shed light on the role of NO–sGC–cGMP signaling pathways in basal ganglia dysfunction and motor symptoms associated with PD and l-DOPA-induced dyskinesias. PMID:21747761

  3. Dermatophytes Activate Skin Keratinocytes via Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Signaling and Induce Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Achterman, Rebecca R.; Moyes, David L.; Thavaraj, Selvam; Smith, Adam R.; Blair, Kris M.

    2015-01-01

    Dermatophytes cause superficial and cutaneous fungal infections in immunocompetent hosts and invasive disease in immunocompromised hosts. However, the host mechanisms that regulate innate immune responses against these fungi are largely unknown. Here, we utilized commercially available epidermal tissues and primary keratinocytes to assess (i) damage induction by anthropophilic, geophilic, and zoophilic dermatophyte strains and (ii) the keratinocyte signaling pathways, transcription factors, and proinflammatory responses induced by a representative dermatophyte, Trichophyton equinum. Initially, five dermatophyte species were tested for their ability to invade, cause tissue damage, and induce cytokines, with Microsporum gypseum inducing the greatest level of damage and cytokine release. Using T. equinum as a representative dermatophyte, we found that the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways were predominantly affected, with increased levels of phospho-p38 and phospho-Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK) but decreased levels of phospho-extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2). Notably, the NF-κB and PI3K pathways were largely unaffected. T. equinum also significantly increased expression of the AP-1-associated transcription factor, c-Fos, and the MAPK regulatory phosphatase, MKP1. Importantly, the ability of T. equinum to invade, cause tissue damage, activate signaling and transcription factors, and induce proinflammatory responses correlated with germination, indicating that germination may be important for dermatophyte virulence and host immune activation. PMID:25667269

  4. Dermatophytes activate skin keratinocytes via mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling and induce immune responses.

    PubMed

    Achterman, Rebecca R; Moyes, David L; Thavaraj, Selvam; Smith, Adam R; Blair, Kris M; White, Theodore C; Naglik, Julian R

    2015-04-01

    Dermatophytes cause superficial and cutaneous fungal infections in immunocompetent hosts and invasive disease in immunocompromised hosts. However, the host mechanisms that regulate innate immune responses against these fungi are largely unknown. Here, we utilized commercially available epidermal tissues and primary keratinocytes to assess (i) damage induction by anthropophilic, geophilic, and zoophilic dermatophyte strains and (ii) the keratinocyte signaling pathways, transcription factors, and proinflammatory responses induced by a representative dermatophyte, Trichophyton equinum. Initially, five dermatophyte species were tested for their ability to invade, cause tissue damage, and induce cytokines, with Microsporum gypseum inducing the greatest level of damage and cytokine release. Using T. equinum as a representative dermatophyte, we found that the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways were predominantly affected, with increased levels of phospho-p38 and phospho-Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK) but decreased levels of phospho-extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2). Notably, the NF-κB and PI3K pathways were largely unaffected. T. equinum also significantly increased expression of the AP-1-associated transcription factor, c-Fos, and the MAPK regulatory phosphatase, MKP1. Importantly, the ability of T. equinum to invade, cause tissue damage, activate signaling and transcription factors, and induce proinflammatory responses correlated with germination, indicating that germination may be important for dermatophyte virulence and host immune activation. Copyright © 2015, Achterman et al.

  5. Sunitinib activates Axl signaling in renal cell cancer.

    PubMed

    van der Mijn, Johannes C; Broxterman, Henk J; Knol, Jaco C; Piersma, Sander R; De Haas, Richard R; Dekker, Henk; Pham, Thang V; Van Beusechem, Victor W; Halmos, Balazs; Mier, James W; Jiménez, Connie R; Verheul, Henk M W

    2016-06-15

    Mass spectrometry-based phosphoproteomics provides a unique unbiased approach to evaluate signaling network in cancer cells. The tyrosine kinase inhibitor sunitinib is registered as treatment for patients with renal cell cancer (RCC). We investigated the effect of sunitinib on tyrosine phosphorylation in RCC tumor cells to get more insight in its mechanism of action and thereby to find potential leads for combination treatment strategies. Sunitinib inhibitory concentrations of proliferation (IC50) of 786-O, 769-p and A498 RCC cells were determined by MTT-assays. Global tyrosine phosphorylation was measured by LC-MS/MS after immunoprecipitation with the antiphosphotyrosine antibody p-TYR-100. Phosphoproteomic profiling of 786-O cells yielded 1519 phosphopeptides, corresponding to 675 unique proteins including 57 different phosphorylated protein kinases. Compared to control, incubation with sunitinib at its IC50 of 2 µM resulted in downregulation of 86 phosphopeptides including CDK5, DYRK3, DYRK4, G6PD, PKM and LDH-A, while 94 phosphopeptides including Axl, FAK, EPHA2 and p38α were upregulated. Axl- (y702), FAK- (y576) and p38α (y182) upregulation was confirmed by Western Blot in 786-O and A498 cells. Subsequent proliferation assays revealed that inhibition of Axl with a small molecule inhibitor (R428) sensitized 786-O RCC cells and immortalized endothelial cells to sunitinib up to 3 fold. In conclusion, incubation with sunitinib of RCC cells causes significant upregulation of multiple phosphopeptides including Axl. Simultaneous inhibition of Axl improves the antitumor activity of sunitinib. We envision that evaluation of phosphoproteomic changes by TKI treatment enables identification of new targets for combination treatment strategies.

  6. Regulation of L-type CaV1.3 channel activity and insulin secretion by the cGMP-PKG signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Sandoval, Alejandro; Duran, Paz; Gandini, María A; Andrade, Arturo; Almanza, Angélica; Kaja, Simon; Felix, Ricardo

    2017-09-01

    cGMP is a second messenger widely used in the nervous system and other tissues. One of the major effectors for cGMP is the serine/threonine protein kinase, cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG), which catalyzes the phosphorylation of a variety of proteins including ion channels. Previously, it has been shown that the cGMP-PKG signaling pathway inhibits Ca(2+) currents in rat vestibular hair cells and chromaffin cells. This current allegedly flow through voltage-gated CaV1.3L-type Ca(2+) channels, and is important for controlling vestibular hair cell sensory function and catecholamine secretion, respectively. Here, we show that native L-type channels in the insulin-secreting RIN-m5F cell line, and recombinant CaV1.3 channels heterologously expressed in HEK-293 cells, are regulatory targets of the cGMP-PKG signaling cascade. Our results indicate that the CaVα1 ion-conducting subunit of the CaV1.3 channels is highly expressed in RIN-m5F cells and that the application of 8-Br-cGMP, a membrane-permeable analogue of cGMP, significantly inhibits Ca(2+) macroscopic currents and impair insulin release stimulated with high K(+). In addition, KT-5823, a specific inhibitor of PKG, prevents the current inhibition generated by 8-Br-cGMP in the heterologous expression system. Interestingly, mutating the putative phosphorylation sites to residues resistant to phosphorylation showed that the relevant PKG sites for CaV1.3 L-type channel regulation centers on two amino acid residues, Ser793 and Ser860, located in the intracellular loop connecting the II and III repeats of the CaVα1 pore-forming subunit of the channel. These findings unveil a novel mechanism for how the cGMP-PKG signaling pathway may regulate CaV1.3 channels and contribute to regulate insulin secretion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Specific labeling and permanent activation of the retinal rod cGMP-activated channel by the photoaffinity analog 8-p-azidophenacylthio-cGMP.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, R L; Gerber, W V; Karpen, J W

    1993-01-01

    Cyclic nucleotide-gated ion channels play a key role in visual excitation and a variety of other signaling pathways. The photoaffinity probe 8-p-azidophenacylthio-cGMP (APT-cGMP) has been developed for structural and functional studies of the cGMP-activated channel of retinal rod outer segments. Using this analog, we have demonstrated both specific labeling of the channel in a partially purified biochemical preparation from bovine rod outer segments and permanent activation of the channel current in excised membrane patches from salamander outer segments. After UV illumination, a 32P-labeled version of APT-cGMP was shown by SDS/PAGE and autoradiography to be covalently attached to the 63-kDa channel subunit. This incorporation was significantly reduced by 8-Br-cGMP but was not reduced by 5'-GMP. In patch-clamp experiments APT-cGMP was a potent activator of the channel; APT-cGMP typically opened half of the channels in a patch at a 10-fold lower concentration than cGMP. Exposure of membrane patches to UV light in the presence of APT-cGMP resulted in a persistent current observed in the absence of bath-applied nucleotide. This current increased with repeated exposure of the patch to both UV light and fresh APT-cGMP, approaching the maximum current originally evoked by saturating (500 microM) cGMP. At this point, addition of 500 microM cGMP caused a negligible increase in current. The persistent current had several other properties expected of current through cGMP-activated channels: it was outwardly rectifying; outward current was blocked > 90% by 2 mM internal Mg2+, whereas inward current was blocked much less efficiently; a low concentration of cGMP caused a larger increase in current atop a half-maximal persistent current than it did originally. We conclude that the persistent current was caused by the covalent tethering of cGMP moieties to channel binding sites, resulting in irreversible channel activation. APT-cGMP should prove useful for further studies of

  8. Now that you want to take your HIV/AIDS vaccine/biological product research concept into the clinic: what are the "cGMP"?

    PubMed

    Sheets, Rebecca L; Rangavajhula, Vijaya; Pullen, Jeffrey K; Butler, Chris; Mehra, Vijay; Shapiro, Stuart; Pensiero, Michael

    2015-04-08

    The Division of AIDS Vaccine Research Program funds the discovery and development of HIV/AIDS vaccine candidates. Basic researchers, having discovered a potential vaccine in the laboratory, next want to take that candidate into the clinic to test the concept in humans, to see if it translates. Many of them have heard of "cGMP" and know that they are supposed to make a "GMP product" to take into the clinic, but often they are not very familiar with what "cGMP" means and why these good practices are so important. As members of the Vaccine Translational Research Branch, we frequently get asked "can't we use the material we made in the lab in the clinic?" or "aren't Phase 1 studies exempt from cGMP?" Over the years, we have had many experiences where researchers or their selected contract manufacturing organizations have not applied an appropriate degree of compliance with cGMP suitable for the clinical phase of development. We share some of these experiences and the lessons learned, along with explaining the importance of cGMP, just what cGMP means, and what they can assure, in an effort to de-mystify this subject and facilitate the rapid and safe translational development of HIV vaccines. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. The type II cGMP dependent protein kinase regulates GluA1 levels at the plasma membrane of developing cerebellar granule cells

    PubMed Central

    Incontro, Salvatore; Ciruela, Francisco; Ziff, Edward; Hofmann, Franz; Sánchez-Prieto, José; Torres, Magdalena

    2014-01-01

    Trafficking of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors (AMPARs) is regulated by specific interactions with other proteins and by post-translational mechanisms, such as phosphorylation. We have found that the type II cGMP-dependent protein kinase (cGKII) phosphorylates GluA1 (formerly GluR1) at S845, augmenting the surface expression of AMPARs at both synaptic and extrasynaptic sites. Activation of cGKII by 8-Br-cGMP enhances the surface expression of GluA1, whereas its inhibition or suppression effectively diminished the expression of this protein at the cell surface. In granule cells, NMDA receptor activation (NMDAR) stimulates nitric oxide and cGMP production, which in turn activates cGKII and induces the phosphorylation of GluA1, promoting its accumulation in the plasma membrane. GluA1 is mainly incorporated into calcium permeable AMPARs as exposure to 8-Br-cGMP or NMDA activation enhanced AMPA-elicited calcium responses that are sensitive to NASPM inhibition. We summarize evidence for an increase of calcium permeable AMPA receptors downstream of NMDA receptor activation that might be relevant for granule cell development and plasticity. PMID:23545413

  10. The type II cGMP dependent protein kinase regulates GluA1 levels at the plasma membrane of developing cerebellar granule cells.

    PubMed

    Incontro, Salvatore; Ciruela, Francisco; Ziff, Edward; Hofmann, Franz; Sánchez-Prieto, José; Torres, Magdalena

    2013-08-01

    Trafficking of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors (AMPARs) is regulated by specific interactions with other proteins and by post-translational mechanisms, such as phosphorylation. We have found that the type II cGMP-dependent protein kinase (cGKII) phosphorylates GluA1 (formerly GluR1) at S845, augmenting the surface expression of AMPARs at both synaptic and extrasynaptic sites. Activation of cGKII by 8-Br-cGMP enhances the surface expression of GluA1, whereas its inhibition or suppression effectively diminished the expression of this protein at the cell surface. In granule cells, NMDA receptor activation (NMDAR) stimulates nitric oxide and cGMP production, which in turn activates cGKII and induces the phosphorylation of GluA1, promoting its accumulation in the plasma membrane. GluA1 is mainly incorporated into calcium permeable AMPARs as exposure to 8-Br-cGMP or NMDA activation enhanced AMPA-elicited calcium responses that are sensitive to NASPM inhibition. We summarize evidence for an increase of calcium permeable AMPA receptors downstream of NMDA receptor activation that might be relevant for granule cell development and plasticity.

  11. Crosstalk between signaling pathways of adrenoreceptors and signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 (STAT3) in heart.

    PubMed

    Gong, Kai-zheng; Zhang, Hui; Du, Jian-hai; Zhang, You-yi

    2007-02-01

    Recently, there have been important advancements in our understanding of the signaling mechanisms of adrenoreceptors (AR) and signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 (STAT3). While their crucial roles in the pathological processes of the heart are well established, accumulating evidence suggests there is a complex pattern of crosstalk between these 2 signaling pathways. Moreover, the potential for crosstalk occurs at multiple levels in each signaling cascade and involves receptor transactivation, G proteins, small GTPases, cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate/protein kinase A, protein kinase C, scaffold/adaptor proteins, protein tyrosine kinases, and mitogen-activated protein kinases. In addition, post-translational modification (eg acetylation) of STAT3 may provide a link between STAT3 and AR signaling. In particular, crosstalk between these 2 systems in the heart would appear to be dependent upon the species/tissue studied, developmental stage, and eliciting stimulus. This at least partly accounts for the epigenetic effects on biological function that is mediated by the 2 signaling pathways. Elucidation of these mechanisms will provide new targets in the development of novel clinical strategies for heart disorders.

  12. Signal Transduction in T Cell Activation and Tolerance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-01

    wealth of new information regarding the mechanism by which these surface receptors influence intracellular biochemical events. Transmembrane...Ltd 98 7 1 5 Vi 86 Basic MI | I L I IF a 86 Basic Mechanisms - How can an understanding of signal transduction aid in our understand- ing of T...distribution of the r consensus sequence suggests that it may represent a common mechanism used by a variety of immune system receptors to couple to signal

  13. Nitric oxide signaling in the retina: what have we learned in two decades?

    PubMed

    Vielma, Alex H; Retamal, Mauricio A; Schmachtenberg, Oliver

    2012-01-09

    Two decades after its first detection in the retina, nitric oxide (NO) continues to puzzle visual neuroscientists. While its liberation by photoreceptors remains controversial, recent evidence supports three subtypes of amacrine cells as main sources of NO in the inner retina. NO synthesis was shown to depend on light stimulation, and mounting evidence suggests that NO is a regulator of visual adaptation at different signal processing levels. NO modulates light responses in all retinal neuron classes, and specific ion conductances are activated by NO in rods, cones, bipolar and ganglion cells. Light-dependent gap junction coupling in the inner and outer plexiform layers is also affected by NO. The vast majority of these effects were shown to be mediated by activation of the NO receptor soluble guanylate cyclase and resultant cGMP elevation. This review analyzes the current state of knowledge on physiological NO signaling in the retina.

  14. 78 FR 4383 - Foreign-Trade Zone 117-Orange, Texas; Notification of Proposed Production Activity; Signal...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-22

    ... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 117--Orange, Texas; Notification of Proposed Production Activity; Signal International Texas GP, LLC (Shipbuilding), Orange, TX The Foreign Trade Zone of Southeast... Signal International Texas GP, LLC (Signal), located in Orange, Texas. The notification conforming to the...

  15. Biological Signaling: the Role of ``Electrostatic Epicenter'' in ``Protein Quake'' and Receptor Activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Aihua; Kaledhonkar, Sandip; Kang, Zhouyang; Hendriks, Johnny; Hellingwerf, Klaas

    2013-03-01

    Activation of a receptor protein during biological signaling is often characterized by a two state model: a receptor state (also called ``off state'') for detection of a stimuli, and a signaling state (``on state'') for signal relay. Receptor activation is a process that a receptor protein is structurally transformed from its receptor state to its signaling state through substantial conformational changes that are recognizable by its downstream signal relay partner. What are the structural and energetic origins for receptor activation in biological signaling? We report extensive evidence that further support the role of ``electrostatic epicenter'' in driving ``protein quake'' and receptor activation. Photoactive yellow protein (PYP), a bacterial blue light photoreceptor protein for the negative phototaxis of a salt loving Halorhodospira halophia, is employed as a model system in this study. We will discuss potential applications of this receptor activation mechanism to other receptor proteins, including B-RAF receptor protein that is associated with many cancers.

  16. Spatio-temporal regulation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signalling by protein phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, M; Mandl, M; Keyse, S M

    2006-11-01

    ERK (extracellular-signal-regulated kinase) is a MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase), which regulates diverse physiological functions including cell proliferation, differentiation, transformation and survival. It is now clear that in addition to the duration and magnitude of signalling through this MAPK pathway, the spatial restriction of MAPK activity plays a key role in determining the physiological outcome of signalling. Recent work has led to the discovery of MAPK-binding proteins, which contain either nuclear localization signals or nuclear export signals. These include MAPK activators and specific protein phosphatases, which may act to both regulate MAPK activity and the subcellular localization of their substrate. This represents a mechanism by which signalling in response to extracellular stimuli may be modulated in terms of both magnitude/duration and spatial restriction thus allowing differential access of the activated MAPK to target proteins and the interpretation of this information by cells to determine an appropriate physiological response.

