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Sample records for chagas departamento general

  1. [Chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy detected in patients at the Regional General Hospital O'Horan, Merida, Yucatan, Mexico].

    PubMed

    Zavala-Castro, J E; Gutiérrez-Flota, H; Barrera-Pérez, M A; Bolio-Solís, A de J; Zavala-Velázquez, J E

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the frequency of cardiopathy due to Chagas' disease in 36 patients of the cardiology department at the Regional General Hospital O'Horan in Merida, Yucatan. All patients included in the study had cardiac involvement compatible with acute or chronic stages of Chagas' disease. Medical records prepared for each one of the patients included a Chagas' disease targeted clinical history, chest X-ray, electrocardiogram, blood culture and serology using indirect immunofluorescence test. Out of the 36 patients studied, 7 were diagnosed as having Chagas' disease cardiopathy. Grade II cardiomegaly was established in 2 patients while the remaining 5 had grade III cardiomegaly. Conduction abnormalities were established in 6 patients while 2 of these had evidence of necrosis and/or ischemia. Chagas' disease cardiopathy, as our results suggest, is not a rare event in the cardiology ward at the O'Horan Hospital.

  2. Chagas Disease

    MedlinePlus

    Chagas disease is caused by a parasite. It is common in Latin America but not in the United States. ... nose, the bite wound or a cut. The disease can also spread through contaminated food, a blood ...

  3. Chagas disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... provider if you think you may have Chagas disease. Prevention Insect control with insecticides and houses that are less likely to have high insect populations will help control the spread of the disease. Blood banks in Central and South America screen ...

  4. Chagas' disease.

    PubMed Central

    Tanowitz, H B; Kirchhoff, L V; Simon, D; Morris, S A; Weiss, L M; Wittner, M

    1992-01-01

    Chagas' disease, caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, is an important cause of morbidity in many countries in Latin America. The important modes of transmission are by the bite of the reduviid bug and blood transfusion. The organism exists in three morphological forms: trypomastigotes, amastigotes, and epimastigotes. The mechanism of transformation and differentiation is currently being explored, and signal transduction pathways of the parasites may be involved in this process. Parasite adherence to and invasion of host cells is a complex process involving complement, phospholipase, penetrin, neuraminidase, and hemolysin. Two clinical forms of the disease are recognized, acute and chronic. During the acute stage pathological damage is related to the presence of the parasite, whereas in the chronic stage few parasites are found. In recent years the roles of tumor necrosis factor, gamma interferon, and the interleukins in the pathogenesis of this infection have been reported. The common manifestations of chronic cardiomyopathy are arrhythmias and thromboembolic events. Autoimmune, neurogenic, and microvascular factors may be important in the pathogenesis of the cardiomyopathy. The gastrointestinal tract is another important target, and "mega syndromes" are common manifestations. The diagnosis and treatment of this infection are active areas of investigation. New serological and molecular biological techniques have improved the diagnosis of chronic infection. Exacerbations of T. cruzi infection have been reported for patients receiving immuno-suppressive therapy and for those with AIDS. Images PMID:1423218

  5. Treatment of Chagas Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Botoni, Fernando A.; Ribeiro, Antonio Luiz P.; Marinho, Carolina Coimbra; Lima, Marcia Maria Oliveira; Nunes, Maria do Carmo Pereira; Rocha, Manoel Otávio C.

    2013-01-01

    Chagas' disease (ChD), caused by the protozoa Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi), was discovered and described by the Brazilian physician Carlos Chagas in 1909. After a century of original description, trypanosomiasis still brings much misery to humanity and is classified as a neglected tropical disease prevalent in underdeveloped countries, particularly in South America. It is an increasing worldwide problem due to the number of cases in endemic areas and the migration of infected subjects to more developed regions, mainly North America and Europe. Despite its importance, chronic chagas cardiomyopathy (CCC) pathophysiology is yet poorly understood, and independently of its social, clinical, and epidemiological importance, the therapeutic approach of CCC is still transposed from the knowledge acquired from other cardiomyopathies. Therefore, the objective of this review is to describe the treatment of Chagas cardiomyopathy with emphasis on its peculiarities. PMID:24350293

  6. Chagas disease in prehistory.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Luiz F; Jansen, Ana M; Araújo, Adauto

    2011-09-01

    The classical hypothesis proposes that Chagas disease has been originated in the Andean region among prehistoric people when they started domesticating animals, changing to sedentary habits, and adopting agriculture. These changes in their way of life happened nearly 6,000 years ago. However, paleoparasitological data based on molecular tools showed that Trypanosoma cruzi infection and Chagas disease were commonly found both in South and North American prehistoric populations long before that time, suggesting that Chagas disease may be as old as the human presence in the American continent. The study of the origin and dispersion of Trypanosoma cruzi infection among prehistoric human populations may help in the comprehension of the clinical and epidemiological questions on Chagas disease that still remain unanswered.

  7. American Trypanosomiasis (Also Known as Chagas Disease) Triatomine Bug FAQs

    MedlinePlus

    ... the blood of mammals (including humans), birds, and reptiles. Triatomine bugs live in a wide range of environmental settings, generally within close proximity to a blood host. In areas of Latin America where human Chagas disease is an important public ...

  8. Current situation and perspectives regarding human Chagas disease in midwestern of the state of Minas Gerais, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Matos, Christiane Santos; dos Santos, José Eloy; Medeiros, Fernanda Alvarenga Cardoso; Furtado, Eliana; Dias, João Carlos Pinto

    2014-01-01

    Recognising the importance of Chagas disease in Brazil, Bambuí set up epidemiological surveillance for Chagas disease in 1974 and was the first municipality to do so. To ascertain the current epidemiology of Chagas disease in this municipality, 1.782 blood samples from the general population were analysed; 7.7% of samples were found to be seropositive for Chagas disease. A strong positive correlation between increasing age and Chagas disease was evident in both genders, with the highest prevalence in individuals aged over 60 years. Clinically, the cardiodigestive form of Chagas disease was the most common in these samples. These data confirm the interruption of Trypanosoma cruzi transmission, in parallel with a still important residual morbidity of Chagas disease in the county, thus supporting political decisions that will prioritise epidemiological surveillance and medical treatment of Chagas disease in the coming years. PMID:24831551

  9. Immunology of Chagas' disease*

    PubMed Central

    1974-01-01

    After reviewing present knowledge of the morphology, multiplication, and transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi, this Memorandum discusses the animal models that may be of value in understanding the immune mechanisms operating in Chagas' disease. The role of both circulating antibody and cell-mediated immunity in protection against the parasite is discussed, together with the possibility that immunopathological mechanisms may be responsible for some of the lesions found in patients with Chagas' disease. The immunodiagnostic methods at present available are also reviewed, and the possibility of producing a vaccine for human use is considered in the light of recent findings in experimental animals. A series of recommendations for further research is included. PMID:4218137

  10. The history of Chagas disease

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The ancestor of Trypanosome cruzi was probably introduced to South American via bats approximately 7-10 million years ago. When the first humans arrived in the New World, a sylvatic cycle of Chagas disease was then already well established. Paleoparasitological data suggests that human American trypanosomiasis originated in the Andean area when people founded the first settlements in the coastal region of the Atacama Desert. Identification of T. cruzi as the etiological agent and triatome bugs as the transmission vector of Chagas disease occurred within a few years at the beginning of the 20th century. History also teaches us that human activity leading to environmental changes, in particular deforestation, is the main cause for the spread of Chagas disease. Recently, migration of T. cruzi-infected patients has led to a distribution of Chagas disease from Latin America to non-endemic countries in Europe, North America and western Pacific region. PMID:25011546

  11. [Chagas disease in Brazil].

    PubMed

    Vinhaes, M C; Dias, J C

    2000-01-01

    This article presents the current situation for Chagas disease vectors in Brazil, based on data from the Brazilian National Health Foundation (FNS). Over the course of the last 20 years, continuous chemical control has resulted in a clear reduction of triatomine densities and Trypanosoma cruzi in Brazilian dwellings. Results have been particularly promising in relation to Triatoma infestans and Panstrongylus megistus, considered the most important species in the past. In parallel, data from school serological surveys, hospitalized patients, and mortality records show an important decrease in the disease. Nevertheless, some areas of the Brazilian Northeast and some residual foci of Triatoma infestans and Panstrongylus megistus remain as major challenges for public health authorities, requiring effective epidemiological surveillance. States and municipalities are required to assume this task at present, as the traditional Brazilian National Health Foundation is undergoing decentralization.

  12. Transfusion-transmitted Chagas' disease.

    PubMed

    Wendel, S

    1998-11-01

    Transfusion-transmitted Chagas' disease has been recognized since 1952. Until recently, no cases were reported outside of Latin America. However, emigration during the past 20 years expanded its transfusional geographic borders to North America. Trypanosoma cruzi-infected donors usually are asymptomatic, often for a lifetime. This situation complicates donor screening, particularly in regions where blood bank personnel are not familiar with the risk factors and natural history of this transfusion-transmitted infection. This review addresses the main aspects of epidemiology, risks of infection, clinical symptoms in donors and recipients, preventive measures, and blood donor screening to prevent transfusion-transmitted Chagas' disease.

  13. [Part V. Laboratory diagnosis of Chagas disease].

    PubMed

    Apt B, Werner; Heitmann G, Ingrid; Jercic L, M Isabel; Jofré M, Leonor; Muñoz C Del V, Patricia; Noemí H, Isabel; San Martín V, Ana M; Sapunar P, Jorge; Torres H, Marisa; Zulantay A, Inés

    2008-10-01

    In this fifth part of Guidelines for Chagas disease, diagnostic techniques for Trypanosoma cruzi infection in humans are reviewed, the interpretation of laboratory results and an algorithm for laboratory diagnosis in immunocompetent hosts are presented. Chagas disease may be diagnosed by three kinds of techniques: direct, which allow detect the presence of the parasite in different kind of samples; indirect, based on the search of immune specific response against T. cruzi antigens and molecular, which detect parasite genetic material. Direct techniques are utilized mainly in acute phase of disease, as the parasite is present in blood of infected host. These techniques do not require be confirmed by other methods. For chronic undetermined phase and for symptomatic phase it is recommended to use indirect techniques; generally, immunoassay techniques (ELISA) that detect IgG antibodies directed against T. cruzi antigens are performed. As false positive results are possible, a positive or undetermined result must be confirmed by at least another technique (indirect immunofluorescence or indirect hemmaglutination). In Chile, confirmation of infection is performed by the Instituto de Salud Pública National Reference Laboratory or at surrogate centers. Molecular methods may be used to make the diagnosis in acute or chronic phase of infection, with more accuracy in the acute phase, and it is mainly recommended to diagnose vertical transmission of T. cruzi as early diagnosis of congenital infection increases the possibility to cure the sibling and besides it is a good marker to evaluate the effectiveness of treatment.

  14. Global economic burden of Chagas disease: a computational simulation model

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Bruce Y; Bacon, Kristina M; Bottazzi, Maria Elena; Hotez, Peter J

    2013-01-01

    of Chagas disease is similar to or exceeds those of other prominent diseases globally (eg, rotavirus $2·0 billion, cervical cancer $4·7 billion) even in the USA (Lyme disease $2·5 billion), where Chagas disease has not been traditionally endemic, suggesting an economic argument for more attention and efforts towards control of Chagas disease. Funding Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the National Institute of General Medical Sciences Models of Infectious Disease Agent Study. PMID:23395248

  15. Duodenogastric reflux in Chagas' disease

    SciTech Connect

    Troncon, L.E.; Rezende Filho, J.; Iazigi, N.

    1988-10-01

    Increased duodenogastric reflux has been recognized as a cause of gastric mucosa damage. The frequent finding of bile-stained gastric juice and a suggested higher frequency of lesions of the gastric mucosa in patients with Chagas' disease, which is characterized by a marked reduction of myenteric neurons, suggest that impairment of intrinsic innervation of the gut might be associated with increased duodenogastric reflux. Duodenogastric bile reflux was quantified after intravenous injection of 99mtechnetium-HIDA, in 18 patients with chronic Chagas' disease, 12 controls, and 7 patients with Billroth II gastrectomy. All but one of the chagasic patients were submitted to upper digestive tract endoscopy. High reflux values (greater than or equal to 10%) were detected both in chagasic patients and in the controls, but the values for both groups were significantly lower (P less than 0.01) than those obtained for Billroth II patients (median: 55.79%; range: 12.58-87.22%). Reflux values tended to be higher in the Chagas' disease group (median: 8.20%; range: 0.0-29.40%) than in the control group (median: 3.20%; range: 0.0-30.64%), with no statistical difference between the two groups (P greater than 0.10). Chronic gastritis was detected by endoscopy in 12 chagasic patients, benign gastric ulcer in 2 patients, and a pool of bile in the stomach in 11 patients. However, neither the occurrence of gastric lesions nor the finding of bile-stained gastric juice was associated with high reflux values after (99mTc)HIDA injection. This study suggests that lesions of the intramural nervous system of the gut in Chagas' disease do not appear to be associated with abnormally increased duodenogastric reflux.

  16. Chagas Disease Risk in Texas

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Sahotra; Strutz, Stavana E.; Frank, David M.; Rivaldi, Chissa–Louise; Sissel, Blake; Sánchez–Cordero, Victor

    2010-01-01

    Background Chagas disease, caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, remains a serious public health concern in many areas of Latin America, including México. It is also endemic in Texas with an autochthonous canine cycle, abundant vectors (Triatoma species) in many counties, and established domestic and peridomestic cycles which make competent reservoirs available throughout the state. Yet, Chagas disease is not reportable in Texas, blood donor screening is not mandatory, and the serological profiles of human and canine populations remain unknown. The purpose of this analysis was to provide a formal risk assessment, including risk maps, which recommends the removal of these lacunae. Methods and Findings The spatial relative risk of the establishment of autochthonous Chagas disease cycles in Texas was assessed using a five–stage analysis. 1. Ecological risk for Chagas disease was established at a fine spatial resolution using a maximum entropy algorithm that takes as input occurrence points of vectors and environmental layers. The analysis was restricted to triatomine vector species for which new data were generated through field collection and through collation of post–1960 museum records in both México and the United States with sufficiently low georeferenced error to be admissible given the spatial resolution of the analysis (1 arc–minute). The new data extended the distribution of vector species to 10 new Texas counties. The models predicted that Triatoma gerstaeckeri has a large region of contiguous suitable habitat in the southern United States and México, T. lecticularia has a diffuse suitable habitat distribution along both coasts of the same region, and T. sanguisuga has a disjoint suitable habitat distribution along the coasts of the United States. The ecological risk is highest in south Texas. 2. Incidence–based relative risk was computed at the county level using the Bayesian Besag–York–Mollié model and post–1960 T. cruzi incidence data. This risk

  17. Autoimmune Pathogenesis of Chagas Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bonney, Kevin M.; Engman, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Chagas heart disease is an inflammatory cardiomyopathy that develops in approximately one-third of individuals infected with the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. Since the discovery of T. cruzi by Carlos Chagas >100 years ago, much has been learned about Chagas disease pathogenesis; however, the outcome of T. cruzi infection is highly variable and difficult to predict. Many mechanisms have been proposed to promote tissue inflammation, but the determinants and the relative importance of each have yet to be fully elucidated. The notion that some factor other than the parasite significantly contributes to the development of myocarditis was hypothesized by the first physician-scientists who noted the conspicuous absence of parasites in the hearts of those who succumbed to Chagas disease. One of these factors—autoimmunity—has been extensively studied for more than half a century. Although questions regarding the functional role of autoimmunity in the pathogenesis of Chagas disease remain unanswered, the development of autoimmune responses during infection clearly occurs in some individuals, and the implications that this autoimmunity may be pathogenic are significant. In this review, we summarize what is known about the pathogenesis of Chagas heart disease and conclude with a view of the future of Chagas disease diagnosis, pathogenesis, therapy, and prevention, emphasizing recent advances in these areas that aid in the management of Chagas disease. PMID:25857229

  18. The Chronic Gastrointestinal Manifestations of Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Nilce Mitiko; Miller, Steven M.; Evora, Paulo R. Barbosa

    2009-01-01

    Chagas disease is an infectious disease caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. The disease mainly affects the nervous system, digestive system and heart. The objective of this review is to revise the literature and summarize the main chronic gastrointestinal manifestations of Chagas disease. The chronic gastrointestinal manifestations of Chagas disease are mainly a result of enteric nervous system impairment caused by T. cruzi infection. The anatomical locations most commonly described to be affected by Chagas disease are salivary glands, esophagus, lower esophageal sphincter, stomach, small intestine, colon, gallbladder and biliary tree. Chagas disease has also been studied in association with Helicobacter pylori infection, interstitial cells of Cajal and the incidence of gastrointestinal cancer. PMID:20037711

  19. [Oral transmission of Chagas' disease].

    PubMed

    Toso M, Alberto; Vial U, Felipe; Galanti, Norbel

    2011-02-01

    The traditional transmission pathways of Chagas' disease are vectorial, transfusional, transplacental and organ transplantation. However, oral transmission is gaining importance. The first evidence of oral transmission was reported in Brazil in 1965. Nowadays the oral route is the transmission mode in 50% of cases in the Amazon river zone. Oral infection is produced by the ingestion of infected triatomine bugs or their feces, undercooked meat from infested host animals and food contaminated with urine or anal secretion of infected marsupials. Therefore travelers to those zones should be advised about care to be taken with ingested food. In Chile, this new mode of transmission should be considered in public health policies.

  20. The Vasculature in Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Prado, Cibele M.; Jelicks, Linda A.; Weiss, Louis M.; Factor, Stephen M.; Tanowitz, Herbert B.; Rossi, Marcos A.

    2013-01-01

    The cardiovascular manifestations of Chagas disease are well known. However, the contribution of the vasculature and specifically the microvasculature has received little attention. This chapter reviews the evidence supporting the notion that alterations in the microvasculature especially in the heart contribute to the pathogenesis of chagasic cardiomyopathy. These data may also be important in understanding the contributions of the microvasculature in the aetiologies of other cardiomyopathies. The role of endothelin-1 and of thromboxane A2 vascular spasm and platelet aggregation is also discussed. Further, these observations may provide target(s) for intervention. PMID:21884888

  1. Economic evaluation of Chagas disease screening in Spain.

    PubMed

    Imaz-Iglesia, Iñaki; Miguel, Lucía García-San; Ayala-Morillas, L Eduardo; García-Pérez, Lidia; González-Enríquez, Jesús; Blasco-Hernández, Teresa; Martín-Águeda, María Belén; Sarría-Santamera, Antonio

    2015-08-01

    Although Spain is the European country with the highest Chagas disease burden, the country does not have a national control program of the disease. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficiency of several strategies for Chagas disease screening among Latin American residents living in Spain. The following screening strategies were evaluated: (1) non-screening; (2) screening of the Latin American pregnant women and their newborns; (3) screening also the relatives of the positive pregnant women; (4) screening also the relatives of the negative pregnant women. A cost-utility analysis was carried out to compare the four strategies from two perspectives, the societal and the Spanish National Health System (SNHS). A decision tree representing the clinical evolution of Chagas disease throughout patient's life was built. The strategies were compared through the incremental cost-utility ratio, using euros as cost measurement and quality-adjusted life years as utility measurement. A sensitivity analysis was performed to test the model parameters and their influence on the results. We found the "Non-screening" as the most expensive and less effective of the evaluated strategies, from both the societal and the SNHS perspectives. Among the screening evaluated strategies the most efficient was, from both perspectives, to extent the antenatal screening of the Latin American pregnant women and their newborns up to the relatives of the positive women. Several parameters influenced significantly on the sensitivity analyses, particularly the chronic treatment efficacy or the prevalence of Chagas disease. In conclusion, for the general Latin American immigrants living in Spain the most efficient would be to screen the Latin American mothers, their newborns and the close relatives of the mothers with a positive serology. However for higher prevalence immigrant population the most efficient intervention would be to extend the program to the close relatives of the negative

  2. Chaga mushroom-induced oxalate nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Yuko; Seta, Koichi; Ogawa, Yayoi; Takayama, Tatsuya; Nagata, Masao; Taguchi, Takashi; Yahata, Kensei

    2014-06-01

    Chaga mushrooms have been used in folk and botanical medicine as a remedy for cancer, gastritis, ulcers, and tuberculosis of the bones. A 72-year-old Japanese female had been diagnosed with liver cancer 1 year prior to presenting at our department. She underwent hepatectomy of the left lobe 3 months later. Chaga mushroom powder (4 - 5 teaspoons per day) had been ingested for the past 6 months for liver cancer. Renal function decreased and hemodialysis was initiated. Renal biopsy specimens showed diffuse tubular atrophy and interstitial fibrosis. Oxalate crystals were detected in the tubular lumina and urinary sediment and oxalate nephropathy was diagnosed. Chaga mushrooms contain extremely high oxalate concentrations. This is the first report of a case of oxalate nephropathy associated with ingestion of Chaga mushrooms.

  3. Chagas' disease as a foodborne illness.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Karen Signori; Schmidt, Flávio Luis; Guaraldo, Ana M A; Franco, Regina M B; Dias, Viviane L; Passos, Luiz A C

    2009-02-01

    Various researchers have studied the importance of the oral transmission of Chagas' disease since the mid-20th century. Only in recent years, due to an outbreak that occurred in the Brazilian State of Santa Catarina in 2005 and to various outbreaks occurring during the last 3 years in the Brazilian Amazon basin, mainly associated with the consumption of Amazonian palm berry or açaí (Euterpe oleracea Mart.) juice, has this transmission route aroused the attention of researchers. Nevertheless, reports published in the 1960s already indicated the possibility of Chagas' disease transmission via food in Brazil, mainly in the Amazonian region. Recently, in December 2007, an outbreak of Chagas' disease occurred in Caracas, Venezuela, related to ingestion of contaminated fruit juices. The objective of this article is to point out the importance of foodborne transmission in the etiology of Chagas' disease, on the basis of published research and Brazilian epidemiology data.

  4. Chagas Heart Disease: Report on Recent Developments

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Fabiana S.; Jelicks, Linda A.; Kirchhoff, Louis V.; Shirani, Jamshid; Nagajyothi, Fnu; Mukherjee, Shankar; Nelson, Randin; Coyle, Christina M.; Spray, David C.; Campos de Carvalho, Antonio C.; Guan, Fangxia; Prado, Cibele M.; Lisanti, Michael P.; Weiss, Louis M.; Montgomery, Susan P.; Tanowitz, Herbert B.

    2011-01-01

    Chagas disease, caused by the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, is an important cause of cardiac disease in endemic areas of Latin America. It is now being diagnosed in non-endemic areas due to immigration. Typical cardiac manifestations of Chagas disease include dilated cardiomyopathy, congestive heart failure, arrhythmias, cardioembolism and stroke. Clinical and laboratory-based research to define the pathology resulting from T. cruzi infection has shed light on many of the cellular and molecular mechanisms leading to these manifestations. Antiparasitic treatment may not be appropriate for patients with advanced cardiac disease. Clinical management of Chagas heart disease is similar to that used for cardiomyopathies due to other processes. Cardiac transplantation has been successfully performed in a small number of patients with Chagas heart disease. PMID:22293860

  5. Orally-transmitted Chagas disease.

    PubMed

    Filigheddu, Maria Teresa; Górgolas, Miguel; Ramos, José Manuel

    2017-02-09

    Chagas disease is a zoonosis caused by protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, which is most frequently associated with a vectorial transmission. However, in recent years we have observed a significant increase in the oral transmission of the disease, associated mainly with the consumption of drinks made from fruit or other vegetables contaminated with triatomine faeces or secretions from infected mammals. After a latency period of 3 to 22 days after ingestion, the oral infection is characterized by more severe manifestations than those associated with vectorial transmission: prolonged fever, acute myocarditis with heart failure and, in some cases, meningoencephalitis. Mortality can reach up to 33% of those infected. The aim of this paper is to review this matter and to promote prevention practices.

  6. Chaga mushroom extract inhibits oxidative DNA damage in lymphocytes of patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Najafzadeh, Mojgan; Reynolds, P Dominic; Baumgartner, Adolf; Jerwood, David; Anderson, Diana

    2007-01-01

    Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) is partly caused by oxidative stress from free radicals and reduced antioxidant levels. Using hydrogen peroxide to induce oxidative stress in vitro in peripheral lymphocytes we investigated the induction of DNA damage supplemented with ethanolic extract of Chaga mushroom as a protective antioxidant. Lymphocytes were obtained from 20 IBD patients and 20 healthy volunteers. For treatment, a constant H_{2}O_{2 } dose (50 microg/ml) was used with variable doses of Chaga extract (10-500 microg/ml). DNA damage was evaluated in 50 cells per individual and dose using the Comet assay (making 1000 observations per experimental point ensuring appropriate statistical power). Chaga supplementation resulted in a 54.9% (p < 0.001) reduction of H_{2}O_{2 } induced DNA damage within the patient group and 34.9% (p < 0.001) within the control group. Lymphocytes from Crohn's disease (CD) patients had a greater basic DNA damage than Ulcerative Colitis (UC) patients (p < 0.001). Conclusively, Chaga extract reduces oxidative stress in lymphocytes from IBD patients and also healthy individuals when challenged in vitro. Thus, Chaga extract could be a possible and valuable supplement to inhibit oxidative stress in general.

  7. Carlos Chagas Discoveries as a Drop Back to Scientific Construction of Chronic Chagas Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bestetti, Reinaldo B.; Restini, Carolina Baraldi A.; Couto, Lucélio B.

    2016-01-01

    The scientific construction of chronic Chagas heart disease (CCHD) started in 1910 when Carlos Chagas highlighted the presence of cardiac arrhythmia during physical examination of patients with chronic Chagas disease, and described a case of heart failure associated with myocardial inflammation and nests of parasites at autopsy. He described sudden cardiac death associated with arrhythmias in 1911, and its association with complete AV block detected by Jacquet's polygraph as Chagas reported in 1912. Chagas showed the presence of myocardial fibrosis underlying the clinical picture of CCHD in 1916, he presented a full characterization of the clinical aspects of CCHD in 1922. In 1928, Chagas detected fibrosis of the conductive system, and pointed out the presence of marked cardiomegaly at the chest X-Ray associated with minimal symptomatology. The use of serological reaction to diagnose CCHD was put into clinical practice in 1936, after Chagas' death, which along with the 12-lead ECG, revealed the epidemiological importance of CCHD in 1945. In 1953, the long period between initial infection and appearance of CCHD was established, whereas the annual incidence of CCHD from patients with the indeterminate form of the disease was established in 1956. The use of heart catheterization in 1965, exercise stress testing in 1973, Holter monitoring in 1975, Electrophysiologic testing in 1973, echocardiography in 1975, endomyocardial biopsy in 1981, and Magnetic Resonance Imaging in 1995, added to the fundamental clinical aspects of CCHD as described by Carlos Chagas. PMID:27223644

  8. American Trypanosomiasis (Also Known as Chagas Disease) Blood Screening FAQs

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tropical Diseases Laboratory Diagnostic Assistance [DPDx] Parasites Home Blood Screening FAQs Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on ... be concerned about getting Chagas disease? Why are blood banks now screening for Chagas disease? The transmission ...

  9. American Trypanosomiasis (Also Known as Chagas Disease) Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... by testing with at least two different serologic tests. Related Links For more information about laboratory diagnosis of Chagas disease, see the DPDx Web site: Chagas disease (American Trypanosomiasis) Diagnostic Procedures: Blood ...

  10. American Trypanosomiasis (Also Known as Chagas Disease) Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... United States Trypanosoma cruzi Infection Study: Evidence for Vector-borne Transmission of the Parasite That Causes Chagas ... United States Trypanosoma cruzi Infection Study: Evidence for Vector-borne Transmission of the Parasite That Causes Chagas ...

  11. [Chagas disease with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Clinical cases].

    PubMed

    Labarca, J; Acuña, G; Saavedra, H; Oddó, D; Sepúlveda, C; Ballesteros, J; Alvarez, M

    1992-02-01

    We report 2 patients with AIDS who developed Chagas infection, one with encephalitis, the other with acute myocarditis. The implications of immune depression for the manifestations and course of Chagas disease are discussed. Chagas disease should be considered in patients with AIDS who live in endemic zones and who develop cerebral or cardiac manifestations.

  12. Chagas disease and breast-feeding.

    PubMed

    Norman, Francesca F; López-Vélez, Rogelio

    2013-10-01

    Chagas disease (infection by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi) is a major parasitic disease of the Americas and one of the main neglected tropical diseases. Although various routes of transmission sre recognized, the risk for transmission of the infection through breast-feeding has not clearly been established. We reviewed the literature on transmission of T. cruzi through breast-feeding to provide breast-feeding mothers with Chagas disease with medical guidance. Although data from animal studies and human studies are scarce, we do not recommend that mothers with Chagas disease discontinue breast-feeding, unless they are experiencing the acute phase of the disease, reactivated disease resulting from immunosuppression, or bleeding nipples. In these cases, thermal treatment of milk before feeding the infant may be considered.

  13. Chagas Disease and Breast-feeding

    PubMed Central

    López-Vélez, Rogelio

    2013-01-01

    Chagas disease (infection by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi) is a major parasitic disease of the Americas and one of the main neglected tropical diseases. Although various routes of transmission sre recognized, the risk for transmission of the infection through breast-feeding has not clearly been established. We reviewed the literature on transmission of T. cruzi through breast-feeding to provide breast-feeding mothers with Chagas disease with medical guidance. Although data from animal studies and human studies are scarce, we do not recommend that mothers with Chagas disease discontinue breast-feeding, unless they are experiencing the acute phase of the disease, reactivated disease resulting from immunosuppression, or bleeding nipples. In these cases, thermal treatment of milk before feeding the infant may be considered. PMID:24050257

  14. [Part VI. Antiparasitic treatment for Chagas disease].

    PubMed

    B, Werner Apt; G, Ingrid Heitmann; L, M Isabel Jercic; M, Leonor Jofré; V, Patricia Muñoz C Del; H, Isabel Noemí; V, Ana M San Martín; P, Jorge Sapunar; H, Marisa Torres; A, Inés Zulantay

    2008-10-01

    As expert consensus has been arisen about universal antiparasitic treatment for all patients infected with Trypanosoma cruzi, most important drugs licensed for Chagas disease treatment are reviewed: nifurtimox and benznidazol, their mechanisms of action, doses, treatment schedules, adverse effects and contraindications. Two other drugs used for Chagas disease treatment, for which a Chilean experience may be exhibited, are allopurinol and itraconazole. Indications for treatment of Chagas disease in immunocompetent patients and immunocompromised hosts are detailed. This chapter refers besides to the evaluation and monitoring of antiparasitic therapy in immunocompromised patients, the availability of drugs and includes various forms facsimiles suggested to perform clinical and laboratory follow up of patients that undergo treatment, indicating the prescribed drug, adverse effects and time of follow up.

  15. Developments in the management of Chagas cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Tanowitz, Herbert B; Machado, Fabiana S; Spray, David C; Friedman, Joel M; Weiss, Oren S; Lora, Jose N; Nagajyothi, Jyothi; Moraes, Diego N; Garg, Nisha Jain; Nunes, Maria Carmo P; Ribeiro, Antonio Luiz P

    2016-01-01

    Over 100 years have elapsed since the discovery of Chagas disease and there is still much to learn regarding pathogenesis and treatment. Although there are antiparasitic drugs available, such as benznidazole and nifurtimox, they are not totally reliable and often toxic. A recently released negative clinical trial with benznidazole in patients with chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy further reinforces the concerns regarding its effectiveness. New drugs and new delivery systems, including those based on nanotechnology, are being sought. Although vaccine development is still in its infancy, the reality of a therapeutic vaccine remains a challenge. New ECG methods may help to recognize patients prone to developing malignant ventricular arrhythmias. The management of heart failure, stroke and arrhythmias also remains a challenge. Although animal experiments have suggested that stem cell based therapy may be therapeutic in the management of heart failure in Chagas cardiomyopathy, clinical trials have not been promising. PMID:26496376

  16. [Chagas diseases seroepidemiology in schoolchildren of Jujuy].

    PubMed

    Tortora, C; Bejarano, I; Dipierri, J; Alfaro, E; García, T

    2000-01-01

    Chagas disease constitutes the main zoonosis in the province of Jujuy, Argentina, where it is one of the most important issues in public health. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the results of a serologic evaluation carried out for a seven-year period among schoolchildren in the Jujenean capital city. The population under study consisted of all seventh grade students of all schools in San Salvador de Jujuy. They were classified into three socioeconomic levels: High, Medium and Low levels. Indirect hemagglutination and immunofluorescence tests were performed. Percentages of seroprevalence were determined by sex, age group, and socioeconomic level. To analyze and check results, the following tests were applied: ANOVA, Tukey's and chi-square test. General prevalence was 1.95% with inter-annual statistically non-significant variations. Statistically significant variations were found among: 1) sex, where the feminine sex exhibited higher seroprevalence; 2) age groups, in which 12-year-olds showed higher seroprevalence; 3) socioeconomic levels, where seroprevalence increased as socioeconomic level decreased. Chagasic seroprevalence in children populations is an indicator that allows assessing both transmission risks in the community and the efficiency of preventive measures to control the vector. Data resulting from this study would indicate: 1) an adequate control both of non-vectorial transmission as well as of the vector, since no temporal variation was recorded in seroprevalence in the age-group analyzed; 2) higher seroprevalence in children belonging to a lower socioeconomic level, probably due to migrations of already-infected mothers coming from neighboring endemic, less epidemiologically controlled areas.

  17. Integrated control of Chagas disease for its elimination as public health problem - A Review

    PubMed Central

    Sosa-Estani, Sergio; Segura, Elsa Leonor

    2015-01-01

    Chagas disease or American trypanosomiasis is, together with geohelminths, the neglected disease that causes more loss of years of healthy life due to disability in Latin America. Chagas disease, as determined by the factors and determinants, shows that different contexts require different actions, preventing new cases or reducing the burden of disease. Control strategies must combine two general courses of action including prevention of transmission to prevent the occurrence of new cases (these measures are cost effective), as well as opportune diagnosis and treatment of infected individuals in order to prevent the clinical evolution of the disease and to allow them to recuperate their health. All actions should be implemented as fully as possible and with an integrated way, to maximise the impact. Chagas disease cannot be eradicated due because of the demonstrated existence of infected wild triatomines in permanent contact with domestic cycles and it contributes to the occurrence of at least few new cases. However, it is possible to interrupt the transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi in a large territory and to eliminate Chagas disease as a public health problem with a dramatic reduction of burden of the disease. PMID:25993503

  18. Could Carlos Chagas' assumption on the relationship between goiter and chronic Chagas heart disease be correct? A historical reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Bestetti, Reinaldo B; Cardinalli-Neto, Augusto; Restini, Carolina B A; Couto, Lucelio B

    2016-01-01

    In 1910, Chagas divided the clinical manifestations of the chronic form of Chagas disease according to heart, Central Nervous System, and thyroid involvement, particularly the presence of goiter. Chagas emphasized the association of goiter with poor houses infested with kissing bugs, the similarity of the clinical picture with that of patients underwent partial thyroidectomy, and with the presence of thyroid sclerosis (inflammation) on histological examination. In addition, Chagas observed that all people living in poor houses infested by sucking bugs had goiter, contrasting with persons who lived in the same region, drinking the same water, but living in good houses, which did not have goiter. Furthermore, Chagas stressed the fact that people without any evidence of thyroid disease that migrated to live in poor houses in areas infested by sucking bugs developed thyroid disease some time later. Finally, and more importantly, Chagas emphasized the association of goiter with cardiac abnormalities in 80% of patients with chronic Chagas heart disease. Despite this, other authors working in different regions did not confirm such an association. A reappraisal of data from a work published in 1949 clearly shows that the presence of goiter was statistically associated with chronic Chagas heart disease and with chronic Chagas disease. Our paper highlights once more the grandiosity of Chagas' work, which has been proved to be correct even in the history of goiter, and justifies our claim for a posthumous Nobel Prize inasmuch as his work was not perceived by the Karolinska Institute.

  19. The Southern Cone Initiative against Chagas disease.

    PubMed

    Schofield, C J; Dias, J C

    1999-01-01

    Chagas disease (also known as American trypanosomiasis) is now ranked as the most serious parasitic disease of the Americas, with an economic impact far outranking the combined effects of other parasitic diseases such as malaria, schistosomiasis and leishmaniasis. Although the chronic infection remains virtually incurable, transmission can be halted by eliminating the domestic insect vectors and screening blood donors to avoid transfusional transmission. In line with this strategy, governments of the six Southern Cone countries (Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Paraguay and Uruguay) launched in 1991 an ambitious initiative to control Chagas disease through elimination of the main vector, Triatoma infestans, and large-scale screening of blood donors. Now at its mid-point, the programme has achieved remarkable success, with transmission halted over vast areas of the previously endemic regions. Well over 2 million rural houses have been sprayed to eliminate T. infestans, and the programme has already shown significant economic rates of return in addition to the medical and social benefits.

  20. Palm trees and Chagas' disease in Panama.

    PubMed

    Whitlaw, J T; Chaniotis, B N

    1978-09-01

    An ecological survey of triatomines in the sylvan ecosystem of the Canal Zone and selected sites in Panama disclosed for the first time a close association of Rhodnius pullescens and Triatoma dimidiata, the two most important vector species of Chagas' disease in Panama, with a single species of a widely distributed palm tree, Scheelea zonensis. This association may explain why Chagas' disease is prevalent in certain rural communities in Central Panama and rare in others. An immense focus of zoonotic Trypanosoma cruzi infection exists in the forests of the Canal Zone with presence of large populations of triatomines, associated with scheelea zonensis and other yet undescribed microhabitats, and high (50--60%) trypanosome infections in all of the major triatomine species. Common opossums, anteaters, and spiny rats seem to be the principal animal reservoirs of T. cruzi in this complex and relatively undisturbed ecosystem.

  1. Apical aneurysm of Chagas's heart disease.

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, J S; Mello De Oliveira, J A; Frederigue, U; Lima Filho, E C

    1981-01-01

    A retrospective study of Chagas's heart disease was carried out by a review of necropsy reports with special reference to the lesion known as the apical aneurysm. It was concluded that this lesion was more frequent in men, was unrelated to age, and was unrelated to heart weight. Patients dying of the cardiac consequences of Chagas's cardiomyopathy were more likely to have an apical aneurysm than those whose death was unrelated to the disease but the mode of death (sudden, or with heart failure) was unconnected with its presence. Transillumination from within the ventricle at necropsy was not only useful in demonstrating the aneurysm but also showed areas of myocardial thinning elsewhere. Thrombosis within the lesion was frequent. The aetiology of the apical aneurysm is discussed and it is concluded that while ischaemia, inflammation, thrombosis, and mechanical factors may produce and localise this lesion, the underlying cause is the basic pathogenetic process-parasympathetic nerve cell destruction. Images PMID:7295439

  2. Immunosensor for the diagnosis of Chagas' disease.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Antonio Aparecido Pupim; Colli, Walter; da Costa, Paulo Inácio; Yamanaka, Hideko

    2005-07-15

    Trypanosoma cruzi proteins from epimastigote membranes, herein referred as antigens, have been used for the construction of an amperometric immunosensor for serological diagnosis of Chagas' disease. The proteins used had a molecular mass ranging from 30 to 100 kDa. The gold electrode was treated with cysteamine and glutaraldehyde prior to antigen immobilization. Antibodies present in the serum of patients with Chagas' disease were captured by the immobilized antigens and the affinity interaction was monitored by chronoamperometry at a potential of -400 mV (versus Ag pseudo-reference electrode) using peroxidase-labeled IgG conjugate and hydrogen peroxide, iodide substrate. The incubation time to allow maximum antigen-antibody and antibody-peroxidase-labeled IgG interactions was 20 min with a reactivity threshold at -0.104 microA.

  3. Fatal acute Chagas Disease in a Chimpanzee

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-08-01

    Fatal Acute Chagas Disease in a Chimpanzee Yugendar R. Bommineni1, Edward J. Dick Jr.1, J. Scot Estep2, John L. Van de Berg1, and Gene B. Hubbard1...species and several insect vectors demonstrating a wide host distribution and low host specificity. Methods—A 23 year old male chimpanzee died acutely and... chimpanzee . Keywords Ape; nonhuman primate; protozoa; fatal case; Trypanosoma cruzi Introduction CD or American trypanosomiasis is caused by TC, a

  4. Molecular Epidemiologic Source Tracking of Orally Transmitted Chagas Disease, Venezuela

    PubMed Central

    Segovia, Maikell; Martínez, Clara E.; Messenger, Louisa A.; Nessi, Anaibeth; Londoño, Juan C.; Espinosa, Raul; Martínez, Cinda; Alfredo, Mijares; Bonfante-Cabarcas, Rafael; Lewis, Michael D.; de Noya, Belkisyolé A.; Miles, Michael A.; Llewellyn, Martin S.

    2013-01-01

    Oral outbreaks of Chagas disease are increasingly reported in Latin America. The transitory presence of Trypanosoma cruzi parasites within contaminated foods, and the rapid consumption of those foods, precludes precise identification of outbreak origin. We report source attribution for 2 peri-urban oral outbreaks of Chagas disease in Venezuela via high resolution microsatellite typing. PMID:23768982

  5. Molecular epidemiologic source tracking of orally transmitted Chagas disease, Venezuela.

    PubMed

    Segovia, Maikell; Carrasco, Hernán J; Martínez, Clara E; Messenger, Louisa A; Nessi, Anaibeth; Londoño, Juan C; Espinosa, Raul; Martínez, Cinda; Alfredo, Mijares; Bonfante-Cabarcas, Rafael; Lewis, Michael D; de Noya, Belkisyolé A; Miles, Michael A; Llewellyn, Martin S

    2013-07-01

    Oral outbreaks of Chagas disease are increasingly reported in Latin America. The transitory presence of Trypanosoma cruzi parasites within contaminated foods, and the rapid consumption of those foods, precludes precise identification of outbreak origin. We report source attribution for 2 peri-urban oral outbreaks of Chagas disease in Venezuela via high resolution microsatellite typing.

  6. Cardiac arrhythmias in Chagas' heart disease.

    PubMed

    Elizari, M V; Chiale, P A

    1993-10-01

    Chagas' disease is a chronic parasitosis affecting most Latin American countries. Its most important clinical manifestation is a late developing chronic myocarditis and, much less frequently, an early acute myocarditis. Chagasic myocardial damage is microfocal and disseminated throughout the heart. In most cases, the coexistence of areas of myocytic degeneration, inflammatory infiltration, and fibrosis suggests a permanent evolving process. Commonly, chronic chagasic myocarditis resembles a dilated cardiomyopathy, with characteristic ECG abnormalities (atrial and ventricular extrasystoles, intraventricular and/or AV conduction disturbances, and primary ST-T wave changes). Since myocardial damage is scattered throughout the heart, the ECG abnormalities (arrhythmias, conduction disturbances, and repolarization changes) are also representative of the widespread cardiac involvement. Thus, sick sinus syndrome, atrial extrasystoles, intraatrial conduction disturbances, and atrial fibrillation or flutter are common findings in different stages of the disease. At the ventricular level, both conduction disturbances and arrhythmias are conspicuous expressions of the myocardial damage. Right bundle branch block alone or in combination with left anterior hemiblock are the most common conduction defects. Further compromise of the conduction system can lead to different degrees of AV block. Chagas' disease is the main cause of bundle branch block and AV block in endemic areas. In advanced cases of Chagas' heart disease, ventricular premature contractions are extremely frequent, multiform, and repetitive (couplets and runs of ventricular tachycardia), and show R on T phenomenon. These arrhythmias are usually aggravated by increased sympathetic tone, implying an enhanced risk of cardiac sudden death among chagasic patients, which is sometimes the first manifestation of the illness. Chronic chagasic myocarditis is the leading cause of cardiovascular death, mostly as a consequence

  7. Dobutamine Stress Echocardiography Safety in Chagas Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Rassi, Daniela do Carmo; Vieira, Marcelo Luiz Campos; Furtado, Rogerio Gomes; Turco, Fabio de Paula; Melato, Luciano Henrique; Hotta, Viviane Tiemi; Nunes, Colandy Godoy de Oliveira; Rassi Jr., Luiz; Rassi, Salvador

    2017-01-01

    Background A few decades ago, patients with Chagas disease were predominantly rural workers, with a low risk profile for obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD). As urbanization has increased, they became exposed to the same risk factors for CAD of uninfected individuals. Dobutamine stress echocardiography (DSE) has proven to be an important tool in CAD diagnosis. Despite being a potentially arrhythmogenic method, it is safe for coronary patients without Chagas disease. For Chagas disease patients, however, the indication of DSE in clinical practice is uncertain, because of the arrhythmogenic potential of that heart disease. Objectives To assess DSE safety in Chagas disease patients with clinical suspicion of CAD, as well as the incidence of arrhythmias and adverse events during the exam. Methods Retrospective analysis of a database of patients referred for DSE from May/2012 to February/2015. This study assessed 205 consecutive patients with Chagas disease suspected of having CAD. All of them had their serology for Chagas disease confirmed. Results Their mean age was 64±10 years and most patients were females (65.4%). No patient had significant adverse events, such as acute myocardial infarction, ventricular fibrillation, asystole, stroke, cardiac rupture and death. Regarding arrhythmias, ventricular extrasystoles occurred in 48% of patients, and non-sustained ventricular tachycardia in 7.3%. Conclusion DSE proved to be safe in this population of Chagas disease patients, in which no potentially life-threatening outcome was found. PMID:28099588

  8. The controversy on the early history of Chagas disease.

    PubMed

    Löwy, I

    2005-12-01

    Recently historians of medicine have proposed three distinctive accounts of early history of Chagas disease (American trypasonomiasis). According to the first the disease, described by the Brazilian researcher Carlos Chagas in 1909, was "deconstructed" in the 1920s and disappeared for about twenty years, then was recovered in the 1940s, mainly through the epidemiological studies of Emmanuel Dias and his colleagues in Minas Gerais (Brazil). According to the second Chagas disease could not be "deconstructed" in the 1920s because it did not exist at that time. Chagas observations were inaccurate and unreliable and did not define a new human pathology. The entity called today "Chagas disease" appeared in the 1930, principally as the result of investigations of Cecilio Romaña in Argentina. Finally, a third view assumes that "Chagas disease" was constructed gradually between 1909 and the 1950s through the collective efforts of numerous Latino-American researchers. This paper juxtaposes different histories of Chagas disease, and argues that their divergences stems from allegiance to distinct, partly incommensurable epistemological "thought styles". The co-existence of divergent styles of historical investigation, this text proposes, should be perceived as potential source of enrichment of our understanding of the past.

  9. [Standardization of serological tests for Chagas disease: an immunoenzymatic test for blood donors triage].

    PubMed

    Ferreira, A W; Belem, Z R; Moura, M E; Camargo, M E

    1991-01-01

    In the serological diagnosis of Chagas disease large divergences may be found even between laboratories with experience, as a consequence of different criteria for the standardization of the tests. To standardize a immunoenzymatic test developed primarily for screening blood donors, serum panels were carefully chosen so as to best represent chagasic and non-chagasic populations. Produced for the highest sensibility and stability, the new reagent (bioELISA cruzi, Biolab Diagnóstica S/A, Brasil), was tested in serum from 1648 patients 219 with Chagas disease and 104 with other diseases, plus a comparison with well standardized immunofluorescence and hemagglutination tests in 1325 sera. In the immunoenzymatic assays, the cut off was indicated by the absorbance value of a chagasic serum showing a minimal reactivity. ELISA sensibility was 0.9954 and specificity 0.9969, as co-negativity. False positive results were absent with sera from syphilis, toxoplasmosis, mononucleosis and high titered sera for antistreptolysin 0 antibodies. However they were seen in 5 to 15 cases of tegumentar leishmaniasis, 1 of 12 Kala-azar 1 of 15 rheumatoid arthritis and 1 of 12 systemic lupus erythematosus. The high sensibility in chagasics and high specificity in the general population indicate the confiability of the immunoenzymatic assay for screening blood donors and even to confirm a clinical diagnosis of Chagas' disease.

  10. Chagas disease: changes in knowledge and management.

    PubMed

    Lescure, François-Xavier; Le Loup, Guillaume; Freilij, Hector; Develoux, Michel; Paris, Luc; Brutus, Laurent; Pialoux, Gilles

    2010-08-01

    More than 100 years after the discovery of human American trypanosomiasis by Carlos Chagas, our knowledge and management of the disease are profoundly changing. Substantial progress made by disease control programmes in most endemic areas contrasts with persisting difficulties in the Gran Chaco region in South America and the recent emergence of the disease in non-endemic areas because of population movements. In terms of pathogenesis, major discoveries have been made about the life cycle and genomics of Trypanosoma cruzi, and the role of the parasite itself in the chronic phase of the disease. From a clinical perspective, a growing number of arguments have challenged the notion of an indeterminate phase, and suggest new approaches to manage patients. New methods such as standardised PCR will be necessary to ensure follow-up of this chronic infection. Although drugs for treatment of Chagas disease are limited, poorly tolerated, and not very effective, treatment indications are expanding. The results of the Benznidazole Evaluation For Interrupting Trypanosomiasis (BENEFIT) trial in 2012 will also help to inform treatment. Mobilisation of financial resources to fund research on diagnosis and randomised controlled trials of treatment are international health priorities.

  11. Current and Future Chemotherapy for Chagas Disease.

    PubMed

    Gaspar, Luís; Moraes, Carolina B; Freitas-Junior, Lucio H; Ferrari, Stefania; Costantino, Luca; Costi, Maria Paola; Coron, Ross P; Smith, Terry K; Siqueira-Neto, Jair L; McKerrow, James H; Cordeiro-da-Silva, Anabela

    2015-01-01

    Human American trypanosomiasis, commonly called Chagas disease, is one of the most neglected illnesses in the world and remains one of the most prevalent chronic infectious diseases of Latin America with thousands of new cases every year. The only treatments available have been introduced five decades ago. They have serious, undesirable side effects and disputed benefits in the chronic stage of the disease - a characteristic and debilitating cardiomyopathy and/or megavisceras. Several laboratories have therefore focused their efforts in finding better drugs. Although recent years have brought new clinical trials, these are few and lack diversity in terms of drug mechanism of action, thus resulting in a weak drug discovery pipeline. This fragility has been recently exposed by the failure of two candidates; posaconazole and E1224, to sterilely cure patients in phase 2 clinical trials. Such setbacks highlight the need for continuous, novel and high quality drug discovery and development efforts to discover better and safer treatments. In this article we will review past and current findings on drug discovery for Trypanosoma cruzi made by academic research groups, industry and other research organizations over the last half century. We also analyze the current research landscape that is now better placed than ever to deliver alternative treatments for Chagas disease in the near future.

  12. Chagas' Disease: Pregnancy and Congenital Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Chagas disease is a chronic infection that kills approximately 12,000 people a year. Mass migration of chronically infected and asymptomatic persons has caused globalization of Chagas disease and has made nonvectorial infection, including vertical and blood-borne transmission, more of a threat to human communities than vectorial infection. To control transmission, it is essential to test all pregnant women living in endemic countries and all pregnant women having migrated from, or having lived in, endemic countries. All children born to seropositive mothers should be tested not only within the first month of life but also at ~6 months and ~12 months of age. The diagnosis is made by identification of the parasite in blood before the age of 6 months and by identification of the parasite in blood and/or positive serology after 10 months of age. Follow up for a year is essential as a significant proportion of cases are initially negative and are only detected at a later stage. If the condition is diagnosed and treated early, the clinical response is excellent and the majority of cases are cured. PMID:24949443

  13. Chagas disease and globalization of the Amazon.

    PubMed

    Briceño-León, Roberto

    2007-01-01

    The increasing number of autochthonous cases of Chagas disease in the Amazon since the 1970s has led to fear that the disease may become a new public health problem in the region. This transformation in the disease's epidemiological pattern in the Amazon can be explained by environmental and social changes in the last 30 years. The current article draws on the sociological theory of perverse effects to explain these changes as the unwanted result of the shift from the "inward" development model prevailing until the 1970s to the "outward" model that we know as globalization, oriented by industrial forces and international trade. The current article highlights the implementation of five new patterns in agriculture, cattle-raising, mining, lumbering, and urban occupation that have generated changes in the environment and the traditional indigenous habitat and have led to migratory flows, deforestation, sedentary living, the presence of domestic animals, and changes in the habitat that facilitate colonization of human dwellings by vectors and the domestic and work-related transmission of the disease. The expansion of Chagas disease is thus a perverse effect of the globalization process in the Amazon.

  14. Immunoregulatory networks in human Chagas disease

    PubMed Central

    Dutra, Walderez O.; Menezes, Cristiane A.S.; Magalhães, Luisa M. D.; Gollob, Kenneth J.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Chagas disease, caused by the infection with Trypanosoma cruzi, is endemic in all Latin America. Due to the increase in population migration, Chagas disease has spread worldwide and is now considered a health issue not only in endemic countries. While most chronically infected individuals remain asymptomatic, approximately 30% of the patients develop a potentially deadly cardiomyopathy. The exact mechanisms that underlie the establishment and maintenance of the cardiac pathology are not clear. However, there is consistent evidence that immunoregulatory cytokines are critical for orchestrating the immune response and, thus, influence disease development or control. While the asymptomatic (indeterminate) form represents a state of balance between the host and the parasite, the establishment of the cardiac form represents the loss of this balance. Analysis of data obtained from several studies have led to the hypothesis that the indeterminate form is associated with an anti-inflammatory cytokine profile, represented by high expression of IL-10, while cardiac form is associated with a high production of IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha in relation to IL-10, leading to an inflammatory profile. Here, we discuss the immunoregulatory events that might influence disease outcome, as well as the mechanisms that influence the establishment of these complex immunoregulatory networks. PMID:24611805

  15. Lower richness of small wild mammal species and chagas disease risk.

    PubMed

    Xavier, Samanta Cristina das Chagas; Roque, André Luiz Rodrigues; Lima, Valdirene dos Santos; Monteiro, Kerla Joeline Lima; Otaviano, Joel Carlos Rodrigues; Ferreira da Silva, Luiz Felipe Coutinho; Jansen, Ana Maria

    2012-01-01

    A new epidemiological scenario involving the oral transmission of Chagas disease, mainly in the Amazon basin, requires innovative control measures. Geospatial analyses of the Trypanosoma cruzi transmission cycle in the wild mammals have been scarce. We applied interpolation and map algebra methods to evaluate mammalian fauna variables related to small wild mammals and the T. cruzi infection pattern in dogs to identify hotspot areas of transmission. We also evaluated the use of dogs as sentinels of epidemiological risk of Chagas disease. Dogs (n = 649) were examined by two parasitological and three distinct serological assays. kDNA amplification was performed in patent infections, although the infection was mainly sub-patent in dogs. The distribution of T. cruzi infection in dogs was not homogeneous, ranging from 11-89% in different localities. The interpolation method and map algebra were employed to test the associations between the lower richness in mammal species and the risk of exposure of dogs to T. cruzi infection. Geospatial analysis indicated that the reduction of the mammal fauna (richness and abundance) was associated with higher parasitemia in small wild mammals and higher exposure of dogs to infection. A Generalized Linear Model (GLM) demonstrated that species richness and positive hemocultures in wild mammals were associated with T. cruzi infection in dogs. Domestic canine infection rates differed significantly between areas with and without Chagas disease outbreaks (Chi-squared test). Geospatial analysis by interpolation and map algebra methods proved to be a powerful tool in the evaluation of areas of T. cruzi transmission. Dog infection was shown to not only be an efficient indicator of reduction of wild mammalian fauna richness but to also act as a signal for the presence of small wild mammals with high parasitemia. The lower richness of small mammal species is discussed as a risk factor for the re-emergence of Chagas disease.

  16. Cardiac Repolarization Abnormalities and Potential Evidence for Loss of Cardiac Sodium Currents on ECGs of Patients with Chagas' Heart Disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlegel, T. T.; Medina, R.; Jugo, D.; Nunez, T. J.; Borrego, A.; Arellano, E.; Arenare, B.; DePalma, J. L.; Greco, E. C.; Starc, V.

    2007-01-01

    were not significantly different between groups. Patients with Chagas heart disease have increased cardiac repolarization abnormalities, especially by advanced ECG. Moreover, as a group, they have decreased uncorrected JT and QT interval durations and increased filtered QRS interval durations (versus age/gender-matched controls), all suggesting a potential loss of cardiac sodium channel function that might be mediated, in part, by cardiac autonomic damage. Overall findings support Brugada et al's recent hypothesis that the pathway leading to sudden death may often be similar in Chagas' disease and Brugada syndrome i.e., damage to the sodium channel (infectious/immunologic/autonomic in Chagas' genetic in Brugada) with consequent loss of sodium currents may facilitate a phase II-reentry based arrhythmic substrate for ventricular fibrillation in both conditions. In general, JT interval-related results have been underreported in the Chagas literature.

  17. 2 nd Brazilian Consensus on Chagas Disease, 2015.

    PubMed

    Dias, João Carlos Pinto; Ramos, Alberto Novaes; Gontijo, Eliane Dias; Luquetti, Alejandro; Shikanai-Yasuda, Maria Aparecida; Coura, José Rodrigues; Torres, Rosália Morais; Melo, José Renan da Cunha; Almeida, Eros Antonio de; Oliveira, Wilson de; Silveira, Antônio Carlos; Rezende, Joffre Marcondes de; Pinto, Fabiane Scalabrini; Ferreira, Antonio Walter; Rassi, Anis; Fragata, Abílio Augusto; Sousa, Andréa Silvestre de; Correia, Dalmo; Jansen, Ana Maria; Andrade, Glaucia Manzan Queiroz; Britto, Constança Felícia De Paoli de Carvalho; Pinto, Ana Yecê das Neves; Rassi, Anis; Campos, Dayse Elisabeth; Abad-Franch, Fernando; Santos, Silvana Eloi; Chiari, Egler; Hasslocher-Moreno, Alejandro Marcel; Moreira, Eliane Furtado; Marques, Divina Seila de Oliveira; Silva, Eliane Lages; Marin-Neto, José Antonio; Galvão, Lúcia Maria da Cunha; Xavier, Sergio Salles; Valente, Sebastião Aldo da Silva; Carvalho, Noêmia Barbosa; Cardoso, Alessandra Viana; Silva, Rafaella Albuquerque E; Costa, Veruska Maia da; Vivaldini, Simone Monzani; Oliveira, Suelene Mamede; Valente, Vera da Costa; Lima, Mayara Maia; Alves, Renato Vieira

    2016-12-01

    Chagas disease is a neglected chronic condition with a high burden of morbidity and mortality. It has considerable psychological, social, and economic impacts. The disease represents a significant public health issue in Brazil, with different regional patterns. This document presents the evidence that resulted in the Brazilian Consensus on Chagas Disease. The objective was to review and standardize strategies for diagnosis, treatment, prevention, and control of Chagas disease in the country, based on the available scientific evidence. The consensus is based on the articulation and strategic contribution of renowned Brazilian experts with knowledge and experience on various aspects of the disease. It is the result of a close collaboration between the Brazilian Society of Tropical Medicine and the Ministry of Health. It is hoped that this document will strengthen the development of integrated actions against Chagas disease in the country, focusing on epidemiology, management, comprehensive care (including families and communities), communication, information, education, and research .

  18. Tc-99m pyrophosphate myocardial scanning in Chagas' disease

    SciTech Connect

    Goncalves da Rocha, A.F.; Meguerian, B.A.; Harbert, J.C.

    1981-04-01

    Chagas' disease is a serious protozoan infection affecting up to 20% of populations in some endemic areas. Myocarditis and cardiomyopathy occur in 50% of patients who go on to develop chronic Chagas's disease. We have studied a patient with no overt cardiac symptoms who revealed intense myocardial uptake of Tc-99m pyrophosphate. The significance of this finding in relation to early detection and progress of therapy is explored.

  19. Tc-99m pyrophosphate myocardial scanning in Chagas' disease

    SciTech Connect

    da Rocha, A.F.; Meguerian, B.A.; Harbert, J.C.

    1981-04-01

    Chagas' disease is a serious protozoan infection affecting up to 20% of populations in some endemic areas. Myocarditis and cardiomyopathy occur in 50% of patients who go on to develop chronic Chagas' disease. We have studied a patient with no overt cardiac symptoms who revealed intense myocardial uptake of Tc-99m pyrophosphate. The significance of this finding in relation to early detection and progress of therapy is explored.

  20. Inhibitory effect of chaga mushroom extract on compound 48/80-induced anaphylactic shock and IgE production in mice.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Taek Joon; Lee, Sue Jung; Kim, Eun Young; Cho, Eun Hee; Kang, Tae Bong; Yu, Kwang-Won; Suh, Hyung Joo

    2013-04-01

    Chaga mushrooms (Inonotus obliquus) are hypothesised to exhibit general immune-potentiating, anti-inflammatory, and antitumor properties, but their anti-allergic activities are not fully understood. Therefore, this study investigated whether a chaga mushroom extract (C-HE) might have anti-allergic activity. This activity was assessed through the levels of the IgE Ab produced in response to an allergen (OVA). The administration of C-HE prophylactically inhibited the systemic anaphylactic shock induced by compound 48/80 in mice. The oral administration of C-HE significantly reduced the total IgE levels in mice and slightly affected the production of IgG1. Furthermore, spleen cell cultures harvested from OVA-sensitised mice that had received C-HE orally showed a significant increase in Th1-derived responses (IFN-γ production). Therefore, our results suggest that the chaga mushroom extract may be used as an anti-allergic functional food.

  1. Chagas disease (American trypanosomiasis) in Mexico: an update.

    PubMed

    Carabarin-Lima, Alejandro; González-Vázquez, María Cristina; Rodríguez-Morales, Olivia; Baylón-Pacheco, Lidia; Rosales-Encina, José Luis; Reyes-López, Pedro Antonio; Arce-Fonseca, Minerva

    2013-08-01

    Chagas disease is a parasitic infection caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, a flagellated organism that is transmitted mainly to humans through the infected feces of triatomine kissing bugs (vector transmission in endemic areas) or by transfusion of infected blood, donations of infected organ, or transmission from an infected mother to her child at birth. Chagas disease was first described in 1909 by the Brazilian physician Carlos Chagas, and due to the parasite's distribution throughout North, Central and South America, the disease is commonly known as American trypanosomiasis. However, this disease is now present in non-endemic countries such as Canada, the United States of America, and several countries in Europe (principally Spain). Moreover, Chagas disease was recently designated by the World Health Organization as one of the main neglected tropical diseases. The aim of this review is to summarize the research efforts recently described in studies conducted in Mexico on Chagas disease. In this country, there are no existing vector control programs. In addition, there is no consensus on the diagnostic methods for acute and chronic Chagas disease in maternity wards and blood banks, and trypanocidal therapy is not administered to chronic patients. The actual prevalence of the disease is unknown because no official reporting of cases is performed. Therefore, the number of people infected by different routes of transmission (vector, congenital, blood transfusion, organ transplantation, or oral) is unknown. We believe that by promoting education about Chagas disease in schools starting at the basic elementary level and including reinforcement at higher education levels will ensure that the Mexican population would be aware of this health problem and that the control measures adopted will have more acceptance and success. We hope that this review sensitizes the relevant authorities and that the appropriate measures to reduce the risk of infection by T. cruzi

  2. [Guidelines for chagas disease: Part IV. Chagas disease in immune compromised patients].

    PubMed

    Apt B, Werner; Heitmann G, Ingrid; Jercic L, M Isabel; Jotré M, Leonor; Muñoz C Del V, Patricia; Noemí H, Isabel; San Martin V, Ana M; Sapunar P, Jorge; Torres H, Marisa; Zulantay A, Inés

    2008-08-01

    A summary of different kind of immune suppressed hosts and the importance of Trypanosoma cruzi infection in this group of patients is presented. Then, most relevant aspects of immune compromised host-parasite interaction are analyzed such as the moment of acquiring the infection, immune compromise level, mechanisms of acquisition the infection and geographic region. Clinical features of primary infection and reactivation of infection in chronic Chagasic patients are described making special emphasis in solid organ transplant and BMT. Chagas disease in AIDS patients is discussed including its treatment, follow up, monitoring the immune compromise level and prophylaxis.

  3. [Seroepidemiology of Chagas disease in the Province of Jujuy].

    PubMed

    Tortora, C C; Quincoces, V; Dipierri, J E

    1996-01-01

    Chagas disease is the principal zoonosis of the Province of Jujuy where it represents a major public health problem. In this paper the results of a serological screening of T. cruzi infection carried out in the Province of Jujuy are analyzed to determine the general prevalence, age and geographic distribution, sex ratio, prevalence in foreign population and their relation with migratory process. In every individual (N = 16482) indirect hemagglutination (IHA) and immunofluorescence (TIF) tests have been carried out. In 5879 of them the birth place in the territory of the Province and the number of foreign individuals (313, all Bolivians) were confirmed. Based on these data the individuals were grouped according to: a) the four geographical regions of the Province located at different altitude levels, Puna, Quebrada, Valle and Ramal; b) towns placed on or away from the main routes of communication of the Province. For the statistical analysis the X2 and Z tests were employed. The results show that: 1) the general prevalence was of 11.50%; 2) no differences existed between the sexes: 3) the region with the highest prevalence was the Valley (12.84%) followed by Ramal (10.43%), Quebrada (8.53%) and Puna (2.98%); 4) differences of the serum prevalence can be observed between the residents on and away from the main routes of communication denoting the existence of a migratory effect in the distribution of chagasic infection; 5) prevalence differences exist between naturalized foreigns (39.30%) and Argentines (10.25%), data which strengthen the previous remark. Except for the general prevalence, there are no similar serological surveys which might allow us to establish relationships with our results of which the outstanding one is the influence of the migratory aspect upon the prevalence and distribution of T. cruzi in the Province of Jujuy.

  4. Perspectives on Trypanosoma cruzi-induced heart disease (Chagas disease)

    PubMed Central

    Tanowitz, Herbert B.; Machado, Fabiana S.; Jelicks, Linda A.; Shirani, Jamshid; Campos de Carvalho, Antonio C.; Spray, David C.; Factor, Stephen M.; Kirchhoff, Louis V.; Weiss, Louis M.

    2009-01-01

    Chagas disease is caused by the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi it is the most common cause of heart disease in endemic areas of Latin America. The year 2009 marks the 100th anniversary of the discovery of T. cruzi infection and Chagas disease by the Brazilian physician Carlos Chagas. Chagasic cardiomyopathy develops in from 10 to 30 percent of persons who are chronically infected with this parasite. Echocardiography and magnetic resonance imaging are important modalities in the evaluation and prognosis of individuals with chagasic heart disease. The etiology of chagasic heart disease likely is multifactorial. Parasite persistence, autoimmunity, and microvascular abnormalities have been studied extensively as possible pathogenic mechanisms. Experimental studies suggest that alterations in cardiac gap junctions may be etiologic in the pathogenesis of conduction abnormalities. The diagnosis of chronic Chagas disease is made by serology. The treatment of this infection has shortcomings that need to be addressed. Cardiac transplantation and bone marrow stem cell therapy for persons with Chagas disease have received increasing research attention in recent years. PMID:19410685

  5. Antioxidant small phenolic ingredients in Inonotus obliquus (persoon) Pilat (Chaga).

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Yuki; Sato, Yuzo; Konishi, Tetsuya

    2007-08-01

    Inonotus obliquus (persoon) Pilat (Chaga, in Russia, kabanoanatake in Japan) is a fungus having been used as a folk medicine in Russia and said to have many health beneficial functions such as immune modulating and anti-cancer activities. In the present study, the antioxidant activity of hot water extract (decoction) of Chaga was precisely compared with those of other medicinal fungi (Agaricus blazei Mycelia, Ganoderma lucidum and Phellinus linteus) showing Chaga had the strongest antioxidant activity among fungi examined in terms of both superoxide and hydroxyl radicals scavenging activities. Further determination of the antioxidant potential of isolated fruiting body (brown part) and Sclerotium (black part) revealed the 80% MeOH extract of fruiting body had the highest potential as high as that of Chaga decoction. Finally, seven antioxidant components were isolated and purified from the 80% MeOH extract of Chaga fruiting body, and their chemical structures were determined as small phenolics as follows: 4-hydroxy-3,5-dimethoxy benzoic acid 2-hydroxy-1-hydroxymethyl ethyl ester (BAEE), protocatechic acid (PCA), caffeic acid (CA), 3,4-dihybenzaladehyde (DB), 2,5-dihydroxyterephtalic acid (DTA), syringic acid (SA) and 3,4-dihydroxybenzalacetone (DBL). Notably, BAEE was assigned as the new compound firstly identified from the natural source in the present study.

  6. Would selenium supplementation aid in therapy for Chagas Disease?

    PubMed Central

    Jelicks, Linda A.; de Souza, Andréa P.; Araújo-Jorge, Tania C; Tanowitz, Herbert B.

    2010-01-01

    Chagas disease, a neglected tropical disease discovered over 100 years ago, is caused by the intracellular parasite Trypanosoma cruzi and is most frequently associated with chronic cardiomyopathy and digestive disorders. Initial invasion of cells is followed by progressive inflammatory destruction of heart, muscles, nerves, and gastrointestinal (GI) tract tissue. About 30% of patients progress to a chronic cardiomyopathy associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Seven to 10% of patients develop megasyndromes involving the GI tract, in particular, the esophagus and the colon. Results from several studies suggest that selenium (Se) deficiency may be an important factor in the pathogenesis of Chagas disease. In this opinion article, Se supplementation is proposed as an adjuvant therapy for treatment of chronic Chagas disease. PMID:21212020

  7. Novel cruzipain inhibitors for the chemotherapy of chronic Chagas disease.

    PubMed

    Sbaraglini, María L; Bellera, Carolina L; Fraccaroli, Laura; Larocca, Luciana; Carrillo, Carolina; Talevi, Alan; Alba Soto, Catalina D

    2016-07-01

    Despite current efforts worldwide to develop new medications against Chagas disease, only two drugs are available, nifurtimox and benznidazole. Both drugs require prolonged treatment and have multiple side effects and limited efficacy on adult patients chronically infected with Trypanosoma cruzi. Recently, computer-guided drug repositioning led to the discovery of the trypanocidal effects of clofazimine and benidipine. These compounds showed inhibitory effects on cruzipain, the major cysteine protease of T. cruzi, of different parasite stages and in a murine model of acute Chagas disease. The aim of this work was to determine the efficacy of these novel cruzipain inhibitors when administered in a murine model of chronic Chagas disease. Benidipine and clofazimine were able to reduce the parasite burden in cardiac and skeletal muscles of chronically infected mice compared with untreated mice as well as diminish the inflammatory process in these tissues. Further studies should be performed to study the synergism with benznidazole and nifurtimox in view of combined therapies.

  8. The Costs of Preventing and Treating Chagas Disease in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Castillo-Riquelme, Marianela; Guhl, Felipe; Turriago, Brenda; Pinto, Nestor; Rosas, Fernando; Martínez, Mónica Flórez; Fox-Rushby, Julia; Davies, Clive; Campbell-Lendrum, Diarmid

    2008-01-01

    Background The objective of this study is to report the costs of Chagas disease in Colombia, in terms of vector disease control programmes and the costs of providing care to chronic Chagas disease patients with cardiomyopathy. Methods Data were collected from Colombia in 2004. A retrospective review of costs for vector control programmes carried out in rural areas included 3,084 houses surveyed for infestation with triatomine bugs and 3,305 houses sprayed with insecticide. A total of 63 patient records from 3 different hospitals were selected for a retrospective review of resource use. Consensus methodology with local experts was used to estimate care seeking behaviour and to complement observed data on utilisation. Findings The mean cost per house per entomological survey was $4.4 (in US$ of 2004), whereas the mean cost of spraying a house with insecticide was $27. The main cost driver of spraying was the price of the insecticide, which varied greatly. Treatment of a chronic Chagas disease patient costs between $46.4 and $7,981 per year in Colombia, depending on severity and the level of care used. Combining cost and utilisation estimates the expected cost of treatment per patient-year is $1,028, whereas lifetime costs averaged $11,619 per patient. Chronic Chagas disease patients have limited access to healthcare, with an estimated 22% of patients never seeking care. Conclusion Chagas disease is a preventable condition that affects mostly poor populations living in rural areas. The mean costs of surveying houses for infestation and spraying infested houses were low in comparison to other studies and in line with treatment costs. Care seeking behaviour and the type of insurance affiliation seem to play a role in the facilities and type of care that patients use, thus raising concerns about equitable access to care. Preventing Chagas disease in Colombia would be cost-effective and could contribute to prevent inequalities in health and healthcare. PMID:19015725

  9. Acquired Cell-Mediated Immunodepression in Acute Chagas' Disease

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Antonio R. L.; Teixeira, Glória; Macêdo, Vanize; Prata, Aluizio

    1978-01-01

    In this study two groups of patients with acute Chagas' disease were identified. Group one consisted of five patients with apparent acute Chagas' disease. These patients showed symptoms and signals of an acute illness, such as high fever and enlarged spleen. One of these patients developed severe myocarditis and heart failure. Group two consisted of seven patients with inapparent acute Chagas' disease. This was a nonclinical entity, not perceived by the patient who did not seek medical care. The diagnosis was made by the shift of a serologic test which indicates the presence of immunoglobulin M antibodies to Trypanosoma cruzi. The patients with apparent acute Chagas' disease showed positive delayed-type skin response to T. cruzi antigen. Also, their leukocytes showed significant inhibition of migration in the presence of this antigen. By contrast, the patients with the inapparent acute Chagas' disease did not show positive delayed-type skin response to T. cruzi antigen and no significant inhibition was observed when their cells migrated in the presence of this antigen. Of interest, none of these patients was capable of developing contact sensitivity to 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene. However, three out of five patients with the apparent acute disease and all the normal control subjects showed positive contact reaction after sensitization to this drug. The results of these experiments would suggest that the thymus-derived (T)-lymphocyte function is depressed in patients with the clinically inapparent acute Chagas' disease. This immunodepression seems to be acquired in the course of the T. cruzi infection because all patients showed positive delayed-type skin response to at least one ubiquitous microbial extract, thus indicating previously normal T-cell function. We hypothesize that T. cruzi antigens may directly stimulate T cells with the concomitant release of factors that might become supressive for T-cell responses. Furthermore, the suppressive effect might interfere

  10. Chagas disease: role of parasite genetic variation in pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Macedo, Andra M; Oliveira, Riva P; Pena, Srgio D J

    2002-03-05

    Chagas disease, caused by the parasite protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, is characterised by a variable clinical course, from symptomless cases to severe chronic disease with cardiac and/or gastrointestinal involvement. This variability has been attributed both to differences in the host response and to genomic heterogeneity of the parasite. This article reviews the evidence in favour of an important role of the genetic constitution of T. cruzi in determining the clinical characteristics of Chagas disease and discusses the basis of the 'Clonal-Histotropic Model' for the pathogenesis of this disease.

  11. Interrupting Chagas disease transmission in Venezuela.

    PubMed

    Aché, A; Matos, A J

    2001-01-01

    The interruption of vectorial transmission of Chagas disease in Venezuela is attributed to the combined effects of ongoing entomoepidemiological surveillance, ongoing house spraying with residual insecticides and the concurrent building and modification of rural houses in endemic areas during almost five decades. The original endemic areas which totaled 750,000 km(2), have been reduced to 365,000 km(2). During 1958-1968, initial entomological evaluations carried out showed that the house infestation index ranged between 60-80%, the house infection index at 8-11% and a house density index of 30-50 triatomine bugs per house. By 1990-98, these indexes were further reduced to 1.6-4.0%, 0.01-0.6% and 3-4 bugs per house respectively. The overall rural population seroprevalence has declined from 44.5% (95% C.I.: 43.4-45.3%) to 9.2% (95% C.I.: 9.0-9.4%) for successive grouped periods from 1958 to 1998. The annual blood donor prevalence is firmly established below 1%. The population at risk of infection has been estimated to be less than four million. Given that prevalence rates are stable and appropriate for public health programmes, consideration has been given to potential biases that may distort results such as: a) geographical differences in illness or longevity of patients; b) variations in levels of ascertainment; c) variations in diagnostic criteria; and d) variations in population structure, mainly due to appreciable population migration. The endemic areas with continuous transmission are now mainly confined to piedmonts, as well as patchy foci in higher mountainous ranges, where the exclusive vector is Rhodnius prolixus. There is also an unstable area, of which landscapes are made up of grasslands with scattered broad-leaved evergreen trees and costal plains, where transmission is very low and occasional outbreaks are reported.

