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Sample records for chagosensis leucettidae founder

  1. New Leucettidae de Laubenfels, 1936 (Porifera, Calcarea) from Western Australia.

    PubMed

    Leocorny, Pedro; Alencar, Aline; Fromont, Jane; Klautau, Michelle

    2016-10-17

    This paper reports four new Leucettidae (Porifera, Calcarea) from Western Australia, with two representatives of Leucetta and two of Pericharax: L. foliata sp. nov., L. purpurea sp. nov., Pericharax crypta sp. nov., and P. vallii sp. nov. This is the first time tripods have been described within Pericharax. In addition, one species (L. foliata sp. nov.) has an external morphology not previously reported for Leucetta, and for the first time tetractines of the inhalant and exhalant canals have been distinguished. Leucettidae now comprises 28 species, eight of them occur in Western Australia, which means this Australian State has the highest species richness for this family in Australia. The WA coastline has been largely unexplored for Calcarea so it is likely that further collecting will yield additional species. Leucetta microraphis is the most widespread species of Leucettidae in Australia, occurring in all States except the Northern Territory and Tasmania. We highlight the importance of a revision of the Leucettidae using molecular and morphological characters to determine which morphological characters have a phylogenetic signal.

  2. New imidazole alkaloids from the Indonesian sponge Leucetta chagosensis.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Wafaa; Edrada, RuAngelie; Ebel, Rainer; Wray, Victor; Berg, Albrecht; van Soest, Rob; Wiryowidagdo, Sumali; Proksch, Peter

    2004-05-01

    Chemical investigation of the sponge Leucetta chagosensis collected in Indonesia afforded five new imidazole alkaloids, naamine F (2), naamine G (3), kealiinine A (6), kealiinine B (7), and kealiinine C (8), in addition to the known compound naamine A (1). Naamine G (3) exhibited strong antifungal activity against the phytopathogenic fungus Cladosporium herbarum and also showed mild cytotoxicity against mouse lymphoma (L5178Y) and human cervix carcinoma (HeLa) cell lines. In the brine shrimp assay, kealiinine A (6) was more active than naamine G (3). The structures of the new compounds were unambiguously established by 1D and 2D NMR and MS data.

  3. Quorum sensing inhibitors from Leucetta chagosensis Dendy, 1863.

    PubMed

    Mai, T; Tintillier, F; Lucasson, A; Moriou, C; Bonno, E; Petek, S; Magré, K; Al Mourabit, A; Saulnier, D; Debitus, C

    2015-10-01

    Sponges are a rich source for investigation of bioactive small molecules. They have been mostly investigated for the search of new pharmacological models or therapeutic agents for the treatment of human diseases. Micro-organisms can also represent a virulent pathogen for marine invertebrates such as sponges, which need to protect themselves against these microbes. Sponges' self defence mechanisms involving dialogue molecules thus represent a pertinent research track for potent anti-infective and anti-biofilm activities such as quorum sensing inhibitors (QSIs). The investigation of the QSI crude extract of Leucetta chagosensis Dendy, 1863 led to the isolation of three new alkaloids, isonaamine D, di-isonaamidine A and leucettamine D, along with the known isonaamine A and isonaamidine A. Isonaamidine A and isonaamine D were identified as inhibitors of the three quorum sensing pathways of Vibrio harveyi (CAI-1, AI-2 and harveyi auto inducer), but isonaamidine A displayed the strongest activity on AI-2 biosensor. Both compounds are new examples of natural QSIs of V. harveyi. These results outline the importance of these secondary metabolites for their producing organisms themselves in their natural environment, as well as the potential of the marine resource for aquaculture needs. A new type of quorum sensing inhibitors was isolated from the sponge Leucetta chagosensis. One of them inhibits strongly the AI-2 channel of Vibrio harveyi, a marine pathogen of special importance in aquaculture. The activity of five different related compounds, including three new natural products discovered there, was investigated leading to structure-activity relationships which are useful for the design of new quorum sensing inhibitors to control marine infectious pathogens. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  4. Phylogeography of western Pacific Leucetta 'chagosensis' (Porifera: Calcarea) from ribosomal DNA sequences: implications for population history and conservation of the Great Barrier Reef World Heritage Area (Australia).

    PubMed

    Wörheide, Gert; Hooper, John N A; Degnan, Bernard M

    2002-09-01

    Leucetta 'chagosensis' is a widespread calcareous sponge, occurring in shaded habitats of Indo-Pacific coral reefs. In this study we explore relationships among 19 ribosomal DNA sequence types (the ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region plus flanking gene sequences) found among 54 individuals from 28 locations throughout the western Pacific, with focus on the Great Barrier Reef (GBR). Maximum parsimony analysis revealed phylogeographical structuring into four major clades (although not highly supported by bootstrap analysis) corresponding to the northern/central GBR with Guam and Taiwan, the southern GBR and subtropical regions south to Brisbane, Vanuatu and Indonesia. Subsequent nested clade analysis (NCA) confirmed this structure with a probability of > 95%. After NCA of geographical distances, a pattern of range expansion from the internal Indonesian clade was inferred at the total cladogram level, as the Indonesian clade was found to be the internal and therefore oldest clade. Two distinct clades were found on the GBR, which narrowly overlap geographically in a line approximately from the Whitsunday Islands to the northern Swain Reefs. At various clade levels, NCA inferred that the northern GBR clade was influenced by past fragmentation and contiguous range expansion events, presumably during/after sea level low stands in the Pleistocene, after which the northern GBR might have been recolonized from the Queensland Plateau in the Coral Sea. The southern GBR clade is most closely related to subtropical L. 'chagosensis', and we infer that the southern GBR probably was recolonized from there after sea level low stands, based on our NCA results and supported by oceanographic data. Our results have important implications for conservation and management of the GBR, as they highlight the importance of marginal transition zones in the generation and maintenance of species rich zones, such as the Great Barrier Reef World Heritage Area.

  5. The founder's dilemma.

    PubMed

    Wasserman, Noam

    2008-02-01

    Why do people start businesses? For the money and the chance to control their own companies, certainly. But new research from Harvard Business School professor Wasserman shows that those goals are largely incompatible. The author's studies indicate that a founder who gives up more equity to attract cofounders, new hires, and investors builds a more valuable company than one who parts with less equity. More often than not, however, those superior returns come from replacing the founder with a professional CEO more experienced with the needs of a growing company. This fundamental tension requires founders to make "rich" versus "king" trade-offs to maximize either their wealth or their control over the company. Founders seeking to remain in control (as John Gabbert of the furniture retailer Room & Board has done) would do well to restrict themselves to businesses where large amounts of capital aren't required and where they already have the skills and contacts they need. They may also want to wait until late in their careers, after they have developed broader management skills, before setting up shop. Entrepreneurs who focus on wealth, such as Jim Triandiflou, who founded Ockham Technologies, can make the leap sooner because they won't mind taking money from investors or depending on executives to manage their ventures. Such founders will often bring in new CEOs themselves and be more likely to work with their boards to develop new, post-succession roles for themselves. Choosing between money and power allows entrepreneurs to come to grips with what success means to them. Founders who want to manage empires will not believe they are successes if they lose control, even if they end up rich. Conversely, founders who understand that their goal is to amass wealth will not view themselves as failures when they step down from the top job.

  6. Founder of cosmonautics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksimov, A. I.

    2007-09-01

    The paper described the creative path of K.E. Tsiolkovsky, the founder of theoretical cosmonautics, who devoted his life to solving various problems in the field of aerodynamics and rocket engineering, creating dirigibles with a metallic shell, jet planes, and air-cushioned trains, and studying the origin of planets, the Sun, and the Universe. The main engineering proposals of a scientist of great originality, which found applications in modern rocket and space engineering, are briefly analysed. The versatility of his interests is demonstrated; his research is shown to deal with many fields of science and technology, including the kinetic theory of gases, geology, cosmology, biology, philosophy, sociology, theology, and language science.

  7. Founders of the Social Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weakland, John E., Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Presents educational biographies of Henry Johnson, I. James Quillen, Lawrence E. Metcalf, and Shirley Engle; all considered founders of the social studies. Additional articles on defining the social studies, problem solving, and mentoring are included in this issue. (JDH)

  8. Trichohepatoenteric syndrome: founder mutation in asian indians.

    PubMed

    Kotecha, U H; Movva, S; Puri, R D; Verma, I C

    2012-08-01

    Trichohepatoenteric syndrome (THES) is characterized by chronic diarrhea, dysmorphic facies and hair abnormalities. Hepatic involvement varies from no abnormality to cirrhosis and hemochromatosis. Recently, mutations in the tetratricopeptide repeat domain 37 (TTC37) gene were identified to cause THES. The c.2808G>A variation was suggested as a possible founder mutation among the South Asians. We further report 2 unrelated cases of Asian-Indian ethnicity (Gujrati) with THES, wherein targeted mutation analysis revealed the same mutation in homozygous form in both cases. These findings, as well as haplotype analysis, corroborate the founder mutation hypothesis amongst Asian Indo-Pakistani ethnic groups. A restriction enzyme-based method is also described to identify this founder mutation. One of our probands had multiple hepatic hemangiomas, a feature not previously observed in this syndrome.

  9. Breast cancer risk is similar for CHEK2 founder and non-founder mutation carriers.

    PubMed

    Leedom, Tracey P; LaDuca, Holly; McFarland, Rachel; Li, Shuwei; Dolinsky, Jill S; Chao, Elizabeth C

    2016-09-01

    CHEK2 mutations are associated with increased cancer risks, including breast; however, published risk estimates are limited to those conferred by CHEK2 founder mutations, presenting uncertainty in risk assessment for carriers of other CHEK2 mutations. This study aimed to assess phenotypes and molecular characteristics of CHEK2 mutation carriers (CHEK2 + s) from a multi-gene panel testing (MGPT) cohort, focusing on comparing phenotypes of founder and non-founder CHEK2 + s. Clinical histories and molecular results were reviewed from 45,879 patients who underwent MGPT including CHEK2 at a commercial laboratory. Of individuals tested, 2.4% (n = 1085) were CHEK2 + s. Sixteen individuals harbored biallelic CHEK2 mutations, bringing the total number of CHEK2 mutations detected in this cohort to 1101. Personal/family cancer histories were compared between founder (n = 576; included c.1100delC, p.S428F, c.444 + 1G > A, and EX8_9del) and non-founder (n = 259) CHEK2 + s using Fisher's exact test and multivariate logistic regression analysis. Individuals carrying the p.I157T moderate risk founder mutation (n = 231), additional mutations in non-CHEK2 genes (n = 83), or biallelic mutations (n = 16) were excluded from phenotype analysis, as were cases with no clinical information provided. No significant phenotypic differences were observed between founder and non-founder CHEK2 + s. These data suggest that cancer risks reported for founder mutations may be generalizable to all CHEK2 + s, particularly for breast cancer. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Moving Forward with Founders: Strategies for Change in Volunteer Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huff, Paula Rogers; Pleskac, Sue

    2012-01-01

    Founder's Syndrome can create barriers to change in Extension programs. As a result, Extension staff have experienced challenges in effecting organizational change where Founders are present. 4-H Youth Development staff in Wisconsin applied a variety of strategies to move forward with 4-H programming, despite the influence of the Founders. Staff…

  11. Founders' Continuing Roles in Schools Supporting Self-Directed Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nash, Carol

    2014-01-01

    What should be the continuing role of founders in schools supporting self-directed learning? To answer this, the founders' views of two North American schools for self-directed learners will be compared. One school is exam-focused and private; the other is, test-free and public. The founders of both schools have comparable beliefs regarding the…

  12. Founders' Continuing Roles in Schools Supporting Self-Directed Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nash, Carol

    2014-01-01

    What should be the continuing role of founders in schools supporting self-directed learning? To answer this, the founders' views of two North American schools for self-directed learners will be compared. One school is exam-focused and private; the other is, test-free and public. The founders of both schools have comparable beliefs regarding the…

  13. Lithospheric foundering and underthrusting imaged beneath Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Min; Niu, Fenglin; Tromp, Jeroen; Lenardic, Adrian; Lee, Cin-Ty A.; Cao, Wenrong; Ribeiro, Julia

    2017-06-01

    Long-standing debates exist over the timing and mechanism of uplift of the Tibetan Plateau and, more specifically, over the connection between lithospheric evolution and surface expressions of plateau uplift and volcanism. Here we show a T-shaped high wave speed structure in our new tomographic model beneath South-Central Tibet, interpreted as an upper-mantle remnant from earlier lithospheric foundering. Its spatial correlation with ultrapotassic and adakitic magmatism supports the hypothesis of convective removal of thickened Tibetan lithosphere causing major uplift of Southern Tibet during the Oligocene. Lithospheric foundering induces an asthenospheric drag force, which drives continued underthrusting of the Indian continental lithosphere and shortening and thickening of the Northern Tibetan lithosphere. Surface uplift of Northern Tibet is subject to more recent asthenospheric upwelling and thermal erosion of thickened lithosphere, which is spatially consistent with recent potassic volcanism and an imaged narrow low wave speed zone in the uppermost mantle.

  14. Lithospheric foundering and underthrusting imaged beneath Tibet.

    PubMed

    Chen, Min; Niu, Fenglin; Tromp, Jeroen; Lenardic, Adrian; Lee, Cin-Ty A; Cao, Wenrong; Ribeiro, Julia

    2017-06-06

    Long-standing debates exist over the timing and mechanism of uplift of the Tibetan Plateau and, more specifically, over the connection between lithospheric evolution and surface expressions of plateau uplift and volcanism. Here we show a T-shaped high wave speed structure in our new tomographic model beneath South-Central Tibet, interpreted as an upper-mantle remnant from earlier lithospheric foundering. Its spatial correlation with ultrapotassic and adakitic magmatism supports the hypothesis of convective removal of thickened Tibetan lithosphere causing major uplift of Southern Tibet during the Oligocene. Lithospheric foundering induces an asthenospheric drag force, which drives continued underthrusting of the Indian continental lithosphere and shortening and thickening of the Northern Tibetan lithosphere. Surface uplift of Northern Tibet is subject to more recent asthenospheric upwelling and thermal erosion of thickened lithosphere, which is spatially consistent with recent potassic volcanism and an imaged narrow low wave speed zone in the uppermost mantle.

  15. Lithospheric foundering and underthrusting imaged beneath Tibet

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Min; Niu, Fenglin; Tromp, Jeroen; Lenardic, Adrian; Lee, Cin-Ty A.; Cao, Wenrong; Ribeiro, Julia

    2017-01-01

    Long-standing debates exist over the timing and mechanism of uplift of the Tibetan Plateau and, more specifically, over the connection between lithospheric evolution and surface expressions of plateau uplift and volcanism. Here we show a T-shaped high wave speed structure in our new tomographic model beneath South-Central Tibet, interpreted as an upper-mantle remnant from earlier lithospheric foundering. Its spatial correlation with ultrapotassic and adakitic magmatism supports the hypothesis of convective removal of thickened Tibetan lithosphere causing major uplift of Southern Tibet during the Oligocene. Lithospheric foundering induces an asthenospheric drag force, which drives continued underthrusting of the Indian continental lithosphere and shortening and thickening of the Northern Tibetan lithosphere. Surface uplift of Northern Tibet is subject to more recent asthenospheric upwelling and thermal erosion of thickened lithosphere, which is spatially consistent with recent potassic volcanism and an imaged narrow low wave speed zone in the uppermost mantle. PMID:28585571

  16. Differentiating founder and chronic HIV envelope sequences

    PubMed Central

    Maher, Stephen; Mota, Talia; Suzuki, Kazuo; Kelleher, Anthony D.

    2017-01-01

    Significant progress has been made in characterizing broadly neutralizing antibodies against the HIV envelope glycoprotein Env, but an effective vaccine has proven elusive. Vaccine development would be facilitated if common features of early founder virus required for transmission could be identified. Here we employ a combination of bioinformatic and operations research methods to determine the most prevalent features that distinguish 78 subtype B and 55 subtype C founder Env sequences from an equal number of chronic sequences. There were a number of equivalent optimal networks (based on the fewest covarying amino acid (AA) pairs or a measure of maximal covariance) that separated founders from chronics: 13 pairs for subtype B and 75 for subtype C. Every subtype B optimal solution contained the founder pairs 178–346 Asn-Val, 232–236 Thr-Ser, 240–340 Lys-Lys, 279–315 Asp-Lys, 291–792 Ala-Ile, 322–347 Asp-Thr, 535–620 Leu-Asp, 742–837 Arg-Phe, and 750–836 Asp-Ile; the most common optimal pairs for subtype C were 644–781 Lys-Ala (74 of 75 networks), 133–287 Ala-Gln (73/75) and 307–337 Ile-Gln (73/75). No pair was present in all optimal subtype C solutions highlighting the difficulty in targeting transmission with a single vaccine strain. Relative to the size of its domain (0.35% of Env), the α4β7 binding site occurred most frequently among optimal pairs, especially for subtype C: 4.2% of optimal pairs (1.2% for subtype B). Early sequences from 5 subtype B pre-seroconverters each exhibited at least one clone containing an optimal feature 553–624 (Ser-Asn), 724–747 (Arg-Arg), or 46–293 (Arg-Glu). PMID:28187204

  17. Differentiating founder and chronic HIV envelope sequences.

    PubMed

    Murray, John M; Maher, Stephen; Mota, Talia; Suzuki, Kazuo; Kelleher, Anthony D; Center, Rob J; Purcell, Damian

    2017-01-01

    Significant progress has been made in characterizing broadly neutralizing antibodies against the HIV envelope glycoprotein Env, but an effective vaccine has proven elusive. Vaccine development would be facilitated if common features of early founder virus required for transmission could be identified. Here we employ a combination of bioinformatic and operations research methods to determine the most prevalent features that distinguish 78 subtype B and 55 subtype C founder Env sequences from an equal number of chronic sequences. There were a number of equivalent optimal networks (based on the fewest covarying amino acid (AA) pairs or a measure of maximal covariance) that separated founders from chronics: 13 pairs for subtype B and 75 for subtype C. Every subtype B optimal solution contained the founder pairs 178-346 Asn-Val, 232-236 Thr-Ser, 240-340 Lys-Lys, 279-315 Asp-Lys, 291-792 Ala-Ile, 322-347 Asp-Thr, 535-620 Leu-Asp, 742-837 Arg-Phe, and 750-836 Asp-Ile; the most common optimal pairs for subtype C were 644-781 Lys-Ala (74 of 75 networks), 133-287 Ala-Gln (73/75) and 307-337 Ile-Gln (73/75). No pair was present in all optimal subtype C solutions highlighting the difficulty in targeting transmission with a single vaccine strain. Relative to the size of its domain (0.35% of Env), the α4β7 binding site occurred most frequently among optimal pairs, especially for subtype C: 4.2% of optimal pairs (1.2% for subtype B). Early sequences from 5 subtype B pre-seroconverters each exhibited at least one clone containing an optimal feature 553-624 (Ser-Asn), 724-747 (Arg-Arg), or 46-293 (Arg-Glu).

  18. Founder mitochondrial haplotypes in Amerindian populations.

    PubMed Central

    Bailliet, G.; Rothhammer, F.; Carnese, F. R.; Bravi, C. M.; Bianchi, N. O.

    1994-01-01

    It had been proposed that the colonization of the New World took place by three successive migrations from northeastern Asia. The first one gave rise to Amerindians (Paleo-Indians), the second and third ones to Nadene and Aleut-Eskimo, respectively. Variation in mtDNA has been used to infer the demographic structure of the Amerindian ancestors. The study of RFLP all along the mtDNA and the analysis of nucleotide substitutions in the D-loop region of the mitochondrial genome apparently indicate that most or all full-blooded Amerindians cluster in one of four different mitochondrial haplotypes that are considered to represent the founder maternal lineages of Paleo-Indians. We have studied the mtDNA diversity in 109 Amerindians belonging to 3 different tribes, and we have reanalyzed the published data on 482 individuals from 18 other tribes. Our study confirms the existence of four major Amerindian haplotypes. However, we also found evidence supporting the existence of several other potential founder haplotypes or haplotype subsets in addition to the four ancestral lineages reported. Confirmation of a relatively high number of founder haplotypes would indicate that early migration into America was not accompanied by a severe genetic bottleneck. PMID:7517626

  19. Founder mitochondrial haplotypes in Amerindian populations.

    PubMed

    Bailliet, G; Rothhammer, F; Carnese, F R; Bravi, C M; Bianchi, N O

    1994-07-01

    It had been proposed that the colonization of the New World took place by three successive migrations from northeastern Asia. The first one gave rise to Amerindians (Paleo-Indians), the second and third ones to Nadene and Aleut-Eskimo, respectively. Variation in mtDNA has been used to infer the demographic structure of the Amerindian ancestors. The study of RFLP all along the mtDNA and the analysis of nucleotide substitutions in the D-loop region of the mitochondrial genome apparently indicate that most or all full-blooded Amerindians cluster in one of four different mitochondrial haplotypes that are considered to represent the founder maternal lineages of Paleo-Indians. We have studied the mtDNA diversity in 109 Amerindians belonging to 3 different tribes, and we have reanalyzed the published data on 482 individuals from 18 other tribes. Our study confirms the existence of four major Amerindian haplotypes. However, we also found evidence supporting the existence of several other potential founder haplotypes or haplotype subsets in addition to the four ancestral lineages reported. Confirmation of a relatively high number of founder haplotypes would indicate that early migration into America was not accompanied by a severe genetic bottleneck.

  20. Lithospheric foundering and underthrusting imaged beneath Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, M.; Niu, F.; Tromp, J.; Lenardic, A.; Lee, C. T.; Cao, W.; Ribeiro, J.

    2016-12-01

    New tomographic images unveil a large-scale, high wave speed structure beneath South-Central Tibet in the middle to lower portions of the upper mantle. We interpret this structure as a remnant of an earlier lithospheric foundering event. Spatial correlations between foundering lithosphere and ultrapotassic and adakitic magmatism support the hypothesis of convective removal of thickened Tibetan lithosphere causing a major rise of Southern Tibet during the Oligocene. Lithospheric foundering induces an asthenospheric drag force, which drives continued underthrusting of the Indian continental lithosphere and associated shortening of the remaining Tibetan lithosphere. We speculate that more recent asthenospheric upwelling leads to a thermal modification of thickened lithosphere beneath Northern Tibet and subsequent surface uplift, consistent with the correlation of recent potassic volcanism and an imaged narrow low wave speed zone in the uppermost mantle. In contrast, the unusually high seismic wave speeds in the uppermost mantle beneath Southern Tibet, reminiscent of images beneath the North American craton, suggest a possible prototype of modern craton formation due to continued under-accretion of Indian continent.

  1. Founder niche constrains evolutionary adaptive radiation.

    PubMed

    Flohr, Régis C E; Blom, Carsten J; Rainey, Paul B; Beaumont, Hubertus J E

    2013-12-17

    Adaptive radiation of a lineage into a range of organisms with different niches underpins the evolution of life's diversity. Although the role of the environment in shaping adaptive radiation is well established, theory predicts that the evolvability and niche of the founding ancestor are also of importance. Direct demonstration of a causal link requires resolving the independent effects of these additional factors. Here, we accomplish this using experimental bacterial populations and demonstrate how the dynamics of adaptive radiation are constrained by the niche of the founder. We manipulated the propensity of the founder to undergo adaptive radiation and resolved the underlying causal changes in both its evolvability and niche. Evolvability did not change, but the propensity for adaptive radiation was altered by changes in the position and breadth of the niche of the founder. These observations provide direct empirical evidence for a link between the niche of organisms and their propensity for adaptive radiation. This general mechanism may have rendered the evolutionary dynamics of extant adaptive radiations dependent on chance events that determined their founding ancestors.

  2. Characterization of founder viruses in very early SIV rectal transmission.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Zhe; Ma, Fangrui; Demers, Andrew J; Wang, Dong; Xu, Jianqing; Lewis, Mark G; Li, Qingsheng

    2017-02-01

    A better understanding of HIV-1 transmission is critical for developing preventative strategies. To that end, we analyzed 524 full-length env sequences of SIVmac251 at 6 and 10 days post intrarectal infection of rhesus macaques. There was no tissue compartmentalization of founder viruses across plasma, rectal and distal lymphatic tissues for most animals; however one animal has evidence of virus tissue compartmentalization. Despite identical viral inoculums, founder viruses were animal-specific, primarily derived from rare variants in the inoculum, and have a founder virus signature that can distinguish dominant founder variants from minor founder or untransmitted variants in the inoculum. Importantly, the sequences of post-transmission defective viruses were phylogenetically associated with competent viral variants in the inoculum and were mainly converted from competent viral variants by frameshift rather than APOBEC mediated mutations, suggesting the converting the transmitted viruses into defective viruses through frameshift mutation is an important component of rectal transmission bottleneck. Anorectal receptive intercourse is a common route of HIV-1 transmission and a better understanding of the transmission mechanisms is critical for developing HIV-1 preventative strategies. Here, we report that there is no tissue compartmentalization of founder viruses during very early rectal transmission of SIV in the majority of rhesus macaques and founder viruses are preferentially derived from rare variant in the inoculum. We also found that founder viruses are animal-specific despite identical viral inoculums. After viruses cross the mucosal barriers, the host further reduces viral diversity by converting some of the transmitted functional viruses into defective viruses through frameshift rather than APOBEC derived mutations. To our knowledge, this is the first study of founder viruses at multiple tissue sites during very early rectal transmission. Copyright © 2016

  3. BRCA1 founder mutations compared to ovarian cancer in Belarus.

    PubMed

    Savanevich, Alena; Oszurek, Oleg; Lubiński, Jan; Cybulski, Cezary; Dębniak, Tadeusz; Narod, Steven A; Gronwald, Jacek

    2014-09-01

    In Belarus and other Slavic countries, founder mutations in the BRCA1 gene are responsible for a significant proportion of breast cancer cases, but the data on contribution of these mutations to ovarian cancers are limited. To estimate the proportion of ovarian cancers in Belarus, which are dependent on BRCA1 Slavic founder mutations, we sought the presence of three most frequent mutations (BRCA1: 5382insC, C61G and, 4153delA) in 158 consecutive unselected cases of ovarian cancer. One of the three founder mutations was present in 25 of 158 unselected cases of ovarian cancer (15.8 %). We recommend that all cases of ovarian cancer in Belarus be offered genetic testing for these founder mutations. Furthermore, genetic testing of the Belarusian population will provide the opportunity to prevent a significant proportion of ovarian cancer.

  4. Founder populations and their uses for breast cancer genetics

    PubMed Central

    Neuhausen, Susan L

    2000-01-01

    Numerous founder mutations have been reported in BRCA1 and BRCA2. For genetic screening of a population with a founder mutation, testing can be targeted to the mutation, allowing for a more rapid and less expensive test. In addition, more precise estimates of the prior probability of carrying a mutation and of the likelihood of a mutation carrier developing cancer should be possible. For a given founder mutation a large number of carriers are available, so that focused scientific studies of penetrance, expression, and genetic and environmental modifiers of risk can be performed. Finally, founder populations may be a powerful resource to localize additional breast cancer susceptibility loci, because of the reduction in locus heterogeneity. PMID:11250694

  5. The effective founder effect in a spatially expanding population

    PubMed Central

    Peter, Benjamin M.; Slatkin, Montgomery

    2016-01-01

    The gradual loss of diversity and the establishment of clines in allele frequencies associated with range expansions are patterns observed in many species, including humans. These patterns can result from a series of founder events occurring as populations colonize previously unoccupied areas. We develop a model of an expanding population and, using a branching process approximation, show that spatial gradients reflect different amounts of genetic drift experienced by different subpopulations. We then use this model to measure the net average strength of the founder effect, and we demonstrate that the predictions from the branching process model fit simulation results well. We further show that estimates of the effective founder size are robust to potential confounding factors such as migration between subpopulations. We apply our method to data from Arabidopsis thaliana. We find that the average founder effect is approximately three times larger in the Americas than in Europe, possibly indicating that a more recent, rapid expansion occurred. PMID:25656983

  6. The effective founder effect in a spatially expanding population.

    PubMed

    Peter, Benjamin M; Slatkin, Montgomery

    2015-03-01

    The gradual loss of diversity and the establishment of clines in allele frequencies associated with range expansions are patterns observed in many species, including humans. These patterns can result from a series of founder events occurring as populations colonize previously unoccupied areas. We develop a model of an expanding population and, using a branching process approximation, show that spatial gradients reflect different amounts of genetic drift experienced by different subpopulations. We then use this model to measure the net average strength of the founder effect, and we demonstrate that the predictions from the branching process model fit simulation results well. We further show that estimates of the effective founder size are robust to potential confounding factors such as migration between subpopulations. We apply our method to data from Arabidopsis thaliana. We find that the average founder effect is approximately three times larger in the Americas than in Europe, possibly indicating that a more recent, rapid expansion occurred. © 2015 The Author(s).

  7. Recurrent and founder mutations in the PMS2 gene.

    PubMed

    Tomsic, J; Senter, L; Liyanarachchi, S; Clendenning, M; Vaughn, C P; Jenkins, M A; Hopper, J L; Young, J; Samowitz, W; de la Chapelle, A

    2013-03-01

    Germline mutations in PMS2 are associated with Lynch syndrome (LS), the most common known cause of hereditary colorectal cancer. Mutation detection in PMS2 has been difficult due to the presence of several pseudogenes, but a custom-designed long-range PCR strategy now allows adequate mutation detection. Many mutations are unique. However, some mutations are observed repeatedly across individuals not known to be related due to the mutation being either recurrent, arising multiple times de novo at hot spots for mutations, or of founder origin, having occurred once in an ancestor. Previously, we observed 36 distinct mutations in a sample of 61 independently ascertained Caucasian probands of mixed European background with PMS2 mutations. Eleven of these mutations were detected in more than one individual not known to be related and of these, six were detected more than twice. These six mutations accounted for 31 (51%) ostensibly unrelated probands. Here, we performed genotyping and haplotype analysis in four mutations observed in multiple probands and found two (c.137G>T and exon 10 deletion) to be founder mutations and one (c.903G>T) a probable founder. One (c.1A>G) could not be evaluated for founder mutation status. We discuss possible explanations for the frequent occurrence of founder mutations in PMS2. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  8. Variation in founder groups promotes establishment success in the wild

    PubMed Central

    Forsman, Anders; Wennersten, Lena; Karlsson, Magnus; Caesar, Sofia

    2012-01-01

    Environmental changes currently pose severe threats to biodiversity, and reintroductions and translocations are increasingly used to protect declining populations and species from extinction. Theory predicts that establishment success should be higher for more variable groups of dissimilar individuals. To test this ‘diversity promotes establishment’ hypothesis, we introduced colour polymorphic pygmy grasshoppers (Tetrix subulata) to different sites in the wild. The number of descendants found at the release sites the subsequent year increased with increasing number of colour morphs in the founder group, and variation in founder groups also positively affected colour morph diversity in the established populations. Since colour morphs differ in morphology, physiology, behaviour, reproductive life history and types of niche used, these findings demonstrate that variation among individuals in functionally important traits promotes establishment success under natural conditions, and further indicate that founder diversity may contribute to evolutionary rescue and increased population persistence. PMID:22456885

  9. Utilization of founder lines for improved Citrus biotechnology via RMCE

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    On October 1st 2011 the CRB chose to fund a unique research project, the development of citrus cultivars specifically for genetic engineering (GE). The objective of this research was to develop GE citrus ‘Founder Lines’ containing DNA sequences that will allow the precise insertion of genes for de...

  10. Genetic Studies of Stuttering in a Founder Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wittke-Thompson, Jacqueline K.; Ambrose, Nicoline; Yairi, Ehud; Roe, Cheryl; Cook, Edwin H.; Ober, Carole; Cox, Nancy J.

    2007-01-01

    Genome-wide linkage and association analyses were conducted to identify genetic determinants of stuttering in a founder population in which 48 individuals affected with stuttering are connected in a single 232-person genealogy. A novel approach was devised to account for all necessary relationships to enable multipoint linkage analysis. Regions…

  11. Genetic Studies of Stuttering in a Founder Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wittke-Thompson, Jacqueline K.; Ambrose, Nicoline; Yairi, Ehud; Roe, Cheryl; Cook, Edwin H.; Ober, Carole; Cox, Nancy J.

    2007-01-01

    Genome-wide linkage and association analyses were conducted to identify genetic determinants of stuttering in a founder population in which 48 individuals affected with stuttering are connected in a single 232-person genealogy. A novel approach was devised to account for all necessary relationships to enable multipoint linkage analysis. Regions…

  12. Comment on "Phonemic diversity supports a serial founder effect model of language expansion from Africa".

    PubMed

    Jaeger, T Florian; Pontillo, Daniel; Graff, Peter

    2012-03-02

    Atkinson (Reports, 15 April 2011, p. 346) argues that the phonological complexity of languages reflects the loss of phonemic distinctions due to successive founder events during human migration (the serial founder hypothesis). Statistical simulations show that the type I error rate of Atkinson's analysis is hugely inflated. The data at best support only a weak interpretation of the serial founder hypothesis.

  13. Anatomy of a founder effect: myotonic dystrophy in Northeastern Quebec.

    PubMed

    Yotova, Vania; Labuda, Damian; Zietkiewicz, Ewa; Gehl, Dominik; Lovell, Alan; Lefebvre, Jean-François; Bourgeois, Stéphane; Lemieux-Blanchard, Emilie; Labuda, Marcin; Vézina, Hélène; Houde, Louis; Tremblay, Marc; Toupance, Bruno; Heyer, Evelyne; Hudson, Thomas J; Laberge, Claude

    2005-07-01

    Founder effects are largely responsible for changes in frequency profiles of genetic variants in local populations or isolates. They are often recognized by elevated incidence of certain hereditary disorders as observed in regions of Charlevoix and Saguenay-Lac-Saint-Jean (SLSJ) in Northeastern Quebec. Dominantly transmitted myotonic dystrophy (DM1) is highly prevalent in SLSJ where its carrier rate reaches 1/550, compared with 1/5,000 to 1/50,000 elsewhere. To shed light on the origin of DM1 in this region, we have screened 50 nuclear DM1 families from SLSJ and studied the genetic variation in a 2.05 Mb (2.9 cM) segment spanning the site of the expansion mutation. The markers analyzed included 22 biallelic SNPs and two microsatellites. Among 50 independent DM1 chromosomes, we distinguished ten DM1-associated haplotypes and grouped them into three haplotype families, A, B and C, based on the relevant extent of allele sharing between them. To test whether the data were consistent with a single entry of the mutation into SLSJ, we evaluated the age of the founder effect from the proportion of recombinant haplotypes. Taking the prevalent haplotype A1_21 (58%) as ancestral to all the disease-associated haplotypes in this study, the estimated age of the founder effect was 19 generations, long predating the colonization of Nouvelle-France. In contrast, considering A1_21 as ancestral to the haplotype family A only, yielded the estimated founder age of nine generations, consistent with the settlement of Charlevoix at the turn of 17th century and subsequent colonization of SLSJ. We conclude that it was the carrier of haplotype A (present day carrier rate of 1/730) that was a "driver" of the founder effect, while minor haplotypes B and C, with corresponding carrier rates of 1/3,000 and 1/10,000, respectively, contribute DM1 to the incidence level known in other populations. Other studies confirm that this might be a general scenario in which a major "driver" mutation

  14. A newly discovered founder population: the Roma/Gypsies.

    PubMed

    Kalaydjieva, Luba; Morar, Bharti; Chaix, Raphaelle; Tang, Hua

    2005-10-01

    The Gypsies (a misnomer, derived from an early legend about Egyptian origins) defy the conventional definition of a population: they have no nation-state, speak different languages, belong to many religions and comprise a mosaic of socially and culturally divergent groups separated by strict rules of endogamy. Referred to as "the invisible minority", the Gypsies have for centuries been ignored by Western medicine, and their genetic heritage has only recently attracted attention. Common origins from a small group of ancestors characterise the 8-10 million European Gypsies as an unusual trans-national founder population, whose exodus from India played the role of a profound demographic bottleneck. Social and economic pressures within Europe led to gradual fragmentation, generating multiple genetically differentiated subisolates. The string of population bottlenecks and founder effects have shaped a unique genetic profile, whose potential for genetic research can be met only by study designs that acknowledge cultural tradition and self-identity. (c) 2005 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. GNE Myopathy: Two Clusters with History and Several Founder Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Argov, Zohar; Mitrani Rosenbaum, Stella

    2015-01-01

    Abstract GNE myopathy (previous names: HIBM, DMRV, IBM2) is a unique distal myopathy with quadriceps sparing. This recessively inherited myopathy has been diagnosed in various regions of the world with more than 150 disease-causing mutations already identified. Several of those are proven or suspected to be founder mutations in certain regional clusters and are described in this review. The review also discusses some historical aspects that might be relevant to the mutational distribution. PMID:27858758

  16. Founder mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes.

    PubMed

    Ferla, R; Calò, V; Cascio, S; Rinaldi, G; Badalamenti, G; Carreca, I; Surmacz, E; Colucci, G; Bazan, V; Russo, A

    2007-06-01

    BRCA1 and BRCA2 germline mutations contribute to a significant number of familial and hereditary breast and/or ovarian cancers. The proportion of high-risk families with breast and/or ovarian cancer cases due to mutations in these tumor suppressor genes varies widely among populations. In some population, a wide spectrum of different mutations in both genes are present, whereas in other groups specific mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 have been reported with high frequency. Most of these mutations are prevalent in restricted populations as consequence of a founder effect. The comparison of haplotypes between families with the same mutation can distinguish whether high-frequency alleles derive from an older or more recent single mutational event or whether they have arisen independently more than once. Here, we review some of the most well-known and significant examples of founder mutations in BRCA genes found in European and non-European populations. In conclusion, the identification of the ethnic group of families undergoing genetic counseling enables the geneticist and oncologist to make more specific choices, leading to simplify the clinical approach to genetic testing carried out on members of high-risk families. Futhermore, the high frequency of founder mutations, allowing to analyze a large number of cases, might provide accurate information regarding their penetrance.

  17. Uplift of the Colorado Plateau via Lower Crustal Foundering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdman, M.; Lee, C. T.; Jiang, H.

    2014-12-01

    How the Colorado Plateau reached its current elevation with little internal deformation compared to surrounding regions has perplexed researchers for nearly a century. Hypotheses to explain the two kilometers of uplift since the Late Cretaceous range from delamination of the Farallon plate following flat slab subduction, thermal expansion of upwelling mantle, dynamic topography in response to mantle upwelling, mid-crustal flow from over-thickened crust, and foundering of a dense lower crustal root. Many of these hypotheses are constrained by geodynamic modelling with limited evidence from the rock record. We report here the petrologic and geochemical makeup of lower crustal xenoliths from the Transition Zone in Arizona between the southern Basin and Range Province and the Colorado Plateau. This xenolith suite erupted within a ~25 Ma volcanic host and is dominated by garnet pyroxenite with minor gabbro and amphibolite. Major and trace element geochemistry, petrography, and thermobarometry suggest these rocks represent deep-seated (12-25 kb) cumulates formed during arc magmatism. A preliminary U-Pb sphene age of ~50 Ma suggests that the cumulates formed during the end of the Laramide orogeny. Calculated compositional densities for these cumulates are up to 10% greater than the mantle, suggesting that early to mid-Tertiary arc magmatism generated a dense and unstable lower crustal root. Because these rocks are cold (580-840 °C), thermal contraction may further increase the density contrast. Foundering of this dense root could cause significant uplift. Isostatic calculations show that two kilometers of uplift may be explained by removal of a 20-km-thick root that is 10% denser than the underlying mantle. If lower crustal foundering is indeed responsible for uplift of the Colorado Plateau, the eruption age of the xenolith suite constrains uplift to be younger than ~25 Ma.

  18. Fragile X founder effects and new mutations in Finland

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, N.; Smits, B.; Curley, D.

    1996-07-12

    The apparent associations between fragile X mutations and nearby microsatellites may reflect both founder effects and microsatellite instability. To gain further insight into their relative contributions, we typed a sample of 56 unrelated control and 37 fragile X chromosomes from an eastern Finnish population for FMR1 CGG repeat lengths, AGG interspersion patterns, DXS548, FRAXAC1, FRAXE and a new polymorphic locus, Alu-L. In the controls, the most common FMR1 allele was 30 repeats with a range of 20 to 47 and a calculated heterozygosity of 88%. A strong founder effect was observed for locus DXS548 with 95% of fragile X chromosomes having the 21 CA repeat (196 bp) allele compared to 17% of controls, while none of the fragile X but 69% of controls had the 20 repeat allele. Analysis of the combined loci DXS548-FRAXAC1-FRAXE showed three founder haplotypes. Haplotype 21-19-16 was found on 27 (75%) of fragile X chromosomes but on none of controls. Three (8.4%) fragile X chromosomes had haplotypes 21-19-15, 21-19-20, and 21-19-25 differing from the common fragile X haplotype only in FRAXE. These could have arisen by recombination or from mutations of FRAXE. A second haplotype 21-18-17 was found in four (11.1%) fragile X chromosomes but only one (1.9%) control. This may represent a more recent founder mutation. A third haplotype 25-21-15, seen in two fragile X chromosomes (5.6%) and one (1.9%) control, was even less common and thus may represent an even more recent mutation or admixture of immigrant types. Analysis of the AGG interspersions within the FMR1 CGG repeat showed that 7/8 premutation chromosomes lacked an AGG whereas all controls had at least one AGG. This supports the hypothesis that the mutation of AGG to CGG leads to repeat instability and mutational expansion. 43 refs., 3 figs., 7 tabs.

  19. Bounds of foundering in the southern Sierra Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, H.; Yang, Y.; Forsyth, D. W.; Jones, C. H.; Owens, T. J.; Zandt, G.

    2008-12-01

    Previous petrologic and tomographic observations have found that while a thick residual root formed under the southern Sierra Nevada batholith, it has since foundered and descends into the mantle. The recent Sierra Nevada EarthScope Project (SNEP) FlexArray in eastern California sought to improve our understanding of the mechanism, extent, and tectonic consequences of this process. Over fifty broadband seismic stations deployed between 2005 and 2007 comprised the SNEP array. Many of these stations were redeployed once to occupy ~100 sites spanning much of the mountain range. Surrounding stations from the TransportableArray provide a common reference for analyzing SNEP stations that moved. Using fundamental mode Rayleigh waves, generated by teleseismic earthquakes at periods between 20 and 100 s, we examine lithospheric structures beyond the crust into the mantle. By employing an array processing approach, and treating the incoming surface wave field as two interfering plane waves (Forsyth and Li, 2005), we account for multipathing and scattering of the wave field, which is common along continental margins and within mountain ranges. The 25 km station spacing of the SNEP deployment allows for features to be resolved that could not be found using only the TransportableArray. For periods between 20 and 50 s that are sensitive structures in the crust and uppermost mantle, the pattern of phase velocities along the southern Sierra Nevada exhibits a similar asymmetry to that found for crustal structures. Within this period range, low phase velocities characterize regions of thin crust of the southeastern Sierra and extend out to Walker Lane and the western Basin and Range. Conversely, the western foothills possess thicker crust and higher phase velocities. In the central Sierra, at latitudes near Lake Tahoe, the distribution of anomalies changes and the low and the high phase velocities that mark the eastern and western sides of the southern Sierra terminate. These

  20. Founder mutation for Huntington disease in Caucasus Jews.

    PubMed

    Melamed, O; Behar, D M; Bram, C; Magal, N; Pras, E; Reznik-Wolf, H; Borochowitz, Z U; Davidov, B; Mor-Cohen, R; Baris, H N

    2015-02-01

    Huntington disease (HD), an autosomal dominant disorder involving HTT, is characterized by chorea, psychiatric illness and cognitive decline. Diagnosis and age of onset depend on the degree of expansion of the trinucleotide CAG repeat within the gene. The prevalence of HD is known for Europeans but has not been studied in the Israeli population. Between 2006 and 2011 we diagnosed in our adult genetics clinic ten HD probands, nine of whom were Caucasus Jews (CJ) (Azerbaijani), and one Ashkenazi Jewish. We performed haplotype analysis to look for evidence of a founder mutation, and found that of the nine CJ, eight shared the same haplotype that was compatible with the A1 haplogroup. We calculated the coalescence age of the mutation to be between 80 and 150 years. Ninety percent of our HD patients are CJ, as are 27% of the HD patients in Israel, although the CJ comprise only 1.4% of the Israeli population. Our findings suggest a higher prevalence of HD among CJ compared to the general Israeli population and are consistent with a recent founder mutation. We recommend a higher degree of suspicion for HD in CJ with subtle clinical findings.

  1. An ancient founder mutation in PROKR2 impairs human reproduction.

    PubMed

    Avbelj Stefanija, Magdalena; Jeanpierre, Marc; Sykiotis, Gerasimos P; Young, Jacques; Quinton, Richard; Abreu, Ana Paula; Plummer, Lacey; Au, Margaret G; Balasubramanian, Ravikumar; Dwyer, Andrew A; Florez, Jose C; Cheetham, Timothy; Pearce, Simon H; Purushothaman, Radhika; Schinzel, Albert; Pugeat, Michel; Jacobson-Dickman, Elka E; Ten, Svetlana; Latronico, Ana Claudia; Gusella, James F; Dode, Catherine; Crowley, William F; Pitteloud, Nelly

    2012-10-01

    Congenital gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) deficiency manifests as absent or incomplete sexual maturation and infertility. Although the disease exhibits marked locus and allelic heterogeneity, with the causal mutations being both rare and private, one causal mutation in the prokineticin receptor, PROKR2 L173R, appears unusually prevalent among GnRH-deficient patients of diverse geographic and ethnic origins. To track the genetic ancestry of PROKR2 L173R, haplotype mapping was performed in 22 unrelated patients with GnRH deficiency carrying L173R and their 30 first-degree relatives. The mutation's age was estimated using a haplotype-decay model. Thirteen subjects were informative and in all of them the mutation was present on the same ~123 kb haplotype whose population frequency is ≤10%. Thus, PROKR2 L173R represents a founder mutation whose age is estimated at approximately 9000 years. Inheritance of PROKR2 L173R-associated GnRH deficiency was complex with highly variable penetrance among carriers, influenced by additional mutations in the other PROKR2 allele (recessive inheritance) or another gene (digenicity). The paradoxical identification of an ancient founder mutation that impairs reproduction has intriguing implications for the inheritance mechanisms of PROKR2 L173R-associated GnRH deficiency and for the relevant processes of evolutionary selection, including potential selective advantages of mutation carriers in genes affecting reproduction.

  2. Identification of a founder BRCA2 mutation in Sardinia

    PubMed Central

    Pisano, M; Cossu, A; Persico, I; Palmieri, G; Angius, A; Casu, G; Palomba, G; Sarobba, M G; Rocca, P C Ossu; Dedola, M F; Olmeo, N; Pasca, A; Budroni, M; Marras, V; Pisano, A; Farris, A; Massarelli, G; Pirastu, M; Tanda, Francesco

    2000-01-01

    Sardinian population can be instrumental in defining the molecular basis of cancer, using the identity-by-descent method. We selected seven Sardinian breast cancer families originating from the northern-central part of the island with multiple affected members in different generations. We genotyped 106 members of the seven families and 20 control nuclear families with markers flanking BRCA2 locus at 13q12–q13. The detection of a common haplotype shared by four out of seven families (60%) suggests the presence of a founder BRCA2 mutation. Direct sequencing of BRCA2 coding exons of patients carrying the shared haplotype, allowed the identification of a ‘frame-shift’ mutation at codon 2867 (8765delAG), causing a premature termination-codon. This mutation was found in breast cancer patients as well as one prostate and one bladder cancer patient with shared haplotype. We then investigated the frequency of 8765delAG in the Sardinian breast cancer population by analysing 270 paraffin-embedded normal tissue samples from breast cancer patients. Five patients (1.7%) were found to be positive for the 8765delAG mutation. Discovery of a founder mutation in Sardinia through the identity-by-descent method demonstrates that this approach can be applied successfully to find mutations either for breast cancer or for other types of tumours. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10682665

  3. Identity by Descent Mapping of Founder Mutations in Cancer Using High-Resolution Tumor SNP Data

    PubMed Central

    Letouzé, Eric; Sow, Aliou; Petel, Fabien; Rosati, Roberto; Figueiredo, Bonald C.; Burnichon, Nelly; Gimenez-Roqueplo, Anne-Paule

    2012-01-01

    Dense genotype data can be used to detect chromosome fragments inherited from a common ancestor in apparently unrelated individuals. A disease-causing mutation inherited from a common founder may thus be detected by searching for a common haplotype signature in a sample population of patients. We present here FounderTracker, a computational method for the genome-wide detection of founder mutations in cancer using dense tumor SNP profiles. Our method is based on two assumptions. First, the wild-type allele frequently undergoes loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in the tumors of germline mutation carriers. Second, the overlap between the ancestral chromosome fragments inherited from a common founder will define a minimal haplotype conserved in each patient carrying the founder mutation. Our approach thus relies on the detection of haplotypes with significant identity by descent (IBD) sharing within recurrent regions of LOH to highlight genomic loci likely to harbor a founder mutation. We validated this approach by analyzing two real cancer data sets in which we successfully identified founder mutations of well-characterized tumor suppressor genes. We then used simulated data to evaluate the ability of our method to detect IBD tracts as a function of their size and frequency. We show that FounderTracker can detect haplotypes of low prevalence with high power and specificity, significantly outperforming existing methods. FounderTracker is thus a powerful tool for discovering unknown founder mutations that may explain part of the “missing” heritability in cancer. This method is freely available and can be used online at the FounderTracker website. PMID:22567117

  4. Founders' Sensemaking and Sensegiving Behaviors Effect on the Organizational Identities of New Charter Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fehsenfeld, Corie

    2010-01-01

    This qualitative, multiple case study looked at the emerging organizational identity of four charter schools during the early years of development and the influence of the founder on that developing identity. The study looked at the ways in which each founder's sensemaking and sensegiving behaviors may have influenced the organizational identity…

  5. Founder effects initiated rapid species radiation in Hawaiian cave planthoppers

    PubMed Central

    Wessel, Andreas; Hoch, Hannelore; Asche, Manfred; von Rintelen, Thomas; Stelbrink, Björn; Heck, Volker; Stone, Fred D.; Howarth, Francis G.

    2013-01-01

    The Hawaiian Islands provide the venue of one of nature’s grand experiments in evolution. Here, we present morphological, behavioral, genetic, and geologic data from a young subterranean insect lineage in lava tube caves on Hawai‘i Island. The Oliarus polyphemus species complex has the potential to become a model for studying rapid speciation by stochastic events. All species in this lineage live in extremely similar environments but show strong differentiation in behavioral and morphometric characters, which are random with respect to cave age and geographic distribution. Our observation that phenotypic variability within populations decreases with increasing cave age challenges traditional views on founder effects. Furthermore, these cave populations are natural replicates that can be used to test the contradictory hypotheses. Moreover, Hawaiian cave planthoppers exhibit one of the highest speciation rates among animals and, thus, radically shift our perception on the evolutionary potential of obligate cavernicoles. PMID:23696661

  6. [Identification and characterization of HIV-1 transmitted /founder viruses].

    PubMed

    Jianyuan, Zhao; Jiwei, Ding; Zeyun, Mi; Tao, Wei; Shan, Cen

    2015-05-01

    During the spread of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in the mucosa, the entire genetic diversity of the viruses is significantly reduced. The vast majority of HIV-1 mucosal infections are established by one or a few viruses and ultimately develop into systemic infections, thus the initial virus is called transmitted/founder virus (T/F virus). The study of T/F virus will benefit understanding its key characteristics resulting in successful viral replication in the new host body, which may provide novel strategies for the development of AIDS vaccines, pre-exposure prophylaxis and other therapeutic interventions. In this review, we summarize the discovery and evolutionary characteristics of T/F virus as well as early immune response after HIV-1 infection, which will establish the basis to explore the features of T/F viruses.

  7. Founder effects initiated rapid species radiation in Hawaiian cave planthoppers.

    PubMed

    Wessel, Andreas; Hoch, Hannelore; Asche, Manfred; von Rintelen, Thomas; Stelbrink, Björn; Heck, Volker; Stone, Fred D; Howarth, Francis G

    2013-06-04

    The Hawaiian Islands provide the venue of one of nature's grand experiments in evolution. Here, we present morphological, behavioral, genetic, and geologic data from a young subterranean insect lineage in lava tube caves on Hawai'i Island. The Oliarus polyphemus species complex has the potential to become a model for studying rapid speciation by stochastic events. All species in this lineage live in extremely similar environments but show strong differentiation in behavioral and morphometric characters, which are random with respect to cave age and geographic distribution. Our observation that phenotypic variability within populations decreases with increasing cave age challenges traditional views on founder effects. Furthermore, these cave populations are natural replicates that can be used to test the contradictory hypotheses. Moreover, Hawaiian cave planthoppers exhibit one of the highest speciation rates among animals and, thus, radically shift our perception on the evolutionary potential of obligate cavernicoles.

  8. Origins, admixture and founder lineages in European Roma

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Cruz, Begoña; Mendizabal, Isabel; Harmant, Christine; de Pablo, Rosario; Ioana, Mihai; Angelicheva, Dora; Kouvatsi, Anastasia; Makukh, Halyna; Netea, Mihai G; Pamjav, Horolma; Zalán, Andrea; Tournev, Ivailo; Marushiakova, Elena; Popov, Vesselin; Bertranpetit, Jaume; Kalaydjieva, Luba; Quintana-Murci, Lluis; Comas, David

    2016-01-01

    The Roma, also known as ‘Gypsies', represent the largest and the most widespread ethnic minority of Europe. There is increasing evidence, based on linguistic, anthropological and genetic data, to suggest that they originated from the Indian subcontinent, with subsequent bottlenecks and undetermined gene flow from/to hosting populations during their diaspora. Further support comes from the presence of Indian uniparentally inherited lineages, such as mitochondrial DNA M and Y-chromosome H haplogroups, in a significant number of Roma individuals. However, the limited resolution of most genetic studies so far, together with the restriction of the samples used, have prevented the detection of other non-Indian founder lineages that might have been present in the proto-Roma population. We performed a high-resolution study of the uniparental genomes of 753 Roma and 984 non-Roma hosting European individuals. Roma groups show lower genetic diversity and high heterogeneity compared with non-Roma samples as a result of lower effective population size and extensive drift, consistent with a series of bottlenecks during their diaspora. We found a set of founder lineages, present in the Roma and virtually absent in the non-Roma, for the maternal (H7, J1b3, J1c1, M18, M35b, M5a1, U3, and X2d) and paternal (I-P259, J-M92, and J-M67) genomes. This lineage classification allows us to identify extensive gene flow from non-Roma to Roma groups, whereas the opposite pattern, although not negligible, is substantially lower (up to 6.3%). Finally, the exact haplotype matching analysis of both uniparental lineages consistently points to a Northwestern origin of the proto-Roma population within the Indian subcontinent. PMID:26374132

  9. Origins, admixture and founder lineages in European Roma.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Cruz, Begoña; Mendizabal, Isabel; Harmant, Christine; de Pablo, Rosario; Ioana, Mihai; Angelicheva, Dora; Kouvatsi, Anastasia; Makukh, Halyna; Netea, Mihai G; Pamjav, Horolma; Zalán, Andrea; Tournev, Ivailo; Marushiakova, Elena; Popov, Vesselin; Bertranpetit, Jaume; Kalaydjieva, Luba; Quintana-Murci, Lluis; Comas, David

    2016-06-01

    The Roma, also known as 'Gypsies', represent the largest and the most widespread ethnic minority of Europe. There is increasing evidence, based on linguistic, anthropological and genetic data, to suggest that they originated from the Indian subcontinent, with subsequent bottlenecks and undetermined gene flow from/to hosting populations during their diaspora. Further support comes from the presence of Indian uniparentally inherited lineages, such as mitochondrial DNA M and Y-chromosome H haplogroups, in a significant number of Roma individuals. However, the limited resolution of most genetic studies so far, together with the restriction of the samples used, have prevented the detection of other non-Indian founder lineages that might have been present in the proto-Roma population. We performed a high-resolution study of the uniparental genomes of 753 Roma and 984 non-Roma hosting European individuals. Roma groups show lower genetic diversity and high heterogeneity compared with non-Roma samples as a result of lower effective population size and extensive drift, consistent with a series of bottlenecks during their diaspora. We found a set of founder lineages, present in the Roma and virtually absent in the non-Roma, for the maternal (H7, J1b3, J1c1, M18, M35b, M5a1, U3, and X2d) and paternal (I-P259, J-M92, and J-M67) genomes. This lineage classification allows us to identify extensive gene flow from non-Roma to Roma groups, whereas the opposite pattern, although not negligible, is substantially lower (up to 6.3%). Finally, the exact haplotype matching analysis of both uniparental lineages consistently points to a Northwestern origin of the proto-Roma population within the Indian subcontinent.

  10. Identification of kin structure among Guam rail founders: a comparison of pedigrees and DNA profiles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haig, Susan M.; Ballou, J.D.; Casna, N.J.

    1994-01-01

    Kin structure among founders can have a significant effect on subsequent population structure. Here we use the correlation between DNA profile similarity and relatedness calculated from pedigrees to test hypotheses regarding kin structure among founders to the captive Guam rail (Rallus owstoni) population. Five different pedigrees were generated under the following hypotheses: (i) founders are unrelated; (ii) founders are unrelated except for same-nest chicks; (iii) founders from the same major site are siblings; (iv) founders from the same local site are siblings; and (v) founders are related as defined by a UPGMA cluster analysis of DNA similarity data. Relatedness values from pedigrees 1, 2 and 5 had the highest correlation with DNA similarity but the correlation between relatedness and similarity were not significantly different among pedigrees. Pedigree 5 resulted in the highest correlation overall when using only relatedness values that changed as a result of different founder hypotheses. Thus, founders were assigned relatedness based on pedigree 5 because it had the highest correlations with DNA similarity, was the most conservative approach, and incorporated all field data. The analyses indicated that estimating relatedness using DNA profiles remains problematic, therefore we compared mean kinship, a measure of genetic importance, with mean DNA profile similarity to determine if genetic importance among individuals could be determined via use of DNA profiles alone. The significant correlation suggests this method may provide more information about population structure than was previously thought. Thus, DNA profiles can provide a reasonable explanation for founder relatedness and mean DNA profile similarity may be helpful in determining relative genetic importance of individuals when detailed pedigrees are absent.

  11. Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy in the Agarwals: Utility of founder mutations in CAPN3 gene

    PubMed Central

    Khadilkar, Satish V.; Chaudhari, Chetan R.; Dastur, Rashna S.; Gaitonde, Pradnya S.; Yadav, Jayendra G.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Diagnostic evaluation of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2A (LGMD2A) involves specialized studies on muscle biopsy and mutation analysis. Mutation screening is the gold standard for diagnosis but is difficult as the gene is large and multiple mutations are known. This study evaluates the utility of two known founder mutations as a first-line diagnostic test for LGMD2A in the Agarwals. Materials and Methods: The Agarwals with limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) phenotype were analyzed for two founder alleles (intron 18/exon 19 c.2051-1G>T and exon 22 c.2338G>C). Asymptomatic first-degree relatives of patients with genetically confirmed mutations and desirous of counseling were screened for founder mutations. Results: Founder alleles were detected in 26 out of 29 subjects with LGMD phenotype (89%). The most common genotype observed was homozygous for exon 22 c.2338 G>C mutation followed by compound heterozygosity. Single founder allele was identified in two. Single allele was detected in two of the five asymptomatic relatives. Conclusion: Eighty-nine percent of the Agarwals having LGMD phenotype have LGMD2A resulting from founder mutations. Founder allele analysis can be utilized as the initial noninvasive diagnostic step for index cases, carrier detection, and counseling. PMID:27011640

  12. Expanding the Spectrum of Founder Mutations Causing Isolated Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jin-Ho; Balasubramanian, Ravikumar; Lee, Phil H.; Shaw, Natalie D.; Hall, Janet E.; Plummer, Lacey; Buck, Cassandra L.; Kottler, Marie-Laure; Jarzabek, Katarzyna; Wołczynski, Sławomir; Quinton, Richard; Latronico, Ana Claudia; Dode, Catherine; Ogata, Tsutomu; Kim, Hyung-Goo; Layman, Lawrence C.; Gusella, James F.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Loss of function (LoF) mutations in more than 20 genes are now known to cause isolated GnRH deficiency (IGD) in humans. Most causal IGD mutations are typically private, ie, limited to a single individual/pedigree. However, somewhat paradoxically, four IGD genes (GNRH1, TAC3, PROKR2, and GNRHR) have been shown to harbor LoF founder mutations that are shared by multiple unrelated individuals. It is not known whether similar founder mutations occur in other IGD genes. Objective: The objective of the study was to determine whether shared deleterious mutations in IGD-associated genes represent founder alleles. Setting: This study was an international collaboration among academic medical centers. Methods: IGD patients with shared mutations, defined as those documented in three or more unrelated probands in 14 IGD-associated genes, were identified from various academic institutions, the Human Gene Mutation Database, and literature reports by other international investigators. Haplotypes of single-nucleotide polymorphisms and short tandem repeats surrounding the mutations were constructed to assess genetic ancestry. Results: A total of eight founder mutations in five genes, GNRHR (Q106R, R262Q, R139H), TACR3 (W275X), PROKR2 (R85H), FGFR1 (R250Q, G687R), and HS6ST1 (R382W) were identified. Most founder alleles were present at low frequency in the general population. The estimated age of these mutant alleles ranged from 1925 to 5600 years and corresponded to the time of rapid human population expansion. Conclusions: We have expanded the spectrum of founder alleles associated with IGD to a total of eight founder mutations. In contrast to the approximately 9000-year-old PROKR2 founder allele that may confer a heterozygote advantage, the rest of the founder alleles are relatively more recent in origin, in keeping with the timing of recent human population expansion and any selective heterozygote advantage of these alleles requires further evaluation. PMID:26207952

  13. Mediterranean Founder Mutation Database (MFMD): Taking Advantage from Founder Mutations in Genetics Diagnosis, Genetic Diversity and Migration History of the Mediterranean Population.

    PubMed

    Charoute, Hicham; Bakhchane, Amina; Benrahma, Houda; Romdhane, Lilia; Gabi, Khalid; Rouba, Hassan; Fakiri, Malika; Abdelhak, Sonia; Lenaers, Guy; Barakat, Abdelhamid

    2015-11-01

    The Mediterranean basin has been the theater of migration crossroads followed by settlement of several societies and cultures in prehistoric and historical times, with important consequences on genetic and genomic determinisms. Here, we present the Mediterranean Founder Mutation Database (MFMD), established to offer web-based access to founder mutation information in the Mediterranean population. Mutation data were collected from the literature and other online resources and systematically reviewed and assembled into this database. The information provided for each founder mutation includes DNA change, amino-acid change, mutation type and mutation effect, as well as mutation frequency and coalescence time when available. Currently, the database contains 383 founder mutations found in 210 genes related to 219 diseases. We believe that MFMD will help scientists and physicians to design more rapid and less expensive genetic diagnostic tests. Moreover, the coalescence time of founder mutations gives an overview about the migration history of the Mediterranean population. MFMD can be publicly accessed from http://mfmd.pasteur.ma. © 2015 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  14. Synthetic biology: evolution or revolution? A co-founder's perspective.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Timothy S; Hawkins, Kristy

    2013-12-01

    In this article, we relate the story of Synthetic Biology's birth, from the perspective of a co-founder, and consider its original premise--that standardization and abstraction of biological components will unlock the full potential of biological engineering. The standardization ideas of Synthetic Biology emerged in the late 1990s from a convergence of research on cellular computing, and were motivated by an array of applications from tissue regeneration to bio-sensing to mathematical programming. As the definition of Synthetic Biology has grown to be synonymous with Biological Engineering and Biotechnology, the field has lost sight of the fact that its founding premise has not yet been validated. While the value of standardization has been proven in many other engineering disciplines, none of them involve self-replicating systems. The engineering of self-replicating systems will likely benefit from standardization, and also by embracing the forces of evolution that inexorably shape such systems. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Ludwig Edinger (1855-1918): founder of modern neuroanatomy.

    PubMed

    Prithishkumar, Ivan James

    2012-03-01

    Ludwig Edinger, a German neurologist is considered as one of the founders of modern neuroanatomy. He was conferred the degree of Doctor of Medicine at the University of Strassburg. His observation of small living organisms under a microscope at an early age led him to study medicine. Edinger had many discoveries to his credit. He was the first to describe the ventral and dorsal spinocerebellar tracts, to distinguish between paleo-encephalon and neo-encephalon, and between paleo-cerebellum and neo-cerebellum. He coined the terms "gnosis" and "praxis," which were later adopted in psychological descriptions of agnosia and apraxia. He identified the Edinger-Westphal nucleus in 1885 and was the first to describe the syndrome of thalamic pain. Edinger worked with renowned clinicians and published a large number of papers. He founded the Neurological Institute at the Goethe University in Frankfurt, which is the oldest neurological Institute in Germany. Edinger was a rare combination of a profound scientist, a brilliant teacher, a fine artist, and a noted hypnotist. While at the height of his career, he underwent a surgery and died a few hours later. It was his last will that his brain should be dissected in his own institute. It showed extraordinarily well-developed occipital lobes as well as other unusual features.

  16. Genetic Comparison of a Croatian Isolate and CEPH European Founders

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, Pau; Vitart, Véronique; Hayward, Caroline; Tenesa, Albert; Zgaga, Lina; Juricic, Danica; Polasek, Ozren; Hastie, Nicholas D; Rudan, Igor; Campbell, Harry; Wright, Alan F; Haley, Chris S; Knott, Sara A

    2010-01-01

    Human isolates have been postulated as a good resource for the identification of QTL due to reduced genetic diversity and a more homogeneous environment. Isolates may also have increased linkage disequilibrium (LD) due to small effective population size and, either loss or increase in frequency of alleles that are rare in the general population from which they originate. Here we investigate the difference in allele and genotype frequencies, LD and homozygous tracts between an isolate—several villages from the island of Vis in Croatia—and an outbred population of European origin: the Hapmap CEPH founders. Using the HumanHap300 v1 Genotyping BeadChip, we show that our population does not differ greatly from the reference CEU outbred population despite having a slightly higher proportion of monomorphic loci, a slightly higher long-range LD, and a greater proportion of individuals with long homozygous tracts. We conclude that genotyping arrays should perform equally well in our isolate as in outbred European populations for disease mapping studies and that SNP–trait associations discovered in our well-characterized Croatian isolate should be valid in the general European population from which they descend. Genet. Epidemiol. 34: 140–145, 2010. © 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:19697321

  17. Founder effect in spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA).

    PubMed

    Tanaka, F; Doyu, M; Ito, Y; Matsumoto, M; Mitsuma, T; Abe, K; Aoki, M; Itoyama, Y; Fischbeck, K H; Sobue, G

    1996-09-01

    We analyzed the polymorphic (CAG)n and (GGC)n repeats of the androgen receptor gene in 113 unrelated X-linked spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) X chromosomes and 173 control X chromosomes in Japanese males. The control chromosomes had an average CAG repeat number of 21 +/- 3 with a range from 14-32 repeat units, and SBMA chromosomes had a range from 40-55 with a median of 47 +/- 3 copies. The control chromosomes had seven different alleles of the (GGC)n repeat with the range of 11 to 17; the most frequent size of (GGC)n was 16 (79%), while (GGC)17 was very rare (1%). However, in SBMA chromosomes only two alleles were seen; the most frequent size of (GGC)n was 16 (61%) followed by 17 (39%). (GGC)n size distribution was significantly different between SBMA and control chromosomes (P < 0.0001), indicating the presence of linkage disequilibrium. There was no allelic association between the (CAG)n and (GGC)n microsatellites among control subjects as well as SBMA patients, which suggests that a founder effect makes a more significant contribution to generation of Japanese SBMA chromosomes than new mutations.

  18. Multipoint likelihoods for genetic linkage: The untyped founder problem

    SciTech Connect

    O`Connell, J.R.; Chiarulli, D.M.; Weeks, D.E.

    1994-09-01

    Too many untyped founders in a pedigree cause the Elston-Stewart algorithm to grind to a halt. Our solution to this problem involves recoding alleles based on symmetry and identity-by-descent to greatly reduce the number of multi-locus genotypes. We also use modified genotype elimination to better organize the calculation, substantially reducing the amount of memory needed. We never have to consider multi-locus genotypes that are not valid. Thus for typed pedigrees, the calculation is independent of the number of alleles at a locus. In addition, our locus-by-locus method allows us to group similar calculations to avoid recomputation, costly bookkeeping for valid genotypes, and large memory allocation. We were able to do a 4-locus likelihood for a 41-member simple pedigree with the first two generations untyped and an allele product of over 1500 in under an hour. This likelihood cannot be computed at all with LINKAGE, since some of its arrays would require over a gigabyte of memory. Our locus-by-locus method is also well-suited for parallelization since we can factor the computation into smaller independent pieces. This will enable us to tackle problems of even greater complexity.

  19. Long-distance plant dispersal to North Atlantic islands: colonization routes and founder effect

    PubMed Central

    Alsos, Inger Greve; Ehrich, Dorothee; Eidesen, Pernille Bronken; Solstad, Heidi; Westergaard, Kristine Bakke; Schönswetter, Peter; Tribsch, Andreas; Birkeland, Siri; Elven, Reidar; Brochmann, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Long-distance dispersal (LDD) processes influence the founder effect on islands. We use genetic data for 25 Atlantic species and similarities among regional floras to analyse colonization, and test whether the genetic founder effect on five islands is associated with dispersal distance, island size and species traits. Most species colonized postglacially via multiple dispersal events from several source regions situated 280 to >3000 km away, and often not from the closest ones. A strong founder effect was observed for insect-pollinated mixed maters, and it increased with dispersal distance and decreased with island size in accordance with the theory of island biogeography. Only a minor founder effect was observed for wind-pollinated outcrossing species. Colonization patterns were largely congruent, indicating that despite the importance of stochasticity, LDD is mainly determined by common factors, probably dispersal vectors. Our findings caution against a priori assuming a single, close source region in biogeographic analyses. PMID:25876627

  20. Drosophila Heartless Acts with Heartbroken/Dof in Muscle Founder Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Devkanya; Shaw, Sanjeev; Maqbool, Tariq; Pandya, Hetal

    2005-01-01

    The formation of a multi-nucleate myofibre is directed, in Drosophila, by a founder cell. In the embryo, founders are selected by Notch-mediated lateral inhibition, while during adult myogenesis this mechanism of selection does not appear to operate. We show, in the muscles of the adult abdomen, that the Fibroblast growth factor pathway mediates founder cell choice in a novel manner. We suggest that the developmental patterns of Heartbroken/Dof and Sprouty result in defining the domain and timing of activation of the Fibroblast growth factor receptor Heartless in specific myoblasts, thereby converting them into founder cells. Our results point to a way in which muscle differentiation could be initiated and define a critical developmental function for Heartbroken/Dof in myogenesis. PMID:16207075

  1. Founder mutations in Tunisia: implications for diagnosis in North Africa and Middle East

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Tunisia is a North African country of 10 million inhabitants. The native background population is Berber. However, throughout its history, Tunisia has been the site of invasions and migratory waves of allogenic populations and ethnic groups such as Phoenicians, Romans, Vandals, Arabs, Ottomans and French. Like neighbouring and Middle Eastern countries, the Tunisian population shows a relatively high rate of consanguinity and endogamy that favor expression of recessive genetic disorders at relatively high rates. Many factors could contribute to the recurrence of monogenic morbid trait expression. Among them, founder mutations that arise in one ancestral individual and diffuse through generations in isolated communities. Method We report here on founder mutations in the Tunisian population by a systematic review of all available data from PubMed, other sources of the scientific literature as well as unpublished data from our research laboratory. Results We identified two different classes of founder mutations. The first includes founder mutations so far reported only among Tunisians that are responsible for 30 genetic diseases. The second group represents founder haplotypes described in 51 inherited conditions that occur among Tunisians and are also shared with other North African and Middle Eastern countries. Several heavily disabilitating diseases are caused by recessive founder mutations. They include, among others, neuromuscular diseases such as congenital muscular dystrophy and spastic paraglegia and also severe genodermatoses such as dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa and xeroderma pigmentosa. Conclusion This report provides informations on founder mutations for 73 genetic diseases either specific to Tunisians or shared by other populations. Taking into account the relatively high number and frequency of genetic diseases in the region and the limited resources, screening for these founder mutations should provide a rapid and cost effective tool for

  2. Founder mutations in Tunisia: implications for diagnosis in North Africa and Middle East.

    PubMed

    Romdhane, Lilia; Kefi, Rym; Azaiez, Hela; Ben Halim, Nizar; Dellagi, Koussay; Abdelhak, Sonia

    2012-08-21

    Tunisia is a North African country of 10 million inhabitants. The native background population is Berber. However, throughout its history, Tunisia has been the site of invasions and migratory waves of allogenic populations and ethnic groups such as Phoenicians, Romans, Vandals, Arabs, Ottomans and French. Like neighbouring and Middle Eastern countries, the Tunisian population shows a relatively high rate of consanguinity and endogamy that favor expression of recessive genetic disorders at relatively high rates. Many factors could contribute to the recurrence of monogenic morbid trait expression. Among them, founder mutations that arise in one ancestral individual and diffuse through generations in isolated communities. We report here on founder mutations in the Tunisian population by a systematic review of all available data from PubMed, other sources of the scientific literature as well as unpublished data from our research laboratory. We identified two different classes of founder mutations. The first includes founder mutations so far reported only among Tunisians that are responsible for 30 genetic diseases. The second group represents founder haplotypes described in 51 inherited conditions that occur among Tunisians and are also shared with other North African and Middle Eastern countries. Several heavily disabilitating diseases are caused by recessive founder mutations. They include, among others, neuromuscular diseases such as congenital muscular dystrophy and spastic paraglegia and also severe genodermatoses such as dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa and xeroderma pigmentosa. This report provides informations on founder mutations for 73 genetic diseases either specific to Tunisians or shared by other populations. Taking into account the relatively high number and frequency of genetic diseases in the region and the limited resources, screening for these founder mutations should provide a rapid and cost effective tool for molecular diagnosis. Indeed, our report

  3. Legacy of mutiny on the Bounty: founder effect and admixture on Norfolk Island.

    PubMed

    Macgregor, Stuart; Bellis, Claire; Lea, Rod A; Cox, Hannah; Dyer, Tom; Blangero, John; Visscher, Peter M; Griffiths, Lyn R

    2010-01-01

    The population of Norfolk Island, located off the eastern coast of Australia, possesses an unusual and fascinating history. Most present-day islanders are related to a small number of the 'Bounty' mutineer founders. These founders consisted of Caucasian males and Polynesian females and led to an admixed present-day population. By examining a single large pedigree of 5742 individuals, spanning >200 years, we analyzed the influence of admixture and founder effect on various cardiovascular disease (CVD)-related traits. On account of the relative isolation of the population, on average one-third of the genomes of present-day islanders (single large pedigree individuals) is derived from 17 initial founders. The proportion of Polynesian ancestry in the present-day individuals was found to significantly influence total triglycerides, body mass index, systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure. For various cholesterol traits, the influence of ancestry was less marked but overall the direction of effect for all CVD-related traits was consistent with Polynesian ancestry conferring greater CVD risk. Marker-derived homozygosity was computed and agreed with measures of inbreeding derived from pedigree information. Founder effect (inbreeding and marker-derived homozygosity) significantly influenced height. In conclusion, both founder effect and extreme admixture have substantially influenced the genetic architecture of a variety of CVD-related traits in this population.

  4. The Slavic NBN Founder Mutation: A Role for Reproductive Fitness?

    PubMed Central

    Seemanova, Eva; Varon, Raymonda; Vejvalka, Jan; Seeman, Pavel; Chrzanowska, Krystyna H.; Digweed, Martin; Resnick, Igor; Kremensky, Ivo; Saar, Kathrin; Hoffmann, Katrin; Dutrannoy, Véronique; Karbasiyan, Mohsen; Ghani, Mehdi; Barić, Ivo; Tekin, Mustafa; Kovacs, Peter; Krawczak, Michael; Reis, André; Sperling, Karl

    2016-01-01

    The vast majority of patients with Nijmegen Breakage Syndrome (NBS) are of Slavic origin and carry a deleterious deletion (c.657del5; rs587776650) in the NBN gene on chromosome 8q21. This mutation is essentially confined to Slavic populations and may thus be considered a Slavic founder mutation. Notably, not a single parenthood of a homozygous c.657del5 carrier has been reported to date, while heterozygous carriers do reproduce but have an increased cancer risk. These observations seem to conflict with the considerable carrier frequency of c.657del5 of 0.5% to 1% as observed in different Slavic populations because deleterious mutations would be eliminated quite rapidly by purifying selection. Therefore, we propose that heterozygous c.657del5 carriers have increased reproductive success, i.e., that the mutation confers heterozygote advantage. In fact, in our cohort study of the reproductive history of 24 NBS pedigrees from the Czech Republic, we observed that female carriers gave birth to more children on average than female non-carriers, while no such reproductive differences were observed for males. We also estimate that c.657del5 likely occurred less than 300 generations ago, thus supporting the view that the original mutation predated the historic split and subsequent spread of the ‘Slavic people’. We surmise that the higher fertility of female c.657del5 carriers reflects a lower miscarriage rate in these women, thereby reflecting the role of the NBN gene product, nibrin, in the repair of DNA double strand breaks and their processing in immune gene rearrangements, telomere maintenance, and meiotic recombination, akin to the previously described role of the DNA repair genes BRCA1 and BRCA2. PMID:27936167

  5. American founder mutation for attenuated familial adenomatous polyposis.

    PubMed

    Neklason, Deborah W; Stevens, Jeffery; Boucher, Kenneth M; Kerber, Richard A; Matsunami, Nori; Barlow, Jahn; Mineau, Geraldine; Leppert, Mark F; Burt, Randall W

    2008-01-01

    Specific mutations in the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene can lead to an attenuated form of familial adenomatous polyposis (AFAP). Although AFAP mutation carriers have a 69% risk of colorectal cancer by age 80, clinical recognition remains a challenge in some cases because they present with few colonic adenomas and are difficult to distinguish clinically from patients with sporadic polyps. Family relationships were established using family history reports, the Utah Population Database, and the public records of the Mormon Church. Genetic analysis of representative family members was performed using a 10,000 single nucleotide polymorphism array platform. Colonoscopy data were available on 120 individuals with the AFAP mutation. Two large AFAP kindreds with the identical APC disease-causing mutation (c.426_427delAT) were linked to a founding couple who came to America from England around 1630. Genetic analysis showed that the 2 families share a conserved haplotype of 7.17 Mbp surrounding the mutant APC allele. The data show that 36.6% of the mutation-positive family members have fewer than 10 colonic adenomatous polyps, and 3 (6.8%) of these individuals were diagnosed with colorectal cancer. In view of the apparent age of this mutation, a notable fraction of both multiple-adenoma patients and perhaps even colon cancer cases in the United States could be related to this founder mutation. The colon cancer risk associated with the mutation makes genetic testing of considerable importance in patients with a personal or family history of either colonic polyps or cancer at a young age.

  6. American Founder Mutation for Attenuated Familial Adenomatous Polyposis

    PubMed Central

    Neklason, Deborah W.; Stevens, Jeffery; Boucher, Kenneth M.; Kerber, Richard A.; Matsunami, Nori; Barlow, Jahn; Mineau, Geraldine; Leppert, Mark F.; Burt, Randall W.

