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Sample records for chagas cardiomyopathy

  1. Treatment of Chagas Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Botoni, Fernando A.; Ribeiro, Antonio Luiz P.; Marinho, Carolina Coimbra; Lima, Marcia Maria Oliveira; Nunes, Maria do Carmo Pereira; Rocha, Manoel Otávio C.

    2013-01-01

    Chagas' disease (ChD), caused by the protozoa Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi), was discovered and described by the Brazilian physician Carlos Chagas in 1909. After a century of original description, trypanosomiasis still brings much misery to humanity and is classified as a neglected tropical disease prevalent in underdeveloped countries, particularly in South America. It is an increasing worldwide problem due to the number of cases in endemic areas and the migration of infected subjects to more developed regions, mainly North America and Europe. Despite its importance, chronic chagas cardiomyopathy (CCC) pathophysiology is yet poorly understood, and independently of its social, clinical, and epidemiological importance, the therapeutic approach of CCC is still transposed from the knowledge acquired from other cardiomyopathies. Therefore, the objective of this review is to describe the treatment of Chagas cardiomyopathy with emphasis on its peculiarities. PMID:24350293

  2. Heart Transplantation for Chagas Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Benatti, Rodolfo D; Oliveira, Guilherme H; Bacal, Fernando

    2017-06-01

    Chagas cardiomyopathy (CC) is one of the chronic manifestations of Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi) infection and is a major public health disease in Latin America. Since it is a chronic systemic infection, Chagas disease was long considered a potential contraindication for transplantation because of the risk of recurrence with immunosuppression. However, early South American experience in the 1980's established the feasibility of heart transplantation (HT) in patients with Chagas disease. Indeed, the first cardiac transplant for a recipient with CC was performed in 1985 in Brazil. Chagas etiology of heart failure has become the third most common indication for HT in South America. T. cruzi reactivation post-transplant is a common issue that requires prophylactic surveillance but responds well to appropriate therapy. Chagas reactivation has been associated with the potency of the immunosuppressive protocol and occurs more frequently after rejection episodes. Yet, many important questions regarding the management of Chagas HT candidates and recipients remain unanswered. For example, biventricular systolic failure is frequent in end-stage CC, but its impact on the modality of mechanical circulatory bridging has not been described. Also, there is no consensus regarding the most adequate immunosuppressive regimen that balances the risk of graft rejection and disease reactivation. The real efficacy and safety of HT for end-stage CC will only be appreciated when a Latin American transplant registry is established. This review covers the current state of the art of HT for CC. Copyright © 2017 International Society for the Heart and Lung Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Chagas Disease Cardiomyopathy: Immunopathology and Genetics

    PubMed Central

    Chevillard, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    Chagas disease, caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, is endemic in Latin America and affects ca. 10 million people worldwide. About 30% of Chagas disease patients develop chronic Chagas disease cardiomyopathy (CCC), a particularly lethal inflammatory cardiomyopathy that occurs decades after the initial infection, while most patients remain asymptomatic. Mortality rate is higher than that of noninflammatory cardiomyopathy. CCC heart lesions present a Th1 T-cell-rich myocarditis, with cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and prominent fibrosis. Data suggest that the myocarditis plays a major pathogenetic role in disease progression. Major unmet goals include the thorough understanding of disease pathogenesis and therapeutic targets and identification of prognostic genetic factors. Chagas disease thus remains a neglected disease, with no vaccines or antiparasitic drugs proven efficient in chronically infected adults, when most patients are diagnosed. Both familial aggregation of CCC cases and the fact that only 30% of infected patients develop CCC suggest there might be a genetic component to disease susceptibility. Moreover, previous case-control studies have identified some genes associated to human susceptibility to CCC. In this paper, we will review the immunopathogenesis and genetics of Chagas disease, highlighting studies that shed light on the differential progression of Chagas disease patients to CCC. PMID:25210230

  4. Developments in the management of Chagas cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Tanowitz, Herbert B; Machado, Fabiana S; Spray, David C; Friedman, Joel M; Weiss, Oren S; Lora, Jose N; Nagajyothi, Jyothi; Moraes, Diego N; Garg, Nisha Jain; Nunes, Maria Carmo P; Ribeiro, Antonio Luiz P

    2015-12-01

    Over 100 years have elapsed since the discovery of Chagas disease and there is still much to learn regarding pathogenesis and treatment. Although there are antiparasitic drugs available, such as benznidazole and nifurtimox, they are not totally reliable and often toxic. A recently released negative clinical trial with benznidazole in patients with chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy further reinforces the concerns regarding its effectiveness. New drugs and new delivery systems, including those based on nanotechnology, are being sought. Although vaccine development is still in its infancy, the reality of a therapeutic vaccine remains a challenge. New ECG methods may help to recognize patients prone to developing malignant ventricular arrhythmias. The management of heart failure, stroke and arrhythmias also remains a challenge. Although animal experiments have suggested that stem cell based therapy may be therapeutic in the management of heart failure in Chagas cardiomyopathy, clinical trials have not been promising.

  5. Developments in the management of Chagas cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Tanowitz, Herbert B; Machado, Fabiana S; Spray, David C; Friedman, Joel M; Weiss, Oren S; Lora, Jose N; Nagajyothi, Jyothi; Moraes, Diego N; Garg, Nisha Jain; Nunes, Maria Carmo P; Ribeiro, Antonio Luiz P

    2016-01-01

    Over 100 years have elapsed since the discovery of Chagas disease and there is still much to learn regarding pathogenesis and treatment. Although there are antiparasitic drugs available, such as benznidazole and nifurtimox, they are not totally reliable and often toxic. A recently released negative clinical trial with benznidazole in patients with chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy further reinforces the concerns regarding its effectiveness. New drugs and new delivery systems, including those based on nanotechnology, are being sought. Although vaccine development is still in its infancy, the reality of a therapeutic vaccine remains a challenge. New ECG methods may help to recognize patients prone to developing malignant ventricular arrhythmias. The management of heart failure, stroke and arrhythmias also remains a challenge. Although animal experiments have suggested that stem cell based therapy may be therapeutic in the management of heart failure in Chagas cardiomyopathy, clinical trials have not been promising. PMID:26496376

  6. Biomarkers and mortality in severe Chagas cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Sherbuk, Jacqueline E; Okamoto, Emi E; Marks, Morgan A; Fortuny, Enzo; Clark, Eva H; Galdos-Cardenas, Gerson; Vasquez-Villar, Angel; Fernandez, Antonio B; Crawford, Thomas C; Do, Rose Q; Flores-Franco, Jorge Luis; Colanzi, Rony; Gilman, Robert H; Bern, Caryn

    2015-09-01

    Chagas cardiomyopathy is a chronic sequela of infection by the parasite, Trypanosoma cruzi. Advanced cardiomyopathy is associated with a high mortality rate, and clinical characteristics have been used to predict mortality risk. Though multiple biomarkers have been associated with Chagas cardiomyopathy, it is unknown how these are related to survival. This study aimed to identify biomarkers associated with mortality in individuals with severe Chagas cardiomyopathy in an urban Bolivian hospital. The population included individuals with and without T. cruzi infection recruited in an urban hospital in Santa Cruz, Bolivia. Baseline characteristics, electrocardiogram findings, medications, and serum cardiac biomarker levels (B-type natriuretic peptide [BNP], N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide [NT-proBNP], creatine kinase-myocardial band [CK-MB], troponin I, matrix metalloproteinase [MMP]-2, MMP-9, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases [TIMP] 1 and 2, transforming growth factor [TGF] beta 1 and 2) were ascertained. Echocardiograms were performed on those with cardiac symptoms or electrocardiogram abnormalities at baseline. Participants were contacted approximately 1 year after initial evaluation; deaths were reported by family members. Receiver-operating characteristic curves (ROC) were used to optimize cutoff values for each marker. For markers with area under the curve (AUC) >0.55, Cox proportional hazards models were performed to determine the hazards ratio (HR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for the association of each marker with mortality. The median follow-up time was 14.1 months (interquartile range 12.5, 16.7). Of 254 individuals with complete cardiac data, 220 (87%) had follow-up data. Of 50 patients with severe Chagas cardiomyopathy at baseline, 20 (40%) had died. Higher baseline levels of BNP (HR: 3.1, 95% CI: 1.2 to 8.4), NT-proBNP (HR: 4.4, 95% CI: 1.8 to 11.0), CK-MB (HR: 3.3, 95% CI: 1.3 to 8.0), and MMP-2 (HR: 4.2, 95% CI: 1.5 to 11.8) were

  7. Chagas Cardiomyopathy in the Context of the Chronic Disease Transition

    PubMed Central

    Hidron, Alicia I.; Gilman, Robert H.; Justiniano, Juan; Blackstock, Anna J.; LaFuente, Carlos; Selum, Walter; Calderon, Martiza; Verastegui, Manuela; Ferrufino, Lisbeth; Valencia, Eduardo; Tornheim, Jeffrey A.; O'Neal, Seth; Comer, Robert; Galdos-Cardenas, Gerson; Bern, Caryn

    2010-01-01

    Background Patients with Chagas disease have migrated to cities, where obesity, hypertension and other cardiac risk factors are common. Methodology/Principal Findings The study included adult patients evaluated by the cardiology service in a public hospital in Santa Cruz, Bolivia. Data included risk factors for T. cruzi infection, medical history, physical examination, electrocardiogram, echocardiogram, and contact 9 months after initial data collection to ascertain mortality. Serology and PCR for Trypanosoma cruzi were performed. Of 394 participants, 251 (64%) had confirmed T. cruzi infection by serology. Among seropositive participants, 109 (43%) had positive results by conventional PCR; of these, 89 (82%) also had positive results by real time PCR. There was a high prevalence of hypertension (64%) and overweight (body mass index [BMI] >25; 67%), with no difference by T. cruzi infection status. Nearly 60% of symptomatic congestive heart failure was attributed to Chagas cardiomyopathy; mortality was also higher for seropositive than seronegative patients (p = 0.05). In multivariable models, longer residence in an endemic province, residence in a rural area and poor housing conditions were associated with T. cruzi infection. Male sex, increasing age and poor housing were independent predictors of Chagas cardiomyopathy severity. Males and participants with BMI ≤25 had significantly higher likelihood of positive PCR results compared to females or overweight participants. Conclusions Chagas cardiomyopathy remains an important cause of congestive heart failure in this hospital population, and should be evaluated in the context of the epidemiological transition that has increased risk of obesity, hypertension and chronic cardiovascular disease. PMID:20502520

  8. Randomized Trial of Benznidazole for Chronic Chagas' Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Morillo, Carlos A; Marin-Neto, Jose Antonio; Avezum, Alvaro; Sosa-Estani, Sergio; Rassi, Anis; Rosas, Fernando; Villena, Erick; Quiroz, Roberto; Bonilla, Rina; Britto, Constança; Guhl, Felipe; Velazquez, Elsa; Bonilla, Laura; Meeks, Brandi; Rao-Melacini, Purnima; Pogue, Janice; Mattos, Antonio; Lazdins, Janis; Rassi, Anis; Connolly, Stuart J; Yusuf, Salim

    2015-10-01

    The role of trypanocidal therapy in patients with established Chagas' cardiomyopathy is unproven. We conducted a prospective, multicenter, randomized study involving 2854 patients with Chagas' cardiomyopathy who received benznidazole or placebo for up to 80 days and were followed for a mean of 5.4 years. The primary outcome in the time-to-event analysis was the first event of any of the components of the composite outcome of death, resuscitated cardiac arrest, sustained ventricular tachycardia, insertion of a pacemaker or implantable cardioverter-defibrillator, cardiac transplantation, new heart failure, stroke, or other thromboembolic event. The primary outcome occurred in 394 patients (27.5%) in the benznidazole group and in 414 (29.1%) in the placebo group (hazard ratio, 0.93; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.81 to 1.07; P=0.31). At baseline, a polymerase-chain-reaction (PCR) assay was performed on blood samples obtained from 1896 patients; 60.5% had positive results for Trypanosoma cruzi on PCR. The rates of conversion to negative PCR results (PCR conversion) were 66.2% in the benznidazole group and 33.5% in the placebo group at the end of treatment, 55.4% and 35.3%, respectively, at 2 years, and 46.7% and 33.1%, respectively, at 5 years or more (P<0.001 for all comparisons). The effect of treatment on PCR conversion varied according to geographic region: in Brazil, the odds ratio for PCR conversion was 3.03 (95% CI, 2.12 to 4.34) at 2 years and 1.87 (95% CI, 1.33 to 2.63) at 5 or more years; in Colombia and El Salvador, the odds ratio was 1.33 (95% CI, 0.90 to 1.98) at 2 years and 0.96 (95% CI, 0.63 to 1.45) at 5 or more years; and in Argentina and Bolivia, the odds ratio was 2.63 (95% CI, 1.89 to 3.66) at 2 years and 2.79 (95% CI, 1.99 to 3.92) at 5 or more years (P<0.001 for interaction). However, the rates of PCR conversion did not correspond to effects on clinical outcome (P=0.16 for interaction). Trypanocidal therapy with benznidazole in patients with

  9. Circulating serum markers and QRS scar score in Chagas cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Clark, Eva H; Marks, Morgan A; Gilman, Robert H; Fernandez, Antonio B; Crawford, Thomas C; Samuels, Aaron M; Hidron, Alicia I; Galdos-Cardenas, Gerson; Menacho-Mendez, Gilberto Silvio; Bozo-Gutierrez, Ricardo W; Martin, Diana L; Bern, Caryn

    2015-01-01

    Approximately 8 million people have Trypanosoma cruzi infection, and nearly 30% will manifest Chagas cardiomyopathy (CC). Identification of reliable early indicators of CC risk would enable prioritization of treatment to those with the highest probability of future disease. Serum markers and electrocardiogram (EKG) changes were measured in 68 T. cruzi-infected individuals in various stages of cardiac disease and 17 individuals without T. cruzi infection or cardiac disease. T. cruzi-infected individuals were assigned to stage A (normal EKG/chest x-ray [CXR]), B (abnormal EKG/normal CXR), or C (abnormal EKG/cardiac structural changes). Ten serum markers were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA)/Luminex, and QRS scores were calculated. Higher concentrations of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGFβ1), and TGFβ2 were associated with stage B compared with stage A. Matrix Metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2), Tissue Inhibitors of MMP 1, QRS score, and Brain Natriuretic Protein rose progressively with increasing CC severity. Elevated levels of several markers of cardiac damage and inflammation are seen in early CC and warrant additional evaluation in longitudinal studies. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  10. Antibodies to beta-adrenergic receptors disclosing agonist-like properties in idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy and Chagas' heart disease.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, M B; Chiale, P A; Schejtman, D; Levin, M; Elizari, M V

    1994-04-01

    Recent studies confirm the existence of antibodies (Abs) to beta-adrenoceptors in patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy and Chagas' heart disease. These Abs can be shown to exert both stimulatory and inhibitory effects, which may play a role in the development of the cardiac abnormalities known to occur in these diseases, including advanced heart failure. The hypothesis is advanced that Chagas' heart disease and some forms of idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy may represent, at least partially, a form of "adrenergic cardiomyopathy."

  11. [Study of the factors determining an unexpected occurrecne of Chagas cardiomyopathy in Sucre, Bolivia].

    PubMed

    De Muynck, A; Muñoz, R; Manirankunda, L; Pizzaro, J C; Gutierrez, J

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this case-control study carried out between February 1, 1994 and December 22, 1994 at the "Instituto de Gastroenterologia Boliviano-Japonés" in Sucre, Bolivia was to determine risk factors for chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy in adult patients with positive serological tests for Trypanosoma cruzi. A total of 196 subjects were included. Inclusion criteria were positive serological tests for Trypanosoma cruzi, residence in the city of Sucre, Bolivia for at least 3 months, and age over 14 years. There were 62 cases presenting electrocardiographic findings consistent with Chagas cardiomyopathy and 134 controls presenting normal electrocardiographic findings. Both cases and controls underwent a standardized protocol including physical examination and laboratory tests. Interviews were set up to evaluate personal and familial history of Chagas disease, socioeconomic status, and presence of Triatoma infestans in the home. Bivariate analysis of data indicated that Chagas cardiomyopathy was associated with the following risk factors: heart rate (p < 0.05), fecaloma (p < 0.05), occupation requiring strenuous physical exertion (p < 0.001), proximity with domestic animals (p < 0.005), especially pigs (p < 0.005), dwelling features including outbuildings, more than 2 bedrooms, and inside ceilings (p < 0.001). Multivariate analysis revealed the following risk factors: occupation requiring strenuous physical exertion (p < 0.005), a yard around the house (p < 0.05), and inside ceilings (p < 0.05). The results of this study show that prevention of chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy in Sucre, Bolivia will depend on improvement of living conditions.

  12. Blood Gene Signatures of Chagas Cardiomyopathy With or Without Ventricular Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Ludmila Rodrigues Pinto; Ferreira, Frederico Moraes; Nakaya, Helder Imoto; Deng, Xutao; Cândido, Darlan da Silva; de Oliveira, Lea Campos; Billaud, Jean-Noel; Lanteri, Marion C; Rigaud, Vagner Oliveira-Carvalho; Seielstad, Mark; Kalil, Jorge; Fernandes, Fabio; Ribeiro, Antonio Luiz P; Sabino, Ester Cerdeira; Cunha-Neto, Edecio

    2017-02-01

    Chagas disease, caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, affects 7 million people in Latin American areas of endemicity. About 30% of infected patients will develop chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy (CCC), an inflammatory cardiomyopathy characterized by hypertrophy, fibrosis, and myocarditis. Further studies are necessary to understand the molecular mechanisms of disease progression. Transcriptome analysis has been increasingly used to identify molecular changes associated with disease outcomes. We thus assessed the whole-blood transcriptome of patients with Chagas disease. Microarray analysis was performed on blood samples from 150 subjects, of whom 30 were uninfected control patients and 120 had Chagas disease (1 group had asymptomatic disease, and 2 groups had CCC with either a preserved or reduced left ventricular ejection fraction [LVEF]). Each Chagas disease group displayed distinct gene expression and functional pathway profiles. The most different expression patterns were between CCC groups with a preserved or reduced LVEF. A more stringent analysis indicated that 27 differentially expressed genes, particularly those related to natural killer (NK)/CD8+ T-cell cytotoxicity, separated the 2 groups. NK/CD8+ T-cell cytotoxicity could play a role in determining Chagas disease progression. Understanding genes associated with disease may lead to improved insight into CCC pathogenesis and the identification of prognostic factors for CCC progression. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Omega-3 supplementation on inflammatory markers in patients with chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy: a randomized clinical study.

    PubMed

    Silva, Paula Simplício da; Mediano, Mauro Felippe Felix; Silva, Gilberto Marcelo Sperandio da; Brito, Patricia Dias de; Cardoso, Claudia Santos de Aguiar; Almeida, Cristiane Fonseca de; Sangenis, Luiz Henrique Conde; Pinheiro, Roberta Olmo; Hasslocher-Moreno, Alejandro Marcel; Brasil, Pedro Emmanuel Alvarenga Americano do; Sousa, Andrea Silvestre de

    2017-06-09

    Several studies have been focusing on the effect of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids on modulation of inflammatory markers in several cardiopathies. Although immunoregulatory dysfunction has been associated to the chronic cardiac involvement in Chagas disease, there is no study examining the effects of omega-3 supplementation in these patients. We investigated the effects of omega-3 PUFAs on markers of inflammation and lipid profile in chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy patients. The present study was a single-center double-blind clinical trial including patients with chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy. Patients were randomly assigned to receive omega-3 PUFAs capsules (1.8g EPA and 1.2g DHA) or placebo (corn oil) during an 8-week period. Cytokines, fasting glucose, lipid, and anthropometric profiles were evaluated. Forty-two patients (23 women and 19 men) were included in the study and there were only two losses to follow-up during the 8-week period. Most of sociodemographic and clinical characteristics were similar between the groups at baseline, except for the cytokines IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-17α, and IFNγ. The omega-3 PUFAs group demonstrated greater improvements in serum triglycerides (-21.1 vs. -4.1; p = 0.05) and IL-10 levels (-10.6 vs. -35.7; p = 0.01) in comparison to controls after 8 weeks of intervention. No further differences were observed between groups. Omega-3 PUFAs supplementation may favorably affect lipid and inflammatory profile in chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy patients, demonstrated by a decrease in triglycerides and improvements on IL-10 concentration. Further studies examining the clinical effects of omega-3 fatty acids supplementation in chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy are necessary. NCT01863576.

  14. Chagas Cardiomyopathy: Clinical Presentation and Management in the Americas.

    PubMed

    Benziger, Catherine Pastorius; do Carmo, Gabriel Assis Lopes; Ribeiro, Antonio Luiz Pinho

    2017-02-01

    The initial infection of Chagas disease is typically asymptomatic, but approximately 30% of people will progress to a chronic cardiac form, and others develop the gastrointestinal form. Death is often sudden due to arrhythmias or progressive heart failure. Prevention through vector control programs and blood bank screening, along with strengthened surveillance systems and rapid information sharing, are key to decreasing disease burden globally. The epidemiology, diagnostic evaluation, diagnosis, and treatment of acute and chronic Chagas cardiac disease are discussed with focus on educating the primary care professionals and general cardiologists in nonendemic areas who have limited experience treating this disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. BNP, NTproBNP, CMBK, and MMP-2 predict mortality in severe Chagas cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Sherbuk, Jacqueline E.; Okamoto, Emi E.; Marks, Morgan A.; Fortuny, Enzo; Clark, Eva H.; Galdos-Cardenas, Gerson; Vasquez-Villar, Angel; Fernandez, Antonio B.; Crawford, Thomas C.; Do, Rose Q.; Flores-Franco, Jorge Luis; Colanzi, Rony; Gilman, Robert H.; Bern, Caryn

    2015-01-01

    Background Chagas cardiomyopathy is a chronic sequela of infection by the parasite, Trypanosoma cruzi. Advanced cardiomyopathy is associated with a high mortality rate, and clinical characteristics have been used to predict mortality risk. Though multiple biomarkers have been associated with Chagas cardiomyopathy, it is unknown how these are related to survival. Objectives Our study aimed to identify biomarkers associated with mortality in individuals with severe Chagas cardiomyopathy in an urban Bolivian hospital. Methods The population included individuals with and without T. cruzi infection recruited in an urban hospital in Santa Cruz, Bolivia. Baseline characteristics, ECG findings, medications, and serum cardiac biomarker levels (BNP, NTproBNP, CKMB, troponin I, MMP-2, MMP-9, TIMP-1, TIMP-2, TGFb1, and TGFb2) were ascertained. Echocardiograms were preferentially performed on those with cardiac symptoms or electrocardiogram abnormalities. Participants were contacted by phone approximately 1 year after initial evaluation; deaths were reported by family members. Receiver operating characteristic curves were used to optimize cut-off values for each marker. For markers with area under curve > 0.55, Cox proportional hazards models were performed to determine the hazards ratio (HR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for the association of each marker with mortality. Results The median follow-up time was 14.1 months (interquartile range 12.5- 16.7 months). Of 254 individuals with complete cardiac data, 220 (87%) had follow-up data. Of 50 patients with severe Chagas cardiomyopathy, 20 (40%) had died. Higher baseline levels of BNP (HR[95% CI]:3.1 [1.2, 8.4]), NTproBNP (4.4[1.8,11.0]), CKMB (3.3[1.3, 8.0]), and MMP-2 (4.2[1.5, 11.8]) were significantly associated with subsequent mortality. Conclusions Severe Chagas cardiomyopathy is associated with high short-term mortality. BNP, NTproBNP, CKMB and MMP2 have added predictive value for mortality, even in the presence of

  16. Chagas Disease in Mexico: Report of 14 Cases of Chagasic Cardiomyopathy in Children.

    PubMed

    Salazar-Schettino, Paz María; Cabrera-Bravo, Margarita; Vazquez-Antona, Clara; Zenteno, Edgar; Alba-Alvarado, Mariana De; Gutierrez, Elia Torres; Gomez, Yolanda Guevara; Perera-Salazar, María Gabriela; Torre, Guadalupe Garcia de la; Bucio-Torres, Martha Irene

    2016-01-01

    Chagas disease is a parasitic infection mainly found in Latin America; it is transmitted by a triatomine, also known as assassin bug or kissing bug. In humans, the parasite causes mostly cardiac disorders. Two-thirds of the Mexican territory are regarded as risk areas for vector transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi, the causal agent. The parasite can be found as a blood-borne trypomastigote or as an intracellular amastigote. The progression and severity of lesions could be due to frequent reinfections or to infection by highly virulent strains. A total of 3,327 individuals younger than 18 years old, living in risk areas for this disease in the rural setting of the States of Queretaro, San Luis Potosi, and Veracruz, underwent a seroepidemiological study. Among them, 37 subjects were seropositive for T. cruzi, and were studied to look for signs of cardiac pathology, which has only been reported in adults. A clinical record was prepared for all included individuals, and electrocardiography (ECG) and echocardiography (ECHO) studies were performed; 25 cases showed lesions compatible with the onset of Chagas cardiomyopathy. The other 12 patients showed either normal ECG and ECHO data or showed abnormal parameters that were not regarded as significant. Lesions found in the onset of Chagas cardiomyopathy in children are herein reported, along with 14 cases of cardiac pathology compatible with Chagas disease. Our results indicate that patients younger than 18 years can show a cardiac pathology similar to that observed in adults.

  17. Diagnosis of Chagas' cardiomyopathy. Non-invasive techniques.

    PubMed Central

    Puigbó, J. J.; Valecillos, R.; Hirschhaut, E.; Giordano, H.; Boccalandro, I.; Suárez, C.; Aparicio, J. M.

    1977-01-01

    The natural history of Chagas' disease and its manifestations when the heart is involved are detailed clinically and pathologically. Three phases are recognized: the acute phase, lasting from 1-3 months, the latent phase, which may last from 10-20 years, and the chronic phase, which has the most serious manifestations. This phase is subdivided into three clinical stages. An analysis of the varied cardiac manifestations on 235 patients is included. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:412174

  18. Coronary Microvascular Disease in Chronic Chagas Cardiomyopathy Including an Overview on History, Pathology, and Other Proposed Pathogenic Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Marcos A.; Tanowitz, Herbert B.; Malvestio, Lygia M.; Celes, Mara R.; Campos, Erica C.; Blefari, Valdecir; Prado, Cibele M.

    2010-01-01

    This review focuses on the short and bewildered history of Brazilian scientist Carlos Chagas's discovery and subsequent developments, the anatomopathological features of chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy (CCC), an overview on the controversies surrounding theories concerning its pathogenesis, and studies that support the microvascular hypothesis to further explain the pathological features and clinical course of CCC. It is our belief that knowledge of this particular and remarkable cardiomyopathy will shed light not only on the microvascular involvement of its pathogenesis, but also on the pathogenetic processes of other cardiomyopathies, which will hopefully provide a better understanding of the various changes that may lead to an end-stage heart disease with similar features. This review is written to celebrate the 100th anniversary of the discovery of Chagas disease. PMID:20824217

  19. Histopathological Correlates of Global and Segmental Left Ventricular Systolic Dysfunction in Experimental Chronic Chagas Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Luciano Fonseca Lemos; Romano, Minna Moreira Dias; de Carvalho, Eduardo Elias Vieira; Cabeza, Jorge Mejia; Salgado, Hélio Cesar; Fazan Júnior, Rubens; Costa, Renata Sesti; da Silva, João Santana; Higuchi, Maria de Lourdes; Maciel, Benedito Carlos; Cunha-Neto, Edécio; Marin-Neto, José Antônio; Simões, Marcus Vinícius

    2016-01-21

    Chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy in humans is characterized by segmental left ventricular wall motion abnormalities (WMA), mainly in the early stages of disease. This study aimed at investigating the detection of WMA and its correlation with the underlying histopathological changes in a chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy model in hamsters. Female Syrian hamsters (n=34) infected with 3.5×10(4) or 10(5) blood trypomastigote Trypanosoma cruzi (Y strain) forms and an uninfected control group (n=7) were investigated. After 6 or 10 months after the infection, the animals were submitted to in vivo evaluation of global and segmental left ventricular systolic function by echocardiography, followed by euthanasia and histological analysis for quantitative assessment of fibrosis and inflammation with tissue sampling in locations coinciding with the left ventricular wall segmentation employed at the in vivo echocardiographic evaluation. Ten of the 34 infected animals (29%) showed reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (<73%). Left ventricular ejection fraction was more negatively correlated with the intensity of inflammation (r=-0.63; P<0.0001) than with the extent of fibrosis (r=-0.36; P=0.036). Among the 24 animals with preserved left ventricular ejection fraction (82.9±5.5%), 8 (33%) showed segmental WMA predominating in the apical, inferior, and posterolateral segments. The segments exhibiting WMA, in comparison to those with normal wall motion, showed a greater extent of fibrosis (9.3±5.7% and 7±6.3%, P<0.0001) and an even greater intensity of inflammation (218.0±111.6 and 124.5±84.8 nuclei/mm², P<0.0001). Isolated WMA with preserved global systolic left ventricular function is frequently found in Syrian hamsters with experimental chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy whose underlying histopathological features are mainly inflammatory. © 2016 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  20. [New concepts on the pathogenesis of chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy: myocardial gene and protein expression profiles].

    PubMed

    Cunha-Neto, Edecio; Teixeira, Priscila C; Nogueira, Luciana G; Mady, Charles; Lanni, Barbara; Stolf, Noedir; Fiorelli, Alfredo; Honorato, Ronaldo; Kalil, Jorge

    2006-01-01

    The pathogenesis of chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy (CCC) is still being unraveled. In the last decade, a role for inflammatory cytokines on tissue damage has been shown. The present review will address the molecular and immunological mechanisms of tissue damage on human CCC with a special focus on results obtained by our research group using genomic and proteomic approaches. The results suggest that direct modulation of myocardium gene and protein expression by inflammatory cytokines may be a new pathogenic mechanism in CCC, with therapeutic implications.

  1. Genome Wide Association Study (GWAS) of Chagas Cardiomyopathy in Trypanosoma cruzi Seropositive Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Xutao; Sabino, Ester C.; Cunha-Neto, Edecio; Ribeiro, Antonio L.; Ianni, Barbara; Mady, Charles; Busch, Michael P.; Seielstad, Mark; Component, International

    2013-01-01

    Background Familial aggregation of Chagas cardiac disease in T. cruzi–infected persons suggests that human genetic variation may be an important determinant of disease progression. Objective To perform a GWAS using a well-characterized cohort to detect single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and genes associated with cardiac outcomes. Methods A retrospective cohort study was developed by the NHLBI REDS-II program in Brazil. Samples were collected from 499 T. cruzi seropositive blood donors who had donated between1996 and 2002, and 101 patients with clinically diagnosed Chagas cardiomyopathy. In 2008–2010, all subjects underwent a complete medical examination. After genotype calling, quality control filtering with exclusion of 20 cases, and imputation of 1,000 genomes variants; association analysis was performed for 7 cardiac and parasite related traits, adjusting for population stratification. Results The cohort showed a wide range of African, European, and modest Native American admixture proportions, consistent with the recent history of Brazil. No SNPs were found to be highly (P<10−8) associated with cardiomyopathy. The two mostly highly associated SNPs for cardiomyopathy (rs4149018 and rs12582717; P-values <10−6) are located on Chromosome 12p12.2 in the SLCO1B1 gene, a solute carrier family member. We identified 44 additional genic SNPs associated with six traits at P-value <10-6: Ejection Fraction, PR, QRS, QT intervals, antibody levels by EIA, and parasitemia by PCR. Conclusion This GWAS identified suggestive SNPs that may impact the risk of progression to cardiomyopathy. Although this Chagas cohort is the largest examined by GWAS to date, (580 subjects), moderate sample size may explain in part the limited number of significant SNP variants. Enlarging the current sample through expanded cohorts and meta-analyses, and targeted studies of candidate genes, will be required to confirm and extend the results reported here. Future studies should also

  2. Chagas Cardiomyopathy in New Orleans and the Southeastern United States

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Robert C.; Burak, Joshua; Tiwari, Sumit; Chakraborti, Chayan; Sander, Gary E.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Chagas disease (CD), caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, affects 6-7 million people worldwide annually, primarily in Central and South America, and >300,000 people in the United States. CD consists of acute and chronic stages. Hallmarks of acute CD include fever, myalgia, diaphoresis, hepatosplenomegaly, and myocarditis. Symptoms of chronic CD include pathologic involvement of the heart, esophagus, and colon. Myocardial involvement is identifiable by electrocardiogram and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging showing inflammation and left ventricular wall functional abnormalities. Case Reports: We present two cases of CD identified in a single hospital in the Southeastern United States. Case 1 presents a patient with symptoms of anginal chest pain and associated shortness of breath with myocardial involvement suggestive of ischemic infarction but normal coronary arteries. Case 2 describes a patient with no physical symptoms and echocardiogram with ejection fraction of 50% with posterolateral and anterolateral wall hypokinesis but normal coronary arteries. Conclusion: With a growing number of immigrants from Central and South America in the United States, it is imperative for clinicians to include CD as part of the differential diagnosis for patients presenting with heart disease who have a history of exposure to T. cruzi endemic areas. PMID:27660581

  3. Pathology of Chronic Chagas Cardiomyopathy in the United States:  A Detailed Review of 13 Cardiectomy Cases.

    PubMed

    Kransdorf, Evan P; Fishbein, Mike C; Czer, Lawrence S C; Patel, Jignesh K; Velleca, Angela; Tazelaar, Henry D; Roy, R Raina; Steidley, D Eric; Kobashigawa, Jon A; Luthringer, Daniel J

    2016-08-01

    The pathologic features of chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy may not be widely appreciated in the United States. We sought to describe the gross, microscopic, immunohistochemical, and molecular pathology features useful to diagnose chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy. The features from a case series of cardiectomy specimens of patients undergoing heart transplantation (12 patients) or mechanical circulatory support device implantation (one patient) for chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy at three institutions in the United States are reported and analyzed. Gross findings included enlarged and dilated ventricles (100% of cases), mural thrombi (54%), epicardial plaques (42%), and left ventricular aneurysm (36%). Microscopic evaluation revealed myocarditis (100% of cases) characterized by mononuclear cell infiltration, fibrosis (100%), nonnecrotizing granulomas (62%), and giant cells (38%). Two specimens (15%) showed rare intracellular amastigotes. Immunohistochemical assays for Trypanosoma cruzi organisms were negative in all cardiectomy specimens, whereas tissue polymerase chain reaction was positive in six (54%) of 11 cases. The gross and microscopic features of chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy in the United States appear similar to those reported in endemic countries. Importantly, tissue polymerase chain reaction may be useful to confirm the diagnosis. © American Society for Clinical Pathology, 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Prevalence and Impact of Chagas Disease Among Latin American Immigrants With Nonischemic Cardiomyopathy in Los Angeles, California.

    PubMed

    Traina, Mahmoud I; Sanchez, Daniel R; Hernandez, Salvador; Bradfield, Jason S; Labedi, Mohamed R; Ngab, Tarik A; Steurer, Frank; Montgomery, Susan P; Meymandi, Sheba K

    2015-09-01

    Chagas disease is a well-known cause of cardiomyopathy in Latin America; however, 300 000 individuals are estimated to have Chagas disease in the United States. This study examined the prevalence and impact of Chagas cardiomyopathy (CCM) in a US population. We hypothesized that patients with CCM would have increased morbidity and mortality when compared with patients with non-CCM. This is a single-center, prospective cohort study. Enrollment criteria were new diagnosis of nonischemic cardiomyopathy (left ventricular ejection fraction ≤40%) and previous residence in Latin America for at least 12 months. Serological testing for Trypanosoma cruzi was performed at enrollment. The primary end point was all-cause mortality or heart transplantation. The secondary end point was heart failure-related hospitalization. A total of 135 patients were enrolled, with a median of 43 months of follow-up. Chagas disease was diagnosed in 25 (19%) patients. The primary end point occurred in 9 patients (36%) in the CCM group and in 11 patients (10%) in the non-CCM group (hazard ratio [HR], 4.46; 95% confidence interval, 1.8-10.8; P=0.001). The secondary end point occurred in 13 patients (52%) in the CCM group and in 35 patients (32%) in the non-CCM group (HR, 2.22; 95% confidence interval, 1.2-4.2; P=0.01). There is a high prevalence of Chagas disease among Latin American immigrants diagnosed with nonischemic cardiomyopathy in Los Angeles. Advanced CCM portends a poor prognosis and is associated with increased all-cause mortality/heart transplantation and heart failure-related hospitalization. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  5. Chagas Cardiomyopathy: Usefulness of EKG and Echocardiogram in a Non-Endemic Country

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Montalvá, Adrián; Salvador, Fernando; Rodríguez-Palomares, José; Sulleiro, Elena; Sao-Avilés, Augusto; Roure, Sílvia; Valerio, Lluís; Evangelista, Arturo; Molina, Israel

    2016-01-01

    Background Chagas disease (CD) is a major cause of cardiomyopathy in Latin America, and migration movements have now spread the disease worldwide. However, data regarding Chagas cardiomyopathy (CC) and the usefulness of echocardiography in non endemic countries are still scarce. Methods and results We selected 485 patients in the chronic phase of CD from two Spanish settings. Data from physical examination, electrocardiogram (EKG), x-ray, and two dimensional transthoracic echocardiogram were recorded. Trypanosoma cruzi DNA was assessed by PCR in peripheral blood. Patients were stratified according to the Kuschnir classification and a combination of echocardiogram and electrocardiogram findings. Patients mainly came from Bolivia (459; 94.6%). One hundred and forty three patients (31.5%) had at least one electrocardiogram abnormality. Twenty seven patients (5.3%) had an abnormal echocardiography. Patients with abnormal echocardiography were older (47 (IQR 38–57) years vs 41 (IQR 38–57) years); p = 0.019) and there was a greater proportion of males (66.7% vs 29.7%); p<0.001). Among echocardiographic variables, diastolic dysfunction was associated with poor cardiac status. In the multivariate analysis, abnormal EKG and gender were associated with abnormal echocardiography. Echocardiography may be spared for males under 30 and females under 45 years old with normal EKG as the likelihood of having an abnormal echocardiography is minimal. Association between T. cruzi DNA in the peripheral blood and cardiac involvement was not observed. Conclusion CC rates in the studied population are low. Age and sex are important determinants for the development of CC, and with the EKG should guide echocardiogram performance. PMID:27308824

  6. Pharmacological interventions for treating heart failure in patients with Chagas cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Martí-Carvajal, Arturo J; Kwong, Joey S W

    2016-07-08

    Chagas disease-related cardiomyopathy is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in Latin America. Despite the substantial burden to the healthcare system, there is uncertainty regarding the efficacy and safety of pharmacological interventions for treating heart failure in people with Chagas disease. This is an update of a Cochrane review published in 2012. To assess the clinical benefits and harms of current pharmacological interventions for treating heart failure in people with Chagas cardiomyopathy. We updated the searches in the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; The Cochrane Library 2016, Issue 1), MEDLINE (Ovid; 1946 to to February Week 1 2016), EMBASE (Ovid; 1947 to 2016 Week 07), LILACS (1982 to 15 February 2016), and Web of Science (Thomson Reuters; 1970 to 15 February 2016). We checked the reference lists of included papers. We applied no language restrictions. We included randomised clinical trials (RCTs) that assessed the effects of pharmacological interventions to treat heart failure in adult patients (18 years or older) with symptomatic heart failure (New York Heart Association classes II to IV), regardless of the left ventricular ejection fraction stage (reduced or preserved), with Chagas cardiomyopathy. We did not apply limits to the length of follow-up. Primary outcomes were all-cause mortality, cardiovascular mortality at 30 days, time-to-heart decompensation, disease-free period (at 30, 60, and 90 days), and adverse events. Two authors independently performed study selection, 'Risk of bias' assessment and data extraction. We estimated relative risk (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for dichotomous outcomes. We measured statistical heterogeneity using the I² statistic. We used a fixed-effect model to synthesize the findings. We contacted authors for additional data. We developed 'Summary of findings' (SoF) tables and used GRADE methodology to assess the quality of the evidence. In this update, we identified one new

  7. CHARITY: Chagas cardiomyopathy bisoprolol intervention study: a randomized double-blind placebo force-titration controlled study with Bisoprolol in patients with chronic heart failure secondary to Chagas cardiomyopathy [NCT00323973

    PubMed Central

    Quiros, Franklin R; Morillo, Carlos A; Casas, Juan P; Cubillos, Luz A; Silva, Federico A

    2006-01-01

    Background Chagas' disease is the major cause of disability secondary to tropical diseases in young adults from Latin America, and around 20 million people are currently infected by T. cruzi. Heart failure due to Chagas cardiomyopathy is the main clinical presenation in Colombia. Heart failure due to Chagas' disease may respond to digoxin, diuretics and vasodilator therapy. Beta-adrenoreceptor antagonism seems to protect against the increased risk of cardiac arrhythmia and sudden death due to chronic sympathetic stimulation. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effects of the selective beta-adrenergic receptor blocker Bisoprolol on cardiovascular mortality, hospital readmission due to progressive heart failure and functional status in patients with heart failure secondary to Chagas' cardiomyopathy. Methods/design A cohort of 500 T. cruzi seropositive patients (250 per arm) will be selected from several institutions in Colombia. During the pretreatment period an initial evaluation visit will be scheduled in which participants will sign consent forms and baseline measurements and tests will be conducted including blood pressure measurements, twelve-lead ECG and left ventricular ejection fraction assessment by 2D echocardiography. Quality of life questionnaire will be performed two weeks apart during baseline examination using the "Minnesota living with heart failure" questionnaire. A minimum of two 6 minutes corridor walk test once a week over a two-week period will be performed to measure functional class. During the treatment period patients will be randomly assigned to receive Bisoprolol or placebo, initially taking a total daily dose of 2.5 mgrs qd. The dose will be increased every two weeks to 5, 7.5 and 10 mgrs qd (maximum maintenance dose). Follow-up assessment will include clinical check-up, and blood collection for future measurements of inflammatory reactants and markers. Quality of life measurements will be obtained at six months. This study will allow

  8. Total Artificial Heart as Bridge to Heart Transplantation in Chagas Cardiomyopathy: Case Report.

    PubMed

    Ruzza, A; Czer, L S C; De Robertis, M; Luthringer, D; Moriguchi, J; Kobashigawa, J; Trento, A; Arabia, F

    2016-01-01

    Chagas disease (CD) is becoming an increasingly recognized cause of dilated cardiomyopathy outside of Latin America, where it is endemic, due to population shifts and migration. Heart transplantation (HTx) is a therapeutic option for end-stage cardiomyopathy due to CD, but may be considered a relative contraindication due to potential reactivation of the causative organism with immunosuppression therapy. The total artificial heart (TAH) can provide mechanical circulatory support in decompensated patients with severe biventricular dysfunction until the time of HTx, while avoiding immunosuppressive therapy and removing the organ most affected by the causative organism. We report herein a patient with CD and severe biventricular dysfunction, who had mechanical circulatory support with a TAH for more than 6 months, followed by successful orthotopic HTx and treatment with benznidazole for 3 months. The patient had no evidence of recurrent disease in the transplanted heart based on endomyocardial biopsy up to 1 year post-transplantation, and remains alive more than 30 months after insertion of a TAH and 24 months after HTx. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Chagas Cardiomyopathy Manifestations and Trypanosoma cruzi Genotypes Circulating in Chronic Chagasic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez, Juan David; Guhl, Felipe; Rendón, Lina María; Rosas, Fernando; Marin-Neto, Jose A.; Morillo, Carlos A.

    2010-01-01

    Chagas disease caused by Trypanosoma cruzi is a complex disease that is endemic and an important problem in public health in Latin America. The T. cruzi parasite is classified into six discrete taxonomic units (DTUs) based on the recently proposed nomenclature (TcI, TcII, TcIII, TcIV, TcV and TcVI). The discovery of genetic variability within TcI showed the presence of five genotypes (Ia, Ib, Ic, Id and Ie) related to the transmission cycle of Chagas disease. In Colombia, TcI is more prevalent but TcII has also been reported, as has mixed infection by both TcI and TcII in the same Chagasic patient. The objectives of this study were to determine the T. cruzi DTUs that are circulating in Colombian chronic Chagasic patients and to obtain more information about the molecular epidemiology of Chagas disease in Colombia. We also assessed the presence of electrocardiographic, radiologic and echocardiographic abnormalities with the purpose of correlating T. cruzi genetic variability and cardiac disease. Molecular characterization was performed in Colombian adult chronic Chagasic patients based on the intergenic region of the mini-exon gene, the 24Sα and 18S regions of rDNA and the variable region of satellite DNA, whereby the presence of T.cruzi I, II, III and IV was detected. In our population, mixed infections also occurred, with TcI-TcII, TcI-TcIII and TcI-TcIV, as well as the existence of the TcI genotypes showing the presence of genotypes Ia and Id. Patients infected with TcI demonstrated a higher prevalence of cardiac alterations than those infected with TcII. These results corroborate the predominance of TcI in Colombia and show the first report of TcIII and TcIV in Colombian Chagasic patients. Findings also indicate that Chagas cardiomyopathy manifestations are more correlated with TcI than with TcII in Colombia. PMID:21152056

  10. Chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy: a review of the main pathogenic mechanisms and the efficacy of aetiological treatment following the BENznidazole Evaluation for Interrupting Trypanosomiasis (BENEFIT) trial

    PubMed Central

    Rassi, Anis; Marin, José Antonio; Rassi, Anis

    2017-01-01

    Chagas cardiomyopathy is the most frequent and most severe manifestation of chronic Chagas disease, and is one of the leading causes of morbidity and death in Latin America. Although the pathogenesis of Chagas cardiomyopathy is incompletely understood, it may involve several mechanisms, including parasite-dependent myocardial damage, immune-mediated myocardial injury (induced by the parasite itself and by self-antigens), and microvascular and neurogenic disturbances. In the past three decades, a consensus has emerged that parasite persistence is crucial to the development and progression of Chagas cardiomyopathy. In this context, antiparasitic treatment in the chronic phase of Chagas disease could prevent complications related to the disease. However, according to the results of the BENEFIT trial, benznidazole seems to have no benefit for arresting disease progression in patients with chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy. In this review, we give an update on the main pathogenic mechanisms of Chagas disease, and re-examine and discuss the results of the BENEFIT trial, together with its limitations and implications. PMID:28225900

  11. Chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy: a review of the main pathogenic mechanisms and the efficacy of aetiological treatment following the BENznidazole Evaluation for Interrupting Trypanosomiasis (BENEFIT) trial.

    PubMed

    Rassi, Anis; Marin, José Antonio; Rassi, Anis

    2017-03-01

    Chagas cardiomyopathy is the most frequent and most severe manifestation of chronic Chagas disease, and is one of the leading causes of morbidity and death in Latin America. Although the pathogenesis of Chagas cardiomyopathy is incompletely understood, it may involve several mechanisms, including parasite-dependent myocardial damage, immune-mediated myocardial injury (induced by the parasite itself and by self-antigens), and microvascular and neurogenic disturbances. In the past three decades, a consensus has emerged that parasite persistence is crucial to the development and progression of Chagas cardiomyopathy. In this context, antiparasitic treatment in the chronic phase of Chagas disease could prevent complications related to the disease. However, according to the results of the BENEFIT trial, benznidazole seems to have no benefit for arresting disease progression in patients with chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy. In this review, we give an update on the main pathogenic mechanisms of Chagas disease, and re-examine and discuss the results of the BENEFIT trial, together with its limitations and implications.

  12. Chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy: a review of the main pathogenic mechanisms and the efficacy of aetiological treatment following the BENznidazole Evaluation for Interrupting Trypanosomiasis (BENEFIT) trial.

    PubMed

    Rassi, Anis; Marin, José Antonio; Rassi, Anis

    2017-02-16

    Chagas cardiomyopathy is the most frequent and most severe manifestation of chronic Chagas disease, and is one of the leading causes of morbidity and death in Latin America. Although the pathogenesis of Chagas cardiomyopathy is incompletely understood, it may involve several mechanisms, including parasite-dependent myocardial damage, immune-mediated myocardial injury (induced by the parasite itself and by self-antigens), and microvascular and neurogenic disturbances. In the past three decades, a consensus has emerged that parasite persistence is crucial to the development and progression of Chagas cardiomyopathy. In this context, antiparasitic treatment in the chronic phase of Chagas disease could prevent complications related to the disease. However, according to the results of the BENEFIT trial, benznidazole seems to have no benefit for arresting disease progression in patients with chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy. In this review, we give an update on the main pathogenic mechanisms of Chagas disease, and re-examine and discuss the results of the BENEFIT trial, together with its limitations and implications.

  13. Therapeutic effects of sphingosine kinase inhibitor N,N-dimethylsphingosine (DMS) in experimental chronic Chagas disease cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, Juliana Fraga; Meira, Cássio Santana; Silva, Daniela Nascimento; Nonaka, Carolina Kymie Vasques; Daltro, Pâmela Santana; Macambira, Simone Garcia; Domizi, Pablo Daniel; Borges, Valéria Matos; Ribeiro-Dos-Santos, Ricardo; de Freitas Souza, Bruno Solano; Soares, Milena Botelho Pereira

    2017-07-21

    Chagas disease cardiomyopathy is a parasite-driven inflammatory disease to which there are no effective treatments. Here we evaluated the therapeutic potential of N,N-dimethylsphingosine(DMS), which blocks the production of sphingosine-1-phosphate(S1P), a mediator of cellular events during inflammatory responses, in a model of chronic Chagas disease cardiomyopathy. DMS-treated, Trypanosoma cruzi-infected mice had a marked reduction of cardiac inflammation, fibrosis and galectin-3 expression when compared to controls. Serum concentrations of galectin-3, IFNγ and TNFα, as well as cardiac gene expression of inflammatory mediators were reduced after DMS treatment. The gene expression of M1 marker, iNOS, was decreased, while the M2 marker, arginase1, was increased. DMS-treated mice showed an improvement in exercise capacity. Moreover, DMS caused a reduction in parasite load in vivo. DMS inhibited the activation of lymphocytes, and reduced cytokines and NO production in activated macrophage cultures in vitro, while increasing IL-1β production. Analysis by qRT-PCR array showed that DMS treatment modulated inflammasome activation induced by T. cruzi on macrophages. Altogether, our results demonstrate that DMS, through anti-parasitic and immunomodulatory actions, can be beneficial in the treatment of chronic phase of T. cruzi infection and suggest that S1P-activated processes as possible therapeutic targets for the treatment of Chagas disease cardiomyopathy.

  14. Benznidazole Use among Patients with Chronic Chagas' Cardiomyopathy in an Endemic Region of Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Chagas disease (CD) is a neglected tropical disease that affects individuals in almost every country in Latin America. There are two available drugs with antiparasitic profiles; however, only benznidazole (BZN) has been approved for commercialization in Brazil. The usefulness of prescribing BZN for patients with chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy (CCC) is controversial. There are no studies in the literature describing the extent of BZN use at this stage or the profile of patients using this drug. The present study aimed to determine the prevalence and factors associated with previous BZN use among individuals with CCC. This cross-sectional study was conducted with 1,812 individuals with CCC from 21 Brazilian cities endemic for CD. The dependent variable was "prior use of BZN" (no vs. yes). The independent variables were grouped into socioeconomic, lifestyle and medical history aspects. Binary logistic regression (α ≥ 0.05) was used. Among the evaluated individuals, 27.2% reported previous use of BZN. The likelihood of prior use of BZN was higher among younger individuals (OR = 2.7), individuals with a higher education (OR = 2.7), individuals with a lower monthly per capita income (OR = 1.3), individuals who practiced physical exercise (OR = 1.5), individuals who had prior knowledge of the CD diagnosis (OR = 2.5), individuals without hypertension (OR = 1.3) and individuals with a longer time to the CD diagnosis (OR = 6.1). The present study revealed a small proportion of therapeutic BZN use among Brazilian CCC patients. This finding suggests a late diagnosis and undertreatment of the disease. BZN use was higher among individuals with better clinical and demographic conditions but with a lower income and a longer time to the CD diagnosis. Knowledge of the BZN usage profile may help reduce the current state of neglect of this disease and pave the way for future studies. PMID:27855177

  15. Infectious agents and inflammation in donated hearts and dilated cardiomyopathies related to cardiovascular diseases, Chagas' heart disease, primary and secondary dilated cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Mangini, Sandrigo; Higuchi, Maria de Lourdes; Kawakami, Joyce Tiyeko; Reis, Marcia Martins; Ikegami, Renata Nishiyama; Palomino, Suely Aparecida Pinheiro; Pomerantzeff, Pablo Maria Alberto; Fiorelli, Alfredo Inácio; Marcondes-Braga, Fabiana Goulart; Bacal, Fernando; Ferreira, Sílvia Moreira Ayub; Issa, Victor Sarli; Souza, Germano Emílio Conceição; Chizzola, Paulo Roberto; Bocchi, Edimar Alcides

    2015-01-15

    Clinical and experimental conflicting data have questioned the relationship between infectious agents, inflammation and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of infectious agents and inflammation in endomyocardial biopsy (EMB) specimens from patients with idiopathic DCM, explanted hearts from different etiologies, including Chagas' disease, compared to donated hearts. From 2008 to 2011, myocardial samples from 29 heart donors and 55 patients with DCMs from different etiologies were studied (32 idiopathic, 9 chagasic, 6 ischemic and 8 other specific etiologies). Inflammation was investigated by immunohistochemistry and infectious agents by immunohistochemistry, molecular biology, in situ hybridization and electron microscopy. There were no differences regarding the presence of macrophages, expression of HLA class II and ICAM-I in donors and DCM. Inflammation in Chagas' disease was predominant. By immunohistochemistry, in donors, there was a higher expression of antigens of enterovirus and Borrelia, hepatitis B and C in DCMs. By molecular biology, in all groups, the positivity was elevated to microorganisms, including co-infections, with a higher positivity to adenovirus and HHV6 in donors towards DCMs. This study was the first to demonstrate the presence of virus in the heart tissue of chagasic DCM. The presence of inflammation and infectious agents is frequent in donated hearts, in the myocardium of patients with idiopathic DCM, myocardial dysfunction related to cardiovascular diseases, and primary and secondary cardiomyopathies, including Chagas' disease. The role of co-infection in Chagas' heart disease physiopathology deserves to be investigated in future studies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. PREDICTIVE FACTORS FOR THE PROGRESSION OF CHRONIC CHAGAS CARDIOMYOPATHY IN PATIENTS WITHOUT LEFT VENTRICULAR DYSFUNCTION

    PubMed Central

    SILVA, Silvana de Araújo; GONTIJO, Eliane Dias; DIAS, João Carlos Pinto; ANDRADE, Camila Gomes de Souza; AMARAL, Carlos Faria Santos

    2015-01-01

    The identification of predictors for the progression of chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy (CCC) is essential to ensure adequate patient management. This study looked into a non-concurrent cohort of 165 CCC patients between 1985 and 2010 for independent predictors for CCC progression. The outcomes were worsening of the CCC scores and the onset of left ventricular dysfunction assessed by means of echo-Doppler cardiography. Patients were analyzed for social, demographic, epidemiologic, clinical and workup-related variables. A descriptive analysis was conducted, followed by survival curves based on univariate (Kaplan-Meier and Cox’s univariate model) and multivariate (Cox regression model) analysis. Patients were followed from two to 20 years (mean: 8.2). Their mean age was 44.8 years (20-77). Comparing both iterations of the study, in the second there was a statistically significant increase in the PR interval and in the QRS duration, despite a reduction in heart rates (Wilcoxon < 0.01). The predictors for CCC progression in the final regression model were male gender (HR = 2.81), Holter monitoring showing pauses equal to or greater than two seconds (HR = 3.02) increased cardiothoracic ratio (HR = 7.87) and time of use of digitalis (HR = 1.41). Patients with multiple predictive factors require stricter follow-up and treatment. PMID:25923895

  17. Predictive factors for the progression of chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy in patients without left ventricular dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Silva, Silvana de Araújo; Gontijo, Eliane Dias; Dias, João Carlos Pinto; Andrade, Camila Gomes de Souza; Amaral, Carlos Faria Santos

    2015-01-01

    The identification of predictors for the progression of chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy (CCC) is essential to ensure adequate patient management. This study looked into a non-concurrent cohort of 165 CCC patients between 1985 and 2010 for independent predictors for CCC progression. The outcomes were worsening of the CCC scores and the onset of left ventricular dysfunction assessed by means of echo-Doppler cardiography. Patients were analyzed for social, demographic, epidemiologic, clinical and workup-related variables. A descriptive analysis was conducted, followed by survival curves based on univariate (Kaplan-Meier and Cox's univariate model) and multivariate (Cox regression model) analysis. Patients were followed from two to 20 years (mean: 8.2). Their mean age was 44.8 years (20-77). Comparing both iterations of the study, in the second there was a statistically significant increase in the PR interval and in the QRS duration, despite a reduction in heart rates (Wilcoxon < 0.01). The predictors for CCC progression in the final regression model were male gender (HR = 2.81), Holter monitoring showing pauses equal to or greater than two seconds (HR = 3.02) increased cardiothoracic ratio (HR = 7.87) and time of use of digitalis (HR = 1.41). Patients with multiple predictive factors require stricter follow-up and treatment.

  18. Genetically Determined MBL Deficiency Is Associated with Protection against Chronic Cardiomyopathy in Chagas Disease.

    PubMed

    Luz, Paola Rosa; Miyazaki, Márcia I; Chiminacio Neto, Nelson; Padeski, Marcela C; Barros, Ana Cláudia M; Boldt, Angelica B W; Messias-Reason, Iara J

    2016-01-01

    Chagas disease (CD) is caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, whose sugar moieties are recognized by mannan binding lectin (MBL), a soluble pattern-recognition molecule that activates the lectin pathway of complement. MBL levels and protein activity are affected by polymorphisms in the MBL2 gene. We sequenced the MBL2 promoter and exon 1 in 196 chronic CD patients and 202 controls. The MBL2*C allele, which causes MBL deficiency, was associated with protection against CD (P = 0.007, OR = 0.32). Compared with controls, genotypes with this allele were completely absent in patients with the cardiac form of the disease (P = 0.003). Furthermore, cardiac patients with genotypes causing MBL deficiency presented less heart damage (P = 0.003, OR = 0.23), compared with cardiac patients having the XA haplotype causing low MBL levels, but fully capable of activating complement (P = 0.005, OR = 7.07). Among the patients, those with alleles causing MBL deficiency presented lower levels of cytokines and chemokines possibly implicated in symptom development (IL9, p = 0.013; PDGFB, p = 0.036 and RANTES, p = 0.031). These findings suggest a protective effect of genetically determined MBL deficiency against the development and progression of chronic CD cardiomyopathy.

  19. Genetically Determined MBL Deficiency Is Associated with Protection against Chronic Cardiomyopathy in Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Márcia I.; Chiminacio Neto, Nelson; Padeski, Marcela C.; Barros, Ana Cláudia M.

    2016-01-01

    Chagas disease (CD) is caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, whose sugar moieties are recognized by mannan binding lectin (MBL), a soluble pattern-recognition molecule that activates the lectin pathway of complement. MBL levels and protein activity are affected by polymorphisms in the MBL2 gene. We sequenced the MBL2 promoter and exon 1 in 196 chronic CD patients and 202 controls. The MBL2*C allele, which causes MBL deficiency, was associated with protection against CD (P = 0.007, OR = 0.32). Compared with controls, genotypes with this allele were completely absent in patients with the cardiac form of the disease (P = 0.003). Furthermore, cardiac patients with genotypes causing MBL deficiency presented less heart damage (P = 0.003, OR = 0.23), compared with cardiac patients having the XA haplotype causing low MBL levels, but fully capable of activating complement (P = 0.005, OR = 7.07). Among the patients, those with alleles causing MBL deficiency presented lower levels of cytokines and chemokines possibly implicated in symptom development (IL9, p = 0.013; PDGFB, p = 0.036 and RANTES, p = 0.031). These findings suggest a protective effect of genetically determined MBL deficiency against the development and progression of chronic CD cardiomyopathy. PMID:26745156

  20. Simvastatin Attenuates Endothelial Activation through 15-Epi-Lipoxin A4 Production in Murine Chronic Chagas Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    González-Herrera, Fabiola; Cramer, Allysson; Pimentel, Pollyana; Castillo, Christian; Liempi, Ana; Kemmerling, Ulrike; Machado, Fabiana S; Maya, Juan D

    2017-03-01

    Current treatments for chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy, a disease with high mortality rates and caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, are unsatisfactory. Myocardial inflammation, including endothelial activation, is responsible for the structural and functional damage seen in the chronic phase. The clinical efficacy of benznidazole could be improved by decreasing chronic inflammation. Statins, which have anti-inflammatory properties, may improve the action of benznidazole. Here, the action of simvastatin in a murine model of chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy and the link with the production of the proresolving eicosanoid 15-epi-lipoxin A4, produced by 5-lipoxygenase, are evaluated. Simvastatin decreased the expression of the adhesion molecules E-selectin, intracellular adhesion molecule type 1 (ICAM-1), and vascular cell adhesion molecule type 1 (VCAM-1) in T. cruzi-infected mice. However, when this drug was administered to 5-lipoxygenase-deficient mice, the anti-inflammatory effect was not observed unless exogenous 15-epi-lipoxin A4 was administered. Thus, in chronic Chagas disease, 5-epi-lipoxin A4 induced by simvastatin treatment could improve the pathophysiological condition of patients by increasing the trypanocidal action of benznidazole.

  1. Simvastatin Attenuates Endothelial Activation through 15-Epi-Lipoxin A4 Production in Murine Chronic Chagas Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    González-Herrera, Fabiola; Cramer, Allysson; Pimentel, Pollyana; Castillo, Christian; Liempi, Ana; Kemmerling, Ulrike; Machado, Fabiana S.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Current treatments for chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy, a disease with high mortality rates and caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, are unsatisfactory. Myocardial inflammation, including endothelial activation, is responsible for the structural and functional damage seen in the chronic phase. The clinical efficacy of benznidazole could be improved by decreasing chronic inflammation. Statins, which have anti-inflammatory properties, may improve the action of benznidazole. Here, the action of simvastatin in a murine model of chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy and the link with the production of the proresolving eicosanoid 15-epi-lipoxin A4, produced by 5-lipoxygenase, are evaluated. Simvastatin decreased the expression of the adhesion molecules E-selectin, intracellular adhesion molecule type 1 (ICAM-1), and vascular cell adhesion molecule type 1 (VCAM-1) in T. cruzi-infected mice. However, when this drug was administered to 5-lipoxygenase-deficient mice, the anti-inflammatory effect was not observed unless exogenous 15-epi-lipoxin A4 was administered. Thus, in chronic Chagas disease, 5-epi-lipoxin A4 induced by simvastatin treatment could improve the pathophysiological condition of patients by increasing the trypanocidal action of benznidazole. PMID:27993857

  2. Longitudinal study of patients with chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy in Brazil (SaMi-Trop project): a cohort profile

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso, Clareci Silva; Sabino, Ester Cerdeira; Oliveira, Claudia Di Lorenzo; de Oliveira, Lea Campos; Ferreira, Ariela Mota; Cunha-Neto, Edécio; Bierrenbach, Ana Luiza; Ferreira, João Eduardo; Haikal, Desirée Sant'Ana; Reingold, Arthur L; Ribeiro, Antonio Luiz P

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We have established a prospective cohort of 1959 patients with chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy to evaluate if a clinical prediction rule based on ECG, brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels, and other biomarkers can be useful in clinical practice. This paper outlines the study and baseline characteristics of the participants. Participants The study is being conducted in 21 municipalities of the northern part of Minas Gerais State in Brazil, and includes a follow-up of 2 years. The baseline evaluation included collection of sociodemographic information, social determinants of health, health-related behaviours, comorbidities, medicines in use, history of previous treatment for Chagas disease, functional class, quality of life, blood sample collection, and ECG. Patients were mostly female, aged 50–74 years, with low family income and educational level, with known Chagas disease for >10 years; 46% presented with functional class >II. Previous use of benznidazole was reported by 25.2% and permanent use of pacemaker by 6.2%. Almost half of the patients presented with high blood cholesterol and hypertension, and one-third of them had diabetes mellitus. N-terminal of the prohormone BNP (NT-ProBNP) level was >300 pg/mL in 30% of the sample. Findings to date Clinical and laboratory markers predictive of severe and progressive Chagas disease were identified as high NT-ProBNP levels, as well as symptoms of advanced heart failure. These results confirm the important residual morbidity of Chagas disease in the remote areas, thus supporting political decisions that should prioritise in addition to epidemiological surveillance the medical treatment of chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy in the coming years. The São Paulo-Minas Gerais Tropical Medicine Research Center (SaMi-Trop) represents a major challenge for focused research in neglected diseases, with knowledge that can be applied in primary healthcare. Future plans We will continue following this patients’ cohort

  3. Longitudinal study of patients with chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy in Brazil (SaMi-Trop project): a cohort profile.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Clareci Silva; Sabino, Ester Cerdeira; Oliveira, Claudia Di Lorenzo; de Oliveira, Lea Campos; Ferreira, Ariela Mota; Cunha-Neto, Edécio; Bierrenbach, Ana Luiza; Ferreira, João Eduardo; Haikal, Desirée Sant'Ana; Reingold, Arthur L; Ribeiro, Antonio Luiz P

    2016-05-04

    We have established a prospective cohort of 1959 patients with chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy to evaluate if a clinical prediction rule based on ECG, brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels, and other biomarkers can be useful in clinical practice. This paper outlines the study and baseline characteristics of the participants. The study is being conducted in 21 municipalities of the northern part of Minas Gerais State in Brazil, and includes a follow-up of 2 years. The baseline evaluation included collection of sociodemographic information, social determinants of health, health-related behaviours, comorbidities, medicines in use, history of previous treatment for Chagas disease, functional class, quality of life, blood sample collection, and ECG. Patients were mostly female, aged 50-74 years, with low family income and educational level, with known Chagas disease for >10 years; 46% presented with functional class >II. Previous use of benznidazole was reported by 25.2% and permanent use of pacemaker by 6.2%. Almost half of the patients presented with high blood cholesterol and hypertension, and one-third of them had diabetes mellitus. N-terminal of the prohormone BNP (NT-ProBNP) level was >300 pg/mL in 30% of the sample. Clinical and laboratory markers predictive of severe and progressive Chagas disease were identified as high NT-ProBNP levels, as well as symptoms of advanced heart failure. These results confirm the important residual morbidity of Chagas disease in the remote areas, thus supporting political decisions that should prioritise in addition to epidemiological surveillance the medical treatment of chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy in the coming years. The São Paulo-Minas Gerais Tropical Medicine Research Center (SaMi-Trop) represents a major challenge for focused research in neglected diseases, with knowledge that can be applied in primary healthcare. We will continue following this patients' cohort to provide relevant information about the development

  4. Selective Decrease of Components of the Creatine Kinase System and ATP Synthase Complex in Chronic Chagas Disease Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Priscila Camillo; Santos, Ronaldo Honorato Barros; Fiorelli, Alfredo Inácio; Bilate, Angelina Morand Bianchi; Benvenuti, Luiz Alberto; Stolf, Noedir Antonio; Kalil, Jorge; Cunha-Neto, Edecio

    2011-01-01

    Background Chronic Chagas disease cardiomyopathy (CCC) is an inflammatory dilated cardiomyopathy with a worse prognosis than other cardiomyopathies. CCC occurs in 30 % of individuals infected with Trypanosoma cruzi, endemic in Latin America. Heart failure is associated with impaired energy metabolism, which may be correlated to contractile dysfunction. We thus analyzed the myocardial gene and protein expression, as well as activity, of key mitochondrial enzymes related to ATP production, in myocardial samples of end-stage CCC, idiopathic dilated (IDC) and ischemic (IC) cardiomyopathies. Methodology/Principal Findings Myocardium homogenates from CCC (N = 5), IC (N = 5) and IDC (N = 5) patients, as well as from heart donors (N = 5) were analyzed for protein and mRNA expression of mitochondrial creatine kinase (CKMit) and muscular creatine kinase (CKM) and ATP synthase subunits aplha and beta by immunoblotting and by real-time RT-PCR. Total myocardial CK activity was also assessed. Protein levels of CKM and CK activity were reduced in all three cardiomyopathy groups. However, total CK activity, as well as ATP synthase alpha chain protein levels, were significantly lower in CCC samples than IC and IDC samples. CCC myocardium displayed selective reduction of protein levels and activity of enzymes crucial for maintaining cytoplasmic ATP levels. Conclusions/Significance The selective impairment of the CK system may be associated to the loss of inotropic reserve observed in CCC. Reduction of ATP synthase alpha levels is consistent with a decrease in myocardial ATP generation through oxidative phosphorylation. Together, these results suggest that the energetic deficit is more intense in the myocardium of CCC patients than in the other tested dilated cardiomyopathies. PMID:21738806

  5. Synergic and antagonistic relationship between MMP-2 and MMP-9 with fibrosis and inflammation in Chagas' cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Medeiros, N I; Gomes, J A S; Correa-Oliveira, R

    2017-08-01

    Cardiomyopathy is the most important clinical manifestation in the chronic phase of Chagas' disease because of its frequency, severity and impact on morbidity and mortality. The extracellular matrix degradation during cardiac remodeling in Trypanosoma cruzi infection is driven by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), primarily the MMP-2 and MMP-9 gelatinases. MMPs also regulate some molecules related to inflammation, such as growth factors, cytokines and chemokines. The involvement of MMP-2 and MMP-9 is not yet fully understood in Chagas' disease. It has been proposed that the gelatinases may have opposite effect on inflammation/regulation and cardiac remodeling. MMP-2 would participate in regulation, offering a protective role for cardiac damage in asymptomatic patients and would be a good marker for the initiation of changes in the heart. On the other hand, MMP-9 can be used as a marker for serious changes on the heart and would be associated with inflammation and fibrosis. Here, we consolidate all characteristics involving MMP-2 and MMP-9 in Chagas' disease based on current studies to clarify their participation on the inflammation/regulation and fibrosis, and the synergistic or antagonistic role between them. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Detection of Trypanosoma cruzi DNA in blood by PCR is associated with Chagas cardiomyopathy and disease severity.

    PubMed

    Sabino, E C; Ribeiro, A L; Lee, T H; Oliveira, C L; Carneiro-Proietti, A B; Antunes, A P; Menezes, M M; Ianni, B M; Salemi, V M; Nastari, L; Fernandes, F; Sachdev, V; Carrick, D M; Deng, X; Wright, D; Gonçalez, T T; Murphy, E L; Custer, B; Busch, M P

    2015-04-01

    The significance of detection of Trypanosoma cruzi DNA in blood of antibody-positive patients for risk of development of Chagas heart disease is not well established. The objective of this study was to compare detection of T. cruzi DNA with known clinical and laboratory markers of Chagas cardiomyopathy (CC) severity. This is a case-control study nested within a retrospective cohort developed in Brazil to understand the natural history of Chagas disease. The study enrolled 499 T. cruzi seropositive blood donors (SP-BD) and 488 frequency matched seronegative control donors (SN-BD) who had donated between 1996 and 2002, and 101 patients with clinically diagnosed CC. In 2008-2010 all enrolled subjects underwent a health questionnaire, medical examination, electrocardiograms and echocardiograms and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analyses. A blinded panel of three cardiologists adjudicated the outcome of CC. Trypanosoma cruzi kinetoplast minicircle sequences were amplified by real-time PCR using an assay with a sensitivity of one parasite per 20 mL of blood. All testing was performed on coded samples. Rates of PCR detection of T. cruzi DNA were significantly (P = 0.003) higher in CC patients and SP-BD diagnosed with CC (79/105 [75.2 %]) compared with SP-BD without CC (143/279 [51.3%]). The presence of parasitaemia was significantly associated with known markers of disease progression such as QRS and QT interval duration, lower left ventricular ejection fraction, higher left ventricular index mass, and elevated troponin and NTpro-BNP levels. Trypanosoma cruzi PCR positivity is associated with presence and severity of cardiomyopathy, suggesting a direct role of parasite persistence in disease pathogenesis. © 2015 The Authors. European Journal of Heart Failure © 2015 European Society of Cardiology.

  7. Genetic susceptibility to Chagas disease cardiomyopathy: involvement of several genes of the innate immunity and chemokine-dependent migration pathways.

    PubMed

    Frade, Amanda Farage; Pissetti, Cristina Wide; Ianni, Barbara Maria; Saba, Bruno; Lin-Wang, Hui Tzu; Nogueira, Luciana Gabriel; de Melo Borges, Ariana; Buck, Paula; Dias, Fabrício; Baron, Monique; Ferreira, Ludmila Rodrigues Pinto; Schmidt, Andre; Marin-Neto, José Antonio; Hirata, Mario; Sampaio, Marcelo; Fragata, Abílio; Pereira, Alexandre Costa; Donadi, Eduardo; Kalil, Jorge; Rodrigues, Virmondes; Cunha-Neto, Edecio; Chevillard, Christophe

    2013-12-12

    Chagas disease, caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi is endemic in Latin America. Thirty percent of infected individuals develop chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy (CCC), an inflammatory dilated cardiomyopathy that is, by far, the most important clinical consequence of T. cruzi infection. The others remain asymptomatic (ASY). A possible genetic component to disease progression was suggested by familial aggregation of cases and the association of markers of innate and adaptive immunity genes with CCC development. Migration of Th1-type T cells play a major role in myocardial damage. Our genetic analysis focused on CCR5, CCL2 and MAL/TIRAP genes. We used the Tag SNPs based approach, defined to catch all the genetic information from each gene. The study was conducted on a large Brazilian population including 315 CCC cases and 118 ASY subjects. The CCL2rs2530797A/A and TIRAPrs8177376A/A were associated to an increase susceptibility whereas the CCR5rs3176763C/C genotype is associated to protection to CCC. These associations were confirmed when we restricted the analysis to severe CCC, characterized by a left ventricular ejection fraction under 40%. Our data show that polymorphisms affecting key molecules involved in several immune parameters (innate immunity signal transduction and T cell/monocyte migration) play a role in genetic susceptibility to CCC development. This also points out to the multigenic character of CCC, each polymorphism imparting a small contribution. The identification of genetic markers for CCC will provide information for pathogenesis as well as therapeutic targets.

  8. Genetic susceptibility to Chagas disease cardiomyopathy: involvement of several genes of the innate immunity and chemokine-dependent migration pathways

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Chagas disease, caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi is endemic in Latin America. Thirty percent of infected individuals develop chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy (CCC), an inflammatory dilated cardiomyopathy that is, by far, the most important clinical consequence of T. cruzi infection. The others remain asymptomatic (ASY). A possible genetic component to disease progression was suggested by familial aggregation of cases and the association of markers of innate and adaptive immunity genes with CCC development. Migration of Th1-type T cells play a major role in myocardial damage. Methods Our genetic analysis focused on CCR5, CCL2 and MAL/TIRAP genes. We used the Tag SNPs based approach, defined to catch all the genetic information from each gene. The study was conducted on a large Brazilian population including 315 CCC cases and 118 ASY subjects. Results The CCL2rs2530797A/A and TIRAPrs8177376A/A were associated to an increase susceptibility whereas the CCR5rs3176763C/C genotype is associated to protection to CCC. These associations were confirmed when we restricted the analysis to severe CCC, characterized by a left ventricular ejection fraction under 40%. Conclusions Our data show that polymorphisms affecting key molecules involved in several immune parameters (innate immunity signal transduction and T cell/monocyte migration) play a role in genetic susceptibility to CCC development. This also points out to the multigenic character of CCC, each polymorphism imparting a small contribution. The identification of genetic markers for CCC will provide information for pathogenesis as well as therapeutic targets. PMID:24330528

  9. Specific activation of CD4(-) CD8(-) double-negative T cells by Trypanosoma cruzi-derived glycolipids induces a proinflammatory profile associated with cardiomyopathy in Chagas patients.

