Science.gov

Sample records for chain delta lattice

  1. Lattice and off-lattice side chain models of protein folding: Linear time structure prediction better than 86% of optimal

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, W.E.; Istrail, S.

    1996-08-09

    This paper considers the protein structure prediction problem for lattice and off-lattice protein folding models that explicitly represent side chains. Lattice models of proteins have proven extremely useful tools for reasoning about protein folding in unrestricted continuous space through analogy. This paper provides the first illustration of how rigorous algorithmic analyses of lattice models can lead to rigorous algorithmic analyses of off-lattice models. The authors consider two side chain models: a lattice model that generalizes the HP model (Dill 85) to explicitly represent side chains on the cubic lattice, and a new off-lattice model, the HP Tangent Spheres Side Chain model (HP-TSSC), that generalizes this model further by representing the backbone and side chains of proteins with tangent spheres. They describe algorithms for both of these models with mathematically guaranteed error bounds. In particular, the authors describe a linear time performance guaranteed approximation algorithm for the HP side chain model that constructs conformations whose energy is better than 865 of optimal in a face centered cubic lattice, and they demonstrate how this provides a 70% performance guarantee for the HP-TSSC model. This is the first algorithm in the literature for off-lattice protein structure prediction that has a rigorous performance guarantee. The analysis of the HP-TSSC model builds off of the work of Dancik and Hannenhalli who have developed a 16/30 approximation algorithm for the HP model on the hexagonal close packed lattice. Further, the analysis provides a mathematical methodology for transferring performance guarantees on lattices to off-lattice models. These results partially answer the open question of Karplus et al. concerning the complexity of protein folding models that include side chains.

  2. Generating folded protein structures with a lattice chain growth algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Hin Hark; Tropsha, Alexander; Schlick, Tamar

    2000-10-01

    We present a new application of the chain growth algorithm to lattice generation of protein structure and thermodynamics. Given the difficulty of ab initio protein structure prediction, this approach provides an alternative to current folding algorithms. The chain growth algorithm, unlike Metropolis folding algorithms, generates independent protein structures to achieve rapid and efficient exploration of configurational space. It is a modified version of the Rosenbluth algorithm where the chain growth transition probability is a normalized Boltzmann factor; it was previously applied only to simple polymers and protein models with two residue types. The independent protein configurations, generated segment-by-segment on a refined cubic lattice, are based on a single interaction site for each amino acid and a statistical interaction energy derived by Miyazawa and Jernigan. We examine for several proteins the algorithm's ability to produce nativelike folds and its effectiveness for calculating protein thermodynamics. Thermal transition profiles associated with the internal energy, entropy, and radius of gyration show characteristic folding/unfolding transitions and provide evidence for unfolding via partially unfolded (molten-globule) states. From the configurational ensembles, the protein structures with the lowest distance root-mean-square deviations (dRMSD) vary between 2.2 to 3.8 Å, a range comparable to results of an exhaustive enumeration search. Though the ensemble-averaged dRMSD values are about 1.5 to 2 Å larger, the lowest dRMSD structures have similar overall folds to the native proteins. These results demonstrate that the chain growth algorithm is a viable alternative to protein simulations using the whole chain.

  3. Valence quark contribution for the gamma N -> Delta quadrupole transition extracted from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Ramalho, Gilberto; Haderer De La Pena S, Maria

    2009-01-01

    Starting with a spectator quark model developed for the nucleon (N) and the Delta in the physical pion mass region, we extend the predictions of the reaction gamma N -> Delta to the lattice QCD regime. The quark model includes S and D waves in the quark-diquark wavefunctions. Within this framework it is the D-wave part in the Delta wavefunction that generates nonzero valence contributions for the quadrupole form factors of the transition. Those contributions are however insufficient to explain the physical data, since the pion cloud contributions dominate. To separate the two effects we apply the model to the lattice regime in a region where the pion cloud effects are negligible, and adjust the D-state parameters directly to the lattice data. This process allows us to obtain a better determination of the D-state contributions. Finally, by adding a simple parametrization of the pion cloud we establish the connection between the experimental data and the lattice da

  4. Factors Governing Fibrillogenesis of Polypeptide Chains Revealed by Lattice Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Mai Suan; Co, Nguyen Truong; Reddy, Govardhan; Hu, Chin-Kun; Straub, J. E.; Thirumalai, D.

    2010-11-01

    Using lattice models we explore the factors that determine the tendencies of polypeptide chains to aggregate by exhaustively sampling the sequence and conformational space. The morphologies of the fibril-like structures and the time scales (τfib) for their formation depend on a balance between hydrophobic and Coulomb interactions. The extent of population of an ensemble of N* structures, which are fibril-prone structures in the spectrum of conformations of an isolated protein, is the major determinant of τfib. This observation is used to determine the aggregating sequences by exhaustively exploring the sequence space, thus providing a basis for genome wide search of fragments that are aggregation prone.

  5. Nucleon, $\\Delta$ and $\\Omega$ excited states in $N_f=2+1$ lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    John Bulava; Edwards, Robert G.; Engelson, Eric; Joo, Balint; Lin, Huey -Wen; Morningstar, Colin; Richards, David G.; Wallace, Stephen J.

    2010-07-22

    The energies of the excited states of the Nucleon, $\\Delta$ and $\\Omega$ are computed in lattice QCD, using two light quarks and one strange quark on anisotropic lattices. The calculation is performed at three values of the light quark mass, corresponding to pion masses $m_{\\pi}$ = 392(4), 438(3) and 521(3) MeV. We employ the variational method with a large basis of interpolating operators enabling six energies in each irreducible representation of the lattice to be distinguished clearly. We compare our calculation with the low-lying experimental spectrum, with which we find reasonable agreement in the pattern of states. In addition, the need to include operators that couple to the expected multi-hadron states in the spectrum is clearly identified.

  6. Nucleon, $$\\Delta$$ and $$\\Omega$$ excited states in $N_f=2+1$ lattice QCD

    DOE PAGESBeta

    John Bulava; Edwards, Robert G.; Engelson, Eric; Joo, Balint; Lin, Huey -Wen; Morningstar, Colin; Richards, David G.; Wallace, Stephen J.

    2010-07-22

    The energies of the excited states of the Nucleon,more » $$\\Delta$$ and $$\\Omega$$ are computed in lattice QCD, using two light quarks and one strange quark on anisotropic lattices. The calculation is performed at three values of the light quark mass, corresponding to pion masses $$m_{\\pi}$$ = 392(4), 438(3) and 521(3) MeV. We employ the variational method with a large basis of interpolating operators enabling six energies in each irreducible representation of the lattice to be distinguished clearly. We compare our calculation with the low-lying experimental spectrum, with which we find reasonable agreement in the pattern of states. In addition, the need to include operators that couple to the expected multi-hadron states in the spectrum is clearly identified.« less

  7. Quantum simulation of antiferromagnetic spin chains in an optical lattice.

    PubMed

    Simon, Jonathan; Bakr, Waseem S; Ma, Ruichao; Tai, M Eric; Preiss, Philipp M; Greiner, Markus

    2011-04-21

    Understanding exotic forms of magnetism in quantum mechanical systems is a central goal of modern condensed matter physics, with implications for systems ranging from high-temperature superconductors to spintronic devices. Simulating magnetic materials in the vicinity of a quantum phase transition is computationally intractable on classical computers, owing to the extreme complexity arising from quantum entanglement between the constituent magnetic spins. Here we use a degenerate Bose gas of rubidium atoms confined in an optical lattice to simulate a chain of interacting quantum Ising spins as they undergo a phase transition. Strong spin interactions are achieved through a site-occupation to pseudo-spin mapping. As we vary a magnetic field, quantum fluctuations drive a phase transition from a paramagnetic phase into an antiferromagnetic phase. In the paramagnetic phase, the interaction between the spins is overwhelmed by the applied field, which aligns the spins. In the antiferromagnetic phase, the interaction dominates and produces staggered magnetic ordering. Magnetic domain formation is observed through both in situ site-resolved imaging and noise correlation measurements. By demonstrating a route to quantum magnetism in an optical lattice, this work should facilitate further investigations of magnetic models using ultracold atoms, thereby improving our understanding of real magnetic materials.

  8. Producing High-Accuracy Lattice Models from Protein Atomic Coordinates Including Side Chains

    PubMed Central

    Mann, Martin; Saunders, Rhodri; Smith, Cameron; Backofen, Rolf; Deane, Charlotte M.

    2012-01-01

    Lattice models are a common abstraction used in the study of protein structure, folding, and refinement. They are advantageous because the discretisation of space can make extensive protein evaluations computationally feasible. Various approaches to the protein chain lattice fitting problem have been suggested but only a single backbone-only tool is available currently. We introduce LatFit, a new tool to produce high-accuracy lattice protein models. It generates both backbone-only and backbone-side-chain models in any user defined lattice. LatFit implements a new distance RMSD-optimisation fitting procedure in addition to the known coordinate RMSD method. We tested LatFit's accuracy and speed using a large nonredundant set of high resolution proteins (SCOP database) on three commonly used lattices: 3D cubic, face-centred cubic, and knight's walk. Fitting speed compared favourably to other methods and both backbone-only and backbone-side-chain models show low deviation from the original data (~1.5 Å RMSD in the FCC lattice). To our knowledge this represents the first comprehensive study of lattice quality for on-lattice protein models including side chains while LatFit is the only available tool for such models. PMID:22934109

  9. Producing high-accuracy lattice models from protein atomic coordinates including side chains.

    PubMed

    Mann, Martin; Saunders, Rhodri; Smith, Cameron; Backofen, Rolf; Deane, Charlotte M

    2012-01-01

    Lattice models are a common abstraction used in the study of protein structure, folding, and refinement. They are advantageous because the discretisation of space can make extensive protein evaluations computationally feasible. Various approaches to the protein chain lattice fitting problem have been suggested but only a single backbone-only tool is available currently. We introduce LatFit, a new tool to produce high-accuracy lattice protein models. It generates both backbone-only and backbone-side-chain models in any user defined lattice. LatFit implements a new distance RMSD-optimisation fitting procedure in addition to the known coordinate RMSD method. We tested LatFit's accuracy and speed using a large nonredundant set of high resolution proteins (SCOP database) on three commonly used lattices: 3D cubic, face-centred cubic, and knight's walk. Fitting speed compared favourably to other methods and both backbone-only and backbone-side-chain models show low deviation from the original data (~1.5 Å RMSD in the FCC lattice). To our knowledge this represents the first comprehensive study of lattice quality for on-lattice protein models including side chains while LatFit is the only available tool for such models. PMID:22934109

  10. Producing high-accuracy lattice models from protein atomic coordinates including side chains.

    PubMed

    Mann, Martin; Saunders, Rhodri; Smith, Cameron; Backofen, Rolf; Deane, Charlotte M

    2012-01-01

    Lattice models are a common abstraction used in the study of protein structure, folding, and refinement. They are advantageous because the discretisation of space can make extensive protein evaluations computationally feasible. Various approaches to the protein chain lattice fitting problem have been suggested but only a single backbone-only tool is available currently. We introduce LatFit, a new tool to produce high-accuracy lattice protein models. It generates both backbone-only and backbone-side-chain models in any user defined lattice. LatFit implements a new distance RMSD-optimisation fitting procedure in addition to the known coordinate RMSD method. We tested LatFit's accuracy and speed using a large nonredundant set of high resolution proteins (SCOP database) on three commonly used lattices: 3D cubic, face-centred cubic, and knight's walk. Fitting speed compared favourably to other methods and both backbone-only and backbone-side-chain models show low deviation from the original data (~1.5 Å RMSD in the FCC lattice). To our knowledge this represents the first comprehensive study of lattice quality for on-lattice protein models including side chains while LatFit is the only available tool for such models.

  11. Lattice model of linear telechelic polymer melts. I. Inclusion of chain semiflexibility in the lattice cluster theory

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Wen-Sheng; Freed, Karl F.

    2015-07-14

    The lattice cluster theory (LCT) for the thermodynamics of polymer systems has recently been reformulated to treat strongly interacting self-assembling polymers composed of fully flexible linear telechelic chains [J. Dudowicz and K. F. Freed, J. Chem. Phys. 136, 064902 (2012)]. Here, we further extend the LCT for linear telechelic polymer melts to include a description of chain semiflexibility, which is treated by introducing a bending energy penalty whenever a pair of consecutive bonds from a single chain lies along orthogonal directions. An analytical expression for the Helmholtz free energy is derived for the model of semiflexible linear telechelic polymer melts. The extension provides a theoretical tool for investigating the influence of chain stiffness on the thermodynamics of self-assembling telechelic polymers, and for further exploring the influence of self-assembly on glass formation in such systems.

  12. delta. M/sub j/ transitions in homonuclear molecule scattering off corrugated surfaces. Square and rectangular lattice symmetry and purely repulsive interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Proctor, T.R.; Kouri, D.J.; Gerber, R.B.

    1984-04-15

    In this paper, we present the first formal and computational studies of ..delta..m/sub j/ transitions occurring in homonuclear molecule-corrugated surface collisions. The model potential is a pairwise additive one which correctly incorporates the fact that ..delta..m/sub j/ transitions occur only for corrugated surfaces (provided the quantization axis is chosen to be the average surface normal). The principal results are: (a) ..delta..m/sub j/ transitions are extremely sensitive to lattice symmetry; (b) strong selection rules obtain for specular scattering; (c) the magnitude of ..delta..m/sub j/ -transition probabilities are strongly sensitive to surface corrugation; (d) the ..delta..m/sub j/ transitions depend strongly on diffraction peak; (e) the ratio of molecular length to lattice dimension (r/a) has a strong influence on the magnitude of ..delta..m/sub j/ -transition probabilities (with the probabilities increasing as (r/a) increases); (f) ..delta..m/sub j/ rainbows are predicted to occur as a function of the (r/a) ratio increases; (g) ..delta..m/sub j/ transitions and the ..delta..m/sub j/ rainbow are expected to accompany ..delta..j-rotational rainbows; (h) such magnetic transition rainbows accompanying ..delta..j rainbows are suggested as an explanation of recent experimental observations of quenching of NO polarization for larger ..delta..j transitions in NO/Ag(111) scattering.

  13. Nucleon, {Delta}, and {Omega} excited state spectra in N{sub f}=2+1 lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Bulava, J.; Edwards, R. G.; Joo, B.; Richards, D. G.; Engelson, E.; Wallace, S. J.; Lin, H-W.; Morningstar, C.

    2010-07-01

    The energies of the excited states of the nucleon, {Delta}, and {Omega} are computed in lattice QCD, using two light quarks and one strange quark on anisotropic lattices. The calculation is performed at three values of the light quark mass, corresponding to pion masses m{sub {pi}=}392(4), 438(3), and 521(3) MeV. We employ the variational method with a large basis of interpolating operators enabling six energies in each irreducible representation of the lattice to be distinguished clearly. We compare our calculation with the low-lying experimental spectrum, with which we find reasonable agreement in the pattern of states. The need to include operators that couple to the expected multihadron states in the spectrum is clearly identified.

  14. V{delta}1 T cell receptor binds specifically to MHC I chain related A: Molecular and biochemical evidences

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Jianqing; Huang Jie; Chen Hui; Cui Lianxian; He Wei . E-mail: heweiimu@public.bta.net.cn

    2006-01-06

    Human MHC class I chain-related A (MICA) is a tumor-associated antigen that can be recognized by V{delta}1 subset of tumor-infiltrating {gamma}{delta} T cells. We previously reported that immobilized recombinant MICA protein could induce the proliferation of tumor-infiltrating V{delta}1 {gamma}{delta} T cells in vitro. But there has been no direct evidence showing the engagement of {gamma}{delta} T cell receptors (TCR) of the induced cells with MICA. In the current investigation, we show that MICA induces specific cytolytic activity of the expanded {gamma}{delta} T cells. We expressed the coupled V domains from the MICA-induced T cells as a single polypeptide chain V{delta}V{gamma} TCR ({gamma}{delta} scTCR). Such scTCR can specifically bind MICA of HeLa cells. Direct interaction of {gamma}{delta} scTCRs with in vitro expressed MICA was monitored using an IAsys biosensor. We found that the V{delta}1 scTCR can specifically bind to immobilized MICA molecule and MICA{alpha}1{alpha}2 domains are responsible for the binding reaction.

  15. Effects of protein engineering and rational mutagenesis on crystal lattice of single chain antibody fragments

    PubMed Central

    Kalyoncu, Sibel; Hyun, Jeongmin; Pai, Jennifer C.; Johnson, Jennifer L.; Entzminger, Kevin; Jain, Avni; Heaner, David P.; Morales, Ivan A.; Truskett, Thomas M.; Maynard, Jennifer A.; Lieberman, Raquel L.

    2014-01-01

    Protein crystallization is dependent upon, and sensitive to, the intermolecular contacts that assist in ordering proteins into a three dimensional lattice. Here we used protein engineering and mutagenesis to affect the crystallization of single chain antibody fragments (scFvs) that recognize the EE epitope (EYMPME) with high affinity. These hypercrystallizable scFvs are under development to assist difficult proteins, such as membrane proteins, in forming crystals, by acting as crystallization chaperones. Guided by analyses of intermolecular crystal lattice contacts, two second-generation anti-EE scFvs were produced, which bind to proteins with installed EE tags. Surprisingly, although non-complementarity determining region (CDR) lattice residues from the parent scFv framework remained unchanged through the processes of protein engineering and rational design, crystal lattices of the derivative scFvs differ. Comparison of energy calculations and the experimentally-determined lattice interactions for this basis set provides insight into the complexity of the forces driving crystal lattice choice and demonstrates the availability of multiple well-ordered surface features in our scFvs capable of forming versatile crystal contacts. PMID:24615866

  16. One-dimensional topological chains with Majorana fermions in two-dimensional nontopological optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Lei; Qu, Chunlei; Zhang, Chuanwei

    2016-06-01

    The recent experimental realization of one-dimensional (1D) equal Rashba-Dresselhaus spin-orbit coupling (ERD-SOC) for cold atoms provides a disorder-free and highly controllable platform for the implementation and observation of Majorana fermions (MFs), analogous to the broadly studied solid-state nanowire-superconductor heterostructures. However, the corresponding 1D chains of cold atoms possess strong quantum fluctuation, which may destroy the superfluids and MFs. In this paper, we show that such 1D topological chains with MFs may be on demand generated in a two- or three-dimensional nontopological optical lattice with 1D ERD-SOC by modifying local potentials on target locations using experimentally already implemented atomic gas microscopes or patterned (e.g., double- or triple-well) optical lattices. All ingredients in our scheme have been experimentally realized, and the combination of them may pave the way for the experimental observation of MFs in a clean system.

  17. DELTAE

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, W.C. )

    1993-11-01

    In thermoacoustic engines and refrigerators, and in many simple acoustic systems, a one dimensional wave equation determines the spatial dependence of the acoustic pressure and velocity. DELTAE numerically integrates such wave equations in the acoustic approximation, in gases or liquids, in user-defined geometries. Boundary conditions can include conventional acoustic boundary conditions of geometry and impedance, as well as temperature and thermal power in thermoacoustic systems. DELTAE can be used easily for apparatus ranging from simple duct networks and resonators to thermoacoustic engines refrigerators and combinations thereof. It can predict how a given apparatus will perform, or can allow the user to design an apparatus to achieve desired performance. DELTAE views systems as a series of segments; twenty segment types are supported. The purely acoustic segments include ducts and cones, and lumped impedances including compliances, series impedances, and endcaps. Electroacoustics tranducer segments can be defined using either frequency-independent coefficients or the conventional parameters of loudspeaker-style drivers: mass, spring constant, magnetic field strength, etc. Tranducers can be current driven, voltage driven, or connected to an electrical load impedance. Thermoacoustic segment geometries include parallel plates, circular and rectangular pores, and pin arrays. Side branches can be defined with fixed impedances, frequency-dependent radiation impedances, or as an auxiliary series of segments of any types. The user can select working fluids from among air, helium, neon, argon, hydrogen, deuterium, carbon dioxide, nitrogen, helium-argon mixtures, helium-xenon mixtures, liquid sodium, and eutectic sodium-potassium. Additional fluids and solids can be defined by the user.

  18. Lattice energies of apatites and the estimation of DeltaH f degrees (PO 4 3-, g).

    PubMed

    Flora, Natalie J; Yoder, Claude H; Jenkins, H Donald Brooke

    2004-04-01

    Experimentally based lattice energies are calculated for the apatite family of double salts M(5)(PO(4))(3)X, where M is a divalent metal cation (Ca, Sr, Ba) and X is hydroxide or a halide. These values are also shown to be estimable, generally to within 4%, using the recently derived Glasser-Jenkins equation, U(POT) = AI(2I/V(m))(1/3), where A = 121.39 kJ mol(-)(1). The apatites exhibiting greater covalent character (e.g., M = Pb, Cd, etc.) are less well reproduced but are within 8% of the experimentally based value. The lattice energy for ionic apatites (having identical lattice ionic strengths, I) takes the particularly simple form U(POT)/kJ mol(-)(1) = 26680/(V(m)/nm(3))(1/3), reproducing cycle values of U(POT) well when V(m) is estimated by ion volume summation and employing a volume for the PO(4)(3)(-) ion (not previously quantified with an associated error) of 0.063 +/- 0.003 nm(3). A value for the enthalpy of formation of the gaseous phosphate ion, DeltaH(f)( ) degrees (PO(4)(3)(-), g), is absent from current thermochemical tabulations. Examination of solution and solid state thermochemical cycles for apatites, however, leads us to a remarkably consistent value of 321.8 +/- 1.2 kJ mol(-)(1). Experimental and estimated lattice energies were used along with other thermodynamic data to determine enthalpies, entropies, and free energies of dissolution for apatites of uncertain stabilities. These dissolution values are compared with the corresponding values for stable apatites and are used to rationalize the relative instability of certain derivatives.

  19. Investigations on thermodynamic properties of the three sub-lattice spin frustrated chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jue; Zhou, Hong-Fei; Li, Qian-Chun; Dong, Hui-Ning

    2015-08-01

    The spin frustration related to the high-Tc superconductivity has received much attention. In this paper, based on the Jordan-Wigner transformation and Green’s function method, we study the magnetic and thermodynamic properties of the three sub-lattice spin frustrated chains. It is found that there are three branches for the spin-wave excitation spectra at zero temperature. Among them, two belong to nature excitation patterns with antiferromagnetic interaction and the third one is band gap excitation spectrum with ferromagnetic nature. The specific heat capacity of sub-lattice spin system presents complex characteristics with the change of temperature due to the intense competition between the ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic interactions. It is also shown that the increase of the ferromagnetic action is helpful to the value of net spin.

  20. Lattice model of linear telechelic polymer melts. II. Influence of chain stiffness on basic thermodynamic properties.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wen-Sheng; Freed, Karl F

    2015-07-14

    The lattice cluster theory (LCT) for semiflexible linear telechelic melts, developed in Paper I, is applied to examine the influence of chain stiffness on the average degree of self-assembly and the basic thermodynamic properties of linear telechelic polymer melts. Our calculations imply that chain stiffness promotes self-assembly of linear telechelic polymer melts that assemble on cooling when either polymer volume fraction ϕ or temperature T is high, but opposes self-assembly when both ϕ and T are sufficiently low. This allows us to identify a boundary line in the ϕ-T plane that separates two regions of qualitatively different influence of chain stiffness on self-assembly. The enthalpy and entropy of self-assembly are usually treated as adjustable parameters in classical Flory-Huggins type theories for the equilibrium self-assembly of polymers, but they are demonstrated here to strongly depend on chain stiffness. Moreover, illustrative calculations for the dependence of the entropy density of linear telechelic polymer melts on chain stiffness demonstrate the importance of including semiflexibility within the LCT when exploring the nature of glass formation in models of linear telechelic polymer melts.

  1. Lattice model of linear telechelic polymer melts. II. Influence of chain stiffness on basic thermodynamic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wen-Sheng; Freed, Karl F.

    2015-07-01

    The lattice cluster theory (LCT) for semiflexible linear telechelic melts, developed in Paper I, is applied to examine the influence of chain stiffness on the average degree of self-assembly and the basic thermodynamic properties of linear telechelic polymer melts. Our calculations imply that chain stiffness promotes self-assembly of linear telechelic polymer melts that assemble on cooling when either polymer volume fraction ϕ or temperature T is high, but opposes self-assembly when both ϕ and T are sufficiently low. This allows us to identify a boundary line in the ϕ-T plane that separates two regions of qualitatively different influence of chain stiffness on self-assembly. The enthalpy and entropy of self-assembly are usually treated as adjustable parameters in classical Flory-Huggins type theories for the equilibrium self-assembly of polymers, but they are demonstrated here to strongly depend on chain stiffness. Moreover, illustrative calculations for the dependence of the entropy density of linear telechelic polymer melts on chain stiffness demonstrate the importance of including semiflexibility within the LCT when exploring the nature of glass formation in models of linear telechelic polymer melts.

  2. Lattice model of linear telechelic polymer melts. II. Influence of chain stiffness on basic thermodynamic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Wen-Sheng; Freed, Karl F.

    2015-07-14

    The lattice cluster theory (LCT) for semiflexible linear telechelic melts, developed in Paper I, is applied to examine the influence of chain stiffness on the average degree of self-assembly and the basic thermodynamic properties of linear telechelic polymer melts. Our calculations imply that chain stiffness promotes self-assembly of linear telechelic polymer melts that assemble on cooling when either polymer volume fraction ϕ or temperature T is high, but opposes self-assembly when both ϕ and T are sufficiently low. This allows us to identify a boundary line in the ϕ-T plane that separates two regions of qualitatively different influence of chain stiffness on self-assembly. The enthalpy and entropy of self-assembly are usually treated as adjustable parameters in classical Flory-Huggins type theories for the equilibrium self-assembly of polymers, but they are demonstrated here to strongly depend on chain stiffness. Moreover, illustrative calculations for the dependence of the entropy density of linear telechelic polymer melts on chain stiffness demonstrate the importance of including semiflexibility within the LCT when exploring the nature of glass formation in models of linear telechelic polymer melts.

  3. Frustrated Ising chains on the triangular lattice in Sr3NiIrO6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toth, S.; Wu, W.; Adroja, D. T.; Rayaprol, S.; Sampathkumaran, E. V.

    2016-05-01

    Inelastic neutron scattering study on the spin-chain compound Sr3NiIrO6 reveals gapped quasi-1D magnetic excitations. The observed one-magnon band between 29.5 and 39 meV consists of magnon modes of the Ni2 + ions. The fitting of the spin wave spectrum reveals strongly coupled Ising-like chains along the c axis that are weakly coupled into a frustrated triangular lattice in the a b plane. The magnetic excitations survive up to 200 K well above the magnetic ordering temperature of TN˜75 K, also indicating a quasi-1D nature of the magnetic interactions in Sr3NiIrO6 . Our microscopic model is in agreement with ab initio electronic structure calculations and explains the giant spin-flip field observed in bulk magnetization measurements.

  4. Dual effect of crowders on fibrillation kinetics of polypeptide chains revealed by lattice models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Co, Nguyen Truong; Hu, Chin-Kun; Li, Mai Suan

    2013-05-01

    We have developed the lattice model for describing polypeptide chains in the presence of crowders. The influence of crowding confinement on the fibrillation kinetics of polypeptide chains is studied using this model. We observed the non-trivial behavior of the fibril formation time τfib that it decreases with the concentration of crowders if crowder sizes are large enough, but the growth is observed for crowders of small sizes. This allows us to explain the recent experimental observation on the dual effect of crowding particles on fibril growth of proteins that for a fixed crowder concentration the fibrillation kinetics is fastest at intermediate values of total surface of crowders. It becomes slow at either small or large coverages of cosolutes. It is shown that due to competition between the energetics and entropic effects, the dependence of τfib on the size of confined space is described by a parabolic function.

  5. Spin-lattice relaxation within a dimerized Ising chain in a magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Erdem, Rıza E-mail: rerdem29@hotmail.com; Gülpınar, Gül; Yalçın, Orhan; Pawlak, Andrzej

    2014-07-21

    A qualitative study of the spin-lattice relaxation within a dimerized Ising chain in a magnetic field is presented. We have first determined the time dependence of the deviation of the lattice distortion parameter δΔ from the equilibrium state within framework of a technique combining the statistical equilibrium theory based on the transfer matrix method and the linear theory of irreversible thermodynamics. We have shown that the time dependence of the lattice distortion parameter is characterized by a single time constant (τ) which diverges around the critical point in both dimerized (Δ≠0) and uniform (Δ=0) phase regions. When the temperature and magnetic field are fixed to certain values, the time τ depends only on exchange coupling between the spins. It is a characteristic time associated with the long wavelength fluctuations of distortion. We have also taken into account the effects of spatial fluctuations on the relaxation time using the full Landau-Ginzburg free energy functional. We have found an explicit expression for the relaxation time as a function of temperature, coupling constant and wave vector (q) and shown that the critical mode corresponds to the case q=0. Finally, our results are found to be in good qualitative agreement with the results obtained in recent experimental study on synchrotron x-ray scattering and muon spin relaxation in diluted material Cu{sub 1−y}Mg{sub y}GeO{sub 3} where the composition y is very close to 0.0209. These results can be considered as natural extensions of some previous works on static aspects of the problem.

  6. Simulating the dynamics of a single polymer chain in solution: Lattice Boltzmann vs Brownian dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duenweg, Burkhard

    2010-03-01

    Two well--established and complementary methodologies to simulate the dynamics of polymers in solution are (i) Brownian Dynamics (BD), and (ii) Molecular Dynamics coupled dissipatively to a lattice Boltzmann background (MD/LB). The talk gives a brief introduction into both methods, and then presents results of a recent comparative study that applied both methods to the same model of a single chain that moves in a solvent under the influence of thermal noise. Emphasis is put on the question how to map the parameters onto each other, in particular those that are crucial for the dynamics. The agreement of static properties is perfect, as it must be. The dynamic properties agree very well, if for the MD/LB case the effects of finite box size are eliminated by extrapolation. We also find that proper thermalization of all MD/LB degrees of freedom (including the so--called ``kinetic modes'') is necessary. Small deviations between BD and MD/LB remain as a result of the different simulation methodologies. Finally, the computational efficiency of the two methods is compared. For the single--chain system, BD is clearly much faster, while scaling estimates suggest that the opposite is true for semidilute solutions. References: *Tri T. Pham, Ulf D. Schiller, J. Ravi Prakash, and B. D"unweg, J. Chem. Phys. 131, 164114 (2009). *B. D"unweg and A. J. C. Ladd, Adv. Polym. Sci. 221, 89 (2009).

  7. Variance-reduced simulation of lattice discrete-time Markov chains with applications in reaction networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maginnis, P. A.; West, M.; Dullerud, G. E.

    2016-10-01

    We propose an algorithm to accelerate Monte Carlo simulation for a broad class of stochastic processes. Specifically, the class of countable-state, discrete-time Markov chains driven by additive Poisson noise, or lattice discrete-time Markov chains. In particular, this class includes simulation of reaction networks via the tau-leaping algorithm. To produce the speedup, we simulate pairs of fair-draw trajectories that are negatively correlated. Thus, when averaged, these paths produce an unbiased Monte Carlo estimator that has reduced variance and, therefore, reduced error. Numerical results for three example systems included in this work demonstrate two to four orders of magnitude reduction of mean-square error. The numerical examples were chosen to illustrate different application areas and levels of system complexity. The areas are: gene expression (affine state-dependent rates), aerosol particle coagulation with emission and human immunodeficiency virus infection (both with nonlinear state-dependent rates). Our algorithm views the system dynamics as a "black-box", i.e., we only require control of pseudorandom number generator inputs. As a result, typical codes can be retrofitted with our algorithm using only minor changes. We prove several analytical results. Among these, we characterize the relationship of covariances between paths in the general nonlinear state-dependent intensity rates case, and we prove variance reduction of mean estimators in the special case of affine intensity rates.

  8. Measurement-induced disturbance and thermal negativity in 1D optical lattice chain

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Jin-Liang; Lin-Wang; Long, Gui-Lu

    2013-03-15

    We study the measurement-induced disturbance (MID) in a 1D optical lattice chain with nonlinear coupling. Special attention is paid to the difference between the thermal entanglement and MID when considering the influences of the linear coupling constant, nonlinear coupling constant and external magnetic field. It is shown that MID is more robust than thermal entanglement against temperature T and external magnetic field B, and MID may reveal more properties about quantum correlations of the system, which can be seen from the point of view that MID can be nonzero when there is no thermal entanglement and MID can detect the critical point of quantum phase transition at finite temperature. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The nonlinear coupling constant can strengthen the quantum correlation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MID is more robust than entanglement against temperature and magnetic field. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MID exhibits more information about quantum correlation than entanglement. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MID can detect the critical point of quantum phase transition at finite temperature.

  9. Lattice distortion-induced phase transformations in La{sub 1-y}Pr{sub y}MnO{sub 3+{delta}} manganites

    SciTech Connect

    Bukhanko, F. N.

    2013-04-15

    The structural and magnetic phase transformations that occur in the system of self-doped La{sub 1-y}Pr{sub y}MnO{sub 3+{delta}} ({delta} Almost-Equal-To 0.1, 0 {<=} y {<=} 1) manganites in the temperature range 4.2-300 K are studied by X-ray diffraction and measuring the temperature and field dependences of dc magnetization. The low-temperature magnetic phase transformations induced by the substitution of Pr for La correlate well with the structural phase transformations at T = 300 K, which indicates a strong coupling of the electronic and magnetic subsystems of La{sub 1-y}Pr{sub y}MnO{sub 3+{delta}} manganites with the crystal lattice. The anomalies of the magnetic and structural properties detected in this work in the form of peaks and inflection points in the concentration dependences of the magnetization and lattice parameters of the pseudocubic phase of La{sub 1-y}Pr{sub y}MnO{sub 3+{delta}} (0.1 {<=} y {<=} 0.7) in the temperature range 4.2-300 K are explained in terms of the existing concepts of the effect of Fermi surface nesting on the renormalization of the density of states and the hole dispersion near E{sub F} in the presence of a strong coupling of holes with low-frequency optical phonons, which results in their transformation into quasiparticles. The narrow peak in the magnetization curve M(y) of La{sub 1-y}Pr{sub y}MnO{sub 3+{delta}} that is detected near y = 0.3 at T = 4.2 K is assumed to correspond to the peak of coherence of quasiparticles with a low energy of coupling with the crystal lattice near E{sub F}, which was found earlier in the photoelectron emission spectra of manganites. The disappearance of the narrow magnetization peak with increasing Pr concentration is explained by the transition of charge carriers from the mode of 'light' holes weakly coupled to one of the soft phonons to the mode of 'heavy' holes strongly coupled to several phonons. The transition between phases with strongly different effective quasiparticle masses proceeds

  10. Extensive esterification of adrenal C19-delta 5-sex steroids to long-chain fatty acids in the ZR-75-1 human breast cancer cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Poulin, R.; Poirier, D.; Merand, Y.; Theriault, C.; Belanger, A.; Labrie, F.

    1989-06-05

    Estrogen-sensitive human breast cancer cells (ZR-75-1) were incubated with the 3H-labeled adrenal C19-delta 5-steroids dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and its fully estrogenic derivative, androst-5-ene-3 beta,17 beta-diol (delta 5-diol) for various time intervals. When fractionated by solvent partition, Sephadex LH-20 column chromatography and silica gel TLC, the labeled cell components were largely present (40-75%) in three highly nonpolar, lipoidal fractions. Mild alkaline hydrolysis of these lipoidal derivatives yielded either free 3H-labeled DHEA or delta 5-diol. The three lipoidal fractions cochromatographed with the synthetic DHEA 3 beta-esters, delta 5-diol 3 beta (or 17 beta)-monoesters and delta 5-diol 3 beta,17 beta-diesters of long-chain fatty acids. DHEA and delta 5-diol were mainly esterified to saturated and mono-unsaturated fatty acids. For delta 5-diol, the preferred site of esterification of the fatty acids is the 3 beta-position while some esterification also takes place at the 17 beta-position. Time course studies show that ZR-75-1 cells accumulate delta 5-diol mostly (greater than 95%) as fatty acid mono- and diesters while DHEA is converted to delta 5-diol essentially as the esterified form. Furthermore, while free C19-delta 5-steroids rapidly diffuse out of the cells after removal of the precursor (3H)delta 5-diol, the fatty acid ester derivatives are progressively hydrolyzed, and DHEA and delta 5-diol thus formed are then sulfurylated prior to their release into the culture medium. The latter process however is rate-limited, since new steady-state levels of free steroids and fatty acid esters are rapidly reached and maintained for extended periods of time after removal of precursor, thus maintaining minimal concentrations of intracellular steroids.

  11. Demonstration of long-chain n-alkyl caffeates and delta7-steryl glucosides in the bark of Acacia species by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Freire, Carmen S R; Silvestre, Armando J D; Neto, Carlos Pascoal

    2007-01-01

    The GC-MS identification of several abundant long-chain aliphatic n-alkyl caffeates, together with other phydroxycinnamic acid esters, in the dichloromethane extracts of the bark of Acacia dealbata and A. melanoxylon, is reported. In addition, the unambiguous differentiation between two delta7-steryl glucosides (namely, spinasteryl glucoside and dihydrospinasteryl glucosides) and the homologous delta5-steryl glucosides was achieved based on the EI-MS fragmentation features of their trimethylsilyl derivatives. PMID:17439016

  12. Soft mode characteristics of up-up-down-down spin chains: The role of exchange interactions on lattice dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Y. J.; Gao, Y. J.; Ge, C. N; Guo, Y. Y.; Yan, Z. B.; Liu, J.-M.

    2015-05-07

    In this work, the dynamics of a diatomic chain is investigated with ↑↑↓↓ spin order in which the dispersion relation characterizes the effect of magnetic interactions on the lattice dynamics. The optical or acoustic mode softening in the center or boundary of the Brillouin zone can be observed, indicating the transitions of ferroelectric state, antiferromagnetic state, or ferroelastic state. The coexistence of the multiferroic orders related to the ↑↑↓↓ spin order represents a type of intrinsic multiferroic with strong ferroelectric order and different microscopic mechanisms.

  13. Relative locations of the. beta. and delta chains of the acetylcholine receptor determined by electron microscopy of isolated receptor trimer. [Fishes, electric tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Wise, D.S.; Wall, J.; Karlin, A.

    1981-12-25

    The monomeric unit of the acetylcholine receptor of electric tissue of Torpedo californica has previously been shown to have a subunit composition of ..cap alpha../sub 2/..beta gamma..delta. Receptor in membrane isolated from Torpedo electric tissue occurs as both monomer and dimer. In the dimer, which is the predominant form, the monomeric units are cross-linked via a disulfide bond between delta chains. The addition of diamide to receptor-rich membrane causes the formation of trimer and higher oligomers in which the monomeric units are linked by disulfide bonds alternately between pairs of delta chains and between pairs ..beta.. chains. We have isolated receptor trimer and determined the relative locations of the monomeric units by scanning transmission electron microscopy of negatively stained preparations. In face view, the trimer appears as three approximately 90 angstrom disks, each with a central, densely staining pit. From the angles of the triangle formed by the lines connecting the centers of the monomers in the trimer, we infer that the ..beta..-..beta.. disulfide bond is separated from the delta-delta disulfide bond by an angle in the range of 50-80/sup 0/.

  14. Negative magnetization of Li2Ni2Mo3O12 including two spin subsystems, distorted honeycomb lattice and linear chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hase, Masashi; Pomjakushin, Vladimir Yu; Sikolenko, Vadim; Keller, Lukas; Dönni, Andreas; Kitazawa, Hideaki

    2012-12-01

    We studied magnetism of a spin-1 insulating substance Li2Ni2Mo3O12. The spin system consists of distorted honeycomb lattices and linear chains of Ni2+ spins. A magnetic phase transition occurs at Tc = 8.0 K in the zero magnetic field. In low magnetic fields, the magnetization increases rapidly below Tc, decreases below 7 K and becomes negative at low temperatures. We determined the magnetic structure using neutron powder diffraction data. The honeycomb lattices and linear chains show antiferromagnetic and ferromagnetic long-range order, respectively. We discuss the origin of the negative magnetization.

  15. Molecular structure stability of short-chain chlorinated paraffins (SCCPs): Evidence from lattice compatibility and Simha-Somcynsky theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yumak, A.; Boubaker, K.; Petkova, P.; Yahsi, U.

    2015-10-01

    In is known that short-chain chlorinated paraffins (SCCPs) are highly complex technical mixtures of polychlorinated n-alkanes with single chlorine content. Due to their physical properties (viscosity, flame resistance) they are used in many different applications, such as lubricant additives, metal processing, leather fat-liquoring, plastics softening, PVC plasticizing and flame retardants in paints, adhesives and sealants. SCCPs are studied here in terms of processing-linked molecular structure stability, under Simha and Somcynsky-EOS theory calculations and elements from Simha-Somcynsky-related Lattice Compatibility Theory. Analyses were carried out on 1-chloropropane, 2-chloropropane, 1-chlorobutane, 2-chlorobutane, 1-chloro 2-methylane, and 2-chloro 2-methylane as (SCCPs) universal representatives. This paper gives evidence to this stability and reviews the current state of knowledge and highlights the need for further research in order to improve future (SCCPs) monitoring efforts.

  16. Numerical Simulation of the Proton Spin-Lattice Relaxation in Bimetallic Chain Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, S.

    In response to recent proton spin relaxation-time measurements on a bimetallic chain compound NiCu(C7H6N2O6) (H2O)3\\cdot2H2O, we simulate the Raman relaxation process in Heisenberg alternating-spin chains on the assumption of predominantly dipolar hyperfine interactions between protons and magnetic ions. The relaxation time T1 is formulated within the spin-wave theory and is estimated as a function of temperature and an applied field H by a quantum Monte Carlo method. The low-temperature behavior of the relaxation rate T1-1 qualitatively varies with (S,s), while T1-1 is almost proportional to H-1/2 due to the characteristic dispersion relations.

  17. Side chain methyl substitution in the delta-opioid receptor antagonist TIPP has an important effect on the activity profile.

    PubMed

    Tourwé, D; Mannekens, E; Diem, T N; Verheyden, P; Jaspers, H; Tóth, G; Péter, A; Kertész, I; Török, G; Chung, N N; Schiller, P W

    1998-12-17

    The delta-opioid antagonist H-Tyr-Tic-Phe-Phe-OH (TIPP-OH) or its C-terminal amide analogue was systematically modified topologically by substitution of each amino acid residue by all stereoisomers of the corresponding beta-methyl amino acid. The potency and selectivity (delta- vs mu- and kappa-opioid receptor) were evaluated by radioreceptor binding assays. Agonist or antagonist potency were assayed in the mouse vas deferens and in the guinea pig ileum. In the TIPP analogues containing L-beta-methyl amino acids the influence on delta-receptor affinity and on delta-antagonist potency is limited, the [(2S,3R)-beta-MePhe3]TIPP-OH analogue being among the most potent delta-antagonists reported. In the D-beta-methyl amino acid series, the [D-beta-MeTic2] analogues are delta-selective antagonists whereas [D-Tic2]TIPP-NH2 is a delta-agonist. NMR studies did not indicate any influence of the beta-methyl substituent on the conformation of the Tic residue. The [(2R,3S)-beta-MePhe3]TIPP-NH2 is a potent delta-agonist, its C-terminal carboxylic acid analogue being more delta-selective but displaying partial agonism in both the delta- and mu-bioassay. These results constitute further examples of a profound influence of beta-methyl substitution on the potency, selectivity, and signal transduction properties of a peptide.

  18. Exact solution of the thermodynamics and size parameters of a polymer confined to a lattice of finite size: Large chain limit

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, Chad R. Guttman, Charles M.; Di Marzio, Edmund A.

    2014-01-21

    We extend the exact solutions of the Di Marzio-Rubin matrix method for the thermodynamic properties, including chain density, of a linear polymer molecule confined to walk on a lattice of finite size. Our extensions enable (a) the use of higher dimensions (explicit 2D and 3D lattices), (b) lattice boundaries of arbitrary shape, and (c) the flexibility to allow each monomer to have its own energy of attraction for each lattice site. In the case of the large chain limit, we demonstrate how periodic boundary conditions can also be employed to reduce computation time. Advantages to this method include easy definition of chemical and physical structure (or surface roughness) of the lattice and site-specific monomer-specific energetics, and straightforward relatively fast computations. We show the usefulness and ease of implementation of this extension by examining the effect of energy variation along the lattice walls of an infinite rectangular cylinder with the idea of studying the changes in properties caused by chemical inhomogeneities on the surface of the box. Herein, we look particularly at the polymer density profile as a function of temperature in the confined region for very long polymers. One particularly striking result is the shift in the critical condition for adsorption due to surface energy inhomogeneities and the length scale of the inhomogeneities; an observation that could have important implications for polymer chromatography. Our method should have applications to both copolymers and biopolymers of arbitrary molar mass.

  19. Exact solution of the thermodynamics and size parameters of a polymer confined to a lattice of finite size: large chain limit.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Chad R; Guttman, Charles M; Di Marzio, Edmund A

    2014-01-21

    We extend the exact solutions of the Di Marzio-Rubin matrix method for the thermodynamic properties, including chain density, of a linear polymer molecule confined to walk on a lattice of finite size. Our extensions enable (a) the use of higher dimensions (explicit 2D and 3D lattices), (b) lattice boundaries of arbitrary shape, and (c) the flexibility to allow each monomer to have its own energy of attraction for each lattice site. In the case of the large chain limit, we demonstrate how periodic boundary conditions can also be employed to reduce computation time. Advantages to this method include easy definition of chemical and physical structure (or surface roughness) of the lattice and site-specific monomer-specific energetics, and straightforward relatively fast computations. We show the usefulness and ease of implementation of this extension by examining the effect of energy variation along the lattice walls of an infinite rectangular cylinder with the idea of studying the changes in properties caused by chemical inhomogeneities on the surface of the box. Herein, we look particularly at the polymer density profile as a function of temperature in the confined region for very long polymers. One particularly striking result is the shift in the critical condition for adsorption due to surface energy inhomogeneities and the length scale of the inhomogeneities; an observation that could have important implications for polymer chromatography. Our method should have applications to both copolymers and biopolymers of arbitrary molar mass. PMID:25669412

  20. Use of the V delta 1 variable region in the functional T-cell receptor alpha chain of a WT31+ cytotoxic T lymphocyte clone which specifically recognizes HLA-A2 molecule.

    PubMed

    Castelli, C; Mazzocchi, A; Salvi, S; Anichini, A; Sensi, M

    1992-04-01

    We report here the molecular characterization of the T-cell receptor (TCR) expressed by a human HLA-A2 specific cytotoxic T-cell clone named CTL 49. Flow cytometry analysis with a panel of anti-TCR antibodies revealed an OKT3+, WT31+, A13+, BB3-, TCR delta-, delta TCS1-, TCR gamma/delta 1-, OKT4-, and OKT8+ phenotype, suggesting that, in CTL 49, the V delta 1-encoded A13 epitope could be included in its alpha beta TCR. Northern blot analysis confirmed the presence of C alpha, C beta and V delta 1 specific transcripts while no hybridization signal was detected by a C delta specific probe. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of the first strand cDNA from CTL 49 with TCR-specific primers and sequence analysis revealed that V delta 1 region is productively rearranged to J alpha and to C alpha regions. This alpha chain pairs with a beta chain composed of V beta 13.2/D beta/J beta 2.3/C beta 2 leading to the expression of a functional TCR complex. These results, in addition to providing further evidence for the sharing of V delta 1 by alpha/beta and gamma/delta TCR, indicate that an alpha/beta T-cell receptor which includes the V delta 1 variable region can be involved in alloreactive recognition. PMID:1313600

  1. Characterizing traveling-wave collisions in granular chains starting from integrable limits: the case of the Korteweg-de Vries equation and the Toda lattice.

    PubMed

    Shen, Y; Kevrekidis, P G; Sen, S; Hoffman, A

    2014-08-01

    Our aim in the present work is to develop approximations for the collisional dynamics of traveling waves in the context of granular chains in the presence of precompression. To that effect, we aim to quantify approximations of the relevant Hertzian FPU-type lattice through both the Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation and the Toda lattice. Using the availability in such settings of both one-soliton and two-soliton solutions in explicit analytical form, we initialize such coherent structures in the granular chain and observe the proximity of the resulting evolution to the underlying integrable (KdV or Toda) model. While the KdV offers the possibility to accurately capture collisions of solitary waves propagating in the same direction, the Toda lattice enables capturing both copropagating and counterpropagating soliton collisions. The error in the approximation is quantified numerically and connections to bounds established in the mathematical literature are also given. PMID:25215797

  2. Temperature dependence of the NMR spin-lattice relaxation rate for spin-1/2 chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coira, E.; Barmettler, P.; Giamarchi, T.; Kollath, C.

    2016-10-01

    We use recent developments in the framework of a time-dependent matrix product state method to compute the nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation rate 1 /T1 for spin-1/2 chains under magnetic field and for different Hamiltonians (XXX, XXZ, isotropically dimerized). We compute numerically the temperature dependence of the 1 /T1 . We consider both gapped and gapless phases, and also the proximity of quantum critical points. At temperatures much lower than the typical exchange energy scale, our results are in excellent agreement with analytical results, such as the ones derived from the Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid (TLL) theory and bosonization, which are valid in this regime. We also cover the regime for which the temperature T is comparable to the exchange coupling. In this case analytical theories are not appropriate, but this regime is relevant for various new compounds with exchange couplings in the range of tens of Kelvin. For the gapped phases, either the fully polarized phase for spin chains or the low-magnetic-field phase for the dimerized systems, we find an exponential decrease in Δ /(kBT ) of the relaxation time and can compute the gap Δ . Close to the quantum critical point our results are in good agreement with the scaling behavior based on the existence of free excitations.

  3. Oxidative cleavage of the pentyl side-chain of cannabinoids. Identification of new biotransformation pathways in the metabolism of 4'-hydroxy-delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Harvey, D J

    1990-01-01

    During an investigation of the mechanisms leading to the formation of metabolites of cannabinoids in which the pentyl side chain is reduced to 2, 3 or 4 carbon atoms, the further metabolism of 4'-hydroxy-delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol was investigated in vivo in mice. Metabolites were extracted with ethyl acetate, concentrated by chromatography on Sephadex LH-20 and identified by GC/MS. Ten metabolites were identified and a further two had tentative structural assignments made. The major metabolic route, in common with that seen with most cannabinoids, was hydroxylation at the allylic 11-position, followed by oxidation to a carboxylic acid. Additional hydroxylation occurred at C-8. Abundant metabolites were also formed by oxidative cleavage of the pentyl side chain. The major metabolites of this type had lost the terminal two carbon atoms to give compounds containing a carboxyethyl side chain. This is the major product normally produced by beta-oxidation of the acid formed from 5'-hydroxy-delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol. Trace concentrations of two other acids that appeared to have a carboxypropyl side chain were also found. The results show that, in addition to beta-oxidation, initiated by hydroxylation at the 5'-carbon atom (omega-hydroxylation), at least one other oxidative route, initiated by omega-1-hydroxylation, is involved in the production of metabolites with two carbon atoms missing from the pentyl side chain. This pathway does not seem to have been characterized as a biotransformation mechanism in drug metabolism and a possible mechanism is suggested. PMID:1974198

  4. Irreversibility and flux-lattice melting in YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}{delta}}

    SciTech Connect

    Billon, B.; Charalambous, M.; Chaussy, J.; Koch, R.; Liang, R.

    1997-06-01

    We report on ac susceptibility measurements using a local Hall probe close to the melting point of the flux lattice in a clean, detwinned YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}{delta}} (YBCO) single crystal. The critical current density, probed at a voltage level of 10{sup {minus}11} V, abruptly jumps from a null value in the liquid state to a small but finite value in the solid state. The resulting irreversible magnetization is below the resolution level of standard superconducting quantum interference device magnetometry. The temperature T{sub irr} where the critical current jumps coincides with the melting temperature T{sub m} as defined by dc magnetization. The above measurements establish a clear coincidence between the irreversibility line and the melting line in clean YBCO. The pinning force for the as-formed flux solid is shown to increase with its density. A critical end point is observed above a threshold value of the pinning force. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  5. Statistical mechanics of polymer chains grafted to adsorbing boundaries of fractal lattices embedded in three-dimensional space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Živić, I.; Elezović-Hadžić, S.; Milošević, S.

    2014-11-01

    We study the adsorption problem of linear polymers, immersed in a good solvent, when the container of the polymer-solvent system is taken to be a member of the Sierpinski gasket (SG) family of fractals, embedded in the three-dimensional Euclidean space. Members of the SG family are enumerated by an integer b (2≤b<∞), and it is assumed that one side of each SG fractal is impenetrable adsorbing boundary. We calculate the surface critical exponents γ11,γ1, and γs which, within the self-avoiding walk model (SAW) of polymer chain, are associated with the numbers of all possible SAWs with both, one, and no ends grafted to the adsorbing surface (adsorbing boundary), respectively. By applying the exact renormalization group method, for 2≤b≤4, we have obtained specific values for these exponents, for various types of polymer conformations. To extend the obtained sequences of exact values for surface critical exponents, we have applied the Monte Carlo renormalization group method for fractals with 2≤b≤40. The obtained results show that all studied exponents are monotonically increasing functions of the parameter b, for all possible polymer states. We discuss mutual relations between the studied critical exponents, and compare their values with those found for other types of lattices, in order to attain a unified picture of the attacked problem.

  6. Efficient chain moves for Monte Carlo simulations of a wormlike DNA model: Excluded volume, supercoils, site juxtapositions, knots, and comparisons with random-flight and lattice models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhirong; Chan, Hue Sun

    2008-04-01

    We develop two classes of Monte Carlo moves for efficient sampling of wormlike DNA chains that can have significant degrees of supercoiling, a conformational feature that is key to many aspects of biological function including replication, transcription, and recombination. One class of moves entails reversing the coordinates of a segment of the chain along one, two, or three axes of an appropriately chosen local frame of reference. These transformations may be viewed as a generalization, to the continuum, of the Madras-Orlitsky-Shepp algorithm for cubic lattices. Another class of moves, termed T±2, allows for interconversions between chains with different lengths by adding or subtracting two beads (monomer units) to or from the chain. Length-changing moves are generally useful for conformational sampling with a given site juxtaposition, as has been shown in previous lattice studies. Here, the continuum T±2 moves are designed to enhance their acceptance rate in supercoiled conformations. We apply these moves to a wormlike model in which excluded volume is accounted for by a bond-bond repulsion term. The computed autocorrelation functions for the relaxation of bond length, bond angle, writhe, and branch number indicate that the new moves lead to significantly more efficient sampling than conventional bead displacements and crankshaft rotations. A close correspondence is found in the equilibrium ensemble between the map of writhe computed for pair of chain segments and the map of site juxtapositions or self-contacts. To evaluate the more coarse-grained freely jointed chain (random-flight) and cubic lattice models that are commonly used in DNA investigations, twisting (torsional) potentials are introduced into these models. Conformational properties for a given superhelical density σ may then be sampled by computing the writhe and using White's formula to relate the degree of twisting to writhe and σ. Extensive comparisons of contact patterns and knot probabilities

  7. Efficient chain moves for Monte Carlo simulations of a wormlike DNA model: excluded volume, supercoils, site juxtapositions, knots, and comparisons with random-flight and lattice models.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhirong; Chan, Hue Sun

    2008-04-14

    We develop two classes of Monte Carlo moves for efficient sampling of wormlike DNA chains that can have significant degrees of supercoiling, a conformational feature that is key to many aspects of biological function including replication, transcription, and recombination. One class of moves entails reversing the coordinates of a segment of the chain along one, two, or three axes of an appropriately chosen local frame of reference. These transformations may be viewed as a generalization, to the continuum, of the Madras-Orlitsky-Shepp algorithm for cubic lattices. Another class of moves, termed T+/-2, allows for interconversions between chains with different lengths by adding or subtracting two beads (monomer units) to or from the chain. Length-changing moves are generally useful for conformational sampling with a given site juxtaposition, as has been shown in previous lattice studies. Here, the continuum T+/-2 moves are designed to enhance their acceptance rate in supercoiled conformations. We apply these moves to a wormlike model in which excluded volume is accounted for by a bond-bond repulsion term. The computed autocorrelation functions for the relaxation of bond length, bond angle, writhe, and branch number indicate that the new moves lead to significantly more efficient sampling than conventional bead displacements and crankshaft rotations. A close correspondence is found in the equilibrium ensemble between the map of writhe computed for pair of chain segments and the map of site juxtapositions or self-contacts. To evaluate the more coarse-grained freely jointed chain (random-flight) and cubic lattice models that are commonly used in DNA investigations, twisting (torsional) potentials are introduced into these models. Conformational properties for a given superhelical density sigma may then be sampled by computing the writhe and using White's formula to relate the degree of twisting to writhe and sigma. Extensive comparisons of contact patterns and knot

  8. Commensurate and incommensurate magnetic order in spin-1 chains stacked on the triangular lattice in Li2NiW2O8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjith, K. M.; Nath, R.; Majumder, M.; Kasinathan, D.; Skoulatos, M.; Keller, L.; Skourski, Y.; Baenitz, M.; Tsirlin, A. A.

