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Sample records for chain reaction pcr

  1. PCR (Polymerase Chain Reaction) Testing for Leishmaniasis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-10-20

    reactions. Prior to temperature cycling, this moderately heat stable enzyme selectively excises uracil residues which have been incorporated into DNA... temperature . Despite these precautions, some non-specific annealing of PCR primers does occur, even with single copy gene detection, and more so with...Mallinckrodt) in slightly hypotonic saline and allowed to remain at ambient temperature for 5 minutes, during which time RBC’s are lysed. Centrifugation

  2. Buoyancy-Driven Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Ness, K D; Wheeler, E K; Benett, W; Stratton, P; Christian, A; Chen, A; Ortega, J; Weisgraber, T H; Goodson, K E

    2004-09-28

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) facilitates DNA detection by significantly increasing the concentration of specific DNA segments. A new class of PCR instruments uses a buoyancy-driven re-circulating flow to thermally cycle the DNA sample and benefits from reduced cycle times, low sample volumes, a miniaturized format, and low power consumption. This paper analyzes a specific buoyancy PCR device in a micro-channel ''race-track'' geometry to determine key parameters about PCR cycle times and other figures of merit as functions of device dimensions. The 1-D model balances the buoyancy driving force with frictional losses. A hydrostatic pressure imbalance concept is used between the left and right sides of the fluid loop to calculate the buoyancy driving force. Velocity and temperature distributions within the channels are determined from two-dimensional analysis of the channel section, with developing region effects included empirically through scaled values of the local Nusselt number. Good agreement between four independent verification steps validate the 1-D simulation approach: (1) analytical expressions for the thermal entrance length are compared against, (2) comparison with a full 3-D finite element simulation, (3) comparison with an experimental flow field characterization, and (4) calculation of the minimum PCR runtime required to get a positive PCR signal from the buoyancy-driven PCR device. The 1-D approach closely models an actual buoyancy-driven PCR device and can further be used as a rapid design tool to simulate buoyancy PCR flows and perform detailed design optimizations studies.

  3. Monitoring infection: from blood culture to polymerase chain reaction (PCR).

    PubMed

    Book, Malte; Lehmann, Lutz Eric; Zhang, XiangHong; Stüber, Frank

    2013-06-01

    In patients with sepsis, diagnosis of blood stream infection (BSI) is a key concern to the therapist. Direct verification of pathogens in the blood stream executed by blood cultures (BC) still is regarded as the gold standard up to date. The quickest possible initiation of an appropriate antimicrobial therapy is a cornerstone of an effective therapy. Moreover, in this view BC can also serve to identify antimicrobial agents to target the pathogen. However, when employing BC the time needed until microbiological results are available ranges from 24 up to 72 h. Moreover, infections caused by multiple pathogens often remain undetected and concurrent antibiotic therapy may lower the overall sensitivity. Alternative pathogen characterization can be performed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based amplification methods. Results using PCR can be obtained within 6-8 h. Therefore, the time delay until an appropriate therapy can be reduced enormously. Moreover, these methods have the potential to enhance the sensitivity in the diagnosis of blood stream infections. Therefore, PCR based methods might be a valuable adjunct to present procedures of diagnosing bacteraemia.

  4. Identifying of meat species using polymerase chain reaction (PCR)

    SciTech Connect

    Foong, Chow Ming; Sani, Norrakiah Abdullah

    2013-11-27

    Meat has been widely consumed as an important protein source in daily life of human. Furthermore, with busy and intense urban lifestyle, processed food is now one of the main protein sources of one’s diet. Consumers rely on the food labeling to decide if the meat product purchased is safe and reliable. Therefore, it is important to ensure the food labeling is done in a correct manner to avoid consumer fraud. More consumers are now concern about the food quality and safety as compared to before. This study described the meat species identification and detection method using Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) in 8 types of meats (cattle, buffalo, goat, sheep, chicken, duck, pork and horse). The objective of this study is to decide on the specificity of oligonucleotide sequences obtained from previous study. There were 5 proposed oligonucleotide primer in this study. The main important finding in this work is the specificity of oligonucleotide primers to raw meats. It if found that the oligonucleotide primers proposed were not specific to the local raw meat species. Therefore, further study is needed to obtain a species-specific oligonucletide primers for PCR, in order to be applied in food product testing.

  5. Identifying of meat species using polymerase chain reaction (PCR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foong, Chow Ming; Sani, Norrakiah Abdullah

    2013-11-01

    Meat has been widely consumed as an important protein source in daily life of human. Furthermore, with busy and intense urban lifestyle, processed food is now one of the main protein sources of one's diet. Consumers rely on the food labeling to decide if the meat product purchased is safe and reliable. Therefore, it is important to ensure the food labeling is done in a correct manner to avoid consumer fraud. More consumers are now concern about the food quality and safety as compared to before. This study described the meat species identification and detection method using Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) in 8 types of meats (cattle, buffalo, goat, sheep, chicken, duck, pork and horse). The objective of this study is to decide on the specificity of oligonucleotide sequences obtained from previous study. There were 5 proposed oligonucleotide primer in this study. The main important finding in this work is the specificity of oligonucleotide primers to raw meats. It if found that the oligonucleotide primers proposed were not specific to the local raw meat species. Therefore, further study is needed to obtain a species-specific oligonucletide primers for PCR, in order to be applied in food product testing.

  6. Evaluation of Microbial Diversity in Wetland through Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) and Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (RFLP)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-01

    MICROBIAL DIVERSITY IN WETLANDS THROUGH POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION ( PCR ) AND RESTRICTION FRAGMENT LENGTH POLYMORPHISM ( RFLP ) THESIS Presented to the...MICROBIAL DIVERSITY IN WETLANDS THROUGH POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION ( PCR ) AND RESTRICTION FRAGMENT LENGTH POLYMORPHISM ( RFLP ) Gregory K. Joseph, B.A...AFIT/GES/ENV/06J-02 EVALUATION OF MICROBIAL DIVERSITY IN WETLANDS THROUGH POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION ( PCR ) AND RESTRICTION FRAGMENT LENGTH

  7. Enzymological considerations for a theoretical description of the quantitative competitive polymerase chain reaction (QC-PCR).

    PubMed

    Schnell, S; Mendoza, C

    1997-02-21

    The enzymological principles of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and of the quantitative competitive PCR (QC-PCR) are developed, proposing a theoretical framework that will facilitate quantification in experimental methodologies. It is demonstrated that the specificity of the QC-PCR, i.e. the ratio of the target initial velocity to that of the competitor template, remains constant not only during a particular amplification but also for increasing initial competitor concentrations. Linear fitting procedures are thus recommended that will enable a quantitative estimate of the initial target concentration. Finally, expressions for the efficiency of the PCR and QC-PCR are derived that are in agreement with previous experimental inferences.

  8. Designing Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) Primer Multiplexes in the Forensic Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elkins, Kelly M.

    2011-01-01

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a common experiment in upper-level undergraduate biochemistry, molecular biology, and forensic laboratory courses as reagents and thermocyclers have become more affordable for institutions. Typically, instructors design PCR primers to amplify the region of interest and the students prepare their samples for…

  9. Advances in digital polymerase chain reaction (dPCR) and its emerging biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Cao, Lei; Cui, Xingye; Hu, Jie; Li, Zedong; Choi, Jane Ru; Yang, Qingzhen; Lin, Min; Ying Hui, Li; Xu, Feng

    2017-04-15

    Since the invention of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in 1985, PCR has played a significant role in molecular diagnostics for genetic diseases, pathogens, oncogenes and forensic identification. In the past three decades, PCR has evolved from end-point PCR, through real-time PCR, to its current version, which is the absolute quantitive digital PCR (dPCR). In this review, we first discuss the principles of all key steps of dPCR, i.e., sample dispersion, amplification, and quantification, covering commercialized apparatuses and other devices still under lab development. We highlight the advantages and disadvantages of different technologies based on these steps, and discuss the emerging biomedical applications of dPCR. Finally, we provide a glimpse of the existing challenges and future perspectives for dPCR.

  10. Application of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for diagnosis of equine herpes virus-1 (EHV-1).

    PubMed

    Gupta, A K; Singh, B K; Yadav, M P

    1996-11-01

    Fifty aborted foetus samples were diagnosed for the presence of equine herpes virus-1 (EHV-1) by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique. Specific primer pair for amplification of a particular segment of EHV-1 DNA in gc region having 3 Hae III restriction endonuclease sites was used. A 409 base pair segment obtained as PCR amplification product in 9 samples was digested with Hae III to confirm the presence of EHV-1 as the infectious agent in aborted tissues. It was observed that PCR technique was more sensitive, specific and rapid than the conventional virological diagnostic methods.

  11. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for detection of aquatic animal pathogens in a diagnostic laboratory setting

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Purcell, Maureen K.; Getchell, Rodman G.; McClure, Carol A.; Weber, S.E.; Garver, Kyle A.

    2011-01-01

    Real-time, or quantitative, polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) is quickly supplanting other molecular methods for detecting the nucleic acids of human and other animal pathogens owing to the speed and robustness of the technology. As the aquatic animal health community moves toward implementing national diagnostic testing schemes, it will need to evaluate how qPCR technology should be employed. This review outlines the basic principles of qPCR technology, considerations for assay development, standards and controls, assay performance, diagnostic validation, implementation in the diagnostic laboratory, and quality assurance and control measures. These factors are fundamental for ensuring the validity of qPCR assay results obtained in the diagnostic laboratory setting.

  12. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for detection of aquatic animal pathogens in a diagnostic laboratory setting.

    PubMed

    Purcell, Maureen K; Getchell, Rodman G; McClure, Carol A; Garver, Kyle A

    2011-09-01

    Real-time, or quantitative, polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) is quickly supplanting other molecular methods for detecting the nucleic acids of human and other animal pathogens owing to the speed and robustness of the technology. As the aquatic animal health community moves toward implementing national diagnostic testing schemes, it will need to evaluate how qPCR technology should be employed. This review outlines the basic principles of qPCR technology, considerations for assay development, standards and controls, assay performance, diagnostic validation, implementation in the diagnostic laboratory, and quality assurance and control measures. These factors are fundamental for ensuring the validity of qPCR assay results obtained in the diagnostic laboratory setting.

  13. Polymerase chain reaction and real-time PCR for diagnosing of Leishmania infantum chagasi in dogs.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Rafael Antonio do Nascimento; Ramos, Carlos Alberto do Nascimento; Jusi, Márcia Mariza Gomes; de Araújo, Flábio Ribeiro; Machado, Rosangela Zacarias; Faustino, Maria Aparecida da Glória; Alves, Leucio Câmara

    2012-01-01

    The importance of dogs as a reservoir for Leishmania infantumchagasi in urban environments has stimulated numerous studies assessing diagnostic techniques. When performed properly, such procedures are an important step in preventing leishmaniasis in humans. Molecular methods have become prominent for this purpose. The aim of the present study was to determine the performance of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and real-time PCR (qPCR) for diagnosing of canine visceral leishmaniasis (CVL) using different biological samples. For this, 35 dogs from an area endemic for CVL were used. Bone marrow aspirate and lymph node and spleen fragments from these dogs were used for the molecular diagnosis. In the present study, qPCR was able to detect a greater number of positive animals than seen with PCR. Among the different biological samples used, there was no significant difference in L. infantumchagasi DNA detection between PCR and qPCR. However, considering that lymph nodes are easy to acquire, these can be considered to be the best samples for making molecular diagnoses of L. infantum chagasi infection.

  14. Biofunctionalization of Polyoxometalates with DNA Primers, Their Use in the Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) and Electrochemical Detection of PCR Products.

    PubMed

    Debela, Ahmed M; Ortiz, Mayreli; Beni, Valerio; Thorimbert, Serge; Lesage, Denis; Cole, Richard B; O'Sullivan, Ciara K; Hasenknopf, Bernold

    2015-12-01

    The bioconjugation of polyoxometalates (POMs), which are inorganic metal oxido clusters, to DNA strands to obtain functional labeled DNA primers and their potential use in electrochemical detection have been investigated. Activated monooxoacylated polyoxotungstates [SiW11 O39 {Sn(CH2 )2 CO}](8-) and [P2 W17 O61 {Sn(CH2 )2 CO}](6-) have been used to link to a 5'-NH2 terminated 21-mer DNA forward primer through amide coupling. The functionalized primer was characterized by using a battery of techniques, including electrophoresis, mass spectrometry, as well as IR and Raman spectroscopy. The functionality of the POM-labeled primers was demonstrated through hybridization with a surface-immobilized probe. Finally, the labeled primers were successfully used in the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and the PCR products were characterized by using electrophoresis.

  15. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of a nucleoprotein gene sequence of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arakawa, C.K.; Deering, R.E.; Higman, K.H.; Oshima, K.H.; O'Hara, P.J.; Winton, J.R.

    1990-01-01

    The polymerase chain reaction [PCR) was used to amplify a portion of the nucleoprotein [NI gene of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV). Using a published sequence for the Round Butte isolate of IHNV, a pair of PCR pnmers was synthesized that spanned a 252 nucleotide region of the N gene from residue 319 to residue 570 of the open reading frame. This region included a 30 nucleotide target sequence for a synthetic oligonucleotide probe developed for detection of IHNV N gene messenger RNA. After 25 cycles of amplification of either messenger or genomic RNA, the PCR product (DNA) of the expected size was easily visible on agarose gels stained with ethidium bromide. The specificity of the amplified DNA was confirmed by Southern and dot-blot analysis using the biotinylated oligonucleotide probe. The PCR was able to amplify the N gene sequence of purified genomic RNA from isolates of IHNV representing 5 different electropherotypes. Using the IHNV primer set, no PCR product was obtained from viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus RNA, but 2 higher molecular weight products were synthesized from hirame rhabdovirus RNA that did not hybridize with the biotinylated probe. The PCR could be efficiently performed with all IHNV genomic RNA template concentrations tested (1 ng to 1 pg). The lowest level of sensitivity was not determined. The PCR was used to amplify RNA extracted from infected cell cultures and selected tissues of Infected rainbow trout. The combination of PCR and nucleic acid probe promises to provide a detection method for IHNV that is rapid, h~ghly specific, and sensitive.

  16. Confirmation of presumptive Salmonella colonies contaminated with Proteus swarming using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez Rojo, Rosalba; Torres Chavolla, Edith

    2007-01-01

    In Mexico, zero tolerance regulation is practiced regarding Salmonella in food products. the presence of which is verified by the procedure described in NOM 114-SSA-1994. During the period between August 2002 and March 2003, 245 food samples were tested using this procedure in the Central Laboratories of the Department of Health for the State of Jalisco (CEESLAB). Of these 245 samples, 35 showed presumptive colonies contaminated with Proteus swarm cells even after selective isolation. These swarm cells make Salmonella recovery and biochemical identification difficult due to the occurance of atypical biochemical profiles which generally correspond to that of Proteus. Out of the 35 samples contaminated with Proteus, 65 presumptive colonies were isolated. These colonies were analyzed using both normative microbiological method and Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR). The PCR method detected two positive samples while normative microbiological method was not able to identify. In order to determine the extent of interference of Proteus swarming on the Salmonella-specific PCR band amplification, Salmonella ser. Typhimurium was grown in the presence of Proteus swarming. These results show that Proteus swarming did not interfere with Salmonella PCR-amplification, although the appearance of Sanlmonella was altered such that the black precipitate was no observed in the presence of Proteus swarming. Ours result indicate that the PCR method used in this study may be successfully applied to confirm presumptive Salmnonella colonies contaminated with Proteus swarming.

  17. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) identification of Penicillium brevicompactum, a grape contaminant and mycophenolic acid producer.

    PubMed

    Patiño, B; Medina, A; Doménech, M; González-Jaén, M T; Jiménez, M; Vázquez, C

    2007-02-01

    Penicillium brevicompactum is a ubiquitous fungal species that contaminates diverse substrates and commodities and produces an array of metabolites toxic to human and animals. The present work has obtained evidence, by liquid chromatography (LC)-ion-trap mass spectrometry, of the ability of P. brevicompactum strains isolated from grapes to produce mycophenolic acid, a potent immunosuppressor. In order to facilitate early diagnosis of this species on commodities for human and animal consumption, a rapid, sensitive and specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay for P. brevicompactum was developed. The specific primers were designed based on the ITS1-5.8S-ITS2ITS (Internal Transcribed Spacers of rRNA genes) multicopy region. This method provides a useful aid to detect the presence of this fungal species in grapes and other commodities in order to prevent the toxins produced entering the food chain.

  18. Nano-magnetic primer based electrochemiluminescence-polymerase chain reaction (NMPE-PCR) assay.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiao; Zhou, Xiaoming; Xing, Da

    2012-01-15

    Here we have developed a novel nano-magnetic primer based electrochemiluminescence-polymerase chain reaction (NMPE-PCR) strategy for detection of genome. The key idea of this method is integrating the two in situ processes: PCR on the surface of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) and magnetic beads based ECL readout platform, to avoid some laborious manual operations and achieve rapid yet sensitive detection. At first, the approach employs a pair of functional primers for amplification: one is tris-(2,2'-bipyridyl) ruthenium (TBR) labeled primer; the other one is nano-magnetic primer which is prepared by attaching the primer to the surfaces of MNPs. With the presence of DNA analyte and PCR mixture, the TBR labeled products are directly loaded and enriched on the surface of MNPs during PCR cycling. Then the MNPs-TBR complexes can be analyzed by a magnetic ECL platform without any post-modification or post-incubation. Finally, we used Listeria monocytogenes as the target to examine these desirable properties of this assay, reaching a detection limit of 500 fg/μL for genome in 1 h. The proposed study has provided the evidence as a proof-of-concept, thus having potential for development of automatic mode for detection of specific gene.

  19. Monitoring Acidophilic Microbes with Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) Assays

    SciTech Connect

    Frank F. Roberto

    2008-08-01

    Many techniques that are used to characterize and monitor microbial populations associated with sulfide mineral bioleaching require the cultivation of the organisms on solid or liquid media. Chemolithotrophic species, such as Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans and Leptospirillum ferrooxidans, or thermophilic chemolithotrophs, such as Acidianus brierleyi and Sulfolobus solfataricus can grow quite slowly, requiring weeks to complete efforts to identify and quantify these microbes associated with bioleach samples. Real-time PCR (polymerase chain reaction) assays in which DNA targets are amplified in the presence of fluorescent oligonucleotide primers, allowing the monitoring and quantification of the amplification reactions as they progress, provide a means of rapidly detecting the presence of microbial species of interest, and their relative abundance in a sample. This presentation will describe the design and use of such assays to monitor acidophilic microbes in the environment and in bioleaching operations. These assays provide results within 2-3 hours, and can detect less than 100 individual microbial cells.

  20. Amplification of Chloroplast DNA Using the Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR): A Practical Activity for Secondary School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Kenny; Barfoot, Jan; Crawford, Kathleen E.; Simpson, Craig G.; Beaumont, Paul C.; Bownes, Mary

    2006-01-01

    We describe a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) protocol suitable for use in secondary schools and colleges. This PCR protocol can be used to investigate genetic variation between plants. The protocol makes use of primers which are complementary to sequences of nucleotides that are highly conserved across different plant genera. The regions of…

  1. In planta distribution of 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' as revealed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Tatineni, Satyanarayana; Sagaram, Uma Shankar; Gowda, Siddarame; Robertson, Cecile J; Dawson, William O; Iwanami, Toru; Wang, Nian

    2008-05-01

    Huanglongbing (HLB) is one of the most devastating diseases of citrus worldwide, and is caused by a phloem-limited fastidious prokaryotic alpha-proteobacterium that is yet to be cultured. In this study, a combination of traditional polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and real-time PCR targeting the putative DNA polymerase and 16S rDNA sequence of 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus,' respectively, were used to examine the distribution and movement of the HLB pathogen in the infected citrus tree. We found that 'Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus' was distributed in bark tissue, leaf midrib, roots, and different floral and fruit parts, but not in endosperm and embryo, of infected citrus trees. Quantification analysis of the HLB bacterium indicated that it was distributed unevenly in planta and ranged from 14 to 137,031 cells/mug of total DNA in different tissues. A relatively high concentration of 'Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus' was observed in fruit peduncles. Our data from greenhouse-infected plants also indicated that 'Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus' was transmitted systemically from infection site to different parts of the plant. Understanding the distribution and movement of the HLB bacterium inside an individual citrus tree is critical for discerning its virulence mechanism and to develop management strategies for HLB.

  2. Droplet digital polymerase chain reaction (PCR) outperforms real-time PCR in the detection of environmental DNA from an invasive fish species.

    PubMed

    Doi, Hideyuki; Takahara, Teruhiko; Minamoto, Toshifumi; Matsuhashi, Saeko; Uchii, Kimiko; Yamanaka, Hiroki

    2015-05-05

    Environmental DNA (eDNA) has been used to investigate species distributions in aquatic ecosystems. Most of these studies use real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to detect eDNA in water; however, PCR amplification is often inhibited by the presence of organic and inorganic matter. In droplet digital PCR (ddPCR), the sample is partitioned into thousands of nanoliter droplets, and PCR inhibition may be reduced by the detection of the end-point of PCR amplification in each droplet, independent of the amplification efficiency. In addition, real-time PCR reagents can affect PCR amplification and consequently alter detection rates. We compared the effectiveness of ddPCR and real-time PCR using two different PCR reagents for the detection of the eDNA from invasive bluegill sunfish, Lepomis macrochirus, in ponds. We found that ddPCR had higher detection rates of bluegill eDNA in pond water than real-time PCR with either of the PCR reagents, especially at low DNA concentrations. Limits of DNA detection, which were tested by spiking the bluegill DNA to DNA extracts from the ponds containing natural inhibitors, found that ddPCR had higher detection rate than real-time PCR. Our results suggest that ddPCR is more resistant to the presence of PCR inhibitors in field samples than real-time PCR. Thus, ddPCR outperforms real-time PCR methods for detecting eDNA to document species distributions in natural habitats, especially in habitats with high concentrations of PCR inhibitors.

  3. Identification of gadoid species in fish meat by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) on genomic DNA.

    PubMed

    Hubalkova, Zora; Kralik, Petr; Kasalova, Janka; Rencova, Eva

    2008-05-28

    Identification of fish species is significant due to the increasing interest of consumers in the meat of sea fish. Methods focusing on fish species identification help to reveal fraudulent substitution among economically important gadoid species in commercial seafood products. The objective of this work was to develop a conventional PCR method for the differentiation of the following gadoid fish species in fish products: Alaska pollack ( Theragra chalcogramma), blue whiting ( Micromesistius poutassou), hake spp. ( Merluccius spp.), Atlantic cod ( Gadus morhua), saithe ( Pollachius virens), and whiting ( Merlangius merlangus). The species-specific primer pairs for gadoid species determination were based on the partial pantophysin I ( PanI) genomic sequence. Sequence identification was confirmed by cloning and sequencing of the PCR products obtained from the species considered. For the simultaneous detection of Alaska pollack, blue whiting, and hake spp., a quadruplex PCR system was constructed. Other gadoid species were detected in separate PCR reactions. After optimization of the reactions, the developed PCR systems were used for the analysis of codfish samples obtained from the Czech market and the customs' laboratories. This method represents an alternative approach in the use of genomic DNA for the identification of fish species. This method is rapid, simple, and reliable without the need for further confirmative methods. Furthermore, the identification of a mixture of more than one species is possible. The PCR system has been optimized for routine diagnostic purposes.

  4. NanoPCR observation: different levels of DNA replication fidelity in nanoparticle-enhanced polymerase chain reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Cenchao; Yang, Wenjuan; Ji, Qiaoli; Maki, Hisaji; Dong, Anjie; Zhang, Zhizhou

    2009-11-01

    Nanoparticle-assisted PCR (polymerase chain reaction) technology is getting more and more attention recently. It is believed that some of the DNA recombinant technologies will be upgraded by nanotechnology in the near future, among which DNA replication is one of the core manipulation techniques. So whether or not the DNA replication fidelity is compromised in nanoparticle-assisted PCR is a question. In this study, a total of 16 different metallic and non-metallic nanoparticles (NPs) were tested for their effects on DNA replication fidelity in vitro and in vivo. Sixteen types of nanomaterials were distinctly different in enhancing the PCR efficiency, and their relative capacity to retain DNA replication fidelity was largely different from each other based on rpsL gene mutation assay. Generally speaking, metallic nanoparticles induced larger error rates in DNA replication fidelity than non-metallic nanoparticles, and non-metallic nanomaterials such as carbon nanopowder or nanotubes were still safe as PCR enhancers because they did not compromise the DNA replication fidelity in the Taq DNA polymerase-based PCR system.

  5. NanoPCR observation: different levels of DNA replication fidelity in nanoparticle-enhanced polymerase chain reactions.

    PubMed

    Shen, Cenchao; Yang, Wenjuan; Ji, Qiaoli; Maki, Hisaji; Dong, Anjie; Zhang, Zhizhou

    2009-11-11

    Nanoparticle-assisted PCR (polymerase chain reaction) technology is getting more and more attention recently. It is believed that some of the DNA recombinant technologies will be upgraded by nanotechnology in the near future, among which DNA replication is one of the core manipulation techniques. So whether or not the DNA replication fidelity is compromised in nanoparticle-assisted PCR is a question. In this study, a total of 16 different metallic and non-metallic nanoparticles (NPs) were tested for their effects on DNA replication fidelity in vitro and in vivo. Sixteen types of nanomaterials were distinctly different in enhancing the PCR efficiency, and their relative capacity to retain DNA replication fidelity was largely different from each other based on rpsL gene mutation assay. Generally speaking, metallic nanoparticles induced larger error rates in DNA replication fidelity than non-metallic nanoparticles, and non-metallic nanomaterials such as carbon nanopowder or nanotubes were still safe as PCR enhancers because they did not compromise the DNA replication fidelity in the Taq DNA polymerase-based PCR system.

  6. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) for rapid diagnosis of neonatal sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Rohit, Anusha; Maiti, Biswajit; Shenoy, Shalini; Karunasagar, Indrani

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: The difficulties in diagnosis of neonatal sepsis are due to varied clinical presentation, low sensitivity of blood culture which is considered the gold standard and empirical antibiotic usage affecting the outcome of results. Though polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based detection of bacterial 16S rRNA gene has been reported earlier, this does not provide identification of the causative agent. In this study, we used restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) of amplified 16S rRNA gene to identify the organisms involved in neonatal sepsis and compared the findings with blood culture. Methods: Blood samples from 97 neonates were evaluated for diagnosis of neonatal sepsis using BacT/Alert (automated blood culture) and PCR-RFLP. Results: Bacterial DNA was detected by 16S rRNA gene PCR in 55 cases, while BacT/Alert culture was positive in 34 cases. Staphylococcus aureus was the most common organism detected with both methods. Klebsiella spp. was isolated from four samples by culture but was detected by PCR-RFLP in five cases while Acinetobacter spp. was isolated from one case but detected in eight cases by PCR-RFLP. The sensitivity of PCR was found to be 82.3 per cent with a negative predictive value of 85.7 per cent. Eighty of the 97 neonates had prior exposure to antibiotics. Interpretation & conclusions: The results of our study demonstrate that PCR-RFLP having a rapid turnaround time may be useful for the early diagnosis of culture negative neonatal sepsis. PMID:26997017

  7. The polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Welch, Hazel M

    2012-01-01

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) has had a significant impact on all aspects of the molecular biosciences, from cancer research to forensic science. The sensitivity and specificity inherent in the technique allow minute quantities of genetic material to be detected while the unique properties of thermostable DNA polymerase ensure that abundant copies are reliably reproduced to levels that can be visualized and/or used for further applications. This chapter describes applications of PCR and PCR-RT to investigate primary cancer and metastatic disease at both the DNA and mRNA expression levels.

  8. Use of Fluorescence Quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) for the Detection of Escherichia coli Adhesion to Pig Intestinal Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Dai, C H; Gan, L N; Qin, W U; Zi, C; Zhu, G Q; Wu, S L; Bao, W B

    2016-09-01

    An efficient and accurate method to test Escherichia coli (E. coli) adhesion to intestinal epithelial cells will contribute to the study of bacterial pathogenesis and the function of genes that encode receptors related to adhesion. This study used the quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) method. qPCR primers were designed from the PILIN gene of E. coli F18ab, F18ac, and K88ac, and the pig β-ACTIN gene. Total deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) from E. coli and intestinal epithelial cells (IPEC-J2 cells) were used as templates for qPCR. The 2-ΔΔCt formula was used to calculate the relative number of bacteria in cultures of different areas. We found that the relative numbers of F18ab, F18ac, and K88ac that adhered to IPEC-J2 cells did not differ significantly in 6-, 12-, and 24-well culture plates. This finding indicated that there was no relationship between the relative adhesion number of E. coli and the area of cells, so the method of qPCR could accurately test the relative number of E. coli. This study provided a convenient and reliable testing method for experiments involving E. coli adhesion, and also provided innovative ideas for similar detection methods.

  9. Application of a real time Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) assay for the early diagnosis of human leptospirosis in Sri Lanka.

    PubMed

    Denipitiya, D T H; Chandrasekharan, N V; Abeyewickreme, W; Hartskeerl, C M; Hartskeerl, R A; Jiffrey, A M; Hapugoda, M D

    2016-11-01

    Leptospirosis has a major impact on health in Sri Lanka but is probably grossly under-recognized due to difficulties in clinical diagnosis and lack of diagnostic laboratory services. The objective of this study was to establish and evaluate a SYBR Green-based real-time Polymerase Chain Reaction (rt-PCR) assay for early, rapid and definitive laboratory diagnosis of leptospirosis in Sri Lanka. The rt-PCR assay was established and analytical specificity and sensitivity were determined using reference DNA samples. Evaluation of the assay for diagnosis of clinical samples was performed using two panels of serum samples obtained from 111 clinically suspected adult patients. Patients were confirmed as leptospirosis (n = 65) and non-leptospirosis (n = 30) by the Patoc - MAT. Other 16 samples gave ambiguous results. The analytical sensitivity of the rt-PCR was approximately 60 genome copies and no cross-reactivity was observed with saprophytic Leptospira spp. and other pathogenic microorganisms. Based on confirmation with Patoc-MAT on paired samples this corresponds to a diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of 67.7% (44/65) and 90.0% (27/30), respectively. This study showed that rt-PCR has the potential to facilitate rapid and definitive diagnosis of leptospirosis during early phase of infection in Sri Lanka.

  10. Screening of Bacillus thuringiensis serotypes by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for insecticidal crystal genes toxic against coffee berry borer.

    PubMed

    Naidu, M M; Rang, C; Frutos, R; Sreenivasan, C S; Naidu, R

    2001-02-01

    Using PCR,257 isolates of Bacillus thuringiensis(Bt) were screened for cry-type genes. Of 257 isolates/strains, 60 isolates were identified as cry7/8, 10 isolates as cry3 and 36 isolates as cry 1I. One specific strain of B. thuringiensis (sumiyoshiensis; T03B 001) was investigated for the presence of cry7 and cry8 genes. Genes Cry7 and cry8 were first detected in this strain using family primers prior to analysis by exclusion polymerase chain reaction (E-PCR) using specific type primers. E-PCR conducted with the above said primers led to the identification by agarose gel electrophoresis of a remaining 1.5 Kb family band indicating a potentially novel gene. This PCR product, (1.5 Kb), was purified from the gel and cloned in pGEM-T Easy vector. Twenty recombinant colonies bearing 1.5 Kb insert were identified and three randomly selected representatives of the group, clones 7, 8 and 10, were sequenced and compared to all cry7 and cry8 sequences available from Gene Bank. Alignments with available DNA and protein sequences showed that all these clones contained a gene related to cry8Aa1. Analysis using protein sequence alignment showed that the sequence from clone 7 differed from the closest relative, known under the new nomenclature as cry 8Aa1, by 44%. The crystal proteins from B. thuringiensis sumiyoshiensis (T03B 001) was toxic to coffee berry borer larvae.

  11. Haplotyping using a combination of polymerase chain reaction-single-strand conformational polymorphism analysis and haplotype-specific PCR amplification.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Huitong; Li, Shaobin; Liu, Xiu; Wang, Jiqing; Luo, Yuzhu; Hickford, Jon G H

    2014-12-01

    A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) may have an impact on phenotype, but it may also be influenced by multiple SNPs within a gene; hence, the haplotype or phase of multiple SNPs needs to be known. Various methods for haplotyping SNPs have been proposed, but a simple and cost-effective method is currently unavailable. Here we describe a haplotyping approach using two simple techniques: polymerase chain reaction-single-strand conformational polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) and haplotype-specific PCR. In this approach, individual regions of a gene are analyzed by PCR-SSCP to identify variation that defines sub-haplotypes, and then extended haplotypes are assembled from the sub-haplotypes either directly or with the additional use of haplotype-specific PCR amplification. We demonstrate the utility of this approach by haplotyping ovine FABP4 across two variable regions that contain seven SNPs and one indel. The simplicity of this approach makes it suitable for large-scale studies and/or diagnostic screening.

  12. Leptospira species categorized by arbitrarily primed polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and by mapped restriction polymorphisms in PCR-amplified rRNA genes.

    PubMed Central

    Ralph, D; McClelland, M; Welsh, J; Baranton, G; Perolat, P

    1993-01-01

    Reference strains from 48 selected serovars representing eight species of Leptospira were examined by two polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based strategies. First, mapped restriction site polymorphisms (MRSP) were examined in PCR products from portions of rrs (16S rRNA gene) and rrl (23S rRNA gene). Twenty MRSP and 2 length polymorphisms were used to group reference strains into 16 MRSP profiles. Species assignments were consistent with those obtained by a second method, genomic fingerprinting with arbitrarily primed PCR, in which strains within a species were characterized by many shared arbitrarily primed PCR products. The results of both of these methods were in general agreement with those of previous studies that used DNA-DNA relatedness and confirmed the high level of divergence among the recognized species of Leptospira. However, Leptospira meyeri serovar ranarum and evansi strains were indistinguishable from some strains of Leptospira interrogans sensu stricto. Intervening sequences of about 485 to 740 bp were located near base 1230 in rrl of some strains. Images PMID:8094390

  13. Detection of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) targets using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and paper surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) chromatography.

    PubMed

    Hoppmann, Eric P; Yu, Wei W; White, Ian M

    2014-01-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) enables multiplex detection of analytes using simple, portable equipment consisting of a single excitation source and detector. Thus, in theory, SERS is ideally suited to replace fluorescence in assays that screen for numerous deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) targets, but in practice, SERS-based assays have suffered from complexity and elaborate processing steps. Here, we report an assay in which a simple inkjet-fabricated plasmonic paper device enables SERS-based detection of multiple DNA targets within a single polymerase chain reaction (PCR). In prior work, we demonstrated the principles of chromatographic separation and SERS-based detection on inkjet-fabricated plasmonic paper. The present work extends that capability for post-PCR gene sequence detection. In this design, hydrolysis DNA probes with 5' Raman labels are utilized; if the target is present, the probe is hydrolyzed during PCR, freeing the reporter. After applying the PCR sample to a paper SERS device, an on-device chromatographic separation and concentration is conducted to discriminate between hydrolyzed and intact probes. SERS is then used to detect the reporter released by the hydrolyzed probes. This simple separation and detection on paper eliminates the need for complex sample processing steps. In this work, we simultaneously detect the methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus genes mecA and femB to illustrate the concept. We envision that this approach could contribute to the development of multiplex DNA diagnostic tests enabling screening for several target sequences within a single reaction, which is necessary for cases in which sample volume and resources are limited.

  14. Statistical Models for the Analysis and Design of Digital Polymerase Chain Reaction (dPCR) Experiments.

    PubMed

    Dorazio, Robert M; Hunter, Margaret E

    2015-11-03

    Statistical methods for the analysis and design of experiments using digital PCR (dPCR) have received only limited attention and have been misused in many instances. To address this issue and to provide a more general approach to the analysis of dPCR data, we describe a class of statistical models for the analysis and design of experiments that require quantification of nucleic acids. These models are mathematically equivalent to generalized linear models of binomial responses that include a complementary, log-log link function and an offset that is dependent on the dPCR partition volume. These models are both versatile and easy to fit using conventional statistical software. Covariates can be used to specify different sources of variation in nucleic acid concentration, and a model's parameters can be used to quantify the effects of these covariates. For purposes of illustration, we analyzed dPCR data from different types of experiments, including serial dilution, evaluation of copy number variation, and quantification of gene expression. We also showed how these models can be used to help design dPCR experiments, as in selection of sample sizes needed to achieve desired levels of precision in estimates of nucleic acid concentration or to detect differences in concentration among treatments with prescribed levels of statistical power.

  15. Comparison of bacterial culture and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the detection of F. tularensis subsp. holarctica in wild animals.

    PubMed

    Sting, Reinhard; Runge, Martin; Eisenberg, Tobias; Braune, Silke; Müller, Wolfgang; Otto, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Detection of the zoonotic pathogen Francisella tularensis subsp. holarctica (EF tularensis) in wild animals with culture techniques as well as polymerase chain reaction were compared and discussed on the basis of the investigation of 60 animals. The samples originated from 55 European brown hares (Lepus europaeus), two red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) and one each from a wild rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus), a European beaver (Castor fiber), and a lemur (Lemur catta). When comparing the growth of 28 F. tularensis isolates on the cysteine blood agar and the modified Martin-Lewis-agar used in this study, cultivation was successful for 26 isolates on both media, but for two isolates only on the cysteine blood agar. Out of 43 carcasses 19 tested positive in bacteriological culture and PCR. Two culture positive samples of tonsils originating from foxes could not be confirmed by PCR, although PCR was positive in 22 samples that missed growth of F. tularensis. Comparative studies on cultural detection of E. tularensis were performed on samples of 16 hares from lung, spleen, liver and gut and in one case with a peritoneal swab. In at least one of these localizations cultivation of the pathogen was successful. Detection rate was reduced to 94% (15 of 16 hares) considering only the results of the cultures of the lungs and spleens. For a sensitive and rapid detection of F. tularensis subsp. holarctica, the PCR is a suitable method thereby avoiding hazardous multiplying of the pathogen. However, cultivation of F. tularensis is often a prerequisite for further studies on antibiotic resistance patterns of the pathogen, molecular epidemiological and pathological analyses of tularaemia.

  16. Molecular typing among beef isolates of Escherichia coli using consensus repetitive intergenic enterobacteria-polymerase chain reaction (ERIC-PCR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoolkifli, Nurliyana Wan; Mutalib, Sahilah Abd

    2013-11-01

    Genomic DNA of Escherichia coli were characterized by enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus-Polymerase chain reaction (ERIC-PCR) and the presence of Shiga toxin gene-I (Stx1) and Shiga toxin gene-2 (Stx2). These isolates were originated from imported raw beef which are come from two countries namely Australia and India. The isolation of E. coli was conducted by using Eosin Methylene Blue Agar (EMBA). A total of 94 strains had been isolated from 30 samples of imported raw beefand 42 strains had been detected positively E. coli by doing biochemical tests. All strains had been tested and the results of biochemical tests showed that 3 strains were from Australia samples while the other 39 strains were from India samples. The biochemical tests used are Indole test, Methyl Red test, Voges-Proskauer test and Citrate test. All the 42 strains were examined for Shiga toxin (stx1 and stx2) gene detection by two pair primers which are stx2F (5'-TTCTTCGGTATCCTATTCCC-3'), stx2R (5'-ATGCATCTCTGGTCATTGTA-3'), stx1F (5'-CAGTTAATGTGGTGGCGAAG-3'), and stx1R (5'-CTGTCACAGTAACAACCGT-3'). The results showed that none of the strains are positive for Shiga toxin gene. Application of ERIC-PCR method towards E. coli had successfully shown the high diversity polymorphism in 21 different genome types of DNA with primers ERIC1R (5'- CACTTAGGGGTCCTCGAATGTA- 3') and ERIC2R (5'- AAGTAAGTGACTGGGGTGACGC- 3').

  17. Molecular typing of Paenibacillus larvae strains isolated from Bulgarian apiaries based on repetitive element polymerase chain reaction (Rep-PCR).

    PubMed

    Rusenova, Nikolina; Parvanov, Parvan; Stanilova, Spaska

    2013-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to perform molecular typing of Paenibacillus larvae (P. larvae) isolates from Bulgarian apiaries with repetitive element polymerase chain reaction (rep-PCR) using BOX A1R, MBO REP1, and ERIC primers. A total of 96 isolates collected from brood combs with clinical symptoms of American foulbrood originating from apiaries located in different geographical regions of Bulgaria, a reference strain P. larvae NBIMCC 8478 and 30 commercial honey samples with Bulgarian origin were included in the study. Rep-PCR fingerprinting analysis revealed two genotypes ab and AB of P. larvae isolates from brood combs and honey samples. A combination of genotypes ab/AB was detected in one apiary and honey sample. The prevailing genotype ab was found in 78.1 % of brood combs isolates as well as in the reference strain whereas genotype AB was determined in 21.9 % of isolates. The examination of honey samples confirmed the preponderance of ab genotype which was demonstrated in 20 of 30 samples analyzed. In conclusion, the genetic epidemiology of P. larvae revealed two genotypes--ab and AB for Bulgarian strains. Developed protocols for molecular typing of P. larvae are reliable and may be used to trace the source of infection.

  18. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays for a bacterial thiaminase I gene and the thiaminase-producing bacterium Paenibacillus thiaminolyticus.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Richter, C.A.; Wright-Osment, Maureen K.; Zajicek, J.L.; Honeyfield, D.C.; Tillitt, D.E.

    2009-01-01

    The thiaminase I enzyme produced by the gram-positive bacterium Paenibacillus thiaminolyticus isolated from the viscera of Lake Michigan alewives Alosa pseudoharengus is currently the only defined source of the thiaminase activity linked to thiamine (vitamin B1) deficiency in early mortality syndrome (EMS) in the larvae of Great Lakes salmonines. Diets of alewife or isolated strains of P. thiaminolyticus mixed in a semipurified diet and fed to lake trout Salvelinus namaycush have been shown to produce EMS in fry. We utilized quantitative polymerase chain reaction (Q-PCR) to aid in studies of the sources of P. thiaminolyticus and thiaminase I. Quantitative PCR assays were established to detect the thiaminase I gene of P. thiaminolyticus, the 16S rRNA gene from most species of bacteria, and the 16S rRNA gene specifically from P. thiaminolyticus and a few closely related taxa. The Q-PCR assays are linear over at least six orders of magnitude and can detect the thiaminase I gene of P. thiaminolyticus from as few as 1,000 P. thiaminolyticus cells/g of sample or the Paenibacillus 16S rRNA gene from as few as 100 P. thiaminolyticus cells/g of sample. The initial results from alewife viscera samples with high thiaminase activity yielded unexpectedly low densities of P. thiaminolyticus cells; Paenibacillus thiaminolyticus was detectable in 2 of 6 alewife viscera tested at densities on the order of 100 cells/g out of 100,000,000 total bacterial cells/g. The low numbers of P. thiaminolyticus detected suggest that alewives contain additional non-P. thiaminolyticus sources of thiaminase activity.

  19. Identification of trypanosomes in wild animals from southern Cameroon using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR).

    PubMed

    Herder, S; Simo, G; Nkinin, S; Njiokou, F

    2002-12-01

    One possible explanation of the maintenance of many historical foci of sleeping sickness in Central Africa could be the existence of a wild animal reservoir. In this study, PCR was used to detect the different trypanosome species present in wild animal captured by hunters in the southern forest belt of Cameroon (Bipindi). Trypanosomes were also detected by a parasitological method (Quantitative buffy coat: QBC). Parasite could not be isolated in culture medium (Kit for in vitro isolation: KIVI). Specific primers of T. brucei s.l., T. congolense forest type, T. congolense savannah type, T. vivax, T. simiae and T. b. gambiense group 1 were used to identify parasites in the blood of 164 animals belonging to 24 different species including ungulates, rodents, pangolins, carnivores, reptiles and primates. Of the 24 studied species, eight were carrying T. b. gambiense group 1. Those parasites pathogenic to man were found in monkeys (Cercocebus torquatus and Cercopithecus nictitans), in ungulates (Cephalophus dorsalis and C. monticola), in carnivores (Nandinia binotata and Genetta servalina) and in rodents (Cricetomys gambianus and Atherurus africanus). 13 species (54%) were carrying T. brucei s.l. identified as non-gambiense group 1.

  20. Comparison of Enterococcus quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis results from midwest U.S. river samples using EPA Method 1611 and Method 1609 PCR reagents

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has provided recommended beach advisory values in its 2012 recreational water quality criteria (RWQC) for states wishing to use quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) for the monitoring of Enterococcus fecal indicator bacteria...

  1. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) identification of rodent blood meals confirms host sharing by flea vectors of plague.

    PubMed

    Franklin, Heather A; Stapp, Paul; Cohen, Amybeth

    2010-12-01

    Elucidating feeding relationships between hosts and parasites remains a significant challenge in studies of the ecology of infectious diseases, especially those involving small or cryptic vectors. Black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus) are a species of conservation importance in the North American Great Plains whose populations are extirpated by plague, a flea-vectored, bacterial disease. Using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays, we determined that fleas (Oropsylla hirsuta) associated with prairie dogs feed upon northern grasshopper mice (Onychomys leucogaster), a rodent that has been implicated in the transmission and maintenance of plague in prairie-dog colonies. Our results definitively show that grasshopper mice not only share fleas with prairie dogs during plague epizootics, but also provide them with blood meals, offering a mechanism by which the pathogen, Yersinia pestis, may be transmitted between host species and maintained between epizootics. The lack of identifiable host DNA in a significant fraction of engorged Oropsylla hirsuta collected from animals (47%) and prairie-dog burrows (100%) suggests a rapid rate of digestion and feeding that may facilitate disease transmission during epizootics but also complicate efforts to detect feeding on alternative hosts. Combined with other analytical approaches, e.g., stable isotope analysis, molecular genetic techniques can provide novel insights into host-parasite feeding relationships and improve our understanding of the role of alternative hosts in the transmission and maintenance of disease.

  2. Loop mediated isothermal amplification assay using hydroxy naphthol blue, conventional polymerase chain reaction and real-time PCR in the diagnosis of intraocular tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Balne, P K; Basu, S; Rath, S; Barik, M R; Sharma, S

    2015-01-01

    This study is a comparative evaluation (Chi-square test) of a closed tube loop mediated isothermal amplification assay using hydroxy naphthol blue dye (HNB-LAMP), real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and conventional PCR in the diagnosis of intraocular tuberculosis. Considering clinical presentation as the gold standard in 33 patients, the sensitivity of HNB-LAMP assay (75.8%) was higher (not significant, P value 0.2) than conventional PCR (57.6%) and lower than real-time PCR (90.9%). Specificity was 100% by all three methods. No amplification was observed in negative controls (n = 20) by all three methods. The cost of the HNB-LAMP assay was Rs. 500.00 and it does not require thermocycler, therefore, it can be used as an alternative to conventional PCR in resource-poor settings.

  3. Polymerase Chain Reaction for Educational Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrison, Stephen J.; dePamphillis, Claude

    1994-01-01

    Suggests the incorporation of the Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) technique into high school and college biology laboratories. Discusses the following sections: (1) current PCR applications; (2) PCR technique; (3) Manual and Machine PCR; (4) Manual PCR Preparations and Procedure; (5) Materials, Supplies, and Recipes; (6) Primer Selection; and (7)…

  4. Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR)-based methods for detection and identification of mycotoxigenic Penicillium species using conserved genes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polymerase chain reaction amplification of conserved genes and sequence analysis provides a very powerful tool for the identification of toxigenic as well as non-toxigenic Penicillium species. Sequences are obtained by amplification of the gene fragment, sequencing via capillary electrophoresis of d...

  5. Use of genetic polymorphisms detected by the random-amplified polymorphic DNA polymerase chain reaction (RAPD-PCR) for differentiation and identification of Aedes aegypti subspecies and populations.

    PubMed

    Ballinger-Crabtree, M E; Black, W C; Miller, B R

    1992-12-01

    Amplification of random regions of genomic DNA using 10-base primers in the random-amplified polymorphic DNA polymerase chain reaction (RAPD-PCR) was used to differentiate and identify mosquito populations based on genetic variation. Genomic DNA was extracted from individual mosquitoes from 11 geographic populations of Aedes aegypti and amplified in PCR reactions using single primers of arbitrary nucleotide sequence. Discriminant analysis of the population frequencies of RAPD fragments produced using three different primers allowed accurate discrimination between the geographic populations in 89% of individuals and between subspecies (Ae. aegypti aegypti versus Ae. aegypti formosus) in 100% of mosquitoes tested. The genetic relatedness of the populations was estimated using three different statistical methods, and unknown populations were correctly classified in a blind test. These results indicate that the RAPD-PCR technique will be useful in studies of arthropod molecular taxonomy and in epidemiologic studies of the relatedness of geographic populations and vector movement.

  6. Apparent Polyploidization after Gamma Irradiation: Pitfalls in the Use of Quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction (qPCR) for the Estimation of Mitochondrial and Nuclear DNA Gene Copy Numbers

    PubMed Central

    Kam, Winnie W. Y.; Lake, Vanessa; Banos, Connie; Davies, Justin; Banati, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) has been widely used to quantify changes in gene copy numbers after radiation exposure. Here, we show that gamma irradiation ranging from 10 to 100 Gy of cells and cell-free DNA samples significantly affects the measured qPCR yield, due to radiation-induced fragmentation of the DNA template and, therefore, introduces errors into the estimation of gene copy numbers. The radiation-induced DNA fragmentation and, thus, measured qPCR yield varies with temperature not only in living cells, but also in isolated DNA irradiated under cell-free conditions. In summary, the variability in measured qPCR yield from irradiated samples introduces a significant error into the estimation of both mitochondrial and nuclear gene copy numbers and may give spurious evidence for polyploidization. PMID:23722662

  7. Giardia and Cryptosporidium spp. dissemination during wastewater treatment and comparative detection via immunofluorescence assay (IFA), nested polymerase chain reaction (nested PCR) and loop mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP).

    PubMed

    Gallas-Lindemann, Carmen; Sotiriadou, Isaia; Plutzer, Judit; Noack, Michael J; Mahmoudi, Mohammad Reza; Karanis, Panagiotis

    2016-06-01

    Environmental water samples from the Lower Rhine area in Germany were investigated via immunofluorescence assays (IFAs), nested polymerase chain reaction (nested PCR) and loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) to detect the presence of Giardia spp. (n=185) and Cryptosporidium spp. (n=227). The samples were concentrated through filtration or flocculation, and oocysts were purified via centrifugation through a sucrose density gradient. For all samples, IFA was performed first, followed by DNA extraction for the nested PCR and LAMP assays. Giardia cysts were detected in 105 samples (56.8%) by IFA, 62 samples (33.5%) by nested PCR and 79 samples (42.7%) by LAMP. Cryptosporidium spp. were detected in 69 samples (30.4%) by IFA, 95 samples (41.9%) by nested PCR and 99 samples (43.6%) by LAMP. According to these results, the three detection methods are complementary for monitoring Giardia and Cryptosporidium in environmental waters.

  8. Nested reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for typing ruminant pestiviruses: bovine viral diarrhea viruses and border disease virus.

    PubMed Central

    Fulton, R W; d'Offay, J M; Saliki, J T; Burge, L J; Helman, R G; Confer, A W; Bolin, S R; Ridpath, J F

    1999-01-01

    A nested reverse transcription (RT) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was evaluated for differentiating reference bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) strains, BVDV from diagnostic accessions, modified-live virus (MLV) BVDV strains in bovine viral vaccines, and a reference border disease virus (BDV). The detection level of this assay was compared to viral infection in cell culture. The PCR assay was used to distinguish 3 ruminant pestiviruses, types 1 and 2 BVDV, and type 3 BDV. The consensus (first) PCR assay detected all 3 ruminant pestiviruses, a result of the shared sequence homology. The consensus PCR product was subjected to a second (nested) PCR which used type-specific primers. The nested PCR was able to differentiate the 3 ruminant pestiviruses. Viral stocks of BVDV were diluted 10-fold and processed for the 2-step PCR assay. The sensitivity of this 2-step PCR assay was compared to viral infectivity in cell culture based on identical volumes of the system tested (cell culture assay and processing for RNA). The RT-PCR type-specific assay differentiated BVDV laboratory reference strains (12), diagnostic laboratory isolates (15), 2 MLV BVDV vaccine strains, and a BDV strain. The 30 ruminant pestiviruses typed included: (1) 27 reference strains and diagnostic laboratory isolates; 18 cytopathic (CP) type 1 strains, 3 CP type 2 strains, 3 noncytopathic (NCP) type 1 strains, and 3 NCP type 2 strains; (2) 2 MLV strains, type 1; and (3) 1 CP BDV type 3. The PCR assay had a detection limit of 10 TCID50/0.025 mL of virus when 3 separate BVDV were tested. This 2 step RT-PCR assay would be useful for the typing of ruminant pestiviruses, particularly BVDV isolates from the diagnostic laboratory. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. PMID:10534007

  9. Antibiotic resistance and molecular typing among cockle (Anadara granosa) strains of Vibrio parahaemolyticus by polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based analysis.

    PubMed

    Sahilah, A M; Laila, R A S; Sallehuddin, H Mohd; Osman, H; Aminah, A; Ahmad Azuhairi, A

    2014-02-01

    Genomic DNA of Vibrio parahaemolyticus were characterized by antibiotic resistance, enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus-polymerase chain reaction (ERIC-PCR) and random amplified polymorphic DNA-polymerase chain reaction (RAPD-PCR) analysis. These isolates originated from 3 distantly locations of Selangor, Negeri Sembilan and Melaka (East coastal areas), Malaysia. A total of 44 (n = 44) of tentatively V. parahaemolyticus were also examined for the presence of toxR, tdh and trh gene. Of 44 isolates, 37 were positive towards toxR gene; while, none were positive to tdh and trh gene. Antibiotic resistance analysis showed the V. parahaemolyticus isolates were highly resistant to bacitracin (92%, 34/37) and penicillin (89%, 33/37) followed by resistance towards ampicillin (68%, 25/37), cefuroxime (38%, 14/37), amikacin (6%, 2/37) and ceftazidime (14%, 5/37). None of the V. parahaemolyticus isolates were resistant towards chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, ceftriaxone, enrofloxacin, norfloxacin, streptomycin and vancomycin. Antibiogram patterns exhibited, 9 patterns and phenotypically less heterogenous when compared to PCR-based techniques using ERIC- and RAPD-PCR. The results of the ERIC- and RAPD-PCR were analyzed using GelCompare software. ERIC-PCR with primers ERIC1R and ERIC2 discriminated the V. parahaemolyticus isolates into 6 clusters and 21 single isolates at a similarity level of 80%. While, RAPD-PCR with primer Gen8 discriminated the V. parahaemolyticus isolates into 11 clusters and 10 single isolates and Gen9 into 8 clusters and 16 single isolates at the same similarity level examined. Results in the presence study demonstrated combination of phenotypically and genotypically methods show a wide heterogeneity among cockle isolates of V. parahaemolyticus.

  10. Thermally multiplexed polymerase chain reaction

    PubMed Central

    Phaneuf, Christopher R.; Pak, Nikita; Saunders, D. Curtis; Holst, Gregory L.; Birjiniuk, Joav; Nagpal, Nikita; Culpepper, Stephen; Popler, Emily; Shane, Andi L.; Jerris, Robert; Forest, Craig R.

    2015-01-01

    Amplification of multiple unique genetic targets using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is commonly required in molecular biology laboratories. Such reactions are typically performed either serially or by multiplex PCR. Serial reactions are time consuming, and multiplex PCR, while powerful and widely used, can be prone to amplification bias, PCR drift, and primer-primer interactions. We present a new thermocycling method, termed thermal multiplexing, in which a single heat source is uniformly distributed and selectively modulated for independent temperature control of an array of PCR reactions. Thermal multiplexing allows amplification of multiple targets simultaneously—each reaction segregated and performed at optimal conditions. We demonstrate the method using a microfluidic system consisting of an infrared laser thermocycler, a polymer microchip featuring 1 μl, oil-encapsulated reactions, and closed-loop pulse-width modulation control. Heat transfer modeling is used to characterize thermal performance limitations of the system. We validate the model and perform two reactions simultaneously with widely varying annealing temperatures (48 °C and 68 °C), demonstrating excellent amplification. In addition, to demonstrate microfluidic infrared PCR using clinical specimens, we successfully amplified and detected both influenza A and B from human nasopharyngeal swabs. Thermal multiplexing is scalable and applicable to challenges such as pathogen detection where patients presenting non-specific symptoms need to be efficiently screened across a viral or bacterial panel. PMID:26339317

  11. A temperature control method for shortening thermal cycling time to achieve rapid polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in a disposable polymer microfluidic device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bu, Minqiang; Perch-Nielsen, Ivan R.; Sørensen, Karen S.; Skov, Julia; Sun, Yi; Duong Bang, Dang; Pedersen, Michael E.; Hansen, Mikkel F.; Wolff, Anders

    2013-07-01

    We present a temperature control method capable of effectively shortening the thermal cycling time of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in a disposable polymer microfluidic device with an external heater and a temperature sensor. The method employs optimized temperature overshooting and undershooting steps to achieve a rapid ramping between the temperature steps for DNA denaturation, annealing and extension. The temperature dynamics within the microfluidic PCR chamber was characterized and the overshooting and undershooting parameters were optimized using the temperature-dependent fluorescence signal from Rhodamine B. The method was validated with the PCR amplification of mecA gene (162 bp) from methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bacterium (MRSA), where the time for 30 cycles was reduced from 50 min (without over- and undershooting) to 20 min.

  12. A comparison of in situ hybridisation, reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and in situ-RT-PCR for the detection of canine distemper virus RNA in Paget's disease.

    PubMed

    Hoyland, Judith A; Dixon, Janet A; Berry, Jacqueline L; Davies, Michael; Selby, Peter L; Mee, Andrew P

    2003-05-01

    Previous evidence implicating Paramyxoviruses in the aetiopathology of Paget's disease of bone has proved controversial. Whilst several groups have demonstrated Paramyxoviruses using techniques such as in situ hybridisation (ISH), reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and in situ-RT-PCR (IS-RT-PCR), others have found no evidence of viruses using only RT-PCR. To investigate this latter finding, we have now compared detection of canine distemper virus by ISH, RT-PCR (three different methods) and IS-RT-PCR, in 10 patients with Paget's disease, and samples of non-diseased bone from four patients. Canine distemper virus was detectable in six of the samples by ISH, but only in five of the samples by RT-PCR, using one of the methods. Neither of the other RT-PCR methods detected canine distemper virus. IS-RT-PCR demonstrated canine distemper virus in all 10 samples. There was no evidence of virus in the control samples. We have shown that the ability to detect canine distemper virus in bone is dependent on the technique used. IS-RT-PCR clearly showed that canine distemper virus was present in 100% of Pagetic samples, whereas canine distemper virus was only found in 60% by ISH and in 50% using one particular RT-PCR method. These results provide conclusive evidence that canine distemper virus is present within Pagetic bone, and provide a possible explanation for the failure of some groups to detect Paramyxovirus sequences. These findings also have wider implications for other studies investigating viral expression.

  13. T Oligo-Primed Polymerase Chain Reaction (TOP-PCR): A Robust Method for the Amplification of Minute DNA Fragments in Body Fluids

    PubMed Central

    Nai, Yu-Shin; Chen, Tzu-Han; Huang, Yu-Feng; Midha, Mohit K.; Shiau, Hsin-Chieh; Shen, Chen-Yang; Chen, Chien-Jen; Yu, Alice L.; Chiu, Kuo Ping

    2017-01-01

    Body fluid DNA sequencing is a powerful noninvasive approach for the diagnosis of genetic defects, infectious agents and diseases. The success relies on the quantity and quality of the DNA samples. However, numerous clinical samples are either at low quantity or of poor quality due to various reasons. To overcome these problems, we have developed T oligo-primed polymerase chain reaction (TOP-PCR) for full-length nonselective amplification of minute quantity of DNA fragments. TOP-PCR adopts homogeneous “half adaptor” (HA), generated by annealing P oligo (carrying a phosphate group at the 5′ end) and T oligo (carrying a T-tail at the 3′ end), for efficient ligation to target DNA and subsequent PCR amplification primed by the T oligo alone. Using DNA samples from body fluids, we demonstrate that TOP-PCR recovers minute DNA fragments and maintains the DNA size profile, while enhancing the major molecular populations. Our results also showed that TOP-PCR is a superior method for detecting apoptosis and outperforms the method adopted by Illumina for DNA amplification. PMID:28094343

  14. T Oligo-Primed Polymerase Chain Reaction (TOP-PCR): A Robust Method for the Amplification of Minute DNA Fragments in Body Fluids.

    PubMed

    Nai, Yu-Shin; Chen, Tzu-Han; Huang, Yu-Feng; Midha, Mohit K; Shiau, Hsin-Chieh; Shen, Chen-Yang; Chen, Chien-Jen; Yu, Alice L; Chiu, Kuo Ping

    2017-01-17

    Body fluid DNA sequencing is a powerful noninvasive approach for the diagnosis of genetic defects, infectious agents and diseases. The success relies on the quantity and quality of the DNA samples. However, numerous clinical samples are either at low quantity or of poor quality due to various reasons. To overcome these problems, we have developed T oligo-primed polymerase chain reaction (TOP-PCR) for full-length nonselective amplification of minute quantity of DNA fragments. TOP-PCR adopts homogeneous "half adaptor" (HA), generated by annealing P oligo (carrying a phosphate group at the 5' end) and T oligo (carrying a T-tail at the 3' end), for efficient ligation to target DNA and subsequent PCR amplification primed by the T oligo alone. Using DNA samples from body fluids, we demonstrate that TOP-PCR recovers minute DNA fragments and maintains the DNA size profile, while enhancing the major molecular populations. Our results also showed that TOP-PCR is a superior method for detecting apoptosis and outperforms the method adopted by Illumina for DNA amplification.

  15. Development of a TaqMan Probe-Based Insulated Isothermal Polymerase Chain Reaction (iiPCR) Assay for Detection of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense Race 4

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yi-Jia; Chang, Tsai-De; Hong, Li-Ling; Chen, Tzu-Yu; Chang, Pi-Fang Linda

    2016-01-01

    This study developed a novel and inexpensive detection method based on a TaqMan probe-based insulated isothermal polymerase chain reaction (iiPCR) method for the rapid detection of Panama disease caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense (Foc) race 4, which is currently among the most serious fungal vascular diseases worldwide. By using the portable POCKIT™ device with the novel primer set iiFoc-1/iiFoc-2, the Foc race 4 iiPCR assay (including DNA amplification and signal monitoring) could be completed within one hour. The developed Foc race 4 iiPCR assay is thus a user-friendly and efficient platform designed specifically for the detection of Foc race 4. The detection limit of this optimized Foc iiPCR system was estimated to be 1 copy of the target standard DNA as well as 1 fg of the Foc genomic DNA. This approach can serve as a rapid detection method for in planta detection of Foc race 4 in field-infected banana. It was concluded that this molecular detection procedure based on iiPCR has good potential for use as an efficient detection method. PMID:27448242

  16. [Universal or broad-range polymerase chain reaction (PCR): a contribution to the detection and identification of bacteria and fungi in clinical practice].

    PubMed

    Poggi M, Helena; Guzmán D, Ana María; García C, Patricia; Lagos L, Marcela

    2009-08-01

    The use of techniques for the detection of nucleic acids such as the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) has had a major impact on microbiological analysis, playing an important role in the clinical laboratory. Most of the techniques currently used are designed for specific detection of a particular microorganism. However, infectious agents can also be identified even if genus or species are unknown, using universal primers to amplify bacterial or fungal DNA and then identify the species by sequence (universal or wide spectrum PCR). This methodology is applied in cultures that are difficult to identify using phenotypic techniques, and more recently it is also being used directly in clinical samples, where the detection and identification of the infectious agent by traditional techniques is difficult or not possible.

  17. The first identification of a blood-sucking abomasal nematode Ashworthius sidemi in cattle (Bos taurus) using simple polymerase chain reaction (PCR).

    PubMed

    Moskwa, Bożena; Bień, Justyna; Cybulska, Aleksandra; Kornacka, Aleksandra; Krzysiak, Michał; Cencek, Tomasz; Cabaj, Władysław

    2015-06-30

    A simple polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test was used to identify Ashworthius sidemi, a blood-sucking gastrointestinal nematode that commonly infects bison, red and roe deer, and moose in Poland. The present study uses this technique to confirm the possibility of transmission of A. sidemi infection from wildlife to domestic animals, such as cattle and sheep, grazing on the same natural pastures. A 406 bp fragment of genomic A. sidemi DNA was actually detected in DNA isolated from larval cultures derived from feces from cattle. A. sidemi DNA has been detected in cattle which represent a new host for this parasite. This is the first evidence of A. sidemi in cattle. The results reveal that a PCR test based on DNA from L3 larvae can be used for in vivo detection of A. sidemi invasions in breeding animals. In conclusion, the transfer of A. sidemi infection from wildlife to the farm animals sharing the same pastures appears possible.

  18. Chain Reaction Polymerization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGrath, James E.

    1981-01-01

    The salient features and importance of chain-reaction polymerization are discussed, including such topics as the thermodynamics of polymerization, free-radical polymerization kinetics, radical polymerization processes, copolymers, and free-radical chain, anionic, cationic, coordination, and ring-opening polymerizations. (JN)

  19. Isolation of Coxiella burnetii by a centrifugation shell-vial assay from ticks collected in Cyprus: detection by nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism analyses.

    PubMed

    Spyridaki, Ioanna; Psaroulaki, Anna; Loukaides, Fidias; Antoniou, Maria; Hadjichristodolou, Christos; Tselentis, Yannis

    2002-01-01

    Ticks are the principal vectors and reservoirs of Coxiella burnetii. The identification of isolates is necessary for understanding the clinical diversity of Q fever in different geographic areas. This is the first report of isolation of C. burnetii from ticks by the shell-vial assay and by nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay for the detection of this pathogen in ticks. Of 141 ticks collected in Cyprus (Rhipicephalus sanguineus and Hyalloma spp.), 10% were found to be infected with C. burnetii. Three ticks were positive by hemolymph test, and 11 triturated ticks were positive by nested PCR. Three isolates were obtained by the centrifugation shell-vial technique. Analysis by PCR, then restriction fragment length polymorphism showed that the 3 Cyprus isolates had identical restriction profiles to reference strains Nine Mile and Q212. The methods described are useful in studying the epidemiology and ecology of C. burnetii.

  20. A fluorescence-based polymerase chain reaction-linked single-strand conformation polymorphism (F-PCR-SSCP) assay for the identification of Fasciola spp.

    PubMed

    Alasaad, Samer; Soriguer, Ramón C; Abu-Madi, Marawan; El Behairy, Ahmed; Baños, Pablo Díez; Píriz, Ana; Fickel, Joerns; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2011-06-01

    The present study aimed to establish a fluorescence-based polymerase chain reaction-linked single-strand conformation polymorphism (F-PCR-SSCP) assay for the identification of Fasciola spp. Based on the sequences of the second internal transcribed spacer (ITS-2) of the nuclear ribosomal DNA, we designed a set of genus-specific primers for the amplification of Fasciola ITS-2, with an estimated size of 140 bp. These primers were labelled by fluorescence dyes, and the PCR products were analyzed by capillary electrophoresis under non-denaturing conditions (F-PCR-SSCP). Capillary electrophoresis analysis of the fluorescence-labelled DNA fragments displayed three different peak profiles that allowed the accurate identification of Fasciola species: one single peak specific for either Fasciola hepatica or Fasciola gigantica and a doublet peak corresponding to the "intermediate" Fasciola. Validation of our novel method was performed using Fasciola specimens from different host animals from China, Spain, Nigeria, and Egypt. This F-PCR-SSCP assay provides a rapid, simple, and robust tool for the identification and differentiation between Fasciola spp.