    2008-01-01

    Background & Aims Specific mutations in the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene can lead to an attenuated form of the Familial Adenomatous Polyposis (AFAP). Although AFAP mutation carriers have a 69% risk of colorectal cancer by age 80, clinical recognition remains a challenge in some cases, as they present with few colonic adenomas and are difficult to distinguish clinically from patients with sporadic polyps. Methods Family relationships were established using family history reports, the Utah Population Database, and the public records of the Mormon Church. Genetic analysis of representative family members was done using the Affymetrix 10K SNP array platform. Colonoscopy data were available on 120 individuals with the AFAP mutation. Results Two large AFAP kindreds with the identical APC disease causing mutation (c.426_427delAT) link to a founding couple who came to America from England around 1630. Genetic analysis demonstrates that the two families share a conserved haplotype of 7.17 Mbp surrounding the mutant APC allele. The data shows that 36.6% of the mutation-positive family members have fewer than 10 colonic adenomatous polyps, and 3 (6.8%) of these individuals were diagnosed with colorectal cancer. Conclusions In view of the apparent age of this mutation, a notable fraction of both multiple adenoma patients and perhaps even colon cancer cases in the U.S. could be related to this founder mutation. The colon cancer risk associated with the mutation makes genetic testing of considerable importance in patients with a personal or family history of either colonic polyps or cancer at a young age. PMID:18063416

  7. New insights on lithospheric foundering from thermo-mechanically coupled numerical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastor-Galán, Daniel; Thieulot, Cedric

    2015-04-01

    Earth's lithosphere is recycled into the mantle as required by global mass considerations. At least during the latest 1 G.y. the main mechanism of lithospheric foundering into the mantle has been subduction. Yet other mechanisms of mantle removal such as Rayleigh-Taylor-type instability or delamination have significant influence at present as revealed by mantle anomalies, and are considered to be likely candidates for the main recycling mechanisms of lithospheric during the Archean. Although lithospheric mantle removal has been geophysically imaged, e.g. Carpathians, Colorado Plateau, at many other locations geophysical and geological observations also seem to indicate that mantle lithosphere is anomalously thin or absent. Potential places where lithospheric mantle foundering processes took place are The Urals, the Variscides, underneath the Ibero Armorican Orocline in western Europe, and the Tibetan, Puna and Anatolian Plateaus. Lithospheric foundering has been blamed for, among others, cratonization processes, rapid surface uplift, generation of voluminous magmatism, changes in crustal stress from compression to extension and a long etc. However, its triggering mechanisms are not well studied, and a variety of possible explanations have been given for lithospheric foundering processes, including convective instability following orogenic thickening or some other perturbation of thermal boundary layers, development of eclogitic roots, erosion of the lithosphere by a flat-subducting slab or partial melting of the asthenosphere, and partial intruding pyroxenites into the base of lithosphere. To understand the mechanisms, causes and consequences of lithospheric foundering, we explored lithospheric foundering in an assortment of scenarios using the numerical code, ELEFANT, an user-friendly multipurpose geodynamics code. Preliminary results indicate that changes in geometry, thermal state and composition of the lithosphere, associated with mantle flow, can have a first

  8. Identification of a common founder couple for 40 South African Afrikaner families with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Geldenhuys, Gerhard; Glanzmann, Brigitte; Lombard, Debbie; Boolay, Sihaam; Carr, Jonathan; Bardien, Soraya

    2014-05-12

    Afrikaners are a unique ethnic group in South Africa (SA) with well-documented ancestral records spanning a period of over 350 years. They are mainly descended from Dutch, German and French settlers to SA in the 17th and 18th centuries. Today several disorders in this population occur at relatively high frequencies as a result of founder effects.Objective. To determine whether a founder effect for Parkinson's disease (PD) is present in the Afrikaner population. Study participants were recruited from the Movement Disorders Clinic at Tygerberg Hospital in Cape Town, SA, and from support groups of the Parkinson's Association of South Africa. Standard methods for genealogical research in SA on hereditary diseases were used including interviews and searches in sources such as state archives, the Huguenot Museum in Franschhoek, marriage and baptismal records, and tombstone inscriptions. For 40 of the PD families, there was only a single most recent ancestral couple common to all of the families. On average there are between three and four ancestral lines to the founder couple per proband (range 1 -14). If genetic studies confirm the presence of a founder effect for PD in Afrikaners, this would imply that there is a large number of individuals from this ethnic group who may potentially be at risk of developing this debilitating condition. This study illustrates and reinforces the concept that genealogical analysis is a powerful tool for identification of founder effects for various disorders in the Afrikaner population.

  9. Mismatch repair genes founder mutations and cancer susceptibility in Lynch syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ponti, G; Castellsagué, E; Ruini, C; Percesepe, A; Tomasi, A

    2015-06-01

    Founder mutations in specific populations are common in several Mendelian disorders. They are shared by apparently unrelated families that inherited them from a common ancestor that existed hundreds to thousands of years ago. They have been proven to impact in molecular diagnostics strategies in specific populations, where they can be assessed as the first screening step and, if positive, avoid further expensive gene scanning. In Lynch syndrome (LS), a dominantly inherited colorectal cancer disease, more than 50 founder pathogenic mutations have been described so far in the mismatch repair (MMR) genes (MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2). We here provide a comprehensive summary of the founder mutations found in the MMR genes and an overview of their main characteristics. At a time when high-throughput strategies are being introduced in the molecular diagnostics of cancer, genetic testing for founder mutations can complement next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies to most efficiently identify MMR gene mutations in any given population. Additionally, special attention is paid to MMR founder mutations with interesting anthropological significance. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Interpretation of findings of founder population genetics studies applying lineage extinction theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livni, Haim; Livni, Joseph

    2016-11-01

    Population genetic investigation of founder events produce intriguing results and this work discusses how branching processes help the cross-examination of such results. For example one reads that 40% of the current Ashkenazi population carry the mtDNA of four founding mothers, (Behar et al., 2006) half of the Ashkenazi Levites descend from one founder (Behar et al., 2003), and 22% of the Malagasy population are descendants of a Polynesian ancestor, (Cox et al., 2012). Probability distributions obtained using a Galton-Watson lineage extinction model yield statistical relations between current population and founder population data. These relations lead to most likely estimates and 90% confidence intervals of the founder population size. The investigation compares the Galton-Watson methodology with the Wright-Fisher model adopted by coalescent theory and a back-to-back analysis of the Malagasy founder event produces matching results. The results reconcile the previous knowledge about the roots of Ashkenazi Jewry with published population genetic findings. They also confirm that random drift is sufficient to explain the genetic findings of the examined examples.

  11. High prevalence of four long QT syndrome founder mutations in the Finnish population

    PubMed Central

    MARJAMAA, ANNUKKA; SALOMAA, VEIKKO; NEWTON-CHEH, CHRISTOPHER; PORTHAN, KIMMO; REUNANEN, ANTTI; KARANKO, HANNU; JULA, ANTTI; LAHERMO, PÄIVI; VÄÄNÄNEN, HEIKKI; TOIVONEN, LAURI; SWAN, HEIKKI; VIITASALO, MATTI; NIEMINEN, MARKKU S.; PELTONEN, LEENA; OIKARINEN, LASSE; PALOTIE, AARNO; KONTULA, KIMMO

    2009-01-01

    Aims Long QT syndrome (LQTS) is an inherited arrhythmia disorder with an estimated prevalence of 0.01%–0.05%. In Finland, four founder mutations constitute up to 70% of the known genetic spectrum of LQTS. In the present survey, we sought to estimate the actual prevalence of the founder mutations and to determine their effect sizes in the general Finnish population. Methods and results We genotyped 6334 subjects aged≥30 years from a population cohort (Health 2000 study) for the four Finnish founder mutations using Sequenom MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. The electrocardiogram (ECG) parameters were measured from digital 12-lead ECGs, and QT intervals were adjusted for age, sex, and heart rate using linear regression. A total of 27 individuals carried one of the founder mutations resulting in their collective prevalence estimate of 0.4% (95% CI 0.3%–0.6%). The KCNQ1 G589D mutation (n=8) was associated with a 50 ms (SE 7.0) prolongation of the adjusted QT interval (P=9.0×10-13). The KCNH2 R176W variant (n=16) resulted in a 22 ms (SE 4.7) longer adjusted QT interval (P=2.1×10-6). Conclusion In Finland 1 individual out of 250 carries a LQTS founder mutation, which is the highest documented prevalence of LQTS mutations that lead to a marked QT prolongation. PMID:19160088

  12. Phonemic diversity supports a serial founder effect model of language expansion from Africa.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Quentin D

    2011-04-15

    Human genetic and phenotypic diversity declines with distance from Africa, as predicted by a serial founder effect in which successive population bottlenecks during range expansion progressively reduce diversity, underpinning support for an African origin of modern humans. Recent work suggests that a similar founder effect may operate on human culture and language. Here I show that the number of phonemes used in a global sample of 504 languages is also clinal and fits a serial founder-effect model of expansion from an inferred origin in Africa. This result, which is not explained by more recent demographic history, local language diversity, or statistical non-independence within language families, points to parallel mechanisms shaping genetic and linguistic diversity and supports an African origin of modern human languages.

  13. Prevalence and impact of founder mutations in hereditary breast cancer in Latin America

    PubMed Central

    Ashton-Prolla, Patricia; Vargas, Fernando Regla

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 10% of all cancers are considered hereditary and are primarily caused by germline, high penetrance mutations in cancer predisposition genes. Although most cancer predisposition genes are considered molecularly heterogeneous, displaying hundreds of different disease-causing sequence alterations, founder mutations have been identified in certain populations. In some Latin American countries, founder mutations associated with increased risk of breast and other cancers have been described. This is particularly interesting considering that in most of these countries, populations are highly admixed with genetic contributions from native populations and from the in-flux of several distinct populations of immigrants. In this article, we present a review of the scientific literature on the subject and describe current data available on founder mutations described in the most common breast cancer predisposition genes: BRCA1, BRCA2 and TP53. PMID:24764757

  14. Genetics of murine craniofacial morphology: Diallel analysis of the eight founders of the Collaborative Cross

    PubMed Central

    Percival, Christopher J.; Liberton, Denise K.; de Villena, Fernando Pardo-Manuel; Spritz, Richard; Marcucio, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    Summary Using eight inbred founder strains of the mouse Collaborative Cross (CC) project and their reciprocal F1 hybrids, we quantified variation in craniofacial morphology across mouse strains, explored genetic contributions to craniofacial variation that distinguish the founder strains, and tested whether specific or summary measures of craniofacial shape display stronger additive genetic contributions. This study thus provides critical information about phenotypic diversity among CC founder strains and about the genetic contributions to this phenotypic diversity, which is relevant to understanding the basis of variation in standard laboratory strains and natural populations. Craniofacial shape was quantified as a series of size-adjusted linear dimensions (RDs) and by principal components (PC) analysis of morphological landmarks captured from computed tomography images from 62 out of the 64 reciprocal crosses of the CC founder strains. We first identified aspects of skull morphology that vary between these phenotypically ‘normal’ founder strains and that are defining characteristics of these strains. We estimated the contributions of additive and various non-additive genetic factors to phenotypic variation using diallel analyses of a subset of these strongly differing RDs and the first 8 PCs of skull shape variation. We find little difference in the genetic contributions to RD measures and PC scores, suggesting fundamental similarities in the magnitude of genetic contributions to both specific and summary measures of craniofacial phenotypes. Our results indicate that there are stronger additive genetic effects associated with defining phenotypic characteristics of specific founder strains, suggesting these distinguishing measures are good candidates for use in genotype-phenotype association studies of CC mice. Our results add significantly to understanding of genotype-phenotype associations in the skull, which serve as a foundation for modeling the origins of

  15. Plasmodium falciparum Founder Populations in Western Cambodia Have Reduced Artemisinin Sensitivity In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Amaratunga, Chanaki; Witkowski, Benoit; Dek, Dalin; Try, Vorleak; Khim, Nimol; Miotto, Olivo

    2014-01-01

    Reduced Plasmodium falciparum sensitivity to short-course artemisinin (ART) monotherapy manifests as a long parasite clearance half-life. We recently defined three parasite founder populations with long half-lives in Pursat, western Cambodia, where reduced ART sensitivity is prevalent. Using the ring-stage survival assay, we show that these founder populations have reduced ART sensitivity in vitro at the early ring stage of parasite development and that a genetically admixed population contains subsets of parasites with normal or reduced ART sensitivity. PMID:24867977

  16. The impact of founder effects, gene flow, and European admixture on native American genetic diversity.

    PubMed

    Hunley, Keith; Healy, Meghan

    2011-12-01

    Recent studies have concluded that the global pattern of neutral genetic diversity in humans reflects a series of founder effects and population movements associated with our recent expansion out of Africa. In contrast, regional studies tend to emphasize the significance of more complex patterns of colonization, gene flow, and secondary population movements in shaping patterns of diversity. Our objective in this study is to examine how founder effects, gene flow, and European admixture have molded patterns of neutral genetic diversity in the Americas. Our strategy is to test the fit of a serial founder effects process to the pattern of neutral autosomal genetic variation and to examine the contribution of gene flow and European admixture to departures from fit. The genetic data consist of 678 autosomal microsatellite loci assayed by Wang and colleagues in 530 individuals in 29 widely distributed Native American populations. We find that previous evidence for serial founder effects in the Americas may be driven in part by high levels of European admixture in northern North America, intermediate levels in Central America, and low levels in eastern South America. Geographically patterned admixture may also account for previously reported genetic differences between Andean and Amazonian groups. Though admixture has obscured the precise details of precontact evolutionary processes, we find that genetic diversity is still largely hierarchically structured and that gene flow between neighboring groups has had surprisingly little impact on macrogeographic patterns of genetic diversity in the Americas. 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. 171. Credit PG&E. Hamden Holmes Noble, founder of the Keswick ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    171. Credit PG&E. Hamden Holmes Noble, founder of the Keswick Electric Power Company. President of Keswick Power and its successor companies -- Northern California Power Company and Northern California Power Company, Consolidated (until 1915). - Battle Creek Hydroelectric System, Battle Creek & Tributaries, Red Bluff, Tehama County, CA

  18. Teaching Evolution through the Founder Effect: A Standards-Based Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leonard, William H.; Edmondson, Elizabeth

    2003-01-01

    Presents an activity called "The Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium, Founder Effect, and Evolution" to allow students to learn about evolution in an engaging, constructivist manner. The activity also uses the tools of mathematics to learn several related biology concepts. (Author/SOE)

  19. Comment on "Phonemic diversity supports a serial founder effect model of language expansion from Africa".

    PubMed

    Van Tuyl, Rory; Pereltsvaig, Asya

    2012-02-10

    Atkinson (Reports, 15 April 2011, p. 346) concluded that language originated in western Africa and that, due to a serial founder effect, languages repeatedly lost phonemes the farther they moved from the African point of origin. Independent examination of the published data tends to refute both these claims.

  20. Optimization methods for selecting founder individuals for captive breeding or reintroduction of endangered species.

    PubMed

    Miller, Webb; Wright, Stephen J; Zhang, Yu; Schuster, Stephan C; Hayes, Vanessa M

    2010-01-01

    Methods from genetics and genomics can be employed to help save endangered species. One potential use is to provide a rational strategy for selecting a population of founders for a captive breeding program. The hope is to capture most of the available genetic diversity that remains in the wild population, to provide a safe haven where representatives of the species can be bred, and eventually to release the progeny back into the wild. However, the founders are often selected based on a random-sampling strategy whose validity is based on unrealistic assumptions. Here we outline an approach that starts by using cutting-edge genome sequencing and genotyping technologies to objectively assess the available genetic diversity. We show how combinatorial optimization methods can be applied to these data to guide the selection of the founder population. In particular, we develop a mixed-integer linear programming technique that identifies a set of animals whose genetic profile is as close as possible to specified abundances of alleles (i.e., genetic variants), subject to constraints on the number of founders and their genders and ages.

  1. Long-distance plant dispersal to North Atlantic islands: colonization routes and founder effect.

    PubMed

    Alsos, Inger Greve; Ehrich, Dorothee; Eidesen, Pernille Bronken; Solstad, Heidi; Westergaard, Kristine Bakke; Schönswetter, Peter; Tribsch, Andreas; Birkeland, Siri; Elven, Reidar; Brochmann, Christian

    2015-04-15

    Long-distance dispersal (LDD) processes influence the founder effect on islands. We use genetic data for 25 Atlantic species and similarities among regional floras to analyse colonization, and test whether the genetic founder effect on five islands is associated with dispersal distance, island size and species traits. Most species colonized postglacially via multiple dispersal events from several source regions situated 280 to >3000 km away, and often not from the closest ones. A strong founder effect was observed for insect-pollinated mixed maters, and it increased with dispersal distance and decreased with island size in accordance with the theory of island biogeography. Only a minor founder effect was observed for wind-pollinated outcrossing species. Colonization patterns were largely congruent, indicating that despite the importance of stochasticity, LDD is mainly determined by common factors, probably dispersal vectors. Our findings caution against a priori assuming a single, close source region in biogeographic analyses. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany Company.

  2. Teaching Evolution through the Founder Effect: A Standards-Based Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leonard, William H.; Edmondson, Elizabeth

    2003-01-01

    Presents an activity called "The Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium, Founder Effect, and Evolution" to allow students to learn about evolution in an engaging, constructivist manner. The activity also uses the tools of mathematics to learn several related biology concepts. (Author/SOE)

  3. The role of founder effects on the evolution of reproductive isolation.

    PubMed

    Matute, D R

    2013-11-01

    Several theories argue that large changes in allele frequencies through genetic drift after a small founding population becomes allopatrically isolated can lead to significant changes in reproductive isolation and thus trigger the origin of new species. For this reason, founder speciation has been proposed as a potent force in the generation of new species. Nonetheless, the relative importance of such 'founder effects' remains largely untested. In this report, I used experimental evolution to create one thousand replicates that underwent an extreme bottleneck and to study whether founder effects can lead to an increase in reproductive isolation in Drosophila yakuba. Even though the most common outcome of inbreeding is extinction, founder effects can lead to increased premating reproductive isolation in a very small proportion of cases. Changes in reproductive isolation after a founding population bottleneck are similar to changes in other phenotypic traits, in which inbreeding might displace the mean phenotypic value and substantially increase the phenotypic variance. This increase in phenotypic variance does not confer an increase in the response to selection for reproductive isolation in artificial selection experiments, indicating that the increased phenotypic variance is not caused by increases in additive genetic variance. These results also demonstrate that, similar to morphological and life-history traits, behavioural traits can be affected by inbreeding and genetic drift. © 2013 The Author. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2013 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  4. Estimation of epistatic variance components and heritability in founder populations and crosses.

    PubMed

    Young, Alexander I; Durbin, Richard

    2014-12-01

    Genetic association studies have explained only a small proportion of the estimated heritability of complex traits, leaving the remaining heritability "missing." Genetic interactions have been proposed as an explanation for this, because they lead to overestimates of the heritability and are hard to detect. Whether this explanation is true depends on the proportion of variance attributable to genetic interactions, which is difficult to measure in outbred populations. Founder populations exhibit a greater range of kinship than outbred populations, which helps in fitting the epistatic variance. We extend classic theory to founder populations, giving the covariance between individuals due to epistasis of any order. We recover the classic theory as a limit, and we derive a recently proposed estimator of the narrow sense heritability as a corollary. We extend the variance decomposition to include dominance. We show in simulations that it would be possible to estimate the variance from pairwise interactions with samples of a few thousand from strongly bottlenecked human founder populations, and we provide an analytical approximation of the standard error. Applying these methods to 46 traits measured in a yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) cross, we estimate that pairwise interactions explain 10% of the phenotypic variance on average and that third- and higher-order interactions explain 14% of the phenotypic variance on average. We search for third-order interactions, discovering an interaction that is shared between two traits. Our methods will be relevant to future studies of epistatic variance in founder populations and crosses. Copyright © 2014 by the Genetics Society of America.

  5. Clovis Vincent (1879-1947): founder of French neurosurgery and promoter of oncologic neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Karamanou, M; Androutsos, G; Lymperi, M; Stamboulis, E; Liappas, I; Lykouras, E

    2012-01-01

    The eminent neurologist Clovis Vincent decided to become neurosurgeon at an advanced age. His is considered the founder of French neurosurgery and the Europe's first neurosurgeon. He was mainly interested in pituitary tumors and his work on oncologic neurosurgery remains valuable.

  6. The Influence of Founder Type on Charter School Structures and Operations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henig, Jeffrey R.; Holyoke, Thomas T.; Brown, Heath; Lacireno-Paquet, Natalie

    Much of the literature on charter schools treats them as an undifferentiated mass. A typology of charter schools grounded in the norms, traditions, and perspectives of the founding organization or organizers is presented and tested in this paper. It is suggested that there are two broad categories of charter founders: (1) those who are more…

  7. The Influence of Founder Type on Charter School Structures and Operations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henig, Jeffrey R.; Holyoke, Thomas T.; Brown, Heath; Lacireno-Paquet, Natalie

    2005-01-01

    Much of the literature on charter schools treats them as an undifferentiated mass. Here we present and test a typology of charter schools that is grounded in the norms, traditions, and perspectives of the founding organization or organizers. We suggest that there are two broad categories of charter founders--those who are more mission oriented and…

  8. Hallie Quinn Brown (1845-Or 1850-1949): Educator, Author, Lecturer, Founder, and Reformer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, A.L.; Lamikanra, A.E.; Jones, O.S.L.; Evans, V.

    2004-01-01

    Most black educators are aware of black pioneers, such as Frederick Douglass, Phillis Wheatley, Booker T. Washington, W. E. B. DuBois, George Washington Carver, Mary McLeod Bethune, and others, Few are, however, aware of Hallie Quinn Brown (1845-or 1850-1949) educator, author, lecture, founder, and reformer, who wrote one of the first biographies…

  9. Molecular Diagnosis of Hereditary Fructose Intolerance: Founder Mutation in a Community from India.

    PubMed

    Bijarnia-Mahay, Sunita; Movva, Sireesha; Gupta, Neerja; Sharma, Deepak; Puri, Ratna D; Kotecha, Udhaya; Saxena, Renu; Kabra, Madhulika; Mohan, Neelam; Verma, Ishwar C

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI) is a difficult-to-confirm diagnosis, requiring either invasive liver biopsy-enzyme assay or potentially hazardous fructose challenge test or expensive molecular genetic analysis. Therefore, worldwide there has been a trend towards finding "common mutations" in distinct ethnic groups to simplify the process of diagnosis. The nonspecific presentation of the disease often leads to diagnostic confusion with other metabolic liver disorders such as glycogenoses, galactosemia, and tyrosinemia. This leads to much delay in diagnosis with consequent harm to the patient.We report mutations in the ALDOB gene, from eleven Indian patients, seven of whom belong to the Agarwal community. Six patients from the Agarwal community and two non-Agarwal patients harbored one novel mutation, c.324+1G>A (five homozygous and one heterozygous), in the ALDOB gene. Haplotyping performed in families confirmed a founder effect. The community has been known to harbor founder mutations in other genes such as the MLC1, PANK2, and CAPN3 genes, thus providing another evidence for a founder effect in the community in case of HFI. This may pave the path for a simpler and quicker test at least for this community in India. In addition to the founder mutation, we report four other novel mutations, c.112+1delG, c.380-1G>A, c.677G>A, and c.689delA, and a previously reported mutation, c.1013C>T, in the cohort from India.

  10. A Study of Founders of Community Based Nonprofit Organizations: Implications for Extension Leadership Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolton, Elizabeth B.; Spence, Lynda M.

    2006-01-01

    This study was conducted to explore the motives and experiences of founders of community based nonprofit organizations. The information collected in this study will be useful to extension leadership educators as they work with the leaders in developing and sustaining these organizations that address needs unmet by government or other…

  11. A. G. Vernon Harcourt: A Founder of Chemical Kinetics and a Friend of "Lewis Carroll."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shorter, John

    1980-01-01

    Outlines the life of A. G. Vernon Harcourt, a founder of chemical kinetics, contributor to the purification of coal gas from sulfur compounds, inventor of the percentage chloroform inhaler, friend to Lewis Carroll, and instructor to the Prince of Wales. (CS)

  12. Ideas of the Founders on Constitutional Government: Resources for Teachers of History and Government.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patrick, John J., Ed.

    The political ideas of John Adams, Alexander Hamilton, John Jay, Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, and other Founders of the United States have been a rich civic legacy for successive generations of citizens. An important means of ensuring that these ideas on constitutional government continue to inspire and guide people in the 21st century lies in…

  13. Hallie Quinn Brown (1845-Or 1850-1949): Educator, Author, Lecturer, Founder, and Reformer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, A.L.; Lamikanra, A.E.; Jones, O.S.L.; Evans, V.

    2004-01-01

    Most black educators are aware of black pioneers, such as Frederick Douglass, Phillis Wheatley, Booker T. Washington, W. E. B. DuBois, George Washington Carver, Mary McLeod Bethune, and others, Few are, however, aware of Hallie Quinn Brown (1845-or 1850-1949) educator, author, lecture, founder, and reformer, who wrote one of the first biographies…

  14. Estimation of Epistatic Variance Components and Heritability in Founder Populations and Crosses

    PubMed Central

    Young, Alexander I.; Durbin, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Genetic association studies have explained only a small proportion of the estimated heritability of complex traits, leaving the remaining heritability “missing.” Genetic interactions have been proposed as an explanation for this, because they lead to overestimates of the heritability and are hard to detect. Whether this explanation is true depends on the proportion of variance attributable to genetic interactions, which is difficult to measure in outbred populations. Founder populations exhibit a greater range of kinship than outbred populations, which helps in fitting the epistatic variance. We extend classic theory to founder populations, giving the covariance between individuals due to epistasis of any order. We recover the classic theory as a limit, and we derive a recently proposed estimator of the narrow sense heritability as a corollary. We extend the variance decomposition to include dominance. We show in simulations that it would be possible to estimate the variance from pairwise interactions with samples of a few thousand from strongly bottlenecked human founder populations, and we provide an analytical approximation of the standard error. Applying these methods to 46 traits measured in a yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) cross, we estimate that pairwise interactions explain 10% of the phenotypic variance on average and that third- and higher-order interactions explain 14% of the phenotypic variance on average. We search for third-order interactions, discovering an interaction that is shared between two traits. Our methods will be relevant to future studies of epistatic variance in founder populations and crosses. PMID:25326236

  15. A. G. Vernon Harcourt: A Founder of Chemical Kinetics and a Friend of "Lewis Carroll."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shorter, John

    1980-01-01

    Outlines the life of A. G. Vernon Harcourt, a founder of chemical kinetics, contributor to the purification of coal gas from sulfur compounds, inventor of the percentage chloroform inhaler, friend to Lewis Carroll, and instructor to the Prince of Wales. (CS)

  16. Founder effects, inbreeding, and loss of genetic diversity in four avian reintroduction programs.

    PubMed

    Jamieson, Ian G

    2011-02-01

    The number of individuals translocated and released as part of a reintroduction is often small, as is the final established population, because the reintroduction site is typically small. Small founder and small resulting populations can result in population bottlenecks, which are associated with increased rates of inbreeding and loss of genetic diversity, both of which can affect the long-term viability of reintroduced populations. I used information derived from pedigrees of four monogamous bird species reintroduced onto two different islands (220 and 259 ha) in New Zealand to compare the pattern of inbreeding and loss of genetic diversity among the reintroduced populations. Although reintroduced populations founded with few individuals had higher levels of inbreeding, as predicted, other factors, including biased sex ratio and skewed breeding success, contributed to high levels of inbreeding and loss of genetic diversity. Of the 10-58 individuals released, 4-25 genetic founders contributed at least one living descendent and yielded approximately 3-11 founder-genome equivalents (number of genetic founders assuming an equal contribution of offspring and no random loss of alleles across generations) after seven breeding seasons. This range is much lower than the 20 founder-genome equivalents recommended for captive-bred populations. Although the level of inbreeding in one reintroduced population initially reached three times that of a closely related species, the long-term estimated rate of inbreeding of this one population was approximately one-third that of the other species due to differences in carrying capacities of the respective reintroduction sites. The increasing number of reintroductions to suitable areas that are smaller than those I examined here suggests that it might be useful to develop long-term strategies and guidelines for reintroduction programs, which would minimize inbreeding and maintain genetic diversity. ©2010 Society for Conservation

  17. Stereotypic founder cell patterning and embryonic muscle formation in Drosophila require nautilus (MyoD) gene function

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Qin; Rong, Yikang; Paterson, Bruce M.

    2007-01-01

    nautilus is the only MyoD-related gene in Drosophila. Nautilus expression begins around stage 9 at full germ-band extension in a subset of mesodermal cells organized in a stereotypic pattern in each hemisegment. The muscle founder cell marker Duf-LacZ, produced by the enhancer trap line rP298LacZ, is coexpressed in numerous Nautilus-positive cells when founders first appear. Founders entrain muscle identity through the restricted expression of transcription factors such as S59, eve, and Kr, all of which are observed in subsets of the nautilus expressing founders. We inactivated the nautilus gene using homology-directed gene targeting and Gal4/UAS regulated RNAi to determine whether loss of nautilus gene activity affected founder cell function. Both methods produced a range of defects that included embryonic muscle disruption, reduced viability and female sterility, which could be rescued by hsp70-nautilus cDNA transgenes. Our results demonstrate Nautilus expression marks early founders that give rise to diverse muscle groups in the embryo, and that nautilus gene activity is required to seed the correct founder myoblast pattern that prefigures the muscle fiber arrangement during embryonic development. PMID:17376873

  18. The legacy of nuclear risk and the founder effect in biotechnology organizations.

    PubMed

    Fleising, Usher

    2002-04-01

    In the wake of the Chernobyl nuclear accident and a decline in the public trust of science, the founders of modern biotechnology recognized the strategic importance of risk assessment and regulatory affairs. In an effort to avoid the demonization that was attached to the nuclear industry, the pioneers of modern biotechnology delegated authority for regulatory negotiation and risk management to senior positions in the firm. At the same time, the Biotechnology Industry Organization was handed great latitude and trust with making public pronouncements on issues of bioethics and public policy. The way in which founders and leaders embed norms for negotiating regulation and responding to public perceptions has proved important in the maturation and acceptance of a biotechnology sector.

  19. Demogenetic study of three populations within a region with strong founder effects.

    PubMed

    Lavoie, Eve-Marie; Tremblay, Marc; Houde, Louis; Vézina, Hélène

    2005-01-01

    The population of the Saguenay-Lac-St-Jean (SLSJ) region (Quebec, Canada) is known to have a relatively high prevalence of certain hereditary disorders, which can be explained by the consequences of founder effects. This study aims at providing new insights on the origins and subregional stratification of these founder effects. The genealogies of 300 individuals were reconstructed and analyzed using the BALSAC population register. Inbreeding and kinship levels are higher in Lower Saguenay than in Upper Saguenay and Lac-St-Jean. The population of Lower Saguenay also distinguishes itself because of a fewer number of distinct ancestors. Beyond the genetic features that characterize the whole region, SLSJ also displays intraregional variability. Thus it is important to take into account the settlement patterns and the demographic history of this population for a better appraisal of its contemporary genetic structure.

  20. Pervasive Genotypic Mosaicism in Founder Mice Derived from Genome Editing through Pronuclear Injection

    PubMed Central

    Oliver, Daniel; Yuan, Shuiqiao; McSwiggin, Hayden; Yan, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Genome editing technologies, especially the Cas9/CRISPR system, have revolutionized biomedical research over the past several years. Generation of novel alleles has been simplified to unprecedented levels, allowing for rapid expansion of available genetic tool kits for researchers. However, the issue of genotypic mosaicism has become evident, making stringent analyses of the penetrance of genome-edited alleles essential. Here, we report that founder mice, derived from pronuclear injection of ZFNs or a mix of guidance RNAs and Cas9 mRNAs, display consistent genotypic mosaicism for both deletion and insertion alleles. To identify founders with greater possibility of transmitting the mutant allele through the germline, we developed an effective germline genotyping method. The awareness of the inherent genotypic mosaicism issue with genome editing will allow for a more efficient implementation of the technologies, and the germline genotyping method will save valuable time and resources. PMID:26053263

  1. G130V, a common FRDA point mutation, appears to have arisen from a common founder.

    PubMed

    Delatycki, M B; Knight, M; Koenig, M; Cossée, M; Williamson, R; Forrest, S M

    1999-10-01

    Friedreich ataxia (FRDA) is the most common inherited ataxia. About 98% of mutant alleles have an expansion of a GAA trinucleotide repeat in intron 1 of the affected gene, FRDA. The other 2% are point mutations. Of the 17 point mutations so far described, three appear to be more common. One of these is the G130V mutation in exon 4 of FRDA. G130V, when present with an expanded GAA repeat on the other allele, is associated with an atypical FRDA phenotype. Haplotype analysis was undertaken on the four families who have been described with this mutation. The results suggest a common founder for this mutation. Although marked differences in extragenic marker haplotypes were seen in one family, similar intragenic haplotyping suggests the same mutation founder for this family with the differences explicable by two recombination events.

  2. Haplotype analysis of α-thalassemia chromosomes reveals heterogeneity and multiple founders in Ashkenazi Jews.

    PubMed

    Shaulov, Adir; Filon, Dvora; Rund, Deborah

    2016-11-01

    α-Thalassemia (α-thal) is among the world's most common single gene disorders, generally attributed to a selective advantage of heterozygotes against malaria mortality. A high frequency of -α(3.7) deletion heterozygosity has been previously reported in Ashkenazi Jews despite lack of obvious malarial selection pressure in this population. Using haplotype and -α(3.7) subtype analysis we analyzed a subset of -α(3.7) homozygotes from various Israeli ethnic groups. We found a high frequency of the common Ia haplotype in Yemenite Jews and Arabs (54% and 13% respectively). Ashkenazi Jews exhibited a high frequency of IIIb alleles (67%) previously reported only in Aboriginal Australians and not found in other Israeli ethnicities. Both Yemenites and Ashkenazim carried the rare IIh alleles (18% and 15% respectively). These results may suggest multiple founder effects in Ashkenazi Jews as well a common founder for both Yemenite and Ashkenazi Jews. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Momir H. Polenakovic - Founder of the Nephrology Associations in the Republic of Macedonia.

    PubMed

    Spasovski, Goce; Stojceva-Taneva, Olivera

    2015-01-01

    Acad. Momir Polenakovic has devoted his life and work in the diagnosis and treatment of kidney patients, as well as in research of kidney disease. The great experience he has acquired in the work with kidney patients, and after the visit to the most renowned nephrology centers in Europe and the world, he has transferred it to his colleagues through the work in the medical and nephrology associations. The work of the associations was in fact a successful education of young doctors and specialists. Among his most distinguished positions, we can mention: President of the Macedonian Medical Association, founder and President of the MSNDTAO, President of the Yugoslav Society of Nephrology, founder and President of BANTAO, as well as member of the Boards of ESAO and ERA-EDTA. He has received a lot of recognitions for his work achievements.

  4. Ancient founder mutation is responsible for Imerslund-Gräsbeck Syndrome among diverse ethnicities

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Imerslund-Gräsbeck syndrome (IGS) was described just over 50 years ago by Olga Imerslund and Ralph Gräsbeck and colleagues. IGS is caused by specific malabsorption of cobalamin (Cbl) due to bi-allelic mutations in either the cubilin gene (CUBN) or the human amnionless homolog (AMN). Mutations in the two genes are commonly seen in founder populations or in societies with a high degree of consanguineous marriages. One particular mutation in AMN, c.208-2A>G, causing an out-of-frame loss of exon 4 in the mRNA, is responsible for some 15% of IGS cases globally. We present evidence that this founder mutation causes a substantial percentage of cases among diverse ethnicities and that the mutation is as old as human civilization. Methods Partial genotyping indicated a founder event but its presence in diverse peoples of Arabic, Turkish, Jewish, and Hispanic ancestry suggested that the mutation might be recurrent. We therefore studied the flanking sequence spanning 3.5 Mb to elucidate the origin of the haplotype and estimate the age of the mutation using a Bayesian inference method based on observed linkage disequilibrium. Results The mutation's distribution, the size of the shared haplotype, and estimates of growth rate and carrier frequency indicated that the mutation was a single prehistoric event. Dating back to the ancient Middle East around 11,600 BC, the mutation predates the advent of writing, farming, and the monotheistic religions of the region. Conclusions This mutation causes over 50% of the IGS cases among Arabic, Turkish, and Sephardic Jewish families, making it a primary target for genetic screening among diverse IGS cases originating from the Middle East. Thus, rare founder mutations may cause a substantial number of cases, even among diverse ethnicities not usually thought to be related. PMID:22078000

  5. Twin Town in South Brazil: A Nazi's Experiment or a Genetic Founder Effect?

    PubMed Central

    Tagliani-Ribeiro, Alice; Oliveira, Mariana; Sassi, Adriana K.; Rodrigues, Maira R.; Zagonel-Oliveira, Marcelo; Steinman, Gary; Matte, Ursula; Fagundes, Nelson J. R.; Schuler-Faccini, Lavinia

    2011-01-01

    Cândido Godói (CG) is a small municipality in South Brazil with approximately 6,000 inhabitants. It is known as the “Twins' Town” due to its high rate of twin births. Recently it was claimed that such high frequency of twinning would be connected to experiments performed by the German Nazi doctor Joseph Mengele. It is known, however, that this town was founded by a small number of families and therefore a genetic founder effect may represent an alternatively explanation for the high twinning prevalence in CG. In this study, we tested specific predictions of the “Nazi's experiment” and of the “founder effect” hypotheses. We surveyed a total of 6,262 baptism records from 1959–2008 in CG catholic churches, and identified 91 twin pairs and one triplet. Contrary to the “Nazi's experiment hypothesis”, there is no spurt in twinning between the years (1964–1968) when Mengele allegedly was in CG (P = 0.482). Moreover, there is no temporal trend for a declining rate of twinning since the 1960s (P = 0.351), and no difference in twinning among CG districts considering two different periods: 1927–1958 and 1959–2008 (P = 0.638). On the other hand, the “founder effect hypothesis” is supported by an isonymy analysis that shows that women who gave birth to twins have a higher inbreeding coefficient when compared to women who never had twins (0.0148, 0.0081, respectively, P = 0.019). In summary, our results show no evidence for the “Nazi's experiment hypothesis” and strongly suggest that the “founder effect hypothesis” is a much more likely alternative for explaining the high prevalence of twinning in CG. If this hypothesis is correct, then this community represents a valuable population where genetic factors linked to twinning may be identified. PMID:21687665

  6. Molecular investigation of distal renal tubular acidosis in Tunisia, evidence for founder mutations.

    PubMed

    Nagara, Majdi; Voskarides, Konstantinos; Nouira, Sonia; Ben Halim, Nizar; Kefi, Rym; Aloulou, Hajer; Romdhane, Lilia; Ben Abdallah, Rim; Ben Rhouma, Faten; Aissa, Khaoula; Boughamoura, Lamia; Kammoun, Thouraya; Azzouz, Hatem; Abroug, Saoussen; Ben Turkia, Hathemi; Ayadi, Abdelkarim; Mrad, Ridha; Chabchoub, Imen; Hachicha, Mongia; Chemli, Jalel; Deltas, Constantinos; Abdelhak, Sonia

    2014-11-01

    Distal renal tubular acidosis (dRTA) is a rare genetic disease caused by mutations in different genes involved in the secretion of H+ ions in the intercalated cells of the collecting duct. Both autosomal dominant and recessive forms have been described; the latter is also associated with sensorineural hearing loss. Twenty-two Tunisian families were analyzed for mutations in the ATP6V1B1 and ATP6V0A4 genes by direct sequencing. Dating of the founder mutations was performed. Two founder mutations in the ATP6V1B1 gene were found in 16/27 dRTA cases. The p.Ile386Hisfs*56 founder mutation was estimated to be older than 2400 years and no correlations were found with deafness. For the remaining patients, two mutations in the ATP6V0A4 gene, one of them being novel, were found in three Tunisian cases. The presence of a heterozygous missense mutation p.T30I, of the ATP6V1B1 gene, was identified in six patients, while no mutations of the second gene were detected. No deleterious mutations of either ATP6V1B1 or ATP6V0A were found for the two probands. Our study gives evidence of phenotypic and genotypic heterogeneity of dRTA in the Tunisian population. Five different mutations were found, two of them were due to a founder effect, and screening of these mutations could provide a rapid and valuable tool for diagnosis of dRTA.

  7. Germline Mutations of BRCA1 and BRCA2 in Korean Ovarian Cancer Patients: Finding Founder Mutations.

    PubMed

    Choi, Min Chul; Heo, Jin-Hyung; Jang, Ja-Hyun; Jung, Sang Geun; Park, Hyun; Joo, Won Duk; Lee, Chan; Lee, Je Ho; Lee, Jun Mo; Hwang, Yoon Young; Kim, Seung Jo

    2015-10-01

    To investigate and analyze the BRCA mutations in Korean ovarian cancer patients with or without family history and to find founder mutations in this group. One hundred two patients who underwent a staging operation for pathologically proven epithelial cancer between January 2013 and December 2014 were enrolled. Thirty-two patients declined to analyze BRCA1/2 gene alterations after genetic counseling and pedigree analysis. Lymphocyte specimens from peripheral blood were assessed for BRCA1/2 by direct sequencing. BRCA genetic test results of 70 patients were available. Eighteen BRCA1/2 mutations and 17 unclassified variations (UVs) were found. Five of the BRCA1/2 mutations and 4 of the UVs were not reported in the Breast Cancer Information Core database. One BRCA2 UV (8665_8667delGGA) was strongly suspicious to be a deleterious mutation. BRCA1/2 mutations were identified in 11 (61.1%) of 18 patients with a family history and in 7 (13.5%) of 52 patients without a family history.Candidates for founder mutations in Korean ovarian cancer patients were assessed among 39 BRCA1/2 mutations from the present study and from literature reviews. The analysis showed that 1041_1043delAGCinsT (n = 4; 10.2%) and 3746insA (n = 4; 10.2%) were possible BRCA1 founder mutations. Only one of the BRCA2 mutations (5804_5807delTTAA) was repeated twice (n = 2; 5.1%). The prevalence of BRCA1/2 mutations in Korean ovarian cancer patients irrespective of the family history was significantly higher than previously reported. Possible founder mutations in Korean ovarian cancer patients were identified.

  8. Proof-of-principle rapid noninvasive prenatal diagnosis of autosomal recessive founder mutations

    PubMed Central

    Zeevi, David A.; Altarescu, Gheona; Weinberg-Shukron, Ariella; Zahdeh, Fouad; Dinur, Tama; Chicco, Gaya; Herskovitz, Yair; Renbaum, Paul; Elstein, Deborah; Levy-Lahad, Ephrat; Rolfs, Arndt; Zimran, Ari

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Noninvasive prenatal testing can be used to accurately detect chromosomal aneuploidies in circulating fetal DNA; however, the necessity of parental haplotype construction is a primary drawback to noninvasive prenatal diagnosis (NIPD) of monogenic disease. Family-specific haplotype assembly is essential for accurate diagnosis of minuscule amounts of circulating cell-free fetal DNA; however, current haplotyping techniques are too time-consuming and laborious to be carried out within the limited time constraints of prenatal testing, hampering practical application of NIPD in the clinic. Here, we have addressed this pitfall and devised a universal strategy for rapid NIPD of a prevalent mutation in the Ashkenazi Jewish (AJ) population. METHODS. Pregnant AJ couples, carrying mutation(s) in GBA, which encodes acid β-glucosidase, were recruited at the SZMC Gaucher Clinic. Targeted next-generation sequencing of GBA-flanking SNPs was performed on peripheral blood samples from each couple, relevant mutation carrier family members, and unrelated individuals who are homozygotes for an AJ founder mutation. Allele-specific haplotypes were constructed based on linkage, and a consensus Gaucher disease–associated founder mutation–flanking haplotype was fine mapped. Together, these haplotypes were used for NIPD. All test results were validated by conventional prenatal or postnatal diagnostic methods. RESULTS. Ten parental alleles in eight unrelated fetuses were diagnosed successfully based on the noninvasive method developed in this study. The consensus mutation–flanking haplotype aided diagnosis for 6 of 9 founder mutation alleles. CONCLUSIONS. The founder NIPD method developed and described here is rapid, economical, and readily adaptable for prenatal testing of prevalent autosomal recessive disease-causing mutations in an assortment of worldwide populations. FUNDING. SZMC, Protalix Biotherapeutics Inc., and Centogene AG. PMID:26426075

  9. The chromosome 9 ALS and FTD locus is probably derived from a single founder

    PubMed Central

    Mok, Kin; Traynor, Bryan J.; Schymick, Jennifer; Tienari, Pentti J.; Laaksovirta, Hannu; Peuralinna, Terhi; Myllykangas, Liisa; Chiò, Adriano; Shatunov, Aleksey; Boeve, Bradley F.; Boxer, Adam L.; DeJesus-Hernandez, Mariely; Mackenzie, Ian R.; Waite, Adrian; Williams, Nigel; Morris, Huw R.; Simón-Sánchez, Javier; van Swieten, John C.; Heutink, Peter; Restagno, Gabriella; Mora, Gabriele; Morrison, Karen E.; Shaw, Pamela J.; Rollinson, Pamela Sara; Al-Chalabi, Ammar; Rademakers, Rosa; Pickering-Brown, Stuart; Orrell, Richard W.; Nalls, Michael A.; Hardy, John

    2012-01-01

    We and others have recently reported an association between amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and single nucleotide polymorphisms on chromosome 9p21 in several populations. Here we show that the associated haplotype is the same in all populations and that several families previously shown to have genetic linkage to this region also share this haplotype. The most parsimonious explanation of these data are that there is a single founder for this form of disease. PMID:21925771

  10. Molecular Investigation of Distal Renal Tubular Acidosis in Tunisia, Evidence for Founder Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Voskarides, Konstantinos; Nouira, Sonia; Ben Halim, Nizar; Kefi, Rym; Aloulou, Hajer; Romdhane, Lilia; Ben Abdallah, Rim; Ben Rhouma, Faten; Aissa, Khaoula; Boughamoura, Lamia; Kammoun, Thouraya; Azzouz, Hatem; Abroug, Saoussen; Ben Turkia, Hathemi; Ayadi, Abdelkarim; Mrad, Ridha; Chabchoub, Imen; Hachicha, Mongia; Chemli, Jalel; Deltas, Constantinos; Abdelhak, Sonia

    2014-01-01

    Background: Distal renal tubular acidosis (dRTA) is a rare genetic disease caused by mutations in different genes involved in the secretion of H+ ions in the intercalated cells of the collecting duct. Both autosomal dominant and recessive forms have been described; the latter is also associated with sensorineural hearing loss. Methods: Twenty-two Tunisian families were analyzed for mutations in the ATP6V1B1 and ATP6V0A4 genes by direct sequencing. Dating of the founder mutations was performed. Results: Two founder mutations in the ATP6V1B1 gene were found in 16/27 dRTA cases. The p.Ile386Hisfs*56 founder mutation was estimated to be older than 2400 years and no correlations were found with deafness. For the remaining patients, two mutations in the ATP6V0A4 gene, one of them being novel, were found in three Tunisian cases. The presence of a heterozygous missense mutation p.T30I, of the ATP6V1B1 gene, was identified in six patients, while no mutations of the second gene were detected. No deleterious mutations of either ATP6V1B1 or ATP6V0A were found for the two probands. Conclusion: Our study gives evidence of phenotypic and genotypic heterogeneity of dRTA in the Tunisian population. Five different mutations were found, two of them were due to a founder effect, and screening of these mutations could provide a rapid and valuable tool for diagnosis of dRTA. PMID:25285676

  11. Identification of a founder mutation for Pendred syndrome in families from northwest Iran.

    PubMed

    Mohseni, Marzieh; Honarpour, Asal; Mozafari, Reza; Davarnia, Behzad; Najmabadi, Hossein; Kahrizi, Kimia

    2014-11-01

    Mutations in the SLC26A4 gene cause both Pendred syndrome and autosomal recessive nonsyndromic hearing loss (ARNSHL) at the DFNB4 locus. The SLC26A4 mutations vary among different communities. Previous studies have shown that mutations in the SLC26A4 gene are responsible for the more common syndromic hereditary hearing loss in Iran. This study assesses the possibility of a founder mutation for Pendred syndrome in northwest Iran. In this study, we performed comprehensive clinical and genetic evaluations in two unrelated families from northwest Iran with nine members affected by hearing loss (HL). After testing short tandem repeat (STR) markers to confirm linkage to the SLC26A4 locus, we screened the SLC26A4 gene by Sanger sequencing of all 21 exons, exon-intron boundaries and the promoter region for any causative mutation. We identified the same causative mutation in these two families as we had detected earlier in two other Azeri families from northwest Iran. To investigate the possibility of a founder effect in these four families, we conducted haplotype analysis, and 14 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) throughout the SLC26A4 gene were genotyped. Patients in the two families showed the phenotype of Pendred syndrome. A known frameshift mutation (c.965insA, p.N322Fs7X) in exon 8 was identified in the two families, which was the same mutation that we detected previously in two other Azeri families. The results of haplotype analysis showed that all 15 patients from four families shared the founder mutation. Common haplotypes were not observed in noncarrier members. Based on the results of our two studies, the c.965insA mutation has only been described in Iranian families from northwest Iran, so there is evidence for a founder mutation originating in this part of Iran. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The Role of the Founder in the Creation of Organizational Culture.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-01

    company. It i&s not even the philosophy or value system which the founder may articulate or write down in various "charters." Rather, it is the...assumptions which lie behind the values and which determine the -2- behavior patterns and the visible artifacts such as architecture, office layout, dress...responsible, C would get publicly angry at that person and accuse them of incompetence. If a manager overran a budget or had too much inventory and did not

  13. Chromosome 9 ALS and FTD locus is probably derived from a single founder.

    PubMed

    Mok, Kin; Traynor, Bryan J; Schymick, Jennifer; Tienari, Pentti J; Laaksovirta, Hannu; Peuralinna, Terhi; Myllykangas, Liisa; Chiò, Adriano; Shatunov, Aleksey; Boeve, Bradley F; Boxer, Adam L; DeJesus-Hernandez, Mariely; Mackenzie, Ian R; Waite, Adrian; Williams, Nigel; Morris, Huw R; Simón-Sánchez, Javier; van Swieten, John C; Heutink, Peter; Restagno, Gabriella; Mora, Gabriele; Morrison, Karen E; Shaw, Pamela J; Rollinson, Pamela Sara; Al-Chalabi, Ammar; Rademakers, Rosa; Pickering-Brown, Stuart; Orrell, Richard W; Nalls, Michael A; Hardy, John

    2012-01-01

    We and others have recently reported an association between amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and single nucleotide polymorphisms on chromosome 9p21 in several populations. Here we show that the associated haplotype is the same in all populations and that several families previously shown to have genetic linkage to this region also share this haplotype. The most parsimonious explanation of these data are that there is a single founder for this form of disease.

  14. Proof-of-principle rapid noninvasive prenatal diagnosis of autosomal recessive founder mutations.

    PubMed

    Zeevi, David A; Altarescu, Gheona; Weinberg-Shukron, Ariella; Zahdeh, Fouad; Dinur, Tama; Chicco, Gaya; Herskovitz, Yair; Renbaum, Paul; Elstein, Deborah; Levy-Lahad, Ephrat; Rolfs, Arndt; Zimran, Ari

    2015-10-01

    Noninvasive prenatal testing can be used to accurately detect chromosomal aneuploidies in circulating fetal DNA; however, the necessity of parental haplotype construction is a primary drawback to noninvasive prenatal diagnosis (NIPD) of monogenic disease. Family-specific haplotype assembly is essential for accurate diagnosis of minuscule amounts of circulating cell-free fetal DNA; however, current haplotyping techniques are too time-consuming and laborious to be carried out within the limited time constraints of prenatal testing, hampering practical application of NIPD in the clinic. Here, we have addressed this pitfall and devised a universal strategy for rapid NIPD of a prevalent mutation in the Ashkenazi Jewish (AJ) population. Pregnant AJ couples, carrying mutation(s) in GBA, which encodes acid β-glucosidase, were recruited at the SZMC Gaucher Clinic. Targeted next-generation sequencing of GBA-flanking SNPs was performed on peripheral blood samples from each couple, relevant mutation carrier family members, and unrelated individuals who are homozygotes for an AJ founder mutation. Allele-specific haplotypes were constructed based on linkage, and a consensus Gaucher disease-associated founder mutation-flanking haplotype was fine mapped. Together, these haplotypes were used for NIPD. All test results were validated by conventional prenatal or postnatal diagnostic methods. Ten parental alleles in eight unrelated fetuses were diagnosed successfully based on the noninvasive method developed in this study. The consensus mutation-flanking haplotype aided diagnosis for 6 of 9 founder mutation alleles. The founder NIPD method developed and described here is rapid, economical, and readily adaptable for prenatal testing of prevalent autosomal recessive disease-causing mutations in an assortment of worldwide populations. SZMC, Protalix Biotherapeutics Inc., and Centogene AG.

  15. Characterization of two Ashkenazi Jewish founder mutations in MSH6 gene causing Lynch syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Raskin, Leon; Schwenter, Frank; Freytsis, Marina; Tischkowitz, Marc; Wong, Nora; Chong, George; Narod, Steven A.; Levine, Douglas A.; Bogomolniy, Faina; Aronson, Melyssa; Thibodeau, Stephen N.; Hunt, Katherine S.; Rennert, Gad; Gallinger, Steven; Gruber, Stephen B.; Foulkes, William D.

    2015-01-01

    Founder mutations are an important cause of Lynch syndrome and facilitate genetic testing in specific ethnic populations. Two putative founder mutations in MSH6 were analyzed in 2685 colorectal cancer (CRC) cases, 337 endometrial cancer (EnCa) cases and 3310 healthy controls of Ashkenazi Jewish (AJ) descent from population-based and hospital-based case-control studies in Israel, Canada and the USA. The carriers were haplotyped and the age of the mutations was estimated. MSH6*c.3984_3987dupGTCA was found in 8/2685 CRC cases, 2/337 EnCa cases, and 1/3310 controls, consistent with a high risk of CRC (odds ratio (OR) = 9.9, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.2–78.9, p=0.0079) and a very high risk of EnCa (OR = 19.6, 95%CI = 1.8–217.2, p = 0.0006). MSH6*c.3959_3962delCAAG was identified in 3/2685 CRC cases, 2/337 EnCa cases and no controls. Each mutation was associated with separate conserved haplotypes. MSH6*c.3984_3987dupGTCA and MSH6*c.3959_3962delCAAG likely arose around 585 CE and 685 CE respectively. No carriers were identified in Sephardi Jews (450 cases and 490 controls). Truncating mutations MSH6*c.3984_3987dupGTCA and MSH6*c.3959_3962delCAAG cause Lynch syndrome and are founder mutations in Ashkenazi Jews. Together with other AJ founder mutations, they contribute substantially to the incidence of CRC and EnCa and are important tools for the early diagnosis and appropriate management of AJ Lynch syndrome patients. PMID:21155762

  16. Twin Town in South Brazil: a Nazi's experiment or a genetic founder effect?

    PubMed

    Tagliani-Ribeiro, Alice; Oliveira, Mariana; Sassi, Adriana K; Rodrigues, Maira R; Zagonel-Oliveira, Marcelo; Steinman, Gary; Matte, Ursula; Fagundes, Nelson J R; Schuler-Faccini, Lavinia

    2011-01-01

    Cândido Godói (CG) is a small municipality in South Brazil with approximately 6,000 inhabitants. It is known as the "Twins' Town" due to its high rate of twin births. Recently it was claimed that such high frequency of twinning would be connected to experiments performed by the German Nazi doctor Joseph Mengele. It is known, however, that this town was founded by a small number of families and therefore a genetic founder effect may represent an alternatively explanation for the high twinning prevalence in CG. In this study, we tested specific predictions of the "Nazi's experiment" and of the "founder effect" hypotheses. We surveyed a total of 6,262 baptism records from 1959-2008 in CG catholic churches, and identified 91 twin pairs and one triplet. Contrary to the "Nazi's experiment hypothesis", there is no spurt in twinning between the years (1964-1968) when Mengele allegedly was in CG (P = 0.482). Moreover, there is no temporal trend for a declining rate of twinning since the 1960s (P = 0.351), and no difference in twinning among CG districts considering two different periods: 1927-1958 and 1959-2008 (P = 0.638). On the other hand, the "founder effect hypothesis" is supported by an isonymy analysis that shows that women who gave birth to twins have a higher inbreeding coefficient when compared to women who never had twins (0.0148, 0.0081, respectively, P = 0.019). In summary, our results show no evidence for the "Nazi's experiment hypothesis" and strongly suggest that the "founder effect hypothesis" is a much more likely alternative for explaining the high prevalence of twinning in CG. If this hypothesis is correct, then this community represents a valuable population where genetic factors linked to twinning may be identified.

  17. The contribution of founder mutations in BRCA1 to breast cancer in Belarus.

    PubMed

    Uglanitsa, N; Oszurek, O; Uglanitsa, K; Savonievich, E; Lubiński, J; Cybulski, C; Debniak, T; Narod, S A; Gronwald, J

    2010-10-01

    Mutations in the BRCA1 gene increase susceptibility to both breast and ovarian cancer. In some countries, including several in Eastern Europe, founder mutations in the BRCA1 gene are responsible for a significant proportion of breast cancer cases. To estimate the hereditary proportion of breast cancer in Belarus, we sought the presence of any of three founder mutations in BRCA1 (4153delA, 5382insC and C61G) in 500 unselected cases of breast cancer. These mutations have previously been identified in breast/ovarian cancer families from Belarus and from other Slavic countries, including Poland and Russia. One of the three founder mutations in BRCA1 was present in 38 of 500 unselected cases of breast cancer (7.6%). A mutation was found in 12.6% of women diagnosed before age 50 and 5.6% of women diagnosed after age 50. A mutation was identified in 2 of 251 newborn controls (0.8%). The hereditary proportion of breast cancers in Belarus is among the highest of any countries studied to date.

  18. Tracing European founder lineages in the Near Eastern mtDNA pool.

    PubMed

    Richards, M; Macaulay, V; Hickey, E; Vega, E; Sykes, B; Guida, V; Rengo, C; Sellitto, D; Cruciani, F; Kivisild, T; Villems, R; Thomas, M; Rychkov, S; Rychkov, O; Rychkov, Y; Gölge, M; Dimitrov, D; Hill, E; Bradley, D; Romano, V; Calì, F; Vona, G; Demaine, A; Papiha, S; Triantaphyllidis, C; Stefanescu, G; Hatina, J; Belledi, M; Di Rienzo, A; Novelletto, A; Oppenheim, A; Nørby, S; Al-Zaheri, N; Santachiara-Benerecetti, S; Scozari, R; Torroni, A; Bandelt, H J

    2000-11-01

    Founder analysis is a method for analysis of nonrecombining DNA sequence data, with the aim of identification and dating of migrations into new territory. The method picks out founder sequence types in potential source populations and dates lineage clusters deriving from them in the settlement zone of interest. Here, using mtDNA, we apply the approach to the colonization of Europe, to estimate the proportion of modern lineages whose ancestors arrived during each major phase of settlement. To estimate the Palaeolithic and Neolithic contributions to European mtDNA diversity more accurately than was previously achievable, we have now extended the Near Eastern, European, and northern-Caucasus databases to 1,234, 2, 804, and 208 samples, respectively. Both back-migration into the source population and recurrent mutation in the source and derived populations represent major obstacles to this approach. We have developed phylogenetic criteria to take account of both these factors, and we suggest a way to account for multiple dispersals of common sequence types. We conclude that (i) there has been substantial back-migration into the Near East, (ii) the majority of extant mtDNA lineages entered Europe in several waves during the Upper Palaeolithic, (iii) there was a founder effect or bottleneck associated with the Last Glacial Maximum, 20,000 years ago, from which derives the largest fraction of surviving lineages, and (iv) the immigrant Neolithic component is likely to comprise less than one-quarter of the mtDNA pool of modern Europeans.

  19. [High prevalence of specific language impairment in Robinson Crusoe Island. A possible founder effect].

    PubMed

    Villanueva, Pía; de Barbieri, Zulema; Palomino, Hernán M; Palomino, Hernán

    2008-02-01

    Specific language impairment (SLI) occurs in 2% to 8% of preschool children. Major and candidate genes are probably involved. Genetic drift is a cause for the presence of high frequencies of deleterious alíeles of a specific disease and the founder effect is one of its forms. Robinson Crusoe Island has 633 inhabitants and its actual population began with 8 families that repopulated the island at the end of XIXth century. To assess the frequency of specific language impairment among children living in Robinson Crusoe Island. All 66 children aged between 3 and 9 years living in the island, were studied. Parents were interviewed and in children, non verbal intelligence, audiometric parameters, comprehension and expression of oral language were assessed. Extended genealogies were also performed. Forty children had at least one parent that was descending of founder families. Among these, 35% had SLI. Eighth five percent of SLI affected children came from the same colonizer family. The prevalence of SLI in Robinson Crusoe Island is higher than that reported in mainland Chile and abroad. This high prevalence, associated to a high frequency of consanguinity, supports the influence of genetic mechanisms in SLI transmission, based on a founder effect.

  20. The founder-cell transcriptome in the Arabidopsis apetala1 cauliflower inflorescence meristem.

    PubMed

    Frerichs, Anneke; Thoma, Rahere; Abdallah, Ali Taleb; Frommolt, Peter; Werr, Wolfgang; Chandler, John William

    2016-11-03

    Although the pattern of lateral organ formation from apical meristems establishes species-specific plant architecture, the positional information that confers cell fate to cells as they transit to the meristem flanks where they differentiate, remains largely unknown. We have combined fluorescence-activated cell sorting and RNA-seq to characterise the cell-type-specific transcriptome at the earliest developmental time-point of lateral organ formation using DORNRÖSCHEN-LIKE::GFP to mark founder-cell populations at the periphery of the inflorescence meristem (IM) in apetala1 cauliflower double mutants, which overproliferate IMs. Within the lateral organ founder-cell population at the inflorescence meristem, floral primordium identity genes are upregulated and stem-cell identity markers are downregulated. Additional differentially expressed transcripts are involved in polarity generation and boundary formation, and in epigenetic and post-translational changes. However, only subtle transcriptional reprogramming within the global auxin network was observed. The transcriptional network of differentially expressed genes supports the hypothesis that lateral organ founder-cell specification involves the creation of polarity from the centre to the periphery of the IM and the establishment of a boundary from surrounding cells, consistent with bract initiation. However, contrary to the established paradigm that sites of auxin response maxima pre-pattern lateral organ initiation in the IM, auxin response might play a minor role in the earliest stages of lateral floral initiation.

  1. Identification of a founder BRCA1 mutation in the Moroccan population.

    PubMed

    Quiles, F; Teulé, À; Martinussen Tandstad, N; Feliubadaló, L; Tornero, E; Del Valle, J; Menéndez, M; Salinas, M; Wethe Rognlien, V; Velasco, A; Izquierdo, A; Capellá, G; Brunet, J; Lázaro, C

    2016-10-01

    Breast cancer (BC) is the most frequent cancer among women in Morocco. However, the role of the most prevalent BC-predisposing genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2, has been largely unexplored. To help define the role of BRCA1 in BC in Morocco, we characterized the first potential BRCA1 founder mutation in this population. Genetic testing of BRCA1 and BRCA2 in BC high-risk families identified mutation BRCA1 c.5309G>T, p.(Gly1770Val) or G1770V in five independent families from Morocco, suggesting a founder effect. To confirm this hypothesis, haplotype construction was performed using seven intragenic and flanking BRCA1 microsatellite markers. Clinical data were also compiled. Clinical data from carriers of mutation G1770V correspond to data from carriers of BRCA1 pathogenic mutations. Microsatellite analysis showed a common haplotype for the five families in a region comprising 1.54 Mb, confirming G1770V as the first specific founder BRCA1 mutation in the Moroccan population. Our findings contribute to a better understanding of BC genetics in the Moroccan population. Nevertheless, comprehensive studies of mutation G1770V in large series of BC patients from Morocco are needed to assess the real prevalence of this mutation and to improve genetic testing and risk assessment in this population. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. The sex determination gene shows no founder effect in the giant honey bee, Apis dorsata.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhi Yong; Wang, Zi Long; Yan, Wei Yu; Wu, Xiao Bo; Zeng, Zhi Jiang; Huang, Zachary Y

    2012-01-01

    All honey bee species (Apis spp) share the same sex determination mechanism using the complementary sex determination (csd) gene. Only individuals heterogeneous at the csd allele develop into females, and the homozygous develop into diploid males, which do not survive. The honeybees are therefore under selection pressure to generate new csd alleles. Previous studies have shown that the csd gene is under balancing selection. We hypothesize that due to the long separation from the mainland of Hainan Island, China, that the giant honey bees (Apis dorsata) should show a founder effect for the csd gene, with many different alleles clustered together, and these would be absent on the mainland. We sampled A. dorsata workers from both Hainan and Guangxi Provinces and then cloned and sequenced region 3 of the csd gene and constructed phylogenetic trees. We failed to find any clustering of the csd alleles according to their geographical origin, i.e. the Hainan and Guangxi samples did not form separate clades. Further analysis by including previously published csd sequences also failed to show any clade-forming in both the Philippines and Malaysia. Results from this study and those from previous studies did not support the expectations of a founder effect. We conclude that because of the extremely high mating frequency of A. dorsata queens, a founder effect does not apply in this species.

  3. Clinical applications and implications of common and founder mutations in Indian subpopulations.

    PubMed

    Ankala, Arunkanth; Tamhankar, Parag M; Valencia, C Alexander; Rayam, Krishna K; Kumar, Manisha M; Hegde, Madhuri R

    2015-01-01

    South Asian Indians represent a sixth of the world's population and are a racially, geographically, and genetically diverse people. Their unique anthropological structure, prevailing caste system, and ancient religious practices have all impacted the genetic composition of most of the current-day Indian population. With the evolving socio-religious and economic activities of the subsects and castes, endogamous and consanguineous marriages became a commonplace. Consequently, the frequency of founder mutations and the burden of heritable genetic disorders rose significantly. Specifically, the incidence of certain autosomal-recessive disorders is relatively high in select Indian subpopulations and communities that share common recent ancestry. Although today clinical genetics and molecular diagnostic services are making inroads in India, the high costs associated with the technology and the tests often keep patients from an exact molecular diagnosis, making more customized and tailored tests, such as those interrogating the most common and founder mutations or those that cater to select sects within the population, highly attractive. These tests offer a quick first-hand affordable diagnostic and carrier screening tool. Here, we provide a comprehensive catalog of known common mutations and founder mutations in the Indian population and discuss them from a molecular, clinical, and historical perspective. © 2014 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  4. FKRP mutations, including a founder mutation, cause phenotype variability in Chinese patients with dystroglycanopathies.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xiaona; Yang, Haipo; Wei, Cuijie; Jiao, Hui; Wang, Shuo; Yang, Yanling; Han, Chunxi; Wu, Xiru; Xiong, Hui

    2016-12-01

    Mutations in the fukutin-related protein (FKRP) gene have been associated with dystroglycanopathies, which are common in Europe but rare in Asia. Our study aimed to retrospectively analyze and characterize the clinical, myopathological and genetic features of 12 Chinese patients with FKRP mutations. Three patients were diagnosed with congenital muscular dystrophy type 1C (MDC1C) and nine patients were diagnosed with limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2I (LGMD2I). Three muscle biopsy specimens had dystrophic changes and reduced glycosylated α-dystroglycan staining, and two showed reduced expression of laminin α2. Two known and 13 novel mutations were identified in our single center cohort. Interestingly, the c.545A>G mutation was found in eight of the nine LGMD2I patients as a founder mutation and this founder mutation in Chinese patients differs from the one seen in European patients. Moreover, patients homozygous for the c.545A>G mutation were clinically asymptomatic, a less severe phenotype than in compound heterozygous patients with the c.545A>G mutation. The 13 novel mutations of FKRP significantly expanded the mutation spectrum of MDC1C and LGMD2I, and the different founder mutations indicate the ethnic difference in FKRP mutations.

  5. The Sex Determination Gene Shows No Founder Effect in the Giant Honey Bee, Apis dorsata

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Wei Yu; Wu, Xiao Bo; Zeng, Zhi Jiang; Huang, Zachary Y.

    2012-01-01

    Background All honey bee species (Apis spp) share the same sex determination mechanism using the complementary sex determination (csd) gene. Only individuals heterogeneous at the csd allele develop into females, and the homozygous develop into diploid males, which do not survive. The honeybees are therefore under selection pressure to generate new csd alleles. Previous studies have shown that the csd gene is under balancing selection. We hypothesize that due to the long separation from the mainland of Hainan Island, China, that the giant honey bees (Apis dorsata) should show a founder effect for the csd gene, with many different alleles clustered together, and these would be absent on the mainland. Methodology/Principal Findings We sampled A. dorsata workers from both Hainan and Guangxi Provinces and then cloned and sequenced region 3 of the csd gene and constructed phylogenetic trees. We failed to find any clustering of the csd alleles according to their geographical origin, i.e. the Hainan and Guangxi samples did not form separate clades. Further analysis by including previously published csd sequences also failed to show any clade-forming in both the Philippines and Malaysia. Conclusions/Significance Results from this study and those from previous studies did not support the expectations of a founder effect. We conclude that because of the extremely high mating frequency of A. dorsata queens, a founder effect does not apply in this species. PMID:22511940

  6. A mitochondrial analysis reveals distinct founder effect signatures in Canarian and Balearic goats.

    PubMed

    Ferrando, A; Manunza, A; Jordana, J; Capote, J; Pons, A; Pais, J; Delgado, T; Atoche, P; Cabrera, B; Martínez, A; Landi, V; Delgado, J V; Argüello, A; Vidal, O; Lalueza-Fox, C; Ramírez, O; Amills, M

    2015-08-01

    In the course of human migrations, domestic animals often have been translocated to islands with the aim of assuring food availability. These founder events are expected to leave a genetic footprint that may be recognised nowadays. Herewith, we have examined the mitochondrial diversity of goat populations living in the Canarian and Balearic archipelagos. Median-joining network analysis produced very distinct network topologies for these two populations. Indeed, a majority of Canarian goats shared a single ancestral haplotype that segregated in all sampled islands, suggesting a single founder effect followed by a stepping-stone pattern of diffusion. This haplotype also was present in samples collected from archaeological assemblies at Gran Canaria and Lanzarote, making evident its widespread distribution in ancient times. In stark contrast, goats from Majorca and Ibiza did not share any mitochondrial haplotypes, indicating the occurrence of two independent founder events. Furthermore, in Majorcan goats, we detected the segregation of the mitochondrial G haplogroup that has only been identified in goats from Egypt, Iran and Turkey. This finding suggests the translocation of Asian and/or African goats to Majorca, possibly as a consequence of the Phoenician and Carthaginian colonisations of this island.

  7. An ancient DNA test of a founder effect in Native American ABO blood group frequencies.

    PubMed

    Halverson, Melissa S; Bolnick, Deborah A

    2008-11-01

    Anthropologists have assumed that reduced genetic diversity in extant Native Americans is due to a founder effect that occurred during the initial peopling of the Americas. However, low diversity could also be the result of subsequent historical events, such as the population decline following European contact. In this study, we show that autosomal DNA from ancient Native American skeletal remains can be used to investigate the low level of ABO blood group diversity in the Americas. Extant Native Americans exhibit a high frequency of blood type O, which may reflect a founder effect, genetic drift associated with the historical population decline, or natural selection in response to the smallpox epidemics that occurred following European contact. To help distinguish between these possibilities, we determined the ABO genotypes of 15 precontact individuals from eastern North America. The precontact ABO frequencies were not significantly different from those observed in extant Native Americans from the same region, but they did differ significantly from the ABO frequencies in extant Siberian populations. Studies of other precontact populations are needed to better test the three hypotheses for low ABO blood group diversity in the Americas, but our findings are most consistent with the hypothesis of a founder effect during the initial settlement of this continent.

  8. 76 FR 35263 - Founders Equity SBIC I, L.P.; Notice Seeking Exemption Under Section 312 of the Small Business...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-16

    ... Investment Act, Conflicts of Interest Notice is hereby given that Founders Equity SBIC I, L.P., 711 Fifth... exemption under Section 312 of the Act and Section 107.730, Financings Which Constitute Conflicts of...

  9. Differences in the Selection Bottleneck between Modes of Sexual Transmission Influence the Genetic Composition of the HIV-1 Founder Virus

    PubMed Central

    Tully, Damien C.; Ogilvie, Colin B.; Batorsky, Rebecca E.; Bean, David J.; Power, Karen A.; Ghebremichael, Musie; Bedard, Hunter E.; Gladden, Adrianne D.; Seese, Aaron M.; Amero, Molly A.; Lane, Kimberly; McGrath, Graham; Bazner, Suzane B.; Tinsley, Jake; Lennon, Niall J.; Henn, Matthew R.; Brumme, Zabrina L.; Norris, Philip J.; Rosenberg, Eric S.; Mayer, Kenneth H.; Jessen, Heiko; Kosakovsky Pond, Sergei L.; Walker, Bruce D.; Altfeld, Marcus; Carlson, Jonathan M.; Allen, Todd M.

    2016-01-01

    Due to the stringent population bottleneck that occurs during sexual HIV-1 transmission, systemic infection is typically established by a limited number of founder viruses. Elucidation of the precise forces influencing the selection of founder viruses may reveal key vulnerabilities that could aid in the development of a vaccine or other clinical interventions. Here, we utilize deep sequencing data and apply a genetic distance-based method to investigate whether the mode of sexual transmission shapes the nascent founder viral genome. Analysis of 74 acute and early HIV-1 infected subjects revealed that 83% of men who have sex with men (MSM) exhibit a single founder virus, levels similar to those previously observed in heterosexual (HSX) transmission. In a metadata analysis of a total of 354 subjects, including HSX, MSM and injecting drug users (IDU), we also observed no significant differences in the frequency of single founder virus infections between HSX and MSM transmissions. However, comparison of HIV-1 envelope sequences revealed that HSX founder viruses exhibited a greater number of codon sites under positive selection, as well as stronger transmission indices possibly reflective of higher fitness variants. Moreover, specific genetic “signatures” within MSM and HSX founder viruses were identified, with single polymorphisms within gp41 enriched among HSX viruses while more complex patterns, including clustered polymorphisms surrounding the CD4 binding site, were enriched in MSM viruses. While our findings do not support an influence of the mode of sexual transmission on the number of founder viruses, they do demonstrate that there are marked differences in the selection bottleneck that can significantly shape their genetic composition. This study illustrates the complex dynamics of the transmission bottleneck and reveals that distinct genetic bottleneck processes exist dependent upon the mode of HIV-1 transmission. PMID:27163788

  10. Tracing European Founder Lineages in the Near Eastern mtDNA Pool

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Martin; Macaulay, Vincent; Hickey, Eileen; Vega, Emilce; Sykes, Bryan; Guida, Valentina; Rengo, Chiara; Sellitto, Daniele; Cruciani, Fulvio; Kivisild, Toomas; Villems, Richard; Thomas, Mark; Rychkov, Serge; Rychkov, Oksana; Rychkov, Yuri; Gölge, Mukaddes; Dimitrov, Dimitar; Hill, Emmeline; Bradley, Dan; Romano, Valentino; Calì, Francesco; Vona, Giuseppe; Demaine, Andrew; Papiha, Surinder; Triantaphyllidis, Costas; Stefanescu, Gheorghe; Hatina, Jiři; Belledi, Michele; Di Rienzo, Anna; Oppenheim, Ariella; Nørby, Søren; Al-Zaheri, Nadia; Santachiara-Benerecetti, Silvana; Scozzari, Rosaria; Torroni, Antonio; Bandelt, Hans-Jürgen

    2000-01-01

    Founder analysis is a method for analysis of nonrecombining DNA sequence data, with the aim of identification and dating of migrations into new territory. The method picks out founder sequence types in potential source populations and dates lineage clusters deriving from them in the settlement zone of interest. Here, using mtDNA, we apply the approach to the colonization of Europe, to estimate the proportion of modern lineages whose ancestors arrived during each major phase of settlement. To estimate the Palaeolithic and Neolithic contributions to European mtDNA diversity more accurately than was previously achievable, we have now extended the Near Eastern, European, and northern-Caucasus databases to 1,234, 2,804, and 208 samples, respectively. Both back-migration into the source population and recurrent mutation in the source and derived populations represent major obstacles to this approach. We have developed phylogenetic criteria to take account of both these factors, and we suggest a way to account for multiple dispersals of common sequence types. We conclude that (i) there has been substantial back-migration into the Near East, (ii) the majority of extant mtDNA lineages entered Europe in several waves during the Upper Palaeolithic, (iii) there was a founder effect or bottleneck associated with the Last Glacial Maximum, 20,000 years ago, from which derives the largest fraction of surviving lineages, and (iv) the immigrant Neolithic component is likely to comprise less than one-quarter of the mtDNA pool of modern Europeans. PMID:11032788

  11. Founder mutations and genotype-phenotype correlations in Meckel-Gruber syndrome and associated ciliopathies

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Meckel-Gruber syndrome (MKS) is an autosomal recessive lethal condition that is a ciliopathy. MKS has marked phenotypic variability and genetic heterogeneity, with mutations in nine genes identified as causative to date. Methods Families diagnosed with Meckel-Gruber syndrome were recruited for research studies following informed consent. DNA samples were analyzed by microsatellite genotyping and direct Sanger sequencing. Results We now report the genetic analyses of 87 individuals from 49 consanguineous and 19 non-consanguineous families in an unselected cohort with reported MKS, or an associated severe ciliopathy in a kindred. Linkage and/or direct sequencing were prioritized for seven MKS genes (MKS1, TMEM216, TMEM67/MKS3, RPGRIP1L, CC2D2A, CEP290 and TMEM237) selected on the basis of reported frequency of mutations or ease of analysis. We have identified biallelic mutations in 39 individuals, of which 13 mutations are novel and previously unreported. We also confirm general genotype-phenotype correlations. Conclusions TMEM67 was the most frequently mutated gene in this cohort, and we confirm two founder splice-site mutations (c.1546 + 1 G > A and c.870-2A > G) in families of Pakistani ethnic origin. In these families, we have also identified two separate founder mutations for RPGRIP1L (c. 1945 C > T p.R649X) and CC2D2A (c. 3540delA p.R1180SfsX6). Two missense mutations in TMEM67 (c. 755 T > C p.M252T, and c. 1392 C > T p.R441C) are also probable founder mutations. These findings will contribute to improved genetic diagnosis and carrier testing for affected families, and imply the existence of further genetic heterogeneity in this syndrome. PMID:23351400

  12. Founder mutations and genotype-phenotype correlations in Meckel-Gruber syndrome and associated ciliopathies.

    PubMed

    Szymanska, Katarzyna; Berry, Ian; Logan, Clare V; Cousins, Simon Rr; Lindsay, Helen; Jafri, Hussain; Raashid, Yasmin; Malik-Sharif, Saghira; Castle, Bruce; Ahmed, Mushtag; Bennett, Chris; Carlton, Ruth; Johnson, Colin A

    2012-10-01

    Meckel-Gruber syndrome (MKS) is an autosomal recessive lethal condition that is a ciliopathy. MKS has marked phenotypic variability and genetic heterogeneity, with mutations in nine genes identified as causative to date. Families diagnosed with Meckel-Gruber syndrome were recruited for research studies following informed consent. DNA samples were analyzed by microsatellite genotyping and direct Sanger sequencing. We now report the genetic analyses of 87 individuals from 49 consanguineous and 19 non-consanguineous families in an unselected cohort with reported MKS, or an associated severe ciliopathy in a kindred. Linkage and/or direct sequencing were prioritized for seven MKS genes (MKS1, TMEM216, TMEM67/MKS3, RPGRIP1L, CC2D2A, CEP290 and TMEM237) selected on the basis of reported frequency of mutations or ease of analysis. We have identified biallelic mutations in 39 individuals, of which 13 mutations are novel and previously unreported. We also confirm general genotype-phenotype correlations. TMEM67 was the most frequently mutated gene in this cohort, and we confirm two founder splice-site mutations (c.1546 + 1 G > A and c.870-2A > G) in families of Pakistani ethnic origin. In these families, we have also identified two separate founder mutations for RPGRIP1L (c. 1945 C > T p.R649X) and CC2D2A (c. 3540delA p.R1180SfsX6). Two missense mutations in TMEM67 (c. 755 T > C p.M252T, and c. 1392 C > T p.R441C) are also probable founder mutations. These findings will contribute to improved genetic diagnosis and carrier testing for affected families, and imply the existence of further genetic heterogeneity in this syndrome.

  13. Tracking HCV protease population diversity during transmission and susceptibility of founder populations to antiviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Khera, Tanvi; Todt, Daniel; Vercauteren, Koen; McClure, C. Patrick; Verhoye, Lieven; Farhoudi, Ali; Bhuju, Sabin; Geffers, Robert; Baumert, Thomas F.; Steinmann, Eike; Meuleman, Philip; Pietschmann, Thomas; Brown, Richard J.P.