    PubMed

    Passos, L S A; Magalhães, L M D; Soares, R P; Marques, A F; Nunes, M do C P; Gollob, K J; Dutra, W O

    2017-10-01

    Cardiomyopathy is the most severe outcome of Chagas disease, causing more than 12 000 deaths/year. Immune cells participate in cardiomyopathy development either by direct tissue destruction, or by driving inflammation. We have shown that CD4(-) CD8(-) [double-negative (DN)] T cells are major sources of inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines, associated with the cardiac (CARD) and indeterminate (IND) forms of Chagas disease, respectively. Here, we sought to identify Trypanosoma cruzi-derived components that lead to activation of DN T cells in Chagas patients. Glycolipid (GCL), lipid (LIP) and protein-enriched (PRO) fractions derived from trypomastigote forms of T. cruzi were utilized to stimulate cells from IND and CARD patients to determine DN T cell activation by evaluating CD69 and cytokine expression. We observed that GCL, but not LIP or PRO fractions, induced higher activation of DN T cells, especially T cell receptor (TCR)-γδ DN T, from IND and CARD. GCL led to an increase in tumour necrosis factor (TNF) and interleukin (IL)-10 expression by TCR-γδ DN T cells from IND, while inducing IFN-γ expression by TCR-γδ DN T cells from CARD. This led to an increase in the ratio IFN-γ/IL-10 in TCR-γδ DN T cells from CARD, favouring an inflammatory profile. These results identify GCL as the major T. cruzi component responsible for activation of DN T cells in chronic Chagas disease, associated predominantly with an inflammatory profile in CARD, but not IND. These findings may have implications for designing new strategies of control or prevention of Chagas disease cardiomyopathy by modulating the response to GCL. © 2017 British Society for Immunology.

  10. SEROPREVALENCE OF T. cruzi INFECTION IN BLOOD DONORS AND CHAGAS CARDIOMYOPATHY IN PATIENTS FROM THE COAL MINING REGION OF COAHUILA, MEXICO

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Tovar, José Gerardo; Rebollar-Téllez, Eduardo A.; Salas, Ildefonso Fernández

    2014-01-01

    Context and Objective: Chagas disease is considered a worldwide emerging disease; it is endemic in Mexico and the state of Coahuila and is considered of little relevance. The objective of this study was to determine the seroprevalence of T. cruzi infection in blood donors and Chagas cardiomyopathy in patients from the coal mining region of Coahuila, Mexico. Design and Setting: Epidemiological, exploratory and prospective study in a general hospital during the period January to June 2011. Methods: We performed laboratory tests ELISA and indirect hemagglutination in three groups of individuals: 1) asymptomatic voluntary blood donors, 2) patients hospitalized in the cardiology department and 3) patients with dilated cardiomyopathy. Results: There were three levels of seroprevalence: 0.31% in asymptomatic individuals, 1.25% in cardiac patients and in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy in 21.14%. Conclusions: In spite of having detected autochthonous cases of Chagas disease, its importance to local public health remains to be established as well as the details of the dynamics of transmission so that the study is still in progress. PMID:24626421

  11. Radionuclide evaluation of left-ventricular function in chronic Chagas' cardiomyopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Arreaza, N.; Puigbo, J.J.; Acquatella, H. Casal, H.; Giordano, H.; Valecillos, R.; Mendoza, I.; Perez, J.F.; Hirschhaut, E.; Combellas, I.

    1983-07-01

    Left-ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and abnormalities of regional wall motion (WMA) were studied by means of radionuclide ventriculography in 41 patients prospectively diagnosed as having chronic Chagas' disease. Thirteen patients were asymptomatic (ASY), 16 were arrhythmic (ARR), and 12 had congestive heart failure (CHF). Mean LVEF was normal in ASY but markedly depressed in CHF. Regional WMAs were minimal in ASY and their severity increased in ARR. Most CHFs (75%) had diffuse hypokinesia of the left ventricle. Seven patients had a distinct apical aneurysm. Correlation between radionuclide and contrast ventriculography data was good in 17 patients. Selective coronary arteriography showed normal arteries in all patients. Therefore, chronic Chagas' heart disease joins ischemic heart disease as a cause of regional WMA.

  12. Elevated Serum Levels of Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor Are Associated with Progressive Chronic Cardiomyopathy in Patients with Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cutrullis, Romina A.; Petray, Patricia B.; Schapachnik, Edgardo; Sánchez, Rubén; Postan, Miriam; González, Mariela N.; Martín, Valentina; Corral, Ricardo S.

    2013-01-01

    Clinical symptoms of chronic Chagas disease occur in around 30% of the individuals infected with Trypanosoma cruzi and are characterized by heart inflammation and dysfunction. The pathogenesis of chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy (CCC) is not completely understood yet, partially because disease evolution depends on complex host-parasite interactions. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a pleiotropic proinflammatory cytokine that promotes numerous pathophysiological processes. In the current study, we investigated the link between MIF and CCC progression. Immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated MIF overexpression in the hearts from chronically T. cruzi-infected mice, particularly those showing intense inflammatory infiltration. We also found that MIF exogenously added to parasite-infected murine macrophage cultures is capable of enhancing the production of TNF-α and reactive oxygen species, both with pathogenic roles in CCC. Thus, the integrated action of MIF and other cytokines and chemokines may account for leukocyte influx to the infected myocardium, accompanied by enhanced local production of multiple inflammatory mediators. We further examined by ELISA the level of MIF in the sera from chronic indeterminate and cardiomyopathic chagasic patients, and healthy subjects. CCC patients displayed significantly higher MIF concentrations than those recorded in asymptomatic T. cruzi-infected and uninfected individuals. Interestingly, increased MIF levels were associated with severe progressive Chagas heart disease, in correlation with elevated serum concentration of high sensitivity C-reactive protein and also with several echocardiographic indicators of left ventricular dysfunction, one of the hallmarks of CCC. Our present findings represent the first evidence that enhanced MIF production is associated with progressive cardiac impairment in chronic human infection with T. cruzi, strengthening the relationship between inflammatory response and parasite

  13. Myocardial Chemokine Expression and Intensity of Myocarditis in Chagas Cardiomyopathy Are Controlled by Polymorphisms in CXCL9 and CXCL10

    PubMed Central

    Nogueira, Luciana Gabriel; Santos, Ronaldo Honorato Barros; Ianni, Barbara Maria; Fiorelli, Alfredo Inácio; Mairena, Eliane Conti; Benvenuti, Luiz Alberto; Frade, Amanda; Donadi, Eduardo; Dias, Fabrício; Saba, Bruno; Wang, Hui-Tzu Lin; Fragata, Abilio; Sampaio, Marcelo; Hirata, Mario Hiroyuki; Buck, Paula; Mady, Charles; Bocchi, Edimar Alcides; Stolf, Noedir Antonio; Kalil, Jorge; Cunha-Neto, Edecio

    2012-01-01

    Background Chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy (CCC), a life-threatening inflammatory dilated cardiomyopathy, affects 30% of the approximately 8 million patients infected by Trypanosoma cruzi. Even though the Th1 T cell-rich myocarditis plays a pivotal role in CCC pathogenesis, little is known about the factors controlling inflammatory cell migration to CCC myocardium. Methods and Results Using confocal immunofluorescence and quantitative PCR, we studied cell surface staining and gene expression of the CXCR3, CCR4, CCR5, CCR7, CCR8 receptors and their chemokine ligands in myocardial samples from end-stage CCC patients. CCR5+, CXCR3+, CCR4+, CCL5+ and CXCL9+ mononuclear cells were observed in CCC myocardium. mRNA expression of the chemokines CCL5, CXCL9, CXCL10, CCL17, CCL19 and their receptors was upregulated in CCC myocardium. CXCL9 mRNA expression directly correlated with the intensity of myocarditis, as well as with mRNA expression of CXCR3, CCR4, CCR5, CCR7, CCR8 and their ligands. We also analyzed single-nucleotide polymorphisms for genes encoding the most highly expressed chemokines and receptors in a cohort of Chagas disease patients. CCC patients with ventricular dysfunction displayed reduced genotypic frequencies of CXCL9 rs10336 CC, CXCL10 rs3921 GG, and increased CCR5 rs1799988CC as compared to those without dysfunction. Significantly, myocardial samples from CCC patients carrying the CXCL9/CXCL10 genotypes associated to a lower risk displayed a 2–6 fold reduction in mRNA expression of CXCL9, CXCL10, and other chemokines and receptors, along with reduced intensity of myocarditis, as compared to those with other CXCL9/CXCL10 genotypes. Conclusions Results may indicate that genotypes associated to reduced risk in closely linked CXCL9 and CXCL10 genes may modulate local expression of the chemokines themselves, and simultaneously affect myocardial expression of other key chemokines as well as intensity of myocarditis. Taken together our results may suggest that

  14. Cardiomyopathy

    MedlinePlus

    Cardiomyopathy is the name for diseases of the heart muscle. These diseases enlarge your heart muscle or ... tissue. Some people live long, healthy lives with cardiomyopathy. Some people don't even realize they have ...

  15. Value of echocardiography for diagnosis and prognosis of chronic Chagas disease cardiomyopathy without heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Viotti, R J; Vigliano, C; Laucella, S; Lococo, B; Petti, M; Bertocchi, G; Ruiz Vera, B; Armenti, H

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: To establish the usefulness of echocardiography for the clinical classification of patients with Chagas disease and to determine the predictors of mortality and clinical events. Methods: 849 patients with chronic Chagas disease with a mean follow up of 9.9 years were studied. On admission, ECG, chest radiograph, and two dimensional echocardiogram were obtained from all patients. Clinical events were defined as new ECG abnormalities, change in clinical status resulting in transfer to another group, and death. Morphologically characterised segmental lesions were also seen in 12 patients on a second harmonic echocardiogram with intravenous contrast agent. Univariate and multivariate analysis for clinical events and mortality were performed. Setting: Community of San Martín, Buenos Aires, Argentina. Results: Change in clinical group (68 of 833 survivors v 15 of 16 who died, p < 0.001), left ventricular systolic dimension (mean (SD) 3.06 (0.72) cm v 4.71 (0.90) cm, p < 0.0001), and ejection fraction (mean (SD) 0.67 (0.11)% v 0.42 (0.17)%, p < 0.0001) were found to be the only predictors of mortality. ECG abnormalities related to the disease (in 220 of 699 patients with no clinical event v 98 of 150 patients with a clinical event, p < 0.0001), left ventricular diastolic dimension (mean (SD) 4.88 (0.54) cm v 5.44 (0.83) cm, p < 0.0001), left ventricular systolic dimension (mean (SD) 2.98 (0.62) cm v 3.64 (1.03) cm, p < 0.0001), and ejection fraction (mean (SD) 0.68 (0.10)% v 0.60 (0.16)%, p < 0.0001) were predictors of clinical events. Segmental lesions were observed in 211 of 849 patients (25%). Segmental lesions were seen in 66 (13%) and systolic dysfunction was seen in four of 505 (0.8%) patients with normal ECG. Significant differences were found between the groups of patients (group 0: reactive serology and normal ECG and chest radiography without cardiac enlargement and no signs of heart failure; group 1: reactive serology and abnormal ECG and chest

  16. CD73 Inhibition Shifts Cardiac Macrophage Polarization toward a Microbicidal Phenotype and Ameliorates the Outcome of Experimental Chagas Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Ponce, Nicolás Eric; Sanmarco, Liliana Maria; Eberhardt, Natalia; García, Mónica Cristina; Rivarola, Héctor Walter; Cano, Roxana Carolina; Aoki, Maria Pilar

    2016-08-01

    Increasing evidence demonstrates that generation of extracellular adenosine from ATP, which is hydrolyzed by the CD39/CD73 enzyme pair, attenuates the inflammatory response and deactivates macrophage antimicrobial mechanisms. Although CD73 is emerging as a critical pathway and therapeutic target in cardiovascular disorders, the involvement of this ectonucleotidase during myocardial infection has not been explored. Using a murine model of infection with Trypanosoma cruzi, the causal agent of Chagas cardiomyopathy, we observed a sudden switch from the classical M1 macrophage (microbicidal) phenotype toward an alternative M2 (repairing/anti-inflammatory) phenotype that occurred within the myocardium very shortly after BALB/c mice infection. The observed shift in M1/M2 rate correlated with the cardiac cytokine milieu. Considering that parasite persistence within myocardium is a necessary and sufficient condition for the development of the chronic myocarditis, we hypothesized that CD73 activity may counteract cardiac macrophage microbicidal polarization, rendering the local immune response less effective. In fact, a transient treatment with a specific CD73 inhibitor (adenosine 5'-α,β-methylene-diphosphate) enhanced the microbicidal M1 subset predominance, diminished IL-4- and IL-10-producing CD4(+) T cells, promoted a proinflammatory cytokine milieu, and reduced parasite load within the myocardium during the acute phase. As a direct consequence of these events, there was a reduction in serum levels of creatine kinase muscle-brain isoenzyme, a myocardial-specific injury marker, and an improvement in the electrocardiographic characteristics during the chronic phase. Our results demonstrate that this purinergic system drives the myocardial immune response postinfection and harbors a promising potential as a therapeutic target. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  17. Chronic Chagas Heart Disease Management: From Etiology to Cardiomyopathy Treatment.

    PubMed

    Bocchi, Edimar Alcides; Bestetti, Reinaldo Bulgarelli; Scanavacca, Mauricio Ibrahim; Cunha Neto, Edecio; Issa, Victor Sarli

    2017-09-19

    Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi) infection is endemic in Latin America and is becoming a worldwide health burden. It may lead to heterogeneous phenotypes. Early diagnosis of T. cruzi infection is crucial. Several biomarkers have been reported in Chagas heart disease (ChHD), but most are nonspecific for T. cruzi infection. Prognosis of ChHD patients is worse compared with other etiologies, with sudden cardiac death as an important mode of death. Most ChHD patients display diffuse myocarditis with fibrosis and hypertrophy. The remodeling process seems to be associated with etiopathogenic mechanisms and neurohormonal activation. Pharmacological treatment and antiarrhythmic therapy for ChHD is mostly based on results for other etiologies. Heart transplantation is an established, valuable therapeutic option in refractory ChHD. Implantable cardioverter-defibrillators are indicated for prevention of secondary sudden cardiac death. Specific etiological treatments should be revisited and reserved for select patients. Understanding and management of ChHD need improvement, including development of randomized trials. Copyright © 2017 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. [Chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy detected in patients at the Regional General Hospital O'Horan, Merida, Yucatan, Mexico].

    PubMed

    Zavala-Castro, J E; Gutiérrez-Flota, H; Barrera-Pérez, M A; Bolio-Solís, A de J; Zavala-Velázquez, J E

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the frequency of cardiopathy due to Chagas' disease in 36 patients of the cardiology department at the Regional General Hospital O'Horan in Merida, Yucatan. All patients included in the study had cardiac involvement compatible with acute or chronic stages of Chagas' disease. Medical records prepared for each one of the patients included a Chagas' disease targeted clinical history, chest X-ray, electrocardiogram, blood culture and serology using indirect immunofluorescence test. Out of the 36 patients studied, 7 were diagnosed as having Chagas' disease cardiopathy. Grade II cardiomegaly was established in 2 patients while the remaining 5 had grade III cardiomegaly. Conduction abnormalities were established in 6 patients while 2 of these had evidence of necrosis and/or ischemia. Chagas' disease cardiopathy, as our results suggest, is not a rare event in the cardiology ward at the O'Horan Hospital.

  19. Cytokine Production but Lack of Proliferation in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells from Chronic Chagas' Disease Cardiomyopathy Patients in Response to T. cruzi Ribosomal P Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Longhi, Silvia A.; Atienza, Augusto; Perez Prados, Graciela; Buying, Alcinette; Balouz, Virginia; Buscaglia, Carlos A.; Santos, Radleigh; Tasso, Laura M.; Bonato, Ricardo; Chiale, Pablo; Gómez, Karina A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Trypanosoma cruzi ribosomal P proteins, P2β and P0, induce high levels of antibodies in patients with chronic Chagas' disease Cardiomyopathy (CCC). It is well known that these antibodies alter the beating rate of cardiomyocytes and provoke apoptosis by their interaction with β1-adrenergic and M2-muscarinic cardiac receptors. Based on these findings, we decided to study the cellular immune response to these proteins in CCC patients compared to non-infected individuals. Methodology/Principal findings We evaluated proliferation, presence of surface activation markers and cytokine production in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) stimulated with P2β, the C-terminal portion of P0 (CP0) proteins and T. cruzi lysate from CCC patients predominantly infected with TcVI lineage. PBMC from CCC patients cultured with P2β or CP0 proteins, failed to proliferate and express CD25 and HLA-DR on T cell populations. However, multiplex cytokine assays showed that these antigens triggered higher secretion of IL-10, TNF-α and GM-CSF by PBMC as well as both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells subsets of CCC subjects. Upon T. cruzi lysate stimulation, PBMC from CCC patients not only proliferated but also became activated within the context of Th1 response. Interestingly, T. cruzi lysate was also able to induce the secretion of GM-CSF by CD4+ or CD8+ T cells. Conclusions/Significance Our results showed that although the lack of PBMC proliferation in CCC patients in response to ribosomal P proteins, the detection of IL-10, TNF-α and GM-CSF suggests that specific T cells could have both immunoregulatory and pro-inflammatory potential, which might modulate the immune response in Chagas' disease. Furthermore, it was possible to demonstrate for the first time that GM-CSF was produced by PBMC of CCC patients in response not only to recombinant ribosomal P proteins but also to parasite lysate, suggesting the value of this cytokine to evaluate T cells responses in T. cruzi infection. PMID

  20. Sustained Domestic Vector Exposure Is Associated With Increased Chagas Cardiomyopathy Risk but Decreased Parasitemia and Congenital Transmission Risk Among Young Women in Bolivia

    PubMed Central

    Kaplinski, Michelle; Jois, Malasa; Galdos-Cardenas, Gerson; Rendell, Victoria R.; Shah, Vishal; Do, Rose Q.; Marcus, Rachel; Burroughs Pena, Melissa S.; del Carmen Abastoflor, Maria; LaFuente, Carlos; Bozo, Ricardo; Valencia, Edward; Verastegui, Manuela; Colanzi, Rony; Gilman, Robert H.; Bern, Caryn

    2015-01-01

    Background. We studied women and their infants to evaluate risk factors for congenital transmission and cardiomyopathy in Trypanosoma cruzi–infected women. Methods. Women provided data and blood for serology and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Infants of infected women had blood tested at 0 and 1 month by microscopy, PCR and immunoblot, and serology at 6 and 9 months. Women underwent electrocardiography (ECG). Results. Of 1696 women, 456 (26.9%) were infected; 31 (6.8%) transmitted T. cruzi to their infants. Women who transmitted had higher parasite loads than those who did not (median, 62.0 [interquartile range {IQR}, 25.8–204.8] vs 0.05 [IQR, 0–29.6]; P < .0001). Transmission was higher in twin than in singleton births (27.3% vs 6.4%; P = .04). Women who had not lived in infested houses transmitted more frequently (9.7% vs 4.6%; P = .04), were more likely to have positive results by PCR (65.5% vs 33.9%; P < .001), and had higher parasite loads than those who had lived in infested houses (median, 25.8 [IQR, 0–64.1] vs 0 [IQR, 0–12.3]; P < .001). Of 302 infected women, 28 (9.3%) had ECG abnormalities consistent with Chagas cardiomyopathy; risk was higher for older women (odds ratio [OR], 1.06 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 1.01–1.12] per year) and those with vector exposure (OR, 3.7 [95% CI, 1.4–10.2]). We observed a strong dose-response relationship between ECG abnormalities and reported years of living in an infested house. Conclusions. We hypothesize that repeated vector-borne infection sustains antigen exposure and the consequent inflammatory response at a higher chronic level, increasing cardiac morbidity, but possibly enabling exposed women to control parasitemia in the face of pregnancy-induced Th2 polarization. PMID:26063720

  1. Sustained Domestic Vector Exposure Is Associated With Increased Chagas Cardiomyopathy Risk but Decreased Parasitemia and Congenital Transmission Risk Among Young Women in Bolivia.

    PubMed

    Kaplinski, Michelle; Jois, Malasa; Galdos-Cardenas, Gerson; Rendell, Victoria R; Shah, Vishal; Do, Rose Q; Marcus, Rachel; Pena, Melissa S Burroughs; Abastoflor, Maria del Carmen; LaFuente, Carlos; Bozo, Ricardo; Valencia, Edward; Verastegui, Manuela; Colanzi, Rony; Gilman, Robert H; Bern, Caryn

    2015-09-15

    We studied women and their infants to evaluate risk factors for congenital transmission and cardiomyopathy in Trypanosoma cruzi-infected women. Women provided data and blood for serology and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Infants of infected women had blood tested at 0 and 1 month by microscopy, PCR and immunoblot, and serology at 6 and 9 months. Women underwent electrocardiography (ECG). Of 1696 women, 456 (26.9%) were infected; 31 (6.8%) transmitted T. cruzi to their infants. Women who transmitted had higher parasite loads than those who did not (median, 62.0 [interquartile range {IQR}, 25.8-204.8] vs 0.05 [IQR, 0-29.6]; P < .0001). Transmission was higher in twin than in singleton births (27.3% vs 6.4%; P = .04). Women who had not lived in infested houses transmitted more frequently (9.7% vs 4.6%; P = .04), were more likely to have positive results by PCR (65.5% vs 33.9%; P < .001), and had higher parasite loads than those who had lived in infested houses (median, 25.8 [IQR, 0-64.1] vs 0 [IQR, 0-12.3]; P < .001). Of 302 infected women, 28 (9.3%) had ECG abnormalities consistent with Chagas cardiomyopathy; risk was higher for older women (odds ratio [OR], 1.06 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 1.01-1.12] per year) and those with vector exposure (OR, 3.7 [95% CI, 1.4-10.2]). We observed a strong dose-response relationship between ECG abnormalities and reported years of living in an infested house. We hypothesize that repeated vector-borne infection sustains antigen exposure and the consequent inflammatory response at a higher chronic level, increasing cardiac morbidity, but possibly enabling exposed women to control parasitemia in the face of pregnancy-induced Th2 polarization. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Chagas' disease.

    PubMed Central

    Tanowitz, H B; Kirchhoff, L V; Simon, D; Morris, S A; Weiss, L M; Wittner, M

    1992-01-01

    Chagas' disease, caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, is an important cause of morbidity in many countries in Latin America. The important modes of transmission are by the bite of the reduviid bug and blood transfusion. The organism exists in three morphological forms: trypomastigotes, amastigotes, and epimastigotes. The mechanism of transformation and differentiation is currently being explored, and signal transduction pathways of the parasites may be involved in this process. Parasite adherence to and invasion of host cells is a complex process involving complement, phospholipase, penetrin, neuraminidase, and hemolysin. Two clinical forms of the disease are recognized, acute and chronic. During the acute stage pathological damage is related to the presence of the parasite, whereas in the chronic stage few parasites are found. In recent years the roles of tumor necrosis factor, gamma interferon, and the interleukins in the pathogenesis of this infection have been reported. The common manifestations of chronic cardiomyopathy are arrhythmias and thromboembolic events. Autoimmune, neurogenic, and microvascular factors may be important in the pathogenesis of the cardiomyopathy. The gastrointestinal tract is another important target, and "mega syndromes" are common manifestations. The diagnosis and treatment of this infection are active areas of investigation. New serological and molecular biological techniques have improved the diagnosis of chronic infection. Exacerbations of T. cruzi infection have been reported for patients receiving immuno-suppressive therapy and for those with AIDS. Images PMID:1423218

  3. Myocardial Gene Expression of T-bet, GATA-3, Ror-γt, FoxP3, and Hallmark Cytokines in Chronic Chagas Disease Cardiomyopathy: An Essentially Unopposed TH1-Type Response

    PubMed Central

    Nogueira, Luciana Gabriel; Santos, Ronaldo Honorato Barros; Fiorelli, Alfredo Inácio; Mairena, Eliane Conti; Benvenuti, Luiz Alberto; Bocchi, Edimar Alcides; Stolf, Noedir Antonio; Kalil, Jorge; Cunha-Neto, Edecio

    2014-01-01

    Background. Chronic Chagas disease cardiomyopathy (CCC), a late consequence of Trypanosoma cruzi infection, is an inflammatory cardiomyopathy with prognosis worse than those of noninflammatory etiology (NIC). Although the T cell-rich myocarditis is known to play a pathogenetic role, the relative contribution of each of the functional T cell subsets has never been thoroughly investigated. We therefore assessed gene expression of cytokines and transcription factors involved in differentiation and effector function of each functional T cell subset (TH1/TH2/TH17/Treg) in CCC, NIC, and heart donor myocardial samples. Methods and Results. Quantitative PCR showed markedly upregulated expression of IFN-γ and transcription factor T-bet, and minor increases of GATA-3; FoxP3 and CTLA-4; IL-17 and IL-18 in CCC as compared with NIC samples. Conversely, cytokines expressed by TH2 cells (IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13) or associated with Treg (TGF-β and IL-10) were not upregulated in CCC myocardium. Expression of TH1-related genes such as T-bet, IFN-γ, and IL-18 correlated with ventricular dilation, FoxP3, and CTLA-4. Conclusions. Results are consistent with a strong local TH1-mediated response in most samples, possibly associated with pathological myocardial remodeling, and a proportionally smaller FoxP3+CTLA4+ Treg cell population, which is unable to completely curb IFN-γ production in CCC myocardium, therefore fueling inflammation. PMID:25152568

  4. Chagas Heart Disease: Report on Recent Developments

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Fabiana S.; Jelicks, Linda A.; Kirchhoff, Louis V.; Shirani, Jamshid; Nagajyothi, Fnu; Mukherjee, Shankar; Nelson, Randin; Coyle, Christina M.; Spray, David C.; Campos de Carvalho, Antonio C.; Guan, Fangxia; Prado, Cibele M.; Lisanti, Michael P.; Weiss, Louis M.; Montgomery, Susan P.; Tanowitz, Herbert B.

    2011-01-01

    Chagas disease, caused by the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, is an important cause of cardiac disease in endemic areas of Latin America. It is now being diagnosed in non-endemic areas due to immigration. Typical cardiac manifestations of Chagas disease include dilated cardiomyopathy, congestive heart failure, arrhythmias, cardioembolism and stroke. Clinical and laboratory-based research to define the pathology resulting from T. cruzi infection has shed light on many of the cellular and molecular mechanisms leading to these manifestations. Antiparasitic treatment may not be appropriate for patients with advanced cardiac disease. Clinical management of Chagas heart disease is similar to that used for cardiomyopathies due to other processes. Cardiac transplantation has been successfully performed in a small number of patients with Chagas heart disease. PMID:22293860

  5. The Vasculature in Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Prado, Cibele M.; Jelicks, Linda A.; Weiss, Louis M.; Factor, Stephen M.; Tanowitz, Herbert B.; Rossi, Marcos A.

    2013-01-01

    The cardiovascular manifestations of Chagas disease are well known. However, the contribution of the vasculature and specifically the microvasculature has received little attention. This chapter reviews the evidence supporting the notion that alterations in the microvasculature especially in the heart contribute to the pathogenesis of chagasic cardiomyopathy. These data may also be important in understanding the contributions of the microvasculature in the aetiologies of other cardiomyopathies. The role of endothelin-1 and of thromboxane A2 vascular spasm and platelet aggregation is also discussed. Further, these observations may provide target(s) for intervention. PMID:21884888

  6. Cell therapies for Chagas disease.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Adriana Bastos; Goldenberg, Regina Coeli Dos Santos; Campos de Carvalho, Antonio Carlos

    2017-09-05

    In this review of cell therapies in Chagas disease, we cover aspects related to the disease, its treatment and world demographics, before proceeding to describe the preclinical and clinical trials performed using cell therapies in the search for an alternative therapy for the most severe and lethal form of this disease, chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Towards the establishment of a consensus real-time qPCR to monitor Trypanosoma cruzi parasitemia in patients with chronic Chagas disease cardiomyopathy: a substudy from the BENEFIT trial.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Otacilio C; Ramírez, Juan David; Velázquez, Elsa; Melo, Myllena F A Dias; Lima-Ferreira, Carolina; Guhl, Felipe; Sosa-Estani, Sergio; Marin-Neto, Jose Antonio; Morillo, Carlos A; Britto, Constança

    2013-01-01

    Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) is an accurate method to quantify Trypanosoma cruzi DNA and can be used to follow-up parasitemia in Chagas disease (CD) patients undergoing chemotherapy. The Benznidazole Evaluation for Interrupting Trypanosomiasis (BENEFIT) study is an international, multicenter, randomized, double-blinded and placebo-controlled clinical trial to evaluate the efficacy of benznidazole (BZ) treatment in patients with chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy (CCC). One important question to be addressed concerns the effectiveness of BZ in reducing overall parasite load in CCC patients, even in the absence of parasitological cure. This report describes the evaluation of multiple procedures for DNA extraction and qPCR-based protocols aiming to establish a standardized methodology for the absolute quantification of T. cruzi DNA in Guanidine-EDTA blood (GEB) samples. A panel of five primer sets directed to the T. cruzi nuclear satellite DNA repeats (Sat-DNA) and to the minicircle DNA conserved regions (kDNA) was compared in either SYBR Green or TaqMan systems. Standard curve parameters such as, amplification efficiency, coefficient of determination and intercept were evaluated, as well as different procedures to generate standard samples containing pre-established T. cruzi DNA concentration. Initially, each primer set was assayed in a SYBR Green qPCR to estimate parasite load in GEB samples from chronic Chagas disease patients. The results achieved from Bayesian transmutability analysis elected the primer sets Cruzi1/Cruzi2 (p=0.0031) and Diaz7/Diaz8 (p=0.0023) coupled to the QIAamp DNA Kit extraction protocol (silica gel column), as the most suitable for monitoring parasitemia in these patients. Comparison between the parasite burden of 150 GEB samples of BENEFIT patients from Argentina, Brazil and Colombia, prior to drug/placebo administration, was performed using Cruzi1/Cruzi2 primers in a SYBR Green approach. The median parasitemia found in patients from

  8. Autoimmune Pathogenesis of Chagas Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bonney, Kevin M.; Engman, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Chagas heart disease is an inflammatory cardiomyopathy that develops in approximately one-third of individuals infected with the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. Since the discovery of T. cruzi by Carlos Chagas >100 years ago, much has been learned about Chagas disease pathogenesis; however, the outcome of T. cruzi infection is highly variable and difficult to predict. Many mechanisms have been proposed to promote tissue inflammation, but the determinants and the relative importance of each have yet to be fully elucidated. The notion that some factor other than the parasite significantly contributes to the development of myocarditis was hypothesized by the first physician-scientists who noted the conspicuous absence of parasites in the hearts of those who succumbed to Chagas disease. One of these factors—autoimmunity—has been extensively studied for more than half a century. Although questions regarding the functional role of autoimmunity in the pathogenesis of Chagas disease remain unanswered, the development of autoimmune responses during infection clearly occurs in some individuals, and the implications that this autoimmunity may be pathogenic are significant. In this review, we summarize what is known about the pathogenesis of Chagas heart disease and conclude with a view of the future of Chagas disease diagnosis, pathogenesis, therapy, and prevention, emphasizing recent advances in these areas that aid in the management of Chagas disease. PMID:25857229

  9. Heterozygosity for the S180L variant of MAL/TIRAP, a gene expressing an adaptor protein in the Toll-like receptor pathway, is associated with lower risk of developing chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Ramasawmy, Rajendranath; Cunha-Neto, Edecio; Fae, Kellen C; Borba, Susan C P; Teixeira, Priscila C; Ferreira, Susanne C P; Goldberg, Anna C; Ianni, Barbara; Mady, Charles; Kalil, Jorge

    2009-06-15

    Chagas disease is caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. Among T. cruzi-infected individuals, only a subgroup develops severe chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy (CCC); the majority remain asymptomatic. T. cruzi displays numerous ligands for the Toll-like receptors (TLRs), which are an important component of innate immunity that lead to the transcription of proinflammatory cytokines by nuclear factor-kappaB. Because proinflammatory cytokines play an important role in CCC, we hypothesized that single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the genes that encode proteins in the TLR pathway could explain differential susceptibility to CCC among T. cruzi-infected individuals. For 169 patients with CCC and 76 T. cruzi-infected, asymptomatic individuals, we analyzed SNPs by use of polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis for the genes TLR1, TLR2, TLR4, TLR5, TLR9, and MAL/TIRAP, which encodes an adaptor protein. Heterozygous carriers of the MAL/TIRAP variant S180L were more prevalent in the asymptomatic group (24 [32%] of 76 subjects) than in the CCC group (21 [12%] of 169) (chi2=12.6; P=.0004 [adjusted P (Pc)=.0084]; odds ratio [OR], 0.31 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 0.16-0.60]). Subgroup analysis showed a stronger association when asymptomatic patients were compared with patients who had severe CCC (i.e., patients with left-ventricular ejection fraction40%) (chi2=7.7; P=.005 [Pc=.11]; OR, 0.33 [95% CI, 0.15-0.73]). T. cruzi-infected individuals who are heterozygous for the MAL/TIRAP S180L variant that leads to a decrease in signal transduction upon ligation of TLR2 or TLR4 to their respective ligand may have a lower risk of developing CCC.

  10. Chagas Disease

    MedlinePlus

    Chagas disease is caused by a parasite. It is common in Latin America but not in the United States. ... nose, the bite wound or a cut. The disease can also spread through contaminated food, a blood ...

  11. Functional IL18 polymorphism and susceptibility to Chronic Chagas Disease.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, Luciana Gabriel; Frade, Amanda Farage; Ianni, Barbara Maria; Laugier, Laurie; Pissetti, Cristina Wide; Cabantous, Sandrine; Baron, Monique; Peixoto, Gisele de Lima; Borges, Ariana de Melo; Donadi, Eduardo; Marin-Neto, José A; Schmidt, André; Dias, Fabrício; Saba, Bruno; Wang, Hui-Tzu Lin; Fragata, Abilio; Sampaio, Marcelo; Hirata, Mario Hiroyuki; Buck, Paula; Mady, Charles; Martinelli, Martino; Lensi, Mariana; Siqueira, Sergio Freitas; Pereira, Alexandre Costa; Rodrigues, Virmondes; Kalil, Jorge; Chevillard, Christophe; Cunha-Neto, Edecio

    2015-05-01

    Chronic Chagas Disease cardiomyopathy (CCC), a life-threatening inflammatory dilated cardiomyopathy, affects 30% of the approximately 8 million patients infected by Trypanosoma cruzi, the rest of the infected subjects remaining asymptomatic (ASY). The Th1 T cell-rich myocarditis plays a pivotal role in CCC pathogenesis. Local expression of IL-18 in CCC myocardial tissue has recently been described. IL-18 could potentially amplify the process by inducing increased expression of IFN-γ which in turn can increase the production of IL-18, thereby creating a positive feedback mechanism. In order to assess the contribution of the IL-18 to susceptibility to Chronic Chagas Disease, we investigated the association between a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) located in the IL-18 gene with the risk of developing Chagas cardiomyopathy. We analyzed the rs2043055 marker in the IL18 gene in a cohort of Chagas disease cardiomyopathy patients (n=849) and asymptomatic subjects (n=202). We found a significant difference in genotype frequencies among moderate and severe CCC patients with ventricular dysfunction. Our analysis suggests that the IL18 rs2043055 polymorphism- or a SNP in tight linkage disequilibrium with it- may contribute to modulating the Chagas cardiomyopathy outcome. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Tc-99m pyrophosphate myocardial scanning in Chagas' disease

    SciTech Connect

    Goncalves da Rocha, A.F.; Meguerian, B.A.; Harbert, J.C.

    1981-04-01

    Chagas' disease is a serious protozoan infection affecting up to 20% of populations in some endemic areas. Myocarditis and cardiomyopathy occur in 50% of patients who go on to develop chronic Chagas's disease. We have studied a patient with no overt cardiac symptoms who revealed intense myocardial uptake of Tc-99m pyrophosphate. The significance of this finding in relation to early detection and progress of therapy is explored.

  13. Tc-99m pyrophosphate myocardial scanning in Chagas' disease

    SciTech Connect

    da Rocha, A.F.; Meguerian, B.A.; Harbert, J.C.

    1981-04-01

    Chagas' disease is a serious protozoan infection affecting up to 20% of populations in some endemic areas. Myocarditis and cardiomyopathy occur in 50% of patients who go on to develop chronic Chagas' disease. We have studied a patient with no overt cardiac symptoms who revealed intense myocardial uptake of Tc-99m pyrophosphate. The significance of this finding in relation to early detection and progress of therapy is explored.

  14. Restrictive cardiomyopathy

    MedlinePlus

    Cardiomyopathy - restrictive; Infiltrative cardiomyopathy; Idiopathic myocardial fibrosis ... In a case of restrictive cardiomyopathy, the heart muscle is of normal size or slightly enlarged. Most of the time, it also pumps normally. However, it does ...

  15. Types of Cardiomyopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Types of Cardiomyopathy The types of cardiomyopathy include: Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy Dilated ... cardiomyopathy Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy Unclassified ... Cardiomyopathy Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is very common and can affect ...

  16. [The third and new face of Chagas disease].

    PubMed

    Pays, J-F

    2016-08-01

    After the publication of the results of the BENEFIT study concluding that the benznidazole (5 mg/kg/d/60 d) is ineffective to stop the progression of the established Chagas' cardiomyopathy in adults, the author evokes the new experiences and the new challenges of 2016 regarding Chagas disease while speculating on its future and by calling back some elements little known of his history, in particular the fact that it is Chagas who invented about it to some extent the concept of "neglected disease".

  17. Would selenium supplementation aid in therapy for Chagas Disease?

    PubMed Central

    Jelicks, Linda A.; de Souza, Andréa P.; Araújo-Jorge, Tania C; Tanowitz, Herbert B.

    2010-01-01

    Chagas disease, a neglected tropical disease discovered over 100 years ago, is caused by the intracellular parasite Trypanosoma cruzi and is most frequently associated with chronic cardiomyopathy and digestive disorders. Initial invasion of cells is followed by progressive inflammatory destruction of heart, muscles, nerves, and gastrointestinal (GI) tract tissue. About 30% of patients progress to a chronic cardiomyopathy associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Seven to 10% of patients develop megasyndromes involving the GI tract, in particular, the esophagus and the colon. Results from several studies suggest that selenium (Se) deficiency may be an important factor in the pathogenesis of Chagas disease. In this opinion article, Se supplementation is proposed as an adjuvant therapy for treatment of chronic Chagas disease. PMID:21212020

  18. Autochthonous Chagas disease in the southern United States: A case report of suspected residential and military exposures.

    PubMed

    Harris, N; Woc-Colburn, L; Gunter, S M; Gorchakov, R; Murray, K O; Rossmann, S; Garcia, M N

    2017-09-01

    Chagas disease is a parasitic infection that can result in a progressive dilated cardiomyopathy. Here, we present the epidemiologic details of a suspected locally acquired transmission case originating from the southern United States. This is the first published report of Chagas disease in a young, healthy United States veteran with repeat triatomine exposures in Arizona. Military personnel and Arizona residents should be aware of their Chagas disease transmission risks. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  19. What's Cardiomyopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... people in the U.S. with children under 12 accounting for less than 10% of all cases. According ... RCM) is the least common type of cardiomyopathy accounting for only 5% of patients with cardiomyopathy. It ...

  20. Peripartum cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Grixti, Sarah; Magri, Caroline J; Xuereb, Robert; Fava, Stephen

    2015-02-01

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy is a form of dilated cardiomyopathy of indeterminate aetiology occurring in late pregnancy or the months following delivery. This article reviews current knowledge of its pathophysiology, therapeutic strategies and prognosis, as well as new treatments and future directions.

  1. Pediatric Cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Lee, Teresa M; Hsu, Daphne T; Kantor, Paul; Towbin, Jeffrey A; Ware, Stephanie M; Colan, Steven D; Chung, Wendy K; Jefferies, John L; Rossano, Joseph W; Castleberry, Chesney D; Addonizio, Linda J; Lal, Ashwin K; Lamour, Jacqueline M; Miller, Erin M; Thrush, Philip T; Czachor, Jason D; Razoky, Hiedy; Hill, Ashley; Lipshultz, Steven E

    2017-09-15

    Pediatric cardiomyopathies are rare diseases with an annual incidence of 1.1 to 1.5 per 100 000. Dilated and hypertrophic cardiomyopathies are the most common; restrictive, noncompaction, and mixed cardiomyopathies occur infrequently; and arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy is rare. Pediatric cardiomyopathies can result from coronary artery abnormalities, tachyarrhythmias, exposure to infection or toxins, or secondary to other underlying disorders. Increasingly, the importance of genetic mutations in the pathogenesis of isolated or syndromic pediatric cardiomyopathies is becoming apparent. Pediatric cardiomyopathies often occur in the absence of comorbidities, such as atherosclerosis, hypertension, renal dysfunction, and diabetes mellitus; as a result, they offer insights into the primary pathogenesis of myocardial dysfunction. Large international registries have characterized the epidemiology, cause, and outcomes of pediatric cardiomyopathies. Although adult and pediatric cardiomyopathies have similar morphological and clinical manifestations, their outcomes differ significantly. Within 2 years of presentation, normalization of function occurs in 20% of children with dilated cardiomyopathy, and 40% die or undergo transplantation. Infants with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy have a 2-year mortality of 30%, whereas death is rare in older children. Sudden death is rare. Molecular evidence indicates that gene expression differs between adult and pediatric cardiomyopathies, suggesting that treatment response may differ as well. Clinical trials to support evidence-based treatments and the development of disease-specific therapies for pediatric cardiomyopathies are in their infancy. This compendium summarizes current knowledge of the genetic and molecular origins, clinical course, and outcomes of the most common phenotypic presentations of pediatric cardiomyopathies and highlights key areas where additional research is required. URL: http

  2. Pathogenesis of Chagas' Disease: Parasite Persistence and Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Antonio R. L.; Hecht, Mariana M.; Guimaro, Maria C.; Sousa, Alessandro O.; Nitz, Nadjar

    2011-01-01

    Summary: Acute Trypanosoma cruzi infections can be asymptomatic, but chronically infected individuals can die of Chagas' disease. The transfer of the parasite mitochondrial kinetoplast DNA (kDNA) minicircle to the genome of chagasic patients can explain the pathogenesis of the disease; in cases of Chagas' disease with evident cardiomyopathy, the kDNA minicircles integrate mainly into retrotransposons at several chromosomes, but the minicircles are also detected in coding regions of genes that regulate cell growth, differentiation, and immune responses. An accurate evaluation of the role played by the genotype alterations in the autoimmune rejection of self-tissues in Chagas' disease is achieved with the cross-kingdom chicken model system, which is refractory to T. cruzi infections. The inoculation of T. cruzi into embryonated eggs prior to incubation generates parasite-free chicks, which retain the kDNA minicircle sequence mainly in the macrochromosome coding genes. Crossbreeding transfers the kDNA mutations to the chicken progeny. The kDNA-mutated chickens develop severe cardiomyopathy in adult life and die of heart failure. The phenotyping of the lesions revealed that cytotoxic CD45, CD8+ γδ, and CD8α+ T lymphocytes carry out the rejection of the chicken heart. These results suggest that the inflammatory cardiomyopathy of Chagas' disease is a genetically driven autoimmune disease. PMID:21734249

  3. Apical aneurysm of Chagas's heart disease.

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, J S; Mello De Oliveira, J A; Frederigue, U; Lima Filho, E C

    1981-01-01

    A retrospective study of Chagas's heart disease was carried out by a review of necropsy reports with special reference to the lesion known as the apical aneurysm. It was concluded that this lesion was more frequent in men, was unrelated to age, and was unrelated to heart weight. Patients dying of the cardiac consequences of Chagas's cardiomyopathy were more likely to have an apical aneurysm than those whose death was unrelated to the disease but the mode of death (sudden, or with heart failure) was unconnected with its presence. Transillumination from within the ventricle at necropsy was not only useful in demonstrating the aneurysm but also showed areas of myocardial thinning elsewhere. Thrombosis within the lesion was frequent. The aetiology of the apical aneurysm is discussed and it is concluded that while ischaemia, inflammation, thrombosis, and mechanical factors may produce and localise this lesion, the underlying cause is the basic pathogenetic process-parasympathetic nerve cell destruction. Images PMID:7295439

  4. Peripartum Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Arany, Zolt; Elkayam, Uri

    2016-04-05

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy is a potentially life-threatening pregnancy-associated disease that typically arises in the peripartum period and is marked by left ventricular dysfunction and heart failure. The disease is relatively uncommon, but its incidence is rising. Women often recover cardiac function, but long-lasting morbidity and mortality are not infrequent. Management of peripartum cardiomyopathy is largely limited to the same neurohormonal antagonists used in other forms of cardiomyopathy, and no proven disease-specific therapies exist yet. Research in the past decade has suggested that peripartum cardiomyopathy is caused by vascular dysfunction, triggered by late-gestational maternal hormones. Most recently, information has also indicated that many cases of peripartum cardiomyopathy have genetic underpinnings. We review here the known epidemiology, clinical presentation, and management of peripartum cardiomyopathy, as well as the current knowledge of the pathophysiology of the disease. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  5. Doxorubicin Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Kanu; Zhang, Jianqing; Honbo, Norman; Karliner, Joel S.

    2010-01-01

    Established doxorubicin cardiomyopathy is a lethal disease. When congestive heart failure develops, mortality is approximately 50%. Extensive research has been done to understand the mechanism and pathophysiology of doxorubicin cardiomyopathy, and considerable knowledge and experience has been gained. Unfortunately, no effective treatment for established doxorubicin cardiomyopathy is presently available. Extensive research has been done and is being done to discover preventive treatments. However an effective and clinically applicable preventive treatment is yet to be discovered. PMID:20016174

  6. Mitochondrial Cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    El-Hattab, Ayman W; Scaglia, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria are found in all nucleated human cells and perform various essential functions, including the generation of cellular energy. Mitochondria are under dual genome control. Only a small fraction of their proteins are encoded by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), whereas more than 99% of them are encoded by nuclear DNA (nDNA). Mutations in mtDNA or mitochondria-related nDNA genes result in mitochondrial dysfunction leading to insufficient energy production required to meet the needs for various organs, particularly those with high energy requirements, including the central nervous system, skeletal and cardiac muscles, kidneys, liver, and endocrine system. Because cardiac muscles are one of the high energy demanding tissues, cardiac involvement occurs in mitochondrial diseases with cardiomyopathies being one of the most frequent cardiac manifestations found in these disorders. Cardiomyopathy is estimated to occur in 20-40% of children with mitochondrial diseases. Mitochondrial cardiomyopathies can vary in severity from asymptomatic status to severe manifestations including heart failure, arrhythmias, and sudden cardiac death. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is the most common type; however, mitochondrial cardiomyopathies might also present as dilated, restrictive, left ventricular non-compaction, and histiocytoid cardiomyopathies. Cardiomyopathies are frequent manifestations of mitochondrial diseases associated with defects in electron transport chain complexes subunits and their assembly factors, mitochondrial transfer RNAs, ribosomal RNAs, ribosomal proteins, translation factors, mtDNA maintenance, and coenzyme Q10 synthesis. Other mitochondrial diseases with cardiomyopathies include Barth syndrome, Sengers syndrome, TMEM70-related mitochondrial complex V deficiency, and Friedreich ataxia.

  7. INHERITED CARDIOMYOPATHIES

    PubMed Central

    Towbin, Jeffrey A.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiomyopathies, diseases of the heart muscle, are major causes of morbidity and mortality. A significant percentage of patients with cardiomyopathies have genetic-based, inheritable disease and, over the past two decades the genetic causes of these disorders have been increasingly discovered. The genes causing these disorders when they are mutated appear to encode proteins that frame a “final common pathway” for that specific disorder but the specifics of the phenotype, including age of onset, severity, and outcome is variable for reasons not yet understood. The “final common pathways” for the classified forms of cardiomyopathy include the sarcomere in the primarily diastolic dysfunction disorders hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) and restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM), the linkage of the sarcomere and sarcolemma in the systolic dysfunction disorder dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), and the desmosome in arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy (AVC). Left ventricular noncompaction cardiomyopathy (LVNC) is an overlap disorder and appears that any of these “final common pathways” can be involved depending on the specific form of LVNC. The genetics and mechanisms responsible for these clinical phenotypes will be described. PMID:25186923

  8. Peripartum cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Sundin, Courtney Stanley

    2014-01-01

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy is a very rare, but serious life-threatening emergency. Early recognition of signs and symptoms, along with radiologic imaging and blood work, can facilitate timely diagnosis. Once peripartum cardiomyopathy is diagnosed, a multidisciplinary team can facilitate the delivery of quality care to promote optimal outcomes.

  9. Mitochondrial Cardiomyopathies

    PubMed Central

    El-Hattab, Ayman W.; Scaglia, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria are found in all nucleated human cells and perform various essential functions, including the generation of cellular energy. Mitochondria are under dual genome control. Only a small fraction of their proteins are encoded by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), whereas more than 99% of them are encoded by nuclear DNA (nDNA). Mutations in mtDNA or mitochondria-related nDNA genes result in mitochondrial dysfunction leading to insufficient energy production required to meet the needs for various organs, particularly those with high energy requirements, including the central nervous system, skeletal and cardiac muscles, kidneys, liver, and endocrine system. Because cardiac muscles are one of the high energy demanding tissues, cardiac involvement occurs in mitochondrial diseases with cardiomyopathies being one of the most frequent cardiac manifestations found in these disorders. Cardiomyopathy is estimated to occur in 20–40% of children with mitochondrial diseases. Mitochondrial cardiomyopathies can vary in severity from asymptomatic status to severe manifestations including heart failure, arrhythmias, and sudden cardiac death. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is the most common type; however, mitochondrial cardiomyopathies might also present as dilated, restrictive, left ventricular non-compaction, and histiocytoid cardiomyopathies. Cardiomyopathies are frequent manifestations of mitochondrial diseases associated with defects in electron transport chain complexes subunits and their assembly factors, mitochondrial transfer RNAs, ribosomal RNAs, ribosomal proteins, translation factors, mtDNA maintenance, and coenzyme Q10 synthesis. Other mitochondrial diseases with cardiomyopathies include Barth syndrome, Sengers syndrome, TMEM70-related mitochondrial complex V deficiency, and Friedreich ataxia. PMID:27504452

  10. Stem Cell-Based Therapies in Chagasic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Campos de Carvalho, Antonio Carlos; Bastos Carvalho, Adriana

    2015-01-01

    Chagas disease is caused by Trypanosoma cruzi and can lead to a dilated cardiomyopathy decades after the prime infection by the parasite. As with other dilated cardiomyopathies, conventional pharmacologic therapies are not always effective and as heart failure progresses patients need heart transplantation. Therefore alternative therapies are highly desirable and cell-based therapies have been investigated in preclinical and clinical studies. In this paper we review the main findings of such studies and discuss future directions for stem cell-based therapies in chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy. PMID:26161401

  11. Trypanosomiasis, cardiomyopathy and the risk of ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Carod-Artal, Francisco Javier

    2010-05-01

    American (Chagas disease) and African (sleeping sickness) trypanosomiasis are neglected tropical diseases and are a heavy burden in Latin America and Africa, respectively. Chagas disease is an independent risk factor for stroke. Apical aneurysm, heart failure and cardiac arrhythmias are associated with ischemic stroke in chagasic cardiomyopathy. Not all chagasic patients who suffer an ischemic stroke have a severe cardiomyopathy, and stroke may be the first manifestation of Chagas disease. Cardioembolism affecting the middle cerebral artery is the most common stroke subtype. Risk of recurrence is high and careful evaluation of recurrence risk should be addressed. Repolarization changes, low voltage and prolonged QT interval are common electrocardiography alterations in human African trypanosomiasis, and can be found in more than 70% of patients. Epidemiological studies are needed to asses the risk of stroke in African trypanosomiasis perimyocarditis.

  12. Development of chagas cardiac manifestations among Texas blood donors.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Melissa N; Murray, Kristy O; Hotez, Peter J; Rossmann, Susan N; Gorchakov, Rodion; Ontiveros, Alejandra; Woc-Colburn, Laila; Bottazzi, Maria Elena; Rhodes, Charles E; Ballantyne, Christie M; Aguilar, David

    2015-01-01

    Chagas disease, infection with the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, has recently been identified as an important emerging parasitic disease in the United States. To describe the cardiac abnormalities in T. cruzi-positive blood donors in southeastern Texas, a pilot study of donors who had screened positive from 2007 to 2012 was performed. This one-time assessment included (1) a questionnaire to evaluate the source of infection, cardiac symptoms, and health co-morbidities; (2) electrocardiography; (3) echocardiography if electrocardiographic findings were abnormal; and (4) measurement of a high-sensitivity troponin T biomarker. Of those with confirmed infection, 41% (7 of 17) had electrocardiographic abnormalities consistent with Chagas cardiomyopathy. In addition, 36% (6 of 17) were suspected to be locally acquired cases. High-sensitivity troponin T serum levels increased with cardiac severity. In conclusion, cardiologists should consider Chagas disease in their differential diagnoses for patients who may have clinically compatible electrocardiographic changes or nonischemic cardiomyopathy, even if the patients have no histories of residing in Chagas-endemic countries. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Chagas disease in the immunosuppressed host.

    PubMed

    Bern, Caryn

    2012-08-01

    This review examines recent literature on Chagas disease in the immunosuppressed host. Chagas disease in immunosuppressed patients may represent acute transmission in an organ recipient, or reactivation of chronic infection in an HIV-infected individual or patient receiving cardiac transplantation for Chagas cardiomyopathy. Transplantation of the kidney or liver from an infected donor resulted in transmission in 18-19 and 29%, respectively. Prospective monitoring usually detects acute infection before symptom onset; early treatment is highly effective. In heart transplant patients, reactivation symptoms include fever, myocarditis and skin lesions, and may mimic rejection. Approximately 20% of HIV- Trypanosoma cruzi infected patients experience reactivation; manifestations include meningoencephalitis and/or myocarditis. Transplantation of the heart from a T. cruzi-infected donor is contraindicated; use of other organs can be considered. Guidelines recommend prospective monitoring rather than prophylactic treatment in recipients. Posttransplant monitoring for acute infection or reactivation relies on PCR, culture and microscopy of blood specimens regularly for at least 6 months. Treatment employs standard courses of benznidazole or nifurtimox, and immune reconstitution for the HIV-coinfected patient. Case reports suggest some HIV-T. cruzi-infected patients may benefit from secondary prophylaxis, but more data are needed to determine efficacy and specific regimens.

  14. Chagas Disease in a Domestic Transmission Cycle in Southern Texas, USA

    PubMed Central

    Pye, Greg; Steurer, Frank J.; Rodriguez, Ray; Campman, Richard; Peterson, A. Townsend; Ramsey, Janine; Wirtz, Robert A.; Robinson, Laura E.

    2003-01-01

    After three dogs died from acute Chagas cardiomyopathy at one location, an investigation was conducted of the home, garage, and grounds of the owner. A serologic study was conducted on stray dogs, and an ecologic niche model was developed to predict areas where the vector Tryiatoma gerstaeckeri might be expected. PMID:12533289

  15. Perspectives on Trypanosoma cruzi-induced heart disease (Chagas disease)

    PubMed Central

    Tanowitz, Herbert B.; Machado, Fabiana S.; Jelicks, Linda A.; Shirani, Jamshid; Campos de Carvalho, Antonio C.; Spray, David C.; Factor, Stephen M.; Kirchhoff, Louis V.; Weiss, Louis M.

    2009-01-01

    Chagas disease is caused by the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi it is the most common cause of heart disease in endemic areas of Latin America. The year 2009 marks the 100th anniversary of the discovery of T. cruzi infection and Chagas disease by the Brazilian physician Carlos Chagas. Chagasic cardiomyopathy develops in from 10 to 30 percent of persons who are chronically infected with this parasite. Echocardiography and magnetic resonance imaging are important modalities in the evaluation and prognosis of individuals with chagasic heart disease. The etiology of chagasic heart disease likely is multifactorial. Parasite persistence, autoimmunity, and microvascular abnormalities have been studied extensively as possible pathogenic mechanisms. Experimental studies suggest that alterations in cardiac gap junctions may be etiologic in the pathogenesis of conduction abnormalities. The diagnosis of chronic Chagas disease is made by serology. The treatment of this infection has shortcomings that need to be addressed. Cardiac transplantation and bone marrow stem cell therapy for persons with Chagas disease have received increasing research attention in recent years. PMID:19410685

  16. Evaluation of Right Ventricular Systolic Function in Chagas Disease Using Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Henrique T; Volpe, Gustavo J; Marin-Neto, José A; Ambale-Venkatesh, Bharath; Nwabuo, Chike C; Trad, Henrique S; Romano, Minna M D; Pazin-Filho, Antonio; Maciel, Benedito C; Lima, João A C; Schmidt, André

    2017-03-01

    Right ventricular (RV) impairment is postulated to be responsible for prominent systemic congestion in Chagas disease. However, occurrence of primary RV dysfunction in Chagas disease remains controversial. We aimed to study RV systolic function in patients with Chagas disease using cardiac magnetic resonance. This cross-sectional study included 158 individuals with chronic Chagas disease who underwent cardiac magnetic resonance. RV systolic dysfunction was defined as reduced RV ejection fraction based on predefined cutoffs accounting for age and sex. Multivariable logistic regression was used to verify the relationship of RV systolic dysfunction with age, sex, functional class, use of medications for heart failure, atrial fibrillation, and left ventricular systolic dysfunction. Mean age was 54±13 years, 51.2% men. RV systolic dysfunction was identified in 58 (37%) individuals. Although usually associated with reduced left ventricular ejection fraction, isolated RV systolic dysfunction was found in 7 (4.4%) patients, 2 of them in early stages of Chagas disease. Presence of RV dysfunction was not significantly different in patients with indeterminate/digestive form of Chagas disease (35.7%) compared with those with Chagas cardiomyopathy (36.8%) (P=1.000). In chronic Chagas disease, RV systolic dysfunction is more commonly associated with left ventricular systolic dysfunction, although isolated and early RV dysfunction can also be identified. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  17. Chagas disease in prehistory.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Luiz F; Jansen, Ana M; Araújo, Adauto

    2011-09-01

    The classical hypothesis proposes that Chagas disease has been originated in the Andean region among prehistoric people when they started domesticating animals, changing to sedentary habits, and adopting agriculture. These changes in their way of life happened nearly 6,000 years ago. However, paleoparasitological data based on molecular tools showed that Trypanosoma cruzi infection and Chagas disease were commonly found both in South and North American prehistoric populations long before that time, suggesting that Chagas disease may be as old as the human presence in the American continent. The study of the origin and dispersion of Trypanosoma cruzi infection among prehistoric human populations may help in the comprehension of the clinical and epidemiological questions on Chagas disease that still remain unanswered.

  18. [Peripartum cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Mouquet, Frédéric; Bouabdallaoui, Nadia

    2015-01-01

    The peripartum cardiomyopathy is a rare form of dilated cardiomyopathy resulting from alteration of angiogenesis toward the end of pregnancy. The diagnosis is based on the association of clinical heart failure and systolic dysfunction assessed by echocardiography or magnetic resonance imaging. Diagnoses to rule out are myocardial infarction, amniotic liquid embolism, myocarditis, inherited cardiomyopathy, and history of treatment by anthracycline. Risk factors are advance maternal age (>30), multiparity, twin pregnancy, African origin, obesity, preeclampsia, gestational hypertension, and prolonged tocolytic therapy. Treatment of acute phase is identical to usual treatment of acute systolic heart failure. After delivery, VKA treatment should be discussed in case of systolic function <25% because of higher risk of thrombus. A specific treatment by bromocriptine can be initiated on a case-by-case basis. Complete recovery of systolic function is observed in 50% of cases. The mortality risk is low. Subsequent pregnancy should be discouraged, especially if systolic function did not recover.

  19. Carlos Chagas: biographical sketch.

    PubMed

    Moncayo, Alvaro

    2010-01-01

    Carlos Chagas was born on 9 July 1878 in the farm "Bon Retiro" located close to the City of Oliveira in the interior of the State of Minas Gerais, Brazil. He started his medical studies in 1897 at the School of Medicine of Rio de Janeiro. In the late XIX century, the works by Louis Pasteur and Robert Koch induced a change in the medical paradigm with emphasis in experimental demonstrations of the causal link between microbes and disease. During the same years in Germany appeared the pathological concept of disease, linking organic lesions with symptoms. All these innovations were adopted by the reforms of the medical schools in Brazil and influenced the scientific formation of Chagas. Chagas completed his medical studies between 1897 and 1903 and his examinations during these years were always ranked with high grades. Oswaldo Cruz accepted Chagas as a doctoral candidate and directed his thesis on "Hematological studies of Malaria" which was received with honors by the examiners. In 1903 the director appointed Chagas as research assistant at the Institute. In those years, the Institute of Manguinhos, under the direction of Oswaldo Cruz, initiated a process of institutional growth and gathered a distinguished group of Brazilian and foreign scientists. In 1907, he was requested to investigate and control a malaria outbreak in Lassance, Minas Gerais. In this moment Chagas could not have imagined that this field research was the beginning of one of the most notable medical discoveries. Chagas was, at the age of 28, a Research Assistant at the Institute of Manguinhos and was studying a new flagellate parasite isolated from triatomine insects captured in the State of Minas Gerais. Chagas made his discoveries in this order: first the causal agent, then the vector and finally the human cases. These notable discoveries were carried out by Chagas in twenty months. At the age of 33 Chagas had completed his discoveries and published the scientific articles that gave him world

  20. Restrictive cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Nihoyannopoulos, Petros; Dawson, David

    2009-12-01

    Restrictive cardiomyopathies constitute a heterogenous group of heart muscle conditions that all have, in common, the symptoms of heart failure. Diastolic dysfunction with preserved systolic function is often the only echocardiographic abnormality that may be noted, although systolic dysfunction may also be an integral part of some specific pathologies, particularly in the most advanced cases such as amyloid infiltration of the heart. By far, the majority of restrictive cardiomyopathies are secondary to a systemic disorder such as amyloidosis, sarcoidosis, scleroderma, haemochromatosis, eosinophilic heart disease, or as a result of radiation treatment. The much more rare diagnosis of idiopathic restrictive cardiomyopathy is supported only by the absence of specific pathology on either endomyocardial biopsies or at post-mortem. Restrictive cardiomyopathy is diagnosed based on medical history, physical examination, and tests: such as blood tests, electrocardiogram, chest X-ray, echocardiography, and magnetic resonance imaging. With its wide availability, echocardiography is probably the most important investigation to identify the left ventricular dysfunction and should be performed early and by groups that are familiar with the wide variety of aetiologies. Finally, on rare occasions, the differential diagnosis from constrictive pericarditis may be necessary.

  1. Cirrhotic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-del-Árbol, Luis; Serradilla, Regina

    2015-11-07

    During the course of cirrhosis, there is a progressive deterioration of cardiac function manifested by the disappearance of the hyperdynamic circulation due to a failure in heart function with decreased cardiac output. This is due to a deterioration in inotropic and chronotropic function which takes place in parallel with a diastolic dysfunction and cardiac hypertrophy in the absence of other known cardiac disease. Other findings of this specific cardiomyopathy include impaired contractile responsiveness to stress stimuli and electrophysiological abnormalities with prolonged QT interval. The pathogenic mechanisms of cirrhotic cardiomyopathy include impairment of the b-adrenergic receptor signalling, abnormal cardiomyocyte membrane lipid composition and biophysical properties, ion channel defects and overactivity of humoral cardiodepressant factors. Cirrhotic cardiomyopathy may be difficult to determine due to the lack of a specific diagnosis test. However, an echocardiogram allows the detection of the diastolic dysfunction and the E/e' ratio may be used in the follow-up progression of the illness. Cirrhotic cardiomyopathy plays an important role in the pathogenesis of the impairment of effective arterial blood volume and correlates with the degree of liver failure. A clinical consequence of cardiac dysfunction is an inadequate cardiac response in the setting of vascular stress that may result in renal hypoperfusion leading to renal failure. The prognosis is difficult to establish but the severity of diastolic dysfunction may be a marker of mortality risk. Treatment is non-specific and liver transplantation may normalize the cardiac function.

  2. Cardiomyopathy in neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Finsterer, Josef; Stöllberger, Claudia; Wahbi, Karim

    2013-01-01

    According to the American Heart Association, cardiomyopathies are classified as primary (solely or predominantly confined to heart muscle), secondary (those showing pathological myocardial involvement as part of a neuromuscular disorder) and those in which cardiomyopathy is the first/predominant manifestation of a neuromuscular disorder. Cardiomyopathies may be further classified as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, dilated cardiomyopathy, restrictive cardiomyopathy, arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, or unclassified cardiomyopathy (noncompaction, Takotsubo-cardiomyopathy). This review focuses on secondary cardiomyopathies and those in which cardiomyopathy is the predominant manifestation of a myopathy. Any of them may cause neurological disease, and any of them may be a manifestation of a neurological disorder. Neurological disease most frequently caused by cardiomyopathies is ischemic stroke, followed by transitory ischemic attack, syncope, or vertigo. Neurological disease, which most frequently manifests with cardiomyopathies are the neuromuscular disorders. Most commonly associated with cardiomyopathies are muscular dystrophies, myofibrillar myopathies, congenital myopathies and metabolic myopathies. Management of neurological disease caused by cardiomyopathies is not at variance from the same neurological disorders due to other causes. Management of secondary cardiomyopathies is not different from that of cardiomyopathies due to other causes either. Patients with neuromuscular disorders require early cardiologic investigations and close follow-ups, patients with cardiomyopathies require neurological investigation and avoidance of muscle toxic medication if a neuromuscular disorder is diagnosed. Which patients with cardiomyopathy profit most from primary stroke prevention is unsolved and requires further investigations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. What Is Cardiomyopathy?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Cardiomyopathy? Cardiomyopathy refers to diseases of the heart muscle. These ... many causes, signs and symptoms, and treatments. In cardiomyopathy, the heart muscle becomes enlarged, thick, or rigid. ...

  4. The Costs of Preventing and Treating Chagas Disease in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Castillo-Riquelme, Marianela; Guhl, Felipe; Turriago, Brenda; Pinto, Nestor; Rosas, Fernando; Martínez, Mónica Flórez; Fox-Rushby, Julia; Davies, Clive; Campbell-Lendrum, Diarmid

    2008-01-01

    Background The objective of this study is to report the costs of Chagas disease in Colombia, in terms of vector disease control programmes and the costs of providing care to chronic Chagas disease patients with cardiomyopathy. Methods Data were collected from Colombia in 2004. A retrospective review of costs for vector control programmes carried out in rural areas included 3,084 houses surveyed for infestation with triatomine bugs and 3,305 houses sprayed with insecticide. A total of 63 patient records from 3 different hospitals were selected for a retrospective review of resource use. Consensus methodology with local experts was used to estimate care seeking behaviour and to complement observed data on utilisation. Findings The mean cost per house per entomological survey was $4.4 (in US$ of 2004), whereas the mean cost of spraying a house with insecticide was $27. The main cost driver of spraying was the price of the insecticide, which varied greatly. Treatment of a chronic Chagas disease patient costs between $46.4 and $7,981 per year in Colombia, depending on severity and the level of care used. Combining cost and utilisation estimates the expected cost of treatment per patient-year is $1,028, whereas lifetime costs averaged $11,619 per patient. Chronic Chagas disease patients have limited access to healthcare, with an estimated 22% of patients never seeking care. Conclusion Chagas disease is a preventable condition that affects mostly poor populations living in rural areas. The mean costs of surveying houses for infestation and spraying infested houses were low in comparison to other studies and in line with treatment costs. Care seeking behaviour and the type of insurance affiliation seem to play a role in the facilities and type of care that patients use, thus raising concerns about equitable access to care. Preventing Chagas disease in Colombia would be cost-effective and could contribute to prevent inequalities in health and healthcare. PMID:19015725

  5. Immunoregulatory networks in human Chagas disease

    PubMed Central

    Dutra, Walderez O.; Menezes, Cristiane A.S.; Magalhães, Luisa M. D.; Gollob, Kenneth J.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Chagas disease, caused by the infection with Trypanosoma cruzi, is endemic in all Latin America. Due to the increase in population migration, Chagas disease has spread worldwide and is now considered a health issue not only in endemic countries. While most chronically infected individuals remain asymptomatic, approximately 30% of the patients develop a potentially deadly cardiomyopathy. The exact mechanisms that underlie the establishment and maintenance of the cardiac pathology are not clear. However, there is consistent evidence that immunoregulatory cytokines are critical for orchestrating the immune response and, thus, influence disease development or control. While the asymptomatic (indeterminate) form represents a state of balance between the host and the parasite, the establishment of the cardiac form represents the loss of this balance. Analysis of data obtained from several studies have led to the hypothesis that the indeterminate form is associated with an anti-inflammatory cytokine profile, represented by high expression of IL-10, while cardiac form is associated with a high production of IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha in relation to IL-10, leading to an inflammatory profile. Here, we discuss the immunoregulatory events that might influence disease outcome, as well as the mechanisms that influence the establishment of these complex immunoregulatory networks. PMID:24611805

  6. Melatonin in Chagas' disease. Possible therapeutic value.

    PubMed

    Cardinali, Daniel P; Alvarez, Carlos B

    2011-01-01

    Chagas' disease is a severe health problem in Latin America, causing approximately 50 000 deaths a year, with approximately 18 million infected people. About 25-30% of the patients infected with Trypanosoma cruzi develop the chronic form of the disease. The protective response against T. cruzi depends on both innate and acquired immunity involving macrophages, natural killer cells, T and B lymphocytes, and the production of proinflammatory Th-1 cytokines. In addition, an increased nitric oxide (NO) production in macrophages leading to effective microbicidal action is needed to control parasitemia. Melatonin is detectable in T. cruzi and may play a role in promoting infection whereas, when administered in high doses during the acute phase of T. cruzi infection, it can decrease parasitemia while reducing NO production. During chronic disease progression, the sustained oxidative stress concomitant to myocardial damage could be reduced by administering melatonin. It is hypothesized that the coordinated administration of a melatonin agonist like the MT1 /MT2 agonist ramelteon, that lacks antioxidant activity and may not affect NO production during the acute phase, and of melatonin in doses high enough to decrease oxidative damage, to preserve mitochondrial and to prevent cardiomyopathy during the chronic phase, could be a novel add-on treatment of Chagas' disease.

  7. Current and Future Chemotherapy for Chagas Disease.

    PubMed

    Gaspar, Luís; Moraes, Carolina B; Freitas-Junior, Lucio H; Ferrari, Stefania; Costantino, Luca; Costi, Maria Paola; Coron, Ross P; Smith, Terry K; Siqueira-Neto, Jair L; McKerrow, James H; Cordeiro-da-Silva, Anabela

    2015-01-01

    Human American trypanosomiasis, commonly called Chagas disease, is one of the most neglected illnesses in the world and remains one of the most prevalent chronic infectious diseases of Latin America with thousands of new cases every year. The only treatments available have been introduced five decades ago. They have serious, undesirable side effects and disputed benefits in the chronic stage of the disease - a characteristic and debilitating cardiomyopathy and/or megavisceras. Several laboratories have therefore focused their efforts in finding better drugs. Although recent years have brought new clinical trials, these are few and lack diversity in terms of drug mechanism of action, thus resulting in a weak drug discovery pipeline. This fragility has been recently exposed by the failure of two candidates; posaconazole and E1224, to sterilely cure patients in phase 2 clinical trials. Such setbacks highlight the need for continuous, novel and high quality drug discovery and development efforts to discover better and safer treatments. In this article we will review past and current findings on drug discovery for Trypanosoma cruzi made by academic research groups, industry and other research organizations over the last half century. We also analyze the current research landscape that is now better placed than ever to deliver alternative treatments for Chagas disease in the near future.

  8. Cardiac arrhythmias in Chagas' heart disease.

    PubMed

    Elizari, M V; Chiale, P A

    1993-10-01

    Chagas' disease is a chronic parasitosis affecting most Latin American countries. Its most important clinical manifestation is a late developing chronic myocarditis and, much less frequently, an early acute myocarditis. Chagasic myocardial damage is microfocal and disseminated throughout the heart. In most cases, the coexistence of areas of myocytic degeneration, inflammatory infiltration, and fibrosis suggests a permanent evolving process. Commonly, chronic chagasic myocarditis resembles a dilated cardiomyopathy, with characteristic ECG abnormalities (atrial and ventricular extrasystoles, intraventricular and/or AV conduction disturbances, and primary ST-T wave changes). Since myocardial damage is scattered throughout the heart, the ECG abnormalities (arrhythmias, conduction disturbances, and repolarization changes) are also representative of the widespread cardiac involvement. Thus, sick sinus syndrome, atrial extrasystoles, intraatrial conduction disturbances, and atrial fibrillation or flutter are common findings in different stages of the disease. At the ventricular level, both conduction disturbances and arrhythmias are conspicuous expressions of the myocardial damage. Right bundle branch block alone or in combination with left anterior hemiblock are the most common conduction defects. Further compromise of the conduction system can lead to different degrees of AV block. Chagas' disease is the main cause of bundle branch block and AV block in endemic areas. In advanced cases of Chagas' heart disease, ventricular premature contractions are extremely frequent, multiform, and repetitive (couplets and runs of ventricular tachycardia), and show R on T phenomenon. These arrhythmias are usually aggravated by increased sympathetic tone, implying an enhanced risk of cardiac sudden death among chagasic patients, which is sometimes the first manifestation of the illness. Chronic chagasic myocarditis is the leading cause of cardiovascular death, mostly as a consequence

  9. Reversible Cardiomyopathies

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Harsh; Madanieh, Raef; Kosmas, Constantine E; Vatti, Satya K; Vittorio, Timothy J

    2015-01-01

    Cardiomyopathies (CMs) have many etiological factors that can result in severe structural and functional dysregulation. Fortunately, there are several potentially reversible CMs that are known to improve when the root etiological factor is addressed. In this article, we discuss several of these reversible CMs, including tachycardia-induced, peripartum, inflammatory, hyperthyroidism, Takotsubo, and chronic illness–induced CMs. Our discussion also includes a review on their respective pathophysiology, as well as possible management solutions. PMID:26052233

  10. Immunology of Chagas' disease*

    PubMed Central

    1974-01-01

    After reviewing present knowledge of the morphology, multiplication, and transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi, this Memorandum discusses the animal models that may be of value in understanding the immune mechanisms operating in Chagas' disease. The role of both circulating antibody and cell-mediated immunity in protection against the parasite is discussed, together with the possibility that immunopathological mechanisms may be responsible for some of the lesions found in patients with Chagas' disease. The immunodiagnostic methods at present available are also reviewed, and the possibility of producing a vaccine for human use is considered in the light of recent findings in experimental animals. A series of recommendations for further research is included. PMID:4218137

  11. Arrhythmogenic Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Corrado, Domenico; Basso, Cristina; Judge, Daniel P

    2017-09-15

    Arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy is an inherited heart muscle disorder, predisposing to sudden cardiac death, particularly in young patients and athletes. Pathological features include loss of myocytes and fibrofatty replacement of right ventricular myocardium; biventricular involvement is often observed. It is a cell-to-cell junction cardiomyopathy, typically caused by genetically determined abnormalities of cardiac desmosomes, which leads to detachment of myocytes and alteration of intracellular signal transduction. The diagnosis of arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy does not rely on a single gold standard test but is achieved using a scoring system, which encompasses familial and genetic factors, ECG abnormalities, arrhythmias, and structural/functional ventricular alterations. The main goal of treatment is the prevention of sudden cardiac death. Implantable cardioverter defibrillator is the only proven lifesaving therapy; however, it is associated with significant morbidity because of device-related complications and inappropriate implantable cardioverter defibrillator interventions. Selection of patients who are the best candidates for implantable cardioverter defibrillator implantation is one of the most challenging issues in the clinical management. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  12. [Cardiomyopathies. I: classification of cardiomyopathies--dilated cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Schultheiss, H P; Noutsias, M; Kühl, U; Lassner, D; Gross, U; Poller, W; Pauschinger, M

    2005-11-01

    Cardiomyopathies are common causes of heart failure and sudden cardiac death. According to the WHO classification, "specific" cardiomyopathies are differentiated from "idiopathic" cardiomyopathies. Thus, this classification is primarily based on pathophysiological characteristics. The diagnostic spectrum in cardiomyopathies comprises the entire spectrum of non-invasive and invasive cardiological examination techniques. The exact verification of certain cardiomyopathies necessitates additionally investigations. For example, immunohistological and molecular biological investigations of endomyocardial biopsies may confirm inflammatory cardiomyopathy, which is often induced by viruses. Several studies have shown that specific immunomodulatory treatment options can halt the progressive course of the disease. Several gene mutations have been identified in genetic/familial dilated cardiomyopathy. First-degree relatives should be screened for early stages. Primary prevention of sudden cardiac death shows increasing superiority of the implantable defibrillator compared with pharmacological approaches (i.e. amiodarone).