  12. Inflammation Enhances the Risks of Stroke and Death in Chronic Chagas Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Guedes, Paulo Marcos Matta; de Andrade, Cléber Mesquita; Nunes, Daniela Ferreira; de Sena Pereira, Nathalie; Queiroga, Tamyres Bernadete Dantas; Machado-Coelho, George Luiz Lins; Nascimento, Manuela Sales Lima; Do-Valle-Matta, Maria Adelaide; da Câmara, Antônia Cláudia Jácome; Chiari, Egler; Galvão, Lúcia Maria da Cunha

    2016-01-01

    Ischemic strokes have been implicated as a cause of death in Chagas disease patients. Inflammation has been recognized as a key component in all ischemic processes, including the intravascular events triggered by vessel interruption, brain damage and repair. In this study, we evaluated the association between inflammatory markers and the death risk (DR) and stroke risk (SR) of patients with different clinical forms of chronic Chagas disease. The mRNA expression levels of cytokines, transcription factors expressed in the adaptive immune response (Th1, Th2, Th9, Th17, Th22 and regulatory T cell), and iNOS were analyzed by real-time PCR in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of chagasic patients who exhibited the indeterminate, cardiac, digestive and cardiodigestive clinical forms of the disease, and the levels of these transcripts were correlated with the DR and SR. Cardiac patients exhibited lower mRNA expression levels of GATA-3, FoxP3, AHR, IL-4, IL-9, IL-10 and IL-22 but exhibited higher expression of IFN-γ and TNF-α compared with indeterminate patients. Digestive patients showed similar levels of GATA-3, IL-4 and IL-10 than indeterminate patients. Cardiodigestive patients exhibited higher levels of TNF-α compared with indeterminate and digestive patients. Furthermore, we demonstrated that patients with high DR and SR exhibited lower GATA-3, FoxP3, and IL-10 expression and higher IFN-γ, TNF-α and iNOS mRNA expression than patients with low DR and SR. A negative correlation was observed between Foxp3 and IL-10 mRNA expression and the DR and SR. Moreover, TNF-α and iNOS expression was positively correlated with DR and SR. Our data suggest that an inflammatory imbalance in chronic Chagas disease patients is associated with a high DR and SR. This study provides a better understanding of the stroke pathobiology in the general population and might aid the development of therapeutic strategies for controlling the morbidity and mortality of Chagas disease. PMID

  13. Inflammation Enhances the Risks of Stroke and Death in Chronic Chagas Disease Patients.

    PubMed

    Guedes, Paulo Marcos Matta; de Andrade, Cléber Mesquita; Nunes, Daniela Ferreira; de Sena Pereira, Nathalie; Queiroga, Tamyres Bernadete Dantas; Machado-Coelho, George Luiz Lins; Nascimento, Manuela Sales Lima; Do-Valle-Matta, Maria Adelaide; da Câmara, Antônia Cláudia Jácome; Chiari, Egler; Galvão, Lúcia Maria da Cunha

    2016-04-01

    Ischemic strokes have been implicated as a cause of death in Chagas disease patients. Inflammation has been recognized as a key component in all ischemic processes, including the intravascular events triggered by vessel interruption, brain damage and repair. In this study, we evaluated the association between inflammatory markers and the death risk (DR) and stroke risk (SR) of patients with different clinical forms of chronic Chagas disease. The mRNA expression levels of cytokines, transcription factors expressed in the adaptive immune response (Th1, Th2, Th9, Th17, Th22 and regulatory T cell), and iNOS were analyzed by real-time PCR in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of chagasic patients who exhibited the indeterminate, cardiac, digestive and cardiodigestive clinical forms of the disease, and the levels of these transcripts were correlated with the DR and SR. Cardiac patients exhibited lower mRNA expression levels of GATA-3, FoxP3, AHR, IL-4, IL-9, IL-10 and IL-22 but exhibited higher expression of IFN-γ and TNF-α compared with indeterminate patients. Digestive patients showed similar levels of GATA-3, IL-4 and IL-10 than indeterminate patients. Cardiodigestive patients exhibited higher levels of TNF-α compared with indeterminate and digestive patients. Furthermore, we demonstrated that patients with high DR and SR exhibited lower GATA-3, FoxP3, and IL-10 expression and higher IFN-γ, TNF-α and iNOS mRNA expression than patients with low DR and SR. A negative correlation was observed between Foxp3 and IL-10 mRNA expression and the DR and SR. Moreover, TNF-α and iNOS expression was positively correlated with DR and SR. Our data suggest that an inflammatory imbalance in chronic Chagas disease patients is associated with a high DR and SR. This study provides a better understanding of the stroke pathobiology in the general population and might aid the development of therapeutic strategies for controlling the morbidity and mortality of Chagas disease.

  14. Experimental Vaccines against Chagas Disease: A Journey through History

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Morales, Olivia; Monteón-Padilla, Víctor; Carrillo-Sánchez, Silvia C.; Rios-Castro, Martha; Martínez-Cruz, Mariana; Carabarin-Lima, Alejandro; Arce-Fonseca, Minerva

    2015-01-01

    Chagas disease, or American trypanosomiasis, which is caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, is primarily a vector disease endemic in 21 Latin American countries, including Mexico. Although many vector control programs have been implemented, T. cruzi has not been eradicated. The development of an anti-T. cruzi vaccine for prophylactic and therapeutic purposes may significantly contribute to the transmission control of Chagas disease. Immune protection against experimental infection with T. cruzi has been studied since the second decade of the last century, and many types of immunogens have been used subsequently, such as killed or attenuated parasites and new DNA vaccines. This primary prevention strategy appears feasible, effective, safe, and inexpensive, although problems remain. The objective of this review is to summarize the research efforts about the development of vaccines against Chagas disease worldwide. A thorough literature review was conducted by searching PubMed with the terms “Chagas disease” and “American trypanosomiasis” together with “vaccines” or “immunization”. In addition, reports and journals not cited in PubMed were identified. Publications in English, Spanish, and Portuguese were reviewed. PMID:26090490

  15. Chagas Parasite Detection in Blood Images Using AdaBoost

    PubMed Central

    Uc-Cetina, Víctor; Brito-Loeza, Carlos; Ruiz-Piña, Hugo

    2015-01-01

    The Chagas disease is a potentially life-threatening illness caused by the protozoan parasite, Trypanosoma cruzi. Visual detection of such parasite through microscopic inspection is a tedious and time-consuming task. In this paper, we provide an AdaBoost learning solution to the task of Chagas parasite detection in blood images. We give details of the algorithm and our experimental setup. With this method, we get 100% and 93.25% of sensitivity and specificity, respectively. A ROC comparison with the method most commonly used for the detection of malaria parasites based on support vector machines (SVM) is also provided. Our experimental work shows mainly two things: (1) Chagas parasites can be detected automatically using machine learning methods with high accuracy and (2) AdaBoost + SVM provides better overall detection performance than AdaBoost or SVMs alone. Such results are the best ones known so far for the problem of automatic detection of Chagas parasites through the use of machine learning, computer vision, and image processing methods. PMID:25861375

  16. Pathogenesis of Chagas' Disease: Parasite Persistence and Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Antonio R. L.; Hecht, Mariana M.; Guimaro, Maria C.; Sousa, Alessandro O.; Nitz, Nadjar

    2011-01-01

    Summary: Acute Trypanosoma cruzi infections can be asymptomatic, but chronically infected individuals can die of Chagas' disease. The transfer of the parasite mitochondrial kinetoplast DNA (kDNA) minicircle to the genome of chagasic patients can explain the pathogenesis of the disease; in cases of Chagas' disease with evident cardiomyopathy, the kDNA minicircles integrate mainly into retrotransposons at several chromosomes, but the minicircles are also detected in coding regions of genes that regulate cell growth, differentiation, and immune responses. An accurate evaluation of the role played by the genotype alterations in the autoimmune rejection of self-tissues in Chagas' disease is achieved with the cross-kingdom chicken model system, which is refractory to T. cruzi infections. The inoculation of T. cruzi into embryonated eggs prior to incubation generates parasite-free chicks, which retain the kDNA minicircle sequence mainly in the macrochromosome coding genes. Crossbreeding transfers the kDNA mutations to the chicken progeny. The kDNA-mutated chickens develop severe cardiomyopathy in adult life and die of heart failure. The phenotyping of the lesions revealed that cytotoxic CD45, CD8+ γδ, and CD8α+ T lymphocytes carry out the rejection of the chicken heart. These results suggest that the inflammatory cardiomyopathy of Chagas' disease is a genetically driven autoimmune disease. PMID:21734249

  17. Chagas disease: control, elimination and eradication. Is it possible?

    PubMed

    Coura, José Rodrigues

    2013-12-01

    From an epidemiological point of view, Chagas disease and its reservoirs and vectors can present the following characteristics: (i) enzooty, maintained by wild animals and vectors, with broad occurrence from southern United States of America (USA) to southern Argentina and Chile (42ºN 49ºS), (ii) anthropozoonosis, when man invades the wild ecotope and becomes infected with Trypanosoma cruzi from wild animals or vectors or when the vectors and wild animals, especially marsupials, invade the human domicile and infect man, (iii) zoonosis-amphixenosis and exchanged infection between animals and humans by domestic vectors in endemic areas and (iv) zooanthroponosis, infection that is transmitted from man to animals, by means of domestic vectors, which is the rarest situation in areas endemic for Chagas disease. The characteristics of Chagas disease as an enzooty of wild animals and as an anthropozoonosis are seen most frequently in the Brazilian Amazon and in the Pan-Amazon region as a whole, where there are 33 species of six genera of wild animals: Marsupialia, Chiroptera, Rodentia, Edentata (Xenarthra), Carnivora and Primata and 27 species of triatomines, most of which infected with T. cruzi . These conditions place the resident populations of this area or its visitors - tourists, hunters, fishermen and especially the people whose livelihood involves plant extraction - at risk of being affected by Chagas disease. On the other hand, there has been an exponential increase in the acute cases of Chagas disease in that region through oral transmission of T. cruzi , causing outbreaks of the disease. In four seroepidemiological surveys that were carried out in areas of the microregion of the Negro River, state of Amazonas, in 1991, 1993, 1997 and 2010, we found large numbers of people who were serologically positive for T. cruzi infection. The majority of them and/or their relatives worked in piassava extraction and had come into contact with and were stung by wild

  18. Estimating the Burden of Chagas Disease in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Manne-Goehler, Jennifer; Umeh, Chukwuemeka A.; Montgomery, Susan P.; Wirtz, Veronika J.

    2016-01-01

    Background In recent years, there has been growing awareness of the significant burden of Chagas disease in the United States (US). However, epidemiological data on both prevalence and access to care for this disease are limited. The objective of this study is to provide an updated national estimate of Chagas disease prevalence, the first state-level estimates of cases of T. cruzi infection in the US and to analyze these estimates in the context of data on confirmed cases of infection in the US blood supply. Methods In this study, we calculated estimates of the state and national prevalence of Chagas disease. The number of residents originally from Chagas disease endemic countries were computed using data on Foreign-Born Hispanic populations from the American Community Survey, along with recent prevalence estimates for Chagas disease in Latin America from the World Health Organization that were published in 2006 and updated in 2015. We then describe the distribution of estimated cases in each state in relation to the number of infections identified in the donated blood supply per data from the AABB (formerly American Association of Blood Banks). Findings The results of this analysis offer an updated national estimate of 238,091 cases of T. cruzi infection in the United States as of 2012, using the same method as was used by Bern and Montgomery to estimate cases in 2005. This estimate indicates that there are 62,070 cases less than the most recent prior estimate, though it does not include undocumented immigrants who may account for as many as 109,000 additional cases. The state level results show that four states (California, Texas, Florida and New York) have over 10,000 cases and an additional seven states have over 5,000 cases. Moreover, since 2007, the AABB has reported 1,908 confirmed cases of T. cruzi infection identified through screening of blood donations. Conclusions This study demonstrates a substantial burden of Chagas disease in the US, with state

  19. Chagas disease: control, elimination and eradication. Is it possible?

    PubMed Central

    Coura, José Rodrigues

    2013-01-01

    From an epidemiological point of view, Chagas disease and its reservoirs and vectors can present the following characteristics: (i) enzooty, maintained by wild animals and vectors, with broad occurrence from southern United States of America (USA) to southern Argentina and Chile (42ºN 49ºS), (ii) anthropozoonosis, when man invades the wild ecotope and becomes infected with Trypanosoma cruzi from wild animals or vectors or when the vectors and wild animals, especially marsupials, invade the human domicile and infect man, (iii) zoonosis-amphixenosis and exchanged infection between animals and humans by domestic vectors in endemic areas and (iv) zooanthroponosis, infection that is transmitted from man to animals, by means of domestic vectors, which is the rarest situation in areas endemic for Chagas disease. The characteristics of Chagas disease as an enzooty of wild animals and as an anthropozoonosis are seen most frequently in the Brazilian Amazon and in the Pan-Amazon region as a whole, where there are 33 species of six genera of wild animals: Marsupialia, Chiroptera, Rodentia, Edentata (Xenarthra), Carnivora and Primata and 27 species of triatomines, most of which infected with T. cruzi . These conditions place the resident populations of this area or its visitors - tourists, hunters, fishermen and especially the people whose livelihood involves plant extraction - at risk of being affected by Chagas disease. On the other hand, there has been an exponential increase in the acute cases of Chagas disease in that region through oral transmission of T. cruzi , causing outbreaks of the disease. In four seroepidemiological surveys that were carried out in areas of the microregion of the Negro River, state of Amazonas, in 1991, 1993, 1997 and 2010, we found large numbers of people who were serologically positive for T. cruzi infection. The majority of them and/or their relatives worked in piassava extraction and had come into contact with and were stung by wild

  20. Rational spatio-temporal strategies for controlling a Chagas disease vector in urban environments

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Michael Z.; Malaga Chavez, Fernando S.; Cornejo del Carpio, Juan G.; Vilhena, Daril A.; McKenzie, F. Ellis; Plotkin, Joshua B.

    2010-01-01

    The rational design of interventions is critical to controlling communicable diseases, especially in urban environments. In the case of the Chagas disease vector Triatoma infestans, successful control is stymied by the return of the insect after the effectiveness of the insecticide wanes. Here, we adapt a genetic algorithm, originally developed for the travelling salesman problem, to improve the spatio-temporal design of insecticide campaigns against T. infestans, in a complex urban environment. We find a strategy that reduces the expected instances of vector return 34-fold compared with the current strategy of sequential insecticide application to spatially contiguous communities. The relative success of alternative control strategies depends upon the duration of the effectiveness of the insecticide, and it shows chaotic fluctuations in response to unforeseen delays in a control campaign. We use simplified models to analyse the outcomes of qualitatively different spatio-temporal strategies. Our results provide a detailed procedure to improve control efforts for an urban Chagas disease vector, as well as general guidelines for improving the design of interventions against other disease agents in complex environments. PMID:20061346

  1. Current drug therapy and pharmaceutical challenges for Chagas disease.

    PubMed

    Bermudez, José; Davies, Carolina; Simonazzi, Analía; Real, Juan Pablo; Palma, Santiago

    2016-04-01

    One of the most significant health problems in the American continent in terms of human health, and socioeconomic impact is Chagas disease, caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. Infection was originally transmitted by reduviid insects, congenitally from mother to fetus, and by oral ingestion in sylvatic/rural environments, but blood transfusions, organ transplants, laboratory accidents, and sharing of contaminated syringes also contribute to modern day transmission. Likewise, Chagas disease used to be endemic from Northern Mexico to Argentina, but migrations have earned it global. The parasite has a complex life cycle, infecting different species, and invading a variety of cells - including muscle and nerve cells of the heart and gastrointestinal tract - in the mammalian host. Human infection outcome is a potentially fatal cardiomyopathy, and gastrointestinal tract lesions. In absence of a vaccine, vector control and treatment of patients are the only tools to control the disease. Unfortunately, the only drugs now available for Chagas' disease, Nifurtimox and Benznidazole, are relatively toxic for adult patients, and require prolonged administration. Benznidazole is the first choice for Chagas disease treatment due to its lower side effects than Nifurtimox. However, different strategies are being sought to overcome Benznidazole's toxicity including shorter or intermittent administration schedules-either alone or in combination with other drugs. In addition, a long list of compounds has shown trypanocidal activity, ranging from natural products to specially designed molecules, re-purposing drugs commercialized to treat other maladies, and homeopathy. In the present review, we will briefly summarize the upturns of current treatment of Chagas disease, discuss the increment on research and scientific publications about this topic, and give an overview of the state-of-the-art research aiming to produce an alternative medication to treat T. cruzi infection.

  2. Chagas Disease, Migration and Community Settlement Patterns in Arequipa, Peru

    PubMed Central

    Gilman, Robert H.; Cornejo del Carpio, Juan G.; Naquira, Cesar; Bern, Caryn; Levy, Michael Z.

    2009-01-01

    Background Chagas disease is one of the most important neglected tropical diseases in the Americas. Vectorborne transmission of Chagas disease has been historically rare in urban settings. However, in marginal communities near the city of Arequipa, Peru, urban transmission cycles have become established. We examined the history of migration and settlement patterns in these communities, and their connections to Chagas disease transmission. Methodology/Principal Findings This was a qualitative study that employed focus group discussions and in-depth interviews. Five focus groups and 50 in-depth interviews were carried out with 94 community members from three shantytowns and two traditional towns near Arequipa, Peru. Focus groups utilized participatory methodologies to explore the community's mobility patterns and the historical and current presence of triatomine vectors. In-depth interviews based on event history calendars explored participants' migration patterns and experience with Chagas disease and vectors. Focus group data were analyzed using participatory analysis methodologies, and interview data were coded and analyzed using a grounded theory approach. Entomologic data were provided by an ongoing vector control campaign. We found that migrants to shantytowns in Arequipa were unlikely to have brought triatomines to the city upon arrival. Frequent seasonal moves, however, took shantytown residents to valleys surrounding Arequipa where vectors are prevalent. In addition, the pattern of settlement of shantytowns and the practice of raising domestic animals by residents creates a favorable environment for vector proliferation and dispersal. Finally, we uncovered a phenomenon of population loss and replacement by low-income migrants in one traditional town, which created the human settlement pattern of a new shantytown within this traditional community. Conclusions/Significance The pattern of human migration is therefore an important underlying determinant of

  3. Ecoepidemiology, short history and control of Chagas disease in the endemic countries and the new challenge for non-endemic countries

    PubMed Central

    Coura, José Rodrigues; Viñas, Pedro Albajar; Junqueira, Angela CV

    2014-01-01

    Chagas disease is maintained in nature through the interchange of three cycles: the wild, peridomestic and domestic cycles. The wild cycle, which is enzootic, has existed for millions of years maintained between triatomines and wild mammals. Human infection was only detected in mummies from 4,000-9,000 years ago, before the discovery of the disease by Carlos Chagas in 1909. With the beginning of deforestation in the Americas, two-three centuries ago for the expansion of agriculture and livestock rearing, wild mammals, which had been the food source for triatomines, were removed and new food sources started to appear in peridomestic areas: chicken coops, corrals and pigsties. Some accidental human cases could also have occurred prior to the triatomines in peridomestic areas. Thus, triatomines progressively penetrated households and formed the domestic cycle of Chagas disease. A new epidemiological, economic and social problem has been created through the globalisation of Chagas disease, due to legal and illegal migration of individuals infected by Trypanosoma cruzi or presenting Chagas disease in its varied clinical forms, from endemic countries in Latin America to non-endemic countries in North America, Europe, Asia and Oceania, particularly to the United States of America and Spain. The main objective of the present paper was to present a general view of the interchanges between the wild, peridomestic and domestic cycles of the disease, the development of T. cruzi among triatomine, their domiciliation and control initiatives, the characteristics of the disease in countries in the Americas and the problem of migration to non-endemic countries. PMID:25410988

  4. Ecoepidemiology, short history and control of Chagas disease in the endemic countries and the new challenge for non-endemic countries.

    PubMed

    Coura, José Rodrigues; Viñas, Pedro Albajar; Junqueira, Angela Cv

    2014-11-01

    Chagas disease is maintained in nature through the interchange of three cycles: the wild, peridomestic and domestic cycles. The wild cycle, which is enzootic, has existed for millions of years maintained between triatomines and wild mammals. Human infection was only detected in mummies from 4,000-9,000 years ago, before the discovery of the disease by Carlos Chagas in 1909. With the beginning of deforestation in the Americas, two-three centuries ago for the expansion of agriculture and livestock rearing, wild mammals, which had been the food source for triatomines, were removed and new food sources started to appear in peridomestic areas: chicken coops, corrals and pigsties. Some accidental human cases could also have occurred prior to the triatomines in peridomestic areas. Thus, triatomines progressively penetrated households and formed the domestic cycle of Chagas disease. A new epidemiological, economic and social problem has been created through the globalisation of Chagas disease, due to legal and illegal migration of individuals infected by Trypanosoma cruzi or presenting Chagas disease in its varied clinical forms, from endemic countries in Latin America to non-endemic countries in North America, Europe, Asia and Oceania, particularly to the United States of America and Spain. The main objective of the present paper was to present a general view of the interchanges between the wild, peridomestic and domestic cycles of the disease, the development of T. cruzi among triatomine, their domiciliation and control initiatives, the characteristics of the disease in countries in the Americas and the problem of migration to non-endemic countries.

  5. Ecoepidemiology, short history and control of Chagas disease in the endemic countries and the new challenge for non-endemic countries.

    PubMed

    Coura, José Rodrigues; Viñas, Pedro Albajar; Junqueira, Angela Cv

    2014-10-21

    Chagas disease is maintained in nature through the interchange of three cycles: the wild, peridomestic and domestic cycles. The wild cycle, which is enzootic, has existed for millions of years maintained between triatomines and wild mammals. Human infection was only detected in mummies from 4,000-9,000 years ago, before the discovery of the disease by Carlos Chagas in 1909. With the beginning of deforestation in the Americas, two-three centuries ago for the expansion of agriculture and livestock rearing, wild mammals, which had been the food source for triatomines, were removed and new food sources started to appear in peridomestic areas: chicken coops, corrals and pigsties. Some accidental human cases could also have occurred prior to the triatomines in peridomestic areas. Thus, triatomines progressively penetrated households and formed the domestic cycle of Chagas disease. A new epidemiological, economic and social problem has been created through the globalisation of Chagas disease, due to legal and illegal migration of individuals infected by Trypanosoma cruzi or presenting Chagas disease in its varied clinical forms, from endemic countries in Latin America to non-endemic countries in North America, Europe, Asia and Oceania, particularly to the United States of America and Spain. The main objective of the present paper was to present a general view of the interchanges between the wild, peridomestic and domestic cycles of the disease, the development of T. cruzi among triatomine, their domiciliation and control initiatives, the characteristics of the disease in countries in the Americas and the problem of migration to non-endemic countries.

  6. Dissecting slander and crying for justice: Carlos Chagas and the Nobel Prize of 1921.

    PubMed

    Bestetti, Reinaldo B; Cardinalli-Neto, Augusto

    2013-10-03

    Chagas disease was discovered by Carlos Chagas in 1909. Chagas worked at Oswaldo Cruz Institute, where the bases of experimental medicine were settled in Brazil, and that had no connection with the Faculty of Medicine of Rio de Janeiro. Chagas had several enemies at Oswaldo Cruz Institute mainly because of his election to Head of Service in 1910, and for the position of Oswaldo Cruz Directorship in 1917. Furthermore, Chagas gained enemies at Faculty of Medicine of Rio de Janeiro, which did not like to see the economical political autonomy of Oswaldo Cruz Institute. This allowed the Institute not only to perform top experimental research, but also to take the leadership of research in the country. Chagas was nominated to the Nobel Prize of 1921 in December, 1920. None was awarded the Nobel Prize in that year. He seems to have been evaluated by the Noble Committee of Karolinska Institute from March to May of 1921. At that time, his enemies were denying his discovery of Trypanosoma cruzi, a key point in Chagas' nomination by Karolinska Institute, and giving no epidemiological importance for the disease. By the same way, the obligation of small pox vaccination was tarnishing his public image. Having taken into account the epidemiologic importance of Chagas disease, the strong historical mistake in the process of Chagas evaluation, and the inequity behind all these facts, we insist on a posthumous Nobel Prize for the man who made the most complete medical-scientist discovery of all time.

  7. Motor unit involvement in human acute Chagas' disease.

    PubMed

    Benavente, O R; Patiño, O L; Peña, L B; Lugònes, H; Kalala, E; Meneclier, C R; Genovese, O; Sica, R E

    1989-09-01

    Thirty five patients with acute Chagas' disease who demonstrated parasitaemia at the time of the investigation were submitted to a detailed electromyographical study. With their muscles at rest, 12 patients showed fibrillation potentials and/or positive sharp waves. On volitional contraction, 7 had short duration motor unit potentials (MUPs) and low polyphasic MUPs. On motor and sensory nerve fibers conduction studies, 20 disclosed values below the lower control limit within one or more nerves. Finally, 12 patients produced a muscle decremental response on nerve supramaximal repetitive stimulation. The findings signal that primary muscle involvement, neuropathy and impairement of the neuromuscular transmission, either isolated or combined, may be found in the acute stage of human Chagas' disease.

  8. Therapy of Chagas Disease: Implications for Levels of Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Sosa-Estani, Sergio; Colantonio, Lisandro; Segura, Elsa Leonor

    2012-01-01

    This paper reviews the evidence supporting the use of etiological treatment for Chagas disease that has changed the standard of care for patients with Trypanosoma cruzi infection in the last decades. Implications of this evidence on different levels of prevention as well as gaps in current knowledge are also discussed. In this regard, etiological treatment has shown to be beneficial as an intervention for secondary prevention to successfully cure the infection or to delay, reduce, or prevent the progression to disease, and as primary disease prevention by breaking the chain of transmission. Timely diagnosis during initial stages would allow for the prescription of appropriate therapies mainly in the primary health care system thus improving chances for a better quality of life. Based on current evidence, etiological treatment has to be considered as an essential public health strategy useful to reduce disease burden and to eliminate Chagas disease altogether. PMID:22523499

  9. Multicenter epidemiological and clinical study on imported Chagas diseases in Alicante, Spain

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, José M; Torrús, Diego; Amador, Concepción; Jover, Francisco; Pérez-Chacón, Fabiola; Ponce, Yamileth; Arjona, Francisco J; Caro, Elena; Martínez-Peinado, Concepción; Gallegos, Ingrid; Cuadrado, José M; Tello, Antonio; Gutiérrez, Felix

    2012-01-01

    Recently, there has been an increase in the number of patients with Chagas disease outside of areas that are generally considered endemic. The aim of this investigation is to describe the clinical profile of a series of patients with Chagas disease in Alicante, Spain, which is a province located on the coast of the Mediterranean Sea. This study was performed at four general hospitals in Alicante between January 2002 and May 2011. A total of 128 patients from seven countries were diagnosed with Trypanosoma cruzi. The main country of origin of these patients was Bolivia (n = 101; 78.9%), and the median of age of these patients was 35 years (range: 0–72 years). Four (3.3%) patients were children under 14 years of age, and 81 (63.3%) were female. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to analyze 106 patients, 66.0% of whom demonstrated positive PCR results. Visceral involvement was diagnosed in 26.8%: 24.1% demonstrated cardiac involvement, 0.9% demonstrated gastrointestinal involvement, 0.9% demonstrated cardiac and gastrointestinal involvement, and 0.9% demonstrated involvement of the central nervous system. Syncope was found to be associated with cardiomyopathy (28.0% versus 5.2%) (odds ratio: 6.5; 95% confidence interval: 1.5–27.1). Seventy-six patients received treatment with benznidazole, of whom 57 (75.0%) completed the treatment course without significant adverse events and 17.1% discontinued benznidazole due to adverse events. In total, 50% of patients experienced documented adverse reactions. Among patients with positive PCR results before treatment, all demonstrated negative PCR results following treatment. In conclusion, majority of our patients were female Bolivians immigrants, one of four of our patients demonstrated cardiac involvement, and treatment tolerance was poor. It is important to improve the clinical and epidemiological knowledge of Chagas disease in nonendemic with additional multicenter studies in order to determine the magnitude of

  10. Chagas Cardiomyopathy in the Context of the Chronic Disease Transition

    PubMed Central

    Hidron, Alicia I.; Gilman, Robert H.; Justiniano, Juan; Blackstock, Anna J.; LaFuente, Carlos; Selum, Walter; Calderon, Martiza; Verastegui, Manuela; Ferrufino, Lisbeth; Valencia, Eduardo; Tornheim, Jeffrey A.; O'Neal, Seth; Comer, Robert; Galdos-Cardenas, Gerson; Bern, Caryn

    2010-01-01

    Background Patients with Chagas disease have migrated to cities, where obesity, hypertension and other cardiac risk factors are common. Methodology/Principal Findings The study included adult patients evaluated by the cardiology service in a public hospital in Santa Cruz, Bolivia. Data included risk factors for T. cruzi infection, medical history, physical examination, electrocardiogram, echocardiogram, and contact 9 months after initial data collection to ascertain mortality. Serology and PCR for Trypanosoma cruzi were performed. Of 394 participants, 251 (64%) had confirmed T. cruzi infection by serology. Among seropositive participants, 109 (43%) had positive results by conventional PCR; of these, 89 (82%) also had positive results by real time PCR. There was a high prevalence of hypertension (64%) and overweight (body mass index [BMI] >25; 67%), with no difference by T. cruzi infection status. Nearly 60% of symptomatic congestive heart failure was attributed to Chagas cardiomyopathy; mortality was also higher for seropositive than seronegative patients (p = 0.05). In multivariable models, longer residence in an endemic province, residence in a rural area and poor housing conditions were associated with T. cruzi infection. Male sex, increasing age and poor housing were independent predictors of Chagas cardiomyopathy severity. Males and participants with BMI ≤25 had significantly higher likelihood of positive PCR results compared to females or overweight participants. Conclusions Chagas cardiomyopathy remains an important cause of congestive heart failure in this hospital population, and should be evaluated in the context of the epidemiological transition that has increased risk of obesity, hypertension and chronic cardiovascular disease. PMID:20502520

  11. Challenges and perspectives of Chagas disease: a review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Chagas disease (CD), also known as American trypanosomiasis, is caused by the flagellated protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, and affects an estimated 8 to 10 million people worldwide. In Latin America, 25 million people live in risk areas, while in 2008 alone, 10,000 CD-related deaths were reported. This review aimed to evaluate the challenges of CD control, future perspectives, and actions performed worldwide to control expansion of the disease and its impact on public health in Latin America. PMID:24354455

  12. Potential Distribution of Chagas Disease Vectors (Hemiptera, Reduviidae, Triatominae) in Colombia, Based on Ecological Niche Modeling.

    PubMed

    Parra-Henao, Gabriel; Suárez-Escudero, Laura C; González-Caro, Sebastián

    2016-01-01

    Ecological niche modeling of Triatominae bugs allow us to establish the local risk of transmission of the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, which causes Chagas disease. This information could help to guide health authority recommendations on infection monitoring, prevention, and control. In this study, we estimated the geographic distribution of triatomine species in Colombia and identified the relationship between landscape structure and climatic factors influencing their occurrence. A total of 2451 records of 4 triatomine species (Panstrongylus geniculatus, Rhodnius pallescens, R. prolixus, and Triatoma maculata) were analyzed. The variables that provided more information to explain the ecologic niche of these vectors were related to precipitation, altitude, and temperature. We found that the species with the broadest potential geographic distribution were P. geniculatus, R. pallescens, and R. prolixus. In general, the models predicted the highest occurrence probability of these vectors in the eastern slope of the Eastern Cordillera, the southern region of the Magdalena valley, and the Sierra Nevada of Santa Marta.

  13. Potential Distribution of Chagas Disease Vectors (Hemiptera, Reduviidae, Triatominae) in Colombia, Based on Ecological Niche Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Suárez-Escudero, Laura C.; González-Caro, Sebastián

    2016-01-01

    Ecological niche modeling of Triatominae bugs allow us to establish the local risk of transmission of the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, which causes Chagas disease. This information could help to guide health authority recommendations on infection monitoring, prevention, and control. In this study, we estimated the geographic distribution of triatomine species in Colombia and identified the relationship between landscape structure and climatic factors influencing their occurrence. A total of 2451 records of 4 triatomine species (Panstrongylus geniculatus, Rhodnius pallescens, R. prolixus, and Triatoma maculata) were analyzed. The variables that provided more information to explain the ecologic niche of these vectors were related to precipitation, altitude, and temperature. We found that the species with the broadest potential geographic distribution were P. geniculatus, R. pallescens, and R. prolixus. In general, the models predicted the highest occurrence probability of these vectors in the eastern slope of the Eastern Cordillera, the southern region of the Magdalena valley, and the Sierra Nevada of Santa Marta. PMID:28115946

  14. The Role of Haptoglobin Genotypes in Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mundaray Fernández, Ninomar; Fernández-Mestre, Mercedes

    2014-01-01

    Although the number of people infected with T. cruzi is on the rise, host genetic and immune components that are crucial in the development of the Chagas disease have been discovered. We investigated the frequency of polymorphisms in the gene encoding haptoglobin of patients with chronic Chagas disease. The results suggest that while the HP1-1 genotype may confer protection against infection and the development of chronic Chagas disease due to the rapid metabolism of the Hp1-1-Hb complex and its anti-inflammatory activity, the presence of HP2-2 genotype may increase susceptibility towards a chronic condition of the disease due to a slow metabolism of the Hp2-2-Hb complex, lower antioxidant activity, and increased inflammatory reactivity, which lead to cell damage and a deterioration of the cardiac function. Finally, correlations between HP genotypes in different age groups and cardiac manifestations suggest that HP polymorphism could influence the prognosis of this infectious disease. This study shows some of the relevant aspects of the haptoglobin gene polymorphism and its implications in the T. cruzi infection. PMID:25147423

  15. Trypanosoma cruzi and Chagas' Disease in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Bern, Caryn; Kjos, Sonia; Yabsley, Michael J.; Montgomery, Susan P.

    2011-01-01

    Summary: Chagas' disease is caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi and causes potentially life-threatening disease of the heart and gastrointestinal tract. The southern half of the United States contains enzootic cycles of T. cruzi, involving 11 recognized triatomine vector species. The greatest vector diversity and density occur in the western United States, where woodrats are the most common reservoir; other rodents, raccoons, skunks, and coyotes are also infected with T. cruzi. In the eastern United States, the prevalence of T. cruzi is highest in raccoons, opossums, armadillos, and skunks. A total of 7 autochthonous vector-borne human infections have been reported in Texas, California, Tennessee, and Louisiana; many others are thought to go unrecognized. Nevertheless, most T. cruzi-infected individuals in the United States are immigrants from areas of endemicity in Latin America. Seven transfusion-associated and 6 organ donor-derived T. cruzi infections have been documented in the United States and Canada. As improved control of vector- and blood-borne T. cruzi transmission decreases the burden in countries where the disease is historically endemic and imported Chagas' disease is increasingly recognized outside Latin America, the United States can play an important role in addressing the altered epidemiology of Chagas' disease in the 21st century. PMID:21976603

  16. Prophylactic and therapeutic DNA vaccines against Chagas disease.

    PubMed

    Arce-Fonseca, Minerva; Rios-Castro, Martha; Carrillo-Sánchez, Silvia del Carmen; Martínez-Cruz, Mariana; Rodríguez-Morales, Olivia

    2015-02-24

    Chagas disease is a zoonosis caused by Trypanosoma cruzi in which the most affected organ is the heart. Conventional chemotherapy has a very low effectiveness; despite recent efforts, there is currently no better or more effective treatment available. DNA vaccines provide a new alternative for both prevention and treatment of a variety of infectious disorders, including Chagas disease. Recombinant DNA technology has allowed some vaccines to be developed using recombinant proteins or virus-like particles capable of inducing both a humoral and cellular specific immune response. This type of immunization has been successfully used in preclinical studies and there are diverse models for viral, bacterial and/or parasitic diseases, allergies, tumors and other diseases. Therefore, several research groups have been given the task of designing a DNA vaccine against experimental infection with T. cruzi. In this review we explain what DNA vaccines are and the most recent studies that have been done to develop them with prophylactic or therapeutic purposes against Chagas disease.

  17. Opportunity Cost for Early Treatment of Chagas Disease in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Ramsey, Janine M.; Elizondo-Cano, Miguel; Sanchez-González, Gilberto; Peña-Nieves, Adriana; Figueroa-Lara, Alejandro

    2014-01-01

    Background Given current neglect for Chagas disease in public health programs in Mexico, future healthcare and economic development policies will need a more robust model to analyze costs and impacts of timely clinical attention of infected populations. Methodology/Principal Findings A Markov decision model was constructed to simulate the natural history of a Chagas disease cohort in Mexico and to project the associated short and long-term clinical outcomes and corresponding costs. The lifetime cost for a timely diagnosed and treated Chagas disease patient is US$ 10,160, while the cost for an undiagnosed individual is US$ 11,877. The cost of a diagnosed and treated case increases 24-fold from early acute to indeterminate stage. The major cost component for lifetime cost was working days lost, between 44% and 75%, depending on the program scenario for timely diagnosis and treatment. Conclusions/Significance In the long term, it is cheaper to diagnose and treat chagasic patients early, instead of doing nothing. This finding by itself argues for the need to shift current policy, in order to prioritize and attend this neglected disease for the benefit of social and economic development, which implies including treatment drugs in the national formularies. Present results are even more relevant, if one considers that timely diagnosis and treatment can arrest clinical progression and enhance a chronic patient's quality of life. PMID:24743112

  18. Fatal congenital Chagas' disease in a non-endemic area: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Flores-Chávez, María; Faez, Yamile; Olalla, José M; Cruz, Israel; Gárate, Teresa; Rodríguez, Mercedes; Blanc, Pilar; Cañavate, Carmen

    2008-01-01

    The early diagnosis of congenital Chagas' disease is very important if infected newborns, whether symptomatic or not, are to receive adequate treatment. This paper describes the complications arising in the diagnosis of a newborn with fatal congenital Chagas' disease in Spain, a non-endemic area where visceral leishmaniasis is present. PMID:18992159

  19. Chagas Disease Screening in Maternal Donors of Publicly Banked Umbilical Cord Blood, United States

    PubMed Central

    Gilner, Jennifer B.; Hernandez, Jose; Kurtzberg, Joanne; Heine, R. Phillips

    2016-01-01

    To assess patterns of Chagas disease, we reviewed results of screening umbilical cord blood from a US public cord blood bank during 2007–2014. Nineteen maternal donors tested positive for Trypanosoma cruzi parasites (0.04%). Because perinatal transmission of Chagas disease is associated with substantial illness, targeted prenatal programs should screen for this disease. PMID:27433974

  20. Acute Chagas Disease: New Global Challenges for an Old Neglected Disease

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, Daniela V.; Gollob, Kenneth J.; Dutra, Walderez O.

    2014-01-01

    Chagas disease is caused by infection with the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, and although over 100 years have passed since the discovery of Chagas disease, it still presents an increasing problem for global public health. A plethora of information concerning the chronic phase of human Chagas disease, particularly the severe cardiac form, is available in the literature. However, information concerning events during the acute phase of the disease is scarce. In this review, we will discuss (1) the current status of acute Chagas disease cases globally, (2) the immunological findings related to the acute phase and their possible influence in disease outcome, and (3) reactivation of Chagas disease in immunocompromised individuals, a key point for transplantation and HIV infection management. PMID:25077613

  1. Ecological Connectivity of Trypanosoma cruzi Reservoirs and Triatoma pallidipennis Hosts in an Anthropogenic Landscape with Endemic Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ramsey, Janine M.; Gutiérrez-Cabrera, Ana E.; Salgado-Ramírez, Liliana; Peterson, A. Townsend; Sánchez-Cordero, Victor; Ibarra-Cerdeña, Carlos N.

    2012-01-01

    Traditional methods for Chagas disease prevention are targeted at domestic vector reduction, as well as control of transfusion and maternal-fetal transmission. Population connectivity of Trypanosoma cruzi-infected vectors and hosts, among sylvatic, ecotone and domestic habitats could jeopardize targeted efforts to reduce human exposure. This connectivity was evaluated in a Mexican community with reports of high vector infestation, human infection, and Chagas disease, surrounded by agricultural and natural areas. We surveyed bats, rodents, and triatomines in dry and rainy seasons in three adjacent habitats (domestic, ecotone, sylvatic), and measured T. cruzi prevalence, and host feeding sources of triatomines. Of 12 bat and 7 rodent species, no bat tested positive for T. cruzi, but all rodent species tested positive in at least one season or habitat. Highest T. cruzi infection prevalence was found in the rodents, Baiomys musculus and Neotoma mexicana. In general, parasite prevalence was not related to habitat or season, although the sylvatic habitat had higher infection prevalence than by chance, during the dry season. Wild and domestic mammals were identified as bloodmeals of T. pallidipennis, with 9% of individuals having mixed human (4.8% single human) and other mammal species in bloodmeals, especially in the dry season; these vectors tested >50% positive for T. cruzi. Overall, ecological connectivity is broad across this matrix, based on high rodent community similarity, vector and T. cruzi presence. Cost-effective T. cruzi, vector control strategies and Chagas disease transmission prevention will need to consider continuous potential for parasite movement over the entire landscape. This study provides clear evidence that these strategies will need to include reservoir/host species in at least ecotones, in addition to domestic habitats. PMID:23049923

  2. Immunoblot assay using excreted-secreted antigens of Trypanosoma cruzi in serodiagnosis of congenital, acute, and chronic Chagas' disease.

    PubMed Central

    Umezawa, E S; Nascimento, M S; Kesper, N; Coura, J R; Borges-Pereira, J; Junqueira, A C; Camargo, M E

    1996-01-01

    Immunoblotting with trypomastigote excreted-secreted antigens (TESA blot) of Trypanosoma cruzi was evaluated as a method for diagnosis of chronic and acute phases as well as congenital (in newborn children) Chagas' disease. Serum samples from acute-phase and congenital infections were considered to be positive when they reacted with ladder-like bands of 130- to 200-kDa antigens, recognized by immunoglobulin M (IgM) and IgG antibodies, while IgG from chronic-phase sera recognized a broad band antigen of 150 to 160 kDa. Nonchagasic sera were not reactive to these antigens. The study was carried out on 512 patients, 111 of whom were nonchagasic but included cases of leishmaniasis or other pathologies, and 401 chagasic patients. The latter group comprised 361 chronic cases, 36 acute cases, and 4 congenital cases in newborn children. Among the chronic cases, 256 were from areas in which T. cruzi is endemic but which differed widely in the pathogenic expression of T. cruzi infection and in parasitemia levels. These patients at the same time showed a broad range of low, medium, and high reactivity to conventional enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and indirect immunofluorescence serotests for Chagas' disease. For these reasons they may better represent the universe of chagasic patients than would a sample of highly reactive sera obtained from chagasic patients in a single area endemic for T. cruzi. All acute and congenital cases showed positivity in the IgM and IgG TESA blots, while chronic cases were 100% positive for IgG antibodies. In nonchagasic sera, including 30 cases of visceral and muco-cutaneous leishmaniasis, the specificity index was 1.000, and no cross-reactions were observed. The TESA blot thus seems to be useful as a sensitive and specific diagnostic assay in cases of suspected acute or congenital T. cruzi infection and as a general confirmatory test for conventional Chagas' disease serology. PMID:8862574

  3. Information on Vinchucas and Chagas disease.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schenone, H.

    1981-12-01

    Following a significant increase in the number of vinchucas observed at La Silla during the last summer, the Director-General of ESO asked Prof. Hugo Schenone, Director of the Department of Microbiology and Parasitology of the University of Chile to pay a visit to La Silla to investigate the situation. The following gives a summary of the resulting report.

  4. Chagas disease diagnostic applications: present knowledge and future steps

    PubMed Central

    Balouz, Virginia; Agüero, Fernán; Buscaglia, Carlos A.

    2017-01-01

    Chagas disease, caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, is a life-long and debilitating illness of major significance throughout Latin America, and an emergent threat to global public health. Being a neglected disease, the vast majority of Chagasic patients have limited access to proper diagnosis and treatment, and there is only a marginal investment into R&D for drug and vaccine development. In this context, identification of novel biomarkers able to transcend the current limits of diagnostic methods surfaces as a main priority in Chagas disease applied research. The expectation is that these novel biomarkers will provide reliable, reproducible and accurate results irrespective of the genetic background, infecting parasite strain, stage of disease, and clinical-associated features of Chagasic populations. In addition, they should be able to address other still unmet diagnostic needs, including early detection of congenital T. cruzi transmission, rapid assessment of treatment efficiency or failure, indication/prediction of disease progression and direct parasite typification in clinical samples. The lack of access of poor and neglected populations to essential diagnostics also stress the necessity of developing new methods operational in Point-of-Care (PoC) settings. In summary, emergent diagnostic tests integrating these novel and tailored tools should provide a significant impact on the effectiveness of current intervention schemes and on the clinical management of Chagasic patients. In this chapter, we discuss the present knowledge and possible future steps in Chagas disease diagnostic applications, as well as the opportunity provided by recent advances in high-throughput methods for biomarker discovery. PMID:28325368

  5. Resveratrol Reverses Functional Chagas Heart Disease in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Mata-Santos, Hilton; Vicentino, Amanda R. R.; Feijó, Daniel F.; Meyer-Fernandes, José R.; Paula-Neto, Heitor A.; Medei, Emiliano; Bozza, Marcelo T.; Lannes-Vieira, Joseli; Paiva, Claudia N.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy (CCC) develops years after acute infection by Trypanosoma cruzi and does not improve after trypanocidal therapy, despite reduction of parasite burden. During disease, the heart undergoes oxidative stress, a potential causative factor for arrhythmias and contractile dysfunction. Here we tested whether antioxidants/ cardioprotective drugs could improve cardiac function in established Chagas heart disease. We chose a model that resembles B1-B2 stage of human CCC, treated mice with resveratrol and performed electrocardiography and echocardiography studies. Resveratrol reduced the prolonged PR and QTc intervals, increased heart rates and reversed sinus arrhythmia, atrial and atrioventricular conduction disorders; restored a normal left ventricular ejection fraction, improved stroke volume and cardiac output. Resveratrol activated the AMPK-pathway and reduced both ROS production and heart parasite burden, without interfering with vascularization or myocarditis intensity. Resveratrol was even capable of improving heart function of infected mice when treatment was started late after infection, while trypanocidal drug benznidazole failed. We attempted to mimic resveratrol’s actions using metformin (AMPK-activator) or tempol (SOD-mimetic). Metformin and tempol mimicked the beneficial effects of resveratrol on heart function and decreased lipid peroxidation, but did not alter parasite burden. These results indicate that AMPK activation and ROS neutralization are key strategies to induce tolerance to Chagas heart disease. Despite all tissue damage observed in established Chagas heart disease, we found that a physiological dysfunction can still be reversed by treatment with resveratrol, metformin and tempol, resulting in improved heart function and representing a starting point to develop innovative therapies in CCC. PMID:27788262

  6. Resveratrol Reverses Functional Chagas Heart Disease in Mice.

    PubMed

    Vilar-Pereira, Glaucia; Carneiro, Vitor C; Mata-Santos, Hilton; Vicentino, Amanda R R; Ramos, Isalira P; Giarola, Naira L L; Feijó, Daniel F; Meyer-Fernandes, José R; Paula-Neto, Heitor A; Medei, Emiliano; Bozza, Marcelo T; Lannes-Vieira, Joseli; Paiva, Claudia N

    2016-10-01

    Chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy (CCC) develops years after acute infection by Trypanosoma cruzi and does not improve after trypanocidal therapy, despite reduction of parasite burden. During disease, the heart undergoes oxidative stress, a potential causative factor for arrhythmias and contractile dysfunction. Here we tested whether antioxidants/ cardioprotective drugs could improve cardiac function in established Chagas heart disease. We chose a model that resembles B1-B2 stage of human CCC, treated mice with resveratrol and performed electrocardiography and echocardiography studies. Resveratrol reduced the prolonged PR and QTc intervals, increased heart rates and reversed sinus arrhythmia, atrial and atrioventricular conduction disorders; restored a normal left ventricular ejection fraction, improved stroke volume and cardiac output. Resveratrol activated the AMPK-pathway and reduced both ROS production and heart parasite burden, without interfering with vascularization or myocarditis intensity. Resveratrol was even capable of improving heart function of infected mice when treatment was started late after infection, while trypanocidal drug benznidazole failed. We attempted to mimic resveratrol's actions using metformin (AMPK-activator) or tempol (SOD-mimetic). Metformin and tempol mimicked the beneficial effects of resveratrol on heart function and decreased lipid peroxidation, but did not alter parasite burden. These results indicate that AMPK activation and ROS neutralization are key strategies to induce tolerance to Chagas heart disease. Despite all tissue damage observed in established Chagas heart disease, we found that a physiological dysfunction can still be reversed by treatment with resveratrol, metformin and tempol, resulting in improved heart function and representing a starting point to develop innovative therapies in CCC.

  7. Ergosterol biosynthesis and drug development for Chagas disease.

    PubMed

    Urbina, Julio A

    2009-07-01

    This article presents an overview of the currently available drugs nifurtimox (NFX) and benznidazole (BZN) used against Trypanosoma cruzi, the aetiological agent of Chagas disease; herein we discuss their limitations along with potential alternatives with a focus on ergosterol biosynthesis inhibitors (EBI). These compounds are currently the most advanced candidates for new anti-T. cruzi agents given that they block de novo production of 24-alkyl-sterols, which are essential for parasite survival and cannot be replaced by a host's own cholesterol. Among these compounds, new triazole derivatives that inhibit the parasite's C14alpha sterol demethylase are the most promising, as they have been shown to have curative activity in murine models of acute and chronic Chagas disease and are active against NFX and BZN-resistant T. cruzi strains; among this class of compounds, posaconazole (Schering-Plough Research Institute) and ravuconazole (Eisai Company) are poised for clinical trials in Chagas disease patients in the short term. Other T. cruzi-specific EBI, with in vitro and in vivo potency, include squalene synthase, lanosterol synthase and squalene epoxidase-inhibitors as well as compounds with dual mechanisms of action (ergosterol biosynthesis inhibition and free radical generation), but they are less advanced in their development process. The main putative advantages of EBI over currently available therapies include their higher potency and selectivity in both acute and chronic infections, activity against NFX and BZN-resistant T. cruzi strains, and much better tolerability and safety profiles. Limitations may include complexity and cost of manufacture of the new compounds. As for any new drug, such compounds will require extensive clinical testing before being introduced for clinical use, and the complexity of such studies, particularly in chronic patients, will be compounded by the current limitations in the verification of true parasitological cures for T. cruzi

  8. Retracing Micro-Epidemics of Chagas Disease Using Epicenter Regression

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Michael Z.; Small, Dylan S.; Vilhena, Daril A.; Bowman, Natalie M.; Kawai, Vivian; Cornejo del Carpio, Juan G.; Cordova-Benzaquen, Eleazar; Gilman, Robert H.; Bern, Caryn; Plotkin, Joshua B.

    2011-01-01

    Vector-borne transmission of Chagas disease has become an urban problem in the city of Arequipa, Peru, yet the debilitating symptoms that can occur in the chronic stage of the disease are rarely seen in hospitals in the city. The lack of obvious clinical disease in Arequipa has led to speculation that the local strain of the etiologic agent, Trypanosoma cruzi, has low chronic pathogenicity. The long asymptomatic period of Chagas disease leads us to an alternative hypothesis for the absence of clinical cases in Arequipa: transmission in the city may be so recent that most infected individuals have yet to progress to late stage disease. Here we describe a new method, epicenter regression, that allows us to infer the spatial and temporal history of disease transmission from a snapshot of a population's infection status. We show that in a community of Arequipa, transmission of T. cruzi by the insect vector Triatoma infestans occurred as a series of focal micro-epidemics, the oldest of which began only around 20 years ago. These micro-epidemics infected nearly 5% of the community before transmission of the parasite was disrupted through insecticide application in 2004. Most extant human infections in our study community arose over a brief period of time immediately prior to vector control. According to our findings, the symptoms of chronic Chagas disease are expected to be absent, even if the strain is pathogenic in the chronic phase of disease, given the long asymptomatic period of the disease and short history of intense transmission. Traducción al español disponible en Alternative Language Text S1/A Spanish translation of this article is available in Alternative Language Text S1 PMID:21935346

  9. Retracing micro-epidemics of Chagas disease using epicenter regression.

    PubMed

    Levy, Michael Z; Small, Dylan S; Vilhena, Daril A; Bowman, Natalie M; Kawai, Vivian; Cornejo del Carpio, Juan G; Cordova-Benzaquen, Eleazar; Gilman, Robert H; Bern, Caryn; Plotkin, Joshua B

    2011-09-01

    Vector-borne transmission of Chagas disease has become an urban problem in the city of Arequipa, Peru, yet the debilitating symptoms that can occur in the chronic stage of the disease are rarely seen in hospitals in the city. The lack of obvious clinical disease in Arequipa has led to speculation that the local strain of the etiologic agent, Trypanosoma cruzi, has low chronic pathogenicity. The long asymptomatic period of Chagas disease leads us to an alternative hypothesis for the absence of clinical cases in Arequipa: transmission in the city may be so recent that most infected individuals have yet to progress to late stage disease. Here we describe a new method, epicenter regression, that allows us to infer the spatial and temporal history of disease transmission from a snapshot of a population's infection status. We show that in a community of Arequipa, transmission of T. cruzi by the insect vector Triatoma infestans occurred as a series of focal micro-epidemics, the oldest of which began only around 20 years ago. These micro-epidemics infected nearly 5% of the community before transmission of the parasite was disrupted through insecticide application in 2004. Most extant human infections in our study community arose over a brief period of time immediately prior to vector control. According to our findings, the symptoms of chronic Chagas disease are expected to be absent, even if the strain is pathogenic in the chronic phase of disease, given the long asymptomatic period of the disease and short history of intense transmission. Traducción al español disponible en Alternative Language Text S1/A Spanish translation of this article is available in Alternative Language Text S1.

  10. Diagnosis of Chagas' cardiomyopathy. Non-invasive techniques.

    PubMed Central

    Puigbó, J. J.; Valecillos, R.; Hirschhaut, E.; Giordano, H.; Boccalandro, I.; Suárez, C.; Aparicio, J. M.

    1977-01-01

    The natural history of Chagas' disease and its manifestations when the heart is involved are detailed clinically and pathologically. Three phases are recognized: the acute phase, lasting from 1-3 months, the latent phase, which may last from 10-20 years, and the chronic phase, which has the most serious manifestations. This phase is subdivided into three clinical stages. An analysis of the varied cardiac manifestations on 235 patients is included. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:412174

  11. Chagas' achalasia treated by a jejunal interposed segment.

    PubMed

    Dantas, A N; Carvalho, J L; Coelho, F K; Teixeira, A M; Lyra, L G; Rebouças, G; Didier, F V

    1975-01-01

    Resection of the achalasic area and replacement by a segment of jejunal loop, associated with vagotomy and pyloroplasty, has been performed in 21 patients. The majority of these patients had Chagas' disease, with a dilated esophagus wider than 7 cm. This surgical procedure offered symptomatic relief in 20 of our 21 cases. One patient died, but the death was not necessarily related to the operation. Although disphagia and regurgitation did not disappear entirely in all cases the decrease in severity of these symptoms was such to allow the few symptomatic patients to lead an entirely normal life after the operation.

  12. Tropical diseases encountered in Canada: 1. Chagas' disease.

    PubMed Central

    Schipper, H.; McClarty, B. M.; McRuer, K. E.; Nash, R. A.; Penney, C. J.

    1980-01-01

    Chagas' disease, or South American trypanosomiasis, is an endemic South American disease now being seen in Canada in both acute and chronic forms. It is characterized by an initial parasitemia that elicits a brisk immune response. Evidence is mounting that the debilitating chronic form, which is characterized by cardiac and visceral organ failure, results from antigenic cross-reactivity between the parasite and the human host, which generates an aberrant, destructive, cell-mediated immune response. Diagnosis, treatment and potential areas for investigation are discussed. PMID:6767543

  13. Mortality Related to Chagas Disease and HIV/AIDS Coinfection in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Martins-Melo, Francisco Rogerlândio; Ramos, Alberto Novaes; Alencar, Carlos Henrique; Heukelbach, Jorg

    2012-01-01

    Chagas disease in patients with HIV infection represents a potentially serious event with high case fatality rates. This study describes epidemiological and clinical aspects of deaths related to Chagas disease and HIV/AIDS coinfection in Brazil, 1999–2007. We performed a descriptive study based on mortality data from the nationwide Mortality Information System. Of a total of about 9 million deaths, Chagas disease and HIV/AIDS were mentioned in the same death certificate in 74 cases. AIDS was an underlying cause in 77.0% (57) and Chagas disease in 17.6% (13). Males (51.4%), white skin color (50%), age group 40–49 years (29.7%), and residents in the Southeast region (75.7%) were most common. Mean age at death was significantly lower in the coinfected (47.1 years [SD ± 14.6]), as compared to Chagas disease deaths (64.1 years [SD ± 14.7], P < 0.001). Considering the lack of data on morbidity related to Chagas disease and AIDS coinfection, the use of mortality data may be an appropriate sentinel approach to monitor the occurrence of this association. Due to the epidemiological transition in Brazil, chronic Chagas disease and HIV/AIDS coinfection will be further complicated and require the development of evidence-based preventive control measures. PMID:22969814

  14. Risks of endemicity, morbidity and perspectives regarding the control of Chagas disease in the Amazon Region.

    PubMed

    Coura, José Rodrigues; Junqueira, Angela Cv

    2012-03-01

    Chagas disease, in the Amazon Region as elsewhere, can be considered an enzootic disease of wild animals or an anthropozoonosis, an accidental disease of humans that is acquired when humans penetrate a wild ecosystem or when wild triatomines invade human dwellings attracted by light or searching for human blood. The risk of endemic Chagas disease in the Amazon Region is associated with the following phenomena: (i) extensive deforestation associated with the displacement of wild mammals, which are the normal sources of blood for triatomines, (ii) adaptation of wild triatomines to human dwellings due to the need for a new source of blood for feeding and (iii) uncontrolled migration of human populations and domestic animals that are already infected with Trypanosoma cruzi from areas endemic for Chagas disease to the Amazon Region. Several outbreaks of severe acute cases of Chagas disease, as well as chronic cases, have been described in the Amazon Region. Control measures targeted to avoiding endemic Chagas disease in the Amazon Region should be the following: improving health education in communities, training public health officials and communities for vector and Chagas disease surveillance and training local physicians to recognise and treat acute and chronic cases of Chagas diseases as soon as possible.

  15. Chagas disease awareness among Latin American immigrants living in Los Angeles, California.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Daniel R; Traina, Mahmoud I; Hernandez, Salvador; Smer, Aiman M; Khamag, Haneen; Meymandi, Sheba K

    2014-11-01

    Approximately 300,000 persons have Chagas disease in the United States, although almost all persons acquired the disease in Latin America. We examined awareness of Chagas disease among Latin American immigrants living in Los Angeles, California. We surveyed 2,677 persons (age range = 18-60 years) in Los Angeles who resided in Latin America for at least six months. A total of 62% of the participants recalled seeing triatomines in Latin America, and 27% of the participants reported triatomine bites at least once per year while living abroad. A total of 86% of the participants had never heard of Chagas disease. Of persons who had heard of Chagas disease, 81% believed that it was not serious. More than 95% of those who had heard of Chagas disease would want to be tested and treated. Most Latin American immigrants living in Los Angeles recalled exposure to vectors of Chagas disease. However, they have little knowledge of this disease. Increasing awareness of Chagas disease is needed in this high-risk population.

  16. When a misperception favors a tragedy: Carlos Chagas and the Nobel Prize of 1921.

    PubMed

    Bestetti, Reinaldo B; Couto, Lucélio B; Cardinalli-Neto, Augusto

    2013-11-20

    Carlos Chagas, the discoverer of Chagas' disease was nominated to the Nobel Prize in 1921, but none did win the prize in that year. As a leader of a young scientist team, he discovered all aspects of the new disease from 1909 to 1920. It is still obscure why he did not win the Nobel Prize in 1921. Chagas was discarded by Gunnar Hedrèn on April 16, 1921. Hedrèn should have made a written report about the details of his evaluation to the Nobel Committee. However, such a document has not been found in the Nobel Committee Archives. No evidence of detractions made by Brazilian scientists on Chagas was found. Since Chagas nomination was consistent with the Nobel Committee requirements, as seen in the presentation letter by until now unknown Cypriano de Freitas, it become clear that Chagas did not win the Nobel Prize exclusively because the Nobel Committee did not perceive the importance of his discovery. Thus, it would be fair a posthumous Nobel Prize of 1921 to Carlos Chagas. A diploma of the Nobel Prize, as precedent with Dogmack in 1947, would recognize the merit of the scientist who made the most complete medical discovery of all times.

  17. SEROPREVALENCE OF T. cruzi INFECTION IN BLOOD DONORS AND CHAGAS CARDIOMYOPATHY IN PATIENTS FROM THE COAL MINING REGION OF COAHUILA, MEXICO

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Tovar, José Gerardo; Rebollar-Téllez, Eduardo A.; Salas, Ildefonso Fernández

    2014-01-01

    Context and Objective: Chagas disease is considered a worldwide emerging disease; it is endemic in Mexico and the state of Coahuila and is considered of little relevance. The objective of this study was to determine the seroprevalence of T. cruzi infection in blood donors and Chagas cardiomyopathy in patients from the coal mining region of Coahuila, Mexico. Design and Setting: Epidemiological, exploratory and prospective study in a general hospital during the period January to June 2011. Methods: We performed laboratory tests ELISA and indirect hemagglutination in three groups of individuals: 1) asymptomatic voluntary blood donors, 2) patients hospitalized in the cardiology department and 3) patients with dilated cardiomyopathy. Results: There were three levels of seroprevalence: 0.31% in asymptomatic individuals, 1.25% in cardiac patients and in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy in 21.14%. Conclusions: In spite of having detected autochthonous cases of Chagas disease, its importance to local public health remains to be established as well as the details of the dynamics of transmission so that the study is still in progress. PMID:24626421

  18. Right ventricular endomyocardial biopsy in chronic Chagas' disease.

    PubMed

    Pereira Barretto, A C; Mady, C; Arteaga-Fernandez, E; Stolf, N; Lopes, E A; Higuchi, M L; Bellotti, G; Pileggi, F

    1986-02-01

    Right ventricular endomyocardial biopsy was used to study myocardial involvement in 42 patients with chronic Chagas' disease. Patients were divided into three groups: group A included 16 patients with normal ECGs, normal chest x-rays, and no symptoms; group B included 15 patients with abnormal ECGs and no cardiomegaly; and group C included 11 patients with abnormal ECGs and cardiomegaly. Biopsy fragments were analyzed for hypertrophy, degeneration of myocardial fibers, and interstitial changes such as edema, fibrosis, and inflammatory infiltrate. In group A, 5 of 16 biopsies exhibited none of the previously mentioned alterations. The frequencies pathologic alterations in groups A, B, and C, respectively, were: hypertrophy 31%, 66%, and 100%; degeneration 50%, 86%, and 81%; edema 43%, 46%, and 36%; fibrosis 12%, 33%, and 54%; and inflammatory infiltrate 37%, 66%, and 65%. These data suggest that myocardial lesions of Chagas' disease represent a continuous progression from fiber destruction to substitution by fibrosis, with compensatory hypertrophy; these data also suggest that cardiac dilatation occurs when the extent of fibrosis no longer allows for efficient compensatory hypertrophy.

  19. Research priorities for Chagas disease, human African trypanosomiasis and leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    2012-01-01

    This report provides a review and analysis of the research landscape for three diseases - Chagas disease, human African trypanosomiasis and leishmaniasis - that disproportionately afflict poor and remote populations with limited access to health services. It represents the work of the disease reference group on Chagas Disease, Human African Trypanosomiasis and Leishmaniasis (DRG3) which was established to identify key research priorities through review of research evidence and input from stakeholders' consultations. The diseases, which are caused by related protozoan parasites, are described in terms of their epidemiology and diseases burden, clinical forms and pathogenesis, HIV coinfection, diagnosis, drugs and drug resistance, vaccines, vector control, and health-care interventions. Priority areas for research are identified based on criteria such as public health relevance, benefit and impact on poor populations and equity, and feasibility. The priorities are found in the areas of diagnostics, drugs, vector control, asymptomatic infection, economic analysis of treatment and vector control methods, and in some specific issues such as surveillance methods or transmission-blocking vaccines for particular diseases. This report will be useful to researchers, policy and decision-makers, funding bodies, implementation organizations, and civil society. This is one of ten disease and thematic reference group reports that have come out of the TDR Think Tank, all of which have contributed to the development of the Global Report for Research on Infectious Diseases of Poverty, available at: www.who.int/tdr/stewardship/global_report/en/index.html.

  20. Squalene Synthase As a Target for Chagas Disease Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Hsiu-Chien; Li, Jikun; Zheng, Yingying; Huang, Chun-Hsiang; Ren, Feifei; Chen, Chun-Chi; Zhu, Zhen; Galizzi, Melina; Li, Zhu-Hong; Rodrigues-Poveda, Carlos A.; Gonzalez-Pacanowska, Dolores; Veiga-Santos, Phercyles; de Carvalho, Tecia Maria Ulisses; de Souza, Wanderley; Urbina, Julio A.; Wang, Andrew H.-J.; Docampo, Roberto; Li, Kai; Liu, Yi-Liang; Oldfield, Eric; Guo, Rey-Ting

    2014-01-01

    Trypanosomatid parasites are the causative agents of many neglected tropical diseases and there is currently considerable interest in targeting endogenous sterol biosynthesis in these organisms as a route to the development of novel anti-infective drugs. Here, we report the first x-ray crystallographic structures of the enzyme squalene synthase (SQS) from a trypanosomatid parasite, Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease. We obtained five structures of T. cruzi SQS and eight structures of human SQS with four classes of inhibitors: the substrate-analog S-thiolo-farnesyl diphosphate, the quinuclidines E5700 and ER119884, several lipophilic bisphosphonates, and the thiocyanate WC-9, with the structures of the two very potent quinuclidines suggesting strategies for selective inhibitor development. We also show that the lipophilic bisphosphonates have low nM activity against T. cruzi and inhibit endogenous sterol biosynthesis and that E5700 acts synergistically with the azole drug, posaconazole. The determination of the structures of trypanosomatid and human SQS enzymes with a diverse set of inhibitors active in cells provides insights into SQS inhibition, of interest in the context of the development of drugs against Chagas disease. PMID:24789335

  1. Advances in Chagas disease drug development: 2009-2010

    PubMed Central

    Buckner, Frederick S.; Navabi, Nazlee

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of Review The need for better drugs to treat patients with Chagas disease remains urgent. This review summarizes the advancements in drug development over the past two years. Recent Findings Drug development efforts are almost exclusively occurring as preclinical research. The exceptions being Phase I safety studies for the cruzain inhibitor, K-777, and potential Phase II studies for the antifungal drug, posaconazole, and a prodrug of ravuconazole. Several recent laboratory investigations demonstrate anti-T. cruzi activity of novel small molecules in animal models. These include nonpeptidic cruzain inhibitors, novel inhibitors of the sterol 14α-demethylase enzyme, new compounds (arylimidamides) related to pentamidine, derivatives of nifurtimox, compounds using ruthenium complexes, and several natural products. The recent implementation of a high-throughput screen of >300,000 compounds against intracellular T. cruzi amastigotes done at the Broad Institute is an important development, yielding ~300 selective inhibitors, many of which may serve as leads for medicinal chemistry efforts. Summary Progress is slow, but recent advancements in both drug development and advocacy for research on neglected diseases are encouraging. Efforts to define a target product profile and to harmonize methodologies for testing drugs for Chagas disease are described herein. PMID:20885320

  2. Clinical and nutritional profile of individuals with Chagas disease.

    PubMed

    Geraix, Juliana; Ardisson, Lidiane Paula; Marcondes-Machado, Jussara; Pereira, Paulo Câmara Marques

    2007-08-01

    Chagas disease (CD), caused by the protozoan Trypanossoma cruzi, affects approximately 18 million individuals in the Americas, 5 million of which live in Brazil. Most chronic sufferers have either the indeterminate form of the disease, without organic compromise, or the cardiac or digestive forms. Despite the importance of this disease, there is no information on the effect of nutrition on CD evolution. We evaluated the clinical-nutritional profile of individuals with CD treated at the Tropical Diseases Nutrition Out-Patient Clinic of the Botucatu School of Medicine, UNESP. A retrospective cohort study was performed between 2002 and 2006, on 66 patients with serum and parasitological diagnosis of CD. Epidemiological, clinical, nutritional, and biochemical data were collected, including gender, age, skin color, smoking, alcoholism, physical activity, weight, stature, body mass index, abdominal circumference, glycemia, and lipid profile. Fifty-three percent were male and 47% female; 96% were white skinned. Mean age was 49.6 +/- 6.36 years. The predominant form was indeterminate in 71%; smoking and drinking were recorded in 23% and 17%, respectively. Sedentariness predominated in 83%, and 55% presented increased abdominal circumference. Most, 94%, were overweight or obese. The biochemical exams revealed hyperglycemia in 12% and dyslipidemia in 74%. These findings suggest that the Chagas population presents co-morbidities and risk factors for developing chronic non-transmissible diseases, including cardiovascular diseases, making CD evolution even worse.

  3. High Interleukin 17 Expression Is Correlated With Better Cardiac Function in Human Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Magalhães, Luisa M. D.; Villani, Fernanda N. A.; Nunes, Maria do Carmo P.; Gollob, Kenneth J.; Rocha, Manoel O. C.; Dutra, Walderez O.

    2013-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate whether the expression of interleukin 17 (IL-17) is associated with the indeterminate or cardiac clinical forms of Chagas disease and whether IL-17 expression can be correlated with patients' cardiac function. Our results demonstrated that cardiac Chagas patients have a lower intensity of expression of IL-17 by total lymphocytes and lower frequency of circulating T helper 17 cells. Correlative analysis showed that high IL-17 expression was associated with better cardiac function, as determined by left ventricular ejection fraction and left ventricular diastolic diameter values. Therefore, IL-17 expression can be a protective factor to prevent myocardial damage in human Chagas disease. PMID:23204182

  4. [Human American trypanosomiasis 90 years after its discovery by Carlos Chagas. II--Clinical aspects, physiopathology, diagnosis and treatment].

    PubMed

    Pays, J F

    1999-01-01

    Cardiac, neurologic, and gastrointestinal manifestations of Chagas Disease have been well documented, but underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms, especially of chronic myocarditis, remain unclear. In the last decades, vectorial and transfusional transmission has been diminished. However congenital forms, which were long unknown and are still poorly understood, and reactive forms, which occur in patients with acquired or induced immunodeficiency, have confounded conventional wisdom concerning the evolution of this disease. Several new diagnostic tools have been developed without replacing the traditional methods, e.g. the xenodiagnostic technique proposed by Brumpt. With regard to indirect diagnosis, further progress is needed to improve specificity and sensitivity as well as the discriminating ability of the numerous techniques now available. Recently several double-blind randomized trials showed that benznidazole may be useful for early stage disease in children under 12 years of age. Further study with long-term follow-up will be necessary to determine the value of generalizing treatment to all patients with Chagas disease regardless of age and disease stage. However the ideal trypanocidal agent has yet to be found. Although attempts to immunize animals have not been complete failures, current results are not adequate to hold forth hope of a vaccine for use in man within the foreseeable future.

  5. Gene-deleted live-attenuated Trypanosoma cruzi parasites as vaccines to protect against Chagas disease.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Valdéz, Fernando J; Pérez Brandán, Cecilia; Ferreira, Arturo; Basombrío, Miguel Ángel

    2015-05-01

    Chagas disease is a neglected tropical disease caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. This illness is now becoming global, mainly due to congenital transmission, and so far, there are no prophylactic or therapeutic vaccines available to either prevent or treat Chagas disease. Therefore, different approaches aimed at identifying new protective immunogens are urgently needed. Live vaccines are likely to be more efficient in inducing protection, but safety issues linked with their use have been raised. The development of improved protozoan genetic manipulation tools and genomic and biological information has helped to increase the safety of live vaccines. These advances have generated a renewed interest in the use of genetically attenuated parasites as vaccines against Chagas disease. This review discusses the protective capacity of genetically attenuated parasite vaccines and the challenges and perspectives for the development of an effective whole-parasite Chagas disease vaccine.

  6. IL18 Gene Variants Influence the Susceptibility to Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Leon Rodriguez, Daniel A; Carmona, F. David; Echeverría, Luis Eduardo; González, Clara Isabel; Martin, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Chagas disease is a parasitic disorder caused by the infection with the flagellated protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. According to the World Health Organization, more than six million people are currently infected in endemic regions. Genetic factors have been proposed to influence predisposition to infection and development of severe clinical phenotypes like chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy (CCC). Interleukin 18 (IL18) encodes a proinflammatory cytokine that has been proposed to be involved in controlling T. cruzi infection. In this study, we analyzed the possible role of six IL18 gene variants (rs5744258, rs360722, rs2043055, rs187238, rs1946518 and rs360719), which cover most of the variation within the locus, in the susceptibility to infection by T. cruzi and/or CCC. In total, 1,171 individuals from a Colombian region endemic for Chagas disease, classified as seronegative (n = 595), seropositive asymptomatic (n = 175) and CCC (n = 401), were genotyped using TaqMan probes. Significant associations with T. cruzi infection were observed when comparing seronegative and seropositive individuals for rs187238 (P = 2.18E-03, OR = 0.77), rs360719 (P = 1.49E-03, OR = 0.76), rs2043055 (P = 2.52E-03, OR = 1.29), and rs1946518 (P = 0.0162, OR = 1.22). However, dependence analyses suggested that the association was mainly driven by the polymorphism rs360719. This variant is located within the promoter region of the IL18 gene, and it has been described that it creates a binding site for the transcription factor OCT-1 affecting IL-18 expression levels. In addition, no evidence of association was observed between any of the analyzed IL18 gene polymorphisms and the development of CCC. In summary, our data suggest that genetic variation within the promoter region of IL18 is directly involved in the susceptibility to infection by T. cruzi, which provides novel insight into disease pathophysiology and adds new perspectives to achieve a more effective disease control. PMID:27027876

  7. On palms, bugs, and Chagas disease in the Americas.

    PubMed

    Abad-Franch, Fernando; Lima, Marli M; Sarquis, Otília; Gurgel-Gonçalves, Rodrigo; Sánchez-Martín, María; Calzada, José; Saldaña, Azael; Monteiro, Fernando A; Palomeque, Francisco S; Santos, Walter S; Angulo, Victor M; Esteban, Lyda; Dias, Fernando B S; Diotaiuti, Liléia; Bar, María Esther; Gottdenker, Nicole L

    2015-11-01

    Palms are ubiquitous across Neotropical landscapes, from pristine forests or savannahs to large cities. Although palms provide useful ecosystem services, they also offer suitable habitat for triatomines and for Trypanosoma cruzi mammalian hosts. Wild triatomines often invade houses by flying from nearby palms, potentially leading to new cases of human Chagas disease. Understanding and predicting triatomine-palm associations and palm infestation probabilities is important for enhancing Chagas disease prevention in areas where palm-associated vectors transmit T. cruzi. We present a comprehensive overview of palm infestation by triatomines in the Americas, combining a thorough reanalysis of our published and unpublished records with an in-depth review of the literature. We use site-occupancy modeling (SOM) to examine infestation in 3590 palms sampled with non-destructive methods, and standard statistics to describe and compare infestation in 2940 palms sampled by felling-and-dissection. Thirty-eight palm species (18 genera) have been reported to be infested by ∼39 triatomine species (10 genera) from the USA to Argentina. Overall infestation varied from 49.1-55.3% (SOM) to 62.6-66.1% (dissection), with important heterogeneities among sub-regions and particularly among palm species. Large palms with complex crowns (e.g., Attalea butyracea, Acrocomia aculeata) and some medium-crowned palms (e.g., Copernicia, Butia) are often infested; in slender, small-crowned palms (e.g., Euterpe) triatomines associate with vertebrate nests. Palm infestation tends to be higher in rural settings, but urban palms can also be infested. Most Rhodnius species are probably true palm specialists, whereas Psammolestes, Eratyrus, Cavernicola, Panstrongylus, Triatoma, Alberprosenia, and some Bolboderini seem to use palms opportunistically. Palms provide extensive habitat for enzootic T. cruzi cycles and a critical link between wild cycles and transmission to humans. Unless effective means to

  8. Acute Chagas' cardiopathy in a polar bear (Ursus maritimus) in Guadalajara, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Jaime-Andrade, J; Avila-Figueroa, D; Lozano-Kasten, F J; Hernández-Gutiérrez, R J; Magallón-Gastélum, E; Kasten-Monges, M J; Lopes, E R

    1997-01-01

    We report a 24-year-old female polar bear (Ursus maritimus) who contracted Chagas' infection at the Guadalajara Zoo, in Jalisco, México, and died of acute Chagas' carditis 15 days later. The histopathological findings are described, as well as the presence of triatomids (Triatoma longipennis Usinger) infected with Trypanosoma cruzi collected within 5 meters from the place where the animal lived in the city of Guadalajara.

  9. [Current status of knowledge on Chagas' disease in the Mexican Republic].

    PubMed

    Tay, J; Schenone, H; Sánchez, J T; Robert, L

    1992-01-01

    A thorough review of the medical literature is made regarding Chagas' disease in Mexico and elsewhere since 1939, when Trypanosoma cruzi was first reported in this country, until 1991. The location where human cases, non human reservoirs and vectors have been found and are pointed out by means of tables and charts. Comments are made regarding the results reported. The importance of increasing the studies of Chagas' disease in Mexican Republic is stressed.

  10. Serological Diagnosis of Chronic Chagas Disease: Is It Time for a Change?

    PubMed Central

    Abras, Alba; Gállego, Montserrat; Llovet, Teresa; Tebar, Silvia; Herrero, Mercedes; Berenguer, Pere; Ballart, Cristina; Martí, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Chagas disease has spread to areas that are nonendemic for the disease with human migration. Since no single reference standard test is available, serological diagnosis of chronic Chagas disease requires at least two tests. New-generation techniques have significantly improved the accuracy of Chagas disease diagnosis by the use of a large mixture of recombinant antigens with different detection systems, such as chemiluminescence. The aim of the present study was to assess the overall accuracy of a new-generation kit, the Architect Chagas (cutoff, ≥1 sample relative light units/cutoff value [S/CO]), as a single technique for the diagnosis of chronic Chagas disease. The Architect Chagas showed a sensitivity of 100% (95% confidence interval [CI], 99.5 to 100%) and a specificity of 97.6% (95% CI, 95.2 to 99.9%). Five out of six false-positive serum samples were a consequence of cross-reactivity with Leishmania spp., and all of them achieved results of <5 S/CO. We propose the Architect Chagas as a single technique for screening in blood banks and for routine diagnosis in clinical laboratories. Only gray-zone and positive sera with a result of ≤6 S/CO would need to be confirmed by a second serological assay, thus avoiding false-positive sera and the problem of cross-reactivity with Leishmania species. The application of this proposal would result in important savings in the cost of Chagas disease diagnosis and therefore in the management and control of the disease. PMID:27053668

  11. Historical Perspectives on the Epidemiology of Human Chagas Disease in Texas and Recommendations for Enhanced Understanding of Clinical Chagas Disease in the Southern United States.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Melissa N; Woc-Colburn, Laila; Aguilar, David; Hotez, Peter J; Murray, Kristy O

    2015-11-01

    Chagas disease (Trypanosoma cruzi infection) has recently been identified as an important neglected tropical disease in the United States. Anecdotally referred to as a "silent killer," it leads to the development of potentially fatal cardiac disease in approximately 30% of those infected. In an attempt to better understand the potential of Chagas disease as a significant underlying cause of morbidity in Texas, we performed a historical literature review to assess disease burden. Human reports of triatomine bites and disease exposure were found to be prevalent in Texas. Despite current beliefs that Chagas disease is a recently emerging disease, we report historical references dating as far back as 1935. Both imported cases and autochthonous transmission contribute to the historical disease burden in Texas. We end by discussing the current knowledge gaps, and recommend priorities for advancing further epidemiologic studies and their policy implications.