    2016-07-01

    We report the thermodynamic properties, magnetic ground state, and microscopic magnetic model of the spin-1 frustrated antiferromagnet Li2NiW2O8 , showing successive transitions at TN 1≃18 K and TN 2≃12.5 K in zero field. Nuclear magnetic resonance and neutron diffraction reveal collinear and commensurate magnetic order with the propagation vector k =(1/2 ,0 ,1/2 ) below TN 2. The ordered moment of 1.8 μB at 1.5 K is directed along [0.89 (9 ),-0.10 (5 ),-0.49 (6 )] and matches the magnetic easy axis of spin-1 Ni2 + ions, which is determined by the scissor-like distortion of the NiO6 octahedra. Incommensurate magnetic order, presumably of spin-density-wave type, is observed in the region between TN 2 and TN 1. Density-functional band-structure calculations put forward a three-dimensional spin lattice with spin-1 chains running along the [01 1 ¯] direction and stacked on a spatially anisotropic triangular lattice in the a b plane. We show that the collinear magnetic order in Li2NiW2O8 is incompatible with the triangular lattice geometry and thus driven by a pronounced easy-axis single-ion anisotropy of Ni2 +.

  9. Vortex-lattice melting in Bi[sub 2]Sr[sub 2]CaCu[sub 2]O[sub 8+[delta

    SciTech Connect

    Balestrino, G.; Livanov, D.V.; Milani, E. ); Camarota, B.; Fiorani, D.; Testa, A.M. )

    1994-08-01

    We have studied the effects of the oxygen stoichiometry on the magnetic irreversibility line and on the decay of the zero-field-cooled (ZFC) magnetization in Bi[sub 2]Sr[sub 2]CaCu[sub 2]O[sub 8+[delta

  10. First-Order Vortex-Lattice Melting Transition in YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{ital {minus}{delta}}} near the Critical Temperature Detected by Magnetic Torque

    SciTech Connect

    Willemin, M.; Schilling, A.; Keller, H.; Hofer, J.; Rossel, C.; Welp, U.; Kwok, W.K.; Olsson, R.J.; Crabtree, G.W.

    1998-11-01

    High-resolution magnetic-torque studies on an untwinned YBa{sub 2}Cu {sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}{delta}} single crystal near its critical temperature T{sub c} reveal that the first-order vortex-lattice melting transition (VLMT) persists at least up to 0.5thinspthinspK below T{sub c} . The associated sharp discontinuity in magnetization is detectable even at temperatures where the torque signal deviates from mean-field behavior due to fluctuations. The magnetic irreversibility at the VLMT can be suppressed by applying a weak transverse ac magnetic field. This offers the possibility of separating the irreversibility line from the melting line near T{sub c} . {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society }

  11. Pair and triplet approximation of a spatial lattice population model with multiscale dispersal using Markov chains for estimating spatial autocorrelation.

    PubMed

    Hiebeler, David E; Millett, Nicholas E

    2011-06-21

    We investigate a spatial lattice model of a population employing dispersal to nearest and second-nearest neighbors, as well as long-distance dispersal across the landscape. The model is studied via stochastic spatial simulations, ordinary pair approximation, and triplet approximation. The latter method, which uses the probabilities of state configurations of contiguous blocks of three sites as its state variables, is demonstrated to be greatly superior to pair approximations for estimating spatial correlation information at various scales. Correlations between pairs of sites separated by arbitrary distances are estimated by constructing spatial Markov processes using the information from both approximations. These correlations demonstrate why pair approximation misses basic qualitative features of the model, such as decreasing population density as a large proportion of offspring are dropped on second-nearest neighbors, and why triplet approximation is able to include them. Analytical and numerical results show that, excluding long-distance dispersal, the initial growth rate of an invading population is maximized and the equilibrium population density is also roughly maximized when the population spreads its offspring evenly over nearest and second-nearest neighboring sites.

  12. Kinetics of diffusion-controlled oxygen ordering in a lattice-gas model of YBa sub 2 Cu sub 3 O sub 7 minus. delta

    SciTech Connect

    Andersen, J.V. ); Bohr, H. ); Mouritsen, O.G. )

    1990-07-01

    Nonequilibrium properties of oxygen ordering in high-{ital T}{sub {ital c}} superconductors of the Y-Ba-Cu-O type are studied via computer simulation of an anisotropic two-dimensional lattice-gas model in which the ordering processes are controlled by diffusion across the sample edges. With a view to designing optimal annealing strategies, various quenches and annealing schedules through the phase diagram are investigated. The ordering kinetics and the grain morphology are found to have a characteristic dependence on the thermal treatment of the system.

  13. Nile Delta

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-15

    article title:  The Nile River Delta     View Larger Image ... of eastern Africa. At the apex of the fertile Nile River Delta is the Egyptian capital city of Cairo. To the west are the Great Pyramids ...

  14. Mississippi Delta

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    article title:  The Mississippi Delta     Left: True Color Image ... Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) images of the Mississippi delta were acquired on April 26, 2000. The true color image displays the ...

  15. Volga Delta

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-17

    article title:  Volga Delta and the Caspian Sea     View ... appear reddish. A small cloud near the center of the delta separates into red, green, and blue components due to geometric parallax ... include several linear features located near the Volga Delta shoreline. These long, thin lines are artificially maintained shipping ...

  16. Lattices of processes in graphs with inputs

    SciTech Connect

    Shakhbazyan, K.V.

    1995-09-01

    This article is a continuation of others work, presenting a detailed analysis of finite lattices of processes in graphs with input nodes. Lattices of processes in such graphs are studied by representing the lattices in the form of an algebra of pairs. We define the algebra of pairs somewhat generalizing the definition. Let K and D be bounded distributive lattices. A sublattice {delta} {contained_in} K x D is called an algebra of pairs if for all K {element_of} K we have (K, 1{sub D}) {element_of} {delta} and for all d {element_of} D we have (O{sub K}).

  17. Hadronic Resonances from Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Lichtl, Adam C.; Bulava, John; Morningstar, Colin; Edwards, Robert; Mathur, Nilmani; Richards, David; Fleming, George; Juge, K. Jimmy; Wallace, Stephen J.

    2007-10-26

    The determination of the pattern of hadronic resonances as predicted by Quantum Chromodynamics requires the use of non-perturbative techniques. Lattice QCD has emerged as the dominant tool for such calculations, and has produced many QCD predictions which can be directly compared to experiment. The concepts underlying lattice QCD are outlined, methods for calculating excited states are discussed, and results from an exploratory Nucleon and Delta baryon spectrum study are presented.

  18. Hadronic Resonances from Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    John Bulava; Robert Edwards; George Fleming; K. Jimmy Juge; Adam C. Lichtl; Nilmani Mathur; Colin Morningstar; David Richards; Stephen J. Wallace

    2007-06-16

    The determination of the pattern of hadronic resonances as predicted by Quantum Chromodynamics requires the use of non-perturbative techniques. Lattice QCD has emerged as the dominant tool for such calculations, and has produced many QCD predictions which can be directly compared to experiment. The concepts underlying lattice QCD are outlined, methods for calculating excited states are discussed, and results from an exploratory Nucleon and Delta baryon spectrum study are presented.

  19. Results and Frontiers in Lattice Baryon Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    John Bulava; Robert Edwards; George Fleming; K.Jimmy Juge; Adam C. Lichtl; Nilmani Mathur; Colin Morningstar; David Richards; Stephen J. Wallace

    2007-06-16

    The Lattice Hadron Physics Collaboration (LHPC) baryon spectroscopy effort is reviewed. To date the LHPC has performed exploratory Lattice QCD calculations of the low-lying spectrum of Nucleon and Delta baryons. These calculations demonstrate the effectiveness of our method by obtaining the masses of an unprecedented number of excited states with definite quantum numbers. Future work of the project is outlined.

  20. Results and Frontiers in Lattice Baryon Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bulava, John; Morningstar, Colin; Edwards, Robert; Richards, David; Fleming, George; Juge, K. Jimmy; Lichtl, Adam C.; Mathur, Nilmani; Wallace, Stephen J.

    2007-10-26

    The Lattice Hadron Physics Collaboration (LHPC) baryon spectroscopy effort is reviewed. To date the LHPC has performed exploratory Lattice QCD calculations of the low-lying spectrum of Nucleon and Delta baryons. These calculations demonstrate the effectiveness of our method by obtaining the masses of an unprecedented number of excited states with definite quantum numbers. Future work of the project is outlined.

  1. Lattice gas methods for computational aeroacoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sparrow, Victor W.

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents the lattice gas solution to the category 1 problems of the ICASE/LaRC Workshop on Benchmark Problems in Computational Aeroacoustics. The first and second problems were solved for Delta t = Delta x = 1, and additionally the second problem was solved for Delta t = 1/4 and Delta x = 1/2. The results are striking: even for these large time and space grids the lattice gas numerical solutions are almost indistinguishable from the analytical solutions. A simple bug in the Mathematica code was found in the solutions submitted for comparison, and the comparison plots shown at the end of this volume show the bug. An Appendix to the present paper shows an example lattice gas solution with and without the bug.

  2. Structure of the high-affinity binding site for noncompetitive blockers of the acetylcholine receptor: (/sup 3/H)chlorpromazine labels homologous residues in the. beta. and delta chains

    SciTech Connect

    Giraudat, J.; Dennis, M.; Heidmann, T.; Haumont, P.Y.; Lederer, F.; Changeux, J.P.

    1987-05-05

    The membrane-bound acetylcholine receptor from Torpedo marmorata was photolabeled by the noncompetitive channel blocker (/sup 3/H)chlorpromazine under equilibrium conditions in the presence of the agonist carbamoylcholine. The amount of radioactivity incorporated into all subunits was reduced by addition of phencyclidine, a specific ligand for the high-affinity site for noncompetitive blockers. The labeled ..beta.. chain was purified and digested with trypsin or CNBr, and the resulting fragments were fractionated by high-performance liquid chromatography. Sequence analysis resulted in the identification of Ser-254 and Leu-257 as residues labeled by (/sup 3/H)chlorpromazine in a phencyclidine-sensitive manner. These residues are located in the hydrophobic and potentially transmembrane segment M II of the ..beta.. chain, a region homologous to that containing the chlorpromazine-labeled Ser-262 in the delta chain. These results show that homologous regions of different receptor subunits contribute to the unique high-affinity site for noncompetitive blockers, a finding consistent with the location of this site on the axis of symmetry of the receptor molecule.

  3. Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Bornyakov, V.G.

    2005-06-01

    Possibilities that are provided by a lattice regularization of QCD for studying nonperturbative properties of QCD are discussed. A review of some recent results obtained from computer calculations in lattice QCD is given. In particular, the results for the QCD vacuum structure, the hadron mass spectrum, and the strong coupling constant are considered.

  4. Short- and medium-chain chlorinated paraffins in air and soil of subtropical terrestrial environment in the pearl river delta, South China: distribution, composition, atmospheric deposition fluxes, and environmental fate.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Li, Jun; Cheng, Zhineng; Li, Qilu; Pan, Xiaohui; Zhang, Ruijie; Liu, Di; Luo, Chunling; Liu, Xiang; Katsoyiannis, Athanasios; Zhang, Gan

    2013-03-19

    Research on the environmental fate of short- and medium-chain chlorinated paraffins (SCCPs and MCCPs) in highly industrialized subtropical areas is still scarce. Air, soil, and atmospheric deposition process in the Pearl River Delta of South China were investigated, and the average SCCP and MCCP concentrations were 5.2 μg/sampler (17.69 ng/m(3)) and 4.1 μg/sampler for passive air samples, 18.3 and 59.3 ng/g for soil samples, and 5.0 and 5.3 μg/(m(2)d) for deposition samples, respectively. Influenced by primary sources and the properties of chlorinated paraffins (CPs), a gradient trend of concentrations and a fractionation of composition from more to less industrialized areas were discovered. Intense seasonal variations with high levels in summer air and winter deposition samples indicated that the air and deposition CP levels were controlled mainly by the vapor and particle phase, respectively. Complex environmental processes like volatilization and fractionation resulted in different CP profiles in different environment matrixes and sampling locations, with C(10-11) C(l6-7) and C(14) C(l6-7), C(10-12) C(l6-7) and C(14) C(l6-8), and C(11-12) C(l6-8) and C(14) C(l7-8) dominating in air, soil, and atmospheric deposition, respectively. Shorter-chain and less chlorinated congeners were enriched in air in the less industrialized areas, while longer-chain and higher chlorinated congeners were concentrated in soil in the more industrialized areas. This is suggesting that the gaseous transport of CPs is the dominant mechanism responsible for the higher concentrations of lighter and likely more mobile CPs in the rural areas.

  5. Superradiance Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Da-Wei; Liu, Ren-Bao; Zhu, Shi-Yao; Scully, Marlan O.

    2015-01-01

    We show that the timed Dicke states of a collection of three-level atoms can form a tight-binding lattice in momentum space. This lattice, coined the superradiance lattice (SL), can be constructed based on electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT). For a one-dimensional SL, we need the coupling field of the EIT system to be a standing wave. The detuning between the two components of the standing wave introduces an effective uniform force in momentum space. The quantum lattice dynamics, such as Bloch oscillations, Wannier-Stark ladders, Bloch band collapsing, and dynamic localization can be observed in the SL. The two-dimensional SL provides a flexible platform for Dirac physics in graphene. The SL can be extended to three and higher dimensions where no analogous real space lattices exist with new physics waiting to be explored.

  6. Electron-lattice interactions strongly renormalize the charge-transfer energy in the spin-chain cuprate Li2CuO2

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Steve; Monney, Claude; Bisogni, Valentina; Zhou, Ke-Jin; Kraus, Roberto; Behr, Günter; Strocov, Vladimir N.; Málek, Jiři; Drechsler, Stefan-Ludwig; Geck, Jochen; Schmitt, Thorsten; van den Brink, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    Strongly correlated insulators are broadly divided into two classes: Mott–Hubbard insulators, where the insulating gap is driven by the Coulomb repulsion U on the transition-metal cation, and charge-transfer insulators, where the gap is driven by the charge-transfer energy Δ between the cation and the ligand anions. The relative magnitudes of U and Δ determine which class a material belongs to, and subsequently the nature of its low-energy excitations. These energy scales are typically understood through the local chemistry of the active ions. Here we show that the situation is more complex in the low-dimensional charge-transfer insulator Li2CuO2, where Δ has a large non-electronic component. Combining resonant inelastic X-ray scattering with detailed modelling, we determine how the elementary lattice, charge, spin and orbital excitations are entangled in this material. This results in a large lattice-driven renormalization of Δ, which significantly reshapes the fundamental electronic properties of Li2CuO2. PMID:26884151

  7. Electron-lattice interactions strongly renormalize the charge-transfer energy in the spin-chain cuprate Li2CuO2

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Johnston, Steve; Monney, Claude; Bisogni, Valentina; Zhou, Ke-Jin; Kraus, Roberto; Behr, Günter; Strocov, Vladimir N.; Málek, Jiři; Drechsler, Stefan-Ludwig; Geck, Jochen; et al

    2016-02-17

    Strongly correlated insulators are broadly divided into two classes: Mott–Hubbard insulators, where the insulating gap is driven by the Coulomb repulsion U on the transition-metal cation, and charge-transfer insulators, where the gap is driven by the charge-transfer energy Δ between the cation and the ligand anions. The relative magnitudes of U and Δ determine which class a material belongs to, and subsequently the nature of its low-energy excitations. These energy scales are typically understood through the local chemistry of the active ions. Here we show that the situation is more complex in the low-dimensional charge-transfer insulator Li2CuO2, where Δ hasmore » a large non-electronic component. Combining resonant inelastic X-ray scattering with detailed modelling, we determine how the elementary lattice, charge, spin and orbital excitations are entangled in this material. This results in a large lattice-driven renormalization of Δ, which significantly reshapes the fundamental electronic properties of Li2CuO2.« less

  8. Dietary long-chain n-3 fatty acids modify blood and cardiac phospholipids and reduce protein kinase-C-delta and protein kinase-C-epsilon translocation.

    PubMed

    Judé, Sébastien; Martel, Eric; Vincent, Fanny; Besson, Pierre; Couet, Charles; Ogilvie, Gregory K; Pinault, Michelle; De Chalendar, Catherine; Bougnoux, Philippe; Richard, Serge; Champeroux, Pascal; Crozatier, Bertrand; Le Guennec, Jean-Yves

    2007-12-01

    The effects of an n-3 PUFA-enriched diet on cardiac cell membrane phospholipid fraction compositions and associated protein kinase-C (PKC) translocation modification have never been studied in higher mammals. This is of importance since membrane fatty acid composition has been shown to influence PKC signalling pathways. In the present study, we have tested whether the incorporation of n-3 PUFA in cardiac membrane phospholipids correlated with changes in the fatty acid composition of diacylglycerols (DAG) and led to a differential translocation of PKC isoforms. Two groups of five dogs were fed the standard diet supplemented with palm oil or fish oil for 8 weeks. Dogs fed a fish oil-enriched diet showed a preferential incorporation of EPA and, to a lesser extent, of DHA, at the expense of arachidonic acid, in the circulating TAG, plasma phospholipids, erythrocyte phospholipids and cardiomyocyte phospholipid fractions. Analysis of 1,2-DAG fatty acid composition also indicated a preferential enrichment of EPA compared with DHA. Associated with these results, a reduction in the expression of PKC-delta and PKC-epsilon isoforms in the particulate fractions was observed whereas no effect was seen for PKC-alpha and PKC-zeta. We conclude that a fish oil-enriched diet induces a modification in fatty acid composition of cardiac membrane phospholipids, associated with a differential translocation of PKC isoforms. These results can be explained by the production of structurally different DAG that may participate in some of the protective effects of n-3 PUFA against various chronic diseases.

  9. Estimation of enthalpy data for reactions involving gas phase ions utilizing lattice potential energies: fluoride ion affinities (FIA) and pF- values of mSbF5(l) and mSbF5(g) (m = 1, 2, 3), AsF5(g), AsF5.SO2(c). Standard enthalpies of formation: Delta(f)H degrees (SbmF5m+1)(-),g) (m = 1, 2, 3), Delta(f)H degrees (AsF6(-),g), and Delta(f)H degrees (NF4+,g).

    PubMed

    Jenkins, H Donald Brooke; Roobottom, H K; Passmore, Jack

    2003-05-01

    Fluoride ion affinity (FIA) values (and the associated pF(-) values) are difficult to establish experimentally for pentafluorides of arsenic and antimony. Our approach, utilizing estimated lattice potential energies, provides a further opportunity to establish this data for liquid (and gaseous) SbF(5) and gaseous AsF(5) which compliments values obtained using ab initio routes for monomeric gas phase molecules and adds to results based on rigorous methods. A strategy is developed whereby construction of (multiple) Born-Fajans-Haber cycles centered around the (target) FIA reaction of interest yield a plethora of estimates for the enthalpy change of interest. This general approach is illustrated here by specific estimation of some experimentally based FIA values of SbF(5) and AsF(5). FIA values/kJ mol(-1) and pF- values estimated in this paper are FIA(SbF(5),l) approximately equal to -475 (+/-63), pF-(SbF(5),l) = 11.4 (+/-1.5); FIA(SbF(5),g) approximately equal to -506 (+/-63), pF-(SbF(5),g) = 12.4 (+/-1.5); FIA(2SbF(5),l) approximately equal to -609 (+/-63), pF- (2SbF(5),l) = 14.6 (+/-1.5); FIA (2SbF(5),g) approximately equal to -671 (+/-63), pF- (2SbF(5),g) = 16.0 (+/-1.5); FIA (3SbF(5),l) approximately -635 (+/-39), pF(-) (3SbF(5),l) = 15.2 (+/-0.9); FIA(3SbF(5),g) approximately -728 (+/-39), pF(-) (3SbF(5),g) = 17.4 (+/-0.9); FIA(AsF(5),g) approximately equal to -421 (+/-22), pF(-) (AsF(5),g) = 10.1 (+/- 0.5); and FIA (AsF(5).SO(2),s) approximately equal to -390 (+/-22), pF(-) (AsF(5).SO(2),s) = 9.3 (+/-0.5). Related standard enthalpies of formation (in kJ mol(-1)) are also assigned: Delta(f)H degrees (SbF(6)(-),g) approximately equal to -2075 (+/-52); Delta(f)H degrees (Sb(2)F(11)(-),g) approximately equal to -3520 (+/-63); Delta(f)H degrees (Sb(3)F(16)(-),g) approximately equal to -4874 (+/-39); Delta(f)H degrees (NF(4)(+),g) approximately equal to 903 (+/-32); Delta(f)H degrees (AsF(6)(-),g) approximately equal to -1907 (+/-22).

  10. Nonlinear dust-lattice waves: a modified Toda lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Cramer, N. F.

    2008-09-07

    Charged dust grains in a plasma interact with a Coulomb potential, but also with an exponential component to the potential, due to Debye shielding in the background plasma. Here we investigate large-amplitude oscillations and waves in dust-lattices, employing techniques used in Toda lattice analysis. The lattice consists of a linear chain of particles, or a periodic ring as occurs in experimentally observed dust particle clusters. The particle motion has a triangular waveform, and chaotic motion for large amplitude motion of a grain.

  11. Mississippi Delta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The streamers of clouds draped over the Gulf of Mexico in this true-color MODIS image from February 27, 2002, suggest that a cold, dry wind was blowing southward over the United States and began to pick up moisture over the Gulf, causing these strips of clouds. That the clouds didn't pick up until some distance from the coastline allowed MODIS to get a perfect view of the dynamic Gulf Coast environment spanning (left to right) Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, and Florida's Western Panhandle. The Mississippi River runs roughly down the center of the image, and is joined in Louisiana by the Red River coming in from the northwest. Over the past 7000 years, the actual delta, where the main river channel empties into the Gulf, has wandered around what we now think of as the Louisiana coast. Considering all the sediment visible in this image, it's not hard to imagine that the river carries about 2.4 billion kilograms of sediment into the Gulf each year. Deposition of some of this sediment has been building up the current delta, called the Birdfoot Delta, for obvious reasons, for about 700 years. The coastal waters are alive with microscopic organisms called phytoplankton, which contain colorful pigments, including chlorophyll, for harvesting sunlight. Beyond the sediment plume off Louisiana, the waters are very dark, which could indicate that a large amount of chlorophyll is present, absorbing lots of sunlight and causing the water to appear dark. Farther south, the waters appear bright blue, which could be a signature of coccolithophores, which use highly reflective calcium carbonate to build scaly coverings for themselves. The brighter offshore waters could also be caused by a blue-green algae called Trichodesmium, an organism that can not only harness carbon dioxide for photosynthesis, but can also take nitrogen from the air and turn it into a form that can be used by living organisms. Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  12. Electromagnetic excitation of the Delta(1232) resonance

    SciTech Connect

    V. Pascalutsa; M. Vanderhaeghen; Shin Nan Yang

    2006-09-05

    We review the description of the lowest-energy nucleon excitation--the Delta(1232)-resonance. Much of the recent effort has been focused on the precision measurements of the nucleon to Delta transition by means of electromagnetic probes. We review the results of those measurements and confront them with the state-of-the-art calculations based on chiral effective-field theories (EFT), lattice QCD, and QCD-inspired models. Some of the theoretical approaches are reviewed in detail. In particular, we describe the chiral EFT of QCD in the energy domain of the Delta-resonance, and its applications to the electromagnetic nucleon-to-Delta transition (gamma N Delta). We also describe the recent dynamical and unitary-isobar models of pion electroproduction which are extensively used in the extraction of the gamma* N Delta form factors from experiment. Furthermore, we discuss the link of the gamma* N Delta form factors to generalized parton distributions (GPDs), as well as the predictions of perturbative QCD for these transition form factors. The present status of understanding the Delta-resonance properties and the nature of its excitation is summarized.

  13. Synthesis and structural chemistry of Au(III)-substituted Ba2YCu3O(7-delta)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hepp, A. F.; Gaier, J. R.; Pouch, J. J.; Banerjea, A.; Hambourger, P. D.

    1988-01-01

    Gold-substituted superconductors, Ba2Y(Au(x)Cu(1-x))3O(7-delta) (x = 0-0.1) were synthesized. For x = 0.1, there was no change in the a and b lattice parameters (a = 3.826 A and b = 3.889 A) but a 0.06 A c axis expansion to 11.75 A was observed. Substituted gold is found to be trivalent by XPS. Replacing Cu(1) in the copper oxide chain with a slight reordering of oxygen is consistent with c axis expansion. The formal charge of the site remains trivalent; remaining Cu in the chains may be reduced resulting in an oxygen stoichiometry is less than or equal to 7. A small effect on T(sub c)(89 K for x = 0.10) is observed upon gold substitution.

  14. Mississippi Delta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Mississippi River delta teems with sediment deposited by the river as it flows into the Gulf of Mexico in this true-color image captured by MODIS on October 15, 2001. The sediment, which is marked by brown swirls in the Gulf, provides nutrients for the bloom of phytoplankton visible as blue-green swirls off the coastline. In the high-resolution image the city of Memphis can be seen in the southwest corner of Tennessee, which is just to left of center at the top of the image. The brown coloration that encompasses Memphis and either side of the river, as flows north to south along the left side of the image, is the river's flood plain. Also visible, in the upper-right hand corner of the image is the southern end of the Appalachian Mountains.

  15. A delta T-cell receptor deleting element transgenic reporter construct is rearranged in alpha beta but not gamma delta T-cell lineages.

    PubMed Central

    Shutter, J; Cain, J A; Ledbetter, S; Rogers, M D; Hockett, R D

    1995-01-01

    T cells can be divided into two groups on the basis of the expression of either alpha beta or gamma delta T-cell receptors (TCRs). Because the TCR delta chain locus lies within the larger TCR alpha chain locus, control of the utilization of these two receptors is important in T-cell development, specifically for determination of T-cell type: rearrangement of the alpha locus results in deletion of the delta coding segments and commitment to the alpha beta lineage. In the developing thymus, a relative site-specific recombination occurs by which the TCR delta chain gene segments are deleted. This deletion removes all D delta, J delta, and C delta genes and occurs on both alleles. This delta deletional mechanism is evolutionarily conserved between mice and humans. Transgenic mice which contain the human delta deleting elements and as much internal TCR delta chain coding sequence as possible without allowing the formation of a complete delta chain gene were developed. Several transgenic lines showing recombinations between deleting elements within the transgene were developed. These lines demonstrate that utilization of the delta deleting elements occurs in alpha beta T cells of the spleen and thymus. These recombinations are rare in the gamma delta population, indicating that the machinery for utilization of delta deleting elements is functional in alpha beta T cells but absent in gamma delta T cells. Furthermore, a discrete population of early thymocytes containing delta deleting element recombinations but not V alpha-to-J alpha rearrangements has been identified. These data are consistent with a model in which delta deletion contributes to the implementation of a signal by which the TCR alpha chain locus is rearranged and expressed and thus becomes an alpha beta T cell. PMID:8524269

  16. Delta III—an evolutionary delta growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arvesen, R. J.; Simpson, J. S.

    1996-03-01

    In order to remain competitive in the future and expand the McDonnell Douglas Aerospace market share, MDA has developed an expendable launch system strategy that devices cost-effective launch systems from the Delta II with a growth vehicle configuration called Delta III. The Delta III evolves from the Delta II launch system through development of a larger payload fairing (4-meter diameter), new cryogenically propelled upper stage, new first stage fuel tank, and larger strap-on solid rocket motors. We are developing the Delta III using Integrated Product Development Teams that capitalize on the experience base that has led us to a world record breaking mission success of 49 consecutive Delta II missions. The Delta III first-launch capability is currently planned for the spring of 1998 in support of our first spacecraft customer, Hughes Space and Communications International.

  17. Lattice effects and magnetic order in the canted ferromagnetic insulator La{sub {bold 0.875}}Sr{sub {bold 0.125}}MnO{sub {bold 3+{delta}}}

    SciTech Connect

    Argyriou, D.N.; Mitchell, J.F.; Potter, C.D.; Hinks, D.G.; Jorgensen, J.D.; Bader, S.D.

    1996-05-01

    The structural, magnetic, and transport behavior of orthorhombic, insulating La{sub 0.875}Sr{sub 0.125}MnO{sub 3+{delta}} were studied as a function of temperature from 20 to 300 K. Upon cooling from room temperature, we observe the rapid development of a large breathing-mode distortion coincident with large positive and negative thermal expansions for the {ital c} and {ital b} axes, respectively. The onset of canted ferromagnetic ordering at 220 K is correlated with the relaxation of this distortion, which reaches values similar to those at room temperature when the magnetic ordering saturates. We observe no first-order-type discontinuity in the volume at the ferromagnetic transition. These results demonstrate a strong coupling between magnetic ordering and crystal structure even though there is no metal-insulator transition associated with the magnetic transition. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  18. The Delta 2 launcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ousley, Gilbert W., Sr.

    1991-12-01

    The utilization of the Delta 2 as the vehicle for launching Aristoteles into its near Sun synchronous orbit is addressed. Delta is NASA's most reliable launch vehicle and is well suited for placing the present Aristoteles spacecraft into a 400 m circular orbit. A summary of some of the Delta 2 flight parameters is presented. Diagrams of a typical Delta 2 two stage separation are included along with statistics on delta reliability and launch plans.

  19. Fan deltas and braid deltas: conceptual problems

    SciTech Connect

    McPherson, J.G.; Shanmugam, G.; Moiola, R.J.

    1986-05-01

    The concept of fan deltas has been widely misinterpreted in the geologic literature. A true fan delta is defined as an alluvial fan deposited into a standing body of water. Such sequences are of limited areal extent and are, as expected, uncommon in the rock record. By contrast, braid deltas (herein defined), formed by progradation of a braided fluvial system into a standing body of water, are a common geomorphic feature in many modern settings, and their deposits are common in the geologic record. Braid-delta sequences are often identified as fan deltas, on the false premise that coarse-grained deposits in a deltaic setting are always part of an alluvial fan complex. The authors find that most published examples of so called fan deltas contain no direct evidence for the presence of an alluvial fan. Even in examples where an alluvial fan could be documented, the authors found that, in many cases, the alluvial fan complex was far removed from the shoreline, separated by an extensive braid plain. The authors suggest that such systems are better classified as braid deltas. They consider that it is essential to distinguish the environmental setting of true fan deltas from that of braid deltas. Misclassification will lead to incorrect interpretations of expected facies, sandstone geometry, reservoir quality, and tectonic settings. Criteria based on geometry, vertical and lateral lithofacies associations, and paleocurrent patterns should be used to correctly identify and distinguish these depositional systems.

  20. Non-V delta 2 gamma delta T lymphocytes as effectors of cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Jonathan; Kramer, Anne-Marijn; Gustafsson, Kenth; Anderson, John

    2014-01-01

    Gamma delta T cells (γδT) are potent mediators of antitumor cytotoxicity and have shown promising efficacy in early phase clinical trials. Most is known about the tumoricidal properties of cells bearing the Vδ2 T cell receptor chain, but recent studies have demonstrated that cells with the Vδ1 chain and those with neither Vδ1 nor Vδ2 chains have properties which may make them more attractive anticancer effectors in adoptive immunotherapy. PMID:25949890

  1. delta-Hexachlorocyclohexane (delta-HCH)

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    delta - Hexachlorocyclohexane ( delta - HCH ) ; CASRN 319 - 86 - 8 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Ass

  2. The essential light chain N-terminal extension alters force and fiber kinetics in mouse cardiac muscle.

    PubMed

    Miller, Mark S; Palmer, Bradley M; Ruch, Stuart; Martin, Lisa A; Farman, Gerrie P; Wang, Yuan; Robbins, Jeffrey; Irving, Thomas C; Maughan, David W

    2005-10-14

    The functional significance of the actin-binding region at the N terminus of the cardiac myosin essential light chain (ELC) remains elusive. In a previous experiment, the endogenous ventricular ELC was replaced with a protein containing a 10-amino acid deletion at positions 5-14 (ELC1vDelta5-14, referred to as 1vDelta5-14), a region that interacts with actin. 1vDelta5-14 mice showed no discernable mutant phenotype in skinned ventricular strips. However, because the myofilament lattice swells upon skinning, the mutant phenotype may have been concealed by the inability of the ELC to reach the actin-binding site. Using the same mouse model, we repeated earlier measurements and performed additional experiments on skinned strips osmotically compressed to the intact lattice spacing as determined by x-ray diffraction. 1vDelta5-14 mice exhibited decreased maximum isometric tension without a change in calcium sensitivity. The decreased force was most evident in 5-6-month-old mice compared with 13-15-month-old mice and may account for the greater ventricular wall thickness in young 1vDelta5-14 mice compared with age-matched controls. No differences were observed in unloaded shortening velocity at maximum calcium activation. However, 1vDelta5-14 mice exhibited a significant difference in the frequency at which minimum complex modulus amplitude occurred, indicating a change in cross-bridge kinetics. We hypothesize that the ELC N-terminal extension interaction with actin inhibits the reversal of the power stroke, thereby increasing isometric force. Our results strongly suggest that an interaction between residues 5-14 of the ELC N terminus and the C-terminal residues of actin enhances cardiac performance.

  3. Differentiation of Boc-protected alpha,delta-/delta,alpha- and beta,delta-/delta,beta-hybrid peptide positional isomers by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Raju, G; Ramesh, V; Srinivas, R; Sharma, G V M; Shoban Babu, B

    2010-06-01

    Two new series of Boc-N-alpha,delta-/delta,alpha- and beta,delta-/delta,beta-hybrid peptides containing repeats of L-Ala-delta(5)-Caa/delta(5)-Caa-L-Ala and beta(3)-Caa-delta(5)-Caa/delta(5)-Caa-beta(3)-Caa (L-Ala = L-alanine, Caa = C-linked carbo amino acid derived from D-xylose) have been differentiated by both positive and negative ion electrospray ionization (ESI) ion trap tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). MS(n) spectra of protonated isomeric peptides produce characteristic fragmentation involving the peptide backbone, the Boc-group, and the side chain. The dipeptide positional isomers are differentiated by the collision-induced dissociation (CID) of the protonated peptides. The loss of 2-methylprop-1-ene is more pronounced for Boc-NH-L-Ala-delta-Caa-OCH(3) (1), whereas it is totally absent for its positional isomer Boc-NH-delta-Caa-L-Ala-OCH(3) (7), instead it shows significant loss of t-butanol. On the other hand, second isomeric pair shows significant loss of t-butanol and loss of acetone for Boc-NH-delta-Caa-beta-Caa-OCH(3) (18), whereas these are insignificant for its positional isomer Boc-NH-beta-Caa-delta-Caa-OCH(3) (13). The tetra- and hexapeptide positional isomers also show significant differences in MS(2) and MS(3) CID spectra. It is observed that 'b' ions are abundant when oxazolone structures are formed through five-membered cyclic transition state and cyclization process for larger 'b' ions led to its insignificant abundance. However, b(1)(+) ion is formed in case of delta,alpha-dipeptide that may have a six-membered substituted piperidone ion structure. Furthermore, ESI negative ion MS/MS has also been found to be useful for differentiating these isomeric peptide acids. Thus, the results of MS/MS of pairs of di-, tetra-, and hexapeptide positional isomers provide peptide sequencing information and distinguish the positional isomers.

  4. Quantum transport in d-dimensional lattices

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Manzano, Daniel; Chuang, Chern; Cao, Jianshu

    2016-04-28

    We show that both fermionic and bosonic uniform d-dimensional lattices can be reduced to a set of independent one-dimensional chains. This reduction leads to the expression for ballistic energy fluxes in uniform fermionic and bosonic lattices. By the use of the Jordan–Wigner transformation we can extend our analysis to spin lattices, proving the coexistence of both ballistic and non-ballistic subspaces in any dimension and for any system size. Lastly, we then relate the nature of transport to the number of excitations in the homogeneous spin lattice, indicating that a single excitation always propagates ballistically and that the non-ballistic behaviour ofmore » uniform spin lattices is a consequence of the interaction between different excitations.« less

  5. Quantum transport in d-dimensional lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzano, Daniel; Chuang, Chern; Cao, Jianshu

    2016-04-01

    We show that both fermionic and bosonic uniform d-dimensional lattices can be reduced to a set of independent one-dimensional chains. This reduction leads to the expression for ballistic energy fluxes in uniform fermionic and bosonic lattices. By the use of the Jordan–Wigner transformation we can extend our analysis to spin lattices, proving the coexistence of both ballistic and non-ballistic subspaces in any dimension and for any system size. We then relate the nature of transport to the number of excitations in the homogeneous spin lattice, indicating that a single excitation always propagates ballistically and that the non-ballistic behaviour of uniform spin lattices is a consequence of the interaction between different excitations.

  6. Extended variational approach to the SU(2) mass gap on the lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Akeyo, J.O. ); Jones, H.F.; Parker, C.S. )

    1995-02-01

    The linear [delta] expansion is applied to a calculation of the SU(2) mass gap on the lattice. Our results compare favorably with the strong-coupling expansion and are in good agreement with recent Monte Carlo estimates.

  7. Steady-state cracks in viscoelastic lattice models

    SciTech Connect

    Kessler, D.A.; Levine, H.

    1999-05-01

    We study the steady-state motion of mode III cracks propagating on a lattice exhibiting viscoelastic dynamics. The introduction of a Kelvin viscosity {eta} allows for a direct comparison between lattice results and continuum treatments. Utilizing both numerical and analytical (Wiener-Hopf) techniques, we explore this comparison as a function of the driving displacement {Delta} and the number of transverse rows {ital N}. At any {ital N}, the continuum theory misses the lattice-trapping phenomenon; this is well known, but the introduction of {eta} introduces some new twists. More importantly, for large {ital N} even at large {Delta}, the standard two-dimensional elastodynamics approach completely misses the {eta}-dependent velocity selection, as this selection disappears completely in the leading order naive continuum limit of the lattice problem. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  8. X-ray search for CDW in single crystal YBa{sub 2}CU{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}}

    SciTech Connect

    Wochner, P.; Isaacs, E.; Moss, S.C.; Zschack, P.; Giapintzakis, J.; Ginsberg, D.M.

    1996-06-01

    Recently, H.L. Edwards et al. observed, in STM experiments at 20K, modulations in the CuO chain layer of cold-cleaved single crystals of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} which they interpreted as a possible charge density wave (CDW). Since X-ray scattering is an ideal tool for the study of static or dynamic lattice displacements, we performed a synchrotron X-ray study at beamline X14 at the NSLS of BNL on a high quality single crystal of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7- {delta}}, which was mainly single domain with a spacially well localized volume fraction of other twin orientations of roughly 10%. Appropriate scattering configurations were chosen to enable observations of longitudinal or transverse CDWs with polarization either in the chain direction, {parallel} <001> or {perpendicular} to it in <001>. The X-ray energy of 16keV allowed us to reach large momentum transfers to increase the sensitivity to lattice displacements. In none of our scans, which definitely covered the case of a 1-dimensional longitudinal CDW with propagation in the b direction as proposed by Edwards et al., did we find intensity other than the main Bragg peak(s) and the twin reflections. We therefore suspect that the STM finding may be a surface-induced phenomenon.

  9. Lattice variations of Ti-6Al-4V alloy with hydrogen content

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu Tangkui Li, Miaoquan

    2011-07-15

    Effect of hydrogen content on the lattice parameter of Ti-6Al-4V alloy has been investigated by X-ray diffraction. The experimental results show that the solution of hydrogen in the Ti-6Al-4V alloy affects significantly on the lattice parameters of {alpha}, {beta} and {delta} phases, especially the {beta} phase. Furthermore, the critical hydrogen content of {delta} hydride formation for Ti-6Al-4V alloy is 0.385 wt.%. When the hydrogen content is lower than the critical hydrogen content, the {delta} hydride cannot precipitate and the lattice parameter ({alpha}) of {beta} phase linearly increases with the increasing of hydrogen content. When the hydrogen content is higher than the critical hydrogen content, the {delta} hydride precipitates and the lattice parameter ({alpha}) of {beta} phase varies inconspicuously with hydrogen content. In addition, the effects of lattice variations and {delta} hydride formation on microstructure are discussed. The {alpha}/{beta} interfaces of lamellar transformed {beta} phase become fuzzy with the increasing of hydrogen content because of the lattice expansion of {beta} phase. Compared with that of the Ti-6Al-4V alloy at low hydrogen content ({<=} 0.385 wt.%), the contrasts of primary {alpha} phase and transformed {beta} phase of Ti-6Al-4V alloy at high hydrogen content ({>=} 0.385 wt.%) were completely reversed due to the formation of {delta} hydride. - Research Highlights: {yields} A novel method for determining {delta} hydride in Ti-6Al-4V alloy is presented. {yields} The critical hydrogen content of {delta} hydride formation is 0.385 wt.%. {yields} The lattice parameter of {beta} phase can be expressed as follows: a=0.323(1+9.9x10{sup -2}C{sub H}) . {yields} Precipitation of {delta} hydride has a significant influence on the microstructure. {yields} The {alpha}/{beta} interfaces of transformed {beta} phase became fuzzy in the hydrogenated alloy.

  10. Delta launcher enhanced

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1987-08-01

    The next-generation, 'Delta II' version of the Delta expendable launch vehicle will be able to launch over 4000 lbs into geosynchronous transfer orbit (GTO), as required by the USAF's Navstar GPS; the current Delta 3920 configuration can loft only 2800 lbs into GEO. Three distinct growth configurations of the Delta II are planned: the 6925, whose booster propellant tanks will be extended by 12 ft; the 7925, whose improved booster engine will increase nozzle expansion ratio from 8:1 to 12:1; and the 'enhanced ' Delta II, with stretched graphite-epoxy solid rocket motor cases. In this final form, Delta II will boost 4010 lbs into GTO, or 11,110 lbs into LEO.

  11. Excited state baryon spectroscopy from lattice QCD

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Robert G. Edwards; Dudek, Jozef J.; Richards, David G.; Wallace, Stephen J.

    2011-10-31

    Here, we present a calculation of the Nucleon and Delta excited state spectrum on dynamical anisotropic clover lattices. A method for operator construction is introduced that allows for the reliable identification of the continuum spins of baryon states, overcoming the reduced symmetry of the cubic lattice. Using this method, we are able to determine a spectrum of single-particle states for spins up to and including $J = 7/2$, of both parities, the first time this has been achieved in a lattice calculation. We find a spectrum of states identifiable as admixtures of $SU(6) Ⓧ O(3)$ representations and a counting ofmore » levels that is consistent with the non-relativistic $qqq$ constituent quark model. This dense spectrum is incompatible with quark-diquark model solutions to the "missing resonance problem" and shows no signs of parity doubling of states.« less

  12. Excited state baryon spectroscopy from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, Robert G.; Richards, David G.; Dudek, Jozef J.; Wallace, Stephen J.

    2011-10-01

    We present a calculation of the Nucleon and Delta excited state spectra on dynamical anisotropic clover lattices. A method for operator construction is introduced that allows for the reliable identification of the continuum spins of baryon states, overcoming the reduced symmetry of the cubic lattice. Using this method, we are able to determine a spectrum of single-particle states for spins up to and including J=(7/2), of both parities, the first time this has been achieved in a lattice calculation. We find a spectrum of states identifiable as admixtures of SU(6) x O(3) representations and a counting of levels that is consistent with the nonrelativistic qqq constituent quark model. This dense spectrum is incompatible with quark-diquark model solutions to the 'missing resonance problem' and shows no signs of parity doubling of states.

  13. Excited state baryon spectroscopy from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Robert G. Edwards; Dudek, Jozef J.; Richards, David G.; Wallace, Stephen J.

    2011-10-31

    Here, we present a calculation of the Nucleon and Delta excited state spectrum on dynamical anisotropic clover lattices. A method for operator construction is introduced that allows for the reliable identification of the continuum spins of baryon states, overcoming the reduced symmetry of the cubic lattice. Using this method, we are able to determine a spectrum of single-particle states for spins up to and including $J = 7/2$, of both parities, the first time this has been achieved in a lattice calculation. We find a spectrum of states identifiable as admixtures of $SU(6) Ⓧ O(3)$ representations and a counting of levels that is consistent with the non-relativistic $qqq$ constituent quark model. This dense spectrum is incompatible with quark-diquark model solutions to the "missing resonance problem" and shows no signs of parity doubling of states.

  14. Recombinative events of the T cell antigen receptor delta gene in peripheral T cell lymphomas.

    PubMed Central

    Kanavaros, P; Farcet, J P; Gaulard, P; Haioun, C; Divine, M; Le Couedic, J P; Lefranc, M P; Reyes, F

    1991-01-01

    Recombinative events of the T cell antigen receptor (TCR) delta-chain gene were studied in 37 cases of peripheral T cell lymphoma (PTCL) and related to their clinical presentation and the expression of the alpha beta or gamma delta heterodimers as determined by immunostaining of frozen tissue samples. There were 22 cases of alpha beta, 5 cases of gamma delta, and 10 cases of silent TCR expressing neither the alpha beta nor gamma delta TCR. 5 different probes were used to examine the delta locus. The 22 cases of alpha beta PTCL displayed biallelic and monoallelic deletions; a monoallelic V delta 1 J delta 1 rearrangement was observed in 1 case and a monoallelic germ line configuration in 7 cases. The 5 cases of gamma delta PTCL displayed biallelic rearrangements: the productive rearrangements could be ascribed to V delta 1J delta 1 joining in 3 cases and VJ delta 1 joining in 2 cases according to the combined pattern of DNA hybridization with the appropriate probes and of cell reactivity with the TCR delta-1, delta TCS-1, and anti-V delta 2 monoclonal antibodies. In the VJ delta 1 joining, the rearranged V segments were located between V delta 1 and V delta 2. Interestingly, in the third group of 10 cases of silent PTCL, 5 cases were found to have a TCR gene configuration identical to that in the TCR alpha beta PTCL, as demonstrated by biallelic delta gene deletion. These 5 cases were CD3 positive. The 5 remaining cases showed a monoallelic delta gene rearrangement with a monoallelic germ line configuration in 4 and a monoallelic deletion in 1. Four of these cases were CD3 negative, which was consistent with an immature genotype the TCR commitent of which could not be ascertained. Finally, TCR gamma delta PTCL consisted of a distinct clinical morphological and molecular entity whereas TCR alpha beta and silent PTCL had a similar presentation. Images PMID:1991851

  15. Pen Branch delta expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, E.A.; Christensen, E.J.; Mackey, H.E.; Sharitz, R.R.; Jensen, J.R.; Hodgson, M.E.

    1984-02-01

    Since 1954, cooling water discharges from K Reactor ({anti X} = 370 cfs {at} 59 C) to Pen Branch have altered vegetation and deposited sediment in the Savannah River Swamp forming the Pen Branch delta. Currently, the delta covers over 300 acres and continues to expand at a rate of about 16 acres/yr. Examination of delta expansion can provide important information on environmental impacts to wetlands exposed to elevated temperature and flow conditions. To assess the current status and predict future expansion of the Pen Branch delta, historic aerial photographs were analyzed using both basic photo interpretation and computer techniques to provide the following information: (1) past and current expansion rates; (2) location and changes of impacted areas; (3) total acreage presently affected. Delta acreage changes were then compared to historic reactor discharge temperature and flow data to see if expansion rate variations could be related to reactor operations.

  16. Delta hepatitis in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Sinniah, M; Dimitrakakis, M; Tan, D S

    1986-06-01

    Sera from one hundred and fifty nine Malaysian individuals were screened for the prevalence of delta markers. These included 15 HBsAg positive homosexuals, 16 acute hepatitis B cases, 9 chronic hepatitis B patients, 13 healthy HBsAg carriers and 106 intravenous (i.v.) drug abusers, of whom 27 were positive for HBsAg only and the rest were anti-HBc IgG positive but HBsAg negative. The prevalence of delta markers in the homosexuals was found to be 6.7%, in the HBsAg positive drug abusers 17.8%, in acute hepatitis B cases 12.5%. No evidence of delta infection was detected in healthy HBsAg carriers, chronic hepatitis B cases and HBsAg negative i.v. drug abusers. With reference to i.v. drug abusers, the prevalence of delta markers was higher in Malays (23%) than in Chinese (7%) although the latter had a higher HBsAg carrier rate. Although the HBsAg carrier rate in the homosexuals was high, their delta prevalence rate was low as compared to drug abusers. In Malaysia, as in other non-endemic regions, hepatitis delta virus transmission appeared to occur mainly via the parenteral and sexual routes. This is the first time in Malaysia that a reservoir of delta infection has been demonstrated in certain groups of the population at high risk for hepatitis B. PMID:3787309

  17. Perspectives in Lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuramashi, Yoshinobu

    2007-12-01

    Preface -- Fixed point actions, symmetries and symmetry transformations on the lattice / P. Hasenfratz -- Algorithms for dynamical fennions / A. D. Kennedy -- Applications of chiral perturbation theory to lattice QCD / Stephen R. Sharpe -- Lattice QCD with a chiral twist / S. Sint -- Non-perturbative QCD: renormalization, O(A) - Improvement and matching to Heavy Quark effective theory / Rainer Sommer.

  18. Delta Scuti stars: Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Guzik, J.A.

    1998-03-01

    The purpose of asteroseismology is not only to derive the internal structure of individual stars from their observed oscillation frequencies, but also to test and extend one`s understanding of the physics of matter under the extremes of temperature, density, and pressure found in stellar interiors. In this review, the author hopes to point out what one can learn about the Sun by studying {delta} Scuti stars, as well as what one can learn about stars more massive or evolved than the Sun. He discusses some of the difficulties in theoretical approaches to asteroseismology for {delta} Scuti stars, using FG Vir, {delta} Scuti, and CD-24{degree} 7599 as examples.

  19. Nile Delta, Egypt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The Nile Delta of Egypt (30.0N, 31.0E) irrigated by the Nile River and its many distributaries, is some of the richest farm land in the world and home to some 45 million people, over half of Egypt's population of 57 million. The capital city of Cairo is at the apex of the delta in the middle of the scene. Across the river from Cairo can be seen the three big pyramids and sphinx at Giza and the Suez Canal is just to the right of the delta.

  20. Nile River Delta, Egypt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The Nile River Delta of Egypt (30.0N, 31.0E) irrigated by the Nile River and its many distributaries, is some of the richest farm land in the world and home to some 45 million people, over half of Egypt's population. The capital city of Cairo is at the apex of the delta. Just across the river from Cairo can be seen the ancient three big pyramids and sphinx at Giza and the Suez Canal is just to the right of the delta.

  1. Modeling river delta formation.

    PubMed

    Seybold, Hansjörg; Andrade, José S; Herrmann, Hans J

    2007-10-23

    A model to simulate the time evolution of river delta formation process is presented. It is based on the continuity equation for water and sediment flow and a phenomenological sedimentation/erosion law. Different delta types are reproduced by using different parameters and erosion rules. The structures of the calculated patterns are analyzed in space and time and compared with real data patterns. Furthermore, our model is capable of simulating the rich dynamics related to the switching of the mouth of the river delta. The simulation results are then compared with geological records for the Mississippi River. PMID:17940031

  2. Doping of Semiconducting Atomic Chains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toshishige, Yamada; Kutler, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Due to the rapid progress in atom manipulation technology, atomic chain electronics would not be a dream, where foreign atoms are placed on a substrate to form a chain, and its electronic properties are designed by controlling the lattice constant d. It has been shown theoretically that a Si atomic chain is metallic regardless of d and that a Mg atomic chain is semiconducting or insulating with a band gap modified with d. For electronic applications, it is essential to establish a method to dope a semiconducting chain, which is to control the Fermi energy position without altering the original band structure. If we replace some of the chain atoms with dopant atoms randomly, the electrons will see random potential along the chain and will be localized strongly in space (Anderson localization). However, if we replace periodically, although the electrons can spread over the chain, there will generally appear new bands and band gaps reflecting the new periodicity of dopant atoms. This will change the original band structure significantly. In order to overcome this dilemma, we may place a dopant atom beside the chain at every N lattice periods (N > 1). Because of the periodic arrangement of dopant atoms, we can avoid the unwanted Anderson localization. Moreover, since the dopant atoms do not constitute the chain, the overlap interaction between them is minimized, and the band structure modification can be made smallest. Some tight-binding results will be discussed to demonstrate the present idea.

  3. Man made deltas

    PubMed Central

    Maselli, Vittorio; Trincardi, Fabio

    2013-01-01

    The review of geochronological and historical data documents that the largest southern European deltas formed almost synchronously during two short intervals of enhanced anthropic pressure on landscapes, respectively during the Roman Empire and the Little Ice Age. These growth phases, that occurred under contrasting climatic regimes, were both followed by generalized delta retreat, driven by two markedly different reasons: after the Romans, the fall of the population and new afforestation let soil erosion in river catchments return to natural background levels; since the industrial revolution, instead, flow regulation through river dams overkill a still increasing sediment production in catchment basins. In this second case, furthermore, the effect of a reduced sediment flux to the coasts is amplified by the sinking of modern deltas, due to land subsidence and sea level rise, that hampers delta outbuilding and increases the vulnerability of coastal zone to marine erosion and flooding. PMID:23722597

  4. Man made deltas.

    PubMed

    Maselli, Vittorio; Trincardi, Fabio

    2013-01-01

    The review of geochronological and historical data documents that the largest southern European deltas formed almost synchronously during two short intervals of enhanced anthropic pressure on landscapes, respectively during the Roman Empire and the Little Ice Age. These growth phases, that occurred under contrasting climatic regimes, were both followed by generalized delta retreat, driven by two markedly different reasons: after the Romans, the fall of the population and new afforestation let soil erosion in river catchments return to natural background levels; since the industrial revolution, instead, flow regulation through river dams overkill a still increasing sediment production in catchment basins. In this second case, furthermore, the effect of a reduced sediment flux to the coasts is amplified by the sinking of modern deltas, due to land subsidence and sea level rise, that hampers delta outbuilding and increases the vulnerability of coastal zone to marine erosion and flooding. PMID:23722597

  5. Study of hadron deformation in lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandrou, Constantia; Koutsou, Giannis

    2008-11-01

    We develop the formalism for the evaluation of density-density correlators in lattice QCD that includes techniques for the computation of the all-to-all propagators involved. A novel technique in this context is the implementation of the one-end trick in the meson sector. Density-density correlators provide a gauge invariant definition for the hadron wave function and yield information on hadron deformation. We evaluate density-density correlators using two degenerate flavors of dynamical Wilson fermions for the pion, the rho meson, the nucleon, and the {delta}. Using the one-end trick we obtain results that clearly show deformation of the rho meson.

  6. Turbulent heat exchanger {Delta}T and {Delta}P

    SciTech Connect

    Steinmeyer, D.

    1996-12-31

    Optimum pressure drop ({Delta}P) and temperature difference ({Delta}T) in turbulent flow heat exchangers are presented in three frameworks: as quantitatively defined by fluid properties, the value of energy and the cost of heat exchange surface (with a little help from a relationship between [power/mass] and heat transfer); as the energy cost for heat recovery (with the {Delta}T cost being about equal to the heat exchanger cost and the {Delta}P cost being about 1/3 as great); and as the second law lost work inherent in heat exchange (with the {Delta}T loss being {approximately}3 times the {Delta}T loss).

  7. Formation and Dynamics of Antiferromagnetic Correlations in Tunable Optical Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greif, Daniel; Jotzu, Gregor; Messer, Michael; Desbuquois, Rémi; Esslinger, Tilman

    2015-12-01

    We report on the observation of antiferromagnetic correlations of ultracold fermions in a variety of optical lattice geometries that are well described by the Hubbard model, including dimers, 1D chains, ladders, isolated and coupled honeycomb planes, as well as square and cubic lattices. The dependence of the strength of spin correlations on the specific geometry is experimentally studied by measuring the correlations along different lattice tunneling links, where a redistribution of correlations between the different lattice links is observed. By measuring the correlations in a crossover between distinct geometries, we demonstrate an effective reduction of the dimensionality for our atom numbers and temperatures. We also investigate the formation and redistribution time of spin correlations by dynamically changing the lattice geometry and studying the time evolution of the system. Time scales ranging from a sudden quench of the lattice geometry to an adiabatic evolution are probed.

  8. On Traveling Waves in Lattices: The Case of Riccati Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrova, Zlatinka

    2012-09-01

    The method of simplest equation is applied for analysis of a class of lattices described by differential-difference equations that admit traveling-wave solutions constructed on the basis of the solution of the Riccati equation. We denote such lattices as Riccati lattices. We search for Riccati lattices within two classes of lattices: generalized Lotka-Volterra lattices and generalized Holling lattices. We show that from the class of generalized Lotka-Volterra lattices only the Wadati lattice belongs to the class of Riccati lattices. Opposite to this many lattices from the Holling class are Riccati lattices. We construct exact traveling wave solutions on the basis of the solution of Riccati equation for three members of the class of generalized Holling lattices.

  9. Engineering novel optical lattices.

    PubMed

    Windpassinger, Patrick; Sengstock, Klaus

    2013-08-01

    Optical lattices have developed into a widely used and highly recognized tool to study many-body quantum physics with special relevance for solid state type systems. One of the most prominent reasons for this success is the high degree of tunability in the experimental setups. While at the beginning quasi-static, cubic geometries were mainly explored, the focus of the field has now shifted toward new lattice topologies and the dynamical control of lattice structures. In this review we intend to give an overview of the progress recently achieved in this field on the experimental side. In addition, we discuss theoretical proposals exploiting specifically these novel lattice geometries. PMID:23828639

  10. Ganges River Delta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Ganges River forms an extensive delta where it empties into the Bay of Bengal. The delta is largely covered with a swamp forest known as the Sunderbans, which is home to the Royal Bengal Tiger. It is also home to most of Bangladesh, one of the world's most densely populated countries. Roughly 120 million people live on the Ganges Delta under threat of repeated catastrophic floods due to heavy runoff of meltwater from the Himalayas, and due to the intense rainfall during the monsoon season. This image was acquired by Landsat 7's Enhanced Thematic Mapper plus (ETM+) sensor on February 28, 2000. This is a false-color composite image made using green, infrared, and blue wavelengths. Image provided by the USGS EROS Data Center Satellite Systems Branch

  11. Delta II Mars Pathfinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Final preparations for lift off of the DELTA II Mars Pathfinder Rocket are shown. Activities include loading the liquid oxygen, completing the construction of the Rover, and placing the Rover into the Lander. After the countdown, important visual events include the launch of the Delta Rocket, burnout and separation of the three Solid Rocket Boosters, and the main engine cutoff. The cutoff of the main engine marks the beginning of the second stage engine. After the completion of the second stage, the third stage engine ignites and then cuts off. Once the third stage engine cuts off spacecraft separation occurs.