  13. Clinical and Echocardiographic Predictors of Mortality in Chagasic Cardiomyopathy - Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Clodoval de Barros; Markman, Brivaldo

    2014-01-01

    Diagnosis, prognosis and evaluation of death risk in Chagas cardiomyopathy still constitute a challenge due to the diversity of manifestations, which determine the importance of using echocardiography, tissue Doppler and biomarkers. To evaluate, within a systematic review, clinical and echocardiographic profiles of patients with chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy, which may be related to worse prognosis and major mortality risk. To perform the systematic review, we used Medline (via PubMed), LILACS and SciELO databases to identify 82 articles published from 1991 to 2012, with the following descriptors: echocardiography, mortality and Chagas disease. We selected 31 original articles, involving diagnostic and prognostic methods. The importance of Chagas disease has increased due to its emergence in Europe and United States, but most evidence came from Brazil. Among the predictors of worse prognosis and higher mortality risk are morphological and functional alterations in the left and right ventricles, evaluated by conventional echocardiography and tissue Doppler, as well as the increase in brain natriuretic peptide and troponin I concentrations. Recently, the evaluations of dyssynchrony, dysautonomia, as well as strain, strain rate and myocardial twisting were added to the diagnostic arsenal for the early differentiation of Chagas cardiomyopathy. Developments in imaging and biochemical diagnostic procedures have enabled more detailed cardiac evaluations, which demonstrate the early involvement of both ventricles, allowing a more accurate assessment of the mortality risk in Chagas disease. PMID:25004422

  14. The Prevalence of Atrial Fibrillation and Conduction Abnormalities in Chagas' Disease: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Rhanderson; Garcia, Daniel; Fernandes, Gilson; He, L I; Lichtenberger, Paola; Viles-Gonzalez, Juan; Coffey, James O; Mitrani, Raul D

    2016-02-01

    Chagas' disease (CD) has been associated with atrial fibrillation (AF) and electrocardiographic (ECG) conduction defects. However, prior studies have shown conflicting results. We performed a meta-analysis comparing the prevalence of AF and conduction abnormalities between CD and non-CD patients. PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Central, and Latin American databases were searched for studies that directly compared the prevalence of AF and conduction defects in CD and non-CD patients. Odds ratios (OR) were computed using random-effects model due to anticipated heterogeneity. We further performed subanalyses limited to studies that included only patients with cardiomyopathy. A total of 17,238 patients from 30 studies were included, of whom 6,840 (40%) had a positive serology for CD. In the pooled data, AF was significantly more prevalent in the CD group (OR 1.62; 95%CI 1.21-2.15; P = 0.001). However, no significant difference was observed between groups when the analysis included only patients with cardiomyopathy (OR 1.21; 95%CI 0.97-1.50; P = 0.08) or heart failure (OR 1.09; 95%CI 0.81-1.47; P = 0.55). The combination of right bundle branch block (RBBB) and left anterior fascicular block (LAFB) had the highest OR for increased prevalence in patients with Chagas' cardiomyopathy compared to non-CD etiologies (OR 5.31; 95%CI 1.23-22.86; P = 0.03). Our meta-analysis suggests that the prevalence of AF in patients with Chagas' cardiomyopathy is not significantly different from non-CD cardiomyopathies. The pattern of RBBB and LAFB in patients with cardiomyopathy of unknown etiology and epidemiologic risk factors should raise the possibility of CD and prompt specific diagnostic testing. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Metabolic cardiomyopathies

    PubMed Central

    Guertl, Barbara; Noehammer, Christa; Hoefler, Gerald

    2000-01-01

    The energy needed by cardiac muscle to maintain proper function is supplied by adenosine Ariphosphate primarily (ATP) production through breakdown of fatty acids. Metabolic cardiomyopathies can be caused by disturbances in metabolism, for example diabetes mellitus, hypertrophy and heart failure or alcoholic cardiomyopathy. Deficiency in enzymes of the mitochondrial β-oxidation show a varying degree of cardiac manifestation. Aberrations of mitochondrial DNA lead to a wide variety of cardiac disorders, without any obvious correlation between genotype and phenotype. A completely different pathogenetic model comprises cardiac manifestation of systemic metabolic diseases caused by deficiencies of various enzymes in a variety of metabolic pathways. Examples of these disorders are glycogen storage diseases (e.g. glycogenosis type II and III), lysosomal storage diseases (e.g. Niemann-Pick disease, Gaucher disease, I-cell disease, various types of mucopolysaccharidoses, GM1 gangliosidosis, galactosialidosis, carbohydrate–deficient glycoprotein syndromes and Sandhoff's disease). There are some systemic diseases which can also affect the heart, for example triosephosphate isomerase deficiency, hereditary haemochromatosis, CD 36 defect or propionic acidaemia. PMID:11298185

  16. Immunity in Chagas’ Disease.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    This is the final report on the immunity in Chagas ’ disease contract and it summarizes the results of a diversity of studies directed toward...antibody test for Chagas ’ disease. Also mentioned are the facts that the cell membranes of live trypomastigotes are not immunoreactive with the...humoral immune response of an infected host and that suppression of parasitemias in chronic Chagas ’ disease is probably a function of the cell immune system of the host. (Author)

  17. Molecular mechanisms of cardiac electromechanical remodeling during Chagas disease: Role of TNF and TGF-β.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Jader Santos; Machado, Fabiana Simão; Ropert, Catherine; Roman-Campos, Danilo

    2017-02-01

    Chagas disease is caused by the trypanosomatid Trypanosoma cruzi, which chronically causes heart problems in up to 30% of infected patients. Chagas disease was initially restricted to Latin America. However, due to migratory events, this disease may become a serious worldwide health problem. During Chagas disease, many patients die of cardiac arrhythmia despite the apparent benefits of anti-arrhythmic therapy (e.g., amiodarone). Here, we assimilate the cardiac form of Chagas disease to an inflammatory cardiac disease. Evidence from the literature, mostly provided using experimental models, supports this view and argues in favor of new strategies for treating cardiac arrhythmias in Chagas disease by modulating cytokine production and/or action. But the complex nature of myocardial inflammation underlies the need to better understand the molecular mechanisms of the inflammatory response during Chagas disease. Here, particular attention has been paid to tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF) and transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) although other cytokines may be involved in the chagasic cardiomyopathy.

  18. Abnormal 18 F-FDG and 82 Rb PET Findings in Chagas Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Salimy, Medhi S; Parwani, Purvi J; Mukai, Kanae; Pampaloni, Miguel Hernandez; Flavell, Robert R

    2017-03-03

    Uptake of the radiopharmaceutical F-FDG visualized by PET imaging can reflect abnormal myocardial inflammation. When utilized in conjunction with other imaging modalities, such as echocardiography, PET F-FDG imaging can help distinguish between active cardiac sarcoidosis and other etiologies of nonischemic cardiomyopathy. We present a case of a 46-year-old man with nonischemic cardiomyopathy and ventricular tachycardia who underwent an echocardiogram suggestive of cardiac Chagas disease. A subsequent F-FDG PET demonstrated abnormal hypermetabolism. The diagnosis was confirmed by positive serologic examination results.

  19. Current drug therapy and pharmaceutical challenges for Chagas disease.

    PubMed

    Bermudez, José; Davies, Carolina; Simonazzi, Analía; Real, Juan Pablo; Palma, Santiago

    2016-04-01

    One of the most significant health problems in the American continent in terms of human health, and socioeconomic impact is Chagas disease, caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. Infection was originally transmitted by reduviid insects, congenitally from mother to fetus, and by oral ingestion in sylvatic/rural environments, but blood transfusions, organ transplants, laboratory accidents, and sharing of contaminated syringes also contribute to modern day transmission. Likewise, Chagas disease used to be endemic from Northern Mexico to Argentina, but migrations have earned it global. The parasite has a complex life cycle, infecting different species, and invading a variety of cells - including muscle and nerve cells of the heart and gastrointestinal tract - in the mammalian host. Human infection outcome is a potentially fatal cardiomyopathy, and gastrointestinal tract lesions. In absence of a vaccine, vector control and treatment of patients are the only tools to control the disease. Unfortunately, the only drugs now available for Chagas' disease, Nifurtimox and Benznidazole, are relatively toxic for adult patients, and require prolonged administration. Benznidazole is the first choice for Chagas disease treatment due to its lower side effects than Nifurtimox. However, different strategies are being sought to overcome Benznidazole's toxicity including shorter or intermittent administration schedules-either alone or in combination with other drugs. In addition, a long list of compounds has shown trypanocidal activity, ranging from natural products to specially designed molecules, re-purposing drugs commercialized to treat other maladies, and homeopathy. In the present review, we will briefly summarize the upturns of current treatment of Chagas disease, discuss the increment on research and scientific publications about this topic, and give an overview of the state-of-the-art research aiming to produce an alternative medication to treat T. cruzi infection.

  20. Arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Pilichou, Kalliopi; Thiene, Gaetano; Bauce, Barbara; Rigato, Ilaria; Lazzarini, Elisabetta; Migliore, Federico; Perazzolo Marra, Martina; Rizzo, Stefania; Zorzi, Alessandro; Daliento, Luciano; Corrado, Domenico; Basso, Cristina

    2016-04-02

    Arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy (AC) is a heart muscle disease clinically characterized by life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias and pathologically by an acquired and progressive dystrophy of the ventricular myocardium with fibro-fatty replacement. Due to an estimated prevalence of 1:2000-1:5000, AC is listed among rare diseases. A familial background consistent with an autosomal-dominant trait of inheritance is present in most of AC patients; recessive variants have also been reported, either or not associated with palmoplantar keratoderma and woolly hair. AC-causing genes mostly encode major components of the cardiac desmosome and up to 50% of AC probands harbor mutations in one of them. Mutations in non-desmosomal genes have been also described in a minority of AC patients, predisposing to the same or an overlapping disease phenotype. Compound/digenic heterozygosity was identified in up to 25% of AC-causing desmosomal gene mutation carriers, in part explaining the phenotypic variability. Abnormal trafficking of intercellular proteins to the intercalated discs of cardiomyocytes and Wnt/beta catenin and Hippo signaling pathways have been implicated in disease pathogenesis.AC is a major cause of sudden death in the young and in athletes. The clinical picture may include a sub-clinical phase; an overt electrical disorder; and right ventricular or biventricular pump failure. Ventricular fibrillation can occur at any stage. Genotype-phenotype correlation studies led to identify biventricular and dominant left ventricular variants, thus supporting the use of the broader term AC.Since there is no "gold standard" to reach the diagnosis of AC, multiple categories of diagnostic information have been combined and the criteria recently updated, to improve diagnostic sensitivity while maintaining specificity. Among diagnostic tools, contrast enhanced cardiac magnetic resonance is playing a major role in detecting left dominant forms of AC, even preceding morpho

  1. [What is not searched, it is difficult to find: Chagas' disease].

    PubMed

    Briceno, Luis; Mosca, Walter

    2016-05-01

    A conservative estimation indicates that more than 400 000 Latin American immigrants are living in Italy. Several studies have shown that among these, the prevalence of Chagas disease is between 3.9% and 17%, so it is not unlikely to find a patient with this disease during a cardiology visit. How many patients from Latin America are diagnosed with heart failure in Italy and no one has ever thought about a possible Chagas disease? This brief review describes the situation of the disease in Italy, its characteristics, the etiology of this disease and its treatment. The latter aspect will be discussed considering the recent published results of the BENEFIT study, where it was found that treatment with benznidazole in patients with Chagas' cardiomyopathy is able to reduce significantly the detection of parasites in the blood, but it is not able to prevent clinical deterioration during 5 years of follow-up. The possible implications of these results will be discussed.

  2. Chagas disease (Trypanosoma cruzi) and HIV co-infection in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Carolina; Cucunubá, Zulma; Parra, Edgar; Toro, German; Zambrano, Pilar; Ramírez, Juan David

    2014-09-01

    Chagas disease is a complex zoonotic pathology caused by the kinetoplastid Trypanosoma cruzi. This parasite presents remarkable genetic variability and has been grouped into six discrete typing units (DTUs). The association between the DTUs and clinical outcome remains unknown. Chagas disease and co-infection with HIV/AIDS has been reported widely in Brazil and Argentina. Herein, we present the molecular analyses from a Chagas disease patient with HIV/AIDS co-infection in Colombia who presented severe cardiomyopathy, pleural effusion, and central nervous system involvement. A mixed infection by T. cruzi genotypes was detected. We suggest including T. cruzi in the list of opportunistic pathogens for the management of HIV patients in Colombia. The epidemiological implications of this finding are discussed. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. Global economic burden of Chagas disease: a computational simulation model

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Bruce Y; Bacon, Kristina M; Bottazzi, Maria Elena; Hotez, Peter J

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background As Chagas disease continues to expand beyond tropical and subtropical zones, a growing need exists to better understand its resulting economic burden to help guide stakeholders such as policy makers, funders, and product developers. We developed a Markov simulation model to estimate the global and regional health and economic burden of Chagas disease from the societal perspective. Methods Our Markov model structure had a 1 year cycle length and consisted of five states: acute disease, indeterminate disease, cardiomyopathy with or without congestive heart failure, megaviscera, and death. Major model parameter inputs, including the annual probabilities of transitioning from one state to another, and present case estimates for Chagas disease came from various sources, including WHO and other epidemiological and disease-surveillance-based reports. We calculated annual and lifetime health-care costs and disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) for individuals, countries, and regions. We used a discount rate of 3% to adjust all costs and DALYs to present-day values. Findings On average, an infected individual incurs US$474 in health-care costs and 0·51 DALYs annually. Over his or her lifetime, an infected individual accrues an average net present value of $3456 and 3·57 DALYs. Globally, the annual burden is $627·46 million in health-care costs and 806 170 DALYs. The global net present value of currently infected individuals is $24·73 billion in health-care costs and 29 385 250 DALYs. Conversion of this burden into costs results in annual per-person costs of $4660 and lifetime per-person costs of $27 684. Global costs are $7·19 billion per year and $188·80 billion per lifetime. More than 10% of these costs emanate from the USA and Canada, where Chagas disease has not been traditionally endemic. A substantial proportion of the burden emerges from lost productivity from cardiovascular disease-induced early mortality. Interpretation The economic burden

  4. Interleukin-10 and tumour necrosis factor-alpha serum levels in chronic Chagas disease patients.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, R H T; Azevedo, E de A N; Diniz, G T N; Cavalcanti, M da G A de M; de Oliveira, W; de Morais, C N L; Gomes, Y de M

    2015-07-01

    In Chagas disease, chronically infected individuals may be asymptomatic or may present cardiac or digestive complications, and it is well known that the human immune response is related to different clinical manifestations. Different patterns of cytokine levels have been previously described in different clinical forms of this disease, but contradictory results are reported. Our aim was to evaluate the serum levels of interleukin-10 and tumour necrosis factor-alpha in patients with asymptomatic and cardiac Chagas disease. The serum interleukin-10 levels in patients with cardiomyopathy were higher than those in asymptomatic patients, mainly in those without heart enlargement. Although no significant difference was observed in serum tumour necrosis factor-alpha levels among the patients, we found that cardiac patients also present high levels of this cytokine, largely those with heart dilatation. Therefore, these cytokines play an important role in chronic Chagas disease cardiomyopathy. Follow-up investigations of these and other cytokines in patients with chronic Chagas disease need to be conducted to improve the understanding of the immunopathology of this disease. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Matrix Metalloproteinases 2 and 9 Are Differentially Expressed in Patients with Indeterminate and Cardiac Clinical Forms of Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fares, Rafaelle Christine Gomes; Gomes, Juliana de Assis Silva; Garzoni, Luciana Ribeiro; Waghabi, Mariana Caldas; Saraiva, Roberto Magalhães; Medeiros, Nayara Ingrid; Oliveira-Prado, Roberta; Sangenis, Luiz Henrique Conde; Chambela, Mayara da Costa; de Araújo, Fernanda Fortes; Teixeira-Carvalho, Andréa; Damásio, Marcos Paulo; Valente, Vanessa Azevedo; Ferreira, Karine Silvestre; Sousa, Giovane Rodrigo; Rocha, Manoel Otávio da Costa

    2013-01-01

    Dilated chronic cardiomyopathy (DCC) from Chagas disease is associated with myocardial remodeling and interstitial fibrosis, resulting in extracellular matrix (ECM) changes. In this study, we characterized for the first time the serum matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) and MMP-9 levels, as well as their main cell sources in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients presenting with the indeterminate (IND) or cardiac (CARD) clinical form of Chagas disease. Our results showed that serum levels of MMP-9 are associated with the severity of Chagas disease. The analysis of MMP production by T lymphocytes showed that CD8+ T cells are the main mononuclear leukocyte source of both MMP-2 and MMP-9 molecules. Using a new 3-dimensional model of fibrosis, we observed that sera from patients with Chagas disease induced an increase in the extracellular matrix components in cardiac spheroids. Furthermore, MMP-2 and MMP-9 showed different correlations with matrix proteins and inflammatory cytokines in patients with Chagas disease. Our results suggest that MMP-2 and MMP-9 show distinct activities in Chagas disease pathogenesis. While MMP-9 seems to be involved in the inflammation and cardiac remodeling of Chagas disease, MMP-2 does not correlate with inflammatory molecules. PMID:23856618

  6. Children's Cardiomyopathy Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... in Washington, D.C. and help cardiomyopathy related bills get passed into law and protect at-risk children from sudden cardiac death. TAKE ACTION TODAY Disclaimer & Privacy Policy © 2017 Children's Cardiomyopathy Foundation. All rights reserved.

  7. Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... purchased, 10% will be donated to Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Association. iGive.com - Online Shopping Joing iGive.com to ... 5% of the purchase price to Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Association. Bookmark the link http://smile.amazon.com/ch/ ...

  8. Clinical forms of Trypanosoma cruzi infected individuals in the chronic phase of Chagas disease in Puebla, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Guillén, María Del Carmen; López-Colombo, Aurelio; Ordóñez-Toquero, Guillermo; Gomez-Albino, Isidoro; Ramos-Jimenez, Judith; Torres-Rasgado, Enrique; Salgado-Rosas, Hilda; Romero-Díaz, Mónica; Pulido-Pérez, Patricia; Pérez-Fuentes, Ricardo

    2006-11-01

    In Mexico, despite the relatively high seroprevalence of Trypanosoma cruzi infection in humans in some areas, reported morbidity of Chagas disease is not clear. We determined clinical stage in 71 individuals seropositive to T. cruzi in the state of Puebla, Mexico, an area endemic for Chagas disease with a reported seroprevalence of 7.7%. Diagnosis of Chagas disease was made by two standardized serological tests (ELISA, IHA). Individuals were stratified according to clinical studies. All patients were submitted to EKG, barium swallow, and barium enema. Groups were identified as indeterminate form (IF) asymptomatic individuals without evidence of abnormalities (n = 34 cases); those with gastrointestinal alterations (12 patients) including symptoms of abnormal relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter and absent peristalsis in the esophageal body, grade I megaesophagus, and/or megacolon; patients with clinical manifestations and documented changes of chronic Chagas heart disease who were subdivided as follows: mild (8 patients)--mild electrocardiographic changes of ventricular repolarization, sinus bradychardia); moderate (6 patients)--left bundle branch block, right bundle branch block associated with left anterior fascicular block); severe (8 patients)--signs of cardiomegaly, dilated cardiomyopathy); and the associated form (3 cases) that included presence of both cardiomyopathy and megaesophagus. These data highlight the importance of accurate evaluation of the prevalence and clinical course of Chagas disease in endemic and non-endemic areas of Mexico.

  9. Clinical, electrocardiographic and echocardiographic abnormalities in Latin American migrants with newly diagnosed Chagas disease 2005-2009, Barcelona, Spain.

    PubMed

    Valerio, L; Roure, S; Sabria, M; Balanzo, X; Valles, X; Seres, L

    2011-09-22

    Following Latin American migration, Chagas disease has inevitably appeared in non-endemic countries in Europe and elsewhere. New policies are necessary to prevent transmission in those countries but the long, often undetected chronic period of the early stages of the disease also renders epidemiological studies important. The main objective of our study was to determine the presence of clinical, electrocardiogram (ECG) and echocardiographic abnormalities in a population of Latin American migrants infected with Trypanosoma cruzi at the moment of diagnosis. We performed a hospital-based observational study of 100 adult patients with newly diagnosed Chagas infection between January 2005 and December 2009. Thirty-seven patients were classified within the Brazilian Consensus on Chagas cardiomyopathy early cardiac stages (A or B1) and 49 presented pathological findings (stage B2) according to the Panamerican Health Organization Classification. Overall, 49 patients showed ECG and/or echocardiographic alterations. The presence of ECG and ecocardiographic alterations were significantly associated (p=0.038). The most frequent ECG and echocardiographic findings were right bundle branch block (12 cases) and impaired left ventricular wall relaxation (24 cases), respectively. In conclusion, ECG and echocardiographic alterations coherent with Chagas cardiomyopathy were found in a large proportion of newly diagnosed Latin American migrants infected with T. cruzi. In the mid-term, Chagas disease might become an important cause of chronic cadiomyopathy in our attendance area.

  10. Anthracycline cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Kobrinsky, N L; Ramsay, N K; Krivit, W

    1982-01-01

    Life-threatening irreversible cardiomyopathy is a major complication of anthracycline therapy, particularly in the pediatric population. The pediatric cardiologist, in concert with the primary oncologist, should therefore play a major role in the care of patients receiving these agents and in clinical trials involving their use. Many risk factors and their relationships to drug pharmacokinetics, mechanisms of action, and toxicity have been identified. These data provide a rational basis for present-day recommendations regarding anthracycline administration and dosage scheduling. They furthermore provide potential avenues for clinical investigation aimed at improving the therapeutic index of these agents: alpha-tocopherol, cytochrome Q10, and other free radical scavengers may decrease the deleterious effects of free radical generation on the myocardium without apparent interference with tumoricidal effect. The cardiac glycosides may decrease cardiac toxicity by specific myocardial exclusion. Anthracycline analogs have been designed to specifically inhibit myocardial binding and/or free radical generation. Clinical trials involving these agents are difficult to interpret because of variability in front end risk factors and dosage schedules in the study population. Furthermore, the relatively low (5 to 10%) incidence of affected patients implies the need for large numbers to demonstrate a statistically significant benefit. Pediatric protocols addressing these issues are urgently needed. Guidelines for present-day management and future studies are outlined.

  11. Dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Weintraub, Robert G; Semsarian, Christopher; Macdonald, Peter

    2017-02-09

    Dilated cardiomyopathy is defined by the presence of left ventricular dilatation and contractile dysfunction. Genetic mutations involving genes that encode cytoskeletal, sarcomere, and nuclear envelope proteins, among others, account for up to 35% of cases. Acquired causes include myocarditis and exposure to alcohol, drugs and toxins, and metabolic and endocrine disturbances. The most common presenting symptoms relate to congestive heart failure, but can also include circulatory collapse, arrhythmias, and thromboembolic events. Secondary neurohormonal changes contribute to reverse remodelling and ongoing myocyte damage. The prognosis is worst for individuals with the lowest ejection fractions or severe diastolic dysfunction. Treatment of chronic heart failure comprises medications that improve survival and reduce hospital admission-namely, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and β blockers. Other interventions include enrolment in a multidisciplinary heart failure service, and device therapy for arrhythmia management and sudden death prevention. Patients who are refractory to medical therapy might benefit from mechanical circulatory support and heart transplantation. Treatment of preclinical disease and the potential role of stem-cell therapy are being investigated.

  12. Electrocardiographic and echocardiographic abnormalities in Chagas disease: findings in residents of rural Bolivian communities hyperendemic for Chagas disease.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Antonio B; Nunes, Maria Carmo P; Clark, Eva H; Samuels, Aaron; Menacho, Silvio; Gomez, Jesus; Bozo Gutierrez, Ricardo W; Crawford, Thomas C; Gilman, Robert H; Bern, Caryn

    2015-09-01

    Chagas disease is a neglected and preventable tropical disease that causes significant cardiac morbidity and mortality in Latin America. This study sought to describe cardiac findings among inhabitants of rural communities of the Bolivian Chaco. The cardiac study drew participants from an epidemiologic study in 7 indigenous Guarani communities. All infected participants 10 years or older were asked to undergo a brief physical examination and 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG). A subset had echocardiograms. ECG and echocardiograms were read by 1 or more cardiologists. Of 1,137 residents 10 years or older, 753 (66.2%) had Trypanosoma cruzi infection. Cardiac evaluations were performed for 398 infected participants 10 years or older. Fifty-five participants (13.8%) had 1 or more ECG abnormalities suggestive of Chagas cardiomyopathy. The most frequent abnormalities were bundle branch blocks in 42 (11.3%), followed by rhythm disturbances or ventricular ectopy in 13 (3.3%), and atrioventricular blocks (AVB) in 10 participants (2.6%). The prevalence of any abnormality rose from 1.1% among those 10 to 19 years old to 14.2%, 17.3%, and 26.4% among those 20 to 39, 40 to 59, and older than 60 years, respectively. First-degree AVB was seen most frequently in participants 60 years or older, but the 4 patients with third-degree AVB were all under 50 years old. Eighteen and 2 participants had a left ventricular ejection fraction of 40% to 54% and <40%, respectively. An increasing number of ECG abnormalities was associated with progressively larger left ventricular end-diastolic dimensions and lower left ventricular ejection fraction. We found a high prevalence of ECG abnormalities and substantial evidence of Chagas cardiomyopathy. Programs to improve access to basic cardiac care (annual ECG, antiarrhythmics, pacemakers) could have an immediate impact on morbidity and mortality in these highly endemic communities. Copyright © 2015 World Heart Federation (Geneva). All rights reserved.

  13. Inherited cardiomyopathies mimicking arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Jason D; Veinot, John P; Rutberg, Julie; Gollob, Michael H

    2010-01-01

    Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) represents an inherited cardiomyopathy that manifests clinically with malignant ventricular arrhythmias, sudden cardiac death, and less commonly heart failure. The condition is characterized by replacement of the myocardium, primarily of the right ventricle, with fibrofatty tissue. Extensive fibrofatty replacement of the myocardium has been previously thought to be pathognomonic of ARVC; however, this report details two other forms of inherited cardiomyopathy, namely hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) and the PRKAG2 cardiac syndrome, that were found to have significant fibrofatty myocardial replacement at pathologic examination. This report represents the first documentation of inherited cardiomyopathies mimicking ARVC and highlights the concept that other cardiac conditions can be associated with fibrofatty replacement of the myocardium. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. [Classification of cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Asakura, Masanori; Kitakaze, Masafumi

    2014-01-01

    Cardiomyopathy is a group of cardiovascular diseases with poor prognosis. Some patients with dilated cardiomyopathy need heart transplantations due to severe heart failure. Some patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy die unexpectedly due to malignant ventricular arrhythmias. Various phenotypes of cardiomyopathies are due to the heterogeneous group of diseases. The classification of cardiomyopathies is important and indispensable in the clinical situation. However, their classification has not been established, because the causes of cardiomyopathies have not been fully elucidated. We usually use definition and classification offered by WHO/ISFC task force in 1995. Recently, several new definitions and classifications of the cardiomyopathies have been published by American Heart Association, European Society of Cardiology and Japanese Circulation Society.

  15. Neonatal dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Soares, Paulo; Rocha, Gustavo; Pissarra, Susana; Soares, Henrique; Flôr-de-Lima, Filipa; Costa, Sandra; Moura, Cláudia; Dória, Sofia; Guimarães, Hercília

    2017-03-01

    Cardiomyopathies are rare diseases of the heart muscle, of multiple causes, that manifest with various structural and functional phenotypes but are invariably associated with cardiac dysfunction. Dilated cardiomyopathy is the commonest cardiomyopathy in children, and the majority present before one year of age. Its etiology may be acquired or genetic. Myocarditis is an important cause and is responsible for the majority of acquired cases. Inherited (familial) forms of dilated cardiomyopathy may occur in 25-50% of patients. Echocardiographic and tissue Doppler studies are the basis for diagnosis of dilated cardiomyopathy in most patients. Marked dilatation of the left ventricle with global hypokinesis is the hallmark of the disease. This review will cover the classification, epidemiology and management of newborns with dilated cardiomyopathy. In particular, a comprehensive and up-to-date review of the genetic study of dilated cardiomyopathy and of detailed echocardiographic assessment of these patients will be presented.

  16. Towards a Paradigm Shift in the Treatment of Chronic Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Alarcón de Noya, B.; Araujo-Jorge, T.; Grijalva, M. J.; Guhl, F.; López, M. C.; Ramsey, J. M.; Ribeiro, I.; Schijman, A. G.; Sosa-Estani, S.; Torrico, F.; Gascon, J.

    2014-01-01

    Treatment for Chagas disease with currently available medications is recommended universally only for acute cases (all ages) and for children up to 14 years old. The World Health Organization, however, also recommends specific antiparasite treatment for all chronic-phase Trypanosoma cruzi-infected individuals, even though in current medical practice this remains controversial, and most physicians only prescribe palliative treatment for adult Chagas patients with dilated cardiomyopathy. The present opinion, prepared by members of the NHEPACHA network (Nuevas Herramientas para el Diagnóstico y la Evaluación del Paciente con Enfermedad de Chagas/New Tools for the Diagnosis and Evaluation of Chagas Disease Patients), reviews the paradigm shift based on clinical and immunological evidence and argues in favor of antiparasitic treatment for all chronic patients. We review the tools needed to monitor therapeutic efficacy and the potential criteria for evaluation of treatment efficacy beyond parasitological cure. Etiological treatment should now be mandatory for all adult chronic Chagas disease patients. PMID:24247135

  17. Towards a paradigm shift in the treatment of chronic Chagas disease.

    PubMed

    Viotti, R; Alarcón de Noya, B; Araujo-Jorge, T; Grijalva, M J; Guhl, F; López, M C; Ramsey, J M; Ribeiro, I; Schijman, A G; Sosa-Estani, S; Torrico, F; Gascon, J

    2014-01-01

    Treatment for Chagas disease with currently available medications is recommended universally only for acute cases (all ages) and for children up to 14 years old. The World Health Organization, however, also recommends specific antiparasite treatment for all chronic-phase Trypanosoma cruzi-infected individuals, even though in current medical practice this remains controversial, and most physicians only prescribe palliative treatment for adult Chagas patients with dilated cardiomyopathy. The present opinion, prepared by members of the NHEPACHA network (Nuevas Herramientas para el Diagnóstico y la Evaluación del Paciente con Enfermedad de Chagas/New Tools for the Diagnosis and Evaluation of Chagas Disease Patients), reviews the paradigm shift based on clinical and immunological evidence and argues in favor of antiparasitic treatment for all chronic patients. We review the tools needed to monitor therapeutic efficacy and the potential criteria for evaluation of treatment efficacy beyond parasitological cure. Etiological treatment should now be mandatory for all adult chronic Chagas disease patients.

  18. The history of Chagas disease

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The ancestor of Trypanosome cruzi was probably introduced to South American via bats approximately 7-10 million years ago. When the first humans arrived in the New World, a sylvatic cycle of Chagas disease was then already well established. Paleoparasitological data suggests that human American trypanosomiasis originated in the Andean area when people founded the first settlements in the coastal region of the Atacama Desert. Identification of T. cruzi as the etiological agent and triatome bugs as the transmission vector of Chagas disease occurred within a few years at the beginning of the 20th century. History also teaches us that human activity leading to environmental changes, in particular deforestation, is the main cause for the spread of Chagas disease. Recently, migration of T. cruzi-infected patients has led to a distribution of Chagas disease from Latin America to non-endemic countries in Europe, North America and western Pacific region. PMID:25011546

  19. Pregnancy, cardiomyopathies, and genetics.

    PubMed

    Van Tintelen, J Peter; Pieper, Petronella G; Van Spaendonck-Zwarts, Karin Y; Van Den Berg, Maarten P

    2014-03-15

    Although familial forms of cardiomyopathy such as hypertrophic or dilated cardiomyopathy have been recognized for decades, it is only recently that much of the genetic basis of these inherited cardiomyopathies has been elucidated. This has provided important insights into the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the disease phenotype. This increased knowledge and the availability of genetic testing has resulted in increasing numbers of mutation carriers who are being monitored, including many who are now of child-bearing age. Pregnancy is generally well tolerated in asymptomatic patients or mutation carriers with inherited cardiomyopathies. However, since pregnancy leads to major physiological changes in the cardiovascular system, in women with genetic cardiomyopathies or who carry a mutation pre-disposing to a genetic cardiomyopathy, pregnancy entails a risk of developing heart failure and/or arrhythmias. This deterioration of cardiac function may occur despite optimal medical treatment. Advanced left ventricular dysfunction, poor functional class (NYHA class III or IV), or prior cardiac events appear to increase the risk of maternal cardiac complications. However, there are no large series of cardiomyopathy patients who are regularly evaluated for cardiac complications during pregnancy and for certain types of inherited cardiomyopathy, only case reports on individual pregnancies are available. Pre-conception cardiologic evaluation and genetic counselling are important for every woman with a cardiomyopathy or a cardiomyopathy-related mutation who is considering having a family. In this article, we give an overview of the basic clinical aspects, genetics, and pregnancy outcome in women with different types of inherited cardiomyopathies. We also discuss the genetic aspects of pregnancy-associated cardiomyopathy, including peripartum cardiomyopathy.

  20. [Chagas disease in Brazil].

    PubMed

    Vinhaes, M C; Dias, J C

    2000-01-01

    This article presents the current situation for Chagas disease vectors in Brazil, based on data from the Brazilian National Health Foundation (FNS). Over the course of the last 20 years, continuous chemical control has resulted in a clear reduction of triatomine densities and Trypanosoma cruzi in Brazilian dwellings. Results have been particularly promising in relation to Triatoma infestans and Panstrongylus megistus, considered the most important species in the past. In parallel, data from school serological surveys, hospitalized patients, and mortality records show an important decrease in the disease. Nevertheless, some areas of the Brazilian Northeast and some residual foci of Triatoma infestans and Panstrongylus megistus remain as major challenges for public health authorities, requiring effective epidemiological surveillance. States and municipalities are required to assume this task at present, as the traditional Brazilian National Health Foundation is undergoing decentralization.

  1. Ventricular hypertrophy in cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Oakley, C

    1971-01-01

    Semantic difficulties arise when hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy is seen without obstruction and with congestive failure, and also when congestive cardiomyopathy is seen with gross hypertrophy but without heart failure. Retention of a small left ventricular cavity and a normal ejection fraction characterizes hypertrophic cardiomyopathy at all stages of the disorder. Congestive cardiomyopathy is recognized by the presence of a dilated left ventricular cavity and reduced ejection fraction regardless of the amount of hypertrophy and the presence or not of heart failure. Longevity in congestive cardiomyopathy seems to be promoted when hypertrophy is great relative to the amount of pump failure as measured by increase in cavity size. Conversely, death in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is most likely when hypertrophy is greatest at a time when outflow tract obstruction has been replaced by inflow restriction caused by diminishing ventricular distensibility. Hypertrophy is thus beneficial and compensatory in congestive cardiomyopathy, whereas it may be the primary disorder and eventual cause of death in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Reasons are given for believing that hypertension may have been the original cause of left ventricular dilatation in some case of congestive cardiomyopathy in which loss of stroke output thenceforward is followed by normotension. Development of severe hypertension in these patients after recovery from a prolonged period of left ventricular failure with normotension lends weight to this hypothesis. No fault has been found in the large or small coronary arteries in either hypertrophic cardiomyopathy or congestive cardiomyopathy when they have been examined in life by selective coronary angiography, or by histological methods in biopsy or post-mortem material. Coronary blood supply may be a limiting factor in the compensatory hypertrophy of congestive cardiomyopathy, and the ability to hypertrophy may explain the better prognosis of some

  2. Human viral cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Maisch, Bernhard; Ristic, Arsen D; Portig, Irene; Pankuweit, Sabine

    2003-01-01

    Viral infection of the heart is relatively common, usually asymptomatic and has a spontaneous and complete resolution. It can, however, in rare cases, lead to substantial cardiac damage, development of viral cardiomyopathy and congestive heart failure. Viral cardiomyopathy is defined as viral persistence in a dilated heart. It may be accompanied by myocardial inflammation and then termed inflammatory viral cardiomyopathy (or viral myocarditis with cardiomegaly). If no inflammation is observed in the biopsy of a dilated heart (<14 lymphocytes and macrophages/mm ) the term viral cardiomyopathy or viral persistence in dilated cardiomyopathy should be applied. The diagnosis of myocarditis and viral cardiomyopathy can be made only by endomyocardial biopsy, implementing the WHO/WHF criteria, and PCR techniques for identification of viral genome. The most frequent cardiotropic viruses detected by endomyocardial biopsy are Parvo B19, enteroviruses, adenoviruses, cytomegalovirus, and less frequently Epstein-Barr virus, and influenza virus.

  3. [Desmin-related cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Rybakova, M G; Kuznetsova, I A; Gudkova, A Ia; Kostareva, A A; Semernin, E N

    2011-01-01

    The observation of 26 years old patient with desminopathy declared itself by hypertrophied cardiomyopathy with its transformation into restrictive phenotype is presented. The features of pathologic course at the patient were a dominance and diversity of cardiac manifestations. Endomyocardiac biopsy allowed suspecting the desminopathy confirmed by genetic analysis. Morphological features of desmin-related cardiomyopathy were irregular desmin conglomerates mainly located under sarcolemma and an indirect histological signs of idiopathic cardiomyopathy as well nuclear polymorphism, perinuclear "nimbus", chaotic located myofibrils.

  4. Mode of Death on Chagas Heart Disease: Comparison with Other Etiologies. A Subanalysis of the REMADHE Prospective Trial

    PubMed Central

    Ayub-Ferreira, Silvia M.; Mangini, Sandrigo; Issa, Victor S.; Cruz, Fátima D.; Bacal, Fernando; Guimarães, Guilherme V.; Chizzola, Paulo R.; Conceição-Souza, Germano E.; Marcondes-Braga, Fabiana G.; Bocchi, Edimar A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Sudden death has been considered the main cause of death in patients with Chagas heart disease. Nevertheless, this information comes from a period before the introduction of drugs that changed the natural history of heart failure. We sought to study the mode of death of patients with heart failure caused by Chagas heart disease, comparing with non-Chagas cardiomyopathy. Methods and results We examined the REMADHE trial and grouped patients according to etiology (Chagas vs non-Chagas) and mode of death. The primary end-point was all-cause, heart failure and sudden death mortality; 342 patients were analyzed and 185 (54.1%) died. Death occurred in 56.4% Chagas patients and 53.7% non-Chagas patients. The cumulative incidence of all-cause mortality and heart failure mortality was significantly higher in Chagas patients compared to non-Chagas. There was no difference in the cumulative incidence of sudden death mortality between the two groups. In the Cox regression model, Chagas etiology (HR 2.76; CI 1.34–5.69; p = 0.006), LVEDD (left ventricular end diastolic diameter) (HR 1.07; CI 1.04–1.10; p<0.001), creatinine clearance (HR 0.98; CI 0.97–0.99; p = 0.006) and use of amiodarone (HR 3.05; CI 1.47–6.34; p = 0.003) were independently associated with heart failure mortality. LVEDD (HR 1.04; CI 1.01–1.07; p = 0.005) and use of beta-blocker (HR 0.52; CI 0.34–0.94; p = 0.014) were independently associated with sudden death mortality. Conclusions In severe Chagas heart disease, progressive heart failure is the most important mode of death. These data challenge the current understanding of Chagas heart disease and may have implications in the selection of treatment choices, considering the mode of death. Trial Registration ClinicalTrails.gov NCT00505050 (REMADHE) PMID:23638197

  5. Current Understanding of Immunity to Trypanosoma cruzi Infection and Pathogenesis of Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Fabiana S.; Dutra, Walderez O.; Esper, Lisia; Gollob, Kenneth; Teixeira, Mauro M.; Factor, Stephen M.; Weiss, Louis M.; Nagajyothi, Fnu; Tanowitz, Herbert B.; Garg, Nisha J.

    2012-01-01

    Chagas disease caused by Trypanosoma cruzi remains an important neglected tropical disease and a cause of significant morbidity and mortality. No longer confined to endemic areas of Latin America, it is now found in non-endemic areas due to immigration. The parasite may persist in any tissue, but in recent years there has been increased recognition of adipose tissue both as an early target of infection and a reservoir of chronic infection. The major complications of this disease are cardiomyopathy and megasyndromes involving the gastrointestinal tract. The pathogenesis of Chagas disease is complex and multifactorial involving many interactive pathways. The significance of innate immunity, including the contributions of cytokines, chemokines, reactive oxygen species, and oxidative stress, has been emphasized. The role of the components of the eicosanoid pathway such as thromboxane A2 and the lipoxins has been demonstrated to have profound effects as both pro-and anti-inflammatory factors. Additionally, we discuss the vasoconstrictive actions of thromboxane A2 and endothelin-1n Chagas disease. Human immunity to T. cruzi infection and its role in pathogen control and disease progression have not been fully investigated. However, recently, it was demonstrated that a reduction in the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 was associated with clinically significant chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy. PMID:23076807

  6. Chagas' disease after bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Altclas, J; Jaimovich, G; Milovic, V; Klein, F; Feldman, L

    1996-08-01

    Chagas' disease is caused by Trypanosoma cruzi. It is endemic in Latin America where 16 to 18 million people are infected. Immunocompromised patients such as BMT recipients are at risk of Chagas' disease either due to reactivation or transfusion. We report a case of acute Chagas' disease in the setting of BMT.

  7. Acute Chagas Disease in a Returning Traveler

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Yvonne L.; Juliano, Jonathan J.; Montgomery, Susan P.; Qvarnstrom, Yvonne

    2012-01-01

    Acute Chagas disease is rarely recognized, and the risk for acquiring the disease is undefined in travelers to Central America. We describe a case of acute Chagas disease in a traveler to Costa Rica and highlight the need for increased awareness of this infection in travelers to Chagas-endemic areas. PMID:23091192

  8. Membranous nephropathy PLA2R+ associated with Chagas disease

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Vanessa dos Santos; Viero, Rosa Marlene

    2015-01-01

    Chagas disease (CD) — a tropical parasitic disease caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi — is a major health problem in Latin America. The immune response against the parasite is responsible for chronic CD lesions. Currently, there are no reports of an association between CD and membranous nephropathy (MN). The detection of the phospholipase A2 receptor (PLA2R) as a target antigen in idiopathic MN can improve the differential diagnosis of primary and secondary forms of MN. The authors report the case of a male patient with positive serology for CD who presented sudden death and underwent autopsy. Histological sections of the heart showed multifocal inflammatory infiltrate composed mainly of mononuclear cells, leading to myocardiocytes necrosis and interstitial fibrosis. The kidneys showed a MN with positive expression for PLA2R. As far as we know, this is the first report of a case of primary MN in a patient with CD, with severe chronic cardiomyopathy and heart failure. PMID:26558244

  9. Stroke history and Chagas disease are independent predictors of silent cerebral microembolism in patients with congestive heart failure.

    PubMed

    Jesus, Pedro A P; Neville, Iuri; Cincurá, Carolina; Menezes, Daniela F; Vieira-de-Melo, Rodrigo M; Lacerda, Amanda M; Viana, Leila C; Pereira, Davidson F; Ribeiro-dos-Santos, Valter; Reis, Francisco J F B; Macedo, Cristiano; Oliveira-Filho, Jamary

    2011-01-01

    Chagas disease is endemic in South and Central America, where 18 million individuals are infected by Trypanosoma cruzi, causing congestive heart failure (CHF) and cardioembolic stroke. Transcranial Doppler (TCD) is able to detect real-time microembolic signals (MES) to the brain vessels and may represent a surrogate marker of stroke risk. We aimed to determine predictors of MES in a population of patients with CHF. Consecutive CHF patients from a university-based cardiomyopathy clinic underwent TCD recording of the middle cerebral artery for 60 min by a single investigator who was blinded to all clinical data including cardiomyopathy etiology. Predictors of MES were sought by multivariable logistic regression analysis. From April 2004 to February 2009, 144 patients were studied, including 62 (44.6%) patients with Chagas disease. MES were detected in 9 (6.2%) patients and were more frequent in patients with Chagas disease than in patients with other causes of CHF (12.9 vs. 1.2%, p = 0.005). In multivariate analysis corrected for age and left-ventricular ejection fraction, predictors of MES were Chagas disease (odds ratio = 1.15, 95% confidence interval = 1.05-1.26, p = 0.004) and stroke history (odds ratio = 1.27, 95% confidence interval = 1.08-1.50, p = 0.005). Chagas disease and stroke history are risk factors for MES independent of cardiac disease severity. Other mechanisms besides structural cardiac disease may be operative, increasing embolic risk in Chagas disease. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. High specificity of Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigote ribonucleoprotein as antigen in serodiagnosis of Chagas' disease.

    PubMed Central

    Solana, M E; Katzin, A M; Umezawa, E S; Miatello, C S

    1995-01-01

    We assessed the performance of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with the Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigote ribosomal fraction (Tulahuen and Y strains) in order to improve the diagnostic specificity of the test. A total of 100 serum samples from patients with chronic Chagas' disease from Brazil and Argentina were studied. Sera from 116 patients, without Chagas' disease, including 10 with active mucocutaneous leishmaniasis and 20 with visceral leishmaniasis, were used as controls. Immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies against the ribosomal fraction (ribonucleoproteins [RNPs]) in the ELISA were found in 97% of samples from patients with Chagas' disease. A total of 99% of the sera from patients without the disease were negative, including sera from patients with mucocutaneous and visceral leishmaniases. The distribution of IgG isotypes in randomly chosen serum samples was determined by ELISA; IgG1 and IgG3 were predominant (100% exhibited IgG1 and 85% exhibited IgG3, and 50% also presented the IgG2 isotype. The distribution of the IgG subclasses was confirmed by the Western blot (immunoblot) technique. When total IgG was assayed by Western blot assay, no correlation was found between the pattern of serum reactivity and the clinical features of the patients with Chagas' disease. Therefore, no typical profile of polypeptide recognition could be associated with any clinical form of Chagas' disease (cardiomyopathy or megaviscera). Our results showed that sera from patients with Chagas' disease react with ribosomal antigens and display a typical profile of IgG isotypes (IgG1 plus IgG3).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7650167

  11. Molecular mechanisms in cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Dadson, Keith; Hauck, Ludger; Billia, Filio

    2017-07-01

    Cardiomyopathies represent a heterogeneous group of diseases that negatively affect heart function. Primary cardiomyopathies specifically target the myocardium, and may arise from genetic [hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy/dysplasia (ARVC/D), mitochondrial cardiomyopathy] or genetic and acquired [dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM)] etiology. Modern genomics has identified mutations that are common in these populations, while in vitro and in vivo experimentation with these mutations have provided invaluable insight into the molecular mechanisms native to these diseases. For example, increased myosin heavy chain (MHC) binding and ATP utilization lead to the hypercontractile sarcomere in HCM, while abnormal protein-protein interaction and impaired Ca(2+) flux underlie the relaxed sarcomere of DCM. Furthermore, expanded access to genetic testing has facilitated identification of potential risk factors that appear through inheritance and manifest sometimes only in the advanced stages of the disease. In this review, we discuss the genetic and molecular abnormalities unique to and shared between these primary cardiomyopathies and discuss some of the important advances made using more traditional basic science experimentation. © 2017 The Author(s). published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  12. Control of Chagas disease.

    PubMed

    Yamagata, Yoichi; Nakagawa, Jun

    2006-01-01

    The Southern Cone Initiative (Iniciativa de Salud del Cono Sur, INCOSUR) to control domestic transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi is a substantial achievement based on the enthusiasm of the scientific community, effective strategies, leadership, and cost-effectiveness. INCOSUR triggered the launch of other regional initiatives in Central America and in the Andean and Amazon regions, which have all made progress. The Central American Initiative targeted the elimination of an imported triatomine bug (Rhodnius prolixus) and the control of a widespread native species (Triatoma dimidiata), and faced constraints such as a small scientific community, the difficulty in controlling a native species, and a vector control programme that had fragmented under a decentralized health system. International organizations such as the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) have played an important role in bridging the gaps between fragmented organizational resources. Guatemala achieved virtual elimination of R. prolixus and ;reduction of Tri. Dimidiata and El Salvador and Honduras revitalized their national programmes. The programme also revealed new challenges. Tri. dimidiata control needs to cover a large geographic area efficiently with stratification, quality control, community mobilization, and information management. Stakeholders such as the National Chagas Program, the local health system and their communities, as well as local government must share responsibilities to continue comprehensive vector control.

  13. [Genetic diagnostics for cardiomyopathies].

    PubMed

    Czepluch, Frauke; Wollnik, Bernd; Hasenfuß, Gerd

    2017-05-01

    Cardiomyopathies often have a genetic etiology. New genetic diagnostic strategies based on next generation sequencing (NGS)-approaches will continuously increase our knowledge about the genetic basis of cardiomyopathies within the following years. Diagnostics and therapy of rare, genetically-induced cardiac diseases increasingly require special cardiac and genetic knowledge. Interestingly, mutations in the same gene or even identical gene mutations can be associated with different cardiomyopathy phenotypes and can exhibit incomplete penetrance or variable expressivity. In the future, the correct interpretation and classification of novel gene variants identified in patients with inherited cardiomyopathy forms will represent a great challenge. Genetic counselling and - if appropriate - subsequent genetic testing for cardiomyopathy patients and their asymptomatic relatives is essential for an early diagnosis of the disease, a prognostic evaluation and possibly for the start of preventive or therapeutic measures. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  14. Chagas Heart Disease: An Update.

    PubMed

    Malik, Lindsey H; Singh, Gagan D; Amsterdam, Ezra A

    2015-11-01

    Chagas disease, also known as American trypanosomiasis, results from infection by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, and is a major cause of cardiac disease worldwide. Until recently, Chagas disease was confined to those areas of South and Central America where Trypanosoma cruzi is endemic. With the migration of infected individuals, however, the disease has spread, and it is estimated that 6-7 million people worldwide are infected. In the US alone, more than 7 million people from Trypanosoma cruzi-endemic countries became legal US residents by the turn of the century, resulting in a surge of Chagas disease in this country. According to preliminary estimates, the US now ranks seventh in the Western Hemisphere in number of individuals infected with Trypanosoma cruzi, and the disease has become a major public health concern due to limited awareness in the medical community. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. [Gender effect on cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Biagini, Elena; Berardini, Alessandra; Graziosi, Maddalena; Rosmini, Stefania; Pazzi, Chiara; Rapezzi, Claudio

    2012-06-01

    The role of a gender effect (that means differences in clinical manifestations, access to therapies and response to treatments according to gender) in cardiomyopathies remains a matter of debate. Although recent studies have evaluated the differences in the clinical features and prognosis between the two sexes, many issues remain to be elucidated. At present, the only sex-specific condition that affects females is peripartum cardiomyopathy. Recent evidence suggests a pathogenetic role of a prolactin derivative, and ongoing clinical trials are investigating the possibility of targeted therapies using prolactin secretion inhibitors, such as bromocriptine and carbegoline. Although women were considered so far only carriers of X-linked diseases (Anderson-Fabry disease, Danon disease, Hunter syndrome and dystrophinopathies), clinical experience showed a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations in females due to random X chromosome inactivation. Conversely, in mitochondrial diseases (with matrilineal inheritance), cardiomyopathies may occur in the context of clinical multisystemic involvement without significant gender-related differences. Autosomal inherited cardiomyopathies also show different phenotypes and prognostic impact according to gender. The hypothesis of a premenopausal protective role of female hormones towards myocardial involvement has been raised by recent data on transtiretin-related amyloidosis and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Preexisting cardiomyopathies may affect pregnancy, labor and delivery in women, since all these conditions are associated with important hemodynamic changes. Women with low-risk hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (asymptomatic and without left ventricular outflow tract gradient) usually can tolerate pregnancy. Conversely, women who are symptomatic before pregnancy or have severe hypertrophy with important outflow tract gradient are at higher risk and should be referred to a tertiary center to be evaluated on a case by case basis

  16. IL18 Gene Variants Influence the Susceptibility to Chagas Disease.

    PubMed

    Leon Rodriguez, Daniel A; Carmona, F David; Echeverría, Luis Eduardo; González, Clara Isabel; Martin, Javier

    2016-03-01

    Chagas disease is a parasitic disorder caused by the infection with the flagellated protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. According to the World Health Organization, more than six million people are currently infected in endemic regions. Genetic factors have been proposed to influence predisposition to infection and development of severe clinical phenotypes like chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy (CCC). Interleukin 18 (IL18) encodes a proinflammatory cytokine that has been proposed to be involved in controlling T. cruzi infection. In this study, we analyzed the possible role of six IL18 gene variants (rs5744258, rs360722, rs2043055, rs187238, rs1946518 and rs360719), which cover most of the variation within the locus, in the susceptibility to infection by T. cruzi and/or CCC. In total, 1,171 individuals from a Colombian region endemic for Chagas disease, classified as seronegative (n = 595), seropositive asymptomatic (n = 175) and CCC (n = 401), were genotyped using TaqMan probes. Significant associations with T. cruzi infection were observed when comparing seronegative and seropositive individuals for rs187238 (P = 2.18E-03, OR = 0.77), rs360719 (P = 1.49E-03, OR = 0.76), rs2043055 (P = 2.52E-03, OR = 1.29), and rs1946518 (P = 0.0162, OR = 1.22). However, dependence analyses suggested that the association was mainly driven by the polymorphism rs360719. This variant is located within the promoter region of the IL18 gene, and it has been described that it creates a binding site for the transcription factor OCT-1 affecting IL-18 expression levels. In addition, no evidence of association was observed between any of the analyzed IL18 gene polymorphisms and the development of CCC. In summary, our data suggest that genetic variation within the promoter region of IL18 is directly involved in the susceptibility to infection by T. cruzi, which provides novel insight into disease pathophysiology and adds new perspectives to achieve a more effective disease control.

  17. Resveratrol Reverses Functional Chagas Heart Disease in Mice.

    PubMed

    Vilar-Pereira, Glaucia; Carneiro, Vitor C; Mata-Santos, Hilton; Vicentino, Amanda R R; Ramos, Isalira P; Giarola, Naira L L; Feijó, Daniel F; Meyer-Fernandes, José R; Paula-Neto, Heitor A; Medei, Emiliano; Bozza, Marcelo T; Lannes-Vieira, Joseli; Paiva, Claudia N

    2016-10-01

    Chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy (CCC) develops years after acute infection by Trypanosoma cruzi and does not improve after trypanocidal therapy, despite reduction of parasite burden. During disease, the heart undergoes oxidative stress, a potential causative factor for arrhythmias and contractile dysfunction. Here we tested whether antioxidants/ cardioprotective drugs could improve cardiac function in established Chagas heart disease. We chose a model that resembles B1-B2 stage of human CCC, treated mice with resveratrol and performed electrocardiography and echocardiography studies. Resveratrol reduced the prolonged PR and QTc intervals, increased heart rates and reversed sinus arrhythmia, atrial and atrioventricular conduction disorders; restored a normal left ventricular ejection fraction, improved stroke volume and cardiac output. Resveratrol activated the AMPK-pathway and reduced both ROS production and heart parasite burden, without interfering with vascularization or myocarditis intensity. Resveratrol was even capable of improving heart function of infected mice when treatment was started late after infection, while trypanocidal drug benznidazole failed. We attempted to mimic resveratrol's actions using metformin (AMPK-activator) or tempol (SOD-mimetic). Metformin and tempol mimicked the beneficial effects of resveratrol on heart function and decreased lipid peroxidation, but did not alter parasite burden. These results indicate that AMPK activation and ROS neutralization are key strategies to induce tolerance to Chagas heart disease. Despite all tissue damage observed in established Chagas heart disease, we found that a physiological dysfunction can still be reversed by treatment with resveratrol, metformin and tempol, resulting in improved heart function and representing a starting point to develop innovative therapies in CCC.

  18. Resveratrol Reverses Functional Chagas Heart Disease in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Mata-Santos, Hilton; Vicentino, Amanda R. R.; Feijó, Daniel F.; Meyer-Fernandes, José R.; Paula-Neto, Heitor A.; Medei, Emiliano; Bozza, Marcelo T.; Lannes-Vieira, Joseli; Paiva, Claudia N.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy (CCC) develops years after acute infection by Trypanosoma cruzi and does not improve after trypanocidal therapy, despite reduction of parasite burden. During disease, the heart undergoes oxidative stress, a potential causative factor for arrhythmias and contractile dysfunction. Here we tested whether antioxidants/ cardioprotective drugs could improve cardiac function in established Chagas heart disease. We chose a model that resembles B1-B2 stage of human CCC, treated mice with resveratrol and performed electrocardiography and echocardiography studies. Resveratrol reduced the prolonged PR and QTc intervals, increased heart rates and reversed sinus arrhythmia, atrial and atrioventricular conduction disorders; restored a normal left ventricular ejection fraction, improved stroke volume and cardiac output. Resveratrol activated the AMPK-pathway and reduced both ROS production and heart parasite burden, without interfering with vascularization or myocarditis intensity. Resveratrol was even capable of improving heart function of infected mice when treatment was started late after infection, while trypanocidal drug benznidazole failed. We attempted to mimic resveratrol’s actions using metformin (AMPK-activator) or tempol (SOD-mimetic). Metformin and tempol mimicked the beneficial effects of resveratrol on heart function and decreased lipid peroxidation, but did not alter parasite burden. These results indicate that AMPK activation and ROS neutralization are key strategies to induce tolerance to Chagas heart disease. Despite all tissue damage observed in established Chagas heart disease, we found that a physiological dysfunction can still be reversed by treatment with resveratrol, metformin and tempol, resulting in improved heart function and representing a starting point to develop innovative therapies in CCC. PMID:27788262

  19. Transfusion-transmitted Chagas' disease.

    PubMed

    Wendel, S

    1998-11-01

    Transfusion-transmitted Chagas' disease has been recognized since 1952. Until recently, no cases were reported outside of Latin America. However, emigration during the past 20 years expanded its transfusional geographic borders to North America. Trypanosoma cruzi-infected donors usually are asymptomatic, often for a lifetime. This situation complicates donor screening, particularly in regions where blood bank personnel are not familiar with the risk factors and natural history of this transfusion-transmitted infection. This review addresses the main aspects of epidemiology, risks of infection, clinical symptoms in donors and recipients, preventive measures, and blood donor screening to prevent transfusion-transmitted Chagas' disease.

  20. Metallothionein-1 and nitric oxide expression are inversely correlated in a murine model of Chagas disease

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Mejia, Martha Elba; Torres-Rasgado, Enrique; Porchia, Leonardo M; Salgado, Hilda Rosas; Totolhua, José-Luis; Ortega, Arturo; Hernández-Kelly, Luisa Clara Regina; Ruiz-Vivanco, Guadalupe; Báez-Duarte, Blanca G; Pérez-Fuentes, Ricardo

    2014-01-01

    Chagas disease, caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, represents an endemic among Latin America countries. The participation of free radicals, especially nitric oxide (NO), has been demonstrated in the pathophysiology of seropositive individuals with T. cruzi. In Chagas disease, increased NO contributes to the development of cardiomyopathy and megacolon. Metallothioneins (MTs) are efficient free radicals scavengers of NO in vitro and in vivo. Here, we developed a murine model of the chronic phase of Chagas disease using endemic T. cruzi RyCH1 in BALB/c mice, which were divided into four groups: infected non-treated (Inf), infected N-monomethyl-L-arginine treated (Inf L-NAME), non-infected L-NAME treated and non-infected vehicle-treated. We determined blood parasitaemia and NO levels, the extent of parasite nests in tissues and liver MT-I expression levels. It was observed that NO levels were increasing in Inf mice in a time-dependent manner. Inf L-NAME mice had fewer T. cruzi nests in cardiac and skeletal muscle with decreased blood NO levels at day 135 post infection. This affect was negatively correlated with an increase of MT-I expression (r = -0.8462, p < 0.0001). In conclusion, we determined that in Chagas disease, an unknown inhibitory mechanism reduces MT-I expression, allowing augmented NO levels. PMID:24676665

  1. Chagas Disease in 2 Geriatric Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta) Housed in the Pacific Northwest

    PubMed Central

    Dickerson, Mary F; Astorga, Nestor Gerardo; Astorga, Nestor Rodrigo; Lewis, Anne D

    2014-01-01

    Chagas disease (American trypanosomiasis) is caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. It is endemic in Latin America but also is found in the southern United States, particularly Texas and along the Gulf Coast. Typical clinical manifestations of Chagas disease are not well-characterized in rhesus macaques, but conduction abnormalities, myocarditis, and encephalitis and megaesophagus have been described. Here we report 2 cases of Chagas disease in rhesus macaques housed in the northwestern United States. The first case involved a geriatric male macaque with cardiomegaly, diagnosed as dilated cardiomyopathy on ultrasonographic examination. Postmortem findings included myocarditis as well as ganglioneuritis in the esophagus, stomach, and colon. The second case affected a geriatric female macaque experimentally infected with SIV. She was euthanized for a protocol-related time point. Microscopic examination revealed chronic myocarditis with amastigotes present in the cardiomyocytes, ganglioneuritis, and opportunistic infections attributed to her immunocompromised status. Banked serum samples from both macaques had positive titers for T. cruzi. T. cruzi DNA was amplified by conventional PCR from multiple tissues from both animals. Review of their histories revealed that both animals had been obtained from facilities in South Texas more than 12 y earlier. Given the long period of clinical latency, Chagas disease may be more prevalent in rhesus macaques than typically has been reported. T. cruzi infection should be considered for animals with unexplained cardiac or gastrointestinal pathology and that originated from areas known to have a high risk for disease transmission. PMID:25296019

  2. Preclinical stem cell therapy in Chagas Disease: Perspectives for future research.

    PubMed

    de Carvalho, Katherine Athayde Teixeira; Abdelwahid, Eltyeb; Ferreira, Reginaldo Justino; Irioda, Ana Carolina; Guarita-Souza, Luiz Cesar

    2013-12-24

    Chagas cardiomyopathy still remains a challenging problem that is responsible for high morbidity and mortality in Central and Latin America. Chagas disease disrupts blood microcirculation via various autoimmune mechanisms, causing loss of cardiomyocytes and severe impairment of heart function. Different cell types and delivery approaches in Chagas Disease have been studied in both preclinical models and clinical trials. The main objective of this article is to clarify the reasons why the benefits that have been seen with cell therapy in preclinical models fail to translate to the clinical setting. This can be explained by crucial differences between the cellular types and pathophysiological mechanisms of the disease, as well as the differences between human patients and animal models. We discuss examples that demonstrate how the results from preclinical trials might have overestimated the efficacy of myocardial regeneration therapies. Future research should focus, not only on studying the best cell type to use but, very importantly, understanding the levels of safety and cellular interaction that can elicit efficient therapeutic effects in human tissue. Addressing the challenges associated with future research may ensure the success of stem cell therapy in improving preclinical models and the treatment of Chagas disease.

  3. ADENOSINE DEAMINASE ACTIVITY AND SERUM C-REACTIVE PROTEIN AS PROGNOSTIC MARKERS OF CHAGAS DISEASE SEVERITY

    PubMed Central

    BRAVO-TOBAR, Iván Darío; NELLO-PÉREZ, Carlota; FERNÁNDEZ, Alí; MOGOLLÓN, Nora; PÉREZ, Mary Carmen; VERDE, Juan; CONCEPCIÓN, Juan Luis; RODRIGUEZ-BONFANTE, Claudina; BONFANTE-CABARCAS, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Chagas disease is a public health problem worldwide. The availability of diagnostic tools to predict the development of chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy is crucial to reduce morbidity and mortality. Here we analyze the prognostic value of adenosine deaminase serum activity (ADA) and C-reactive protein serum levels (CRP) in chagasic individuals. One hundred and ten individuals, 28 healthy and 82 chagasic patients were divided according to disease severity in phase I (n = 35), II (n = 29), and III (n = 18). A complete medical history, 12-lead electrocardiogram, chest X-ray, and M-mode echocardiogram were performed on each individual. Diagnosis of Chagas disease was confirmed by ELISA and MABA using recombinant antigens; ADA was determined spectrophotometrically and CRP by ELISA. The results have shown that CRP and ADA increased linearly in relation to disease phase, CRP being significantly higher in phase III and ADA at all phases. Also, CRP and ADA were positively correlated with echocardiographic parameters of cardiac remodeling and with electrocardiographic abnormalities, and negatively with ejection fraction. CRP and ADA were higher in patients with cardiothoracic index ≥ 50%, while ADA was higher in patients with ventricular repolarization disturbances. Finally, CRP was positively correlated with ADA. In conclusion, ADA and CRP are prognostic markers of cardiac dysfunction and remodeling in Chagas disease. PMID:26603224

  4. Accelerating the development of a therapeutic vaccine for human Chagas disease: rationale and prospects.

    PubMed

    Dumonteil, Eric; Bottazzi, Maria Elena; Zhan, Bin; Heffernan, Michael J; Jones, Kathryn; Valenzuela, Jesus G; Kamhawi, Shaden; Ortega, Jaime; de Leon Rosales, Samuel Ponce; Lee, Bruce Y; Bacon, Kristina M; Fleischer, Bernhard; Slingsby, B T; Cravioto, Miguel Betancourt; Tapia-Conyer, Roberto; Hotez, Peter J

    2012-09-01

    Chagas disease is a leading cause of heart disease affecting approximately 10 million people in Latin America and elsewhere worldwide. The two major drugs available for the treatment of Chagas disease have limited efficacy in Trypanosoma cruzi-infected adults with indeterminate (patients who have seroconverted but do not yet show signs or symptoms) and determinate (patients who have both seroconverted and have clinical disease) status; they require prolonged treatment courses and are poorly tolerated and expensive. As an alternative to chemotherapy, an injectable therapeutic Chagas disease vaccine is under development to prevent or delay Chagasic cardiomyopathy in patients with indeterminate or determinate status. The bivalent vaccine will be comprised of two recombinant T. cruzi antigens, Tc24 and TSA-1, formulated on alum together with the Toll-like receptor 4 agonist, E6020. Proof-of-concept for the efficacy of these antigens was obtained in preclinical testing at the Autonomous University of Yucatan. Here the authors discuss the potential for a therapeutic Chagas vaccine as well as the progress made towards such a vaccine, and the authors articulate a roadmap for the development of the vaccine as planned by the nonprofit Sabin Vaccine Institute Product Development Partnership and Texas Children's Hospital Center for Vaccine Development in collaboration with an international consortium of academic and industrial partners in Mexico, Germany, Japan, and the USA.

  5. Accelerating the development of a therapeutic vaccine for human Chagas disease: rationale and prospects

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Bin; Heffernan, Michael J; Jones, Kathryn; Valenzuela, Jesus G; Kamhawi, Shaden; Ortega, Jaime; de Leon Rosales, Samuel Ponce; Lee, Bruce Y; Bacon, Kristina M; Fleischer, Bernhard; Slingsby, BT; Cravioto, Miguel Betancourt; Tapia-Conyer, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Chagas disease is a leading cause of heart disease affecting approximately 10 million people in Latin America and elsewhere worldwide. The two major drugs available for the treatment of Chagas disease have limited efficacy in Trypanosoma cruzi-infected adults with indeterminate (patients who have seroconverted but do not yet show signs or symptoms) and determinate (patients who have both seroconverted and have clinical disease) status; they require prolonged treatment courses and are poorly tolerated and expensive. As an alternative to chemotherapy, an injectable therapeutic Chagas disease vaccine is under development to prevent or delay Chagasic cardiomyopathy in patients with indeterminate or determinate status. The bivalent vaccine will be comprised of two recombinant T. cruzi antigens, Tc24 and TSA-1, formulated on alum together with the Toll-like receptor 4 agonist, E6020. Proof-of-concept for the efficacy of these antigens was obtained in preclinical testing at the Autonomous University of Yucatan. Here the authors discuss the potential for a therapeutic Chagas vaccine as well as the progress made towards such a vaccine, and the authors articulate a roadmap for the development of the vaccine as planned by the nonprofit Sabin Vaccine Institute Product Development Partnership and Texas Children’s Hospital Center for Vaccine Development in collaboration with an international consortium of academic and industrial partners in Mexico, Germany, Japan, and the USA. PMID:23151163

  6. Heart Failure Secondary to Chagas Disease: an Emerging Problem in Non-endemic Areas.

    PubMed

    Traina, Mahmoud; Meymandi, Sheba; Bradfield, Jason S

    2016-12-01

    Chagas disease affects millions of people worldwide. Though the majority of infected individuals remain asymptomatic, approximately 30 % of patients progress to develop cardiac manifestations and eventual heart failure. While vectorial transmission occurs predominantly in South America, Central America, and Mexico, millions of people originally from these endemic regions immigrate to non-endemic countries in North America, Europe, and Asia. Outside of rare specialized centers, health-care providers lack experience diagnosing and treating this disease. This lack of experience likely leads to far fewer Chagas disease patients being diagnosed than what actually exist in non-endemic countries, with subsequent adverse effect on patient outcomes and health-care expenses. Underdiagnosis increases the risk of developing cardiomyopathy, associated heart failure, and life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias as the disease progresses.

  7. Cardiomyopathy in Marfan syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hetzer, Roland; Siegel, Günter; Delmo Walter, Eva Maria

    2016-02-01

    This report aims to evaluate the existence of primary and secondary cardiomyopathy in patients with Marfan syndrome (MFS) who underwent surgical management for primary cardiovascular sequelae of this genetic disorder. Likewise, we aim to determine whether the myocardium in MFS is susceptible to ischaemia independent of myocardial protection used during surgery. Between April 1986 and May 2012, 421 patients with MFS were surgically treated for cardiovascular manifestations. Among them, 47 (mean age: 39.45 ± 12.64, median: 36, range: 19-66, years) eventually were surgically treated for cardiomyopathy. They were grouped into A: patients who subsequently developed ischaemic cardiomyopathy and eventually underwent coronary revascularization for coronary artery disease (n = 11); B: patients who subsequently developed end-stage cardiomyopathy for which a mechanical circulatory support device was implanted to support the failing heart (n = 13) and C: patients who subsequently developed end-stage cardiomyopathy (n = 23), among whom 21 underwent primary heart transplantation, while 2 patients are still waiting for donor hearts. Retrospective analysis of the medical records of 47 patients revealed the following: In Group A, 3 (27.2%) patients had already existing ischaemic cardiomyopathy before the first various cardiovascular surgeries, while ischaemic cardiomyopathy in the other 8 (72.7%) developed postoperatively. The interval between previous surgery and development of cardiomyopathy was a mean of 8.0 ± 07 years. In Group B, 5 (38.4%) had existing primary cardiomyopathy prior to surgery, while 8 (61.5%) developed end-stage cardiomyopathy postoperatively. The interval between previous surgery and development of cardiomyopathy was a mean of 9.0 ± 4 months. In Group C, 5 (21.7%) had been diagnosed with cardiomyopathy prior to the cardiovascular surgery, while 18 (78.2%) developed end-stage cardiomyopathy postoperatively. The mean interval between previous surgery and

  8. Nutrition in Pediatric Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Tracie L.; Neri, Daniela; Extein, Jason; Somarriba, Gabriel; Strickman-Stein, Nancy

    2007-01-01

    Pediatric cardiomyopathies are heterogeneous groups of serious disorders of the heart muscle and are responsible for significant morbidity and mortality among children who have the disease. While enormous improvements have been made in the treatment and survival of children with congenital heart disease, parallel strides have not been made in the outcomes for cardiomyopathies. Thus, ancillary therapies, such as nutrition and nutritional interventions, that may not cure but may potentially improve cardiac function and quality of life, are imperative to consider in children with all types of cardiomyopathy. Growth failure is one of the most significant clinical problems of children with cardiomyopathy with nearly one-third of children with this disorder manifesting some degree of growth failure during the course of their illness. Optimal intake of macronutrients can help improve cardiac function. In addition, several specific nutrients have been shown to correct myocardial abnormalities that often occur with cardiomyopathy and heart failure. In particular, antioxidants that can protect against free radical damage that often occurs in heart failure and nutrients that augment myocardial energy production are important therapies that have been explored more in adults with cardiomyopathy than in the pediatric population. Future research directions should pay particular attention to the effect of overall nutrition and specific nutritional therapies on clinical outcomes and quality of life in children with pediatric cardiomyopathy. PMID:18159216

  9. Genetics of restrictive cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Sen-Chowdhry, Srijita; Syrris, Petros; McKenna, William J

    2010-04-01

    Restrictive physiology, a severe form of diastolic dysfunction, is characteristically observed in the setting of constrictive pericarditis and myocardial restriction. The latter is commonly due to systemic diseases, some of which are inherited as mendelian traits (eg, hereditary amyloidosis), while others are multifactorial (eg, sarcoidosis). When restrictive physiology occurs as an early and dominant feature of a primary myocardial disorder, it may be termed restrictive cardiomyopathy. In the past decade, clinical and genetic studies have demonstrated that restrictive cardiomyopathy as such is part of the spectrum of sarcomeric disease and frequently coexists with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in affected families.