  12. Molecular mechanisms of cardiac electromechanical remodeling during Chagas disease: Role of TNF and TGF-β.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Jader Santos; Machado, Fabiana Simão; Ropert, Catherine; Roman-Campos, Danilo

    2017-02-01

    Chagas disease is caused by the trypanosomatid Trypanosoma cruzi, which chronically causes heart problems in up to 30% of infected patients. Chagas disease was initially restricted to Latin America. However, due to migratory events, this disease may become a serious worldwide health problem. During Chagas disease, many patients die of cardiac arrhythmia despite the apparent benefits of anti-arrhythmic therapy (e.g., amiodarone). Here, we assimilate the cardiac form of Chagas disease to an inflammatory cardiac disease. Evidence from the literature, mostly provided using experimental models, supports this view and argues in favor of new strategies for treating cardiac arrhythmias in Chagas disease by modulating cytokine production and/or action. But the complex nature of myocardial inflammation underlies the need to better understand the molecular mechanisms of the inflammatory response during Chagas disease. Here, particular attention has been paid to tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF) and transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) although other cytokines may be involved in the chagasic cardiomyopathy.

  13. Urban Chagas disease in children and women in primary care centres in Buenos Aires, Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Moscatelli, Guillermo; Berenstein, Ada; Tarlovsky, Ana; Siniawski, Susana; Biancardi, Miguel; Ballering, Griselda; Moroni, Samanta; Schwarcz, Marta; Hernández, Susana; García-Bournissen, Facundo; Cozzi, Andrés Espejo; Freilij, Héctor; Altcheh, Jaime

    2015-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to estimate the prevalence of this disease in women of childbearing age and children treated at health centres in underserviced areas of the city of Buenos Aires. Demographic and Chagas disease status data were collected. Samples for Chagas disease serology were obtained on filter paper and the reactive results were confirmed with conventional samples. A total of 1,786 subjects were screened and 73 positive screening results were obtained: 17 were from children and 56 were from women. The Trypanosoma cruzi infection risk was greater in those individuals who had relatives with Chagas disease, who remember seeing kissing bugs, who were of Bolivian nationality or were born in the Argentine province of Santiago del Estero. The overall prevalence of Chagas disease was 4.08%. Due to migration, Chagas disease is currently predominantly urban. The observed prevalence requires health programme activities that are aimed at urban children and their mothers. Most children were infected congenitally, which reinforces the need for Chagas disease screening of all pregnant women and their babies in Argentina. The active search for new cases is important because the appropriate treatment in children has a high cure rate. PMID:26222020

  14. Chagas disease and transfusion medicine: a perspective from non-endemic countries

    PubMed Central

    Angheben, Andrea; Boix, Lucia; Buonfrate, Dora; Gobbi, Federico; Bisoffi, Zeno; Pupella, Simonetta; Gandini, Giorgio; Aprili, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    In the last decades, increasing international migration and travel from Latin America to Europe have favoured the emergence of tropical diseases outside their “historical” boundaries. Chagas disease, a zoonosis endemic in rural areas of Central and South America represents a clear example of this phenomenon. In the absence of the vector, one of the potential modes of transmission of Chagas disease in non-endemic regions is through blood and blood products. As most patients with Chagas disease are asymptomatic and unaware of their condition, in case of blood donation they can inadvertently represent a serious threat to the safety of the blood supply in non-endemic areas. Since the first cases of transfusion-transmitted Chagas disease were described in the last years, non-endemic countries began to develop ad hoc strategies to prevent and control the spread of the infection. United States, Spain, United Kingdom and France first recognised the need for Trypanosoma cruzi screening in at-risk blood donors. In this review, we trace an up-to-date perspective on Chagas disease, describing its peculiar features, from epidemiological, pathological, clinical and diagnostic points of view. Moreover, we describe the possible transmission of Chagas disease through blood or blood products and the current strategies for its control, focusing on non-endemic areas. PMID:26513769

  15. Assessment of Rectocolonic Morphology and Function in Patients with Chagas Disease in Barcelona (Spain)

    PubMed Central

    Salvador, Fernando; Mego, Marianela; Sánchez-Montalvá, Adrián; Morís, María; Ramírez, Kathleen; Accarino, Ana; Malagelada, Juan-Ramon; Azpiroz, Fernando; Molina, Israel

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between colonic symptoms, radiological abnormalities, and anorectal dysfunction in patients with Chagas disease. We performed a cross-sectional study of untreated patients diagnosed with Chagas disease. All patients were evaluated clinically (by a questionnaire for colonic symptoms based on Rome III criteria) and underwent a barium enema and anorectal manometry. A control group of patients with functional constipation and without Chagas disease was included in the study. Overall, 69 patients were included in the study: 42 patients were asymptomatic and 27 patients had abdominal symptoms according to Rome III criteria. Anorectal manometry showed a higher proportion of abnormalities in symptomatic patients than in asymptomatic ones (73% versus 21%, respectively; P < 0.0001). Megarectum was detected in a similar proportion in the different subgroups regardless of the presence of symptoms or abnormalities in anorectal functions. Among non-Chagas disease patients with functional constipation, 90% had an abnormal anorectal manometry study. Patients with Chagas disease present a high proportion of constipation with dyssynergic defecation in anorectal manometry but a low prevalence of impaired rectoanal inhibitory reflex, although these abnormalities may be nonspecific for Chagas disease. The presence of megarectum is a nonspecific finding. PMID:25778503

  16. Putting Infection Dynamics at the Heart of Chagas Disease.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Michael D; Kelly, John M

    2016-11-01

    In chronic Trypanosoma cruzi infections, parasite burden is controlled by effective, but nonsterilising immune responses. Infected cells are difficult to detect because they are scarce and focally distributed in multiple sites. However, advances in detection technologies have established a link between parasite persistence and the pathogenesis of Chagas heart disease. Long-term persistence likely involves episodic reinvasion as well as continuous infection, to an extent that varies between tissues. The primary reservoir sites in humans are not definitively known, but analysis of murine models has identified the gastrointestinal tract. Here, we highlight that quantitative, spatial, and temporal aspects of T. cruzi infection are central to a fuller understanding of the association between persistence, pathogenesis, and immunity, and for optimising treatment.

  17. Chagas Disease: Increased Parasitemia during Pregnancy Detected by Hemoculture

    PubMed Central

    da Rocha Siriano, Liliane; Luquetti, Alejandro Ostermayer; Avelar, Juliana Boaventura; Marra, Neusa Leal; de Castro, Ana Maria

    2011-01-01

    One hundred fifty-two Trypanosoma cruzi seropositive women were submitted to a single hemoculture; 101 were pregnant, and 51 were not pregnant. Seven tubes from each individual were harvested with liver infusion tryptose (LIT) medium and observed monthly until the fifth month. Hemocultures were positive in 50% (76 of 152) of the women. Results showed that the positivity was 29.4% (15 of 51) among non-pregnant women and 60.4% (61 of 101) in pregnant women (P < 0.05). In relation to gestational age, there were significant differences in positivity, with a higher proportion of women with positive hemocultures (20 of 25) before 21 weeks and lower after 30 weeks (10 of 21; P = 0.02). We conclude that pregnancy enhances the parasitemia in Chagas disease, with a higher effect early in pregnancy. PMID:21460012

  18. [Science as a profession: an interview with Carlos Chagas Filho].

    PubMed

    Chagas Filho, Carlos

    2012-06-01

    The editing of this interview focuses on aspects of the extensive professional career of Carlos Chagas Filho, who was the founder of the Instituto de Biofísica of the Universidade do Brasil, currently the Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro. It highlights the scientific and political role he played in Brazilian science and on the international scene. His memoirs include his experience at the Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, where he began his scientific training; the efforts to create the Laboratório de Física Biológica, succeeded by the Instituto de Biofísica; his work on the Conselho Nacional de Pesquisas and the Academia Brasileira de Ciências; the part he played at the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization; his time as president of the Pontifical Academy of Sciences of the Vatican, which led him to ponder questions about the relationship between science and religion.

  19. The Evolutionary Origin of Diversity in Chagas Disease Vectors.

    PubMed

    Justi, Silvia A; Galvão, Cleber

    2017-01-01

    Chagas disease is amongst the ten most important neglected tropical diseases but knowledge on the diversification of its vectors, Triatominae (Hemiptera: Reduviidae), is very scarce. Most Triatominae species occur in the Americas, and are all considered potential vectors. Despite its amazing ecological vignette, there are remarkably few evolutionary studies of the whole subfamily, and only one genome sequence has been published. The young age of the subfamily, coupled with the high number of independent lineages, are intriguing, yet the lack of genome-wide data makes it a challenge to infer the phylogenetic relationships within Triatominae. Here we synthesize what is known, and suggest the next steps towards a better understanding of how this important group of disease vectors came to be.

  20. Agrochemicals against malaria, sleeping sickness, leishmaniasis and Chagas disease.

    PubMed

    Witschel, Matthias; Rottmann, Matthias; Kaiser, Marcel; Brun, Reto

    2012-01-01

    In tropical regions, protozoan parasites can cause severe diseases with malaria, leishmaniasis, sleeping sickness, and Chagas disease standing in the forefront. Many of the drugs currently being used to treat these diseases have been developed more than 50 years ago and can cause severe adverse effects. Above all, resistance to existing drugs is widespread and has become a serious problem threatening the success of control measures. In order to identify new antiprotozoal agents, more than 600 commercial agrochemicals have been tested on the pathogens causing the above mentioned diseases. For all of the pathogens, compounds were identified with similar or even higher activities than the currently used drugs in applied in vitro assays. Furthermore, in vivo activity was observed for the fungicide/oomyceticide azoxystrobin, and the insecticide hydramethylnon in the Plasmodium berghei mouse model, and for the oomyceticide zoxamide in the Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense STIB900 mouse model, respectively.

  1. Membranous nephropathy PLA2R+ associated with Chagas disease

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Vanessa dos Santos; Viero, Rosa Marlene

    2015-01-01

    Chagas disease (CD) — a tropical parasitic disease caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi — is a major health problem in Latin America. The immune response against the parasite is responsible for chronic CD lesions. Currently, there are no reports of an association between CD and membranous nephropathy (MN). The detection of the phospholipase A2 receptor (PLA2R) as a target antigen in idiopathic MN can improve the differential diagnosis of primary and secondary forms of MN. The authors report the case of a male patient with positive serology for CD who presented sudden death and underwent autopsy. Histological sections of the heart showed multifocal inflammatory infiltrate composed mainly of mononuclear cells, leading to myocardiocytes necrosis and interstitial fibrosis. The kidneys showed a MN with positive expression for PLA2R. As far as we know, this is the first report of a case of primary MN in a patient with CD, with severe chronic cardiomyopathy and heart failure. PMID:26558244

  2. Epicuticular lipids induce aggregation in Chagas disease vectors

    PubMed Central

    Figueiras, Alicia N Lorenzo; Girotti, Juan R; Mijailovsky, Sergio J; Juárez, M Patricia

    2009-01-01

    Background The triatomine bugs are vectors of the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease. Aggregation behavior plays an important role in their survival by facilitating the location of refuges and cohesion of aggregates, helping to keep them safely assembled into shelters during daylight time, when they are vulnerable to predators. There are evidences that aggregation is mediated by thigmotaxis, by volatile cues from their faeces, and by hexane-extractable contact chemoreceptive signals from their cuticle surface. The epicuticular lipids of Triatoma infestans include a complex mixture of hydrocarbons, free and esterified fatty acids, alcohols, and sterols. Results We analyzed the response of T. infestans fifth instar nymphs after exposure to different amounts either of total epicuticular lipid extracts or individual lipid fractions. Assays were performed in a circular arena, employing a binary choice test with filter papers acting as aggregation attractive sites; papers were either impregnated with a hexane-extract of the total lipids, or lipid fraction; or with the solvent. Insects were significantly aggregated around papers impregnated with the epicuticular lipid extracts. Among the lipid fractions separately tested, only the free fatty acid fraction promoted significant bug aggregation. We also investigated the response to different amounts of selected fatty acid components of this fraction; receptiveness varied with the fatty acid chain length. No response was elicited by hexadecanoic acid (C16:0), the major fatty acid component. Octadecanoic acid (C18:0) showed a significant assembling effect in the concentration range tested (0.1 to 2 insect equivalents). The very long chain hexacosanoic acid (C26:0) was significantly attractant at low doses (≤ 1 equivalent), although a repellent effect was observed at higher doses. Conclusion The detection of contact aggregation pheromones has practical application in Chagas disease

  3. [Scintigraphic study of gallbladder emptying in chronic Chagas' disease].

    PubMed

    Troncon, L E; Rezende Filho, J; Iazigi, N

    1987-01-01

    Previous studies on gallbladder motility in Chagas' disease, which is known to be associated with diffuse destruction of intramural neurons, have produced conflicting results. In the present study we reevaluated this question by submitting chronic chagasic patients (n = 18) and controls (n = 12) to a cholescintigraphic study of gallbladder emptying in response to a single intra-venous injection of 60 ng/kg cerulein 90 min after administration of 99mTC-HIDA. Five min. before and immediately before carulein injection, as well as every 5 min. up to 45 min. after the stimulus, images of the gallbladder were obtained with a gamma-camera coupled to a computer. The counts obtained for regions of interest corresponding to the gallbladder, permitted the calculation of the ejection fraction of the organ and the construction of individual gallbladder emptying curves. The ejection fractions values for the total sample of chagasic patients (median 67.8%; variation, 4.0 to 99.0%), although higher than those for the control group (median: 34.2% variation, 13.1 to 88.0%), were not statistically significant (p greater than 0.05). However, analysis of the individual curves for the chagasics permitted identifying 2 subgroups, one of which (n = 9) showed values very similar to those for the controls, whereas the other (n = 9) showed a very rapid and intense gallbladder emptying. It is concluded that impairment of the gallbladder innervation in Chagas' disease may lead to heterogeneous patterns of gallbladder emptying, with some patients being definitely hypersensitive to an exogenous cholecystokinetic agent.

  4. Under-Expression of Chemosensory Genes in Domiciliary Bugs of the Chagas Disease Vector Triatoma brasiliensis

    PubMed Central

    Marchant, Axelle; Mougel, Florence; Jacquin-Joly, Emmanuelle; Costa, Jane; Almeida, Carlos Eduardo; Harry, Myriam

    2016-01-01

    Background In Latin America, the bloodsucking bugs Triatominae are vectors of Trypanosoma cruzi, the parasite that causes Chagas disease. Chemical elimination programs have been launched to control Chagas disease vectors. However, the disease persists because native vectors from sylvatic habitats are able to (re)colonize houses—a process called domiciliation. Triatoma brasiliensis is one example. Because the chemosensory system allows insects to interact with their environment and plays a key role in insect adaption, we conducted a descriptive and comparative study of the chemosensory transcriptome of T. brasiliensis samples from different ecotopes. Methodology/Principal Finding In a reference transcriptome built using de novo assembly, we found transcripts encoding 27 odorant-binding proteins (OBPs), 17 chemosensory proteins (CSPs), 3 odorant receptors (ORs), 5 transient receptor potential channel (TRPs), 1 sensory neuron membrane protein (SNMPs), 25 takeout proteins, 72 cytochrome P450s, 5 gluthatione S-transferases, and 49 cuticular proteins. Using protein phylogenies, we showed that most of the OBPs and CSPs for T. brasiliensis had well supported orthologs in the kissing bug Rhodnius prolixus. We also showed a higher number of these genes within the bloodsucking bugs and more generally within all Hemipterans compared to the other species in the super-order Paraneoptera. Using both DESeq2 and EdgeR software, we performed differential expression analyses between samples of T. brasiliensis, taking into account their environment (sylvatic, peridomiciliary and domiciliary) and sex. We also searched clusters of co-expressed contigs using HTSCluster. Among differentially expressed (DE) contigs, most were under-expressed in the chemosensory organs of the domiciliary bugs compared to the other samples and in females compared to males. We clearly identified DE genes that play a role in the chemosensory system. Conclusion/Significance Chemosensory genes could be good

  5. A role for extracellular amastigotes in the immunopathology of Chagas disease.

    PubMed

    Scharfstein, J; Morrot, A

    1999-01-01

    In spite of the growing knowledge obtained about immune control of Trypanosoma cruzi infection, the mechanisms responsible for the variable clinico-pathological expression of Chagas disease remain unknown. In a twist from previous concepts, recent studies indicated that tissue parasitism is a pre-requisite for the development of chronic myocarditis. This fundamental concept, together with the realization that T. cruzi organisms consist of genetically heterogeneous clones, offers a new framework for studies of molecular pathogenesis. In the present article, we will discuss in general terms the possible implications of genetic variability of T. cruzi antigens and proteases to immunopathology. Peptide epitopes from a highly polymorphic subfamily of trans-sialidase (TS) antigens were recently identified as targets of killer T cell (CTL) responses, both in mice and humans. While some class I MHC restricted CTL recognize epitopes derived from amastigote-specific TS-related antigens (TSRA), others are targeted to peptide epitopes originating from trypomastigote-specific TSRA. A mechanistic hypothesis is proposed to explain how the functional activity and specificity of class I MHC restricted killer T cells may control the extent to which tissue are exposed to prematurely released amastigotes. Chronic immunopathology may be exacerbated due the progressive accumulation of amastigote-derived antigens and pro-inflammatory molecules (eg. GPI-mucins and kinin-releasing proteases) in dead macrophage bodies.

  6. "I Cannot Be Worried": Living with Chagas Disease in Tropical Bolivia

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Background Chagas disease (CD) profoundly affects the social and emotional dimensions of patients’ lives, and disproportionately impacts poor, marginalized populations in Latin America. Biomedical treatment for CD fails to reach up to 99% of the people affected, and in any case seldom addresses the emotional health or socioeconomic conditions of patients. This study examines patient strategies for coping with CD in the department of Santa Cruz, Bolivia. Methodology In this ethnographic study, semistructured interviews took place from March-June 2013 with 63 patients who had previously tested positive for CD. During the fieldwork period, participant observation was conducted and patient family members, providers, community members, and public health officials were consulted. Principal Findings Patients often experienced emotional distress when diagnosed with CD, yet were generally unable to find biomedical treatment. Respondents stressed the need to avoid powerful emotions which would worsen the impact of CD symptoms. To manage CD, patients embraced a calm state of mind, described in Spanish as tranquilidad, which partially empowered them to return to a normal existence. Conclusions In the perceived absence of biomedical treatment options, patients seek their own means of coping with CD diagnosis. Rather than fatalism or resignation, patients’ emphasis on maintaining calm and not worrying about CD represents a pragmatic strategy for restoring a sense of normalcy and control to their lives. Programs focused on treatment of CD should remain mindful of the emotional and social impact of the disease on patients. PMID:28099488

  7. A Critical Assessment of Officially Reported Chagas Disease Surveillance Data in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Shelly, Ellen M.; Acuna-Soto, Rodolfo; Ernst, Kacey C.; Sterling, Charles R.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Chagas disease, a disease caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, disproportionately affects poor people throughout Latin America. In Mexico, assessments of officially reported burden have not been previously reported. To evaluate discontinuity between surveillance data and data from other sources, we used data from the Mexican Ministry of Health to describe the distribution of reported Chagas disease over time in Mexico and compare it with estimates from the literature. Methods We summarized age and sex differences for Chagas cases and mortality for 1995–2013 and 1982–2010, respectively. We examined the spatial distribution of Chagas disease over time with respect to disease burden. We further compared officially reported figures with estimates from the literature. Results Among 6,494 officially reported cases, rates of Chagas disease were highest in adults aged 25–44 years (47.3%). Mortality was highest in adults aged ≥45 years (423/495, 85.5%). The data indicated increasing temporal trends for incidence and mortality. The greatest burden occurred in southern states, with increasing spatial distribution over time. Fewer than 900 cases and 40 deaths were officially reported annually, in contrast to estimates from the literature of approximately 69,000 new cases and 25,000 deaths annually. Conclusion While increasing trends in officially reported data have been observed, large discrepancies in case estimates compromise our understanding of Chagas disease epidemiology. Reported cases based on current practices are not enough to correctly assess the Chagas disease burden and spatial distribution in Mexico. Understanding the true epidemiology of this disease will lead to more focused and successful control and prevention strategies to decrease disease burden. PMID:26843671

  8. SQ109, a New Drug Lead for Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Veiga-Santos, Phercyles; Li, Kai; Lameira, Lilianne; de Carvalho, Tecia Maria Ulisses; Huang, Guozhong; Galizzi, Melina; Shang, Na; Li, Qian; Gonzalez-Pacanowska, Dolores; Hernandez-Rodriguez, Vanessa; Benaim, Gustavo; Guo, Rey-Ting; Urbina, Julio A.; Docampo, Roberto; de Souza, Wanderley

    2015-01-01

    We tested the antituberculosis drug SQ109, which is currently in advanced clinical trials for the treatment of drug-susceptible and drug-resistant tuberculosis, for its in vitro activity against the trypanosomatid parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease. SQ109 was found to be a potent inhibitor of the trypomastigote form of the parasite, with a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) for cell killing of 50 ± 8 nM, but it had little effect (50% effective concentration [EC50], ∼80 μM) in a red blood cell hemolysis assay. It also inhibited extracellular epimastigotes (IC50, 4.6 ± 1 μM) and the clinically relevant intracellular amastigotes (IC50, ∼0.5 to 1 μM), with a selectivity index of ∼10 to 20. SQ109 caused major ultrastructural changes in all three life cycle forms, as observed by light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). It rapidly collapsed the inner mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) in succinate-energized mitochondria, acting in the same manner as the uncoupler FCCP [carbonyl cyanide 4-(trifluoromethoxy)phenylhydrazone], and it caused the alkalinization of internal acidic compartments, effects that are likely to make major contributions to its mechanism of action. The compound also had activity against squalene synthase, binding to its active site; it inhibited sterol side-chain reduction and, in the amastigote assay, acted synergistically with the antifungal drug posaconazole, with a fractional inhibitory concentration index (FICI) of 0.48, but these effects are unlikely to account for the rapid effects seen on cell morphology and cell killing. SQ109 thus most likely acts, at least in part, by collapsing Δψ/ΔpH, one of the major mechanisms demonstrated previously for its action against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Overall, the results suggest that SQ109, which is currently in advanced clinical trials for the treatment of drug-susceptible and drug

  9. Population Pharmacokinetics of Benznidazole in Adult Patients with Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Aldasoro, E.; Guerrero, L.; Posada, E.; Serret, N.; Mejía, T.; Urbina, J. A.; Gascón, J.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to build a population pharmacokinetic (popPK) model to characterize benznidazole (BNZ) pharmacokinetics in adults with chronic Chagas disease. This study was a prospective, open-label, single-center clinical trial approved by the local ethics committee. Patients received BNZ at 2.5 mg/kg of body weight/12 h (Abarax, Elea Laboratory, Argentina) for 60 days. Plasma BNZ samples were taken several times during the study and analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography with UV-visible detection (HPLC-UV). The popPK analysis was done with NONMEMv.7.3. Demographic and biological data were tested as covariates. Intraindividual, interoccasion, and residual variabilities were modeled. Internal and external validations were completed to assess the robustness of the model. Later on, simulations were performed to generate BNZ concentration-time course profiles for different dosage regimens. A total of 358 plasma BNZ concentrations from 39 patients were included in the analysis. A one-compartment PK model characterized by clearance (CL/F) and the apparent volume of distribution (V/F), with first-order absorption (Ka) and elimination, adequately described the data (CL/F, 1.73 liters/h; V/F, 89.6 liters; and Ka, 1.15 h−1). No covariates were found to be significant for CL/F and V/F. Internal and external validations of the final model showed adequate results. Data from simulations revealed that a dose of 2.5 mg/kg/12 h might lead to overexposure in most patients. A lower dose (2.5 mg/kg/24 h) was able to achieve trough BNZ plasma concentrations within the accepted therapeutic range of 3 to 6 mg/liter. In summary, we developed a population PK model for BNZ in adults with chronic Chagas disease. Dosing simulations showed that a BNZ dose of 2.5 mg/kg/24 h will adequately keep BNZ trough plasma concentrations within the recommended target range for the majority of patients. (This study has been registered at EudraCT under number 2011

  10. Esophageal body motility in achalasia and Chagas' disease.

    PubMed

    Abrahão, L J; de Oliveira Lemme, E M

    2011-07-01

    Previous studies have correlated esophageal body motility findings in idiopathic (IdAc) achalasia and achalasia secondary to Chagas' disease (ChAc) with degree of megaesophagus. The aim of this study was to compare esophageal body manometric data in patients with IdAc and achalasia secondary to Chagas' disease and correlate it with the degree of megaesophagus and symptom duration. One hundred nontreated patients with achalasia, 79% IdAc and 21% secondary to ChAc were compared with regards to age of presentation, duration of symptoms, amplitude and duration of simultaneous contractions, frequency of failed contractions, and degree of megaesophagus. Seventy-one percent of patients were classified as nonadvanced megaesophagus (60 [76%] with IdAc and 11 [52%] with ChAc) and 29% as advanced megaesophagus (19 [24%] with IdAc and 10 [48%] with ChAc, P= 0.04). In IdAc but not in ChAc, the symptom duration was significantly longer in advanced megaesophagus (A) compared with nonadvanced megaesophagus (NA) (34.8 ± 6.3 months vs. 95.4 ± 22.2 months, P= 0.001). There was no difference in amplitude and duration of simultaneous contractions in both achalasia groups (P > 0.05). Duration of contractions were longer in IdAc compared with ChAc in (NA) (P < 0.05), but not in (A). In IdAc but not in ChAc the amplitude of simultaneous contractions decreased with increased esophageal dilatation (P < 0.05). In ChAc but not in IdAC, the duration of contractions increased with esophageal dilatation (P < 0.05). Failed contractions were more frequent in ChAc group (28.6%) than in IdAc (10% -P= 0.03). Patients with ChAc have a higher prevalence of advanced megaesophagus compared with IdAc at diagnosis. In IdAc there was a strong correlation between advanced megaesophagus and longer symptom duration, suggesting disease progression over time, not observed in ChAc in which a more extensive denervation occurs earlier in the disease process.

  11. Socio-Cultural Aspects of Chagas Disease: A Systematic Review of Qualitative Research

    PubMed Central

    Ventura-Garcia, Laia; Roura, Maria; Pell, Christopher; Posada, Elisabeth; Gascón, Joaquim; Aldasoro, Edelweis; Muñoz, Jose; Pool, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Background Globally, more than 10 million people are infected with Trypanosoma cruzi, which causes about 20 000 annual deaths. Although Chagas disease is endemic to certain regions of Latin America, migratory flows have enabled its expansion into areas where it was previously unknown. Economic, social and cultural factors play a significant role in its presence and perpetuation. This systematic review aims to provide a comprehensive overview of qualitative research on Chagas disease, both in endemic and non-endemic countries. Methodology/Principal Findings Searches were carried out in ten databases, and the bibliographies of retrieved studies were examined. Data from thirty-three identified studies were extracted, and findings were analyzed and synthesized along key themes. Themes identified for endemic countries included: socio-structural determinants of Chagas disease; health practices; biomedical conceptions of Chagas disease; patient's experience; and institutional strategies adopted. Concerning non-endemic countries, identified issues related to access to health services and health seeking. Conclusions The emergence and perpetuation of Chagas disease depends largely on socio-cultural aspects influencing health. As most interventions do not address the clinical, environmental, social and cultural aspects jointly, an explicitly multidimensional approach, incorporating the experiences of those affected is a potential tool for the development of long-term successful programs. Further research is needed to evaluate this approach. PMID:24069473

  12. [Study of the factors determining an unexpected occurrecne of Chagas cardiomyopathy in Sucre, Bolivia].

    PubMed

    De Muynck, A; Muñoz, R; Manirankunda, L; Pizzaro, J C; Gutierrez, J

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this case-control study carried out between February 1, 1994 and December 22, 1994 at the "Instituto de Gastroenterologia Boliviano-Japonés" in Sucre, Bolivia was to determine risk factors for chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy in adult patients with positive serological tests for Trypanosoma cruzi. A total of 196 subjects were included. Inclusion criteria were positive serological tests for Trypanosoma cruzi, residence in the city of Sucre, Bolivia for at least 3 months, and age over 14 years. There were 62 cases presenting electrocardiographic findings consistent with Chagas cardiomyopathy and 134 controls presenting normal electrocardiographic findings. Both cases and controls underwent a standardized protocol including physical examination and laboratory tests. Interviews were set up to evaluate personal and familial history of Chagas disease, socioeconomic status, and presence of Triatoma infestans in the home. Bivariate analysis of data indicated that Chagas cardiomyopathy was associated with the following risk factors: heart rate (p < 0.05), fecaloma (p < 0.05), occupation requiring strenuous physical exertion (p < 0.001), proximity with domestic animals (p < 0.005), especially pigs (p < 0.005), dwelling features including outbuildings, more than 2 bedrooms, and inside ceilings (p < 0.001). Multivariate analysis revealed the following risk factors: occupation requiring strenuous physical exertion (p < 0.005), a yard around the house (p < 0.05), and inside ceilings (p < 0.05). The results of this study show that prevention of chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy in Sucre, Bolivia will depend on improvement of living conditions.

  13. Four TDR diseases can be "eliminated". 3. Chagas success in Brazil and Colombia.

    PubMed

    1996-03-01

    Recent figures published by Brazil's Chagas disease control program indicate that the disease will soon be eradicated in Brazil. For example, in 1982, 711 Brazilian municipalities reported infestation with Triatoma infestans, the most important domiciliary vector of Chagas disease. However, in 1993, only 83 municipalities reported any infestation. Disease transmission through blood transfusion in the country has also been dramatically reduced. In 1982, 6.5% of blood donations in Brazil were infected with Trypanosoma cruzi, but by 1992 the level of infection had fallen to only 1%. 4.2% of infected individuals aged 7-14 years converted serologically in 1980, compared to only 0.15% in 1994, indicating a 95% decline in the incidence of newly infected cases in that age group. Furthermore, 84,000 infected triatomine insects were captured in households in endemic areas in 1983, far more than the 2500 collected throughout the entire country in 1993. The complete interruption of Chagas disease transmission in Brazil is expected in 1998. Work is also progressing with a control plan by countries in which the disease is transmitted by insects with an extradomiciliary life cycle. Colombia is the 15th of the 21 Chagas-endemic countries in Latin America where, due to blood bank screening, the transfusional transmission of Chagas disease has been interrupted.

  14. Controlled but not cured: Structural processes and explanatory models of Chagas disease in tropical Bolivia.

    PubMed

    Forsyth, Colin

    2015-11-01

    Dressler (2001:456) characterizes medical anthropology as divided between two poles: the constructivist, which focuses on the "meaning and significance that events have for people," and the structuralist, which emphasizes socioeconomic processes and relationships. This study synthesizes structuralist and constructivist perspectives by investigating how structural processes impact explanatory models of Chagas disease in a highly endemic area. The research took place from March-June 2013 through the Centro Medico Humberto Parra, a non-profit clinic servicing low income populations in Palacios, Bolivia and surrounding communities. Semistructured interviews (n = 68) and consensus analysis questionnaires (n = 48) were administered to people dealing with Chagas disease. In the interview narratives, respondents link Chagas disease with experiences of marginalization and rural poverty, and describe multilayered impediments to accessing treatment. They often view the disease as incurable, but this reflects inconsistent messages from the biomedical system. The consensus analysis results show strong agreement on knowledge of the vector, ethnomedical treatment, and structural factors related to Chagas disease. In interpreting Chagas disease, respondents account for the structural factors which place them at risk and impede access to care.

  15. Translational challenges of animal models in Chagas disease drug development: a review

    PubMed Central

    Chatelain, Eric; Konar, Nandini

    2015-01-01

    Chagas disease, or American trypanosomiasis, caused by Trypanosoma cruzi parasite infection is endemic in Latin America and presents an increasing clinical challenge due to migrating populations. Despite being first identified over a century ago, only two drugs are available for its treatment, and recent outcomes from the first clinical trials in 40 years were lackluster. There is a critical need to develop new drugs to treat Chagas disease. This requires a better understanding of the progression of parasite infection, and standardization of animal models designed for Chagas disease drug discovery. Such measures would improve comparison of generated data and the predictability of test hypotheses and models designed for translation to human disease. Existing animal models address both disease pathology and treatment efficacy. Available models have limited predictive value for the preclinical evaluation of novel therapies and need to more confidently predict the efficacy of new drug candidates in clinical trials. This review highlights the overall lack of standardized methodology and assessment tools, which has hampered the development of efficacious compounds to treat Chagas disease. We provide an overview of animal models for Chagas disease, and propose steps that could be undertaken to reduce variability and improve predictability of drug candidate efficacy. New technological developments and tools may contribute to a much needed boost in the drug discovery process. PMID:26316715

  16. Towards a Paradigm Shift in the Treatment of Chronic Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Alarcón de Noya, B.; Araujo-Jorge, T.; Grijalva, M. J.; Guhl, F.; López, M. C.; Ramsey, J. M.; Ribeiro, I.; Schijman, A. G.; Sosa-Estani, S.; Torrico, F.; Gascon, J.

    2014-01-01

    Treatment for Chagas disease with currently available medications is recommended universally only for acute cases (all ages) and for children up to 14 years old. The World Health Organization, however, also recommends specific antiparasite treatment for all chronic-phase Trypanosoma cruzi-infected individuals, even though in current medical practice this remains controversial, and most physicians only prescribe palliative treatment for adult Chagas patients with dilated cardiomyopathy. The present opinion, prepared by members of the NHEPACHA network (Nuevas Herramientas para el Diagnóstico y la Evaluación del Paciente con Enfermedad de Chagas/New Tools for the Diagnosis and Evaluation of Chagas Disease Patients), reviews the paradigm shift based on clinical and immunological evidence and argues in favor of antiparasitic treatment for all chronic patients. We review the tools needed to monitor therapeutic efficacy and the potential criteria for evaluation of treatment efficacy beyond parasitological cure. Etiological treatment should now be mandatory for all adult chronic Chagas disease patients. PMID:24247135

  17. Triatominae Biochemistry Goes to School: Evaluation of a Novel Tool for Teaching Basic Biochemical Concepts of Chagas Disease Vectors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunha, Leonardo Rodrigues; de Oliveria Cudischevitch, Cecília; Carneiro, Alan Brito; Macedo, Gustavo Bartholomeu; Lannes, Denise; da Silva-Neto, Mário Alberto Cardoso

    2014-01-01

    We evaluate a new approach to teaching the basic biochemistry mechanisms that regulate the biology of Triatominae, major vectors of "Trypanosoma cruzi," the causative agent of Chagas disease. We have designed and used a comic book, "Carlos Chagas: 100 years after a hero's discovery" containing scientific information obtained by…

  18. Chagas disease vector control in Tupiza, southern Bolivia.

    PubMed

    Guillen, G; Diaz, R; Jemio, A; Cassab, J A; Pinto, C T; Schofield, C J

    1997-01-01

    Heavy domestic and peridomestic infestations of Triatoma infestans were controlled in two villages in southern Bolivia by the application of deltamethrin SC25 (2.5% suspension concentrate) at a target dose of 25 mg a.i./m2. Actual applied dose was monitored by HPLC analysis of filter papers placed at various heights on the house walls, and was shown to range from 0 to 59.6 about a mean of 28.5 mg a.i./m2. Wall bioassays showed high mortality of T. infestans during the first month after the application of deltamethrin. Mortality declined to zero as summer temperatures increased, but reappeared with the onset of the following winter. In contrast, knockdown was apparent throughout the trial, showing no discernible temperature dependence. House infestation rates, measured by manual sampling and use of paper sheets to collect bug faeces, declined from 79% at the beginning of the trial to zero at the 6 month evaluation. All but one of the houses were still free of T. infestans at the final evaluation 12 months after spraying, although a small number of bugs were found at this time in 5 of 355 peridomestic dependencies. Comparative cost studies endorse the recommendation of large-scale application of deltamethrin, or pyrethroid of similar cost-effectiveness, as a means to eliminate domestic T. infestans populations in order to interrupt transmission of Chagas disease.

  19. A Model for Chagas Disease with Oral and Congenital Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Coffield, Daniel J.; Spagnuolo, Anna Maria; Shillor, Meir; Mema, Ensela; Pell, Bruce; Pruzinsky, Amanda; Zetye, Alexandra

    2013-01-01

    This work presents a new mathematical model for the domestic transmission of Chagas disease, a parasitic disease affecting humans and other mammals throughout Central and South America. The model takes into account congenital transmission in both humans and domestic mammals as well as oral transmission in domestic mammals. The model has time-dependent coefficients to account for seasonality and consists of four nonlinear differential equations, one of which has a delay, for the populations of vectors, infected vectors, infected humans, and infected mammals in the domestic setting. Computer simulations show that congenital transmission has a modest effect on infection while oral transmission in domestic mammals substantially contributes to the spread of the disease. In particular, oral transmission provides an alternative to vector biting as an infection route for the domestic mammals, who are key to the infection cycle. This may lead to high infection rates in domestic mammals even when the vectors have a low preference for biting them, and ultimately results in high infection levels in humans. PMID:23840647

  20. Lack of Segregation between Two Species of Chagas Disease Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Mota, Theo; Lorenzo, Marcelo Gustavo

    2012-01-01

    Triatoma infestans and Panstrongylus megistus are relevant Chagas disease vectors. An apparent segregation among these triatomine species inside human households was suggested to rely on mutual repellence between them. However, P. megistus and T. infestans show aggregation responses to chemical signals emitted by the other species. These findings do not rule out the possibility that stimuli other than chemical signals could mediate repellence when these species exploit shelters simultaneously. In the present study, we investigated how P. megistus and T. infestans exploit shelters in controlled laboratory conditions and how insect density and environmental illumination modulate this behavior. We evaluated whether these species aggregate inside shelters or mutually repel each other. Panstrongylus megistus and T. infestans show specific patterns of shelter exploitation, which are differentially affected by insect density and environment illumination. In particular, P. megistus is more sensitive to insect density than T. infestans, whereas T. infestans shows higher sensitivity to illumination than P. megistus. Nevertheless, these species exploit shelters randomly without any apparent repellence. PMID:22764300

  1. Chagas Cardiomyopathy in New Orleans and the Southeastern United States

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Robert C.; Burak, Joshua; Tiwari, Sumit; Chakraborti, Chayan; Sander, Gary E.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Chagas disease (CD), caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, affects 6-7 million people worldwide annually, primarily in Central and South America, and >300,000 people in the United States. CD consists of acute and chronic stages. Hallmarks of acute CD include fever, myalgia, diaphoresis, hepatosplenomegaly, and myocarditis. Symptoms of chronic CD include pathologic involvement of the heart, esophagus, and colon. Myocardial involvement is identifiable by electrocardiogram and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging showing inflammation and left ventricular wall functional abnormalities. Case Reports: We present two cases of CD identified in a single hospital in the Southeastern United States. Case 1 presents a patient with symptoms of anginal chest pain and associated shortness of breath with myocardial involvement suggestive of ischemic infarction but normal coronary arteries. Case 2 describes a patient with no physical symptoms and echocardiogram with ejection fraction of 50% with posterolateral and anterolateral wall hypokinesis but normal coronary arteries. Conclusion: With a growing number of immigrants from Central and South America in the United States, it is imperative for clinicians to include CD as part of the differential diagnosis for patients presenting with heart disease who have a history of exposure to T. cruzi endemic areas. PMID:27660581

  2. Urbanization, land tenure security and vector-borne Chagas disease

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Michael Z.; Barbu, Corentin M.; Castillo-Neyra, Ricardo; Quispe-Machaca, Victor R.; Ancca-Juarez, Jenny; Escalante-Mejia, Patricia; Borrini-Mayori, Katty; Niemierko, Malwina; Mabud, Tarub S.; Behrman, Jere R.; Naquira-Velarde, Cesar

    2014-01-01

    Modern cities represent one of the fastest growing ecosystems on the planet. Urbanization occurs in stages; each stage characterized by a distinct habitat that may be more or less susceptible to the establishment of disease vector populations and the transmission of vector-borne pathogens. We performed longitudinal entomological and epidemiological surveys in households along a 1900 × 125 m transect of Arequipa, Peru, a major city of nearly one million inhabitants, in which the transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi, the aetiological agent of Chagas disease, by the insect vector Triatoma infestans, is an ongoing problem. The transect spans a cline of urban development from established communities to land invasions. We find that the vector is tracking the development of the city, and the parasite, in turn, is tracking the dispersal of the vector. New urbanizations are free of vector infestation for decades. T. cruzi transmission is very recent and concentrated in more established communities. The increase in land tenure security during the course of urbanization, if not accompanied by reasonable and enforceable zoning codes, initiates an influx of construction materials, people and animals that creates fertile conditions for epidemics of some vector-borne diseases. PMID:24990681

  3. Archaeosomes display immunoadjuvant potential for a vaccine against Chagas disease

    PubMed Central

    Higa, Leticia H.; Corral, Ricardo S.; Morilla, María José; Romero, Eder L.; Petray, Patricia B.

    2013-01-01

    Archaeosomes (ARC), vesicles made from lipids extracted from Archaea, display strong adjuvant properties. In this study, we evaluated the ability of the highly stable ARC formulated from total polar lipids of a new Halorubrum tebenquichense strain found in Argentinean Patagonia, to act as adjuvant for soluble parasite antigens in developing prophylactic vaccine against the intracellular protozoan T. cruzi, the etiologic agent of Chagas disease. We demonstrated for the first time that C3H/HeN mice subcutaneously immunized with trypanosomal antigens entrapped in these ARC (ARC-TcAg) rapidly developed higher levels of circulating T. cruzi antibodies than those measured in the sera from animals receiving the antigen alone. Enhanced humoral responses elicited by ARC-TcAg presented a dominant IgG2a antibody isotype, usually associated with Th1-type immunity and resistance against T. cruzi. More importantly, ARC-TcAg-vaccinated mice displayed reduced parasitemia during early infection and were protected against an otherwise lethal challenge with the virulent Tulahuén strain of the parasite. Our findings suggest that, as an adjuvant, H. tebenquichense-derived ARC may hold great potential to develop a safe and helpful vaccine against this relevant human pathogen. PMID:23291939

  4. Direct micromethod for diagnosis of acute and congenital Chagas' disease.

    PubMed Central

    Feilij, H; Muller, L; Gonzalez Cappa, S M

    1983-01-01

    A microhematocrit concentration method (MH) for immediate diagnosis of Chagas' disease during the acute stage or in congenital cases was standardized. Parasitemia as low as 1,000 parasites per ml was detected, after centrifugation of six 50-microliters capillary tubes, by 10-min microscopic observation of each buffy coat spread between slide and cover glass. Operator's time was reduced by at least one-third when compared with a fresh blood observation (FB). In 12 of the 15 patients studied, diagnosis was performed in 4.9 +/- 3.08 min with MH, whereas 27.0 +/- 12.1 min were necessary when FB was used. In the three remaining patients whose FB results were negative, MH became positive after 13, 16, and 40 min. In our experience, FB proved to be more sensitive than previously reported. Suckling mouse inoculation also proved to be sensitive but, as in xenodiagnosis and in hemoculture, the delay in getting the final result was a limiting factor. PMID:6413530

  5. Genomic Changes of Chagas Disease Vector, South America

    PubMed Central

    Dujardin, Jean Pierre; Nicolini, Paula; Caraccio, María Noel; Rose, Virginia; Tellez, Tatiana; Bermúdez, Hernán; Bargues, María Dolores; Mas-Coma, Santiago; O’Connor, José Enrique; Pérez, Ruben

    2004-01-01

    We analyzed the main karyologic changes that have occurred during the dispersion of Triatoma infestans, the main vector of Chagas disease. We identified two allopatric groups, named Andean and non-Andean. The Andean specimens present C-heterochromatic blocks in most of their 22 chromosomes, whereas non-Andean specimens have only 4–7 autosomes with C-banding. These heterochromatin differences are the likely cause of a striking DNA content variation (approximately 30%) between Andean and non-Andean insects. Our study, together with previous historical and genetic data, suggests that T. infestans was originally a sylvatic species, with large quantities of DNA and heterochromatin, inhabiting the Andean region of Bolivia. However, the spread of domestic T. infestans throughout the non-Andean regions only involved insects with an important reduction of heterochromatin and DNA amounts. We propose that heterochromatin and DNA variation mainly reflected adaptive genomic changes that contribute to the ability of T. infestans to survive, reproduce, and disperse in different environments. PMID:15109410

  6. Urbanization, land tenure security and vector-borne Chagas disease.

    PubMed

    Levy, Michael Z; Barbu, Corentin M; Castillo-Neyra, Ricardo; Quispe-Machaca, Victor R; Ancca-Juarez, Jenny; Escalante-Mejia, Patricia; Borrini-Mayori, Katty; Niemierko, Malwina; Mabud, Tarub S; Behrman, Jere R; Naquira-Velarde, Cesar

    2014-08-22

    Modern cities represent one of the fastest growing ecosystems on the planet. Urbanization occurs in stages; each stage characterized by a distinct habitat that may be more or less susceptible to the establishment of disease vector populations and the transmission of vector-borne pathogens. We performed longitudinal entomological and epidemiological surveys in households along a 1900 × 125 m transect of Arequipa, Peru, a major city of nearly one million inhabitants, in which the transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi, the aetiological agent of Chagas disease, by the insect vector Triatoma infestans, is an ongoing problem. The transect spans a cline of urban development from established communities to land invasions. We find that the vector is tracking the development of the city, and the parasite, in turn, is tracking the dispersal of the vector. New urbanizations are free of vector infestation for decades. T. cruzi transmission is very recent and concentrated in more established communities. The increase in land tenure security during the course of urbanization, if not accompanied by reasonable and enforceable zoning codes, initiates an influx of construction materials, people and animals that creates fertile conditions for epidemics of some vector-borne diseases.

  7. A three-dimensional multi-agent-based model for the evolution of Chagas' disease.

    PubMed

    Galvão, Viviane; Miranda, José Garcia Vivas

    2010-06-01

    A better understanding of Chagas' disease is important because the knowledge about the progression and the participation of the different types of cells in this disease are still lacking. To clarify this system, the kinetics of inflammatory cells and parasite nests was shown in an experiment. Using this experimental data, we have developed a three-dimensional multi-agent-based computational model for the evolution of Chagas' disease. Our model includes five different types of agents: inflammatory cell, fibrosis, cardiomyocyte, fibroblast, and Trypanosoma cruzi. Fibrosis is fixed and the other types of agents can move through the empty space. They move randomly by using the Moore neighborhood. This model reproduces the acute and chronic phases of Chagas' disease and the volume occupied by all different types of cells in the cardiac tissue.

  8. The Sphingolipid Biosynthetic Pathway Is a Potential Target for Chemotherapy against Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Koeller, Carolina Macedo; Heise, Norton

    2011-01-01

    The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi is the causative agent of human Chagas disease, for which there currently is no cure. The life cycle of T. cruzi is complex, including an extracellular phase in the triatomine insect vector and an obligatory intracellular stage inside the vertebrate host. These phases depend on a variety of surface glycosylphosphatidylinositol-(GPI-) anchored glycoconjugates that are synthesized by the parasite. Therefore, the surface expression of GPI-anchored components and the biosynthetic pathways of GPI anchors are attractive targets for new therapies for Chagas disease. We identified new drug targets for chemotherapy by taking the available genome sequence information and searching for differences in the sphingolipid biosynthetic pathways (SBPs) of mammals and T. cruzi. In this paper, we discuss the major steps of the SBP in mammals, yeast and T. cruzi, focusing on the IPC synthase and ceramide remodeling of T. cruzi as potential therapeutic targets for Chagas disease. PMID:21603271

  9. Trypanosoma cruzi trans-sialidase as a drug target against Chagas disease (American trypanosomiasis).

    PubMed

    Miller, Bill R; Roitberg, Adrian E

    2013-10-01

    Chagas disease (or American trypanosomiasis) is a deadly tropical disease that affects millions of people worldwide, primarily in rural regions of South America. Trypanosoma cruzi, the parasitic cause of Chagas disease, possesses a membrane-anchored trans-sialidase enzyme that transfers sialic acids from the host cell surface to the parasitic cell surface, allowing T. cruzi to effectively evade the host's immune system. This enzyme has no analogous human counterpart and thus has become an interesting drug target to combat the parasite. Recent computational efforts have improved our knowledge about the enzyme's structure, dynamics and catalyzed reaction. Many compounds have been tested against trans-sialidase activity, but no strong inhibitors have been identified yet. The current lack of drugs for Chagas disease necessitates more R&D into the design and discovery of strong inhibitors of T. cruzi trans-sialidase.

  10. [What is not searched, it is difficult to find: Chagas' disease].

    PubMed

    Briceno, Luis; Mosca, Walter

    2016-05-01

    A conservative estimation indicates that more than 400 000 Latin American immigrants are living in Italy. Several studies have shown that among these, the prevalence of Chagas disease is between 3.9% and 17%, so it is not unlikely to find a patient with this disease during a cardiology visit. How many patients from Latin America are diagnosed with heart failure in Italy and no one has ever thought about a possible Chagas disease? This brief review describes the situation of the disease in Italy, its characteristics, the etiology of this disease and its treatment. The latter aspect will be discussed considering the recent published results of the BENEFIT study, where it was found that treatment with benznidazole in patients with Chagas' cardiomyopathy is able to reduce significantly the detection of parasites in the blood, but it is not able to prevent clinical deterioration during 5 years of follow-up. The possible implications of these results will be discussed.

  11. [Knowledge, attitudes, and practices concerning Chagas disease in schoolchildren from an endemic area in Peru].

    PubMed

    Cabrera, Rufino; Mayo, Carlos; Suárez, Nicolás; Infante, César; Náquira, César; García-Zapata, Marco Tulio A

    2003-01-01

    This study analyzes knowledge, attitudes, and practices concerning Chagas disease among 241 primary schoolchildren in "La Tinguiña", Ica, Peru (December 2000 - January 2001). Less than 1% of those interviewed knew that triatomines transmit Chagas disease, while nearly a quarter recognized the illness based on the appearance of "lumps" on the skin; 35.27% knew that vector infestation is controlled using insecticides; 26.56% recognized the adult stage of the vector, and 21.16% the nymphal instar; 14.11% knew triatomines or "kissing bugs" by the name "chirimacha"; 82.57% would accept an entomological survey, 66.80% would submit to a serological study, and 63.90% would participate in a triatomine search. The study shows that the population, despite having very limited knowledge on the disease and its vectors, shows interest in collaborating. Therefore, it is recommended that Chagas disease surveillance and control include educational programs and community participation.

  12. Oesophageal manometric studies in patients with chronic Chagas disease and megacolon

    PubMed Central

    Heitmann, Peter; Espinoza, Julio

    1969-01-01

    Intraluminal manometric studies performed on 12 patients with chronic Chagas disease and megacolon without clinical or radiological abnormalities of the oesophagus showed no alteration in oesophageal physiology under basal conditions when compared with a control group of 30 healthy subjects. Oesophageal peristalsis was unimpaired. Patients with chronic Chagas disease and megacolon differed from normals in their reaction to a small dose of a cholinergic drug. This agent induced an isolated but significant increase in resting pressure at the level of the oesophagogastric sphincter, accompanied in most cases by an increase in spontaneous activity but not by a change in resting pressure in the body of the oesophagus. This is interpreted as a subclinical expression of oesophageal pathology related to Chagas disease. PMID:4981710

  13. Genetic transformation of a Corynebacterial symbiont from the Chagas disease vector Triatoma infestans.

    PubMed

    Durvasula, Ravi V; Sundaram, Ranjini K; Kirsch, Philipp; Hurwitz, Ivy; Crawford, Carl V; Dotson, Ellen; Beard, Charles B

    2008-05-01

    Insect-borne diseases have experienced a troubling resurgence in recent years. Emergence of resistance to pesticides greatly hampers control efforts. Paratransgenesis, or the genetic transformation of bacterial symbionts of disease vectors, is an alternative to traditional approaches. Previously, we developed paratransgenic lines of Rhodnius prolixus, a vector of Chagas disease in Central America. Here, we report identification of a Corynebacterial species as a symbiont of Triatoma infestans, a leading vector of Chagas disease in South America. We have modified this bacterium to produce an immunologically active single chain antibody fragment, termed rDB3. This study establishes the basis for generating paratransgenic T. infestans as a strategy for control of Chagas disease.

  14. High specificity of Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigote ribonucleoprotein as antigen in serodiagnosis of Chagas' disease.

    PubMed Central

    Solana, M E; Katzin, A M; Umezawa, E S; Miatello, C S

    1995-01-01

    We assessed the performance of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with the Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigote ribosomal fraction (Tulahuen and Y strains) in order to improve the diagnostic specificity of the test. A total of 100 serum samples from patients with chronic Chagas' disease from Brazil and Argentina were studied. Sera from 116 patients, without Chagas' disease, including 10 with active mucocutaneous leishmaniasis and 20 with visceral leishmaniasis, were used as controls. Immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies against the ribosomal fraction (ribonucleoproteins [RNPs]) in the ELISA were found in 97% of samples from patients with Chagas' disease. A total of 99% of the sera from patients without the disease were negative, including sera from patients with mucocutaneous and visceral leishmaniases. The distribution of IgG isotypes in randomly chosen serum samples was determined by ELISA; IgG1 and IgG3 were predominant (100% exhibited IgG1 and 85% exhibited IgG3, and 50% also presented the IgG2 isotype. The distribution of the IgG subclasses was confirmed by the Western blot (immunoblot) technique. When total IgG was assayed by Western blot assay, no correlation was found between the pattern of serum reactivity and the clinical features of the patients with Chagas' disease. Therefore, no typical profile of polypeptide recognition could be associated with any clinical form of Chagas' disease (cardiomyopathy or megaviscera). Our results showed that sera from patients with Chagas' disease react with ribosomal antigens and display a typical profile of IgG isotypes (IgG1 plus IgG3).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7650167

  15. Toxic Profile of Benznidazole in Patients with Chronic Chagas Disease: Risk Factors and Comparison of the Product from Two Different Manufacturers

    PubMed Central

    Salvador, F.; Sánchez-Montalvá, A.; Treviño, B.; Serre, N.; Sao Avilés, A.; Almirante, B.

    2015-01-01

    Benznidazole is considered the first-line treatment option against Chagas disease. The major drawback of benznidazole is its toxicity profile. The main objectives of this study were to describe the adverse events (AEs) in patients with chronic Chagas disease treated with benznidazole, determine the risk factors involved and compare the toxic profiles of two different preparations of the drug from ELEA and Roche. A total of 746 patients were diagnosed with Chagas disease in a 5-year period, and of these 472 were treated with benznidazole. A high proportion of patients (n = 360 [76%]) suffered AEs, the most frequent being those related to hypersensitivity (52.9% of patients), headache (12.5%), and epigastric pain (10.4%). In 72 (12.7%) cases, treatment was discontinued. Overall, women had a higher incidence of AEs compared to men (81.3% versus 66%, P = 0.001) and were subject to higher levels of hypersensitivity-related events. Dermatological events, digestive tract manifestations, and general symptoms had a greater likelihood to appear around day 10 and neurological AEs around day 40 after starting treatment. With respect to liver function and hematological tests, the majority of patients did not suffer significant perturbation of liver enzymes or altered blood cell counts. However, 14 patients suffered from neutropenia, and 14 patients had aminotransferase levels that were more than four times the upper limit of the normal range. Patients treated with the ELEA benznidazole product experienced more arthromyalgia, neutropenia, and neurological disorders (mainly paresthesias) than those treated with the Roche product. Both drug products resulted in approximately the same percentage of permanent withdrawals. PMID:26195525

  16. Field Evaluation of the InBios Chagas Detect Plus Rapid Test in Serum and Whole-Blood Specimens in Bolivia

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Vishal; Ferrufino, Lisbeth; Gilman, Robert H.; Ramirez, Margot; Saenza, Eliana; Malaga, Edith; Sanchez, Gerardo; Okamoto, Emi E.; Sherbuck, Jacqueline E.; Clark, Eva H.; Galdos-Cardenas, Gerson; Bozo, Ricardo; Flores-Franco, Jorge Luis; Colanzi, Rony; Verastegui, Manuela

    2014-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi causes Chagas disease, which affects an estimated 7 million to 8 million people. Chagas disease is endemic throughout Latin America, with the highest prevalence in Bolivia. Conventional diagnosis requires a well-equipped laboratory with experienced personnel. We evaluated the Chagas Detect Plus (CDP) (InBios, Seattle, WA), a rapid immunochromatographic assay for IgG antibodies to T. cruzi. CDP performance was compared to infection status based on results obtained by indirect hemagglutination assay, immunofluorescent-antibody test, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Confirmed infection required positive results by at least 2 conventional assays. We used specimens from adults of both sexes in a general hospital in the city of Santa Cruz and from pregnant women in a hospital and children in villages in the Bolivian Chaco, an area of hyperendemicity. CDP was performed in paired whole-blood and serum specimens from 385 individuals in the two hospital studies and in 200 serum specimens from the community study. CDP showed sensitivities/specificities of 96.2% (95% confidence interval, 92.7 to 98.4)/98.8% (95.9 to 99.9) in whole blood and 99.3% (97.5 to 99.9)/96.9% (94.2 to 98.6) in serum, with no differences by sex, age group, or study site. CDP showed excellent sensitivity and specificity in our study population, comparable to those of conventional serology. The test is reliable for field surveys, requires no laboratory equipment, and performed well in serum and whole blood. The CDP could also be used for accurate maternal screening to identify neonates at risk of congenital transmission. CDP performance data in diverse geographic areas are needed to strengthen the evidence base for its use. PMID:25274804

  17. Drug discovery for Chagas disease should consider Trypanosoma cruzi strain diversity

    PubMed Central

    Zingales, Bianca; Miles, Michael A; Moraes, Carolina B; Luquetti, Alejandro; Guhl, Felipe; Schijman, Alejandro G; Ribeiro, Isabela

    2014-01-01

    This opinion piece presents an approach to standardisation of an important aspect of Chagas disease drug discovery and development: selecting Trypanosoma cruzi strains for in vitro screening. We discuss the rationale for strain selection representing T. cruzi diversity and provide recommendations on the preferred parasite stage for drug discovery, T. cruzi discrete typing units to include in the panel of strains and the number of strains/clones for primary screens and lead compounds. We also consider experimental approaches for in vitro drug assays. The Figure illustrates the current Chagas disease drug-discovery and development landscape. PMID:25317712

  18. Should trypanocidal therapy be used to treat patients in the chronic phase of Chagas disease?

    PubMed

    Popoff, Federico; Izcovich, Ariel

    2015-10-26

    Antiparasitic treatment of patients with Chagas’ disease in chronic stage could prevent the complications related to the disease. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified five systematic reviews including eight randomized trials and 11 observational studies. We combined the evidence using meta-analysis and generated a summary of findings table following the GRADE approach. We concluded it is not clear whether antiparasitic treatment improves survival or reduces complications related to chronic Chagas’ disease because the certainty of the evidence is very low.

  19. Drug discovery for Chagas disease should consider Trypanosoma cruzi strain diversity.

    PubMed

    Zingales, Bianca; Miles, Michael A; Moraes, Carolina B; Luquetti, Alejandro; Guhl, Felipe; Schijman, Alejandro G; Ribeiro, Isabela

    2014-09-01

    This opinion piece presents an approach to standardisation of an important aspect of Chagas disease drug discovery and development: selecting Trypanosoma cruzi strains for in vitro screening. We discuss the rationale for strain selection representing T. cruzi diversity and provide recommendations on the preferred parasite stage for drug discovery, T. cruzi discrete typing units to include in the panel of strains and the number of strains/clones for primary screens and lead compounds. We also consider experimental approaches for in vitro drug assays. The Figure illustrates the current Chagas disease drug-discovery and development landscape.

  20. Modulation of immune response in experimental Chagas disease.

    PubMed

    Basso, Beatriz

    2013-02-20

    Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi), the etiological agent of Chagas disease, affects nearly 18 million people in Latin America and 90 million are at risk of infection. The parasite presents two stages of medical importance in the host, the amastigote, intracellular replicating form, and the extracellular trypomastigote, the infective form. Thus infection by T. cruzi induces a complex immune response that involves effectors and regulatory mechanisms. That is why control of the infection requires a strong humoral and cellular immune response; hence, the outcome of host-parasite interaction in the early stages of infection is extremely important. A critical event during this period of the infection is innate immune response, in which the macrophage's role is vital. Thus, after being phagocytized, the parasite is able to develop intracellularly; however, during later periods, these cells induce its elimination by means of toxic metabolites. In turn, as the infection progresses, adaptive immune response mechanisms are triggered through the TH1 and TH2 responses. Finally, T. cruzi, like other protozoa such as Leishmania and Toxoplasma, have numerous evasive mechanisms to the immune response that make it possible to spread around the host. In our Laboratory we have developed a vaccination model in mice with Trypanosoma rangeli, nonpathogenic to humans, which modulates the immune response to infection by T. cruzi, thus protecting them. Vaccinated animals showed an important innate response (modulation of NO and other metabolites, cytokines, activation of macrophages), a strong adaptive cellular response and significant increase in specific antibodies. The modulation caused early elimination of the parasites, low parasitaemia, the absence of histological lesions and high survival rates. Even though progress has been made in the knowledge of some of these mechanisms, new studies must be conducted which could target further prophylactic and therapeutic trials against T. cruzi

  1. Barriers to Treatment Access for Chagas Disease in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Manne, Jennifer M.; Snively, Callae S.; Ramsey, Janine M.; Salgado, Marco Ocampo; Bärnighausen, Till; Reich, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    Background According to World Health Organization (WHO) prevalence estimates, 1.1 million people in Mexico are infected with Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiologic agent of Chagas disease (CD). However, limited information is available about access to antitrypanosomal treatment. This study assesses the extent of access in Mexico, analyzes the barriers to access, and suggests strategies to overcome them. Methods and Findings Semi-structured in-depth interviews were conducted with 18 key informants and policymakers at the national level in Mexico. Data on CD cases, relevant policy documents and interview data were analyzed using the Flagship Framework for Pharmaceutical Policy Reform policy interventions: regulation, financing, payment, organization, and persuasion. Data showed that 3,013 cases were registered nationally from 2007–2011, representing 0.41% of total expected cases based on Mexico's national prevalence estimate. In four of five years, new registered cases were below national targets by 11–36%. Of 1,329 cases registered nationally in 2010–2011, 834 received treatment, 120 were pending treatment as of January 2012, and the treatment status of 375 was unknown. The analysis revealed that the national program mainly coordinated donation of nifurtimox and that important obstacles to access include the exclusion of antitrypanosomal medicines from the national formulary (regulation), historical exclusion of CD from the social insurance package (organization), absence of national clinical guidelines (organization), and limited provider awareness (persuasion). Conclusions Efforts to treat CD in Mexico indicate an increased commitment to addressing this disease. Access to treatment could be advanced by improving the importation process for antitrypanosomal medicines and adding them to the national formulary, increasing education for healthcare providers, and strengthening clinical guidelines. These recommendations have important implications for other countries in

  2. Environmental Changes Can Produce Shifts in Chagas Disease Infection Risk

    PubMed Central

    Cordovez, Juan M; Sanabria, Camilo

    2014-01-01

    An epidemiological network contains all the organisms involved (types) in the transmission of a parasite. The nodes of the network represent reservoirs, hosts, and vectors, while the links between the nodes represent the strength and direction of parasite movement. Networks that contain humans are of special interest because they are of concern to public health authorities. Under these circumstances, it is possible, in principle, to identify cycles (closed paths in the network) that include humans and select the ones that carry the maximum probability of human infection. The basic reproduction number R0 in such a network gives the average number of new infections of any type after the introduction of one individual infected by any type. To obtain R0 for complex networks, one can use the next-generation matrix (NGM) approach. Every entry in NGM will average the contribution of each link that connects two types. To tease the contribution of every cycle apart, we define the virulence as the geometric mean of the NGM entries corresponding to the links therein. This approach allows for the quantification of specific cycles of interest while it also makes the computation of the sensitivity and elasticity of the parameters easier. In this work, we compute the virulence for the transmission dynamics of Chagas disease for a typical rural area in Colombia incorporating the effect of environmental changes on the vector population size. We concluded that the highest contribution to human infection comes from humans themselves, which is a surprising and interesting result. In addition, sensitivity analysis revealed that increasing vector population size increases the risk of human infection. PMID:25574142

  3. Environmental changes can produce shifts in chagas disease infection risk.

    PubMed

    Cordovez, Juan M; Sanabria, Camilo

    2014-01-01

    An epidemiological network contains all the organisms involved (types) in the transmission of a parasite. The nodes of the network represent reservoirs, hosts, and vectors, while the links between the nodes represent the strength and direction of parasite movement. Networks that contain humans are of special interest because they are of concern to public health authorities. Under these circumstances, it is possible, in principle, to identify cycles (closed paths in the network) that include humans and select the ones that carry the maximum probability of human infection. The basic reproduction number R 0 in such a network gives the average number of new infections of any type after the introduction of one individual infected by any type. To obtain R 0 for complex networks, one can use the next-generation matrix (NGM) approach. Every entry in NGM will average the contribution of each link that connects two types. To tease the contribution of every cycle apart, we define the virulence as the geometric mean of the NGM entries corresponding to the links therein. This approach allows for the quantification of specific cycles of interest while it also makes the computation of the sensitivity and elasticity of the parameters easier. In this work, we compute the virulence for the transmission dynamics of Chagas disease for a typical rural area in Colombia incorporating the effect of environmental changes on the vector population size. We concluded that the highest contribution to human infection comes from humans themselves, which is a surprising and interesting result. In addition, sensitivity analysis revealed that increasing vector population size increases the risk of human infection.

  4. Insecticide resistance in vector Chagas disease: evolution, mechanisms and management.

    PubMed

    Mougabure-Cueto, Gastón; Picollo, María Inés

    2015-09-01

    Chagas disease is a chronic parasitic infection restricted to America. The disease is caused by the protozoa Trypanosoma cruzi, which is transmitted to human through the feces of infected triatomine insects. Because no treatment is available for the chronic forms of the disease, vector chemical control represents the best way to reduce the incidence of the disease. Chemical control has been based principally on spraying dwellings with insecticide formulations and led to the reduction of triatomine distribution and consequent interruption of disease transmission in several areas from endemic region. However, in the last decade it has been repeatedly reported the presence triatomnes, mainly Triatoma infestans, after spraying with pyrethroid insecticides, which was associated to evolution to insecticide resistance. In this paper the evolution of insecticide resistance in triatomines is reviewed. The insecticide resistance was detected in 1970s in Rhodnius prolixus and 1990s in R. prolixus and T. infestans, but not until the 2000s resistance to pyrthroids in T. infestans associated to control failures was described in Argentina and Bolivia. The main resistance mechanisms (i.e. enhanced metabolism, altered site of action and reduced penetration) were described in the T. infestans resistant to pyrethrods. Different resistant profiles were demonstrated suggesting independent origin of the different resistant foci of Argentina and Bolivia. The deltamethrin resistance in T. infestans was showed to be controlled by semi-dominant, autosomally inherited factors. Reproductive and developmental costs were also demonstrated for the resistant T. infestans. A discussion about resistance and tolerance concepts and the persistence of T. infestans in Gran Chaco region are presented. In addition, theoretical concepts related to toxicological, evolutionary and ecological aspects of insecticide resistance are discussed in order to understand the particular scenario of pyrethroid

  5. Antimutagenic effects of subfractions of Chaga mushroom (Inonotus obliquus) extract.

    PubMed

    Ham, Seung-Shi; Kim, Soo-Hyun; Moon, Sun-Young; Chung, Mi Ja; Cui, Cheng-Bi; Han, Eun-Kyung; Chung, Cha-Kwon; Choe, Myeon

    2009-01-01

    Inonotus obliquus is a mushroom commonly known as Chaga that is widely used in folk medicine in Siberia, North America, and North Europe. Here, we evaluated the antimutagenic and antioxidant capacities of subfractions of Inonotus obliquus extract. The ethyl acetate extract was separated by vacuum chromatography into three fractions, and the fraction bearing the highest antimutagenic activity was subsequently separated into four fractions by reversed phase (ODS-C18) column chromatography. The most antimutagenic fraction was then separated into two subfractions (subfractions 1 and 2) by normal phase silica gel column chromatography. Ames test analysis revealed that the subfractions were not mutagenic. At 50 μg/plate, subfractions 1 and 2 strongly inhibited the mutagenesis induced in Salmonella typhimurium strain TA100 by the directly acting mutagen MNNG (0.4 μg/plate) by 80.0% and 77.3%, respectively. They also inhibited 0.15 μg/plate 4NQO-induced mutagenesis in TA98 and TA100 by 52.6-62.0%. The mutagenesis in TA98 induced by the indirectly acting mutagens Trp-P-1 (0.15 μg/plate) and B(α)P (10 μg/plate) was reduced by 47.0-68.2% by the subfractions, while the mutagenesis in TA100 by Trp-P-1 and B(α)P was reduced by 70.5-87.2%. Subfraction 1 was more inhibitory than subfraction 2 with regard to the mutagenic effects of 4NQO, Trp-P-1, and B(α)P. Subfractions 1 and 2 also had a strong antioxidant activity against DPPH radicals and were identified by MS, 1H NMR and 13C NMR analyses as 3β-hydroxy-lanosta-8, 24-dien-21-al and inotodiol, respectively. Thus, we show that the 3beta-hydroxy-lanosta-8, 24-dien-21-al and inotodiol components of Inonotus obliquus bear antimutagenic and antioxidative activities.

  6. Community Participation in Chagas Disease Vector Surveillance: Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Abad-Franch, Fernando; Vega, M. Celeste; Rolón, Miriam S.; Santos, Walter S.; Rojas de Arias, Antonieta

    2011-01-01

    Background Vector control has substantially reduced Chagas disease (ChD) incidence. However, transmission by household-reinfesting triatomines persists, suggesting that entomological surveillance should play a crucial role in the long-term interruption of transmission. Yet, infestation foci become smaller and harder to detect as vector control proceeds, and highly sensitive surveillance methods are needed. Community participation (CP) and vector-detection devices (VDDs) are both thought to enhance surveillance, but this remains to be thoroughly assessed. Methodology/Principal Findings We searched Medline, Web of Knowledge, Scopus, LILACS, SciELO, the bibliographies of retrieved studies, and our own records. Data from studies describing vector control and/or surveillance interventions were extracted by two reviewers. Outcomes of primary interest included changes in infestation rates and the detection of infestation/reinfestation foci. Most results likely depended on study- and site-specific conditions, precluding meta-analysis, but we re-analysed data from studies comparing vector control and detection methods whenever possible. Results confirm that professional, insecticide-based vector control is highly effective, but also show that reinfestation by native triatomines is common and widespread across Latin America. Bug notification by householders (the simplest CP-based strategy) significantly boosts vector detection probabilities; in comparison, both active searches and VDDs perform poorly, although they might in some cases complement each other. Conclusions/Significance CP should become a strategic component of ChD surveillance, but only professional insecticide spraying seems consistently effective at eliminating infestation foci. Involvement of stakeholders at all process stages, from planning to evaluation, would probably enhance such CP-based strategies. PMID:21713022

  7. FC-TRIPLEX Chagas/Leish IgG1: A Multiplexed Flow Cytometry Method for Differential Serological Diagnosis of Chagas Disease and Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira-Carvalho, Andréa; Campos, Fernanda Magalhães Freire; Geiger, Stefan Michael; Rocha, Roberta Dias Rodrigues; de Araújo, Fernanda Fortes; Vitelli-Avelar, Danielle Marquete; Andrade, Mariléia Chaves; Araújo, Márcio Sobreira Silva; Lemos, Elenice Moreira; de Freitas Carneiro Proietti, Anna Bárbara; Sabino, Ester Cerdeira; Caldas, Rafaella Gaiotti; Freitas, Carolina Renata Camargos; Campi-Azevedo, Ana Carolina; Elói-Santos, Silvana Maria; Martins-Filho, Olindo Assis

    2015-01-01

    Differential serological diagnosis of Chagas disease and leishmaniasis is difficult owing to cross-reactivity resulting from the fact that the parasites that cause these pathologies share antigenic epitopes. Even with optimized serological assays that use parasite-specific recombinant antigens, inconclusive test results continue to be a problem. Therefore, new serological tests with high sensitivity and specificity are needed. In the present work, we developed and evaluated the performance of a new flow cytometric serological method, referred to as FC-TRIPLEX Chagas/Leish IgG1, for the all-in-one classification of inconclusive tests. The method uses antigens for the detection of visceral leishmaniasis, localized cutaneous leishmaniasis, and Chagas disease and is based on an inverted detuned algorithm for analysis of anti-Trypanosomatidae IgG1 reactivity. First, parasites were label with fluorescein isothiocyanate or Alexa Fluor 647 at various concentrations. Then serum samples were serially diluted, the dilutions were incubated with suspensions of mixed labeled parasites, and flow cytometric measurements were performed to determine percentages of positive fluorescent parasites. Using the new method, we obtained correct results for 76 of 80 analyzed serum samples (95% overall performance), underscoring the outstanding performance of the method. Moreover, we found that the fluorescently labeled parasite suspensions were stable during storage at room temperature, 4°C, and –20°C for 1 year. In addition, two different lots of parasite suspensions showed equivalent antigen recognition; that is, the two lots showed equivalent categorical segregation of anti-Trypanosomatidae IgG1 reactivity at selected serum dilutions. In conclusion, we have developed a sensitive and selective method for differential diagnosis of Chagas disease, visceral leishmaniasis, and localized cutaneous leishmaniasis. PMID:25875961

  8. FC-TRIPLEX Chagas/Leish IgG1: a multiplexed flow cytometry method for differential serological diagnosis of chagas disease and leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Teixeira-Carvalho, Andréa; Campos, Fernanda Magalhães Freire; Geiger, Stefan Michael; Rocha, Roberta Dias Rodrigues; de Araújo, Fernanda Fortes; Vitelli-Avelar, Danielle Marquete; Andrade, Mariléia Chaves; Araújo, Márcio Sobreira Silva; Lemos, Elenice Moreira; de Freitas Carneiro Proietti, Anna Bárbara; Sabino, Ester Cerdeira; Caldas, Rafaella Gaiotti; Freitas, Carolina Renata Camargos; Campi-Azevedo, Ana Carolina; Elói-Santos, Silvana Maria; Martins-Filho, Olindo Assis

    2015-01-01

    Differential serological diagnosis of Chagas disease and leishmaniasis is difficult owing to cross-reactivity resulting from the fact that the parasites that cause these pathologies share antigenic epitopes. Even with optimized serological assays that use parasite-specific recombinant antigens, inconclusive test results continue to be a problem. Therefore, new serological tests with high sensitivity and specificity are needed. In the present work, we developed and evaluated the performance of a new flow cytometric serological method, referred to as FC-TRIPLEX Chagas/Leish IgG1, for the all-in-one classification of inconclusive tests. The method uses antigens for the detection of visceral leishmaniasis, localized cutaneous leishmaniasis, and Chagas disease and is based on an inverted detuned algorithm for analysis of anti-Trypanosomatidae IgG1 reactivity. First, parasites were label with fluorescein isothiocyanate or Alexa Fluor 647 at various concentrations. Then serum samples were serially diluted, the dilutions were incubated with suspensions of mixed labeled parasites, and flow cytometric measurements were performed to determine percentages of positive fluorescent parasites. Using the new method, we obtained correct results for 76 of 80 analyzed serum samples (95% overall performance), underscoring the outstanding performance of the method. Moreover, we found that the fluorescently labeled parasite suspensions were stable during storage at room temperature, 4 °C, and -20 °C for 1 year. In addition, two different lots of parasite suspensions showed equivalent antigen recognition; that is, the two lots showed equivalent categorical segregation of anti-Trypanosomatidae IgG1 reactivity at selected serum dilutions. In conclusion, we have developed a sensitive and selective method for differential diagnosis of Chagas disease, visceral leishmaniasis, and localized cutaneous leishmaniasis.

  9. Further genetic characterization of the two Trypanosoma cruzi Berenice strains (Be-62 and Be-78) isolated from the first human case of Chagas disease (Chagas, 1909).

    PubMed

    Cruz, R E; Macedo, A M; Barnabé, C; Freitas, J M; Chiari, E; Veloso, V M; Carneiro, C M; Bahia, M T; Tafuri, Washington L; Lana, M

    2006-03-01

    We describe here an extension of a previous genetic characterization of Trypanosoma cruzi strains (Be-62 and Be-78) isolated from the patient Berenice, the first human case of Chagas disease [Chagas, C., 1909. Nova Tripanomíase humana. Estudos sobre morfologia e o ciclo evolutivo do Schizotrypanum cruzi, n. gen., n. sp., agente etiolójico da nova entidade morbida do homem. Mem. Inst. Oswaldo Cruz 1, 159-218]. We wanted to verify the composition of T. cruzi populations originated from these two isolates. In the present work, 22 enzymatic loci (MLEE), nine RAPD primers and 7 microsatellite loci were analyzed. Clones from both strains were also characterized to verify whether these strains are mono or polyclonal. Be-62 and Be-78 strains were different in 3 out of 22 enzymatic systems, in 3 out of 9 RAPD primers tested and in all microsatellite loci investigated. However, our data suggests that both strains are phylogenetically closely related, belonging to genetic group 32 from Tibayrenc and Ayala [Tibayrenc, M., Ayala, F.J., 1988. Isoenzime variability in Trypanosoma cruzi, the agent of Chagas' disease: genetical, taxonomical, and epidemiological significance. Evolution 42, 277-292], equivalent to zymodeme 2 and T. cruzi II major lineage which, in Brazil, comprises parasites from the domestic cycle of the disease. Microsatellite analyses showed differences between the parental strains but suggested that both populations are monoclonal since each strain and their respective clones showed the same amplification products.