  17. Effect of acute hyperglycaemia on sodium handling and excretion of nitric oxide metabolites, bradykinin, and cGMP in Type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Simková, R; Kazdová, L; Karasová, L; Simek, S; Pelikánová, T

    2004-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of acutely induced hyperglycaemia on renal sodium handling and to explore the role of the bradykinin-nitric oxide-cGMP signalling pathway. We compared 20 Type 1 diabetic (DM1) patients without microalbuminuria with 15 weight-, age-, and sex-matched healthy controls (C). Clearances of para-aminohippuric acid (CPAH), inulin (Cin), lithium, sodium, and urinary nitrite/nitrate (NOx), cGMP and bradykinin excretion rates were measured in two 90-min periods: a glycaemic clamp-induced euglycaemia (5 mmol/l-period I) and hyperglycaemia (12 mmol/l-period II) (Study 1) and during time-controlled euglycaemia (5 mmol/l-period I and 5 mmol/l-period II) to avoid the effects of time and volume load (Study 2). Cin and CPAH were not significantly different during euglycaemia (period I of Study 1) in DM1 and controls, whereas fractional excretion of sodium was decreased in DM1 (1.84 +/- 0.75 vs. 2.36 +/- 0.67%; P < 0.05) due to an increase in fractional distal tubular reabsorption of sodium (94.01 +/- 1.94 vs. 92.24 +/- 2.47%; P < 0.05). A comparison of changes during Study 1 and Study 2 revealed acute hyperglycaemia did not change renal haemodynamics significantly, while fractional distal tubular reabsorption of sodium increased (DM1: P < 0.05; C: P < 0.01) and fractional excretion of sodium decreased (P < 0.01) in both groups. The urinary excretion rates of NOx were comparable during euglycaemia in DM1 and C. While in C, they significantly increased during Study 1 (period I: 382 +/- 217 vs. period II: 515 +/- 254 nmol/min; P < 0.01) and Study 2 (period I: 202.9 +/- 176.8 vs. period II: 297.2 +/- 267.5 nmol/min; P < 0.05) as a consequence of the water load, no changes were found in DM1. The urinary excretion of bradykinin was lower in DM1 compared with C (0.84 +/- 0.68 vs. 1.20 +/- 0.85 micro g/min; P < 0.01) during euglycaemia; it was not affected by hyperglycaemia. There were no significant differences between DM1 and C and in cGMP

  18. Human ZCCHC12 activates AP-1 and CREB signaling as a transcriptional co-activator.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong; Liu, Qian; Hu, Xiang; Feng, Du; Xiang, Shuanglin; He, Zhicheng; Hu, Xingwang; Zhou, Jianlin; Ding, Xiaofeng; Zhou, Chang; Zhang, Jian

    2009-07-01

    Mouse zinc finger CCHC domain containing 12 gene (ZCCHC12) has been identified as a transcriptional co-activator of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling, and human ZCCHC12 was reported to be related to non-syndromic X-linked mental retardation (NS-XLMR). However, the details of how human ZCCHC12 involve in the NS-XLMR still remain unclear. In this study, we identified a novel nuclear localization signal (NLS) in the middle of human ZCCHC12 protein which is responsible for the nuclear localization. Multiple-tissue northern blot analysis indicated that ZCCHC12 is highly expressed in human brain. Furthermore, in situ hybridization showed that ZCCHC12 is specifically expressed in neuroepithelium of forebrain, midbrain, and diencephalon regions of mouse E10.5 embryos. Luciferase reporter assays demonstrated that ZCCHC12 enhanced the transcriptional activities of activator protein 1 (AP-1) and cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) as a coactivator. In conclusion, we identified a new NLS in ZCCHC12 and figured out that ZCCHC12 functions as a transcriptional co-activator of AP-1 and CREB.

  19. New Constitutively Active Phytochromes Exhibit Light-Independent Signaling Activity1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, A-Reum; Lee, Si-Seok; Han, Yun-Jeong; Shin, Ah-Young; Baek, Ayoung; Ahn, Taeho; Kim, Min-Gon; Kim, Young Soon; Lee, Keun Woo; Nagatani, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Plant phytochromes are photoreceptors that mediate a variety of photomorphogenic responses. There are two spectral photoisomers, the red light-absorbing Pr and far-red light-absorbing Pfr forms, and the photoreversible transformation between the two forms is important for the functioning of phytochromes. In this study, we isolated a Tyr-268-to-Val mutant of Avena sativa phytochrome A (AsYVA) that displayed little photoconversion. Interestingly, transgenic plants of AsYVA showed light-independent phytochrome signaling with a constitutive photomorphogenic (cop) phenotype that is characterized by shortened hypocotyls and open cotyledons in the dark. In addition, the corresponding Tyr-303-to-Val mutant of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) phytochrome B (AtYVB) exhibited nuclear localization and interaction with phytochrome-interacting factor 3 (PIF3) independently of light, conferring a constitutive photomorphogenic development to its transgenic plants, which is comparable to the first constitutively active version of phytochrome B (YHB; Tyr-276-to-His mutant). We also found that chromophore ligation was required for the light-independent interaction of AtYVB with PIF3. Moreover, we demonstrated that AtYVB did not exhibit phytochrome B activity when it was localized in the cytosol by fusion with the nuclear export signal and that AsYVA exhibited the full activity of phytochrome A when localized in the nucleus by fusion with the nuclear localization signal. Furthermore, the corresponding Tyr-269-to-Val mutant of Arabidopsis phytochrome A (AtYVA) exhibited similar cop phenotypes in transgenic plants to AsYVA. Collectively, these results suggest that the conserved Tyr residues in the chromophore-binding pocket play an important role during the Pr-to-Pfr photoconversion of phytochromes, providing new constitutively active alleles of phytochromes by the Tyr-to-Val mutation. PMID:27325667

  20. Notch signaling activation in pediatric low-grade astrocytoma.

    PubMed

    Brandt, William D; Schreck, Karisa C; Bar, Eli E; Taylor, Isabella; Marchionni, Luigi; Raabe, Eric; Eberhart, Charles G; Rodriguez, Fausto J

    2015-02-01

    Pilocytic astrocytoma (PA) is the most common primary brain tumor in children; various signaling pathways have been implicated in its biology. The Notch signaling pathway has been found to play a role in the development, stem cell biology, and pathogenesis of several cancers, but its role in PA has not been investigated. We studied alterations in Notch signaling components in tumor tissue from 18 patients with PA and 4 with other low-grade astrocytomas to identify much needed therapeutic targets. We found that Notch pathway members were overexpressed at the mRNA (NOTCH1, NOTCH2, HEY1, HEY2) and protein (HES1) levels in PAs at various anatomic sites compared with non-neoplastic brain samples. These changes were not associated with specific BRAF alterations. Inhibiting the Notch pathway in the pediatric low-grade astrocytoma cell lines Res186 and Res259 using either RNA interference or a γ-secretase inhibitor resulted in variable, but significant, reduction in cell growth and migration. This study suggests a potential role for Notch signaling in pediatric low-grade astrocytoma tumorigenesis and that Notch signaling may be a viable pathway therapeutic target.

  1. Notch Signaling Activation in Pediatric Low-Grade Astrocytoma

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, William D.; Schreck, Karisa C.; Bar, Eli E.; Taylor, Isabella; Marchionni, Luigi; Raabe, Eric; Eberhart, Charles G.; Rodriguez, Fausto J.

    2014-01-01

    Pilocytic astrocytoma (PA) is the most common primary brain tumor in children; various signaling pathways have been implicated in its biology. The Notch signaling pathway has been found to play a role in development, stem cell biology, and the pathogenesis of several cancers but its role in PA has not been investigated. We studied alterations in Notch signaling components in tumor tissue from 18 patients with PA and 4 with other low-grade astrocytomas to identify much needed therapeutic targets. We found that Notch pathway members were overexpressed at the mRNA (NOTCH1, NOTCH2, HEY1, HEY2) and protein (HES1) levels in PAs at various anatomical sites compared to non-neoplastic brain samples. These changes were not associated with specific BRAF alterations. Inhibiting the Notch pathway in the pediatric low-grade astrocytoma cell lines Res 186 and Res 259 using either RNA interference or a γ-secretase inhibitor resulted in variable but significant reduction in cell growth and migration. This study suggests a potential role for Notch signaling in pediatric low-grade astrocytoma tumorigenesis and that Notch signaling may be a viable pathway therapeutic target. PMID:25575134

  2. The impact of cGMP compliance on consumer confidence in dietary supplement products.

    PubMed

    Crowley, Richard; FitzGerald, Libby Harvey

    2006-04-03

    The FDA estimates that US citizens spend more than $ 8.5 billion a year on dietary supplements and world wide the market is estimated at more than $ 60 billion. However, although a majority of consumers express confidence in the safety of these products, 74% believe the government should be more involved in ensuring that these products are safe and efficacious. Recent regulatory initiatives such as the imminent adoption of cGMPs for dietary supplements in the US, implementation of cGMPs in Canada and the recent EU dietary supplement initiative represent legislative and industry response to public clamor for more comprehensive oversight of dietary supplements. Regardless of mandated practices, the majority of dietary supplement manufacturers have done an excellent job of protecting the safety and quality of their products. The promulgation of these cGMPs will help ensure consumers that equal standards are followed throughout the industry. For some companies with established processes based on existing food or pharmaceutical cGMP regulations, the transition will be relatively painless while, for many, it will represent a significant increase in the level of documentation and testing. However, consumers deserve and demand that products meet standards for safety and quality and the implementation of cGMPs for these products are an important first step. Although the cGMPs are designed to ensure products are safe from a standpoint of identity, purity, quality, strength and composition, they do not address preclinical or clinical testing of ingredients for safety or efficacy. This would involve ingredients meeting the requirements of Generally Recognized as Safe (GRAS) status or going through the New Dietary Ingredient (NDI) process.

  3. GSK621 Targets Glioma Cells via Activating AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Signalings

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hong; Liu, Wei; Zhan, Shi-Kun; Pan, Yi-Xin; Bian, Liu-Guan; Sun, Bomin; Sun, Qing-Fang; Pan, Si-Jian

    2016-01-01

    Here, we studied the anti-glioma cell activity by a novel AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activator GSK621. We showed that GSK621 was cytotoxic to human glioma cells (U87MG and U251MG lines), possibly via provoking caspase-dependent apoptotic cell death. Its cytotoxicity was alleviated by caspase inhibitors. GSK621 activated AMPK to inhibit mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and downregulate Tetraspanin 8 (Tspan8) in glioma cells. AMPK inhibition, through shRNA knockdown of AMPKα or introduction of a dominant negative (T172A) AMPKα, almost reversed GSK621-induced AMPK activation, mTOR inhibition and Tspan8 degradation. Consequently, GSK621’s cytotoxicity in glioma cells was also significantly attenuated by AMPKα knockdown or mutation. Further studies showed that GSK621, at a relatively low concentration, significantly potentiated temozolomide (TMZ)’s sensitivity and lethality against glioma cells. We summarized that GSK621 inhibits human glioma cells possibly via activating AMPK signaling. This novel AMPK activator could be a novel and promising anti-glioma cell agent. PMID:27532105

  4. Immunologic consequences of signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 activation in human squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Albesiano, Emilia; Davis, Meghan; See, Alfred P; Han, James E; Lim, Michael; Pardoll, Drew M; Kim, Young

    2010-08-15

    Paracrine cross-talk between tumor cells and immune cells within the tumor microenvironment underlies local mechanisms of immune evasion. Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), which is constitutively activated in diverse cancer types, is a key regulator of cytokine and chemokine expression in murine tumors, resulting in suppression of both innate and adaptive antitumor immunity. However, the immunologic effects of STAT3 activation in human cancers have not been studied in detail. To investigate how STAT3 activity in human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) might alter the tumor microenvironment to enable immune escape, we used small interfering RNA and small-molecule inhibitors to suppress STAT3 activity. STAT3 inhibition in multiple primary and established human squamous carcinoma lines resulted in enhanced expression and secretion of both proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Although conditioned medium containing supernatants from human HNSCC inhibited lipopolysaccharide-induced dendritic cell activation in vitro, supernatants from STAT3-silenced tumor cells reversed this immune evasion mechanism. Moreover, supernatants from STAT3-silenced tumor cells were able to stimulate the migratory behavior of lymphocytes from human peripheral blood in vitro. These results show the importance of STAT3 activation in regulating the immunomodulatory mediators by human tumors and further validate STAT3 as a promising target for therapeutic intervention. (c)2010 AACR.

  5. PKCδ activated by c-MET enhances infiltration of human glioblastoma cells through NOTCH2 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Seok-Gu; Kim, Rae-Kwon; Cui, Yan-Hong; Lee, Hae-June; Kim, Min-Jung; Lee, Jae-Seong; Kim, In-Gyu; Suh, Yongjoon; Lee, Su-Jae

    2016-01-01

    Poor prognosis of glioblastoma (GBM) is attributable to the propensity of tumor cells to infiltrate into the brain parenchyma. Protein kinase C (PKC) isozymes are highly expressed or aberrantly activated in GBM. However, how this signaling node translates to GBM cell invasiveness remains unknown. Here, we report that among PKC isoforms, PKCδ is strongly associated with infiltration of GBM cells. Notably, PKCδ enhanced Tyr418 phosphorylation of the non-receptor tyrosine kinase SRC, which in turn activated STAT3 and subsequent NOTCH2 signaling, ultimately leading to GBM cell invasiveness. Furthermore, we showed that PKCδ was aberrantly activated in GBM cells by c-MET, a receptor tyrosine kinase hyperactivated in GBM. In agreement, inhibition either component in the c-MET/PKCδ/SRC/STAT3 signaling axis effectively blocked the NOTCH2 signaling and invasiveness of GBM cells. Taken together, our findings shed a light on the signaling mechanisms behind the constitutive activation of PKCδ signaling in GBM. PMID:26700818

  6. Synaptic generation of an intracellular retrograde signal requires activation of the tyrosine kinase and mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling cascades in Aplysia.

    PubMed

    Stough, Shara; Kopec, Ashley M; Carew, Thomas J

    2015-11-01

    Cellular changes underlying memory formation can be generated in an activity-dependent manner at specific synapses. Thus an important question concerns the mechanisms by which synaptic signals communicate with the cell body to mediate these cellular changes. A monosynaptic circuit that is enhanced by sensitization in Aplysia is well-suited to study this question because three different subcellular compartments: (i) the sensorimotor SN-MN synapses, (ii) the SN projections to MNs via axonal connections, (iii) the SN cell bodies, can all be manipulated and studied independently. Here, we report that activity-dependent (AD) training in either the entire SN-MN circuit or in only the synaptic compartment, activates MAPK in a temporally and spatially specific pattern. Specifically, we find (i) MAPK activation is first transiently generated at SN-MN synapses during training, (ii) immediately after training MAPK is transiently activated in SN-MN axonal connections and persistently activated in SN cell bodies, and finally, (iii) MAPK is activated in SN cell bodies and SN-MN synapses 1h after training. These data suggest that there is an intracellularly transported retrograde signal generated at the synapse which is later responsible for delayed MAPK activation at SN somata. Finally, we find that this retrograde signal requires activation of tyrosine kinase (TK) and MEK signaling cascades at the synapses.

  7. Increased PDE5 activity and decreased Rho kinase and PKC activities in colonic muscle from caveolin-1-/- mice impair the peristaltic reflex and propulsion.

    PubMed

    Mahavadi, Sunila; Bhattacharya, Sayak; Kumar, Divya P; Clay, Chereena; Ross, Gracious; Akbarali, Hamid I; Grider, John R; Murthy, Karnam S

    2013-12-01

    Caveolae are specialized regions of the plasma membrane that concentrate receptors and associated signaling molecules critical in regulation of cellular response to transmitters and hormones. We have determined the effects of caveolin-1 (Cav-1) deletion, caveolin-1 siRNA, and caveolar disruption in mice on the signaling pathways that mediate contraction and relaxation in colonic smooth muscle and on the components of the peristaltic reflex in isolated tissue and propulsion in intact colonic segments. In Cav-1-/- mice, both relaxation and contraction were decreased in smooth muscle cells and muscle strips, as well as during both phases of the peristaltic reflex and colonic propulsion. The decrease in relaxation in response to the nitric oxide (NO) donor was accompanied by a decrease in cGMP levels and an increase in phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) activity. Relaxation by a PDE5-resistant cGMP analog was not affected in smooth muscle of Cav-1-/- mice, suggesting that inhibition of relaxation was due to augmentation of PDE5 activity. Similar effects on relaxation, PDE5 and cGMP were obtained in muscle cells upon disruption of caveolae by methyl-β-cyclodextrin or suppression of Cav-1. Sustained contraction mediated via inhibition of myosin light chain phosphatase (MLCP) activity is regulated by Rho kinase and PKC via phosphorylation of two endogenous inhibitors of MLCP: myosin phosphatase-targeting subunit (MYPT1) and 17-kDa PKC-potentiated protein phosphatase 1 inhibitor protein (CPI-17), respectively. The activity of both enzymes and phosphorylation of MYPT1 and CPI-17 were decreased in smooth muscle from Cav-1-/- mice. We conclude that the integrity of caveolae is essential for contractile and relaxant activity in colonic smooth muscle and the maintenance of neuromuscular function at organ level.

  8. Increased PDE5 activity and decreased Rho kinase and PKC activities in colonic muscle from caveolin-1−/− mice impair the peristaltic reflex and propulsion

    PubMed Central

    Mahavadi, Sunila; Bhattacharya, Sayak; Kumar, Divya P.; Clay, Chereena; Ross, Gracious; Akbarali, Hamid I.; Grider, John R.