  10. Effects of aspirin-triggered resolvin D1 on peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with Chagas' heart disease.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Haline; Teixeira, Maxelle Martins; Sousa, Rodrigo Cunha de; Silva, Marcos Vinícius da; Correia, Dalmo; Rodrigues Junior, Virmondes; Levy, Bruce David; Rogério, Alexandre de Paula

    2016-04-15

    Chagas disease is caused by Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi). In some patients with Chagas disease, symptoms progress to chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy. Endogenously, inflammation is resolved in the presence of lipid mediators such as aspirin-triggered RvD1 (AT-RvD1) which has anti-inflammatory and pro-resolution effects. Here, we demonstrated, for the first time, the effects of AT-RvD1 on T. cruzi antigen-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from patients with Chagas heart disease. The levels of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-10, and IL-13 increased in PBMCs from cardiac-form Chagas patients in stage B1 (patients with fewer heart abnormalities) stimulated with T. cruzi antigen compared to those in non-stimulated PBMCs. AT-RvD1 reduced the IFN-γ concentrations in PBMCs from patients with Chagas disease stimulated with T. cruzi antigen compared to stimulated with T. cruzi antigen cells. AT-RvD1 treatment resulted in no observable changes in TNF-α, IL-10, and IL-13 levels. AT-RvD1 significantly decreased the percentage of necrotic cells and caused a significant reduction in the proliferation rate of T. cruzi antigen-stimulated PBMCs from patients with Chagas disease. These findings demonstrate that AT-RvD1 modulates the immune response in Chagas disease patients and might have potential to be used as an alternative approach for slowing the development of further heart damage. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Mitochondrial Diseases and Cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Brunel-Guitton, Catherine; Levtova, Alina; Sasarman, Florin

    2015-11-01

    Mitochondrial cardiomyopathies are clinically and genetically heterogeneous. An integrative approach encompassing clinical, biochemical, and molecular investigations is required to reach a specific diagnosis. In this review we summarize the clinical and genetic aspects of mitochondrial disorders associated with cardiomyopathy, including disorders of oxidative phosphorylation. It also describes groups of disorders that, although not usually classified as mitochondrial disorders, stem from defects in mitochondrial function (eg, disorders of β-oxidation and the carnitine cycle), are associated with secondary mitochondrial impairment (eg, organic acidurias), and are important diagnostically because they are treatable. Current biochemical and molecular techniques for the diagnosis of mitochondrial cardiomyopathies are described, and a diagnostic algorithm is proposed, to help clinicians in their approach to cardiomyopathies in the context of mitochondrial diseases.

  12. Takotsubo (Stress) Cardiomyopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... the American Heart Association Cardiology Patient Page Takotsubo (Stress) Cardiomyopathy Scott W. Sharkey , John R. Lesser , Barry ... heart contraction has returned to normal. Importance of Stress In 85% of cases, takotsubo is triggered by ...

  13. Trypanosoma cruzi P21: a potential novel target for chagasic cardiomyopathy therapy

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Thaise Lara; Machado, Fabrício Castro; Alves da Silva, Aline; Teixeira, Samuel Cota; Borges, Bruna Cristina; dos Santos, Marlus Alves; Martins, Flávia Alves; Brígido, Paula Cristina; Rodrigues, Adele Aud; Notário, Ana Flávia Oliveira; Ferreira, Bruno Antônio; Servato, João Paulo Silva; Deconte, Simone Ramos; Lopes, Daiana Silva; Ávila, Veridiana Melo Rodrigues; Araújo, Fernanda de Assis; Tomiosso, Tatiana Carla; Silva, Marcelo José Barbosa; da Silva, Claudio Vieira

    2015-01-01

    Chagas disease, which is caused by the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, is an important cause of cardiomyopathy in Latin America. It is estimated that 10%–30% of all infected individuals will acquire chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy (CCC). The etiology of CCC is multifactorial and involves parasite genotype, host genetic polymorphisms, immune response, signaling pathways and autoimmune progression. Herein we verified the impact of the recombinant form of P21 (rP21), a secreted T. cruzi protein involved in host cell invasion, on progression of inflammatory process in a polyester sponge-induced inflammation model. Results indicated that rP21 can recruit immune cells induce myeloperoxidase and IL-4 production and decrease blood vessels formation compared to controls in vitro and in vivo. In conclusion, T. cruzi P21 may be a potential target for the development of P21 antagonist compounds to treat chagasic cardiomyopathy. PMID:26574156

  14. Peripartum cardiomyopathy: a review.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Anirban; Basra, Sukhdeep Singh; Sen, Priyanka; Kar, Biswajit

    2012-01-01

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy is idiopathic heart failure occurring in the absence of any determinable heart disease during the last month of pregnancy or the first 5 months postpartum. The incidence varies worldwide but is high in developing nations; the cause of the disease might be a combination of environmental and genetic factors. Diagnostic echocardiographic criteria include left ventricular ejection fraction <0.45 or M-mode fractional shortening <30% (or both) and end-diastolic dimension >2.7 cm/m(2). Electrocardiography, magnetic resonance imaging, endomyocardial biopsy, and cardiac catheterization aid in the diagnosis and management of peripartum cardiomyopathy. Cardiac protein assays can also be useful, as suggested by reports of high levels of NT-proBNP, cardiac troponin, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, interferon-γ, and C-reactive protein in peripartum cardiomyopathy. The prevalence of mutations associated with familial dilated-cardiomyopathy genes in patients with peripartum cardiomyopathy suggests an overlap in the clinical spectrum of these 2 diseases.Treatment for peripartum cardiomyopathy includes conventional pharmacologic heart-failure therapies-principally diuretics, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, vasodilators, digoxin, β-blockers, anticoagulants, and peripartum cardiomyopathy-targeted therapies. Therapeutic decisions are influenced by drug-safety profiles during pregnancy and lactation. Mechanical support and transplantation might be necessary in severe cases. Targeted therapies (such as intravenous immunoglobulin, pentoxifylline, and bromocriptine) have shown promise in small trials but require further evaluation. Fortunately, despite a mortality rate of up to 10% and a high risk of relapse in subsequent pregnancies, many patients with peripartum cardiomyopathy recover within 3 to 6 months of disease onset.

  15. Assessment of Galectin-3 Polymorphism in Subjects with Chronic Chagas Disease.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Gabriela da Silva; Angelo, Ana Luiza Dias; Larocca, Ticiana Ferreira; Macedo, Carolina Thé; Noya-Rabelo, Márcia; Correia, Luís Claudio Lemos; Torreão, Jorge Andion; Souza, Bruno Solano de Freitas; Santos, Ricardo Ribeiro Dos; Soares, Milena Botelho Pereira

    2015-11-01

    Galectin-3, a β-galactoside binding lectin, has been described as a mediator of cardiac fibrosis in experimental studies and as a risk factor associated with cardiovascular events in subjects with heart failure. Previous studies have evaluated the genetic susceptibility to Chagas disease in humans, including the polymorphisms of cytokine genes, demonstrating correlations between the genetic polymorphism and cardiomyopathy development in the chronic phase. However, the relationship between the galectin-3 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and phenotypic variations in Chagas disease has not been evaluated. The present study aimed to determine whether genetic polymorphisms of galectin-3 may predispose to the development of cardiac forms of Chagas disease. Fifty-five subjects with Chagas disease were enrolled in this observational study. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used for genotyping the variants rs4644 and rs4652 of the galectin-3 gene. For the SNP rs4644, the relative risk for the cardiac form was not associated with the genotypes AA (OR = 0.79, p = 0.759), AC (OR = 4.38, p = 0.058), or CC (OR = 0.39, p = 0.127). Similarly, for the SNP rs4652, no association was found between the genotypes AA (OR = 0.64, p = 0.571), AC (OR = 2.85, p = 0.105), or CC (OR = 0.49, p = 0.227) and the cardiac form of the disease. Our results showed no association between the different genotypes for both SNPs of the galectin-3 gene and the cardiac form of Chagas disease.

  16. Assessment of Galectin-3 Polymorphism in Subjects with Chronic Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Gabriela da Silva; Angelo, Ana Luiza Dias; Larocca, Ticiana Ferreira; Macedo, Carolina Thé; Noya- Rabelo, Márcia; Correia, Luís Claudio Lemos; Torreão, Jorge Andion; Souza, Bruno Solano de Freitas; dos Santos, Ricardo Ribeiro; Soares, Milena Botelho Pereira

    2015-01-01

    Background Galectin-3, a β-galactoside binding lectin, has been described as a mediator of cardiac fibrosis in experimental studies and as a risk factor associated with cardiovascular events in subjects with heart failure. Previous studies have evaluated the genetic susceptibility to Chagas disease in humans, including the polymorphisms of cytokine genes, demonstrating correlations between the genetic polymorphism and cardiomyopathy development in the chronic phase. However, the relationship between the galectin-3 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and phenotypic variations in Chagas disease has not been evaluated. Objective The present study aimed to determine whether genetic polymorphisms of galectin-3 may predispose to the development of cardiac forms of Chagas disease. Methods Fifty-five subjects with Chagas disease were enrolled in this observational study. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used for genotyping the variants rs4644 and rs4652 of the galectin-3 gene. Results For the SNP rs4644, the relative risk for the cardiac form was not associated with the genotypes AA (OR = 0.79, p = 0.759), AC (OR = 4.38, p = 0.058), or CC (OR = 0.39, p = 0.127). Similarly, for the SNP rs4652, no association was found between the genotypes AA (OR = 0.64, p = 0.571), AC (OR = 2.85, p = 0.105), or CC (OR = 0.49, p = 0.227) and the cardiac form of the disease. Conclusion Our results showed no association between the different genotypes for both SNPs of the galectin-3 gene and the cardiac form of Chagas disease. PMID:26312551

  17. Early polymerase chain reaction detection of Chagas disease reactivation in heart transplant patients.

    PubMed

    da Costa, Priscilla Almeida; Segatto, Marcela; Durso, Danielle Fernandes; de Carvalho Moreira, Wagson José; Junqueira, Lucas Lodi; de Castilho, Fábio Morato; de Andrade, Silvio Amadeu; Gelape, Cláudio Léo; Chiari, Egler; Teixeira-Carvalho, Andréa; Junho Pena, Sergio Danilo; Machado, Carlos Renato; Franco, Gloria Regina; Filho, Geraldo Brasileiro; Vieira Moreira, Maria da Consolação; Mara Macedo, Andréa

    2017-07-01

    Heart transplantation is a valuable therapeutic option for Chagas disease patients with severe cardiomyopathy. During patient follow-up, the differential diagnosis between cardiac transplant rejection and Chagas disease infection reactivation remains a challenging task, which hinders rapid implementation of the appropriate treatment. Herein we investigate whether polymerase chain reaction (PCR) strategies could facilitate early detection of Trypanosoma cruzi (T cruzi) in transplanted endomyocardial biopsies (EMBs). In this study we analyzed 500 EMB specimens obtained from 58 chagasic cardiac transplant patients, using PCR approaches targeted to nuclear (rDNA 24Sα) and kinetoplastid (kDNA) markers, and compared the efficiency of these approaches with that of other tests routinely used. T cruzi DNA was detected in 112 EMB specimens derived from 39 patients (67.2%). The first positive result occurred at a median 1.0 month post-transplant. Conventional histopathologic, blood smear and hemoculture analyses showed lower sensitivity and higher median time to the first positive result. Patient follow-up revealed that 31 of 39 PCR-positive cases presented clinical reactivation of Chagas disease at different time-points after transplantation. PCR techniques showed considerable sensitivity (0.82) and specificity (0.60), with area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves of 0.708 (p = 0.001). Moreover, PCR techniques anticipated the clinical signs of Chagas disease reactivation by up to 36 months, with a median time of 6 months and an average of 9.1 months. We found a good association between the PCR diagnosis and the clinical signs of the disease, indicating that the PCR approaches used herein are suitable for early diagnosis of Chagas disease reactivation, with high potential to assist physicians in treatment decisions. For this purpose, an algorithm is proposed for surveillance based on the molecular tests. Copyright © 2017 International Society for the

  18. [Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Arrhythmia in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Colín Lizalde, Luis de Jesús

    2003-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a relatively common genetic disorder with heterogeneity in mutations, forms of presentation, prognosis and treatment strategies. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is recognized as the most common cause of sudden cardiac death that occurs in young people, including athletes. The clinical diagnosis is complemented with the ecocardiographic study, in which an abnormal myocardial hypertrophy of the septum can be observed in the absence of a cardiac or systemic disease (arterial systemic hypertension, aortic stenosis). The annual sudden mortality rate is 1% and, in selected populations, it ranges between 3 and 6%. The therapeutic strategies depend on the different subsets of patients according to the morbidity and mortality, sudden cardiac death, obstructive symptoms, heart failure or atrial fibrillation and stroke. High risk patients for sudden death may effectively be treated with the automatic implantable cardioverter-defibrillator.

  19. [Globalization, inequity and Chagas disease].

    PubMed

    Dias, João Carlos Pinto

    2007-01-01

    Chagas disease (American trypanosomiasis) bears a close relationship to multiple social and political aspects involving issues of globalization and inequity. Such relations concern the process of disease production and control in parallel with medical management. Despite the poverty in Latin America and various problems related to inequities and globalization, Chagas disease has been controlled in several areas, a fact that reinforces the countries' self-reliance. Several problems and challenges related to the disease can be expected in the future, mainly concerning medical care for already infected individuals and the sustainability of effective epidemiological surveillance. Both points depend heavily on improved performance by the national health systems, principally in terms of their efficiency and their capacity to overcome inequity. A particularly important role has been attributed to the Latin American scientific and academic community in the implementation and sustainability of efficient control policies. Control activities have now evolved towards internationally shared initiatives, a major new stride forward in the region's political context.

  20. Stress-related cardiomyopathies

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Stress-related cardiomyopathies can be observed in the four following situations: Takotsubo cardiomyopathy or apical ballooning syndrome; acute left ventricular dysfunction associated with subarachnoid hemorrhage; acute left ventricular dysfunction associated with pheochromocytoma and exogenous catecholamine administration; acute left ventricular dysfunction in the critically ill. Cardiac toxicity was mediated more by catecholamines released directly into the heart via neural connection than by those reaching the heart via the bloodstream. The mechanisms underlying the association between this generalized autonomic storm secondary to a life-threatening stress and myocardial toxicity are widely discussed. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy has been reported all over the world and has been acknowledged by the American Heart Association as a form of reversible cardiomyopathy. Four "Mayo Clinic" diagnostic criteria are required for the diagnosis of Takotsubo cardiomyopathy: 1) transient left ventricular wall motion abnormalities involving the apical and/or midventricular myocardial segments with wall motion abnormalities extending beyond a single epicardial coronary artery distribution; 2) absence of obstructive epicardial coronary artery disease that could be responsible for the observed wall motion abnormality; 3) ECG abnormalities, such as transient ST-segment elevation and/or diffuse T wave inversion associated with a slight troponin elevation; and 4) the lack of proven pheochromocytoma and myocarditis. ECG changes and LV dysfunction occur frequently following subarachnoid hemorrhage and ischemic stroke. This entity, referred as neurocardiogenic stunning, was called neurogenic stress-related cardiomyopathy. Stress-related cardiomyopathy has been reported in patients with pheochromocytoma and in patients receiving intravenous exogenous catecholamine administration. The role of a huge increase in endogenous and/or exogenous catecholamine level in critically ill patients

  1. Duodenogastric reflux in Chagas' disease

    SciTech Connect

    Troncon, L.E.; Rezende Filho, J.; Iazigi, N.

    1988-10-01

    Increased duodenogastric reflux has been recognized as a cause of gastric mucosa damage. The frequent finding of bile-stained gastric juice and a suggested higher frequency of lesions of the gastric mucosa in patients with Chagas' disease, which is characterized by a marked reduction of myenteric neurons, suggest that impairment of intrinsic innervation of the gut might be associated with increased duodenogastric reflux. Duodenogastric bile reflux was quantified after intravenous injection of 99mtechnetium-HIDA, in 18 patients with chronic Chagas' disease, 12 controls, and 7 patients with Billroth II gastrectomy. All but one of the chagasic patients were submitted to upper digestive tract endoscopy. High reflux values (greater than or equal to 10%) were detected both in chagasic patients and in the controls, but the values for both groups were significantly lower (P less than 0.01) than those obtained for Billroth II patients (median: 55.79%; range: 12.58-87.22%). Reflux values tended to be higher in the Chagas' disease group (median: 8.20%; range: 0.0-29.40%) than in the control group (median: 3.20%; range: 0.0-30.64%), with no statistical difference between the two groups (P greater than 0.10). Chronic gastritis was detected by endoscopy in 12 chagasic patients, benign gastric ulcer in 2 patients, and a pool of bile in the stomach in 11 patients. However, neither the occurrence of gastric lesions nor the finding of bile-stained gastric juice was associated with high reflux values after (99mTc)HIDA injection. This study suggests that lesions of the intramural nervous system of the gut in Chagas' disease do not appear to be associated with abnormally increased duodenogastric reflux.

  2. Heterologous Infection During Chagas' Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibona, G. J.; Condat, C. A.; Cossi Isasi, S.

    2007-05-01

    Human populations are often infected with more than one parasite strain. This is frequently the case with ChagasŠ disease, which is endemic to large regions of Latin America. In the present work we study the dynamics of the heterologous infection for this disease, using a model for the interaction between the trypanosoma cruzi parasite and the immune system. We find the dependence of the nature of the post-acute stage on the parameters characterizing the inoculated infectious strains.

  3. [Clinical profile of Chagas and non-Chagas' disease patients with cardiac pacemaker].

    PubMed

    Rincon, Leonor Garcia; Rocha, Manoel Otávio da Costa; Pires, Marco Túlio Baccarini; Oliveira, Bruna Guimarães; Barros, Vladimir da Costa Val; Barros, Marcio Vinicius Lins; Ribeiro, Antônio Luiz Pinho

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare Chagas and non-Chagas' disease patients using single or dual-chamber pacemaker in relation to the ejection fraction of the left ventricle, the ventricular stimulation threshold and the occurrence of ventricular arrhythmia. From January, 2001 to November, 2002, 45 Chagas' disease patients and 35 non-Chagas' disease patients, all pacemaker users, were evaluated considering clinical history, echocardiographic study, Holter monitoring and analysis of the pacemaker telemetry data. Chagas' disease patients were significantly younger, but both groups were similar when chest X-Ray variables and right ventricular stimulation threshold were analyzed. Chagas' disease patients had a lower left ventricular ejection fraction and more frequent ventricular arrhythmia during Holter monitoring. A positive correlation between the low ejection fraction of the left ventricle and the intensity of ventricular arrhythmia was observed. In conclusion, among pacemaker user patients, Chagas' disease is related to cardiac markers of worse prognosis.

  4. Cardiomyopathy in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Lewey, Jennifer; Haythe, Jennifer

    2014-08-01

    Cardiomyopathy during pregnancy is uncommon but potentially catastrophic to maternal health, accounting for up to 11% of maternal deaths. Peripartum cardiomyopathy is diagnosed in women without a history of heart disease 1 month before delivery or within 5 months postpartum. About half of all women will have full myocardial recovery within 6 months of diagnosis, but complications such as severe heart failure or death are not rare. African-American women have higher rates of diagnosis and adverse events. Women with preexisting cardiomyopathy, such as dilated or hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, followed closely during pregnancy often tolerate pregnancy and delivery. Risk factors for adverse outcomes include functional status at baseline, severity of systolic dysfunction or outflow tract gradient, or history of prior cardiac event, such as arrhythmia or stroke. The level of brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) can be used to risk stratify women for adverse events. Pregnant women with cardiomyopathy should be followed closely by a multidisciplinary team comprised of nurses, obstetricians, neonatologists, cardiologists, anesthesiologists, and cardiac surgeons.

  5. Chagas Disease Risk in Texas

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Sahotra; Strutz, Stavana E.; Frank, David M.; Rivaldi, Chissa–Louise; Sissel, Blake; Sánchez–Cordero, Victor

    2010-01-01

    Background Chagas disease, caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, remains a serious public health concern in many areas of Latin America, including México. It is also endemic in Texas with an autochthonous canine cycle, abundant vectors (Triatoma species) in many counties, and established domestic and peridomestic cycles which make competent reservoirs available throughout the state. Yet, Chagas disease is not reportable in Texas, blood donor screening is not mandatory, and the serological profiles of human and canine populations remain unknown. The purpose of this analysis was to provide a formal risk assessment, including risk maps, which recommends the removal of these lacunae. Methods and Findings The spatial relative risk of the establishment of autochthonous Chagas disease cycles in Texas was assessed using a five–stage analysis. 1. Ecological risk for Chagas disease was established at a fine spatial resolution using a maximum entropy algorithm that takes as input occurrence points of vectors and environmental layers. The analysis was restricted to triatomine vector species for which new data were generated through field collection and through collation of post–1960 museum records in both México and the United States with sufficiently low georeferenced error to be admissible given the spatial resolution of the analysis (1 arc–minute). The new data extended the distribution of vector species to 10 new Texas counties. The models predicted that Triatoma gerstaeckeri has a large region of contiguous suitable habitat in the southern United States and México, T. lecticularia has a diffuse suitable habitat distribution along both coasts of the same region, and T. sanguisuga has a disjoint suitable habitat distribution along the coasts of the United States. The ecological risk is highest in south Texas. 2. Incidence–based relative risk was computed at the county level using the Bayesian Besag–York–Mollié model and post–1960 T. cruzi incidence data. This risk

  6. Etanercept induces low QRS voltage and autonomic dysfunction in mice with experimental Chagas disease.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Angulo, Héctor; García, Oscar; Castillo, Endher; Cardenas, Edward; Marques, Juan; Mijares, Alfredo

    2013-09-01

    Chagas disease is a tropical parasitic disease caused by the flagellate protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. Chagasic cardiomyopathy is characterized by disorders of autonomic regulation and action potential conduction in the acute and chronic phases of infection. Although tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) has been linked to cardiomyopathy in experimental models and in patients with Chagas disease, other reports suggest that TNF-α may exert anti-parasitic actions during the acute phase of infection. This study aimed to determine the effects of a soluble TNF-α agonist, etanercept, on electrocardiographic parameters in the acute phase of experimental infection with Trypanosoma cruzi. Electrocardiograms were obtained from untreated infected mice and infected mice who were treated with etanercept 7 days after infection. ECG wave and heart rate variability parameters were determined using Chart for Windows. Etanercept treatment resulted in a low QRS voltage and decreased heart rate variability compared with no treatment. However, the treated mice exhibited a delay in the fall of the survival curve during the acute phase. The results of this study suggest that although etanercept treatment promotes survival in mice infected with a virulent T. cruzi strain, TNF-α blockade generates a low voltage complex and autonomic dysfunction during the acute phase of infection. These findings indicate that mortality during the acute phase can be attributed to a systemic inflammatory response rather than cardiac dysfunction.

  7. Alcoholic cardiomyopathy: Pathophysiologic insights

    PubMed Central

    Piano, Mariann R.; Phillips, Shane A.

    2014-01-01

    Alcoholic cardiomyopathy is a specific heart muscle disease found in individuals with a history of long-term heavy alcohol consumption. Alcoholic cardiomyopathy is associated with a number of adverse histological, cellular, and structural changes within the myocardium. Several mechanisms are implicated in mediating the adverse effects of ethanol, including the generation of oxidative stress, apoptotic cell death, impaired mitochondrial bioenergetics/stress, derangements in fatty acid metabolism and transport, and accelerated protein catabolism. In this review, we discuss the evidence for such mechanisms and present the potential importance of drinking patterns, genetic susceptibility, nutritional factors, race, and sex. The purpose of this review is to provide a mechanistic paradigm for future research in the area of alcoholic cardiomyopathy. PMID:24671642

  8. Mitochondrial cardiomyopathy and related arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Montaigne, David; Pentiah, Anju Duva

    2015-06-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been shown to be involved in the pathophysiology of arrhythmia, not only in inherited cardiomyopathy due to specific mutations in the mitochondrial DNA but also in acquired cardiomyopathy such as ischemic or diabetic cardiomyopathy. This article briefly discusses the basics of mitochondrial physiology and details the mechanisms generating arrhythmias due to mitochondrial dysfunction. The clinical spectrum of inherited and acquired cardiomyopathies associated with mitochondrial dysfunction is discussed followed by general aspects of the management of mitochondrial cardiomyopathy and related arrhythmia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Association of uterine leiomyoma and Chagas' disease.

    PubMed

    Murta, Eddie Fernando Candido; Oliveira, Gustavo Paludetto; Prado, Fernando De Oliveira; De Souza, Maria Azniv Hazarabedian; Tavares Murta, Beatriz Martins; Adad, Sheila Jorge

    2002-03-01

    With the aim of studying the frequency of Chagas' disease among sufferers of uterine leiomyoma, we analyzed women older than 35 years who underwent surgery and presented with leiomyoma on anatomicopathological examination. The diagnosis of Chagas infection was based on positivity to at least two of three serological tests: enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, passive hemagglutination, and immunofluorescence. The study was case controlled, matching for age, skin color, and parity. The control group consisted of women undergoing surgery for other benign gynecological alterations. During this period, 118 women presented with uterine leiomyoma, 27.1% of whom were serologically positive for Chagas' disease versus 16.1% of the controls (P < 0.05). Matching by skin color and parity showed that 40% of the white multiparous women with uterine leiomyoma had Chagas' disease versus 10% of the controls (P < 0.05). We concluded that there appears to be an association between Chagas' disease and uterine leiomyoma.

  10. The Chronic Gastrointestinal Manifestations of Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Nilce Mitiko; Miller, Steven M.; Evora, Paulo R. Barbosa

    2009-01-01

    Chagas disease is an infectious disease caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. The disease mainly affects the nervous system, digestive system and heart. The objective of this review is to revise the literature and summarize the main chronic gastrointestinal manifestations of Chagas disease. The chronic gastrointestinal manifestations of Chagas disease are mainly a result of enteric nervous system impairment caused by T. cruzi infection. The anatomical locations most commonly described to be affected by Chagas disease are salivary glands, esophagus, lower esophageal sphincter, stomach, small intestine, colon, gallbladder and biliary tree. Chagas disease has also been studied in association with Helicobacter pylori infection, interstitial cells of Cajal and the incidence of gastrointestinal cancer. PMID:20037711

  11. Arrhythmias in peripartum cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Honigberg, Michael C; Givertz, Michael M

    2015-06-01

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) is a complication of late pregnancy and the early postpartum period characterized by dilated cardiomyopathy and heart failure with reduced ejection fraction. Approximately half of women fail to recover left ventricular function. Standard management of heart failure is indicated, with some exceptions for women who are predelivery or breastfeeding. Atrial and ventricular arrhythmias are reported in PPCM, but the frequency of arrhythmias in this condition is not well characterized. Management of PPCM-associated arrhythmias may include antiarrhythmic drugs, catheter ablation, and wearable or implantable cardioverter-defibrillators. Further research is needed on the prevalence, natural history, and optimal management of arrhythmias in PPCM.

  12. Overcoming research barriers in Chagas disease-designing effective implementation science.

    PubMed

    Henao-Martínez, Andrés F; Colborn, Kathryn; Parra-Henao, Gabriel

    2017-01-01

    Chagas disease is a complex tropical parasitic infection. It affects a significant portion of the population in Latin America, especially in areas of poverty and poor access to health care. It also affects immigrants in high-income countries who lack access to health care due to their legal status. Millions of people are at risk of contracting the disease, and approximately 30 % of chronically infected patients will develop cardiomyopathy. The cost of caring for patients that have been infected is substantial. Basic science research has introduced new concepts and knowledge for the parasite and vector biology as well as better understanding of the pathophysiology of the disease. These research findings nevertheless require effective and timely translation into clinical practice. Likewise, the design of new research projects should account for the multiple system-based barriers. Implementation science facilitates the applicability of research findings and identifies barriers to its execution. Creation of implementation science measures to reach and sustain research programs with greater potential to impact Chagas disease are lacking. This point of view proposes opportunities for implementation science in Chagas disease and strategies for researching effective interventions for preventing and treating the disease.

  13. Chagas disease in the 21st Century: a public health success or an emerging threat?

    PubMed Central

    Bonney, Kevin M.

    2014-01-01

    Chagas disease, caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, is a major public health burden in Latin America and a potentially serious emerging threat to a number of countries throughout the world. Although public health programs have significantly reduced the prevalence of Chagas disease in Latin America in recent decades, the number of infections in the United States and non-endemic countries in Europe and the Western Pacific Region continues to rise. Moreover, there is still no vaccine or highly effective cure available for the approximately 10 million people currently infected with T. cruzi, a third of which will develop potentially fatal cardiomyopathy and/or severe digestive tract disorders. As Chagas disease becomes an increasingly globalized public health issue in the twenty-first century, continued attentiveness from governmental and health organizations as well as improved diagnostic tools, expanded surveillance and increased research funding will be required to maintain existing public health successes and stymie the spread of the disease to new areas and populations. PMID:24626257

  14. Chagas disease in the 21st century: a public health success or an emerging threat?

    PubMed

    Bonney, Kevin M

    2014-01-01

    Chagas disease, caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, is a major public health burden in Latin America and a potentially serious emerging threat to a number of countries throughout the world. Although public health programs have significantly reduced the prevalence of Chagas disease in Latin America in recent decades, the number of infections in the United States and non-endemic countries in Europe and the Western Pacific Region continues to rise. Moreover, there is still no vaccine or highly effective cure available for the approximately 10 million people currently infected with T. cruzi, a third of which will develop potentially fatal cardiomyopathy and/or severe digestive tract disorders. As Chagas disease becomes an increasingly globalized public health issue in the twenty-first century, continued attentiveness from governmental and health organizations as well as improved diagnostic tools, expanded surveillance and increased research funding will be required to maintain existing public health successes and stymie the spread of the disease to new areas and populations. © K.M. Bonney, published by EDP Sciences, 2014.

  15. Chagas disease in Europe: A review for the internist in the globalized world.

    PubMed

    Antinori, Spinello; Galimberti, Laura; Bianco, Roberto; Grande, Romualdo; Galli, Massimo; Corbellino, Mario

    2017-05-11

    Chagas disease (CD) or American trypanosomiasis identified in 1909 by Carlos Chagas, has become over the last 40years a global health concern due to the huge migration flows from Latin America to Europe, United States, Canada and Japan. In Europe, most migrants from CD-endemic areas are concentrated in Spain, Italy, France, United Kingdom and Switzerland. Pooled seroprevalence studies conducted in Europe show an overall 4.2% prevalence, with the highest infection rates observed among individuals from Bolivia (18.1%). However, in most European countries the disease is neglected with absence of screening programmes and low access to diagnosis and treatment. Physicians working in Europe should also be aware of the risk of autochthonous transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi to newborns by their infected mothers and to recipients of blood or transplanted organs from infected donors. Finally, physicians should be able to recognize and treat the most frequent and serious complications of chronic Chagas disease, namely cardiomyopathy, megacolon and megaesophagus. This review aims to highlights the problem of CD in Europe by reviewing papers published by European researchers on this argument, in order to raise the awareness of internists who are bound to increasingly encounter patients with the disease in their routine daily activities. Copyright © 2017 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Trypanosoma cruzi maxicircle heterogeneity in Chagas disease patients from Brazil.

    PubMed

    Carranza, Julio César; Valadares, Helder M S; D'Avila, Daniella A; Baptista, Rodrigo P; Moreno, Margoth; Galvão, Lúcia M C; Chiari, Egler; Sturm, Nancy R; Gontijo, Eliane D; Macedo, Andrea M; Zingales, Bianca

    2009-07-15

    The majority of individuals in the chronic phase of Chagas disease are asymptomatic (indeterminate form, IF). Each year, approximately 3% of them develop lesions in the heart or gastrointestinal tract. Cardiomyopathy (CCHD) is the most severe manifestation of Chagas disease. The factors that determine the outcome of the infection are unknown, but certainly depend on complex interactions amongst the genetic make-up of the parasite, the host immunogenetic background and environment. In a previous study we verified that the maxicircle gene NADH dehydrogenase (mitochondrial complex I) subunit 7 (ND7) from IF isolates had a 455 bp deletion compared with the wild type (WT) ND7 gene from CCHD strains. We proposed that ND7 could constitute a valuable target for PCR assays in the differential diagnosis of the infective strain. In the present study we evaluated this hypothesis by examination of ND7 structure in parasites from 75 patients with defined pathologies, from Southeast Brazil. We also analysed the structure of additional mitochondrial genes (ND4/CR4, COIII and COII) since the maxicircle is used for clustering Trypanosoma cruzi strains into three clades/haplogroups. We conclude that maxicircle genes do not discriminate parasite populations which induce IF or CCHD forms. Interestingly, the great majority of the analysed isolates belong to T. cruzi II (discrete typing unit, (DTU) IIb) genotype. This scenario is at variance with the prevalence of hybrid (DTU IId) human isolates in Bolivia, Chile and Argentina. The distribution of WT and deleted ND7 and ND4 genes in T. cruzi strains suggests that mutations in the two genes occurred in different ancestrals in the T. cruzi II cluster, allowing the identification of at least three mitochondrial sub-lineages within this group. The observation that T. cruzi strains accumulate mutations in several genes coding for complex I subunits favours the hypothesis that complex I may have a limited activity in this parasite.

  17. Electrocardiographic and echocardiographic abnormalities in residents of rural Bolivian communities hyperendemic for Chagas disease

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, Antonio B.; Nunes, Maria Carmo P.; Clark, Eva H.; Samuels, Aaron; Menacho, Silvio; Gomez, Jesus; Gutierrez, Ricardo W. Bozo; Crawford, Thomas C.; Gilman, Robert H.; Bern, Caryn

    2015-01-01

    Background Chagas disease is a neglected and preventable tropical disease that causes significant cardiac morbidity and mortality in Latin America. Our objective in this study was to describe cardiac findings among inhabitants of rural communities of the Bolivian Chaco. Methods The cardiac study drew participants from an epidemiologic study in 7 indigenous Guarani communities. All infected participants 10 years or older were asked to undergo a brief physical examination and 12-lead electrocardiogram. A subset had echocardiograms (ECGs). ECGs and echocardiograms were read by one or more cardiologists. Results Of 1137 residents 10 years or older, 753 (66.2%) had T. cruzi infection. Cardiac evaluations were performed for 398 infected participants 10 years or older. Fifty-five (13.8%) participants had one or more ECG abnormality suggestive of Chagas cardiomyopathy. The most frequent abnormalities were bundle branch blocks in 42 (11.3%), followed by rhythm disturbances or ventricular ectopy in 13 (3.3%) and atrioventricular blocks (AVB) in 10 (2.6%) participants. The prevalence of any abnormality rose from 1.1% among those 10-19 years old to 14.2%, 17.3% and 26.4% among those 20-39, 40-59 and older than 60 years, respectively. First degree AVB was seen most frequently in participants 60 years or older, but the 4 patients with 3rd degree AVB were all under 50 years old. Eighteen and two participants had a left ventricular ejection fraction of 40-54% and <40%, respectively. An increasing number of ECG abnormalities was associated with progressively larger left ventricular end-diastolic dimensions and lower left ventricular ejection fraction. Conclusions We found a high prevalence of ECG abnormalities and substantial evidence of Chagas cardiomyopathy. Programs to improve access to basic cardiac care (annual ECGs, antiarrhythmics, pacemakers) could have an immediate impact on morbidity and mortality in these highly endemic communities. PMID:26407511

  18. The BENEFIT trial: testing the hypothesis that trypanocidal therapy is beneficial for patients with chronic Chagas heart disease.

    PubMed

    Marin-Neto, J Antonio; Rassi, Anis; Avezum, Alvaro; Mattos, Antonio C; Rassi, Anis; Morillo, Carlos A; Sosa-Estani, Sergio; Yusuf, Salim

    2009-07-01

    Among the pathophysiological derangements operating in the chronic phase of Chagas disease, parasite persistence is likely to constitute the main mechanism of myocardial injury in patients with chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy. The presence of Trypanosoma cruzi in the heart causes a low-grade, but relentless, inflammatory process and induces myocardial autoimmune injury. These facts suggest that trypanocidal therapy may positively impact the clinical course of patients with chronic Chagas heart disease. However, the experimental and clinical evidence currently available is insufficient to support the routine use of etiologic treatment in these patients. The BENEFIT project--Benznidazole Evaluation for Interrupting Trypanosomiasis--is an international, multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of trypanocidal treatment with benznidazole in patients with chronic Chagas heart disease. This project is actually comprised of two studies. The pilot study investigates whether etiologic treatment significantly reduces parasite burden, as assessed by polymerase chain reaction-based techniques and also determines the safety and tolerability profile of the trypanocidal drug in this type of chagasic population. The full-scale study determines whether antitrypanosomal therapy with benznidazole reduces mortality and other major cardiovascular clinical outcomes in patients with chronic Chagas heart disease.

  19. Genetic Adjuvantation of a Cell-Based Therapeutic Vaccine for Amelioration of Chagasic Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Konduri, Vanaja; Halpert, Matthew M; Liang, Dan; Levitt, Jonathan M; Cruz-Chan, Julio Vladimir; Zhan, Bin; Bottazzi, Maria Elena; Hotez, Peter J; Jones, Kathryn M; Decker, William K

    2017-09-01

    Chagas disease, caused by infection with the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, is a leading cause of heart disease ("chagasic cardiomyopathy") in Latin America, disproportionately affecting people in resource-poor areas. The efficacy of currently approved pharmaceutical treatments is limited mainly to acute infection, and there are no effective treatments for the chronic phase of the disease. Preclinical models of Chagas disease have demonstrated that antigen-specific CD8(+) gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-positive T-cell responses are essential for reducing parasite burdens, increasing survival, and decreasing cardiac pathology in both the acute and chronic phases of Chagas disease. In the present study, we developed a genetically adjuvanted, dendritic cell-based immunotherapeutic for acute Chagas disease in an attempt to delay or prevent the cardiac complications that eventually result from chronic T. cruzi infection. Dendritic cells transduced with the adjuvant, an adenoviral vector encoding a dominant negative isoform of Src homology region 2 domain-containing tyrosine phosphatase 1 (SHP-1) along with the T. cruzi Tc24 antigen and trans-sialidase antigen 1 (TSA1), induced significant numbers of antigen-specific CD8(+) IFN-γ-positive cells following injection into BALB/c mice. A vaccine platform transduced with the adenoviral vector and loaded in tandem with the recombinant protein reduced parasite burdens by 76% to >99% in comparison to a variety of different controls and significantly reduced cardiac pathology in a BALB/c mouse model of live Chagas disease. Although no statistical differences in overall survival rates among cohorts were observed, the data suggest that immunotherapeutic strategies for the treatment of acute Chagas disease are feasible and that this approach may warrant further study. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  20. [Oral transmission of Chagas' disease].

    PubMed

    Toso M, Alberto; Vial U, Felipe; Galanti, Norbel

    2011-02-01

    The traditional transmission pathways of Chagas' disease are vectorial, transfusional, transplacental and organ transplantation. However, oral transmission is gaining importance. The first evidence of oral transmission was reported in Brazil in 1965. Nowadays the oral route is the transmission mode in 50% of cases in the Amazon river zone. Oral infection is produced by the ingestion of infected triatomine bugs or their feces, undercooked meat from infested host animals and food contaminated with urine or anal secretion of infected marsupials. Therefore travelers to those zones should be advised about care to be taken with ingested food. In Chile, this new mode of transmission should be considered in public health policies.

  1. Cardiomyopathy Following Latrodectus Envenomation

    PubMed Central

    Levine, Michael; Canning, Josh; Chase, Robyn; Ruha, Anne-Michelle

    2010-01-01

    Latrodectus envenomations are common throughout the United States and the world. While many envenomations can result in catecholamine release with resultant hypertension and tachycardia, myocarditis is very rare. We describe a case of a 22-year-old male who sustained a Latrodectus envenomation complicated by cardiomyopathy. PMID:21293781

  2. Myocardial mechanics in cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Modesto, Karen; Sengupta, Partho P

    2014-01-01

    Cardiomyopathies are a heterogeneous group of diseases that can be phenotypically recognized by specific patterns of ventricular morphology and function. The authors summarize recent clinical observations that mechanistically link the multidirectional components of left ventricular (LV) deformation with morphological phenotypes of cardiomyopathies for offering key insights into the transmural heterogeneity of myocardial function. Subendocardial dysfunction predominantly alters LV longitudinal shortening, lengthening and suction performance and contributes to the phenotypic patterns of heart failure (HF) with preserved ejection fraction (EF) seen with hypertrophic and restrictive patterns of cardiomyopathy. On the other hand, a more progressive transmural disease results in reduction of LV circumferential and twist mechanics leading to the phenotypic pattern of dilated cardiomyopathy and the clinical syndrome of HF with reduced (EF). A proper characterization of LV transmural mechanics, energetics, and space-time distributions of pressure and shear stress may allow recognition of early functional changes that can forecast progression or reversal of LV remodeling. Furthermore, the interactions between LV muscle and fluid mechanics hold the promise for offering newer mechanistic insights and tracking impact of novel therapies.

  3. IL18 Gene Variants Influence the Susceptibility to Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Leon Rodriguez, Daniel A; Carmona, F. David; Echeverría, Luis Eduardo; González, Clara Isabel; Martin, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Chagas disease is a parasitic disorder caused by the infection with the flagellated protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. According to the World Health Organization, more than six million people are currently infected in endemic regions. Genetic factors have been proposed to influence predisposition to infection and development of severe clinical phenotypes like chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy (CCC). Interleukin 18 (IL18) encodes a proinflammatory cytokine that has been proposed to be involved in controlling T. cruzi infection. In this study, we analyzed the possible role of six IL18 gene variants (rs5744258, rs360722, rs2043055, rs187238, rs1946518 and rs360719), which cover most of the variation within the locus, in the susceptibility to infection by T. cruzi and/or CCC. In total, 1,171 individuals from a Colombian region endemic for Chagas disease, classified as seronegative (n = 595), seropositive asymptomatic (n = 175) and CCC (n = 401), were genotyped using TaqMan probes. Significant associations with T. cruzi infection were observed when comparing seronegative and seropositive individuals for rs187238 (P = 2.18E-03, OR = 0.77), rs360719 (P = 1.49E-03, OR = 0.76), rs2043055 (P = 2.52E-03, OR = 1.29), and rs1946518 (P = 0.0162, OR = 1.22). However, dependence analyses suggested that the association was mainly driven by the polymorphism rs360719. This variant is located within the promoter region of the IL18 gene, and it has been described that it creates a binding site for the transcription factor OCT-1 affecting IL-18 expression levels. In addition, no evidence of association was observed between any of the analyzed IL18 gene polymorphisms and the development of CCC. In summary, our data suggest that genetic variation within the promoter region of IL18 is directly involved in the susceptibility to infection by T. cruzi, which provides novel insight into disease pathophysiology and adds new perspectives to achieve a more effective disease control. PMID:27027876

  4. [Consensus document for the detection and management of Chagas disease in primary health care in a non-endemic areas].

    PubMed

    Roca Saumell, Carme; Soriano-Arandes, Antoni; Solsona Díaz, Lluís; Gascón Brustenga, Joaquim

    2015-05-01

    Chagas disease is caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. Although it is commonly transmitted by an insect vector in continental Latin-America, in recent decades, due migration, has been diagnosed in other countries such Spain, the European country with a largest immigrant population of Latin American. For a long time, the patient remains asymptomatic, but some years after this stage, the symptoms can be serious (dilated cardiomyopathy, megacolon, megaesophagus). In addition, detection in pregnant women has a high priority because of the route of vertical transmission. Several specific guidelines about Chagas disease has been developed on the Banks of blood, maternal hospitals, HIV co-infection, organ transplant. But due to the detection of lack of information to primary care professionals, we consider to will be useful this document written and agreed to by family phisicians, pediatricians and specialists in International Health.

  5. Genetics Home Reference: familial restrictive cardiomyopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Health Conditions familial restrictive cardiomyopathy familial restrictive cardiomyopathy Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Familial restrictive cardiomyopathy is a genetic form of heart disease. For ...

  6. The Prevalence of Chagas Heart Disease in a Central Bolivian Community Endemic for Trypanosoma Cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Yager, Jessica E.; Lozano Beltran, Daniel F.; Torrico, Faustino; Gilman, Robert H.; Bern, Caryn

    2015-01-01

    Background Though the incidence of new Trypanosoma cruzi infections has decreased significantly in endemic regions in the Americas, medical professionals continue to encounter a high burden of resulting Chagas disease among infected adults. The current prevalence of Chagas heart disease in a community setting is not known; nor is it known how recent insecticide vector control measures may have impacted the progression of cardiac disease in an infected population. Objectives and Methods Nested within a community serosurvey in rural and periurban communities in central Bolivia, we performed a cross-sectional cardiac substudy to evaluate adults for historical, clinical, and electrocardiographic evidence of cardiac disease. All adults between the ages of 20 and 60 years old with T. cruzi infection and those with a clinical history, physical exam, or ECG consistent with cardiac abnormalities were also scheduled for echocardiography. Results and conclusions Of the 604 cardiac substudy participants with definitive serology results, 183 were seropositive for infection with T. cruzi (30.3%). Participants who were seropositive for T. cruzi infection were more likely to have conduction system defects (1.6% versus 0 for complete right bundle branch block and 10.4% versus 1.9% for any bundle branch block; p=0.008 and p<0.001, respectively). However, there was no statistically significant difference in the prevalence of bradycardia among seropositive versus seronegative participants. Echocardiogram findings were not consistent with a high burden of Chagas cardiomyopathy: valvulopathies were the most common abnormality, and few participants were found to have low ejection fraction or left ventricular dilatation. No participants had significant heart failure. Though almost one third of adults in the community were seropositive for T. cruzi infection, few had evidence of Chagas heart disease. PMID:26407509

  7. Experimental Trypanosoma cruzi cardiomyopathy in BALB/c mice: histochemical evidence of hypoxic changes in the myocardium.

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, M. A.; Carobrez, S. G.

    1985-01-01

    Mice inoculated three times at intervals of 15 days with epimastigote forms of an 'avirulent' strain of Trypanosoma cruzi and challenged 30 days after the last inoculation with trypomastigote forms of the 'Colombia' strain of T. cruzi develop a cardiomyopathy very similar to that observed in the chronic phase of Chagas' disease in man. The most conspicuous histopathological finding in both human and experimental chagasic cardiomyopathy is focal myocardial necrosis and degeneration. Based on the nature of cell necrosis and degeneration, and the association of this lesion with intravascular platelet aggregation in the experimental model, we suggested that the microcirculation could be involved, via transient ischaemia, in the pathogenesis of chagasic cardiomyopathy. Additional support to this hypothesis is given by the results of the present study showing histochemical evidence of hypoxic changes in the myocardium of mice chronically infected with T. cruzi. Images Fig. 1 PMID:3986128

  8. Chagas' disease as a foodborne illness.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Karen Signori; Schmidt, Flávio Luis; Guaraldo, Ana M A; Franco, Regina M B; Dias, Viviane L; Passos, Luiz A C

    2009-02-01

    Various researchers have studied the importance of the oral transmission of Chagas' disease since the mid-20th century. Only in recent years, due to an outbreak that occurred in the Brazilian State of Santa Catarina in 2005 and to various outbreaks occurring during the last 3 years in the Brazilian Amazon basin, mainly associated with the consumption of Amazonian palm berry or açaí (Euterpe oleracea Mart.) juice, has this transmission route aroused the attention of researchers. Nevertheless, reports published in the 1960s already indicated the possibility of Chagas' disease transmission via food in Brazil, mainly in the Amazonian region. Recently, in December 2007, an outbreak of Chagas' disease occurred in Caracas, Venezuela, related to ingestion of contaminated fruit juices. The objective of this article is to point out the importance of foodborne transmission in the etiology of Chagas' disease, on the basis of published research and Brazilian epidemiology data.

  9. Chaga mushroom-induced oxalate nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Yuko; Seta, Koichi; Ogawa, Yayoi; Takayama, Tatsuya; Nagata, Masao; Taguchi, Takashi; Yahata, Kensei

    2014-06-01

    Chaga mushrooms have been used in folk and botanical medicine as a remedy for cancer, gastritis, ulcers, and tuberculosis of the bones. A 72-year-old Japanese female had been diagnosed with liver cancer 1 year prior to presenting at our department. She underwent hepatectomy of the left lobe 3 months later. Chaga mushroom powder (4 - 5 teaspoons per day) had been ingested for the past 6 months for liver cancer. Renal function decreased and hemodialysis was initiated. Renal biopsy specimens showed diffuse tubular atrophy and interstitial fibrosis. Oxalate crystals were detected in the tubular lumina and urinary sediment and oxalate nephropathy was diagnosed. Chaga mushrooms contain extremely high oxalate concentrations. This is the first report of a case of oxalate nephropathy associated with ingestion of Chaga mushrooms.

  10. Inflammatory dilated cardiomyopathy (DCMI).

    PubMed

    Maisch, Bernhard; Richter, Anette; Sandmöller, Andrea; Portig, Irene; Pankuweit, Sabine

    2005-09-01

    Cardiomyopathies are heart muscle diseases, which have been defined by their central hemodynamics and macropathology and divided in five major forms: dilated (DCM), hypertrophic (HCM), restrictive (RCM), right ventricular (RVCM), and nonclassifiable cardiomyopathies (NCCM). Furthermore, the most recent WHO/WHF definition also comprises, among the specific cardiomyopathies, inflammatory cardiomyopathy as a distinct entity, defined as myocarditis in association with cardiac dysfunction. Idiopathic, autoimmune, and infectious forms of inflammatory cardiomyopathy were recognized. Viral cardiomyopathy has been defined as viral persistence in a dilated heart. It may be accompanied by myocardial inflammation and then termed inflammatory viral cardiomyopathy (or viral myocarditis with cardiomegaly). If no inflammation is observed in the biopsy of a dilated heart (< 14 lymphocytes and macrophages/mm(2)), the term viral cardiomyopathy or viral persistence in DCM should be applied according to the WHF Task Force recommendations. Within the German heart failure net it is the authors' working hypothesis, that DCM shares genetic risk factors with other diseases of presumed autoimmune etiology and, therefore, the same multiple genes in combination with environmental factors lead to numerous different autoimmune diseases including DCM. Therefore, the authors' primary goal is to acquire epidemiologic data of patients with DCM regarding an infectious and inflammatory etiology of the disease. Circumstantial evidence points to a major role of viral myocarditis in the etiology of DCM. The common presence of viral genetic material in the myocardium of patients with DCM provides the most compelling evidence, but proof of causality is still lacking. In addition, autoimmune reactions have been described in many studies, indicating them as an important etiologic factor. Nevertheless, data on the proportion of patients, in whom both mechanisms play a role are still missing.A pivotal role for

  11. Peripartum cardiomyopathy: a review

    PubMed Central

    Capriola, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) is a form of dilated cardiomyopathy of unclear etiology affecting women without preexisting heart disease during the last month of pregnancy or during the first 5 months postpartum. Its incidence shows marked geographic and ethnic variation, being most common in Africa and among women of African descent. Most women present in the first month postpartum with typical heart failure symptoms such as dyspnea, lower extremity edema, and fatigue. These symptoms are often initially erroneously diagnosed as part of the normal puerperal process. Diagnosis can be aided by the finding of a significantly elevated serum brain natriuretic peptide. The etiology of PPCM is unclear; however, recent research suggests abnormal prolactin metabolism is seminal in its development, and prolactin antagonism with bromocriptine shows promise as a novel treatment for PPCM. PMID:23300351

  12. [Tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Povolný, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Cardiomyopathy is a heterogeneous group of diseases of heart muscle accompanied with impaired cardiac function. Tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy (TIC) is caused by prolonged tachycardia leading to dilatation and systolic dysfunction with clinical manifestation of heart failure. This state is reversible after normalization of heart rate. The diagnosis is usually made retrospectively after normalization of heart rate and recovery of left ventricular function (LVF). More than 100 years after the first documented case (described in 1913 in a young patient with atrial fibrillation and symptoms of heart failure [25]) is still limited knowledge of pathophysiological mechanisms. The most common arrhythmias responsible for the TIC include atrial fibrillation [1,2], atrial flutter [3], incessant supraventricular tachycardia [4], ventricular tachycardia (VT) [5] and frequent ventricular extrasystoles (VES) [6]. TIC detection and therapeutic intervention is crucial considering potential reversibility of tachycardia. Current options of treatment involve drug therapy and surgical or catheter ablation.

  13. Dystrophin-Deficient Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Kamdar, Forum; Garry, Daniel J

    2016-05-31

    Dystrophinopathies are a group of distinct neuromuscular diseases that result from mutations in the structural cytoskeletal Dystrophin gene. Dystrophinopathies include Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD), X-linked dilated cardiomyopathy, as well as DMD and BMD female carriers. The primary presenting symptom in most dystrophinopathies is skeletal muscle weakness. However, cardiac muscle is also a subtype of striated muscle and is similarly affected in many of the muscular dystrophies. Cardiomyopathies associated with dystrophinopathies are an increasingly recognized manifestation of these neuromuscular disorders and contribute significantly to their morbidity and mortality. Recent studies suggest that these patient populations would benefit from cardiovascular therapies, annual cardiovascular imaging studies, and close follow-up with cardiovascular specialists. Moreover, patients with DMD and BMD who develop end-stage heart failure may benefit from the use of advanced therapies. This review focuses on the pathophysiology, cardiac involvement, and treatment of cardiomyopathy in the dystrophic patient. Copyright © 2016 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Inflammation and metabolic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Kazuhiko; Otsu, Kinya

    2017-03-15

    Excessive feeding is associated with an increase in the incidence of chronic metabolic diseases, such as obesity, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes. Metabolic disturbance induces chronic low-grade inflammation in metabolically-important organs, such as the liver and adipose tissue. Many of the inflammatory signalling pathways are directly triggered by nutrients. The pro-inflammatory mediators in adipocytes and macrophages infiltrating adipose tissue promote both local and systemic pro-inflammatory status. Metabolic cardiomyopathy is a chronic metabolic disease characterized by structural and functional alterations and interstitial fibrosis without coronary artery disease or hypertension. In the early stage of metabolic cardiomyopathy, metabolic disturbance is not accompanied by substantial changes in myocardial structure and cardiac function. However, metabolic disturbance induces subcellular low-grade inflammation in the heart, and in turn, subcellular component abnormalities, such as oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and impaired calcium handling, leading to impaired myocardial relaxation. In the advanced stage, the vicious cycle of subcellular component abnormalities, inflammatory cell infiltration, and neurohumoral activation induces cardiomyocyte injury and death, and cardiac fibrosis, resulting in impairment of both diastolic and systolic functions. This review discusses some recent advances in understanding involvement of inflammation in metabolic cardiomyopathy. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2017. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Orally-transmitted Chagas disease.

    PubMed

    Filigheddu, Maria Teresa; Górgolas, Miguel; Ramos, José Manuel

    2017-02-09

    Chagas disease is a zoonosis caused by protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, which is most frequently associated with a vectorial transmission. However, in recent years we have observed a significant increase in the oral transmission of the disease, associated mainly with the consumption of drinks made from fruit or other vegetables contaminated with triatomine faeces or secretions from infected mammals. After a latency period of 3 to 22 days after ingestion, the oral infection is characterized by more severe manifestations than those associated with vectorial transmission: prolonged fever, acute myocarditis with heart failure and, in some cases, meningoencephalitis. Mortality can reach up to 33% of those infected. The aim of this paper is to review this matter and to promote prevention practices. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Lymphocyte Transformation in Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tschudi, E. Irene; Anziano, Dante F.; Dalmasso, Agustin P.

    1972-01-01

    The in vitro response of human peripheral lymphocytes to Trypanosoma (Schizotrypanum) cruzi antigens and to phytohemagglutinin was used to study the role of cellular immunity in Chagas disease (American trypanosomiasis). Solubilized T. cruzi antigens elicited 5 to 30% transformed cells in 5-day cultures of lymphocytes from adults chronically infected with T. cruzi. No major difference was noted between the response of 22 asymptomatic individuals and of 3 patients with chagasic cardiopathy. No correlation was found between degree of lymphocytic transformation and serum antibody titer. Lymphocytes from 15 normal controls yielded no significant transformation. Intradermal tests provoked a local delayed hypersensitivity reaction in infected individuals only, as evaluated clinically and histologically. The response to phytohemagglutinin of lymphocytes from chronically infected individuals was identical with that of normal controls. Images PMID:4629392

  17. Decade in review--cardiomyopathies: Cardiomyopathy on the move.

    PubMed

    Yacoub, Magdi H

    2014-11-01

    Since Wallace Brigden first used the term 'cardiomyopathy' in 1952, this group of diseases has continued to attract the interest of clinicians, researchers, and importantly, patients. The past decade has seen a substantial accumulation of knowledge relating to various cardiomyopathies, which has partially lifted the mystery surrounding this topic.

  18. Carlos Chagas Discoveries as a Drop Back to Scientific Construction of Chronic Chagas Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bestetti, Reinaldo B.; Restini, Carolina Baraldi A.; Couto, Lucélio B.

    2016-01-01

    The scientific construction of chronic Chagas heart disease (CCHD) started in 1910 when Carlos Chagas highlighted the presence of cardiac arrhythmia during physical examination of patients with chronic Chagas disease, and described a case of heart failure associated with myocardial inflammation and nests of parasites at autopsy. He described sudden cardiac death associated with arrhythmias in 1911, and its association with complete AV block detected by Jacquet's polygraph as Chagas reported in 1912. Chagas showed the presence of myocardial fibrosis underlying the clinical picture of CCHD in 1916, he presented a full characterization of the clinical aspects of CCHD in 1922. In 1928, Chagas detected fibrosis of the conductive system, and pointed out the presence of marked cardiomegaly at the chest X-Ray associated with minimal symptomatology. The use of serological reaction to diagnose CCHD was put into clinical practice in 1936, after Chagas' death, which along with the 12-lead ECG, revealed the epidemiological importance of CCHD in 1945. In 1953, the long period between initial infection and appearance of CCHD was established, whereas the annual incidence of CCHD from patients with the indeterminate form of the disease was established in 1956. The use of heart catheterization in 1965, exercise stress testing in 1973, Holter monitoring in 1975, Electrophysiologic testing in 1973, echocardiography in 1975, endomyocardial biopsy in 1981, and Magnetic Resonance Imaging in 1995, added to the fundamental clinical aspects of CCHD as described by Carlos Chagas. PMID:27223644

  19. Carlos Chagas Discoveries as a Drop Back to Scientific Construction of Chronic Chagas Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Bestetti, Reinaldo B; Restini, Carolina Baraldi A; Couto, Lucélio B

    2016-07-01

    The scientific construction of chronic Chagas heart disease (CCHD) started in 1910 when Carlos Chagas highlighted the presence of cardiac arrhythmia during physical examination of patients with chronic Chagas disease, and described a case of heart failure associated with myocardial inflammation and nests of parasites at autopsy. He described sudden cardiac death associated with arrhythmias in 1911, and its association with complete AV block detected by Jacquet's polygraph as Chagas reported in 1912. Chagas showed the presence of myocardial fibrosis underlying the clinical picture of CCHD in 1916, he presented a full characterization of the clinical aspects of CCHD in 1922. In 1928, Chagas detected fibrosis of the conductive system, and pointed out the presence of marked cardiomegaly at the chest X-Ray associated with minimal symptomatology. The use of serological reaction to diagnose CCHD was put into clinical practice in 1936, after Chagas' death, which along with the 12-lead ECG, revealed the epidemiological importance of CCHD in 1945. In 1953, the long period between initial infection and appearance of CCHD was established, whereas the annual incidence of CCHD from patients with the indeterminate form of the disease was established in 1956. The use of heart catheterization in 1965, exercise stress testing in 1973, Holter monitoring in 1975, Electrophysiologic testing in 1973, echocardiography in 1975, endomyocardial biopsy in 1981, and Magnetic Resonance Imaging in 1995, added to the fundamental clinical aspects of CCHD as described by Carlos Chagas.

  20. Prevalence of Chagas heart disease in a region endemic for Trypanosoma cruzi: evidence from a central Bolivian community.

    PubMed

    Yager, Jessica E; Lozano Beltran, Daniel F; Torrico, Faustino; Gilman, Robert H; Bern, Caryn

    2015-09-01

    Though the incidence of new Trypanosoma cruzi infections has decreased significantly in endemic regions in the Americas, medical professionals continue to encounter a high burden of resulting Chagas disease among infected adults. The current prevalence of Chagas heart disease in a community setting is not known; nor is it known how recent insecticide vector control measures may have impacted the progression of cardiac disease in an infected population. We sought to determine the current prevalence of T. cruzi infection and associated Chagas heart disease in a Bolivian community endemic for T. cruzi. Nested within a community serosurvey in rural and periurban communities in central Bolivia, we performed a cross-sectional cardiac substudy to evaluate adults for historical, clinical, and electrocardiographic evidence of cardiac disease. All adults between the ages of 20 and 60 years old with T. cruzi infection and those with a clinical history, physical exam, or electrocardiogram consistent with cardiac abnormalities were also scheduled for echocardiography. Of the 604 cardiac substudy participants with definitive serology results, 183 were seropositive for infection with T. cruzi (30.3%). Participants who were seropositive for T. cruzi infection were more likely to have conduction system defects (1.6% vs. 0% for complete right bundle branch block and 10.4% vs. 1.9% for any bundle branch block; p = 0.008 and p < 0.001, respectively). However, there was no statistically significant difference in the prevalence of bradycardia among seropositive versus seronegative participants. Echocardiogram findings were not consistent with a high burden of Chagas cardiomyopathy: valvulopathies were the most common abnormality, and few participants were found to have low ejection fraction or left ventricular dilatation. No participants had significant heart failure. Though almost one-third of adults in the community were seropositive for T. cruzi infection, few had evidence of

  1. Characterization of an Immunodominant Antigenic Epitope from Trypanosoma cruzi as a Biomarker of Chronic Chagas' Disease Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, M. Carmen; Fernández-Villegas, Ana; Carrilero, Bartolomé; Marañón, Concepción; Saura, Daniel; Noya, Oscar; Segovia, Manuel; Alarcón de Noya, Belkisyolé; Alonso, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Nowadays, the techniques available for chronic Chagas' disease diagnosis are very sensitive; however, they do not allow discrimination of the patient's clinical stages of the disease. The present paper describes that three out of the five different repeats contained in the Trypanosoma cruzi TcCA-2 membrane protein (3972-FGQAAAGDKPPP, 6303-FGQAAAGDKPAP, and 3973-FGQAAAGDKPSL) are recognized with high sensitivity (>90%) by sera from chronic Chagas' disease patients and that they are not recognized by sera from patients in the acute phase of the disease. A total of 133 serum samples from chagasic patients and 50 serum samples from healthy donors were tested. In addition, sera from 15 patients with different autoimmune diseases, 43 serum samples from patients suffering an infectious disease other than Chagas' disease, and 38 serum samples from patients with nonchagasic cardiac disorders were also included in this study. The residue 3973 peptide shows a specificity of >98%, as it is not recognized by individuals with autoimmune and inflammatory processes or by patients with a nonchagasic cardiomyopathy. Remarkably, the levels of antibody against the 3973 epitope detected by the sera from Chagas' disease patients in the symptomatic chronic phase, involving cardiac or digestive alterations, are higher than those detected by the sera from Chagas' disease patients in the indeterminate phase of the disease. It is suggested that the diagnostic technique described could also be used to indicate the degree of pathology. The amino acids F, Q, and DKP located in the peptide at positions 1, 3, and 8 to 10, respectively, are essential to conform to the immunodominant antigenic epitope. PMID:22155766

  2. American Trypanosomiasis (Also Known as Chagas Disease) Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... The CDC Parasites - American Trypanosomiasis (also known as Chagas Disease) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Chagas Disease General Information Detailed FAQs Blood Screening FAQs ...

  3. American Trypanosomiasis (Also Known as Chagas Disease) Blood Screening FAQs

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tropical Diseases Laboratory Diagnostic Assistance [DPDx] Parasites Home Blood Screening FAQs Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on ... be concerned about getting Chagas disease? Why are blood banks now screening for Chagas disease? The transmission ...

  4. Role of neuropeptides in cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Dvorakova, Magdalena Chottova; Kruzliak, Peter; Rabkin, Simon W

    2014-11-01

    The role of neuropeptides in cardiomyopathy-associated heart failure has been garnering more attention. Several neuropeptides--Neuropeptide Y (NPY), vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP), substance P (SP) and their receptors have been studied in the various types of cardiomyopathies. The data indicate associations with the strength of the association varying depending on the kind of neuropeptide and the nature of the cardiomyopathy--diabetic, ischemic, inflammatory, stress-induced or restrictive cardiomyopathy. Several neuropeptides appear to alter regulation of genes involved in heart failure. Demonstration of an association is an essential first step in proving causality or establishing a role for a factor in a disease. Understanding the complexity of neuropeptide function should be helpful in establishing new or optimal therapeutic strategies for the treatment of heart failure in cardiomyopathies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. [Chagas disease with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Clinical cases].

    PubMed

    Labarca, J; Acuña, G; Saavedra, H; Oddó, D; Sepúlveda, C; Ballesteros, J; Alvarez, M

    1992-02-01

    We report 2 patients with AIDS who developed Chagas infection, one with encephalitis, the other with acute myocarditis. The implications of immune depression for the manifestations and course of Chagas disease are discussed. Chagas disease should be considered in patients with AIDS who live in endemic zones and who develop cerebral or cardiac manifestations.

  6. Stress-induced cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Lisung, Fausto Gabriel; Shah, Ankit B; Levitt, Howard L; Coplan, Neil B

    2015-01-01

    A woman in her early 70s presented with chest pain, dyspnoea and diaphoresis 30 min after her husband expired in our hospital. Cardiac markers were elevated and there were acute changes in ECG suggestive for acute coronary syndrome. Echocardiogram showed apical akinesis, basal segment hyperkinesis with an ejection fraction of 30%. Cardiac catheterisation was performed showing non-obstructive coronary arteries, leading to the diagnosis of stress-induced cardiomyopathy. The patient improved with medical management. Repeat echocardiogram 2 months later showed resolution of heart failure with an ejection fraction of 65–70%. PMID:25858931

  7. [Non-compaction cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Wieneke, Heinrich; Neumann, Till; Breuckmann, Frank; Hunold, Peter; Fries, Jochen W U; Dirsch, Olaf; Erbel, Raimund

    2005-09-01

    Isolated non-compaction of the ventricular myocardium (INVM), also known as left ventricular hypertrabeculation or spongy myocardium, belongs to the "unclassified" cardiomyopathies according to the World Health Organization. The main characteristic of this entity is a prominent trabeculation of the left ventricle with deep intertrabecular recesses communicating with the ventricular cavity. The pathomechanism of INVM is thought to be an arrest in cardiac myogenesis with persistence of embryonic myocardial morphology. The most frequent clinical manifestations include congestive heart failure, ventricular arrhythmias and systemic thromboembolic events. The therapy of INVM comprises standard medical therapy for heart failure.

  8. A therapeutic nanoparticle vaccine against Trypanosoma cruzi in a BALB/c mouse model of Chagas disease.

    PubMed

    Barry, Meagan A; Wang, Qian; Jones, Kathryn M; Heffernan, Michael J; Buhaya, Munir H; Beaumier, Coreen M; Keegan, Brian P; Zhan, Bin; Dumonteil, Eric; Bottazzi, Maria Elena; Hotez, Peter J

    2016-04-02

    Chagas disease, caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, results in an acute febrile illness that progresses to chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy in 30% of patients. Current treatments have significant side effects and poor efficacy during the chronic phase; therefore, there is an urgent need for new treatment modalities. A robust TH1-mediated immune response correlates with favorable clinical outcomes. A therapeutic vaccine administered to infected individuals could bolster the immune response, thereby slowing or stopping the progression of chagasic cardiomyopathy. Prior work in mice has identified an efficacious T. cruzi DNA vaccine encoding Tc24. To elicit a similar protective cell-mediated immune response to a Tc24 recombinant protein, we utilized a poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanoparticle delivery system in conjunction with CpG motif-containing oligodeoxynucleotides as an immunomodulatory adjuvant. In a BALB/c mouse model, the vaccine produced a TH1-biased immune response, as demonstrated by a significant increase in antigen-specific IFNγ-producing splenocytes, IgG2a titers, and proliferative capacity of CD8(+) T cells. When tested for therapeutic efficacy, significantly reduced systemic parasitemia was seen during peak parasitemia. Additionally, there was a significant reduction in cardiac parasite burden and inflammatory cell infiltrate. This is the first study demonstrating immunogenicity and efficacy of a therapeutic Chagas vaccine using a nanoparticle delivery system.

  9. Molecular imaging, biodistribution and efficacy of mesenchymal bone marrow cell therapy in a mouse model of Chagas disease

    PubMed Central

    Jasmin; Jelicks, Linda A; Tanowitz, Herbert B; Peters, Vera Maria; Mendez-Otero, Rosalia

    2015-01-01

    Chagasic cardiomyopathy, resulting from infection with the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, was discovered more than a century ago and remains an incurable disease. Due to the unique properties of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) we hypothesized that these cells could have therapeutic potential for chagasic cardiomyopathy. Recently, our group pioneered use of nanoparticle-labeled MSC to correlate migration with its effect in an acute Chagas disease model. We expanded our investigation into a chronic model and performed more comprehensive assays. Infected mice were treated with nanoparticle labeled MSC and their migration was correlated with alterations in heart morphology, metalloproteinase activity, and expression of several proteins. The vast majority of labeled MSC migrated to liver, lungs and spleen whereas a small number of cells migrated to chagasic hearts. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated that MSC therapy reduced heart dilatation. Additionally metalloproteinase activity was higher in heart and other organs of infected mice. Protein expression analyses revealed that connexin 43, laminin γ1, IL-10 and INF-γ were affected by the disease and recovered after cell therapy. Interestingly, MSC therapy led to upregulation of SDF-1 and c-kit in the hearts. The beneficial effect of MSC therapy in Chagas disease is likely due to an indirect action of the cells of the heart, rather than the incorporation of large numbers of stem cells into working myocardium. PMID:25218054

  10. A therapeutic nanoparticle vaccine against Trypanosoma cruzi in a BALB/c mouse model of Chagas disease

    PubMed Central

    Barry, Meagan A.; Wang, Qian; Jones, Kathryn M.; Heffernan, Michael J.; Buhaya, Munir H.; Beaumier, Coreen M.; Keegan, Brian P.; Zhan, Bin; Dumonteil, Eric; Bottazzi, Maria Elena; Hotez, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Chagas disease, caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, results in an acute febrile illness that progresses to chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy in 30% of patients. Current treatments have significant side effects and poor efficacy during the chronic phase; therefore, there is an urgent need for new treatment modalities. A robust TH1-mediated immune response correlates with favorable clinical outcomes. A therapeutic vaccine administered to infected individuals could bolster the immune response, thereby slowing or stopping the progression of chagasic cardiomyopathy. Prior work in mice has identified an efficacious T. cruzi DNA vaccine encoding Tc24. To elicit a similar protective cell-mediated immune response to a Tc24 recombinant protein, we utilized a poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanoparticle delivery system in conjunction with CpG motif-containing oligodeoxynucleotides as an immunomodulatory adjuvant. In a BALB/c mouse model, the vaccine produced a TH1-biased immune response, as demonstrated by a significant increase in antigen-specific IFNγ-producing splenocytes, IgG2a titers, and proliferative capacity of CD8+ T cells. When tested for therapeutic efficacy, significantly reduced systemic parasitemia was seen during peak parasitemia. Additionally, there was a significant reduction in cardiac parasite burden and inflammatory cell infiltrate. This is the first study demonstrating immunogenicity and efficacy of a therapeutic Chagas vaccine using a nanoparticle delivery system. PMID:26890466

  11. FIRST REPORT OF ACUTE CHAGAS DISEASE BY VECTOR TRANSMISSION IN RIO DE JANEIRO STATE, BRAZIL

    PubMed Central

    SANGENIS, Luiz Henrique Conde; DE SOUSA, Andréa Silvestre; SPERANDIO DA SILVA, Gilberto Marcelo; XAVIER, Sérgio Salles; MACHADO, Carolina Romero Cardoso; BRASIL, Patrícia; DE CASTRO, Liane; DA SILVA, Sidnei; GEORG, Ingebourg; SARAIVA, Roberto Magalhães; do BRASIL, Pedro Emmanuel Alvarenga Americano; HASSLOCHER-MORENO, Alejandro Marcel

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Chagas disease (CD) is an endemic anthropozoonosis from Latin America of which the main means of transmission is the contact of skin lesions or mucosa with the feces of triatomine bugs infected by Trypanosoma cruzi. In this article, we describe the first acute CD case acquired by vector transmission in the Rio de Janeiro State and confirmed by parasitological, serological and PCR tests. The patient presented acute cardiomyopathy and pericardial effusion without cardiac tamponade. Together with fever and malaise, a 3 cm wide erythematous, non-pruritic, papule compatible with a "chagoma" was found on his left wrist. This case report draws attention to the possible transmission of CD by non-domiciled native vectors in non-endemic areas. Therefore, acute CD should be included in the diagnostic workout of febrile diseases and acute myopericarditis in Rio de Janeiro. PMID:26422165

  12. Genetics of inherited cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Jacoby, Daniel; McKenna, William J

    2012-02-01

    During the past two decades, numerous disease-causing genes for different cardiomyopathies have been identified. These discoveries have led to better understanding of disease pathogenesis and initial steps in the application of mutation analysis in the evaluation of affected individuals and their family members. As knowledge of the genetic abnormalities, and insight into cellular and organ biology has grown, so has appreciation of the level of complexity of interaction between genotype and phenotype across disease states. What were initially thought to be one-to-one gene-disease correlates have turned out to display important relational plasticity dependent in large part on the genetic and environmental backgrounds into which the genes of interest express. The current state of knowledge with regard to genetics of cardiomyopathy represents a starting point to address the biology of disease, but is not yet developed sufficiently to supplant clinically based classification systems or, in most cases, to guide therapy to any significant extent. Future work will of necessity be directed towards elucidation of the biological mechanisms of both rare and common gene variants and environmental determinants of plasticity in the genotype-phenotype relationship with the ultimate goal of furthering our ability to identify, diagnose, risk stratify, and treat this group of disorders which cause heart failure and sudden death in the young.

  13. Genetics of inherited cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Jacoby, Daniel; McKenna, William J.

    2012-01-01

    During the past two decades, numerous disease-causing genes for different cardiomyopathies have been identified. These discoveries have led to better understanding of disease pathogenesis and initial steps in the application of mutation analysis in the evaluation of affected individuals and their family members. As knowledge of the genetic abnormalities, and insight into cellular and organ biology has grown, so has appreciation of the level of complexity of interaction between genotype and phenotype across disease states. What were initially thought to be one-to-one gene-disease correlates have turned out to display important relational plasticity dependent in large part on the genetic and environmental backgrounds into which the genes of interest express. The current state of knowledge with regard to genetics of cardiomyopathy represents a starting point to address the biology of disease, but is not yet developed sufficiently to supplant clinically based classification systems or, in most cases, to guide therapy to any significant extent. Future work will of necessity be directed towards elucidation of the biological mechanisms of both rare and common gene variants and environmental determinants of plasticity in the genotype–phenotype relationship with the ultimate goal of furthering our ability to identify, diagnose, risk stratify, and treat this group of disorders which cause heart failure and sudden death in the young. PMID:21810862

  14. [Etiopathogenesis of dilated cardiomyopathies].