  10. Mode of Death on Chagas Heart Disease: Comparison with Other Etiologies. A Subanalysis of the REMADHE Prospective Trial

    PubMed Central

    Ayub-Ferreira, Silvia M.; Mangini, Sandrigo; Issa, Victor S.; Cruz, Fátima D.; Bacal, Fernando; Guimarães, Guilherme V.; Chizzola, Paulo R.; Conceição-Souza, Germano E.; Marcondes-Braga, Fabiana G.; Bocchi, Edimar A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Sudden death has been considered the main cause of death in patients with Chagas heart disease. Nevertheless, this information comes from a period before the introduction of drugs that changed the natural history of heart failure. We sought to study the mode of death of patients with heart failure caused by Chagas heart disease, comparing with non-Chagas cardiomyopathy. Methods and results We examined the REMADHE trial and grouped patients according to etiology (Chagas vs non-Chagas) and mode of death. The primary end-point was all-cause, heart failure and sudden death mortality; 342 patients were analyzed and 185 (54.1%) died. Death occurred in 56.4% Chagas patients and 53.7% non-Chagas patients. The cumulative incidence of all-cause mortality and heart failure mortality was significantly higher in Chagas patients compared to non-Chagas. There was no difference in the cumulative incidence of sudden death mortality between the two groups. In the Cox regression model, Chagas etiology (HR 2.76; CI 1.34–5.69; p = 0.006), LVEDD (left ventricular end diastolic diameter) (HR 1.07; CI 1.04–1.10; p<0.001), creatinine clearance (HR 0.98; CI 0.97–0.99; p = 0.006) and use of amiodarone (HR 3.05; CI 1.47–6.34; p = 0.003) were independently associated with heart failure mortality. LVEDD (HR 1.04; CI 1.01–1.07; p = 0.005) and use of beta-blocker (HR 0.52; CI 0.34–0.94; p = 0.014) were independently associated with sudden death mortality. Conclusions In severe Chagas heart disease, progressive heart failure is the most important mode of death. These data challenge the current understanding of Chagas heart disease and may have implications in the selection of treatment choices, considering the mode of death. Trial Registration ClinicalTrails.gov NCT00505050 (REMADHE) PMID:23638197

  11. Preclinical stem cell therapy in Chagas Disease: Perspectives for future research.

    PubMed

    de Carvalho, Katherine Athayde Teixeira; Abdelwahid, Eltyeb; Ferreira, Reginaldo Justino; Irioda, Ana Carolina; Guarita-Souza, Luiz Cesar

    2013-12-24

    Chagas cardiomyopathy still remains a challenging problem that is responsible for high morbidity and mortality in Central and Latin America. Chagas disease disrupts blood microcirculation via various autoimmune mechanisms, causing loss of cardiomyocytes and severe impairment of heart function. Different cell types and delivery approaches in Chagas Disease have been studied in both preclinical models and clinical trials. The main objective of this article is to clarify the reasons why the benefits that have been seen with cell therapy in preclinical models fail to translate to the clinical setting. This can be explained by crucial differences between the cellular types and pathophysiological mechanisms of the disease, as well as the differences between human patients and animal models. We discuss examples that demonstrate how the results from preclinical trials might have overestimated the efficacy of myocardial regeneration therapies. Future research should focus, not only on studying the best cell type to use but, very importantly, understanding the levels of safety and cellular interaction that can elicit efficient therapeutic effects in human tissue. Addressing the challenges associated with future research may ensure the success of stem cell therapy in improving preclinical models and the treatment of Chagas disease.

  12. Update on oral Chagas disease outbreaks in Venezuela: epidemiological, clinical and diagnostic approaches

    PubMed Central

    de Noya, Belkisyolé Alarcón; Díaz-Bello, Zoraida; Colmenares, Cecilia; Ruiz-Guevara, Raiza; Mauriello, Luciano; Muñoz-Calderón, Arturo; Noya, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    Orally transmitted Chagas disease has become a matter of concern due to outbreaks reported in four Latin American countries. Although several mechanisms for orally transmitted Chagas disease transmission have been proposed, food and beverages contaminated with whole infected triatomines or their faeces, which contain metacyclic trypomastigotes of Trypanosoma cruzi, seems to be the primary vehicle. In 2007, the first recognised outbreak of orally transmitted Chagas disease occurred in Venezuela and largest recorded outbreak at that time. Since then, 10 outbreaks (four in Caracas) with 249 cases (73.5% children) and 4% mortality have occurred. The absence of contact with the vector and of traditional cutaneous and Romana’s signs, together with a florid spectrum of clinical manifestations during the acute phase, confuse the diagnosis of orally transmitted Chagas disease with other infectious diseases. The simultaneous detection of IgG and IgM by ELISA and the search for parasites in all individuals at risk have been valuable diagnostic tools for detecting acute cases. Follow-up studies regarding the microepidemics primarily affecting children has resulted in 70% infection persistence six years after anti-parasitic treatment. Panstrongylus geniculatus has been the incriminating vector in most cases. As a food-borne disease, this entity requires epidemiological, clinical, diagnostic and therapeutic approaches that differ from those approaches used for traditional direct or cutaneous vector transmission. PMID:25946155

  13. Chagas Disease in Mexico: Report of 14 Cases of Chagasic Cardiomyopathy in Children.

    PubMed

    Salazar-Schettino, Paz María; Cabrera-Bravo, Margarita; Vazquez-Antona, Clara; Zenteno, Edgar; Alba-Alvarado, Mariana De; Gutierrez, Elia Torres; Gomez, Yolanda Guevara; Perera-Salazar, María Gabriela; Torre, Guadalupe Garcia de la; Bucio-Torres, Martha Irene

    2016-01-01

    Chagas disease is a parasitic infection mainly found in Latin America; it is transmitted by a triatomine, also known as assassin bug or kissing bug. In humans, the parasite causes mostly cardiac disorders. Two-thirds of the Mexican territory are regarded as risk areas for vector transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi, the causal agent. The parasite can be found as a blood-borne trypomastigote or as an intracellular amastigote. The progression and severity of lesions could be due to frequent reinfections or to infection by highly virulent strains. A total of 3,327 individuals younger than 18 years old, living in risk areas for this disease in the rural setting of the States of Queretaro, San Luis Potosi, and Veracruz, underwent a seroepidemiological study. Among them, 37 subjects were seropositive for T. cruzi, and were studied to look for signs of cardiac pathology, which has only been reported in adults. A clinical record was prepared for all included individuals, and electrocardiography (ECG) and echocardiography (ECHO) studies were performed; 25 cases showed lesions compatible with the onset of Chagas cardiomyopathy. The other 12 patients showed either normal ECG and ECHO data or showed abnormal parameters that were not regarded as significant. Lesions found in the onset of Chagas cardiomyopathy in children are herein reported, along with 14 cases of cardiac pathology compatible with Chagas disease. Our results indicate that patients younger than 18 years can show a cardiac pathology similar to that observed in adults.

  14. Metallothionein-1 and nitric oxide expression are inversely correlated in a murine model of Chagas disease

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Mejia, Martha Elba; Torres-Rasgado, Enrique; Porchia, Leonardo M; Salgado, Hilda Rosas; Totolhua, José-Luis; Ortega, Arturo; Hernández-Kelly, Luisa Clara Regina; Ruiz-Vivanco, Guadalupe; Báez-Duarte, Blanca G; Pérez-Fuentes, Ricardo

    2014-01-01

    Chagas disease, caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, represents an endemic among Latin America countries. The participation of free radicals, especially nitric oxide (NO), has been demonstrated in the pathophysiology of seropositive individuals with T. cruzi. In Chagas disease, increased NO contributes to the development of cardiomyopathy and megacolon. Metallothioneins (MTs) are efficient free radicals scavengers of NO in vitro and in vivo. Here, we developed a murine model of the chronic phase of Chagas disease using endemic T. cruzi RyCH1 in BALB/c mice, which were divided into four groups: infected non-treated (Inf), infected N-monomethyl-L-arginine treated (Inf L-NAME), non-infected L-NAME treated and non-infected vehicle-treated. We determined blood parasitaemia and NO levels, the extent of parasite nests in tissues and liver MT-I expression levels. It was observed that NO levels were increasing in Inf mice in a time-dependent manner. Inf L-NAME mice had fewer T. cruzi nests in cardiac and skeletal muscle with decreased blood NO levels at day 135 post infection. This affect was negatively correlated with an increase of MT-I expression (r = -0.8462, p < 0.0001). In conclusion, we determined that in Chagas disease, an unknown inhibitory mechanism reduces MT-I expression, allowing augmented NO levels. PMID:24676665

  15. Certifying achievement in the control of Chagas disease native vectors: what is a viable scenario?

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Ken; Yoshioka, Kota

    2014-01-01

    As an evaluation scheme, we propose certifying for “control”, as alternative to “interruption”, of Chagas disease transmission by native vectors, to project a more achievable and measurable goal and sharing good practices through an “open online platform” rather than “formal certification” to make the key knowledge more accumulable and accessible. PMID:25317713

  16. PREVALENCE OF CHAGAS DISEASE AMONG BLOOD DONOR CANDIDATES IN TRIANGULO MINEIRO, MINAS GERAIS STATE, BRAZIL

    PubMed Central

    LOPES, Patrícia da Silva; RAMOS, Eliezer Lucas Pires; GÓMEZ-HERNÁNDEZ, César; FERREIRA, Gabriela Lícia Santos; REZENDE-OLIVEIRA, Karine

    2015-01-01

    Despite public health campaigns and epidemiological surveillance activities, Chagas disease remains a major health problem in Latin America. According to data from the World Health Organization, there are approximately 7-8 million people infected with Trypanosoma cruzi worldwide, a large percentage of which in Latin America. This study aims to examine the serological profile of blood donors in blood banks of Hemominas hematology center, in the town of Ituiutaba, Minas Gerais State, Brazil. The study sample consisted of 53,941 blood donors, which were grouped according to gender and age. Sample collections were performed from January 1991 to December 2011, and 277 donors (0.5%) were considered serologically ineligible due to Chagas disease. Analysis of data showed no significant difference between genders. As for age, the highest proportion of ineligible donors was from 40 to 49 years (30%), and there was a positive correlation between increasing age and the percentage of patients seropositive for Chagas disease. Therefore, adopting strategies that allow the safe identification of donors with positive serology for Chagas disease is essential to reduce or eliminate indeterminate serological results. PMID:27049698

  17. Electrocardiographic changes evoked by ajmaline in chronic Chagas' disease with manifest myocarditis.

    PubMed

    Chiale, P A; Przybylski, J; Laiño, R A; Halpern, M S; Sánchez, R A; Gabrieli, A; Elizari, M V; Rosenbaum, M B

    1982-01-01

    Conversion from Chagas' infection to chagasic myocarditis occurs slowly and the earliest signs of myocardial involvement are hard to define. To obtain new information on this difficult clinical problem, ajmaline was administered (1 mg/kg body weight intravenously) to 101 patients with Chagas' infection and to 46 patients without such infection (control group). In 3 patients in the control group left anterior hemiblock alone occurred whereas in the group with Chagas' infection, ajmaline caused the occurrence of right bundle branch block, left anterior hemiblock, or both, in 32 patients (31.6 percent), ventricular extrasystoles in 8 (7.9 percent) and ischemic ST-T changes in 7 (6.9 percent). Ajmaline may thus evoke the most typical electrocardiographic changes of chronic chagasic myocarditis in patients without signs of myocardial involvement or only minor nonspecific signs. A positive ajmaline test, defined in the present context as the occurrence of a fascicular block, ventricular arrhythmias or ischemic ST-T changes, may indicate the existence of localized areas of injured myocardial tissue, not enough to alter the electrocardiogram by itself, but able to give rise to severe abnormalities after exposure to the drug. The test may therefore be used as a nonspecific detector of myocardial damage, and thus may have a much broader scope of clinical application. In chronic Chagas' infection, the ajmaline test is a relatively simple and apparently safe procedure that may serve to unveil the earliest signs of chagasic myocarditis.

  18. [Serologic study of the diagnosis of Chagas disease in Nicaraguan students in the Juventud island].

    PubMed

    Montes de Oca, N V; Cabrera Alonso, C; Martínez, R; Cantelar de Francisco, N; Pérez Insueta, O

    1989-01-01

    The results obtained during the serologic study for the diagnosis of Chagas' disease in 868 Nicaraguan students in the Isle of Youth are reported. Qualitative hemagglutination and indirect immunofluorescence were used. It was found that 8.5% of these students showed antibodies specific to Trypanosoma cruzi by means of this diagnostic test.

  19. Accelerating the development of a therapeutic vaccine for human Chagas disease: rationale and prospects

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Bin; Heffernan, Michael J; Jones, Kathryn; Valenzuela, Jesus G; Kamhawi, Shaden; Ortega, Jaime; de Leon Rosales, Samuel Ponce; Lee, Bruce Y; Bacon, Kristina M; Fleischer, Bernhard; Slingsby, BT; Cravioto, Miguel Betancourt; Tapia-Conyer, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Chagas disease is a leading cause of heart disease affecting approximately 10 million people in Latin America and elsewhere worldwide. The two major drugs available for the treatment of Chagas disease have limited efficacy in Trypanosoma cruzi-infected adults with indeterminate (patients who have seroconverted but do not yet show signs or symptoms) and determinate (patients who have both seroconverted and have clinical disease) status; they require prolonged treatment courses and are poorly tolerated and expensive. As an alternative to chemotherapy, an injectable therapeutic Chagas disease vaccine is under development to prevent or delay Chagasic cardiomyopathy in patients with indeterminate or determinate status. The bivalent vaccine will be comprised of two recombinant T. cruzi antigens, Tc24 and TSA-1, formulated on alum together with the Toll-like receptor 4 agonist, E6020. Proof-of-concept for the efficacy of these antigens was obtained in preclinical testing at the Autonomous University of Yucatan. Here the authors discuss the potential for a therapeutic Chagas vaccine as well as the progress made towards such a vaccine, and the authors articulate a roadmap for the development of the vaccine as planned by the nonprofit Sabin Vaccine Institute Product Development Partnership and Texas Children’s Hospital Center for Vaccine Development in collaboration with an international consortium of academic and industrial partners in Mexico, Germany, Japan, and the USA. PMID:23151163

  20. Modeling Chagas Disease at Population Level to Explain Venezuela's Real Data

    PubMed Central

    González-Parra, Gilberto; Chen-Charpentier, Benito M.; Bermúdez, Moises

    2015-01-01

    Objectives In this paper we present an age-structured epidemiological model for Chagas disease. This model includes the interactions between human and vector populations that transmit Chagas disease. Methods The human population is divided into age groups since the proportion of infected individuals in this population changes with age as shown by real prevalence data. Moreover, the age-structured model allows more accurate information regarding the prevalence, which can help to design more specific control programs. We apply this proposed model to data from the country of Venezuela for two periods, 1961–1971, and 1961–1991 taking into account real demographic data for these periods. Results Numerical computer simulations are presented to show the suitability of the age-structured model to explain the real data regarding prevalence of Chagas disease in each of the age groups. In addition, a numerical simulation varying the death rate of the vector is done to illustrate prevention and control strategies against Chagas disease. Conclusion The proposed model can be used to determine the effect of control strategies in different age groups. PMID:26929912

  1. A 4-year follow-up study of a rural community with endemic Chagas' disease*

    PubMed Central

    Puigbó, J. J.; Rhode, J. R. Nava; Barrios, H. García; Yépez, C. Gil

    1968-01-01

    The paper reports on a 4-year follow-up study that represents the continuation of a previous cross-sectional study on Chagas' disease carried out in a rural community (Belén) in Venezuela. The earlier study included 1210 persons all over 5 years of age out of a total of 1656 inhabitants and demonstrated a high prevalence of Chagas' infection (47.3%) and a high rate of Chagas' disease seropositivity among those with chronic myocardial heart disease (84.8%); heart disease was found in 17.3% of persons studied. The follow-up study was based on 812 persons and established that in the sample the frequency of Chagas' infection was 16.3% and that of heart disease 2.2%. Clinical, electrocardiographic and radiological analyses were made on patients with previous heart disease as well as on new patients. Different evolutive electrocardiographic patterns have been found, including variations ranging from normal to definitively abnormal. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 2 PMID:4974002

  2. PREVALENCE OF CHAGAS DISEASE AMONG BLOOD DONOR CANDIDATES IN TRIANGULO MINEIRO, MINAS GERAIS STATE, BRAZIL.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Patrícia da Silva; Ramos, Eliezer Lucas Pires; Gómez-Hernández, César; Ferreira, Gabriela Lícia Santos; Rezende-Oliveira, Karine

    2015-12-01

    Despite public health campaigns and epidemiological surveillance activities, Chagas disease remains a major health problem in Latin America. According to data from the World Health Organization, there are approximately 7-8 million people infected with Trypanosoma cruzi worldwide, a large percentage of which in Latin America. This study aims to examine the serological profile of blood donors in blood banks of Hemominas hematology center, in the town of Ituiutaba, Minas Gerais State, Brazil. The study sample consisted of 53,941 blood donors, which were grouped according to gender and age. Sample collections were performed from January 1991 to December 2011, and 277 donors (0.5%) were considered serologically ineligible due to Chagas disease. Analysis of data showed no significant difference between genders. As for age, the highest proportion of ineligible donors was from 40 to 49 years (30%), and there was a positive correlation between increasing age and the percentage of patients seropositive for Chagas disease. Therefore, adopting strategies that allow the safe identification of donors with positive serology for Chagas disease is essential to reduce or eliminate indeterminate serological results.

  3. Increasing Access to Treatment for Chagas Disease: The Case of Morelos, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Manne-Goehler, Jennifer; Ramsey, Janine M.; Salgado, Marco Ocampo; Wirtz, Veronika J.; Reich, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    Chagas disease is a neglected vector-borne disease with an estimated prevalence of 1.1 million cases in Mexico. Recent research showed that access to treatment of Chagas disease is limited in Mexico, with < 0.5% of infected cases treated. This brief report used quantitative data from the Morelos Program on Chagas disease and qualitative analysis of key informant interviews to examine strategies to increase treatment access for infected patients in Morelos, Mexico. From 2007 to 2011, 263 (9.2%) of the registered cases of Chagas disease in Mexico occurred in Morelos. Among these, 152 (57.8%) were treated and 97.3% of those treated received benznidazole. The assessment finds that state officials decided to directly purchase benznidazole from the distributor to increase access and improve clinical quality of treatment of patients in their state. They also faced significant barriers, especially in regulation and health system organization, which limited efforts to make high quality treatment available. PMID:25266353

  4. Mother-child transmission of Chagas disease: could coinfection with human immunodeficiency virus increase the risk?

    PubMed

    Scapellato, Pablo Gustavo; Bottaro, Edgardo Gabriel; Rodríguez-Brieschke, María Teresa

    2009-01-01

    A study was conducted on all newborns from mothers with Chagas disease who were attended at Hospital Donación F. Santojanni between January 1, 2001, and August 31, 2007. Each child was investigated for the presence of Trypanosoma cruzi parasitemia through direct examination of blood under the microscope using the buffy coat method on three occasions during the first six months of life. Serological tests were then performed. Ninety-four children born to mothers infected with Trypanosoma cruzi were attended over the study period. Three of these children were born to mothers coinfected with the human immunodeficiency virus. Vertical transmission of Chagas disease was diagnosed in 13 children, in all cases by identifying parasitemia. The overall Chagas disease transmission rate was 13.8% (13/94). It was 100% (3/3) among the children born to mothers with HIV infection and 10.9% (10/91) among children born to mothers without HIV [Difference = 0.89; CI95 = 0.82-0.95; p = 0.0021]. We concluded that coinfection with HIV could increase the risk of vertical transmission of Chagas disease.

  5. The endless race between Trypanosoma cruzi and host immunity: lessons for and beyond Chagas disease.

    PubMed

    Junqueira, Caroline; Caetano, Braulia; Bartholomeu, Daniella C; Melo, Mariane B; Ropert, Catherine; Rodrigues, Maurício M; Gazzinelli, Ricardo T

    2010-09-15

    Infection with the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, the agent of Chagas disease, is characterised by a variable clinical course - from symptomless cases to severe chronic disease with cardiac and/or gastrointestinal involvement. The variability in disease outcome has been attributed to host responses as well as parasite heterogeneity. In this article, we review studies indicating the importance of immune responses as key determinants of host resistance to T. cruzi infection and the pathogenesis of Chagas disease. Particular attention is given to recent studies defining the role of cognate innate immune receptors and immunodominant CD8+ T cells that recognise parasite components - both crucial for host-parasite interaction and disease outcome. In light of these studies we speculate about parasite strategies that induce a strong and long-lasting T-cell-mediated immunity but at the same time allow persistence of the parasite in the vertebrate host. We also discuss what we have learned from these studies for increasing our understanding of Chagas pathogenesis and for the design of new strategies to prevent the development of Chagas disease. Finally, we highlight recent studies employing a genetically engineered attenuated T. cruzi strain as a vaccine shuttle that elicits potent T cell responses specific to a tumour antigen and protective immunity against a syngeneic melanoma cell line.

  6. Behavioural alterations are independent of sickness behaviour in chronic experimental Chagas disease

    PubMed Central

    Vilar-Pereira, Glaucia; Ruivo, Leonardo Alexandre de Souza; Lannes-Vieira, Joseli

    2015-01-01

    The existence of the nervous form of Chagas disease is a matter of discussion since Carlos Chagas described neurological disorders, learning and behavioural alterations in Trypanosoma cruzi-infected individuals. In most patients, the clinical manifestations of the acute phase, including neurological abnormalities, resolve spontaneously without apparent consequence in the chronic phase of infection. However, chronic Chagas disease patients have behavioural changes such as psychomotor alterations, attention and memory deficits, and depression. In the present study, we tested whether or not behavioural alterations are reproducible in experimental models. We show that C57BL/6 mice chronically infected with the Colombian strain of T. cruzi (150 days post-infection) exhibit behavioural changes as (i) depression in the tail suspension and forced swim tests, (ii) anxiety analysed by elevated plus maze and open field test sand and (iii) motor coordination in the rotarod test. These alterations are neither associated with neuromuscular disorders assessed by the grip strength test nor with sickness behaviour analysed by temperature variation sand weight loss. Therefore, chronically T. cruzi-infected mice replicate behavioural alterations (depression and anxiety) detected in Chagas disease patients opening an opportunity to study the interconnection and the physiopathology of these two biological processes in an infectious scenario. PMID:26676323

  7. Trypanosoma cruzi strain TcI is associated with chronic Chagas disease in the Brazilian Amazon

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Chagas disease in the Amazon region is considered an emerging anthropozoonosis with a predominance of the discrete typing units (DTUs) TcI and TcIV. These DTUs are responsible for cases of acute disease associated with oral transmission. Chronic disease cases have been detected through serological surveys. However, the mode of transmission could not be determined, or any association of chronic disease with a specific T. cruzi DTU’s. The aim of this study was to characterize Trypanosoma cruzi in patients with chronic Chagas disease in the State of Amazonas, Brazil. Methods Blood culture and xenodiagnosis were performed in 36 patients with positive serology for Chagas disease who participated in a serological survey performed in urban and rural areas of Manaus, Amazonas. DNA samples were extracted from the feces of triatomines used for xenodiagnosis, and the nontranscribed spacer of the mini-exon gene and the mitochondrial gene cytochrome oxidase subunit II (COII) were amplified by PCR and sequenced. Results Blood culture and xenodiagnosis were negative in 100% of samples; however, molecular techniques revealed that in 13 out of 36 (36%) fecal samples from xenodiagnosis, T. cruzi was characterized as the DTU TcI, and different haplotypes were identified within the same DTU. Conclusion The DTU TcI, which is mainly associated with acute cases of Chagas disease in the Amazon region, is also responsible for chronic infection in patients from a region in the State of Amazonas. PMID:24916362

  8. Chagas Disease in 2 Geriatric Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta) Housed in the Pacific Northwest

    PubMed Central

    Dickerson, Mary F; Astorga, Nestor Gerardo; Astorga, Nestor Rodrigo; Lewis, Anne D

    2014-01-01

    Chagas disease (American trypanosomiasis) is caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. It is endemic in Latin America but also is found in the southern United States, particularly Texas and along the Gulf Coast. Typical clinical manifestations of Chagas disease are not well-characterized in rhesus macaques, but conduction abnormalities, myocarditis, and encephalitis and megaesophagus have been described. Here we report 2 cases of Chagas disease in rhesus macaques housed in the northwestern United States. The first case involved a geriatric male macaque with cardiomegaly, diagnosed as dilated cardiomyopathy on ultrasonographic examination. Postmortem findings included myocarditis as well as ganglioneuritis in the esophagus, stomach, and colon. The second case affected a geriatric female macaque experimentally infected with SIV. She was euthanized for a protocol-related time point. Microscopic examination revealed chronic myocarditis with amastigotes present in the cardiomyocytes, ganglioneuritis, and opportunistic infections attributed to her immunocompromised status. Banked serum samples from both macaques had positive titers for T. cruzi. T. cruzi DNA was amplified by conventional PCR from multiple tissues from both animals. Review of their histories revealed that both animals had been obtained from facilities in South Texas more than 12 y earlier. Given the long period of clinical latency, Chagas disease may be more prevalent in rhesus macaques than typically has been reported. T. cruzi infection should be considered for animals with unexplained cardiac or gastrointestinal pathology and that originated from areas known to have a high risk for disease transmission. PMID:25296019

  9. Oral transmission of Chagas disease by consumption of açaí palm fruit, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Nóbrega, Aglaêr A; Garcia, Marcio H; Tatto, Erica; Obara, Marcos T; Costa, Elenild; Sobel, Jeremy; Araujo, Wildo N

    2009-04-01

    In 2006, a total of 178 cases of acute Chagas disease were reported from the Amazonian state of Pará, Brazil. Eleven occurred in Barcarena and were confirmed by visualization of parasites on blood smears. Using cohort and case-control studies, we implicated oral transmission by consumption of açaí palm fruit.

  10. Spatial Patterns in Discordant Diagnostic Test Results for Chagas Disease: Links to Transmission Hotspots

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Michael Z.; Bowman, Natalie M.; Kawai, Vivian; Plotkin, Joshua B.; Waller, Lance A.; Cabrera, Lilia; Steurer, Frank; Seitz, Amy E.; Pinedo-Cancino, Viviana V.; Carpio, Juan Geny Cornejo del; Benzaquen, Eleazar Cordova; McKenzie, F. Ellis; Maguire, James H.; Gilman, Robert H.; Bern, Caryn

    2009-01-01

    Diagnosis of Chagas disease is hindered by discordance between screening and confirmatory test results for Trypanosoma cruzi infection. In periurban Arequipa, Peru, spatial analysis revealed that individuals with discordant test results are spatially clustered in hotspots of T. cruzi transmission, suggesting that discordant results likely represent true infections in this setting. PMID:19278335

  11. Chaga mushroom extract inhibits oxidative DNA damage in human lymphocytes as assessed by comet assay.

    PubMed

    Park, Yoo Kyoung; Lee, Hyang Burm; Jeon, Eun-Jae; Jung, Hack Sung; Kang, Myung-Hee

    2004-01-01

    The Chaga mushroom (Inonotus obliquus) is claimed to have beneficial properties for human health, such as anti-bacterial, anti-allergic, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities. The antioxidant effects of the mushroom may be partly explained by protection of cell components against free radicals. We evaluated the effect of aqueous Chaga mushroom extracts for their potential for protecting against oxidative damage to DNA in human lymphocytes. Cells were pretreated with various concentrations (10, 50, 100 and 500 microg/mL) of the extract for 1 h at 37 degrees C. Cells were then treated with 100 microM of H2O2 for 5 min as an oxidative stress. Evaluation of oxidative damage was performed using single-cell gel electrophoresis for DNA fragmentation (Comet assay). Using image analysis, the degree of DNA damage was evaluated as the DNA tail moment. Cells pretreated with Chaga extract showed over 40% reduction in DNA fragmentation compared with the positive control (100 micromol H2O2 treatment). Thus, Chaga mushroom treatment affords cellular protection against endogenous DNA damage produced by H2O2.

  12. Spatial patterns in discordant diagnostic test results for Chagas disease: links to transmission hotspots.

    PubMed

    Levy, Michael Z; Bowman, Natalie M; Kawai, Vivian; Plotkin, Joshua B; Waller, Lance A; Cabrera, Lilia; Steurer, Frank; Seitz, Amy E; Pinedo-Cancino, Viviana V; Cornejo del Carpio, Juan Geny; Cordova Benzaquen, Eleazar; McKenzie, F Ellis; Maguire, James H; Gilman, Robert H; Bern, Caryn

    2009-04-15

    Diagnosis of Chagas disease is hindered by discordance between screening and confirmatory test results for Trypanosoma cruzi infection. In periurban Arequipa, Peru, spatial analysis revealed that individuals with discordant test results are spatially clustered in hotspots of T. cruzi transmission, suggesting that discordant results likely represent true infections in this setting.

  13. Update on oral Chagas disease outbreaks in Venezuela: epidemiological, clinical and diagnostic approaches.

    PubMed

    Noya, Belkisyolé Alarcón de; Díaz-Bello, Zoraida; Colmenares, Cecilia; Ruiz-Guevara, Raiza; Mauriello, Luciano; Muñoz-Calderón, Arturo; Noya, Oscar

    2015-05-01

    Orally transmitted Chagas disease has become a matter of concern due to outbreaks reported in four Latin American countries. Although several mechanisms for orally transmitted Chagas disease transmission have been proposed, food and beverages contaminated with whole infected triatomines or their faeces, which contain metacyclic trypomastigotes of Trypanosoma cruzi, seems to be the primary vehicle. In 2007, the first recognised outbreak of orally transmitted Chagas disease occurred in Venezuela and largest recorded outbreak at that time. Since then, 10 outbreaks (four in Caracas) with 249 cases (73.5% children) and 4% mortality have occurred. The absence of contact with the vector and of traditional cutaneous and Romana's signs, together with a florid spectrum of clinical manifestations during the acute phase, confuse the diagnosis of orally transmitted Chagas disease with other infectious diseases. The simultaneous detection of IgG and IgM by ELISA and the search for parasites in all individuals at risk have been valuable diagnostic tools for detecting acute cases. Follow-up studies regarding the microepidemics primarily affecting children has resulted in 70% infection persistence six years after anti-parasitic treatment. Panstrongylus geniculatus has been the incriminating vector in most cases. As a food-borne disease, this entity requires epidemiological, clinical, diagnostic and therapeutic approaches that differ from those approaches used for traditional direct or cutaneous vector transmission.

  14. Severity of chronic Chagas disease is associated with cytokine/antioxidant imbalance in chronically infected individuals.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Fuentes, Ricardo; Guégan, Jean-François; Barnabé, Christian; López-Colombo, Aurelio; Salgado-Rosas, Hilda; Torres-Rasgado, Enrique; Briones, Bernardo; Romero-Díaz, Mónica; Ramos-Jiménez, Judith; Sánchez-Guillén, María del Carmen

    2003-03-01

    Understanding the pathogenic mechanisms in chronic Chagas disease, a major cause of morbidity and mortality in Latin America, is essential for the design of rational therapeutic strategies. In this paper we show that the development of Chagas disease is a consequence of a long-term and complex relationship between parasite persistence and maladapted homeostatic mechanisms in the host which leads to pathologic changes. We performed a retrospective study on 50 patients with chronic Chagas disease and 50 healthy control individuals. The specific immune response was detected by ELISA and IHA tests using autochthonous antigens, inflammatory process with the cytokine tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and nitric oxide (NO), and antioxidant protection with glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase (SOD) levels. We developed generalised linear modelling procedures to assess simultaneously which explanatory variables and/or their interactions better explained disease severity in patients. Our results show the existence of a strong relationship between anti-Trypanosoma cruzi levels and chronic Chagas disease (P<0.0001). Taken together, the statistical data indicate both cumulative and complementary effects, where the increase in TNF-alpha (P=0.004) and NO (P=0.005) levels correlated with a reduction in glutathione peroxidase (P=0.0001) and SOD (P=0.01) levels drives the disease pathology in chronically infected patients. Our findings may have important implications for understanding host susceptibility to develop severe chronic infectious disease. In addition we show putative targets for the design of new therapeutic strategies to prevent disease progression, considering both specific treatment against the aetiological agent and modulation of the different immunopathological reactions in chronically infected individuals with chronic Chagas disease.

  15. High resolution of Trypanosoma cruzi amastigote antigen in serodiagnosis of different clinical forms of Chagas' disease.

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, T K; Hoshino-Shimizu, S; Nakamura, P M; Andrade, H F; Umezawa, E S

    1993-01-01

    The serodiagnosis of Chagas' disease, a highly prevalent disorder in South American countries, is usually made by the detection of antibodies to Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigote antigen. In this study, we assess the diagnostic performance of the immunofluorescence test with T. cruzi (Y strain) amastigote antigen from an LLC-MK2-infected cell supernatant in comparison with a test with the conventional epimastigote antigen. A total of 238 serum samples from patients in the acute and chronic phases of the disease, with the chronic indeterminate, cardiac, and digestive forms, and from nonchagasic individuals were tested for the presence of immunoglobulin G (IgG), IgM, and IgA antibodies. The reactivity of the amastigote antigen in terms of geometric mean titers was 2 to 4 times higher than that of the epimastigote antigen. Clear-cut results were obtained with the amastigote antigen, with no overlapping of true and false positives. IgG antibodies to amastigotes were found in all patients with Chagas' disease, whereas all sera from nonchagasic patients were negative, except for those from patients with visceral leishmaniasis, in which 63% cross-reactivity was observed. IgM antibodies to amastigotes were detected in 100% of sera from patients with acute Chagas' disease and in 7.5% of sera from patients with chronic Chagas' disease, whereas IgA antibodies were found in 60% of sera from patients in the acute phase and in 33% of sera from patients in the chronic phase. Despite the cross-reactivity observed with sera from visceral leishmaniasis patients, the IgG immunofluorescence test with the amastigote antigen had the highest sensitivity, specificity, and efficiency. No relationship was observed between the class-specific antibodies or their titers and the clinical forms of patients in the chronic phase. Amastigotes from the cell culture supernatant proved to be useful as an alternative antigen to epimastigotes because of their high resolution in the serodiagnosis of Chagas

  16. [Investigation of vectors and reservoirs in an acute Chagas outbreak due to possible oral transmission in Aguachica, Cesar, Colombia].

    PubMed

    Soto, Hugo; Tibaduiza, Tania; Montilla, Marleny; Triana, Omar; Suárez, Diana Carolina; Torres Torres, Mariela; Arias, María Teresa; Lugo, Ligia

    2014-04-01

    Colombia recorded 11 cases of acute Chagas disease and 80 cases of oral contamination with Trypanosoma cruzi. The current study analyzes the entomological and parasitological characteristics of the outbreak in Aguachica, Cesar Department, in 2010. An interdisciplinary group of health professionals and regional university personnel conducted the laboratory tests in the patients and the investigation of the transmission focus. Eleven cases of acute Chagas diseases were detected in a single family in a dwelling with domiciliated triatomines and Rhodnius pallescens, Pantrongylus geniculatus, Eratyrus cuspidatus, and two Didelphis marsupialis opossums infected with T. cruzi in Attalea butyracea and Elaeis oleifera palm trees in the urban area of Aguachica. The study analyzes the role of R. pallescens and palm trees in the wild cycle of T. cruzi and in oral transmission of Chagas disease. Sporadic incursions by wild R. pallescens, P. geniculatus, and E. cuspidatus from the nearby palm trees into human dwellings may cause increasingly frequent outbreaks of oral Chagas disease.

  17. Antibodies to beta-adrenergic receptors disclosing agonist-like properties in idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy and Chagas' heart disease.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, M B; Chiale, P A; Schejtman, D; Levin, M; Elizari, M V

    1994-04-01

    Recent studies confirm the existence of antibodies (Abs) to beta-adrenoceptors in patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy and Chagas' heart disease. These Abs can be shown to exert both stimulatory and inhibitory effects, which may play a role in the development of the cardiac abnormalities known to occur in these diseases, including advanced heart failure. The hypothesis is advanced that Chagas' heart disease and some forms of idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy may represent, at least partially, a form of "adrenergic cardiomyopathy."

  18. The Role of Gender in Chagas Disease Prevention and Control in Honduras: An Analysis of Communication and Collaboration Networks.

    PubMed

    Triana, Diana Rocío Rodríguez; Mertens, Frédéric; Zúniga, Concepción Valeriano; Mendoza, Yolanda; Nakano, Eduardo Yoshio; Monroy, Maria Carlota

    2016-09-01

    In Honduras, where Chagas disease is a serious health and environmental concern, prevention measures face the challenge of achieving widespread and long-term sustainable adoption by communities. The article integrates social network analysis and a gender-sensitive approach to understand the role of men and women in the implementation of a community-level intervention, based on the adoption of housing improvements to reduce the presence of the insect vector. A total of 108 people in the community of El Salitre were interviewed. Data were collected on socio-demographic characteristics, participation in project activities, communication and collaboration networks related to Chagas disease prevention, knowledge of Chagas disease, and adoption of housing improvements techniques. Communication mostly occurred between the same gender individuals and was associated with knowledge of Chagas disease. Socioeconomic status, Chagas disease knowledge, and collaboration with men were associated with women adopting housing improvements. For men, however, participation in project activities, formal education, and collaboration with women were associated with adoption. These findings suggest that men and women were driven by distinct concerns, interests, and motivations when adopting new Chagas disease prevention strategies. Participatory community interventions that seek to generate health knowledge and foster collaborations to reduce health risk should address gender differences.

  19. Chaga mushroom (Inonotus obliquus) induces G0/G1 arrest and apoptosis in human hepatoma HepG2 cells

    PubMed Central

    Youn, Myung-Ja; Kim, Jin-Kyung; Park, Seong-Yeol; Kim, Yunha; Kim, Se-Jin; Lee, Jin Seok; Chai, Kyu Yun; Kim, Hye-Jung; Cui, Ming-Xun; So, Hong Seob; Kim, Ki-Young; Park, Raekil

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the anti-proliferative and apoptotic effects of Chaga mushroom (Inonotus obliquus) water extract on human hepatoma cell lines, HepG2 and Hep3B cells. METHODS: The cytotoxicity of Chaga extract was screened by 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Morphological observation, flow cytometry analysis, Western blot were employed to elucidate the cytotoxic mechanism of Chaga extract. RESULTS: HepG2 cells were more sensitive to Chaga extract than Hep3B cells, as demonstrated by markedly reduced cell viability. Chaga extract inhibited the cell growth in a dose-dependent manner, which was accompanied with G0/G1-phase arrest and apoptotic cell death. In addition, G0/G1 arrest in the cell cycle was closely associated with down-regulation of p53, pRb, p27, cyclins D1, D2, E, cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) 2, Cdk4, and Cdk6 expression. CONCLUSION: Chaga mushroom may provide a new therapeutic option, as a potential anticancer agent, in the treatment of hepatoma. PMID:18203281

  20. Chagas Disease Vector Control in a Hyperendemic Setting: The First 11 Years of Intervention in Cochabamba, Bolivia

    PubMed Central

    Espinoza, Natalisisy; Borrás, Rafael; Abad-Franch, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Background Chagas disease has historically been hyperendemic in the Bolivian Department of Cochabamba. In the early 2000s, an extensive vector control program was implemented; 1.34 million dwelling inspections were conducted to ascertain infestation (2000–2001/2003–2011), with blanket insecticide spraying in 2003–2005 and subsequent survey-spraying cycles targeting residual infestation foci. Here, we assess the effects of this program on dwelling infestation rates (DIRs). Methodology/Principal Findings Program records were used to calculate annual, municipality-level aggregate DIRs (39 municipalities); very high values in 2000–2001 (median: 0.77–0.69) dropped to ∼0.03 from 2004 on. A linear mixed model (with municipality as a random factor) suggested that infestation odds decreased, on average, by ∼28% (95% confidence interval [CI95] 6–44%) with each 10-fold increase in control effort. A second, better-fitting mixed model including year as an ordinal predictor disclosed large DIR reductions in 2001–2003 (odds ratio [OR] 0.11, CI95 0.06–0.19) and 2003–2004 (OR 0.22, CI95 0.14–0.34). Except for a moderate decrease in 2005–2006, no significant changes were detected afterwards. In both models, municipality-level DIRs correlated positively with previous-year DIRs and with the extent of municipal territory originally covered by montane dry forests. Conclusions/Significance Insecticide-spraying campaigns had very strong, long-lasting effects on DIRs in Cochabamba. However, post-intervention surveys consistently detected infestation in ∼3% of dwellings, underscoring the need for continuous surveillance; higher DIRs were recorded in the capital city and, more generally, in municipalities dominated by montane dry forest – an eco-region where wild Triatoma infestans are widespread. Traditional strategies combining insecticide spraying and longitudinal surveillance are thus confirmed as very effective means for area-wide Chagas disease vector

  1. [Epidemiologic knowledge and current situation of Chagas disease in the state of Jalisco, Mexico].

    PubMed

    Lozano-Kasten, Felipe; Magallón-Gastélum, Ezequiel; Soto-Gutiérrez, Margarita; Kasten-Monges, Marina; Bosseno, Marie-France; Brenière, Simone Frédérique

    2008-01-01

    Chagas disease in the state of Jalisco, Mexico was described for the first time in 1967; however, knowledge on the disease remains in a slow process. Between 1967 and 2006, the disease was described in its acute and chronic forms. The vector species have been identified, and the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi has been isolated and genetically characterized. Also, the magnitude of the infection in humans has been determined through serological studies of different populations as well as of blood donors. The up-to-dateness of knowledge of the disease in the state of Jalisco, unveils a necessity of increased research on the epidemiology of Chagas disease as well as on clinical studies to assess the health of individuals and the populations.

  2. Sperm Morphological Features Associated with Chronic Chagas Disease in the Semen of Experimentally Infected Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Morales, Olivia; Pedro-Martínez, Elvia; Hernández-Pichardo, José Ernesto; Alejandre-Aguilar, Ricardo; Aranda-Fraustro, Alberto; Graullera-Rivera, Verónica; Arce-Fonseca, Minerva

    2014-01-01

    The presence of trypanosomatids in the reproductive systems of different mammals (causing genital lesions in the acute stage of the disease) may predispose the animals to low semen quality. However, there are no studies examining the alterations in the sperm morphological features in the chronic stage of Trypanosoma cruzi infection. Knowledge of these aspects is important to understand the other ways of transmission of the Chagas disease. Progressive motility, mass motility, concentration, and sperm morphology of 84 ejaculates of dogs that were chronically infected with T. cruzi were evaluated. Most of the findings were consistent with the reference values and with those obtained from healthy control dogs. The scrotal circumference was not correlated with spermatozoa concentration in the infected animals. In conclusion, the T. cruzi Ninoa (MHOM/MX/1994/Ninoa) strain does not cause significant alterations in the semen quality of dogs experiencing chronic Chagas disease (at concentrations of 5 × 104 to 1 × 106 parasites per animal). PMID:25114010

  3. [The contribution of Carlos Chagas Filho to the institutionalization of scientific research in Brazilian universities].

    PubMed

    Almeida, Darcy Fontoura de

    2012-06-01

    This paper studies the period considered the 'prehistory' of the Instituto de Biofísica, namely between November 1937 and October 1945, during which Carlos Chagas Filho championed the inclusion of scientific research at Universidade do Brasil (UB), despite facing multiple and complex obstacles. The lack of successful precedents at UB isolated him to one inexpressive chair. The equipment available was inadequate for his purposes; there were no official sources and forms of access to funding for science or trained personnel for research activities. On the other hand, Chagas Filho won over allies due both to the political and social clout of his name and his marriage, and to his scientific influence ensuing from his success in attaining the goals he fought for.

  4. Population differentiation of the Chagas disease vector Triatoma maculata (Erichson, 1848) from Colombia and Venezuela.

    PubMed

    Monsalve, Yoman; Panzera, Francisco; Herrera, Leidi; Triana-Chávez, Omar; Gómez-Palacio, Andrés

    2016-06-01

    The emerging vector of Chagas disease, Triatoma maculata (Hemiptera, Reduviidae), is one of the most widely distributed Triatoma species in northern South America. Despite its increasing relevance as a vector, no consistent picture of the magnitude of genetic and phenetic diversity has yet been developed. Here, several populations of T. maculata from eleven Colombia and Venezuela localities were analyzed based on the morphometry of wings and the mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase subunit 4 (ND4) gene sequences. Our results showed clear morphometric and genetic differences among Colombian and Venezuelan populations, indicating high intraspecific diversity. Inter-population divergence is suggested related to East Cordillera in Colombia. Analyses of other populations from Colombia, Venezuela, and Brazil from distinct eco-geographic regions are still needed to understand its systematics and phylogeography as well as its actual role as a vector of Chagas disease.

  5. [Progress towards the interruption of transmission of Chagas disease in the southern countries].

    PubMed

    Moncayo, A

    1999-01-01

    The epidemiological and entomological data and the trends observed in the decreasing of the incidence of infection in young age groups indicate that only ninety years after the discovery of Chagas disease, the control of vectorial and transfusional transmission has reduced the incidence by 70% in the Southern Cone countries (Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Paraguay and Uruguay). This has been accomplished thanks to the political and financial engagement of the concerned governments who have invested US$340 millions since 1991 to the present. The initiatives to interrupt transmission of Chagas in the Andean countries and the Central American countries have begun their activities in 1997 and the evolution of the control operations allows to forecast the complete interruption in these areas before the year 2010 to comply with the mandate of Resolution WHA. 52.14 of the World Health Assembly in May 1998.

  6. Epidemiology of Mortality Related to Chagas' Disease in Brazil, 1999–2007

    PubMed Central

    Martins-Melo, Francisco Rogerlândio; Alencar, Carlos Henrique; Ramos, Alberto Novaes; Heukelbach, Jorg

    2012-01-01

    Background Chagas' disease is an important neglected public health problem in many Latin American countries, but population-based epidemiological data are scarce. Here we present a nationwide analysis on Chagas-associated mortality, and risk factors for death from this disease. Methodology/Principal Findings We analyzed all death certificates of individuals who died between 1999 and 2007 in Brazil, based on the nationwide Mortality Information System (a total of 243 data sets with about 9 million entries). Chagas' disease was mentioned in 53,930 (0.6%) of death certificates, with 44,537 (82.6%) as an underlying cause and 9,387 (17.4%) as an associated cause of death. Acute Chagas' disease was responsible for 2.8% of deaths. The mean standardized mortality rate was 3.36/100.000 inhabitants/year. Nationwide standardized mortality rates reduced gradually, from 3.78 (1999) to 2.78 (2007) deaths/year per 100,000 inhabitants (−26.4%). Standardized mortality rates were highest in the Central-West region, ranging from 15.23 in 1999 to 9.46 in 2007 (−37.9%), with a significant negative linear trend (p = 0.001; R2 = 82%). Proportional mortality considering multiple causes of death was 0.60%. The Central-West showed highest proportional mortality among regions (2.17%), with a significant linear negative trend, from 2.28% to 1.90% (−19.5%; p = 0.001; R2 = 84%). There was a significant increase in the Northeast of 38.5% (p = 0.006; R2 = 82%). Bivariable analysis on risk factors for death from Chagas' disease showed highest relative risks (RR) in older age groups (RR: 10.03; 95% CI: 9.40–10.70; p<0.001) and those residing in the Central-West region (RR: 15.01; 95% CI: 3.90–16.22; p<0.001). In logistic regression analysis, age ≥30 years (adjusted OR: 10.81; 95% CI: 10.03–10.65; p<0.001) and residence in one of the three high risk states Minas Gerais, Goiás or the Federal District (adjusted OR: 5.12; 95% CI: 5.03–5.22, p<0.001) maintained

  7. Rational modification of a candidate cancer drug for use against Chagas disease.

    PubMed

    Kraus, James M; Verlinde, Christophe L M J; Karimi, Mandana; Lepesheva, Galina I; Gelb, Michael H; Buckner, Frederick S

    2009-03-26

    Chagas disease is one of the major neglected diseases of the world. Existing drug therapies are limited, ineffective, and highly toxic. We describe a novel strategy of drug discovery of adapting an existing clinical compound with excellent pharmaceutical properties to target a pathogenic organism. The protein farnesyltransferase (PFT) inhibitor tipifarnib, now in phase III anticancer clinical trials, was previously found to kill Trypanosoma cruzi by blocking sterol 14 alpha-demethylase (14DM). We rationally developed tipifarnib analogues that display reduced affinity for human PFT to reduce toxicity while increasing affinity for parasite 14DM. The lead compound has picomolar activity against cultured T. cruzi and is efficacious in a mouse model of acute Chagas disease.

  8. [Carlos Chagas Filho: an articulator of the history of sciences in Brazil].

    PubMed

    Domingues, Heloisa Maria Bertol

    2012-06-01

    A letter sent in 1982 by a group of scientists to the president of Conselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Científico e Tecnológico appealed for a policy of preservation of Brazilian scientific culture. The name of Carlos Chagas Filho topped the list of signatures thereby proving his commitment to that proposal, the ideological structure of which was part of his experience in scientific policy in Brazil and abroad. This document harks back to the practice of the history of the sciences in Brazil and the creation of places for the safeguard and organization of scientific memory, such as the Museu de Astronomia e Ciências Afins, Casa de Oswaldo Cruz and the Sociedade Brasileira de História da Ciência, of which Carlos Chagas Filho was an inaugural member of the board of directors.

  9. Rational Modification of a Candidate Cancer Drug for Use Against Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kraus, James M; Verlinde, Christophe LMJ; Karimi, Mandana; Lepesheva, Galina I.; Gelb, Michael H; Buckner, Frederick S.

    2009-01-01

    Chagas disease is one of the major neglected diseases of the world. Existing drug therapies are limited, ineffective and highly toxic. We describe a novel strategy of drug discovery of adapting an existing clinical compound with excellent pharmaceutical properties to target a pathogenic organism. The protein farnesyltransferase (PFT) inhibitor tipifarnib, now in phase III anti-cancer clinical trials, was previously found to kill Trypanosoma cruzi by blocking sterol 14α-demethylase (14DM). We rationally developed tipifarnib analogs that display reduced affinity for human PFT to reduce toxicity, while increasing affinity for parasite 14DM. The lead compound has picomolar activity against cultured T. cruzi and is efficacious in a mouse model of acute Chagas disease. PMID:19239254

  10. [Cecílio Romaña, Romaña's sign and Chagas' disease].

    PubMed

    Dias, J C

    1997-01-01

    Cecílio Romaña was an important Argentinean researcher dedicated to tropical diseases in the period 1930-1960, recently died in Barcelona. Working mainly on the epidemiological, clinical and pathological aspects of American trypanosomiasis, Romaña became very famous in 1935 when he accurately described the most typical portal recognized in all the endemic area with the cognomen of "Romaña sign". This description caused an enormous polemic with Romaña's then director, the great Salvador Mazza, who never accepted the specificity of the sign and, much less, its popular name (which was proposed by the Brazilian researchers Emmanuel Dias and Evandro Chagas). This history is briefly summarized in the present article, as well as the great impact of Romaña's discovery in the recognition of the acute Chagas' disease in all the endemic area.

  11. The Catalonian Expert Patient Programme for Chagas Disease: An Approach to Comprehensive Care Involving Affected Individuals.

    PubMed

    Claveria Guiu, Isabel; Caro Mendivelso, Johanna; Ouaarab Essadek, Hakima; González Mestre, Maria Asunción; Albajar-Viñas, Pedro; Gómez I Prat, Jordi

    2017-02-01

    The Catalonian Expert Patient Programme on Chagas disease is a initiative, which is part of the Chronic Disease Programme. It aims to boost responsibility of patients for their own health and to promote self-care. The programme is based on nine sessions conducted by an expert patient. Evaluation was focusing in: habits and lifestyle/self-care, knowledge of disease, perception of health, self-esteem, participant satisfaction, and compliance with medical follow-up visits. Eighteen participants initiated the programme and 15 completed it. The participants were Bolivians. The 66.7 % of them had been diagnosed with chagas disease in Spain. The 100 % mentioned that they would participate in this activity again and would recommend it to family and friends. The knowledge about disease improve after sessions. The method used in the programme could serve as a key strategy in the field of comprehensive care for individuals with this disease.

  12. Circadian entrainment by light and host in the Chagas disease vector, Triatoma infestans.

    PubMed

    Valentinuzzi, Verónica Sandra; Amelotti, Ivana; Gorla, David Eladio; Catalá, Silvia Susana; Ralph, Martin Roland

    2014-03-01

    Triatoma infestans (Reduviidae: Triatominae, "kissing bug") is the main insect vector of Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, a chronic trypanosomiasis infecting 10 million people world-wide. This hematophagous bug feeds on diurnal and nocturnal species during each host's quiescent time. As the hosts are also its major predators, kissing bugs are subjected to dual selective pressures from a single source. Therefore, synchronization of feeding with the host's behavior is critical to the insects' survival. We show that nonphotic signals linked to the host eclipse the role of light and dark as the primary circadian zeitgeber for these bugs, although light still strongly inhibits locomotor behavior directly. In nature, this combination provides the insect with great flexibility in organizing physiology and behavior: anticipating a quiescent host or avoiding its potential predation while remaining directly responsive to immediate environmental conditions. Manipulation of nonphotic entrainment could be a useful chronobiotic tool in the control of Chagas disease.

  13. [Urbanization of Chagas disease in Peru: experiences in prevention and control].

    PubMed

    Náquira, César

    2014-04-01

    In Peru, Chagas disease has an epidemiological significance in three macro-regions, one of them is the southern macro-region formed by the departments of Arequipa, Moquegua and Tacna. In 1965 a successful control was performed by house spraying insecticides, however, the persistence of the vector made it necessary for a second control plan that was implemented in 2000 and followed the guidelines of CONAL Plan, based on the elimination of Triatoma infestans and screening in blood banks.This plan was successful in Tacna and Moquegua, therefore these departments were considered free of vectorial transmission by the Pan American Health Organization. A ssimilar situation has not been achieved in the department of Arequipa because of the presence, among other factors, of rural migration to the city, in this way the urbanization of Chagas disease is a new epidemiological scenario of which we need to know more.

  14. Radionuclide evaluation of left-ventricular function in chronic Chagas' cardiomyopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Arreaza, N.; Puigbo, J.J.; Acquatella, H. Casal, H.; Giordano, H.; Valecillos, R.; Mendoza, I.; Perez, J.F.; Hirschhaut, E.; Combellas, I.

    1983-07-01

    Left-ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and abnormalities of regional wall motion (WMA) were studied by means of radionuclide ventriculography in 41 patients prospectively diagnosed as having chronic Chagas' disease. Thirteen patients were asymptomatic (ASY), 16 were arrhythmic (ARR), and 12 had congestive heart failure (CHF). Mean LVEF was normal in ASY but markedly depressed in CHF. Regional WMAs were minimal in ASY and their severity increased in ARR. Most CHFs (75%) had diffuse hypokinesia of the left ventricle. Seven patients had a distinct apical aneurysm. Correlation between radionuclide and contrast ventriculography data was good in 17 patients. Selective coronary arteriography showed normal arteries in all patients. Therefore, chronic Chagas' heart disease joins ischemic heart disease as a cause of regional WMA.

  15. Massive right-sided cardiac thrombosis in Chagas' heart disease without left ventricular dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Bestetti, Reinaldo B; Corbucci, Hélio A R; Cardinalli-Neto, Augusto

    2011-02-01

    A 63-year-old woman with the diagnosis of mega-oesophagus secondary to chronic Chagas' disease and no past cardiac history was referred for cardiac evaluation. The resting ECG showed right bundle-branch block, whereas a 2-D echocardiogram revealed marked right ventricular dilatation with hypokinesia, right atrial dilatation, normal pulmonary artery pressure, and normal left ventricular ejection fraction. A large, irregularly shaped mass, arising from the right atrium and protruding into the right ventricle through the tricuspid valve, with several different bizarre forms inside the right atrium during systole and/or diastole was seen on 2-D echocardiogram. Therefore, massive right-sided thrombosis can be detected in Chagas' disease patients with no overt right- and left-sided ventricular failure.

  16. Evidence for Trypanosoma cruzi in adipose tissue in human chronic Chagas disease

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Adaliene Versiani Matos; Segatto, Marcela; Menezes, Zélia; Macedo, Andréa Mara; Gelape, Cláudio; de Oliveira Andrade, Luciana; Nagajyothi, Fnu; Scherer, Philipp E.; Teixeira, Mauro Martins; Tanowitz, Herbert B.

    2013-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi the cause of Chagas disease persists in tissues of infected experimental animals and humans. Here we demonstrate the persistence of the parasite in adipose tissue from of three of 10 elderly seropositive patients with chronic chagasic heart disease. Nine control patients had no parasites in the fat. We also demonstrate that T. cruzi parasitizes primary adipocytes in vitro. Thus, in humans as in mice the parasite may persist in adipose tissue for decades and become a reservoir of infection. PMID:21726660

  17. Evidence for Trypanosoma cruzi in adipose tissue in human chronic Chagas disease.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Adaliene Versiani Matos; Segatto, Marcela; Menezes, Zélia; Macedo, Andréa Mara; Gelape, Cláudio; de Oliveira Andrade, Luciana; Nagajyothi, Fnu; Scherer, Philipp E; Teixeira, Mauro Martins; Tanowitz, Herbert B

    2011-11-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi the cause of Chagas disease persists in tissues of infected experimental animals and humans. Here we demonstrate the persistence of the parasite in adipose tissue from of three of 10 elderly seropositive patients with chronic chagasic heart disease. Nine control patients had no parasites in the fat. We also demonstrate that T. cruzi parasitizes primary adipocytes in vitro. Thus, in humans as in mice the parasite may persist in adipose tissue for decades and become a reservoir of infection.

  18. Chagas disease: a Latin American health problem becoming a world health problem.

    PubMed

    Schmunis, Gabriel A; Yadon, Zaida E

    2010-01-01

    Political repression and/or economic stagnation stimulated the flow of migration from the 17 Latin American countries endemic for Chagas disease to developed countries. Because of this migration, Chagas disease, an autochthonous disease of the Continental Western Hemisphere is becoming a global health problem. In 2006, 3.8% of the 80,522 immigrants from those 17 countries to Australia were likely infected with Trypanosoma cruzi. In Canada in 2006, 3.5% of the 156,960 immigrants from Latin America whose country of origin was identified were estimated to have been infected. In Japan in 2007, there were 80,912 immigrants from Brazil, 15,281 from Peru, and 19,413 from other South American countries whose country of origin was not identified, a portion of whom may have been also infected. In 15 countries of Europe in 2005, excluding Spain, 2.9% of the 483,074 legal Latin American immigrants were estimated to be infected with T. cruzi. By 2008, Spain had received 1,678,711 immigrants from Latin American endemic countries; of these, 5.2% were potentially infected with T. cruzi and 17,390 may develop Chagas disease. Further, it was estimated that 24-92 newborns delivered by South American T. cruzi infected mothers in Spain may have been congenitally infected with T. cruzi in 2007. In the USA we estimated that 1.9% of approximately 13 million Latin American immigrants in 2000, and 2% of 17 million in 2007, were potentially infected with T. cruzi. Of these, 49,157 and 65,133 in 2000 and 2007 respectively, may have or may develop symptoms and signs of chronic Chagas disease. Governments should implement policies to prevent donations of blood and organs from T. cruzi infected donors. In addition, an infrastructure that assures detection and treatment of acute and chronic cases as well as congenital infection should be developed.

  19. A Scientometric Evaluation of the Chagas Disease Implementation Research Programme of the PAHO and TDR

    PubMed Central

    Carbajal-de-la-Fuente, Ana Laura; Yadón, Zaida E.

    2013-01-01

    The Special Programme for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases (TDR) is an independent global programme of scientific collaboration cosponsored by the United Nations Children's Fund, the United Nations Development Program, the World Bank, and the World Health Organization. TDR's strategy is based on stewardship for research on infectious diseases of poverty, empowerment of endemic countries, research on neglected priority needs, and the promotion of scientific collaboration influencing global efforts to combat major tropical diseases. In 2001, in view of the achievements obtained in the reduction of transmission of Chagas disease through the Southern Cone Initiative and the improvement in Chagas disease control activities in some countries of the Andean and the Central American Initiatives, TDR transferred the Chagas Disease Implementation Research Programme (CIRP) to the Communicable Diseases Unit of the Pan American Health Organization (CD/PAHO). This paper presents a scientometric evaluation of the 73 projects from 18 Latin American and European countries that were granted by CIRP/PAHO/TDR between 1997 and 2007. We analyzed all final reports of the funded projects and scientific publications, technical reports, and human resource training activities derived from them. Results about the number of projects funded, countries and institutions involved, gender analysis, number of published papers in indexed scientific journals, main topics funded, patents inscribed, and triatomine species studied are presented and discussed. The results indicate that CIRP/PAHO/TDR initiative has contributed significantly, over the 1997–2007 period, to Chagas disease knowledge as well as to the individual and institutional-building capacity. PMID:24244761

  20. High Resolution Esophageal Manometry in Patients with Chagas Disease: A Cross-Sectional Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Montalvá, Adrián; Moris, María; Mego, Marianela; Salvador, Fernando; Accarino, Anna; Ramírez, Kathleen; Azpiroz, Fernando; Ruiz-de-Leon, Antonio; Molina, Israel

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Gastrointestinal involvement affects 30–40% of the patients with chronic Chagas disease. Esophageal symptoms appear once the structural damage is established. Little is known about the usefulness of high resolution manometry to early identification of esophageal involvement. Method We performed a cross-sectional study at the Vall d’Hebron University Hospital (Barcelona, Spain) between May 2011 and April 2012. Consecutive patients diagnosed with Chagas disease in the chronic phase were offered to participate. All patients underwent a structured questionnaire about digestive symptoms, a barium esophagogram (Rezende classification) and an esophageal high resolution manometry (HRM). A control group of patients with heartburn who underwent an esophageal HRM in our hospital was selected. Results 62 out of 73 patients that were included in the study fulfilled the study protocol. The median age of the Chagas disease group (CG) was 37 (IQR 32–45) years, and 42 (67.7%) patients were female. Twenty-seven (43.5%) patients had esophageal symptoms, heartburn being the most frequent. Esophagogram was abnormal in 5 (8.77%). The esophageal HRM in the CG showed a pathological motility pattern in 14 patients (22.6%). All of them had minor disorders of the peristalsis (13 with ineffective esophageal motility and 1 with fragmented peristalsis). Hypotonic lower esophageal sphincter was found more frequently in the CG than in the control group (21% vs 3.3%; p<0.01). Upper esophageal sphincter was hypertonic in 22 (35.5%) and hypotonic in 1 patient. When comparing specific manometric parameters or patterns in the CG according to the presence of symptoms or esophagogram no statistically significant association were seen, except for distal latency. Conclusion The esophageal involvement measured by HRM in patients with chronic Chagas disease in our cohort is 22.6%. All the patients with esophageal alterations had minor disorders of the peristalsis. Symptoms and

  1. Efficacy of Lychnopholide Polymeric Nanocapsules after Oral and Intravenous Administration in Murine Experimental Chagas Disease.

    PubMed

    de Mello, Carlos Geraldo Campos; Branquinho, Renata Tupinambá; Oliveira, Maykon Tavares; Milagre, Matheus Marques; Saúde-Guimarães, Dênia Antunes; Mosqueira, Vanessa Carla Furtado; Lana, Marta de

    2016-09-01

    The etiological treatment of Chagas disease remains neglected. The compounds available show several limitations, mainly during the chronic phase. Lychnopholide encapsulated in polymeric nanocapsules (LYC-NC) was efficacious in mice infected with Trypanosoma cruzi and treated by intravenous administration during the acute phase (AP). As the oral route is preferred for treatment of chronic infections, such as Chagas disease, this study evaluated the use of oral LYC-NC in the AP and also compared it with LYC-NC administered to mice by the oral and intravenous routes during the chronic phase (CP). The therapeutic efficacy was evaluated by fresh blood examination, hemoculture, PCR, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The cure rates in the AP and CP were 62.5% and 55.6%, respectively, upon oral administration of LYC-poly(d,l-lactide)-polyethylene glycol nanocapsules (LYC-PLA-PEG-NC) and 57.0% and 30.0%, respectively, with LYC-poly-ε-caprolactone nanocapsules (LYC-PCL-NC). These cure rates were significantly higher than that of free LYC, which did not cure any animals. LYC-NC formulations administered orally during the AP showed cure rates similar to that of benznidazole, but only LYC-NC cured mice in the CP. Similar results were achieved with intravenous treatment during the CP. The higher cure rates obtained with LYC loaded in PLA-PEG-NC may be due to the smaller particle size of these NC and the presence of PEG, which influence tissue diffusion and the controlled release of LYC. Furthermore, PLA-PEG-NC may improve the stability of the drug in the gastrointestinal tract. This work is the first report of cure of experimental Chagas disease via oral administration during the CP. These findings represent a new and important perspective for oral treatment of Chagas disease.

  2. [Chagas' disease in patients in chronic hemodialysis. Prevalence and risk of transmission by blood transfusion].

    PubMed

    Lorca, M; Lorca, E; Atías, A; Plubins, L

    1989-06-01

    A serologic study of Chagas disease was performed in 110 patients submitted to chronic hemodialisis and blood transfusions. Immunofluorescence antibody testing (IgG and IgM) was positive in 6 out of 62 patients receiving multiple blood transfusions (9.7%), but negative in all 48 subjects without transfusions. Thus, repeated blood transfusion is a significant risk for T cruzi infection in chronic hemodialized patients.

  3. Efficacy of Lychnopholide Polymeric Nanocapsules after Oral and Intravenous Administration in Murine Experimental Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    de Mello, Carlos Geraldo Campos; Branquinho, Renata Tupinambá; Oliveira, Maykon Tavares; Milagre, Matheus Marques; Saúde-Guimarães, Dênia Antunes; Mosqueira, Vanessa Carla Furtado

    2016-01-01

    The etiological treatment of Chagas disease remains neglected. The compounds available show several limitations, mainly during the chronic phase. Lychnopholide encapsulated in polymeric nanocapsules (LYC-NC) was efficacious in mice infected with Trypanosoma cruzi and treated by intravenous administration during the acute phase (AP). As the oral route is preferred for treatment of chronic infections, such as Chagas disease, this study evaluated the use of oral LYC-NC in the AP and also compared it with LYC-NC administered to mice by the oral and intravenous routes during the chronic phase (CP). The therapeutic efficacy was evaluated by fresh blood examination, hemoculture, PCR, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The cure rates in the AP and CP were 62.5% and 55.6%, respectively, upon oral administration of LYC–poly(d,l-lactide)–polyethylene glycol nanocapsules (LYC-PLA-PEG-NC) and 57.0% and 30.0%, respectively, with LYC–poly-ε-caprolactone nanocapsules (LYC-PCL-NC). These cure rates were significantly higher than that of free LYC, which did not cure any animals. LYC-NC formulations administered orally during the AP showed cure rates similar to that of benznidazole, but only LYC-NC cured mice in the CP. Similar results were achieved with intravenous treatment during the CP. The higher cure rates obtained with LYC loaded in PLA-PEG-NC may be due to the smaller particle size of these NC and the presence of PEG, which influence tissue diffusion and the controlled release of LYC. Furthermore, PLA-PEG-NC may improve the stability of the drug in the gastrointestinal tract. This work is the first report of cure of experimental Chagas disease via oral administration during the CP. These findings represent a new and important perspective for oral treatment of Chagas disease. PMID:27324760

  4. The Prevalence of Chagas Heart Disease in a Central Bolivian Community Endemic for Trypanosoma Cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Yager, Jessica E.; Lozano Beltran, Daniel F.; Torrico, Faustino; Gilman, Robert H.; Bern, Caryn

    2015-01-01

    Background Though the incidence of new Trypanosoma cruzi infections has decreased significantly in endemic regions in the Americas, medical professionals continue to encounter a high burden of resulting Chagas disease among infected adults. The current prevalence of Chagas heart disease in a community setting is not known; nor is it known how recent insecticide vector control measures may have impacted the progression of cardiac disease in an infected population. Objectives and Methods Nested within a community serosurvey in rural and periurban communities in central Bolivia, we performed a cross-sectional cardiac substudy to evaluate adults for historical, clinical, and electrocardiographic evidence of cardiac disease. All adults between the ages of 20 and 60 years old with T. cruzi infection and those with a clinical history, physical exam, or ECG consistent with cardiac abnormalities were also scheduled for echocardiography. Results and conclusions Of the 604 cardiac substudy participants with definitive serology results, 183 were seropositive for infection with T. cruzi (30.3%). Participants who were seropositive for T. cruzi infection were more likely to have conduction system defects (1.6% versus 0 for complete right bundle branch block and 10.4% versus 1.9% for any bundle branch block; p=0.008 and p<0.001, respectively). However, there was no statistically significant difference in the prevalence of bradycardia among seropositive versus seronegative participants. Echocardiogram findings were not consistent with a high burden of Chagas cardiomyopathy: valvulopathies were the most common abnormality, and few participants were found to have low ejection fraction or left ventricular dilatation. No participants had significant heart failure. Though almost one third of adults in the community were seropositive for T. cruzi infection, few had evidence of Chagas heart disease. PMID:26407509

  5. [Regression of acute Chagas cardiopathy in an infant with a suspected transfusion infection].

    PubMed

    Gónzalez-Zambrano, H; Amador Mena, J E; Delgadillo Jaime, C B

    1999-01-01

    Chagas disease was described in Mexico by Mazzotti in 1940. Post-transfusional cases have not been described. We report proved case of acute chagasic cardiopathy in a nine months old infant with suspected transfusional infection during neonatal period. She was treated with nifurtimox with disappearance of parasites and regression of cardiopathy. She is asymptomatic nine years afterwards with normal growth and negative parasitology and serology.

  6. Human Chagas Disease and Migration in the Context of Globalization: Some Particular Aspects

    PubMed Central

    Pinto Dias, João Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Human Chagas disease originated in Latin America, being spread around the world in relation with multiple bioecological, sociocultural, and political factors. The process of the disease production and dispersion is discussed, emphasizing the human migration and correlated aspects, in the context of globalization. Positive and negative consequences concern the future of this trypanosomiasis, mainly in terms of the ecologic and sociopolitical characteristics of the endemic and nonendemic countries. PMID:23606862

  7. Oesophageal motility disorders in infected immigrants with Chagas disease in a non-endemic European area

    PubMed Central

    Valerio, Lluís; Vallès, Xavier; Morales, Betty; Garcia-Diaz, M Immaculada; Pedro-Botet, M Luisa; Serra, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    Background Immigration-related new diseases pose a growing challenge for healthcare services in receptor countries. Following Latin American migration, Chagas disease has inevitably appeared in Europe. Aim To determine the prevalence and characteristics of oesophageal motility disorders in immigrants infected with Trypanosoma cruzi, using high resolution oesophageal manometry (HREM). Methods In all newly-diagnosed cases with chronic Chagas infection referring upper digestive symptoms, a protocolized clinical evaluation and complementary tests including barium oesophagogram and HREM were carried out. As control group, 14 healthy subjects from the same endemic areas were studied with HREM. Results We included 61 patients (46 female, 15 male; age range 26–63 years). Only seven patients (11%) had a minor alteration on barium oesophagogram. By contrast, 23 (37%) patients showed an alteration in oesophageal manometry, mainly minor motility disorders (34%). Only one healthy control (7%) had a minor motility disorder at HREM (p = 0.029 vs. patients). Conclusions Oesophageal motor disorders in infected immigrants with Chagas disease are common, and mainly characterized by a minor motility disorder that is not detected by barium oesophagogram. Hence, as well as barium oesophagogram examination, HREM should be considered, to assess oesophageal damage in this specific group of patients. PMID:27536373

  8. Positive deviance study to inform a Chagas disease control program in southern Ecuador

    PubMed Central

    Nieto-Sanchez, Claudia; Baus, Esteban G; Guerrero, Darwin; Grijalva, Mario J

    2015-01-01

    Chagas disease is caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, which is mainly transmitted by the faeces of triatomine insects that find favourable environments in poorly constructed houses. Previous studies have documented persistent triatomine infestation in houses in the province of Loja in southern Ecuador despite repeated insecticide and educational interventions. We aim to develop a sustainable strategy for the interruption of Chagas disease transmission by promoting living environments that are designed to prevent colonisation of rural houses by triatomines. This study used positive deviance to inform the design of an anti-triatomine prototype house by identifying knowledge, attitudes and practices used by families that have remained triatomine-free (2010-2012). Positive deviants reported practices that included maintenance of structural elements of the house, fumigation of dwellings and animal shelters, sweeping with "insect repellent" plants and relocation of domestic animals away from the house, among others. Participants favoured construction materials that do not drastically differ from those currently used (adobe walls and tile roofs). They also expressed their belief in a clear connection between a clean house and health. The family's economic dynamics affect space use and must be considered in the prototype's design. Overall, the results indicate a positive climate for the introduction of housing improvements as a protective measure against Chagas disease in this region. PMID:25807468

  9. Chagas disease and housing improvement in northeastern Brazil: a cross-sectional survey.

    PubMed

    Lima, Marli M; Carvalho-Costa, Filipe A; Toma, Helena K; Borges-Pereira, José; de Oliveira, Tiago Guedes; Sarquis, Otília

    2015-05-01

    Chagas disease was investigated in two new settlements of landless rural workers inhabiting prefabricated, triatomine-proof houses and in four neighboring older communities where mud huts were still well suitable for vectors. Through a cross-sectional survey and entomological assessment, we surveyed 148 houses/families in the two new settlements and in 47 houses/families in the four older localities. We determined seroprevalence of Chagas disease through IFI and Elisa (eluates) assays and searched for vectors in the domestic and peridomestic environments. Seroprevalence reached 0.6% (3/466) in the new settlements and 0.8% (1/115) in the older communities. Triatomines were not found in the new settlements, while 7 Triatoma brasiliensis, 4 T. pseudomaculata, 1 Panstrongylus lutzi, and 145 Rhodnius nasutus were collected in the older localities. In addition, a colony of T. brasiliensis (n = 55) was encountered inside a school attended by children of the region. Parasite strains isolated from the insects were characterized as T. cruzi I. Despite the low prevalence of Chagas disease in both scenarios, entomological surveillance must be strengthened and housing improvement reinforced in order to control vector transmission. The risk of infection by the vectors was lower in the settlements of improved homes, where conditions for colonization of the peridomestic environment by transmitting insects were not observed.

  10. The main sceneries of Chagas disease transmission. The vectors, blood and oral transmissions - A comprehensive review

    PubMed Central

    Coura, José Rodrigues

    2015-01-01

    This review deals with transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi by the most important domestic vectors, blood transfusion and oral intake. Among the vectors, Triatoma infestans, Panstrongylus megistus, Rhodnius prolixus, Triatoma dimidiata, Triatoma brasiliensis, Triatoma pseudomaculata, Triatoma sordida, Triatoma maculata, Panstrongylus geniculatus, Rhodnius ecuadoriensis and Rhodnius pallescens can be highlighted. Transmission of Chagas infection, which has been brought under control in some countries in South and Central America, remains a great challenge, particularly considering that many endemic countries do not have control over blood donors. Even more concerning is the case of non-endemic countries that receive thousands of migrants from endemic areas that carry Chagas disease, such as the United States of America, in North America, Spain, in Europe, Japan, in Asia, and Australia, in Oceania. In the Brazilian Amazon Region, since Shaw et al. (1969) described the first acute cases of the disease caused by oral transmission, hundreds of acute cases of the disease due to oral transmission have been described in that region, which is today considered to be endemic for oral transmission. Several other outbreaks of acute Chagas disease by oral transmission have been described in different states of Brazil and in other South American countries. PMID:25466622

  11. [The control of the transmission by transfusion of Chagas' disease in the Southern Cone Initiative].

    PubMed

    Dias, J C; Schofield, C J

    1998-01-01

    The Southern Cone Initiative against Chagas' disease, was launched in 1991. The aim was to interrupt the transmission of Chagas disease by elimination of domestic populations of the major vector, Triatoma infestans, and by improved screening of blood donors. As a result of these activities, a marked reduction in the risk of transfusional transmission can now be seen throughout the programme area. In addition to specific legislation concerning the quality of transfused blood, a series of national and regional reference laboratories have been set up with the help of PAHO in order to improve the quality of pre-transfusional serodiagnosis. Results indicate a progressive reduction in the overall infection prevalence of blood donors, and show that the age-prevalence curve has shifted towards older age-groups. In this paper we analyse the changes in infection prevalence in the Southern Cone countries, drawing attention to the situation in Bolivia which has the highest indices of infection and lowest levels of coverage by the control programme. In this situation chemoprophylaxis of blood prior to transfusion may be recommended in accordance with PAHO criteria. In the medium term however, interruption of human Chagas disease transmission may be expected over most of the Southern Cone region, as long as the control activities are continued and consolidated through effective epidemiological surveillance.

  12. Overcoming research barriers in Chagas disease-designing effective implementation science.

    PubMed

    Henao-Martínez, Andrés F; Colborn, Kathryn; Parra-Henao, Gabriel

    2017-01-01

    Chagas disease is a complex tropical parasitic infection. It affects a significant portion of the population in Latin America, especially in areas of poverty and poor access to health care. It also affects immigrants in high-income countries who lack access to health care due to their legal status. Millions of people are at risk of contracting the disease, and approximately 30 % of chronically infected patients will develop cardiomyopathy. The cost of caring for patients that have been infected is substantial. Basic science research has introduced new concepts and knowledge for the parasite and vector biology as well as better understanding of the pathophysiology of the disease. These research findings nevertheless require effective and timely translation into clinical practice. Likewise, the design of new research projects should account for the multiple system-based barriers. Implementation science facilitates the applicability of research findings and identifies barriers to its execution. Creation of implementation science measures to reach and sustain research programs with greater potential to impact Chagas disease are lacking. This point of view proposes opportunities for implementation science in Chagas disease and strategies for researching effective interventions for preventing and treating the disease.

  13. [American human trypanosomiasis 90 years after its discovery by Carlos Chagas. I. Epidemiology and control].