    2017-01-01

    Due to the highly restricted species-tropism of Hepatitis C virus (HCV) a limited number of animal models exist for pre-clinical evaluation of vaccines and antiviral compounds. The human-liver chimeric mouse model allows heterologous challenge with clinically relevant strains derived from patients. However, to date, the transmission and longitudinal evolution of founder viral populations in this model have not been characterized in-depth using state-of-the-art sequencing technologies. Focusing on NS3 protease encoding region of the viral genome, mutant spectra in a donor inoculum and individual recipient mice were determined via Illumina sequencing and compared, to determine the effects of transmission on founder viral population complexity. In all transmissions, a genetic bottleneck was observed, although diverse viral populations were transmitted in each case. A low frequency cloud of mutations (<1%) was detectable in the donor inoculum and recipient mice, with single nucleotide variants (SNVs) > 1% restricted to a subset of nucleotides. The population of SNVs >1% was reduced upon transmission while the low frequency SNV cloud remained stable. Fixation of multiple identical synonymous substitutions was apparent in independent transmissions, and no evidence for reversion of T-cell epitopes was observed. In addition, susceptibility of founder populations to antiviral therapy was assessed. Animals were treated with protease inhibitor (PI) monotherapy to track resistance associated substitution (RAS) emergence. Longitudinal analyses revealed a decline in population diversity under therapy, with no detectable RAS >1% prior to therapy commencement. Despite inoculation from a common source and identical therapeutic regimens, unique RAS emergence profiles were identified in different hosts prior to and during therapeutic failure, with complex mutational signatures at protease residues 155, 156 and 168 detected. Together these analyses track viral population complexity at

  14. Expression-Guided In Silico Evaluation of Candidate Cis Regulatory Codes for Drosophila Muscle Founder Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gisselbrecht, Stephen S; He, Fangxue Sherry; Estrada, Beatriz; Michelson, Alan M; Bulyk, Martha L

    2006-01-01

    While combinatorial models of transcriptional regulation can be inferred for metazoan systems from a priori biological knowledge, validation requires extensive and time-consuming experimental work. Thus, there is a need for computational methods that can evaluate hypothesized cis regulatory codes before the difficult task of experimental verification is undertaken. We have developed a novel computational framework (termed “CodeFinder”) that integrates transcription factor binding site and gene expression information to evaluate whether a hypothesized transcriptional regulatory model (TRM; i.e., a set of co-regulating transcription factors) is likely to target a given set of co-expressed genes. Our basic approach is to simultaneously predict cis regulatory modules (CRMs) associated with a given gene set and quantify the enrichment for combinatorial subsets of transcription factor binding site motifs comprising the hypothesized TRM within these predicted CRMs. As a model system, we have examined a TRM experimentally demonstrated to drive the expression of two genes in a sub-population of cells in the developing Drosophila mesoderm, the somatic muscle founder cells. This TRM was previously hypothesized to be a general mode of regulation for genes expressed in this cell population. In contrast, the present analyses suggest that a modified form of this cis regulatory code applies to only a subset of founder cell genes, those whose gene expression responds to specific genetic perturbations in a similar manner to the gene on which the original model was based. We have confirmed this hypothesis by experimentally discovering six (out of 12 tested) new CRMs driving expression in the embryonic mesoderm, four of which drive expression in founder cells. PMID:16733548

  15. BRCA1/BRCA2 founder mutations and cancer risks: impact in the western Danish population.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Henriette Roed; Nilbert, Mef; Petersen, Janne; Ladelund, Steen; Thomassen, Mads; Pedersen, Inge Søkilde; Hansen, Thomas V O; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Borg, Åke; Therkildsen, Christina

    2016-10-01

    Mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes significantly contribute to hereditary breast cancer and ovarian cancer, but the phenotypic effect from different mutations is insufficiently recognized. We used a western Danish clinic-based cohort of 299 BRCA families to study the female cancer risk in mutation carriers and their untested first-degree relatives. Founder mutations were characterized and the risk of cancer was assessed in relation to the specific mutations. In BRCA1, the cumulative cancer risk at age 70 was 35 % for breast cancer and 29 % for ovarian cancer. In BRCA2, the cumulative risk was 44 % for breast cancer and 15 % for ovarian cancer. We identified 47 distinct BRCA1 mutations and 48 distinct mutations in BRCA2. Among these, 8 founder mutations [BRCA1 c.81-?_4986+?del, c.3319G>T (p.Glu1107*), c.3874delT and c.5213G>A (p.Gly1738Glu) and BRCA2 c.6373delA, c.7008-1G>A, c.7617+1G>A and c.8474delC] were found to account for 23 % of the BRCA1 mutations and for 32 % of the BRCA2 mutations. The BRCA1 mutation c.3319G>T was, compared to other BRCA1 mutations, associated with a higher risk for ovarian cancer. In conclusion, founder mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 contribute to up to one-third of the families in western Denmark and among these the BRCA1 c.3319G>T mutation is potentially linked to an increased risk of ovarian cancer.

  16. Overview of genetic defects in endocrinopathies in the island of Cyprus; evidence of a founder effect.

    PubMed

    Shammas, Christos; Neocleous, Vassos; Toumba, Meropi; Costi, Constantina; Phedonos, Alexia A P; Efstathiou, Elisavet; Kyriakou, Andreas; Phylactou, Leonidas A; Skordis, Nicos

    2012-09-01

    Hereditary endocrinopathies in Cyprus exhibit evidence of a founder effect and display the influence of past migration patterns. The genetic frequency and mutation pattern of a specific disorder of sex development (DSD), which is classified as 46,XX DSD or 46,XY DSD, and the non-classic form of congenital adrenal hyperplasia (NC-CAH) outline a type of genetic drift. Not only the high prevalence of the NC-CAH p.V281L mutation but also the rarity of CAH large lesions present a genetic diversity similar to that observed in the Middle Eastern countries. In addition, both the high frequency of the 5-alpha steroid reductase deficiency (5αSRD) IVS1-2A>G mutation and the carrier frequency of the 17-beta hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 3 (17β-HSD-3) p.R80Q mutation are good examples of a founder effect. p.R80Q can be considered a founder mutation, even though it has been identified in patients of Dutch, Brazilian, and Portuguese origin. This has led to the speculation that it has a Phoenician origin. Phoenicians as ancient traders migrated around 750 BC from present day Syria, Lebanon, and Israel toward Portugal, Spain, and also to nearby Cyprus. While the 5αSRD IVS1-2A>G mutation has already been extensively reported in Turkish patients, it is very common in the Eastern Mediterranean region. This short article portrays clearly, through specific endocrine genetic disorders, the past migration trends in Cyprus that shaped the present-day gene pool of the Greek-Cypriot population.

  17. Constitutional Mismatch Repair Deficiency in Israel: High Proportion of Founder Mutations in MMR Genes and Consanguinity.

    PubMed

    Baris, Hagit N; Barnes-Kedar, Inbal; Toledano, Helen; Halpern, Marisa; Hershkovitz, Dov; Lossos, Alexander; Lerer, Israela; Peretz, Tamar; Kariv, Revital; Cohen, Shlomi; Half, Elizabeth E; Magal, Nurit; Drasinover, Valerie; Wimmer, Katharina; Goldberg, Yael; Bercovich, Dani; Levi, Zohar

    2016-03-01

    Heterozygous germline mutations in any of the mismatch repair (MMR) genes, MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2, cause Lynch syndrome (LS), an autosomal dominant cancer predisposition syndrome conferring a high risk of colorectal, endometrial, and other cancers in adulthood. Offspring of couples where both spouses have LS have a 1:4 risk of inheriting biallelic MMR gene mutations. These cause constitutional MMR deficiency (CMMRD) syndrome, a severe recessively inherited cancer syndrome with a broad tumor spectrum including mainly hematological malignancies, brain tumors, and colon cancer in childhood and adolescence. Many CMMRD children also present with café au lait spots and axillary freckling mimicking neurofibromatosis type 1. We describe our experience in seven CMMRD families demonstrating the role and importance of founder mutations and consanguinity on its prevalence. Clinical presentations included brain tumors, colon cancer, lymphoma, and small bowel cancer. In children from two nonconsanguineous Ashkenazi Jewish (AJ) families, the common Ashkenazi founder mutations were detected; these were homozygous in one family and compound heterozygous in the other. In four consanguineous families of various ancestries, different homozygous mutations were identified. In a nonconsanguineous Caucasus/AJ family, lack of PMS2 was demonstrated in tumor and normal tissues; however, mutations were not identified. CMMRD is rare, but, especially in areas where founder mutations for LS and consanguinity are common, pediatricians should be aware of it since they are the first to encounter these children. Early diagnosis will enable tailored cancer surveillance in the entire family and a discussion regarding prenatal genetic diagnosis. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Muir-Torre Syndrome and founder mismatch repair gene mutations: A long gone historical genetic challenge.

    PubMed

    Ponti, G; Manfredini, M; Tomasi, A; Pellacani, G

    2016-09-10

    A "cancer predisposing syndrome" later labeled as Hereditary Non-Polyposis Colorectal Cancer (HNPCC) or Lynch Syndrome, was firstly described by Warthin, about one century ago. An increased predisposition to the development of multiple familial tumors is described as characteristic of this syndrome where visceral and cutaneous malignancies may appear at an early age namely endometrial, gastric, small bowel, ureteral and renal pelvis, ovarian, hepatobiliary tract, pancreatic, brain (Turcot Syndrome) and sebaceous glands (Muir-Torre Syndrome). The latter, a variant of Lynch Syndrome, is characterized by the presence of sebaceous skin adenomas, carcinomas and/or keratoacanthomas associated with visceral malignancies. Both Lynch Syndrome and Muir-Torre Syndrome have been recognized due to germline mutations in mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6. To date, 56 Lynch Syndrome founder mutations dependent on MLH1, MSH2 and, although less frequently found, MSH6 and PMS2 are described. Some of these founder mutations, principally of MSH2 gene, have been described to cause Muir-Torre phenotype and have been traced in large and outbreed Muir-Torre Syndrome families living in different US and European territories. Due to the evidences of highly specific Muir-Torre phenotypes related to the presence of widespread MSH2 founder mutations, preliminary search for these MSH2 common mutations in individuals carrying sebaceous tumors and/or keratoacanthomas, at early age or in association to visceral and familial tumors, permits cost-effective and time-saving diagnostic strategies for Lynch/Muir-Torre Syndromes. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Bipolar disorder in the Bulgarian Gypsies: genetic heterogeneity in a young founder population.

    PubMed

    Kaneva, Radka; Milanova, Vihra; Angelicheva, Dora; MacGregor, Stuart; Kostov, Christian; Vladimirova, Rositza; Aleksiev, Spiridon; Angelova, Mina; Stoyanova, Vessela; Loh, Angeline; Hallmayer, Joachim; Kalaydjieva, Luba; Jablensky, Assen

    2009-03-05

    We report the results of follow-up analyses of 12 genomic regions showing evidence of linkage in a genome-wide scan (GWS) of Gypsy families with bipolar affective disorder (BPAD). The Gypsies are a young founder population comprising multiple genetically differentiated sub-isolates with strong founder effect and limited genetic diversity. The BPAD families belong to a single sub-isolate and are connected by numerous inter-marriages, resulting in a super-pedigree with 181 members. We aimed to re-assess the positive GWS findings and search for evidence of a founder susceptibility allele after the addition of newly recruited subjects, some changes in diagnostic assignment, and the use of denser genetic maps. Linkage analysis was conducted with SimWalk2, accommodating the full complexity of pedigree structure and using a conservative narrow phenotype definition (BPAD only). Six regions were rejected, while 1p36, 13q31, 17p11, 17q21, 6q24, and 4q31 produced nominally significant results in both the individual families and the super-pedigree. Haplotypes were reconstructed and joint tests for linkage and association were done for the most promising regions. No common ancestral haplotype was identified by sequencing a strong positional and functional candidate gene (GRM1) and additional STR genotyping in the top GWS region, 6q24. The best supported region was a 12 cM interval on 4q31, also implicated in previous studies, where we obtained significant results in the super-pedigree using both SimWalk2 (P = 0.004) and joint Pseudomarker analysis of linkage and linkage disequilibrium (P = 0.000056). The size of the region and the characteristics of the Gypsy population make it suitable for LD mapping. 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. Clara Barton: teacher, nurse, Civil War heroine, founder of the American Red Cross.

    PubMed

    Evans, Gerald D

    2003-01-01

    Clara Barton was a nineteenth century woman driven to greatness. She was a teacher, a nurse, a Civil War heroine and founder of the American Red Cross. In order to cut a path into the future we must know where we have been. The story of Clara Barton is about someone who cut that path. It is about courage, overcoming obstacles, never giving up and doing the job that needs doing. What makes it fascinating is the human side, the weaknesses that coloured her life. We can learn from her journey as we develop our own path into the future.

  1. Relative resistance of HIV-1 founder viruses to control by interferon-alpha

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Following mucosal human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) transmission, type 1 interferons (IFNs) are rapidly induced at sites of initial virus replication in the mucosa and draining lymph nodes. However, the role played by IFN-stimulated antiviral activity in restricting HIV-1 replication during the initial stages of infection is not clear. We hypothesized that if type 1 IFNs exert selective pressure on HIV-1 replication in the earliest stages of infection, the founder viruses that succeed in establishing systemic infection would be more IFN-resistant than viruses replicating during chronic infection, when type 1 IFNs are produced at much lower levels. To address this hypothesis, the relative resistance of virus isolates derived from HIV-1-infected individuals during acute and chronic infection to control by type 1 IFNs was analysed. Results The replication of plasma virus isolates generated from subjects acutely infected with HIV-1 and molecularly cloned founder HIV-1 strains could be reduced but not fully suppressed by type 1 IFNs in vitro. The mean IC50 value for IFNα2 (22 U/ml) was lower than that for IFNβ (346 U/ml), although at maximally-inhibitory concentrations both IFN subtypes inhibited virus replication to similar extents. Individual virus isolates exhibited differential susceptibility to inhibition by IFNα2 and IFNβ, likely reflecting variation in resistance to differentially up-regulated IFN-stimulated genes. Virus isolates from subjects acutely infected with HIV-1 were significantly more resistant to in vitro control by IFNα than virus isolates generated from the same individuals during chronic, asymptomatic infection. Viral IFN resistance declined rapidly after the acute phase of infection: in five subjects, viruses derived from six-month consensus molecular clones were significantly more sensitive to the antiviral effects of IFNs than the corresponding founder viruses. Conclusions The establishment of systemic HIV-1 infection by

  2. Do founder mutations characteristic of some cancer sites also predispose to pancreatic cancer?

    PubMed

    Lener, Marcin R; Scott, Rodney J; Kluźniak, Wojciech; Baszuk, Piotr; Cybulski, Cezary; Wiechowska-Kozłowska, Anna; Huzarski, Tomasz; Byrski, Tomasz; Kładny, Józef; Pietrzak, Sandra; Soluch, Agnieszka; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubiński, Jan

    2016-08-01

    Understanding of the etiology and risk of pancreatic cancer (PaCa) is still poorly understood. This study evaluated the prevalence of 10 Polish founder mutations in four genes among PaCa patients and assessed their possible association with the risk of disease in Poland. In the study 383 PaCa patients and 4,000 control subjects were genotyped for founder mutations in: BRCA1 (5382insC, 4153delA, C61G), CHEK2 (1100delC, IVS2 + 1G > A, del5395, I157T), NBS1 (657del5) and PALB2 (509_510delGA, 172_175delTTGT). A statistically significant association between the 657del5 mutation and an increased risk of pancreatic cancer was observed for NBS1 gene. The Slavic NBS1 gene mutation (657delACAAA) was detected in 8 of 383 (2.09%) unselected cases compared with 22 of 4,000 (0.55%) controls (OR: 3.80, p = 0.002). The PALB2 509_510delGA and 172_175delTTGT mutations combined were seen in 2 (0.52%) unselected cases of PaCa and in 8 (0.20%) of 4,000 controls (OR: 2.61, p = 0.49). For BRCA1, the three mutations combined were detected in 4 of 383 (1.04%) PaCa patients and in 17 of 4,000 (0.42%) controls (OR: 2.46, p = 0.20). CHEK2 mutations were not associated with the risk of pancreatic cancer (OR: 1.11, p = 0.72). The founder mutation in NBS1 (657del5) was associated with an increased risk of PaCa in heterozygous carriers, indicating that this mutation appears to predispose to cancer of the pancreas. By identifying pancreatic cancer risk groups, founder mutation testing in Poland should be considered for people at risk for PaCa. © 2016 UICC.

  3. Bottlenecks in HIV-1 transmission: insights from the study of founder viruses.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Sarah B; Swanstrom, Ronald; Kashuba, Angela D M; Cohen, Myron S

    2015-07-01

    HIV-1 infection typically results from the transmission of a single viral variant, the transmitted/founder (T/F) virus. Studies of these HIV-1 variants provide critical information about the transmission bottlenecks and the selective pressures acting on the virus in the transmission fluid and in the recipient tissues. These studies reveal that T/F virus phenotypes are shaped by stochastic and selective forces that restrict transmission and may be targets for prevention strategies. In this Review, we highlight how studies of T/F viruses contribute to a better understanding of the biology of HIV-1 transmission and discuss how these findings affect HIV-1 prevention strategies.

  4. To reflex or not: additional BRCA1/2 testing in Ashkenazi Jewish individuals without founder mutations.

    PubMed

    Petrucelli, Nancie; Mange, Sarah; Fulbright, Jennifer L; Dohany, Lindsay; Zakalik, Dana; Duquette, Debra

    2015-04-01

    This study determined the prevalence of non-Ashkenazi Jewish BRCA1/2 mutations in the Ashkenazi Jewish population in the state of Michigan, current provider testing practices, and the use of mutation probability models in determining which Ashkenazi Jewish individuals should be offered further analysis following negative BRCA1/2 founder testing. Testing patterns, mutation probabilities, and testing results were assessed for 327 Ashkenazi Jewish individuals seen for BRCA1/2 counseling in the state of Michigan who underwent testing for the Ashkenazi Jewish founder mutations. Only one (0.6 %) Ashkenazi Jewish individual with sequencing after negative founder analysis was found to have a non-founder mutation; no rearrangements were identified. Testing patterns varied by clinic, with the proportion of Ashkenazi Jewish individuals undergoing additional sequencing ranging from 22.2 to 92.9 %. In Ashkenazi Jewish individuals with a pre-test BRCAPRO risk calculation, the mean risk was significantly higher in those with follow-up sequencing compared to those who did not pursue additional testing. The low prevalence of non-founder BRCA1/2 mutations in Ashkenazi Jewish individuals does not warrant automatically reflexing to full analysis after negative mutation testing. Increased use of mutation probability models may aid in determining which cases warrant additional testing.

  5. Local mitochondrial DNA haplotype databases needed for domestic dog populations that have experienced founder effect.

    PubMed

    Spadaro, Amanda; Ream, Kelsey; Braham, Caitlyn; Webb, Kristen M

    2015-03-01

    Biological material from pets is often collected as evidence from crime scenes. Due to sample type and quality, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is frequently evaluated to identify the potential contributor. MtDNA has a lower discriminatory power than nuclear DNA with multiple individuals in a population potentially carrying the same mtDNA sequence, or haplotype. The frequency distribution of mtDNA haplotypes in a population must be known in order to determine the evidentiary value of a match between crime scene evidence and the potential contributor of the biological material. This is especially important in geographic areas that include remote and/or isolated populations where founder effect may have lead to a decrease in genetic diversity and a non-random distribution of haplotypes relative to the population at large. Here we compared the haplotype diversity in dogs from the noncontiguous states of Alaska and Hawaii relative to the contiguous United States (US). We report a greater proportion of dogs carrying an A haplotype in Alaska relative to any other US population. Significant variation in the distribution of haplotype frequencies was discovered when comparing the haplotype diversity of dogs in Hawaii to that of the continental US. Each of these regions exhibits reduced genetic diversity relative to the contiguous US, likely due to founder effect. We recommend that specific databases be created to accurately represent the mitochondrial haplotype diversity in these remote areas. Furthermore, our work demonstrates the importance of local surveys for populations that may have experienced found effect.

  6. Can a linguistic serial founder effect originating in Africa explain the worldwide phonemic cline?

    PubMed

    Fort, Joaquim; Pérez-Losada, Joaquim

    2016-04-01

    It has been proposed that a serial founder effect could have caused the present observed pattern of global phonemic diversity. Here we present a model that simulates the human range expansion out of Africa and the subsequent spatial linguistic dynamics until today. It does not assume copying errors, Darwinian competition, reduced contrastive possibilities or any other specific linguistic mechanism. We show that the decrease of linguistic diversity with distance (from the presumed origin of the expansion) arises under three assumptions, previously introduced by other authors: (i) an accumulation rate for phonemes; (ii) small phonemic inventories for the languages spoken before the out-of-Africa dispersal; (iii) an increase in the phonemic accumulation rate with the number of speakers per unit area. Numerical simulations show that the predictions of the model agree with the observed decrease of linguistic diversity with increasing distance from the most likely origin of the out-of-Africa dispersal. Thus, the proposal that a serial founder effect could have caused the present observed pattern of global phonemic diversity is viable, if three strong assumptions are satisfied. © 2016 The Authors.

  7. Founder BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in French Canadian breast and ovarian cancer families.

    PubMed Central

    Tonin, P N; Mes-Masson, A M; Futreal, P A; Morgan, K; Mahon, M; Foulkes, W D; Cole, D E; Provencher, D; Ghadirian, P; Narod, S A

    1998-01-01

    We have identified four mutations in each of the breast cancer-susceptibility genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2, in French Canadian breast cancer and breast/ovarian cancer families from Quebec. To identify founder effects, we examined independently ascertained French Canadian cancer families for the distribution of these eight mutations. Mutations were found in 41 of 97 families. Six of eight mutations were observed at least twice. The BRCA1 C4446T mutation was the most common mutation found, followed by the BRCA2 8765delAG mutation. Together, these mutations were found in 28 of 41 families identified to have a mutation. The odds of detection of any of the four BRCA1 mutations was 18.7x greater if one or more cases of ovarian cancer were also present in the family. The odds of detection of any of the four BRCA2 mutations was 5.3x greater if there were at least five cases of breast cancer in the family. Interestingly, the presence of a breast cancer case <36 years of age was strongly predictive of the presence of any of the eight mutations screened. Carriers of the same mutation, from different families, shared similar haplotypes, indicating that the mutant alleles were likely to be identical by descent for a mutation in the founder population. The identification of common BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations will facilitate carrier detection in French Canadian breast cancer and breast/ovarian cancer families. PMID:9792861

  8. [Max Josef von Pettenkofer--founder of modern hygiene (1818-1901)].

    PubMed

    Paunović, Katarina; Maksimović, Milos; Davidović, Dragana; Milenković, Sanja; Slepcević, Vesna

    2005-01-01

    Max Josef von Pettenkofer was one of the leading personalities in the world of medicine in the 19th century. He was the founder of the modern science of hygiene. In his experimental work, he was involved in the research of problems dealing with the relationship between human beings and the environment, including such topics as soil and air pollution, water supply, sewage water management, room ventilation and heating, as well as the function of clothing and the cleanliness of homes and streets. Pettenkofer also studied the onset, the course, and the consequences of infectious diseases, such as cholera and typhus. He realised the great economic value of public health and emphasised that personal preventive measures should be supplemented with the improvement of factors in communal and work environments. His efforts lead to hygiene becoming a part of medical studies in 1865. The Institute for Hygiene at the School of Medicine in Munich was established in 1879. It was constructed according to his drawings and was considered to be the most modern institute for hygiene in the world. Since hygiene was a subject on the school curriculum in the German Empire in 1882, Pettenkofer became the Chairman of Hygiene in Berlin in 1885. Research institutions established by Pettenkofer and the fact that many of his students became professors of hygiene speak about the importance of his work. One of his students was professor Milan Jovanović Batut, founder of the Institute for Hygiene at the School of Medicine in Belgrade.

  9. Mutation analysis in Norwegian families with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia: founder mutations in ACVRL1.

    PubMed

    Heimdal, K; Dalhus, B; Rødningen, O K; Kroken, M; Eiklid, K; Dheyauldeen, S; Røysland, T; Andersen, R; Kulseth, M A

    2016-02-01

    Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT, Osler-Weber-Rendu disease) is an autosomal dominant inherited disease defined by the presence of epistaxis and mucocutaneous telangiectasias and arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) in internal organs. In most families (~85%), HHT is caused by mutations in the ENG (HHT1) or the ACVRL1 (HHT2) genes. Here, we report the results of genetic testing of 113 Norwegian families with suspected or definite HHT. Variants in ENG and ACVRL1 were found in 105 families (42 ENG, 63 ACVRL1), including six novel variants of uncertain pathogenic significance. Mutation types were similar to previous reports with more missense variants in ACVRL1 and more nonsense, frameshift and splice-site mutations in ENG. Thirty-two variants were novel in this study. The preponderance of ACVRL1 mutations was due to founder mutations, specifically, c.830C>A (p.Thr277Lys), which was found in 24 families from the same geographical area of Norway. We discuss the importance of founder mutations and present a thorough evaluation of missense and splice-site variants. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Coalescence-Time Distributions in a Serial Founder Model of Human Evolutionary History

    PubMed Central

    DeGiorgio, Michael; Degnan, James H.; Rosenberg, Noah A.

    2011-01-01

    Simulation studies have demonstrated that a variety of patterns in worldwide genetic variation are compatible with the trends predicted by a serial founder model, in which populations expand outward from an initial source via a process in which new populations contain only subsets of the genetic diversity present in their parental populations. Here, we provide analytical results for key quantities under the serial founder model, deriving distributions of coalescence times for pairs of lineages sampled either from the same population or from different populations. We use these distributions to obtain expectations for coalescence times and for homozygosity and heterozygosity values. A predicted approximate linear decline in expected heterozygosity with increasing distance from the source population reproduces a pattern that has been observed both in human genetic data and in simulations. Our formulas predict that populations close to the source location have lower between-population gene identity than populations far from the source, also mirroring results obtained from data and simulations. We show that different models that produce similar declining patterns in heterozygosity generate quite distinct patterns in coalescence-time distributions and gene identity measures, thereby providing a basis for distinguishing these models. We interpret the theoretical results in relation to their implications for human population genetics. PMID:21775469

  11. Mutational founder effect in recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa families from Southern Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Ben Brick, Ahlem Sabrine; Laroussi, Nadia; Mesrati, Hela; Kefi, Rym; Bchetnia, Mbarka; Lasram, Khaled; Ben Halim, Nizar; Romdhane, Lilia; Ouragini, Houyem; Marrakchi, Salaheddine; Boubaker, Mohamed Samir; Meddeb Cherif, Mounira; Castiglia, Daniele; Hovnanian, Alain; Abdelhak, Sonia; Turki, Hamida

    2014-05-01

    Dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (DEB) is a group of heritable bullous skin disorders caused by mutations in the COL7A1 gene. One of the most severe forms of DEB is the severe generalized [recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB-SG)] subtype, which is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner. This subtype is most often due to COL7A1 mutations resulting in a premature termination codon on both alleles. We report here, the molecular investigation of 15 patients belonging to 14 nuclear families from the city of Sfax in Southern Tunisia, with clinical features of RDEB-SG complicated by squamous cell carcinoma in 3 patients. We identified two novel mutations, p.Val769LeufsX1 and p.Ala2297SerfsX91, in addition to one previously reported mutation (p.Arg2063Trp). The p.Val769LeufsX1 mutation was shared by 11 families and haplotype analysis indicated that it is a founder mutation. The p.Ala2297SerfsX91 mutation was a private mutation found in only one family. Together with the previously described recurrent mutations in Tunisia, screening for the founder p.Val769LeufsX1 mutation should provide a rapid molecular diagnosis tool for mutation screening in RDEB patients from Southern Tunisia and possibly from other Mediterranean populations sharing the same genetic background.

  12. Overrepresentation of missense mutations in mild hemophilia A patients from Belgium: founder effect or independent occurrence?

    PubMed

    Lannoy, N; Lambert, C; Vikkula, M; Hermans, C

    2015-06-01

    Roughly 40% of observed mutations responsible for hemophilia A (HA) are novel and present in either a single family or a limited number of unrelated families. During routine diagnostic analysis of 73 unrelated Belgian patients with mild HA, 4 out of 43 different mutations (p.Ser2030Asn, p.Arg2178Cys, p.Arg2178His, and p.Pro2311His) were detected in more than one family, representing 35% of total identified mutations. To discriminate between an independent recurrence or a founder effect, an analysis of intra- and -extragenic single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and short tandem repeats (STRs) flanking the F8 gene was conducted. SNP haplotype and microsatellite analysis revealed strong evidence that p.Ser2030Asn and p.Pro2311His mutations were probably associated with a founder effect. The two other mutations localized in an F8 cytosine-phosphate-guanine (CpG) site likely resulted from recurrent de novo events. This study suggests that missense mutations producing C-to-T or G-to-A substitutions in CpG dinucleotide can occur de novo with more repetition than other causal substitutions that do not affect the CpG site. Analysis of F8 database implied that CpG sites throughout the F8 gene are not all mutated with the same frequency. Causes are still unknown and remain to be identified. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Multiple founder effects in spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA, Kennedy disease) around the world.

    PubMed

    Lund, A; Udd, B; Juvonen, V; Andersen, P M; Cederquist, K; Davis, M; Gellera, C; Kölmel, C; Ronnevi, L O; Sperfeld, A D; Sörensen, S A; Tranebjaerg, L; Van Maldergem, L; Watanabe, M; Weber, M; Yeung, L; Savontaus, M L

    2001-06-01

    SBMA (spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy), also called Kennedy disease, is an X-chromosomal recessive adult-onset neurodegenerative disorder caused by death of the spinal and bulbar motor neurones and dorsal root ganglia. Patients may also show signs of partial androgen insensitivity. SBMA is caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the first exon of the androgen receptor (AR) gene on the X-chromosome. Our previous study suggested that all the Nordic patients with SBMA originated from an ancient Nordic founder mutation, but the new intragenic SNP marker ARd12 revealed that the Danish patients derive their disease chromosome from another ancestor. In search of relationships between patients from different countries, we haplotyped altogether 123 SBMA families from different parts of the world for two intragenic markers and 16 microsatellites spanning 25 cM around the AR gene. The fact that different SBMA founder haplotypes were found in patients from around the world implies that the CAG repeat expansion mutation has not been a unique event. No expansion-prone haplotype could be detected. Trinucleotide diseases often show correlation between the repeat length and the severity and earlier onset of the disease. The longer the repeat, the more severe the symptoms are and the onset of the disease is earlier. A negative correlation between the CAG repeat length and the age of onset was found in the 95 SBMA patients with defined ages at onset.

  14. Founder effect in spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) in Scandinavia.

    PubMed

    Lund, A; Udd, B; Juvonen, V; Andersen, P M; Cederquist, K; Ronnevi, L O; Sistonen, P; Sörensen, S A; Tranebjaerg, L; Wallgren-Pettersson, C; Savontaus, M L

    2000-08-01

    We haplotyped 13 Finnish, 10 Swedish, 12 Danish and 2 Norwegian SBMA (spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy, Kennedy disease) families with a total of 45 patients and 7 carriers for 17 microsatellite markers spanning a 25.2 cM region around the androgen receptor gene on chromosome Xq11-q12 in search of a genetic founder effect. In addition, the haplotypes of 50 Finnish, 20 Danish and 22 Swedish control males were examined. All the Scandinavian SBMA families shared the same 18 repeat allele for the intragenic GGC repeat, which was present in only 24% of the controls. Linkage disequilibrium was also seen for the closest microsatellite markers. In addition, extended haplotypes of the Finnish, Swedish and Danish SBMA families revealed country-specific common founder haplotypes, which over time became gradually shortened by recombinations. No common haplotype was found among the controls. The data suggest that the SBMA mutation was introduced into western Finland 20 generations ago. Haplotype analysis implies a common ancestor for the majority of Scandinavian SBMA patients.

  15. No common founder for C9orf72 expansion mutation in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Huei-Hsin; Forsell, Charlotte; Lindström, Anna-Karin; Lilius, Lena; Thonberg, Håkan; Nennesmo, Inger; Graff, Caroline

    2017-02-01

    Hexanucleotide expansion mutations in the chromosome 9 open reading frame 72 (C9orf72) gene is the most common genetic cause for frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). SNP haplotype analyses have suggested that all C9orf72 expansion mutations originate from a common founder. However, not all C9orf72 expansion mutation carriers have the same haplotype. To investigate if the C9orf72 expansion mutation carriers in Sweden share a common founder, we have genotyped SNPs flanking the C9orf72 expansion mutation in cases with FTD, FTD-ALS or ALS to perform haplotype analysis. We have genotyped 57 SNPs in 232 cases of which 45 carried the C9orf72 expansion mutation. Two risk haplotypes consisting of 31 SNPs, spanning 131 kbp, were found to be significantly associated with the mutation. In summary, haplotype analysis on Swedish C9orf72 expansion mutation carriers indicates that the C9orf72 expansion mutation arose on at least two risk haplotypes.

  16. A shared haplotype indicates a founder event in Unverricht-Lundborg disease patients from Serbia.

    PubMed

    Kecmanović, Miljana; Ristić, Aleksandar J; Ercegovac, Marko; Keckarević-Marković, Milica; Keckarević, Dušan; Sokić, Dragoslav; Romac, Stanka

    2014-02-01

    Unverricht-Lundborg disease (ULD) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by dodecamer repeat expansion in the promoter region of the cystatin B (CSTB) gene in approximately 90% of the disease alleles worldwide. This study presents results of genetic findings in four Serbian unrelated patients with clinical and molecular diagnosis of ULD. Using newly established PCR protocol with betaine, we detected a homozygous expansion of dodecamer repeats in the CSTB gene in four patients with clinical diagnosis of ULD. Our results are in agreement with previous studies showing that dodecamer repeats expansion is the most common mutation associated with ULD. Haplotype analysis of eight unrelated ULD chromosomes was performed using seven markers flanking CSTB gene and one intragenic variant. We demonstrated the existence of a founder effect, strongly supported by LD calculations. Size of the minimal common haplotype implies that the most recent common ancestor of the Serbian ULD patients lived about 110 generations ago. We showed that Serbian ULD patients share the same common ancestor with patients from Baltic countries and North Africa. In the light of our data, we proposed extended minimal common haplotype, which could be considered as initial haplotype of the founder event common for Serbian, Baltic, and North African ULD patients.

  17. Cytokinins act directly on lateral root founder cells to inhibit root initiation.

    PubMed

    Laplaze, Laurent; Benkova, Eva; Casimiro, Ilda; Maes, Lies; Vanneste, Steffen; Swarup, Ranjan; Weijers, Dolf; Calvo, Vanessa; Parizot, Boris; Herrera-Rodriguez, Maria Begoña; Offringa, Remko; Graham, Neil; Doumas, Patrick; Friml, Jiri; Bogusz, Didier; Beeckman, Tom; Bennett, Malcolm

    2007-12-01

    In Arabidopsis thaliana, lateral roots are formed from root pericycle cells adjacent to the xylem poles. Lateral root development is regulated antagonistically by the plant hormones auxin and cytokinin. While a great deal is known about how auxin promotes lateral root development, the mechanism of cytokinin repression is still unclear. Elevating cytokinin levels was observed to disrupt lateral root initiation and the regular pattern of divisions that characterizes lateral root development in Arabidopsis. To identify the stage of lateral root development that is sensitive to cytokinins, we targeted the expression of the Agrobacterium tumefaciens cytokinin biosynthesis enzyme isopentenyltransferase to either xylem-pole pericycle cells or young lateral root primordia using GAL4-GFP enhancer trap lines. Transactivation experiments revealed that xylem-pole pericycle cells are sensitive to cytokinins, whereas young lateral root primordia are not. This effect is physiologically significant because transactivation of the Arabidopsis cytokinin degrading enzyme cytokinin oxidase 1 in lateral root founder cells results in increased lateral root formation. We observed that cytokinins perturb the expression of PIN genes in lateral root founder cells and prevent the formation of an auxin gradient that is required to pattern lateral root primordia.

  18. Two BRCA1/2 founder mutations in Jews of Sephardic origin.

    PubMed

    Sagi, Michal; Eilat, Avital; Ben Avi, Liat; Goldberg, Yael; Bercovich, Dani; Hamburger, Tamar; Peretz, Tamar; Lerer, Israela

    2011-03-01

    Founder mutations in BRCA1/2 genes have been detected in several Jewish communities in Israel, including in Ashkenazi Jews and Jews who immigrated to Israel from Iraq, Yemen, Iran and Afghanistan. We analyzed DNA samples of patients of Sephardic origin (descendents of Jews from the Iberian Peninsula) with breast cancer (BC) and/or ovarian cancer (OC) and additional family history of these cancers. In this study we identified 2 mutations: p.A1708E in BRCA1 and c.67 + 1G > A (IVS2 + 1G > A) in BRCA2, each in 3 unrelated patients. The frequency of the two mutations was 26-31% among Sephardic high risk families and about 3% among the full cohort of 177 patients of this origin who were tested in our center. Based on haplotype analysis we concluded that these mutations are most probably founder mutations in Sephardic Jews. We recommend testing the two mutations in women of Sephardic origin who apply for BRCA testing because of personal and/or family history of BC and/or OC. Furthermore, we suggest adding them to the 5 mutations included in "The Jewish panel" of BRCA1/2 mutations that are being tested in Israel.

  19. Serial founder effects and genetic differentiation during worldwide range expansion of monarch butterflies.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Amanda A; Zalucki, Myron P; Bangura, Marie; Udawatta, Milan; Kronforst, Marcus R; Altizer, Sonia; Haeger, Juan Fernández; de Roode, Jacobus C

    2014-12-22

    Range expansions can result in founder effects, increasing genetic differentiation between expanding populations and reducing genetic diversity along the expansion front. However, few studies have addressed these effects in long-distance migratory species, for which high dispersal ability might counter the effects of genetic drift. Monarchs (Danaus plexippus) are best known for undertaking a long-distance annual migration in North America, but have also dispersed around the world to form populations that do not migrate or travel only short distances. Here, we used microsatellite markers to assess genetic differentiation among 18 monarch populations and to determine worldwide colonization routes. Our results indicate that North American monarch populations connected by land show limited differentiation, probably because of the monarch's ability to migrate long distances. Conversely, we found high genetic differentiation between populations separated by large bodies of water. Moreover, we show evidence for serial founder effects across the Pacific, suggesting stepwise dispersal from a North American origin. These findings demonstrate that genetic drift played a major role in shaping allele frequencies and created genetic differentiation among newly formed populations. Thus, range expansion can give rise to genetic differentiation and declines in genetic diversity, even in highly mobile species. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  20. Role of founder cell deficit and delayed neuronogenesis in microencephaly of the trisomy 16 mouse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haydar, T. F.; Nowakowski, R. S.; Yarowsky, P. J.; Krueger, B. K.

    2000-01-01

    Development of the neocortex of the trisomy 16 (Ts16) mouse, an animal model of Down syndrome (DS), is characterized by a transient delay in the radial expansion of the cortical wall and a persistent reduction in cortical volume. Here we show that at each cell cycle during neuronogenesis, a smaller proportion of Ts16 progenitors exit the cell cycle than do control, euploid progenitors. In addition, the cell cycle duration was found to be longer in Ts16 than in euploid progenitors, the Ts16 growth fraction was reduced, and an increase in apoptosis was observed in both proliferative and postmitotic zones of the developing Ts16 neocortical wall. Incorporation of these changes into a model of neuronogenesis indicates that they are sufficient to account for the observed delay in radial expansion. In addition, the number of neocortical founder cells, i.e., precursors present just before neuronogenesis begins, is reduced by 26% in Ts16 mice, leading to a reduction in overall cortical size at the end of Ts16 neuronogenesis. Thus, altered proliferative characteristics during Ts16 neuronogenesis result in a delay in the generation of neocortical neurons, whereas the founder cell deficit leads to a proportional reduction in the overall number of neurons. Such prenatal perturbations in either the timing of neuron generation or the final number of neurons produced may lead to significant neocortical abnormalities such as those found in DS.

  1. Can a linguistic serial founder effect originating in Africa explain the worldwide phonemic cline?

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    It has been proposed that a serial founder effect could have caused the present observed pattern of global phonemic diversity. Here we present a model that simulates the human range expansion out of Africa and the subsequent spatial linguistic dynamics until today. It does not assume copying errors, Darwinian competition, reduced contrastive possibilities or any other specific linguistic mechanism. We show that the decrease of linguistic diversity with distance (from the presumed origin of the expansion) arises under three assumptions, previously introduced by other authors: (i) an accumulation rate for phonemes; (ii) small phonemic inventories for the languages spoken before the out-of-Africa dispersal; (iii) an increase in the phonemic accumulation rate with the number of speakers per unit area. Numerical simulations show that the predictions of the model agree with the observed decrease of linguistic diversity with increasing distance from the most likely origin of the out-of-Africa dispersal. Thus, the proposal that a serial founder effect could have caused the present observed pattern of global phonemic diversity is viable, if three strong assumptions are satisfied. PMID:27122180

  2. PRIMAL: Fast and Accurate Pedigree-based Imputation from Sequence Data in a Founder Population

    PubMed Central

    Livne, Oren E.; Han, Lide; Alkorta-Aranburu, Gorka; Wentworth-Sheilds, William; Abney, Mark; Ober, Carole; Nicolae, Dan L.

    2015-01-01

    Founder populations and large pedigrees offer many well-known advantages for genetic mapping studies, including cost-efficient study designs. Here, we describe PRIMAL (PedigRee IMputation ALgorithm), a fast and accurate pedigree-based phasing and imputation algorithm for founder populations. PRIMAL incorporates both existing and original ideas, such as a novel indexing strategy of Identity-By-Descent (IBD) segments based on clique graphs. We were able to impute the genomes of 1,317 South Dakota Hutterites, who had genome-wide genotypes for ~300,000 common single nucleotide variants (SNVs), from 98 whole genome sequences. Using a combination of pedigree-based and LD-based imputation, we were able to assign 87% of genotypes with >99% accuracy over the full range of allele frequencies. Using the IBD cliques we were also able to infer the parental origin of 83% of alleles, and genotypes of deceased recent ancestors for whom no genotype information was available. This imputed data set will enable us to better study the relative contribution of rare and common variants on human phenotypes, as well as parental origin effect of disease risk alleles in >1,000 individuals at minimal cost. PMID:25735005

  3. PRIMAL: Fast and accurate pedigree-based imputation from sequence data in a founder population.

    PubMed

    Livne, Oren E; Han, Lide; Alkorta-Aranburu, Gorka; Wentworth-Sheilds, William; Abney, Mark; Ober, Carole; Nicolae, Dan L

    2015-03-01

    Founder populations and large pedigrees offer many well-known advantages for genetic mapping studies, including cost-efficient study designs. Here, we describe PRIMAL (PedigRee IMputation ALgorithm), a fast and accurate pedigree-based phasing and imputation algorithm for founder populations. PRIMAL incorporates both existing and original ideas, such as a novel indexing strategy of Identity-By-Descent (IBD) segments based on clique graphs. We were able to impute the genomes of 1,317 South Dakota Hutterites, who had genome-wide genotypes for ~300,000 common single nucleotide variants (SNVs), from 98 whole genome sequences. Using a combination of pedigree-based and LD-based imputation, we were able to assign 87% of genotypes with >99% accuracy over the full range of allele frequencies. Using the IBD cliques we were also able to infer the parental origin of 83% of alleles, and genotypes of deceased recent ancestors for whom no genotype information was available. This imputed data set will enable us to better study the relative contribution of rare and common variants on human phenotypes, as well as parental origin effect of disease risk alleles in >1,000 individuals at minimal cost.

  4. High relative frequency of SCA1 in Poland reflecting a potential founder effect.

    PubMed

    Krysa, Wioletta; Sulek, Anna; Rakowicz, Maria; Szirkowiec, Walentyna; Zaremba, Jacek

    2016-08-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) have irregular distributions worldwide. SCA1 is the most frequent in Poland, and no cases of SCA3 of Polish origin has yet been identified. In view of such patterns of SCAs occurrence, the relative frequency, geographical distribution and a possible founder effect of SCA1 were investigated. DNA samples of 134 probands with SCA1 and 228 controls were analysed. The genotyping of four markers, D6S89, D6S109, D6S274, D6S288, around the ATXN1 gene (SCA1) and sequencing of the selected variant of D6S89 were performed. The relative frequency of SCA1 was 68 %. The studied SCA1 pedigrees were irregularly distributed, with the highest concentration in Central Poland. Haplotyping revealed the association of ATXN1 gene mutation with a 197-bp variant of D6S89 marker (63 % of probands) and with a 184-bp variant of DS6274 (50.7 % of probands). Out of 61 SCA1 probands from Mazowieckie, 41 carried the same 197-bp variant. SCA1 relative frequency in Poland shows the highest value compared with the data from other countries worldwide. Due to the association with the mutation obtained for the investigated markers and the SCA1 pedigrees concentration in Central Poland, we hypothesise that it represents a potential founder effect.

  5. Serial founder effects and genetic differentiation during worldwide range expansion of monarch butterflies

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, Amanda A.; Zalucki, Myron P.; Bangura, Marie; Udawatta, Milan; Kronforst, Marcus R.; Altizer, Sonia; Haeger, Juan Fernández; de Roode, Jacobus C.

    2014-01-01

    Range expansions can result in founder effects, increasing genetic differentiation between expanding populations and reducing genetic diversity along the expansion front. However, few studies have addressed these effects in long-distance migratory species, for which high dispersal ability might counter the effects of genetic drift. Monarchs (Danaus plexippus) are best known for undertaking a long-distance annual migration in North America, but have also dispersed around the world to form populations that do not migrate or travel only short distances. Here, we used microsatellite markers to assess genetic differentiation among 18 monarch populations and to determine worldwide colonization routes. Our results indicate that North American monarch populations connected by land show limited differentiation, probably because of the monarch's ability to migrate long distances. Conversely, we found high genetic differentiation between populations separated by large bodies of water. Moreover, we show evidence for serial founder effects across the Pacific, suggesting stepwise dispersal from a North American origin. These findings demonstrate that genetic drift played a major role in shaping allele frequencies and created genetic differentiation among newly formed populations. Thus, range expansion can give rise to genetic differentiation and declines in genetic diversity, even in highly mobile species. PMID:25377462

  6. Role of founder cell deficit and delayed neuronogenesis in microencephaly of the trisomy 16 mouse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haydar, T. F.; Nowakowski, R. S.; Yarowsky, P. J.; Krueger, B. K.

    2000-01-01

    Development of the neocortex of the trisomy 16 (Ts16) mouse, an animal model of Down syndrome (DS), is characterized by a transient delay in the radial expansion of the cortical wall and a persistent reduction in cortical volume. Here we show that at each cell cycle during neuronogenesis, a smaller proportion of Ts16 progenitors exit the cell cycle than do control, euploid progenitors. In addition, the cell cycle duration was found to be longer in Ts16 than in euploid progenitors, the Ts16 growth fraction was reduced, and an increase in apoptosis was observed in both proliferative and postmitotic zones of the developing Ts16 neocortical wall. Incorporation of these changes into a model of neuronogenesis indicates that they are sufficient to account for the observed delay in radial expansion. In addition, the number of neocortical founder cells, i.e., precursors present just before neuronogenesis begins, is reduced by 26% in Ts16 mice, leading to a reduction in overall cortical size at the end of Ts16 neuronogenesis. Thus, altered proliferative characteristics during Ts16 neuronogenesis result in a delay in the generation of neocortical neurons, whereas the founder cell deficit leads to a proportional reduction in the overall number of neurons. Such prenatal perturbations in either the timing of neuron generation or the final number of neurons produced may lead to significant neocortical abnormalities such as those found in DS.

  7. Signatures of seaway closures and founder dispersal in the phylogeny of a circumglobally distributed seahorse lineage

    PubMed Central

    Teske, Peter R; Hamilton, Healy; Matthee, Conrad A; Barker, Nigel P

    2007-01-01

    Background The importance of vicariance events on the establishment of phylogeographic patterns in the marine environment is well documented, and generally accepted as an important cause of cladogenesis. Founder dispersal (i.e. long-distance dispersal followed by founder effect speciation) is also frequently invoked as a cause of genetic divergence among lineages, but its role has long been challenged by vicariance biogeographers. Founder dispersal is likely to be common in species that colonize remote habitats by means of rafting (e.g. seahorses), as long-distance dispersal events are likely to be rare and subsequent additional recruitment from the source habitat is unlikely. In the present study, the relative importance of vicariance and founder dispersal as causes of cladogenesis in a circumglobally distributed seahorse lineage was investigated using molecular dating. A phylogeny was reconstructed using sequence data from mitochondrial and nuclear markers, and the well-documented closure of the Central American seaway was used as a primary calibration point to test whether other bifurcations in the phylogeny could also have been the result of vicariance events. The feasibility of three other vicariance events was explored: a) the closure of the Indonesian Seaway, resulting in sister lineages associated with the Indian Ocean and West Pacific, respectively; b) the closure of the Tethyan Seaway, resulting in sister lineages associated with the Indo-Pacific and Atlantic Ocean, respectively, and c) continental break-up during the Mesozoic followed by spreading of the Atlantic Ocean, resulting in pairs of lineages with amphi-Atlantic distribution patterns. Results Comparisons of pairwise genetic distances among the seahorse species hypothesized to have diverged as a result of the closure of the Central American Seaway with those of published teleost sequences having the same distribution patterns show that the seahorses were among the last to diverge. This suggests

  8. Signatures of seaway closures and founder dispersal in the phylogeny of a circumglobally distributed seahorse lineage.

    PubMed

    Teske, Peter R; Hamilton, Healy; Matthee, Conrad A; Barker, Nigel P

    2007-08-15

    The importance of vicariance events on the establishment of phylogeographic patterns in the marine environment is well documented, and generally accepted as an important cause of cladogenesis. Founder dispersal (i.e. long-distance dispersal followed by founder effect speciation) is also frequently invoked as a cause of genetic divergence among lineages, but its role has long been challenged by vicariance biogeographers. Founder dispersal is likely to be common in species that colonize remote habitats by means of rafting (e.g. seahorses), as long-distance dispersal events are likely to be rare and subsequent additional recruitment from the source habitat is unlikely. In the present study, the relative importance of vicariance and founder dispersal as causes of cladogenesis in a circumglobally distributed seahorse lineage was investigated using molecular dating. A phylogeny was reconstructed using sequence data from mitochondrial and nuclear markers, and the well-documented closure of the Central American seaway was used as a primary calibration point to test whether other bifurcations in the phylogeny could also have been the result of vicariance events. The feasibility of three other vicariance events was explored: a) the closure of the Indonesian Seaway, resulting in sister lineages associated with the Indian Ocean and West Pacific, respectively; b) the closure of the Tethyan Seaway, resulting in sister lineages associated with the Indo-Pacific and Atlantic Ocean, respectively, and c) continental break-up during the Mesozoic followed by spreading of the Atlantic Ocean, resulting in pairs of lineages with amphi-Atlantic distribution patterns. Comparisons of pairwise genetic distances among the seahorse species hypothesized to have diverged as a result of the closure of the Central American Seaway with those of published teleost sequences having the same distribution patterns show that the seahorses were among the last to diverge. This suggests that their

  9. Strong Amerind/White Sex Bias and a Possible Sephardic Contribution among the Founders of a Population in Northwest Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Carvajal-Carmona, Luis G.; Soto, Iván D.; Pineda, Nicolás; Ortíz-Barrientos, Daniel; Duque, Constanza; Ospina-Duque, Jorge; McCarthy, Mark; Montoya, Patricia; Alvarez, Victor M.; Bedoya, Gabriel; Ruiz-Linares, Andrés

    2000-01-01

    Historical and genetic evidences suggest that the recently founded population of Antioquia (Colombia) is potentially useful for the genetic mapping of complex traits. This population was established in the 16th–17th centuries through the admixture of Amerinds, Europeans, and Africans and grew in relative isolation until the late 19th century. To examine the origin of the founders of Antioquia, we typed 11 markers on the nonrecombining portion of the Y chromosome and four markers on mtDNA in a sample of individuals with confirmed Antioquian ancestry. The polymorphisms on the Y chromosome (five biallelic markers and six microsatellites) allow an approximation to the origin of founder men, and those on mtDNA identify the four major founder Native American lineages. These data indicate that ∼94% of the Y chromosomes are European, 5% are African, and 1% are Amerind. Y-chromosome data are consistent with an origin of founders predominantly in southern Spain but also suggest that a fraction came from northern Iberia and that some possibly had a Sephardic origin. In stark contrast with the Y-chromosome, ∼90% of the mtDNA gene pool of Antioquia is Amerind, with the frequency of the four Amerind founder lineages being closest to Native Americans currently living in the area. These results indicate a highly asymmetric pattern of mating in early Antioquia, involving mostly immigrant men and local native women. The discordance of our data with blood-group estimates of admixture suggests that the number of founder men was larger than that of women. PMID:11032790

  10. Clinal patterns of human Y chromosomal diversity in continental Italy and Greece are dominated by drift and founder effects.

    PubMed

    Di Giacomo, F; Luca, F; Anagnou, N; Ciavarella, G; Corbo, R M; Cresta, M; Cucci, F; Di Stasi, L; Agostiano, V; Giparaki, M; Loutradis, A; Mammi', C; Michalodimitrakis, E N; Papola, F; Pedicini, G; Plata, E; Terrenato, L; Tofanelli, S; Malaspina, P; Novelletto, A

    2003-09-01

    We explored the spatial distribution of human Y chromosomal diversity on a microgeographic scale, by typing 30 population samples from closely spaced locations in Italy and Greece for 9 haplogroups and their internal microsatellite variation. We confirm a significant difference in the composition of the Y chromosomal gene pools of the two countries. However, within each country, heterogeneity is not organized along the lines of clinal variation deduced from studies on larger spatial scales. Microsatellite data indicate that local increases of haplogroup frequencies can be often explained by a limited number of founders. We conclude that local founder or drift effects are the main determinants in shaping the microgeographic Y chromosomal diversity.

  11. PedHunter 2.0 and its usage to characterize the founder structure of the Old Order Amish of Lancaster County

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Because they are a closed founder population, the Old Order Amish (OOA) of Lancaster County have been the subject of many medical genetics studies. We constructed four versions of Anabaptist Genealogy Database (AGDB) using three sources of genealogies and multiple updates. In addition, we developed PedHunter, a suite of query software that can solve pedigree-related problems automatically and systematically. Methods We report on how we have used new features in PedHunter to quantify the number and expected genetic contribution of founders to the OOA. The queries and utility of PedHunter programs are illustrated by examples using AGDB in this paper. For example, we calculated the number of founders expected to be contributing genetic material to the present-day living OOA and estimated the mean relative founder representation for each founder. New features in PedHunter also include pedigree trimming and pedigree renumbering, which should prove useful for studying large pedigrees. Results With PedHunter version 2.0 querying AGDB version 4.0, we identified 34,160 presumed living OOA individuals and connected them into a 14-generation pedigree descending from 554 founders (332 females and 222 males) after trimming. From the analysis of cumulative mean relative founder representation, 128 founders (78 females and 50 males) accounted for over 95% of the mean relative founder contribution among living OOA descendants. Discussion/Conclusions The OOA are a closed founder population in which a modest number of founders account for the genetic variation present in the current OOA population. Improvements to the PedHunter software will be useful in future studies of both the OOA and other populations with large and computerized genealogies. PMID:20433770

  12. Genetic characterization and founder effect analysis of recently introduced Salers cattle breed population.

    PubMed

    Gamarra, D; Lopez-Oceja, A; de Pancorbo, M M

    2017-01-01

    Salers are a native French breed used for beef and dairy production that has expanded to all the continents. The Salers breed was introduced to the north of Spain in 1985 with only 15 individuals from France and has successfully increased to over 20 000 animals. Although over time new animals have been imported from France for breeding, it is possible that the limiting number of founder animals could have resulted in a reduction of the genetic diversity found in Spanish Salers. Thus, the purpose of the present study has been to characterize the genetic diversity of Salers breed in Spain and evaluate a possible founder effect due to reduced number of the first reproducers. A total of 403 individuals from 12 Salers herds were analyzed using 12 microsatellite markers and compared with phylogenetically and geographically close related Blonde d'Aquitaine, Limousin and Charolais French breeds but also other 16 European breeds. Microsatellites in Salers were polymorphic, with a mean allelic richness of 5.129 and an expected heterozygosity of 0.621 across loci (0.576 to 0.736 among all breeds). Average observed heterozygosity was 0.618. All the loci fit the Hardy-Weinberg (HW) equilibrium except TGLA227 locus due to a significant deficit of heterozygotes in only one of the herds, probably attributable to a sampling effect. When all loci were combined, Salers inbreeding coefficient did not differ statistically from 0 (F IS=0.005), indicating not significant excess or deficit of heterozygotes (P=0.309). Based in allelic distribution, Salers revealed a frequency of 0.488 in BM2113-131 and 0.064 in BM2113-143 diagnostic alleles, which are specific to the African zebu. These zebu alleles are also found in some French breeds, supported by STR data previously postulated hypothesis of a migration route through Mediterranean route by which North African cattle may have left a genetic signature in southern Europe. Phylogenetic tree and population structure analyses could

  13. Tracking HCV protease population diversity during transmission and susceptibility of founder populations to antiviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Khera, Tanvi; Todt, Daniel; Vercauteren, Koen; McClure, C Patrick; Verhoye, Lieven; Farhoudi, Ali; Bhuju, Sabin; Geffers, Robert; Baumert, Thomas F; Steinmann, Eike; Meuleman, Philip; Pietschmann, Thomas; Brown, Richard J P

    2017-03-01

    Due to the highly restricted species-tropism of Hepatitis C virus (HCV) a limited number of animal models exist for pre-clinical evaluation of vaccines and antiviral compounds. The human-liver chimeric mouse model allows heterologous challenge with clinically relevant strains derived from patients. However, to date, the transmission and longitudinal evolution of founder viral populations in this model have not been characterized in-depth using state-of-the-art sequencing technologies. Focusing on NS3 protease encoding region of the viral genome, mutant spectra in a donor inoculum and individual recipient mice were determined via Illumina sequencing and compared, to determine the effects of transmission on founder viral population complexity. In all transmissions, a genetic bottleneck was observed, although diverse viral populations were transmitted in each case. A low frequency cloud of mutations (<1%) was detectable in the donor inoculum and recipient mice, with single nucleotide variants (SNVs) > 1% restricted to a subset of nucleotides. The population of SNVs >1% was reduced upon transmission while the low frequency SNV cloud remained stable. Fixation of multiple identical synonymous substitutions was apparent in independent transmissions, and no evidence for reversion of T-cell epitopes was observed. In addition, susceptibility of founder populations to antiviral therapy was assessed. Animals were treated with protease inhibitor (PI) monotherapy to track resistance associated substitution (RAS) emergence. Longitudinal analyses revealed a decline in population diversity under therapy, with no detectable RAS >1% prior to therapy commencement. Despite inoculation from a common source and identical therapeutic regimens, unique RAS emergence profiles were identified in different hosts prior to and during therapeutic failure, with complex mutational signatures at protease residues 155, 156 and 168 detected. Together these analyses track viral population complexity

  14. MLH1 founder mutations with moderate penetrance in Spanish Lynch syndrome families.

    PubMed

    Borràs, Ester; Pineda, Marta; Blanco, Ignacio; Jewett, Ethan M; Wang, Fei; Teulé, Alex; Caldés, Trinidad; Urioste, Miguel; Martínez-Bouzas, Cristina; Brunet, Joan; Balmaña, Judith; Torres, Asunción; Ramón y Cajal, Teresa; Sanz, Judit; Pérez-Cabornero, Lucía; Castellví-Bel, Sergi; Alonso, Angel; Lanas, Angel; González, Sara; Moreno, Víctor; Gruber, Stephen B; Rosenberg, Noah A; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Lázaro, Conxi; Capellá, Gabriel

    2010-10-01

    The variants c.306+5G>A and c.1865T>A (p.Leu622His) of the DNA repair gene MLH1 occur frequently in Spanish Lynch syndrome families. To understand their ancestral history and clinical effect, we performed functional assays and a penetrance analysis and studied their genetic and geographic origins. Detailed family histories were taken from 29 carrier families. Functional analysis included in silico and in vitro assays at the RNA and protein levels. Penetrance was calculated using a modified segregation analysis adjusted for ascertainment. Founder effects were evaluated by haplotype analysis. The identified MLH1 c.306+5G>A and c.1865T>A (p.Leu622His) variants are absent in control populations and segregate with the disease. Tumors from carriers of both variants show microsatellite instability and loss of expression of the MLH1 protein. The c.306+5G>A variant is a pathogenic mutation affecting mRNA processing. The c.1865T>A (p.Leu622His) variant causes defects in MLH1 expression and stability. For both mutations, the estimated penetrance is moderate (age-cumulative colorectal cancer risk by age 70 of 20.1% and 14.1% for c.306+5G>A and of 6.8% and 7.3% for c.1865T>A in men and women carriers, respectively) in the lower range of variability estimated for other pathogenic Spanish MLH1 mutations. A common haplotype was associated with each of the identified mutations, confirming their founder origin. The ages of c.306+5G>A and c.1865T>A mutations were estimated to be 53 to 122 and 12 to 22 generations, respectively. Our results confirm the pathogenicity, moderate penetrance, and founder origin of the MLH1 c.306+5G>A and c.1865T>A mutations. These findings have important implications for genetic counseling and molecular diagnosis of Lynch syndrome.

  15. Compositional assessments of key maize populations: B73 hybrids of the nested association mapping founder lines and diverse landrace inbred lines

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The present study provides an assessment of compositional diversity in maize B73 hybrids derived from both the nested association mapping (NAM) founder lines and from a geographically diverse collection of landrace accessions from North and South America. The NAM founders represent a key population...

  16. John D. Rockefeller 3rd, statesman and founder of the Population Council.

    PubMed

    Dunlop, J

    2000-01-01

    This article presents a profile of John D. Rockefeller 3rd, statesman and founder of the Population Council. It is noted that Rockefeller took a broad view of population control as a means to address poverty and economic development rather than as an end in itself. In 1952 he initiated the convocation of the Conference on Population Problems held in Williamsburg, Virginia. The discussion focused on food supply, industrial development, depletion of natural resources, and political instability resulting from unchecked population growth. In 1967, Rockefeller initiated, lobbied for, and finally achieved a World Leaders' Statement signed by 30 heads of state including US President Lyndon Johnson. The document drew attention to population growth as a world problem and engendered political support for family planning as a solution. After 3 years the Commission on Population Growth and the American Future was established, and Rockefeller was made its chairman. Several issues were debated, including more safer fertility control and the legalization of abortion.

  17. Linkage-disequilibrium mapping of disease genes by reconstruction of ancestral haplotypes in founder populations.

    PubMed Central

    Service, S K; Lang, D W; Freimer, N B; Sandkuijl, L A

    1999-01-01

    Linkage disequilibrium (LD) mapping may be a powerful means for genome screening to identify susceptibility loci for common diseases. A new statistical approach for detection of LD around a disease gene is presented here. This method compares the distribution of haplotypes in affected individuals versus that expected for individuals descended from a common ancestor who carried a mutation of the disease gene. Simulations demonstrate that this method, which we term "ancestral haplotype reconstruction" (AHR), should be powerful for genome screening of phenotypes characterized by a high degree of etiologic heterogeneity, even with currently available marker maps. AHR is best suited to application in isolated populations where affected individuals are relatively recently descended (< approximately 25 generations) from a common disease mutation-bearing founder. PMID:10330361

  18. Eduard Strasburger (1844-1912): founder of modern plant cell biology.

    PubMed

    Volkmann, Dieter; Baluška, František; Menzel, Diedrik

    2012-10-01

    Eduard Strasburger, director of the Botany Institute and the Botanical Garden at the University of Bonn from 1881 to 1912, was one of the most admirable scientists in the field of plant biology, not just as the founder of modern plant cell biology but in addition as an excellent teacher who strongly believed in "education through science." He contributed to plant cell biology by discovering the discrete stages of karyokinesis and cytokinesis in algae and higher plants, describing cytoplasmic streaming in different systems, and reporting on the growth of the pollen tube into the embryo sac and guidance of the tube by synergides. Strasburger raised many problems which are hot spots in recent plant cell biology, e.g., structure and function of the plasmodesmata in relation to phloem loading (Strasburger cells) and signaling, mechanisms of cell plate formation, vesicle trafficking as a basis for most important developmental processes, and signaling related to fertilization.

  19. Founder effect in beta-thalassaemia in Portneuf, Québec.

    PubMed

    De Braekeleer, M; Dao, T N

    1993-08-01

    The genealogies of seven individuals with beta-thalassaemia minor carrying the (beta+IVS-1, nt110) mutation were reconstructed to determine the origin of the mutation in the French Canadian population of Portneuf County. A set of 55 ancestors common to all seven carriers was defined. These founders included 38 born in Europe of whom 34 came from 13 different regions of France and in particular from Languedoc (2 ancestors), a French province along the Mediterranean sea in which the mutation is still present. Descendants of these two individuals settled in Portneuf County where the gene frequency increased due to a high level of endogamy. However, present results cannot exclude a possibility that the (beta+IVS-1, nt110) mutation was introduced into the French Canadian population by settlers originating from a non-malarial region of France. The beta-thalassaemia gene has since spread from Portneuf County over the last century.

  20. An intriguing "silent" mutation and a founder effect in antiquitin (ALDH7A1).

    PubMed

    Salomons, Gajja S; Bok, Levinus A; Struys, Eduard A; Pope, Lorna Landegge; Darmin, Patricia S; Mills, Philippa B; Clayton, Peter T; Willemsen, Michèl A; Jakobs, Cornelis

    2007-10-01

    Recently, alpha-aminoadipic semialdehyde (alpha-AASA) dehydrogenase deficiency was shown to cause pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy in a considerable number of patients. alpha-AASA dehydrogenase deficiency is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by a neonatal-onset epileptic encephalopathy in which seizures are resistant to antiepileptic drugs but respond immediately to the administration of pyridoxine (OMIM 266100). Increased plasma and urinary levels of alpha-AASA are associated with pathogenic mutations in the alpha-AASA dehydrogenase (ALDH7A1/antiquitin) gene. Here, we report an intriguing "silent" mutation in ALDH7A1, a novel missense mutation and a founder mutation in a Dutch cohort (10 patients) with alpha-AASA dehydrogenase deficiency.

  1. The first independent pharmacognosy institute in the world and its founder Julije Domac (1853-1928).

    PubMed

    Inić, S; Kujundzić, N

    2011-09-01

    The aim of this article is to describe the foundation and development of the first distinct Institute of Pharmacognosy in the world and to provide a biography of its founder Julije Domac. The Institute was founded in 1896 as a separate institution at the University of Zagreb, Croatia, part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire at the time. In other European university centers, pharmacognosy institutes were founded together with pharmacology, botany, pharmaceutical or general chemistry. Julije Domac (1853-1928) graduated pharmacy from the University of Vienna (1874) and received his Ph.D. from the University of Graz (1880) with a paper elucidating the structure of hexene and mannitol obtained from manna. He lectured pharmacognosy at the University of Zagreb (1887-1924), wrote chemistry and pharmacognosy textbooks, and co-wrote the Croatian-Slavonian Pharmacopoeia.

  2. Congenital sucrase-isomaltase deficiency: identification of a common Inuit founder mutation.

    PubMed

    Marcadier, Julien L; Boland, Margaret; Scott, C Ronald; Issa, Kheirie; Wu, Zaining; McIntyre, Adam D; Hegele, Robert A; Geraghty, Michael T; Lines, Matthew A

    2015-02-03

    Congenital sucrase-isomaltase deficiency is a rare hereditary cause of chronic diarrhea in children. People with this condition lack the intestinal brush-border enzyme required for digestion of di- and oligosaccharides, including sucrose and isomaltose, leading to malabsorption. Although the condition is known to be highly prevalent (about 5%-10%) in several Inuit populations, the genetic basis for this has not been described. We sought to identify a common mutation for congenital sucrase-isomaltase deficiency in the Inuit population. We sequenced the sucrase-isomaltase gene, SI, in a single Inuit proband with congenital sucrase-isomaltase deficiency who had severe fermentative diarrhea and failure to thrive. We then genotyped a further 128 anonymized Inuit controls from a variety of locales in the Canadian Arctic to assess for a possible founder effect. In the proband, we identified a novel, homozygous frameshift mutation, c.273_274delAG (p.Gly92Leufs*8), predicted to result in complete absence of a functional protein product. This change was very common among the Inuit controls, with an observed allele frequency of 17.2% (95% confidence interval [CI] 12.6%-21.8%). The predicted Hardy-Weinberg prevalence of congenital sucrase-isomaltase deficiency in Inuit people, based on this single founder allele, is 3.0% (95% CI 1.4%-4.5%), which is comparable with previous estimates. We found a common mutation, SI c.273_274delAG, to be responsible for the high prevalence of congenital sucrase-isomaltase deficiency among Inuit people. Targeted mutation testing for this allele should afford a simple and minimally invasive means of diagnosing this condition in Inuit patients with chronic diarrhea. © 2015 Canadian Medical Association or its licensors.

  3. Characterization of an Italian Founder Mutation in the RING-Finger Domain of BRCA1

    PubMed Central

    Colombo, Mara; Congregati, Caterina; Sarkar, Mohosin; Magliery, Thomas J.; Ripamonti, Carla B.; Foglia, Claudia; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Manoukian, Siranoush; Tondini, Carlo; Barile, Monica; Pensotti, Valeria; Bernard, Loris

    2014-01-01

    The identification of founder mutations in cancer predisposing genes is important to improve risk assessment in geographically defined populations, since it may provide specific targets resulting in cost-effective genetic testing. Here, we report the characterization of the BRCA1 c.190T>C (p.Cys64Arg) mutation, mapped to the RING-finger domain coding region, that we detected in 43 hereditary breast/ovarian cancer (HBOC) families, for the large part originating from the province of Bergamo (Northern Italy). Haplotype analysis was performed in 21 families, and led to the identification of a shared haplotype extending over three BRCA1-associated marker loci (0.4 cM). Using the DMLE+2.2 software program and regional population demographic data, we were able to estimate the age of the mutation to vary between 3,100 and 3,350 years old. Functional characterization of the mutation was carried out at both transcript and protein level. Reverse transcriptase-PCR analysis on lymphoblastoid cells revealed expression of full length mRNA from the mutant allele. A green fluorescent protein (GFP)-fragment reassembly assay showed that the p.Cys64Arg substitution prevents the binding of the BRCA1 protein to the interacting protein BARD1, in a similar way as proven deleterious mutations in the RING-domain. Overall, 55 of 83 (66%) female mutation carriers had a diagnosis of breast and/or ovarian cancer. Our observations indicate that the BRCA1 c.190T>C is a pathogenic founder mutation present in the Italian population. Further analyses will evaluate whether screening for this mutation can be suggested as an effective strategy for the rapid identification of at-risk individuals in the Bergamo area. PMID:24516540

  4. NRL S50T mutation and the importance of 'founder effects' in inherited retinal dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Bessant, D A; Payne, A M; Plant, C; Bird, A C; Swaroop, A; Bhattacharya, S S

    2000-10-01

    The aim of this work was to identify NRL mutations in a panel of 200 autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP) families. All samples were subjected to heteroduplex analysis of the three exons of the NRL gene, and HphI restriction digest analysis of exon 2 (to identify the S50T mutation). Families found to have the S50T mutation, and six additional larger pedigrees (which had previously been excluded from the other nine adRP loci) underwent linkage analysis using polymorphic markers located in the region of 14q11. HphI restriction analysis followed by direct sequencing of the amplified NRL exon 2 product demonstrated the presence of the NRL S50T sequence change in three adRP families. Comparison of marker haplotypes in affected individuals from these families with those of affected members of the original 14q11 linked family revealed a common disease haplotype for markers within the adRP locus. Recombination events observed in these families define an adRP critical interval of 14.9 cM between D13S72 and D14S1041. Linkage analysis enabled all six of the larger adRP pedigrees to be excluded from the 14q11 locus. The NRL S50T mutation represents another example of a 'founder effect' in a dominantly inherited retinal dystrophy. Identification of such 'founder effects' may greatly simplify diagnostic genetic screening and lead to better prognostic counselling. The exclusion of several adRP families from all ten adRP loci indicates that at least one further adRP locus remains to be found.

  5. The split of the Arara population: comparison of genetic drift and founder effect.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro-dos-Santos, A K; Guerreiro, J F; Santos, S E; Zago, M A

    2001-01-01

    The total genetic diversity of the Amerindian population is as high as that observed for other continental human populations because a large contribution from variation among tribes makes up for the low variation within tribes. This is attributed mainly to genetic drift acting on small isolated populations. However, a small founder population with a low genetic diversity is another factor that may contribute to the low intratribal diversity. Small founder populations seem to be a frequent event in the formation of new tribes among the Amerindians, but this event is usually not well recorded. In this paper, we analyze the genetic diversity of the Arara of Laranjal village and the Arara of Iriri village, with respect to seven tandem repeat autosomic segments (D1S80, ApoB, D4S43, vW1, vW2, F13A1 and D12S67), two Y-chromosome-specific polymorphisms (DYS19 and DYS199), and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) markers (restriction fragment length polymorphisms and sequencing of a segment of the D loop region). The occurrence of a single Y chromosome and mtDNA haplotype, and only 1-4 alleles of the autosomic loci investigated, corroborates historic and demographic records that the Arara of Iriri were founded by a single couple of siblings who came from the Arara of Laranjal, the largest group. Notwithstanding this fact, the genetic distance and the molecular variance between the two Arara villages were greater than those observed between them and other Amazonian tribes, suggesting that the microevolutionary process among Brazilian Amerindians may be misinterpreted if historic demographic data are not considered. Copyright 2000 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Patterns in avian malaria at founder and source populations of an endemic New Zealand passerine.

    PubMed

    Baillie, Shauna M; Gudex-Cross, David; Barraclough, Rosemary K; Blanchard, Wade; Brunton, Dianne H

    2012-11-01

    Significant progress in our understanding of disease transmission in the wild can be made by examining variation in host-parasite-vector interactions after founder events of the host. This study is the first to document patterns in avian malaria, Plasmodium spp., infecting an endemic New Zealand passerine, Anthornis melanura, at multiple-host subpopulations simultaneously. We assess the Beaudoin hypothesis of bimodal seasonality and use AIC model selection to determine host factors associated with disease prevalence. We had the rare opportunity to test the enemy release hypothesis (ERH) after a recent colonisation event of the bellbird host. Four Plasmodium species were found to infect bellbirds. Temporal patterns of three exotic parasite lineages, including GRW06 Plasmodium (Huffia) elongatum, SYAT05 Plasmodium (Novyella) vaughani and a Plasmodium (Haemamoeba) relictum, were sporadic with low prevalence year round. The fourth species was an endemic parasite, an unresolved Plasmodium (Novyella) sp. here called ANME01, which exhibited a strong winter peak at the source subpopulations possibly indicating greater immune stressors at the densely populated source site. At the colonies, we observed bimodal seasonality in the prevalence of ANME01 with autumn and spring peaks. These infection peaks were male-biased, and the amplitude of sex bias was more pronounced at the newer colony perhaps due to increased seasonal competition resulting from territory instability. We observed a decrease in parasite species diversity and increase in body condition from source to founder sites, but statistical differences in the direct relationship between body condition and malaria prevalence between source and colony were weak and significant only during winter. Though our data did not strongly support the ERH, we highlight the benefits of 'conspecific release' associated with decreased population density and food competition. Our findings contribute to the identification of ecological

  7. Distribution and medical impact of loss-of-function variants in the Finnish founder population.

    PubMed

    Lim, Elaine T; Würtz, Peter; Havulinna, Aki S; Palta, Priit; Tukiainen, Taru; Rehnström, Karola; Esko, Tõnu; Mägi, Reedik; Inouye, Michael; Lappalainen, Tuuli; Chan, Yingleong; Salem, Rany M; Lek, Monkol; Flannick, Jason; Sim, Xueling; Manning, Alisa; Ladenvall, Claes; Bumpstead, Suzannah; Hämäläinen, Eija; Aalto, Kristiina; Maksimow, Mikael; Salmi, Marko; Blankenberg, Stefan; Ardissino, Diego; Shah, Svati; Horne, Benjamin; McPherson, Ruth; Hovingh, Gerald K; Reilly, Muredach P; Watkins, Hugh; Goel, Anuj; Farrall, Martin; Girelli, Domenico; Reiner, Alex P; Stitziel, Nathan O; Kathiresan, Sekar; Gabriel, Stacey; Barrett, Jeffrey C; Lehtimäki, Terho; Laakso, Markku; Groop, Leif; Kaprio, Jaakko; Perola, Markus; McCarthy, Mark I; Boehnke, Michael; Altshuler, David M; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Metspalu, Andres; Freimer, Nelson B; Zeller, Tanja; Jalkanen, Sirpa; Koskinen, Seppo; Raitakari, Olli; Durbin, Richard; MacArthur, Daniel G; Salomaa, Veikko; Ripatti, Samuli; Daly, Mark J; Palotie, Aarno

    2014-07-01

    Exome sequencing studies in complex diseases are challenged by the allelic heterogeneity, large number and modest effect sizes of associated variants on disease risk and the presence of large numbers of neutral variants, even in phenotypically relevant genes. Isolated populations with recent bottlenecks offer advantages for studying rare variants in complex diseases as they have deleterious variants that are present at higher frequencies as well as a substantial reduction in rare neutral variation. To explore the potential of the Finnish founder population for studying low-frequency (0.5-5%) variants in complex diseases, we compared exome sequence data on 3,000 Finns to the same number of non-Finnish Europeans and discovered that, despite having fewer variable sites overall, the average Finn has more low-frequency loss-of-function variants and complete gene knockouts. We then used several well-characterized Finnish population cohorts to study the phenotypic effects of 83 enriched loss-of-function variants across 60 phenotypes in 36,262 Finns. Using a deep set of quantitative traits collected on these cohorts, we show 5 associations (p<5×10⁻⁸) including splice variants in LPA that lowered plasma lipoprotein(a) levels (P = 1.5×10⁻¹¹⁷). Through accessing the national medical records of these participants, we evaluate the LPA finding via Mendelian randomization and confirm that these splice variants confer protection from cardiovascular disease (OR = 0.84, P = 3×10⁻⁴), demonstrating for the first time the correlation between very low levels of LPA in humans with potential therapeutic implications for cardiovascular diseases. More generally, this study articulates substantial advantages for studying the role of rare variation in complex phenotypes in founder populations like the Finns and by combining a unique population genetic history with data from large population cohorts and centralized research access to National Health Registers.

  8. Congenital sucrase–isomaltase deficiency: identification of a common Inuit founder mutation

    PubMed Central

    Marcadier, Julien L.; Boland, Margaret; Scott, C. Ronald; Issa, Kheirie; Wu, Zaining; McIntyre, Adam D.; Hegele, Robert A.; Geraghty, Michael T.; Lines, Matthew A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Congenital sucrase–isomaltase deficiency is a rare hereditary cause of chronic diarrhea in children. People with this condition lack the intestinal brush-border enzyme required for digestion of di- and oligosaccharides, including sucrose and isomaltose, leading to malabsorption. Although the condition is known to be highly prevalent (about 5%–10%) in several Inuit populations, the genetic basis for this has not been described. We sought to identify a common mutation for congenital sucrase–isomaltase deficiency in the Inuit population. Methods: We sequenced the sucrase–isomaltase gene, SI, in a single Inuit proband with congenital sucrase–isomaltase deficiency who had severe fermentative diarrhea and failure to thrive. We then genotyped a further 128 anonymized Inuit controls from a variety of locales in the Canadian Arctic to assess for a possible founder effect. Results: In the proband, we identified a novel, homozygous frameshift mutation, c.273_274delAG (p.Gly92Leufs*8), predicted to result in complete absence of a functional protein product. This change was very common among the Inuit controls, with an observed allele frequency of 17.2% (95% confidence interval [CI] 12.6%–21.8%). The predicted Hardy–Weinberg prevalence of congenital sucrase–isomaltase deficiency in Inuit people, based on this single founder allele, is 3.0% (95% CI 1.4%–4.5%), which is comparable with previous estimates. Interpretation: We found a common mutation, SI c.273_274delAG, to be responsible for the high prevalence of congenital sucrase–isomaltase deficiency among Inuit people. Targeted mutation testing for this allele should afford a simple and minimally invasive means of diagnosing this condition in Inuit patients with chronic diarrhea. PMID:25452324

  9. A personalised approach to prostate cancer screening based on genotyping of risk founder alleles

    PubMed Central

    Cybulski, C; Wokołorczyk, D; Kluźniak, W; Kashyap, A; Gołąb, A; Słojewski, M; Sikorski, A; Puszyński, M; Soczawa, M; Borkowski, T; Borkowski, A; Antczak, A; Przybyła, J; Sosnowski, M; Małkiewicz, B; Zdrojowy, R; Domagała, P; Piotrowski, K; Menkiszak, J; Krzystolik, K; Gronwald, J; Jakubowska, A; Górski, B; Dębniak, T; Masojć, B; Huzarski, T; Muir, K R; Lophatananon, A; Lubiński, J; Narod, S A

    2013-01-01

    Background: To evaluate whether genotyping for 18 prostate cancer founder variants is helpful in identifying high-risk individuals and for determining optimal screening regimens. Methods: A serum PSA level was measured and a digital rectal examination (DRE) was performed on 2907 unaffected men aged 40–90. Three hundred and twenty-three men with an elevated PSA (⩾4 ng ml−1) or an abnormal DRE underwent a prostate biopsy. All men were genotyped for three founder alleles in BRCA1 (5382insC, 4153delA and C61G), for four alleles in CHEK2 (1100delC, IVS2+1G>A, del5395 and I157T), for one allele in NBS1 (657del5), for one allele in HOXB13 (G84E), and for nine low-risk single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Results: On the basis of an elevated PSA or an abnormal DRE, prostate cancer was diagnosed in 135 of 2907 men (4.6%). In men with a CHEK2 missense mutation I157T, the cancer detection rate among men with an elevated PSA or an abnormal DRE was much higher (10.2%, P=0.0008). The cancer detection rate rose with the number of SNP risk genotypes observed from 1.2% for men with no variant to 8.6% for men who carried six or more variants (P=0.04). No single variant was helpful on its own in predicting the presence of prostate cancer, however, the combination of all rare mutations and SNPs improved predictive power (area under the curve=0.59; P=0.03). Conclusion: These results suggest that testing for germline CHEK2 mutations improves the ability to predict the presence of prostate cancer in screened men, however, the clinical utility of incorporating DNA variants in the screening process is marginal. PMID:23722471

  10. Distribution and Medical Impact of Loss-of-Function Variants in the Finnish Founder Population

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Elaine T.; Würtz, Peter; Havulinna, Aki S.; Palta, Priit; Tukiainen, Taru; Rehnström, Karola; Esko, Tõnu; Mägi, Reedik; Inouye, Michael; Lappalainen, Tuuli; Chan, Yingleong; Salem, Rany M.; Lek, Monkol; Flannick, Jason; Sim, Xueling; Manning, Alisa; Ladenvall, Claes; Bumpstead, Suzannah; Hämäläinen, Eija; Aalto, Kristiina; Maksimow, Mikael; Salmi, Marko; Blankenberg, Stefan; Ardissino, Diego; Shah, Svati; Horne, Benjamin; McPherson, Ruth; Hovingh, Gerald K.; Reilly, Muredach P.; Watkins, Hugh; Goel, Anuj; Farrall, Martin; Girelli, Domenico; Reiner, Alex P.; Stitziel, Nathan O.; Kathiresan, Sekar; Gabriel, Stacey; Barrett, Jeffrey C.; Lehtimäki, Terho; Laakso, Markku; Groop, Leif; Kaprio, Jaakko; Perola, Markus; McCarthy, Mark I.; Boehnke, Michael; Altshuler, David M.; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Metspalu, Andres; Freimer, Nelson B.; Zeller, Tanja; Jalkanen, Sirpa; Koskinen, Seppo; Raitakari, Olli; Durbin, Richard; MacArthur, Daniel G.; Salomaa, Veikko; Ripatti, Samuli

    2014-01-01

    Exome sequencing studies in complex diseases are challenged by the allelic heterogeneity, large number and modest effect sizes of associated variants on disease risk and the presence of large numbers of neutral variants, even in phenotypically relevant genes. Isolated populations with recent bottlenecks offer advantages for studying rare variants in complex diseases as they have deleterious variants that are present at higher frequencies as well as a substantial reduction in rare neutral variation. To explore the potential of the Finnish founder population for studying low-frequency (0.5–5%) variants in complex diseases, we compared exome sequence data on 3,000 Finns to the same number of non-Finnish Europeans and discovered that, despite having fewer variable sites overall, the average Finn has more low-frequency loss-of-function variants and complete gene knockouts. We then used several well-characterized Finnish population cohorts to study the phenotypic effects of 83 enriched loss-of-function variants across 60 phenotypes in 36,262 Finns. Using a deep set of quantitative traits collected on these cohorts, we show 5 associations (p<5×10−8) including splice variants in LPA that lowered plasma lipoprotein(a) levels (P = 1.5×10−117). Through accessing the national medical records of these participants, we evaluate the LPA finding via Mendelian randomization and confirm that these splice variants confer protection from cardiovascular disease (OR = 0.84, P = 3×10−4), demonstrating for the first time the correlation between very low levels of LPA in humans with potential therapeutic implications for cardiovascular diseases. More generally, this study articulates substantial advantages for studying the role of rare variation in complex phenotypes in founder populations like the Finns and by combining a unique population genetic history with data from large population cohorts and centralized research access to National Health Registers. PMID

  11. Estimation of the number of founders of an invasive pest insect population: the fire ant Solenopsis invicta in the USA

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Kenneth G; Shoemaker, D. DeWayne

    2008-01-01

    Determination of the number of founders responsible for the establishment of invasive populations is important for developing biologically based management practices, predicting the invasive potential of species, and making inferences about ecological and evolutionary processes. The fire ant Solenopsis invicta is a major invasive pest insect first introduced into the USA from its native South American range in the mid-1930s. We use data from diverse genetic markers surveyed in the source population and the USA to estimate the number of founders of this introduced population. Data from different classes of nuclear markers (microsatellites, allozymes, sex-determination locus) and mitochondrial DNA are largely congruent in suggesting that 9–20 unrelated mated queens comprised the initial founder group to colonize the USA at Mobile, Alabama. Estimates of founder group size based on expanded samples from throughout the southern USA were marginally higher than this, consistent with the hypothesis of one or more secondary introductions of the ant into the USA. The rapid spread and massive population build-up of introduced S. invicta occurred despite the loss of substantial genetic variation associated with the relatively small invasive propagule size, a pattern especially surprising in light of the substantial genetic load imposed by the loss of variation at the sex-determination locus. PMID:18577505

  12. Remembering Nancy. 25 Members of the Montessori Community Share Their Reflections on the Death of the AMS Founder.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Joy; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Twenty-five members of the Montessori community share their memories of Dr. Nancy McCormick Rambusch, charismatic founder of the American Montessori movement, early childhood professional, and innovative educator, who died of pancreatic cancer on October 27, 1994. Rambusch's work of 40 years now flowers as an institutionalized educational program…

  13. [Johann Friedrich Dieffenbach (1792-1847) as the founder of plastic surgery. His contribution to maxillofacial surgery].