    PubMed

    Petronio, A S; Manes, M T; Di Meco, F; Nardini, V; Pecori, F; Ceccherini-Nellis, L; Barsotti, A; Mariani, M

    1993-12-01

    This study was carried out on 43 patients affected by dilated cardiomyopathy to investigate some of the etiopathological hypotheses on this illness. The Authors investigated: the persistence of virus genoma (coxsackie, HBV) on endomyocardial biopsies; the pattern of the II class major histocompatibility complex (MHC) were in the blood lymphocytes; the microvascular aspect of coronary circulation in the endomyocardial biopsies. Finally, in a separated group of 19 patients, the microvascular circulation was studied on skin biopsies and correlated with diabetic, valvular and normal subject. The results showed a 14% positivity for the presence of the virus genoma and a significant predominate of DR5 in the II class MHC of patients with a worse ventricular function. Capillary vessels of the coronary microcirculation were dilated in the 48% of the patients, especially in more compromised subjects. Viral myocarditis seem to play a role in the etiopathogenesis of dilated cardiomyopathies (DCM) and the pattern of MHC could influence the progression of the illness. The microcirculation is probably a pathophysiological aspect. No etiological hypothesis seems to predominate.

  15. One Health Interactions of Chagas Disease Vectors, Canid Hosts, and Human Residents along the Texas-Mexico Border

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Melissa N.; O’Day, Sarah; Fisher-Hoch, Susan; Gorchakov, Rodion; Patino, Ramiro; Feria Arroyo, Teresa P.; Laing, Susan T.; Lopez, Job E.; Ingber, Alexandra; Jones, Kathryn M.; Murray, Kristy O.

    2016-01-01

    Background Chagas disease (Trypanosoma cruzi infection) is the leading cause of non-ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy in Latin America. Texas, particularly the southern region, has compounding factors that could contribute to T. cruzi transmission; however, epidemiologic studies are lacking. The aim of this study was to ascertain the prevalence of T. cruzi in three different mammalian species (coyotes, stray domestic dogs, and humans) and vectors (Triatoma species) to understand the burden of Chagas disease among sylvatic, peridomestic, and domestic cycles. Methodology/Principal Findings To determine prevalence of infection, we tested sera from coyotes, stray domestic dogs housed in public shelters, and residents participating in related research studies and found 8%, 3.8%, and 0.36% positive for T. cruzi, respectively. PCR was used to determine the prevalence of T. cruzi DNA in vectors collected in peridomestic locations in the region, with 56.5% testing positive for the parasite, further confirming risk of transmission in the region. Conclusions/Significance Our findings contribute to the growing body of evidence for autochthonous Chagas disease transmission in south Texas. Considering this region has a population of 1.3 million, and up to 30% of T. cruzi infected individuals developing severe cardiac disease, it is imperative that we identify high risk groups for surveillance and treatment purposes. PMID:27832063

  16. One Health Interactions of Chagas Disease Vectors, Canid Hosts, and Human Residents along the Texas-Mexico Border.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Melissa N; O'Day, Sarah; Fisher-Hoch, Susan; Gorchakov, Rodion; Patino, Ramiro; Feria Arroyo, Teresa P; Laing, Susan T; Lopez, Job E; Ingber, Alexandra; Jones, Kathryn M; Murray, Kristy O

    2016-11-01

    Chagas disease (Trypanosoma cruzi infection) is the leading cause of non-ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy in Latin America. Texas, particularly the southern region, has compounding factors that could contribute to T. cruzi transmission; however, epidemiologic studies are lacking. The aim of this study was to ascertain the prevalence of T. cruzi in three different mammalian species (coyotes, stray domestic dogs, and humans) and vectors (Triatoma species) to understand the burden of Chagas disease among sylvatic, peridomestic, and domestic cycles. To determine prevalence of infection, we tested sera from coyotes, stray domestic dogs housed in public shelters, and residents participating in related research studies and found 8%, 3.8%, and 0.36% positive for T. cruzi, respectively. PCR was used to determine the prevalence of T. cruzi DNA in vectors collected in peridomestic locations in the region, with 56.5% testing positive for the parasite, further confirming risk of transmission in the region. Our findings contribute to the growing body of evidence for autochthonous Chagas disease transmission in south Texas. Considering this region has a population of 1.3 million, and up to 30% of T. cruzi infected individuals developing severe cardiac disease, it is imperative that we identify high risk groups for surveillance and treatment purposes.

  17. Tumor Necrosis Factor Is a Therapeutic Target for Immunological Unbalance and Cardiac Abnormalities in Chronic Experimental Chagas' Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Isabela Resende; Vilar-Pereira, Glaucia; Silva, Andrea Alice; Moreira, Otacilio Cruz; Britto, Constança; Sarmento, Ellen Diana Marinho

    2014-01-01

    Background. Chagas disease (CD) is characterized by parasite persistence and immunological unbalance favoring systemic inflammatory profile. Chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy, the main manifestation of CD, occurs in a TNF-enriched milieu and frequently progresses to heart failure. Aim of the Study. To challenge the hypothesis that TNF plays a key role in Trypanosoma cruzi-induced immune deregulation and cardiac abnormalities, we tested the effect of the anti-TNF antibody Infliximab in chronically T. cruzi-infected C57BL/6 mice, a model with immunological, electrical, and histopathological abnormalities resembling Chagas' heart disease. Results. Infliximab therapy did not reactivate parasite but reshaped the immune response as reduced TNF mRNA expression in the cardiac tissue and plasma TNF and IFNγ levels; diminished the frequency of IL-17A+ but increased IL-10+ CD4+ T-cells; reduced TNF+ but augmented IL-10+ Ly6C+ and F4/80+ cells. Further, anti-TNF therapy decreased cytotoxic activity but preserved IFNγ-producing VNHRFTLV-specific CD8+ T-cells in spleen and reduced the number of perforin+ cells infiltrating the myocardium. Importantly, Infliximab reduced the frequency of mice afflicted by arrhythmias and second degree atrioventricular blocks and decreased fibronectin deposition in the cardiac tissue. Conclusions. Our data support that TNF is a crucial player in the pathogenesis of Chagas' heart disease fueling immunological unbalance which contributes to cardiac abnormalities. PMID:25140115

  18. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (Broken heart syndrome).

    PubMed

    Javed, Aqib; Chitkara, Kamal; Mahmood, Arslan; Kainat, Aleesha

    2015-11-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy is an acute reversible cardiomyopathy characterised by transient regional left ventricular (LV) motion abnormalities. It is diagnosed on a coronary angiography and left ventriculography. We report the case of a 50-year-old lady who presented with sudden onset of chest pain, with no history of cardiac disease and no risk factors. Remarkably though, she had lost her husband the previous night. Coronary and LV angiography was done which revealed findings typical of takotsubo cardiomyopathy. We report this case for its rarity. Informed consent was taken from the patient before undertaking and reporting this study.

  19. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked dilated cardiomyopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions X-linked dilated cardiomyopathy X-linked dilated cardiomyopathy Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... the expand/collapse boxes. Description X-linked dilated cardiomyopathy is a form of heart disease. Dilated cardiomyopathy ...

  20. Chagas Disease and Breast-feeding

    PubMed Central

    López-Vélez, Rogelio

    2013-01-01

    Chagas disease (infection by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi) is a major parasitic disease of the Americas and one of the main neglected tropical diseases. Although various routes of transmission sre recognized, the risk for transmission of the infection through breast-feeding has not clearly been established. We reviewed the literature on transmission of T. cruzi through breast-feeding to provide breast-feeding mothers with Chagas disease with medical guidance. Although data from animal studies and human studies are scarce, we do not recommend that mothers with Chagas disease discontinue breast-feeding, unless they are experiencing the acute phase of the disease, reactivated disease resulting from immunosuppression, or bleeding nipples. In these cases, thermal treatment of milk before feeding the infant may be considered. PMID:24050257

  1. [Part VI. Antiparasitic treatment for Chagas disease].

    PubMed

    B, Werner Apt; G, Ingrid Heitmann; L, M Isabel Jercic; M, Leonor Jofré; V, Patricia Muñoz C Del; H, Isabel Noemí; V, Ana M San Martín; P, Jorge Sapunar; H, Marisa Torres; A, Inés Zulantay

    2008-10-01

    As expert consensus has been arisen about universal antiparasitic treatment for all patients infected with Trypanosoma cruzi, most important drugs licensed for Chagas disease treatment are reviewed: nifurtimox and benznidazol, their mechanisms of action, doses, treatment schedules, adverse effects and contraindications. Two other drugs used for Chagas disease treatment, for which a Chilean experience may be exhibited, are allopurinol and itraconazole. Indications for treatment of Chagas disease in immunocompetent patients and immunocompromised hosts are detailed. This chapter refers besides to the evaluation and monitoring of antiparasitic therapy in immunocompromised patients, the availability of drugs and includes various forms facsimiles suggested to perform clinical and laboratory follow up of patients that undergo treatment, indicating the prescribed drug, adverse effects and time of follow up.

  2. Chagas disease and breast-feeding.

    PubMed

    Norman, Francesca F; López-Vélez, Rogelio

    2013-10-01

    Chagas disease (infection by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi) is a major parasitic disease of the Americas and one of the main neglected tropical diseases. Although various routes of transmission sre recognized, the risk for transmission of the infection through breast-feeding has not clearly been established. We reviewed the literature on transmission of T. cruzi through breast-feeding to provide breast-feeding mothers with Chagas disease with medical guidance. Although data from animal studies and human studies are scarce, we do not recommend that mothers with Chagas disease discontinue breast-feeding, unless they are experiencing the acute phase of the disease, reactivated disease resulting from immunosuppression, or bleeding nipples. In these cases, thermal treatment of milk before feeding the infant may be considered.

  3. Mannose-Binding Lectin and Toll-Like Receptor Polymorphisms and Chagas Disease in Chile

    PubMed Central

    Zulantay, Inés; Danquah, Ina; Hamann, Lutz; Schumann, Ralf R.; Apt, Werner; Mockenhaupt, Frank P.

    2012-01-01

    Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) and Toll-like receptor (TLR) polymorphisms may influence susceptibility and manifestation of Trypanosoma cruzi infection. In northern Chile, we examined 61 asymptomatic patients with chronic Chagas disease (CD), 64 patients with chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy (CCC), and 45 healthy individuals. Low-producer MBL2*B genotypes were more common in CD patients (48%) than healthy individuals (31%; adjusted odds ratio = 2.3, 95% confidence interval = 1.01–5.4, P = 0.047) but did not differ with manifestation. In contrast, the heterozygous Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)-deficiency genotype D299G/T399I occurred more frequently in asymptomatic (14.8%) than CCC patients (3.1%; P = 0.02). TLR1-I602S, TLR2-R753Q, TLR6-S249P, and MAL/TIRAP-S180L did not associate with CD or CCC. These findings support the complement system to be involved in defense against Trypanosoma cruzi infection and indicate that curbed TLR4 activation might be beneficial in preventing CCC. PMID:22302853

  4. Mannose-binding lectin and Toll-like receptor polymorphisms and Chagas disease in Chile.

    PubMed

    Weitzel, Thomas; Zulantay, Inés; Danquah, Ina; Hamann, Lutz; Schumann, Ralf R; Apt, Werner; Mockenhaupt, Frank P

    2012-02-01

    Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) and Toll-like receptor (TLR) polymorphisms may influence susceptibility and manifestation of Trypanosoma cruzi infection. In northern Chile, we examined 61 asymptomatic patients with chronic Chagas disease (CD), 64 patients with chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy (CCC), and 45 healthy individuals. Low-producer MBL2*B genotypes were more common in CD patients (48%) than healthy individuals (31%; adjusted odds ratio = 2.3, 95% confidence interval = 1.01-5.4, P = 0.047) but did not differ with manifestation. In contrast, the heterozygous Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)-deficiency genotype D299G/T399I occurred more frequently in asymptomatic (14.8%) than CCC patients (3.1%; P = 0.02). TLR1-I602S, TLR2-R753Q, TLR6-S249P, and MAL/TIRAP-S180L did not associate with CD or CCC. These findings support the complement system to be involved in defense against Trypanosoma cruzi infection and indicate that curbed TLR4 activation might be beneficial in preventing CCC.

  5. Genetics of hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Felix W; Carrier, Lucie

    2012-10-01

    Cardiomyopathies are categorized as extrinsic, being caused by external factors, such as hypertension, ischemia, inflammation, valvular dysfunction, or as intrinsic, which correspond to myocardial diseases without identifiable external causes. These so called primary cardiomyopathies can be categorized in four main forms: hypertrophic, dilated, restrictive, and arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy. Cardiomyopathies are diagnosed by clinical expression, echocardiography, electrocardiography, non-invasive imaging, and sometimes by cardiac catheterization to rule out external causes as ischemia. The two main forms of primary cardiomyopathies are the hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathies. Most of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and 20-50% of dilated cardiomyopathy are familial showing a wide genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity. This review presents the current knowledge on the causative genes, molecular mechanisms and the genotype � phenotype relations of hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathies.

  6. Cytokine profiling in Chagas disease: towards understanding the association with infecting Trypanosoma cruzi discrete typing units (a BENEFIT TRIAL sub-study).

    PubMed

    Poveda, Cristina; Fresno, Manuel; Gironès, Núria; Martins-Filho, Olindo A; Ramírez, Juan David; Santi-Rocca, Julien; Marin-Neto, José A; Morillo, Carlos A; Rosas, Fernando; Guhl, Felipe

    2014-01-01

    Chagas disease caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi is an important public health problem in Latin America. The immunological mechanisms involved in Chagas disease pathogenesis remain incompletely elucidated. The aim of this study was to explore cytokine profiles and their possible association to the infecting DTU and the pathogenesis of Chagas disease. 109 sero-positive T. cruzi patients and 21 negative controls from Bolivia and Colombia, were included. Flow cytometry assays for 13 cytokines were conducted on human sera. Patients were divided into two groups: in one we compared the quantification of cytokines between patients with and without chronic cardiomyopathy; in second group we compared the levels of cytokines and the genetic variability of T. cruzi. Significant difference in anti-inflammatory and pro-inflammatory cytokines profiles was observed between the two groups cardiac and non-cardiac. Moreover, serum levels of IFN-γ, IL-12, IL-22 and IL-10 presented an association with the genetic variability of T.cruzi, with significant differences in TcI and mixed infections TcI/TcII. Expression of anti-inflammatory and pro-inflammatory cytokines may play a relevant role in determining the clinical presentation of chronic patients with Chagas disease and suggests the occurrence of specific immune responses, probably associated to different T. cruzi DTUs.

  7. Cytokine Profiling in Chagas Disease: Towards Understanding the Association with Infecting Trypanosoma cruzi Discrete Typing Units (A BENEFIT TRIAL Sub-Study)

    PubMed Central

    Poveda, Cristina; Fresno, Manuel; Gironès, Núria; Martins-Filho, Olindo A.; Ramírez, Juan David; Santi-Rocca, Julien; Marin-Neto, José A.; Morillo, Carlos A.; Rosas, Fernando; Guhl, Felipe

    2014-01-01

    Background Chagas disease caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi is an important public health problem in Latin America. The immunological mechanisms involved in Chagas disease pathogenesis remain incompletely elucidated. The aim of this study was to explore cytokine profiles and their possible association to the infecting DTU and the pathogenesis of Chagas disease. Methods 109 sero-positive T. cruzi patients and 21 negative controls from Bolivia and Colombia, were included. Flow cytometry assays for 13 cytokines were conducted on human sera. Patients were divided into two groups: in one we compared the quantification of cytokines between patients with and without chronic cardiomyopathy; in second group we compared the levels of cytokines and the genetic variability of T. cruzi. Results Significant difference in anti-inflammatory and pro-inflammatory cytokines profiles was observed between the two groups cardiac and non-cardiac. Moreover, serum levels of IFN-γ, IL-12, IL-22 and IL-10 presented an association with the genetic variability of T.cruzi, with significant differences in TcI and mixed infections TcI/TcII. Conclusion Expression of anti-inflammatory and pro-inflammatory cytokines may play a relevant role in determining the clinical presentation of chronic patients with Chagas disease and suggests the occurrence of specific immune responses, probably associated to different T. cruzi DTUs. PMID:24608170

  8. Cardiomyopathy associated with celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Goel, Nisheeth K; McBane, Robert D; Kamath, Patrick S

    2005-05-01

    Celiac disease or celiac sprue is predominantly a disease of the small intestine characterized by chronic malabsorption in genetically susceptible individuals who ingest grains containing gluten, such as wheat, barley, and rye. Although previously believed to be uncommon, celiac disease may be present in up to 1% of the general population. Celiac disease is associated frequently with iron deficiency anemia, dermatitis herpetiformis, selective IgA deficiency, thyroid disorders, diabetes mellitus, and various connective tissue disorders but is rarely associated with cardiomyopathy. We describe a patient with celiac disease associated with cardiomyopathy whose cardiac function improved substantially after treatment with a gluten-free diet. Cardiomyopathy associated with celiac disease is a serious and potentially lethal condition. However, with early diagnosis and treatment with a gluten-free diet, cardiomyopathy in patients with celiac disease may be completely reversible.

  9. Cytokines in myocarditis and cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Matsumori, A

    1996-05-01

    Myocarditis is thought to be caused by various viruses, and accumulating evidence links viral myocarditis with the eventual development of dilated cardiomyopathy. Recently the importance of hepatitis C virus infection was noted in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy. Cytokines are increasingly recognized as an important factor in the pathogenesis and pathophysiology of myocarditis and cardiomyopathy. Elevated circulating cytokines have been reported in patients with heart failure, and various cytokines have been shown to depress myocardial contractility in vitro and in vivo. A number of recent studies showed that cytokines generated by activated immune cells cause an increase in NO (nitric oxide) via induction of NO synthase. Increased generation of NO may induce negative inotropism and myocardial damage. This review discusses the etiology and pathogenesis of myocarditis and cardiomyopathy from this point of view.

  10. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy following subarachnoid haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Maekawa, Hidetsugu; Hadeishi, Hiromu

    2014-08-01

    A 67-year-old woman was admitted with aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage and a 12-lead ECG showed ST segment elevation. Transthoracic echocardiography confirmed akinesis of the left ventricular mid-apical segment, with an ejection fraction of 26%, features characteristic of takotsubo cardiomyopathy. Five days later, we identified thrombus in the apex of the left ventricle. Sixteen days after onset, the thrombus had disappeared and wall motion improved (ejection fraction 58%) without evidence of cardioembolism. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy is a cause of cardiac dysfunction after stroke, including SAH. It is characterised by transiently depressed contractile function of the left mid and apical ventricle, without obstructive coronary artery disease. Clinicians should suspect takotsubo cardiomyopathy in patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage who have an ECG abnormality. Echocardiography is needed to detect the distinctive regional wall motion abnormality. Despite its severity in the acute phase, takotsubo cardiomyopathy is self-limiting and its management is conservative.

  11. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy post liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Vachiat, Ahmed; McCutcheon, Keir; Mahomed, Adam; Schleicher, Gunter; Brand, Liezl; Botha, Jean; Sussman, Martin; Manga, Pravin

    2016-10-23

    A patient with end-stage liver disease developed stress-induced Takotsubo cardiomyopathy post liver transplantation, with haemodynamic instability requiring a left ventricular assist device. We discuss the diagnosis and management of this condition.

  12. Molecular etiology of idiopathic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Arimura, T; Hayashi, T; Kimura, A

    2007-01-01

    Summary Idiopathic cardiomyopathy (ICM) is a primary cardiac disorder associated with abnormalities of ventricular wall thickness, size of ventricular cavity, contraction, relaxation, conduction and rhythm. Over the past two decades, molecular genetic analyses have revealed that mutations in the various genes cause ICM and such information concerning the genetic basis of ICM enables us to speculate the pathogenesis of this heterogeous cardiac disease. This review focuses on the molecular pathogenesis, i.e., genetic abnormalities and functional alterations due to the mutations especially in sarcomere/cytoskeletal components, in three characteristic features of ICM, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM). Understanding the functional abnormalities of the sarcomere/cytoskeletal components, in ICM, has unraveled the function of these components not only as a contractile unit but also as a pivot for transduction of biochemical signals. PMID:18646564

  13. Calcium Ions in Inherited Cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Deftereos, Spyridon; Papoutsidakis, Nikolaos; Giannopoulos, Georgios; Angelidis, Christos; Raisakis, Konstantinos; Bouras, Georgios; Davlouros, Periklis; Panagopoulou, Vasiliki; Goudevenos, John; Cleman, Michael W; Lekakis, John

    2016-01-01

    Inherited cardiomyopathies are a known cause of heart failure, although the pathways and mechanisms leading from mutation to the heart failure phenotype have not been elucidated. There is strong evidence that this transition is mediated, at least in part, by abnormal intracellular Ca(2+) handling, a key ion in ventricular excitation, contraction and relaxation. Studies in human myocytes, animal models and in vitro reconstituted contractile protein complexes have shown consistent correlations between Ca(2+) sensitivity and cardiomyopathy phenotype, irrespective of the causal mutation. In this review we present the available data about the connection between mutations linked to familial hypertrophic (HCM), dilated (DCM) and restrictive (RCM) cardiomyopathy, right ventricular arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy/dysplasia (ARVC/D) as well as left ventricular non-compaction and the increase or decrease in Ca(2+) sensitivity, together with the results of attempts to reverse the manifestation of heart failure by manipulating Ca(2+) homeostasis.

  14. [Antibodies against T. cruzi in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy in Tuxtla Gutierrez, Chiapas].

    PubMed

    Guillén-Ortega, Fernando; Pérez-Vargas, Adrián; Estrada-Suárez, Alfredo; Moleres-Villegas, Juan; Ricárdez-Esquinca, Jorge; Monteón Padilla, Víctor; Reyes, Pedro A

    2005-01-01

    Chagas disease is caused by the flagellate protozoan T: cruzi. Seroepidemiological surveys in Chiapas, Mexico have shown seropositive individuals, therefore, we searched for people affected by the chronic form of Chagas disease which involves the heart, causing a chronic, progressive and fatal disease called Chronic Chagasic Cardiopathy (CCC). To establish the frequency of CCC we studied 28 patients seen at the Hospital General Regional "Dr. Rafael Pascacio Gamboa" during October 2002 through October 2003 in Tuxtla Gutierrez, Chiapas, the State capital city, with diagnosis of dilated cardiomyopathy (DC), a serological survey for antibodies against T. cruzi was done. This hospital cares for people from all parts of Chiapas, Mexico. Clinical diagnosis of DC was established there and blind serological studies were performed in Mexico City. Fifteen out of 28 DC patients (54%) had anti T. cruzi antibodies. All of them came from poor rural villages and they had heart failure and/or arrhythmia or heart blockade on EKG. This observation suggest that in Chiapas were Chagas disease is endemic, there are CCC patients. Any case with a clinical diagnosis of DC should be tested for antibodies against T. cruzi. The low socioeconomic status, culture and environment in this Mexican State favour the presence and transmission of this parasitic disease.

  15. Evaluation of In-House ELISA Using Trypanosoma cruzi Lysate and Recombinant Antigens for Diagnosis of Chagas Disease and Discrimination of Its Clinical Forms

    PubMed Central

    Longhi, Silvia A.; Brandariz, Silvia B.; Lafon, Sonia O.; Niborski, Leticia L.; Luquetti, Alejandro O.; Schijman, Alejandro G.; Levin, Mariano J.; Gómez, Karina A.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the potential usefulness of Trypanosoma cruzi lysate, recombinant protein JL7, and peptides P013, R13, JL18, JL19, and P0β as serological markers for human Chagas disease. We analyzed 228 sera from Brazilian Chagas disease patients classified into four clinical groups and 108 from non-chagasic patients. We defined the diagnostic sensitivity, specificity, and Kappa index measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). As previously described, the highest values of diagnostic parameters were achieved for T. cruzi lysate and JL7; peptide P013 showed high specificity but low sensitivity. The other peptides resulted in lower sensitivity and specificity in our ELISA than T. cruzi lysate and JL7 protein. Antibodies against JL7 protein were mainly detected in sera from patients with severe chagasic cardiomyopathy, compared with those from the indeterminate form, whereas peptides failed to discriminate between the clinical forms of the disease. PMID:22855757

  16. Hypocalcemic rachitic cardiomyopathy in infants

    PubMed Central

    Elidrissy, Abdelwahab T.H.; Munawarah, Medinah; Alharbi, Khalid M.

    2012-01-01

    Hypocalcemic cardiomyopathy in infants is characterized by heart failure in a previously normal infant with hypocalcemia without organic cardiac lesion. Vitamin D deficiency rickets is increasing in Middle East. In a six month study 136 cases of rickets were diagnosed in the main Children’s Hospital in Almadinah but none of them showed evidence of cardiomyopathy. Concerned of missing this serious complication of rickets we searched pub med and present this review article. Results 61 cases of hypocalcemic cardiomyopathy were reported as case reports with two series of 16 and 15 cases from London and Delhi, respectively. The major features of these cases: the age ranged from one month to 15 months with a mean age of 5 months. All presented with heart failure and hypocalcemia. There was a minor feature of rickets in a few of the cases. All had high alkaline phosphatase. Echocardiology evidence of cardiomyopathy was found in all. Most of them responded to calcium, vitamin D and cardiotonic and diuretics. Discussion We concentrated on pathogenesis of this hypocalcemic cardiomyopathy and reviewed the literature. The evidence available supports that the most likely cause of cardiomyopathy is hypocalcemia. Hypovitamin D also contributes but hyperparathyroidism might have a protective role as we did not detect any evidence of cardiomyopathy with hyperparathyroidism and florid features of rickets. Conclusion We need to look out for cardiomyopathy among infants with hypocalcemia. For prevention maternal supplementation during pregnancy and lactation with up to 2000 units of vitamin D and 400 units for their infants. PMID:24174842

  17. Misconceptions and Facts About Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Argulian, Edgar; Sherrid, Mark V; Messerli, Franz H

    2016-02-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is the most common genetic heart disease. Once considered relentless, untreatable, and deadly, it has become a highly treatable disease with contemporary management. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is one of cardiology's "great masqueraders." Mistakes and delays in diagnosis abound. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy commonly "masquerades" as asthma, anxiety, mitral prolapse, and coronary artery disease. However, once properly diagnosed, patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy can be effectively managed to improve both symptoms and survival. This review highlights some of the misconceptions about hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Providers at all levels should have awareness of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy to promptly diagnose and properly manage these individuals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Methamphetamine-Associated Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Won, Sekon; Hong, Robert A.; Shohet, Ralph V.; Seto, Todd B.; Parikh, Nisha I.

    2015-01-01

    Methamphetamine and related compounds are now the second most commonly used illicit substance worldwide, after cannabis. Reports of methamphetamine-associated cardiomyopathy (MAC) are increasing, but MAC has not been well reviewed. This analysis of MAC will provide an overview of the pharmacology of methamphetamine, historical perspective and epidemiology, a review of case and clinical studies, and a summary of the proposed mechanisms for MAC. Clinically, many questions remain, including the appropriate therapeutic interventions for MAC, the incidence and prevalence of cardiac pathology in methamphetamine users, risk factors for developing MAC, and prognosis of these patients. In conclusion, recognition of the significance of MAC among physicians and other medical caregivers is important given the growing use of methamphetamine and related stimulants worldwide. PMID:24037954

  19. Hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Veselka, Josef; Anavekar, Nandan S; Charron, Philippe

    2017-03-25

    Hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy is an inherited myocardial disease defined by cardiac hypertrophy (wall thickness ≥15 mm) that is not explained by abnormal loading conditions, and left ventricular obstruction greater than or equal to 30 mm Hg. Typical symptoms include dyspnoea, chest pain, palpitations, and syncope. The diagnosis is usually suspected on clinical examination and confirmed by imaging. Some patients are at increased risk of sudden cardiac death, heart failure, and atrial fibrillation. Patients with an increased risk of sudden cardiac death undergo cardioverter-defibrillator implantation; in patients with severe symptoms related to ventricular obstruction, septal reduction therapy (myectomy or alcohol septal ablation) is recommended. Life-long anticoagulation is indicated after the first episode of atrial fibrillation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy Following Cardiac Surgery.

    PubMed

    Chiariello, Giovanni Alfonso; Bruno, Piergiorgio; Colizzi, Christian; Crea, Filippo; Massetti, Massimo

    2016-02-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy syndrome, commonly occurring in postmenopausal women, is characterized by transient apical systolic dysfunction in absence of coronary lesions. The cardiomyopathy is often observed after intense stressful events such as a major surgical procedure. A 72-year-old woman symptomatic for dyspnea at rest, chest pain, and peripheral edema successfully underwent surgery for noncoronary sinus aneurysm-right atrium fistula repair. Two days after surgery the patient developed takotsubo syndrome, diagnosed according to the Mayo Clinic criteria. We reviewed the literature on takotsubo cardiomyopathy as a complication of major cardiac surgery procedures. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy is confirmed as a possible early complication of cardiac surgery. Exaggerated sympathetic stimulation may cause massive endogenous catecholamine release. Hypoperfusion during cardiopulmonary bypass, inotropic drugs administration, and postoperative anxiety and pain are all factors generating stress, possible coronary artery spasm and transient cardiomyopathy, clinically simulating acute myocardial infarction. Several clinical features have been described such as acute mitral insufficiency, systolic anterior motion of the anterior mitral valve leaflet, left ventricular outflow tract obstruction, acute cardiac failure, and cardiogenic shock. Intraventricular thrombi and adverse cerebrovascular events may also be possible complications. Rare catastrophic events such as left ventricular free wall rupture and ventricular septal perforation have been also encountered. After cardiac surgery takotsubo cardiomyopathy should be suspected if clinical and instrumental criteria are met, and promptly differentiated from the more frequent acute myocardial infarction. Prognosis may be favorable if appropriate conservative medical treatment is promptly started. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Evolution of anti-Trypanosoma cruzi antibody production in patients with chronic Chagas disease: Correlation between antibody titers and development of cardiac disease severity

    PubMed Central

    Georg, Ingebourg; Hasslocher-Moreno, Alejandro Marcel; Xavier, Sergio Salles; de Holanda, Marcelo Teixeira; Bonecini-Almeida, Maria da Gloria

    2017-01-01

    Chagas disease is one of the most important endemic infections in Latin America affecting around 6–7 million people. About 30–50% of patients develop the cardiac form of the disease, which can lead to severe cardiac dysfunction and death. In this scenario, the identification of immunological markers of disease progression would be a valuable tool for early treatment and reduction of death rates. In this observational study, the production of anti-Trypanosoma cruzi antibodies through a retrospective longitudinal follow-up in chronic Chagas disease patients´ cohort and its correlation with disease progression and heart commitment was evaluated. Strong inverse correlation (ρ = -0.6375, p = 0.0005) between anti-T. cruzi IgG1 titers and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) in chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy (CCC) patients were observed after disease progression. Elevated levels of anti-T. cruzi IgG3 titers were detected in all T. cruzi-infected patients, indicating a lack of correlation of this IgG isotype with disease progression. Furthermore, low levels of anti-T. cruzi IgG2, IgG4, and IgA were detected in all patients through the follow-up. Although without statistical significance anti-T. cruzi IgE tends to be more reactive in patients with the indeterminate form (IND) of the disease (p = 0.0637). As this study was conducted in patients with many years of chronic disease no anti-T. cruzi IgM was detected. Taken together, these results indicate that the levels of anti-T. cruzi IgG1 could be considered to seek for promising biomarkers to predict the severity of chronic Chagas disease cardiomyopathy. PMID:28723905

  2. Evolution of anti-Trypanosoma cruzi antibody production in patients with chronic Chagas disease: Correlation between antibody titers and development of cardiac disease severity.

    PubMed

    Georg, Ingebourg; Hasslocher-Moreno, Alejandro Marcel; Xavier, Sergio Salles; Holanda, Marcelo Teixeira de; Roma, Eric Henrique; Bonecini-Almeida, Maria da Gloria

    2017-07-01

    Chagas disease is one of the most important endemic infections in Latin America affecting around 6-7 million people. About 30-50% of patients develop the cardiac form of the disease, which can lead to severe cardiac dysfunction and death. In this scenario, the identification of immunological markers of disease progression would be a valuable tool for early treatment and reduction of death rates. In this observational study, the production of anti-Trypanosoma cruzi antibodies through a retrospective longitudinal follow-up in chronic Chagas disease patients´ cohort and its correlation with disease progression and heart commitment was evaluated. Strong inverse correlation (ρ = -0.6375, p = 0.0005) between anti-T. cruzi IgG1 titers and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) in chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy (CCC) patients were observed after disease progression. Elevated levels of anti-T. cruzi IgG3 titers were detected in all T. cruzi-infected patients, indicating a lack of correlation of this IgG isotype with disease progression. Furthermore, low levels of anti-T. cruzi IgG2, IgG4, and IgA were detected in all patients through the follow-up. Although without statistical significance anti-T. cruzi IgE tends to be more reactive in patients with the indeterminate form (IND) of the disease (p = 0.0637). As this study was conducted in patients with many years of chronic disease no anti-T. cruzi IgM was detected. Taken together, these results indicate that the levels of anti-T. cruzi IgG1 could be considered to seek for promising biomarkers to predict the severity of chronic Chagas disease cardiomyopathy.

  3. Polymorphism in the Alpha Cardiac Muscle Actin 1 Gene Is Associated to Susceptibility to Chronic Inflammatory Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Frade, Amanda Farage; Teixeira, Priscila Camilo; Ianni, Barbara Maria; Pissetti, Cristina Wide; Saba, Bruno; Wang, Lin Hui Tzu; Kuramoto, Andréia; Nogueira, Luciana Gabriel; Buck, Paula; Dias, Fabrício; Giniaux, Helene; Llored, Agnes; Alves, Sthefanny; Schmidt, Andre; Donadi, Eduardo; Marin-Neto, José Antonio; Hirata, Mario; Sampaio, Marcelo; Fragata, Abílio; Bocchi, Edimar Alcides; Stolf, Antonio Noedir; Fiorelli, Alfredo Inacio; Santos, Ronaldo Honorato Barros; Rodrigues, Virmondes; Pereira, Alexandre Costa; Kalil, Jorge; Cunha-Neto, Edecio; Chevillard, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    Aims Chagas disease, caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi is endemic in Latin America, and may lead to a life-threatening inflammatory dilated, chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy (CCC). One third of T. cruzi-infected individuals progress to CCC while the others remain asymptomatic (ASY). A possible genetic component to disease progression was suggested by familial aggregation of cases and the association of markers of innate and adaptive immunity genes with CCC development. Since mutations in multiple sarcomeric genes, including alpha-cardiac actin (ACTC1) have been involved in hereditary dilated cardiomyopathy, we investigated the involvement of the ACTC1 gene in CCC pathogenesis. Methods and Results We conducted a proteomic and genetic study on a Brazilian study population. The genetic study was done on a main cohort including 118 seropositive asymptomatic subjects and 315 cases and the replication was done on 36 asymptomatic and 102 CCC cases. ACTC1 protein and mRNA levels were lower in myocardial tissue from patients with end-stage CCC than those found in hearts from organ donors. Genotyping a case-control cohort of CCC and ASY subjects for all informative single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the ACTC1 gene identified rs640249 SNP, located at the 5’ region, as associated to CCC. Associations are borderline after correction for multiple testing. Correlation and haplotype analysis led to the identification of a susceptibility haplotype. Functional assays have shown that the rs640249A/C polymorphism affects the binding of transcriptional factors in the promoter regions of the ACTC1 gene. Confirmation of the detected association on a larger independent replication cohort will be useful. Conclusions Genetic variations at the ACTC1 gene may contribute to progression to chronic Chagas Cardiomyopathy among T. cruzi-infected patients, possibly by modulating transcription factor binding to ACTC1 promoter regions. PMID:24367596

  4. Blocking of CD1d Decreases Trypanosoma cruzi-Induced Activation of CD4-CD8- T Cells and Modulates the Inflammatory Response in Patients With Chagas Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Passos, Lívia Silva Araújo; Villani, Fernanda Nobre Amaral; Magalhães, Luísa Mourão Dias; Gollob, Kenneth J; Antonelli, Lis Ribeiro do Vale; Nunes, Maria Carmo Pereira; Dutra, Walderez Ornelas

    2016-09-15

    The control of inflammatory responses to prevent the deadly cardiac pathology in human Chagas disease is a desirable and currently unattained goal. Double-negative (DN) T cells are important sources of inflammatory and antiinflammatory cytokines in patients with Chagas heart disease and those with the indeterminate clinical form of Chagas disease, respectively. Given the importance of DN T cells in immunoregulatory processes and their potential as targets for controlling inflammation-induced pathology, we studied the involvement of CD1 molecules in the activation and functional profile of Trypanosoma cruzi-specific DN T cells. We observed that parasite stimulation significantly increased the expression of CD1a, CD1b, CD1c, and CD1d by CD14(+) cells from patients with Chagas disease. Importantly, among the analyzed molecules, only CD1d expression showed an association with the activation of DN T cells, as well as with worse ventricular function in patients with Chagas disease. Blocking of CD1d-mediated antigen presentation led to a clear reduction of DN T-cell activation and a decrease in the expression of interferon γ (IFN-γ) by DN T cells. Thus, our results showed that antigen presentation via CD1d is associated with activation of DN T cells in Chagas disease and that CD1d blocking leads to downregulation of IFN-γ by DN T cells from patients with Chagas heart disease, which may be a potential target for preventing progression of inflammation-mediated dilated cardiomyopathy. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Cerebral embolic stroke after disappearing takotsubo cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Matsuzono, Kosuke; Ikeda, Yoshio; Deguchi, Shoko; Yamashita, Toru; Kurata, Tomoko; Deguchi, Kentaro; Abe, Koji

    2013-11-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy can induce cerebral embolic stroke because of intracardiac thrombosis, but the timing of cardiogenic embolism relating to takotsubo cardiomyopathy has not been well described. We evaluated a 71-year-old woman with takotsubo cardiomyopathy, who developed cardiogenic cerebral embolism after recovery of cardiac wall motion. Nevertheless, we treated her with anticoagulation therapy. The present clinical observation suggests that attention should be paid to the timing when takotsubo cardiomyopathy resolves against risk of cardiogenic cerebral embolism.

  6. Could Carlos Chagas' assumption on the relationship between goiter and chronic Chagas heart disease be correct? A historical reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Bestetti, Reinaldo B; Cardinalli-Neto, Augusto; Restini, Carolina B A; Couto, Lucelio B

    2016-01-01

    In 1910, Chagas divided the clinical manifestations of the chronic form of Chagas disease according to heart, Central Nervous System, and thyroid involvement, particularly the presence of goiter. Chagas emphasized the association of goiter with poor houses infested with kissing bugs, the similarity of the clinical picture with that of patients underwent partial thyroidectomy, and with the presence of thyroid sclerosis (inflammation) on histological examination. In addition, Chagas observed that all people living in poor houses infested by sucking bugs had goiter, contrasting with persons who lived in the same region, drinking the same water, but living in good houses, which did not have goiter. Furthermore, Chagas stressed the fact that people without any evidence of thyroid disease that migrated to live in poor houses in areas infested by sucking bugs developed thyroid disease some time later. Finally, and more importantly, Chagas emphasized the association of goiter with cardiac abnormalities in 80% of patients with chronic Chagas heart disease. Despite this, other authors working in different regions did not confirm such an association. A reappraisal of data from a work published in 1949 clearly shows that the presence of goiter was statistically associated with chronic Chagas heart disease and with chronic Chagas disease. Our paper highlights once more the grandiosity of Chagas' work, which has been proved to be correct even in the history of goiter, and justifies our claim for a posthumous Nobel Prize inasmuch as his work was not perceived by the Karolinska Institute.

  7. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy triggered by alcohol withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Alexandre, Joakim; Benouda, Leila; Champ-Rigot, Laure; Labombarda, Fabien

    2011-07-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy is a reversible cardiomyopathy frequently precipitated by a sudden emotional or physical stress. The exact physiopathology is still debated and may involve catecholamine-induced myocardial stunning. Alcohol withdrawal is associated with an hyperadrenergic state and may be a period at risk of cardiac events. We report a 56-year-old man with Takotsubo cardiomyopathy triggered by alcohol withdrawal.

  8. Biventricular Takotsubo cardiomyopathy in Graves hyperthyroidism.

    PubMed

    Perkins, Matthew J; Schachter, David T

    2014-03-01

    Graves hyperthyroidism is commonly seen in clinical practice and Takotsubo stress cardiomyopathy is an increasingly recognized cardiac complication of physical or emotional stress. We report the rare case of a patient with Graves hyperthyroidism that was complicated by severe biventricular takotsubo cardiomyopathy, which was demonstrated on heart catheterization. After appropriate pharmacologic treatment of her hyperthyroidism, she had complete resolution of her cardiomyopathy.

  9. PSORIASIS AND CARDIOMYOPATHY: AN INTRIGUING ASSOCIATION

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Anupam; Deepshikha

    2010-01-01

    A 25-year-old male symptomatic of heart disease for four months presented with biventricular failure. Echocardiography revealed dilated cardiomyopathy. He had skin lesions for 10 years which were clinically and histopathologically identified as psoriasis. Association of cardiomyopathy with psoriasis is uncommon and intriguing. The link between dilated cardiomyopathy and psoriasis on a common inflammatory background is discussed. PMID:21063523

  10. ABO, Secretor and Lewis histo-blood group systems influence the digestive form of Chagas disease.

    PubMed

    Bernardo, Cássia Rubia; Camargo, Ana Vitória Silveira; Ronchi, Luís Sérgio; de Oliveira, Amanda Priscila; de Campos Júnior, Eumildo; Borim, Aldenis Albaneze; Brandão de Mattos, Cinara Cássia; Bestetti, Reinaldo Bulgarelli; de Mattos, Luiz Carlos

    2016-11-01

    Chagas disease, caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, can affect the heart, esophagus and colon. The reasons that some patients develop different clinical forms or remain asymptomatic are unclear. It is believed that tissue immunogenetic markers influence the tropism of T. cruzi for different organs. ABO, Secretor and Lewis histo-blood group systems express a variety of tissue carbohydrate antigens that influence the susceptibility or resistance to diseases. This study aimed to examine the association of ABO, secretor and Lewis histo-blood systems with the clinical forms of Chagas disease. We enrolled 339 consecutive adult patients with chronic Chagas disease regardless of gender (cardiomyopathy: n=154; megaesophagus: n=119; megacolon: n=66). The control group was composed by 488 healthy blood donors. IgG anti-T. cruzi antibodies were detected by ELISA. ABO and Lewis phenotypes were defined by standard hemagglutination tests. Secretor (FUT2) and Lewis (FUT3) genotypes, determined by Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP), were used to infer the correct histo-blood group antigens expressed in the gastrointestinal tract. The proportions between groups were compared using the χ2 test with Yates correction and Fisher's exact test and the Odds Ratio (OR) and 95% Confidence Interval (95% CI) were calculated. An alpha error of 5% was considered significant with p-values <0.05 being corrected for multiple comparisons (pc). No statistically significant differences were found for the ABO (X(2): 2.635; p-value=0.451), Secretor (X(2): 0.056; p-value=0.812) or Lewis (X(2): 2.092; p-value=0.351) histo-blood group phenotypes between patients and controls. However, B plus AB Secretor phenotypes were prevalent in pooled data from megaesophagus and megacolon patients (OR: 5.381; 95% CI: 1.230-23.529; p-value=0.011; pc=0.022) in comparison to A plus O Secretor phenotypes. The tissue antigen variability resulting from the combined action of ABO and

  11. Peripartum cardiomyopathy and dilated cardiomyopathy: different at heart

    PubMed Central

    Bollen, Ilse A. E.; Van Deel, Elza D.; Kuster, Diederik W. D.; Van Der Velden, Jolanda

    2015-01-01

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) is a severe cardiac disease occurring in the last month of pregnancy or in the first 5 months after delivery and shows many similar clinical characteristics as dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) such as ventricle dilation and systolic dysfunction. While PPCM was believed to be DCM triggered by pregnancy, more and more studies show important differences between these diseases. While it is likely they share part of their pathogenesis such as increased oxidative stress and an impaired microvasculature, discrepancies seen in disease progression and outcome indicate there must be differences in pathogenesis as well. In this review, we compared studies in DCM and PPCM to search for overlapping and deviating disease etiology, pathogenesis and outcome in order to understand why these cardiomyopathies share similar clinical features but have different underlying pathologies. PMID:25642195

  12. Discoveries in peripartum cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Fett, James D; Markham, David W

    2015-07-01

    The past decade has seen remarkable gains for outcomes in peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM), one of the leading causes of maternal mortality and morbidity in the USA and many other countries, including the high-incidence areas of Haiti and South Africa. This review article emphasizes the importance of continuing the process of increasing awareness of PPCM and presents details of this evolving picture, including important discoveries that point the way to full recovery for almost all PPCM subjects. In addition, new interventions will be highlighted, which may facilitate recovery. Numerous studies have demonstrated that when the diagnosis of PPCM is made with LVEF > 0.30, the probability is that recovery to LVEF ≥ 0.50 will occur in the overwhelming majority of subjects. PPCM patients diagnosed with severely depressed systolic function (LVEF < 0.30) and a remodeled left ventricle with greater dilatation (LVEDd ≥ 60mm) are least likely to reach the outcome recovery goals. These are the patients with the greatest need for newer interventional strategies.

  13. Flavonoids and Chagas' Disease: The Story So Far!

    PubMed

    Nabavi, Seyed Fazel; Sureda, Antoni; Daglia, Maria; Izadi, Morteza; Rastrelli, Luca; Nabavi, Seyed Mohammad

    2017-01-01

    Chagas disease is one of the major health problems in Central and South America, which is caused by the parasitic protozoa, Trypanosoma cruzi. It is commonly transmitted by members of blood-sucking subfamily Triatominae. Chagas disease is associated with cardiac and gastrointestinal manifestations. Up to now, there are no effective vaccines for treatment of Chagas disease and benznidazole and nifurtimox are the only effective anti-Chagas drugs that cause different adverse and side effects. Therefore, much attention has been paid to natural products as novel therapeutic strategies for Chagas disease and its manifestations. Nowadays, some flavonoids could be considered as effective and safe bioactive natural products with potential anti-Chagas activity. Despite the increasing evidence, there is lack of review papers regarding the beneficial effects of flavonoids against Chagas disease and its manifestations. The aim of this paper is to review the available scientific data on the beneficial effects of flavonoids on Chagas disease and its manifestations published over the past two decades. Moreover, we provide an overview on etiology, transmission, epidemiology, clinical manifestations, and current treatment protocols of Chagas disease.

  14. An update on peripartum cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Dalzell, Jonathan R; Jackson, Colette E; Gardner, Roy S

    2011-09-01

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy is a rare but potentially devastating complication of pregnancy. Although the definition of this condition has recently been revised by the Heart Failure Association of the European Society of Cardiology, the pathogenesis of peripartum cardiomyopathy is not well understood and relatively little is known about its incidence and prevalence. Hence, peripartum cardiomyopathy is often under-recognized in the clinical setting. A heightened awareness of this condition and its current management options is therefore warranted throughout primary and secondary care. The identification of the putative role of prolactin in the development and progression of this condition has been recently discovered, with preclinical work suggesting beneficial effects of prolactin antagonism. In this article, we review the literature regarding this condition including these recent advances.

  15. Peripartum cardiomyopathy: a contemporary review.

    PubMed

    Shah, Tina; Ather, Sameer; Bavishi, Chirag; Bambhroliya, Arvind; Ma, Tony; Bozkurt, Biykem

    2013-01-01

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy is a rare and potentially fatal disease. Though approximately half of the patients recover, the clinical course is highly variable and some patients develop refractory heart failure and persistent left ventricular systolic dysfunction. It is diagnosed when women present with heart failure secondary to left ventricular systolic dysfunction towards the end of pregnancy or in the months following delivery, where no other cause of heart failure is found. Etiology remains unclear, and treatment is similar to other cardiomyopathies and includes evidence-based standard heart failure management strategies. Experimental strategies such as intravenous immunoglobulin and bromocriptine await further clinical validation.

  16. Immunosensor for the diagnosis of Chagas' disease.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Antonio Aparecido Pupim; Colli, Walter; da Costa, Paulo Inácio; Yamanaka, Hideko

    2005-07-15

    Trypanosoma cruzi proteins from epimastigote membranes, herein referred as antigens, have been used for the construction of an amperometric immunosensor for serological diagnosis of Chagas' disease. The proteins used had a molecular mass ranging from 30 to 100 kDa. The gold electrode was treated with cysteamine and glutaraldehyde prior to antigen immobilization. Antibodies present in the serum of patients with Chagas' disease were captured by the immobilized antigens and the affinity interaction was monitored by chronoamperometry at a potential of -400 mV (versus Ag pseudo-reference electrode) using peroxidase-labeled IgG conjugate and hydrogen peroxide, iodide substrate. The incubation time to allow maximum antigen-antibody and antibody-peroxidase-labeled IgG interactions was 20 min with a reactivity threshold at -0.104 microA.

  17. The Southern Cone Initiative against Chagas disease.

    PubMed

    Schofield, C J; Dias, J C

    1999-01-01

    Chagas disease (also known as American trypanosomiasis) is now ranked as the most serious parasitic disease of the Americas, with an economic impact far outranking the combined effects of other parasitic diseases such as malaria, schistosomiasis and leishmaniasis. Although the chronic infection remains virtually incurable, transmission can be halted by eliminating the domestic insect vectors and screening blood donors to avoid transfusional transmission. In line with this strategy, governments of the six Southern Cone countries (Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Paraguay and Uruguay) launched in 1991 an ambitious initiative to control Chagas disease through elimination of the main vector, Triatoma infestans, and large-scale screening of blood donors. Now at its mid-point, the programme has achieved remarkable success, with transmission halted over vast areas of the previously endemic regions. Well over 2 million rural houses have been sprayed to eliminate T. infestans, and the programme has already shown significant economic rates of return in addition to the medical and social benefits.

  18. Natural Chagas Disease in Four Baboons

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Jeff T.; Dick, Edward J.; VandeBerg, John L.; Hubbard, Gene B.

    2010-01-01

    Background Chagas disease is common in Central and South America and the southern United States. The causative agent is Trypanosoma cruzi (T cruzi, Order Kinetoplastida, Family Trypanosomatidae), a kinetoplastid protozoan parasite of humans and other vertebrates. It is a serious public health issue and the leading cause of heart disease and cardiovascular death in Central and South America. In 1984 a colony baboon was discovered to be infected with T cruzi. Methods Since the initial diagnosis was made by microscopic observation of the amastigote forms of T. cruzi in myocardial fibers, T. cruzi amastigotes have been identified in three additional baboons. Results The primary findings were similar in all four baboons and were congestive heart failure with edema of dependent areas, hydrothorax, hydropericardium, and multifocal to diffuse lymphoplasmacytic myocarditis. Conclusions A baboon animal model of Chagas disease could contribute significantly to the development of therapies for the disease in humans. PMID:18671766

  19. Palm trees and Chagas' disease in Panama.

    PubMed

    Whitlaw, J T; Chaniotis, B N

    1978-09-01

    An ecological survey of triatomines in the sylvan ecosystem of the Canal Zone and selected sites in Panama disclosed for the first time a close association of Rhodnius pullescens and Triatoma dimidiata, the two most important vector species of Chagas' disease in Panama, with a single species of a widely distributed palm tree, Scheelea zonensis. This association may explain why Chagas' disease is prevalent in certain rural communities in Central Panama and rare in others. An immense focus of zoonotic Trypanosoma cruzi infection exists in the forests of the Canal Zone with presence of large populations of triatomines, associated with scheelea zonensis and other yet undescribed microhabitats, and high (50--60%) trypanosome infections in all of the major triatomine species. Common opossums, anteaters, and spiny rats seem to be the principal animal reservoirs of T. cruzi in this complex and relatively undisturbed ecosystem.

  20. Ticks, ivermectin, and experimental Chagas disease.

    PubMed

    Dias, João Carlos Pinto; Schofield, Christopher J; Machado, Evandro Mm; Fernandes, Alexandre José

    2005-12-01

    Following an infestation of dogticks in kennels housing dogs used for long-term studies of the pathogenesis of Chagas disease, we examined the effect of ivermectin treatment on the dogs, ticks, trypanosome parasites, and also on triatomine vectors of Chagas disease. Ivermectin treatment was highly effective in eliminating the ticks, but showed no apparent effect on the dogs nor on their trypanosome infection. Triatominae fed on the dogs soon after ivermectin treatment showed high mortality, but this effect quickly declined for bugs fed at successive intervals after treatment. In conclusion, although ivermectin treatment may have a transient effect on peridomestic populations of Triatominae, it is not the treatment of choice for this situation. The study also showed that although the dogticks could become infected with Trypanosoma cruzi, this only occurred when feeding on dogs in the acute phase of infection, and there was no evidence of subsequent parasite development in the ticks.

  1. Fatal acute Chagas Disease in a Chimpanzee

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-08-01

    Fatal Acute Chagas Disease in a Chimpanzee Yugendar R. Bommineni1, Edward J. Dick Jr.1, J. Scot Estep2, John L. Van de Berg1, and Gene B. Hubbard1...species and several insect vectors demonstrating a wide host distribution and low host specificity. Methods—A 23 year old male chimpanzee died acutely and... chimpanzee . Keywords Ape; nonhuman primate; protozoa; fatal case; Trypanosoma cruzi Introduction CD or American trypanosomiasis is caused by TC, a

  2. [Chagas disease (American trypanosomiasis) in France].

    PubMed

    Salamanca-Dejour, D; Blanchet, D; Aznar, C; La Ruche, G; Jeannel, D; Gastellu-Etchegorry, M

    2012-08-01

    Chagas disease is an anthropozoonotic infection caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, transmitted by a hematophagous triatomine insect vector belonging to the Reduviidae family, while taking a blood meal. There is a large reservoir of wild and domestic mammals. Human contamination may come via vectorial, transplacental, and digestive routes, blood transfusion, organ or tissue transplantation, and by accident. The disease has two phases. The acute phase, oligosymptomatic, is frequently undiagnosed. It is followed by a chronic phase. Most of the infected patients remain asymptomatic all life-long. But 10 or 25 years later, one third of infected patients present with cardiac or digestive complications. Chagas disease is endemic in Latin America, from Mexico to Argentina. In French Guyana, the prevalence of the infection was estimated at 0.25% and 0.5% (from 500 to 1000 infected patients) on blood samples collected from 1992 to 1998. In 2000 and 2009, 192 cases were diagnosed. In this district, there is no established domestic vector and the transmission risk is low. The vector is very easily found in forest habitats and even in the peridomestic persistent forest, with an infection rate of 46 to 86%. Vectorial eradication is impossible. Fighting against Chagas disease in French Guyana relies more on individual protection, control of blood transfusion, prevention of mother-to-child transmission, diagnosis, and treatment of infected patients than on vectorial control. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  3. Paleoparasitology of Chagas disease--a review.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Adauto; Jansen, Ana Maria; Reinhard, Karl; Ferreira, Luiz Fernando

    2009-07-01

    One hundred years since the discovery of Chagas disease associated with Trypanosoma cruzi infection, growing attention has focused on understanding the evolution in parasite-human host interaction. This interest has featured studies and results from paleoparasitology, not only the description of lesions in mummified bodies, but also the recovery of genetic material from the parasite and the possibility of analyzing such material over time. The present study reviews the evidence of Chagas disease in organic remains excavated from archeological sites and discusses two findings in greater detail, both with lesions suggestive of chagasic megacolon and confirmed by molecular biology techniques. One of these sites is located in the United States, on the border between Texas and Mexico and the other in state of Minas Gerais, in the Brazilian cerrado (savannah). Dated prior to contact with Europeans, these results confirm that Chagas disease affected prehistoric human groups in other regions outside the Andean altiplanos and other transmission areas on the Pacific Coast, previously considered the origin of T. cruzi infection in the human host.

  4. A Case of Chagas Cardiomyopathy Following Infection in South Central Texas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-05-24

    abstracts, papers, posters. etc .. should contain the following disdalmer statement for research involving animals , as required by AFMAN 40-401 IP...34The experiments reported herein were conducted according to tho principles set forth in tho National Institute of Health Publication No. 80-23...Guide for the care and Uso of Laboratory Animals and the Animal Welfare Act of 1966, as amended." 59 MOW FORM 3039, 20160628 Prescribed by 59 MDWI 41

  5. The Cardiomyopathy of Iron Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Hegde, Nikita; Rich, Michael W.; Gayomali, Charina

    2006-01-01

    Iron-deficiency anemia can have deleterious effects on the heart. Herein, we describe the effects of iron deficiency on the heart as corroborated with electrocardiography, radiology, echocardiography, and cardiac catheterization. We review the pathophysiology, clinical features, and management of iron-deficiency–induced cardiomyopathy. PMID:17041692

  6. The genetics of dilated cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Dellefave, Lisa; McNally, Elizabeth M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of review More than forty different individual genes have been implicated in the inheritance of dilated cardiomyopathy. For a subset of these genes, mutations can lead to a spectrum of cardiomyopathy that extends to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and left ventricular noncompaction. In nearly all cases, there is an increased risk of arrhythmias. With some genetic mutations, extracardiac manifestations are likely to be present. The precise genetic etiology can usually not be discerned from the cardiac and/or extracardiac manifestations and requires molecular genetic diagnosis for prognostic determination and cardiac care. Recent findings Newer technologies are influencing genetic testing, especially cardiomyopathy genetic testing, where an increased number of genes are now routinely being tested simultaneously. While this approach to testing multiple genes is increasing the diagnostic yield, the analysis of multiple genes in one test is also resulting in a large amount of genetic information of unclear significance. Summary Genetic testing is highly useful in the care of patients and families, since it guides diagnosis, influences care and aids in prognosis. However, the large amount of benign human genetic variation may complicate genetic results, and often requires a skilled team to accurately interpret the findings. PMID:20186049

  7. Recent advances in cirrhotic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Karagiannakis, Dimitrios S; Papatheodoridis, George; Vlachogiannakos, Jiannis

    2015-05-01

    Cirrhotic cardiomyopathy, a cardiac dysfunction presented in patients with cirrhosis, represents a recently recognized clinical entity. It is characterized by altered diastolic relaxation, impaired contractility, and electrophysiological abnormalities, in particular prolongation of the QT interval. Several mechanisms seem to be involved in the pathogenesis of cirrhotic cardiomyopathy, including impaired function of beta-receptors, altered transmembrane currents, and overproduction of cardiodepressant factors, like nitric oxide, tumor necrosis factor α, and endogenous cannabinoids. Diastolic dysfunction is the first manifestation of cirrhotic cardiomyopathy and reflects the increased stiffness of the cardiac mass, which leads to delayed left ventricular filling. On the other hand, systolic incompetence is presented later, is usually unmasked during pharmacological or physical stress, and predisposes to the development of hepatorenal syndrome. The prolongation of QT is found in about 50 % of cirrhotic patients, but rarely leads to fatal arrhythmias. Cirrhotics with blunted cardiac function seem to have poorer survival rates compared to those without, and the risk is particularly increased during the insertion of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt or liver transplantation. Till now, there is no specific treatment for the management of cirrhotic cardiomyopathy. New agents, targeting to its pathogenetical mechanisms, may play some role as future therapeutic options.

  8. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in Friedreich's ataxia.

    PubMed

    Fayssoil, A; Nardi, O; Orlikowski, D; Annane, D

    2008-07-21

    Friedreich's ataxia is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by spinocerebellar degeneration. It is caused by a mutation that consists of an unstable expansion of GAA repeats in the first intron of the gene encoding frataxin on chromosome 9 (9q13). We reported a case of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy associated with Friedreich's ataxia in a twenty year old patient.

  9. Chagas Cardiomiopathy: The Potential of Diastolic Dysfunction and Brain Natriuretic Peptide in the Early Identification of Cardiac Damage

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Alvarez, Ana; Sitges, Marta; Pinazo, María-Jesús; Regueiro-Cueva, Ander; Posada, Elizabeth; Poyatos, Silvia; Ortiz-Pérez, José Tomás; Heras, Magda; Azqueta, Manel; Gascon, Joaquim; Sanz, Ginés

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Chagas disease remains a major cause of mortality in several countries of Latin America and has become a potential public health problem in non-endemic countries as a result of migration flows. Cardiac involvement represents the main cause of mortality, but its diagnosis is still based on nonspecific criteria with poor sensitivity. Early identification of patients with cardiac involvement is desirable, since early treatment may improve prognosis. This study aimed to assess the role of diastolic dysfunction, abnormal myocardial strain and elevated brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) in the early identification of cardiac involvement in Chagas disease. Methodology/Principal Findings Fifty-four patients divided into 3 groups—group 1 (undetermined form: positive serology without ECG or 2D-echocardiographic abnormalities; N = 32), group 2 (typical ECG abnormalities of Chagas disease but normal 2D-echocardiography; N = 14), and group 3 (regional wall motion abnormalities, left ventricular [LV] end-diastolic diameter >55 mm or LV ejection fraction <50% on echocardiography; N = 8)—and 44 control subjects were studied. Patients with significant non-cardiac diseases, other heart diseases and previous treatment with benznidazol were excluded. The median age was 37 (20–58) years; 40% were men. BNP levels, longitudinal and radial myocardial strain and LV diastolic dysfunction increased progressively from group 1 to 3 (p for trend <0.01). Abnormal BNP levels (>37 pg/ml) were noted in 0%, 13%, 29% and 63% in controls and groups 1 to 3, respectively. Half of patients in the undetermined form had impaired relaxation patterns, whereas half of patients with ECG abnormalities suggestive of Chagas cardiomyopathy had normal diastolic function. In group 1, BNP levels were statistically higher in patients with diastolic dysfunction as compared to those with normal diastolic function (27±26 vs. 11±8 pg/ml, p = 0.03). Conclusion/Significance In conclusion

  10. Molecular epidemiologic source tracking of orally transmitted Chagas disease, Venezuela.

    PubMed

    Segovia, Maikell; Carrasco, Hernán J; Martínez, Clara E; Messenger, Louisa A; Nessi, Anaibeth; Londoño, Juan C; Espinosa, Raul; Martínez, Cinda; Alfredo, Mijares; Bonfante-Cabarcas, Rafael; Lewis, Michael D; de Noya, Belkisyolé A; Miles, Michael A; Llewellyn, Martin S

    2013-07-01

    Oral outbreaks of Chagas disease are increasingly reported in Latin America. The transitory presence of Trypanosoma cruzi parasites within contaminated foods, and the rapid consumption of those foods, precludes precise identification of outbreak origin. We report source attribution for 2 peri-urban oral outbreaks of Chagas disease in Venezuela via high resolution microsatellite typing.

  11. Molecular Epidemiologic Source Tracking of Orally Transmitted Chagas Disease, Venezuela

    PubMed Central

    Segovia, Maikell; Martínez, Clara E.; Messenger, Louisa A.; Nessi, Anaibeth; Londoño, Juan C.; Espinosa, Raul; Martínez, Cinda; Alfredo, Mijares; Bonfante-Cabarcas, Rafael; Lewis, Michael D.; de Noya, Belkisyolé A.; Miles, Michael A.; Llewellyn, Martin S.

    2013-01-01

    Oral outbreaks of Chagas disease are increasingly reported in Latin America. The transitory presence of Trypanosoma cruzi parasites within contaminated foods, and the rapid consumption of those foods, precludes precise identification of outbreak origin. We report source attribution for 2 peri-urban oral outbreaks of Chagas disease in Venezuela via high resolution microsatellite typing. PMID:23768982

  12. Classification, Epidemiology, and Global Burden of Cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    McKenna, William J; Maron, Barry J; Thiene, Gaetano

    2017-09-15

    In the past 25 years, major advances were achieved in the nosography of cardiomyopathies, influencing the definition and taxonomy of this important chapter of cardiovascular disease. Nearly, 50% of patients dying suddenly in childhood or adolescence or undergoing cardiac transplantation are affected by cardiomyopathies. Novel cardiomyopathies have been discovered (arrhythmogenic, restrictive, and noncompacted) and added to update the World Health Organization classification. Myocarditis has also been named inflammatory cardiomyopathy. Extraordinary progress accomplished in molecular genetics of inherited cardiomyopathies allowed establishment of dilated cardiomyopathy as mostly cytoskeleton, force transmission disease; hypertrophic-restrictive cardiomyopathies as sarcomeric, force generation disease; and arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy as desmosome, cell junction disease. Channelopathies (short and long QT, Brugada, and catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia syndromes) should also be considered cardiomyopathies because of electric myocyte dysfunction. Cardiomyopathies are easily diagnosed but treated only with palliative pharmacological or invasive therapy. Curative therapy, thanks to insights into the molecular pathogenesis, has to target the fundamental mechanisms involved in the onset and progression of these conditions. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  13. Living with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Subasic, Kim

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to provide an insider's account of what it is like to live with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), a genetic cardiovascular illness that carries the risk for sudden cardiac death. This study aims to reveal how HCM impacts the family and guides the decision whether or not to pursue genetic testing, how the physical limitations associated with HCM alter being-in-the-world, and how HCM alters social relationships. Fifteen adults with HCM were recruited for a longitudinal, phenomenological, qualitative study through purposive sampling and word of mouth. A total of 45 interviews were conducted by the researcher at a time and place designated by the participant between August 2011 and January 2012. The first interview with each participant was conducted in person. While efforts were made to conduct all interviews in person, a total of three interviews were conducted by telephone as requested by three participants due to scheduling conflicts. Through methods of interpretive phenomenology, three audio-recorded, semistructured interviews occurred over the course of 3 months. Detailed narratives were solicited and transcribed verbatim. Methodological and analytical documentation was supported with the identification of key phrases, similar experiences, themes, and documentation of the rationale for decisions throughout the research process. Participation in genetic testing carries a multitude of personal, familial, financial, and emotional implications. The results of a genetic test elicited an emotional response regardless of whether the results were negative, positive, or inconclusive. Living with a potentially life-threatening illness altered identity, disrupted social relationships, and generated chronic fear and uncertainty. A new normal was re-ordered or transformed by the demands and limitations posed by HCM, and by the person's concerns, priorities, and the meaning of the illness. Results from this study underscore the need for healthcare

  14. Increased Myeloperoxidase Activity and Protein Nitration Are Indicators of Inflammation in Patients with Chagas' Disease▿

    PubMed Central

    Dhiman, Monisha; Estrada-Franco, Jose Guillermo; Pando, Jasmine M.; Ramirez-Aguilar, Francisco J.; Spratt, Heidi; Vazquez-Corzo, Sara; Perez-Molina, Gladys; Gallegos-Sandoval, Rosa; Moreno, Roberto; Garg, Nisha Jain

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we investigated whether inflammatory responses contribute to oxidative/nitrosative stress in patients with Chagas' disease. We used three tests (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, immuno-flow cytometry, and STAT-PAK immunochromatography) to screen human serum samples (n = 1,481) originating from Chiapas, Mexico, for Trypanosoma cruzi-specific antibodies. We identified 121 subjects who were seropositive for T. cruzi-specific antibodies, a finding indicative of an 8.5% seroprevalence in the rural population from Chiapas. Seropositive and seronegative subjects were examined for plasma levels of biomarkers of inflammation, i.e., myeloperoxidase (MPO), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and xanthine oxidase (XOD), as well as for oxidative (advanced oxidation protein products [AOPPs]) and nitrosative (3-nitrotyrosine [3NT]) biomarkers. The seropositive subjects exhibited a significant increase in MPO activity and protein level, the indicator of neutrophil activation. Subsequently, a corresponding increase in AOPP contents, formed by MPO-dependent hypochlorous acid and chloramine formation, was noted in seropositive subjects. The plasma level of 3NT was significantly increased in seropositive subjects, yet we observed no change in XOD activity (O2− source) and nitrate/nitrite contents (denotes iNOS activation and NO production), which implied that direct peroxynitrite formation does not contribute to increased nitrosative damage in chagasic subjects. Instead, a positive correlation between increased MPO activity and protein 3NT formation was observed, which suggested to us that MPO-dependent formation of nitrylchloride that occurs in the presence of physiological NO and O2− concentrations contributes to protein nitration. Overall, our data demonstrate that T. cruzi-induced neutrophil activation is pathological and contributes to MPO-mediated collateral protein oxidative and nitrosative damage in human patients with Chagas' disease. Therapies

  15. Altered Hypercoagulability Factors in Patients with Chronic Chagas Disease: Potential Biomarkers of Therapeutic Response

    PubMed Central

    Pinazo, Maria-Jesus; Posada, Elizabeth de Jesus; Izquierdo, Luis; Tassies, Dolors; Marques, Alexandre-Ferreira; de Lazzari, Elisa; Aldasoro, Edelweiss; Muñoz, Jose; Abras, Alba; Tebar, Silvia; Gallego, Montserrat; de Almeida, Igor Correia; Reverter, Joan-Carles; Gascon, Joaquim

    2016-01-01

    Thromboembolic events were described in patients with Chagas disease without cardiomyopathy. We aim to confirm if there is a hypercoagulable state in these patients and to determine if there is an early normalization of hemostasis factors after antiparasitic treatment. Ninety-nine individuals from Chagas disease-endemic areas were classified in two groups: G1, with T.cruzi infection (n = 56); G2, healthy individuals (n = 43). Twenty-four hemostasis factors were measured at baseline. G1 patients treated with benznidazole were followed for 36 months, recording clinical parameters and performance of conventional serology, chemiluminescent enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (trypomastigote-derived glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored mucins), quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and hemostasis tests every 6-month visits. Prothrombin fragment 1+2 (F1+2) and endogenous thrombin potential (ETP) were abnormally expressed in 77% and 50% of infected patients at baseline but returned to and remained at normal levels shortly after treatment in 76% and 96% of cases, respectively. Plasmin-antiplasmin complexes (PAP) were altered before treatment in 32% of G1 patients but normalized in 94% of cases several months after treatment. None of the patients with normal F1+2 values during follow-up had a positive qRT-PCR result, but 3/24 patients (13%) with normal ETP values did. In a percentage of chronic T. cruzi infected patients treated with benznidazole, altered coagulation markers returned into normal levels. F1+2, ETP and PAP could be useful markers for assessing sustained response to benznidazole. PMID:26727000

  16. Evaluation of Parasiticide Treatment with Benznidazol in the Electrocardiographic, Clinical, and Serological Evolution of Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fragata-Filho, Abilio Augusto; França, Francisco Faustino; Fragata, Claudia da Silva; Lourenço, Angela Maria; Faccini, Cristiane Castro; Costa, Cristiane Aparecida de Jesus

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Chagas disease is one of the most important endemic parasitic diseases in Latin America. In its chronic phase, progression to cardiomyopathy has high morbidity and mortality. The persistence of a normal electrocardiogram (ECG) provides a similar prognosis to that of a non-diseased population. Benznidazole (BNZ) is the only drug with trypanocidal action available in Brazil. Materials/Methods/Results A group of 310 patients with chronic Chagas disease who had normal ECGs at the first medical visit performed before 2002 were included. There were 263 patients treated with BNZ and 47 untreated. The follow-up period was 19.59 years. Univariate analyses showed that those treated were younger and predominantly male. As many as 79.08% of those treated and 46.81% of those untreated continued with normal electrocardiograms (p <0.0001). The occurrence of electrocardiographic abnormalities and relevant clinical events (heart failure, stroke, total mortality, and cardiovascular death) was less prevalent in treated patients (p <0.001, p: 0.022, p: 0.047 respectively). In multivariate analyses, the parasiticide treatment was an independent variable for persistence of a normal ECG pattern, which was an independent variable in the prevention of significant clinical events. The immunofluorescence titers decreased with the parasitological treatment. However, the small number of tests in untreated patients did not allow the correlation of the decrease of these titers with electrocardiographic alterations. Conclusion These data suggest that treatment with benznidazole prevents the occurrence of electrocardiographic alterations. On the other hand, patients who develop ECG abnormalities present with more significant clinical events. PMID:26974551

  17. Plasma Cytokine Expression Is Associated with Cardiac Morbidity in Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, Giovane Rodrigo; Gomes, Juliana Assis Silva; Fares, Rafaelle Christine Gomes; Damásio, Marcos Paulo de Souza; Chaves, Ana Thereza; Ferreira, Karine Silvestre; Nunes, Maria Carmo Pereira; Medeiros, Nayara Ingrid; Valente, Vanessa Alves Azevedo; Corrêa-Oliveira, Rodrigo; Rocha, Manoel Otávio da Costa

    2014-01-01

    The expression of immune response appears to be associated with morbidity in Chagas disease. However, the studies in this field have usually employed small samples of patients and statistical analyses that do not consider the wide dispersion of cytokine production observed in these patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the plasma cytokine levels in well-defined clinical polar groups of chagasic patients divided into categories that better reflect the wide cytokine profile and its relationship with morbidity. Patients infected with Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi) were grouped as indeterminate (IND) and cardiac (CARD) forms ranging from 23 to 69 years of age (mean of 45.6±11.25). The IND group included 82 individuals, ranging from 24 to 66 years of age (mean of 39.6±10.3). The CARD group included 94 patients ranging from 23 to 69 years of age (mean of 48±12.52) presenting dilated cardiomyopathy. None of the patients have undergone chemotherapeutic treatment, nor had been previously treated for T. cruzi infection. Healthy non-chagasic individuals, ranging from 29 to 55 years of age (mean of 42.6±8.8) were included as a control group (NI). IND patients have a higher intensity of interleukin 10 (IL-10) expression when compared with individuals in the other groups. By contrast, inflammatory cytokine expression, such as interferon gamma (IFN-γ), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin 6 (IL-6), and interleukin 1 beta (IL-1β), proved to be the highest in the CARD group. Correlation analysis showed that higher IL-10 expression was associated with better cardiac function, as determined by left ventricular ejection fraction and left ventricular diastolic diameter values. Altogether, these findings reinforce the concept that a fine balance between regulatory and inflammatory cytokines represents a key element in the establishment of distinct forms of chronic Chagas disease. PMID:24603474

  18. Clomipramine and Benznidazole Act Synergistically and Ameliorate the Outcome of Experimental Chagas Disease.

    PubMed

    García, Mónica Cristina; Ponce, Nicolás Eric; Sanmarco, Liliana Maria; Manzo, Rubén Hilario; Jimenez-Kairuz, Alvaro Federico; Aoki, Maria Pilar

    2016-06-01

    Chagas disease is an important public health problem in Latin America, and its treatment by chemotherapy with benznidazole (BZ) or nifurtimox remains unsatisfactory. In order to design new alternative strategies to improve the current etiological treatments, in the present work, we comprehensively evaluated the in vitro and in vivo anti-Trypanosoma cruzi effects of clomipramine (CMP) (a parasite-trypanothione reductase-specific inhibitor) combined with BZ. In vitro studies, carried out using a checkerboard technique on trypomastigotes (T. cruzi strain Tulahuen), revealed a combination index (CI) of 0.375, indicative of a synergistic effect of the drug combination. This result was correlated with the data obtained in infected BALB/c mice. We observed that during the acute phase (15 days postinfection [dpi]), BZ at 25 mg/kg of body weight/day alone decreased the levels of parasitemia compared with those of the control group, but when BZ was administered with CMP, the drug combination completely suppressed the parasitemia due to the observed synergistic effect. Furthermore, in the chronic phase (90 dpi), mice treated with both drugs showed less heart damage as assessed by the histopathological analysis, index of myocardial inflammation, and levels of heart injury biochemical markers than mice treated with BZ alone at the reference dose (100 mg/kg/day). Collectively, these data support the notion that CMP combined with low doses of BZ diminishes cardiac damage and inflammation during the chronic phase of cardiomyopathy. The synergistic activity of BZ-CMP clearly suggests a potential drug combination for Chagas disease treatment, which would allow a reduction of the effective dose of BZ and an increase in therapeutic safety.