    2013-01-01

    Caveolae are specialized regions of the plasma membrane that concentrate receptors and associated signaling molecules critical in regulation of cellular response to transmitters and hormones. We have determined the effects of caveolin-1 (Cav-1) deletion, caveolin-1 siRNA, and caveolar disruption in mice on the signaling pathways that mediate contraction and relaxation in colonic smooth muscle and on the components of the peristaltic reflex in isolated tissue and propulsion in intact colonic segments. In Cav-1−/− mice, both relaxation and contraction were decreased in smooth muscle cells and muscle strips, as well as during both phases of the peristaltic reflex and colonic propulsion. The decrease in relaxation in response to the nitric oxide (NO) donor was accompanied by a decrease in cGMP levels and an increase in phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) activity. Relaxation by a PDE5-resistant cGMP analog was not affected in smooth muscle of Cav-1−/− mice, suggesting that inhibition of relaxation was due to augmentation of PDE5 activity. Similar effects on relaxation, PDE5 and cGMP were obtained in muscle cells upon disruption of caveolae by methyl-β-cyclodextrin or suppression of Cav-1. Sustained contraction mediated via inhibition of myosin light chain phosphatase (MLCP) activity is regulated by Rho kinase and PKC via phosphorylation of two endogenous inhibitors of MLCP: myosin phosphatase-targeting subunit (MYPT1) and 17-kDa PKC-potentiated protein phosphatase 1 inhibitor protein (CPI-17), respectively. The activity of both enzymes and phosphorylation of MYPT1 and CPI-17 were decreased in smooth muscle from Cav-1−/− mice. We conclude that the integrity of caveolae is essential for contractile and relaxant activity in colonic smooth muscle and the maintenance of neuromuscular function at organ level. PMID:24157969

  9. Rheb/mTORC1 Signaling Promotes Kidney Fibroblast Activation and Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Lei; Xu, Lingling; Mao, Junhua; Li, Jianzhong; Fang, Li; Zhou, Yang; Liu, Wei; He, Weichun; Zhao, Allan Zijian

    2013-01-01

    Ras homolog enriched in brain (Rheb) is a small GTPase that regulates cell growth, differentiation, and survival by upregulating mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling. The role of Rheb/mTORC1 signaling in the activation of kidney fibroblasts and the development of kidney fibrosis remains largely unknown. In this study, we found that Rheb/mTORC1 signaling was activated in interstitial myofibroblasts from fibrotic kidneys. Treatment of rat kidney interstitial fibroblasts (NRK-49F cell line) with TGFβ1 also activated Rheb/mTORC1 signaling. Blocking Rheb/mTORC1 signaling with rapamycin or Rheb small interfering RNA abolished TGFβ1-induced fibroblast activation. In a transgenic mouse, ectopic expression of Rheb activated kidney fibroblasts. These Rheb transgenic mice exhibited increased activation of mTORC1 signaling in both kidney tubular and interstitial cells as well as progressive interstitial renal fibrosis; rapamycin inhibited these effects. Similarly, mice with fibroblast-specific deletion of Tsc1, a negative regulator of Rheb, exhibited activated mTORC1 signaling in kidney interstitial fibroblasts and increased renal fibrosis, both of which rapamycin abolished. Taken together, these results suggest that Rheb/mTORC1 signaling promotes the activation of kidney fibroblasts and contributes to the development of interstitial fibrosis, possibly providing a therapeutic target for progressive renal disease. PMID:23661807

  10. Kurarinol induces hepatocellular carcinoma cell apoptosis through suppressing cellular signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Shu, Guangwen; Yang, Jing; Zhao, Wenhao; Xu, Chan; Hong, Zongguo; Mei, Zhinan; Yang, Xinzhou

    2014-12-01

    Kurarinol is a flavonoid isolated from roots of the medical plant Sophora flavescens. However, its cytotoxic activity against hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells and toxic effects on mammalians remain largely unexplored. Here, the pro-apoptotic activities of kurarinol on HCC cells and its toxic impacts on tumor-bearing mice were evaluated. The molecular mechanisms underlying kurarinol-induced HCC cell apoptosis were also investigated. We found that kurarinol dose-dependently provoked HepG2, Huh-7 and H22 HCC cell apoptosis. In addition, kurarinol gave rise to a considerable decrease in the transcriptional activity of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) in HCC cells. Suppression of STAT3 signaling is involved in kurarinol-induced HCC cell apoptosis. In vivo studies showed that kurarinol injection substantially induced transplanted H22 cell apoptosis with low toxic impacts on tumor-bearing mice. Similarly, the transcriptional activity of STAT3 in transplanted tumor tissues was significantly suppressed after kurarinol treatment. Collectively, our current research demonstrated that kurarinol has the capacity of inducing HCC cell apoptosis both in vitro and in vivo with undetectable toxic impacts on the host. Suppressing STAT3 signaling is implicated in kurarinol-mediated HCC cell apoptosis. - Highlights: • Kurarinol induces hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell apoptosis. • Kurarinol induces HCC cell apoptosis via inhibiting STAT3. • Kurarinol exhibits low toxic effects on tumor-bearing animals.

  11. Honokiol suppresses survival signals mediated by Ras-dependent phospholipase D activity in human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Avalon; Zheng, Yang; Zhao, Chen; Toschi, Alfredo; Fan, Judy; Shraibman, Natalie; Brown, H Alex; Bar-Sagi, Dafna; Foster, David A; Arbiser, Jack L

    2008-07-01

    Elevated phospholipase D (PLD) activity provides a survival signal in several human cancer cell lines and suppresses apoptosis when cells are subjected to the stress of serum withdrawal. Thus, targeting PLD survival signals has potential to suppress survival in cancer cells that depend on PLD for survival. Honokiol is a compound that suppresses tumor growth in mouse models. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of honokiol on PLD survival signals and the Ras dependence of these signals. The effect of honokiol upon PLD activity was examined in human cancer cell lines where PLD activity provides a survival signal. The dependence of PLD survival signals on Ras was investigated, as was the effect of honokiol on Ras activation. We report here that honokiol suppresses PLD activity in human cancer cells where PLD has been shown to suppress apoptosis. PLD activity is commonly elevated in response to the stress of serum withdrawal, and, importantly, the stress-induced increase in PLD activity is selectively suppressed by honokiol. The stress-induced increase in PLD activity was accompanied by increased Ras activation, and the stress-induced increase in PLD activity in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells was dependent on a Ras. The PLD activity was also dependent on the GTPases RalA and ADP ribosylation factor. Importantly, honokiol suppressed Ras activation. The data provided here indicate that honokiol may be a valuable therapeutic reagent for targeting a large number of human cancers that depend on Ras and PLD for their survival.

  12. Calcium signaling and the MAPK cascade are required for sperm activation in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhiyu; Wang, Bin; He, Ruijun; Zhao, Yanmei; Miao, Long

    2014-02-01

    In nematode, sperm activation (or spermiogenesis), a process in which the symmetric and non-motile spermatids transform into polarized and crawling spermatozoa, is critical for sperm cells to acquire fertilizing competence. SPE-8 dependent and SPE-8 independent pathways function redundantly during sperm activation in both males and hermaphrodites of Caenorhabditis elegans. However, the downstream signaling for both pathways remains unclear. Here we show that calcium signaling and the MAPK cascade are required for both SPE-8 dependent and SPE-8 independent sperm activation, implying that both pathways share common downstream signaling components during sperm activation. We demonstrate that activation of the MAPK cascade is sufficient to activate spermatids derived from either wild-type or spe-8 group mutant males and that activation of the MAPK cascade bypasses the requirement of calcium signal to induce sperm activation, indicating that the MAPK cascade functions downstream of or parallel with the calcium signaling during sperm activation. Interestingly, the persistent activation of MAPK in activated spermatozoa inhibits Major Sperm Protein (MSP)-based cytoskeleton dynamics. We demonstrate that MAPK plays dual roles in promoting pseudopod extension during sperm activation but also blocking the MSP-based, amoeboid motility of the spermatozoa. Thus, though nematode sperm are crawling cells, morphologically distinct from flagellated sperm, and the molecular machinery for motility of amoeboid and flagellated sperm is different, both types of sperm might utilize conserved signaling pathways to modulate sperm maturation.

  13. CSF Concentrations of cAMP and cGMP Are Lower in Patients with Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease but Not Parkinson's Disease and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Oeckl, Patrick; Steinacker, Petra; Lehnert, Stefan; Jesse, Sarah; Kretzschmar, Hans A.; Ludolph, Albert C.; Otto, Markus; Ferger, Boris

    2012-01-01

    Background The cyclic nucleotides cyclic adenosine-3′,5′-monophosphate (cAMP) and cyclic guanosine-3′,5′-monophosphate (cGMP) are important second messengers and are potential biomarkers for Parkinson's disease (PD), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we investigated by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) concentrations of cAMP and cGMP of 82 patients and evaluated their diagnostic potency as biomarkers. For comparison with a well-accepted biomarker, we measured tau concentrations in CSF of CJD and control patients. CJD patients (n = 15) had lower cAMP (−70%) and cGMP (−55%) concentrations in CSF compared with controls (n = 11). There was no difference in PD, PD dementia (PDD) and ALS cases. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analyses confirmed cAMP and cGMP as valuable diagnostic markers for CJD indicated by the area under the curve (AUC) of 0.86 (cAMP) and 0.85 (cGMP). We calculated a sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 64% for cAMP and a sensitivity of 67% and specificity of 100% for cGMP. The combination of both nucleotides increased the sensitivity to 80% and specificity to 91% for the term cAMPxcGMP (AUC 0.92) and to 93% and 100% for the ratio tau/cAMP (AUC 0.99). Conclusions/Significance We conclude that the CSF determination of cAMP and cGMP may easily be included in the diagnosis of CJD and could be helpful in monitoring disease progression as well as in therapy control. PMID:22396786

  14. Danger signals activating the immune response after trauma.

    PubMed

    Hirsiger, Stefanie; Simmen, Hans-Peter; Werner, Clément M L; Wanner, Guido A; Rittirsch, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Sterile injury can cause a systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) that resembles the host response during sepsis. The inflammatory response following trauma comprises various systems of the human body which are cross-linked with each other within a highly complex network of inflammation. Endogenous danger signals (danger-associated molecular patterns; DAMPs; alarmins) as well as exogenous pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) play a crucial role in the initiation of the immune response. With popularization of the "danger theory," numerous DAMPs and PAMPs and their corresponding pathogen-recognition receptors have been identified. In this paper, we highlight the role of the DAMPs high-mobility group box protein 1 (HMGB1), interleukin-1α (IL-1α), and interleukin-33 (IL-33) as unique dual-function mediators as well as mitochondrial danger signals released upon cellular trauma and necrosis.

  15. Janus kinases and signal transducers and activators of transcription: their roles in cytokine signaling, development and immunoregulation

    PubMed Central

    Ortmann, Robert A; Cheng, Tammy; Visconti, Roberta; Frucht , David M; O'Shea, John J

    2000-01-01

    Cytokines play a critical role in the normal development and function of the immune system. On the other hand, many rheumatologic diseases are characterized by poorly controlled responses to or dysregulated production of these mediators. Over the past decade tremendous strides have been made in clarifying how cytokines transmit signals via pathways using the Janus kinase (Jak) protein tyrosine kinases and the Signal transducer and activator of transcription (Stat) proteins. More recently, research has focused on several distinct proteins responsible for inhibiting these pathways. It is hoped that further elucidation of cytokine signaling through these pathways will not only allow for a better comprehension of the etiopathogenesis of rheumatologic illnesses, but may also direct future treatment options. PMID:11094415

  16. Noise exposure immediately activates cochlear mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling.

    PubMed

    Alagramam, Kumar N; Stepanyan, Ruben; Jamesdaniel, Samson; Chen, Daniel H-C; Davis, Rickie R

    2014-01-01

    Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) is a major public health issue worldwide. Uncovering the early molecular events associated with NIHL would reveal mechanisms leading to the hearing loss. Our aim is to investigate the immediate molecular responses after different levels of noise exposure and identify the common and distinct pathways that mediate NIHL. Previous work showed mice exposed to 116 decibels sound pressure level (dB SPL) broadband noise for 1 h had greater threshold shifts than the mice exposed to 110 dB SPL broadband noise, hence we used these two noise levels in this study. Groups of 4-8-week-old CBA/CaJ mice were exposed to no noise (control) or to broadband noise for 1 h, followed by transcriptome analysis of total cochlear RNA isolated immediately after noise exposure. Previously identified and novel genes were found in all data sets. Following exposure to noise at 116 dB SPL, the earliest responses included up-regulation of 243 genes and down-regulation of 61 genes, while a similar exposure at 110 dB SPL up-regulated 155 genes and down-regulated 221 genes. Bioinformatics analysis indicated that mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling was the major pathway in both levels of noise exposure. Nevertheless, both qualitative and quantitative differences were noticed in some MAPK signaling genes, after exposure to different noise levels. Cacna1b , Cacna1g , and Pla2g6 , related to calcium signaling were down-regulated after 110 dB SPL exposure, while the fold increase in the expression of Fos was relatively lower than what was observed after 116 dB SPL exposure. These subtle variations provide insight on the factors that may contribute to the differences in NIHL despite the activation of a common pathway.

  17. Enhanced Multistatic Active Sonar via Innovative Signal Processing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    290-302, April 2014. [published, refereed]. W. Rowe, P. Stoica, and J. Li, "Spectrally Constrained Waveform Design," IEEE Signal Processing Magazine ...PAS systems work on the principle of broadcasting a low duty cycle high instantaneous power pulse into the region of interest followed by a long...listening time, while the CAS systems broadcast a waveform that is characterized by a high duty cycle and low instantaneous power . PAS systems due to

  18. Transforming Growth Factor-β Signaling Pathway Activation in Keratoconus

    PubMed Central

    ENGLER, CHRISTOPH; CHAKRAVARTI, SHUKTI; DOYLE, JEFFERSON; EBERHART, CHARLES G.; MENG, HUAN; STARK, WALTER J.; KELLIHER, CLARE; JUN, ALBERT S.

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE To assess the presence of transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ) pathway markers in the epithelium of keratoconus patient corneas. DESIGN Retrospective, comparative case series of laboratory specimens. METHODS Immunohistochemistry results for TGFβ2, total TGFβ, mothers against decacentaplegic homolog (Smad) 2, and phosphorylated Smad2 was performed on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded sections of keratoconus patient corneas and normal corneas from human autopsy eyes. Keratoconus patient corneas were divided in two groups, depending on their severity based on keratometer readings and pachymetry. Autopsy controls were age-matched with the keratoconus cases. Immunohistochemistry signal quantification was performed using automated software. Real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction was performed on total ribonucleic acid of epithelium of keratoconus patient corneas and autopsy control corneas. RESULTS Immunohistochemistry quantification showed a significant increase in mean signal in the group of severe keratoconus cases compared with normal corneas for TGFβ2 and phosphorylated Smad2 (P < .05). Immunohistochemistry analysis using antibodies against total TGFβ and Smad2 did not show any significant increase in the keratoconus cases versus the autopsy controls. Reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction exhibited elevated messenger ribonucleic acid levels of Smad2 and TGFβ2 in severe keratoconus corneal epithelium. CONCLUSIONS This work shows increased TGFβ pathway markers in severe keratoconus cases and provides the rationale for investigating TGFβ signaling further in the pathophysiology of keratoconus. PMID:21310385

  19. Mammary ductal growth is impaired in mice lacking leptin-dependent signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 signaling.

    PubMed

    Thorn, Stephanie R; Giesy, Sarah L; Myers, Martin G; Boisclair, Yves R

    2010-08-01

    Mice lacking leptin (ob/ob) or its full-length receptor (db/db) are obese and reproductively incompetent. Fertility, pregnancy, and lactation are restored, respectively, in ob/ob mice treated with leptin through mating, d 6.5 post coitum, and pregnancy. Therefore, leptin signaling is needed for lactation, but the timing of its action and the affected mammary process remain unknown. To address this issue, we used s/s mice lacking only leptin-dependent signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)3 signaling. These mice share many features with db/db mice, including obesity, but differ by retaining sufficient activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis to support reproduction. The s/s mammary epithelium was normal at 3 wk of age but failed to expand through the mammary fat pad (MFP) during the subsequent pubertal period. Ductal growth failure was not corrected by estrogen therapy and did not relate to inadequate IGF-I production by the MFP or to the need for epithelial or stromal leptin-STAT3 signaling. Ductal growth failure coincided with adipocyte hypertrophy and increased MFP production of leptin, TNFalpha, and IL6. These cytokines, however, were unable to inhibit the proliferation of a collection of mouse mammary epithelial cell lines. In conclusion, the very first step of postnatal mammary development fails in s/s mice despite sufficient estrogen IGF-I and an hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis capable of supporting reproduction. This failure is not caused by mammary loss of leptin-dependent STAT3 signaling or by the development of inflammation. These data imply the existence of an unknown mechanism whereby leptin-dependent STAT3 signaling and obesity alter mammary ductal development.

  20. Stress and radiation-induced activation of multiple intracellular signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Dent, Paul; Yacoub, Adly; Contessa, Joseph; Caron, Ruben; Amorino, George; Valerie, Kristoffer; Hagan, Michael P; Grant, Steven; Schmidt-Ullrich, Rupert

    2003-03-01

    Exposure of cells to a variety of stresses induces compensatory activations of multiple intracellular signaling pathways. These activations can play critical roles in controlling cell survival and repopulation effects in a stress-specific and cell type-dependent manner. Some stress-induced signaling pathways are those normally activated by mitogens such as the EGFR/RAS/PI3K-MAPK pathway. Other pathways activated by stresses such as ionizing radiation include those downstream of death receptors, including pro-caspases and the transcription factor NFKB. This review will attempt to describe some of the complex network of signals induced by ionizing radiation and other cellular stresses in animal cells, with particular attention to signaling by growth factor and death receptors. This includes radiation-induced signaling via the EGFR and IGFI-R to the PI3K, MAPK, JNK, and p38 pathways as well as FAS-R and TNF-R signaling to pro-caspases and NFKB. The roles of autocrine ligands in the responses of cells and bystander cells to radiation and cellular stresses will also be discussed. Based on the data currently available, it appears that radiation can simultaneously activate multiple signaling pathways in cells. Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species may play an important role in this process by inhibiting protein tyrosine phosphatase activity. The ability of radiation to activate signaling pathways may depend on the expression of growth factor receptors, autocrine factors, RAS mutation, and PTEN expression. In other words, just because pathway X is activated by radiation in one cell type does not mean that pathway X will be activated in a different cell type. Radiation-induced signaling through growth factor receptors such as the EGFR may provide radioprotective signals through multiple downstream pathways. In some cell types, enhanced basal signaling by proto-oncogenes such as RAS may provide a radioprotective signal. In many cell types, this may be through PI3K, in others

  1. The Role of cGMP on Adenosine A1 Receptor-mediated Inhibition of Synaptic Transmission at the Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Isa; Serpa, André; Sebastião, Ana M.; Cascalheira, José F.