    PubMed

    Pays, J F

    1998-01-01

    It was in 1909 that Carlos Chagas described the disease which now bears his name. During the ensuing 90 years, our knowledge of this apparently whimsical, protozoan disease has grown enormously but many points remain unclear. Epidemiologically speaking, current knowledge is poor about the mechanisms and markers of variability of Trypanosoma cruzi, mechanisms allowing the organism to survive in the host, and susceptibility of infected individuals to disabling or fatal late complications. With regard to vector control, it is increasingly obvious that success will be more difficult than previously thought due to the likelihood that, as domestic species are exterminated, they will be replaced by semi-domesticated or wild species. Two other factors that have significantly changed the conventional epidemiological profile of Chagas'disease on the subcontinent over the past 50 years are human intervention in the environment and population migration from rural to urban zones. Despite the breakthroughs achieved in the last decade. Chagas'disease, with its multiple modes of transmission (vector-borne, congenital, and transfusional to name but the most important), diverse reservoir involving over 175 species, and potential for course of the disease in man, will remain a major health problem in Latin America countries for many years to come.

  14. A Novel Vaccine Approach for Chagas Disease Using Rare Adenovirus Serotype 48 Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Farrow, Anitra L.; Peng, Binghao J.; Gu, Linlin; Krendelchtchikov, Alexandre; Matthews, Qiana L.

    2016-01-01

    Due to the increasing amount of people afflicted worldwide with Chagas disease and an increasing prevalence in the United States, there is a greater need to develop a safe and effective vaccine for this neglected disease. Adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) is the most common adenovirus vector used for gene therapy and vaccine approaches, but its efficacy is limited by preexisting vector immunity in humans resulting from natural infections. Therefore, we have employed rare serotype adenovirus 48 (Ad48) as an alternative choice for adenovirus/Chagas vaccine therapy. In this study, we modified Ad5 and Ad48 vectors to contain T. cruzi’s amastigote surface protein 2 (ASP-2) in the adenoviral early gene. We also modified Ad5 and Ad48 vectors to utilize the “Antigen Capsid-Incorporation” strategy by adding T. cruzi epitopes to protein IX (pIX). Mice that were immunized with the modified vectors were able to elicit T. cruzi-specific humoral and cellular responses. This study indicates that Ad48-modified vectors function comparable to or even premium to Ad5-modified vectors. This study provides novel data demonstrating that Ad48 can be used as a potential adenovirus vaccine vector against Chagas disease. PMID:26978385

  15. Chagas disease in the 21st Century: a public health success or an emerging threat?

    PubMed Central

    Bonney, Kevin M.

    2014-01-01

    Chagas disease, caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, is a major public health burden in Latin America and a potentially serious emerging threat to a number of countries throughout the world. Although public health programs have significantly reduced the prevalence of Chagas disease in Latin America in recent decades, the number of infections in the United States and non-endemic countries in Europe and the Western Pacific Region continues to rise. Moreover, there is still no vaccine or highly effective cure available for the approximately 10 million people currently infected with T. cruzi, a third of which will develop potentially fatal cardiomyopathy and/or severe digestive tract disorders. As Chagas disease becomes an increasingly globalized public health issue in the twenty-first century, continued attentiveness from governmental and health organizations as well as improved diagnostic tools, expanded surveillance and increased research funding will be required to maintain existing public health successes and stymie the spread of the disease to new areas and populations. PMID:24626257

  16. First century of Chagas' disease: an overview on novel approaches to nifurtimox and benzonidazole delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Salomon, Claudio J

    2012-03-01

    Hundred years after the discovery of Chagas' disease, there is a lack of effective treatment to control this neglected disease caused by the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. The transmission is primarily through vector-borne blood transfusion or during pregnancy, producing high mortality and morbidity among poor people in many countries of Latin America. In the last decades, the efforts have been focused mainly on the elimination of vectors. At the same time, screening of blood donors in order to avoid transfusional transmission has been improved all over the world. However, Chagas' disease is still a major public health problem, with estimates of nearly 90 million people at risk of infection and more than eight million infected in 18 endemic countries. Despite the high incidence in endemic regions and the dissemination of neglected diseases in North America and Europe, to date, there are only two drugs developed and prescribed for the treatment of Chagas' disease, nifurtimox (tablets of 120 mg) and benzonidazole (tablets of 100 mg). In this review, different approaches carried out in the last decades for developing novel pharmaceutical formulations for the delivery of nifurtimox and benznidazole are discussed.

  17. Evaluation of Adult Chronic Chagas' Heart Disease Diagnosis by Molecular and Serological Methods ▿

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez, Juan David; Guhl, Felipe; Umezawa, Eufrosina Setsu; Morillo, Carlos A.; Rosas, Fernando; Marin-Neto, Jose A.; Restrepo, Silvia

    2009-01-01

    Chagas' disease caused by Trypanosoma cruzi is endemic in Latin America. T. cruzi presents heterogeneous populations and comprises two main genetic lineages, named T. cruzi I and T. cruzi II. Diagnosis in the chronic phase is based on conventional serological tests, including indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and diagnosis in the acute phase based on parasitological methods, including hemoculture. The objective of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic procedures of Chagas' disease in adult patients in the chronic phase by using a PCR assay and conventional serological tests, including TESA-blot as the gold standard. Samples were obtained from 240 clinical chronic chagasic patients. The sensitivities, compared to that of TESA-blot, were 70% for PCR using the kinetoplast region, 75% for PCR using the nuclear repetitive region, 99% for IIF, and 95% for ELISA. According to the serological tests results, we recommend that researchers assess the reliability and sensitivity of the commercial kit Chagatest ELISA recombinant, version 3.0 (Chagatest Rec v3.0; Wiener Lab, Rosario, Argentina), due to the lack of sensitivity. Based on our analysis, we concluded that PCR cannot be validated as a conventional diagnostic technique for Chagas' disease. These data have been corroborated by low levels of concordance with serology test results. It is recommended that PCR be used only for alternative diagnostic support. Using the nuclear repetitive region of T. cruzi, PCR could also be applicable for monitoring patients receiving etiologic treatment. PMID:19846646

  18. Current Understanding of Immunity to Trypanosoma cruzi Infection and Pathogenesis of Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Fabiana S.; Dutra, Walderez O.; Esper, Lisia; Gollob, Kenneth; Teixeira, Mauro M.; Factor, Stephen M.; Weiss, Louis M.; Nagajyothi, Fnu; Tanowitz, Herbert B.; Garg, Nisha J.

    2012-01-01

    Chagas disease caused by Trypanosoma cruzi remains an important neglected tropical disease and a cause of significant morbidity and mortality. No longer confined to endemic areas of Latin America, it is now found in non-endemic areas due to immigration. The parasite may persist in any tissue, but in recent years there has been increased recognition of adipose tissue both as an early target of infection and a reservoir of chronic infection. The major complications of this disease are cardiomyopathy and megasyndromes involving the gastrointestinal tract. The pathogenesis of Chagas disease is complex and multifactorial involving many interactive pathways. The significance of innate immunity, including the contributions of cytokines, chemokines, reactive oxygen species, and oxidative stress, has been emphasized. The role of the components of the eicosanoid pathway such as thromboxane A2 and the lipoxins has been demonstrated to have profound effects as both pro-and anti-inflammatory factors. Additionally, we discuss the vasoconstrictive actions of thromboxane A2 and endothelin-1n Chagas disease. Human immunity to T. cruzi infection and its role in pathogen control and disease progression have not been fully investigated. However, recently, it was demonstrated that a reduction in the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 was associated with clinically significant chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy. PMID:23076807

  19. Prevalence and Risk Factors for Chagas Disease in Pregnant Women in Casanare, Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Cucunubá, Zulma M.; Flórez, Astrid C.; Cárdenas, Ángela; Pavía, Paula; Montilla, Marleny; Aldana, Rodrigo; Villamizar, Katherine; Ríos, Lyda C.; Nicholls, Rubén S.; Puerta, Concepción J.

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge of the prevalence and risk factors associated with maternal infection is the first step to develop a surveillance system for congenital transmission of Chagas disease. We conducted a cross-sectional study in Casanare, a disease-endemic area in Colombia. A total of 982 patients were enrolled in the study. A global prevalence of Trypanosoma cruzi infection of 4.0% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.8–5.3%) was found. Multivariate analysis showed that the most important risk-associated factors were age > 29 years (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 3.4, 95% CI = 0.9–12.4), rural residency (aOR = 2.2, 95% CI = 1.0–4.6), low education level (aOR = 10.2, 95% CI = 1.6–82.7), and previous knowledge of the vector (aOR = 2.2, 95% CI = 1.0–4.9). Relatives and siblings of infected mothers showed a prevalence of 9.3%. These findings may help physicians to investigate congenital cases, screen Chagas disease in siblings and relatives, and provide early treatment to prevent the chronic complications of Chagas disease. PMID:23033397

  20. Positive deviance study to inform a Chagas disease control program in southern Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Nieto-Sanchez, Claudia; Baus, Esteban G; Guerrero, Darwin; Grijalva, Mario J

    2015-05-01

    Chagas disease is caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, which is mainly transmitted by the faeces of triatomine insects that find favourable environments in poorly constructed houses. Previous studies have documented persistent triatomine infestation in houses in the province of Loja in southern Ecuador despite repeated insecticide and educational interventions. We aim to develop a sustainable strategy for the interruption of Chagas disease transmission by promoting living environments that are designed to prevent colonisation of rural houses by triatomines. This study used positive deviance to inform the design of an anti-triatomine prototype house by identifying knowledge, attitudes and practices used by families that have remained triatomine-free (2010-2012). Positive deviants reported practices that included maintenance of structural elements of the house, fumigation of dwellings and animal shelters, sweeping with "insect repellent" plants and relocation of domestic animals away from the house, among others. Participants favoured construction materials that do not drastically differ from those currently used (adobe walls and tile roofs). They also expressed their belief in a clear connection between a clean house and health. The family's economic dynamics affect space use and must be considered in the prototype's design. Overall, the results indicate a positive climate for the introduction of housing improvements as a protective measure against Chagas disease in this region.

  1. Understanding transmissibility patterns of Chagas disease through complex vector-host networks.

    PubMed

    Rengifo-Correa, Laura; Stephens, Christopher R; Morrone, Juan J; Téllez-Rendón, Juan Luis; González-Salazar, Constantino

    2017-01-12

    Chagas disease is one of the most important vector-borne zoonotic diseases in Latin America. Control strategies could be improved if transmissibility patterns of its aetiologic agent, Trypanosoma cruzi, were better understood. To understand transmissibility patterns of Chagas disease in Mexico, we inferred potential vectors and hosts of T. cruzi from geographic distributions of nine species of Triatominae and 396 wild mammal species, respectively. The most probable vectors and hosts of T. cruzi were represented in a Complex Inference Network, from which we formulated a predictive model and several associated hypotheses about the ecological epidemiology of Chagas disease. We compiled a list of confirmed mammal hosts to test our hypotheses. Our tests allowed us to predict the most important potential hosts of T. cruzi and to validate the model showing that the confirmed hosts were those predicted to be the most important hosts. We were also able to predict differences in the transmissibility of T. cruzi among triatomine species from spatial data. We hope our findings help drive efforts for future experimental studies.

  2. Prevalence of Chagas Disease in Latin-American Migrants Living in Europe: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Requena-Méndez, Ana; Aldasoro, Edelweiss; de Lazzari, Elisa; Sicuri, Elisa; Brown, Michael; Moore, David A. J.; Gascon, Joaquim; Muñoz, Jose

    2015-01-01

    Background Few studies have assessed the burden of Chagas disease in non-endemic countries and most of them are based on prevalence estimates from Latin American (LA) countries that likely differ from the prevalence in migrants living in Europe. The aim of this study was to systematically review the existing data informing current understanding of the prevalence of Chagas disease in LA migrants living in European countries. Methods We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of studies reporting prevalence of Chagas disease in European countries belonging to the European Union (EU) before 2004 in accordance with the MOOSE guidelines and based on the database sources MEDLINE and Global Health. No restrictions were placed on study date, study design or language of publication. The pooled prevalence was estimated using random effect models based on DerSimonian & Laird method. Results We identified 18 studies conducted in five European countries. The random effect pooled prevalence was 4.2% (95%CI:2.2-6.7%); and the heterogeneity of Chagas disease prevalence among studies was high (I2 = 97%,p<0.001). Migrants from Bolivia had the highest prevalence of Chagas disease (18.1%, 95%CI:13.9–22.7%). Conclusions Prevalence of Chagas in LA migrants living in Europe is high, particularly in migrants from Bolivia and Paraguay. Data are highly heterogeneous dependent upon country of origin and within studies of migrants from the same country of origin. Country-specific prevalence differs from the estimates available from LA countries. Our meta-analysis provides prevalence estimates of Chagas disease that should be used to estimate the burden of disease in European countries. PMID:25680190

  3. The immunology of experimental Chagas' disease. IV. Production of lesions in rabbits similar to those of chronic Chagas' disease in man.

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, A. R.; Teixeira, M. L.; Santos-Buch, C. A.

    1975-01-01

    Eight rabbits that received a single inoculation of trypomastigotes of a virulent strain of Trypanosoma cruzi first developed a transient acute illness associated with parasitemia; later, 4 of these rabbits died with chronic myocarditis and/or with megacolon in the absence of demonstrable parasitemia or encysted parasites in tissues. Two of these rabbits with chronic myocarditis died unexpectedly. Three of the inoculated rabbits that survived the infection were sacrificed 18 months later and showed similar but less severe microscopic lesions. The remaining rabbit is alive and well at the time of writing (26 months) with negative blood cultures but high hemagglutinating antibody titers to T. cruzi antigens. The natural course of T. cruzi infection in rabbits and the lesions observed postmortem are similar to those recorded for humans with chronic Chagas' disease. Multiple injections of particulate subcellular antigens of T. cruzi in rabbits resulted in microscopic lesions similar to those observed in rabbits that survived protozoan infection. Sera of rabbits inoculated with T. cruzi have antibodies to striated and smooth muscle structures. However, evidence provided in this and in other experiments strongly suggest that the lesions of chronic Chagas' disease are produced by delayed hypersensitivity to T. cruzi antigens. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figures 3-4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:808136

  4. Clinical forms of Trypanosoma cruzi infected individuals in the chronic phase of Chagas disease in Puebla, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Guillén, María Del Carmen; López-Colombo, Aurelio; Ordóñez-Toquero, Guillermo; Gomez-Albino, Isidoro; Ramos-Jimenez, Judith; Torres-Rasgado, Enrique; Salgado-Rosas, Hilda; Romero-Díaz, Mónica; Pulido-Pérez, Patricia; Pérez-Fuentes, Ricardo

    2006-11-01

    In Mexico, despite the relatively high seroprevalence of Trypanosoma cruzi infection in humans in some areas, reported morbidity of Chagas disease is not clear. We determined clinical stage in 71 individuals seropositive to T. cruzi in the state of Puebla, Mexico, an area endemic for Chagas disease with a reported seroprevalence of 7.7%. Diagnosis of Chagas disease was made by two standardized serological tests (ELISA, IHA). Individuals were stratified according to clinical studies. All patients were submitted to EKG, barium swallow, and barium enema. Groups were identified as indeterminate form (IF) asymptomatic individuals without evidence of abnormalities (n = 34 cases); those with gastrointestinal alterations (12 patients) including symptoms of abnormal relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter and absent peristalsis in the esophageal body, grade I megaesophagus, and/or megacolon; patients with clinical manifestations and documented changes of chronic Chagas heart disease who were subdivided as follows: mild (8 patients)--mild electrocardiographic changes of ventricular repolarization, sinus bradychardia); moderate (6 patients)--left bundle branch block, right bundle branch block associated with left anterior fascicular block); severe (8 patients)--signs of cardiomegaly, dilated cardiomyopathy); and the associated form (3 cases) that included presence of both cardiomyopathy and megaesophagus. These data highlight the importance of accurate evaluation of the prevalence and clinical course of Chagas disease in endemic and non-endemic areas of Mexico.

  5. Clinical, electrocardiographic and echocardiographic abnormalities in Latin American migrants with newly diagnosed Chagas disease 2005-2009, Barcelona, Spain.

    PubMed

    Valerio, L; Roure, S; Sabria, M; Balanzo, X; Valles, X; Seres, L

    2011-09-22

    Following Latin American migration, Chagas disease has inevitably appeared in non-endemic countries in Europe and elsewhere. New policies are necessary to prevent transmission in those countries but the long, often undetected chronic period of the early stages of the disease also renders epidemiological studies important. The main objective of our study was to determine the presence of clinical, electrocardiogram (ECG) and echocardiographic abnormalities in a population of Latin American migrants infected with Trypanosoma cruzi at the moment of diagnosis. We performed a hospital-based observational study of 100 adult patients with newly diagnosed Chagas infection between January 2005 and December 2009. Thirty-seven patients were classified within the Brazilian Consensus on Chagas cardiomyopathy early cardiac stages (A or B1) and 49 presented pathological findings (stage B2) according to the Panamerican Health Organization Classification. Overall, 49 patients showed ECG and/or echocardiographic alterations. The presence of ECG and ecocardiographic alterations were significantly associated (p=0.038). The most frequent ECG and echocardiographic findings were right bundle branch block (12 cases) and impaired left ventricular wall relaxation (24 cases), respectively. In conclusion, ECG and echocardiographic alterations coherent with Chagas cardiomyopathy were found in a large proportion of newly diagnosed Latin American migrants infected with T. cruzi. In the mid-term, Chagas disease might become an important cause of chronic cadiomyopathy in our attendance area.

  6. [A study of the antiherpetic activity of the chaga mushroom (Inonotus obliquus) extracts in the Vero cells infected with the herpes simplex virus].

    PubMed

    Polkovnikova, M V; Nosik, N N; Garaev, T M; Kondrashina, N G; Finogenova, M P; Shibnev, V A

    2014-01-01

    The chaga mushroom (Inonotus obliquus) contains a wide range of excellent bioactive compounds. However, limited information exists on the antiviral activity of the compounds extracted from chaga. A number of subfractions of chaga were obtained using different solvents and different procedures. The subfractions of chaga extracted with water, alcohol, alkali were tested for their toxicity for the Vero cell culture and antiviral effect in the Vero cells infected with the Herpes simplex virus (HSV), Type 1. It was shown that most of the subfractions were not toxic for the Vero cells and had protective effect on the Vero cells infected with HSV. The subfraction IV in the concentration 5 microg/ml protected the Vero cells from cytodestructive action of HSV and no viral DNA was detected in infected cells treated with chaga extracts. Best protective effect was observed when compound was added before or within one hour after the Vero cells were infected with HSV.

  7. [How health activities view man and how man rethinks them: an anthropological analysis of Chagas disease control].

    PubMed

    Magnani, Claudia; Dias, João Carlos Pinto; Gontijo, Eliane Dias

    2009-09-01

    This anthropological study addresses the cultural perceptions of a group of residents in the city of Bambuí, Minas Gerais State, Brazil, in relation to experience with Chagas disease and the impact of health measures on social life. The ethnographic study was based on open interviews, seeking to identify individual perceptions among 35 inhabitants of Bambuí (with and without Chagas disease) living in the region since the 1940s, when Chagas disease control activities were launched. Within a broad analysis of social perceptions concerning the effect of these health measures, the study sought to observe the cultural representations of the illness process. The study is intended to contribute to comprehensive work in health interventions, including the target population's socio-cultural characteristics. The cultural perspective plays an important role in preventing social distress.

  8. Coronary Microvascular Disease in Chronic Chagas Cardiomyopathy Including an Overview on History, Pathology, and Other Proposed Pathogenic Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Marcos A.; Tanowitz, Herbert B.; Malvestio, Lygia M.; Celes, Mara R.; Campos, Erica C.; Blefari, Valdecir; Prado, Cibele M.

    2010-01-01

    This review focuses on the short and bewildered history of Brazilian scientist Carlos Chagas's discovery and subsequent developments, the anatomopathological features of chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy (CCC), an overview on the controversies surrounding theories concerning its pathogenesis, and studies that support the microvascular hypothesis to further explain the pathological features and clinical course of CCC. It is our belief that knowledge of this particular and remarkable cardiomyopathy will shed light not only on the microvascular involvement of its pathogenesis, but also on the pathogenetic processes of other cardiomyopathies, which will hopefully provide a better understanding of the various changes that may lead to an end-stage heart disease with similar features. This review is written to celebrate the 100th anniversary of the discovery of Chagas disease. PMID:20824217

  9. How universal is coverage and access to diagnosis and treatment for Chagas disease in Colombia? A health systems analysis.

    PubMed

    Cucunubá, Zulma M; Manne-Goehler, Jennifer M; Díaz, Diana; Nouvellet, Pierre; Bernal, Oscar; Marchiol, Andrea; Basáñez, María-Gloria; Conteh, Lesong

    2017-02-01

    Limited access to Chagas disease diagnosis and treatment is a major obstacle to reaching the 2020 World Health Organization milestones of delivering care to all infected and ill patients. Colombia has been identified as a health system in transition, reporting one of the highest levels of health insurance coverage in Latin America. We explore if and how this high level of coverage extends to those with Chagas disease, a traditionally marginalised population. Using a mixed methods approach, we calculate coverage for screening, diagnosis and treatment of Chagas. We then identify supply-side constraints both quantitatively and qualitatively. A review of official registries of tests and treatments for Chagas disease delivered between 2008 and 2014 is compared to estimates of infected people. Using the Flagship Framework, we explore barriers limiting access to care. Screening coverage is estimated at 1.2% of the population at risk. Aetiological treatment with either benznidazol or nifurtimox covered 0.3-0.4% of the infected population. Barriers to accessing screening, diagnosis and treatment are identified for each of the Flagship Framework's five dimensions of interest: financing, payment, regulation, organization and persuasion. The main challenges identified were: a lack of clarity in terms of financial responsibilities in a segmented health system, claims of limited resources for undertaking activities particularly in primary care, non-inclusion of confirmatory test(s) in the basic package of diagnosis and care, poor logistics in the distribution and supply chain of medicines, and lack of awareness of medical personnel. Very low screening coverage emerges as a key obstacle hindering access to care for Chagas disease. Findings suggest serious shortcomings in this health system for Chagas disease, despite the success of universal health insurance scale-up in Colombia. Whether these shortcomings exist in relation to other neglected tropical diseases needs investigating

  10. Major Trypanosoma cruzi antigenic determinant in Chagas' heart disease shares homology with the systemic lupus erythematosus ribosomal P protein epitope.

    PubMed Central

    Mesri, E A; Levitus, G; Hontebeyrie-Joskowicz, M; Dighiero, G; Van Regenmortel, M H; Levin, M J

    1990-01-01

    A Trypanosoma cruzi lambda gt11 cDNA clone, JL5, expressed a recombinant protein which was found to react predominantly with chronic Chagas' heart disease sera. The cloned 35-residue-long peptide was identified as the carboxyl-terminal portion of a T. cruzi ribosomal P protein. The JL5 13 carboxyl-terminal residues shared a high degree of homology with the systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) ribosomal P protein epitope. Synthetic peptides comprising the 13 (R-13), 10 (R-10), and 7 (R-7) carboxyl-terminal residues of the JL5 protein were used to study, by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, the specificity of the Chagas' disease anti-JL5 and SLE anti-P antibodies. The R-13 peptide defined a linear antigenic determinant of the JL5 recombinant protein. As was proved for JL5, R-13 defined antibody specificities which were significantly increased in chronic Chagas' heart disease patients. Only SLE anti-P positive sera were found to react with JL5 and R-13. Fine epitope mapping showed that Chagas' disease anti-JL5 and SLE anti-P antibodies define similar epitopes within the R-13 peptide. The binding of the SLE sera to JL5 was completely blocked by the R-13 peptide, indicating that the shared specificity between anti-JL5 and anti-P autoantibodies was exclusively limited to the conserved linear epitope(s) within the R-13 peptide. The prevalence of high anti-R-13 antibody titers in Chagas' heart disease patients supports the hypothesis that postulates the existence of autoimmune disorders in Chagas' heart disease. PMID:1696282

  11. Killer Cell Immunoglobulin-like Receptors and Their HLA Ligands are Related with the Immunopathology of Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ayo, Christiane Maria; Reis, Pâmela Guimarães; Dalalio, Márcia Machado de Oliveira; Visentainer, Jeane Eliete Laguila; Oliveira, Camila de Freitas; de Araújo, Silvana Marques; de Oliveira Marques, Divina Seila; Sell, Ana Maria

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) genes and their human leucocyte antigen (HLA) ligands in the susceptibility of chronic Chagas disease. This case-control study enrolled 131 serologically-diagnosed Chagas disease patients (59 men and 72 women, mean age of 60.4 ± 9.8 years) treated at the University Hospital of Londrina and the Chagas Disease Laboratory of the State University of Maringa. A control group was formed of 165 healthy individuals - spouses of patients or blood donors from the Regional Blood Bank in Maringa (84 men and 81 women, with a mean age of 59.0 ± 11.4 years). Genotyping of HLA and KIR was performed by PCR-SSOP. KIR2DS2-C1 in the absence of KIR2DL2 (KIR2DS2+/2DL2-/C1+) was more frequent in Chagas patients (P = 0.020; Pc = 0.040; OR = 2.14) and, in particular, those who manifested chronic chagasic cardiopathy—CCC (P = 0.0002; Pc = 0.0004; OR = 6.64; 95% CI = 2.30–18.60) when compared to the control group, and when CCC group was compared to the patients without heart involvement (P = 0.010; Pc = 0.020; OR = 3.97). The combination pair KIR2DS2+/2DL2-/KIR2DL3+/C1+ was also positively associated with chronic chagasic cardiopathy. KIR2DL2 and KIR2DS2 were related to immunopathogenesis in Chagas disease. The combination of KIR2DS2 activating receptor with C1 ligand, in the absence of KIR2DL2, may be related to a risk factor in the chronic Chagas disease and chronic chagasic cardiopathy. PMID:25978047

  12. Impact of Helminth Infection on the Clinical and Microbiological Presentation of Chagas Diseases in Chronically Infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Salvador, Fernando; Sulleiro, Elena; Sánchez-Montalvá, Adrián; Martínez-Gallo, Mónica; Carrillo, Eugenia; Molina, Israel

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Helminth infections are highly prevalent in tropical and subtropical countries, coexisting in Chagas disease endemic areas. Helminth infections in humans may modulate the host immune system, changing the Th1/Th2 polarization. This immunological disturbance could modify the immune response to other infections. The aim of this study is to evaluate the relationship between clinical, microbiological and epidemiological characteristics of Chagas disease patients, with the presence of helminth infection. Methods A prospective observational study was conducted at Vall d’Hebron University Hospital (Barcelona, Spain). Inclusion criteria were: age over 18 years, diagnosis of Chagas disease, and not having received specific treatment for Chagas disease previously to the inclusion. The study protocol included Chagas disease assessment (cardiac and digestive evaluation, detection of T. cruzi DNA measured by PCR in peripheral blood), and helminth infection diagnosis (detection of IgG anti-Strongyloides stercoralis by ELISA, microscopic examination of stool samples from three different days, and specific faecal culture for S. stercoralis larvae). Results Overall, 65 patients were included, median age was 38 years, 75.4% were women and most of them came from Bolivia. Cardiac and digestive involvement was present in 18.5% and 27.7% of patients respectively. T. cruzi PCR was positive in 28 (43.1%) patients. Helminth infection was diagnosed in 12 (18.5%) patients. No differences were observed in clinical and epidemiological characteristics between patients with and without helminth infection. Nevertheless, the proportion of patients with positive T. cruzi PCR was higher among patients with helminth infection compared with patients without helminth infection (75% vs 35.8%, p = 0.021). Conclusions We observed a high prevalence of S. stercoralis infection among chronic Chagas disease patients attended in our tropical medicine unit. Strongyloidiasis was associated

  13. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic responses in adult patients with Chagas disease treated with a new formulation of benznidazole

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Marisa Liliana; Marson, Maria Elena; Ramirez, Juan Carlos; Mastrantonio, Guido; Schijman, Alejandro Gabriel; Altcheh, Jaime; Riarte, Adelina Rosa; Bournissen, Facundo García

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacological treatment of Chagas disease with benznidazole (BNZ) is effective in children in all stages, but it is controversial in chronically infected adults. We report the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics in six adult patients with Chagas disease treated with the new BNZ formulation (ABARAX®) in doses between 2.5-5.5 mg/Kg/day. All but one patient had plasmatic BNZ concentrations within the expected range. All patients finalised treatment with nondetectable Trypanosoma cruziquantitative polymerase chain reaction, which remained nondetectable at the six month follow-up. Our data suggests parasitological responses with the new BNZ and supports the hypothesis that treatment protocols with lower BNZ doses may be effective. PMID:26982179

  14. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic responses in adult patients with Chagas disease treated with a new formulation of benznidazole.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Marisa Liliana; Marson, Maria Elena; Ramirez, Juan Carlos; Mastrantonio, Guido; Schijman, Alejandro Gabriel; Altcheh, Jaime; Riarte, Adelina Rosa; Bournissen, Facundo García

    2016-03-01

    Pharmacological treatment of Chagas disease with benznidazole (BNZ) is effective in children in all stages, but it is controversial in chronically infected adults. We report the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics in six adult patients with Chagas disease treated with the new BNZ formulation (ABARAX®) in doses between 2.5-5.5 mg/Kg/day. All but one patient had plasmatic BNZ concentrations within the expected range. All patients finalised treatment with nondetectable Trypanosoma cruzi quantitative polymerase chain reaction, which remained nondetectable at the six month follow-up. Our data suggests parasitological responses with the new BNZ and supports the hypothesis that treatment protocols with lower BNZ doses may be effective.

  15. Amazonian Triatomine Biodiversity and the Transmission of Chagas Disease in French Guiana: In Medio Stat Sanitas

    PubMed Central

    Flores-Ferrer, Alheli; Blanchet, Denis; Gourbière, Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    The effects of biodiversity on the transmission of infectious diseases now stand as a cornerstone of many public health policies. The upper Amazonia and Guyana shield are hot-spots of biodiversity that offer genuine opportunities to explore the relationship between the risk of transmission of Chagas disease and the diversity of its triatomine vectors. Over 730 triatomines were light-trapped in four geomorphological landscapes shaping French-Guiana, and we determined their taxonomic status and infection by Trypanosoma cruzi. We used a model selection approach to unravel the spatial and temporal variations in species abundance, diversity and infection. The vector community in French-Guiana is typically made of one key species (Panstrongylus geniculatus) that is more abundant than three secondary species combined (Rhodnius pictipes, Panstrongylus lignarius and Eratyrus mucronatus), and four other species that complete the assemblage. Although the overall abundance of adult triatomines does not vary across French-Guiana, their diversity increases along a coastal-inland gradient. These variations unravelled a non-monotonic relationship between vector biodiversity and the risk of transmission of Chagas disease, so that intermediate biodiversity levels are associated with the lowest risks. We also observed biannual variations in triatomine abundance, representing the first report of a biannual pattern in the risk of Chagas disease transmission. Those variations were highly and negatively correlated with the average monthly rainfall. We discuss the implications of these patterns for the transmission of T. cruzi by assemblages of triatomine species, and for the dual challenge of controlling Amazonian vector communities that are made of both highly diverse and mostly intrusive species. PMID:26867025

  16. Posttherapeutic Cure Criteria in Chagas' Disease: Conventional Serology followed by Supplementary Serological, Parasitological, and Molecular Tests

    PubMed Central

    Silva, A. R.; Do Bem, V. A. L.; Bahia, M. T.; Martins-Filho, O. A.; Dias, J. C. P.; Albajar-Viñas, P.; Torres, R. M.; Lana, M.

    2012-01-01

    We performed a critical study of conventional serology, followed by supplementary serological, parasitological, and molecular tests, to assess the response to etiologic treatment of Chagas' disease. A group of 94 Chagas' disease patients treated with benznidazole at least 10 years earlier were evaluated from the laboratory and clinical points of view. When conventional serology (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay [ELISA], indirect immunofluorescence [IIF], and indirect hemagglutination [IHA]) and classic criteria (consistent results with any two of the three tests) or more rigorous criteria (consistent results from the three tests) were used, 10.6% and 8.5% of patients were considered treated and cured (TC) by classic and rigorous criteria, respectively. Patients were then evaluated using supplementary (recombinant ELISA and Trypanosoma cruzi excreted-secreted antigen blotting [TESA-blot]), parasitological (hemoculture), and molecular (PCR) tests. The results of recombinant ELISA were similar to those with the rigorous criterion (three consistent test results). The TESA-blot group showed a higher percentage (21.3%) of negative results than the groups defined by either cure criterion. Hemoculture and PCR gave negative results for all treated and cured (TC) patients, regardless of the criterion used. Recombinant ELISA and TESA-blot tests showed negative results for 70% and 87.5% of the patients categorized as TC by the classic and three-test criteria, respectively. For patients with discordant conventional serology, the supplementary serological and molecular tests were the decisive factor in determining therapeutic failure. Clinical evaluation showed that 62.5% of TC patients presented with the indeterminate form of the disease. Additionally, treated patients with negative TESA-blot results should be reevaluated later with all methodologies used here to verify whether TESA-blot is a reliable way to determine early parasitological cure of Chagas' disease. PMID

  17. Utilizing Chemical Genomics to Identify Cytochrome b as a Novel Drug Target for Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Khare, Shilpi; Roach, Steven L.; Barnes, S. Whitney; Hoepfner, Dominic; Walker, John R.; Chatterjee, Arnab K.; Neitz, R. Jeffrey; Arkin, Michelle R.; McNamara, Case W.; Ballard, Jaime; Lai, Yin; Fu, Yue; Molteni, Valentina; Yeh, Vince; McKerrow, James H.; Glynne, Richard J.; Supek, Frantisek

    2015-01-01

    Unbiased phenotypic screens enable identification of small molecules that inhibit pathogen growth by unanticipated mechanisms. These small molecules can be used as starting points for drug discovery programs that target such mechanisms. A major challenge of the approach is the identification of the cellular targets. Here we report GNF7686, a small molecule inhibitor of Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, and identification of cytochrome b as its target. Following discovery of GNF7686 in a parasite growth inhibition high throughput screen, we were able to evolve a GNF7686-resistant culture of T. cruzi epimastigotes. Clones from this culture bore a mutation coding for a substitution of leucine by phenylalanine at amino acid position 197 in cytochrome b. Cytochrome b is a component of complex III (cytochrome bc1) in the mitochondrial electron transport chain and catalyzes the transfer of electrons from ubiquinol to cytochrome c by a mechanism that utilizes two distinct catalytic sites, QN and QP. The L197F mutation is located in the QN site and confers resistance to GNF7686 in both parasite cell growth and biochemical cytochrome b assays. Additionally, the mutant cytochrome b confers resistance to antimycin A, another QN site inhibitor, but not to strobilurin or myxothiazol, which target the QP site. GNF7686 represents a promising starting point for Chagas disease drug discovery as it potently inhibits growth of intracellular T. cruzi amastigotes with a half maximal effective concentration (EC50) of 0.15 µM, and is highly specific for T. cruzi cytochrome b. No effect on the mammalian respiratory chain or mammalian cell proliferation was observed with up to 25 µM of GNF7686. Our approach, which combines T. cruzi chemical genetics with biochemical target validation, can be broadly applied to the discovery of additional novel drug targets and drug leads for Chagas disease. PMID:26186534

  18. Antitrypanosomal Treatment with Benznidazole Is Superior to Posaconazole Regimens in Mouse Models of Chagas Disease.

    PubMed

    Khare, Shilpi; Liu, Xianzhong; Stinson, Monique; Rivera, Ianne; Groessl, Todd; Tuntland, Tove; Yeh, Vince; Wen, Ben; Molteni, Valentina; Glynne, Richard; Supek, Frantisek

    2015-10-01

    Two CYP51 inhibitors, posaconazole and the ravuconazole prodrug E1224, were recently tested in clinical trials for efficacy in indeterminate Chagas disease. The results from these studies show that both drugs cleared parasites from the blood of infected patients at the end of the treatment but that parasitemia rebounded over the following months. In the current study, we sought to identify a dosing regimen of posaconazole that could permanently clear Trypanosoma cruzi from mice with experimental Chagas disease. Infected mice were treated with posaconazole or benznidazole, an established Chagas disease drug, and parasitological cure was defined as an absence of parasitemia recrudescence after immunosuppression. Twenty-day therapy with benznidazole (10 to 100 mg/kg of body weight/day) resulted in a dose-dependent increase in antiparasitic activity, and the 100-mg/kg regimen effected parasitological cure in all treated mice. In contrast, all mice remained infected after a 25-day treatment with posaconazole at all tested doses (10 to 100 mg/kg/day). Further extension of posaconazole therapy to 40 days resulted in only a marginal improvement of treatment outcome. We also observed similar differences in antiparasitic activity between benznidazole and posaconazole in acute T. cruzi heart infections. While benznidazole induced rapid, dose-dependent reductions in heart parasite burdens, the antiparasitic activity of posaconazole plateaued at low doses (3 to 10 mg/kg/day) despite increasing drug exposure in plasma. These observations are in good agreement with the outcomes of recent phase 2 trials with posaconazole and suggest that the efficacy models combined with the pharmacokinetic analysis employed here will be useful in predicting clinical outcomes of new drug candidates.

  19. Cultivation-Independent Methods Reveal Differences among Bacterial Gut Microbiota in Triatomine Vectors of Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    da Mota, Fabio Faria; Marinho, Lourena Pinheiro; Moreira, Carlos José de Carvalho; Lima, Marli Maria; Mello, Cícero Brasileiro; Garcia, Eloi Souza; Carels, Nicolas; Azambuja, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    Background Chagas disease is a trypanosomiasis whose agent is the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, which is transmitted to humans by hematophagous bugs known as triatomines. Even though insecticide treatments allow effective control of these bugs in most Latin American countries where Chagas disease is endemic, the disease still affects a large proportion of the population of South America. The features of the disease in humans have been extensively studied, and the genome of the parasite has been sequenced, but no effective drug is yet available to treat Chagas disease. The digestive tract of the insect vectors in which T. cruzi develops has been much less well investigated than blood from its human hosts and constitutes a dynamic environment with very different conditions. Thus, we investigated the composition of the predominant bacterial species of the microbiota in insect vectors from Rhodnius, Triatoma, Panstrongylus and Dipetalogaster genera. Methodology/Principal Findings Microbiota of triatomine guts were investigated using cultivation-independent methods, i.e., phylogenetic analysis of 16s rDNA using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and cloned-based sequencing. The Chao index showed that the diversity of bacterial species in triatomine guts is low, comprising fewer than 20 predominant species, and that these species vary between insect species. The analyses showed that Serratia predominates in Rhodnius, Arsenophonus predominates in Triatoma and Panstrongylus, while Candidatus Rohrkolberia predominates in Dipetalogaster. Conclusions/Significance The microbiota of triatomine guts represents one of the factors that may interfere with T. cruzi transmission and virulence in humans. The knowledge of its composition according to insect species is important for designing measures of biological control for T. cruzi. We found that the predominant species of the bacterial microbiota in triatomines form a group of low complexity whose structure

  20. Cancer cell cytotoxicity of extracts and small phenolic compounds from Chaga [Inonotus obliquus (persoon) Pilat].

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Yuki; Nishida, Hiroshi; Matsugo, Seiichi; Konishi, Tetsuya

    2009-06-01

    Previously, we studied the antioxidant potential of Chaga mushroom [Inonotus obliquus (persoon) Pilat] extracts and isolated several small (poly)phenolic compounds as the major antioxidant components in the 80% methanol (MeOH) extract. In the present study, these isolated phenolic ingredients together with several other types of Chaga extracts were examined for cytotoxic effects against normal (IMR90) and cancer (A549, PA-1, U937, and HL-60) cell lines. Results revealed decoctions from both the fruiting body (FB) and sclerotium (ST) parts of Chaga, especially the ST part, showed considerable cytotoxicity toward tumor cells, but the cytotoxicity appeared to be stronger against normal cells than cancer cells. The 80% MeOH ST extract also showed the same trend. On the other hand, the 80% MeOH extract of FB showed significant cytotoxicity towards tumor cell lines without affecting normal cells, for example, the 50% lethal dose was 49.4 +/- 2.9 microg/mL for PA-1 cells versus 123.6 +/- 13.8 microg/mL for normal cells. The phenolic components isolated from the 80% MeOH extracts had markedly greater cancer cell toxicity than the extracts themselves. In particular, two out of seven compounds showed strong cytotoxicity towards several tumor cell lines without giving rise to significant cell toxicity toward normal cells. For example, the 50% lethal dose for 3,4-dihydroxybenzalacetone was 12.2 micromol/L in PA-1 cells but was 272.8 micromol/L in IMR90 cells. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis further revealed these phenolic ingredients have high potentiality for apoptosis induction in PA-1 cells.

  1. Impact of Aetiological Treatment on Conventional and Multiplex Serology in Chronic Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Viotti, Rodolfo; Vigliano, Carlos; Álvarez, María Gabriela; Lococo, Bruno; Petti, Marcos; Bertocchi, Graciela; Armenti, Alejandro; De Rissio, Ana María; Cooley, Gretchen; Tarleton, Rick; Laucella, Susana

    2011-01-01

    Background The main criterion for treatment effectiveness in Chagas Disease has been the seronegative conversion, achieved many years post-treatment. One of the main limitations in evaluating treatment for chronic Chagas disease is the lack of reliable tests to ensure parasite clearance and to examine the effects of treatment. However, declines in conventional serological titers and a new multiplex assay can be useful tools to monitor early the treatment impact. Methodology/Principal Findings Changes in antibody levels, including seronegative conversion as well as declines in titers, were serially measured in 53 benznidazole-treated and 89 untreated chronic patients in Buenos Aires, Argentina with a median follow-up of 36 months. Decrease of titers (34/53 [64%] treated vs. 19/89 [21%] untreated, p<0.001) and seronegative conversion (21/53, [40%] treated vs. 6/89, [7%] untreated, p<0.001) in at least one conventional serological test were significantly higher in the benznidazole-treated group compare with the untreated group. When not only complete seronegative conversion but also seronegative conversion on 2 tests and the decreases of titers on 2 or 3 tests were considered, the impact of treatment on conventional serology increased from 21% (11/53 subjects) to 45% (24/53 subjects). A strong concordance was found between the combination of conventional serologic tests and multiplex assay (kappa index 0.60) to detect a decrease in antibody levels pos-treatment. Conclusions/Significance Treatment with benznidazole in subjects with chronic Chagas disease has a major impact on the serology specific for T. cruzi infection in a shorter follow-up period than previously considered, reflected either by a complete or partial seronegative conversion or by a significant decrease in the levels of T. cruzi antibodies, consistent with a possible elimination or reduction of parasite load. PMID:21909451

  2. Electrocardiographic and echocardiographic abnormalities in residents of rural Bolivian communities hyperendemic for Chagas disease

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, Antonio B.; Nunes, Maria Carmo P.; Clark, Eva H.; Samuels, Aaron; Menacho, Silvio; Gomez, Jesus; Gutierrez, Ricardo W. Bozo; Crawford, Thomas C.; Gilman, Robert H.; Bern, Caryn

    2015-01-01

    Background Chagas disease is a neglected and preventable tropical disease that causes significant cardiac morbidity and mortality in Latin America. Our objective in this study was to describe cardiac findings among inhabitants of rural communities of the Bolivian Chaco. Methods The cardiac study drew participants from an epidemiologic study in 7 indigenous Guarani communities. All infected participants 10 years or older were asked to undergo a brief physical examination and 12-lead electrocardiogram. A subset had echocardiograms (ECGs). ECGs and echocardiograms were read by one or more cardiologists. Results Of 1137 residents 10 years or older, 753 (66.2%) had T. cruzi infection. Cardiac evaluations were performed for 398 infected participants 10 years or older. Fifty-five (13.8%) participants had one or more ECG abnormality suggestive of Chagas cardiomyopathy. The most frequent abnormalities were bundle branch blocks in 42 (11.3%), followed by rhythm disturbances or ventricular ectopy in 13 (3.3%) and atrioventricular blocks (AVB) in 10 (2.6%) participants. The prevalence of any abnormality rose from 1.1% among those 10-19 years old to 14.2%, 17.3% and 26.4% among those 20-39, 40-59 and older than 60 years, respectively. First degree AVB was seen most frequently in participants 60 years or older, but the 4 patients with 3rd degree AVB were all under 50 years old. Eighteen and two participants had a left ventricular ejection fraction of 40-54% and <40%, respectively. An increasing number of ECG abnormalities was associated with progressively larger left ventricular end-diastolic dimensions and lower left ventricular ejection fraction. Conclusions We found a high prevalence of ECG abnormalities and substantial evidence of Chagas cardiomyopathy. Programs to improve access to basic cardiac care (annual ECGs, antiarrhythmics, pacemakers) could have an immediate impact on morbidity and mortality in these highly endemic communities. PMID:26407511

  3. Distantiae Transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi: A New Epidemiological Feature of Acute Chagas Disease in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Xavier, Samanta Cristina das Chagas; Roque, André Luiz Rodrigues; Bilac, Daniele; de Araújo, Vitor Antônio Louzada; Neto, Sócrates Fraga da Costa; Lorosa, Elias Seixas; da Silva, Luiz Felipe Coutinho Ferreira; Jansen, Ana Maria

    2014-01-01

    Background The new epidemiological scenario of orally transmitted Chagas disease that has emerged in Brazil, and mainly in the Amazon region, needs to be addressed with a new and systematic focus. Belém, the capital of Pará state, reports the highest number of acute Chagas disease (ACD) cases associated with the consumption of açaí juice. Methodology/Principal Findings The wild and domestic enzootic transmission cycles of Trypanosoma cruzi were evaluated in the two locations (Jurunas and Val-de Cães) that report the majority of the autochthonous cases of ACD in Belém city. Moreover, we evaluated the enzootic cycle on the three islands that provide most of the açaí fruit that is consumed in these localities. We employed parasitological and serological tests throughout to evaluate infectivity competence and exposure to T. cruzi. In Val-de-Cães, no wild mammal presented positive parasitological tests, and 56% seroprevalence was observed, with low serological titers. Three of 14 triatomines were found to be infected (TcI). This unexpected epidemiological picture does not explain the high number of autochthonous ACD cases. In Jurunas, the cases of ACD could not be autochthonous because of the absence of any enzootic cycle of T. cruzi. In contrast, in the 3 island areas from which the açaí fruit originates, 66.7% of wild mammals and two dogs displayed positive hemocultures, and 15.6% of triatomines were found to be infected by T. cruzi. Genotyping by mini-exon gene and PCR-RFLP (1f8/Akw21I) targeting revealed that the mammals and triatomines from the islands harbored TcI and Trypanosoma rangeli in single and mixed infections. Conclusion/Significance These findings show that cases of Chagas disease in the urban area of Belém may be derived from infected triatomines coming together with the açaí fruits from distant islands. We term this new epidemiological feature of Chagas disease as “Distantiae transmission”. PMID:24854494

  4. PREVALENCE OF CHAGAS DISEASE IN A RURAL AREA IN THE STATE OF CEARA, BRAZIL

    PubMed Central

    FREITAS, Erlane Chaves; OLIVEIRA, Maria de Fátima; ANDRADE, Mônica Coelho; VASCONCELOS, Arduina Sofia Ortet de Barros; da SILVA, José Damião; CÂNDIDO, Darlan da Silva; PEREIRA, Laíse dos Santos; CORREIA, João Paulo Ramalho; da CRUZ, José Napoleão Monte; CAVALCANTI, Luciano Pamplona de Góes

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Chagas disease is caused by Trypanosoma cruzi and affects about two to three million people in Brazil, still figuring as an important public health problem. A study was conducted in a rural area of the municipality of Limoeiro do Norte - CE, northeastern Brazil, aiming to determine the prevalence of T. cruzi infection. Of the inhabitants, 52% were examined, among whom 2.6% (4/154) were seropositive in at least two serological tests. All seropositive individuals were older than 50 years, farmers, with a low education and a family income of less than three minimum wages. Active surveillance may be an alternative for early detection of this disease. PMID:26603232

  5. Triatominae species of Suriname (Heteroptera: Reduviidae) and their role as vectors of Chagas disease

    PubMed Central

    Hiwat, Hélène

    2014-01-01

    Nine species of Triatominae, representing three tribes and five genera, are currently known in Suriname. An annotated list of the species based on the collections of the Bureau of Public Health (Suriname), the National Zoological Collection Suriname and the National History Museum Leiden (the Netherlands) is provided. Additionally, the results of several years of opportunistic collection in two domestic environments are presented. The most common species are Rhodnius pictipes Stål, 1972, Rhodnius robustus Larrouse, 1972 and Panstrongylus geniculatus (Latreille, 1811). The significance of the species as vectors of Chagas disease in Suriname is discussed. PMID:25004146

  6. Chagas Cardiomyopathy Manifestations and Trypanosoma cruzi Genotypes Circulating in Chronic Chagasic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez, Juan David; Guhl, Felipe; Rendón, Lina María; Rosas, Fernando; Marin-Neto, Jose A.; Morillo, Carlos A.

    2010-01-01

    Chagas disease caused by Trypanosoma cruzi is a complex disease that is endemic and an important problem in public health in Latin America. The T. cruzi parasite is classified into six discrete taxonomic units (DTUs) based on the recently proposed nomenclature (TcI, TcII, TcIII, TcIV, TcV and TcVI). The discovery of genetic variability within TcI showed the presence of five genotypes (Ia, Ib, Ic, Id and Ie) related to the transmission cycle of Chagas disease. In Colombia, TcI is more prevalent but TcII has also been reported, as has mixed infection by both TcI and TcII in the same Chagasic patient. The objectives of this study were to determine the T. cruzi DTUs that are circulating in Colombian chronic Chagasic patients and to obtain more information about the molecular epidemiology of Chagas disease in Colombia. We also assessed the presence of electrocardiographic, radiologic and echocardiographic abnormalities with the purpose of correlating T. cruzi genetic variability and cardiac disease. Molecular characterization was performed in Colombian adult chronic Chagasic patients based on the intergenic region of the mini-exon gene, the 24Sα and 18S regions of rDNA and the variable region of satellite DNA, whereby the presence of T.cruzi I, II, III and IV was detected. In our population, mixed infections also occurred, with TcI-TcII, TcI-TcIII and TcI-TcIV, as well as the existence of the TcI genotypes showing the presence of genotypes Ia and Id. Patients infected with TcI demonstrated a higher prevalence of cardiac alterations than those infected with TcII. These results corroborate the predominance of TcI in Colombia and show the first report of TcIII and TcIV in Colombian Chagasic patients. Findings also indicate that Chagas cardiomyopathy manifestations are more correlated with TcI than with TcII in Colombia. PMID:21152056

  7. Chagas disease in Spain, the United States and other non-endemic countries.

    PubMed

    Gascon, Joaquim; Bern, Caryn; Pinazo, María-Jesús

    2010-01-01

    Due to recent trends in migration, there are millions of people from Chagas disease-endemic countries now living in North America, Europe, Australia and Japan, including thousands of people with Trypanosoma cruzi infection. Most infected individuals are not aware of their status. Congenital, transfusion- and/or transplant-associated transmission has been documented in the United States, Spain, Canada and Switzerland; most instances likely go undetected. High priorities include the implementation of appropriate screening, evaluation and clinical management, and better assessment of the true burden associated with this disease.

  8. Genome Wide Association Study (GWAS) of Chagas Cardiomyopathy in Trypanosoma cruzi Seropositive Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Xutao; Sabino, Ester C.; Cunha-Neto, Edecio; Ribeiro, Antonio L.; Ianni, Barbara; Mady, Charles; Busch, Michael P.; Seielstad, Mark; Component, International

    2013-01-01

    Background Familial aggregation of Chagas cardiac disease in T. cruzi–infected persons suggests that human genetic variation may be an important determinant of disease progression. Objective To perform a GWAS using a well-characterized cohort to detect single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and genes associated with cardiac outcomes. Methods A retrospective cohort study was developed by the NHLBI REDS-II program in Brazil. Samples were collected from 499 T. cruzi seropositive blood donors who had donated between1996 and 2002, and 101 patients with clinically diagnosed Chagas cardiomyopathy. In 2008–2010, all subjects underwent a complete medical examination. After genotype calling, quality control filtering with exclusion of 20 cases, and imputation of 1,000 genomes variants; association analysis was performed for 7 cardiac and parasite related traits, adjusting for population stratification. Results The cohort showed a wide range of African, European, and modest Native American admixture proportions, consistent with the recent history of Brazil. No SNPs were found to be highly (P<10−8) associated with cardiomyopathy. The two mostly highly associated SNPs for cardiomyopathy (rs4149018 and rs12582717; P-values <10−6) are located on Chromosome 12p12.2 in the SLCO1B1 gene, a solute carrier family member. We identified 44 additional genic SNPs associated with six traits at P-value <10-6: Ejection Fraction, PR, QRS, QT intervals, antibody levels by EIA, and parasitemia by PCR. Conclusion This GWAS identified suggestive SNPs that may impact the risk of progression to cardiomyopathy. Although this Chagas cohort is the largest examined by GWAS to date, (580 subjects), moderate sample size may explain in part the limited number of significant SNP variants. Enlarging the current sample through expanded cohorts and meta-analyses, and targeted studies of candidate genes, will be required to confirm and extend the results reported here. Future studies should also

  9. Training Systems Modelers through the Development of a Multi-scale Chagas Disease Risk Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanley, J.; Stevens-Goodnight, S.; Kulkarni, S.; Bustamante, D.; Fytilis, N.; Goff, P.; Monroy, C.; Morrissey, L. A.; Orantes, L.; Stevens, L.; Dorn, P.; Lucero, D.; Rios, J.; Rizzo, D. M.

    2012-12-01

    The goal of our NSF-sponsored Division of Behavioral and Cognitive Sciences grant is to create a multidisciplinary approach to develop spatially explicit models of vector-borne disease risk using Chagas disease as our model. Chagas disease is a parasitic disease endemic to Latin America that afflicts an estimated 10 million people. The causative agent (Trypanosoma cruzi) is most commonly transmitted to humans by blood feeding triatomine insect vectors. Our objectives are: (1) advance knowledge on the multiple interacting factors affecting the transmission of Chagas disease, and (2) provide next generation genomic and spatial analysis tools applicable to the study of other vector-borne diseases worldwide. This funding is a collaborative effort between the RSENR (UVM), the School of Engineering (UVM), the Department of Biology (UVM), the Department of Biological Sciences (Loyola (New Orleans)) and the Laboratory of Applied Entomology and Parasitology (Universidad de San Carlos). Throughout this five-year study, multi-educational groups (i.e., high school, undergraduate, graduate, and postdoctoral) will be trained in systems modeling. This systems approach challenges students to incorporate environmental, social, and economic as well as technical aspects and enables modelers to simulate and visualize topics that would either be too expensive, complex or difficult to study directly (Yasar and Landau 2003). We launch this research by developing a set of multi-scale, epidemiological models of Chagas disease risk using STELLA® software v.9.1.3 (isee systems, inc., Lebanon, NH). We use this particular system dynamics software as a starting point because of its simple graphical user interface (e.g., behavior-over-time graphs, stock/flow diagrams, and causal loops). To date, high school and undergraduate students have created a set of multi-scale (i.e., homestead, village, and regional) disease models. Modeling the system at multiple spatial scales forces recognition that

  10. Abnormal 18 F-FDG and 82 Rb PET Findings in Chagas Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Salimy, Medhi S; Parwani, Purvi J; Mukai, Kanae; Pampaloni, Miguel Hernandez; Flavell, Robert R

    2017-03-03

    Uptake of the radiopharmaceutical F-FDG visualized by PET imaging can reflect abnormal myocardial inflammation. When utilized in conjunction with other imaging modalities, such as echocardiography, PET F-FDG imaging can help distinguish between active cardiac sarcoidosis and other etiologies of nonischemic cardiomyopathy. We present a case of a 46-year-old man with nonischemic cardiomyopathy and ventricular tachycardia who underwent an echocardiogram suggestive of cardiac Chagas disease. A subsequent F-FDG PET demonstrated abnormal hypermetabolism. The diagnosis was confirmed by positive serologic examination results.

  11. Cardiac autonomic denervation and functional response to neurotoxins during acute experimental Chagas' disease in rats.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, A L; Fontoura, B F; Freire-Maia, L; Chiari, E; Machado, C R; Teixeira, M M; Camargos, E R

    2001-06-20

    Severe cardiac autonomic denervation occurs in the acute Chagas' disease in rats. The present study aims at verifying whether this denervation was accompanied by impairment of heart function. Scorpionic (Tityus serrulatus) crude venom was used for neurotransmitter release in isolated hearts (Langendorff's preparation). In control hearts, the venom induced significant bradycardia followed by tachycardia. In infected animals, despite the severe (sympathetic) or moderate (parasympathetic) cardiac denervation, the venom provoked similar bradycardia but the tachycardia was higher. The hearts of infected animals beat at significantly lower rate. Atropine prevented this lower rate. Our results demonstrated sympathetic dysfunction during the acute phase of Trypanosoma cruzi infection in rats, the parasympathetic function being spared.

  12. Training the Next Generation of Scientists: System Dynamics Modeling of Chagas Disease (American Trypanosomiasis) transmission.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goff, P.; Hulse, A.; Harder, H. R.; Pierce, L. A.; Rizzo, D.; Hanley, J.; Orantes, L.; Stevens, L.; Justi, S.; Monroy, C.

    2015-12-01

    A computational simulation has been designed as an investigative case study by high school students to introduce system dynamics modeling into high school curriculum. This case study approach leads users through the forensics necessary to diagnose an unknown disease in a Central American village. This disease, Chagas, is endemic to 21 Latin American countries. The CDC estimates that of the 110 million people living in areas with the disease, 8 million are infected, with as many as 300,000 US cases. Chagas is caused by the protozoan parasite, Trypanosoma cruzi, and is spread via blood feeding insect (vectors), that feed on vertebrates and live in crevasses in the walls and roofs of adobe homes. One-third of the infected people will develop chronic Chagas who are asymptomatic for years before their heart or GI tract become enlarged resulting in death. The case study has three parts. Students play the role of WHO field investigators and work collaboratively to: 1) use genetics to identify the host(s) and vector of the disease 2) use a STELLA™ SIR (Susceptible, Infected, Recovered) system dynamics model to study Chagas at the village scale and 3) develop management strategies. The simulations identify mitigation strategies known as Ecohealth Interventions (e.g., home improvements using local materials) to help stakeholders test and compare multiple optima. High school students collaborated with researchers from the University of Vermont, Loyola University and Universidad de San Carlos, Guatemala, working in labs, interviewing researchers, and incorporating mulitple field data as part of a NSF-funded multiyear grant. The model displays stable equilibria of hosts, vectors, and disease-states. Sensitivity analyses show measures of household condition and presence of vertebrates were significant leverage points, supporting other findings by the University research team. The village-scale model explores multiple solutions to disease mitigation for the purpose of producing

  13. [New concepts on the pathogenesis of chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy: myocardial gene and protein expression profiles].

    PubMed

    Cunha-Neto, Edecio; Teixeira, Priscila C; Nogueira, Luciana G; Mady, Charles; Lanni, Barbara; Stolf, Noedir; Fiorelli, Alfredo; Honorato, Ronaldo; Kalil, Jorge

    2006-01-01

    The pathogenesis of chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy (CCC) is still being unraveled. In the last decade, a role for inflammatory cytokines on tissue damage has been shown. The present review will address the molecular and immunological mechanisms of tissue damage on human CCC with a special focus on results obtained by our research group using genomic and proteomic approaches. The results suggest that direct modulation of myocardium gene and protein expression by inflammatory cytokines may be a new pathogenic mechanism in CCC, with therapeutic implications.

  14. ELISA versus PCR for diagnosis of chronic Chagas disease: systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Most current guidelines recommend two serological tests to diagnose chronic Chagas disease. When serological tests are persistently inconclusive, some guidelines recommend molecular tests. The aim of this investigation was to review chronic Chagas disease diagnosis literature and to summarize results of ELISA and PCR performance. Methods A systematic review was conducted searching remote databases (MEDLINE, LILACS, EMBASE, SCOPUS and ISIWeb) and full texts bibliography for relevant abstracts. In addition, manufacturers of commercial tests were contacted. Original investigations were eligible if they estimated sensitivity and specificity, or reliability -or if their calculation was possible - of ELISA or PCR tests, for chronic Chagas disease. Results Heterogeneity was high within each test (ELISA and PCR) and threshold effect was detected only in a particular subgroup. Reference standard blinding partially explained heterogeneity in ELISA studies, and pooled sensitivity and specificity were 97.7% [96.7%-98.5%] and 96.3% [94.6%-97.6%] respectively. Commercial ELISA with recombinant antigens studied in phase three investigations partially explained heterogeneity, and pooled sensitivity and specificity were 99.3% [97.9%-99.9%] and 97.5% [88.5%-99.5%] respectively. ELISA's reliability was seldom studied but was considered acceptable. PCR heterogeneity was not explained, but a threshold effect was detected in three groups created by using guanidine and boiling the sample before DNA extraction. PCR sensitivity is likely to be between 50% and 90%, while its specificity is close to 100%. PCR reliability was never studied. Conclusions Both conventional and recombinant based ELISA give useful information, however there are commercial tests without technical reports and therefore were not included in this review. Physicians need to have access to technical reports to understand if these serological tests are similar to those included in this review and therefore

  15. Triatominae species of Suriname (Heteroptera: Reduviidae) and their role as vectors of Chagas disease.

    PubMed

    Hiwat, Hélène

    2014-07-01

    Nine species of Triatominae, representing three tribes and five genera, are currently known in Suriname. An annotated list of the species based on the collections of the Bureau of Public Health (Suriname), the National Zoological Collection Suriname and the National History Museum Leiden (the Netherlands) is provided. Additionally, the results of several years of opportunistic collection in two domestic environments are presented. The most common species are Rhodnius pictipes Stål, 1972, Rhodnius robustus Larrouse, 1972 and Panstrongylus geniculatus (Latreille, 1811). The significance of the species as vectors of Chagas disease in Suriname is discussed.

  16. Chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy: a review of the main pathogenic mechanisms and the efficacy of aetiological treatment following the BENznidazole Evaluation for Interrupting Trypanosomiasis (BENEFIT) trial

    PubMed Central

    Rassi, Anis; Marin, José Antonio; Rassi, Anis

    2017-01-01

    Chagas cardiomyopathy is the most frequent and most severe manifestation of chronic Chagas disease, and is one of the leading causes of morbidity and death in Latin America. Although the pathogenesis of Chagas cardiomyopathy is incompletely understood, it may involve several mechanisms, including parasite-dependent myocardial damage, immune-mediated myocardial injury (induced by the parasite itself and by self-antigens), and microvascular and neurogenic disturbances. In the past three decades, a consensus has emerged that parasite persistence is crucial to the development and progression of Chagas cardiomyopathy. In this context, antiparasitic treatment in the chronic phase of Chagas disease could prevent complications related to the disease. However, according to the results of the BENEFIT trial, benznidazole seems to have no benefit for arresting disease progression in patients with chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy. In this review, we give an update on the main pathogenic mechanisms of Chagas disease, and re-examine and discuss the results of the BENEFIT trial, together with its limitations and implications. PMID:28225900

  17. Molecular Evidence of Demographic Expansion of the Chagas Disease Vector Triatoma dimidiata (Hemiptera, Reduviidae, Triatominae) in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Palacio, Andrés; Triana, Omar

    2014-01-01

    Background Triatoma dimidiata is one of the most significant vectors of Chagas disease in Central America and Colombia, and, as in most species, its pattern of genetic variation within and among populations is strongly affected by its phylogeographic history. A putative origin from Central America has been proposed for Colombian populations, and high genetic differentiation among three biographically different population groups has recently been evidenced. Analyses based on putatively neutral markers provide data from which past events, such as population expansions and colonization, can be inferred. We analyzed the genealogies of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide dehydrogenase 4 (ND4) and the cytochrome oxidase subunit 1-mitochondrial genes, as well as partial nuclear ITS-2 DNA sequences obtained across most of the eco-geographical range in Colombia, to assess the population structure and demographic factors that may explain the geographical distribution of T. dimidiata in this country. Results The population structure results support a significant association between genetic divergence and the eco-geographical location of population groups, suggesting that clear signals of demographic expansion can explain the geographical distribution of haplotypes of population groups. Additionally, empirical date estimation of the event suggests that the population's expansion can be placed after the emergence of the Panama Isthmus, and that it was possibly followed by a population fragmentation process, perhaps resulting from local adaptation accomplished by orographic factors such as geographical isolation. Conclusion Inferences about the historical population processes in Colombian T. dimidiata populations are generally in accordance with population expansions that may have been accomplished by two important biotic and orographic events such as the Great American Interchange and the uplift of the eastern range of the Andes mountains in central Colombia. PMID:24625572

  18. Reversal of the TPA-induced inhibition of gap junctional intercellular communication by Chaga mushroom (Inonotus obliquus) extracts: effects on MAP kinases.

    PubMed

    Park, Jung-Ran; Park, Joon-Suk; Jo, Eun-Hye; Hwang, Jae-Woong; Kim, Sun-Jung; Ra, Jeong-Chan; Aruoma, Okezie I; Lee, Yong-Soon; Kang, Kyung-Sun

    2006-01-01

    Chaga mushroom (Inonotus obliquus) has continued to receive attention as a folk medicine with indications for the treatment of cancers and digestive diseases. The anticarcinogenic effect of Chaga mushroom extract was investigated using a model system of gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) in WB-F344 normal rat liver epithelial cells. The cells were pre-incubated with Chaga mushroom extracts (5, 10, 20 microg/ml) for 24 h and this was followed by co-treatment with Chaga mushroom extracts and TPA (12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate, 10 ng/ml) for 1 h. The inhibition of GJIC by TPA (12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate), promoter of cancer, was prevented with treatment of Chaga mushroom extracts. Similarly, the increased phosphorylated ERK1/2 and p38 protein kinases were markedly reduced in Chaga mushroom extracts-treated cells. There was no change in the JNK kinase protein level, suggesting that Chaga mushroom extracts could only block the activation of ERK1/2 and p38 MAP kinase. The Chaga mushroom extracts further prevented the inhibition of GJIC through the blocking of Cx43 phosphorylation. Indeed cell-to-cell communication through gap junctional channels is a critical factor in the life and death balance of cells because GJIC has an important function in maintaining tissue homeostasis through the regulation of cell growth, differentiation, apoptosis and adaptive functions of differentiated cells. Thus Chaga mushroom may act as a natural anticancer product by preventing the inhibition of GJIC through the inactivation of ERK1/2 and p38 MAP kinase.

  19. Arylimidamide DB766, a Potential Chemotherapeutic Candidate for Chagas' Disease Treatment ▿

    PubMed Central

    Batista, Denise da Gama Jaén; Batista, Marcos Meuser; Oliveira, Gabriel Melo de; Amaral, Patrícia Borges do; Lannes-Vieira, Joseli; Britto, Constança Carvalho; Junqueira, Angela; Lima, Marli Maria; Romanha, Alvaro José; Sales Junior, Policarpo Ademar; Stephens, Chad E.; Boykin, David W.; Soeiro, Maria de Nazaré Correia

    2010-01-01

    Chagas' disease, a neglected tropical illness for which current therapy is unsatisfactory, is caused by the intracellular parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. The goal of this work is to investigate the in vitro and in vivo effects of the arylimidamide (AIA) DB766 against T. cruzi. This arylimidamide exhibits strong trypanocidal activity and excellent selectivity for bloodstream trypomastigotes and intracellular amastigotes (Y strain), giving IC50s (drug concentrations that reduce 50% of the number of the treated parasites) of 60 and 25 nM, respectively. DB766 also exerts striking effects upon different parasite stocks, including those naturally resistant to benznidazole, and displays higher activity in vitro than the reference drugs. By fluorescent and transmission electron microscopy analyses, we found that this AIA localizes in DNA-enriched compartments and induces considerable damage to the mitochondria. DB766 effectively reduces the parasite load in the blood and cardiac tissue and presents efficacy similar to that of benznidazole in mouse models of T. cruzi infection employing the Y and Colombian strains, using oral and intraperitoneal doses of up to 100 mg/kg/day that were given after the establishment of parasite infection. This AIA ameliorates electrocardiographic alterations, reduces hepatic and heart lesions induced by the infection, and provides 90 to 100% protection against mortality, which is similar to that provided by benznidazole. Our data clearly show the trypanocidal efficacy of DB766, suggesting that this AIA may represent a new lead compound candidate to Chagas' disease treatment. PMID:20457822

  20. Morphological and Genetic Differentiation within the Southernmost Vector of Chagas Disease: Triatoma patagonica (Hemiptera – Reduviidae)

    PubMed Central

    Pita, Sebastián; Calleros, Lucía; Crocco, Liliana; Panzera, Yanina; Rodríguez, Claudia S.; Panzera, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    The epidemiological importance of Chagas disease vectors largely depends on their spreading ability and adaptation to domestic habitats. Triatoma patagonica is a secondary vector of Chagas disease endemic of Argentina, and it has been found colonizing domiciles and most commonly peridomiciliary structures in several Argentine provinces and morphological variation along its distribution range have been described. To asses if population differentiation represents geographic variants or true biological species, multiple genetic and phenotypic approaches and laboratory cross-breeding were performed in T. patagonica peridomestic populations. Analyses of chromatic variation of forewings, their size and the content of C-heterochromatin on chromosomes revealed that populations are structured following a North-South latitudinal variation. Cytochrome c oxidase I mitochondrial gene (COI) nucleotide analysis showed a mean genetic distance of 5.2% between the most distant populations. The cross-breeding experiments suggest a partial reproductive isolation between some populations with 40% of couples not laying eggs and low hatching efficiency. Our findings reveal phenotypic and genetic variations that suggest an incipient differentiation processes among T. patagonica populations with a pronounced phenotypic and genetic divergence between the most distant populations. The population differentiation here reported is probably related to differential environmental conditions and it could reflect the occurrence of an incipient speciation process in T. patagonica. PMID:28005972

  1. Morphological and Genetic Differentiation within the Southernmost Vector of Chagas Disease: Triatoma patagonica (Hemiptera - Reduviidae).

    PubMed

    Nattero, Julieta; Pita, Sebastián; Calleros, Lucía; Crocco, Liliana; Panzera, Yanina; Rodríguez, Claudia S; Panzera, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    The epidemiological importance of Chagas disease vectors largely depends on their spreading ability and adaptation to domestic habitats. Triatoma patagonica is a secondary vector of Chagas disease endemic of Argentina, and it has been found colonizing domiciles and most commonly peridomiciliary structures in several Argentine provinces and morphological variation along its distribution range have been described. To asses if population differentiation represents geographic variants or true biological species, multiple genetic and phenotypic approaches and laboratory cross-breeding were performed in T. patagonica peridomestic populations. Analyses of chromatic variation of forewings, their size and the content of C-heterochromatin on chromosomes revealed that populations are structured following a North-South latitudinal variation. Cytochrome c oxidase I mitochondrial gene (COI) nucleotide analysis showed a mean genetic distance of 5.2% between the most distant populations. The cross-breeding experiments suggest a partial reproductive isolation between some populations with 40% of couples not laying eggs and low hatching efficiency. Our findings reveal phenotypic and genetic variations that suggest an incipient differentiation processes among T. patagonica populations with a pronounced phenotypic and genetic divergence between the most distant populations. The population differentiation here reported is probably related to differential environmental conditions and it could reflect the occurrence of an incipient speciation process in T. patagonica.

  2. Arylimidamide DB766, a potential chemotherapeutic candidate for Chagas' disease treatment.

    PubMed

    Batista, Denise da Gama Jaén; Batista, Marcos Meuser; de Oliveira, Gabriel Melo; do Amaral, Patrícia Borges; Lannes-Vieira, Joseli; Britto, Constança Carvalho; Junqueira, Angela; Lima, Marli Maria; Romanha, Alvaro José; Sales Junior, Policarpo Ademar; Stephens, Chad E; Boykin, David W; Soeiro, Maria de Nazaré Correia

    2010-07-01

    Chagas' disease, a neglected tropical illness for which current therapy is unsatisfactory, is caused by the intracellular parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. The goal of this work is to investigate the in vitro and in vivo effects of the arylimidamide (AIA) DB766 against T. cruzi. This arylimidamide exhibits strong trypanocidal activity and excellent selectivity for bloodstream trypomastigotes and intracellular amastigotes (Y strain), giving IC(50)s (drug concentrations that reduce 50% of the number of the treated parasites) of 60 and 25 nM, respectively. DB766 also exerts striking effects upon different parasite stocks, including those naturally resistant to benznidazole, and displays higher activity in vitro than the reference drugs. By fluorescent and transmission electron microscopy analyses, we found that this AIA localizes in DNA-enriched compartments and induces considerable damage to the mitochondria. DB766 effectively reduces the parasite load in the blood and cardiac tissue and presents efficacy similar to that of benznidazole in mouse models of T. cruzi infection employing the Y and Colombian strains, using oral and intraperitoneal doses of up to 100 mg/kg/day that were given after the establishment of parasite infection. This AIA ameliorates electrocardiographic alterations, reduces hepatic and heart lesions induced by the infection, and provides 90 to 100% protection against mortality, which is similar to that provided by benznidazole. Our data clearly show the trypanocidal efficacy of DB766, suggesting that this AIA may represent a new lead compound candidate to Chagas' disease treatment.

  3. Serodiagnosis of Chagas' disease by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using two synthetic peptides as antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Peralta, J M; Teixeira, M G; Shreffler, W G; Pereira, J B; Burns, J M; Sleath, P R; Reed, S G

    1994-01-01

    An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was developed for detecting antibodies against Trypanosoma cruzi. Two synthetic T. cruzi peptides, TcD and PEP2, were used. The specificity and sensitivity of the peptide ELISA were determined with 260 serum samples from individuals living in an area in which Chagas' disease is endemic. ELISAs were performed with the peptides singly or in combination. The evaluation of these tests showed that 168 (93.8%) of 179 serum samples from T. cruzi-infected patients were positive when TcD peptide was used as antigen; 164 (91.6%) samples were positive with PEP2, and 178 (99.4%) samples were positive when the two peptides were combined. Thus, the sensitivity of the ELISA using the two peptides exceeded 99%. The specificity was evaluated by using a panel of 118 serum samples that included samples from 81 individuals living in an area of endemicity with negative serology for Chagas' disease and from 37 patients from areas in which T. cruzi was not endemic but with other pathologies, such as leishmaniasis, tuberculosis, and leprosy. Only two false-positive serum samples were found in this group of individuals, giving a test specificity of more than 98%. Because these peptides can be synthesized and are very stable at room temperature, the use of such reagents can improve the standardization and reproducibility of ELISAs for the serodiagnosis of T. cruzi infection. PMID:8027352

  4. Current and developing therapeutic agents in the treatment of Chagas disease

    PubMed Central

    Apt, Werner

    2010-01-01

    Chagas disease must be treated in all its stages: acute, indeterminate, chronic, and initial and middle determinant chronic, due to the fact that DNA of the parasite can be demonstrated by PCR in chronic cases, where optical microscopy does not detect parasites. Nifurtimox (NF) and benznidazole (BNZ) are the drugs accepted to treat humans based upon ethical considerations and efficiency. However, both the drugs produce secondary effects in 30% of the cases, and the treatment must be given for at least 30–60 days. Other useful drugs are itraconazole and posaconazole. The latter may be the drug to treat Chagas disease in the future when all the investigations related to it are finished. At present, there is no criterion of cure for chronic cases since in the majority, the serology remains positive, although it may decrease. In acute cases, 70% cure with NF and 75% with BNZ is achieved. In congenital cases, 100% cure is obtained if the treatment is performed during the first year of life. In chronic acquired cases, 20% cure and 50% improvement of the electrocardiographic changes are obtained with itraconazole. PMID:20957215

  5. Benznidazole Extended-Release Tablets for Improved Treatment of Chagas Disease: Preclinical Pharmacokinetic Study

    PubMed Central

    Campos, Michel Leandro; Rosa, Talita Atanazio; Padilha, Elias Carvalho; Alzate, Alejandro Henao; Rolim, Larissa Araújo; Rolim-Neto, Pedro José

    2016-01-01

    Benznidazole (BNZ) is the first-line drug for the treatment of Chagas disease. The drug is available in the form of immediate-release tablets for 100-mg (adult) and 12.5-mg (pediatric) doses. The drug is administered two or three times daily for 60 days. The high frequency of daily administrations and the long period of treatment are factors that significantly contribute to the abandonment of therapy, affecting therapeutic success. Accordingly, this study aimed to evaluate the preclinical pharmacokinetics of BNZ administered as extended-release tablets (200-mg dose) formulated with different types of polymers (hydroxypropyl methylcellulose K4M and K100M), compared to the tablets currently available. The studies were conducted with rabbits, and BNZ quantification was performed in plasma and urine by ultraperformance liquid chromatography methods previously validated. The bioavailability of BNZ was adequate in the administration of extended-release tablets; however, with the administration of the pediatric tablet, the bioavailability was lower than with other tablets, which showed that the clinical use of this formulation should be monitored. The pharmacokinetic parameters demonstrated that the extended-release tablets prolonged drug release from the pharmaceutical matrix and provided an increase in the maintenance of the drug concentration in vivo, which would allow the frequency of administration to be reduced. Thus, a relative bioavailability study in humans will be planned for implementation of a new product for the treatment of Chagas disease. PMID:26883698

  6. Benznidazole Extended-Release Tablets for Improved Treatment of Chagas Disease: Preclinical Pharmacokinetic Study.

    PubMed

    Davanço, Marcelo Gomes; Campos, Michel Leandro; Rosa, Talita Atanazio; Padilha, Elias Carvalho; Alzate, Alejandro Henao; Rolim, Larissa Araújo; Rolim-Neto, Pedro José; Peccinini, Rosângela Gonçalves

    2016-04-01

    Benznidazole (BNZ) is the first-line drug for the treatment of Chagas disease. The drug is available in the form of immediate-release tablets for 100-mg (adult) and 12.5-mg (pediatric) doses. The drug is administered two or three times daily for 60 days. The high frequency of daily administrations and the long period of treatment are factors that significantly contribute to the abandonment of therapy, affecting therapeutic success. Accordingly, this study aimed to evaluate the preclinical pharmacokinetics of BNZ administered as extended-release tablets (200-mg dose) formulated with different types of polymers (hydroxypropyl methylcellulose K4M and K100M), compared to the tablets currently available. The studies were conducted with rabbits, and BNZ quantification was performed in plasma and urine by ultraperformance liquid chromatography methods previously validated. The bioavailability of BNZ was adequate in the administration of extended-release tablets; however, with the administration of the pediatric tablet, the bioavailability was lower than with other tablets, which showed that the clinical use of this formulation should be monitored. The pharmacokinetic parameters demonstrated that the extended-release tablets prolonged drug release from the pharmaceutical matrix and provided an increase in the maintenance of the drug concentrationin vivo, which would allow the frequency of administration to be reduced. Thus, a relative bioavailability study in humans will be planned for implementation of a new product for the treatment of Chagas disease.