  1. The lack of a systematic validation of reference genes: a serious pitfall undervalued in reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis in plants.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Laurent; Mauriat, Mélanie; Guénin, Stéphanie; Pelloux, Jérôme; Lefebvre, Jean-François; Louvet, Romain; Rusterucci, Christine; Moritz, Thomas; Guerineau, François; Bellini, Catherine; Van Wuytswinkel, Olivier

    2008-08-01

    Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) approaches have been used in a large proportion of transcriptome analyses published to date. The accuracy of the results obtained by this method strongly depends on accurate transcript normalization using stably expressed genes, known as references. Statistical algorithms have been developed recently to help validate reference genes, and most studies of gene expression in mammals, yeast and bacteria now include such validation. Surprisingly, this important approach is under-utilized in plant studies, where putative housekeeping genes tend to be used as references without any appropriate validation. Using quantitative RT-PCR, the expression stability of several genes commonly used as references was tested in various tissues of Arabidopsis thaliana and hybrid aspen (Populus tremula x Populus tremuloides). It was found that the expression of most of these genes was unstable, indicating that their use as references is inappropriate. The major impact of the use of such inappropriate references on the results obtained by RT-PCR is demonstrated in this study. Using aspen as a model, evidence is presented indicating that no gene can act as a universal reference, implying the need for a systematic validation of reference genes. For the first time, the extent to which the lack of a systematic validation of reference genes is a stumbling block to the reliability of results obtained by RT-PCR in plants is clearly shown.

  2. Identification of Pork Contamination in Meatballs of Indonesia Local Market Using Polymerase Chain Reaction-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Erwanto, Yuny; Abidin, Mohammad Zainal; Sugiyono, Eko Yasin Prasetyo Muslim; Rohman, Abdul

    2014-01-01

    This research applied and evaluated a polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) using cytochrome b gene to detect pork contamination in meatballs from local markets in Surabaya and Yogyakarta regions, Indonesia. To confirm the effectiveness and specificity of this fragment, thirty nine DNA samples from different meatball shops were isolated and amplified, and then the PCR amplicon was digested by BseDI restriction enzyme to detect the presence of pork in meatballs. BseDI restriction enzyme was able to cleave porcine cytochrome b gene into two fragments (131 bp and 228 bp). Testing the meatballs from the local market showed that nine of twenty meatball shops in Yogyakarta region were detected to have pork contamination, but there was no pork contamination in meatball shops in Surabaya region. In conclusion, specific PCR amplification of cytochrome b gen and cleaved by BseDI restriction enzymes seems to be a powerful technique for the identification of pork presence in meatball because of its simplicity, specificity and sensitivity. Furthermore, pork contamination intended for commercial products of sausage, nugget, steak and meat burger can be checked. The procedure is also much cheaper than other methods based on PCR, immunodiffusion and other techniques that need expensive equipment. PMID:25178301

  3. Quantitation of Bt-176 maize genomic sequences by surface plasmon resonance-based biospecific interaction analysis of multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR).

    PubMed

    Feriotto, Giordana; Gardenghi, Sara; Bianchi, Nicoletta; Gambari, Roberto

    2003-07-30

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) based biosensors have been described for the identification of genetically modified organisms (GMO) by biospecific interaction analysis (BIA). This paper describes the design and testing of an SPR-based BIA protocol for quantitative determinations of GMOs. Biotinylated multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) products from nontransgenic maize as well as maize powders containing 0.5 and 2% genetically modified Bt-176 sequences were immobilized on different flow cells of a sensor chip. After immobilization, different oligonucleotide probes recognizing maize zein and Bt-176 sequences were injected. The results obtained were compared with Southern blot analysis and with quantitative real-time PCR assays. It was demonstrated that sequential injections of Bt-176 and zein probes to sensor chip flow cells containing multiplex PCR products allow discrimination between PCR performed using maize genomic DNA containing 0.5% Bt-176 sequences and that performed using maize genomic DNA containing 2% Bt-176 sequences. The efficiency of SPR-based BIA in discriminating material containing different amounts of Bt-176 maize is comparable to real-time quantitative PCR and much more reliable than Southern blotting, which in the past has been used for semiquantitative purposes. Furthermore, the approach allows the BIA assay to be repeated several times on the same multiplex PCR product immobilized on the sensor chip, after washing and regeneration of the flow cell. Finally, it is emphasized that the presented strategy to quantify GMOs could be proposed for all of the SPR-based, commercially available biosensors. Some of these optical SPR-based biosensors use, instead of flow-based sensor chips, stirred microcuvettes, reducing the costs of the experimentation.

  4. Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) Assay for Rapid Diagnosis and Its Role in Prevention of Human Brucellosis in Punjab, India

    PubMed Central

    Gemechu, Moti Yohannes; Gill, Jatinder Paul Singh; Arora, Anil Kumar; Ghatak, Sandeep; Singh, Dhirendra Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: Brucellosis is the most common zoonotic disease that has been diagnosed mainly by serological tests and blood culture to some extent. This study was designed to establish a PCR technique for rapid diagnosis to be used in surveillance activities. Methods: The purpose of this study was firstly explained to the study population and verbal consent was obtained before sample collection. Peripheral blood was collected from 116 occupationally exposed groups with and without pyrexia of unknown origin from various districts of Punjab. Samples were subjected to blood culture, serological tests and DNA extraction was done using conventional laboratory extraction procedure. A primer pair B4/B5 that amplifies a gene encoding a 31 kDa immunogenic outer membrane protein (bcsp31) of Brucella species was used for PCR amplification. Results: The results showed that 8 (7%) of the cases had positive PCR and the detection threshold of primers used in this study were 715 cfu/ml. PCR results were 51.3% accurate for sensitivity of 12.6% and specificity of 100% using STAT as gold standard. Conclusions: Early-case reporting is possible by rapid tests like PCR. Thus, PCR is a promising diagnostic tool for routine investigation and surveillance of brucellosis which is the key element for management of prevention and control programmes. But patient condition before testing, optimal clinical specimen, sample volume used, simple and efficient DNA extraction protocol are the points of concern for PCR to be used as a routine test in clinical laboratory practice. PMID:21811660

  5. Identification of brucella species and biotypes using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP).

    PubMed

    Al Dahouk, Sascha; Tomaso, Herbert; Prenger-Berninghoff, Ellen; Splettstoesser, Wolf D; Scholz, Holger C; Neubauer, Heinrich

    2005-01-01

    Brucellosis is a worldwide zoonosis causing reproductive failures in livestock and a severe multi-organ disease in humans. The genus Brucella is divided into seven species and various biotypes differing in pathogenicity and host specificity. Although Brucella spp. represent a highly homogenous group of bacteria, RFLPs of selected genes display sufficient polymorphism to distinguish Brucella species and biovars. PCR-RFLP analysis shows excellent typeability, reproducibility, stability, and epidemiological concordance. Consequently, PCR-RFLP assays of specific gene loci can serve as tools for diagnostic, epidemiological, taxonomic, and evolutionary studies. Various PCR-RFLPs used for the identification of Brucella species and biotypes are reviewed.

  6. Use of length heterogeneity polymerase chain reaction (LH-PCR) as non-invasive approach for dietary analysis of Svalbard reindeer, Rangifer tarandus platyrhynchus.

    PubMed

    Joo, Sungbae; Han, Donguk; Lee, Eun Ju; Park, Sangkyu

    2014-01-01

    To efficiently investigate the forage preference of Svalbard reindeer (Rangifer tarandus platyrhynchus), we applied length-heterogeneity polymerase chain reaction (LH-PCR) based on length differences of internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) to fecal samples from R. tarandus platyrhynchus. A length-heterogeneity (LH) database was constructed using both collected potential food sources of Svalbard reindeer and fecal samples, followed by PCR, cloning and sequencing. In total, eighteen fecal samples were collected between 2011 and 2012 from 2 geographic regions and 15 samples were successfully amplified by PCR. The LH-PCR analysis detected abundant peaks, 18.6 peaks on an average per sample, ranging from 100 to 500 bp in size and showing distinct patterns associated with both regions and years of sample collection. Principal component analysis (PCA) resulted in clustering of 15 fecal samples into 3 groups by the year of collection and region with a statistically significant difference at 99.9% level. The first 2 principal components (PCs) explained 71.1% of the total variation among the samples. Through comparison with LH database and identification by cloning and sequencing, lichens (Stereocaulon sp. and Ochrolechia sp.) and plant species (Salix polaris and Saxifraga oppositifolia) were detected as the food sources that contributed most to the Svalbard reindeer diet. Our results suggest that the use of LH-PCR analysis would be a non-invasive and efficient monitoring tool for characterizing the foraging strategy of Svalbard reindeer. Additionally, combining sequence information would increase its resolving power in identification of foraged diet components.

  7. Evaluation of Real-Time Quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction (qPCR) to Determine Escherichia coli Concentrations at Two Lake Erie Beaches

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kephart, Christopher M.; Bushon, Rebecca N.

    2009-01-01

    During the recreational seasons of 2006 and 2007, the quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) method was used to determine Escherichia coli (E. coli) concentrations in samples from two Lake Erie beaches. Results from the qPCR method were compared to those obtained by traditional culturing on modified mTEC agar. Regression analysis showed strong, statistically significant correlations between results from the two methods for both years. Correlation coefficients at Edgewater and Villa Angela Beaches were 0.626 and 0.789 for 2006 and 0.667 and 0.829 for 2007, respectively. Linear regression analyses were done to determine how well E. coli concentrations could have been predicted from qPCR results. These hypothetical predictions were compared to the current practice of determining recreational water quality from E. coli concentrations determined for samples collected on the previous day. The qPCR method resulted in a greater percentage of correct predictions of water-quality exceedances than the current method for both beaches and both years. However, because regression equations differed somewhat between both sites and both years, the study did not result in any single relation reliable enough to use for actual real-time prediction of water-quality exceedances for either beach; therefore, a posterior analysis of data was done. Additional years of data may be needed to develop such a relation. Results from this study support the continued development and testing of a qPCR method for providing rapid and accurate estimates of E. coli concentrations for monitoring recreational water quality.

  8. Market surveillance on non-halal additives incorporated in surimi based products using polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-southern hybridization analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aravindran, S.; Sahilah, A. M.; Aminah, A.

    2014-09-01

    Halal surveillance on halal ingredients incorporated in surimi based products were studied using polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-southern hybridization on chip analysis. The primers used in this technique were targeted on mitochondria DNA (mtDNA) of cytochrome b (cyt b) gene sequence which able to differentiate 7 type (beef, chicken, duck, goat, buffalo, lamb and pork) of species on a single chip. 17 (n = 17*3) different brands of surimi-based product were purchased randomly from Selangor local market in January 2013. Of 17 brands, 3 (n = 3*3) brands were positive for chicken DNA, 1 (n = 1*3) brand was positive for goat DNA, and the remainder 13 brands (n = 13*3) have no DNA species detected. The sensitivity of PCR-southern hybridization primers to detect each meat species was 0.1 ng. In the present study, it is evidence that PCR-Southern Hybridization analysis offered a reliable result due to its highly specific and sensitive properties in detecting non-halal additive such as plasma protein incorporation in surimi-based product.

  9. Identification of WA-type three-line hybrid rice with real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Y; Gao, B D; Chen, H Y; Mao, J J; Cao, A X; Zhu, J G; Zhu, S F

    2012-02-01

    A real-time fluorescent PCR (RTF-PCR) was developed to detect and quantify wild abortive (WA)-type three-line hybrid rice (Oryza sativa L.). The mitochondrial R₂₋₆₃₀ WA gene was reported to be closely related to male sterility in plants, and developed as a molecular maker to identify the cytoplasmic male sterility system of hybrid rice. First, we got the DNA sequence of R₂₋₆₃₀ WA gene in 17 rice species with traditional PCR. Then, a pair of specific primers (P₃, P₄) and TaqMan fluorescence probe (P₃₋₁₄) were designed based on the R₂₋₆₃₀ DNA sequence. The following RTF-PCR was performed on the 17 rice species finally. The results indicate that the probes used here are specific for three-line hybrid rice F₁ and male sterile lines. We can even identify a single hybrid seed using the probes, which confirmed that the probes can be applied to the identification and quantification of the WA-type three-line hybrid rice. In addition, the RFT-PCR system can be optimized when the annealing temperature is 60 °C and the Mg²⁺ concentration is 3.5 mmol/L.

  10. Polymerase chain reaction system

    DOEpatents

    Benett, William J.; Richards, James B.; Stratton, Paul L.; Hadley, Dean R.; Milanovich, Fred P.; Belgrader, Phil; Meyer, Peter L.

    2004-03-02

    A portable polymerase chain reaction DNA amplification and detection system includes one or more chamber modules. Each module supports a duplex assay of a biological sample. Each module has two parallel interrogation ports with a linear optical system. The system is capable of being handheld.

  11. Direct polymerase chain reaction (PCR) from human whole blood and filter-paper-dried blood by using a PCR buffer with a higher pH.

    PubMed

    Bu, Ying; Huang, Huan; Zhou, Guohua

    2008-04-15

    We described a novel approach to directly amplify genomic DNA from whole blood and dried blood spotted on filter paper without any DNA isolation by using the PCR buffer with a higher pH, which was optimized as pH 9.1-9.6. Direct PCR on blood treated with various anticoagulants showed that the buffer worked well with the blood treated by citrate, EDTA, or heparinate. DNA fragments with different lengths could be efficiently amplified directly from various forms of blood samples. By coupling the buffer with tetra-PCR, a "true" single-tube genotyping was realized by using whole blood or paper-dried blood as starting material.

  12. 9 CFR 147.30 - Laboratory procedure recommended for the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test for Mycoplasma...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...) Electrophoresis. Mix PCR products (5 to 10 μl) with 2 μl loading buffer (Sigma) and electrophorese on a 2 percent agarose gel containing 0.5 μg/mL ethidium bromide in TAE buffer (40 mM tris; 2 mM EDTA; pH 8.0...

  13. 9 CFR 147.30 - Laboratory procedure recommended for the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test for Mycoplasma...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...) Electrophoresis. Mix PCR products (5 to 10 μl) with 2 μl loading buffer (Sigma) and electrophorese on a 2 percent agarose gel containing 0.5 μg/mL ethidium bromide in TAE buffer (40 mM tris; 2 mM EDTA; pH 8.0...

  14. 9 CFR 147.30 - Laboratory procedure recommended for the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test for Mycoplasma...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...) Electrophoresis. Mix PCR products (5 to 10 μl) with 2 μl loading buffer (Sigma) and electrophorese on a 2 percent agarose gel containing 0.5 μg/mL ethidium bromide in TAE buffer (40 mM tris; 2 mM EDTA; pH 8.0...

  15. 9 CFR 147.30 - Laboratory procedure recommended for the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test for Mycoplasma...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...) Electrophoresis. Mix PCR products (5 to 10 μl) with 2 μl loading buffer (Sigma) and electrophorese on a 2 percent agarose gel containing 0.5 μg/mL ethidium bromide in TAE buffer (40 mM tris; 2 mM EDTA; pH 8.0...

  16. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) detection of B cell clonality in Sjögren's syndrome patients: a diagnostic tool of clonal expansion

    PubMed Central

    Guzmán, L M; Castillo, D; Aguilera, S O

    2010-01-01

    Sjögren's syndrome (SS) is an autoimmune disease characterized by clonal B cell attack of the exocrine glands and dysregulated expression of B cell-activating factor (BAFF). Based upon the current data of increased rates of lymphoid malignancy, as non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) is associated with SS, we propose the detection of clonal rearrangements of immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) gene in those patients as a predictor of malignant clonal expansion. To test our proposal, we examined the IgH clonal rearrangements in SS patients (60) and healthy control subjects (42) having chronic non-specific sialadenitis, to determine the presence of clonal B cells in minor labial salivary glands (MSG) of SS patients. Clonal B cell expansion was assessed by two polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays: (i) semi-nested PCR, against sequences encoding framework regions FR3, FR2 and FR1c of the variable chain IgH gene in B cells present in the MSG infiltrate; and (ii) the PCR–enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) technique, against the major and minor breakpoint regions of the Bcl-2 oncogene coupled with a variable segment of the IgH to assess the Bcl-2/JH translocation. When FR3, FR2 and FR1c primers were employed, we detected B cell monoclonality in 87% of the SS patients and 19% of the control subjects. The association between inflammation severity of the MSG pattern and the presence of B cell clonality was found to be statistically significant (P < 0·01). We concluded that the presence of B cell clonality in MSG can be used as a index of an altered microenvironment favouring the development of lymphoma in SS patients. PMID:20408860

  17. Characterization and evaluation of an arbitrary primed Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) product for the specific detection of Brucella species.

    PubMed

    Qasem, Jafar A; AlMomin, Sabah; Al-Mouqati, Salwa A; Kumar, Vinod

    2015-03-01

    Laboratory detection of Brucella is based largely on bacterial isolation and phenotypic characterization. These methods are lengthy and labor-intensive and have been associated with a heightened risk of laboratory-acquired infection. Antibody based indirect detection methods also suffer from limitations in proper diagnosis of the organism. To overcome these problems, nucleic acid amplification has been explored for rapid detection and confirmation of the presence of Brucella spp. PCR-based diagnostics is useful for screening large populations of livestock to identify infected individuals and confirms the presence of the pathogen. Random Amplification of Polymorphic DNA (RAPD) was performed and identified a 1.3 kb PCR fragment specifically amplifiable from DNA isolated from Brucella. A BLAST search revealed no significant homology with the reported sequences from species other than the members of Brucella. The isolated fragment seems to be a part of d-alanine-d-alanine ligase gene in Brucella sp. Translational BLAST revealed certain degree of homology of this sequence with orthologs of this gene reported from other microbial species at the deduced amino acid level. The sequence information was used to develop PCR based assays to detect Brucella sp. from various samples. The minimum detection limit of Brucella from blood and milk samples spiked with Brucella DNA was found to be 1 ng/ml and 10 ng/ml, respectively. In conclusion, we demonstrated that the PCR based detection protocol was successfully used for the detection of Brucella from various organs and spiked samples of diseased sheep. Diagnosis of Brucellosis by PCR based method reported in this study is relatively rapid, specific and simple.

  18. Comparative evaluation of conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR), with loop-mediated isothermal amplification and SYBR green I-based real-time PCR for the quantitation of porcine circovirus-1 DNA in contaminated samples destined for vaccine production.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bo-Chao; Wang, Feng-Xue; Zhang, Shu-Qin; Song, Ni; Li, Jian-Xi; Yang, Zhi-Qiang; Wen, Yong-Jun; Wu, Hua

    2013-07-01

    Porcine circovirus type1 (PCV1), described initially as a contaminant of a porcine kidney cell line, is ubiquitous within the swine population The presence of PCV1 in porcine cell lines can lead to contamination during both human and porcine vaccine production. Therefore, a rapid, specific, sensitive and practical method is needed for the detection of PCV1 in bio-products. The aim of this study was to compare three assays in their ability to accurately quantify PCV1 virus in biological samples, namely loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP), SYBR green I-based real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and conventional PCR. All assays yielded successful quantitation of PCV1 DNA and differentiated between PCV1-free and-contaminated cells. In addition, the results were specific for PCV1, since amplification of samples containing closely-related PCV2 or other pathogenic swine viruses yielded negative results. The lowest detection threshold of 10(2) copies was displayed by the SYBR green I-based real-time PCR assay. In addition, this assay was the most effective in detecting PCV1 contamination in a set of commercially available porcine vaccines. Therefore we conclude that SYBR green I-based real-time PCR is specific and sensitive for detecting PCV1 in biological samples and maybe used for quality control of vaccine and biomaterial production.

  19. Mathematics analysis of polymerase chain reaction kinetic curves.

    PubMed

    Sochivko, D G; Fedorov, A A; Varlamov, D A; Kurochkin, V E; Petrov, R V

    2016-01-01

    The paper reviews different approaches to the mathematical analysis of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) kinetic curves. The basic principles of PCR mathematical analysis are presented. Approximation of PCR kinetic curves and PCR efficiency curves by various functions is described. Several PCR models based on chemical kinetics equations are suggested. Decision criteria for an optimal function to describe PCR efficiency are proposed.

  20. Quantitation of viable Coxiella burnetii in milk using an integrated cell culture-polymerase chain reaction (ICC-PCR) assay.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Diana; Shieh, Y-Carol; Tortorello, Mary; Kukreja, Ankush; Shazer, Arlette; Schlesser, Joseph

    2015-11-01

    The obligate intracellular pathogen Coxiella burnetii has long been considered the most heat resistant pathogen in raw milk, making it the reference pathogen for determining pasteurisation conditions for milk products. New milk formulations and novel non-thermal processes require validation of effectiveness which requires a more practical method for analysis than using the currently used animal model for assessing Coxiella survival. Also, there is an interest in better characterising thermal inactivation of Coxiella in various milk formulations. To avoid the use of the guinea pig model for evaluating Coxiella survival, an Integrated Cell Culture-PCR (ICC-PCR) method was developed for determining Coxiella viability in milk. Vero cell cultures were directly infected from Coxiella-contaminated milk in duplicate 24-well plates. Viability of the Coxiella in milk was shown by a ≥ 0.5 log genome equivalent (ge)/ml increase in the quantity of IS111a gene from the baseline post-infection (day 0) level after 9-11 d propagation. Coxiella in skim, 2%, and whole milk, and half and half successfully infected Vero cells and increased in number by at least 2 logs using a 48-h infection period followed by 9-d propagation time. As few as 125 Coxiella ge/ml in whole milk was shown to infect and propagate at least 2 logs in the optimised ICC-PCR assay, though variable confirmation of propagation was shown for as low as 25 Coxiella ge/ml. Applicability of the ICC-PCR method was further proven in an MPN format to quantitate the number of viable Coxiella remaining in whole milk after 60 °C thermal treatment at 0, 20, 40, 60 and 90 min.

  1. 9 CFR 147.30 - Laboratory procedure recommended for the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test for Mycoplasma...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... and re-suspend the pellet in 25-50 μl of 0.1 percent DEP (Diethyl Pyrocarbonate; Sigma) water. Boil at... μl taq-polymerase (5 U), 32 μl DEP water. (ii) 18 μl water, 25 μl PCR mix (Promega), 1 μl Reverse... Agriculture or an endorsement over other products not mentioned. Temperature ( °C) Duration Cycles 94...

  2. [Staphylococcus aureus enterotoxin A detection using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and its correlation with coagulase and thermonuclease tests].

    PubMed

    Suarez, María José; Arias, María Laura; del Mar Gamboa, María

    2008-03-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a pathogenic bacterium, widely distributed on nature and associated to general infection and food borne outbreaks. The relationship between this bacterium and food borne outbreaks has been done, historically, using several tests, including coagulase, thermonuclease and actually, PCR for the genes codifying for the enterotoxin responsible of clinical symptoms. The objective of this work is to detect enterotoxin A codifying gene through PCR in a group of S. aureus strains isolated from food samples, and also to correlate the presence of this gene with the production of coagulase and thermonuclease enzymes. A total of 69 staphylococcal strains were analyzed, 58 obtained from non pasteurized milk samples from the Estación Experimental Alfredo Volio Mata and 11 from the Food and Water Microbiology Laboratory collection, Universidad de Costa Rica. Coagulase, thermonuclease and enterotoxin A were analyzed in all the strains, and a statistical correlation was performed in order to verify possible associations. Results show that there is no correlation between the three variables, nevertheless, all coagulase positive strains were thermonuclease positive, and all enterotoxin positive strains were coagulase and thermonuclease positive, but not inversely. These results show that the use of presumptive or indirect tests for establishing entorotoxigenity of S. aureus strains is not truthful, more sensible and specific analysis, as PCR, shall be performed.

  3. Determining Annealing Temperatures for Polymerase Chain Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porta, Angela R.; Enners, Edward

    2012-01-01

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a common technique used in high school and undergraduate science teaching. Students often do not fully comprehend the underlying principles of the technique and how optimization of the protocol affects the outcome and analysis. In this molecular biology laboratory, students learn the steps of PCR with an…

  4. A simple real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based assay for authentication of the Chinese Panax ginseng cultivar Damaya from a local ginseng population.

    PubMed

    Wang, H; Wang, J; Li, G

    2016-06-27

    Panax ginseng is one of the most important medicinal plants in the Orient. Owing to its increasing demand in the world market, cultivated ginseng has become the main source of medicinal material. Among the Chinese ginseng cultivars, Damaya commands higher prices and is grown in significant proportions among the local ginseng population. Due to the lack of rapid and accurate authentication methods, Damaya is distributed among different cultivars in the local ginseng population in China. Here, we identified a unique, Damaya-specific single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) site present in the second intron of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 2 (cox2). Based on this SNP, a Damaya cultivar-specific primer was designed and an allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was optimized for the effective molecular authentication of Damaya. We designed a method by combining a simple DNA isolation method with real-time allele-specific PCR using SYBR Green I fluorescent dye, and proved its efficacy in clearly discriminated Damaya cultivar from other Chinese ginseng cultivars according to the allelic discrimination analysis. Hence, this study provides a simple and rapid assay for the differentiation and conservation of Damaya from the local Chinese ginseng population.

  5. Use of reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in molecular screening of Newcastle disease virus in poultry and free-living bird populations.

    PubMed

    Carrasco, Adriano de Oliveira Torres; Rodrigues, Juliana Nogueira Martins; Seki, Meire Christina; de Moraes, Fabricio Edgar; Silva, Jaqueline Raymondi; Durigon, Edison Luis; Pinto, Aramis Augusto

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate a simple molecular method of reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) to differentiate Newcastle disease virus strains according to their pathogenicity, in order to use it in molecular screening of Newcastle disease virus in poultry and free-living bird populations. Specific primers were developed to differentiate LaSota--LS--(vaccine strain) and Sao Joao do Meriti--SJM--strain (highly pathogenic strain). Chickens and pigeons were experimentally vaccinated/infected for an in vivo study to determine virus shedding in feces. Validation of sensitivity and specificity of the primers (SJM and LS) by experimental models used in the present study and results obtained in the molecular analysis of the primers by BLAST made it possible to generalize results. The development of primers that differentiate the level of pathogenicity of NDV stains is very important, mainly in countries where real-time RT-PCR is still not used as a routine test. These primers were able to determine the presence of the agent and to differentiate it according to its pathogenicity.

  6. Interlaboratory comparison of three microbial source tracking quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays from fecal-source and environmental samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stelzer, Erin A.; Strickler, Kriston M.; Schill, William B.

    2012-01-01

    During summer and early fall 2010, 15 river samples and 6 fecal-source samples were collected in West Virginia. These samples were analyzed by three laboratories for three microbial source tracking (MST) markers: AllBac, a general fecal indicator; BacHum, a human-associated fecal indicator; and BoBac, a ruminant-associated fecal indicator. MST markers were analyzed by means of the quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) method. The aim was to assess interlaboratory precision when the three laboratories used the same MST marker and shared deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) extracts of the samples, but different equipment, reagents, and analyst experience levels. The term assay refers to both the markers and the procedure differences listed above. Interlaboratory precision was best for all three MST assays when using the geometric mean absolute relative percent difference (ARPD) and Friedman's statistical test as a measure of interlaboratory precision. Adjustment factors (one for each MST assay) were calculated using results from fecal-source samples analyzed by all three laboratories and applied retrospectively to sample concentrations to account for differences in qPCR results among labs using different standards and procedures. Following the application of adjustment factors to qPCR results, ARPDs were lower; however, statistically significant differences between labs were still observed for the BacHum and BoBac assays. This was a small study and two of the MST assays had 52 percent of samples with concentrations at or below the limit of accurate quantification; hence, more testing could be done to determine if the adjustment factors would work better if the majority of sample concentrations were above the quantification limit.

  7. Ring test evaluation of the detection of influenza A virus in swine oral fluids by real-time, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (rRT-PCR) and virus isolation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The probability of detecting influenza A virus (IAV) in oral fluid (OF) specimens was calculated for each of 13 real-time, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (rRT-PCR) and 7 virus isolation (VI) assays. To conduct the study, OF was inoculated with H1N1 or H3N2 IAV and serially 10-fold d...

  8. Effects of Holding Time, Storage, and the Preservation of Samples on Sample Integrity for the Detection of Fecal Indicator Bacteria by Quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction (qPCR)-based assays.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this project was to answer questions related to storage of samples to be analyzed by the quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR)-based assays for fecal indicator bacteria. The project was divided into two parts. The first part was to determine if filters th...

  9. Translation of a laboratory-validated equine herpesvirus-1 specific real-time PCR assay into an insulated isothermal polymerase chain reaction (iiPCR) assay for point-of-need diagnosis using POCKIT™ nucleic acid analyzer.

    PubMed

    Balasuriya, Udeni B R; Lee, Pei-Yu Alison; Tsai, Yun-Long; Tsai, Chuan-Fu; Shen, Yu-Han; Chang, Hsiao-Fen Grace; Skillman, Ashley; Wang, Hwa-Tang Thomas; Pronost, Stéphane; Zhang, Yan

    2017-03-01

    Equine herpesvirus myeloencephalopathy (EHM), a major problem for the equine industry in the United States, is caused by equine herpesvirus-1 (EHV-1). In addition, EHV-1 is associated with upper respiratory disease, abortion, and chorioretinal lesions in horses. Here we describe the development and evaluation of an inexpensive, user-friendly insulated isothermal PCR (iiPCR) method targeting open reading 30 (ORF30) to detect both neuropathogenic and non-neuropathogenic strains on the field-deployable POCKIT™ device for point-of-need detection of EHV-1. The analytical sensitivity of the EHV-1 iiPCR assay was 13 genome equivalents per reaction. The assay did not cross react with ten non-target equine viral pathogens. Performance of the EHV-1 iiPCR assay was compared to two previously described real-time PCR (qPCR) assays in two laboratories by using 104 archived clinical samples. All 53 qPCR-positive and 46 of the 51 qPCR-negative samples tested positive and negative, respectively, by the iiPCR. The agreement between the two assays was 95.19% (confidence interval 90.48-99.90%) with a kappa value of 0.90. In conclusion, the newly developed EHV-1 iiPCR assay is robust to provide specificity and sensitivity comparable to qPCR assays for the detection of EHV-1 nucleic acid in clinical specimens.

  10. Detection and identification of dengue virus isolates from Brazil by a simplified reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) method.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, L T; Batista, W C; Igarashi, A

    1997-01-01

    We show here a simplified RT-PCR for identification of dengue virus types 1 and 2. Five dengue virus strains, isolated from Brazilian patients, and yellow fever vaccine 17DD as a negative control, were used in this study. C6/36 cells were infected and supernatants were collected after 7 days. The RT-PCR, done in a single reaction vessel, was carried out following a 1/10 dilution of virus in distilled water or in a detergent mixture containing Nonidet P40. The 50 microliters assay reaction mixture included 50 pmol of specific primers amplifying a 482 base pair sequence for dengue type 1 and 210 base pair sequence for dengue type 2. In other assays, we used dengue virus consensus primers having maximum sequence similarity to the four serotypes, amplifying a 511 base pair sequence. The reaction mixture also contained 0.1 mM of the four deoxynucleoside triphosphates, 7.5 U of reverse transcriptase, 1U of thermostable Taq DNA polymerase. The mixture was incubated for 5 minutes at 37 degrees C for reverse transcription followed by 30 cycles of two-step PCR amplification (92 degrees C for 60 seconds, 53 degrees C for 60 seconds) with slow temperature increment. The PCR products were subjected to 1.7% agarose gel electrophoresis and visualized by UV light after staining with ethidium bromide solution. Low virus titer around 10(3, 6) TCID50/ml was detected by RT-PCR for dengue type 1. Specific DNA amplification was observed with all the Brazilian dengue strains by using dengue virus consensus primers. As compared to other RT-PCRs, this assay is less laborious, done in a shorter time, and has reduced risk of contamination.

  11. Development of a quantitative competitive reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (QC-RT-PCR) for detection and quantitation of Chikungunya virus.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Shashi; Dash, Paban Kumar; Santhosh, S R; Shukla, Jyoti; Parida, Manmohan; Rao, P V Lakshmana

    2010-05-01

    Chikungunya is one of the most important emerging arboviral infections of public health significance. Due to lack of a licensed vaccine, rapid diagnosis plays an important role in early management of patients. In this study, a QC-RT-PCR assay was developed to quantify Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) RNA by targeting the conserved region of E1 gene. A competitor molecule containing an internal insertion was generated, which provided a stringent control of the quantification process. The introduction of 10-fold serially diluted competitor in each reaction was further used to determine sensitivity. The applicability of this assay for quantification of CHIKV RNA was evaluated with human clinical samples, and the results were compared with real-time quantitative RT-PCR. The sensitivity of this assay was estimated to be 100 RNA copies per reaction with a dynamic detection range of 10(2) to 10(10) copies. Specificity was confirmed using closely related alpha and flaviviruses. The comparison of QC-RT-PCR result with real-time RT-PCR revealed 100% concordance for the detection of CHIKV in clinical samples. These findings demonstrated that the reported assay is convenient, sensitive and accurate method and has the potential usefulness for clinical diagnosis due to simultaneous detection and quantification of CHIKV in acute-phase serum samples.

  12. Direct RNA detection without nucleic acid purification and PCR: Combining sandwich hybridization with signal amplification based on branched hybridization chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yao; Zheng, Zhi

    2016-05-15

    We have developed a convenient, robust and low-cost RNA detection system suitable for high-throughput applications. This system uses a highly specific sandwich hybridization to capture target RNA directly onto solid support, followed by on-site signal amplification via 2-dimensional, branched hybridizing chain polymerization through toehold-mediated strand displacement reaction. The assay uses SYBR Green to detect targets at concentrations as low as 1 pM, without involving nucleic acid purification or any enzymatic reaction, using ordinary oligonucleotides without modification or labeling. The system was demonstrated in the detection of malaria RNA in blood and GAPDH gene expression in cell lysate.

  13. Integrated polymerase chain reaction/electrophoresis instrument

    DOEpatents

    Andresen, Brian D.

    2000-01-01

    A new approach and instrument for field identification of micro-organisms and DNA fragments using a small and disposable device containing integrated polymerase chain reaction (PCR) enzymatic reaction wells, attached capillary electrophoresis (CE) channels, detectors, and read-out all on/in a small hand-held package. The analysis instrument may be made inexpensively, for example, of plastic, and thus is disposable, which minimizes cross contamination and the potential for false positive identification between samples. In addition, it is designed for multiple users with individual applications. The integrated PCR/CE is manufactured by the PCR well and CE channels are "stamped" into plastic depressions where conductive coatings are made in the wells and ends of the CE microchannels to carry voltage and current to heat the PCR reaction mixtures and simultaneously draw DNA bands up the CE channels. Light is transmitted through the instrument at appropriate points and detects PCR bands and identifies DNA fragments by size (retention time) and quantifies each by the amount of light generated as each phototransistor positioned below each CE channel detects a passing band. The instrument is so compact that at least 100 PCR/CE reactions/analyses can be performed easily on one detection device.

  14. Genetic structure of soil population of fungus Fusarium oxysporum Schlechtend.: Fr.: Molecular reidentification of the species and genetic differentiation of isolates using polymerase chain reaction technique with universal primers (UP-PCR)

    SciTech Connect

    Bulat, S.A.; Mironenko, N.V.; Zholkevich, Yu.G.

    1995-07-01

    The genetic structure of three soil populations of fungus Fusarium oxysporum was analyzed using polymerase chain reaction with universal primers (UP-PCR). Distinct UP-PCR variants revealed by means of cross-dot hybridization of amplified DNA and restriction analysis of nuclear ribosomal DNA represent subspecies or sibling species of F. oxysporum. The remaining isolates of F. oxysporum showed moderate UP-PCR polymorphism characterized by numerous types, whose relatedness was analyzed by computer treatment of the UP-PCR patterns. The genetic distance trees based on the UP-PCR patterns, which were obtained with different universal primers, demonstrated similar topology. This suggests that evolutionarily important genome rearrangements correlatively occur within the entire genome. Isolates representing different UP-PCR polymorphisms were encountered in all populations, being distributed asymmetrically in two of these. In general, soil populations of F. oxysporum were represented by numerous genetically isolated groups with a similar genome structure. The genetic heterogeneity of the isolates within these groups is likely to be caused by the parasexual process. The usefulness of the UP-PCR technique for population studies of F. oxysporum was demonstrated. 39 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Development and evaluation of a reverse transcription-insulated isothermal polymerase chain reaction (RT-iiPCR) assay for detection of equine arteritis virus in equine semen and tissue samples using the POCKIT™ system.

    PubMed

    Carossino, Mariano; Lee, Pei-Yu A; Nam, Bora; Skillman, Ashley; Shuck, Kathleen M; Timoney, Peter J; Tsai, Yun-Long; Ma, Li-Juan; Chang, Hsiao-Fen G; Wang, Hwa-Tang T; Balasuriya, Udeni B R

    2016-08-01

    Equine arteritis virus (EAV) is the causative agent of equine viral arteritis (EVA), a respiratory and reproductive disease of horses. Most importantly, EAV induces abortion in pregnant mares and can establish persistent infection in up to 10-70% of the infected stallions, which will continue to shed the virus in their semen. The objective of this study was to develop and evaluate a reverse transcription insulated isothermal polymerase chain reaction (RT-iiPCR) for the detection of EAV in semen and tissue samples. The newly developed assay had a limit of detection of 10 RNA copies and a 10-fold higher sensitivity than a previously described real-time RT-PCR (RT-qPCR). Evaluation of 125 semen samples revealed a sensitivity and specificity of 98.46% and 100.00%, respectively for the RT-qPCR assay, and 100.00% and 98.33%, respectively for the RT-iiPCR assay. Both assays had the same accuracy (99.2%, k=0.98) compared to virus isolation. Corresponding values derived from testing various tissue samples (n=122) collected from aborted fetuses, foals, and EAV carrier stallions are as follows: relative sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of 88.14%, 96.83%, and 92.62% (k=0.85), respectively for the RT-qPCR assay, and 98.31%, 92.06%, and 95.08% (k=0.90), respectively for the RT-iiPCR assay. These results indicate that RT-iiPCR is a sensitive, specific, and a robust test enabling detection of EAV in semen and tissue samples with very considerable accuracy. Even though the RT-qPCR assay showed a sensitivity and specificity equal to virus isolation for semen samples, its diagnostic performance was somewhat limited for tissue samples. Thus, this new RT-iiPCR could be considered as an alternative tool in the implementation of EAV control and prevention strategies.

  16. A Practical Polymerase Chain Reaction Laboratory for Introductory Biology Classes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowlus, R. David; Grether, Susan C.

    1996-01-01

    Presents a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) laboratory exercise that can be performed by introductory biology students in 1 45- to 55-minute class period. Includes a general description of the polymerase chain reaction, materials needed, procedure, and details of interest to teachers. (JRH)

  17. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays for the specific detection and quantification of seven Eimeria species that cause coccidiosis in chickens.

    PubMed

    Morgan, J A T; Morris, G M; Wlodek, B M; Byrnes, R; Jenner, M; Constantinoiu, C C; Anderson, G R; Lew-Tabor, A E; Molloy, J B; Gasser, R B; Jorgensen, W K

    2009-04-01

    Coccidiosis of chickens is an economically important disease caused by infection with species of Eimeria. The oocysts of some of the seven recognized species are difficult to distinguish morphologically and for this reason diagnostic laboratories are increasingly utilizing DNA-based technologies for the specific identification of Eimeria. The real-time PCR provides both sensitivity and speed for the analysis of DNA samples, and the approach has the capability of quantifying DNA. Together with a protocol for the extraction of DNA directly from faecal samples, real-time PCR assays have been established for the detection and quantification of seven species of Eimeria that infect chickens in Australia. The assays target one genetic marker, the second internal transcribed spacer of nuclear ribosomal DNA (ITS-2), use TaqMan MGB technology with species-specific probes, and can be multiplexed in pairs such that the seven species of Eimeria can be screened in four reaction tubes. A test screen of commercial flocks identified more Eimeria-infected chickens than were detected by coproscopic examination for oocysts. These molecular assays can also be used for the quality control of mixed-species vaccines. The ability to multiplex the assays makes them particularly practical for screening samples from chickens with mixed-species infections where the relative abundance of each Eimeria species present is required.

  18. Assessing HER2 amplification by IHC, FISH, and real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis (real-time PCR) following LCM in formalin-fixed paraffin embedded tissue from 40 women with ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Hillig, Thore; Thode, Jørgen; Breinholt, Marie F; Franzmann, Maria-Benedicte; Pedersen, Carsten; Lund, Flemming; Mygind, Henrik; Sölétormos, György; Rudnicki, Martin

    2012-12-01

    We compare HER2 receptor amplification analysis by immunohistochemistry (IHC), fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), and real-time polymerase chain reaction (real-time PCR) DNA copy-number assay following laser capture microdissection (LCM) in formalin-fixed paraffin embedded tissue from 40 women with verified ovarian cancer. We speculate that LCM should result in a more accurate assessment of HER2 amplification in our real-time PCR assay compared with IHC and FISH. HER2 overexpression measured by IHC, FISH, or real-time PCR was found in 5.0%, 5.0%, and 22.5%, respectively. HER2 negative results measured by IHC, FISH, or real-time PCR were found in 95%, 92.5%, and 60.0%, respectively. Analysis failed for IHC, FISH, or real-time PCR in 0%, 2.5%, or 17.5% of cases. Concordance between IHC and FISH, IHC and real-time PCR, or FISH and real-time PCR were 89.7%, 72.7%, or 78.1%, respectively. Only few ovarian cancer patients were HER2 overexpressed measured by IHC or FISH and thus could be eligible for antibody-based therapy with trastuzumab (Herceptin). Interestingly, we find an increased number of HER2 positive patients by real-time PCR analysis on microdissected cancer cells, suggesting a number of HER2 positive patients not detected by current methods. Thus, the concept of quantitative measurement of HER2 on microdissected cancer cells should be explored further.

  19. Selection of internal reference genes for normalization of reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) analysis in the rumen epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Die, Jose V.; Rowland, Lisa J.; Li, Robert; Oh, Sunghee; Li, Congjun; Connor, Erin E.; Ranilla, Maria-Jose

    2017-01-01

    The rumen is lined on the luminal side by a stratified squamous epithelium that is responsible for not only absorption, but also transport, extensive short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) metabolism and protection. Butyrate has been demonstrated to initiate the differentiation of the tissue following introduction of solid feed to the weaning neonate as well as affecting the metabolism of other nutrients and absorption of nutrients in in vitro experiments. The objective of the present study was to validate expression stability of eight putative reference genes bovine rumen, considering the intrinsic heterogeneity of bovine rumen with regard to different luminal characteristics due to direct infusion of butyrate to double the intra-ruminal content of the rumen liquor. Our focus was on identifying stable reference genes which are suitable to normalize real-time RT-qPCR experiments from rumen samples collected from clinical assays, irrespective of localization within the organ and the across physiological state. The most stably expressed genes included: ACTB, UXT, DBNDD2, RPS9, DDX54 and HMBS. Their high stability values suggest these reference genes will facilitate better evaluation of variation of across an array of conditions including: localization within the rumen, differences among cattle fed an array of rations, as well as response to development in the weaning animal. Moreover, we anticipate these reference genes may be useful for expression studies in other ruminants. PMID:28234977

  20. Evaluation of Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) with Slit Skin Smear Examination (SSS) to Confirm Clinical Diagnosis of Leprosy in Eastern Nepal

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Keshav; Bhattarai, Narayan Raj; Agarwal, Sudha; Khanal, Basudha

    2016-01-01

    Background Detection of Mycobacterium leprae in slit skin smear (SSS) is a gold standard technique for the leprosy diagnosis. Over recent years, molecular diagnosis by using PCR has been increasingly used as an alternative for its diagnosis due to its higher sensitivity. This study was carried out for comparative evaluation of PCR and SSS microscopy in a cohort of new leprosy cases diagnosed in B. P. Koirala Institute of health Sciences, Dharan, Nepal. Methodology/Principal Findings In this prospective crossectional study, 50 new clinically diagnosed cases of leprosy were included. DNA was extracted from SSS and PCR was carried out to amplify 129 bp sequence of M. leprae repetitive element. Sensitivity of SSS and PCR was 18% and 72% respectively. Improvement of 54% case detection by PCR clearly showed its advantage over SSS. Furthermore, PCR could confirm the leprosy diagnosis in 66% of AFB negative cases indicating its superiority over SSS. In the paucibacillary (PB) patients, whose BI was zero; sensitivity of PCR was 44%, whereas it was 78% in the multibacillary patients. Conclusions/Significance Our study showed PCR to be more sensitive than SSS microscopy in diagnosing leprosy. Moreover, it explored the characteristic feature of PCR which detected higher level of early stage(PB) cases tested negative by SSS. Being an expensive technique, PCR may not be feasible in all the cases, however, it would be useful in diagnosis of early cases of leprosy as opposed to SSS. PMID:28027305

  1. The development of a real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (rRT-PCR) assay using TaqMan technology for the pan detection of bluetongue virus (BTV).

    PubMed

    Mulholland, Catherine; McMenamy, Michael J; Hoffmann, Bernd; Earley, Bernadette; Markey, Bryan; Cassidy, Joseph; Allan, Gordon; Welsh, Michael D; McKillen, John

    2017-03-23

    Bluetongue virus (BTV) is an infectious, non-contagious viral disease of domestic and wild ruminants that is transmitted by adult females of certain Culicoides species. Since 2006, several serotypes including BTV-1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 9 and 16, have spread from the Mediterranean basin into Northern Europe for the first time. BTV-8 in particular, caused a major epidemic in northern Europe. As a result, it is evident that most European countries are at risk of BTV infection. The objective of this study was to develop and validate a real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (rRT-PCR) assay based on TaqMan technology for the detection of representative strains of all BTV serotypes. Primers and probes were based on genome segment 10 of the virus, the NS3 gene. The assay was tested for sensitivity, and specificity. The analytical sensitivity of the rRT-PCR assay was 200 copies of RNA per reaction. The assay did not amplify the closely related orbivirus epizootic hemorrhagic disease virus (EHDV) but successfully detected all BTV reference strains including clinical samples from animals experimentally infected with BTV-8. This real time RT-PCR assay offers a sensitive, specific and rapid alternative assay for the pan detection of BTV that could be used as part of a panel of diagnostic assays for the detection of all serotypes of BTV.

  2. The use of a one-step real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (rRT-PCR) for the surveillance of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) in Minnesota.

    PubMed

    Phelps, Nicholas B D; Patnayak, Devi P; Jiang, Yin; Goyal, Sagar M

    2012-12-01

    Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) is a highly contagious and pathogenic virus of fish. The virus infects more than 70 fish species worldwide, in both fresh and salt water. A new viral strain (VHSV-IVb) has proven both virulent and persistent, spreading throughout the Great Lakes of North America and to inland water bodies in the region. To better understand the geographic distribution of the virus, we used a modified real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (rRT-PCR) assay for high-throughput testing of fish for VHSV. The assay was shown to be twice as sensitive as the gold standard, virus isolation, and did not cross react with other viruses found in fish. In addition, the diagnostic turnaround time was reduced from 28 to 30 d for virus isolation to 2-4 d for rRT-PCR. To demonstrate the usefulness of the rRT-PCR assay, 115 high-priority water bodies in Minnesota were tested by both methods from April 2010 to June 2011. All survey sites tested negative for VHSV by both methods. The survey results have informed fisheries managers on the absence of VHSV in Minnesota and have better prepared them for the eventual arrival of the disease. In addition, the results demonstrate the value of this rRT-PCR as a surveillance tool to rapidly identify an outbreak so that it can be controlled in a timely manner.

  3. Cykotine mRNA expression in mouse retina after laser injury by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuschereba, Steven T.; Bowman, Phillip D.; Ujimore, Veronica; Hoxie, Stephen W.; Pizarro, Jose M.; Cross, Michael E.; Lund, David J.

    1996-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify cytokines produced by the retina after laser injury. With the aid of a scanning laser ophthalmoscope (SLO), right eyes of mice received lesions from a continuous wave argon laser. Left eyes served as unirradiated controls. At 2, 4, 6, 12, 24, and 48 hr after laser irradiation groups of 3 mice were euthanized and retinas fixed for histology or isolated for RNA. Messenger RNA (mRNA) was reverse-transcribed into complementary DNA (cDNA) and subjected to polymerase chain reaction for the following cytokines: tumor necrosis factor-(alpha) (TNF-(alpha) ), interleukin-1(alpha) /(Beta) (IL- 1(alpha) /(Beta) ), interleukin-6 (IL-6), transforming growth factor-(Beta) 1 (TGF- (Beta) 1), macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (G3PDH). Histologically, lesions were confined to the photoreceptors, retinal pigment epithelium, and choroid. In laser-injured retinas, mRNA levels were elevated for IL-1(alpha) , TGF-(Beta) 1, iNOS, and G3PDH, but not TNF-(alpha) , IL-1(Beta) , or IL-6. It appears that the retina, in response to laser injury, upregulates a select number of cytokines in a time-course dependent fashion.

  4. Polymerase Chain Reaction for Detection of Systemic Plant Pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This chapter outlines the advances and application of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) since its development in 1984 and its enhancements and applications to detection of viruses, viroids and phytoplasma in pome and stone fruits. PCR is probably the most rapidly and widely adopted technology eve...

  5. Evaluation of a broad range real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay for the diagnosis of septic synovitis in horses.

    PubMed

    Elmas, Colette R; Koenig, Judith B; Bienzle, Dorothee; Cribb, Nicola C; Cernicchiaro, Natalia; Coté, Nathalie M; Weese, J Scott

    2013-07-01

    Septic synovitis is a potentially debilitating and life-threatening disorder in horses. We hypothesized that a universal bacterial real-time PCR (RT-PCR) assay would have improved sensitivity and decreased turn-around time for detection of bacteria in synovial fluid (SF) samples. Forty-eight SF samples were collected from 36 horses that presented to two referral institutions with suspected septic synovitis. Universal RT-PCR, bacterial culture and SF analysis were performed on all samples, and an interpretation on the sample being septic or not was derived by three board certified specialists from the history, clinical assessment and SF characteristics. RT-PCR results were compared to a composite standard comprised of positive culture and interpretation by all three specialists of samples as "septic". For 41 of 48 samples (85%), culture and RT-PCR results were concordant. Compared to the composite standard, 83% of samples were correctly classified by RT-PCR (turn-around time of approximately 4 hours). Relative sensitivity and specificity of RT-PCR were 87% and 72% respectively, and 56% and 86% for culture. Hence, universal RT-PCR was a rapid and highly sensitive test, which may accelerate diagnosis and improve outcome for horses with septic synovitis.

  6. Use of Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in diagnosis of Marek’s disease and reticuloendotheliosis in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumorous tissues

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    PCR was used in diagnosis of Marek’s disease (MD) and reticuloendotheliosis (RE) in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tumorous tissues that have been stored for periods varied from 5-244 months. In another experiment, PCR was also used in diagnosis of MD in tumorous tissues that have been onl...

  7. Detection of Listeria monocytogenes with a nonisotopic polymerase chain reaction-coupled ligase chain reaction assay.

    PubMed Central

    Wiedmann, M; Barany, F; Batt, C A

    1993-01-01

    A polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-coupled ligase chain reaction (LCR) assay for the specific detection of Listeria monocytogenes (M. Wiedmann, J. Czajka, F. Barany, and C. A. Batt, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 58:3443-3447, 1992) has been modified for detection of the LCR products with a nonisotopic readout. When a chemiluminescent or a colorimetric substrate for the nonisotopic detection of the LCR products was used, the PCR-coupled LCR gave a sensitivity of 10 CFU of L. monocytogenes. The detection method with the chemiluminescent substrate Lumi-Phos 530 permitted detection of the LCR products in less than 3 h, so that the whole assay can be completed within 10 h. Images PMID:8368859

  8. Dual phase multiplex polymerase chain reaction

    DOEpatents

    Pemov, Alexander; Bavykin, Sergei

    2008-10-07

    Highly specific and sensitive methods were developed for multiplex amplification of nucleic acids on supports such as microarrays. Based on a specific primer design, methods include five types of amplification that proceed in a reaction chamber simultaneously. These relate to four types of multiplex amplification of a target DNA on a solid support, directed by forward and reverse complex primers immobilized to the support and a fifth type--pseudo-monoplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of multiple targets in solution, directed by a single pair of unbound universal primers. The addition of the universal primers in the reaction mixture increases the yield over the traditional "bridge" amplification on a solid support by approximately ten times. Methods that provide multitarget amplification and detection of as little as 0.45-4.5.times.10.sup.-12 g (equivalent to 10.sup.2-10.sup.3 genomes) of a bacterial genomic DNA are disclosed.

  9. Actinobaculum suis Detection Using Polymerase Chain Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Amigo, Cristina Román; de Gobbi, Debora Dirani Sena; Gomes, Vasco Túlio de Moura; Perina, Danilo do Prado; Nogueira de Lima Filsner, Pedro Henrique; Costa, Barbara Letícia Pereira; Spindola, Maria Garcia; Ferreira, Thais Sebastiana Porfida; Brandão, Paulo Eduardo; Moreno, Andrea Micke

    2012-01-01

    Actinobaculum suis is an important agent related to urinary infection in swine females. Due to its fastidious growth characteristics, the isolation of this anaerobic bacterium is difficult, thus impairing the estimation of its prevalence. The purpose of this study was to develop and test a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the detection and identification of A. suis and then compare these results with traditional isolation methods. Bacterial isolation and PCR were performed on one hundred and ninety-two urine samples from sows and forty-five preputial swabs from boars. The results indicate that this PCR was specific for A. suis, presenting a detection limit between 1.0 × 101 CFU/mL and 1.0 × 102 CFU/mL. A. suis frequencies, as measured by PCR, were 8.9% (17/192) in sow urine samples and 82.2% (37/45) in preputial swabs. Assessed using conventional culturing techniques, none of the urine samples were positive for A. suis; however, A. suis was detected in 31.1% (14/45) of the swabs. This PCR technique was shown to be an efficient method for the detection of A. suis in urine and preputial swabs. PMID:23346017

  10. Quantification of minimal residual disease (MRD) in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) using amplicon-fusion-site polymerase chain reaction (AFS-PCR).

    PubMed

    Weber, Axel; Taube, Sylvia; Zur Stadt, Udo; Horstmann, Martin; Krohn, Knut; Bradtke, Jutta; Teigler-Schlegel, Andrea; Leiblein, Sabine; Christiansen, Holger

    2012-11-09

    The amplification of putative oncogenes is a common finding within the genome of various cancer types. Identification and further targeting of specific junction sites within the sequence of genomic amplicons (amplicon fusion sites, AFS) by PCR (AFS-PCR) is suitable for quantification of minimal residual disease (MRD). This approach has recently been developed and described for MYCN amplified neuroblastomas. To compare AFS-PCR directly to routinely used MRD diagnostic strategies, we mapped the amplified genomic regions (ampGR) of an iAMP21-amplicon in high resolution of a patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Successfully, we established AFS-PCR covering junction sites between ampGR within the iAMP21-amplicon. Quantification of MRD by AFS-PCR was directly comparable to IgH/TCR based real time quantitative PCR and fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) analysis in consecutive bone marrow (BM) specimens. Our data give an additional proof of concept of AFS-PCR for quantification of MRD. The method could be taken into account for ALL patients with genomic amplifications as alternative MRD diagnostic, if no or qualitatively poor Ig/TCR-PCRs are available.

  11. Primer design for PCR reactions in forensic biology.

    PubMed

    Elkins, Kelly M

    2015-01-01

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a popular method to copy DNA in vitro. Its invention revolutionized fields ranging from clinical medicine to anthropology, molecular biology, and forensic biology. The method employs one of many available heat-stable DNA polymerases in a reaction that is repeated many times in situ. The DNA polymerase reads a template DNA strand and using the components of the reaction mix, catalyzes the addition of free 2'-deoxynucleotide triphosphate nitrogenous bases to short segment of DNA that forms a complement with the template via Watson-Crick base pairing. This short segment of DNA is referred to as a PCR primer and it is essential to the success of the reaction. The most widely used application of PCR in forensic labs is the amplification of short tandem repeat (STR) loci used in DNA typing. The STRs are routinely evaluated in concert with 16 or more reactions, a multiplex, run in one test tube simultaneously. In a multiplex, it is essential that the primers work specifically and accurately on the intended reactions without hindering the other reactions. The primers, which are very specific, also can be used to probe single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a DNA sequence of interest by single base extension. Primers are often designed using one of many available automated software packages. Here the process of manually designing PCR primers for forensic biology using no-cost software is described.

  12. Polymerase chain reaction with phase change as intrinsic thermal control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Yi-Fan; Yonezawa, Eri; Kuo, Long-Sheng; Yeh, Shiou-Hwei; Chen, Pei-Jer; Chen, Ping-Hei

    2013-04-01

    This research demonstrated that without any external temperature controller, the capillary convective polymerase chain reaction (ccPCR) powered by a candle can operate with the help of phase change. The candle ccPCR system productively amplified hepatitis B virus 122 base-pairs DNA fragment. The detection sensitivity can achieve at an initial DNA concentration to 5 copies per reaction. The results also show that the candle ccPCR system can operate functionally even the ambient temperature varies from 7 °C to 45 °C. These features imply that the candle ccPCR system can provide robust medical detection services.

  13. Universal primer-multiplex-polymerase chain reaction (UP-M-PCR) and capillary electrophoresis-laser-induced fluorescence analysis for the simultaneous detection of six genetically modified maize lines.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chunjiao; Xu, Wentao; Zhai, Zhifang; Luo, Yunbo; Yan, Xinghua; Zhang, Nan; Huang, Kunlun

    2011-05-25

    To meet the labeling and traceability requirement of genetically modified (GM) maize and their products for trade and regulation, it is essential to develop a specific detection method for monitoring the presence of GM content. In this work, six GM maize lines, including GA21, Bt11, NK603, Bt176, Mir604, and Mon810, were simultaneously detected by universal primer-multiplex-polymerase chain reaction (UP-M-PCR), and the amplicons for the six event-specific genes as well as the endogenous Ivr gene were successfully separated by the method of capillary electrophoresis-laser-induced fluorescence (CE-LIF). The UP-M-PCR method overcame the disadvantages in conventional M-PCR, such as complex manipulation, lower sensitivity, amplification disparity resulting from different primers, etc., and in combination with CE-LIF, it obtained a high sensitivity of 0.1 ng for both single and mixed DNA samples. The established method can be widely used for the qualitative identification of the GM maize lines.

  14. Multiplex PCR (polymerase chain reaction) assay for detection of E. coli O157:H7, Salmonella sp., Vibrio cholerae and Vibrio parahaemolyticus in spiked shrimps (Penaeus monodon).

    PubMed

    Fakruddin, M D; Sultana, Mahmuda; Ahmed, Monzur Morshed; Chowdhury, Abhijit; Choudhury, Naiyyum

    2013-03-15

    The coastal aquaculture mainly shrimps constitute major export sector in Bangladesh and is increasingly shaped by international trade conditions and by national responses to those stringent quality and safety standards. PCR based validated methods for detection of major bacterial pathogens in shrimp might be very useful tool for ensuring quality and safety standards of exportable shrimps. The objective of this study was to evaluate overall performance (sensitivity and specificity) of the multiplex PCR assay for detection of Vibrio cholerae, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Salmonella sp. and Escherichia coli O157:H7 from spiked shrimp samples. The targeted genes were ompW for V. cholerae, tdh for V. parahaemolyticus, sefA for Salmonella spp. and hlyEHEC for E. coli O157:H7. The genomic DNA was extracted by using standard method and amplified accordingly. Sensitivity of the assay was tested by inoculating the shrimp homogenate with viable cells of laboratory references strains (target pathogens). The genes were amplified individually both from culture homogenate and spiked samples. Twenty different uniplex and multiplex PCR assay were performed; the results showed that the sensitivity and specificity of multiplex PCR are comparable to that of the results of uniplex PCR for the samples. DNA extracted from shrimp samples spiked with non-target pathogen (Bacillus cereus, Shigella flexneri and Staphylococcus aureus) yielded negative results.

  15. Development of a Multiplexed Polymerase Chain Reaction-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) Assay to Identify Common Members of the Subgenera Culex (Culex) and Culex (Phenacomyia) in Guatemala

    PubMed Central

    Kent, Rebekah J.; Deus, Stephen; Williams, Martin; Savage, Harry M.

    2010-01-01

    Morphological differentiation of mosquitoes in the subgenera Culex (Culex) and Culex (Phenacomyia) in Guatemala is difficult, with reliable identification ensured only through examination of larval skins from individually reared specimens and associated male genitalia. We developed a multiplexed polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) assay to identify common Cx. (Cux.) and Cx. (Phc.). Culex (Cux.) chidesteri, Cx. (Cux.) coronator, Cx. (Cux.) interrogator, Cx. (Cux.) quinquefasciatus, Cx. (Cux.) nigripalpus/Cx. (Cux.) thriambus, and Cx. (Phc.) lactator were identified directly with a multiplexed primer cocktail comprising a conserved forward primer and specific reverse primers targeting ribosomal DNA (rDNA). Culex nigripalpus and Cx. thriambus were differentiated by restriction digest of homologous amplicons. The assay was developed and optimized using well-characterized specimens from Guatemala and the United States and field tested with unknown material from Guatemala. This assay will be a valuable tool for mosquito identification in entomological and arbovirus ecology studies in Guatemala. PMID:20682869

  16. Evaluation of UV-C induced changes in Escherichia coli DNA using repetitive extragenic palindromic-polymerase chain reaction (REP-PCR).

    PubMed

    Trombert, Alejandro; Irazoqui, Horacio; Martín, Carlos; Zalazar, Fabián

    2007-11-12

    Ultraviolet radiation is an efficient inactivation method for a broad range of bacteria, viruses and parasites. Inactivation of microorganisms by UV-B and UV-C radiation is driven through modifications in their genomic DNA, being the most stable DNA-lesions different kinds of pyrimidine dimers (PDs) (e.g., cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) and other photoproducts). Taking into account that these modifications inhibit the DNA polymerization in vivo as well as in vitro, in the present work the usefulness of the REP-PCR assay to detect UV-induced changes in the Escherichia coli DNA was evaluated. In vitro amplification of DNA extracted at different times after UV treatment showed a disappearance of amplicons of higher size as time of treatment increases. When the bacteria were let to progress through their dark repair process, modifications in the electrophoretic patterns by REP-PCR were observed again. Amplified bacterial DNA tended to recover the profile showed at the beginning of treatment. In addition, the reappearance of bands of higher molecular size was associated to an increase in their signal intensity probably due to a higher amplification rate. Results of REP-PCR were correlated to the colony-forming ability of E. coli. It was concluded that REP-PCR appears as a rapid, robust, useful complementary methodology to monitor the impact of UV irradiation--at a molecular level--on the inactivation and the mechanisms of repair, applicable on a broad spectrum of microorganisms.

  17. Sensitive quantitative detection of Ralstonia solanacearum in soil by the most probable number-polymerase chain reaction (MPN-PCR) method.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Yasuhiro; Nakaho, Kazuhiro

    2014-05-01

    We developed a sensitive quantitative assay for detecting Ralstonia solanacearum in soil by most probable number (MPN) analysis based on bio-PCR results. For development of the detection method, we optimized an elution buffer containing 5 g/L skim milk for extracting bacteria from soil and reducing contamination of polymerase inhibitors in soil extracts. Because R. solanacearum can grow in water without any added nutrients, we used a cultivation buffer in the culture step of the bio-PCR that contained only the buffer and antibiotics to suppress the growth of other soil microorganisms. To quantify the bacterial population in soil, the elution buffer was added to 10 g soil on a dry weight basis so that the combined weight of buffer, soil, and soil-water was 50 g; 5 mL of soil extract was assumed to originate from 1 g of soil. The soil extract was divided into triplicate aliquots each of 5 mL and 500, 50, and 5 μL. Each aliquot was diluted with the cultivation buffer and incubated at 35 °C for about 24 h. After incubation, 5 μL of culture was directly used for nested PCR. The number of aliquots showing positive results was collectively checked against the MPN table. The method could quantify bacterial populations in soil down to 3 cfu/10 g dried soil and was successfully applied to several types of soil. We applied the method for the quantitative detection of R. solanacearum in horticultural soils, which could quantitatively detect small populations (9.3 cfu/g), but the semiselective media were not able to detect the bacteria.

  18. Development of a Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) method based on amplification of mitochondrial DNA to detect Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Maristela G; Medina, Tiago S; Oliveira, Salma G; Marinho, Anderson N; Póvoa, Marinete M; Ribeiro-dos-Santos, Andrea K C

    2009-07-01

    In this study we standardized a new technical approach in which the target mitochondrial DNA sequence (mtDNA) is amplified using a simple but sensitive PCR method as a tool to detect Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax. Specific primers were designed to hybridize with cytochrome c oxidase genes of P. falciparum (cox III) and P. vivax (cox I). Amplification products were obtained for all positive samples, presenting homology only for species-specific mtDNA. Sensitivity and specificity were 100%. The applicability of the method was tested in a cross-sectional study, in which 88 blood samples from individuals naturally exposed to malaria in the Brazilian Amazon region were analyzed. Based on the results, the sensitivity and specificity were 100% and 88.3%, respectively. This simple and sensitive PCR method can be useful in specific situations and in different settings of malaria management, in endemic as well as non-endemic areas (travelers), and in clinical or epidemiological studies, with applications in malaria control programs.

  19. Pressure-driven one-step solid phase-based on-chip sample preparation on a microfabricated plastic device and integration with flow-through polymerase chain reaction (PCR).

    PubMed

    Tran, Hong Hanh; Trinh, Kieu The Loan; Lee, Nae Yoon

    2013-10-01

    In this study, we fabricate a monolithic poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA) microdevice on which solid phase-based DNA preparation and flow-through polymerase chain reaction (PCR) units were functionally integrated for one-step sample preparation and amplification operated by pressure. Chelex resin, which is used as a solid support for DNA preparation, can capture denatured proteins but releases DNA, and the purified DNA can then be used as a template in a subsequent amplification process. Using the PMMA microdevices, DNA was successfully purified from both Escherichia coli and human hair sample, and the plasmid vector inserted in E. coli and the D1S80 locus in human genomic DNA were successfully amplified from on-chip purified E. coli and human hair samples. Furthermore, the integration potential of the proposed sample preparation and flow-through PCR units was successfully demonstrate on a monolithic PMMA microdevice with a seamless flow, which could pave the way for a pressure-driven, simple one-step sample preparation and amplification with greatly decreased manufacture cost and enhanced device disposability.

  20. Convective polymerase chain reaction around micro immersion heater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennig, Martin; Braun, Dieter

    2005-10-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is performed in the thermal convection created by a micro immersion heater. Instead of repetitive heating and cooling, the temperature gradient induces thermal convection which drives the reaction liquid between hot and cold parts of the chamber. The convection triggers DNA amplification as the DNA melts into two single strands in the hot region and replicates with the use of proteins into twice the amount in the cold region. The constant heater is simply dipped into the reaction solution. Compared to previous experiments, we demonstrate that convective PCR is possible in a robotically accessible open vessel. Our approach compares well with fast PCR cyclers and replicates DNA 500 000 fold within 20minutes. We reduce the necessary components for PCR to cheap, single-use components and therefore increasing the prospects of bringing PCR to point of care applications—even in third world countries.