    2016-01-01

    Both adenosine A1 receptor and cGMP inhibit synaptic transmission at the hippocampus and recently it was found that A1 receptor increased cGMP levels in hippocampus, but the role of cGMP on A1 receptor-mediated inhibition of synaptic transmission remains to be established. In the present work we investigated if blocking the NOS/sGC/cGMP/PKG pathway using nitric oxide synthase (NOS), protein kinase G (PKG), and soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) inhibitors modify the A1 receptor effect on synaptic transmission. Neurotransmission was evaluated by measuring the slope of field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs) evoked by electrical stimulation at hippocampal slices. N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA, 15 nM), a selective A1 receptor agonist, reversibly decreased the fEPSPs by 54 ± 5%. Incubation of the slices with an inhibitor of NOS (L-NAME, 200 μM) decreased the CPA effect on fEPSPs by 57 ± 9% in female rats. In males, ODQ (10 μM), an sGC inhibitor, decreased the CPA inhibitory effect on fEPSPs by 23 ± 6%, but only when adenosine deaminase (ADA,1 U/ml) was present; similar results were found in females, where ODQ decreased CPA-induced inhibition of fEPSP slope by 23 ± 7%. In male rats, the presence of the PKG inhibitor (KT5823, 1 nM) decreased the CPA effect by 45.0 ± 9%; similar results were obtained in females, where KT5823 caused a 32 ± 9% decrease on the CPA effect. In conclusion, the results suggest that the inhibitory action of adenosine A1 receptors on synaptic transmission at hippocampus is, in part, mediated by the NOS/sGC/cGMP/PKG pathway. PMID:27148059

  2. CRH activation of different signaling pathways results in differential calcium signaling in human pregnant myometrium before and during labor.

    PubMed

    You, Xingji; Gao, Lu; Liu, Jie; Xu, Chen; Liu, Chunmin; Li, Yuan; Hui, Ning; Gu, Hang; Ni, Xin

    2012-10-01

    Our previous study has demonstrated that CRH has differential effects on human uterine contractility before and after onset of labor. Intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) mobilization plays an important role in the control of uterine contraction. Our objective was to investigate the effects of CRH on [Ca2+]i homeostasis in laboring and nonlaboring myometrial cells and determine subsequent signaling involved in [Ca2+]i regulation by CRH. The myometrial tissues were obtained from pregnant women who were undergoing or not undergoing labor at term. [Ca2+]i was determined by Ca2+ imaging system using the fluorescent dye fura-2-acetoxymethyl ester. Western blot analysis, ELISA, and RIA were used to determine the signaling pathways induced by CRH. CRH induced Ca2+ transient in laboring cells, which was blocked by CRH receptor type 1 (CRHR1) antagonist antalarmin. CRHR1 knockdown impaired this effect of CRH. CRH activated Gi protein, decreased cAMP production, and induced phosphorylated phospholipase C-β3 and inositol-1,4,5-triphosphate production. Phospholipase C and inositol-1,4,5-triphosphate receptor inhibitors blocked the CRH-induced Ca2+ transient in laboring cells. CRH did not induce whereas antalarmin induced the Ca2+ transient in nonlaboring cells. Knockdown of CRHR1 impaired the effect of antalarmin. CRH acted on CRHR1 to activate Gs in nonlaboring cells. Forskolin blocked antalarmin-induced Ca2+ transient. CRH acts on CRHR1 to activate different signaling pathways before and after onset of labor, thereby resulting in differential calcium signaling in response to CRH. The signaling pathways of CRHR1 might serve as a target for the development of new therapeutic strategies for preterm birth.

  3. Oligodendrocyte-specific activation of PERK signaling protects mice against experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wensheng; Lin, Yifeng; Li, Jin; Fenstermaker, Ali G; Way, Sharon W; Clayton, Benjamin; Jamison, Stephanie; Harding, Heather P; Ron, David; Popko, Brian

    2013-04-03

    There is compelling evidence that oligodendrocyte apoptosis, in response to CNS inflammation, contributes significantly to the development of the demyelinating disorder multiple sclerosis and its animal model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Therefore, approaches designed to protect oligodendrocytes would likely have therapeutic value. Activation of pancreatic endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK) signaling in response to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress increases cell survival under various cytotoxic conditions. Moreover, there is evidence that PERK signaling is activated in oligodendrocytes within demyelinating lesions in multiple sclerosis and EAE. Our previous study demonstrated that CNS delivery of the inflammatory cytokine interferon-γ before EAE onset protected mice against EAE, and this protection was dependent on PERK signaling. In our current study, we sought to elucidate the role of PERK signaling in oligodendrocytes during EAE. We generated transgenic mice that allow for temporally controlled activation of PERK signaling, in the absence of ER stress, specifically in oligodendrocytes. We demonstrated that persistent activation of PERK signaling was not deleterious to oligodendrocyte viability or the myelin of adult animals. Importantly, we found that enhanced activation of PERK signaling specifically in oligodendrocytes significantly attenuated EAE disease severity, which was associated with reduced oligodendrocyte apoptosis, demyelination, and axonal degeneration. This effect was not the result of an altered degree of the inflammatory response in EAE mice. Our results provide direct evidence that activation of PERK signaling in oligodendrocytes is cytoprotective, protecting mice against EAE.

  4. Controlling NK Cell Responses: Integration of Signals for Activation and Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Long, Eric O.; Kim, Hun Sik; Liu, Dongfang; Peterson, Mary E.; Rajagopalan, Sumati

    2013-01-01

    Understanding how signals are integrated to control NK cell responsiveness in the absence of antigen-specific receptors has been a challenge, but recent work has revealed some underlying principles that govern NK cell responses. NK cells use an array of innate receptors to sense their environment and respond to alterations caused by infections, cellular stress and transformation. No single activation receptor dominates; instead, synergistic signals from combinations of receptors are integrated to activate natural cytotoxicity and cytokine production. Inhibitory receptors for MHC class I have a critical role in controlling NK cell responses and paradoxically, in maintaining NK cells in a state of responsiveness to subsequent activation events, a process referred to as licensing. MHC-I specific inhibitory receptors both block activation signals and trigger signals to phosphorylate and inactivate the small adaptor Crk. These different facets of inhibitory signaling are incorporated into a revocable license model for the reversible tuning of NK cell responsiveness. PMID:23516982

  5. Prion-like Polymerization Underlies Signal Transduction in Antiviral Immune Defense and Inflammasome Activation

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Xin; Chen, Jueqi; Xu, Hui; Liu, Siqi; Jiang, Qiu-Xing; Halfmann, Randal; Chen, Zhijian J.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Pathogens and cellular danger signals activate sensors such as RIG-I and NLRP3 to produce robust immune and inflammatory responses through respective adaptor proteins MAVS and ASC, which harbor essential N-terminal CARD and PYRIN domains, respectively. Here, we show that CARD and PYRIN function as bona fide prions in yeast and their prion forms are inducible by their respective upstream activators. Likewise, a yeast prion domain can functionally replace CARD and PYRIN in mammalian cell signaling. Mutations in MAVS and ASC that disrupt their prion activities in yeast also abrogate their ability to signal in mammalian cells. Furthermore, fibers of recombinant PYRIN can convert ASC into functional polymers capable of activating caspase-1. Remarkably, a conserved fungal NOD-like receptor and prion pair can functionally reconstitute signaling of NLRP3 and ASC PYRINs in mammalian cells. These results indicate that prion-like polymerization is a conserved signal transduction mechanism in innate immunity and inflammation. PMID:24630723

  6. Integration of light and metabolic signals for stem cell activation at the shoot apical meristem.

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, Anne; Janocha, Denis; Dong, Yihan; Medzihradszky, Anna; Schöne, Stefanie; Daum, Gabor; Suzaki, Takuya; Forner, Joachim; Langenecker, Tobias; Rempel, Eugen; Schmid, Markus; Wirtz, Markus; Hell, Rüdiger; Lohmann, Jan U

    2016-07-11

    A major feature of embryogenesis is the specification of stem cell systems, but in contrast to the situation in most animals, plant stem cells remain quiescent until the postembryonic phase of development. Here, we dissect how light and metabolic signals are integrated to overcome stem cell dormancy at the shoot apical meristem. We show on the one hand that light is able to activate expression of the stem cell inducer WUSCHEL independently of photosynthesis and that this likely involves inter-regional cytokinin signaling. Metabolic signals, on the other hand, are transduced to the meristem through activation of the TARGET OF RAPAMYCIN (TOR) kinase. Surprisingly, TOR is also required for light signal dependent stem cell activation. Thus, the TOR kinase acts as a central integrator of light and metabolic signals and a key regulator of stem cell activation at the shoot apex.

  7. Integration of light and metabolic signals for stem cell activation at the shoot apical meristem

    PubMed Central

    Pfeiffer, Anne; Janocha, Denis; Dong, Yihan; Medzihradszky, Anna; Schöne, Stefanie; Daum, Gabor; Suzaki, Takuya; Forner, Joachim; Langenecker, Tobias; Rempel, Eugen; Schmid, Markus; Wirtz, Markus; Hell, Rüdiger; Lohmann, Jan U

    2016-01-01

    A major feature of embryogenesis is the specification of stem cell systems, but in contrast to the situation in most animals, plant stem cells remain quiescent until the postembryonic phase of development. Here, we dissect how light and metabolic signals are integrated to overcome stem cell dormancy at the shoot apical meristem. We show on the one hand that light is able to activate expression of the stem cell inducer WUSCHEL independently of photosynthesis and that this likely involves inter-regional cytokinin signaling. Metabolic signals, on the other hand, are transduced to the meristem through activation of the TARGET OF RAPAMYCIN (TOR) kinase. Surprisingly, TOR is also required for light signal dependent stem cell activation. Thus, the TOR kinase acts as a central integrator of light and metabolic signals and a key regulator of stem cell activation at the shoot apex. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17023.001 PMID:27400267

  8. Smoothened Regulates Activator and Repressor Functions of Hedgehog Signaling via Two Distinct Mechanisms*

    PubMed Central

    Ogden, Stacey K.; Casso, David J.; Ascano, Manuel; Yore, Mark M.; Kornberg, Thomas B.; Robbins, David J.

    2013-01-01

    The secreted protein Hedgehog (Hh) plays an important role in metazoan development and as a survival factor for many human tumors. In both cases, Hh signaling proceeds through the activation of the seven-transmembrane protein Smoothened (Smo), which is thought to convert the Gli family of transcription factors from transcriptional repressors to transcriptional activators. Here, we provide evidence that Smo signals to the Hh signaling complex, which consists of the kinesin-related protein Costal2 (Cos2), the protein kinase Fused (Fu), and the Drosophila Gli homolog cubitus interruptus (Ci), in two distinct manners. We show that many of the commonly observed molecular events following Hh signaling are not transmitted in a linear fashion but instead are activated through two signals that bifurcate at Smo to independently affect activator and repressor pools of Ci. PMID:16423832

  9. 1'-Acetoxychavicol Acetate Increases Proteasome Activity by Activating cAMP-PKA Signaling.

    PubMed

    Yaku, Keisuke; Matsui-Yuasa, Isao; Kojima-Yuasa, Akiko

    2017-08-31

    Protein degradation systems are critical pathways for the maintenance of protein homeostasis. The age-dependent attenuation of the proteasome activity contributes to age-related neurodegenerative processes. The molecule 1'-acetoxychavicol acetate (ACA) is naturally obtained from the rhizomes and seeds of Zingiberaceae plants, such as Languas galangal and Alpinia galangal, and exhibits anti-carcinogenic effects. Recently, we have shown that ACA protected the age-related learning and memory impairments in senescence-accelerated mice and maintained cognitive performance. Therefore, we here examined the effects of ACA on the protein degradation systems and cell protection against neurotoxicity in differentiated PC12 cells. ACA increased proteasome activity in PC12 cells. Increased proteasome activity occurred during the initial stages of ACA treatment and lasted at least 9 h. The activity returned to control levels within 24 h. The increase in proteasome activity by ACA was suppressed by H-89, which is a cAMP-dependent protein kinase A inhibitor. ACA increased the adenylate cyclase activity and therefore the intracellular cAMP levels. Furthermore, ACA recovered the initial cell viability, which was reduced after the addition of the amyloid β-protein fragment to neuronally differentiated PC12 cells. The effects of ACA on amyloid toxicity were reduced after treatment with MG132, a proteasome inhibitor. These results demonstrated a neuroprotective effect of ACA via activation of cAMP/cAMP-dependent protein kinase A signaling in neuronally differentiated PC12 cells. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  10. Leukemia inhibitory factor and NGF regulate signal transducers and activators of transcription activation in sympathetic ganglia: convergence of cytokine- and neurotrophin-signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Rajan, P; Gearan, T; Fink, J S

    1998-08-17

    We have used the response of the superior cervical ganglia (SCG) to axotomy to investigate interactions between neuropoietic cytokines and neurotrophins. Postganglionic sympathetic axotomy leads to a prolonged leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF)-dependent activation of signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT) factors. To study regulation of LIF-dependent activation of STAT proteins and to mimic the loss of target-derived NGF resulting from postganglionic axotomy in vivo, SCG were explanted into media lacking NGF and activation of STAT proteins was assessed by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Like postganglionic axotomy in vivo. STAT proteins were activated for up to 8 days after explantation of SCG in vitro. SCG cultured in the presence of NGF showed decreased STAT binding when compared to ganglia cultured in NGF-free media. This inhibition of STAT activation by NGF was only present in ganglia cultured for more than 5 days and was mimicked by brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). The serine kinase inhibitor H7 augmented the increase of STAT binding produced by explantation, suggesting the presence of a labile repressor of STAT activation in the SCG. These data indicated that the neuropoietic cytokine-signaling pathway interacts with neurotrophin and H7-sensitive-signaling pathways to regulate activation of STAT proteins in sympathetic neurons. Moreover, these data suggest that one of the mechanisms leading to prolonged activation of STAT proteins after postganglionic axotomy in vivo is loss of target-derived neurotrophins.

  11. The CLAVATA signaling pathway mediating stem cell fate in shoot meristems requires Ca(2+) as a secondary cytosolic messenger.

    PubMed

    Chou, Hsuan; Zhu, Yingfang; Ma, Yi; Berkowitz, Gerald A

    2016-02-01

    CLAVATA1 (CLV1) is a receptor protein expressed in the shoot apical meristem (SAM) that translates perception of a non-cell-autonomous CLAVATA3 (CLV3) peptide signal into altered stem cell fate. CLV3 reduces expression of WUSCHEL (WUS) and FANTASTIC FOUR 2 (FAF2) in the SAM. Expression of WUS and FAF2 leads to maintenance of undifferentiated stem cells in the SAM. CLV3 binding to CLV1 inhibits expression of these genes and controls stem cell fate in the SAM through an unidentified signaling pathway. Cytosolic Ca(2+) elevations, cyclic nucleotide (cGMP)-activated Ca(2+) channels, and cGMP have been linked to signaling downstream of receptors similar to CLV1. Hence, we hypothesized that cytosolic Ca(2+) elevation mediates the CLV3 ligand/CLV1 receptor signaling that controls meristem stem cell fate. CLV3 application to Arabidopsis seedlings results in elevation of cytosolic Ca(2+) and cGMP. CLV3 control of WUS was prevented in a genotype lacking a functional cGMP-activated Ca(2+) channel. In wild-type plants, CLV3 inhibition of WUS and FAF2 expression was impaired by treatment with either a Ca(2+) channel blocker or a guanylyl cyclase inhibitor. When CLV3-dependent repression of WUS is blocked, altered control of stem cell fate leads to an increase in SAM size; we observed a larger SAM size in seedlings treated with the Ca(2+) channel blocker. These results suggest that the CLV3 ligand/CLV1 receptor system initiates a signaling cascade that elevates cytosolic Ca(2+), and that this cytosolic secondary messenger is involved in the signal transduction cascade linking CLV3/CLV1 to control of gene expression and stem cell fate in the SAM. © 2016 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Raising the standard: changes to the Australian Code of Good Manufacturing Practice (cGMP) for human blood and blood components, human tissues and human cellular therapy products.