    PubMed

    Schultheiss, D; Knöner, W; Kramer, F J; Jonas, U

    1998-11-01

    Johann Friedrich Dieffenbach (1792-1847) is generally known as the founder of modern plastic surgery. One focus of his work, apart from the physiology of transplantation and operative techniques, was reconstructive oral and maxillofacial surgery. This special aspect of plastic surgery as well as Dieffenbach's biography is presented in this historic article.

  14. Torsten Husén--A Co-Founder and Chairman of IEA from 1962 to 1978

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Genova, Teodora

    2015-01-01

    This paper reviews the work and contribution of one of the most influential comparativists in education--Torsten Husén in the period when he was a co-founder and chairman of the International Association for the Evaluation of Educational Achievement (IEA) in the 60 and 70 decades of the 20th century. At that particular time, the first major…

  15. Apple founder targets healthcare as NeXT market. Interview by Carolyn Dunbar and Michael L. Laughlin.

    PubMed

    Jobs, S

    1992-12-01

    Cofounder and former chairman of the board of Apple Computer Steven Jobs looks beyond the 1980s image of a petulant, embittered young man, fighting with all who failed to share his vision, and many who did. Today, as a founder, president and chairman of NeXT, Inc., he looks to more high-minded applications of his computer genius.

  16. TGfU--Would You Know It if You Saw It? Benchmarks from the Tacit Knowledge of the Founders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Joy

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores the tacit expert knowledge and understanding about games curriculum and pedagogy of three men, Len Almond, David Bunker, and Rod Thorpe, credited as the founders of the Teaching Games for Understanding (TGfU) model. The model emerged from teacher practice in the late 1970s and was little theorized at the time, apart from a…

  17. TGfU--Would You Know It if You Saw It? Benchmarks from the Tacit Knowledge of the Founders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Joy

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores the tacit expert knowledge and understanding about games curriculum and pedagogy of three men, Len Almond, David Bunker, and Rod Thorpe, credited as the founders of the Teaching Games for Understanding (TGfU) model. The model emerged from teacher practice in the late 1970s and was little theorized at the time, apart from a…

  18. Remembering Nancy. 25 Members of the Montessori Community Share Their Reflections on the Death of the AMS Founder.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Joy; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Twenty-five members of the Montessori community share their memories of Dr. Nancy McCormick Rambusch, charismatic founder of the American Montessori movement, early childhood professional, and innovative educator, who died of pancreatic cancer on October 27, 1994. Rambusch's work of 40 years now flowers as an institutionalized educational program…

  19. A low frequency of non-founder BRCA1 mutations in Ashkenazi Jewish breast-ovarian cancer families.

    PubMed

    Phelan, Catherine M; Kwan, Elaine; Jack, Elaine; Li, Song; Morgan, Cindy; Aubé, Jennifer; Hanna, Danielle; Narod, Steven A

    2002-11-01

    The 185delAG and 5382insC founder mutations account for the majority of mutations identified in BRCA1 in Ashkenazi Jewish breast and breast-ovarian cancer families. Few non-founder BRCA1 mutations have been identified to date in these families. We initially screened a panel of 245 Ashkenazi Jewish breast-ovarian cancer families with an affected proband and at least one other case of breast or ovarian cancer for founder mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2. Founder mutations were identified in 85 families (185delAG in 44 families, 5382insC in 16 families, and the BRCA2 6174delT in 25 families). The 160 negative families were then screened for the entire BRCA1 gene by a combination of DGGE and PTT. We identified one novel frameshift mutation in BRCA1 in exon 14 (4572del22) that truncated the protein at codon 1485. The family contained three cases of early-onset ovarian cancer (41 years, 43 years, and 52 years) and one case of breast cancer (at age 54 years subsequent to an ovarian cancer). In addition, three missense variants of unknown significance (exon 11 C3832T (P1238L), exon 15 G4654T (S1512I), and exon 15 G4755A (D1546N)) were found in single families. These missense variants have been previously identified in other families [BIC Database] and are considered to be "unclassified variants, favoring polymorphism." Non-founder BRCA1 mutations are rare in Ashkenazi Jewish breast/ovarian cancer families.

  20. Org-1 is required for the diversification of circular visceral muscle founder cells and normal midgut morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Schaub, Christoph; Frasch, Manfred

    2013-01-01

    The T-Box family of transcription factors plays fundamental roles in the generation of appropriate spatial and temporal gene expression profiles during cellular differentiation and organogenesis in animals. In this study we report that the Drosophila Tbx1 orthologue optomotor-blind-related-gene-1 (org-1) exerts a pivotal function in the diversification of circular visceral muscle founder cell identities in Drosophila. In embryos mutant for org-1, the specification of the midgut musculature per se is not affected, but the differentiating midgut fails to form the anterior and central midgut constrictions and lacks the gastric caeca. We demonstrate that this phenotype results from the nearly complete loss of the founder cell specific expression domains of several genes known to regulate midgut morphogenesis, including odd-paired (opa), teashirt (tsh), Ultrabithorax (Ubx), decapentaplegic (dpp) and wingless (wg). To address the mechanisms that mediate the regulatory inputs from org-1 towards Ubx, dpp, and wg in these founder cells we genetically dissected known visceral mesoderm specific cis-regulatory-modules (CRMs) of these genes. The analyses revealed that the activities of the dpp and wg CRMs depend on org-1, the CRMs are bound by Org-1 in vivo and their T-Box binding sites are essential for their activation in the visceral muscle founder cells. We conclude that Org-1 acts within a well-defined signaling and transcriptional network of the trunk visceral mesoderm as a crucial founder cell-specific competence factor, in concert with the general visceral mesodermal factor Biniou. As such, it directly regulates several key genes involved in the establishment of morphogenetic centers along the anteroposterior axis of the visceral mesoderm, which subsequently organize the formation of midgut constrictions and gastric caeca and thereby determine the morphology of the midgut. PMID:23380635

  1. Geochemical evidence for pre- and syn-rifting lithospheric foundering in the East African Rift System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, W. R.; Furman, T.; Elkins-Tanton, L. T.

    2015-12-01

    The East African Rift System (EARS) is the archetypal active continental rift. The rift branches cut through the elevated Ethiopian and Kenyan domes and are accompanied by a >40 Myr volcanic record. This record is often used to understand changing mantle dynamics, but this approach is complicated by the diversity of spatio-temporally constrained, geochemically unique volcanic provinces. Various sources have been invoked to explain the geochemical variability across the EARS (e.g. mantle plume(s), both enriched and depleted mantle, metasomatized or pyroxenitic lithosphere, continental crust). Mantle contributions are often assessed assuming adiabatic melting of mostly peridotitic material due to extension or an upwelling thermal plume. However, metasomatized lithospheric mantle does not behave like fertile or depleted peridotite mantle, so this model must be modified. Metasomatic lithologies (e.g. pyroxenite) are unstable compared to neighboring peridotite and can founder into the underlying asthenosphere via ductile dripping. As such a drip descends, the easily fusible metasomatized lithospheric mantle heats conductively and melts at increasing T and P; the subsequent volcanic products in turn record this drip magmatism. We re-evaluated existing data of major mafic volcanic episodes throughout the EARS to investigate potential evidence for lithospheric drip foundering that may be an essential part of the rifting process. The data demonstrate clearly that lithospheric drip melting played an important role in pre-flood basalt volcanism in Turkana (>35 Ma), high-Ti "mantle plume-derived" flood basalts and picrites (HT2) from NW Ethiopia (~30 Ma), Miocene shield volcanism on the E Ethiopian Plateau and in Turkana (22-26 Ma), and Quaternary volcanism in Virunga (Western Rift) and Chyulu Hills (Eastern Rift). In contrast, there is no evidence for drip melting in "lithosphere-derived" flood basalts (LT) from NW Ethiopia, Miocene volcanism in S Ethiopia, or Quaternary

  2. Highly prevalent LIPH founder mutations causing autosomal recessive woolly hair/hypotrichosis in Japan and the genotype/phenotype correlations.

    PubMed

    Tanahashi, Kana; Sugiura, Kazumitsu; Kono, Michihiro; Takama, Hiromichi; Hamajima, Nobuyuki; Akiyama, Masashi

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in LIPH cause of autosomal recessive woolly hair/hypotrichosis (ARWH), and the 2 missense mutations c.736T>A (p.Cys246Ser) and c.742C>A (p.His248Asn) are considered prevalent founder mutations for ARWH in the Japanese population. To reveal genotype/phenotype correlations in ARWH cases in Japan and the haplotypes in 14 Japanese patients from 14 unrelated Japanese families. 13 patients had woolly hair, and 1 patient had complete baldness since birth. An LIPH mutation search revealed homozygous c.736T>A mutations in 10 of the patients. Compound heterozygous c.736T>A and c.742C>A mutations were found in 3 of the patients, and homozygous c.742C>A mutation in 1 patient. The phenotype of mild hypotrichosis with woolly hair was restricted to the patients with the homozygous c.736T>A mutation. The severe phenotype of complete baldness was seen in only 1 patient with homozygous c.742C>A. Haplotype analysis revealed that the alleles containing the LIPH c.736T>A mutation had a haplotype identical to that reported previously, although 4 alleles out of 5 chromosomes containing the LIPH c.742C>A mutation had a different haplotype from the previously reported founder allele. These alleles with c.742C>A are thought to be the third founder LIPH mutation causing ARWH. To accurately determine the prevalence of the founder mutations, we investigated allele frequencies of those mutations in 819 Japanese controls. Heterozygous c.736T>A mutations were found in 13 controls (allele frequency: 0.0079; carrier rate: 0.016), and heterozygous c.742C>A mutations were found in 2 controls (allele frequency: 0.0012; carrier rate: 0.0024). In conclusion, this study confirms the more accurate allele frequencies of the pathogenic founder mutations of LIPH and shows that there is a third founder mutation in Japan. In addition, the present findings suggest that the mutation patterns of LIPH might be associated with hypotrichosis severity in ARWH.

  3. Familial mediterranean fever (FMF) in Moroccan Jews: Demonstration of a founder effect by extended haplotype analysis

    PubMed Central

    Aksentijevich, Ivona; Pras, Elon; Gruberg, Luis; Shen, Yang; Holman, Katherine; Helling, Sharon; Prosen, Leandrea; Sutherland, Grant R.; Richards, Robert I.; Dean, Michael; Pras, Mordechai; Kastner, Daniel L.

    1993-01-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is an autosomal recessive disease causing attacks of fever and serositis. The FMF gene (designated “MEF”) is on 16p, with the gene order 16cen–D16S80–MEF–D16S94–D16S283–D16S291–16pter. Here we report the association of FMF susceptibility with alleles at D16S94, D16S283, and D16S291 among 31 non-Ashkenazi Jewish families (14 Moroccan, 17 non-Moroccan). We observed highly significant associations at D16S283 and D16S291 among the Moroccan families. For the non-Moroccans, only the allelic association at D16S94 approached statistical significance. Haplotype analysis showed that 18/25 Moroccan FMF chromosomes, versus 0/21 noncarrier chromosomes, bore a specific haplotype for D16S94–D16S283–D16S291. Among non-Moroccans this haplotype was present in 6/26 FMF chromosomes versus 1/28 controls. Both groups of families are largely descended from Jews who fled the Spanish Inquisition. The strong haplotype association seen among the Moroccans is most likely a founder effect, given the recent origin and genetic isolation of the Moroccan Jewish community. The lower haplotype frequency among non-Moroccan carriers may reflect differences both in history and in population genetics. PMID:8102507

  4. Familial Mediterranean Fever (FMF) in Moroccan Jews: Demonstration of a founder effect by extened haplotype analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Aksentijevich, I.; Pras, E.; Helling, S.; Prosen, L.; Kastner, D.L.; Gruberg, L.; Pras, M. )

    1993-09-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is an autosomal recessive disease causing attacks of fever and serositis. The FMF gene (designated MEF') is on 16p, with the gene order 16 cen-D16S80-MEF-D16S94-D16S283-D16S291-16pter. Here the authors report the association of FMF susceptibility with alleles at D16S94, D16S283, and D16S291 among 31 non-Ashkenazi Jewish families 14 Moroccan families. For the non-Moroccans, only the allelic association at D16S94 approached statistical significance. Haplotype analysis showed that 18/25 Moroccan FMF chromosomes, versus 0/21 noncarrier chromosomes, bore a specific haplotype for D16S94-D16S283-D16S291. Among non-Moroccans this haplotype was present in 6/26 FMF chromosomes versus 1/28 controls. Both groups of families are largely descended from Jews who fled the Spanish Inquisition. The strong haplotype association seen among the Moroccans is most likely a founder effect, given the recent origin and genetic isolation of the Moroccan Jewish community. The lowest haplotype frequency among non-Moroccan carriers may reflect differences both in history and in population genetics. 28 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  5. Targeted Resequencing of Deafness Genes Reveals a Founder MYO15A Variant in Northeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Manzoli, Gabrielle N; Bademci, Guney; Acosta, Angelina X; Félix, Têmis M; Cengiz, F Basak; Foster, Joseph; Da Silva, Danniel S Dias; Menendez, Ibis; Sanchez-Pena, Isalis; Tekin, Demet; Blanton, Susan H; Abe-Sandes, Kiyoko; Liu, Xue Zhong; Tekin, Mustafa

    2016-11-01

    Identifying the genetic etiology in a person with hearing loss (HL) is challenging due to the extreme genetic heterogeneity in HL and the population-specific variability. In this study, after excluding GJB2 variants, targeted resequencing of 180 deafness-related genes revealed the causative variants in 11 of 19 (58%) Brazilian probands with autosomal recessive HL. Identified pathogenic variants were in MYO15A (10 families) and CLDN14 (one family). Remarkably, the MYO15A p.(Val1400Met) variant was identified in eight families from the city of Monte Santo in the northeast region of Brazil. Haplotype analysis of this variant was consistent with a single founder. No other cases with this variant were detected among 105 simplex cases from other cities of northeastern Brazil, suggesting that this variant is confined to a geographical region. This study suggests that it is feasible to develop population-specific screening for deafness variants once causative variants are identified in different geographical groups.

  6. Isolation mediates persistent founder effects on zooplankton colonisation in new temporary ponds

    PubMed Central

    Badosa, Anna; Frisch, Dagmar; Green, Andy J.; Rico, Ciro; Gómez, Africa

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the colonisation process in zooplankton is crucial for successful restoration of aquatic ecosystems. Here, we analyzed the clonal and genetic structure of the cyclical parthenogenetic rotifer Brachionus plicatilis by following populations established in new temporary ponds during the first three hydroperiods. Rotifer populations established rapidly after first flooding, although colonisation was ongoing throughout the study. Multilocus genotypes from 7 microsatellite loci suggested that most populations (10 of 14) were founded by few clones. The exception was one of the four populations that persisted throughout the studied hydroperiods, where high genetic diversity in the first hydroperiod suggested colonisation from a historical egg bank, and no increase in allelic diversity was detected with time. In contrast, in another of these four populations, we observed a progressive increase of allelic diversity. This population became less differentiated from the other populations suggesting effective gene flow soon after its foundation. Allelic diversity and richness remained low in the remaining two, more isolated, populations, suggesting little gene flow. Our results highlight the complexity of colonisation dynamics, with evidence for persistent founder effects in some ponds, but not in others, and with early immigration both from external source populations, and from residual, historical diapausing egg banks. PMID:28276459

  7. Isolation mediates persistent founder effects on zooplankton colonisation in new temporary ponds.

    PubMed

    Badosa, Anna; Frisch, Dagmar; Green, Andy J; Rico, Ciro; Gómez, Africa

    2017-03-09

    Understanding the colonisation process in zooplankton is crucial for successful restoration of aquatic ecosystems. Here, we analyzed the clonal and genetic structure of the cyclical parthenogenetic rotifer Brachionus plicatilis by following populations established in new temporary ponds during the first three hydroperiods. Rotifer populations established rapidly after first flooding, although colonisation was ongoing throughout the study. Multilocus genotypes from 7 microsatellite loci suggested that most populations (10 of 14) were founded by few clones. The exception was one of the four populations that persisted throughout the studied hydroperiods, where high genetic diversity in the first hydroperiod suggested colonisation from a historical egg bank, and no increase in allelic diversity was detected with time. In contrast, in another of these four populations, we observed a progressive increase of allelic diversity. This population became less differentiated from the other populations suggesting effective gene flow soon after its foundation. Allelic diversity and richness remained low in the remaining two, more isolated, populations, suggesting little gene flow. Our results highlight the complexity of colonisation dynamics, with evidence for persistent founder effects in some ponds, but not in others, and with early immigration both from external source populations, and from residual, historical diapausing egg banks.

  8. [THE FOUNDERS OF FIRST CHAIRS OF HISTORY OF MEDICINE AND SOCIAL HYGIENE IN THE USSR].

    PubMed

    Gorelova, L E; Kasimovskaia, N A

    2015-01-01

    The USSR academy of medical sciences was organized in 1944. At the same year, the institute of health care organization, medical statistics and social hygiene was included in its structure. Before the institute global tasks in area of research and pedagogic activities were stated. They were implemented in accordance with actual national demands. The institute became a leading research center of studying problems of population health, social hygiene, organization and management of health care and history of medicine. In 2003, the institute was renamed in the The RAMS national research institute of public health, and in 2013 was handed over the Federal agency of research organizations (FANO) of Russia. The directors of the institute were well-known scientists in the field of social hygiene health care organization and history of medicine. They made a significant input into development of medical education, combining scientific, managerial and pedagogic activities. The founders of the first chairs of history of medicine and social hygiene were the directors of the institute I.D. Strashun and N.A. Semashko.

  9. Use of Dried Blood Spots to Elucidate Full-Length Transmitted/Founder HIV-1 Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Salazar-Gonzalez, Jesus F.; Salazar, Maria G.; Tully, Damien C.; Ogilvie, Colin B.; Learn, Gerald H.; Allen, Todd M.; Heath, Sonya L.; Goepfert, Paul; Bar, Katharine J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Identification of HIV-1 genomes responsible for establishing clinical infection in newly infected individuals is fundamental to prevention and pathogenesis research. Processing, storage, and transportation of the clinical samples required to perform these virologic assays in resource-limited settings requires challenging venipuncture and cold chain logistics. Here, we validate the use of dried-blood spots (DBS) as a simple and convenient alternative to collecting and storing frozen plasma. Methods We performed parallel nucleic acid extraction, single genome amplification (SGA), next generation sequencing (NGS), and phylogenetic analyses on plasma and DBS. Results We demonstrated the capacity to extract viral RNA from DBS and perform SGA to infer the complete nucleotide sequence of the transmitted/founder (TF) HIV-1 envelope gene and full-length genome in two acutely infected individuals. Using both SGA and NGS methodologies, we showed that sequences generated from DBS and plasma display comparable phylogenetic patterns in both acute and chronic infection. SGA was successful on samples with a range of plasma viremia, including samples as low as 1,700 copies/ml and an estimated ∼50 viral copies per blood spot. Further, we demonstrated reproducible efficiency in gp160 env sequencing in DBS stored at ambient temperature for up to three weeks or at -20°C for up to five months. Conclusions These findings support the use of DBS as a practical and cost-effective alternative to frozen plasma for clinical trials and translational research conducted in resource-limited settings. PMID:27819061

  10. A serial founder effect model for human settlement out of Africa.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, Omkar; Batzoglou, Serafim; Feldman, Marcus W; Cavalli-Sforza, L Luca

    2009-01-22

    The increasing abundance of human genetic data has shown that the geographical patterns of worldwide genetic diversity are best explained by human expansion out of Africa. This expansion is modelled well by prolonged migration from a single origin in Africa with multiple subsequent serial founding events. We discuss a new simulation model for the serial founder effect out of Africa and compare it with results from previous studies. Unlike previous models, we distinguish colonization events from the continued exchange of people between occupied territories as a result of mating. We conduct a search through parameter space to estimate the range of parameter values that best explain key statistics from published data on worldwide variation in microsatellites. The range of parameters we use is chosen to be compatible with an out-of-Africa migration at 50-60Kyr ago and archaeo-ethno-demographic information. In addition to a colonization rate of 0.09-0.18, for an acceptable fit to the published microsatellite data, incorporation into existing models of exchange between neighbouring populations is essential, but at a very low rate. A linear decay of genetic diversity with geographical distance from the origin of expansion could apply to any species, especially if it moved recently into new geographical niches.

  11. [On the founders of the Institute of Mathematics and Physics, University of Bahia].

    PubMed

    Dias, A L

    The reduced number of female students of mathematics at the University of Bahia School of Philosophy (Faculdade de Filosofia, Universidade da Bahia - FF/UBa) is quite surprising. To date, they are concentrated in areas traditionally viewed as feminine whereas men predominate in the mathematical fields. I have examined interview data from a few women who graduated in mathematics and went on to teach at the University of Bahia School of Mathematics (Faculdade de Filosofia - FF) and at the Institute of Mathematics and Physics (Instituto de Matemática e Física - IMF), where they were soon to outnumber men and constitute the majority of the mathematics teaching staff. In this study, I have investigated the course of their careers over time: from their early student days, through their time as teaching assistants and professors, and finally as founders of the Institute of Mathematics and Physics, in 1960. Special reference is made to Martha Maria de Souza Dantas, organizer of the I Brazilian Conference on Mathematics Teaching, an event which has provided the groundwork for what was to become the Institute (IMF); and to Arlete Cerqueira Lima, the mastermind behind its creation.

  12. BRCA1 4153delA founder mutation in Russian ovarian cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Krylova, Nadezhda Yu; Lobeiko, Oksana S; Sokolenko, Anna P; Iyevleva, Aglaya G; Rozanov, Maxim E; Mitiushkina, Natalia V; Gergova, Madina M; Porhanova, Tatiana V; Urmancheyeva, Adel F; Maximov, Sergey Ya; Togo, Alexandr V; Imyanitov, Evgeny N

    2006-09-15

    The BRCA1 4153delA allele is frequently referred to as the Russian founder mutation, as it was initially detected in several cancer families from Moscow. Our earlier studies have demonstrated 1% occurrence of BRCA1 4153delA heterozygosity in familial and/or early-onset and/or bilateral Russian breast cancer (BC) patients. Since literature data suggest that the 4153delA variant is more associated with ovarian cancer (OC) than with BC, we expected to reveal a highly elevated frequency of this genotype in Russian ovarian cancer series. However, real-time allele-specific PCR genotyping has detected only two BRCA1 4153delA carriers out of 177 unselected OC patients (1.1%). Both these carriers were early-onset and had serous carcinomas of grade 3. Thus, our study supports neither the Russian origin of BRCA1 4153delA mutation, nor its selectivity towards ovarian versus breast cancer predisposition.

  13. Founder effect uncovers a new axis in polyethylene succinate bioremediation during biostimulation.

    PubMed

    Tribedi, Prosun; Sil, Alok K

    2013-09-01

    Biostimulation is a method of in situ bioremediation wherein native soil microbes are stimulated by nutrient supplementation. In a previous report, we showed considerable polyethylene succinate (PES) degradation by biostimulation. To gain an insight into this, this study was undertaken to investigate the different facets of the microbial population present in both soil and PES-films during biostimulation-mediated PES degradation. It was observed that addition of PES-films to both nutrient-treated and untreated soil resulted in significant reduction of soil microbial counts compared with the corresponding control. It was observed that a small microbial population containing both PES degraders and non-degraders translocated to PES surface. Over time, the population adhering to PES films changed from having both PES degraders and non-degraders to being mainly PES degraders. This newly developed microbial community on PES-films exhibited low diversity with a distinct cluster of metabolic fingerprinting and higher evenness compared with parent soil microbial population. Thus the establishment of a new community on the PES surface is an exhibition of founder effect, which subsequently resulted in the emergence of a more efficient PES-degrading population and subsequently led to considerable PES degradation. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Founder effect of a prevalent phenylketonuria mutation in the Oriental population

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Tao Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing ); Okano, Yoshiyuki; Eisensmith, R.C.; Harvey, M.L.; Woo, S.L.C. ); Lo, W.H.Y.; Yuan, Lifang ); Huang, Shuzhen; Zeng, Yitao ); Furuyama, Junichi ); Oura, Toshiaki ); Sommer, S.S. )

    1991-03-15

    A missense mutation has been identified in the human phenylalanine hydroxylase Chinese patient with classic phenylketonuria (PKU). A G-to-C transition at the second base of codon 413 in exon 12 of the gene results in the substitution of Pro{sup 413} for Arg{sup 413} in the mutant protein. This mutation (R413P) results in negligible enzymatic activity when expressed in heterologous mammalian cells and is compatible with a classic PKU phenotype in the patient. Population genetic studies reveal that this mutation is tightly linked to restriction fragment length polymorphism haplotype 4, which is the predominant haplotype of the PAH locus in the Oriental population. It accounts for 13.8% of northern Chinese and 27% of Japanese PKU alleles, but it is rare in southern Chinese (2.2%) and is absent in the Caucasian population. The data demonstrate unambiguously that the mutation occurred after racial divergence of Orientals and Caucasians and suggest that the allele has spread throughout the Orient by a founder effect. Previous protein polymorphism studies in eastern Asia have led to the hypothesis that northern Mongoloids represented a founding population in Asia. The results are compatible with this hypothesis in that the PKU mutation might have occurred in northern Mongoloids and subsequently spread to the Chinese and Japanese populations.

  15. Clinical and molecular manifestation of fifteen 17OHD patients: a novel mutation and a founder effect.

    PubMed

    Han, Bing; Xue, Liqiong; Fan, Mengxia; Zhao, Shuangxia; Liu, Wei; Zhu, Hui; Cheng, Tong; Lu, Yingli; Cheng, Kaixiang; Song, Huaidong; Liu, Yang; Qiao, Jie

    2016-09-01

    17-hydroxylase deficiency (17OHD) has long been regarded as a rare form of congenital adrenal hyperplasia, inherited in an autosomal recessive pattern. Fifteen patients with 17OHD were described from clinical manifestations and hormone profile. Then, CYP17A1 gene was amplified and sequenced in a new patient. Heterozygous mutations c. 431_433del, p.K144del/c. 985_987delinsAA, p.Y329 fs were identified. Functional study indicated the novel mutation K144del completely abolished enzyme activity. In the three-dimensional model, the K144del mutation completely destroyed the alpha helix in the steroid binding domain. Sixteen SNPs within CYP17A1 gene were selected and genotyped in 7 unrelated families to determine whether Y329 fs had founder effect in China. Haplotyping study showed that all c. 985_987delinsAA mutation shared the same haplotype. However, from GWAS data of 2760 controls, this special haplotype was found only in one chromosome. In conclusion, we identified a novel (K144del) and a widely reported (Y329 fs) heterozygous mutations of CYP17A1 gene from a 17OHD patient. Haplotyping analysis showed the common mutation Y329 fs in China came from the same ancestor, which explains the reason that 17OHD was the second cause of CAH in China.

  16. Are continental “adakites” derived from thickened or foundered lower crust?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Qiang; Zheng, Jian-Ping; Xu, Yi-Gang; Griffin, William L.; Zhang, Rui-Sheng

    2015-06-01

    The geochemical signatures of "adakites" are usually attributed to high-pressure (≥ 50 km) partial melting of mafic rocks, and accordingly the occurrence of adakitic magmas in continental settings is frequently used as an indicator of a thickened or foundered lower crust at the time of magma emplacement. These premises are built on experiments and modeling using an MORB-like source, but the probable source of continental "adakites" (i.e., continental lower crust) is compositionally different from MORB. To elucidate the effect of source inheritance and pressure on resultant melts, geochemical analyses and trace-element modeling have been carried out on Jurassic adakitic rocks from the northern part of the North China Craton. The results show that these continental adakitic melts can be generated at depths less than 40 km, and their "adakitic" signature is most likely inherited from their source rocks. Such conclusions can be applied to the Mesozoic adakitic magmas from the interior of the North China Craton. Only the "adakites" from collisional orogens (i.e., Tibet, Dabie UHP belt) require crustal melting at depths greater than 50 km, consistent with collision-induced crustal thickening in these areas. This study therefore highlights the importance of source composition when defining the formation conditions of magmatic rocks in general, and in particular questions the common use of "adakites" as an indicator of specific geodynamic situations.

  17. Density of founder cells affects spatial pattern formation and cooperation in Bacillus subtilis biofilms.

    PubMed

    van Gestel, Jordi; Weissing, Franz J; Kuipers, Oscar P; Kovács, Akos T

    2014-10-01

    In nature, most bacteria live in surface-attached sedentary communities known as biofilms. Biofilms are often studied with respect to bacterial interactions. Many cells inhabiting biofilms are assumed to express 'cooperative traits', like the secretion of extracellular polysaccharides (EPS). These traits can enhance biofilm-related properties, such as stress resilience or colony expansion, while being costly to the cells that express them. In well-mixed populations cooperation is difficult to achieve, because non-cooperative individuals can reap the benefits of cooperation without having to pay the costs. The physical process of biofilm growth can, however, result in the spatial segregation of cooperative from non-cooperative individuals. This segregation can prevent non-cooperative cells from exploiting cooperative neighbors. Here we examine the interaction between spatial pattern formation and cooperation in Bacillus subtilis biofilms. We show, experimentally and by mathematical modeling, that the density of cells at the onset of biofilm growth affects pattern formation during biofilm growth. At low initial cell densities, co-cultured strains strongly segregate in space, whereas spatial segregation does not occur at high initial cell densities. As a consequence, EPS-producing cells have a competitive advantage over non-cooperative mutants when biofilms are initiated at a low density of founder cells, whereas EPS-deficient cells have an advantage at high cell densities. These results underline the importance of spatial pattern formation for competition among bacterial strains and the evolution of microbial cooperation.

  18. Isolation mediates persistent founder effects on zooplankton colonisation in new temporary ponds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badosa, Anna; Frisch, Dagmar; Green, Andy J.; Rico, Ciro; Gómez, Africa

    2017-03-01

    Understanding the colonisation process in zooplankton is crucial for successful restoration of aquatic ecosystems. Here, we analyzed the clonal and genetic structure of the cyclical parthenogenetic rotifer Brachionus plicatilis by following populations established in new temporary ponds during the first three hydroperiods. Rotifer populations established rapidly after first flooding, although colonisation was ongoing throughout the study. Multilocus genotypes from 7 microsatellite loci suggested that most populations (10 of 14) were founded by few clones. The exception was one of the four populations that persisted throughout the studied hydroperiods, where high genetic diversity in the first hydroperiod suggested colonisation from a historical egg bank, and no increase in allelic diversity was detected with time. In contrast, in another of these four populations, we observed a progressive increase of allelic diversity. This population became less differentiated from the other populations suggesting effective gene flow soon after its foundation. Allelic diversity and richness remained low in the remaining two, more isolated, populations, suggesting little gene flow. Our results highlight the complexity of colonisation dynamics, with evidence for persistent founder effects in some ponds, but not in others, and with early immigration both from external source populations, and from residual, historical diapausing egg banks.

  19. A MAYAN FOUNDER MUTATION IS A COMMON CAUSE OF DEAFNESS IN GUATEMALA

    PubMed Central

    Carranza, Claudia; Menendez, Ibis; Herrera, Mariana; Castellanos, Patricia; Amado, Carlos; Maldonado, Fabiola; Rosales, Luisa; Escobar, Nancy; Guerra, Mariela; Alvarez, Darwin; Foster, Joseph; Guo, Shengru; Blanton, Susan H.; Bademci, Guney; Tekin, Mustafa

    2017-01-01

    SUMMARY Over 5% of the world population have varying degrees of hearing loss. Mutations in GJB2 are the most common cause of autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing loss (NSHL) in many populations. The frequency and type of mutations are influenced by ethnicity. Guatemala is a multi-ethnic country with four major populations: Maya, Ladino, Xinca, and Garifuna. To determine the mutation profile of GJB2 in a NSHL population from Guatemala, we sequenced both exons of GJB2 in 133 unrelated families. A total of six pathogenic variants were detected. The most frequent pathogenic variant is c.131G>A (p.Trp44*) detected in 21 of 266 alleles. We show that c.131G>A is associated with a conserved haplotype in Guatemala suggesting a single founder. The majority of Mayan population lives in the west region of the country from where all c.131G>A carriers originated. Further analysis of genome-wide variation of individuals carrying the c.131G>A mutation compared to those of Native American, European, and African populations shows a close match with the Mayan population. PMID:26346709

  20. Sergei Winogradsky: a founder of modern microbiology and the first microbial ecologist.

    PubMed

    Dworkin, Martin

    2012-03-01

    Sergei Winogradsky, was born in Russia in 1856 and was to become a founder of modern microbiology. After his Master's degree work on the nutrition and growth physiology of the yeast Mycoderma vini at the University of St. Petersburg, he joined the laboratory of Anton DeBary in Strassburg. There he carried out his studies on the sulfur-oxidizing bacterium Beggiatoa which resulted in his formulation of the theory of chemolithotrophy. He then joined the Swiss Polytechnic Institute in Zurich where he did his monumental work on bacterial nitrification. He isolated the first pure cultures of the nitrifying bacteria and confirmed that they carried out the separate steps of the conversion of ammonia to nitrite and of nitrite to nitrate. This led directly to the concept of the cycles of sulfur and nitrogen in Nature. He returned to Russia and there was the first to isolate a free-living dinitrogen-fixing bacterium. In the flush of success, he retired from science and spent 15 years on his familial estate in the Ukraine. The Russian revolution forced him to flee Russia. He joined the Pasteur Institute in Paris where he spent his remaining 24 years initiating and developing the field of microbial ecology. He died in 1953.

  1. Co-evolution of a broadly neutralizing HIV-1 antibody and founder virus.

    PubMed

    Liao, Hua-Xin; Lynch, Rebecca; Zhou, Tongqing; Gao, Feng; Alam, S Munir; Boyd, Scott D; Fire, Andrew Z; Roskin, Krishna M; Schramm, Chaim A; Zhang, Zhenhai; Zhu, Jiang; Shapiro, Lawrence; Mullikin, James C; Gnanakaran, S; Hraber, Peter; Wiehe, Kevin; Kelsoe, Garnett; Yang, Guang; Xia, Shi-Mao; Montefiori, David C; Parks, Robert; Lloyd, Krissey E; Scearce, Richard M; Soderberg, Kelly A; Cohen, Myron; Kamanga, Gift; Louder, Mark K; Tran, Lillian M; Chen, Yue; Cai, Fangping; Chen, Sheri; Moquin, Stephanie; Du, Xiulian; Joyce, M Gordon; Srivatsan, Sanjay; Zhang, Baoshan; Zheng, Anqi; Shaw, George M; Hahn, Beatrice H; Kepler, Thomas B; Korber, Bette T M; Kwong, Peter D; Mascola, John R; Haynes, Barton F

    2013-04-25

    Current human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) vaccines elicit strain-specific neutralizing antibodies. However, cross-reactive neutralizing antibodies arise in approximately 20% of HIV-1-infected individuals, and details of their generation could provide a blueprint for effective vaccination. Here we report the isolation, evolution and structure of a broadly neutralizing antibody from an African donor followed from the time of infection. The mature antibody, CH103, neutralized approximately 55% of HIV-1 isolates, and its co-crystal structure with the HIV-1 envelope protein gp120 revealed a new loop-based mechanism of CD4-binding-site recognition. Virus and antibody gene sequencing revealed concomitant virus evolution and antibody maturation. Notably, the unmutated common ancestor of the CH103 lineage avidly bound the transmitted/founder HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein, and evolution of antibody neutralization breadth was preceded by extensive viral diversification in and near the CH103 epitope. These data determine the viral and antibody evolution leading to induction of a lineage of HIV-1 broadly neutralizing antibodies, and provide insights into strategies to elicit similar antibodies by vaccination.

  2. Founder mutation R245H of Sanfilippo syndrome type A in the Cayman Islands.

    PubMed

    Rady, Peter L; Surendran, Sankar; Vu, Ahn T; Hawkins, Judy C; Michals-Matalon, Kimberlee; Tyring, Stephan K; Merren, Joy; Kumar, Alla K; Matalon, Reuben

    2002-01-01

    Sanfilippo A syndrome is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disease. This disease was reported in the Cayman Islands population with carrier frequency of 1/7 to 1/10 in the West Bay district of Grand Cayman. The carrier testing of Sanfilippo A disease for families at risk was carried out using the thermal characteristics of sulfamidase activity. In the present study, a search for mutations in the sulfamidase gene in an index family was performed. In addition, 77 individuals, relatives of children with Sanfilippo A syndrome, were also studied by single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP), restriction fragment-length polymorphism (RFLP) analyses, and sequencing. A single mutation, G746A (R245H), was found in the family, with the patient being homozygous and both parents and 1 of the 3 siblings being carriers. Among the 77 family members of the patient with Sanfilippo syndrome, the same mutation was found among carriers of the disease. The finding of a single mutation supports the idea of a founder effect, which facilitates accurate carrier identification of Sanfilippo A syndrome in the population of Cayman Islands.

  3. Genomic complexity of the Y-STR DYS19: inversions, deletions and founder lineages carrying duplications

    PubMed Central

    Balaresque, Patricia; Parkin, Emma J.; Roewer, Lutz; Carvalho-Silva, Denise R.; Mitchell, R. John; van Oorschot, Roland A. H.; Henke, Jürgen; Stoneking, Mark; Nasidze, Ivan; Wetton, Jon; de Knijff, Peter; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Jobling, Mark A.

    2009-01-01

    The Y-STR DYS19 is firmly established in the repertoire of Y-chromosomal markers used in forensic analysis yet is poorly understood at the molecular level, lying in a complex genomic environment and exhibiting null alleles, as well as duplications and occasional triplications in population samples. Here, we analyse three null alleles and 51 duplications and show that DYS19 can also be involved in inversion events, so that even its location within the short arm of the Y chromosome is uncertain. Deletion mapping in the three chromosomes carrying null alleles shows that their deletions are less than ~300 kb in size. Haplotypic analysis with binary markers shows that they belong to three different haplogroups and so represent independent events. In contrast, a collection of 51 DYS19 duplication chromosomes belong to only four haplogroups: two are singletons and may represent somatic mutation in lymphoblastoid cell lines, but two, in haplogroups G and C3c, represent founder lineages that have spread widely in Central Europe/West Asia and East Asia, respectively. Consideration of candidate mechanisms underlying both deletions and duplications provides no evidence for the involvement of non-allelic homologous recombination, and they are likely to represent sporadic events with low mutation rates. Understanding the basis and population distribution of these DYS19 alleles will aid in the utilisation and interpretation of profiles that contain them. PMID:18553096

  4. Arsov Dimitar, founder of the modern internal medicine in the Republic of Macedonia (1908-2008).

    PubMed

    Polenakovic, Momir

    2008-12-01

    Arsov Dimitar (Kriva Palanka, 28. IX 1908 - Skopje, 2. VII 1974) - specialist of internal medicine, rheumatologist, Professor at the Medical Faculty of the University of Ss. Cyril and Methodius in Skopje, member of the Macedonian Academy of Sciences and Arts. D. Arsov is the founder of the modern internal medicine in the Republic of Macedonia. He has completed medical studies and specialized in internal medicine at Sorbonne, Paris, France. For 22 years he was the Director of the Clinic for Internal Medicine in Skopje and a Head of the Chair for Internal Medicine of the Medical Faculty in Skopje. He has published over 200 scientific and expert papers and five textbooks, in which he introduced series of medical terms, which entered the Macedonian medical terminology. With his researches he has penetrated in all areas of the internal medicine. An original contribution is his study on intravenous application of adrenalin in the treatment of rheumatic fever and rheumatic endocarditis. He was a member and a head of many medical associations. He received a number of awards. He was promoted for Doctor Honoris Causa at the University of Besanson (France) in 1961. As a great clinician, educator and Professor of internal medicine, and scientist he was one of the most distinguished medical persons of the second part of the XX century in the Republic of Macedonia.

  5. Cytokinin-mediated cell cycling arrest of pericycle founder cells in lateral root initiation of Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang; Mo, Xiaorong; Shou, Huixia; Wu, Ping

    2006-08-01

    In Arabidopsis, lateral root formation is a post-embryonic developmental event, which is regulated by hormones and environmental signals. In this study, via analyzing the expression of cyclin genes during lateral root (LR) formation, we report that cytokinins (CTKs) inhibit the initiation of LR through blocking the pericycle founder cells cycling at the G(2) to M transition phase, while the promotion by CTK of LR elongation is due to the stimulation of the G(1) to S transition. No significant difference was detected in the inhibitory effect of CTK on LR formation between wild-type plants and mutants defective in auxin response or transport. In addition, exogenously applied auxin at different concentrations could not rescue the CTK-mediated inhibition of LR initiation. Our data suggest that CTK and auxin might control LR initiation through two separate signaling pathways in Arabidopsis. The CTK-mediated repression of LR initiation is transmitted through the two-component signal system and mediated by the receptor CRE1.

  6. A prevalent mutation with founder effect in xeroderma pigmentosum group C from north Africa.

    PubMed

    Soufir, Nadem; Ged, Cecile; Bourillon, Agnes; Austerlitz, Frederic; Chemin, Cécile; Stary, Anne; Armier, Jacques; Pham, Daniele; Khadir, Khadija; Roume, Joelle; Hadj-Rabia, Smail; Bouadjar, Bakar; Taieb, Alain; de Verneuil, Hubert; Benchiki, Hakima; Grandchamp, Bernard; Sarasin, Alain

    2010-06-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder that is associated with an inherited defect of the nucleotide excision repair pathway (NER). In this study, we investigated the involvement of XP genes in 86 XP patients belonging to 66 unrelated families, most of them consanguineous and originating from Maghreb. Sequencing analysis was performed either directly (44 probands) or after having previously characterized the involved XP gene by complementation assay (22 families). XPC and XPA mutations were respectively present in 56/66 and 8/66 probands. Strikingly, we identified the same homozygous frameshift mutation c.1643_1644delTG (p.Val548AlafsX25) in 87% of XP-C patients. Haplotype analysis showed a common founder effect for this mutation in the Mediterranean region, with an estimated age of 50 generations or 1,250 years. Among 7/8 XP-A patients, we found the previously reported nonsense homozygous XPA mutation (p.Arg228X). Six mutations--to our knowledge previously unreported--(five in XPC, one in XPA) were also identified. In conclusion, XPC appears to be the major disease-causing gene concerning xeroderma pigmentosum in North Africa. As the (p.Val548AlafsX25) XPC mutation is responsible for a huge proportion of XP cases, our data imply an obvious simplification of XP molecular diagnosis, at least in North Africa.

  7. Founder mutation in dystonin-e underlying autosomal recessive epidermolysis bullosa simplex in Kuwait.

    PubMed

    Takeichi, T; Nanda, A; Liu, L; Aristodemou, S; McMillan, J R; Sugiura, K; Akiyama, M; Al-Ajmi, H; Simpson, M A; McGrath, J A

    2015-02-01

    Only two homozygous nonsense mutations in the epidermal isoform of the dystonin gene, DST-e, have been reported previously in autosomal recessive epidermolysis bullosa simplex (EBS); the affected pedigrees were Kuwaiti and Iranian. This subtype of EBS is therefore considered to be a rare clinicopathological entity. In this study, we identified four seemingly unrelated Kuwaiti families in which a total of seven individuals had predominantly acral trauma-induced blistering since infancy. All affected individuals were homozygous for the mutation p.Gln1124* in DST-e, the same mutation that was identified in the originally reported family from Kuwait. Haplotype analysis in the five pedigrees (including the previous case) revealed a shared block of ~60 kb of genomic DNA across the site of the mutation, consistent with a founder effect. Most heterozygotes had no clinical abnormalities although one subject had mild transient skin fragility during childhood, an observation noted in the previously reported Iranian pedigree, suggesting that the condition may also be semidominant in some pedigrees rather than purely autosomal recessive. Our study reveals propagation of a mutant ancestral allele in DST-e throughout Kuwait, indicating that this subtype of EBS may be more common in Kuwait, and perhaps other Middle Eastern countries, than is currently appreciated.

  8. Founders, Drift, and Infidelity: The Relationship between Y Chromosome Diversity and Patrilineal Surnames

    PubMed Central

    King, Turi E.

    2009-01-01

    Most heritable surnames, like Y chromosomes, are passed from father to son. These unique cultural markers of coancestry might therefore have a genetic correlate in shared Y chromosome types among men sharing surnames, although the link could be affected by mutation, multiple foundation for names, nonpaternity, and genetic drift. Here, we demonstrate through an analysis of 1,678 Y-chromosomal haplotypes within 40 British surnames a remarkably high degree of coancestry that generally increases as surnames become rarer. On average, the proportion of haplotypes lying within descent clusters is 62% but ranges from 0% to 87%. The shallow time depth of many descent clusters within names, the lack of a detectable effect of surname derivation on diversity, and simulations of surname descent suggest that genetic drift through variation in reproductive success is important in structuring haplotype diversity. Modern patterns therefore provide little reliable information about the original founders of surnames some 700 years ago. A comparative analysis of published data on Y diversity within Irish surnames demonstrates a relative lack of surname frequency dependence of coancestry, a difference probably mediated through distinct Irish and British demographic histories including even more marked genetic drift in Ireland. PMID:19204044

  9. Identification of a Dutch founder mutation in MUSK causing fetal akinesia deformation sequence.

    PubMed

    Tan-Sindhunata, M Brigita; Mathijssen, Inge B; Smit, Margriet; Baas, Frank; de Vries, Johanna I; van der Voorn, J Patrick; Kluijt, Irma; Hagen, Marleen A; Blom, Eveline W; Sistermans, Erik; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Waisfisz, Quinten; Weiss, Marjan M; Groffen, Alexander J

    2015-09-01

    Fetal akinesia deformation sequence (FADS) refers to a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of disorders with congenital malformations related to impaired fetal movement. FADS can result from mutations in CHRNG, CHRNA1, CHRND, DOK7 and RAPSN; however, these genes only account for a minority of cases. Here we identify MUSK as a novel cause of lethal FADS. Fourteen affected fetuses from a Dutch genetic isolate were traced back to common ancestors 11 generations ago. Homozygosity mapping in two fetuses revealed MUSK as a candidate gene. All tested cases carried an identical homozygous variant c.1724T>C; p.(Ile575Thr) in the intracellular domain of MUSK. The carrier frequency in the genetic isolate was 8%, exclusively found in heterozygous carriers. Consistent with the established role of MUSK as a tyrosine kinase that orchestrates neuromuscular synaptogenesis, the fetal myopathy was accompanied by impaired acetylcholine receptor clustering and reduced tyrosine kinase activity at motor nerve endings. A functional assay in myocytes derived from human fetuses confirmed that the variant blocks MUSK-dependent motor endplate formation. Taken together, the results strongly support a causal role of this founder mutation in MUSK, further expanding the gene set associated with FADS and offering new opportunities for prenatal genetic testing.

  10. Identification of a Dutch founder mutation in MUSK causing fetal akinesia deformation sequence

    PubMed Central

    Tan-Sindhunata, M Brigita; Mathijssen, Inge B; Smit, Margriet; Baas, Frank; de Vries, Johanna I; van der Voorn, J Patrick; Kluijt, Irma; Hagen, Marleen A; Blom, Eveline W; Sistermans, Erik; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Waisfisz, Quinten; Weiss, Marjan M; Groffen, Alexander J

    2015-01-01

    Fetal akinesia deformation sequence (FADS) refers to a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of disorders with congenital malformations related to impaired fetal movement. FADS can result from mutations in CHRNG, CHRNA1, CHRND, DOK7 and RAPSN; however, these genes only account for a minority of cases. Here we identify MUSK as a novel cause of lethal FADS. Fourteen affected fetuses from a Dutch genetic isolate were traced back to common ancestors 11 generations ago. Homozygosity mapping in two fetuses revealed MUSK as a candidate gene. All tested cases carried an identical homozygous variant c.1724T>C; p.(Ile575Thr) in the intracellular domain of MUSK. The carrier frequency in the genetic isolate was 8%, exclusively found in heterozygous carriers. Consistent with the established role of MUSK as a tyrosine kinase that orchestrates neuromuscular synaptogenesis, the fetal myopathy was accompanied by impaired acetylcholine receptor clustering and reduced tyrosine kinase activity at motor nerve endings. A functional assay in myocytes derived from human fetuses confirmed that the variant blocks MUSK-dependent motor endplate formation. Taken together, the results strongly support a causal role of this founder mutation in MUSK, further expanding the gene set associated with FADS and offering new opportunities for prenatal genetic testing. PMID:25537362

  11. Animal personality meets community ecology: founder species aggression and the dynamics of spider communities.

    PubMed

    Quinn, John L

    2015-11-01

    Silken web-reef created by the spider Anelosimus studiosus (main picture) and close-up (insert picture) of multi-female, adult colony of the same species. (photographs: T. Jones, J. Pruitt and A. Wild) In Focus: Pruitt, J.N. & Modlmeier, A.P. (2015) Animal personality in a foundation species drives community divergence and collapse in the wild. Journal of Animal Ecology, 84 Interspecific interactions form the cornerstone of niche theory in community ecology. The 7-year study In Focus here supports the view that variation within species could also be crucially important. Spider communities created experimentally in the wild, with either aggressive or docile individuals of the same founder species, were highly divergent in patterns of community succession for several years. Eventually, they converged on the same community composition only to collapse entirely shortly after, apparently because of the specific mix of aggression phenotypes within and between species just before collapse. These results suggest numerous avenues of research for behavioural ecology and evolutionary community ecology in metapopulations, and could help to resolve differences between competing theories. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Animal Ecology © 2015 British Ecological Society.

  12. Founders, drift, and infidelity: the relationship between Y chromosome diversity and patrilineal surnames.

    PubMed

    King, Turi E; Jobling, Mark A

    2009-05-01

    Most heritable surnames, like Y chromosomes, are passed from father to son. These unique cultural markers of coancestry might therefore have a genetic correlate in shared Y chromosome types among men sharing surnames, although the link could be affected by mutation, multiple foundation for names, nonpaternity, and genetic drift. Here, we demonstrate through an analysis of 1,678 Y-chromosomal haplotypes within 40 British surnames a remarkably high degree of coancestry that generally increases as surnames become rarer. On average, the proportion of haplotypes lying within descent clusters is 62% but ranges from 0% to 87%. The shallow time depth of many descent clusters within names, the lack of a detectable effect of surname derivation on diversity, and simulations of surname descent suggest that genetic drift through variation in reproductive success is important in structuring haplotype diversity. Modern patterns therefore provide little reliable information about the original founders of surnames some 700 years ago. A comparative analysis of published data on Y diversity within Irish surnames demonstrates a relative lack of surname frequency dependence of coancestry, a difference probably mediated through distinct Irish and British demographic histories including even more marked genetic drift in Ireland.

  13. C329X in KRIT1 is a founder mutation among CCM patients in Sardinia.

    PubMed

    Cau, Milena; Loi, Mario; Melis, Maurizio; Congiu, Rita; Loi, Alberto; Meloni, Cristiana; Serrenti, Marianna; Addis, Maria; Melis, Maria Antonietta

    2009-01-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are CNS vascular anomalies associated with seizures, headaches and hemorrhagic strokes and represent 10-20% of cerebral lesions. CCM is present in 0.1-0.5 of the population. This disorder most often occurs sporadically but may also be familial. Familial cases are inherited as a dominant trait with incomplete penetrance and are estimated to account for KRIT1 10-40% of the patients. The identification of the genes involved in such disorders allows to characterize carriers of the mutations without clear symptoms. The first gene involved in CCM1 is KRIT1. In addition to two other genes have been described: MGC4607 (CCM2) and PDCD10 (CCM3). We selected 13 patients belonging to seven Sardinian families on the basis of clinical symptoms and Magnetic Resonance results. In MGC4607 gene an undescribed exon five deletion likely producing a truncated protein was identified in one family. In two patients with clear phenotype and in three asymptomatic relatives a 4 bp deletion in exon 9 of KRIT1 gene, leading to a premature stop codon, was detected. A unique nonsense mutation (C329X) has been found in seven patients and two asymptomatic subjects belonging to four unrelated families. Haplotype analysis revealed a common origin of this mutation. These data suggest a "founder effect" in Sardinia for the C329X mutation, similar to other mutations described in different populations.

  14. Alzheimer and Parkinson diagnoses in progranulin null mutation carriers in an extended founder family.

    PubMed

    Brouwers, Nathalie; Nuytemans, Karen; van der Zee, Julie; Gijselinck, Ilse; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan; Theuns, Jessie; Kumar-Singh, Samir; Pickut, Barbara A; Pals, Philippe; Dermaut, Bart; Bogaerts, Veerle; De Pooter, Tim; Serneels, Sally; Van den Broeck, Marleen; Cuijt, Ivy; Mattheijssens, Maria; Peeters, Karin; Sciot, Raf; Martin, Jean-Jacques; Cras, Patrick; Santens, Patrick; Vandenberghe, Rik; De Deyn, Peter P; Cruts, Marc; Van Broeckhoven, Christine; Sleegers, Kristel

    2007-10-01

    Progranulin gene (PGRN) haploinsufficiency was recently associated with ubiquitin-positive frontotemporal lobar degeneration linked to chromosome 17q21 (FTLDU-17). To assess whether PGRN genetic variability contributed to other common neurodegenerative brain diseases, such as Alzheimer disease (AD) or Parkinson disease (PD). Mutation analysis of PGRN. Memory Clinic of the Middelheim General Hospital. Patients We analyzed 666 Belgian patients with AD and 255 with PD. Results of PGRN sequencing, PGRN transcript analysis, short tandem repeat genotyping, and neuropathologic analysis. We identified 2 patients with AD and 1 patient with PD who carried the null mutation IVS0 + 5G>C, which we reported earlier in an extensively characterized Belgian founder family, DR8, segregating FTLDU. Postmortem pathologic diagnosis of the patient with PD revealed both FTLDU and Lewy body pathologic features. In addition, we identified in PGRN only 1 other null mutation, the nonsense mutation p.Arg535X, in 1 patient with probable AD. However, in vitro analysis predicted a PGRN C-truncated protein, although it remains to be elucidated if this shortened transcript leads to haploinsufficiency. Our mutation data indicated that null mutations are rare in patients with AD (3/666 = 0.45%) and PD (1/255 = 0.39%). Also, AD and PD clinical diagnoses in patients who carry PGRN null mutations likely result from etiologic heterogeneity rather than PGRN haploinsufficiency.

  15. Rejection of a serial founder effects model of genetic and linguistic coevolution.

    PubMed

    Hunley, Keith; Bowern, Claire; Healy, Meghan

    2012-06-07

    Recent genetic studies attribute the negative correlation between population genetic diversity and distance from Africa to a serial founder effects (SFE) evolutionary process. A recent linguistic study concluded that a similar decay in phoneme inventories in human languages was also the product of the SFE process. However, the SFE process makes additional predictions for patterns of neutral genetic diversity, both within and between groups, that have not yet been tested on phonemic data. In this study, we describe these predictions and test them on linguistic and genetic samples. The linguistic sample consists of 725 widespread languages, which together contain 908 distinct phonemes. The genetic sample consists of 614 autosomal microsatellite loci in 100 widespread populations. All aspects of the genetic pattern are consistent with the predictions of SFE. In contrast, most of the predictions of SFE are violated for the phonemic data. We show that phoneme inventories provide information about recent contacts between languages. However, because phonemes change rapidly, they cannot provide information about more ancient evolutionary processes.

  16. Characterization of a novel founder MSH6 mutation causing Lynch syndrome in the French Canadian population.

    PubMed

    Castellsagué, E; Liu, J; Volenik, A; Giroux, S; Gagné, R; Maranda, B; Roussel-Jobin, A; Latreille, J; Laframboise, R; Palma, L; Kasprzak, L; Marcus, V A; Breguet, M; Nolet, S; El-Haffaf, Z; Australie, K; Gologan, A; Aleynikova, O; Oros-Klein, K; Greenwood, C; Mes-Masson, A M; Provencher, D; Tischkowitz, M; Chong, G; Rousseau, F; Foulkes, W D

    2015-06-01

    We identified an MSH6 mutation (c.10C>T, p.Gln4*) causing Lynch syndrome (LS) in 11 French Canadian (FC) families from the Canadian province of Quebec. We aimed to investigate the molecular and clinical implications of this mutation among FC carriers and to assess its putative founder origin. We studied 11 probands and 27 family members. Additionally 6433 newborns, 187 colorectal cancer (CRC) cases, 381 endometrial cancer (EC) cases and 179 additional controls, all of them from Quebec, were used. Found in approximately 1 of 400 newborns, the mutation is one of the most common LS mutations described. We have found that this mutation confers a greater risk for EC than for CRC, both in the 11 studied families and in the unselected cases: EC [odds ratio (OR) = 7.5, p < 0.0001] and CRC (OR = 2.2, p = 0.46). Haplotype analyses showed that the mutation arose in a common ancestor, probably around 430-656 years ago, coinciding with the arrival of the first French settlers. Application of the results of this study could significantly improve the molecular testing and clinical management of LS families in Quebec. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Willet M. Hays, great benefactor to plant breeding and the founder of our association.

    PubMed

    Troyer, A F; Stoehr, H

    2003-01-01

    Willet M. Hays was a great benefactor to plant breeding and the founder of the American Genetic Association (AGA). We commemorate the AGA's centennial. We mined university archives, U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) yearbooks, plant breeding textbooks, scientific periodicals, and descendants for information. Willet Hays first recognized the individual plant as the unit of selection and started systematic pure-line selection and progeny tests in 1888. He developed useful plant breeding methods. He selected superior flax (Linum usitatissimum L.), wheat (Triticum vulgare L.), corn (Zea mays L.), barley (Hordeum vulgare L.), and oat (Avena sativa L.) varieties, and discovered Grimm alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.); all became commercially important. He initiated branch stations for better performance testing. Willet Hays befriended colleagues in other universities, in federal stations, in a London conference, and in Europe. He gathered and spread the scientific plant breeding gospel. He also improved rural roads and initiated animal breeding records and agricultural economics records. He started the AGA in 1903, serving as secretary for 10 years. He became assistant secretary of agriculture in 1904. He introduced the project system for agricultural research. He authored or coauthored the Nelson Amendment, the Smith-Lever Act, the Smith-Hughes Act, and the protocol leading to the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization-all involved teaching agricultural practices that improved the world.

  18. Shipwrecks and founder effects: divergent demographic histories reflected in Caribbean mtDNA.

    PubMed

    Salas, Antonio; Richards, Martin; Lareu, María-Victoria; Sobrino, Beatriz; Silva, Sandra; Matamoros, Mireya; Macaulay, Vincent; Carracedo, Angel

    2005-12-01

    During the period of the Atlantic slave trade (15th-19th centuries), millions of people were forced to move from Africa to many American destinations, changing dramatically the human landscape of the Americas. Here, we analyze mitochondrial DNA from two different American populations with African ancestry, with hitherto unknown European and Native American components. On the basis of historical records, African-Americans from Chocó (Colombia) and the Garífunas (or "Black Carib") of Honduras are likely to have had very different demographic histories, with a significant founder effect in the formation of the latter. Both the common features and differences are reflected in their mtDNA composition. Both show a minor component (approximately 16%) from Native Central/South Americans and a larger component (approximately 84%) from sub-Saharan Africans. The latter component is very diverse in the African-Americans from Chocó, similar to that of sub-Saharan Africans, but much less so in the Garífunas, with several mtDNA types elevated to high frequency, suggesting the action of genetic drift.

  19. [Prof. Alfonsas Kaikaris -- the founder of the Lithuanian Pharmacy Museum: his personality and scientific activities].

    PubMed

    Gudiene, Vilma

    2002-01-01

    Alfonsas Kaikaris (1922-1997) was a professor of pharmacy at the Kaunas Medical Institute (now University), historian, museologist, founder of the Lithuanian Pharmacy Museum and of the field of pharmacy history in Lithuania. A. Kaikaris was born in Zagare in 1922. He received his pharmacy diploma in 1947 and began work at the university. Following the reorganization of the university into two institutes, he went to work in the Medical Institute, where he served as the vice dean of the Pharmacy and Stomatology Department from 1957 until 1963. He began to collect pharmaceutical artifacts in 1957. In 1973, the Institute provided a small room in the attic for these objects and so a small pharmacy museum, the first in Lithuania, was born. Thanks to the hard work of A. Kaikaris and others, today this museum has grown into the Pharmacy and Medical History Center of Lithuania, whose work is widely known throughout Europe. A. Kaikaris was also a member of the board of the Lithuanian Scientific Society and head of the Society's Pharmaceutical History Section from 1964 until he retired in 1987. He is the author of 67 scholarly papers and numerous popular articles and conference presentations. In 1988, he received the Paul Stradins Award from the Paul Stradins Medical History Museum in Riga, Latvia, and until his death in 1997 worked as a consultant to the Lithuanian Museum of the History of Medicine and Pharmacy.

  20. [Detection of a founder mutation in an Argentine family with hereditary non polyposis colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Gómez, Laura; Adi, José; Ibarra, Jorge; Roqué, María

    2010-01-01

    Hereditary non polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) has been related to mutations in the DNA mismatch repair genes (MLH1, MSH2 y MSH6). Mutation detection analysis requires the complete sequencing of these genes, given the high frequency of family-specific alterations. A point mutation (2269-2270insT) in the last codon of the MLH1 gene has been detected in families from a northern region of Italy (Reggio Emilia).Given that this alteration was registered only in people from this region, it has been considered a founder mutation. In this work, we present an Argentine HNPCC family whose ancestors were natives from the Reggio Emilia, Italy, and who were carriers for this mutation. In order to detect the genetic alteration, a PCR was developed followed by a restriction enzyme incubation assay. The mutation was detected in 3 family members, two of them without clinical symptoms. The PCR/restriction enzyme methodology has been sensitive and specific for the detection of this mutation. It has allowed the performance of a pre-symptomatic genetic diagnosis in the Argentine HNPCC family, avoiding sending samples abroad. It is worth mentioning that pre-symptomatic diagnosis of hereditary cancers allows enhanced surveillance and support for the affected families when it is performed by a multidisciplinary group.

  1. Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction in a child harboring a founder Hirschsprung RET mutation.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Valentina; Mosconi, Manuela; Nozza, Paolo; Murgia, Daniele; Mattioli, Girolamo; Ceccherini, Isabella; Pini Prato, Alessio

    2016-09-01

    Chronic intestinal pseudo obstruction (CIPO) is a rare clinical entity characterized by symptoms and signs of intestinal obstruction without either recognizable anatomical abnormalities or intestinal aganglionosis. A Chinese female infant presented to our institution with a clinical diagnosis of CIPO. Aganglionosis was ruled out by full thickness colonic and ileal biopsies and by rectal suction biopsies. Unexpectedly, direct sequencing and PCR amplification of RET proto-oncogene from peripheral blood extracted DNA identified a RET R114H mutation. This mutation has already been reported as strongly associated with Asian patients affected by Hirschsprung's disease (HSCR) and is considered a founder mutation in Asia. The same mutation has never been reported in patients with CIPO, so far. These findings support the role of RET in the development of the enteric nervous system but underline the importance of other genetic or environmental factors contributing to the gastrointestinal phenotype of the disease. Somehow, this RET R114H mutation proved to have a role in the etiology of both CIPO and HSCR and could contribute to a more diffuse imbalance of gut dysmotility. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Phenotypic consequences in black South African Fanconi anemia patients homozygous for a founder mutation.

    PubMed

    Feben, Candice; Kromberg, Jennifer; Wainwright, Rosalind; Stones, David; Sutton, Chris; Poole, Janet; Haw, Tabitha; Krause, Amanda

    2014-05-01

    Fanconi anemia is a genotypically and phenotypically heterogeneous condition, characterized microscopically by chromosomal instability and breakage. Affected individuals manifest growth restriction and congenital physical abnormalities; most progress to hematological disease including bone marrow aplasia. Black South African Fanconi anemia patients share a common causative founder mutation in the Fanconi G gene in 80% of cases (637_643delTACCGCC). The aim of this study was to investigate the genotype-physical phenotype correlation in a cohort of individuals homozygous for this mutation. Thirty-five black patients were recruited from tertiary level hematology/oncology clinics in South Africa. Participants were subjected to a comprehensive clinical examination, documenting growth, congenital anomalies, and phenotypic variability. Descriptive statistical analysis showed significant growth abnormalities in many patients and a high frequency (97%) of skin pigmentary anomalies. Subtle anomalies of the eyes, ears, and hands occurred frequently (≥70%). Apart from malformations of the kidney (in 37%) and gastrointestinal tract (in 8.5%), congenital anomalies of other systems including the cardiovascular and central nervous systems, genitalia, and vertebrae were infrequent (<5%). The diagnosis of Fanconi anemia in black South African patients before the onset of hematological symptoms remains a clinical challenge, with the physical phenotype unlikely to be recognized by those without dysmorphology expertise.

  3. [HUGO STEINHAUS--CO-FOUNDER OF THE LWÓW SCHOOL OF MATHEMATICS].

    PubMed

    Wócik, Wiesław

    2014-01-01

    The paper is dedicated to the presentation of professor Hugo Steinhaus--co-founder of the Lwów School of Mathematics. It is indicated that had it not been for the scholar, the founding and development of the Lwów School of Mathematics would have been almost impossible. The analyses focus on his undertakings during the Lvov period in the early 1920s and those events that preceded the founding of the school (namely Steinhaus's education at the Göttingen University, various meetings and gatherings, discussions, first fascinations and mathematical dissertations). This paper, however, does not look into the scientific output of Steinhaus, only presents his method of scientific work and highlights the strategy that he chose in order to create the scientific community. An attempt has been also made to justify the effectiveness of the adopted strategy by describing the scientific atmosphere of Lvov and intellectual potential of the students of the school. Steinhaus's activities in the 1930s will be only marginally presented with an impact on particularly interesting cooperation with the alumni of the Lwów School of Mathematics--Marek Kac, Stefan Kaczmarz, Paweł Nikliborec and scholars from other fields of science (as part of the process of the application of mathematics).

  4. Genomic complexity of the Y-STR DYS19: inversions, deletions and founder lineages carrying duplications.

    PubMed

    Balaresque, Patricia; Parkin, Emma J; Roewer, Lutz; Carvalho-Silva, Denise R; Mitchell, R John; van Oorschot, Roland A H; Henke, Jürgen; Stoneking, Mark; Nasidze, Ivan; Wetton, Jon; de Knijff, Peter; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Jobling, Mark A

    2009-01-01

    The Y-STR DYS19 is firmly established in the repertoire of Y-chromosomal markers used in forensic analysis yet is poorly understood at the molecular level, lying in a complex genomic environment and exhibiting null alleles, as well as duplications and occasional triplications in population samples. Here, we analyse three null alleles and 51 duplications and show that DYS19 can also be involved in inversion events, so that even its location within the short arm of the Y chromosome is uncertain. Deletion mapping in the three chromosomes carrying null alleles shows that their deletions are less than approximately 300 kb in size. Haplotypic analysis with binary markers shows that they belong to three different haplogroups and so represent independent events. In contrast, a collection of 51 DYS19 duplication chromosomes belong to only four haplogroups: two are singletons and may represent somatic mutation in lymphoblastoid cell lines, but two, in haplogroups G and C3c, represent founder lineages that have spread widely in Central Europe/West Asia and East Asia, respectively. Consideration of candidate mechanisms underlying both deletions and duplications provides no evidence for the involvement of non-allelic homologous recombination, and they are likely to represent sporadic events with low mutation rates. Understanding the basis and population distribution of these DYS19 alleles will aid in the utilisation and interpretation of profiles that contain them.

  5. Autosomal dominant ataxia: Genetic evidence for locus heterogeneity from a cuban founder-effect population

    PubMed Central

    Auburger, Georg; Diaz, Guillermo Orozco; Capote, Raul Ferreira; Sanchez, Suzana Gispert; Perez, Marta Paradoa; del Cueto, Marianela Estrada; Meneses, Mirna Garcia; Farrall, Martin; Williamson, Robert; Chamberlain, Susan; Baute, Luis Heredero

    1990-01-01

    The locus for autosomal dominant ataxia with a diagnosis of olivo-ponto-cerebellar atrophy at autopsy has been previously assigned to chromosome 6p. However, evidence for two alternative locations has been reported. We have recently described a large potential founder-effect population of such patients in the Holguin province of Cuba. With an estimated 1,000 patients available for analysis, this extensive cluster of families provides a unique opportunity for the definitive localization of the genetic mutation. Linkage analysis between the disease locus in this population and markers within and flanking the HLA region on chromosome 6 were undertaken in 12 families comprising over 100 affected individuals. Despite similarity in the clinical phenotype between those families where the disease locus has been reported to be linked to the HLA locus and the Cuban patients, no evidence of linkage to this region could be demonstrated in the latter. The disease locus was excluded from a 96-cM genetic interval of the short arm of chromosome 6, encompassing the F13A1–HLA–GLO1–MUT/D6S4 loci. These data strongly support the existence of genetic heterogeneity for the disease. PMID:1971152

  6. Five families with arginine 519-cysteine mutation in COL2A1: evidence for three distinct founders.

    PubMed

    Bleasel, J F; Holderbaum, D; Brancolini, V; Moskowitz, R W; Considine, E L; Prockop, D J; Devoto, M; Williams, C J

    1998-01-01

    Arginine519-cysteine mutation in the type II procollagen gene (COL2A1) is known to be associated with mild spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia (SED) and precocious generalized osteoarthritis (OA). Five families have now been identified with this mutation. To determine whether a common founder was responsible for the mutation in these five families, we defined the haplotype of the mutation-bearing chromosome using four restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) and the 3'-untranslated region VNTR. Haplotype frequencies were estimated for 69 control samples. Three distinct mutation-bearing haplotypes were identified, with three families sharing a common haplotype. For three distinct haplotypes to have derived from a single founder, three independent recombination events would have had to occur. Thus the arg519 codon appears to represent a possible site of recurrent mutations in COL2A1, an uncommon phenomenon in collagen genes.

  7. Evidence for a common founder effect amongst South African and Zambian individuals with Spinocerebellar ataxia type 7.

    PubMed

    Smith, Danielle C; Atadzhanov, Masharip; Mwaba, Mwila; Greenberg, Leslie Jacqueline

    2015-07-15

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 7 (SCA7) is an inherited neurodegenerative disease caused by the expansion of a CAG repeat within the ataxin 7 gene, leading to a pathogenic polyglutamine tract within the ataxin 7 protein. SCA7 patients suffer from progressive cerebellar ataxia and macular degeneration. SCA7 is considered to be rare, although founder effects have been reported in South Africa, Scandinavia and Mexico. The South African SCA7-associated haplotype has not been investigated in any other populations, and there have been limited reports of SCA7 patients from other African countries. Here, we describe the first two ethnic Zambian families with confirmed SCA7. Haplotype analysis showed that the South African SCA7 haplotype alleles were significantly associated with the pathogenic expansion in affected Zambian individuals, providing strong evidence for a shared founder effect between South African and Zambian SCA7 patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Beyond Serial Founder Effects: The Impact of Admixture and Localized Gene Flow on Patterns of Regional Genetic Diversity.

    PubMed

    Hunley, Keith L; Cabana, Graciela S

    2016-07-01

    Geneticists have argued that the linear decay in within-population genetic diversity with increasing geographic distance from East Africa is best explained by a phylogenetic process of repeated founder effects, growth, and isolation. However, this serial founder effect (SFE) process has not yet been adequately vetted against other evolutionary processes that may also affect geospatial patterns of diversity. Additionally, studies of the SFE process have been largely based on a limited 52-population sample. Here, we assess the effects of founder effect, admixture, and localized gene flow processes on patterns of global and regional diversity using a published data set of 645 autosomal microsatellite genotypes from 5,415 individuals in 248 widespread populations. We used a formal tree-fitting approach to explore the role of founder effects. The approach involved fitting global and regional population trees to extant patterns of gene diversity and then systematically examining the deviations in fit. We also informally tested the SFE process using linear models of gene diversity versus waypoint geographic distances from Africa. We tested the role of localized gene flow using partial Mantel correlograms of gene diversity versus geographic distance controlling for the confounding effects of treelike genetic structure. We corroborate previous findings that global patterns of diversity, both within and between populations, are the product of an out-of-Africa SFE process. Within regions, however, diversity within populations is uncorrelated with geographic distance from Africa. Here, patterns of diversity have been largely shaped by recent interregional admixture and secondary range expansions. Our detailed analyses of the pattern of diversity within and between populations reveal that the signatures of different evolutionary processes dominate at different geographic scales. These findings have important implications for recent publications on the biology of race.

  9. Local and regional founder effects in lake zooplankton persist after thousands of years despite high dispersal potential.

    PubMed

    Ventura, M; Petrusek, A; Miró, A; Hamrová, E; Buñay, D; De Meester, L; Mergeay, J

    2014-03-01

    We reconstructed the genetic structure of a planktonic crustacean Daphnia longispina living in high mountain lakes and ponds in the Pyrenees to investigate whether it was shaped by persistent founder effects originating shortly after the last glacial maximum or by ongoing dispersal and effective migration (gene flow). We found that the genetic structure can largely be explained by a single colonization event following gradual deglaciation of the Pyrenees ~10 000-15 000 years ago. Nuclear genetic diversity declined steeply from southeast to northwest, suggestive of serial colonization of available habitats with advancing deglaciation. The spatial genetic structure suggests that founder effects were major determinants of the present-day diversity, both at the catchment level and at the level of individual water bodies, further supporting extremely low effective migration rates. This study reveals a prime example of a founder effect that is both long lasting and maintained at small spatial scales. Our data suggest a process of isolation by colonization as a result of strong priority effects and monopolization. We found evidence for the spread of haplotypes with Pyrenean ancestry across the Palaearctic over distances up to 5500 km, although the local genetic structure after colonization was hardly influenced by contemporary dispersal. Finally, our data also suggest that mitochondrial mutation rates in the studied populations were seven times higher than typically assumed. Overall, we show that founder effects can persist for centuries even at small spatial scales at which the potential for dispersal is high. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. [Founder of domestic bioastronautics (to the 100th anniversary of the birth of V.I. Yazdovskiy)].

    PubMed

    Vartbaronov, R A; Zhdan'ko, I M; Khomenko, M N

    2013-06-01

    The article is concerned to the anniversary of the founder of domestic bioastronautics, leader and organizer of realization of biomedical programs, preparations and supply of the first space flights in our country, V.I. Yazdovskiy. The authors underlined significancy of his shining merits, which helped to develop domestic bioastronautics. In cooperation with S.P. Korolyov, V.I. Yazdovskiy launched the first manned spaceflight. With this flight our country became a leader in space exploration.

  11. Foundering of lower island-arc crust as an explanation for the origin of the continental Moho.

    PubMed

    Jagoutz, Oliver; Behn, Mark D

    2013-12-05

    A long-standing theory for the genesis of continental crust is that it is formed in subduction zones. However, the observed seismic properties of lower crust and upper mantle in oceanic island arcs differ significantly from those in the continental crust. Accordingly, significant modifications of lower arc crust must occur, if continental crust is indeed formed from island arcs. Here we investigate how the seismic characteristics of arc crust are transformed into those of the continental crust by calculating the density and seismic structure of two exposed sections of island arc (Kohistan and Talkeetna). The Kohistan crustal section is negatively buoyant with respect to the underlying depleted upper mantle at depths exceeding 40 kilometres and is characterized by a steady increase in seismic velocity similar to that observed in active arcs. In contrast, the lower Talkeetna crust is density sorted, preserving only relicts (about ten to a hundred metres thick) of rock with density exceeding that of the underlying mantle. Specifically, the foundering of the lower Talkeetna crust resulted in the replacement of dense mafic and ultramafic cumulates by residual upper mantle, producing a sharp seismic discontinuity at depths of around 38 to 42 kilometres, characteristic of the continental Mohorovičić discontinuity (the Moho). Dynamic calculations indicate that foundering is an episodic process that occurs in most arcs with a periodicity of half a million to five million years. Moreover, because foundering will continue after arc magmatism ceases, this process ultimately results in the formation of the continental Moho.

  12. Explaining worldwide patterns of human genetic variation using a coalescent-based serial founder model of migration outward from Africa

    PubMed Central

    DeGiorgio, Michael; Jakobsson, Mattias; Rosenberg, Noah A.

    2009-01-01

    Studies of worldwide human variation have discovered three trends in summary statistics as a function of increasing geographic distance from East Africa: a decrease in heterozygosity, an increase in linkage disequilibrium (LD), and a decrease in the slope of the ancestral allele frequency spectrum. Forward simulations of unlinked loci have shown that the decline in heterozygosity can be described by a serial founder model, in which populations migrate outward from Africa through a process where each of a series of populations is formed from a subset of the previous population in the outward expansion. Here, we extend this approach by developing a retrospective coalescent-based serial founder model that incorporates linked loci. Our model both recovers the observed decline in heterozygosity with increasing distance from Africa and produces the patterns observed in LD and the ancestral allele frequency spectrum. Surprisingly, although migration between neighboring populations and limited admixture between modern and archaic humans can be accommodated in the model while continuing to explain the three trends, a competing model in which a wave of outward modern human migration expands into a series of preexisting archaic populations produces nearly opposite patterns to those observed in the data. We conclude by developing a simpler model to illustrate that the feature that permits the serial founder model but not the archaic persistence model to explain the three trends observed with increasing distance from Africa is its incorporation of a cumulative effect of genetic drift as humans colonized the world. PMID:19706453

  13. Mathematical theory of group selection: Structure of group selection in founder populations determined from convexity of the extinction operator*

    PubMed Central

    Boorman, Scott A.