  1. New methods as alternative or corrective measures for the pitfalls and artifacts of reverse transcription and polymerase chain reactions (RT-PCR) in cloning chimeric or antisense-accompanied RNA

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Chengfu; Liu, Yongming; Yang, Min; Liao, D. Joshua

    2013-01-01

    We established new methods for cloning cDNA ends that start with reverse transcription (RT) and soon proceed with the synthesis of the second cDNA strand, avoiding manipulations of fragile RNA. Our 3′-end cloning method does not involve poly-dT primers and polymerase chain reactions (PCR), is low in efficiency but high in fidelity and can clone those RNAs without a poly-A tail. We also established a cDNA protection assay to supersede RNA protection assay. The protected cDNA can be amplified, cloned and sequenced, enhancing sensitivity and fidelity. We report that RT product using gene-specific primer (GSP) cannot be gene- or strand-specific because RNA sample contains endogenous random primers (ERP). The gene-specificity may be improved by adding a linker sequence at the 5′-end of the GSP to prime RT and using the linker as a primer in the ensuing PCR. The strand-specificity may be improved by using strand-specific DNA oligos in our protection assay. The CDK4 mRNA and TSPAN31 mRNA are transcribed from the opposite DNA strands and overlap at their 3′ ends. Using this relationship as a model, we found that the overlapped sequence might serve as a primer with its antisense as the template to create a wrong-template extension in RT or PCR. We infer that two unrelated RNAs or cDNAs overlapping at the 5′- or 3′-end might create a spurious chimera in this way, and many chimeras with a homologous sequence may be such artifacts. The ERP and overlapping antisense together set complex pitfalls, which one should be aware of. PMID:23618925

  2. Polymerization as a Model Chain Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morton, Maurice

    1973-01-01

    Describes the features of the free radical, anionic, and cationic mechanisms of chain addition polymerization. Indicates that the nature of chain reactions can be best taught through the study of macromolecules. (CC)

  3. Evaluation of the presence of equine viral herpesvirus 1 (EHV-1) and equine viral herpesvirus 4 (EHV-4) DNA in stallion semen using polymerase chain reaction (PCR).

    PubMed

    Hebia-Fellah, Imen; Léauté, Anne; Fiéni, Francis; Zientara, Stéphan; Imbert-Marcille, Berthe-Marie; Besse, Bernard; Fortier, Guillaume; Pronost, Stephane; Miszczak, Fabien; Ferry, Bénédicte; Thorin, Chantal; Pellerin, Jean-Louis; Bruyas, Jean-François

    2009-06-01

    In the horse, the risk of excretion of two major equine pathogens (equine herpesvirus types 1 (EHV-1) and 4 (EHV-4)) in semen is unknown. The objective of our study was to assess the possible risks for the horizontal transmission of equine rhinopneumonitis herpesviruses via the semen and the effect of the viruses on stallion fertility. Samples of stallion semen (n=390) were gathered from several different sources. Examination of the semen involved the detection of viral DNA using specific PCR. The mean fertility of the stallions whose sperm tested positive for viral DNA and the mean fertility of stallions whose sperm did not contain viral DNA, were compared using the Student's t-test. EHV-4 viral DNA was not detected in any of the semen samples. EHV-1 DNA was identified in 51 of the 390 samples, (13%). One hundred and eighty-two samples came from 6 studs and there was significant difference (p<0.05) among the proportion of stallions whose semen tested positive for viral DNA from 0 to 55% between the studs. There was a significant difference (p<0.014) between the fertility of stallions whose semen tested positive for viral DNA and those whose semen was free from viral DNA. The stallions that excreted the EHV-1 virus in their semen appeared to be more fertile than the non-excretors, but this difference was in fact related to the breeding technique since higher proportion of excretors were found among those whose semen was used fresh rather than preserved by cooling or freezing. In conclusion, this study suggests that the EHV-1 virus may be transmitted via the semen at mating or by artificial insemination as demonstrated with other herpes viruses in other species.

  4. Polymerase chain reaction: A molecular diagnostic tool in periodontology.

    PubMed

    Maheaswari, Rajendran; Kshirsagar, Jaishree Tukaram; Lavanya, Nallasivam

    2016-01-01

    This review discusses the principles of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and its application as a diagnostic tool in periodontology. The relevant MEDLINE and PubMed indexed journals were searched manually and electronically by typing PCR, applications of PCR, PCR in periodontics, polymorphism studies in periodontitis, and molecular techniques in periodontology. The searches were limited to articles in English language and the articles describing PCR process and its relation to periodontology were collected and used to prepare a concise review. PCR has now become a standard diagnostic and research tool in periodontology. Various studies reveal that its sensitivity and specificity allow it as a rapid, efficient method of detecting, identifying, and quantifying organism. Different immune and inflammatory markers can be identified at the mRNA expression level, and also the determination of genetic polymorphisms, thus providing the deeper insight into the mechanisms underlying the periodontal disease.

  5. Polymerase chain reaction: A molecular diagnostic tool in periodontology

    PubMed Central

    Maheaswari, Rajendran; Kshirsagar, Jaishree Tukaram; Lavanya, Nallasivam

    2016-01-01

    This review discusses the principles of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and its application as a diagnostic tool in periodontology. The relevant MEDLINE and PubMed indexed journals were searched manually and electronically by typing PCR, applications of PCR, PCR in periodontics, polymorphism studies in periodontitis, and molecular techniques in periodontology. The searches were limited to articles in English language and the articles describing PCR process and its relation to periodontology were collected and used to prepare a concise review. PCR has now become a standard diagnostic and research tool in periodontology. Various studies reveal that its sensitivity and specificity allow it as a rapid, efficient method of detecting, identifying, and quantifying organism. Different immune and inflammatory markers can be identified at the mRNA expression level, and also the determination of genetic polymorphisms, thus providing the deeper insight into the mechanisms underlying the periodontal disease. PMID:27143822

  6. DNA probe and PCR-specific reaction for Lactobacillus plantarum.

    PubMed

    Quere, F; Deschamps, A; Urdaci, M C

    1997-06-01

    A 300 bp DNA fragment of Lactobacillus plantarum isolated by randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis was cloned and sequenced. This fragment was tested using a dot-blot DNA hybridization to technique for its ability to identify Lact. plantarum strains. This probe hybridized with all Lact. plantarum strains tested and with some strains of Lact. pentosus, albeit more weakly. Two internal primers of this probe were selected (LbP11 and LbP12) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was carried out. All Lact. plantarum strains tested amplified a 250 bp fragment contrary to the other LAB species tested. This specific PCR for Lact. plantarum was also performed from colonies grown on MRS medium with similar results. These methods enabled the rapid and specific detection and identification of Lact. plantarum.

  7. Detection of Clostridium septicum hemolysin gene by polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, S; Hashizume, N; Kinoshita, T; Kaidoh, T; Tamura, Y

    1997-09-01

    A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was developed for the detection of the hemolysin (alpha toxin) gene of Clostridium septicum. The PCR primers were designed from the sequence of the hemolysin gene and synthesized. A DNA fragment of 270 bp was amplified from 10 strains of C. septicum, but was not from strains of C. chauvoei, C. perfringens, C. novyi, or C. haemolyticum. When the PCR product was digested with Sau3AI, two DNA fragments of the expected 148 bp and 122 bp were recognized. The lowest detectable threshold of PCR for the hemolysin gene was 3.8 x 10(3) cells/ml. The PCR technique may be useful for rapid detection or identification of C. septicum associated with malignant edema.

  8. Nuclear chain reaction: forty years later

    SciTech Connect

    Sachs, R.G.

    1984-01-01

    The proceedings from a 1982 symposium 40 years after the first controlled nuclear chain reaction took place in Chicago covers four sessions and public discussion. The session covered the history of the chain reaction; peaceful uses in technology, medicine, and biological science; peaceful uses in power generation; and nuclear weapons control. Among the speakers were Eugene Wigner, Glenn Seaborg, Alvin Weinberg, and others who participated in the first chain reaction experiments. The proceedings reflect differences of opinion among the scientists as well as the general public. References, slides, and tables used to illustrate the individual talks are included with the papers.

  9. A molecular survey of S. mutans and P. gingivalis oral microbial burden in human saliva using Relative Endpoint Polymerase Chain Reaction (RE-PCR) within the population of a Nevada dental school revealed disparities among minorities

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The University of Nevada, Las Vegas School of Dental Medicine recently opened an orthodontic treatment clinic to address the needs of the racially and ethnically diverse population of Southern Nevada, primarily focusing on the treatment and care of low-income and minority patients. Although orthodontic treatment and therapy has been shown to induce changes in the oral cavity, much of this evidence was collected from traditional White, teenage orthodontic clinic populations. The primary goal of this study was to describe the microbial burden of the cariogenic and periodontal pathogens, Streptococcus mutans and Porphyromonas gingivalis within the UNLV-SDM patient population. Methods Representative saliva samples were collected from healthy adult patients for DNA isolation. Relative endpoint polymerase chain reaction (RE-PCR) was performed to ascertain the presence and relative microbial burden of these oral pathogens. Results Nearly one quarter (13/56) or 23.3% of these patients had elevated levels of S. mutans, while (10/56) and 17.8% of these samples were found to have elevated levels of P. gingivalis, - with (90%) of P. gingivalis-positive samples from minority patients (X2 = 17.921, d.f. = 1; p < 0.0001). Conclusions These findings of elevated P. gingivalis levels, primarily among minority patients, may suggest underlying oral health practices contributing to adverse oral health conditions within this population. Oral health knowledge and practices among minority patients may be strongly influenced by other factors, including education and socioeconomic status, suggesting additional research may be needed to accurately determine the most appropriate standards for care and oral health education within this patient population. PMID:22925755

  10. Supplement to Theory of Neutron Chain Reactions

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Weinberg, Alvin M.; Noderer, L. C.

    1952-05-26

    General discussions are given of the theory of neutron chain reactions. These include observations on exponential experiments, the general reactor with resonance fission, microscopic pile theory, and homogeneous slow neutron reactors. (B.J.H.)

  11. Polymerase chain reaction based detection of fungi in infected corneas

    PubMed Central

    Gaudio, P A; Gopinathan, U; Sangwan, V; Hughes, T E

    2002-01-01

    Aims: To evaluate a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based assay to detect fungi in scrapings from infected corneas. Methods: A PCR assay was developed to amplify a portion of the fungal 18S ribosome gene. Corneal scrapings from 30 patients with presumed infectious keratitis were evaluated using this assay, as well as by standard microbiological techniques, and the results were compared. Conjunctival swabs from each patient's healthy, fellow eye were also evaluated by PCR. Results: PCR and fungal culture results matched (were both positive or both negative for fungi) in 22 (74%) of 30 scrapings from infected corneas. Three (10%) of 30 samples were PCR positive but fungal culture negative; two of these appeared clinically to represent fungal infections, and the third was clinically indeterminate. Four (13%) scrapings were positive by PCR but also by bacterial and not fungal culture. One specimen (3%) was PCR negative but fungal culture positive. Of the conjunctival swabs from each patient's healthy fellow eye, five (17%) of 30 were positive by PCR, and the opposite, infected eye of all five of these harboured a fungal infection. Conclusions: PCR is promising as a means to diagnose fungal keratitis and offers some advantages over culture methods, including rapid analysis and the ability to analyse specimens far from where they are collected. PMID:12084744

  12. Assay of gliadin by real-time immunopolymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Henterich, Nadine; Osman, Awad A; Méndez, Enrique; Mothes, Thomas

    2003-10-01

    Patients with coeliac disease (gluten-sensitive enteropathy) are intolerant against gliadins from wheat and the respective proteins from related cereals and have to keep a lifelong gluten-free diet. For control of gliadin in gluten-free food sensitive assay techniques are necessary. We developed an immunopolymerase chain reaction (iPCR) assay for gliadin. In this technique immunological detection of gliadin by a monoclonal antibody R5 conjugated with an oligonucleotide is amplified by PCR. For quantification, iPCR was performed as real-time PCR (real-time iPCR) in one step. By means of real-time iPCR, the sensitivity of gliadin analysis was increased more than 30-fold above the level reached by enzyme immunoassay. Real time-iPCR using R5 directly conjugated with oligonucleotide was clearly more sensitive than real time-iPCR applying sequentially biotinylated R5, streptavidin, and biotinylated oligonucleotide. With directly conjugated R5 gliadin was detected at a concentration as low as 0.16 ng/mL corresponding to 16 microg gliadin/100 g food or 0.16 ppm (corresponding to 0.25 g of food extracted in 10 mL of solvent and 25-fold dilution of the extract prior to analysis). This is the first report applying the highly sensitive technique of iPCR for gliadin analysis. Furthermore, this is the first approach to perform real-time iPCR in one step without changing the reaction vessels after enzyme immunoassay for subsequent PCR analysis thus minimizing risks of contamination and loss of sensitivity.

  13. Taylor dispersion in polymerase chain reaction in a microchannel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jinkee; Kulla, Elejdis; Chauhan, Anuj; Tripathi, Anubhav

    2008-09-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is commonly used for a wide range of DNA applications such as disease detection, genetic fingerprinting, and paternity testing. The importance of PCR has led to an increased interest in performing PCR in a microfluidic platform with a high throughput while using very small DNA quantities. In this paper we solve convection-diffusion equations for the DNA and deoxynucleoside triphosphate (dNTP) under conditions suitable for PCR operation in a microchip. These include pressure driven flow accompanied by temporal temperature changes that lead to an amplification reaction, which is modeled as a first order reaction. The convection-diffusion-reaction equations are solved by using the method of multiple time scales to yield average equations that can be solved to obtain the long time evolution of the concentration profiles. The results obtained by solving the averaged equations agree well with full numerical solutions. The averaged equations are also solved to simulate the PCR to illustrate some interesting aspects of this operation in a microfluidic device. It is shown that insufficient nucleotide concentrations can lead to complete depletion of NTP at certain axial locations, which leads to termination of DNA amplification at these locations, resulting in formation of a plateau in DNA concentration.

  14. Detection of Mycoplasma pneumoniae by using the polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Bernet, C; Garret, M; de Barbeyrac, B; Bebear, C; Bonnet, J

    1989-01-01

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique was used to detect Mycoplasma pneumoniae. A specific DNA sequence for M. pneumoniae was selected from a genomic library, and two oligonucleotides were chosen in this sequence to give an amplified fragment of 144 base pairs. We show that DNA from different M. pneumoniae strains can be detected by PCR, with DNA from other Mycoplasma species giving negative results. Analysis of biological samples (throat swabs) obtained from hamsters that were experimentally infected with M. pneumoniae showed that PCR was more sensitive and reliable than conventional culture techniques for the detection of M. pneumoniae. Initial experiments on artificially seeded human bronchoalveolar lavages showed that PCR can be used to detect 10(2) to 10(3) organisms. Images PMID:2509513

  15. Polymerase chain reaction technology as analytical tool in agricultural biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Lipp, Markus; Shillito, Raymond; Giroux, Randal; Spiegelhalter, Frank; Charlton, Stacy; Pinero, David; Song, Ping

    2005-01-01

    The agricultural biotechnology industry applies polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technology at numerous points in product development. Commodity and food companies as well as third-party diagnostic testing companies also rely on PCR technology for a number of purposes. The primary use of the technology is to verify the presence or absence of genetically modified (GM) material in a product or to quantify the amount of GM material present in a product. This article describes the fundamental elements of PCR analysis and its application to the testing of grains. The document highlights the many areas to which attention must be paid in order to produce reliable test results. These include sample preparation, method validation, choice of appropriate reference materials, and biological and instrumental sources of error. The article also discusses issues related to the analysis of different matrixes and the effect they may have on the accuracy of the PCR analytical results.

  16. Accuracy and Significance of Polymerase Chain Reaction Detection of Sentinel Node Metastases in Breast Cancer Patients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-10-01

    specific reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction markers in the detection of metastases in the lymph nodes... chain reaction detection of cytokeratin-19 mRNA in bone marrow and blood of breast cancer patients. J Cancer Res Clin Oncol 1996; 122: 679-86. (43...directly drain a tumor and are most likely to harbor occult cells . Reverse transcriptase- polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) is a sensitive

  17. Nested polymerase chain reaction for early diagnosis of typhoid fever.

    PubMed

    Sultana, S; Hossain, M A; Alam, M A; Paul, S K; Mahmud, C; Kabir, M R; Haque, N; Yesmin, T; Kayes, M T; Maruf, A A; Kobayashi, N

    2012-01-01

    Typhoid fever, caused by Salmonella typhi, is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in many developing countries. A rapid and sensitive method for the detection of S. typhi is essential for early diagnosis. This was a study to prospectively evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to identify the S. typhi using flagellin gene related primers. The study was carried out in the department of Microbiology, Mymensingh Medical College, Mymensingh between July, 2010 and June, 2011, including 82 individuals of different age and sex. Of them, 62 were clinically suspected cases of typhoid fever and remaining 20 were apparently healthy controls. Cultures as well as PCR of blood specimens were performed for each of the cases. Among the 62 suspected typhoid fever cases, 8(12.9%) were blood culture positive and 55(88.7%) were PCR positive for S. typhi. All culture positive cases were positive by PCR and among 54 culture negative cases, 47(87%) were positive by PCR. Neither of the healthy controls was positive by PCR or blood culture. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of PCR using blood culture as gold standard were 88.7%, 100%, 100% and 74% respectively for typhoid fever. In this study, the PCR appears highly specific, very sensitive and superior to blood culture for the early diagnosis of typhoid fever.

  18. Polymerase chain reaction: basic protocol plus troubleshooting and optimization strategies.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, Todd C

    2012-05-22

    In the biological sciences there have been technological advances that catapult the discipline into golden ages of discovery. For example, the field of microbiology was transformed with the advent of Anton van Leeuwenhoek's microscope, which allowed scientists to visualize prokaryotes for the first time. The development of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is one of those innovations that changed the course of molecular science with its impact spanning countless subdisciplines in biology. The theoretical process was outlined by Keppe and coworkers in 1971; however, it was another 14 years until the complete PCR procedure was described and experimentally applied by Kary Mullis while at Cetus Corporation in 1985. Automation and refinement of this technique progressed with the introduction of a thermal stable DNA polymerase from the bacterium Thermus aquaticus, consequently the name Taq DNA polymerase. PCR is a powerful amplification technique that can generate an ample supply of a specific segment of DNA (i.e., an amplicon) from only a small amount of starting material (i.e., DNA template or target sequence). While straightforward and generally trouble-free, there are pitfalls that complicate the reaction producing spurious results. When PCR fails it can lead to many non-specific DNA products of varying sizes that appear as a ladder or smear of bands on agarose gels. Sometimes no products form at all. Another potential problem occurs when mutations are unintentionally introduced in the amplicons, resulting in a heterogeneous population of PCR products. PCR failures can become frustrating unless patience and careful troubleshooting are employed to sort out and solve the problem(s). This protocol outlines the basic principles of PCR, provides a methodology that will result in amplification of most target sequences, and presents strategies for optimizing a reaction. By following this PCR guide, students should be able to: • Set up reactions and thermal cycling

  19. qPCR (quantitative polymerase chain reaction) for the quantification of bacteriophages in stream water samples to investigate hydrological processes: a proof-of-concept study in the Huewelerbach experimental catchment (Luxembourg)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonelli, Marta; Narayanan Balasubramanian, Mukundh; Ogorzaly, Leslie; Pfister, Laurent

    2016-04-01

    Albeit recent technological developments (e.g. field deployable instruments operating at high temporal frequencies), experimental hydrology is a discipline that remains measurement limited. From this perspective, trans-disciplinary approaches may create valuable opportunities to enlarge the amount of tools available for investigating hydrological processes. Bacteriophages have been widely used in hydrology as biological tracer for investigating colloid transport and contamination of ground water systems. However, there are only a few studies focusing on the employability of bacteriophages as surface water tracers (i.e. phage transport, system functioning). Here, we present a proof-of-concept study carried out in the Huewelerbach catchment in Luxembourg in December 2015. The aim of this study was to investigate how viral particles can be used to detect hydrological connectivity between the riparian zone/river bank and the stream during rainfall events. Moreover, this study is one of the first attempts for applying the qPCR (quantitative polymerase chain reaction) technique for the quantification of bacteriophages in stream water samples to investigate hydrological processes. This technique is very sensitive and has a large dynamic range - enhancing ease and speed of phage detection. We used two different male-specific coliphages (GA phage, genogroup II and SP phage, genogroup IV). Two litres of GA phage were injected directly in the stream as a slug injection and two litres of SP phage were poured next to the river bank (alluvial deposition) close to the injection point. We also added NaCl (200 g) to both phage suspensions. We collected stream water samples 100 m and 500 m downstream (i.e. catchment outlet) of the injection point for one week. Phages were concentrated through ultracentrifugation of 100 ml of water sample followed by quantification via qPCR. Conductivity in stream water was monitored for the entire duration of the experiment. Discharge was monitored

  20. Random Mutagenesis by Error-Prone Polymerase Chain Reaction Using a Heavy Water Solvent.

    PubMed

    Minamoto, Toshifumi

    2017-01-01

    Heavy water is a form of water that contains a heavier isotope of hydrogen ((2)H, also known as deuterium, D) or oxygen ((17)O or (18)O). When using heavy water as a solvent, error-prone polymerase chain reaction (epPCR) can induce random mutations independent of the polymerase used or the composition of the PCR reaction mixture. This relatively new method can easily be combined with the existing epPCR methods to increase the rate of mutations.

  1. Integrated polymerase chain reaction chips utilizing digital microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yi-Hsien; Lee, Gwo-Bin; Huang, Fu-Chun; Chen, Yi-Yu; Lin, Jr-Lung

    2006-09-01

    This study reports an integrated microfluidic chip for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) applications utilizing digital microfluidic chip (DMC) technology. Several crucial procedures including sample transportation, mixing, and DNA amplification were performed on the integrated chip using electro-wetting-on-dielectric (EWOD) effect. An innovative concept of hydrophobic/hydrophilic structure has been successfully demonstrated to integrate the DMC chip with the on-chip PCR device. Sample droplets were generated, transported and mixed by the EWOD-actuation. Then the mixture droplets were transported to a PCR chamber by utilizing the hydrophilic/hydrophobic interface to generate required surface tension gradient. A micro temperature sensor and two micro heaters inside the PCR chamber along with a controller were used to form a micro temperature control module, which could perform precise PCR thermal cycling for DNA amplification. In order to demonstrate the performance of the integrated DMC/PCR chips, a detection gene for Dengue II virus was successfully amplified and detected. The new integrated DMC/PCR chips only required an operation voltage of 12V(RMS) at a frequency of 3 KHz for digital microfluidic actuation and 9V(DC) for thermal cycling. When compared to its large-scale counterparts for DNA amplification, the developed system consumed less sample and reagent and could reduce the detection time. The developed chips successfully demonstrated the feasibility of Lab-On-a-Chip (LOC) by utilizing EWOD-based digital microfluidics.

  2. Diagnosis of Jamestown Canyon encephalitis by polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Huang, C; Campbell, W; Grady, L; Kirouac, I; LaForce, F M

    1999-06-01

    In recent years, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) has been under study as a potential technique to improve the accuracy of diagnosis of suspected central nervous system viral infections. We describe a case of severe encephalitis in a previously healthy 20-year-old woman from New York who presented with headache, fever, and photophobia. Her illness was characterized by progressive worsening of her neurological status, leading to confusion, delirium, and status epilepticus. The diagnosis of Jamestown Canyon encephalitis was established by positive reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR and nucleic acid sequencing of the band from both cerebrospinal fluid and brain tissue. The nucleotide sequence and the deduced amino acid sequence of the Jamestown Canyon virus from this patient were very similar to Jamestown Canyon virus isolates from mosquito pools in New York. This report suggests that RT-PCR assays could be important tools in the diagnostic workup of cases of encephalitis.

  3. Circulating polymerase chain reaction chips utilizing multiple-membrane activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chih-Hao; Chen, Yi-Yu; Liao, Chia-Sheng; Hsieh, Tsung-Min; Luo, Ching-Hsing; Wu, Jiunn-Jong; Lee, Huei-Huang; Lee, Gwo-Bin

    2007-02-01

    This paper reports a new micromachined, circulating, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) chip for nucleic acid amplification. The PCR chip is comprised of a microthermal control module and a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-based microfluidic control module. The microthermal control modules are formed with three individual heating and temperature-sensing sections, each modulating a specific set temperature for denaturation, annealing and extension processes, respectively. Micro-pneumatic valves and multiple-membrane activations are used to form the microfluidic control module to transport sample fluids through three reaction regions. Compared with other PCR chips, the new chip is more compact in size, requires less time for heating and cooling processes, and has the capability to randomly adjust time ratios and cycle numbers depending on the PCR process. Experimental results showed that detection genes for two pathogens, Streptococcus pyogenes (S. pyogenes, 777 bps) and Streptococcus pneumoniae (S. pneumoniae, 273 bps), can be successfully amplified using the new circulating PCR chip. The minimum number of thermal cycles to amplify the DNA-based S. pyogenes for slab gel electrophoresis is 20 cycles with an initial concentration of 42.5 pg µl-1. Experimental data also revealed that a high reproducibility up to 98% could be achieved if the initial template concentration of the S. pyogenes was higher than 4 pg µl-1. The preliminary results of the current paper were presented at the 19th IEEE International Conference on Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (IEEE MEMS 2006), Istanbul, Turkey, 22-26 January, 2006.

  4. Toxoplasma polymerase chain reaction on experimental blood samples.

    PubMed

    Joss, A W; Chatterton, J M; Evans, R; Ho-Yen, D O

    1993-01-01

    A two-stage polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay employing oligonucleotide primers from the B1 gene of Toxoplasma gondii was developed and assessed for sensitivity and specificity. It was able to detect T. gondii DNA from as little as one parasite/sample in mock-infected rat or mouse leucocyte preparations. Parasitaemia was also identified in animals at five stages between 16 and 66 h after infection with the virulent RH strain, and at 12 stages between 2 and 38 days after infection with the cyst-forming Beverley strain. In the latter case, PCR was more sensitive than animal culture. No cross-reactions were observed in samples containing various opportunist pathogens which may also be found in the blood of immunocompromised patients.

  5. A circular ferrofluid driven microchip for rapid polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Sun, Y; Kwok, Y C; Nguyen, N T

    2007-08-01

    In the past few years, much attention has been paid to the development of miniaturized polymerase chain reaction (PCR) devices. After a continuous flow (CF) PCR chip was introduced, several CFPCR systems employing various pumping mechanisms were reported. However, the use of pumps increases cost and imposes a high requirement on microchip bonding integrity due to the application of high pressure. Other significant limitations of CFPCR devices include the large footprint of the microchip and the fixed cycle number which is dictated by the channel layout. In this paper, we present a novel circular close-loop ferrofluid driven microchip for rapid PCR. A small ferrofluid plug, containing sub-domain magnetic particles in a liquid carrier, is driven by an external magnet along the circular microchannel, which in turn propels the PCR mixture through three temperature zones. Amplification of a 500 bp lambda DNA fragment has been demonstrated on the polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) PCR microchip fabricated by CO(2) laser ablation and bonded by a low pressure, high temperature technique. Successful PCR was achieved in less than 4 min. Effects of cycle number and cycle time on PCR products were investigated. Using a magnet as the actuator eliminates the need for expensive pumps and provides advantages of low cost, small power consumption, low requirement on bonding strength and flexible number of PCR cycles. Furthermore, the microchip has a much simpler design and smaller footprint compared to the rectangular serpentine CFPCR devices. To demonstrate its application in forensics, a 16-loci short tandem repeat (STR) sample was successfully amplified using the PCR microchip.

  6. Polymerase Chain Reaction Assay and Bacterial Meningitis Surveillance in Remote Areas, Niger

    PubMed Central

    Sidikou, Fati; Djibo, Saacou; Taha, Muhamed Kheir; Alonso, Jean Michel; Djibo, Ali; Kairo, Kiari Kaka; Chanteau, Suzanne

    2003-01-01

    To compensate for the lack of laboratories in remote areas, the national reference laboratory for meningitis in Niger used polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to enhance the surveillance of meningitis caused by Neisseria meningitidis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Haemophilus influenzae. PCR effectively documented the wide geographic spread of N. meningitidis serogroup W135. PMID:14718100

  7. Single Multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction To Detect Diverse Loci Associated with Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    López-Saucedo, Catalina; Cerna, Jorge F.; Villegas-Sepulveda, Nicolas; Thompson, Rocío; Velazquez, F. Raul; Torres, Javier; Tarr, Phillip I.

    2003-01-01

    We developed and tested a single multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) that detects enterotoxigenic, enteropathogenic, enteroinvasive, and Shiga-toxin–producing Escherichia coli. This PCR is specific, sensitive, and rapid in detecting target isolates in stool and food. Because of its simplicity, economy, and efficiency, this protocol warrants further evaluation in large, prospective studies of polymicrobial substances. PMID:12533296

  8. Detection of Aspergillus fumigatus by polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Spreadbury, C; Holden, D; Aufauvre-Brown, A; Bainbridge, B; Cohen, J

    1993-01-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is an opportunistic nosocomial pathogen causing an often fatal pneumonia, invasive aspergillosis (IA), in immunosuppressed patients. Oligonucleotide primers were used to amplify a 401-bp fragment spanning the 26S/intergenic spacer region of the rDNA complex of A. fumigatus by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The primers were highly sensitive and specific: as little as 1 pg of A. fumigatus genomic DNA could be detected, and the primers only amplified DNA from A. fumigatus and not any other fungal, bacterial, viral, or human DNA tested. Using the PCR, we were able to detect A. fumigatus DNA in lung homogenates from immunosuppressed mice experimentally infected with A. fumigatus but not from immunosuppressed uninfected controls. There was 93% correlation between the culture results and the PCR results. In a retrospective clinical study, the sensitivity of the PCR for the detection of A. fumigatus in clinical samples was confirmed by positive amplification in three of three culture-positive respiratory samples from confirmed cases of IA. Because isolation of Aspergillus spp. may reflect contamination and colonization without infection, the feasibility of using the PCR was evaluated by analyzing culture-negative samples from both immunosuppressed patients at high risk for IA and immunocompetent patients with other lung infections. Only 2 of 10 patients were culture negative and PCR positive in the high-risk group, and 2 of 7 patients were culture negative and PCR positive in the immunocompetent group. The results indicate that PCR detection might be a valuable adjunct to current laboratory methods to diagnose IA. Images PMID:8458955

  9. MEANS FOR PRODUCING PLUTONIUM CHAIN REACTIONS

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.; Weinberg, A.M.

    1961-01-24

    A neutronic reactor is described with an active portion capable of operating at an energy level of 0.5 to 1000 ev comprising discrete bodies of Pu/ sup 239/ disposed in a body of water which contains not more than 5 molecules of water to one atom of plutonium, the total amount of Pu/sup 239/ being sufficient to sustain a chain reaction. (auth)

  10. Nucleic acid amplification: Alternative methods of polymerase chain reaction

    PubMed Central

    Fakruddin, Md; Mannan, Khanjada Shahnewaj Bin; Chowdhury, Abhijit; Mazumdar, Reaz Mohammad; Hossain, Md. Nur; Islam, Sumaiya; Chowdhury, Md. Alimuddin

    2013-01-01

    Nucleic acid amplification is a valuable molecular tool not only in basic research but also in application oriented fields, such as clinical medicine development, infectious diseases diagnosis, gene cloning and industrial quality control. A comperehensive review of the literature on the principles, applications, challenges and prospects of different alternative methods of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was performed. PCR was the first nucleic acid amplification method. With the advancement of research, a no of alternative nucleic acid amplification methods has been developed such as loop mediated isothermal amplification, nucleic acid sequence based amplification, strand displacement amplification, multiple displacement amplification. Most of the alternative methods are isothermal obviating the need for thermal cyclers. Though principles of most of the alternate methods are relatively complex than that of PCR, they offer better applicability and sensitivity in cases where PCR has limitations. Most of the alternate methods still have to prove themselves through extensive validation studies and are not available in commercial form; they pose the potentiality to be used as replacements of PCR. Continuous research is going on in different parts of the world to make these methods viable technically and economically. PMID:24302831

  11. Nucleic acid amplification: Alternative methods of polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Fakruddin, Md; Mannan, Khanjada Shahnewaj Bin; Chowdhury, Abhijit; Mazumdar, Reaz Mohammad; Hossain, Md Nur; Islam, Sumaiya; Chowdhury, Md Alimuddin

    2013-10-01

    Nucleic acid amplification is a valuable molecular tool not only in basic research but also in application oriented fields, such as clinical medicine development, infectious diseases diagnosis, gene cloning and industrial quality control. A comperehensive review of the literature on the principles, applications, challenges and prospects of different alternative methods of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was performed. PCR was the first nucleic acid amplification method. With the advancement of research, a no of alternative nucleic acid amplification methods has been developed such as loop mediated isothermal amplification, nucleic acid sequence based amplification, strand displacement amplification, multiple displacement amplification. Most of the alternative methods are isothermal obviating the need for thermal cyclers. Though principles of most of the alternate methods are relatively complex than that of PCR, they offer better applicability and sensitivity in cases where PCR has limitations. Most of the alternate methods still have to prove themselves through extensive validation studies and are not available in commercial form; they pose the potentiality to be used as replacements of PCR. Continuous research is going on in different parts of the world to make these methods viable technically and economically.

  12. Diagnosis of duck plague in waterfowl by polymerase chain reaction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hansen, W.R.; Nashold, S.W.; Docherty, D.E.; Brown, S.E.; Knudson, D.L.

    2000-01-01

    A recently developed polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was used for diagnosis of duck plague in waterfowl tissues from past and current cases of waterfowl mortality and to identify duck plague virus in combined cloacal/oral-pharyngeal swab samples from healthy mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) after a disease outbreak. The PCR was able to detect viral DNA from all the individual or pooled tissues assayed from 10 waterfowl, including liver and spleen samples from three Muscovy ducks (Cairina moschata domesticus) that did not yield virus isolates. The strong staining intensity of the PCR products from the waterfowl tissues indicated that large amounts of virus were present, even when virus was not isolated. Duck plague DNA was also detected in a cloacal swab sample from a wood duck (Aix sponsa) carcass submitted for diagnosis. The PCR assay identified duck plague DNA in 13 swab samples that produced virus isolates from carrier mallards sampled in 1981 after a duck plague die-off. The duck plague PCR clearly demonstrated the ability to quickly diagnose duck plague in suspect mortality cases and to detect virus shed by carrier waterfowl.

  13. Studying the effect of graphene-ZnO nanocomposites on polymerase chain reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Vinay; Rajaura, Rajveer; Sharma, Preetam Kumar; Srivastava, Rishabh Ronin; Sharma, Shyam Sundar; Agrawal, Kailash

    2016-05-01

    An emerging area of research is improving the efficiency of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) by using nanoparticles. With graphene nano-flakes showing promising results, in this paper we report the effect of Graphene-ZnO nanocomposites on Polymerase Chain reaction (PCR) efficiency. G-ZnO nanocomposites were efficiently synthesized via in situ chemical method. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) image confirms the formation of nanocomposites. ZnO nanoparticles of size range ~20-30 nm are uniformly attached on the graphene sheets. No amplification during PCR indicates inhibitory activity of G-ZnO nanocomposites which points the fingers at ZnO moiety of the G-ZnO composite for no amplification during our PCR reaction. Further work should concentrate on finding out the main inhibitory mechanism involved in inhibition of PCR using G-ZnO composites.

  14. Separation-Type Multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction Chip for Detecting Male Infertility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Seung-Mo; Ju, Jin-Kyoung; Ahn, Yoomin; Hwang, Seung Young

    2008-06-01

    A novel polymerase chain reaction (PCR) biochip is presented in this paper. In this PCR chip, the glass substrate integrated with the microheater and microsensor is separable from the reaction chamber where the sample is injected, which now makes repeated reuse of the glass substrate possible. The heat transfer efficiency and target gene amplification of the proposed separable PCR chip was compared with that of the conventional united PCR chip. The results showed that the sex-determining Y chromosome (SRY) gene PCR for detecting male infertility was successfully performed in the separable chip. However, repeated multiplex PCR was successful for only two genes, SPGY1 and SRY, but not for gene SY586. Future work is needed for a multiplex PCR with more than three genes.

  15. Detection of Murine Typhus Infection in Fleas by Using the Polymerase Chain Reaction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-03-01

    spotted fever ( Rickettsia group-specific primers and probes for the diagnosis of rick- rickettsii ), epidemic typhus ( Rickettsia prowazekii), murine...Polymerase chain reaction, Xenops.yl~j.Lopsis;" Rickettsia typhi,- Enz me-linked immunosorbent assay ’ A amplificatin6 fProu)t 19. ABSTRACT (Continue on...olymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of CDNA was used to detect the etiologic agent of murine typhus, Rickettsia typhi, in experimentally infected

  16. Fluorescence-based temperature control for polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Sanford, Lindsay N; Wittwer, Carl T

    2014-03-01

    The ability to accurately monitor solution temperature is important for the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Robust amplification during PCR is contingent on the solution reaching denaturation and annealing temperatures. By correlating temperature to the fluorescence of a passive dye, noninvasive monitoring of solution temperatures is possible. The temperature sensitivity of 22 fluorescent dyes was assessed. Emission spectra were monitored and the change in fluorescence between 45 and 95°C was quantified. Seven dyes decreased in intensity as the temperature increased, and 15 were variable depending on the excitation wavelength. Sulforhodamine B (monosodium salt) exhibited a fold change in fluorescence of 2.85. Faster PCR minimizes cycling times and improves turnaround time, throughput, and specificity. If temperature measurements are accurate, no holding period is required even at rapid speeds. A custom instrument using fluorescence-based temperature monitoring with dynamic feedback control for temperature cycling amplified a fragment surrounding rs917118 from genomic DNA in 3min and 45s using 35 cycles, allowing subsequent genotyping by high-resolution melting analysis. Gold-standard thermocouple readings and fluorescence-based temperature differences were 0.29±0.17 and 0.96±0.26°C at annealing and denaturation, respectively. This new method for temperature cycling may allow faster speeds for PCR than currently considered possible.

  17. Role of multiplex polymerase chain reaction in diagnosing tubercular meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Berwal, Anupam; Chawla, Kiran; Vishwanath, Shashidhar; Shenoy, Vishnu Prasad

    2017-01-01

    Tuberculous meningitis (TBM) is one of the most serious manifestations of extrapulmonary tuberculosis. Timely and accurate diagnosis provides a favorable prognosis in patients with TBM. The study evaluated the use of multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in the diagnosis of TBM. A study was conducted on 74 patients clinically suspected with TBM. The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) specimens were processed for smear microscopy, middle brook 7H9 culture, and multiplex PCR using primers directed against IS6110 gene and 38 kD protein for detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The results were analyzed to assess the role of multiplex PCR in the diagnosis of TBM. A total of 26 (35.1%) patients were diagnosed with TBM. Microscopy was negative in all while culture was positive in two cases only. Comparing with clinical diagnosis and CSF adenosine deaminase levels of ≥10 U/L, multiplex PCR showed sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of 71.4%, 89.6%, 83.3%, and 81.2%, respectively, in the diagnosis of TBM. PMID:28367034

  18. Comparison of Nested Polymerase Chain Reaction and Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction with Parasitological Methods for Detection of Strongyloides stercoralis in Human Fecal Samples

    PubMed Central

    Sharifdini, Meysam; Mirhendi, Hossein; Ashrafi, Keyhan; Hosseini, Mostafa; Mohebali, Mehdi; Khodadadi, Hossein; Kia, Eshrat Beigom

    2015-01-01

    This study was performed to evaluate nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and real-time PCR methods for detection of Strongyloides stercoralis in fecal samples compared with parasitological methods. A total of 466 stool samples were examined by conventional parasitological methods (formalin ether concentration [FEC] and agar plate culture [APC]). DNA was extracted using an in-house method, and mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 and 18S ribosomal genes were amplified by nested PCR and real-time PCR, respectively. Among 466 samples, 12.7% and 18.2% were found infected with S. stercoralis by FEC and APC, respectively. DNA of S. stercoralis was detected in 18.9% and 25.1% of samples by real-time PCR and nested PCR, respectively. Considering parasitological methods as the diagnostic gold standard, the sensitivity and specificity of nested PCR were 100% and 91.6%, respectively, and that of real-time PCR were 84.7% and 95.8%, respectively. However, considering sequence analyzes of the selected nested PCR products, the specificity of nested PCR is increased. In general, molecular methods were superior to parasitological methods. They were more sensitive and more reliable in detection of S. stercoralis in comparison with parasitological methods. Between the two molecular methods, the sensitivity of nested PCR was higher than real-time PCR. PMID:26350449

  19. Comparison of Nested Polymerase Chain Reaction and Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction with Parasitological Methods for Detection of Strongyloides stercoralis in Human Fecal Samples.

    PubMed

    Sharifdini, Meysam; Mirhendi, Hossein; Ashrafi, Keyhan; Hosseini, Mostafa; Mohebali, Mehdi; Khodadadi, Hossein; Kia, Eshrat Beigom

    2015-12-01

    This study was performed to evaluate nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and real-time PCR methods for detection of Strongyloides stercoralis in fecal samples compared with parasitological methods. A total of 466 stool samples were examined by conventional parasitological methods (formalin ether concentration [FEC] and agar plate culture [APC]). DNA was extracted using an in-house method, and mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 and 18S ribosomal genes were amplified by nested PCR and real-time PCR, respectively. Among 466 samples, 12.7% and 18.2% were found infected with S. stercoralis by FEC and APC, respectively. DNA of S. stercoralis was detected in 18.9% and 25.1% of samples by real-time PCR and nested PCR, respectively. Considering parasitological methods as the diagnostic gold standard, the sensitivity and specificity of nested PCR were 100% and 91.6%, respectively, and that of real-time PCR were 84.7% and 95.8%, respectively. However, considering sequence analyzes of the selected nested PCR products, the specificity of nested PCR is increased. In general, molecular methods were superior to parasitological methods. They were more sensitive and more reliable in detection of S. stercoralis in comparison with parasitological methods. Between the two molecular methods, the sensitivity of nested PCR was higher than real-time PCR.

  20. Polymerase chain reaction assay for avian polyomavirus.

    PubMed

    Phalen, D N; Wilson, V G; Graham, D L

    1991-05-01

    A polymerase chain reaction assay was developed for detection of budgerigar fledgling disease virus (BFDV). The assay used a single set of primers complementary to sequences located in the putative coding region for the BFDV VP1 gene. The observed amplification product had the expected size of 550 bp and was confirmed to derive from BFDV DNA by its restriction digestion pattern. This assay was specific for BFDV and highly sensitive, being able to detect as few as 20 copies of the virus. By using the polymerase chain reaction, BFDV was detected in adult, nestling, and embryo budgerigar (Melopsitticus undulatus) tissue DNAs and in sera from adult and nestling budgerigars. These results suggest the possibility of persistent infections in adult birds and lend further support to previously described evidence of possible in ovo transmission. BFDV was also detected in chicken embryo fibroblast cell cultures and chicken eggs inoculated with the virus. A 550-bp product with identical restriction enzyme sites was amplified from a suspected polyomavirus isolated from a peach-faced lovebird (Agapornis pesonata) and from tissue DNA from a Hahn's macaw (Ara nobilis) and a sun conure (Aratinga solstitialis) with histological lesions suggestive of polyomavirus infection. These fragments also hybridized with a BFDV-derived probe, proving that they were derived from a polyomavirus very similar, if not identical, to BFDV.

  1. Polymerase chain reaction assay for avian polyomavirus.

    PubMed Central

    Phalen, D N; Wilson, V G; Graham, D L

    1991-01-01

    A polymerase chain reaction assay was developed for detection of budgerigar fledgling disease virus (BFDV). The assay used a single set of primers complementary to sequences located in the putative coding region for the BFDV VP1 gene. The observed amplification product had the expected size of 550 bp and was confirmed to derive from BFDV DNA by its restriction digestion pattern. This assay was specific for BFDV and highly sensitive, being able to detect as few as 20 copies of the virus. By using the polymerase chain reaction, BFDV was detected in adult, nestling, and embryo budgerigar (Melopsitticus undulatus) tissue DNAs and in sera from adult and nestling budgerigars. These results suggest the possibility of persistent infections in adult birds and lend further support to previously described evidence of possible in ovo transmission. BFDV was also detected in chicken embryo fibroblast cell cultures and chicken eggs inoculated with the virus. A 550-bp product with identical restriction enzyme sites was amplified from a suspected polyomavirus isolated from a peach-faced lovebird (Agapornis pesonata) and from tissue DNA from a Hahn's macaw (Ara nobilis) and a sun conure (Aratinga solstitialis) with histological lesions suggestive of polyomavirus infection. These fragments also hybridized with a BFDV-derived probe, proving that they were derived from a polyomavirus very similar, if not identical, to BFDV. Images PMID:1647403

  2. Quantitative detection of Cryptosporidium oocyst in water source based on 18S rRNA by alternately binding probe competitive reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (ABC-RT-PCR).

    PubMed

    Kishida, Naohiro; Miyata, Ryo; Furuta, Atsushi; Izumiyama, Shinji; Tsuneda, Satoshi; Sekiguchi, Yuji; Noda, Naohiro; Akiba, Michihiro

    2012-01-01

    We describe an assay for simple and cost-effective quantification of Cryptosporidium oocysts in water samples using a recently developed quantification method named alternately binding probe competitive PCR (ABC-PCR). The assay is based on the detection of 18S rRNA specific for Cryptosporidium oocysts. The standard curve of the ABC-PCR assay had a good fitting to a rectangular hyperbola with a correlation coefficient (R) of 0.9997. Concentrations of Cryptosporidium oocysts in real river water samples were successfully quantified by the ABC-reverse transcription (RT)-PCR assay. The quantified values by the ABC-RT-PCR assay very closely resemble those by the real-time RT-PCR assay. In addition, the quantified concentration in most water samples by the ABC-RT-PCR assay was comparable to that by conventional microscopic observation. Thus, Cryptosporidium oocysts in water samples can be accurately and specifically determined by the ABC-RT-PCR assay. As the only equipment that is needed for this end-point fluorescence assay is a simple fluorometer and a relatively inexpensive thermal cycler, this method can markedly reduce time and cost to quantify Cryptosporidium oocysts and other health-related water microorganisms.

  3. Fluorochrome-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles for high-sensitivity monitoring of the polymerase chain reaction by magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Alcantara, David; Guo, Yanyan; Yuan, Hushan; Goergen, Craig J; Chen, Howard H; Cho, Hoonsung; Sosnovik, David E; Josephson, Lee

    2012-07-09

    Easy to find: magnetic nanoparticles bearing fluorochromes (red) that intercalate with DNA (green) form microaggregates with DNA generated by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). These aggregates can be detected at low cycle numbers by magnetic resonance (MR).

  4. Rapid detection of waterborne viruses using the polymerase chain reaction and a gene probe.

    PubMed

    Jothikumar, N; Khanna, P; Kamatchiammal, S; Murugan, R P

    1992-01-01

    We describe a membrane-filter-based urea-arginine phosphate buffer method for concentrating waterborne viruses from large volumes of water to microlitre volumes, and their subsequent detection by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The detection step involves the extraction of RNA, synthesis of complementary DNA, amplification by PCR of target DNA with specific primers, and confirmation through nucleic acid hybridization with a radiolabelled oligonucleotide probe. The PCR technique detected the presence of enteroviruses in spiked as well as in contaminated water samples. The technique is sensitive and detects as few as 120 waterborne viral particles. PCR is simple, rapid, sensitive, specific and adaptable for water quality surveillance in less developed countries.

  5. Multifunctional polyurethane sponge for polymerase chain reaction enhancement.

    PubMed

    Seok, Seunghwan; Shin, Sujeong; Lee, Tae Jae; Jeong, Jae-Min; Yang, MinHo; Kim, Do Hyun; Park, Jung Youn; Lee, Seok Jae; Choi, Bong Gill; Lee, Kyoung G

    2015-03-04

    Selective filtering of target biomaterials from impurities is an important task in DNA amplification through polymerase chain reaction (PCR) enhancement and gene identification to save endangered animals and marine species. Conventional gene extraction methods require complicated steps, skilled persons, and expensive chemicals and instruments to improve DNA amplification. Herein, we proposed an alternative method for overcoming such challenges by imparting secondary functionality using commercially available polyurethane (PU) sponges and cost-effective fabrication approaches through polydopamine and polysiloxane coatings. The porous, highly flexible, and chemically modified superhydrophilic and superhydrophobic PU sponges allow large surface areas and mechanically stable frames for effective extraction of genomic DNA through selective filtering of fish tissues and oils. Furthermore, these chemically modified PU sponges allow separation of genes and improvement of PCR for DNA amplification for the identification of fish species. The combination of a simple fabrication method and functionalized PU sponges could be a useful platform for PCR enhancement and gene-based identification of species for practical applications.

  6. Detection of Penicillium expansum by polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Marek, Patrick; Annamalai, Thirunavukkarasu; Venkitanarayanan, Kumar

    2003-12-31

    Penicillium expansum is a major causative agent of postharvest decay in a variety of fruits, including apples, peaches, nectarines, and cherries. It causes significant economic losses to the fruit industry and is also of potential public health significance, since it produces patulin, a mycotoxin known to cause harmful effects in animals. Rapid and specific detection of P. expansum is important for ensuring microbiological quality and safety of fruits and fruit juices. The traditional methods for identification of P. expansum are time-consuming and labor-intensive. In this study, we report a polymerase chain reaction utilizing primers based on the polygalacturonase gene of P. expansum. The PCR amplified a 404-bp DNA product from all the P. expansum isolates tested, but not in other common foodborne Penicillium species and Escherichia coli. Experiments to determine the sensitivity of the PCR indicated that it can detect the DNA equivalent from as low as 25 spores of P. expansum. The PCR could potentially be used as a rapid tool for screening fruits for the presence of P. expansum.

  7. Identification of Erwinia stewartii by a ligase chain reaction assay.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, W J; Wiedmann, M; Dillard, H R; Batt, C A

    1994-01-01

    A PCR-coupled ligase chain reaction (LCR) assay was developed to distinguish the plant pathogenic bacterium Erwinia stewartii from other erwiniae. This new technique allows discrimination to the species level on the basis of a single-base-pair difference in the 16S rRNA gene which is unique to E. stewartii. Portions of the 16S rRNA genes of E. stewartii and the closely related Erwinia herbicola were sequenced. From comparison of the two 16S rRNA gene regions, two primer pairs were constructed such that only E. stewartii DNA gave a product in the LCR assay. The ligated product was separated from the radioactively labelled primers by denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and visualized by autoradiography. Twenty-four different Erwinia species and strains were tested by PCR-coupled LCR to verify the specificity of the assay, and only E. stewartii strains gave a positive reaction. In addition, infected and healthy plant material was also assayed. E. stewartii was detected in infected plant material, even when large populations of epiphytic bacteria were present. No enrichment was necessary for detection of the pathogen in corn leaves. This assay has potential as a diagnostic technique for the detection of E. stewartii in infected plant and vector material. Images PMID:7509585

  8. Polymerase chain reaction-based assays for the diagnosis of human brucellosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Wang, Zhanli; Zhang, Yaxian; Bai, Liyun; Zhao, Yue; Liu, Chunfang; Ma, An; Yu, Hui

    2014-08-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is an in vitro technique for the nucleic acid amplification, which is commonly used to diagnose infectious diseases. The use of PCR for pathogens detection, genotyping and quantification has some advantages, such as high sensitivity, high specificity, reproducibility and technical ease. Brucellosis is a common zoonosis caused by Brucella spp., which still remains as a major health problem in many developing countries around the world. The direct culture and immunohistochemistry can be used for detecting infection with Brucella spp. However, PCR has the potential to address limitations of these methods. PCR are now one of the most useful assays for the diagnosis in human brucellosis. The aim of this review was to summarize the main PCR techniques and their applications for diagnosis and follow-up of patients with brucellosis. Moreover, advantages or limitation of the different PCR methods as well as the evaluation of PCR results for treatment and follow-up of human brucellosis were also discussed.

  9. Principles and applications of polymerase chain reaction in medical diagnostic fields: a review

    PubMed Central

    Valones, Marcela Agne Alves; Guimarães, Rafael Lima; Brandão, Lucas André Cavalcanti; de Souza, Paulo Roberto Eleutério; de Albuquerque Tavares Carvalho, Alessandra; Crovela, Sergio

    2009-01-01

    Recent developments in molecular methods have revolutionized the detection and characterization of microorganisms in a broad range of medical diagnostic fields, including virology, mycology, parasitology, microbiology and dentistry. Among these methods, Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) has generated great benefits and allowed scientific advancements. PCR is an excellent technique for the rapid detection of pathogens, including those difficult to culture. Along with conventional PCR techniques, Real-Time PCR has emerged as a technological innovation and is playing an ever-increasing role in clinical diagnostics and research laboratories. Due to its capacity to generate both qualitative and quantitative results, Real-Time PCR is considered a fast and accurate platform. The aim of the present literature review is to explore the clinical usefulness and potential of both conventional PCR and Real-Time PCR assays in diverse medical fields, addressing its main uses and advances. PMID:24031310

  10. Enhanced Specificity of Multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction via CdTe Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Gaofeng; Ma, Chao; Zhu, Yanliang; Li, Shuchun; Shao, Youhua; Wang, Yong; Xiao, Zhongdang

    2011-12-01

    Nanoparticles were recently reported to be able to improve both efficiency and specificity in polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Here, CdTe QDs were introduced into multi-PCR systems. It was found that an appropriate concentration of CdTe QDs could enhance the performance of multi-PCR by reducing the formation of nonspecific products in the complex system, but an excessive amount of CdTe QDs could suppress the PCR. The effects of QDs on PCR can be reversed by increasing the polymerase concentration or by adding bovine serum albumin (BSA). The mechanisms underlying these effects were also discussed. The results indicated that CdTe QDs could be used to optimize the amplification products of the PCR, especially in the multi-PCR system with different primers annealing temperatures, which is of great significance for molecular diagnosis.

  11. Universal CG cloning of polymerase chain reaction products.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Julian; Brown, Andrew J

    2015-02-15

    Single-insert cloning of DNA fragments without restriction enzymes has traditionally been achieved using TA cloning, with annealing of a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) fragment containing a single overhanging 3' A to a plasmid vector containing a 3' T. In this article, we show that the analogous "CG cloning" is faster and far more efficient, using AhdI to generate a C-vector. For an afternoon ligation, CG cloning achieved double the cloning efficiency and more than 4-fold the number of transformants compared with TA cloning. However, blunt-end ligation was markedly more efficient than both. CG cloning could prove to be extremely useful for single-copy high-throughput cloning.

  12. Identification of bacterial plant pathogens using multilocus polymerase chain reaction/electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Postinikova, E; Baldwin, C; Whitehouse, C A; Sechler, A; Schaad, N W; Sampath, R; Harpin, V; Li, F; Melton, R; Blyn, L; Drader, J; Hofstadler, S; Schneider, W L

    2008-11-01

    Polymerase chain reaction/electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (PCR/ESI-MS, previously known as "TIGER") utilizes PCR with broad-range primers to amplify products from a wide array of organisms within a taxonomic group, followed by analysis of PCR amplicons using mass spectrometry. Computer analysis of precise masses allows for calculations of base compositions for the broad-range PCR products, which can then be compared to a database for identification. PCR/ESI-MS has the benefits of PCR in sensitivity and high-throughput capacity, but also has the distinct advantage of being able to detect and identify organisms with no prior characterization or sequence data. Existing broad range PCR primers, designed with an emphasis on human pathogens, were tested for their ability to amplify DNA of well characterized phytobacterial strains, as well as to populate the existing PCR/ESI-MS bacterial database with base counts. In a blinded panel study, PCR/ESI-MS successfully identified 93% of unknown bacterial DNAs to the genus level and 73% to the species/subspecies level. Additionally, PCR/ESI-MS was capable of detecting and identifying multiple bacteria within the same sample. The sensitivity of PCR/ESI-MS was consistent with other PCR based assays, and the specificity varied depending on the bacterial species. Preliminary tests with real life samples demonstrate a high potential for using PCR/ESI-MS systems for agricultural diagnostic applications.

  13. The use of real-time polymerase chain reaction with high resolution melting (real-time PCR-HRM) analysis for the detection and discrimination of nematodes Bursaphelenchus xylophilus and Bursaphelenchus mucronatus.

    PubMed

    Filipiak, Anna; Hasiów-Jaroszewska, Beata

    2016-04-01

    The real-time PCR-HRM analysis was developed for the detection and discrimination of the quarantine nematode Bursaphelenchus xylophilus and Bursaphelenchus mucronatus. A set of primers was designed to target the ITS region of rDNA. The results have demonstrated that this analysis is a valuable tool for differentiation of these both species.

  14. INTERNAL AMPLIFICATION CONTROL FOR USE IN QUANTITATIVE POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION FECAL INDICATOR BACTERIA ASSAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR) can be used as a rapid method for detecting fecal indicator bacteria. Because false negative results can be caused by PCR inhibitors that co-extract with the DNA samples, an internal amplification control (IAC) should be run with eac...

  15. Use of enrichment real time-Polymerase Chain Reaction to enumerate Salmonella on chicken parts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella that survive cooking and that cross-contaminate other food during meal preparation and serving represent primary routes of consumer exposure to this pathogen from chicken. Consequently, the present study was undertaken to use enrichment real time-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) to enu...

  16. Extended kinetic model of real-time polymerase chain reaction process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorov, A. A.; Sochivko, D. G.; Varlamov, D. A.; Kurochkin, V. E.

    2016-11-01

    Real-time polymerase chain reaction (real-time PCR) is the main molecular genetic method used for qualitative and quantitative analysis of specific nucleic acid sequences in many areas of biomedical research. Theoretical study of pCr models allows to estimate the influence of various reaction components and parameters, and to determine the unknown parameter values by approximating the experimental real-time PCR curves. An extended kinetic model of real-time PCR is presented. The model takes into account the enzyme activity based on Michaelis-Menten kinetics, the hybridization of complementary DNA fragments, the presence of a fluorescent probe used for detection of the reaction products, and the temperature dependence of primers and probe hybridization.

  17. Quantitative detection of human enteric adenoviruses in river water by microfluidic digital polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Kishida, Naohiro; Noda, Naohiro; Haramoto, Eiji; Kawaharasaki, Mamoru; Akiba, Michihiro; Sekiguchi, Yuji

    2014-01-01

    We describe an assay for simple and accurate quantification of human enteric adenoviruses (EAdVs) in water samples using a recently developed quantification method named microfluidic digital polymerase chain reaction (dPCR). The assay is based on automatic distribution of reaction mixture into a large number of nanolitre-volume reaction chambers and absolute copy number quantification from the number of chambers containing amplification products on the basis of Poisson statistics. This assay allows absolute quantification of target genes without the use of standard DNA. Concentrations of EAdVs in Japanese river water samples were successfully quantified by the developed dPCR assay. The EAdVs were detected in seven of the 10 samples (1 L each), and the concentration ranged from 420 to 2,700 copies/L. The quantified values closely resemble those by most probable number (MPN)-PCR and real-time PCR when standard DNA was validated by dPCR whereas they varied substantially when the standard was not validated. Accuracy and sensitivity of the dPCR was higher than those of real-time PCR and MPN-PCR. To our knowledge, this is the first study that has successfully quantified enteric viruses in river water using dPCR. This method will contribute to better understanding of existence of viruses in water.

  18. Increased sample capacity for genotyping and expression profiling by kinetic polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Watson, Robert M; Griaznova, Olga I; Long, Christopher M; Holland, Michael J

    2004-06-01

    We fabricated and evaluated high-throughput kinetic thermal cyclers with 768-reaction capacity for kinetic polymerase chain reaction (kPCR)-based genotyping and kinetic reverse transcription (kRT)-PCR-based transcript quantitation. The system uses dye-based detection with ethidium bromide and a single DNA polymerase-based PCR or RT-PCR assay. Allele-specific detection of the two most common hereditary hemochromotosis mutant alleles, C282Y and H63D, was reliably measured by kPCR using human DNA templates as low as 10 genome equivalents per assay. Transcript profiling was performed for 16 yeast transcripts ranging in intracellular abundance over four orders of magnitude. Standard deviations of the PCR cycle threshold values determined from multiple kRT-PCR assays in three different instruments ranged from 0.11 to 0.97 PCR cycles and were reproducible, transcript specific, and instrument independent. The effects of the sin3, gal11, and snf2 knockout mutations on expression of 385 yeast genes were evaluated by kRT-PCR and compared to published values determined by high-density oligonucleotide array and/or microarray analysis for snf2 and sin3. The 768-reaction kinetic thermalcyclers, each with a capacity for more than a half million assays per year, are well suited to genomics applications such as single nucleotide polymorphism/disease association studies and genomewide transcription profiling where high sensitivity and accuracy are required.

  19. Human papillomavirus (HPV) in high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) detected by morphology and polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-- a cytohistologic correlation of 277 cases treated by laser conization.

    PubMed

    Lie, A K; Isaksen, C V; Skarsvåg, S; Haugen, O A

    1999-04-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the cytohistologic correlation in women treated for high-grade lesions of the cervix uteri (HG CIN), to assess the distribution of HPV features and finally to test the validity of the morphological criteria of HPV infection. The smears and biopsy specimens from 277 women treated for HG CIN by laser conization were re-evaluated blindly. Tissue blocks (n = 188) and 52 archival smears were examined for HPV DNA using PCR. HPV changes were detected with equal frequency in the smears and biopsy specimens by light microscopy; 63% and 65%, respectively. The prevalence of HPV DNA in biopsies was 88% and in archival smears 85%; agreement was found in 89% of the cases. Using PCR as the gold standard, we found a sensitivity of 63% for cytology and 70% for histology; the specificity was 41% and 37%, respectively. The positive predictive value was > 80%, but the negative predictive value was < 20%. Our study confirms that HPV features are frequently associated with HG CIN and that morphology is a non-specific method of identifying HPV infection and should be followed by PCR, also allowing detection of oncogenic HPV types and latent infections.

  20. A new and improved method based on polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) for the determination of A1298C mutation in the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene.

    PubMed

    Machnik, Grzegorz; Zapala, Malgorzata; Pelc, Ewa; Gasecka-Czapla, Monika; Kaczmarczyk, Grzegorz; Okopien, Boguslaw

    2013-01-01

    Intracellular folate homeostasis and metabolism is regulated by numerous genes. Among them, 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) is of special interest because of its involvement in regulation of the homocysteine level in the body as a result of folate metabolism. Moreover, some studies demonstrated that the homocysteine plasma level in individuals may be influenced by polymorphisms present in the MTHFR gene. Two common, clinically relevant mutations have been described: MTHFR C677T and MTHFR A1298C. Although several laboratory techniques allow genotyping of both polymorphisms, PCR-RFLP analysis is simple to perform, relatively cheap, and thus one of the most utilized. In the case of A1298C, the PCR-RFLP technique that utilizes MboII endonuclease class II requires an acrylamide gel electrophoresis, since agarose gel electrophoresis is unable to resolve short deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) fragments after restriction digestion. Agarose gel electrophoresis is commonly preferred over that of acrylamide. To resolve this inconvenience, a novel PCR-RFLP, AjuI-based method to genotype A1298C alleles has been developed that can be performed on standard agarose gel.

  1. Discrepancies between Antigen and Polymerase Chain Reaction Tests for the Detection of Rotavirus and Norovirus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Soo; Kim, Jae-Seok

    2016-05-01

    We compared the results of an antigen test (ELISA) with those of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the detection of rotavirus and norovirus in stool specimens. Rotavirus and norovirus antigen-positive stool specimens were collected, and rotavirus and norovirus PCRs were performed on these specimens. Of the 325 rotavirus antigen-positive specimens, 200 were positive for both assays and 125 were PCR negative. Of 286 norovirus antigen-positive specimens, 51 were PCR negative. Comparison of the lower limit of detection showed that rotavirus PCR was 16 times more sensitive and norovirus PCR was over 4,000 times more sensitive than the ELISA. Discrepant results between ELISA and PCR were common, and the possibility of false-positive and false-negative results should be considered with rotavirus and norovirus assays.

  2. Touchdown digital polymerase chain reaction for quantification of highly conserved sequences in the HIV-1 genome.

    PubMed

    De Spiegelaere, Ward; Malatinkova, Eva; Kiselinova, Maja; Bonczkowski, Pawel; Verhofstede, Chris; Vogelaers, Dirk; Vandekerckhove, Linos

    2013-08-15

    Digital polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is an emerging absolute quantification method based on the limiting dilution principle and end-point PCR. This methodology provides high flexibility in assay design without influencing quantitative accuracy. This article describes an assay to quantify HIV DNA that targets a highly conserved region of the HIV-1 genome that hampers optimal probe design. To maintain high specificity and allow probe binding and hydrolysis of a probe with low melting temperature, a two-stage touchdown PCR was designed with a first round of amplification at high temperature and a subsequent round at low temperature to allow accumulation of fluorescence.

  3. Rapid diagnosis of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis by quantitative polymerase chain reaction using bronchial lavage fluid.

    PubMed

    Kawazu, Masahito; Kanda, Yoshinobu; Goyama, Susumu; Takeshita, Masataka; Nannya, Yasuhito; Niino, Miyuki; Komeno, Yukiko; Nakamoto, Tetsuya; Kurokawa, Mineo; Tsujino, Shiho; Ogawa, Seishi; Aoki, Katsunori; Chiba, Shigeru; Motokura, Toru; Ohishi, Nobuya; Hirai, Hisamaru

    2003-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a sensitive method for detection of Aspergillus DNA in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, but it has not yet been able to distinguish infection from contamination. We have established a technique to quantify Aspergillus DNA using a real-time PCR method to resolve this problem, and we report herein a successful application of real-time PCR to diagnose invasive pulmonary aspergillosis by comparing the amount of Aspergillus DNA in bronchial lavage fluid from an affected area to that from an unaffected area. This novel tool will provide rapid, sensitive, and specific diagnosis of pulmonary aspergillosis.

  4. Polymerase Chain Reaction in the Diagnosis of Visceral Leishmaniasis Recurrence in the Setting of Negative Splenic Smears.

    PubMed

    Hasnain, Golam; Basher, Ariful; Nath, Proggananda; Ghosh, Prakash; Hossain, Faria; Hossain, Shakhawat; Mondal, Dinesh

    2016-01-01

    This report presents two cases of visceral leishmaniasis (VL) recurrence where the microscopy of the splenic smear failed in diagnosis. However, a strong clinical suspicion compelled further evaluation by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), which validated the etiology. This short report highlights the usefulness of PCR in diagnosing cases of suspected smear-negative VL recurrence.

  5. Chain-reaction crash on a highway in high visibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagatani, Takashi

    2016-05-01

    We study the chain-reaction crash (multiple-vehicle collision) in high-visibility condition on a highway. In the traffic situation, drivers control their vehicles by both gear-changing and braking. Drivers change the gears according to the headway and brake according to taillights of the forward vehicle. We investigate whether or not the first collision induces the chain-reaction crash numerically. It is shown that dynamic transitions occur from no collisions, through a single collision, to multiple collisions with decreasing the headway. Also, we find that the dynamic transition occurs from the finite chain reaction to the infinite chain reaction when the headway is less than the critical value. We compare the multiple-vehicle collisions in high-visibility with that in low-visibility. We derive the transition points and the region maps for the chain-reaction crash in high visibility.

  6. Prompt detection of influenza A and B viruses using the BD Veritor™ System Flu A+B, Quidel® Sofia® Influenza A+B FIA, and Alere BinaxNOW® Influenza A&B compared to real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR).