  12. Nonlinear, unsteady aerodynamic loads on rectangular and delta wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atta, E. H.; Kandil, O. A.; Mook, D. T.; Nayfeh, A. H.

    1977-01-01

    Nonlinear unsteady aerodynamic loads on rectangular and delta wings in an incompressible flow are calculated by using an unsteady vortex-lattice model. Examples include flows past fixed wings in unsteady uniform streams and flows past wings undergoing unsteady motions. The unsteadiness may be due to gusty winds or pitching oscillations. The present technique establishes a reliable approach which can be utilized in the analysis of problems associated with the dynamics and aeroelasticity of wings within a wide range of angles of attack.

  13. Supersymmetry on the lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergner, Georg; Catterall, Simon

    2016-08-01

    We discuss the motivations, difficulties and progress in the study of supersymmetric lattice gauge theories focusing in particular on 𝒩 = 1 and 𝒩 = 4 super-Yang-Mills in four dimensions. Brief reviews of the corresponding lattice formalisms are given and current results are presented and discussed. We conclude with a summary of the main aspects of current work and prospects for the future.

  14. Laterally closed lattice homomorphisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toumi, Mohamed Ali; Toumi, Nedra

    2006-12-01

    Let A and B be two Archimedean vector lattices and let be a lattice homomorphism. We call that T is laterally closed if T(D) is a maximal orthogonal system in the band generated by T(A) in B, for each maximal orthogonal system D of A. In this paper we prove that any laterally closed lattice homomorphism T of an Archimedean vector lattice A with universal completion Au into a universally complete vector lattice B can be extended to a lattice homomorphism of Au into B, which is an improvement of a result of M. Duhoux and M. Meyer [M. Duhoux and M. Meyer, Extended orthomorphisms and lateral completion of Archimedean Riesz spaces, Ann. Soc. Sci. Bruxelles 98 (1984) 3-18], who established it for the order continuous lattice homomorphism case. Moreover, if in addition Au and B are with point separating order duals (Au)' and B' respectively, then the laterally closedness property becomes a necessary and sufficient condition for any lattice homomorphism to have a similar extension to the whole Au. As an application, we give a new representation theorem for laterally closed d-algebras from which we infer the existence of d-algebra multiplications on the universal completions of d-algebras.

  15. THE EMMA LATTICE DESIGN

    SciTech Connect

    BERG,J.S.; RUGGIERO, A.; MACHIDA, S.; KOSCIELNIAK, S.

    2007-06-25

    EMMA is a 10 to 20 MeV electron ring designed to test our understanding of beam dynamics in a relativistic linear non-scaling fixed field alternating gradient accelerator (FFAG). This paper describes the design of the EMMA lattice. We begin with a summary of the experimental goals that impact the lattice design, and then outline what motivated the choice for the basic lattice parameters, such as the type of cells, the number of cells, and the RF frequency. We next list the different configurations that we wish to operate the machine in so as to accomplish our experimental goals. Finally, we enumerate the detailed lattice parameters, showing how these parameters result from the various lattice configurations.

  16. DELTA PHASE PLUTONIUM ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Cramer, E.M.; Ellinger, F.H.; Land. C.C.

    1960-03-22

    Delta-phase plutonium alloys were developed suitable for use as reactor fuels. The alloys consist of from 1 to 4 at.% zinc and the balance plutonium. The alloys have good neutronic, corrosion, and fabrication characteristics snd possess good dimensional characteristics throughout an operating temperature range from 300 to 490 deg C.

  17. Anderson localization in optical lattices with speckle disorder

    SciTech Connect

    Sucu, Serpil; Aktas, Saban; Okan, S. Erol; Akdeniz, Zehra; Vignolo, Patrizia

    2011-12-15

    We study the localization properties of noninteracting waves propagating in a speckle-like potential superposed on a one-dimensional lattice. Using a combined decimation-renormalization procedure, we estimate the localization length for a tight-binding Hamiltonian where site energies are square-sinc-correlated random variables. By decreasing the width of the correlation function, the disorder patterns approach a {delta}-correlated disorder, and the localization length becomes almost energy independent in the strong disorder limit. We show that this regime can be reached for a size of the speckle grains on the order of (lower than) four lattice steps.

  18. The Devil's in the Delta

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luyben, William L.

    2007-01-01

    Students frequently confuse and incorrectly apply the several "deltas" that are used in chemical engineering. The deltas come in three different flavors: "out minus in", "big minus little" and "now versus then." The first applies to a change in a stream property as the stream flows through a process. For example, the "[delta]H" in an energy…

  19. Delta-ALA urine test

    MedlinePlus

    Delta-aminolevulinic acid ... This test looks for an increased level of delta-ALA. It may be used to help diagnose ... An increased level of urinary delta-ALA may indicate: Lead poisoning ... level may occur with chronic (long-term) liver disease .

  20. A realistic lattice example

    SciTech Connect

    Courant, E.D.; Garren, A.A.

    1985-10-01

    A realistic, distributed interaction region (IR) lattice has been designed that includes new components discussed in the June 1985 lattice workshop. Unlike the test lattices, the lattice presented here includes utility straights and the mechanism for crossing the beams in the experimental straights. Moreover, both the phase trombones and the dispersion suppressors contain the same bending as the normal cells. Vertically separated beams and 6 Tesla, 1-in-1 magnets are assumed. Since the cells are 200 meters long, and have 60 degree phase advance, this lattice has been named RLD1, in analogy with the corresponding test lattice, TLD1. The quadrupole gradient is 136 tesla/meter in the cells, and has similar values in other quadrupoles except in those in the IR`s, where the maximum gradient is 245 tesla/meter. RLD1 has distributed IR`s; however, clustered realistic lattices can easily be assembled from the same components, as was recently done in a version that utilizes the same type of experimental and utility straights as those of RLD1.

  1. Superalloy Lattice Block Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whittenberger, J. D.; Nathal, M. V.; Hebsur, M. G.; Kraus, D. L.

    2003-01-01

    In their simplest form, lattice block panels are produced by direct casting and result in lightweight, fully triangulated truss-like configurations which provide strength and stiffness [2]. The earliest realizations of lattice block were made from A1 and steels, primarily under funding from the US Navy [3]. This work also showed that the mechanical efficiency (eg., specific stiffness) of lattice block structures approached that of honeycomb structures [2]. The lattice architectures are also less anisotropic, and the investment casting route should provide a large advantage in cost and temperature capability over honeycombs which are limited to alloys that can be processed into foils. Based on this early work, a program was initiated to determine the feasibility of extending the high temperature superalloy lattice block [3]. The objective of this effort was to provide an alternative to intermetallics and composites in achieving a lightweight high temperature structure without sacrificing the damage tolerance and moderate cost inherent in superalloys. To establish the feasibility of the superalloy lattice block concept, work was performed in conjunction with JAMCORP, Inc. Billerica, MA, to produce a number of lattice block panels from both IN71 8 and Mar-M247.

  2. DELTAS: A new Global Delta Sustainability Initiative (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foufoula-Georgiou, E.

    2013-12-01

    Deltas are economic and environmental hotspots, food baskets for many nations, home to a large part of the world population, and hosts of exceptional biodiversity and rich ecosystems. Deltas, being at the land-water interface, are international, regional, and local transport hubs, thus providing the basis for intense economic activities. Yet, deltas are deteriorating at an alarming rate as 'victims' of human actions (e.g. water and sediment reduction due to upstream basin development), climatic impacts (e.g. sea level rise and flooding from rivers and intense tropical storms), and local exploration (e.g. sand or aggregates, groundwater and hydrocarbon extraction). Although many efforts exist on individual deltas around the world, a comprehensive global delta sustainability initiative that promotes awareness, science integration, data and knowledge sharing, and development of decision support tools for an effective dialogue between scientists, managers and policy makers is lacking. Recently, the international scientific community proposed to establish the International Year of Deltas (IYD) to serve as the beginning of such a Global Delta Sustainability Initiative. The IYD was proposed as a year to: (1) increase awareness and attention to the value and vulnerability of deltas worldwide; (2) promote and enhance international and regional cooperation at the scientific, policy, and stakeholder level; and (3) serve as a launching pad for a 10-year committed effort to understand deltas as complex socio-ecological systems and ensure preparedness in protecting and restoring them in a rapidly changing environment. In this talk, the vision for such an international coordinated effort on delta sustainability will be presented as developed by a large number of international experts and recently funded through the Belmont Forum International Opportunities Fund. Participating countries include: U.S., France, Germany, U.K., India, Japan, Netherlands, Norway, Brazil, Bangladesh

  3. Understanding pesticides in California's Delta

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kuivila, Kathryn M.; Orlando, James L.

    2012-01-01

    The Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta (Delta) is the hub of California’s water system and also an important habitat for imperiled fish and wildlife. Aquatic organisms are exposed to mixtures of pesticides that flow through the maze of Delta water channels from sources including agricultural, landscape, and urban pest-control applications. While we do not know all of the effects pesticides have on the ecosystem, there is evidence that they cause some damage to organisms in the Delta. Decades of USGS research have provided a good understanding of when, where, and how pesticides enter the Delta. However, pesticide use is continually changing. New field studies and methods are needed so that scientists can analyze which pesticides are present in the Delta, and at what concentrations, enabling them to estimate exposure and ultimate effects on organisms. Continuing research will provide resource managers and stakeholders with crucial information to manage the Delta wisely.

  4. Melting of the Abrikosov flux lattice in anisotropic superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, R. G.; Farrell, D. E.; Rice, J. P.; Ginsberg, D. M.; Kogan, V. G.

    1992-01-01

    It has been proposed that the Abrikosov flux lattice in high-Tc superconductors is melted over a significant fraction of the phase diagram. A thermodynamic argument is provided which establishes that the angular dependence of the melting temperature is controlled by the superconducting mass anisotropy. Using a low-frequency torsional-oscillator technique, this relationship has been tested in untwinned single-crystal YBa2Cu3O(7-delta). The results offer decisive support for the melting proposal.

  5. A LOW GAMMA_T INJECTION LATTICE FOR POLARIZED PROTONS IN RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    MONTAG,C.

    2007-06-25

    Polarized protons are injected into the Relativistic Heavy Jon Collider (RHIC) just above transition energy. When installation of a cold partial Siberian snake in the AGS required lowering the injection energy by {Delta}{gamma} = 0.56, the transition energy in RHIC had to be lowered accordingly to ensure proper longitudinal matching. This paper presents lattice modifications implemented to lower the transition energy by {Delta}{gamma}{sub t} = 0.8.

  6. Monte Carlo without chains

    SciTech Connect

    Chorin, Alexandre J.

    2007-12-12

    A sampling method for spin systems is presented. The spin lattice is written as the union of a nested sequence of sublattices, all but the last with conditionally independent spins, which are sampled in succession using their marginals. The marginals are computed concurrently by a fast algorithm; errors in the evaluation of the marginals are offset by weights. There are no Markov chains and each sample is independent of the previous ones; the cost of a sample is proportional to the number of spins (but the number of samples needed for good statistics may grow with array size). The examples include the Edwards-Anderson spin glass in three dimensions.

  7. Evaluation of agonist-antagonist properties of nitrogen mustard and cyano derivatives of delta 8-tetrahydrocannabinol.

    PubMed

    Wiley, J L; Compton, D R; Gordon, P M; Siegel, C; Singer, M; Dutta, A; Lichtman, A H; Balster, R L; Razdan, R K; Martin, B R

    1996-01-01

    delta 8-Tetrahydrocannabinol (delta 8-THC) is a naturally occurring cannabinoid with a characteristic pharmacological profile of in vivo effects. Previous studies have shown that modification of the structure of delta 8-THC by inclusion of a nitrogen-containing functional group alters this profile and may alkylate the cannabinoid receptor, similar to the manner in which beta-funaltrexamine (beta-FNA) alkylates the micro-opioid receptor. Two novel analogs of delta 8-THC were synthesized: a nitrogen mustard analog with a dimethylheptyl side chain (NM-delta 8-THC) and a cyano analog with a dimethylpentyl side chain (CY-delta 8-THC). Both analogs showed high affinity for brain cannabinoid receptors and when administered acutely, produced characteristic delta 9-THC-like effects in mice, including locomotor suppression, hypothermia, antinociception and catalepsy. CY-delta 8-THC shared discriminative stimulus effects with CP 55,940; for NM-delta 8-THC, these effects also occurred, but were delayed. Although both compounds attenuated the effects of delta 9-THC in the mouse behavioral tests, evaluation of potential antagonist effects of these compounds was complicated by the fact that two injections of delta 9-THC produced similar results, suggesting that acute tolerance or desensitization might account for the observations. NM-delta 8-THC, but not CY-delta 8-THC, attenuated the discriminative stimulus effects of CP 55,940 in rats several days following injection. Hence, addition of a nitrogen-containing functional group to a traditional cannabinoid structure does not eliminate agonist effects and may produce delayed attenuation of cannabinoid-induced pharmacological effects. PMID:9076759

  8. Coherent transfer by adiabatic passage in two-dimensional lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Longhi, Stefano

    2014-09-15

    Coherent tunneling by adiabatic passage (CTAP) is a well-established technique for robust spatial transport of quantum particles in linear chains. Here we introduce two exactly-solvable models where the CTAP protocol can be extended to two-dimensional lattice geometries. Such bi-dimensional lattice models are synthesized from time-dependent second-quantization Hamiltonians, in which the bosonic field operators evolve adiabatically like in an ordinary three-level CTAP scheme thus ensuring adiabatic passage in Fock space. - Highlights: • New ways of coherent transport by adiabatic passage (CTAP) in 2D lattices. • Synthesis of exactly-solvable 2D lattices from a simple three-well model. • CTAP in 2D lattices can be exploited for quantum state transfer.

  9. Superalloy Lattice Block Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nathal, M. V.; Whittenberger, J. D.; Hebsur, M. G.; Kantzos, P. T.; Krause, D. L.

    2004-01-01

    Initial investigations of investment cast superalloy lattice block suggest that this technology will yield a low cost approach to utilize the high temperature strength and environmental resistance of superalloys in lightweight, damage tolerant structural configurations. Work to date has demonstrated that relatively large superalloy lattice block panels can be successfully investment cast from both IN-718 and Mar-M247. These castings exhibited mechanical properties consistent with the strength of the same superalloys measured from more conventional castings. The lattice block structure also accommodates significant deformation without failure, and is defect tolerant in fatigue. The potential of lattice block structures opens new opportunities for the use of superalloys in future generations of aircraft applications that demand strength and environmental resistance at elevated temperatures along with low weight.

  10. Shaken lattice interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidner, Carrie; Yu, Hoon; Anderson, Dana

    2016-05-01

    In this work, we report on progress towards performing interferometry using atoms trapped in an optical lattice. That is, we start with atoms in the ground state of an optical lattice potential V(x) =V0cos [ 2 kx + ϕ(t) ] , and by a prescribed phase function ϕ(t) , transform from one atomic wavefunction to another. In this way, we implement the standard interferometric sequence of beam splitting, propagation, reflection, reverse propagation, and recombination. Through the use of optimal control techniques, we have computationally demonstrated a scalable accelerometer that provides information on the sign of the applied acceleration. Extension of this idea to a two-dimensional shaken-lattice-based gyroscope is discussed. In addition, we report on the experimental implementation of the shaken lattice system.

  11. SPIN ON THE LATTICE.

    SciTech Connect

    ORGINOS,K.

    2003-01-07

    I review the current status of hadronic structure computations on the lattice. I describe the basic lattice techniques and difficulties and present some of the latest lattice results; in particular recent results of the RBC group using domain wall fermions are also discussed. In conclusion, lattice computations can play an important role in understanding the hadronic structure and the fundamental properties of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). Although some difficulties still exist, several significant steps have been made. Advances in computer technology are expected to play a significant role in pushing these computations closer to the chiral limit and in including dynamical fermions. RBC has already begun preliminary dynamical domain wall fermion computations [49] which we expect to be pushed forward with the arrival of QCD0C. In the near future, we also expect to complete the non-perturbative renormalization of the relevant derivative operators in quenched QCD.

  12. Asymptotic energy of lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Weigen; Zhang, Zuhe

    2009-04-01

    The energy of a simple graph G arising in chemical physics, denoted by E(G), is defined as the sum of the absolute values of eigenvalues of G. As the dimer problem and spanning trees problem in statistical physics, in this paper we propose the energy per vertex problem for lattice systems. In general for a type of lattice in statistical physics, to compute the entropy constant with toroidal, cylindrical, Mobius-band, Klein-bottle, and free boundary conditions are different tasks with different hardness and may have different solutions. We show that the energy per vertex of plane lattices is independent of the toroidal, cylindrical, Mobius-band, Klein-bottle, and free boundary conditions. In particular, the asymptotic formulae of energies of the triangular, 33.42, and hexagonal lattices with toroidal, cylindrical, Mobius-band, Klein-bottle, and free boundary conditions are obtained explicitly.

  13. Automated Lattice Perturbation Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Monahan, Christopher

    2014-11-01

    I review recent developments in automated lattice perturbation theory. Starting with an overview of lattice perturbation theory, I focus on the three automation packages currently "on the market": HiPPy/HPsrc, Pastor and PhySyCAl. I highlight some recent applications of these methods, particularly in B physics. In the final section I briefly discuss the related, but distinct, approach of numerical stochastic perturbation theory.

  14. Additive lattice kirigami

    PubMed Central

    Castle, Toen; Sussman, Daniel M.; Tanis, Michael; Kamien, Randall D.

    2016-01-01

    Kirigami uses bending, folding, cutting, and pasting to create complex three-dimensional (3D) structures from a flat sheet. In the case of lattice kirigami, this cutting and rejoining introduces defects into an underlying 2D lattice in the form of points of nonzero Gaussian curvature. A set of simple rules was previously used to generate a wide variety of stepped structures; we now pare back these rules to their minimum. This allows us to describe a set of techniques that unify a wide variety of cut-and-paste actions under the rubric of lattice kirigami, including adding new material and rejoining material across arbitrary cuts in the sheet. We also explore the use of more complex lattices and the different structures that consequently arise. Regardless of the choice of lattice, creating complex structures may require multiple overlapping kirigami cuts, where subsequent cuts are not performed on a locally flat lattice. Our additive kirigami method describes such cuts, providing a simple methodology and a set of techniques to build a huge variety of complex 3D shapes. PMID:27679822

  15. Legless locomotion in lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiebel, Perrin; Dai, Jin; Gong, Chaohui; Serrano, Miguel M.; Mendelson, Joseph R., III; Choset, Howie; Goldman, Daniel I.

    2015-03-01

    By propagating waves from head to tail, limbless organisms like snakes can traverse terrain composed of rocks, foliage, soil and sand. Previous research elucidated how rigid obstacles influence snake locomotion by studying a model terrain-symmetric lattices of pegs placed in hard ground. We want to understand how different substrate-body interaction modes affect performance in desert-adapted snakes during transit of substrates composed of both rigid obstacles and granular media (GM). We tested Chionactis occipitalis, the Mojave shovel-nosed snake, in two laboratory treatments: lattices of 0 . 64 cm diameter obstacles arrayed on both a hard, slick substrate and in a GM of ~ 0 . 3 mm diameter glass particles. For all lattice spacings, d, speed through the hard ground lattices was less than that in GM lattices. However, maximal undulation efficiencies ηu (number of body lengths advanced per undulation cycle) in both treatments were comparable when d was intermediate. For other d, ηu was lower than this maximum in hard ground lattices, while on GM, ηu was insensitive to d. To systematically explore such locomotion, we tested a physical robot model of the snake; performance depended sensitively on base substrate, d and body wave parameters.

  16. Additive lattice kirigami

    PubMed Central

    Castle, Toen; Sussman, Daniel M.; Tanis, Michael; Kamien, Randall D.

    2016-01-01

    Kirigami uses bending, folding, cutting, and pasting to create complex three-dimensional (3D) structures from a flat sheet. In the case of lattice kirigami, this cutting and rejoining introduces defects into an underlying 2D lattice in the form of points of nonzero Gaussian curvature. A set of simple rules was previously used to generate a wide variety of stepped structures; we now pare back these rules to their minimum. This allows us to describe a set of techniques that unify a wide variety of cut-and-paste actions under the rubric of lattice kirigami, including adding new material and rejoining material across arbitrary cuts in the sheet. We also explore the use of more complex lattices and the different structures that consequently arise. Regardless of the choice of lattice, creating complex structures may require multiple overlapping kirigami cuts, where subsequent cuts are not performed on a locally flat lattice. Our additive kirigami method describes such cuts, providing a simple methodology and a set of techniques to build a huge variety of complex 3D shapes.

  17. Mississippi River Delta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    As the Mississippi River enters the Gulf of Mexico, it loses energy and dumps its load of sediment that it has carried on its journey through the mid continent. This pile of sediment, or mud, accumulates over the years building up the delta front. As one part of the delta becomes clogged with sediment, the delta front will migrate in search of new areas to grow. The area shown on this image is the currently active delta front of the Mississippi. The migratory nature of the delta forms natural traps for oil. Most of the land in the image consists of mud flats and marsh lands. There is little human settlement in this area due to the instability of the sediments. The main shipping channel of the Mississippi River is the broad stripe running northwest to southeast.

    This image was acquired on May 24, 2001 by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER will image Earth for the next 6 years to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18,1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, is the U.S. Science team leader; Bjorn Eng of JPL is the project manager. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, a long-term research and technology program designed to examine Earth's land, oceans, atmosphere, ice and life as a total integrated system.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping

  18. An improved method for extracting matrix elements from lattice three-point functions

    SciTech Connect

    C. Aubin, K. Orginos

    2011-12-01

    The extraction of matrix elements from baryon three-point functions is complicated by the fact that the signal-to-noise drops rapidly as a function of time. Using a previously discussed method to improve the signal-to-noise for lattice two-point functions, we use this technique to do so for lattice three-point functions, using electromagnetic form factors for the nucleon and Delta as an example.

  19. Experimental evidence for flux-lattice melting. [in high-Tc superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrell, D. E.; Rice, J. P.; Ginsberg, D. M.

    1991-01-01

    A low-frequency torsional oscillator has been used to search for flux-lattice melting in an untwinned single crystal of YBa2Cu3O(7-delta). The damping of the oscillator was measured as a function of temperature, for applied magnetic fields in the range H = 0.1-2.3 T. A remarkably sharp damping peak has been located. It is suggested that the temperature of the peak corresponds to the melting point of the Abrikosov flux lattice.

  20. Natural processes in delta restoration: application to the Mississippi Delta.

    PubMed

    Paola, Chris; Twilley, Robert R; Edmonds, Douglas A; Kim, Wonsuck; Mohrig, David; Parker, Gary; Viparelli, Enrica; Voller, Vaughan R

    2011-01-01

    Restoration of river deltas involves diverting sediment and water from major channels into adjoining drowned areas, where the sediment can build new land and provide a platform for regenerating wetland ecosystems. Except for local engineered structures at the points of diversion, restoration mainly relies on natural delta-building processes. Present understanding of such processes is sufficient to provide a basis for determining the feasibility of restoration projects through quantitative estimates of land-building rates and sustainable wetland area under different scenarios of sediment supply, subsidence, and sea-level rise. We are not yet to the point of being able to predict the evolution of a restored delta in detail. Predictions of delta evolution are based on field studies of active deltas, deltas in mine-tailings ponds, experimental deltas, and countless natural experiments contained in the stratigraphic record. These studies provide input for a variety of mechanistic delta models, ranging from radially averaged formulations to more detailed models that can resolve channels, topography, and ecosystem processes. Especially exciting areas for future research include understanding the mechanisms by which deltaic channel networks self-organize, grow, and distribute sediment and nutrients over the delta surface and coupling these to ecosystem processes, especially the interplay of topography, network geometry, and ecosystem dynamics. PMID:21329199

  1. Falling chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Chun Wa; Yasui, Kosuke

    2006-06-01

    The one-dimensional fall of a folded chain with one end suspended from a rigid support and a chain falling from a resting heap on a table is studied. Because their Lagrangians contain no explicit time dependence, the falling chains are conservative systems. Their equations of motion are shown to contain a term that enforces energy conservation when masses are transferred between subchains. We show that Cayley's 1857 energy nonconserving solution for a chain falling from a resting heap is incorrect because it neglects the energy gained when a link leaves a subchain. The maximum chain tension measured by Calkin and March for the falling folded chain is given a simple if rough interpretation. Other aspects of the falling folded chain are briefly discussed.

  2. Monte Carlo simulations of lattice models for single polymer systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, Hsiao-Ping

    2014-10-28

    Single linear polymer chains in dilute solutions under good solvent conditions are studied by Monte Carlo simulations with the pruned-enriched Rosenbluth method up to the chain length N∼O(10{sup 4}). Based on the standard simple cubic lattice model (SCLM) with fixed bond length and the bond fluctuation model (BFM) with bond lengths in a range between 2 and √(10), we investigate the conformations of polymer chains described by self-avoiding walks on the simple cubic lattice, and by random walks and non-reversible random walks in the absence of excluded volume interactions. In addition to flexible chains, we also extend our study to semiflexible chains for different stiffness controlled by a bending potential. The persistence lengths of chains extracted from the orientational correlations are estimated for all cases. We show that chains based on the BFM are more flexible than those based on the SCLM for a fixed bending energy. The microscopic differences between these two lattice models are discussed and the theoretical predictions of scaling laws given in the literature are checked and verified. Our simulations clarify that a different mapping ratio between the coarse-grained models and the atomistically realistic description of polymers is required in a coarse-graining approach due to the different crossovers to the asymptotic behavior.

  3. Finite Volume Study of the Delta Magnetic Moments Using Dynamical Clover Fermions

    SciTech Connect

    Aubin, Christopher; Orginos, Konstantinos; Pascalutsa, Vladimir; Vanderhaeghen, Marc

    2009-01-01

    We calculate the magnetic dipole moment of the $\\Delta$ baryon using a background magnetic field on 2+1-flavors of clover fermions on anisotropic lattices. We focus on the finite volume effects that can be significant in background field studies, and thus we use two different spatial volumes in addition to several quark masses.

  4. Pioneer Launch on Delta Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    NASA launches the last in the series of interplanetary Pioneer spacecraft, Pioneer 10 from Cape Kennedy, Florida. The long-tank Delta launch vehicle placed the spacecraft in a solar orbit along the path of Earth's orbit. The spacecraft then passed inside and outside Earth's orbit, alternately speeding up and slowing down relative to Earth. The Delta launch vehicle family started development in 1959. The Delta was composed of parts from the Thor, an intermediate-range ballistic missile, as its first stage, and the Vanguard as its second. The first Delta was launched from Cape Canaveral on May 13, 1960 and was powerful enough to deliver a 100-pound spacecraft into geostationary transfer orbit. Delta has been used to launch civil, commercial, and military satellites into orbit. For more information about Delta, please see Chapter 3 in Roger Launius and Dennis Jenkins' book To Reach the High Frontier published by The University Press of Kentucky in 2002.

  5. Delta in Eberswalde

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    This HiRISE image covers a portion of a delta that partially fills Eberswalde crater in Margaritifer Sinus. The delta was first recognized and mapped using MOC images that revealed various features whose presence required sustained flow and deposition into a lake that once occupied the crater. The HiRISE image resolves meter-scale features that record the migration of channels and delta distributaries as the delta grew over time. Differences in grain-size of sediments within the environments on the delta enable differential erosion of the deposits. As a result, coarser channel deposits are slightly more resistant and stand in relief relative to finer-grained over-bank and more easily eroded distal delta deposits. Close examination of the relict channel deposits confirms the presence of some meter-size blocks that were likely too coarse to have been transported by water flowing within the channels. These blocks may be formed of the sand and gravel that more likely moved along the channels that was lithified and eroded. Numerous meter-scale polygonal structures are common on many surfaces, but mostly those associated with more quiescent depositional environments removed from the channels. The polygons could be the result of deposition of fine-grained sediments that were either exposed and desiccated (dried out), rich in clays that shrunk when the water was removed, turned into rock and then fractured and eroded, or some combination of these processes.

    Image PSP_001336_1560 was taken by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft on November 8, 2006. The complete image is centered at -23.8 degrees latitude, 326.4 degrees East longitude. The range to the target site was 256.3 km (160.2 miles). At this distance the image scale is 25.6 cm/pixel (with 1 x 1 binning) so objects 77 cm across are resolved. The image shown here has been map-projected to 25 cm/pixel and north is up. The image was

  6. Luminescence enhancement of Eu{sup 2+}, Ce{sup 3+} co-doped Ba{sub 3}Si{sub 5}O{sub 13-{delta}}N{sub {delta}} phosphors

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Ruili; Maeda, Tomonori; Maruta, Ryosuke; Kusaka, Sho; Ding Bingjun; Murai, Kei-ichiro; Moriga, Toshihiro

    2010-03-15

    Host lattice Ba{sub 3}Si{sub 5}O{sub 13-{delta}}N{sub {delta}} oxonitridosilicates have been synthesized by the traditional solid state reaction method. The lattice structure is based on layers of vertex-linked SiO{sub 4} tetrahedrons and Ba{sup 2+} ions, where each Ba{sup 2+} ion is coordinated by eight oxygen atoms forming distorted square antiprisms. Under an excitation wavelength of 365 nm, Ba{sub 3}Si{sub 5}O{sub 13-{delta}}N{sub {delta}}:Eu{sup 2+} and Ba{sub 3}Si{sub 5}O{sub 13-{delta}}N{sub {delta}}:Eu{sup 2+},Ce{sup 3+} show broad emission bands from about 400-620 nm, with maxima at about 480 nm and half-peak width of around 130 nm. The emission intensity is strongly enhanced by co-doping Ce{sup 3+} ions into the Ba{sub 3}Si{sub 5}O{sub 13-{delta}}N{sub {delta}}:Eu{sup 2+} phosphor, which could be explained by energy transfer. The excitation band from the near UV to the blue light region confirms the possibility that Ba{sub 3}Si{sub 5}O{sub 13-{delta}}N{sub {delta}}:Eu{sup 2+}, Ce{sup 3+} could be used as a phosphor for white LEDs. - Graphical abstract: Emission spectra for Ba{sub 3(1-x-y)}Si{sub 5}O{sub 13-{delta}}N{sub {delta}}/xEu{sup 2+},yCe{sup 3+} (0<=x<=2%,0<=y<=2%) under the excitation wavelength of 365 nm.

  7. Delta II commercial space transportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyers, J. F.

    1988-07-01

    Delta II is an upgraded variant of the Delta family of launch vehicles that has been in use by NASA since 1960. Among the design improvements incorporated by Delta II is a cryogenic-propellant second stage, a 2.89-m diameter satellite-protecting nose fairing, graphite/epoxy solid rocket motor cases, and 12:1 main engine expansion nozzle. The manufacturer/operator offers Delta II customers a dedicated, single satellite launch capability fully tailored to the given spacecraft's unique mission requirements.

  8. Extensive TCR junctional diversity of V gamma 9/V delta 2 clones from human female reproductive tissues.

    PubMed

    Christmas, S E; Brew, R; Thornton, S M; Deniz, G; Flanagan, B F

    1995-09-01

    Panels of gamma delta T cell clones bearing the V gamma 9/V delta 2 form of TCR were derived from human first trimester decidualized endometrium and cervix. Seventy-three percent of these clones expressed the human mucosal lymphocyte Ag HML-1 compared with only 14% of PBL V gamma 9/V delta 2 clones, indicating that most clones were derived from the tissue itself rather than contaminating peripheral blood. All 13 clones isolated expressed V gamma 9JPC gamma 1- and V delta 2(D)J delta 1-encoded receptors; TCR gamma and delta junctional regions from most of these were sequenced and analyzed, together with the TCR-delta junctional region of a sequence obtained from bulk CD3+ decidual leukocytes. There was considerable junctional diversity of both gamma- and delta-chains with a similar extent of germline V and J gene trimming and N-region nucleotide addition to that found in PBL V gamma 9/V delta 2 cells. Eight of eleven TCR-delta junctional sequences contained a strongly hydrophobic amino acid in position 97, as has been found in > 90% o V gamma 9/V delta 2 clones. Thymic V gamma 9/V delta 2 cells show much less junctional diversity and less pronounced selection at residue 97 of the delta-chain. Thus, unlike the mouse, gamma delta T cells from human female reproductive tissues exhibit extensive TCR junctional as well as combinatorial diversity. This suggests that V gamma 9/V delta 2 cells in these human tissues have undergone selective but diverse peripheral expansion in response to antigenic stimuli in a similar manner to those in peripheral blood.

  9. Lattice studies of baryons

    SciTech Connect

    David Richards

    2004-10-01

    This talk describes progress at understanding the properties of the nucleon and its excitations from lattice QCD. I begin with a review of recent lattice results for the lowest-lying states of the excited baryon spectrum. The need to approach physical values of the light quark masses is emphasized, enabling the effects of the pion cloud to be revealed. I then outline the development of techniques that will enable the extraction of the masses of the higher resonances, and describe how such calculations provide insight into the structure of the hadrons. Finally, I discuss direct probes of the quark and gluon structure of baryons through the lattice measurement of the moments of quark distributions and of Generalized Parton Distributions.

  10. Latticed pentamode acoustic cloak.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi; Liu, Xiaoning; Hu, Gengkai

    2015-01-01

    We report in this work a practical design of pentamode acoustic cloak with microstructure. The proposed cloak is assembled by pentamode lattice made of a single-phase solid material. The function of rerouting acoustic wave round an obstacle has been demonstrated numerically. It is also revealed that shear related resonance due to weak shear resistance in practical pentamode lattices punctures broadband feature predicted based on ideal pentamode cloak. As a consequence, the latticed pentamode cloak can only conceal the obstacle in segmented frequency ranges. We have also shown that the shear resonance can be largely reduced by introducing material damping, and an improved broadband performance can be achieved. These works pave the way for experimental demonstration of pentamode acoustic cloak. PMID:26503821

  11. Latticed pentamode acoustic cloak

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi; Liu, Xiaoning; Hu, Gengkai

    2015-01-01

    We report in this work a practical design of pentamode acoustic cloak with microstructure. The proposed cloak is assembled by pentamode lattice made of a single-phase solid material. The function of rerouting acoustic wave round an obstacle has been demonstrated numerically. It is also revealed that shear related resonance due to weak shear resistance in practical pentamode lattices punctures broadband feature predicted based on ideal pentamode cloak. As a consequence, the latticed pentamode cloak can only conceal the obstacle in segmented frequency ranges. We have also shown that the shear resonance can be largely reduced by introducing material damping, and an improved broadband performance can be achieved. These works pave the way for experimental demonstration of pentamode acoustic cloak. PMID:26503821

  12. Shanghai Delta Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, R.E.; Hoffman, P.F.; Parker, R.W.

    1988-01-01

    The upper Eocene Yegua Formation expands dramatically across a regional system of growth faults into an area generally 12-15 km wide, extending at least from the western edge of the Houston sale dome basin to the San Marcos arch. Within this area, the expanded Yegua trend has yielded, since 1982, at least seven noteworthy discoveries: Toro Grande and Lost Bridge fields in Jackson County, and Black Owl, Shanghai, Shanghai East, El Campo, and Phase Four fields in Wharton County. During each of several postulated Yegua sea level drops, this flexure became a focal point for deltaic deposition of excellent reservoir-quality sands. Shanghai, Shanghai East, and El Campo fields are located within what the writers have labeled the ''Shanghai delta complex.'' Integration of seismic and well data in this vicinity shows a marked increase in the expansion indices of growth faults, and moderately thick progradational sand sequences have accumulated immediately downthrow. This structural-stratigraphic pattern, as well as internal bedding characteristics and other lithologic data observed, is believed typical of deltas deposited along the Yegua shelf margin.

  13. Holden Crater Delta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA03694 Holden Crater Delta

    This fan-shaped delta deposit is located in Holden Crater.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -27.3N, Longitude 324.5E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  14. Expression of the alpha/beta and gamma/delta T-cell receptors in 57 cases of peripheral T-cell lymphomas. Identification of a subset of gamma/delta T-cell lymphomas.

    PubMed Central

    Gaulard, P.; Bourquelot, P.; Kanavaros, P.; Haioun, C.; Le Couedic, J. P.; Divine, M.; Goossens, M.; Zafrani, E. S.; Farcet, J. P.; Reyes, F.

    1990-01-01

    Fifty-seven cases of peripheral T-cell lymphoma were studied for cell expression of the T-cell receptor (TCR) chains, using monoclonal antibodies specific for the beta chain (beta F1) of the alpha/beta TCR, and for the delta chain (anti-TCR delta-1) of the gamma/delta TCR. Three different patterns were demonstrated: in 39 cases (69%), the phenotype (CD3+beta F1+TCR delta-1-) was that of most normal T cells. A second pattern was found on six cases (10%), which were of CD3+beta F1-TCR delta-1+ phenotype, and in which DNA analysis showed a clonal rearrangement of the delta locus in the five cases studied. It is suggested that these cases are the neoplastic counterpart of the small subpopulation of normal T cells that express gamma delta receptor. It is of considerable interest that these gamma delta lymphomas had unusual clinicopathologic presentations, as one case corresponded to a lethal midline granuloma and the five others to hepatosplenic lymphomas with a sinusal/sinusoidal infiltration in spleen, marrow, and liver. The fact that the distribution of the neoplastic gamma delta cells in the splenic red pulp resembles that of normal gamma delta cells reinforces the concept of a preferential homing of gamma delta T cells to this tissue. A third pattern (CD3 +/- beta F1-TCR delta-1-) was seen in 12 cases (21%), in which, by contrast to normal post-thymic T cells, no evidence of either alpha beta or gamma delta T cell receptor was found. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:1698028

  15. Exact Lattice Supersymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Catterall, Simon; Kaplan, David B.; Unsal, Mithat

    2009-03-31

    We provide an introduction to recent lattice formulations of supersymmetric theories which are invariant under one or more real supersymmetries at nonzero lattice spacing. These include the especially interesting case of N = 4 SYM in four dimensions. We discuss approaches based both on twisted supersymmetry and orbifold-deconstruction techniques and show their equivalence in the case of gauge theories. The presence of an exact supersymmetry reduces and in some cases eliminates the need for fine tuning to achieve a continuum limit invariant under the full supersymmetry of the target theory. We discuss open problems.

  16. Lattice of the CSR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, J. W.; Yuan, Y. J.; Song, M. T.; Zhang, W. Z.; Yang, X. D.; He, Y.; Mao, L. Z.; Xia, G. X.; Yang, J. C.; Wu, J. X.; Liu, W.

    2001-12-01

    CSR, a new Cooler-Storage-Ring project, is the post-acceleration system of the Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou (HIRFL). It consists of a main ring (CSRm) and an experimental ring (CSRe). From the HIRFL cyclotron system the heavy ions will be accumulated, cooled and accelerated in the CSRm, then extracted fast and injected into the CSRe for many internal-target experiments with electron cooling. The experimental ring (CSRe) will be operated with three lattice modes for different experiments. The details of the lattice for the two rings will be described in this paper.

  17. Coupled map lattice model of jet breakup

    SciTech Connect

    Minich, R W; Schwartz, A J; Baker, E L

    2001-01-25

    An alternative approach is described to evaluate the statistical nature of the breakup of shaped charge liners. Experimental data from ductile and brittle copper jets are analyzed in terms of velocity gradient, deviation of {Delta}V from linearity, R/S analysis, and the Hurst exponent within the coupled map lattice model. One-dimensional simulations containing 600 zones of equal mass and using distinctly different force-displacement curves are generated to simulate ductile and brittle behavior. A particle separates from the stretching jet when an element of material reaches the failure criterion. A simple model of a stretching rod using brittle, semi-brittle, and ductile force-displacement curves is in agreement with the experimental results for the Hurst exponent and the phase portraits and indicates that breakup is a correlated phenomenon.

  18. T cell receptor gamma/delta+ lymphocyte subsets during HIV infection.

    PubMed Central

    Autran, B; Triebel, F; Katlama, C; Rozenbaum, W; Hercend, T; Debre, P

    1989-01-01

    The gamma/delta T cell receptor is expressed on 1-15% of normal human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL). This subpopulation is recognized by anti-TcR-delta 1 MoAb which is functionally defined as a pan-delta MoAb. Two other antibodies, anti-Ti-gamma A and anti-delta-TcS1 are directed at variable determinants of either the gamma or the delta chain, respectively. In normal individuals anti-Ti-gamma A characterizes two thirds of the TcR-delta 1+ subpopulation whereas anti-delta TcS1 reacts with most of the delta-TcR1+, Ti-gamma A- cells. In the present study, we have used these three MoAbs to characterize the TcR gamma/delta+ peripheral lymphocytes during HIV infection. Fifty patients at three distinct clinical stages (SPC/PGL, ARC, AIDS) of the infection have been studied. The Ti-gamma A+ subset in the whole group accounted for 3.45% of PBL and did not differ from controls; it was also unchanged when the three groups were analysed separately. The Ti-gamma A+ circulating cells were in a resting state as assessed by the absence of surface-expressed activation markers. In contrast, in some patients the proportion of circulating TcR-delta 1+, Ti-gamma A-, delta TcS1+ cells was increased (4.75%) leading to an inversion of the Ti-gamma A/delta-TcS1 ratio. Altogether, those data suggest a conservation of the Ti-gamma A+ subset during HIV infection, contrasting with an increase of the delta-TcS1+, Ti-gamma A- fraction in some cases. PMID:2522839

  19. T cell receptor gamma and delta rearrangements in hematologic malignancies. Relationship to lymphoid differentiation.

    PubMed Central

    Griesinger, F; Greenberg, J M; Kersey, J H

    1989-01-01

    We have studied recombinatorial events of the T cell receptor delta and gamma chain genes in hematopoietic malignancies and related these to normal stages of lymphoid differentiation. T cell receptor delta gene recombinatorial events were found in 91% of acute T cell lymphoblastic leukemia, 68% of non-T, non-B lymphoid precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and 80% of mixed lineage acute leukemias. Mature B-lineage leukemias and acute nonlymphocytic leukemias retained the T-cell receptor delta gene in the germline configuration. The incidence of T cell receptor gamma and delta was particularly high in CD10+CD19+ non-T, non-B lymphoid precursor ALL. In lymphoid precursor ALL, T cell receptor delta was frequently rearranged while T cell receptor gamma was in the germline configuration. This suggests that TCR delta rearrangements may precede TCR gamma rearrangements in lymphoid ontogeny. In T-ALL, only concordant T cell receptor delta and gamma rearrangements were observed. Several distinct rearrangements were defined using a panel of restriction enzymes. Most of the rearrangements observed in T-ALL represented joining events of J delta 1 to upstream regions. In contrast, the majority of rearrangements in lymphoid precursor ALL most likely represented D-D or V-D rearrangements, which have been found to be early recombinatorial events of the TCR delta locus. We next analyzed TCR delta rearrangements in five CD3+TCR gamma/delta+ ALL and cell lines. One T-ALL, which demonstrated a different staining pattern with monoclonal antibodies against the products of the TCR gamma/delta genes than the PEER cell line, rearranges J delta 1 to a currently unidentified variable region. Images PMID:2547833

  20. Delta Electroproduction in 12-C

    SciTech Connect

    Steven McLauchlan

    2003-01-31

    The Delta-nucleus potential is a crucial element in the understanding of the nuclear system. Previous electroexcitation measurements in the delta region reported a Q2 dependence of the delta mass indicating that this potential is dependent on the momentum of the delta. Such a dependence is not observed for protons and neutrons in the nuclear medium. This thesis presents the experimental study of the electroexcitation of the delta resonance in 12C, performed using the high energy electron beam at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, and the near 4(pie) acceptance detector CLAS that enables the detection of the full reaction final state. Inclusive, semi inclusive, and exclusive cross sections were measured with an incident electron beam energy of 1.162GeV over the Q2 range 0.175-0.475 (GeV/c)2. A Q2 dependence of the delta mass was only observed in the exclusive measurements indicating that the delta-nucleus potential is affected by the momentum of the delta.

  1. Morphologic and stratigraphic evolution of muddy ebb-tidal deltas along a subsiding coast: Barataria Bay, Mississippi River delta

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    FitzGerald, D.M.; Kulp, M.; Penland, S.; Flocks, J.; Kindinger, J.

    2004-01-01

    grows in dimensions, the proximal and distal tidal delta facies prograde seawards. Owing to the relatively low gradient of the inner continental shelf, the ebb-tidal delta lithosome is presently no more than 5 m thick and is generally only 2-3 m in thickness. The ebb delta sediment is sourced from deepening of the inlet and the associated channels and from the longshore sediment transport system. The final stage in the model envisages erosion and segmentation of the barrier chain, leading to a decrease in tidal discharge through the former major inlets. This process ultimately results in fine-grained sedimentation seaward of the inlets and the encasement of the ebb-tidal delta lithosome in mud. The ebb-tidal deltas along the Barataria coast are distinguished from most other ebb deltas along sand-rich coasts by their muddy content and lack of large-scale stratification produced by channel cut-and-fills and bar migration. ?? 2004 International Association of Sedimentologists.

  2. Rigidity of lattice domes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savelyev, V. A.

    1979-01-01

    The means of ensuring total rigidity of lattice domes, using comparison with solid shells of 1-3 layers are discussed. Irregularities of manufacture, processing, and other factors are considered, as they relate to diminution of rigidity. The discussion uses the concepts of upper and lower critical loads on the structure in question.

  3. Supersymmetry on the Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaich, David

    2016-03-01

    Lattice field theory provides a non-perturbative regularization of strongly interacting systems, which has proven crucial to the study of quantum chromodynamics among many other theories. Supersymmetry plays prominent roles in the study of physics beyond the standard model, both as an ingredient in model building and as a tool to improve our understanding of quantum field theory. Attempts to apply lattice techniques to supersymmetric field theories have a long history, but until recently these efforts have generally encountered insurmountable difficulties related to the interplay of supersymmetry with the lattice discretization of spacetime. In recent years these difficulties have been overcome for a class of theories that includes the particularly interesting case of maximally supersymmetric Yang-Mills (N = 4 SYM) in four dimensions, which is a cornerstone of AdS/CFT duality. In combination with computational advances this progress enables practical numerical investigations of N = 4 SYM on the lattice, which can address questions that are difficult or impossible to handle through perturbation theory, AdS/CFT duality, or the conformal bootstrap program. I will briefly review some of the new ideas underlying this recent progress, and present some results from ongoing large-scale numerical calculations, including comparisons with analytic predictions.

  4. Progress in lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Andreas S. Kronfeld

    2002-09-30

    After reviewing some of the mathematical foundations and numerical difficulties facing lattice QCD, I review the status of several calculations relevant to experimental high-energy physics. The topics considered are moments of structure functions, which may prove relevant to search for new phenomena at the LHC, and several aspects of flavor physics, which are relevant to understanding CP and flavor violation.

  5. The JKJ Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shigaki, Kenta; Noda, Fumiaki; Yamamoto, Kazami; Machida, Shinji; Molodojentsev, Alexander; Ishi, Yoshihiro

    2002-12-01

    The JKJ high-intensity proton accelerator facility consists of a 400-MeV linac, a 3-GeV 1-MW rapid-cycling synchrotron and a 50-GeV 0.75-MW synchrotron. The lattice and beam dynamics design of the two synchrotrons are reported.

  6. Fibonacci Optical Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Kevin; Geiger, Zachary; Senaratne, Ruwan; Rajagopal, Shankari; Fujiwara, Kurt; Weld, David; Weld Group Team

    2015-05-01

    Quasiperiodicity is intimately involved in quantum phenomena from localization to the quantum Hall effect. Recent experimental investigation of quasiperiodic quantum effects in photonic and electronic systems have revealed intriguing connections to topological phenomena. However, such experiments have been limited by the absence of techniques for creating tunable quasiperiodic structures. We propose a new type of quasiperiodic optical lattice, constructed by intersecting a Gaussian beam with a 2D square lattice at an angle with an irrational tangent. The resulting potential, a generalization of the Fibonacci lattice, is a physical realization of the mathematical ``cut-and-project'' construction which underlies all quasiperiodic structures. Calculation of the energies and wavefunctions of atoms loaded into the proposed quasiperiodic lattice demonstrate a fractal energy spectrum and the existence of edge states. We acknowledge support from the ONR (award N00014-14-1-0805), the ARO and the PECASE program (award W911NF-14-1-0154), the AFOSR (award FA9550-12-1-0305), and the Alfred P. Sloan foundation (grant BR2013-110).

  7. Shaken Lattice Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidner, Carrie; Yu, Hoon; Anderson, Dana

    2015-05-01

    This work introduces a method to perform interferometry using atoms trapped in an optical lattice. Starting at t = 0 with atoms in the ground state of a lattice potential V(x) =V0cos [ 2 kx + ϕ(t) ] , we show that it is possible to transform from one atomic wavefunction to another by a prescribed shaking of the lattice, i.e., by an appropriately tailored time-dependent phase shift ϕ(t) . In particular, the standard interferometer sequence of beam splitting, propagation, reflection, reverse propagation, and recombination can be achieved via a set of phase modulation operations {ϕj(t) } . Each ϕj(t) is determined using a learning algorithm, and the split-step method calculates the wavefunction dynamics. We have numerically demonstrated an interferometer in which the shaken wavefunctions match the target states to better than 1 % . We carried out learning using a genetic algorithm and optimal control techniques. The atoms remain trapped in the lattice throughout the full interferometer sequence. Thus, the approach may be suitable for use in an dynamic environment. In addition to the general principles, we discuss aspects of the experimental implementation. Supported by the Office of Naval Research (ONR) and Northrop Grumman.

  8. Mackenzie River Delta, Canada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    The Mackenzie River in the Northwest Territories, Canada, with its headstreams the Peace and Finley, is the longest river in North America at 4241 km, and drains an area of 1,805,000 square km. The large marshy delta provides habitat for migrating Snow Geese, Tundra Swans, Brant, and other waterfowl. The estuary is a calving area for Beluga whales. The Mackenzie (previously the Disappointment River) was named after Alexander Mackenzie who travelled the river while trying to reach the Pacific in 1789.

    The image was acquired on August 4, 2005, covers an area of 55.8 x 55.8 km, and is located at 68.6 degrees north latitude, 134.7 degrees west longitude.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  9. Thresholds of surface codes on the general lattice structures suffering biased error and loss

    SciTech Connect

    Tokunaga, Yuuki; Fujii, Keisuke

    2014-12-04

    A family of surface codes with general lattice structures is proposed. We can control the error tolerances against bit and phase errors asymmetrically by changing the underlying lattice geometries. The surface codes on various lattices are found to be efficient in the sense that their threshold values universally approach the quantum Gilbert-Varshamov bound. We find that the error tolerance of the surface codes depends on the connectivity of the underlying lattices; the error chains on a lattice of lower connectivity are easier to correct. On the other hand, the loss tolerance of the surface codes exhibits an opposite behavior; the logical information on a lattice of higher connectivity has more robustness against qubit loss. As a result, we come upon a fundamental trade-off between error and loss tolerances in the family of surface codes with different lattice geometries.

  10. Assembling Fibonacci anyons from a Z3 parafermion lattice model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoudenmire, E. M.; Clarke, David J.; Mong, Roger S. K.; Alicea, Jason

    2015-06-01

    Recent concrete proposals suggest it is possible to engineer a two-dimensional bulk phase supporting non-Abelian Fibonacci anyons out of Abelian fractional quantum Hall systems. The low-energy degrees of freedom of such setups can be modeled as Z3 parafermions "hopping" on a two-dimensional lattice. We use the density matrix renormalization group to study a model of this type interpolating between the decoupled-chain, triangular-lattice, and square-lattice limits. The results show clear evidence of the Fibonacci phase over a wide region of the phase diagram, most notably including the isotropic triangular-lattice point. We also study the broader phase diagram of this model and show that elsewhere it supports an Abelian state with semionic excitations.

  11. Fluctuating pancake vortices revealed by dissipation of Josephson vortex lattice.

    SciTech Connect

    Koshelev, A. E.; Buzdin, A. I.; Kakeya, I.; Yamamoto, T.; Kadowaki, K.

    2011-06-01

    In strongly anisotropic layered superconductors in tilted magnetic fields, the Josephson vortex lattice coexists with the lattice of pancake vortices. Due to the interaction between them, the dissipation of the Josephson vortex lattice is very sensitive to the presence of the pancake vortices. If the c-axis magnetic field is smaller than the corresponding lower critical field, the pancake stacks are not formed but the individual pancakes may exist in the fluctuational regime either near the surface in large-size samples or in the central region for small-size mesas. We calculate the contribution of such fluctuating pancake vortices to the c-axis conductivity of the Josephson vortex lattice and compare the theoretical results with measurements on small mesas fabricated out of Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+{delta}} crystals. A fingerprint of fluctuating pancakes is a characteristic exponential dependence of the c-axis conductivity observed experimentally. Our results provide strong evidence of the existence of the fluctuating pancakes and their influence on the Josephson vortex lattice dissipation.

  12. Flutter of pairs of aerodynamically interfering delta wings.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chipman, R. R.; Rauch, F. J.; Hess, R. W.

    1973-01-01

    To examine the effect on flutter of the aerodynamic interference between pairs of closely spaced delta wings, several structurally uncoupled 1/80th-scale models were studied by experiment and analysis. Flutter test boundaries obtained in NASA Langley's 26-in. transonic blowdown wind tunnel were compared with subsonic analytical results generated using the doublet lattice method. Trends for several combinations of vertical and longitudinal wing separation were determined, showing flutter speed significantly affected in the closely spaced configurations. A new flutter mechanism coupling one wing's first bending mode with the other wing's first torsion mode was predicted and observed.

  13. Artificial delta growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikeš, Daniel

    2010-05-01

    A deltaic sedimentary system has a point source; sediment is carried over the delta plain by distributary channels away from the point source and deposited at the delta front by distributary mouth bars. The established methods to describe such a sedimentary system are "bedding analysis", "facies analysis", and "basin analysis". We shall call the ambient conditions "input" and the rock record "output". There exist a number of methods to deduce input from output, e.g. "Sequence stratigraphy" (a.o. Vail et al. 1977, Catuneanu et al. 2009), "Shoreline trajectory" (a.o. Helland-Hansen & Martinsen 1996, Helland-Hansen & Hampson 2009) on the one hand and the complex use of established techniques on the other (a.o. Miall & Miall 2001, Miall & Miall 2002). None of these deductive methods seems to be sufficient. I claim that the common errors in all these attempts are the following: (1) a sedimentary system is four-dimensional (3+1) and a lesser dimensional analysis is insufficient; (2) a sedimentary system is complex and any empirical/deductive analysis is non-unique. The proper approach to the problem is therefore the theoretical/inductive analysis. To that end we performed six scenarios of a scaled version of a passive margin delta in a flume tank. The scenarios have identical stepwise tectonic subsidence and semi-cyclic sealevel, but different supply curves, i.e. supply is: constant, highly-frequent, proportional to sealevel, inversely proportional to sealevel, lagging to sealevel, ahead of sealevel. The preliminary results are indicative. Lobe-switching occurs frequently and hence locally sedimentation occurs shortly and hiatuses are substantial; therefore events in 2D (+1) cross-sections don't correlate temporally. The number of sedimentary cycles disequals the number of sealevel cycles. Lobe-switching and stepwise tectonic subsidence cause onlap/transgression. Erosional unconformities are local diachronous events, whereas maximum flooding surfaces are regional

  14. Lattice Quantum Chromodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachrajda, C. T.

    2016-10-01

    I review the the application of the lattice formulation of QCD and large-scale numerical simulations to the evaluation of non-perturbative hadronic effects in Standard Model Phenomenology. I present an introduction to the elements of the calculations and discuss the limitations both in the range of quantities which can be studied and in the precision of the results. I focus particularly on the extraction of the QCD parameters, i.e. the quark masses and the strong coupling constant, and on important quantities in flavour physics. Lattice QCD is playing a central role in quantifying the hadronic effects necessary for the development of precision flavour physics and its use in exploring the limits of the Standard Model and in searches for inconsistencies which would signal the presence of new physics.

  15. Introduction to lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, R.

    1998-12-31

    The goal of the lectures on lattice QCD (LQCD) is to provide an overview of both the technical issues and the progress made so far in obtaining phenomenologically useful numbers. The lectures consist of three parts. The author`s charter is to provide an introduction to LQCD and outline the scope of LQCD calculations. In the second set of lectures, Guido Martinelli will discuss the progress they have made so far in obtaining results, and their impact on Standard Model phenomenology. Finally, Martin Luescher will discuss the topical subjects of chiral symmetry, improved formulation of lattice QCD, and the impact these improvements will have on the quality of results expected from the next generation of simulations.

  16. Revisiting the microtrabecular lattice.

    PubMed

    Clegg, James S

    2010-11-01

    The 'microtrabecular lattice' (MTL) that Keith Porter described in the 1970s and 1980s is reconsidered as a proposed fundamental cytoplasmic structure of eukaryotic cells. Although considered to be an artefact by most cell biologists of his time (and probably ours), the case is made that something like the MTL may well exist, but in a much more dynamic form than images from electron microscopy imply and convey.