    1978-01-01

    Genetic analysis for group selection is developed for the case of a biallelic locus (A, a) undergoing group selection of founder populations only. By contrast to R. Levins“E = E(x) models, extinction now depends on genetics at the propagule stage but acts uniformly on larger populations. Biological evidence supports this hypothesis, which also allows mathematical treatment at once simpler and biologically more general than the Fokker-Planck partial differential equation formalism adopted by Levins. It is presently possible to handle cytogenetics of both diploid and haplodiploid type. The model is set up as a quasideterministic recursion in the 5-simplex Σ5, collapsing both drift and mendelian selection effects into a single parameter u, which is a Fisher-Kimura-Ohta fixation probability. In the analysis, it is shown that the stability of the fixed points is determined by the convexity of the extinction operator acting on propagules, assumed to be of size 2. Thus, [Formula: see text] in which E1 and E3 are extinction probabilities for phenotypically uniform founder populations and E2 is the corresponding probability for founder populations of mixed phenotype. Further parameter regions are defined where fixation of the group-selected gene is globally stable, and this is still possible even when extinction pressure acting on carrying capacity populations becomes weak relative to a fixed mendelian selection strength. PMID:16592520

  14. Quantitative founder-effect analysis of French Canadian families identifies specific loci contributing to metabolic phenotypes of hypertension.

    PubMed

    Hamet, P; Merlo, E; Seda, O; Broeckel, U; Tremblay, J; Kaldunski, M; Gaudet, D; Bouchard, G; Deslauriers, B; Gagnon, F; Antoniol, G; Pausová, Z; Labuda, M; Jomphe, M; Gossard, F; Tremblay, G; Kirova, R; Tonellato, P; Orlov, S N; Pintos, J; Platko, J; Hudson, T J; Rioux, J D; Kotchen, T A; Cowley, A W

    2005-05-01

    The Saguenay-Lac St-Jean population of Quebec is relatively isolated and has genealogical records dating to the 17th-century French founders. In 120 extended families with at least one sib pair affected with early-onset hypertension and/or dyslipidemia, we analyzed the genetic determinants of hypertension and related cardiovascular and metabolic conditions. Variance-components linkage analysis revealed 46 loci after 100,000 permutations. The most prominent clusters of overlapping quantitative-trait loci were on chromosomes 1 and 3, a finding supported by principal-components and bivariate analyses. These genetic determinants were further tested by classifying families by use of LOD score density analysis for each measured phenotype at every 5 cM. Our study showed the founder effect over several generations and classes of living individuals. This quantitative genealogical approach supports the notion of the ancestral causality of traits uniquely present and inherited in distinct family classes. With the founder effect, traits determined within population subsets are measurably and quantitatively transmitted through generational lineage, with a precise component contributing to phenotypic variance. These methods should accelerate the uncovering of causal haplotypes in complex diseases such as hypertension and metabolic syndrome.

  15. Founder effect and estimation of the age of the French Gypsy mutation associated with Glanzmann thrombasthenia in Manouche families.

    PubMed

    Fiore, Mathieu; Pillois, Xavier; Nurden, Paquita; Nurden, Alan T; Austerlitz, Frédéric

    2011-09-01

    The c.1544+1G>A substitution at the 5' splice donor site of intron 15 of the ITGA2B gene, called the French Gypsy mutation, causes Glanzmann thrombasthenia, an inherited hemorrhagic disorder transmitted as an autosomal recessive trait and characterized by an altered synthesis of the platelet αIIbβ3 integrin. So far, this mutation has only been found in affected individuals originating from French Manouche families, strongly suggesting a founder effect. Our goal was to investigate the origin of the French Gypsy mutation. We estimated the age of the mutation by a likelihood-based method that uses the length of the shared haplotypes among a set of patients. For this, we genotyped 23 individuals of Manouche origin; consisting of 9 Glanzmann thrombasthenia patients homozygous for the French Gypsy mutation, 6 heterozygous carriers and 8 homozygous wild-type individuals. They were genotyped for four single-nucleotide polymorphisms using high-resolution melting curve analysis, and for two CA repeats in the BRCA1 and THRA genes at chromosome 17, using fragment analysis gels. We found that a haplotype of five polymorphic loci covering a 4-cM region was strongly associated with the French Gypsy mutation, suggesting a founder effect. The estimated age of this founder mutation was 300-400 years (range 255-552 years). Thus, all carriers of the French Gypsy mutation c.1544+1G>A at intron 15 descended from a common ancestor 300-400 years ago.

  16. Linkage disequilibrium analysis in young populations: Pseudo-vitamin D-deficiency rickets and the founder effect in French Canadians

    SciTech Connect

    Labuda, M.; Glorieux, F.H.; Labuda, D.; Korab-Laskowska, M.

    1996-09-01

    Pseudo-vitamin D-deficiency rickets (PDDR) was mapped close to D12S90 and between proximal D12S312 and distal (D12S305, D12S104) microsatellites that were subsequently found on a single YAC clone. Analysis of a complex haplotype in linkage disequilibrium (LD) with the disease discriminated among distinct founder effects in French Canadian populations in Acadia and in Charlevoix-Saguenay-Lac-Saint-Jean (Ch-SLSJ), as well as an earlier one in precolonial Europe. A simple demographic model suggested the historical age of the founder effect in Ch-SLSJ to be {approximately}12 generations. The corresponding LD data are consistent with this figure when they are analyzed within the framework of Luria-Delbruck model, which takes into account the population growth. Population sampling due to a limited number of first settlers and the rapid demographic expansion appear to have played a major role in the founding of PDDR in Ch-SLSJ and, presumably, other genetic disorders endemic to French Canada. Similarly, the founder effect in Ashkenazim, coinciding with their early settlement in medieval Poland and subsequent expansion eastward, could explain the origin of frequent genetic diseases in this population. 48 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. SNPs across time and space: population genomic signatures of founder events and epizootics in the House Finch (Haemorhous mexicanus).

    PubMed

    Shultz, Allison J; Baker, Allan J; Hill, Geoffrey E; Nolan, Paul M; Edwards, Scott V

    2016-10-01

    Identifying genomic signatures of natural selection can be challenging against a background of demographic changes such as bottlenecks and population expansions. Here, we disentangle the effects of demography from selection in the House Finch (Haemorhous mexicanus) using samples collected before and after a pathogen-induced selection event. Using ddRADseq, we genotyped over 18,000 SNPs across the genome in native pre-epizootic western US birds, introduced birds from Hawaii and the eastern United States, post-epizootic eastern birds, and western birds sampled across a similar time span. We found 14% and 7% reductions in nucleotide diversity, respectively, in Hawaiian and pre-epizootic eastern birds relative to pre-epizootic western birds, as well as elevated levels of linkage disequilibrium and other signatures of founder events. Despite finding numerous significant frequency shifts (outlier loci) between pre-epizootic native and introduced populations, we found no signal of reduced genetic diversity, elevated linkage disequilibrium, or outlier loci as a result of the epizootic. Simulations demonstrate that the proportion of outliers associated with founder events could be explained by genetic drift. This rare view of genetic evolution across time in an invasive species provides direct evidence that demographic shifts like founder events have genetic consequences more widespread across the genome than natural selection.

  18. Identification of full-length transmitted/founder viruses and their progeny in primary HIV-1 infection

    SciTech Connect

    Korber, Bette; Hraber, Peter; Giorgi, Elena; Bhattacharya, T

    2009-01-01

    Identification of transmitted/founder virus genomes and their progeny by is a novel strategy for probing the molecular basis of HIV-1 transmission and for evaluating the genetic imprint of viral and host factors that act to constrain or facilitate virus replication. Here, we show in a cohort of twelve acutely infected subjects (9 clade B; 3 clade C), that complete genomic sequences of transmitted/founder viruses could be inferred using single genome amplification of plasma viral RNA, direct amplicon sequencing, and a model of random virus evolution. This allowed for the precise identification, chemical synthesis, molecular cloning, and biological analysis of those viruses actually responsible for productive clinical infection and for a comprehensive mapping of sequential viral genomes and proteomes for mutations that are necessary or incidental to the establishment of HIV-1 persistence. Transmitted/founder viruses were CD4 and CCR5 tropic, replicated preferentially in activated primary T-Iymphocytes but not monocyte-derived macrophages, and were effectively shielded from most heterologous or broadly neutralizing antibodies. By 3 months of infection, the evolving viral quasispecies in three subjects showed mutational fixation at only 2-5 discreet genomic loci. By 6-12 months, mutational fixation was evident at 18-27 genomic loci. Some, but not all, of these mutations were attributable to virus escape from cytotoxic Tlymphocytes or neutralizing antibodies, suggesting that other viral or host factors may influence early HIV -1 fitness.

  19. Linkage disequilibrium analysis in young populations: pseudo-vitamin D-deficiency rickets and the founder effect in French Canadians.

    PubMed Central

    Labuda, M.; Labuda, D.; Korab-Laskowska, M.; Cole, D. E.; Zietkiewicz, E.; Weissenbach, J.; Popowska, E.; Pronicka, E.; Root, A. W.; Glorieux, F. H.

    1996-01-01

    Pseudo-vitamin D-deficiency rickets (PDDR) was mapped close to D12S90 and between proximal D12S312 and distal (D12S305, D12S104) microsatellites that were subsequently found on a single YAC clone. Analysis of a complex haplotype in linkage disequilibrium (LD) with the disease discriminated among distinct founder effects in French Canadian populations in Acadia and in Charlevoix-Saguenay-Lac-Saint-Jean (Ch-SLSJ), as well as an earlier one in precolonial Europe. A simple demographic model suggested the historical age of the founder effect in Ch-SLSJ to be approximately 12 generations. The corresponding LD data are consistent with this figure when they are analyzed within the framework of Luria-Delbrück model, which takes into account the population growth. Population sampling due to a limited number of first settlers and the rapid demographic expansion appear to have played a major role in the founding of PDDR in Ch-SLSJ and, presumably, other genetic disorders endemic to French Canada. Similarly, the founder effect in Ashkenazim, coinciding with their early settlement in medieval Poland and subsequent expansion eastward, could explain the origin of frequent genetic diseases in this population. Images Figure 2 Figure 4 PMID:8751865

  20. Diversification in the tropical pacific: comparisons between marine and terrestrial systems and the importance of founder speciation.

    PubMed

    Paulay, Gustav; Meyer, Chris

    2002-11-01

    Patterns of distribution and processes of differentiation have often been contrasted between terrestrial and marine biotas. The islands of Oceania offer an excellent setting to explore this contrast, because the geographic setting for terrestrial and shallow-water, benthic, marine organisms are the same: the myriad islands strewn across the vast Pacific. The size of species ranges and the geographic distribution of endemism are two biogeographic attributes that are thought to differ markedly between terrestrial and marine biotas in the Pacific. While terrestrial species are frequently confined to single islands or archipelagoes throughout Oceania, marine species tend to have wide to very wide distributions, and are rarely restricted to single island groups except for the most isolated archipelagoes. We explore the conditions under which species can reach an island by dispersal and differentiate. Genetic differentiation can occur either through founder speciation or vicariance; these processes are requisite ends of a continuum. We show that founder speciation is most likely when few propagules enter the dispersal medium and survive well while they travel far. We argue that conditions favorable to founder speciation are common in marine as well as terrestrial systems, and that terrestrial-type, archipelagic-level endemism is likely common in marine taxa. We give examples of marine groups that show archipelagic level endemism on most Pacific island groups as well as of terrestrial species that are widespread. Thus both the patterns and processes of insular diversification are variable, and overlap more between land and sea than previously considered.

  1. Genetic identity, biological phenotype, and evolutionary pathways of transmitted/founder viruses in acute and early HIV-1 infection

    PubMed Central

    Salazar-Gonzalez, Jesus F.; Salazar, Maria G.; Keele, Brandon F.; Learn, Gerald H.; Giorgi, Elena E.; Li, Hui; Decker, Julie M.; Wang, Shuyi; Baalwa, Joshua; Kraus, Matthias H.; Parrish, Nicholas F.; Shaw, Katharina S.; Guffey, M. Brad; Bar, Katharine J.; Davis, Katie L.; Ochsenbauer-Jambor, Christina; Kappes, John C.; Saag, Michael S.; Cohen, Myron S.; Mulenga, Joseph; Derdeyn, Cynthia A.; Allen, Susan; Hunter, Eric; Markowitz, Martin; Hraber, Peter; Perelson, Alan S.; Bhattacharya, Tanmoy; Haynes, Barton F.; Korber, Bette T.; Hahn, Beatrice H.

    2009-01-01

    Identification of full-length transmitted HIV-1 genomes could be instrumental in HIV-1 pathogenesis, microbicide, and vaccine research by enabling the direct analysis of those viruses actually responsible for productive clinical infection. We show in 12 acutely infected subjects (9 clade B and 3 clade C) that complete HIV-1 genomes of transmitted/founder viruses can be inferred by single genome amplification and sequencing of plasma virion RNA. This allowed for the molecular cloning and biological analysis of transmitted/founder viruses and a comprehensive genome-wide assessment of the genetic imprint left on the evolving virus quasispecies by a composite of host selection pressures. Transmitted viruses encoded intact canonical genes (gag-pol-vif-vpr-tat-rev-vpu-env-nef) and replicated efficiently in primary human CD4+ T lymphocytes but much less so in monocyte-derived macrophages. Transmitted viruses were CD4 and CCR5 tropic and demonstrated concealment of coreceptor binding surfaces of the envelope bridging sheet and variable loop 3. 2 mo after infection, transmitted/founder viruses in three subjects were nearly completely replaced by viruses differing at two to five highly selected genomic loci; by 12–20 mo, viruses exhibited concentrated mutations at 17–34 discrete locations. These findings reveal viral properties associated with mucosal HIV-1 transmission and a limited set of rapidly evolving adaptive mutations driven primarily, but not exclusively, by early cytotoxic T cell responses. PMID:19487424

  2. Foundering of lower island-arc crust as an explanation for the origin of the continental Moho

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagoutz, Oliver; Behn, Mark D.

    2013-12-01

    A long-standing theory for the genesis of continental crust is that it is formed in subduction zones. However, the observed seismic properties of lower crust and upper mantle in oceanic island arcs differ significantly from those in the continental crust. Accordingly, significant modifications of lower arc crust must occur, if continental crust is indeed formed from island arcs. Here we investigate how the seismic characteristics of arc crust are transformed into those of the continental crust by calculating the density and seismic structure of two exposed sections of island arc (Kohistan and Talkeetna). The Kohistan crustal section is negatively buoyant with respect to the underlying depleted upper mantle at depths exceeding 40 kilometres and is characterized by a steady increase in seismic velocity similar to that observed in active arcs. In contrast, the lower Talkeetna crust is density sorted, preserving only relicts (about ten to a hundred metres thick) of rock with density exceeding that of the underlying mantle. Specifically, the foundering of the lower Talkeetna crust resulted in the replacement of dense mafic and ultramafic cumulates by residual upper mantle, producing a sharp seismic discontinuity at depths of around 38 to 42kilometres, characteristic of the continental Mohorovičić discontinuity (the Moho). Dynamic calculations indicate that foundering is an episodic process that occurs in most arcs with a periodicity of half a million to five million years. Moreover, because foundering will continue after arc magmatism ceases, this process ultimately results in the formation of the continental Moho.

  3. Quantitative Founder-Effect Analysis of French Canadian Families Identifies Specific Loci Contributing to Metabolic Phenotypes of Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Hamet, P.; Merlo, E.; Šeda, O.; Broeckel, U.; Tremblay, J.; Kaldunski, M.; Gaudet, D.; Bouchard, G.; Deslauriers, B.; Gagnon, F.; Antoniol, G.; Pausová, Z.; Labuda, M.; Jomphe, M.; Gossard, F.; Tremblay, G.; Kirova, R.; Tonellato, P.; Orlov, S. N.; Pintos, J.; Platko, J.; Hudson, T. J.; Rioux, J. D.; Kotchen, T. A.; Cowley, A. W.

    2005-01-01

    The Saguenay–Lac St-Jean population of Quebec is relatively isolated and has genealogical records dating to the 17th-century French founders. In 120 extended families with at least one sib pair affected with early-onset hypertension and/or dyslipidemia, we analyzed the genetic determinants of hypertension and related cardiovascular and metabolic conditions. Variance-components linkage analysis revealed 46 loci after 100,000 permutations. The most prominent clusters of overlapping quantitative-trait loci were on chromosomes 1 and 3, a finding supported by principal-components and bivariate analyses. These genetic determinants were further tested by classifying families by use of LOD score density analysis for each measured phenotype at every 5 cM. Our study showed the founder effect over several generations and classes of living individuals. This quantitative genealogical approach supports the notion of the ancestral causality of traits uniquely present and inherited in distinct family classes. With the founder effect, traits determined within population subsets are measurably and quantitatively transmitted through generational lineage, with a precise component contributing to phenotypic variance. These methods should accelerate the uncovering of causal haplotypes in complex diseases such as hypertension and metabolic syndrome. PMID:15800845

  4. Effect of maternal aging on transgene heritability in transgenic founder mice derived from zygotes microinjected with retroviral long terminal repeat-containing recombinant deoxyribonucleic acid.

    PubMed

    Wang, T H; Yang, W K; Hoyt, P R; Ch'ang, L Y; Savin, T J

    1993-05-01

    To determine the stability of artificially introduced recombinant DNA in the mouse germline throughout the reproductive life, founder mice derived from fertilized eggs injected with retroviral long-terminal-repeat-containing recombinant DNAs were mated with congenic FVB/N mice. Tail DNA of all progeny were screened and restriction fragment patterns of the transgenes were examined. Litter size and percentage of transgene transmission at various reproductive age periods were analyzed. Microinjection of 1737 eggs with four different recombinant DNAs resulted in 12 female and 11 male transgenic mice; 2 males were sterile and the remaining 21 mice served as founders to produce 1087 F1 progeny. With increasing parental age, litter size decreased generally. The percentage of progeny inheriting the transgenes declined markedly with increasing aging of 4 female founders; this aging effect was not observed in male founders (p < 0.005). No apparent change in transgenes was detected in progeny from late reproductive stages.

  5. Testing founder effect speciation: Divergence population genetics of the Spoonbills Platalea regia and Pl. minor (Threskiornithidae, Aves)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yeung, Carol K.L.; Tsai, Pi-Wen; Chesser, R. Terry; Lin, Rong-Chien; Yao, Cheng-Te; Tian, Xiu-Hua; Li, Shou-Hsien

    2011-01-01

    Although founder effect speciation has been a popular theoretical model for the speciation of geographically isolated taxa, its empirical importance has remained difficult to evaluate due to the intractability of past demography, which in a founder effect speciation scenario would involve a speciational bottleneck in the emergent species and the complete cessation of gene flow following divergence. Using regression-weighted approximate Bayesian computation, we tested the validity of these two fundamental conditions of founder effect speciation in a pair of sister species with disjunct distributions: the royal spoonbill Platalea regia in Australasia and the black-faced spoonbill Pl. minor in eastern Asia. When compared with genetic polymorphism observed at 20 nuclear loci in the two species, simulations showed that the founder effect speciation model had an extremely low posterior probability (1.55 × 10-8) of producing the extant genetic pattern. In contrast, speciation models that allowed for postdivergence gene flow were much more probable (posterior probabilities were 0.37 and 0.50 for the bottleneck with gene flow and the gene flow models, respectively) and postdivergence gene flow persisted for a considerable period of time (more than 80% of the divergence history in both models) following initial divergence (median = 197,000 generations, 95% credible interval [CI]: 50,000-478,000, for the bottleneck with gene flow model; and 186,000 generations, 95% CI: 45,000-477,000, for the gene flow model). Furthermore, the estimated population size reduction in Pl. regia to 7,000 individuals (median, 95% CI: 487-12,000, according to the bottleneck with gene flow model) was unlikely to have been severe enough to be considered a bottleneck. Therefore, these results do not support founder effect speciation in Pl. regia but indicate instead that the divergence between Pl. regia and Pl. minor was probably driven by selection despite continuous gene flow. In this light, we

  6. Testing founder effect speciation: divergence population genetics of the spoonbills Platalea regia and Pl. minor (Threskiornithidae, Aves).

    PubMed

    Yeung, Carol K L; Tsai, Pi-Wen; Chesser, R Terry; Lin, Rong-Chien; Yao, Cheng-Te; Tian, Xiu-Hua; Li, Shou-Hsien

    2011-01-01

    Although founder effect speciation has been a popular theoretical model for the speciation of geographically isolated taxa, its empirical importance has remained difficult to evaluate due to the intractability of past demography, which in a founder effect speciation scenario would involve a speciational bottleneck in the emergent species and the complete cessation of gene flow following divergence. Using regression-weighted approximate Bayesian computation, we tested the validity of these two fundamental conditions of founder effect speciation in a pair of sister species with disjunct distributions: the royal spoonbill Platalea regia in Australasia and the black-faced spoonbill Pl. minor in eastern Asia. When compared with genetic polymorphism observed at 20 nuclear loci in the two species, simulations showed that the founder effect speciation model had an extremely low posterior probability (1.55 × 10(-8)) of producing the extant genetic pattern. In contrast, speciation models that allowed for postdivergence gene flow were much more probable (posterior probabilities were 0.37 and 0.50 for the bottleneck with gene flow and the gene flow models, respectively) and postdivergence gene flow persisted for a considerable period of time (more than 80% of the divergence history in both models) following initial divergence (median = 197,000 generations, 95% credible interval [CI]: 50,000-478,000, for the bottleneck with gene flow model; and 186,000 generations, 95% CI: 45,000-477,000, for the gene flow model). Furthermore, the estimated population size reduction in Pl. regia to 7,000 individuals (median, 95% CI: 487-12,000, according to the bottleneck with gene flow model) was unlikely to have been severe enough to be considered a bottleneck. Therefore, these results do not support founder effect speciation in Pl. regia but indicate instead that the divergence between Pl. regia and Pl. minor was probably driven by selection despite continuous gene flow. In this light, we

  7. A founder splice site mutation underlies glycogen storage disease type 3 in consanguineous Saudi families.

    PubMed

    Basit, Sulman; Malibari, Omhani; Al Balwi, Alia Mahmood; Abdusamad, Firoz; Abu Ismail, Feras

    2014-01-01

    Glycogen storage disease type 3 (GSD III) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by genetic mutations in the gene AGL. AGL encodes amylo-a-1, 6-glucosidase, 4-a-glucanotransferase, a glycogen debranching enzyme. GSD III is characterized by fasting hypoglycemia, hepatomegaly, growth retardation, progressive myopathy, and cardiomyopathy due to storage of abnormally structured glycogen in both skeletal and cardiac muscles and/or liver. The aim of this study is to detect mutations underlying GSD III in Saudi patients. A cross-sectional clinical genetic study of 5 Saudi consanguineous families examined at the metabolic clinic of the Madinah Maternity and Children Hospital. We present a biochemical and molecular analysis of 5 consanguineous Saudi families with GSD III. DNA was isolated from the peripheral blood of 31 individuals, including 12 patients, and the AGL gene was sequenced bidirectionally. DNA sequences were compared with the AGL reference sequence from the ensemble genome browser. Genotyping and sequence analysis identified a homozygous intronic splice acceptor site mutation (IVS32-12A > G) in 4 families perfectly segregating with the phenotype. Complementary (c)DNA sequence analysis of the AGL gene revealed an 11-bp sequence insertion between exon 32 and exon 33 due to the creation of a new 3' splice site. The predicted mutant enzyme was truncated by 112 carboxyl-terminal amino acids as a result of premature termination. Haplotype analysis revealed that the mutation arises as a result of founder effect, not an independent event. This is the first report of a genetic mutation in the AGL gene from Saudi Arabia. Screening for this mutation can improve genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis of GSD III in Saudi Arabia.

  8. Comprehensive Characterization of the Transmitted/Founder env Genes From a Single MSM Cohort in China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yue; Li, Ning; Zhang, Tong; Huang, Xiaojie; Cai, Fangping; Vandergrift, Nathan; Xin, Ruolei; Meng, Zhefeng; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Jiang, Chunlai; Xu, Xiaoning; Montefiori, David C; Gao, Feng; Wu, Hao

    2015-08-01

    The men having sex with men (MSM) population has become one of the major risk groups for HIV-1 infection in China. However, the epidemiological patterns, function of the env genes, and autologous and heterologous neutralization activity in the same MSM population have not been systematically characterized. The env gene sequences were obtained by the single genome amplification. The time to the most recent common ancestor was estimated for each genotype using the Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo approach. Coreceptor usage was determined in NP-2 cells. Neutralization was analyzed using Env pseudoviruses in TZM-bl cells. We have obtained 547 full-length env gene sequences by single genome amplification from 30 acute/early HIV-1--infected individuals in the Beijing MSM cohort. Three genotypes (subtype B, CRF01_AE, and CRF07_BC) were identified and 20% of the individuals were infected with multiple transmitted/founder (T/F) viruses. The tight clusters of the MSM sequences regardless of geographic origins indicated nearly exclusive transmission within the MSM population and limited number of introductions. The time to the most recent common ancestor for each genotype was 10-15 years after each was first introduced in China. Disparate preferences for coreceptor usages among 3 genotypes might lead to the changes in percentage of different genotypes in the MSM population over time. The genotype-matched and genotype-mismatched neutralization activity varied among the 3 genotypes. The identification of unique characteristics for transmission, coreceptor usage, neutralization profile, and epidemic patterns of HIV-1 is critical for the better understanding of transmission mechanisms, development of preventive strategies, and evaluation of vaccine efficacy in the MSM population in China.

  9. Evolution of the Friedreich’s ataxia trinucleotide repeat expansion: Founder effect and premutations

    PubMed Central

    Cossée, Mireille; Schmitt, Michèle; Campuzano, Victoria; Reutenauer, Laurence; Moutou, Céline; Mandel, Jean-Louis; Koenig, Michel

    1997-01-01

    Friedreich’s ataxia, the most frequent inherited ataxia, is caused, in the vast majority of cases, by large GAA repeat expansions in the first intron of the frataxin gene. The normal sequence corresponds to a moderately polymorphic trinucleotide repeat with bimodal size distribution. Small normal alleles have approximately eight to nine repeats whereas a more heterogeneous mode of large normal alleles ranges from 16 to 34 GAA. The latter class accounts for ≈17% of normal alleles. To identify the origin of the expansion mutation, we analyzed linkage disequilibrium between expansion mutations or normal alleles and a haplotype of five polymorphic markers within or close to the frataxin gene; 51% of the expansions were associated with a single haplotype, and the other expansions were associated with haplotypes that could be related to the major one by mutation at a polymorphic marker or by ancient recombination. Of interest, the major haplotype associated with expansion is also the major haplotype associated with the larger alleles in the normal size range and was almost never found associated with the smaller normal alleles. The results indicate that most if not all large normal alleles derive from a single founder chromosome and that they represent a reservoir for larger expansion events, possibly through “premutation” intermediates. Indeed, we found two such alleles (42 and 60 GAA) that underwent cataclysmic expansion to pathological range in a single generation. This stepwise evolution to large trinucleotide expansions already was suggested for myotonic dystrophy and fragile X syndrome and may relate to a common mutational mechanism, despite sequence motif differences. PMID:9207112

  10. Ocular biometry and determinants of refractive error in a founder population of European ancestry.

    PubMed

    Hilkert, Sarah M; Parness-Yossifon, Reut; Mets-Halgrimson, Rebecca; Mets, Marilyn B

    2017-06-01

    The prevalence of myopia is increasing worldwide. Previous studies have found a positive association between myopia, education, and near activities, while others have noted a negative association with outdoor exposure. This study reports refractive error and biometry in a founder population of European ancestry, the Hutterites, and discusses risk factors contributing to myopia. Cross-sectional study, including complete eye exams with retinoscopy and biometry. 939 study participants, ages 6 to 89, were examined. Females were significantly more myopic than males (SE -0.87 ± 2.07 and -0.40 ± 1.49 in females and males, respectively, p < 0.0001). Males had significantly longer axial lengths. Females had steeper corneas. This is the first epidemiological report of refractive error among the Hutterites. As a genetically isolated population with a communal lifestyle, the Hutterites present a unique opportunity to study risk factors for myopia. Hutterite females are more myopic than males, a finding which has only been reported in a few other populations. Hutterite children complete compulsory education through the 8th grade, after which women and men assume gender-specific occupational tasks. Men often work outside on the farm, while women engage in more domestic activities inside. These occupational differences likely contribute to the increased myopia comparing females to males, and their uniform lifestyle reduces the impact of potential confounding factors, such as education and income. The Hutterites are more myopic than most other North American and European populations. Greater time spent doing near work and less time spent outdoors likely explain the increased myopia comparing females to males.

  11. Genome-wide association study of lung function phenotypes in a founder population.

    PubMed

    Yao, Tsung-Chieh; Du, Gaixin; Han, Lide; Sun, Ying; Hu, Donglei; Yang, James J; Mathias, Rasika; Roth, Lindsey A; Rafaels, Nicholas; Thompson, Emma E; Loisel, Dagan A; Anderson, Rebecca; Eng, Celeste; Arruabarrena Orbegozo, Maitane; Young, Melody; Klocksieben, James M; Anderson, Elizabeth; Shanovich, Kathleen; Lester, Lucille A; Williams, L Keoki; Barnes, Kathleen C; Burchard, Esteban G; Nicolae, Dan L; Abney, Mark; Ober, Carole

    2014-01-01

    Lung function is a long-term predictor of mortality and morbidity. We sought to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with lung function. We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of FEV1, forced vital capacity (FVC), and FEV1/FVC in 1144 Hutterites aged 6 to 89 years, who are members of a founder population of European descent. We performed least absolute shrinkage and selection operation regression to select the minimum set of SNPs that best predict FEV1/FVC in the Hutterites and used the GRAIL algorithm to mine the Gene Ontology database for evidence of functional connections between genes near the predictive SNPs. Our GWAS identified significant associations between FEV1/FVC and SNPs at the THSD4-UACA-TLE3 locus on chromosome 15q23 (P = 5.7 × 10(-8) to 3.4 × 10(-9)). Nine SNPs at or near 4 additional loci had P < 10(-5) with FEV1/FVC. Only 2 SNPs were found with P < 10(-5) for FEV1 or FVC. We found nominal levels of significance with SNPs at 9 of the 27 previously reported loci associated with lung function measures. Among a predictive set of 80 SNPs, 6 loci were identified that had a significant degree of functional connectivity (GRAIL P < .05), including 3 clusters of β-defensin genes, 2 chemokine genes (CCL18 and CXCL12), and TNFRSF13B. This study identifies genome-wide significant associations and replicates results of previous GWASs. Multimarker modeling implicated for the first time common variation in genes involved in antimicrobial immunity in airway mucosa that influences lung function. Copyright © 2013 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Dissection of the HLA association with multiple sclerosis in the founder isolated population of Sardinia.

    PubMed

    Marrosu, M G; Murru, R; Murru, M R; Costa, G; Zavattari, P; Whalen, M; Cocco, E; Mancosu, C; Schirru, L; Solla, E; Fadda, E; Melis, C; Porru, I; Rolesu, M; Cucca, F

    2001-12-01

    Several studies have indicated that multiple sclerosis (MS) is associated and linked to the major histocompatibility complex (MHC)/human leukocyte antigen (HLA) region of chromosome 6p21.3, but the exact location and nature of the primarily associated locus within the HLA complex is still controversial and largely presumptive. By linkage disequilibrium mapping, we have systematically investigated this chromosome region in the founder population of Sardinia to determine the relative associations of the various loci with MS. An overall 11.4 Mb region, which encompasses the whole HLA complex, was scanned with 19 microsatellite markers and with single nucleotide polymorphisms within 12 functional candidate genes and assessed for MS association using the extended transmission disequilibrium test (ETDT). A peak of association represented by the three adjacent DRB1, -DQA1 and -DQB1 loci was detected in the class II region. Two additional less significant areas of association were detected, respectively, in the centromeric side of the class II region at the DPB1 locus and, telomeric of the classically defined class I loci, at the D6S1683 microsatellite. Conditional ETDT analysis indicated that these regions of association could be independent of each other. Within the main peak of association, DRB1 and DQB1 contribute to the disease association independently of each other whereas DQA1 had no detectable primary genetic effects. We evaluated the haplotype distribution at the region showing the strongest association and found five DQB1-DRB1 haplotypes positively associated with MS in Sardinia. These consistently included all the haplotypes previously found associated with MS in the various human populations, thus supporting a primary effect of the products of these loci in MS. Overall these results are consistent with a multilocus model of the MHC encoded susceptibility to MS.

  13. The Icelandic founder mutation BRCA2 999del5: analysis of expression

    PubMed Central

    Mikaelsdottir, Evgenia K; Valgeirsdottir, Sigridur; Eyfjord, Jorunn E; Rafnar, Thorunn

    2004-01-01

    Introduction A founder mutation in the BRCA2 gene (BRCA2 999del5) accounts for 7–8% of female breast cancers and for 40% of male breast cancers in Iceland. If expressed, the mutant gene would encode a protein consisting of the first 256 amino acids of the BRCA2 protein. The purpose of this study was to determine whether this mutant protein is produced in heterozygous individuals and, if so, what might be the functional consequences of mutant protein production. Methods The presence of BRCA2 999del5 transcripts in fibroblasts from heterozygous individuals was assayed by cDNA synthesis and sequencing. The potential protein-coding portion of BRCA2 999del5 was cloned into the pIND(SP1)/V5-His vector and expressed in COS7 cells. The presence of the mutant protein in cell lysates from heterozygous fibroblasts and from COS7 cells was tested by a number of methods including immunoprecipitation, affinity purification with nickel-coated agarose beads, Western blotting and ELISA, using antibodies to the N-terminal end of BRCA2, antiserum specific for the 16 nonrelevant amino acids at the carboxyl end and antibodies to fusion partners of recombinant proteins. Results The frequency of the BRCA2 999del5 transcript in heterozygous fibroblasts was about one-fifth of the wild-type transcript; however, no mutant protein could be detected. Overexpression of BRCA2 999del5 mRNA in COS7 cells failed to produce a mutant protein unless degradation by proteasomes was blocked. Conclusion Our results show that the protein product of BRCA2 999del5 is extremely unstable. Therefore, an increase in breast cancer risk in BRCA2 999del5 carriers is due to haploinsufficiency at the BRCA2 locus. PMID:15217494

  14. The Icelandic founder mutation BRCA2 999del5: analysis of expression.

    PubMed

    Mikaelsdottir, Evgenia K; Valgeirsdottir, Sigridur; Eyfjord, Jorunn E; Rafnar, Thorunn

    2004-01-01

    A founder mutation in the BRCA2 gene (BRCA2 999del5) accounts for 7-8% of female breast cancers and for 40% of male breast cancers in Iceland. If expressed, the mutant gene would encode a protein consisting of the first 256 amino acids of the BRCA2 protein. The purpose of this study was to determine whether this mutant protein is produced in heterozygous individuals and, if so, what might be the functional consequences of mutant protein production. The presence of BRCA2 999del5 transcripts in fibroblasts from heterozygous individuals was assayed by cDNA synthesis and sequencing. The potential protein-coding portion of BRCA2 999del5 was cloned into the pIND(SP1)/V5-His vector and expressed in COS7 cells. The presence of the mutant protein in cell lysates from heterozygous fibroblasts and from COS7 cells was tested by a number of methods including immunoprecipitation, affinity purification with nickel-coated agarose beads, Western blotting and ELISA, using antibodies to the N-terminal end of BRCA2, antiserum specific for the 16 nonrelevant amino acids at the carboxyl end and antibodies to fusion partners of recombinant proteins. The frequency of the BRCA2 999del5 transcript in heterozygous fibroblasts was about one-fifth of the wild-type transcript; however, no mutant protein could be detected. Overexpression of BRCA2 999del5 mRNA in COS7 cells failed to produce a mutant protein unless degradation by proteasomes was blocked. Our results show that the protein product of BRCA2 999del5 is extremely unstable. Therefore, an increase in breast cancer risk in BRCA2 999del5 carriers is due to haploinsufficiency at the BRCA2 locus.

  15. Counting the founders: the matrilineal genetic ancestry of the Jewish Diaspora.

    PubMed

    Behar, Doron M; Metspalu, Ene; Kivisild, Toomas; Rosset, Saharon; Tzur, Shay; Hadid, Yarin; Yudkovsky, Guennady; Rosengarten, Dror; Pereira, Luisa; Amorim, Antonio; Kutuev, Ildus; Gurwitz, David; Bonne-Tamir, Batsheva; Villems, Richard; Skorecki, Karl

    2008-04-30

    The history of the Jewish Diaspora dates back to the Assyrian and Babylonian conquests in the Levant, followed by complex demographic and migratory trajectories over the ensuing millennia which pose a serious challenge to unraveling population genetic patterns. Here we ask whether phylogenetic analysis, based on highly resolved mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) phylogenies can discern among maternal ancestries of the Diaspora. Accordingly, 1,142 samples from 14 different non-Ashkenazi Jewish communities were analyzed. A list of complete mtDNA sequences was established for all variants present at high frequency in the communities studied, along with high-resolution genotyping of all samples. Unlike the previously reported pattern observed among Ashkenazi Jews, the numerically major portion of the non-Ashkenazi Jews, currently estimated at 5 million people and comprised of the Moroccan, Iraqi, Iranian and Iberian Exile Jewish communities showed no evidence for a narrow founder effect, which did however characterize the smaller and more remote Belmonte, Indian and the two Caucasus communities. The Indian and Ethiopian Jewish sample sets suggested local female introgression, while mtDNAs in all other communities studied belong to a well-characterized West Eurasian pool of maternal lineages. Absence of sub-Saharan African mtDNA lineages among the North African Jewish communities suggests negligible or low level of admixture with females of the host populations among whom the African haplogroup (Hg) L0-L3 sub-clades variants are common. In contrast, the North African and Iberian Exile Jewish communities show influence of putative Iberian admixture as documented by mtDNA Hg HV0 variants. These findings highlight striking differences in the demographic history of the widespread Jewish Diaspora.

  16. A founder haplotype of APOE-Sendai mutation associated with lipoprotein glomerulopathy.

    PubMed

    Toyota, Kentaro; Hashimoto, Taeko; Ogino, Daisuke; Matsunaga, Akira; Ito, Minoru; Masakane, Ikuto; Degawa, Noriyuki; Sato, Hiroshi; Shirai, Sayuri; Umetsu, Kazuo; Tamiya, Gen; Saito, Takao; Hayasaka, Kiyoshi

    2013-05-01

    Lipoprotein glomerulopathy (LPG) is a hereditary disease characterized by lipoprotein thrombi in the glomerulus, hyperlipoproteinemia, and a marked increase in serum apolipoprotein E (APOE). More than 12 APOE mutations have been identified as causes of LPG, and APOE-Sendai (Arg145Pro) mutation was frequently detected in patients from the eastern part of Japan including Yamagata prefecture. Recently, effective therapy with intensive lipid-lowering agents was established, and epidemiologic data are required for early diagnosis. We determined the haplotype structure of APOE-Sendai in 13 patients from 9 unrelated families with LPG, and found that the haplotype of all APOE-Sendai mutations was identical, suggesting that APOE-Sendai mutation is common in Japanese patients probably through a founder effect. We also studied the gene frequency of APOE-Sendai in 2023 control subjects and 418 patients receiving hemodialysis in Yamagata prefecture using the TaqMan method, but did not identify any subjects carrying the mutation, indicating that it is very rare in the general population even in the eastern part of Japan. In addition to APOE mutation, other genetic and/or epigenetic factors are considered to be involved in the pathogenesis of LPG because of its low penetrance. The patients did not have a common haplotype of the counterpart APOE allele, and some patients had the same haplotype of the counterpart APOE allele as the asymptomatic carriers. These results suggest that the counterpart APOE allele is not likely associated with the onset of LPG. Further study is required to clarify the pathogenesis of LPG.

  17. Susceptibility to quantum dot induced lung inflammation differs widely among the Collaborative Cross founder mouse strains

    PubMed Central

    Scoville, David K.; White, Collin C.; Botta, Dianne; McConnachie, Lisa A.; Zadworny, Megan E.; Schmuck, Stefanie C.; Hu, Xiaoge; Gao, Xiaohu; Yu, Jianbo; Dills, Russell L.; Sheppard, Lianne; Delaney, Martha A.; Griffith, William C.; Beyer, Richard P.; Zangar, Richard C.; Pounds, Joel G.; Faustman, Elaine M.; Kavanagh, Terrance J.

    2015-01-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) are engineered semiconductor nanoparticles with unique physicochemical properties that make them potentially useful in clinical, research and industrial settings. However, a growing body of evidence indicates that like other engineered nanomaterials, QDs have the potential to be respiratory hazards, especially in the context of the manufacture of QDs and products containing them, as well as exposures to consumers using these products. The overall goal of this study was to investigate the role of mouse strain in determining susceptibility to QD-induced pulmonary inflammation and toxicity. Male mice from 8 genetically diverse inbred strains (the Collaborative Cross founder strains) were exposed to CdSe–ZnS core–shell QDs stabilized with an amphiphilic polymer. QD treatment resulted in significant increases in the percentage of neutrophils and levels of cytokines present in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) obtained from NOD/ShiLtJ and NZO/HlLtJ mice relative to their saline (Sal) treated controls. Cadmium measurements in lung tissue indicated strain-dependent differences in disposition of QDs in the lung. Total glutathione levels in lung tissue were significantly correlated with percent neutrophils in BALF as well as with lung tissue Cd levels. Our findings indicate that QD-induced acute lung inflammation is mouse strain dependent, that it is heritable, and that the choice of mouse strain is an important consideration in planning QD toxicity studies. These data also suggest that formal genetic analyses using additional strains or recombinant inbred strains from these mice could be useful for discovering potential QD-induced inflammation susceptibility loci. PMID:26476918

  18. The Significance of Genetic Polymorphisms within and between Founder Populations of Ceratitis capitata (Wied.) from Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Basso, Alicia; Martinez, Laura; Manso, Fanny

    2009-01-01

    Background The Mediterranean fruit fly Ceratitis Capitata (DIPTERA: Tephritidae) is a major agricultural pest in Argentina. One main cause for the success of non-contaminant control programs based on genetic strategies is compatibility between natural and laboratory germplasms. A comprehensive characterization of the fruit fly based on genetic studies and compatibility analysis was undertaken on two founder populations from the provinces of Buenos Aires and Mendoza, used in pioneering sterile male technique control programmes in our country. The locations are 1,000 km apart from each other. Methodology/Principal Findings We compared the genetic composition of both populations based on cytological, physiological and morphological characterization. Compatibility studies were performed in order to determine the presence of isolation barriers. Results indicate that the Buenos Aires germplasm described previously is partially different from that of the Mendoza population. Both laboratory colonies are a reservoir of mutational and cytological polymorphisms. Some sexual chromosome variants such as the XL and the YL resulting from attachment of a B-chromosome to the X-chromosome or Y-chromosome behave as a lethal sex-linked factor. Our results also show incompatibility between both germplasms and pre-zygotic isolation barriers between them. Our evidence is consistent with the fact that polymorphisms are responsible for the lack of compatibility. Conclusions The genetic control mechanism should be directly produced in the germplasm of the target population in order to favour mating conditions. This is an additional requirement for the biological as well as economic success of control programs based on genetic strategies such as the sterile insect technique. The analysis of representative samples also revealed natural auto-control mechanisms which could be used in modifying pest population dynamics. PMID:19252742

  19. Tissue-specific responses to the LRPPRC founder mutation in French Canadian Leigh Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sasarman, Florin; Nishimura, Tamiko; Antonicka, Hana; Weraarpachai, Woranontee; Shoubridge, Eric A.; Allen, Bruce; Burelle, Yan; Charron, Guy; Coderre, Lise; DesRosiers, Christine; Laprise, Catherine; Morin, Charles; Rioux, John; Shoubridge, Eric A.

    2015-01-01

    French Canadian Leigh Syndrome (LSFC) is an early-onset, progressive neurodegenerative disorder with a distinct pattern of tissue involvement. Most cases are caused by a founder missense mutation in LRPPRC. LRPPRC forms a ribonucleoprotein complex with SLIRP, another RNA-binding protein, and this stabilizes polyadenylated mitochondrial mRNAs. LSFC fibroblasts have reduced levels of LRPPRC and a specific complex IV assembly defect; however, further depletion of mutant LRPPRC results in a complete failure to assemble a functional oxidative phosphorylation system, suggesting that LRPPRC levels determine the nature of the biochemical phenotype. We tested this hypothesis in cultured muscle cells and tissues from LSFC patients. LRPPRC levels were reduced in LSFC muscle cells, resulting in combined complex I and IV deficiencies. A similar combined deficiency was observed in skeletal muscle. Complex IV was only moderately reduced in LSFC heart, but was almost undetectable in liver. Both of these tissues showed elevated levels of complexes I and III. Despite the marked biochemical differences, the steady-state levels of LRPPRC and mitochondrial mRNAs were extremely low, LRPPRC was largely detergent-insoluble, and SLIRP was undetectable in all LSFC tissues. The level of the LRPPRC/SLIRP complex appeared much reduced in control tissues by the first dimension blue-native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (BN-PAGE) analysis compared with fibroblasts, and even by second dimension analysis it was virtually undetectable in control heart. These results point to tissue-specific pathways for the post-transcriptional handling of mitochondrial mRNAs and suggest that the biochemical defects in LSFC reflect the differential ability of tissues to adapt to the mutation. PMID:25214534

  20. Contribution of HPC1 (RNASEL) and HPCX variants to prostate cancer in a founder population.

    PubMed

    Agalliu, Ilir; Leanza, Suzanne M; Smith, Lorie; Trent, Jeffrey M; Carpten, John D; Bailey-Wilson, Joan E; Burk, Robert D

    2010-11-01

    Prostate cancer is a genetically complex disease with locus and disease heterogeneity. The RNASEL gene and HPCX locus have been implicated in hereditary prostate cancer; however, their contributions to sporadic forms of this malignancy remain uncertain. Associations of prostate cancer with two variants in the RNASEL gene (a founder mutation, 471delAAAG, and a non-synonymous SNP, rs486907), and with five microsatellite markers in the HPCX locus, were examined in 979 cases and 1,251 controls of Ashkenazi Jewish descent. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using logistic regression models. There was an inverse association between RNASEL rs486907 and prostate cancer in younger men (<65 years) and those with a first-degree relative with prostate cancer; men with AA genotype had ORs of 0.64 and 0.47 (both P < 0.05), respectively, in comparison to men with GG genotype. Within the HPCX region, there were positive associations for allele 135 of bG82i1.1 marker (OR = 1.77, P = 0.01) and allele 188 of DXS1205 (OR = 1.65, P = 0.02). In addition, allele 248 of marker D33 was inversely associated (OR = 0.65, P = 0.05) with Gleason score ≥7 tumors. Results suggest that variants in RNASEL contribute to susceptibility to early onset and familial forms of prostate cancer, whereas HPCX variants are associated with prostate cancer risk and tumor aggressiveness. The observation that a mutation predicted to completely inactivate RNASEL protein was not associated with prostate cancer, but that a missense variant was associated, suggests that the effect is due to either partial inactivation of the protein, and/or acquisition of a new protein activity.

  1. Contribution of HPC1 (RNASEL) and HPCX variants to prostate cancer in a founder population

    PubMed Central

    Agalliu, Ilir; Leanza, Suzanne M.; Smith, Lorrie; Trent, Jeffrey M.; Carpten, John D.; Bailey-Wilson, Joan E.; Burk, Robert D.

    2012-01-01

    Background Prostate cancer is a genetically complex disease with locus and disease heterogeneity. The RNASEL gene and HPCX locus have been implicated in hereditary prostate cancer; however, their contributions to sporadic forms of this malignancy remain uncertain. Methods Associations of prostate cancer with two variants in the RNASEL gene (a founder mutation, 471delAAAG, and a non-synonymous SNP, rs486907), and with five microsatellite markers in the HPCX locus, were examined in 979 cases and 1,251 controls of Ashkenazi Jewish descent. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using logistic regression models. Results There was an inverse association between RNASEL rs486907 and prostate cancer in younger men (<65 years) and those with a first-degree relative with prostate cancer; men with AA genotype had ORs of 0.64 and 0.47 (both p<0.05), respectively, in comparison to men with GG genotype. Within the HPCX region, there were positive associations for allele 135 of bG82i1.1 marker (OR=1.77, p=0.01) and allele 188 of DXS1205 (OR=1.65, p=0.02). In addition, allele 248 of marker D33 was inversely associated (OR=0.65, p=0.05) with Gleason score ≥7 tumors. Conclusions Results suggest that variants in RNASEL contribute to susceptibility to early onset and familial forms of prostate cancer, whereas HPCX variants are associated with prostate cancer risk and tumor aggressiveness. The observation that a mutation predicted to completely inactivate RNASEL protein was not associated with prostate cancer, but that a missense variant was associated, suggests that the effect is due to either partial inactivation of the protein, and/or acquisition of a new protein activity. PMID:20564318

  2. Master John of Arderne (1307-1380): a founder of modern surgery.

    PubMed

    Pearn, John

    2012-01-01

    John of Arderne (1307-1380) was one founder of surgery as the profession is known today. He was the first English surgeon of whom biographic details survive. Born on the Arderne Estates at Newark, England, he served as a military surgeon in France in campaigns where gunpowder was used in combat for the first time. His best-known work, the Practica (De Arte Phisicali et de Cirurgia), formed the basis of practical surgical teaching in the medical schools of medieval Europe. Biographic research of primary and secondary archives and documents. John of Arderne's surgical practice was undertaken against a background of turbulent political, military and medical events. He survived the Black Death (1347) and its cyclical recurrences. He lived through the turbulent reigns of Edward II and Edward III and practised in London in the decades preceding the simmering unrest which preceded the Peasant's Revolt of 1381. Surgical and medical practice in the late Middle Ages was enmeshed in astrological beliefs. It was greatly influenced by church doctrine of disease causation. In this paper, the known details of John of Arderne's life are placed in the perspective of these societal and professional influences. He is one of several pre-Renaissance European doctors who were the first to challenge the received medical lore of Galen and later Arabic surgeons. Writing when he was 70 years of age, John of Arderne was the first to advocate that surgeons should trust their own clinical experience 'Wele ymagynyng subtile things' rather than following the directions of others, even including those advocated by himself. © 2011 The Author. ANZ Journal of Surgery © 2011 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  3. Counting the Founders: The Matrilineal Genetic Ancestry of the Jewish Diaspora

    PubMed Central

    Behar, Doron M.; Metspalu, Ene; Kivisild, Toomas; Rosset, Saharon; Tzur, Shay; Hadid, Yarin; Yudkovsky, Guennady; Rosengarten, Dror; Pereira, Luisa; Amorim, Antonio; Kutuev, Ildus; Gurwitz, David; Bonne-Tamir, Batsheva; Villems, Richard; Skorecki, Karl

    2008-01-01

    The history of the Jewish Diaspora dates back to the Assyrian and Babylonian conquests in the Levant, followed by complex demographic and migratory trajectories over the ensuing millennia which pose a serious challenge to unraveling population genetic patterns. Here we ask whether phylogenetic analysis, based on highly resolved mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) phylogenies can discern among maternal ancestries of the Diaspora. Accordingly, 1,142 samples from 14 different non-Ashkenazi Jewish communities were analyzed. A list of complete mtDNA sequences was established for all variants present at high frequency in the communities studied, along with high-resolution genotyping of all samples. Unlike the previously reported pattern observed among Ashkenazi Jews, the numerically major portion of the non-Ashkenazi Jews, currently estimated at 5 million people and comprised of the Moroccan, Iraqi, Iranian and Iberian Exile Jewish communities showed no evidence for a narrow founder effect, which did however characterize the smaller and more remote Belmonte, Indian and the two Caucasus communities. The Indian and Ethiopian Jewish sample sets suggested local female introgression, while mtDNAs in all other communities studied belong to a well-characterized West Eurasian pool of maternal lineages. Absence of sub-Saharan African mtDNA lineages among the North African Jewish communities suggests negligible or low level of admixture with females of the host populations among whom the African haplogroup (Hg) L0-L3 sub-clades variants are common. In contrast, the North African and Iberian Exile Jewish communities show influence of putative Iberian admixture as documented by mtDNA Hg HV0 variants. These findings highlight striking differences in the demographic history of the widespread Jewish Diaspora. PMID:18446216

  4. Comprehensive Characterization of the Transmitted/founder env Genes from a Single MSM Cohort in China

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yue; Li, Ning; Zhang, Tong; Huang, Xiaojie; Cai, Fangping; Vandergrift, Nathan; Xin, Ruolei; Meng, Zhefeng; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Jiang, Chunlai; Xu, Xiaoning; Montefiori, David C; Gao, Feng; Wu, Hao

    2015-01-01

    Background The men having sex with men (MSM) population has become one of major risk groups for HIV-1 infection in China. However, the epidemiological patterns, function of the env genes, and autologous and heterologous neutralization activity in the same MSM population have not been systematically characterized. Methods The env gene sequences were obtained by the single genome amplification (SGA). The time to the most recent common ancestor (tMRCA) was estimated for each genotype using the Bayesian MCMC approach. Coreceptor usage was determined in NP-2 cells. Neutralization was analyzed using Env pseudoviruses in TZM-bl cells. Results We have obtained 547 full-length env gene sequences by SGA from 30 acute/early HIV-1-infected individuals in the Beijing MSM cohort. Three genotypes (Subtype B, CRF01_AE, and CRF07_BC) were identified and 20% of the individuals were infected with multiple transmitted/founder (T/F) viruses. The tight clusters of the MSM sequences regardless of geographic origins indicated nearly exclusive transmission within the MSM population and limited number of introductions. The tMRCA for each genotype was 10-15 years after each was first introduced in China. Disparate preferences for coreceptor usages among three genotypes might lead to the changes in percentage of different genotypes in the MSM population over time. The genotype-matched and -mismatched neutralization activity varied among the three genotypes. Conclusions Identification of unique characteristics for transmission, coreceptor usage, neutralization profile and epidemic patterns of HIV-1 is critical for the better understanding of transmission mechanisms, development of preventive strategies, and evaluation of vaccine efficacy in the MSM population in China. PMID:25886933

  5. Foundering lithosphere triggers transient basins and backarc magmatism at subduction zones?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; Currie, C. A.; DeCelles, P. G.

    2015-12-01

    Many upper-plate processes at subduction zones cannot be directly explained by traditional subduction mechanisms. In the Central Andes, the crust is shortened and thickened by the subduction of Nazca plate, but the lower lithosphere is anomalously thin at present. Within the plateau, localized, transient basins have formed since the Miocene. These basins have experienced subsidence, internal shortening, and then inversion. One hypothesis is these basins are related to the formation and foundering of dense eclogite rocks in the lithosphere. Along the eastern plateau, there are sites of basaltic magmatism which show a gradual westward migration. Geochemistry studies suggest that these magmas are mainly caused by upwelling asthenosphere, indicating lithosphere thinning beneath this area. However, the magmas are landward of the basins, and therefore the formation and removal of the dense anomaly is spatially and temporally offset from the region of lithosphere thinning. In this study, 2D numerical models are used to investigate lithosphere removal within a subduction zone. A dense root is placed in lower crust of the upper plate to simulate the eclogitization process and initiate gravitational removal. The model evolves in three phases: 1) As the root becomes denser, the overlying surface subsides and a basin forms; 2) once the root is denser than mantle, it sinks and decouples from the upper plate. During this period, the basin inverts and uplifts. 3) Meanwhile, the mantle lithosphere landward of the root is sheared by the corner flow in the mantle wedge. As the lithosphere is carried trenchward, a gap forms at the landside of plateau which widens over time. Hot asthenosphere upwells to fill the gap and undergoes decompression melting. The model results are consistent with observations from the Central Andes and could have implications for other subduction regions with enigmatic transient basins and backarc magmatism, such as those in North America and Eastern China.

  6. A founder mutation in the CLCNKB gene causes Bartter syndrome type III in Spain.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Soriano, Juan; Vallo, Alfredo; Pérez de Nanclares, Gustavo; Bilbao, José Ramón; Castaño, Luis

    2005-07-01

    The term "Bartter syndrome" encompasses a group of closely related inherited tubulopathies characterized by markedly reduced NaCl transport by the distal nephron. At present, five different genetic variants have been demonstrated. The majority of patients with so-called classic Bartter syndrome carry inactivating mutations of the CLCNKB gene encoding the basolateral ClC-Kb chloride channel (Bartter syndrome type III). The purpose of this study was to investigate the underlying mutation in cases of classic Bartter syndrome followed at our center. Ten patients, including two sisters, with clinical and biochemical features of classic Bartter syndrome were included in the mutational analysis. They originated from different regions of Spain with either Basque or Spanish ancestry. There was no history of consanguineous marriage in any of the kindreds. The parents and siblings of each patient, as well as a population of 300 healthy control adult subjects, were also analyzed. All ten patients were found to be homozygous for an identical missense mutation in the CLCNKB gene, substituting a threonine for an alanine at codon 204 (A204T) in the putative fifth transmembrane domain of the protein. None of the 300 control subjects were homozygous for the A204T allele. Overall, the A204T mutation was detected on 2/600 control chromosomes. Despite sharing a common mutation, the clinical manifestations of the syndrome in the patients varied from lack of symptoms to severe growth retardation. Demonstration of a point mutation within the CLCNKB gene as the apparently unique cause of Bartter syndrome type III in Spain is highly suggestive of a founder effect. Our results also support the lack of correlation between genotype and phenotype in this disease.

  7. Myotonic dystrophy type 2: human founder haplotype and evolutionary conservation of the repeat tract.

    PubMed

    Liquori, Christina L; Ikeda, Yoshio; Weatherspoon, Marcy; Ricker, Kenneth; Schoser, Benedikt G H; Dalton, Joline C; Day, John W; Ranum, Laura P W

    2003-10-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (DM), the most common form of muscular dystrophy in adults, can be caused by a mutation on either chromosome 19 (DM1) or 3 (DM2). In 2001, we demonstrated that DM2 is caused by a CCTG expansion in intron 1 of the zinc finger protein 9 (ZNF9) gene. To investigate the ancestral origins of the DM2 expansion, we compared haplotypes for 71 families with genetically confirmed DM2, using 19 short tandem repeat markers that we developed that flank the repeat tract. All of the families are white, with the majority of Northern European/German descent and a single family from Afghanistan. Several conserved haplotypes spanning >700 kb appear to converge into a single haplotype near the repeat tract. The common interval that is shared by all families with DM2 immediately flanks the repeat, extending up to 216 kb telomeric and 119 kb centromeric of the CCTG expansion. The DM2 repeat tract contains the complex repeat motif (TG)(n)(TCTG)(n)(CCTG)(n). The CCTG portion of the repeat tract is interrupted on normal alleles, but, as in other expansion disorders, these interruptions are lost on affected alleles. We examined haplotypes of 228 control chromosomes and identified a potential premutation allele with an uninterrupted (CCTG)(20) on a haplotype that was identical to the most common affected haplotype. Our data suggest that the predominant Northern European ancestry of families with DM2 resulted from a common founder and that the loss of interruptions within the CCTG portion of the repeat tract may predispose alleles to further expansion. To gain insight into possible function of the repeat tract, we looked for evolutionary conservation. The complex repeat motif and flanking sequences within intron 1 are conserved among human, chimpanzee, gorilla, mouse, and rat, suggesting a conserved biological function.

  8. HIV competition dynamics over sexual networks: first comer advantage conserves founder effects.

    PubMed

    Ferdinandy, Bence; Mones, Enys; Vicsek, Tamás; Müller, Viktor

    2015-02-01

    Outside Africa, the global phylogeography of HIV is characterized by compartmentalized local epidemics that are typically dominated by a single subtype, which indicates strong founder effects. We hypothesized that the competition of viral strains at the epidemic level may involve an advantage of the resident strain that was the first to colonize a population. Such an effect would slow down the invasion of new strains, and thus also the diversification of the epidemic. We developed a stochastic modelling framework to simulate HIV epidemics over dynamic contact networks. We simulated epidemics in which the second strain was introduced into a population where the first strain had established a steady-state epidemic, and assessed whether, and on what time scale, the second strain was able to spread in the population. Simulations were parameterized based on empirical data; we tested scenarios with varying levels of overall prevalence. The spread of the second strain occurred on a much slower time scale compared with the initial expansion of the first strain. With strains of equal transmission efficiency, the second strain was unable to invade on a time scale relevant for the history of the HIV pandemic. To become dominant over a time scale of decades, the second strain needed considerable (>25%) advantage in transmission efficiency over the resident strain. The inhibition effect was weaker if the second strain was introduced while the first strain was still in its growth phase. We also tested how possible mechanisms of interference (inhibition of superinfection, depletion of highly connected hubs in the network, one-time acute peak of infectiousness) contribute to the inhibition effect. Our simulations confirmed a strong first comer advantage in the competition dynamics of HIV at the population level, which may explain the global phylogeography of the virus and may influence the future evolution of the pandemic.

  9. [Edward Wilhelm Drescher--the founder of pediatric surgery in West Pomerania].

    PubMed

    Pacanowski, J H

    1999-01-01

    Professor Edward Wilhelm Drescher--an eminent Polish pediatric surgeon and pioneer of this specialization in West Pomerania--was born in 1912 in Biłgoraj. His young years he spent in his parents familial town Kalisz, where he attended a very famous college--State Humanistic Grammar-School. In 1937 he graduated from Faculty of Medicine at the Warsaw University. Next year he started his career as a surgeon in the Surgery at Orthopedic Ward of Pediatric Clinic in Warsaw, which was directed by prof. Jan Kossakowski--excellent pediatric surgeon and artist. During the September Campaign he took part in the battle of Bzura and in the defense of Polish capital as the physician in the 25th Regiment of Artillery. In 1940 he joined Polish underground army--AK. In 1944, when the Warsaw Uprising broke out, he was the Commander of the insurgent hospital--Poznańska 11. It was a very well arranged and headed hospital, which admitted about eight hundred wounded soldiers and civilians. After the war for two years he lived in Sopot, where he organized and directed the Surgery Hospital and the Town Outpatients' Department. In 1947 he moved to Szczecin, where he arranged the first ward of pediatric surgery in West Pomerania (in Polish Red Cross hospital). Ten years later he was nominated the head of the Clinic of Pediatric Surgery in the Pomeranian Medical Academy in Szczecin. For many years Prof. Drescher was provincial and regional consultant. He helped to organize a few pediatric surgery wards in Pomerania (Koszalin, Gorzów Wlkp., Słupsk). He died in 1977 in Warsaw. Prof. Drescher published almost 80 scientific papers including two medical books. Traumatology of children and the newborn surgery became his principal area of interest. He was the author of Code of the Ethical and Moral Procedure of the Polish Medical Society. For almost twenty years he was co-author the Annales of Pomeranian Medical Academy. He was a co-founder, next was a president of the Polish Association of

  10. Origin and number of founders in an introduced insular primate: estimation from nuclear genetic data.

    PubMed

    Bonhomme, M; Blancher, A; Cuartero, S; Chikhi, L; Crouau-Roy, B

    2008-02-01

    Cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis) were introduced on the island of Mauritius between 400 and 500 years ago and underwent a strong population expansion after a probable initial founding event. However, in practice, little is known of the geographical origin of the individuals that colonized the island, on how many individuals were introduced, and of whether the following demographic expansion erased any signal of this putative bottleneck. In this study, we asked whether the current nuclear genome of the Mauritius population retained a signature that would allow us to answer these questions. Altogether, 21 polymorphic autosomal and sex-linked microsatellites were surveyed from 81 unrelated Mauritius individuals and 173 individuals from putative geographical sources in Southeast Asia: Java, the Philippines islands and the Indochinese peninsula. We found that (i) the Mauritius population was closer to different populations depending on the markers we used, which suggests a possible mixed origin with Java playing most probably a major role; and (ii) the level of diversity was lower than the other populations but there was no clear and consistent bottleneck signal using either summary statistics or full-likelihood methods. However, summary statistics strongly suggest that Mauritius is not at mutation-drift equilibrium and favours an expansion rather than a bottleneck. This suggests that on a short time scale, population decline followed by growth can be difficult to deduce from genetic data based on mutation-drift theory. We then used a simple Bayesian rejection algorithm to estimate the number of founders under different demographic models (exponential, logistic and logistic with lag) and pure genetic drift. This new method uses current population size estimates and expected heterozygosity of Mauritius and source population(s). Our results indicate that a simple exponential growth is unlikely and that, under the logistic models, the population may have expanded

  11. [Professor Adam Nowosławski (1925-2012)--founder of the Polish School of Immunopathology].

    PubMed

    Madaliński, Kazimierz

    2012-01-01

    Professor dr med. Adam Nowosławski, has died at age of 87, on February 3, 2012, the founder of the Polish school of immunopathology, member of Polish Academy of Sciences and of Polish Academy of Art and Sciences. Professor was born on April 30, 1925 in Rzeszów (SE Poland). During the Second World War he took part in the anti-nazi resistance movement; he was the soldier of the 'Baszta' regiment of the Home Army. Subsequently, he was imprisoned in the Pawiak and concentration camps: Majdanek and Buchenwald. The medical studies he has completed at Warsaw Medical Academy between 1946-1951. The degree of doctor of medicine Prof. Adam Nowosławski has obtained in 1963, habilitation degree in the field of immunopathology--in 1966; the title of Professor he has obtained in 1980. His scientific achievements consist of 170 publications, including 101 original papers. His publications were quoted in several American books for students and physicians. Topics of his early papers concerned the immunopatogenesis ofPneumocystis carinii--induced pneumonia in premature babies, immunopatogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis, and the origin of rheumatoid factor. The enormous role in the field of hepatology played research on the virus of hepatitis B. These studies dealt with the discovery of HB core antigen which had the cellular localization different from HB surface antigen and with the parameters of the immune response to infection. Papers published on this topic were the mostly quoted in the literature and earned him national awards. The activity of Prof. Adam Nowosławski in the field of HIV/AIDS prevention was honored by the special prize of the Minister of Health. Professor was the honorary member of the two Societies: Polish Society of Pathologists and Polish Society of Hepatology. He was also the member of International Association for the Study of the Liver and International Academy of Pathology. Prof. Adam Nowosławski received the national medals: Polonia Restituta Crosses

  12. Microsatellites haplotyping of CF chromosomes shows linkage disequilibrium and several founder effects in Brittany (France)

    SciTech Connect

    Raguenes, O.; Ferec, C.; Mercier, B.

    1994-09-01

    A large study on cystic fibrosis (CF) is underway in Brittany (France). It is based on 902 CF patients distributed in 795 families who were or are still followed at the {open_quotes}Centre Helio-Marin{close_quotes} in Roscoff and/or were subjected to a molecular analysis at the {open_quotes}Centre de Biogenetique{close_quotes} in Brest. At present, the CF mutations have been identified in 309 patients born in Brittany, most of them of Celtic origin. A microsatellite (MS) study using IVS 17b TA, IVS 17b CA and IVS 8 CA was also completed in 63 CF patients and their parents (carriers of the {Delta}F508 mutation or the G551D mutation or the 1078delT mutation or the W846X mutation). All the 21 chromosomes carrying the 1078delT mutation had the same MS haplotype (16-21-13), which was also found on 9 of the 83 non-CF chromosomes analyzed. All the 16 chromosomes with the G551D mutation carried another MS haplotype (16-7-17), which was also found on 13.3% of the non-CF chromosomes. All the 6 chromosomes with the W846X mutation carried the 16-32-13 haplotype, also found on 6.0% of the non-CF chromosomes. Sixteen different MS haplotypes were found among the 74 chromosomes carrying the{Delta}F508 mutation, three of them representing 74.3% (55/74) of the chromosomes. These were the 23-31-13 haplotype (31/74 - 41.9%), the 17-31-13 haplotype (11/74 - 14.9%), and the 17-32-13 haplotype (13/74 - 17.6%). These results show that the CF mutations observed in Brittany are in linkage disequilibrium with the MS haplotypes. They also suggest that their presence in Brittany is the consequence of several founder effects.

  13. Identification of novel BRCA founder mutations in Middle Eastern breast cancer patients using capture and Sanger sequencing analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bu, Rong; Siraj, Abdul K.; Al‐Obaisi, Khadija A.S.; Beg, Shaham; Al Hazmi, Mohsen; Ajarim, Dahish; Tulbah, Asma; Al‐Dayel, Fouad

    2016-01-01

    Ethnic differences of breast cancer genomics have prompted us to investigate the spectra of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in different populations. The prevalence and effect of BRCA 1 and BRCA 2 mutations in Middle Eastern population is not fully explored. To characterize the prevalence of BRCA mutations in Middle Eastern breast cancer patients, BRCA mutation screening was performed in 818 unselected breast cancer patients using Capture and/or Sanger sequencing. 19 short tandem repeat (STR) markers were used for founder mutation analysis. In our study, nine different types of deleterious mutation were identified in 28 (3.4%) cases, 25 (89.3%) cases in BRCA 1 and 3 (10.7%) cases in BRCA 2. Seven recurrent mutations identified accounted for 92.9% (26/28) of all the mutant cases. Haplotype analysis was performed to confirm c.1140 dupG and c.4136_4137delCT mutations as novel putative founder mutation, accounting for 46.4% (13/28) of all BRCA mutant cases and 1.6% (13/818) of all the breast cancer cases, respectively. Moreover, BRCA 1 mutation was significantly associated with BRCA 1 protein expression loss (p = 0.0005). Our finding revealed that a substantial number of BRCA mutations were identified in clinically high risk breast cancer from Middle East region. Identification of the mutation spectrum, prevalence and founder effect in Middle Eastern population facilitates genetic counseling, risk assessment and development of cost‐effective screening strategy. PMID:27082205

  14. The Expression of TALEN before Fertilization Provides a Rapid Knock-Out Phenotype in Xenopus laevis Founder Embryos.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Kei; Suzuki, Ken-Ichi T; Suzuki, Miyuki; Sakane, Yuto; Sakuma, Tetsushi; Herberg, Sarah; Simeone, Angela; Simpson, David; Jullien, Jerome; Yamamoto, Takashi; Gurdon, J B

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in genome editing using programmable nucleases have revolutionized gene targeting in various organisms. Successful gene knock-out has been shown in Xenopus, a widely used model organism, although a system enabling less mosaic knock-out in founder embryos (F0) needs to be explored in order to judge phenotypes in the F0 generation. Here, we injected modified highly active transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) mRNA to oocytes at the germinal vesicle (GV) stage, followed by in vitro maturation and intracytoplasmic sperm injection, to achieve a full knock-out in F0 embryos. Unlike conventional injection methods to fertilized embryos, the injection of TALEN mRNA into GV oocytes allows expression of nucleases before fertilization, enabling them to work from an earlier stage. Using this procedure, most of developed embryos showed full knock-out phenotypes of the pigmentation gene tyrosinase and/or embryonic lethal gene pax6 in the founder generation. In addition, our method permitted a large 1 kb deletion. Thus, we describe nearly complete gene knock-out phenotypes in Xenopus laevis F0 embryos. The presented method will help to accelerate the production of knock-out frogs since we can bypass an extra generation of about 1 year in Xenopus laevis. Meantime, our method provides a unique opportunity to rapidly test the developmental effects of disrupting those genes that do not permit growth to an adult able to reproduce. In addition, the protocol shown here is considerably less invasive than the previously used host transfer since our protocol does not require surgery. The experimental scheme presented is potentially applicable to other organisms such as mammals and fish to resolve common issues of mosaicism in founders.

  15. Identification of novel BRCA founder mutations in Middle Eastern breast cancer patients using capture and Sanger sequencing analysis.

    PubMed

    Bu, Rong; Siraj, Abdul K; Al-Obaisi, Khadija A S; Beg, Shaham; Al Hazmi, Mohsen; Ajarim, Dahish; Tulbah, Asma; Al-Dayel, Fouad; Al-Kuraya, Khawla S

    2016-09-01

    Ethnic differences of breast cancer genomics have prompted us to investigate the spectra of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in different populations. The prevalence and effect of BRCA 1 and BRCA 2 mutations in Middle Eastern population is not fully explored. To characterize the prevalence of BRCA mutations in Middle Eastern breast cancer patients, BRCA mutation screening was performed in 818 unselected breast cancer patients using Capture and/or Sanger sequencing. 19 short tandem repeat (STR) markers were used for founder mutation analysis. In our study, nine different types of deleterious mutation were identified in 28 (3.4%) cases, 25 (89.3%) cases in BRCA 1 and 3 (10.7%) cases in BRCA 2. Seven recurrent mutations identified accounted for 92.9% (26/28) of all the mutant cases. Haplotype analysis was performed to confirm c.1140 dupG and c.4136_4137delCT mutations as novel putative founder mutation, accounting for 46.4% (13/28) of all BRCA mutant cases and 1.6% (13/818) of all the breast cancer cases, respectively. Moreover, BRCA 1 mutation was significantly associated with BRCA 1 protein expression loss (p = 0.0005). Our finding revealed that a substantial number of BRCA mutations were identified in clinically high risk breast cancer from Middle East region. Identification of the mutation spectrum, prevalence and founder effect in Middle Eastern population facilitates genetic counseling, risk assessment and development of cost-effective screening strategy. © 2016 UICC.

  16. OPTN 691_692insAG is a founder mutation causing recessive ALS and increased risk in heterozygotes

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Orly; Nayshool, Omri; Nefussy, Beatrice; Traynor, Bryan J.; Renton, Alan E.; Gana-Weisz, Mali; Drory, Vivian E.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To detect genetic variants underlying familial and sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Methods: We analyzed 2 founder Jewish populations of Moroccan and Ashkenazi origins and ethnic matched controls. Exome sequencing of 2 sisters with ALS from Morocco was followed by genotyping the identified causative null mutation in 379 unrelated patients with ALS and 1,000 controls. The shared risk haplotype was characterized using whole-genome single nucleotide polymorphism array. Results: We identified 5 unrelated patients with ALS homozygous for the null 691_692insAG mutation in the optineurin gene (OPTN), accounting for 5.8% of ALS of Moroccan origin and 0.3% of Ashkenazi. We also identified a high frequency of heterozygous carriers among patients with ALS, 8.7% and 2.9%, respectively, compared to 0.75% and 1.0% in controls. The risk of carriers for ALS was significantly increased, with odds ratio of 13.46 and 2.97 in Moroccan and Ashkenazi Jews, respectively. We determined that 691_692insAG is a founder mutation in the tested populations with a minimal risk haplotype of 58.5 Kb, encompassing the entire OPTN gene. Conclusions: Our data show that OPTN 691_692insAG mutation is a founder mutation in Moroccan and Ashkenazi Jews. This mutation causes autosomal recessive ALS and significantly increases the risk to develop the disease in heterozygous carriers, suggesting both a recessive mode of inheritance and a dominant with incomplete penetrance. These data emphasize the important role of OPTN in ALS pathogenesis, and demonstrate the complex genetics of ALS, as the same mutation leads to different phenotypes and appears in 2 patterns of inheritance. PMID:26740678

  17. LTBP2 and CYP1B1 mutations and associated ocular phenotypes in the Roma/Gypsy founder population

    PubMed Central

    Azmanov, Dimitar N; Dimitrova, Stanislava; Florez, Laura; Cherninkova, Sylvia; Draganov, Dragomir; Morar, Bharti; Saat, Rosmawati; Juan, Manel; Arostegui, Juan I; Ganguly, Sriparna; Soodyall, Himla; Chakrabarti, Subhabrata; Padh, Harish; López-Nevot, Miguel A; Chernodrinska, Violeta; Anguelov, Botio; Majumder, Partha; Angelova, Lyudmila; Kaneva, Radka; Mackey, David A; Tournev, Ivailo; Kalaydjieva, Luba

    2011-01-01

    Primary congenital glaucoma (PCG) is a genetically heterogeneous autosomal recessive disorder, which is an important cause of blindness in childhood. The first known gene, CYP1B1, accounts for a variable proportion of cases in most populations. A second gene, LTBP2, was recently reported in association with a syndrome, in which glaucoma is secondary to lens dislocation. We report on the molecular and clinical profile of 34 families diagnosed as PCG, all originating from the Roma/Gypsy founder population. Comprehensive sequencing analysis revealed a level of heterogeneity unusual for this population, with five CYP1B1 and one ancestral LTBP2 mutation accounting for ∼70% of patients (25 out of 37) and the remainder still unexplained. Homozygosity for the founder LTBP2 p.R299X mutation resulted in a more severe clinical phenotype and poorer outcome despite a markedly higher number of surgical interventions. The genetically homogeneous group of p.R299X homozygotes showed variable phenotypes (presumably also underlying pathogenetic mechanisms), wherein PCG proper with primary dysgenesis of the trabecular meshwork, and Marfan syndrome-like zonular disease with ectopia lentis and later onset secondary glaucoma are two extremes. The spectrum manifestations may occur in different combinations and have a different evolution even within the same sibship or a single patient. Preliminary observations on compounds with mutations in both CYP1B1-LTBP2 suggest that the observed combinations are of no clinical significance and digenic inheritance is unlikely. We provide a population genetics perspective to explain the allelic heterogeneity, comparing the history and geographic distribution of the two major founder mutations – p.R299X/LTBP2 and p.E387K/CYP1B1. PMID:21081970

  18. [Shestov V I--the founder of the Department of Organisation and tactics of the naval medical services].

    PubMed

    Chernikov, O G; Chernyĭ, V S; Mishin, Iu A; Soshkin, P A

    2014-11-01

    Vasilii Ivanovich Shestov during the Great Patriotic War performed various tasks concerning the organization of medical support in the Leningrad naval base, consulted on an issue of production and use of hospital and medical transport ships, worked on the organization of medical support in Schliessburg and etc. Shestov performed a considerable amount of research and methodological works concerning the establishment of the discipline "Organisation of naval medical support". He is considered as one of the founders of the theory of naval medical evacuation support.

  19. Mutations in COL27A1 cause Steel syndrome and suggest a founder mutation effect in the Puerto Rican population

    PubMed Central

    Gonzaga-Jauregui, Claudia; Gamble, Candace N; Yuan, Bo; Penney, Samantha; Jhangiani, Shalini; Muzny, Donna M; Gibbs, Richard A; Lupski, James R; Hecht, Jacqueline T

    2015-01-01

    Osteochondrodysplasias represent a large group of developmental structural disorders that can be caused by mutations in a variety of genes responsible for chondrocyte development, differentiation, mineralization and early ossification. The application of whole-exome sequencing to disorders apparently segregating as Mendelian traits has proven to be an effective approach to disease gene identification for conditions with unknown molecular etiology. We identified a homozygous missense variant p.(Gly697Arg) in COL27A1, in a family with Steel syndrome and no consanguinity. Interestingly, the identified variant seems to have arisen as a founder mutation in the Puerto Rican population. PMID:24986830

  20. Mutations in COL27A1 cause Steel syndrome and suggest a founder mutation effect in the Puerto Rican population.

    PubMed

    Gonzaga-Jauregui, Claudia; Gamble, Candace N; Yuan, Bo; Penney, Samantha; Jhangiani, Shalini; Muzny, Donna M; Gibbs, Richard A; Lupski, James R; Hecht, Jacqueline T

    2015-03-01

    Osteochondrodysplasias represent a large group of developmental structural disorders that can be caused by mutations in a variety of genes responsible for chondrocyte development, differentiation, mineralization and early ossification. The application of whole-exome sequencing to disorders apparently segregating as Mendelian traits has proven to be an effective approach to disease gene identification for conditions with unknown molecular etiology. We identified a homozygous missense variant p.(Gly697Arg) in COL27A1, in a family with Steel syndrome and no consanguinity. Interestingly, the identified variant seems to have arisen as a founder mutation in the Puerto Rican population.

  1. William Cooke MD MRCS (1785-1873) - General Practitioner, Founder of the Hunterian Society and Deacon of the Congregational Church.

    PubMed

    Selley, Peter

    2015-12-21

    Farmer's son William Cooke completed his medical training at Barts before embarking on a 60-year career as a general practitioner in and around London. In 1819, he was a co-founder, and for 20 years secretary, of the Hunterian Society which continues to provide education to its members. He was the author of several books where his views on the importance of post-mortem examinations and the interrelationships of body and mind in disease were discussed. He was a prominent non-conformist and became a deacon in the Congregational Church. He died in 1873, aged 87.

  2. Genome-Wide SNP and STR Discovery in the Japanese Crested Ibis and Genetic Diversity among Founders of the Japanese Population

    PubMed Central

    Taniguchi, Yukio; Matsuda, Hirokazu; Yamada, Takahisa; Sugiyama, Toshie; Homma, Kosuke; Kaneko, Yoshinori; Yamagishi, Satoshi; Iwaisaki, Hiroaki

    2013-01-01

    The Japanese crested ibis is an internationally conserved, critically threatened bird. Captive-breeding programs have been established to conserve this species in Japan. Since the current Japanese population of crested ibis originates only from 5 founders donated by the Chinese government, understanding the genetic diversity between them is critical for an effective population management. To discover genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and short tandem repeats (STRs) while obtaining genotype data of these polymorphic markers in each founder, reduced representation libraries were independently prepared from each of the founder genomes and sequenced on an Illumina HiSeq2000. This yielded 316 million 101-bp reads. Consensus sequences were created by clustering sequence reads, and then sequence reads from each founder were mapped to the consensus sequences, resulting in the detection of 52,512 putative SNPs and 162 putative STRs. The numbers of haplotypes and STR alleles and the investigation of genetic similarities suggested that the total genetic diversity between the founders was lower, although we could not identify a pair with closely related genome sequences. This study provided important insight into protocols for genetic management of the captive breeding population of Japanese crested ibis in Japan and towards the national project for reintroduction of captive-bred individuals into the wild. We proposed a simple, efficient, and cost-effective approach for simultaneous detection of genome-wide polymorphic markers and their genotypes for species currently lacking a reference genome sequence. PMID:23991150

  3. Nucleotide Variation, Linkage Disequilibrium and Founder-Facilitated Speciation in Wild Populations of the Zebra Finch (Taeniopygia guttata)

    PubMed Central

    Balakrishnan, Christopher N.; Edwards, Scott V.