  7. Aptamer-based detection of disease biomarkers in mouse models for chagas drug discovery.

    PubMed

    de Araujo, Fernanda Fortes; Nagarkatti, Rana; Gupta, Charu; Marino, Ana Paula; Debrabant, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Drug discovery initiatives, aimed at Chagas treatment, have been hampered by the lack of standardized drug screening protocols and the absence of simple pre-clinical assays to evaluate treatment efficacy in animal models. In this study, we used a simple Enzyme Linked Aptamer (ELA) assay to detect T. cruzi biomarker in blood and validate murine drug discovery models of Chagas disease. In two mice models, Apt-29 ELA assay demonstrated that biomarker levels were significantly higher in the infected group compared to the control group, and upon Benznidazole treatment, their levels reduced. However, biomarker levels in the infected treated group did not reduce to those seen in the non-infected treated group, with 100% of the mice above the assay cutoff, suggesting that parasitemia was reduced but cure was not achieved. The ELA assay was capable of detecting circulating biomarkers in mice infected with various strains of T. cruzi parasites. Our results showed that the ELA assay could detect residual parasitemia in treated mice by providing an overall picture of the infection in the host. They suggest that the ELA assay can be used in drug discovery applications to assess treatment efficacy in-vivo.

  8. Ecology, evolution and control of Chagas disease: a century of neglected modelling and a promising future.

    PubMed

    Nouvellet, Pierre; Cucunubá, Zulma M; Gourbière, Sébastien

    2015-03-01

    More than 100 years after its formal description, Chagas disease remains a major public health concern in Latin America with a yearly burden of 430,000 Disability-Adjusted Life Years (DALYs). The aetiological agent, a protozoan named Trypanosoma cruzi, is mainly transmitted to mammalian hosts by triatomine vectors. Multiple species of mammals and triatomines can harbour and transmit the parasite, and the feeding range of triatomine species typically includes many noncompetent hosts. Furthermore, the transmission of the pathogen can occur via several routes including the typical vector's faeces, but also oral, congenital and blood transfusion routes. These ecological and epidemiological complexities of the disease have hindered many control initiatives. In such a context, mathematical models provide invaluable tools to explore and understand the dynamics of T. cruzi transmission, and to design, optimize and monitor the efficacy of control interventions. We intend here to provide the first review of the mathematical models of Chagas disease, focussing on how they have contributed to our understanding of (1) the population dynamics and control of triatomine vectors, and (2) the epidemiology of T. cruzi infections. We also aim at suggesting promising lines of modelling that could further improve our understanding of the ecology, evolution, and control of the disease.

  9. Cardiac Magnetic Resonance-Verified Myocardial Fibrosis in Chagas Disease: Clinical Correlates and Risk Stratification

    PubMed Central

    Uellendahl, Marly; de Siqueira, Maria Eduarda Menezes; Calado, Eveline Barros; Kalil-Filho, Roberto; Sobral, Dário; Ribeiro, Clébia; Oliveira, Wilson; Martins, Silvia; Narula, Jagat; Rochitte, Carlos Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Background Chagas disease (CD) is an important cause of heart failure and mortality, mainly in Latin America. This study evaluated the morphological and functional characteristics of the heart as well the extent of myocardial fibrosis (MF) in patients with CD by cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR). The prognostic value of MF evaluated by myocardial-delayed enhancement (MDE) was compared with that via Rassi score. Methods This study assessed 39 patients divided into 2 groups: 28 asymptomatic patients as indeterminate form group (IND); and symptomatic patients as Chagas Heart Disease (CHD) group. All patients underwent CMR using the techniques of cine-MRI and MDE, and the amount of MF was compared with the Rassi score. Results Regarding the morphological and functional analysis, significant differences were observed between both groups (p < 0.001). Furthermore, there was a strong correlation between the extent of MF and the Rassi score (r = 0.76). Conclusions CMR is an important technique for evaluating patients with CD, stressing morphological and functional differences in all clinical presentations. The strong correlation with the Rassi score and the extent of MF detected by CMR emphasizes its role in the prognostic stratification of patients with CD. PMID:27982271

  10. Humoral autoimmune response to ribosomal P proteins in chronic Chagas heart disease.

    PubMed Central

    Levitus, G; Hontebeyrie-Joskowicz, M; Van Regenmortel, M H; Levin, M J

    1991-01-01

    The C terminal region of a Trypanosoma cruzi ribosomal P protein, encoded by the lambda gt11 JL5 recombinant, defined a major antigenic determinant in chronic Chagas heart disease. Immunopurified anti-JL5 antibodies were tested for anti-human ribosome reactivity by immunoblotting. They recognized the parasite ribosomal P proteins and clearly reacted with the corresponding human P proteins. The peptide R-13, that comprises the 13 C terminal residues of the JL5 recombinant and defines the specificity shared between chronic Chagas heart disease anti-JL5 antibodies and the systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) anti-P antibodies, was used to study the specificity and the IgG subclass distribution of the anti-R-13 response by ELISA. The R-13 autoepitope is recognized mainly by sera from chagasic patients, but not by sera from malaria patients. Moreover, there was a significant correlation between anti-R-13 antibody levels and anti-T. cruzi antibody titres. The anti-R-13 response was mainly restricted to the IgG1 heavy chain isotype and correlated with the anti-T. cruzi isotype distribution. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:1893622

  11. Anti-β1-adrenergic receptor autoantibodies in patients with chronic Chagas heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Labovsky, V; Smulski, C R; Gómez, K; Levy, G; Levin, M J

    2007-01-01

    Chronic Chagas heart disease (cChHD), a chronic manifestation of the Trypanosoma cruzi infection, is characterized by high antibody levels against the C-terminal region of the ribosomal P proteins (i.e. peptide R13, EEEDDDMGFGLFD) which bears similarity with the second extracellular loop of β1-adrenergic receptor (β1-AR, peptide H26R HWWRAESDEARRCYNDPKCCDFVTNR). Because it has not been demonstrated clearly that IgGs from cChHD patients bind to native human β1-AR, the aim of this study was to investigate further the physical interaction between cChHD IgGs and the human β1-AR. Immunofluorescence assays demonstrated the binding of these antibodies to the receptor expressed on stably transfected cells, together with a β1-AR agonist-like effect. In addition, immunoadsorption of the serum samples from cChHD patients with a commercially available matrix, containing peptides representing the first and the second extracellular loop of the β1-AR, completely abolished reactivity against the H26R peptide and the physiological response to the receptor. The follow-up of this specificity after in vitro immunoadsorption procedures suggests that this treatment might be used to diminish significantly the serum levels of anti-β1-AR antibodies in patients with Chagas heart disease. PMID:17419712

  12. Identification of major Trypanosoma cruzi antigenic determinants in chronic Chagas' heart disease.

    PubMed

    Levin, M J; Mesri, E; Benarous, R; Levitus, G; Schijman, A; Levy-Yeyati, P; Chiale, P A; Ruiz, A M; Kahn, A; Rosenbaum, M B

    1989-11-01

    To identify Trypanosoma cruzi target antigens in overt Chagas' heart disease, a parasite lambda gt11 cDNA library was screened with the serum of a patient with a severe chagasic heart involvement (JL). Using a phage dot array immunoassay, 5 highly antigenic clones, JL1, JL5, JL7, JL8, and JL9, were probed with sera from clinically characterized T. cruzi infected subjects. The correlation of cloned T. cruzi antigen recognition with the clinical status of the subjects led to the identification of a recombinant antigen, JL5, that reacted predominantly with sera from patients with Chagas' heart disease. The antigenic determinant of the JL5 recombinant was a small 35 amino acid peptide. The nucleotide and the deduced amino acid sequence, together with other experimental data, allowed identification as the C-terminal portion of a T. cruzi P ribosomal protein. The C-terminal undecapeptide in JL5, EDDDMGFGLFD, was highly homologous to the same region of the human P protein SD(D/E)DMGFGLFD. The latter sequence has been identified as the P protein epitope in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Positive SLE sera reacted with the JL5 recombinant phage, suggesting that the T. cruzi P protein might induce antibodies with a similar specificity to that of P antibodies in SLE.

  13. Impact of Chagas Disease in Bolivian Immigrants Living in Europe and the Risk of Stigmatization

    PubMed Central

    Ortí-Lucas, Rafael M.; Parada-Barba, María C.; de la Rubia-Ortí, José E.; Carrillo-Ruiz, Alejandra; Beso-Delgado, María; Boone, An L. D.

    2014-01-01

    Background. The prevalence of Chagas disease in endemic countries varies with the kind of vector involved and the socioeconomic conditions of the population of origin. Due to recent immigration it is an emerging public health problem in Europe, especially in those countries which receive immigrant populations with a high prevalence of carriers. The study reviews the impact of the disease on Bolivian immigrants living in Europe, the preventive measures and regulations applied in European countries, and their repercussion on possible stigmatization of certain population groups. Methods. The Bolivian immigrant population resident in 2012 was estimated and the affected population in different European countries was calculated with data on carrier prevalence that were recently published. The preventive measures and regulations available in Europe were also reviewed. MEDLINE-PubMed, GoPubMed, and Embase were consulted for the literature review. Results. The Bolivian immigrant population has the highest prevalence of Chagas carriers (6.7%–25%) compared to the overall Latin American population (1.3%–2.4%). Only in Spain, France, Belgium, UK, Portugal, Italy, Switzerland, The Netherlands, and Germany, preventive measures are applied to this population. The established regulations are insufficient and completely different criteria are applied in the different countries and this could reflect a certain degree of stigmatization. PMID:24719753

  14. [Neonatal screening for congenital Chagas infection: application of latent class analysis for diagnostic test evaluation].

    PubMed

    Andrade, André Queiroz de; Gontijo, Eliane Dias

    2008-01-01

    The present study had the aim of evaluating conventional serum tests that are used in neonatal screening for Chagas disease, with a discussion on the statistical methods available. A random sample among 23,308 newborns who were screened for congenital Chagas disease was studied using the following three tests: enzyme immunoassay, indirect immunofluorescence and indirect hemagglutination. The data were analyzed by different statistical methodologies: latent class analysis, Kappa test and relative sensitivity analysis. Using latent class analysis, enzyme immunoassay had the highest sensitivity (48.6%), followed by indirect immunofluorescence (39.8%) and indirect hemagglutination (23.2%). The kappa value was 0.496. The ratio between the sensitivities of enzyme immunoassays and indirect immunofluorescence tests was 92% [0.74;1.13]. Latent class analysis was not found to be adequate for sensitivity and specificity determination, but it provided important data about the equivalence of the tests, corroborated by relative sensitivity analysis. The results showed that enzyme immunoassaying of dry blood samples can be used as safely as the indirect immunofluorescence test.

  15. Mitigating social and health inequities: community participation and Chagas disease in rural Argentina.

    PubMed

    Llovet, Ignacio; Dinardi, Graciela; De Maio, Fernando G

    2011-01-01

    Chagas disease (CD) causes 12,500 deaths annually in Latin America. As a neglected disease primarily associated with poverty, it is a major driver of health inequity. Argentina's efforts to control vector transmission have been unsuccessful. Using new survey data (n=400 households), we compare the social patterning of the burden of CD by examining socio-demographic predictors of self-reported CD and the presence of vinchucas in two areas of rural northern Argentina known to have experienced different interventions in surveillance and control. Our analyses suggest that Avellaneda, an area known for horizontal intervention strategies which nurture community participation is quite distinct from Silipica, an area which has experienced a vertical intervention strategy since 1990. Avellaneda has higher level of self-reported Chagas infection and lower level of vinchuca presence; Silipica has pronounced and statistically significant differences patterned by the head of household's level of educational attainment. A greater awareness of the disease and its transmission, along with community mobilisation and spraying, may bring about more self-reported CD and less vinchuca presence in Avellaneda than in Silipica. This suggests that strategies based on community participation may be effective in reducing the social patterning of the burden of disease, even in poor places.

  16. Specific chemotherapy of Chagas disease: relevance, current limitations and new approaches.

    PubMed

    Urbina, Julio A

    2010-01-01

    A critical review of the development of specific chemotherapeutic approaches for the management of American Trypanosomiasis or Chagas disease is presented, including controversies on the pathogenesis of the disease, the initial efforts that led to the development of currently available drugs (nifurtimox and benznidazole), limitations of these therapies and novel approaches for the development of anti-Trypanosoma cruzi drugs, based on our growing understanding of the biology of this parasite. Among the later, the most promising approaches are ergosterol biosynthesis inhibitors such as posaconazole and ravuconazole, poised to enter clinical trials for chronic Chagas disease in the short term; inhibitors of cruzipain, the main cysteine protease of T. cruzi, essential for its survival and proliferation in vitro and in vivo; bisphosphonates, metabolic stable pyrophosphate analogs that have trypanocidal activity through the inhibition of the parasite's farnesyl-pyrophosphate synthase or hexokinase; inhibitors of trypanothione synthesis and redox metabolism and inhibitors of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl-transferase, an essential enzyme for purine salvage in T. cruzi and related organisms. Finally, the economic and political challenges faced by development of drugs for the treatment of neglected tropical diseases, which afflict almost exclusively poor populations in developing countries, are analyzed and recent potential solutions for this conundrum are discussed.

  17. Parasite prolyl oligopeptidases and the challenge of designing chemotherapeuticals for Chagas disease, leishmaniasis and African trypanosomiasis.

    PubMed

    Bastos, I M D; Motta, F N; Grellier, P; Santana, J M

    2013-01-01

    The trypanosomatids Trypanosoma cruzi, Leishmania spp. and Trypanosoma brucei spp. cause Chagas disease, leishmaniasis and human African trypanosomiasis, respectively. It is estimated that over 10 million people worldwide suffer from these neglected diseases, posing enormous social and economic problems in endemic areas. There are no vaccines to prevent these infections and chemotherapies are not adequate. This picture indicates that new chemotherapeutic agents must be developed to treat these illnesses. For this purpose, understanding the biology of the pathogenic trypanosomatid- host cell interface is fundamental for molecular and functional characterization of virulence factors that may be used as targets for the development of inhibitors to be used for effective chemotherapy. In this context, it is well known that proteases have crucial functions for both metabolism and infectivity of pathogens and are thus potential drug targets. In this regard, prolyl oligopeptidase and oligopeptidase B, both members of the S9 serine protease family, have been shown to play important roles in the interactions of pathogenic protozoa with their mammalian hosts and may thus be considered targets for drug design. This review aims to discuss structural and functional properties of these intriguing enzymes and their potential as targets for the development of drugs against Chagas disease, leishmaniasis and African trypanosomiasis.

  18. Geographic Distribution of Chagas Disease Vectors in Brazil Based on Ecological Niche Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Gurgel-Gonçalves, Rodrigo; Galvão, Cléber; Costa, Jane; Peterson, A. Townsend

    2012-01-01

    Although Brazil was declared free from Chagas disease transmission by the domestic vector Triatoma infestans, human acute cases are still being registered based on transmission by native triatomine species. For a better understanding of transmission risk, the geographic distribution of Brazilian triatomines was analyzed. Sixteen out of 62 Brazilian species that both occur in >20 municipalities and present synanthropic tendencies were modeled based on their ecological niches. Panstrongylus geniculatus and P. megistus showed broad ecological ranges, but most of the species sort out by the biome in which they are distributed: Rhodnius pictipes and R. robustus in the Amazon; R. neglectus, Triatoma sordida, and T. costalimai in the Cerrado; R. nasutus, P. lutzi, T. brasiliensis, T. pseudomaculata, T. melanocephala, and T. petrocchiae in the Caatinga; T. rubrovaria in the southern pampas; T. tibiamaculata and T. vitticeps in the Atlantic Forest. Although most occurrences were recorded in open areas (Cerrado and Caatinga), our results show that all environmental conditions in the country are favorable to one or more of the species analyzed, such that almost nowhere is Chagas transmission risk negligible. PMID:22523500

  19. Chronic Chagas cardiopathy in Chile. Importance of Trypanosoma cruzi burden and clinical evaluation.

    PubMed

    Apt, Werner; Arribada, Arturo; Zulantay, Inés; Saavedra, Miguel; Muñoz, Catalina; Toro, Bruno; Vega, Bastián; Rodríguez, Jorge

    2016-10-01

    Currently there are no biological markers to indicate which individuals with chronic indeterminate period of Chagas disease develop heart disease and who will remain all his life in this phase. The aim of this survey was to determine if Trypanosoma cruzi burden is related to the presence of heart disease in patients with chronic Chagas disease. 200 patients who had not been treated, 100 with cardiopathy and 100 without, groups A and B respectively, were submitted to clinical study and electrocardiogram, Echo-Doppler was performed for group A in which all important known causes of cardiopathy were discarded. In both groups xenodiagnosis, conventional PCR and quantitative PCR were undertaken. The 100 cardiopaths had 133 electrocardiographic alterations most of them in grade II of the New York Heart Association classification. 98 cardiopaths were classified in grade I by Echo-Doppler and only 2 cases were in grade III due to low ejection fraction. The difference in average parasitemia in patients of group A and B was not significant and no statistically differences were observed between average parasitemia of cardiopaths grade II versus grade I of NYHA. This results allow to characterize same clinical, electrocardiographical and parasitological features in chagasic cardiopaths of Chile.

  20. Entomological factors affecting the low endemicity of Chagas disease in Nazca, Southwestern Peru.

    PubMed

    Paredes-Esquivel, Claudia; Lecaros, Emilio; Aguliar-Rosales, Mauro; Acosta, Hilda Solis; Castellanos, Pedro

    2010-05-01

    Chagas disease is prevalent in Peru. The province of Nazca, in the southwestern region of the country, shows a high intradomiciliary infestation rate of Triatoma infestans bugs. Although the vector is present, the number of Chagas disease cases appears to be much lower than those reported in the neighboring region of Arequipa. We examined 624 T. infestans from Nazca to determine the current Trypanosoma cruzi infection rates, and found that no bugs were infected with this parasite. These results contrast with those found in Arequipa, where 19-30% triatomines have been reported infected. To compare their vectorial capacity, we infected 30 T. infestans specimens, selected both from Nazca and Arequipa, by feeding bugs on T. cruzi-infected mice. The parasites developed all stages expected in the vector; furthermore, the infective stage, metacyclic trypomastigote, was found in both insect populations from the second week after infection. In addition, those insects that accepted to be fed with mice blood defecated immediately after finishing blood meal, indicating that they might be efficient vectors. We maintain that differences observed in infection rates between vectors from Nazca and Arequipa may be explained by differences in host availability. In Arequipa hosts are mainly small animals, whereas in Nazca the main blood source comes from birds, which are refractory to the infection.

  1. Trypanosoma cruzi infection enhances polyreactive antibody response in an acute case of human Chagas' disease.

    PubMed Central

    Grauert, M R; Houdayer, M; Hontebeyrie-Joskowciz, M

    1993-01-01

    The kinetics of antibody response in an acute case of human Chagas' disease was investigated. Hypergammaglubulinaemia appeared at day 17 of infection, and persisted after 66 days of infection, at which time parasitaemia became undetectable. Titration of immunoglobulins showed that the three principal isotypes were involved in the response, emphasizing polyclonal B cell activation. Total IgA was detected before total IgM, and the latter before total IgG. High titres of autoantibodies were found among IgM and IgG subclasses. IgA was also the first isotype to be detected among specific anti-Trypanosoma cruzi antibodies. However, the maximal parasite antibody response was attained after 30 days of infection for all isotypes. With regard to possible cross-reactivity between molecules of host and parasite, adsorption experiments on T. cruzi-specific immunosorbent were designed. Specific antibodies, present in the eluates, also recognized natural antigens, especially laminin. In order to characterize the alpha-galactose epitope of laminin, adsorption experiments on sheep erythrocytes were performed, and revealed the possible presence of another epitope on the glycoprotein. Our results indicate that in the case of Chagas' disease investigated here, polyclonal activation occurred; moreover, they suggest that molecular mimicry may play a role by increasing autoantibodies, probably via a parasite-driven mechanism. PMID:7686828

  2. In Situ Expression of Regulatory Cytokines by Heart Inflammatory Cells in Chagas' Disease Patients with Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Denise Bertulucci Rocha; dos Reis, Marlene Antonia; Romano, Audrey; Pereira, Sanívia Aparecida de Lima; Teixeira, Vicente de Paula Antunes; Tostes Junior, Sebastião; Rodrigues, Virmondes

    2012-01-01

    Chagas' disease is caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. The immune system plays an important role in the reduction of parasite load, but may also contribute to the development of lesions observed during the chronic phase of the disease. We analyzed cytokines produced by inflammatory heart cells in 21 autopsy samples obtained from patients with Chagas' disease divided according to the presence or absence of heart failure (HF). Left ventricular sections were analyzed by immunohistochemistry using antibodies against human IL-4, IFN-γ, TGF-β, TNF-α, and NOS2. In situ mRNA expression was quantified by a Low Density Array. The number of IFN-γ-positive cells was significantly higher than IL-4 positive cells. TNF-α, TGF-β and NOS2 were detected in 65%, 62% and 94% of samples respectively. There was an association between TNF-α-producing cells and the presence of HF. Subjects with HF presented higher levels of STAT4 mRNA, whereas FoxP3 and STAT6 levels were similar in the two groups. A Th1 cytokine pattern predominated in the cardiac inflammatory cell infiltrate of Chagas' disease patients associated with HF. High degree of fibrosis was associated with low NOS2 expression. These results support the idea that Th1 immune responses are involved in heart lesions of Chagas' disease patients. PMID:22811738

  3. Opportunities for Improved Chagas Disease Vector Control Based on Knowledge, Attitudes and Practices of Communities in the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Rosecrans, Kathryn; Cruz-Martin, Gabriela; King, Ashley; Dumonteil, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Background Chagas disease is a vector-borne parasitic disease of major public health importance. Current prevention efforts are based on triatomine vector control to reduce transmission to humans. Success of vector control interventions depends on their acceptability and value to affected communities. We aimed to identify opportunities for and barriers to improved vector control strategies in the Yucatan peninsula, Mexico. Methodology/principal findings We employed a sequence of qualitative and quantitative research methods to investigate knowledge, attitudes and practices surrounding Chagas disease, triatomines and vector control in three rural communities. Our combined data show that community members are well aware of triatomines and are knowledgeable about their habits. However, most have a limited understanding of the transmission dynamics and clinical manifestations of Chagas disease. While triatomine control is not a priority for community members, they frequently use domestic insecticide products including insecticide spray, mosquito coils and plug-in repellents. Families spend about $32 US per year on these products. Alternative methods such as yard cleaning and window screens are perceived as desirable and potentially more effective. Screens are nonetheless described as unaffordable, in spite of a cost comparable to the average annual spending on insecticide products. Conclusion/Significance Further education campaigns and possibly financing schemes may lead families to redirect their current vector control spending from insecticide products to window screens. Also, synergism with mosquito control efforts should be further explored to motivate community involvement and ensure sustainability of Chagas disease vector control. PMID:24676038

  4. Trypanosoma cruzi discrete typing units in Chagas disease patients from endemic and non-endemic regions of Argentina.

    PubMed

    Cura, C I; Lucero, R H; Bisio, M; Oshiro, E; Formichelli, L B; Burgos, J M; Lejona, S; Brusés, B L; Hernández, D O; Severini, G V; Velazquez, E; Duffy, T; Anchart, E; Lattes, R; Altcheh, J; Freilij, H; Diez, M; Nagel, C; Vigliano, C; Favaloro, L; Favaloro, R R; Merino, D E; Sosa-Estani, S; Schijman, A G

    2012-04-01

    Genetic diversity of Trypanosoma cruzi may play a role in pathogenesis of Chagas disease forms. Natural populations are classified into 6 Discrete Typing Units (DTUs) Tc I-VI with taxonomical status. This study aimed to identify T. cruzi DTUs in bloodstream and tissue samples of Argentinean patients with Chagas disease. PCR-based strategies allowed DTU identification in 256 clinical samples from 239 Argentinean patients. Tc V prevailed in blood from both asymptomatic and symptomatic cases and Tc I was more frequent in bloodstream, cardiac tissues and chagoma samples from immunosuppressed patients. Tc II and VI were identified in a minority of cases, while Tc III and Tc IV were not detected in the studied population. Interestingly, Tc I and Tc II/VI sequences were amplified from the same skin biopsy slice from a kidney transplant patient suffering Chagas disease reactivation. Further data also revealed the occurrence of mixed DTU populations in the human chronic infection. In conclusion, our findings provide evidence of the complexity of the dynamics of T. cruzi diversity in the natural history of human Chagas disease and allege the pathogenic role of DTUs I, II, V and VI in the studied population.

  5. Targeted screening and health education for Chagas disease tailored to at-risk migrants in Spain, 2007 to 2010.

    PubMed

    Navarro, M; Perez-Ayala, A; Guionnet, A; Perez-Molina, J A; Navaza, B; Estevez, L; Norman, F; Flores-Chavez, M; Lopez-Velez, R

    2011-09-22

    Chagas disease is endemic in Latin America, but migration has expanded the disease's geographical limits. Spain is the most affected country in Europe. From 2007, a specific Chagas disease programme aimed at at-risk migrants was developed in three Spanish cities (Madrid, Jerez de la Frontera and Alicante). The objectives of the programme were to increase participants' knowledge and decrease their fears about the disease and to encourage them to undergo screening for Trypanosoma cruzi infection. The programme was specially focused on migrants from Bolivia and Latin American women of childbearing age. Culturally tailored interventions were carried out in non-clinical settings. A total of 276 migrants were screened using a rapid immunochromatographic test following talks on the disease: the results were then later confirmed by standard serological tests. Of those tested, 44 (15.9%) were confirmed cases of Chagas disease. All of them came from Bolivia and a quarter were pregnant women. Of the 44 cases, 31 were later followed up at a specialised Chagas disease clinic. We consider that the adaptation of the programme to the target population's needs and collaboration with non-governmental organisations and migrants' associations contributed to the acceptance of the programme and the increasing number of patients seen at a specialised clinic.

  6. CHARITY: Chagas cardiomyopathy bisoprolol intervention study: a randomized double-blind placebo force-titration controlled study with Bisoprolol in patients with chronic heart failure secondary to Chagas cardiomyopathy [NCT00323973

    PubMed Central

    Quiros, Franklin R; Morillo, Carlos A; Casas, Juan P; Cubillos, Luz A; Silva, Federico A

    2006-01-01

    Background Chagas' disease is the major cause of disability secondary to tropical diseases in young adults from Latin America, and around 20 million people are currently infected by T. cruzi. Heart failure due to Chagas cardiomyopathy is the main clinical presenation in Colombia. Heart failure due to Chagas' disease may respond to digoxin, diuretics and vasodilator therapy. Beta-adrenoreceptor antagonism seems to protect against the increased risk of cardiac arrhythmia and sudden death due to chronic sympathetic stimulation. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effects of the selective beta-adrenergic receptor blocker Bisoprolol on cardiovascular mortality, hospital readmission due to progressive heart failure and functional status in patients with heart failure secondary to Chagas' cardiomyopathy. Methods/design A cohort of 500 T. cruzi seropositive patients (250 per arm) will be selected from several institutions in Colombia. During the pretreatment period an initial evaluation visit will be scheduled in which participants will sign consent forms and baseline measurements and tests will be conducted including blood pressure measurements, twelve-lead ECG and left ventricular ejection fraction assessment by 2D echocardiography. Quality of life questionnaire will be performed two weeks apart during baseline examination using the "Minnesota living with heart failure" questionnaire. A minimum of two 6 minutes corridor walk test once a week over a two-week period will be performed to measure functional class. During the treatment period patients will be randomly assigned to receive Bisoprolol or placebo, initially taking a total daily dose of 2.5 mgrs qd. The dose will be increased every two weeks to 5, 7.5 and 10 mgrs qd (maximum maintenance dose). Follow-up assessment will include clinical check-up, and blood collection for future measurements of inflammatory reactants and markers. Quality of life measurements will be obtained at six months. This study will allow

  7. Chagas disease: current epidemiological trends after the interruption of vectorial and transfusional transmission in the Southern Cone countries.

    PubMed

    Moncayo, Alvaro

    2003-07-01

    Chagas disease, named after Carlos Chagas who first described it in 1909, exists only on the American Continent. It is caused by a parasite, Trypanosoma cruzi, transmitted to humans by blood-sucking triatomine bugs and by blood transfusion. Chagas disease has two successive phases, acute and chronic. The acute phase lasts 6 to 8 weeks. After several years of starting the chronic phase, 20% to 35% of the infected individuals, depending on the geographical area will develop irreversible lesions of the autonomous nervous system in the heart, esophagus, colon and the peripheral nervous system. Data on the prevalence and distribution of Chagas disease improved in quality during the 1980's as a result of the demographically representative cross-sectional studies carried out in countries where accurate information was not available. A group of experts met in Bras lia in 1979 and devised standard protocols to carry out countrywide prevalence studies on human T. cruzi infection and triatomine house infestation. Thanks to a coordinated multi-country program in the Southern Cone countries the transmission of Chagas disease by vectors and by blood transfusion has been interrupted in Uruguay in1997, in Chile in 1999, and in 8 of the 12 endemic states of Brazil in 2000 and so the incidence of new infections by T. cruzi in the whole continent has decreased by 70%. Similar control multi-country initiatives have been launched in the Andean countries and in Central America and rapid progress has been recorded to ensure the interruption of the transmission of Chagas disease by 2005 as requested by a Resolution of the World Health Assembly approved in 1998. The cost-benefit analysis of the investments of the vector control program in Brazil indicate that there are savings of US$17 in medical care and disabilities for each dollar spent on prevention, showing that the program is a health investment with good return. Since the inception in 1979 of the Steering Committee on Chagas Disease

  8. Longitudinal study of patients with chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy in Brazil (SaMi-Trop project): a cohort profile

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso, Clareci Silva; Sabino, Ester Cerdeira; Oliveira, Claudia Di Lorenzo; de Oliveira, Lea Campos; Ferreira, Ariela Mota; Cunha-Neto, Edécio; Bierrenbach, Ana Luiza; Ferreira, João Eduardo; Haikal, Desirée Sant'Ana; Reingold, Arthur L; Ribeiro, Antonio Luiz P

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We have established a prospective cohort of 1959 patients with chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy to evaluate if a clinical prediction rule based on ECG, brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels, and other biomarkers can be useful in clinical practice. This paper outlines the study and baseline characteristics of the participants. Participants The study is being conducted in 21 municipalities of the northern part of Minas Gerais State in Brazil, and includes a follow-up of 2 years. The baseline evaluation included collection of sociodemographic information, social determinants of health, health-related behaviours, comorbidities, medicines in use, history of previous treatment for Chagas disease, functional class, quality of life, blood sample collection, and ECG. Patients were mostly female, aged 50–74 years, with low family income and educational level, with known Chagas disease for >10 years; 46% presented with functional class >II. Previous use of benznidazole was reported by 25.2% and permanent use of pacemaker by 6.2%. Almost half of the patients presented with high blood cholesterol and hypertension, and one-third of them had diabetes mellitus. N-terminal of the prohormone BNP (NT-ProBNP) level was >300 pg/mL in 30% of the sample. Findings to date Clinical and laboratory markers predictive of severe and progressive Chagas disease were identified as high NT-ProBNP levels, as well as symptoms of advanced heart failure. These results confirm the important residual morbidity of Chagas disease in the remote areas, thus supporting political decisions that should prioritise in addition to epidemiological surveillance the medical treatment of chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy in the coming years. The São Paulo-Minas Gerais Tropical Medicine Research Center (SaMi-Trop) represents a major challenge for focused research in neglected diseases, with knowledge that can be applied in primary healthcare. Future plans We will continue following this patients’ cohort

  9. Lineage Analysis of Circulating Trypanosoma cruzi Parasites and Their Association with Clinical Forms of Chagas Disease in Bolivia

    PubMed Central

    del Puerto, Ramona; Nishizawa, Juan Eiki; Kikuchi, Mihoko; Iihoshi, Naomi; Roca, Yelin; Avilas, Cinthia; Gianella, Alberto; Lora, Javier; Gutierrez Velarde, Freddy Udalrico; Renjel, Luis Alberto; Miura, Sachio; Higo, Hiroo; Komiya, Norihiro; Maemura, Koji; Hirayama, Kenji

    2010-01-01

    Background The causative agent of Chagas disease, Trypanosoma cruzi, is divided into 6 Discrete Typing Units (DTU): Tc I, IIa, IIb, IIc, IId and IIe. In order to assess the relative pathogenicities of different DTUs, blood samples from three different clinical groups of chronic Chagas disease patients (indeterminate, cardiac, megacolon) from Bolivia were analyzed for their circulating parasites lineages using minicircle kinetoplast DNA polymorphism. Methods and Findings Between 2000 and 2007, patients sent to the Centro Nacional de Enfermedades Tropicales for diagnosis of Chagas from clinics and hospitals in Santa Cruz, Bolivia, were assessed by serology, cardiology and gastro-intestinal examinations. Additionally, patients who underwent colonectomies due to Chagasic magacolon at the Hospital Universitario Japonés were also included. A total of 306 chronic Chagas patients were defined by their clinical types (81 with cardiopathy, 150 without cardiopathy, 100 with megacolon, 144 without megacolon, 164 with cardiopathy or megacolon, 73 indeterminate and 17 cases with both cardiopathy and megacolon). DNA was extracted from 10 ml of peripheral venous blood for PCR analysis. The kinetoplast minicircle DNA (kDNA) was amplified from 196 out of 306 samples (64.1%), of which 104 (53.3%) were Tc IId, 4 (2.0%) Tc I, 7 (3.6%) Tc IIb, 1 (0.5%) Tc IIe, 26 (13.3%) Tc I/IId, 1 (0.5%) Tc I/IIb/IId, 2 (1.0%) Tc IIb/d and 51 (25.9%) were unidentified. Of the 133 Tc IId samples, three different kDNA hypervariable region patterns were detected; Mn (49.6%), TPK like (48.9%) and Bug-like (1.5%). There was no significant association between Tc types and clinical manifestations of disease. Conclusions None of the identified lineages or sublineages was significantly associated with any particular clinical manifestations in the chronic Chagas patients in Bolivia. PMID:20502516

  10. Characterization of an Immunodominant Antigenic Epitope from Trypanosoma cruzi as a Biomarker of Chronic Chagas' Disease Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, M. Carmen; Fernández-Villegas, Ana; Carrilero, Bartolomé; Marañón, Concepción; Saura, Daniel; Noya, Oscar; Segovia, Manuel; Alarcón de Noya, Belkisyolé; Alonso, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Nowadays, the techniques available for chronic Chagas' disease diagnosis are very sensitive; however, they do not allow discrimination of the patient's clinical stages of the disease. The present paper describes that three out of the five different repeats contained in the Trypanosoma cruzi TcCA-2 membrane protein (3972-FGQAAAGDKPPP, 6303-FGQAAAGDKPAP, and 3973-FGQAAAGDKPSL) are recognized with high sensitivity (>90%) by sera from chronic Chagas' disease patients and that they are not recognized by sera from patients in the acute phase of the disease. A total of 133 serum samples from chagasic patients and 50 serum samples from healthy donors were tested. In addition, sera from 15 patients with different autoimmune diseases, 43 serum samples from patients suffering an infectious disease other than Chagas' disease, and 38 serum samples from patients with nonchagasic cardiac disorders were also included in this study. The residue 3973 peptide shows a specificity of >98%, as it is not recognized by individuals with autoimmune and inflammatory processes or by patients with a nonchagasic cardiomyopathy. Remarkably, the levels of antibody against the 3973 epitope detected by the sera from Chagas' disease patients in the symptomatic chronic phase, involving cardiac or digestive alterations, are higher than those detected by the sera from Chagas' disease patients in the indeterminate phase of the disease. It is suggested that the diagnostic technique described could also be used to indicate the degree of pathology. The amino acids F, Q, and DKP located in the peptide at positions 1, 3, and 8 to 10, respectively, are essential to conform to the immunodominant antigenic epitope. PMID:22155766

  11. Molecular identification and genotyping of Trypanosoma cruzi DNA in autochthonous Chagas disease patients from Texas, USA.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Melissa N; Burroughs, Hadley; Gorchakov, Rodion; Gunter, Sarah M; Dumonteil, Eric; Murray, Kristy O; Herrera, Claudia P

    2017-04-01

    The parasitic protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, is widely distributed throughout the Americas, from the southern United States (US) to northern Argentina, and infects at least 6 million people in endemic areas. Much remains unknown about the dynamics of T. cruzi transmission among mammals and triatomine vectors in sylvatic and peridomestic eco-epidemiological cycles, as well as of the risk of transmission to humans in the US. Identification of T. cruzi DTUs among locally-acquired cases is necessary for enhancing our diagnostic and clinical prognostic capacities, as well as to understand parasite transmission cycles. Blood samples from a cohort of 15 confirmed locally-acquired Chagas disease patients from Texas were used for genotyping T. cruzi. Conventional PCR using primers specific for the minicircle variable region of the kinetoplastid DNA (kDNA) and the highly repetitive genomic satellite DNA (satDNA) confirmed the presence of T. cruzi in 12/15 patients. Genotyping was based on the amplification of the intergenic region of the miniexon gene of T. cruzi and sequencing. Sequences were analyzed by BLAST and phylogenetic analysis by Maximum Likelihood method allowed the identification of non-TcI DTUs infection in six patients, which corresponded to DTUs TcII, TcV or TcVI, but not to TcIII or TcIV. Two of these six patients were also infected with a TcI DTU, indicating mixed infections in those individuals. Electrocardiographic abnormalities were seen among patients with single non-TcI and mixed infections of non-TcI and TcI DTUs. Our results indicate a greater diversity of T. cruzi DTUs circulating among autochthonous human Chagas disease cases in the southern US, including for the first time DTUs from the TcII-TcV-TcVI group. Furthermore, the DTUs infecting human patients in the US are capable of causing Chagasic cardiac disease, highlighting the importance of parasite detection in the population.

  12. Modeling horizontal gene transfer (HGT) in the gut of the Chagas disease vector Rhodnius prolixus

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Paratransgenesis is an approach to reducing arthropod vector competence using genetically modified symbionts. When applied to control of Chagas disease, the symbiont bacterium Rhodococcus rhodnii, resident in the gut lumen of the triatomine vector Rhodnius prolixus (Hemiptera: Reduviidae), is transformed to export cecropin A, an insect immune peptide. Cecropin A is active against Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease. While proof of concept has been achieved in laboratory studies, a rigorous and comprehensive risk assessment is required prior to consideration of field release. An important part of this assessment involves estimating probability of transgene horizontal transfer to environmental organisms (HGT). This article presents a two-part risk assessment methodology: a theoretical model predicting HGT in the gut of R. prolixus from the genetically transformed symbiont R. rhodnii to a closely related non-target bacterium, Gordona rubropertinctus, in the absence of selection pressure, and a series of laboratory trials designed to test the model. Results The model predicted an HGT frequency of less than 1.14 × 10-16 per 100,000 generations at the 99% certainty level. The model was iterated twenty times, with the mean of the ten highest outputs evaluated at the 99% certainty level. Laboratory trials indicated no horizontal gene transfer, supporting the conclusions of the model. Conclusions The model treats HGT as a composite event, the probability of which is determined by the joint probability of three independent events: gene transfer through the modalities of transformation, transduction, and conjugation. Genes are represented in matrices and Monte Carlo method and Markov chain analysis are used to simulate and evaluate environmental conditions. The model is intended as a risk assessment instrument and predicts HGT frequency of less than 1.14 × 10-16 per 100,000 generations. With laboratory studies that support the predictions of

  13. [Experience of targeted screening of Chagas disease in Ile-de-France].

    PubMed

    Lescure, F-X; Paris, L; Elghouzzi, M H; Le Loup, G; Develoux, M; Touafek, F; Mazier, D; Pialoux, G

    2009-12-01

    2009 is marked by the centenary of the discovery by Carlos Chagas of Human American Trypanosomiasis. As a result of international cooperation its incidence has been falling in endemic areas, whereas North America and Europe are witnessing an increase in the number of imported cases. In metropolitan France, 18 such cases were reported between 2004 and 2007. Recently, estimates based on immigration figures have been made and suggest that about 1,500 imported cases can be expected in France. The object of this article is to assess the value of targeted screening of an at-risk population, originally from Latin America and now living in the Ile-de-France (area centred on Paris). The serological techniques employed were indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) and, depending on the case, 2 or 3 Elisa tests (Biomérieux, Biokit and Wiener). Trypanosoma cruzi serology was considered positive when the IIF was superior or equal to 200, or when two Elisa's were > 1, or when the IIF was superior or equal to 100 with at least one Elisa > 1. PCR was performed in 48 cases, which were considered to be positive. The tests were carried out on a voluntary basis after a publicity campaign within the Latin American community in the Ile-de-France. In this article, we present the findings of the first year of screening. Two hundred and fifty-four individuals were screened for Chagas' disease between June 2008 and June 2009. The median age was 33 years [11-63], the male/female ratio 102/152. Overall prevalence of positive serology was 23.6% (60/254). For six patients, the results were classified as "uncertain" (discordant serological tests). Of the seropositive group, 87.4% were Bolivian and 100% presented as a chronic form. Of these, 23.6% presented with functional cardiac manifestations and 22% with gastro-intestinal problems. The PCR was positive in 61% of the seropositive individuals. Clinical evaluation together with other investigations and therapeutic intervention is being carried out at

  14. A Field Trial of Alternative Targeted Screening Strategies for Chagas Disease in Arequipa, Peru

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Gabrielle C.; Borrini-Mayorí, Katty; Ancca Juárez, Jenny; Castillo Neyra, Ricardo; Verastegui, Manuela R.; Malaga Chavez, Fernando S.; Cornejo del Carpio, Juan Geny; Córdova Benzaquen, Eleazar; Náquira, César; Gilman, Robert H.; Bern, Caryn; Levy, Michael Z.

    2012-01-01

    Background Chagas disease is endemic in the rural areas of southern Peru and a growing urban problem in the regional capital of Arequipa, population ∼860,000. It is unclear how to implement cost-effective screening programs across a large urban and periurban environment. Methods We compared four alternative screening strategies in 18 periurban communities, testing individuals in houses with 1) infected vectors; 2) high vector densities; 3) low vector densities; and 4) no vectors. Vector data were obtained from routine Ministry of Health insecticide application campaigns. We performed ring case detection (radius of 15 m) around seropositive individuals, and collected data on costs of implementation for each strategy. Results Infection was detected in 21 of 923 (2.28%) participants. Cases had lived more time on average in rural places than non-cases (7.20 years versus 3.31 years, respectively). Significant risk factors on univariate logistic regression for infection were age (OR 1.02; p = 0.041), time lived in a rural location (OR 1.04; p = 0.022), and time lived in an infested area (OR 1.04; p = 0.008). No multivariate model with these variables fit the data better than a simple model including only the time lived in an area with triatomine bugs. There was no significant difference in prevalence across the screening strategies; however a self-assessment of disease risk may have biased participation, inflating prevalence among residents of houses where no infestation was detected. Testing houses with infected-vectors was least expensive. Ring case detection yielded four secondary cases in only one community, possibly due to vector-borne transmission in this community, apparently absent in the others. Conclusions Targeted screening for urban Chagas disease is promising in areas with ongoing vector-borne transmission; however, these pockets of epidemic transmission remain difficult to detect a priori. The flexibility to adapt to the epidemiology that

  15. Stimulatory effect of lymphocytes from Chagas' patients on spontaneously beating rat atria.

    PubMed Central

    de Bracco, M M; Sterin-Borda, L; Fink, S; Finiasz, M; Borda, E

    1984-01-01

    The aim of this work was to study the effect of lymphocytes from individuals infected with Trypanosoma cruzi (Chagas' patients) on the contractile behaviour of living heart tissue. Chagas' lymphocytes (ChL) reacted with isolated rat atria preparations increasing the isometric development tension (IDT) and frequency of contractions (FC) in a dose-dependent manner. The maximal stimulatory effect was reached after 30-40 min of contract. In contrast, normal lymphocytes (NL) did not alter the basal IDT and FC values. beta-adrenergic antagonists, anti-histamine agents and inhibitors of the synthesis and action of arachidonic acid (AA) products were used to study the mechanisms of the reaction. (-)-propranolol (10(-7)M) and pyrilamine (10(-6)M) had no effect ruling out the participation of beta-adrenergic agonists or histamine. However, indomethacin (10(-6)M) and acetylsalicylic acid (1.8 X 10(-4)M) enhanced the effect of ChL. Inhibitors of the lipoxygenase pathway (5,8,11,14-eicosatetraynoic acid, 10(-7)M; nordihydroguairetic acid, 10(-5)M) and FPL55712, an antagonist of one of its terminal products: the slow reacting substance of anaphilaxis (SRS-A), abolished the reaction. Therefore, a fundamental role for SRS-A in the production of the stimulatory effect is postulated. Lymphocytes of the T cell lineage (E rosette forming cells, ERFC) are the effector cells involved in this reaction, whereas non-rosetting ChL depressed IDT. T ascertain if effector cells could be replaced by soluble factors, ChL were reacted with homogenates of rat atria and the cell free supernatants were added to beating rat atria. Positive ino- and chronotropic effects were obtained, indicating that soluble factors generated during the reaction can substitute for the intact effector cells. On the other hand if the effector cells were purified from Chagas' patients that had been treated 1 month to 6 years before the assay with trypanocidal drugs (3-methyl-4-(5'-nitrofurfurylidene-amino)-tetrahydro-4H

  16. Relacion Clasificada de los Trabajos del Departamento (Annotated Bibliography of Department Publications).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zierer, Ernesto, Comp.; And Others

    This is a bibliography of the publications of the Department of Languages and Linguistics at the University of Trujillo in Peru from 1959 through 1974. The 323 entries include works both by department members and others. The bibliography is divided into three main categories: (A) Linguistics, the principal areas being (1) General Studies, (2)…

  17. [Transfusional Chagas infection detected in the program for the control of Chagas disease in the state of São Paulo (Brazil)].

    PubMed

    Wanderley, D M; de Carvalho, M E; Mantegazza, E; Yasumaru, S; Barata, L C

    1992-06-01

    A system of surveillance for Chagas' disease aiming at a systematic investigation of the occurrence of triatominae in human dwellings in S. Paulo, Brazil was proposed. It included a serological survey of residents in house considered to be potential breeding places for blood-sucking triatomines. Serologically positive cases were observed to be distributed in age groups from 19 years of age upwards. Case-investigation revealed that the infection had been acquired either in S. Paulo in the past or recently in other States. A serologically positive (titre = 128 - IgG) case of an 8-year-old male child, was detected by the In direct Fluorescent Antibody Technique (IFAT). In S. Paulo State natural transmission is now of low probability. An epidemiological investigation disclosed the fact that this was a case of blood transfusion infection. The donor was found to be serologically positive (IFAT, titre = 1024 - IgG). His case-history was typical of vector transmitted infection. It is worthy of note that blood had been donated by this patient in four instances, without his condition having been diagnosed. The necessity of organizing an integrated Public Health Service to take more efficient care of such cases is stressed.

  18. FIRST REPORT OF ACUTE CHAGAS DISEASE BY VECTOR TRANSMISSION IN RIO DE JANEIRO STATE, BRAZIL

    PubMed Central

    SANGENIS, Luiz Henrique Conde; DE SOUSA, Andréa Silvestre; SPERANDIO DA SILVA, Gilberto Marcelo; XAVIER, Sérgio Salles; MACHADO, Carolina Romero Cardoso; BRASIL, Patrícia; DE CASTRO, Liane; DA SILVA, Sidnei; GEORG, Ingebourg; SARAIVA, Roberto Magalhães; do BRASIL, Pedro Emmanuel Alvarenga Americano; HASSLOCHER-MORENO, Alejandro Marcel

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Chagas disease (CD) is an endemic anthropozoonosis from Latin America of which the main means of transmission is the contact of skin lesions or mucosa with the feces of triatomine bugs infected by Trypanosoma cruzi. In this article, we describe the first acute CD case acquired by vector transmission in the Rio de Janeiro State and confirmed by parasitological, serological and PCR tests. The patient presented acute cardiomyopathy and pericardial effusion without cardiac tamponade. Together with fever and malaise, a 3 cm wide erythematous, non-pruritic, papule compatible with a "chagoma" was found on his left wrist. This case report draws attention to the possible transmission of CD by non-domiciled native vectors in non-endemic areas. Therefore, acute CD should be included in the diagnostic workout of febrile diseases and acute myopericarditis in Rio de Janeiro. PMID:26422165

  19. A simple, biologically sound, and potentially useful working classification of Chagas disease vectors

    PubMed Central

    Abad-Franch, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Current working classifications of Chagas disease vectors rely on a loose mix-up of biological and operational matters. They are therefore confusing and ineffective. I propose a very simple classification that makes biological sense and can be operationally useful. It considers a four-level hierarchy of species (which can be native or non-native); populations (either wild or non-wild); infestation foci (natural, domestic or peridomestic); and individual bugs (which can be solitary house-invaders or part of a hidden infestation focus). This classification translates into a clear, algorithmic scheme for triatomine control-surveillance that may be useful at every operationally relevant scale, from multi-country initiatives to on-site control-surveillance action. PMID:27759764

  20. Tetradentate polyamines as efficient metallodrugs for Chagas disease treatment in murine model.

    PubMed

    Olmo, Francisco; Costas, Miquel; Marín, Clotilde; Rosales, Maria José; Martín-Escolano, Rubén; Cussó, Olaf; Gutierrez-Sánchez, Ramón; Ribas, Xavi; Sánchez-Moreno, Manuel

    2017-04-01

    A series of tetraamine-based compounds was prepared, and their trypanocidal effects against Trypanosoma cruzi and cytotoxicity were determined through the determination of IC50 values. In vivo assays were performed in mice, where parasitaemia levels were quantified by fresh blood examination and the assignment of a cure was determined by polymerase chain reaction and reactivation of blood parasitaemia levels after immunosuppression. The mechanisms of action were elucidated at metabolic and ultra-structural levels, by (1)H NMR, Fe-SOD inhibition and TEM studies. The high-selectivity indexes observed in vitro were the basis of promoting one of the tested compounds to in vivo assays. Compound 6 induced a remarkable decrease in the reactivation of parasitaemia after immunosuppression and curative rates of 33%. The experiments allowed us to select compound 6 as a promising candidate for treating Chagas disease, but a further high-level study should be considered to obtain an improved efficiency.

  1. Successful Treatment with Posaconazole of a Patient with Chronic Chagas Disease and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Pinazo, María-Jesús; Espinosa, Gerard; Gállego, Montserrat; López-Chejade, Paulo Luis; Urbina, Julio A.; Gascón, Joaquim

    2010-01-01

    American Trypanosomiasis or Chagas disease (CD) is a neglected disease that affects Latin American people worldwide. Two old antiparasitic drugs, benznidazole and nifurtimox, are currently used for specific CD treatment with limited efficacy in chronic infections and frequent side effects. New drugs are needed for patients with chronic CD as well as for immunosuppressed patients, for whom the risk of reactivation is life-threatening. We describe a case of chronic CD and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) that required immunosuppression to control the autoimmune process. It was found that benznidazole induced a reduction, but not an elimination, of circulating Trypanosoma cruzi levels, whereas subsequent treatment with posaconazole led to a successful resolution of the infection, despite the maintenance of immunosuppressive therapy. PMID:20348503

  2. Clinical and epidemiological study of chronic heart involvment in Chagas' disease*

    PubMed Central

    Puigbó, J. J.; Rhode, J. R. Nava; Barrios, H. García; Suárez, J. A.; Yépez, C. Gil

    1966-01-01

    It has been estimated that, in vast areas of the American continent, there is a high prevalence of human infection by Trypanosoma cruzi. Such infection can lead to a variety of heart diseases, predominantly with involvement of the myocardium. The aim of the present work was to determine the prevalence of heart disease in two rural areas of Venezuela with a high endemicity of Chagas' disease and to try to determine the natural history of the disease. It is shown that a form of chronic myocardial disease in patients with positive specific serology and good functional capacity is highly prevalent. Electrocardiographic patterns typical of the initial and developing stages of the disease, as well as early abnormalities of the cardiac rhythm, are described and illustrated. The present work forms part of a longitudinal study still in progress. ImagesFIG. 2FIG. 8FIG. 9FIG. 6FIG. 7FIG. 3FIG. 5FIG. 4 PMID:4957485

  3. Molecular diagnosis of Chagas' disease and use of an animal model to study parasite tropism.

    PubMed

    Vera-Cruz, J M; Magallón-Gastelum, E; Grijalva, G; Rincón, A R; Ramos-García, C; Armendáriz-Borunda, J

    2003-04-01

    Chagas' disease, which is an important health problem in humans, is caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. The cellular and molecular mechanisms, involved in the selective tropism of T. cruzi to different organs remain largely unknown. In this study we designed a PCR-based molecular diagnosis method in order to study the tropism and growth kinetics of T. cruzi in a murine model infected with parasites isolated from an endemic area of Mexico. The growth kinetics and parasite tropism of T. cruzi were also evaluated in the blood and other tissues. We observed that T. cruzi isolates from the Western Mexico showed a major tropism to mouse heart and skeletal muscles in this murine model.

  4. Latex of immunodiagnosis for detecting the Chagas disease. I. Synthesis of the base carboxylated latex.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Verónica D G; Gugliotta, Luis M; Meira, Gregorio R

    2008-02-01

    This article investigates the synthesis of two (monodisperse, carboxylated, and core-shell) latexes, through a batch and a semibatch emulsion copolymerizations of styrene (St) and methacrylic acid (MAA) onto polystyrene latex seeds. A mathematical model of the process was developed that predicts conversion, average particle size, and surface density of carboxyl groups. The model was adjusted to the batch reaction measurements, and then it was used in the design of the semibatch experiment. The semibatch reaction involved an initial homopolymerization of St followed by instantaneous addition of MAA-St-initiator. Compared with the batch reaction results, the semibatch policy more than doubled the surface density of carboxyl groups. The second part of this series describes the development of an immunodiagnosis latex-protein complex for detecting the Chagas disease, by coupling an antigen of Trypanosoma cruzi onto the produced carboxylated latexes.

  5. Two Analogues of Fenarimol Show Curative Activity in an Experimental Model of Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Chagas disease, caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi), is an increasing threat to global health. Available medicines were introduced over 40 years ago, have undesirable side effects, and give equivocal results of cure in the chronic stage of the disease. We report the development of two compounds, 6 and (S)-7, with PCR-confirmed curative activity in a mouse model of established T. cruzi infection after once daily oral dosing for 20 days at 20 mg/kg 6 and 10 mg/kg (S)-7. Compounds 6 and (S)-7 have potent in vitro activity, are noncytotoxic, show no adverse effects in vivo following repeat dosing, are prepared by a short synthetic route, and have druglike properties suitable for preclinical development. PMID:24304150

  6. Human Trypanosomiasis in the Eastern Region of the Panama Province: New Endemic Areas for Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Calzada, José E.; Pineda, Vanesa; Garisto, Juan D.; Samudio, Franklyn; Santamaria, Ana Maria; Saldaña, Azael

    2010-01-01

    The epidemiology of Chagas disease was studied in five rural communities located in the eastern region of the Panama Province. Serological tests for Trypanosoma cruzi infection revealed a prevalence of 5.88% (12/204). Hemocultures coupled with polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis showed a Trypanosoma rangeli infection rate of 5.88% (12/204). An overall trypanosome infection index of 11.76% (24/204) was detected in this population. A total of 121 triatomine specimens were collected in domestic and peridomestic habitats. Rhodnius pallescens was confirmed as the predominant species. Molecular analysis showed that 17.8% (13/73) of the examined insects were positive for T. cruzi, 17.8% (13/73) for T. rangeli, and 35.6% (26/73) presented mixed infections. Among 73 R. pallescens evaluated, 16.4% (12/73) contained opossum blood meals. The epidemiological implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:20348502

  7. [Scientific training and professional practice in the career of Carlos Chagas Filho].

    PubMed

    Lima, Ana Luce Girão Soares de

    2012-06-01

    The study dwells on the scientific background of Carlos Chagas Filho, between 1926 and 1942, which was the period of socialization of the scientist in the Faculdade de Medicina do Rio de Janeiro and the Instituto Oswaldo Cruz. It covers the period from the beginning of his professional career to the moment when he resigned from the administration of the Serviço de Estudos de Grandes Endemias in 1942 to devote himself to his academic career at the Laboratório de Física Biológica. The way in which his social and scientific resources were deployed throughout his career is analyzed, with a view to ascertaining the moment when he broke with the tradition of biomedical research of Manguinhos and embarked on the construction of a new location where he could implement his own scientific project.

  8. A Deep Insight Into the Sialotranscriptome of the Chagas Disease Vector, Panstrongylus megistus (Hemiptera: Heteroptera).

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, José M C; Schwarz, Alexandra; Francischetti, Ivo M B

    2015-05-01

    Saliva of blood-sucking arthropods contains a complex cocktail of pharmacologically active compounds that assists feeding by counteracting their hosts' hemostatic and inflammatory reactions. Panstrongylus megistus (Burmeister) is an important vector of Chagas disease in South America, but despite its importance there is only one salivary protein sequence publicly deposited in GenBank. In the present work, we used Illumina technology to disclose and publicly deposit 3,703 coding sequences obtained from the assembly of >70 million reads. These sequences should assist proteomic experiments aimed at identifying pharmacologically active proteins and immunological markers of vector exposure. A supplemental file of the transcriptome and deducted protein sequences can be obtained from http://exon.niaid.nih.gov/transcriptome/P_megistus/Pmeg-web.xlsx.

  9. Does orchiectomy enhance the immune-stimulatory effects of melatonin during experimental Chagas' disease?

    PubMed

    Santello, Fabricia Helena; Caetano, Leony Cristina; Filipin, Marina Del Vecchio; Brazão, Vânia; Caetano, Luana Naiara; Toldo, Míriam Paula Alonso; do Prado, José Clóvis

    2012-10-01

    Melatonin has been reported to play a fundamental role in T-cell immunoregulation. Control of Trypanosoma cruzi parasitism during the acute phase of infection is considered to be critically dependent on direct macrophage activation by cytokines. The aim of this work was to evaluate the influence of exogenous melatonin treatment and the influences exerted by sexual hormones during the acute phase of the experimental Chagas' disease in rats. With melatonin treatment, orchiectomized animals (CMOR and IMOR) displayed the highest concentrations of IFN-γ and TNF-α. On the 7th day post-infection, untreated and treated orchiectomized animals (IOR and IMOR) showed an enhanced number of peritoneal macrophages. Nitric oxide levels were also increased in untreated and treated orchiectomized (IOR and IMOR) when compared to the other groups, with or without LPS. Our data suggest that melatonin therapy associated with orchiectomy induced a stimulating effect on the immune response to the parasite.

  10. Familial Analysis of Seropositivity to Trypanosoma cruzi and of Clinical Forms of Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Silva-Grecco, Roseane L.; Balarin, Marly A. S.; Correia, Dalmo; Prata, Aluízio; Rodrigues, Virmondes

    2010-01-01

    A cross-sectional study was carried out in Água Comprida, MG, Brazil, a region previously endemic to Chagas disease whose vectorial transmission was interrupted around 20 year ago. A total of 998 individuals were examined for anti-Trypanosoma cruzi antibodies. Seropositivity was observed in 255 subjects (25.5%), and 743 subjects were negative. Forty-one families with 5–80 individuals with similar environmental conditions were selected for familial analysis. In 15 families, seropositivity to T. cruzi was observed in > 50% of individuals. The segregation analysis confirmed family aggregation for the seropositivity to the T. cruzi. Heart commitment was the major clinical form observed, and in six families, > 50% of the individuals display cardiopathy that may be attributed to T. cruzi infection. Our results support the hypothesis that there is a family aggregation for the seropositivity but without the effect of one major gene. PMID:20064994

  11. Dendritic Cells: A Double-Edged Sword in Immune Responses during Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gil-Jaramillo, Natalia; Motta, Flávia N.; Favali, Cecília B. F.; Bastos, Izabela M. D.; Santana, Jaime M.

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are the most important member of the antigen presenting cells group due to their ability to recognize antigen at the infection site and their high specialized antigen internalization capacity. These cells have central role in connecting the innate and adaptive immune responses against Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease. These first line defense cells modulate host immune response depending on type, maturation level, cytokine milieu and DC receptor involved in the interactions with T. cruzi, influencing the development of the disease clinic forms. Here, we present a review of DCs–T. cruzi interactions both in human and murine models, pointing out the parasite ability to manipulate DCs activity for the purpose of evading innate immune response and assuring its own survival and persistence. PMID:27471496

  12. Catalogue of the type material of Phlebotominae (Diptera, Psychodidae) deposited in the Instituto Evandro Chagas, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Thiago Vasconcelos; Pinheiro, Maria Sueli Barros; de Andrade, Andrey José

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The available type material of Phlebotominae (Diptera, Psychodidae) deposited in the “Coleção de Flebotomíneos” of the Instituto Evandro Chagas (ColFleb IEC) is now presented in an annotated catalogue comprising a total of 121 type specimens belonging to 12 species as follow: Nyssomyia richardwardi (2 female paratypes), Nyssomyia shawi (9 male and 25 female paratypes), Nyssomyia umbratilis (female holotype and 1 female paratype), Nyssomyia yuilli yuilli (1 male and 1 female paratypes), Pintomyia gruta (1 male and 2 female paratypes), Psychodopygus lainsoni (2 male syntypes), Psychodopygus leonidasdeanei (male holotype, female “allotype” and 45 female paratypes), Psychodopygus llanosmartinsi (2 female paratypes), Psychodopygus wellcomei (1 male and 4 female “syntypes”), Trichophoromyia readyi (male holotype, female “allotype” and 1 male paratype), Trichophoromyia adelsonsouzai (male holotype, 13 male 5 female paratypes), and Trichophoromyia brachipyga (1 male paratype). PMID:24715786

  13. Catalogue of the type material of Phlebotominae (Diptera, Psychodidae) deposited in the Instituto Evandro Chagas, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Thiago Vasconcelos; Pinheiro, Maria Sueli Barros; de Andrade, Andrey José

    2014-01-01

    The available type material of Phlebotominae (Diptera, Psychodidae) deposited in the "Coleção de Flebotomíneos" of the Instituto Evandro Chagas (ColFleb IEC) is now presented in an annotated catalogue comprising a total of 121 type specimens belonging to 12 species as follow: Nyssomyia richardwardi (2 female paratypes), Nyssomyia shawi (9 male and 25 female paratypes), Nyssomyia umbratilis (female holotype and 1 female paratype), Nyssomyia yuilli yuilli (1 male and 1 female paratypes), Pintomyia gruta (1 male and 2 female paratypes), Psychodopygus lainsoni (2 male syntypes), Psychodopygus leonidasdeanei (male holotype, female "allotype" and 45 female paratypes), Psychodopygus llanosmartinsi (2 female paratypes), Psychodopygus wellcomei (1 male and 4 female "syntypes"), Trichophoromyia readyi (male holotype, female "allotype" and 1 male paratype), Trichophoromyia adelsonsouzai (male holotype, 13 male 5 female paratypes), and Trichophoromyia brachipyga (1 male paratype).

  14. Trypanosoma cruzi, the Causal Agent of Chagas Disease: Boundaries between Wild and Domestic Cycles in Venezuela

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, Leidi

    2014-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi the etiological agent of American Trypanosomiasis or Chagas disease (ChD) is transmitted by triatomines vectors between mammals including man. T. cruzi has existed for circa 150 Ma in the Americas and nearly 10 million people are currently infected. The overlap between wild and domestic ecotopes where T. cruzi circulates is increasing. Host–parasite interactions have been determined by infection patterns in these cycles, all under natural or laboratorial conditions. This mini-review describes specific parasite niches, such as plant communities or biological corridors between domestic and wild landscapes, in order to help identify risk factors for ChD and define the boundaries between wild and domestic transmission cycles, with an emphasis on research undertaken in Venezuela. PMID:25506587

  15. Gamma-irradiation improves the color and antioxidant properties of Chaga mushroom (Inonotus obliquus) extract.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Hun; Sung, Nak-Yun; Kwon, Sun-Kyu; Srinivasan, Periasamy; Song, Beom-Seok; Choi, Jong-Il; Yoon, Yohan; Kim, Jin Kyu; Byun, Myung-Woo; Kim, Mee-Ree; Lee, Ju-Woon

    2009-12-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of ionizing radiation on color and antioxidative properties of Chaga mushroom (Inonotus obliquus) extract (CME). CME (10 mg/mL) was gamma-irradiated at 0, 3, 5, 7, and 10 kGy, and color, antioxidant activity, and total phenolic compound levels were then determined. The lightness and yellowness were increased (P < .05), and the redness was decreased (P < .05), as irradiation dose increased. The antioxidant parameters such as the 2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl, superoxide, and hydroxyl radical scavenging activities, ferric reducing/antioxidant power, and inhibition of lipid peroxidation increased as the irradiation dose increased. Also, the total phenolic compound levels of CME were increased (P < .05) by gamma-irradiation. These results suggest that gamma-irradiation could be considered a means for improving the antioxidant properties and the color of CME.

  16. Drug discovery for the treatment of leishmaniasis, African sleeping sickness and Chagas disease.

    PubMed

    2013-10-01

    The trypanosomatid protozoa Leishmania, Trypanosoma brucei and Trypanosoma cruzi are the caustive agents of the human diseases respectively, leishmaniasis, African sleeping sickness and Chagas disease. Among the 17 'neglected tropical diseases' highlighted by WHO, progress towards the treatment of these diseases has improved in recent decades, as a result of increased awareness, the emergence of public-private research partnerships and advances in drug-discovery technologies and techniques. Despite this, the current therapies for these diseases have serious shortcomings and, as such, the need to develop novel drugs, improve diagnosis and control the spread of disease is of paramount importance. Future Medicinal Chemistry invited leading experts in the field to share their thoughts and opinions on the changing face of drug discovery in the pursuit of treatments for trypanosomatid-based diseases.

  17. [Carlos Chagas and the debates and controversies surrounding the disease of Brazil (1909-1923)].

    PubMed

    Kropf, Simone Petraglia

    2009-07-01

    The article explores the relation between the debate on Chagas' disease, discovered in 1909, and Brazil's 1916-1920 rural sanitation campaign. It argues that the political planks of the sanitary movement were intimately bound up with the definition and legitimization of this illness as a scientific fact and social issue. Presented as emblematic of rural endemic disease, this 'new tropical ailment' was characterized as 'the disease of Brazil', symbol of a 'sickly country'. The sanitary campaign was in turn a decisive element of the 1919-1923 polemic surrounding the disease. This is an exemplary case of how Brazilian scientists used theories from European tropical medicine to produce original knowledge in the field, basing themselves on meanings specific to the national context of their day.

  18. Benznidazole and Posaconazole in Experimental Chagas Disease: Positive Interaction in Concomitant and Sequential Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Diniz, Lívia de Figueiredo; Urbina, Julio A.; de Andrade, Isabel Mayer; Mazzeti, Ana Lia; Martins, Tassiane Assíria F.; Caldas, Ivo Santana; Talvani, André; Ribeiro, Isabela; Bahia, Maria Terezinha

    2013-01-01

    Background Current chemotherapy for Chagas disease is unsatisfactory due to its limited efficacy, particularly in the chronic phase, with frequent side effects that can lead to treatment discontinuation. Combined therapy is envisioned as an ideal approach since it may improve treatment efficacy whilst decreasing toxicity and the likelihood of resistance development. We evaluated the efficacy of posaconazole in combination with benznidazole on Trypanosoma cruzi infection in vivo. Methods and Findings Benznidazole and posaconazole were administered individually or in combination in an experimental acute murine infection model. Using a rapid treatment protocol for 7 days, the combined treatments were more efficacious in reducing parasitemia levels than the drugs given alone, with the effects most evident in combinations of sub-optimal doses of the drugs. Subsequently, the curative action of these drug combinations was investigated, using the same infection model and 25, 50, 75 or 100 mg/kg/day (mpk) of benznidazole in combination with 5, 10 or 20 mpk of posaconazole, given alone or concomitantly for 20 days. The effects of the combination treatments on parasitological cures were higher than the sum of such effects when the drugs were administered separately at the same doses, indicating synergistic activity. Finally, sequential therapy experiments were carried out with benznidazole or posaconazole over a short interval (10 days), followed by the second drug administered for the same period of time. It was found that the sequence of benznidazole (100 mpk) followed by posaconazole (20 mpk) provided cure rates comparable to those obtained with the full (20 days) treatments with either drug alone, and no cure was observed for the short treatments with drugs given alone. Conclusions Our data demonstrate the importance of investigating the potential beneficial effects of combination treatments with marketed compounds, and showed that combinations of benznidazole with

  19. Efficacy of a trans-sialidase-ISCOMATRIX subunit vaccine candidate to protect against experimental Chagas disease.

    PubMed

    Bontempi, Iván Alejandro; Vicco, Miguel Hernán; Cabrera, Gabriel; Villar, Silvina Raquel; González, Florencia Belén; Roggero, Eduardo Angel; Ameloot, Paul; Callewaert, Nico; Pérez, Ana Rosa; Marcipar, Iván Sergio

    2015-03-03

    Recombinant protein vaccines are safe but elicit low immunological responses. The new generation of adjuvants is currently reversing this situation. Here, a new antigen-adjuvant combination for protection against experimental Chagas disease was assessed. The antigen used in the formulation was a glycosylated mutant inactive trans-sialidase (mTS) that was previously proven to be highly protective against Trypanosoma cruzi infection; here, we show that it can be produced in large quantities and high quality using Pichia pastoris. The adjuvant used in the formulation was ISCOMATRIX (IMX), which was found to be effective and safe in human clinical trials of vaccines designed to control other intracellular infections. Fifteen days after the third immunization, mice immunized with mTS-IMX showed a TS-specific IgG response with titers >10(6) and high avidity, an increased IgG2a/IgG1 ratio, significant delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) reactivity, a balanced production of IFN-γ and IL-10 by splenocytes and a strong IFN-γ secretion by CD8(+) T lymphocytes. When these mice where challenged with 1000 trypomastigotes of T. cruzi, all mTS-IMX immunized mice survived, whereas mice immunized with mTS alone, IMX or PBS exhibited high mortality. Remarkably, during acute infection, when the parasitemia is highest in this infection model (day 21), mTS-IMX immunized mice had ∼50 times less parasitemia than non-immunized mice. At this moment and also in the chronic phase, 100 days after infection, tissue presented ∼4.5 times lower parasite load and associated inflammatory infiltrate and lesions. These results indicate that protection against Chagas disease can be achieved by a protein antigen-adjuvant mTS formulation that is compatible with human medicine. Therefore, the current formulation is a highly promising T. cruzi vaccine candidate to be tested in clinical trials.

  20. Sesquiterpene Lactone in Nanostructured Parenteral Dosage Form Is Efficacious in Experimental Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Branquinho, Renata Tupinambá; Mosqueira, Vanessa Carla Furtado; de Oliveira-Silva, Jaquelline Carla Valamiel; Simões-Silva, Marianne Rocha; Saúde-Guimarães, Dênia Antunes

    2014-01-01

    The drugs available for Chagas disease treatment are toxic and ineffective. We studied the in vivo activity of a new drug, lychnopholide (LYC). LYC was loaded in nanocapsules (NC), and its effects were compared to free LYC and benznidazole against Trypanosoma cruzi. Infected mice were treated in the acute phase at 2.0 mg/kg/day with free LYC, LYC-poly-ε-caprolactone NC (LYC-PCL), and LYC-poly(lactic acid)-co-polyethylene glycol NC (LYC-PLA-PEG) or at 50 mg/kg/day with benznidazole solution by the intravenous route. Animals infected with the CL strain, treated 24 h after infection for 10 days, evaluated by hemoculture, PCR, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay exhibited a 50% parasitological cure when treated with LYC-PCL NC and 100% cure when treated with benznidazole, but 100% of the animals treated during the prepatent period for 20 days with these formulations or LYC-PLA-PEG NC were cured. In animals with the Y strain treated 24 h after infection for 10 days, only mice treated by LYC-PCL NC were cured, but animals treated in the prepatent period for 20 days exhibited 100, 75, and 62.5% cure when treated with LYC-PLA-PEG NC, benznidazole, and LYC-PCL NC, respectively. Free LYC reduced the parasitemia and improved mice survival, but no mice were cured. LYC-loaded NC showed higher cure rates, reduced parasitemia, and increased survival when used in doses 2five times lower than those used for benznidazole. This study confirms that LYC is a potential new treatment for Chagas disease. Furthermore, the long-circulating property of PLA-PEG NC and its ability to improve LYC efficacy showed that this formulation is more effective in reaching the parasite in vivo. PMID:24449777

  1. Safety Profile of Nifurtimox and Treatment Interruption for Chronic Chagas Disease in Colombian Adults

    PubMed Central

    Olivera, Mario Javier; Cucunubá, Zulma M.; Álvarez, Carlos Arturo; Nicholls, Rubén Santiago

    2015-01-01

    Nifurtimox (NFX) is one of the approved drugs used to treat Chagas disease. Safety profile studies and models on risk factors for treatment interruption in adults are scarce in Latin America. This study evaluated retrospectively the medical records of adult Chagas disease patients treated with NFX between 2007 and 2012 in Bogotá, Colombia. An accelerated failure time model was used, and associations were expressed as time ratio (TR). In total, 76 adult patients with NFX were included: 60 (79.0%) completed 60 days of treatment, 61 (80.3%) presented adverse drug reactions (ADRs), and 16 (21.0%) required treatment interruption. The predominant symptoms were epigastric pain (23.7%), nauseas (18.4%), sleep disturbances (18.4%), loss of appetite (17.1%), and temporary loss of memory (15.2%). ADRs were classified as mild (64.5%), moderate (30.4%), and severe (5.1%). Time of treatment was significantly longer when presenting ≤ 3 ADRs (TR: 1.78; 95% CI: 1.04–3.03), presence of non-severe ADRs (TR: 6.52; 95% CI: 3.24–13.1), doses of NFX ≤ 8 mg/kg/day (TR: 1.78; 95% CI: 0.90–3.49), and age < 48 years (TR: 1.57; 95% CI: 0.90–2.74). Treatment with NFX in adults caused a high frequency of ADRs, but most of the cases were mild and did not require treatment interruption. Severity and number of ADRs were the main predictors for treatment interruption. PMID:26392162

  2. Different infective forms trigger distinct immune response in experimental Chagas disease.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Paula Melo de Abreu; Francisco, Amanda Fortes; Machado, Evandro Marques de Meneses; Nogueira, Nívia Carolina; Fonseca, Kátia da Silva; Reis, Alexandre Barbosa; Teixeira-Carvalho, Andrea; Martins-Filho, Olindo Assis; Tafuri, Washington Luiz; Carneiro, Cláudia Martins

    2012-01-01

    Although metacyclic and blood trypomastigotes are completely functional in relation to parasite-host interaction and/or target cell invasion, they differ in the molecules present on the surface. Thus, aspects related to the variability that the forms of T. cruzi interacts with host cells may lead to fundamental implications on the immune response against this parasite and, consequently, the clinical evolution of Chagas disease. We have shown that BT infected mice presented higher levels of parasitemia during all the acute phase of infection. Moreover, the infection with either MT or BT forms resulted in increased levels of total leukocytes, monocytes and lymphocytes, specifically later for MT and earlier for BT. The infection with BT forms presented earlier production of proinflammatory cytokine TNF-α and later of IFN-γ by both T cells subpopulations. This event was accompanied by an early cardiac inflammation with an exacerbation of this process at the end of the acute phase. On the other hand, infection with MT forms result in an early production of IFN-γ, with subsequent control in the production of this cytokine by IL-10, which provided to these animals an immunomodulatory profile in the end of the acute phase. These results are in agreement with what was found for cardiac inflammation where animals infected with MT forms showed intense cardiac inflammation later at infection, with a decrease in the same at the end of this phase. In summary, our findings emphasize the importance of taking into account the inoculums source of T. cruzi, since vectorial or transfusional routes of T. cruzi infection may trigger distinct parasite-host interactions during the acute phase that may influence relevant biological aspects of chronic Chagas disease.