  17. Monomer-dimer problem on random planar honeycomb lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Haizhen; Zhang, Fuji; Qian, Jianguo

    2014-02-15

    We consider the monomer-dimer (MD) problem on a random planar honeycomb lattice model, namely, the random multiple chain. This is a lattice system with non-periodic boundary condition, whose generating process is inspired by the growth of single walled zigzag carbon nanotubes. By applying algebraic and combinatorial techniques we establish a calculating expression of the MD partition function for bipartite graphs, which corresponds to the permanent of a matrix. Further, by using the transfer matrix argument we show that the computing problem of the permanent of high order matrix can be converted into some lower order matrices for this family of lattices, based on which we derive an explicit recurrence formula for evaluating the MD partition function of multiple chains and random multiple chains. Finally, we analyze the expectation of the number of monomer-dimer arrangements on a random multiple chain and the asymptotic behavior of the annealed MD entropy when the multiple chain becomes infinite in width and length, respectively.

  18. Crystallographic Lattice Boltzmann Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namburi, Manjusha; Krithivasan, Siddharth; Ansumali, Santosh

    2016-06-01

    Current approaches to Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) are computationally quite expensive for most realistic scientific and engineering applications of Fluid Dynamics such as automobiles or atmospheric flows. The Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM), with its simplified kinetic descriptions, has emerged as an important tool for simulating hydrodynamics. In a heterogeneous computing environment, it is often preferred due to its flexibility and better parallel scaling. However, direct simulation of realistic applications, without the use of turbulence models, remains a distant dream even with highly efficient methods such as LBM. In LBM, a fictitious lattice with suitable isotropy in the velocity space is considered to recover Navier-Stokes hydrodynamics in macroscopic limit. The same lattice is mapped onto a cartesian grid for spatial discretization of the kinetic equation. In this paper, we present an inverted argument of the LBM, by making spatial discretization as the central theme. We argue that the optimal spatial discretization for LBM is a Body Centered Cubic (BCC) arrangement of grid points. We illustrate an order-of-magnitude gain in efficiency for LBM and thus a significant progress towards feasibility of DNS for realistic flows.

  19. Crystallographic Lattice Boltzmann Method.

    PubMed

    Namburi, Manjusha; Krithivasan, Siddharth; Ansumali, Santosh

    2016-01-01

    Current approaches to Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) are computationally quite expensive for most realistic scientific and engineering applications of Fluid Dynamics such as automobiles or atmospheric flows. The Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM), with its simplified kinetic descriptions, has emerged as an important tool for simulating hydrodynamics. In a heterogeneous computing environment, it is often preferred due to its flexibility and better parallel scaling. However, direct simulation of realistic applications, without the use of turbulence models, remains a distant dream even with highly efficient methods such as LBM. In LBM, a fictitious lattice with suitable isotropy in the velocity space is considered to recover Navier-Stokes hydrodynamics in macroscopic limit. The same lattice is mapped onto a cartesian grid for spatial discretization of the kinetic equation. In this paper, we present an inverted argument of the LBM, by making spatial discretization as the central theme. We argue that the optimal spatial discretization for LBM is a Body Centered Cubic (BCC) arrangement of grid points. We illustrate an order-of-magnitude gain in efficiency for LBM and thus a significant progress towards feasibility of DNS for realistic flows. PMID:27251098

  20. Crystallographic Lattice Boltzmann Method

    PubMed Central

    Namburi, Manjusha; Krithivasan, Siddharth; Ansumali, Santosh

    2016-01-01

    Current approaches to Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) are computationally quite expensive for most realistic scientific and engineering applications of Fluid Dynamics such as automobiles or atmospheric flows. The Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM), with its simplified kinetic descriptions, has emerged as an important tool for simulating hydrodynamics. In a heterogeneous computing environment, it is often preferred due to its flexibility and better parallel scaling. However, direct simulation of realistic applications, without the use of turbulence models, remains a distant dream even with highly efficient methods such as LBM. In LBM, a fictitious lattice with suitable isotropy in the velocity space is considered to recover Navier-Stokes hydrodynamics in macroscopic limit. The same lattice is mapped onto a cartesian grid for spatial discretization of the kinetic equation. In this paper, we present an inverted argument of the LBM, by making spatial discretization as the central theme. We argue that the optimal spatial discretization for LBM is a Body Centered Cubic (BCC) arrangement of grid points. We illustrate an order-of-magnitude gain in efficiency for LBM and thus a significant progress towards feasibility of DNS for realistic flows. PMID:27251098

  1. A Mechanical Lattice Aid for Crystallography Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amezcua-Lopez, J.; Cordero-Borboa, A. E.

    1988-01-01

    Introduces a 3-dimensional mechanical lattice with adjustable telescoping mechanisms. Discusses the crystalline state, the 14 Bravais lattices, operational principles of the mechanical lattice, construction methods, and demonstrations in classroom. Provides lattice diagrams, schemes of the lattice, and various pictures of the lattice. (YP)

  2. A lattice-free concept lattice update algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Outrata, Jan

    2016-02-01

    Upon a change of input data, one usually wants an update of output computed from the data rather than recomputing the whole output over again. In Formal Concept Analysis, update of concept lattice of input data when introducing new objects to the data can be done by any of the so-called incremental algorithms for computing concept lattice. The algorithms use and update the lattice while introducing new objects to input data one by one. The present concept lattice of input data without the new objects is thus required by the computation. However, the lattice can be large and may not fit into memory. In this paper, we propose an efficient algorithm for updating the lattice from the present and new objects only, not requiring the possibly large concept lattice of present objects. The algorithm results as a modification of the Close-by-One algorithm for computing the set of all formal concepts, or its modifications like Fast Close-by-One, Parallel Close-by-One or Parallel Fast Close-by-One, to compute new and modified formal concepts and the changes of the lattice order relation only. The algorithm can be used not only for updating the lattice when new objects are introduced but also when some existing objects are removed from the input data or attributes of the objects are changed. We describe the algorithm, discuss efficiency issues and present an experimental evaluation of its performance and a comparison with the AddIntent incremental algorithm for computing concept lattice.

  3. Graphene, Lattice Field Theory and Symmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Drissi, L. B.; Bousmina, M.; Saidi, E. H.

    2011-02-15

    Borrowing ideas from tight binding model, we propose a board class of lattice field models that are classified by non simply laced Lie algebras. In the case of A{sub N-1{approx_equal}}su(N) series, we show that the couplings between the quantum states living at the first nearest neighbor sites of the lattice L{sub suN} are governed by the complex fundamental representations N-bar and N of su(N) and the second nearest neighbor interactions are described by its adjoint N-bar x N. The lattice models associated with the leading su(2), su(3), and su(4) cases are explicitly studied and their fermionic field realizations are given. It is also shown that the su(2) and su(3) models describe the electronic properties of the acetylene chain and the graphene, respectively. It is established as well that the energy dispersion of the first nearest neighbor couplings is completely determined by the A{sub N} roots {alpha} through the typical dependence N/2+{Sigma}{sub roots} cos(k.{alpha} with k the wave vector.Other features such as the SO(2N) extension and other applications are also discussed.

  4. Lattice-induced nonadiabatic frequency shifts in optical lattice clocks

    SciTech Connect

    Beloy, K.

    2010-09-15

    We consider the frequency shift in optical lattice clocks which arises from the coupling of the electronic motion to the atomic motion within the lattice. For the simplest of three-dimensional lattice geometries this coupling is shown to affect only clocks based on blue-detuned lattices. We have estimated the size of this shift for the prospective strontium lattice clock operating at the 390-nm blue-detuned magic wavelength. The resulting fractional frequency shift is found to be on the order of 10{sup -18} and is largely overshadowed by the electric quadrupole shift. For lattice clocks based on more complex geometries or other atomic systems, this shift could potentially be a limiting factor in clock accuracy.

  5. Delta and Omega masses in a three-quark covariant Faddeev approach

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchis-Alepuz, Helios; Villalba-Chavez, Selym; Alkofer, Reinhard; Eichmann, Gernot

    2011-11-01

    We present the solution of the Poincare-covariant Faddeev equation for the {Delta}(1232) and {Omega}(1672) baryons. The covariant structure of the corresponding baryon amplitudes and their decomposition in terms of internal spin and orbital angular momentum is explicitly derived. The interaction kernel is truncated to a rainbow-ladder dressed-gluon exchange such that chiral symmetry and its dynamical breaking are correctly implemented. The resulting physical masses agree reasonably with experiment and their evolution with the pion mass compares favorably with lattice calculations. Evidence for the nonsphericity of the {Delta} resonance is discussed as well.

  6. Single identities for lattice theory and for weakly associative lattices

    SciTech Connect

    McCune, W.; Padmanabhan, R.

    1995-03-13

    We present a single identity for the variety of all lattices that is much simpler than those previously known to us. We also show that the variety of weakly associative lattices is one-based, and we present a generalized one-based theorem for subvarieties of weakly associative lattices that can be defined with absorption laws. The automated theorem-proving program OTTER was used in substantial way to obtain the results.

  7. LocalMove: computing on-lattice fits for biopolymers

    PubMed Central

    Ponty, Y.; Istrate, R.; Porcelli, E.; Clote, P.

    2008-01-01

    Given an input Protein Data Bank file (PDB) for a protein or RNA molecule, LocalMove is a web server that determines an on-lattice representation for the input biomolecule. The web server implements a Markov Chain Monte-Carlo algorithm with simulated annealing to compute an approximate fit for either the coarse-grain model or backbone model on either the cubic or face-centered cubic lattice. LocalMove returns a PDB file as output, as well as dynamic movie of 3D images of intermediate conformations during the computation. The LocalMove server is publicly available at http://bioinformatics.bc.edu/clotelab/localmove/. PMID:18556754

  8. Engineered nonlinear lattices.

    PubMed

    Clausen, C B; Christiansen, P L; Torner, L; Gaididei, Y B

    1999-11-01

    We show that with the quasi-phase-matching technique it is possible to fabricate stripes of nonlinearity that trap and guide light like waveguides. We investigate an array of such stripes and find that when the stripes are sufficiently narrow, the beam dynamics is governed by a quadratic nonlinear discrete equation. The proposed structure therefore provides an experimental setting for exploring discrete effects in a controlled manner. In particular, we show propagation of breathers that are eventually trapped by discreteness. When the stripes are wide the beams evolve in a structure we term a quasilattice, which interpolates between a lattice system and a continuous system. PMID:11970457

  9. Lattice QCD determination of patterns of excited baryon states

    SciTech Connect

    Basak, Subhasish; Edwards, R. G.; Richards, D. G.; Fleming, G. T.; Juge, K. J.; Lichtl, A.; Morningstar, C.; Sato, I.; Wallace, S. J.

    2007-10-01

    Energies for excited isospin I=(1/2) and I=(3/2) states that include the nucleon and {delta} families of baryons are computed using quenched, anisotropic lattices. Baryon interpolating field operators that are used include nonlocal operators that provide G{sub 2} irreducible representations of the octahedral group. The decomposition of spin (5/2) or higher spin states is realized for the first time in a lattice QCD calculation. We observe patterns of degenerate energies in the irreducible representations of the octahedral group that correspond to the subduction of the continuum spin (5/2) or higher. The overall pattern of low-lying excited states corresponds well to the pattern of physical states subduced to the irreducible representations of the octahedral group.

  10. Lattice QCD determination of patterns of excited baryon states

    SciTech Connect

    Subhasish Basak; Robert Edwards; George Fleming; Keisuke Juge; Adam Lichtl; Colin Morningstar; David Richards; Ikuro Sato; Stephen Wallace

    2007-10-01

    Energies for excited isospin I = 1/2 and I = 3/2 states that include the nucleon and Delta families of baryons are computed using quenched, anisotropic lattices. Baryon interpolating field operators that are used include nonlocal operators that provide G2 irreducible representations of the octahedral group. The decomposition of spin 5/2 or higher spin states is realized for the first time in a lattice QCD calculation. We observe patterns of degenerate energies in the irreducible representations of the octahedral group that correspond to the subduction of the continuum spin 5/2 or higher. The overall pattern of low-lying excited states corresponds well to the pattern of physical states subduced to the irreducible representations of the octahedral group.

  11. Quantum spin chains with fractional revival

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genest, Vincent X.; Vinet, Luc; Zhedanov, Alexei

    2016-08-01

    A systematic study of fractional revival at two sites in XX quantum spin chains is presented. Analytic models with this phenomenon are obtained by combining two basic ways of realizing fractional revival in a spin chain. The first proceeds through isospectral deformations of spin chains with perfect state transfer. The second makes use of couplings provided by the recurrence coefficients of polynomials with a bi-lattice orthogonality grid. The latter method leads to analytic models previously identified that can exhibit perfect state transfer in addition to fractional revival.

  12. STM Studies of Near-Optimal Doped Bi_2Sr_2CaCu_2O_8 delta

    SciTech Connect

    Kapitulnik, Aharon

    2010-04-05

    In this paper we summarize our STM studies of the density of electronic states in nearly optimally doped Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8 + {delta}} in zero field. We report on the inhomogeneity of the gap structure, density of states modulations with four-lattice constant period, and coherence peak modulation.

  13. Nucleon, Delta and Omega excited state spectra at three pion mass values

    SciTech Connect

    John Bulava, Robert G. Edwards, Balint Joo, David G. Richards, Eric Engelson, Huey-Wen Lin, Colin Morningstar, Stephen J. Wallace

    2010-06-01

    The energies of the excited states of the Nucleon, Delta and Omega are computed in lattice QCD, using two light quarks and one strange quark on anisotropic lattices. The calculations are performed at three values of the pion mass: 392(4), 438(3) and 521(3) MeV. We employ the variational method with a basis of about ten interpolating operators enabling six energies to be distinguished clearly in each irreducible representation of the octahedral group. We compare our calculations of nucleon excited states with the low-lying experimental spectrum. There is reasonable agreement for the pattern of states.

  14. Two Nucleons on a Lattice

    SciTech Connect

    S.R. Beane; P.F.Bedaque; A. Parreno; M.J. Savage

    2004-04-01

    The two-nucleon sector is near an infrared fixed point of QCD and as a result the S-wave scattering lengths are unnaturally large compared to the effective ranges and shape parameters. It is usually assumed that a lattice QCD simulation of the two-nucleon sector will require a lattice that is much larger than the scattering lengths in order to extract quantitative information. In this paper we point out that this does not have to be the case: lattice QCD simulations on much smaller lattices will produce rigorous results for nuclear physics.

  15. Nuclear Physics and Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Beane, Silas

    2003-11-01

    Impressive progress is currently being made in computing properties and interac- tions of the low-lying hadrons using lattice QCD. However, cost limitations will, for the foreseeable future, necessitate the use of quark masses, Mq, that are signif- icantly larger than those of nature, lattice spacings, a, that are not significantly smaller than the physical scale of interest, and lattice sizes, L, that are not sig- nificantly larger than the physical scale of interest. Extrapolations in the quark masses, lattice spacing and lattice volume are therefore required. The hierarchy of mass scales is: L 1 j Mq j â ºC j a 1 . The appropriate EFT for incorporating the light quark masses, the finite lattice spacing and the lattice size into hadronic observables is C-PT, which provides systematic expansions in the small parame- ters e m L, 1/ Lâ ºC, p/â ºC, Mq/â ºC and aâ ºC . The lattice introduces other unphysical scales as well. Lattice QCD quarks will increasingly be artificially separated

  16. Electric Polarizability of Neutral Hadrons from Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Joe Christensen; Walter Wilcox; Frank X. Lee; Leming Zhou

    2004-08-01

    By simulating a uniform electric field on a lattice and measuring the change in the rest mass, we calculate the electric polarizability of neutral mesons and baryons using the methods of quenched lattice QCD. Specifically, we measure the electric polarizability coefficient from the quadratic response to the electric field for 10 particles: the vector mesons {rho}{sup 0} and K{sup *0}; the octet baryons n, {Sigma}{sup 0}, {Lambda}{sub o}{sup 0}, {Lambda}{sub s}{sup 0}, and {Xi}{sup 0}; and the decouplet baryons {Delta}{sup 0}, {Sigma}{sup 0}, and {Xi}{sup 0}. Independent calculations using two fermion actions were done for consistency and comparison purposes. One calculation uses Wilson fermions with a lattice spacing of a = 0.10 fm. The other uses tadpole improved Luesher-Weiss gauge fields and clover quark action with a lattice spacing a = 0.17 fm. Our results for neutron electric polarizability are compared to experiment.

  17. The DELTA Synchrotron Light Interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Berges, U.

    2004-05-12

    Synchrotron radiation sources like DELTA, the Dortmund Electron Accelerator, a third generation synchrotron light source, need an optical monitoring system to measure the beam size at different points of the ring with high resolution and accuracy. These measurements also allow an investigation of the emittance of the storage ring, an important working parameter for the efficiency of working beamlines with experiments using the synchrotron radiation. The resolution limits of the different types of optical synchrotron light monitors at DELTA are investigated. The minimum measurable beamsize with the normal synchrotron light monitor using visible light at DELTA is about 80 {mu}m. Due to this a synchrotron light interferometer was built up and tested at DELTA. The interferometer uses the same beamline in the visible range. The minimum measurable beamsize is with about 8 {mu}m one order of magnitude smaller. This resolution is sufficient for the expected small vertical beamsizes at DELTA. The electron beamsize and emittance were measured with both systems at different electron beam energies of the storage ring. The theoretical values of the present optics are smaller than the measured emittance. So possible reasons for beam movements are investigated.

  18. Nucleon structure in lattice QCD with dynamical domain-wall fermions quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Huey-Wen Lin; Shigemi Ohta

    2006-07-23

    We report RBC and RBC/UKQCD lattice QCD numerical calculations of nucleon electroweak matrix elements with dynamical domain-wall fermions (DWF) quarks. The first, RBC, set of dynamical DWF ensembles employs two degenerate flavors of DWF quarks and the DBW2 gauge action. Three sea quark mass values of 0.04, 0.03 and 0.02 in lattice units are used with about 200 gauge configurations each. The lattice cutoff is about 1.7 GeV and the spatial volume is about (1.9 fm){sup 3}. Despite the small volume, the ratio of the isovector vector and axial charges g{sub A}/g{sub V} and that of structure function moments {sub u-d}/{sub {Delta} u - {Delta} d} are in agreement with experiment, and show only very mild quark mass dependence. The second, RBC/UK, set of ensembles employs one strange and two degenerate (up and down) dynamical DWF quarks and Iwasaki gauge action. The strange quark mass is set at 0.04, and three up/down mass values of 0.03, 0.02 and 0.01 in lattice units are used. The lattice cutoff is about 1.6 GeV and the spatial volume is about (3.0 fm){sup 3}. Even with preliminary statistics of 25-30 gauge configurations, the ratios g{sub A}/g{sub V} and {sub u-d}/{sub {Delta} u - {Delta} d} are consistent with experiment and show only very mild quark mass dependence. Another structure function moment, d{sub 1}, though yet to be renormalized, appears small in both sets.

  19. NUCLEON STRUCTURE IN LATTICE QCD WITH DYNAMICAL DOMAIN--WALL FERMIONS QUARKS.

    SciTech Connect

    LIN H.-W.; OHTA, S.

    2006-10-02

    We report RBC and RBC/UKQCD lattice QCD numerical calculations of nucleon electroweak matrix elements with dynamical domain-wall fermions (DWF) quarks. The first, RBC, set of dynamical DWF ensembles employs two degenerate flavors of DWF quarks and the DBW2 gauge action. Three sea quark mass values of 0.04, 0.03 and 0.02 in lattice units are used with 220 gauge configurations each. The lattice cutoff is a{sup -1} {approx} 1.7GeV and the spatial volume is about (1.9fm){sup 3}. Despite the small volume, the ratio of the isovector vector and axial charges g{sub A}/g{sub V} and that of structure function moments {sub u-d}/{sub {Delta}u-{Delta}d} are in agreement with experiment, and show only very mild quark mass dependence. The second, RBC/UK, set of ensembles employs one strange and two degenerate (up and down) dynamical DWF quarks and Iwasaki gauge action. The strange quark mass is set at 0.04, and three up/down mass values of 0.03, 0.02 and 0.01 in lattice units are used. The lattice cutoff is a{sup -1} {approx} 1.6GeV and the spatial volume is about (3.0fm){sup 3}. Even with preliminary statistics of 25-30 gauge configurations, the ratios g{sub A}/g{sub V} and {sub u-d}/{sub {Delta}u-{Delta}d} are consistent with experiment and show only very mild quark mass dependence. Another structure function moment, d{sub 1}, though yet to be renormalized, appears small in both sets.

  20. Quantum magnetism on kagome lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Zhihao

    The spin 1/2 Heisenberg antiferromagnet on kagome (a planar lattice of corner sharing triangles) is one of the most celebrated models of a strongly correlated system. Despite intensive studies, the physics of its ground state and excitations remains unsettled. Recently, researchers successfully synthesized and characterized several new materials described by this model. It is hoped that the longstanding problem can be finally resolved through combined efforts of experimentalists, material scientists and theorists. In this thesis, we present a physical picture of the low energy physics of kagome. We demonstrate that there are N/3 fermionic particles on a kagome of N sites. The motion of these particles is strongly constrained. They are bound into small bosonic states by strong pair-wise attractions. The "antiparticle" also exists and a particle-antiparticle pair can be created at energy cost 0.218J. Low energy spin 1 excitations correspond to breaking a bound state into two free particles at energy cost 0.06J. This is the physical mechanism of the kagome spin gap. Our physical picture finds several applications. The dynamical structure factor of pair-breaking processes on kagome is computed. We assume the bound states are independent thanks to their small sizes. The result agrees well with the recent inelastic neutron scattering measurement conducted on herbertsmithite, a kagome antiferromagnet. In the second application, we study the effect of Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya (DM) interaction. DM interaction is important for low energy physics on kagome since the ground state of the dominate exchange interaction is highly degenerated. Through analytical and numerical arguments, it is determined that the vacuum become unstable to creation of particle-antiparticle pairs at critical strength D of DM interaction on the sawtooth chain, a chain of corner sharing triangles. We speculate that the mechanism is behind the numerically observed quantum phase transition at finite D on

  1. Geologic maps of the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Atwater, Brian F.

    1982-01-01

    The Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, the arm of the San Francisco Bay estuary that reaches into the Central Valley of California, differs from typical coastal-plain deltas in three important respects.  First, rather than meeting the ocean individually and directly, all major waterways of this delta discharge via a single constricted outlet into a chain of estuarine bays and straits.  Second, in the most common vertical sequence of deposits, peat and mud deposited in tidal marshes and swamps (tidal wetlands) directly overlie alluvium or eolian sand, a sequence recording a landward spread of tidal environments rather than the seaward migration of fluvial environments that is typical of coastal-plain deltas (Cosby, 1941, p. 43; Thompson, 1957, p. 12; Shlemon and Begg, 1975, p. 259; Atwater and Belknap, 1980).  Finally, intensive human use has led to a peculiar set of conflicts involving rights to water and responsibilities for flood-control levees (Kockelman and other, 1982).

  2. Elimination of spurious lattice fermion solutions and noncompact lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, T.D.

    1997-09-22

    It is well known that the Dirac equation on a discrete hyper-cubic lattice in D dimension has 2{sup D} degenerate solutions. The usual method of removing these spurious solutions encounters difficulties with chiral symmetry when the lattice spacing l {ne} 0, as exemplified by the persistent problem of the pion mass. On the other hand, we recall that in any crystal in nature, all the electrons do move in a lattice and satisfy the Dirac equation; yet there is not a single physical result that has ever been entangled with a spurious fermion solution. Therefore it should not be difficult to eliminate these unphysical elements. On a discrete lattice, particle hop from point to point, whereas in a real crystal the lattice structure in embedded in a continuum and electrons move continuously from lattice cell to lattice cell. In a discrete system, the lattice functions are defined only on individual points (or links as in the case of gauge fields). However, in a crystal the electron state vector is represented by the Bloch wave functions which are continuous functions in {rvec {gamma}}, and herein lies one of the essential differences.

  3. Interacting fermions in one-dimensional disordered lattices: Exploring localization and transport properties with lattice density-functional theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vettchinkina, V.; Kartsev, A.; Karlsson, D.; Verdozzi, C.

    2013-03-01

    We investigate the static and dynamical behavior of one-dimensional interacting fermions in disordered Hubbard chains contacted to semi-infinite leads. The chains are described via the repulsive Anderson-Hubbard Hamiltonian, using static and time-dependent lattice density-functional theory. The dynamical behavior of our quantum transport system is studied using an integration scheme available in the literature, which we modify via the recursive Lanczos method to increase its efficiency. To quantify the degree of localization due to disorder and interactions, we adapt the definition of the inverse participation ratio to obtain an indicator which is suitable for quantum transport geometries and can be obtained within density-functional theory. Lattice density-functional theories are reviewed and, for contacted chains, we analyze the merits and limits of the coherent-potential approximation in describing the spectral properties, with interactions included via lattice density-functional theory. Our approach appears to be able to capture complex features due to the competition between disorder and interactions. Specifically, we find a dynamical enhancement of delocalization in the presence of a finite bias and an increase of the steady-state current induced by interparticle interactions. This behavior is corroborated by results for the time-dependent densities and for the inverse participation ratio. Using short isolated chains with interaction and disorder, a brief comparative analysis between time-dependent density-functional theory and exact results is then given, followed by general concluding remarks.

  4. Optical Abelian lattice gauge theories

    SciTech Connect

    Tagliacozzo, L.; Celi, A.; Zamora, A.; Lewenstein, M.

    2013-03-15

    We discuss a general framework for the realization of a family of Abelian lattice gauge theories, i.e., link models or gauge magnets, in optical lattices. We analyze the properties of these models that make them suitable for quantum simulations. Within this class, we study in detail the phases of a U(1)-invariant lattice gauge theory in 2+1 dimensions, originally proposed by P. Orland. By using exact diagonalization, we extract the low-energy states for small lattices, up to 4 Multiplication-Sign 4. We confirm that the model has two phases, with the confined entangled one characterized by strings wrapping around the whole lattice. We explain how to study larger lattices by using either tensor network techniques or digital quantum simulations with Rydberg atoms loaded in optical lattices, where we discuss in detail a protocol for the preparation of the ground-state. We propose two key experimental tests that can be used as smoking gun of the proper implementation of a gauge theory in optical lattices. These tests consist in verifying the absence of spontaneous (gauge) symmetry breaking of the ground-state and the presence of charge confinement. We also comment on the relation between standard compact U(1) lattice gauge theory and the model considered in this paper. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We study the quantum simulation of dynamical gauge theories in optical lattices. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We focus on digital simulation of abelian lattice gauge theory. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We rediscover and discuss the puzzling phase diagram of gauge magnets. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We detail the protocol for time evolution and ground-state preparation in any phase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We provide two experimental tests to validate gauge theory quantum simulators.

  5. Chain Gang

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    6 August 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a chain of clustered and battered craters. These were formed by secondary impact. That is, somewhere to the south (beyond the bottom of this image), a large impact crater formed. When this occurred, material ejected from the crater was thrown tens to hundreds of kilometers away. This material then impacted the martian surface, forming clusters and chains of smaller craters.

    Location near: 15.8oN, 35.6oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Northern Spring

  6. Effect of chain stiffness on polymer properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luettmer-Strathmann, Jutta

    2008-03-01

    Static and dynamic properties of polymers are affected by the stiffness of the chains. In this work, we investigate structural and thermodynamic properties of a lattice model for semiflexible polymer chains. The model is an extension of Shaffer's bond- fluctuation model and includes attractive interactions between monomers and an adjustable bending penalty that determines the Kuhn segment length. For isolated chains, a competition between monomer-monomer interactions and bending penalties determines the chain conformations at low temperatures. For dense melts, packing effects play an important role in the structure and thermodynamics of the polymeric liquid. In order to investigate static properties as a function of temperature and chain stiffness, we perform Wang-Landau type simulations and construct densities of states over the two-dimensional state space of monomer-monomer and bending contributions to the internal energy.

  7. Direct Tunneling Delay Time Measurement in an Optical Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortun, A.; Cabrera-Gutiérrez, C.; Condon, G.; Michon, E.; Billy, J.; Guéry-Odelin, D.

    2016-07-01

    We report on the measurement of the time required for a wave packet to tunnel through the potential barriers of an optical lattice. The experiment is carried out by loading adiabatically a Bose-Einstein condensate into a 1D optical lattice. A sudden displacement of the lattice by a few tens of nanometers excites the micromotion of the dipole mode. We then directly observe in momentum space the splitting of the wave packet at the turning points and measure the delay between the reflected and the tunneled packets for various initial displacements. Using this atomic beam splitter twice, we realize a chain of coherent micron-size Mach-Zehnder interferometers at the exit of which we get essentially a wave packet with a negative momentum, a result opposite to the prediction of classical physics.

  8. Tight-binding lattices with an oscillating imaginary gauge field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longhi, Stefano

    2016-08-01

    We consider non-Hermitian dynamics of a quantum particle hopping on a one-dimensional tight-binding lattice made of N sites with asymmetric hopping rates induced by a time-periodic oscillating imaginary gauge field. A deeply different behavior is found depending on the lattice topology. While in a linear chain (open boundary conditions) an oscillating field can lead to a complex quasienergy spectrum via a multiple parametric resonance; in a ring topology (Born-von Karman periodic boundary conditions) an entirely real quasienergy spectrum can be found and the dynamics is pseudo-Hermitian. In the large-N limit, parametric instability and pseudo-Hermitian dynamics in the two different lattice topologies are physically explained on the basis of a simple picture of wave-packet propagation.

  9. Direct Tunneling Delay Time Measurement in an Optical Lattice.

    PubMed

    Fortun, A; Cabrera-Gutiérrez, C; Condon, G; Michon, E; Billy, J; Guéry-Odelin, D

    2016-07-01

    We report on the measurement of the time required for a wave packet to tunnel through the potential barriers of an optical lattice. The experiment is carried out by loading adiabatically a Bose-Einstein condensate into a 1D optical lattice. A sudden displacement of the lattice by a few tens of nanometers excites the micromotion of the dipole mode. We then directly observe in momentum space the splitting of the wave packet at the turning points and measure the delay between the reflected and the tunneled packets for various initial displacements. Using this atomic beam splitter twice, we realize a chain of coherent micron-size Mach-Zehnder interferometers at the exit of which we get essentially a wave packet with a negative momentum, a result opposite to the prediction of classical physics. PMID:27419545

  10. Excitonic surface lattice resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humphrey, A. D.; Gentile, M. J.; Barnes, W. L.

    2016-08-01

    Electromagnetic resonances are important in controlling light at the nanoscale. The most studied such resonance is the surface plasmon resonance that is associated with metallic nanostructures. Here we explore an alternative resonance, the surface exciton-polariton resonance, one based on excitonic molecular materials. Our study is based on analytical and numerical modelling. We show that periodic arrays of suitable molecular nanoparticles may support surface lattice resonances that arise as a result of coherent interactions between the particles. Our results demonstrate that excitonic molecular materials are an interesting alternative to metals for nanophotonics; they offer the prospect of both fabrication based on supramolecular chemistry and optical functionality arising from the way the properties of such materials may be controlled with light.

  11. A study of the N to Delta transition form factors in full QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Constantia Alexandrou; Robert Edwards; Giannis Koutsou; Theodoros Leontiou; Hartmut Neff; John W. Negele; Wolfram Schroers; Antonios Tsapalis

    2005-07-01

    The N to Delta transition form factors GM1, GE2 and GC2 are evaluated using dynamical MILC configurations and valence domain wall fermions at three values of quark mass corresponding to pion mass 606 MeV, 502 MeV and 364 MeV on lattices of spatial size 20{sup 3} and 28{sup 3}. The unquenched results are compared to those obtained at similar pion mass in the quenched theory.

  12. Interphases of chain molecules: Monolayers and lipid bilayer membranes

    PubMed Central

    Dill, Ken A.; Flory, Paul J.

    1980-01-01

    Using the lattice model for a liquid, we treat the packing of short-chain molecules in interphases such as bilayer membranes. The constant density in the interphase imposes intermolecular constraints on the configurations of the flexible chains. The statistical theory here presented predicts a diffuse distribution of chain ends near the bilayer midplane; no adjustable parameters are required. Inasmuch as some of the chains terminate relatively near the polar interface, the number of chains reaching deeper planar layers is diminished. Consequently, configurational freedom increases with depth. This is the source of the well-known disorder gradient. PMID:16592834

  13. Buckling modes in pantographic lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giorgio, Ivan; Della Corte, Alessandro; dell'Isola, Francesco; Steigmann, David J.

    2016-07-01

    We study buckling patterns in pantographic sheets, regarded as two-dimensional continua consisting of lattices of continuously distributed fibers. The fibers are modeled as beams endowed with elastic resistance to stretching, shearing, bending and twist. Included in the theory is a non-standard elasticity due to geodesic bending of the fibers relative to the lattice surface. xml:lang="fr"

  14. The E3 ubiquitin ligase WWP1 regulates {Delta}Np63-dependent transcription through Lys63 linkages

    SciTech Connect

    Peschiaroli, Angelo; Scialpi, Flavia; Bernassola, Francesca; Sherbini, El Said El; Melino, Gerry

    2010-11-12

    Research highlights: {yields} WWP1 ubiquitylates {Delta}Np63 through conjugation of Lys63-linked poly-ubiquitin chains. {yields} WWP1 does not control {Delta}Np63 protein stability. {yields} WWP1 regulates {Delta}Np63-dependent transcription. -- Abstract: The transcription factor p63, a member of the p53 family, plays a crucial role in epithelial development and tumorigenesis through the regulation of epithelial progenitor cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. Similarly to p53, p63 activity is regulated by post-translational modifications, including ubiquitylation. Here, we report that the WWP1 E3 ubiquitin ligase binds specifically to {Delta}Np63 isoform but it does not trigger {Delta}Np63 proteasome-dependent degradation. Accordingly, we found that WWP1-dependent ubiquitylation of {Delta}Np63 occurs through the formation of Lys63-linked poly-ubiquitin chains. Importantly, we found that WWP1 is able to increase {Delta}Np63-dependent transcription and depletion of WWP1 in human primary keratinocytes induces cell cycle arrest. All together these results indicate that WWP1 regulates {Delta}Np63 transcriptional activity, acting thus as a potential regulator of the proliferation and survival of epithelial-derived cells.

  15. Human TCR-gamma+/delta+, CD8+ T lymphocytes recognize tetanus toxoid in an MHC-restricted fashion

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    We have analyzed the ability of human gamma+/delta+ T cells to recognize a nominal antigen in association with MHC molecules. A TT- specific T cell line with approximately 40% gamma+/delta+ T cells was established from a hyperimmunized donor, D.F., by stimulation with antigen and autologous APC. Three DF-derived gamma+/delta+ clones were CD8+ as determined by immunofluorescence staining, and by Southern and Northern blotting with probes detecting delta chain rearrangement and delta and gamma chain transcripts, respectively. The gamma+/delta+ clones responded to stimulation with TT, but not TNP-BSA, and autologous APC by proliferation and IFN-gamma production. No proliferation or IFN-gamma production was detected when TT-specific T cell clones were stimulated with either TT or autologous APC only. The response to TT was enhanced by addition of exogenous IL-2. The use of allogeneic APC from 19 donors sharing one HLA-determinant with the autologous donor D.F., showed that the gamma+/delta+ T cells responded to TT with HLA-DR4-related restriction as measured by proliferation and IFN-gamma production. These results demonstrate that gamma/delta receptors can recognize non-MHC-encoded foreign antigen in a self-MHC- restricted fashion. PMID:2469770

  16. Side-chain entropy and packing in proteins.

    PubMed

    Bromberg, S; Dill, K A

    1994-07-01

    What role does side-chain packing play in protein stability and structure? To address this question, we compare a lattice model with side chains (SCM) to a linear lattice model without side chains (LCM). Self-avoiding configurations are enumerated in 2 and 3 dimensions exhaustively for short chains and by Monte Carlo sampling for chains up to 50 main-chain monomers long. This comparison shows that (1) side-chain degrees of freedom increase the entropy of open conformations, but side-chain steric exclusion decreases the entropy of compact conformations, thus producing a substantial entropy that opposes folding; (2) there is side-chain "freezing" or ordering, i.e., a sharp decrease in entropy, near maximum compactness; and (3) the different types of contacts among side chains (s) and main-chain elements (m) have different frequencies, and the frequencies have different dependencies on compactness. mm contacts contribute significantly only at high densities, suggesting that main-chain hydrogen bonding in proteins may be promoted by compactness. The distributions of mm, ms, and ss contacts in compact SCM configurations are similar to the distributions in protein structures in the Brookhaven Protein Data Bank. We propose that packing in proteins is more like the packing of nuts and bolts in a jar than like the pairwise matching of jigsaw puzzle pieces. PMID:7920265

  17. Moving lattice kinks and pulses: an inverse method.

    PubMed

    Flach, S; Zolotaryuk, Y; Kladko, K

    1999-05-01

    We develop a general mapping from given kink or pulse shaped traveling-wave solutions including their velocity to the equations of motion on one-dimensional lattices which support these solutions. We apply this mapping-by definition an inverse method-to acoustic solitons in chains with nonlinear intersite interactions, nonlinear Klein-Gordon chains, reaction-diffusion equations, and discrete nonlinear Schrödinger systems. Potential functions can be found in a unique way provided the pulse shape is reflection symmetric and pulse and kink shapes are at least C2 functions. For kinks we discuss the relation of our results to the problem of a Peierls-Nabarro potential and continuous symmetries. We then generalize our method to higher dimensional lattices for reaction-diffusion systems. We find that increasing also the number of components easily allows for moving solutions.

  18. Chimeras of Delta6-fatty acid and Delta8-sphingolipid desaturases.

    PubMed

    Libisch, B; Michaelson, L V; Lewis, M J; Shewry, P R; Napier, J A

    2000-12-29

    The Borago officinalis Delta6 fatty acid desaturase (Boofd6) shares 58% identity in its amino acid sequence with Boofd8, a Delta8 sphingolipid desaturase from the same plant species. In order to localise the distinct catalytic properties of Boofd6 and Boofd8 to individual regions within them, a set of chimeras of these two enzymes were constructed and expressed in yeast. Chimera 2 is different from the other chimeras and Boofd6 in that it did not have any detectable desaturase activity on 18 carbon fatty acids. However, it desaturated C16 palmitoleic and C14 myristoleic acid, and the conversion rate for the later one was more than three times higher than that of Boofd6. These results suggest that the predicted membrane helices 1 and 2 of Boofd6 are involved in forming the substrate-binding site. This site appears to place constraints on the chain length of fatty acid substrates, which is similar to hydrophobic substrate binding pockets. PMID:11162428

  19. Delta launch vehicle inertial guidance system (DIGS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duck, K. I.

    1973-01-01

    The Delta inertial guidance system, part of the Delta launch vehicle improvement effort, has been flown on three launches and was found to perform as expected for a variety of mission profiles and vehicle configurations.

  20. MATRIX PRODUCT VARIATIONAL FORMULATION FOR LATTICE GAUGE THEORY.

    SciTech Connect

    SUGIHARA,T.

    2004-09-21

    For hamiltonian lattice gauge theory, we introduce the matrix product ansatz inspired from density matrix renormalization group. In this method, wavefunction of the target state is assumed to be a product of finite matrices. As a result, the energy becomes a simple function of the matrices, which can be evaluated using a computer. The minimum of the energy function corresponds to the vacuum state. We show that the S = 1/2 Heisenberg chain model are well described with the ansatz. The method is also applied to the two-dimensional S = 1/2 Heisenberg and U(1) plaquette chain models.

  1. Delta nitrogen tetroxide fueling operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grigsby, R. B.; Cross, T. M.; Rucci, T. D.

    1978-01-01

    The development of the Delta second stage nitrogen tetroxide fueling system is briefly summarized. The nitrogen tetroxide fueling system and the equipment used to protect the spacecraft environment from the toxic nitrogen tetroxide fumes are described. Topics covered include: the nitrogen tetroxide transfer system; loading operations; safety precautions; and chemical treatment of all toxic vapors.

  2. Spongeplant Spreading in the Delta

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Invasive, exotic aquatic plants impact a range of important economic and ecological functions in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta of California, and the state now spends over $5 million to control water hyacinth and Brazilian waterweed. In 2007, a new exotic floating plant South American Spongeplan...

  3. Delta launch vehicle accident investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1986-03-01

    The text of the testimony given by several witnesses during the House hearings on the Delta launch vehicle accident of May 3, 1986 is given. Pre-launch procedures, failure analysis, the possibility of sabotage, and design and testing are among the topics discussed.

  4. N-{Delta} weak transition

    SciTech Connect

    Graczyk, Krzysztof M.

    2011-11-23

    A short review of the Rein-Sehgal and isobar models is presented. The attention is focused on the nucleon-{Delta}(1232) weak transition form-factors. The results of the recent re-analyses of the ANL and BNL bubble chamber neutrino-deuteron scattering data are discussed.

  5. Phytoplankton fuels Delta food web

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jassby, Alan D.; Cloern, James E.; Muller-Solger, A. B.

    2003-01-01

    Populations of certain fishes and invertebrates in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta have declined in abundance in recent decades and there is evidence that food supply is partly responsible. While many sources of organic matter in the Delta could be supporting fish populations indirectly through the food web (including aquatic vegetation and decaying organic matter from agricultural drainage), a careful accounting shows that phytoplankton is the dominant food source. Phytoplankton, communities of microscopic free-floating algae, are the most important food source on a Delta-wide scale when both food quantity and quality are taken into account. These microscopic algae have declined since the late 1960s. Fertilizer and pesticide runoff do not appear to be playing a direct role in long-term phytoplankton changes; rather, species invasions, increasing water transparency and fluctuations in water transport are responsible. Although the potential toxicity of herbicides and pesticides to plank- ton in the Delta is well documented, the ecological significance remains speculative. Nutrient inputs from agricultural runoff at current levels, in combination with increasing transparency, could result in harmful al- gal blooms. 

  6. Revisiting double Dirac delta potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Zafar; Kumar, Sachin; Sharma, Mayank; Sharma, Vibhu

    2016-07-01

    We study a general double Dirac delta potential to show that this is the simplest yet still versatile solvable potential to introduce double wells, avoided crossings, resonances and perfect transmission (T = 1). Perfect transmission energies turn out to be the critical property of symmetric and anti-symmetric cases wherein these discrete energies are found to correspond to the eigenvalues of a Dirac delta potential placed symmetrically between two rigid walls. For well(s) or barrier(s), perfect transmission (or zero reflectivity, R(E)) at energy E=0 is non-intuitive. However, this has been found earlier and called the ‘threshold anomaly’. Here we show that it is a critical phenomenon and we can have 0≤slant R(0)\\lt 1 when the parameters of the double delta potential satisfy an interesting condition. We also invoke a zero-energy and zero curvature eigenstate (\\psi (x)={Ax}+B) of the delta well between two symmetric rigid walls for R(0)=0. We resolve that the resonant energies and the perfect transmission energies are different and they arise differently.

  7. Maintenance of large deltas through channelization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giosan, L.; Constatinescu, S.; Filip, F.

    2013-12-01

    A new paradigm for delta restoration is currently taking shape using primarily Mississippi delta examples. Here we propose an alternative for delta maintenance primarily envisioned for wave-influenced deltas based on Danube delta experiences. Over the last half century, while the total sediment load of the Danube dramatically decreased due to dam construction on tributaries and its mainstem, a grand experiment was inadvertently run in the Danube delta: the construction of a dense network of canals, which almost tripled the water discharge toward the interior of the delta plain. We use core-based and chart-based sedimentation rates and patterns to explore the delta transition from the natural to an anthropogenic regime, to understand the effects of far-field damming and near-field channelization, and to construct a conceptual model for delta development as a function sediment partition between the delta plain and the delta coastal fringe. We show that sediment fluxes increased to the delta plain due to channelization, counteracting sea level rise. In turn, the delta coastal fringe was most impacted by the Danube's sediment load collapse. Furthermore, we show that morphodynamic feedbacks at the river mouth are crucial in trapping sediment near the coast and constructing wave-dominated deltas or lobes or delaying their destruction. As a general conclusion, we suggest that increased channelization that mimics and enhances natural processes may provide a simple solution for keeping delta plains above sea level and that abandonment of wave-dominated lobes may be the most long term efficient solution for protecting the internal fluvial regions of deltas and provide new coastal growth downcoast.

  8. Synthesis and oxygen content dependent properties of hexagonal DyMnO[subscript 3+delta

    SciTech Connect

    Remsen, S.; Dabrowski, B.; Chmaissem, O.; Mais, J.; Szewczyk, A.

    2011-10-28

    Oxygen deficient polycrystalline samples of hexagonal P6{sub 3}cm (space group No.185) DyMnO{sub 3+{delta}} ({delta} < 0) were synthesized in Ar by intentional decomposition of its perovskite phase obtained in air. The relative stability of these phases is in accord with our previous studies of the temperature and oxygen vacancy dependent tolerance factor. Thermogravimetric measurements have shown that hexagonal samples of DyMnO{sub 3+{delta}} (0 {le} {delta} {le} 0.4) exhibit unusually large excess oxygen content, which readily incorporates on heating near 300 C in various partial-pressures of oxygen atmospheres. Neutron and synchrotron diffraction data show the presence of two new structural phases at {delta} {approx} 0.25 (Hex{sub 2}) and {delta} {approx} 0.40 (Hex{sub 3}). Rietveld refinements of the Hex{sub 2} phase strongly suggest it is well modeled by the R3 space group (No.146). These phases were observed to transform back to P6{sub 3}cm above {approx} 350 C when material becomes stoichiometric in oxygen content ({delta} = 0). Chemical expansion of the crystal lattice corresponding to these large changes of oxygen was found to be 3.48 x 10{sup -2} mol{sup -1}. Thermal expansion of stoichiometric phases were determined to be 11.6 x 10{sup -6} and 2.1 x 10{sup -6} K{sup -1} for the P6{sub 3}cm and Hex{sub 2} phases, respectively. Our measurements also indicate that the oxygen non-stoichiometry of hexagonal RMnO{sub 3+{delta}} materials may have important influence on their multiferroic properties.

  9. Synthesis and oxygen content dependent properties of hexagonal DyMnO{sub 3 + sub delta}.

    SciTech Connect

    Remsen, S.; Dabrowski, B.; Chmaissem, O.; Mais, J.; Szewczyk, A.

    2011-07-01

    Oxygen deficient polycrystalline samples of hexagonal P6{sub 3}cm (space group No.185) DyMnO{sub 3+{delta}} ({delta} < 0) were synthesized in Ar by intentional decomposition of its perovskite phase obtained in air. The relative stability of these phases is in accord with our previous studies of the temperature and oxygen vacancy dependent tolerance factor. Thermogravimetric measurements have shown that hexagonal samples of DyMnO{sub 3+{delta}} (0 {<=} {delta} {<=} 0.4) exhibit unusually large excess oxygen content, which readily incorporates on heating near 300 C in various partial-pressures of oxygen atmospheres. Neutron and synchrotron diffraction data show the presence of two new structural phases at {delta} {approx} 0.25 (Hex{sub 2}) and {delta} {approx} 0.40 (Hex{sub 3}). Rietveld refinements of the Hex{sub 2} phase strongly suggest it is well modeled by the R3 space group (No.146). These phases were observed to transform back to P6{sub 3}cm above {approx}350 C when material becomes stoichiometric in oxygen content ({delta} = 0). Chemical expansion of the crystal lattice corresponding to these large changes of oxygen was found to be 3.48 x 10{sup -2} mol{sup -1}. Thermal expansion of stoichiometric phases were determined to be 11.6 x 10{sup -6} and 2.1 x 10{sup -6} K{sup -1} for the P6{sub 3}cm and Hex{sub 2} phases, respectively. Our measurements also indicate that the oxygen non-stoichiometry of hexagonal RMnO{sub 3+{delta}} materials may have important influence on their multiferroic properties.

  10. Selective effects of isomeric cis and trans fatty acids on fatty acyl delta 9 and delta 6 desaturation by human skin fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, M D; Whitehurst, M C

    1983-10-11

    Human skin fibroblasts incorporate and actively desaturate long-chain fatty acids. Growth of these cells in lipid-free medium can be used to enhance delta 9 and delta 6 desaturation of [14C]stearate and [14C]linoleate, respectively. Medium supplementation with cis fatty acids inhibits delta 9 desaturation; effectiveness as inhibitors is linoleate (9c,12c-18:2) greater than oleate (9c-18:1) greater than vaccenate (11c-18:1). Linoelaidate (9t,12t-18:2), trans-vaccenate (11t-18:1) and saturated fatty acids are without effect; elaidate (9t-18:1) appears stimulatory. By contrast, the trans fatty acids elaidate and linoelaidate are potent inhibitors of delta 6 desaturation; inhibition by trans-vaccenate is 50% of that of elaidate. Desaturation of [14C]linoleate is only slightly inhibited by oleate, cis-vaccenate, or (6c,9c,12c)-linolenate. The relative effectiveness of isomeric cis- and trans-octadecenoic acids as inhibitors of delta 9 and delta 6 desaturation in intact human cells is different from that found in microsomal studies. The cell culture system can thus be important in evaluating physiological effects of isomeric fatty acids on cellular metabolic processes.

  11. 27 CFR 9.96 - Mississippi Delta.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Mississippi Delta. 9.96... Mississippi Delta. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Mississippi Delta.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundaries of the Mississippi...

  12. 27 CFR 9.96 - Mississippi Delta.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Mississippi Delta. 9.96... Mississippi Delta. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Mississippi Delta.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundaries of the Mississippi...

  13. 27 CFR 9.96 - Mississippi Delta.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Mississippi Delta. 9.96... Mississippi Delta. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Mississippi Delta.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundaries of the Mississippi...

  14. 27 CFR 9.96 - Mississippi Delta.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Mississippi Delta. 9.96... Mississippi Delta. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Mississippi Delta.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundaries of the Mississippi...

  15. 27 CFR 9.96 - Mississippi Delta.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Mississippi Delta. 9.96... Mississippi Delta. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Mississippi Delta.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundaries of the Mississippi...

  16. Kenneth Wilson and Lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ukawa, Akira

    2015-09-01

    We discuss the physics and computation of lattice QCD, a space-time lattice formulation of quantum chromodynamics, and Kenneth Wilson's seminal role in its development. We start with the fundamental issue of confinement of quarks in the theory of the strong interactions, and discuss how lattice QCD provides a framework for understanding this phenomenon. A conceptual issue with lattice QCD is a conflict of space-time lattice with chiral symmetry of quarks. We discuss how this problem is resolved. Since lattice QCD is a non-linear quantum dynamical system with infinite degrees of freedom, quantities which are analytically calculable are limited. On the other hand, it provides an ideal case of massively parallel numerical computations. We review the long and distinguished history of parallel-architecture supercomputers designed and built for lattice QCD. We discuss algorithmic developments, in particular the difficulties posed by the fermionic nature of quarks, and their resolution. The triad of efforts toward better understanding of physics, better algorithms, and more powerful supercomputers have produced major breakthroughs in our understanding of the strong interactions. We review the salient results of this effort in understanding the hadron spectrum, the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix elements and CP violation, and quark-gluon plasma at high temperatures. We conclude with a brief summary and a future perspective.

  17. Reconciling lattice and continuum models for polymers at interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleer, G. J.; Skvortsov, A. M.

    2012-04-01

    It is well known that lattice and continuum descriptions for polymers at interfaces are, in principle, equivalent. In order to compare the two models quantitatively, one needs a relation between the inverse extrapolation length c as used in continuum theories and the lattice adsorption parameter Δχs (defined with respect to the critical point). So far, this has been done only for ideal chains with zero segment volume in extremely dilute solutions. The relation Δχs(c) is obtained by matching the boundary conditions in the two models. For depletion (positive c and Δχs) the result is very simple: Δχs = ln(1 + c/5). For adsorption (negative c and Δχs) the ideal-chain treatment leads to an unrealistic divergence for strong adsorption: c decreases without bounds and the train volume fraction exceeds unity. This due to the fact that for ideal chains the volume filling cannot be accounted for. We extend the treatment to real chains with finite segment volume at finite concentrations, for both good and theta solvents. For depletion the volume filling is not important and the ideal-chain result Δχs = ln(1 + c/5) is generally valid also for non-ideal chains, at any concentration, chain length, or solvency. Depletion profiles can be accurately described in terms of two length scales: ρ = tanh2[(z + p)/δ], where the depletion thickness (distal length) δ is a known function of chain length and polymer concentration, and the proximal length p is a known function of c (or Δχs) and δ. For strong repulsion p = 1/c (then the proximal length equals the extrapolation length), for weaker repulsion p depends also on chain length and polymer concentration (then p is smaller than 1/c). In very dilute solutions we find quantitative agreement with previous analytical results for ideal chains, for any chain length, down to oligomers. In more concentrated solutions there is excellent agreement with numerical self-consistent depletion profiles, for both weak and strong

  18. Introduction to lattice gauge theory

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, R.

    1987-01-01

    The lattice formulation of Quantum Field Theory (QFT) can be exploited in many ways. We can derive the lattice Feynman rules and carry out weak coupling perturbation expansions. The lattice then serves as a manifestly gauge invariant regularization scheme, albeit one that is more complicated than standard continuum schemes. Strong coupling expansions: these give us useful qualitative information, but unfortunately no hard numbers. The lattice theory is amenable to numerical simulations by which one calculates the long distance properties of a strongly interacting theory from first principles. The observables are measured as a function of the bare coupling g and a gauge invariant cut-off approx. = 1/..cap alpha.., where ..cap alpha.. is the lattice spacing. The continuum (physical) behavior is recovered in the limit ..cap alpha.. ..-->.. 0, at which point the lattice artifacts go to zero. This is the more powerful use of lattice formulation, so in these lectures the author focuses on setting up the theory for the purpose of numerical simulations to get hard numbers. The numerical techniques used in Lattice Gauge Theories have their roots in statistical mechanics, so it is important to develop an intuition for the interconnection between quantum mechanics and statistical mechanics. This will be the emphasis of the first lecture. In the second lecture, the author reviews the essential ingredients of formulating QCD on the lattice and discusses scaling and the continuum limit. In the last lecture the author summarizes the status of some of the main results. He also mentions the bottlenecks and possible directions for research. 88 refs.

  19. Quasilocal charges in integrable lattice systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilievski, Enej; Medenjak, Marko; Prosen, Tomaž; Zadnik, Lenart

    2016-06-01

    We review recent progress in understanding the notion of locality in integrable quantum lattice systems. The central concept concerns the so-called quasilocal conserved quantities, which go beyond the standard perception of locality. Two systematic procedures to rigorously construct families of quasilocal conserved operators based on quantum transfer matrices are outlined, specializing on anisotropic Heisenberg XXZ spin-1/2 chain. Quasilocal conserved operators stem from two distinct classes of representations of the auxiliary space algebra, comprised of unitary (compact) representations, which can be naturally linked to the fusion algebra and quasiparticle content of the model, and non-unitary (non-compact) representations giving rise to charges, manifestly orthogonal to the unitary ones. Various condensed matter applications in which quasilocal conservation laws play an essential role are presented, with special emphasis on their implications for anomalous transport properties (finite Drude weight) and relaxation to non-thermal steady states in the quantum quench scenario.

  20. Legless locomotion in lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiebel, Perrin; Goldman, Daniel I.

    2014-11-01

    Little is known about interactions between an animal body and complex terrestrial terrain like sand and boulders during legless, undulatory travel (e.g. snake locomotion). We study the locomotor performance of Mojave shovel-nosed snakes (Chionactisoccipitalis , ~ 35 cm long) using a simplified model of heterogeneous terrain: symmetric lattices of obstacles. To quantify performance we measure mean forward speed and slip angle, βs, defined as the angle between the instantaneous velocity and tangent vectors at each point on the body. We find that below a critical peg density the presence of granular media results in high speed (~ 60 cm/s), low average slip (βs ~6°) snake performance as compared to movement in the same peg densities on hard ground (~ 25 cm/s and βs ~15°). Above this peg density, performance on granular and hard substrates converges. Speed on granular media decreases with increasing peg density to that of the speed on hard ground, while speed on hard ground remains constant. Conversely, βs on hard ground trends toward that on granular media as obstacle density increases.

  1. Lattice function measurement with TBT BPM data

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, M.J.

    1995-06-01

    At Fermilab Main Ring some of the Beam Position Monitors (BPM) are instrumented with Turn-By-Turn (TBT) capability to record up to 1,024 consecutive turns of BPM data for each given trigger. For example, there are 9 horizontal plane and 8 vertical plane BPM`s in the sector D3 and D4. The BPM data, which records the betatron oscillation, is fitted to obtain beam parameters x, x{prime}, y, y{prime}, and {Delta}p/p, using the calculated beam line transfer matrix. The resulted TBT beam parameters (x, x{prime}) or (y, y{prime}) are fitted to ellipses to obtain the lattice function {beta}, {alpha}, and the emittance associated with the betatron oscillation. The tune of the machine can be calculated from the phase space angles of the successive turns, in the normalized phase space. The beam parameters can also be used to extract transfer matrix to be used for local and global coupling analysis. The process of fitting the BPM data produces information that can be used to diagnose problems such as calibration, noise level and polarity. Being available at every turn and at changing beam position the information carries a lot of statistical power. Since most of the BPM`s are located at high beta location only the x and y beam position information is not simultaneously available. The BPM data fitting processing essentially bridged the gap.

  2. Reliability analysis of interdependent lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limiao, Zhang; Daqing, Li; Pengju, Qin; Bowen, Fu; Yinan, Jiang; Zio, Enrico; Rui, Kang

    2016-06-01

    Network reliability analysis has drawn much attention recently due to the risks of catastrophic damage in networked infrastructures. These infrastructures are dependent on each other as a result of various interactions. However, most of the reliability analyses of these interdependent networks do not consider spatial constraints, which are found important for robustness of infrastructures including power grid and transport systems. Here we study the reliability properties of interdependent lattices with different ranges of spatial constraints. Our study shows that interdependent lattices with strong spatial constraints are more resilient than interdependent Erdös-Rényi networks. There exists an intermediate range of spatial constraints, at which the interdependent lattices have minimal resilience.