    2009-01-01

    The zebra finch has long been an important model system for the study of vocal learning, vocal production, and behavior. With the imminent sequencing of its genome, the zebra finch is now poised to become a model system for population genetics. Using a panel of 30 noncoding loci, we characterized patterns of polymorphism and divergence among wild zebra finch populations. Continental Australian populations displayed little population structure, exceptionally high levels of nucleotide diversity (π = 0.010), a rapid decay of linkage disequilibrium (LD), and a high population recombination rate (ρ ≈ 0.05), all of which suggest an open and fluid genomic background that could facilitate adaptive variation. By contrast, substantial divergence between the Australian and Lesser Sunda Island populations (KST = 0.193), reduced genetic diversity (π = 0.002), and higher levels of LD in the island population suggest a strong but relatively recent founder event, which may have contributed to speciation between these populations as envisioned under founder-effect speciation models. Consistent with this hypothesis, we find that under a simple quantitative genetic model both drift and selection could have contributed to the observed divergence in six quantitative traits. In both Australian and Lesser Sundas populations, diversity in Z-linked loci was significantly lower than in autosomal loci. Our analysis provides a quantitative framework for studying the role of selection and drift in shaping patterns of molecular evolution in the zebra finch genome. PMID:19047416

  4. A novel founder MYO15A frameshift duplication is the major cause of genetic hearing loss in Oman.

    PubMed

    Palombo, Flavia; Al-Wardy, Nadia; Ruscone, Guido Alberto Gnecchi; Oppo, Manuela; Kindi, Mohammed Nasser Al; Angius, Andrea; Al Lamki, Khalsa; Girotto, Giorgia; Giangregorio, Tania; Benelli, Matteo; Magi, Alberto; Seri, Marco; Gasparini, Paolo; Cucca, Francesco; Sazzini, Marco; Al Khabori, Mazin; Pippucci, Tommaso; Romeo, Giovanni

    2017-02-01

    The increased risk for autosomal recessive disorders is one of the most well-known medical implications of consanguinity. In the Sultanate of Oman, a country characterized by one of the highest rates of consanguineous marriages worldwide, prevalence of genetic hearing loss (GHL) is estimated to be 6/10 000. Families of GHL patients have higher consanguinity rates than the general Omani population, indicating a major role for recessive forms. Mutations in GJB2, the most commonly mutated GHL gene, have been sporadically described. We collected 97 DNA samples of GHL probands, affected/unaffected siblings and parents from 26 Omani consanguineous families. Analyzing a first family by whole-exome sequencing, we identified a novel homozygous frameshift duplication (c.1171_1177dupGCCATCT) in MYO15A, the gene linked to the deafness locus DFNB3. This duplication was then found in a total of 8/26 (28%) families, within a 849 kb founder haplotype. Reconstruction of haplotype structure at MYO15A surrounding genomic regions indicated that the founder haplotype branched out in the past two to three centuries from a haplotype present worldwide. The MYO15A duplication emerges as the major cause of GHL in Oman. These findings have major implications for the design of GHL diagnosis and prevention policies in Oman.

  5. Consanguinity and founder effect for Gaucher disease mutation G377S in a population from Tabuleiro do Norte, Northeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Chaves, R G; Pereira, L da Veiga; de Araújo, F T; Rozenberg, R; Carvalho, M D F; Coelho, J C; Michelin-Tirelli, K; Chaves, M de Freitas; Cavalcanti, G B

    2015-10-01

    Gaucher's disease (GD) is caused by a β-glucocerebrosidase deficiency, leading to the accumulation of glucocerebroside in the reticuloendothelial system. The prevalence of GD in Tabuleiro do Norte (TN) (1:4000) is the highest in Brazil. The purpose of this study was to present evidence of consanguinity and founder effect for the G377S mutation (c.1246G>A) among GD patients in TN based on enzyme, molecular and genealogical studies. Between March 2009 and December 2010, 131 subjects at risk for GD (GC in dried blood ≤2.19 nmol/h/ml) and 5 confirmed GD patients from the same community were submitted for molecular analysis to characterize the genetic profile of the population. Based on the enzymatic and molecular analysis, the subjects were classified into three categories: affected (n = 5), carrier (n = 20) and non-carrier (n = 111). All carriers were (G377S/wt). Affected subjects were homozygous (G377S/G377S). The identification of a single mutation in carriers and homozygotes from different generations, the history of the community and the genealogy study suggest that the high prevalence of GD in this population may be due to a combination of consanguinity and founder effect for the G377S mutation. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Fabry disease: Evidence for a regional founder effect of the GLA gene mutation 30delG in Brazilian patients.

    PubMed

    de Alencar, Dayse Oliveira; Netto, Cristina; Ashton-Prolla, Patricia; Giugliani, Roberto; Ribeiro-Dos-Santos, Ândrea; Pereira, Fernanda; Matte, Ursula; Santos, Ney; Santos, Sidney

    2014-01-01

    The Fabry disease is caused by mutations in the gene (GLA) that encodes the enzyme α-galactosidase A (α-Gal A). More than 500 pathologic variants of GLA have already been described, most of them are family-specific. In southern Brazil, a frequent single-base deletion (GLA 30delG) was identified among four families that do not recognize any common ancestral. In order to investigate the history of this mutation (investigate the founder effect, estimate the mutation age and the most likely source), six gene-flanking microsatellite markers of the X chromosome on the mutation carriers and their parents, 150 individuals from the same population and 300 individuals that compose the Brazilian parental populations (Europeans, Africans and Native Americans) were genotyped. A common haplotype to the four families was identified and characterized as founder. The age was estimated with two statistics software (DMLE 2.2 and ESTIAGE) that agreed with 11 to 12 generations old. This result indicates that the mutation GLA 30delG was originated from a single event on the X chromosome of a European immigrant, during the southern Brazil colonization between 1710 and 1740.

  7. Founder effect and ancestral origin of the spinocerebellar ataxia type 7 (SCA7) mutation in Mexican families.

    PubMed

    García-Velázquez, Lizbeth E; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel; Romero-Hidalgo, Sandra; Ochoa-Morales, Adriana; Martínez-Ruano, Leticia; Márquez-Luna, Carla; Acuña-Alonzo, Víctor; Villarreal-Molina, M Teresa; Alonso-Vilatela, M Elisa; Yescas-Gómez, Petra

    2014-03-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 7 (SCA7) is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by progressive cerebellar ataxia and macular degeneration causing progressive blindness. It accounts for 1 to 11.6 % of spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) cases worldwide and for 7.4 % of SCA7 cases in Mexico. We identified a cluster of SCA7 families who resided in a circumscribed area of Veracruz and investigated whether the high incidence of the disease in this region was due to a founder effect. A total of 181 individuals from 20 families were studied. Four microsatellite markers and one SNP flanking the ATNX7 gene were genotyped and the ancestral origin and local ancestry analysis of the SCA7 mutation were evaluated. Ninety individuals from 19 families had the SCA7 mutation; all were found to share a common haplotype, suggesting that the mutation in these families originated from a common ancestor. Ancestral origin and local ancestry analysis of SCA7 showed that the chromosomal segment containing the mutation was of European origin. We here present evidence strongly suggesting that the high frequency of SCA7 in Veracruz is due to a founder effect and that the mutation is most likely of European origin with greatest resemblance to the Finnish population.

  8. The MSH2 c.388_389del mutation shows a founder effect in Portuguese Lynch syndrome families.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, M; Pinto, C; Peixoto, A; Veiga, I; Mesquita, B; Henrique, R; Lopes, P; Sousa, O; Fragoso, M; Dias, L M; Baptista, M; Marinho, C; Mangold, E; Vaccaro, C; Evans, D G; Farrington, S; Dunlop, M G; Teixeira, M R

    2013-09-01

    The MSH2 c.388_389del mutation has occasionally been described in Lynch families worldwide. At the Portuguese Oncology Institute in Porto, Portugal, we have identified 16 seemingly unrelated families with this germline mutation. To evaluate if this alteration is a founder or a recurrent mutation we performed haplotype analysis in the 16 Portuguese index cases and 55 relatives, as well as in four index cases and 13 relatives reported from Germany, Scotland, England, and Argentina. In the Portuguese families we observed a shared haplotype of approximately 10 Mb and all were originated from the north of Portugal. These results suggest that this alteration is a founder mutation in Portugal with a relatively recent origin. In the reported families outside Portugal with this mutation different haplotype backgrounds were observed, supporting the hypothesis that it occurred de novo on multiple occasions. We also conclude that the high proportion of families with the MSH2 c.388_389del mutation indicates that screening for this alteration as a first step may be cost-effective in the genetic testing of Lynch syndrome suspects of Portuguese ancestry, especially those originating from the north of Portugal. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Genetic structure and parasitization-related ability divergence of a nematode fungal pathogen Hirsutella minnesotensis following founder effect in China.

    PubMed

    Shu, Chi; Jiang, Xianzhi; Cheng, Xiaoli; Wang, Niuniu; Chen, Senyu; Xiang, Meichun; Liu, Xingzhong

    2015-08-01

    The fungal parasitoid, Hirsutella minnesotensis, is a dominant parasitoid of the soybean cyst nematode, which is a destruction pest of soybean crops. We investigated population structure and parasitism pattern in samples of H. minnesotensis in China to reveal the spreading pattern of this fungal species and the underlying mechanism generating the parasitization-related ability variability in Chinese population. In cross-inoculation experiments using different combinations of H. minnesotensis and soybean cyst nematode samples from China, most H. minnesotensis isolates fitted the criterion for "local versus foreign" parasitism profile, exhibiting local adaptation pattern to the SCN host. However, the genetic analysis of the single nucleotide polymorphisms with clone-corrected samples based on ten DNA fragments in 56 isolates of H. minnesotensis from China revealed that the Chinese H. minnesotensis population was a clonal lineage that underwent a founder event. The results demonstrated that the Chinese H. minnesotensis population had generated parasitization-related ability diversity after a founder event through individual variation or phenotypic plasticity other than local adaptation. The rapid divergence of parasitization-related abilities with simple genetic structure in Chinese H. minnesotensis population indicates a fundamental potential for the establishment of invasive fungal species, which is a prerequisite for biological control agents. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. A Population-Based Study of Autosomal-Recessive Disease-Causing Mutations in a Founder Population

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Jessica X.; Ouwenga, Rebecca; Anderson, Rebecca L.; Waggoner, Darrel J.; Ober, Carole

    2012-01-01

    The decreasing cost of whole-genome and whole-exome sequencing has resulted in a renaissance for identifying Mendelian disease mutations, and for the first time it is possible to survey the distribution and characteristics of these mutations in large population samples. We conducted carrier screening for all autosomal-recessive (AR) mutations known to be present in members of a founder population and revealed surprisingly high carrier frequencies for many of these mutations. By utilizing the rich demographic, genetic, and phenotypic data available on these subjects and simulations in the exact pedigree that these individuals belong to, we show that the majority of mutations were most likely introduced into the population by a single founder and then drifted to the high carrier frequencies observed. We further show that although there is an increased incidence of AR diseases overall, the mean carrier burden is likely to be lower in the Hutterites than in the general population. Finally, on the basis of simulations, we predict the presence of 30 or more undiscovered recessive mutations among these subjects, and this would at least double the number of AR diseases that have been reported in this isolated population. PMID:22981120

  11. Megalencephalic leukoencephalopathy with cysts in twelve Egyptian patients: novel mutations in MLC1 and HEPACAM and a founder effect.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Salam, Ghada M H; Abdel-Hamid, Mohamed S; Ismail, Samira I; Hosny, Heba; Omar, Tarek; Effat, Laila; Aglan, Mona S; Temtamy, Samia A; Zaki, Maha S

    2016-10-01

    Two genes causing megalencephalic leukoencephalopathy with subcortical cysts (MLC) have been discovered so far. Here, we identified MLC1 and HEPACAM mutations in ten and two patients, respectively. The molecular results included an unreported inframe duplication mutation (c.929_930dupCTGCTG; p.L309dup) of MLC1 and a novel missense mutation c.293G>A (p.R98H) of HEPACAM. Further, the previously reported missense (c.278C>T; p.S93L) and the deletion/insertion (c.908_918delinsGCA; p.V303Gfs*96) were found in one and 8 patients (75 %), respectively. The 8 patients carrying the p.V303Gfs*96 shared a similar haplotype suggesting a founder effect. All mutations were in the homozygous state proving the autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. The core phenotype of macrocephaly, subcortical cysts and white matter appeared homogeneous although the patients differed in the onset, clinical course, disease severity and brain imaging findings. Our study expands the spectrum of mutations in MLC1 and HEPACAM and supports the genetic and clinical heterogeneity. Further, It confirms c.908_918delinsGCA (p.V303Gfs*96) as a founder mutation among Egyptian patients. This finding will contribute to provide targeted testing for this mutation in MLC patients in our population.

  12. Estimation of the Effective Number of Founders That Initiate an Infection after Aphid Transmission of a Multipartite Plant Virus ▿

    PubMed Central

    Betancourt, Mónica; Fereres, Alberto; Fraile, Aurora; García-Arenal, Fernando

    2008-01-01

    The fecundity of RNA viruses can be very high. Thus, it is often assumed that viruses have large populations, and RNA virus evolution has been mostly explained using purely deterministic models. However, population bottlenecks during the virus life cycle could result in effective population numbers being much smaller than reported censuses, and random genetic drift could be important in virus evolution. A step at which population bottlenecks may be severe is host-to-host transmission. We report here an estimate of the size of the population that starts a new infection when Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) is transmitted by the aphid Aphis gossypii, based on the segregation of two CMV genotypes in plants infected by aphids that acquired the virus from plants infected by both genotypes. Results show very small effective numbers of founders, between one and two, both in experiments in which the three-partite genome of CMV was aphid transmitted and in experiments in which a fourth RNA, CMV satellite RNA, was also transmitted. These numbers are very similar to those published for Potato virus Y, which has a monopartite genome and is transmitted by aphids according to a different mechanism than CMV. Thus, the number of genomic segments seems not to be a major determinant of the effective number of founders. Also, our results suggest that the occurrence of severe bottlenecks during horizontal transmission is general for viruses nonpersistently transmitted by aphids, indicating that random genetic drift should be considered when modeling virus evolution. PMID:18842732

  13. A founder large deletion mutation in Xeroderma pigmentosum-Variant form in Tunisia: implication for molecular diagnosis and therapy.

    PubMed

    Ben Rekaya, Mariem; Laroussi, Nadia; Messaoud, Olfa; Jones, Mariem; Jerbi, Manel; Naouali, Chokri; Bouyacoub, Yosra; Chargui, Mariem; Kefi, Rym; Fazaa, Becima; Boubaker, Mohamed Samir; Boussen, Hamouda; Mokni, Mourad; Abdelhak, Sonia; Zghal, Mohamed; Khaled, Aida; Yacoub-Youssef, Houda

    2014-01-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum Variant (XP-V) form is characterized by a late onset of skin symptoms. Our aim is the clinical and genetic investigations of XP-V Tunisian patients in order to develop a simple tool for early diagnosis. We investigated 16 suspected XP patients belonging to ten consanguineous families. Analysis of the POLH gene was performed by linkage analysis, long range PCR, and sequencing. Genetic analysis showed linkage to the POLH gene with a founder haplotype in all affected patients. Long range PCR of exon 9 to exon 11 showed a 3926 bp deletion compared to control individuals. Sequence analysis demonstrates that this deletion has occurred between two Alu-Sq2 repetitive sequences in the same orientation, respectively, in introns 9 and 10. We suggest that this mutation POLH NG_009252.1: g.36847_40771del3925 is caused by an equal crossover event that occurred between two homologous chromosomes at meiosis. These results allowed us to develop a simple test based on a simple PCR in order to screen suspected XP-V patients. In Tunisia, the prevalence of XP-V group seems to be underestimated and clinical diagnosis is usually later. Cascade screening of this founder mutation by PCR in regions with high frequency of XP provides a rapid and cost-effective tool for early diagnosis of XP-V in Tunisia and North Africa.

  14. Haplotype analysis reveals that the recurrent BRCA1 deletion of exons 23 and 24 is a Greek founder mutation.

    PubMed

    Apostolou, P; Pertesi, M; Aleporou-Marinou, V; Dimitrakakis, C; Papadimitriou, C; Razis, E; Christodoulou, C; Fountzilas, G; Yannoukakos, D; Konstantopoulou, I; Fostira, F

    2017-03-01

    A recurrent large genomic rearrangement (LGR) encompassing exons 23 and 24 of the BRCA1 gene has been identified in breast-ovarian cancer families of Greek origin. Its breakpoints have been determined as c.5406 + 664_*8273del11052 (RefSeq: NM_007294.3) and a diagnostic polymerase chain reaction (PCR) has been set up for rapid screening. In a series of 2,092 high-risk families completely screened for BRCA1 and BRCA2 germline mutations, we have found the deletion in 35 families (1.68%), representing 7.83% of the mutations identified in both genes and 10.3% of the total BRCA1 mutations. In order to characterize this deletion as a founder mutation, haplotype analysis was conducted in 60 carriers from 35 families, using three BRCA1 intragenic microsatellite markers and four markers surrounding the BRCA1 locus. Our results demonstrate a common shared core disease-associated haplotype of 2.89Mb. Our calculations estimate that the deletion has originated from a common ancestor 1450 years ago, which most probably inhabited the Asia Minor area. The particular (LGR) is the third mutation of such type that is proven to have a Greek founder effect in the Greek population, illustrating the necessity for LGRs testing in individuals of Greek descent. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Inbred Strain Variant Database (ISVdb): A Repository for Probabilistically Informed Sequence Differences Among the Collaborative Cross Strains and Their Founders

    PubMed Central

    Oreper, Daniel; Cai, Yanwei; Tarantino, Lisa M.; de Villena, Fernando Pardo-Manuel; Valdar, William

    2017-01-01

    The Collaborative Cross (CC) is a panel of recently established multiparental recombinant inbred mouse strains. For the CC, as for any multiparental population (MPP), effective experimental design and analysis benefit from detailed knowledge of the genetic differences between strains. Such differences can be directly determined by sequencing, but until now whole-genome sequencing was not publicly available for individual CC strains. An alternative and complementary approach is to infer genetic differences by combining two pieces of information: probabilistic estimates of the CC haplotype mosaic from a custom genotyping array, and probabilistic variant calls from sequencing of the CC founders. The computation for this inference, especially when performed genome-wide, can be intricate and time-consuming, requiring the researcher to generate nontrivial and potentially error-prone scripts. To provide standardized, easy-to-access CC sequence information, we have developed the Inbred Strain Variant Database (ISVdb). The ISVdb provides, for all the exonic variants from the Sanger Institute mouse sequencing dataset, direct sequence information for CC founders and, critically, the imputed sequence information for CC strains. Notably, the ISVdb also: (1) provides predicted variant consequence metadata; (2) allows rapid simulation of F1 populations; and (3) preserves imputation uncertainty, which will allow imputed data to be refined in the future as additional sequencing and genotyping data are collected. The ISVdb information is housed in an SQL database and is easily accessible through a custom online interface (http://isvdb.unc.edu), reducing the analytic burden on any researcher using the CC. PMID:28592645

  16. Revisiting MSUD in Portuguese Gypsies: evidence for a founder mutation and for a mutational hotspot within the BCKDHA gene.

    PubMed

    Quental, Sofia; Gusmão, Alfredo; Rodríguez-Pombo, Pilar; Ugarte, Magdalena; Vilarinho, Laura; Amorim, António; Prata, Maria J

    2009-05-01

    Maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder of branched-chain amino acid metabolism. In the context of the wide mutational spectrum known for this disease, a few common mutations have been described in populations where founder effects played a major role in modeling diversities. In Portugal, for instance, a high proportion of patients are of Gypsy origin and all share the same mutation (c.117delC-alpha; p.R40GfsX23), causing the neonatal severe form of MSUD. In this study, we used four microsatellite markers closely flanking the BCKDHA gene (E1alpha protein) to demonstrate that c.117delC-alpha is a founder mutation responsible for the high incidence of the disorder among Portuguese Gypsies. These results are of medical relevance since carrier tests and prenatal diagnosis can be offered to families at risk, particularly because the carrier frequency of c.117delC-alpha was estimated at 1.4% among the healthy Portuguese Gypsies from the South of the country. Finally we present evidence that the genomic region of the BCKDHA gene where c.117delC-alpha is located is likely a mutational hotspot, since recurrence of c.117delC-alpha was observed in two distinct population groups.

  17. Support from the relationship of genetic and geographic distance in human populations for a serial founder effect originating in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, Sohini; Deshpande, Omkar; Roseman, Charles C.; Rosenberg, Noah A.; Feldman, Marcus W.; Cavalli-Sforza, L. Luca

    2005-01-01

    Equilibrium models of isolation by distance predict an increase in genetic differentiation with geographic distance. Here we find a linear relationship between genetic and geographic distance in a worldwide sample of human populations, with major deviations from the fitted line explicable by admixture or extreme isolation. A close relationship is shown to exist between the correlation of geographic distance and genetic differentiation (as measured by FST) and the geographic pattern of heterozygosity across populations. Considering a worldwide set of geographic locations as possible sources of the human expansion, we find that heterozygosities in the globally distributed populations of the data set are best explained by an expansion originating in Africa and that no geographic origin outside of Africa accounts as well for the observed patterns of genetic diversity. Although the relationship between FST and geographic distance has been interpreted in the past as the result of an equilibrium model of drift and dispersal, simulation shows that the geographic pattern of heterozygosities in this data set is consistent with a model of a serial founder effect starting at a single origin. Given this serial-founder scenario, the relationship between genetic and geographic distance allows us to derive bounds for the effects of drift and natural selection on human genetic variation. PMID:16243969

  18. Is BRCA1-5083del19, identified in breast cancer patients of Sicilian origin, a Calabrian founder mutation?

    PubMed

    Russo, Antonio; Calò, Valentina; Bruno, Loredana; Schirò, Valentina; Agnese, Valentina; Cascio, Sandra; Foddai, Elena; Fanale, Daniele; Rizzo, Sergio; Di Gaudio, Francesca; Gulotta, Eliana; Surmacz, Eva; Di Fede, Gaetana; Bazan, Viviana

    2009-01-01

    Various studies have been published in Italy regarding the different BRCA1 mutations, but only the BRCA1-5083del19 mutation is recurrent and specific to individuals of Italian descent with a founder effect on the Calabrian population. In our previous study, BRCA1-5083del19 mutation carriers were found in four index cases of 106 Sicilian patients selected for familial and/or hereditary breast/ovarian cancers. The high frequency rate of this mutation identified in the Sicilian population led us to perform haplotype analysis in all family carriers. Five highly polymorphic microsatellite markers were used (D17S1320, D17S932, D17S1323, D17S1326, D17S1325) to establish whether or not all these families had a common ancestor. This analysis showed that all mutation carriers of these families had a common allele. None of the non-carriers of the mutation or of the 50 healthy Sicilian controls showed this haplotype. This allelotype analysis highlighted the presence of a common allele (ancestor), thus suggesting the presence of a founder effect in the Sicilian population. Our results are in contrast with other studies but only the allelotype analysis of all the BRCA1-5083del19 mutation carriers of two neighboring regions of the south of Italy (Calabria and Sicily) will make it possible to identify the real ancestor of this mutation.

  19. The Unseen Founders Of Quaternary Science - The Men Of Glasgow, Scotland (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, J.

    2010-12-01

    Louis Agassiz (1807-1873) and Charles Lyell (1797-1875) are widely regarded as the founders of Quaternary Science, and there is no doubt that they played their part: Agassiz in 1840 presented and promoted his case for the wide-scale fluctuations of glaciers, and Lyell, through his books and contacts, did much to introduce the subject which we now know as climate change. However there are a number of individuals who contributed to the founding of Quaternary Science who are not so readily recognised and a remarkable fact is that a significant proportion were men without academic training or background who come from, or worked in Glasgow or the adjacent region of central Scotland. First amongst the Glaswegians was James Smith (1782-1867) who, in 1836 presented a paper to the Geological Society of London (where it was duly ignored) in which he suggested, on the basis of fossils dredged from the bed of the Clyde and experience of sailing around Iceland, that the climate of Scotland had been as cold as that of Iceland in the recent past. In 1841, Charles Maclaren (1782-1866) a journalist from Edinburgh, but using information based on raised shorelines near Glasgow proposed what we now know as the glacio-eustatic theory in which the variations in glacier extent control the level of the sea. Perhaps the most important of all was James Croll (1821- 1890) who worked on the theory of ice ages, based on orbital forcing, while janitor at the Andersonian Institute and Museum in Glasgow between 1859-1867. This work was the true precursor to the Milankovitch theory which provides the explanation for the major predictable elements of climate change. Robert Jack (1845-1921) from Irvine, southwest of Glasgow, while doing fieldwork for the British Geological Survey near Loch Lomond close to Glasgow, described in 1874 evidence for non-glacial conditions between tills and clearly recognised that climate could change from glacial to temperate and then glacial climate, before returning to

  20. Genotype and Phenotype Studies in Autosomal Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa (adRP) of the French Canadian Founder Population.

    PubMed

    Coussa, Razek Georges; Chakarova, Christina; Ajlan, Radwan; Taha, Mohammed; Kavalec, Conrad; Gomolin, Julius; Khan, Ayesha; Lopez, Irma; Ren, Huanan; Waseem, Naushin; Kamenarova, Kunka; Bhattacharya, Shomi S; Koenekoop, Robert K

    2015-12-01

    The French Canadian population of Quebec is a unique, well-known founder population with religious, linguistic, and geographic isolation. The genetics of retinitis pigmentosa (RP) in Quebec is not well studied thus far. The purpose of our study was to establish the genetic architecture of autosomal dominant RP (adRP) and to characterize the phenotypes associated with new adRP mutations in Quebec. Sanger sequencing of the commonly mutated currently known adRP genes was performed in a clinically well-characterized cohort of 60 adRP French Canadian families. Phenotypes were analyzed by projected visual acuity (best corrected), Goldmann visual fields, optical coherence tomography (OCT), fundus autofluorescence (FAF), and ERG. The potential effect of the novel mutations was assessed using in silico bioinformatic tools. The pathogenicity of all variants was then confirmed by segregation analysis within the families, when available. We identified the causal mutation/gene in 24 of our adRP families, as 24 (40%) of 60 patients had adRP mutations in six known adRP genes. Eleven (46%) of these mutations were in RHO, four mutations (17%) were found in SNRNP200, three mutations (12.5%) in PRPH2/RDS, three mutations (12.5%) in TOPORS, two mutations (8%) in PRPF31, and one mutation (4%) in IMPDH1. Four mutations were novel. We identified new mutations in RHO (p.S270I), PRPF31 (p.R288W), IMPDH1 (p.Q318H), and TOPORS (p.H889R); the rest were previously reported. We present the genotype-phenotype characteristics of the four novel missense mutations. This is the first large screening of adRP genes in the founder population of Quebec. Our prevalence of known adRP genes is 40% in the French Canadian population, which is lower than in other adRP populations around the world, illustrating the uniqueness of the French Canadian population. Our findings are crucial in expanding the current understanding of the genotypic-phenotypic spectrum of RP and documenting the genetic architecture of

  1. Model selection in historical biogeography reveals that founder-event speciation is a crucial process in Island Clades.

    PubMed

    Matzke, Nicholas J

    2014-11-01

    Founder-event speciation, where a rare jump dispersal event founds a new genetically isolated lineage, has long been considered crucial by many historical biogeographers, but its importance is disputed within the vicariance school. Probabilistic modeling of geographic range evolution creates the potential to test different biogeographical models against data using standard statistical model choice procedures, as long as multiple models are available. I re-implement the Dispersal-Extinction-Cladogenesis (DEC) model of LAGRANGE in the R package BioGeoBEARS, and modify it to create a new model, DEC + J, which adds founder-event speciation, the importance of which is governed by a new free parameter, [Formula: see text]. The identifiability of DEC and DEC + J is tested on data sets simulated under a wide range of macroevolutionary models where geography evolves jointly with lineage birth/death events. The results confirm that DEC and DEC + J are identifiable even though these models ignore the fact that molecular phylogenies are missing many cladogenesis and extinction events. The simulations also indicate that DEC will have substantially increased errors in ancestral range estimation and parameter inference when the true model includes + J. DEC and DEC + J are compared on 13 empirical data sets drawn from studies of island clades. Likelihood-ratio tests indicate that all clades reject DEC, and AICc model weights show large to overwhelming support for DEC + J, for the first time verifying the importance of founder-event speciation in island clades via statistical model choice. Under DEC + J, ancestral nodes are usually estimated to have ranges occupying only one island, rather than the widespread ancestors often favored by DEC. These results indicate that the assumptions of historical biogeography models can have large impacts on inference and require testing and comparison with statistical methods. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford

  2. Haplotype study of West European and North African Unverricht-Lundborg chromosomes: evidence for a few founder mutations.

    PubMed

    Moulard, Bruno; Genton, Pierre; Grid, Djamel; Jeanpierre, Marc; Ouazzani, Réda; Mrabet, Amel; Morris, Mike; LeGuern, Eric; Dravet, Charlotte; Mauguière, François; Utermann, Barbara; Baldy-Moulinier, Michel; Belaidi, Halima; Bertran, Françoise; Biraben, Arnaud; Ali Chérif, André; Chkili, Taieb; Crespel, Arielle; Darcel, Françoise; Dulac, Olivier; Geny, Christian; Humbert-Claude, Véronique; Kassiotis, Philippe; Buresi, Catherine; Malafosse, Alain

    2002-09-01

    Unverricht-Lundborg disease (ULD) is a progressive myoclonus epilepsy common in Finland and North Africa, and less common in Western Europe. ULD is mostly caused by expansion of a dodecamer repeat in the cystatin B gene ( CSTB) promoter. We performed a haplotype study of ULD chromosomes (ULDc) with the repeat expansion. We included 48 West European Caucasian (WEC) and 47 North African (NA) ULDc. We analysed eight markers flanking CSTB(GT10-D21S1890-D21S1885-D21S2040-D21S1259- CSTB-D21S1912-PFKL-D21S171) and one intragenic variant in the CSTB 3' UTR (A2575G). We observed a founder effect in most of the NA ULD patients, as 61.7% of the NA ULDc (29/47) shared the same haplotype, A1 (1-1-A-1-6-7), for markers D21S1885-D21S2040-A2575G-D21S1259-D21S1912-PFKL. Moreover, if we considered only the markers D21S1885, D21S2040, A2575G and D21S1259, 43 of the 47 NA ULDc shared the same alleles 1-1-A-1, haplotype A. As previously shown, the WEC ULDc were heterogeneous. However, the Baltic haplotype, A3 (5-1-1-A-1-1), was observed in ten WEC ULDc (20.8%) and the CSTB 3'UTR variant, which we called the Alps variant, was observed in 17 ULDc (35.4%). Finally, as almost all NA patients, like Scandinavian patients, were of the haplotype A, we assumed that there was an ancient common founder effect in NA and Baltic ULD patients. We estimated that the putative most recent common ancestral ULD carrier with this haplotype A must have existed about 2,500 years ago (100-150 generations). Finally, this work provides evidence for the existence of only a small number of founder mutations in ULD.

  3. Impact on electroencephalography of Adolf Beck, a prominent Polish scientist and founder of the Lviv School of Physiology.

    PubMed

    Zayachkivska, Oksana; Gzhegotsky, Mechyslav; Coenen, Anton

    2012-07-01

    Adolf Beck (1863-1942) can be regarded as the co-founder of electroencephalography. His studies on the cerebral cortex of animals have facilitated the introduction of the electroencephalogram (EEG) as a main tool for studying the brain. The localization of senses on the cortex with evoked potentials and the description of the desynchronization of the electrical brain activity upon stimulation, are hallmarks of the research of Beck. He performed his groundbreaking studies under supervision of the famous Napoleon Cybulski at the Jagiellonian University in Cracow (Poland) between 1888 and 1895. In that last year Beck was appointed professor at the University of Lemberg (Lviv), where he founded the Department of Physiology and recruited scientists to the Lviv School of Physiology. Beck was the leading authority of the University of Lemberg in the most turbulent period of the town's history. Together with Cybulski he wrote the influential textbook 'Human physiology' in 1915.

  4. ["The blessed Leon Szancer Scholarships Foundation for Poor Students of the Jagiellonian Academy Faculty of Medicine" and its founder].

    PubMed

    Sliz, Małgorzata

    2004-01-01

    The paper is devoted to a small but significant episode in the history of the 19th century philanthropy. It describes one of numerous scholarship foundations existing then and a person of its founder, Leon Szancer (1802-1879). The Szancer's Foundation was created for students of medicine of the Jagiellonian University and 25 persons used its help. Szancer himself was a representative of Poles of Mosaic religion. He had graduated from the Jagiellonian University and afterwards he worked as physician in the Army of the Congress Kingdom of Poland. He participated in the Polish November Insurrection and after its fall he emigrated. He was working in Opatów for many years and spent his last years of life in Krakow.

  5. BRCA1 founder mutations do not contribute to increased risk of gastric cancer in the Polish population.

    PubMed

    Ławniczak, Małgorzata; Jakubowska, Anna; Białek, Andrzej; Lubiński, Jan; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Kaczmarek, Katarzyna; Starzyńska, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is part of the spectrum of diseases linked to BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations that increase the risk of breast and ovarian cancer. Data suggesting an increased risk of developing GC among BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers are based almost exclusively on indirect studies. The objective was to assess in a direct study whether there is a relationship between GC and selected recurrent BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in the Polish population. Three hundred seventeen GC patients (193 males and 124 females; mean age 59.5 ± 12.8 y) diagnosed at the Department of Gastroenterology at the Pomeranian Medical University were included in this retrospective study. All patients were genotyped for 3 BRCA1 Polish founder mutations (5382insC, C61G and 4153delA) as well as for 9 known recurrent mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. Genotyping was performed using allele-specific oligonucleotide polymerase chain reaction (ASA-PCR) for 4153delA and 5382insC, restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) for C61G and TaqMan real-time PCR for 185delAG, 3819del5, 3875del4, 5370C > T, 886delGT, 4075delGT, 5467insT, 6174delT and 8138del5. Among tested mutations one founder BRCA1 mutation 5382insC was detected in two of 317 (0.63 %) GC cases. A comparison of frequency of detected BRCA1 founder mutations in GC patients to previously described 4570 Polish controls (0.63 % vs. 0.48 %) failed to indicate an increased risk of GC in the mutation carriers (OR = 1.3; 95 % CI 0.3-5.6, p = 0.71). A comparison of frequency of GC male cases and male controls (1.0 % vs. 0.43 %,OR = 1.5; 95 % CI 0.3-6.4, p = 0.61) allowed to formulate the same conclusion that there is no increased risk for GC for males. None of the 9 recurrent BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations has been detected in tested GC patients. The current study indicates that founder BRCA1 mutations reported in Polish breast/ovarian cancer patients do not contribute to increased GC risk. The nine tested recurrent

  6. Leukocyte adhesion deficiency (LAD) type II/carbohydrate deficient glycoprotein (CDG) IIc founder effect and genotype/phenotype correlation.

    PubMed

    Etzioni, Amos; Sturla, Laura; Antonellis, Anthony; Green, Eric D; Gershoni-Baruch, Ruth; Berninsone, Patricia M; Hirschberg, Carlos B; Tonetti, Michela

    2002-06-15

    Leukocyte adhesion deficiency (LAD) type II is a rare autosomal recessive syndrome characterized by recurrent infections, typical dysmorphic features, the Bombay blood phenotype and severe growth and psychomotor retardation. It is attributed to a general absence of fucosylated glycans on the cell surface. Three Arab Israeli patients and one Turkish child have been reported so far. The primary defect in a specific GDP-L-fucose transporter of the Golgi apparatus has been disclosed recently. All three children reported by us are homozygous for one single founder mutation, different from that reported in the Turkish child. The amount of mRNA of the GDP-L-fucose transporter in cells from Arab patients and their parents are comparable to controls. Genotype/phenotype correlation studies show that the two different mutations are distinguished by differences in response to fucose supplementation and in the clinical phenotypes. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. A founder mutation in ADAMTSL4 causes early-onset bilateral ectopia lentis among Jews of Bukharian origin.

    PubMed

    Reinstein, Eyal; Smirin-Yosef, Pola; Lagovsky, Irina; Davidov, Bella; Peretz Amit, Gabriela; Neumann, Doron; Orr-Urtreger, Avi; Ben-Shachar, Shay; Basel-Vanagaite, Lina

    2016-01-01

    The term isolated ectopia lentis (EL; subluxation or dislocation of the human crystalline lens) is applied to patients with EL, without skeletal features and in the absence of aortic root dilatation. To date, the only gene shown to cause autosomal-recessive isolated EL is ADAMTSL4. Here we report a novel founder mutation in ADAMTSL4 gene in children of Bukharian Jewish origin presenting with early-onset bilateral EL. A carrier frequency of 1:48 was determined among unrelated healthy Bukharian Jews. Given the complications associated with disease and the allele frequency, a population screening for individuals of this ancestry is warranted in order to allow prenatal, pre-implantation or early postnatal diagnosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. ANO10 c.1150_1151del is a founder mutation causing autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia in Roma/Gypsies.

    PubMed

    Chamova, Teodora; Florez, Laura; Guergueltcheva, Velina; Raycheva, Margarita; Kaneva, Radka; Lochmüller, Hanns; Kalaydjieva, Luba; Tournev, Ivailo

    2012-05-01

    A recent report (Vermeer et al. in Am J Hum Genet 87:813-819, 2010) implicated for the first time the ANO10 gene in the genetic basis of autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxias. One of the three described families were Roma/Gypsies from Serbia, where the affected individuals were homozygous for the truncating p.Leu384fs mutation and displayed distinct phenotypic features (Vermeer et al. in Am J Hum Genet 87:813-819, 2010). Based on the history and population genetics of the Roma/Gypsies, we hypothesised that p.Leu384fs could be another founder mutation in this population, whose identification in a larger number of genetically homogeneous patients will contribute to defining the phenotypic spectrum of the disorder. Here, we describe additional patients from neighbouring Bulgaria, outlining invariable ANO10-ataxia features and confirming global intellectual decline as part of the phenotype resulting from complete Anactomin 10 deficit.

  9. [Max Isserlin, Kantian orientation at Königsberg, psychotherapist with Kraepelin, founder of child psychiatry at Munich, emigrant to Britain].

    PubMed

    Peters, U H

    2002-01-01

    This account of the life and work of Max Isserlin (1879 - 1941) wants to be a reminder of a German-Jewish fate next to Kraepelin and as a forced emigrant. Immediately after his studies at Königsberg Isserlin in 1903 came to Kraepelin at Heidelberg, later he followed him to Munich. All his life he kept a Kantian orientation and defended Kraepelin's positions out of this background. Kraepelin entrusted to him all of psychotherapy, theory and practice, which Isserlin for at least 18 years gave courses of in Kraepelin's department. His textbook of psychotherapy thus transmissions Kraepelins convictions about this topic also. During World War I Isserlin was the head of a field-hospital for brain damaged soldiers and continued working this way after the end of the war. Finally he became the founder of child psychiatry in Munich, until he was forced to leave Germany for Britain with a heavy heart.

  10. The CHEK2 del5395 is a founder mutation without direct effects for cancer risk in the latvian population

    PubMed Central

    Kalniete, D; Nakazawa-Miklasevica, M; Irmejs, A; Vjaters, E; Gardovskis, J; Miklasevics, E

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Our objective was to determine: 1) whether the checkpoint kinase 2 (CHEK2) del5395 (g.27417113-27422508 del, NC_000022.11) is a founder mutation in the Latvian population, 2) if there is an association between CHEK2 del5395 mutation and cancer risk, and 3) and whether the CHEK2 del5395 mutation impacts cancer predisposition in Chernobyl disaster liquidators (the civil and military personnel who were called upon to deal with consequences of the 1986 nuclear disaster) as well as geriatric populations. We recruited 438 breast cancer patients, 568 colorectal cancer patients, 399 ovarian cancer patients, 419 prostate cancer patients, 526 healthy blood donors, 480 Chernobyl disaster liquidators and 444 geriatric cancer-free participants. DNA samples were isolated from blood samples and subjected to multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The truncation of del5395 was estimated by fragment size of the multiplex PCR.All groups were compared to the healthy blood donors using Fisher’s exact test. All p values were two-sided and the odds ratios (OR) calculated by two-by-two table. In cancer groups, the del5395 mutation was most frequently observed in the ovarian cancer group (1.00%, OR = 1.32). In control groups, the del5395 mutation was most frequent (0.76%) in the healthy donors, which exceeded its frequency in the Chernobyl liquidators group and the geriatric group by 0.01 and 0.08%, respectively. For all groups, the OR appeared to be >1 only in ovarian cancer patients. However, OR rates showed no statistical significance in either cancer or control groups, with the p value fluctuating within the range of 0.39-1.00. The CHEK2 gene del5395 is a founder mutation in the Latvian population, which, however, does not have a direct impact on genetic predisposition toward colorectal, breast, ovarian and prostate cancer. PMID:27785394

  11. A common variant in CLDN14 causes precipitous, prelingual sensorineural hearing loss in multiple families due to founder effect.

    PubMed

    Pater, Justin A; Benteau, Tammy; Griffin, Anne; Penney, Cindy; Stanton, Susan G; Predham, Sarah; Kielley, Bernadine; Squires, Jessica; Zhou, Jiayi; Li, Quan; Abdelfatah, Nelly; O'Rielly, Darren D; Young, Terry-Lynn

    2017-01-01

    Genetic isolates provide unprecedented opportunities to identify pathogenic mutations and explore the full natural history of clinically heterogeneous phenotypes such as hearing loss. We noticed a unique audioprofile, characterized by prelingual and rapid deterioration of hearing thresholds at frequencies >0.5 kHz in several adults from unrelated families from the island population of Newfoundland. Targeted serial Sanger sequencing of probands for deafness alleles (n = 23) that we previously identified in this founder population was negative. Whole exome sequencing in four members of the largest family (R2010) identified a CLDN14 (DFNB29) variant [c.488C>T; p. (Ala163Val)], likely pathogenic, sensorineural hearing loss, autosomal recessive. Although not associated with deafness or disease, CLDN14 p.(Ala163Val) has been previously reported as a variant of uncertain significance (VUS). Targeted sequencing of 169 deafness probands identified one homozygote and one heterozygous carrier. Genealogical studies, cascade sequencing and haplotype analysis across four unrelated families showed all subjects with the unique audioprofile (n = 12) were also homozygous for p.(Ala163Val) and shared a 1.4 Mb DFNB29-associated haplotype on chromosome 21. Most significantly, sequencing 175 population controls revealed 1% of the population are heterozygous for CLDN14 p.(Ala163Val), consistent with a major founder effect in Newfoundland. The youngest CLDN14 [c.488C>T; p.(Ala163Val)] homozygote passed newborn screening and had normal hearing thresholds up to 3 years of age, which then deteriorated to a precipitous loss >1 kHz during the first decade. Our study suggests that genetic testing may be necessary to identify at-risk children in time to prevent speech, language and developmental delay.

  12. Founder effects and stochastic dispersal at the continental scale of the fungal pathogen of bananas Mycosphaerella fijiensis.

    PubMed

    Rivas, Gonzalo-Galileo; Zapater, Marie-Françoise; Abadie, Catherine; Carlier, Jean

    2004-02-01

    The worldwide destructive epidemic of the fungus Mycosphaerella fijiensis on banana started recently, spreading from South-East Asia. The founder effects detected in the global population structure of M. fijiensis reflected rare migration events among continents through movements of infected plant material. The main objective of this work was to infer gene flow and dispersal processes of M. fijiensis at the continental scale from population structure analysis in recently invaded regions. Samples of isolates were collected from banana plantations in 13 countries in Latin America and the Caribbean and in Africa. The isolates were analysed using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) and microsatellite molecular markers. The results indicate that a high level of genetic diversity was maintained at the plantation and the plant scales. The loci were at gametic equilibrium in most of the samples analysed, supporting the hypothesis of the existence of random-mating populations of M. fijiensis, even at the plant scale. A low level of gene diversity was observed in some populations from the Africa and Latin America-Caribbean regions. Nearly half the populations analysed showed a significant deviation from mutation-drift equilibrium with gene diversity excess. Finally, a high level of genetic differentiation was detected between populations from Africa (FST = 0.19) and from the Latin America-Caribbean region (FST = 0.30). These results show that founder effects accompanied the recent invasion of M. fijiensis in both regions, suggesting stochastic spread of the disease at the continental scale. This spread might be caused by either the limited dispersal of ascospores or by movements of infected plant material.

  13. The Struggle for Community and Respectability: Black Women School Founders and the Politics of Character Education in the Early Twentieth Century

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bair, Sarah D.

    2009-01-01

    The author examines character education within the context of early twentieth-century, Black schooling and discusses how school founders, Mary McLeod Bethune, Nannie Helen Burroughs, and Charlotte Hawkins Brown, used the language and practice of character education to help their students confront racism and navigate a segregated society. These…

  14. A Bundle of Silences: Examining the Racial Representation of Black Founding Fathers of the United States through Glenn Beck's "Founders' Fridays"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, LaGarrett J.; Womac, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    This article explores the discourse on Black Founding Fathers through Glenn Beck's television show, "Founders' Fridays". According to Beck, this 2010 summer television special was an opportunity to present Black American history in a more nuanced and truthful way. The theoretical framework, silencing the past, is used to…

  15. Colleges and Universities as Historic Institutions: a Study of the Historical Context of Campus Architecture: Founders Hall, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shultz, James A.

    A study of Founders Hall at the Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU) explores the history of that building and its symbolic role for the campus and the institution. The building was originally a residence built in the late 19th century and was later the location of the Richmond School of Social Work and Public Policy and of the Richmond…

  16. HealthSouth's most wanted. Founder and former chairman and CEO Richard Scrushy is indicted for 85 counts of conspiracy, fraud and money laundering.

    PubMed

    Piotrowski, Julie

    2003-11-10

    Wake-up call for the industry or an isolated case of corporate chicanery? Healthcare experts are divided on the import of Richard Scrushy's indictment on 85 counts last week in connection with the financial scandal at HealthSouth Corp. The indictment alleges the company founder relied on electronic and telephone surveillance, threats and intimidation to control his accomplices.

  17. Uterine Epithelial Cell Regulation of DC-SIGN Expression Inhibits Transmitted/Founder HIV-1 Trans Infection by Immature Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ochiel, Daniel O.; Ochsenbauer, Christina; Kappes, John C.; Ghosh, Mimi; Fahey, John V.; Wira, Charles R.

    2010-01-01

    Background Sexual transmission accounts for the majority of HIV-1 infections. In over 75% of cases, infection is initiated by a single variant (transmitted/founder virus). However, the determinants of virus selection during transmission are unknown. Host cell-cell interactions in the mucosa may be critical in regulating susceptibility to infection. We hypothesized in this study that specific immune modulators secreted by uterine epithelial cells modulate susceptibility of dendritic cells (DC) to infection with HIV-1. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we report that uterine epithelial cell secretions (i.e. conditioned medium, CM) decreased DC-SIGN expression on immature dendritic cells via a transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) mechanism. Further, CM inhibited dendritic cell-mediated trans infection of HIV-1 expressing envelope proteins of prototypic reference. Similarly, CM inhibited trans infection of HIV-1 constructs expressing envelopes of transmitted/founder viruses, variants that are selected during sexual transmission. In contrast, whereas recombinant TGF- β1 inhibited trans infection of prototypic reference HIV-1 by dendritic cells, TGF-β1 had a minimal effect on trans infection of transmitted/founder variants irrespective of the reporter system used to measure trans infection. Conclusions/Significance Our results provide the first direct evidence for uterine epithelial cell regulation of dendritic cell transmission of infection with reference and transmitted/founder HIV-1 variants. These findings have immediate implications for designing strategies to prevent sexual transmission of HIV-1. PMID:21179465

  18. 500th birthday of Andreas Vesalius, the founder of modern anatomy: "vivitur ingenio, caetera mortis erunt" ("genius lives on, all else is mortal").

    PubMed

    Hadzic, Admir; Sadeghi, Neda; Vandepitte, Catherine; Vandepitte, Walter; Van de Velde, Marc; Hadzic, Alen; Van Robays, Johan; Heylen, Rene; Herijgers, Paul; Vloka, Caroline; Van Zundert, Jan

    2014-01-01

    It is often said that regional anesthesia is the practice of applied anatomy. Therefore, it is fitting that on the occasion of his 500th birthday, we celebrate the life and work of the brilliant Flemish anatomist, Andreas Vesalius (1514-1564), the founder of modern anatomy.

  19. A Bundle of Silences: Examining the Racial Representation of Black Founding Fathers of the United States through Glenn Beck's "Founders' Fridays"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, LaGarrett J.; Womac, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    This article explores the discourse on Black Founding Fathers through Glenn Beck's television show, "Founders' Fridays". According to Beck, this 2010 summer television special was an opportunity to present Black American history in a more nuanced and truthful way. The theoretical framework, silencing the past, is used to…

  20. Mutation Spectrum of STAR and a Founder Effect of the p.Q258* in Korean Patients with Congenital Lipoid Adrenal Hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Kang, Eungu; Kim, Yoon-Myung; Kim, Gu-Hwan; Lee, Beom Hee; Yoo, Han-Wook; Choi, Jin-Ho

    2017-05-02

    Congenital lipoid adrenal hyperplasia (CLAH) is the most severe form of congenital adrenal hyperplasia, caused by defects in the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (STAR). The STAR p.Q258* mutation is the most common mutation in China, Japan, and Korea, suggesting a founder effect. This study aimed to investigate the phenotypic and mutation spectrum of STAR defects and identify a founder effect of the p.Q258* mutation in Korean patients with CLAH. For 45 patients from 42 independent pedigrees, haplotype analysis was performed in 10 unrelated trio families, including patients with the p.Q258* mutation whose DNA samples were available, using 1,972 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and six short tandem repeat (STR) markers. An Illumina Infinium® Human Omni2.5-8 v1.3 performed the SNP genotyping. Among 84 alleles from 42 unrelated families, mutation p.Q258* was found in 74 alleles (88.1%) from 41 families. A shared haplotype was identified in 17 of 20 alleles from 10 patients (size, 198 kb). The age of the founder mutation was estimated as 4,875 years (95% credible set: 3,575-7,925 years) assuming an intergenerational time interval of 25 years. The STAR p.Q258* mutation is the most common in Korean patients with CLAH, suggesting a founder effect. The age of the mutation corresponded with the date when the Korean people settled in the Korean peninsula. The high prevalence of p.Q258* in Japan and China also suggests a founder effect in Asian countries.

  1. Founder mutations characterise the mutation panorama in 200 Swedish index cases referred for Long QT syndrome genetic testing

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Long QT syndrome (LQTS) is an inherited arrhythmic disorder characterised by prolongation of the QT interval on ECG, presence of syncope and sudden death. The symptoms in LQTS patients are highly variable, and genotype influences the clinical course. This study aims to report the spectrum of LQTS mutations in a Swedish cohort. Methods Between March 2006 and October 2009, two hundred, unrelated index cases were referred to the Department of Clinical Genetics, Umeå University Hospital, Sweden, for LQTS genetic testing. We scanned five of the LQTS-susceptibility genes (KCNQ1, KCNH2, SCN5A, KCNE1, and KCNE2) for mutations by DHPLC and/or sequencing. We applied MLPA to detect large deletions or duplications in the KCNQ1, KCNH2, SCN5A, KCNE1, and KCNE2 genes. Furthermore, the gene RYR2 was screened in 36 selected LQTS genotype-negative patients to detect cases with the clinically overlapping disease catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT). Results In total, a disease-causing mutation was identified in 103 of the 200 (52%) index cases. Of these, altered exon copy numbers in the KCNH2 gene accounted for 2% of the mutations, whereas a RYR2 mutation accounted for 3% of the mutations. The genotype-positive cases stemmed from 64 distinct mutations, of which 28% were novel to this cohort. The majority of the distinct mutations were found in a single case (80%), whereas 20% of the mutations were observed more than once. Two founder mutations, KCNQ1 p.Y111C and KCNQ1 p.R518*, accounted for 25% of the genotype-positive index cases. Genetic cascade screening of 481 relatives to the 103 index cases with an identified mutation revealed 41% mutation carriers who were at risk of cardiac events such as syncope or sudden unexpected death. Conclusion In this cohort of Swedish index cases with suspected LQTS, a disease-causing mutation was identified in 52% of the referred patients. Copy number variations explained 2% of the mutations and 3 of 36 selected

  2. Nonsyndromic retinitis pigmentosa is highly prevalent in the Jerusalem region with a high frequency of founder mutations.

    PubMed

    Sharon, Dror; Banin, Eyal

    2015-01-01

    Nonsyndromic retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is the most common inherited retinal degeneration, and prevalence of the disease has been reported in populations of American and European origin with a relatively low consanguinity rate. Our aim was to determine the prevalence of nonsyndromic RP in the Jerusalem region, which has a population of about 1 million individuals with a high rate of consanguinity. The patients' clinical data included eye exam findings (visual acuity, anterior segment, and funduscopy) as well as electroretinographic (ERG) testing results under scotopic and photopic conditions. Mutation analysis on a subgroup of patients was performed mainly with candidate gene analysis and homozygosity mapping. We evaluated the medical records of patients with degenerative retinal diseases residing in the Jerusalem region who were examined over the past 20 years in a large tertiary medical center. A total of 453 individuals affected with nonsyndromic RP were diagnosed at our center, according to funduscopic findings and ERG testing. Based on the estimated population size of 945,000 individuals who reside in the vicinity of Jerusalem, the prevalence of nonsyndromic RP in this region is 1:2,086. The prevalence of RP was higher among Arab Muslims (1:1,798) compared to Jews (1:2,230), mainly due to consanguineous marriages that are more common in the Arab Muslim population. To identify the genetic causes of RP in our cohort, we recruited 383 patients from 183 different families for genetic analysis: 70 with autosomal recessive (AR) inheritance, 15 with autosomal dominant, 86 isolate cases, and 12 with an X-linked inheritance pattern. In 64 (35%) of the families, we identified the genetic cause of the disease, and we revised the inheritance pattern of 20 isolate cases to the AR pattern; 49% of the families in our cohort had AR inheritance. Interestingly, in 42 (66%) of the genetically identified families, the cause of disease was a founder mutation. Previous studies

  3. Nonsyndromic retinitis pigmentosa is highly prevalent in the Jerusalem region with a high frequency of founder mutations

    PubMed Central

    Banin, Eyal

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Nonsyndromic retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is the most common inherited retinal degeneration, and prevalence of the disease has been reported in populations of American and European origin with a relatively low consanguinity rate. Our aim was to determine the prevalence of nonsyndromic RP in the Jerusalem region, which has a population of about 1 million individuals with a high rate of consanguinity. Methods The patients’ clinical data included eye exam findings (visual acuity, anterior segment, and funduscopy) as well as electroretinographic (ERG) testing results under scotopic and photopic conditions. Mutation analysis on a subgroup of patients was performed mainly with candidate gene analysis and homozygosity mapping. Results We evaluated the medical records of patients with degenerative retinal diseases residing in the Jerusalem region who were examined over the past 20 years in a large tertiary medical center. A total of 453 individuals affected with nonsyndromic RP were diagnosed at our center, according to funduscopic findings and ERG testing. Based on the estimated population size of 945,000 individuals who reside in the vicinity of Jerusalem, the prevalence of nonsyndromic RP in this region is 1:2,086. The prevalence of RP was higher among Arab Muslims (1:1,798) compared to Jews (1:2,230), mainly due to consanguineous marriages that are more common in the Arab Muslim population. To identify the genetic causes of RP in our cohort, we recruited 383 patients from 183 different families for genetic analysis: 70 with autosomal recessive (AR) inheritance, 15 with autosomal dominant, 86 isolate cases, and 12 with an X-linked inheritance pattern. In 64 (35%) of the families, we identified the genetic cause of the disease, and we revised the inheritance pattern of 20 isolate cases to the AR pattern; 49% of the families in our cohort had AR inheritance. Interestingly, in 42 (66%) of the genetically identified families, the cause of disease was a founder

  4. Genetic and morphological evolution following a founder event in the dark-eyed junco, Junco hyemalis thurberi.

    PubMed

    Rasner, C A; Yeh, P; Eggert, L S; Hunt, K E; Woodruff, D S; Price, T D

    2004-03-01

    An isolated population of dark-eyed juncos, Junco hyemalis, became established on the campus of the University of California at San Diego (UCSD), probably in the early 1980s. It now numbers about 70 breeding pairs. Populations across the entire natural range of the subspecies J. h. thurberi are weakly differentiated from each other at five microsatellite loci (FST = 0.01). The UCSD population is significantly different from these populations, the closest of which is 70 km away. It has 88% of the genetic heterozygosity and 63% of the allelic richness of populations in the montane range of the subspecies, consistent with a harmonic mean effective population size of 32 (but with 95% confidence limits from four to > 70) over the eight generations since founding. Results suggest a moderate bottleneck in the early establishment phase but with more than seven effective founders. Individuals in the UCSD population have shorter wings and tails than those in the nearby mountains and a common garden experiment indicates that the morphological differences are genetically based. The moderate effective population size is not sufficient for the observed morphological differences to have evolved as a consequence of genetic drift, indicating a major role for selection subsequent to the founding of the UCSD population.

  5. High Frequency of Pathogenic Rearrangements in SPG11 and Extensive Contribution of Mutational Hotspots and Founder Alleles.

    PubMed

    Günther, Sven; Elert-Dobkowska, Ewelina; Soehn, Anne S; Hinreiner, Sophie; Yoon, Grace; Heller, Raoul; Hellenbroich, Yorck; Hübner, Christian A; Ray, Peter N; Hehr, Ute; Bauer, Peter; Sulek, Anna; Beetz, Christian

    2016-07-01

    Biallelic loss-of-function mutations in SPG11 cause a wide spectrum of recessively inherited, neurodegenerative disorders including hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. By comprehensive screening of three large cohorts of HSP index patients, we identified 83 alleles with "small" mutations and 13 alleles that carry large genomic rearrangements. Including relevant data from previous studies, we estimate that copy number variants (CNVs) account for ∼19% of pathogenic SPG11 alleles. The breakpoints for all novel and some previously reported CNVs were determined by long-range PCR and sequencing. This revealed several Alu-associated recombination hotspots. We also found evidence for additional mutational mechanisms, including for a two-step event in which an Alu retrotransposition preceded the actual rearrangement. Apparently independent samples with identical breakpoints were analyzed by microsatellite PCRs. The resulting haplotypes suggested the existence of two rearrangement founder alleles. Our findings widen the spectra of mutations and mutational mechanisms in SPG11, underscore the pivotal role played by Alus, and are of high diagnostic relevance for a wide spectrum of clinical phenotypes including the most frequent form of recessive HSP. © 2016 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  6. Phenylalanine hydroxylase deficiency in Mexico: genotype-phenotype correlations, BH4 responsiveness and evidence of a founder effect.

    PubMed

    Vela-Amieva, M; Abreu-González, M; González-del Angel, A; Ibarra-González, I; Fernández-Lainez, C; Barrientos-Ríos, R; Monroy-Santoyo, S; Guillén-López, S; Alcántara-Ortigoza, M A

    2015-07-01

    The mutational spectrum of the phenylalanine hydroxylase gene (PAH) in Mexico is unknown, although it has been suggested that PKU variants could have a differential geographical distribution. Genotype-phenotype correlations and genotype-based predictions of responsiveness to tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4 ) have never been performed. We sequenced the PAH gene and determined the geographic origin of each allele, mini-haplotype associated, genotype-phenotype correlations and genotype-based prediction of BH4 responsiveness in 48 Mexican patients. The mutational spectrum included 34 variants with c.60+5G>T being the most frequent (20.8%) and linked to haplotype 4.3 possibly because of a founder effect and/or genetic drift. Two new variants were found c.1A>T and c.969+6T>C. The genotype-phenotype correlation was concordant in 70.8%. The genotype-based prediction to BH4 -responsiveness was 41.7%, this information could be useful for the rational selection of candidates for BH4 testing and therapy.

  7. Initial founders of captive populations are genetically representative of natural populations in critically endangered dusky gopher frogs, Lithobates sevosus.

    PubMed

    Hinkson, Kristin M; Henry, Natochia L; Hensley, Nina M; Richter, Stephen C

    2016-09-01

    The rapid rate of decline in amphibian populations has urged many researchers and conservationists to establish captive, or ex situ, populations. Such populations are guarded against effects of habitat loss and degradation, and if actively managed, can serve as a reservoir for rare alleles that might be lost in the wild. Without proper management, ex situ population sizes can dwindle and will no longer perform this function. The dusky gopher frog, Lithobates sevosus, is a critically endangered species, imperiled by habitat loss and population isolation. To assist in recovery of the species and prevent further genetic erosion, a captive breeding program was initiated. We investigated how well natural genetic variation was captured within the ex situ population and determined relatedness within each ex situ population. We genotyped individuals from two natural populations and two founding, captive populations to compare metrics of genetic variation and relatedness. The data show the initial founder populations are genetically representative of the natural populations, although variation is low in each, and that relatedness values are similar. Therefore, founding captive populations were successful at capturing genetic variation in the wild. Future research should continue to compare genetic variation of captive and natural populations to monitor efficacy of their management programs. Zoo Biol. 35:378-384, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. History of settlement of villages from Central Tunisia by studying families sharing a common founder Glycogenosis type III mutation.

    PubMed

    Rhouma, Faten Ben; Messai, Habib; Hsouna, Sana; Halim, Nizar Ben; Cherif, Wafa; Fadhel, Sihem Ben; Tiar, Afaf; Nagara, Majdi; Azzouz, Hatem; Sfar, Mohamed-Tahar; Dridi, Marie-Françoise Ben; Tebib, Neji; Ayadi, Abdelkarim; Abdelhak, Sonia; Kefi, Rym

    2016-09-01

    Glycogen storage disease type III (GSD III; Cori disease; Forbes disease) is an autosomal recessive inherited metabolic disorder resulting from deficient glycogen debrancher enzyme activity in liver and muscle. In this study, we focused on a single AGL gene mutation p.W1327X in 16 Tunisian patients from rural area surrounding the region of Mahdia in Central Tunisia. This constitutes the largest pool of patients with this mutation ever described. This study was performed to trace the history of the patients' ancestries in a single region. After extraction of genomic DNA, exon 31 of AGL gene was sequenced. The patients were investigated for the hypervariable segment 1 of mitochondrial DNA and 17 Y-STR markers. We found that the p.W1327X mutation was a founder mutation in Tunisia Analysis of maternal lineages shows an admixture of autochthonous North African, sub-Saharan and a predominance of Eurasian haplogroups. Heterogeneity of maternal haplogroups indicates an ancient settlement. However, paternal gene flow was highly homogeneous and originates from the Near East. We hypothesize that the p.W1327X mutation was introduced into the Tunisian population probably by a recent migration event; then the mutation was fixed in a small region due to the high rate of consanguineous marriages and genetic drift. The screening for this mutation should be performed in priority for GSD III molecular diagnosis, for patients from the region of Mahdia and those from regions sharing the same settlement history.

  9. Localization of the familial Mediterranean fever gene (FMF) to a 250-kb interval in non-Ashkenazi Jewish founder haplotypes

    SciTech Connect

    1996-09-01

    Chromosome 16p13.3 harbors a gene (MEF) associated with familial Mediterranean fever (FMF), a recessive disease very common in populations of Mediterranean ancestry. In the course of positional cloning of MEF, we genotyped 26 non-Ashkenazi Jewish FMF pedigrees (310 meioses) with 15 microsatellite markers, most of which were recently developed by Genethon. Identification of recombination events in the haplotypes allowed narrowing of the MEF interval to a region between D16S3124 (telomeric) and D16S475 (centromeric). Two markers, D16S3070 and D16S3275, a microsatellite marker isolated from a YAC that also contains D16S3070, showed no recombination with the disease. Linkage disequilibrium and haplotype analysis high-lighted the existence of a founder haplotype in our population. The core ancestral alleles were present in 71% of MEF-bearing chromosomes at loci D16S3070 and D16S3275. Furthermore, identification of historical crossing-over events in these pedigrees indicated that MEF is located between these two loci, which are both contained in a 250-kb genomic fragment. 24 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Mutational analysis in podocin-associated hereditary nephrotic syndrome in Polish patients: founder effect in the Kashubian population.

    PubMed

    Lipska, Beata S; Balasz-Chmielewska, Irena; Morzuch, Lucyna; Wasielewski, Kacper; Vetter, Dominika; Borzecka, Halina; Drozdz, Dorota; Firszt-Adamczyk, Agnieszka; Gacka, Ewa; Jarmolinski, Tomasz; Ksiazek, Joanna; Kuzma-Mroczkowska, Elzbieta; Litwin, Mieczyslaw; Medynska, Anna; Silska, Magdalena; Szczepanska, Maria; Tkaczyk, Marcin; Wasilewska, Anna; Schaefer, Franz; Zurowska, Aleksandra; Limon, Janusz

    2013-08-01

    Hereditary nephrotic syndrome is caused by mutations in a number of different genes, the most common being NPHS2. The aim of the study was to identify the spectrum of NPHS2 mutations in Polish patients with the disease. A total of 141 children with steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome (SRNS) were enrolled in the study. Mutational analysis included the entire coding sequence and intron boundaries of the NPHS2 gene. Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and TaqMan genotyping assay were applied to detect selected NPHS2 sequence variants in 575 population-matched controls. Twenty patients (14 %) had homozygous or compound heterozygous NPHS2 mutations, the most frequent being c.1032delT found in 11 children and p.R138Q found in four patients. Carriers of the c.1032delT allele were exclusively found in the Pomeranian (Kashubian) region, suggesting a founder effect origin. The 14 % NPHS2 gene mutation detection rate is similar to that observed in other populations. The heterogeneity of mutations detected in the studied group confirms the requirement of genetic testing the entire NPHS2 coding sequence in Polish patients, with the exception of Kashubs, who should be initially screened for the c.1032delT deletion.

  11. Alfred Russel Wallace (1823-1913): the forgotten co-founder of the Neo-Darwinian theory of biological evolution.

    PubMed

    Kutschera, Ulrich; Hossfeld, Uwe

    2013-12-01

    The British naturalist Alfred Russel Wallace (1823-1913), who had to leave school aged 14 and never attended university, did extensive fieldwork, first in the Amazon River basin (1848-1852) and then in Southeast Asia (1854-1862). Based on this experience, and after reading the corresponding scientific literature, Wallace postulated that species were not created, but are modified descendants of pre-existing varieties (Sarawak Law paper, 1855). Evolution is brought about by a struggle for existence via natural selection, which results in the adaptation of those individuals in variable populations who survive and reproduce (Ternate essay, 1858). In his monograph Darwinism (1889), and in subsequent publications, Wallace extended the contents of Darwin's Origin of Species (1859) into the Neo-Darwinian theory of biological evolution, with reference to the work of August Weismann (1834-1914). Wallace also became the (co)-founder of biogeography, biodiversity research, astrobiology and evolutionary anthropology. Moreover, he envisioned what was later called the anthropocene (i.e., the age of human environmental destructiveness). However, since Wallace believed in atheistic spiritualism and mixed up scientific facts and supernatural speculations in some of his writings, he remains a controversial figure in the history of biology.

  12. A Founder Effect for the HGD G360R Mutation in Italy: Implications for a Regional Screening of Alkaptonuria.

    PubMed

    Porfirio, Berardino; Sestini, Roberta; Gorelli, Greta; Cordovana, Miriam; Mannoni, Alessandro; Usher, Jeanette L; Introne, Wendy J; Gahl, William A; Vilboux, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    We sought to establish rapid and specific genotyping methods for G360R mutation and for seven tightly linked markers in the homogentisate dioxygenase gene to address the question of whether G360R is a mutational hot spot or the result of a founder effect, as it has been repeatedly found in alkaptonuric patients from a geographic isolate in Italy.For G360R and single nucleotide polymorphism genotyping, high-resolution melting analysis was performed. Microsatellites were analysed by multiplex PCR and capillary electrophoresis. To investigate the natural history of the G360R mutation, we genotyped markers in 52 controls and in 8 unrelated patients from the UK and USA, who also segregated the G360R mutation, and calculated its age using DMLE+2.3 software.A distinct G360R-bearing haplotype was identified in all patients of Caucasian descent. Estimated mutation age was 545 generations (95% credible set, 402-854), suggesting that G360R arose in an ancestor who lived 8,000-10,000 years BC. Archaeological, historical and demographic data support that a G360R carrier has settled the remote valley where present-day population might have a heterozygote frequency of at least 6%.Given the late health-threatening complications of alkaptonuria and a cure within reach, inhabitants of this isolate would benefit from screening and genetic counselling.

  13. Mutation screening of the HGD gene identifies a novel alkaptonuria mutation with significant founder effect and high prevalence.

    PubMed

    Sakthivel, Srinivasan; Zatkova, Andrea; Nemethova, Martina; Surovy, Milan; Kadasi, Ludevit; Saravanan, Madurai P

    2014-05-01

    Alkaptonuria (AKU) is an autosomal recessive disorder; caused by the mutations in the homogentisate 1, 2-dioxygenase (HGD) gene located on Chromosome 3q13.33. AKU is a rare disorder with an incidence of 1: 250,000 to 1: 1,000,000, but Slovakia and the Dominican Republic have a relatively higher incidence of 1: 19,000. Our study focused on studying the frequency of AKU and identification of HGD gene mutations in nomads. HGD gene sequencing was used to identify the mutations in alkaptonurics. For the past four years, from subjects suspected to be clinically affected, we found 16 positive cases among a randomly selected cohort of 41 Indian nomads (Narikuravar) settled in the specific area of Tamil Nadu, India. HGD gene mutation analysis showed that 11 of these patients carry the same homozygous splicing mutation c.87 + 1G > A; in five cases, this mutation was found to be heterozygous, while the second AKU-causing mutation was not identified in these patients. This result indicates that the founder effect and high degree of consanguineous marriages have contributed to AKU among nomads. Eleven positive samples were homozygous for a novel mutation c.87 + 1G > A, that abolishes an intron 2 donor splice site and most likely causes skipping of exon 2. The prevalence of AKU observed earlier seems to be highly increased in people of nomadic origin. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/University College London.

  14. A founder effect for p47(phox)Trp193Ter chronic granulomatous disease in Kavkazi Jews.

    PubMed

    de Boer, Martin; Tzur, Shay; van Leeuwen, Karin; Dencher, Paula C D; Skorecki, Karl; Wolach, Baruch; Gavrieli, Ronit; Nasidze, Ivane; Stoneking, Mark; Tanck, Michael W T; Roos, Dirk

    2015-12-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is a rare congenital immune deficiency caused by mutations in any of the five genes encoding NADPH oxidase subunits. One of these genes is NCF1, encoding the p47(phox) protein. A group of 39 patients, 14 of whom are of Kavkazi Jewish descent, was investigated for a founder effect for the mutation c.579G>A (p.Trp193Ter) in NCF1. We analyzed various genetic markers in the NCF1 region, including two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in NCF1 and two short tandem repeats (STRs) located near NCF1. Most patients were homozygous for the c.579G>A mutation, but three patients were hemizygotes, with a deletion of NCF1 on the other allele, and three patients were compound heterozygotes with another mutation in NCF1. All Kavkazi Jewish patients had a c.295G_c.345T SNP combination in NCF1 and shared a common number of repeats in STR3. In addition, 90% of the Kavkazi Jewish patients shared a common number of repeats in STR1. This uniformity indicates that the c.579G>A mutation in NCF1 was introduced some 1200-2300 years ago in the Kavkazi Jewish population. Variation amongst the other investigated populations from the Middle East indicates that this mutation exists in these non-Kavkazi populations already for more than 5000 years. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. [Detection of a clonal complex with Brucella abortus biovar 2 genotype as founder in B. abortus isolates from Argentina].

    PubMed

    Hollender, Daiana; Conde, Sandra B; Salustio, Eduardo; Samartino, Luis E

    2013-01-01

    Brucella abortus is the causative agent of bovine brucellosis, a worldwide zoonosis. Up to date, eight biovars of B. abortus have been described. In Argentina, biovar 1 is the most frequently isolated. However, biovar 2, which is more pathogenic than biovar 1, is also found. Molecular methods for subtyping isolates are necessary for allowing epidemiological surveillance and control of eradication programs. Due to the genetic homogeneity of the genus Brucella, the development of molecular typing tools has been difficult. The publication of microorganism genomes facilitates the design of this approach. The aim of this work was to employ a Multiple Locus VNTR Analysis (MLVA) scheme for strains from Argentina isolated in our laboratory. From the 56 isolates analyzed, 47 different genotypic profiles were obtained. All the strains typed as biovar 2 showed the same profile. This scheme allowed assigning each isolate to the biovar it belongs to. All the genotypes were related using the goeBURST analysis and biovar 2 was proposed as founder.

  16. Generation and Characterization of HIV-1 Transmitted and Founder Virus Consensus Sequence from Intravenous Drug Users in Xinjiang, China.

    PubMed

    Li, Fan; Ma, Liying; Feng, Yi; Hu, Jing; Ni, Na; Ruan, Yuhua; Shao, Yiming

    2017-03-02

    HIV-1 transmission in intravenous drug users (IDUs) has been characterized by high genetic multiplicity and suggests a greater challenge for HIV-1 infection blocking. We investigated a total of 749 sequences of full-length gp160 gene obtained by single genome sequencing (SGS) from 22 HIV-1 early infected IDUs in Xinjiang province, northwest China, and generated a transmitted and founder virus (T/F virus) consensus sequence (IDU.CON). The T/F virus was classified as subtype CRF07_BC and predicted to be CCR5-tropic virus. The variable region (V1, V2, and V4 loop) of IDU.CON showed length variation compared with the heterosexual T/F virus consensus sequence (HSX.CON) and homosexual T/F virus consensus sequence (MSM.CON). A total of 26 N-linked glycosylation sites were discovered in the IDU.CON sequence, which is less than that of MSM.CON and HSX.CON. Characterization of T/F virus from IDUs highlights the genetic make-up and complexity of virus near the moment of transmission or in early infection preceding systemic dissemination and is important toward the development of an effective HIV-1 preventive methods, including vaccines.

  17. Infection of monkeys by simian-human immunodeficiency viruses with transmitted/founder clade C HIV-1 envelopes.

    PubMed

    Asmal, Mohammed; Luedemann, Corinne; Lavine, Christy L; Mach, Linh V; Balachandran, Harikrishnan; Brinkley, Christie; Denny, Thomas N; Lewis, Mark G; Anderson, Hanne; Pal, Ranajit; Sok, Devin; Le, Khoa; Pauthner, Matthias; Hahn, Beatrice H; Shaw, George M; Seaman, Michael S; Letvin, Norman L; Burton, Dennis R; Sodroski, Joseph G; Haynes, Barton F; Santra, Sampa

    2015-01-15

    Simian-human immunodeficiency viruses (SHIVs) that mirror natural transmitted/founder (T/F) viruses in man are needed for evaluation of HIV-1 vaccine candidates in nonhuman primates. Currently available SHIVs contain HIV-1 env genes from chronically-infected individuals and do not reflect the characteristics of biologically relevant HIV-1 strains that mediate human transmission. We chose to develop clade C SHIVs, as clade C is the major infecting subtype of HIV-1 in the world. We constructed 10 clade C SHIVs expressing Env proteins from T/F viruses. Three of these ten clade C SHIVs (SHIV KB9 C3, SHIV KB9 C4 and SHIV KB9 C5) replicated in naïve rhesus monkeys. These three SHIVs are mucosally transmissible and are neutralized by sCD4 and several HIV-1 broadly neutralizing antibodies. However, like natural T/F viruses, they exhibit low Env reactivity and a Tier 2 neutralization sensitivity. Of note, none of the clade C T/F SHIVs elicited detectable autologous neutralizing antibodies in the infected monkeys, even though antibodies that neutralized a heterologous Tier 1 HIV-1 were generated. Challenge with these three new clade C SHIVs will provide biologically relevant tests for vaccine protection in rhesus macaques.

  18. Genetic consequences of a century of protection: serial founder events and survival of the little spotted kiwi (Apteryx owenii)

    PubMed Central

    Ramstad, Kristina M.; Colbourne, Rogan M.; Robertson, Hugh A.; Allendorf, Fred W.; Daugherty, Charles H.

    2013-01-01

    We present the outcome of a century of post-bottleneck isolation of a long-lived species, the little spotted kiwi (Apteryx owenii, LSK) and demonstrate that profound genetic consequences can result from protecting few individuals in isolation. LSK were saved from extinction by translocation of five birds from South Island, New Zealand to Kapiti Island 100 years ago. The Kapiti population now numbers some 1200 birds and provides founders for new populations. We used 15 microsatellite loci to compare genetic variation among Kapiti LSK and the populations of Red Mercury, Tiritiri Matangi and Long Islands that were founded with birds from Kapiti. Two LSK native to D'Urville Island were also placed on Long Island. We found extremely low genetic variation and signatures of acute and recent genetic bottleneck effects in all four populations, indicating that LSK have survived multiple genetic bottlenecks. The Long Island population appears to have arisen from a single mating pair from Kapiti, suggesting there is no genetic contribution from D'Urville birds among extant LSK. The Ne/NC ratio of Kapiti Island LSK (0.03) is exceptionally low for terrestrial vertebrates and suggests that genetic diversity might still be eroding in this population, despite its large census size. PMID:23677342

  19. A common spinal muscular atrophy deletion mutation is present on a single founder haplotype in the US Hutterites.

    PubMed

    Chong, Jessica X; Oktay, A Afşin; Dai, Zunyan; Swoboda, Kathryn J; Prior, Thomas W; Ober, Carole

    2011-10-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive (AR) neuromuscular disease that is one of the most common lethal genetic disorders in children, with carrier frequencies as high as ∼1 in 35 in US Whites. As part of our genetic studies in the Hutterites from South Dakota, we identified a large 22 Mb run of homozygosity, spanning the SMA locus in an affected child, of which 10 Mb was also homozygous in three affected Hutterites from Montana, supporting a single founder origin for the mutation. We developed a haplotype-based method for identifying carriers of the SMN1 deletion that leveraged existing genome-wide SNP genotype data for ∼1400 Hutterites. In combination with two direct PCR-based assays, we identified 176 carriers of the SMN1 deletion, one asymptomatic homozygous adult and three carriers of a de novo deletion. This corresponds to a carrier frequency of one in eight (12.5%) in the South Dakota Hutterites, representing the highest carrier frequency reported to date for SMA and for an AR disease in the Hutterite population. Lastly, we show that 26 SNPs can be used to predict SMA carrier status in the Hutterites, with 99.86% specificity and 99.71% sensitivity.

  20. Four common glomulin mutations cause two thirds of glomuvenous malformations ("familial glomangiomas"): evidence for a founder effect

    PubMed Central

    Brouillard, P; Ghassibe, M; Penington, A; Boon, L; Dompmartin, A; Temple, I; Cordisco, M; Adams, D; Piette, F; Harper, J; Syed, S; Boralevi, F; Taieb, A; Danda, S; Baselga, E; Enjolras, O; Mulliken, J; Vikkula, M

    2005-01-01

    Background: Glomuvenous malformation (GVM) ("familial glomangioma") is a localised cutaneous vascular lesion histologically characterised by abnormal smooth muscle-like "glomus cells" in the walls of distended endothelium lined channels. Inheritable GVM has been linked to chromosome 1p21-22 and is caused by truncating mutations in glomulin. A double hit mutation was identified in one lesion. This finding suggests that GVM results from complete localised loss of function and explains the paradominant mode of inheritance. Objective: To report on the identification of a mutation in glomulin in 23 additional families with GVM. Results: Three mutations are new; the others have been described previously. Among the 17 different inherited mutations in glomulin known up to now in 43 families, the 157delAAGAA mutation is the most common and was present in 21 families (48.8%). Mutation 108C→A was found in five families (11.8%), and the mutations 554delA+556delCCT and 1179delCAA were present together in two families (4.7% each). Polymorphic markers suggested a founder effect for all four mutations. Conclusions: Screening for these mutations should lead to a genetic diagnosis in about 70% of patients with inherited GVM. So far, a mutation in glomulin has been found in all GVM families tested, thus demonstrating locus homogeneity. PMID:15689436

  1. Apparent founder effect during the early years of the San Francisco HIV type 1 epidemic (1978-1979).

    PubMed

    Foley, B; Pan, H; Buchbinder, S; Delwart, E L

    2000-10-10

    HIV-1 envelope sequence variants were RT-PCR amplified from serum samples cryopreserved in San Francisco in 1978-1979. The HIV-1 subtype B env V3-V5 sequences from four homosexual men clustered phylogenetically, with a median nucleotide distance of 2.8%, reflecting a recent common origin. These early U.S. HIV-1 env variants mapped close to the phylogenetic root of the subtype B tree while env variants collected in the United States throughout the 1980s and 1990s showed, on average, increasing genetic diversity and divergence from the subtype B consensus sequence. These results indicate that the majority of HIV-1 currently circulating in the United States may be descended from an initial introduction and rapid spread during the mid- to late 1970s of subtype B viruses with limited variability (i.e., a founder effect). As expected from the starburst-shaped phylogeny of HIV-1 subtype B, contemporary U.S. strains were, on average, more closely related at the nucleic acid and amino acid levels to the earlier 1978-1979 env variants than to each other. The growing levels of HIV-1 genetic diversity, one of multiple obstacles in designing a protective vaccine, may therefore be mitigated by using epidemic founding variants as antigenic strains for protection against contemporary strains.