  19. Clomipramine and Benznidazole Act Synergistically and Ameliorate the Outcome of Experimental Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    García, Mónica Cristina; Ponce, Nicolás Eric; Sanmarco, Liliana Maria; Manzo, Rubén Hilario; Jimenez-Kairuz, Alvaro Federico

    2016-01-01

    Chagas disease is an important public health problem in Latin America, and its treatment by chemotherapy with benznidazole (BZ) or nifurtimox remains unsatisfactory. In order to design new alternative strategies to improve the current etiological treatments, in the present work, we comprehensively evaluated the in vitro and in vivo anti-Trypanosoma cruzi effects of clomipramine (CMP) (a parasite-trypanothione reductase-specific inhibitor) combined with BZ. In vitro studies, carried out using a checkerboard technique on trypomastigotes (T. cruzi strain Tulahuen), revealed a combination index (CI) of 0.375, indicative of a synergistic effect of the drug combination. This result was correlated with the data obtained in infected BALB/c mice. We observed that during the acute phase (15 days postinfection [dpi]), BZ at 25 mg/kg of body weight/day alone decreased the levels of parasitemia compared with those of the control group, but when BZ was administered with CMP, the drug combination completely suppressed the parasitemia due to the observed synergistic effect. Furthermore, in the chronic phase (90 dpi), mice treated with both drugs showed less heart damage as assessed by the histopathological analysis, index of myocardial inflammation, and levels of heart injury biochemical markers than mice treated with BZ alone at the reference dose (100 mg/kg/day). Collectively, these data support the notion that CMP combined with low doses of BZ diminishes cardiac damage and inflammation during the chronic phase of cardiomyopathy. The synergistic activity of BZ-CMP clearly suggests a potential drug combination for Chagas disease treatment, which would allow a reduction of the effective dose of BZ and an increase in therapeutic safety. PMID:27067322

  20. Heart failure and tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Ethan R; Josephson, Mark E

    2013-12-01

    Congestive heart failure is a major health care concern affecting almost six million Americans and an estimated 23 million people worldwide, and its prevalence is increasing with time. Long-standing tachycardia is a well-recognized cause of heart failure and left ventricular dysfunction and has led to the nomenclature, tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy. Tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy is generally a reversible cardiomyopathy with effective treatment of the causative arrhythmia, either with medications, surgery, or catheter ablation. Tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy remains poorly understood and is likely under-diagnosed. A better understanding of tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy and improved recognition of its presence in clinical practice is vital to the health of patients with this disorder. The goal of this review is to discuss the pathogenesis and clinical manifestations of tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy, as well as approaches to its diagnosis and treatment.

  1. Role of cardiac MRI in nonischemic cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Anand, Senthil; Janardhanan, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) with its higher spatial resolution is considered the gold standard for evaluating ventricular mass, volumes, and ejection fraction. CMR can be used for accurate diagnosis of several conditions, especially cardiomyopathies. The purpose of this article is to review the utility of CMR in the diagnosis and management of nonischemic cardiomyopathies. We have reviewed both common and rare types of nonischemic cardiomyopathies in detail and elaborated on the specific CMR findings in each. We believe that CMR is an invaluable tool, not only in differentiating nonischemic from ischemic cardiomyopathy, but also in aiding the accurate diagnosis and management of the subtype of nonischemic cardiomyopathy. CMR should routinely be integrated in the diagnostic workup of various cardiomyopathies. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Gene expression changes associated with myocarditis and fibrosis in hearts of mice with chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Milena Botelho Pereira; de Lima, Ricardo Santana; Rocha, Leonardo Lima; Vasconcelos, Juliana Fraga; Rogatto, Silvia Regina; dos Santos, Ricardo Ribeiro; Iacobas, Sanda; Goldenberg, Regina Coeli; Iacobas, Dumitru Andrei; Tanowitz, Herbert Bernard; de Carvalho, Antonio Carlos Campos; Spray, David Conover

    2010-01-01

    Chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy is a leading cause of heart failure in Latin American countries. About 30% of Trypanosoma cruzi-infected individuals develop this severe symptomatic form of the disease, characterized by intense inflammatory response accompanied by fibrosis in the heart. We performed an extensive microarray analysis of hearts from a mouse model of this disease and determined significant alterations in expression of ∼12% of the sampled genes. Extensive upregulations were associated with immune-inflammatory responses (chemokines, adhesion molecules, cathepsins and MHC molecules) and fibrosis (extracellular matrix components, lysyl oxidase and Timp-1). Our results indicate potentially relevant factors involved in the pathogenesis of the disease that may provide new therapeutic targets in chronic Chagas' disease. PMID:20565256

  3. Differential Expression of Matrix Metalloproteinases 2, 9 and Cytokines by Neutrophils and Monocytes in the Clinical Forms of Chagas Disease.

    PubMed

    Medeiros, Nayara I; Fares, Rafaelle C G; Franco, Eliza P; Sousa, Giovane R; Mattos, Rafael T; Chaves, Ana T; Nunes, Maria do Carmo P; Dutra, Walderez O; Correa-Oliveira, Rodrigo; Rocha, Manoel O C; Gomes, Juliana A S

    2017-01-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy, the most severe manifestation in chronic phase of Chagas disease, affects about 30% of patients and is characterized by myocardial dysfunction and interstitial fibrosis due to extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling. ECM remodeling is regulated by proteolytic enzymes such as matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and cytokines produced by immune cells, including phagocytes. We evaluated by flow cytometry the expression of MMP-2, MMP-9, IL-1β, TNF-α, TGF-β and IL-10 by neutrophils and monocytes from patients with indeterminate (IND) and cardiac (CARD) clinical forms of Chagas disease and non-infected individuals (NI), before and after in vitro stimulation with Trypanosoma cruzi antigens. Our results showed an important contribution of neutrophils for MMPs production, while monocytes seemed to be involved in cytokine production. The results showed that neutrophils and monocytes from IND and CARD patients had higher intracellular levels of MMP-2 and MMP-9 than NI individuals. On the other hand, T. cruzi derived-antigens promote a differential expression of MMP-2 and MMP-9 in patients with Chagas disease and may regulate MMPs expression in neutrophils and monocytes, mainly when a cardiac alteration is not present. Our data also showed that in the presence of T. cruzi derived-antigens the production of cytokines by neutrophils and monocytes, but mainly by monocytes, may be intensified. Correlation analysis demonstrated that MMP-2 had a positive correlation with IL-10 and a negative correlation with IL-1β, whereas MMP-9 showed a negative correlation with IL-10. We also observed that IND patients presented a greater percentage of high producer cells of regulatory molecules when compared to CARD patients, indicating a different pattern in the immune response. Our data suggest that MMPs and cytokines produced by neutrophils and monocytes are important contributors for cardiac remodeling and may be an interesting target for new biomarker research.

  4. Differential Expression of Matrix Metalloproteinases 2, 9 and Cytokines by Neutrophils and Monocytes in the Clinical Forms of Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Medeiros, Nayara I.; Fares, Rafaelle C. G.; Franco, Eliza P.; Sousa, Giovane R.; Mattos, Rafael T.; Chaves, Ana T.; Nunes, Maria do Carmo P.; Dutra, Walderez O.; Correa-Oliveira, Rodrigo; Rocha, Manoel O. C.; Gomes, Juliana A. S.

    2017-01-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy, the most severe manifestation in chronic phase of Chagas disease, affects about 30% of patients and is characterized by myocardial dysfunction and interstitial fibrosis due to extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling. ECM remodeling is regulated by proteolytic enzymes such as matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and cytokines produced by immune cells, including phagocytes. We evaluated by flow cytometry the expression of MMP-2, MMP-9, IL-1β, TNF-α, TGF-β and IL-10 by neutrophils and monocytes from patients with indeterminate (IND) and cardiac (CARD) clinical forms of Chagas disease and non-infected individuals (NI), before and after in vitro stimulation with Trypanosoma cruzi antigens. Our results showed an important contribution of neutrophils for MMPs production, while monocytes seemed to be involved in cytokine production. The results showed that neutrophils and monocytes from IND and CARD patients had higher intracellular levels of MMP-2 and MMP-9 than NI individuals. On the other hand, T. cruzi derived-antigens promote a differential expression of MMP-2 and MMP-9 in patients with Chagas disease and may regulate MMPs expression in neutrophils and monocytes, mainly when a cardiac alteration is not present. Our data also showed that in the presence of T. cruzi derived-antigens the production of cytokines by neutrophils and monocytes, but mainly by monocytes, may be intensified. Correlation analysis demonstrated that MMP-2 had a positive correlation with IL-10 and a negative correlation with IL-1β, whereas MMP-9 showed a negative correlation with IL-10. We also observed that IND patients presented a greater percentage of high producer cells of regulatory molecules when compared to CARD patients, indicating a different pattern in the immune response. Our data suggest that MMPs and cytokines produced by neutrophils and monocytes are important contributors for cardiac remodeling and may be an interesting target for new biomarker research. PMID

  5. Tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Anil C; Prapa, Matina; Pellicori, Pierpaolo; Mabote, Thato; Nasir, Mansoor; Clark, Andrew L

    2016-10-01

    Heart failure in pregnancy is rare, but usually ascribed to peripartum cardiomyopathy in the absence of other possible diagnoses. However, heart failure can develop solely due to a tachycardia, so-called 'tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy'. The incidence of tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy in pregnancy is unknown, but it is a treatable and potentially reversible cause of heart failure. Clinically, tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy during pregnancy might present in a similar manner, but its management has to be individualized according to the arrhythmic substrate and usually involve multidisciplinary input from specialists in obstetrics, cardiac electrophysiology and heart failure.

  6. Multicenter epidemiological and clinical study on imported Chagas diseases in Alicante, Spain

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, José M; Torrús, Diego; Amador, Concepción; Jover, Francisco; Pérez-Chacón, Fabiola; Ponce, Yamileth; Arjona, Francisco J; Caro, Elena; Martínez-Peinado, Concepción; Gallegos, Ingrid; Cuadrado, José M; Tello, Antonio; Gutiérrez, Felix

    2012-01-01

    Recently, there has been an increase in the number of patients with Chagas disease outside of areas that are generally considered endemic. The aim of this investigation is to describe the clinical profile of a series of patients with Chagas disease in Alicante, Spain, which is a province located on the coast of the Mediterranean Sea. This study was performed at four general hospitals in Alicante between January 2002 and May 2011. A total of 128 patients from seven countries were diagnosed with Trypanosoma cruzi. The main country of origin of these patients was Bolivia (n = 101; 78.9%), and the median of age of these patients was 35 years (range: 0–72 years). Four (3.3%) patients were children under 14 years of age, and 81 (63.3%) were female. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to analyze 106 patients, 66.0% of whom demonstrated positive PCR results. Visceral involvement was diagnosed in 26.8%: 24.1% demonstrated cardiac involvement, 0.9% demonstrated gastrointestinal involvement, 0.9% demonstrated cardiac and gastrointestinal involvement, and 0.9% demonstrated involvement of the central nervous system. Syncope was found to be associated with cardiomyopathy (28.0% versus 5.2%) (odds ratio: 6.5; 95% confidence interval: 1.5–27.1). Seventy-six patients received treatment with benznidazole, of whom 57 (75.0%) completed the treatment course without significant adverse events and 17.1% discontinued benznidazole due to adverse events. In total, 50% of patients experienced documented adverse reactions. Among patients with positive PCR results before treatment, all demonstrated negative PCR results following treatment. In conclusion, majority of our patients were female Bolivians immigrants, one of four of our patients demonstrated cardiac involvement, and treatment tolerance was poor. It is important to improve the clinical and epidemiological knowledge of Chagas disease in nonendemic with additional multicenter studies in order to determine the magnitude of

  7. Primary Carnitine Deficiency and Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Lijun; Huang, Meirong

    2013-01-01

    Carnitine is essential for the transfer of long-chain fatty acids from the cytosol into mitochondria for subsequent β-oxidation. A lack of carnitine results in impaired energy production from long-chain fatty acids, especially during periods of fasting or stress. Primary carnitine deficiency (PCD) is an autosomal recessive disorder of mitochondrial β-oxidation resulting from defective carnitine transport and is one of the rare treatable etiologies of metabolic cardiomyopathies. Patients affected with the disease may present with acute metabolic decompensation during infancy or with severe cardiomyopathy in childhood. Early recognition of the disease and treatment with L-carnitine may be life-saving. In this review article, the pathophysiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of PCD are discussed, with a focus on cardiac involvements. PMID:24385988

  8. Genetic basis of dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Serra, Alexandra; Toro, Rocio; Sarquella-Brugada, Georgia; de Gonzalo-Calvo, David; Cesar, Sergi; Carro, Esther; Llorente-Cortes, Vicenta; Iglesias, Anna; Brugada, Josep; Brugada, Ramon; Campuzano, Oscar

    2016-12-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy is a rare cardiac disease characterized by left ventricular dilatation and systolic dysfunction leading to heart failure and sudden cardiac death. Currently, despite several conditions have been reported as aetiologies of the disease, a large number of cases remain classified as idiopathic. Recent studies determine that nearly 60% of cases are inherited, therefore due to a genetic cause. Progressive technological advances in genetic analysis have identified over 60 genes associated with this entity, being TTN the main gene, so far. All these genes encode a wide variety of myocyte proteins, mainly sarcomeric and desmosomal, but physiopathologic pathways are not yet completely unraveled. We review the recent published data about genetics of familial dilated cardiomyopathy.

  9. Inhibition of Autoimmune Chagas-Like Heart Disease by Bone Marrow Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Guimaro, Maria C.; Alves, Rozeneide M.; Rose, Ester; Sousa, Alessandro O.; de Cássia Rosa, Ana; Hecht, Mariana M.; Sousa, Marcelo V.; Andrade, Rafael R.; Vital, Tamires; Plachy, Jiří; Nitz, Nadjar; Hejnar, Jiří; Gomes, Clever C.; L. Teixeira, Antonio R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Infection with the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi manifests in mammals as Chagas heart disease. The treatment available for chagasic cardiomyopathy is unsatisfactory. Methods/Principal Findings To study the disease pathology and its inhibition, we employed a syngeneic chicken model refractory to T. cruzi in which chickens hatched from T. cruzi inoculated eggs retained parasite kDNA (1.4 kb) minicircles. Southern blotting with EcoRI genomic DNA digests revealed main 18 and 20 kb bands by hybridization with a radiolabeled minicircle sequence. Breeding these chickens generated kDNA-mutated F1, F2, and F3 progeny. A targeted-primer TAIL-PCR (tpTAIL-PCR) technique was employed to detect the kDNA integrations. Histocompatible reporter heart grafts were used to detect ongoing inflammatory cardiomyopathy in kDNA-mutated chickens. Fluorochromes were used to label bone marrow CD3+, CD28+, and CD45+ precursors of the thymus-dependent CD8α+ and CD8β+ effector cells that expressed TCRγδ, vβ1 and vβ2 receptors, which infiltrated the adult hearts and the reporter heart grafts. Conclusions/Significance Genome modifications in kDNA-mutated chickens can be associated with disruption of immune tolerance to compatible heart grafts and with rejection of the adult host's heart and reporter graft, as well as tissue destruction by effector lymphocytes. Autoimmune heart rejection was largely observed in chickens with kDNA mutations in retrotransposons and in coding genes with roles in cell structure, metabolism, growth, and differentiation. Moreover, killing the sick kDNA-mutated bone marrow cells with cytostatic and anti-folate drugs and transplanting healthy marrow cells inhibited heart rejection. We report here for the first time that healthy bone marrow cells inhibited heart pathology in kDNA+ chickens and thus prevented the genetically driven clinical manifestations of the disease. PMID:25521296

  10. Peripartum Cardiomyopathy Presenting as Bradycardia

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Carl H.; Tweet, Marysia S.; Hayes, Sharonne N.; Best, Patricia J. M.; Blauwet, Lori A.

    2017-01-01

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) is a disease that typically affects young otherwise healthy women. As PPCM is associated with significant mortality, timely diagnosis is necessary to ensure appropriate care. To our knowledge, this represents the first reported case of PPCM presenting as symptomatic bradycardia. We describe the patient's clinical presentation and relevant findings and review the potential etiology and ramifications of bradycardia in patients with PPCM. PMID:28255481

  11. The controversy on the early history of Chagas disease.

    PubMed

    Löwy, I

    2005-12-01

    Recently historians of medicine have proposed three distinctive accounts of early history of Chagas disease (American trypasonomiasis). According to the first the disease, described by the Brazilian researcher Carlos Chagas in 1909, was "deconstructed" in the 1920s and disappeared for about twenty years, then was recovered in the 1940s, mainly through the epidemiological studies of Emmanuel Dias and his colleagues in Minas Gerais (Brazil). According to the second Chagas disease could not be "deconstructed" in the 1920s because it did not exist at that time. Chagas observations were inaccurate and unreliable and did not define a new human pathology. The entity called today "Chagas disease" appeared in the 1930, principally as the result of investigations of Cecilio Romaña in Argentina. Finally, a third view assumes that "Chagas disease" was constructed gradually between 1909 and the 1950s through the collective efforts of numerous Latino-American researchers. This paper juxtaposes different histories of Chagas disease, and argues that their divergences stems from allegiance to distinct, partly incommensurable epistemological "thought styles". The co-existence of divergent styles of historical investigation, this text proposes, should be perceived as potential source of enrichment of our understanding of the past.

  12. Chagas disease, a risk factor for high blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Vicco, Miguel Hernán; Rodeles, Luz; Yódice, Agustina; Marcipar, Iván

    2014-12-01

    Chagas disease is a parasite infection caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. Its most common complications is chronic Chagas heart disease but impairments of the systemic vasculature also has been observed. Although the different mechanisms that regulate blood pressure are disrupted, to our knowledge data on the association of hypertension and chronic Chagas disease are scarce. In this regard we evaluate whether Chagas disease constitutes a high blood pressure risk factor. We recruited 200 individuals, half of them with positive serology for T. cruzi. They were subjected to a complete clinical examination. The mean age of sampled individuals was 46.7 ± 12.3, and the mean of systolic and diastolic blood pressure were 124 ± 12 mmHg and 82 ± 10 mmHg, respectively. There were no between-group differences regarding age, sex distribution or body mass index. Chagas disease contributed significantly to high blood pressure (OR = 4, 95% CI 1.8323-7.0864, p = 0.0002). Our results reveal an important association between Chagas disease and high blood pressure, which should be contemplated by physicians in order to promote preventive cardiovascular actions in patients with Chagas disease.

  13. A global systematic review of Chagas disease prevalence among migrants.

    PubMed

    Conners, Erin E; Vinetz, Joseph M; Weeks, John R; Brouwer, Kimberly C

    2016-04-01

    Human migration has been identified as a potential factor for increased Chagas disease risk and has transformed the disease from a Latin American problem to a global one. We conducted a systematic review of the scientific literature between 2004-2014 in order to: summarize recent seroprevalence estimates of Chagas disease among Latin American migrants, in both endemic and non-endemic settings; compare seroprevalence estimates in migrants to countrywide prevalence estimates; and identify risk factors for Chagas disease among migrants. A total of 320 studies were screened and 23 studies were included. We found evidence that the prevalence of Chagas disease is higher than expected in some migrant groups and that reliance on blood donor screening prevalence estimates underestimates the burden of disease. Overall there is a dearth of high quality epidemiologic studies on the prevalence of Chagas disease in migrants, especially among intra-regional migrants within Latin America. Given that this zoonotic disease cannot likely be eradicated, improved surveillance and reporting is vital to continuing control efforts. More accurate health surveillance of both Latin American migrants and the Chagas disease burden will help countries appropriately scale up their response to this chronic disease. Overall, improved estimates of Chagas disease among migrants would likely serve to highlight the real need for better screening, diagnostics, and treatment of individuals living with the disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Dobutamine Stress Echocardiography Safety in Chagas Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Rassi, Daniela do Carmo; Vieira, Marcelo Luiz Campos; Furtado, Rogerio Gomes; Turco, Fabio de Paula; Melato, Luciano Henrique; Hotta, Viviane Tiemi; Nunes, Colandy Godoy de Oliveira; Rassi Jr., Luiz; Rassi, Salvador

    2017-01-01

    Background A few decades ago, patients with Chagas disease were predominantly rural workers, with a low risk profile for obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD). As urbanization has increased, they became exposed to the same risk factors for CAD of uninfected individuals. Dobutamine stress echocardiography (DSE) has proven to be an important tool in CAD diagnosis. Despite being a potentially arrhythmogenic method, it is safe for coronary patients without Chagas disease. For Chagas disease patients, however, the indication of DSE in clinical practice is uncertain, because of the arrhythmogenic potential of that heart disease. Objectives To assess DSE safety in Chagas disease patients with clinical suspicion of CAD, as well as the incidence of arrhythmias and adverse events during the exam. Methods Retrospective analysis of a database of patients referred for DSE from May/2012 to February/2015. This study assessed 205 consecutive patients with Chagas disease suspected of having CAD. All of them had their serology for Chagas disease confirmed. Results Their mean age was 64±10 years and most patients were females (65.4%). No patient had significant adverse events, such as acute myocardial infarction, ventricular fibrillation, asystole, stroke, cardiac rupture and death. Regarding arrhythmias, ventricular extrasystoles occurred in 48% of patients, and non-sustained ventricular tachycardia in 7.3%. Conclusion DSE proved to be safe in this population of Chagas disease patients, in which no potentially life-threatening outcome was found. PMID:28099588

  15. [Diagnostic performance of surface electrocardiogram in early detection of chagasic cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Bochard-Villanueva, Bruno; Estornell-Erill, Jordi; Fabregat-Andrés, Óscar; García-González, Pilar; Morell-Cabedo, Salvador; Ridocci-Soriano, Francisco

    2015-03-15

    Contrast-enhanced cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) allows early detection of myocardial involvement by Trypanosoma cruzi infection. The aim of our study was to assess the diagnostic performance of the surface electrocardiogram (ECG) in the early detection of Chagas' cardiomyopathy (CCM) compared with CMR. We included 43 asymptomatic patients (30 women, 42 ± 9.8 years), diagnosed of Chagas disease. The sample was divided into 2 groups according to the presence (n=17) or absence (n=26) of electrocardiographic abnormalities. All patients underwent CMR and late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) was used as a marker of early myocardial involvement. Six (14%) patients had a LGE significantly higher in the group who had electrocardiographic abnormalities (29 vs. 4%, P<.05). With CMR as the method of reference, the ECG had a sensitivity of 83% and a negative predictive value of 96% to detect CCM. ECG is a useful, inexpensive and globally available tool for the screening of CCM in asymptomatic patients but with proven myocardial involvement in CMR. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Research priorities in sarcomeric cardiomyopathies

    PubMed Central

    van der Velden, Jolanda; Ho, Carolyn Y.; Tardiff, Jil C.; Olivotto, Iacopo; Knollmann, Bjorn C.; Carrier, Lucie

    2015-01-01

    The clinical variability in patients with sarcomeric cardiomyopathies is striking: a mutation causes cardiomyopathy in one individual, while the identical mutation is harmless in a family member. Moreover, the clinical phenotype varies ranging from asymmetric hypertrophy to severe dilatation of the heart. Identification of a single phenotype-associated disease mechanism would facilitate the design of targeted treatments for patient groups with different clinical phenotypes. However, evidence from both the clinic and basic knowledge of functional and structural properties of the sarcomere argues against a ‘one size fits all’ therapy for treatment of one clinical phenotype. Meticulous clinical and basic studies are needed to unravel the initial and progressive changes initiated by sarcomere mutations to better understand why mutations in the same gene can lead to such opposing phenotypes. Ultimately, we need to design an ‘integrative physiology’ approach to fully realize patient/gene-tailored therapy. Expertise within different research fields (cardiology, genetics, cellular biology, physiology, and pharmacology) must be joined to link longitudinal clinical studies with mechanistic insights obtained from molecular and functional studies in novel cardiac muscle systems. New animal models, which reflect both initial and more advanced stages of sarcomeric cardiomyopathy, will also aid in achieving these goals. Here, we discuss current priorities in clinical and preclinical investigation aimed at increasing our understanding of pathophysiological mechanisms leading from mutation to disease. Such information will provide the basis to improve risk stratification and to develop therapies to prevent/rescue cardiac dysfunction and remodelling caused by sarcomere mutations. PMID:25631582

  17. Determinants of Thyrotoxic Cardiomyopathy Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Oliveros-Ruiz, Lucia; Vallejo, Maite; Diez Canseco, L. Fernando; Cárdenas, Manuel; Hermosillo, J. Antonio G.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose was to evaluate the effect of the disease duration prior to treatment, thyroid hormones level, or both on the reversibility of dilated cardiomyopathy. Between January 2006 and December 2010, a longitudinal study with a 6 months follow-up was carried on. One hundred and seventy patients with hyperthyroidism were referred to the cardiologist, and 127 had a 6 months followup after antithyroid treatment and were evaluated by echocardiography. Dilated cardiomyopathy reversibility criteria were established according to echocardiographic parameters. Complete reversibility existed when all parameters were met, partial reversibility when LVEF was ≥55% plus two or three other parameters, and no reversibility when LVEF was ≤55% regardless of other parameters. The results showed that echocardiography parameters related to the regression of myocardial mass were associated with a disease duration shorter than 10.38 months. This was the main predictive variable for reversal of dilated cardiomyopathy, followed by β-blocker treatment, and the last predictive variable was the serum level of free triiodothyronine. This study showed that the effect on the myocardium related to thyrotoxicosis was associated with the disease duration before treatment. PMID:24106705

  18. [Part V. Laboratory diagnosis of Chagas disease].

    PubMed

    Apt B, Werner; Heitmann G, Ingrid; Jercic L, M Isabel; Jofré M, Leonor; Muñoz C Del V, Patricia; Noemí H, Isabel; San Martín V, Ana M; Sapunar P, Jorge; Torres H, Marisa; Zulantay A, Inés

    2008-10-01

    In this fifth part of Guidelines for Chagas disease, diagnostic techniques for Trypanosoma cruzi infection in humans are reviewed, the interpretation of laboratory results and an algorithm for laboratory diagnosis in immunocompetent hosts are presented. Chagas disease may be diagnosed by three kinds of techniques: direct, which allow detect the presence of the parasite in different kind of samples; indirect, based on the search of immune specific response against T. cruzi antigens and molecular, which detect parasite genetic material. Direct techniques are utilized mainly in acute phase of disease, as the parasite is present in blood of infected host. These techniques do not require be confirmed by other methods. For chronic undetermined phase and for symptomatic phase it is recommended to use indirect techniques; generally, immunoassay techniques (ELISA) that detect IgG antibodies directed against T. cruzi antigens are performed. As false positive results are possible, a positive or undetermined result must be confirmed by at least another technique (indirect immunofluorescence or indirect hemmaglutination). In Chile, confirmation of infection is performed by the Instituto de Salud Pública National Reference Laboratory or at surrogate centers. Molecular methods may be used to make the diagnosis in acute or chronic phase of infection, with more accuracy in the acute phase, and it is mainly recommended to diagnose vertical transmission of T. cruzi as early diagnosis of congenital infection increases the possibility to cure the sibling and besides it is a good marker to evaluate the effectiveness of treatment.

  19. Chagas disease and globalization of the Amazon.

    PubMed

    Briceño-León, Roberto

    2007-01-01

    The increasing number of autochthonous cases of Chagas disease in the Amazon since the 1970s has led to fear that the disease may become a new public health problem in the region. This transformation in the disease's epidemiological pattern in the Amazon can be explained by environmental and social changes in the last 30 years. The current article draws on the sociological theory of perverse effects to explain these changes as the unwanted result of the shift from the "inward" development model prevailing until the 1970s to the "outward" model that we know as globalization, oriented by industrial forces and international trade. The current article highlights the implementation of five new patterns in agriculture, cattle-raising, mining, lumbering, and urban occupation that have generated changes in the environment and the traditional indigenous habitat and have led to migratory flows, deforestation, sedentary living, the presence of domestic animals, and changes in the habitat that facilitate colonization of human dwellings by vectors and the domestic and work-related transmission of the disease. The expansion of Chagas disease is thus a perverse effect of the globalization process in the Amazon.

  20. Chagas' Disease: Pregnancy and Congenital Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Chagas disease is a chronic infection that kills approximately 12,000 people a year. Mass migration of chronically infected and asymptomatic persons has caused globalization of Chagas disease and has made nonvectorial infection, including vertical and blood-borne transmission, more of a threat to human communities than vectorial infection. To control transmission, it is essential to test all pregnant women living in endemic countries and all pregnant women having migrated from, or having lived in, endemic countries. All children born to seropositive mothers should be tested not only within the first month of life but also at ~6 months and ~12 months of age. The diagnosis is made by identification of the parasite in blood before the age of 6 months and by identification of the parasite in blood and/or positive serology after 10 months of age. Follow up for a year is essential as a significant proportion of cases are initially negative and are only detected at a later stage. If the condition is diagnosed and treated early, the clinical response is excellent and the majority of cases are cured. PMID:24949443

  1. Chagas disease: changes in knowledge and management.

    PubMed

    Lescure, François-Xavier; Le Loup, Guillaume; Freilij, Hector; Develoux, Michel; Paris, Luc; Brutus, Laurent; Pialoux, Gilles

    2010-08-01

    More than 100 years after the discovery of human American trypanosomiasis by Carlos Chagas, our knowledge and management of the disease are profoundly changing. Substantial progress made by disease control programmes in most endemic areas contrasts with persisting difficulties in the Gran Chaco region in South America and the recent emergence of the disease in non-endemic areas because of population movements. In terms of pathogenesis, major discoveries have been made about the life cycle and genomics of Trypanosoma cruzi, and the role of the parasite itself in the chronic phase of the disease. From a clinical perspective, a growing number of arguments have challenged the notion of an indeterminate phase, and suggest new approaches to manage patients. New methods such as standardised PCR will be necessary to ensure follow-up of this chronic infection. Although drugs for treatment of Chagas disease are limited, poorly tolerated, and not very effective, treatment indications are expanding. The results of the Benznidazole Evaluation For Interrupting Trypanosomiasis (BENEFIT) trial in 2012 will also help to inform treatment. Mobilisation of financial resources to fund research on diagnosis and randomised controlled trials of treatment are international health priorities.

  2. Genetic Variations Leading to Familial Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Kae Won; Lee, Jongsung; Kim, Youngjo

    2016-01-01

    Cardiomyopathy is a major cause of death worldwide. Based on pathohistological abnormalities and clinical manifestation, cardiomyopathies are categorized into several groups: hypertrophic, dilated, restricted, arrhythmogenic right ventricular, and unclassified. Dilated cardiomyopathy, which is characterized by dilation of the left ventricle and systolic dysfunction, is the most severe and prevalent form of cardiomyopathy and usually requires heart transplantation. Its etiology remains unclear. Recent genetic studies of single gene mutations have provided significant insights into the complex processes of cardiac dysfunction. To date, over 40 genes have been demonstrated to contribute to dilated cardiomyopathy. With advances in genetic screening techniques, novel genes associated with this disease are continuously being identified. The respective gene products can be classified into several functional groups such as sarcomere proteins, structural proteins, ion channels, and nuclear envelope proteins. Nuclear envelope proteins are emerging as potential molecular targets in dilated cardiomyopathy. Because they are not directly associated with contractile force generation and transmission, the molecular pathways through which these proteins cause cardiac muscle disorder remain unclear. However, nuclear envelope proteins are involved in many essential cellular processes. Therefore, integrating apparently distinct cellular processes is of great interest in elucidating the etiology of dilated cardiomyopathy. In this mini review, we summarize the genetic factors associated with dilated cardiomyopathy and discuss their cellular functions. PMID:27802374

  3. Recurrent takotsubo cardiomyopathy in a child.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Nayan T; Parent, John J; Hurwitz, Roger A

    2016-02-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy or transient apical ballooning syndrome very rarely presents in children. In all patients with takotsubo, it is estimated that only 3.5% will have recurrence. In this study, we describe a case of recurrent takotsubo cardiomyopathy in a child, likely triggered by status epilepticus.

  4. Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy in a weimaraner

    PubMed Central

    Eason, Bryan D.; Leach, Stacey B.; Kuroki, Keiichi

    2015-01-01

    Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) was diagnosed postmortem in a weimaraner dog. Syncope, ventricular arrhythmias, and sudden death in this patient combined with the histopathological fatty tissue infiltration affecting the right ventricular myocardium are consistent with previous reports of ARVC in non-boxer dogs. Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy has not been previously reported in weimaraners. PMID:26483577

  5. Genetic Variations Leading to Familial Dilated Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Cho, Kae Won; Lee, Jongsung; Kim, Youngjo

    2016-10-01

    Cardiomyopathy is a major cause of death worldwide. Based on pathohistological abnormalities and clinical manifestation, cardiomyopathies are categorized into several groups: hypertrophic, dilated, restricted, arrhythmogenic right ventricular, and unclassified. Dilated cardiomyopathy, which is characterized by dilation of the left ventricle and systolic dysfunction, is the most severe and prevalent form of cardiomyopathy and usually requires heart transplantation. Its etiology remains unclear. Recent genetic studies of single gene mutations have provided significant insights into the complex processes of cardiac dysfunction. To date, over 40 genes have been demonstrated to contribute to dilated cardiomyopathy. With advances in genetic screening techniques, novel genes associated with this disease are continuously being identified. The respective gene products can be classified into several functional groups such as sarcomere proteins, structural proteins, ion channels, and nuclear envelope proteins. Nuclear envelope proteins are emerging as potential molecular targets in dilated cardiomyopathy. Because they are not directly associated with contractile force generation and transmission, the molecular pathways through which these proteins cause cardiac muscle disorder remain unclear. However, nuclear envelope proteins are involved in many essential cellular processes. Therefore, integrating apparently distinct cellular processes is of great interest in elucidating the etiology of dilated cardiomyopathy. In this mini review, we summarize the genetic factors associated with dilated cardiomyopathy and discuss their cellular functions.

  6. Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy Associated with Severe Hypothyroidism in an Elderly Female

    PubMed Central

    Brenes-Salazar, Jorge A.

    2016-01-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, also known as stress cardiomyopathy, is a syndrome that affects predominantly postmenopausal women. Despite multiple described mechanisms, intense, neuroadrenergic myocardial stimulation appears to be the main trigger. Hyperthyroidism, but rarely hypothyroidism, has been described in association with Takotsubo cardiomyopathy. Herein, we present a case of stress cardiomyopathy in the setting of symptomatic hypothyroidism. PMID:27512537

  7. Herpes simplex virus-induced cardiomyopathy successfully treated with acyclovir.

    PubMed

    Kuchynka, Petr; Palecek, Tomas; Hrbackova, Hana; Vitkova, Ivana; Simek, Stanislav; Nemecek, Eduard; Aster, Viktor; Louch, William E; Aschermann, Michael; Linhart, Ales

    2010-10-01

    Inflammatory dilated cardiomyopathy (DCMi) represents an acquired form of dilated cardiomyopathy. Viral infection is the most common cause of DCMi. In contrast with other cardiotropic viruses, herpes simplex virus (HSV) is a very rare finding in endomyocardial biopsies of patients with dilated cardiomyopathy. We report a case of HSV-induced cardiomyopathy successfully treated with acyclovir.

  8. Nemaline myopathy with dilated cardiomyopathy in childhood.

    PubMed

    Gatayama, Ryohei; Ueno, Kentaro; Nakamura, Hideaki; Yanagi, Sadamitsu; Ueda, Hideaki; Yamagishi, Hiroyuki; Yasui, Seiyo

    2013-06-01

    We present a case of a 9-year-old boy with nemaline myopathy and dilated cardiomyopathy. The combination of nemaline myopathy and cardiomyopathy is rare, and this is the first reported case of dilated cardiomyopathy associated with childhood-onset nemaline myopathy. A novel mutation, p.W358C, in ACTA1 was detected in this patient. An unusual feature of this case was that the patient's cardiac failure developed during early childhood with no delay of gross motor milestones. The use of a β-blocker did not improve his clinical course, and the patient died 6 months after diagnosis of dilated cardiomyopathy. Congenital nonprogressive nemaline myopathy is not necessarily a benign disorder: deterioration can occur early in the course of dilated cardiomyopathy with neuromuscular disease, and careful clinical evaluation is therefore necessary.

  9. Cardiomyopathy in Coffin-Lowry syndrome.

    PubMed

    Facher, Jennifer J; Regier, Elizabeth J; Jacobs, Gretta H; Siwik, Ernest; Delaunoy, Jean-Pierre; Robin, Nathaniel H

    2004-07-15

    Coffin-Lowry syndrome (CLS) is a rare but well-documented X-linked disorder characterized by small size, developmental delay/mental retardation, and characteristic facial and skeletal findings in affected males. The phenotype in affected females is far more variable and can include developmental differences, obesity, and characteristic facial and skeletal differences. Cardiac anomalies are reported in less than 20% of affected males, with cardiomyopathy being one of the rare but reported complications of this disorder. However, cardiomyopathy is not well characterized in CLS. Here, we report on a 14-year-old boy with physical and developmental findings consistent with CLS who presented with a relatively sudden onset of signs of congestive heart failure due to a restrictive cardiomyopathy; an endomyocardial biopsy demonstrated non-specific hypertrophic myocyte alterations consistent with cardiomyopathy. This is the first description of the histology and electron microscopy of cardiomyopathy in CLS. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. American Trypanosomiasis (Also Known as Chagas Disease) Detailed FAQs

    MedlinePlus

    ... Trypanosoma cruzi , which is transmitted to animals and people by insect vectors that are found only in the Americas (mainly, in rural areas of Latin America where poverty is widespread). Chagas disease ( T. cruzi infection) is ...

  11. 2 nd Brazilian Consensus on Chagas Disease, 2015.

    PubMed

    Dias, João Carlos Pinto; Ramos, Alberto Novaes; Gontijo, Eliane Dias; Luquetti, Alejandro; Shikanai-Yasuda, Maria Aparecida; Coura, José Rodrigues; Torres, Rosália Morais; Melo, José Renan da Cunha; Almeida, Eros Antonio de; Oliveira, Wilson de; Silveira, Antônio Carlos; Rezende, Joffre Marcondes de; Pinto, Fabiane Scalabrini; Ferreira, Antonio Walter; Rassi, Anis; Fragata, Abílio Augusto; Sousa, Andréa Silvestre de; Correia, Dalmo; Jansen, Ana Maria; Andrade, Glaucia Manzan Queiroz; Britto, Constança Felícia De Paoli de Carvalho; Pinto, Ana Yecê das Neves; Rassi, Anis; Campos, Dayse Elisabeth; Abad-Franch, Fernando; Santos, Silvana Eloi; Chiari, Egler; Hasslocher-Moreno, Alejandro Marcel; Moreira, Eliane Furtado; Marques, Divina Seila de Oliveira; Silva, Eliane Lages; Marin-Neto, José Antonio; Galvão, Lúcia Maria da Cunha; Xavier, Sergio Salles; Valente, Sebastião Aldo da Silva; Carvalho, Noêmia Barbosa; Cardoso, Alessandra Viana; Silva, Rafaella Albuquerque E; Costa, Veruska Maia da; Vivaldini, Simone Monzani; Oliveira, Suelene Mamede; Valente, Vera da Costa; Lima, Mayara Maia; Alves, Renato Vieira

    2016-12-01

    Chagas disease is a neglected chronic condition with a high burden of morbidity and mortality. It has considerable psychological, social, and economic impacts. The disease represents a significant public health issue in Brazil, with different regional patterns. This document presents the evidence that resulted in the Brazilian Consensus on Chagas Disease. The objective was to review and standardize strategies for diagnosis, treatment, prevention, and control of Chagas disease in the country, based on the available scientific evidence. The consensus is based on the articulation and strategic contribution of renowned Brazilian experts with knowledge and experience on various aspects of the disease. It is the result of a close collaboration between the Brazilian Society of Tropical Medicine and the Ministry of Health. It is hoped that this document will strengthen the development of integrated actions against Chagas disease in the country, focusing on epidemiology, management, comprehensive care (including families and communities), communication, information, education, and research .

  12. Imaging Phenotype vs. Genotype in Non-Hypertrophic Heritable Cardiomyopathies: Dilated Cardiomyopathy and Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Raman, Subha V.; Basso, Cristina; Tandri, Harikrishna; Taylor, Matthew R. G.

    2011-01-01

    Advances in cardiovascular imaging increasingly afford unique insights into heritable myocardial disease. As clinical presentation of genetic cardiomyopathies may range from nonspecific symptoms to sudden cardiac death, accurate diagnosis has implications for individual patients as well as related family members. The initial consideration of genetic cardiomyopathy may occur in the imaging laboratory, where one must recognize the patient with arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) among the many with ventricular arrhythmia referred to define myocardial substrate. Accurate diagnosis of the patient presenting with dyspnea and palpitations whose first-degree relatives have lamin A/C cardiomyopathy may warrant genetic testing1, 2 plus imaging of diastolic function and myocardial fibrosis3. As advances in cardiac imaging afford detection of subclinical structural and functional changes, the imaging specialist must be attuned to signatures of specific genetic disorders. With increased availability of both advanced imaging as well as genotyping techniques, this review seeks to provide cardiovascular imaging specialists and clinicians with the contemporary information needed for more precise diagnosis and treatment of heritable myocardial disease. A companion paper in this series covers imaging phenotype and genotype considerations in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). This review details clinical features, imaging phenotype and current genetic understanding for two of the most common non-HCM conditions that prompt myocardial imaging - dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC). While all modalities are considered herein, considerable focus is given to CMR with its unique capabilities for myocardial tissue characterization. PMID:21081743

  13. Therapeutical approaches under investigation for treatment of Chagas disease.

    PubMed

    Bahia, Maria Terezinha; Diniz, Lívia de Figueiredo; Mosqueira, Vanessa Carla Furtado

    2014-09-01

    A century after its discovery, American trypanosomiasis or Chagas disease remains a serious health problem in Latin America, where it affects around 7 - 8 million people. The prevalence of Chagas disease in the poorer parts of the world has meant that it has largely been neglected with limited progress that made in identifying new drugs for the treatment. The nitroheterocyclic drugs nifurtimox and benznidazole are first-line drugs available for Chagas disease with limitations that include variable efficacy, long treatment courses and toxicity. This review focuses on different therapeutic strategies that have been used for the discovery of new treatments for Chagas disease. These include combination chemotherapy, drug repositioning, re-dosing regimens for current drugs and the identification of new drugs with specified target profiles. There are currently several reasons for a more optimistic view about chemotherapy with Chagas disease. However, despite some progress being made in preclinical studies, there is yet to be an ideal drug or formulation for human treatment. One major drawback in the evaluation of potential Chagas disease therapeutics is the lack of tools available to perform the said evaluation. Indeed, there is a great need to discover a better biomarker that could determine the efficacy of potential chemotherapeutics in treated patients.

  14. Altered Cardiomyocyte Function and Trypanosoma cruzi Persistence in Chagas Disease.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Jader Santos; Santos-Miranda, Artur; Sales-Junior, Policarpo Ademar; Monti-Rocha, Renata; Campos, Paula Peixoto; Machado, Fabiana Simão; Roman-Campos, Danilo

    2016-05-04

    Chagas disease, caused by the triatominae Trypanosoma cruzi, is one of the leading causes of heart malfunctioning in Latin America. The cardiac phenotype is observed in 20-30% of infected people 10-40 years after their primary infection. The cardiac complications during Chagas disease range from cardiac arrhythmias to heart failure, with important involvement of the right ventricle. Interestingly, no studies have evaluated the electrical properties of right ventricle myocytes during Chagas disease and correlated them to parasite persistence. Taking advantage of a murine model of Chagas disease, we studied the histological and electrical properties of right ventricle in acute (30 days postinfection [dpi]) and chronic phases (90 dpi) of infected mice with the Colombian strain of T. cruzi and their correlation to parasite persistence. We observed an increase in collagen deposition and inflammatory infiltrate at both 30 and 90 dpi. Furthermore, using reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, we detected parasites at 90 dpi in right and left ventricles. In addition, we observed action potential prolongation and reduced transient outward K(+) current and L-type Ca(2+) current at 30 and 90 dpi. Taking together, our results demonstrate that T. cruzi infection leads to important modifications in electrical properties associated with inflammatory infiltrate and parasite persistence in mice right ventricle, suggesting a causal role between inflammation, parasite persistence, and altered cardiomyocyte function in Chagas disease. Thus, arrhythmias observed in Chagas disease may be partially related to altered electrical function in right ventricle. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  15. [Chagas disease in the Americas: an ecohealth perspective].

    PubMed

    Briceño-León, Roberto

    2009-01-01

    The historical processes involved in Chagas disease transmission relate to the patterns and conditions of human settlements, especially in rural areas, due to proximity to forest areas, where both vectors and Trypanosoma cruzi can occur, combined with precarious housing conditions and underlying poverty. However, seasonal and permanent rural-urban migration has played a major role in re-mobilizing vectors, T. cruzi, and Chagas-infected individuals. A new agricultural frontier in the Amazon has led to a new transmission pattern, especially with palm trees located close to houses. Improved blood bank surveillance has decreased transmission by blood transfusions. International migration also plays a role in Chagas disease epidemiology. The United States and Spain, where specific health services for Chagas disease diagnosis and treatment are largely absent, harbor an unknown number of individuals with Chagas, probably infected decades ago. The article discusses major strides in Chagas disease knowledge and control, besides identifying persistent gaps, such as the need for housing improvements, especially in poor rural areas in the Americas.

  16. Research priorities in sarcomeric cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    van der Velden, Jolanda; Ho, Carolyn Y; Tardiff, Jil C; Olivotto, Iacopo; Knollmann, Bjorn C; Carrier, Lucie

    2015-04-01

    The clinical variability in patients with sarcomeric cardiomyopathies is striking: a mutation causes cardiomyopathy in one individual, while the identical mutation is harmless in a family member. Moreover, the clinical phenotype varies ranging from asymmetric hypertrophy to severe dilatation of the heart. Identification of a single phenotype-associated disease mechanism would facilitate the design of targeted treatments for patient groups with different clinical phenotypes. However, evidence from both the clinic and basic knowledge of functional and structural properties of the sarcomere argues against a 'one size fits all' therapy for treatment of one clinical phenotype. Meticulous clinical and basic studies are needed to unravel the initial and progressive changes initiated by sarcomere mutations to better understand why mutations in the same gene can lead to such opposing phenotypes. Ultimately, we need to design an 'integrative physiology' approach to fully realize patient/gene-tailored therapy. Expertise within different research fields (cardiology, genetics, cellular biology, physiology, and pharmacology) must be joined to link longitudinal clinical studies with mechanistic insights obtained from molecular and functional studies in novel cardiac muscle systems. New animal models, which reflect both initial and more advanced stages of sarcomeric cardiomyopathy, will also aid in achieving these goals. Here, we discuss current priorities in clinical and preclinical investigation aimed at increasing our understanding of pathophysiological mechanisms leading from mutation to disease. Such information will provide the basis to improve risk stratification and to develop therapies to prevent/rescue cardiac dysfunction and remodelling caused by sarcomere mutations. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Cardiomyopathies and the Armed Forces.

    PubMed

    Holdsworth, D A; Cox, A T; Boos, C; Hardman, R; Sharma, S

    2015-09-01

    Cardiomyopathies are a group of heterogeneous myocardial diseases that are frequently inherited and are a recognised cause of premature sudden cardiac death in young individuals. Incomplete expressions of disease and the overlap with the physiological cardiac manifestations of regular intensive exercise create diagnostic challenges in young athletes and military recruits. Early identification is important because sudden death in the absence of prodromal symptoms is a common presentation, and there are several therapeutic strategies to minimise this risk. This paper examines the classification and clinical features of cardiomyopathies with specific reference to a military population and provides a detailed account of the optimum strategy for diagnosis, indications for specialist referral and specific guidance on the occupational significance of cardiomyopathy. A 27-year-old Lance Corporal Signaller presents to his Regimental medical officer (RMO) after feeling 'light-headed' following an 8 mile unloaded run. While waiting to see the RMO, the medical sergeant records a 12-lead ECG. The ECG is reviewed by the RMO immediately prior to the consultation and shows voltage criteria for left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy and inverted T-waves in II, III, aVF and V1-V3 (Figure 1). This Lance Corporal is a unit physical training instructor and engages in >10 h of aerobic exercise per week. He is a non-smoker and does not have any significant medical history. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  18. Serological screening of Chagas disease in an immigrant population in Asturias, Spain proceeding from Chagas-endemic areas.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Guardado, Azucena; Rodríguez, Mercedes; Alonso, Paula; Seco, Carolina; Flores-Chavez, Maria; Mejuto, Patricia; Cartón, Jose A

    2009-01-01

    Population movements from Chagas disease-endemic areas to non-endemic countries due to immigration make the occurrence of this disease in these latter areas possible. We describe the results of a screening programme conducted in an immigrant population from endemic areas, attending the Tropical Medicine Unit of the Hospital Central de Asturias between June 2006 and June 2008. The ID-Chagas antibody test (particle gel immunoassay (PaGIA); DiaMed-ID) was used as a screening assay. We analysed 64 patients, 9 of whom (14%) tested positive for Chagas disease antibodies, a diagnosis that was confirmed in all cases. Six patients came from Bolivia, 2 from Paraguay and 1 from Brazil. Chagas disease is of increasing importance, even in areas with low migratory flows; hence screening programmes for this population group are especially important.

  19. Scintigraphic characterization of amyloid cardiomyopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Li, C.K.; Rabinovitch, M.A.; Juni, J.E.; Thrall, J.H.; Pitt, B.; Das, S.K.; Abrams, G.D.; Helvie, M.

    1985-03-01

    Amyloidosis is an important entity in the differential diagnosis of cardiac failure of undetermined etiology. In this case report, the typical pattern of combined systolic and diastolic impairment in amyloid cardiomyopathy was demonstrated by analysis of the cardiac blood pool study. In addition, the patient described had mild uptake of Ga-67 citrate, as well as the characteristically intense myocardial uptake of Tc-99m pyrophosphate. Scintigraphic assessment may be particularly helpful when the diagnosis of amyloidosis is being considered in a patient with unexplained cardiac failure.

  20. Improving outcomes in peripartum cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Dalzell, Jonathan R; Cannon, Jane A; Simpson, Joanne; Gardner, Roy S; Petrie, Mark C

    2015-06-01

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) is a rare condition with a diverse spectrum of potential outcomes, ranging from frequent complete recovery to fulminant heart failure and death. The pathogenesis of PPCM is not well understood, and relatively little is known about its incidence and prevalence. PPCM is often under-recognised in the clinical setting. Early investigation and diagnosis with subsequent expert management may improve outcomes. The development of registries will allow this condition to be better characterised and may help answer crucial questions regarding its optimal medical and surgical management. This paper reviews the potential approaches to improve outcomes in patients with PPCM.

  1. Peripartum cardiomyopathy: summary of an international survey on peripartum cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Veille, J C; Zaccaro, D

    1999-08-01

    The aim of this survey was to assess the evaluation, management, and future recommendations of patients with the diagnosis of peripartum cardiomyopathy and to evaluate the interest in the creation of a prospective database regarding this rare disorder. A total of 116 surveys were sent to major teaching institutions in the United States (including Puerto Rico), Canada, Crete, and South Korea after a national conference held at the National Institutes of Health regarding peripartum cardiomyopathy. This was an open-ended survey containing 17 specific questions regarding this disorder and its management. A total of 78 (67%) maternal-fetal specialists responded to the survey. Diuretics and digoxin were used as first-line treatment for this disorder. Only 6% used angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors during pregnancy. Fifty-eight percent of the perinatologists (58%) recommended either intrauterine contraceptive devices or foam and condoms, whereas oral contraceptives (progesterone-only pill or estrogen-progesterone mix) were recommended in 23% and 41%, respectively. Sixty-six percent (66%) of the respondents would recommend future pregnancy if ventricular function returned to normal. Fundamental clinical and basic research is lacking regarding this rare but potentially devastating disorder. Major teaching institutions do not have significant numbers of patients with this disorder to provide concrete recommendations, and starting a database will be useful in the gathering of important epidemiologic information. A secondary aim of such a registry would be to establish a repository for tissue and blood samples to answer basic mechanistic questions about this disorder.

  2. Acquired non-Chagas megacolon associated with the use of psychiatric medication: case report and differential diagnosis with Chagas megacolon.

    PubMed

    Adad, Sheila Jorge; Souza, Moisés Amâncio; Silva, Gisele Barbosa E; Carmo Junior, José do; Godoy, Charles Antônio Pires de; Micheletti, Adilha Misson Rua

    2008-01-01

    A case of acquired megacolon in a 62-year-old man with acute abdomen due to sigmoid volvulus is reported. The case was associated with the use of psychiatric medications. The aim in this report was to emphasize the differential diagnosis with Chagas megacolon. Anatomopathological examination did not show any evidence of denervation, ganglionitis and/or myositis, and the serological test for Chagas disease was negative.

  3. [Peripartum cardiomyopathy--a case report].

    PubMed

    Banaczek, Zbigniew; Rak, Grzegorz; Gołyska-Rączkiewicz, Danuta

    2015-01-01

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy, a type of dilated cardiomyopathy of unknown origin, occurs in previously healthy women in the final month of pregnancy and up to 5 months after delivery. Although the incidence is low--less than 0.1% of pregnancies--morbidity and mortality rates are high at 5% to 32%. The etiology of left ventricular dysfunction is unknown. Diagnosis of peripartum cardiomyopathy requires heightened awareness among multidisciplinary patient care teams and a high degree of suspicion. Confirmation involves the echocardiography reveals severe left ventricular failure. The outcome of peripartum cardiomyopathy is also highly variable. For some women, the clinical and echocardiographic status improves and sometimes returns to normal, whereas for others, the disease progresses to severe cardiac failure and even sudden cardiac death. Management of peripartum cardiomyopathy should aim first at improving heart-failure symptoms through conventional therapies, and then at administering targeted therapies.The prognosis is best when peripartum cardiomyopathy is diagnosed and treated early. Fortunately, despite a high risk of recurrence in subsequent pregnancies, many patients with peripartum cardiomyopathy recover within 3 to 6 months of disease onset. Future pregnancy is not recommended especially in patients with persistent left ventricular dysfunction because of the risk of dangerous complications.

  4. Stress cardiomyopathy in a patient with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and myocardial bridging

    PubMed Central

    Benavides, Miguel; Vinardell, Juan M; Arenas, Ivan; Santana, Orlando

    2017-01-01

    Stress cardiomyopathy is an acquired cardiomyopathy of unknown aetiology. It usually occurs in women over the age of 70 who have experienced physical or emotional stress. It is most commonly characterised by a transient, left ventricular systolic dysfunction in the apical portion and hyperkinesia in the basal segments, without obstructive coronary artery disease. Its association with obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and myocardial bridging is rare. Herein, we present such a case. PMID:28228389

  5. Transformation of myocarditis and inflammatory cardiomyopathy to idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy: facts and fiction.

    PubMed

    Figulla, Hans R

    2004-05-01

    There is broad evidence that enteroviruses and adenoviruses can induce an acute inflammation of the myocardium without cardiac dysfunction (i.e. myocarditis) or with cardiac dysfunction (i.e. inflammatory cardiomyopathy) that can transform to a virus-negative dilated cardiomyopathy. In the adult patient neither other viruses (parvo-B 19 virus, hepatitis C virus, cytomegalovirus) nor post-infection autoimmunity are likely to induce idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy.

  6. Diabetic Cardiomyopathy: Mechanisms and Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Battiprolu, Pavan K.; Gillette, Thomas G.; Wang, Zhao V.; Lavandero, Sergio; Hill, Joseph A.

    2010-01-01

    The incidence and prevalence of diabetes mellitus are each increasing rapidly in our society. The majority of patients with diabetes succumb ultimately to heart disease, much of which stems from atherosclerotic disease and hypertension. However, cardiomyopathy can develop independent of elevated blood pressure or coronary artery disease, a process termed diabetic cardiomyopathy. This disorder is a complex diabetes-associated process characterized by significant changes in the physiology, structure, and mechanical function of the heart. Here, we review recently derived insights into mechanisms and molecular events involved in the pathogenesis of diabetic cardiomyopathy. PMID:21274425

  7. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy due to iatrogenic methadone withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Saiful, Faisal B; Lafferty, James; Jun, Chin Hee; Teli, Sumaya; Duvvuri, Srinivas; Khattri, Saakshi; Bhat, Tariq

    2011-01-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy is a syndrome characterized by transient apical ballooning or reversible midventricular systolic dysfunction. Most cases occur in postmenopausal women and are typically triggered by an acute medical illness or emotional or physical stress. Its presentation is highly suggestive of myocardial ischemia, but there is little or no evidence of epicardial coronary artery disease. To our knowledge there are only three reported cases in the literature of Takotsubo cardiomyopathy induced by opioid agonist withdrawal in adults; ours is the first reported case of iatrogenic methadone withdrawal leading to Takotsubo cardiomyopathy.

  8. Evolutionary change mimicking apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in a patient with takotsubo cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Hui-Jeong; Lee, Hyae-Min; Yang, In-Ho; Kim, Dong-Hee; Byun, Jong-Kyu; Sohn, Il Suk

    2014-11-01

    In this report, we introduce a case of thickening of the involved left ventricular apical segment on echocardiography and deep T-wave inversions in precordial leads on electrocardiography transiently seen in the course of recovery from biventricular takotsubo cardiomyopathy, mimicking apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. This result suggests that the echocardiographic finding of transient myocardial edema can be identified by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in takotsubo cardiomyopathy. Additionally, it persisted a few weeks after full functional recovery. We believe that this case will contribute in part toward clarifying the pathophysiology of takotsubo cardiomyopathy.

  9. Chagas disease (American trypanosomiasis) in Mexico: an update.

    PubMed

    Carabarin-Lima, Alejandro; González-Vázquez, María Cristina; Rodríguez-Morales, Olivia; Baylón-Pacheco, Lidia; Rosales-Encina, José Luis; Reyes-López, Pedro Antonio; Arce-Fonseca, Minerva

    2013-08-01

    Chagas disease is a parasitic infection caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, a flagellated organism that is transmitted mainly to humans through the infected feces of triatomine kissing bugs (vector transmission in endemic areas) or by transfusion of infected blood, donations of infected organ, or transmission from an infected mother to her child at birth. Chagas disease was first described in 1909 by the Brazilian physician Carlos Chagas, and due to the parasite's distribution throughout North, Central and South America, the disease is commonly known as American trypanosomiasis. However, this disease is now present in non-endemic countries such as Canada, the United States of America, and several countries in Europe (principally Spain). Moreover, Chagas disease was recently designated by the World Health Organization as one of the main neglected tropical diseases. The aim of this review is to summarize the research efforts recently described in studies conducted in Mexico on Chagas disease. In this country, there are no existing vector control programs. In addition, there is no consensus on the diagnostic methods for acute and chronic Chagas disease in maternity wards and blood banks, and trypanocidal therapy is not administered to chronic patients. The actual prevalence of the disease is unknown because no official reporting of cases is performed. Therefore, the number of people infected by different routes of transmission (vector, congenital, blood transfusion, organ transplantation, or oral) is unknown. We believe that by promoting education about Chagas disease in schools starting at the basic elementary level and including reinforcement at higher education levels will ensure that the Mexican population would be aware of this health problem and that the control measures adopted will have more acceptance and success. We hope that this review sensitizes the relevant authorities and that the appropriate measures to reduce the risk of infection by T. cruzi

  10. Importance of genetic evaluation and testing in pediatric cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Tariq, Muhammad; Ware, Stephanie M

    2014-01-01

    Pediatric cardiomyopathies are clinically heterogeneous heart muscle disorders that are responsible for significant morbidity and mortality. Phenotypes include hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, dilated cardiomyopathy, restrictive cardiomyopathy, left ventricular noncompaction and arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy. There is substantial evidence for a genetic contribution to pediatric cardiomyopathy. To date, more than 100 genes have been implicated in cardiomyopathy, but comprehensive genetic diagnosis has been problematic because of the large number of genes, the private nature of mutations, and difficulties in interpreting novel rare variants. This review will focus on current knowledge on the genetic etiologies of pediatric cardiomyopathy and their diagnostic relevance in clinical settings. Recent developments in sequencing technologies are greatly impacting the pace of gene discovery and clinical diagnosis. Understanding the genetic basis for pediatric cardiomyopathy and establishing genotype-phenotype correlations may help delineate the molecular and cellular events necessary to identify potential novel therapeutic targets for heart muscle dysfunction in children. PMID:25429328

  11. Evolving Approaches to Genetic Evaluation of Specific Cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Teo, Loon Yee Louis; Moran, Rocio T; Tang, W H Wilson

    2015-12-01

    The understanding of the genetic basis of cardiomyopathy has expanded significantly over the past 2 decades. The increasing availability, shortening diagnostic time, and lowering costs of genetic testing have provided researchers and physicians with the opportunity to identify the underlying genetic determinants for thousands of genetic disorders, including inherited cardiomyopathies, in effort to improve patient morbidities and mortality. As such, genetic testing has advanced from basic scientific research to clinical application and has been incorporated as part of patient evaluations for suspected inherited cardiomyopathies. Genetic evaluation framework of inherited cardiomyopathies typically encompasses careful evaluation of family history, genetic counseling, clinical screening of family members, and if appropriate, molecular genetic testing. This review summarizes the genetics, current guideline recommendations, and evidence supporting the genetic evaluation framework of five hereditary forms of cardiomyopathy: dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC), restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM), and left ventricular noncompaction (LVNC).

  12. Importance of genetic evaluation and testing in pediatric cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Tariq, Muhammad; Ware, Stephanie M

    2014-11-26

    Pediatric cardiomyopathies are clinically heterogeneous heart muscle disorders that are responsible for significant morbidity and mortality. Phenotypes include hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, dilated cardiomyopathy, restrictive cardiomyopathy, left ventricular noncompaction and arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy. There is substantial evidence for a genetic contribution to pediatric cardiomyopathy. To date, more than 100 genes have been implicated in cardiomyopathy, but comprehensive genetic diagnosis has been problematic because of the large number of genes, the private nature of mutations, and difficulties in interpreting novel rare variants. This review will focus on current knowledge on the genetic etiologies of pediatric cardiomyopathy and their diagnostic relevance in clinical settings. Recent developments in sequencing technologies are greatly impacting the pace of gene discovery and clinical diagnosis. Understanding the genetic basis for pediatric cardiomyopathy and establishing genotype-phenotype correlations may help delineate the molecular and cellular events necessary to identify potential novel therapeutic targets for heart muscle dysfunction in children.

  13. [Guidelines for chagas disease: Part IV. Chagas disease in immune compromised patients].

    PubMed

    Apt B, Werner; Heitmann G, Ingrid; Jercic L, M Isabel; Jotré M, Leonor; Muñoz C Del V, Patricia; Noemí H, Isabel; San Martin V, Ana M; Sapunar P, Jorge; Torres H, Marisa; Zulantay A, Inés

    2008-08-01

    A summary of different kind of immune suppressed hosts and the importance of Trypanosoma cruzi infection in this group of patients is presented. Then, most relevant aspects of immune compromised host-parasite interaction are analyzed such as the moment of acquiring the infection, immune compromise level, mechanisms of acquisition the infection and geographic region. Clinical features of primary infection and reactivation of infection in chronic Chagasic patients are described making special emphasis in solid organ transplant and BMT. Chagas disease in AIDS patients is discussed including its treatment, follow up, monitoring the immune compromise level and prophylaxis.

  14. Acute Chagas disease in El Salvador 2000-2012 - Need for surveillance and control

    PubMed Central

    Sasagawa, Emi; de Aguilar, Ana Vilma Guevara; de Ramírez, Marta Alicia Hernández; Chévez, José Eduardo Romero; Nakagawa, Jun; Cedillos, Rafael Antonio; Kita, Kiyoshi

    2014-01-01

    Several parasitological studies carried out in El Salvador between 2000-2012 showed a higher frequency of acute cases of Chagas disease than that in other Central American countries. There is an urgent need for improved Chagas disease surveillance and vector control programs in the provinces where acute Chagas disease occurs and throughout El Salvador as a whole. PMID:24676660

  15. Acute Chagas disease in El Salvador 2000-2012 - need for surveillance and control.

    PubMed

    Sasagawa, Emi; Aguilar, Ana Vilma Guevara de; Ramírez, Marta Alicia Hernández de; Chévez, José Eduardo Romero; Nakagawa, Jun; Cedillos, Rafael Antonio; Kita, Kiyoshi

    2014-04-01

    Several parasitological studies carried out in El Salvador between 2000-2012 showed a higher frequency of acute cases of Chagas disease than that in other Central American countries. There is an urgent need for improved Chagas disease surveillance and vector control programs in the provinces where acute Chagas disease occurs and throughout El Salvador as a whole.

  16. Genetics Home Reference: familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... cardiomyopathy is a heart condition characterized by thickening (hypertrophy) of the heart (cardiac) muscle . Thickening usually occurs ... also lead to symptoms of the condition. Cardiac hypertrophy often begins in adolescence or young adulthood, although ...

  17. Genetics Home Reference: arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diagnosis and Management Resources (4 links) Brigham and Women's Hospital Cleveland Clinic: How Are Arrhythmias Treated? GeneReview: Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Cardiomyopathy St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital Center General ...

  18. Who Is at Risk for Cardiomyopathy?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. Who Is at Risk for Cardiomyopathy? People of all ages and races ... dysplasia, although it's rare in both groups. Major Risk Factors Certain diseases, conditions, or factors can raise ...

  19. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: Clinical recognition and management

    SciTech Connect

    Ten Cate, F.J.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 14 chapters. Some of the titles are: Hemodynamics and angiography; Familial and genetic aspects; Recognition and management in children; Morphologic and microscopic aspects of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy; Clinical recognition; and Management with beta-adrenergic blocking drugs.

  20. [Takotsubo cardiomyopathy in a cardiology department].

    PubMed

    Cesário, Vera; Loureiro, Maria José; Pereira, Hélder

    2012-09-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, also known as transient left ventricular apical ballooning syndrome, stress-induced cardiomyopathy and broken heart syndrome, is characterized by transient left ventricular dysfunction in the absence of obstructive coronary artery disease. It was first described in 1990 in Japan, and gained worldwide recognition following the publication of several series of case reports. Its prevalence is estimated to be 1.7-2.2% of suspected acute coronary syndromes. Although takotsubo cardiomyopathy has been progressively better characterized, certain aspects remain to be clarified, and it is still under study. In this article, we report a series of ten cases of takotsubo cardiomyopathy admitted to a cardiology department, and compare the clinical, laboratory, electrocardiographic and imaging characteristics, therapeutic regimens and follow-up of these patients with those described in the latest scientific reviews.

  1. Echocardiographic differences between preeclampsia and peripartum cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Dennis, A T; Castro, J M

    2014-08-01

    Peripartum heart failure due to preeclampsia or peripartum cardiomyopathy represents a significant global health issue. Transthoracic echocardiography enables differentiation of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction, commonly observed in women with preeclampsia, from that with peripartum cardiomyopathy in which a reduced ejection fraction is more common. An understanding of the different definitions and diagnostic features of these two diseases, as well as accurate characterisation of the haemodynamics in preeclampsia and peripartum cardiomyopathy, allows clinicians to manage these conditions appropriately. This article outlines the echocardiographic differences between preeclampsia and peripartum cardiomyopathy, the likely mechanisms for heart failure in preeclampsia and the relevance of these differences to clinicians in relation to prevention and treatment. It also emphasises the importance of disease definitions as a key framework for the more consistent classification of the two diseases.

  2. Recurrent Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy Related to Recurrent Thyrotoxicosis.

    PubMed

    Patel, Keval; Griffing, George T; Hauptman, Paul J; Stolker, Joshua M

    2016-04-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, or transient left ventricular apical ballooning syndrome, is characterized by acute left ventricular dysfunction caused by transient wall-motion abnormalities of the left ventricular apex and mid ventricle in the absence of obstructive coronary artery disease. Recurrent episodes are rare but have been reported, and several cases of takotsubo cardiomyopathy have been described in the presence of hyperthyroidism. We report the case of a 55-year-old woman who had recurrent takotsubo cardiomyopathy, documented by repeat coronary angiography and evaluations of left ventricular function, in the presence of recurrent hyperthyroidism related to Graves disease. After both episodes, the patient's left ventricular function returned to normal when her thyroid function normalized. These findings suggest a possible role of thyroid-hormone excess in the pathophysiology of some patients who have takotsubo cardiomyopathy.

  3. Recurrent Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy Related to Recurrent Thyrotoxicosis

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Keval; Griffing, George T.; Hauptman, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, or transient left ventricular apical ballooning syndrome, is characterized by acute left ventricular dysfunction caused by transient wall-motion abnormalities of the left ventricular apex and mid ventricle in the absence of obstructive coronary artery disease. Recurrent episodes are rare but have been reported, and several cases of takotsubo cardiomyopathy have been described in the presence of hyperthyroidism. We report the case of a 55-year-old woman who had recurrent takotsubo cardiomyopathy, documented by repeat coronary angiography and evaluations of left ventricular function, in the presence of recurrent hyperthyroidism related to Graves disease. After both episodes, the patient's left ventricular function returned to normal when her thyroid function normalized. These findings suggest a possible role of thyroid-hormone excess in the pathophysiology of some patients who have takotsubo cardiomyopathy. PMID:27127432

  4. Mechanical aberrations in hypetrophic cardiomyopathy: emerging concepts

    PubMed Central

    Ntelios, Dimitrios; Tzimagiorgis, Georgios; Efthimiadis, Georgios K.; Karvounis, Haralambos

    2015-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is the most common monogenic disorder in cardiology. Despite important advances in understanding disease pathogenesis, it is not clear how flaws in individual sarcomere components are responsible for the observed phenotype. The aim of this article is to provide a brief interpretative analysis of some currently proposed pathophysiological mechanisms of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, with a special emphasis on alterations in the cardiac mechanical properties. PMID:26347658

  5. Pregnancy in inherited and acquired cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Herrey, Anna S

    2014-05-01

    Cardiomyopathy encompasses a wide spectrum of heart muscle disease, which can have an impact on the patient's ability to sustain the increased cardiac workload of pregnancy. Pregnancy can also unmask previously unknown cardiomyopathy. The outcome for both mother and baby is often related to the patient's functional class prior to pregnancy, and a multidisciplinary approach to managing this challenging group of patients is pivotal. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy: A New Perspective in Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Marmoush, Fady Y.; Barbour, Mohamad F.; Noonan, Thomas E.; Al-Qadi, Mazen O.

    2015-01-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TCM) is an entity of reversible cardiomyopathy known for its association with physical or emotional stress and may mimic myocardial infarction. We report an exceedingly rare case of albuterol-induced TCM with moderate asthma exacerbation. An interesting association that may help in understanding the etiology of TCM in the asthmatic population. Although the prognosis of TCM is excellent, it is crucial to recognize beta agonists as a potential stressor. PMID:26246918

  7. Chronic Trypanosoma cruzi-elicited cardiomyopathy: from the discovery to the proposal of rational therapeutic interventions targeting cell adhesion molecules and chemokine receptors--how to make a dream come true.

    PubMed

    Lannes-Vieira, Joseli; Silverio, Jaline Coutinho; Pereira, Isabela Resende; Vinagre, Nathália Ferreira; Carvalho, Cristiano Marcelo Espinola; Paiva, Cláudia Neto; Silva da, Andréa Alice

    2009-07-01

    One hundred years ago, Carlos Chagas discovered a new disease, the American trypanosomiasis. Chagas and co-workers later characterised the disease's common manifestation, chronic cardiomyopathy, and suggested that parasitic persistence coupled with inflammation was the key underlying pathogenic mechanism. Better comprehension of the molecular mechanisms leading to clinical heart afflictions is a prerequisite to developing new therapies that ameliorate inflammation and improve heart function without hampering parasite control. Here, we review recent data showing that distinct cell adhesion molecules, chemokines and chemokine receptors participate in anti-parasite immunity and/or detrimental leukocyte trafficking to the heart. Moreover, we offer evidence that CC-chemokine receptors may be attractive therapeutic targets aiming to regain homeostatic balance in parasite/host interaction thereby improving prognosis, supporting that it is becoming a non-phantasious proposal.

  8. Antioxidant small phenolic ingredients in Inonotus obliquus (persoon) Pilat (Chaga).

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Yuki; Sato, Yuzo; Konishi, Tetsuya

    2007-08-01

    Inonotus obliquus (persoon) Pilat (Chaga, in Russia, kabanoanatake in Japan) is a fungus having been used as a folk medicine in Russia and said to have many health beneficial functions such as immune modulating and anti-cancer activities. In the present study, the antioxidant activity of hot water extract (decoction) of Chaga was precisely compared with those of other medicinal fungi (Agaricus blazei Mycelia, Ganoderma lucidum and Phellinus linteus) showing Chaga had the strongest antioxidant activity among fungi examined in terms of both superoxide and hydroxyl radicals scavenging activities. Further determination of the antioxidant potential of isolated fruiting body (brown part) and Sclerotium (black part) revealed the 80% MeOH extract of fruiting body had the highest potential as high as that of Chaga decoction. Finally, seven antioxidant components were isolated and purified from the 80% MeOH extract of Chaga fruiting body, and their chemical structures were determined as small phenolics as follows: 4-hydroxy-3,5-dimethoxy benzoic acid 2-hydroxy-1-hydroxymethyl ethyl ester (BAEE), protocatechic acid (PCA), caffeic acid (CA), 3,4-dihybenzaladehyde (DB), 2,5-dihydroxyterephtalic acid (DTA), syringic acid (SA) and 3,4-dihydroxybenzalacetone (DBL). Notably, BAEE was assigned as the new compound firstly identified from the natural source in the present study.

  9. Cholinesterase inhibition reduces arrhythmias in asymptomatic Chagas disease.

    PubMed

    Castro, Renata R T; Porphirio, Graciema; Xavier, Sergio S; Moraes, Ruy S; Ferlin, Elton L; Ribeiro, Jorge P; da Nóbrega, Antonio C L

    2017-10-01

    Parasympathetic dysfunction may play a role in the genesis of arrhythmias in Chagas disease. This study evaluates the acute effects of pyridostigmine (PYR), a reversible cholinesterase inhibitor, on the occurrence of arrhythmias in patients with Chagas cardiac disease. Following a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, cross-over protocol, 17 patients (age 50±2 years) with Chagas cardiac disease type B underwent 24-hour Holter recordings after oral administration of either pyridostigmine bromide (45 mg, 3 times/day) or placebo (PLA). Pyridostigmine reduced the 24-hours incidence (median [25%-75%]) of premature ventricular beats-PLA: 2998 (1920-4870), PYR: 2359 (940-3253), P=.044; ventricular couplets-PLA: 84 (15-159), PYR: 33 (6-94), P=.046. Although the total number of nonsustained ventricular tachycardia in the entire group was not different (P=.19) between PLA (1 [0-8]) and PYR (0 [0-4]), there were fewer episodes under PYR in 72% of the patients presenting this type of arrhythmia (P=.033). Acute administration of pyridostigmine reduced the incidence of nonsustained ventricular arrhythmias in patients with Chagas cardiac disease. Further studies that address the use of pyridostigmine by patients with Chagas cardiac disease under a more prolonged follow-up are warranted. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. [The origin of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Moiseev, V S

    1985-01-01

    The author describes the clinical cases of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (CMP). The development of obstructive CMP in a patient with hyperparathyroidism indicates a possible pathogenetic role of endocrine factors and calcium metabolism abnormalities. The familial character of the disease and its combination with hereditary diseases (familial microspherocytosis) point to the significance of genetic factors. In addition, marked hypertrophy of the myocardium (without dilatation) including hypertrophy with obstruction of the outflow tract of the left ventricle was observed in nonspecific protracted myocarditis, alcoholic injury to the heart, in athletes, in coronary heart disease (after survival of myocardial infarction). It is suggested that hypertrophic CMP (similarly to restrictive and congestive CMP) is most likely a syndrome of varying origin.