  3. Localized structures in Kagome lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Saxena, Avadh B; Bishop, Alan R; Law, K J H; Kevrekidis, P G

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the existence and stability of gap vortices and multi-pole gap solitons in a Kagome lattice with a defocusing nonlinearity both in a discrete case and in a continuum one with periodic external modulation. In particular, predictions are made based on expansion around a simple and analytically tractable anti-continuum (zero coupling) limit. These predictions are then confirmed for a continuum model of an optically-induced Kagome lattice in a photorefractive crystal obtained by a continuous transformation of a honeycomb lattice.

  4. Lattice design for head-on beam-beam compensation at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Montag, C.

    2011-03-28

    Electron lenses for head-on beam-beam compensation will be installed in IP 10 at RHIC. Compensation of the beam-beam effect experienced at IP 8 requires betatron phase advances of {Delta}{psi} = k {center_dot} {pi} between the proton-proton interaction point at IP 8, and the electron lens at IP 10. This paper describes the lattice solutions for both the BLUE and the YELLOW ring to achieve this goal.

  5. GMUGLE: A goal lattice constructor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hintz, Kenneth J.

    2001-08-01

    Goal lattices are a method for ordering the goals of a system and associating with each goal the value of performing that goal in terms of how much it contributes to the accomplishment of the topmost goal of a system. This paper presents a progress report on the development of a web-based implementation of the George Mason University Goal Lattice Engine (GMUGLE). GMUGLE allows a user to interactively create goal lattices, add/delete goals, and specify their ordering relations through a web-based interface. The database portion automatically computes the GLB and LUB of pairs of goals which have been entered to form them into a lattice. Yet to be implemented is the code to input goal values, automatically apportion the values among included goals, and accrue value among the included goals.

  6. Heavy quarks and lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Andreas S. Kronfeld

    2003-11-05

    This paper is a review of heavy quarks in lattice gauge theory, focusing on methodology. It includes a status report on some of the calculations that are relevant to heavy-quark spectroscopy and to flavor physics.

  7. Topological Charge Evolution in the Markov-Chain of QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Derek Leinweber; Anthony Williams; Jian-bo Zhang; Frank Lee

    2004-04-01

    The topological charge is studied on lattices of large physical volume and fine lattice spacing. We illustrate how a parity transformation on the SU(3) link-variables of lattice gauge configurations reverses the sign of the topological charge and leaves the action invariant. Random applications of the parity transformation are proposed to traverse from one topological charge sign to the other. The transformation provides an improved unbiased estimator of the ensemble average and is essential in improving the ergodicity of the Markov chain process.

  8. Emergent three-brane lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Mello Koch, Robert de; Mashile, Grant; Park, Nicholas

    2010-05-15

    In this article the anomalous dimension of a class of operators with a bare dimension of O(N) is studied. The operators considered are dual to excited states of a two giant graviton system. In the Yang-Mills theory they are described by restricted Schur polynomials, labeled with Young diagrams that have at most two columns. In a certain limit the dilatation operator looks like a lattice version of a second derivative, with the lattice emerging from the Young diagram itself.

  9. Berry Phase in Lattice QCD.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Arata

    2016-07-29

    We propose the lattice QCD calculation of the Berry phase, which is defined by the ground state of a single fermion. We perform the ground-state projection of a single-fermion propagator, construct the Berry link variable on a momentum-space lattice, and calculate the Berry phase. As the first application, the first Chern number of the (2+1)-dimensional Wilson fermion is calculated by the Monte Carlo simulation. PMID:27517766

  10. Lattice gauge theory for QCD

    SciTech Connect

    DeGrand, T.

    1997-06-01

    These lectures provide an introduction to lattice methods for nonperturbative studies of Quantum Chromodynamics. Lecture 1: Basic techniques for QCD and results for hadron spectroscopy using the simplest discretizations; lecture 2: Improved actions--what they are and how well they work; lecture 3: SLAC physics from the lattice-structure functions, the mass of the glueball, heavy quarks and {alpha}{sub s} (M{sub z}), and B-{anti B} mixing. 67 refs., 36 figs.

  11. Shoreline change in 48 river deltas: towards indexing erosion as a criterion of delta vulnerability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besset, Manon; Anthony, Edward; Dussouillez, Philippe; Sabatier, François

    2016-04-01

    River deltas are considered as increasingly vulnerable to environmental modifications resulting from climate change and human activities. Delta vulnerability is associated with a number of drivers, chief among which are depleted sediment supply, changes in water discharge, and pumping of underground fluids. These activities lead to accelerated subsidence and erosion, the twin mechanisms of delta destruction. A lot of attention has been focused on vulnerability resulting from accelerated subsidence. Here, we address the problem of delta erosion based on the analysis of 48 deltas, including 30 of the world's largest deltas. Using satellite images (Landsat, Spot 5, Spot 6) and aerial photographs, we determined for each delta, the change in delta protruberance area over a 30-year period, this being defined as the area of delta protrusion relative to a straight shoreline running across the delta plain and linking the delta to the adjacent non-protruding non-deltaic shoreline. We classified the deltas in terms of net area loss, gain, or stability, the last corresponding to an uncertainty threshold of _0.3% of the delta's protruberance over the 30-year period. The results show that 25 (52%) of the studied set of deltas show area loss, 11 (23%) stability, and 12 (25%) gain. Area loss is more important in deltas with a protruberance area <500 km2 (67% of small deltas) than in the largest deltas (23%), with a protruberance area >500 km2. Besides sediment supply conditions, which are a primary factor in delta erosion, eroding deltas tend to be more commonly subjected to relatively significant levels of wave energy.

  12. [delta-Aminolevulinate dehydratase deficiency].

    PubMed

    Fujita, H; Ishida, N; Akagi, R

    1995-06-01

    delta-Aminolevulinate dehydratase (ALAD: E. C. 4.2.1.24), the second enzyme in the heme biosynthetic pathway, condenses two moles of delta-aminolevulinic acid to form porphobilinogen. ALAD deficiency is well known to develop signs and symptoms of typical hepatic porphyria, and classified into three categories as follows: (i) ALAD porphyria, a genetic defect of the enzyme, (ii) tyrosinemia type I, a genetic defect of fumarylacetoacetase in the tyrosine catabolic pathway, producing succinylacetone (a potent inhibitor of ALAD), and (iii) ALAD inhibition by environmental hazards, such as lead, trichloroethylene, and styrene. In the present article, we will describe molecular and biochemical mechanisms to cause the enzyme defect to discuss the significance of ALAD defect on human health.

  13. Parana River Delta in Argentina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Parana River delta is a huge forested marshland about 20 miles northeast of Buenos Aires, Argentina. The area is a very popular tour destination. Guided boat tours can be taken into this vast labyrinth of marsh and trees. The Parana River delta is one of the world's greatest bird-watching destinations. This image highlights the striking contrast between dense forest and wetland marshes, and the deep blue ribbon of the Parana River. This image was acquired by Landsat 7's Enhanced Thematic Mapper plus (ETM+) sensor on May 26, 2000. This is a false-color composite image made using shortwave infrared, near infrared, and green wavelengths. Image provided by the USGS EROS Data Center Satellite Systems Branch.

  14. Lattice architecture effect on the cooperativity of spin transition coordination polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Chiruta, Daniel; Jureschi, Catalin-Maricel; Rotaru, Aurelian E-mail: rotaru@eed.usv.ro; Linares, Jorge E-mail: rotaru@eed.usv.ro; Garcia, Yann

    2014-02-07

    We have investigated in the framework of the Ising-like model, by means of Monte Carlo Metropolis method with open boundary condition, the architecture effect on the cooperativity of spin transition coordination polymers. We have analyzed the influence of several physical parameters (size, pressure, and edge effects) on different lattice architectures which were in good agreement with reported experimental data. We show that the cooperativity of a spin crossover system, characterized by the same number of molecules and the same short- and long-range interaction parameters, is progressively enhanced when going from a 1D chain to a 1D ladder type lattice and to a 2D square lattice.

  15. Chaotic quantum ratchets and filters with cold atoms in optical lattices: Analysis using Floquet states

    SciTech Connect

    Hur, G.; Creffield, C.E.; Jones, P.H.; Monteiro, T.S.

    2005-07-15

    Recently, cesium atoms in optical lattices subjected to cycles of unequally spaced pulses have been found to show interesting behavior: they represent an experimental demonstration of a Hamiltonian ratchet mechanism, and they show strong variability of the dynamical localization lengths as a function of initial momentum. The behavior differs qualitatively from corresponding atomic systems pulsed with equal periods, which are a textbook implementation of a well-studied quantum chaos paradigm, the quantum {delta}-kicked rotor ({delta}-QKR). We investigate here the properties of the corresponding eigenstates (Floquet states) in the parameter regime of the recent experiments and compare them with those of the eigenstates of the {delta}-QKR at similar kicking strengths. We show that by studying the properties of the Floquet states we can shed light on the form of the observed ratchet current, as well as variations in the dynamical localization length.

  16. Parafermion excitations in a superfluid of quasi-molecular chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsvelik, A. M.; Kuklov, A. B.

    2012-11-01

    We study a quantum phase transition in a system of dipoles confined in a stack of N identical one-dimensional lattices (tubes) polarized perpendicularly to the lattices. In this arrangement, the intra-lattice interaction is purely repulsive, preventing system collapse, and the inter-lattice interaction is attractive. The dipoles may represent polar molecules or indirect excitons. The transition separates two phases; in one of them, superfluidity (understood as algebraic decay of the corresponding correlation functions) takes place in each individual lattice, and in the other (chain superfluid) the order parameter is the product of bosonic operators from all lattices. We argue that in the presence of finite inter-lattice tunneling the transition belongs to the universality class of the q = N two-dimensional classical Potts model. For N = 2,3,4 the corresponding low-energy field theory is the model of ZN parafermions perturbed by the thermal operator. The results of Monte Carlo simulations are consistent with these predictions. The detection scheme for the chain superfluid is outlined.

  17. Optimal lattice-structured materials

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Messner, Mark C.

    2016-07-09

    This paper describes a method for optimizing the mesostructure of lattice-structured materials. These materials are periodic arrays of slender members resembling efficient, lightweight macroscale structures like bridges and frame buildings. Current additive manufacturing technologies can assemble lattice structures with length scales ranging from nanometers to millimeters. Previous work demonstrates that lattice materials have excellent stiffness- and strength-to-weight scaling, outperforming natural materials. However, there are currently no methods for producing optimal mesostructures that consider the full space of possible 3D lattice topologies. The inverse homogenization approach for optimizing the periodic structure of lattice materials requires a parameterized, homogenized material model describingmore » the response of an arbitrary structure. This work develops such a model, starting with a method for describing the long-wavelength, macroscale deformation of an arbitrary lattice. The work combines the homogenized model with a parameterized description of the total design space to generate a parameterized model. Finally, the work describes an optimization method capable of producing optimal mesostructures. Several examples demonstrate the optimization method. One of these examples produces an elastically isotropic, maximally stiff structure, here called the isotruss, that arguably outperforms the anisotropic octet truss topology.« less

  18. Doping Scheme of Semiconducting Atomic Chains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toshishige, Yamada; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Atomic chains, precise structures of atomic scale created on an atomically regulated substrate surface, are candidates for future electronics. A doping scheme for intrinsic semiconducting Mg chains is considered. In order to suppress the unwanted Anderson localization and minimize the deformation of the original band shape, atomic modulation doping is considered, which is to place dopant atoms beside the chain periodically. Group I atoms are donors, and group VI or VII atoms are acceptors. As long as the lattice constant is long so that the s-p band crossing has not occurred, whether dopant atoms behave as donors or acceptors is closely related to the energy level alignment of isolated atomic levels. Band structures are calculated for Br-doped (p-type) and Cs-doped (n-type) Mg chains using the tight-binding theory with universal parameters, and it is shown that the band deformation is minimized and only the Fermi energy position is modified.

  19. Reversible expansion of gallium-stabilized (delta)-plutonium

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfer, W G; Oudot, B; Baclet, N

    2006-02-27

    It is shown that the transient expansion of plutonium-gallium alloys observed both in the lattice parameter as well as in the dimension of a sample held at ambient temperature can be explained by assuming incipient precipitation of Pu{sub 3}Ga. However, this ordered {zeta}-phase is also subject to radiation-induced disordering. As a result, the gallium-stabilized {delta}-phase, being metastable at ambient temperature, is driven towards thermodynamic equilibrium by radiation-enhanced diffusion of gallium and at the same time reverted back to its metastable state by radiation-induced disordering. A steady state is reached in which only a modest fraction of the gallium present is arranged in ordered {zeta}-phase regions.

  20. Reversible expansion of gallium-stabilized delta-plutonium

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfer, W; Oudot, B; Baclet, N

    2006-01-26

    The transient expansion of plutonium-gallium alloys observed both in the lattice parameter as well as in the dimension of a sample held at ambient temperature is explained by assuming incipient precipitation of Pu{sub 3}Ga. However, this ordered {zeta}{prime}-phase is also subject to radiation-induced disordering. As a result, the gallium-stabilized {delta}-phase, being metastable at ambient temperature, is both driven towards thermodynamic equilibrium by radiation-enhanced diffusion of gallium and at the same time pushed back to its metastable state by radiation-induced disordering. A steady state is reached in which only a modest fraction of the gallium present is tied up in the {zeta}{prime}-phase.

  1. Deformation characteristics of {delta} phase in the delta-processed Inconel 718 alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, H.Y.; Zhang, S.H.; Cheng, M.; Li, Z.X.

    2010-01-15

    The hot working characteristics of {delta} phase in the delta-processed Inconel 718 alloy during isothermal compression deformation at temperature of 950 deg. C and strain rate of 0.005 s{sup -1}, were studied by using optical microscope, scanning electron microscope and quantitative X-ray diffraction technique. The results showed that the dissolution of plate-like {delta} phase and the precipitation of spherical {delta} phase particles coexisted during the deformation, and the content of {delta} phase decreased from 7.05 wt.% to 5.14 wt.%. As a result of deformation breakage and dissolution breakage, the plate-like {delta} phase was spheroidized and transferred to spherical {delta} phase particles. In the center with largest strain, the plate-like {delta} phase disappeared and spherical {delta} phase appeared in the interior of grains and grain boundaries.

  2. Shocks, Rarefaction Waves, and Current Fluctuations for Anharmonic Chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendl, Christian B.; Spohn, Herbert

    2016-10-01

    The nonequilibrium dynamics of anharmonic chains is studied by imposing an initial domain-wall state, in which the two half lattices are prepared in equilibrium with distinct parameters. We analyse the Riemann problem for the corresponding Euler equations and, in specific cases, compare with molecular dynamics. Additionally, the fluctuations of time-integrated currents are investigated. In analogy with the KPZ equation, their typical fluctuations should be of size t^{1/3} and have a Tracy-Widom GUE distributed amplitude. The proper extension to anharmonic chains is explained and tested through molecular dynamics. Our results are calibrated against the stochastic LeRoux lattice gas.

  3. Magnetic Dipole Interaction on a Square Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabel, Hartmut; Ewerlin, Melanie; Demirbas, Derya; Bruessing, Frank; Kronast, Florian

    2013-03-01

    We have studied interactions and phase transitions of circular magnetic islands with dipole character on a square lattice. By lithographic means we have prepared square patterns of periodicity 300 nm decorated with circular islands of 150 nm diameter using Pd0.87Fe0.13 as magnetic alloy. Below the Curie temperature of 260 K each island is in a ferromagnetic, single domain state with dipolar character and zero in-plane anisotropy. Below a second transition temperature the dipoles start to interact. MOKE measurements show a characteristic change in the magnetic hysteresis for temperatures below 160 K with increasing coercivity for decreasing temperatures. Furthermore, below the second transition the in-plane hysteresis becomes anisotropic, having an easy axis along [10] direction and a hard axis along [11] direction. SPEEM experiments at BESSY II of the HZB with circularly polarized incident photons tuned to the Fe L3 - edge show clearly the development of dipolar chains below the second phase transition that increase in length with decreasing temperature. Neighbouring chains are found to be oriented parallel as well as antiparallel. This work was supported by DFG-SFB 491 and BMBF under contracts 05K10PC2 and 05ES3xBA/5

  4. The crystal structure of Hf{sub 1.5+{delta}}Nb{sub 1.5-{delta}}As and structure-composition relations in the section Hf{sub 3}As-Nb{sub 3}As

    SciTech Connect

    Warczok, Piotr; Chumak, Igor

    2009-04-15

    The title compound Hf{sub 1.5+{delta}}Nb{sub 1.5-{delta}}As was characterized by means of single crystal X-ray diffraction. It represents a new structure type of intermetallic compounds (space group Pnma; lattice parameters a=7.142(2) A, b=3.583(2) A, c=11.640(2) A) and shows a small homogeneity range corresponding to (0.1<delta<0.25) at 1400 deg. C. The crystal structure may be visualized by a combination of As-centred trigonal prisms of the metal atoms and bcc-like fragments formed by metal atoms. Structural relations with various binary arsenides are discussed. The structure of Hf{sub 1.5+{delta}}Nb{sub 1.5-{delta}}As shows significant preferred site occupation of Hf and Nb at the three independent metal positions (differential fractional site occupancy). Structure-composition relations in the section Hf{sub 3}As-Nb{sub 3}As which also contains the new phase Hf{sub 2+{delta}}Nb{sub 1-{delta}}As with Ti{sub 3}P-type structure (space group P4{sub 2}/n) are discussed. Ground state energies of various ordered compounds with Hf{sub 1.5+{delta}}Nb{sub 1.5-{delta}}As-, Ti{sub 3}P- and Ta{sub 3}As-type structures were calculated from ab initio density functional theory. These energies were used for thermodynamic calculations employing the compound energy formalism (CEF) with the aim to model the experimentally observed site fraction data for both ternary compounds as well as Gibbs energies at the temperature of equilibration (1400 deg. C). - Graphical abstract: Hf{sub 1.5+{delta}}Nb{sub 1.5-{delta}}As with a new structure type (space group Pnma; lattice parameters a=7.142(2) A, b=3.583(2) A, c=11.640(2)A) was synthesized. Phase relations, energies and partial ordering in the section Hf{sub 3}As-Nb{sub 3}As were studied by first principle DFT calculations and thermodynamic modelling.

  5. The kaon B-parameter from unquenched mixed action lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Aubin, Christopher A.; Laiho, Jack; Van de Water, Ruth S.

    2007-10-01

    We present a preliminary calculation of B{sub K} using domain-wall valence quarks and 2+1 flavors of improved staggered sea quarks. Both the size of the residual quark mass, which measures the amount of chiral symmetry breaking, and of the mixed meson splitting Delta{sub mix}, a measure of taste-symmetry breaking, show that discretization effects are under control in our mixed action lattice simulations. We show preliminary data for pseudoscalar meson masses, decay constants and B{sub K}. We discuss general issues associated with the chiral extrapolation of lattice data, and, as an example, present a preliminary chiral and continuum extrapolation of f{sub pi}. The quality of our data shows that the good chiral properties of domain-wall quarks, in combination with the light sea quark masses and multiple lattice spacings available with the MILC staggered configurations, will allow for a precise determination of B{sub K}.

  6. COMMD1 regulates the delta epithelial sodium channel ({delta}ENaC) through trafficking and ubiquitination

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Tina; Ke, Ying; Ly, Kevin; McDonald, Fiona J.

    2011-08-05

    Highlights: {yields} The COMM domain of COMMD1 mediates binding to {delta}ENaC. {yields} COMMD1 reduces the cell surface population of {delta}ENaC. {yields} COMMD1 increases the population of {delta}ENaC-ubiquitin. {yields} Both endogenous and transfected {delta}ENaC localize with COMMD1 and transferrin suggesting they are located in early/recycling endosomes. -- Abstract: The delta subunit of the epithelial sodium channel ({delta}ENaC) is a member of the ENaC/degenerin family of ion channels. {delta}ENaC is distinct from the related {alpha}-, {beta}- and {gamma}ENaC subunits, known for their role in sodium homeostasis and blood pressure control, as {delta}ENaC is expressed in brain neurons and activated by external protons. COMMD1 (copper metabolism Murr1 domain 1) was previously found to associate with and downregulate {delta}ENaC activity. Here, we show that COMMD1 interacts with {delta}ENaC through its COMM domain. Co-expression of {delta}ENaC with COMMD1 significantly reduced {delta}ENaC surface expression, and led to an increase in {delta}ENaC ubiquitination. Immunocytochemical and confocal microscopy studies show that COMMD1 promoted localization of {delta}ENaC to the early/recycling endosomal pool where the two proteins were localized together. These results suggest that COMMD1 downregulates {delta}ENaC activity by reducing {delta}ENaC surface expression through promoting internalization of surface {delta}ENaC to an intracellular recycling pool, possibly via enhanced ubiquitination.

  7. Delta hepatitis agent: structural and antigenic properties of the delta-associated particle.

    PubMed Central

    Bonino, F; Hoyer, B; Shih, J W; Rizzetto, M; Purcell, R H; Gerin, J L

    1984-01-01

    Delta agent (delta) was serially passaged to a second and third hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) carrier chimpanzee, using as inoculum the peak delta antigen (delta Ag) serum of an animal previously infected with human serum. The characteristics of serially transmitted delta Ag were similar to those described in first-passage animals. It was consistently detected before the development of anti-delta, in association with a 35- to 37-nm subpopulation of HBsAg particles and a unique low-molecular-weight (5.5 X 10(5)) RNA. RNase susceptibility of the delta-associated RNA and release of delta Ag activity upon treatment of delta-associated particles with detergent revealed that this particle is organized into a virion-like form with the RNA and delta Ag as internal components within a coat of HBsAg. Surface determinants of the delta-associated particle other than HBsAg were not detected by radioimmunoprecipitation experiments, using sera of humans and chimpanzees convalescent from delta hepatitis. The HBsAg-associated particle is the "candidate agent" of delta hepatitis. Images PMID:6698598

  8. Effect of Late Holocene sea level change and deltaic lobe-shifting, Apalachicola Delta, northwest Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Donoghue, J.F. . Geology Dept.); White, N.M. . Dept. of Anthropology)

    1993-03-01

    Late Holocene environmental changes in the lower Apalachicola River region of the northwest Florida appear to be related to deltaic lobe-shifting and sea level change. Sedimentologic, archaeologic and seismic evidence all indicate a major shift in deltaic deposition approximately 2,000 years ago. The effect is observed in the mid-region of the modern Apalachicola Delta as a pronounced change from estuarine to freshwater conditions. On the barrier island chain flanking the delta the result was a change in depositional patterns with a shift in the sediment supply.

  9. T cell receptor junctional regions of V gamma 9+/V delta 2+ T cell clones in relation to non-MHC restricted cytotoxic activity.

    PubMed

    Flanagan, B F; Wheatcroft, N J; Thornton, S M; Christmas, S E

    1993-05-01

    Human gamma delta T cell clones having V gamma 9JP and V delta 2DJ1 T cell receptor (TCR) gene rearrangements were isolated form an individual donor and tested for non-MHC restricted cytotoxicity against the B lymphoblastoid cell line, BSM. Most clones were highly cytotoxic but 3/9 clones had very low activity, comparable to that of CD4+ alpha beta T cell clones. Although there was a tendency for clones with low cytotoxic function to produce high levels of interferon-gamma and tumor necrosis factor-alpha, this correlation was not complete. TCR gamma and delta junctional sequences were obtained and were found to be different for all clones. There were no consistent structural differences between gamma delta TCRs of cytotoxic and non-cytotoxic clones, but gamma or delta junctional regions of all three non-cytotoxic clones had unusual features. One clone had a particularly short gamma chain junctional sequence, one had a short delta chain junctional sequence and the third clone was the only one of the panel which failed to utilise the D delta 3 segment. If the gamma delta TCR is involved in target cell recognition in this model of non-MHC restricted killing, such variations in receptor structure may be sufficient to inhibit recognition and thereby reduce the cytotoxic capacity of a minority of V gamma 9+/V delta 2+ clones. Also, a panel of gamma delta T cell clones expressing V gamma 8/V delta 3 isolated from a different donor, were all highly cytotoxic against BSM, indicating that these target cells can be recognised by effector cells expressing a TCR other than the V gamma 9/V delta 2 receptor. The possible influence of other cell surface molecules on non-MHC restricted cytotoxic function is discussed.

  10. Algebraic Lattices in QFT Renormalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borinsky, Michael

    2016-07-01

    The structure of overlapping subdivergences, which appear in the perturbative expansions of quantum field theory, is analyzed using algebraic lattice theory. It is shown that for specific QFTs the sets of subdivergences of Feynman diagrams form algebraic lattices. This class of QFTs includes the standard model. In kinematic renormalization schemes, in which tadpole diagrams vanish, these lattices are semimodular. This implies that the Hopf algebra of Feynman diagrams is graded by the coradical degree or equivalently that every maximal forest has the same length in the scope of BPHZ renormalization. As an application of this framework, a formula for the counter terms in zero-dimensional QFT is given together with some examples of the enumeration of primitive or skeleton diagrams.

  11. Lattice Structures For Aerospace Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Olmo, E.; Grande, E.; Samartin, C. R.; Bezdenejnykh, M.; Torres, J.; Blanco, N.; Frovel, M.; Canas, J.

    2012-07-01

    The way of mass reduction improving performances in the aerospace structures is a constant and relevant challenge in the space business. The designs, materials and manufacturing processes are permanently in evolution to explore and get mass optimization solutions at low cost. In the framework of ICARO project, EADS CASA ESPACIO (ECE) has designed, manufactured and tested a technology demonstrator which shows that lattice type of grid structures is a promising weight saving solution for replacing some traditional metallic and composite structures for space applications. A virtual testing methodology was used in order to support the design of a high modulus CFRP cylindrical lattice technology demonstrator. The manufacturing process, based on composite Automatic Fiber Placement (AFP) technology developed by ECE, allows obtaining high quality low weight lattice structures potentially applicable to a wide range of aerospace structures. Launcher payload adaptors, satellite platforms, antenna towers or instrument supports are some promising candidates.

  12. Hadron Structure on the Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Can, K. U.; Kusno, A.; Mastropas, E. V.; Zanotti, J. M.

    The aim of these lectures will be to provide an introduction to some of the concepts needed to study the structure of hadrons on the lattice. Topics covered include the electromagnetic form factors of the nucleon and pion, the nucleon's axial charge and moments of parton and generalised parton distribution functions. These are placed in a phenomenological context by describing how they can lead to insights into the distribution of charge, spin and momentum amongst a hadron's partonic constituents. We discuss the techniques required for extracting the relevant matrix elements from lattice simulations and draw attention to potential sources of systematic error. Examples of recent lattice results are presented and are compared with results from both experiment and theoretical models.

  13. Delta II development and flight results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihara, S. K.

    An account is given of the design modifications of the Delta launch vehicle which have resulted in its Delta II variant, together with flight results obtained with the Delta II to date. Delta II launchers feature a stretched LX tank, a larger-diameter satellite-payload fairing, and an expansion of first-stage nozzle expansion ratio from 8:1 to 12:1. The thrust-augmenting solid rocket boosters use graphite/epoxy composite motor cases. Both two-stage and three-stage launches are discussed, with attention to flights for the Navstar satellites.

  14. From Natural to Design River Deltas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giosan, Liviu

    2016-04-01

    Productive and biologically diverse, deltaic lowlands attracted humans since prehistory and may have spurred the emergence of the first urban civilizations. Deltas continued to be an important nexus for economic development across the world and are currently home for over half a billion people. But recently, under the double whammy of sea level rise and inland sediment capture behind dams, they have become the most threatened coastal landscape. Here I will address several deceptively simple questions to sketch some unexpected answers using example deltas from across the world from the Arctic to the Tropics, from the Danube to the Indus, Mississippi to Godavari and Krishna, Mackenzie to Yukon. What is a river delta? What is natural and what is not in a river delta? Are the geological and human histories of a delta important for its current management? Is maintaining a delta the same to building a new one? Can we design better deltas than Nature? These answers help us see clearly that survival of deltas in the next century depends on human intervention and is neither assured nor simple to address or universally applicable. Empirical observations on the hydrology, geology, biology and biochemistry of deltas are significantly lagging behind modeling capabilities endangering the applicability of numerical-based reconstruction solutions and need to be ramped up significantly and rapidly across the world.

  15. Successive refinement lattice vector quantization.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Debargha; Mitra, Sanjit K

    2002-01-01

    Lattice Vector quantization (LVQ) solves the complexity problem of LBG based vector quantizers, yielding very general codebooks. However, a single stage LVQ, when applied to high resolution quantization of a vector, may result in very large and unwieldy indices, making it unsuitable for applications requiring successive refinement. The goal of this work is to develop a unified framework for progressive uniform quantization of vectors without having to sacrifice the mean- squared-error advantage of lattice quantization. A successive refinement uniform vector quantization methodology is developed, where the codebooks in successive stages are all lattice codebooks, each in the shape of the Voronoi regions of the lattice at the previous stage. Such Voronoi shaped geometric lattice codebooks are named Voronoi lattice VQs (VLVQ). Measures of efficiency of successive refinement are developed based on the entropy of the indices transmitted by the VLVQs. Additionally, a constructive method for asymptotically optimal uniform quantization is developed using tree-structured subset VLVQs in conjunction with entropy coding. The methodology developed here essentially yields the optimal vector counterpart of scalar "bitplane-wise" refinement. Unfortunately it is not as trivial to implement as in the scalar case. Furthermore, the benefits of asymptotic optimality in tree-structured subset VLVQs remain elusive in practical nonasymptotic situations. Nevertheless, because scalar bitplane- wise refinement is extensively used in modern wavelet image coders, we have applied the VLVQ techniques to successively refine vectors of wavelet coefficients in the vector set-partitioning (VSPIHT) framework. The results are compared against SPIHT and the previous successive approximation wavelet vector quantization (SA-W-VQ) results of Sampson, da Silva and Ghanbari.

  16. Molecular simulation of the intercrystalline phase of chain molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balijepalli, Sudhakar; Rutledge, Gregory C.

    1998-10-01

    Off-lattice Monte Carlo simulations of the interphase between crystals for freely rotating chains are reported. Both conformational and topological spaces are sampled during a single simulation. The transition region between the crystal and the amorphous phase is characterized in terms of density, bond orientation order, and interfacial energy. The topology of the interphase is quantified in terms of loop and bridge chain populations, and the position of loop re-entry sites.

  17. Machines for lattice gauge theory

    SciTech Connect

    Mackenzie, P.B.

    1989-05-01

    The most promising approach to the solution of the theory of strong interactions is large scale numerical simulation using the techniques of lattice gauge theory. At the present time, computing requirements for convincing calculations of the properties of hadrons exceed the capabilities of even the most powerful commercial supercomputers. This has led to the development of massively parallel computers dedicated to lattice gauge theory. This talk will discuss the computing requirements behind these machines, and general features of the components and architectures of the half dozen major projects now in existence. 20 refs., 1 fig.

  18. Chiral symmetry on the lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Creutz, M.

    1994-11-01

    The author reviews some of the difficulties associated with chiral symmetry in the context of a lattice regulator. The author discusses the structure of Wilson Fermions when the hopping parameter is in the vicinity of its critical value. Here one flavor contrasts sharply with the case of more, where a residual chiral symmetry survives anomalies. The author briefly discusses the surface mode approach, the use of mirror Fermions to cancel anomalies, and finally speculates on the problems with lattice versions of the standard model.

  19. Nuclear Physics from Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    William Detmold, Silas Beane, Konstantinos Orginos, Martin Savage

    2011-01-01

    We review recent progress toward establishing lattice Quantum Chromodynamics as a predictive calculational framework for nuclear physics. A survey of the current techniques that are used to extract low-energy hadronic scattering amplitudes and interactions is followed by a review of recent two-body and few-body calculations by the NPLQCD collaboration and others. An outline of the nuclear physics that is expected to be accomplished with Lattice QCD in the next decade, along with estimates of the required computational resources, is presented.

  20. Comments on the slip factor and the relation Delta phi = -h Delta theta

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab

    2009-09-01

    The definition of the slip factor can be obtained from the phase equation. However, a derivation using the relation {Delta}{phi} = -h{Delta}{theta} leads to a different slip-factor definition. This apparent paradox is examined in detail and resolved. Here {Delta}{phi} is the rf phase difference and {Delta}{theta} is the azimuthal phase difference around the accelerator ring between an off-momentum particle and the synchronous particle, while h is the rf harmonic.

  1. Video Adaptation Model Based on Cognitive Lattice in Ubiquitous Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Svetlana; Yoon, Yong-Ik

    The multimedia service delivery chain poses today many challenges. There are an increasing terminal diversity, network heterogeneity and a pressure to satisfy the user preferences. The situation encourages the need for the personalized contents to provide the user in the best possible experience in ubiquitous computing. This paper introduces a personalized content preparation and delivery framework for multimedia service. The personalized video adaptation is expected to satisfy individual users' need in video content. Cognitive lattice plays a significant role of video annotation to meet users' preference on video content. In this paper, a comprehensive solution for the PVA (Personalized Video Adaptation) is proposed based on Cognitive lattice concept. The PVA is implemented based on MPEG-21 Digital Item Adaptation framework. One of the challenges is how to quantify users' preference on video content.

  2. Chern mosaic: topology of chiral superconductivity in ferromagnetic adatom lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rontynen, Joel; Ojanen, Teemu

    Recent experiments have demonstrated signatures of Majorana bound states in ferromagnetic atomic chains. We show that similar systems, extended to two dimensional geometry, may support chiral topological superconductivity with large Chern numbers. Our observation is based on the fact that magnetic adatoms on an s-wave superconductor bind subgap Shiba states, which can hybridize and form subgap energy bands with nontrivial topology. Such a Shiba lattice supports long-range hopping, leading to a complex, mosaic-like phase diagram with large Chern numbers. We analyze the incidence of different Chern numbers phases and the size of their energy gaps for various lattice geometries. Our findings reveal the studied system as one of the riches platforms of topological matter known to date. The authors acknowledge the Finnish Cultural Foundation and the Academy of Finland for support.

  3. Doping Scheme in Atomic Chain Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toshishige, Yamada

    1997-01-01

    Due to the dramatic reduction in MOS size, there appear many unwanted effects. In these small devices, the number of dopant atoms in the channel is not macroscopic and electrons may suffer significantly different scattering from device to device since the spatial distribution of dopant atoms is no longer regarded as continuous. This prohibits integration, while it is impossible to control such dopant positions within atomic scale. A fundamental solution is to create electronics with simple but atomically precise structures, which could be fabricated with recent atom manipulation technology. All the constituent atoms are placed as planned, and then the device characteristics are deviation-free, which is mandatory for integration. Atomic chain electronics belongs to this category. Foreign atom chains or arrays form devices, and they are placed on the atomically flat substrate surface. We can design the band structure and the resultant Fermi energy of these structures by manipulating the lattice constant. Using the tight-binding theory with universal parameters, it has been predicted that isolated Si chains and arrays are metallic, Mg chains are insulating, and Mg arrays have metallic and insulating phases [1]. The transport properties along a metallic chain have been studied, emphasizing the role of the contact to electrodes [2]. For electronic applications, it is essential to establish a method to dope a semiconducting chain, which is to control the Fermi energy position without altering the original band structure. If we replace some of the chain atoms with dopant atoms randomly, the electrons will see random potential along die chain and will be localized strongly in space (Anderson localization). However, if we replace periodically, although the electrons can spread over the chain, there will generally appear new bands and band gaps reflecting the new periodicity of dopant atoms. This will change the original band structure significantly. In order to overcome

  4. Spin-3/2 baryons in lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    J.M. Zanotti; S. Choe; D.B. Leinweber; W. Melnitchouk; A.G. Williams; J.B. Zhang

    2002-06-01

    We present first results for masses of spin-3/2 baryons in lattice QCD, using a novel fat-link clover fermion action in which only the irrelevant operators are constructed using fat links. In the isospin-1/2 sector, we observe, after appropriate spin and parity projection, a strong signal for the J{sup P} = 3/2{sup -} state, and find good agreement between the 1/2{sup +} mass and earlier nucleon mass simulations with a spin-1/2 interpolating field. For the isospin-3/2 Delta states, clear mass splittings are observed between the various 1/2{sup +/-} and the 3/2{sup +/-} channels, with the calculated level orderings in good agreement with those observed empirically.

  5. Studies of iron impurities in YxPr1-xBa2Cu3O7-delta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swartzendruber, L. J.; Bennett, L. H.; Ritter, J.; Rubinstein, M.; Harford, M. Z.

    1990-01-01

    Pr is the only rare earth which, when substituted for Y in YBa2Cu3O7, significantly alters the superconducting transition temperature T(sub c) without changing the crystal structure. For YxPr1-xBa2Cu3O7-delta with delta approx. equal to 0, T(sub c) is reduced rapidly as x is increased, reaching zero for x about 0.5. For x above 0.5 the compound is antiferromagnetic with a Neel temperature that increases with increasing x, rising to above room temperature for x near 1. A similar behavior is observed when the oxygen deficit delta is increased from zero to 1 with x=0. For the case of Pr substitution, the drop in T(sub c) is believed due to magnetic interactions. For the case of varying delta with x=0, the drop can be attributed to a combination of magnetic interactions, band filling, and changes in crystal structure. To study these effects, the Mossbauer effect of 57 Fe atoms substituted for the Cu atoms has been observed as a function of delta, x, and temperature. The observed spectra are all well described by a two quadrupole-split pairs, a central singlet, and a six-line magnetic hyperfine field pattern. For several Pr compositions both delta and temperature were varied, and the results support the hypothesis that a magnetic interaction exists between the Fe in the Cu lattice and the substitutional Pr atoms.

  6. Molecular model for a complete clathrin lattice from electron cryomicroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fotin, Alexander; Cheng, Yifan; Sliz, Piotr; Grigorieff, Nikolaus; Harrison, Stephen C; Kirchhausen, Tomas; Walz, Thomas

    2004-12-01

    Clathrin-coated vesicles are important vehicles of membrane traffic in cells. We report the structure of a clathrin lattice at subnanometre resolution, obtained from electron cryomicroscopy of coats assembled in vitro. We trace most of the 1,675-residue clathrin heavy chain by fitting known crystal structures of two segments, and homology models of the rest, into the electron microscopy density map. We also define the position of the central helical segment of the light chain. A helical tripod, the carboxy-terminal parts of three heavy chains, projects inward from the vertex of each three-legged clathrin triskelion, linking that vertex to 'ankles' of triskelions centred two vertices away. Analysis of coats with distinct diameters shows an invariant pattern of contacts in the neighbourhood of each vertex, with more variable interactions along the extended parts of the triskelion 'legs'. These invariant local interactions appear to stabilize the lattice, allowing assembly and uncoating to be controlled by events at a few specific sites. PMID:15502812

  7. Lattice fields and strong interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Creutz, M.

    1989-06-01

    I review the lattice formulation of gauge theories and the use of numerical methods to investigate nonperturbative phenomena. These methods are directly applicable to studying hadronic matter at high temperatures. Considerable recent progress has been made in numerical algorithms for including dynamical fermions in such calculations. Dealing with a nonvanishing baryon density adds new unsolved challenges. 33 refs.

  8. Lattice QCD in Background Fields

    SciTech Connect

    William Detmold, Brian Tiburzi, Andre Walker-Loud

    2009-06-01

    Electromagnetic properties of hadrons can be computed by lattice simulations of QCD in background fields. We demonstrate new techniques for the investigation of charged hadron properties in electric fields. Our current calculations employ large electric fields, motivating us to analyze chiral dynamics in strong QED backgrounds, and subsequently uncover surprising non-perturbative effects present at finite volume.

  9. Experimenting with Langevin lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Gavai, R.V.; Potvin, J.; Sanielevici, S.

    1987-05-01

    We report on the status of our investigations of the effects of systematic errors upon the practical merits of Langevin updating in full lattice QCD. We formulate some rules for the safe use of this updating procedure and some observations on problems which may be common to all approximate fermion algorithms.

  10. On Some Periodic Toda Lattices

    PubMed Central

    Kac, M.; Van Moerbeke, Pierre

    1975-01-01

    A discrete version of Floquet's theory is developed and applied to a system of non-linear differential equations related to the periodic Toda lattice. A special solution previously found by Toda is thus seen to fit into the formalism of inverse scattering problems. PMID:16592244

  11. Hadronic Interactions from Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Konstantinos Orginos

    2006-03-19

    In this talk I discuss a few recent results on lattice calculations of scattering lengths in hadronic processes. In particular, I present the scattering length of the pion-pion scattering in the I=2 channel and the nucleon-nucleon {sup 1}S{sub 0} channel and {sup 3}S{sub 1}-{sup 3}D{sub 1} coupled channels.

  12. Lattice continuum and diffusional creep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesarovic, Sinisa Dj.

    2016-04-01

    Diffusional creep is characterized by growth/disappearance of lattice planes at the crystal boundaries that serve as sources/sinks of vacancies, and by diffusion of vacancies. The lattice continuum theory developed here represents a natural and intuitive framework for the analysis of diffusion in crystals and lattice growth/loss at the boundaries. The formulation includes the definition of the Lagrangian reference configuration for the newly created lattice, the transport theorem and the definition of the creep rate tensor for a polycrystal as a piecewise uniform, discontinuous field. The values associated with each crystalline grain are related to the normal diffusional flux at grain boundaries. The governing equations for Nabarro-Herring creep are derived with coupled diffusion and elasticity with compositional eigenstrain. Both, bulk diffusional dissipation and boundary dissipation accompanying vacancy nucleation and absorption, are considered, but the latter is found to be negligible. For periodic arrangements of grains, diffusion formally decouples from elasticity but at the cost of a complicated boundary condition. The equilibrium of deviatorically stressed polycrystals is impossible without inclusion of interface energies. The secondary creep rate estimates correspond to the standard Nabarro-Herring model, and the volumetric creep is small. The initial (primary) creep rate is estimated to be much larger than the secondary creep rate.

  13. Triangles in a Lattice Parabola.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sastry, K. R. S.

    1991-01-01

    Discussed are properties possessed by polygons inscribed in the lattice parabola y=x, including the area of a triangle, triangles of minimum area, conditions for right triangles, triangles whose area is the cube of an integer, and implications of Pick's Theorem. Further directions to pursue are suggested. (MDH)

  14. Structure of the T-cell receptor in a Ti alpha beta, Ti gamma delta double positive T-cell line.

    PubMed

    Kuhlmann, J; Geisler, C

    1993-02-01

    The multichain T-cell receptor is composed of at least six different polypeptide chains. The clonotypic Ti heterodimer (Ti alpha beta or Ti gamma delta) is non-covalently associated with the CD3 chains (CD3 gamma delta epsilon zeta). The exact number of subunits constituting the T-cell receptor is still not known. It has been suggested that each T-cell receptor contains two Ti dimers. To gain insight into the structure of the T-cell receptor we constructed a Ti alpha beta, Ti gamma delta double positive T-cell line which contained four functional Ti chains (Ti alpha, beta, gamma, and delta). The data demonstrated an absence of Ti dimers containing mixtures of chains other than the typical Ti alpha beta and Ti gamma delta combinations. Furthermore, by co-modulation experiments we demonstrated that the Ti alpha beta and the Ti gamma delta dimers were not expressed in the same T-cell receptor. Our data indicate that the T-cell receptor does not contain two Ti dimers.

  15. Orbital optical lattices with bosons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kock, T.; Hippler, C.; Ewerbeck, A.; Hemmerich, A.

    2016-02-01

    This article provides a synopsis of our recent experimental work exploring Bose-Einstein condensation in metastable higher Bloch bands of optical lattices. Bipartite lattice geometries have allowed us to implement appropriate band structures, which meet three basic requirements: the existence of metastable excited states sufficiently protected from collisional band relaxation, a mechanism to excite the atoms initially prepared in the lowest band with moderate entropy increase, and the possibility of cross-dimensional tunneling dynamics, necessary to establish coherence along all lattice axes. A variety of bands can be selectively populated and a subsequent thermalization process leads to the formation of a condensate in the lowest energy state of the chosen band. As examples the 2nd, 4th and 7th bands in a bipartite square lattice are discussed. The geometry of the 2nd and 7th bands can be tuned such that two inequivalent energetically degenerate energy minima arise at the X ±-points at the edge of the 1st Brillouin zone. In this case even a small interaction energy is sufficient to lock the phase between the two condensation points such that a complex-valued chiral superfluid order parameter can emerge, which breaks time reversal symmetry. In the 4th band a condensate can be formed at the Γ-point in the center of the 1st Brillouin zone, which can be used to explore topologically protected band touching points. The new techniques to access orbital degrees of freedom in higher bands greatly extend the class of many-body scenarios that can be explored with bosons in optical lattices.

  16. The hepatitis delta virus and its infection

    SciTech Connect

    Rizzeto, M.; Gerin, J.L.; Purcell, R.H.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains over 50 papers. Some of the titles are: Structure and Replication of the Genome of Hepatitis Delta Virus; Clinical Significance of HDV RNA in HDV Disease; HBV DNA in Delta Chronic Carriers; Prevalance of HBV-DNA Among Anti-Hd Positive Patients; and Characterization of LKM/sub 1/ and LKM/sub 2/ Antigens.

  17. Wave-angle control of delta evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashton, Andrew D.; Giosan, Liviu

    2011-07-01

    Wave-influenced deltas, with large-scale arcuate shapes and demarcated beach ridge complexes, often display an asymmetrical form about their river channel. Here, we use a numerical model to demonstrate that the angles from which waves approach a delta can have a first-order influence upon its plan-view morphologic evolution and sedimentary architecture. The directional spread of incoming waves plays a dominant role over fluvial sediment discharge in controlling the width of an active delta lobe, which in turn affects the characteristic rates of delta progradation. Oblique wave approach (and a consequent net alongshore sediment transport) can lead to the development of morphologic asymmetry about the river in a delta's plan-view form. This plan-form asymmetry can include the development of discrete breaks in shoreline orientation and the appearance of self-organized features arising from shoreline instability along the downdrift delta flank, such as spits and migrating shoreline sand waves—features observed on natural deltas. Somewhat surprisingly, waves approaching preferentially from one direction tend to increase sediment deposition updrift of the river. This ‘morphodynamic groin effect’ occurs when the delta's plan-form aspect ratio is sufficiently large such that the orientation of the shoreline on the downdrift flank is rotated past the angle of maximum alongshore sediment transport, resulting in preferential redirection of fluvial sediment updrift of the river mouth.

  18. The determination of equilibrium constants, DeltaG, DeltaH and DeltaS for vapour interaction with a pharmaceutical drug, using gravimetric vapour sorption.

    PubMed

    Willson, Richard J; Beezer, Anthony E

    2003-06-01

    The application of gravimetric vapour sorption (GVS) to the characterisation of pharmaceutical drugs is often restricted to the study of gross behaviour such as a measure of hygroscopicity. Although useful in early development of a drug substance, for example, in salt selection screening exercises, such types of analysis may not contribute to a fundamental understanding of the properties of the material. This paper reports a new methodology for GVS experimentation that will allow specific sorption parameters to be calculated; equilibrium constant (K), van't Hoff enthalpy change (DeltaH(v)), Gibbs free energy for sorption (DeltaG) and the entropy change for sorption (DeltaS). Unlike other reports of such type of analysis that require the application of a specific model, this method is model free. The analysis does require that over the narrow temperature range of the study DeltaH(v) is constant and there is no change in interaction mechanism.

  19. Delta connected resonant snubber circuit

    DOEpatents

    Lai, J.S.; Peng, F.Z.; Young, R.W. Sr.; Ott, G.W. Jr.

    1998-01-20

    A delta connected, resonant snubber-based, soft switching, inverter circuit achieves lossless switching during dc-to-ac power conversion and power conditioning with minimum component count and size. Current is supplied to the resonant snubber branches solely by the dc supply voltage through the main inverter switches and the auxiliary switches. Component count and size are reduced by use of a single semiconductor switch in the resonant snubber branches. Component count is also reduced by maximizing the use of stray capacitances of the main switches as parallel resonant capacitors. Resonance charging and discharging of the parallel capacitances allows lossless, zero voltage switching. In one embodiment, circuit component size and count are minimized while achieving lossless, zero voltage switching within a three-phase inverter. 36 figs.

  20. Delta connected resonant snubber circuit

    DOEpatents

    Lai, Jih-Sheng; Peng, Fang Zheng; Young, Sr., Robert W.; Ott, Jr., George W.

    1998-01-01

    A delta connected, resonant snubber-based, soft switching, inverter circuit achieves lossless switching during dc-to-ac power conversion and power conditioning with minimum component count and size. Current is supplied to the resonant snubber branches solely by the dc supply voltage through the main inverter switches and the auxiliary switches. Component count and size are reduced by use of a single semiconductor switch in the resonant snubber branches. Component count is also reduced by maximizing the use of stray capacitances of the main switches as parallel resonant capacitors. Resonance charging and discharging of the parallel capacitances allows lossless, zero voltage switching. In one embodiment, circuit component size and count are minimized while achieving lossless, zero voltage switching within a three-phase inverter.

  1. Magnetic Moments of Delta and Omega- baryons with dynamical clover fermions

    SciTech Connect

    Aubin, Christopher; Orginos, Konstantinos; Pascalutsa, Vladimir; Vanderhaeghen, Marc

    2009-01-01

    We calculate the magnetic dipole moment of the Delta(1232) and Omega- baryons with 2+1-flavors of clover fermions on anisotropic lattices using a background magnetic field. This is the first dynamical calculation of these magnetic moments using a background field technique. The calculation for Omega- is done at the physical strange quark mass, with the result in units of the physical nuclear magneton µ_(Omega-) = -1.93(8)(12) (where the first error is statistical and the second is systematic) compared to the experimental number: -2.02(5). The Delta has been studied at three unphysical quark masses, corresponding to pion mass 366, 438, and 548 MeV. The pion-mass dependence is compared with the behavior obtained from chiral effective-field theory.

  2. Lattice dynamics and lattice thermal conductivity of thorium dicarbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Zongmeng; Huai, Ping; Qiu, Wujie; Ke, Xuezhi; Zhang, Wenqing; Zhu, Zhiyuan

    2014-11-01

    The elastic and thermodynamic properties of ThC2 with a monoclinic symmetry have been studied by means of density functional theory and direct force-constant method. The calculated properties including the thermal expansion, the heat capacity and the elastic constants are in a good agreement with experiment. Our results show that the vibrational property of the C2 dimer in ThC2 is similar to that of a free standing C2 dimer. This indicates that the C2 dimer in ThC2 is not strongly bonded to Th atoms. The lattice thermal conductivity for ThC2 was calculated by means of the Debye-Callaway model. As a comparison, the conductivity of ThC was also calculated. Our results show that the ThC and ThC2 contributions of the lattice thermal conductivity to the total conductivity are 29% and 17%, respectively.

  3. The CKM Matrix from Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Mackenzie, Paul B.; /Fermilab

    2009-07-01

    Lattice QCD plays an essential role in testing and determining the parameters of the CKM theory of flavor mixing and CP violation. Very high precisions are required for lattice calculations analyzing CKM data; I discuss the prospects for achieving them. Lattice calculations will also play a role in investigating flavor mixing and CP violation beyond the Standard Model.

  4. Modal analysis of kagome-lattice structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, H.; Blakley, S.; Zheltikov, A. M.

    2015-05-01

    The first few lowest order circularly symmetric electromagnetic eigenmodes of a full kagome lattice are compared to those of a kagome lattice with a hexagonal defect. This analysis offers important insights into the physics behind the waveguiding properties of hollow-core fibers with a kagome-lattice cladding.

  5. Ontogenic development and tissue distribution of V gamma 1-expressing gamma/delta T lymphocytes in normal mice

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    A hamster monoclonal antibody (mAb) recognizing an epitope in the V gamma 1-J gamma 4-C gamma 4 chain of the gamma/delta T cell receptor has been generated. Using this mAb, we have quantitated the occurrence of V gamma 1-bearing gamma/delta T cells in the developing thymus and in the lymphoid organs and several epithelia of adult mice. The V gamma 1-expressing cells constitute a minor gamma/delta T cell subpopulation during fetal and early postnatal life, but they constitute a major population of gamma/delta T cells in the thymus and in the peripheral lymphoid organs in adult mice. In addition, we found that V gamma 1- bearing cells comprise a large proportion (15-60%) of the gamma/delta T cells present in the intestinal epithelium (i-IEL) in all strains of mice tested. V gamma 1+ i-IEL are present in athymic (nude) mice and in antigen-free mice, demonstrating that they can develop extrathymically and that their presence in the intestinal epithelium is independent of the antigenic load of the gut. Our results show that V gamma 1-bearing lymphocytes account for the largest population of gamma/delta T cells in the mouse. This population includes a thymus-dependent component that homes to the secondary lymphoid organs and a thymus-independent component that constitutes a major fraction of the gamma/delta i-IELs. PMID:7500038

  6. Partial lattice participation in the spin-lattice relaxation of potassium chromium alum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overweg, J. A.; Flokstra, J.; ter Brake, H. J. M.; Gerritsma, G. J.

    1981-08-01

    We developed a SQUID-based frequency sweeping system for a.c. susceptibility measurements. Using this instrument we found that in Potassium Chromium Alum only a part of the lattice system is involved in the spin-lattice relaxation process. This partial lattice participation amounts 60-75% of the total lattice specific heat.

  7. 78 FR 53127 - Delta-Bienville Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-28

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Delta-Bienville Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. Date change. SUMMARY: The Delta-Bienville Resource Advisory...

  8. Dirac lattices, zero-range potentials, and self-adjoint extension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordag, M.; Muñoz-Castañeda, J. M.

    2015-03-01

    We consider the electromagnetic field in the presence of polarizable point dipoles. In the corresponding effective Maxwell equation these dipoles are described by three dimensional delta function potentials. We review the approaches handling these: the self-adjoint extension, regularization/renormalization and the zero range potential methods. Their close interrelations are discussed in detail and compared with the electrostatic approach which drops the contributions from the self fields. For a homogeneous two dimensional lattice of dipoles we write down the complete solutions, which allow, for example, for an easy numerical treatment of the scattering of the electromagnetic field on the lattice or for investigating plasmons. Using these formulas, we consider the limiting case of vanishing lattice spacing, i.e., the transition to a continuous sheet. For a scalar field and for the TE polarization of the electromagnetic field this transition is smooth and results in the results known from the continuous sheet. Especially for the TE polarization, we reproduce the results known from the hydrodynamic model describing a two dimensional electron gas. For the TM polarization, for polarizability parallel and perpendicular to the lattice, in both cases, the transition is singular. For the parallel polarizability this is surprising and different from the hydrodynamic model. For perpendicular polarizability this is what was known in literature. We also investigate the case when the transition is done with dipoles described by smeared delta function, i.e., keeping a regularization. Here, for TM polarization for parallel polarizability, when subsequently doing the limit of vanishing lattice spacing, we reproduce the result known from the hydrodynamic model. In case of perpendicular polarizability we need an additional renormalization to reproduce the result obtained previously by stepping back from the dipole approximation.

  9. Influence of different organic fertilizers on quality parameters and the delta(15)N, delta(13)C, delta(2)H, delta(34)S, and delta(18)O values of orange fruit (Citrus sinensis L. Osbeck).

    PubMed

    Rapisarda, Paolo; Camin, Federica; Fabroni, Simona; Perini, Matteo; Torrisi, Biagio; Intrigliolo, Francesco

    2010-03-24

    To investigate the influence of different types of fertilizers on quality parameters, N-containing compounds, and the delta(15)N, delta(13)C, delta(2)H, delta (34)S, and delta(18)O values of citrus fruit, a study was performed on the orange fruit cv. 'Valencia late' (Citrus sinensis L. Osbeck), which was harvested in four plots (three organic and one conventional) located on the same farm. The results demonstrated that different types of organic fertilizers containing the same amount of nitrogen did not effect important changes in orange fruit quality parameters. The levels of total N and N-containing compounds such as synephrine in fruit juice were not statistically different among the different treatments. The delta(15)N values of orange fruit grown under fertilizer derived from animal origin as well as from vegetable compost were statistically higher than those grown with mineral fertilizer. Therefore, delta(15)N values can be used as an indicator of citrus fertilization management (organic or conventional), because even when applied organic fertilizers are of different origins, the natural abundance of (15)N in organic citrus fruit remains higher than in conventional ones. These treatments also did not effect differences in the delta(13)C, delta(2)H, delta(34)S, and delta(18)O values of fruit.

  10. Delta and Omega electromagnetic form factors in a Dyson-Schwinger/Bethe-Salpeter approach

    SciTech Connect

    Diana Nicmorus, Gernot Eichmann, Reinhard Alkofer

    2010-12-01

    We investigate the electromagnetic form factors of the Delta and the Omega baryons within the Poincare-covariant framework of Dyson-Schwinger and Bethe-Salpeter equations. The three-quark core contributions of the form factors are evaluated by employing a quark-diquark approximation. We use a consistent setup for the quark-gluon dressing, the quark-quark bound-state kernel and the quark-photon interaction. Our predictions for the multipole form factors are compatible with available experimental data and quark-model estimates. The current-quark mass evolution of the static electromagnetic properties agrees with results provided by lattice calculations.

  11. Flutter analysis and testing of pairs of aerodynamically interfering delta wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chipman, R. R.; Rauch, F. J.