    PubMed

    Dunn, Jim; Obuekwe, Joy; Baun, Traci; Rogers, Justin; Patel, Twinkle; Snow, Linda

    2014-05-01

    The performance characteristics of rapid influenza diagnostic tests vary widely. This study evaluated the BD Veritor™ System Flu A+B (Veritor; BD Diagnostics, Sparks, MD, USA), Quidel® Sofia® Influenza A+B FIA (Sofia; Quidel Corp., San Diego, CA, USA), and Alere BinaxNOW® Influenza A&B (Binax; Alere Scarborough, Inc., Scarborough, ME, USA) compared to reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for detection of influenza viruses in nasal wash specimens from 240 pediatric patients. Positive percent agreements for influenza A and B virus detection were 93.8% and 94.2%, 95.8% and 98.1%, and 79.2% and 80.8% for Veritor, Sofia, and Binax, respectively. The Veritor and Binax tests demonstrated negative percent agreements >97.9% for detection of both influenza viruses, but the negative percent agreement of the Sofia test was 91.1% for influenza A and 70.7% for influenza B virus. Overall, the Veritor and Sofia tests were nearly as sensitive as RT-PCR and considerably more sensitive than Binax for detection of influenza viruses. However, the accuracy of the Sofia test was significantly lower than either Veritor or Binax.

  7. Submicroscopic malaria parasite carriage: how reproducible are polymerase chain reaction-based methods?

    PubMed

    Costa, Daniela Camargos; Madureira, Ana Paula; Amaral, Lara Cotta; Sanchez, Bruno Antônio Marinho; Gomes, Luciano Teixeira; Fontes, Cor Jésus Fernandes; Limongi, Jean Ezequiel; Brito, Cristiana Ferreira Alves de; Carvalho, Luzia Helena

    2014-02-01

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based methods for the diagnosis of malaria infection are expected to accurately identify submicroscopic parasite carriers. Although a significant number of PCR protocols have been described, few studies have addressed the performance of PCR amplification in cases of field samples with submicroscopic malaria infection. Here, the reproducibility of two well-established PCR protocols (nested-PCR and real-time PCR for the Plasmodium 18 small subunit rRNA gene) were evaluated in a panel of 34 blood field samples from individuals that are potential reservoirs of malaria infection, but were negative for malaria by optical microscopy. Regardless of the PCR protocol, a large variation between the PCR replicates was observed, leading to alternating positive and negative results in 38% (13 out of 34) of the samples. These findings were quite different from those obtained from the microscopy-positive patients or the unexposed individuals; the diagnosis of these individuals could be confirmed based on the high reproducibility and specificity of the PCR-based protocols. The limitation of PCR amplification was restricted to the field samples with very low levels of parasitaemia because titrations of the DNA templates were able to detect < 3 parasites/µL in the blood. In conclusion, conventional PCR protocols require careful interpretation in cases of submicroscopic malaria infection, as inconsistent and false-negative results can occur.

  8. Profound inhibition of the PCR step of CF V3 multiplex PCR/OLA assay by the use of UV-irradiated plastic reaction tubes.

    PubMed

    Fox, David H; Huang, Chih-Kang; Du, Juan; Chang, Tylis Y; Pan, Qiulu

    2007-06-01

    Supplies, such as bags of plastic reaction tubes, are sometimes left in the laminar flow hoods unintentionally while the ultraviolet (UV) lamp is illuminated overnight. In addition, UV irradiation is used for sterilization and amplicon inactivation to avoid contamination. The oligonucleotide ligation assay (OLA) is a unique approach to mutation detection of point mutations, small deletions, and small insertions. Recently, we encountered problems with this assay and peak heights were much lower or disappeared. After going through systemic trouble-shooting, we found that profound inhibition of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) step of CF V3 multiplex PCR/OLA assay by the use of UV-irradiated plastic reaction tubes. When UV-irradiated tubes used throughout the assay, tubes exposed for 8 weeks at 0.7 m from the UV source gave a reduction of 60% and 67% in the assay products on the basis of sum of peak heights. Tubes exposed for 3 weeks at 0.1 m from the UV source totally eliminated assay product yielding no peaks. Further experiments showed that the inhibition happened mostly in the PCR step. Burgess and Hall had reported that inhibition of PCR of human glyceraldehydes-3-phosphate dehydrogenase transcripts after UV irradiating the tubes. This showed that the inhibition was not assay-specific. The reason that the inhibition of PCR was more profound could be due to a multiplex PCR assay and small reaction volume. The mechanism of PCR inhibition by UV irradiation is not clear. In conclusion, plastic reaction tubes intended for PCR/OLA assays should not be exposed to UV.

  9. Gene synthesis by integrated polymerase chain assembly and PCR amplification using a high-speed thermocycler

    PubMed Central

    TerMaat, Joel R.; Pienaar, Elsje; Whitney, Scott E.; Mamedov, Tarlan G.; Subramanian, Anuradha

    2013-01-01

    Polymerase chain assembly (PCA) is a technique used to synthesize genes ranging from a few hundred base pairs to many kilobase pairs in length. In traditional PCA, equimolar concentrations of single stranded DNA oligonucleotides are repeatedly hybridized and extended by a polymerase enzyme into longer dsDNA constructs, with relatively few full-length sequences being assembled. Thus, traditional PCA is followed by a second primer-mediated PCR reaction to amplify the desired full-length sequence to useful, detectable quantities. Integration of assembly and primer-mediated amplification steps into a single reaction using a high-speed thermocycler is shown to produce similar results. For the integrated technique, the effects of oligo concentration, primer concentration, and number of oligonucleotides are explored. The technique is successfully demonstrated for the synthesis of two genes encoding EPCR-1 (653 bp) and pUC19 β-lactamase (929 bp) in under 20 min. However, rapid integrated PCA–PCR was found to be problematic when attempted with the TM-1 gene (1509 bp). Partial oligonucleotide sets of TM-1 could be assembled and amplified simultaneously, indicating that the technique may be limited to a maximum number of oligonucleotides due to competitive annealing and competition for primers. PMID:19799938

  10. A Universal Polymerase Chain Reaction Developer.

    PubMed

    Valentini, Paola; Pompa, Pier Paolo

    2016-02-05

    The versatility of PCR, the gold standard for amplification of DNA targets, is hampered by the laborious, multi-step detection based on gel electrophoresis. We propose a one-step, one-tube method for the rapid (5 min) naked-eye detection of PCR products, based on controlled aggregation of gold nanoparticles. Our method is universal, instrument-free, and ultra-sensitive, as it could detect as low as 0.01 zeptomoles of HIV template DNA in an excess of interfering human genomic DNA.

  11. Total chemical synthesis of a thermostable enzyme capable of polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Xu, Weiliang; Jiang, Wenjun; Wang, Jiaxing; Yu, Linping; Chen, Ji; Liu, Xianyu; Liu, Lei; Zhu, Ting F

    2017-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) has been a defining tool in modern biology. Towards realizing mirror-image PCR, we have designed and chemically synthesized a mutant version of the 352-residue thermostable Sulfolobus solfataricus P2 DNA polymerase IV with l-amino acids and tested its PCR activity biochemically. To the best of our knowledge, this enzyme is the largest chemically synthesized protein reported to date. We show that with optimization of PCR conditions, the fully synthetic polymerase is capable of amplifying template sequences of up to 1.5 kb. The establishment of this synthetic route for chemically synthesizing DNA polymerase IV is a stepping stone towards building a d-enzyme system for mirror-image PCR, which may open up an avenue for the creation of many mirror-image molecular tools such as mirror-image systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment.

  12. Total chemical synthesis of a thermostable enzyme capable of polymerase chain reaction

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Weiliang; Jiang, Wenjun; Wang, Jiaxing; Yu, Linping; Chen, Ji; Liu, Xianyu; Liu, Lei; Zhu, Ting F

    2017-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) has been a defining tool in modern biology. Towards realizing mirror-image PCR, we have designed and chemically synthesized a mutant version of the 352-residue thermostable Sulfolobus solfataricus P2 DNA polymerase IV with l-amino acids and tested its PCR activity biochemically. To the best of our knowledge, this enzyme is the largest chemically synthesized protein reported to date. We show that with optimization of PCR conditions, the fully synthetic polymerase is capable of amplifying template sequences of up to 1.5 kb. The establishment of this synthetic route for chemically synthesizing DNA polymerase IV is a stepping stone towards building a d-enzyme system for mirror-image PCR, which may open up an avenue for the creation of many mirror-image molecular tools such as mirror-image systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment. PMID:28265464

  13. Analysis of raw meats and fats of pigs using polymerase chain reaction for Halal authentication.

    PubMed

    Aida, A A; Che Man, Y B; Wong, C M V L; Raha, A R; Son, R

    2005-01-01

    A method for species identification from pork and lard samples using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis of a conserved region in the mitochondrial (mt) cytochrome b (cyt b) gene has been developed. Genomic DNA of pork and lard were extracted using Qiagen DNeasy(®) Tissue Kits and subjected to PCR amplification targeting the mt cyt b gene. The genomic DNA from lard was found to be of good quality and produced clear PCR products on the amplification of the mt cyt b gene of approximately 360 base pairs. To distinguish between species, the amplified PCR products were cut with restriction enzyme BsaJI resulting in porcine-specific restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLP). The cyt b PCR-RFLP species identification assay yielded excellent results for identification of pig species. It is a potentially reliable technique for detection of pig meat and fat from other animals for Halal authentication.

  14. Analysis of myosin heavy chain mRNA expression by RT-PCR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, C.; Haddad, F.; Qin, A. X.; Baldwin, K. M.

    1997-01-01

    An assay was developed for rapid and sensitive analysis of myosin heavy chain (MHC) mRNA expression in rodent skeletal muscle. Only 2 microg of total RNA were necessary for the simultaneous analysis of relative mRNA expression of six different MHC genes. We designed synthetic DNA fragments as internal standards, which contained the relevant primer sequences for the adult MHC mRNAs type I, IIa, IIx, IIb as well as the embryonic and neonatal MHC mRNAs. A known amount of the synthetic fragment was added to each polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and yielded a product of different size than the amplified MHC mRNA fragment. The ratio of amplified MHC fragment to synthetic fragment allowed us to calculate percentages of the gene expression of the different MHC genes in a given muscle sample. Comparison with the traditional Northern blot analysis demonstrated that our reverse transcriptase-PCR-based assay was reliable, fast, and quantitative over a wide range of relative MHC mRNA expression in a spectrum of adult and neonatal rat skeletal muscles. Furthermore, the high sensitivity of the assay made it very useful when only small quantities of tissue were available. Statistical analysis of the signals for each MHC isoform across the analyzed samples showed a highly significant correlation between the PCR and the Northern signals as Pearson correlation coefficients ranged between 0.77 and 0.96 (P < 0.005). This assay has potential use in analyzing small muscle samples such as biopsies and samples from pre- and/or neonatal stages of development.

  15. Multiplex polymerase chain reaction method to detect Cyclospora, Cystoisospora, and Microsporidia in stool samples.

    PubMed

    Taniuchi, Mami; Verweij, Jaco J; Sethabutr, Orntipa; Bodhidatta, Ladaporn; Garcia, Lynne; Maro, Athanasia; Kumburu, Happiness; Gratz, Jean; Kibiki, Gibson; Houpt, Eric R

    2011-12-01

    Cyclospora, Cystoisospora, and Microsporidia are eukaryotic enteropathogens that are difficult to detect in stool samples because they require special stains and microscopy. We developed a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) reaction with 4 primer sets to amplify Cyclospora cayetanensis, Cystoisospora belli, Enterocytozoon bieneusi, and Encephalitozoon intestinalis. Detection of the amplicon is through specific probes coupled to Luminex beads. Sensitivity of the assay was evaluated using Encephalitozoon intestinalis spores and revealed detection of 10(1) spores spiked into stool. No cross-reactivity was observed. We evaluated the assay on diarrheal specimens from Thailand, Tanzania, Indonesia, and the Netherlands that had been previously tested by microscopy, and the assay yielded 87-100% sensitivity and 88-100% specificity. Microscopy-negative/PCR-positive samples had lower Luminex values, suggesting they were true but with lower burden infections. In summary, this is a convenient single PCR reaction that can detect Cyclospora, Cystoisospora, and Microsporidia without the need for cumbersome microscopic analysis.

  16. Detection of human papillomavirus types 45 and 51 by type-specific polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Weyn, Christine; Boulenouar, Selma; Mathys, Vanessa; Vanhoolandt, Julie; Bernis, Aurore; Fontaine, Véronique

    2007-12-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) types 45 and 51 are both considered as high risk types for the development of human cervical cancer. To optimize the detection of these two types in clinical samples, HPV-45 and HPV-51 specific primers were designed to amplify respectively a 141bp and a 266bp fragment from the L1 gene by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The sensitivity and the specificity of these two PCR reactions were determined using varying amounts of HPV DNA containing plasmids and negative and positive controls. Overall, the sensitivity for the HPV-45 plasmid DNA is 10fg, while for HPV-51 the sensitivity is 1fg. This is equivalent to approximately 100 and 10 HPV genome copies per PCR reaction, respectively.

  17. Comparison of Analytic Methods for Quantitative Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction Data

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a laboratory procedure to amplify and simultaneously quantify targeted DNA molecules, and then detect the product of the reaction at the end of all the amplification cycles. A more modern technique, real-time PCR, also known as quantitative PCR (qPCR), detects the product after each cycle of the progressing reaction by applying a specific fluorescence technique. The quantitative methods currently used to analyze qPCR data result in varying levels of estimation quality. This study compares the accuracy and precision of the estimation achieved by eight different models when applied to the same qPCR dataset. Also, the study evaluates a newly introduced data preprocessing approach, the taking-the-difference approach, and compares it to the currently used approach of subtracting the background fluorescence. The taking-the-difference method subtracts the fluorescence in the former cycle from that in the latter cycle to avoid estimating the background fluorescence. The results obtained from the eight models show that taking-the-difference is a better way to preprocess qPCR data compared to the original approach because of a reduction in the background estimation error. The results also show that weighted models are better than non-weighted models, and that the precision of the estimation achieved by the mixed models is slightly better than that achieved by the linear regression models. PMID:26204477

  18. Comparison of analytic methods for quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction data.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ping; Huang, Xuelin

    2015-11-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a laboratory procedure to amplify and simultaneously quantify targeted DNA molecules, and then detect the product of the reaction at the end of all the amplification cycles. A more modern technique, real-time PCR, also known as quantitative PCR (qPCR), detects the product after each cycle of the progressing reaction by applying a specific fluorescence technique. The quantitative methods currently used to analyze qPCR data result in varying levels of estimation quality. This study compares the accuracy and precision of the estimation achieved by eight different models when applied to the same qPCR dataset. Also, the study evaluates a newly introduced data preprocessing approach, the taking-the-difference approach, and compares it to the currently used approach of subtracting the background fluorescence. The taking-the-difference method subtracts the fluorescence in the former cycle from that in the latter cycle to avoid estimating the background fluorescence. The results obtained from the eight models show that taking-the-difference is a better way to preprocess qPCR data compared to the original approach because of a reduction in the background estimation error. The results also show that weighted models are better than non-weighted models, and that the precision of the estimation achieved by the mixed models is slightly better than that achieved by the linear regression models.

  19. Chain reaction mechanism in hydrogen/fluorine combustion.

    PubMed

    Matsugi, Akira; Shiina, Hiroumi; Tsuchiya, Kentaro; Miyoshi, Akira

    2013-12-27

    Vibrationally excited species have been considered to play significant roles in H2/F2 reaction systems. In the present study, in order to obtain further understanding of the chain reaction mechanism in the combustion of mixtures containing H2 and F2, burning velocities for H2/F2/O2/N2 flames were measured and compared to that obtained from kinetic simulations using a detailed kinetic model, which involves the vibrationally excited species, HF(ν) and H2(ν), and the chain-branching reactions, HF(ν > 2) + F2 = HF + F + F (R1) and H2(ν = 1) + F2 = HF + H + F (R2). The results indicated that reaction R1 is not responsible for chain branching, whereas reaction R2 plays a dominant role in the chain reaction mechanism. The kinetic model reproduced the experimental burning velocities with the presumed rate constant of k2 = 6.6 × 10(-10) exp(-59 kJ mol(-1)/RT) cm(3) s(-1) for R2. The suggested chain-branching reaction was also investigated by quantum chemical calculations at the MRCI-F12+CV+Q/cc-pCVQZ-F12 level of theory.

  20. A diagnostic polymerase chain reaction assay for Zika virus.

    PubMed

    Balm, Michelle N D; Lee, Chun Kiat; Lee, Hong Kai; Chiu, Lily; Koay, Evelyn S C; Tang, Julian W

    2012-09-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is a mosquito-borne flavivirus. Infection results in a dengue-like illness with fever, headache, malaise, and a maculopapular rash. Nearly all cases are mild and self-limiting but in 2007, a large outbreak of ZIKV was reported from the island of Yap (in Micronesia, northwest of Indonesia). Singapore is already endemic for dengue, and its impact on public health and economic burden is significant. Other dengue-like infections (e.g., Chikungunya virus) are present. Yet only 10% of reported dengue cases have laboratory confirmation. The identification and control of other dengue-like, mosquito-transmitted infections is thus important for the health of Singapore's population, as well as its economy. Given that ZIKV shares the same Aedes mosquito vector with both dengue and Chikungunya, it is possible that this virus is present in Singapore and causing some of the mild dengue-like illness. A specific and sensitive one-step, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) with an internal control (IC) was designed and tested on 88 archived samples of dengue-negative, Chikungunya-negative sera from patients presenting to our hospital with a dengue-like illness, to determine the presence of ZIKV in Singapore. The assay was specific for detection of ZIKV and displayed a lower limit of detection (LoD) of 140 copies viral RNA/reaction when tested on synthetic RNA standards prepared using pooled negative patient plasma. Of the 88 samples tested, none were positive for ZIKV RNA, however, the vast majority of these were from patients admitted to hospital and further study may be warranted in community-based environments.

  1. Leptospirosis diagnosis by immunocapture polymerase chain reaction: a new tool for early diagnosis and epidemiologic surveillance.

    PubMed

    Balassiano, Ilana Teruszkin; Vital-Brazil, Juliana Magalhães; Pereira, Martha Maria

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study was to develop an immunocapture polymerase chain reaction (IC-PCR) protocol for leptospirosis. For the standardization of IC-PCR, polyclonal (AS) and monoclonal (MAb) antibodies against different serogroups and serovars of Leptospira were coupled to polystyrene plates. Human sera were artificially contaminated with leptospires and incubated on plates. The bacterial DNA was obtained and used in a multiplex PCR. Sensitivity was tested using sera contaminated with crescent concentrations of leptospires, while specificity was established using sera contaminated with different bacterial genera and sera obtained from patients positive for viral infections. IC-PCR using AS was able to recognize specific serogroups, although some cross-reactions have been observed. No cross-reactions were observed when MAbs were used; however, the sensitivity in this case was lower than that of IC-PCR using AS. IC-PCR proved to be specific to Leptospira and is a promising tool for early diagnosis of leptospirosis, providing additional information about the infecting serovar or serogroup.

  2. Multiplex-microsphere-quantitative polymerase chain reaction: nucleic acid amplification and detection on microspheres.

    PubMed

    Liang, Fang; Lai, Richard; Arora, Neetika; Zhang, Kang Liang; Yeh, Che-Cheng; Barnett, Graeme R; Voigt, Paul; Corrie, Simon R; Barnard, Ross T

    2013-01-01

    We report the development of a new system to monitor the amplification of nucleic acids on microspheres. This was realized by the design of (i) a "universal" oligonucleotide "tagged" polymerase chain reaction (PCR) forward primer, (ii) a sensor sequence complementary to the universal sequence on the forward PCR primer modified with a fluorescent dye, and (iii) a universal oligonucleotide coupled to Luminex microspheres. The PCR takes place with the microspheres present in the reaction tube. With the consumption of the universal oligonucleotide tagged forward primer, the fluorescently labeled sequences can bind to the universal oligonucleotide on the microspheres. We tested the microsphere quantitative PCR system with up to three different target genes (Neisseria meningitides porA and ctrA and influenza A M gene segment) as templates in a single PCR tube. The analytical sensitivity of this quantitative PCR system was tested and compared with the TaqMan system. The multiplex-microsphere-quantitative PCR system does not require design of unique internal probes for each target and has potential for a high degree of multiplexing, greater than the limited multiplexing achievable with current real-time protocols.

  3. A noncontact temperature measurement method in polymerase chain reaction reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sochivko, D. G.; Varlamov, D. A.; Fedorov, A. A.; Kurochkin, V. E.

    2016-04-01

    A new noncontact method for measuring temperatures of liquids, which is based on the fluorescent probes, is proposed. The method is intended for measuring temperatures of reaction media in reactors of devices for polymerase chain reactions in real time and can be used for determining dynamic temperature parameters.

  4. Improved polymerase chain reaction technique for determining the species composition of Eimeria in poultry litter.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, M C; Miska, K; Klopp, S

    2006-12-01

    An improved polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based method for determining the species composition of Eimeria in poultry litter was developed by incorporating species-specific internal standards in the assay. Internal standard molecules were prepared by fusing seven different Eimeria species-specific intervening transcribed sequence 1 (ITS1) rDNA primer pairs to a non-Eimeria DNA molecule and by cloning the hybrid DNA molecules into a plasmid. The internal DNA standards were then used in Eimeria-specific ITS 1 PCR, and they were found to be capable of detecting E. acervulina, E. maxima, E. praecox, and E. tenella oocysts isolated directly from poultry litter.

  5. [Identification of human pathogenic variola and monkeypox viruses by real-time polymerase chain reaction].

    PubMed

    Kostina, E V; Gavrilova, E V; Riabinin, V A; Shchelkunov, S N; Siniakov, A N

    2009-01-01

    A kit of specific oligonucleotide primers and hybridization probes has been proposed to detect orthopoxviruses (OPV) and to discriminate human pathogenic viruses, such as variola virus and monkey virus by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). For real-time PCR, the following pairs of fluorophore and a fluorescence quencher were used: TAMRA-BHQ2 for genus-specific probes and FAM-BHQ1 for species-specific ones (variola virus, monkeypox virus, ectomelia virus). The specificity of this assay was tested on 38 strains of 6 OPV species and it was 100%.

  6. The rapid molecular genetic diagnosis of cystic fibrosis by polymerase chain reaction: an experience report.

    PubMed

    Macek, M; Boehm, I; Arnold, L; Smrt, J; Macek, M; Duspivová, R; Vávrová, V; Sedlácek, Z; Sperling, K; Schmidtke, J

    1990-01-01

    The authors report their experience with about two thousand DNA amplifications by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in prenatal diagnosis of cystic fibrosis. The method is demonstrated on examples of diagnostic informativity and prenatal diagnosis examination in a family at 1 in 4 risk of the disease using closely CF-linked diagnostic polymorphisms: J3.11/MspI, MetH/MspI, CS7/HhaI, KM19/PstI, Mp6-d9/MspI and XV2c/TaqI, PCR methodology and safety precautions are discussed.

  7. Comparison of proteases in DNA extraction via quantitative polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Eychner, Alison M; Lebo, Roberta J; Elkins, Kelly M

    2015-06-01

    We compared four proteases in the QIAamp DNA Investigator Kit (Qiagen) to extract DNA for use in multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays. The aim was to evaluate alternate proteases for improved DNA recovery as compared with proteinase K for forensic, biochemical research, genetic paternity and immigration, and molecular diagnostic purposes. The Quantifiler Kit TaqMan quantitative PCR assay was used to measure the recovery of DNA from human blood, semen, buccal cells, breastmilk, and earwax in addition to low-template samples, including diluted samples, computer keyboard swabs, chewing gum, and cigarette butts. All methods yielded amplifiable DNA from all samples.

  8. Rapid polymerase chain reaction diagnosis of white-nose syndrome in bats

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lorch, J.M.; Gargas, A.; Meteyer, C.U.; Berlowski-Zier, B. M.; Green, D.E.; Shearn-Bochsler, V.; Thomas, N.J.; Blehert, D.S.

    2010-01-01

    A newly developed polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based method to rapidly and specifically detect Geomyces destructans on the wings of infected bats from small quantities (1-2 mg) of tissue is described in the current study (methods for culturing and isolating G. destructans from bat skin are also described). The lower limits of detection for PCR were 5 fg of purified fungal DNA or 100 conidia per 2 mg of wing tissue. By using histology as the standard, the PCR had a diagnostic specificity of 100% and a diagnostic sensitivity of 96%, whereas the diagnostic sensitivity of culture techniques was only 54%. The accuracy and fast turnaround time of PCR provides field biologists with valuable information on infection status more rapidly than traditional methods, and the small amount of tissue required for the test would allow diagnosis of white-nose syndrome in live animals.

  9. Detection of Mycoplasma Contamination Directly from Culture Supernatant Using Polymerase Chain Reaction.

    PubMed

    Pisal, R V; Hrebíková, H; Chvátalová, J; Kunke, D; Filip, S; Mokrý, J

    2016-01-01

    Ensuring mycoplasma-free cell culture is of prime importance as they severely affect cellular characteristics leading to experimental artefacts and spurious results. Various methods persist for mycoplasma detection; out of the whole array of methods polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is the most favoured one because it is highly sensitive, specific and quick. The PCR-based detection procedure involves three steps: cell culture supernatant collection, DNA isolation, and PCR. We have modified this procedure so that cell culture supernatant can directly be used for PCR without the need for DNA extraction. This modification makes the procedure quicker and more sensitive because loss of mycoplasma DNA is prevented and this loss becomes more significant when the level of mycoplasma contamination is very low.

  10. Rapid identification of mycobacteria to the species level by polymerase chain reaction and restriction enzyme analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Telenti, A; Marchesi, F; Balz, M; Bally, F; Böttger, E C; Bodmer, T

    1993-01-01

    A method for the rapid identification of mycobacteria to the species level was developed on the basis of evaluation by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of the gene encoding for the 65-kDa protein. The method involves restriction enzyme analysis of PCR products obtained with primers common to all mycobacteria. Using two restriction enzymes, BstEII and HaeIII, medically relevant and other frequent laboratory isolates were differentiated to the species or subspecies level by PCR-restriction enzyme pattern analysis. PCR-restriction enzyme pattern analysis was performed on isolates (n = 330) from solid and fluid culture media, including BACTEC, or from frozen and lyophilized stocks. The procedure does not involve hybridization steps or the use of radioactivity and can be completed within 1 working day. Images PMID:8381805

  11. Preparation of 13C/15N-labeled oligomers using the polymerase chain reaction

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Xian; Gupta, Goutam; Bradbury, E. Morton

    2001-01-01

    Preparation of .sup.13 C/.sup.15 N-labeled DNA oligomers using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). A PCR based method for uniform (.sup.13 C/.sup.15 N)-labeling of DNA duplexes is described. Multiple copies of a blunt-ended duplex are cloned into a plasmid, each copy containing the sequence of interest and restriction Hinc II sequences at both the 5' and 3' ends. PCR using bi-directional primers and uniformly .sup.13 C/.sup.15 N-labeled dNTP precursors generates labeled DNA duplexes containing multiple copies of the sequence of interest. Twenty-four cycles of PCR, followed by restriction and purification, gave the uniformly .sup.13 C/.sup.15 N-labeled duplex sequence with a 30% yield. Such labeled duplexes find significant applications in multinuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

  12. Single primer-mediated circular polymerase chain reaction for hairpin DNA cloning and plasmid editing.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jiansheng; Khan, Inamullah; Liu, Rui; Yang, Yan; Zhu, Naishuo

    2016-05-01

    We developed and validated a universal polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method, single primer circular (SPC)-PCR, using single primer to simultaneously insert and amplify a short hairpin sequence into a vector with a high success rate. In this method, the hairpin structure is divided into two parts and fused into a vector by PCR. Then, a single primer is used to cyclize the chimera into a mature short hairpin RNA (shRNA) expression vector. It is not biased by loop length or palindromic structures. Six hairpin DNAs with short 4-nucleotide loops were successfully cloned. Moreover, SPC-PCR was also applied to plasmid editing within 3 h with a success rate higher than 95%.

  13. Diagnosis of Fusarium keratitis in an animal model using the polymerase chain reaction

    PubMed Central

    Alexandrakis, G.; Jalali, S.; Gloor, P.

    1998-01-01

    AIMS/BACKGROUND—The purpose of this study was apply the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to develop a sensitive, specific, and rapid test to diagnose Fusarium keratitis. Fusarium is the most common cause of fungal corneal infection in some parts of the world. It is often difficult to establish that a keratitis is due to fungal infection.
METHODS—Fusarium solani keratitis was induced in three eyes of three rabbits by injection of a suspension of the fungus into the anterior corneal stroma. In one rabbit the contralateral eye served as a control. From four to 28 days after inoculation, the corneas were scraped for culture, then scraped and swabbed for PCR analysis. The PCR was performed with primers directed against a portion of the Fusarium cutinase gene, and the presence or absence of this amplified target sequence was determined by agarose gel.
RESULTS—The amplified DNA sequence was detected in 25 of 28 samples from the corneas infected with Fusarium, for a sensitivity of 89%. Only three of the 14 samples from these eyes with Fusarium keratitis were positive by culture, for a sensitivity of 21%. Seven of eight control samples were negative by the PCR based test, for a specificity of 88%.
CONCLUSION—This PCR based test holds promise of being an effective method of diagnosing Fusarium keratitis as well as Fusarium infections at other sites.

 Keywords: keratitis; Fusarium; ulcer; cornea; polymerase chain reaction PMID:9602631

  14. Identification of duck plague virus by polymerase chain reaction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hansen, W.R.; Brown, Sean E.; Nashold, S.W.; Knudson, D.L.

    1999-01-01

    A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was developed for detecting duck plague virus. A 765-bp EcoRI fragment cloned from the genome of the duck plague vaccine (DP-VAC) virus was sequenced for PCR primer development. The fragment sequence was found by GenBank alignment searches to be similar to the 3a?? ends of an undefined open reading frame and the gene for DNA polymerase protein in other herpesviruses. Three of four primer sets were found to be specific for the DP-VAC virus and 100% (7/7) of field isolates but did not amplify DNA from inclusion body disease of cranes virus. The specificity of one primer set was tested with genome templates from other avian herpesviruses, including those from a golden eagle, bald eagle, great horned owl, snowy owl, peregrine falcon, prairie falcon, pigeon, psittacine, and chicken (infectious laryngotracheitis), but amplicons were not produced. Hence, this PCR test is highly specific for duck plague virus DNA. Two primer sets were able to detect 1 fg of DNA from the duck plague vaccine strain, equivalent to five genome copies. In addition, the ratio of tissue culture infectious doses to genome copies of duck plague vaccine virus from infected duck embryo cells was determined to be 1:100, making the PCR assay 20 times more sensitive than tissue culture for detecting duck plague virus. The speed, sensitivity, and specificity of this PCR provide a greatly improved diagnostic and research tool for studying the epizootiology of duck plague. /// Se desarroll?? una prueba de reacci??n en cadena por la polimerasa para detectar el virus de la peste del pato. Un fragmento EcoRI de 765 pares de bases clonado del genoma del virus vacunal de la peste del pato fue secuenciado para la obtenci??n de los iniciadores de la prueba de la reacci??n en cadena por la polimerasa. En investigaciones de alineaci??n en el banco de genes ('GenBank') se encontr?? que la secuencia del fragmento era similar a los extremos 3a?? de un marco de lectura abierto

  15. Use of polymerase chain reaction in human African trypanosomiasis stage determination and follow-up.

    PubMed Central

    Truc, P.; Jamonneau, V.; Cuny, G.; Frézil, J. L.

    1999-01-01

    Stage determination of human African trypanosomiasis is based on the detection of parasites and measurements of biological changes in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) (concentration of white blood cells > 5 cells per mm3 and increased total protein levels). The patient is treated accordingly. Demonstration of the absence or presence of trypanosomes by the double centrifugation technique is still the only test available to clinicians for assessing treatment success. In this study, however, we evaluate the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) as a tool for assessing the disease stage of trypanosomiasis and for determining whether treatment has been successful. All 15 study patients considered to be in the advanced stage of the disease were PCR positive; however, trypanosomes were demonstrated by double centrifugation in only 11 patients. Of the five remaining patients, who were considered to be in the early stage, PCR and double centrifugation were negative. Following treatment, 13 of the 15 second-stage patients were found to be negative for the disease in at least two samples by PCR and double centrifugation. Two others were still positive by PCR immediately and one month after the treatment. Trypanosome DNA detection using PCR suggested that the two positive patients were not cured but that their possible relapse could not be identified by a search for parasites using the double centrifugation technique. Further evaluation of the PCR method is required, in particular to determine whether PCR assays could be used in studies on patients who fail to respond to melarsoprol, as observed in several foci. PMID:10534898

  16. Routine application of the polymerase chain reaction for detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in clinical samples.

    PubMed Central

    Noordhoek, G T; Kaan, J A; Mulder, S; Wilke, H; Kolk, A H

    1995-01-01

    AIM--To investigate the use of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in the routine laboratory for the detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in clinical samples. METHODS--Samples were divided and processed separately for the detection of M tuberculosis by microscopy, culture and PCR. After DNA extraction, PCR was performed with primers specific for the insertion element IS6110 and the product was analysed by agarose gel electrophoresis, Southern blotting or dot blotting and hybridisation with a digoxigenin labelled internal probe. Each sample was tested for inhibitors of Taq polymerase with the aid of an internal control. Multiple negative and positive controls were used to monitor each step of the procedure. RESULTS--The data from two laboratories, using the same operating procedures, were combined. Of 1957 specimens, 79 (4%) were culture and PCR positive, while 1839 (93.9%) were negative in both tests. Thirty specimens (1.5%) were PCR positive only and nine (0.5%) were culture positive but PCR negative. CONCLUSION--Using culture and clinical history as the gold standard, sensitivity and specificity for PCR were 92.1% and 99.8%, respectively. With elaborate precautions, PCR is a suitable and reliable method for the detection of M tuberculosis in clinical samples in a routine microbiology laboratory. Images PMID:7490312

  17. Detection of schistosomes polymerase chain reaction amplified DNA by oligochromatographic dipstick.

    PubMed

    Akinwale, O P; Laurent, T; Mertens, P; Leclipteux, T; Rollinson, D; Kane, R; Emery, A; Ajayi, M B; Akande, D O; Fesobi, T W

    2008-08-01

    The applications of highly specific and sensitive molecular techniques based on polymerase chain reaction (PCR) have constituted a valuable tool for the diagnosis of schistosomiasis and also for the detection of schistosome infections in the snail intermediate hosts. The common method of detecting PCR amplicons is gel electrophoresis in the presence of ethidium bromide, a carcinogen, which is followed by UV transillumination. Other methods, which are available for detecting PCR products, are real-time PCR, PCR-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (PCR-ELIZA) and mass spectrometry but they are cumbersome while they are sometimes complex and expensive. Therefore, a simple method of PCR product detection would be a welcome idea and a most valuable tool particularly in disease endemic countries with limited research facilities and resources. In this study, we applied a simple and rapid method for the detection of Schistosoma haematobium and Schistosoma mansoni PCR amplified DNA products using oligochromatographic (OC) dipstick. The amplicons are visualized by hybridization with a gold conjugated probe, while a control for the chromatographic migration is incorporated in the assay. The lower detection limit observed was 10fg of genomic DNA from each of the two species, while the dipstick was also specific for each of the species used in this study.

  18. Utility of Real-Time Quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction in Detecting Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Mingxin; Zhang, Hui

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the value of real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) for the detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB). Samples from 192 patients with suspected MTB were examined by RT-qPCR and an improved Löwenstein–Jensen (L-J) culture method. To evaluate the diagnostic usefulness of RT-qPCR in detecting MTB, a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve for RT-qPCR was generated, and the area under the curve (AUC) as well as a cutoff value was calculated. Using the L-J culture method as the gold standard, accuracy of the RT-qPCR method for detecting MTB was 92.7%, with sensitivity and specificity of 62.5% and 97.02%, respectively. In comparison with the improved L-J culture method, the AUC of RT-qPCR ROC curve was 0.957, which was statistically significant (p < 0.001). The Youden Index reached the maximum value (0.88) for gene copy number of 794.5 IU/mL, which was used as the cutoff value. RT-qPCR detection of MTB yielded results consistent with those of the improved L-J culture method, with high accuracy. RT-qPCR may be used as an auxiliary method for etiological diagnosis of tuberculosis. PMID:28168192

  19. A METHOD TO REMOVE ENVIRONMENTAL INHIBITORS PRIOR TO THE DETECTION OF WATERBORNE ENTERIC VIRUSES BY REVERSE TRANSCRIPTION-POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A method was developed to remove environmental inhibitors from sample concentrates prior to detection of human enteric viruses using the reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR).Environmental inhibitors, concentrated along with viruses during water sample processi...

  20. An oligonucleotide-ligation assay for the differentiation between Cyclospora and Eimeria spp. polymerase chain reaction amplification products.

    PubMed

    Jinneman, K C; Wetherington, J H; Hill, W E; Omiescinski, C J; Adams, A M; Johnson, J M; Tenge, B J; Dang, N L; Wekell, M M

    1999-06-01

    An oligonucleotide-ligation assay (OLA) was developed and compared to a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) test for distinguishing between 294-bp polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification products of the 18S rRNA gene from Cyclospora and Eimeria spp. The PCR/OLA correctly distinguished between three Cyclospora, three E. tenella, and one E. mitis strains and the ratio of positive to negative spectrophotometric absorbance (A490) values for each strain ranged from 4.086 to 15.280 (median 9.5). PCR/OLA provides a rapid, reliable, spectrophotometric alternative to PCR/RFLP.

  1. Polymerase Chain Reaction: An Important Tool for Early Diagnosis of Leptospirosis Cases

    PubMed Central

    Mullan, Summaiya

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Various diagnostic methods like Microscopic Agglutination Test (MAT), IgM ELISA, Isolation of Leptospira from the clinical specimen, Rapid leptocheck tests etc., are available for diagnosis of leptospirosis. Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) is used for diagnosis of various diseases of infectious origin including leptospirosis but there is paucity of data about comparison of PCR with other available method of diagnosis of leptospirosis. Aim The aim of the study was to detect the leptospiral DNA by PCR method and to compare the results of PCR with other available diagnostic methods used for diagnosis of suspected leptospirosis cases in acute phase of illness. Materials and Methods A total of 207 blood samples were obtained from suspected patients of leptospirosis admitted in New Civil Hospital, a tertiary care hospital in South Gujarat, during the period of July 2008 to November 2008. These blood samples were subjected to Rapid leptocheck, IgM ELISA, MAT test to detect (IgG or IgM) antibody level, Leptospira culture and PCR. Results In early phase of the disease, Rapid leptocheck test gave 44% detection, but along with PCR seropositivity reached upto 71%. Detection rate by IgM ELISA was 59% which increased to 80% with PCR. By MAT seropositivity was 57% but combined seropositivity of MAT with PCR was 78%. Sensitivity and specificity of PCR as compared to MAT (Gold standard) was 52% and 79% respectively. Leptospira was not growing in culture. Conclusion In present study, PCR picked up to 50% of cases which were negative by other serological tests so these finding suggest that PCR should be used routinely in acute phase of disease. PMID:28208854

  2. Cell-based polymerase chain reaction for canine transmissible venereal tumor (CTVT) diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    SETTHAWONGSIN, Chanokchon; TECHANGAMSUWAN, Somporn; TANGKAWATTANA, Sirikachorn; RUNGSIPIPAT, Anudep

    2016-01-01

    Canine transmissible venereal tumor (CTVT) is the only naturally contagious tumor that is transmitted during coitus or social behaviors. Based on the tumor’s location, the diagnosis of genital TVT (GTVT) is comparably easier than those in the extragenital area (ETVT) that are more easily incorrectly diagnosed. Fortunately, CTVT cells contain a specific long interspersed nuclear elements (LINE), inserted upstream of the myc gene, allowing a diagnostic polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based detection assay. The objectives of this study were aimed to improve the diagnostic accuracy by applying the diagnostic LINE1-c-myc PCR assay and fine needle aspiration (FNA) collection in direct comparison with standard cytological and histopathological analyses. Seventy-four dogs, comprised of 41 and 31 dogs with tumor masses at their external genitalia and extragenital areas (e.g. skin and nasal cavity), respectively, were included in this study. The signalment of these 65 dogs and clinical history of 20 client-owned dogs were collected. Samples were taken by biopsy for both histopathological examination and FNA for cytological examination and diagnostic PCR. The PCR products from 10 apparently CTVT samples were purified and sequenced. Sixty-one CTVT cases were diagnosed by cytological and histological analyses, but 65 were positive by the PCR assay. Overall, the PCR assay improved the accuracy of diagnostic CTVT results, especially for the more difficult ETVT tumors. Moreover, this PCR-based approach can facilitate the decision as to discontinue chemotherapy by discrimination between residual tumor cell masses and fibrotic tissue. PMID:27075116

  3. Molecular detection of plant pathogenic bacteria using polymerase chain reaction single-strand conformation polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Srinivasa, Chandrashekar; Sharanaiah, Umesha; Shivamallu, Chandan

    2012-03-01

    The application of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technology to molecular diagnostics holds great promise for the early identification of agriculturally important plant pathogens. Ralstonia solanacearum, Xanthomoans axonopodis pv. vesicatoria, and Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae are phytopathogenic bacteria, which can infect vegetables, cause severe yield loss. PCR-single-strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) is a simple and powerful technique for identifying sequence changes in amplified DNA. The technique of PCR-SSCP is being exploited so far, only to detect and diagnose human bacterial pathogens in addition to plant pathogenic fungi. Selective media and serology are the commonly used methods for the detection of plant pathogens in infected plant materials. In this study, we developed PCR-SSCP technique to identify phytopathogenic bacteria. The PCR product was denatured and separated on a non-denaturing polyacrylamide gel. SSCP banding patterns were detected by silver staining of nucleic acids. We tested over 56 isolates of R. solanacearum, 44 isolates of X. axonopodis pv. vesicatoria, and 20 isolates of X. oryzae pv. oryzae. With the use of universal primer 16S rRNA, we could discriminate such species at the genus and species levels. Species-specific patterns were obtained for bacteria R. solanacearum, X. axonopodis pv. vesicatoria, and X. oryzae pv. oryzae. The potential use of PCR-SSCP technique for the detection and diagnosis of phytobacterial pathogens is discussed in the present paper.

  4. Humic substances cause fluorescence inhibition in real-time polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Sidstedt, Maja; Jansson, Linda; Nilsson, Elin; Noppa, Laila; Forsman, Mats; Rådström, Peter; Hedman, Johannes

    2015-10-15

    Real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) is the cornerstone of DNA analysis, enabling detection and quantification of minute nucleic acid amounts. However, PCR-based analysis is limited, in part, by the presence of inhibitors in the samples. PCR inhibition has been viewed solely as failure to efficiently generate amplicons, that is, amplification inhibition. Humic substances (HS) are well-known inhibitors of PCR amplification. Here we show that HS from environmental samples, specifically humic acid (HA), are very potent detection inhibitors, that is, quench the fluorescence signal of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) binding dyes. HA quenched the fluorescence of the commonly used qPCR dyes EvaGreen, ResoLight, SYBR Green I, and SYTO 82, generating lowered amplification plots, although amplicon production was unaffected. For EvaGreen, 500 ng of HA quenched nearly all fluorescence, whereas 1000 ng of HA completely inhibited amplification when applying Immolase DNA polymerase with bovine serum albumin (BSA). Fluorescence spectroscopy measurements showed that HA quenching was either static or collisional and indicated that HA bound directly to the dye. Fulvic acid did not act as a qPCR detection inhibitor but inhibited amplification similarly to HA. Hydrolysis probe fluorescence was not quenched by HA. Detection inhibition is an overlooked phenomenon that needs to be considered to allow for development of optimal qPCR assays.

  5. Factors influencing polymerase chain reaction outcomes in patients with clinically suspected ocular tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay can be a useful method for definitive diagnosis in paucibacillary infections such as ocular tuberculosis (TB). In this study, we have evaluated factors affecting PCR outcomes in patients with clinically suspected ocular TB. Patients with clinically suspected ocular TB were investigated by PCR of aqueous or vitreous samples. Three control groups were also tested: group 1 included culture-proven non-tuberculous endophthalmitis, group 2 culture-negative non-tuberculous endophthalmitis, and group 3 patients undergoing surgery for uncomplicated cataract. PCR targeted one or more of following targets: IS6110, MPB64, and protein b genes of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex. Multiple regression analysis (5% level of significance) was done to evaluate the associations between positive PCR outcome and laterality of disease, tuberculin skin test (TST)/interferon-gamma release assay (IGRA), chest radiography, and type of sample (aqueous or vitreous). The main outcome measures were positive PCR by one or more gene targets, and factors influencing positive PCR outcomes. Results All 114 samples were tested for MPB64, 110 for protein b, and 88 for IS6110. MPB64 was positive in 70.2% (n = 80) of tested samples, protein b in 40.0% (n = 44), and IS6110 in only 9.1% (n = 8). DNA sequencing of amplicons from four randomly chosen PCR reactions showed homology for M. tuberculosis complex. Of the 80 PCR-positive patients, 71 completed a full course of antitubercular therapy, of which 65 patients (91.5%) had complete resolution of inflammation at final follow-up. Among controls, 12.5% (3 out of 24) in group 1 and 18.7% (6 out of 32) in group 2 also tested positive by PCR. No PCR-positive outcome was observed in control group 3 (n = 25). Multiple regression analysis revealed significant association of positive PCR outcome with bilateral presentation, but not with a positive TST/IGRA, chest radiography, or type of sample

  6. Tangled nonlinear driven chain reactions of all optical singularities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasil'ev, V. I.; Soskin, M. S.

    2012-03-01

    Dynamics of polarization optical singularities chain reactions in generic elliptically polarized speckle fields created in photorefractive crystal LiNbO3 was investigated in details Induced speckle field develops in the tens of minutes scale due to photorefractive 'optical damage effect' induced by incident beam of He-Ne laser. It was shown that polarization singularities develop through topological chain reactions of developing speckle fields driven by photorefractive nonlinearities induced by incident laser beam. All optical singularities (C points, optical vortices, optical diabolos,) are defined by instantaneous topological structure of the output wavefront and are tangled by singular optics lows. Therefore, they have develop in tangled way by six topological chain reactions driven by nonlinear processes in used nonlinear medium (photorefractive LiNbO3:Fe in our case): C-points and optical diabolos for right (left) polarized components domains with orthogonally left (right) polarized optical vortices underlying them. All elements of chain reactions consist from loop and chain links when nucleated singularities annihilated directly or with alien singularities in 1:9 ratio. The topological reason of statistics was established by low probability of far enough separation of born singularities pair from existing neighbor singularities during loop trajectories. Topology of developing speckle field was measured and analyzed by dynamic stokes polarimetry with few seconds' resolution. The hierarchy of singularities govern scenario of tangled chain reactions was defined. The useful space-time data about peculiarities of optical damage evolution were obtained from existence and parameters of 'islands of stability' in developing speckle fields.

  7. Investigation of false-positive reactions for CBH351 maize in screening PCR analysis.

    PubMed

    Monma, Kimio; Moriuchi, Rie; Sagi, Naoki; Ichikawa, Hisatsugu; Satoh, Kazue; Tobe, Takashi; Kamata, Kunihiro

    2006-02-01

    Examination for CBH351 maize was conducted by the qualitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method in maize grain and maize processed foods obtained in the Tokyo area. The numbers of samples possibly positive in the screening test were 7 of 22 (31.8%) for maize grain samples, 4 of 14 (28.6%) for semi-processed foods, 11 of 30 (36.7%) for canned products, 3 of 30 (10.0%) for maize snacks, 3 of 4 (75%) for tacos and 1 of 3 (33.3%) for tortillas. However, CBH351 maize was not detected in the confirmation test. Therefore, the results of the screening test were false-positive. Since the reaction might have been caused by the base sequences of the 3'-end of primers CaM03-5' and CBH02-3' used in the screening test, a new primer pair was designed. The PCR products obtained with the new primer pair TMC2-5'--TMS2-3' were specific for CBH351 and were not obtained with barley, wheat, rice, RRS, Bt11, or Event176. Thus, the new primer pair shows high specificity. CBH351 maize was detected from samples containing at least 0.05% CBH 351 maize DNA by using this primer pair.

  8. Does Polymerase Chain Reaction of Tissue Specimens Aid in the Diagnosis of Tuberculosis?

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yoo Jin; Kim, Seojin; Kang, Youngjin; Jung, Jiyoon; Lee, Eunjung; Kim, Joo-Young; Lee, Jeong Hyeon; Lee, Youngseok; Chae, Yang-seok; Kim, Chul Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Background Mycobacterial culture is the gold standard test for diagnosing tuberculosis (TB), but it is time-consuming. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a highly sensitive and specific method that can reduce the time required for diagnosis. The diagnostic efficacy of PCR differs, so this study determined the actual sensitivity of TB-PCR in tissue specimens. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 574 cases. The results of the nested PCR of the IS6110 gene, mycobacterial culture, TB-specific antigen-induced interferon-γ release assay (IGRA), acid-fast bacilli (AFB) staining, and histological findings were evaluated. Results The positivity rates were 17.6% for PCR, 3.3% for the AFB stain, 22.2% for mycobacterial culture, and 55.4% for IGRA. PCR had a low sensitivity (51.1%) and a high specificity (86.3%) based on the culture results of other studies. The sensitivity was higher (65.5%) in cases with necrotizing granuloma but showed the highest sensitivity (66.7%) in those with necrosis only. The concordance rate between the methods indicated that PCR was the best method compared to mycobacterial culture, and the concordance rate increased for the methods using positive result for PCR or histologic features. Conclusions PCR of tissue specimens is a good alternative to detect tuberculosis, but it may not be as sensitive as previously suggested. Its reliability may also be influenced by some histological features. Our data showed a higher sensitivity when specimens contained necrosis, which indicated that only specimens with necrosis should be used for PCR to detect tuberculosis. PMID:27725619

  9. Identification of genetically modified potato (Solanum tuberosum) cultivars using event specific polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Côté, Marie-José; Meldrum, Allison J; Raymond, Philippe; Dollard, Cheryl

    2005-08-24

    Several genetically modified (GM) cultivars are registered in Canada although they are not currently in commercial production. The GM cultivars can be distinguished from the non-GM and other GM cultivars by analyzing the DNA nucleotide sequence at the insertion site of the transgene corresponding to a single transformation event in the plant genome. Techniques based on modified polymerase chain reaction (PCR) strategies were used to generate sequence information from the plant genome flanking the insertion site of transgenic DNA for specific GM potato events. The plant genome sequence adjacent to the transgenic insertion was used to design PCR primers, which could be used in combination with a primer annealing to one of the nearby inserted genetic elements to amplify an event specific DNA fragment. The event specific PCR fragments generated were sequenced to confirm the specificity of the method.

  10. Detection of rodent coronaviruses in tissues and cell cultures by using polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Homberger, F R; Smith, A L; Barthold, S W

    1991-01-01

    A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method was developed for the detection of rodent coronaviruses in biological material by using reverse transcriptase and two primers which flanked an M gene sequence of 375 bp. PCR detected all of 11 different strains of mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) as well as rat sialodacryoadenitis virus but not bovine coronavirus or human coronavirus strains OC43 and 229E. The M gene sequences of bovine coronavirus and human coronavirus OC43 are homologous to that of MHV, but minor differences exist in the primer regions, preventing annealing of the primers. For detecting MHV-Y in tissue samples, PCR was faster than and at least as sensitive as either of the two bioassays (infant mouse bioassay and mouse antibody production test) currently used for MHV diagnostic purposes. Images PMID:1661745

  11. Identification of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans by leukotoxin gene-specific hybridization and polymerase chain reaction assays.

    PubMed Central

    Tønjum, T; Haas, R

    1993-01-01

    Eleven strains of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans isolated from cases of systemic infections, local abscesses, and periodontitis were identified by genetic assays using the leukotoxin gene as the target. We have developed a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay, based on the leukotoxin structural gene of this pathogen, which clearly identified all tested strains of A. actinomycetemcomitans and separated them from the closely related Haemophilus aphrophilus as well as other bacterial species. Furthermore, DNA-DNA hybridization was performed with the cloned partial leukotoxin structural gene (lktA) as a probe, which again clearly distinguished A. actinomycetemcomitans from H. aphrophilus, parts of the normal oral flora, and species harboring RTX (repeats in toxin) family-related cytotoxins. The PCR fragment amplified from the leukotoxin structural gene gave results similar to those given by the cloned leukotoxin gene when used as a probe in hybridization experiments. The hybridization and PCR assays described here are fundamental improvements for the identification of A. actinomycetemcomitans. Images PMID:8349764

  12. Identification of Rickettsia conorii infection by polymerase chain reaction in a soldier returning from Somalia.

    PubMed

    Williams, W J; Radulovic, S; Dasch, G A; Lindstrom, J; Kelly, D J; Oster, C N; Walker, D H

    1994-07-01

    A soldier developed characteristic manifestations of boutonneuse fever shortly after leaving Somalia. Rickettsial DNA was detected in a biopsy sample of the tache noire by a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in which primers derived from the 190-kD antigen gene of Rickettsia rickettsii were used. The source of this DNA was identified as Rickettsia conorii by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of the PCR product. R. conorii was also isolated from the skin biopsy specimen. The patient did not develop a significant increase in specific antibodies, as assessed by indirect fluorescent antibody testing, until several weeks after the onset of symptoms. This case demonstrates that the PCR/RFLP technique can be used for the direct identification of rickettsiae from clinical specimens. To our knowledge, this is the first confirmed case of R. conorii infection in Somalia.

  13. Detection of DNA sequence polymorphisms in carcinogen metabolism genes by polymerase chain reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, D.A. )

    1991-01-01

    The glutathione transferase mu gene (GST1) and the debrisoquine hydroxylase gene (CYP2D6) are known to be polymorphic in the human population and have been associated with increased susceptibility to cancer. Smokers with low lymphocyte GST mu activity are at higher risk for lung cancer, while low debrisoquine hydroxylase activity has been correlated with lower risk for lung and bladder cancer. Phenotypic characterization of these polymorphisms by lymphocyte enzyme activity (GST) and urine metabolite ratios (debrisoquine) is cumbersome for population studies. Recent cloning and sequencing of the mutant alleles of these genes has allowed genotyping via the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Advantages of PCR approaches are speed, technical simplicity, and minimal sample requirements. This article reviews the PCR-based methods for detection of genetic polymorphisms in human cancer susceptibility genes.

  14. Detection of Rickettsia rickettsii DNA in clinical specimens by using polymerase chain reaction technology.

    PubMed Central

    Tzianabos, T; Anderson, B E; McDade, J E

    1989-01-01

    A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) procedure for detecting rickettsial DNA was developed and shown to be specific for Rickettsia rickettsii and R. conorii, the etiologic agents of Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) and Boutonneuse fever, respectively. Blood clots were obtained from nine confirmed RMSF patients and six controls and analyzed for the presence of rickettsial DNA by the PCR method. A defined region of the rickettsial genome was successfully amplified from seven of the nine clinical specimens tested; all six control specimens gave negative results. These findings indicate that R. rickettsii can be detected early after the onset of RMSF, possibly facilitating the decision regarding appropriate antibiotic therapy for some patients. Further refinement of PCR technology could make this procedure a mainstay in the clinical laboratory. Images PMID:2512328

  15. Decapitation Improves Detection of Wolbachia pipientis (Rickettsiales: Anaplasmataceae) in Culex pipiens (Diptera: Culicidae) Mosquitoes by the Polymerase Chain Reaction

    PubMed Central

    BECKMANN, J. F.; FALLON, A. M.

    2013-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is often used to detect microorganisms, pathogens, or both, including the reproductive parasite Wolbachia pipientis (Rickettsiales: Anaplasmataceae), in mosquitoes. Natural populations of Culex pipiens L. (Diptera: Culicidae) mosquitoes are infected with one or more strains of W. pipientis, and crosses between mosquitoes harboring different Wolbachia strains provide one of the best-known examples of cytoplasmic incompatibililty (CI). When we used PCR to monitor Wolbachia in the Buckeye strain of Culex pipiens, and in a Wolbachia-cured sister colony obtained by tetracycline treatment, we noted false negative PCR reactions with DNA samples from infected mosquitoes; these results were inconsistent with direct microscopic observation of Wolbachia-like particles in gonads dissected from mosquitoes in the same population. Assays with diluted template often improved detection of positive samples, suggesting that DNA prepared from whole mosquitoes contained an inhibitor of the PCR reaction. We reconciled discrepancies between PCR and microscopy by systematic measurement of the PCR reaction in the presence of an internal standard. Mosquito decapitation before DNA extraction restored the reliability of the PCR reaction, allowing accurate determination of Wolbachia infection status in infected and tetracycline-cured mosquito populations, consistent with microscopic examination. Using PCR primers based on the Tr1 gene, we confirmed that the Wolbachia infection in the Buckeye strain of Culex pipiens belongs to the genotype designated wPip1. Finally, to explore more widely the distribution of PCR inhibitors, we demonstrated that DNA isolated from the cricket, Acheta domesticus (L.); the beetle, Tenebrio molitor L.; the honey bee, Apis mellifera L.; and the mosquito, Anopheles punctipennis Say also contained PCR inhibitors. These results underscore the importance of measuring the presence of inhibitors in PCR templates by using a known positive

  16. Identification of fast and slow growing rhizobia nodulating soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr) by a multiplex PCR reaction.

    PubMed

    Pastorino, G N; Martinez Alcántara, V; Balatti, P A

    2003-12-12

    Two DNA fragments, a 730-bp and a 900-bp fragment, one homologous to host cultivar specificity genes nolBT of Sinorhizobium fredii and the other one homologous to RSalpha, an insertion-like sequence present in Bradyrhizobium japonicum, were generated by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with two pairs of primers. The amount of each fragment generated by the multiplex PCR was proportional to the amount of template DNA present. The amplification of the 900-bp RSalpha fragment was more sensitive, since it was amplified from a smaller amount of template DNA than the 730-bp nolBT fragment. By running the multiplex reaction in the presence of template DNA isolated from different sources, we confirmed that the reaction can discriminate between S. fredii, Bradyrhizobium japonicum and Sinorhizobium xinjiangensis.

  17. A multiplex real-time polymerase chain reaction assay differentiates between Bolbphorus damnificus and Bolbophorus type II sp

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A duplex quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assay was developed to differentiate between Bolbophorus damnificus and Bolbophorus type II species cercariae. Both trematode species are prevalent throughout the commercial catfish industry,.as both infect the ram’s horn snail, Plano...

  18. Problem-Solving Test: Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2009-01-01

    Terms to be familiar with before you start to solve the test: polymerase chain reaction, DNA amplification, electrophoresis, breast cancer, "HER2" gene, genomic DNA, "in vitro" DNA synthesis, template, primer, Taq polymerase, 5[prime][right arrow]3[prime] elongation activity, 5[prime][right arrow]3[prime] exonuclease activity, deoxyribonucleoside…

  19. [The contamination under polymerase chain reaction studies: problems and solutions].

    PubMed

    Titov, V N; Ameliushkina, V A; Rozhkova, T A

    2015-01-01

    The study was carried out to determine risk factors of false positive and false negative results under polymerase chain reaction-analysis of clinical material. The samples with high viral load can be the source of false positive results. The contamination with nucleic acids can occur at any section of polymerase chain reaction analysis. The study data permitted to establish that the most sensitive stage is isolation and purification of nucleic acids especially under manual mode of operation. The detection of positive signal in most samples of one setting indicates total contamination. The cases when only several samples are polluted are special challenge. The presence of sample with high concentration of viral nucleic acid and several samples with low concentration in one setting means necessity of repeated analysis beginning with stage of isolation of nucleic acid. The analysis of curves of accumulation of products of amplification, their forms and positioning on chart is the obligatory stage of polymerase chain reaction study in real time regimen. These actions permit to exclude the readouts of false negative testing results to departments. The study conclusions are equipotent for polymerase chain reaction testing of any nucleic acid targets.

  20. Detection of Listeria monocytogenes by using the polymerase chain reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Bessesen, M.T.; Luo, Q.; Blaser, M.J.; Ellison, R.T. III.; Rotbart. H.A. )

    1990-09-01

    A method was developed for detection of Listeria monocytogens by polymerase chain reaction amplification followed by agarose gel electrophoresis or dot blot analysis with {sup 32}P-labeled internal probe. The technique identified 95 of 95 L. monocytogenes strains, 0 of 12 Listeria strains of other species, and 0 of 12 non-Listeria strains.

  1. A serotype-specific polymerase chain reaction for identification of Pasteurella multocida serotype 1

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rocke, Tonie E.; Smith, Susan R.; Miyamoto, Amy; Shadduck, Daniel J.

    2002-01-01

    A serotype-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was developed for detection and identification of Pasteurella multocida serotype 1, the causative agent of avian cholera in wild waterfowl. Arbitrarily primed PCR was used to detect DNA fragments that distinguish serotype 1 from the other 15 serotypes of P. multocida (with the exception of serotype 14). Oligonucleotide primers were constructed from these sequences, and a PCR assay was optimized and evaluated. PCR reactions consistently resulted in amplification products with reference strains 1 and 14 and all other serotype 1 strains tested, with cell numbers as low as 2.3 cells/ml. No amplification products were produced with other P. multocida serotypes or any other bacterial species tested. To compare the sensitivity and further test the specificity of this PCR assay with traditional culturing and serotyping techniques, tissue samples from 84 Pekin ducks inoculated with field strains of P. multocida and 54 wild lesser snow geese collected during an avian cholera outbreak were provided by other investigators working on avian cholera. PCR was as sensitive (58/64) as routine isolation (52/64) in detecting and identifying P. multocida serotype 1 from the livers of inoculated Pekins that became sick or died from avian cholera. No product was amplified from tissues of 20 other Pekin ducks that received serotypes other than type 1 (serotype 3, 12 × 3, or 10) or 12 control birds. Of the 54 snow geese necropsied and tested for P. multocida, our PCR detected and identified the bacteria from 44 compared with 45 by direct isolation. The serotype-specific PCR we developed was much faster and less labor intensive than traditional culturing and serotyping procedures and could result in diagnosis of serotype 1 pasteurellosis within 24 hr of specimen submission.

  2. A disposable, continuous-flow polymerase chain reaction device: design, fabrication and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Ragsdale, Victoria; Li, Huizhong; Sant, Himanshu; Ameel, Tim; Gale, Bruce K

    2016-08-01

    Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) is used to amplify a specific segment of DNA through a thermal cycling protocol. The PCR industry is shifting its focus away from macro-scale systems and towards micro-scale devices because: micro-scale sample sizes require less blood from patients, total reaction times are on the order of minutes opposed to hours, and there are cost advantages as many microfluidic devices are manufactured from inexpensive polymers. Some of the fastest PCR devices use continuous flow, but they have all been built of silicon or glass to allow sufficient heat transfer. This article presents a disposable polycarbonate (PC) device that is capable of achieving real-time, continuous flow PCR in a completely disposable polymer device in less than 13 minutes by thermally cycling the sample through an established temperature gradient in a serpentine channel. The desired temperature gradient was determined through simulations and validated by experiments which showed that PCR was achieved. Practical demonstration included amplification of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) derived cDNA.

  3. A multiplex polymerase chain reaction for discriminating Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae from Erysipelothrix tonsillarum.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Yoshinao

    2006-07-01

    Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae is the causative agent of swine erysipelas, and it causes great economic losses in Japan and worldwide. In meat inspection, it is very important to distinguish E. rhusiopathiae from other bacteria showing similar clinical signs of disease or similar bacterial characteristics. To distinguish E. rhusiopathiae from Erysipelothrix tonsillarum, 2 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) systems were combined. The primer sets ERY-1F and ERY-2R were designed to amplify 2210 base pairs (bp) of nucleotide sequence specific for E. rhusiopathiae chromosomal DNA, and the primer sets MO101 and ERS-1R were designed to amplify 719 bp of nucleotide sequence including a highly conserved region of genus Erysipelothrix 16S rRNA. Two fragments were amplified when E. rhusiopathiae was used as the PCR template using the primer sets, whereas a single fragment was amplified when E. tonsillarum was used as the template. No fragments were amplified when nucleic acid from other bacteria that cause clinical signs similar to swine erysipelas were used as the template. Moreover, 5 specimens collected from postinspected swine carcasses were diagnosed as E. rhusiopathiae using the PCR described in this study, in agreement with results of microbiological tests for the genus Erysipelothrix, whereas negative samples were negative both in conventional bacterial tests and by PCR. The detection limit of multiplex PCR ranged from 10(2) to 10(4) colony forming units per reaction tube for positive samples. These results suggest that this method is useful for screening of swine erysipelas in meat inspection centers.

  4. A new method for quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction data analysis.

    PubMed

    Rao, Xiayu; Lai, Dejian; Huang, Xuelin

    2013-09-01

    Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) is a sensitive gene quantification method that has been extensively used in biological and biomedical fields. The currently used methods for PCR data analysis, including the threshold cycle method and linear and nonlinear model-fitting methods, all require subtracting background fluorescence. However, the removal of background fluorescence can hardly be accurate and therefore can distort results. We propose a new method, the taking-difference linear regression method, to overcome this limitation. Briefly, for each two consecutive PCR cycles, we subtract the fluorescence in the former cycle from that in the latter cycle, transforming the n cycle raw data into n-1 cycle data. Then, linear regression is applied to the natural logarithm of the transformed data. Finally, PCR amplification efficiencies and the initial DNA molecular numbers are calculated for each reaction. This taking-difference method avoids the error in subtracting an unknown background, and thus it is more accurate and reliable. This method is easy to perform, and this strategy can be extended to all current methods for PCR data analysis.

  5. Assembling long heteroduplexes by asymmetric polymerase chain reaction and annealing the resulting single-stranded DNAs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mugui; Wei, Chuchu; Ye, Xiufen; Liu, Jianping; Zhang, Cuicui; Chen, Hao; Zhang, Xiaobo; Tu, Jumin

    2015-04-15

    We developed an effective protocol for generating high-purity heteroduplexes via annealing single-stranded DNAs (ssDNAs) derived from plasmid DNA by asymmetric polymerase chain reaction (A-PCR). With the addition of dimethyl sulfoxide, a one-step A-PCR procedure can generate ssDNAs stably at a range of reaction temperatures. Several annealing buffers can anneal two ssDNAs into heteroduplexes effectively. We further developed a simple strategy to create d(GATC) hemimethylated heteroduplexes by annealing fully methylated homoduplexes in the presence of excessive unmethylated ssDNAs. The constructed heteroduplexes have been well tested as substrates for mismatch repair in Escherichia coli and, thus, can be used in various biotechnology applications.