    PubMed

    Wright, Craig; Velickovic, Zlatibor; Brown, Ross; Larsen, Stephen; Macpherson, Janet L; Gibson, John; Rasko, John E J

    2014-04-01

    In Australia, manufacture of blood, tissues and biologicals must comply with the federal laws and meet the requirements of the Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) Manufacturing Principles as outlined in the current Code of Good Manufacturing Practice (cGMP). The Therapeutic Goods Order (TGO) No. 88 was announced concurrently with the new cGMP, as a new standard for therapeutic goods. This order constitutes a minimum standard for human blood, tissues and cellular therapeutic goods aimed at minimising the risk of infectious disease transmission. The order sets out specific requirements relating to donor selection, donor testing and minimisation of infectious disease transmission from collection and manufacture of these products. The Therapeutic Goods Manufacturing Principles Determination No. 1 of 2013 references the human blood and blood components, human tissues and human cellular therapy products 2013 (2013 cGMP). The name change for the 2013 cGMP has allowed a broadening of the scope of products to include human cellular therapy products. It is difficult to directly compare versions of the code as deletion of some clauses has not changed the requirements to be met, as they are found elsewhere amongst the various guidelines provided. Many sections that were specific for blood and blood components are now less prescriptive and apply to a wider range of cellular therapies, but the general overall intent remains the same. Use of 'should' throughout the document instead of 'must' allows flexibility for alternative processes, but these systems will still require justification by relevant logical argument and validation data to be acceptable to TGA. The cGMP has seemingly evolved so that specific issues identified at audit over the last decade have now been formalised in the new version. There is a notable risk management approach applied to most areas that refer to process justification and decision making. These requirements commenced on 31 May 2013 and a 12 month

  13. Activator of G protein signaling 3 regulates opiate activation of protein kinase A signaling and relapse of heroin-seeking behavior.

    PubMed

    Yao, Lina; McFarland, Krista; Fan, Peidong; Jiang, Zhan; Inoue, Yuichiro; Diamond, Ivan

    2005-06-14

    The nucleus accumbens (NAc) is central to heroin addiction. Activation of opiate receptors in the NAc dissociates G(i/o) into alpha and betagamma subunits. Galpha(i) inhibits cAMP production, but betagamma regulates several molecular pathways, including protein kinase A (PKA). We show in NAc/striatal neurons that opiates paradoxically activate PKA signaling by means of betagamma dimers. Activation requires Galpha(i3) and an activator of G protein signaling 3 (AGS3). AGS3 competes with betagamma for binding to Galpha(i3)-GDP and enhances the action of unbound betagamma. AGS3 and Galpha(i3) knockdown prevents opiate activation of PKA signaling. In rats self-administering heroin, AGS3 antisense in the NAc core, but not shell, eliminates reinstatement of heroin-seeking behavior, a model of human relapse. Thus, Galpha(i3)/betagamma/AGS3 appears to mediate mu opiate receptor activation of PKA signaling as well as heroin-seeking behavior.

  14. Activation of Ca(2+) -activated Cl(-) channel ANO1 by localized Ca(2+) signals.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xin; Shah, Sihab; Du, Xiaona; Zhang, Hailin; Gamper, Nikita

    2016-01-01

    Ca(2+)-activated chloride channels (CaCCs) regulate numerous physiological processes including epithelial transport, smooth muscle contraction and sensory processing. Anoctamin-1 (ANO1, TMEM16A) is a principal CaCC subunit in many cell types, yet our understanding of the mechanisms of ANO1 activation and regulation are only beginning to emerge. Ca(2+) sensitivity of ANO1 is rather low and at negative membrane potentials the channel requires several micromoles of intracellular Ca(2+) for activation. However, global Ca(2+) levels in cells rarely reach such levels and, therefore, there must be mechanisms that focus intracellular Ca(2+) transients towards the ANO1 channels. Recent findings indeed indicate that ANO1 channels often co-localize with sources of intracellular Ca(2+) signals. Interestingly, it appears that in many cell types ANO1 is particularly tightly coupled to the Ca(2+) release sites of the intracellular Ca(2+) stores. Such preferential coupling may represent a general mechanism of ANO1 activation in native tissues.

  15. Activation of p38 and Erk Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases Signaling in Ocular Rosacea.

    PubMed

    Wladis, Edward J; Swamy, Supraja; Herrmann, Alyssa; Yang, Jinhong; Carlson, J Andrew; Adam, Alejandro P

    2017-02-01

    Rosacea-related cutaneous inflammation is a common cause of ocular surface disease. Currently, there are no specific pharmacologic therapies to treat ocular rosacea. Here, we aimed at determining the differences in intracellular signaling activity in eyelid skin from patients with and without ocular rosacea. This was an observational, comparative case series including 21 patients undergoing lower lid ectropion surgery at one practice during 2013 and 2014 (18 patients with rosacea, 13 control patients), and 24 paraffin-embedded archival samples from Albany Medical Center, selected randomly (12 patients with rosacea, 12 control patients). Cutaneous biopsies resulting from elective lower lid ectropion surgery were analyzed by Proteome Profiler Human Phospho-Kinase Array, Western blot, and/or immunohistochemistry. Samples derived from ocular rosacea patients showed increased levels of phosphorylated (active) p38 and Erk kinases. Phosphoproteins were mainly localized to the epidermis of affected eyelids. This finding provides a novel potential therapeutic target for treatment of ocular rosacea and possibly other forms of rosacea. Further testing is required to determine if p38 and Erk activation have a causal role in ocular rosacea. The selective activation of keratinocytes in the affected skin suggests that topical pathway inhibition may be an effective treatment that will ultimately prevent ocular surface damage due to ocular rosacea.

  16. Angiogenic activity of sesamin through the activation of multiple signal pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Byung-Hee; Lee, Jung Joon; Kim, Jong-Dai; Jeoung, Dooil; Lee, Hansoo; Choe, Jongseon; Ha, Kwon-Soo; Kwon, Young-Geun; Kim, Young-Myeong

    2010-01-01

    The natural product sesamin has been known to act as a potent antioxidant and prevent endothelial dysfunction. We here found that sesamin increased in vitro angiogenic processes, such as endothelial cell proliferation, migration, and tube formation, as well as neovascularization in an animal model. This compound elicited the activation of multiple angiogenic signal modulators, such as ERK, Akt, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), NO production, FAK, and p38 MAPK, but not Src. The MEK inhibitor PD98059 and the PI3K inhibitor Wortmannin specifically inhibited sesamin-induced activation of the ERK and Akt/eNOS pathways. These inhibitors reduced angiogenic events, with high specificity for MEK/ERK-dependent cell proliferation and migration and PI3K/Akt-mediated tube formation. Moreover, inhibition of p38 MAPK effectively inhibited sesamin-induced cell migration. The angiogenic activity of sesamin was not associated with VEGF expression. Furthermore, this compound did not induce vascular permeability and upregulated ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 expression, which are hallmarks of vascular inflammation. These results suggest that sesamin stimulates angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo through the activation of MEK/ERK-, PI3K/Akt/eNOS-, p125{sup FAK}-, and p38 MAPK-dependent pathways, without increasing vascular inflammation, and may be used for treating ischemic diseases and tissue regeneration.

  17. Choline-releasing glycerophosphodiesterase EDI3 links the tumor metabolome to signaling network activities

    PubMed Central

    Marchan, Rosemarie; Lesjak, Michaela S.; Stewart, Joanna D.; Winter, Roland; Seeliger, Janine; Hengstler, Jan G.

    2012-01-01

    Recently, EDI3 was identified as a key factor for choline metabolism that controls tumor cell migration and is associated with metastasis in endometrial carcinomas. EDI3 cleaves glycerophosphocholine (GPC) to form choline and glycerol-3-phosphate (G3P). Choline is then further metabolized to phosphatidylcholine (PtdC), the major lipid in membranes and a key player in membrane-mediated cell signaling. The second product, G3P, is a precursor molecule for several lipids with central roles in signaling, for example lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), phosphatidic acid (PA) and diacylglycerol (DAG). LPA activates intracellular signaling pathways by binding to specific LPA receptors, including membrane-bound G protein-coupled receptors and the intracellular nuclear receptor, PPARγ. Conversely, PA and DAG mediate signaling by acting as lipid anchors that bind and activate several signaling proteins. For example, binding of GTPases and PKC to PA and DAG, respectively, increases the activation of signaling networks, mediating processes such as migration, adhesion, proliferation or anti-apoptosis—all relevant for tumor development. We present a concept by which EDI3 either directly generates signaling molecules or provides “membrane anchors” for downstream signaling factors. As a result, EDI3 links choline metabolism to signaling activities resulting in a more malignant phenotype. PMID:23114620

  18. Involvement of glutamate and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic systems in thyrotropin-releasing hormone-induced rat cerebellar cGMP formation.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, T; Hashimoto, T; Nagai, Y

    1996-12-05

    The increase in cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cGMP) caused by subcutaneous injection of thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) tartrate was observed in a region-specific manner in the rat cerebellum. TRH tartrate (TRH-T) (2.8, 7.0 and 17 mg/kg as free TRH, s.c.) produced dose-dependent increases in cGMP levels markedly in the cerebellar superior and inferior vermis, and a smaller but still significant increase in the cerebellar hemispheres and brainstem but no significant increases in other brain regions. The TRH-induced increase in the cGMP level in the cerebellum was suppressed by pretreatment with muscimol, THIP (4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[5,4-c]pyridin-3(2H)-one) or MK-801 (dizocilpine maleate) and partially suppressed by atropine but was not suppressed by chlordiazepoxide, oxazepam, phentolamine, propranolol, cyproheptadine, haloperidol, baclofen or DNQX (6,7-dinitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione), suggesting the possible involvement of GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid)(A)-ergic, N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-type glutamatergic and cholinergic systems. These results suggest that excitatory amino acids may be involved in the cGMP formation caused by TRH in the cerebellar areas, and that cGMP formation is inhibited by enhancement of GABAA receptor function.

  19. Release of neuronal HMGB1 by ethanol through decreased HDAC activity activates brain neuroimmune signaling.

    PubMed

    Zou, Jian Y; Crews, Fulton T

    2014-01-01

    Neuroimmune gene induction is involved in many brain pathologies including addiction. Although increased expression of proinflammatory cytokines has been found in ethanol-treated mouse brain and rat brain slice cultures as well as in post-mortem human alcoholic brain, the mechanisms remain elusive. High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) protein is a nuclear protein that has endogenous cytokine-like activity. We previously found increased HMGB1 in post-mortem alcoholic human brain as well as in ethanol treated mice and rat brain slice cultures. The present study investigated the mechanisms for ethanol-induced release of HMGB1 and neuroimmune activation in a model of rat hippocampal-entorhinal cortex (HEC) brain slice cultures. Ethanol exposure triggered dose-dependent HMGB1 release, predominantly from neuronal cells. Inhibitors of histone deacetylases (HDACs) promoted nucleocytoplasmic mobilization of HDAC1/4 and HMGB1 resulting in increased total HMGB1 and acetylated HMGB1 release. Similarly, ethanol treatment was found to induce the translocation of HDAC1/4 and HMGB1 proteins from nuclear to cytosolic fractions. Furthermore, ethanol treatment reduced HDAC1/4 mRNA and increased acetylated HMGB1 release into the media. These results suggest decreased HDAC activity may be critical in regulating acetylated HMGB1 release from neurons in response to ethanol. Ethanol and HMGB1 treatment increased mRNA expression of proinflammatory cytokines TNFα and IL-1β as well as toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). Targeting HMGB1 or microglial TLR4 by using siRNAs to HMGB1 and TLR4, HMGB1 neutralizing antibody, HMGB1 inhibitor glycyrrhizin and TLR4 antagonist as well as inhibitor of microglial activation all blocked ethanol-induced expression of proinflammatory cytokines TNFα and IL-1β. These results support the hypothesis that ethanol alters HDACs that regulate HMGB1 release and that danger signal HMGB1 as endogenous ligand for TLR4 mediates ethanol-induced brain neuroimmune signaling

  20. Ethanol activates midkine and anaplastic lymphoma kinase signaling in neuroblastoma cells and in the brain.

    PubMed

    He, Donghong; Chen, Hu; Muramatsu, Hisako; Lasek, Amy W

    2015-11-01

    Alcohol engages signaling pathways in the brain. Midkine (MDK) is a neurotrophic factor that is over-expressed in the prefrontal cortex of alcoholics. MDK and one of its receptors, anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), also regulate behavioral responses to ethanol in mice. The goal of this study was to determine whether MDK and ALK expression and signaling are activated by ethanol. We found that ethanol treatment of neuroblastoma cells increased MDK and ALK expression. We also assessed activation of ALK by ethanol in cells and found that ALK and ALK-dependent extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) phosphorylation increased rapidly with ethanol exposure. Similarly, treatment of cells with recombinant MDK protein increased ALK, ERK and STAT3 phosphorylation, suggesting that ethanol may utilize MDK to activate ALK signaling. In support of this, transfection of cells with MDK siRNAs attenuated ALK signaling in response to ethanol. Ethanol also activates ERK signaling in the brain. We found that inhibition of ALK or knockout of MDK attenuated ethanol-induced ERK phosphorylation in mouse amygdala. These results demonstrate that ethanol engages MDK and ALK signaling, which has important consequences for alcohol-induced neurotoxicity and the regulation of behaviors related to alcohol abuse.

  1. Hyaluronan activates Hyal-2/WWOX/Smad4 signaling and causes bubbling cell death when the signaling complex is overexpressed.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Li-Jin; Hong, Qunying; Chen, Shur-Tzu; Kuo, Hsiang-Lin; Schultz, Lori; Heath, John; Lin, Sing-Ru; Lee, Ming-Hui; Li, Dong-Zhang; Li, Zih-Ling; Cheng, Hui-Ching; Armand, Gerard; Chang, Nan-Shan

    2016-11-10

    Malignant cancer cells frequently secrete significant amounts of transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β), hyaluronan (HA) and hyaluronidases to facilitate metastasizing to target organs. In a non-canonical signaling, TGF-β binds membrane hyaluronidase Hyal-2 for recruiting tumor suppressors WWOX and Smad4, and the resulting Hyal-2/WWOX/Smad4 complex is accumulated in the nucleus to enhance SMAD-promoter dependent transcriptional activity. Yeast two-hybrid analysis showed that WWOX acts as a bridge to bind both Hyal-2 and Smad4. When WWOX-expressing cells were stimulated with high molecular weight HA, an increased formation of endogenous Hyal-2/WWOX/Smad4 complex occurred rapidly, followed by relocating to the nuclei in 20-40 min. In WWOX-deficient cells, HA failed to induce Smad2/3/4 relocation to the nucleus. To prove the signaling event, we designed a real time tri-molecular FRET analysis and revealed that HA induces the signaling pathway from ectopic Smad4 to WWOX and finally to p53, as well as from Smad4 to Hyal-2 and then to WWOX. An increased binding of the Smad4/Hyal-2/WWOX complex occurs with time in the nucleus that leads to bubbling cell death. In contrast, HA increases the binding of Smad4/WWOX/p53, which causes membrane blebbing but without cell death. In traumatic brain injury-induced neuronal death, the Hyal-2/WWOX complex was accumulated in the apoptotic nuclei of neurons in the rat brains in 24 hr post injury, as determined by immunoelectron microscopy. Together, HA activates the Hyal-2/WWOX/Smad4 signaling and causes bubbling cell death when the signaling complex is overexpressed.

  2. Alternative splicing of MALT1 controls signalling and activation of CD4(+) T cells.

    PubMed

    Meininger, Isabel; Griesbach, Richard A; Hu, Desheng; Gehring, Torben; Seeholzer, Thomas; Bertossi, Arianna; Kranich, Jan; Oeckinghaus, Andrea; Eitelhuber, Andrea C; Greczmiel, Ute; Gewies, Andreas; Schmidt-Supprian, Marc; Ruland, Jürgen; Brocker, Thomas; Heissmeyer, Vigo; Heyd, Florian; Krappmann, Daniel

    2016-04-12

    MALT1 channels proximal T-cell receptor (TCR) signalling to downstream signalling pathways. With MALT1A and MALT1B two conserved splice variants exist and we demonstrate here that MALT1 alternative splicing supports optimal T-cell activation. Inclusion of exon7 in MALT1A facilitates the recruitment of TRAF6, which augments MALT1 scaffolding function, but not protease activity. Naive CD4(+) T cells express almost exclusively MALT1B and MALT1A expression is induced by TCR stimulation. We identify hnRNP U as a suppressor of exon7 inclusion. Whereas selective depletion of MALT1A impairs T-cell signalling and activation, downregulation of hnRNP U enhances MALT1A expression and T-cell activation. Thus, TCR-induced alternative splicing augments MALT1 scaffolding to enhance downstream signalling and to promote optimal T-cell activation.

  3. Alternative splicing of MALT1 controls signalling and activation of CD4+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Meininger, Isabel; Griesbach, Richard A.; Hu, Desheng; Gehring, Torben; Seeholzer, Thomas; Bertossi, Arianna; Kranich, Jan; Oeckinghaus, Andrea; Eitelhuber, Andrea C.; Greczmiel, Ute; Gewies, Andreas; Schmidt-Supprian, Marc; Ruland, Jürgen; Brocker, Thomas; Heissmeyer, Vigo; Heyd, Florian; Krappmann, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    MALT1 channels proximal T-cell receptor (TCR) signalling to downstream signalling pathways. With MALT1A and MALT1B two conserved splice variants exist and we demonstrate here that MALT1 alternative splicing supports optimal T-cell activation. Inclusion of exon7 in MALT1A facilitates the recruitment of TRAF6, which augments MALT1 scaffolding function, but not protease activity. Naive CD4+ T cells express almost exclusively MALT1B and MALT1A expression is induced by TCR stimulation. We identify hnRNP U as a suppressor of exon7 inclusion. Whereas selective depletion of MALT1A impairs T-cell signalling and activation, downregulation of hnRNP U enhances MALT1A expression and T-cell activation. Thus, TCR-induced alternative splicing augments MALT1 scaffolding to enhance downstream signalling and to promote optimal T-cell activation. PMID:27068814

  4. Early induction of CREB activation and CREB-regulating signalling by antidepressants.

    PubMed

    Tardito, Daniela; Musazzi, Laura; Tiraboschi, Ettore; Mallei, Alessandra; Racagni, Giorgio; Popoli, Maurizio

    2009-11-01

    Converging evidence points to adaptive changes in neuroplasticity and gene expression as mediators of therapeutic action of antidepressants. Activation of cAMP response-element binding protein (CREB) and CREB-regulating signalling are considered main effectors in these mechanisms. We analysed the temporal profile of intracellular changes induced by antidepressants, by measuring activation of major CREB-regulating signalling cascades and activation (Ser133 phosphorylation) of CREB. The main aims of the study were to investigate how these different variables are modulated with time, whether stronger activation of signalling cascades corresponds to stronger activation of CREB, and whether these changes are different in distinct brain areas. Rat groups were treated for 1, 2 or 3 wk with the antidepressants fluoxetine or reboxetine; in additional groups drug treatment was followed by a washout week (3+1). Activation of CREB and major effectors in signalling cascades were analysed by Western blot analysis with phospho-antibodies, in nuclear and cytosolic fractions from hippocampus and prefrontal/frontal cortex (P/FC). Surprisingly, CREB activation was already maximal after 1-wk treatment. In hippocampus early and stronger CREB activation was consistent with early and stronger activation of signalling. For both drugs, the profile of activation in P/FC was different from that observed in hippocampus. The results also showed that, contrary to the activatory role of MAP-ERKs and CaM kinase IV, nuclear alphaCaM kinase II was inactivated in parallel with activation of CREB.