  2. History of the ISS/SIC: Antoine Depage, one of the founders of the ISS/SIC.

    PubMed

    Van Hee, R

    2002-10-01

    Antoine Depage, born near Brussels in 1862, was one of the founders and first Secretary General of the Société Internationale de Chirurgie (ISS-SIC). After an excellent medical education at the Free Brussels University, he became professor at the same university at the age of 27. Surgically trained by Prof. Thiriar, he became one of the leading Belgian surgeons at the end of the nineteenth century, and he published more than 100 articles in national and international journals. In 1907 he founded a school for nurses in Brussels, to be directed by Edith Cavell. He also vigorously transformed the organization of the public hospitals in the Belgian capital. During World War I Queen Elisabeth appointed him surgeon-in-chief of the Océan-hospital in De Panne, where more than 50,000 soldiers with wounds, fractures, cerebral trauma, nitrous gas intoxication, and infectious diseases, among other problems were treated. The results he and his team obtained were excellent, and mortality was low. Many surgeons, including Alexis Carrel, as well as distinguished political leaders came to visit him in the hospital barracks. After the war he was honored by many political and scientific organizations, including the Société Internationale de Chirurgie. He served our Society not only as Secretary General from 1902 to 1912 but became President of the 4th Congress of the ISS-SIC in New York. Antoine Depage died after a long illness in 1925.

  3. A novel APC promoter 1B deletion shows a founder effect in Italian patients with classical familial adenomatous polyposis phenotype.

    PubMed

    Marabelli, Monica; Gismondi, Viviana; Ricci, Maria Teresa; Vetro, Annalisa; Abou Khouzam, Raefa; Rea, Valentina; Vitellaro, Marco; Zuffardi, Orsetta; Varesco, Liliana; Ranzani, Guglielmina Nadia

    2017-08-09

    Familial adenomatous polyposis is a Mendelian syndrome in which germline loss-of-function mutations of APC are associated with multiple adenomatous polyps of the large bowel, a multiplicity of extracolonic features, and a high lifetime risk of colorectal cancer. Different APC germline mutations have been identified, including sequence changes, genomic rearrangements, and expression defects. Recently, very rare families have been associated with constitutive large deletions encompassing the APC-5' regulatory region, while leaving the remaining gene sequence intact; the regulatory region contains a proximal and a distal promoter, called 1A and 1B, respectively. We identified a novel deletion encompassing promoter 1B in a large Italian family that manifested polyposis in three of the six branches descending from a founding couple married in 1797. By combining different molecular approaches on both DNA and RNA, we precisely mapped this deletion (6858 bp in length) that proved to be associated with APC allele silencing. The finding of the same deletion in two additional polyposis families pointed to a founder mutation in Italy. Deletion carriers from the three families all showed a "classical" polyposis phenotype. To explore the molecular mechanisms underlying promoter deletions, we performed an in silico analysis of the breakpoints of 1A and 1B rearrangements so far reported in the literature; moreover, to decipher genotype-phenotype correlations, we critically reviewed current knowledge on deletions versus point mutations in the APC-5' regulatory region. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. A sea urchin homologue of the chordate Brachyury (T) gene is expressed in the secondary mesenchyme founder cells.

    PubMed

    Harada, Y; Yasuo, H; Satoh, N

    1995-09-01

    Chordates are thought to have emerged from some common ancestor of deuterostomes by organizing shared anatomical and embryological features including a notochord, a dorsal nerve cord and pharyngeal gill slits. Because the notochord is the most prominent feature of chordates and because the Brachyury (T) gene is essential for notochord formation, the T gene is a key molecular probe with which to explore the origin and evolution of chordates. We investigated whether the sea urchin (echinoderm) conserves the T gene and, if so, where the sea urchin T gene is expressed. A cDNA clone for the sea urchin T (HpTa) gene contained a long open reading frame that encodes a polypeptide of 434 amino acids. Although the overall degree of amino acid identity was not very high (52%, sea urchin/mouse), in the T domain of the N terminus the amino acid identity was 73% (sea urchin/mouse). The HpTa gene is present as a single copy per haploid genome. As with the chordate T gene, the expression of HpTa is transient, being first detected in the swimming blastula, maximally transcribed in the gastrula, decreasing at the prism larval stage and barely detectable at the pluteus larval stage. HpTa transcripts were found in the secondary mesenchyme founder cells, vegetal plate of the mesenchyme blastula, extending tip of the invaginating archenteron and, finally, the secondary mesenchyme cells at the late-gastrula stage.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Friedreich ataxia in Louisiana Acadians: demonstration of a founder effect by analysis of microsatellite-generated extended haplotypes.

    PubMed Central

    Sirugo, G; Keats, B; Fujita, R; Duclos, F; Purohit, K; Koenig, M; Mandel, J L

    1992-01-01

    Eleven Acadian families with Friedreich ataxia (FA) who were from southwest Louisiana were studied with a series of polymorphic markers spanning 310 kb in the D9S5-D9S15 region previously shown to be tightly linked to the disease locus. In particular, three very informative microsatellites were tested. Evidence for a strong founder effect was found, since a specific extended haplotype spanning 230 kb from 26P (D9S5) to MCT112 (D9S15) was present on 70% of independent FA chromosomes and only once (6%) on the normal ones. There was no evident correlation between haplotypes and clinical expression. The typing of an additional microsatellite (GS4) located 80 kb from MCT112 created a divergence of the main FA-linked haplotype, generating four minor and one major haplotype. A similar split was observed with GS4 in a patient homozygous for a rare 26P-to-MCT112 haplotype. These results suggest that GS4 is flanking marker for the disease locus, although other interpretations are possible. Images Figure 2 PMID:1347194

  6. A community-based study of mucopolysaccharidosis type VI in Brazil: the influence of founder effect, endogamy and consanguinity.

    PubMed

    Costa-Motta, Fabiana Moura; Bender, Fernanda; Acosta, Angelina; Abé-Sandes, Kiyoko; Machado, Taísa; Bomfim, Thaís; Boa Sorte, Tatiana; da Silva, Danniel; Bittles, Alan; Giugliani, Roberto; Leistner-Segal, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type VI (MPS VI - Maroteaux-Lamy syndrome) is a globally rare lysosomal storage disease caused by a deficiency of arylsulfatase B. However, in Monte Santo, a poor and isolated rural region in Northeast Brazil with large family sizes and high rates of community endogamy and parental consanguinity (α = 0.00483), 9 living and 4 now deceased individuals in 11 kindreds have been diagnosed with MPS VI, all with the same p.H178L missense founder mutation. A further 33 deceased persons have been identified by family members as exhibiting the disease phenotype. Detailed pedigrees were constructed for the 13 genomically confirmed MPS VI patients, with blood samples collected from 236 unaffected family members to determine the prevalence of the p.H178L mutation. A total of 98 (20.8%) mutant alleles and 374 (79.2%) normal alleles were identified, with 41.5% of the individuals heterozygous for the p.H178L mutation and 58.5% homozygous for the normal allele. A significant number of other family members with a 50 or 25% chance of being heterozygous for the p.H178L mutation were unavailable for testing. The data indicate a compelling case for community-based neonatal screening in conjunction with further initiatives among MPS VI family members to promote genetic education and genetic counselling. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel

  7. Genetic consequences of a century of protection: serial founder events and survival of the little spotted kiwi (Apteryx owenii).

    PubMed

    Ramstad, Kristina M; Colbourne, Rogan M; Robertson, Hugh A; Allendorf, Fred W; Daugherty, Charles H

    2013-07-07

    We present the outcome of a century of post-bottleneck isolation of a long-lived species, the little spotted kiwi (Apteryx owenii, LSK) and demonstrate that profound genetic consequences can result from protecting few individuals in isolation. LSK were saved from extinction by translocation of five birds from South Island, New Zealand to Kapiti Island 100 years ago. The Kapiti population now numbers some 1200 birds and provides founders for new populations. We used 15 microsatellite loci to compare genetic variation among Kapiti LSK and the populations of Red Mercury, Tiritiri Matangi and Long Islands that were founded with birds from Kapiti. Two LSK native to D'Urville Island were also placed on Long Island. We found extremely low genetic variation and signatures of acute and recent genetic bottleneck effects in all four populations, indicating that LSK have survived multiple genetic bottlenecks. The Long Island population appears to have arisen from a single mating pair from Kapiti, suggesting there is no genetic contribution from D'Urville birds among extant LSK. The Ne/NC ratio of Kapiti Island LSK (0.03) is exceptionally low for terrestrial vertebrates and suggests that genetic diversity might still be eroding in this population, despite its large census size.

  8. The Role of bZIP Transcription Factors in Green Plant Evolution: Adaptive Features Emerging from Four Founder Genes

    PubMed Central

    Schrago, Carlos Guerra; dos Santos, Renato Vicentini; Mueller-Roeber, Bernd; Vincentz, Michel

    2008-01-01

    Background Transcription factors of the basic leucine zipper (bZIP) family control important processes in all eukaryotes. In plants, bZIPs are regulators of many central developmental and physiological processes including photomorphogenesis, leaf and seed formation, energy homeostasis, and abiotic and biotic stress responses. Here we performed a comprehensive phylogenetic analysis of bZIP genes from algae, mosses, ferns, gymnosperms and angiosperms. Methodology/Principal Findings We identified 13 groups of bZIP homologues in angiosperms, three more than known before, that represent 34 Possible Groups of Orthologues (PoGOs). The 34 PoGOs may correspond to the complete set of ancestral angiosperm bZIP genes that participated in the diversification of flowering plants. Homologous genes dedicated to seed-related processes and ABA-mediated stress responses originated in the common ancestor of seed plants, and three groups of homologues emerged in the angiosperm lineage, of which one group plays a role in optimizing the use of energy. Conclusions/Significance Our data suggest that the ancestor of green plants possessed four bZIP genes functionally involved in oxidative stress and unfolded protein responses that are bZIP-mediated processes in all eukaryotes, but also in light-dependent regulations. The four founder genes amplified and diverged significantly, generating traits that benefited the colonization of new environments. PMID:18698409

  9. Infection of Monkeys by Simian-human Immunodeficiency Viruses with Transmitted/ founder Clade C HIV-1 Envelopes

    PubMed Central

    Asmal, Mohammed; Luedemann, Corinne; Lavine, Christy L.; Mach, Linh V.; Balachandran, Harikrishnan; Brinkley, Christie; Denny, Thomas N.; Lewis, Mark G.; Anderson, Hanne; Pal, Ranajit; Sok, Devin; Le, Khoa; Pauthner, Matthias; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Shaw, George M.; Seaman, Michael S.; Letvin, Norman L.; Burton, Dennis R.; Sodroski, Joseph G.; Haynes, Barton F.; Santra, Sampa

    2014-01-01

    Simian-human immunodeficiency viruses (SHIVs) that mirror natural transmitted/founder (T/F) viruses in man are needed for evaluation of HIV-1 vaccine candidates in nonhuman primates. Currently available SHIVs contain HIV-1 env genes from chronically-infected individuals and do not reflect the characteristics of biologically relevant HIV-1 strains that mediate human transmission. We chose to develop clade C SHIVs, as clade C is the major infecting subtype of HIV-1 in the world. We constructed ten clade C SHIVs expressing Env proteins from T/F viruses. Three of these ten clade C SHIVs (SHIV KB9 C3, SHIV KB9 C4 and SHIV KB9 C5) replicated in naïve rhesus monkeys. These three SHIVs are mucosally transmissible and are neutralized by sCD4 and several HIV-1 broadly neutralizing antibodies. However, like natural T/F viruses, they exhibit low Env reactivity and a Tier 2 neutralization sensitivity. Of note, none of the clade C T/F SHIVs elicited detectable autologous neutralizing antibodies in the infected monkeys, even though antibodies that neutralized a heterologous Tier 1 HIV-1 were generated. Challenge with these three new clade C SHIVs will provide biologically relevant tests for vaccine protection in rhesus macaques. PMID:25462344

  10. Comprehensive SNP-chip for retinitis pigmentosa-Leber congenital amaurosis diagnosis: new mutations and detection of mutational founder effects

    PubMed Central

    Pomares, Esther; Riera, Marina; Permanyer, Jon; Méndez, Pilar; Castro-Navarro, Joaquín; Andrés-Gutiérrez, Ángeles; Marfany, Gemma; Gonzàlez-Duarte, Roser

    2010-01-01

    Fast and efficient high-throughput techniques are essential for the molecular diagnosis of highly heterogeneous hereditary diseases, such as retinitis pigmentosa (RP). We had previously approached RP genetic testing by devising a chip based on co-segregation analysis for the autosomal recessive forms. In this study, we aimed to design a diagnostic tool for all the known genes (40 up to now) responsible for the autosomal dominant and recessive RP and Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA). This new chip analyzes 240 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (6 per gene) on a high-throughput genotyping platform (SNPlex, Applied Biosystems), and genetic diagnosis is based on the co-segregation analysis of SNP haplotypes in independent families. In a single genotyping step, the number of RP candidates to be screened for mutations is considerably reduced, and in the most informative families, all the candidates are ruled out at once. In a panel of RP Spanish pedigrees, the disease chip became a crucial tool for selecting those suitable for genome-wide RP gene search, and saved the burdensome direct mutational screening of every known RP gene. In a large adRP family, the chip allowed ruling out of all but the causative gene, and identification of an unreported null mutation (E181X) in PRPF31. Finally, on the basis of the conservation of the SNP haplotype linked to this pathogenic variant, we propose that the E181X mutation spread through a cohort of geographically isolated families by a founder effect. PMID:19584904

  11. The history of the German Cardiac Society and the American College of Cardiology and their two founders.

    PubMed

    Lüderitz, Berndt; Holmes, David R; Harold, John

    2013-02-26

    The German Cardiac Society is the oldest national cardiac society in Europe, founded on June 3, 1927, in Bad Nauheim by Dr. Bruno Kisch and Professor Arthur Weber. They were actively supported by Dr. Franz Groedel, who together with Kisch became co-founders of the American College of Cardiology in 1949. Both Groedel and Kisch would be proud to see the fulfillment of their visions and dreams, which was commemorated at the joint session of the two societies held during the 78th annual meeting of the German Cardiac Society in Mannheim, Germany. "It is ironic that their dreadful years in Germany and their loss to German Cardiology helped to contribute to advances in American and international Cardiology," said Dr. Simon Dack, American College of Cardiology president in 1956 and 1957. The legacy of Groedel might be reflected by his own words: "We will meet the future not merely by dreams but by concerned action and inextinguishable enthusiasm". Copyright © 2013 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Tyrosinemia type II: Mutation update, 11 novel mutations and description of 5 independent subjects with a novel founder mutation.

    PubMed

    Peña-Quintana, L; Scherer, G; Curbelo-Estévez, M L; Jiménez-Acosta, F; Hartmann, B; La Roche, F; Meavilla-Olivas, S; Pérez-Cerdá, C; García-Segarra, N; Giguère, Y; Huppke, P; Mitchell, G A; Mönch, E; Trump, D; Vianey-Saban, C; Trimble, E R; Vitoria-Miñana, I; Reyes-Suárez, D; Ramírez-Lorenzo, T; Tugores, A

    2017-09-01

    Tyrosinemia type II, also known as Richner-Hanhart Syndrome, is an extremely rare autosomal recessive disorder, caused by mutations in the gene encoding hepatic cytosolic tyrosine aminotransferase, leading to the accumulation of tyrosine and its metabolites which cause ocular and skin lesions, that may be accompanied by neurological manifestations, mostly intellectual disability. To update disease-causing mutations and current clinical knowledge of the disease. Genetic and clinical information were obtained from a collection of both unreported and previously reported cases. We report 106 families, represented by 143 individuals, carrying a total of 36 genetic variants, 11 of them not previously known to be associated with the disease. Variants include 3 large deletions, 21 non-synonymous and 5 nonsense amino-acid changes, 5 frameshifts and 2 splice variants. We also report 5 patients from Gran Canaria, representing the largest known group of unrelated families sharing the same P406L mutation. Data analysis did not reveal a genotype-phenotype correlation, but stressed the need of early diagnosis: All patients improved the oculocutaneous lesions after dietary treatment but neurological symptoms prevailed. The discovery of founder mutations in isolated populations, and the benefits of early intervention, should increase diagnostic awareness in newborns. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Genome Wide Association Analysis of a Founder Population Identified TAF3 as a Gene for MCHC in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Pistis, Giorgio; Okonkwo, Shawntel U.; Traglia, Michela; Sala, Cinzia; Shin, So-Youn; Masciullo, Corrado; Buetti, Iwan; Massacane, Roberto; Mangino, Massimo; Thein, Swee-Lay; Spector, Timothy D.; Ganesh, Santhi; Pirastu, Nicola; Gasparini, Paolo; Soranzo, Nicole; Camaschella, Clara; Hart, Daniel; Green, Michael R.; Toniolo, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    The red blood cell related traits are highly heritable but their genetics are poorly defined. Only 5–10% of the total observed variance is explained by the genetic loci found to date, suggesting that additional loci should be searched using approaches alternative to large meta analysis. GWAS (Genome Wide Association Study) for red blood cell traits in a founder population cohort from Northern Italy identified a new locus for mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC) in the TAF3 gene. The association was replicated in two cohorts (rs1887582, P = 4.25E–09). TAF3 encodes a transcription cofactor that participates in core promoter recognition complex, and is involved in zebrafish and mouse erythropoiesis. We show here that TAF3 is required for transcription of the SPTA1 gene, encoding alpha spectrin, one of the proteins that link the plasma membrane to the actin cytoskeleton. Mutations in SPTA1 are responsible for hereditary spherocytosis, a monogenic disorder of MCHC, as well as for the normal MCHC level. Based on our results, we propose that TAF3 is required for normal erythropoiesis in human and that it might have a role in controlling the ratio between hemoglobin (Hb) and cell volume and in the dynamics of RBC maturation in healthy individuals. Finally, TAF3 represents a potential candidate or a modifier gene for disorders of red cell membrane. PMID:23935956

  14. A founder MYBPC3 mutation results in HCM with a high risk of sudden death after the fourth decade of life.

    PubMed

    Calore, Chiara; De Bortoli, Marzia; Romualdi, Chiara; Lorenzon, Alessandra; Angelini, Annalisa; Basso, Cristina; Thiene, Gaetano; Iliceto, Sabino; Rampazzo, Alessandra; Melacini, Paola

    2015-05-01

    Mutations in the cardiac myosin binding protein C (MYBPC3) gene account for a significant proportion of patients affected with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). The aim of this study was to evaluate the penetrance and the impact of a frequent founder MYBPC3 mutation on HCM clinical expression and prognosis. Mutation screening of MYBPC3 gene was performed in 97 HCM probands. Nineteen (19.5%) resulted to be carriers of the founder p.F305Pfs*27 mutation and other 45 mutation carriers were identified during the evaluation of 14 families. Eleven (38%) mutation carriers were diagnosed between ages 30 years and 40 years. Disease penetrance was incomplete (64.4%), age-related and was greater in men than women (85% vs 48%, p=0.009). Probands carrying the founder mutation exhibited highest prevalence of non-sustained ventricular tachycardia (63% vs 22%, p=0.003; 63% vs 23%, p=0.01) and implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (58% vs 17%, p=0.001; 58% vs 18%, p=0.005) when compared with probands without MYBPC3 mutations or carrying other MYBPC3 mutations. Reduced survival due to sudden cardiac death (SCD) or aborted SCD occurred more frequently after the fourth decade of life in probands carrying p.F305Pfs*27 mutation than those without MYBPC3 mutations (32% vs 15%, p=0.01). p.F305Pfs*27 mutation carriers have a high probability to develop the disease between ages 30 years and 40 years with a significant major risk if they are men. This founder mutation is associated with an increase of SCD/aborted SCD events after the fourth decade of life.These findings are of relevant importance for management and clinical decision-making in patients with HCM. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  15. A molecular phylogeny of the Pacific clade of Cyrtandra (Gesneriaceae) reveals a Fijian origin, recent diversification, and the importance of founder events.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Melissa A; Clark, John R; Wagner, Warren L; McDade, Lucinda A

    2017-07-10

    Cyrtandra (Gesneriaceae) is among the largest genera of flowering plants in the remote oceanic islands of the Pacific, with an estimated 175 species distributed across an area that extends from the Solomon Islands, east to the Marquesas Islands, and north to the Hawaiian Islands. The vast majority of species are single-island endemics that inhabit upland rainforests. Although previous molecular phylogenetic studies greatly advanced our understanding of the diversification of Pacific Cyrtandra, a number of uncertainties remain regarding phylogenetic relationships, divergence times, and biogeographic patterns within this large and widely dispersed group. In the present study, five loci (ITS, ETS, Cyrt1, psbA-trnH, and rpl32-trnL) were amplified and sequenced for phylogenetic reconstruction of 121 Cyrtandra taxa. Maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference confirmed that C. taviunensis from Fiji is sister to the remaining members of the Pacific clade. Dating analyses and ancestral area estimation indicates that the Pacific clade of Cyrtandra originated in Fiji during the Miocene ca. 9mya. All major crown lineages within the Pacific clade appeared < 5mya, coincident with the emergence of numerous Pacific islands and a subsequent increase in available habitat. The biogeographic history of Cyrtandra in the Pacific has been shaped by extinction, dispersal distance, and founder events. Biogeographic stochastic mapping analyses suggest that cladogenesis within Pacific Cyrtandra involved a combination of narrow (within-area) sympatry and founder events. A mean of 24 founder events was recovered between Pacific archipelagos, while a mean of 10 founder events was recovered within the Hawaiian archipelago. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Out of Africa: modern human origins special feature: explaining worldwide patterns of human genetic variation using a coalescent-based serial founder model of migration outward from Africa.

    PubMed

    DeGiorgio, Michael; Jakobsson, Mattias; Rosenberg, Noah A

    2009-09-22

    Studies of worldwide human variation have discovered three trends in summary statistics as a function of increasing geographic distance from East Africa: a decrease in heterozygosity, an increase in linkage disequilibrium (LD), and a decrease in the slope of the ancestral allele frequency spectrum. Forward simulations of unlinked loci have shown that the decline in heterozygosity can be described by a serial founder model, in which populations migrate outward from Africa through a process where each of a series of populations is formed from a subset of the previous population in the outward expansion. Here, we extend this approach by developing a retrospective coalescent-based serial founder model that incorporates linked loci. Our model both recovers the observed decline in heterozygosity with increasing distance from Africa and produces the patterns observed in LD and the ancestral allele frequency spectrum. Surprisingly, although migration between neighboring populations and limited admixture between modern and archaic humans can be accommodated in the model while continuing to explain the three trends, a competing model in which a wave of outward modern human migration expands into a series of preexisting archaic populations produces nearly opposite patterns to those observed in the data. We conclude by developing a simpler model to illustrate that the feature that permits the serial founder model but not the archaic persistence model to explain the three trends observed with increasing distance from Africa is its incorporation of a cumulative effect of genetic drift as humans colonized the world.

  17. Growth hormone insensitivity with immune dysfunction caused by a STAT5B mutation in the south of Brazil: evidence for a founder effect

    PubMed Central

    Scalco, Renata C.; Gonçalves, Fernanda T.; Santos, Hadassa C.; Cardena, Mari M. S. G.; Tonelli, Carlos A.; Funari, Mariana F. A.; Aracava, Rosana M.; Pereira, Alexandre C.; Fridman, Cintia; Jorge, Alexander A. L.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Homozygous STAT5B mutations causing growth hormone insensitivity with immune dysfunction were described in 10 patients since 2003, including two Brazilian brothers from the south of Brazil. Our objectives were to evaluate the prevalence of their STAT5B mutation in this region and to analyze the presence of a founder effect. We obtained DNA samples from 1,205 local inhabitants, 48 relatives of the homozygous patients and four individuals of another affected family. Genotyping for STAT5B c.424_427del mutation and for two polymorphic markers around it was done through fragment analysis technique. We also determined Y-chromosome and mtDNA haplotypes and genomic ancestry in heterozygous carriers. We identified seven families with STAT5B c.424_427del mutation, with 33 heterozygous individuals. The minor allelic frequency of this mutation was 0.29% in this population (confidence interval 95% 0.08-0.5%), which is significantly higher than the frequency of other pathogenic STAT5B allele variants observed in public databases (p < 0.001). All heterozygous carriers had the same haplotype present in the homozygous patients, found in only 9.4% of non-carriers (p < 0.001), supporting the existence of a founder effect. The Y-chromosome haplotype, mtDNA and genomic ancestry analysis indicated a European origin of this mutation. Our results provide compelling evidence for a founder effect of STAT5B c.424_427del mutation. PMID:28590503

  18. Mucolipidosis II: a single causal mutation in the N-acetylglucosamine-1-phosphotransferase gene (GNPTAB) in a French Canadian founder population.

    PubMed

    Plante, M; Claveau, S; Lepage, P; Lavoie, E-M; Brunet, S; Roquis, D; Morin, C; Vézina, H; Laprise, C

    2008-03-01

    Mucolipidosis (ML) II (I-cell disease) is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by a deficiency of UDP-N-acetylglucosamine:lysosomal enzyme N-acetylglucosamine-1-phosphotransferase. MLII is an autosomal recessive disease with a carrier rate estimated at 1/39 in Saguenay-Lac-Saint-Jean (SLSJ) (Quebec, Canada), which is the highest frequency documented worldwide. To identify the causing mutation, we sequenced GNPTAB exons in 27 parents of 16 MLII-deceased children from the SLSJ region as obligatory and potential carriers. We also performed a genealogical reconstruction for each parent to evaluate consanguinity levels and genetic contribution of ancestors. Our goal was to identify which parameters could explain the high MLII frequency observed in the SLSJ population. A single mutation (c.3503_3504delTC) was found in all obligatory carriers. In addition, 11 apparent polymorphisms were identified. The mutation was not detected in genomic DNA of 50 unrelated controls. Genealogical data show six founders (three couples) with a higher probability of having introduced the mutation in the population. The frequency of the mutation was increased as a consequence of this founder effect and of the resulting population structure. We suggest that c.3503_3504delTC is the allele causing MLII in the SLSJ population, and its high carrier rate is most likely explained by a founder effect.

  19. A slowly progressive form of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2C associated with founder mutation in the SGCG gene in Puerto Rican Hispanics.

    PubMed

    Al-Zaidy, Samiah A; Malik, Vinod; Kneile, Kelley; Rosales, Xiomara Q; Gomez, Ana Maria; Lewis, Sarah; Hashimoto, Sayaka; Gastier-Foster, Julie; Kang, Peter; Darras, Basil; Kunkel, Louis; Carlo, Jose; Sahenk, Zarife; Moore, Steven A; Pyatt, Robert; Mendell, Jerry R

    2015-03-01

    Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2C (LGMD2C) is considered one of the severe forms of childhood-onset muscular dystrophy. The geographical distribution of founder mutations in the SGCG gene has a prominent effect on the prevalence of LGMD2C in certain populations. The aim of this study was to confirm the hypothesis that the c.787G>A (p.E263K) mutation in the SGCG gene is a founder mutation among Puerto Rican Hispanics and to characterize the associated clinical and immunohistochemical phenotype. Genotyping of six polymorphic microsatellite markers internal to (D13S232) and flanking (D13S175, D13S292, D13S787, D13S1243, D13S283) the SGCG gene was performed on four unrelated Puerto Rican patients with LGMD2C. Preserved ambulation to the second decade of life was observed in at least two subjects. Immunostaining of skeletal muscle demonstrated absence of γ-sarcoglycan in all affected subjects. Two markers, D13S232 and D13S292, were highly informative and confirmed that all four families share the haplotype of the mutant allele. Our findings confirm that the E263K missense mutation in the SGCG gene is a founder mutation in Puerto Rican Hispanics. A slowly progressive disease course with prolonged preservation of ambulation can be seen in association with this mutation, providing evidence for phenotypic variability.

  20. A recurrent F8 mutation (c.6046C>T) causing hemophilia A in 8% of northern Italian patients: evidence for a founder effect.

    PubMed

    Garagiola, Isabella; Seregni, Sabrina; Mortarino, Mimosa; Mancuso, Maria Elisa; Fasulo, Maria Rosaria; Notarangelo, Lucia Dora; Peyvandi, Flora

    2016-03-01

    Hemophilia A is a heterogeneous hemorrhagic disorder caused by a large number of mutations. Recurrent mutations are rare, except intron 22 and intron 1 inversions. The substitution of a cytosine to a thymine at nucleotide 6046 in F8 gene was identified in a group of Italian patients affected by hemophilia A from a specific region of Northern Italy with a prevalence of 7.6%. This F8 variant was the second most frequent mutation in our cohort, after the intron 22 inversion. The identification of the same mutation in a restricted population gets to suppose the existence of a founder effect. Intragenic and extragenic polymorphic markers were tested to assess this assumption. A peculiar haplotype in linkage disequilibrium with this recurrent mutation (c.6046C>T) was identified in 71% of patients, supporting a founder effect. This distinctive haplotype was not identified in a control group (Fisher's exact test, P < 0.0001), coming from the same geographic region. These data strongly suggested the presence of a founder effect, supporting the existence of a single mutation event. Using DMLE+2.3 software and the mathematical approach described by Bengtsson and Thomson, the inferred age of this mutation is supposed to be about 2325 years (95% CI: 904-5081) ago.

  1. Founder effect for the Ala431Glu mutation of the presenilin 1 gene causing early-onset Alzheimer's disease in Mexican families.

    PubMed

    Yescas, Petra; Huertas-Vazquez, Adriana; Villarreal-Molina, María Teresa; Rasmussen, Astrid; Tusié-Luna, María Teresa; López, Marisol; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel; Alonso, María Elisa

    2006-07-01

    The etiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is complex. To date, molecular genetic studies in several families affected with AD have identified three genes associated with highly penetrant early-onset AD: Presenilin 1 (PSEN1), Presenilin 2 (PSEN2) and beta-amyloid precursor protein (APP); and one gene (apolipoprotein E) associated with late-onset AD. Molecular analysis of the PSEN1 gene was performed by direct sequencing of genomic DNA. The possible founder effect was investigated analyzing two highly polymorphic microsatellite markers flanking the PSEN1 gene. Twelve unrelated Mexican families with early-onset AD were analyzed. The Ala431Glu mutation in exon 12 of PSEN1 was found in nine (75%) of these families, which segregated showing autosomal dominant inheritance. Because all families bearing the mutation are from the State of Jalisco (located in Western Mexico), a founder effect was hypothesized. Microsatellite haplotype analysis suggested a common ancestor in these nine kindreds. In conclusion, the Ala431Glu mutation is a prevalent cause of early-onset familial Alzheimer's disease in families from the State of Jalisco, Mexico. Genetic evidence supports that it is a founder mutation descending from a single common ancestor. These findings have important implications for prompt diagnosis and genetic counseling for Mexican patients with familial AD from Jalisco.

  2. Compositional assessments of key maize populations: B73 hybrids of the Nested Association Mapping founder lines and diverse landrace inbred lines.

    PubMed

    Venkatesh, Tyamagondlu V; Harrigan, George G; Perez, Tim; Flint-Garcia, Sherry

    2015-06-03

    The present study provides an assessment of the compositional diversity in maize B73 hybrids derived both from the Nested Association Mapping (NAM) founder lines and from a diverse collection of landrace accessions from North and South America. The NAM founders represent a key population of publicly available lines that are used extensively in the maize community to investigate the genetic basis of complex traits. Landraces are also of interest to the maize community as they offer the potential to discover new alleles that could be incorporated into modern maize lines. The compositional analysis of B73 hybrids from the 25 NAM founders and 24 inbred lines derived from landraces included measurements of proximates (protein, fat, ash, and starch), fibers, minerals, amino acids, fatty acids, tocopherols (α-, γ-, and δ-), β-carotene, phytic acid, and raffinose. Grain was harvested from a replicated trial in New York, USA. For each data set (NAM and landrace) canonical discriminant analysis allowed separation of distinct breeding groups (tropical, temperate, flint, mixed/intermediate) within each data set. Overall, results highlighted extensive variation in all composition components assessed for both sets of hybrids. The variation observed for some components within the landraces may therefore be of value for increasing their levels in modern maize lines. The study described here provided significant information on contributions of conventional breeding to crop compositional variation, as well as valuable information on key genetic resources for the maize community in the development of new improved lines.

  3. Growth hormone insensitivity with immune dysfunction caused by a STAT5B mutation in the south of Brazil: evidence for a founder effect.

    PubMed

    Scalco, Renata C; Gonçalves, Fernanda T; Santos, Hadassa C; Cardena, Mari M S G; Tonelli, Carlos A; Funari, Mariana F A; Aracava, Rosana M; Pereira, Alexandre C; Fridman, Cintia; Jorge, Alexander A L

    2017-01-01

    Homozygous STAT5B mutations causing growth hormone insensitivity with immune dysfunction were described in 10 patients since 2003, including two Brazilian brothers from the south of Brazil. Our objectives were to evaluate the prevalence of their STAT5B mutation in this region and to analyze the presence of a founder effect. We obtained DNA samples from 1,205 local inhabitants, 48 relatives of the homozygous patients and four individuals of another affected family. Genotyping for STAT5B c.424_427del mutation and for two polymorphic markers around it was done through fragment analysis technique. We also determined Y-chromosome and mtDNA haplotypes and genomic ancestry in heterozygous carriers. We identified seven families with STAT5B c.424_427del mutation, with 33 heterozygous individuals. The minor allelic frequency of this mutation was 0.29% in this population (confidence interval 95% 0.08-0.5%), which is significantly higher than the frequency of other pathogenic STAT5B allele variants observed in public databases (p < 0.001). All heterozygous carriers had the same haplotype present in the homozygous patients, found in only 9.4% of non-carriers (p < 0.001), supporting the existence of a founder effect. The Y-chromosome haplotype, mtDNA and genomic ancestry analysis indicated a European origin of this mutation. Our results provide compelling evidence for a founder effect of STAT5B c.424_427del mutation.

  4. Identification, molecular cloning, and analysis of full-length hepatitis C virus transmitted/founder genotypes 1, 3, and 4.

    PubMed

    Stoddard, Mark B; Li, Hui; Wang, Shuyi; Saeed, Mohsan; Andrus, Linda; Ding, Wenge; Jiang, Xinpei; Learn, Gerald H; von Schaewen, Markus; Wen, Jessica; Goepfert, Paul A; Hahn, Beatrice H; Ploss, Alexander; Rice, Charles M; Shaw, George M

    2015-02-24

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is characterized by persistent replication of a complex mixture of viruses termed a "quasispecies." Transmission is generally associated with a stringent population bottleneck characterized by infection by limited numbers of "transmitted/founder" (T/F) viruses. Characterization of T/F genomes of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) has been integral to studies of transmission, immunopathogenesis, and vaccine development. Here, we describe the identification of complete T/F genomes of HCV by single-genome sequencing of plasma viral RNA from acutely infected subjects. A total of 2,739 single-genome-derived amplicons comprising 10,966,507 bp from 18 acute-phase and 11 chronically infected subjects were analyzed. Acute-phase sequences diversified essentially randomly, except for the poly(U/UC) tract, which was subject to polymerase slippage. Fourteen acute-phase subjects were productively infected by more than one genetically distinct virus, permitting assessment of recombination between replicating genomes. No evidence of recombination was found among 1,589 sequences analyzed. Envelope sequences of T/F genomes lacked transmission signatures that could distinguish them from chronic infection viruses. Among chronically infected subjects, higher nucleotide substitution rates were observed in the poly(U/UC) tract than in envelope hypervariable region 1. Fourteen full-length molecular clones with variable poly(U/UC) sequences corresponding to seven genotype 1a, 1b, 3a, and 4a T/F viruses were generated. Like most unadapted HCV clones, T/F genomes did not replicate efficiently in Huh 7.5 cells, indicating that additional cellular factors or viral adaptations are necessary for in vitro replication. Full-length T/F HCV genomes and their progeny provide unique insights into virus transmission, virus evolution, and virus-host interactions associated with immunopathogenesis. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infects 2% to 3% of the world

  5. Concordance of nuclear and mitochondrial DNA markers in detecting a founder event in Lake Clark sockeye salmon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ramstad, Kristina M.; Woody, Carol Ann; Habicht, Chris; Sage, G. Kevin; Seeb, James E.; Allendorf, Fred W.

    2007-01-01

    Genetic bottleneck effects can reduce genetic variation, persistence probability, and evolutionary potential of populations. Previous microsatellite analysis suggested a bottleneck associated with a common founding of sock-eye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka populations of Lake Clark, Alaska, about 100 to 400 generations ago. The common foundingevent occurred after the last glacial recession and resulted in reduced allelic diversity and strong divergence of Lake Clarksockeye salmon relative to neighboring Six Mile Lake and LakeIliamna populations. Here we used two additional genetic marker types (allozymes and mtDNA) to examine these patterns further. Allozyme and mtDNA results were congruent with the microsatellite data in suggesting a common founder event in LakeClark sockeye salmon and confirmed the divergence of Lake Clarkpopulations from neighboring Six Mile Lake and Lake Iliamna populations. The use of multiple marker types provided better understanding of the bottleneck in Lake Clark. For example, the Sucker Bay Lake population had an exceptionally severe reduction in allelic diversity at microsatellite loci, but not at mtDNA. This suggests that the reduced microsatellite variation in Sucker Bay Lake fish is due to consistently smaller effective population size than other Lake Clark populations, rather than a more acute or additional bottleneck since founding. Caution is urged in using reduced heterozygosity as a measure of genetic bottleneck effects because stochastic variance among loci resulted in an overall increase in allozyme heterozygosity within bottlenecked Lake Clark populations. However, heterozygosity excess, which assesses heterozygosity relative to allelic variation, detected genetic bottleneck effects in both allozyme and microsatellite loci. 

  6. Fine localization of the Nijmegen breakage syndrome gene to 8q21: evidence for a common founder haplotype.

    PubMed Central

    Cerosaletti, K M; Lange, E; Stringham, H M; Weemaes, C M; Smeets, D; Sölder, B; Belohradsky, B H; Taylor, A M; Karnes, P; Elliott, A; Komatsu, K; Gatti, R A; Boehnke, M; Concannon, P

    1998-01-01

    Nijmegen breakage syndrome (NBS) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by microcephaly, a birdlike face, growth retardation, immunodeficiency, lack of secondary sex characteristics in females, and increased incidence of lymphoid cancers. NBS cells display a phenotype similar to that of cells from ataxia-telangiectasia patients, including chromosomal instability, radiation sensitivity, and aberrant cell-cycle-checkpoint control following exposure to ionizing radiation. A recent study reported genetic linkage of NBS to human chromosome 8q21, with strong linkage disequilibrium detected at marker D8S1811 in eastern European NBS families. We collected a geographically diverse group of NBS families and tested them for linkage, using an expanded panel of markers at 8q21. In this article, we report linkage of NBS to 8q21 in 6/7 of these families, with a maximum LOD score of 3.58. Significant linkage disequilibrium was detected for 8/13 markers tested in the 8q21 region, including D8S1811. In order to further localize the gene for NBS, we generated a radiation-hybrid map of markers at 8q21 and constructed haplotypes based on this map. Examination of disease haplotypes segregating in 11 NBS pedigrees revealed recombination events that place the NBS gene between D8S1757 and D8S270. A common founder haplotype was present on 15/18 disease chromosomes from 9/11 NBS families. Inferred (ancestral) recombination events involving this common haplotype suggest that NBS can be localized further, to an interval flanked by markers D8S273 and D8S88. PMID:9634525

  7. Identification of Genetic Variation on the Horse Y Chromosome and the Tracing of Male Founder Lineages in Modern Breeds

    PubMed Central

    Wallner, Barbara; Vogl, Claus; Shukla, Priyank; Burgstaller, Joerg P.; Druml, Thomas; Brem, Gottfried

    2013-01-01

    The paternally inherited Y chromosome displays the population genetic history of males. While modern domestic horses (Equus caballus) exhibit abundant diversity within maternally inherited mitochondrial DNA, no significant Y-chromosomal sequence diversity has been detected. We used high throughput sequencing technology to identify the first polymorphic Y-chromosomal markers useful for tracing paternal lines. The nucleotide variability of the modern horse Y chromosome is extremely low, resulting in six haplotypes (HT), all clearly distinct from the Przewalski horse (E. przewalskii). The most widespread HT1 is ancestral and the other five haplotypes apparently arose on the background of HT1 by mutation or gene conversion after domestication. Two haplotypes (HT2 and HT3) are widely distributed at high frequencies among modern European horse breeds. Using pedigree information, we trace the distribution of Y-haplotype diversity to particular founders. The mutation leading to HT3 occurred in the germline of the famous English Thoroughbred stallion “Eclipse” or his son or grandson and its prevalence demonstrates the influence of this popular paternal line on modern sport horse breeds. The pervasive introgression of Thoroughbred stallions during the last 200 years to refine autochthonous breeds has strongly affected the distribution of Y-chromosomal variation in modern horse breeds and has led to the replacement of autochthonous Y chromosomes. Only a few northern European breeds bear unique variants at high frequencies or fixed within but not shared among breeds. Our Y-chromosomal data complement the well established mtDNA lineages and document the male side of the genetic history of modern horse breeds and breeding practices. PMID:23573227

  8. Effect of a Founder Event on Variation in the Genetic Sex-Determining System of the Fire Ant Solenopsis Invicta

    PubMed Central

    Ross, K. G.; Vargo, E. L.; Keller, L.; Trager, J. C.

    1993-01-01

    Effects of a recent founder event on genetic diversity in wild populations of the fire ant Solenopsis invicta were studied, with particular attention given to the genetic sex-determining system. Diploid males are far more common relative to haploid males in introduced populations than in native populations of fire ants, and queens that produce diploid males account for a significantly larger proportion of the mated queens in introduced than in native populations. Differences between native and introduced populations in attributes of the mating systems (i.e., queen mating frequency or level of inbreeding) can be excluded as factors contributing to these different levels of diploid male production. Thus, we conclude that diploid males have increased in frequency in introduced populations because of a loss of allelic diversity at the sex-determining locus (loci). This loss of sex alleles has generated a substantial increase in the estimated segregational genetic load associated with production of sterile diploid males in introduced populations over the load in native populations. The loss of allelic diversity in the sex-determining system in introduced S. invicta is paralleled by a loss of electrophoretically detectable rare alleles at protein-encoding loci. Such concordance between these different types of markers is predicted because each of the many sex alleles present in the native populations is expected to be rare. Estimates of expected heterozygosity (H(exp)) based on 76 electrophoretic loci do not differ significantly between the native and introduced fire ant populations, illustrating the lack of sensitivity of this measure for detecting many types of bottlenecks. PMID:8293983

  9. Identification of genetic variation on the horse y chromosome and the tracing of male founder lineages in modern breeds.

    PubMed

    Wallner, Barbara; Vogl, Claus; Shukla, Priyank; Burgstaller, Joerg P; Druml, Thomas; Brem, Gottfried

    2013-01-01

    The paternally inherited Y chromosome displays the population genetic history of males. While modern domestic horses (Equus caballus) exhibit abundant diversity within maternally inherited mitochondrial DNA, no significant Y-chromosomal sequence diversity has been detected. We used high throughput sequencing technology to identify the first polymorphic Y-chromosomal markers useful for tracing paternal lines. The nucleotide variability of the modern horse Y chromosome is extremely low, resulting in six haplotypes (HT), all clearly distinct from the Przewalski horse (E. przewalskii). The most widespread HT1 is ancestral and the other five haplotypes apparently arose on the background of HT1 by mutation or gene conversion after domestication. Two haplotypes (HT2 and HT3) are widely distributed at high frequencies among modern European horse breeds. Using pedigree information, we trace the distribution of Y-haplotype diversity to particular founders. The mutation leading to HT3 occurred in the germline of the famous English Thoroughbred stallion "Eclipse" or his son or grandson and its prevalence demonstrates the influence of this popular paternal line on modern sport horse breeds. The pervasive introgression of Thoroughbred stallions during the last 200 years to refine autochthonous breeds has strongly affected the distribution of Y-chromosomal variation in modern horse breeds and has led to the replacement of autochthonous Y chromosomes. Only a few northern European breeds bear unique variants at high frequencies or fixed within but not shared among breeds. Our Y-chromosomal data complement the well established mtDNA lineages and document the male side of the genetic history of modern horse breeds and breeding practices.

  10. Large number of rebounding/founder HIV variants emerge from multifocal infection in lymphatic tissues after treatment interruption.

    PubMed

    Rothenberger, Meghan K; Keele, Brandon F; Wietgrefe, Stephen W; Fletcher, Courtney V; Beilman, Gregory J; Chipman, Jeffrey G; Khoruts, Alexander; Estes, Jacob D; Anderson, Jodi; Callisto, Samuel P; Schmidt, Thomas E; Thorkelson, Ann; Reilly, Cavan; Perkey, Katherine; Reimann, Thomas G; Utay, Netanya S; Nganou Makamdop, Krystelle; Stevenson, Mario; Douek, Daniel C; Haase, Ashley T; Schacker, Timothy W

    2015-03-10

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) suppresses HIV replication in most individuals but cannot eradicate latently infected cells established before ART was initiated. Thus, infection rebounds when treatment is interrupted by reactivation of virus production from this reservoir. Currently, one or a few latently infected resting memory CD4 T cells are thought be the principal source of recrudescent infection, but this estimate is based on peripheral blood rather than lymphoid tissues (LTs), the principal sites of virus production and persistence before initiating ART. We, therefore, examined lymph node (LN) and gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT) biopsies from fully suppressed subjects, interrupted therapy, monitored plasma viral load (pVL), and repeated biopsies on 12 individuals as soon as pVL became detectable. Isolated HIV RNA-positive (vRNA+) cells were detected by in situ hybridization in LTs obtained before interruption in several patients. After interruption, multiple foci of vRNA+ cells were detected in 6 of 12 individuals as soon as pVL was measureable and in some subjects, in more than one anatomic site. Minimal estimates of the number of rebounding/founder (R/F) variants were determined by single-gene amplification and sequencing of viral RNA or DNA from peripheral blood mononuclear cells and plasma obtained at or just before viral recrudescence. Sequence analysis revealed a large number of R/F viruses representing recrudescent viremia from multiple sources. Together, these findings are consistent with the origins of recrudescent infection by reactivation from many latently infected cells at multiple sites. The inferred large pool of cells and sites to rekindle recrudescent infection highlights the challenges in eradicating HIV.

  11. Fine localization of the Nijmegen breakage syndrome gene to 8q21: Evidence for a common founder haplotype

    SciTech Connect

    Cerosaletti, K.M.; Lange, E.; Stringham, H.M.

    1998-07-01

    Nijmegen breakage syndrome (NBS) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by microcephaly, a birdlike face, growth retardation, immunodeficiency, lack of secondary sex characteristics in females, and increased incidence of lymphoid cancers. NBS cells display a phenotype similar to that of cells from ataxia-telangiectasia patients, including chromosomal instability, radiation sensitivity, and aberrant cell-cycle-checkpoint control following exposure to ionizing radiation. A recent study reported genetic linkage of NBs to human chromosome 8q21, with strong linkage disequilibrium detected at marker D8S1811 in eastern European NBS families. The authors collected a geographically diverse group of NBS families and tested them for linkage, using an expanded panel of markers at 8q21. In this article, the authors report linkage of NBS to 8q21 in 6/7 of these families, with a maximum LOD score of 3.58. Significant linkage disequilibrium was detected for 8/13 markers tested in the 8q21 region, including D8S1811. In order to further localize the gene for NBS, the authors generated a radiation-hybrid map of markers at 8q21 and constructed haplotypes based on this map. Examination of disease haplotypes segregating in 11 NBS pedigrees revealed recombination events that place the NBS gene between D8S1757 and D8S270. A common founder haplotype was present on 15/18 disease chromosomes from 9/11 NBS families. Inferred (ancestral) recombination events involving this common haplotype suggest that NBS can be localized further, to an interval flanked by markers D8S273 and D8S88.

  12. Founder representation and effective population size in old versus young breeds-genetic diversity of Finnish and Nordic Spitz.

    PubMed

    Kumpulainen, M; Anderson, H; Svevar, T; Kangasvuo, I; Donner, J; Pohjoismäki, J

    2017-10-01

    Finnish Spitz is 130-year-old breed and has been highly popular in Finland throughout its history. Nordic Spitz is very similar to Finnish Spitz by origin and use, but is a relatively recent breed with much smaller population size. To see how breed age and breeding history have influenced the current population, we performed comprehensive population genetic analysis using pedigree data of 28,119 Finnish and 9,009 Nordic Spitzes combined with genomewide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data from 135 Finnish and 110 Nordic Spitzes. We found that the Finnish Spitz has undergone repeated male bottlenecks resulting in dramatic loss of genetic diversity, reflected by 20 effective founders (fa ) and mean heterozygosity (Hz) of 0.313. The realized effective population size in the breed based on pedigree analysis (N¯ec) is 168, whereas the genetic effective population size (Neg ) computed the decay of linkage disequilibrium (r(2) ) is only 57 individuals. Nordic Spitz, although once been near extinction, has not been exposed to similar repeated bottlenecks than Finnish Spitz and had fa of 27 individuals. However, due to the smaller total population size, the breed has also smaller effective population size than Finnish Spitz (N¯ec = 98 and Neg  = 49). Interestingly, the r(2) data show that the effective population size has contracted dramatically since the establishment of the breed, emphasizing the role of breed standards as constrains for the breeding population. Despite the small population size, Nordic Spitz still maintains SNP heterozygosity levels similar to mixed breed dogs (mean Hz = 0.409). Our study demonstrates that although pedigree analyses cannot provide estimates of the present diversity within a breed, the effective population sizes inferred from them correlate with the genotyping results. The genetic relationships of the northern Spitz breeds and the benefits of the open breed registry are discussed. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  13. Werner Ernst Reichardt Ph.D: founder of modern computational visual neurophysiology and anti-Nazi resistance fighter.

    PubMed

    Flynn, J T

    1999-01-01

    Werner Ernst Reichardt was born on January 30, 1924 in Berlin and at age 19 was drafted into the Luftwaffe and assigned to an electronic signals section laboratory. He became an active member of a resistance group and supplied radios for the movement in Germany. He emerged from the ashes of the Second World War and dedicated his scientific life to the development of the newborn specialty of biological physics. Following graduation from the Technische Hochschule Charlottenburg, he did a fellowship at CalTech under Max Delbrück. On returning to Germany he joined the Max Planck Institut and later became Director of the Max Planck Institut für Biologische Kybernetik in Tübingen, West Germany. Reichardt was one of the founders of the quantitative study of visually controlled orientation in animals. His work is very nearly unique in its close dialectic between elegant non-linear mathematical theory and quantitative experimental test of their predictions. During the 1950s Reichardt and his collaborators jointly developed an autocorrelation model (i.e. the firing rate of the involved visual neurones is closely correlated with the features of the pattern stimulating them) of how moving patterns are perceived by motion detectors in the visual system of the fly. This was the first mathematical description of a biological abstraction process. His findings apply to vertebrate vision, including motion detection and figure-ground description in human vision. His Max Planck Institute became a world renowned center for the computational approach to information processing by the nervous system. At his retirement party from the Institute he founded, Reichardt died on the evening of September 11th, 1992.

  14. A SDHC Founder Mutation Causes Paragangliomas (PGLs) in the French Canadians: New Insights on the SDHC-Related PGL

    PubMed Central

    Grunenwald, Solange; Burnichon, Nelly; Khalifa, Emmanuel; Dumas, Nadine; Binet, Marie-Claire; Nolet, Serge; Gimenez-Roqueplo, Anne-Paule

    2016-01-01

    Background: More than 40% of patients with paragangliomas (PGLs) harbor a germline mutation of the known PGL susceptibility genes, mainly in the SDHB or SDHD genes. Objective: The objective of the study was to characterize the genetic background of the French Canadian (FC) patients with PGLs and provide new clinical and paraclinical insights on SDHC-related PGLs. Methods: Genetic testing has been offered to FC patients affected with PGLs followed up at the adrenal genetics clinic at Centre hospitalier de l'Université de Montréal. After genetic counseling, 29 FC patients consented for PGL genetic testing. Results: Thirteen of 29 patients (44.8%) carried a germline mutation. The same heterozygous nonsense mutation at codon 133 of exon 5 of the SDHC gene (c.397C>T, p.[Arg133Ter]) was found in nine patients, representing 69.2% of the patients having a germline mutation. Seventy percent of these patients had head and neck PGLs. Twenty percent had multiple and 30% had malignant PGLs. We traced back the ascending genealogy of 10 index cases (nine patients from our cohort and one patient referred to us) and found that this mutation was most probably introduced in Nouvelle France by a couple of French settlers who established themselves in the 17th century. Conclusions: We found that 31% of the PGLs in the French Canadian can be explained by the SDHC mutation (c.397C>T, p.[Arg133Ter]). The dominance of the SDHC mutation is unique to the FCs and is most likely due to a French founder effect. SDHC gene analysis should be prioritized in FC patients with PGL. PMID:27700540

  15. Founder haplotype analysis of Fanconi anemia in the Korean population finds common ancestral haplotypes for a FANCG variant.

    PubMed

    Park, Joonhong; Kim, Myungshin; Jang, Woori; Chae, Hyojin; Kim, Yonggoo; Chung, Nack-Gyun; Lee, Jae-Wook; Cho, Bin; Jeong, Dae-Chul; Park, In Yang; Park, Mi Sun

    2015-05-01

    A common ancestral haplotype is strongly suggested in the Korean and Japanese patients with Fanconi anemia (FA), because common mutations have been frequently found: c.2546delC and c.3720_3724delAAACA of FANCA; c.307+1G>C, c.1066C>T, and c.1589_1591delATA of FANCG. Our aim in this study was to investigate the origin of these common mutations of FANCA and FANCG. We genotyped 13 FA patients consisting of five FA-A patients and eight FA-G patients from the Korean FA population. Microsatellite markers used for haplotype analysis included four CA repeat markers which are closely linked with FANCA and eight CA repeat markers which are contiguous with FANCG. As a result, Korean FA-A patients carrying c.2546delC or c.3720_3724delAAACA did not share the same haplotypes. However, three unique haplotypes carrying c.307+1G>C, c.1066C > T, or c.1589_1591delATA, that consisted of eight polymorphic loci covering a flanking region were strongly associated with Korean FA-G, consistent with founder haplotypes reported previously in the Japanese FA-G population. Our finding confirmed the common ancestral haplotypes on the origins of the East Asian FA-G patients, which will improve our understanding of the molecular population genetics of FA-G. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the association between disease-linked mutations and common ancestral haplotypes in the Korean FA population.

  16. Founder and Recurrent Mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Genes in Latin American Countries: State of the Art and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Ossa, Carlos Andrés; Torres, Diana

    2016-07-01

    Numerous epidemiological factors affect the probability of developing breast or ovarian cancer, but no predictor is as determinant as inheriting a mutation in BRCA1 or BRCA2. The concept of the founder effect explains the reduced genetic variability in some populations, according to the theory that new populations can be formed from a reduced number of individuals, so the new population would carry only a small fraction of the genetic variability of the original population. The main purpose of this review is to provide an update on the state of the art in founder mutations and some recurrent mutations that have recently been described in Latin America. A literature search was performed in the electronic databases of PUBMED, EMBASE, LILACS, and BIREME using the terms BRCA1, BRCA2, founder mutation, Latin American population, and Hispanic. Sixty-two papers were identified, of which 38 were considered relevant for this review. Each result is shown per country. In Latin America, clear founder effects have been reported in Mexico (BRCA1 del exons 9-12), Brazil (BRCA1 5382insC and BRCA2 c.156_157insAlu), and Colombia (BRCA1 3450del4, A1708E, and BRCA2 3034del4) and in Latinas residing in Southern California (BRCA1 185delAG, IVS5+1G>A, S955x, and R1443x). Of these, mutation BRCA1 3450del4 has also been reported in Brazil and Chile, whereas mutation BRCA2 3034del4 has been reported in Argentina and Peru. These data support the idea that although most Hispanic populations are the result of a mixture between Europeans, Africans, and Amerindians, the relative proportion of each genetic component varies throughout the Hispanic populations, making it necessary to identify the mutations characteristic of each population to generate mutation profiles adjusted to each one of them. In Latin American countries, and even among regions of the same country, there is great heterogeneity of ancestors. Therefore, Latinas should not be analyzed like other population groups without taking

  17. Founder and Recurrent Mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Genes in Latin American Countries: State of the Art and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Diana

    2016-01-01

    Background. Numerous epidemiological factors affect the probability of developing breast or ovarian cancer, but no predictor is as determinant as inheriting a mutation in BRCA1 or BRCA2. The concept of the founder effect explains the reduced genetic variability in some populations, according to the theory that new populations can be formed from a reduced number of individuals, so the new population would carry only a small fraction of the genetic variability of the original population. The main purpose of this review is to provide an update on the state of the art in founder mutations and some recurrent mutations that have recently been described in Latin America. Methods. A literature search was performed in the electronic databases of PUBMED, EMBASE, LILACS, and BIREME using the terms BRCA1, BRCA2, founder mutation, Latin American population, and Hispanic. Sixty-two papers were identified, of which 38 were considered relevant for this review. Each result is shown per country. Results. In Latin America, clear founder effects have been reported in Mexico (BRCA1 del exons 9–12), Brazil (BRCA1 5382insC and BRCA2 c.156_157insAlu), and Colombia (BRCA1 3450del4, A1708E, and BRCA2 3034del4) and in Latinas residing in Southern California (BRCA1 185delAG, IVS5+1G>A, S955x, and R1443x). Of these, mutation BRCA1 3450del4 has also been reported in Brazil and Chile, whereas mutation BRCA2 3034del4 has been reported in Argentina and Peru. These data support the idea that although most Hispanic populations are the result of a mixture between Europeans, Africans, and Amerindians, the relative proportion of each genetic component varies throughout the Hispanic populations, making it necessary to identify the mutations characteristic of each population to generate mutation profiles adjusted to each one of them. Conclusion. In Latin American countries, and even among regions of the same country, there is great heterogeneity of ancestors. Therefore, Latinas should not be analyzed

  18. Dallas's Nonprofit Foundation Founders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levin, Dan

    1979-01-01

    Describes the scandals that have destroyed the Foundation for Quality Education, the foundation the Dallas (Texas) school district created to raise money for the schools through real estate management and the marketing of school-system-developed curriculum materials. (Author/IRT)

  19. Transmitted/Founder Viruses Rapidly Escape from CD8+ T Cell Responses in Acute Hepatitis C Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Bull, Rowena A; Leung, Preston; Gaudieri, Silvana; Deshpande, Pooja; Cameron, Barbara; Walker, Melanie; Chopra, Abha; Lloyd, Andrew R; Luciani, Fabio

    2015-05-01

    The interaction between hepatitis C virus (HCV) and cellular immune responses during very early infection is critical for disease outcome. To date, the impact of antigen-specific cellular immune responses on the evolution of the viral population establishing infection and on potential escape has not been studied. Understanding these early host-virus dynamics is important for the development of a preventative vaccine. Three subjects who were followed longitudinally from the detection of viremia preseroconversion until disease outcome were analyzed. The evolution of transmitted/founder (T/F) viruses was undertaken using deep sequencing. CD8(+) T cell responses were measured via enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot (ELISpot) assay using HLA class I-restricted T/F epitopes. T/F viruses were rapidly extinguished in all subjects associated with either viral clearance (n = 1) or replacement with viral variants leading to establishment of chronic infection (n = 2). CD8(+) T cell responses against 11 T/F epitopes were detectable by 33 to 44 days postinfection, and 5 of these epitopes had not previously been reported. These responses declined rapidly in those who became chronically infected and were maintained in the subject who cleared infection. Higher-magnitude CD8(+) T cell responses were associated with rapid development of immune escape variants at a rate of up to 0.1 per day. Rapid escape from CD8(+) T cell responses has been quantified for the first time in the early phase of primary HCV infection. These rapid escape dynamics were associated with higher-magnitude CD8(+) T cell responses. These findings raise questions regarding optimal selection of immunogens for HCV vaccine development and suggest that detailed analysis of individual epitopes may be required. A major limitation in our detailed understanding of the role of immune response in HCV clearance has been the lack of data on very early primary infection when the transmitted viral variants successfully establish

  20. Specific mutations in the HEXA gene among Iraqi Jewish Tay-Sachs disease carriers: dating of founder ancestor.

    PubMed

    Karpati, Mazal; Gazit, Ephraim; Goldman, Boleslaw; Frisch, Amos; Colombo, Roberto; Peleg, Leah

    2004-02-01

    The incidence of Tay-Sachs disease (TSD) carriers, as defined by enzyme assay, is 1:29 among Ashkenazi Jews and 1:110 among Moroccan Jews. An elevated carrier frequency of 1:140 was also observed in the Iraqi Jews (IJ), while in other Israeli populations the world's pan-ethnic frequency of approximately 1:280 has been found. Recently a novel mutation, G749T, has been reported in 38.7% of the IJ carriers (24/62). Here we report a second novel HEXA mutation specific to the IJ TDS carriers: a substitution of cytosine 1351 by guanosine (C1351G), resulting in the change of leucine to valine in position 451. This mutation was found in 33.9% (21/62) of the carriers and in none of 100 non-carrier IJ. In addition to the two specific mutations, 14.5% (9/62) of the IJ carriers bear a known "Jewish" mutation (Ashkenazi or Moroccan) and 11.3% (7/62) carry a known "non-Jewish" mutation. In 1 DNA sample no mutation has yet been detected. To investigate the genetic history of the IJ-specific mutations (C1351G and G749T), the allelic distribution of four polymorphic markers (D15S131, D15S1025, D15S981, D15S1050) was analyzed in IJ heterozygotes and ethnically matched controls. Based on linkage disequilibrium, recombination factor (theta) between the markers and mutated loci, and the population growth correction, we deduced that G749T occurred in a founder ancestor 44.8 +/- 14.2 generations (g) ago [95% confidence interval (CI) 17.0-72.6 g] and C1351G arose 80.4 +/- 35.9 g ago (95% CI 44.5-116.3 g). Thus, the estimated dates for introduction of mutations are: 626 +/- 426 A.D. (200-1052 A.D.) for G749T and 442 +/- 1077 B.C. (1519 B.C. to 635 A.D.) for C1351G.

  1. The Founder Strains of the Collaborative Cross Express a Complex Combination of Advantageous and Deleterious Traits for Male Reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Odet, Fanny; Pan, Wenqi; Bell, Timothy A.; Goodson, Summer G.; Stevans, Alicia M.; Yun, Zianing; Aylor, David L.; Kao, Chia-Yu; McMillan, Leonard; de Villena, Fernando Pardo-Manuel; O’Brien, Deborah A.

    2015-01-01

    Surveys of inbred strains of mice are standard approaches to determine the heritability and range of phenotypic variation for biomedical traits. In addition, they may lead to the identification of novel phenotypes and models of human disease. Surprisingly, male reproductive phenotypes are among the least-represented traits in the Mouse Phenome Database. Here we report the results of a broad survey of the eight founder inbred strains of both the Collaborative Cross (CC) and the Diversity Outbred populations, two new mouse resources that are being used as platforms for systems genetics and sources of mouse models of human diseases. Our survey includes representatives of the three main subspecies of the house mice and a mix of classical and wild-derived inbred strains. In addition to standard staples of male reproductive phenotyping such as reproductive organ weights, sperm counts, and sperm morphology, our survey includes sperm motility and the first detailed survey of testis histology. As expected for such a broad survey, heritability varies widely among traits. We conclude that although all eight inbred strains are fertile, most display a mix of advantageous and deleterious male reproductive traits. The CAST/EiJ strain is an outlier, with an unusual combination of deleterious male reproductive traits including low sperm counts, high levels of morphologically abnormal sperm, and poor motility. In contrast, sperm from the PWK/PhJ and WSB/EiJ strains had the greatest percentages of normal morphology and vigorous motility. Finally, we report an abnormal testis phenotype that is highly heritable and restricted to the WSB/EiJ strain. This phenotype is characterized by the presence of a large, but variable, number of vacuoles in at least 10% of the seminiferous tubules. The onset of the phenotype between 2 and 3 wk of age is temporally correlated with the formation of the blood-testis barrier. We speculate that this phenotype may play a role in high rates of extinction in

  2. Is the Isabella anomaly a fossil slab or the foundered lithospheric root of the Sierra Nevada batholith?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoots, C. R.; Schmandt, B.; Clayton, R. W.; Hansen, S. M.; Dougherty, S. L.

    2015-12-01

    The Isabella Anomaly is a volume of relatively high seismic velocity upper mantle beneath the southern Great Valley in California. We deployed ~45 broadband seismometers in central California to test two main hypotheses for the origin of the Isabella Anomaly. One suggests that the Isabella Anomaly is the foundered lithospheric root of the southern Sierra Nevada batholith, which delaminated on account of eclogite-rich composition and translated westward as it began to sink into the asthenosphere. The other hypothesis suggests that the Isabella Anomaly is a fossil slab fragment attached to the Monterey microplate that lies offshore of central California and thus it is mechanically coupled to the Pacific plate. Prior seismic imaging with ~70 km station spacing cannot resolve the landward termination of Monterey microplate lithosphere beneath coastal California or where/if the Isabella Anomaly is attached to North America lithosphere beneath the Great Valley. The new temporary broadband array consists of 40 broadband seismometers with ~7 km spacing extending from the central California coast to the western Sierra Nevada batholith, plus some outliers to fill gaps in the regional network coverage. The temporary array was initially deployed in early 2014 and will continue to record until October 2015 so the complete data are not yet available. Preliminary Ps scattered wave images show an abrupt ~6 km increase in Moho depth eastward across the San Andreas fault, a strong positive impedance contrast that dips westward from ~7-25 km beneath Great Valley, and a sharp Moho with a slight westward dip beneath the western edge of the Sierra Nevada batholith. Apparently low impedance contrast characterizes the Moho beneath the eastern Great Valley and foothills, consistent with near mantle velocities in the lower crust. Processing of the cumulative data that will be available in October 2015 and incorporation of new tomography models into scattered wave imaging are needed before

  3. Founder effect is responsible for the p.Leu131Phe heparin-binding-site antithrombin mutation common in Hungary: phenotype analysis in a large cohort.

    PubMed

    Gindele, R; Oláh, Z; Ilonczai, P; Speker, M; Udvari, Á; Selmeczi, A; Pfliegler, G; Marján, E; Kovács, B; Boda, Z; Muszbek, L; Bereczky, Z

    2016-04-01

    Antithrombin (AT) is a key regulator of the coagulation. In type II deficiency, the heparin-binding-site defect (type II HBS) is considered to be relatively low thrombosis risk. Our aims were to search for SERPINC1 mutation(s) and to describe the clinical and laboratory phenotype of a large number of AT Budapest3 (ATBp3, p.Leu131Phe) carriers and confirm the presence of a founder effect. AT-deficient patients were recruited and carriers of ATBp3, n = 102 (63 families) were selected. To investigate the founder effect, eight intragenic single nucleotide polymorphisms, a 5'-length dimorphism, and five microsatellite markers were detected. Clinical and laboratory data of the patients were collected and analyzed. In AT deficiency, 16 different causative mutations were found, and the great majority of patients were of type II HBS subtype. Most of them (n = 102/118, 86.5%) carried the ATBp3 mutation. The ATBp3 mutant allele was associated with one single haplotype, while different haplotypes were detected in the case of normal allele. The anti-factor Xa-based AT activity assay that we used could detect all ATBp3 patients with high sensitivity in our cohort. ATBp3 homozygosity (n = 26) was associated with thrombosis at a young age and conferred a high thrombotic risk. Half of the heterozygotes (n = 41/76, 53.9%) also had venous and/or arterial thrombosis, and pregnancy complications were also recorded. In Hungary, the founder mutation, ATBp3, is the most common AT deficiency. Our study is the first in which the clinical characterization of ATBp3 mutation was executed in a large population. © 2016 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  4. The FGF8-related signals Pyramus and Thisbe promote pathfinding, substrate adhesion, and survival of migrating longitudinal gut muscle founder cells

    PubMed Central

    Reim, Ingolf; Hollfelder, Dominik; Ismat, Afshan; Frasch, Manfred

    2013-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) frequently fulfill prominent roles in the regulation of cell migration in various contexts. In Drosophila, the FGF8-like ligands Pyramus (Pyr) and Thisbe (Ths), which signal through their receptor Heartless (Htl), are known to regulate early mesodermal cell migration after gastrulation as well as glial cell migration during eye development. Herein, we show that Pyr and Ths also exert key roles during the long-distance migration of a specific sub-population of mesodermal cells that migrate from the caudal visceral mesoderm within stereotypic bilateral paths along the trunk visceral mesoderm toward the anterior. These cells constitute the founder myoblasts of the longitudinal midgut muscles. In a forward genetic screen for regulators of this morphogenetic process we identified loss of function alleles for pyr. We show that pyr and ths are expressed along the paths of migration in the trunk visceral mesoderm and endoderm and act largely redundantly to help guide the founder myoblasts reliably onto and along their substrate of migration. Ectopically-provided Pyr and Ths signals can efficiently re-rout the migrating cells, both in the presence and absence of endogenous signals. Our data indicate that the guidance functions of these FGFs must act in concert with other important attractive or adhesive activities of the trunk visceral mesoderm. Apart from their guidance functions, the Pyr and Ths signals play an obligatory role for the survival of the migrating cells. Without these signals, essentially all of these cells enter cell death and detach from the migration substrate during early migration. We present experiments that allowed us to dissect the roles of these FGFs as guidance cues versus trophic activities during the migration of the longitudinal visceral muscle founders. PMID:22609944

  5. Localization of the gene causing keratolytic winter erythema to chromosome 8p22-p23, and evidence for a founder effect in South African Afrikaans-speakers.

    PubMed Central

    Starfield, M; Hennies, H C; Jung, M; Jenkins, T; Wienker, T; Hull, P; Spurdle, A; Küster, W; Ramsay, M; Reis, A

    1997-01-01

    Keratolytic winter erythema (KWE), also known as "Oudtshoorn skin disease," or "erythrokeratolysis hiemalis," is an autosomal dominant skin disorder of unknown etiology characterized by a cyclical erythema, hyperkeratosis, and recurrent and intermittent peeling of the palms and soles, particularly during winter. Initially KWE was believed to be unique to South Africa, but recently a large pedigree of German origin has been identified. The disorder occurs with a prevalence of 1/7,000 in the South African Afrikaans-speaking Caucasoid population, and this high frequency has been attributed to founder effect. After a number of candidate regions were excluded from linkage to KWE in both the German family and several South African families, a genomewide analysis was embarked on. Linkage to the microsatellite marker D8S550 on chromosome 8p22-p23 was initially observed, with a maximum LOD score (Z(max)) of 9.2 at a maximum recombination fraction (theta(max)) of .0 in the German family. Linkage was also demonstrated in five of the larger South African families, with Z(max) = 7.4 at theta(max) = .02. When haplotypes were constructed, 11 of 14 South African KWE families had the complete "ancestral" haplotype, and 3 demonstrated conservation of parts of this haplotype, supporting the hypothesis of founder effect. The chromosome segregating with the disease in the German family demonstrated a different haplotype, suggesting that these chromosomes do not have a common origin. Recombination events place the KWE gene in a 6-cM interval between D8S550 and D8S552. If it is assumed that there was a single South African founder, a proposed ancestral recombinant suggests that the gene is most likely in a 1-cM interval between D8S550 and D8S265. PMID:9311742

  6. Variable Expressivity of a Founder Mutation in the EIF2AK4 Gene in Hereditary Pulmonary Veno-occlusive Disease and Its Impact on Survival.

    PubMed

    Navas Tejedor, Paula; Palomino Doza, Julián; Tenorio Castaño, Jair Antonio; Enguita Valls, Ana Belén; Rodríguez Reguero, José Julián; Martínez Meñaca, Amaya; Hernández González, Ignacio; Bueno Zamora, Héctor; Lapunzina Badía, Pablo Daniel; Escribano Subías, Pilar

    2017-07-08

    Hereditary pulmonary veno-occlusive disease (PVOD) has been associated with biallelic mutations in EIF2AK4 with the recent discovery of a founder mutation in Iberian Romani patients with familial PVOD. The aims of this study were phenotypical characterization and survival analysis of Iberian Romani patients with familial PVOD carrying the founder p.Pro1115Leu mutation in EIF2AK4, according to their tolerance to pulmonary vasodilators (PVD). Familial genetic screening was conducted, as well as assessment of sociocultural determinants with a potential influence on disease course. Observational study of Romani patients with familial PVOD included in the Spanish Registry of Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension. Genetic screening of EIF2AK4 was performed in index cases and relatives between November 2011 and July 2016 and histological pulmonary examination was carried out in patients who received a lung transplant or died. The patients were divided into 2 groups depending on their tolerance to PVD, with comparison of baseline characteristics and survival free of death or lung transplant. Eighteen Romani patients were included: 9 index cases and 9 relatives. The biallelic founder mutation in EIF2AK4 was found in all affected cases and 2 unaffected relatives. Family screening showed 34.2% of healthy heterozygotes, high consanguinity, young age at childbirth, and frequent multiparity. Prognosis was bleak, with significant differences depending on tolerance to PVD. We describe 2 phenotypes of hereditary PVOD depending on tolerance to PVD, with prognostic impact and familial distribution. Consanguinity may have a negative impact on the transmission of PVOD, with familial genetic screening showing high effectiveness. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Mantle plumes & lithospheric foundering: Determining the timing and amplitude of post-Miocene uplift in the Wallowa mountains, north-east Oregon with low-temperature thermochronometry.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoettle-Greene, P.; Duvall, A. R.

    2016-12-01

    The foundering of gravitationally unstable lithosphere, while frequently invoked to explain anomalous topography, proves difficult to verify from an Earth surface perspective. Theoretically, direct observables like sudden uplift associated with extension and mantle-sourced volcanism should help identify affected regions but these markers are often obscured by background stresses and heterogeneous lithosphere. To better understand topographic evolution following the removal of mantle lithosphere, we present new apatite U-Th/He thermocrhonometry data and field observations from the Wallowa mountains adjacent to Hells Canyon in the northwestern United States. The granodiorite-cored Wallowa are increasingly recognized as a type locality for the process of lithospheric foundering, as they are bound by extensional structures and were presumably uplifted contemporaneous with the intrusion of feeder dikes for the mantle-sourced Columbia River Basalts at 16 Ma. Cretaceous and early Cenozoic cooling ages from our study imply that in spite of the presumed 1-2 km of basalt flows eroded from the Wallowa and heating associated with the intrusion of the Chief Joseph dike swarm, and 2 km of proposed rapid post-foundering uplift, there has been little exhumation. We attempt to reconcile these conflicting observations with field mapping of folded basalt flows at the margins of the Wallowa mountains, modeling of geothermal response times following a thermal perturbation, and further study using the 4He/3He thermochronometer on a subset of samples to reveal more recent cooling histories. Our findings will improve our understanding of the landscape evolution of the Wallowa mountains, information pertinent to the geodynamics of lithosphere removal and the eruption of Columbia River Basalts.

  8. The Evolutionary History of Drosophila buzzatii. XXXVI. Molecular Structural Analysis of Osvaldo Retrotransposon Insertions in Colonizing Populations Unveils Drift Effects in Founder Events

    PubMed Central

    García Guerreiro, María Pilar; Fontdevila, Antonio

    2007-01-01

    Previous work on transposable element distribution in colonizing populations of Drosophila buzzatii revealed a high frequency of occupancy in several chromosomal sites. Two explanatory hypotheses were advanced: the founder hypothesis, by which founder genetic drift was responsible, and the unstable hypothesis that assigns this unusual distribution to bursts of transposition toward some chromosomal sites. Here, we study the molecular structure of three euchromatic Osvaldo clones isolated from sites occupied at high (A4 and B9) and low frequency (B4) in colonizing populations, to test these hypotheses. Large insertions, duplications, and indels in the Osvaldo coding region and LTR were detected in the A4 clone and a truncated Osvaldo with many substitutions was found in the B9 clone. These altered sequences indicate that the two copies of this retroelement are precolonization insertions. Interestingly, the LTR of the A4 clone and the reverse transcriptase region of B9 show identical sequences in all colonizing populations indicating, most probably, that they are identical by descent. Moreover, Osvaldo is inserted at the same nucleotide site in all colonizing populations. On the other hand an almost identical LTR sequence, except by 1 base deletion, was found in the B4 clone compared to the canonical active Osvaldo element. These results suggest that Osvaldo copies in highly occupied sites are, most probably, identical by descent and strongly favor the founder hypothesis. On the other hand, low-insertion-frequency sites could represent recent transposition events. This work emphasizes the importance of molecular population studies to disentangle the effects of genetic drift and transposition in colonization. PMID:17151248

  9. The initial antibody response to HIV-1: induction of ineffective early B cell responses against GP41 by the transmitted/founder virus

    SciTech Connect

    Chavez, Leslie L; Perelson, Alan

    2008-01-01

    A window of opportunity for immune responses to extinguish HIV -1 exists from the moment of transmission through establishment of the latent pool of HIV -I-infected cells. A critical time to study the initial immune responses to the transmitted/founder virus is the eclipse phase of HIV-1 infection (time from transmission to the first appearance of plasma virus) but, to date, this period has been logistically difficult to analyze. Studies in non-human primates challenged with chimeric simianhuman immunodeficiency virus have shown that neutralizing antibodies, when present at the time of infection, can prevent virus infection.

  10. Armadillos exhibit less genetic polymorphism in North America than in South America: nuclear and mitochondrial data confirm a founder effect in Dasypus novemcinctus (Xenarthra).

    PubMed

    Huchon, D; Delsuc, F; Catzeflis, F M; Douzery, E J

    1999-10-01

    Heterozygosity at eight nuclear enzymatic loci and mitochondrial DNA control region (D-loop) sequence polymorphism was compared between North and South American nine-banded armadillos (Dasypus novemcinctus: Xenarthra, Dasypodidae). All markers revealed a striking genetic homogeneity amongst Texas, Louisiana, and Mississippi individuals, vs. the usual level of polymorphism for the French Guiana population. This may reflect a founder effect during colonization of North America. Occurrence of polymorphism in the D-loop microsatellite motif of North American armadillos suggests a recent recovery of mitochondrial variability. Phylogeographic analyses using Dasypus kappleri as outgroup provides evidence for a clear separation between North and South American control region haplotypes.

  11. Linkage disequilibrium between the fragile X mutation and two closely linked CA repeats suggests that fragile X chromosomes are derived from a small number of founder chromosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Oudet, C.; Lentes-Zengerling, S.; Kretz, C.; Mandel, J.L. ); Mornet, E.; Thomas, F.; Deluchat, C.; Boue, J.; Boue, A. ); Serre, J.L. INSERM U155, Paris ); Tejada, I. )

    1993-02-01

    In order to investigate the origin of mutations responsible for the fragile X syndrome, two polymorphic CA repeats, one at 10 kb (FRAXAC2) and the other at 150 kb (DXS548) from the mutation target, were analyzed in normal and fragil X chromosomes. Contrary to observations made in myotonic dystrophy, fragil X mutations were not strongly associated with a single allele at the marker loci. However, significant differences in allelic and haplotypic distributions were observed between normal and fragile X chromosomes, indicating that a limited number of primary events may have been at the origin of most present-day fragile X chromosomes in Caucasian populations. The authors propose a putative scheme with six founder chromosomes from which most of the observed fragile X-linked haplotypes can be derived directly or by a single event at one of the marker loci, either a change of one repeat unit or a recombination between DXS548 and the mutation target. Such founder chromosomes may have carried a number of CGG repeats in an upper-normal range, from which recurrent multistep expansion mutations have arisen. 23 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Is the c.3G>C mutation in the succinate dehydrogenase subunit D (SDHD) gene due to a founder effect in Chinese head and neck paraganglioma patients?

    PubMed

    Zha, Yang; Chen, Xing-ming; Lam, Ching-wan; Lee, Soo-chin; Tong, Sui-fan; Gao, Zhi-qiang

    2011-08-01

    Three Chinese patients with head and neck paragangliomas have been reported to carry the c.3G>C mutation in the succinate dehydrogenase subunit D (SDHD) gene. In addition, in our hospital, two further patients were identified who have the same mutation. It is unclear whether the c.3G>C mutation in Chinese patients is a recurrent mutation or if it is due to a founder effect. We conducted haplotype analysis on these patients to answer this question. Individual case-control study. Germ-line mutations were confirmed in the patients and their families examined in this study using direct sequencing. We also constructed and analyzed haplotypes in four Chinese families. Genotype frequencies were compared to the control group. Three of four families shared the same haplotype, which rarely occurred in the control group. The last family shared a very short area on the physical map with the other three families. There is a founder effect in Chinese head and neck paraganglioma patients carrying the SDHD c.3G>C mutation. Copyright © 2011 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.