  11. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: the early years.

    PubMed

    Braunwald, Eugene

    2009-12-01

    Hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM) has four major features: (1) severe left ventricular hypertrophy, often most prominent in the basal interventricular septum; (2) frequent familial occurrence with autosomal dominant transmission; (3) occurrence of sudden cardiac death that is usually considered to be due to ventricular fibrillation; and (4) presence of hemodynamic evidence of labile intraventricular obstruction. The key papers describing the recognition of each of these features, as well as of various combinations of them, are reviewed in this paper. Particular attention is focused on the very frequent finding of marked lability of intraventricular obstruction. The recognition of this fourth and last major feature in 1959 makes 2009 the golden anniversary year marking completion of the description of the major features of HOCM.

  12. Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy Occurring in the Postoperative Period.

    PubMed

    Deniz, Süleyman; Bakal, Ömer; İnangil, Gökhan; Şen, Hüseyin; Özkan, Sezai

    2015-02-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy simulates acute myocardial infarction, and it is characterised by reversible left ventricular failure. A case of Takotsubo cardiomyopathy diagnosed after emergency angiography performed in a patient with evidence of acute myocardial infarction in the postoperative period will be described in this report. Transurethral resection of a bladder tumour (TUR-BT) was performed in a 92-year-old male patient by the urology clinic. The patient was transferred to the post-anaesthesia care unit after the operation. An echocardiography was performed because of the sudden onset of dyspnoea, tachycardia (140-150 beats per minute, rhythm-atrial fibrillation) and ST-segment elevation on electrocardiography (ECG) at the first postoperative hour, and midapical dyskinesia was detected at the patient. An immediate angiography was performed due to suspicion of acute coronary syndrome. Patent coronary arteries and temporary aneurysmatic dilatation of the apex of the heart were revealed by angiography. As a result of these findings, the patient was diagnosed with Takotsubo cardiomyopathy by the cardiology service. The patient was discharged uneventfully following 10 days in the intensive care unit. Aneurysm of the apex of the left ventricle and normal anatomy of the coronary arteries in the angiography have diagnostic value for Takotsubo cardiomyopathy. Diuretics (furosemide) and beta-blockers (metoprolol) are commonly used for the treatment of Takotsubo cardiomyopathy. Even though Takotsubo cardiomyopathy is a rare and benign disease, it should be kept in mind in patients suspected for acute myocardial infarction in the postoperative period.

  13. Familial cardiomyopathy in Norwegian Forest cats.

    PubMed

    März, Imke; Wilkie, Lois J; Harrington, Norelene; Payne, Jessie R; Muzzi, Ruthnea A L; Häggström, Jens; Smith, Ken; Luis Fuentes, Virginia

    2015-08-01

    Norwegian Forest cats (NFCs) are often listed as a breed predisposed to cardiomyopathy, but the characteristics of cardiomyopathy in this breed have not been described. The aim of this preliminary study was to report the features of NFC cardiomyopathy based on prospective echocardiographic screening of affected family groups; necropsy findings; and open-source breed screening databases. Prospective examination of 53 NFCs revealed no murmur or left ventricular (LV) outflow tract obstruction in any screened cat, though mild LV hypertrophy (defined as diastolic LV wall thickness ≥5.5mm) was present in 13/53 cats (25%). Gross pathology results and histopathological sections were analysed in eight NFCs, six of which had died of a cardiac cause. Myocyte hypertrophy, myofibre disarray and interstitial fibrosis typical of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy were present in 7/8 cats, but endomyocardial fibrosis suggestive of restrictive cardiomyopathy was also present in the same cats. Pedigree data analysis from 871 NFCs was supportive of a familial cardiomyopathy in this breed.

  14. [Peripartum cardiomyopathy: A multiple entity].

    PubMed

    Vanzetto, Gérald; Martin, Alix; Bouvaist, Hélène; Marlière, Stéphanie; Durand, Michel; Chavanon, Olivier

    2012-06-01

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCMP) is a dilated and hypokinetic cardiomyopathy occurring during pregnancy or after delivery, with an estimated incidence between 1/1000 and 1/4000 births. It has been defined as a new onset of heart failure in the month preceding or following delivery, without demonstrated aetiology nor previously known heart disease, and with echocardiographic evidences of left ventricular (LV) dysfunction (LV ejection fraction<0.45). It's a multifactorial disease, immunologic, hormonal, and possibly viral mechanisms playing a determinant pathophysiological role. The classical clinical presentation is a rapid and unexpected onset of heart failure in a previously healthy woman, echocardiography being the key examination for positive and differential diagnosis, prognostication, therapeutic decision-making, and follow-up. The potential severity of PPCMP, and its unpredictable evolution in the first days following diagnosis, require that patients be referred to a tertiary care centre with a high skill in intensive cardiology care. Therapeutic management of PPCMP does not offer any specificity when compared to other causes of acute or chronic heart failure (from diuretics to extracorporeal life support), except for ACE-inhibitors, that are contraindicated before delivery. The high incidence of thrombo-embolic complications observed in the disease requires however rapid and curative anticoagulation, and immuno-suppressive treatment has been proposed in fulminant and highly inflammatory presentation, but its efficacy remains controversial. Very recently, promising results have been reported with bromocriptin-a prolactin secretion inhibitor-for reducing 6-month morbidity and mortality, but these findings have to be confirmed in larger scale randomised trials. As for the long-term evolution, approximately half of the patients will heal, while half of the women will keep some degree of LV dysfunction, 25% of them developing moderate to severe chronic heart

  15. Trypanocide Treatment of Women Infected with Trypanosoma cruzi and Its Effect on Preventing Congenital Chagas

    PubMed Central

    Fabbro, Diana L.; Danesi, Emmaria; Olivera, Veronica; Codebó, Maria Olenka; Denner, Susana; Heredia, Cecilia; Streiger, Mirtha; Sosa-Estani, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    With the control of the vectorial and transfusional routes of infection with Trypanosoma cruzi, congenital transmission has become an important source of new cases. This study evaluated the efficacy of trypanocidal therapy to prevent congenital Chagas disease and compared the clinical and serological evolution between treated and untreated infected mothers. We conducted a multicenter, observational study on a cohort of mothers infected with T. cruzi, with and without trypanocidal treatment before pregnancy. Their children were studied to detect congenital infection. Among 354 “chronically infected mother-biological child” pairs, 132 were treated women and 222 were untreated women. Among the children born to untreated women, we detected 34 infected with T. cruzi (15.3%), whose only antecedent was maternal infection. Among the 132 children of previously treated women, no infection with T. cruzi was found (0.0%) (p<0.05). Among 117 mothers with clinical and serological follow up, 71 had been treated and 46 were untreated. The women were grouped into three groups. Group A: 25 treated before 15 years of age; Group B: 46 treated at 15 or more years of age; Group C: untreated, average age of 29.2±6.2 years at study entry. Follow-up for Groups A, B and C was 16.3±5.8, 17.5±9.2 and 18.6±8.6 years respectively. Negative seroconversion: Group A, 64.0% (16/25); Group B, 32.6% (15/46); Group C, no seronegativity was observed. Clinical electrocardiographic alterations compatible with chagasic cardiomyopathy: Group A 0.0% (0/25); B 2.2% (1/46) and C 15.2% (7/46). The trypanocidal treatment of women with chronic Chagas infection was effective in preventing the congenital transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi to their children; it had also a protective effect on the women's clinical evolution and deparasitation could be demonstrated in many treated women after over 10 years of follow up. PMID:25411847

  16. Trypanocide treatment of women infected with Trypanosoma cruzi and its effect on preventing congenital Chagas.

    PubMed

    Fabbro, Diana L; Danesi, Emmaria; Olivera, Veronica; Codebó, Maria Olenka; Denner, Susana; Heredia, Cecilia; Streiger, Mirtha; Sosa-Estani, Sergio

    2014-11-01

    With the control of the vectorial and transfusional routes of infection with Trypanosoma cruzi, congenital transmission has become an important source of new cases. This study evaluated the efficacy of trypanocidal therapy to prevent congenital Chagas disease and compared the clinical and serological evolution between treated and untreated infected mothers. We conducted a multicenter, observational study on a cohort of mothers infected with T. cruzi, with and without trypanocidal treatment before pregnancy. Their children were studied to detect congenital infection. Among 354 "chronically infected mother-biological child" pairs, 132 were treated women and 222 were untreated women. Among the children born to untreated women, we detected 34 infected with T. cruzi (15.3%), whose only antecedent was maternal infection. Among the 132 children of previously treated women, no infection with T. cruzi was found (0.0%) (p<0.05). Among 117 mothers with clinical and serological follow up, 71 had been treated and 46 were untreated. The women were grouped into three groups. Group A: 25 treated before 15 years of age; Group B: 46 treated at 15 or more years of age; Group C: untreated, average age of 29.2 ± 6.2 years at study entry. Follow-up for Groups A, B and C was 16.3 ± 5.8, 17.5 ± 9.2 and 18.6 ± 8.6 years respectively. Negative seroconversion: Group A, 64.0% (16/25); Group B, 32.6% (15/46); Group C, no seronegativity was observed. Clinical electrocardiographic alterations compatible with chagasic cardiomyopathy: Group A 0.0% (0/25); B 2.2% (1/46) and C 15.2% (7/46). The trypanocidal treatment of women with chronic Chagas infection was effective in preventing the congenital transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi to their children; it had also a protective effect on the women's clinical evolution and deparasitation could be demonstrated in many treated women after over 10 years of follow up.

  17. Chagas' disease and ageing: the coexistence of other chronic diseases with Chagas' disease in elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Alves, Rosalía Matera de Angelis; Thomaz, Raquel Prado; Almeida, Eros Antônio de; Wanderley, Jamiro da Silva; Guariento, Maria Elena

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed to identify the main comorbidities in elderly chagasic patients treated in a reference service and identify possible associations between the clinical form of Chagas' disease and chronic diseases. Ninety patients aged 60 years-old or over were interviewed and their clinical diagnoses recorded. The study population profile was: women (55.6%); median age (67 years); married (51.1%); retired (73.3%); up to four years' education (64.4%); and earning less than two minimum wages (67.8%). The predominant forms of Chagas' disease were the cardiac (46.7%) and mixed forms (30%). There was a greater proportion of mild cardiac dysfunction (84.1%), frequently in association with megaesophagus. The mean number of concurrent diseases was 2.856 +/- 1.845, and 33% of the patients had four or more comorbidities. The most frequent were systemic arterial hypertension (56.7%), osteoporosis (23.3%), osteoarthritis (21.2%) and dyslipidemia (20%). Positive correlations were verified between sex and comorbidities and between age group and comorbidities.

  18. Epidemiology of American trypanosomiasis (Chagas disease).

    PubMed

    Kirchhoff, Louis V

    2011-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the cause of American trypanosomiasis, or Chagas disease, is a protozoan parasite that is enzootic and endemic in much of the Americas, where it infects a wide variety of wild and domestic mammals as well as many species of triatomine vectors, in addition to humans. Historically, vector-borne transmission of T. cruzi has been the most important mechanism through which humans have become infected with the parasite, but transmission by blood transfusion and congenital transmission also have been important. In many of the endemic countries transmission of T. cruzi has improved markedly in recent years as vector control and donor screening programs have been implemented on a widespread basis. In the United States autochthonous transmission of T. cruzi appears to be extremely rare. Five persons are known to have become infected with T. cruzi through organ transplants here, and prior to the implementation of blood donor screening in 2007 five instances of transmission by transfusion had been reported. Current estimates put the total number of T. cruzi-infected persons living in the United States at 300,000, essentially all of whom are immigrants from the endemic countries. The obstacles that stand in the way of the total elimination of T. cruzi transmission throughout the endemic range are economic and political, and no major technological advances are needed to accomplish this goal. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Highly Effective Serodiagnosis for Chagas' Disease ▿

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, Pilar; Heimann, Michael; Riera, Cristina; Solano, Marco; Santalla, José; Luquetti, Alejandro O.; Beck, Ewald

    2010-01-01

    Many proteins of Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas' disease, contain characteristic arrays of highly repetitive immunogenic amino acid motifs. Diagnostic tests using these motifs in monomeric or dimeric form have proven to provide markedly improved specificity compared to conventional tests based on crude parasite extracts. However, in many cases the available tests still suffer from limited sensitivity. In this study we produced stable synthetic genes with maximal codon variability for the four diagnostic antigens, B13, CRA, TcD, and TcE, each containing between three and nine identical amino acid repeats. These genes were combined by linker sequences encoding short proline-rich peptides, giving rise to a 24-kDa fusion protein which was used as a novel diagnostic antigen in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay setup. Validation of the assay with a large number of well-characterized patient sera from Bolivia and Brazil revealed excellent diagnostic performance. The high sensitivity of the new test may allow future studies to use blood collected by finger prick and dried on filter paper, thus dramatically reducing the costs and effort for the detection of T. cruzi infection. PMID:20668136

  20. Behavioural biology of Chagas disease vectors

    PubMed Central

    Lazzari, Claudio Ricardo; Pereira, Marcos Horácio; Lorenzo, Marcelo Gustavo

    2013-01-01

    Many arthropod species have adopted vertebrate blood as their main food source. Blood is rich in nutrients and, except for the presence of parasites, sterile. However, this food source is not freely available, nor is obtaining it devoid of risk. It circulates inside vessels hidden underneath the skin of mobile hosts that are able to defend themselves and even predate the insects that try to feed on them. Thus, the haematophagous lifestyle is associated with major morphological, physiological and behavioural adaptations that have accumulated throughout the evolutionary history of the various lineages of blood-sucking arthropods. These adaptations have significant consequences for the evolution of parasites as well as for the epidemiology of vector-transmitted diseases. In this review article, we analyse various aspects of the behaviour of triatomine bugs to illustrate how each behavioural trait represents a particular adaptation to their close association with their hosts, which may easily turn into predators. Our aim is to offer to the reader an up-to-date integrative perspective on the behaviour of Chagas disease vectors and to propose new research avenues to encourage both young and experienced colleagues to explore this aspect of triatomine biology. PMID:24473801

  1. Effects of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid supplementation in patients with chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy is an inflammatory disease that occurs in approximately 30% of patients infected by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, and it has a profile of high morbidity and mortality. The worst prognosis and the progression of this cardiomyopathy are associated with an exacerbated immune response and the production of proinflammatory cytokines, which also occur in other cardiomyopathies. Some nutrients, including omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), promote the inhibition and/or stimulation of cytokine production. The objective of this trial is to study the effects of omega-3 PUFA supplementation on the inflammatory response and lipid profile in patients with chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy. Methods/Design This is a parallel, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind clinical trial with 40 patients that will be conducted at a reference unit for Chagas disease patients, where the patients will be selected. The study will include patients with chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy who are 18 years of age or older. The exclusion criteria are (a) ongoing diarrheal disease, (b) inflammatory bowel disease, (c) diabetes or other endocrine disease, (d) use of fibrates, niacin, or statins, (e) use of anti-inflammatory drugs, (f) pregnant and lactating women, (g) use of vitamin, mineral, or omega-3 supplementation during the previous 30 days, (h) hospital admission during the study, and (i) other associated cardiomyopathies. The intervention will be treatment with omega-3 PUFAs at a dose of 3 g/day for 8 weeks, compared to placebo (corn oil). The primary endpoints will be the concentrations of inflammatory markers (interleukin (IL)-1, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)α, interferon (IFN)γ, and transforming growth factor (TGF)β). Secondary endpoints will be the fasting glucose, lipid, and anthropometric profiles. For statistical analysis, we plan to run either a t test or Wilcoxon test (numerical variables) and

  2. Cardiomyopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... In most cases of ischemia, this temporary blood shortage to the heart causes pain in the chest ( ... doctor. Also, because drinking too much alcohol, eating foods without the proper vitamins, and exposure to toxins ...

  3. Cardiomyopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... the myocardium and endocardium. In Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ... failure: management and diagnosis. In Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  4. Cardiomyopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... to grow in the heart and other organs (sarcoidosis) A disorder that causes the buildup of abnormal ... to grow in the heart and other organs (sarcoidosis), connective tissue disorders, or a disorder that causes ...

  5. Novel cruzipain inhibitors for the chemotherapy of chronic Chagas disease.

    PubMed

    Sbaraglini, María L; Bellera, Carolina L; Fraccaroli, Laura; Larocca, Luciana; Carrillo, Carolina; Talevi, Alan; Alba Soto, Catalina D

    2016-07-01

    Despite current efforts worldwide to develop new medications against Chagas disease, only two drugs are available, nifurtimox and benznidazole. Both drugs require prolonged treatment and have multiple side effects and limited efficacy on adult patients chronically infected with Trypanosoma cruzi. Recently, computer-guided drug repositioning led to the discovery of the trypanocidal effects of clofazimine and benidipine. These compounds showed inhibitory effects on cruzipain, the major cysteine protease of T. cruzi, of different parasite stages and in a murine model of acute Chagas disease. The aim of this work was to determine the efficacy of these novel cruzipain inhibitors when administered in a murine model of chronic Chagas disease. Benidipine and clofazimine were able to reduce the parasite burden in cardiac and skeletal muscles of chronically infected mice compared with untreated mice as well as diminish the inflammatory process in these tissues. Further studies should be performed to study the synergism with benznidazole and nifurtimox in view of combined therapies.

  6. Biologic and Genetics Aspects of Chagas Disease at Endemic Areas

    PubMed Central

    Bellini, Marilanda Ferreira; Silistino-Souza, Rosana; Varella-Garcia, Marileila; de Azeredo-Oliveira, Maria Tercília Vilela; Silva, Ana Elizabete

    2012-01-01

    The etiologic agent of Chagas Disease is the Trypanosoma cruzi, transmitted through blood-sucking insect vectors of the Triatominae subfamily, representing one of the most serious public health concerns in Latin America. There are geographic variations in the prevalence of clinical forms and morbidity of Chagas disease, likely due to genetic variation of the T. cruzi and the host genetic and environmental features. Increasing evidence has supported that inflammatory cytokines and chemokines are responsible for the generation of the inflammatory infiltrate and tissue damage. Moreover, genetic polymorphisms, protein expression levels, and genomic imbalances are associated with disease progression. This paper discusses these key aspects. Large surveys were carried out in Brazil and served as baseline for definition of the control measures adopted. However, Chagas disease is still active, and aspects such as host-parasite interactions, genetic mechanisms of cellular interaction, genetic variability, and tropism need further investigations in the attempt to eradicate the disease. PMID:22529863

  7. VNI Cures Acute and Chronic Experimental Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Villalta, Fernando; Dobish, Mark C.; Nde, Pius N.; Kleshchenko, Yulia Y.; Hargrove, Tatiana Y.; Johnson, Candice A.; Waterman, Michael R.; Johnston, Jeffrey N.; Lepesheva, Galina I.

    2013-01-01

    Chagas disease is a deadly infection caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. Afflicting approximately 8 million people in Latin America, Chagas disease is now becoming a serious global health problem proliferating beyond the traditional geographical borders, mainly because of human and vector migration. Because the disease is endemic in low-resource areas, industrial drug development has been lethargic. The chronic form remains incurable, there are no vaccines, and 2 existing drugs for the acute form are toxic and have low efficacy. Here we report the efficacy of a small molecule, VNI, including evidence of its effectiveness against chronic Chagas disease. VNI is a potent experimental inhibitor of T. cruzi sterol 14α-demethylase. Nontoxic and highly selective, VNI displays promising pharmacokinetics and administered orally to mice at 25 mg/kg for 30 days cures, with 100% cure rate and 100% survival, the acute and chronic T. cruzi infection. PMID:23372180

  8. Chagas Heart Failure in Patients from Latin America

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Physicians working in Europe and the United States should suspect Chagas heart failure in every patient coming from Latin America with chronic heart failure. Diagnosis should be confirmed by positive serology. Right bundle branch block and left anterior fascicular block on 12-lead electrocardiogram, enlarged cardiac silhouette with no pulmonary congestion on chest X-ray and left ventricular apical aneurysm on echocardiography are the distinctive features of this condition. The clinical course is poorer than that of non-Chagas heart failure; however, medical treatment is similar. Implantable cardioverter-defibrillators are useful in the primary and secondary prevention of sudden cardiac death. Cardiac resynchronisation therapy can be given to patients on optimal medical therapy and with lengthened QRS complex. Heart transplantation is the treatment of choice for patients with end-stage Chagas heart failure. PMID:28785459

  9. Cardiomyopathy in a dish: using human inducible pluripotent stem cells to model inherited cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Kamdar, Forum; Klaassen Kamdar, Andre; Koyano-Nakagawa, Naoko; Garry, Mary G; Garry, Daniel J

    2015-09-01

    Inherited cardiomyopathies, including hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, dilated cardiomyopathies, arrythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, and other inherited forms of heart failure, represent a unique set of genetically defined cardiovascular disease processes. Unraveling the molecular mechanisms of these deadly forms of human heart disease has been challenging, but recent groundbreaking scientific advances in stem cell technology have allowed for the generation of patient-specific human inducible stem cell (hiPSC)-derived cardiomyocytes (CMs). hiPSC-derived CMs retain the genetic blueprint of the patient, they can be maintained in culture, and they recapitulate the phenotypic characteristics of the disease in vitro, thus serving as a disease in a dish. This review provides an overview of in vitro modeling of inherited cardiomyopathies with the use of patient-specific hiPSC-derived CMs. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Cardiomyopathy in a dish: Using human inducible pluripotent stem cells to model inherited cardiomyopathies

    PubMed Central

    Kamdar, Forum; Kamdar, Andre Klaassen; Koyano-Nakagawa, Naoko; Garry, Mary G.; Garry, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    Inherited cardiomyopathies including hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), dilated cardiomyopathies (DCM), arrythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC), and other inherited forms of heart failure represent a unique set of genetically defined cardiovascular disease processes. Unraveling the molecular mechanisms of these deadly forms of human heart disease has been challenging, however recent groundbreaking scientific advances in stem cell technology has allowed for the generation of patient-specific human inducible stem cell (hiPSC)-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-derived CMs). hiPSC-derived CMs retain the genetic blueprint of the patient, they can be maintained in culture, and they recapitulate the phenotypic characteristics of the disease in vitro, thus serving as a disease in a dish. This review provides an overview of in vitro modeling of inherited cardiomyopathies using patient-specific hiPSC-derived CMs. PMID:25934595

  11. [Hereditary cardiomyopathies: a review. Mutation of structural proteins a common cause of hereditary cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Sjöberg, Gunnar; Kostareva, Anna; Sejersen, Thomas

    Cardiomyopathy is a disorder of the cardiac muscle and can be either primary or secondary. The primary disorders have been classified by WHO into 4 groups based on structure and function; hypertrophic, dilated and restricted cardiomyopathies and arrythmogenic right ventricle dysplasia. During the last decade the familial nature of many of these cardiomyopathies has been elucidated and different genes have been found to be mutated and causative of disease. Certain patterns can be distinguished in the mutated genes, e.g. in general the genes causing hypertrophic cardiomyopathies code for proteins involved in the contractile apparatus, the sarcomere, and the genes causing dilated cardiomyopathy code for proteins that anchor the sarcomere to the cell membrane and extracellular matrix. This article reviews these recent genetic findings and discusses their potential clinical applicability.

  12. Gallbladder neuron count in cholelithiasis patients with and without Chagas disease.

    PubMed

    Crema, Eduardo; Ribeiro, Lara Beatriz Prata; Adad, Sheila Jorge; Ectchebehere, Renata Margarida; Martins Júnior, Aiodair; Silva, Alex Augusto

    2007-01-01

    Various investigators agree that the incidence of cholelithiasis is greater in patients with Chagas disease. The most plausible explanation for this is based on the parasympathetic denervation that occurs over the whole digestive tract due to Chagas disease. In order to analyze the occurrence of this alteration, gallbladder neuron counts were performed on cholelithiasis patients with and without Chagas disease who were being treated at the Department of Digestive Surgery, Universidade Federal do Triângulo Mineiro, Uberaba, Brazil. In the present study, a notable reduction in the number of neurons in the gallbladder wall was observed in Chagas patients, in comparison with non-Chagas subjects.

  13. Acquired Cell-Mediated Immunodepression in Acute Chagas' Disease

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Antonio R. L.; Teixeira, Glória; Macêdo, Vanize; Prata, Aluizio

    1978-01-01

    In this study two groups of patients with acute Chagas' disease were identified. Group one consisted of five patients with apparent acute Chagas' disease. These patients showed symptoms and signals of an acute illness, such as high fever and enlarged spleen. One of these patients developed severe myocarditis and heart failure. Group two consisted of seven patients with inapparent acute Chagas' disease. This was a nonclinical entity, not perceived by the patient who did not seek medical care. The diagnosis was made by the shift of a serologic test which indicates the presence of immunoglobulin M antibodies to Trypanosoma cruzi. The patients with apparent acute Chagas' disease showed positive delayed-type skin response to T. cruzi antigen. Also, their leukocytes showed significant inhibition of migration in the presence of this antigen. By contrast, the patients with the inapparent acute Chagas' disease did not show positive delayed-type skin response to T. cruzi antigen and no significant inhibition was observed when their cells migrated in the presence of this antigen. Of interest, none of these patients was capable of developing contact sensitivity to 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene. However, three out of five patients with the apparent acute disease and all the normal control subjects showed positive contact reaction after sensitization to this drug. The results of these experiments would suggest that the thymus-derived (T)-lymphocyte function is depressed in patients with the clinically inapparent acute Chagas' disease. This immunodepression seems to be acquired in the course of the T. cruzi infection because all patients showed positive delayed-type skin response to at least one ubiquitous microbial extract, thus indicating previously normal T-cell function. We hypothesize that T. cruzi antigens may directly stimulate T cells with the concomitant release of factors that might become supressive for T-cell responses. Furthermore, the suppressive effect might interfere

  14. Anti-galectin-1 autoantibodies in human Trypanosoma cruzi infection: differential expression of this β-galactoside-binding protein in cardiac Chagas' disease

    PubMed Central

    Giordanengo, L; Gea, S; Barbieri, G; Rabinovich, G A

    2001-01-01

    The pathogenesis of Chagas' disease has been subject of active research and still remains to be ascertained. Galectin-1 (Gal-1), a member of a conserved family of animal β-galactoside-binding proteins, localized in human heart tissue, has been suggested to play key roles in immunological and inflammatory processes. In the present study we demonstrated the occurrence of anti-Gal-1 autoAb in sera from patients in the acute and chronic stages of Chagas' disease (ACD and CCD) by means of ELISA and Western blot analysis. We found a marked increase in the level and frequency of Ig E anti-Gal-1 antibodies in sera from patients with ACD, but a low frequency of Ig M anti-Gal-1 immunoreactivity. Moreover, Ig G immunoreactivity to this β-galactoside-binding protein was found to be correlated with the severity of cardiac damage in CCD, but was absent in nonrelated cardiomyopathies. We could not detect immunoreactivity with Trypanosoma cruzi antigens using a polyclonal antibody raised to human Gal-1 and no hemagglutinating activity could be specifically eluted from a lactosyl-agarose matrix from parasite lysates. Moreover, despite sequence homology between Gal-1 and shed acute phase antigen (SAPA) of T. cruzi, anti-Gal-1 antibodies eluted from human sera failed to cross-react with SAPA. In an attempt to explore whether Gal-1 immunoreactivity was originated from endogenous human Gal-1, we finally investigated its expression levels in cardiac tissue (the main target of Chagas' disease). This protein was found to be markedly upregulated in cardiac tissue from patients with severe CCD, compared to cardiac tissue from normal individuals. PMID:11422204

  15. Anti-galectin-1 autoantibodies in human Trypanosoma cruzi infection: differential expression of this beta-galactoside-binding protein in cardiac Chagas' disease.

    PubMed

    Giordanengo, L; Gea, S; Barbieri, G; Rabinovich, G A

    2001-05-01

    The pathogenesis of Chagas' disease has been subject of active research and still remains to be ascertained. Galectin-1 (Gal-1), a member of a conserved family of animal beta-galactoside-binding proteins, localized in human heart tissue, has been suggested to play key roles in immunological and inflammatory processes. In the present study we demonstrated the occurrence of anti-Gal-1 autoAb in sera from patients in the acute and chronic stages of Chagas' disease (ACD and CCD) by means of ELISA and Western blot analysis. We found a marked increase in the level and frequency of Ig E anti-Gal-1 antibodies in sera from patients with ACD, but a low frequency of Ig M anti-Gal-1 immunoreactivity. Moreover, Ig G immunoreactivity to this beta-galactoside-binding protein was found to be correlated with the severity of cardiac damage in CCD, but was absent in nonrelated cardiomyopathies. We could not detect immunoreactivity with Trypanosoma cruzi antigens using a polyclonal antibody raised to human Gal-1 and no hemagglutinating activity could be specifically eluted from a lactosyl-agarose matrix from parasite lysates. Moreover, despite sequence homology between Gal-1 and shed acute phase antigen (SAPA) of T. cruzi, anti-Gal-1 antibodies eluted from human sera failed to cross-react with SAPA. In an attempt to explore whether Gal-1 immunoreactivity was originated from endogenous human Gal-1, we finally investigated its expression levels in cardiac tissue (the main target of Chagas' disease). This protein was found to be markedly upregulated in cardiac tissue from patients with severe CCD, compared to cardiac tissue from normal individuals.

  16. Chagas disease: role of parasite genetic variation in pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Macedo, Andra M; Oliveira, Riva P; Pena, Srgio D J

    2002-03-05

    Chagas disease, caused by the parasite protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, is characterised by a variable clinical course, from symptomless cases to severe chronic disease with cardiac and/or gastrointestinal involvement. This variability has been attributed both to differences in the host response and to genomic heterogeneity of the parasite. This article reviews the evidence in favour of an important role of the genetic constitution of T. cruzi in determining the clinical characteristics of Chagas disease and discusses the basis of the 'Clonal-Histotropic Model' for the pathogenesis of this disease.

  17. Changes in Proteome Profile of Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells in Chronic Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Soman, Kizhake V.; Zago, Maria P.; Koo, Sue-Jie; Spratt, Heidi; Stafford, Susan; Blell, Zinzi N.; Gupta, Shivali; Nuñez Burgos, Julio; Barrientos, Natalia; Brasier, Allan R.

    2016-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi (Tc) infection causes chagasic cardiomyopathy; however, why 30–40% of the patients develop clinical disease is not known. To discover the pathomechanisms in disease progression, we obtained the proteome signature of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of normal healthy controls (N/H, n = 30) and subjects that were seropositive for Tc-specific antibodies, but were clinically asymptomatic (C/A, n = 25) or clinically symptomatic (C/S, n = 28) with cardiac involvement and left ventricular dysfunction. Protein samples were labeled with BODIPY FL-maleimide (dynamic range: > 4 orders of magnitude, detection limit: 5 f-mol) and resolved by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2D-GE). After normalizing the gel images, protein spots that exhibited differential abundance in any of the two groups were analyzed by mass spectrometry, and searched against UniProt human database for protein identification. We found 213 and 199 protein spots (fold change: |≥ 1.5|, p< 0.05) were differentially abundant in C/A and C/S individuals, respectively, with respect to N/H controls. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) of PBMCs proteome dataset identified an increase in disorganization of cytoskeletal assembly and recruitment/activation and migration of immune cells in all chagasic subjects, though the invasion capacity of cells was decreased in C/S individuals. IPA predicted with high probability a decline in cell survival and free radical scavenging capacity in C/S (but not C/A) subjects. The MYC/SP1 transcription factors that regulate hypoxia and oxidative/inflammatory stress were predicted to be key targets in the context of control of Chagas disease severity. Further, MARS-modeling identified a panel of proteins that had >93% prediction success in classifying infected individuals with no disease and those with cardiac involvement and LV dysfunction. In conclusion, we have identified molecular pathways and a panel of proteins that could aid in detecting

  18. [Chagas diseases seroepidemiology in schoolchildren of Jujuy].

    PubMed

    Tortora, C; Bejarano, I; Dipierri, J; Alfaro, E; García, T

    2000-01-01

    Chagas disease constitutes the main zoonosis in the province of Jujuy, Argentina, where it is one of the most important issues in public health. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the results of a serologic evaluation carried out for a seven-year period among schoolchildren in the Jujenean capital city. The population under study consisted of all seventh grade students of all schools in San Salvador de Jujuy. They were classified into three socioeconomic levels: High, Medium and Low levels. Indirect hemagglutination and immunofluorescence tests were performed. Percentages of seroprevalence were determined by sex, age group, and socioeconomic level. To analyze and check results, the following tests were applied: ANOVA, Tukey's and chi-square test. General prevalence was 1.95% with inter-annual statistically non-significant variations. Statistically significant variations were found among: 1) sex, where the feminine sex exhibited higher seroprevalence; 2) age groups, in which 12-year-olds showed higher seroprevalence; 3) socioeconomic levels, where seroprevalence increased as socioeconomic level decreased. Chagasic seroprevalence in children populations is an indicator that allows assessing both transmission risks in the community and the efficiency of preventive measures to control the vector. Data resulting from this study would indicate: 1) an adequate control both of non-vectorial transmission as well as of the vector, since no temporal variation was recorded in seroprevalence in the age-group analyzed; 2) higher seroprevalence in children belonging to a lower socioeconomic level, probably due to migrations of already-infected mothers coming from neighboring endemic, less epidemiologically controlled areas.

  19. Interrupting Chagas disease transmission in Venezuela.

    PubMed

    Aché, A; Matos, A J

    2001-01-01

    The interruption of vectorial transmission of Chagas disease in Venezuela is attributed to the combined effects of ongoing entomoepidemiological surveillance, ongoing house spraying with residual insecticides and the concurrent building and modification of rural houses in endemic areas during almost five decades. The original endemic areas which totaled 750,000 km(2), have been reduced to 365,000 km(2). During 1958-1968, initial entomological evaluations carried out showed that the house infestation index ranged between 60-80%, the house infection index at 8-11% and a house density index of 30-50 triatomine bugs per house. By 1990-98, these indexes were further reduced to 1.6-4.0%, 0.01-0.6% and 3-4 bugs per house respectively. The overall rural population seroprevalence has declined from 44.5% (95% C.I.: 43.4-45.3%) to 9.2% (95% C.I.: 9.0-9.4%) for successive grouped periods from 1958 to 1998. The annual blood donor prevalence is firmly established below 1%. The population at risk of infection has been estimated to be less than four million. Given that prevalence rates are stable and appropriate for public health programmes, consideration has been given to potential biases that may distort results such as: a) geographical differences in illness or longevity of patients; b) variations in levels of ascertainment; c) variations in diagnostic criteria; and d) variations in population structure, mainly due to appreciable population migration. The endemic areas with continuous transmission are now mainly confined to piedmonts, as well as patchy foci in higher mountainous ranges, where the exclusive vector is Rhodnius prolixus. There is also an unstable area, of which landscapes are made up of grasslands with scattered broad-leaved evergreen trees and costal plains, where transmission is very low and occasional outbreaks are reported.

  20. Arterial microembolisation: an unusual presentation of dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Gillespie, R L; Mullen, G M; Costanzo-Nordin, M R

    1990-01-01

    Systemic embolisation is common in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy. Microembolisation as a presenting sign of dilated cardiomyopathy, however, has not been reported before. A 37 year old woman in whom dilated cardiomyopathy presented as arterial microembolisation to the toes is described. Images PMID:2310647

  1. High Frequency QRS ECG Accurately Detects Cardiomyopathy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlegel, Todd T.; Arenare, Brian; Poulin, Gregory; Moser, Daniel R.; Delgado, Reynolds

    2005-01-01

    High frequency (HF, 150-250 Hz) analysis over the entire QRS interval of the ECG is more sensitive than conventional ECG for detecting myocardial ischemia. However, the accuracy of HF QRS ECG for detecting cardiomyopathy is unknown. We obtained simultaneous resting conventional and HF QRS 12-lead ECGs in 66 patients with cardiomyopathy (EF = 23.2 plus or minus 6.l%, mean plus or minus SD) and in 66 age- and gender-matched healthy controls using PC-based ECG software recently developed at NASA. The single most accurate ECG parameter for detecting cardiomyopathy was an HF QRS morphological score that takes into consideration the total number and severity of reduced amplitude zones (RAZs) present plus the clustering of RAZs together in contiguous leads. This RAZ score had an area under the receiver operator curve (ROC) of 0.91, and was 88% sensitive, 82% specific and 85% accurate for identifying cardiomyopathy at optimum score cut-off of 140 points. Although conventional ECG parameters such as the QRS and QTc intervals were also significantly longer in patients than controls (P less than 0.001, BBBs excluded), these conventional parameters were less accurate (area under the ROC = 0.77 and 0.77, respectively) than HF QRS morphological parameters for identifying underlying cardiomyopathy. The total amplitude of the HF QRS complexes, as measured by summed root mean square voltages (RMSVs), also differed between patients and controls (33.8 plus or minus 11.5 vs. 41.5 plus or minus 13.6 mV, respectively, P less than 0.003), but this parameter was even less accurate in distinguishing the two groups (area under ROC = 0.67) than the HF QRS morphologic and conventional ECG parameters. Diagnostic accuracy was optimal (86%) when the RAZ score from the HF QRS ECG and the QTc interval from the conventional ECG were used simultaneously with cut-offs of greater than or equal to 40 points and greater than or equal to 445 ms, respectively. In conclusion 12-lead HF QRS ECG employing

  2. High Frequency QRS ECG Accurately Detects Cardiomyopathy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlegel, Todd T.; Arenare, Brian; Poulin, Gregory; Moser, Daniel R.; Delgado, Reynolds

    2005-01-01

    High frequency (HF, 150-250 Hz) analysis over the entire QRS interval of the ECG is more sensitive than conventional ECG for detecting myocardial ischemia. However, the accuracy of HF QRS ECG for detecting cardiomyopathy is unknown. We obtained simultaneous resting conventional and HF QRS 12-lead ECGs in 66 patients with cardiomyopathy (EF = 23.2 plus or minus 6.l%, mean plus or minus SD) and in 66 age- and gender-matched healthy controls using PC-based ECG software recently developed at NASA. The single most accurate ECG parameter for detecting cardiomyopathy was an HF QRS morphological score that takes into consideration the total number and severity of reduced amplitude zones (RAZs) present plus the clustering of RAZs together in contiguous leads. This RAZ score had an area under the receiver operator curve (ROC) of 0.91, and was 88% sensitive, 82% specific and 85% accurate for identifying cardiomyopathy at optimum score cut-off of 140 points. Although conventional ECG parameters such as the QRS and QTc intervals were also significantly longer in patients than controls (P less than 0.001, BBBs excluded), these conventional parameters were less accurate (area under the ROC = 0.77 and 0.77, respectively) than HF QRS morphological parameters for identifying underlying cardiomyopathy. The total amplitude of the HF QRS complexes, as measured by summed root mean square voltages (RMSVs), also differed between patients and controls (33.8 plus or minus 11.5 vs. 41.5 plus or minus 13.6 mV, respectively, P less than 0.003), but this parameter was even less accurate in distinguishing the two groups (area under ROC = 0.67) than the HF QRS morphologic and conventional ECG parameters. Diagnostic accuracy was optimal (86%) when the RAZ score from the HF QRS ECG and the QTc interval from the conventional ECG were used simultaneously with cut-offs of greater than or equal to 40 points and greater than or equal to 445 ms, respectively. In conclusion 12-lead HF QRS ECG employing

  3. Cardiomyopathy in captive African hedgehogs (Atelerix albiventris).

    PubMed

    Raymond, J T; Garner, M M

    2000-09-01

    From 1994 to 1999, 16 captive African hedgehogs (Atelerix albiventris), from among 42 necropsy cases, were diagnosed with cardiomyopathy. The incidence of cardiomyopathy in this study population was 38%. Fourteen of 16 hedgehogs with cardiomyopathy were males and all hedgehogs were adult (>1 year old). Nine hedgehogs exhibited 1 or more of the following clinical signs before death: heart murmur, lethargy, icterus, moist rales, anorexia, dyspnea, dehydration, and weight loss. The remaining 7 hedgehogs died without premonitory clinical signs. Gross findings were cardiomegaly (6 cases), hepatomegaly (5 cases), pulmonary edema (5 cases), pulmonary congestion (4 cases), hydrothorax (3 cases), pulmonary infarct (1 case), renal infarcts (1 case), ascites (1 case), and 5 cases showed no changes. Histologic lesions were found mainly within the left ventricular myocardium and consisted primarily of myodegeneration, myonecrosis, atrophy, hypertrophy, and disarray of myofibers. All hedgehogs with cardiomyopathy had myocardial fibrosis, myocardial edema, or both. Other common histopathologic findings were acute and chronic passive congestion of the lungs, acute passive congestion of the liver, renal tubular necrosis, vascular thrombosis, splenic extramedullary hematopoiesis, and hepatic lipidosis. This is the first report of cardiomyopathy in African hedgehogs.

  4. Metabolic imaging of patients with cardiomyopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Geltman, E.M. )

    1991-09-01

    The cardiomyopathies comprise a diverse group of illnesses that can be characterized functionally by several techniques. However, the delineation of derangements of regional perfusion and metabolism have been accomplished only relatively recently with positron emission tomography (PET). Regional myocardial accumulation and clearance of 11C-palmitate, the primary myocardial substrate under most conditions, demonstrate marked spatial heterogeneity when studied under fasting conditions or with glucose loading. PET with 11C-palmitate permits the noninvasive differentiation of patients with nonischemic from ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy, since patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy demonstrate large zones of intensely depressed accumulation of 11C-palmitate, probably reflecting prior infarction. Patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and Duchenne's muscular dystrophy demonstrate relatively unique patterns of myocardial abnormalities of perfusion and metabolism. The availability of new tracers and techniques for the evaluation of myocardial metabolism (11C-acetate), perfusion (H2(15)O), and autonomic tone (11-C-hydroxyephedrine) should facilitate further understanding of the pathogenesis of the cardiomyopathies.

  5. CURRENT MANAGEMENT OF PERIPARTUM CARDIOMYOPATHY: A REVIEW.

    PubMed

    Dodiyi-Manuel, S T; Ezennaka, R C

    2015-01-01

    Demarkis et al in 1971 described 27 patients who presented during pueperium with cardiomegaly, abnormal electrocardiographic findings, congestive heart failure and named the syndrome "peripartum cardiomyopathy". The aim of this review is to document the current concepts in the management of peripartum cardiomyopathy. A search of the literature was done using PubMed, Goggle scholar and books from authors' collections. The cause of the disease might be environmental and genetic factors. Diagnostic echocardiographic criteria include left ventricular ejection fraction of less than 45% or a combination of M-mode fractional shortening of less than 30% and end diastolic dimension of greater than 2.7 cm/m². Electrocardiogram, magnetic resonance imaging, endomyocardial biopsy and cardiac catheterization aid in the diagnosis and management of peripartum cardiomyopathy. Treatment includes both conventional pharcomological heart failure and peripartum cardiomyopathy targeted therapies.Therapeutic decisions are influenced by drug safety profiles during pregnancy and lactation. Mechanical support and transplantation might be necessary in severe cases. Peripartum cardiomyopathy is an uncommon but life threatening cardiac failure of unknown aetiology encountered in late pregnancy or postpartum period. Management aims at improving heart failure symptoms through conventional therapies and then at administering targeted therapies.The risk of recurrence in future pregnancies should always be considered.

  6. Insulin resistance and hyperinsulinaemia in diabetic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Guanghong; DeMarco, Vincent G.; Sowers, James R.

    2016-01-01

    Insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes mellitus and associated hyperinsulinaemia can promote the development of a specific form of cardiomyopathy that is independent of coronary artery disease and hypertension. Termed diabetic cardiomyopathy, this form of cardiomyopathy is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in developed nations, and the prevalence of this condition is rising in parallel with increases in the incidence of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Of note, female patients seem to be particularly susceptible to the development of this complication of metabolic disease. The diabetic cardiomyopathy observed in insulin-resistant or hyperinsulinaemic states is characterized by impaired myocardial insulin signalling, mitochondrial dysfunction, endoplasmic reticulum stress, impaired calcium homeostasis, abnormal coronary microcirculation, activation of the sympathetic nervous system, activation of the renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system and maladaptive immune responses. These pathophysiological changes result in oxidative stress, fibrosis, hypertrophy, cardiac diastolic dysfunction and eventually systolic heart failure. This Review highlights a surge in diabetic cardiomyopathy research, summarizes current understanding of the molecular mechanisms underpinning this condition and explores potential preventive and therapeutic strategies. PMID:26678809

  7. Physiopathology of Chagas' heart disease: correlations between clinical and experimental findings*

    PubMed Central

    Anselmi, Alfonso; Moleiro, Federico

    1971-01-01

    In penetrating the heart and developing in it, Trypanosoma cruzi produces an immunoallergic reaction that leads to changes in the histological structure of the myocardium; these changes alter the fundamental properties of the heart, causing fundamental dynamic disorders and morphological changes in the organ. In Chagas' cardiomyopathy, the velocity of impulse propagation diminishes in the auricular and ventricular musculature, altering the activation mechanism, this being shown by changes in the P-wave and in ventricular focal blocks. The functional refractory period (FRP) is shortened in the auricular and ventricular tissue and constitutes, together with changes in conductivity, the physiopathological basis that explains the circus movement—the fundamental factor of the arrhythmias of this stage of the disease. Localization of the inflammation in the A-V conduction system increases the duration of the FRP, producing all types of A-V block. The oedema and the cellular interstitial infiltration seen during this acute phase reduce the distensibility of the fibres; this, in turn, limits their contractility, producing a decrease in systolic volume and an increase in the final diastolic pressure in the chambers of the heart—fundamental factors in reducing kinesia and in increasing the heart's volume. In the chronic phase, destruction of the contractile tissue and fibroblastic proliferation bring into play compensatory mechanisms that maintain the strength of cardiac contractions; the elongation of the fibres and the nature of the dynamic pressure—volume curves explain the dilatation of the chambers of the heart and the dynamic changes seen in this phase of the disease. PMID:5003721

  8. Trypanosoma cruzi in the Chicken Model: Chagas-Like Heart Disease in the Absence of Parasitism

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Antonio R. L.; Gomes, Clever; Nitz, Nadjar; Sousa, Alessandro O.; Alves, Rozeneide M.; Guimaro, Maria C.; Cordeiro, Ciro; Bernal, Francisco M.; Rosa, Ana C.; Hejnar, Jiri; Leonardecz, Eduardo; Hecht, Mariana M.

    2011-01-01

    Background The administration of anti-trypanosome nitroderivatives curtails Trypanosoma cruzi infection in Chagas disease patients, but does not prevent destructive lesions in the heart. This observation suggests that an effective treatment for the disease requires understanding its pathogenesis. Methodology/Principal Findings To understand the origin of clinical manifestations of the heart disease we used a chicken model system in which infection can be initiated in the egg, but parasite persistence is precluded. T. cruzi inoculation into the air chamber of embryonated chicken eggs generated chicks that retained only the parasite mitochondrial kinetoplast DNA minicircle in their genome after eight days of gestation. Crossbreeding showed that minicircles were transferred vertically via the germ line to chicken progeny. Minicircle integration in coding regions was shown by targeted-primer thermal asymmetric interlaced PCR, and detected by direct genomic analysis. The kDNA-mutated chickens died with arrhythmias, shortness of breath, cyanosis and heart failure. These chickens with cardiomyopathy had rupture of the dystrophin and other genes that regulate cell growth and differentiation. Tissue pathology revealed inflammatory dilated cardiomegaly whereby immune system mononuclear cells lyse parasite-free target heart fibers. The heart cell destruction implicated a thymus-dependent, autoimmune; self-tissue rejection carried out by CD45+, CD8γδ+, and CD8α lymphocytes. Conclusions/Significance These results suggest that genetic alterations resulting from kDNA integration in the host genome lead to autoimmune-mediated destruction of heart tissue in the absence of T. cruzi parasites. PMID:21468314

  9. Cardiomyocyte Hypertrophy in Arrhythmogenic Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Gerçek, Mustafa; Gerçek, Muhammed; Kant, Sebastian; Simsekyilmaz, Sakine; Kassner, Astrid; Milting, Hendrik; Liehn, Elisa A; Leube, Rudolf E; Krusche, Claudia A

    2017-04-01

    Arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy (AC) is a hereditary disease leading to sudden cardiac death or heart failure. AC pathology is characterized by cardiomyocyte loss and replacement fibrosis. Our goal was to determine whether cardiomyocytes respond to AC progression by pathological hypertrophy. To this end, we examined tissue samples from AC patients with end-stage heart failure and tissue samples that were collected at different disease stages from desmoglein 2-mutant mice, a well characterized AC model. We find that cardiomyocyte diameters are significantly increased in right ventricles of AC patients. Increased mRNA expression of the cardiac stress marker natriuretic peptide B is also observed in the right ventricle of AC patients. Elevated myosin heavy chain 7 mRNA expression is detected in left ventricles. In desmoglein 2-mutant mice, cardiomyocyte diameters are normal during the concealed disease phase but increase significantly after acute disease onset on cardiomyocyte death and fibrotic myocardial remodeling. Hypertrophy progresses further during the chronic disease stage. In parallel, mRNA expression of myosin heavy chain 7 and natriuretic peptide B is up-regulated in both ventricles with right ventricular preference. Calcineurin/nuclear factor of activated T cells (Nfat) signaling, which is linked to pathological hypertrophy, is observed during AC progression, as evidenced by Nfatc2 and Nfatc3 mRNA in cardiomyocytes and increased mRNA of the Nfat target regulator of calcineurin 1. Taken together, we demonstrate that pathological hypertrophy occurs in AC and is secondary to cardiomyocyte loss and cardiac remodeling.

  10. Mitochondrial Dynamics in Diabetic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Galloway, Chad A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Cardiac function is energetically demanding, reliant on efficient well-coupled mitochondria to generate adenosine triphosphate and fulfill the cardiac demand. Predictably then, mitochondrial dysfunction is associated with cardiac pathologies, often related to metabolic disease, most commonly diabetes. Diabetic cardiomyopathy (DCM), characterized by decreased left ventricular function, arises independently of coronary artery disease and atherosclerosis. Dysregulation of Ca2+ handling, metabolic changes, and oxidative stress are observed in DCM, abnormalities reflected in alterations in mitochondrial energetics. Cardiac tissue from DCM patients also presents with altered mitochondrial morphology, suggesting a possible role of mitochondrial dynamics in its pathological progression. Recent Advances: Abnormal mitochondrial morphology is associated with pathologies across diverse tissues, suggesting that this highly regulated process is essential for proper cell maintenance and physiological homeostasis. Highly structured cardiac myofibers were hypothesized to limit alterations in mitochondrial morphology; however, recent work has identified morphological changes in cardiac tissue, specifically in DCM. Critical Issues: Mitochondrial dysfunction has been reported independently from observations of altered mitochondrial morphology in DCM. The temporal relationship and causative nature between functional and morphological changes of mitochondria in the establishment/progression of DCM is unclear. Future Directions: Altered mitochondrial energetics and morphology are not only causal for but also consequential to reactive oxygen species production, hence exacerbating oxidative damage through reciprocal amplification, which is integral to the progression of DCM. Therefore, targeting mitochondria for DCM will require better mechanistic characterization of morphological distortion and bioenergetic dysfunction. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 1545–1562. PMID

  11. Dilated Cardiomyopathy Revealing Cushing Disease

    PubMed Central

    Marchand, Lucien; Segrestin, Bérénice; Lapoirie, Marion; Favrel, Véronique; Dementhon, Julie; Jouanneau, Emmanuel; Raverot, Gérald

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Cardiovascular impairments are frequent in Cushing's syndrome and the hypercortisolism can result in cardiac structural and functional changes that lead in rare cases to dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). Such cardiac impairment may be reversible in response to a eucortisolaemic state. A 43-year-old man with a medical past of hypertension and history of smoking presented to the emergency department with global heart failure. Coronary angiography showed a significant stenosis of a marginal branch and cardiac MRI revealed a nonischemic DCM. The left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was estimated as 28% to 30%. Clinicobiological features and pituitary imaging pointed toward Cushing's disease and administration of adrenolytic drugs (metyrapone and ketoconazole) was initiated. Despite the normalization of cortisol which had been achieved 2 months later, the patient presented an acute heart failure. A massive mitral regurgitation secondary to posterior papillary muscle rupture was diagnosed as a complication of the occlusion of the marginal branch. After 6 months of optimal pharmacological treatment for systolic heart failure, as well as treatment with inhibitors of steroidogenesis, there was no improvement of LVEF. The percutaneous mitral valve was therefore repaired and a defibrillator implanted. The severity of heart failure contraindicated pituitary surgery and the patient was instead treated by stereotaxic radiotherapy. This is the first case reporting a Cushing's syndrome DCM without improvement of LVEF despite normalization of serum cortisol levels. PMID:26579807

  12. Diagnostic approaches for diabetic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Lorenzo-Almorós, A; Tuñón, J; Orejas, M; Cortés, M; Egido, J; Lorenzo, Ó

    2017-02-23

    Diabetic cardiomyopathy (DCM) is a cardiac dysfunction which affects approximately 12% of diabetic patients, leading to overt heart failure and death. However, there is not an efficient and specific methodology for DCM diagnosis, possibly because molecular mechanisms are not fully elucidated, and it remains asymptomatic for many years. Also, DCM frequently coexists with other comorbidities such as hypertension, obesity, dyslipidemia, and vasculopathies. Thus, human DCM is not specifically identified after heart failure is established. In this sense, echocardiography has been traditionally considered the gold standard imaging test to evaluate the presence of cardiac dysfunction, although other techniques may cover earlier DCM detection by quantification of altered myocardial metabolism and strain. In this sense, Phase-Magnetic Resonance Imaging and 2D/3D-Speckle Tracking Echocardiography may potentially diagnose and stratify diabetic patients. Additionally, this information could be completed with a quantification of specific plasma biomarkers related to related to initial stages of the disease. Cardiotrophin-1, activin A, insulin-like growth factor binding protein-7 (IGFBP-7) and Heart fatty-acid binding protein have demonstrated a stable positive correlation with cardiac hypertrophy, contractibility and steatosis responses. Thus, we suggest a combination of minimally-invasive diagnosis tools for human DCM recognition based on imaging techniques and measurements of related plasma biomarkers.

  13. Cardiac MRI in restrictive cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Gupta, A; Singh Gulati, G; Seth, S; Sharma, S

    2012-02-01

    Restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM) is a specific group of heart muscle disorders characterized by inadequate ventricular relaxation during diastole. This leads to diastolic dysfunction with relative preservation of systolic function. Although short axis systolic function is usually preserved in RCM, the long axis systolic function may be severely impaired. Confirmation of diagnosis and information regarding aetiology, extent of myocardial damage, and response to treatment requires imaging. Importantly, differentiation from constrictive pericarditis (CCP) is needed, as only the latter is managed surgically. Echocardiography is the initial cardiac imaging technique but cannot reliably suggest a tissue diagnosis; although recent advances, especially tissue Doppler imaging and spectral tracking, have improved its ability to differentiate RCM from CCP. Cardiac catheterization is the reference standard, but is invasive, two-dimensional, and does not aid myocardial characterization. Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) is a versatile technique providing anatomical, morphological and functional information. In recent years, it has been shown to provide important information regarding disease mechanisms, and also been found useful to guide treatment, assess its outcome and predict patient prognosis. This review describes the CMR features of RCM, appearances in various diseases, its overall role in patient management, and how it compares with other imaging techniques.

  14. Electrocardiographic predictors of peripartum cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Karaye, Kamilu M; Karaye, Kamilu M; Lindmark, Krister; Henein, Michael Y; Lindmark, Krister; Henein, Michael Y

    2016-01-01

    Summary Objective To identify potential electrocardiographic predictors of peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM). Methods: This was a case–control study carried out in three hospitals in Kano, Nigeria. Logistic regression models and a risk score were developed to determine electrocardiographic predictors of PPCM. Results: A total of 54 PPCM and 77 controls were consecutively recruited after satisfying the inclusion criteria. After controlling for confounding variables, a rise in heart rate of one beat/minute increased the risk of PPCM by 6.4% (p = 0.001), while the presence of ST–T-wave changes increased the odds of PPCM 12.06-fold (p < 0.001). In the patients, QRS duration modestly correlated (r = 0.4; p < 0.003) with left ventricular dimensions and end-systolic volume index, and was responsible for 19.9% of the variability of the latter (R2 = 0.199; p = 0.003). A risk score of ≥ 2, developed by scoring 1 for each of the three ECG disturbances (tachycardia, ST–T-wave abnormalities and QRS duration), had a sensitivity of 85.2%, specificity of 64.9%, negative predictive value of 86.2% and area under the curve of 83.8% (p < 0.0001) for potentially predicting PPCM. Conclusion In postpartum women, using the risk score could help to streamline the diagnosis of PPCM with significant accuracy, prior to confirmatory investigations PMID:27213852

  15. Pathophysiological Fundamentals of Diabetic Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xinyue; Bai, Tao; Xu, Zheng; Liu, Qiuju; Zheng, Yang; Cai, Lu

    2017-03-16

    Diabetic cardiomyopathy (DCM) was first recognized more than four decades ago and occurred independent of cardiovascular diseases or hypertension in both type 1 and type 2 diabetic patients. The exact mechanisms underlying this disease remain incompletely understood. Several pathophysiological bases responsible for DCM have been proposed, including the presence of hyperglycemia, nonenzymatic glycosylation of large molecules (e.g., proteins), energy metabolic disturbance, mitochondrial damage and dysfunction, impaired calcium handling, reactive oxygen species formation, inflammation, cardiac cell death, and cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis, leading to impairment of cardiac contractile functions. Increasing evidence also indicates the phenomenon called "metabolic memory" for diabetes-induced cardiovascular complications, for which epigenetic modulation seemed to play an important role, suggesting that the aforementioned pathogenic bases may be regulated by epigenetic modification. Therefore, this review aims at briefly summarizing the current understanding of the pathophysiological bases for DCM. Although how epigenetic mechanisms play a role remains incompletely understood now, extensive clinical and experimental studies have implicated its importance in regulating the cardiac responses to diabetes, which are believed to shed insight into understanding of the pathophysiological and epigenetic mechanisms for the development of DCM and its possible prevention and/or therapy. © 2017 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 7:693-711, 2017. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  16. American Trypanosomiasis (Also Known as Chagas Disease) Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Laboratory Diagnostic Assistance [DPDx] Parasites Home Treatment Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Treatment for Chagas disease is recommended for people diagnosed early in the course of infection (acute phase), congenital infection, and for ...

  17. Chagas disease transmission in periurban communities of Arequipa, Peru.

    PubMed

    Bowman, Natalie M; Kawai, Vivian; Levy, Michael Z; Cornejo del Carpio, Juan Geny; Cabrera, Lilia; Delgado, F; Malaga, Francisco; Cordova Benzaquen, Eleazar; Pinedo, Viviana V; Steurer, Francis; Seitz, Amy E; Gilman, Robert H; Bern, Caryn

    2008-06-15

    Chagas disease, caused by Trypanosoma cruzi infection, is an urban problem in Arequipa, Peru, and the epidemiology of Chagas disease is likely to be quite different in this area, compared with in rural zones. We conducted a serosurvey of 1615 children <18 years old in periurban districts that included hillside shantytowns and slightly more affluent low-lying communities. In addition, 639 adult residents of 1 shantytown were surveyed to provide data across the age spectrum for this community. Of 1615 children, 75 (4.7%) were infected with Trypanosoma cruzi. Infection risk increased by 12% per year of age, and children living in hillside shantytowns were 2.5 times as likely to be infected as were those living in lower-lying communities. However, age-prevalence data from 1 shantytown demonstrated that adults were no more likely to be seropositive than were teenagers; the results of maximum likelihood modeling suggest that T. cruzi transmission began in this community <20 years ago. The problem of Chagas disease in periurban settings, such as those around Arequipa, must be addressed to achieve elimination of vector-borne T. cruzi transmission. Identification of infected children, vector-control efforts, and education to avoid modifiable risk factors are necessary to decrease the burden of Chagas disease.

  18. Experimental Vaccines against Chagas Disease: A Journey through History

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Morales, Olivia; Monteón-Padilla, Víctor; Carrillo-Sánchez, Silvia C.; Rios-Castro, Martha; Martínez-Cruz, Mariana; Carabarin-Lima, Alejandro; Arce-Fonseca, Minerva

    2015-01-01

    Chagas disease, or American trypanosomiasis, which is caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, is primarily a vector disease endemic in 21 Latin American countries, including Mexico. Although many vector control programs have been implemented, T. cruzi has not been eradicated. The development of an anti-T. cruzi vaccine for prophylactic and therapeutic purposes may significantly contribute to the transmission control of Chagas disease. Immune protection against experimental infection with T. cruzi has been studied since the second decade of the last century, and many types of immunogens have been used subsequently, such as killed or attenuated parasites and new DNA vaccines. This primary prevention strategy appears feasible, effective, safe, and inexpensive, although problems remain. The objective of this review is to summarize the research efforts about the development of vaccines against Chagas disease worldwide. A thorough literature review was conducted by searching PubMed with the terms “Chagas disease” and “American trypanosomiasis” together with “vaccines” or “immunization”. In addition, reports and journals not cited in PubMed were identified. Publications in English, Spanish, and Portuguese were reviewed. PMID:26090490

  19. Proteomic profile of circulating immune complexes in chronic Chagas disease.

    PubMed

    Ohyama, K; Huy, N T; Yoshimi, H; Kishikawa, N; Nishizawa, J E; Roca, Y; Revollo Guzmán, R J; Velarde, F U G; Kuroda, N; Hirayama, K

    2016-10-01

    Immune complexes (ICs) are the direct and real-time products of humoral immune responses. The identification of constituent foreign or autoantigens within ICs might bring new insights into the pathology of infectious diseases. We applied immune complexome analysis of plasma to the study of Chagas disease caused by Trypanosoma cruzi. Twenty seropositive plasma samples including cardiac and/or megacolon determinate patients (n = 11) and indeterminate (n = 9) were analysed along with 10 seronegative individuals to characterize the antigens bound to circulating ICs. We identified 39 T. cruzi antigens and 114 human autoantigens specific to patients with Chagas. Among those antigens, two T. cruzi antigens (surface protease GP63, glucose-6-isomerase) and six human autoantigens (CD180 antigen, ceruloplasmin, fibrinogen beta chain, fibrinogen beta chain isoform 2 preprotein, isoform gamma-A of fibrinogen γ-chain, serum paraoxonase) were detected in more than 50% of the patients tested. Human isoform short of complement factor H-related protein 2 and trans-sialidase of T. cruzi were more frequently found in the indeterminate (5/9 for both) compared with in the determinate Chagas (0/11, P = 0·046 for human, 1/11, P = 0·0498 for T. cruzi). The immune complexome could illustrate the difference of immune status between clinical forms of chronic Chagas disease. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Chagas Parasite Detection in Blood Images Using AdaBoost

    PubMed Central

    Uc-Cetina, Víctor; Brito-Loeza, Carlos; Ruiz-Piña, Hugo

    2015-01-01

    The Chagas disease is a potentially life-threatening illness caused by the protozoan parasite, Trypanosoma cruzi. Visual detection of such parasite through microscopic inspection is a tedious and time-consuming task. In this paper, we provide an AdaBoost learning solution to the task of Chagas parasite detection in blood images. We give details of the algorithm and our experimental setup. With this method, we get 100% and 93.25% of sensitivity and specificity, respectively. A ROC comparison with the method most commonly used for the detection of malaria parasites based on support vector machines (SVM) is also provided. Our experimental work shows mainly two things: (1) Chagas parasites can be detected automatically using machine learning methods with high accuracy and (2) AdaBoost + SVM provides better overall detection performance than AdaBoost or SVMs alone. Such results are the best ones known so far for the problem of automatic detection of Chagas parasites through the use of machine learning, computer vision, and image processing methods. PMID:25861375

  1. Experimental Trypanosoma cruzi cardiomyopathy in BALB/c mice. The potential role of intravascular platelet aggregation in its genesis.

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, M. A.; Gonçalves, S.; Ribeiro-dos-Santos, R.

    1984-01-01

    In male BALB/c mice aged 5-6 weeks inoculated three times at intervals of 15 days with 1 X 10(7) epimastigote forms of the PF strain of Trypanosoma cruzi and challenged 30 days after the last inoculation with 2 X 10(4) trypomastigote forms of the Colombia strain of T cruzi (the mice were sacrificed 80-100 days after the challenge) a cardiomyopathy very similar to that observed in the chronic phase of Chagas' disease in man develops. The cardiac syndrome is characterized grossly by cardiomegaly with hypertrophy, dilatation of ventricular chambers, and thinning of the apex of the left ventricle (apical aneurysm) and microscopically by focal areas of myocytolytic necrosis and myocardial degeneration with an inflammatory response composed of mononuclear cells (predominantly macrophages and a few lymphocytes) with concurrent interstitial fibrosis and occasional myofibers containing pseudocysts. In addition, aggregated platelets and occlusive thrombi were found in small epicardial and intramyocardial vessels of infected mice as compared with controls. The potential role of intravascular platelet aggregation in the causation of focal myocardial necrosis and degeneration and apical aneurysm in experimental T cruzi cardiomyopathy in BALB/c mice is discussed. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 PMID:6230012

  2. Cardiac sarcoid: a chameleon masquerading as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and dilated cardiomyopathy in the same patient.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Anushree; Sulemanjee, Nasir Z; Cheema, Omar; Downey, Francis X; Tajik, A Jamil

    2014-05-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem, granulomatous disease of unknown etiology often seen in young adults, with cardiac involvement in more than one-quarter of sarcoid patients. The clinical presentation of cardiac sarcoid depends upon the location and extent of myocardium involved. Although cardiac sarcoid may produce asymmetrical septal hypertrophy, it is most commonly considered in the differential diagnosis of dilated cardiomyopathy. The hypertrophic stage of cardiac sarcoid is rarely seen. We describe a case of cardiac sarcoid in a young patient wherein a distinctive appearance of the cardiac sarcoid spectrum from "hypertrophic" stage to thinned/scarred stage, masquerading as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy followed by dilated cardiomyopathy, is demonstrated.

  3. Estimating the Burden of Chagas Disease in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Manne-Goehler, Jennifer; Umeh, Chukwuemeka A.; Montgomery, Susan P.; Wirtz, Veronika J.

    2016-01-01

    Background In recent years, there has been growing awareness of the significant burden of Chagas disease in the United States (US). However, epidemiological data on both prevalence and access to care for this disease are limited. The objective of this study is to provide an updated national estimate of Chagas disease prevalence, the first state-level estimates of cases of T. cruzi infection in the US and to analyze these estimates in the context of data on confirmed cases of infection in the US blood supply. Methods In this study, we calculated estimates of the state and national prevalence of Chagas disease. The number of residents originally from Chagas disease endemic countries were computed using data on Foreign-Born Hispanic populations from the American Community Survey, along with recent prevalence estimates for Chagas disease in Latin America from the World Health Organization that were published in 2006 and updated in 2015. We then describe the distribution of estimated cases in each state in relation to the number of infections identified in the donated blood supply per data from the AABB (formerly American Association of Blood Banks). Findings The results of this analysis offer an updated national estimate of 238,091 cases of T. cruzi infection in the United States as of 2012, using the same method as was used by Bern and Montgomery to estimate cases in 2005. This estimate indicates that there are 62,070 cases less than the most recent prior estimate, though it does not include undocumented immigrants who may account for as many as 109,000 additional cases. The state level results show that four states (California, Texas, Florida and New York) have over 10,000 cases and an additional seven states have over 5,000 cases. Moreover, since 2007, the AABB has reported 1,908 confirmed cases of T. cruzi infection identified through screening of blood donations. Conclusions This study demonstrates a substantial burden of Chagas disease in the US, with state

  4. Chagas disease: control, elimination and eradication. Is it possible?

    PubMed

    Coura, José Rodrigues

    2013-12-01

    From an epidemiological point of view, Chagas disease and its reservoirs and vectors can present the following characteristics: (i) enzooty, maintained by wild animals and vectors, with broad occurrence from southern United States of America (USA) to southern Argentina and Chile (42ºN 49ºS), (ii) anthropozoonosis, when man invades the wild ecotope and becomes infected with Trypanosoma cruzi from wild animals or vectors or when the vectors and wild animals, especially marsupials, invade the human domicile and infect man, (iii) zoonosis-amphixenosis and exchanged infection between animals and humans by domestic vectors in endemic areas and (iv) zooanthroponosis, infection that is transmitted from man to animals, by means of domestic vectors, which is the rarest situation in areas endemic for Chagas disease. The characteristics of Chagas disease as an enzooty of wild animals and as an anthropozoonosis are seen most frequently in the Brazilian Amazon and in the Pan-Amazon region as a whole, where there are 33 species of six genera of wild animals: Marsupialia, Chiroptera, Rodentia, Edentata (Xenarthra), Carnivora and Primata and 27 species of triatomines, most of which infected with T. cruzi . These conditions place the resident populations of this area or its visitors - tourists, hunters, fishermen and especially the people whose livelihood involves plant extraction - at risk of being affected by Chagas disease. On the other hand, there has been an exponential increase in the acute cases of Chagas disease in that region through oral transmission of T. cruzi , causing outbreaks of the disease. In four seroepidemiological surveys that were carried out in areas of the microregion of the Negro River, state of Amazonas, in 1991, 1993, 1997 and 2010, we found large numbers of people who were serologically positive for T. cruzi infection. The majority of them and/or their relatives worked in piassava extraction and had come into contact with and were stung by wild

  5. Chagas disease: control, elimination and eradication. Is it possible?

    PubMed Central

    Coura, José Rodrigues

    2013-01-01

    From an epidemiological point of view, Chagas disease and its reservoirs and vectors can present the following characteristics: (i) enzooty, maintained by wild animals and vectors, with broad occurrence from southern United States of America (USA) to southern Argentina and Chile (42ºN 49ºS), (ii) anthropozoonosis, when man invades the wild ecotope and becomes infected with Trypanosoma cruzi from wild animals or vectors or when the vectors and wild animals, especially marsupials, invade the human domicile and infect man, (iii) zoonosis-amphixenosis and exchanged infection between animals and humans by domestic vectors in endemic areas and (iv) zooanthroponosis, infection that is transmitted from man to animals, by means of domestic vectors, which is the rarest situation in areas endemic for Chagas disease. The characteristics of Chagas disease as an enzooty of wild animals and as an anthropozoonosis are seen most frequently in the Brazilian Amazon and in the Pan-Amazon region as a whole, where there are 33 species of six genera of wild animals: Marsupialia, Chiroptera, Rodentia, Edentata (Xenarthra), Carnivora and Primata and 27 species of triatomines, most of which infected with T. cruzi . These conditions place the resident populations of this area or its visitors - tourists, hunters, fishermen and especially the people whose livelihood involves plant extraction - at risk of being affected by Chagas disease. On the other hand, there has been an exponential increase in the acute cases of Chagas disease in that region through oral transmission of T. cruzi , causing outbreaks of the disease. In four seroepidemiological surveys that were carried out in areas of the microregion of the Negro River, state of Amazonas, in 1991, 1993, 1997 and 2010, we found large numbers of people who were serologically positive for T. cruzi infection. The majority of them and/or their relatives worked in piassava extraction and had come into contact with and were stung by wild

  6. Estimating the Burden of Chagas Disease in the United States.

    PubMed

    Manne-Goehler, Jennifer; Umeh, Chukwuemeka A; Montgomery, Susan P; Wirtz, Veronika J

    2016-11-01

    In recent years, there has been growing awareness of the significant burden of Chagas disease in the United States (US). However, epidemiological data on both prevalence and access to care for this disease are limited. The objective of this study is to provide an updated national estimate of Chagas disease prevalence, the first state-level estimates of cases of T. cruzi infection in the US and to analyze these estimates in the context of data on confirmed cases of infection in the US blood supply. In this study, we calculated estimates of the state and national prevalence of Chagas disease. The number of residents originally from Chagas disease endemic countries were computed using data on Foreign-Born Hispanic populations from the American Community Survey, along with recent prevalence estimates for Chagas disease in Latin America from the World Health Organization that were published in 2006 and updated in 2015. We then describe the distribution of estimated cases in each state in relation to the number of infections identified in the donated blood supply per data from the AABB (formerly American Association of Blood Banks). The results of this analysis offer an updated national estimate of 238,091 cases of T. cruzi infection in the United States as of 2012, using the same method as was used by Bern and Montgomery to estimate cases in 2005. This estimate indicates that there are 62,070 cases less than the most recent prior estimate, though it does not include undocumented immigrants who may account for as many as 109,000 additional cases. The state level results show that four states (California, Texas, Florida and New York) have over 10,000 cases and an additional seven states have over 5,000 cases. Moreover, since 2007, the AABB has reported 1,908 confirmed cases of T. cruzi infection identified through screening of blood donations. This study demonstrates a substantial burden of Chagas disease in the US, with state variation that reflects the distribution of

  7. Exercise Prescription for the Athlete with Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Saberi, Sara; Day, Sharlene M

    2016-11-01

    Inherited cardiomyopathies have highly variable expression in terms of symptoms, functional limitations, and disease severity. Associated risk of sudden cardiac death is also variable. International guidelines currently recommend restriction of all athletes with cardiomyopathy from participation in competitive sports. While the guidelines are necessarily conservative because predictive risk factors for exercise-triggered SCD have not been clearly identified, the risk is clearly not uniform across all athletes and all sports. The advent of implantable cardioverter defibrillators, automated external defibrillators, and successful implementation of emergency action plans may safely mitigate risk of sudden cardiac death during physical activity. An individualized approach to risk stratification of athletes that recognizes patient autonomy may allow many individuals with cardiomyopathies to safely train and compete. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Dilated cardiomyopathy and progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis

    PubMed Central

    James, Stephanie; Waterhouse, Deirdre; McDonald, Kenneth; O'Hanlon, Rory

    2014-01-01

    This case is of a 29-year-old man with progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis type 1 also known as Byler's disease. At the age of 21, our patient developed non-ischaemic dilated cardiomyopathy. Cardiac MRI demonstrated global wall thinning, with significant areas of myocardial fibrosis in the mid and epicardial walls from base to apex on postgadolinium late contrast enhanced images. No shared genetic loci between dilated cardiomyopathy and Byler's or cholestatic liver disease have yet been found. This presents the first documented case of non-ischaemic dilated cardiomyopathy, with evidence of mid wall fibrosis, in association with an established diagnosis of progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis type 1 since childhood. PMID:24654243

  9. Role of Cardiac MR Imaging in Cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Christopher M

    2015-06-01

    Cardiac MR imaging has made major inroads in the new millennium in the diagnosis and assessment of prognosis for patients with cardiomyopathies. Imaging of left and right ventricular structure and function and tissue characterization with late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) as well as T1 and T2 mapping enable accurate diagnosis of the underlying etiology. In the setting of coronary artery disease, either transmurality of LGE or contractile reserve in response to dobutamine can assess the likelihood of recovery of function after revascularization. The presence of scar reduces the likelihood of a response to medical therapy and to cardiac resynchronization therapy in heart failure. The presence and extent of LGE relate to overall cardiovascular outcome in cardiomyopathies. A major role for cardiac MR imaging in cardiomyopathies is to identify myocardial scar for diagnostic and prognostic purposes. © 2015 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  10. The Role of CMR in Cardiomyopathies

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Christopher M.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) has made major inroads in the new millenium in the diagnosis and assessment of prognosis for patients with cardiomyopathies. Imaging of left and right ventricular structure and function and tissue characterization with late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) as well as T1 and T2 mapping enable accurate diagnosis of the underlying etiology. In the setting of coronary artery disease, either transmurality of LGE or contractile reserve in response to dobutamine can assess the likelihood of recovery of function after revascularization. The presence of scar reduces the likelihood of response to medical therapy and to cardiac resynchronization therapy in heart failure. The presence and extent of LGE relate to overall cardiovascular outcome in cardiomyopathies. An emerging major role for CMR in cardiomyopathies is to identify myocardial scar for diagnostic and prognostic purposes. PMID:26033902

  11. A fatal case of peripartum cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Ronny; Mallet, Thierry; Mirrer, Brooks; Loarte, Pablo; Gale, Michael; Kastell, Paul

    2014-06-01

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy is a life-threatening cardiac condition affecting pregnant women either late in pregnancy or early in the post-partum period. The latest studies show a dramatic improvement in the mortality rates of women affected with this disorder, which has been correlated with advances in medical therapy for heart failure. However, patients continue to die of this condition. The following case report describes a typical patient with peripartum cardiomyopathy diagnosed on clinical grounds, along with echocardiogram findings of severe systolic dysfunction and global hypokinesis consistent with dilated cardiomyopathy. Emergency cesarean delivery had to be performed for fetal distress. There was significant improvement of the patient's condition with standard pharmacological management for heart failure at the time of discharge. However, five weeks after discharge, fatal cardiac arrest occurred. It is hoped that this article will raise awareness about this rare but potentially fatal condition and promote understanding of its main clinical features, diagnostic criteria, and conventional pharmacological management.