    1973-01-01

    To examine the effect on flutter of the aerodynamic interference between pairs of closely spaced delta wings, several structurally uncoupled 1/80th-scale models were studied by experiment and analysis. Flutter test boundaries run in a 26-in transonic blowdown wind tunnel were compared with subsonic analytical results generated using the doublet lattice method. Trends for several combinations of vertical and longitudinal wing separation showed that flutter speeds can be significantly lowered in closely spaced configurations. For some configurations, a new flutter mechanism, characterized by coupling of the flexible modes from both surfaces at a distinctive flutter frequency, was predicted and observed.

  12. Pressure measurements on a thick cambered and twisted 58 deg delta wing at high subsonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Julio; Lamar, John E.

    1987-01-01

    A pressure experiment at high subsonic speeds was conducted by a cambered and twisted thick delta wing at the design condition (Mach number 0.80), as well as at nearby Mach numbers (0.75 and 0.83) and over an angle-of-attack range. Effects of twin vertical tails on the wing pressure measurements were also assessed. Comparisons of detailed theoretical and experimental surface pressures and sectional characteristics for the wing alone are presented. The theoretical codes employed are FLO-57, FLO-28, PAN AIR, and the Vortex Lattice Method-Suction Analogy.

  13. Enhancing the Electron Mobility via Delta-Doping in SrTiO3

    SciTech Connect

    Kozuka, Y.

    2011-08-11

    We fabricated high-mobility {delta}-doped structures in SrTiO{sub 3} thin films in order to investigate the low temperature electronic transport properties of confined carriers in this system. An enhancement of the electron mobility above the bulk value was observed as the doped layer thickness decreased. High-field Hall measurements revealed that this mobility enhancement originates from higher-mobility electrons in the undoped clean regions, which have quantum-mechanically broadened from the doped layer. Because of the absence of apparent lattice misfit between the layers, this structure is highly suitable for investigating two-dimensional electron gases in SrTiO{sub 3}

  14. Identification of Ca2+-dependent binding partners for the neuronal calcium sensor protein neurocalcin delta: interaction with actin, clathrin and tubulin.

    PubMed Central

    Ivings, Lenka; Pennington, Stephen R; Jenkins, Roz; Weiss, Jamie L; Burgoyne, Robert D

    2002-01-01

    The neuronal calcium sensors are a family of EF-hand-containing Ca(2+)-binding proteins expressed predominantly in retinal photoreceptors and neurons. One of the family members is neurocalcin delta, the function of which is unknown. As an approach to elucidating the protein interactions made by neurocalcin delta, we have identified brain cytosolic proteins that bind to neurocalcin delta in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner. We used immobilized recombinant myristoylated neurocalcin delta combined with protein identification using MS. We demonstrate a specific interaction with clathrin heavy chain, alpha- and beta-tubulin, and actin. These interactions were dependent upon myristoylation of neurocalcin delta indicating that the N-terminal myristoyl group may be important for protein-protein interactions in addition to membrane association. Direct binding of neurocalcin delta to clathrin, tubulin and actin was confirmed using an overlay assay. These interactions were also demonstrated for endogenous neurocalcin delta by co-immunoprecipitation from rat brain cytosol. When expressed in HeLa cells, neurocalcin delta was cytosolic at resting Ca(2+) levels but translocated to membranes, including a perinuclear compartment (trans-Golgi network) where it co-localized with clathrin, following Ca(2+) elevation. These data suggest the possibility that neurocalcin delta functions in the control of clathrin-coated vesicle traffic. PMID:11964161

  15. Biofilm growth: a lattice Monte Carlo model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Yuguo; Slater, Gary

    2011-03-01

    Biofilms are complex colonies of bacteria that grow in contact with a wall, often in the presence of a flow. In the current work, biofilm growth is investigated using a new two-dimensional lattice Monte Carlo algorithm based on the Bond-Fluctuation Algorithm (BFA). One of the distinguishing characteristics of biofilms, the synthesis and physical properties of the extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) in which the cells are embedded, is explicitly taken into account. Cells are modelled as autonomous closed loops with well-defined mechanical and thermodynamic properties, while the EPS is modelled as flexible polymeric chains. This BFA model allows us to add biologically relevant features such as: the uptake of nutrients; cell growth, division and death; the production of EPS; cell maintenance and hibernation; the generation of waste and the impact of toxic molecules; cell mutation and evolution; cell motility. By tuning the structural, interactional and morphologic parameters of the model, the cell shapes as well as the growth and maturation of various types of biofilm colonies can be controlled.

  16. Spectral Properties of Unimodular Lattice Triangulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krüger, Benedikt; Schmidt, Ella M.; Mecke, Klaus

    2016-05-01

    Random unimodular lattice triangulations have been recently used as an embedded random graph model, which exhibit a crossover behavior between an ordered, large-world and a disordered, small-world behavior. Using the ergodic Pachner flips that transform such triangulations into another and an energy functional that corresponds to the degree distribution variance, Markov chain Monte Carlo simulations can be applied to study these graphs. Here, we consider the spectra of the adjacency and the Laplacian matrix as well as the algebraic connectivity and the spectral radius. Power law dependencies on the system size can clearly be identified and compared to analytical solutions for periodic ground states. For random triangulations we find a qualitative agreement of the spectral properties with well-known random graph models. In the microcanonical ensemble analytical approximations agree with numerical simulations. In the canonical ensemble a crossover behavior can be found for the algebraic connectivity and the spectral radius, thus combining large-world and small-world behavior in one model. The considered spectral properties can be applied to transport problems on triangulation graphs and the crossover behavior allows a tuning of important transport quantities.

  17. LATTICE QCD AT FINITE DENSITY.

    SciTech Connect

    SCHMIDT, C.

    2006-07-23

    I discuss different approaches to finite density lattice QCD. In particular, I focus on the structure of the phase diagram and discuss attempts to determine the location of the critical end-point. Recent results on the transition line as function of the chemical potential (T{sub c}({mu}{sub q})) are reviewed. Along the transition line, hadronic fluctuations have been calculated; which can be used to characterize properties of the Quark Gluon plasma and eventually can also help to identify the location of the critical end-point in the QCD phase diagram on the lattice and in heavy ion experiments. Furthermore, I comment on the structure of the phase diagram at large {mu}{sub q}.

  18. Heterogeneous, weakly coupled map lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotelo Herrera, M.a. Dolores; San Martín, Jesús; Porter, Mason A.

    2016-07-01

    Coupled map lattices (CMLs) are often used to study emergent phenomena in nature. It is typically assumed (unrealistically) that each component is described by the same map, and it is important to relax this assumption. In this paper, we characterize periodic orbits and the laminar regime of type-I intermittency in heterogeneous weakly coupled map lattices (HWCMLs). We show that the period of a cycle in an HWCML is preserved for arbitrarily small coupling strengths even when an associated uncoupled oscillator would experience a period-doubling cascade. Our results characterize periodic orbits both near and far from saddle-node bifurcations, and we thereby provide a key step for examining the bifurcation structure of heterogeneous CMLs.

  19. Form factors from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Dru Renner

    2012-04-01

    Precision computation of hadronic physics with lattice QCD is becoming feasible. The last decade has seen precent-level calculations of many simple properties of mesons, and the last few years have seen calculations of baryon masses, including the nucleon mass, accurate to a few percent. As computational power increases and algorithms advance, the precise calculation of a variety of more demanding hadronic properties will become realistic. With this in mind, I discuss the current lattice QCD calculations of generalized parton distributions with an emphasis on the prospects for well-controlled calculations for these observables as well. I will do this by way of several examples: the pion and nucleon form factors and moments of the nucleon parton and generalized-parton distributions.

  20. Fluctuating multicomponent lattice Boltzmann model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belardinelli, D.; Sbragaglia, M.; Biferale, L.; Gross, M.; Varnik, F.

    2015-02-01

    Current implementations of fluctuating lattice Boltzmann equations (FLBEs) describe single component fluids. In this paper, a model based on the continuum kinetic Boltzmann equation for describing multicomponent fluids is extended to incorporate the effects of thermal fluctuations. The thus obtained fluctuating Boltzmann equation is first linearized to apply the theory of linear fluctuations, and expressions for the noise covariances are determined by invoking the fluctuation-dissipation theorem directly at the kinetic level. Crucial for our analysis is the projection of the Boltzmann equation onto the orthonormal Hermite basis. By integrating in space and time the fluctuating Boltzmann equation with a discrete number of velocities, the FLBE is obtained for both ideal and nonideal multicomponent fluids. Numerical simulations are specialized to the case where mean-field interactions are introduced on the lattice, indicating a proper thermalization of the system.

  1. A transportable optical lattice clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, Stefan; Häfner, Sebastian; Grotti, Jacopo; Koller, Silvio; Al-Masoudi, Ali; Sterr, Uwe; Lisdat, Christian

    2016-06-01

    We present the experimental setup and first results of PTB's transportable 87Sr clock. It consists of a physics package, several compact laser breadboards, and a transportable high finesse cavity for the clock laser. A comparison of the transportable system with our stationary optical lattice clock yields an instability of 2.2 x 10-15 √s/τ for the transportable clock. The current fractional uncertainty of 1 × 10-15 is still limited by the not yet fully evaluated light shift from the free running optical lattice laser operated near the magic wavelength. We are currently improving our transportable system to reach an uncertainty at or below the 10-17 level, which will finaly be limited by the uncertainty in blackbody radiation shift correction.

  2. Breathers in strongly anharmonic lattices.

    PubMed

    Rosenau, Philip; Pikovsky, Arkady

    2014-02-01

    We present and study a family of finite amplitude breathers on a genuinely anharmonic Klein-Gordon lattice embedded in a nonlinear site potential. The direct numerical simulations are supported by a quasilinear Schrodinger equation (QLS) derived by averaging out the fast oscillations assuming small, albeit finite, amplitude vibrations. The genuinely anharmonic interlattice forces induce breathers which are strongly localized with tails evanescing at a doubly exponential rate and are either close to a continuum, with discrete effects being suppressed, or close to an anticontinuum state, with discrete effects being enhanced. Whereas the D-QLS breathers appear to be always stable, in general there is a stability threshold which improves with spareness of the lattice.

  3. Lattice Simulations and Infrared Conformality

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Appelquist, Thomas; Fleming, George T.; Lin, Meifeng; Neil, Ethan T.; Schaich, David A

    2011-09-01

    We examine several recent lattice-simulation data sets, asking whether they are consistent with infrared conformality. We observe, in particular, that for an SU(3) gauge theory with 12 Dirac fermions in the fundamental representation, recent simulation data can be described assuming infrared conformality. Lattice simulations include a fermion mass m which is then extrapolated to zero, and we note that this data can be fit by a small-m expansion, allowing a controlled extrapolation. We also note that the conformal hypothesis does not work well for two theories that are known or expected to be confining and chirally broken, and that itmore » does work well for another theory expected to be infrared conformal.« less

  4. The Fermilab lattice supercomputer project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischler, Mark; Atac, R.; Cook, A.; Deppe, J.; Gaines, I.; Husby, D.; Nash, T.; Pham, T.; Zmuda, T.; Hockney, George; Eichten, E.; Mackenzie, P.; Thacker, H. B.; Toussaint, D.

    1989-06-01

    The ACPMAPS system is a highly cost effective, local memory MIMD computer targeted at algorithm development and production running for gauge theory on the lattice. The machine consists of a compound hypercube of crates, each of which is a full crossbar switch containing several processors. The processing nodes are single board array processors based on the Weitek XL chip set, each with a peak power of 20 MFLOPS and supported by 8MBytes of data memory. The system currently being assembled has a peak power of 5 GFLOPS, delivering performance at approximately $250/MFLOP. The system is programmable in C and Fortran. An underpinning of software routines (CANOPY) provides an easy and natural way of coding lattice problems, such that the details of parallelism, and communication and system architecture are transparent to the user. CANOPY can easily be ported to any single CPU or MIMD system which supports C, and allows the coding of typical applications with very little effort.

  5. Entropy favours open colloidal lattices.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xiaoming; Chen, Qian; Granick, Steve

    2013-03-01

    Burgeoning experimental and simulation activity seeks to understand the existence of self-assembled colloidal structures that are not close-packed. Here we describe an analytical theory based on lattice dynamics and supported by experiments that reveals the fundamental role entropy can play in stabilizing open lattices. The entropy we consider is associated with the rotational and vibrational modes unique to colloids interacting through extended attractive patches. The theory makes predictions of the implied temperature, pressure and patch-size dependence of the phase diagram of open and close-packed structures. More generally, it provides guidance for the conditions at which targeted patchy colloidal assemblies in two and three dimensions are stable, thus overcoming the difficulty in exploring by experiment or simulation the full range of conceivable parameters.

  6. Scattering in Quantum Lattice Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Hara, Andrew; Love, Peter

    2009-03-01

    Quantum Lattice Gas Automata (QLGA) are of interest for their use in simulating quantum mechanics on both classical and quantum computers. QLGAs are an extension of classical Lattice Gas Automata where the constraint of unitary evolution is added. In the late 1990s, David A. Meyer as well as Bruce Boghosian and Washington Taylor produced similar models of QLGAs. We start by presenting a unified version of these models and study them from the point of view of the physics of wave-packet scattering. We show that the Meyer and Boghosian-Taylor models are actually the same basic model with slightly different parameterizations and limits. We then implement these models computationally using the Python programming language and show that QLGAs are able to replicate the analytic results of quantum mechanics (for example reflected and transmitted amplitudes for step potentials and the Klein paradox).

  7. Stable kagome lattices from group IV elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leenaerts, O.; Schoeters, B.; Partoens, B.

    2015-03-01

    A thorough investigation of three-dimensional kagome lattices of group IV elements is performed with first-principles calculations. The investigated kagome lattices of silicon and germanium are found to be of similar stability as the recently proposed carbon kagome lattice. Carbon and silicon kagome lattices are both direct-gap semiconductors but they have qualitatively different electronic band structures. While direct optical transitions between the valence and conduction bands are allowed in the carbon case, no such transitions can be observed for silicon. The kagome lattice of germanium exhibits semimetallic behavior but can be transformed into a semiconductor after compression.

  8. Apiary B Factory lattice design

    SciTech Connect

    Donald, M.H.R. ); Garren, A.A. )

    1991-04-01

    The Apiary B Factory is a proposed high-intensity electron-positron collider. This paper will present the lattice design for this facility, which envisions two rings with unequal energies in the PEP tunnel. The design has many interesting optical and geometrical features due to the needs to conform to the existing tunnel, and to achieve the necessary emittances, damping times and vacuum. Existing hardware is used to a maximum extent. 8 figs. 1 tab.

  9. Apiary B Factory Lattice Design

    SciTech Connect

    Donald, M.H.R.; Garren, A.A.

    1991-05-03

    The Apiary B Factory is a proposed high-intensity electron-positron collider. This paper presents the lattice design for this facility, which envisions two rings with unequal energies in the PEP tunnel. The design has many interesting optical and geometrical features due to the needs to conform to the existing tunnel, and to achieve the necessary emittances, damping times and vacuum. Existing hardware is used to a maximum extent.

  10. Threshold Resonances - a Lattice Perspective

    SciTech Connect

    David Richards

    2002-10-01

    The calculation of the masses of the lightest nucleon resonances using lattice QCD is surveyed. Recent results for the mass of the First radial excitation of the nucleon, the Roper resonance, are reviewed and the interpretation in terms of models of hadronic structure, such as the quark model and multi-quark states, discussed. The talk concludes with an outline of prospects for future calculations.

  11. Scanning phononic lattices with ultrasound

    SciTech Connect

    Vines, R.E.; Wolfe, J.P.; Every, A.V.

    1999-11-01

    A method for probing the elastic properties of newly developed periodic structures using acoustic waves is introduced. Highly anisotropic transmission of surface acoustic waves is observed by continuously scanning the wave vector angle. Preliminary models of wave propagation through multilayers and two-dimensional lattices explain some of the experimental features, while other features can be attributed to the resonant excitation of interface waves. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  12. Baryon Interactions from Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Aoki, Sinya

    2010-05-12

    We report on new attempt to investigate baryon interactions in lattice QCD. From the Bethe-Salpeter (BS) wave function, we have successfully extracted the nucleon-nucleon (NN) potentials in quenched QCD simulations, which reproduce qualitative features of modern NN potentials. The method has been extended to obtain the tensor potential as well as the central potential and also applied to the hyperon-nucleon (YN) interactions, in both quenched and full QCD.

  13. Novel correlation of Schottky constants with lattice energies for II-VI and I-VII compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Wiedemeier, Heribert

    2010-10-15

    Correlations of computed Schottky constants (K{sub S}=[V''{sub Zn}][V{sub S}{sup ..}]) with structural and thermodynamic properties showed linear dependences of log K{sub S} on the lattice energies for the Zn-, Cd-, Hg-, Mg-, and Sr-chalcogenides and for the Na- and K-halides. These findings suggest a basic relation between the Schottky constants and the lattice energies for these families of compounds from different parts of the Periodic Table, namely, {Delta}H{sub T,L}{sup o}=-(2.303nRT log K{sub S})+2.303nRm{sub b}+2.303nRTi{sub b}. {Delta}H{sub T,L}{sup o} is the experimental (Born-Haber) lattice energy (enthalpy), n is a constant approximately equal to the formal valence (charge) of the material, m{sub b} and i{sub b} are the slope and intercept, respectively, of the intercept b (of the log K{sub S} versus {Delta}H{sub L}{sup o} linear relation) versus the reciprocal temperature. The results of this work also provide an empirical correlation between the Gibbs free energy of vacancy formation and the lattice energy. - Graphical abstract: For the Zn-chalcogenides, the quantities n and I{sub e} are 2.007 and 650.3 kcal (2722 kJ), respectively. For the other groups of compounds, they are approximately equal to the formal valences and ionization energies of the metals: Log K{sub S{approx}}-(2.303nRT){sup -1} (0.99{Delta}H{sup o}{sub T,L}-I{sub e}).

  14. Understand {Delta}P and {Delta}T in turbulent flow heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Steinmeyer, D.

    1996-06-01

    This article attempts to lead the reader down a clear path to the approximate optimum pressure drop ({Delta}P) and temperature difference ({Delta}T) for the most important class of heat exchangers--those with turbulent flow, no phase change, and fluids and flow rates that are similar on both the hot and cold sides. The optimum {Delta}P and {Delta}T are presented in two frameworks: equations for quantitatively estimating the {Delta}P and {Delta}T from fluid properties, the price of energy, the price of heat exchange surface, and the equivalent diameter; and ratios of the bills (i.e., costs) for the {Delta}P and {Delta}T in an optimized design to the bill (i.e., value) for incremental heat exchanger area. The equations can be used in heat exchanger specification. The ratios provide a guide for the designer when the process flowsheet is constructed. As discussed later, these ratios suggest that the engineer should consider the {Delta}P and {Delta}T costs as more important than the capital spent on the heat exchanger.

  15. Monte Carlo lattice models for adsorbed polymer conformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Good, B. S.

    1985-01-01

    The adhesion between a polymer film and a metal surface is of great technological interest. However, the prediction of adhesion and wear properties of polymer coated metals is quite difficult because a fundamental understanding of the polymer surface interaction does not yet exist. A computer model for the conformation of a polymer molecule adsorbed on a surface is discussed. The chain conformation is assumed to be described by a partially directed random walk on a three dimensional simple cubic lattice. An attractive surface potential is incorporated into the model through the use of a random walk step probability distribution that is anisotropic in the direction normal to the attractive surface. The effects of variations in potential characteristics are qualitatively included by varying both the degree of anisotropy of the step distribution and the range of the anisotropy. Polymer conformation is characterized by the average end to end distance, average radius of gyration, and average number of chain segments adsorbed on the surface.

  16. Nuclear reactions from lattice QCD

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Briceño, Raúl A.; Davoudi, Zohreh; Luu, Thomas C.

    2015-01-13

    In this study, one of the overarching goals of nuclear physics is to rigorously compute properties of hadronic systems directly from the fundamental theory of strong interactions, Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). In particular, the hope is to perform reliable calculations of nuclear reactions which will impact our understanding of environments that occur during big bang nucleosynthesis, the evolution of stars and supernovae, and within nuclear reactors and high energy/density facilities. Such calculations, being truly ab initio, would include all two-nucleon and three- nucleon (and higher) interactions in a consistent manner. Currently, lattice QCD provides the only reliable option for performing calculationsmore » of some of the low-energy hadronic observables. With the aim of bridging the gap between lattice QCD and nuclear many-body physics, the Institute for Nuclear Theory held a workshop on Nuclear Reactions from Lattice QCD on March 2013. In this review article, we report on the topics discussed in this workshop and the path planned to move forward in the upcoming years.« less

  17. Species-specific optical lattices

    SciTech Connect

    LeBlanc, L. J.; Thywissen, J. H.

    2007-05-15

    We examine single-frequency optical schemes for species-selective trapping of ultracold alkali-metal atoms. Independently addressing the elements of a binary mixture enables the creation of an optical lattice for one atomic species with little or no effect on the other. We analyze a 'tune-in' scheme, using near-resonant detuning to create a strong potential for one specific element. A 'tune-out' scheme is also developed, in which the trapping wavelength is chosen to lie between two strong transitions of an alkali-metal atom such that the induced dipole moment is zero for that species but is nonzero for any other. We compare these schemes by examining the trap depths and heating rates associated with both. We find that the tune-in scheme is preferable for Li-Na, Li-K, and K-Na mixtures, while the tune-out scheme is preferable for Li-Cs, K-Rb, Rb-Cs, K-Cs, and {sup 39}K-{sup 40}K mixtures. Several applications of species-selective optical lattices are explored, including the creation of a lattice for a single species in the presence of a phononlike background, the tuning of relative effective mass, and the isothermal increase of phase-space density.

  18. Nuclear reactions from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Briceño, Raúl A.; Davoudi, Zohreh; Luu, Thomas C.

    2015-01-13

    In this study, one of the overarching goals of nuclear physics is to rigorously compute properties of hadronic systems directly from the fundamental theory of strong interactions, Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). In particular, the hope is to perform reliable calculations of nuclear reactions which will impact our understanding of environments that occur during big bang nucleosynthesis, the evolution of stars and supernovae, and within nuclear reactors and high energy/density facilities. Such calculations, being truly ab initio, would include all two-nucleon and three- nucleon (and higher) interactions in a consistent manner. Currently, lattice QCD provides the only reliable option for performing calculations of some of the low-energy hadronic observables. With the aim of bridging the gap between lattice QCD and nuclear many-body physics, the Institute for Nuclear Theory held a workshop on Nuclear Reactions from Lattice QCD on March 2013. In this review article, we report on the topics discussed in this workshop and the path planned to move forward in the upcoming years.

  19. Identifying hazards associated with lava deltas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poland, Michael P.; Orr, Tim R.

    2014-01-01

    Lava deltas, formed where lava enters the ocean and builds a shelf of new land extending from the coastline, represent a significant local hazard, especially on populated ocean island volcanoes. Such structures are unstable and prone to collapse—events that are often accompanied by small explosions that can deposit boulders and cobbles hundreds of meters inland. Explosions that coincide with collapses of the East Lae ‘Apuki lava delta at Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai‘i, during 2005–2007 followed an evolutionary progression mirroring that of the delta itself. A collapse that occurred when the lava–ocean entry was active was associated with a blast of lithic blocks and dispersal of spatter and fine, glassy tephra. Shortly after delta growth ceased, a collapse exposed hot rock to cold ocean water, resulting in an explosion composed entirely of lithic blocks and lapilli. Further collapse of the delta after several months of inactivity, by which time it had cooled significantly, resulted in no recognizable explosion deposit. Seaward displacement and subsidence of the coastline immediately inland of the delta was measured by both satellite and ground-based sensors and occurred at rates of several centimeters per month even after the lava–ocean entry had ceased. The anomalous deformation ended only after complete collapse of the delta. Monitoring of ground deformation may therefore provide an indication of the potential for delta collapse, while the hazard associated with collapse can be inferred from the level of activity, or the time since the last activity, on the delta.

  20. Lattice Green's functions in all dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guttmann, Anthony J.

    2010-07-01

    We give a systematic treatment of lattice Green's functions (LGF) on the d-dimensional diamond, simple cubic, body-centred cubic and face-centred cubic lattices for arbitrary dimensionality d >= 2 for the first three lattices, and for 2 <= d <= 5 for the hyper-fcc lattice. We show that there is a close connection between the LGF of the d-dimensional hyper-cubic lattice and that of the (d - 1)-dimensional diamond lattice. We give constant-term formulations of LGFs for each of these lattices in all dimensions. Through a still under-developed connection with Mahler measures, we point out an unexpected connection between the coefficients of the sc, bcc and diamond LGFs and some Ramanujan-type formulae for 1/π.

  1. Manipulation and control of a bichromatic lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Claire; Barter, Thomas; Daiss, Severin; Leung, Zephy; Stamper-Kurn, Dan

    2015-05-01

    Recent experiments with ultracold atoms in optical lattices have had great success emulating the simple models of condensed matter systems. These experiments are typically performed with a single site per unit cell. We realize a lattice with up to four sites per unit cell by overlaying an attractive triangular lattice with a repulsive one at twice the wavelength. The relative displacement of the two lattices determines the particular structure. One available configuration is the kagome lattice, which has a flat energy band. In the flat band all kinetic energy states are degenerate, so we have the opportunity to explore a regime where interactions dominate. This bichromatic lattice requires careful stabilization, but offers an opportunity to manipulate the unit cell and band structure by perturbing the lattices relative to one another. I will discuss recent progress.

  2. Lattice Truss Structural Response Using Energy Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenner, Winfred Scottson

    1996-01-01

    A deterministic methodology is presented for developing closed-form deflection equations for two-dimensional and three-dimensional lattice structures. Four types of lattice structures are studied: beams, plates, shells and soft lattices. Castigliano's second theorem, which entails the total strain energy of a structure, is utilized to generate highly accurate results. Derived deflection equations provide new insight into the bending and shear behavior of the four types of lattices, in contrast to classic solutions of similar structures. Lattice derivations utilizing kinetic energy are also presented, and used to examine the free vibration response of simple lattice structures. Derivations utilizing finite element theory for unique lattice behavior are also presented and validated using the finite element analysis code EAL.

  3. Design of lipid-based delivery systems for improving lymphatic transport and bioavailability of delta-tocopherol and nobiletin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Chunxin

    Lymphatic drug transport can confer bioavailability advantage by avoiding the first-pass metabolism normally observed in the portal vein hepatic route. It was reported that long chain lipid-based delivery systems can stimulate the formation of chylomicron and thus promote the lymphatic transport of drugs. In this study, a novel delta-tocopherol (delta-T) loaded Solid Lipid Nanoparticle (SLN) system was developed to investigate its effect on promoting the lymphatic transport of delta-T. The delta-T SLN was prepared with hot melt emulsification method by using glyceryl behenate (compritol RTM888) as the lipid phase and lecithin (PC75) as the emulsifier. Formula configuration, processing condition and loading capacity were carefully optimized. Physicochemical properties (particle size, surface charge, morphology) were also characterized. Moreover, excellent stability of the developed delta-T SLN in the gastrointestinal environment was observed by using an in vitro digestion model. Further investigations of the SLN in stimulating delta-T lymphatic transport were performed on mice without cannulation. Compared with the control group (delta-T corn oil dispersion), much lower delta-T levels in both blood and liver indicated reduced portal vein and hepatic transport of delta-T in the form of SLN. On the other hand, significantly higher concentrations of delta-T were observed in thymus, a major lymphatic tissue, indicating improved lymphatic transport of delta-T with the SLN delivery system. Finally, the far less excreted delta-T level in feces further confirmed improved lymphatic transport and overall bioavailability of delta-T by using SLN system. Nobiletin (NOB), one of most abundant polymethoxyflavones (PMFs) found in Citrus genus, has a low solubility in both water and oil at ambient temperatures. Thus it tends to form crystals when the loading exceeds its saturation level in the carrier system. This character greatly impaired its bioavailability and application. To

  4. Niger Delta play types, Nigeria

    SciTech Connect

    Akinpelu, A.O.

    1995-08-01

    Exploration databases can be more valuable when sorted by play type. Play specific databases provide a system to organize E & P data used in evaluating the range of values of parameters for reserve estimation and risk assessment. It is important both in focusing the knowledge base and in orienting research effort. A play in this context is any unique combination of trap, reservoir and source properties with the right dynamics of migration and preservation that results in hydrocarbon accumulation. This definitions helps us to discriminate the subtle differences found with these accumulation settings. About 20 play types were identified around the Niger Delta oil province in Nigeria. These are grouped into three parts: (1) The proven plays-constituting the bulk of exploration prospects in Nigeria today. (2) The unproven or semi-proven plays usually with some successes recorded in a few tries but where knowledge is still inadequate. (3) The unproven or analogous play concept. These are untested but geologically sound ideas which may or may not have been tried elsewhere. With classification and sub grouping of these play types into specific databases, intrinsic attributes and uniqueness of each of them with respect to the four major risk elements and the eight parameters for reserve estimation can be better understood.

  5. Novel diazabicycloalkane delta opioid agonists.

    PubMed

    Loriga, Giovanni; Lazzari, Paolo; Manca, Ilaria; Ruiu, Stefania; Falzoi, Matteo; Murineddu, Gabriele; Bottazzi, Mirko Emilio Heiner; Pinna, Giovanni; Pinna, Gérard Aimè

    2015-09-01

    Here we report the investigation of diazabicycloalkane cores as potential new scaffolds for the development of novel analogues of the previously reported diazatricyclodecane selective delta (δ) opioid agonists, as conformationally constrained homologues of the reference δ agonist (+)-4-[(αR)-α((2S,5R)-4-allyl-2,5-dimethyl-1-piperazinyl)-3-methoxybenzyl]-N,N-diethylbenzamide (SNC80). In particular, we have simplified the diazatricyclodecane motif of δ opioid agonist prototype 1a with bridged bicyclic cores. 3,6-diazabicyclo[3.1.1]heptane, 3,8-diazabicyclo[3.2.1]octane, 3,9-diazabicyclo[3.3.1]nonane, 3,9-diazabicyclo[4.2.1]nonane, and 3,10-diazabicyclo[4.3.1]decane were adopted as core motifs of the novel derivatives. The compounds were synthesized and biologically assayed as racemic (3-5) or diastereoisomeric (6,7) mixtures. All the novel compounds 3-7 showed δ agonism behaviour and remarkable affinity to δ receptors. Amongst the novel derivatives, 3,8-diazabicyclo[3.2.1]octane based compound 4 evidenced improved δ affinity and selectivity relative to SNC80.

  6. Laser amplifier chain

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, R.P.

    1992-10-20

    A laser amplifier chain has a plurality of laser amplifiers arranged in a chain to sequentially amplify a low-power signal beam to produce a significantly higher-power output beam. Overall efficiency of such a chain is improved if high-gain, low efficiency amplifiers are placed on the upstream side of the chain where only a very small fraction of the total pumped power is received by the chain and low-gain, high-efficiency amplifiers are placed on the downstream side where a majority of pumping energy is received by the chain. 6 figs.

  7. Laser amplifier chain

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, Richard P.

    1992-01-01

    A laser amplifier chain has a plurality of laser amplifiers arranged in a chain to sequentially amplify a low-power signal beam to produce a significantly higher-power output beam. Overall efficiency of such a chain is improved if high-gain, low efficiency amplifiers are placed on the upstream side of the chain where only a very small fraction of the total pumped power is received by the chain and low-gain, high-efficiency amplifiers are placed on the downstream side where a majority of pumping energy is received by the chain.

  8. Delta-nucleus dynamics: proceedings of symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, T.S.H.; Geesaman, D.F.; Schiffer, J.P.

    1983-10-01

    The appreciation of the role in nuclear physics of the first excited state of the nucleon, the delta ..delta..(1232), has grown rapidly in the past decade. The delta resonance dominates nuclear reactions induced by intermediate energy pions, nucleons, and electromagnetic probes. It is also the most important non-nucleonic degree of freedom needed to resolve many fundamental problems encountered in the study of low-energy nuclear phenomena. Clearly, a new phase of nuclear physics has emerged and conventional thinking must be extended to account for this new dimension of nuclear dynamics. The most challenging problem we are facing is how a unified theory can be developed to describe ..delta..-nucleus dynamics at all energies. In exploring this new direction, it is important to have direct discussions among researchers with different viewpoints. Separate entries were prepared for the 49 papers presented. (WHK)

  9. Contemporary depositional environments of the Omo delta.

    PubMed

    Butzer, K W

    1970-05-01

    Geomorphological and sedimentological studies of depositional environments of the modern Omo River delta and floodplain are essential to an understanding of the Pliocene to Pleistocene Mursi, Nkalabong and Kibish Formations of the Lower Omo Basin (southwestern Ethiopia).

  10. delta(13)C and delta(2)H isotope ratios in amphetamine synthesized from benzaldehyde and nitroethane.

    PubMed

    Collins, Michael; Salouros, Helen; Cawley, Adam T; Robertson, James; Heagney, Aaron C; Arenas-Queralt, Andrea

    2010-06-15

    Previous work in these laboratories and by Butzenlechner et al. and Culp et al. has demonstrated that the delta(2)H isotope value of industrial benzaldehyde produced by the catalytic oxidation of toluene is profoundly positive, usually in the range +300 per thousand to +500 per thousand. Synthetic routes leading to amphetamine, methylamphetamine or their precursors and commencing with such benzaldehyde may be expected to exhibit unusually positive delta(2)H values. Results are presented for delta(13)C and delta(2)H isotope values of 1-phenyl-2-nitropropene synthesized from an industrial source of benzaldehyde, having a positive delta(2)H isotope value, by a Knoevenagel condensation with nitroethane. Results are also presented for delta(13)C and delta(2)H isotope values for amphetamine prepared from the resulting 1-phenyl-2-nitropropene. The values obtained were compared with delta(13)C and delta(2)H isotope values obtained for an amphetamine sample prepared using a synthetic route that did not involve benzaldehyde. Finally, results are presented for samples of benzaldehyde, 1-phenyl-2-nitropropene and amphetamine that had been seized at a clandestine amphetamine laboratory.

  11. Migration in Vulnerable Deltas: A Research Strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutton, C.; Nicholls, R. J.; Allan, A.

    2015-12-01

    C. Hutton1, & R. J. Nicholls1, , 1 University of Southampton, University Road, Southampton, Hampshire, United Kingdom, SO17 1BJ. cwh@geodata. soton.ac.ukAbstractGlobally, deltas contain 500 million people and with rising sea levels often linked to large number of forced migrants are expected in the coming century. However, migration is already a major process in deltas, such as the growth of major cities such as Dhaka and Kolkata. Climate and environmental change interacts with a range of catchment and delta level drivers, which encompass a nexus of sea-level rise, storms, freshwater and sediment supply from the catchment, land degradation, subsidence, agricultural loss and socio-economic stresses. DECCMA (Deltas, Vulnerability and Climate Change: Migration and Adaptation/CARRIA) is investigating migration in the Ganges-Brahmaputra-Meghna (GBM), Mahanadi and Volta Deltas, including the influence of climate change. The research will explore migration from a range of perspectives including governance and stakeholder analysis, demographic analysis, household surveys of sending and receiving areas, macro-economic analysis, and hazards and hotspot analysis both historically and into the future. Migration under climate change will depend on other adaptation in the deltas and this will be examined. Collectively, integrated analysis will be developed to examine migration, other adaptation and development pathways with a particular focus on the implications for the poorest. This will require the development of input scenarios, including expert-derived exogenous scenarios (e.g., climate change) and endogenous scenarios of the delta developed in a participatory manner. This applied research will facilitate decision support methods for the development of deltas under climate change, with a focus on migration and other adaptation strategies.

  12. Lattice cluster theory for dense, thin polymer films

    SciTech Connect

    Freed, Karl F.

    2015-04-07

    While the application of the lattice cluster theory (LCT) to study the miscibility of polymer blends has greatly expanded our understanding of the monomer scale molecular details influencing miscibility, the corresponding theory for inhomogeneous systems has not yet emerged because of considerable technical difficulties and much greater complexity. Here, we present a general formulation enabling the extension of the LCT to describe the thermodynamic properties of dense, thin polymer films using a high dimension, high temperature expansion. Whereas the leading order of the LCT for bulk polymer systems is essentially simple Flory-Huggins theory, the highly non-trivial leading order inhomogeneous LCT (ILCT) for a film with L layers already involves the numerical solution of 3(L − 1) coupled, highly nonlinear equations for the various density profiles in the film. The new theory incorporates the essential “transport” constraints of Helfand and focuses on the strict imposition of excluded volume constraints, appropriate to dense polymer systems, rather than the maintenance of chain connectivity as appropriate for lower densities and as implemented in self-consistent theories of polymer adsorption at interfaces. The ILCT is illustrated by presenting examples of the computed profiles of the density, the parallel and perpendicular bonds, and the chain ends for free standing and supported films as a function of average film density, chain length, temperature, interaction with support, and chain stiffness. The results generally agree with expected general trends.

  13. Coupled ion and network dynamics in polymer electrolytes: Monte Carlo study of a lattice model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dürr, O.; Dieterich, W.; Nitzan, A.

    2004-12-01

    Monte Carlo simulations are used to study ion and polymer chain dynamic properties in a simplified lattice model with only one species of mobile ions. The ions interact attractively with specific beads in the host chains, while polymer beads repel each other. Cross linking of chains by the ions reduces chain mobilities which in turn suppresses ionic diffusion. Diffusion constants for ions and chains as a function of temperature follow the Vogel-Tammann-Fulcher (VTF) law with a common VTF temperature at low ion concentration, but both decouple at higher concentrations, in agreement with experimental observations. Our model allows us to introduce pressure as an independent variable through calculations of the equation of state using the quasichemical approximation, and to detect an exponential pressure dependence of the ionic diffusion.

  14. Lena River Delta formation during the Holocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolshiyanov, D.; Makarov, A.; Savelieva, L.

    2014-03-01

    The Lena River Delta, the largest delta of the Arctic Ocean, differs from other deltas because it consists mainly of organomineral sediments, commonly called peat, that contain a huge organic carbon reservoir. The analysis of Delta sediment radiocarbon ages showed that they could not have formed as peat during floodplain bogging, but accumulated when Laptev Sea water level was high and green mosses and sedges grew and were deposited on the surface of flooded marshes. The Lena River Delta formed as organomineral masses and layered sediments accumulated during transgressive phases when sea level rose. In regressive phases, the islands composed of these sediments and other, more ancient islands were eroded. Each new sea transgression led to further accumulation of layered sediments. As a result of alternating transgressive and regressive phases the first alluvial-marine terrace formed, consisting of geological bodies of different ages. Determining the formation age of different areas of the first terrace and other marine terraces on the coast allowed the periods of increasing (8-6 Ka, 4.5-4 Ka, 2.5-1.5 Ka, 0.4-0.2 Ka) and decreasing (5 Ka, 3 Ka, 0.5 Ka) Laptev Sea levels to be distinguished in the Lena Delta area.

  15. Lena River delta formation during the Holocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolshiyanov, D.; Makarov, A.; Savelieva, L.

    2015-01-01

    The Lena River delta, the largest delta of the Arctic Ocean, differs from other deltas because it consists mainly of organomineral sediments, commonly called peat, that contain a huge organic carbon reservoir. The analysis of delta sediment radiocarbon ages showed that they could not have formed as peat during floodplain bogging; rather, they accumulated when Laptev Sea water level was high and green mosses and sedges grew and were deposited on the surface of flooded marshes. The Lena River delta formed as organomineral masses and layered sediments accumulated during transgressive phases when sea level rose. In regressive phases, the islands composed of these sediments and other, more ancient islands were eroded. Each new sea transgression led to further accumulation of layered sediments. As a result of alternating transgressive and regressive phases, the first alluvial-marine terrace formed, consisting of geological bodies of different ages. Determining the formation age of different areas of the first terrace and other marine terraces on the coast allowed the periods of increasing (8000-6000 BP (years before present), 4500-4000, 2500-1500, and 400-200 BP) and decreasing (5000, 3000, and 500 BP) Laptev Sea levels to be distinguished in the Lena Delta area.

  16. Preparing Nimbus E on Delta Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Nimbus E, the sixth spacecraft in the Nimbus series, is shown preparing for launch on December 12, 1972 from the Western Test Range (WTR), Space Launch Complex SLC-2, West, by the Thrust- Augmented Delta vehicle. The satellite was placed in an 1100-kilometer run-synchronous nearly circular polar orbit. The spacecraft was designated Nimbus 5 upon confirmation that it had achieved successful orbit. The Delta launch vehicle family started development in 1959. The Delta is composed of parts from the Thor, an intermediate-range ballistic missile, as its first stage, and the Vanguard as its second. The first Delta was launched from Cape Canaveral on May 13, 1960 and was powerful enough to deliver a 100-pound spacecraft into geostationary transfer orbit. Delta has been used to launch civil, commercial, and military satellites into orbit. For more information about Delta, please see Chapter 3 in Roger Launius and Dennis Jenkins' book To Reach the High Frontier published by The University Press of Kentucky in 2002.

  17. Phytotaphonomy in subtropical to temperate bayhead delta

    SciTech Connect

    Gastaldo, R.A.

    1986-05-01

    Deltaic regimes act as sinks for hydrocarbon precursors of various organic origin. Most organic detritus incorporated into deltaic sediments is contributed by vegetation established in wetland environments. Processes that incorporate vegetational components in deltaic subenvironments vary, depending on the climate and geography of the sediment-receiving basin. Understanding the phytotaphonomy within the sedimentologic context of different deltas will help workers develop criteria to identify ancient deltaic subenvironments. Some subenvironments are richer in accumulated plant detritus than others; therefore, to plan exploration and exploitation programs, the relationships between sources and reservoirs must be understood. The Mobile delta, Alabama, is a bayhead delta that began prograding through a drowned Pleistocene river valley before 9.5 k.y.B.P. Plant detritus accumulated - and is presently accumulating - in parts of the upper and lower delta flood basins. In the upper delta, large quantities of detritus are deposited in abandoned distributary channels, whereas litter is recycled in clastic swamps. Organic detritus is concentrated in the lower delta in interdistributary bays and marshes. These latter sites contain more productive source sediments for future hydrocarbon resources.

  18. Topological order-by-disorder in orbitally degenerate dipolar bosons on a zigzag lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, G.; Vekua, T.

    2014-09-01

    Spinor bosons offer a conceptually simple picture of macroscopic quantum behavior of topological order-by-disorder: The paramagnetic state of two-component dipolar bosons in an orbitally degenerate zigzag lattice is unstable against infinitesimal quantum fluctuations of orbitals, λ, towards developing nonlocal hidden order. Adjacent to the topological state a locally correlated exact ground state with spontaneously a quadrupoled lattice constant is realized for the broad parameter regime. The topological order is extremely robust surviving the λ →∞ limit where the ground state evolves into the Majumdar-Ghosh state of a frustrated spin-1/2 chain.

  19. One-dimensional lattices topologically equivalent to two-dimensional lattices within the context of the lattice gas model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costanza, E. F.; Costanza, G.

    2016-10-01

    Continuum partial differential equations are obtained from a set of discrete stochastic evolution equations of both non-Markovian and Markovian processes and applied to the diffusion within the context of the lattice gas model. A procedure allowing to construct one-dimensional lattices that are topologically equivalent to two-dimensional lattices is described in detail in the case of a rectangular lattice. This example shows the general features that possess the procedure and extensions are also suggested in order to provide a wider insight in the present approach.

  20. Colliding-beam-accelerator lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Claus, J.; Cornacchia, M.; Courant, E.D.; Parzen, G.

    1983-01-01

    We describe the lattice of the Colliding Beam Accelerator, a 400 x 400 GeV pp facility proposed for construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The structure adopted is very versatile, in part in consequence of its desirable behavior as function of momentum deviation and as function of the betatron tunes. Each of the six insertions can be arranged to meet specific requirements at the crossing points as illustrated by a discussion of the tuneable low-beta insertions. The luminosity in these low-beta insertions (2 x 10/sup 33/ cm/sup -2/ sec/sup -1/) would be an order of magnitude larger than the standard insertions.

  1. Lattice models of biological growth

    SciTech Connect

    Young, D.A.; Corey, E.M. )

    1990-06-15

    We show that very simple iterative rules for the growth of cells on a two-dimensional lattice can simulate biological-growth phenomena realistically. We discuss random cellular automata models for the growth of fern gametophytes, branching fungi, and leaves, and for shape transformations useful in the study of biological variation and evolution. Although there are interesting analogies between biological and physical growth processes, we stress the uniqueness of biological automata behavior. The computer growth algorithms that successfully mimic observed growth behavior may be helpful in determining the underlying biochemical mechanisms of growth regulation.

  2. Multi-stable cylindrical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirrera, Alberto; Lachenal, Xavier; Daynes, Stephen; Weaver, Paul M.; Chenchiah, Isaac V.

    2013-11-01

    We present a cylindrical lattice structure that mimics the behaviour of the virus bacteriophage T4 in having two (or more) stable states which differ in their radii and length. While the virus achieves bistability through molecular mechanisms we use composite materials to exploit the interplay between pre-stress, material properties and structural geometry. We demonstrate (computationally) that multi-stability is a robust phenomenon. We also show (analytically) that it is possible to choose the design variables so that the energy is independent of the radius, thus resulting in every state of the structure being stable.

  3. GLAD: A Generic LAttice Debugger

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, M.J.

    1991-11-01

    Today, numerous simulation and analysis codes exist for the design, commission, and operation of accelerator beam lines. There is a need to develop a common user interface and database link to run these codes interactively. This paper will describe a proposed system, GLAD (Generic LAttice Debugger), to fulfill this need. Specifically, GLAD can be used to find errors in beam lines during commissioning, control beam parameters during operation, and design beam line optics and error correction systems for the next generation of linear accelerators and storage rings.

  4. Solitary waves on tensegrity lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraternali, F.; Senatore, L.; Daraio, C.

    2012-06-01

    We study the dynamics of lattices formed by masses connected through tensegrity prisms. By employing analytic and numerical arguments, we show that such structures support two limit dynamic regimes controlled by the prisms' properties: (i) in the low-energy (sonic) regime the system supports the formation and propagation of solitary waves which exhibit sech2 shape and (ii) in the high-energy (ultrasonic) regime the system supports atomic-scale localization. Such peculiar features found in periodic arrays of tensegrity structures suggest their use for the creation of new composite materials (here called "tensegrity materials") of potential interest for applications in impact absorption, energy localization and in new acoustic devices.

  5. Kaon Condensation with Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Detmold, Will; Detmold, William; Detmold, Will; Detmold, William; Savage, Martin; Walker-Loud, Andre; Orginos, Konstantinos; Torok, Aaron

    2008-09-01

    doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevD.78.054514
    Kaon condensation may play an important role in the structure of hadronic matter at densities greater than that of nuclear matter, as exist in the interior of neutron stars. We present the results of the first lattice QCD calculation of kaon condensation obtained by studying systems containing up to twelve charged kaons. Surprisingly, the equation of state of the condensate is remarkably well reproduced by leading order chiral perturbation theory. We determine the three-kaon interaction from the multi-kaon systems and update our results for pion condensates.

  6. A novel mouse PKC{delta} splice variant, PKC{delta}IX, inhibits etoposide-induced apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jung D.; Seo, Kwang W.; Lee, Eun A.; Quang, Nguyen N.; Cho, Hong R.; Kwon, Byungsuk

    2011-07-01

    Highlights: {yields} A novel PKC{delta} isoform, named PKC{delta}IX, that lacks the C1 domain and the ATP-binding site is ubiquitously expressed. {yields} PKC{delta}IX inhibits etoposide-induced apoptosis. {yields} PKC{delta}IX may function as an endogenous dominant negative isoform for PKC{delta}. -- Abstract: Protein kinase C (PKC) {delta} plays an important role in cellular proliferation and apoptosis. The catalytic fragment of PKC{delta} generated by caspase-dependent cleavage is essential for the initiation of etoposide-induced apoptosis. In this study, we identified a novel mouse PKC{delta} isoform named PKC{delta}IX (Genebank Accession No. (HQ840432)). PKC{delta}IX is generated by alternative splicing and is ubiquitously expressed, as seen in its full-length PKC{delta}. PKC{delta}IX lacks the C1 domain, the caspase 3 cleavage site, and the ATP binding site but preserves an almost intact c-terminal catalytic domain and a nuclear localization signal (NLS). The structural characteristics of PKC{delta}IX provided a possibility that this PKC{delta} isozyme functions as a novel dominant-negative form for PKC{delta} due to its lack of the ATP-binding domain that is required for the kinase activity of PKC{delta}. Indeed, overexpression of PKC{delta}IX significantly inhibited etoposide-induced apoptosis in NIH3T3 cells. In addition, an in vitro kinase assay showed that recombinant PKC{delta}IX protein could competitively inhibit the kinase activity of PKC{delta}. We conclude that PKC{delta}IX can function as a natural dominant-negative inhibitor of PKC{delta}in vivo.

  7. Parallel algorithms for simulating continuous time Markov chains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicol, David M.; Heidelberger, Philip

    1992-01-01

    We have previously shown that the mathematical technique of uniformization can serve as the basis of synchronization for the parallel simulation of continuous-time Markov chains. This paper reviews the basic method and compares five different methods based on uniformization, evaluating their strengths and weaknesses as a function of problem characteristics. The methods vary in their use of optimism, logical aggregation, communication management, and adaptivity. Performance evaluation is conducted on the Intel Touchstone Delta multiprocessor, using up to 256 processors.

  8. Localization of Waves in Merged Lattices.

    PubMed

    Alagappan, G; Png, C E

    2016-01-01

    This article describes a new two-dimensional physical topology-merged lattice, that allows dense number of wave localization states. Merged lattices are obtained as a result of merging two lattices of scatters of the same space group, but with slightly different spatial resonances. Such merging creates two-dimensional scattering "beats" which are perfectly periodic on the longer spatial scale. On the shorter spatial scale, the systematic breakage of the translational symmetry leads to strong wave scattering, and this causes the occurrences of wave localization states. Merged Lattices promises variety of localization states including tightly confined, and ring type annular modes. The longer scale perfect periodicity of the merged lattice, enables complete prediction and full control over the density of the localization states and its' quality factors. In addition, the longer scale periodicity, also allows design of integrated slow wave components. Merged lattices, thus, can be engineered easily to create technologically beneficial applications. PMID:27535096

  9. Localization of Waves in Merged Lattices

    PubMed Central

    Alagappan, G.; Png, C. E.

    2016-01-01

    This article describes a new two–dimensional physical topology–merged lattice, that allows dense number of wave localization states. Merged lattices are obtained as a result of merging two lattices of scatters of the same space group, but with slightly different spatial resonances. Such merging creates two–dimensional scattering “beats” which are perfectly periodic on the longer spatial scale. On the shorter spatial scale, the systematic breakage of the translational symmetry leads to strong wave scattering, and this causes the occurrences of wave localization states. Merged Lattices promises variety of localization states including tightly confined, and ring type annular modes. The longer scale perfect periodicity of the merged lattice, enables complete prediction and full control over the density of the localization states and its’ quality factors. In addition, the longer scale periodicity, also allows design of integrated slow wave components. Merged lattices, thus, can be engineered easily to create technologically beneficial applications. PMID:27535096

  10. Localization of Waves in Merged Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alagappan, G.; Png, C. E.

    2016-08-01

    This article describes a new two-dimensional physical topology-merged lattice, that allows dense number of wave localization states. Merged lattices are obtained as a result of merging two lattices of scatters of the same space group, but with slightly different spatial resonances. Such merging creates two-dimensional scattering “beats” which are perfectly periodic on the longer spatial scale. On the shorter spatial scale, the systematic breakage of the translational symmetry leads to strong wave scattering, and this causes the occurrences of wave localization states. Merged Lattices promises variety of localization states including tightly confined, and ring type annular modes. The longer scale perfect periodicity of the merged lattice, enables complete prediction and full control over the density of the localization states and its’ quality factors. In addition, the longer scale periodicity, also allows design of integrated slow wave components. Merged lattices, thus, can be engineered easily to create technologically beneficial applications.

  11. Working Group Report: Lattice Field Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Blum, T.; et al.,

    2013-10-22

    This is the report of the Computing Frontier working group on Lattice Field Theory prepared for the proceedings of the 2013 Community Summer Study ("Snowmass"). We present the future computing needs and plans of the U.S. lattice gauge theory community and argue that continued support of the U.S. (and worldwide) lattice-QCD effort is essential to fully capitalize on the enormous investment in the high-energy physics experimental program. We first summarize the dramatic progress of numerical lattice-QCD simulations in the past decade, with some emphasis on calculations carried out under the auspices of the U.S. Lattice-QCD Collaboration, and describe a broad program of lattice-QCD calculations that will be relevant for future experiments at the intensity and energy frontiers. We then present details of the computational hardware and software resources needed to undertake these calculations.

  12. Localization of Waves in Merged Lattices.

    PubMed

    Alagappan, G; Png, C E

    2016-08-18

    This article describes a new two-dimensional physical topology-merged lattice, that allows dense number of wave localization states. Merged lattices are obtained as a result of merging two lattices of scatters of the same space group, but with slightly different spatial resonances. Such merging creates two-dimensional scattering "beats" which are perfectly periodic on the longer spatial scale. On the shorter spatial scale, the systematic breakage of the translational symmetry leads to strong wave scattering, and this causes the occurrences of wave localization states. Merged Lattices promises variety of localization states including tightly confined, and ring type annular modes. The longer scale perfect periodicity of the merged lattice, enables complete prediction and full control over the density of the localization states and its' quality factors. In addition, the longer scale periodicity, also allows design of integrated slow wave components. Merged lattices, thus, can be engineered easily to create technologically beneficial applications.

  13. The Okavango: Whose Delta is it?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magole, Lapologang; Magole, Lefatshe Innocent

    The Okavango Delta is amongst the largest Ramsar sites ( http://www.ramsar.org/sitelist.pdf) in the world and an important wetland for community livelihoods, conservation and tourism in Botswana. Over the years, the utilization of the delta has shifted from communal use to state control, with an increased use for conservation and tourism. This increased use for conservation and tourism has manifested in the physical expansion of the conservation area - Moremi Game Reserve and the formation of Wildlife Management Areas (WMAs) around the reserve, whose primary land use is wildlife utilization. The expansion of the conservation area has translated into several practical matters, including expansion of the area for non-hunting activities or photographic areas. The livelihoods of local communities of the Okavango delta who depended on fishing, hunter-gathering, livestock rearing, rain-fed agriculture and flood recession farming have been negatively affected by the expansion of conservation and tourism in the delta. The livelihoods alternatives in the form of Community Based Natural Resource Management (CBNRM) and tourism have not provided substitutes for the people as the communities are still reliant on the same old livelihood sources as in the past, albeit within smaller and restricted areas. This paper explores the ownership of the natural resources within the Okavango Delta. It asks and attempts to answer the following questions: Who owns and controls the use of the land? Who has access to other resources there in? Who makes the decisions on how the delta resources should be managed and used? Who benefits from the delta resources? We argue firstly that ownership of the delta as defined by legal parameters and demonstrated in natural resource management practice is vested on government. Secondly, government, after assuming ownership of the delta continues to sell its stake to the international community, at the expense of local ownership and access to resources. We

  14. Delta9-THC as a discriminative cue in pigeons: effects of delta8-THC, CBD, and CBN.

    PubMed

    Järbe, T U; Henriksson, B G; Ohlin, G C

    1977-07-01

    Pigeons, trained to discriminate the effects of i.m. injections of delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta9-THC, 0.25 mg/kg) from the effects of the vehicle in a drug discrimination paradigm, were tested for generalization with the isomeric delta8-THC, cannabidiol (CBD) and cannabinol (CBN). When given in sufficient doses, delta8-THC and CBN were found to substitute for delta9-THC whereas CBD did not. CBD and CBN did not antagonize the stimulus effect of delta9-THC. The combination of CBN and delta9-THC rather appeared to accentuate the drug response.

  15. Experimental generation of optical coherence lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yahong; Ponomarenko, Sergey A.; Cai, Yangjian

    2016-08-01

    We report experimental generation and measurement of recently introduced optical coherence lattices. The presented optical coherence lattice realization technique hinges on a superposition of mutually uncorrelated partially coherent Schell-model beams with tailored coherence properties. We show theoretically that information can be encoded into and, in principle, recovered from the lattice degree of coherence. Our results can find applications to image transmission and optical encryption.

  16. Trapping Rydberg Atoms in an Optical Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Sarah E.

    2012-06-01

    Optical lattice traps for Rydberg atoms are of interest in advanced science and in practical applications. After a brief discussion of these areas of interest, I will review some basics of optical Rydberg-atom trapping. The trapping potential experienced by a Rydberg atom in an optical lattice is given by the spatial average of the free-electron ponderomotive energy weighted by the Rydberg electron's probability distribution. I will then present experimental results on the trapping of ^85Rb Rydberg atoms in a one-dimensional ponderomotive optical lattice (wavelength 1064 nm). The principal methods employed to study the lattice performance are microwave spectroscopy, which is used to measure the lattice's trapping efficiency, and photo-ionization, which is used to measure the dwell time of the atoms in the lattice. I have achieved a 90% trapping efficiency for ^85Rb 50S atoms by inverting the lattice immediately after laser excitation of ground-state atoms into Rydberg states. I have characterized the dwell time of the atoms in the lattice using photo-ionization of 50D5/2 atoms. In continued work, I have explored the dependence of the Rydberg-atom trapping potential on the angular portion of the atomic wavefunction. Distinct angular states exhibit different trapping behavior in the optical lattice, depending on how their wavefunctions are oriented relative to the lattice planes. Specifically, I have measured the lattice potential depth of sublevels of ^85Rb nD atoms (50<=n<=65) in a one-dimensional optical lattice with a transverse DC electric field. The trapping behavior varies substantially for the various angular sublevels, in agreement with theory. The talk will conclude with an outlook into planned experiments.