  13. A missense mutation in the extracellular domain of Fas: the most common change in Argentinean patients with autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome represents a founder effect.

    PubMed

    Simesen de Bielke, María Gabriela; Yancoski, Judith; Rocco, Carlos; Pérez, Laura E; Cantisano, Claudio; Pérez, Néstor; Oleastro, Matías; Danielian, Silvia

    2012-12-01

    Mutations in the Fas gene (TNFRSF6) are the most common causes of Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome (ALPS-FAS). In Argentina almost a third of patients with ALPS-FAS present a missense mutation affecting the extracellular cysteine rich domain 2 of Fas, p.Cys107Tyr (C107Y). This change was found in homozygous state in 2 patients from a consanguineous family, and heterozygously, in 3 other patients from 3 unrelated families. In these families, 12 relatives were identified as healthy carriers of the mutation. We sought to test the hypothesis that this mutation actually represents a single haplotype of TNFRSF6. DNAs from ALPS-C107Y patients and their families, as well as from 150 Argentinean control subjects were sequenced for the known higher frequency single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of TNFRSF6. The C107Y-carriers were also genotyped at 5 microsatellites proximal to the Fas gene locus. All C107Y alleles presented a unique intragenic haplotype that could be restricted to this group. Extent of haplotype sharing and variability of microsatellite alleles in C107Y chromosomes support the presence of a single haplotype block including the mutation and encompassing 2.395 Mb. A founder effect for C107Y has been evidenced in this work and the most common recent ancestor to the patients probably lived 350 years ago. This constitutes the first report of a founder event in ALPS.

  14. A 1,100-year-old founder effect mutation in IL12B gene is responsible for Mendelian susceptibility to mycobacterial disease in Tunisian patients.

    PubMed

    Ben-Mustapha, Imen; Ben-Ali, Meriem; Mekki, Najla; Patin, Etienne; Harmant, Christine; Bouguila, Jihène; Elloumi-Zghal, Houda; Harbi, Abdelaziz; Béjaoui, Mohamed; Boughammoura, Lamia; Chemli, Jalel; Barbouche, Mohamed-Ridha

    2014-01-01

    Mendelian susceptibility to mycobacterial disease (MSMD) is a rare disorder predisposing apparently healthy individuals to infections caused by weakly virulent mycobacteria such as bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG), environmental mycobacteria, and poorly virulent Salmonella strains. IL-12p40 deficiency is the first reported human disease due to a cytokine gene defect and is one of the deficiencies that cause MSMD. Nine mutant alleles only have been identified in the IL12B gene, and three of them are recurrent mutations due to a founder effect in specific populations. IL-12p40 deficiency has been identified especially in countries where consanguinity is high and where BCG vaccination at birth is universal. We investigated, in such settings, the clinical, cellular, and molecular features of six IL-12p40-deficient Tunisian patients having the same mutation in IL12B gene (c.298_305del). We found that this mutation is inherited as a common founder mutation arousing ~1,100 years ago. This finding facilitates the development of a preventive approach by genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis especially in affected families.

  15. Molecular genetics of achromatopsia in Newfoundland reveal genetic heterogeneity, founder effects and the first cases of Jalili syndrome in North America.

    PubMed

    Doucette, Lance; Green, Jane; Black, Coleman; Schwartzentruber, Jeremy; Johnson, Gordon J; Galutira, Dante; Young, Terry-Lynn

    2013-09-01

    Achromatopsia (ACHM) is a severe retinal disorder characterized by an inability to distinguish colors, impaired visual acuity, photophobia and nystagmus. This rare autosomal recessive disorder of the cone photoreceptors is best known for its increased frequency due to founder effect in the Pingelapese population of the Pacific islands. Sixteen patients from Newfoundland, Canada were sequenced for mutations in the four known achromatopsia genes CNGA3, CNGB3, GNAT2, and PDE6C. The majority (n = 12) of patients were either homozygotes or compound heterozygotes for known achromatopsia alleles, two in CNGB3 (p.T383fsX and p.T296YfsX9) and three in CNGA3 (p.R283Q, p.R427C and p.L527R). Haplotype reconstruction showed that recurrent mutations p.T383fsX and p.L527R were due to a founder effect. Aggregate data from exome sequencing, segregation analysis and archived medical records support a rediagnosis of Jalili syndrome in affected siblings (n = 4) from Family 0094, which to our knowledge is the first family identified with Jalili Syndrome in North America.

  16. The C9ORF72 expansion mutation is a common cause of ALS+/-FTD in Europe and has a single founder.

    PubMed

    Smith, Bradley N; Newhouse, Stephen; Shatunov, Aleksey; Vance, Caroline; Topp, Simon; Johnson, Lauren; Miller, Jack; Lee, Younbok; Troakes, Claire; Scott, Kirsten M; Jones, Ashley; Gray, Ian; Wright, Jamie; Hortobágyi, Tibor; Al-Sarraj, Safa; Rogelj, Boris; Powell, John; Lupton, Michelle; Lovestone, Simon; Sapp, Peter C; Weber, Markus; Nestor, Peter J; Schelhaas, Helenius J; Asbroek, Anneloor Alm Ten; Silani, Vincenzo; Gellera, Cinzia; Taroni, Franco; Ticozzi, Nicola; Van den Berg, Leonard; Veldink, Jan; Van Damme, Phillip; Robberecht, Wim; Shaw, Pamela J; Kirby, Janine; Pall, Hardev; Morrison, Karen E; Morris, Alex; de Belleroche, Jacqueline; Vianney de Jong, J M B; Baas, Frank; Andersen, Peter M; Landers, John; Brown, Robert H; Weale, Michael E; Al-Chalabi, Ammar; Shaw, Christopher E

    2013-01-01

    A massive hexanucleotide repeat expansion mutation (HREM) in C9ORF72 has recently been linked to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Here we describe the frequency, origin and stability of this mutation in ALS+/-FTD from five European cohorts (total n=1347). Single-nucleotide polymorphisms defining the risk haplotype in linked kindreds were genotyped in cases (n=434) and controls (n=856). Haplotypes were analysed using PLINK and aged using DMLE+. In a London clinic cohort, the HREM was the most common mutation in familial ALS+/-FTD: C9ORF72 29/112 (26%), SOD1 27/112 (24%), TARDBP 1/112 (1%) and FUS 4/112 (4%) and detected in 13/216 (6%) of unselected sporadic ALS cases but was rare in controls (3/856, 0.3%). HREM prevalence was high for familial ALS+/-FTD throughout Europe: Belgium 19/22 (86%), Sweden 30/41 (73%), the Netherlands 10/27 (37%) and Italy 4/20 (20%). The HREM did not affect the age at onset or survival of ALS patients. Haplotype analysis identified a common founder in all 137 HREM carriers that arose around 6300 years ago. The haplotype from which the HREM arose is intrinsically unstable with an increased number of repeats (average 8, compared with 2 for controls, P<10(-8)). We conclude that the HREM has a single founder and is the most common mutation in familial and sporadic ALS in Europe.

  17. Ethnic-Specific WRN Mutations in South Asian Werner Syndrome Patients: Potential Founder Effect in Patients with Indian or Pakistani Ancestry.

    PubMed

    Saha, Bidisha; Lessel, Davor; Nampoothiri, Sheela; Rao, Anuradha S; Hisama, Fuki M; Peter, Dincy; Bennett, Chris; Nürnberg, Gudrun; Nürnberg, Peter; Martin, George M; Kubisch, Christian; Oshima, Junko

    2013-05-01

    Werner syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by multiple features consistent with accelerated aging. It is caused by mutations in the WRN gene, which encodes a RecQ type helicase. To date, more than 70 disease-causing mutations have been reported. While founder mutations and a corresponding relatively high incidence of WS have been reported in Japan and Sardinia, such mutations have not been previously described among patients of South Asian descent. Here we report two novel WRN mutations in three pedigrees. A homozygous c.561A>G mutation in exon 6 was identified both in a pedigree from Kerala, India and in a British patient of Pakistani ancestry. Although c.561A>G does not alter the corresponding amino acid (p.K187K), it creates a cryptic splice site resulting in a 98bp deletion at the mRNA level (r.557-654del98) followed by a frameshift (p.K187fs). These two cases shared the same haplotype across the WRN gene, and were distinct from another Indian Werner patient with a homozygous stop codon mutation, c.2855 C>A (p.S952*) in exon 24. As the Indian population increases and the awareness of Werner syndrome grows, we anticipate that more cases will be identified with these founder mutations among South Asian Werner syndrome patients.

  18. Genetic and morphometric evidence on a Galápagos Island exposes founder effects and diversification in the first-known (truly) feral western dog population.

    PubMed

    Reponen, Sini E M; Brown, Sarah K; Barnett, Bruce D; Sacks, Benjamin N

    2014-02-01

    Domesticated animals that revert to a wild state can become invasive and significantly impact native biodiversity. Although dogs can be problematic locally, only the Australasian dingo is known to occur in isolation from humans. Western dogs have experienced more intense artificial selection, which potentially limits their invasiveness. However, feral dogs eradicated from Isabela Island, Galápagos in the 1980s could be the first-known exception. We used DNA and morphometric data from 92 of these dogs to test the hypotheses that (i) these dogs persisted independently of humans for up to a century and a half since descending from a handful of dogs introduced in the early 1800s, vs. (ii) similarly to other western feral dog populations, they reflected continuous recruitment of strays from human settlements on a portion of the Island. We detected one dominant maternal lineage and one dominant paternal lineage shared by the three subpopulations, along with low autosomal genetic diversity, consistent with the hypothesized common origins from a small founder population. Genetic diversity patterns among the three island subpopulations were consistent with stepping-stone founder effects, while morphometric differentiation suggested rapid phenotypic divergence, possibly due to drift and reinforced by selection corresponding to distinct microclimates and habitats on Isabela. Despite the continued presence of free-ranging dogs in the vicinity of settlements on Isabela and other Galápagos Islands, feral populations have not reestablished in remote areas since the 1980s, emphasizing the rarity of conditions necessary for feralization of modern western dogs.

  19. The M53I mutation in CDKN2A is a founder mutation that predominates in melanoma patients with Scottish ancestry.

    PubMed

    Lang, Julie; Hayward, Nicholas; Goldgar, David; Tsao, Hensin; Hogg, David; Palmer, Jane; Stark, Mitchell; Tobias, Edward S; MacKie, Rona

    2007-03-01

    Germline mutations in the tumor suppressor gene CDKN2A have been shown to predispose to cutaneous malignant melanoma. The M53I mutation is the most common CDKN2A mutation identified in Scottish melanoma patients and is also found in a small number of families in other countries. The aim of this study was to determine whether the occurrence of this mutation is due to a common ancestor originating from Scotland, and if so, to estimate how long ago the mutation arose. We examined 18 families carrying the M53I mutation: six from Scotland, five from Canada, four from Australia, and three from America. Haplotypes derived from segregation of seven informative microsatellite markers flanking CDKN2A were constructed in each family. Our findings show that 14 of 18 families carry a common ancestral haplotype on which the mutation arose approximately 88 generations ago (1-LOD-unit support interval 44-198 generations). This haplotype is very rare in controls, which supports the idea that it is a common founder mutation haplotype. The four M53I families that do not share the consensus haplotype may in fact have arisen from the same founder, but this is potentially obscured by presumed replication slippage for some of the microsatellite markers tested.

  20. Ethnic-specific WRN mutations in South Asian Werner syndrome patients: potential founder effect in patients with Indian or Pakistani ancestry

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Bidisha; Lessel, Davor; Nampoothiri, Sheela; Rao, Anuradha S; Hisama, Fuki M; Peter, Dincy; Bennett, Chris; Nürnberg, Gudrun; Nürnberg, Peter; Martin, George M; Kubisch, Christian; Oshima, Junko

    2013-01-01

    Werner syndrome (WS) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by multiple features consistent with accelerated aging. It is caused by mutations in the WRN gene, which encodes a RecQ type helicase. To date, more than 70 disease-causing mutations have been reported. While founder mutations and a corresponding relatively high incidence of WS have been reported in Japan and Sardinia, such mutations have not been previously described among patients of South Asian descent. Here, we report two novel WRN mutations in three pedigrees. A homozygous c.561A>G mutation in exon 6 was identified both in a pedigree from Kerala, India and in a British patient of Pakistani ancestry. Although c.561A>G does not alter the corresponding amino acid (p.Lys187), it creates a cryptic splice site resulting in a 98 bp deletion at the mRNA level (r.557_654del98) followed by a frameshift (p.Lys187Trpfs*13). These two cases shared the same haplotype across the WRN gene, and were distinct from another Indian Werner patient with a homozygous stop codon mutation, c.2855 C > A (p.Ser952*), in exon 24. As the Indian population increases and the awareness of WS grows, we anticipate that more cases will be identified with these founder mutations among South Asian WS patients. PMID:23936869

  1. Recent crustal foundering in the Northern Volcanic Zone of the Andean arc: Petrological insights from the roots of a modern subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloch, Elias; Ibañez-Mejia, Mauricio; Murray, Kendra; Vervoort, Jeffrey; Müntener, Othmar

    2017-10-01

    Periodic loss of the lower lithosphere into the convecting mantle due to gravitational instability is postulated to be a major mechanism for lithosphere recycling in orogenic zones, but unequivocal petrologic evidence of this process is elusive. The Granatifera Tuff, located in the Mercaderes-Rio Mayo area of the southern Colombian Andes, contains a wide variety of crustal and mantle xenoliths. Here we focus on the thermobarometry and Lu-Hf isotope systematics of crustal garnet clinopyroxenite xenoliths, the results of which offer the first evidence of recent, and likely active, crustal foundering in the Northern Volcanic Zone of the Andean arc. We find that most of these xenoliths equilibrated between 60-80 km depths, ∼7-27 km below the seismically determined Moho in this region, and that at least one crustal garnet clinopyroxenite re-equilibrated at depths exceeding 95 km. A second garnet clinopyroxenite equilibrated at ∼150 km depths, and is either foundered lithospheric material or the product of reaction between peridotite and a mobile component (either silicic melt or fluids) at >4 GPa. All of the investigated garnet clinopyroxenites are negatively buoyant relative to the upper mantle asthenosphere. The presence of minor amounts of secondary amphibole and orthopyroxene, coupled with the lack of major-element retrograde zonation in primary phases within these xenoliths, indicates that these rocks were rapidly transported to, and briefly resided at, shallow depths before eruption. Lu-Hf ages from two garnet clinopyroxenites and one garnet-clinopyroxene hornblendite are <5 Ma, and approximate the time at which these xenoliths were transported to shallow depths prior to eruption. A large-magnitude positive geoid anomaly and relatively low mean surface elevations indicate that the gravitationally unstable crustal root is still largely attached to the overriding crust in this part of the Northern Volcanic Zone. Thermobarometric calculations indicate that the

  2. Heritability in a SCN5A-mutation founder population with increased female susceptibility to non-nocturnal ventricular tachyarrhythmia and sudden cardiac death.

    PubMed

    Ter Bekke, Rachel M A; Isaacs, Aaron; Barysenka, Andrei; Hoos, Marije B; Jongbloed, Jan D H; Hoorntje, Jan C A; Patelski, Alfons S M; Helderman-van den Enden, Apollonia T J M; van den Wijngaard, Arthur; Stoll, Monika; Volders, Paul G A

    2017-08-03

    Heritable cardiac-sodium channel dysfunction is associated with various arrhythmia syndromes, some predisposing to ventricular fibrillation. Phenotypic diversity among carriers of identical-by-descent mutations is often remarkable, suggesting influences of genetic modifiers. The purpose of this study was to identify a unique SCN5A-mutation founder population with mixed clinical phenotypes and sudden cardiac death, and to investigate the heritability of electromechanical traits besides the SCN5A-mutation effect. The 16-generation founder population segregating SCN5A c.4850_4852delTCT, p.(Phe1617del), was comprehensively phenotyped. Variance component analysis was used to evaluate the mutation's effects and assess heritability. In 45 p.(Phe1617del) positives, the mutation associated strongly with QTc prolongation (472 ± 60 ms vs 423 ± 35 ms in 26 mutation negatives; P <.001; odds ratio for long-QT syndrome 22.4; 95% confidence interval 4.5-224.2; P <.001) and electromechanical window (EMW) negativity (-29 ± 47 ms vs 34 ± 26 ms; P <.001). Overlapping phenotypes including conduction delay and Brugada syndrome were noted in 19. Polymorphic ventricular tachyarrhythmias occurred mostly in the daytime, after arousal-evoked heart-rate acceleration and repolarization prolongation. Cox proportional hazards regression analysis revealed female gender as an independent risk factor for cardiac events (hazard ratio 5.1; 95% confidence interval 1.6-16.3; P = .006). p.(Phe1617del) was an important determinant of QTcbaseline, QTcmax, and EMW, explaining 18%, 28%, and 37%, respectively, of the trait's variance. Significant heritability was observed for PQ interval (P = .003) after accounting for the p.(Phe1617del) effect. This SCN5A-p.(Phe1617del) founder population with phenotypic divergence and overlap reveals long-QT syndrome-related and arousal-evoked ventricular tachyarrhythmias with a female preponderance. Variance component analysis indicates additional genetic variance for

  3. Analysis of Founder Mutations in Rare Tumors Associated With Hereditary Breast/Ovarian Cancer Reveals a Novel Association of BRCA2 Mutations with Ampulla of Vater Carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Pedro; Peixoto, Ana; Santos, Catarina; Rocha, Patrícia; Pinto, Carla; Pinheiro, Manuela; Leça, Luís; Martins, Ana Teresa; Ferreira, Verónica; Bartosch, Carla; Teixeira, Manuel R

    2016-01-01

    BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations are responsible for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer, but they also confer an increased risk for the development of rarer cancers associated with this syndrome, namely, cancer of the pancreas, male breast, peritoneum, and fallopian tube. The objective of this work was to quantify the contribution of the founder mutations BRCA2 c.156_157insAlu and BRCA1 c.3331_3334del for cancer etiology in unselected hospital-based cohorts of Portuguese patients diagnosed with these rarer cancers, by using a strategy that included testing of archival tumor tissue. A total of 102 male breast, 68 pancreatic and 33 peritoneal/fallopian tube carcinoma cases were included in the study. The BRCA2 c.156_157insAlu mutation was observed with a frequency of 7.8% in male breast cancers, 3.0% in peritoneal/fallopian tube cancers, and 1.6% in pancreatic cancers, with estimated total contributions of germline BRCA2 mutations of 14.3%, 5.5%, and 2.8%, respectively. No carriers of the BRCA1 c.3331_3334del mutation were identified. During our study, a patient with an ampulla of Vater carcinoma was incidentally found to carry the BRCA2 c.156_157insAlu mutation, so we decided to test a consecutive series of additional 15 ampullary carcinomas for BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations using a combination of direct founder mutation testing and full gene analysis with next generation sequencing. BRCA2 mutations were observed with a frequency of 14.3% in ampulla of Vater carcinomas. In conclusion, taking into account the implications for both the individuals and their family members, we recommend that patients with these neoplasias should be offered BRCA1/BRCA2 genetic testing and we here show that it is feasible to test for founder mutations in archival tumor tissue. Furthermore, we identified for the first time a high frequency of germline BRCA2 mutations in ampullary cancers.

  4. Identification of BRCA1/2 Founder Mutations in Southern Chinese Breast Cancer Patients Using Gene Sequencing and High Resolution DNA Melting Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kwong, Ava; Ng, Enders Kai On; Wong, Chris Lei Po; Law, Fian Bic Fai; Au, Tommy; Wong, Hong Nei; Kurian, Allison W.; West, Dee W.; Ford, James M.; Ma, Edmond Siu Kwan

    2012-01-01

    Background Ethnic variations in breast cancer epidemiology and genetics have necessitated investigation of the spectra of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in different populations. Knowledge of BRCA mutations in Chinese populations is still largely unknown. We conducted a multi-center study to characterize the spectra of BRCA mutations in Chinese breast and ovarian cancer patients from Southern China. Methodology/Principal Findings A total of 651 clinically high-risk breast and/or ovarian cancer patients were recruited from the Hong Kong Hereditary Breast Cancer Family Registry from 2007 to 2011. Comprehensive BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation screening was performed using bi-directional sequencing of all coding exons of BRCA1 and BRCA2. Sequencing results were confirmed by in-house developed full high resolution DNA melting (HRM) analysis. Among the 451 probands analyzed, 69 (15.3%) deleterious BRCA mutations were identified, comprising 29 in BRCA1 and 40 in BRCA2. The four recurrent BRCA1 mutations (c.470_471delCT, c.3342_3345delAGAA, c.5406+1_5406+3delGTA and c.981_982delAT) accounted for 34.5% (10/29) of all BRCA1 mutations in this cohort. The four recurrent BRCA2 mutations (c.2808_2811delACAA, c.3109C>T, c.7436_7805del370 and c.9097_9098insA) accounted for 40% (16/40) of all BRCA2 mutations. Haplotype analysis was performed to confirm 1 BRCA1 and 3 BRCA2 mutations are putative founder mutations. Rapid HRM mutation screening for a panel of the founder mutations were developed and validated. Conclusion In this study, our findings suggest that BRCA mutations account for a substantial proportion of hereditary breast/ovarian cancer in Southern Chinese population. Knowing the spectrum and frequency of the founder mutations in this population will assist in the development of a cost-effective rapid screening assay, which in turn facilitates genetic counseling and testing for the purpose of cancer risk assessment. PMID:22970155

  5. High frequency and allele-specific differences of BRCA1 founder mutations in breast cancer and ovarian cancer patients from Belarus.

    PubMed

    Bogdanova, N V; Antonenkova, N N; Rogov, Y I; Karstens, J H; Hillemanns, P; Dörk, T

    2010-10-01

    Breast cancer and ovarian cancer are common malignancies in Belarus accounting for about 3500 and 800 new cases per year, respectively. For breast cancer, the rates and age of onset appear to vary significantly in regions differentially affected by the Chernobyl accident. We assessed the frequency and distribution of three BRCA1 founder mutations 5382insC, 4153delA and Cys61Gly in two hospital-based series of 1945 unselected breast cancer patients and of 201 unselected ovarian cancer patients from Belarus as well as in 1019 healthy control females from the same population. Any of these mutations were identified in 4.4% of the breast cancer patients, 26.4% of the ovarian cancer patients and 0.5% of the controls. In the breast cancer patients, BRCA1 mutations were strongly associated with earlier age at diagnosis, with oestrogen receptor (ER) negative tumours and with a first-degree family history of breast cancer, although only 35% of the identified BRCA1 mutation carriers had such a family history. There were no marked differences in the regional distribution of BRCA1 mutations, so that the significant differences in age at diagnosis and family history of breast cancer patients from areas afflicted by the Chernobyl accident could not be explained by BRCA1. We next observed a higher impact and a shifted mutational spectrum of BRCA1 in the series of Byelorussian ovarian cancer patients where the three founder mutations accounted for 26.4% (53/201). While the Cys61Gly mutation appeared underrepresented in ovarian cancer as compared with breast cancer cases from the same population (p = 0.01), the 4153delA mutation made a higher contribution to ovarian cancer than to breast cancer (p < 0.01). BRCA1 mutations were significantly enriched among ovarian cancer cases with a first-degree family history of breast or ovarian cancer, whereas the median age at ovarian cancer diagnosis was not different between mutation carriers and non-carriers. Taken together, these results

  6. Influenza H3N2 infection of the collaborative cross founder strains reveals highly divergent host responses and identifies a unique phenotype in CAST/EiJ mice.

    PubMed

    Leist, Sarah R; Pilzner, Carolin; van den Brand, Judith M A; Dengler, Leonie; Geffers, Robert; Kuiken, Thijs; Balling, Rudi; Kollmus, Heike; Schughart, Klaus

    2016-02-27

    Influenza A virus is a zoonotic pathogen that poses a major threat to human and animal health. The severe course of influenza infection is not only influenced by viral virulence factors but also by individual differences in the host response. To determine the extent to which the genetic background can modulate severity of an infection, we studied the host responses to influenza infections in the eight genetically highly diverse Collaborative Cross (CC) founder mouse strains. We observed highly divergent host responses between the CC founder strains with respect to survival, body weight loss, hematological parameters in the blood, relative lung weight and viral load. Mouse strain was the main factor with highest effect size on body weight loss after infection, demonstrating that this phenotype was highly heritable. Sex represented another significant main effect, although it was less strong. Analysis of survival rates and mean time to death suggested three groups of susceptibility phenotypes: highly susceptible (A/J, CAST/EiJ, WSB/EiJ), intermediate susceptible (C57BL/6J, 129S1/SvImJ, NOD/ShiLtJ) and highly resistant strains (NZO/HlLtJ, PWK/PhJ). These three susceptibility groups were significantly different with respect to death/survival counts. Viral load was significantly different between susceptible and resistant strains but not between intermediate and highly susceptible strains. CAST/EiJ mice showed a unique phenotype. Despite high viral loads in their lungs, CAST/EiJ mice exhibited low counts of infiltrating granulocytes and showed increased numbers of macrophages in the lung. Histological studies of infected lungs and transcriptome analyses of peripheral blood cells and lungs confirmed an abnormal response in the leukocyte recruitment in CAST/EiJ mice. The eight CC founder strains exhibited a large diversity in their response to influenza infections. Therefore, the CC will represent an ideal mouse genetic reference population to study the influence of

  7. Analysis of Founder Mutations in Rare Tumors Associated With Hereditary Breast/Ovarian Cancer Reveals a Novel Association of BRCA2 Mutations with Ampulla of Vater Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Pedro; Peixoto, Ana; Santos, Catarina; Rocha, Patrícia; Pinto, Carla; Pinheiro, Manuela; Leça, Luís; Martins, Ana Teresa; Ferreira, Verónica; Bartosch, Carla

    2016-01-01

    BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations are responsible for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer, but they also confer an increased risk for the development of rarer cancers associated with this syndrome, namely, cancer of the pancreas, male breast, peritoneum, and fallopian tube. The objective of this work was to quantify the contribution of the founder mutations BRCA2 c.156_157insAlu and BRCA1 c.3331_3334del for cancer etiology in unselected hospital-based cohorts of Portuguese patients diagnosed with these rarer cancers, by using a strategy that included testing of archival tumor tissue. A total of 102 male breast, 68 pancreatic and 33 peritoneal/fallopian tube carcinoma cases were included in the study. The BRCA2 c.156_157insAlu mutation was observed with a frequency of 7.8% in male breast cancers, 3.0% in peritoneal/fallopian tube cancers, and 1.6% in pancreatic cancers, with estimated total contributions of germline BRCA2 mutations of 14.3%, 5.5%, and 2.8%, respectively. No carriers of the BRCA1 c.3331_3334del mutation were identified. During our study, a patient with an ampulla of Vater carcinoma was incidentally found to carry the BRCA2 c.156_157insAlu mutation, so we decided to test a consecutive series of additional 15 ampullary carcinomas for BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations using a combination of direct founder mutation testing and full gene analysis with next generation sequencing. BRCA2 mutations were observed with a frequency of 14.3% in ampulla of Vater carcinomas. In conclusion, taking into account the implications for both the individuals and their family members, we recommend that patients with these neoplasias should be offered BRCA1/BRCA2 genetic testing and we here show that it is feasible to test for founder mutations in archival tumor tissue. Furthermore, we identified for the first time a high frequency of germline BRCA2 mutations in ampullary cancers. PMID:27532258

  8. Sexually-Transmitted/Founder HIV-1 Cannot Be Directly Predicted from Plasma or PBMC-Derived Viral Quasispecies in the Transmitting Partner

    PubMed Central

    Frange, Pierre; Meyer, Laurence; Jung, Matthieu; Goujard, Cecile; Zucman, David; Abel, Sylvie; Hochedez, Patrick; Gousset, Marine; Gascuel, Olivier; Rouzioux, Christine; Chaix, Marie-Laure

    2013-01-01

    Objective Characterization of HIV-1 sequences in newly infected individuals is important for elucidating the mechanisms of viral sexual transmission. We report the identification of transmitted/founder viruses in eight pairs of HIV-1 sexually-infected patients enrolled at the time of primary infection (“recipients”) and their transmitting partners (“donors”). Methods Using a single genome-amplification approach, we compared quasispecies in donors and recipients on the basis of 316 and 376 C2V5 env sequences amplified from plasma viral RNA and PBMC-associated DNA, respectively. Results Both DNA and RNA sequences indicated very homogeneous viral populations in all recipients, suggesting transmission of a single variant, even in cases of recent sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in donors (n = 2) or recipients (n = 3). In all pairs, the transmitted/founder virus was derived from an infrequent variant population within the blood of the donor. The donor variant sequences most closely related to the recipient sequences were found in plasma samples in 3/8 cases and/or in PBMC samples in 6/8 cases. Although donors were exclusively (n = 4) or predominantly (n = 4) infected by CCR5-tropic (R5) strains, two recipients were infected with highly homogeneous CXCR4/dual-mixed-tropic (X4/DM) viral populations, identified in both DNA and RNA. The proportion of X4/DM quasispecies in donors was higher in cases of X4/DM than R5 HIV transmission (16.7–22.0% versus 0–2.6%), suggesting that X4/DM transmission may be associated with a threshold population of X4/DM circulating quasispecies in donors. Conclusions These suggest that a severe genetic bottleneck occurs during subtype B HIV-1 heterosexual and homosexual transmission. Sexually-transmitted/founder virus cannot be directly predicted by analysis of the donor’s quasispecies in plasma and/or PBMC. Additional studies are required to fully understand the traits that confer the capacity to transmit and

  9. The initiation of lateral roots in the primary roots of maize (Zea mays L.) implies a reactivation of cell proliferation in a group of founder pericycle cells.

    PubMed

    Alarcón, M Victoria; Lloret, Pedro G; Martín-Partido, Gervasio; Salguero, Julio

    2016-03-15

    The initiation of lateral roots (LRs) has generally been viewed as a reactivation of proliferative activity in pericycle cells that are committed to initiate primordia. However, it is also possible that pericycle founder cells that initiate LRs never cease proliferative activity but rather are displaced to the most distal root zones while undertaking successive stages of LR initiation. In this study, we tested these two alternative hypotheses by examining the incorporation of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) into the DNA of meristematic root cells of Zea mays. According to the values for the length of the cell cycle and values for cell displacement along the maize root, our results strongly suggest that pericycle cells that initiate LR primordia ceased proliferative activity upon exiting the meristematic zone. This finding is supported by the existence of a root zone between 4 and 20mm from the root cap junction, in which neither mitotic cells nor labelled nuclei were observed in phloem pericycle cells.

  10. Mapping the gene for hereditary hyperparathyroidism and prolactinoma (MENI[sub Burin]) to chromosome 11q: Evidence for a founder effect in patients from Newfoundland

    SciTech Connect

    Petty, E.M.; Bale, A.E. ); Green, J.S. ); Marx, S.J. ); Taggart, R.T. ); Farid, N. )

    1994-06-01

    An autosomal dominant syndrome of prolactinomas, carcinoids, and hyperparathyroidism was described in four Newfoundland kindreds in 1980 and in one kindred from the Pacific Northwest in 1983. Because this syndrome shares many features with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1, the gene for which maps to proximal chromosome 11q, the authors performed linkage studies with chromosome 11 markers in prolactinoma families to determine whether the two genes map to the same location. All proximal chromosome 11q markers gave positive LOD scores, and no recombinants were seen with PYGM (LOD score 15.25, recombination fraction .0). All affected individuals from Newfoundland shared the same PYGM allele, providing evidence for a founder effect. The disease in the Pacific Northwest kindred cosegregated with a different PYGM allele. 32 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. A founder mutation in the Ashkenazi Jewish population affecting messenger RNA splicing of the CCM2 gene causes cerebral cavernous malformations.

    PubMed

    Gallione, Carol J; Solatycki, Ann; Awad, Issam A; Weber, James L; Marchuk, Douglas A

    2011-07-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformations can occur sporadically or are caused by mutations in one of three identified genes. Cerebral cavernous malformations often remain clinically silent until a mutation carrier suffers a stroke or seizure. Presymptomatic genetic testing has been valuable to follow and manage cerebral cavernous malformation mutation carriers. During routine diagnostic testing, we identified a two base pair change in seven unrelated people of Ashkenazi Jewish heritage. Because of the location of the variant beyond the invariant splice donor sequence, the change was reported as a variant of unknown significance. In this study, we determined whether this change was a disease-causing mutation and whether it represents a founder mutation in the Ashkenazi Jewish population. Transcripts arising from the normal and mutant alleles were examined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction from affected and unaffected Ashkenazi Jewish cerebral cavernous malformation family members. A synthetic splicing system using a chimeric exon was used to visualize the effects of the change on splice donor site utilization. The two base pair change in CCM2, c.30 + 5_6delinsTT, segregated with affected status in the study families. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction revealed loss of the transcript allele that was in phase with the mutation. The two base pair change, when tested in an in vitro synthetic splicing system, altered splice donor site utilization. Resequencing of the genomic region proximal and distal to the CCM2 gene mutation revealed a common single-nucleotide polymorphism haplotype in affected individuals. The two base pair change in CCM2, c.30 + 5_6delinsTT, disrupted proper splice donor utilization leading to a degraded transcript. Single nucleotide polymorphism haplotype analysis demonstrated that this mutation was due to a founder in the Ashkenazi Jewish population. These data have the potential to simplify genetic testing for cerebral

  12. A founder AGL mutation causing glycogen storage disease type IIIa in Inuit identified through whole-exome sequencing: a case series.

    PubMed

    Rousseau-Nepton, Isabelle; Okubo, Minoru; Grabs, Rosemarie; Mitchell, John; Polychronakos, Constantin; Rodd, Celia

    2015-02-03

    Glycogen storage disease type III is caused by mutations in both alleles of the AGL gene, which leads to reduced activity of glycogen-debranching enzyme. The clinical picture encompasses hypoglycemia, with glycogen accumulation leading to hepatomegaly and muscle involvement (skeletal and cardiac). We sought to identify the genetic cause of this disease within the Inuit community of Nunavik, in whom previous DNA sequencing had not identified such mutations. Five Inuit children with a clinical and biochemical diagnosis of glycogen storage disease type IIIa were recruited to undergo genetic testing: 2 underwent whole-exome sequencing and all 5 underwent Sanger sequencing to confirm the identified mutation. Selected DNA regions near the AGL gene were also sequenced to identify a potential founder effect in the community. In addition, control samples from 4 adults of European descent and 7 family members of the affected children were analyzed for the specific mutation by Sanger sequencing. We identified a homozygous frame-shift deletion, c.4456delT, in exon 33 of the AGL gene in 2 children by whole-exome sequencing. Confirmation by Sanger sequencing showed the same mutation in all 5 patients, and 5 family members were found to be carriers. With the identification of this mutation in 5 probands, the estimated prevalence of genetically confirmed glycogen storage disease type IIIa in this region is among the highest worldwide (1:2500). Despite identical mutations, we saw variations in clinical features of the disease. Our detection of a homozygous frameshift mutation in 5 Inuit children determines the cause of glycogen storage disease type IIIa and confirms a founder effect. © 2015 Canadian Medical Association or its licensors.

  13. Autologous Neutralizing Antibodies to the Transmitted/Founder Viruses Emerge Late after Simian Immunodeficiency Virus SIVmac251 Infection of Rhesus Monkeys▿

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Wendy W.; Rahman, Ishita; Hraber, Peter; Coffey, Rory T.; Nevidomskyte, Daiva; Giri, Ayush; Asmal, Mohammed; Miljkovic, Svetlana; Daniels, Marcus; Whitney, James B.; Keele, Brandon F.; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Korber, Bette T.; Shaw, George M.; Seaman, Michael S.; Letvin, Norman L.

    2010-01-01

    While the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected rhesus monkey is an important animal model for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection of humans, much remains to be learned about the evolution of the humoral immune response in this model. In HIV-1 infection, autologous neutralizing antibodies emerge 2 to 3 months after infection. However, the ontogeny of the SIV-specific neutralizing antibody response in mucosally infected animals has not been defined. We characterized the kinetics of the autologous neutralizing antibody response to the transmitted/founder SIVmac251 using a pseudovirion-based TZM-bl cell assay and monitored env sequence evolution using single-genome amplification in four rhesus animals that were infected via intrarectal inoculations. We show that the SIVmac251 founder viruses induced neutralizing antibodies at 5 to 8 months after infection. Despite their slow emergence and low titers, these neutralizing antibodies selected for escape mutants that harbored substitutions and deletions in variable region 1 (V1), V2, and V4 of Env. The neutralizing antibody response was initially focused on V4 at 5 to 8 months after infection and then targeted V1/V2 and V4 by 16 months. These findings reveal a striking delay in the development of neutralizing antibodies in SIVmac-infected animals, thus raising questions concerning the suitability of SIVmac251 as a challenge strain to screen AIDS vaccines that elicit neutralizing antibodies as a means to prevent virus acquisition. They also illustrate the capacity of the SIVmac quasispecies to modify antigenic determinants in response to very modest titers of neutralizing antibodies. PMID:20357097

  14. Homozygous EXOSC3 mutation c.92G→C, p.G31A is a founder mutation causing severe pontocerebellar hypoplasia type 1 among the Czech Roma.

    PubMed

    Schwabova, Jaroslava; Brozkova, Dana Safka; Petrak, Borivoj; Mojzisova, Mahulena; Pavlickova, Klara; Haberlova, Jana; Mrazkova, Lenka; Hedvicakova, Petra; Hornofova, Ludmila; Kaluzova, Marie; Fencl, Filip; Krutova, Marcela; Zamecnik, Josef; Seeman, Pavel

    2013-12-01

    Pontocerebellar hypoplasia type 1 (PCH1) is characterized by cerebellar and anterior horn motor neuron degeneration and loss, signs of spinal muscular atrophy plus. Patients manifest severe perinatal weakness, hypotonia, and respiratory insufficiency, causing death frequently before the age of 1 year. Recently, causative mutations in EXOSC3 were reported in a majority of PCH1 patients, but the detailed clinical phenotype caused by EXOSC3 mutations, genotype-phenotype correlations, and prevalent mutations in specific ethnic groups is not yet known. Three unrelated Czech Roma patients with PCH1 were investigated clinically, electrophysiologically, neuroradiologically, and neuropathologically (patients 1 and 2). The entire coding region of the EXOSC3 gene, including the adjacent intron sequences, was sequenced in all three patients. The same mutation c.92G→C, p.G31A in EXOSC3 was found in all three affected patients in homozygous state and in heterozygous state in the parents from two of the families. Haplotype analysis with four flanking microsatellite markers showed identical haplotype in 9 out of 11 haplotypes carrying the c.92G→C, p.G31A mutation. Furthermore, four heterozygotes for this mutation were found in anonymous DNA samples from 90 unrelated Roma individuals. All four of these samples shared the same haplotype. No heterozygous sample was found among 120 anonymous DNA samples from Czech non-Roma individuals with no familial relation. It may therefore be concluded that EXOSC3 c.92G→C, p.G31A mutation is a founder mutation with high prevalence among the Czech Roma causing a similar and particularly severe phenotype of PCH1. These observations from the Czech Roma may have consequences also for other Roma from other countries. PCH1 caused by EXOSC3 founder mutation c.92G→C, p.G31A extends the list of autosomal recessive disorders rare among the general population but more frequent among Roma at least in the Czech Republic.

  15. Founder mutations in NDRG1 and HK1 genes are common causes of inherited neuropathies among Roma/Gypsies in Slovakia.

    PubMed

    Gabrikova, Dana; Mistrik, Martin; Bernasovska, Jarmila; Bozikova, Alexandra; Behulova, Regina; Tothova, Iveta; Macekova, Sona

    2013-11-01

    Autosomal recessive forms of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) account for less than 10 % of all CMT cases, but are more frequent in the populations with a high rate of consanguinity. Roma (Gypsies) are a transnational minority with an estimated population of 10 to 14 million, in which a high degree of consanguineous marriages is a generally known fact. Similar to the other genetically isolated founder populations, the Roma harbour a number of unique or rare autosomal recessive disorders, caused by "private" founder mutations. There are three subtypes of autosomal recessive CMT with mutations private to the Roma population: CMT4C, CMT4D and CMT4G. We report on the molecular examination of four families of Roma origin in Slovakia with early-onset demyelinating neuropathy and autosomal recessive inheritance. We detected mutation p.R148X (g.631C>T) in the NDRG1 (NM_006096.3) gene in two families and mutation g.9712G>C in the HK1 (NM_033498) gene in the other two families. These mutations cause CMT4D and CMT4G, respectively. The success of molecular genetic analysis in all families confirms that autosomal recessive forms of CMT caused by mutations on the NDRG1 and HK1 genes are common causes of inherited neuropathies among Slovak Roma. Providing genetic analysis of these genes for patients with Roma origin as a common part of diagnostic procedure would contribute to a better rate of diagnosed cases of demyelinating neuropathy in Slovakia and in other countries with a Roma minority.

  16. Establishment of three human breast epithelial cell lines derived from carriers of the 999del5 BRCA2 Icelandic founder mutation.

    PubMed

    Rubner Fridriksdottir, Agla J; Gudjonsson, Thorarinn; Halldorsson, Thorhallur; Björnsson, Johannes; Steinarsdottir, Margret; Johannsson, Oskar Thor; Ogmundsdottir, Helga M

    2005-01-01

    Germ line mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 account for a large proportion of inherited breast and ovarian cancer. Both genes are involved in DNA repair by homologous recombination and are thought to play a vital role in maintaining genomic stability. A major drawback for long-term functional studies of BRCA in general and BRCA2 in particular has been a lack of representative human breast epithelial cell lines. In the present study, we have established three cell lines from two patients harboring the 999del5 germ line founder mutation in the BRCA2 gene. Primary cultures were established from cellular outgrowth of explanted tissue and subsequently transfected with a retroviral construct containing the HPV-16 E6 and E7 oncogenes. Paired cancer-derived and normal-derived cell lines were established from one patient referred to as BRCA2-999del5-2T and BRCA2-999del5-2N, respectively. In addition, one cell line was derived from cancer-associated normal tissue from another patient referred to as BRCA2-999del5-1N. All three cell lines showed characteristics of breast epithelial cells as evidenced by expression of breast epithelial specific cytokeratins. Cytogenetic analysis showed marked chromosomal instability with tetraploidy and frequent telomeric associations. In conclusion, we have established three breast epithelial cell lines from two patients carrying the BRCA2 Icelandic 999del5 founder mutation. These cell lines form the basis for further studies on carcinogenesis and malignant progression of breast cancer on a defined genetic background.

  17. Recurrence of carbamoyl phosphate synthetase 1 (CPS1) deficiency in Turkish patients: characterization of a founder mutation by use of recombinant CPS1 from insect cells expression.

    PubMed

    Hu, Liyan; Diez-Fernandez, Carmen; Rüfenacht, Véronique; Hismi, Burcu Öztürk; Ünal, Özlem; Soyucen, Erdogan; Çoker, Mahmut; Bayraktar, Bilge Tanyeri; Gunduz, Mehmet; Kiykim, Ertugrul; Olgac, Asburce; Pérez-Tur, Jordi; Rubio, Vicente; Häberle, Johannes

    2014-12-01

    Carbamoyl phosphate synthetase 1 (CPS1) deficiency due to CPS1 mutations is a rare autosomal-recessive urea cycle disorder causing hyperammonemia that can lead to death or severe neurological impairment. CPS1 catalyzes carbamoyl phosphate formation from ammonia, bicarbonate and two molecules of ATP, and requires the allosteric activator N-acetyl-L-glutamate. Clinical mutations occur in the entire CPS1 coding region, but mainly in single families, with little recurrence. We characterized here the only currently known recurrent CPS1 mutation, p.Val1013del, found in eleven unrelated patients of Turkish descent using recombinant His-tagged wild type or mutant CPS1 expressed in baculovirus/insect cell system. The global CPS1 reaction and the ATPase and ATP synthesis partial reactions that reflect, respectively, the bicarbonate and the carbamate phosphorylation steps, were assayed. We found that CPS1 wild type and V1013del mutant showed comparable expression levels and purity but the mutant CPS1 exhibited no significant residual activities. In the CPS1 structural model, V1013 belongs to a highly hydrophobic β-strand at the middle of the central β-sheet of the A subdomain of the carbamate phosphorylation domain and is close to the predicted carbamate tunnel that links both phosphorylation sites. Haplotype studies suggested that p.Val1013del is a founder mutation. In conclusion, the mutation p.V1013del inactivates CPS1 but does not render the enzyme grossly unstable or insoluble. Recurrence of this particular mutation in Turkish patients is likely due to a founder effect, which is consistent with the frequent consanguinity observed in the affected population. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Hidden founder effects: small-scale spatial genetic structure in recently established populations of the grassland specialist plant Anthyllis vulneraria.

    PubMed

    Helsen, Kenny; Jacquemyn, Hans; Honnay, Olivier

    2015-06-01

    The long-term establishment success of founder plant populations has been commonly assessed based on the measures of population genetic diversity and among population genetic differentiation, with founder populations expected to carry sufficient genetic diversity when population establishment is the result of many colonists from multiple source populations (the 'migrant pool' colonization model). Theory, however, predicts that, after initial colonization, rapid population expansion may result in a fast increase in the extent of spatial genetic structure (SGS), independent of extant genetic diversity. This SGS can reduce long-term population viability by increasing inbreeding. Using 12 microsatellite markers, we inferred colonization patterns in four recent populations of the grassland specialist plant Anthyllis vulneraria and compared the extent of SGS between recently established and old populations. Assignment analyses of the individuals of recent population based on the genetic composition of nine adjacent putative source populations suggested the occurrence of the 'migrant pool' colonization model, further confirmed by high genetic diversity within and low genetic differentiation among recent populations. Population establishment, however, resulted in the build-up of strong SGS, most likely as a result of spatially restricted recruitment of the progeny of initial colonists. Although reduced, significant SGS was nonetheless observed to persist in old populations. The presence of SGS was in all populations associated with elevated inbreeding coefficients, potentially affecting the long-term viability of these populations. In conclusion, this study illustrates the importance of studying SGS next to population genetic diversity and differentiation to adequately infer colonization patterns and long-term establishment success of plant species. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Genetic and biochemical study of dual hereditary jaundice: Dubin-Johnson and Gilbert's syndromes. Haplotyping and founder effect of deletion in ABCC2.

    PubMed

    Slachtova, Lenka; Seda, Ondrej; Behunova, Jana; Mistrik, Martin; Martasek, Pavel

    2016-05-01

    Dual hereditary jaundice, a combination of Dubin-Johnson and Gilbert's syndromes, is a rare clinical entity resulting from the compound defects of bilirubin conjugation and transport. We aimed to study the hereditary jaundice in 56 members from seven seemingly unrelated Roma families, to find the causal genetic defect and to estimate its origin in Roma population. On the basis of biochemical results of total and conjugated serum bilirubin and clinical observations, ABCC2 gene, TATA box and phenobarbital enhancer (PBREM) of UGT1A1 gene were analyzed by sequencing, RFLP and fragment analysis. We found a novel variant c.1013_1014delTG in the eighth exon of ABCC2 gene in 17 individuals in homozygous state. Dual defect NG_011798.1:c.[1013_1014delTG]; NG_002601.2:g.[175492_175493insTA] in homozygous state was found in four subjects. Biochemical analyses of porphyrins and coproporphyrin isomers in urine performed by HPLC showed inverted ratio of excreted coproporphyrin, with the predominance of coproporphyrin I (up to 100%), typical for patients with Dubin-Johnson syndrome. Pursuant cultural and social specifics of the population led us to suspect a founder effect; therefore, we performed a haplotype study using genotyping data from Affymetrix Genome-Wide Human SNP Array 6.0. As a result, we detected a common 86 kbp haplotype encompassing promoter and part of the ABCC2 coding region among all families, and estimated the age of the ancestral variant to 178-185 years. In this study, we found a novel deletion in ABCC2 gene, described genetic and biochemical features of dual hereditary jaundice and confirmed the existence of founder effect and common haplotype among seven Roma families.

  20. The impact of an early truncating founder ATM mutation on immunoglobulins, specific antibodies and lymphocyte populations in ataxia-telangiectasia patients and their parents

    PubMed Central

    STRAY-PEDERSEN, A; JÓNSSON, T; HEIBERG, A; LINDMAN, C R; WIDING, E; AABERGE, I S; BORRESEN-DALE, A L; ABRAHAMSEN, T G

    2004-01-01

    Eleven Norwegian patients (aged 2–33 years, seven males and four females) with Ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) and their parents were investigated. Five of the patients were homozygous for the same ATM mutation, 3245delATCinsTGAT, a Norwegian founder mutation. They had the lowest IgG2 levels; mean (95% confidence interval) 0·23 (0·05–0·41) g/l versus 0·91 (0·58–1·26) g/l in the other patients (P = 0·002). Among the 11 A-T patients, six had IgG2 deficiency, six had IgA deficiency (three in combination with IgG2 deficiency) and seven had low/undetectable IgE values. All patients had very low levels of antibodies to Streptococcus pneumoniae 0·9 (0·4–1·4) U/ml, while normal levels were found in their parents 11·1 (8·7–13·4) U/ml (P < 0·001). A positive linear relationship between pneumococcal antibodies and IgG2 (r = 0·85, P = 0·001) was found in the patients. Six of 11 had diphtheria antibodies and 7 of 11 tetanus antibodies after childhood vaccinations, while 4 of 7 Hemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) vaccinated patients had protective antibodies. Ten patients had low B cell (CD19+) counts, while six had low T cell (CD3+) counts. Of the T cell subpopulations, 11 had low CD4+ cell counts, six had reduced CD8+ cell counts, and four had an increased portion of double negative (CD3+/CD4-/CD8-) gamma delta T cells. Of the 22 parents (aged 23–64 years) 12 were heterozygous for the ATM founder mutation. Abnormalities in immunoglobulin levels and/or lymphocyte subpopulations were also observed in these carriers, with no correlation to a special ATM genotype. PMID:15196260

  1. Rapid Buildup of Genetic Diversity in Founder Populations of the Gynodioecious Plant Species Origanum vulgare after Semi-Natural Grassland Restoration

    PubMed Central

    Helsen, Kenny; Jacquemyn, Hans; Hermy, Martin; Vandepitte, Katrien; Honnay, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    In most landscapes the success of habitat restoration is largely dependent on spontaneous colonization of plant species. This colonization process, and the outcome of restoration practices, can only be considered successful if the genetic makeup of founding populations is not eroded through founder effects and subsequent genetic drift. Here we used 10 microsatellite markers to investigate the genetic effects of recent colonization of the long-lived gynodioecious species Origanum vulgare in restored semi-natural grassland patches. We compared the genetic diversity and differentiation of fourteen recent populations with that of thirteen old, putative source populations, and we evaluated the effects of spatial configuration of the populations on colonization patterns. We did not observe decreased genetic diversity in recent populations, or inflated genetic differentiation among them. Nevertheless, a significantly higher inbreeding coefficient was observed in recent populations, although this was not associated with negative fitness effects. Overall population genetic differentiation was low (FST = 0.040). Individuals of restored populations were assigned to on average 6.1 different source populations (likely following the ‘migrant pool’ model). Gene flow was, however, affected by the spatial configuration of the grasslands, with gene flow into the recent populations mainly originating from nearby source populations. This study demonstrates how spontaneous colonization after habitat restoration can lead to viable populations in a relatively short time, overcoming pronounced founder effects, when several source populations are nearby. Restored populations can therefore rapidly act as stepping stones and sources of genetic diversity, likely increasing overall metapopulation viability of the study species. PMID:23840642

  2. An USH2A founder mutation is the major cause of Usher syndrome type 2 in Canadians of French origin and confirms common roots of Quebecois and Acadians

    PubMed Central

    Ebermann, Inga; Koenekoop, Robert K; Lopez, Irma; Bou-Khzam, Lara; Pigeon, Renée; Bolz, Hanno J

    2009-01-01

    Congenital hearing loss affects approximately one child in 1000. About 10% of the deaf population have Usher syndrome (USH). In USH, hearing loss is complicated by retinal degeneration with onset in the first (USH1) or second (USH2) decade. In most populations, diagnostic testing is hampered by a multitude of mutations in nine genes. We have recently shown that in French Canadians from Quebec, USH1 largely results from a single USH1C founder mutation, c.216G>A (‘Acadian allele'). The genetic basis of USH2 in Canadians of French descent, however, has remained elusive. Here, we have investigated nine USH2 families from Quebec and New Brunswick (the former Acadia) by haplotype analyses of the USH2A locus and sequencing of the three known USH2 genes. Seven USH2A mutations were identified in eight patients. One of them, c.4338_4339delCT, accounts for 10 out of 18 disease alleles (55.6%). This mutation has previously been reported in an Acadian USH2 family, and it was found in homozygous state in the three Acadians of our sample. As in the case of c.216G>A (USH1C), a common haplotype is associated with c.4338_4339delCT. With a limited number of molecular tests, it will now be possible in these populations to estimate whether children with congenital hearing impairment of different degrees will develop retinal disease – with important clinical and therapeutic implications. USH2 is the second example that reveals a significant genetic overlap between Quebecois and Acadians: in contrast to current understanding, other genetic disorders present in both populations are likely based on common founder mutations as well. PMID:18665195

  3. A Founder Mutation in LEPRE1 Carried by 1.5% of West Africans and 0.4% of African Americans Causes Lethal Recessive Osteogenesis Imperfecta

    PubMed Central

    Cabral, Wayne A.; Barnes, Aileen M.; Adeyemo, Adebowale; Cushing, Kelly; Chitayat, David; Porter, Forbes D.; Panny, Susan R.; Gulamali-Majid, Fizza; Tishkoff, Sarah A.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Gueye, Serigne M.; Bailey-Wilson, Joan E.; Brody, Lawrence C.; Rotimi, Charles N.; Marini, Joan C.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Deficiency of prolyl 3-hydroxylase 1, encoded by LEPRE1, causes recessive osteogenesis imperfecta. We previously identified a LEPRE1 mutation, exclusively in African Americans and contemporary West Africans. We hypothesized that this allele originated in West Africa and was introduced to the Americas with the Atlantic slave trade. We aimed to determine the frequency of carriers for this mutation among African Americans and West Africans, and the mutation origin and age. Methods Genomic DNA was screened for the mutation using PCR and restriction digestion, and a custom TaqMan genomic SNP assay. The mutation age was estimated using microsatellites and short tandem repeats spanning 4.2 Mb surrounding LEPRE1 in probands and carriers. Results Approximately 0.4% of Mid-Atlantic African Americans carry this mutation, estimating recessive OI in 1/260,000 births in this population. In Nigeria and Ghana, 1.48% of unrelated individuals are heterozygous carriers, predicting 1/18,260 births will be affected with recessive OI, equal to the incidence of de novo dominant OI. The mutation was not detected in Africans from surrounding countries. All carriers shared a haplotype of 63-770 Kb, consistent with a single founder for this mutation. Using linkage disequilibrium analysis, the mutation was estimated to have originated between 650 and 900 years before present (1100-1350 C.E.). Conclusions We identified a West African founder mutation for recessive OI in LEPRE1. Nearly 1.5% of Ghanians and Nigerians are carriers. The age of this allele is consistent with introduction to North America via the Atlantic slave trade (1501 – 1867 C.E). PMID:22281939

  4. Autologous neutralizing antibodies to the transmitted/founder viruses emerge late after simian immunodeficiency virus SIVmac251 infection of rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Wendy W; Rahman, Ishita; Hraber, Peter; Coffey, Rory T; Nevidomskyte, Daiva; Giri, Ayush; Asmal, Mohammed; Miljkovic, Svetlana; Daniels, Marcus; Whitney, James B; Keele, Brandon F; Hahn, Beatrice H; Korber, Bette T; Shaw, George M; Seaman, Michael S; Letvin, Norman L

    2010-06-01

    While the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected rhesus monkey is an important animal model for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection of humans, much remains to be learned about the evolution of the humoral immune response in this model. In HIV-1 infection, autologous neutralizing antibodies emerge 2 to 3 months after infection. However, the ontogeny of the SIV-specific neutralizing antibody response in mucosally infected animals has not been defined. We characterized the kinetics of the autologous neutralizing antibody response to the transmitted/founder SIVmac251 using a pseudovirion-based TZM-bl cell assay and monitored env sequence evolution using single-genome amplification in four rhesus animals that were infected via intrarectal inoculations. We show that the SIVmac251 founder viruses induced neutralizing antibodies at 5 to 8 months after infection. Despite their slow emergence and low titers, these neutralizing antibodies selected for escape mutants that harbored substitutions and deletions in variable region 1 (V1), V2, and V4 of Env. The neutralizing antibody response was initially focused on V4 at 5 to 8 months after infection and then targeted V1/V2 and V4 by 16 months. These findings reveal a striking delay in the development of neutralizing antibodies in SIVmac-infected animals, thus raising questions concerning the suitability of SIVmac251 as a challenge strain to screen AIDS vaccines that elicit neutralizing antibodies as a means to prevent virus acquisition. They also illustrate the capacity of the SIVmac quasispecies to modify antigenic determinants in response to very modest titers of neutralizing antibodies.

  5. Formation of low-δ18O magmas of the Kangerlussuaq Intrusion by addition of water derived from dehydration of foundered basaltic roof rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riishuus, Morten S.; Harris, Chris; Peate, David W.; Tegner, Christian; Wilson, J. Richard; Brooks, C. Kent

    2015-05-01

    The Kangerlussuaq Intrusion in East Greenland is concentrically zoned from quartz nordmarkite (quartz syenite) at the margin, through pulaskite, to foyaite (nepheline syenite) in the centre, with no apparent intrusive contacts. The δ18O values of coexisting minerals are consistent with oxygen isotope equilibrium at magmatic temperatures. Most of the intrusion formed from low-δ18O magma; magma δ18O values generally increased upwards from about 3.3 ‰ in the quartz nordmarkites to 5.6 ‰ in the foyaites. The lowest magma δ18O value of about -1.0 ‰ is from the upper part of the nordmarkites, where there is a high concentration of foundered basaltic xenoliths (stoped from the roof of the intrusion). The amphiboles in the syenites have δD values that range from those typical of hydrous mantle-derived minerals to much lower values (-86 to -157 ‰), as do whole-rock samples of xenolith and country rock (-125 to -148 ‰). The low magma δ18O and δD values are consistent with continuous incorporation, exchange and upward escape of low-δ18O and δD fluids released from stoped basaltic roof material. Mass balance suggests that the integrated amount of water involved was 7 wt% of the volume of the magma, but locally reached 30 wt% water. The requirement for large amounts of water with low δ18O value is satisfied only if the foundered basalt contained most of its water in cavities as opposed to hydrous minerals. Even with this requirement, the volume of stoped basalt would have been equal to the volume of the magma. Repeated recharge of the residual magma with progressively less contaminated silica undersaturated melt resulted in a gradual shift across the low-pressure thermal divide. Crystallisation was suppressed by the depression of the liquidus due to water saturation of the residual magma (pH2O ~1 kbar).

  6. Mutations in Danish patients with long QT syndrome and the identification of a large founder family with p.F29L in KCNH2

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Long QT syndrome (LQTS) is a cardiac ion channelopathy which presents clinically with palpitations, syncope or sudden death. More than 700 LQTS-causing mutations have been identified in 13 genes, all of which encode proteins involved in the execution of the cardiac action potential. The most frequently affected genes, covering > 90% of cases, are KCNQ1, KCNH2 and SCN5A. Methods We describe 64 different mutations in 70 unrelated Danish families using a routine five-gene screen, comprising KCNQ1, KCNH2 and SCN5A as well as KCNE1 and KCNE2. Results Twenty-two mutations were found in KCNQ1, 28 in KCNH2, 9 in SCN5A, 3 in KCNE1 and 2 in KCNE2. Twenty-six of these have only been described in the Danish population and 18 are novel. One double heterozygote (1.4% of families) was found. A founder mutation, p.F29L in KCNH2, was identified in 5 “unrelated” families. Disease association, in 31.2% of cases, was based on the type of mutation identified (nonsense, insertion/deletion, frameshift or splice-site). Functional data was available for 22.7% of the missense mutations. None of the mutations were found in 364 Danish alleles and only three, all functionally characterised, were recorded in the Exome Variation Server, albeit at a frequency of < 1:1000. Conclusion The genetic etiology of LQTS in Denmark is similar to that found in other populations. A large founder family with p.F29L in KCNH2 was identified. In 48.4% of the mutations disease causation was based on mutation type or functional analysis. PMID:24606995

  7. Fifty-five years (1955-2010) of the Coagulation Section at Laboratory of Hematology, Sestre milosrdnice University Hospital, and its founder, hematologist Ljubomir Popović.

    PubMed

    Stancić, Vladimir; Stancić, Nevenka; Vucelić, Vesna; Lang, Nada; Grbac, Ljiljana

    2011-09-01

    The Coagulation Section at Laboratory of Hematology, Sestre milosrdnice University Hospital, Zagreb, was founded in 1955 by Ljubomir Popović, hematologist and assistant at School of Medicine, University of Zagreb, in cooperation with hard-working laboratory technicians. Apart from papers on hematologic neoplasms, plasmacytoma and lymphoma, Ljubomir Popović published a number of papers in the field of anticoagulant therapy with heparin and oral anticoagulants, some of which are also in use today. After Ljubomir Popović left the Hospital in 1964, the Laboratory was run by Professor Nedjeljko Milić, head of the newly founded Division of Hematology. In 1968, the management of the Laboratory of Hematology was taken over by Biserka Raić, MS, medical biochemist, until her retirement in 2007. Great development in morphological and cytometric studies of blood and blood cells has been paralleled by continuous progress and almost dominating activities in the diagnosis of hemostasis disorders. In the 1970s, Marko Koprcina, hematologist, and Biserka Raić introduced the then latest tests in practice at all Hospital departments. In that golden age of the Coagulation Section, M. Koprcina, B. Raić and their associates transferred their knowledge to all colleagues in the Hospital. Through that collaboration, high standards in the diagnosis of hemostasis disorders were achieved, from which the currently high level of clinical knowledge about coagulation disorders and their treatment has derived, making Sestre milosrdnice University Hospital one of the leading hospitals in this field in the country. By describing development of the Coagulation Section and the life of its founder Ljubomir Popović, the authors tried to provide an answer to the following question: can today's clinicians still have a deciding role in laboratory development, considering that assessments of different phenomena are always initiated by an interested clinician who is trying to interpret and understand

  8. Founder Effect of a c.828+3A>T Splice Site Mutation in Peripherin 2 (PRPH2) Causing Autosomal Dominant Retinal Dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Shankar, Suma P; Birch, David G; Ruiz, Richard S; Hughbanks-Wheaton, Dianna K; Sullivan, Lori S; Bowne, Sara J; Stone, Edwin M; Daiger, Stephen P

    2015-05-01

    ancestor and is a founder mutation. It has a prevalence of 2% in families diagnosed as having autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa and 10% in families with variable clinical diagnosis of pattern, macular, and retinal dystrophies. Individuals with the c.828+3A>T mutation expressed a PRPH2 transcript not found in control participants and that was consistent with abnormal splicing. The PRPH2 c.828+3A>T splice site mutation is a frequent cause of inherited retinal dystrophies and is owing to the founder effect. The likely cause of disease is the missplicing of the PRPH2 message that results in a truncated protein product. Identifying the genetic etiology assists in more accurate management and possible future therapeutic options.

  9. Adoptive Transfer of Engineered Rhesus Simian Immunodeficiency Virus-Specific CD8+ T Cells Reduces the Number of Transmitted/Founder Viruses Established in Rhesus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Ayala, Victor I.; Trivett, Matthew T.; Barsov, Eugene V.; Jain, Sumiti; Piatak, Michael; Trubey, Charles M.; Alvord, W. Gregory; Chertova, Elena; Roser, James D.; Smedley, Jeremy; Komin, Alexander; Keele, Brandon F.; Ohlen, Claes

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT AIDS virus infections are rarely controlled by cell-mediated immunity, in part due to viral immune evasion and immunodeficiency resulting from CD4+ T-cell infection. One likely aspect of this failure is that antiviral cellular immune responses are either absent or present at low levels during the initial establishment of infection. To test whether an extensive, timely, and effective response could reduce the establishment of infection from a high-dose inoculum, we adoptively transferred large numbers of T cells that were molecularly engineered with anti-simian immunodeficiency virus (anti-SIV) activity into rhesus macaques 3 days following an intrarectal SIV inoculation. To measure in vivo antiviral activity, we assessed the number of viruses transmitted using SIVmac239X, a molecularly tagged viral stock containing 10 genotypic variants, at a dose calculated to transmit 12 founder viruses. Single-genome sequencing of plasma virus revealed that the two animals receiving T cells expressing SIV-specific T-cell receptors (TCRs) had significantly fewer viral genotypes than the two control animals receiving non-SIV-specific T cells (means of 4.0 versus 7.5 transmitted viral genotypes; P = 0.044). Accounting for the likelihood of transmission of multiple viruses of a particular genotype, the calculated means of the total number of founder viruses transmitted were 4.5 and 14.5 in the experimental and control groups, respectively (P = 0.021). Thus, a large antiviral T-cell response timed with virus exposure can limit viral transmission. The presence of strong, preexisting T-cell responses, including those induced by vaccines, might help prevent the establishment of infection at the lower-exposure doses in humans that typically transmit only a single virus. IMPORTANCE The establishment of AIDS virus infection in an individual is essentially a race between the spreading virus and host immune defenses. Cell-mediated immune responses induced by infection or vaccination

  10. Adoptive Transfer of Engineered Rhesus Simian Immunodeficiency Virus-Specific CD8+ T Cells Reduces the Number of Transmitted/Founder Viruses Established in Rhesus Macaques.

    PubMed

    Ayala, Victor I; Trivett, Matthew T; Barsov, Eugene V; Jain, Sumiti; Piatak, Michael; Trubey, Charles M; Alvord, W Gregory; Chertova, Elena; Roser, James D; Smedley, Jeremy; Komin, Alexander; Keele, Brandon F; Ohlen, Claes; Ott, David E

    2016-11-01

    AIDS virus infections are rarely controlled by cell-mediated immunity, in part due to viral immune evasion and immunodeficiency resulting from CD4(+) T-cell infection. One likely aspect of this failure is that antiviral cellular immune responses are either absent or present at low levels during the initial establishment of infection. To test whether an extensive, timely, and effective response could reduce the establishment of infection from a high-dose inoculum, we adoptively transferred large numbers of T cells that were molecularly engineered with anti-simian immunodeficiency virus (anti-SIV) activity into rhesus macaques 3 days following an intrarectal SIV inoculation. To measure in vivo antiviral activity, we assessed the number of viruses transmitted using SIVmac239X, a molecularly tagged viral stock containing 10 genotypic variants, at a dose calculated to transmit 12 founder viruses. Single-genome sequencing of plasma virus revealed that the two animals receiving T cells expressing SIV-specific T-cell receptors (TCRs) had significantly fewer viral genotypes than the two control animals receiving non-SIV-specific T cells (means of 4.0 versus 7.5 transmitted viral genotypes; P = 0.044). Accounting for the likelihood of transmission of multiple viruses of a particular genotype, the calculated means of the total number of founder viruses transmitted were 4.5 and 14.5 in the experimental and control groups, respectively (P = 0.021). Thus, a large antiviral T-cell response timed with virus exposure can limit viral transmission. The presence of strong, preexisting T-cell responses, including those induced by vaccines, might help prevent the establishment of infection at the lower-exposure doses in humans that typically transmit only a single virus. The establishment of AIDS virus infection in an individual is essentially a race between the spreading virus and host immune defenses. Cell-mediated immune responses induced by infection or vaccination are important

  11. A c.3216_3217delGA mutation in AGL gene in Tunisian patients with a glycogen storage disease type III: evidence of a founder effect.

    PubMed

    Mili, A; Ben Charfeddine, I; Amara, A; Mamaï, O; Adala, L; Ben Lazreg, T; Bouguila, J; Saad, A; Limem, K; Gribaa, M

    2012-12-01

    Glycogen storage disease type III (GSD III) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by excessive accumulation of abnormal glycogen in the liver and muscles and caused by deficiency in the glycogen debranching enzyme, the amylo-1,6-glucosidase (AGL). In this study, we report the clinical, biochemical and genotyping features of five unrelated GSD III patients coming from the same region in Tunisia. The concentration of erythrocyte glycogen and AGL activity were measured by colorimetric and fluorimetric methods, respectively. Four CA/TG microsatellite markers flanking the AGL gene in chromosome 1 were amplified with fluoresceinated primers. The full coding exons and their relevant exon-intron boundaries of the AGL gene were directly sequenced for the patients and their parents. All patients showed a striking increase of erythrocytes glycogen content. No AGL activity was detected in peripheral leukocytes. Sequencing of the AGL gene identified a c.3216_3217delGA (p.Glu1072AspfsX36) mutation in the five patients which leads to a premature termination, abolishing the AGL activity. Haplotype analysis showed that the mutation was associated with a common homozygote haplotype. Our results suggested the existence of a founder effect responsible for GSD III in this region of Tunisia. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. AmericaPlex26: A SNaPshot Multiplex System for Genotyping the Main Human Mitochondrial Founder Lineages of the Americas

    PubMed Central

    Coutinho, Alexandra; Valverde, Guido; Fehren-Schmitz, Lars; Cooper, Alan; Barreto Romero, Maria Inés; Espinoza, Isabel Flores; Llamas, Bastien; Haak, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Phylogeographic studies have described a reduced genetic diversity in Native American populations, indicative of one or more bottleneck events during the peopling and prehistory of the Americas. Classical sequencing approaches targeting the mitochondrial diversity have reported the presence of five major haplogroups, namely A, B, C, D and X, whereas the advent of complete mitochondrial genome sequencing has recently refined the number of founder lineages within the given diversity to 15 sub-haplogroups. We developed and optimized a SNaPshot assay to study the mitochondrial diversity in pre-Columbian Native American populations by simultaneous typing of 26 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) characterising Native American sub-haplogroups. Our assay proved to be highly sensitive with respect to starting concentrations of target DNA and could be applied successfully to a range of ancient human skeletal material from South America from various time periods. The AmericaPlex26 is a powerful assay with enhanced phylogenetic resolution that allows time- and cost-efficient mitochondrial DNA sub-typing from valuable ancient specimens. It can be applied in addition or alternative to standard sequencing of the D-loop region in forensics, ancestry testing, and population studies, or where full-resolution mitochondrial genome sequencing is not feasible. PMID:24671218

  13. Hyperparathyroidism-jaw tumor syndrome in Roma families from Portugal is due to a founder mutation of the HRPT2 gene.

    PubMed

    Cavaco, Branca M; Guerra, Laura; Bradley, Karin J; Carvalho, Davide; Harding, Brian; Oliveira, Amélia; Santos, Maria-Amparo; Sobrinho, Luís G; Thakker, Rajesh V; Leite, Valeriano

    2004-04-01

    The hyperparathyroidism-jaw tumor (HPT-JT) syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by the occurrence of parathyroid tumors and ossifying jaw fibromas. The gene causing HPT-JT, HRPT2, is located on chromosome 1q31.2 and consists of 17 exons that encode a 531-amino acid protein, designated parafibromin. We recently identified six Roma families in Portugal with 56 members (11 affected and 45 asymptomatic), who had the HPT-JT syndrome. We postulated that they may have a common ancestor and that the HPT-JT syndrome may be due to a mutation of the HRPT2 gene. Haplotype analysis using 14 chromosome 1q24-q32 polymorphic markers showed that the 11 affected individuals shared a common haplotype defined by seven markers that spanned an approximately 12.5-cM region, flanked centromerically by D1S202 and telomerically by D1S306. DNA sequence analysis identified a 2-bp (TG or GT) frameshift deletion in exon 8, which predicts a truncated parafibromin protein, in all 11 affected individuals. This mutation was also found in 19 unaffected individuals (age range, 12-74 yr) who shared the affected haplotype, suggesting a low age-related penetrance for HPT-JT in these families. Thus, the HPT-JT syndrome in six Roma families from Portugal is due to a novel founder mutation in the HRPT2 gene.

  14. Genetically heterogeneous selective intestinal malabsorption of vitamin B12: founder effects, consanguinity, and high clinical awareness explain aggregations in Scandinavia and the Middle East.

    PubMed

    Tanner, Stephan M; Li, Zhongyuan; Bisson, Ryan; Acar, Ceren; Oner, Cihan; Oner, Reyhan; Cetin, Mualla; Abdelaal, Mohamed A; Ismail, Essam A; Lissens, Willy; Krahe, Ralf; Broch, Harald; Gräsbeck, Ralph; de la Chapelle, Albert

    2004-04-01

    Selective intestinal malabsorption of vitamin B(12) causing juvenile megaloblastic anemia (MGA; MIM# 261100) is a recessively inherited disorder that is believed to be rare except for notable clusters of cases in Finland, Norway, and the Eastern Mediterranean region. The disease can be caused by mutations in either the cubilin (CUBN; MGA1; MIM# 602997) or the amnionless (AMN; MIM# 605799) gene. To explain the peculiar geographical distribution, we hypothesized that mutations in one of the genes would mainly be responsible for the disease in Scandinavia, and mutations in the other gene in the Mediterranean region. We studied 42 sibships and found all cases in Finland to be due to CUBN (three different mutations) and all cases in Norway to be due to AMN (two different mutations), while in Turkey, Israel, and Saudi Arabia, there were two different AMN mutations and three different CUBN mutations. Haplotype evidence excluded both CUBN and AMN conclusively in five families and tentatively in three families, suggesting the presence of at least one more gene locus that can cause MGA. We conclude that the Scandinavian cases are typical examples of enrichment by founder effects, while in the Mediterranean region high degrees of consanguinity expose rare mutations in both genes. We suggest that in both regions, physician awareness of this disease causes it to be more readily diagnosed than elsewhere; thus, it may well be more common worldwide than previously thought.

  15. A novel 3-bp deletion in the PANK2 gene of Dutch patients with pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration: evidence for a founder effect.

    PubMed

    Rump, P; Lemmink, H H; Verschuuren-Bemelmans, C C; Grootscholten, P M; Fock, J M; Hayflick, S J; Westaway, S K; Vos, Y J; van Essen, A J

    2005-12-01

    Mutation analysis was performed in four apparently unrelated Dutch families with pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration, formerly known as Hallervorden-Spatz syndrome. A novel 3-bp deletion encompassing the nucleotides GAG at positions 1,142 to 1,144 of exon 5 of the PANK2 gene was found in all patients. One patient was compound heterozygous; she also carried a novel nonsense mutation (Ser68Stop). The other patients were homozygous for the 1142_1144delGAG mutation. The 1142_1144delGAG mutation was also found in a German patient of unknown descent. We used polymorphic microsatellite markers flanking the PANK2 gene (spanning a region of approximately 8 cM) for haplotype analyses in all these families. A conserved haplotype of 1.5 cM was found for the 1142_1144delGAG mutation carriers. All the Dutch families originated from the same geographical region within the Netherlands. The results indicate a founder effect and suggest that the 1142_1144delGAG mutation probably originated from one common ancestor. It was estimated that this mutation arose at the beginning of the ninth century, approximately 38 generations ago.

  16. Human mtDNA hypervariable regions, HVR I and II, hint at deep common maternal founder and subsequent maternal gene flow in Indian population groups.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Swarkar; Saha, Anjana; Rai, Ekta; Bhat, Audesh; Bamezai, Ramesh

    2005-01-01

    We have analysed the hypervariable regions (HVR I and II) of human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in individuals from Uttar Pradesh (UP), Bihar (BI) and Punjab (PUNJ), belonging to the Indo-European linguistic group, and from South India (SI), that have their linguistic roots in Dravidian language. Our analysis revealed the presence of known and novel mutations in both hypervariable regions in the studied population groups. Median joining network analyses based on mtDNA showed extensive overlap in mtDNA lineages despite the extensive cultural and linguistic diversity. MDS plot analysis based on Fst distances suggested increased maternal genetic proximity for the studied population groups compared with other world populations. Mismatch distribution curves, respective neighbour joining trees and other statistical analyses showed that there were significant expansions. The study revealed an ancient common ancestry for the studied population groups, most probably through common founder female lineage(s), and also indicated that human migrations occurred (maybe across and within the Indian subcontinent) even after the initial phase of female migration to India.

  17. Transmission of Multiple HIV-1 Subtype C Transmitted/founder Viruses into the Same Recipients Was not Determined by Modest Phenotypic Differences

    PubMed Central

    Song, Hongshuo; Hora, Bhavna; Giorgi, Elena E.; Kumar, Amit; Cai, Fangping; Bhattacharya, Tanmoy; Perelson, Alan S.; Gao, Feng

    2016-01-01

    A severe bottleneck exists during HIV-1 mucosal transmission. However, viral properties that determine HIV-1 transmissibility are not fully elucidated. We identified multiple transmitted/founder (T/F) viruses in six HIV-1-infected subjects by analyzing whole genome sequences. Comparison of biological phenotypes of different T/F viruses from the same individual allowed us to more precisely identify critical determinants for viral transmissibility since they were transmitted under similar conditions. All T/F viruses used coreceptor CCR5, while no T/F viruses used CXCR4 or GPR15. However, the efficiency for different T/F viruses from the same individual to use CCR5 was significantly variable, and the differences were even more significant for usage of coreceptors FPRL1, CCR3 and APJ. Resistance to IFN-α was also different between T/F viruses in 2 of 3 individuals. The relative fitness between T/F viruses from the same subject was highly variable (2–6%). Importantly, the levels of coreceptor usage efficiency, resistance to IFN-α and viral fitness were not associated with proportions of T/F viruses in each individual during acute infection. Our results show that the modest but significant differences in coreceptor usage efficiency, IFN-α sensitivity and viral fitness each alone may not play a critical role in HIV-1 transmission. PMID:27909304

  18. Molecular identification, cloning and characterization of transmitted/founder HIV-1 subtype A, D and A/D infectious molecular clones

    PubMed Central

    Baalwa, Joshua; Wang, Shuyi; Parrish, Nicholas; Decker, Julie M.; Keele, Brandon F.; Learn, Gerald H.; Yue, Ling; Ruzagira, Eugene; Ssemwanga, Deogratius; Kamali, Anatoli; Amornkul, Pauli N.; Price, Matt A.; Kappes, John C.; Karita, Etienne; Kaleebu, Pontiano; Sanders, Eduard; Gilmour, Jill; Allen, Susan; Hunter, Eric; Montefiori, David C.; Haynes, Barton F.; Cormier, Emmanuel; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Shaw, George M.

    2012-01-01

    We report the molecular identification, cloning and initial biological characterization of 12 full-length HIV-1 subtype A, D and A/D recombinant transmitted/founder (T/F) genomes. T/F genomes contained intact canonical open reading frames and all T/F viruses were replication competent in primary human T-cells, although subtype D virus replication was more efficient (p<0.05). All 12 viruses utilized CCR5 but not CXCR4 as a co-receptor for entry and exhibited a neutralization profile typical of tier 2 primary virus strains, with significant differences observed between subtype A and D viruses with respect to sensitivity to monoclonal antibodies VRC01, PG9 and PG16 and polyclonal subtype C anti-HIV IgG (p<0.05 for each). The present report doubles the number of T/F HIV-1 clones available for pathogenesis and vaccine research and extends their representation to include subtypes A, B, C and D. PMID:23123038

  19. Effect of multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) gene mutations on premature mortality in familial MEN1 syndrome with founder mutations.

    PubMed

    Ebeling, T; Vierimaa, O; Kytölä, S; Leisti, J; Salmela, P I

    2004-07-01

    Estimation of mortality and the natural course of a disease is usually based on information of carefully studied individuals with or at risk for a specific disease. Genealogical information has rarely been accurate enough for such studies. With the help of church records and multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) family information of the two founder MEN1 mutations in Northern Finland (1466del12 and 1657insC), we could trace back common ancestors born in the beginning of the 1700s (1466del12) and approximately 1850 (1657insC) and find 67 probable gene carriers born between 1728 and 1929, which were identified among their offspring. Information was gathered from 34 obligatory MEN1 gene carriers and 31 spouses. The mean age (+/- sd) of death of affected males (n = 16) was 61.1 +/- 12.0 yr vs. 65.8 +/- 15.3 yr for unaffected males (n = 16) and for affected females (n = 16) was 67.2 +/- 10.7 yr vs. 67.7 +/- 14.7 yr for unaffected females (n = 13). The ages of death of the obligatory heterozygotes did not differ from that of the spouses in sex groups or from the sex-matched life expectancy estimates derived from Finnish national statistics. Causes of death differed significantly between female probands and spouses. In conclusion, obligatory MEN1 gene carrier status did not show a harmful effect on survival in this retrospective analysis tracing back to almost 300 yr.

  20. A founder mutation in the PEX6 gene is responsible for increased incidence of Zellweger syndrome in a French Canadian population.

    PubMed

    Levesque, Sebastien; Morin, Charles; Guay, Simon-Pierre; Villeneuve, Josee; Ma