  6. Direct detection of Bacillus anthracis DNA in animals by polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Makino, S I; Iinuma-Okada, Y; Maruyama, T; Ezaki, T; Sasakawa, C; Yoshikawa, M

    1993-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis is a soil pathogen capable of causing anthrax. To establish a method for specifically detecting B. anthracis for practical applications, such as for the inspection of slaughterhouses, the cap region, which is essential for encapsulation in B. anthracis, was used in a DNA hybridization study by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Oligonucleotide primers were designed to amplify a 288-bp DNA fragment within the capA gene by PCR. The amplified DNA sequence specifically hybridized to the DNA of B. anthracis but not to that of other bacterial strains tested. Since this PCR-based method efficiently and specifically detected the capA sequence of bacteria in blood and spleen samples of mice within 8 h after the administration of live B. anthracis, this PCR system could be used for practical applications. By using lysis methods in preparing the samples for PCR, it was possible to amplify the 288-bp DNA segment from samples containing very few bacteria, as few as only 1 sporeforming unit, indicating that the PCR detection method developed in this study will permit the monitoring of B. anthracis contamination in the environment. Images PMID:8458949

  7. Ion-Mediated Polymerase Chain Reactions Performed with an Electronically Driven Microfluidic Device.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Li, Qian; Guo, Linjie; Huang, Qing; Shi, Jiye; Yang, Yang; Liu, Dongsheng; Fan, Chunhai

    2016-09-26

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a powerful method for exponentially amplifying very low amounts of target DNA from genetic, clinical, and forensic samples. However, the heating and cooling steps in PCR largely hamper the miniaturization of thermocyclers for on-site detection of pathogens and point-of-care tests. Herein, we devise an ion-mediated PCR (IM-PCR) strategy by exploiting ion-induced DNA denaturation/renaturation cycles. DNA duplexes are effectively denatured in alkaline solutions; whereas, the denatured single-stranded DNA strands readily reform duplexes at neutral pH. By using an integrated microchip that can programmably control the solution pH simply switching the potential in a range of several hundred millivolts, we can trigger IM-PCR at a constant temperature. Analogously to thermal cycling, 30 cycles of pH-induced denaturation/renaturation were used to amplify protein DNA fragments as confirmed by DNA sequencing. We anticipate that this portable, low-cost, and scalable IM-PCR holds great promise for widespread biological, clinical, and environmental applications.

  8. Nanostructured biochip for label-free and real-time optical detection of polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Hiep, Ha Minh; Kerman, Kagan; Endo, Tatsuro; Saito, Masato; Tamiya, Eiichi

    2010-02-19

    In this report, Au-coated nanostructured biochip with functionalized thiolated primers on its surface is developed for label-free and real-time optical detection of polymerase chain reaction (PCR). A PCR chamber of 150 microm in thickness containing Au-coated nanostructured substrate in the bottom layer was bordered with SU-8 100 walls. After immobilization of 5'-thiolated primers on the surface, simultaneous DNA amplification and detection were performed without any labeled molecules via the relative reflected intensity (RRI) of Au-coated nanostructured substrate. When human genomic DNA at several concentrations of 0.2, 0.5 and 1 ng microL(-1) was included in the initial DNA samples, the increases in the RRI peak values were clearly observed with the increasing PCR cycle numbers. We found that the starting point of the optical signal, which was divergent from the background in our PCR biochip, was around 3-4 cycles, much lower than that of the fluorescent real-time PCR analysis (around 23-25 cycles). Our proposed PCR device using Au-coated nanostructured substrate holds noteworthy promise for rapid, label-free and real-time DNA detection for point-of-care testing (POCT) applications.

  9. Detection of Giardia cysts by using the polymerase chain reaction and distinguishing live from dead cysts.

    PubMed Central

    Mahbubani, M H; Bej, A K; Perlin, M; Schaefer, F W; Jakubowski, W; Atlas, R M

    1991-01-01

    A method was developed for the detection of Giardia cysts by using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and the giardin gene as the target. DNA amplification by PCR, using giardin DNA as the target, resulted in detection of both live and dead cysts. When giardin mRNA was used as the target, the ability to amplify cDNA by PCR depended on the mode of killing. Cysts killed by freezing were not detected by PCR when giardin mRNA was the target. Cysts killed by heating or exposure to monochloramine, however, gave positive detection signals for both DNA and giardin mRNA targets. The amount of giardin mRNA and total RNA was significantly increased in live cysts following the induction of excystation. Cysts killed by freezing, heating, or exposure to monochloramine did not show a change in RNA content. The detection of the giardin gene by PCR permits a sensitive and specific diagnosis for Giardia spp. Discrimination between live and dead cysts can be made by measuring the amounts of RNA or PCR-amplified product from the giardin mRNA target before and after the induction of excystation. Images PMID:1785923

  10. Sensitive Detection of Thirteen Bacterial Vaginosis-Associated Agents Using Multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Malaguti, Natália; Bahls, Larissa Danielle; Uchimura, Nelson Shozo; Gimenes, Fabrícia; Consolaro, Marcia Edilaine Lopes

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is characterized by a polymicrobial proliferation of anaerobic bacteria and depletion of lactobacilli, which are components of natural vaginal microbiota. Currently, there are limited conventional methods for BV diagnosis, and these methods are time-consuming, expensive, and rarely allow for the detection of more than one agent simultaneously. Therefore, we conceived and validated a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (M-PCR) assay for the simultaneous screening of thirteen bacterial vaginosis-associated agents (BV-AAs) related to symptomatic BV: Gardnerella vaginalis, Mobiluncus curtisii, Mobiluncus mulieris, Bacteroides fragilis, Mycoplasma hominis, Atopobium vaginae, Ureaplasma urealyticum, Megasphaera type I, Clostridia-like bacteria vaginosis-associated bacteria (BVABs) 1, 2, and 3, Sneathia sanguinegens, and Mycoplasma genitalium. The overall validation parameters of M-PCR compared to single PCR (sPCR) were extremely high, including agreement of 99.1% and sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive values of 100.0%, negative predictive value of 97.0%, accuracy of 99.3%, and agreement with Nugent results of 100.0%. The prevalence of BV-AAs was very high (72.6%), and simultaneous agents were detected in 53.0%, which demonstrates the effectiveness of the M-PCR assay. Therefore, the M-PCR assay has great potential to impact BV diagnostic methods in vaginal samples and diminish associated complications in the near future. PMID:26078959

  11. Sensitive Detection of Thirteen Bacterial Vaginosis-Associated Agents Using Multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction.

    PubMed

    Malaguti, Natália; Bahls, Larissa Danielle; Uchimura, Nelson Shozo; Gimenes, Fabrícia; Consolaro, Marcia Edilaine Lopes

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is characterized by a polymicrobial proliferation of anaerobic bacteria and depletion of lactobacilli, which are components of natural vaginal microbiota. Currently, there are limited conventional methods for BV diagnosis, and these methods are time-consuming, expensive, and rarely allow for the detection of more than one agent simultaneously. Therefore, we conceived and validated a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (M-PCR) assay for the simultaneous screening of thirteen bacterial vaginosis-associated agents (BV-AAs) related to symptomatic BV: Gardnerella vaginalis, Mobiluncus curtisii, Mobiluncus mulieris, Bacteroides fragilis, Mycoplasma hominis, Atopobium vaginae, Ureaplasma urealyticum, Megasphaera type I, Clostridia-like bacteria vaginosis-associated bacteria (BVABs) 1, 2, and 3, Sneathia sanguinegens, and Mycoplasma genitalium. The overall validation parameters of M-PCR compared to single PCR (sPCR) were extremely high, including agreement of 99.1% and sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive values of 100.0%, negative predictive value of 97.0%, accuracy of 99.3%, and agreement with Nugent results of 100.0%. The prevalence of BV-AAs was very high (72.6%), and simultaneous agents were detected in 53.0%, which demonstrates the effectiveness of the M-PCR assay. Therefore, the M-PCR assay has great potential to impact BV diagnostic methods in vaginal samples and diminish associated complications in the near future.

  12. A highly sensitive immuno-polymerase chain reaction assay for Clostridium botulinum neurotoxin type A.

    PubMed

    Chao, Hai-Yuan; Wang, Yeau-Ching; Tang, Shiao-Shek; Liu, Hwan-Wun

    2004-01-01

    Our goal was to develop a sensitive method for detecting Clostridium botulinum neurotoxin type A (BoNT/A). We were able to detect BoNT/A in the femtogram (10(-15)g) range using an indirect immuno-polymerase chain reaction (immuno-PCR) assay and an indirect sandwich immuno-PCR assay. For the indirect immuno-PCR assay, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) plates were coated with BoNT/A that was recognized by anti-BoNT/A monoclonal antibody. For the indirect sandwich immuno-PCR assay, the monoclonal antibody was immobilized on ELISA plates for detecting BoNT/A that was recognized by its polyclonal antibodies. Reporter DNA was prepared by PCR amplification using biotinylated 5'-primers, and it was coupled with biotinylated antibodies through streptavidin. In order to increase sensitivity and reduce background noise, the amounts of reporter DNA (ranging from 50 fg to 50 ng) and streptavidin (ranging from 0.125 ng to 8 ng) were optimized. Using the optimized concentration of reporter DNA and streptavidin, both indirect and indirect sandwich immuno-PCR assays detected BoNT/A as low as 50 fg. These results are a 10(5)-fold improvement over conventional indirect ELISA and indirect sandwich ELISA methods. The assays we developed are currently the most sensitive methods for detecting BoNT/A.

  13. Trends and advances in food analysis by real-time polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Salihah, Nur Thaqifah; Hossain, Mohammad Mosharraf; Lubis, Hamadah; Ahmed, Minhaz Uddin

    2016-05-01

    Analyses to ensure food safety and quality are more relevant now because of rapid changes in the quantity, diversity and mobility of food. Food-contamination must be determined to maintain health and up-hold laws, as well as for ethical and cultural concerns. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), a rapid and inexpensive quantitative method to detect the presence of targeted DNA-segments in samples, helps in determining both accidental and intentional adulterations of foods by biological contaminants. This review presents recent developments in theory, techniques, and applications of RT-PCR in food analyses, RT-PCR addresses the limitations of traditional food analyses in terms of sensitivity, range of analytes, multiplexing ability, cost, time, and point-of-care applications. A range of targets, including species of plants or animals which are used as food ingredients, food-borne bacteria or viruses, genetically modified organisms, and allergens, even in highly processed foods can be identified by RT-PCR, even at very low concentrations. Microfluidic RT-PCR eliminates the separate sample-processing step to create opportunities for point-of-care analyses. We also cover the challenges related to using RT-PCR for food analyses, such as the need to further improve sample handling.

  14. [Species-specific detection of Proteus vulgaris and Proteus mirabilis by the polymerase chain reaction].

    PubMed

    Limanskiĭ, A; Minukhin, V; Limanskaia, O; Pavlenko, N; Mishina, M; Tsygenenko, A

    2005-01-01

    Sets of primers for the species-specific detection of P. mirabilis and P. vulgaris by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) were developed. As targets for these primers beta-lactamase and 16S rRNA gene fragments were chosen on the basis of the multiple leveling of the sequences of the DNA of all known P. mirabilis and P. vulgaris isolates. For differential detection oligonucleotides were selected in such a way that primers, specific for P. vulgaris, contained the non-paired nucleotide for P. mirabilis isolate at the 3'-end, and all other nucleotides were complementary to the beta-lactamase gene fragment. Primers, specific for gene 16S rRNA of P. mirabilis, contained the non-paired nucleotide for P. vulgaris isolates at the 3'-end. Standard PCR was carried out for 6 P. mirabilis and P. vulgaris strains. The use of PCR species-specific primers to P. vulgaris DNA made it possible to amplify the DNA fragment of the expected length only for P. vulgaris isolates, while the result of PCR for P. mirabilis was negative. PCR with primers specific to P. mirabilis permitted the detection of amplicon sized 101 nucleotides pairs only for P. mirabilis strains. These primers were optimized so as to use them in the specific differentiation of closely related P. mirabilis and P. vulgaris species by multiplex PCR. Genus-specific primers permitted the detection of bacterial gyrB gene of the genus Proteus were developed also.

  15. Absolute quantification of genetically modified MON810 maize (Zea mays L.) by digital polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Corbisier, Philippe; Bhat, Somanath; Partis, Lina; Xie, Vicki Rui Dan; Emslie, Kerry R

    2010-03-01

    Quantitative analysis of genetically modified (GM) foods requires estimation of the amount of the transgenic event relative to an endogenous gene. Regulatory authorities in the European Union (EU) have defined the labelling threshold for GM food on the copy number ratio between the transgenic event and an endogenous gene. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is currently being used for quantification of GM organisms (GMOs). Limitations in real-time PCR applications to detect very low number of DNA targets has led to new developments such as the digital PCR (dPCR) which allows accurate measurement of DNA copies without the need for a reference calibrator. In this paper, the amount of maize MON810 and hmg copies present in a DNA extract from seed powders certified for their mass content and for their copy number ratio was measured by dPCR. The ratio of these absolute copy numbers determined by dPCR was found to be identical to the ratios measured by real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) using a plasmid DNA calibrator. These results indicate that both methods could be applied to determine the copy number ratio in MON810. The reported values were in agreement with estimations from a model elaborated to convert mass fractions into copy number fractions in MON810 varieties. This model was challenged on two MON810 varieties used for the production of MON810 certified reference materials (CRMs) which differ in the parental origin of the introduced GM trait. We conclude that dPCR has a high metrological quality and can be used for certifying GM CRMs in terms of DNA copy number ratio.

  16. Aseptic meningitis caused by Leptospira spp diagnosed by polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Romero, Eliete Caló; Blanco, Roberta Morozetti; Yasuda, Paulo Hideki

    2010-12-01

    Leptospirosis is a zoonotic disease caused by the pathogenic Leptospira spp. The clinical presentations are diverse, ranging from undifferentiated fever to fulminant disease including meningeal forms. The neurological leptospirosis forms are usually neglected. The aim of this study was to investigate leptospirosis as the cause of aseptic meningitis using different diagnostic techniques including the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Thirty-nine cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples from patients presenting with meningeal abnormalities, predominance of lymphocytes and negative results by traditional microbiological tests were processed by leptospiral culture, anti-leptospiral antibody response and PCR. Leptospira spp DNA was detected in 23 (58.97%) of the CSF samples. Anti-leptospiral antibodies were found in 13 (33.33%) CSF samples. Twelve CSF samples were positive by PCR assay and negative by microscopic agglutination test (MAT) assay. Two CSF samples were positive by MAT and negative by PCR. The positive and negative agreement between both tests was 11 and 14, respectively. CSF samples from six cases of unknown diagnosis were positive by PCR assay. Eight cases showed positive results using PCR and MAT. Leptospirosis could be detected by PCR assay from the 3rd-26th day after illness onset. The sensitivity of the PCR was assessed with confirmed cases of leptospirosis (by MAT) and found to be 89.5%. All CSFs were negative by culture. PCR was found to be a powerful tool for diagnosing meningitis cases of leptospirosis. We recommend that it may be used as a supplementary diagnostic tool, especially in the early stages of the disease, when other diagnostic techniques such as serology are not sensitive.

  17. Use of the polymerase chain reaction to detect Mycobacterium leprae in urine.

    PubMed

    Caleffi, K R; Hirata, R D C; Hirata, M H; Caleffi, E R; Siqueira, V L D; Cardoso, R F

    2012-02-01

    Leprosy is an infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae. The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) has been applied to detect M. leprae in different clinical samples and urine seems to be attractive for this purpose. PCR was used to improve the sensitivity for diagnosing leprosy by amplifying a 151-bp PCR fragment of the M. leprae pra gene (PCR-Pra) in urine samples. Seventy-three leprosy patients (39 males and 34 females, 14 to 78 years old) were selected for leprosy diagnosis at a reference laboratory in Maringá, PR, Brazil. Of these, 36 were under anti-leprosy multidrug therapy with dapsone and rifampicin for tuberculoid (TT) and dapsone, rifampicin and clofazimine for borderline (BB) and lepromatous (LL) forms. The control group contained 50 healthy individuals without any clinical history of leprosy. DNA isolated from leprosy patients' urine samples was successfully amplified by PCR-Pra in 46.6% (34/73) of the cases. The positivity of PCR-Pra for patients with the TT form was 75% for both patients under treatment and non-treated patients (P = 0.1306). In patients with the LL form, PCR-Pra positivity was 52 and 30% for patients under treatment and non-treated patients, respectively (P = 0.2386). PCR-Pra showed a statistically significant difference in detecting M. leprae between the TT and LL forms of leprosy in patients under treatment (P = 0.0033). Although the current study showed that the proposed PCR-Pra has some limitations in the detection of M. leprae, this method has the potential to be a useful tool for leprosy diagnosis mainly in TT leprosy where the AFB slit-skin smear is always negative.

  18. Chain Copolymerization Reactions: An Algorithm to Predict the Reaction Evolution with Conversion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallardo, Alberto; Aguilar, Maria Rosa; Abraham, Gustavo A.; Roman, Julio San

    2004-01-01

    An algorithm is developed to study and understand the behavior of chain copolymerization reactions. When a binary copolymerization reaction follows the terminal model, Conversion is able to predict the evolution of different parameters, such as instantaneous and cumulative copolymer molar fractions, or molar fractions of any sequence with the…

  19. Nested polymerase chain reaction amplification and sequencing analysis of the light-chain and heavy-chain variable regions in the influenza A H1N1 virus hemagglutinin monoclonal antibody gene.

    PubMed

    Li, H J; Guo, C Y; Sun, J Y; Sun, L J; Zhao, P H; Hu, L; Li, Y; Hu, J

    2014-06-11

    The nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method was used for the amplification of the influenza A H1N1 virus hemagglutinin monoclonal antibody light-chain and heavy-chain genes. Sequence analysis of the obtained genes was then used to identify common cloning methods of the mouse immunoglobulin-kappa (Igκ) light-chain and heavy-chain variable gene regions. Twenty-two pairs of amplification primers for the mouse Igκ light-chain and heavy-chain variable gene regions were designed, and 6 mouse anti-human H1N1 influenza virus hemagglutinin monoclonal antibody light-chain and heavy-chain variable gene regions were cloned and sequenced. Comparative analysis was conducted between our results and the mouse Ig sequences published in the National Center of Biotechnology Information (NCBI). The nested PCR method effectively avoided cloning the pseudogenes of the monoclonal antibody, and the amino acid sequence obtained was consistent with the characteristics of the mouse Ig variable region. A general method of cloning the mouse Ig light-chain and heavy-chain variable gene regions was established, which provides a basis for further cloning of mouse monoclonal antibody variable gene regions. This study also provides data for further studies of H1N1 influenza virus hemagglutinin antibody binding sites.

  20. MAMMALIAN DNA IN PCR REAGENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ancient DNA analysis is becoming widespread. These studies use polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to amplify minute quantities of heavily damaged template. Unusual steps are taken to achieve the sensitivity necessary to detect ancient DNA, including high- cycle PCR amplification t...

  1. Rapid and inexpensive species differentiation using a multiplex real-time polymerase chain reaction high-resolution melt assay.

    PubMed

    Elkins, Kelly M; Perez, Anjelica C U; Sweetin, Katherine C

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate a method for developing real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) high-resolution melt (HRM) assays to identify multiple species present in a mixture simultaneously using LCGreen Plus and melt temperatures. Highly specific PCR primers are designed to yield amplicons with different melt temperatures for simple routine species identification compared with differentiating melt curve kinetics traces or difference plots. This method is robust and automatable, and it leads to savings in time and reagent costs, is easily modified to probe any species of interest, eliminates the need for post-PCR gel or capillary electrophoresis in routine assays, and requires no expensive dye-labeled primers.

  2. Evaluation of a real-time polymerase chain reaction assay of the outer membrane protein P2 gene for the detection of Haemophilus parasuis in clinical samples

    PubMed Central

    McDowall, Rebeccah; Slavic, Durda; MacInnes, Janet I.; Cai, Hugh Y.

    2014-01-01

    A real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay of the outer membrane protein (OMP) P2 gene was developed and used to test 97 putative Haemophilus parasuis pure cultures and 175 clinical tissue samples. With standard culture isolation as the gold standard, the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of the PCR assay were determined to be 83% and 80%, respectively. PMID:24688178

  3. Optimized nested polymerase chain reaction for antemortem detection of Mycobacteria in Amazon parrots (Amazona aestiva) and orange-winged Amazons (Amazona amazonica).

    PubMed

    Baquião, Arianne Costa; Luna, Janaina Oliveira; Medina, Aziz Orro; Sanfilippo, Luiz Francisco; de Faria, Maria Jacinta; dos Santos, Manuel Armando Azevedo

    2014-03-01

    The objectives of this study were to optimize nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for Mycobacterium avium complex and Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex and apply them on samples from parrots. Results were negative for the presence of these Mycobacterium in the samples, and nested PCR was specific, faster, and more sensitive than other tests, thereby justifying its use in antemortem diagnosis.

  4. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction improves conventional microbiological diagnosis in an outbreak of brucellosis due to ingestion of unpasteurized goat cheese.

    PubMed

    Colmenero, Juan D; Clavijo, Encarnación; Morata, Pilar; Bravo, María J; Queipo-Ortuño, María I

    2011-11-01

    Rapid diagnosis of individuals involved in brucellosis outbreaks can sometimes be difficult with conventional microbiological techniques. We analyzed, for the first time, the diagnostic yield of a real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay in a family outbreak of brucellosis due to consumption of unpasteurized goat cheese. PCR correctly identified all symptomatic cases.

  5. A real time polymerase chain reaction assay for quantification of Edwardsiella ictaluri in catfish pond water and genetic homogeneity of diagnostic case isolates from Mississippi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assay was developed for the detection and quantification of Edwardsiella ictaluri in channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus pond water using modifications to a published E. ictaluri–specific qPCR assay and previously established protocols for the molecula...

  6. Dynamic optimization of on-chip polymerase chain reaction by monitoring intracycle fluorescence using fast synchronous detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Sudip; Paul, Debjani; Venkataraman, V.

    2007-01-01

    The authors report on-chip dynamic optimization of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based on a feedback technique utilizing synchronous detection of intracycle fluorescence every 500ms. From a direct measurement of polymerase activity, the authors determine the optimum extension temperature. The authors dynamically optimize PCR in an inductively heated microchip by sensing the saturation of extension in each cycle and applying the feedback. They demonstrate that, even with fast ramp rates, dynamic optimization leads to faster reactions compared to fixed-duration extension protocols for long DNA (>500bp). This optimization scheme uses a fairly universal dye Sybr Green I and can be applied to most PCRs.

  7. A chain reaction approach to modelling gene pathways

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Gary C.; Chen, Dung-Tsa; Chen, James J.; Soong, Seng-jaw; Lamartiniere, Coral; Barnes, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Background Of great interest in cancer prevention is how nutrient components affect gene pathways associated with the physiological events of puberty. Nutrient-gene interactions may cause changes in breast or prostate cells and, therefore, may result in cancer risk later in life. Analysis of gene pathways can lead to insights about nutrient-gene interactions and the development of more effective prevention approaches to reduce cancer risk. To date, researchers have relied heavily upon experimental assays (such as microarray analysis, etc.) to identify genes and their associated pathways that are affected by nutrient and diets. However, the vast number of genes and combinations of gene pathways, coupled with the expense of the experimental analyses, has delayed the progress of gene-pathway research. The development of an analytical approach based on available test data could greatly benefit the evaluation of gene pathways, and thus advance the study of nutrient-gene interactions in cancer prevention. In the present study, we have proposed a chain reaction model to simulate gene pathways, in which the gene expression changes through the pathway are represented by the species undergoing a set of chemical reactions. We have also developed a numerical tool to solve for the species changes due to the chain reactions over time. Through this approach we can examine the impact of nutrient-containing diets on the gene pathway; moreover, transformation of genes over time with a nutrient treatment can be observed numerically, which is very difficult to achieve experimentally. We apply this approach to microarray analysis data from an experiment which involved the effects of three polyphenols (nutrient treatments), epigallo-catechin-3-O-gallate (EGCG), genistein, and resveratrol, in a study of nutrient-gene interaction in the estrogen synthesis pathway during puberty. Results In this preliminary study, the estrogen synthesis pathway was simulated by a chain reaction model. By

  8. A chain reaction approach to modelling gene pathways.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Gary C; Chen, Dung-Tsa; Chen, James J; Soong, Seng-Jaw; Lamartiniere, Coral; Barnes, Stephen

    2012-08-01

    BACKGROUND: Of great interest in cancer prevention is how nutrient components affect gene pathways associated with the physiological events of puberty. Nutrient-gene interactions may cause changes in breast or prostate cells and, therefore, may result in cancer risk later in life. Analysis of gene pathways can lead to insights about nutrient-gene interactions and the development of more effective prevention approaches to reduce cancer risk. To date, researchers have relied heavily upon experimental assays (such as microarray analysis, etc.) to identify genes and their associated pathways that are affected by nutrient and diets. However, the vast number of genes and combinations of gene pathways, coupled with the expense of the experimental analyses, has delayed the progress of gene-pathway research. The development of an analytical approach based on available test data could greatly benefit the evaluation of gene pathways, and thus advance the study of nutrient-gene interactions in cancer prevention. In the present study, we have proposed a chain reaction model to simulate gene pathways, in which the gene expression changes through the pathway are represented by the species undergoing a set of chemical reactions. We have also developed a numerical tool to solve for the species changes due to the chain reactions over time. Through this approach we can examine the impact of nutrient-containing diets on the gene pathway; moreover, transformation of genes over time with a nutrient treatment can be observed numerically, which is very difficult to achieve experimentally. We apply this approach to microarray analysis data from an experiment which involved the effects of three polyphenols (nutrient treatments), epigallo-catechin-3-O-gallate (EGCG), genistein, and resveratrol, in a study of nutrient-gene interaction in the estrogen synthesis pathway during puberty. RESULTS: In this preliminary study, the estrogen synthesis pathway was simulated by a chain reaction model. By

  9. Investigation of polymerase chain reaction assays to improve detection of bacterial involvement in bovine respiratory disease.

    PubMed

    Bell, Colin J; Blackburn, Paul; Elliott, Mark; Patterson, Tony I A P; Ellison, Sean; Lahuerta-Marin, Angela; Ball, Hywel J

    2014-09-01

    Bovine respiratory disease (BRD) causes severe economic losses to the cattle farming industry worldwide. The major bacterial organisms contributing to the BRD complex are Mannheimia haemolytica, Histophilus somni, Mycoplasma bovis, Pasteurella multocida, and Trueperella pyogenes. The postmortem detection of these organisms in pneumonic lung tissue is generally conducted using standard culture-based techniques where the presence of therapeutic antibiotics in the tissue can inhibit bacterial isolation. In the current study, conventional and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays were used to assess the prevalence of these 5 organisms in grossly pneumonic lung samples from 150 animals submitted for postmortem examination, and the results were compared with those obtained using culture techniques. Mannheimia haemolytica was detected in 51 cases (34%) by PCR and in 33 cases (22%) by culture, H. somni was detected in 35 cases (23.3%) by PCR and in 6 cases (4%) by culture, Myc. bovis was detected in 53 cases (35.3%) by PCR and in 29 cases (19.3%) by culture, P. multocida was detected in 50 cases (33.3%) by PCR and in 31 cases (20.7%) by culture, and T. pyogenes was detected in 42 cases (28%) by PCR and in 31 cases (20.7%) by culture, with all differences being statistically significant. The PCR assays indicated positive results for 111 cases (74%) whereas 82 cases (54.6%) were culture positive. The PCR assays have demonstrated a significantly higher rate of detection of all 5 organisms in cases of pneumonia in cattle in Northern Ireland than was detected by current standard procedures.

  10. A power-efficient thermocycler based on induction heating for DNA amplification by polymerase chain reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Debjani; Venkataraman, V.; Mohan, K. Naga; Chandra, H. Sharat; Natarajan, Vasant

    2004-09-01

    We have built a thermocycler based on the principles of induction heating for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of target sequences in DNA samples of interest. The cycler has an average heating rate of ˜0.8 °C/s and a cooling rate of ˜0.5 °C/s, and typically takes ˜4 h to complete a 40-cycle PCR protocol. It is power-efficient (˜6 W per reaction tube), micro-processor controlled, and can be adapted for battery operation. Using this instrument, we have successfully amplified a 350 bp segment from a plasmid and SRY, the human sex determining gene, which occurs as a single-copy sequence in genomic DNA of human males. The PCR products from this thermocycler are comparable to those obtained by the use of commercially available machines. Its easy front-end operation, low-power design, portability and low cost makes it suitable for diagnostic field applications of PCR.

  11. A reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction assay for detecting Highlands J virus.

    PubMed

    Whitehouse, C A; Guibeau, A; McGuire, D; Takeda, T; Mather, T N

    2001-01-01

    Highlands J (HJ) virus is an arbovirus frequently recovered at high rates in mosquitoes collected in the eastern United States. HJ virus is primarily a veterinary pathogen causing disease in domestic birds including turkeys, chickens, and partridges. It has an enzootic cycle similar to eastern equine encephalitis (EEE) virus and is often used as an indicator species in EEE surveillance programs. Current immunologic techniques to identify HJ virus are often inefficient and can involve cross-reactivity of antibodies. Therefore, we developed a molecular-based assay by a reverse transcriptase (RT)-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique. Primers were constructed from conserved sequences of the E1 coding region from 19 strains of HJ virus. PCR amplifications from serial dilutions of HJ virus-infected Vero cell culture supernatants indicated that this assay could detect viral RNA at concentrations of 10 plaque-forming units per reaction. Extracted RNAs from western equine encephalitis, EEE, LaCrosse, and Jamestown Canyon viruses were not detected with this assay. RNA extracted directly from the brain tissue of a dead house sparrow and from a pool of Culiseta mosquitoes yielded a PCR product of the expected size. The RT-PCR technique developed was both sensitive and specific for detecting HJ virus from infected cell culture supernatants, bird brain tissues, and mosquitoes. This new assay will permit rapid and accurate diagnosis of HJ virus, both enhancing surveillance activities for EEE transmission risk and monitoring infections in domestic poultry and wild birds.

  12. Development of a polymerase chain reaction assay for the detection of pseudorabies virus in clinical samples

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, Lester J.; de Arce, Heidy Díaz

    2009-01-01

    Aujeszky’s disease, also known as pseudorabies causes severe economic losses in swine industry and affects the pig husbandry all over the world. The conventional diagnostic procedure is time-consuming and false-negative results may occur in submissions from latently infected animals. The development, optimization and evaluation of a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay are presented for the diagnosis of pseudorabies infection. This assay was based on the amplification of a highly conserved viral gD gene fragment. PCR products of the expected size were obtained from PRV strains. Non-specific reactions were not observed when a related herpesvirus, other porcine DNA genome viruses and uninfected cells were used to assess PCR. The analytical sensitivity of the test was estimated to be 1.34 TCID50/ 50 uL. The analysis of tissue homogenate samples from naturally infected animals proved the potential usefulness of the method for a rapid disease diagnosis from field cases. A rapid, sensitive and specific PCR-based diagnostic assay to detect pseudorabies virus in clinical samples is provided. PMID:24031383

  13. Development of a polymerase chain reaction assay for the detection of pseudorabies virus in clinical samples.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Lester J; de Arce, Heidy Díaz

    2009-07-01

    Aujeszky's disease, also known as pseudorabies causes severe economic losses in swine industry and affects the pig husbandry all over the world. The conventional diagnostic procedure is time-consuming and false-negative results may occur in submissions from latently infected animals. The development, optimization and evaluation of a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay are presented for the diagnosis of pseudorabies infection. This assay was based on the amplification of a highly conserved viral gD gene fragment. PCR products of the expected size were obtained from PRV strains. Non-specific reactions were not observed when a related herpesvirus, other porcine DNA genome viruses and uninfected cells were used to assess PCR. The analytical sensitivity of the test was estimated to be 1.34 TCID50/ 50 uL. The analysis of tissue homogenate samples from naturally infected animals proved the potential usefulness of the method for a rapid disease diagnosis from field cases. A rapid, sensitive and specific PCR-based diagnostic assay to detect pseudorabies virus in clinical samples is provided.

  14. A novel mechanism for direct real-time polymerase chain reaction that does not require DNA isolation from prokaryotic cells.

    PubMed

    Soejima, Takashi; Xiao, Jin-Zhong; Abe, Fumiaki

    2016-06-23

    Typically, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is performed after DNA isolation. Real-time PCR (qPCR), also known as direct qPCR in mammalian cells with weak membranes, is a common technique using crude samples subjected to preliminary boiling to elute DNA. However, applying this methodology to prokaryotic cells, which have solid cell walls, in contrast to mammalian cells which immediately burst in water, can result in poor detection. We successfully achieved PCR elongation with the addition of 1.3 cfu of Cronobacter muytjensii to a newly developed direct qPCR master mix without performing any crude DNA extraction (detection limit of 1.6 × 10(0) cfu/ml for the test sample compared with a detection limit of 1.6 × 10(3) cfu/ml primarily for crude (boiling) or classical DNA isolation). We revealed that the chromosomal DNA retained in prokaryotic cells can function as a PCR template, similarly to the mechanism in in situ PCR. Elucidating this reaction mechanism may contribute to the development of an innovative master mix for direct qPCR to detect genes in a single bacterium with solid cell walls and might lead to numerous novel findings in prokaryotic genomics research.

  15. Direct detection of infectious bursal disease virus from clinical samples by in situ reverse transcriptase-linked polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Tereza C; Rosa, Ana C G; Astolphi, Rafael D; Vincente, Rafael M; Novais, Juliana B; Hirata, Karina Y; Luvizotto, Maria Cecilia R

    2008-08-01

    The presence of the very virulent (vv) Brazilian strain of infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) was determined in the bursa of Fabricius, thymus and liver of 2-week-old broilers from a flock with a higher than expected mortality. For this purpose, a direct in situ reverse transcriptase (RT)-linked polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method was developed using specific primers for vvIBDV. Unlabelled forward and reverse biotinylated oligonucleotides were used for RT-PCR in a one-step method and the respective products were revealed by a direct enzymatic reaction. The results were compared with those obtained by standard RT-PCR using general primers for IBDV and virus isolation. The virus isolation, RT-PCR and in situ RT-PCR revealed positive results on the bursa of Fabricius in 86%, 80% and 100%, respectively. The in situ RT-PCR detected vvIBDV in all tested thymus and liver samples, whereas the standard RT-PCR detected virus in 80% and 90% of the samples, respectively. After three consecutive passages on chicken embryonated eggs, IBDV was isolated from 64% of the thymus samples and 30% of the liver samples. In the present study, no classical or antigenic variants of IBDV were detected. The developed in situ RT-PCR assay was able to detect the very virulent strain of IBDV with a higher sensitivity than the conventional RT-PCR and virus isolation.

  16. Molecular epidemiology of human hepatitis A virus defined by an antigen-capture polymerase chain reaction method.

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, R W; Siegl, G; Lemon, S M

    1990-01-01

    We describe an immunoaffinity-linked nucleic acid amplification system (antigen-capture/polymerase chain reaction, or AC/PCR) for detection of viruses in clinical specimens and its application to the study of the molecular epidemiology of a picornavirus, hepatitis A virus (HAV). Immunoaffinity capture of virus, synthesis of viral cDNA, and amplification of cDNA by a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) were carried out sequentially in a single reaction vessel. This approach simplified sample preparation and enhanced the specificity of conventional PCR. AC/PCR detected less than one cell culture infectious unit of virus in 80 microliters of sample. Sequencing of AC/PCR reaction products from 34 virus strains demonstrated remarkable conservation at the nucleotide level among most strains but revealed hitherto unsuspected genetic diversity among human isolates. Epidemiologically related strains were identical or closely related in sequence. Virus strains recovered from epidemics of hepatitis A in the United States and Germany were identical in sequence, providing evidence for a previously unrecognized epidemiologic link between these outbreaks. Images PMID:2158093

  17. Reaction chain modeling of denitrification reactions during a push-pull test.

    PubMed

    Boisson, A; de Anna, P; Bour, O; Le Borgne, T; Labasque, T; Aquilina, L

    2013-05-01

    Field quantitative estimation of reaction kinetics is required to enhance our understanding of biogeochemical reactions in aquifers. We extended the analytical solution developed by Haggerty et al. (1998) to model an entire 1st order reaction chain and estimate the kinetic parameters for each reaction step of the denitrification process. We then assessed the ability of this reaction chain to model biogeochemical reactions by comparing it with experimental results from a push-pull test in a fractured crystalline aquifer (Ploemeur, French Brittany). Nitrates were used as the reactive tracer, since denitrification involves the sequential reduction of nitrates to nitrogen gas through a chain reaction (NO3(-)→NO2(-)→NO→N2O→N2) under anaerobic conditions. The kinetics of nitrate consumption and by-product formation (NO2(-), N2O) during autotrophic denitrification were quantified by using a reactive tracer (NO3(-)) and a non-reactive tracer (Br(-)). The formation of reaction by-products (NO2(-), N2O, N2) has not been previously considered using a reaction chain approach. Comparison of Br(-) and NO3(-) breakthrough curves showed that 10% of the injected NO3(-) molar mass was transformed during the 12 h experiment (2% into NO2(-), 1% into N2O and the rest into N2 and NO). Similar results, but with slower kinetics, were obtained from laboratory experiments in reactors. The good agreement between the model and the field data shows that the complete denitrification process can be efficiently modeled as a sequence of first order reactions. The 1st order kinetics coefficients obtained through modeling were as follows: k1=0.023 h(-1), k2=0.59 h(-1), k3=16 h(-1), and k4=5.5 h(-1). A next step will be to assess the variability of field reactivity using the methodology developed for modeling push-pull tracer tests.

  18. Detection of fastidious mycobacteria in human intestines by the polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Dumonceau, J M; Van Gossum, A; Adler, M; Van Vooren, J P; Fonteyne, P A; De Beenhouwer, H; Portaels, F

    1997-05-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether difficult-to-grow mycobacteria are present in human intestines. Intestinal tissue samples were subjected to both mycobacterial culture and a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay. After detection by PCR, species identity was determined by hybridizing the amplified 16S rRNA gene fragments with species-specific oligonucleotides. Intestinal biopsies from 63 patients with noninflammatory bowel diseases (n = 22), Crohn's disease (n = 31), or ulcerative colitis (n = 10) were analyzed. Culture and PCR revealed mycobacteria in four (6%) and 25 (40%) samples, respectively. Samples positive by PCR were negative with all probes specific to nine common cultivable species but were positive with Mycobacterium genavense-specific probe in 68% of cases. Mycobacterial isolates were identified as Mycobacterium gordonae and Mycobacterium chelonae. Findings were similar in Crohn's disease samples compared to non-Chron's disease samples. This study shows that difficult-to-grow mycobacteria can be detected by PCR in large and similar proportions of inflamed intestinal tissue from patients with inflammatory bowel disease and intestinal tissue that appears normal from patients with noninflammatory bowel disease.

  19. Detection of helicobacter pylori in benign laryngeal lesions by polymerase chain reaction: a cross sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Although Helicobacter Pylori (HP) was detected in some cases of chronic laryngitis, the results were not confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). By this time, it has not been found in laryngeal lesions by in house PCR, the most sensitive method for detecting the genome tracks. Regarding the previous results and also few numbers of studies about the presence of HP in benign laryngeal lesions, specifically by PCR, we aimed to investigate the presence of HP in benign laryngeal lesions by in-house PCR. Methods The samples were taken from 55 patients with benign laryngeal lesions and frozen in −20°C. One milliliter (ml) of lysis buffer was added to 100 mg (mg) of each sample and the tube was placed in 56°C overnight. Then DNA extraction was carried out. Results To find HP DNA, in-house PCR was performed that revealed 5 positive results among 55 patients with benign laryngeal lesions. Of them, 3 were polyp, 1 was nodule and 1 was papilloma. Conclusion Although the number of positive results was not a lot in this study, it was in contrast with previous studies which could not find any HP tracks in benign laryngeal lesions by other methods. More studies about the prevalence of HP in benign laryngeal lesions improve judging about the effect of this infection on benign laryngeal lesions. PMID:22515206

  20. Detection of the genes encoding botulinum neurotoxin types A to E by the polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Szabo, E A; Pemberton, J M; Desmarchelier, P M

    1993-01-01

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used as the basis for the development of highly sensitive and specific diagnostic tests for organisms harboring botulinum neurotoxin type A through E genes. Synthetic DNA primers were selected from nucleic acid sequence data for Clostridium botulinum neurotoxins. Individual components of the PCR for each serotype (serotypes A through E) were adjusted for optimal amplification of the target fragment. Each PCR assay was tested with organisms expressing each of the botulinum neurotoxin types (types A through G), Clostridium tetani, genetically related nontoxigenic organisms, and unrelated strains. Each assay was specific for the intended target. The PCR reliably identified multiple strains having the same neurotoxin type. The sensitivity of the test was determined with different concentrations of genomic DNA from strains producing each toxin type. As little as 10 fg of DNA (approximately three clostridial cells) was detected. C. botulinum neurotoxin types A, B, and E, which are most commonly associated with human botulism, could be amplified from crude DNA extracts, from vegetative cells, and from spore preparations. This suggests that there is great potential for the PCR in the identification and detection of botulinum neurotoxin-producing strains. Images PMID:8215372

  1. Sex identification of pigs using polymerase chain reaction amplification of the amelogenin gene.

    PubMed

    Sembon, Shoichiro; Suzuki, Shun-ichi; Fuchimoto, Dai-ichiro; Iwamoto, Masaki; Kawarasaki, Tatsuo; Onishi, Akira

    2008-11-01

    The amelogenin (AMEL) gene exists on both sex chromosomes of various mammalian species and the length and sequence of the noncoding regions differ between the two chromosome-specific alleles. Because both forms can be amplified using a single primer set, the use of AMEL in polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based methods has facilitated sex identification in various mammalian species, including cattle, sheep and humans. In this study, we designed PCR primers to yield different-sized products from the AMEL genes on the X (AMELX) and Y (AMELY) chromosomes of pigs. PCR amplification of genomic DNA samples collected from various breeds of pigs (European breeds: Landrace, Large White, Duroc and Berkshire; Chinese breeds: Meishan and Jinhua and their crossbreeds) yielded the expected products. For all breeds, DNA from male pigs produced two bands (520 and 350 bp; AMELX and AMELY, respectively), whereas samples from female pigs generated only the 520 bp product. We then tested the use of PCR of AMEL for sex identification of in vitro-produced (IVP) porcine embryos sampled at 2 or 5 to 6 days after fertilization; germinal vesicle (GV)-stage oocytes and electroactivated embryos were used as controls. More than 88% of the GV-stage oocytes and electroactivated embryos yielded a single 520 bp single band and about 50% of the IVP embryos tested produced both bands. Our findings show that PCR analysis of the AMEL gene is reliable for sex identification of pigs and porcine embryos.

  2. Polymerase Chain Reaction: A Better Method for Diagnosing Chronic Schistosoma mansoni Infections.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Hafeez, Ekhlas Hamed; Mohamed, Rabie M; Belal, Usama S; Abdel-Raheem, Ehab M; Naoi, Koji; Norose, Kazumi

    2015-12-01

    For more effective diagnosis of the acute and chronic stages of Schistosoma mansoni infection in humans, the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique was compared with the Kato-Katz method. A total of 150 stool samples were collected from inpatient and outpatient clinics at the Department of Tropical Medicine, Minia University Hospital, Egypt. Three groups of patients, 50 with acute intestinal schistosomiasis, 70 with chronic intestinal schistosomiasis and 30 normal healthy controls were studied. Stool samples were analyzed by PCR and the Kato-Katz method. The mean number of eggs per gram of feces was 4.6 when estimated by the Kato-Katz method in positive stool samples from acute schistosomiasis cases but only 1.7 in chronic cases. In acute intestinal schistosomiasis, 15 and 45 out of 50 cases were positive by Kato-Katz and PCR, respectively. In the chronic intestinal schistosomiasis cases, 6 and 68 out of 70 cases were positive by the Kato-Katz and PCR methods, respectively. We conclude that PCR appears to be an effective diagnostic technique for S. mansoni infection, especially where a low worm burden exists, such as in chronic cases.

  3. An evaluation of serotyping of Avibacterium paragallinarum by use of a multiplex polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Morales-Erasto, Vladimir; Posadas-Quintana, José de Jesús; Fernández-Díaz, Manolo; Saravia, Luis E; Martínez-Castañeda, José Simón; Blackall, Patrick J; Soriano-Vargas, Edgardo

    2014-03-01

    In the present study, the ability of a recently proposed multiplex polymerase chain reaction (mPCR) to determine the serogroups (A, B, and C) of Avibacterium paragallinarum was evaluated. A total of 12 reference strains and 69 field isolates of Av. paragallinarum from Ecuador, Mexico, Panama, and Peru were included in the study. With some exceptions (which were serotyped in the current study), all of the isolates and strains had been previously examined by 2 serotyping schemes (Page and Kume) or were the formal reference strains for the schemes. Three of 6 (50%) reference strains of serogroup A, 2 (100%) of serogroup B, and 1 of 4 (25%) reference strains of serogroup C were correctly serotyped by the mPCR. With the field isolates, the mPCR correctly recognized 16 of the 17 serogroup A isolates, 10 of the 12 serogroup B isolates, and 18 of the 37 serogroup C isolates. Overall, the specificity and sensitivity of the PCR test was as follows: 82.6% and 87.3% (serogroup A), 85.7% and 71.9% (serogroup B), and 46.3% and 100% (serogroup C). The poor performance of the mPCR in terms of recognition of serogroup C isolates (low sensitivity of 46.3%) and the relatively high level of uncertainty about the accuracy of the serogroup A and B results (specificity of 87.3% and 71.9%, respectively) means that the assay cannot be recommended as a replacement for conventional serotyping.

  4. Quantitative analysis of periodontal pathogens by ELISA and real-time polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Hamlet, Stephen M

    2010-01-01

    The development of analytical methods enabling the accurate identification and enumeration of bacterial species colonizing the oral cavity has led to the identification of a small number of bacterial pathogens that are major factors in the etiology of periodontal disease. Further, these methods also underpin more recent epidemiological analyses of the impact of periodontal disease on general health. Given the complex milieu of over 700 species of microorganisms known to exist within the complex biofilms found in the oral cavity, the identification and enumeration of oral periodontopathogens has not been an easy task. In recent years however, some of the intrinsic limitations of the more traditional microbiological analyses previously used have been overcome with the advent of immunological and molecular analytical methods. Of the plethora of methodologies reported in the literature, the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), which combines the specificity of antibody with the sensitivity of simple enzyme assays and the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), has been widely utilized in both laboratory and clinical applications. Although conventional PCR does not allow quantitation of the target organism, real-time PCR (rtPCR) has the ability to detect amplicons as they accumulate in "real time" allowing subsequent quantitation. These methods enable the accurate quantitation of as few as 10(2) (using rtPCR) to 10(4) (using ELISA) periodontopathogens in dental plaque samples.

  5. Towards dynamic coating of glass microchip chambers for amplifying DNA via the polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Giordano, B C; Copeland, E R; Landers, J P

    2001-01-01

    As microchip technology evolves to allow for the integration of more complex processes, particularly the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), it will become necessary to define simple approaches for minimizing the effects of surfaces on the chemistry/processes to be performed. We have explored alternatives to silanization of the glass surface with the use of additives that either dynamically coat or adsorb to the glass surface. Polyethylene glycol, polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), and hydroxyethylcellulose (HEC) have been explored as potential dynamic coatings and epoxy (poly)dimethylacrylamide (EPDMA) evaluated as an adsorbed coating. By carrying out analysis of the PCR products generated under different conditions via microchip electrophoresis, we demonstrate that these coating agents adequately passivate the glass surface in a manner that prevents interference with the subsequent PCR process. While several of the agents tested allowed for PCR amplification of DNA in glass, the EPDMA was clearly superior with respect to ease of preparation. However, more efficient PCR (larger mass of amplified product) could be obtained by silanizing the glass surface.

  6. Ultra-rapid flow-through polymerase chain reaction microfluidics using vapor pressure.

    PubMed

    Fuchiwaki, Yusuke; Nagai, Hidenori; Saito, Masato; Tamiya, Eiichi

    2011-09-15

    A novel flow-through polymerase chain reaction (PCR) microfluidic system using vapor pressure was developed that can achieve ultra-rapid, small-volume DNA amplification on a chip. The 40-cycle amplification can be completed in as little as 120 s, making this device the fastest PCR system in the world. The chip device is made of a pressure-sensitive polyolefin (PSP) film and cyclo-olefin polymer (COP) substrate which was processed by cutting-work to fabricate the microchannel. The enclosed structure of the microchannel was fabricated solely by weighing the PSP film on the COP substrate, resulting in superior practical application. The vapor pressure in the denaturation zone of the destabilizing flow source was applied to the flow force, and ultra-rapid, efficient amplification was accomplished with a minimal amount of PCR reagents for detection. The flowing rhythm created by vapor pressure minimized the residual PCR products, leading to highly efficient amplification. For field test analysis, airborne dust was collected from a public place and tested for the presence of anthrax. The PCR chip had sufficient sensitivity for anthrax identification. The fastest time from aerosol sampling to detection was theoretically estimated as 8 min.

  7. Mechanisms of Propidium Monoazide Inhibition of Polymerase Chain Reaction and implications for Propidium Monoazide Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C. M.; Darrach, H.; Ponce, A.; McFarland, E.; Laymon, C.; Fingland, N. K.

    2015-12-01

    PMA-qPCR is a laboratory technique that can be used to identify viable microbes by employing the use of propidium monoazide (PMA), a DNA-intercalating dye, and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). The current model of PMA-qPCR operates under the assumption that PMA is only capable of entering membrane-compromised cells, where it irreversibly cross-links to DNA and makes it unavailable for amplification via qPCR. However, the exact mechanism behind PMA's entry into the cell and its interaction with genetic material is not well understood. To better understand PMA's capabilities, we have examined the effect PMA has on enzyme binding and processivity using endonucleases and exonucleases. Our results suggest that the current model behind PMA-qPCR inhibition is incomplete, in that rather than precipitating the entirety of the DNA, PMA also inhibits enzyme binding and/or processivity in soluble DNA. These results have important implications for studying the viable community of microorganisms in various applications, such as environmental monitoring, planetary protection and bioburden assessment, and biohazard detection.

  8. Use of polymerase chain reaction to detect Brucella abortus biovar 1 in infected goats.

    PubMed

    Leal-Klevezas, D S; Martínez-Vázquez, I O; García-Cantú, J; López-Merino, A; Martínez-Soriano, J P

    2000-07-03

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to diagnose goat brucellosis and compare its sensitivity against some of the most commonly used serological and bacteriological techniques. Twenty two female and one male out of 300 clinically healthy, mixed-breed goats were randomly chosen from a ranch located at Marín, Nuevo León, Mexico. Milk and blood samples were taken from each animal and used to obtain both microbiological cultures and DNA of the pathogen, and sera was tested against Rose Bengal antigen (RBT). Results showed that 86% of the blood samples were positive on the PCR test, while 60% were positive on the serological test. The pathogen was isolated from only one blood culture. Sixty four percent of the milk samples were positive on PCR tests, but failed to yield bacteria in culture. Biochemical and PCR specific assay demonstrated that Brucella abortus biovar 1 was associated with the infection. This study demonstrates the higher sensitivity of PCR over RBT and blood culture and its potential towards a rapid identification of Brucella strains.

  9. Detection of Listeria monocytogenes in cheese with the magnetic immuno-polymerase chain reaction assay.

    PubMed

    Fluit, A C; Torensma, R; Visser, M J; Aarsman, C J; Poppelier, M J; Keller, B H; Klapwijk, P; Verhoef, J

    1993-05-01

    A new detection system, the magnetic immuno-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay (MIPA) has been developed to detect Listeria monocytogenes in food. This method separates Listeria cells from PCR-inhibitory factors present in enrichment broths containing food samples by using magnetic beads coated with specific monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). The separated bacteria were lysed, and the supernatant containing the bacterial DNA was subjected to the PCR. Detection of L. monocytogenes in three naturally contaminated cheese samples with two different MAbs and PCR primers specific for the gene encoding the delayed-hypersensitivity factor showed that with MAb 55 all three samples were positive whereas with MAb A two samples were positive. A further improvement of the method was obtained by using a PCR step based on the listeriolysin O gene. A MIPA employing MAb 55 and the listeriolysin O gene primer set detected L. monocytogenes after 24 h of culture in Listeria Enrichment Broth samples from Port Salut artificially contaminated with 40 CFU/25 g. We could detect 1 CFU of L. monocytogenes per g of cheese after a second enrichment for 24 h in Fraser broth. The analysis time including both enrichments is approximately 55 h.

  10. A new, multiplex, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction system for nucleic acid detection and quantification.

    PubMed

    Liang, Fang; Arora, Neetika; Zhang, Kang Liang; Yeh, David Che Cheng; Lai, Richard; Pearson, Darnley; Barnett, Graeme; Whiley, David; Sloots, Theo; Corrie, Simon R; Barnard, Ross T

    2013-01-01

    Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) has emerged as a powerful investigative and diagnostic tool with potential to generate accurate and reproducible results. qPCR can be designed to fulfil the four key aspects required for the detection of nucleic acids: simplicity, speed, sensitivity, and specificity. This chapter reports the development of a novel real-time multiplex quantitative PCR technology, dubbed PrimRglo™, with a potential for high-degree multiplexing. It combines the capacity to simultaneously detect many viruses, bacteria, or nucleic acids, in a single reaction tube, with the ability to quantitate viral or bacterial load. The system utilizes oligonucleotide-tagged PCR primers, along with complementary fluorophore-labelled and quencher-labelled oligonucleotides. The analytic sensitivity of PrimRglo technology was compared with the widely used Taqman(®) and SYBR green detection systems.

  11. A simple multiplex polymerase chain reaction assay for the identification of four environmentally relevant fungal contaminants.

    PubMed

    Dean, Timothy R; Roop, Barbara; Betancourt, Doris; Menetrez, Marc Y

    2005-04-01

    Historically, identification of filamentous fungal (mold) species has been based on morphological characteristics, both macroscopic and microscopic. These methods may often be time-consuming and inaccurate, necessitating the development of identification protocols that are rapid, sensitive, and precise. The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) has shown great promise in its ability to identify and quantify individual organisms from a mixed culture environment; however, the cost effectiveness of single organism PCR reactions is quickly becoming an issue. Our laboratory has developed a simple method to identify multiple fungal species, Stachybotrys chartarum, Aspergillus versicolor, Penicillium purpurogenum, and Cladosporium spp. by performing multiplex PCR and distinguishing the different reaction products by their mobility during agarose gel electrophoresis. The amplified genes include the beta-Tubulin gene from A. versicolor, the Tri5 gene from S. chartarum, and ribosomal sequences from both P. purpurogenum and Cladosporium spp. This method was found to be both rapid and easy to perform, while maintaining high sensitivity and specificity for characterizing isolates, even from a mixed culture.

  12. Detection of Babesia bigemina-infected carriers by polymerase chain reaction amplification.

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa, J V; Chieves, L P; Johnson, G S; Buening, G M

    1992-01-01

    A SpeI-AvaI fragment (0.3 kbp) from pBbi16 (a pBR322 derivative containing a 6.3-kbp Babesia bigemina DNA insert) was subcloned into the pBluescript phagemid vector and was sequenced by the dideoxy-mediated chain termination method. Two sets of primers were designed for the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay. Primer set IA-IB was used to amplify a 278-bp DNA fragment, and primer set IAN-IBN was used to prepare a probe directed to a site within the PCR-amplified target DNA. Digoxigenin-dUTP was incorporated into the probe during the amplification reaction. PCR amplification of target DNA obtained from in vitro-cultured B. bigemina and nucleic acid hybridization of amplified product with the nonradioactive DNA probe showed that a 278-bp fragment could be detected when as little as 100 fg of parasite genomic DNA was used in the assay. A fragment of similar size was amplified from genomic DNAs from several B. bigemina isolates but not from DNAs from Babesia bovis, Anaplasma marginale, or six species of bacteria or bovine leukocytes. Similarly, the PCR product could be detected in DNA samples purified from 200 microliters of blood with a parasitemia of as low as 1 in 10(8) cells and which contained an estimated 30 B. bigemina-infected erythrocytes. By a direct PCR method, B. bigemina DNA was amplified from 20 microliters of packed erythrocytes with a calculated parasitemia of 1 in 10(9) cells. With the analytical sensitivity level of the PCR-DNA probe assay, six cattle with inapparent, 11-month chronic B. bigemina infection were found to be positive. No PCR product was observed in bovine blood samples collected from a splenectomized, A. marginale-infected bovine, a 4-year chronic B. bovis-infected animal, or 20 uninfected cattle from Missouri which were subjected to amplification. The PCR-DNA probe assay was shown to be sensitive in detecting latently infected cattle. The specificity and high analytical sensitivity of the test provide valuable tools for performing

  13. Addressing fluorogenic real-time qPCR inhibition using the novel custom Excel file system 'FocusField2-6GallupqPCRSet-upTool-001' to attain consistently high fidelity qPCR reactions

    PubMed Central

    Ackermann, Mark R.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this manuscript is to discuss fluorogenic real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) inhibition and to introduce/define a novel Microsoft Excel-based file system which provides a way to detect and avoid inhibition, and enables investigators to consistently design dynamically-sound, truly LOG-linear qPCR reactions very quickly. The qPCR problems this invention solves are universal to all qPCR reactions, and it performs all necessary qPCR set-up calculations in about 52 seconds (using a pentium 4 processor) for up to seven qPCR targets and seventy-two samples at a time – calculations that commonly take capable investigators days to finish. We have named this custom Excel-based file system "FocusField2-6GallupqPCRSet-upTool-001" (FF2-6-001 qPCR set-up tool), and are in the process of transforming it into professional qPCR set-up software to be made available in 2007. The current prototype is already fully functional. PMID:17033699

  14. Detection of hepatitis C virus RNA by a combined reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assay.

    PubMed Central

    Young, K K; Resnick, R M; Myers, T W

    1993-01-01

    Amplification of RNA by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is normally a two-step process requiring separate enzymes and buffer conditions. We describe a combined reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) assay for hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA amplification in which a single enzyme and buffer condition are used. In this assay, both the RT and PCR steps are carried out with the thermoactive DNA polymerase of Thermus thermophilus. A transcription vector containing HCV sequences has also been constructed to generate quantifiable HCV RNA templates that can be used to optimize reaction conditions and to assess the efficiency of amplification. Amplification from < or = 100 copies of RNA was detected reproducibly by gel electrophoresis. The assay sensitivity was increased to 10 RNA copies by hybridization to a probe. The patterns of viremia in three individuals infected with HCV were examined by amplification of HCV RNA from plasma samples collected serially over a period of 1 year. These results were correlated with the times of seroconversion and the onset of rise in levels of alanine aminotransferase in serum. In all three subjects, HCV RNA was detected prior to seroconversion and the initial rise in levels of alanine aminotransferase in serum. Upon seroconversion, HCV RNA fell to a level below the detection limit of the assay. This pattern of transient viremia appears to be characteristic of acute, resolving HCV infections. The combined RT-PCR assay is a sensitive method which circumvents the problems associated with PCR amplification of RNA. Using this assay, we demonstrated that three donors infected by the same index case all have similar patterns of viremia. Images PMID:8385151

  15. Polymerase chain reaction system using magnetic beads for analyzing a sample that includes nucleic acid

    DOEpatents

    Nasarabadi, Shanavaz [Livermore, CA

    2011-01-11

    A polymerase chain reaction system for analyzing a sample containing nucleic acid includes providing magnetic beads; providing a flow channel having a polymerase chain reaction chamber, a pre polymerase chain reaction magnet position adjacent the polymerase chain reaction chamber, and a post pre polymerase magnet position adjacent the polymerase chain reaction chamber. The nucleic acid is bound to the magnetic beads. The magnetic beads with the nucleic acid flow to the pre polymerase chain reaction magnet position in the flow channel. The magnetic beads and the nucleic acid are washed with ethanol. The nucleic acid in the polymerase chain reaction chamber is amplified. The magnetic beads and the nucleic acid are separated into a waste stream containing the magnetic beads and a post polymerase chain reaction mix containing the nucleic acid. The reaction mix containing the nucleic acid flows to an analysis unit in the channel for analysis.

  16. Discrepancy between Penner serotyping and polymerase chain reaction fingerprinting of Campylobacter isolated from poultry and other animal sources.

    PubMed

    Aarts, H J; van Lith, L A; Jacobs-Reitsma, W F

    1995-06-01

    Thirty-four Campylobacter jejuni or coli strains, isolated from various livestock and darkling beetles from two Dutch poultry farms during different broiler production cycles, were subjected to Penner serotyping and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) fingerprint analysis. Ten different Penner serotypes were determined in the isolates. Visual scoring of the PCR fingerprints resulted in 14 clearly different profiles. Some strains with identical Penner serotypes exhibited different PCR fingerprints and conversely strains with different serotypes produced identical PCR fingerprints. Discrepancies between Penner serotyping and PCR fingerprinting were most obvious between isolates from different animal sources. Indications for the occurrence of genomic rearrangements were found. The inconsistency between serotyping and fingerprinting of Campylobacter strains suggests that conventional typing methods should be used in combination with fingerprinting if the epidemiological factors that contribute to Campylobacter colonization of live chickens are to be assessed reliably.

  17. Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction Detection of Angiostrongylus cantonensis DNA in Cerebrospinal Fluid from Patients with Eosinophilic Meningitis.

    PubMed

    Qvarnstrom, Yvonne; Xayavong, Maniphet; da Silva, Ana Cristina Aramburu; Park, Sarah Y; Whelen, A Christian; Calimlim, Precilia S; Sciulli, Rebecca H; Honda, Stacey A A; Higa, Karen; Kitsutani, Paul; Chea, Nora; Heng, Seng; Johnson, Stuart; Graeff-Teixeira, Carlos; Fox, LeAnne M; da Silva, Alexandre J

    2016-01-01

    Angiostrongylus cantonensis is the most common infectious cause of eosinophilic meningitis. Timely diagnosis of these infections is difficult, partly because reliable laboratory diagnostic methods are unavailable. The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of a real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay for the detection of A. cantonensis DNA in human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) specimens. A total of 49 CSF specimens from 33 patients with eosinophilic meningitis were included: A. cantonensis DNA was detected in 32 CSF specimens, from 22 patients. Four patients had intermittently positive and negative real-time PCR results on subsequent samples, indicating that the level of A. cantonensis DNA present in CSF may fluctuate during the course of the illness. Immunodiagnosis and/or supplemental PCR testing supported the real-time PCR findings for 30 patients. On the basis of these observations, this real-time PCR assay can be useful to detect A. cantonensis in the CSF from patients with eosinophilic meningitis.

  18. Potential of the polymerase chain reaction in the diagnosis of active Toxoplasma infection by detection of parasite in blood.

    PubMed

    Guy, E C; Joynson, D H

    1995-07-01

    Blood samples from 54 patients presenting with acute toxoplasmic lymphadenopathy were tested for the presence of Toxoplasma gondii DNA using a nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR). PCR test results of a single blood sample obtained 2-23 weeks after onset of illness were positive for 19 (35%) of the 54 patients. Nine (53%) of 17 patients were positive by PCR when the initial blood sample was collected within the first 5 weeks of illness. In 7 of the 19 patients found positive, further blood samples were available, and subsequent clearance of T. gondii DNA from the blood was demonstrated. On the basis of positive findings among patients with acute toxoplasmosis and the absence of positive findings among 10 uninfected persons and 43 with past Toxoplasma infection, a positive PCR result appears to be a helpful indicator of active disease. However, since only 53% of patients with lymphadenopathy persisting < or = 5 weeks were positive, a negative PCR result does not exclude recent infection.

  19. Detection of flaviviruses by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction with the universal primer set.

    PubMed

    Meiyu, F; Huosheng, C; Cuihua, C; Xiaodong, T; Lianhua, J; Yifei, P; Weijun, C; Huiyu, G

    1997-01-01

    Using a universal primer set designed to match the sequence of the NS1 gene of flaviviruses, the virus RNA of dengue (DEN), Japanese encephalitis (JEV), powassan and langat of Flaviviridae were successfully amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) via cDNA; and with different internal primers, the serotypes of the dengue viruses were identified. Of the 78 clinically diagnosed dengue fever patients, 18 patients were positive for DEN 1, 48 patients for DEN 2 and 8 patients concurrently infected with DEN 4. Of the 52 patients admitted with Japanese encephalitis (JE), 45 were determined to be JEV infections. By nested PCR, we completed the identification of flaviviruses within 2 days. The results show that seven primers have a potential value for rapid clinical diagnosis of flavivirus infections.

  20. Genotypic study of verocytotoxic Escherichia coli isolates from deer by multiplex polymerase chain reaction

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Raghavendra Prasad; Jain, Udit; Singh, Rakesh Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Aim: This study was planned to study the genotypes of verocytotoxigenic Escherichia coli (VTEC) in fecal samples of deer due to its public health significance. Materials and Methods: A total of 160 fecal samples of deer were taken from Mathura district and Kanpur Zoo and screened for VTEC genes by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Results: All fecal samples were positive for E. coli. All the E. coli isolates were screened by PCR to detect virulence genes stx1, stx2, eaeA, and hlyA. Of these, 15 isolates were found positive for VTEC having one or more genes in different combinations. Conclusion: Genes such as stx1, stx2, eaeA, and hlyA were prevalent in VTEC isolates from feces of deer. The presence of VTEC isolates having virulent genes may pose a threat to public health. PMID:27651685

  1. The actin multigene family and livestock speciation using the polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Fairbrother, K S; Hopwood, A J; Lockley, A K; Bardsley, R G

    1998-01-01

    Actins constitute a family of highly-conserved multifunctional intracellular proteins, best known as myofibrillar components in striated muscle fibres. Most vertebrate genomes contain numerous actin genes with high sequence homology in protein coding regions but considerable variability in intron number and sizes. This genetic diversity can be utilised for livestock speciation purposes. The high sequence conservation has enabled a single pair of oligonucleotides to be used to prime the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with DNA extracted from all animals so far studied. Multiple amplification products were obtained which on gel electrophoresis constituted characteristic species-specific 'fingerprints'. The patterns were reproducible, did not vary between individuals of the same breed or between different breeds within a species, and could be generated even from heat-processed muscle held at 120 degrees C for one hour. Given the capacity of PCR to amplify relatively short sequences in highly-degraded DNA, this approach may be suitable for authentication of processed meat products.

  2. Rapid detection of pathogenic leptospires by lyophilized reagent-based polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Lee, S V; Tai, E S; Mutalib, A R; Khairani-Bejo, S; Bahaman, A R

    2011-12-01

    A simple and reliable tool for the early diagnosis of leptospirosis is urgently needed. We report the development of a lyophilized reagent-based polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay targeting lipL32 gene, which is present only in pathogenic leptospires. To determine the effectiveness of the newly developed assay in the early diagnosis of leptospirosis, the sensitivity and specificity was evaluated. In simulated clinical samples, the assay was able to detect 10² and 10³ leptospires/ml in spiked urine and blood samples, respectively. In experimentally infected animals, leptospiral DNA could be detected in blood and lung samples as early as Day 1 post infection. This assay was also shown to be stable and remained sensitive for up to five months at ambient temperature. Hence, this lyophilized reagent-based PCR assay with high specificity, sensitivity and stability would provide a simple, rapid and reliable method in diagnosing acute leptospirosis, especially in the field of veterinary medicine.

  3. Use of touch-down polymerase chain reaction to enhance the sensitivity of Mycobacterium bovis detection.

    PubMed

    Zumárraga, Martín J; Meikle, Virginia; Bernardelli, Amelia; Abdala, Alejandro; Tarabla, Hector; Romano, María I; Cataldi, Angel

    2005-05-01

    The confirmatory diagnosis of Mycobacterium bovis (M. bovis) in animal samples is carried out by culture in Stonebrink media. However, culture is very slow because of the extremely long duplication time of the bacillus and difficult because of the scarcity of bacilli in diagnostic samples. This study describes the development of a single-tube touch-down polymerase chain reaction (PCR) protocol for the detection of M. bovis using primers that target the IS6110 element. Spiked water and milk as well as routine diagnostic samples (milk and nasal swabs) from M. bovis-positive cattle were tested. This protocol allows the rapid and sensitive detection of M. bovis in bovine samples by enhancing the sensitivity of standard PCR amplification.