  17. Observing dynamical SUSY breaking with lattice simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Kanamori, Issaku

    2008-11-23

    On the basis of the recently developed lattice formulation of supersymmetric theories which keeps a part of the supersymmetry, we propose a method of observing dynamical SUSY breaking with lattice simulation. We use Hamiltonian as an order parameter and measure the ground state energy as a zero temperature limit of the finite temperature simulation. Our method provides a way of obtaining a physical result from the lattice simulation for supersymmetric theories.

  18. SUPER-B LATTICE STUDIES

    SciTech Connect

    Biagini, M.E.; Raimondi, P.; Piminov, P.; Sinyatkin, S.; Nosochkov, Y.; Wittmer, W.; /SLAC

    2010-08-25

    The SuperB asymmetric e{sup +}e{sup -} collider is designed for 10{sup 36} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} luminosity and beam energies of 6.7 and 4.18 GeV for e{sup +} and e{sup -} respectively. The High and Low Energy Rings (HER and LER) have one Interaction Point (IP) with 66 mrad crossing angle. The 1258 m rings fit to the INFN-LNF site at Frascati. The ring emittance is minimized for the high luminosity. The Final Focus (FF) chromaticity correction is optimized for maximum transverse acceptance and energy bandwidth. Included Crab Waist sextupoles suppress betatron resonances induced in the collisions with a large Piwinski angle. The LER Spin Rotator sections provide longitudinally polarized electron beam at the IP. The lattice is flexible for tuning the machine parameters and compatible with reusing the PEP-II magnets, RF cavities and other components. Details of the lattice design are presented.

  19. Computational study of lattice models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zujev, Aleksander

    This dissertation is composed of the descriptions of a few projects undertook to complete my doctorate at the University of California, Davis. Different as they are, the common feature of them is that they all deal with simulations of lattice models, and physics which results from interparticle interactions. As an example, both the Feynman-Kikuchi model (Chapter 3) and Bose-Fermi mixture (Chapter 4) deal with the conditions under which superfluid transitions occur. The dissertation is divided into two parts. Part I (Chapters 1-2) is theoretical. It describes the systems we study - superfluidity and particularly superfluid helium, and optical lattices. The numerical methods of working with them are described. The use of Monte Carlo methods is another unifying theme of the different projects in this thesis. Part II (Chapters 3-6) deals with applications. It consists of 4 chapters describing different projects. Two of them, Feynman-Kikuchi model, and Bose-Fermi mixture are finished and published. The work done on t - J model, described in Chapter 5, is more preliminary, and the project is far from complete. A preliminary report on it was given on 2009 APS March meeting. The Isentropic project, described in the last chapter, is finished. A report on it was given on 2010 APS March meeting, and a paper is in preparation. The quantum simulation program used for Bose-Fermi mixture project was written by our collaborators Valery Rousseau and Peter Denteneer. I had written my own code for the other projects.

  20. Stable nitrogen isotope ratios and accumulation of various HOCs in northern Baltic aquatic food chains

    SciTech Connect

    Broman, D.; Axelman, J.; Bergqvist, P.A.; Naef, C.; Rolff, C.; Zebuehr, Y.

    1995-12-31

    Ratios of naturally occurring stable isotopes of nitrogen ({delta}{sup 15}N) can be used to numerically classify trophic levels of organisms in food chains. By combining analyses results of various HOCs (e.g. PCDD/Fs, PCBs, DDTs, HCHs and some other pesticides) the biomagnification of these substances can be quantitatively estimated. In this paper different pelagic and benthic northern Baltic food chains were studied. The {delta}{sup 15}N-data gave food chain descriptions qualitatively consistent with previous conceptions of trophic arrangements in the food chains. The different HOCs concentrations were plotted versus the {delta}{sup 15}N-values for the different trophic levels and an exponential model of the form e{sup (A+B*{delta}N)} was fitted to the data. The estimates of the constant B in the model allows for an estimation of a biomagnification power (B) of different singular, or groups of, contaminants. A B-value around zero indicates that a substance is flowing through the food chain without being magnified, whereas a value > 0 indicates that a substance is biomagnified. Negative B-values indicate that a substance is not taken up or is metabolized. The A-term of the expression is only a scaling factor depending on the background level of the contaminant.

  1. COOH-terminal truncation of flightin decreases myofilament lattice organization, cross-bridge binding, and power output in Drosophila indirect flight muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Tanner, Bertrand C.W.; Miller, Mark S.; Miller, Becky M.; Lekkas, Panagiotis; Irving, Thomas C.; Maughan, David W.; Vigoreaux, Jim O.

    2011-08-26

    The indirect flight muscle (IFM) of insects is characterized by a near crystalline myofilament lattice structure that likely evolved to achieve high power output. In Drosophila IFM, the myosin rod binding protein flightin plays a crucial role in thick filament organization and sarcomere integrity. Here we investigate the extent to which the COOH terminus of flightin contributes to IFM structure and mechanical performance using transgenic Drosophila expressing a truncated flightin lacking the 44 COOH-terminal amino acids (fln{sup {Delta}C44}). Electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction measurements show decreased myofilament lattice order in the fln{sup {Delta}C44} line compared with control, a transgenic flightin-null rescued line (fln{sup +}). fln{sup {Delta}C44} fibers produced roughly 1/3 the oscillatory work and power of fln{sup +}, with reduced frequencies of maximum work (123 Hz vs. 154 Hz) and power (139 Hz vs. 187 Hz) output, indicating slower myosin cycling kinetics. These reductions in work and power stem from a slower rate of cross-bridge recruitment and decreased cross-bridge binding in fln{sup {Delta}C44} fibers, although the mean duration of cross-bridge attachment was not different between both lines. The decreases in lattice order and myosin kinetics resulted in fln{sup {Delta}C44} flies being unable to beat their wings. These results indicate that the COOH terminus of flightin is necessary for normal myofilament lattice organization, thereby facilitating the cross-bridge binding required to achieve high power output for flight.

  2. The role of chromatin conformations in diffusional transport of chromatin-binding proteins: Cartesian lattice simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wedemeier, Annika; Zhang, Ting; Merlitz, Holger; Wu, Chen-Xu; Langowski, Jörg

    2008-04-01

    In this paper, a lattice model for the diffusional transport of chromatin-binding particles in the interphase cell nucleus is proposed. Sliding effects are studied in dense networks of chromatin fibers created by three different methods: Randomly distributed, noninterconnected obstacles, a random walk chain model with an attractive step potential, and a self-avoiding random walk chain model with a hard repulsive core and attractive surroundings. By comparing a discrete and continuous version of the random walk chain model, we demonstrate that lattice discretization does not alter the diffusion of chromatin-binding particles. The influence of conformational properties of the fiber network on the particle sliding is investigated in detail while varying occupation volume, sliding probability, chain length, and persistence length. It is observed that adjacency of the monomers, the excluded volume effect incorporated in the self-avoiding random walk model, and the persistence length affect the chromatin-binding particle diffusion. It is demonstrated that sliding particles sense local chain structures. When plotting the diffusion coefficient as a function of the accessible volume for diffusing particles, the data fall onto master curves depending on the persistence length. However, once intersegment transfer is involved, chromatin-binding proteins no longer perceive local chain structures.

  3. Cascade Baryon Spectrum from Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Mathur, Nilmani; Bulava, John; Edwards, Robert; Engelson, Eric; Joo, Balint; Lichtl, Adam; Lin, Huey-Wen; Morningstar, Colin; Richards, David; Wallace, Stephen

    2008-12-01

    A comprehensive study of the cascade baryon spectrum using lattice QCD affords the prospect of predicting the masses of states not yet discovered experimentally, and determining the spin and parity of those states for which the quantum numbers are not yet known. The study of the cascades, containing two strange quarks, is particularly attractive for lattice QCD in that the chiral effects are reduced compared to states composed only of u/d quarks, and the states are typically narrow. We report preliminary results for the cascade spectrum obtained by using anisotropic Nf = 2 Wilson lattices with temporal lattice spacing 5.56 GeV?1.

  4. Fractionalized topological defects in optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xing-Hai; Fan, Wen-Jun; Shi, Jin-Wei; Kou, Su-Peng

    2015-10-01

    Topological objects are interesting topics in various fields of physics ranging from condensed matter physics to the grand unified and superstring theories. Among those, ultracold atoms provide a playground to study the complex topological objects. In this paper we present a proposal to realize an optical lattice with stable fractionalized topological objects. In particular, we generate the fractionalized topological fluxes and fractionalized skyrmions on two-dimensional optical lattices and fractionalized monopoles on three-dimensional optical lattices. These results offer a new approach to study the quantum many-body systems on optical lattices of ultracold quantum gases with controllable topological defects, including dislocations, topological fluxes and monopoles.

  5. Subwavelength Lattice Optics by Evolutionary Design

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a new class of structured optical materials—lattice opto-materials—that can manipulate the flow of visible light into a wide range of three-dimensional profiles using evolutionary design principles. Lattice opto-materials are based on the discretization of a surface into a two-dimensional (2D) subwavelength lattice whose individual lattice sites can be controlled to achieve a programmed optical response. To access a desired optical property, we designed a lattice evolutionary algorithm that includes and optimizes contributions from every element in the lattice. Lattice opto-materials can exhibit simple properties, such as on- and off-axis focusing, and can also concentrate light into multiple, discrete spots. We expanded the unit cell shapes of the lattice to achieve distinct, polarization-dependent optical responses from the same 2D patterned substrate. Finally, these lattice opto-materials can also be combined into architectures that resemble a new type of compound flat lens. PMID:25380062

  6. Polarization response of RHIC electron lens lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjbar, V. H.; Méot, F.; Bai, M.; Abell, D. T.; Meiser, D.

    2016-10-01

    Depolarization response for a system of two orthogonal snakes at irrational tunes is studied in depth using lattice independent spin integration. In particular we consider the effect of overlapping spin resonances in this system, to understand the impact of phase, tune, relative location and threshold strengths of the spin resonances. These results are benchmarked and compared to two dimensional direct tracking results for the RHIC e-lens lattice and the standard lattice. Finally we consider the effect of longitudinal motion via chromatic scans using direct six dimensional lattice tracking.

  7. Klein tunneling in deformed honeycomb lattices.

    PubMed

    Bahat-Treidel, Omri; Peleg, Or; Grobman, Mark; Shapira, Nadav; Segev, Mordechai; Pereg-Barnea, T

    2010-02-12

    We study the scattering of waves off a potential step in deformed honeycomb lattices. For deformations below a critical value, perfect Klein tunneling is obtained; i.e., a potential step transmits waves at normal incidence with nonresonant unit-transmission probability. Beyond the critical deformation a gap forms in the spectrum, and a potential step perpendicular to the deformation direction reflects all normally incident waves, exhibiting a dramatic transition form unit transmission to total reflection. These phenomena are generic to honeycomb lattices and apply to electromagnetic waves in photonic lattices, quasiparticles in graphene, and cold atoms in optical lattices. PMID:20366822

  8. Modified Aladdin lattice L2V2

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, S.; Cho, Y.

    1985-04-05

    The N30 lattice discussed in a previous note showed that a nearly matched lattice could be produced by separating four of the present quadrupole from their present power supplies and powering them separately. Although having significantly higher dynamic aperture, less closed orbit distortion and improved natural emittance compared to the present Aladdin lattice, the proximity of the {nu}{sub x} = 5.24 tune was felt to be too close to the 3{nu}{sub x} = 16 (a structure resonance) and the tune should be raised. In order to demonstrate the tunability of this modified lattice, Yang Cho found a new tune ({nu}{sub x} = 6.27, {nu}{sub y} = 6.23), hereafter called L2V2 lattice. This lattice, although not as nicely matched as the N30 lattice, has a 10% lower natural emittance and considerably more dynamic aperture. The L2V2 lattice has not been fully optimized, but is sufficient to demonstrate the advantages of this modified Aladdin lattice.

  9. Thermodynamics of sublimation, crystal lattice energies, and crystal structures of racemates and enantiomers: (+)- and (+/-)-ibuprofen.

    PubMed

    Perlovich, German L; Kurkov, Sergey V; Hansen, Lars Kr; Bauer-Brandl, Annette

    2004-03-01

    Thermodynamic differences between ibuprofen (IBP) racemate and the (+)-enantiomer were studied by X-ray diffraction, thermoanalysis, and crystal energy calculations. The thermodynamic functions of sublimation (as a measure of crystal lattice energy) were obtained by the transpiration method. The sublimation enthalpies (DeltaH(sub)) of (+/-)-IBP and (+)-IBP are 115.8 +/- 0.6 and 107.4 +/- 0.5 kJ. mol(-1), respectively. Using the temperature dependency of the saturated vapor pressure, the relative fractions of enthalpy and entropy of the sublimation process were calculated, and the sublimation process for both the racemate and the enantiomer was found to be enthalpy driven (62%). Two different force fields, Mayo et al. (M) and Gavezzotti (G), were used for comparative analysis of crystal lattice energies. Both force fields revealed that the van der Waals term contributes more to the packing energy in (+)-IBP than in (+/-)-IBP. The hydrogen bonding energy, however, contributes at 29.7 and 32.3% to the total crystal lattice energy in (+)-IBP and (+/-)-IBP (M), respectively. Furthermore, different structure fragments of the IBP molecule were analyzed with respect to their contribution to nonbonded van der Waals interactions. The effect of the C-H distance on the van der Waals term of the crystal lattice energy was also studied.

  10. Model for the {Delta}(1600) resonance and {gamma}N{yields}{Delta}(1600) transition

    SciTech Connect

    Ramalho, G.; Tsushima, K.

    2010-10-01

    A covariant spectator constituent quark model is applied to study the {gamma}N{yields}{Delta}(1600) transition. Two processes are important in the transition: a photon couples to the individual quarks of the {Delta}(1600) core (quark core), and a photon couples to the intermediate pion-baryon states (pion cloud). While the quark core contributions are estimated assuming {Delta}(1600) as the first radial excitation of {Delta}(1232), the pion cloud contributions are estimated based on an analogy with the {gamma}N{yields}{Delta}(1232) transition. To estimate the pion cloud contributions in the {gamma}N{yields}{Delta}(1600) transition, we include the relevant intermediate states, {pi}N, {pi}{Delta}, {pi}N(1440) and {pi}{Delta}(1600). Dependence on the four-momentum transfer squared, Q{sup 2}, is predicted for the magnetic dipole transition form factor, G{sub M}*(Q{sup 2}), as well as the helicity amplitudes, A{sub 1/2}(Q{sup 2}) and A{sub 3/2}(Q{sup 2}). The results at Q{sup 2}=0 are compared with the existing data.

  11. A model for the Delta(1600) resonance and gamma N -> Delta(1600) transition

    SciTech Connect

    G. Ramalho, K. Tsushima

    2010-10-01

    A covariant spectator constituent quark model is applied to study the gamma N -> Delta(1600) transition. Two processes are important in the transition: a photon couples to the individual quarks of the Delta(1600) core (quark core), and a photon couples to the intermediate pion-baryon states (pion cloud). While the quark core contributions are estimated assuming Delta(1600) as the first radial excitation of Delta(1232), the pion cloud contributions are estimated based on an analogy with the gamma N -> Delta(1232) transition. To estimate the pion cloud contributions in the gamma N -> Delta(1600) transition, we include the relevant intermediate states, pi-N, pi-Delta, pi-N(1440) and pi-Delta(1600). Dependence on the four-momentum transfer squared, Q2, is predicted for the magnetic dipole transition form factor, GM*(Q2), as well as the helicity amplitudes, A_1/2(Q2) and A_3/2(Q2). The results at Q2=0 are compared with the existing data.

  12. Dynamic optical lattices: two-dimensional rotating and accordion lattices for ultracold atoms.

    PubMed

    Williams, R A; Pillet, J D; Al-Assam, S; Fletcher, B; Shotter, M; Foot, C J

    2008-10-13

    We demonstrate a novel experimental arrangement which can rotate a 2D optical lattice at frequencies up to several kilohertz. Ultracold atoms in such a rotating lattice can be used for the direct quantum simulation of strongly correlated systems under large effective magnetic fields, allowing investigation of phenomena such as the fractional quantum Hall effect. Our arrangement also allows the periodicity of a 2D optical lattice to be varied dynamically, producing a 2D accordion lattice.

  13. Holocene evolution of a wave-dominated fan-delta: Godavari delta, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Y.; Nageswara Rao, K.; Nagakumar, K.; Demudu, G.; Rajawat, A.; Kubo, S.; Li, Z.

    2013-12-01

    The Godavari delta is one of the world's largest wave-dominated deltas. The Godavari River arises in the Western Ghats near the west coast of India and drains an area of about 3.1x10^5 km^2, flowing about 1465 km southeast across the Indian peninsula to the Bay of Bengal. The Godavari delta consists of a gentle seaward slope from its apex (12 m elevation) at Rajahmundry and a coastal beach-ridge plain over a distance of about 75 km and covers ~5200 km^2 as a delta plain. The river splits into two major distributary channels, the Gautami and the Vasishta, at a barrage constructed in the mid-1800s. The coastal environment of the deltaic coast is microtidal (~1 m mean tidal range) and wave-dominated (~1.5 m mean wave height in the June-September SW monsoon season, ~0.8 m in the NE monsoon season). Models of the Holocene evolution of the Godavari delta have changed from a zonal progradation model (e.g. Nageswara Rao & Sadakata, 1993) to a truncated cuspate delta model (Nageswara Rao et al., 2005, 2012). Twelve borehole cores (340 m total length), taken in the coastal delta plain during 2010-2013, yielded more than 100 C-14 dates. Sediment facies and C-14 dates from these and previous cores and remote-sensing data support a new delta evolution model. The Holocene coastal delta plain is divided into two parts by a set of linear beach ridges 12-14 km landward from the present shoreline in the central part of the delta. The location of the main depocenter (lobe) has shifted during the Holocene from 1) the center to 2) the west, 3) east, 4) center, 5) west, and 6) east. The linear beach ridges separate the first three from the last three stages. These lobe shifts are controlled by river channel shifts near the apex. Just as the current linear shoreline of the central part of the delta and the concave-up nearshore topography are the result of coastal erosion of a cuspate delta, the linear beach ridges indicate a former eroded shoreline. An unconformity within the deltaic

  14. The DELTA MONSTER: An RPV designed to investigate the aerodynamics of a delta wing platform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connolly, Kristen; Flynn, Mike; Gallagher, Randy; Greek, Chris; Kozlowski, Marc; Mcdonald, Brian; Mckenna, Matt; Sellar, Rich; Shearon, Andy

    1989-01-01

    The mission requirements for the performance of aerodynamic tests on a delta wind planform posed some problems, these include aerodynamic interference; structural support; data acquisition and transmission instrumentation; aircraft stability and control; and propulsion implementation. To eliminate the problems of wall interference, free stream turbulence, and the difficulty of achieving dynamic similarity between the test and actual flight aircraft that are associated with aerodynamic testing in wind tunnels, the concept of the remotely piloted vehicle which can perform a basic aerodynamic study on a delta wing was the main objective for the Green Mission - the Delta Monster. The basic aerodynamic studies were performed on a delta wing with a sweep angle greater than 45 degrees. These tests were performed at various angles of attack and Reynolds numbers. The delta wing was instrumented to determine the primary leading edge vortex formation and location, using pressure measurements and/or flow visualization. A data acquisition system was provided to collect all necessary data.

  15. V(D)J recombination generates a high frequency of nonstandard TCR D[delta]-associated rearrangements in thymocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, A.M.; Slack, J.K.; Mu, Xiaochun )

    1993-03-15

    The standard products of V(D)J recombination are coding junctions, which encode Ag receptor polypeptide, and their commonly excised reciprocal products, signal junctions. Additional nonstandard products also have been detected, mostly in artificial recombination substrate studies. The occurrence of nonstandard products, including pseudonormal, hybrid, and open/shut junctions, indicates significant indeterminacy of the V(D)J recombinase. However, the incidence of nonstandard products of endogenous Ag receptor genes in vivo has not been specifically addressed. The data presented here show that for the TCR-[delta] locus, D element-associated recombination in mouse thymocytes results in a high incidence of nonstandard recombination products. D[delta]1-D[delta]2 rearrangements, both chromosome retained and excised episomal products, were studied by polymerase chain reaction amplification, cloning, and sequence analysis. The proximity of D[delta]1 and D[delta]2 elements, and the fact that both are flanked by 5[prime] and 3[prime] recombination signal sequences with 12-bp and 23-bp spacers, respectively, results in frequent pseudonormal joining. The resulting products are signal junctions retained on the chromosome. Excised episomal products include coding junctions, hybrid junctions formed in apparent violation of the 12/23 spacer rule, and standard signal junctions; some signal junctions show evidence of imprecise cleavage. Evidence for open/shut and/or oligonucleotide capture events was also seen. Similar rearrangements were detectable in thymocytes of mutant scid mice. These findings indicate a high degree of indeterminancy of V(D)J recombinase-mediated D[delta]1-D[delta]2 rearrangement in both wild-type and scid thymocytes. This indeterminacy affects the productive potential of TCR-[delta] loci. 45 refs., 4 figs.

  16. Tracking Nile Delta vulnerability to Holocene change.

    PubMed

    Marriner, Nick; Flaux, Clément; Morhange, Christophe; Stanley, Jean-Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Understanding deltaic resilience in the face of Holocene climate change and human impacts is an important challenge for the earth sciences in characterizing the full range of present and future wetland responses to global warming. Here, we report an 8000-year mass balance record from the Nile Delta to reconstruct when and how this sedimentary basin has responded to past hydrological shifts. In a global Holocene context, the long-term decrease in Nile Delta accretion rates is consistent with insolation-driven changes in the 'monsoon pacemaker', attested throughout the mid-latitude tropics. Following the early to mid-Holocene growth of the Nile's deltaic plain, sediment losses and pronounced erosion are first recorded after ~4000 years ago, the corollaries of falling sediment supply and an intensification of anthropogenic impacts from the Pharaonic period onwards. Against the backcloth of the Saharan 'depeopling', reduced river flow underpinned by a weakening of monsoonal precipitation appears to have been particularly conducive to the expansion of human activities on the delta by exposing productive floodplain lands for occupation and irrigation agriculture. The reconstruction suggests that the Nile Delta has a particularly long history of vulnerability to extreme events (e.g. floods and storms) and sea-level rise, although the present sediment-starved system does not have a direct Holocene analogue. This study highlights the importance of the world's deltas as sensitive archives to investigate Holocene geosystem responses to climate change, risks and hazards, and societal interaction.

  17. {delta}-mediated pion production in nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Praet, C.; Lalakulich, O.; Jachowicz, N.; Ryckebusch, J.

    2009-04-15

    We present a fully relativistic formalism for describing neutrino-induced {delta}-mediated single-pion production in nuclei. We assess the ambiguities stemming from the {delta} interactions and quantify the uncertainties in the axial form-factor parameters by comparing with the available bubble-chamber neutrino-scattering data. To include nuclear effects, we turn to a relativistic plane-wave impulse approximation (RPWIA) using realistic bound-state wave functions derived in the Hartree approximation to the {sigma}-{omega} Walecka model. For neutrino energies larger than 1 GeV, we show that a relativistic Fermi-gas model with appropriate binding-energy correction produces results that are comparable to the RPWIA that naturally includes Fermi motion, nuclear-binding effects, and the Pauli exclusion principle. Including {delta} medium modifications roughly halves the RPWIA cross section. Calculations for primary (prior to undergoing final-state interactions) pion production are presented for both electron- and neutrino-induced processes, and a comparison with electron-scattering data and other theoretical approaches is included. We infer that the total {delta}-production strength is underestimated by about 20 to 25%, a fraction that is due to the pionless decay modes of the {delta} in a medium. The model presented in this work can be naturally extended to include the effect of final-state interactions in a relativistic and quantum-mechanical way.

  18. Monte Carlo simulation of dense polymer melts using event chain algorithms.

    PubMed

    Kampmann, Tobias A; Boltz, Horst-Holger; Kierfeld, Jan

    2015-07-28

    We propose an efficient Monte Carlo algorithm for the off-lattice simulation of dense hard sphere polymer melts using cluster moves, called event chains, which allow for a rejection-free treatment of the excluded volume. Event chains also allow for an efficient preparation of initial configurations in polymer melts. We parallelize the event chain Monte Carlo algorithm to further increase simulation speeds and suggest additional local topology-changing moves ("swap" moves) to accelerate equilibration. By comparison with other Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulations, we verify that the event chain algorithm reproduces the correct equilibrium behavior of polymer chains in the melt. By comparing intrapolymer diffusion time scales, we show that event chain Monte Carlo algorithms can achieve simulation speeds comparable to optimized molecular dynamics simulations. The event chain Monte Carlo algorithm exhibits Rouse dynamics on short time scales. In the absence of swap moves, we find reptation dynamics on intermediate time scales for long chains.

  19. Cold atoms in a rotating optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foot, Christopher J.

    2009-05-01

    We have demonstrated a novel experimental arrangement which can rotate a two-dimensional optical lattice at frequencies up to several kilohertz. Our arrangement also allows the periodicity of the optical lattice to be varied dynamically, producing a 2D ``accordion lattice'' [1]. The angles of the laser beams are controlled by acousto-optic deflectors and this allows smooth changes with little heating of the trapped cold (rubidium) atoms. We have loaded a BEC into lattices with periodicities ranging from 1.8μm to 18μm, observing the collapse and revival of the diffraction orders of the condensate over a large range of lattice parameters as recently reported by a group in NIST [2]. We have also imaged atoms in situ in a 2D lattice over a range of lattice periodicities. Ultracold atoms in a rotating lattice can be used for the direct quantum simulation of strongly correlated systems under large effective magnetic fields, i.e. the Hamiltonian of the atoms in the rotating frame resembles that of a charged particle in a strong magnetic field. In the future, we plan to use this to investigate a range of phenomena such as the analogue of the fractional quantum Hall effect. [4pt] [1] R. A. Williams, J. D. Pillet, S. Al-Assam, B. Fletcher, M. Shotter, and C. J. Foot, ``Dynamic optical lattices: two-dimensional rotating and accordion lattices for ultracold atoms,'' Opt. Express 16, 16977-16983 (2008) [0pt] [2] J. H. Huckans, I. B. Spielman, B. Laburthe Tolra, W. D. Phillips, and J. V. Porto, Quantum and Classical Dynamics of a BEC in a Large-Period Optical Lattice, arXiv:0901.1386v1

  20. The ecology of the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta

    SciTech Connect

    Herbold, B.; Moyle, P.B. . Dept. of Wildlife and Fisheries Biology)

    1989-09-01

    This report describes an ecosystem significantly different from other delta ecosystems in North America. The Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta is one of the 60 largest river deltas in the world and is the largest river delta on the west coast. As the hub of California's water system, the delta is of immense municipal, agricultural, and industrial importance. The amount of freshwater that flows through the delta controls the delta's productivity and regulates the life cycles of many of its organisms. The vast estuary of the Sacramento and San Joaquin Rivers is one of the most highly modified and intensively managed estuaries in the world. Biological processes in the delta are obscured by the temporal dynamics of the system. Many of the most significant alterations, such as leveeing, diking, and agricultural practices, are not now recognized as such by most citizens, making conservation and protection of the delta difficult. 308 refs., 43 figs., 11 tabs.

  1. Pharmacologic manipulations of mitochondrial membrane potential (DeltaPsim) selectively in glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Griguer, Corinne E; Oliva, Claudia R; Gillespie, G Yancey; Gobin, Eric; Marcorelles, Pascale; Yancey Gillespie, G

    2007-01-01

    Metabolic control theory applies principles of bioenergetics for the control or management of complex diseases. Since metabolism is a general process underlying all biologic phenotypes, changes in metabolism can potentially modify phenotype. Therefore, it is reasonable to assume that experimental modulation of the availability of cellular energy can potentially alter cell phenotypes and cell functions critical to tumor progression including cell division. The purpose of this study was to determine if OMX-2, a methylquinone system designed to shuttle electrons from mitochondrial complexes, was able to target mitochondria in cancer cells and trigger cell death. Using flow cytometry, cell viability assays, and ATP measurements, we found that OMX-2 differentially decreased DeltaPsim without triggering cell death. In contrast, known blockers of the Electron Transport Chain (ETC) decreased DeltaPsim and triggered cell death. When normal cells were treated with OMX-2, neither DeltaPsim or cell death was triggered. Furthermore, OMX-2 modulated intracellular ATP and decreased cell numbers of glioma cells. Cell cycle analysis indicated that OMX-2 induced a reversible cell cycle arrest in G1/S. Finally, impairment of glycolysis by 2-Deoxyglucose (2-DOG) acted synergistically with OMX-2 to trigger cell death. Overall, these results indicate that it is possible to selectively target cancer cells by decreasing DeltaPsim and induced cell cycle arrest without triggering cell death. Moreover, pharmacological approaches designed to act on both glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation can be considered as a new approach to selectively kill cancer cells.

  2. Crater chains on Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevchenko, V.; Skobeleva, T.

    After discovery of disruption comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 into fragment train before it's collision with Jupiter there was proposed that linear crater chains on the large satellites of Jupiter and on the Moon are impact scars of past tidally disrupted comets.It's known that radar images have revealed the possible presence of water ice deposits in polar regions of Mercury. Impacts by a few large comets seem to provide the best explanation for both the amount and cleanliness of the ice deposits on Mercury because they have a larger volatile content that others external sources, for example, asteroid. A number of crater chains on the surface of Mercury are most likely the impact tracks of "fragment trains" of comets tidally disrupted by Sun or by Mercury and are not secondary craters. Mariner 10 image set (the three Mariner 10 flybys in 1974-1975) was used to recognize the crater chains these did not associate with secondary crater ejecta from observed impact structures. As example, it can be shown such crater chain located near crater Imhotep and crater Ibsen (The Kuiper Quadrangle of Mercury). Resolution of the Mariner 10 image is about 0.54 km/pixel. The crater chain is about 50 km long. It was found a similar crater chain inside large crater Sophocles (The Tolstoj Quadrangle of Mercury). The image resolution is about 1.46 km/pixel. The chain about 50 km long is located in northen part of the crater. Image resolution limits possibility to examine the form of craters strongly. It seems the craters in chains have roughly flat floor and smooth form. Most chain craters are approximately circular. It was examined many images from the Mariner 10 set and there were identified a total 15 crater chains and were unable to link any of these directly to any specific large crater associated with ejecta deposits. Chain craters are remarkably aligned. All distinguished crater chains are superposed on preexisting formations. A total of 127 craters were identified in the 15 recognized

  3. Realizing Parafermions in Optical Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fangli; Gorshkov, Alexey

    2016-05-01

    Parafermions, which are the fractional versions of Majorana fermions, possess more exotic braiding statistics than Majorana fermions and are therefore more powerful from the point of view of topological quantum computing. We propose a scheme to realize parafermionic zero modes in optical lattices, without the use of superconductive paring. With the help of laser assisted tunneling and on-site interactions, two layers of ultracold atoms in distinct hyperfine states can be engineered to host +/- 1 / m fractional quantum Hall states. We then introduce a finite-extent potential barrier that pierces both layers - this gives rise to two counter-propagating edge states that sit on top of each other. Finally, laser induced coupling is used to introduce backscattering between the two edge states and to gap them out. We show that the resulting defects give rise to the topological degeneracy associated with parafermions. We also discuss methods for preparation and detection.

  4. Nuclear forces from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Ishii, Noriyoshi

    2011-05-06

    Lattice QCD construction of nuclear forces is reviewed. In this method, the nuclear potentials are constructed by solving the Schroedinger equation, where equal-time Nambu-Bethe-Salpeter (NBS) wave functions are regarded as quantum mechanical wave functions. Since the long distance behavior of equal-time NBS wave functions is controlled by the scattering phase, which is in exactly the same way as scattering wave functions in quantum mechanics, the resulting potentials are faithful to the NN scattering data. The derivative expansion of this potential leads to the central and the tensor potentials at the leading order. Some of numerical results of these two potentials are shown based on the quenched QCD.

  5. Optical lattices with micromechanical mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Hammerer, K.; Stannigel, K.; Genes, C.; Zoller, P.; Treutlein, P.; Camerer, S.; Hunger, D.; Haensch, T. W.

    2010-08-15

    We investigate a setup where a cloud of atoms is trapped in an optical lattice potential of a standing-wave laser field which is created by retroreflection on a micromembrane. The membrane vibrations itself realize a quantum mechanical degree of freedom. We show that the center-of-mass mode of atoms can be coupled to the vibrational mode of the membrane in free space. Via laser cooling of atoms a significant sympathetic cooling effect on the membrane vibrations can be achieved. Switching off laser cooling brings the system close to a regime of strong coherent coupling. This setup provides a controllable segregation between the cooling and coherent dynamics regimes, and allows one to keep the membrane in a cryogenic environment and atoms at a distance in a vacuum chamber.

  6. Defect solitons in photonic lattices.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jianke; Chen, Zhigang

    2006-02-01

    Nonlinear defect modes (defect solitons) and their stability in one-dimensional photonic lattices with focusing saturable nonlinearity are investigated. It is shown that defect solitons bifurcate out from every infinitesimal linear defect mode. Low-power defect solitons are linearly stable in lower bandgaps but unstable in higher bandgaps. At higher powers, defect solitons become unstable in attractive defects, but can remain stable in repulsive defects. Furthermore, for high-power solitons in attractive defects, we found a type of Vakhitov-Kolokolov (VK) instability which is different from the usual VK instability based on the sign of the slope in the power curve. Lastly, we demonstrate that in each bandgap, in addition to defect solitons which bifurcate from linear defect modes, there is also an infinite family of other defect solitons which can be stable in certain parameter regimes. PMID:16605473

  7. On lattice chiral gauge theories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maiani, L.; Rossi, G. C.; Testa, M.

    1991-01-01

    The Smit-Swift-Aoki formulation of a lattice chiral gauge theory is presented. In this formulation the Wilson and other non invariant terms in the action are made gauge invariant by the coupling with a nonlinear auxilary scalar field, omega. It is shown that omega decouples from the physical states only if appropriate parameters are tuned so as to satisfy a set of BRST identities. In addition, explicit ghost fields are necessary to ensure decoupling. These theories can give rise to the correct continuum limit. Similar considerations apply to schemes with mirror fermions. Simpler cases with a global chiral symmetry are discussed and it is shown that the theory becomes free at decoupling. Recent numerical simulations agree with those considerations.

  8. Entropy of unimodular lattice triangulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knauf, Johannes F.; Krüger, Benedikt; Mecke, Klaus

    2015-02-01

    Triangulations are important objects of study in combinatorics, finite element simulations and quantum gravity, where their entropy is crucial for many physical properties. Due to their inherent complex topological structure even the number of possible triangulations is unknown for large systems. We present a novel algorithm for an approximate enumeration which is based on calculations of the density of states using the Wang-Landau flat histogram sampling. For triangulations on two-dimensional integer lattices we achieve excellent agreement with known exact numbers of small triangulations as well as an improvement of analytical calculated asymptotics. The entropy density is C=2.196(3) consistent with rigorous upper and lower bounds. The presented numerical scheme can easily be applied to other counting and optimization problems.

  9. Multigroup Reactor Lattice Cell Calculation

    1990-03-01

    The Winfrith Improved Multigroup Scheme (WIMS), is a general code for reactor lattice cell calculations on a wide range of reactor systems. In particular, the code will accept rod or plate fuel geometries in either regular arrays or in clusters, and the energy group structure has been chosen primarily for thermal calculations. The basic library has been compiled with 14 fast groups, 13 resonance groups and 42 thermal groups, but the user is offered themore » choice of accurate solutions in many groups or rapid calculations in few groups. Temperature dependent thermal scattering matrices for a variety of scattering laws are available in the library for the principal moderators which include hydrogen, deuterium, graphite, beryllium and oxygen. WIMSD5 is a succesor version of WIMS-D/4.« less

  10. Gluonic transversity from lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detmold, W.; Shanahan, P. E.

    2016-07-01

    We present an exploratory study of the gluonic structure of the ϕ meson using lattice QCD (LQCD). This includes the first investigation of gluonic transversity via the leading moment of the twist-2 double-helicity-flip gluonic structure function Δ (x ,Q2). This structure function only exists for targets of spin J ≥1 and does not mix with quark distributions at leading twist, thereby providing a particularly clean probe of gluonic degrees of freedom. We also explore the gluonic analogue of the Soffer bound which relates the helicity flip and nonflip gluonic distributions, finding it to be saturated at the level of 80%. This work sets the stage for more complex LQCD studies of gluonic structure in the nucleon and in light nuclei where Δ (x ,Q2) is an "exotic glue" observable probing gluons in a nucleus not associated with individual nucleons.

  11. Simple lattice model of macroevolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borkowski, Wojciech

    2009-04-01

    In future astrobiology, like in modern astrophysics, the numerical simulations can be a very important tool for proving theories. In this paper, I propose a simple lattice model of a multi-species ecosystem suitable for the study of emergent properties of macroevolution. Unlike the majority of ecological models, the number of species is not fixed - they emerge by "mutation" of existing species, then survive or go extinct depending on the balance between local ecological interactions. The Monte-Carlo numerical simulations show that this model is able to qualitatively reproduce phenomena that have been empirically observed, like the dependence between size of the isolated area and the number of species inhabiting there, primary production and species-diversity. The model allows also studying the causes of mass extinctions and more generally, repeatability, and the role of pure chance in macroevolution.

  12. Structure, bonding, and magnetic response in two complex borides: Zr{sub 2}Fe{sub 1-{delta}}Ru{sub 5+{delta}}B2 and Zr{sub 2}Fe{sub 1-{delta}}(Ru{sub 1-x}Rh{sub x}){sub 5+{delta}}B2

    SciTech Connect

    Brgoch, Jakoah; Yeninas, Steven; Prozorov, Ruslan; Miller, Gordon J.

    2010-12-15

    Polycrystalline samples of two complex intermetallic borides Zr{sub 2}Fe{sub 1-{delta}}Ru{sub 5+{delta}}B2 and Zr{sub 2}Fe{sub 1-{delta}}(Ru{sub 1-x}Rh{sub x}){sub 5+{delta}}B2 ({delta}=ca. 0.10; x=0.20) were synthesized by high-temperature methods and characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and magnetization measurements. Both structures are variants of Sc{sub 2}Fe(Ru{sub 1-x}Rh{sub x}){sub 5}B{sub 2} and crystallize in the space group P4/mbm (no. 127) with the Ti{sub 3}Co{sub 5}B{sub 2}-type structure. These structures contain single-atom, Fe-rich Fe/Ru or Fe/Ru/Rh chains along the c-axis with an interatomic metal-metal distance of 3.078(1) A, a feature which makes them viable for possible low-dimensional temperature-dependent magnetic behavior. Magnetization measurements indicated weak ferrimagnetic ordering with ordering temperatures ca. 230 K for both specimens. Tight-binding electronic structure calculations on a model 'Zr{sub 2}FeRu{sub 5}B{sub 2}' using LDA yielded a narrow peak at the Fermi level assigned to Fe-Fe antibonding interactions along the c-axis, a result that indicates an electronic instability toward ferromagnetic coupling along these chains. Spin-polarized calculations of various magnetic models were examined to identify possible magnetic ordering within and between the single-atom, Fe-rich chains. -- Graphical abstract: Zr{sub 2}FeRu{sub 5-x}Rh{sub x}B{sub 2} (x=0, 1) crystallizes with magnetic atoms forming chains which have been shown to order magnetically depending on the total valence electron count. Magnetic measurements and tight-binding electronic structure calculations are employed to investigate the ordering. Display Omitted

  13. Selective degradation of T cell antigen receptor chains retained in a pre-Golgi compartment

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    We have examined the fate of newly synthesized T cell antigen receptor (TCR) subunits in a T cell hybridoma deficient in expression of the clonotypic beta chain. Synthesis and assembly of the remaining chains proceed normally but surface expression of TCR chains is undetectable in these cells. A variety of biochemical and morphological techniques has been used to show that the TCR chains in these cells fail to be transported to any of the Golgi cisternae. Instead, they are retained in a pre-Golgi compartment which is either part of or closely related to the endoplasmic reticulum. The CD3-delta chain is degraded by a non- lysosomal process that is inhibited at temperatures at or below 27 degrees C. By contrast, the remaining chains (CD3-epsilon, CD3-gamma, and zeta) are very stable over 7 h. We propose possible mechanisms that may explain the differential fate of TCR chains retained in a pre-Golgi compartment. PMID:2974039

  14. The Chroma Software System for Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Edwards; Balint Joo

    2004-06-01

    We describe aspects of the Chroma software system for lattice QCD calculations. Chroma is an open source C++ based software system developed using the software infrastructure of the US SciDAC initiative. Chroma interfaces with output from the BAGEL assembly generator for optimized lattice fermion kernels on some architectures. It can be run on workstations, clusters and the QCDOC supercomputer.

  15. Wave propagation on a random lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Sahlmann, Hanno

    2010-09-15

    Motivated by phenomenological questions in quantum gravity, we consider the propagation of a scalar field on a random lattice. We describe a procedure to calculate the dispersion relation for the field by taking a limit of a periodic lattice. We use this to calculate the lowest order coefficients of the dispersion relation for a specific one-dimensional model.

  16. Moments of GPDs from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    David Richards

    2006-09-18

    I review the lattice computation of the moments of Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs), and their chiral extrapolation to the physical quark masses. I illustrate how lattice computations of generalized form factors can provide constraints on phenomenological parameterizations of GPDs, and provide insight into the three-dimensional picture of the nucleon.

  17. Different lattice geometries with a synthetic dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suszalski, Dominik; Zakrzewski, Jakub

    2016-09-01

    The possibility of creating different geometries with the help of an extra synthetic dimension in optical lattices is studied. The additional linear potential together with Raman-assisted tunnelings are used to engineer well-controlled tunnelings between available states. The great flexibility of the system allows us to obtain different geometries of synthetic lattices with the possibility for adding synthetic gauge fields.

  18. Recent advances in lattice Boltzmann methods

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S.; Doolen, G.D.; He, X.; Nie, X.; Zhang, R.

    1998-12-31

    In this paper, the authors briefly present the basic principles of lattice Boltzmann method and summarize recent advances of the method, including the application of the lattice Boltzmann method for fluid flows in MEMS and simulation of the multiphase mixing and turbulence.

  19. LHC Phenomenology and Lattice Strong Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleming, G. T.

    2013-03-01

    While the LHC experimentalists work to find evidence of physics beyond the standard model, lattice gauge theorists are working as well to characterize the range of possible phenomena in strongly-coupled models of electroweak symmetry breaking. I will summarize the current progress of the Lattice Strong Dynamics (LSD) collaboration on the flavor dependence of SU(3) gauge theories.

  20. Dimers on the 33 .42 lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shuli; Yan, Weigen

    2016-06-01

    In this work, we obtain explicit expression of the number of close-packed dimers (perfect matchings) of the 33 .42 lattice with cylindrical boundary condition. Particularly, we show that the entropy of 33 .42 lattice is the same for cylindrical and toroidal boundary conditions.

  1. A lattice formulation of chiral gauge theories

    SciTech Connect

    Bodwin, G.T.

    1996-08-01

    We present a method for implementing gauge theories of chiral fermions on the lattice. Discussed topics include: the lattice as a UV regulator, a chiral QED model, modification of the fermion determinant, large gauge-field momenta, and a non-perturbative problem.

  2. Lattice studies of hadrons with heavy flavors

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher Aubin

    2009-07-01

    I will discuss recent developments in lattice studies of hadrons composed of heavy quarks. I will mostly cover topics which are at a state of direct comparison with experiment, but will also discuss new ideas and promising techniques to aid future studies of lattice heavy quark physics.

  3. Delta capability for launch of communications satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grimes, D. W.; Russell, W. A., Jr.; Kraft, J. D.

    1982-01-01

    The evolution of capabilities and the current performance levels of the Delta launch vehicle are outlined. The first payload was the Echo I passive communications satellite, weighing 179 lb, and placed in GEO in 1960. Emphasis since then has been to use off-the-shelf hardware where feasible. The latest version in the 3924 first stage, 3920 second stage, and Pam D apogee kick motor third stage. The Delta is presently equipped to place 2800 lb in GEO, as was proven with the 2717 lb Anik-D1 satellite. The GEO payload placement performance matches the Shuttle's, and work is therefore under way to enhance the Delta performance to handle more massive payloads. Installation of the Castor-IV solid motor separation system, thereby saving mass by utilizing compressed nitrogen, rather than mechanical thrusters to remove the strap-on boosters, is indicated, together with use of a higher performance propellant and a wider nose fairing.

  4. NATO-3C/Delta launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    NATO-3C, the third in a series of NATO defense-related communication satellites, is scheduled to be launched on a delta vehicle from the Eastern Test Range no earlier than November 15, 1978. NATO-3A and -3B were successfully launched by Delta vehicles in April 1976 and January 1977, respectively. The NATO-3C spacecraft will be capable of transmitting voice, data, facsimile, and telex messages among military ground stations. The launch vehicle for the NATO-3C mission will be the Delta 2914 configuration. The launch vehicle is to place the spacecraft in a synchronous transfer orbit. The spacecraft Apogee Kick motor is to be fired at fifth transfer orbit apogee to circularize its orbit at geosynchronous altitude of 35,900 km(22,260 miles) above the equator over the Atlantic Ocean somewhere between 45 and 50 degrees W longitude.

  5. Mutagenesis of the borage Delta(6) fatty acid desaturase.

    PubMed

    Sayanova, O; Beaudoin, F; Libisch, B; Shewry, P; Napier, J

    2000-12-01

    The consensus sequence of the third histidine box of a range of Delta(5), Delta(6), Delta(8) and sphingolipid desaturases differs from that of the membrane-bound non-fusion Delta(12) and Delta(15) desaturases in the presence of glutamine instead of histidine. We have used site-directed mutagenesis to determine the importance of glutamine and other residues of the third histidine box and created a chimaeric enzyme to determine the ability of the Cyt b(5) fusion domain from the plant sphingolipid desaturase to substitute for the endogenous domain of the Delta(6) desaturase. PMID:11171152

  6. DNA polymerase III accessory proteins. I. holA and holB encoding delta and delta'.

    PubMed

    Dong, Z; Onrust, R; Skangalis, M; O'Donnell, M

    1993-06-01

    The genes encoding the delta and delta' subunits of the 10-subunit Escherichia coli replicase, DNA polymerase III holoenzyme, have been identified and sequenced. The holA gene encoding delta is located downstream of rlpB at 15.2 min and predicts a 38.7 kda protein. The holB gene encoding delta' is located at 24.3 min and predicts a 36.9-kDa protein. Hence the delta and delta' subunits are unrelated proteins encoded by separate genes. The genes have been used to express and purify delta and delta' in quantity. The predicted amino acid sequence of delta' is homologous to the sequences of the tau and gamma subunits revealing a large amount of structural redundancy within the holoenzyme.

  7. Gamma-delta t-cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Foppoli, Marco; Ferreri, Andrés J M

    2015-03-01

    Gamma-delta T-cell lymphomas are aggressive and rare diseases originating from gamma-delta lymphocytes. These cells, which naturally play a role in the innate, non-specific immune response, develop from thymic precursor in the bone marrow, lack the major histocompatibility complex restrictions and can be divided into two subpopulations: Vdelta1, mostly represented in the intestine, and Vdelta2, prevalently located in the skin, tonsils and lymph nodes. Chronic immunosuppression such as in solid organ transplanted subjects and prolonged antigenic exposure are probably the strongest risk factors for the triggering of lymphomagenesis. Two entities are recognised by the 2008 WHO Classification: hepatosplenic gamma-delta T-cell lymphoma (HSGDTL) and primary cutaneous gamma-delta T-cell lymphoma (PCGDTL). The former is more common among young males, presenting with B symptoms, splenomegaly and thrombocytopenia, usually with the absence of nodal involvement. Natural behaviour of HSGDTL is characterised by low response rates, poor treatment tolerability, common early progression of disease and disappointing survival figures. PCGDTL accounts for <1% of all primary cutaneous lymphomas, occurring in adults with relevant comorbidities. Cutaneous lesions may vary, but its clinical behaviour is usually aggressive and long-term survival is anecdotal. Available literature on gamma-delta T-cell lymphomas is fractioned, mostly consisting of case reports or small cumulative series. Therefore, clinical suspicion and diagnosis are usually delayed, and therapeutic management remains to be established. This review critically analyses available evidence on diagnosis, staging and behaviour of gamma-delta T-cell lymphomas, provides recommendations for therapeutic management in routine practice and discusses relevant unmet clinical needs for future studies.

  8. Chiral logs and the quenched approximation on the lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrucci, Stefania

    1997-12-01

    The phenomenological success of the quenched approximation has been impressive in obtaining accurate results for the mass spectrum and other aspects of hadron structure. However, an independent theoretical estimate of the systematic error introduced by quenching is still missing. To this end, it can be useful to consider chiral theories which, at the one-loop level, introduced peculiar non analytical terms (the so-called chiral logs). Sharpe showed that when this framework is adapted to the quenched approximation, the dependence of the pion mass squared on the quark mass can be described by an anomalous power δ (the 'hairpin' diagram on the pion mass shell) associated with flavor singlet loops and enhanced chiral logs. Treating the hairpin as a momentum independent mass insertion, he estimated δ≃0.2. However, numerical calculations in quenched lattice quantum chromodynamics show little or no evidence for chiral logs at such a level. The following work determines the anomalous power numerically by studying the pion mass as a function of the bare quark mass, as well as its volume dependence. Sources of systematic error are carefully examined. Last, the coefficient of the chiral log is calculated from the two quark-loops pion propagator. The results consistently indicate a value for the anomalous power that is approximately one order of magnitude smaller than the earlier theoretical estimate, in particular/delta = 0.013(2)From this one can see that for all pion masses considered, the systematic error introduced by quenching is small and always within the statistical error. Finally, by a direct calculation of the topological susceptibility of the lattice configurations, I conclude that the reason why the anomalous power is so small is a strong momentum dependence giving rise to a suppression of the hairpin at momenta comparable with the pion mass.

  9. Ising antiferromagnet on the Archimedean lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Unjong

    2015-06-01

    Geometric frustration effects were studied systematically with the Ising antiferromagnet on the 11 Archimedean lattices using the Monte Carlo methods. The Wang-Landau algorithm for static properties (specific heat and residual entropy) and the Metropolis algorithm for a freezing order parameter were adopted. The exact residual entropy was also found. Based on the degree of frustration and dynamic properties, ground states of them were determined. The Shastry-Sutherland lattice and the trellis lattice are weakly frustrated and have two- and one-dimensional long-range-ordered ground states, respectively. The bounce, maple-leaf, and star lattices have the spin ice phase. The spin liquid phase appears in the triangular and kagome lattices.

  10. Lattice Boltzmann modeling of phonon transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yangyu; Wang, Moran

    2016-06-01

    A novel lattice Boltzmann scheme is proposed for phonon transport based on the phonon Boltzmann equation. Through the Chapman-Enskog expansion, the phonon lattice Boltzmann equation under the gray relaxation time approximation recovers the classical Fourier's law in the diffusive limit. The numerical parameters in the lattice Boltzmann model are therefore rigorously correlated to the bulk material properties. The new scheme does not only eliminate the fictitious phonon speed in the diagonal direction of a square lattice system in the previous lattice Boltzmann models, but also displays very robust performances in predicting both temperature and heat flux distributions consistent with analytical solutions for diverse numerical cases, including steady-state and transient, macroscale and microscale, one-dimensional and multi-dimensional phonon heat transport. This method may provide a powerful numerical tool for deep studies of nonlinear and nonlocal heat transports in nanosystems.

  11. Trapping Rydberg Atoms in an Optical Lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, S. E.; Younge, K. C.; Raithel, G.

    2011-12-23

    Rubidium Rydberg atoms are laser excited and subsequently trapped in a one-dimensional optical lattice (wavelength 1064 nm). Efficient trapping is achieved by a lattice inversion immediately after laser excitation using an electro-optic technique. The trapping efficiency is probed via analysis of the trap-induced shift of the two-photon microwave transition 50S{yields}51S. The inversion technique allows us to reach a trapping efficiency of 90%. The dependence of the efficiency on the timing of the lattice inversion and on the trap laser power is studied. The dwell time of 50D{sub 5/2} Rydberg atoms in the lattice is analyzed using lattice-induced photoionization.

  12. Synthetic magnetic fluxes on the honeycomb lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Gorecka, Agnieszka; Gremaud, Benoit; Miniatura, Christian

    2011-08-15

    We devise experimental schemes that are able to mimic uniform and staggered magnetic fluxes acting on ultracold two-electron atoms, such as ytterbium atoms, propagating in a honeycomb lattice. The atoms are first trapped into two independent state-selective triangular lattices and then further exposed to a suitable configuration of resonant Raman laser beams. These beams induce hops between the two triangular lattices and make atoms move in a honeycomb lattice. Atoms traveling around each unit cell of this honeycomb lattice pick up a nonzero phase. In the uniform case, the artificial magnetic flux sustained by each cell can reach about two flux quanta, thereby realizing a cold-atom analog of the Harper model with its notorious Hofstadter's butterfly structure. Different condensed-matter phenomena such as the relativistic integer and fractional quantum Hall effects, as observed in graphene samples, could be targeted with this scheme.

  13. Status of the ATF2 Lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Marin, E.; Tomas, R.; Bambade, P.; Okugi, T.; Tauchi, T.; Terunuma, N.; Urakawa, J.; Seryi, A.; White, G.; Woodley, M.; /SLAC

    2011-12-09

    The current status for the ATF2 Nominal and Ultra-low {beta}* lattices are presented in this paper. New lattice designs have been obtained in order to minimise the impact of the last interpretation of multipole measurements that have been included into the model. However, the new ATF2 Ultra-low design is not able to recover the expected vertical beam size at the IP with the current magnet distribution. Therefore, different quadrupole sorting have been studied. A significant gain is evident for the ATF2 Ultra-low lattice when sorting the magnets according to the skew-sextupolar components. The ATF2 Nominal lattice is also expected to benefit from the new sorting. Tuning results of the new ATF2 Ultra-low lattice under realistic imperfections are also reported.

  14. A lattice approach to spinorial quantum gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Renteln, Paul; Smolin, Lee

    1989-01-01

    A new lattice regularization of quantum general relativity based on Ashtekar's reformulation of Hamiltonian general relativity is presented. In this form, quantum states of the gravitational field are represented within the physical Hilbert space of a Kogut-Susskind lattice gauge theory. The gauge field of the theory is a complexified SU(2) connection which is the gravitational connection for left-handed spinor fields. The physical states of the gravitational field are those which are annihilated by additional constraints which correspond to the four constraints of general relativity. Lattice versions of these constraints are constructed. Those corresponding to the three-dimensional diffeomorphism generators move states associated with Wilson loops around on the lattice. The lattice Hamiltonian constraint has a simple form, and a correspondingly simple interpretation: it is an operator which cuts and joins Wilson loops at points of intersection.

  15. A reduced-complexity model for river delta formation - Part 1: Modeling deltas with channel dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, M.; Voller, V. R.; Paola, C.

    2014-07-01

    We develop a reduced-complexity model (RCM) delta formation model, in contrast to reductionist models based on high-resolution computational fluid dynamics. The basic framework of this model (referred in this paper as "DeltaRCM") consists of stochastic parcel-based cellular routing schemes for water and sediment and a set of phenomenological rules for sediment deposition and erosion. The outputs of the model include flow field, water surface topography and bed topography that evolves in time. Results show that DeltaRCM is able to: (1) resolve a wide range of channel dynamics, including elongation, bifurcation, avulsion and migration; (2) in response to the changes in input parameters, produce different types of deltas such as alluvial fan deltas at experimental scale. We also identify three key areas of particular model sensitivity, even at the RCM level: (1) avulsion dynamics is sensitive to dynamic free-surface topography; (2) channel network structure is sensitive to instability at channel mouths which creates bars; and (3) out-of-channel sedimentation is sensitive to water surface slope along channel margins. We also demonstrate a simple stratigraphy tracking component which can display the structure of the deposit in terms of distribution of coarse and fine materials along with the age of the deposit. DeltaRCM is a useful tool for understanding the dynamics of river deltas within a relatively simple cellular representation of water and sediment transport.

  16. All optical binary delta-sigma modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayeh, Mohammad R.; Siahmakoun, Azad

    2005-09-01

    This paper describes a novel A/D converter called "Binary Delta-Sigma Modulator" (BDSM) which operates only with nonnegative signal with positive feedback and binary threshold. This important modification to the conventional delta-sigma modulator makes the high-speed (>100GHz) all-optical implementation possible. It has also the capability to modify its own sampling frequency as well as its input dynamic range. This adaptive feature helps designers to optimize the system performance under highly noisy environment and also manage the power consumption of the A/D converters.

  17. The sensitivity of the ESA DELTA model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, C.; Walker, R.; Klinkrad, H.

    2004-01-01

    The debris environment long term analysis (DELTA) model, developed by QinetiQ for the European Space Agency (ESA), allows the future projection of the debris environment throughout Earth orbit. To ensure a sound basis for such future projections, and consequently for assessing the effectiveness of various mitigation measures, it is essential that the sensitivity of the model is examined. This paper discusses the sensitivity of the DELTA model to changes in key model parameters and assumptions. Specifically, the variation in future traffic rates, including the deployment of satellite constellations, and the variation in the break-up model and criteria used to simulate future explosion and collision events.