  5. Arginine vasotocin activates phosphoinositide signal transduction system and potentiates N-acetyltransferase activity in the rat pineal gland.

    PubMed

    Novotná, R; Jác, M; Hájek, I; Novotný, I

    1999-03-05

    The pineal gland is innervated by pinealopetal peptidergic fibers originating in the hypothalamic nuclei which release arginine vasopressin (AVP) and arginine vasotocin (AVT) from their endings. Since the mechanism of AVT action on the pineal signal transduction and melatonin synthesis has not been determined so far, we examined the effect of AVT on the phosphoinositide signalling system and the N-acetyltransferase (NAT) activity in the rat pineal gland. The effect of AVP 4-9 fragment and AVP analogue desmopressin was also tested. The phosphoinositide signalling system was studied by measuring 32P labelling of phosphatidylinositol (PI), phosphatidylinositol phosphate (PIP) and phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate (PIP2) which reflects PI cycle activation. AVT (10(-5) and 10(-4) M) induced a significant increase in 32P labelling of PI, PIP and PIP2. The AVT mediated activation of the PI signal cascade was supressed by the vasopressin V1 receptor antagonist. The desmopressin and AVP 4-9 fragment were without the effect on PI signalling. To assess the AVT role in the melatonin synthesis we studied the daily pattern of the pineal NAT activity in rats treated by AVT (10 microg/100 g b.w). AVT application in the dark period of the day significantly increased nocturnal NAT activity. It can be summarized that AVT activates PI signalling system and potentiates NAT activity in the rat pineal gland.

  6. Asphyxia-activated corticocardiac signaling accelerates onset of cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Li, Duan; Mabrouk, Omar S; Liu, Tiecheng; Tian, Fangyun; Xu, Gang; Rengifo, Santiago; Choi, Sarah J; Mathur, Abhay; Crooks, Charles P; Kennedy, Robert T; Wang, Michael M; Ghanbari, Hamid; Borjigin, Jimo

    2015-04-21

    The mechanism by which the healthy heart and brain die rapidly in the absence of oxygen is not well understood. We performed continuous electrocardiography and electroencephalography in rats undergoing experimental asphyxia and analyzed cortical release of core neurotransmitters, changes in brain and heart electrical activity, and brain-heart connectivity. Asphyxia stimulates a robust and sustained increase of functional and effective cortical connectivity, an immediate increase in cortical release of a large set of neurotransmitters, and a delayed activation of corticocardiac functional and effective connectivity that persists until the onset of ventricular fibrillation. Blocking the brain's autonomic outflow significantly delayed terminal ventricular fibrillation and lengthened the duration of detectable cortical activities despite the continued absence of oxygen. These results demonstrate that asphyxia activates a brainstorm, which accelerates premature death of the heart and the brain.

  7. Asphyxia-activated corticocardiac signaling accelerates onset of cardiac arrest

    PubMed Central

    Li, Duan; Mabrouk, Omar S.; Liu, Tiecheng; Tian, Fangyun; Xu, Gang; Rengifo, Santiago; Choi, Sarah J.; Mathur, Abhay; Crooks, Charles P.; Kennedy, Robert T.; Wang, Michael M.; Ghanbari, Hamid; Borjigin, Jimo

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism by which the healthy heart and brain die rapidly in the absence of oxygen is not well understood. We performed continuous electrocardiography and electroencephalography in rats undergoing experimental asphyxia and analyzed cortical release of core neurotransmitters, changes in brain and heart electrical activity, and brain–heart connectivity. Asphyxia stimulates a robust and sustained increase of functional and effective cortical connectivity, an immediate increase in cortical release of a large set of neurotransmitters, and a delayed activation of corticocardiac functional and effective connectivity that persists until the onset of ventricular fibrillation. Blocking the brain’s autonomic outflow significantly delayed terminal ventricular fibrillation and lengthened the duration of detectable cortical activities despite the continued absence of oxygen. These results demonstrate that asphyxia activates a brainstorm, which accelerates premature death of the heart and the brain. PMID:25848007

  8. Signals of monocyte activation in patients with SLE.

    PubMed Central

    Kávai, M; Zsindely, A; Sonkoly, I; Major, M; Demján, I; Szegedi, G

    1983-01-01

    The Fc receptor mediated reaction, the beta-glucuronidase and the lactic dehydrogenase activities of monocytes and the serum lysozyme level were tested together with the circulating immune complex content of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Simultaneously with the increasing FC receptor-mediated reaction and the elevated enzyme activities of patient monocytes, the secretion of lysozyme and the immune complex content of the sera were higher than those of the controls. A positive correlation was demonstrated between the Fc receptor-mediated reaction, the beta-glucuronidase activity, the lysozyme secretion and the immune complex content of the sera. Thus, the monocytes of patients appeared to be activated by the circulating immune complexes. PMID:6839541

  9. Shuttle extravehicular activity signal processor pulse amplitude modulation decommutator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noble, D. E.; Conrad, W. M.

    1974-01-01

    To provide data with long-term stability and accuracy, the pulse amplitude modulation (PAM) decommutator was synchronized to the PAM-return to zero wavetrain, and each channel was sampled with a common sample and hold circuit and digitized sequentially. The digital value of each channel was then scaled by the digital value of the calibration channels. The corrected digital value of each channel was stored for one complete frame and then transferred to the multiplexer-demultiplexer at a high rate in one block of serial digital data. A test model was built to demonstrate this design approach taken for the PAM decom and performance data was provided. The accuracies obtained with various signal to noise ratios are shown.

  10. Pleiotropic patterning response to activation of Shh signaling in the limb apical ectodermal ridge.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chi-Kuang Leo; Tsugane, Mizuyo H; Scranton, Victoria; Kosher, Robert A; Pierro, Louis J; Upholt, William B; Dealy, Caroline N

    2011-05-01

    Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling in the limb plays a central role in coordination of limb patterning and outgrowth. Shh expression in the limb is limited to the cells of the zone of polarizing activity (ZPA), located in posterior limb bud mesoderm. Shh is not expressed by limb ectoderm or apical ectodermal ridge (AER), but recent studies suggest a role for AER-Shh signaling in limb patterning. Here, we have examined the effects of activation of Shh signaling in the AER. We find that targeted expression of Shh in the AER activates constitutive Shh signaling throughout the AER and subjacent limb mesoderm, and causes a range of limb patterning defects with progressive severity from mild polydactyly, to polysyndactyly with proximal defects, to severe oligodactyly with phocomelia and partial limb ventralization. Our studies emphasize the importance of control of the timing, level and location of Shh pathway signaling for limb anterior-posterior, proximal-distal, and dorsal-ventral patterning.

  11. Membrane bound GSK-3 activates Wnt signaling through disheveled and arrow.

    PubMed

    Mannava, Anirudh G; Tolwinski, Nicholas S

    2015-01-01

    Wnt ligands and their downstream pathway components coordinate many developmental and cellular processes. In adults, they regulate tissue homeostasis through regulation of stem cells. Mechanistically, signal transduction through this pathway is complicated by pathway components having both positive and negative roles in signal propagation. Here we examine the positive role of GSK-3/Zw3 in promoting signal transduction at the plasma membrane. We find that targeting GSK-3 to the plasma membrane activates signaling in Drosophila embryos. This activation requires the presence of the co-receptor Arrow-LRP5/6 and the pathway activating protein Disheveled. Our results provide genetic evidence for evolutionarily conserved, separable roles for GSK-3 at the membrane and in the cytosol, and are consistent with a model where the complex cycles from cytosol to membrane in order to promote signaling at the membrane and to prevent it in the cytosol.

  12. Pleiotropic patterning response to activation of Shh signaling in the limb Apical Ectodermal Ridge

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chi-Kuang Leo; Tsugane, Mizuyo H.; Scranton, Victoria; Kosher, Robert A.; Pierro, Louis J.; Upholt, William B.; Dealy, Caroline N.

    2012-01-01

    Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling in the limb plays a central role in coordination of limb patterning and outgrowth. Shh expression in the limb is limited to the cells of the Zone of Polarizing Activity (ZPA), located in posterior limb bud mesoderm. Shh is not expressed by limb ectoderm or AER, but recent studies suggest a role for AER-Shh signaling in limb patterning. Here, we have examined the effects of activation of Shh signaling in the AER. We find that targeted expression of Shh in the AER activates constitutive Shh signaling throughout the AER and subjacent limb mesoderm, and causes a range of limb patterning defects with progressive severity from mild polydactyly, to polysyndactyly with proximal defects, to severe oligodactyly with phocomelia and partial limb ventralization. Our studies emphasize the importance of control of the timing, level and location of Shh pathway signaling for limb AP, PD and DV patterning. PMID:21465622

  13. GPCR-like signaling mediated by smoothened contributes to acquired chemoresistance through activating Gli

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Smoothened (Smo), which possesses a structural similarity with classic G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR), is the most important molecular target in Hedgehog (Hh) signaling system for developing anticancer drugs; however, whether Smo may transmit GPCR-like signaling to activate the canonical transcriptional factor Gli of Hh signaling system and consequently to be involved in the Gli-dependent biological events remains controversial. Results In this study, using the acquired chemoresistant cancer cell lines and their respective parental cells, we found that Smo may activate Gli through Gαi, Gβγ-JNK signaling axis, thereby promoting the Gli-dependent acquired chemoresistance. These observations were further complementarily strengthened by data obtained from chemosensitive cancer cells with artificially elevated Hh pathway activity. Conclusions Hence, our data demonstrate that GPCR-like signaling mediated by Smo contributes to the acquired chemoresistance through activating the canonical Hh transcriptional factor Gli; therefore improving our knowledge of the nature of the signal transduction of Smo and the molecular mechanisms responsible for the acquired chemoresistance maintained by Hh pathway. Moreover, our data that JNK after activated by Smo-Gβγ signaling axis may stimulate the Gli activity and consequently promotes acquired chemoresistance expose a promising and potential target for developing anti-cancer drugs aimed at Hh pathway and for combating the acquired resistance raised by using of anti-cancer drugs targeting Smo. PMID:24393163

  14. Signal transduction-associated and cell activation-linked antigens expressed in human mast cells.

    PubMed

    Valent, Peter; Ghannadan, Minoo; Hauswirth, Alexander W; Schernthaner, Gerit-Holger; Sperr, Wolfgang R; Arock, Michel

    2002-05-01

    Mast cells (MCs) are multifunctional hematopoietic effector cells that produce and release an array of biologically active mediator substances. Growth and functions of MCs are regulated by cytokines, other extracellular factors, surface and cytoplasmic receptors, oncogene products, and a complex network of signal transduction cascades. Key regulators of differentiation of MCs appear to be stem cell factor (SCF) and its tyrosine kinase receptor KIT (c-kit proto-oncogene product=CD117), downstream-acting elements, and the mi transcription factor (MITF). Signaling through KIT is negatively regulated by the signal regulatory protein (SIRP)-alpha (CD172a)-SHP-1-pathway that is disrupted in neoplastic MCs in MC proliferative disorders. Both KIT and FcepsilonRI are involved in MC activation and mediator release. Activation of MCs through FcepsilonRI is associated with increased expression of activation-linked membrane antigens as well as with signaling events involving Lyn and Syk kinases, the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase-pathway, Ras pathway, and the phospholipase C-protein kinase C pathway. A similar network of signaling is found in SCF-activated MCs. The current article gives an overview on signal transduction-associated and activation-linked antigens expressed in human MCs. Wherever possible the functional implication of signaling pathways and antigen expression are discussed.

  15. Fluctuation analysis of activity biosensor images for the study of information flow in signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Vilela, Marco; Halidi, Nadia; Besson, Sebastien; Elliott, Hunter; Hahn, Klaus; Tytell, Jessica; Danuser, Gaudenz

    2013-01-01

    Comprehensive understanding of cellular signal transduction requires accurate measurement of the information flow in molecular pathways. In the past, information flow has been inferred primarily from genetic or protein-protein interactions. Although useful for overall signaling, these approaches are limited in that they typically average over populations of cells. Single-cell data of signaling states are emerging, but these data are usually snapshots of a particular time point or limited to averaging over a whole cell. However, many signaling pathways are activated only transiently in specific subcellular regions. Protein activity biosensors allow measurement of the spatiotemporal activation of signaling molecules in living cells. These data contain highly complex, dynamic information that can be parsed out in time and space and compared with other signaling events as well as changes in cell structure and morphology. We describe in this chapter the use of computational tools to correct, extract, and process information from time-lapse images of biosensors. These computational tools allow one to explore the biosensor signals in a multiplexed approach in order to reconstruct the sequence of signaling events and consequently the topology of the underlying pathway. The extraction of this information, dynamics and topology, provides insight into how the inputs of a signaling network are translated into its biochemical or mechanical outputs.

  16. cGMP/Protein Kinase G Signaling Suppresses Inositol 1,4,5-Trisphosphate Receptor Phosphorylation and Promotes Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Photoreceptors of Cyclic Nucleotide-gated Channel-deficient Mice*

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Hongwei; Butler, Michael R.; Thapa, Arjun; Belcher, Josh; Yang, Fan; Baehr, Wolfgang; Biel, Martin; Michalakis, Stylianos; Ding, Xi-Qin

    2015-01-01

    Photoreceptor cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channels play a pivotal role in phototransduction. Mutations in the cone CNG channel subunits CNGA3 and CNGB3 are associated with achromatopsia and cone dystrophies. We have shown endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-associated apoptotic cone death and increased phosphorylation of the ER Ca2+ channel inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor 1 (IP3R1) in CNG channel-deficient mice. We also presented a remarkable elevation of cGMP and an increased activity of the cGMP-dependent protein kinase (protein kinase G, PKG) in CNG channel deficiency. This work investigated whether cGMP/PKG signaling regulates ER stress and IP3R1 phosphorylation in CNG channel-deficient cones. Treatment with PKG inhibitor and deletion of guanylate cyclase-1 (GC1), the enzyme producing cGMP in cones, were used to suppress cGMP/PKG signaling in cone-dominant Cnga3−/−/Nrl−/− mice. We found that treatment with PKG inhibitor or deletion of GC1 effectively reduced apoptotic cone death, increased expression levels of cone proteins, and decreased activation of Müller glial cells. Furthermore, we observed significantly increased phosphorylation of IP3R1 and reduced ER stress. Our findings demonstrate a role of cGMP/PKG signaling in ER stress and ER Ca2+ channel regulation and provide insights into the mechanism of cone degeneration in CNG channel deficiency. PMID:26124274

  17. Activation of cGMP-dependent protein kinase by protein kinase C.

    PubMed

    Hou, Yali; Lascola, Judith; Dulin, Nickolai O; Ye, Richard D; Browning, Darren D

    2003-05-09

    The cGMP-dependent protein kinases (PKG) are emerging as important components of mainstream signal transduction pathways. Nitric oxide-induced cGMP formation by stimulation of soluble guanylate cyclase is generally accepted as being the most widespread mechanism underlying PKG activation. In the present study, PKG was found to be a target for phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)-responsive protein kinase C (PKC). PKG1alpha became phosphorylated in HEK-293 cells stimulated with PMA and also in vitro using purified components. PKC-dependent phosphorylation was found to activate PKG as measured by phosphorylation of vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein, and by in vitro kinase assays. Although there are 11 potential PKC substrate recognition sites in PKG1alpha, threonine 58 was examined due to its proximity to the pseudosubstrate domain. Antibodies generated against the phosphorylated form of this region were used to demonstrate phosphorylation in response to PMA treatment of the cells with kinetics similar to vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein phosphorylation. A phospho-mimetic mutation at this site (T58E) generated a partially activated PKG that was more sensitive to cGMP levels. A phospho-null mutation (T58A) revealed that this residue is important but not sufficient for PKG activation by PKC. Taken together, these findings outline a novel signal transduction pathway that links PKC stimulation with cyclic nucleotide-independent activation of PKG.

  18. Initial results of bio-potential signal (Seismic Electric Signal) related to seismic activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushwah, Vinod; Tiwari, Rudraksh; Gaur, Mulayam; Tiwari, Rajeev

    2013-08-01

    In recent year, there has been growing interest in the possible use of electromagnetic observations to study earthquakes and possible precursors prior to seismic activity, in response to the success in United States, Japan, Russia, China, and other countries using seismo-electromagnetic methods. We have established a new experimental setup (i.e., biopotential sensor) in Farah region (geographic coordinates: 27.17°N, 77.47°E), Mathura, India. The setup has started operating and analyzed the data since November 2011. The data have been tested by various methods and a good correlation with seismic events was found; thus, a real-time analysis from 21:00 p.m. through 8:00 a.m. every day was initiated. First, we recorded the amplitude enhancement in bio-potential and found positive correlation with seismic activities (near Delhi and Rajasthan) and analyzed the data with solar flares and magnetic storms during the same period, finding a negative correlation of these events. The studies of these events are in progress with statistical analysis of the data. We chose the observing site in Farah region because this region is well known for being a site of a conductive channel of seismic activity.