  12. Sheehan syndrome with reversible dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Laway, Bashir A; Alai, Mohammad S; Gojwari, Tariq; Ganie, Mohd A; Zargar, Abdul Hamid

    2010-01-01

    Cardiac abnormalities in patients with Sheehan syndrome are uncommon. A case of Sheehan syndrome with dilated cardiomyopathy is presented in whom hormone replacement with levothyroxine and prednisolone resulted in complete recovery of cardiomyopathy. A 25-year-old woman presented with lactation failure, secondary amenorrhea, features of hypothyroidism and a hypocortisol state following severe postpartum hemorrhage after her last child birth. She also had smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis. After starting antitubercular treatment, she developed shock, suggestive of hypocortisol crisis. Hormonal investigations revealed evidence of panhypopitutarism and magnetic resonance imaging revealed partial empty sella. Meanwhile echocardiography revealed evidence of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). The patient was given replacement therapy in the form of glucocorticoids and levothyroxine in addition to antitubercular treatment. She improved and on follow-up over a period of 7 months, the DCM completely reversed. To our knowledge this is the first report of reversible DCM in a patient with Sheehan syndrome.

  13. Aptamer BC007 for neutralization of pathogenic autoantibodies directed against G-protein coupled receptors: A vision of future treatment of patients with cardiomyopathies and positivity for those autoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Wallukat, Gerd; Müller, Johannes; Haberland, Annekathrin; Berg, Sabine; Schulz, Angela; Freyse, Ernst-Joachim; Vetter, Roland; Salzsieder, Eckhard; Kreutz, Reinhold; Schimke, Ingolf

    2016-01-01

    Cardiomyopathies such as idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), Chagas' cardiomyopathy and Peripartum cardiomyopathy present with autoantibodies against G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR-AABs) that agonistically activate their receptors. For the treatment of "agonistic autoantibody diseases" and in particular DCM, the removal of the GPCR-AABs by immunoadsorption (IA) has been studied with convincing patient benefit. To overcome cost and logistics problems of IA, the application of the aptamer BC007 for in vivo neutralization of GPCR-AABs could help. We demonstrate here, that the aptamer neutralized, in vitro, the presently known cardiovascular-pathogenic GPCR-AABs. In spontaneously hypertensive rats, the aptamer demonstrated its GPCR-AAB neutralizing potency in vivo. In the serum of DCM patients, the same GPCR-AAB reduction was achieved when patients were either immunoadsorbed or patient's serum was ex vivo treated with the aptamer. In our view, aptamer BC007 treatment in GPCR-AAB-positive patients would have a comparable benefit as that seen after IA. Not knowing all that interfering with our idea of aptamer-dependent neutralization of GPCR-AABs, the first preliminary steps have been taken for bringing the idea closer to patients.

  14. X-linked cardiomyopathy is heterogeneous

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, M.J.; Sillence, D.O.; Mulley, J.C.

    1994-09-01

    Two major loci of X-linked cardiomyopathy have been mapped by linkage analysis. The gene for X-linked dilated cardiomyopathy (XLCM) is mapped to the dystrophin locus at Xp21, while Barth syndrome has been localised to distal Xq28. XLCM usually presents in juvenile males with no skeletal disease but decreased dystrophin in cardiac muscle. Barth syndrome most often presents in infants and is characterized by skeletal myopathy, short stature and neutropenia in association with cardiomyopathy of variable severity. Prior to carrier or prenatal diagnosis in a family, delineation of the cardiomyopathy locus involved is essential. We report the linkage mapping of a large kindred in which several male infants have died with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. There is a family history of unexplained death of infant males less than 6 months old over 4 generations. Features of Barth syndrome such as short stature, skeletal myopathy and neutropenia have not been observed. Genotyping at 10 marker loci in Xq28 has revealed significant pairwise lod scores with the cardiomyopathy phenotype at DXS52 (Z=2.21 at {theta}=0.0), at markers p26 and p39 near DXS15 (Z=2.30 at {theta}=0.0) and at F8C (Z=2.24 at {theta}=0.0). A recombinant detected with DXS296 defines the proximal limit to the localization. No recombinants were detected at any of the loci distal to DXS296. The most distal marker in Xq28, DXS1108, is within 500 kb of the telomere. As the gene in this family is localized to Xq28, it is possible that this disorder is an allelic variant at the Barth syndrome locus.

  15. Perforin-expressing cytotoxic cells contribute to chronic cardiomyopathy in Trypanosoma cruzi infection

    PubMed Central

    Silverio, Jaline Coutinho; de-Oliveira-Pinto, Luzia Maria; da Silva, Andréa Alice; de Oliveira, Gabriel Melo; Lannes-Vieira, Joseli

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the dual participation of the immune response in controlling the invader and at the same time causing tissue damage might contribute to the design of effective new vaccines and therapies for Chagas disease. Perforin, a cytolytic protein product of killer cells, is involved in resistance to acute Trypanosoma cruzi infection. However, the contribution of perforin in parasite control and chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy is unclear. Perforin-positive cells were detected in the heart tissue during the acute and chronic phases of infection of C57BL/6 mice inoculated with low dose (102 parasites) of the Colombian T. cruzi strain. This protocol led to acute phase survival in both wild-type and perforin null (pfp−/−) mice lineages. During the chronic infection, parasitism and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) as well as interleukin (IL)-4+ and, mainly, interferon (IFN)-γ+ cells were more elevated in the heart tissue of pfp−/− mice. Higher levels of circulating NO and anti-parasite immunoglobulin (Ig)G2c and IgG3, paralleled by a prominent frequency of IFN-γ+ and IL-10+ splenocytes, were present in pfp−/−-infected mice. Therefore, although the perforin-dependent pathway plays a role, it is not crucial for anti-T. cruzi immunity and acute phase survival of mice infected with a low inoculum. Further, perforin deficiency resulted in lower activity of creatine kinase-muscle brain isoform (CK-MB) isoenzyme in serum and a more restricted connexin 43 loss, both of which are markers of the cardiomyocyte lesion. Moreover, perforin deficiency hampered the development of severe electrocardiographic abnormalities. Hence, our results corroborate that perforin-bearing cytotoxic cells might contribute to cardiomyocyte lesion and heart dysfunction during chronic T. cruzi infection, shedding light on immunopathogenesis of chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy. PMID:19878357

  16. The burden of Chagas disease: estimates and challenges.

    PubMed

    Stanaway, Jeffrey D; Roth, Gregory

    2015-09-01

    Chagas disease, caused by infection with the protozoa Trypanosoma cruzi is transmitted most often by Triatominae insect vectors, but also through blood transfusion, organ transplant, and congenital transmission. Between 5 and 18 million people are currently infected and the infection is estimated to cause more than 10,000 deaths annually. The disease has 3 phases: acute, indeterminate, and chronic. The acute phase immediately follows infection. It is typically asymptomatic but produces fever and malaise in up to 5% of people. The indeterminate phase is asymptomatic. More than one-half of those infected will remain in this phase for life and never experience long-term sequelae. After a decade or more, 20% to 30% of people will experience chronic cardiovascular Chagas disease with sequelae including heart failure, arrhythmias, and thromboembolism. Another 15% to 20% will experience chronic digestive sequela including megaesophagus and megacolon. A complete accounting of the burden of Chagas disease requires estimating the prevalence of the infection, the prevalence of each of its sequelae among those with the infection, and the number of deaths attributable to the infection. Attempts to estimate Chagas disease prevalence are complicated by several challenges imposed by the disease's extreme spatial heterogeneity, quickly evolving temporal trends, the decades-long lag between infection and symptomatic disease, biased prevalence data, incomplete recognition of Chagas-attributable deaths, limited data on sequela, and a near total absence of data outside of endemic countries. Even though researchers have found methodological approaches to dealing with these challenges, there is a need for better data. Copyright © 2015 World Heart Federation (Geneva). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Chagas disease in a Texan horse with neurologic deficits.

    PubMed

    Bryan, Laura K; Hamer, Sarah A; Shaw, Sarah; Curtis-Robles, Rachel; Auckland, Lisa D; Hodo, Carolyn L; Chaffin, Keith; Rech, Raquel R

    2016-01-30

    A 10-year-old Quarter Horse gelding presented to the Texas A&M University Veterinary Teaching Hospital with a six month-history of ataxia and lameness in the hind limbs. The horse was treated presumptively for equine protozoal myeloencephalitis (EPM) based on clinical signs but was ultimately euthanized after its condition worsened. Gross lesions were limited to a small area of reddening in the gray matter of the thoracic spinal cord. Histologically, trypanosome amastigotes morphologically similar to Trypanosoma cruzi, the agent of Chagas disease in humans and dogs, were sporadically detected within segments of the thoracic spinal cord surrounded by mild lymphoplasmacytic inflammation. Ancillary testing for Sarcocystis neurona, Neospora spp., Toxoplasma gondii and Leishmania spp. was negative. Conventional and real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of affected paraffin embedded spinal cord were positive for T. cruzi, and sequencing of the amplified T. cruzi satellite DNA PCR fragment from the horse was homologous with various clones of T. cruzi in GenBank. While canine Chagas disease cases have been widely reported in southern Texas, this is the first report of clinical T. cruzi infection in an equid with demonstrable amastigotes in the spinal cord. In contrast to previous instances of Chagas disease in the central nervous system (CNS) of dogs and humans, no inflammation or T. cruzi amastigotes were detected in the heart of the horse. Based on clinical signs, there is a potential for misdiagnosis of Chagas disease with other infectious diseases that affect the equine CNS. T. cruzi should be considered as a differential diagnosis in horses with neurologic clinical signs and histologic evidence of meningomyelitis that originate in areas where Chagas disease is present. The prevalence of T. cruzi in horses and the role of equids in the parasite life cycle require further study. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Two Cases of Stress Cardiomyopathy during Esophagogastroduodenoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jong Won; Park, Jongha; Song, Pil Sang; Park, Jae Hyun; Kim, Min Sung; Jeon, Gi Jung; Kim, Min Sik; Kim, Tae Oh

    2016-01-01

    Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) is considered a relatively safe procedure. However, the procedure and the materials used in EGD with conscious sedation can cause stress to the patient. Adverse events during EGD have been reported, represented by cardiopulmonary complications. To date, five cases have reported worldwide to be associated with gastrointestinal endoscopy. Stress cardiomyopathy (SCMP) is a reversible cardiomyopathy that typically occurs in postmenopausal women due to stress and may resolve within a few weeks. SCMP resembles acute myocardial infarction but differs in terms of treatment and prognosis. Here, we describe two cases of SCMP with shock during EGD with conscious sedation. PMID:26855928

  19. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy: definition and clinical profile.

    PubMed

    Summers, Matthew R; Prasad, Abhiram

    2013-04-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TTC) is an increasingly recognized, reversible cardiomyopathy with a clinical presentation that mimics an acute coronary syndrome but without evidence of obstructive coronary lesions. Typical presentation involves chest pain and/or dyspnea, transient ST-segment elevation on the electrocardiogram, and a modest increase in cardiac troponin. Cardiac imaging demonstrates wall-motion abnormalities that extend beyond the territory of a single epicardial coronary artery, and the absence of obstructive coronary lesions. Supportive treatment leads to spontaneous, rapid recovery of ventricular function, but about 10% of patients have recurrent events. This article reviews the defining features and clinical profile of TTC. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Differentiating constrictive pericarditis from restrictive cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Yazdani, Kambiz; Maraj, Suraj; Amanullah, Aman M

    2005-01-01

    Constrictive pericarditis and restrictive cardiomyopathy are 2 forms of diastolic dysfunction with similar presentation but different treatment options. Whereas constrictive pericarditis has the potential of being cured with pericardiectomy, restrictive cardiomyopathy is usually incurable. It is therefore crucial to differentiate between the 2 disorders. In the last few years, new diagnostic techniques have become available to differentiate these causes of diastolic dysfunction from each other. This review provides a complete, in-depth comparison of the 2 disorders with regard to their symptoms and clinical features, etiology, pathophysiology, hemodynamics, echocardiographic presentation, and finally the different available management options.

  1. Rigid spine syndrome and fatal cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Colver, A F; Steer, C R; Godman, M J; Uttley, W S

    1981-01-01

    A 7 1/2-year-old girl had the clinical features of the rigid spine syndrome of Dubowitz. Muscle biopsy showed a predominance of type 2 fibres with neither myopathic features nor an increase in connective tissue. In addition, she had a hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with which she presented in heart failure and from which she died suddenly one month later. The association of rigid spine syndrome with cardiomyopathy has not been reported previously. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:7193439

  2. Cardiomyopathy from 1,1-Difluoroethane Inhalation.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Suwen; Joginpally, Tejaswini; Kim, David; Yadava, Mrinal; Norgais, Konchok; Laird-Fick, Heather S

    2016-10-01

    Consumer aerosol products can be inhaled for their psychoactive effects, but with attendant adverse health effects including "sudden sniffing death." Cardiomyopathy has rarely been described in association with 1,1-difluoroethane (DFE), a common aerosol propellant. We report a 33-year-old male who developed acute myocardial injury and global hypokinesis along with rhabdomyolysis, acute kidney injury, and fulminant hepatitis after 2 days' nearly continuous huffing. Workup for other causes, including underlying coronary artery disease, was negative. His cardiac function improved over time. The exact mechanism of DFE's effects is uncertain but may include catecholamine-induced cardiomyopathy, coronary vasospasm, or direct cellular toxicity.

  3. Systematic review of pregnancy in women with inherited cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Krul, Sébastien P J; van der Smagt, Jasper J; van den Berg, Maarten P; Sollie, Krystyna M; Pieper, Petronella G; van Spaendonck-Zwarts, Karin Y

    2011-06-01

    Pregnancy exposes women with inherited cardiomyopathies to increased risk for heart failure and arrhythmias. In this paper, we review the clinical course and management of pregnant women with the following inherited cardiomyopathies: hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, dilated cardiomyopathy, arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, left ventricular non-compaction cardiomyopathy, and restrictive cardiomyopathy. We also discuss peripartum cardiomyopathy. Pregnancy is generally well tolerated in asymptomatic patients with inherited cardiomyopathies. However, worsening of the clinical condition can occur during pregnancy, despite intensive medical treatment. If prior cardiac events, poor functional class (New York Heart Association class III or IV), or advanced left ventricular systolic dysfunction are present, the risk of maternal cardiac complications during pregnancy are markedly increased. The postpartum condition is generally no worse than the antepartum condition, but no long-term follow-up studies have been reported. Preconception evaluation and counselling are important aspects of managing women with inherited cardiomyopathies. Genetic counselling and DNA testing should be offered to all women following the diagnosis of an inherited cardiomyopathy.

  4. Prevalence and Clinical Features of Focal Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Kato, Ken; Kitahara, Hideki; Fujimoto, Yoshihide; Sakai, Yoshiaki; Ishibashi, Iwao; Himi, Toshiharu; Kobayashi, Yoshio

    2016-07-25

    Because it is difficult to distinguish between focal takotsubo cardiomyopathy and aborted myocardial infarction, there is little information about the prevalence and clinical features of focal takotsubo cardiomyopathy. Our cardiac catheterization databases were queried to identify patients with focal takotsubo cardiomyopathy and other types of takotsubo cardiomyopathy. We defined focal takotsubo cardiomyopathy as hypo-, a- or dyskinesis in both anterolateral and septal segments without obstructive coronary artery disease explaining the wall motion abnormality. A total of 10 patients were diagnosed with focal takotsubo cardiomyopathy. The control group comprised patients with takotsubo cardiomyopathy with apical, mid-ventricular, or basal ballooning. Clinical features and in-hospital outcomes were compared between patients with focal takotsubo cardiomyopathy and those with other types of takotsubo cardiomyopathy. Among the 144 patients with takotsubo cardiomyopathy, the apical, mid-ventricular, basal, and focal types occurred in 85 (59.0%), 49 (34.0%), 0 (0%), and 10 patients (6.9%), respectively. The left ventricular ejection fraction was significantly higher in the focal group compared with the apical and mid-ventricular group (56±13 vs. 45±13 vs. 46±12%, P=0.03). In-hospital outcome was not significantly different among the 3 groups. Focal takotsubo cardiomyopathy is not rare. Biplane left ventriculography is useful for its diagnosis. (Circ J 2016; 80: 1824-1829).

  5. Biomarkers in Trypanosoma cruzi-infected and uninfected individuals with varying severity of cardiomyopathy in Santa Cruz, Bolivia.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Emi E; Sherbuk, Jacqueline E; Clark, Eva H; Marks, Morgan A; Gandarilla, Omar; Galdos-Cardenas, Gerson; Vasquez-Villar, Angel; Choi, Jeong; Crawford, Thomas C; Do, Rose Q; Q, Rose; Fernandez, Antonio B; Colanzi, Rony; Flores-Franco, Jorge Luis; Gilman, Robert H; Bern, Caryn

    2014-10-01

    Twenty to thirty percent of persons with Trypanosoma cruzi infection eventually develop cardiomyopathy. If an early indicator were to be identified and validated in longitudinal studies, this could enable treatment to be prioritized for those at highest risk. We evaluated cardiac and extracellular matrix remodeling markers across cardiac stages in T. cruzi infected (Tc+) and uninfected (Tc-) individuals. Participants were recruited in a public hospital in Santa Cruz, Bolivia and assigned cardiac severity stages by electrocardiogram and echocardiogram. BNP, NTproBNP, CKMB, troponin I, MMP-2, MMP-9, TIMP-1, TIMP-2, TGFb1, and TGFb2 were measured in specimens from 265 individuals using multiplex bead systems. Biomarker levels were compared between Tc+ and Tc- groups, and across cardiac stages. Receivers operating characteristic (ROC) curves were created; for markers with area under curve>0.60, logistic regression was performed. Analyses stratified by cardiac stage showed no significant differences in biomarker levels by Tc infection status. Among Tc+ individuals, those with cardiac insufficiency had higher levels of BNP, NTproBNP, troponin I, MMP-2, TIMP-1, and TIMP-2 than those with normal ejection fraction and left ventricular diameter. No individual marker distinguished between the two earliest Tc+ stages, but in ROC-based analyses, MMP-2/MMP-9 ratio was significantly higher in those with than those without ECG abnormalities. BNP, NTproBNP, troponin I, MMP-2, TIMP-1, and TIMP-2 levels rose with increasing severity stage but did not distinguish between Chagas cardiomyopathy and other cardiomyopathies. Among Tc+ individuals without cardiac insufficiency, only the MMP-2/MMP-9 ratio differed between those with and without ECG changes.

  6. Arrhythmogenic Noncompaction Cardiomyopathy: Is There an Echocardiographic Phenotypic Overlap of Two Distinct Cardiomyopathies?

    PubMed

    Aras, Dursun; Ozeke, Ozcan; Cay, Serkan; Ozcan, Firat; Baser, Kazım; Dogan, Umuttan; Unlu, Murat; Demirkan, Burcu; Tufekcioglu, Omac; Topaloglu, Serkan

    2015-09-01

    The clinical diagnosis of right ventricular (RV) cardiomyopathies is often challenging. It is difficult to differentiate the isolated left ventricular (LV) noncompaction cardiomyopathy (NC) from biventricular NC or from coexisting arrhythmogenic ventricular cardiomyopathy (AC). There are currently few established morphologic criteria for the diagnosis other than RV dilation and presence of excessive regional trabeculation. The gross and microscopic changes suggest pathological similarities between, or coexistence of, RV-NC and AC. Therefore, the term arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy is somewhat misleading as isolated LV or biventricular involvement may be present and thus a broader term such as AC should be preferred. We describe an unusual case of AC associated with a NC in a 27-year-old man who had a history of permanent pacemaker 7 years ago due to second-degree atrioventricular block.

  7. Platelet function in Takotsubo cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Núñez-Gil, Iván J; Bernardo, Esther; Feltes, Gisela; Escaned, Javier; Mejía-Rentería, Hernán D; De Agustín, José Alberto; Vivas, David; Nombela-Franco, Luis; Jiménez-Quevedo, Pilar; Macaya, Carlos; Fernández-Ortiz, Antonio

    2015-05-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TK) includes a transient left ventricular dysfunction without obstructive coronary disease, sometimes after stressful situations with elevated cathecolamines. Since catecholamines activate platelets we aimed to study the platelet influence in a TK setting. We included 32 patients with a TK diagnosis, 13 with an acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and 18 healthy volunteers. Once consent informed was obtained, blood samples were extracted and processed (at admission and after 3 months follow-up). Clinical, ecg, echocardiographic and angiographic features were thoroughly recorded.Previous treatment before admission was similar between groups. No differences were observed in clinical features or any of the acute markers studied regarding platelet reactivity between TK compared to ACS. After follow-up, aggregation levels and platelet reactivity showed differences, mainly due to the antithrombotic therapy prescribed at discharge, but similar to volunteers. Circulating epinephrine during the acute phase was significantly higher in TK (p < 0.001). Patients with higher levels of epinephrine had elevated platelet activation and aggregation after 3 months. No differences were observed in Takotsubo acute platelet aggregation compared to patients with ACS, in spite of higher blood levels of adrenaline. Takotsubo patients had elevated platelet aggregation and activation compared with ACS patients at 3 months follow-up because they were less frequently on chronic clopidogrel and ASA. However, they had similar platelet aggregation and activation levels to healthy volunteers despite treatment with low-dose ASA. Takotsubo patients who had higher levels of adrenaline in the acute phase displayed increased platelet reactivity during follow-up.

  8. Justice where justice is due: A posthumous Nobel Prize to Carlos Chagas (1879-1934), the discoverer of American Trypanosomiasis (Chagas' disease).

    PubMed

    Bestetti, Reinaldo B; Martins, Cláudia A; Cardinalli-Neto, Augusto

    2009-05-01

    Working in the Brazilian backland, Chagas described a new disease. He discovered the etiologic agent, the vector, the reservoir, the acute stage, the several clinical aspects of the chronic stage (particularly the heart disease), role of autoimmunity in its pathogenesis, and anticipated the social impact of the disease. Chagas was nominated to Nobel Prize twice: in 1913, and in 1921. In 1913, Richet won the prize because his work on anaphylaxis. In 1921, no one received the Nobel Prize. It is believed that detraction of Chagas' work at the National Academy of Medicine, made by jealousy, mediocrity, and political rivalries can be maculated the image of the scientist. Furthermore, misperception of Chagas' work may also have led the Nobel Committee not to award him. One-hundred years after the discovery, we can appreciate the greatness of the discovery of Carlos Chagas, never seem in the realm of biological research. Time to make justice, therefore, has finally come.

  9. Posterolateral hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: a rare, but clinically significant variant of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Seki, Atsuko; Perens, Gregory; Fishbein, Michael C

    2014-01-01

    Posterolateral hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a rare variant of HCM. Segmental HCM is seen in 12% of cases of HCM. Among the patterns of segmental HCM, posterolateral HCM is the least common type. Our case of an 18-year old male documents this unusual type of cardiomyopathy. In this form of HCM, left ventricular thickness and the extent of hypertrophy might be underestimated by 2-dimensional echocardiography. This case illustrates the echocardiographic and pathologic features of posterolateral HCM.

  10. Dobutamine Stress Echocardiography Safety in Chagas Disease Patients.

    PubMed

    Rassi, Daniela do Carmo; Vieira, Marcelo Luiz Campos; Furtado, Rogerio Gomes; Turco, Fabio de Paula; Melato, Luciano Henrique; Hotta, Viviane Tiemi; Nunes, Colandy Godoy de Oliveira; Rassi, Luiz; Rassi, Salvador

    2017-02-01

    A few decades ago, patients with Chagas disease were predominantly rural workers, with a low risk profile for obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD). As urbanization has increased, they became exposed to the same risk factors for CAD of uninfected individuals. Dobutamine stress echocardiography (DSE) has proven to be an important tool in CAD diagnosis. Despite being a potentially arrhythmogenic method, it is safe for coronary patients without Chagas disease. For Chagas disease patients, however, the indication of DSE in clinical practice is uncertain, because of the arrhythmogenic potential of that heart disease. To assess DSE safety in Chagas disease patients with clinical suspicion of CAD, as well as the incidence of arrhythmias and adverse events during the exam. Retrospective analysis of a database of patients referred for DSE from May/2012 to February/2015. This study assessed 205 consecutive patients with Chagas disease suspected of having CAD. All of them had their serology for Chagas disease confirmed. Their mean age was 64±10 years and most patients were females (65.4%). No patient had significant adverse events, such as acute myocardial infarction, ventricular fibrillation, asystole, stroke, cardiac rupture and death. Regarding arrhythmias, ventricular extrasystoles occurred in 48% of patients, and non-sustained ventricular tachycardia in 7.3%. DSE proved to be safe in this population of Chagas disease patients, in which no potentially life-threatening outcome was found. Até poucas décadas atrás, os pacientes chagásicos eram predominantemente trabalhadores rurais, com baixo perfil de risco para doença obstrutiva coronária. Com a crescente urbanização, passaram a ter os mesmos fatores de risco para doença aterosclerótica que indivíduos não infectados. O ecocardiograma sob estresse com dobutamina (EED) é uma importante ferramenta no diagnóstico de coronariopatia. É referido, porém, como um método potencialmente arritmogênico, mas

  11. Mitogenic cardiomyopathy: a lethal neonatal familial dilated cardiomyopathy characterized by myocyte hyperplasia and proliferation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Kenneth T E; Taylor, Glenn P; Meschino, Wendy S; Kantor, Paul F; Cutz, Ernest

    2010-07-01

    Pediatric cardiomyopathies are a heterogenous group of conditions of which dilated cardiomyopathies are the most common clinicomorphologic subtype. However, the etiology and pathogenesis of many cases of dilated cardiomyopathies remain unknown. We describe a series of 5 cases of a rare but clinically and histologically distinctive dilated cardiomyopathy that was uniformly lethal in early infancy. The 5 cases include 2 pairs of siblings. There was parental consanguinity in 1 of the 2 pairs of siblings. Death occurred in early infancy (range, 22-67 days; mean, 42 days) after a short history of general lethargy, decreased feeding, respiratory distress, or cyanosis. There was no specific birth or early neonatal problems. Autopsy revealed congestive cardiac failure and enlarged, dilated hearts with ventricular dilatation more pronounced than atrial dilatation, and endocardial fibroelastosis. Histology showed prominent hypertrophic nuclear changes of cardiac myofibers and markedly increased myocyte mitotic activity including occasional atypical mitoses. Immunohistochemical staining for Mib1 showed a markedly increased proliferative index of 10% to 20%. Ancillary investigations, including molecular studies, did not reveal a primary cause for the cardiomyopathies. This distinctive dilated cardiomyopathy characterized by unusual histologic features of myocyte nuclear hypertrophy and marked mitotic activity is lethal in early infancy. Its occurrence in 2 pairs of siblings suggests familial inheritance. Although the underlying molecular pathogenesis remains to be elucidated, it is important to recognize this distinctive entity for purposes of genetic counseling.

  12. Genetics Home Reference: familial dilated cardiomyopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... 10.1056/NEJMoa1110186. Citation on PubMed or Free article on PubMed Central Hershberger RE, Hedges DJ, Morales A. Dilated cardiomyopathy: the complexity of a diverse genetic architecture. Nat Rev Cardiol. 2013 Sep;10(9):531- ...

  13. Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy in Athletes: Catching a Killer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maron, Barry J.

    1993-01-01

    A leading cause of sudden death among young athletes, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) does not always present cardiac signs and symptoms. Echocardiography offers the most effective means for diagnosis. Some patients require pharmaceutical or surgical intervention. Patients with HCM should not engage in organized competitive sports or…

  14. Relation between stress cardiomyopathy and hemorrhagic stroke.

    PubMed

    Mansencal, Nicolas; N'Guetta, Roland; Desperramons, Julien; Dubourg, Olivier

    2011-02-17

    We present the case of an 89-year-old woman with no previous cardiovascular disease who presented a stress cardiomyopathy secondary to acute hemorrhagic stroke. Contrast and two-dimensional speckle tracking echocardiography was helpful to perform the diagnosis and the follow-up.

  15. Biomarkers in inflammatory and noninflammatory cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Noutsias, Michel; Pankuweit, Sabine; Maisch, Bernhard

    2009-12-01

    Acute myocarditis (AMC) and its sequela, dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), are most often caused by cardiotropic viral infections in the Western world. Inflammatory cardiomyopathy (DCMi) is a specific cardiomyopathy entity of DCM, being defined by the proof of intramyocardial inflammation and/or viral infection in endomyocardial biopsies (EMBs). Diagnostic procedures of EMBs are indispensable for the etiopathogenic differentiation of the disease. Experienced cardiology centers have reported low complication rates of EMB obtainment. The histological Dallas criteria are prone to substantial sampling error and interobserver variability, have no prognostic impact and, moreover, are not suitable to select AMC/DCMi patients who favorably respond to immunosuppression. Immunohistological detection of myocarditis and viral persistence have proven adverse prognostic impact in AMC and DCM patients, respectively. This contemporary diagnostic repertoire on EMBs is essential for the selection of DCMi patients who will likely benefit from immunomodulatory treatment, which has been addressed in randomized trials. During the past decade, cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) has developed as a valuable noninvasive diagnostic approach for the detection and localization of intramyocardial inflammation, and CMR guidelines for AMC have been elaborated. Late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) has been associated with adverse prognostic outcome in DCM patients. CMR techniques, however, are not suitable to specifically detect myocardial viral infections. To date, no classic biomarker has been shown to differentiate between DCMi and noninflammatory cardiomyopathies.

  16. Ubiquitin-proteasome system and hereditary cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Schlossarek, Saskia; Frey, Norbert; Carrier, Lucie

    2014-06-01

    Adequate protein turnover is essential for cardiac homeostasis. Different protein quality controls are involved in the maintenance of protein homeostasis, including molecular chaperones and co-chaperones, the autophagy-lysosomal pathway, and the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). In the last decade, a series of evidence has underlined a major function of the UPS in cardiac physiology and disease. Particularly, recent studies have shown that dysfunctional proteasomal function leads to cardiac disorders. Hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathies are the two most prevalent inherited cardiomyopathies. Both are primarily transmitted as an autosomal-dominant trait and mainly caused by mutations in genes encoding components of the cardiac sarcomere, including a relevant striated muscle-specific E3 ubiquitin ligase. A growing body of evidence indicates impairment of the UPS in inherited cardiomyopathies as determined by measurement of the level of ubiquitinated proteins, the activities of the proteasome and/or the use of fluorescent UPS reporter substrates. The present review will propose mechanisms of UPS impairment in inherited cardiomyopathies, summarize the potential consequences of UPS impairment, including activation of the unfolded protein response, and underline some therapeutic options available to restore proteasome function and therefore cardiac homeostasis and function. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Protein Quality Control, the Ubiquitin Proteasome System, and Autophagy". Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  17. Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy in Athletes: Catching a Killer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maron, Barry J.

    1993-01-01

    A leading cause of sudden death among young athletes, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) does not always present cardiac signs and symptoms. Echocardiography offers the most effective means for diagnosis. Some patients require pharmaceutical or surgical intervention. Patients with HCM should not engage in organized competitive sports or…

  18. Clinical and molecular classification of cardiomyopathies

    PubMed Central

    Cecchi, Franco; Tomberli, Benedetta; Olivotto, Iacopo

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The term “cardiomyopathies” was used for the first time 55 years ago, in 1957. Since then awareness and knowledge of this important and complex group of heart muscle diseases have improved substantially. Over these past five decades a large number of definitions, nomenclature and schemes, have been advanced by experts and consensus panel, which reflect the fast and continued advance of the scientific understanding in the field. Cardiomyopathies are a heterogeneous group of inherited myocardial diseases, which represent an important cause of disability and adverse outcome. Although considered rare diseases, the overall estimated prevalence of all cardiomyopathies is at least 3% in the general population worldwide. Furthermore, their recognition is increasing due to advances in imaging techniques and greater awareness in both the public and medical community. Cardiomyopathies represent an ideal translational model of integration between basic and clinical sciences. A multidisciplinary approach is therefore essential in order to ensure their correct diagnosis and management. In the present work, we aim to provide a concise overview of the historical background, genetic and phenotypic spectrum and evolving concepts leading to the various attempts of cardiomyopathy classifications produced over the decades. PMID:25610835

  19. Secondary Coronary Artery Vasospasm Promotes Cardiomyopathy Progression

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, Matthew T.; Korcarz, Claudia E.; Collins, Keith A.; Lapidos, Karen A.; Hack, Andrew A.; Lyons, Matthew R.; Zarnegar, Sara; Earley, Judy U.; Lang, Roberto M.; McNally, Elizabeth M.

    2004-01-01

    Genetic defects in the plasma membrane-associated sarcoglycan complex produce cardiomyopathy characterized by focal degeneration. The infarct-like pattern of cardiac degeneration has led to the hypothesis that coronary artery vasospasm underlies cardiomyopathy in this disorder. We evaluated the coronary vasculature of γ-sarcoglycan mutant mice and found microvascular filling defects consistent with arterial vasospasm. However, the vascular smooth muscle sarcoglycan complex was intact in the coronary arteries of γ-sarcoglycan hearts with perturbation of the sarcoglycan complex only within the adjacent myocytes. Thus, in this model, coronary artery vasospasm derives from a vascular smooth muscle-cell extrinsic process. To reduce this secondary vasospasm, we treated γ-sarcoglycan-deficient mice with the calcium channel antagonist verapamil. Verapamil treatment eliminated evidence of vasospasm and ameliorated histological and functional evidence of cardiomyopathic progression. Echocardiography of verapamil-treated, γ-sarcoglycan-null mice showed an improvement in left ventricular fractional shortening (44.3 ± 13.3% treated versus 37.4 ± 15.3% untreated), maximal velocity at the aortic outflow tract (114.9 ± 27.9 cm/second versus 92.8 ± 22.7 cm/second), and cardiac index (1.06 ± 0.30 ml/minute/g versus 0.67 ± 0.16 ml/minute/g, P < 0.05). These data indicate that secondary vasospasm contributes to the development of cardiomyopathy and is an important therapeutic target to limit cardiomyopathy progression. PMID:14982859

  20. The Insular Cortex and Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Michiaki; Dote, Keigo; Kato, Masaya; Sasaki, Shota; Oda, Noboru; Kagawa, Eisuke; Nakano, Yoshinori; Yamane, Aya; Higashihara, Tasuku; Miyauchi, Shunsuke; Tsuchiya, Akane; Harada, Wakako; Kario, Kazuomi

    2017-01-01

    Transient left ventricular dysfunction in patients under emotional stress, also known as Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, has been recognized as a distinct clinical entity. Recent studies have supported the concept notion that the cardiovascular system is regulated by cortical modulation. A network consisting of the insular cortex (Ic), anterior cingulate gyrus, and amygdala plays a crucial role in the regulation of the central autonomic nervous system in relation to emotional stress such as anxiety, fear and sadness. Because the Ic is located in the region of the middle cerebral arteries, its structure tends to be exposed to a higher risk of cerebrovascular disease. Ic damage has been associated with myocardial injury, increased brain natriuretic peptide, and the incidence of Takotsubo cardiomyopathy. Because Ic damage has been associated with increased sympathetic nervous system activity, Ic damage is suggested to have a pivotal role in the pathophysiology of Takotsubo cardiomyopathy. In this review, we focus on the role of the Ic as a mediator for the cardiovascular system in relation to emotional stress, and we summarizes the current knowledge on the relationships between the Ic and Takotsubo cardiomyopathy. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  1. Chagas Disease, Migration and Community Settlement Patterns in Arequipa, Peru

    PubMed Central

    Gilman, Robert H.; Cornejo del Carpio, Juan G.; Naquira, Cesar; Bern, Caryn; Levy, Michael Z.

    2009-01-01

    Background Chagas disease is one of the most important neglected tropical diseases in the Americas. Vectorborne transmission of Chagas disease has been historically rare in urban settings. However, in marginal communities near the city of Arequipa, Peru, urban transmission cycles have become established. We examined the history of migration and settlement patterns in these communities, and their connections to Chagas disease transmission. Methodology/Principal Findings This was a qualitative study that employed focus group discussions and in-depth interviews. Five focus groups and 50 in-depth interviews were carried out with 94 community members from three shantytowns and two traditional towns near Arequipa, Peru. Focus groups utilized participatory methodologies to explore the community's mobility patterns and the historical and current presence of triatomine vectors. In-depth interviews based on event history calendars explored participants' migration patterns and experience with Chagas disease and vectors. Focus group data were analyzed using participatory analysis methodologies, and interview data were coded and analyzed using a grounded theory approach. Entomologic data were provided by an ongoing vector control campaign. We found that migrants to shantytowns in Arequipa were unlikely to have brought triatomines to the city upon arrival. Frequent seasonal moves, however, took shantytown residents to valleys surrounding Arequipa where vectors are prevalent. In addition, the pattern of settlement of shantytowns and the practice of raising domestic animals by residents creates a favorable environment for vector proliferation and dispersal. Finally, we uncovered a phenomenon of population loss and replacement by low-income migrants in one traditional town, which created the human settlement pattern of a new shantytown within this traditional community. Conclusions/Significance The pattern of human migration is therefore an important underlying determinant of

  2. Dissecting slander and crying for justice: Carlos Chagas and the Nobel Prize of 1921.

    PubMed

    Bestetti, Reinaldo B; Cardinalli-Neto, Augusto

    2013-10-03

    Chagas disease was discovered by Carlos Chagas in 1909. Chagas worked at Oswaldo Cruz Institute, where the bases of experimental medicine were settled in Brazil, and that had no connection with the Faculty of Medicine of Rio de Janeiro. Chagas had several enemies at Oswaldo Cruz Institute mainly because of his election to Head of Service in 1910, and for the position of Oswaldo Cruz Directorship in 1917. Furthermore, Chagas gained enemies at Faculty of Medicine of Rio de Janeiro, which did not like to see the economical political autonomy of Oswaldo Cruz Institute. This allowed the Institute not only to perform top experimental research, but also to take the leadership of research in the country. Chagas was nominated to the Nobel Prize of 1921 in December, 1920. None was awarded the Nobel Prize in that year. He seems to have been evaluated by the Noble Committee of Karolinska Institute from March to May of 1921. At that time, his enemies were denying his discovery of Trypanosoma cruzi, a key point in Chagas' nomination by Karolinska Institute, and giving no epidemiological importance for the disease. By the same way, the obligation of small pox vaccination was tarnishing his public image. Having taken into account the epidemiologic importance of Chagas disease, the strong historical mistake in the process of Chagas evaluation, and the inequity behind all these facts, we insist on a posthumous Nobel Prize for the man who made the most complete medical-scientist discovery of all time.

  3. Physician Knowledge of Chagas Disease in Hispanic Immigrants Living in Appalachian Ohio.

    PubMed

    Amstutz-Szalay, Shelley

    2017-06-01

    Studies have indicated that US physicians may not consider Chagas disease when diagnosing immigrant patients from Chagas-endemic areas. The purpose of this study was to evaluate physician knowledge of Chagas disease in six Appalachian Ohio counties. Physician knowledge was assessed by self-administrated survey (n = 105). Over 80 % of physicians reported that their current knowledge of Chagas disease was limited or very limited, and 50 % reported never considering Chagas disease diagnosis for their at-risk patients. Nearly 70 % of physicians were unaware of the percentage of chronic Chagas patients that develop clinical disease, and 36 % could not correctly identify the disease course. In addition, over 30 % of physicians reported that no services were available within their practice to assist Spanish-speaking patients with limited English proficiency. A lack of physician awareness of Chagas disease, coupled with a lack of translation services, may create a barrier to care by decreasing the likelihood of identification of patients at risk for Chagas disease. The results of this study support the need for interventions to ensure proper diagnosis and treatment of Chagas disease in Hispanic immigrants in rural Appalachian Ohio.

  4. Evaluation of VDR gene polymorphisms in Trypanosoma cruzi infection and chronic Chagasic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Leon Rodriguez, Daniel A; Carmona, F David; González, Clara Isabel; Martin, Javier

    2016-08-09

    Vitamin D is an important modulator of the immune response. It acts over several immune cell types where the Vitamin D receptor (VDR) is expressed. Due to the high relevance of this signaling pathway, several studies have investigated the possible influence of genes involved in the metabolism of Vitamin D and its receptor in different human diseases. Here, we analyzed whether four single-nucleotide polymorphisms of the VDR gene (rs731236, rs7975232, rs1544410 and rs2228570) are involved in the susceptibility to infection by Trypanosoma cruzi and/or to chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy (CCC) in a Colombian endemic population for this parasite. Our results showed that the rs2228570*A allele is associated with CCC development (P = 4.46E-03, OR = 1.51). In summary, the data presented in this report suggest that variation within the VDR gene may affect the immune response against T. cruzi, increasing the probability of cardiac complications in infected individuals.

  5. Evaluation of VDR gene polymorphisms in Trypanosoma cruzi infection and chronic Chagasic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Leon Rodriguez, Daniel A; Carmona, F David; González, Clara Isabel; Martin, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin D is an important modulator of the immune response. It acts over several immune cell types where the Vitamin D receptor (VDR) is expressed. Due to the high relevance of this signaling pathway, several studies have investigated the possible influence of genes involved in the metabolism of Vitamin D and its receptor in different human diseases. Here, we analyzed whether four single-nucleotide polymorphisms of the VDR gene (rs731236, rs7975232, rs1544410 and rs2228570) are involved in the susceptibility to infection by Trypanosoma cruzi and/or to chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy (CCC) in a Colombian endemic population for this parasite. Our results showed that the rs2228570*A allele is associated with CCC development (P = 4.46E−03, OR = 1.51). In summary, the data presented in this report suggest that variation within the VDR gene may affect the immune response against T. cruzi, increasing the probability of cardiac complications in infected individuals. PMID:27502545

  6. Host and parasite genetics shape a link between Trypanosoma cruzi infection dynamics and chronic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Michael D; Francisco, Amanda Fortes; Taylor, Martin C; Jayawardhana, Shiromani; Kelly, John M

    2016-10-01

    Host and parasite diversity are suspected to be key factors in Chagas disease pathogenesis. Experimental investigation of underlying mechanisms is hampered by a lack of tools to detect scarce, pleiotropic infection foci. We developed sensitive imaging models to track Trypanosoma cruzi infection dynamics and quantify tissue-specific parasite loads, with minimal sampling bias. We used this technology to investigate cardiomyopathy caused by highly divergent parasite strains in BALB/c, C3H/HeN and C57BL/6 mice. The gastrointestinal tract was unexpectedly found to be the primary site of chronic infection in all models. Immunosuppression induced expansion of parasite loads in the gut and was followed by widespread dissemination. These data indicate that differential immune control of T. cruzi occurs between tissues and shows that the large intestine and stomach provide permissive niches for active infection. The end-point frequency of heart-specific infections ranged from 0% in TcVI-CLBR-infected C57BL/6 to 88% in TcI-JR-infected C3H/HeN mice. Nevertheless, infection led to fibrotic cardiac pathology in all models. Heart disease severity was associated with the model-dependent frequency of dissemination outside the gut and inferred cumulative heart-specific parasite loads. We propose a model of cardiac pathogenesis driven by periodic trafficking of parasites into the heart, occurring at a frequency determined by host and parasite genetics. © 2016 The Authors Cellular Microbiology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. [Chronic Chagasic Cardiomyopathy at the Hospital General de Zona no. 24 IMSS. Poza Rica, Veracruz].

    PubMed

    Olivera-Mar, Amonario; Hernández-Vicencio, Catalina; Camacho-Marie, Margarita; Hernández-Becerril, Nidia; Monteón-Padilla, Víctor M; Vallejo, Maite; Reyes, Pedro A

    2006-01-01

    Northern Veracruz has conditions, biotic and abiotic, to support Triatomine bugs and vectorial transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi to human beings. Therefore we explore seroprevalence of antibodies to this parasite and the presence of Chronic Chagasic Cardiopathy (CCC) at Cardiology ward in a General Hospital serving North of Veracruz State, and neighbord states Hidalgo, Puebla San Luis Potosi and Tamaulipas. We search for consecutive adult patients attending outpatient and beds assigned to Cardiology between March through September, 2003. An epidemiology questionnaire, clinical work up, chest roentgenogram, 12 lead peripheral EKG and transthoracic echocardiogram were performed in 240 female/males patients. All of them were bled to blindly search for T. cruzi antibodies. Seroprevalence was 8%, 49 cases of dilated cardiomyopathy were diagnosed 23 attributed to chronic diseases such as systemic hypertension diabetes mellitus or ischemic heart disease 12 with idiopathic disease and 14 (29%) had CCC. The latter accumulated epidemiologic features suggestive of vectorial infection. Four additional individuals without CCC but having specific antibodies were considered indeterminate Chagasic cases. This case series identify American Trypanosomiasis among 19 people attending a Cardiology Service, and 14 of them had a severe heart disease linked to progressive and fatal course. This observation points out that Chagas disease could be a regional public health problem in Northern Veracruz.

  8. Diagnosis and management of inherited cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Millar, Lynne; Sharma, Sanjay

    2014-10-01

    Inherited heart conditions are the most common cause of sudden cardiac death in those under the age of 35 and the leading cause of non-traumatic death in young athletes. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most common inherited heart disease affecting 1 in 500 of the population. Some patients may exhibit severe left ventricular hypertrophy, others may show nothing more than an abnormal ECG. Left ventricular hypertrophy most commonly manifests in the second decade of life. Sudden death is rare and usually affects patients in the first three decades whereas older patients present with heart failure, atrial fibrillation and stroke. Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy is a rare, autosomal dominant heart muscle disorder which affects between 1 in 1,000 and 1 in 5,000 of the population. Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is characterised by a dilated left ventricle with impaired function that cannot be explained by ischaemic heart disease, hypertension or valvular heart disease. At least 25% of cases of DCM are familial. DCM may be associated with multisystem conditions such as muscular dystrophy. Chemotherapy and certain other drugs, alcohol abuse and myocarditis may also lead to a dilated and poorly contracting left ventricle. In many cases the first manifestation of an inherited cardiomyopathy can be a sudden cardiac arrest. Other presentations include chest pain or breathlessness during exertion, palpitations and syncope. In many of the cardiomyopathies, the diagnosis can be made with a standard ECG and echocardiogram. However if the diagnosis is not certain or the cardiologist wishes to look at the heart structure in greater detail, a cardiac MRI may be performed.

  9. Infective endocarditis in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Dominguez, Fernando; Ramos, Antonio; Bouza, Emilio; Muñoz, Patricia; Valerio, Maricela C.; Fariñas, M. Carmen; de Berrazueta, José Ramón; Zarauza, Jesús; Pericás Pulido, Juan Manuel; Paré, Juan Carlos; de Alarcón, Arístides; Sousa, Dolores; Rodriguez Bailón, Isabel; Montejo-Baranda, Miguel; Noureddine, Mariam; García Vázquez, Elisa; Garcia-Pavia, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Infective endocarditis (IE) complicating hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a poorly known entity. Although current guidelines do not recommend IE antibiotic prophylaxis (IEAP) in HCM, controversy remains. This study sought to describe the clinical course of a large series of IE HCM and to compare IE in HCM patients with IE patients with and without an indication for IEAP. Data from the GAMES IE registry involving 27 Spanish hospitals were analyzed. From January 2008 to December 2013, 2000 consecutive IE patients were prospectively included in the registry. Eleven IE HCM additional cases from before 2008 were also studied. Clinical, microbiological, and echocardiographic characteristics were analyzed in IE HCM patients (n = 34) and in IE HCM reported in literature (n = 84). Patients with nondevice IE (n = 1807) were classified into 3 groups: group 1, HCM with native-valve IE (n = 26); group 2, patients with IEAP indication (n = 696); group 3, patients with no IEAP indication (n = 1085). IE episode and 1-year follow-up data were gathered. One-year mortality in IE HCM was 42% in our study and 22% in the literature. IE was more frequent, although not exclusive, in obstructive HCM (59% and 74%, respectively). Group 1 exhibited more IE predisposing factors than groups 2 and 3 (62% vs 40% vs 50%, P < 0.01), and more previous dental procedures (23% vs 6% vs 8%, P < 0.01). Furthermore, Group 1 experienced a higher incidence of Streptococcus infections than Group 2 (39% vs 22%, P < 0.01) and similar to Group 3 (39% vs 30%, P = 0.34). Overall mortality was similar among groups (42% vs 36% vs 35%, P = 0.64). IE occurs in HCM patients with and without obstruction. Mortality of IE HCM is high but similar to patients with and without IEAP indication. Predisposing factors, previous dental procedures, and streptococcal infection are higher in IE HCM, suggesting that HCM patients could benefit from IEAP. PMID:27368014

  10. Aortic biomechanics in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Badran, Hala Mahfouz; Soltan, Ghada; Faheem, Nagla; Elnoamany, Mohamed Fahmy; Tawfik, Mohamed; Yacoub, Magdi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Ventricular-vascular coupling is an important phenomenon in many cardiovascular diseases. The association between aortic mechanical dysfunction and left ventricular (LV) dysfunction is well characterized in many disease entities, but no data are available on how these changes are related in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Aim of the work: This study examined whether HCM alone is associated with an impaired aortic mechanical function in patients without cardiovascular risk factors and the relation of these changes, if any, to LV deformation and cardiac phenotype. Methods: 141 patients with HCM were recruited and compared to 66 age- and sex-matched healthy subjects as control group. Pulse pressure, aortic strain, stiffness and distensibility were calculated from the aortic diameters measured by M-mode echocardiography and blood pressure obtained by sphygmomanometer. Aortic wall systolic and diastolic velocities were measured using pulsed wave Doppler tissue imaging (DTI). Cardiac assessment included geometric parameters and myocardial deformation (strain and strain rate) and mechanical dyssynchrony. Results: The pulsatile change in the aortic diameter, distensibility and aortic wall systolic velocity (AWS') were significantly decreased and aortic stiffness index was increased in HCM compared to control (P < .001) In HCM AWS' was inversely correlated to age(r = − .32, P < .0001), MWT (r = − .22, P < .008), LVMI (r = − .20, P < .02), E/Ea (r = − .16, P < .03) LVOT gradient (r = − 19, P < .02) and severity of mitral regurg (r = − .18, P < .03) but not to the concealed LV deformation abnormalities or mechanical dyssynchrony. On multivariate analysis, the key determinant of aortic stiffness was LV mass index and LVOT obstruction while the role LV dysfunction in aortic stiffness is not evident in this population. Conclusion: HCM is associated with abnormal aortic mechanical properties. The severity of cardiac

  11. An unusual ST-segment elevation: apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy shows the ace up its sleeve.

    PubMed

    de Santis, Francesco; Pergolini, Amedeo; Zampi, Giordano; Pero, Gaetano; Pino, Paolo Giuseppe; Minardi, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is part of the broad clinical and morphologic spectrum of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. We report a patient with electrocardiographic abnormalities in whom acute coronary syndrome was excluded and apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy was demonstrated by careful differential diagnosis.

  12. Is the CCR5-59029-G/G genotype a protective factor for cardiomyopathy in Chagas disease?

    PubMed

    Fernández-Mestre, M T; Montagnani, S; Layrisse, Z

    2004-07-01

    Investigated were two CCR5 gene polymorphisms, the CCR5 Delta 32 deletion and the pCCR5 59029 A-->G promoter point mutation, in 107 ethnically mixed Venezuelan patients serologically positive for Trypanosoma cruzi (34 asymptomatic, 38 arrhythmic, 35 cardiomyopathic). No difference in the distribution of CCR5 Delta 32 among asymptomatic and symptomatic patients was found. We have observed an increase of the 59029-G phenotype among asymptomatic compared with symptomatic chagasic patients (68% vs. 58%), in agreement with previously reported data (57% vs. 31%). This frequency difference, although not statistically significant, is more marked when the 59029-G allele is present in homozygous form. However, a similar distribution of the G/G genotype is present among asymptomatic patients and patients with heart failure. Because it has been reported that the 59029G/G genotype associates with lower CCR5 expression, 37% of our T. cruzi-infected patients with heart failure are genetically predisposed to express low levels of CCR5 on the surface of CD8(+) T cells, contrary to what would be expected if an inflammatory response is required for severe cardiac damage. If confirmed, the possible protection that might be conferred by the G/G genotype may be due to the existence of other genes in linkage disequilibria.

  13. Motor unit involvement in human acute Chagas' disease.

    PubMed

    Benavente, O R; Patiño, O L; Peña, L B; Lugònes, H; Kalala, E; Meneclier, C R; Genovese, O; Sica, R E

    1989-09-01

    Thirty five patients with acute Chagas' disease who demonstrated parasitaemia at the time of the investigation were submitted to a detailed electromyographical study. With their muscles at rest, 12 patients showed fibrillation potentials and/or positive sharp waves. On volitional contraction, 7 had short duration motor unit potentials (MUPs) and low polyphasic MUPs. On motor and sensory nerve fibers conduction studies, 20 disclosed values below the lower control limit within one or more nerves. Finally, 12 patients produced a muscle decremental response on nerve supramaximal repetitive stimulation. The findings signal that primary muscle involvement, neuropathy and impairement of the neuromuscular transmission, either isolated or combined, may be found in the acute stage of human Chagas' disease.

  14. Neglected Parasitic Infections in the United States: Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Montgomery, Susan P.; Starr, Michelle C.; Cantey, Paul T.; Edwards, Morven S.; Meymandi, Sheba K.

    2014-01-01

    Chagas disease, which is caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, can lead to severe cardiac and gastrointestinal disease. Most persons acquire this infection through contact with vector bugs carrying T. cruzi in endemic areas of Latin America. Infection can also be acquired by congenital, transfusion, transplantation, and foodborne transmission. Although an estimated 300,000 persons with Chagas disease live in the United States, little is known about the burden of chagasic heart disease. It is not known how often congenital or vector-borne transmission of T. cruzi occurs in the United States, although it is known that infected mothers and infected vector bugs are found in this country. Better diagnostic tests and treatment drugs are needed to improve patient care, and research is needed to define transmission risks and develop strategies to prevent new infections and reduce the burden of disease. PMID:24808250

  15. Therapy of Chagas Disease: Implications for Levels of Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Sosa-Estani, Sergio; Colantonio, Lisandro; Segura, Elsa Leonor

    2012-01-01

    This paper reviews the evidence supporting the use of etiological treatment for Chagas disease that has changed the standard of care for patients with Trypanosoma cruzi infection in the last decades. Implications of this evidence on different levels of prevention as well as gaps in current knowledge are also discussed. In this regard, etiological treatment has shown to be beneficial as an intervention for secondary prevention to successfully cure the infection or to delay, reduce, or prevent the progression to disease, and as primary disease prevention by breaking the chain of transmission. Timely diagnosis during initial stages would allow for the prescription of appropriate therapies mainly in the primary health care system thus improving chances for a better quality of life. Based on current evidence, etiological treatment has to be considered as an essential public health strategy useful to reduce disease burden and to eliminate Chagas disease altogether. PMID:22523499

  16. Differentiating cardiomyopathy of coronary artery disease from nonischemic dilated cardiomyopathy utilizing positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Mody, F.V.; Brunken, R.C.; Stevenson, L.W.; Nienaber, C.A.; Phelps, M.E.; Schelbert, H.R. )

    1991-02-01

    To determine if imaging of blood flow (using N-13 ammonia) and glucose metabolism (using F-18 2-deoxyglucose) with positron emission tomography can distinguish cardiomyopathy of coronary artery disease from nonischemic dilated cardiomyopathy, 21 patients with severe left ventricular dysfunction who were evaluated for cardiac transplantation were studied. The origin of left ventricular dysfunction had been previously determined by coronary angiography to be ischemic (11 patients) or nonischemic (10 patients). Images were visually analyzed by three observers on a graded scale in seven left ventricular segments and revealed fewer defects in dilated cardiomyopathy compared with ischemic cardiomyopathy for N-13 ammonia (2.7 +/- 1.6 versus 5 +/- 0.6; p less than 0.03) and F-18 deoxyglucose (2.8 +/- 2.1 versus 4.6 +/- 1.1; p less than 0.03). An index incorporating extent and severity of defects revealed more homogeneity with fewer and less severe defects in subjects with nonischemic than in those with ischemic cardiomyopathy as assessed by imaging of flow (2.8 +/- 1.8 versus 9.2 +/- 3; p less than 0.001) and metabolism (3.8 +/- 3.3 versus 8.5 +/- 3.6; p less than 0.005). Diagnostic accuracy for distinguishing the two subgroups by visual image analysis was 85%. Using previously published circumferential count profile criteria, patients with dilated cardiomyopathy had fewer ischemic segments (0.4 +/- 0.8 versus 2.5 +/- 2 per patient; p less than 0.01) and infarcted segments (0.1 +/- 0.3 versus 2.4 +/- 1.4 per patient; p less than 0.001) than did patients with cardiomyopathy of coronary artery disease. The sensitivity for differentiating the two clinical subgroups using circumferential profile analysis was 100% and the specificity 80%.

  17. Current situation and perspectives regarding human Chagas disease in midwestern of the state of Minas Gerais, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Matos, Christiane Santos; dos Santos, José Eloy; Medeiros, Fernanda Alvarenga Cardoso; Furtado, Eliana; Dias, João Carlos Pinto

    2014-01-01

    Recognising the importance of Chagas disease in Brazil, Bambuí set up epidemiological surveillance for Chagas disease in 1974 and was the first municipality to do so. To ascertain the current epidemiology of Chagas disease in this municipality, 1.782 blood samples from the general population were analysed; 7.7% of samples were found to be seropositive for Chagas disease. A strong positive correlation between increasing age and Chagas disease was evident in both genders, with the highest prevalence in individuals aged over 60 years. Clinically, the cardiodigestive form of Chagas disease was the most common in these samples. These data confirm the interruption of Trypanosoma cruzi transmission, in parallel with a still important residual morbidity of Chagas disease in the county, thus supporting political decisions that will prioritise epidemiological surveillance and medical treatment of Chagas disease in the coming years. PMID:24831551

  18. Economic evaluation of Chagas disease screening in Spain.

    PubMed

    Imaz-Iglesia, Iñaki; Miguel, Lucía García-San; Ayala-Morillas, L Eduardo; García-Pérez, Lidia; González-Enríquez, Jesús; Blasco-Hernández, Teresa; Martín-Águeda, María Belén; Sarría-Santamera, Antonio

    2015-08-01

    Although Spain is the European country with the highest Chagas disease burden, the country does not have a national control program of the disease. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficiency of several strategies for Chagas disease screening among Latin American residents living in Spain. The following screening strategies were evaluated: (1) non-screening; (2) screening of the Latin American pregnant women and their newborns; (3) screening also the relatives of the positive pregnant women; (4) screening also the relatives of the negative pregnant women. A cost-utility analysis was carried out to compare the four strategies from two perspectives, the societal and the Spanish National Health System (SNHS). A decision tree representing the clinical evolution of Chagas disease throughout patient's life was built. The strategies were compared through the incremental cost-utility ratio, using euros as cost measurement and quality-adjusted life years as utility measurement. A sensitivity analysis was performed to test the model parameters and their influence on the results. We found the "Non-screening" as the most expensive and less effective of the evaluated strategies, from both the societal and the SNHS perspectives. Among the screening evaluated strategies the most efficient was, from both perspectives, to extent the antenatal screening of the Latin American pregnant women and their newborns up to the relatives of the positive women. Several parameters influenced significantly on the sensitivity analyses, particularly the chronic treatment efficacy or the prevalence of Chagas disease. In conclusion, for the general Latin American immigrants living in Spain the most efficient would be to screen the Latin American mothers, their newborns and the close relatives of the mothers with a positive serology. However for higher prevalence immigrant population the most efficient intervention would be to extend the program to the close relatives of the negative

  19. Challenges and perspectives of Chagas disease: a review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Chagas disease (CD), also known as American trypanosomiasis, is caused by the flagellated protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, and affects an estimated 8 to 10 million people worldwide. In Latin America, 25 million people live in risk areas, while in 2008 alone, 10,000 CD-related deaths were reported. This review aimed to evaluate the challenges of CD control, future perspectives, and actions performed worldwide to control expansion of the disease and its impact on public health in Latin America. PMID:24354455

  20. [Chagas' disease in Mexico. Report of 5 proven cases].

    PubMed

    Marcuchamer Miller, J; Reyes López, P A

    1978-01-01

    Seroepidemiologic studies demonstrated that American Trypanosomiasis is highly prevalent among rural communities in Mexico. However, Chagas' disease seems to be a rarity. That could be a wrong concept. In just a few months 5 patients with epidemiological, clinical and immunologic evidence for Chagasic miocardiopathy or miocarditis were identified in our Institution. Their cardiologic findings have been discussed, as well as diagnostic approaches in different stages of the disease.

  1. Opportunity cost for early treatment of Chagas disease in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, Janine M; Elizondo-Cano, Miguel; Sanchez-González, Gilberto; Peña-Nieves, Adriana; Figueroa-Lara, Alejandro

    2014-04-01

    Given current neglect for Chagas disease in public health programs in Mexico, future healthcare and economic development policies will need a more robust model to analyze costs and impacts of timely clinical attention of infected populations. A Markov decision model was constructed to simulate the natural history of a Chagas disease cohort in Mexico and to project the associated short and long-term clinical outcomes and corresponding costs. The lifetime cost for a timely diagnosed and treated Chagas disease patient is US$ 10,160, while the cost for an undiagnosed individual is US$ 11,877. The cost of a diagnosed and treated case increases 24-fold from early acute to indeterminate stage. The major cost component for lifetime cost was working days lost, between 44% and 75%, depending on the program scenario for timely diagnosis and treatment. In the long term, it is cheaper to diagnose and treat chagasic patients early, instead of doing nothing. This finding by itself argues for the need to shift current policy, in order to prioritize and attend this neglected disease for the benefit of social and economic development, which implies including treatment drugs in the national formularies. Present results are even more relevant, if one considers that timely diagnosis and treatment can arrest clinical progression and enhance a chronic patient's quality of life.

  2. Trypanosoma cruzi and Chagas' Disease in the United States.

    PubMed

    Bern, Caryn; Kjos, Sonia; Yabsley, Michael J; Montgomery, Susan P

    2011-10-01

    Chagas' disease is caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi and causes potentially life-threatening disease of the heart and gastrointestinal tract. The southern half of the United States contains enzootic cycles of T. cruzi, involving 11 recognized triatomine vector species. The greatest vector diversity and density occur in the western United States, where woodrats are the most common reservoir; other rodents, raccoons, skunks, and coyotes are also infected with T. cruzi. In the eastern United States, the prevalence of T. cruzi is highest in raccoons, opossums, armadillos, and skunks. A total of 7 autochthonous vector-borne human infections have been reported in Texas, California, Tennessee, and Louisiana; many others are thought to go unrecognized. Nevertheless, most T. cruzi-infected individuals in the United States are immigrants from areas of endemicity in Latin America. Seven transfusion-associated and 6 organ donor-derived T. cruzi infections have been documented in the United States and Canada. As improved control of vector- and blood-borne T. cruzi transmission decreases the burden in countries where the disease is historically endemic and imported Chagas' disease is increasingly recognized outside Latin America, the United States can play an important role in addressing the altered epidemiology of Chagas' disease in the 21st century.

  3. Prophylactic and therapeutic DNA vaccines against Chagas disease.

    PubMed

    Arce-Fonseca, Minerva; Rios-Castro, Martha; Carrillo-Sánchez, Silvia del Carmen; Martínez-Cruz, Mariana; Rodríguez-Morales, Olivia

    2015-02-24

    Chagas disease is a zoonosis caused by Trypanosoma cruzi in which the most affected organ is the heart. Conventional chemotherapy has a very low effectiveness; despite recent efforts, there is currently no better or more effective treatment available. DNA vaccines provide a new alternative for both prevention and treatment of a variety of infectious disorders, including Chagas disease. Recombinant DNA technology has allowed some vaccines to be developed using recombinant proteins or virus-like particles capable of inducing both a humoral and cellular specific immune response. This type of immunization has been successfully used in preclinical studies and there are diverse models for viral, bacterial and/or parasitic diseases, allergies, tumors and other diseases. Therefore, several research groups have been given the task of designing a DNA vaccine against experimental infection with T. cruzi. In this review we explain what DNA vaccines are and the most recent studies that have been done to develop them with prophylactic or therapeutic purposes against Chagas disease.

  4. Scrutinizing the Biomarkers for the Neglected Chagas Disease: How Remarkable!

    PubMed Central

    Pinho, Rosa T.; Waghabi, Mariana C.; Cardillo, Fabíola; Mengel, José; Antas, Paulo R. Z.

    2016-01-01

    Biomarkers or biosignature profiles have become accessible over time in population-based studies for Chagas disease. Thus, the identification of consistent and reliable indicators of the diagnosis and prognosis of patients with heart failure might facilitate the prioritization of therapeutic management to those with the highest chance of contracting this disease. The purpose of this paper is to review the recent state and the upcoming trends in biomarkers for human Chagas disease. As an emerging concept, we propose a classification of biomarkers based on plasmatic-, phenotype-, antigenic-, genetic-, and management-related candidates. The available data revisited here reveal the lessons learned thus far and the existing challenges that still lie ahead to enable biomarkers to be employed consistently in risk evaluation for this disease. There is a strong need for biomarker validation, particularly for biomarkers that are specific to the clinical forms of Chagas disease. The current failure to achieve the eradication of the transmission of this disease has produced determination to solve this validation issue. Finally, it would be strategic to develop a wide variety of biomarkers and to test them in both preclinical and clinical trials. PMID:27563302

  5. Trypanosoma cruzi and Chagas' Disease in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Bern, Caryn; Kjos, Sonia; Yabsley, Michael J.; Montgomery, Susan P.

    2011-01-01

    Summary: Chagas' disease is caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi and causes potentially life-threatening disease of the heart and gastrointestinal tract. The southern half of the United States contains enzootic cycles of T. cruzi, involving 11 recognized triatomine vector species. The greatest vector diversity and density occur in the western United States, where woodrats are the most common reservoir; other rodents, raccoons, skunks, and coyotes are also infected with T. cruzi. In the eastern United States, the prevalence of T. cruzi is highest in raccoons, opossums, armadillos, and skunks. A total of 7 autochthonous vector-borne human infections have been reported in Texas, California, Tennessee, and Louisiana; many others are thought to go unrecognized. Nevertheless, most T. cruzi-infected individuals in the United States are immigrants from areas of endemicity in Latin America. Seven transfusion-associated and 6 organ donor-derived T. cruzi infections have been documented in the United States and Canada. As improved control of vector- and blood-borne T. cruzi transmission decreases the burden in countries where the disease is historically endemic and imported Chagas' disease is increasingly recognized outside Latin America, the United States can play an important role in addressing the altered epidemiology of Chagas' disease in the 21st century. PMID:21976603

  6. Ecologic Niche Modeling and Potential Reservoirs for Chagas Disease, Mexico.

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Cordero, Victor; Ben Beard, C.; Ramsey, Janine M.

    2002-01-01

    Ecologic niche modeling may improve our understanding of epidemiologically relevant vector and parasite-reservoir distributions. We used this tool to identify host relationships of Triatoma species implicated in transmission of Chagas disease. Associations have been documented between the protracta complex (Triatoma: Triatominae: Reduviidae) with packrat species (Neotoma spp.), providing an excellent case study for the broader challenge of developing hypotheses of association. Species pairs that were identified coincided exactly with those in previous studies, suggesting that local interactions between Triatoma and Neotoma species and subspecies have implications at a geographic level. Nothing is known about sylvatic associates of T. barberi, which are considered the primary Chagas vector in Mexico; its geographic distribution coincided closely with that of N. mexicana, suggesting interaction. The presence of the species was confirmed in two regions where it had been predicted but not previously collected. This approach may help in identifying Chagas disease risk areas, planning vector-control strategies, and exploring parasite-reservoir associations for other emerging diseases. PMID:12095431

  7. The Role of Haptoglobin Genotypes in Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mundaray Fernández, Ninomar; Fernández-Mestre, Mercedes

    2014-01-01

    Although the number of people infected with T. cruzi is on the rise, host genetic and immune components that are crucial in the development of the Chagas disease have been discovered. We investigated the frequency of polymorphisms in the gene encoding haptoglobin of patients with chronic Chagas disease. The results suggest that while the HP1-1 genotype may confer protection against infection and the development of chronic Chagas disease due to the rapid metabolism of the Hp1-1-Hb complex and its anti-inflammatory activity, the presence of HP2-2 genotype may increase susceptibility towards a chronic condition of the disease due to a slow metabolism of the Hp2-2-Hb complex, lower antioxidant activity, and increased inflammatory reactivity, which lead to cell damage and a deterioration of the cardiac function. Finally, correlations between HP genotypes in different age groups and cardiac manifestations suggest that HP polymorphism could influence the prognosis of this infectious disease. This study shows some of the relevant aspects of the haptoglobin gene polymorphism and its implications in the T. cruzi infection. PMID:25147423

  8. Opportunity Cost for Early Treatment of Chagas Disease in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Ramsey, Janine M.; Elizondo-Cano, Miguel; Sanchez-González, Gilberto; Peña-Nieves, Adriana; Figueroa-Lara, Alejandro

    2014-01-01

    Background Given current neglect for Chagas disease in public health programs in Mexico, future healthcare and economic development policies will need a more robust model to analyze costs and impacts of timely clinical attention of infected populations. Methodology/Principal Findings A Markov decision model was constructed to simulate the natural history of a Chagas disease cohort in Mexico and to project the associated short and long-term clinical outcomes and corresponding costs. The lifetime cost for a timely diagnosed and treated Chagas disease patient is US$ 10,160, while the cost for an undiagnosed individual is US$ 11,877. The cost of a diagnosed and treated case increases 24-fold from early acute to indeterminate stage. The major cost component for lifetime cost was working days lost, between 44% and 75%, depending on the program scenario for timely diagnosis and treatment. Conclusions/Significance In the long term, it is cheaper to diagnose and treat chagasic patients early, instead of doing nothing. This finding by itself argues for the need to shift current policy, in order to prioritize and attend this neglected disease for the benefit of social and economic development, which implies including treatment drugs in the national formularies. Present results are even more relevant, if one considers that timely diagnosis and treatment can arrest clinical progression and enhance a chronic patient's quality of life. PMID:24743112

  9. Mechanistic Insights into the Anti-angiogenic Activity of Trypanosoma cruzi Protein 21 and its Potential Impact on the Onset of Chagasic Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Samuel Cota; Lopes, Daiana Silva; Gimenes, Sarah Natalie Cirilo; Teixeira, Thaise Lara; da Silva, Marcelo Santos; Brígido, Rebecca Tavares E Silva; da Luz, Felipe Andrés Cordero; da Silva, Aline Alves; Silva, Makswell Almeida; Florentino, Pilar Veras; Tavares, Paula Cristina Brígido; Dos Santos, Marlus Alves; Ávila, Veridiana de Melo Rodrigues; Silva, Marcelo José Barbosa; Elias, Maria Carolina; Mortara, Renato Arruda; da Silva, Claudio Vieira

    2017-03-21

    Chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy (CCC) is arguably the most important form of the Chagas Disease, caused by the intracellular protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi; it is estimated that 10-30% of chronic patients develop this clinical manifestation. The most common and severe form of CCC can be related to ventricular abnormalities, such as heart failure, arrhythmias, heart blocks, thromboembolic events and sudden death. Therefore, in this study, we proposed to evaluate the anti-angiogenic activity of a recombinant protein from T. cruzi named P21 (rP21) and the potential impact of the native protein on CCC. Our data suggest that the anti-angiogenic activity of rP21 depends on the protein's direct interaction with the CXCR4 receptor. This capacity is likely related to the modulation of the expression of actin and angiogenesis-associated genes. Thus, our results indicate that T. cruzi P21 is an attractive target for the development of innovative therapeutic agents against CCC.

  10. [Takotsubo cardiomyopathy: a novel beta-adrenergic blocker withdrawal syndrome].

    PubMed

    Tomcsányi, János; Jávor, Kinga; Arabadzisz, Hrisula; Zsoldos, András; Wagner, Vince; Sármán, Balázs

    2013-02-17

    The authors describe two cases of takotsubo cardiomyopathy developing after an abrupt withdrawal of carvedilol and bisoprolol. Takotsubo or stress cardiomyopathy is characterized by acute and reversible cardiac dysfunction without coronary artery disease. It is triggered by acute emotional or physical stress, drugs or drug withdrawal. The immediate discontinuation of the long acting vasodilator beta-blocker, carvedilol has not yet been described to cause takotsubo cardiomyopathy. The authors recommend cautious withdrawal of beta-blockers.

  11. Cardiomyopathy: a late complication of hemolytic uremic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Walker, A M; Benson, L N; Wilson, G J; Arbus, G S

    1997-04-01

    This report describes a child who presented with classic hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) and 4 months later developed a life-threatening but reversible cardiomyopathy with global cardiac dysfunction and a left ventricular ejection fraction of 14%. There was no evidence of electrolyte abnormalities, anemia, hypertension, severe fluid overload, or viral infection. Endomyocardial biopsies were consistent with a dilated cardiomyopathy. This paper highlights the importance of considering the diagnosis of associated cardiomyopathy when presenting with late-onset edema following HUS.

  12. Heart failure in pregnant women: is it peripartum cardiomyopathy?

    PubMed

    Dennis, Alicia Therese

    2015-03-01

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy is a rare but important cause of maternal morbidi