  18. The rotator spectrum in the delta-regime of the O(n) effective field theory in 3 and 4 dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niedermayer, Ferenc; Weiermann, Christoph

    2011-01-01

    The low lying spectrum of the O(n) effective field theory is calculated in the delta-regime in 3 and 4 space-time dimensions using lattice regularization to NNL order. It allows, in particular, to determine, using numerical simulations in different spatial volumes, the pion decay constant F in QCD with 2 flavours or the spin stiffness ρ for an antiferromagnet in d=2+1 dimensions.

  19. Chiral spin liquids in arrays of spin chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorohovsky, Gregory; Pereira, Rodrigo G.; Sela, Eran

    2015-06-01

    We describe a coupled-chain construction for chiral spin liquids in two-dimensional spin systems. Starting from a one-dimensional zigzag spin chain and imposing SU(2) symmetry in the framework of non-Abelian bosonization, we first show that our approach faithfully describes the low-energy physics of an exactly solvable model with a three-spin interaction. Generalizing the construction to the two-dimensional case, we obtain a theory that incorporates the universal properties of the chiral spin liquid predicted by Kalmeyer and Laughlin: charge-neutral edge states, gapped spin-1/2 bulk excitations, and ground-state degeneracy on the torus signaling the topological order of this quantum state. In addition, we show that the chiral spin liquid phase is more easily stabilized in frustrated lattices containing corner-sharing triangles, such as the extended kagome lattice, than in the triangular lattice. Our field-theoretical approach invites generalizations to more exotic chiral spin liquids and may be used to assess the existence of the chiral spin liquid as the ground state of specific lattice systems.

  20. Miscibility of polyolefin blends from a Born-Green-Yvon lattice model in conjunction with small scale simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luettmer-Strathmann, J.; Lipson, J. E. G.

    1999-02-01

    The large variation in miscibility of blends of polyolefins is related to the architecture of the chain molecules. In this paper we present first results of an approach in which small scale simulations of local interactions are combined with an analytical model for the thermodynamics, the Born-Green-Yvon lattice model, to predict phase diagrams of polyolefin blends from the pure component properties.

  1. Dynamic structure factor of a Fibonacci lattice: A renormalization-group approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karmakar, S. N.; Chakrabarti, Arunava; Moitra, R. K.

    1992-08-01

    We present a real-space renormalization-group method for evaluating the exact dynamic structure factor S(q,ω) of a quasiperiodic Fibonacci chain. Contrary to earlier work that takes account only of the global aspects of the symmetry of the chain, our method additionally takes care of the local environmental aspects of the symmetry by separating the original lattice into a finite number of self-similar interpenetrating sublattices, followed by elimination of the coupling between them. Our method also yields correctly the positions of the Bragg peaks of the Fibonacci chain. Moreover, the present method allows the sites of the chain to be grouped into classes following a ``genealogical'' classification, the members of a given class being equivalent up to a certain length scale. Based on this classification, the proof of the existence of a key site, which has only been conjectured in our earlier work using numerical search, has been given.

  2. Differential roles of regulatory light chain and myosin binding protein-C phosphorylations in the modulation of cardiac force development

    SciTech Connect

    Colson, Brett A.; Locher, Matthew R.; Bekyarova, Tanya; Patel, Jitandrakumar R.; Fitzsimons, Daniel P.; Irving, Thomas C.; Moss, Richard L.

    2010-05-25

    Phosphorylation of myosin regulatory light chain (RLC) by myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) and myosin binding protein-C (cMyBP-C) by protein kinase A (PKA) independently accelerate the kinetics of force development in ventricular myocardium. However, while MLCK treatment has been shown to increase the Ca{sup 2+} sensitivity of force (pCa{sub 50}), PKA treatment has been shown to decrease pCa{sub 50}, presumably due to cardiac troponin I phosphorylation. Further, MLCK treatment increases Ca{sup 2+}-independent force and maximum Ca{sup 2+}-activated force, whereas PKA treatment has no effect on either force. To investigate the structural basis underlying the kinase-specific differential effects on steady-state force, we used synchrotron low-angle X-ray diffraction to compare equatorial intensity ratios (I{sub 1,1}/I{sub 1,0}) to assess the proximity of myosin cross-bridge mass relative to actin and to compare lattice spacings (d{sub 1,0}) to assess the inter-thick filament spacing in skinned myocardium following treatment with either MLCK or PKA. As we showed previously, PKA phosphorylation of cMyBP-C increases I{sub 1,1}/I{sub 1,0} and, as hypothesized, treatment with MLCK also increased I{sub 1,1}/I{sub 1,0}, which can explain the accelerated rates of force development during activation. Importantly, interfilament spacing was reduced by {approx}2 nm ({Delta} 3.5%) with MLCK treatment, but did not change with PKA treatment. Thus, RLC or cMyBP-C phosphorylation increases the proximity of cross-bridges to actin, but only RLC phosphorylation affects lattice spacing, which suggests that RLC and cMyBP-C modulate the kinetics of force development by similar structural mechanisms; however, the effect of RLC phosphorylation to increase the Ca{sup 2+} sensitivity of force is mediated by a distinct mechanism, most probably involving changes in interfilament spacing.

  3. Chain entanglements. I. Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fixman, Marshall

    1988-09-01

    A model of concentrated polymer solution dynamics is described. The forces in a linear generalized Langevin equation for the motion of a probe chain are derived on the assumption that all relaxation of the forces is due to motion of the surrounding matrix. Vicinal chain displacements are classified as viscoelastic deformation, reptation, and minor residual fluctuations. The latter provide a torsional relaxation of the primitive path that minimizes the significance of transverse forces on the probe chain. All displacements of vicinal segments are assumed proportional to the forces that they exert on the probe chain. In response to an external force, the displacement of the probe chain relative to a laboratory frame is increased by viscoelastic deformation of the matrix, but reptative diffusion relative to the deforming matrix is slowed down. The net effect on translational diffusion is negligible if the probe and vicinal chains have the same chain length N, but the friction constant for reptative motion is increased by a factor N1-xs. xs=1/2 if Gaussian conformational statistics applies during the disengagement process, while xs =0.6 if excluded volume statistics applies. The translational friction constant is βp ˜N2, as in reptation theory, but the viscosity is η˜N4-xs . The persistence of entanglements during the translational diffusion of the probe chain across many radii of gyration is rationalized pictorially in terms of correlated reptative motion of the probe and vicinal chains.

  4. Toward a realistic low-field SSC lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Heifets, S.

    1985-10-01

    Three six-fold lattices for 3 T superferric SSC have been generated at TAC. The program based on the first order canonical transformation was used to compare lattices. On this basis the realistic race-track lattices were generated.

  5. How Deltas Die - a Case Study of the End of Sedimentation in Two Giant Deltas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macdonald, D.; Robinson, P.; Nicholson, U.

    2013-12-01

    Most well-studied deltas are on passive margins (e.g. Mississippi, Rhone, Ebro), where the main tectonic control on accommodation space is thermal subsidence. As long as the main river in the sediment routing system keeps flowing, there is no particular reason for sedimentation to end, and some deltas have a history extending more than 100 Ma (e.g. Niger at 130 Ma). However, some very large deltas can build out over active margins. For example, the Amur, Orinoco, and Colorado (US) deltas all straddle strike-slip plate boundaries and are much less long-lived than their passive margin counterparts. This paper looks in detail at the end of the deltaic sedimentation in the Pliocene deltas of the Amur River on the island of Sakhalin, and the Colorado River in the Fish Creek-Vallecito Basin of southern California. In both cases the deltas are sand-rich with distant provenances in East Asia and the Colorado Plateau respectively; also they both coexist with locally derived clastic sedimentation. Despite these similarities, there are significant differences between the two deltas as a direct result of the differences in plate boundary movement rates and tectonic state. On Sakhalin, the plate boundary has moved at about 1.95 mm a-1 during the Pliocene and has been in a transpressional state. Primary deltaic sedimentation ended by a three main mechanisms: uplift of the island along the transpressional plate boundary detached the delta from the trunk stream; growth of anticlines over strands of the plate boundary disrupted the consequent delta-top drainage; and late sedimentation involved reworking of the far-travelled deltaic material. In California, where the plate boundary has moved at about 50 mm a-1 in the Pliocene, deltaic sedimentation ceased by translation of the receiving basin from the river mouth. New field and mineralogical data suggest that Colorado River sedimentation waned over a period of about 1 Ma in the Late Pliocene, and was gradually overwhelmed by locally

  6. Modeling delta growth and channel geometry on Wax Lake Delta, Louisiana. Preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viparelli, E.; Czapiga, M. J.; Li, C.; Shaw, J. B.; Parker, G.

    2013-12-01

    A numerical model of delta growth, in which the distributary channels are assumed to have self-constructed their cross sections, is validated on Wax Lake Delta, Louisiana. As in previous laterally averaged models of delta growth, the delta is divided in a low slope delta top, a steep delta front and a low slope basement. The flow on the delta top is assumed steady, and a backwater formulation is implemented. Since one or more channels can actively transport water and sediment on the delta top during floods, we simplify the problem by assuming that the bed material is transported in one rectangular channel, with width and depth roughly equal to the sum of the active channel widths, and to the average depth of the active channels. The problem is characterized by one equation (i.e. the backwater equation) in two unknowns, the channel width and depth. Another equation is thus needed to close the problem. Under the assumptions that 1) the system is at bankfull flow, and 2) the Shields number in the channels is equal to its channel formative value, our closure relation is a channel-formative criterion. In particular, a recently derived relation to estimate the formative (bankfull) Shields number as a function of the friction slope is implemented. Recent field work on Wax Lake Delta shows that the distributary channels are incising into a relatively stiff basement. In our model we do not attempt to directly model channel incision, but we implicitly account for it with a modified formulation to compute the shoreline migration rate. In this formulation the bed material at the shoreline is trapped in the non-channelized portion of the delta front only. Measured and numerical shoreline migration rates, longitudinal profiles of delta elevation, and channel geometry, i.e. width and depth, are compared. In the relatively near future we plan to 1) use our model to estimate land-building potential of engineered diversions of the Mississippi River, and 2) couple the present model

  7. Towards an understanding of the molecular mechanism of solvation of drug molecules: a thermodynamic approach by crystal lattice energy, sublimation, and solubility exemplified by hydroxybenzoic acids.

    PubMed

    Perlovich, German L; Volkova, Tatyana V; Bauer-Brandl, Annette

    2006-07-01

    Temperature dependencies of saturated vapor pressure and heat capacities for the 2-, 3-, and 4-hydroxybenzoic acids were measured and thermodynamic functions of sublimation calculated (2-hydroxybenzoic acid: DeltaG(sub) (298) = 38.5 kJ/mol; DeltaH(sub) (298) = 96.6 +/- 0.8 kJ/mol; DeltaS(sub) (298) = 191 +/- 3 J/mol . K; 3-hydroxybenzoic acid: DeltaG(sub) (298) = 50.6 kJ/mol; DeltaH(sub) (298) = 105.2 +/- 0.8 kJ/mol; DeltaS(sub) (298) = 180 +/- 2 J/mol . K; 4-hydroxybenzoic acid: DeltaG(sub) (298) = 55.0 kJ/mol; DeltaH(sub) (298) = 113.3 +/- 0.7 kJ/mol; DeltaS(sub) (298) = 193 +/- 2 J/mol . K). Analysis of crystal lattice packing energies based on geometry optimization of the molecules in the crystal using diffraction data and the program Dmol(3) was carried out. The energetic contributions of van der Waals, Coulombic, and hydrogen bond terms to the total packing energy were analyzed. The fraction of hydrogen bond energy in the packing energy increases as: 3-hydroxybenzoic (29.7%) < 2-hydroxybenzoic (34.7%) < 4-hydroxybenzoic acid (42.0%). Enthalpies of evaporation were estimated from enthalpies of sublimation and fusion. Temperature dependencies of the solubility in n-octanol and n-hexane were measured. The thermodynamic functions of solubility and solvation processes were deduced. Specific and nonspecific solvation terms were distinguished using the transfer from the "inert" n-hexane to the other solvents. The transfer of the molecules from water to n-octanol is enthalpy driven process.

  8. Towards an understanding of the molecular mechanism of solvation of drug molecules: a thermodynamic approach by crystal lattice energy, sublimation, and solubility exemplified by paracetamol, acetanilide, and phenacetin.

    PubMed

    Perlovich, German L; Volkova, Tatyana V; Bauer-Brandl, Annette

    2006-10-01

    Temperature dependencies of saturated vapor pressure for the monoclinic modification of paracetamol (acetaminophen), acetanilide, and phenacetin (acetophenetidin) were measured and thermodynamic functions of sublimation calculated (paracetamol: DeltaGsub298=60.0 kJ/mol; DeltaHsub298=117.9+/-0.7 kJ/mol; DeltaSsub298=190+/-2 J/mol.K; acetanilide: DeltaGsub298=40.5 kJ/mol; DeltaHsub298=99.8+/-0.8 kJ/mol; DeltaSsub298=197+/-2 J/mol.K; phenacetin: DeltaGsub298=52.3 kJ/mol; DeltaHsub298=121.8+/-0.7 kJ/mol; DeltaSsub298=226+/-2 J/mol.K). Analysis of packing energies based on geometry optimization of molecules in the crystal lattices using diffraction data and the program Dmol3 was carried out. Parameters analyzed were: (a) energetic contribution of van der Waals forces and hydrogen bonding to the total packing energy; (b) contributions of fragments of the molecules to the packing energy. The fraction of hydrogen bond energy in the packing energy increases as: phenacetin (17.5%)

  9. Fulde-Ferrell-Larkin-Ovchinnikov critical polarization in one-dimensional fermionic optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    França, Vivian V.; Hörndlein, Dominik; Buchleitner, Andreas

    2012-09-01

    We deduce an expression for the critical polarization PC below which the Fulde-Ferrell-Larkin-Ovchinnikov state emerges in one-dimensional lattices with spin-imbalanced populations. We provide and explore the phase diagram of unconfined chains as a function of polarization, interaction, and particle density. For harmonically confined systems, we supply a quantitative mapping, which also allows applying our phase diagram for confined chains. We find analytically and confirm numerically that the upper bound for the critical polarization is universal: PCmax=1/3 for any density, interaction, and confinement strength.

  10. Structure of the Dimerization Interface in the Mature HIV-1 Capsid Protein Lattice from Solid State NMR of Tubular Assemblies.

    PubMed

    Bayro, Marvin J; Tycko, Robert

    2016-07-13

    The HIV-1 capsid protein (CA) forms the capsid shell that encloses RNA within a mature HIV-1 virion. Previous studies by electron microscopy have shown that the capsid shell is primarily a triangular lattice of CA hexamers, with variable curvature that destroys the ideal symmetry of a planar lattice. The mature CA lattice depends on CA dimerization, which occurs through interactions between helix 9 segments of the C-terminal domain (CTD) of CA. Several high-resolution structures of the CTD-CTD dimerization interface have been reported, based on X-ray crystallography and multidimensional solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), with significant differences in amino acid side chain conformations and helix 9-helix 9 orientations. In a structural model for tubular CA assemblies based on cryogenic electron microscopy (cryoEM) [Zhao et al. Nature, 2013, 497, 643-646], the dimerization interface is substantially disordered. The dimerization interface structure in noncrystalline CA assemblies and the extent to which this interface is structurally ordered within a curved lattice have therefore been unclear. Here we describe solid state NMR measurements on the dimerization interface in tubular CA assemblies, which contain the curved triangular lattice of a mature virion, including quantitative measurements of intermolecular and intramolecular distances using dipolar recoupling techniques, solid state NMR chemical shifts, and long-range side chain-side chain contacts. When combined with restraints on the distance and orientation between helix 9 segments from the cryoEM study, the solid state NMR data lead to a unique high-resolution structure for the dimerization interface in the noncrystalline lattice of CA tubes. These results demonstrate that CA lattice curvature is not dependent on disorder or variability in the dimerization interface. This work also demonstrates the feasibility of local structure determination within large noncrystalline assemblies formed by high

  11. Cloning and characterization of a delta-6 desaturase encoding gene from Nannochloropsis oculata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xiaolei; Yu, Jianzhong; Zhu, Baohua; Pan, Kehou; Pan, Jin; Yang, Guanpin

    2011-03-01

    A gene ( NANOC-D6D) encoding a desaturase that removes two hydrogen atoms from fatty acids at delta 6 position was isolated from a cDNA library of Nannochloropsis oculata (Droop) D. J. Hibberd (Eustigmatophyceae). The unicellular marine microalga N. oculata synthesizes rich long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFAs), including eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5n-3, EPA). The deduced protein contains 474 amino acids that fold into 4 trans-membrane domains. The neighbor-joining phylogenetic tree indicates that NANOC-D6D is phylogenetically close to the delta-6 fatty acid desaturase of marine microalgae such as Glossomastix chrysoplasta, Thalassiosira pseudonana, and Phaeodactylum tricornutum. The gene was expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae INVScl to verify the substrate specificity of NANOC-D6D. Our results suggest that the recombinant NANOC-D6D simultaneously desaturates linoleic acid (LA) and α-linolenic acid (ALA).

  12. Some physical and chemical indices of the Union Jack lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shuli; Yan, Weigen; Tian, Tao

    2015-02-01

    The Union Jack lattice is the dual lattice of the 4.8.8 lattice. The quantum spin model with frustration and the Ising model on the Union Jack lattice have been studied extensively by physicists. In this paper, we derive the spectrum and Laplacian spectrum of the Union Jack lattice with toroidal boundary condition. As applications, we obtain the formulae of the number of spanning trees, the energy, and the Kirchhoff index of the Union Jack lattice with toroidal boundary condition.

  13. CHAIN REACTING SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Fermi, E.; Leverett, M.C.

    1958-06-01

    A nuclear reactor of the gas-cooled, graphitemoderated type is described. In this design, graphite blocks are arranged in a substantially cylindrical lattice having vertically orienied coolant channels in which uranium fuel elements having through passages are disposed. The active lattice is contained within a hollow body. such as a steel shell, which, in turn, is surrounded by water and concrete shields. Helium is used as the primary coolant and is circulated under pressure through the coolant channels and fuel elements. The helium is then conveyed to heat exchangers, where its heat is used to produce steam for driving a prime mover, thence to filtering means where radioactive impurities are removed. From the filtering means the helium passes to a compressor and an after cooler and is ultimately returned to the reactor for recirculation. Control and safety rods are provided to stabilize or stop the reaction. A space is provided between the graphite lattice and the internal walls of the shell to allow for thermal expansion of the lattice during operation. This space is filled with a resilient packing, such as asbestos, to prevent the passage of helium.

  14. Influence of the side chain next to C-terminal benzimidazole in opioid pseudopeptides containing the Dmt-Tic pharmacophore.

    PubMed

    Balboni, Gianfranco; Trapella, Claudio; Sasaki, Yusuke; Ambo, Akihiro; Marczak, Ewa D; Lazarus, Lawrence H; Salvadori, Severo

    2009-09-10

    To improve the structure-activity studies of the lead delta opioid agonist H-Dmt-Tic-Asp*-Bid, we synthesized and pharmacologically characterized a series of analogues in which the side chain next to 1H-benzimidazole-2-yl (Bid) was substituted by those endowed with different chemical properties. Interesting results were obtained: (1) only Gly, Ala, and Asp resulted in delta agonism, (2) Phe yielded delta antagonism, (3) and all other residues except Glu (devoid of any activity) gave mu agonism.

  15. Susceptibility of Naegleria fowleri to delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol.

    PubMed Central

    Pringle, H L; Bradley, S G; Harris, L S

    1979-01-01

    Growth of the pathogenic amoeboflagellate Naegleria fowleri is inhibited by delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta 9-THC). delta 9-THC is amoebostatic at 5 to 50 micrograms/ml. delta 9-THC prevents enflagellation and encystment, but does not impair amoeboid movement. Calf serum at 10 and 20% (vol/vol) reduces the antiamoeba activity of delta 9-THC. Only 1-methoxy delta 8-tetrahydrocannabinol, of 17 cannabinoids tested, failed to inhibit growth of N. fowleri. Antinaeglerial activity was not markedly altered by opening the pyran ring, by converting the cyclohexyl ring to an aromatic ring, or by reversing the hydroxyl and pentyl groups on the benzene ring. delta 9-THC prevented the cytopathic effect of N. fowleri on African green monkey (Vero) cells and human epithelioma (HEp-2) cells in culture. delta 9-THC afforded modest protection to mice infected with N. fowleri. Images PMID:526010

  16. Discretization effects and the scalar meson correlator in mixed-action lattice simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Aubin, C.; Laiho, Jack; Van de Water, Ruth S.

    2008-06-01

    We study discretization effects in a mixed-action lattice theory with domain-wall valence quarks and Asqtad-improved staggered sea quarks. At the level of the chiral effective Lagrangian, discretization effects in the mixed-action theory give rise to two new parameters as compared to the lowest order Lagrangian for rooted-staggered fermions - the residual quark mass m{sub res} and the mixed valence-sea meson mass splitting {delta}{sub mix}. We find that m{sub res}, which parametrizes explicit chiral symmetry breaking in the mixed-action theory, is approximately one-quarter the size of our lightest valence quark mass on our coarser lattice spacing and of comparable size to that of simulations by the RBC and UKQCD Collaborations. We also find that the size of {delta}{sub mix} is comparable to the size of the smallest of the staggered meson taste splittings measured by the MILC Collaboration. Because lattice artifacts are different in the valence and sea sectors of the mixed-action theory, they give rise to unitarity-violating effects that disappear in the continuum limit, some of which should be described by mixed-action chiral perturbation theory (MA{chi}PT). Such effects are expected to be mild for many quantities of interest but are expected to be significant in the case of the isovector scalar (a{sub 0}) correlator. Specifically, once the parameters m{sub res}, {delta}{sub mix}, and two others that can be determined from the light pseudoscalar meson spectrum are known, the two-particle intermediate state 'bubble' contribution to the scalar correlator is completely predicted within MA{chi}PT. We find that the behavior of the scalar meson correlator is quantitatively consistent with the MA{chi}PT prediction; this supports the claim that MA{chi}PT describes the dominant unitarity-violating effects in the mixed-action theory and can therefore be used to remove lattice artifacts and recover physical quantities.

  17. Local rules for protein folding on a triangular lattice and generalized hydrophobicity in the HP model

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwala, R.; Batzoglou, S.; Dancik, V.

    1997-06-01

    We consider the problem of determining the three-dimensional folding of a protein given its one-dimensional amino acid sequence. We use the HP model for protein folding proposed by Dill, which models protein as a chain of amino acid residues that are either hydrophobic or polar, and hydrophobic interactions are the dominant initial driving force for the protein folding. Hart and Istrail gave approximation algorithms for folding proteins on the cubic lattice under HP model. In this paper, we examine the choice of a lattice by considering its algorithmic and geometric implications and argue that triangular lattice is a more reasonable choice. We present a set of folding rules for a triangular lattice and analyze the approximation ratio which they achieve. In addition, we introduce a generalization of the HP model to account for residues having different levels of hydrophobicity. After describing the biological foundation for this generalization, we show that in the new model we are able to achieve similar constant factor approximation guarantees on the triangular lattice as were achieved in the standard HP model. While the structures derived from our folding rules are probably still far from biological reality, we hope that having a set of folding rules with different properties will yield more interesting folds when combined.

  18. Nonlocal continuum analysis of a nonlinear uniaxial elastic lattice system under non-uniform axial load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hérisson, Benjamin; Challamel, Noël; Picandet, Vincent; Perrot, Arnaud

    2016-09-01

    The static behavior of the Fermi-Pasta-Ulam (FPU) axial chain under distributed loading is examined. The FPU system examined in the paper is a nonlinear elastic lattice with linear and quadratic spring interaction. A dimensionless parameter controls the possible loss of convexity of the associated quadratic and cubic energy. Exact analytical solutions based on Hurwitz zeta functions are developed in presence of linear static loading. It is shown that this nonlinear lattice possesses scale effects and possible localization properties in the absence of energy convexity. A continuous approach is then developed to capture the main phenomena observed regarding the discrete axial problem. The associated continuum is built from a continualization procedure that is mainly based on the asymptotic expansion of the difference operators involved in the lattice problem. This associated continuum is an enriched gradient-based or nonlocal axial medium. A Taylor-based and a rational differential method are both considered in the continualization procedures to approximate the FPU lattice response. The Padé approximant used in the continualization procedure fits the response of the discrete system efficiently, even in the vicinity of the limit load when the non-convex FPU energy is examined. It is concluded that the FPU lattice system behaves as a nonlocal axial system in dynamic but also static loading.

  19. Historical Reconstruction of Organic Carbon Inputs to Sediments in the Colville River Delta, Alaska: The Application of Biomarker Proxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Bianchi, T. S.; Allison, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    Arctic permafrost represents about 50% of the total belowground global carbon pool, and thus the fate of this pool, as it thaws in the wake of global warming, warrants close attention. Large-river delta-front estuaries (LDEs) have been shown to be important recorders of natural and human-induced changes in watersheds, as they are critical zones for the exchange of organic carbon between the continents and the ocean. The Colville River is the largest North American Arctic River with a continuous permafrost watershed. Simpson's Lagoon, an eastward distal component of the Colville River Delta is an excellent location for historical reconstruction work since it is an area well protected from intense ice grounding and has minimal bioturbation. Sediment cores were collected from the mouth of the river and the lagoon in August of 2010, and analyzed for bulk organic carbon and nitrogen proxies, biomarkers (including lignin phenols, fatty acids), and compound-specific 13C isotope analysis (CSIA) of fatty acids. Downcore sediment data from CSIA of short-chain fatty acids (C14-C18) to the delta over the past ca. 50 years were found to be more depleted and had a wider isotopic range (-17.0~-33.2‰) than long-chain fatty acids (C22-C30, -30.3~-36.8‰). This possibly reflects alterations of inputs of freshwater flow to the delta which could have resulted in isotopic changes that caused corresponding changes in marine versus freshwater phytoplankton inputs. Downcore short-chain saturated and monounsaturated fatty acid profiles reflected differences in the abundance of bacteria and post-depositional decay of algal inputs across different regions of the delta. Ongoing analyses will also focus on compound-specific radiocarbon analyses (CSRA) of fatty acids and lignin phenols to better understand the changes of organic inputs from terrestrially-derived organic-rich horizons in surface soils vs. old deep permafrost-derived organic horizons.

  20. Experimental and theoretical study of three interacting, closely-spaced, sharp-edged 60 deg delta wings at low speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faery, H. F., Jr.; Strozier, J. K.; Ham, J. A.

    1981-01-01

    Wind tunnel tests were conducted to determine the subsonic longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of lifting configuration consisting of a 60 deg delta main wing with two smaller 60 deg delta wings (called sub-wings) attached underneath. The test was designed to determine the effects on lift, drag, and pitching moment due to various placement of the subwings in relation to the main wing. Test results indicate the increasing vertical separation between the main wing and the sub-wings produced the most significant results; a 23.1% increase in maximum lift coefficient, a reduction in drag coefficient at high lift coefficients, and an increase in longitudinal stability. Lateral separation of the sub-wings produced no significant changes. Placement of the sub-wings rearward increases the initial lift curve slope and maximum lift coefficient and also increase the longitudinal stability. Results of a computer study using a vortex lattice code supported the experimental conclusions.

  1. Dynamic Behavior of Engineered Lattice Materials

    PubMed Central

    Hawreliak, J. A.; Lind, J.; Maddox, B.; Barham, M.; Messner, M.; Barton, N.; Jensen, B. J.; Kumar, M.

    2016-01-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) is enabling the fabrication of materials with engineered lattice structures at the micron scale. These mesoscopic structures fall between the length scale associated with the organization of atoms and the scale at which macroscopic structures are constructed. Dynamic compression experiments were performed to study the emergence of behavior owing to the lattice periodicity in AM materials on length scales that approach a single unit cell. For the lattice structures, both bend and stretch dominated, elastic deflection of the structure was observed ahead of the compaction of the lattice, while no elastic deformation was observed to precede the compaction in a stochastic, random structure. The material showed lattice characteristics in the elastic response of the material, while the compaction was consistent with a model for compression of porous media. The experimental observations made on arrays of 4 × 4 × 6 lattice unit cells show excellent agreement with elastic wave velocity calculations for an infinite periodic lattice, as determined by Bloch wave analysis, and finite element simulations. PMID:27321697

  2. Duality analysis on random planar lattices.

    PubMed

    Ohzeki, Masayuki; Fujii, Keisuke

    2012-11-01

    The conventional duality analysis is employed to identify a location of a critical point on a uniform lattice without any disorder in its structure. In the present study, we deal with the random planar lattice, which consists of the randomized structure based on the square lattice. We introduce the uniformly random modification by the bond dilution and contraction on a part of the unit square. The random planar lattice includes the triangular and hexagonal lattices in extreme cases of a parameter to control the structure. A modern duality analysis fashion with real-space renormalization is found to be available for estimating the location of the critical points with a wide range of the randomness parameter. As a simple test bed, we demonstrate that our method indeed gives several critical points for the cases of the Ising and Potts models and the bond-percolation thresholds on the random planar lattice. Our method leads to not only such an extension of the duality analyses on the classical statistical mechanics but also a fascinating result associated with optimal error thresholds for a class of quantum error correction code, the surface code on the random planar lattice, which is known as a skillful technique to protect the quantum state.

  3. Duality analysis on random planar lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohzeki, Masayuki; Fujii, Keisuke

    2012-11-01

    The conventional duality analysis is employed to identify a location of a critical point on a uniform lattice without any disorder in its structure. In the present study, we deal with the random planar lattice, which consists of the randomized structure based on the square lattice. We introduce the uniformly random modification by the bond dilution and contraction on a part of the unit square. The random planar lattice includes the triangular and hexagonal lattices in extreme cases of a parameter to control the structure. A modern duality analysis fashion with real-space renormalization is found to be available for estimating the location of the critical points with a wide range of the randomness parameter. As a simple test bed, we demonstrate that our method indeed gives several critical points for the cases of the Ising and Potts models and the bond-percolation thresholds on the random planar lattice. Our method leads to not only such an extension of the duality analyses on the classical statistical mechanics but also a fascinating result associated with optimal error thresholds for a class of quantum error correction code, the surface code on the random planar lattice, which is known as a skillful technique to protect the quantum state.

  4. Dynamic Behavior of Engineered Lattice Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawreliak, J. A.; Lind, J.; Maddox, B.; Barham, M.; Messner, M.; Barton, N.; Jensen, B. J.; Kumar, M.

    2016-06-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) is enabling the fabrication of materials with engineered lattice structures at the micron scale. These mesoscopic structures fall between the length scale associated with the organization of atoms and the scale at which macroscopic structures are constructed. Dynamic compression experiments were performed to study the emergence of behavior owing to the lattice periodicity in AM materials on length scales that approach a single unit cell. For the lattice structures, both bend and stretch dominated, elastic deflection of the structure was observed ahead of the compaction of the lattice, while no elastic deformation was observed to precede the compaction in a stochastic, random structure. The material showed lattice characteristics in the elastic response of the material, while the compaction was consistent with a model for compression of porous media. The experimental observations made on arrays of 4 × 4 × 6 lattice unit cells show excellent agreement with elastic wave velocity calculations for an infinite periodic lattice, as determined by Bloch wave analysis, and finite element simulations.

  5. Dynamic Behavior of Engineered Lattice Materials.

    PubMed

    Hawreliak, J A; Lind, J; Maddox, B; Barham, M; Messner, M; Barton, N; Jensen, B J; Kumar, M

    2016-01-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) is enabling the fabrication of materials with engineered lattice structures at the micron scale. These mesoscopic structures fall between the length scale associated with the organization of atoms and the scale at which macroscopic structures are constructed. Dynamic compression experiments were performed to study the emergence of behavior owing to the lattice periodicity in AM materials on length scales that approach a single unit cell. For the lattice structures, both bend and stretch dominated, elastic deflection of the structure was observed ahead of the compaction of the lattice, while no elastic deformation was observed to precede the compaction in a stochastic, random structure. The material showed lattice characteristics in the elastic response of the material, while the compaction was consistent with a model for compression of porous media. The experimental observations made on arrays of 4 × 4 × 6 lattice unit cells show excellent agreement with elastic wave velocity calculations for an infinite periodic lattice, as determined by Bloch wave analysis, and finite element simulations. PMID:27321697

  6. Assembly of hepatitis delta virus particles.

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, W S; Bayer, M; Taylor, J

    1992-01-01

    Hepatitis delta virus (HDV) is a subviral satellite of hepatitis B virus (HBV). Since the RNA genome of HDV can replicate in cultured cells in the absence of HBV, it has been suggested that the only helper function of HBV is to supply HBV coat proteins in the assembly process of HDV particles. To examine the factors involved in such virion assembly, we transiently cotransfected cells with various hepadnavirus constructs and cDNAs of HDV and analyzed the particles released into the medium. We report that the HDV genomic RNA and the delta antigen can be packaged by coat proteins of either HBV or the related hepadnavirus woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV). Among the three co-carboxy-terminal coat proteins of WHV, the smallest form was sufficient to package the HDV genome; even in the absence of HDV RNA, the delta antigen could be packaged by this WHV coat protein. Also, of the two co-amino-terminal forms of the delta antigen, only the larger form was essential for packaging. Images PMID:1548764

  7. Delta Scorpii unusual brightening to first magnitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigismondi, Costantino

    2016-01-01

    The Be star delta Scorpii with a range of variability between 2.35 and 1.65 in visible light is having an unusual brightening to magnitude mV=0.8, as measured on 31 Jan 2016 at 3:56 UT and 5:36 UT from Lanciano, Italy.

  8. Applications of Dirac's Delta Function in Statistics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khuri, Andre

    2004-01-01

    The Dirac delta function has been used successfully in mathematical physics for many years. The purpose of this article is to bring attention to several useful applications of this function in mathematical statistics. Some of these applications include a unified representation of the distribution of a function (or functions) of one or several…

  9. Phi Delta Kappa at the Threshold

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walling, Donovan R.

    2006-01-01

    Since its fraternal origins a century ago, Phi Delta Kappa (PDK) International has been foremost a society of individuals joined together in professional collegiality and dedicated to tenets of leadership, service, and research in education. As PDK crosses the threshold into its second century, that early spirit of association lit in 1906, like…

  10. Definition of the {delta} mass and width

    SciTech Connect

    Djukanovic, D.; Scherer, S.; Gegelia, J.

    2007-08-01

    In the framework of effective field theory we show that, at two-loop order, the mass and width of the {delta} resonance defined via the (relativistic) Breit-Wigner parametrization both depend on the choice of field variables. In contrast, the complex-valued position of the pole of the propagator is independent of this choice.

  11. Backwater controls of avulsion location on deltas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatanantavet, Phairot; Lamb, Michael P.; Nittrouer, Jeffrey A.

    2012-01-01

    River delta complexes are built in part through repeated river-channel avulsions, which often occur about a persistent spatial node creating delta lobes that form a fan-like morphology. Predicting the location of avulsions is poorly understood, but it is essential for wetland restoration, hazard mitigation, reservoir characterization, and delta morphodynamics. Following previous work, we show that the upstream distance from the river mouth where avulsions occur is coincident with the backwater length, i.e., the upstream extent of river flow that is affected by hydrodynamic processes in the receiving basin. To explain this observation we formulate a fluvial morphodynamic model that is coupled to an offshore spreading river plume and subject it to a range of river discharges. Results show that avulsion is less likely in the downstream portion of the backwater zone because, during high-flow events, the water surface is drawn down near the river mouth to match that of the offshore plume, resulting in river-bed scour and a reduced likelihood of overbank flow. Furthermore, during low-discharge events, flow deceleration near the upstream extent of backwater causes enhanced deposition locally and a reduced channel-fill timescale there. Both mechanisms favor preferential avulsion in the upstream part of the backwater zone. These dynamics are fundamentally due to variable river discharges and a coupled offshore river plume, with implications for predicting delta response to climate and sea level change, and fluvio-deltaic stratigraphy.

  12. The Delta Team: Empowering Adolescent Girls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hood, Marian White

    1994-01-01

    In response to adolescent girls' concerns about teen violence, rumors, grooming, careers, and equity, four women teachers and a woman administrator at a Maryland middle school developed the Delta Program. The program provides positive learning experiences, teaches social skills and conflict management techniques, empowers girls through mentoring…

  13. Quantitative Metrics of Robustness in River Deltas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foufoula-Georgiou, E.; Tejedor, A.; Longjas, A.; Zaliapin, I. V.

    2014-12-01

    Deltas are landforms with channels that deliver water, sediment and nutrient fluxes from rivers to oceans or inland water bodies via multiple pathways. We conceptualize a delta channel network as a rooted acyclic directed graph where channels are modeled by edges and junctions by vertices. We use spectral graph theory - mainly the geometry of the null space of the directed weighted graph Laplacian - to establish a quantitative framework for extracting important structural and dynamics-related information from river deltas. Using this information, we introduce refined metrics of system complexity, such as entropy. Entropy has been proven to be an important measure of the amount of uncertainty in stochastic systems, and therefore a surrogate of the capacity of the system to undergo changes. Here we present an entropic approach to evaluate the robustness of deltas, showing how the two components of entropy: mutual information and conditional entropy can be interpreted in this framework. We also present other metrics that include, among others, resistance distance and number of alternative paths, which quantify the structural complexity of the system. We use these metrics to better classify deltaic systems, quantify their resilience and propose possible management scenarios.

  14. Alkoxy radicals: Delta proton hyperfine couplingsa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budzinski, Edwin E.; Box, Harold C.

    1985-04-01

    Single crystals of rhamnose were x irradiated at 4.2 K and the ESR and ENDOR spectra taken at 1.6 K. A component of the ESR absorption arises from an alkoxy radical exhibiting an unusual delta proton hyperfine coupling. Parallels between the radiation-induced oxidation of certain carbohydrates and that of amino acids are pointed out.

  15. Faculty Salaries at Delta College. Research Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, John W.

    In 1989, a study was conducted of faculty salaries at California's San Joaquin Delta Community College (SJDCC). Salary results were compared with community college districts in the State of California, with two specially selected subgroups of colleges comparable to SJDCC, and with all of California's major public and private four-year…

  16. San Joaquin Delta College Student Athlete Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Merrilee R.; Marcopulos, Ernest

    In spring 1988, a study was conducted of students who participated in college athletics at San Joaquin Delta College (SJDC) between 1983-84 and 1987-88. Data collected on each student athlete included ethnicity, sport, place of residence, initial and current reading level, total grade point average (GPA), GPA in athletics and physical education…

  17. Validation of WIMS-IST for CANDU R-type lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Bromley, B. P.; Davis, R.

    2006-07-01

    Prior validation studies of 28-element natural uranium (28-NU) CANDU R-type fuel bundles using the WIMS-IST lattice physics code had demonstrated a bias in the calculation of the coolant void reactivity (CVR) of approximately +0.5 to +0.6 mk (1 mk =100 pcm = 0.001 {Delta}k/k). However, these validation studies were performed using experimental data for 28-element bundles with pressure tubes that were smaller than standard CANDU-type pressure tubes, giving a smaller coolant volume, and a modified neutron energy spectrum. Validation studies performed with 37-element and 43-element fuel bundles with a CANDU-type lattice pitch and pressure tube had shown a CVR bias of {approx} 1.7 to 1.9 mk. It was believed that the CVR bias for a 28-element bundle would be closer to this range of values if a standard CANDU pressure tube diameter were used The objective of this study was to confirm this hypothesis, that using a larger CANDU-standard pressure tube would give a larger CVR bias for a 28-NU fuel bundle, as computed by WIMS-IST in comparison to experimental measurements of critical buckling. Thus, new critical-height and flux-map measurements were performed in substitution experiments in the ZED-2 research reactor to determine the pure critical lattice buckling for 28-element fuel with standard-size CANDU pressure tubes. The derived buckling from these experiments were used in WIMS-IST transport calculations to determine the effective multiplication factors for cooled and voided lattices and hence the bias in the CVR. Calculation results demonstrated that the CVR bias for the 28-NU was {approx} 1.7 mk {+-} 0.42 mk, which is consistent with the results for 37-element and 43-element CANDU-type lattices. (authors)

  18. Growth algorithms for lattice heteropolymers at low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Hsiao-Ping; Mehra, Vishal; Nadler, Walter; Grassberger, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Two improved versions of the pruned-enriched-Rosenbluth method (PERM) are proposed and tested on simple models of lattice heteropolymers. Both are found to outperform not only the previous version of PERM, but also all other stochastic algorithms which have been employed on this problem, except for the core directed chain growth method (CG) of Beutler and Dill. In nearly all test cases they are faster in finding low-energy states, and in many cases they found new lowest energy states missed in previous papers. The CG method is superior to our method in some cases, but less efficient in others. On the other hand, the CG method uses heavily heuristics based on presumptions about the hydrophobic core and does not give thermodynamic properties, while the present method is a fully blind general purpose algorithm giving correct Boltzmann-Gibbs weights, and can be applied in principle to any stochastic sampling problem.

  19. Monte Carlo Study of Real Time Dynamics on the Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandru, Andrei; Başar, Gökçe; Bedaque, Paulo F.; Vartak, Sohan; Warrington, Neill C.

    2016-08-01

    Monte Carlo studies involving real time dynamics are severely restricted by the sign problem that emerges from a highly oscillatory phase of the path integral. In this Letter, we present a new method to compute real time quantities on the lattice using the Schwinger-Keldysh formalism via Monte Carlo simulations. The key idea is to deform the path integration domain to a complex manifold where the phase oscillations are mild and the sign problem is manageable. We use the previously introduced "contraction algorithm" to create a Markov chain on this alternative manifold. We substantiate our approach by analyzing the quantum mechanical anharmonic oscillator. Our results are in agreement with the exact ones obtained by diagonalization of the Hamiltonian. The method we introduce is generic and, in principle, applicable to quantum field theory albeit very slow. We discuss some possible improvements that should speed up the algorithm.

  20. Nonlinear compressional waves in a two-dimensional Yukawa lattice.

    PubMed

    Avinash, K; Zhu, P; Nosenko, V; Goree, J

    2003-10-01

    A modified Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation is obtained for studying the propagation of nonlinear compressional waves and pulses in a chain of particles including the effect of damping. Suitably altering the linear phase velocity makes this equation useful also for the problem of phonon propagation in a two-dimensional (2D) lattice. Assuming a Yukawa potential, we use this method to model compressional wave propagation in a 2D plasma crystal, as in a recent experiment. By integrating the modified KdV equation the pulse is allowed to evolve, and good agreement with the experiment is found. It is shown that the speed of a compressional pulse increases with its amplitude, while the speed of a rarefactive pulse decreases. It is further discussed how the drag due to the background gas has a crucial role in weakening nonlinear effects and preventing the emergence of a soliton. PMID:14683049

  1. Energy transport by lattice solitons in α-helical proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hochstrasser, D.; Mertens, F. G.; Büttner, H.

    1989-09-01

    Yomosa's model for peptide chains is generalized in two respects. (1) The internal vibrations of the peptide groups are incorporated by considering a one-dimensional lattice with alternating masses and alternating linear and nonlinear interactions for the intrapeptide bonds and the hydrogen bonds between the peptide groups, respectively. (2) Discreteness effects are taken into account by applying a new version of Collin's quasicontinuum approach. In the cases in which this approach is not sufficient, we apply an iterative method where the accuracy can be increased systematically. We obtain very narrow solitons with lower and upper velocity limits. Our results have been confirmed by computer simulations. The lifetime of the solitons is finite due to the emission of optical phonons. However, using α-helix parameters, this effect is negligible.

  2. Do lattice protein simulations exhibit self-organized criticality?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wisthoff, Addison; Murray, Joelle

    2014-03-01

    Proteins are known to fold into tertiary structures that determine their functionality in living organisms. The goal of my research is to better understand the protein folding process through a lattice Monte-Carlo simulation. Specifically, amino acids in the chain at each time step are allowed to fold to certain locations according to two main criteria: folds must maintain bond length and should be thermally and energetically favorable. This simulation will then be used to examine whether the folding process can be viewed through the lens of self-organized criticality (SOC). In particular I am interested in whether there are features of the folding process that are independent of the size of the protein. Student

  3. {Delta}G and {Delta}q-bar measurements at PHENIX

    SciTech Connect

    Okada, Kensuke; Collaboration: PHENIX Collaboration

    2011-12-14

    RHIC provides a unique opportunity to address the components of the proton spin. In comparison to deep inelastic scattering experiments, the gluon is the main player in proton-proton collisions. PHENIX has measured double spin asymmetries of various processes. Those contain the information of the gluon spin component ({Delta}G). In addition high energy collisions open the unique channel to access flavor dependent information of quark polarization through the real W boson production. Because of the feature of weak interaction, the parity violating process defines the helicity of quarks in the interaction. The single spin asymmetry is the observable. It is especially interesting to probe anti-quark components ({Delta}q-bar). In this article, we report the recent progress of {Delta}G and {Delta}q-bar measurements at PHENIX.

  4. Hard breakup of the deuteron into two {Delta} isobars

    SciTech Connect

    Granados, Carlos G.; Sargsian, Misak M.

    2011-05-15

    We study high-energy photodisintegration of the deuteron into two {Delta} isobars at large center of mass angles within the QCD hard rescattering model (HRM). According to the HRM, the process develops in three main steps: the photon knocks a quark from one of the nucleons in the deuteron; the struck quark rescatters off a quark from the other nucleon sharing the high energy of the photon; then the energetic quarks recombine into two outgoing baryons which have large transverse momenta. Within the HRM, the cross section is expressed through the amplitude of pn{yields}{Delta}{Delta} scattering which we evaluated based on the quark-interchange model of hard hadronic scattering. Calculations show that the angular distribution and the strength of the photodisintegration is mainly determined by the properties of the pn{yields}{Delta}{Delta} scattering. We predict that the cross section of the deuteron breakup to {Delta}{sup ++}{Delta}{sup -} is 4-5 times larger than that of the breakup to the {Delta}{sup +}{Delta}{sup 0} channel. Also, the angular distributions for these two channels are markedly different. These can be compared with the predictions based on the assumption that two hard {Delta} isobars are the result of the disintegration of the preexisting {Delta}{Delta} components of the deuteron wave function. In this case, one expects the angular distributions and cross sections of the breakup in both {Delta}{sup ++}{Delta}{sup -} and {Delta}{sup +}{Delta}{sup 0} channels to be similar.

  5. Chain Reaction Polymerization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGrath, James E.

    1981-01-01

    The salient features and importance of chain-reaction polymerization are discussed, including such topics as the thermodynamics of polymerization, free-radical polymerization kinetics, radical polymerization processes, copolymers, and free-radical chain, anionic, cationic, coordination, and ring-opening polymerizations. (JN)

  6. Critical Chain Exercises

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doyle, John Kevin

    2010-01-01

    Critical Chains project management focuses on holding buffers at the project level vs. task level, and managing buffers as a project resource. A number of studies have shown that Critical Chain project management can significantly improve organizational schedule fidelity (i.e., improve the proportion of projects delivered on time) and reduce…

  7. Sequence design in lattice models by graph theoretical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanjeev, B. S.; Patra, S. M.; Vishveshwara, S.

    2001-01-01

    A general strategy has been developed based on graph theoretical methods, for finding amino acid sequences that take up a desired conformation as the native state. This problem of inverse design has been addressed by assigning topological indices for the monomer sites (vertices) of the polymer on a 3×3×3 cubic lattice. This is a simple design strategy, which takes into account only the topology of the target protein and identifies the best sequence for a given composition. The procedure allows the design of a good sequence for a target native state by assigning weights for the vertices on a lattice site in a given conformation. It is seen across a variety of conformations that the predicted sequences perform well both in sequence and in conformation space, in identifying the target conformation as native state for a fixed composition of amino acids. Although the method is tested in the framework of the HP model [K. F. Lau and K. A. Dill, Macromolecules 22, 3986 (1989)] it can be used in any context if proper potential functions are available, since the procedure derives unique weights for all the sites (vertices, nodes) of the polymer chain of a chosen conformation (graph).

  8. Topological defects on the lattice: I. The Ising model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aasen, David; Mong, Roger S. K.; Fendley, Paul

    2016-09-01

    In this paper and its sequel, we construct topologically invariant defects in two-dimensional classical lattice models and quantum spin chains. We show how defect lines commute with the transfer matrix/Hamiltonian when they obey the defect commutation relations, cousins of the Yang-Baxter equation. These relations and their solutions can be extended to allow defect lines to branch and fuse, again with properties depending only on topology. In this part I, we focus on the simplest example, the Ising model. We define lattice spin-flip and duality defects and their branching, and prove they are topological. One useful consequence is a simple implementation of Kramers-Wannier duality on the torus and higher genus surfaces by using the fusion of duality defects. We use these topological defects to do simple calculations that yield exact properties of the conformal field theory describing the continuum limit. For example, the shift in momentum quantization with duality-twisted boundary conditions yields the conformal spin 1/16 of the chiral spin field. Even more strikingly, we derive the modular transformation matrices explicitly and exactly.

  9. Topological defects on the lattice: I. The Ising model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aasen, David; Mong, Roger S. K.; Fendley, Paul

    2016-09-01

    In this paper and its sequel, we construct topologically invariant defects in two-dimensional classical lattice models and quantum spin chains. We show how defect lines commute with the transfer matrix/Hamiltonian when they obey the defect commutation relations, cousins of the Yang–Baxter equation. These relations and their solutions can be extended to allow defect lines to branch and fuse, again with properties depending only on topology. In this part I, we focus on the simplest example, the Ising model. We define lattice spin-flip and duality defects and their branching, and prove they are topological. One useful consequence is a simple implementation of Kramers–Wannier duality on the torus and higher genus surfaces by using the fusion of duality defects. We use these topological defects to do simple calculations that yield exact properties of the conformal field theory describing the continuum limit. For example, the shift in momentum quantization with duality-twisted boundary conditions yields the conformal spin 1/16 of the chiral spin field. Even more strikingly, we derive the modular transformation matrices explicitly and exactly.

  10. Group theoretic reduction of Laplacian dynamical problems on fractal lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Schwalm, W.A.; Schwalm, M.K.; Giona, M.

    1997-06-01

    Discrete forms of the Schr{umlt o}dinger equation, the diffusion equation, the linearized Landau-Ginzburg equation, and discrete models for vibrations and spin dynamics belong to a class of Laplacian-based finite difference models. Real-space renormalization of such models on finitely ramified regular fractals is known to give exact recursion relations. It is shown that these recursions commute with Lie groups representing continuous symmetries of the discrete models. Each such symmetry reduces the order of the renormalization recursions by one, resulting in a system of recursions with one fewer variable. Group trajectories are obtained from inverse images of fixed and invariant sets of the recursions. A subset of the Laplacian finite difference models can be mapped by change of boundary conditions and time dependence to a diffusion problem with closed boundaries. In such cases conservation of mass simplifies the group flow and obtaining the groups becomes easier. To illustrate this, the renormalization recursions for Green functions on four standard examples are decoupled. The examples are (1) the linear chain, (2) an anisotropic version of Dhar{close_quote}s 3-simplex, similar to a model dealt with by Hood and Southern, (3) the fourfold coordinated Sierpi{acute n}ski lattice of Rammal and of Domany {ital et al.}, and (4) a form of the Vicsek lattice. Prospects for applying the group theoretic method to more general dynamical systems are discussed. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  11. The AGS-Booster lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.Y.; Barton, D.S.; Claus, J.; Cottingham, J.G.; Courant, E.D.; Danby, G.T.; Dell, G.F.; Forsyth, E.B.; Gupta, R.C.; Kats, J.

    1987-01-01

    The AGS Booster has three objectives. They are to increase the space charge limit of the AGS, to increase the intensity of the polarized proton beam by accumulating many linac pulses (since the intensity is limited by the polarized ion source), and to reaccelerate heavy ions from the BNL Tandem Van de Graaff before injection into the AGS. The machine is capable of accelerating protons at 7.5 Hertz from 200 MeV to 1.5 GeV or to lower final energies at faster repetition rates. The machine will also be able to accelerate heavy ions from as low as 1 MeV/nucleon to a magnetic rigidity as high as 17.6 Tesla-meters with a one second repetition rate. As an accumulator for polarized protons, the Booster should be able to store the protons at 200 MeV for several seconds. We expect that the Booster will increase the AGS proton intensity by a factor of four, polarized proton intensity by a factor of twenty to thirty, and will also enable the AGS to accelerate all species of heavy ions (at present the AGS heavy ion program is limited to the elements lighter than sulfur because it can only accelerate fully stripped ions). The construction project started in FY 1985 and is expected to be completed in 1989. The purpose of this paper is to provide a future reference for the AGS Booster lattice.

  12. Reactive Orthotropic Lattice Diffuser for Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khorrami, Mehdi R. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    An orthotropic lattice structure interconnects porous surfaces of the flap with internal lattice-structured perforations to equalize the steady pressure field on the flap surfaces adjacent to the end and to reduce the amplitude of the fluctuations in the flow field near the flap end. The global communication that exists within all of the perforations provides the mechanism to lessen the pressure gradients experienced by the end portion of the flap. In addition to having diffusive effects (diffusing the incoming flow), the three-dimensional orthogonal lattice structure is also reactive (acoustic wave phase distortion) due to the interconnection of the perforations.

  13. Charmonium excited state spectrum in lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Jozef Dudek; Robert Edwards; Nilmani Mathur; David Richards

    2008-02-01

    Working with a large basis of covariant derivative-based meson interpolating fields we demonstrate the feasibility of reliably extracting multiple excited states using a variational method. The study is performed on quenched anisotropic lattices with clover quarks at the charm mass. We demonstrate how a knowledge of the continuum limit of a lattice interpolating field can give additional spin-assignment information, even at a single lattice spacing, via the overlap factors of interpolating field and state. Excited state masses are systematically high with respect to quark potential model predictions and, where they exist, experimental states. We conclude that this is most likely a result of the quenched approximation.

  14. Heavy flavour phenomenology from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Gamiz, Elvira; /Fermilab

    2010-01-01

    Heavy quark quantities are useful for testing lattice techniques against well known experimental results, as well as for testing the StandardModel (SM), and searching for physics beyond the SM. I review the results of recent lattice calculations relevant for this program including those of B and D decay constants and semileptonic decay form factors, and neutral B mixing. The impact of future improvements of lattice results on the clarification of the origin of several disagreements between theory and experiment which are starting to show up are briefly discussed.

  15. Vibration of prestressed periodic lattice structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, M. S.

    1981-01-01

    Equations are developed for vibration of general lattice structures that have repetitive geometry. The method of solution is an extension of a previous paper for buckling of similar structures. The theory is based on representing each member of the structure with the exact dynamic stiffness matrix and taking advantage of the repetitive geometry to obtain an eigenvalue problem involving the degrees-of-freedom at a single node in the lattice. Results are given for shell-and beam-like lattice structures and for rings stiffened with tension cables and a central mast. The variation of frequency with external loading and the effect of local member vibration on overall modes is shown.

  16. Entropic lattice Boltzmann model for compressible flows.

    PubMed

    Frapolli, N; Chikatamarla, S S; Karlin, I V

    2015-12-01

    We present a lattice Boltzmann model (LBM) that covers the entire range of fluid flows, from low Mach weakly compressible to transonic and supersonic flows. One of the most restrictive limitations of the lattice Boltzmann method, the low Mach number limit, is overcome here by three fundamental changes to the LBM scheme: use of an appropriately chosen multispeed lattice, accurate evaluation of the equilibrium, and the entropic relaxation for the collision. The range of applications is demonstrated through the simulation of a bow shock in front of an airfoil and the simulation of decaying compressible turbulence with shocklets.

  17. A lattice model for data display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hibbard, William L.; Dyer, Charles R.; Paul, Brian E.

    1994-01-01

    In order to develop a foundation for visualization, we develop lattice models for data objects and displays that focus on the fact that data objects are approximations to mathematical objects and real displays are approximations to ideal displays. These lattice models give us a way to quantize the information content of data and displays and to define conditions on the visualization mappings from data to displays. Mappings satisfy these conditions if and only if they are lattice isomorphisms. We show how to apply this result to scientific data and display models, and discuss how it might be applied to recursively defined data types appropriate for complex information processing.

  18. A lattice controller for telerobotic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliwa, Nancy Orlando; Soloway, Donald

    1987-01-01

    A model for a lattice control structure for telerobotic systems (Critter) has been developed and prototyped. The Critter hierarchical lattice structure, node potentiation, and weighted feedback are described, and the implementation of the Critter model on a VAX architecture is addressed with regard to node processes, lattice structure, node potentiation, and network activation. The implementation environment is considered and the Critter model attributes which are desirable in a telerobotic system are discussed. Future research directions on the use of this concept for telerobotic control are examined.

  19. Atomic Fermi gases in optical lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Modugno, G.; De Mirandes, E.; Ferlando, F.; Ott, H.; Roati, G.; Inguscio, M.

    2005-05-05

    We report on the first experiments with atomic Fermi gases in optical lattices. We have studied the properties of non interacting fermions and of an interacting boson-fermion mixture in a 1D lattice in presence of additional linear or harmonic potentials. These systems have allowed to study for the first time the fundamental quantum transport properties of a perfect crystal and to confirm the role of interactions in real crystals. We have found that the combination of Fermi gases and optical lattices can also have important applications, such as high-resolution force sensing.

  20. Continuum methods in lattice perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Becher, Thomas G

    2002-11-15

    We show how methods of continuum perturbation theory can be used to simplify perturbative lattice calculations. We use the technique of asymptotic expansions to expand lattice loop integrals around the continuum limit. After the expansion, all nontrivial dependence on momenta and masses is encoded in continuum loop integrals and the only genuine lattice integrals left are tadpole integrals. Using integration-by-parts relations all of these can be expressed in terms of a small number of master integrals. Four master integrals are needed for bosonic one loop integrals, sixteen in QCD with Wilson or staggered fermions.