  19. Mapping Neuronal Activation and the Influence of Adrenergic Signaling during Contextual Memory Retrieval

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Wei-Ping; Guzowski, John F.; Thomas, Steven A.

    2005-01-01

    We recently described a critical role for adrenergic signaling in the hippocampus during contextual and spatial memory retrieval. To determine which neurons are activated by contextual memory retrieval and its sequelae in the presence and absence of adrenergic signaling, transcriptional imaging for the immediate-early gene "Arc" was used in…

  20. 78 FR 28801 - Foreign-Trade Zone 117-Orange, TX, Authorization of Production Activity, Signal International...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-16

    ... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 117--Orange, TX, Authorization of Production Activity, Signal International Texas GP, LLC (Shipbuilding), Orange, TX On January 10, 2013, the Foreign Trade Zone of Southeast...-Trade Zones (FTZ) Board on behalf of Signal International Texas GP, LLC, in Orange, Texas. The...

  1. cGMP production of patient-specific iPSCs and photoreceptor precursor cells to treat retinal degenerative blindness

    PubMed Central

    Wiley, Luke A.; Burnight, Erin R.; DeLuca, Adam P.; Anfinson, Kristin R.; Cranston, Cathryn M.; Kaalberg, Emily E.; Penticoff, Jessica A.; Affatigato, Louisa M.; Mullins, Robert F.; Stone, Edwin M.; Tucker, Budd A.

    2016-01-01

    Immunologically-matched, induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived photoreceptor precursor cells have the potential to restore vision to patients with retinal degenerative diseases like retinitis pigmentosa. The purpose of this study was to develop clinically-compatible methods for manufacturing photoreceptor precursor cells from adult skin in a non-profit cGMP environment. Biopsies were obtained from 35 adult patients with inherited retinal degeneration and fibroblast lines were established under ISO class 5 cGMP conditions. Patient-specific iPSCs were then generated, clonally expanded and validated. Post-mitotic photoreceptor precursor cells were generated using a stepwise cGMP-compliant 3D differentiation protocol. The recapitulation of the enhanced S-cone phenotype in retinal organoids generated from a patient with NR2E3 mutations demonstrated the fidelity of these protocols. Transplantation into immune compromised animals revealed no evidence of abnormal proliferation or tumor formation. These studies will enable clinical trials to test the safety and efficiency of patient-specific photoreceptor cell replacement in humans. PMID:27471043

  2. cGMP production of patient-specific iPSCs and photoreceptor precursor cells to treat retinal degenerative blindness.

    PubMed

    Wiley, Luke A; Burnight, Erin R; DeLuca, Adam P; Anfinson, Kristin R; Cranston, Cathryn M; Kaalberg, Emily E; Penticoff, Jessica A; Affatigato, Louisa M; Mullins, Robert F; Stone, Edwin M; Tucker, Budd A

    2016-07-29

    Immunologically-matched, induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived photoreceptor precursor cells have the potential to restore vision to patients with retinal degenerative diseases like retinitis pigmentosa. The purpose of this study was to develop clinically-compatible methods for manufacturing photoreceptor precursor cells from adult skin in a non-profit cGMP environment. Biopsies were obtained from 35 adult patients with inherited retinal degeneration and fibroblast lines were established under ISO class 5 cGMP conditions. Patient-specific iPSCs were then generated, clonally expanded and validated. Post-mitotic photoreceptor precursor cells were generated using a stepwise cGMP-compliant 3D differentiation protocol. The recapitulation of the enhanced S-cone phenotype in retinal organoids generated from a patient with NR2E3 mutations demonstrated the fidelity of these protocols. Transplantation into immune compromised animals revealed no evidence of abnormal proliferation or tumor formation. These studies will enable clinical trials to test the safety and efficiency of patient-specific photoreceptor cell replacement in humans.

  3. Neuronal activity regulates remyelination via glutamate signalling to oligodendrocyte progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Gautier, Hélène O. B.; Evans, Kimberley A.; Volbracht, Katrin; James, Rachel; Sitnikov, Sergey; Lundgaard, Iben; James, Fiona; Lao-Peregrin, Cristina; Reynolds, Richard; Franklin, Robin J. M.; Káradóttir, Ragnhildur T

    2015-01-01

    Myelin regeneration can occur spontaneously in demyelinating diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS). However, the underlying mechanisms and causes of its frequent failure remain incompletely understood. Here we show, using an in-vivo remyelination model, that demyelinated axons are electrically active and generate de novo synapses with recruited oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs), which, early after lesion induction, sense neuronal activity by expressing AMPA (α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid)/kainate receptors. Blocking neuronal activity, axonal vesicular release or AMPA receptors in demyelinated lesions results in reduced remyelination. In the absence of neuronal activity there is a ∼6-fold increase in OPC number within the lesions and a reduced proportion of differentiated oligodendrocytes. These findings reveal that neuronal activity and release of glutamate instruct OPCs to differentiate into new myelinating oligodendrocytes that recover lost function. Co-localization of OPCs with the presynaptic protein VGluT2 in MS lesions implies that this mechanism may provide novel targets to therapeutically enhance remyelination. PMID:26439639

  4. Evaluation of the effect of signalment and body conformation on activity monitoring in companion dogs.

    PubMed

    Brown, Dorothy Cimino; Michel, Kathryn E; Love, Molly; Dow, Caitlin

    2010-03-01

    To evaluate the effect of signalment and body conformation on activity monitoring in companion dogs. 104 companion dogs. While wearing an activity monitor, each dog was led through a series of standard activities: lying down, walking laps, trotting laps, and trotting up and down stairs. Linear regression analysis was used to determine which signalment and body conformation factors were associated with activity counts. There was no significant effect of signalment or body conformation on activity counts when dogs were lying down, walking laps, and trotting laps. However, when dogs were trotting up and down stairs, there was a significant effect of age and body weight such that, for every 1-kg increase in body weight, there was a 1.7% (95% confidence interval, 1.1% to 2.4%) decrease in activity counts and for every 1-year increase in age, there was a 4.2% (95% confidence interval, 1.4% to 6.9%) decrease in activity counts. When activity was well controlled, there was no significant effect of signalment or body conformation on activity counts recorded by the activity monitor. However, when activity was less controlled, older dogs and larger dogs had lower activity counts than younger and smaller dogs. The wide range in body conformation (eg, limb or body length) among dogs did not appear to significantly impact the activity counts recorded by the monitor, but age and body weight did and must be considered in analysis of data collected from the monitors.

  5. Tumor-secreted LOXL2 Activates Fibroblasts Through FAK Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Barker, Holly E.; Bird, Demelza; Lang, Georgina; Erler, Janine T.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer-associated fibroblasts enhance cancer progression when activated by tumor cells through mechanisms not yet fully understood. Blocking mammary tumor cell-derived lysyl oxidase-like 2 (LOXL2) significantly inhibited mammary tumor cell invasion and metastasis in transgenic and orthotopic mouse models. Here we discovered that tumor-derived LOXL2 directly activated stromal fibroblasts in the tumor microenvironment. Genetic manipulation or antibody inhibition of LOXL2 in orthotopically grown mammary tumors reduced the expression of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA). Using a marker for reticular fibroblasts, it was determined that expression of α-SMA was localized to fibroblasts recruited from the host tissue. This marker also revealed that the matrix present in tumors with reduced levels of LOXL2 was more scattered compared to control tumors which exhibited matrices with dense, parallel alignments. Importantly, in vitro assays revealed that tumor-derived LOXL2 and a recombinant LOXL2 protein induced fibroblast branching on collagen matrices, as well as increased fibroblast-mediated collagen contraction and invasion of fibroblasts through extracellular matrix (ECM). Moreover, LOXL2 induced the expression of α-SMA in fibroblasts grown on collagen matrices. Mechanistically, it was determined that LOXL2 activated fibroblasts through integrin-mediated FAK activation. These results indicate that inhibition of LOXL2 in tumors not only reduces tumor cell invasion but also attenuates the activation of host cells in the tumor microenvironment. Implications: These findings reveal new insight into the mechanisms of fibroblast activation, a novel function of LOXL2, and further highlight the importance of generating LOXL2-targeted therapies for the prevention of tumor progression and metastasis. PMID:24008674

  6. Queen signals in a stingless bee: suppression of worker ovary activation and spatial distribution of active compounds

    PubMed Central

    Nunes, Túlio M.; Mateus, Sidnei; Favaris, Arodi P.; Amaral, Mônica F. Z. J.; von Zuben, Lucas G.; Clososki, Giuliano C.; Bento, José M. S.; Oldroyd, Benjamin P.; Silva, Ricardo; Zucchi, Ronaldo; Silva, Denise B.; Lopes, Norberto P.

    2014-01-01

    In most species of social insect the queen signals her presence to her workers via pheromones. Worker responses to queen pheromones include retinue formation around the queen, inhibition of queen cell production and suppression of worker ovary activation. Here we show that the queen signal of the Brazilian stingless bee Friesella schrottkyi is a mixture of cuticular hydrocarbons. Stingless bees are therefore similar to ants, wasps and bumble bees, but differ from honey bees in which the queen's signal mostly comprises volatile compounds originating from the mandibular glands. This shows that cuticular hydrocarbons have independently evolved as the queen's signal across multiple taxa, and that the honey bees are exceptional. We also report the distribution of four active queen-signal compounds by Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) imaging. The results indicate a relationship between the behavior of workers towards the queen and the likely site of secretion of the queen's pheromones. PMID:25502598

  7. Body Morphology, Energy Stores, and Muscle Enzyme Activity Explain Cricket Acoustic Mate Attraction Signaling Variation

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, Ian R.; Darveau, Charles-A.; Bertram, Susan M.

    2014-01-01

    High mating success in animals is often dependent on males signalling attractively with high effort. Since males should be selected to maximize their reproductive success, female preferences for these traits should result in minimal signal variation persisting in the population. However, extensive signal variation persists. The genic capture hypothesis proposes genetic variation persists because fitness-conferring traits depend on an individual's basic processes, including underlying physiological, morphological, and biochemical traits, which are themselves genetically variable. To explore the traits underlying signal variation, we quantified among-male differences in signalling, morphology, energy stores, and the activities of key enzymes associated with signalling muscle metabolism in two species of crickets, Gryllus assimilis (chirper: <20 pulses/chirp) and G. texensis (triller: >20 pulses/chirp). Chirping G. assimilis primarily fuelled signalling with carbohydrate metabolism: smaller individuals and individuals with increased thoracic glycogen stores signalled for mates with greater effort; individuals with greater glycogen phosphorylase activity produced more attractive mating signals. Conversely, the more energetic trilling G. texensis fuelled signalling with both lipid and carbohydrate metabolism: individuals with increased β-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase activity and increased thoracic free carbohydrate content signalled for mates with greater effort; individuals with higher thoracic and abdominal carbohydrate content and higher abdominal lipid stores produced more attractive signals. Our findings suggest variation in male reproductive success may be driven by hidden physiological trade-offs that affect the ability to uptake, retain, and use essential nutrients, although the results remain correlational in nature. Our findings indicate that a physiological perspective may help us to understand some of the causes of variation in behaviour. PMID:24608102

  8. Sorafenib inhibits signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 signaling associated with growth arrest and apoptosis of medulloblastomas.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fan; Van Meter, Timothy E; Buettner, Ralf; Hedvat, Michael; Liang, Wei; Kowolik, Claudia M; Mepani, Nilesh; Mirosevich, Janni; Nam, Sangkil; Chen, Mike Y; Tye, Gary; Kirschbaum, Mark; Jove, Richard

    2008-11-01

    Medulloblastomas are the most frequent malignant brain tumors in children. Sorafenib (Nexavar, BAY43-9006), a multikinase inhibitor, blocks cell proliferation and induces apoptosis in a variety of tumor cells. Sorafenib inhibited proliferation and induced apoptosis in two established cell lines (Daoy and D283) and a primary culture (VC312) of human medulloblastomas. In addition, sorafenib inhibited phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) in both cell lines and primary tumor cells. The inhibition of phosphorylated STAT3 (Tyr(705)) occurs in a dose- and time-dependent manner. In contrast, AKT (protein kinase B) was only decreased in D283 and VC312 medulloblastoma cells and mitogen-activated protein kinases (extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2) were not inhibited by sorafenib in these cells. Both D-type cyclins (D1, D2, and D3) and E-type cyclin were down-regulated by sorafenib. Also, expression of the antiapoptotic protein Mcl-1, a member of the Bcl-2 family, was decreased and correlated with apoptosis induced by sorafenib. Finally, sorafenib suppressed the growth of human medulloblastoma cells in a mouse xenograft model. Together, our data show that sorafenib blocks STAT3 signaling as well as expression of cell cycle and apoptosis regulatory proteins, associated with inhibition of cell proliferation and induction of apoptosis in medulloblastomas. These findings provide a rationale for treatment of pediatric medulloblastomas with sorafenib.

  9. Activated signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 signaling induces CD46 expression and protects human cancer cells from complement-dependent cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Buettner, Ralf; Huang, Mei; Gritsko, Tanya; Karras, Jim; Enkemann, Steve; Mesa, Tania; Nam, Sangkil; Yu, Hua; Jove, Richard

    2007-08-01

    CD46 is one of the complement-regulatory proteins expressed on the surface of normal and tumor cells for protection against complement-dependent cytotoxicity. Cancer cells need to access the blood circulation for continued growth and metastasis, thus exposing themselves to destruction by complement system components. Previous studies have established that the signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 (STAT3) transcription factor is persistently activated in a wide variety of human cancer cells and primary tumor tissues compared with their normal counterparts. Using microarray gene expression profiling, we identified the CD46 gene as a target for activated STAT3 signaling in human breast and prostate cancer cells. The CD46 promoter contains two binding sites for activated STAT3 and mutations introduced into the major site abolished STAT3 binding. Chromatin immunoprecipitation confirms binding of STAT3 to the CD46 promoter. CD46 promoter activity is induced by activation of STAT3 and blocked by a dominant-negative form of STAT3 in luciferase reporter assays. CD46 mRNA expression is induced by interleukin-6 and by transient transfection of normal human epithelial cells with a persistently active mutant construct of STAT3, STAT3C. Furthermore, we show that inhibition of STAT3-mediated CD46 cell surface expression sensitizes DU145 prostate cancer cells to cytotoxicity in an in vitro complement lysis assay using rabbit anti-DU145 antiserum and rabbit complement. These results show that activated STAT3 signaling induces the CD46 promoter and protects human cancer cells from complement-dependent cytotoxicity, suggesting a potential mechanism whereby oncogenic signaling contributes to tumor cell evasion of antibody-mediated immunity.

  10. EGF stimulates the activation of EGF receptors and the selective activation of major signaling pathways during mitosis.

    PubMed

    Wee, Ping; Shi, Huaiping; Jiang, Jennifer; Wang, Yuluan; Wang, Zhixiang

    2015-03-01

    Mitosis and epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor (EGFR) are both targets for cancer therapy. The role of EGFR signaling in mitosis has been rarely studied and poorly understood. The limited studies indicate that the activation of EGFR and downstream signaling pathways is mostly inhibited during mitosis. However, we recently showed that EGFR is phosphorylated in response to EGF stimulation in mitosis. Here we studied EGF-induced EGFR activation and the activation of major signaling pathways downstream of EGFR during mitosis. We showed that EGFR was strongly activated by EGF during mitosis as all the five major tyrosine residues including Y992, Y1045, Y1068, Y1086, and Y1173 were phosphorylated to a level similar to that in the interphase. We further showed that the activated EGFR is able to selectively activate some downstream signaling pathways while avoiding others. Activated EGFR is able to activate PI3K and AKT2, but not AKT1, which may be responsible for the observed effects of EGF against nocodazole-induced cell death. Activated EGFR is also able to activate c-Src, c-Cbl and PLC-γ1 during mitosis. However, activated EGFR is unable to activate ERK1/2 and their downstream substrates RSK and Elk-1. While it activated Ras, EGFR failed to fully activate Raf-1 in mitosis due to the lack of phosphorylation at Y341 and the lack of dephosphorylation at pS259. We conclude that contrary to the dogma, EGFR is activated by EGF during mitosis. Moreover, EGFR-mediated cell signaling is regulated differently from the interphase to specifically serve the needs of the cell in mitosis.

  11. Lymphocyte signaling and activation by the CARMA1-BCL10-MALT1 signalosome.

    PubMed

    Meininger, Isabel; Krappmann, Daniel

    2016-12-01

    The CARMA1-BCL10-MALT1 (CBM) signalosome triggers canonical NF-κB signaling and lymphocyte activation upon antigen-receptor stimulation. Genetic studies in mice and the analysis of human immune pathologies unveiled a critical role of the CBM complex in adaptive immune responses. Great progress has been made in elucidating the fundamental mechanisms that dictate CBM assembly and disassembly. By bridging proximal antigen-receptor signaling to downstream signaling pathways, the CBM complex exerts a crucial scaffolding function. Moreover, the MALT1 subunit confers a unique proteolytic activity that is key for lymphocyte activation. Deregulated 'chronic' CBM signaling drives constitutive NF-κB signaling and MALT1 activation, which contribute to the development of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases as well as lymphomagenesis. Thus, the processes that govern CBM activation and function are promising targets for the treatment of immune disorders. Here, we summarize the current knowledge on the functions and mechanisms of CBM signaling in lymphocytes and how CBM deregulations contribute to aberrant signaling in malignant lymphomas.