  4. STR DNA typing: increased sensitivity and efficient sample consumption using reduced PCR reaction volumes.

    PubMed

    Leclair, Benoît; Sgueglia, Joanne B; Wojtowicz, Patricia C; Juston, Ann C; Frégeau, Chantal J; Fourney, Ron M

    2003-09-01

    Improvements in detection limits/sensitivity and lower sample consumption are potential benefits of reducing PCR reaction volumes used in forensic DNA typing of crime scene samples. This premise was studied first with experimental mixtures and a nine-loci megaplex, which demonstrated stochiometric amplification and accurate detection. Next, adjudicated casework samples were subjected to amplification under 15 different template DNA to PCR reaction volume ratios. Reduction of PCR reaction volume and DNA down to 10 microL and 0.500 ng, respectively, produced identical profiles with the same signal intensity and heterozygous allele peak height ratio (HR). Reduction to 5 microL and 0.063 ng yielded HR values that were slightly affected in one to three STR loci. PCR reaction volume reduction can enhance detection and sensitivity while reducing the consumption of irreplaceable crime scene samples.

  5. Detection and quantification of Renibacterium salmoninarum DNA in salmonid tissues by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chase, D.M.; Elliott, D.G.; Pascho, R.J.

    2006-01-01

    Renibacterium salmoninarum is an important salmonid pathogen that is difficult to culture. We developed and assessed a real-time, quantitative, polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assay for the detection and enumeration of R. salmoninarum. The qPCR is based on TaqMan technology and amplifies a 69-base pair (bp) region of the gene encoding the major soluble antigen (MSA) of R. salmoninarum. The qPCR assay consistently detected as few as 5 R. salmoninarum cells per reaction in kidney tissue. The specificity of the qPCR was confirmed by testing the DNA extracts from a panel of microorganisms that were either common fish pathogens or reported to cause false-positive reactions in the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Kidney samples from 38 juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in a naturally infected population were examined by real-time qPCR, a nested PCR, and ELISA, and prevalences of R. salmoninarum detected were 71, 66, and 71%, respectively. The qPCR should be a valuable tool for evaluating the R. salmoninarum infection status of salmonids.

  6. Detection of enteroviral RNA by polymerase chain reaction in cerebrospinal fluid from patients with aseptic meningitis.

    PubMed

    Glimåker, M; Johansson, B; Olcén, P; Ehrnst, A; Forsgren, M

    1993-01-01

    An assay based on a 2-step (semi-nested) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was developed and evaluated for detection of enterovirus-specific RNA in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from patients with aseptic meningitis of different etiology. The limit of detectability of enteroviral RNA was equivalent to about 0.25 tissue culture infective doses 50%. In samples, stored at -70 degrees C, analyzed without repeated thawing, enteroviral RNA was demonstrable in 21/22 CSF specimens from which an enterovirus had been isolated. Enteroviral RNA was shown to be degraded during freeze-thawing of the samples. In repeatedly freeze-thawed samples from 134 consecutive patients with aseptic meningitis, a lower sensitivity (34/48 = 0.71) was observed. In the latest phase of the study, comprising 35 consecutive patients, the PCR was performed in CSF stored at -20 degrees C without thawing. In this material, the PCR yielded positive results in 19 patients, whereas enteroviruses were isolated from 6 cases only. In the total clinical material of 169 patients, 67 (40%) were found positive by PCR, whereas an enterovirus was isolated from CSF in 54 (32%) cases. All the 13 isolated enterovirus serotypes found in the study were demonstrable by PCR, indicating that the assay is broad-reacting within the enterovirus group. The specificity appeared to be high, since all of 21 patients with non-enteroviral diagnoses were negative by the PCR test, except 1 with an Epstein-Barr virus infection. As serological evidence of enteroviral etiology was found in this patient, a dual infection seemed probable. This study indicates that enteroviral RNA can be detected in CSF by a 2-step PCR in meningitis caused by enterovirus and that the technique has the potential to become a screening method for routine diagnosis of enteroviral meningitis.

  7. mRNA-specific reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction from human tissue extracts.

    PubMed

    Hurteau, Gregory J; Spivack, Simon D

    2002-08-15

    Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) has become the method of choice for detection of mRNA transcripts, including those of low abundance obtained from small precious samples of human tissue. A major confounding problem for standard reverse-transcription-priming strategies is the presence of contaminating genomic DNA (gDNA) carried over from the original "RNA" extract into the RT and PCR steps. The contaminating gDNA contains a processed pseudogene sequence-which lacks introns but contains a poly(A) tail-for commonly studied internal reference genes beta-actin and GAPDH, and target genes GSTM1, GSTP1, and others. These pseudogene sequences therefore confound standard-design "RNA-specific" PCR primer pairs which rely, for cDNA versus gDNA specificity, on the pair-spanning introns, or one of the individual primer oligos spanning an exon/exon splice site, because these features are lacking in processed pseudogene sequences. The result is false RT-PCR positives for these "housekeeper" genes in total RNA extracts; the gDNA processed pseudogene is mistaken for mRNA gene transcript. A universal RT primer has been designed that targets the poly(A) tail of mRNA and adds a unique tag sequence not otherwise existing in the human genome. Genomic DNA does not incorporate this RT-inserted unique tag. PCR is then performed using a transcript-specific forward primer and a reverse primer that is identical to the unique tag incorporated at RT. Only cDNA made with this RT primer is compatible with this reverse PCR primer, thus eliminating confounding signal from contaminating gDNA. This method performs RNA-specific qualitative and quantitative evaluation of gene expression, while preserving the sensitivity of standard RT-PCR techniques. Applications to low-copy transcripts in human samples are demonstrated.

  8. Development of a set of multiplex standard polymerase chain reaction assays for the identification of infectious agents from aborted bovine clinical samples.

    PubMed

    Tramuta, Clara; Lacerenza, Daniela; Zoppi, Simona; Goria, Mariella; Dondo, Alessandro; Ferroglio, Ezio; Nebbia, Patrizia; Rosati, Sergio

    2011-07-01

    The current study describes the development of a set of 5 multiplex polymerase chain reaction (mPCR) assays for the simultaneous detection of abortive infection agents in bovine fetal tissues, including Brucella spp., Leptospira spp., and Campylobacter fetus (mPCR1); Hammondia heydorni, Neospora caninum, and Toxoplasma gondii (mPCR2); Coxiella burnetii and Chlamydophila psittaci (mPCR3); Mycoplasma bovis, Mycoplasma bovigenitalium, and Ureaplasma diversum (mPCR4); and Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) and Bovine herpesvirus-1 (BoHV-1; mPCR5). The protocol was tested on different tissue samples collected from 50 aborted bovine fetuses, and it showed that out of the 50 fetuses, 7 (14%, mPCR2) were PCR-positive for N. caninum, 4 (8%, mPCR5) were PCR-positive for BVDV, and 2 (4%, mPCR4) were PCR-positive for U. diversum. The results obtained by using each multiplex PCR were 100% concordant with those obtained by using the respective PCR assays targeting single genes on the same specimens. Moreover, all multiplex PCR assays on clinical samples were compared with reference methods, obtaining a perfect accordance in all samples and confirming the validity of the set of multiplex PCR assays. The proposed set of multiplex PCR assays is, therefore, suitable for the simultaneous detection of the main infectious agents responsible for bovine abortion.

  9. Principles of rapid polymerase chain reactions: mathematical modeling and experimental verification.

    PubMed

    Whitney, Scott E; Sudhir, Alugupally; Nelson, R Michael; Viljoen, Hendrik J

    2004-07-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is an important diagnostic tool for the amplification of DNA. The PCR process can be treated as a problem in biochemical engineering. This study focuses on the development of a mathematical model of the polymerase chain reaction. The PCR process consists of three steps: denaturation of target DNA, annealing of sequence-specific oligonucleotide primers and the enzyme-catalyzed elongation of the annealed complex (primer:DNA:polymerase). The denaturation step separates the double strands of DNA; this model assumes denaturation is complete. The annealing step describes the formation of a primer-fragment complex followed by the attachment of the polymerase to form a ternary complex. This step is complicated by competitive annealing between primers and incomplete fragments including primer-primer reactions. The elongation step is modeled by a stochastic method. Species that compete during the elongation step are deoxynucleotide triphosphates dCTP, dATP, dTTP, dGTP, dUTP, and pyrophosphate. Thermal deamination of dCTP to form dUTP is included in the model. The probability for a species to arrive at the active site is based on its molar fraction. The number of random insertion events depends on the average processing speed of the polymerase and the elongation time of the simulation. The numerical stochastic experiment is repeated a sufficient number of times to construct a probability density distribution (PDF). The moment of the PDF and the annealing step products provide the product distribution at the end of the elongation step. The overall yield is compared to six experimental values of the yield. In all cases the comparisons are very good.

  10. Precise Quantitation of MicroRNA in a Single Cell with Droplet Digital PCR Based on Ligation Reaction.

    PubMed

    Tian, Hui; Sun, Yuanyuan; Liu, Chenghui; Duan, Xinrui; Tang, Wei; Li, Zhengping

    2016-12-06

    MicroRNA (miRNA) analysis in a single cell is extremely important because it allows deep understanding of the exact correlation between the miRNAs and cell functions. Herein, we wish to report a highly sensitive and precisely quantitative assay for miRNA detection based on ligation-based droplet digital polymerase chain reaction (ddPCR), which permits the quantitation of miRNA in a single cell. In this ligation-based ddPCR assay, two target-specific oligonucleotide probes can be simply designed to be complementary to the half-sequence of the target miRNA, respectively, which avoids the sophisticated design of reverse transcription and provides high specificity to discriminate a single-base difference among miRNAs with simple operations. After the miRNA-templated ligation, the ddPCR partitions individual ligated products into a water-in-oil droplet and digitally counts the fluorescence-positive and negative droplets after PCR amplification for quantification of the target molecules, which possesses the power of precise quantitation and robustness to variation in PCR efficiency. By integrating the advantages of the precise quantification of ddPCR and the simplicity of the ligation-based PCR, the proposed method can sensitively measure let-7a miRNA with a detection limit of 20 aM (12 copies per microliter), and even a single-base difference can be discriminated in let-7 family members. More importantly, due to its high selectivity and sensitivity, the proposed method can achieve precise quantitation of miRNAs in single-cell lysate. Therefore, the ligation-based ddPCR assay may serve as a useful tool to exactly reveal the miRNAs' actions in a single cell, which is of great importance for the study of miRNAs' biofunction as well as for the related biomedical studies.

  11. Cross-reactions in specific Brachyspira spp. PCR assays caused by "Brachyspira hampsonii" isolates: implications for detection.

    PubMed

    Aller-Morán, Luis M; Martínez-Lobo, F Javier; Rubio, Pedro; Carvajal, Ana

    2016-11-01

    An emerging novel spirochete in swine, provisionally designated "Brachyspira hampsonii," has been detected worldwide. It has been associated with swine dysentery and cannot be differentiated from B. hyodysenteriae, the classical etiologic agent of this disease, using standard phenotypic methods. We evaluated cross-reactions of "B. hampsonii" isolates recovered from avian species in some of the currently available species-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays for the identification of swine Brachyspira species. Ten avian "B. hampsonii" isolates recovered from wild waterfowl were used. No false-positive results were recorded with a B. pilosicoli-specific PCR based on the amplification of a fragment of the 16S rRNA gene. However, the percentage of false-positive results varied, with a range of 10-80%, in the evaluated B. hyodysenteriae-specific assays based on the amplification of the 23S rRNA, nox, and tlyA genes. Similarly, results of the B. intermedia-specific PCR assays yielded poor specificity, with up to 80% of the "B. hampsonii" isolates tested giving false-positive results. Finally, 2 "B. hampsonii" avian isolates yielded a positive result in a B. innocens- and B. murdochii-specific PCR. This result should be interpreted very cautiously as these 2 isolates could represent a recombinant genotype.

  12. Amplified detection of nucleic acid by G-quadruplex based hybridization chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Dong, Juan; Cui, Xin; Deng, Yun; Tang, Zhuo

    2012-01-01

    A protein-free, isothermal, self-amplified nucleic acid sensing system which was a G-quadruplex integrated hybridization chain reaction (GQ-HCR) system was developed. The G-quadruplex was closed two-thirds in the loop and one-third in the stem of one of the GQ-HCR hairpin probes. In the absence of the target molecule, the GQ-HCR probes stayed as inactive meta-stable hairpin structures and the G-quadruplex was inert. Reversely, the GQ-HCR probes could be cross-opened to start a hybridization chain reaction and the closed G-quadruplex could be released to be free when the GQ-HCR probes came across the target molecule. The GQ-HCR nucleic acid sensing system could detect as low as 7.5 nM ssDNA or RNA by the colorimetric method and 4 nM ssDNA by the fluorometric method. Less than 10 copies of dsDNA template could also be detected when PCR was combined with the GQ-HCR system (PCR+GQ-HCR). Because of these advantages, the GQ-HCR system was also studied for application in visual chip detection to obtain a satisfactory repeatable and specific result.

  13. A multiplex real-time polymerase chain reaction assay to diagnose Epiphyas postvittana (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae).

    PubMed

    Barr, N B; Ledezma, L A; Farris, R E; Epstein, M E; Gilligan, T M

    2011-10-01

    A molecular assay for diagnosis of light brown apple moth, Epiphyas postvittana (Walker) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), in North America is reported. The assay multiplexes two TaqMan real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) probe systems that are designed to target DNA segments of the internal transcribed spacer region 2 (ITS2) and 18S rRNA gene. The RT-PCR probe designed for the 18S target recognizes a DNA sequence conserved in all of the moths included in the study and functions as a control in the assay. The second probe recognizes a segment of the ITS2 specifically found in E. postvittana and not found in the other moths included in the study, i.e., this segment is not conserved. Inclusion of the two markers in a single multiplex reaction did not affect assay performance. The assay was tested against 637 moths representing > 90 taxa in 15 tribes in all three subfamilies in the Tortricidae. The assay generated no false negatives based on analysis of 355 E. postvittana collected from California, Hawaii, England, New Zealand, and Australia. Analysis of a data set including 282 moths representing 41 genera generated no false positives. Only three inconclusive results were generated from the 637 samples. Spike experiments demonstrated that DNA contamination in the assay can affect samples differently. Contaminated samples analyzed with the ITS2 RT-PCR assay and DNA barcode methodology by using the cytochrome oxidase I gene can generate contradictory diagnoses.

  14. Multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction for Detection of Gastrointestinal Pathogens in Migrant Workers in Qatar.

    PubMed

    Humphrey, John M; Ranbhise, Sanjay; Ibrahim, Emad; Al-Romaihi, Hamad E; Farag, Elmoubasher; Abu-Raddad, Laith J; Glesby, Marshall J

    2016-12-07

    The causes of infectious diarrhea among the migrant worker population in Qatar are not well understood. We conducted a prospective observational study to understand the demographic and clinical characteristics and infectious causes of diarrhea among migrant workers in Doha, Qatar. A total of 126 male workers presenting to the Qatar Red Crescent Worker's Health Center outpatient clinic or emergency department were studied over a 5-month period in 2015-2016. Epidemiologic surveys were administered to all subjects and the prevalence of 22 different stool pathogens was determined using multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) (FilmArray(®) Gastrointestinal PCR). A target pathogen was identified in 62.7% of subjects. Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli was the most prevalent pathogen and was detected in 24.6% of subjects, followed by Salmonella (22.2%), enteroaggregative E. coli (15.1%), Giardia lamblia (9.5%), and enterotoxigenic E. coli (8.7%). Multiple pathogens were identified in 49.3% of positive stool samples. In a multivariable analysis, the presence of a heart rate ≥ 90 (adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 3.7, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.4-10.0) and > 5 fecal leukocytes/high-power field (adjusted OR = 2.8, 95% CI = 1.2-7.0) were significant predictors of detecting an acute inflammatory pathogen by PCR. Use of multiplex PCR enabled the detection of gastrointestinal pathogens in a high proportion of cases, illustrating the utility of this diagnostic tool in epidemiologic studies of infectious diarrhea.

  15. [Use of polymerase chain reaction for the diagnosis of central nervous system infections].

    PubMed

    Zambrano, Yelitza; Chiarello, Anna; Soca, Alain; Villalobos, Iris; Marrero, Miguel; Soler, Maritza; Laferte, José; Alvarez, Maritza

    2006-12-01

    In the present work, the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay and his variants RT-PCR and Multiplex PCR were applied for the detection of specific sequences of Enterovirus, Human Herpes viruses (Herpes simple virus, Human Herpes virus type 6, Cytomegalovirus, Epstein Barr virus, and Varicella Zoster), Human Immunodeficiency virus, Toxoplasma gondii, Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycoplasma pneumoniae in patients' cohorts grouped by medical suspicion of meningoencephalitis. Of 326 samples of processed cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), 93 samples (28.5%) were positive for the different infectious agents. In the group of patients with clinical diagnosis of viral meningoencephalitis (n=212), there was obtained a whole of 73 positive samples (34.4%), of which 37 patients were positive to Enterovirus (50.7%), 19 were positive to VHS (26%) and 10 patients (13.7%) were positive to CMV. Other viral agents as VZV, EBV and HVH6 were detected in minor frequency. The 114 remaining samples were analyzed applying specific PCR to each pathogen for strict medical indication, being able to detect the presence of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (40%), Mycoplasma pneumoniae (40%), Toxoplasma gondii (14%) and Mycobacterium tuberculosis (12%) in CSF samples. The results obtained in this study demonstrate the convenience of the application of the molecular assays in the laboratory diagnosis of the meningoencefalitis of different etiology. Besides this, it is also a very valuable tool for the clinical management of the patients and for the execution of the epidemiological studies.

  16. A specific oligonucleotide primer for the rapid detection of Lactobacillus lindneri by polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Yasui, T; Okamoto, T; Taguchi, H

    1997-02-01

    A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method was developed for the rapid detection of the beer-spoilage heterofermentative lactic acid bacterium Lactobacillus lindneri. Three strains, the Chinese brewery isolate DA1, the Japanese commercial beer isolate BG2, and the Japanese brewery isolate SE3, which were serologically classified as belonging to L. lindneri, were used in this study. After sequencing the 16S rDNA of the isolates DA1 and BG2 and the typical beer-spoilage heterofermentative Lactobacillus brevis L63, these sequences were compared with published data. A L. lindneri specific PCR primer, DA-40, was then constructed based on the V1 variable region of 16S rDNA. The specificity of PCR using the L. lindneri specific primer DA-40 and the universal primer 907r was examined using five L. lidneri strains: the three isolates described above and two strains from culture collection, DSM 20690 and DSM 20692. A variety of beer-spoilage lactic acid bacteria, including 71 Lactobacillus strains and 13 Pediococcus strains, were also included in this examination. No PCR product was obtained from any DNA with the exception of the five L. lindneri strains, indicating that the L. lindneri specific primer DA-40 was highly specific. The detection limit for L. lindneri in beer was 63 CFU/100 mL of beer.

  17. Determination of Sperm Sex Ratio in Bovine Semen Using Multiplex Real-time Polymerase Chain Reaction.

    PubMed

    Khamlor, Trisadee; Pongpiachan, Petai; Sangsritavong, Siwat; Chokesajjawatee, Nipa

    2014-10-01

    Gender selection is important in livestock industries; for example, female calves are required in the dairy industry. Sex-sorted semen is commonly used for the production of calves of the desired gender. However, assessment of the sex ratio of the sorted semen is tedious and expensive. In this study, a rapid, cost effective and reliable method for determining the sex ratio was developed using a multiplex real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay. In this assay, the X and Y chromosome-specific markers, i.e., bovine proteolipid protein (PLP) gene and sex-determining region Y (SRY) were simultaneously quantified in a single tube. The multiplex real-time PCR assay was shown to have high amplification efficiencies (97% to 99%) comparable to the separated-tube simplex real-time PCR assay. The results obtained from both assays were not significantly different (p>0.05). The multiplex assay was validated using reference DNA of known X ratio (10%, 50%, and 90%) as templates. The measured %X in semen samples were the same within 95% confidence intervals as the expected values, i.e., >90% in X-sorted semen, <10% in Y-sorted semen and close to 50% in the unsorted semen. The multiplex real-time PCR assay as shown in this study can thus be used to assess purity of sex-sorted semen.

  18. Sensitive and species-specific detection of Erwinia amylovora by polymerase chain reaction analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Bereswill, S; Pahl, A; Bellemann, P; Zeller, W; Geider, K

    1992-01-01

    Detection and identification of the fire blight pathogen, Erwinia amylovora, can be accurately done by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis in less than 6 h. Two oligomers derived from a 29-kb plasmid which is common to all strains of E. amylovora were used to amplify a 0.9-kb fragment of the plasmid. By separation of the PCR products on agarose gel, this fragment wa specifically detected when E. amylovora DNA was present in the amplification assay. It was not found when DNA from other plant-pathogenic bacteria was used for the assay. A visible band specific to the 0.9-kb fragment was produced with DNA from fewer than 100 E. amylovora cells. A signal of similar strength was also obtained from E. amylovora cell lysates in the presence of the mild detergent Tween 20. Signals were weaker when bacteria were added to the PCR mixture without the detergent. As with results obtained from hybridization experiments using pEA29 DNA< the PCR signal was obtained with E. amylovora isolates from various geographic regions. This technique could also be used for detection of the fire blight pathogen in extracts of tissue obtained from infected plant material. Images PMID:1482178

  19. Diagnosis of whooping cough in Switzerland: differentiating Bordetella pertussis from Bordetella holmesii by polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Pittet, Laure F; Emonet, Stéphane; François, Patrice; Bonetti, Eve-Julie; Schrenzel, Jacques; Hug, Melanie; Altwegg, Martin; Siegrist, Claire-Anne; Posfay-Barbe, Klara M

    2014-01-01

    Bordetella holmesii, an emerging pathogen, can be misidentified as Bordetella pertussis by routine polymerase chain reaction (PCR). In some reports, up to 29% of the patients diagnosed with pertussis have in fact B. holmesii infection and invasive, non-respiratory B. holmesii infections have been reported worldwide. This misdiagnosis undermines the knowledge of pertussis' epidemiology, and may lead to misconceptions on pertussis vaccine's efficacy. Recently, the number of whooping cough cases has increased significantly in several countries. The aim of this retrospective study was to determine whether B. holmesii was contributing to the increase in laboratory-confirmed cases of B. pertussis in Switzerland. A multiplex species-specific quantitative PCR assay was performed on 196 nasopharyngeal samples from Swiss patients with PCR-confirmed Bordetella infection (median age: 6 years-old, minimum 21 days-old, maximum 86 years-old), formerly diagnosed as Bordetella pertussis (IS481+). No B. holmesii (IS481+, IS1001-, hIS1001+) was identified. We discuss whether laboratories should implement specific PCR to recognize different Bordetella species. We conclude that in Switzerland B. holmesii seems to be circulating less than in neighboring countries and that specific diagnostic procedures are not necessary routinely. However, as the epidemiological situation may change rapidly, periodic reevaluation is suggested.

  20. Detection of human papillomavirus in juvenile laryngeal papillomatosis using polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Gómez, M A; Drut, R; Lojo, M M; Drut, R M

    1995-01-01

    We examined the presence and subtypes of human papillomavirus (HPV) in 20 paraffin-embedded samples (from 12 patients) of juvenile laryngeal papillomatosis using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The biopsies had been stored for months to 12 years. Due to the great genetic variability of HPV, we selected a conservative sequence of the viral genome (L1 region) to identify the vast majority of the subtypes. Positive results were obtained by one-step PCR amplification with the MY09-11 consensus primers (L1 region) in only 10 of the cases. After a two-step amplification (nested-PCR) with GP5-6 primers the 20 samples proved to be positive demonstrating the higher sensitivity of this method. In order to amplify a highly variable region of the genome (E6), specific primers for HPV types 6 and 11 (H6/11 L1-R2) were used. 7/12 patients were positive for this subtype. Since more that one subtype has been reported in the same sample, the presence of HPV 6-11 sequences does not exclude that other subtypes might be involved. The results of this study show that: 1) HPV is present in JLP. 2) The most frequent HPV subtype involved was from the 6-11 group. 3) PCR can be successfully used in archived tissue routinely processed in a laboratory of pathology.

  1. Polymerase chain reaction with lesion scrapping for the diagnosis of human American tegumentary leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Venazzi, Eneide Aparecida Sabaini; Roberto, Andréa Claudia Bekner Silva; Barbosa-Tessmann, Ione Parra; Zanzarini, Paulo Donizeti; Lonardoni, Maria Valdrinez Campana; Silveira, Thaís Gomes Verzignassi

    2006-06-01

    The objective of this work was to compare the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using lesion scrapping with other conventional techniques for the diagnosis of the American tegumentary leishmaniasis (ATL). For this, patients with cutaneous lesions suspected to be ATL were studied. The DNA was amplified with the MP1L/MP3H primers. From the 156 studied patients, 79 (50.6%) presented positive parasite direct search (PD), 81 (51.9%) had positive Montenegro skin test (MST), and 90 (57.7%) presented PD and/or MST positive. The PCR was positive in all of the positive-PD patients (100% sensitivity), in 91.1% of the positive PD and/or MST patients, and in 27.3% of the patients that presented negative PD and positive MST. The PCR positivity was similar to the PD (P = 0.2482) and inferior to the MST (P = 0.0455), and to the PD/MST association (P = 0.0133). The high PCR sensitivity, and positivity in those cases where the PD was negative, highlights the importance of this technique as an auxiliary tool for the diagnosis of ATL.

  2. Detection of hepatitis E virus in raw and treated wastewater with the polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Jothikumar, N; Aparna, K; Kamatchiammal, S; Paulmurugan, R; Saravanadevi, S; Khanna, P

    1993-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to determine the applicability of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to detection of hepatitis E virus (HEV) in sewage treatment plants and establishment of the prevalence of hepatitis viral diseases in a population. Epidemics of HEV infection because of inadequate public sanitation have been reported in several developing countries. A procedure for concentration of HEV in sewage samples through adsorption to membrane filters, elution with urea-arginine phosphate buffer, and subsequent reconcentration with magnesium chloride enabled us to concentrate HEV to volumes in the microliter range. HEV-specific cDNA was prepared by reverse transcription of the total RNA extracted from samples. Specific DNA amplification by PCR in combination with slot blot hybridization was used to demonstrate the presence of HEV in sewage samples from the inlets and outlets of three sewage treatment plants. The assay was specific for HEV, and a 240-bp amplified product was visualized by ethidium bromide fluorescence. Sewage samples adjusted to pH 5.0 for adsorption of viruses to membrane filters were PCR positive, while samples adjusted to pH 3.5 were PCR negative. Images PMID:8368844

  3. Diagnosis of Whooping Cough in Switzerland: Differentiating Bordetella pertussis from Bordetella holmesii by Polymerase Chain Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Pittet, Laure F.; Emonet, Stéphane; François, Patrice; Bonetti, Eve-Julie; Schrenzel, Jacques; Hug, Melanie; Altwegg, Martin; Siegrist, Claire-Anne; Posfay-Barbe, Klara M.

    2014-01-01

    Bordetella holmesii, an emerging pathogen, can be misidentified as Bordetella pertussis by routine polymerase chain reaction (PCR). In some reports, up to 29% of the patients diagnosed with pertussis have in fact B. holmesii infection and invasive, non-respiratory B. holmesii infections have been reported worldwide. This misdiagnosis undermines the knowledge of pertussis' epidemiology, and may lead to misconceptions on pertussis vaccine's efficacy. Recently, the number of whooping cough cases has increased significantly in several countries. The aim of this retrospective study was to determine whether B. holmesii was contributing to the increase in laboratory-confirmed cases of B. pertussis in Switzerland. A multiplex species-specific quantitative PCR assay was performed on 196 nasopharyngeal samples from Swiss patients with PCR-confirmed Bordetella infection (median age: 6 years-old, minimum 21 days-old, maximum 86 years-old), formerly diagnosed as Bordetella pertussis (IS481+). No B. holmesii (IS481+, IS1001−, hIS1001+) was identified. We discuss whether laboratories should implement specific PCR to recognize different Bordetella species. We conclude that in Switzerland B. holmesii seems to be circulating less than in neighboring countries and that specific diagnostic procedures are not necessary routinely. However, as the epidemiological situation may change rapidly, periodic reevaluation is suggested. PMID:24586447

  4. Massively parallel single-molecule and single-cell emulsion reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction using agarose droplet microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huifa; Jenkins, Gareth; Zou, Yuan; Zhu, Zhi; Yang, Chaoyong James

    2012-04-17

    A microfluidic device for performing single copy, emulsion Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR) within agarose droplets is presented. A two-aqueous-inlet emulsion droplet generator was designed and fabricated to produce highly uniform monodisperse picoliter agarose emulsion droplets with RT-PCR reagents in carrier oil. Template RNA or cells were delivered from one inlet with RT-PCR reagents/cell lysis buffer delivered separately from the other. Efficient RNA/cell encapsulation and RT-PCR at the single copy level was achieved in agarose-in-oil droplets, which, after amplification, can be solidified into agarose beads for further analysis. A simple and efficient method to graft primer to the polymer matrix using 5'-acrydite primer was developed to ensure highly efficient trapping of RT-PCR products in agarose. High-throughput single RNA molecule/cell RT-PCR was demonstrated in stochastically diluted solutions. Our results indicate that single-molecule RT-PCR can be efficiently carried out in agarose matrix. Single-cell RT-PCR was successfully performed which showed a clear difference in gene expression level of EpCAM, a cancer biomarker gene, at the single-cell level between different types of cancer cells. This work clearly demonstrates for the first time, single-copy RT-PCR in agarose droplets. We believe this will open up new possibilities for viral RNA detection and single-cell transcription analysis.

  5. Detection of Avian bornavirus in multiple tissues of infected psittacine birds using real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Delnatte, Pauline; Mak, Matthew; Ojkic, Davor; Raghav, Raj; DeLay, Josepha; Smith, Dale A

    2014-03-01

    Avian bornavirus (ABV), the cause of proventricular dilation disease in psittacine birds, has been detected in multiple tissues of infected birds using immunohistochemical staining (IHC) and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). In the current study, real-time RT-PCR, using primers targeting the ABV matrix gene, was used to detect ABV in 146 tissues from 7 ABV-infected psittacine birds. Eighty-six percent of the samples tested positive, with crossing point values ranging from 13.82 to 37.82 and a mean of 22.3. These results were compared to the findings of a previous study using gel-based RT-PCR and IHC on the same samples. The agreement between the 2 RT-PCR techniques was 91%; when tests disagreed it was because samples were negative using gel-based RT-PCR but positive on real-time RT-PCR. Agreement with IHC was 77%; 16 out of 74 samples were negative using IHC but positive on real-time RT-PCR. The results suggest that real-time RT-PCR is a more sensitive technique than gel-based RT-PCR and IHC to detect ABV in tissues. The tissues that were ranked most frequently as having a high amount of viral RNA were proventriculus, kidney, colon, cerebrum, and cerebellum. Skeletal muscle, on the other hand, was found to have a consistently low amount of viral RNA.

  6. Semi-quantitative digital analysis of polymerase chain reaction-electrophoresis gel: Potential applications in low-income veterinary laboratories

    PubMed Central

    Antiabong, John F.; Ngoepe, Mafora G.; Abechi, Adakole S.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The interpretation of conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay results is often limited to either positive or negative (non-detectable). The more robust quantitative PCR (qPCR) method is mostly reserved for quantitation studies and not a readily accessible technology in laboratories across developing nations. The aim of this study was to evaluate a semi-quantitative method for conventional PCR amplicons using digital image analysis of electrophoretic gel. The potential applications are also discussed. Materials and Methods: This study describes standard conditions for the digital image analysis of PCR amplicons using the freely available ImageJ software and confirmed using the qPCR assay. Results and Conclusion: Comparison of ImageJ analysis of PCR-electrophoresis gel and qPCR methods showed similar trends in the Fusobacterium necrophorum DNA concentration associated with healthy and periodontal disease infected wallabies (p≤0.03). Based on these empirical data, this study adds descriptive attributes (“more” or “less”) to the interpretation of conventional PCR results. The potential applications in low-income veterinary laboratories are suggested, and guidelines for the adoption of the method are also highlighted. PMID:27733792

  7. Rapid detection of sacbrood virus in honeybee using ultra-rapid real-time polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Mi-Sun; Thi, Kim Cuc Nguyen; Van Nguyen, Phu; Han, Sang-Hoon; Kwon, Soon-Hwan; Yoon, Byoung-Su

    2012-01-01

    A real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) assay was developed for the fast and highly sensitive detection of the sacbrood virus (SBV) genome and applied to honeybee samples. Using plasmid DNA containing a partial SBV genome and diluted serially, as few as 1×10(2)copies/μl (correlation co-efficiency >0.99) were detected by the qRT-PCR assay, whereas 1×10(3)copies/μl were detected by the conventional RT-PCR assay. As a rapid detection method, ultra-rapid real-time PCR (URRT-PCR) was carried out with a GenSpector TMC-1000 silicon-glass chip-based thermal cycler, which has a 6μl micro-chamber volume and a fast outstandingly heating/cooling rate. Using this method, 10(3)copies of pBX-SBV3.8 clone were detected within 17 min after 40 PCR cycles, including melting point analysis. To reduce the detection time for SBV, synthesis of the cDNA of the SBV genome from a honeybee sample was attempted for different reaction times and the cDNA was used as the template for URRT-PCR assays. The results indicated that a 5 min reaction time was sufficient to synthesize cDNA as the template for the SBV URRT-PCR assay. This study described a novel PCR-based method that is able to detect an RNA virus in environmental samples within 22 min, including reverse transcription, PCR detection and melting point analysis in real-time.

  8. Fabrication of Polymerase Chain Reaction Plastic Lab-on-a-Chip Device for Rapid Molecular Diagnoses

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: We aim to fabricate a thermoplastic poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA) Lab-on-a-Chip device to perform continuous- flow polymerase chain reactions (PCRs) for rapid molecular detection of foodborne pathogen bacteria. Methods: A miniaturized plastic device was fabricated by utilizing PMMA substrates mediated by poly(dimethylsiloxane) interfacial coating, enabling bonding under mild conditions, and thus avoiding the deformation or collapse of microchannels. Surface characterizations were carried out and bond strength was measured. The feasibility of the Lab-on-a-Chip device for performing on-chip PCR utilizing a lab-made, portable dual heater was evaluated. The results were compared with those obtained using a commercially available thermal cycler. Results: A PMMA Lab-on-a-Chip device was designed and fabricated for conducting PCR using foodborne pathogens as sample targets. A robust bond was established between the PMMA substrates, which is essential for performing miniaturized PCR on plastic. The feasibility of on-chip PCR was evaluated using Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Cronobacter condimenti, two worldwide foodborne pathogens, and the target amplicons were successfully amplified within 25 minutes. Conclusions: In this study, we present a novel design of a low-cost and high-throughput thermoplastic PMMA Lab-on-a-Chip device for conducting microscale PCR, and we enable rapid molecular diagnoses of two important foodborne pathogens in minute resolution using this device. In this regard, the introduced highly portable system design has the potential to enable PCR investigations of many diseases quickly and accurately. PMID:27230459

  9. Detection of Yersinia ruckeri in rainbow trout blood by use of the polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Altinok, I; Grizzle, J M; Liu, Z

    2001-01-26

    We evaluated a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method for detecting Yersinia ruckeri, the bacterial pathogen causing enteric redmouth disease (ERM), in blood of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss. Identification of the PCR product was confirmed by Southern blot hybridization with a 32P-labeled oligonucleotide probe matching a sequence within the small subunit ribosomal RNA gene of Y. ruckeri. Following a 1 h immersion of rainbow trout in water with 4.5 x 10(6) colony-forming units of Y. ruckeri l(-1), the PCR was positive for all blood samples from 1 h (first sample) to 5 d and was negative from 9 to 30 d (last sample). Fish in this experiment did not show signs of disease, probably because they had been vaccinated against Y. ruckeri. To test this method with naturally infected fish, 42 rainbow trout from hatcheries were examined. Four of these fish had clinical signs of ERM and were infected with Y. ruckeri based on bacteriological culture. The PCR method detected Y. ruckeri in blood, intestine, liver, and trunk kidney from the 4 fish with ERM and from 5 additional rainbow trout that were bacteriologically negative for Y. ruckeri. Three of 5 rainbow trout from streams receiving effluent from hatcheries were positive for Y. ruckeri when tested with PCR, although there was no growth of Y. ruckeri on culture plates inoculated with the same samples. Samples were successfully stored for 1 wk in lysis buffer at 25 degrees C. This study demonstrated that a non-lethal blood sample can be used with PCR to detect Y. ruckeri.

  10. Detection of trypanosomes in suspected sleeping sickness patients in Uganda using the polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Kyambadde, J. W.; Enyaru, J. C.; Matovu, E.; Odiit, M.; Carasco, J. F.

    2000-01-01

    Diagnosis of sleeping sickness (trypanosomiasis) is difficult because of the fluctuating levels of parasitaemia encountered in patients. In the present study we found that the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) demonstrated trypanosome infection in 20 out of 35 (57.1%) blood samples and in 21 out of 34 (61.7%) cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples collected from an area endemic for sleeping sickness in north-west Uganda. A total of 14 blood samples and 13 CSF samples that were positive for trypanosomes by double centrifugation were also positive by PCR, demonstrating good concordance between the two methods. However, 6 (28.6%) of the 21 blood samples that were parasitologically negative were positive by PCR, while 8 (38.0%) out of 21 CSF samples that were negative by double centrifugation were positive by PCR. These 14 negative samples could therefore be from sleeping sickness cases even though a positive PCR test is not evidence for the presence of trypanosomes. Furthermore, of these 8 CSF samples, 4 had been designated as early cases, based on the absence of trypanosomes and on a count of < or = 5 white blood cells (WBC) per microliter. This suggests that some late-stage cases could potentially be missed according to the present criteria, and it is therefore important to perform clinical trials to determine whether these cases could be treated successfully with the first-stage drug alone. The remaining four CSF samples had been classified as late-stage cases, based on a count of > 6 WBC per microliter, even though trypanosomes could not be detected in these samples by either double centrifugation or PCR. A cut-off point of 5 WBC per microliter, which is used as a rule of thumb to stage sleeping sickness patients, seems to leave some late-stage cases undetected since trypanosomes were detected in four CSF samples from suspected cases with < 5 WBC per microliter. PMID:10686746

  11. Detection of trypanosomes in suspected sleeping sickness patients in Uganda using the polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Kyambadde, J W; Enyaru, J C; Matovu, E; Odiit, M; Carasco, J F

    2000-01-01

    Diagnosis of sleeping sickness (trypanosomiasis) is difficult because of the fluctuating levels of parasitaemia encountered in patients. In the present study we found that the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) demonstrated trypanosome infection in 20 out of 35 (57.1%) blood samples and in 21 out of 34 (61.7%) cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples collected from an area endemic for sleeping sickness in north-west Uganda. A total of 14 blood samples and 13 CSF samples that were positive for trypanosomes by double centrifugation were also positive by PCR, demonstrating good concordance between the two methods. However, 6 (28.6%) of the 21 blood samples that were parasitologically negative were positive by PCR, while 8 (38.0%) out of 21 CSF samples that were negative by double centrifugation were positive by PCR. These 14 negative samples could therefore be from sleeping sickness cases even though a positive PCR test is not evidence for the presence of trypanosomes. Furthermore, of these 8 CSF samples, 4 had been designated as early cases, based on the absence of trypanosomes and on a count of < or = 5 white blood cells (WBC) per microliter. This suggests that some late-stage cases could potentially be missed according to the present criteria, and it is therefore important to perform clinical trials to determine whether these cases could be treated successfully with the first-stage drug alone. The remaining four CSF samples had been classified as late-stage cases, based on a count of > 6 WBC per microliter, even though trypanosomes could not be detected in these samples by either double centrifugation or PCR. A cut-off point of 5 WBC per microliter, which is used as a rule of thumb to stage sleeping sickness patients, seems to leave some late-stage cases undetected since trypanosomes were detected in four CSF samples from suspected cases with < 5 WBC per microliter.

  12. One-heater flow-through polymerase chain reaction device by heat pipes cooling

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jyh Jian; Liao, Ming Huei; Li, Kun Tze; Shen, Chia Ming

    2015-01-01

    This study describes a novel microfluidic reactor capable of flow-through polymerase chain reactions (PCR). For one-heater PCR devices in previous studies, comprehensive simulations and experiments for the chip geometry and the heater arrangement were usually needed before the fabrication of the device. In order to improve the flexibility of the one-heater PCR device, two heat pipes with one fan are used to create the requisite temperature regions in our device. With the integration of one heater onto the chip, the high temperature required for the denaturation stage can be generated at the chip center. By arranging the heat pipes on the opposite sides of the chip, the low temperature needed for the annealing stage is easy to regulate. Numerical calculations and thermal measurements have shown that the temperature distribution in the five-temperature-region PCR chip would be suitable for DNA amplification. In order to ensure temperature uniformity at specific reaction regions, the Re of the sample flow is less than 1. When the microchannel width increases and then decreases gradually between the denaturation and annealing regions, the extension region located in the enlarged part of the channel can be observed numerically and experimentally. From the simulations, the residence time at the extension region with the enlarged channel is 4.25 times longer than that without an enlarged channel at a flow rate of 2 μl/min. The treated surfaces of the flow-through microchannel are characterized using the water contact angle, while the effects of the hydrophilicity of the treated polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microchannels on PCR efficiency are determined using gel electrophoresis. By increasing the hydrophilicity of the channel surface after immersing the PDMS substrates into Tween 20 (20%) or BSA (1 mg/ml) solutions, efficient amplifications of DNA segments were proved to occur in our chip device. To our knowledge, our group is the first to introduce heat pipes into

  13. One-heater flow-through polymerase chain reaction device by heat pipes cooling.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jyh Jian; Liao, Ming Huei; Li, Kun Tze; Shen, Chia Ming

    2015-01-01

    This study describes a novel microfluidic reactor capable of flow-through polymerase chain reactions (PCR). For one-heater PCR devices in previous studies, comprehensive simulations and experiments for the chip geometry and the heater arrangement were usually needed before the fabrication of the device. In order to improve the flexibility of the one-heater PCR device, two heat pipes with one fan are used to create the requisite temperature regions in our device. With the integration of one heater onto the chip, the high temperature required for the denaturation stage can be generated at the chip center. By arranging the heat pipes on the opposite sides of the chip, the low temperature needed for the annealing stage is easy to regulate. Numerical calculations and thermal measurements have shown that the temperature distribution in the five-temperature-region PCR chip would be suitable for DNA amplification. In order to ensure temperature uniformity at specific reaction regions, the Re of the sample flow is less than 1. When the microchannel width increases and then decreases gradually between the denaturation and annealing regions, the extension region located in the enlarged part of the channel can be observed numerically and experimentally. From the simulations, the residence time at the extension region with the enlarged channel is 4.25 times longer than that without an enlarged channel at a flow rate of 2 μl/min. The treated surfaces of the flow-through microchannel are characterized using the water contact angle, while the effects of the hydrophilicity of the treated polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microchannels on PCR efficiency are determined using gel electrophoresis. By increasing the hydrophilicity of the channel surface after immersing the PDMS substrates into Tween 20 (20%) or BSA (1 mg/ml) solutions, efficient amplifications of DNA segments were proved to occur in our chip device. To our knowledge, our group is the first to introduce heat pipes into

  14. Tidal chain reaction and the origin of replicating biopolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lathe, Richard

    2005-01-01

    Template-directed polymer assembly is a likely feature of prebiotic chemistry, but the product blocks further synthesis, preventing amplification and Darwinian selection. Nucleic acids are unusual because charge repulsion between opposing phosphates permits salt-dependent association and dissociation. It was postulated (Lathe, R. (2004). Fast tidal cycling and the origin of life. Icarus 168, 18-22) that tides at ocean shores provide the driving force for amplification: evaporative concentration promoted association/assembly on drying, while charge repulsion on tidal dilution drove dissociation. This permits exponential amplification by a process termed here the tidal chain reaction (TCR). The process is not strictly contingent upon tidal ebb and flow: circadian dews and rainfalls can produce identical cycling. Ionic strength-dependent association and dissociation of nucleic acids and possible prebiotic precursors are reviewed. Polymer scavenging, chain assembly by the recruitment of pre-formed fragments, is proposed as the primary mechanism of reiterative chain assembly. Parameters determining prebiotic polymer structure and amplification by TCR are discussed, with the suggestion that Darwinian selection may have operated on families of related polymers rather than on individual molecules.

  15. Multiplexed miRNA northern blots via hybridization chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Schwarzkopf, Maayan; Pierce, Niles A

    2016-09-06

    Northern blots enable detection of a target RNA of interest in a biological sample using standard benchtop equipment. miRNAs are the most challenging targets as they must be detected with a single short nucleic acid probe. With existing approaches, it is cumbersome to perform multiplexed blots in which several RNAs are detected simultaneously, impeding the study of interacting regulatory elements. Here, we address this shortcoming by demonstrating multiplexed northern blotting based on the mechanism of hybridization chain reaction (HCR). With this approach, nucleic acid probes complementary to RNA targets trigger chain reactions in which fluorophore-labeled DNA hairpins self-assemble into tethered fluorescent amplification polymers. The programmability of HCR allows multiple amplifiers to operate simultaneously and independently within a blot, enabling straightforward multiplexing. We demonstrate simultaneous detection of three endogenous miRNAs in total RNA extracted from 293T and HeLa cells. For a given target, HCR signal scales linearly with target abundance, enabling relative and absolute quantitation. Using non-radioactive HCR, sensitive and selective miRNA detection is achieved using 2'OMe-RNA probes. The HCR northern blot protocol takes ∼1.5 days independent of the number of target RNAs.

  16. Designing and Applying Proximity-Dependent Hybridization Chain Reaction.

    PubMed

    Koos, Björn; Söderberg, Ola

    2016-08-01

    Proximity-dependent hybridization chain reaction (proxHCR) is a novel technique for detection of protein interaction, post-translational modifications (PTMs), or protein expression. The method is based upon antibodies targeting the proteins of interest that are covalently conjugated to DNA oligonucleotides, which enables the induction of a hybridization chain reaction (HCR) to generate a fluorescent signal visible under a microscope. In contrast to the in situ proximity ligation assay (in situ PLA), which is another method that utilizes antibody-DNA conjugates to detect protein interactions, proxHCR does not require enzymatic steps. This makes proxHCR an inexpensive alternative to in situ PLA. Another potential advantage might be that proxHCR could more readily be adapted for use in automated staining procedures and in point-of-care devices, as all reagents can be stored at room temperature. This unit describes how the oligonucleotide system for proxHCR can be designed and a protocol for how to perform proxHCR is presented. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  17. Multiplex-polymerase chain reaction assay for the authentication of the mackerel Scomber colias in commercial canned products.

    PubMed

    Infante, Carlos; Manchado, Manuel

    2006-01-01

    A multiplex-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) system was developed for the authentication of the mackerel Scomber colias in commercial canned products. This novel method consists of an S. colias-specific fragment [159 base pairs (bp)] located in the nontranscribed spacer (NTS) sequence, and a Scomber genus-specific PCR product in the 5S rRNA gene (196-201 bp) as a positive amplification control. The system was assayed using 18 different canned products labeled as S. colias. A positive identification was made in all but one sample, revealing this methodology as a potential molecular tool for direct application in the authentication of S. colias canned products.

  18. Copy number ratios determined by two digital polymerase chain reaction systems in genetically modified grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez Urquiza, M.; Acatzi Silva, A. I.

    2014-02-01

    Three certified reference materials produced from powdered seeds to measure the copy number ratio sequences of p35S/hmgA in maize containing MON 810 event, p35S/Le1 in soybeans containing GTS 40-3-2 event and DREB1A/acc1 in wheat were produced according to the ISO Guides 34 and 35. In this paper, we report digital polymerase chain reaction (dPCR) protocols, performance parameters and results of copy number ratio content of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) in these materials using two new dPCR systems to detect and quantify molecular deoxyribonucleic acid: the BioMark® (Fluidigm) and the OpenArray® (Life Technologies) systems. These technologies were implemented at the National Institute of Metrology in Mexico (CENAM) and in the Reference Center for GMO Detection from the Ministry of Agriculture (CNRDOGM), respectively. The main advantage of this technique against the more-used quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) is that it generates an absolute number of target molecules in the sample, without reference to standards or an endogenous control, which is very useful when not much information is available for new developments or there are no standard reference materials in the market as in the wheat case presented, or when it was not possible to test the purity of seeds as in the maize case presented here. Both systems reported enhanced productivity, increased reliability and reduced instrument footprint. In this paper, the performance parameters and uncertainty of measurement obtained with both systems are presented and compared.

  19. Development of a screening method for genetically modified soybean by plasmid-based quantitative competitive polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Eri; Kato, Hisashi; Nakagawa, Yuki; Kodama, Takashi; Futo, Satoshi; Minegishi, Yasutaka; Watanabe, Takahiro; Akiyama, Hiroshi; Teshima, Reiko; Furui, Satoshi; Hino, Akihiro; Kitta, Kazumi

    2008-07-23

    A novel type of quantitative competitive polymerase chain reaction (QC-PCR) system for the detection and quantification of the Roundup Ready soybean (RRS) was developed. This system was designed based on the advantage of a fully validated real-time PCR method used for the quantification of RRS in Japan. A plasmid was constructed as a competitor plasmid for the detection and quantification of genetically modified soy, RRS. The plasmid contained the construct-specific sequence of RRS and the taxon-specific sequence of lectin1 (Le1), and both had 21 bp oligonucleotide insertion in the sequences. The plasmid DNA was used as a reference molecule instead of ground seeds, which enabled us to precisely and stably adjust the copy number of targets. The present study demonstrated that the novel plasmid-based QC-PCR method could be a simple and feasible alternative to the real-time PCR method used for the quantification of genetically modified organism contents.

  20. Repeatedly positive human immunodeficiency virus type 1 DNA polymerase chain reaction in human immunodeficiency virus-exposed seroreverting infants.

    PubMed

    Bakshi, S S; Tetali, S; Abrams, E J; Paul, M O; Pahwa, S G

    1995-08-01

    Three human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-exposed children who had repeatedly positive DNA polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests for HIV in > or = 5 samples before seroreversion to HIV-negative status are reported. The children belong to a cohort of 210 infants who were born to HIV-infected mothers and were tested at intervals of 1 to 3 months by HIV viral culture, PCR, and p24 antigen; only the PCR was positive in > or = 5 samples in the children reported here. Their clinical features were indistinguishable from other seroreverters. All three children had a transient drop in CD4:CD8 ratio to < 1.0. The transiently positive DNA PCR in HIV-exposed infants may indicate either that HIV infection was eliminated by a strong host immune response or that infection was caused by an attenuated/defective strain of virus.

  1. Cloning of flanking sequence in transgenic plants by restriction site-anchored single-primer polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Ma, J; Wang, N N; Ren, S; Fu, Y P; Lu, S; Wang, Y P; Wang, P W

    2014-12-12

    Determining the insertion position of an exogenous gene in the target plant genome is one of the main issues in the transgenic plant field. This study introduced a simple, rapid, and accurate method to clone the flanking sequences of the transgenic bar gene as the anchoring gene in the transgenic maize genome using single-primer polymerase chain reaction (PCR). This method was based on the distribution of restriction sites in the maize genome and adopted the single-primer PCR method. Cloning the flanking sequences with the restriction site-anchored single-primer PCR simplified the experimental procedures by about 70% and reduced the experimental time by more than 80%. In conclusion, the restriction site-anchored single-primer PCR was a simple, rapid method to obtain the unknown flanking sequences in the transgenic plants.

  2. [Detection of mycobacterial DNA with polymerase chain reaction in eye discharge and gastric juices in a case of scleritis].

    PubMed

    Tanemoto, K; Ishikawa, H; Kigasawa, K; Obazawa, H; Fusegawa, H; Miyachi, H; Ando, Y

    1997-01-01

    We report a case of mycobacterial scleritis in which prompt diagnosis was made by the detection of mycobacterial DNA with polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in eye discharge and gastric juices, when conventional tests were negative. A 77-year-old woman who had a past history of pulmonary tuberculosis visited the outpatient clinic of Tokai University Hospital complaining of pain in her right eye. She was diagnosed as having scleritis and uveitis. There were no indications of active tuberculosis. We examined the gastric juices, sputum, and eye discharge by microscopy, culture, and PCR for detection of mycobacterium. The results of microscopy and culture were negative, but with PCR we detected atypical mycobacterium in eye discharge and gastric juices. After oral treatment with antituberculosis agents, the patient's eye symptoms disappeared. Detecting mycobacterial DNA with PCR could be useful for early diagnosis of mycobacterial scleritis, so that treatment with antituberculosis agents could be started.

  3. Deconstructing the polymerase chain reaction: understanding and correcting bias associated with primer degeneracies and primer-template mismatches.

    PubMed

    Green, Stefan J; Venkatramanan, Raghavee; Naqib, Ankur

    2015-01-01

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is sensitive to mismatches between primer and template, and mismatches can lead to inefficient amplification of targeted regions of DNA template. In PCRs in which a degenerate primer pool is employed, each primer can behave differently. Therefore, inefficiencies due to different primer melting temperatures within a degenerate primer pool, in addition to mismatches between primer binding sites and primers, can lead to a distortion of the true relative abundance of targets in the original DNA pool. A theoretical analysis indicated that a combination of primer-template and primer-amplicon interactions during PCR cycles 3-12 is potentially responsible for this distortion. To test this hypothesis, we developed a novel amplification strategy, entitled "Polymerase-exonuclease (PEX) PCR", in which primer-template interactions and primer-amplicon interactions are separated. The PEX PCR method substantially and significantly improved the evenness of recovery of sequences from a mock community of known composition, and allowed for amplification of templates with introduced mismatches near the 3' end of the primer annealing sites. When the PEX PCR method was applied to genomic DNA extracted from complex environmental samples, a significant shift in the observed microbial community was detected. Furthermore, the PEX PCR method provides a mechanism to identify which primers in a primer pool are annealing to target gDNA. Primer utilization patterns revealed that at high annealing temperatures in the PEX PCR method, perfect match annealing predominates, while at lower annealing temperatures, primers with up to four mismatches with templates can contribute substantially to amplification. The PEX PCR method is simple to perform, is limited to PCR mixes and a single exonuclease step which can be performed without reaction cleanup, and is recommended for reactions in which degenerate primer pools are used or when mismatches between primers and

  4. Immunomagnetic separation significantly improves the sensitivity of polymerase chain reaction in detecting Giardia duodenalis and Cryptosporidium spp. in dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Coklin, Tatjana; Farber, Jeffrey M; Parrington, Lorna J; Bin Kingombe, Cesar I; Ross, William H; Dixon, Brent R

    2011-03-01

    The effectiveness of molecular methods for the detection of species of Giardia and Cryptosporidium in fecal samples is often reduced by low or intermittent cyst and oocyst shedding, and/or the presence of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) inhibitors. The present study investigates the use of immunomagnetic separation (IMS) as an additional concentration step before PCR in the detection of these common protozoan parasites in dairy cattle. The IMS-PCR assays were optimized for amplifying fragments of the 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA), β-giardin, and glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) genes of Giardia duodenalis, as well as fragments of the 18S rRNA, heat shock protein (HSP)-70, and Cryptosporidium oocyst wall protein (COWP) genes of Cryptosporidium spp. In all cases, IMS-PCR was more sensitive than PCR alone. A significantly greater number of Giardia-positive samples were identified using IMS-PCR of the 16S rRNA gene (P < 0.01) and of the GDH gene (P < 0.01), as compared with PCR without any additional concentration step. In the case of Cryptosporidium, IMS-PCR of the COWP gene (P  =  0.02) resulted in a significantly greater number of positives than did PCR without the IMS concentration step. The greatest number of positives, however, was obtained using IMS-PCR to amplify a portion of the 16S rRNA gene of Giardia and a portion of the HSP-70 gene of Cryptosporidium. A further comparison of the optimized IMS-PCR assays to immunofluorescence microscopy suggested that the IMS-PCR assays were considerably more sensitive than microscopy was in the detection of Giardia cysts and Cryptosporidium oocysts in fecal samples.

  5. Enhancing the specificity and efficiency of polymerase chain reaction using polyethyleneimine-based derivatives and hybrid nanocomposites

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Weiwei; Cao, Xueyan; Wen, Shihui; Guo, Rui; Shen, Mingwu; Wang, Jianhua; Shi, Xiangyang

    2012-01-01

    There is a general necessity to improve the specificity and efficiency of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and exploring the PCR-enhancing mechanism still remains a great challenge. In this paper we report the use of branched polyethyleneimine (PEI)-based derivatives and hybrid nanocomposites as a novel class of enhancers to improve the specificity and efficiency of a nonspecific PCR system. We show that the surface-charge polarity of PEI and PEI derivatives plays a major role in their effectiveness to enhance the PCR. Positively charged amine-terminated pristine PEI, partially (50%) acetylated PEI (PEI-Ac50), and completely acetylated PEI (PEI-Ac) are able to improve PCR efficiency and specificity with an optimum concentration order of PEI < PEI-Ac50 < PEI-Ac, whereas negatively charged carboxyl-terminated PEI (PEI-SAH; SAH denotes succinamic acid groups) and neutralized PEI modified with both polyethylene glycol (PEG) and acetyl (Ac) groups (PEI-PEG-Ac) are unable to improve PCR specificity and efficiency even at concentrations three orders of magnitude higher than that of PEI. Our data clearly suggests that the PCR-enhancing effect is primarily based on the interaction between the PCR components and the PEI derivatives, where electrostatic interaction plays a major role in concentrating the PCR components locally on the backbones of the branched PEI. In addition, multiwalled carbon nanotubes modified with PEI and PEI-stabilized gold nanoparticles are also able to improve the PCR specificity and efficiency with an optimum PEI concentration less than that of the PEI alone, indicating that the inorganic component of the nanocomposites may help improve the interaction between PEI and the PCR components. The developed PEI-based derivatives or nanocomposites may be used as efficient additives to enhance other PCR systems for different biomedical applications. PMID:22393296

  6. Detection of congenital cytomegalovirus infection by real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis of saliva or urine specimens.

    PubMed

    Ross, Shannon A; Ahmed, Amina; Palmer, April L; Michaels, Marian G; Sánchez, Pablo J; Bernstein, David I; Tolan, Robert W; Novak, Zdenek; Chowdhury, Nazma; Fowler, Karen B; Boppana, Suresh B

    2014-11-01

    Viral culture of urine or saliva has been the gold standard technique for the diagnosis of congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection. Results of rapid culture and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis of urine and saliva specimens from 80 children were compared to determine the clinical utility of a real-time PCR assay for diagnosis of congenital CMV infection. Results of urine PCR were positive in 98.8% of specimens. Three PCR-positive urine samples were culture negative. Results of saliva PCR and culture were concordant in 78 specimens (97.5%). Two PCR-positive saliva samples were culture negative. These findings demonstrate that PCR performs as well as rapid culture of urine or saliva specimens for diagnosing congenital CMV infection and saliva specimens are easier to collect. Because PCR also offers more rapid turnaround, is unlikely to be affected by storage and transport conditions, has lower cost, and may be adapted to high-throughput situations, it is well suited for targeted testing and large-scale screening for CMV.

  7. A pipeline with multiplex reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and microarray for screening of chromosomal translocations in leukemia.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Fei-Fei; Li, Ben-Shang; Zhang, Chun-Xiu; Xiong, Hui; Shen, Shu-Hong; Zhang, Qing-Hua

    2013-01-01

    Chromosome rearrangements and fusion genes present major portion of leukemogenesis and contribute to leukemic subtypes. It is practical and helpful to detect the fusion genes in clinic diagnosis of leukemia. Present application of reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) method to detect the fusion gene transcripts is effective, but time- and labor-consuming. To set up a simple and rapid system, we established a method that combined multiplex RT-PCR and microarray. We selected 15 clinically most frequently observed chromosomal rearrangements generating more than 50 fusion gene variants. Chimeric reverse primers and chimeric PCR primers containing both gene-specific and universal sequences were applied in the procedure of multiplex RT-PCR, and then the PCR products hybridized with a designed microarray. With this approach, among 200 clinic samples, 63 samples were detected to have gene rearrangements. All the detected fusion genes positive and negative were validated with RT-PCR and Sanger sequencing. Our data suggested that the RT-PCR-microarray pipeline could screen 15 partner gene pairs simultaneously at the same accuracy of the fusion gene detection with regular RT-PCR. The pipeline showed effectiveness in multiple fusion genes screening in clinic samples.

  8. Molecular diagnosis of A gamma hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin using polymerase chain reaction and oligonucleotide analysis.

    PubMed

    Gottardi, E; Alfarano, A; Serra, A; Sciarratta, G; Bertero, M T; Saglio, G; Camaschella, C

    1990-01-01

    By combining the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of the gamma globin gene promoters with synthetic oligonucleotide analysis we have diagnosed the -196 C----T and the -117 G----A substitutions in heterozygous carriers of non deletional A gamma HPFH from two unrelated Italian families. The identification of the beta-thalassemic defect in a compound heterozygote for -196 A gamma HPFH/beta thalassemia allows us to discuss the effect of this gamma promoter mutation on the globin chain synthetic pattern, and to make a comparison with the mutation at the -117 position.

  9. Detection of DNA from Leishmania (Viannia): Accuracy of Polymerase Chain Reaction for the Diagnosis of Cutaneous Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Neitzke-Abreu, Herintha Coeto; Venazzi, Mateus Sabaini; Bernal, Marcos Vinicius Zandonadi; Reinhold-Castro, Kárin Rosi; Vagetti, Fernanda; Mota, Camila Alves; Silva, Naielly Rodrigues; Aristides, Sandra Mara Alessi; Silveira, Thaís Gomes Verzignassi; Lonardoni, Maria Valdrinez Campana

    2013-01-01

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) can occur in skin and mucosa, causing disfiguring lesions. The laboratory diagnosis of CL involves immunological methods and optical detection of the parasite, al of which have limitations. There is a need for more effective diagnostic methods for CL which wil allow treatment to be initiated more promptly in order to help prevent the development of severe forms of mucosal disease, and to estimate the prognosis of the infection. The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) has been widely used to diagnose CL, because of its higher sensitivity. This study estimated the accuracy and compared PCRs of samples from lesion scarification (PCR-L) and blood sample-enriched leukocytes (PCR-B) with three conventional diagnostic techniques: parasite direct search (DS), Montenegro skin test (MST), and indirect immunofluorescence reaction (IIF). The study included 276 patients under suspicion of CL. We conducted a cross-sectional study, in which patients were selected by convenience sampling. We used MP3H/MP1L primers to generate a Leishmania (Viannia) (minicircle kDNA) fragment of 70-bp. Of 106 patients with CL, 83.87%, 51.67%, 64.52%, 85.71%, or 96.10% tested positive by PCR-L, PCR-B, DS, IIF, or MST, respectively. Five patients tested positive only by PCR-L, and two other patients only by PCR-B. PCR-L is indicated for use in patients with chronic lesions or Leishmania reinfection, which may progress to mucosal lesion. PCR-B is indicated for use in patients with negative results in conventional tests or for patients with no apparent lesion. PCR is not only useful in diagnosing CL but also helps to identify the infecting species. PMID:23976920

  10. A new era of uveitis: impact of polymerase chain reaction in intraocular inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, Manabu; Sugita, Sunao; Kamoi, Koju; Takase, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    Uveitis is a sight-threatening intraocular inflammatory disorder which may occur from both infectious and non-infectious or autoimmune causes. The frequency of infectious uveitis and autoimmune uveitis varies depending on countries and regions. According to a nationwide survey conducted by the Japanese Ocular Inflammation Society, infectious and non-infectious uveitis accounted for 16.4 and 50.1% of new patients, respectively while the remaining 33.5% of new uveitis cases were not classified or were idiopathic uveitis. Infectious uveitis is particularly important because it causes tissue damage to the eye and may result in blindness unless treated. However, it can be treated if the pathogenic microorganisms are identified promptly and accurately. Remarkable advancements in molecular and immunological technologies have been made in the last decade, and the diagnosis of infectious uveitis has been greatly improved by the application of molecular and immunological investigations, particularly polymerase chain reaction (PCR). PCR performed on a small amount of ocular samples provides a prompt, sensitive, and specific molecular diagnosis of pathogenic microorganisms in the eye. This technology has opened a new era in the diagnosis and treatment of uveitis, enabling physicians to establish new clinical entities of uveitis caused by infectious microorganisms, identify pathogens in the eyes of many patients with uveitis, and determine prompt diagnosis and appropriate therapy. Here we review the PCR process, new PCR tests specialized for ocular diseases, microorganisms detected by the PCR tests, diseases in the eye caused by these microorganisms, and the clinical characteristics, diagnosis, and therapy of uveitis.

  11. Nested methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction cancer detection method

    DOEpatents

    Belinsky, Steven A.; Palmisano, William A.

    2007-05-08

    A molecular marker-based method for monitoring and detecting cancer in humans. Aberrant methylation of gene promoters is a marker for cancer risk in humans. A two-stage, or "nested" polymerase chain reaction method is disclosed for detecting methylated DNA sequences at sufficiently high levels of sensitivity to permit cancer screening in biological fluid samples, such as sputum, obtained non-invasively. The method is for detecting the aberrant methylation of the p16 gene, O 6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase gene, Death-associated protein kinase gene, RAS-associated family 1 gene, or other gene promoters. The method offers a potentially powerful approach to population-based screening for the detection of lung and other cancers.

  12. A Unique Primer with an Inosine Chain at the 5'-Terminus Improves the Reliability of SNP Analysis Using the PCR-Amplified Product Length Polymorphism Method.

    PubMed

    Shojo, Hideki; Tanaka, Mayumi; Takahashi, Ryohei; Kakuda, Tsuneo; Adachi, Noboru

    2015-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction-amplified product length polymorphism (PCR-APLP) is one of the most convenient and reliable methods for single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis. This method is based on PCR, but uses allele-specific primers containing SNP sites at the 3'-terminus of each primer. To use this method at least two allele-specific primers and one "counter-primer", which serves as a common forward or reverse primer of the allele-specific primers, are required. The allele-specific primers have SNP sites at the 3'-terminus, and another primer should have a few non-complementary flaps at the 5'-terminus to detect SNPs by determining the difference of amplicon length by PCR and subsequent electrophoresis. A major disadvantage of the addition of a non-complementary flap is the non-specific annealing of the primer with non-complementary flaps. However, a design principle for avoiding this undesired annealing has not been fully established, therefore, it is often difficult to design effective APLP primers. Here, we report allele-specific primers with an inosine chain at the 5'-terminus for PCR-APLP analysis. This unique design improves the competitiveness of allele-specific primers and the reliability of SNP analysis when using the PCR-APLP method.