  3. Epidemiology of and Impact of Insecticide Spraying on Chagas Disease in Communities in the Bolivian Chaco

    PubMed Central

    Galdos-Cardenas, Gerson; Wiegand, Ryan E.; Ferrufino, Lisbeth; Menacho, Silvio; Gil, Jose; Spicer, Jennifer; Budde, Julia; Levy, Michael Z.; Bozo, Ricardo W.; Gilman, Robert H.; Bern, Caryn

    2013-01-01

    Background Chagas disease control campaigns relying upon residual insecticide spraying have been successful in many Southern American countries. However, in some areas, rapid reinfestation and recrudescence of transmission have occurred. Methodology/Principal Findings We conducted a cross-sectional survey in the Bolivian Chaco to evaluate prevalence of and risk factors for T. cruzi infection 11 years after two rounds of blanket insecticide application. We used a cubic B-spline model to estimate change in force of infection over time based on age-specific seroprevalence data. Overall T. cruzi seroprevalence was 51.7%. The prevalence was 19.8% among children 2–15, 72.7% among those 15–30 and 97.1% among participants older than 30 years. Based on the model, the estimated annual force of infection was 4.3% over the two years before the first blanket spray in 2000 and fell to 0.4% for 2001–2002. The estimated annual force of infection for 2004–2005, the 2 year period following the second blanket spray, was 4.6%. However, the 95% bootstrap confidence intervals overlap for all of these estimates. In a multivariable model, only sleeping in a structure with cracks in the walls (aOR = 2.35; 95% CI = 1.15–4.78), age and village of residence were associated with infection. Conclusions/Significance As in other areas in the Chaco, we found an extremely high prevalence of Chagas disease. Despite evidence that blanket insecticide application in 2000 may have decreased the force of infection, active transmission is ongoing. Continued spraying vigilance, infestation surveillance, and systematic household improvements are necessary to disrupt and sustain interruption of infection transmission. PMID:23936581

  4. Regulatory T Cells Phenotype in Different Clinical Forms of Chagas' Disease

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira-Carvalho, Andréa; Renato Zuquim Antas, Paulo; Assis Silva Gomes, Juliana; Sathler-Avelar, Renato; Otávio Costa Rocha, Manoel; Elói-Santos, Silvana Maria; Pinho, Rosa Teixeira; Correa-Oliveira, Rodrigo; Martins-Filho, Olindo Assis

    2011-01-01

    CD25High CD4+ regulatory T cells (Treg cells) have been described as key players in immune regulation, preventing infection-induced immune pathology and limiting collateral tissue damage caused by vigorous anti-parasite immune response. In this review, we summarize data obtained by the investigation of Treg cells in different clinical forms of Chagas' disease. Ex vivo immunophenotyping of whole blood, as well as after stimulation with Trypanosoma cruzi antigens, demonstrated that individuals in the indeterminate (IND) clinical form of the disease have a higher frequency of Treg cells, suggesting that an expansion of those cells could be beneficial, possibly by limiting strong cytotoxic activity and tissue damage. Additional analysis demonstrated an activated status of Treg cells based on low expression of CD62L and high expression of CD40L, CD69, and CD54 by cells from all chagasic patients after T. cruzi antigenic stimulation. Moreover, there was an increase in the frequency of the population of Foxp3+ CD25HighCD4+ cells that was also IL-10+ in the IND group, whereas in the cardiac (CARD) group, there was an increase in the percentage of Foxp3+ CD25High CD4+ cells that expressed CTLA-4. These data suggest that IL-10 produced by Treg cells is effective in controlling disease development in IND patients. However, in CARD patients, the same regulatory mechanism, mediated by IL-10 and CTLA-4 expression is unlikely to be sufficient to control the progression of the disease. These data suggest that Treg cells may play an important role in controlling the immune response in Chagas' disease and the balance between regulatory and effector T cells may be important for the progression and development of the disease. Additional detailed analysis of the mechanisms on how these cells are activated and exert their function will certainly give insights for the rational design of procedure to achieve the appropriate balance between protection and pathology during parasite

  5. Fine-scale predictions of distributions of Chagas disease vectors in the state of Guanajuato, Mexico.

    PubMed

    López-Cárdenas, Jorge; Gonzalez Bravo, Francisco Ernesto; Salazar Schettino, Paz Maria; Gallaga Solorzano, Juan Carlos; Ramírez Barba, Ector; Martinez Mendez, Joel; Sánchez-Cordero, V; Peterson, A Townsend; Ramsey, J M

    2005-11-01

    One of the most daunting challenges for Chagas disease surveillance and control in Mexico is the lack of community level data on vector distributions. Although many states now have assembled representative domestic triatomine collections, only two triatomine specimens had been collected and reported previously from the state of Guanajuato. Field personnel from the state's Secretaría de Salud conducted health promotion activities in 43 of the 46 counties in the state and received donations of a total of 2,522 triatomine specimens between 1998 and 2002. All specimens were identified, and live insects examined for Trypanosoma cruzi. In an effort to develop fine-scale distributional data for Guanajuato, collection localities were georeferenced and ecological niches were modeled for each species by using evolutionary-computing approaches. Five species were collected: Triatoma mexicana (Herrich-Schaeffer), Triatoma longipennis (Usinger), Triatoma pallidipennis (Stål), Triatoma barberi (Usinger), and Triatoma dimidiata (Latreille) from 201 communities located at elevations of 870-2,200 m. Based on collection success, T. mexicana had the broadest dispersion, although niche mapping indicates that T. barberi represents the greatest risk for transmission of Chagas disease in the state. T. dimidiata was represented in collections by a single adult collected from one village outside the predicted area for all species. For humans, an estimated 3,755,380 individuals are at risk for vector transmission in the state, with an incidence of 3,500 new cases per year; overall seroprevalences of 2.6% indicate that 97,640 individuals are infected with T. cruzi at present, including 29,300 chronic cases.

  6. Echocardiographic Parameters and Survival in Chagas Heart Disease with Severe Systolic Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Rassi, Daniela do Carmo; Vieira, Marcelo Luiz Campos; Arruda, Ana Lúcia Martins; Hotta, Viviane Tiemi; Furtado, Rogério Gomes; Rassi, Danilo Teixeira; Rassi, Salvador

    2014-01-01

    Background Echocardiography provides important information on the cardiac evaluation of patients with heart failure. The identification of echocardiographic parameters in severe Chagas heart disease would help implement treatment and assess prognosis. Objective To correlate echocardiographic parameters with the endpoint cardiovascular mortality in patients with ejection fraction < 35%. Methods Study with retrospective analysis of pre-specified echocardiographic parameters prospectively collected from 60 patients included in the Multicenter Randomized Trial of Cell Therapy in Patients with Heart Diseases (Estudo Multicêntrico Randomizado de Terapia Celular em Cardiopatias) - Chagas heart disease arm. The following parameters were collected: left ventricular systolic and diastolic diameters and volumes; ejection fraction; left atrial diameter; left atrial volume; indexed left atrial volume; systolic pulmonary artery pressure; integral of the aortic flow velocity; myocardial performance index; rate of increase of left ventricular pressure; isovolumic relaxation time; E, A, Em, Am and Sm wave velocities; E wave deceleration time; E/A and E/Em ratios; and mitral regurgitation. Results In the mean 24.18-month follow-up, 27 patients died. The mean ejection fraction was 26.6 ± 5.34%. In the multivariate analysis, the parameters ejection fraction (HR = 1.114; p = 0.3704), indexed left atrial volume (HR = 1.033; p < 0.0001) and E/Em ratio (HR = 0.95; p = 0.1261) were excluded. The indexed left atrial volume was an independent predictor in relation to the endpoint, and values > 70.71 mL/m2 were associated with a significant increase in mortality (log rank p < 0.0001). Conclusion The indexed left atrial volume was the only independent predictor of mortality in this population of Chagasic patients with severe systolic dysfunction. PMID:24553982

  7. Altered Hypercoagulability Factors in Patients with Chronic Chagas Disease: Potential Biomarkers of Therapeutic Response

    PubMed Central

    Pinazo, Maria-Jesus; Posada, Elizabeth de Jesus; Izquierdo, Luis; Tassies, Dolors; Marques, Alexandre-Ferreira; de Lazzari, Elisa; Aldasoro, Edelweiss; Muñoz, Jose; Abras, Alba; Tebar, Silvia; Gallego, Montserrat; de Almeida, Igor Correia; Reverter, Joan-Carles; Gascon, Joaquim

    2016-01-01

    Thromboembolic events were described in patients with Chagas disease without cardiomyopathy. We aim to confirm if there is a hypercoagulable state in these patients and to determine if there is an early normalization of hemostasis factors after antiparasitic treatment. Ninety-nine individuals from Chagas disease-endemic areas were classified in two groups: G1, with T.cruzi infection (n = 56); G2, healthy individuals (n = 43). Twenty-four hemostasis factors were measured at baseline. G1 patients treated with benznidazole were followed for 36 months, recording clinical parameters and performance of conventional serology, chemiluminescent enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (trypomastigote-derived glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored mucins), quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and hemostasis tests every 6-month visits. Prothrombin fragment 1+2 (F1+2) and endogenous thrombin potential (ETP) were abnormally expressed in 77% and 50% of infected patients at baseline but returned to and remained at normal levels shortly after treatment in 76% and 96% of cases, respectively. Plasmin-antiplasmin complexes (PAP) were altered before treatment in 32% of G1 patients but normalized in 94% of cases several months after treatment. None of the patients with normal F1+2 values during follow-up had a positive qRT-PCR result, but 3/24 patients (13%) with normal ETP values did. In a percentage of chronic T. cruzi infected patients treated with benznidazole, altered coagulation markers returned into normal levels. F1+2, ETP and PAP could be useful markers for assessing sustained response to benznidazole. PMID:26727000

  8. Evaluation of Parasiticide Treatment with Benznidazol in the Electrocardiographic, Clinical, and Serological Evolution of Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fragata-Filho, Abilio Augusto; França, Francisco Faustino; Fragata, Claudia da Silva; Lourenço, Angela Maria; Faccini, Cristiane Castro; Costa, Cristiane Aparecida de Jesus

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Chagas disease is one of the most important endemic parasitic diseases in Latin America. In its chronic phase, progression to cardiomyopathy has high morbidity and mortality. The persistence of a normal electrocardiogram (ECG) provides a similar prognosis to that of a non-diseased population. Benznidazole (BNZ) is the only drug with trypanocidal action available in Brazil. Materials/Methods/Results A group of 310 patients with chronic Chagas disease who had normal ECGs at the first medical visit performed before 2002 were included. There were 263 patients treated with BNZ and 47 untreated. The follow-up period was 19.59 years. Univariate analyses showed that those treated were younger and predominantly male. As many as 79.08% of those treated and 46.81% of those untreated continued with normal electrocardiograms (p <0.0001). The occurrence of electrocardiographic abnormalities and relevant clinical events (heart failure, stroke, total mortality, and cardiovascular death) was less prevalent in treated patients (p <0.001, p: 0.022, p: 0.047 respectively). In multivariate analyses, the parasiticide treatment was an independent variable for persistence of a normal ECG pattern, which was an independent variable in the prevention of significant clinical events. The immunofluorescence titers decreased with the parasitological treatment. However, the small number of tests in untreated patients did not allow the correlation of the decrease of these titers with electrocardiographic alterations. Conclusion These data suggest that treatment with benznidazole prevents the occurrence of electrocardiographic alterations. On the other hand, patients who develop ECG abnormalities present with more significant clinical events. PMID:26974551

  9. Dynamics of Sylvatic Chagas Disease Vectors in Coastal Ecuador Is Driven by Changes in Land Cover

    PubMed Central

    Grijalva, Mario J.; Terán, David; Dangles, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    Background Chagas disease is a serious public health problem in Latin America where about ten million individuals show Trypanosoma cruzi infection. Despite significant success in controlling domiciliated triatomines, sylvatic populations frequently infest houses after insecticide treatment which hampers long term control prospects in vast geographical areas where vectorial transmission is endemic. As a key issue, the spatio-temporal dynamics of sylvatic populations is likely influenced by landscape yet evidence showing this effect is rare. The aim of this work is to examine the role of land cover changes in sylvatic triatomine ecology, based on an exhaustive field survey of pathogens, vectors, hosts, and microhabitat characteristics' dynamics. Methodology and Principal Findings The study was performed in agricultural landscapes of coastal Ecuador as a study model. Over one year, a spatially-randomized sampling design (490 collection points) allowed quantifying triatomine densities in natural, cultivated and domestic habitats. We also assessed infection of the bugs with trypanosomes, documented their microhabitats and potential hosts, and recorded changes in landscape characteristics. In total we collected 886 individuals, mainly represented by nymphal stages of one triatomine species Rhodnius ecuadoriensis. As main results, we found that 1) sylvatic triatomines had very high T. cruzi infection rates (71%) and 2) densities of T. cruzi-infected sylvatic triatomines varied predictably over time due to changes in land cover and occurrence of associated rodent hosts. Conclusion We propose a framework for identifying the factors affecting the yearly distribution of sylvatic T. cruzi vectors. Beyond providing key basic information for the control of human habitat colonization by sylvatic vector populations, our framework highlights the importance of both environmental and sociological factors in shaping the spatio-temporal population dynamics of triatomines. A better

  10. Benznidazole Use among Patients with Chronic Chagas' Cardiomyopathy in an Endemic Region of Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Chagas disease (CD) is a neglected tropical disease that affects individuals in almost every country in Latin America. There are two available drugs with antiparasitic profiles; however, only benznidazole (BZN) has been approved for commercialization in Brazil. The usefulness of prescribing BZN for patients with chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy (CCC) is controversial. There are no studies in the literature describing the extent of BZN use at this stage or the profile of patients using this drug. The present study aimed to determine the prevalence and factors associated with previous BZN use among individuals with CCC. This cross-sectional study was conducted with 1,812 individuals with CCC from 21 Brazilian cities endemic for CD. The dependent variable was "prior use of BZN" (no vs. yes). The independent variables were grouped into socioeconomic, lifestyle and medical history aspects. Binary logistic regression (α ≥ 0.05) was used. Among the evaluated individuals, 27.2% reported previous use of BZN. The likelihood of prior use of BZN was higher among younger individuals (OR = 2.7), individuals with a higher education (OR = 2.7), individuals with a lower monthly per capita income (OR = 1.3), individuals who practiced physical exercise (OR = 1.5), individuals who had prior knowledge of the CD diagnosis (OR = 2.5), individuals without hypertension (OR = 1.3) and individuals with a longer time to the CD diagnosis (OR = 6.1). The present study revealed a small proportion of therapeutic BZN use among Brazilian CCC patients. This finding suggests a late diagnosis and undertreatment of the disease. BZN use was higher among individuals with better clinical and demographic conditions but with a lower income and a longer time to the CD diagnosis. Knowledge of the BZN usage profile may help reduce the current state of neglect of this disease and pave the way for future studies. PMID:27855177

  11. Radiological findings in megaesophagus secondary to Chagas disease: chest X-ray and esophagogram*

    PubMed Central

    Abud, Thiago Giansante; Abud, Lucas Giansante; Vilar, Vanessa Sales; Szejnfeld, Denis; Reibscheid, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    Objective To identify and classify the radiographic patterns of megaesophagus in Chagas disease, as seen on esophagograms and chest X-rays. Materials and Methods This was a prospective study of 35 patients diagnosed with esophageal disease via manometry. The changes found on esophagograms were stratified according to Rezende's classification, divided into four categories (grades I through IV) determined by the degree of dilatation and impairement of esophageal motility. We subsequently correlated that ranking with the chest X-ray findings: gastric air bubble; air-fluid level; and mediastinal widening. Results Among the 35 patients, the esophageal disease was classified as grade I in 9 (25.7%), grade II in 3 (8.6%), grade III in 19 (54.3%), and grade IV in 4 (11.4%). None of the patients with grade I esophageal disease showed changes on chest X-rays. In two of the three patients with grade II disease, there was no gastric air-bubble, although there were no other findings in any of the grade II patients. Of the 19 patients with grade III disease, 15 had abnormal findings on X-rays. All four patients with grade IV disease showed abnormalities. Conclusion The use of Rezende's classification is feasible, encompassing findings ranging from the subtle changes that characterize the initial phases of esophageal disease to the complete akinesia seen in dolicomegaesophagus. Chest X-ray findings are more common in patients with advanced stages of the disease and indicate the degree of esophageal involvement in Chagas disease. PMID:28100930

  12. Increased Myeloperoxidase Activity and Protein Nitration Are Indicators of Inflammation in Patients with Chagas' Disease▿

    PubMed Central

    Dhiman, Monisha; Estrada-Franco, Jose Guillermo; Pando, Jasmine M.; Ramirez-Aguilar, Francisco J.; Spratt, Heidi; Vazquez-Corzo, Sara; Perez-Molina, Gladys; Gallegos-Sandoval, Rosa; Moreno, Roberto; Garg, Nisha Jain

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we investigated whether inflammatory responses contribute to oxidative/nitrosative stress in patients with Chagas' disease. We used three tests (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, immuno-flow cytometry, and STAT-PAK immunochromatography) to screen human serum samples (n = 1,481) originating from Chiapas, Mexico, for Trypanosoma cruzi-specific antibodies. We identified 121 subjects who were seropositive for T. cruzi-specific antibodies, a finding indicative of an 8.5% seroprevalence in the rural population from Chiapas. Seropositive and seronegative subjects were examined for plasma levels of biomarkers of inflammation, i.e., myeloperoxidase (MPO), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and xanthine oxidase (XOD), as well as for oxidative (advanced oxidation protein products [AOPPs]) and nitrosative (3-nitrotyrosine [3NT]) biomarkers. The seropositive subjects exhibited a significant increase in MPO activity and protein level, the indicator of neutrophil activation. Subsequently, a corresponding increase in AOPP contents, formed by MPO-dependent hypochlorous acid and chloramine formation, was noted in seropositive subjects. The plasma level of 3NT was significantly increased in seropositive subjects, yet we observed no change in XOD activity (O2− source) and nitrate/nitrite contents (denotes iNOS activation and NO production), which implied that direct peroxynitrite formation does not contribute to increased nitrosative damage in chagasic subjects. Instead, a positive correlation between increased MPO activity and protein 3NT formation was observed, which suggested to us that MPO-dependent formation of nitrylchloride that occurs in the presence of physiological NO and O2− concentrations contributes to protein nitration. Overall, our data demonstrate that T. cruzi-induced neutrophil activation is pathological and contributes to MPO-mediated collateral protein oxidative and nitrosative damage in human patients with Chagas' disease. Therapies

  13. Clomipramine and Benznidazole Act Synergistically and Ameliorate the Outcome of Experimental Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    García, Mónica Cristina; Ponce, Nicolás Eric; Sanmarco, Liliana Maria; Manzo, Rubén Hilario; Jimenez-Kairuz, Alvaro Federico

    2016-01-01

    Chagas disease is an important public health problem in Latin America, and its treatment by chemotherapy with benznidazole (BZ) or nifurtimox remains unsatisfactory. In order to design new alternative strategies to improve the current etiological treatments, in the present work, we comprehensively evaluated the in vitro and in vivo anti-Trypanosoma cruzi effects of clomipramine (CMP) (a parasite-trypanothione reductase-specific inhibitor) combined with BZ. In vitro studies, carried out using a checkerboard technique on trypomastigotes (T. cruzi strain Tulahuen), revealed a combination index (CI) of 0.375, indicative of a synergistic effect of the drug combination. This result was correlated with the data obtained in infected BALB/c mice. We observed that during the acute phase (15 days postinfection [dpi]), BZ at 25 mg/kg of body weight/day alone decreased the levels of parasitemia compared with those of the control group, but when BZ was administered with CMP, the drug combination completely suppressed the parasitemia due to the observed synergistic effect. Furthermore, in the chronic phase (90 dpi), mice treated with both drugs showed less heart damage as assessed by the histopathological analysis, index of myocardial inflammation, and levels of heart injury biochemical markers than mice treated with BZ alone at the reference dose (100 mg/kg/day). Collectively, these data support the notion that CMP combined with low doses of BZ diminishes cardiac damage and inflammation during the chronic phase of cardiomyopathy. The synergistic activity of BZ-CMP clearly suggests a potential drug combination for Chagas disease treatment, which would allow a reduction of the effective dose of BZ and an increase in therapeutic safety. PMID:27067322

  14. Chagas Cardiomyopathy: Usefulness of EKG and Echocardiogram in a Non-Endemic Country

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Montalvá, Adrián; Salvador, Fernando; Rodríguez-Palomares, José; Sulleiro, Elena; Sao-Avilés, Augusto; Roure, Sílvia; Valerio, Lluís; Evangelista, Arturo; Molina, Israel

    2016-01-01

    Background Chagas disease (CD) is a major cause of cardiomyopathy in Latin America, and migration movements have now spread the disease worldwide. However, data regarding Chagas cardiomyopathy (CC) and the usefulness of echocardiography in non endemic countries are still scarce. Methods and results We selected 485 patients in the chronic phase of CD from two Spanish settings. Data from physical examination, electrocardiogram (EKG), x-ray, and two dimensional transthoracic echocardiogram were recorded. Trypanosoma cruzi DNA was assessed by PCR in peripheral blood. Patients were stratified according to the Kuschnir classification and a combination of echocardiogram and electrocardiogram findings. Patients mainly came from Bolivia (459; 94.6%). One hundred and forty three patients (31.5%) had at least one electrocardiogram abnormality. Twenty seven patients (5.3%) had an abnormal echocardiography. Patients with abnormal echocardiography were older (47 (IQR 38–57) years vs 41 (IQR 38–57) years); p = 0.019) and there was a greater proportion of males (66.7% vs 29.7%); p<0.001). Among echocardiographic variables, diastolic dysfunction was associated with poor cardiac status. In the multivariate analysis, abnormal EKG and gender were associated with abnormal echocardiography. Echocardiography may be spared for males under 30 and females under 45 years old with normal EKG as the likelihood of having an abnormal echocardiography is minimal. Association between T. cruzi DNA in the peripheral blood and cardiac involvement was not observed. Conclusion CC rates in the studied population are low. Age and sex are important determinants for the development of CC, and with the EKG should guide echocardiogram performance. PMID:27308824

  15. Clomipramine and Benznidazole Act Synergistically and Ameliorate the Outcome of Experimental Chagas Disease.

    PubMed

    García, Mónica Cristina; Ponce, Nicolás Eric; Sanmarco, Liliana Maria; Manzo, Rubén Hilario; Jimenez-Kairuz, Alvaro Federico; Aoki, Maria Pilar

    2016-06-01

    Chagas disease is an important public health problem in Latin America, and its treatment by chemotherapy with benznidazole (BZ) or nifurtimox remains unsatisfactory. In order to design new alternative strategies to improve the current etiological treatments, in the present work, we comprehensively evaluated the in vitro and in vivo anti-Trypanosoma cruzi effects of clomipramine (CMP) (a parasite-trypanothione reductase-specific inhibitor) combined with BZ. In vitro studies, carried out using a checkerboard technique on trypomastigotes (T. cruzi strain Tulahuen), revealed a combination index (CI) of 0.375, indicative of a synergistic effect of the drug combination. This result was correlated with the data obtained in infected BALB/c mice. We observed that during the acute phase (15 days postinfection [dpi]), BZ at 25 mg/kg of body weight/day alone decreased the levels of parasitemia compared with those of the control group, but when BZ was administered with CMP, the drug combination completely suppressed the parasitemia due to the observed synergistic effect. Furthermore, in the chronic phase (90 dpi), mice treated with both drugs showed less heart damage as assessed by the histopathological analysis, index of myocardial inflammation, and levels of heart injury biochemical markers than mice treated with BZ alone at the reference dose (100 mg/kg/day). Collectively, these data support the notion that CMP combined with low doses of BZ diminishes cardiac damage and inflammation during the chronic phase of cardiomyopathy. The synergistic activity of BZ-CMP clearly suggests a potential drug combination for Chagas disease treatment, which would allow a reduction of the effective dose of BZ and an increase in therapeutic safety.

  16. Kongenitale Chagas. Einfluss einer Trypanosoma Cruzi-Infektion auf die Embryonalentwicklung bei Traechtigen Maeusen (Congenital Chagas Diseases. Effect of ’Trypanosoma cruzi’ Infection on Embryogeny in Gravid Mice),

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Congenital Chagas’ disease in man and animals entailing abortion , premature delivery and deformation has been reported in the literature, although...the effect of T. cruzi infection on the fetal development of mice has been investigated after inoculating three different strains of T. cruzi in...in either early death or retarded growth of the embryos and fetuses, although trypanosomes were not demonstrable in injured fetuses (however

  17. Chagas Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... if they: ■ Have lived in rural areas of Mexico, Central America or South America, in countries such ... El Salvador, Ecuador, French Guiana, Guatemala, Guyana, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Suriname, Uruguay or Venezuela ■ ...

  18. Combining geospatial analysis and exploratory study of triatomine ecology to evaluate the risk of Chagas disease in a rural locality.

    PubMed

    Coutinho, Carolina F S; Souza-Santos, Reinaldo; Lima, Marli M

    2012-01-01

    The use of geo-spatial analysis to anticipate transmission risk for Chagas disease was tested in a rural area of northeast Brazil in an approach that combined geo-referencing and exploratory study of triatomine infestation, including related elements such as the environment and hosts. A total of 617 triatomine specimens, mainly Triatoma brasiliensis, were captured, exhibiting an overall T. cruzi positivity of 44.4%. Layer analysis indicated that the greatest transmission risk to man was associated with woodpiles. The buffer area generated contained uninhabited dwellings teeming with bats and positive bugs. Other locations outside the buffer, near uninhabited dwellings housing cattle, contained colonies of triatomines harboring T. cruzi. The results indicate that local residents' activities themselves favor the development of risk areas for Chagas disease.

  19. Between a bug and a hard place: Trypanosoma cruzi genetic diversity and the clinical outcomes of Chagas disease

    PubMed Central

    Messenger, Louisa A; Miles, Michael A; Bern, Caryn

    2015-01-01

    Over the last 30 years, concomitant with successful transnational disease control programs across Latin America, Chagas disease has expanded from a neglected, endemic parasitic infection of the rural poor to an urbanized chronic disease, and now a potentially emergent global health problem. Trypanosoma cruzi infection has a highly variable clinical course, ranging from complete absence of symptoms to severe and often fatal cardiovascular and/or gastrointestinal manifestations. To date, few correlates of clinical disease progression have been identified. Elucidating a putative role for T. cruzi strain diversity in Chagas disease pathogenesis is complicated by the scarcity of parasites in clinical specimens and the limitations of our contemporary genotyping techniques. This article systematically reviews the historical literature, given our current understanding of parasite genetic diversity, to evaluate the evidence for any association between T. cruzi genotype and chronic clinical outcome, risk of congenital transmission or reactivation and orally transmitted outbreaks. PMID:26162928

  20. [Consensus document for the detection and management of Chagas disease in primary health care in a non-endemic areas].

    PubMed

    Roca Saumell, Carme; Soriano-Arandes, Antoni; Solsona Díaz, Lluís; Gascón Brustenga, Joaquim

    2015-05-01

    Chagas disease is caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. Although it is commonly transmitted by an insect vector in continental Latin-America, in recent decades, due migration, has been diagnosed in other countries such Spain, the European country with a largest immigrant population of Latin American. For a long time, the patient remains asymptomatic, but some years after this stage, the symptoms can be serious (dilated cardiomyopathy, megacolon, megaesophagus). In addition, detection in pregnant women has a high priority because of the route of vertical transmission. Several specific guidelines about Chagas disease has been developed on the Banks of blood, maternal hospitals, HIV co-infection, organ transplant. But due to the detection of lack of information to primary care professionals, we consider to will be useful this document written and agreed to by family phisicians, pediatricians and specialists in International Health.

  1. Chagas' disease in Aboriginal and Creole communities from the Gran Chaco Region of Argentina: Seroprevalence and molecular parasitological characterization.

    PubMed

    Lucero, R H; Brusés, B L; Cura, C I; Formichelli, L B; Juiz, N; Fernández, G J; Bisio, M; Deluca, G D; Besuschio, S; Hernández, D O; Schijman, A G

    2016-07-01

    clustered according to their original localities, but in a few cases, signatures from one locality clustered with signatures from other village, suggesting circulation of the same strains in the area. Parasitic loads ranged from undetectable to around 50 parasite equivalents/mL, showing higher values than those generally observed in chronic Chagas disease patients living in urban centers of Argentina. Our findings reveal the persistence of high levels of infection in these neglected populations.

  2. Domestic Animal Hosts Strongly Influence Human-Feeding Rates of the Chagas Disease Vector Triatoma infestans in Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Gürtler, Ricardo E.; Cecere, María C.; Vázquez-Prokopec, Gonzalo M.; Ceballos, Leonardo A.; Gurevitz, Juan M.; Fernández, María del Pilar; Kitron, Uriel; Cohen, Joel E.

    2014-01-01

    Background The host species composition in a household and their relative availability affect the host-feeding choices of blood-sucking insects and parasite transmission risks. We investigated four hypotheses regarding factors that affect blood-feeding rates, proportion of human-fed bugs (human blood index), and daily human-feeding rates of Triatoma infestans, the main vector of Chagas disease. Methods A cross-sectional survey collected triatomines in human sleeping quarters (domiciles) of 49 of 270 rural houses in northwestern Argentina. We developed an improved way of estimating the human-feeding rate of domestic T. infestans populations. We fitted generalized linear mixed-effects models to a global model with six explanatory variables (chicken blood index, dog blood index, bug stage, numbers of human residents, bug abundance, and maximum temperature during the night preceding bug catch) and three response variables (daily blood-feeding rate, human blood index, and daily human-feeding rate). Coefficients were estimated via multimodel inference with model averaging. Findings Median blood-feeding intervals per late-stage bug were 4.1 days, with large variations among households. The main bloodmeal sources were humans (68%), chickens (22%), and dogs (9%). Blood-feeding rates decreased with increases in the chicken blood index. Both the human blood index and daily human-feeding rate decreased substantially with increasing proportions of chicken- or dog-fed bugs, or the presence of chickens indoors. Improved calculations estimated the mean daily human-feeding rate per late-stage bug at 0.231 (95% confidence interval, 0.157–0.305). Conclusions and Significance Based on the changing availability of chickens in domiciles during spring-summer and the much larger infectivity of dogs compared with humans, we infer that the net effects of chickens in the presence of transmission-competent hosts may be more adequately described by zoopotentiation than by zooprophylaxis

  3. Chagas Disease among the Latin American Adult Population Attending in a Primary Care Center in Barcelona, Spain

    PubMed Central

    Roca, Carme; Pinazo, María Jesús; López-Chejade, Paolo; Bayó, Joan; Posada, Elizabeth; López-Solana, Jordi; Gállego, Montserrat; Portús, Montserrat; Gascón, Joaquim

    2011-01-01

    Background/Aims The epidemiology of Chagas disease, until recently confined to areas of continental Latin America, has undergone considerable changes in recent decades due to migration to other parts of the world, including Spain. We studied the prevalence of Chagas disease in Latin American patients treated at a health center in Barcelona and evaluated its clinical phase. We make some recommendations for screening for the disease. Methodology/Principal Findings We performed an observational, cross-sectional prevalence study by means of an immunochromatographic test screening of all continental Latin American patients over the age of 14 years visiting the health centre from October 2007 to October 2009. The diagnosis was confirmed by serological methods: conventional in-house ELISA (cELISA), a commercial kit (rELISA) and ELISA using T cruzi lysate (Ortho-Clinical Diagnostics) (oELISA). Of 766 patients studied, 22 were diagnosed with T. cruzi infection, showing a prevalence of 2.87% (95% CI, 1.6–4.12%). Of the infected patients, 45.45% men and 54.55% women, 21 were from Bolivia, showing a prevalence in the Bolivian subgroup (n = 127) of 16.53% (95% CI, 9.6–23.39%). All the infected patients were in a chronic phase of Chagas disease: 81% with the indeterminate form, 9.5% with the cardiac form and 9.5% with the cardiodigestive form. All patients infected with T. cruzi had heard of Chagas disease in their country of origin, 82% knew someone affected, and 77% had a significant history of living in adobe houses in rural areas. Conclusions We found a high prevalence of T. cruzi infection in immigrants from Bolivia. Detection of T. cruzi–infected persons by screening programs in non-endemic countries would control non-vectorial transmission and would benefit the persons affected, public health and national health systems. PMID:21572511

  4. Combining Public Health Education and Disease Ecology Research: Using Citizen Science to Assess Chagas Disease Entomological Risk in Texas

    PubMed Central

    Curtis-Robles, Rachel; Wozniak, Edward J.; Auckland, Lisa D.; Hamer, Gabriel L.; Hamer, Sarah A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Chagas disease is a zoonotic parasitic disease well-documented throughout the Americas and transmitted primarily by triatomine ‘kissing bug’ vectors. In acknowledgment of the successful history of vector control programs based on community participation across Latin America, we used a citizen science approach to gain novel insight into the geographic distribution, seasonal activity, and Trypanosoma cruzi infection prevalence of kissing bugs in Texas while empowering the public with information about Chagas disease. Methodology/Principal Findings We accepted submissions of kissing bugs encountered by the public in Texas and other states from 2013–2014 while providing educational literature about Chagas disease. In the laboratory, kissing bugs were identified to species, dissected, and tested for T. cruzi infection. A total of 1,980 triatomines were submitted to the program comprised of at least seven species, of which T. gerstaeckeri and T. sanguisuga were the most abundant (85.7% of submissions). Triatomines were most commonly collected from dog kennels and outdoor patios; Overall, 10.5% of triatomines were collected from inside the home. Triatomines were submitted from across Texas, including many counties which were not previously known to harbor kissing bugs. Kissing bugs were captured primarily throughout April-October, and peak activity occurred in June-July. Emails to our dedicated account regarding kissing bugs were more frequent in the summer months (June-August) than the rest of the year. We detected T. cruzi in 63.3% of tested bugs. Conclusions/Significance Citizen science is an efficient approach for generating data on the distribution, phenology, and infection prevalence of kissing bugs—vectors of the Chagas disease parasite—while educating the public and medical community. PMID:26658425

  5. Evaluation of the rabbit as a model for Chagas disease-II. Histopathologic studies of the heart, digestive tract and skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    da Silva, A M; Eduardo Ramirez, L; Vargas, M; Chapadeiro, E; Brener, Z

    1996-01-01

    In order to investigate the value of the rabbit as an experimental model for Chagas' disease, seventy one animals were inoculated with different Trypanosoma cruzi strains and routes. The rabbits were submitted to necropsy in acute (earlier than three months of infection), recent chronic (three to six months) and late chronic (later than six months) phases. Myocarditis, generally focal and endomysial, occurred in 94.1%, 66.7% and 70.8% of the infected rabbits respectively in the acute, recent chronic and late chronic phases. The myocardial inflammatory exudate was composed by mononuclear cells, and also polymorphonuclear cells in the acute phase. In most cases of the late chronic phase, the myocarditis was similar to that described in the indeterminate form of human chagasic patients. Initial fibrosis occurred in the three phases but was more severe and frequent in the early chronic. Advanced fibrosis occurred only in the late chronic phase. Tissue parasites occurred only in the acute phase. The digestive tract and skeletal muscles showed mild and occasional lesions. Our data indicate that experimentally infected chagasic rabbits repeat some lesions similar to that of humans chagasic patients, specially that of the indeterminate form. So, it may be a useful, however not an ideal, model.

  6. Evasion and Immuno-Endocrine Regulation in Parasite Infection: Two Sides of the Same Coin in Chagas Disease?

    PubMed Central

    Morrot, Alexandre; Villar, Silvina R.; González, Florencia B.; Pérez, Ana R.

    2016-01-01

    Chagas disease is a serious illness caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. Nearly 30% of chronically infected people develop cardiac, digestive, or mixed alterations, suggesting a broad range of host-parasite interactions that finally impact upon chronic disease outcome. The ability of T. cruzi to persist and cause pathology seems to depend on diverse factors like T. cruzi strains, the infective load and the route of infection, presence of virulence factors, the parasite capacity to avoid protective immune response, the strength and type of host defense mechanisms and the genetic background of the host. The host-parasite interaction is subject to a constant neuro-endocrine regulation that is thought to influence the adaptive immune system, and as the infection proceeds it can lead to a broad range of outcomes, ranging from pathogen elimination to its continued persistence in the host. In this context, T. cruzi evasion strategies and host defense mechanisms can be envisioned as two sides of the same coin, influencing parasite persistence and different outcomes observed in Chagas disease. Understanding how T. cruzi evade host's innate and adaptive immune response will provide important clues to better dissect mechanisms underlying the pathophysiology of Chagas disease. PMID:27242726

  7. [Rural endemic diseases, health and development: Emmanuel Dias and the construction of a network of allies against Chagas disease].

    PubMed

    Kropf, Simone Petraglia

    2016-11-01

    The scope of this article is to analyze the trajectory of Emmanuel Dias (1908-1962), a researcher at the Oswaldo Cruz Institute (OCI) and director of the Center for Studies and Prophylaxis of Chagas Disease (OCI outpost established in 1943 in the city of Bambuí, Minas Gerais), as a key actor in the acknowledgement of Chagas disease as a public health problem in Brazil and the Americas. It seeks to show that the conquest of this acknowledgement, the cornerstone of which was the staging of the first campaign to combat the disease in Brazil in 1950, was made possible by the intense political mobilization of Dias together with the various social groups, such as physicians, politicians and residents of rural areas, public health officials, governments and international organizations. This mobilization occurred during the 1940s and 1950s in a historical context marked by intense debate about the relationship between health and development and helped to construct a network of alliances that was critical for the recognition of Chagas disease as a chronic cardiopathy, which threatened the productivity of rural workers and represented a medical and social problem that merited public health actions and programs geared to get it under control.

  8. A lytic monoclonal antibody to Trypanosoma cruzi bloodstream trypomastigotes which recognizes an epitope expressed in tissues affected in Chagas' disease.

    PubMed Central

    Zwirner, N W; Malchiodi, E L; Chiaramonte, M G; Fossati, C A

    1994-01-01

    It has been suggested that molecular mimicry between the antigens of Trypanosoma cruzi and the host could have a role in the onset of the chronic stage of Chagas' disease. In this article, we report on a monoclonal antibody (MAb), CAK20.12 (immunoglobulin G2b), which reacts with a polypeptidic epitope of a 150-kDa antigen expressed on the surface of several strains of T. cruzi. This MAb also causes lysis of bloodstream trypomastigotes. Serum samples from 30 of 30 patients with chronic and 11 of 13 patients with acute Chagas' disease present specific antibodies to this antigen. MAb CAK20.12 reacts, by indirect immunofluorescence, with human and syngeneic murine striated muscle tissue, with the smooth muscle layer of cardiac arteries, with the lamina muscularis mucosae and the external striated muscle layer of the esophagus, and with the smooth muscle cells of the colon from normal syngeneic mice. Reactivity with the small intestine was very weak, and no reactivity with ventricle or atrium tissue was detected. Adsorption with an antigenic fraction from normal murine striated muscle or from T. cruzi epimastigotes confirmed that MAb CAK20.12 recognizes a common epitope present in parasites and host tissues. MAb CAK20.12, lytic for the infective form of T. cruzi, recognizes an epitope expressed in striated and smooth muscle cells of the host tissues affected in the chronic stage of Chagas' disease. Images PMID:7514576

  9. One Health Interactions of Chagas Disease Vectors, Canid Hosts, and Human Residents along the Texas-Mexico Border

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Melissa N.; O’Day, Sarah; Fisher-Hoch, Susan; Gorchakov, Rodion; Patino, Ramiro; Feria Arroyo, Teresa P.; Laing, Susan T.; Lopez, Job E.; Ingber, Alexandra; Jones, Kathryn M.; Murray, Kristy O.

    2016-01-01

    Background Chagas disease (Trypanosoma cruzi infection) is the leading cause of non-ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy in Latin America. Texas, particularly the southern region, has compounding factors that could contribute to T. cruzi transmission; however, epidemiologic studies are lacking. The aim of this study was to ascertain the prevalence of T. cruzi in three different mammalian species (coyotes, stray domestic dogs, and humans) and vectors (Triatoma species) to understand the burden of Chagas disease among sylvatic, peridomestic, and domestic cycles. Methodology/Principal Findings To determine prevalence of infection, we tested sera from coyotes, stray domestic dogs housed in public shelters, and residents participating in related research studies and found 8%, 3.8%, and 0.36% positive for T. cruzi, respectively. PCR was used to determine the prevalence of T. cruzi DNA in vectors collected in peridomestic locations in the region, with 56.5% testing positive for the parasite, further confirming risk of transmission in the region. Conclusions/Significance Our findings contribute to the growing body of evidence for autochthonous Chagas disease transmission in south Texas. Considering this region has a population of 1.3 million, and up to 30% of T. cruzi infected individuals developing severe cardiac disease, it is imperative that we identify high risk groups for surveillance and treatment purposes. PMID:27832063

  10. Chagas disease: serological and electrocardiographic studies in Wichi and Creole communities of Misión Nueva Pompeya, Chaco, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Moretti, Edgardo; Castro, Irma; Franceschi, Claudio; Basso, Beatriz

    2010-08-01

    Chagas disease, which is caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, affects nearly 16 million people in Latin America and causes 75-90 million people to be at risk of infection. The disease is urbanizing and globalizing due to frequent migrations. There are regions of high prevalence of infection, including the north-eastern provinces of Argentina and the entire phytogeographic region known as the Gran Chaco. In the province of Chaco, Argentina, there are places inhabited by native populations such as the Wichi and Toba communities, among others. Many Creole populations resulting from miscegenation with European colonists and immigrants coexist within these communities. It has been widely accepted that in the chronic phase of the disease, between 25-30% of individuals develop some form of cardiac disease, with the right bundle-branch block being the most typical condition described so far. The aim of this work was to study the prevalence of Chagas infection and its electrocardiographic profile in the Wichi and Creole populations of Misión Nueva Pompeya, in the area known as Monte Impenetrable in Chaco, to determine the prevalence and the pattern of heart diseases produced by Chagas disease in this region.

  11. Simvastatin Attenuates Endothelial Activation through 15-Epi-Lipoxin A4 Production in Murine Chronic Chagas Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    González-Herrera, Fabiola; Cramer, Allysson; Pimentel, Pollyana; Castillo, Christian; Liempi, Ana; Kemmerling, Ulrike; Machado, Fabiana S; Maya, Juan D

    2017-03-01

    Current treatments for chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy, a disease with high mortality rates and caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, are unsatisfactory. Myocardial inflammation, including endothelial activation, is responsible for the structural and functional damage seen in the chronic phase. The clinical efficacy of benznidazole could be improved by decreasing chronic inflammation. Statins, which have anti-inflammatory properties, may improve the action of benznidazole. Here, the action of simvastatin in a murine model of chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy and the link with the production of the proresolving eicosanoid 15-epi-lipoxin A4, produced by 5-lipoxygenase, are evaluated. Simvastatin decreased the expression of the adhesion molecules E-selectin, intracellular adhesion molecule type 1 (ICAM-1), and vascular cell adhesion molecule type 1 (VCAM-1) in T. cruzi-infected mice. However, when this drug was administered to 5-lipoxygenase-deficient mice, the anti-inflammatory effect was not observed unless exogenous 15-epi-lipoxin A4 was administered. Thus, in chronic Chagas disease, 5-epi-lipoxin A4 induced by simvastatin treatment could improve the pathophysiological condition of patients by increasing the trypanocidal action of benznidazole.

  12. Geology of the Pavana geothermal area, Departamento de Choluteca, Honduras, Central America: Field report

    SciTech Connect

    Eppler, D.B.; Heiken, G.; Wohletz, K.; Flores, W.; Paredes, J.R.; Duffield, W.A.

    1987-09-01

    The Pavana geothermal area is located in southern Honduras near the Gulf of Fonseca. This region is underlain by late Tertiary volcanic rocks. Within ranges near the geothermal manifestations, the rock sequences is characterized by intermediate to mafic laharic breccias and lavas overlain by silicic tuffs and lavas, which are in turn overlain by intermediate to mafic breccias, lavas, and tuffs. The nearest Quaternary volcanoes are about 40 km to the southwest, where the chain of active Central American volcanoes crosses the mouth of the Gulf of Fonseca. Structure of the Pavana area is dominated by generally northwest-trending, southwest-dipping normal faults. This structure is topographically expressed as northwest-trending escarpments that bound blocks of bedrock separated by asymmetric valleys that contain thin alluvial deposits. Thermal waters apparently issue from normal faults and are interpreted as having been heated during deep circulation along fault zones within a regional environment of elevated heat flow. Natural outflow from the main thermal area is about 3000 l/min of 60/sup 0/C water. Geothermometry of the thermal waters suggests a reservoir base temperature of about 150/sup 0/C.

  13. Chagas Cardiomiopathy: The Potential of Diastolic Dysfunction and Brain Natriuretic Peptide in the Early Identification of Cardiac Damage

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Alvarez, Ana; Sitges, Marta; Pinazo, María-Jesús; Regueiro-Cueva, Ander; Posada, Elizabeth; Poyatos, Silvia; Ortiz-Pérez, José Tomás; Heras, Magda; Azqueta, Manel; Gascon, Joaquim; Sanz, Ginés

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Chagas disease remains a major cause of mortality in several countries of Latin America and has become a potential public health problem in non-endemic countries as a result of migration flows. Cardiac involvement represents the main cause of mortality, but its diagnosis is still based on nonspecific criteria with poor sensitivity. Early identification of patients with cardiac involvement is desirable, since early treatment may improve prognosis. This study aimed to assess the role of diastolic dysfunction, abnormal myocardial strain and elevated brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) in the early identification of cardiac involvement in Chagas disease. Methodology/Principal Findings Fifty-four patients divided into 3 groups—group 1 (undetermined form: positive serology without ECG or 2D-echocardiographic abnormalities; N = 32), group 2 (typical ECG abnormalities of Chagas disease but normal 2D-echocardiography; N = 14), and group 3 (regional wall motion abnormalities, left ventricular [LV] end-diastolic diameter >55 mm or LV ejection fraction <50% on echocardiography; N = 8)—and 44 control subjects were studied. Patients with significant non-cardiac diseases, other heart diseases and previous treatment with benznidazol were excluded. The median age was 37 (20–58) years; 40% were men. BNP levels, longitudinal and radial myocardial strain and LV diastolic dysfunction increased progressively from group 1 to 3 (p for trend <0.01). Abnormal BNP levels (>37 pg/ml) were noted in 0%, 13%, 29% and 63% in controls and groups 1 to 3, respectively. Half of patients in the undetermined form had impaired relaxation patterns, whereas half of patients with ECG abnormalities suggestive of Chagas cardiomyopathy had normal diastolic function. In group 1, BNP levels were statistically higher in patients with diastolic dysfunction as compared to those with normal diastolic function (27±26 vs. 11±8 pg/ml, p = 0.03). Conclusion/Significance In conclusion

  14. Impact of pharmaceutical care on the quality of life of patients with Chagas disease and heart failure: randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Pharmaceutical care is the direct interaction between pharmacist and patient, in order to improve therapeutic compliance, promote adequate pharmacotherapeutic follow-up, and improve quality of life. Pharmaceutical care may be effective in reducing complications and in improving the quality of life of patients with chronic diseases, like Chagas heart disease, while bringing a positive impact on health system costs. The morbidity and mortality indexes for patients with Chagas heart disease are high, especially if this heart disease is complicated by heart failure. In this setting, we hypothesize that pharmaceutical care might be an important tool for the clinical management of these patients by improving their quality of life, as a better compliance to their treatment and the avoidance and prompt correction of drug-related problems will minimize their symptoms, improve their functional class, and decrease the number of hospital admissions. Therefore, the aim of this trial is to evaluate the contribution of pharmaceutical care to clinical treatment of patients with Chagas heart disease complicated by heart failure. Methods/design A prospective, single-center randomized clinical trial will be conducted in patients with Chagas heart disease complicated by heart failure. A total of 88 patients will be randomly assigned into two parallel groups: an intervention group will receive standard care and pharmaceutical care, and a control group will receive only standard care. Both groups will be subjected to a follow-up period of 12 months. The primary outcome of this trial is the evaluation of quality of life, measured by the 36-item short-form and the Minnesota Living with Heart Failure Questionnaire. Secondary outcomes include drug-related problems, exercise tolerance as measured by the standard six-minute-walk test, and compliance. Discussion Patients with Chagas heart disease complicated by heart failure under pharmaceutical care are expected to improve their

  15. Trypanocide treatment of women infected with Trypanosoma cruzi and its effect on preventing congenital Chagas.

    PubMed

    Fabbro, Diana L; Danesi, Emmaria; Olivera, Veronica; Codebó, Maria Olenka; Denner, Susana; Heredia, Cecilia; Streiger, Mirtha; Sosa-Estani, Sergio

    2014-11-01

    With the control of the vectorial and transfusional routes of infection with Trypanosoma cruzi, congenital transmission has become an important source of new cases. This study evaluated the efficacy of trypanocidal therapy to prevent congenital Chagas disease and compared the clinical and serological evolution between treated and untreated infected mothers. We conducted a multicenter, observational study on a cohort of mothers infected with T. cruzi, with and without trypanocidal treatment before pregnancy. Their children were studied to detect congenital infection. Among 354 "chronically infected mother-biological child" pairs, 132 were treated women and 222 were untreated women. Among the children born to untreated women, we detected 34 infected with T. cruzi (15.3%), whose only antecedent was maternal infection. Among the 132 children of previously treated women, no infection with T. cruzi was found (0.0%) (p<0.05). Among 117 mothers with clinical and serological follow up, 71 had been treated and 46 were untreated. The women were grouped into three groups. Group A: 25 treated before 15 years of age; Group B: 46 treated at 15 or more years of age; Group C: untreated, average age of 29.2 ± 6.2 years at study entry. Follow-up for Groups A, B and C was 16.3 ± 5.8, 17.5 ± 9.2 and 18.6 ± 8.6 years respectively. Negative seroconversion: Group A, 64.0% (16/25); Group B, 32.6% (15/46); Group C, no seronegativity was observed. Clinical electrocardiographic alterations compatible with chagasic cardiomyopathy: Group A 0.0% (0/25); B 2.2% (1/46) and C 15.2% (7/46). The trypanocidal treatment of women with chronic Chagas infection was effective in preventing the congenital transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi to their children; it had also a protective effect on the women's clinical evolution and deparasitation could be demonstrated in many treated women after over 10 years of follow up.

  16. Evaluation of Nifurtimox Treatment of Chronic Chagas Disease by Means of Several Parasitological Methods

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, Catalina; Zulantay, Inés; Apt, Werner; Ortiz, Sylvia; Schijman, Alejandro G.; Bisio, Margarita; Ferrada, Valentina; Herrera, Cinthya; Martínez, Gabriela

    2013-01-01

    Currently, evaluation of drug efficacy for Chagas disease remains a controversial issue with no consensus. In this work, we evaluated the parasitological efficacy of Nifurtimox treatment in 21 women with chronic Chagas disease from an area of endemicity in Chile who were treated according to current protocols. Under pre- and posttherapy conditions, blood (B) samples and xenodiagnosis (XD) samples from these patients were subjected to analysis by real-time PCR targeting the nuclear satellite DNA of Trypanosoma cruzi (Sat DNA PCR-B, Sat DNA PCR-XD) and by PCR targeting the minicircle of kinetoplast DNA of T. cruzi (kDNA PCR-B, kDNA PCR-XD) and by T. cruzi genotyping using hybridization minicircle tests in blood and fecal samples of Triatoma infestans feed by XD. In pretherapy, kDNA PCR-B and kDNA PCR-XD detected T. cruzi in 12 (57%) and 18 (86%) cases, respectively, whereas Sat DNA quantitative PCR-B (qPCR-B) and Sat DNA qPCR-XD were positive in 18 cases (86%) each. Regarding T. cruzi genotype analysis, it was possible to observe in pretherapy the combination of TcI, TcII, and TcV lineages, including mixtures of T. cruzi strains in most of the cases. At 13 months posttherapy, T. cruzi DNA was detectable in 6 cases (29.6%) and 4 cases (19.1%) by means of Sat DNA PCR-XD and kDNA PCR-XD, respectively, indicating treatment failure with recovery of live parasites refractory to chemotherapy. In 3 cases, it was possible to identify persistence of the baseline genotypes. The remaining 15 baseline PCR-positive cases gave negative results by all molecular and parasitological methods at 13 months posttreatment, suggesting parasite response. Within this follow-up period, kDNA PCR-XD and Sat DNA qPCR-XD proved to be more sensitive tools for the parasitological evaluation of the efficacy of Nifurtimox treatment than the corresponding PCR methods performed directly from blood samples. PMID:23836179

  17. Trypanocide Treatment of Women Infected with Trypanosoma cruzi and Its Effect on Preventing Congenital Chagas

    PubMed Central

    Fabbro, Diana L.; Danesi, Emmaria; Olivera, Veronica; Codebó, Maria Olenka; Denner, Susana; Heredia, Cecilia; Streiger, Mirtha; Sosa-Estani, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    With the control of the vectorial and transfusional routes of infection with Trypanosoma cruzi, congenital transmission has become an important source of new cases. This study evaluated the efficacy of trypanocidal therapy to prevent congenital Chagas disease and compared the clinical and serological evolution between treated and untreated infected mothers. We conducted a multicenter, observational study on a cohort of mothers infected with T. cruzi, with and without trypanocidal treatment before pregnancy. Their children were studied to detect congenital infection. Among 354 “chronically infected mother-biological child” pairs, 132 were treated women and 222 were untreated women. Among the children born to untreated women, we detected 34 infected with T. cruzi (15.3%), whose only antecedent was maternal infection. Among the 132 children of previously treated women, no infection with T. cruzi was found (0.0%) (p<0.05). Among 117 mothers with clinical and serological follow up, 71 had been treated and 46 were untreated. The women were grouped into three groups. Group A: 25 treated before 15 years of age; Group B: 46 treated at 15 or more years of age; Group C: untreated, average age of 29.2±6.2 years at study entry. Follow-up for Groups A, B and C was 16.3±5.8, 17.5±9.2 and 18.6±8.6 years respectively. Negative seroconversion: Group A, 64.0% (16/25); Group B, 32.6% (15/46); Group C, no seronegativity was observed. Clinical electrocardiographic alterations compatible with chagasic cardiomyopathy: Group A 0.0% (0/25); B 2.2% (1/46) and C 15.2% (7/46). The trypanocidal treatment of women with chronic Chagas infection was effective in preventing the congenital transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi to their children; it had also a protective effect on the women's clinical evolution and deparasitation could be demonstrated in many treated women after over 10 years of follow up. PMID:25411847

  18. Serum-mediated activation of macrophages reflects TcVac2 vaccine efficacy against Chagas disease.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Shivali; Silva, Trevor S; Osizugbo, Jessica E; Tucker, Laura; Spratt, Heidi M; Garg, Nisha J

    2014-04-01

    Chagas disease is endemic in Latin America and an emerging infectious disease in the United States. No effective treatments are available. The TcG1, TcG2, and TcG4 antigens are highly conserved in clinically relevant Trypanosoma cruzi isolates and are recognized by B and T cells in infected hosts. Delivery of these antigens as a DNA prime/protein boost vaccine (TcVac2) elicited lytic antibodies and type 1 CD8(+) T cells that expanded upon challenge infection and provided >90% control of parasite burden and myocarditis in chagasic mice. Here we determined if peripheral blood can be utilized to capture the TcVac2-induced protection from Chagas disease. We evaluated the serum levels of T. cruzi kinetoplast DNA (TckDNA), T. cruzi 18S ribosomal DNA (Tc18SrDNA), and murine mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) as indicators of parasite persistence and tissue damage and monitored the effect of sera on macrophage phenotype. Circulating TckDNA/Tc18SrDNA and mtDNA were decreased by >3- to 5-fold and 2-fold, respectively, in vaccinated infected mice compared to nonvaccinated infected mice. Macrophages incubated with sera from vaccinated infected mice exhibited M2 surface markers (CD16, CD32, CD200, and CD206), moderate proliferation, a low oxidative/nitrosative burst, and a regulatory/anti-inflammatory cytokine response (interleukin-4 [IL-4] plus IL-10 > tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α]). In comparison, macrophages incubated with sera from nonvaccinated infected mice exhibited M1 surface markers, vigorous proliferation, a substantial oxidative/nitrosative burst, and a proinflammatory cytokine response (TNF-α ≫ IL-4 plus IL-10). Cardiac infiltration of macrophages and TNF-α and oxidant levels were significantly reduced in TcVac2-immunized chagasic mice. We conclude that circulating TcDNA and mtDNA levels and macrophage phenotype mediated by serum constituents reflect in vivo levels of parasite persistence, tissue damage, and inflammatory/anti-inflammatory state and have potential

  19. Genetic Susceptibility to Cardiac and Digestive Clinical Forms of Chronic Chagas Disease: Involvement of the CCR5 59029 A/G Polymorphism

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Amanda Priscila; Bernardo, Cássia Rubia; Camargo, Ana Vitória da Silveira; Ronchi, Luiz Sérgio; Borim, Aldenis Albaneze; Brandão de Mattos, Cinara Cássia; de Campos Júnior, Eumildo; Castiglioni, Lílian; Netinho, João Gomes; Cavasini, Carlos Eugênio; Bestetti, Reinaldo Bulgarelli; de Mattos, Luiz Carlos

    2015-01-01

    The clinical manifestations of chronic Chagas disease include the cardiac form of the disease and the digestive form. Not all the factors that act in the variable clinical course of this disease are known. This study investigated whether the CCR5Δ32 (rs333) and CCR5 59029 A/G (promoter region—rs1799987) polymorphisms of the CCR5 gene are associated with different clinical forms of chronic Chagas disease and with the severity of left ventricular systolic dysfunction in patients with chronic Chagas heart disease (CCHD). The antibodies anti-T. cruzi were identified by ELISA. PCR and PCR-RFLP were used to identify the CCR5Δ32 and CCR5 59029 A/G polymorphisms. The chi-square test was used to compare variables between groups. There was a higher frequency of the AA genotype in patients with CCHD compared with patients with the digestive form of the disease and the control group. The results also showed a high frequency of the AG genotype in patients with the digestive form of the disease compared to the other groups. The results of this study show that the CCR5Δ32 polymorphism does not seem to influence the different clinical manifestations of Chagas disease but there is involvement of the CCR5 59029 A/G polymorphism in susceptibility to the different forms of chronic Chagas disease. Besides, these polymorphisms do not influence left ventricular systolic dysfunction in patients with CCHD. PMID:26599761

  20. Surveillance, health promotion and control of Chagas disease in the Amazon Region - Medical attention in the Brazilian Amazon Region: a proposal

    PubMed Central

    Coura, José Rodrigues; Junqueira, Angela CV

    2015-01-01

    We refer to Oswaldo Cruz's reports dating from 1913 about the necessities of a healthcare system for the Brazilian Amazon Region and about the journey of Carlos Chagas to 27 locations in this region and the measures that would need to be adopted. We discuss the risks of endemicity of Chagas disease in the Amazon Region. We recommend that epidemiological surveillance of Chagas disease in the Brazilian Amazon Region and Pan-Amazon region should be implemented through continuous monitoring of the human population that lives in the area, their housing, the environment and the presence of triatomines. The monitoring should be performed with periodic seroepidemiological surveys, semi-annual visits to homes by health agents and the training of malaria microscopists and healthcare technicians to identify Trypanosoma cruzi from patients' samples and T. cruzi infection rates among the triatomines caught. We recommend health promotion and control of Chagas disease through public health policies, especially through sanitary education regarding the risk factors for Chagas disease. Finally, we propose a healthcare system through base hospitals, intermediate-level units in the areas of the Brazilian Amazon Region and air transportation, considering the distances to be covered for medical care. PMID:26560976

  1. Development of a PCR Assay to Detect Low Level Trypanosoma cruzi in Blood Specimens Collected with PAXgene Blood DNA Tubes for Clinical Trials Treating Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Bo; Chen, Lei; Kibukawa, Miho; Kang, John; Waskin, Hetty; Marton, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Chagas disease is caused by the parasitic infection of Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi). The STOP CHAGAS clinical trial was initiated in 2011 to evaluate posaconazole in treating Chagas disease, with treatment success defined as negative qualitative PCR results of detecting the parasites in blood specimens collected post-treatment. PAXgene Blood DNA tubes were utilized as a simple procedure to collect and process blood specimens. However, the PAXgene blood specimens challenged published T. cruzi PCR methods, resulting in poor sensitivity and reproducibility. To accurately evaluate the treatment efficacy of the clinical study, we developed and validated a robust PCR assay for detecting low level T. cruzi in PAXgene blood specimens. The assay combines a new DNA extraction method with a custom designed qPCR assay, resulting in limit of detection of 0.005 and 0.01 fg/μl for K98 and CL Brener, two representative strains of two of T. cruzi’s discrete typing units. Reliable qPCR standard curves were established for both strains to measure parasite loads, with amplification efficiency ≥ 90% and the lower limit of linearity ≥ 0.05 fg/μl. The assay successfully analyzed the samples collected from the STOP CHAGAS study and may prove useful for future global clinical trials evaluating new therapies for asymptomatic chronic Chagas disease. PMID:27906977

  2. Surveillance, health promotion and control of Chagas disease in the Amazon Region--Medical attention in the Brazilian Amazon Region: a proposal.

    PubMed

    Coura, José Rodrigues; Junqueira, Angela C V

    2015-11-01

    We refer to Oswaldo Cruz's reports dating from 1913 about the necessities of a healthcare system for the Brazilian Amazon Region and about the journey of Carlos Chagas to 27 locations in this region and the measures that would need to be adopted. We discuss the risks of endemicity of Chagas disease in the Amazon Region. We recommend that epidemiological surveillance of Chagas disease in the Brazilian Amazon Region and Pan-Amazon region should be implemented through continuous monitoring of the human population that lives in the area, their housing, the environment and the presence of triatomines. The monitoring should be performed with periodic seroepidemiological surveys, semi-annual visits to homes by health agents and the training of malaria microscopists and healthcare technicians to identify Trypanosoma cruzi from patients' samples and T. cruzi infection rates among the triatomines caught. We recommend health promotion and control of Chagas disease through public health policies, especially through sanitary education regarding the risk factors for Chagas disease. Finally, we propose a healthcare system through base hospitals, intermediate-level units in the areas of the Brazilian Amazon Region and air transportation, considering the distances to be covered for medical care.

  3. Identification and characterization of microsatellite markers in the Chagas disease vector Triatoma infestans (Heteroptera: Reduviidae)

    PubMed Central

    Marcet, P.L.; Lehmann, T.; Groner, G.; Gürtler, R.E.; Kitron, U.; Dotson, E.M.

    2005-01-01

    Triatoma infestans, the main vector of Chagas disease in the southern cone countries, is the principal target of a regional elimination program. A better understanding of its dispersal, sources of reinfestation, and insecticide resistance is key to an effective control program. To address such problems, we identified and characterized 13 microsatellite loci of T. infestans. For each locus, primer sequences and PCR conditions are presented. Allele variability and frequency were analyzed in 59 T. infestans specimens from different rural communities in northwestern Argentina; nine loci were considered suitable for population genetic studies. Departure from Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium was detected in 10/13 loci with FIS values ranging from 0.04 to 0.91, indicating heterozygote deficit and a possible grade of sub-structure in the sample analyzed. Presence of null alleles in some loci cannot be discarded. The present work provides a promising tool to develop a population genetic study of natural populations of T. infestans in tandem with field studies and analyses of bug dispersal and the reinfestation process. PMID:16376838

  4. Sustainable vector control and management of Chagas disease in the Gran Chaco, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Gürtler, Ricardo E; Kitron, Uriel; Cecere, M Carla; Segura, Elsa L; Cohen, Joel E

    2007-10-09

    Chagas disease remains a serious obstacle to health and economic development in Latin America, especially for the rural poor. We report the long-term effects of interventions in rural villages in northern Argentina during 1984-2006. Two community-wide campaigns of residual insecticide spraying immediately and strongly reduced domestic infestation and infection with Trypanosoma cruzi in Triatoma infestans bugs and dogs and more gradually reduced the seroprevalence of children <15 years of age. Because no effective surveillance and control actions followed the first campaign in 1985, transmission resurged in 2-3 years. Renewed interventions in 1992 followed by sustained, supervised, community-based vector control largely suppressed the reestablishment of domestic bug colonies and finally led to the interruption of local human T. cruzi transmission. Human incidence of infection was nearly an order of magnitude higher in peripheral rural areas under pulsed, unsupervised, community-based interventions, where human transmission became apparent in 2000. The sustained, supervised, community-based strategy nearly interrupted domestic transmission to dogs but did not eliminate T. infestans despite the absence of pyrethroid-insecticide resistance. T. infestans persisted in part because of the lack of major changes in housing construction and quality. Sustained community participation grew out of establishing a trusted relationship with the affected communities and the local schools. The process included health promotion and community mobilization, motivation, and supervision in close cooperation with locally nominated leaders.

  5. Identification and characterization of microsatellite markers in the Chagas disease vector Triatoma infestans (Heteroptera: Reduviidae).

    PubMed

    Marcet, P L; Lehmann, T; Groner, G; Gürtler, R E; Kitron, U; Dotson, E M

    2006-01-01

    Triatoma infestans, the main vector of Chagas disease in the southern cone countries, is the principal target of a regional elimination program. A better understanding of its dispersal, sources of reinfestation, and insecticide resistance is key to an effective control program. To address such problems, we identified and characterized 13 microsatellite loci of T. infestans. For each locus, primer sequences and PCR conditions are presented. Allele variability and frequency were analyzed in 59 T. infestans specimens from different rural communities in northwestern Argentina; nine loci were considered suitable for population genetic studies. Departure from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium was detected in 10/13 loci with F(IS) values ranging from 0.04 to 0.91, indicating heterozygote deficit and a possible grade of sub-structure in the sample analyzed. Presence of null alleles in some loci cannot be discarded. The present work provides a promising tool to develop a population genetic study of natural populations of T. infestans in tandem with field studies and analyses of bug dispersal and the reinfestation process.

  6. Inflammation and glandular duct dilatation of the tongue from patients with chronic Chagas disease.

    PubMed

    de Lima Pereira, Sanívia Aparecida; Rodrigues, Denise Bertulucci Rocha; da Fonseca Ferraz, Mara Lúcia; da Cunha Castro, Eumenia Costa; dos Reis, Marlene Antonia; de Paula Antunes Teixeira, Vicente

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate morphologically the tongue of individuals with chronic Chagas disease (CD) in comparison to the non-chagasic ones. Twenty-four protocol cases of autopsies were selected. They were subdivided into CD patients (10 cases) and non-chagasic ones (14 cases). The morphometric analysis was accomplished for the tongue muscle and salivary glands duct lumen area. In three CD patients, perineuritis was found, and two of them showed megaesophagus and megacolon. The intensity of the inflammation in the von Ebner's glands, the tongue muscles, and the salivary glands duct lumen area was significantly higher in the CD patients. We concluded that the CD patients show salivary glands duct dilatation, which probably would have a relation with alterations in the autonomic nervous system. The inflammation found in CD patients is in accordance with that described in comparative studies on the digestive tract and heart. These morphological findings suggest that the histopathological analysis of the tongue associated with other organs, or even in an isolated manner, can add in the diagnosis and pathogenesis of the CD chronic phase.

  7. Triatomine infestation and vector-borne transmission of Chagas disease in northwest and central Parana, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Falavigna-Guilherme, Ana Lucia; Santana, Rosângela; Pavanelli, Gilberto Cezar; Lorosa, Elias Seixas; Araújo, Silvana Marques de

    2004-01-01

    Triatomine infestation, prevalence of T. cruzi antibodies in humans and domestic animals, and variables potentially associated with the presence of triatomines in a rural domiciliary unit (DU) were investigated in nine municipalities and one district of Parana, Brazil, from June 1996 to February 2000. DUs were defined as all houses and annexes on a given piece of property. Blood samples from human volunteers, dogs, and cats were submitted to indirect immunofluorescence. An epidemiological form was completed for each DU. A logistic model was adopted in order to identify associations. Seven out of nine municipalities were positive for triatomines. T. infestans was not captured, but T. sordida, P. megistus, and R. neglectus were. Different variables were considered decisive for the presence of triatomines across the municipalities: proximity to residual wooded areas, i.e. either scrub forest (capoeira) or islands of residual forest (slightly dense vegetation), longer time of residence, existence of inhabited houses, and past DU infestation. In order to ensure proper continuation of the recommended Chagas disease control program, entomo-epidemiological surveillance measures need to be maintained.

  8. Genetically Determined MBL Deficiency Is Associated with Protection against Chronic Cardiomyopathy in Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Márcia I.; Chiminacio Neto, Nelson; Padeski, Marcela C.; Barros, Ana Cláudia M.

    2016-01-01

    Chagas disease (CD) is caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, whose sugar moieties are recognized by mannan binding lectin (MBL), a soluble pattern-recognition molecule that activates the lectin pathway of complement. MBL levels and protein activity are affected by polymorphisms in the MBL2 gene. We sequenced the MBL2 promoter and exon 1 in 196 chronic CD patients and 202 controls. The MBL2*C allele, which causes MBL deficiency, was associated with protection against CD (P = 0.007, OR = 0.32). Compared with controls, genotypes with this allele were completely absent in patients with the cardiac form of the disease (P = 0.003). Furthermore, cardiac patients with genotypes causing MBL deficiency presented less heart damage (P = 0.003, OR = 0.23), compared with cardiac patients having the XA haplotype causing low MBL levels, but fully capable of activating complement (P = 0.005, OR = 7.07). Among the patients, those with alleles causing MBL deficiency presented lower levels of cytokines and chemokines possibly implicated in symptom development (IL9, p = 0.013; PDGFB, p = 0.036 and RANTES, p = 0.031). These findings suggest a protective effect of genetically determined MBL deficiency against the development and progression of chronic CD cardiomyopathy. PMID:26745156

  9. Chagas disease in bone marrow transplantation: an approach to preemptive therapy.

    PubMed

    Altclas, J; Sinagra, A; Dictar, M; Luna, C; Verón, M T; De Rissio, A M; García, M M; Salgueira, C; Riarte, A

    2005-07-01

    The efficacy of preemptive therapy was evaluated in bone marrow transplantation (BMT) recipients associated with Chagas disease (CD). The criterion to include patients in the protocol was the serological reactivity for CD in recipients and/or donors before transplant. After BMT, the monitoring was performed using the direct Strout method (SM), which detects clinical levels of Trypanosome cruzi parasitemia, and CD conventional serological tests. Monitoring took place during 60 days in ABMT and throughout the immunosuppressive period in allogeneic BMT. Reactivation of CD was diagnosed by detecting T. cruzi parasites in blood or tissues. In primary T. cruzi infection, an additional diagnostic criterion was the serological conversion. A total of 25 CD-BMT patients were included. Two ABMT and four allogeneic BMT recipients showed CD recurrences diagnosed by SM. One patient also showed skin lesions with T. cruzi amastigotes. Benznidazole treatment (Roche Lab), an antiparasitic drug, was prescribed at a dose of 5 mg/kg/day during 4-8 weeks with recovery of patients. Primary T. cruzi infection was not observed. This report proves the relevance of monitoring CD in BMT patients and demonstrates that preemptive therapy was able to abrogate the development of clinical and systemic disease.

  10. Combined treatment with a nitrofuranic and a corticoid in experimental Chagas' disease in the dog.

    PubMed

    Andrade, S G; Andrade, Z A; Sadigursky, M

    1980-09-01

    In order to study the effect of combined treatment of Trypanosoma cruzi infection with a nitrofuranic drug and a corticoid, 27 dogs from three different litters infected with T. cruzi (12 SF strain) were randomly litter-paired in three experimental groups: animals infected and not treated; infected and treated with Bay 2502 (2-methyl-4-[5'nitrofurfurylideneamino]-tetrahydro-4H-1,4-thiazine-1,1-dioxine) (nifurtimox); infected and treated with nifurtimox plus betamethasone. While an enhanced myocarditis appeared in the animals treated with a nitrofuranic drug alone, inflammation was almost abolished when corticoid treatment was added. Both groups showed considerable intracellular parasite destruction. These changes were monitored by serial electrocardiograms and a final histopathologic study which included an investigation of the changes in the conducting tissue by serial sectioning. The survival period was prolonged in animals treated with the combination of the nitrofuranic drug and corticoid, and only in this group did some of the animals reach the chronic phase of the infection. Thus, the association of a nitrofuranic drug with a corticoid in the treatment of acute Chagas' disease produced parasite destruction and inhibited the inflammatory responses that are enhanced by such destruction

  11. Predictive factors for the progression of chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy in patients without left ventricular dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Silva, Silvana de Araújo; Gontijo, Eliane Dias; Dias, João Carlos Pinto; Andrade, Camila Gomes de Souza; Amaral, Carlos Faria Santos

    2015-01-01

    The identification of predictors for the progression of chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy (CCC) is essential to ensure adequate patient management. This study looked into a non-concurrent cohort of 165 CCC patients between 1985 and 2010 for independent predictors for CCC progression. The outcomes were worsening of the CCC scores and the onset of left ventricular dysfunction assessed by means of echo-Doppler cardiography. Patients were analyzed for social, demographic, epidemiologic, clinical and workup-related variables. A descriptive analysis was conducted, followed by survival curves based on univariate (Kaplan-Meier and Cox's univariate model) and multivariate (Cox regression model) analysis. Patients were followed from two to 20 years (mean: 8.2). Their mean age was 44.8 years (20-77). Comparing both iterations of the study, in the second there was a statistically significant increase in the PR interval and in the QRS duration, despite a reduction in heart rates (Wilcoxon < 0.01). The predictors for CCC progression in the final regression model were male gender (HR = 2.81), Holter monitoring showing pauses equal to or greater than two seconds (HR = 3.02) increased cardiothoracic ratio (HR = 7.87) and time of use of digitalis (HR = 1.41). Patients with multiple predictive factors require stricter follow-up and treatment.

  12. Health Care Seeking Behavior of Persons with Acute Chagas Disease in Rural Argentina: A Qualitative View

    PubMed Central

    Dinardi, Graciela; Canevari, Cecilia; Torabi, Nahal

    2016-01-01

    Chagas disease (CD) is a tropical parasitic disease largely underdiagnosed and mostly asymptomatic affecting marginalized rural populations. Argentina regularly reports acute cases of CD, mostly young individuals under 14 years old. There is a void of knowledge of health care seeking behavior in subjects experiencing a CD acute condition. Early treatment of the acute case is crucial to limit subsequent development of disease. The article explores how the health outcome of persons with acute CD may be conditioned by their health care seeking behavior. The study, with a qualitative approach, was carried out in rural areas of Santiago del Estero Province, a high risk endemic region for vector transmission of CD. Narratives of 25 in-depth interviews carried out in 2005 and 2006 are analyzed identifying patterns of health care seeking behavior followed by acute cases. Through the retrospective recall of paths for diagnoses, weaknesses of disease information, knowledge at the household level, and underperformance at the provincial health care system level are detected. The misdiagnoses were a major factor in delaying a health care response. The study results expose lost opportunities for the health care system to effectively record CD acute cases. PMID:27829843

  13. Genes encoding defensins of important Chagas disease vectors used for phylogenetic studies.

    PubMed

    de Araújo, Catarina Andréa Chaves; Lima, Ana Carolina Bastos; Jansen, Ana Maria; Galvão, Cleber; Jurberg, José; Costa, Jane; Azambuja, Patricia; Waniek, Peter Josef

    2015-12-01

    Insects possess both cellular and humoral immune responses. The latter makes them capable to recognize and control invading pathogens after synthesis of a variety of small proteins, also known as antimicrobial peptides. Defensins, cysteine-rich cationic peptides with major activity against Gram-positive bacteria, are one ubiquitous class of antimicrobial peptides, widely distributed in different animal and plant taxa. Regarding triatomines in each of the so far analyzed species, various defensin gene isoforms have been identified. In the present study, these genes were sequenced and used as a molecular marker for phylogenetic analysis. Considering the vectors of Chagas disease the authors are reporting for the first time the presence of these genes in Triatoma sordida (Stål, 1859), Rhodnius nasutus (Stål, 1859), and Panstrongylus megistus (Burmeister, 1835). Members of the Triatoma brasiliensis species complex were included into the study to verify the genetic variability within these taxa. Mainly in their mature peptide, the deduced defensin amino acid sequences were highly conserved. In the dendrogram based on defensin encoding nucleotide, sequences the Triatoma Def3/4 genes were separated from the rest. In the dendrogram based on deduced amino acid sequences the Triatoma Def2/3/4 together with Rhodnius DefA/B pre-propeptides were separated from the rest. In the sub-branches of both the DNA and amino acid dendrograms, the genus Triatoma was separated from the genus Rhodnius as well as from P. megistus.

  14. Benznidazole, a drug used in Chagas' disease, ameliorates LPS-induced inflammatory response in mice.

    PubMed

    Pascutti, María Fernanda; Pitashny, Milena; Nocito, Ana Lía; Guermonprez, Pierre; Amigorena, Sebastian; Wietzerbin, Juana; Serra, Esteban; Bottasso, Oscar; Revelli, Silvia

    2004-12-24

    Benznidazole (BZL) is a drug currently used for treating Chagas' disease. Given our earlier demonstration in which BZL downregulated cytokine and nitric oxide (NO) synthesis by LPS and/or IFN-gamma-stimulated murine macrophages, we have now analysed whether this compound could exert beneficial effects in a model of LPS-induced inflammation in C57BL/6 mice. The lethal model consisted of two LPS intraperitoneal injections, 200 microg each separated by 2 h, with BZL given orally at a dose of 200 mg/kg, 18 and 2 h before the first challenge and 20 and 44 hr following the second one. In this model, BZL treatment led to a significantly decreased mortality in comparison with untreated counterparts. Remaining experiments were carried out in mice given a unique LPS dose, pretreated with BZL or not, since those subjected to the lethal protocol were unsuitable for laboratory handling. Analysis of IL-1beta, IL-6, TNF-alpha, IL-12 and iNOS mRNA expression in liver samples taken at 90 min post-LPS showed a marked reduction of the two latter mRNAs in BZL-treated mice. These animals also displayed significantly decreased peaks levels of serum TNF-alpha and IL-6, accompanied by a diminished number of IL-6-producing peritoneal macrophages. Present effects may broaden the potential usefulness of BZL in situations accompanied by an excessive inflammatory response.

  15. Genetically Determined MBL Deficiency Is Associated with Protection against Chronic Cardiomyopathy in Chagas Disease.

    PubMed

    Luz, Paola Rosa; Miyazaki, Márcia I; Chiminacio Neto, Nelson; Padeski, Marcela C; Barros, Ana Cláudia M; Boldt, Angelica B W; Messias-Reason, Iara J

    2016-01-01

    Chagas disease (CD) is caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, whose sugar moieties are recognized by mannan binding lectin (MBL), a soluble pattern-recognition molecule that activates the lectin pathway of complement. MBL levels and protein activity are affected by polymorphisms in the MBL2 gene. We sequenced the MBL2 promoter and exon 1 in 196 chronic CD patients and 202 controls. The MBL2*C allele, which causes MBL deficiency, was associated with protection against CD (P = 0.007, OR = 0.32). Compared with controls, genotypes with this allele were completely absent in patients with the cardiac form of the disease (P = 0.003). Furthermore, cardiac patients with genotypes causing MBL deficiency presented less heart damage (P = 0.003, OR = 0.23), compared with cardiac patients having the XA haplotype causing low MBL levels, but fully capable of activating complement (P = 0.005, OR = 7.07). Among the patients, those with alleles causing MBL deficiency presented lower levels of cytokines and chemokines possibly implicated in symptom development (IL9, p = 0.013; PDGFB, p = 0.036 and RANTES, p = 0.031). These findings suggest a protective effect of genetically determined MBL deficiency against the development and progression of chronic CD cardiomyopathy.