  12. Danger signals activating innate immunity in graft-versus-host disease.

    PubMed

    Zeiser, Robert; Penack, Olaf; Holler, Ernst; Idzko, Marco

    2011-09-01

    Extensive cell death with consecutive release of danger signals can cause immune-mediated tissue destruction. The abundance of cell death is likely to determine the relevance of the danger signals as physiological mechanisms that counteract immune activation may be overruled. Such constellation is conceivable in chemo-/radiotherapy-induced tissue damage, reperfusion injury, trauma, and severe infection. Studies on graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) development have to consider the effects of chemo-/radiotherapy-related tissue damage leading to the release of exogenous and endogenous danger signals. Our previous work has demonstrated a role for adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) as an endogenous danger signal in GvHD. Besides ATP, uric acid or soluble extracellular matrix components are functional danger signals that activate the NLRP3 inflammasome when released from dying cells or from extracellular matrix. In contrast to sterile inflammation, GvHD is more complex since bacterial components that leak through damaged intestinal barriers and the skin can activate pattern recognition receptors and directly contribute to GvHD pathogenesis. These exogenous danger signals transmit immune activation via toll-like receptors and NOD-like receptors of the innate immune system. This review covers both the impact of endogenous and exogenous danger signals activating innate immunity in GvHD.

  13. Nandrolone reduces activation of Notch signaling in denervated muscle associated with increased Numb expression

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xin-Hua; Yao, Shen; Qiao, Rui-Fang; Levine, Alice C.; Kirschenbaum, Alexander; Pan, Jiangping; Wu, Yong; Qin, Weiping; Bauman, William A.; Cardozo, Christopher P.

    2011-10-14

    Highlights: {yields} Nerve transection increased Notch signaling in paralyzed muscle. {yields} Nandrolone prevented denervation-induced Notch signaling. {yields} Nandrolone induced the expression of an inhibitor of the Notch signaling, Numb. {yields} Reduction of denervation-induced Notch signaling by nandrolone is likely through upregulation of Numb. -- Abstract: Nandrolone, an anabolic steroid, slows denervation-atrophy in rat muscle. The molecular mechanisms responsible for this effect are not well understood. Androgens and anabolic steroids activate Notch signaling in animal models of aging and thereby mitigate sarcopenia. To explore the molecular mechanisms by which nandrolone prevents denervation-atrophy, we investigated the effects of nandrolone on Notch signaling in denervated rat gastrocnemius muscle. Denervation significantly increased Notch activity reflected by elevated levels of nuclear Notch intracellular domain (NICD) and expression of Hey1 (a Notch target gene). Activation was greatest at 7 and 35 days after denervation but remained present at 56 days after denervation. Activation of Notch in denervated muscle was prevented by nandrolone associated with upregulated expression of Numb mRNA and protein. These data demonstrate that denervation activates Notch signaling, and that nandrolone abrogates this response associated with increased expression of Numb, suggesting a potential mechanism by which nandrolone reduces denervation-atrophy.

  14. Multiple functions and dynamic activation of MPK-1 extracellular signal-regulated kinase signaling in Caenorhabditis elegans germline development.

    PubMed

    Lee, Min-Ho; Ohmachi, Mitsue; Arur, Swathi; Nayak, Sudhir; Francis, Ross; Church, Diane; Lambie, Eric; Schedl, Tim

    2007-12-01

    The raison d'etre of the germline is to produce oocytes and sperm that pass genetic material and cytoplasmic constituents to the next generation. To achieve this goal, many developmental processes must be executed and coordinated. ERK, the terminal MAP kinase of a number of signaling pathways, controls many aspects of development. Here we present a comprehensive analysis of MPK-1 ERK in Caenorhabditis elegans germline development. MPK-1 functions in four developmental switches: progression through pachytene, oocyte meiotic maturation/ovulation, male germ cell fate specification, and a nonessential function of promoting the proliferative fate. MPK-1 also regulates multiple aspects of cell biology during oogenesis, including membrane organization and morphogenesis: organization of pachytene cells on the surface of the gonadal tube, oocyte organization and differentiation, oocyte growth control, and oocyte nuclear migration. MPK-1 activation is temporally/spatially dynamic and most processes appear to be controlled through sustained activation. MPK-1 thus may act not only in the control of individual processes but also in the coordination of contemporaneous processes and the integration of sequential processes. Knowledge of the dynamic activation and diverse functions of MPK-1 provides the foundation for identification of upstream signaling cascades responsible for region-specific activation and the downstream substrates that mediate the various processes.

  15. Multiple Functions and Dynamic Activation of MPK-1 Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase Signaling in Caenorhabditis elegans Germline Development

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Min-Ho; Ohmachi, Mitsue; Arur, Swathi; Nayak, Sudhir; Francis, Ross; Church, Diane; Lambie, Eric; Schedl, Tim

    2007-01-01

    The raison d'etre of the germline is to produce oocytes and sperm that pass genetic material and cytoplasmic constituents to the next generation. To achieve this goal, many developmental processes must be executed and coordinated. ERK, the terminal MAP kinase of a number of signaling pathways, controls many aspects of development. Here we present a comprehensive analysis of MPK-1 ERK in Caenorhabditis elegans germline development. MPK-1 functions in four developmental switches: progression through pachytene, oocyte meiotic maturation/ovulation, male germ cell fate specification, and a nonessential function of promoting the proliferative fate. MPK-1 also regulates multiple aspects of cell biology during oogenesis, including membrane organization and morphogenesis: organization of pachytene cells on the surface of the gonadal tube, oocyte organization and differentiation, oocyte growth control, and oocyte nuclear migration. MPK-1 activation is temporally/spatially dynamic and most processes appear to be controlled through sustained activation. MPK-1 thus may act not only in the control of individual processes but also in the coordination of contemporaneous processes and the integration of sequential processes. Knowledge of the dynamic activation and diverse functions of MPK-1 provides the foundation for identification of upstream signaling cascades responsible for region-specific activation and the downstream substrates that mediate the various processes. PMID:18073423

  16. Ras activation and symmetry breaking during Dictyostelium chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Kortholt, Arjan; Keizer-Gunnink, Ineke; Kataria, Rama; Van Haastert, Peter J M

    2013-10-01

    Central to chemotaxis is the molecular mechanism by which a shallow spatial gradient of chemoattractant induces symmetry breaking of activated signaling molecules. Previously, we have used Dictyostelium mutants to investigate the minimal requirements for chemotaxis, and identified a basal signaling module providing activation of Ras and F-actin at the leading edge. Here, we show that Ras activation after application of a pipette releasing the chemoattractant cAMP has three phases, each depending on specific guanine-nucleotide-exchange factors (GEFs). Initially a transient activation of Ras occurs at the entire cell boundary, which is proportional to the local cAMP concentrations and therefore slightly stronger at the front than in the rear of the cell. This transient Ras activation is present in gα2 (gpbB)-null cells but not in gβ (gpbA)-null cells, suggesting that Gβγ mediates the initial activation of Ras. The second phase is symmetry breaking: Ras is activated only at the side of the cell closest to the pipette. Symmetry breaking absolutely requires Gα2 and Gβγ, but not the cytoskeleton or four cAMP-induced signaling pathways, those dependent on phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-triphosphate [PtdIns(3,4,5)P3], cGMP, TorC2 and PLA2. As cells move in the gradient, the crescent of activated Ras in the front half of the cell becomes confined to a small area at the utmost front of the cell. Confinement of Ras activation leads to cell polarization, and depends on cGMP formation, myosin and F-actin. The experiments show that activation, symmetry breaking and confinement of Ras during Dictyostelium chemotaxis uses different G-protein subunits and a multitude of Ras GEFs and GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs).

  17. Ubiquitination in Signaling to and Activation of IKK

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhijian J.

    2013-01-01

    A role of polyubiquitination in the activation of IκB kinase (IKK) through a proteasome-independent mechanism was first reported in 1996, but the physiological significance of this finding was not clear until 2000 when TRAF6 was found to be a ubiquitin E3 ligase that catalyzes lysine-63 (K63) polyubiquitination. Since then, several proteins known to regulate IKK have been linked to the ubiquitin pathway. These include the deubiquitination enzymes CYLD and A20 that inhibit IKK, and the ubiquitin binding proteins NEMO and TAB2 which are the regulatory subunits of IKK and TAK1 kinase complexes, respectively. Now accumulating evidence strongly supports a central role of K63 polyubiquitination in IKK activation by multiple immune and inflammatory pathways. Interestingly, recent research suggests that some alternative ubiquitin chains such as linear or K11 ubiquitin chains may also play a role in certain pathways such as the TNF pathway. Here I present a historical narrative of the discovery of the role of ubiquitin in IKK activation, review recent advances in understanding the role and mechanism of ubiquitin-mediated IKK activation, and raise some questions to be resolved in future research. PMID:22435549

  18. ASBESTOS-INDUCED ACTIVATION OF CELL SIGNALING PATHWAYS IN HUMAN BRONCHIAL EPITHELIAL CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Using respiratory epithelial cells transfected with either superoxide dismutase (SOD) or catalase, the authors tested the hypothesis that the activation of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor signal pathway after asbestos exposure involves an oxidative stress. Western blot...

  19. Towards brain-activity-controlled information retrieval: Decoding image relevance from MEG signals.

    PubMed

    Kauppi, Jukka-Pekka; Kandemir, Melih; Saarinen, Veli-Matti; Hirvenkari, Lotta; Parkkonen, Lauri; Klami, Arto; Hari, Riitta; Kaski, Samuel

    2015-05-15

    We hypothesize that brain activity can be used to control future information retrieval systems. To this end, we conducted a feasibility study on predicting the relevance of visual objects from brain activity. We analyze both magnetoencephalographic (MEG) and gaze signals from nine subjects who were viewing image collages, a subset of which was relevant to a predetermined task. We report three findings: i) the relevance of an image a subject looks at can be decoded from MEG signals with performance significantly better than chance, ii) fusion of gaze-based and MEG-based classifiers significantly improves the prediction performance compared to using either signal alone, and iii) non-linear classification of the MEG signals using Gaussian process classifiers outperforms linear classification. These findings break new ground for building brain-activity-based interactive image retrieval systems, as well as for systems utilizing feedback both from brain activity and eye movements. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. ASBESTOS-INDUCED ACTIVATION OF CELL SIGNALING PATHWAYS IN HUMAN BRONCHIAL EPITHELIAL CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Using respiratory epithelial cells transfected with either superoxide dismutase (SOD) or catalase, the authors tested the hypothesis that the activation of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor signal pathway after asbestos exposure involves an oxidative stress. Western blot...

  1. Saturated fatty acids activate TLR-mediated proinflammatory signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shurong; Rutkowsky, Jennifer M; Snodgrass, Ryan G; Ono-Moore, Kikumi D; Schneider, Dina A; Newman, John W; Adams, Sean H; Hwang, Daniel H

    2012-09-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and TLR2 were shown to be activated by saturated fatty acids (SFAs) but inhibited by docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). However, one report suggested that SFA-induced TLR activation in cell culture systems is due to contaminants in BSA used for solubilizing fatty acids. This report raised doubt about proinflammatory effects of SFAs. Our studies herein demonstrate that sodium palmitate (C16:0) or laurate (C12:0) without BSA solubilization induced phosphorylation of inhibitor of nuclear factor-κB α, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), p44/42 mitogen-activated-kinase (ERK), and nuclear factor-κB subunit p65, and TLR target gene expression in THP1 monocytes or RAW264.7 macrophages, respectively, when cultured in low FBS (0.25%) medium. C12:0 induced NFκB activation through TLR2 dimerized with TLR1 or TLR6, and through TLR4. Because BSA was not used in these experiments, contaminants in BSA have no relevance. Unlike in suspension cells (THP-1), BSA-solubilized C16:0 instead of sodium C16:0 is required to induce TLR target gene expression in adherent cells (RAW264.7). C16:0-BSA transactivated TLR2 dimerized with TLR1 or TLR6 and through TLR4 as seen with C12:0. These results and additional studies with the LPS sequester polymixin B and in MyD88(-/-) macrophages indicated that SFA-induced activation of TLR2 or TLR4 is a fatty acid-specific effect, but not due to contaminants in BSA or fatty acid preparations.

  2. Nitric oxide and Na,K-ATPase activity in rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Juel, C

    2016-04-01

    It has been suggested that nitric oxide (NO) stimulates the Na,K-ATPase in cardiac myocytes. Therefore, the aims of this study were to investigate whether NO increases Na,K-ATPase activity in skeletal muscle and, if that is the case, to identify the underlying mechanism. The study used isolated rat muscle, muscle homogenates and purified membranes as model systems. Na,K-ATPase activity was quantified from phosphate release due to ATP hydrolysis. Exposure to the NO donor spermine NONOate (10 μm) increased the maximal Na,K-ATPase activity by 27% in isolated glycolytic muscles, but had no effect in oxidative muscles. Spermine NONOate increased the maximal Na,K-ATPase activity by 58% (P < 0.05) in homogenates from glycolytic muscle, but had no effect in oxidative muscle. The stimulatory effect of NONOate was not related to one specific Na,K-ATPase α-isoform. Incubation with cGMP (1 mm) increased the maximal Na,K-ATPase activity in homogenates from glycolytic muscle by 16% (P < 0.05), but had no effect on homogenates from oxidative muscle. cGMP had no effect on phospholemman phosphorylation at serine 68. Spermine NONOate had no effect in muscle membranes in which the ATPase activity was depressed by oxidized glutathione. NO and cGMP stimulate the Na,K-ATPase in glycolytic skeletal muscle. Direct S-nitrosylation and interference with S-glutathionylation seem to be excluded. In addition, phosphorylation of phospholemman at serine 68 is not involved. Most likely, the NO/cGMP/protein kinase G signalling pathway is involved. © 2015 Scandinavian Physiological Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. LW protein: a promiscuous integrin receptor activated by adrenergic signaling.

    PubMed

    Delahunty, M; Zennadi, R; Telen, M J

    2006-01-01

    The LW blood group antigen glycoprotein, although part of the Rh macromolecular complex, is nonetheless a member of the intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM) family. Thus, while it is only rarely clinically important in the setting of transfusion and pregnancy, LW is likely to contribute to red cell adhesion in a variety of settings, including during hematopoiesis, as well as in vascular disorders. The best documentation of a pathophysiological role for LW in human disease is in sickle cell disease, where it contributes to red cell adhesion to endothelial cells and the development of vaso-occlusion, the hallmark of that disease. LW may also contribute to other intravascular processes, such as both venous and arterial thrombosis, due to its ability to interact with both activated platelets as well as leukocytes. The evidence that LW itself can undergo activation on red cells holds promise that pharmacotherapeutic maneuvers may be found to prevent such pathophysiologic interactions.

  4. Notchless encodes a novel WD40-repeat-containing protein that modulates Notch signaling activity.

    PubMed Central

    Royet, J; Bouwmeester, T; Cohen, S M

    1998-01-01

    Signaling by Notch family receptors is involved in many cell-fate decisions during development. Several modifiers of Notch activity have been identified, suggesting that regulation of Notch signaling is complex. In a genetic screen for modifiers of Notch activity, we identified a gene encoding a novel WD40-repeat protein. The gene is called Notchless, because loss-of-function mutant alleles dominantly suppress the wing notching caused by certain Notch alleles. Reducing Notchless activity increases Notch activity. Overexpression of Notchless in Xenopus or Drosophila appears to have a dominant-negative effect in that it also increases Notch activity. Biochemical studies show that Notchless binds to the cytoplasmic domain of Notch, suggesting that it serves as a direct regulator of Notch signaling activity. PMID:9857191

  5. Analysis of nitric oxide-cyclic guanosine monophosphate signaling during metamorphosis of the nudibranch Phestilla sibogae Bergh (Gastropoda: Opisthobranchia)

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, Cory D.; Pires, Anthony; Norby, Shong-Wan; Boudko, Dmitri; Moroz, Leonid L.; Hadfield, Michael G.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The gas nitric oxide (NO), and in some cases its downstream second messenger, cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) function in different taxa to regulate the timing of life-history transitions. Increased taxonomic sampling is required to foster conclusions about the evolution and function of NO/cGMP signaling during life-history transitions. We report on the function and localization of NO and cGMP signaling during metamorphosis of the nudibranch Phestilla sibogae. Pharmacological manipulation of NO or cGMP production in larvae modulated responses to a natural settlement cue from the coral Porites compressa in a manner that suggest inhibitory function for NO/cGMP signaling. However, these treatments were not sufficient to induce metamorphosis in the absence of cue, a result unique to this animal. We show that induction of metamorphosis in response to the settlement cue is associated with a reduction in NO production. We documented the expression of putative NO synthase (NOS) and the production of cGMP during larval development and observed no larval cells in which NOS and cGMP were both detected. The production of cGMP in a bilaterally symmetrical group of cells fated to occupy the distal tip of rhinophores is correlated with competence to respond to the coral settlement cue. These results suggest that endogenous NO and cGMP are involved in modulating responses of P. sibogae to a natural settlement cue. We discuss these results with respect to habitat selection and larval ecology. PMID:18460091

  6. Activation of the yeast Hippo pathway by phosphorylation-dependent assembly of signaling complexes.

    PubMed

    Rock, Jeremy M; Lim, Daniel; Stach, Lasse; Ogrodowicz, Roksana W; Keck, Jamie M; Jones, Michele H; Wong, Catherine C L; Yates, John R; Winey, Mark; Smerdon, Stephen J; Yaffe, Michael B; Amon, Angelika

    2013-05-17

    Scaffold-assisted signaling cascades guide cellular decision-making. In budding yeast, one such signal transduction pathway called the mitotic exit network (MEN) governs the transition from mitosis to the G1 phase of the cell cycle. The MEN is conserved and in metazoans is known as the Hippo tumor-suppressor pathway. We found that signaling through the MEN kinase cascade was mediated by an unusual two-step process. The MEN kinase Cdc15 first phosphorylated the scaffold Nud1. This created a phospho-docking site on Nud1, to which the effector kinase complex Dbf2-Mob1 bound through a phosphoserine-threonine binding domain, in order to be activated by Cdc15. This mechanism of pathway activation has implications for signal transmission through other kinase cascades and might represent a general principle in scaffold-assisted signaling.

  7. Active transport improves the precision of linear long distance molecular signalling