  13. Early detection of Brucella canis via quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis.

    PubMed

    Kauffman, L K; Bjork, J K; Gallup, J M; Boggiatto, P M; Bellaire, B H; Petersen, C A

    2014-02-01

    Canine brucellosis is a reportable zoonotic disease that can lead to canine reproductive losses and human infection through contact with infected urine or other genitourinary secretions. Although many locations require testing and euthanasia of positive dogs, current diagnosis is limited by the time required for seroconversion, for example, presence of B. canis-specific antibodies. The goal of this study was to determine the diagnostic ability of Brucella canis-specific quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assay to detect B. canis in field samples prior to serological positivity for faster diagnosis and prevention of transmission within kennels or in households. Two kennels, one of which was located in the owner's home, were sampled following observation of suggestive clinical signs and positive serology of at least one dog. Specimens obtained were comparatively analysed via serology and qPCR analysis. 107 dogs were analysed for B. canis infection via qPCR: 105 via whole-blood samples, 65 via vaginal swab, six via urine and seven via genitourinary tract tissue taken at necropsy. Forty-five dogs were found to be infected with canine brucellosis via qPCR, of which 22 (48.89%) were seropositive. A statistically significant number (P = 0.0228) of qPCR-positive dogs, 5/25 (20.00%), seroconverted within a 30-day interval after initial serologic testing. As compared to serology, qPCR analysis of DNA from vaginal swabs had a sensitivity of 92.31% and specificity of 51.92%, and qPCR analysis of DNA from whole-blood samples had a sensitivity of 16.67% and specificity of 100%. B. canis outer membrane protein 25 DNA qPCR from non-invasive vaginal swab and urine samples provided early detection of B. canis infection in dogs prior to detection of antibodies. This assay provides a critical tool to decrease zoonotic spread of canine brucellosis, its associated clinical presentation(s), and emotional and economic repercussions.

  14. Polymerase chain reaction analysis of aqueous humour samples in necrotising retinitis

    PubMed Central

    Tran, T H C; Rozenberg, F; Cassoux, N; Rao, N A; LeHoang, P; Bodaghi, B

    2003-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the diagnostic value of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) performed on aqueous humour for the detection of viral DNA in patients with necrotising herpetic retinitis. Methods: The clinical features and laboratory results of 22 patients (29 eyes) presenting with necrotising herpetic retinitis between March 1999 and June 2001 were reviewed retrospectively. Aqueous humour was obtained after anterior chamber paracentesis and PCR was performed in all cases. Results: Viral DNA was detected in the aqueous humour of 19 patients (86.4%). Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) seroconversion was evidenced in one additional patient. In the acute retinal necrosis (ARN) group (n = 19), varicella zoster virus (VZV) DNA was identified in six patients, herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) DNA in two patients, herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) DNA in four patients, and cytomegalovirus (CMV) genome in four patients. In the progressive outer retinal necrosis (PORN) group (n = 3), VZV DNA was detected in all patients. No sample was positive for more than one virus. Conclusions: PCR analysis of aqueous humour in patients with clinical features of necrotising viral retinitis can provide specific aetiological orientation and the method appears to be safe and highly sensitive. PMID:12488268

  15. Application of polymerase chain reaction based on ITS1 rDNA to speciate Eimeria.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, M C; Miska, K; Klopp, S

    2006-03-01

    A method was developed to recover Eimeria spp. oocysts directly from poultry litter and determine which species of Eimeria were present using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based on the ITS1 rDNA sequence. The species composition of Eimeria oocysts was also compared before and after propagation in susceptible chickens to determine if the relative proportion of each species changed after expansion. In samples from two broiler operations, ITS1-PCR was able to detect Eimeria spp. oocysts recovered from litter, with Eimeria acervulina, Eimeria maxima, and Eimeria praecox being the predominant species present therein. Although Eimeria tenella was found in one sample, the other species--Eimeria brunetti, Eimeria necatrix, and Eimeria mitis-were not detected. The species composition as determined by ITS1-PCR did not appear to appreciably alter after expansion in susceptible chickens. The described method represents a rapid means for determining the major Eimeria species in a poultry operation and may be helpful in choosing a particular live oocyst vaccine formulation to protect chickens against coccidiosis.

  16. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism authentication of raw meats from game birds.

    PubMed

    Rojas, María; González, Isabel; Fajardo, Violeta; Martín, Irene; Hernández, Pablo E; García, Teresa; Martín, Rosario

    2008-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) analysis has been applied to the identification of meats from quail (Coturnix coturnix), pheasant (Phasianus colchicus), red-legged partridge (Alectoris rufa), guinea fowl (Numida meleagris), capercaillie (Tetrao urogallus), Eurasian woodcock (Scolopax rusticola), woodpigeon (Columba palumbus), and song thrush (Turdus philomelos). PCR amplification was performed using a set of primers flanking a conserved region of approximately 720 base pairs (bp) from the mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene. Restriction site analysis based on sequence data from this DNA fragment permitted the selection of AluI and BfaI endonucleases for species identification. The restriction profiles obtained when amplicons were digested with the chosen enzymes allowed the unequivocal identification of all game bird species analyzed. However, the use of the PCR-RFLP technique described is limited to raw meat authentication. It is not suitable for cooked products because thermal treatment strongly accelerates DNA degradation leading to difficulties in amplifying the 720 bp fragment.

  17. Use of the polymerase chain reaction for diagnosing bovine tuberculosis in Panama.

    PubMed

    Cedeño, I; de Obaldía, R; Sanjur, O; Bayard, V; Ortega-Barría, E; Escobar, C

    2005-12-01

    In addition to causing large losses to the cattle industry, Mycobacterium bovis, the causative agent for bovine tuberculosis, is a serious public health issue because it can potentially infect humans. Diagnosis based on isolation and identification of the bacillus is tedious and may take weeks. The diagnosis of M. bovis by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), using species-specific primers, is fast, highly sensitive and of great value in epidemiological studies. In this study, deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) was extracted from 60 nasal mucus samples collected from three different farms, all located in an area where M. bovis is endemic. Two farms tested negative for an antibody response to the M. tuberculosis purified protein derivative (PPD) antigen, whereas the other farm gave a positive result. The amplified fragment of DNA was 460 base pairs with a sequence similar to that previously reported. Only 5% of the samples from the third farm tested positive for the presence of antibodies against PPD, whereas 65% of samples (from all three farms) gave a positive result when PCR was used. Thus, the authors suggest the use of the PCR species-specific primers test to support the programme against bovine tuberculosis in Panama.

  18. Rapid detection of genetically modified organisms on a continuous-flow polymerase chain reaction microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuyuan; Xing, Da; Zhang, Chunsun

    2009-02-01

    The ability to perform DNA amplification on a microfluidic device is very appealing. In this study, a compact continuous-flow polymerase chain reaction (PCR) microfluidics was developed for rapid analysis of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) in genetically modified soybeans. The device consists of three pieces of copper and a transparent polytetrafluoroethylene capillary tube embedded in the spiral channel fabricated on the copper. On this device, the P35S and Tnos sequences were successfully amplified within 9min, and the limit of detection of the DNA sample was estimated to be 0.005 ng microl(-1). Furthermore, a duplex continuous-flow PCR was also reported for the detection of the P35S and Tnos sequences in GMOs simultaneously. This method was coupled with the intercalating dye SYBR Green I and the melting curve analysis of the amplified products. Using this method, temperature differences were identified by the specific melting temperature values of two sequences, and the limit of detection of the DNA sample was assessed to be 0.01 ng microl(-1). Therefore, our results demonstrated that the continuous-flow PCR assay could discriminate the GMOs in a cost-saving and less time-consuming way.

  19. Identification of rickettsiae from ticks collected in the Central African Republic using the polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Dupont, H T; Cornet, J P; Raoult, D

    1994-03-01

    Spotted fever rickettsiosis have been identified on the African continent since their historical description in 1909. However, only Rickettsia conorii and R. africae have been described in Africa, and the current techniques for the detection of rickettsiae in ticks are difficult to apply in large field studies. We report here a preliminary study using genomic amplification by the polymerase chain reaction followed by restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) analysis directly on 310 crushed ticks (Rhipicephalus, Amblyomma, and Haemaphysalis species) collected in 1985 in the Central African Republic. Among 310 specimen tested, 21.6% were positive. The rate of infection ranged from 0% to 64.3%, depending on the tick species. Based on PCR-RFLP, five different rickettsiae profiles were found: R. conorii and R. africae, previously known in Africa, R. rhipicephali, which has never been described in Africa, and two isolates identical to R. massiliae and Mtu5, previously obtained from Rh. turanicus in southern France. This work shows that PCR-RFLP is a powerful tool to study tick collections, and that it is applicable to samples from developing countries. Further work is needed to confirm the identification of the rickettsiae found in this work, using traditional identification procedures.

  20. Presence of human immunodeficiency virus nucleic acids in wastewater and their detection by polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, S A; Farrah, S R; Chaudhry, G R

    1992-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) released by infected individuals or present in human and hospital wastes can potentially cause contamination problems. The presence of HIV-1 was investigated in 16 environmental samples, including raw wastewater, sludge, final effluent, soil, and pond water, collected from different locations. A method was developed to extract total nucleic acids in intact form directly from the raw samples or from the viral concentrates of the raw samples. The isolated nucleic acids were analyzed for the presence of HIV-1 by using in vitro amplification of the target sequences by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method. HIV-1-specific proviral DNA and viral RNA were detected in the extracted nucleic acids obtained from three wastewater samples by this method. The specificity of the PCR-amplified products was determined by Southern blot hybridization with an HIV-1-specific oligonucleotide probe, SK19. The isolated nucleic acids from wastewater samples were also screened for the presence of poliovirus type 1, representing a commonly found enteric virus, and simian immunodeficiency virus, representing, presumably, rare viruses. While poliovirus type 1 viral RNA was found in all of the wastewater samples, none of the samples yielded a simian immunodeficiency virus-specific product. No PCR-amplified product was yielded when wastewater samples were directly used for the detection of HIV-1 and poliovirus type 1. The wastewater constituents appeared to be inhibitory to the enzymes reverse transcriptase and DNA polymerase.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images PMID:1476440

  1. Solar thermal polymerase chain reaction for smartphone-assisted molecular diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Li; Mancuso, Matthew; Lu, Zhengda; Akar, Gunkut; Cesarman, Ethel; Erickson, David

    2014-02-20

    Nucleic acid-based diagnostic techniques such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR) are used extensively in medical diagnostics due to their high sensitivity, specificity and quantification capability. In settings with limited infrastructure and unreliable electricity, however, access to such devices is often limited due to the highly specialized and energy-intensive nature of the thermal cycling process required for nucleic acid amplification. Here we integrate solar heating with microfluidics to eliminate thermal cycling power requirements as well as create a simple device infrastructure for PCR. Tests are completed in less than 30 min, and power consumption is reduced to 80 mW, enabling a standard 5.5 Wh iPhone battery to provide 70 h of power to this system. Additionally, we demonstrate a complete sample-to-answer diagnostic strategy by analyzing human skin biopsies infected with Kaposi's Sarcoma herpesvirus (KSHV/HHV-8) through the combination of solar thermal PCR, HotSHOT DNA extraction and smartphone-based fluorescence detection. We believe that exploiting the ubiquity of solar thermal energy as demonstrated here could facilitate broad availability of nucleic acid-based diagnostics in resource-limited areas.

  2. A specific polymerase chain reaction test for the identification of Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Prère, Marie-Françoise; Fayet, Olivier A

    2011-05-01

    Using an approach based on the comparison of arbitrary primer polymerase chain reaction (PCR) genomic profiles from oral streptococci and Streptococcus pneumoniae strains, we identified a 434-bp genomic fragment apparently specific for S. pneumoniae. From the nucleotidic sequence of this common fragment, a pair of primers was designed and tested on a set of strains comprising the major Streptococcus species. One species, S. anginosus, gave an amplification product of the same length as S. pneumoniae. Sequence comparison of the S. anginosus and S. pneumoniae amplicons revealed several variations which were used to define a new set of primers giving a 181-bp S. pneumoniae-specific fragment. The amplified fragment contains the 5' terminal part of a gene encoding a putative sugar-specific permease and an intergenic sequence. The PCR test was evaluated on 257 strains of invasive S. pneumoniae corresponding to clinical isolates and on 153 non-pneumoniae oral streptococci strains; in addition, 3 S. pseudopneumoniae strains were tested. With these primers, an amplification product was only obtained with the S. pneumoniae strains. Moreover, the test was successfully evaluated on 10 atypical S. pneumoniae strains related to pneumococcal diseases. In this study, we therefore established the capacity of a simple PCR test to discriminate S. pneumoniae from other Streptococci (including S. pseudopneumoniae), thus allowing rapid and accurate diagnosis.

  3. Specific detection of Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) larvae in plankton samples using nested polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Patil, Jawahar G; Gunasekera, Rasanthi M; Deagle, Bruce E; Bax, Nicholas J

    2005-01-01

    Management of sustainable Pacific oyster fisheries would be assisted by an early, rapid, and accurate means of detecting their planktonic larvae. Reported here is an approach, based on polymerase chain reaction (PCR), for the detection of Pacific oyster larvae in plankton samples. Species-specific primers were designed by comparing partial mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI) sequences from Crassostrea gigas, with other members of the family Ostreidae including those of Crassostrea angulata. Assay specificity was empirically validated through screening DNA samples obtained from several species of oysters. The assay was specific as only C. gigas samples returned PCR-positive results. A nested PCR approach could consistently detect 5 or more D-hinge-stage larvae spiked into a background of about 146 mg of plankton. The assay does not require prior sorting of larvae. We conclude that the assay could be used to screen environmental and ballast water samples, although further specificity testing against local bivalve species is recommended in new locations.

  4. Solar thermal polymerase chain reaction for smartphone-assisted molecular diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Li; Mancuso, Matthew; Lu, Zhengda; Akar, Gunkut; Cesarman, Ethel; Erickson, David

    2014-02-01

    Nucleic acid-based diagnostic techniques such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR) are used extensively in medical diagnostics due to their high sensitivity, specificity and quantification capability. In settings with limited infrastructure and unreliable electricity, however, access to such devices is often limited due to the highly specialized and energy-intensive nature of the thermal cycling process required for nucleic acid amplification. Here we integrate solar heating with microfluidics to eliminate thermal cycling power requirements as well as create a simple device infrastructure for PCR. Tests are completed in less than 30 min, and power consumption is reduced to 80 mW, enabling a standard 5.5 Wh iPhone battery to provide 70 h of power to this system. Additionally, we demonstrate a complete sample-to-answer diagnostic strategy by analyzing human skin biopsies infected with Kaposi's Sarcoma herpesvirus (KSHV/HHV-8) through the combination of solar thermal PCR, HotSHOT DNA extraction and smartphone-based fluorescence detection. We believe that exploiting the ubiquity of solar thermal energy as demonstrated here could facilitate broad availability of nucleic acid-based diagnostics in resource-limited areas.

  5. DNA-based identification of spices: DNA isolation, whole genome amplification, and polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Focke, Felix; Haase, Ilka; Fischer, Markus

    2011-01-26

    Usually spices are identified morphologically using simple methods like magnifying glasses or microscopic instruments. On the other hand, molecular biological methods like the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) enable an accurate and specific detection also in complex matrices. Generally, the origins of spices are plants with diverse genetic backgrounds and relationships. The processing methods used for the production of spices are complex and individual. Consequently, the development of a reliable DNA-based method for spice analysis is a challenging intention. However, once established, this method will be easily adapted to less difficult food matrices. In the current study, several alternative methods for the isolation of DNA from spices have been developed and evaluated in detail with regard to (i) its purity (photometric), (ii) yield (fluorimetric methods), and (iii) its amplifiability (PCR). Whole genome amplification methods were used to preamplify isolates to improve the ratio between amplifiable DNA and inhibiting substances. Specific primer sets were designed, and the PCR conditions were optimized to detect 18 spices selectively. Assays of self-made spice mixtures were performed to proof the applicability of the developed methods.

  6. Accuracy of mucocutaneous leishmaniasis diagnosis using polymerase chain reaction: systematic literature review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Ciro Martins; Mazin, Suleimy Cristina; dos Santos, Elisa Raphael; Cesetti, Mariana Vicente; Bächtold, Guilherme Albergaria Brízida; Cordeiro, João Henrique de Freitas; Theodoro, Fabrício Claudino Estrela Terra; Damasco, Fabiana dos Santos; Carranza, Sebastián Andrés Vernal; Santos, Adriana de Oliveira; Roselino, Ana Maria; Sampaio, Raimunda Nonata Ribeiro

    2015-01-01

    The diagnosis of mucocutaneous leishmaniasis (MCL) is hampered by the absence of a gold standard. An accurate diagnosis is essential because of the high toxicity of the medications for the disease. This study aimed to assess the ability of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to identify MCL and to compare these results with clinical research recently published by the authors. A systematic literature review based on the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses: the PRISMA Statement was performed using comprehensive search criteria and communication with the authors. A meta-analysis considering the estimates of the univariate and bivariate models was performed. Specificity near 100% was common among the papers. The primary reason for accuracy differences was sensitivity. The meta-analysis, which was only possible for PCR samples of lesion fragments, revealed a sensitivity of 71% [95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.59; 0.81] and a specificity of 93% (95% CI = 0.83; 0.98) in the bivariate model. The search for measures that could increase the sensitivity of PCR should be encouraged. The quality of the collected material and the optimisation of the amplification of genetic material should be prioritised. PMID:25946238

  7. Real-time polymerase chain reaction for the diagnosis of necrotizing herpes stromal keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jun-Xin; Wang, Lin-Nong; Zhou, Ru-Xia; Yu, Yang; Du, Tong-Xin

    2016-01-01

    AIM To design, optimize and validate a rapid, internally controlled real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) test for herpes simplex virus (HSV) in the diagnosis of necrotizing herpes stromal keratitis. METHODS Tears alone or together with corneal epithelium scrapings from 30 patients (30 eyes) suspected of necrotizing herpes stromal keratitis were tested for HSV DNA by RT-PCR. The samples were collected during the first visit and then on the subsequent 7, 14, 28, 42, and 56d. The symptoms of the patients were scored before treatment to determine the correlation between HSV concentration in the corneal epithelium scrapings and clinical scores. RESULTS The positive rate (46.4%) in the corneal epithelium group before the therapy was significantly higher than that (13.3%) in the tears group (P=0.006). There were 13 positive HSV patients before the therapy, the concentration of HSV DNA in corneal epithelium scrapings group was significantly higher than that in the tears group (paired t-test, P=0.0397). Multilevel mixed-effects model analysis showed that the difference between the corneal epithelium scrapings group and the tears group was statistically significant (P=0.0049). The Spearman rank correlation analysis indicated a positive correlation between the HSV concentration in the corneal epithelium scrapings and clinical scores before the treatment (r=0.844, P<0.0001). CONCLUSION RT-PCR appears to be a powerful molecular tool for the diagnosis of necrotizing herpes stromal keratitis. PMID:27275421

  8. In situ detection of specific p53 mutations in cultured cells using the amplification refractory mutation system polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Low, E O; Gibbins, J R; Walker, D M

    2000-12-01

    Accurate molecular detection of genetic mutations involved in tumorigenesis has been based predominantly on analysis of extracted DNA, but this does not provide detailed information on the location, number, type or clonal distribution of mutated cells and their precise anatomic location and clonal distribution. This study has used a sensitive and specific application of the amplification refractory mutation system (ARMS)-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in situ, combined with in situ hybridization to localize and identify cells with defined p53 mutations. The ARMS-PCR was performed in situ in SW480 cells in suspension and in cells either cultured or cytospun onto glass slides. Amplified mutant DNA PCR products were detected in SW480 cells using digoxigenin-labeled probes, visually identifying cells harboring specific mutations in the p53 gene. In situ hybridization alone of the mutant cells without the amplification step was negative. Normal human fibroblasts or endothelial cells were refractory to in situ amplification. This reaction was mutation-specific as CEM cells with different p53 mutations reacted negatively. Mutant messenger RNA (mRNA) in tumor cells was also selectively amplified in situ by ARMS-PCR following reverse transcription (RT). This study demonstrates the potential of in situ ARMS-PCR or RT-ARMS-PCR for mutation analysis in situ and could have useful clinical applications.

  9. Optimization of the elution buffer and concentration method for detecting hepatitis E virus in swine liver using a nested reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Son, Na Ry; Seo, Dong Joo; Lee, Min Hwa; Seo, Sheungwoo; Wang, Xiaoyu; Lee, Bog-Hieu; Lee, Jeong-Su; Joo, In-Sun; Hwang, In-Gyun; Choi, Changsun

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to develop an optimal technique for detecting hepatitis E virus (HEV) in swine livers. Here, three elution buffers and two concentration methods were compared with respect to enhancing recovery of HEV from swine liver samples. Real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and nested RT-PCR were performed to detect HEV RNA. When phosphate-buffered saline (PBS, pH 7.4) was used to concentrate HEV in swine liver samples using ultrafiltration, real-time RT-PCR detected HEV in 6 of the 26 samples. When threonine buffer was used to concentrate HEV using polyethylene glycol (PEG) precipitation and ultrafiltration, real-time RT-PCR detected HEV in 1 and 3 of the 26 samples, respectively. When glycine buffer was used to concentrate HEV using ultrafiltration and PEG precipitation, real-time RT-PCR detected HEV in 1 and 3 samples of the 26 samples, respectively. When nested RT-PCR was used to detect HEV, all samples tested negative regardless of the type of elution buffer or concentration method used. Therefore, the combination of real-time RT-PCR and ultrafiltration with PBS buffer was the most sensitive and reliable method for detecting HEV in swine livers.

  10. Detection of Norwalk virus in stool specimens by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and nonradioactive oligoprobes.

    PubMed Central

    De Leon, R; Matsui, S M; Baric, R S; Herrmann, J E; Blacklow, N R; Greenberg, H B; Sobsey, M D

    1992-01-01

    A reverse transcriptase (RT)-polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-oligoprobe (OP), or RT-PCR-OP, method was developed for the detection of the Norwalk virus, which causes acute, epidemic gastroenteritis, in stool specimens. The Norwalk virus genome regions encoding the following two proteins were amplified by RT-PCR: the RNA polymerase (260-bp product) and a putative immunogenic protein (224-bp product). The resulting DNA fragments (amplicons) were hybridized to a digoxigenin-labeled internal OP specific to each amplicon. The detection limit of Norwalk virus, as determined by the endpoint of RT-PCR amplification for serially diluted, positive stool specimens, was similar to the actual virion titer as estimated by electron microscopy and at least 100-fold greater than the titer determined by radioimmunoassay (RIA). The RT-PCR-OP assay was specific for Norwalk virus and negative for other enteric viruses, including human and animal caliciviruses, hepatitis E virus, Snow Mountain agent, astroviruses, 16 human enteroviruses, and 5 human rotaviruses. Components of fecal specimens that interfere with RT-PCR were removed successfully by Sephadex G-200 gel chromatography. Of 20 stool specimens from human volunteers that were positive for Norwalk virus by RIA, a specific RT-PCR-OP result was obtained in 95% (19 of 20) of the samples by using the immunogenic protein primers and 75% (15 of 20) by using the polymerase primers. Twenty-six stool specimens from asymptomatic children and adults were negative by the Norwalk virus RT-PCR-OP. RT-PCR-OP detected Norwalk virus in the 4 of 21 coded fecal specimens that were also positive by enzyme immunoassay. Two samples that were positive by RIA or enzyme immunoassay were negative by RT-PCR, perhaps because viral RNA was not present or RT-PCR inhibitors were not adequately removed. Images PMID:1280649

  11. Detection of HLA-DRB1 microchimerism using nested polymerase chain reaction and single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis.

    PubMed

    Song, Eun Young; Chung, Hye Yoon; Joo, Shin Young; Roh, Eun Youn; Seong, Moon-Woo; Shin, Yunsu; Park, Myoung Hee

    2012-03-01

    For the detection of microchimerism, molecular methods detecting donor-specific HLA-DRB1 alleles in the recipient are most commonly used. Nested polymerase chain reaction sequence specific primer (nested PCR-SSP) methods widely used to increase the sensitivity of detection have been reported to give frequent false-positive reactions. We have developed a new method combining nested PCR with single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis (nested PCR-SSCP) and tested the 1 to 0.00001% level of microchimerism for 27 different HLA-DRB1 alleles. For most (26/27) of the HLA-DRB1 alleles tested, this method could detect 0.01 to 0.001% of microchimerism and its sensitivity was equal to or better than that of nested PCR-SSP tested in parallel. Its specificity was verified by visualizing particular DRB1-specific SSCP bands under test. Nested PCR-SSP indicated frequent false-positive reactions, mainly caused by nonspecific amplification of DRB3/B4/B5 alleles present in the major (recipient) DNAs. We have compared a real-time quantitative PCR for non-human leukocyte antigen (HLA) target (insertion/deletion marker) using a commercial kit (AlleleSEQR Chimerism assay), and its microchimerism detection sensitivity (around 0.1%) was 1 step (10 times) lower than that of nested PCR-SSP or -SSCP methods for HLA-DRB1 alleles. We validated that the newly designed nested PCR-SSCP affords good sensitivity and specificity and may be useful for studying microchimerism in clinical settings.

  12. Spectral output from a premixed chain reaction cw HF laser

    SciTech Connect

    Stanton, A.C.; Bien, F.

    1980-07-01

    Spectral measurements of the output from a purely chemical chain reaction cw HF laser are reported. The laser is a subsonic H/sub 2/-F/sub 2/ flame, with supersonic premixing and spatially uniform initiation by a stationary normal shock. Initial chemical production of fluorine atoms is by the bimolecular reaction of F/sub 2/ with NO. Spectral measurements of the laser output near the initiating shock indicate lasing transitions in the P branches of the v=3 ..-->.. v=2, v=2 ..-->.. v=1, and v=1 ..-->.. v=0 HF bands. Further downstream, the upper vibrational levels are strongly deactivated, and lasing occurs only in the v=1 ..-->.. v=0 band. Laser emission in the v=2 ..-->.. v=1 band reappears at reduced NO flow rates, suggesting efficient deactivation of HF (v) by NO, possibly through multiquantum V-V exchange. An approximate rate of 5 x 10/sup -13plus-or-minus0.5/ cm/sup 3//sec for deactivation of HF (v=2) by NO is inferred.

  13. Dual Combined Real-Time Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction Assay for the Diagnosis of Lyssavirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lavenir, Rachel; Lepelletier, Anthony; Faouzi, Abdellah; Troupin, Cécile; Nourlil, Jalal; Buchy, Philippe; Bourhy, Herve

    2016-01-01

    The definitive diagnosis of lyssavirus infection (including rabies) in animals and humans is based on laboratory confirmation. The reference techniques for post-mortem rabies diagnosis are still based on direct immunofluorescence and virus isolation, but molecular techniques, such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based methods, are increasingly being used and now constitute the principal tools for diagnosing rabies in humans and for epidemiological analyses. However, it remains a key challenge to obtain relevant specificity and sensitivity with these techniques while ensuring that the genetic diversity of lyssaviruses does not compromise detection. We developed a dual combined real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (combo RT-qPCR) method for pan-lyssavirus detection. This method is based on two complementary technologies: a probe-based (TaqMan) RT-qPCR for detecting the RABV species (pan-RABV RT-qPCR) and a second reaction using an intercalating dye (SYBR Green) to detect other lyssavirus species (pan-lyssa RT-qPCR). The performance parameters of this combined assay were evaluated with a large panel of primary animal samples covering almost all the genetic variability encountered at the viral species level, and they extended to almost all lyssavirus species characterized to date. This method was also evaluated for the diagnosis of human rabies on 211 biological samples (positive n = 76 and negative n = 135) including saliva, skin and brain biopsies. It detected all 41 human cases of rabies tested and confirmed the sensitivity and the interest of skin biopsy (91.5%) and saliva (54%) samples for intra-vitam diagnosis of human rabies. Finally, this method was successfully implemented in two rabies reference laboratories in enzootic countries (Cambodia and Morocco). This combined RT-qPCR method constitutes a relevant, useful, validated tool for the diagnosis of rabies in both humans and animals, and represents a promising tool for lyssavirus

  14. Detection of Haemophilus influenzae in respiratory secretions from pneumonia patients by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Abdeldaim, Guma M K; Strålin, Kristoffer; Kirsebom, Leif A; Olcén, Per; Blomberg, Jonas; Herrmann, Björn

    2009-08-01

    A quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based on the omp P6 gene was developed to detect Haemophilus influenzae. Its specificity was determined by analysis of 29 strains of 11 different Haemophilus spp. and was compared with PCR assays having other target genes: rnpB, 16S rRNA, and bexA. The method was evaluated on nasopharyngeal aspirates from 166 adult patients with community-acquired pneumonia. When 10(4) DNA copies/mL was used as cutoff limit for the method, P6 PCR had a sensitivity of 97.5% and a specificity of 96.0% compared with the culture. Of 20 culture-negative but P6 PCR-positive cases, 18 were confirmed by fucK PCR as H. influenzae. Five (5.9%) of 84 nasopharyngeal aspirates from adult controls tested PCR positive. We conclude that the P6 real-time PCR is both sensitive and specific for identification of H. influenzae in respiratory secretions. Quantification facilitates discrimination between disease-causing H. influenzae strains and commensal colonization.

  15. An unusual strain of Haemophilus parasuis that fails to react in a species-specific polymerase chain reaction assay.

    PubMed

    Turni, Conny; Blackall, Patrick J

    2011-03-01

    A total of 30 nasal swabs from pigs preweaned and 11 nasal swabs from sick weaned pigs on a farm in Queensland, Australia, were cultured for the presence of Haemophilus parasuis. Enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus polymerase chain reaction (ERIC-PCR) genotyping and indirect hemagglutination and gel diffusion serotyping were performed on the retrieved H. parasuis isolates. A total of 3 genotypes were recognized among the 42 isolates recovered, and 4 representative isolates of each genotype were found to be nontypeable in the Kielstein/Rapp-Gabrielson serotyping scheme. A total of 20 of the 22 isolates of genotype 1 did not amplify in the species-specific conventional PCR number 1 (cPCR1) based on the 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene but did give the expected PCR amplicon in 2 other species-specific PCR assays, one of which is also based on the 16S rRNA gene. Nine selected isolates representing all genotypes, both positive and negative in the cPCR1, were sequenced, and all showed a 4-base mutation occurring at the forward primer annealing site. The quadruple base pair substitution from GTGG to TGTT near the 3' end of the forward primer sequence may explain the failure of amplification. Diagnostic laboratories should be aware that such failures can occur and should consider having an alternative PCR available to confirm negative results or, alternatively, use phenotypic characteristics for the identification of suspect H. parasuis isolates.

  16. Detection of Wuchereria bancrofti DNA in paired serum and urine samples using polymerase chain reaction-based systems.

    PubMed

    Ximenes, Camila; Brandão, Eduardo; Oliveira, Paula; Rocha, Abraham; Rego, Tamisa; Medeiros, Rafael; Aguiar-Santos, Ana; Ferraz, João; Reis, Christian; Araujo, Paulo; Carvalho, Luiz; Melo, Fabio L

    2014-12-01

    The Global Program for the Elimination of Lymphatic Filariasis (GPELF) aims to eliminate this disease by the year 2020. However, the development of more specific and sensitive tests is important for the success of the GPELF. The present study aimed to standardise polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based systems for the diagnosis of filariasis in serum and urine. Twenty paired biological urine and serum samples from individuals already known to be positive for Wuchereria bancrofti were collected during the day. Conventional PCR and semi-nested PCR assays were optimised. The detection limit of the technique for purified W. bancrofti DNA extracted from adult worms was 10 fg for the internal systems (WbF/Wb2) and 0.1 fg by using semi-nested PCR. The specificity of the primers was confirmed experimentally by amplification of 1 ng of purified genomic DNA from other species of parasites. Evaluation of the paired urine and serum samples by the semi-nested PCR technique indicated only two of the 20 tested individuals were positive, whereas the simple internal PCR system (WbF/Wb2), which has highly promising performance, revealed that all the patients were positive using both samples. This study successfully demonstrated the possibility of using the PCR technique on urine for the diagnosis of W. bancrofti infection.

  17. The genotyping of infectious bronchitis virus in Taiwan by a multiplex amplification refractory mutation system reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shr-Wei; Ho, Chia-Fang; Chan, Kun-Wei; Cheng, Min-Chung; Shien, Jui-Hung; Liu, Hung-Jen; Wang, Chi-Young

    2014-11-01

    Infectious bronchitis virus (IBV; Avian coronavirus) causes acute respiratory and reproductive and urogenital diseases in chickens. Following sequence alignment of IBV strains, a combination of selective primer sets was designed to individually amplify the IBV wild-type and vaccine strains using a multiplex amplification refractory mutation system reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (ARMS RT-PCR) approach. This system was shown to discriminate the IBV wild-type and vaccine strains. Moreover, an ARMS real-time RT-PCR (ARMS qRT-PCR) was combined with a high-resolution analysis (HRMA) to establish a melt curve analysis program. The specificity of the ARMS RT-PCR and the ARMS qRT-PCR was verified using unrelated avian viruses. Different melting temperatures and distinct normalized and shifted melting curve patterns for the IBV Mass, IBV H120, IBV TW-I, and IBV TW-II strains were detected. The new assays were used on samples of lung and trachea as well as virus from allantoic fluid and cell culture. In addition to being able to detect the presence of IBV vaccine and wild-type strains by ARMS RT-PCR, the IBV Mass, IBV H120, IBV TW-I, and IBV TW-II strains were distinguished using ARMS qRT-PCR by their melting temperatures and by HRMA. These approaches have acceptable sensitivities and specificities and therefore should be able to serve as options when carrying out differential diagnosis of IBV in Taiwan and China.

  18. A simple multiplex polymerase chain reaction to determine ABO blood types of rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Premasuthan, A; Kanthaswamy, S; Satkoski, J; Smith, D G

    2011-06-01

    Rhesus macaques are the most common nonhuman primate model organism used in biomedical research. Their increasingly frequent use as subjects in studies involving transplantation requires that blood and other tissue antigens of donors and recipients be compatible. We report here an easy and rapid multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to determine the ABO blood group phenotypes of rhesus macaques that can be performed with only small amounts of DNA. We phenotyped 78 individuals and found this species to exhibit the A, B and AB phenotypes in frequencies that vary by geographic region. The probability of randomly pairing rhesus macaque donors and recipients that exhibit major ABO phenotype incompatibility is approximately 0.35 and 0.45 for Indian and Chinese rhesus macaques, respectively.

  19. Rapid detection for rabbit-derived dermatophytes using microsatellite-primed polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Miao, Zengmin; Li, Song; Li, Daijun; Cai, Chunmei; Cai, Yumei

    2014-01-01

    A method exhibiting high sensitivity, specificity and rapidity to detect pathogenic dermatophytes was developed using microsatellite-primed polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in combination with a clustering method. The DNA fragments of Trichophyton mentagrophyton, Microsporum gypseum and Microsporum canis were amplified by using the primer (GACA)4 to detect the DNA polymorphism fingerprints. Twenty-one clinical strains identified as T. mentagrophyton, M. gypseum or M. canis by morphological methods were distinguished according to the differences of standard stains' bands combined with NTSYS-pc2.10 software. The results showed that there were obvious and direct differences in the bands of the three pathogenic dermatophytes, and the similarity of isolated strains and standard strains were above 90%, in line with the results of morphological identification. The method is more accurate, rapid and simple, which is meaningful for the clinical diagnosis and epidemic research of the dermatophytes.

  20. Presence of Legionellaceae in warm water supplies and typing of strains by polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Zietz, B.; Wiese, J.; Brengelmann, F.; Dunkelberg, H.

    2001-01-01

    Outbreaks of Legionnaire's disease present a public health challenge especially because fatal outcomes still remain frequent. The aim of this study was to describe the abundance and epidemiology of Legionellaceae in the human-made environment. Water was sampled from hot-water taps in private and public buildings across the area of Göttingen, Germany, including distant suburbs. Following isolation, we used polymerase chain reaction in order to generate strain specific banding profiles of legionella isolates. In total, 70 buildings were examined. Of these 18 (26%) had the bacterium in at least one water sample. Legionella pneumophila serogroups 1, 4, 5 and 6 could be identified in the water samples. Most of the buildings were colonized solely by one distinct strain, as proven by PCR. In three cases equal patterns were found in separate buildings. There were two buildings in this study where isolates with different serogroups were found at the same time. PMID:11293675

  1. Acanthamoeba can be differentiated by the polymerase chain reaction and simple plating assays.

    PubMed

    Khan, N A; Jarroll, E L; Paget, T A

    2001-09-01

    Acanthamoeba are opportunistic pathogens with invasive and noninvasive species. For clinical purposes it is important to differentiate potentially pathogenic from nonpathogenic isolates. For the rapid and sensitive identification of Acanthamoeba at the genus level, we used a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based method which detected as few as five cells. Further, we tested nine isolates of Acanthamoeba for their ability to produce cytopathic effects (CPE) on corneal epithelial cells. On the basis of the results, Acanthamoeba were divided into pathogenic or nonpathogenic groups. However, because CPE assays are not available to every diagnostic laboratory, we developed a simple plating assay based on osmotolerance which correlated well with the CPE assays. Pathogenic Acanthamoeba showed growth on higher osmolarity (agar plates containing one molar mannitol), while growth of nonpathogens was inhibited on these plates. In conclusion, we have developed methods for the rapid identification and differentiation of Acanthamoeba.

  2. A new approach to primer selection in polymerase chain reaction experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Pearson, W.R.; Robins, G.; Wrege, D.E.; Zhang, Tongtong

    1995-12-31

    We address the problem of primer selection in polymerase chain reaction (PCR) experiments. We prove that the problem of minimizing the number of primers required to amplify a set of DNA sequences is NP-complete, and show that even approximating solutions to this problem to within a constant factor times optimal is intractable. On the practical side, we give a simple branch-and-bound algorithm that solves the primers minimization problem within reasonable time for typical instances. We present an efficient approximation scheme for this problem, and prove that our heuristic always produces solutions no worse than a logarithmic factor times the optimal, this being the best approximation possible within polynomial time. Finally, we analyze a weighted variant, where both the number of primers as well as the sum of their {open_quotes}costs{close_quotes} is optimized simultaneously. We conclude by presenting the empirical performance of our methods on biological data.

  3. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction molecular testing of cytology specimens: Pre-analytic and analytic factors.

    PubMed

    Bridge, Julia A

    2017-01-01

    The introduction of molecular testing into cytopathology laboratory practice has expanded the types of samples considered feasible for identifying genetic alterations that play an essential role in cancer diagnosis and treatment. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), a sensitive and specific technical approach for amplifying a defined segment of RNA after it has been reverse-transcribed into its DNA complement, is commonly used in clinical practice for the identification of recurrent or tumor-specific fusion gene events. Real-time RT-PCR (quantitative RT-PCR), a technical variation, also permits the quantitation of products generated during each cycle of the polymerase chain reaction process. This review addresses qualitative and quantitative pre-analytic and analytic considerations of RT-PCR as they relate to various cytologic specimens. An understanding of these aspects of genetic testing is central to attaining optimal results in the face of the challenges that cytology specimens may present. Cancer Cytopathol 2017;125:11-19. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  4. Real-time polymerase chain reaction for diagnosing infectious mononucleosis in pediatric patients: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Sha-Yi; Yang, Jing-Wei; Shao, Jing-Bo; Liao, Xue-Lian; Lu, Zheng-Hua; Jiang, Hui

    2016-05-01

    In this meta-analysis, we evaluated the diagnostic role of Epstein-Barr virus deoxyribonucleic acid detection and quantitation in the serum of pediatric and young adult patients with infectious mononucleosis. The primary outcome of this meta-analysis was the sensitivity and specificity of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) detection and quantitation using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). A systematic review and meta-analysis was performed by searching for articles that were published through September 24, 2014 in the following databases: Medline, Cochrane, EMBASE, and Google Scholar. The following keywords were used for the search: "Epstein-Barr virus," "infectious mononucleosis," "children/young adults/infant/pediatric," and "polymerase chain reaction or PCR." Three were included in this analysis. We found that for detection by PCR, the pooled sensitivity for detecting EBV DNA was 77% (95%CI, 66-86%) and the pooled specificity for was 98% (95%CI, 93-100%). Our findings indicate that this PCR-based assay has high specificity and good sensitivity for detecting of EBV DNA, indicating it may useful for identifying patients with infectious mononucleosis. This assay may also be helpful to identify young athletic patients or highly physically active pediatric patients who are at risk for a splenic rupture due to acute infectious mononucleosis.

  5. [The development of a test-system for the quantitative and qualitative evaluation of DNA content in criminalistic objects by the real-time polymerase chain reaction].

    PubMed

    Lapenkov, M I; Plakhina, N V; Alekseev, Ia I; Varlamov, D A

    2011-01-01

    An original test-system for the preliminary quantitative and qualitative evaluation of isolated DNA is proposed by the polymerase chain reaction in real time (PCR-RT) based on the TaqMan technology. This test-system permits to simultaneously measure the amount of DNA in the sample, identify the genetic gender, and detect PCR inhibitors. The method has been approbated in the practical work of forensic medical experts.

  6. [Content of parodontopathogenic microflora in cases of parodontitis of different severity degrees according to the data of polymerase chain reaction method].

    PubMed

    Grudianov, A I; Ovchinnikova, V V

    2008-01-01

    The use of semiquantitative determination of parodontopathogenic microflora of parodontal pockets (PP) by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in cases of chronic generalized parodontitis of different severity degrees was investigated. 63 patients were examined - 6 with light parodontitis, 16 with parodontitis of middle severity and 41 with heavy parodontitis. The content of PP was studied. DNA of the main representatives of parodontopathogenic microflora was determined by PCR method.

  7. Diagnostic challenges of tuberculous lymphadenitis using polymerase chain reaction analysis: a case study.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Hirokazu; Nakamura, Masahiko; Shimokawa, Kazuki; Kamiseki, Fumi; Ishizawa, Shin; Abo, Hitoshi; Furuse, Hideaki; Tsuda, Takeshi; Masaki, Yasuaki; Suzuki, Kensuke

    2015-01-01

    This report presents a case of tuberculous lymphadenitis that was difficult to diagnose using polymerase chain reaction analysis. An 80-year-old Japanese female was hospitalized due to swollen cervical lymph nodes. Her lymph node tests revealed paradoxical polymerase chain reaction results. Polymerase chain reaction analysis of two biopsy tissues using the Cobas TaqMan revealed a positive result for Mycobacterium avium and a negative result for Mycobacterium tuberculosis. However, polymerase chain reaction analysis of a cultured colony of acid-fast bacteria from biopsy tissue using the Cobas TaqMan and an alternative polymerase chain reaction analysis of biopsy tissue yielded discordant results. The patient was diagnosed as having tuberculous lymphadenitis. She was treated with antitubercular drugs and subsequently had a reduction in cervical lymph node swelling. Polymerase chain reaction analysis is not 100% accurate; hence, its use as a diagnostic tool for mycobacterial infection requires increased attention.

  8. Diagnosis of leishmaniasis in Maltese dogs with the aid of the polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Headington, C E; Barbara, C H; Lambson, B E; Hart, D T; Barker, D C

    2002-04-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis due to infection with Leishmania infantum (a member of the L. donovani complex) has been known in Malta since the beginning of the century. In 1946, when human diseases became compulsorily notifiable on the islands, the leishmaniasis figures were 1264 visceral cases, 36 cutaneous cases and 5 unspecified. Five cases of cutaneous infection were reported in 1997 and 23 cases of cutaneous and 3 of visceral infection in January-October 1998. There may be considerable under-reporting of the disease. Figures of between 18% and 47% have been reported for canine leishmaniasis. This large discrepancy between reservoir and human hosts suggests that the canine reservoir could be a serious threat and is worthy of careful examination. This pilot study was carried out to determine the proportion of dogs serologically positive for leishmaniasis in order to assess the necessity for a possible control programme in Malta. Using 60 canine blood samples from the Maltese islands, we tested for deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) of the L. donovani complex using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The samples had all been subjected to the indirect immunofluorescent antibody test (IFAT) and a direct comparison was made. DNA was extracted using the phenol/chloroform method and amplified with primers specific for kinetoplast mini-circle DNA of the L. donovani complex and L. major, Southern blotted and hybridized with a radio-labelled probe specific for the L. donovani complex. Twelve of the samples gave positive results in the IFAT, whilst 37 (62%) were positive by PCR and hybridization. All samples from 36 dogs from a non-endemic area in the UK were negative by PCR. Five of the 12 samples positive by IFAT gave negative PCR results.

  9. National Malaria Prevalence in Cambodia: Microscopy Versus Polymerase Chain Reaction Estimates.

    PubMed

    Lek, Dysoley; Popovici, Jean; Ariey, Frederic; Vinjamuri, Seshu Babu; Meek, Sylvia; Bruce, Jan; Taylor, Walter R J; Socheat, Duong; Menard, Didier; Rogers, William O

    2016-09-07

    Accurate information regarding malaria prevalence at national level is required to design and assess malaria control/elimination efforts. Although many comparisons of microscopy and polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based methods have been conducted, there is little published literature covering such comparisons in southeast Asia especially at the national level. Both microscopic examination and PCR detection were performed on blood films and dried blood spots samples collected from 8,067 individuals enrolled in a nationwide, stratified, multistage, cluster sampling malaria prevalence survey conducted in Cambodia in 2007. The overall malaria prevalence and prevalence rates of Plasmodium falciparum, Plasmodium vivax, and Plasmodium malariae infections estimated by microscopy (N = 8,067) were 2.74% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.39-3.12%), 1.81% (95% CI: 1.53-2.13%), 1.14% (95% CI: 0.92-1.40%), and 0.01% (95% CI: 0.003-0.07%), respectively. The overall malaria prevalence based on PCR detection (N = 7,718) was almost 2.5-fold higher (6.31%, 95% CI: 5.76-6.89%, P < 0.00001). This difference was significantly more pronounced for P. falciparum (4.40%, 95% CI: 3.95-4.90%, P < 0.00001) compared with P. vivax (1.89%, 95% CI: 1.60-2.22%, P < 0.001) and P. malariae infections (0.22%, 95% CI: 0.13-0.35%, P < 0.0001). The significant proportion of microscopy-negative but PCR-positive individuals (289/7,491, 3.85%) suggest microscopic examination frequently underestimated malaria infections and that active case detection based on microscopy may miss a significant reservoir of infection, especially in low-transmission settings.

  10. Multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction for Detection of Gastrointestinal Pathogens in Migrant Workers in Qatar

    PubMed Central

    Humphrey, John M.; Ranbhise, Sanjay; Ibrahim, Emad; Al-Romaihi, Hamad E.; Farag, Elmoubasher; Abu-Raddad, Laith J.; Glesby, Marshall J.

    2016-01-01

    The causes of infectious diarrhea among the migrant worker population in Qatar are not well understood. We conducted a prospective observational study to understand the demographic and clinical characteristics and infectious causes of diarrhea among migrant workers in Doha, Qatar. A total of 126 male workers presenting to the Qatar Red Crescent Worker's Health Center outpatient clinic or emergency department were studied over a 5-month period in 2015–2016. Epidemiologic surveys were administered to all subjects and the prevalence of 22 different stool pathogens was determined using multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) (FilmArray® Gastrointestinal PCR). A target pathogen was identified in 62.7% of subjects. Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli was the most prevalent pathogen and was detected in 24.6% of subjects, followed by Salmonella (22.2%), enteroaggregative E. coli (15.1%), Giardia lamblia (9.5%), and enterotoxigenic E. coli (8.7%). Multiple pathogens were identified in 49.3% of positive stool samples. In a multivariable analysis, the presence of a heart rate ≥ 90 (adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 3.7, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.4–10.0) and > 5 fecal leukocytes/high-power field (adjusted OR = 2.8, 95% CI = 1.2–7.0) were significant predictors of detecting an acute inflammatory pathogen by PCR. Use of multiplex PCR enabled the detection of gastrointestinal pathogens in a high proportion of cases, illustrating the utility of this diagnostic tool in epidemiologic studies of infectious diarrhea. PMID:27928081

  11. A rapid, efficient, and economical inverse polymerase chain reaction-based method for generating a site saturation mutant library.

    PubMed

    Jain, Pankaj C; Varadarajan, Raghavan

    2014-03-15

    With the development of deep sequencing methodologies, it has become important to construct site saturation mutant (SSM) libraries in which every nucleotide/codon in a gene is individually randomized. We describe methodologies for the rapid, efficient, and economical construction of such libraries using inverse polymerase chain reaction (PCR). We show that if the degenerate codon is in the middle of the mutagenic primer, there is an inherent PCR bias due to the thermodynamic mismatch penalty, which decreases the proportion of unique mutants. Introducing a nucleotide bias in the primer can alleviate the problem. Alternatively, if the degenerate codon is placed at the 5' end, there is no PCR bias, which results in a higher proportion of unique mutants. This also facilitates detection of deletion mutants resulting from errors during primer synthesis. This method can be used to rapidly generate SSM libraries for any gene or nucleotide sequence, which can subsequently be screened and analyzed by deep sequencing.

  12. PrimRglo: a multiplexable quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction system for nucleic acid detection.

    PubMed

    Lai, Richard; Liang, Fang; Pearson, Darnley; Barnett, Graeme; Whiley, David; Sloots, Theo; Barnard, Ross T; Corrie, Simon R

    2012-03-15

    We report the development of a new real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) detection system that uses oligonucleotide "tagged" PCR primers, a fluorophore-labeled "universal" detection oligonucleotides, and a complementary quenching oligonucleotide. The fluorescence signal decreases as PCR product accumulates due to the increase in detection/quencher hybrid formation as the tagged primer is consumed. We use plasmids containing the influenza A matrix gene and the porA and ctrA genes of Neisseria meningitidis as targets for developing the system. Cycle threshold (Ct) values were generated, and the sensitivity of the new system (dubbed "PrimRglo") compared favorably with the commonly used SYBR green and Taqman detection systems and, unlike the latter system, does not require the design of a new dual-labeled detection oligonucleotide for each new target sequence.

  13. [Rapid detection of influenza virus A (AH1, AH3) and B by nested-polymerase chain reaction].

    PubMed

    Shimizu, H; Watanabe, S; Imai, M

    1997-06-01

    We applied the Nested-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for laboratory diagnosis of influenza virus infection. We used three primer sets for detection of influenza virus A (AH1, AH3) and B. The primer sets for each type (AH1, AH3, B) was able to detect specifically each type of influenza. We measured the sensitivity for detection of vaccine strains. The PCR method was able to detect 0.9 PFU/assey of AH1 type, 1.0 PFU/assey of AH3 type and 1.8 PFU/assey of B type. Out of 46 isolation negative but antibody positive cases, 38 cases were positive for PCR (82.6%). This method is sensitive and useful for rapid diagnosis of influenza virus infection.

  14. Sensitive Detection of Polyalanine Expansions in PHOX2B by Polymerase Chain Reaction Using Bisulfite-Converted DNA

    PubMed Central

    Horiuchi, Hidekazu; Sasaki, Ayako; Osawa, Motoki; Kijima, Kazuki; Ino, Yukiko; Matoba, Ryoji; Hayasaka, Kiyoshi

    2005-01-01

    Congenital central hypoventilation syndrome, also known as Ondine’s curse, is characterized by idiopathic abnormal control of respiration during sleep. Recent studies indicate that a polyalanine expansion of PHOX2B is relevant to the pathogenesis of this disorder. However, it is difficult to detect the repeated tract because its high GC content inhibits conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification. Here, we describe a bisulfite treatment for DNA in which uracil is obtained by deamination of unmethylated cytosine residues. Deamination of DNA permitted direct PCR amplification that yielded a product of 123 bp for the common 20-residue repetitive tract with replacement of C with T by sequencing. It settled allele dropouts accompanied by insufficient amplification of expanded alleles. The defined procedure dramatically improved detection of expansions to 9 of 10 congenital central hypoventilation syndrome patients examined in a previous study. The chemical conversion of DNA before PCR amplification facilitates effective detection of GC-rich polyalanine tracts. PMID:16258163

  15. Nested polymerase chain reaction for detection of Theileria annulata and comparison with conventional diagnostic techniques: its use in epidemiology studies.

    PubMed

    Martín-Sánchez, J; Viseras, J; Adroher, F J; García-Fernández, P

    1999-03-01

    In this work we studied the ability of a nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to detect Theileria annulata, the causative agent of Mediterranean theileriosis, in blood samples obtained from cattle on farms in different Spanish regions and its possible use in epidemiology studies. Of the 214 samples analyzed, 78.04%, 69.86%, and 62.26% were found to be positive by nested PCR, indirect immunofluorescent antibody test, and optical microscopy of Giemsa-stained smears, respectively. The three techniques were in agreement in 68.6% of the results. The observation that the prevalence of Mediterranean theileriosis estimated using nested PCR alone (70.3%) and that obtained using all three diagnostic techniques together (80.4%) did not significantly differ verifies the utility of this technique in epidemiology studies.

  16. Development of a DNA probe for the myxosporean parasite, Ceratomyxa shasta, using the polymerase chain reaction with arbitrary primers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bartholomew, Jerri L; Rodriguez, Rusty J.; Arakawa, Cindy K.

    1995-01-01

    The arbitrarily primed polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to generate a DNA marker specific for the myxosporean parasite Ceratomyxa shasta. The [32~]-labeled marker hybridized to purified C. shasta DNA and to parasite DNA combined with salmonid DNA in a dot blot assay, demonstrating its potential as a diagnostic tool. The amplified DNA segment was cloned and sequenced, and primers specific for the marker were designed. When these primers were used in a standard PCR assay, DNA was amplified from C. shasta and from infected fish tissues, but not from uninfected fish tissues or from 2 other myxosporean parasites. The sensitivity of the PCR assay will permit detection of low levels of C. shasta from infected fish or oligochaetes and will be useful in defining the parasite's life cycle as well as examining its impact on salmonid populatiosn

  17. Absence of measles viral genomic sequence in intestinal tissues from Crohn's disease by nested polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Haga, Y; Funakoshi, O; Kuroe, K; Kanazawa, K; Nakajima, H; Saito, H; Murata, Y; Munakata, A; Yoshida, Y

    1996-01-01

    The aetiology of Crohn's disease remains unknown, although evidence for a viral cause has long been sought. Recent studies have shown inflammation of the submucosal microvascular endothelium and granulomata, and endothelial cell cytoplasmic inclusions, consistent with paramyxovirus, were identified by electron microscopy suggesting a persistent measles virus infection in Crohn's disease. Measles, mumps, and rubella viruses were tested for Crohn's disease by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). RNA was extracted from resected intestinal specimens from 15 patients with Crohn's disease, 14 with ulcerative colitis, and 14 controls without inflammatory bowel disease. This was used to perform nested PCR after reverse transcription (RT) of the RNA to cDNA with primer pairs directed against two regions in the genome of the measles virus and one region in the mumps and rubella viral genomes. Despite enhanced sensitivity of nested RT-PCR, measles, mumps, and rubella viral genomic sequences were not found in any intestinal specimen. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8801199

  18. Development and validation of quantitative polymerase chain reaction protocols targeting the ‘L’, ‘M’, and ‘S’ ribonucleic acid of Soybean vein necrosis virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean vein necrosis virus (SVNV) was first reported in Wisconsin in 2012. SVNV is a new member of the Tospovirus family and is becoming more frequent in occurrence in the north central region USA. New real-time reverse transcriptase quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) protocols were d...

  19. A Capsid Gene-Based Real-Time Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction Assay for the Detection of Marine Vesiviruses in the Caliciviridae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (rtRT-PCR) assay was developed for the identification of marine vesiviruses. The primers were designed to target a 176-nucleotide fragment within a highly conserved region of the San Miguel sea lion viruses (SMSVs) capsid gene. The assay de...

  20. Rapid Differentiation and Identification of Potential Severe Strains of Citrus tristeza Virus by Real-Time Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction Assays

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A multiplex Taqman®-based real-time reverse transcription (RT) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was developed to detect all strains of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) and to identify potentially severe strains of the virus. A CTV TaqMan probe (CTV-CY5) based on the coat protein (CP) gene sequences...

  1. Use of polymerase chain reaction in detection of Marek’s disease and reticuloendotheliosis viruses in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumorous tissues

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A simple polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method was developed for the diagnosis of Marek’s disease (MD) and reticuloendotheliosis (RE) in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues; and for the diagnosis of MD in tissues only preserved in 10% neutral buffered formalin. MD virus (MDV) and RE vi...

  2. Comparison of automated BAX polymerase chain reaction and standard culture methods for detection of Listeria monocyogenes in blue crab meat (Callinectus sapidus) and blue crab processing plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study compared the BAX Polymerase Chain Reaction method (BAX PCR) with the Standard Culture Method (SCM) for detection of L. monocytogenes in blue crab meat and crab processing plants. The aim of this study was to address this data gap. Raw crabs, finished products and environmental sponge samp...

  3. Evaluation of a real-time polymerase chain reaction assay for the diagnosis of malaria in patients from Thailand.

    PubMed

    Swan, Heather; Sloan, Lynne; Muyombwe, Anthony; Chavalitshewinkoon-Petmitr, Porntip; Krudsood, Srivicha; Leowattana, Wattana; Wilairatana, Polrat; Looareesuwan, Sornchai; Rosenblatt, Jon

    2005-11-01

    We compared the diagnosis of malaria in 297 patients from Thailand by a real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay using the LightCycler with conventional microscopy using Giemsa-stained thick and thin blood films. The PCR assay can be completed in one hour and has the potential to detect and identify four species of Plasmodium in a single reaction by use of melting temperature curve analysis (however, we did not detect Plasmodium ovale in this study). Blood was collected, stored, and transported on IsoCode STIX, which provide a stable matrix for the archiving and rapid simple extraction of DNA. A genus-specific primer set corresponding to the 18S ribosomal RNA was used to amplify the target sequence. Fluorescence resonance energy technology hybridization probes were designed for P. falciparum over a region containing basepair mismatches, which allowed differentiation of the other Plasmodium species. The PCR results correlated with the microscopic results in 282 (95%) of 297 patient specimens. Most of these were single-species infections caused by P. vivax (150) and P. falciparum (120), along with 5 P. malariae, 2 mixed infections (P. falciparum and P. vivax), and 5 negative specimens. No negative microscopy specimens were positive by PCR (100% specificity for detection of any Plasmodium). The 15 discrepant results could not be resolved, but given the subjective nature of microscopy and the analytical objectivity of the PCR, the PCR results may be correct. The ability of the PCR method to detect mixed infections or to detect P. ovale could not be determined in this study. Within the limitations of initial equipment costs, this real-time PCR assay is a rapid, accurate, and efficient method for the specific diagnosis of malaria. It may have application in clinical laboratories, as well as in epidemiologic studies and antimalarial efficacy trials.

  4. Sensitivity of polymerase chain reaction for detection of bovine viral diarrhea virus in pooled serum samples and use of pooled polymerase chain reaction to determine prevalence of bovine viral diarrhea virus in auction market cattle.

    PubMed

    Smith, Rebecca L; Sanderson, Michael W; Walz, Paul H; Givens, M Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Two reverse transcription-nested polymerase chain reaction tests, 1 quantitative (qRT-nPCR) and 1 standard (RT-nPCR), were evaluated to assess sensitivity for detection of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) of a single positive serum sample in a pool of 30. The RT-nPCR and qRT-nPCR each detected 95 of 100 known positives. The RT-nPCR was used to estimate the prevalence of BVDV in adult beef cows. Serum samples were obtained from the US Department of Agriculture brucellosis testing laboratories in 3 Midwestern states. Samples originated from auction markets and private treaty sales throughout the 3 states. A total of 2,990 serum samples were collected and randomly pooled into 100 pools for testing. Two of the 100 pools of field samples were positive, and each positive pool had a single positive individual sample upon confirmation. The estimate of BVDV prevalence in adult cows in this study was 0.07%. This study estimates the diagnostic sensitivity of RT-nPCR for BVDV and confirms that it is a useful diagnostic tool for pools of 30 serum samples and that prevalence of BVDV in adult cattle from auction markets is low.

  5. A new high-speed droplet-real-time polymerase chain reaction method can detect bovine respiratory syncytial virus in less than 10 min.

    PubMed

    Uehara, Masayuki; Matsuda, Kazuyuki; Sugano, Mitsutoshi; Honda, Takayuki

    2014-03-01

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) has been widely used for diagnosis of infectious diseases of domestic animals. Rapid detection of respiratory pathogens of cattle is useful for making therapeutic decisions. Therefore, we developed a new genetic-based method called droplet-real-time PCR, which can detect bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) within 10 min. Our droplet-real-time PCR markedly reduced the reaction time of reverse transcription-PCR while maintaining the same sensitivity as conventional real-time PCR, and it can be used as a rapid assay for detection of BRSV. Furthermore, our method is potentially applicable for rapid diagnosis of almost all infectious diseases, including highly pathogenic avian influenza virus.

  6. Sensitive and specific identification by polymerase chain reaction of Eimeria tenella and Eimeria maxima, important protozoan pathogens in laboratory avian facilities

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun-A; Hong, Sunhwa; Chung, Yungho

    2011-01-01

    Eimeria tenella and Eimeria maxima are important pathogens causing intracellular protozoa infections in laboratory avian animals and are known to affect experimental results obtained from contaminated animals. This study aimed to find a fast, sensitive, and efficient protocol for the molecular identification of E. tenella and E. maxima in experimental samples using chickens as laboratory avian animals. DNA was extracted from fecal samples collected from chickens and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis was employed to detect E. tenella and E. maxima from the extracted DNA. The target nucleic acid fragments were specifically amplified by PCR. Feces secreting E. tenella and E. maxima were detected by a positive PCR reaction. In this study, we were able to successfully detect E. tenella and E. maxima using the molecular diagnostic method of PCR. As such, we recommended PCR for monitoring E. tenella and E. maxima in laboratory avian facilities. PMID:21998616

  7. Identification of Listeria Spp. Strains Isolated from Meat Products and Meat Production Plants by Multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction.

    PubMed

    Mazza, Roberta; Piras, Francesca; Ladu, Daniela; Putzolu, Miriam; Consolati, Simonetta Gianna; Mazzette, Rina

    2015-11-02

    Listeriosis is a foodborne disease caused by Listeria monocytogenes and is considered as a serious health problem, due to the severity of symptoms and the high mortality rate. Recently, other Listeria species have been associated with disease in human and animals. The aim of this study was to develop a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in order to simultaneously detect six Listeria species (L. grayi, L. welshimeri, L. ivanovii, L. monocytogenes, L. seeligeri, L. innocua) in a single reaction. One hundred eighteen Listeria spp. strains, isolated from meat products (sausages) and processing plants (surfaces in contact and not in contact with meat), were included in the study. All the strains were submitted to biochemical identification using the API Listeria system. A multiplex PCR was developed with the aim to identify the six species of Listeria. PCR allowed to uniquely identify strains that had expressed a doubtful profile with API Listeria The results suggest that the multiplex PCR could represent a rapid and sensitive screening test, a reliable method for the detection of all Listeria species, both in contaminated food and in clinical samples, and also a tool that could be used for epidemiological purposes in food-borne outbreaks. A further application could be the development of a PCR that can be directly applied to the pre-enrichment broth.

  8. Identification of Listeria Spp. Strains Isolated from Meat Products and Meat Production Plants by Multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Mazza, Roberta; Ladu, Daniela; Putzolu, Miriam; Consolati, Simonetta Gianna; Mazzette, Rina

    2015-01-01

    Listeriosis is a foodborne disease caused by Listeria monocytogenes and is considered as a serious health problem, due to the severity of symptoms and the high mortality rate. Recently, other Listeria species have been associated with disease in human and animals. The aim of this study was to develop a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in order to simultaneously detect six Listeria species (L. grayi, L. welshimeri, L. ivanovii, L. monocytogenes, L. seeligeri, L. innocua) in a single reaction. One hundred eighteen Listeria spp. strains, isolated from meat products (sausages) and processing plants (surfaces in contact and not in contact with meat), were included in the study. All the strains were submitted to biochemical identification using the API Listeria system. A multiplex PCR was developed with the aim to identify the six species of Listeria. PCR allowed to uniquely identify strains that had expressed a doubtful profile with API Listeria The results suggest that the multiplex PCR could represent a rapid and sensitive screening test, a reliable method for the detection of all Listeria species, both in contaminated food and in clinical samples, and also a tool that could be used for epidemiological purposes in food-borne outbreaks. A further application could be the development of a PCR that can be directly applied to the pre-enrichment broth. PMID:27800422

  9. Development and use of a real-time polymerase chain reaction assay for the detection of Ophidiomyces ophiodiicola in snakes.

    PubMed

    Allender, Matthew C; Bunick, David; Dzhaman, Elena; Burrus, Lucienne; Maddox, Carol

    2015-03-01

    Fungal pathogens threatening the conservation of wildlife are becoming increasingly common. Since 2008, free-ranging snakes across North America have been experiencing a marked increase in the prevalence of snake fungal disease associated with Ophidiomyces ophiodiicola. Diagnosis has historically relied on histology, microbiology, and conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR). More sensitive methods are needed to adequately characterize the epidemiology. The current study describes the development of a real-time PCR (qPCR) assay for detecting a segment of the internal transcribed spacer 1 region between the 18S and 5.8S ribosomal RNA gene. The assay was able to detect as few as 1.05 × 10(1) gene copies per reaction. An additional 4 positive cases were detected when comparing a conventional PCR (n = 3) and the qPCR (n = 7) when used on swab samples from 47 eastern massasauga rattlesnakes. The newly developed assay is a sensitive and specific tool for surveillance and monitoring in the conservation of free-ranging snakes.

  10. Hemoculture and Polymerase Chain Reaction Using Primers TCZ1/TCZ2 for the Diagnosis of Canine and Feline Trypanosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    Eloy, Luciano José; Lucheis, Simone Baldini

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. American trypanosomiasis, also known as Chagas disease, is a zoonosis caused by Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi). Dogs and cats participate actively in this parasite's transmission cycle. This study aimed at evaluating the occurrence of T. cruzi in dogs and cats from Botucatu, SP, Brazil, as well as at evaluating the technique of hemoculture in LIT (liver infusion tryptose) medium by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Methods. Blood samples were collected from 50 dogs and 50 cats in Botucatu-SP, Brazil. For hemoculture, the samples were inoculated in LIT medium, and readings were performed for four months. Upon completion of such period, all the hemocultures were processed for parasitic DNA extraction. The PCR reactions were performed by using primers TCZ1/TCZ2. Results. Ten dogs and ten cats (20%) were positive to PCR, and four dogs and three cats (7%) were positive to hemoculture. Only in a one cat sample (1%) there was confirmation of positive hemoculture by PCR for T. cruzi. Conclusions. Results showed that PCR was a suitable tool for the confirmation of the parasite detection in hemoculture samples, and that dogs and cats from Botucatu, SP, Brazil, are maintaining the role of household reservoirs of T. cruzi, which reinforces the need for constant epidemiologic surveillance for this zoonosis. PMID:23738124

  11. PCR thermocycler

    DOEpatents

    Benett, William J.; Richards, James B.

    2003-01-01

    A sleeve-type silicon polymerase chain reaction (PCR) chamber or thermocycler having improved thermal performance. The silicon sleeve reaction chamber is improved in thermal performance by etched features therein that reduce thermal mass and increase the surface area of the sleeve for cooling. This improved thermal performance of the thermocycler enables an increase in speed and efficiency of the reaction chamber. The improvement is accomplished by providing grooves in the faces of the sleeve and a series of grooves on the interior surfaces that connect with grooves on the faces of the sleeve. The grooves can be anisotropically etched in the silicon sleeve simultaneously with formation of the chamber.

  12. PCR thermocycler

    DOEpatents

    Benett, William J.; Richards, James B.

    2005-05-17

    A sleeve-type silicon polymerase chain reaction (PCR) chamber or thermocycler having improved thermal performance. The silicon sleeve reaction chamber is improved in thermal performance by etched features therein that reduce thermal mass and increase the surface area of the sleeve for cooling. This improved thermal performance of the thermocycler enables an increase in speed and efficiency of the reaction chamber. The improvement is accomplished by providing grooves in the faces of the sleeve and a series of grooves on the interior surfaces that connect with grooves on the faces of the sleeve. The grooves can be anisotropically etched in the silicon sleeve simultaneously with formation of the chamber.