  16. Molecular phylogeography of the Chagas' disease vector Triatoma infestans in Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Pérez de Rosas, A R; Segura, E L; García, B A

    2011-01-01

    Triatoma infestans is the main vector of Chagas' disease in South America between latitudes 10°S and 46°S. A multilocus microsatellite data set of 836 individuals from 27 populations of T. infestans, from all its range of distribution in Argentina, was analyzed. Our results favor the hypothesis of two independent migration events of colonization in Argentina and secondary contacts. The majority of the populations of the western provinces of Catamarca, La Rioja, San Juan and the west of Cordoba province, had almost no shared ancestry with the rest of the populations analyzed. Probably those populations, belonging to localities close to the Andean region, could have been established by the dispersal line of T. infestans that would have arrived to Argentina through the Andes, whereas most of the rest of the populations analyzed may have derived from the dispersal line of T. infestans in non-Andean lowlands. Among them, those from the provinces of Formosa, Chaco, Santiago del Estero and Santa Fe shared different percentages of ancestry and presented lower degree of genetic differentiation. The migratory movement linked to regional economies and possibly associated with passive dispersal, would allow a higher genetic exchange among these populations of T. infestans. This study, using microsatellite markers, provides a new approach for evaluating the validity of the different hypotheses concerning the evolutionary history of this species. Two major lineages of T. infestans, an Andean and non-Andean, are suggested. PMID:21224874

  17. Immunopathology of experimental Chagas' disease: binding of T cells to Trypanosoma cruzi-infected heart tissue.

    PubMed Central

    Mortatti, R C; Maia, L C; de Oliveira, A V; Munk, M E

    1990-01-01

    The immunopathology of Chagas' disease was studied in the experimental model of chronic infection in C57BL/10JT or mice. Sublethal infection with Trypanosoma cruzi, Y strain, induced specific antibodies and a delayed hypersensitivity response to parasite antigens. Mice developed chronic chagasic myocarditis but not skeletal muscle myositis. Binding of T cells to infected heart tissue was investigated during short-term cocultivation of lymphocytes with heart cryostat sections. T cells from infected mice and from normal controls bound equally to myocardium and liver sections from both infected and normal mice. A search in depth was attempted with cells heavily tagged with 99mTc. Labeled T cells from chagasic mice bound to both normal and infected myocardium slices. 99mTc-labeled T cells from controls gave the same binding values. Glass-adherent spleen cells behaved identically to T cells. Prior treatment of the tissue with serum from chronically infected mice did not increase the number of binding cells. Peritoneal macrophages tagged with 99mTc-sulfur colloid also bound to infected myocardium slices. The binding of macrophages was not changed by pretreatment of infected tissue with anti-T, cruzi antibodies. In short, this work did not detect any population of T cells or macrophages which could bind specifically to infected heart tissue to initiate an autoreactive process. Images PMID:2228230

  18. Transmission of Chagas Disease via Blood Transfusions in 2 Immunosuppressed Pigtailed Macaques (Macaca nemestrina)

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Derek L; Torrence, Annie E; Vogel, Keith W; Stockinger, Diane E; Nelson, Veronica; Murnane, Robert D; Baldessari, Audrey; Kuller, LaRene; Agy, Michael; Kiem, Hans-Peter; Hotchkiss, Charlotte E

    2014-01-01

    A 2.25-y-old male pigtailed macaque (Macaca nemestrina) was experimentally irradiated and received a bone marrow transplant. After transplantation and engraftment, the macaque had unexpected recurring pancytopenia and dependent edema of the prepuce, scrotum, and legs. The diagnostic work-up included a blood smear, which revealed a trypomastigote consistent with Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease (CD). We initially hypothesized that the macaque had acquired the infection when it lived in Georgia. However, because the animal had received multiple blood transfusions, all blood donors were screened for CD. One male pigtailed macaque blood donor, which was previously housed in Louisiana, was positive for T. cruzi antibodies via serology. Due to the low prevalence of infection in Georgia, the blood transfusion was hypothesized to be the source of T. cruzi infection. The transfusion was confirmed as the mechanism of transmission when screening of archived serum revealed seroconversion after blood transfusion from the seropositive blood donor. The macaque made a full clinical recovery, and further follow-up including thoracic radiography, echocardiography, and gross necropsy did not show any abnormalities associated with CD. Other animals that received blood transfusions from the positive blood donor were tested, and one additional pigtailed macaque on the same research protocol was positive for T. cruzi. Although CD has been reported to occur in many nonhuman primate species, especially pigtailed macaques, the transmission of CD via blood transfusion in nonhuman primates has not been reported previously. PMID:24512963

  19. Chagas infection transmission control: situation of transfusional transmission in Brazil and other countries of Latin America.

    PubMed

    Moraes-Souza, H

    1999-01-01

    The transmission of the transfusion-associated Chagas disease is an important mechanism of its dissemination in several Latin American countries. The transmission risk depends on five factors: prevalence of infection in blood donors, degree of serological coverage, sensibility of used tests, safety of obtained results and infection risk. The Southern Cone Iniciative set off by the Pan-American Health Organization, in 1991, is contributing to the implementation of blood law in each endemic country, and to reduce the risk of transfusional transmission of this horrible disease. Despite the clear improvement of Brasilian hemotherapy after 1980 (with the creation of the Blood National Program - Pró-Sangue) and the significant reduction of the chagasic infection among its blood donors; socio-economic, politic and cultural unlevels, prevent it from reaching the necessary universality and security. In order to assure both, the Brazilian Ministry of Health decided to restructure its blood system. In May, 1998, a great program was launched, to reach a specific goal: Blood - 100% with quality safety in all its process until 2003. It was divided in 12 projects, intends to guarantee the quality and self sufficiency in blood and hemoderivates.

  20. A Case of Possible Chagas Transmission by Blood Transfusion in Switzerland

    PubMed Central

    Ries, Judith; Komarek, Adriana; Gottschalk, Jochen; Brand, Birgit; Amsler, Lorenz; Jutzi, Markus; Frey, Beat M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Transfusion-transmitted Chagas disease has been reported from endemic countries in Latin America. Switzerland is a non-endemic country but high prevalence of antibodies against Trypanosoma cruzi was found among immigrants. Immigrants may participate in blood donation; therefore, risk-adapted anti-T. cruzi screening for blood donors was implemented in Switzerland in 2013. Methods Between January 2013 and July 2015, 1 out of 1,183 at-risk donors, tested at Blood Transfusion Service Zurich, was found anti-T. cruzi IgG-positive. Results and Conclusion Out of 54 donations given by the index donor (ID), we identified 77 blood products which were delivered to hospitals. Archived serum samples from the donations given during the prior 5 years were available for retrospective testing. All samples from ID revealed positive findings for anti-T. cruzi IgG. Donor-triggered look-back procedure identified a 70-year-old male recipient of a platelet concentrate (PC) donated by ID. The recipient succumbed of acute T. cruzi infection 2 years after transfusion of the PC. PMID:27994528

  1. Mortality profiles of Rhodnius prolixus (Heteroptera: Reduviidae), vector of Chagas disease.

    PubMed

    Chaves, Luis Fernando; Hernandez, Maria-Josefina; Revilla, Tomás A; Rodríguez, Diego J; Rabinovich, Jorge E

    2004-10-01

    Life table data of Rhodnius prolixus (Heteroptera: Reduviidae) kept at laboratory conditions were analysed in search for mortality patterns. Gompertz and Weibull mortality models seem adequate to explain the sigmoid shape of the survivorship curve. A significant fit was obtained with both models for females (R(2) = 0.70, P < 0.0005 for the Gompertz model; R(2) = 0.78, P < 0.0005 for the Weibull model) and for males (R(2) = 0.39, P < 0.0005 for the Gompertz model; R(2) = 0.48, P < 0.0005 for the Weibull model). The mortality parameter (b) is higher for females in Gompertz and Weibull models, using smoothed and non-smoothed data (P < 0.05), revealing a significant sex mortality differential. Given the particular life history of this insect, the non-linear relationship between the force of mortality and age may have an important impact in the vectorial capacity of R. prolixus as Chagas disease vector, and its consideration should be included as an important factor in the transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi by triatomines.

  2. Population structure of the Chagas disease vector, Triatoma infestans, at the urban-rural interface

    PubMed Central

    Foley, Erica A.; Khatchikian, Camilo E.; Hwang, Josephine; Ancca-Juárez, Jenny; Borrini-Mayori, Katty; Quıspe-Machaca, Victor R.; Levy, Michael Z.; Brisson, Dustin

    2013-01-01

    The increasing rate of biological invasions resulting from human transport or human-mediated changes to the environment have had devastating ecologic and public health consequences. The kissing bug, Triatoma infestans, has dispersed through the Peruvian city of Arequipa. The biological invasion of this insect has resulted in a public health crisis, putting thousands of residents of this city at risk of infection by Trypanosoma cruzi and subsequent development of Chagas disease. Here we show that populations of Tria. Infestans in geographically distinct districts within and around this urban center share a common recent evolutionary history although current gene flow is restricted even between proximal sites. The population structure among the Tria. Infestans in different districts is not correlated with the geographic distance between districts. These data suggest that migration among the districts is mediated by factors beyond the short-range migratory capabilities of Tria. Infestans and that human movement has played a significant role in the structuring of the Tria. Infestans population in the region. Rapid urbanization across southern South America will continue to create suitable environments for Tria. Infestans and knowledge of its urban dispersal patterns may play a fundamental role in mitigating human disease risk. PMID:24103030

  3. Trypanosoma cruzi culture used as vaccine to prevent chronic Chagas' disease in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Basombrío, M A; Besuschio, S

    1982-01-01

    The development of chronic pathology in mice at 2 to 10 months after inoculation of 10(2) T. cruzi trypomastigotes can be prevented by preimmunization with live, attenuated culture parasites (strain TCC). Swiss mice received one or three immunizing inoculations of 10(6) TCC organisms and were challenged with 10(2) Tulahuén blood trypomastigotes. Control groups received only the immunizing or the challenge inoculations. Immunized groups as compared with nonimmunized controls had lower mortality rates at 2 months postchallenge (9% versus 23%; P = 0.059), lower early peaks of parasitemia, lower percentages of positive xenodiagnoses at 5.5 months (40 versus 80%; P = 0.061), and lower incidences of tissue lesions in the skeletal muscle (P less than 0.005) at 2,6, and 10 months postchallenge. Tissue lesions in the heart and smooth muscle were also reduced, reaching statistical significance after 10 months (P less than 0.02). Chronic pathology parameters were never enhanced in preimmunized groups. In spite of the putative role that autoimmunity may play in the development of chronic chagasic lesions, the preventive effect of vaccination is readily exerted upon the chronic murine model of Chagas' disease. Images PMID:6804390

  4. Mortality Due to Chagas Disease in Brazil According to a Specific Cause

    PubMed Central

    da Nóbrega, Aglaêr Alves; de Araújo, Wildo Navegantes; Vasconcelos, Ana Maria Nogales

    2014-01-01

    A century after its discovery, Chagas disease (CD) is still considered a public health problem. Mortality caused by CD between 2000 and 2010 was described according to the specific underlying cause, year of occurrence, gender, age range, and region of Brazil. The standardized mortality rate decreased 32.4%, from 3.4% in 2000 to 2.3% in 2010. Most of the deaths (85.9%) occurred in male patients who were > 60 years of age caused by cardiac involvement. The mortality rate caused by cardiac involvement decreased in all regions of Brazil, except in the North region, where it increased by 1.6%. The Northeast had the smallest and the Central-West had the largest decrease. The mortality rate caused by a compromised digestive tract increased in all regions. Despite the control of transmission by vector and blood transfusions, CD should remain on the list of priority diseases for the public health service in Brazil, and surveillance actions cannot be interrupted. PMID:25002301

  5. Chagas disease vector control through different intervention modalities in endemic localities of Paraguay.

    PubMed Central

    Rojas de Arias, A.; Ferro, E. A.; Ferreira, M. E.; Simancas, L. C.

    1999-01-01

    In a field study carried out in three rural communities in Paraguay in a zone endemic for Chagas disease, we implemented three different vector control interventions--spraying, housing improvement, and a combination of spraying plus housing improvement--which effectively reduced the triatomine infestation. The reduction of triatomine infestation was 100% (47/47) in the combined intervention community, whereas in the community where housing improvement was carried out it was 96.4% (53/55). In the community where fumigation alone was used, the impact was 97.6% (40/41) in terms of domiciliary infestation. In all the houses where an intervention was made, an 18-month follow-up showed reinfestation rates of less than 10%. A serological survey of the population in the pre- and post-intervention periods revealed a shift in positive cases towards older age groups, but no significant differences were observed. The rate of seroconversion was 1.3% (three new cases) in the community with housing improvement only, but none of these cases could have resulted from vector transmission. The most cost-effective intervention was insecticide spraying, which during a 21-month follow-up period had a high impact on triatomine infestation and cost US$ 29 per house as opposed to US$ 700 per house for housing improvement. PMID:10327712

  6. Determinants of the domiciliary density of Triatoma infestans, vector of Chagas disease.

    PubMed

    Gürtler, R E; Cecere, M C; Rubel, D N; Schweigmann, N J

    1992-01-01

    In two heavily infested rural villages of Santiago del Estero, Argentina, where no indoor-spraying with residual insecticides had ever been carried out by official control services, we studied the influence of roof and wall structure, domestic use of insecticide, family size and the number of domestic dogs, on the domiciliary density of Triatoma infestans (Klug). Bug density was significantly associated with (1) the interaction between insecticide use and type of roof, (2) the structure of indoor walls, (3) the number of dogs sharing sleeping areas of people (room-mate dogs), and (4) the number of people plus room-mate dogs, but not with just the number of people resident in the house. The interaction between insecticide use and a roof made of 'simbol', a locally available grass (Pennisetum sp.), also reflected a younger age structure of domestic bug populations. In infested houses, the density of bugs infected with Trypanosoma cruzi Chagas was significantly correlated with overall bug density. Our data suggest that the application of environmental management measures by the affected people, such as plastering of walls and modification of roofs, coupled with keeping dogs away from bedrooms and application of insecticides, should limit the domestic population density of T. infestans and thus reduce the transmission of T. cruzi to people.

  7. Acute Chagas' disease (Trypanosomiasis americana) in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Oddó, D; Casanova, M; Acuña, G; Ballesteros, J; Morales, B

    1992-01-01

    Two heterosexual men, aged 31 and 40 years, with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and presenting with the acute form of Chagas' disease are reported. The first patient, a carrier of hemophilia A, was treated for 20 years with Chilean and Brazilian cryoprecipitates. This patient acquired both diseases through this medium. The second patient, an inhabitant of northern Chile (fourth region), was allegedly bitten by Triatoma infestans and was an intravenous drug addict. The hemophilic patient presented with a neurologic syndrome; a brain biopsy showed a necrotizing encephalitis with an obliterative angiitis and abundant macrophages. The second patient developed intractable congestive heart failure; necropsy showed a dilated myocarditis with rupture of myofibers and an inflammatory infiltrate rich in plasma cells, lymphocytes, and macrophages. Using light and electron microscopy, abundant amastigotes of Trypanosoma cruzi were seen in brain tissue, especially in the cytoplasm of macrophages, as well as in some myocardial fibers. In both cases, determination of anti-T cruzi antibodies (indirect hemagglutination technique) and xenodiagnosis were positive.

  8. A Deep Insight into the Sialome of Rhodnius neglectus, a Vector of Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Santiago, Paula Beatriz; Assumpção, Teresa C. F.; de Araújo, Carla Nunes; Bastos, Izabela Marques Dourado; Neves, David; da Silva, Ionizete Garcia; Charneau, Sébastien; Queiroz, Rayner Myr L.; Raiol, Tainá; Oliveira, João Victor de Araújo; de Sousa, Marcelo Valle; Calvo, Eric; Ribeiro, José M. C.; Santana, Jaime M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Triatomines are hematophagous insects that act as vectors of Chagas disease. Rhodnius neglectus is one of these kissing bugs found, contributing to the transmission of this American trypanosomiasis. The saliva of hematophagous arthropods contains bioactive molecules responsible for counteracting host haemostatic, inflammatory, and immune responses. Methods/Principal Findings Next generation sequencing and mass spectrometry-based protein identification were performed to investigate the content of triatomine R. neglectus saliva. We deposited 4,230 coding DNA sequences (CDS) in GenBank. A set of 636 CDS of proteins of putative secretory nature was extracted from the assembled reads, 73 of them confirmed by proteomic analysis. The sialome of R. neglectus was characterized and serine protease transcripts detected. The presence of ubiquitous protein families was revealed, including lipocalins, serine protease inhibitors, and antigen-5. Metalloproteases, disintegrins, and odorant binding protein families were less abundant. Conclusions/Significance The data presented improve our understanding of hematophagous arthropod sialomes, and aid in understanding hematophagy and the complex interplay among vectors and their vertebrate hosts. PMID:27129103

  9. [Description of chagas disease in the Valle de Iguala, Guerrero state, Mexico- Marco].

    PubMed

    Becerril-Flores, Marco Antonio; Valle-De La Cruz, Alfredo

    2003-01-01

    There are reports regarding the presence of triatomine vectors of Trypanosoma cruzi, the causal agent of Chagas' disease, and infected individuals on the coast and zones south of the State of Guerrero, Mexico. Nonetheless, there are no completed reports in the Valley of Iguala. To know with greater precision endemic zones, seropositive individuals and their health condition, T. cruzi-infected triatomines and characteristics of dwellings were studied. Seroprevalence was 1.8% by indirect ELISA and latex agglutination techniques were carried out in serum of 450 individuals of three municipalities of the Valley of Iguala. We reported presence of triatomine and conditions of dwellings. Of 71 triatomines collected, 38.2% were infected with T. cruzi. Triatoma pallidipennis was the only triatomine species found. No seropositive persons presented intestinal, or cardiac problems. The greatest percentage of infected triatomines was observed in rural zones as compared to urban. Results suggest considerable risk of infection in the Valley of Iguala but studies regarding the infectivity capacity of T. cruzi strains are required.

  10. Chagas Disease Control Programme in Brazil: a study of the effectiveness of 13 years of intervention.

    PubMed Central

    Costa, F. C.; Vitor, R. W.; Antunes, C. M.; Carneiro, M.

    1998-01-01

    Reported is an evaluation of 13 years of intervention by the Chagas Disease Control Programme in an endemic area (Montalvania) in the State of Minas Gerais, Brazil. The design used was an epidemiological panel study. The reduction of Trypanosoma cruzi infection rates was estimated from data collected on three separate occasions: a serological survey in 1975-80, a quasi-experimental study in 1987, and the present investigation. A random sample of 156 households was selected and blood samples were collected from 653 inhabitants. The data routinely collected by the control programme were analysed to correlate the results with the incidence of T. cruzi. The overall prevalence of infection was 2.3%; however, no participant under 14 years of age was found to have a positive serological test. The total reduction in T. cruzi infection rates in this area from the start of the programme's activities was estimated to be 83.5%. Cross-sectional comparisons for the age groups 2-6 years and 7-14 years indicated a 100% reduction in T. cruzi incidence rates; but cohort comparisons showed that 100% reduction was achieved only for the 2-6-years age group. PMID:9803589

  11. Intrusive versus domiciliated triatomines and the challenge of adapting vector control practices against Chagas disease

    PubMed Central

    Waleckx, Etienne; Gourbière, Sébastien; Dumonteil, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Chagas disease prevention remains mostly based on triatomine vector control to reduce or eliminate house infestation with these bugs. The level of adaptation of triatomines to human housing is a key part of vector competence and needs to be precisely evaluated to allow for the design of effective vector control strategies. In this review, we examine how the domiciliation/intrusion level of different triatomine species/populations has been defined and measured and discuss how these concepts may be improved for a better understanding of their ecology and evolution, as well as for the design of more effective control strategies against a large variety of triatomine species. We suggest that a major limitation of current criteria for classifying triatomines into sylvatic, intrusive, domiciliary and domestic species is that these are essentially qualitative and do not rely on quantitative variables measuring population sustainability and fitness in their different habitats. However, such assessments may be derived from further analysis and modelling of field data. Such approaches can shed new light on the domiciliation process of triatomines and may represent a key tool for decision-making and the design of vector control interventions. PMID:25993504

  12. Biomarkers of therapeutic responses in chronic Chagas disease: state of the art and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Pinazo, Maria-Jesus; Thomas, Maria-Carmen; Bustamante, Juan; de Almeida, Igor Correia; Lopez, Manuel-Carlos; Gascon, Joaquim

    2015-01-01

    The definition of a biomarker provided by the World Health Organization is any substance, structure, or process that can be measured in the body, or its products and influence, or predict the incidence or outcome of disease. Currently, the lack of prognosis and progression markers for chronic Chagas disease has posed limitations for testing new drugs to treat this neglected disease. Several molecules and techniques to detect biomarkers in Trypanosoma cruzi-infected patients have been proposed to assess whether specific treatment with benznidazole or nifurtimox is effective. Isolated proteins or protein groups from different T. cruzi stages and parasite-derived glycoproteins and synthetic neoglycoconjugates have been demonstrated to be useful for this purpose, as have nucleic acid amplification techniques. The amplification of T. cruzi DNA using the real-time polymerase chain reaction method is the leading test for assessing responses to treatment in a short period of time. Biochemical biomarkers have been tested early after specific treatment. Cytokines and surface markers represent promising molecules for the characterisation of host cellular responses, but need to be further assessed. PMID:25946151

  13. [Strategy for determining a baseline in areas of vector interruption for Chagas disease].

    PubMed

    Montenegro, Diego; Vera, Mauricio; Zuleta, Liliana; Llanos, Violeta; Junqueira, Angela

    2016-06-01

    Objectives Present a strategy to determine the baseline in endemic areas in the process of vector interruption for Chagas disease (CHD). Methods A social and environmental questionnaire and an entomological survey evaluated the physical conditions of dwellings, the inhabitants' knowledge of CHD, the entomological triatomine indicators and the statistical relationship among these variables. Results Colonization and natural infection with Trypanosoma cruzi exist in Rhodnius prolixus, the principal vector of CHD in Colombia. Colonization was related to palm-thatched houses constructed with adobe or wattle and daub. The Panstrongylus geniculatus vector was found to be colonizing. Almost 50% of the surveyed population associated the term CHD with human disease and 37%, with triatomines. Conclusions R. prolixus can be considered to be the principal vector of T. cruzi in domestic environments and the process of interruption is feasible within the prioritized municipality. New studies are needed to verify the existence of wild populations of R. prolixus that could affect future stages of the process and demonstrate whether P. geniculatus is a factor in the transmission of T. cruzi. These scenarios can be made viable by including the inhabitants throughout the process, since they have been highly sensitive in vector detection inside their houses. The study design presented here can be adapted to other endemic areas of the Region of the Americas.

  14. Proteasome inhibition for treatment of leishmaniasis, Chagas disease and sleeping sickness

    PubMed Central

    Khare, Shilpi; Nagle, Advait S.; Biggart, Agnes; Lai, Yin H.; Liang, Fang; Davis, Lauren C.; Barnes, S. Whitney; Mathison, Casey J. N.; Myburgh, Elmarie; Gao, Mu-Yun; Gillespie, J. Robert; Liu, Xianzhong; Tan, Jocelyn L.; Stinson, Monique; Rivera, Ianne C.; Ballard, Jaime; Yeh, Vince; Groessl, Todd; Federe, Glenn; Koh, Hazel X. Y.; Venable, John D.; Bursulaya, Badry; Shapiro, Michael; Mishra, Pranab K.; Spraggon, Glen; Brock, Ansgar; Mottram, Jeremy C.; Buckner, Frederick S.; Rao, Srinivasa P. S.; Wen, Ben G.; Walker, John R.; Tuntland, Tove; Molteni, Valentina; Glynne, Richard J.; Supek, Frantisek

    2016-01-01

    Chagas disease, leishmaniasis, and sleeping sickness affect 20 million people worldwide and lead to more than 50,000 deaths annually1. The diseases are caused by infection with the kinetoplastid parasites Trypanosoma cruzi, Leishmania spp. and Trypanosoma brucei spp., respectively. These parasites have similar biology and genomic sequence, suggesting that all three diseases could be cured with drug(s) modulating the activity of a conserved parasite target2. However, no such molecular targets or broad spectrum drugs have been identified to date. Here we describe a selective inhibitor of the kinetoplastid proteasome (GNF6702) with unprecedented in vivo efficacy, which cleared parasites from mice in all three models of infection. GNF6702 inhibits the kinetoplastid proteasome through a non-competitive mechanism, does not inhibit the mammalian proteasome or growth of mammalian cells, and is well-tolerated in mice. Our data provide genetic and chemical validation of the parasite proteasome as a promising therapeutic target for treatment of kinetoplastid infections, and underscore the possibility of developing a single class of drugs for these neglected diseases. PMID:27501246

  15. Reproductive and developmental costs of deltamethrin resistance in the Chagas disease vector Triatoma infestans.

    PubMed

    Germano, Mónica Daniela; Inés Picollo, María

    2015-06-01

    Effective chemical control relies on reducing vector population size. However, insecticide selection pressure is often associated with the development of resistant populations that reduce control success. In treated areas, these resistant individuals present an adaptive advantage due to enhanced survival. Resistance can also lead to negative effects when the insecticide pressure ceases. In this study, the biological effects of deltamethrin resistance were assessed in the Chagas disease vector Triatoma infestans. The length of each developmental stage and complete life cycle, mating rate, and fecundity were evaluated. Susceptible and resistant insects presented similar mating rates. A reproductive cost of resistance was expressed as a lower fecundity in the resistant colony. Developmental costs in the resistant colony were in the form of a shortening of the second and third nymph stage duration and an extension of the fifth stage. A maternal effect of deltamethrin resistance is suggested as these effects were identified in resistant females and their progeny independently of the mated male's deltamethrin response. Our results suggest the presence of pleiotropic effects of deltamethrin resistance. Possible associations of these characters to other traits such as developmental delays and behavioral resistance are discussed.

  16. Demographic effects of deltamethrin resistance in the Chagas disease vector Triatoma infestans.

    PubMed

    Germano, M D; Picollo, M I

    2016-12-01

    Triatoma infestans (Heteroptera: Reduviidae) Klug is the main vector of Chagas disease in Latin America. Resistance to deltamethrin was reported in Argentina and recently associated with reproductive and longevity trade-offs. The objectives of the present study were to describe the demographic consequences of deltamethrin resistance in T. infestans and to establish possible target stages for chemical control in susceptible and resistant colonies. A stage-classified matrix model was constructed based on the average stage length for susceptible, resistant and reciprocal matings' progeny. The differences between colonies were analysed by prospective and retrospective analysis. The life table parameters indicated reduced fecundity, fertility and population growth in resistant insects. The retrospective analysis suggested the latter was associated with lower reproductive output and increased fifth-instar nymph stage length. The prospective analysis suggested that the adult stage should be the main target for insecticide control. Although, fifth-instar nymphs should also be targeted when resistance has been detected. The presented results show demographic effects of deltamethrin resistance in T. infestans. While the older stages could be the main targets for chemical control, this approach is impeded by their higher tolerance to insecticides. It is concluded that the different mode of action insecticides would be more effective than a dose increase for the control of deltamethrin-resistant T. infestans.

  17. Increase of reactive oxygen species by desferrioxamine during experimental Chagas' disease

    PubMed Central

    Francisco, Amanda Fortes; de Abreu Vieira, Paula Melo; Arantes, Jerusa Marilda; Silva, Maisa; Pedrosa, Maria Lúcia; Elói-Santos, Silvana Maria; Martins-Filho, Olindo Assis; Teixeira-Carvalho, Andréa; Araújo, Márcio Sobreira Silva; Tafuri, Washington Luiz; Carneiro, Cláudia Martins

    2010-01-01

    Oxidative stress is common in inflammatory processes associated with many diseases including Chagas' disease. The aim of the present study was to evaluate, in a murine model, biomarkers of oxidative stress together with components of the antioxidant system in order to provide an overview of the mechanism of action of the iron chelator desferrioxamine (DFO). The study population comprised 48 male Swiss mice, half of which were treated daily by intraperitoneal injection of DFO over a 35-day period, while half were administered sterile water in a similar manner. On the 14th day of the experiment, 12 DFO-treated mice and an equal number of untreated mice were experimentally infected with Trypanosoma cruzi. Serum concentrations of nitric oxide and superoxide dismutase and hepatic levels of total glutathione, thiobarbituric acid reactive species and protein carbonyl, were determined on days 0, 7, 14 and 21 post-infection. The results obtained revealed that DFO enhances antioxidant activity in the host but also increases oxidative stress, indicating that the mode of action of the drug involves a positive contribution to the host together with an effect that is not beneficial to the parasite. PMID:20663295

  18. An innovative ecohealth intervention for Chagas disease vector control in Yucatan, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Waleckx, Etienne; Camara-Mejia, Javier; Ramirez-Sierra, Maria Jesus; Cruz-Chan, Vladimir; Rosado-Vallado, Miguel; Vazquez-Narvaez, Santos; Najera-Vazquez, Rosario; Gourbière, Sébastien; Dumonteil, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Background Non-domiciliated (intrusive) triatomine vectors remain a challenge for the sustainability of Chagas disease vector control as these triatomines are able to transiently (re-)infest houses. One of the best-characterized examples is Triatoma dimidiata from the Yucatan peninsula, Mexico, where adult insects seasonally infest houses between March and July. Methods We focused our study on three rural villages in the state of Yucatan, Mexico, in which we performed a situation analysis as a first step before the implementation of an ecohealth (ecosystem approach to health) vector control intervention. Results The identification of the key determinants affecting the transient invasion of human dwellings by T. dimidiata was performed by exploring associations between bug presence and qualitative and quantitative variables describing the ecological, biological and social context of the communities. We then used a participatory action research approach for implementation and evaluation of a control strategy based on window insect screens to reduce house infestation by T. dimidiata. Conclusions This ecohealth approach may represent a valuable alternative to vertically-organized insecticide spraying. Further evaluation may confirm that it is sustainable and provides effective control (in the sense of limiting infestation of human dwellings and vector/human contacts) of intrusive triatomines in the region. PMID:25604765

  19. Atlas of Mexican Triatominae (Reduviidae: Hemiptera) and vector transmission of Chagas disease

    PubMed Central

    Ramsey, Janine M; Peterson, A Townsend; Carmona-Castro, Oscar; Moo-Llanes, David A; Nakazawa, Yoshinori; Butrick, Morgan; Tun-Ku, Ezequiel; de la Cruz-Félix, Keynes; Ibarra-Cerdeña, Carlos N

    2015-01-01

    Chagas disease is one of the most important yet neglected parasitic diseases in Mexico and is transmitted by Triatominae. Nineteen of the 31 Mexican triatomine species have been consistently found to invade human houses and all have been found to be naturally infected with Trypanosoma cruzi. The present paper aims to produce a state-of-knowledge atlas of Mexican triatomines and analyse their geographic associations with T. cruzi, human demographics and landscape modification. Ecological niche models (ENMs) were constructed for the 19 species with more than 10 records in North America, as well as for T. cruzi. The 2010 Mexican national census and the 2007 National Forestry Inventory were used to analyse overlap patterns with ENMs. Niche breadth was greatest in species from the semiarid Nearctic Region, whereas species richness was associated with topographic heterogeneity in the Neotropical Region, particularly along the Pacific Coast. Three species, Triatoma longipennis, Triatoma mexicana and Triatoma barberi, overlapped with the greatest numbers of human communities, but these communities had the lowest rural/urban population ratios. Triatomine vectors have urbanised in most regions, demonstrating a high tolerance to human-modified habitats and broadened historical ranges, exposing more than 88% of the Mexican population and leaving few areas in Mexico without the potential for T. cruzi transmission. PMID:25993505

  20. Extract of Chaga mushroom (Inonotus obliquus) stimulates 3T3-L1 adipocyte differentiation.

    PubMed

    Joo, Jeong In; Kim, Dong Hyun; Yun, Jong Won

    2010-11-01

    Chaga mushroom (Inonotus obliquus) has long been used as a folk medicine due to its numerous biological functions such as antibacterial, antiallergic, antiinflammatory and antioxidative activities. In the present study, it was found that the I. obliquus hot water extract (IOWE) activated adipogenesis of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. Even in the absence of adipogenic stimuli by insulin, the IOWE strongly induced adipogenesis of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. The major constituent of IOWE was glucose-rich polysaccharides with a molecular mass of 149  kDa. IOWE enhanced the differentiation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes, increasing TG (triacylglycerol) accumulation that is critical for acquisition of the adipocyte phenotype, in a dose-dependent manner. IOWE stimulated gene expression of C/EBPα (CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein α) and PPARγ (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors γ) during adipocyte differentiation, and induced the expression of PPARγ target genes such as aP2 (adipocyte protein 2), LPL (lipoprotein lipase) and CD36 (fatty acid translocase). Immunoblot analysis revealed that IOWE increased the expression of adipogenic makers such as PPARγ and GLUT4 (glucose transporter 4). The luciferase reporter assay demonstrated that IOWE did not exhibit PPARγ ligand activity. Although these results require further investigation, the ability of natural mushroom product to increase PPARγ transcriptional activities may be expected to be therapeutic targets for dyslipidemia and type 2 diabetes.

  1. PREDICTIVE FACTORS FOR THE PROGRESSION OF CHRONIC CHAGAS CARDIOMYOPATHY IN PATIENTS WITHOUT LEFT VENTRICULAR DYSFUNCTION

    PubMed Central

    SILVA, Silvana de Araújo; GONTIJO, Eliane Dias; DIAS, João Carlos Pinto; ANDRADE, Camila Gomes de Souza; AMARAL, Carlos Faria Santos

    2015-01-01

    The identification of predictors for the progression of chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy (CCC) is essential to ensure adequate patient management. This study looked into a non-concurrent cohort of 165 CCC patients between 1985 and 2010 for independent predictors for CCC progression. The outcomes were worsening of the CCC scores and the onset of left ventricular dysfunction assessed by means of echo-Doppler cardiography. Patients were analyzed for social, demographic, epidemiologic, clinical and workup-related variables. A descriptive analysis was conducted, followed by survival curves based on univariate (Kaplan-Meier and Cox’s univariate model) and multivariate (Cox regression model) analysis. Patients were followed from two to 20 years (mean: 8.2). Their mean age was 44.8 years (20-77). Comparing both iterations of the study, in the second there was a statistically significant increase in the PR interval and in the QRS duration, despite a reduction in heart rates (Wilcoxon < 0.01). The predictors for CCC progression in the final regression model were male gender (HR = 2.81), Holter monitoring showing pauses equal to or greater than two seconds (HR = 3.02) increased cardiothoracic ratio (HR = 7.87) and time of use of digitalis (HR = 1.41). Patients with multiple predictive factors require stricter follow-up and treatment. PMID:25923895

  2. Barriers to Testing and Treatment for Chagas Disease among Latino Immigrants in Georgia

    PubMed Central

    Minneman, Rebecca M.; Hennink, Monique M.; Nicholls, Andrea; Salek, Sahar S.; Palomeque, Francisco S.; Khawja, Amina; Albor, Lauren C.; Pennock, Chester C.; Leon, Juan S.

    2012-01-01

    Background. The lack of testing and treatment of Chagas disease (CD), caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, amongst infected immigrants in the USA increases the risk of serious health complications and transmission (congenital or via blood transfusions). Goal. Our goal was to identify the barriers to testing and treatment of CD and understand the process of seeking healthcare amongst Latino immigrants in Georgia. Methods. In this qualitative study, eleven focus group discussions were conducted with 82 Latino immigrants, including migrant farm workers. Grounded theory was used to collect and analyze the data to develop an inductive conceptual framework to explain the context and process of seeking healthcare for CD amongst this at-risk population. Results. Participants were not aware of CD. Three healthcare seeking behaviors were identified: delaying treatment, using traditional remedies, and using either mainstream or alternative health providers. Behaviors and motivations differed by gender, and the use of licensed medical providers was considered a last resort due to the cost of healthcare, loss of earnings while seeking care, and fear of diagnosis with fatal illness. Discussion. Providing free or low cost services, mobile clinics, and education regarding CD is critical to increase testing and treatment of CD in the US. PMID:23326646

  3. Invasion speeds of Triatoma dimidiata, vector of Chagas disease: An application of orthogonal polynomials method.

    PubMed

    Mesk, Mohammed; Mahdjoub, Tewfik; Gourbière, Sébastien; Rabinovich, Jorge E; Menu, Frédéric

    2016-04-21

    Demographic processes and spatial dispersal of Triatoma dimidiata, a triatomine species vector of Chagas disease, are modeled by integrodifference equations to estimate invasion capacity of this species under different ecological conditions. The application of the theory of orthogonal polynomials and the steepest descent method applied to these equations, allow a good approximation of the abundance of the adult female population and the invasion speed. We show that: (1) under the same mean conditions of demography and dispersal, periodic spatial dispersal results in an invasion speed 2.5 times larger than the invasion speed when spatial dispersal is continuous; (2) when the invasion speed of periodic spatial dispersal is correlated to adverse demographic conditions, it is 34.7% higher as compared to a periodic dispersal that is correlated to good demographic conditions. From our results we conclude, in terms of triatomine population control, that the invasive success of T. dimidiata may be most sensitive to the probability of transition from juvenile to adult stage. We discuss our main theoretical predictions in the light of observed data in different triatomines species found in the literature.

  4. Population structure of the Chagas disease vector, Triatoma infestans, at the urban-rural interface.

    PubMed

    Foley, Erica A; Khatchikian, Camilo E; Hwang, Josephine; Ancca-Juárez, Jenny; Borrini-Mayori, Katty; Quıspe-Machaca, Victor R; Levy, Michael Z; Brisson, Dustin

    2013-10-01

    The increasing rate of biological invasions resulting from human transport or human-mediated changes to the environment has had devastating ecological and public health consequences. The kissing bug, Triatoma infestans, has dispersed through the Peruvian city of Arequipa. The biological invasion of this insect has resulted in a public health crisis, putting thousands of residents of this city at risk of infection by Trypanosoma cruzi and subsequent development of Chagas disease. Here, we show that populations of Tria. infestans in geographically distinct districts within and around this urban centre share a common recent evolutionary history although current gene flow is restricted even between proximal sites. The population structure among the Tria. infestans in different districts is not correlated with the geographical distance between districts. These data suggest that migration among the districts is mediated by factors beyond the short-range migratory capabilities of Tria. infestans and that human movement has played a significant role in the structuring of the Tria. infestans population in the region. Rapid urbanization across southern South America will continue to create suitable environments for Tria. infestans, and knowledge of its urban dispersal patterns may play a fundamental role in mitigating human disease risk.

  5. Population Structure of the Chagas Disease Vector Triatoma infestans in an Urban Environment

    PubMed Central

    Khatchikian, Camilo E.; Foley, Erica A.; Barbu, Corentin M.; Hwang, Josephine; Ancca-Juárez, Jenny; Borrini-Mayori, Katty; Quıspe-Machaca, Victor R.; Naquira, Cesar; Brisson, Dustin; Levy, Michael Z.

    2015-01-01

    Chagas disease is a vector-borne disease endemic in Latin America. Triatoma infestans, a common vector of this disease, has recently expanded its range into rapidly developing cities of Latin America. We aim to identify the environmental features that affect the colonization and dispersal of T. infestans in an urban environment. We amplified 13 commonly used microsatellites from 180 T. infestans samples collected from a sampled transect in the city of Arequipa, Peru, in 2007 and 2011. We assessed the clustering of subpopulations and the effect of distance, sampling year, and city block location on genetic distance among pairs of insects. Despite evidence of genetic similarity, the majority of city blocks are characterized by one dominant insect genotype, suggesting the existence of barriers to dispersal. Our analyses show that streets represent an important barrier to the colonization and dispersion of T. infestans in Arequipa. The genetic data describe a T. infestans infestation history characterized by persistent local dispersal and occasional long-distance migration events that partially parallels the history of urban development. PMID:25646757

  6. Population structure of the Chagas disease vector Triatoma infestans in an urban environment.

    PubMed

    Khatchikian, Camilo E; Foley, Erica A; Barbu, Corentin M; Hwang, Josephine; Ancca-Juárez, Jenny; Borrini-Mayori, Katty; Quıspe-Machaca, Victor R; Naquira, Cesar; Brisson, Dustin; Levy, Michael Z

    2015-02-01

    Chagas disease is a vector-borne disease endemic in Latin America. Triatoma infestans, a common vector of this disease, has recently expanded its range into rapidly developing cities of Latin America. We aim to identify the environmental features that affect the colonization and dispersal of T. infestans in an urban environment. We amplified 13 commonly used microsatellites from 180 T. infestans samples collected from a sampled transect in the city of Arequipa, Peru, in 2007 and 2011. We assessed the clustering of subpopulations and the effect of distance, sampling year, and city block location on genetic distance among pairs of insects. Despite evidence of genetic similarity, the majority of city blocks are characterized by one dominant insect genotype, suggesting the existence of barriers to dispersal. Our analyses show that streets represent an important barrier to the colonization and dispersion of T. infestans in Arequipa. The genetic data describe a T. infestans infestation history characterized by persistent local dispersal and occasional long-distance migration events that partially parallels the history of urban development.

  7. Sustainable vector control and management of Chagas disease in the Gran Chaco, Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Gürtler, Ricardo E.; Kitron, Uriel; Cecere, M. Carla; Segura, Elsa L.; Cohen, Joel E.

    2007-01-01

    Chagas disease remains a serious obstacle to health and economic development in Latin America, especially for the rural poor. We report the long-term effects of interventions in rural villages in northern Argentina during 1984–2006. Two community-wide campaigns of residual insecticide spraying immediately and strongly reduced domestic infestation and infection with Trypanosoma cruzi in Triatoma infestans bugs and dogs and more gradually reduced the seroprevalence of children <15 years of age. Because no effective surveillance and control actions followed the first campaign in 1985, transmission resurged in 2–3 years. Renewed interventions in 1992 followed by sustained, supervised, community-based vector control largely suppressed the reestablishment of domestic bug colonies and finally led to the interruption of local human T. cruzi transmission. Human incidence of infection was nearly an order of magnitude higher in peripheral rural areas under pulsed, unsupervised, community-based interventions, where human transmission became apparent in 2000. The sustained, supervised, community-based strategy nearly interrupted domestic transmission to dogs but did not eliminate T. infestans despite the absence of pyrethroid-insecticide resistance. T. infestans persisted in part because of the lack of major changes in housing construction and quality. Sustained community participation grew out of establishing a trusted relationship with the affected communities and the local schools. The process included health promotion and community mobilization, motivation, and supervision in close cooperation with locally nominated leaders. PMID:17913895

  8. Trypanosoma cruzi III from armadillos (Dasypus novemcinctus novemcinctus) from Northeastern Venezuela and its biological behavior in murine model. Risk of emergency of Chagas' disease.

    PubMed

    Morocoima, Antonio; Carrasco, Hernán J; Boadas, Johanna; Chique, José David; Herrera, Leidi; Urdaneta-Morales, Servio

    2012-11-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, etiological agent of Chagas' disease, was isolated from armadillos (Dasypus novemcinctus novemcinctus) captured in rural communities Northeastern Venezuela from Nueva Esparta State (no endemic for Chagas' disease), Monagas and Anzoátegui States (endemics). The isolates, genetically typed by PCR-RFLP as belonging to the TcIII DTU, have demonstrated in murine model heterogenic parasitemia, mortality and histotropism with marked parasitism in cardiac, skeletal, and smooth myocytes that showed correlation with lymphobasophilic inflammatory infiltrates. Our finding of T. cruzi infected armadillos in Isla Margarita (Nueva Esparta State), together with reports of triatomine vectors in this region, the accentuated synanthropy of armadillos, intense economic activity, migration due to tourism and the lack of environmental education programs all of them represent risks that could cause the emergence of Chagas' disease in this area. This is the first report of the TcIII DTU in Northeastern Venezuela, thus widening the geographic distribution of this DTU.

  9. Reactivation of Chagas Disease in a Patient With Follicular Lymphoma Diagnosed by Means of Quantitative Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Garzón, Maria I.; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Goy, Maria C.; Alvarellos, Teresita; Zarate, Abel H.; Basquiera, Ana L.; Garcia, Juan J.; Caeiro, Juan P.

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of Chagas disease reactivation in a patient with stage IIb follicular lymphoma in the cecum. He was admitted to the hospital with neutropenia and fever. He had a history of right hemicolectomy 6 months earlier and had received the sixth cycle of chemotherapy with cyclophosphamide/doxorubicin/vincristine/prednisone/rituximab. Blood and urine cultures were negative, but the fever persisted. Reactivation of Chagas disease was confirmed by means of quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Parasitic load was 577 950 parasite equivalents/mL. The patient began treatment with benznidazole 5 mg/k per day every 12 hours. After 1 month, the qRT-PCR control was undetectable. The patient completed 60 days of treatment and is currently asymptomatic. Trypanosoma cruzi qRT-PCR may become a useful diagnostic method for reactivation of Chagas disease. PMID:26180822

  10. Use of a Chagas Urine Nanoparticle Test (Chunap) to Correlate with Parasitemia Levels in T. cruzi/HIV Co-infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Castro-Sesquen, Yagahira E.; Gilman, Robert H.; Mejia, Carolina; Clark, Daniel E.; Choi, Jeong; Reimer-McAtee, Melissa J.; Castro, Rosario; Valencia-Ayala, Edward; Flores, Jorge; Bowman, Natalie; Castillo-Neyra, Ricardo; Torrico, Faustino; Liotta, Lance; Bern, Caryn; Luchini, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    Background Early diagnosis of reactivated Chagas disease in HIV patients could be lifesaving. In Latin America, the diagnosis is made by microscopical detection of the T. cruzi parasite in the blood; a diagnostic test that lacks sensitivity. This study evaluates if levels of T. cruzi antigens in urine, determined by Chunap (Chagas urine nanoparticle test), are correlated with parasitemia levels in T. cruzi/HIV co-infected patients. Methodology/Principal Findings T. cruzi antigens in urine of HIV patients (N = 55: 31 T. cruzi infected and 24 T. cruzi serology negative) were concentrated using hydrogel particles and quantified by Western Blot and a calibration curve. Reactivation of Chagas disease was defined by the observation of parasites in blood by microscopy. Parasitemia levels in patients with serology positive for Chagas disease were classified as follows: High parasitemia or reactivation of Chagas disease (detectable parasitemia by microscopy), moderate parasitemia (undetectable by microscopy but detectable by qPCR), and negative parasitemia (undetectable by microscopy and qPCR). The percentage of positive results detected by Chunap was: 100% (7/7) in cases of reactivation, 91.7% (11/12) in cases of moderate parasitemia, and 41.7% (5/12) in cases of negative parasitemia. Chunap specificity was found to be 91.7%. Linear regression analysis demonstrated a direct relationship between parasitemia levels and urine T. cruzi antigen concentrations (p<0.001). A cut-off of > 105 pg was chosen to determine patients with reactivation of Chagas disease (7/7). Antigenuria levels were 36.08 times (95% CI: 7.28 to 64.88) higher in patients with CD4+ lymphocyte counts below 200/mL (p = 0.016). No significant differences were found in HIV loads and CD8+ lymphocyte counts. Conclusion Chunap shows potential for early detection of Chagas reactivation. With appropriate adaptation, this diagnostic test can be used to monitor Chagas disease status in T. cruzi/HIV co

  11. Innovative community-based ecosystem management for dengue and Chagas disease prevention in low and middle income countries in Latin America and the Caribbean.

    PubMed

    Finkelman, Jacobo

    2015-02-01

    In 2009, the WHO Special Programme for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases (TDR) and the International Development Research Centre (IDRC) launched a call for innovative community-based ecosystem management research projects for dengue and Chagas disease prevention in low and middle income countries in Latin America and the Caribbean. Eight research institutions were selected. The outputs of these projects led to a better understanding of the interaction between ecological, biological, social and economic (eco-bio-social) determinants of dengue and Chagas disease in Latin America and the Caribbean. Both diseases are considered highly relevant in the regional health agendas.

  12. Challenges in the chemotherapy of Chagas disease: Looking for possibilities related to the differences and similarities between the parasite and host

    PubMed Central

    Sueth-Santiago, Vitor; Decote-Ricardo, Debora; Morrot, Alexandre; Freire-de-Lima, Celio Geraldo; Lima, Marco Edilson Freire

    2017-01-01

    Almost 110 years after the first studies by Dr. Carlos Chagas describing an infectious disease that was named for him, Chagas disease remains a neglected illness and a death sentence for infected people in poor countries. This short review highlights the enormous need for new studies aimed at the development of novel and more specific drugs to treat chagasic patients. The primary tool for facing this challenge is deep knowledge about the similarities and differences between the parasite and its human host. PMID:28289519

  13. Presence of Antigen-Experienced T Cells with Low Grade of Differentiation and Proliferative Potential in Chronic Chagas Disease Myocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Cabeza-Meckert, Patricia; Viotti, Rodolfo; Garelli, Fernando; Favaloro, Liliana E.; Favaloro, Roberto R.; Laguens, Rubén; Laucella, Susana A.

    2014-01-01

    Background The main consequence of chronic Trypanosoma cruzi infection is the development of myocarditis in approximately 20–30% of infected individuals but not until 10–20 years after the initial infection. We have previously shown that circulating interferon-γ-secreting T cells responsive to Trypanosoma cruzi antigens in chronic Chagas disease patients display a low grade of differentiation and the frequency of these T lymphocytes decreases along with the severity of heart disease. This study thought to explore the expression of inhibitory receptors, transcription factors of type 1 or regulatory T cells, and markers of T cell differentiation, immunosenescence or active cell cycle in cardiac explants from patients with advanced Chagas disease myocarditis. Methodology/Principal Findings The expression of different markers for T and B cells as well as for macrophages was evaluated by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence techniques in cardiac explants from patients with advanced chronic Chagas disease submitted to heart transplantation. Most infiltrating cells displayed markers of antigen-experienced T cells (CD3+, CD4+, CD8+, CD45RO+) with a low grade of differentiation (CD27+, CD57−, CD45RA−, PD-1−). A skewed T helper1/T cytotoxic 1 profile was supported by the expression of T-bet; whereas FOXP3+ cells were scarce and located only in areas of severe myocarditis. In addition, a significant proliferative capacity of CD3+ T cells, assessed by Ki67 staining, was found. Conclusions/Significance The quality of T cell responses and immunoregulatory mechanisms might determine the pattern of the cellular response and the severity of disease in chronic Trypanosoma cruzi infection. PMID:25144227

  14. Differential Expression of Matrix Metalloproteinases 2, 9 and Cytokines by Neutrophils and Monocytes in the Clinical Forms of Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Medeiros, Nayara I.; Fares, Rafaelle C. G.; Franco, Eliza P.; Sousa, Giovane R.; Mattos, Rafael T.; Chaves, Ana T.; Nunes, Maria do Carmo P.; Dutra, Walderez O.; Correa-Oliveira, Rodrigo; Rocha, Manoel O. C.; Gomes, Juliana A. S.

    2017-01-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy, the most severe manifestation in chronic phase of Chagas disease, affects about 30% of patients and is characterized by myocardial dysfunction and interstitial fibrosis due to extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling. ECM remodeling is regulated by proteolytic enzymes such as matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and cytokines produced by immune cells, including phagocytes. We evaluated by flow cytometry the expression of MMP-2, MMP-9, IL-1β, TNF-α, TGF-β and IL-10 by neutrophils and monocytes from patients with indeterminate (IND) and cardiac (CARD) clinical forms of Chagas disease and non-infected individuals (NI), before and after in vitro stimulation with Trypanosoma cruzi antigens. Our results showed an important contribution of neutrophils for MMPs production, while monocytes seemed to be involved in cytokine production. The results showed that neutrophils and monocytes from IND and CARD patients had higher intracellular levels of MMP-2 and MMP-9 than NI individuals. On the other hand, T. cruzi derived-antigens promote a differential expression of MMP-2 and MMP-9 in patients with Chagas disease and may regulate MMPs expression in neutrophils and monocytes, mainly when a cardiac alteration is not present. Our data also showed that in the presence of T. cruzi derived-antigens the production of cytokines by neutrophils and monocytes, but mainly by monocytes, may be intensified. Correlation analysis demonstrated that MMP-2 had a positive correlation with IL-10 and a negative correlation with IL-1β, whereas MMP-9 showed a negative correlation with IL-10. We also observed that IND patients presented a greater percentage of high producer cells of regulatory molecules when compared to CARD patients, indicating a different pattern in the immune response. Our data suggest that MMPs and cytokines produced by neutrophils and monocytes are important contributors for cardiac remodeling and may be an interesting target for new biomarker research. PMID

  15. Differential Expression of Matrix Metalloproteinases 2, 9 and Cytokines by Neutrophils and Monocytes in the Clinical Forms of Chagas Disease.

    PubMed

    Medeiros, Nayara I; Fares, Rafaelle C G; Franco, Eliza P; Sousa, Giovane R; Mattos, Rafael T; Chaves, Ana T; Nunes, Maria do Carmo P; Dutra, Walderez O; Correa-Oliveira, Rodrigo; Rocha, Manoel O C; Gomes, Juliana A S

    2017-01-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy, the most severe manifestation in chronic phase of Chagas disease, affects about 30% of patients and is characterized by myocardial dysfunction and interstitial fibrosis due to extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling. ECM remodeling is regulated by proteolytic enzymes such as matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and cytokines produced by immune cells, including phagocytes. We evaluated by flow cytometry the expression of MMP-2, MMP-9, IL-1β, TNF-α, TGF-β and IL-10 by neutrophils and monocytes from patients with indeterminate (IND) and cardiac (CARD) clinical forms of Chagas disease and non-infected individuals (NI), before and after in vitro stimulation with Trypanosoma cruzi antigens. Our results showed an important contribution of neutrophils for MMPs production, while monocytes seemed to be involved in cytokine production. The results showed that neutrophils and monocytes from IND and CARD patients had higher intracellular levels of MMP-2 and MMP-9 than NI individuals. On the other hand, T. cruzi derived-antigens promote a differential expression of MMP-2 and MMP-9 in patients with Chagas disease and may regulate MMPs expression in neutrophils and monocytes, mainly when a cardiac alteration is not present. Our data also showed that in the presence of T. cruzi derived-antigens the production of cytokines by neutrophils and monocytes, but mainly by monocytes, may be intensified. Correlation analysis demonstrated that MMP-2 had a positive correlation with IL-10 and a negative correlation with IL-1β, whereas MMP-9 showed a negative correlation with IL-10. We also observed that IND patients presented a greater percentage of high producer cells of regulatory molecules when compared to CARD patients, indicating a different pattern in the immune response. Our data suggest that MMPs and cytokines produced by neutrophils and monocytes are important contributors for cardiac remodeling and may be an interesting target for new biomarker research.

  16. ECG Manifestations of the Biggest Outbreak of Chagas Disease due to Oral Infection in Latin-America

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Juan; Mendoza, Iván; Noya, Belkisyolé; Acquatella, Harry; Palacios, Igor; Marques-Mejias, María

    2013-01-01

    Background Chagas disease affects more than 15 million people worldwide. Although vector-borne transmission has decreased, oral transmission has become important. Recently, our group published the clinical and epidemiological characteristics of the largest outbreak of orally transmitted Chagas disease reported till date. Objective: To describe electrocardiographic changes occurring in the study population during the outbreak caused by ingestion of contaminated guava juice. Methods We evaluated 103 positive cases, of which 76 (74%) were aged ≤ 18 years (average age: 9.1 ± 3.1 years) and 27 (26%) were aged > 18 years (average age: 46 ± 11.8 years). All patients underwent clinical evaluations and ECG. If the patients had palpitations or evident alterations of rhythm at baseline, ambulatory ECG monitoring was performed. Results A total of 68 cases (66%; 53 children and 15 adults) had ECG abnormalities. Further, 69.7% (53/76) of those aged ≤ 18 years and 56% (15/27) of those aged >18 years showed some ECG alteration (p = ns). ST-T abnormalities were observed in 37.86% cases (39/103) and arrhythmias were evident in 28.16% cases (29/103). ST alterations occurred in 72% of those aged ≤18 years compared with 19% of th ose aged >18 years (p < 0.0001). Conclusion This study reports the largest number of cases in the same outbreak of acute Chagas disease caused by oral contamination, with recorded ECGs. ECG changes suggestive of acute myocarditis and arrhythmias were the most frequent abnormalities found. PMID:23887736

  17. Oral Outbreak of Chagas Disease in Santa Catarina, Brazil: Experimental Evaluation of a Patient’s Strain

    PubMed Central

    Domingues, Carolina S.; Hardoim, Daiana J.; Souza, Celeste S. F.; Cardoso, Flávia O.; Mendes, Verônica G.; Previtalli-Silva, Henrique; Abreu-Silva, Ana L.; Pelajo-Machado, Marcelo; Gonçalves da Costa, Sylvio Celso; Calabrese, Kátia S.

    2015-01-01

    Chagas disease is a worldwide public health problem. Although the vectorial transmission of Chagas disease has been controlled in Brazil there are other ways of transmission, such as the ingestion of T. cruzi contaminated food, which ensures the continuation of this zoonosis. Here, we demonstrate the influence of the inoculation route on the establishment and development of the SC2005 T. cruzi strain infection in mice. Groups of Swiss mice were infected intragastrically (IG) or intraperitoneally (IP) with the T. cruzi SC2005 strain derived from an outbreak of oral Chagas disease. The results revealed that 100% of IP infected mice showed parasitemia, while just 36% of IG infected showed the presence of the parasite in blood. The parasitemia peaks were later and less intense in the IG infected mice. Mortality of the IP infected animals was more intense and earlier when compared to the IG infected mice. In the IP infected mice leucopenia occurred in the early infection followed by leucocytosis, correlating positively with the increase of the parasites. However, in the IG infected mice only an increase in monocytes was observed, which was positively correlated with the increase of the parasites. Histopathological analyses revealed a myotropic pattern of the SC2005 strain with the presence of inflammatory infiltrates and parasites in different organs of the animals infected by both routes as well as fibrosis foci and collagen redistribution. The flow cytometric analysis demonstrated a fluctuation of the T lymphocyte population in the blood, spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes of the infected animals. T. cruzi DNA associated with the presence of inflammatory infiltrates was detected by PCR in the esophagus, stomach and intestine of all infected mice. These findings are important for the understanding of the pathogenesis of T. cruzi infection by both inoculation routes. PMID:26469517

  18. Mining SNPs in extracellular vesicular transcriptome of Trypanosoma cruzi: a step closer to early diagnosis of neglected Chagas disease

    PubMed Central

    Chaturvedi, Anoop

    2016-01-01

    One of the newest and strongest members of intercellular communicators, the Extracellular vesicles (EVs) and their enclosed RNAs; Extracellular RNAs (exRNAs) have been acknowledged as putative biomarkers and therapeutic targets for various diseases. Although a very deep insight has not been possible into the physiology of these vesicles, they are believed to be involved in cell-to-cell communication and host-pathogen interactions. EVs might be significantly helpful in discovering biomarkers for possible target identification as well as prognostics, diagnostics and developing vaccines. In recent studies, highly bioactive EVs have drawn attention of parasitologists for being able to communicate between different cells and having likeliness of reflecting both source and target environments. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) has eased the way to have a deeper insight into these vesicles and their roles in various diseases. This article arises from bioinformatics-based analysis and predictive data mining of transcriptomic (RNA-Seq) data of EVs, derived from different life stages of Trypanosoma cruzi; a causing agent of neglected Chagas disease. Variants (Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs)) were mined from Extracellular vesicular transcriptomic data and functionally analyzed using different bioinformatics based approaches. Functional analysis showed the association of these variants with various important factors like Trans-Sialidase (TS), Alpha Tubulin, P-Type H+-ATPase, etc. which, in turn, are associated with disease in different ways. Some of the ‘candidate SNPs’ were found to be stage-specific, which strengthens the probability of finding stage-specific biomarkers. These results may lead to a better understanding of Chagas disease, and improved knowledge may provide further development of the biomarkers for prognosis, diagnosis and drug development for treating Chagas disease. PMID:27904804

  19. Analysis of Children's Perception of Triatomine Vectors of Chagas Disease through Drawings: Opportunities for Targeted Health Education

    PubMed Central

    Yevstigneyeva, Violetta; Camara-Mejia, Javier; Dumonteil, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Background Chagas disease is a tropical parasitic disease affecting about 10 million people, mostly in the Americas, and transmitted mainly by triatomine bugs. Insect vector control with indoor residual insecticides and the promotion of housing improvement is the main control intervention. The success of such interventions relies on their acceptance and appropriation by communities, which depends on their knowledge and perceptions of both the disease and the vector. In this study, we investigated school-aged children's knowledge and perception on triatomine vectors and Chagas disease to further understand how communities view this vector and the disease in Yucatan, Mexico. Methodology/Principal findings We performed an analysis of children's drawings on the theme of triatomines and their house in several rural villages, to explore in an open-ended manner their views, understanding and misconceptions. A total of 261 drawings were collected from children ages 6–12 from four villages. We found that children are very familiar with triatomine vectors, and know very well many aspects of their biology and ecology, and in particular their blood-feeding habits. On the other hand, their drawings suggest that the role of triatomines as vectors of a chronic and severe cardiac disease is less understood, and the main perceived health threat appears limited to the bite itself, as previously observed in adults. Conclusions/Significance These results have important implications for the specific design of future education materials and campaigns, and for the promotion of the inclusion of children in raising Chagas disease awareness in these endemic communities. PMID:25275321

  20. First Report of Aprostocetus asthenogmus (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae) in South America and Parasitizing Eggs of Triatominae Vectors of Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Claudiney Biral; Leite, Gustavo Rocha; Ferreira, Adelson Luiz; Rocha, Leonardo de Souza; Falqueto, Aloísio

    2014-01-01

    We report for the first time the parasitism of eggs of two triatomine Chagas disease vectors, Triatoma infestans and T. vitticeps, by the microhymenopterous parasitoid Aprostocetus asthenogmus. We also describe the first identification of this parasitoid in South America. A. asthenogmus were captured near unparasitized triatomine colonies in the municipality of Vitória, state of Espírito Santo, Brazil, and placed into pots with recently laid triatomine eggs. After 24 days, we observed wasps emerging from T. infestans and T. vitticeps eggs. Several characteristics of this parasitoid species suggest that it could be a potential biological control agent of triatomine species. PMID:24575298

  1. Experimental chemotherapy with combinations of ergosterol biosynthesis inhibitors in murine models of Chagas' disease.

    PubMed Central

    Maldonado, R A; Molina, J; Payares, G; Urbina, J A

    1993-01-01

    We report the effects of ketoconazole and the bistriazole ICI 195,739 acting alone or in combination with the allylamine terbinafine (Lamisil) on murine models of Chagas' disease. Mice infected with 10(5) Trypanosoma (Schizotrypanum) cruzi blood trypomastigotes and treated orally with 30 mg of ketoconazole per kg of body weight per day for 7 days, starting at 24 h postinoculation, had 100% survival after 35 days, while controls (untreated) or animals that received 15 mg of ketoconazole or 100 mg of terbinafine per kg/day by the same route had 0% survival after the same period of time. However, all mice receiving the combination of 15 mg of ketoconazole plus 100 mg of terbinafine per kg/day survived for 35 days after infection; it was shown that the survival of the animals treated with this combination was statistically greater than that obtained with either drug acting alone and was indistinguishable from that observed with the high doses of ketoconazole, indicating a synergistic action of the drugs in vivo. However, most animals that survived after the 7-day treatments were not cured, as indicated by a delayed but persistent parasitemia. When the treatment was extended to 14 days, 100% survival was obtained 10 weeks after inoculation for mice treated with 30 mg of ketoconazole per kg/day and the combination of 15 mg of ketoconazole per kg/day plus 100 mg of terbinafine per kg/day, while two-thirds of the mice treated with 15 mg of ketoconazole per kg/day alone were alive after the 14-day treatment; controls or animals that received 100 mg of terbinafine per kg/day did not survive after 25 days. Parasitemia in all surviving mice was negative after 55 days but parasitological cure, as assessed by subinoculation of organs in naive animals, was predominant only in animals that received the combined drug treatment. We also investigated the bistriazole ICI 195,739 and found, as reported previously, that just 1 mg of the compound per kg/day administered orally for 5 days

  2. Cost-Effectiveness of Chagas Disease Vector Control Strategies in Northwestern Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Vazquez-Prokopec, Gonzalo M.; Spillmann, Cynthia; Zaidenberg, Mario; Kitron, Uriel; Gürtler, Ricardo E.

    2009-01-01

    Background Control and prevention of Chagas disease rely mostly on residual spraying of insecticides. In Argentina, vector control shifted from a vertical to a fully horizontal strategy based on community participation between 1992 and 2004. The effects of such strategy on Triatoma infestans, the main domestic vector, and on disease transmission have not been assessed. Methods and Findings Based on retrospective (1993–2004) records from the Argentinean Ministry of Health for the Moreno Department, Northwestern Argentina, we performed a cost-effectiveness (CE) analysis and compared the observed CE of the fully horizontal vector control strategy with the expected CE for a vertical or a mixed (i.e., vertical attack phase followed by horizontal surveillance) strategy. Total direct costs (in 2004 US$) of the horizontal and mixed strategies were, respectively, 3.3 and 1.7 times lower than the costs of the vertical strategy, due to reductions in personnel costs. The estimated CE ratios for the vertical, mixed and horizontal strategies were US$132, US$82 and US$45 per averted human case, respectively. When per diems were excluded from the costs (i.e., simulating the decentralization of control activities), the CE of vertical, mixed and horizontal strategies was reduced to US$60, US$42 and US$32 per averted case, respectively. Conclusions and Significance The mixed strategy would have averted between 1.6 and 4.0 times more human cases than the fully horizontal strategy, and would have been the most cost-effective option to interrupt parasite transmission in the Department. In rural and dispersed areas where waning vertical vector programs cannot accomplish full insecticide coverage, alternative strategies need to be developed. If properly implemented, community participation represents not only the most appealing but also the most cost-effective alternative to accomplish such objectives. PMID:19156190

  3. Physiopathology of Chagas' heart disease: correlations between clinical and experimental findings*

    PubMed Central

    Anselmi, Alfonso; Moleiro, Federico

    1971-01-01

    In penetrating the heart and developing in it, Trypanosoma cruzi produces an immunoallergic reaction that leads to changes in the histological structure of the myocardium; these changes alter the fundamental properties of the heart, causing fundamental dynamic disorders and morphological changes in the organ. In Chagas' cardiomyopathy, the velocity of impulse propagation diminishes in the auricular and ventricular musculature, altering the activation mechanism, this being shown by changes in the P-wave and in ventricular focal blocks. The functional refractory period (FRP) is shortened in the auricular and ventricular tissue and constitutes, together with changes in conductivity, the physiopathological basis that explains the circus movement—the fundamental factor of the arrhythmias of this stage of the disease. Localization of the inflammation in the A-V conduction system increases the duration of the FRP, producing all types of A-V block. The oedema and the cellular interstitial infiltration seen during this acute phase reduce the distensibility of the fibres; this, in turn, limits their contractility, producing a decrease in systolic volume and an increase in the final diastolic pressure in the chambers of the heart—fundamental factors in reducing kinesia and in increasing the heart's volume. In the chronic phase, destruction of the contractile tissue and fibroblastic proliferation bring into play compensatory mechanisms that maintain the strength of cardiac contractions; the elongation of the fibres and the nature of the dynamic pressure—volume curves explain the dilatation of the chambers of the heart and the dynamic changes seen in this phase of the disease. PMID:5003721

  4. Assessment of Autonomic Function by Phase Rectification of RRInterval Histogram Analysis in Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nasari-Junior, Olivassé; Benchimol-Barbosa, Paulo Roberto; Pedrosa, Roberto Coury; Nadal, Jurandir

    2015-01-01

    Background In chronic Chagas disease (ChD), impairment of cardiac autonomic function bears prognostic implications. Phase‑rectification of RR-interval series isolates the sympathetic, acceleration phase (AC) and parasympathetic, deceleration phase (DC) influences on cardiac autonomic modulation. Objective This study investigated heart rate variability (HRV) as a function of RR-interval to assess autonomic function in healthy and ChD subjects. Methods Control (n = 20) and ChD (n = 20) groups were studied. All underwent 60-min head-up tilt table test under ECG recording. Histogram of RR-interval series was calculated, with 100 ms class, ranging from 600–1100 ms. In each class, mean RR-intervals (MNN) and root-mean-squared difference (RMSNN) of consecutive normal RR-intervals that suited a particular class were calculated. Average of all RMSNN values in each class was analyzed as function of MNN, in the whole series (RMSNNT), and in AC (RMSNNAC) and DC (RMSNNDC) phases. Slopes of linear regression lines were compared between groups using Student t-test. Correlation coefficients were tested before comparisons. RMSNN was log-transformed. (α < 0.05). Results Correlation coefficient was significant in all regressions (p < 0.05). In the control group, RMSNNT, RMSNNAC, and RMSNNDC significantly increased linearly with MNN (p < 0.05). In ChD, only RMSNNAC showed significant increase as a function of MNN, whereas RMSNNT and RMSNNDC did not. Conclusion HRV increases in proportion with the RR-interval in healthy subjects. This behavior is lost in ChD, particularly in the DC phase, indicating cardiac vagal incompetence. PMID:26131700

  5. Evolutionary and dispersal history of Triatoma infestans, main vector of Chagas disease, by chromosomal markers.

    PubMed

    Panzera, Francisco; Ferreiro, María J; Pita, Sebastián; Calleros, Lucía; Pérez, Ruben; Basmadjián, Yester; Guevara, Yenny; Brenière, Simone Frédérique; Panzera, Yanina

    2014-10-01

    Chagas disease, one of the most important vector-borne diseases in the Americas, is caused by Trypanosoma cruzi and transmitted to humans by insects of the subfamily Triatominae. An effective control of this disease depends on elimination of vectors through spraying with insecticides. Genetic research can help insect control programs by identifying and characterizing vector populations. In southern Latin America, Triatoma infestans is the main vector and presents two distinct lineages, known as Andean and non-Andean chromosomal groups, that are highly differentiated by the amount of heterochromatin and genome size. Analyses with nuclear and mitochondrial sequences are not conclusive about resolving the origin and spread of T. infestans. The present paper includes the analyses of karyotypes, heterochromatin distribution and chromosomal mapping of the major ribosomal cluster (45S rDNA) to specimens throughout the distribution range of this species, including pyrethroid-resistant populations. A total of 417 specimens from seven different countries were analyzed. We show an unusual wide rDNA variability related to number and chromosomal position of the ribosomal genes, never before reported in species with holocentric chromosomes. Considering the chromosomal groups previously described, the ribosomal patterns are associated with a particular geographic distribution. Our results reveal that the differentiation process between both T. infestans chromosomal groups has involved significant genomic reorganization of essential coding sequences, besides the changes in heterochromatin and genomic size previously reported. The chromosomal markers also allowed us to detect the existence of a hybrid zone occupied by individuals derived from crosses between both chromosomal groups. Our genetic studies support the hypothesis of an Andean origin for T. infestans, and suggest that pyrethroid-resistant populations from the Argentinean-Bolivian border are most likely the result of

  6. Baroreflex Sensitivity and its Association with Arrhythmic Events in Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Astrid Meireles; Scanavacca, Mauricio Ibrahim; Darrieux, Francisco; Ianni, Bárbara; de Melo, Sissy Lara; Pisani, Cristiano; Santos Neto, Francisco; Sosa, Eduardo; Hachul, Denise Tessariol

    2014-01-01

    Background Sudden death is the leading cause of death in Chagas disease (CD), even in patients with preserved ejection fraction (EF), suggesting that destabilizing factors of the arrhythmogenic substrate (autonomic modulation) contribute to its occurrence. Objective To determine baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) in patients with undetermined CD (GI), arrhythmogenic CD with nonsustained ventricular tachycardia (NSVT) (GII) and CD with spontaneous sustained ventricular tachycardia (STV) (GIII), to evaluate its association with the occurrence and complexity of arrhythmias. Method Forty-two patients with CD underwent ECG and continuous and noninvasive BP monitoring (TASK force monitor). The following were determined: BRS (phenylephrine method); heart rate variability (HRV) on 24-h Holter; and EF (echocardiogram). Results GIII had lower BRS (6.09 ms/mm Hg) as compared to GII (11.84) and GI (15.23). The difference was significant between GI and GIII (p = 0.01). Correlating BRS with the density of ventricular extrasystoles (VE), low VE density (<10/h) was associated with preserved BRS. Only 59% of the patients with high VE density (> 10/h) had preserved BRS (p = 0.003). Patients with depressed BRS had higher VE density (p = 0.01), regardless of the EF. The BRS was the only variable related to the occurrence of SVT (p = 0.028). Conclusion The BRS is preserved in undetermined CD. The BRS impairment increases as disease progresses, being more severe in patients with more complex ventricular arrhythmias. The degree of autonomic dysfunction did not correlate with EF, but with the density and complexity of ventricular arrhythmias. PMID:25004420

  7. Knowledge and experiences of Chagas disease in Bolivian women living in Spain: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Blasco-Hernández, Teresa; Miguel, Lucía García-San; Navaza, Bárbara; Navarro, Miriam; Benito, Agustín

    2016-01-01

    Background In Europe, Spain has the highest number of people with Chagas disease (CD). Bolivian migrants account for 81% of the reported cases. One of the priorities in controlling the disease is prevention of mother-to-child transmission. Despite under-diagnosis in Spain being estimated at 90%, there are currently few studies that explore the social and cultural dimensions of this disease. Objective The aim of this study was to explore the knowledge and experiences of Bolivian women with CD, in order to generate a useful understanding for the design and implementation of public health initiatives. Design Qualitative study based on semi-structured interviews, triangular groups, and field notes. Participants Fourteen Bolivian women with CD living in Madrid. Results The participants were aware that the disease was transmitted through the vector, that it could be asymptomatic, and that it could also be associated with sudden death by heart failure. They opined that the treatment as such could not cure the disease but only slow it down. There was a sense of indifference along with a lack of understanding of the risk of contracting the disease. Participants who presented with symptoms, or those with relatives suffering from the disease, were concerned about fatalities, cardiac problems, and possible vertical transmission. There was also a fear of being rejected by others. The disease was described as something that affected a large number of people but only showed up in a few cases and that too after many years. There was a widespread assumption that it was better not to know because doing so, allows the disease to take hold. Conclusions Disease risk perception was very low in Bolivian women living in Madrid. This factor, together with the fear of being screened, may be contributing to the current rate of under-diagnosis. PMID:26976265

  8. Comprehensive Survey of Domiciliary Triatomine Species Capable of Transmitting Chagas Disease in Southern Ecuador

    PubMed Central

    Grijalva, Mario J.; Villacis, Anita G.; Ocaña-Mayorga, Sofia; Yumiseva, Cesar A.; Moncayo, Ana L.; Baus, Esteban G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Chagas disease is endemic to the southern Andean region of Ecuador, an area with one of the highest poverty rates in the country. However, few studies have looked into the epidemiology, vectors and transmission risks in this region. In this study we describe the triatomine household infestation in Loja province, determine the rate of Trypanosoma cruzi infection in triatomines and study the risk factors associated with infestation. Methodology/Principal Findings An entomological survey found four triatomine species (Rhodnius ecuadoriensis, Triatoma carrioni, Panstrongylus chinai, and P. rufotuberculatus) infesting domiciles in 68% of the 92 rural communities examined. Nine percent of domiciles were infested, and nymphs were observed in 80% of the infested domiciles. Triatomines were found in all ecological regions below 2,200 masl. We found R. ecuadoriensis (275 to 1948 masl) and T. carrioni (831 to 2242 masl) mostly in bedrooms within the domicile, and they were abundant in chicken coops near the domicile. Established colonies of P. chinai (175 to 2003 masl) and P. rufotuberculatus (404 to 1613 masl) also were found in the domicile. Triatomine infestation was associated with surrogate poverty indicators, such as poor sanitary infrastructure (lack of latrine/toilet [w = 0.95], sewage to environment [w = 1.0]). Vegetation type was a determinant of infestation [w = 1.0] and vector control program insecticide spraying was a protective factor [w = 1.0]. Of the 754 triatomines analyzed, 11% were infected with Trypanosoma cruzi and 2% were infected with T. rangeli. Conclusions/Significance To date, only limited vector control efforts have been implemented. Together with recent reports of widespread sylvatic triatomine infestation and frequent post-intervention reinfestation, these results show that an estimated 100,000 people living in rural areas of southern Ecuador are at high risk for T. cruzi infection. Therefore, there is a need for a systematic, sustained

  9. Trypanosoma cruzi in the Chicken Model: Chagas-Like Heart Disease in the Absence of Parasitism

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Antonio R. L.; Gomes, Clever; Nitz, Nadjar; Sousa, Alessandro O.; Alves, Rozeneide M.; Guimaro, Maria C.; Cordeiro, Ciro; Bernal, Francisco M.; Rosa, Ana C.; Hejnar, Jiri; Leonardecz, Eduardo; Hecht, Mariana M.

    2011-01-01

    Background The administration of anti-trypanosome nitroderivatives curtails Trypanosoma cruzi infection in Chagas disease patients, but does not prevent destructive lesions in the heart. This observation suggests that an effective treatment for the disease requires understanding its pathogenesis. Methodology/Principal Findings To understand the origin of clinical manifestations of the heart disease we used a chicken model system in which infection can be initiated in the egg, but parasite persistence is precluded. T. cruzi inoculation into the air chamber of embryonated chicken eggs generated chicks that retained only the parasite mitochondrial kinetoplast DNA minicircle in their genome after eight days of gestation. Crossbreeding showed that minicircles were transferred vertically via the germ line to chicken progeny. Minicircle integration in coding regions was shown by targeted-primer thermal asymmetric interlaced PCR, and detected by direct genomic analysis. The kDNA-mutated chickens died with arrhythmias, shortness of breath, cyanosis and heart failure. These chickens with cardiomyopathy had rupture of the dystrophin and other genes that regulate cell growth and differentiation. Tissue pathology revealed inflammatory dilated cardiomegaly whereby immune system mononuclear cells lyse parasite-free target heart fibers. The heart cell destructio