  13. Detection of cashew nut DNA in spiked baked goods using a real-time polymerase chain reaction method.

    PubMed

    Brzezinski, Jennifer L

    2006-01-01

    The detection of potentially allergenic foods, such as tree nuts, in food products is a major concern for the food processing industry. A real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method was designed to determine the presence of cashew DNA in food products. The PCR amplifies a 67 bp fragment of the cashew 2S albumin gene, which is detected with a cashew-specific, dual-labeled TaqMan probe. This reaction will not amplify DNA derived from other tree nut species, such as almond, Brazil nut, hazelnut, and walnut, as well as 4 varieties of peanut. This assay was sensitive enough to detect 5 pg purified cashew DNA as well as cashew DNA in a spiked chocolate cookie sample containing 0.01% (100 mg/kg) cashew.

  14. Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction Assays for Rickettsial Diseases

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-06-01

    agents in the blood stream the diseases are also difficult to diagnose by laboratory methods. For that reason we have developed real - time PCR assays to...detect rickettsial disease agents both at the genus and the species level. Real - time PCR assays were developed to identify: 1) pathogenic Rickettsia...calculate the sensitivity of the assays. These real - time PCR assays were found to be capable of detecting rickettsial disease agents quickly and with great sensitivity and specificity.

  15. Development of melting temperature-based SYBR Green I polymerase chain reaction methods for multiplex genetically modified organism detection.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Marta; Rodríguez-Lázaro, David; Esteve, Teresa; Prat, Salomé; Pla, Maria

    2003-12-15

    Commercialization of several genetically modified crops has been approved worldwide to date. Uniplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based methods to identify these different insertion events have been developed, but their use in the analysis of all commercially available genetically modified organisms (GMOs) is becoming progressively insufficient. These methods require a large number of assays to detect all possible GMOs present in the sample and thereby the development of multiplex PCR systems using combined probes and primers targeted to sequences specific to various GMOs is needed for detection of this increasing number of GMOs. Here we report on the development of a multiplex real-time PCR suitable for multiple GMO identification, based on the intercalating dye SYBR Green I and the analysis of the melting curves of the amplified products. Using this method, different amplification products specific for Maximizer 176, Bt11, MON810, and GA21 maize and for GTS 40-3-2 soybean were obtained and identified by their specific Tm. We have combined amplification of these products in a number of multiplex reactions and show the suitability of the methods for identification of GMOs with a sensitivity of 0.1% in duplex reactions. The described methods offer an economic and simple alternative to real-time PCR systems based on sequence-specific probes (i.e., TaqMan chemistry). These methods can be used as selection tests and further optimized for uniplex GMO quantification.

  16. Effect of surface charge of polyethyleneimine-modified multiwalled carbon nanotubes on the improvement of polymerase chain reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Xueyan; Chen, Jingjing; Wen, Shihui; Peng, Chen; Shen, Mingwu; Shi, Xiangyang

    2011-04-01

    In molecular biology, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) has played an important role but suffers a general problem with low efficiency and specificity. Development of suitable additives to improve the PCR specificity and efficiency and the understanding of the PCR enhancing mechanism still remain a great challenge. Here we report the use of polyethyleneimine (PEI)-modified multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with different surface charge polarities as a novel class of enhancers to improve the specificity and efficiency of PCR. The materials used included the positively charged PEI-modified MWCNTs (CNT/PEI), the neutral CNT/PEI modified with acetic anhydride (CNT/PEI.Ac), and the negatively charged CNT/PEI modified with succinic anhydride (CNT/PEI.SAH). We show that the specificity and efficiency of an error-prone two-round PCR are greatly impacted by the surface charge polarity of the PEI-modified MWCNTs. Positively charged CNT/PEI could significantly enhance the specificity and efficiency of PCR with an optimum concentration as low as 0.39 mg L-1, whereas neutral CNT/PEI.Ac had no such effect. Although negatively charged CNT/PEI.SAH could enhance the PCR, the optimum concentration required (630 mg L-1) was more than 3 orders of magnitude higher than that of positively charged CNT/PEI. The present study suggests that the PCR enhancing effect may be primarily based on the electrostatic interaction between the positively charged CNT/PEI and the negatively charged PCR components, rather than only on the thermal conductivity of MWCNTs.In molecular biology, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) has played an important role but suffers a general problem with low efficiency and specificity. Development of suitable additives to improve the PCR specificity and efficiency and the understanding of the PCR enhancing mechanism still remain a great challenge. Here we report the use of polyethyleneimine (PEI)-modified multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with different surface charge

  17. Detection of submicroscopic lymph node metastases with polymerase chain reaction in patients with malignant melanoma.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, X; Heller, R; VanVoorhis, N; Cruse, C W; Glass, F; Fenske, N; Berman, C; Leo-Messina, J; Rappaport, D; Wells, K

    1994-01-01

    BACKGROUND. The presence or absence of lymph node metastases in patients with malignant melanoma is the most powerful prognostic factor for predicting survival. If regional nodal metastases are found, the 5-year survival for the patient decreases approximately 50%. If the presence or absence of regional nodal metastases will determine which patients receive formal dissections or which patients enter adjuvant trials, then a technique is needed to accurately screen lymph node samples for occult disease. Routine histopathologic examination routinely underestimates the number of patients with metastases. This study was initiated to develop a highly sensitive clinically applicable method to detect micrometastases by examining lymph nodes for the presence of tyrosinase messenger RNA (mRNA). The hypothesis was that if mRNA for tyrosinase is found in the lymph node preparation, that finding is good evidence that metastatic melanoma cells are present. METHODS. The assay is accomplished using the combination of reverse transcription and double-round polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The amplified samples are examined on a 2% agarose gel and tyrosinase cDNA is seen as a 207 base pair fragment. Lymph node preparations from 29 patients who were clinically stage I and II and undergoing elective node dissections were analyzed both by standard pathologic staining and RT-PCR. RESULTS. Eleven of 29 lymph node (38%) samples from 29 patients with intermediate thickness melanoma were pathologically positive. Nineteen of the 29 lymph node preparations (66%) were RT-PCR-positive, and these included all of the pathologically positive samples, so that the false-negative rate was 0. In a spiking experiment, one SK-Mel-28 melanoma cell in a background of one million normal lymphocytes could be detected, thus indicating the sensitivity of this method. In addition, analysis by restriction enzyme mapping showed that the amplified 207-bp PCR product produced is part of the tyrosinase gene

  18. Keratin gene expression in non-epithelial tissues. Detection with polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Traweek, S. T.; Liu, J.; Battifora, H.

    1993-01-01

    Keratin filament are characteristically present in epithelial cells and tumors, but have also been detected in many normal and neoplastic non-epithelial cell types using immunohistochemical techniques. To investigate the validity of this seemingly aberrant protein expression, we applied the highly sensitive polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique to study keratin gene expression in a variety of non-epithelial tissues. Total RNA was extracted from nine samples of leiomyosarcoma, four non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, seven normal bone marrows, normal lymph node, normal peripheral blood cells, freshly isolated and cultured endothelial cells, cultured skin fibroblasts, and the myeloid leukemia cell line HL-60. Amplification primers and probes for the three most primitive keratin types (8, 18, and 19) were synthesized using published gene sequences. RNA from the breast carcinoma cell line MCF-7, known to be rich in all three keratins, was used as positive control. Concurrently run actin primers were used to confirm RNA integrity. After an initial cycle with reverse transcriptase, PCR amplification was performed for 30 cycles. Southern blots of the PCR products showed variably intense bands corresponding to keratin 8 and 18 gene products in all samples, offering conclusive evidence of keratin gene expression in cells of both stromal and hematopoietic derivation. However, keratin 19 gene transcription was not nearly so ubiquitous, being detected in normal fibroblasts and endothelial cells, two of four non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and four of nine leiomyosarcoma, but not in normal lymph node, peripheral blood cells, HL-60 cells, or any of the seven normal bone marrows examined. Dilutional experiments showed PCR to be highly sensitive in the detection of keratin 19 gene expression, capable of registering one MCF-7 cell in 10(6) HL-60 cells. These studies show that variable levels of keratin 8 and 18 gene expression may be detected by PCR in a wide variety of non-epithelial tissues

  19. Quantitative fucK gene polymerase chain reaction on sputum and nasopharyngeal secretions to detect Haemophilus influenzae pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Abdeldaim, Guma M K; Strålin, Kristoffer; Olcén, Per; Blomberg, Jonas; Mölling, Paula; Herrmann, Björn

    2013-06-01

    A quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the fucK gene was developed for specific detection of Haemophilus influenzae. The method was tested on sputum and nasopharyngeal aspirate (NPA) from 78 patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). With a reference standard of sputum culture and/or serology against the patient's own nasopharyngeal isolate, H. influenzae etiology was detected in 20 patients. Compared with the reference standard, fucK PCR (using the detection limit 10(5) DNA copies/mL) on sputum and NPA showed a sensitivity of 95.0% (19/20) in both cases, and specificities of 87.9% (51/58) and 89.5% (52/58), respectively. In a receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, sputum fucK PCR was found to be significantly superior to sputum P6 PCR for detection of H. influenzae CAP. NPA fucK PCR was positive in 3 of 54 adult controls without respiratory symptoms. In conclusion, quantitative fucK real-time PCR provides a sensitive and specific identification of H. influenzae in respiratory secretions.

  20. [Adaptation of a sensitive DNA extraction method for detection of Entamoeba histolytica by real-time polymerase chain reaction].

    PubMed

    Pınar, Ahmet; Akyön, Yakut; Alp, Alpaslan; Ergüven, Sibel

    2010-07-01

    This study was aimed to adapt a sensitive DNA extraction protocol in stool samples for real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) detection of Entamoeba histolytica which causes important morbidity and mortality worldwide. Stool extraction is a problematic step and has direct effects on PCR sensitivity. In order to improve the sensitivity of E.histolytica detection by real-time PCR, "QIAamp DNA stool minikit (Qiagen, Germany)" was modified by adding an overnight incubation step with proteinase K and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) in this study. Three different extraction methods [(1) original method, (2) cetyltrimethyl-ammonium bromide (CTAB) method, (3) modified method] were evaluated for effects on sensitivity in real-time quantitative PCR (Artus RealArt TM E.histolytica RG PCR Kit, Qiagen Diagnostics, Germany). For this purpose, several concentrations of standard E.histolytica DNA were spiked in parasite-free stool samples and three different extraction protocols were performed. Detection sensitivities of "QIAamp DNA stool minikit" was found 5000 copies/ml and of CTAB method was found 500 copies/ml. Detection sensitivity of the extraction was improved to 5 copies/mL by modified "QIAamp DNA stool minikit" protocol. Since detection sensitivities of nucleic acid extraction protocols from stool samples directly affect the sensitivity of PCR amplification, different extraction protocols for different microorganisms should be evaluated.

  1. Comparative study of DNA extraction methodologies from goat sperm and its effects on polymerase chain reaction analysis.

    PubMed

    Silva, E C B; Pelinca, M A; Acosta, A C; Silva, D M F; Gomes Filho, M A; Guerra, M M P

    2014-08-07

    Successful DNA extraction is indispensable for molecular methods based on polymerase chain reaction (PCR); however, goat sperm DNA extraction is limited. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate three methods to extract DNA from goat sperm for use in PCR. Eight goat semen pools were used for DNA extraction by using the DNeasy Blood & Tissue Kit, phenol-chloroform, and Chelex-100 methods. DNA samples were analyzed spectrophotometrically to determine the DNA concentration and purity, visualized on 0.8% agarose gel, and used at different amounts (150, 100, 50, 10, and 1 ng) for PCR with electrophoresis, followed by 1.5% agarose gel electrophoresis. The quantity of DNA extracted with Chelex-100 was higher (P < 0.05) than that obtained with either the DNeasy Blood & Tissue Kit or the phenol-chloroform method, with the phenol-chloroform method yielding a greater quantity (P < 0.05) than the kit. The DNeasy Blood & Tissue Kit produced a higher (P < 0.05) purity product than the Chelex-100 method, and all samples obtained by the three protocols were positive for DNA, as assessed by electrophoresis. All of the different concentrations of DNA produced by these methods were amplified by PCR, although for DNA produced by the phenol-chloroform method, PCR was only possible after complementary purification. In conclusion, the Chelex-100 method is cheap, secure, simple, fast, and effective, and is a potential tool for extracting goat sperm DNA without limitations in PCR.

  2. Sensitivity and specificity of polymerase chain reaction in Giemsa-stained slides for diagnosis of visceral leishmaniasis in children.

    PubMed

    Brustoloni, Yvone Maia; Lima, Rosimar Batista; da Cunha, Rivaldo Venâncio; Dorval, Maria Elizabeth; Oshiro, Elisa Teruya; de Oliveira, Ana Lúcia Lyrio; Pirmez, Claude

    2007-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in the detection of Leishmania DNA in archived Giemsa-stained bone marrow slides for diagnosis of visceral leishmaniasis (VL), and to compare PCR with conventional diagnostic techniques, like direct microscopy and parasite culture. Specimens of archived Giemsa-stained bone marrow slides from 91 patients with VL and from 79 controls with other diseases or conditions were studied. PCR showed the highest sensitivity (92.3%) and had good specificity (97.5%). Direct examination detected 79.1% and culture 59% of positive samples. In addition, PCR was able to detect VL in 16 of 19 patients (84.2%) with negative microscopy. PCR in Giemsa-stained bone marrow slides is a suitable tool for confirming diagnosis in patients with VL and may be useful in the diagnosis of difficult cases. Slide smears are easily stored, do not require special storage conditions such as low temperatures, and can be easily mailed to centers where PCR is available, making it an excellent option for diagnosis in the field.

  3. Comparison of different methods of RNA isolation for plum pox virus detection by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Faggioli, F; Pasquini, G; Barba, M

    1998-09-01

    The diagnosis of plum pox virus (PPV) is still considered one of the most important aspects of the "sharka" problem. In fact, different studies demonstrated an uneven distribution of the virus in infected trees due to a high variability in virus concentration. These aspects complicate the PPV diagnosis. To date, biological, serological and molecular assays have been successively developed in order to obtain sensitive and efficient PPV detection techniques. In particular, the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique seems to be promising and can be considered the most sensitive and reliable one. Preparation of viral RNA is still a fundamental step in reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) technique, especially when applied to large scale testing, i.e., for certification purposes. In order to find the most rapid and efficient procedure, we have compared three different procedures of extraction of viral RNA to be processed RT-PCR. Their common characteristics is their capacity to extract the RNA from a small amount of plant tissue without organic solvents in the extraction fluid. The procedures were as follows: an immuno-capture (IC) method using a specific antiserum, a silica-capture (SC) method using a non-specific matrix, and a simple and rapid RNA extraction (RE) method. They all were followed by one-tube RT-PCR. The obtained results show that all the three techniques allowed a successful amplification and detection of PPV in tested samples except the SC-PCR method which proved less effective. In fact, the IC-PCR and RE-PCR methods amplified and detected PPV in all isolates tested, while the SC-PCR method was able to reveal the presence of the virus in apricot and infected control samples only.

  4. A real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction for detection and quantification of Vesiculovirus

    PubMed Central

    Tolardo, Aline Lavado; de Souza, William Marciel; Romeiro, Marilia Farignoli; Vieira, Luiz Carlos; Luna, Luciano Kleber de Souza; Henriques, Dyana Alves; de Araujo, Jansen; Siqueira, Carlos Eduardo Hassegawa; Colombo, Tatiana Elias; Aquino, Victor Hugo; da Fonseca, Benedito Antonio Lopes; Bronzoni, Roberta Vieira de Morais; Nogueira, Maurício Lacerda; Durigon, Edison Luiz; Figueiredo, Luiz Tadeu Moraes

    2016-01-01

    Vesiculoviruses (VSV) are zoonotic viruses that cause vesicular stomatitis disease in cattle, horses and pigs, as well as sporadic human cases of acute febrile illness. Therefore, diagnosis of VSV infections by reliable laboratory techniques is important to allow a proper case management and implementation of strategies for the containment of virus spread. We show here a sensitive and reproducible real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for detection and quantification of VSV. The assay was evaluated with arthropods and serum samples obtained from horses, cattle and patients with acute febrile disease. The real-time RT-PCR amplified the Piry, Carajas, Alagoas and Indiana Vesiculovirus at a melting temperature 81.02 ± 0.8ºC, and the sensitivity of assay was estimated in 10 RNA copies/mL to the Piry Vesiculovirus. The viral genome has been detected in samples of horses and cattle, but not detected in human sera or arthropods. Thus, this assay allows a preliminary differential diagnosis of VSV infections. PMID:27276185

  5. [Sex identification of the rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss by polymerase chain reaction].

    PubMed

    Rud, Yu P; Maistrenko, M I; Buchatskii, L P

    2015-01-01

    A polymerase chain reaction-based test for rapid sex identification of the rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss has been elaborated. Using the data deposited with the NCBI genome bank, nucleotide sequences of the specific sex-linked locus of salmonid species have been analyzed and the oligonucleotide primers have been selected. The length of the amplification products is 800 nucleotide pairs. Amplification specificity has been tested by nucleotide analysis of the amplicon sequences. All PCR products match the Y chromosome region housing the corresponding specific locus. A comparative analysis of the nucleotide sequences of the fragments carrying the rainbow trout (and other salmonid species) sex-linked marker demonstrates a high degree of identity, amounting to 95-99%. The maximal identity between the sequences (99%) is observed when analyzing representatives of the same genus, for example, Oncorhynchus. Thus, the sex is detectable by a simple PCR test, thereby allowing the male revertants emerging via hormonal sex reversion to be identified. This test is a rapid diagnostic method, since it requires only 1 day for testing and informing the fish farm on its results. Results of abdomen opening of rainbow trout revertants and examination of their hormonal status are also described.

  6. Polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation polymorphism applied to sex identification of Accipiter cooperii.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Pedro Silveira; Bastos, Estela; Mannan, Richard William; Guedes-Pinto, Henrique

    2009-04-01

    Determination of sex in birds is valuable for studying population dynamics and structure, habitat use, behavior and mating systems. The purpose of the present study was to optimize a DNA-based methodology to allow the sex identification in Accipiter cooperii nestlings. Chromo-helicase-DNA-binding (CHD1) gene was used in this work as a marker for sex identification. CHD-W and CHD-Z sequences should present length and/or sequence differences providing a way to identify gender. We used a non-invasive method for DNA extraction from feathers and performed polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) method. The length difference between CHD-W and CHD-Z amplified fragments observed by electrophoresis in conventional agarose gel was not enough to provide a clear differentiation between males and females. However, patterns obtained by PCR-SSCP differentiated undoubtedly males and females in A. cooperii. This tool provides a precise gender identification assay and will be applied to confirm and refine morphometrically based sexing techniques used in the field.

  7. Cattle fetal sex determination by polymerase chain reaction using DNA isolated from maternal plasma.

    PubMed

    da Cruz, A S; Silva, D C; Costa, E O A; De M-Jr, P; da Silva, C C; Silva, D M; da Cruz, A D

    2012-03-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the use of polymerase chain reaction analysis (PCR) of fetal cells/DNA in the maternal plasma of pregnant cows to determine the sex of the fetus. Plasma was harvested from 35 cows of mixed genotype at different stages of pregnancy ranging from 5 to 35 weeks. A male calf and a heifer calf provided the control samples. Fetal sex was determined by amplification of Y-specific sequences. For the 35 cows, the fetal sex predicted by this technique was in accordance with the sex of the calf at birth in 88.6% of cases. The agreement between predicted and observed fetal sex was less for cows with a gestational length of 35-48 days (63.6%). Regression analysis showed that there was a strong relationship between the probability of correctly predicting fetal sex and the stage of gestation. It was estimated that the test performed at 43.8 days post fertilization would have 95% accuracy, increasing to 99% accuracy for testing at 48.4 days and 99.9% accuracy for tests at 55.0 days or later. It was concluded that PCR analysis of fetal cells in maternal plasma can be used to predict successfully the sex of the fetus in cattle.

  8. Detecting and Number Counting of Single Engineered Nanoparticles by Digital Particle Polymerase Chain Reaction.

    PubMed

    Paunescu, Daniela; Mora, Carlos A; Querci, Lorenzo; Heckel, Reinhard; Puddu, Michela; Hattendorf, Bodo; Günther, Detlef; Grass, Robert N

    2015-10-27

    The concentrations of nanoparticles present in colloidal dispersions are usually measured and given in mass concentration (e.g. mg/mL), and number concentrations can only be obtained by making assumptions about nanoparticle size and morphology. Additionally traditional nanoparticle concentration measures are not very sensitive, and only the presence/absence of millions/billions of particles occurring together can be obtained. Here, we describe a method, which not only intrinsically results in number concentrations, but is also sensitive enough to count individual nanoparticles, one by one. To make this possible, the sensitivity of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was combined with a binary (=0/1, yes/no) measurement arrangement, binomial statistics and DNA comprising monodisperse silica nanoparticles. With this method, individual tagged particles in the range of 60-250 nm could be detected and counted in drinking water in absolute number, utilizing a standard qPCR device within 1.5 h of measurement time. For comparison, the method was validated with single particle inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (sp-ICPMS).

  9. Rapid screening for sickle cell disease by polymerase chain reaction-high resolution melting analysis.

    PubMed

    Yue, Liang; Lin, Min; Chen, Jiang-Tao; Zhan, Xiao-Fen; Zhong, De-Shang; Monte-Nguba, Santiago-M; Liu, Pei-Fen; Pan, Xue-Fen; Huang, Jiang-Hua; Wang, Xi; Ehapo, Juan Carlos Salas; Eyi, Urbano Monsuy; Yang, Hui-Tian; Yang, Li-Ye

    2014-06-01

    Each year, ~300,000 individuals with sickle cell disease (SCD), a hemoglobinopathy caused by β-globin gene mutation, are born, and >75% of those are in Africa. The present study examined 511 individuals on the island of Bioko (Equatorial Guinea) and attempted to establish a method for rapid sickle cell disease screening. Following DNA extraction and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification, high resolution melting (HRM) analysis was used to assess the specificity of fluorescence signals of the PCR products and to differentiate various genotypes of these products. The analytical results of HRM were validated using DNA sequencing. By HRM analysis, 80 out of 511 samples were classified as hemoglobin S (Hb S) heterozygotes, while 431 out of 511 samples were classified as wild-type. No mutant homozygote was identified. DNA sequencing indicated that within the 431 wild-type samples as indicated by HRM analysis, one case was actually a Hb S heterozygote and another case was a rare hemoglobin S-C genotype (sickle-hemoglobin C disease). One out of 80 suspected Hb S heterozygotes as indicated by HRM was confirmed as wild-type by DNA sequencing and the results of residual 508 cases were consistent for HRM analysis and sequencing. In conclusion, HRM analysis is a simple, high-efficiency approach for Hb S screening and is useful for early diagnosis of SCD and particularly suitable for application in the African area.

  10. Mutagenicity Assessment of Organophosphates using Polymerase Chain Reaction-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism Assay

    PubMed Central

    Bhinder, Preety; Chaudhry, Asha

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: In this study we have evaluated the mutagenicity of organophosphate pesticides acephate, chlorpyrifos, and profenofos using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) assay with the mosquito Culex quinquefasciatus taken as an experimental model. Materials and Methods: Second instar larvae were treated with LC20 of each pesticide for 24 h and mutations induced in the sequence of mitochondrial COII gene (690bp) were studied from restriction patterns generated with AluI, PacI, and PsiI restriction endonucleases. Results: Variations in the number and size of digested fragments were recorded from treated individuals compared with controls showing that the restriction enzymes created a cut at different locations. In addition, sequences of COII gene from control and treated individuals were also used to confirm the RFLP patterns. From the sequence alignment data, it was found that mutations caused the destruction and generation of restriction sites in the gene sequence of treated individuals. Conclusion: This study indicates that all the three pesticides had potential to induce mutations in the normal sequence of COII gene and also advocates the use of PCR-RFLP assay as an efficient, rapid, and sensitive technique to detect mutagenicity of pesticides. PMID:24403735

  11. Highly sensitive polymerase chain reaction-free quantum dot-based quantification of forensic genomic DNA.

    PubMed

    Tak, Yu Kyung; Kim, Won Young; Kim, Min Jung; Han, Eunyoung; Han, Myun Soo; Kim, Jong Jin; Kim, Wook; Lee, Jong Eun; Song, Joon Myong

    2012-04-06

    Forensic DNA samples can degrade easily due to exposure to light and moisture at the crime scene. In addition, the amount of DNA acquired at a criminal site is inherently limited. This limited amount of human DNA has to be quantified accurately after the process of DNA extraction. The accurately quantified extracted genomic DNA is then used as a DNA template in polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification for short tandem repeat (STR) human identification. Accordingly, highly sensitive and human-specific quantification of forensic DNA samples is an essential issue in forensic study. In this work, a quantum dot (Qdot)-labeled Alu sequence was developed as a probe to simultaneously satisfy both the high sensitivity and human genome selectivity for quantification of forensic DNA samples. This probe provided PCR-free determination of human genomic DNA and had a 2.5-femtogram detection limit due to the strong emission and photostability of the Qdot. The Qdot-labeled Alu sequence has been used successfully to assess 18 different forensic DNA samples for STR human identification.

  12. Genome fingerprinting by simple sequence repeat (SSR)-anchored polymerase chain reaction amplification

    SciTech Connect

    Zietkiewicz, E.; Labuda, D. ); Rafalski, A. )

    1994-03-15

    Simple sequence repeats (SSR), or microsatellites, are ubiquitous in eukaryotic genomes. Here the authors demonstrate the utility of microsatellite-directed DNA fingerprinting by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of the interrepeat region. No sequencing is required to design the oligonucleotide primers. They tested primers anchored at 3[prime] or 5[prime] termini of the (A)[sub n] repeats, extended into the flanking sequence by 2 to 4 nucleotide residues [3[prime]-anchored primers: (CA)[sub 8]RG, (CA)[sub 8]RY, and (CA)[sub 7]RTCY; and 5[prime]-anchored primers: BDB(CA)[sub 7]C, DBDA(CA)[sub 7], VHVG(TG)[sub 7] and HVH(TG)[sub 7]T]. Radioactively labeled amplification products were analyzed by electrophoresis, revealing information on multiple genomic loci in a single gel lane. Complex, species-specific patterns were obtained from a variety of eukaryotic taxa. Intraspecies polymorphisms were also observed and shown to segregate as Mendelian markers. Inter-SSR PCR provides a novel fingerprinting approach applicable for taxonomic and phylogenetic comparisons and as a mapping tool in a wide range of organisms. This application of (CA)[sub n] repeats may be extended to different microsatellites and other common dispersed elements. 24 refs., 6 figs.

  13. Nested polymerase chain reaction assay for detection of Mycobacterium shottsii and M. pseudoshottsii in striped bass.

    PubMed

    Gauthier, D T; Vogelbein, W K; Rhodes, M W; Reece, K S

    2008-12-01

    Wild striped bass Morone saxatilis in Chesapeake Bay are experiencing a high prevalence of mycobacteriosis, which produces granulomatous lesions of the skin and visceral organs. Culture-based studies have indicated that the newly described species Mycobacterium shottsii and M. pseudoshottsii are the dominant isolates from diseased fish. The classical fish pathogen M. marinum is also found, albeit at much lower frequencies. Both M. shottsii and M. pseudoshottsii are extremely slow-growing on standard selective media, and up to 12 months may be required for isolation and characterization. Epidemiological studies of mycobacteriosis in Chesapeake Bay would therefore benefit from rapid molecular assays with which to detect these species in fish. In this paper, we describe the development of polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) assays capable of detecting M. shottsii, M. pseudoshottsii, and, in most instances, coinfections thereof in striped bass tissues. In addition, PCR-RFLP assays were designed to detect M. marinum and other as-yet-undescribed Mycobacterium spp. present in Chesapeake Bay striped bass. Comparison of these molecular assays with culture-based techniques using splenic tissue from wild striped bass yielded generally concordant results and demonstrated the applicability of these techniques to the study of wild fish.

  14. Optimisation of forensic genetics procedures used in disputed paternity testing: adjustment of the PCR reaction volume.

    PubMed

    Marjanović, Damir; Bakal, Narcisa; Kovacević, Lejla; Hodzić, Melisa; Haverić, Anja; Haverić, Sanin; Ibrulj, Slavica; Durmić, Adaleta

    2006-05-01

    Standard molecular techniques, with only a slight modification, are very useful in obtaining and interpreting the final results in the field of forensic genetic. Data obtained through such analysis are highly reliable and can be used as a very powerful tool that produces valuable results. However, success and swiftness of DNA typing of biological evidence either that found at a crime scene or used in disputed paternity testing, depends on the optimization of numerous factors. One of the most important and critical phases that ensures reliability of the whole procedure is the choice of the most suitable volume for the amplification protocol. Buccal swabs were collected from volunteers. DNA was extracted by Qiagen Dnaeasy Tissue Kit. PowerPlex 16 kit was used to simultaneously amplify 15 STR loci by PCR. Amplification was carried out as described previously. The tested total working reaction volumes were 5, 10 and 25 microl. The PCR amplification was carried out in PE Gene Amp PCR System Thermal Cycler (ABI, Foster City, CA). Amplification products were analyzed on an ABI PRISM 377 instrument (ABI, Foster City, CA) in 5% bis-acrilamide gel. Amplification was generally successful for all the tested reaction volumes. Lower partial to complete DNA profiles ratio, the quality of obtained STR profiles, significantly reduced amount of reaction's components give advantage to 5 microl reaction volume over other two tested volumes in this case.

  15. Detection of feline herpes virus 1 via polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry in cats with ulcerative facial dermatitis, eosinophilic granuloma complex reaction patterns and mosquito bite hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Persico, Paola; Roccabianca, Paola; Corona, Antonio; Vercelli, Antonella; Cornegliani, Luisa

    2011-12-01

    Ulcerative dermatitis caused by feline herpes virus 1 (FHV-1) is an uncommon disease characterized by cutaneous ulcers secondary to epidermal, adnexal and dermal necrosis. Differential diagnoses for FHV-1 lesions include, but are not limited to, mosquito bite hypersensitivity and eosinophilic granuloma complex. Histopathological diagnosis of FHV-1 dermatitis is based on the detection of the intranuclear inclusion bodies. In cases where intranuclear inclusions are missing but clinical and histological findings are compatible with FHV-1 dermatitis, immunohistochemistry (IHC) and PCRs have been used. In this retrospective study, we evaluated the presence of FHV-1 by IHC and PCR in skin biopsies and compared the results of the two tests. Sixty-four skin biopsy specimens from cats with compatible lesions were reviewed and tested via PCR and IHC for evidence of FHV-1. Polymerase chain reaction was positive in 12 of 64 biopsies; PCR and IHC were positive only in two of 64 biopsies, and these cases were considered true positive cases. The higher number of PCR-positive cases was possibly attributed to amplification of viral DNA from a live attenuated vaccination, but a previous FHV-1 infection with subsequent amplification of latently inserted FHV-1 could not be excluded. If clinical signs and histopathology suggest FHV-1 infection in the absence of typical inclusion bodies, IHC is the preferred diagnostic test; PCR may be useful for initial screening, but due to false positives is not sufficient for a definitive diagnosis.

  16. Detection of human papillomaviruses by polymerase chain reaction and ligation reaction on universal microarray.

    PubMed

    Ritari, Jarmo; Hultman, Jenni; Fingerroos, Rita; Tarkkanen, Jussi; Pullat, Janne; Paulin, Lars; Kivi, Niina; Auvinen, Petri; Auvinen, Eeva

    2012-01-01

    Sensitive and specific detection of human papillomaviruses (HPV) in cervical samples is a useful tool for the early diagnosis of epithelial neoplasia and anogenital lesions. Recent studies support the feasibility of HPV DNA testing instead of cytology (Pap smear) as a primary test in population screening for cervical cancer. This is likely to be an option in the near future in many countries, and it would increase the efficiency of screening for cervical abnormalities. We present here a microarray test for the detection and typing of 15 most important high-risk HPV types and two low risk types. The method is based on type specific multiplex PCR amplification of the L1 viral genomic region followed by ligation detection reaction where two specific ssDNA probes, one containing a fluorescent label and the other a flanking ZipCode sequence, are joined by enzymatic ligation in the presence of the correct HPV PCR product. Human beta-globin is amplified in the same reaction to control for sample quality and adequacy. The genotyping capacity of our approach was evaluated against Linear Array test using cervical samples collected in transport medium. Altogether 14 out of 15 valid samples (93%) gave concordant results between our test and Linear Array. One sample was HPV56 positive in our test and high-risk positive in Hybrid Capture 2 but remained negative in Linear Array. The preliminary results suggest that our test has accurate multiple HPV genotyping capability with the additional advantages of generic detection format, and potential for high-throughput screening.

  17. Development of a Droplet Digital Polymerase Chain Reaction for Rapid and Simultaneous Identification of Common Foodborne Pathogens in Soft Cheese.

    PubMed

    Cremonesi, Paola; Cortimiglia, Claudia; Picozzi, Claudia; Minozzi, Giulietta; Malvisi, Michela; Luini, Mario; Castiglioni, Bianca

    2016-01-01

    Dairy products can harbor various microorganisms (e.g., Campylobacter spp., Salmonella spp., Listeria monocytogenes, verocytotoxin-producing Escherichia coli) arising from animal reservoirs, and which can become important sources of foodborne illness. Therefore, early detection of food pathogens is crucial to prevent diseases. We wished to develop an accurate quantitative protocol based on a droplet digital polymerase chain reaction (ddPCR) involving eight individual TaqMan™ reactions to detect simultaneously, without selective enrichment, Listeria spp., L. monocytogenes, Salmonella spp., verocytotoxin-producing E. coli and Campylobacter spp. in cheese. ddPCR (a "third-generation PCR") provides absolute quantification of target DNAs without requirement of a standard curve, which simplifies experimentation and data comparability. The accuracy, specificity and sensitivity of the developed ddPCR system were assessed using purified DNA from 50 reference pathogenic and non-pathogenic strains from international or Italian collections and analyzing soft cheese samples artificially contaminated with serial dilutions (from 4 × 10(6) to 4 × 10(1) CFU/g) of pure cultures from the American Type Culture Collection. Finally, the performance of our ddPCR system was compared by parallel testing with quantitative PCR: it gave higher sensitivity (10(2) CFU/g for the Listeria spp. assay) without the necessity of a standard curve. In conclusion, this is the first ddPCR system developed for simultaneous detection of common foodborne pathogens in cheese using a single set of amplification conditions. As such, it could become a useful strategy for high-throughput screening of microorganisms to evaluate the quality and safety of food products.

  18. Diagnosis of human herpes virus 1 and 2 (HHV-1 and HHV-2): use of a synthetic standard curve for absolute quantification by real time polymerase chain reaction

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Lyana Rodrigues Pinto; da Silva, Amanda Perse; Schmidt-Chanasit, Jonas; de Paula, Vanessa Salete

    2017-01-01

    The use of quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) for herpesvirus detection has improved the sensitivity and specificity of diagnosis, as it is able to detect shedding episodes in the absence of clinical lesions and diagnose clinical specimens that have low viral loads. With an aim to improve the detection and quantification of herpesvirus by qPCR, synthetic standard curves for human herpesvirus 1 and 2 (HHV-1 and HHV-2) targeting regions gD and gG, respectively, were designed and evaluated. The results show that synthetic curves can replace DNA standard curves in diagnostic herpes qPCR. PMID:28225902

  19. Diagnosis of human herpes virus 1 and 2 (HHV-1 and HHV-2): use of a synthetic standard curve for absolute quantification by real time polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Lima, Lyana Rodrigues Pinto; Silva, Amanda Perse da; Schmidt-Chanasit, Jonas; Paula, Vanessa Salete de

    2017-02-16

    The use of quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) for herpesvirus detection has improved the sensitivity and specificity of diagnosis, as it is able to detect shedding episodes in the absence of clinical lesions and diagnose clinical specimens that have low viral loads. With an aim to improve the detection and quantification of herpesvirus by qPCR, synthetic standard curves for human herpesvirus 1 and 2 (HHV-1 and HHV-2) targeting regions gD and gG, respectively, were designed and evaluated. The results show that synthetic curves can replace DNA standard curves in diagnostic herpes qPCR.

  20. Diagnosis of human herpes virus 1 and 2 (HHV-1 and HHV-2): use of a synthetic standard curve for absolute quantification by real time polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Lima, Lyana Rodrigues Pinto; Silva, Amanda Perse da; Schmidt-Chanasit, Jonas; Paula, Vanessa Salete de

    2017-03-01

    The use of quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) for herpesvirus detection has improved the sensitivity and specificity of diagnosis, as it is able to detect shedding episodes in the absence of clinical lesions and diagnose clinical specimens that have low viral loads. With an aim to improve the detection and quantification of herpesvirus by qPCR, synthetic standard curves for human herpesvirus 1 and 2 (HHV-1 and HHV-2) targeting regions gD and gG, respectively, were designed and evaluated. The results show that synthetic curves can replace DNA standard curves in diagnostic herpes qPCR.

  1. Detection of canine distemper virus by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction in the urine of dogs with clinical signs of distemper encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Saito, T B; Alfieri, A A; Wosiacki, S R; Negrão, F J; Morais, H S A; Alfieri, A F

    2006-02-01

    In a prospective study we evaluated the use of the reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in urine samples to diagnose canine distemper virus in dogs with progressive neurological disease. A fragment of the nucleoprotein gene of canine distemper virus was amplified from the urine of 22 distemper dogs. The body fluids and leukocytes of 12 asymptomatic dogs were RT-PCR negative. RT-PCR of urine samples was more sensitive than serum and leukocytes and at least as sensitive as cerebrospinal fluid to screen for distemper in dogs with neurological signs and extraneural systemic signs.

  2. Typing of Plasmodium falciparum DNA from 2 years old Giemsa-stained dried blood spots using nested polymerase chain reaction assay.

    PubMed

    Kumar, D; Dhiman, S; Rabha, B; Goswami, D; Yadav, K; Deka, M; Veer, V; Baruah, I

    2016-01-01

    A panel of 129 Giemsa-stained thick blood spots (TBS) confirmed for Plasmodium falciparum infection having different levels of parasite density were collected from a malaria endemic area. DNA was extracted and nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was performed to amplify P. falciparum DNA. Nested PCR assay successfully amplified P. falciparum DNA at a very low parasitaemia of ~10 parasites/μl of blood. Current PCR assay is very simple and can be used retrospectively to monitor the invasion and prevalence of different Plasmodium species in endemic areas.

  3. Detection of MYCN Amplification in Serum DNA Using Conventional Polymerase Chain Reaction

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Neuroblastoma (NB) is the most common extra-cranial solid tumor of childhood and is characterized by a wide range of clinical behaviors. Amplification of MYCN is a well-known poor prognostic factor in NB patients. As the MYCN amplification status is usually tested using tumor specimens, lengthy and invasive procedures are unavoidable. To evaluate the possibility of detecting MYCN amplification without invasive procedure, we performed conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis to identify MYCN amplification using the preserved serum DNA. PCR of serum DNA was done in 105 NB patients whose MYCN status had been confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization. MYCN amplification was evaluated as the ratio of signal intensities between MYCN and NAGK (M/N ratio). When regarding the tissue FISH results as a reference, 10 patients had MYCN-amplified (MNA) NB, and 95 had non-MNA NB. The M/N ratio of the MNA group (median 2.56, range 1.01-3.58) was significantly higher than that of the non-MNA group (median 0.97, range 0.67-5.18) (P < 0.001). In the receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, the area under the curve was 0.957 (95% confidence interval 0.898–1.000; P < 0.001), and it showed 90.9% sensitivity and 97.9% specificity with the selected cut-off value set as 1.6. The detection of MYCN amplification using conventional PCR analysis of serum samples seems to be a simple and promising method to evaluate the MYCN status of NB patients. Further study with a larger set of patients is needed to confirm the accuracy of this result. PMID:27510381

  4. Evaluation of a commercial in-clinic point-of-care polymerase chain reaction test for Ehrlichia canis DNA in artificially infected dogs.

    PubMed

    Waner, Trevor; Nachum-Biala, Yaarit; Harrus, Shimon

    2014-12-01

    A novel in-clinic point-of-care (ICPOC) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test was evaluated for its ability to detect Ehrlichia canis DNA in artificially infected dogs compared to a real-time PCR assay. Six Beagle dogs negative for E. canis antibodies and PCR negative were artificially infected with an Israeli E. canis strain (611). All dogs developed IgG antibodies 8 days post infection (PI), and clinical and hematological abnormalities on day 10 PI. Only the real-time PCR detected E. canis DNA in the blood of five dogs at days 3 and 5 PI. At day 12 PI during the acute phase of the disease, 1 day after the initiation of doxycycline treatment, the ICPOC PCR assay detected E. canis DNA in all infected dogs, which were also positive by the real-time PCR. Two days later the ICPOC PCR assay was able to detect only 3/6 infected dogs, which were all positive by the real-time PCR. At days 17 and 19 PI, the ICPOC PCR assay did not detect E. canis DNA in the dogs while the real-time PCR detected all dogs as positive on day 17 PI and two dogs on day 19 PI. In conclusion, the sensitivity of the ICPOC PCR assay was 75% for the acute phase of the disease and 30% for the whole study, suggesting that this ICPOC assay has a potential utility for the diagnosis of acute canine monocytic ehrlichiosis.

  5. Gene expression assay in blood and various tissues using a single-tube real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction method using an oligodeoxythymidine-immobilized polymerase chain reaction tube.

    PubMed

    Harikai, N; Saito, S; Tanaka, A; Kinoshita, K

    2009-06-01

    A single-tube real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) method has been developed which makes it possible to conduct the entire procedure, from nucleic acid extraction to product detection, in a single PCR tube. In this study, we developed the method using an oligodeoxythymidine-immobilized PCR tube, which enables simple and rapid mRNA extraction and quantification of target genes in blood and other tissues. The beta-actin gene was analyzed from lysates of blood and various tissues using this method. The data showed a good correlation between the plotted threshold cycle values and log(10) of blood and tissue amounts without a reduction in PCR efficiency. Gene expression of interleukin-1beta in blood from lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated rats and of beta(3)-adrenoceptors in adipose tissue from SHRSP.Z-Lepr (fa)/IzmDmcr (obese SHRSP) rats was also analyzed using the single-tube method, as well as a general real-time RT-PCR method, using RNA purified with a silica membrane column. In both methods, the copy number ratio of interleukin-1beta to beta-actin in LPS-stimulated rats was higher than in control rats, and the ratio of beta(3)-adrenoceptors to beta-actin in obese SHRSP rats was lower than in lean littermates. These results indicate that the single-tube method can provide results equivalent to those from general real-time RTPCR methods in gene expression analysis.

  6. [Comparison of direct microscopy, culture and polymerase chain reaction methods for the diagnosis of cutaneous leishmaniasis].

    PubMed

    Ertabaklar, Hatice; Özlem Çalışkan, Serçin; Boduç, Erengül; Ertuğ, Sema

    2015-01-01

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) is an endemic disease especially in Southeastern Anatolia of Turkey and recently shows a trend for spread to other regions of the country including the Aegean region. The diagnosis of CL is based on combined evaluation of epidemiological data with the clinical symptoms and laboratory findings. Direct microscopic examination and culture methods are mainly used in the routine diagnosis of CL, while molecular methods are mainly used for research. The aim of this study was to detect the presence of Leishmania spp. in samples obtained from CL-suspected patients by using direct microscopy, culture and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods and to compare the results. A total of 55 patients who were admitted to Parasitology Laboratory of Adnan Menderes University Hospital, Aydin (located at Aegean region in Turkey), between 2012-2014 were included in the study. Smear preparations from the skin lesions of cases were fixed and stained with Giemsa, and the presence of amastigote forms were evaluated by direct microscopy. NNN medium was used for the cultivation of samples. Total genomic DNA of Leishmania from the samples were extracted with a commercial kit (NucleoSpin Tissue(®) Kit, Macherey-Nagel, Germany) and PCR was performed by using 13A and 13B primers to amplify the 116 base pair fragment of Leishmania spp. specific kinetoplast DNA. Amastigotes were observed in 29 (53%) of the 55 samples by direct microscopy, promastigotes were detected among 34 (62%) samples in culture, and parasite-specific amplicons were revealed in 30 (55%) samples by PCR. All assays were positive in 24 patients while in 18 patients all of the tests yielded negative results. Thirty-seven (67%) out of 55 cases were diagnosed as CL when reactivity in at least one of these three methods were considered as positive. Accordingly the positivity rates of the methods were 78.4% (29/37) for direct microscopy, 92% (34/37) for culture and 81.1% (30/37) for PCR in CL

  7. Error Rate Comparison during Polymerase Chain Reaction by DNA Polymerase

    DOE PAGES

    McInerney, Peter; Adams, Paul; Hadi, Masood Z.

    2014-01-01

    As larger-scale cloning projects become more prevalent, there is an increasing need for comparisons among high fidelity DNA polymerases used for PCR amplification. All polymerases marketed for PCR applications are tested for fidelity properties (i.e., error rate determination) by vendors, and numerous literature reports have addressed PCR enzyme fidelity. Nonetheless, it is often difficult to make direct comparisons among different enzymes due to numerous methodological and analytical differences from study to study. We have measured the error rates for 6 DNA polymerases commonly used in PCR applications, including 3 polymerases typically used for cloning applications requiring high fidelity. Errormore » rate measurement values reported here were obtained by direct sequencing of cloned PCR products. The strategy employed here allows interrogation of error rate across a very large DNA sequence space, since 94 unique DNA targets were used as templates for PCR cloning. The six enzymes included in the study, Taq polymerase, AccuPrime-Taq High Fidelity, KOD Hot Start, cloned Pfu polymerase, Phusion Hot Start, and Pwo polymerase, we find the lowest error rates with Pfu , Phusion, and Pwo polymerases. Error rates are comparable for these 3 enzymes and are >10x lower than the error rate observed with Taq polymerase. Mutation spectra are reported, with the 3 high fidelity enzymes displaying broadly similar types of mutations. For these enzymes, transition mutations predominate, with little bias observed for type of transition.« less

  8. Petri dish PCR: laser-heated reactions in nanoliter droplet arrays.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hanyoup; Vishniakou, Siarhei; Faris, Gregory W

    2009-05-07

    We report high-speed real-time PCR performed on an unmodified disposable polystyrene Petri dish. The reaction cycle relies solely on an infrared laser for heating; no conventional heater is required. Nanoliter droplets of PCR mixture as water-in-oil emulsions printed in an array format served as individual PCR microreactors. A simple contact printing technique was developed to generate a large array of uniform sized nanoliter droplets using disposable pipette tips. Printed droplets showed variation of less than 10% in volume and the oil/water/polystyrene interface formed a compact droplet microreactor approximately spherical in shape. The uniform droplet array was used to optimize the laser power required for the two heating steps of PCR, annealing/extension and melting, while the ambient conditions were at room temperature. The optical heating allows for an extremely fast heating rate due to the selective absorption of the infrared laser by PCR buffer only and not the oil or polystyrene Petri dish, allowing completion of 40 amplification cycles in approximately 6 minutes. The quantitative assay capability of the system is also presented and discussed.

  9. Polymerase chain reaction-mediated gene synthesis: synthesis of a gene coding for isozyme c of horseradish peroxidase.

    PubMed Central

    Jayaraman, K; Fingar, S A; Shah, J; Fyles, J

    1991-01-01

    The synthesis of a gene coding for horseradish peroxidase (HRP, isozyme c; EC 1.11.1.7) is described using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-mediated gene synthesis approach developed in our laboratory. In this approach, all the oligonucleotides making up the gene are ligated in a single step by using the two outer oligonucleotides as PCR primers and the crude ligation mixture as the target. The PCR facilitates synthesis and purification of the gene simultaneously. The gene for HRP was synthesized by ligating all 40 oligonucleotides in a single step followed by PCR amplification. The gene was also synthesized from its fragments by using an overlap extension method similar to the procedure as described [Horton, R. M., Hunt, H. D., Ho, S. N., Pullen, J. K. & Pease, L. R. (1989) Gene 77, 61-68]. A method for combining different DNA fragments, in-frame, by using the PCR was also developed and used to synthesize the HRP gene from its gene fragments. This method is applicable to the synthesis of even larger genes and to combine any DNA fragments in-frame. After the synthesis, preliminary characterization of the HRP gene was also carried out by the PCR to confirm the arrangement of oligonucleotides in the gene. This was done by carrying out the PCR with several sets of primers along the gene and comparing the product sizes with the expected sizes. The gene and the fragments generated by PCR were cloned in Escherichia coli and the sequence was confirmed by manual and automated DNA sequencing. Images PMID:1851991

  10. Polymerase chain reaction-mediated gene synthesis: synthesis of a gene coding for isozyme c of horseradish peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Jayaraman, K; Fingar, S A; Shah, J; Fyles, J

    1991-05-15

    The synthesis of a gene coding for horseradish peroxidase (HRP, isozyme c; EC 1.11.1.7) is described using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-mediated gene synthesis approach developed in our laboratory. In this approach, all the oligonucleotides making up the gene are ligated in a single step by using the two outer oligonucleotides as PCR primers and the crude ligation mixture as the target. The PCR facilitates synthesis and purification of the gene simultaneously. The gene for HRP was synthesized by ligating all 40 oligonucleotides in a single step followed by PCR amplification. The gene was also synthesized from its fragments by using an overlap extension method similar to the procedure as described [Horton, R. M., Hunt, H. D., Ho, S. N., Pullen, J. K. & Pease, L. R. (1989) Gene 77, 61-68]. A method for combining different DNA fragments, in-frame, by using the PCR was also developed and used to synthesize the HRP gene from its gene fragments. This method is applicable to the synthesis of even larger genes and to combine any DNA fragments in-frame. After the synthesis, preliminary characterization of the HRP gene was also carried out by the PCR to confirm the arrangement of oligonucleotides in the gene. This was done by carrying out the PCR with several sets of primers along the gene and comparing the product sizes with the expected sizes. The gene and the fragments generated by PCR were cloned in Escherichia coli and the sequence was confirmed by manual and automated DNA sequencing.

  11. Evaluation of RealStar Reverse Transcription–Polymerase Chain Reaction Kits for Filovirus Detection in the Laboratory and Field

    PubMed Central

    Rieger, Toni; Kerber, Romy; El Halas, Hussein; Pallasch, Elisa; Duraffour, Sophie; Günther, Stephan; Ölschläger, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    Background. Diagnosis of Ebola virus (EBOV) disease (EVD) requires laboratory testing. Methods. The RealStar Filovirus Screen reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) kit and the derived RealStar Zaire Ebolavirus RT-PCR kit were validated using in vitro transcripts, supernatant of infected cell cultures, and clinical specimens from patients with EVD. Results. The Filovirus Screen kit detected EBOV, Sudan virus, Taï Forest virus, Bundibugyo virus, Reston virus, and Marburg virus and differentiated between the genera Ebolavirus and Marburgvirus. The amount of filovirus RNA that could be detected with a probability of 95% ranged from 11 to 67 RNA copies/reaction on a LightCycler 480 II. The Zaire Ebolavirus kit is based on the Filovirus Screen kit but was optimized for detection of EBOV. It has an improved signal-to-noise ratio at low EBOV RNA concentrations and is somewhat more sensitive than the Filovirus kit. Both kits show significantly lower analytical sensitivity on a SmartCycler II. Clinical evaluation revealed that the SmartCycler II, compared with other real-time PCR platforms, decreases the clinical sensitivity of the Filovirus Screen kit to diagnose EVD at an early stage. Conclusions. The Filovirus Screen kit detects all human-pathogenic filoviruses with good analytical sensitivity if performed on an appropriate real-time PCR platform. High analytical sensitivity is important for early diagnosis of EVD. PMID:27549586

  12. Real-Time Fluorescent Polymerase Chain Reaction Detection of Phytophthora ramorum and Phytophthora pseudosyringae Using Mitochondrial Gene Regions.

    PubMed

    Tooley, Paul W; Martin, Frank N; Carras, Marie M; Frederick, Reid D

    2006-04-01

    ABSTRACT A real-time fluorescent polymerase chain reaction (PCR) detection method for the sudden oak death pathogen Phytophthora ramorum was developed based on mitochondrial DNA sequence with an ABI Prism 7700 (TaqMan) Sequence Detection System. Primers and probes were also developed for detecting P. pseudosyringae, a newly described species that causes symptoms similar to P. ramorum on certain hosts. The species-specific primer-probe systems were combined in a multiplex assay with a plant primer-probe system to allow plant DNA present in extracted samples to serve as a positive control in each reaction. The lower limit of detection of P. ramorum DNA was 1 fg of genomic DNA, lower than for many other described PCR procedures for detecting Phytophthora species. The assay was also used in a three-way multiplex format to simultaneously detect P. ramorum, P. pseudosyringae, and plant DNA in a single tube. P. ramorum was detected down to a 10(-5) dilution of extracted tissue of artificially infected rhododendron 'Cunningham's White', and the amount of pathogen DNA present in the infected tissue was estimated using a standard curve. The multiplex assay was also used to detect P. ramorum in infected California field samples from several hosts determined to contain the pathogen by other methods. The real-time PCR assay we describe is highly sensitive and specific, and has several advantages over conventional PCR assays used for P. ramorum detection to confirm positive P. ramorum finds in nurseries and elsewhere.

  13. An integrated CMOS quantitative-polymerase-chain-reaction lab-on-chip for point-of-care diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Norian, Haig; Field, Ryan M; Kymissis, Ioannis; Shepard, Kenneth L

    2014-10-21

    Considerable effort has recently been directed toward the miniaturization of quantitative-polymerase-chain-reaction (qPCR) instrumentation in an effort to reduce both cost and form factor for point-of-care applications. Considerable gains have been made in shrinking the required volumes of PCR reagents, but resultant prototypes retain their bench-top form factor either due to heavy heating plates or cumbersome optical sensing instrumentation. In this paper, we describe the use of complementary-metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) integrated circuit (IC) technology to produce a fully integrated qPCR lab-on-chip. Exploiting a 0.35 μm high-voltage CMOS process, the IC contains all of the key components for performing qPCR. Integrated resistive heaters and temperature sensors regulate the surface temperature of the chip to an accuracy of 0.45 °C. Electrowetting-on-dielectric microfluidics are actively driven from the chip surface, allowing for droplet generation and transport down to volumes less than 1.2 nanoliter. Integrated single-photon avalanche diodes (SPADs) are used for fluorescent monitoring of the reaction, allowing for the quantification of target DNA with more than four-orders-of-magnitude of dynamic range and sensitivities down to a single copy per droplet. Using this device, reliable and sensitive real-time proof-of-concept detection of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is demonstrated.

  14. Interlaboratory validation data on real-time polymerase chain reaction detection for unauthorized genetically modified papaya line PRSV-YK.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Kosuke; Kondo, Kazunari; Akiyama, Hiroshi; Ishigaki, Takumi; Noguchi, Akio; Katsumata, Hiroshi; Takasaki, Kazuto; Futo, Satoshi; Sakata, Kozue; Fukuda, Nozomi; Mano, Junichi; Kitta, Kazumi; Tanaka, Hidenori; Akashi, Ryo; Nishimaki-Mogami, Tomoko

    2016-06-01

    This article is referred to research article entitled "Whole genome sequence analysis of unidentified genetically modified papaya for development of a specific detection method" (Nakamura et al., 2016) [1]. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) detection method for unauthorized genetically modified (GM) papaya (Carica papaya L.) line PRSV-YK (PRSV-YK detection method) was developed using whole genome sequence data (DDBJ Sequenced Read Archive under accession No. PRJDB3976). Interlaboratory validation datasets for PRSV-YK detection method were provided. Data indicating homogeneity of samples prepared for interlaboratory validation were included. Specificity and sensitivity test data for PRSV-YK detection method were also provided.

  15. A simple modification to improve the accuracy of methylation-sensitive restriction enzyme quantitative polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Krygier, Magdalena; Podolak-Popinigis, Justyna; Limon, Janusz; Sachadyn, Paweł; Stanisławska-Sachadyn, Anna

    2016-05-01

    DNA digestion with endonucleases sensitive to CpG methylation such as HpaII followed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) quantitation is commonly used in molecular studies as a simple and inexpensive solution for assessment of region-specific DNA methylation. We observed that the results of such analyses were highly overestimated if mock-digested samples were applied as the reference. We determined DNA methylation levels in several promoter regions in two setups implementing different references: mock-digested and treated with a restriction enzyme that has no recognition sites within examined amplicons. Fragmentation of reference templates allowed removing the overestimation effect, thereby improving measurement accuracy.

  16. Generation of polymerase chain reaction-specific probes for library screening using single degenerate primers.

    PubMed

    Hommes, N G; Arp, D J; Sayavedra-Soto, L A

    1995-03-01

    Degenerate oligonucleotide primers were made to peptide sequences from hydroxylamine oxidoreductase (HAO) from Nitrosomonas europaea. The primers were used singly in PCR reactions to amplify portions of the gene for HAO from genomic DNA. Southern hybridizations using fragments amplified with each primer showed that they labeled the same genomic DNA fragments. The PCR-amplified fragments were successfully used to screen a gene library for clones containing the HAO gene. The method of isolating genes by PCR with single primers has general utility.

  17. A polymerase chain reaction assay for ascosporic inoculum of Sclerotinia species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A PCR assay was developed which amplified a 170-bp fragment of the intergenic spacer region of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, the cause of white mould. Sensitivity was 10 S. sclerotiorum ascospores per DNA extraction (0.2 ascospores per PCR reaction). The presence of soil did not affect sensitivity a...

  18. Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction Detection of Angiostrongylus cantonensis DNA in Cerebrospinal Fluid from Patients with Eosinophilic Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Qvarnstrom, Yvonne; Xayavong, Maniphet; da Silva, Ana Cristina Aramburu; Park, Sarah Y.; Whelen, A. Christian; Calimlim, Precilia S.; Sciulli, Rebecca H.; Honda, Stacey A. A.; Higa, Karen; Kitsutani, Paul; Chea, Nora; Heng, Seng; Johnson, Stuart; Graeff-Teixeira, Carlos; Fox, LeAnne M.; da Silva, Alexandre J.

    2016-01-01

    Angiostrongylus cantonensis is the most common infectious cause of eosinophilic meningitis. Timely diagnosis of these infections is difficult, partly because reliable laboratory diagnostic methods are unavailable. The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of a real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay for the detection of A. cantonensis DNA in human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) specimens. A total of 49 CSF specimens from 33 patients with eosinophilic meningitis were included: A. cantonensis DNA was detected in 32 CSF specimens, from 22 patients. Four patients had intermittently positive and negative real-time PCR results on subsequent samples, indicating that the level of A. cantonensis DNA present in CSF may fluctuate during the course of the illness. Immunodiagnosis and/or supplemental PCR testing supported the real-time PCR findings for 30 patients. On the basis of these observations, this real-time PCR assay can be useful to detect A. cantonensis in the CSF from patients with eosinophilic meningitis. PMID:26526920

  19. Comparison between Culture and a Multiplex Quantitative Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction Assay Detecting Ureaplasma urealyticum and U. parvum

    PubMed Central

    Frølund, Maria; Björnelius, Eva; Lidbrink, Peter; Ahrens, Peter; Jensen, Jørgen Skov

    2014-01-01

    A novel multiplex quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) for simultaneous detection of U. urealyticum and U. parvum was developed and compared with quantitative culture in Shepard's 10 C medium for ureaplasmas in urethral swabs from 129 men and 66 women, and cervical swabs from 61 women. Using culture as the gold standard, the sensitivity of the qPCR was 96% and 95% for female urethral and cervical swabs, respectively. In male urethral swabs the sensitivity was 89%. The corresponding specificities were 100%, 87% and 99%. The qPCR showed a linear increasing DNA copy number with increasing colour-changing units. Although slightly less sensitive than culture, this multiplex qPCR assay detecting U. urealyticum and U. parvum constitutes a simple and fast alternative to the traditional methods for identification of ureaplasmas and allows simultaneous species differentiation and quantitation in clinical samples. Furthermore, specimens overgrown by other bacteria using the culture method can be evaluated in the qPCR. PMID:25047036

  20. Detection of Cryptosporidium parvum in secondary effluents using a most probable number-polymerase chain reaction assay.

    PubMed

    Tsuchihashi, Ryujiro; Loge, Frank J; Darby, Jeannie L

    2003-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to detect Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in secondary effluent samples collected from activated-sludge facilities. Serial dilutions of the purified nucleic acid extracts from the samples were made and PCR was conducted to estimate the C. parvum oocyst concentration via a Poisson distribution-based most probable number (MPN). The degree of oocysts associated with wastewater particles was also evaluated. The sensitivity of the MPN-PCR assay was 20 oocysts/PCR unit. The detection limit of the concentration, extraction, and purification protocols in phosphate buffer saline spiked with a known concentration of oocysts ranged from 1.1 to 4.6 oocysts/L; the detection limit for the wastewater samples ranged from 11 to 4200 oocysts/L depending on the extent of inhibition in each sample. The recovery efficiency of the oocysts ranged from 48 to 59% in most samples. Oocysts were found in two out of seven samples with concentrations of 203 and 308 oocysts/L, as estimated by the MPN-PCR method. The oocysts were found only in the filtrate of the grab samples; particle-associated oocysts were not detected. Association of spiked C. parvum oocysts with particles in secondary effluent drawn from wastewater plants with varying operating conditions indicated a weak correlation between the degree of association and the mean cell residence time of the system.

  1. Genetic characterization of Vibrio cholerae isolates from Argentina by V. cholerae repeated sequences-polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Castañeda, Nancy Claudia; Pichel, Mariana; Orman, Betina; Binsztein, Norma; Roy, Paul H; Centrón, Daniela

    2005-11-01

    We have developed a novel typing method based on Vibrio cholerae repeat sequences (VCR) using primers directed out of the VCR sequences. To evaluate the VCR-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) as a typing system, 2 categories, efficacy and efficiency, were analyzed in 69 strains of human and environmental V. cholerae O1 toxigenic and nontoxigenic, and non-O1 strains isolated since 1992-2000 from Argentina. The discriminatory power (0.91), stability (0.95), reproducibility (1), typeability (1), rapidity, accessibility, as well ease of use, indicated that the VCR-PCR method provides an alternative useful tool for molecular epidemiology of V. cholerae. The VCR-PCR of V. cholerae isolates showed 29 patterns, of which pattern 1 represented 68% of the V. cholerae O1 isolates, supporting the hypothesis that a clone with epidemic behavior was responsible for the epidemic in Latin America. These results showed a good correlation and a better epidemiologic analysis when the results were compared in parallel with repetitive extragenic palindromic sequences-PCR. In conclusion, VCR-PCR showed excellent performance as a typing method for cholera surveillance programs.

  2. The utility of polymerase chain reaction for diagnosis of lumpy skin disease in cattle and water buffaloes in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Sharawi, S S A; Abd El-Rahim, I H A

    2011-12-01

    An outbreak of lumpy skin disease (LSD) occurred among cattle and water buffaloes in Egypt in 2006. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and the agar gel precipitation test (AGPT) were compared. Eight of ten (80%) tissue specimens from diseased cattle were positive with AGPT while 100% were positive with PCR. Of ten tissue specimens from diseased water buffaloes, 70% were positive with AGPT while 100% were positive with PCR. Ten milk samples were obtained from diseased water buffaloes; PCR detected nucleic acid of LSD virus (LSDV) in 50% while AGPT failed to detect LSDV antigen. Water buffaloes are susceptible to LSDV infection. The clinical signs of LSD were less severe in water buffaloes, but the virus was excreted in their milk. Diagnosis of LSD outbreaks by PCR will facilitate rapid application of control measures. Mass vaccination should be applied in both cattle and water buffaloes in Egypt using an effective specific vaccine against LSD, such as the attenuated Neethling strain vaccine or a recombinant vaccine.

  3. Detection of multiple strains of Pasteurella multocida in fowl cholera outbreaks by polymerase chain reaction-based typing.

    PubMed

    Shivachandra, S B; Kumar, A A; Gautam, R; Saxena, M K; Chaudhuri, P; Srivastava, S K

    2005-12-01

    Applicability of molecular methods for the detection and differentiation of Pasteurella multocida strains involved in two separate fowl cholera outbreaks in a single poultry farm was investigated. A total of 12 and 18 strains of P. multocida obtained from two separate outbreaks were subjected to phenotypic and genotypic characterization. Phenotypically, all strains were similar; however, DNA-based techniques by employing polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays were found to be highly specific and sensitive for rapid detection and differentiation of strains. All 30 strains gave amplicons of approximately 460 bp and approximately 1,044 bp specific for P. multocida and capsular serogroup A in the Multiplex Capsular PCR typing system. Molecular typing techniques such as repetitive extragenic palindromic PCR, enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus PCR and single primer PCR differentiated all 30 strains into different profiles. However, similar patterns of genome fragments were observed among all strains following restriction endonuclease analysis using the enzyme HpaII. The current investigation revealed involvement of the same and multiple strains of P. multocida in two outbreaks. The results also indicated that molecular methods of detection and typing are rapid in comparison with conventional methods for epidemiological investigations of fowl cholera outbreaks.

  4. Detection and differentiation of filarial parasites by universal primers and polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis.

    PubMed

    Nuchprayoon, Surang; Junpee, Alisa; Poovorawan, Yong; Scott, Alan L

    2005-11-01

    Filarial nematode parasites are a serious cause of morbidity in humans and animals. Identification of filarial infection using traditional morphologic criteria can be difficult and lead to misdiagnosis. We report on a polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP)-based method to detect and differentiate a broad range of filarial species in a single PCR. The first internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) along with the flanking 18S and 5.8S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) were isolated and cloned from Wuchereria bancrofti, Brugia malayi, and Brugia pahangi. Sequence analysis identified conserved sites in the 18S and 5.8S rDNA sequence that could be used as universal priming sites to generate ITS1-distinctive PCR products that were useful for distinguishing filariae at the genus level. The addition of a digestion of the ITS1 PCR product with the restriction endonuclease Ase I generated a fragment profile that allowed differentiation down to the species level for W. bancrofti, B. malayi, B. pahangi, Dirofilaria immitis, and D. repens. The PCR-RFLP of ITS1 rDNA will be useful in diagnosing and differentiating filarial parasites in human, animal reservoir hosts, and mosquito vectors in disease-endemic areas.

  5. Rapid and sensitive electrochemiluminescence detection of rotavirus by magnetic primer based reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Fangfang; Zhou, Xiaoming; Xing, Da

    2013-01-25

    A novel method for detection of rotavirus has been developed by integrating magnetic primer based reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) with electrochemiluminescence (ECL) detection. This is realized by accomplishing RT of rotavirus RNA in traditional way and performing PCR of the resulting cDNA fragment on the surface of magnetic particles (MPs). In order to implement PCR on MPs and achieve rapid ECL detection, forward and reverse primers are bounded to MPs and tris-(2,2'-bipyridyl) ruthenium (TBR), respectively. After RT-PCR amplification, the TBR labels are directly enriched onto the surface of MPs. Then the MPs-TBR complexes can be loaded on the electrode surface and analyzed by magnetic ECL platform without any post-modification or post-incubation process. So some laborious manual operations can be avoided to achieve rapid yet sensitive detection. In this study, rotavirus in fecal specimens was successfully detected within 1.5 h. Experimental results showed that the detection limit of the assay was 0.2 pg μL(-1) of rotavirus. The ECL intensity was linearly with the concentration from 0.2 pg μL(-1) to 400 pg μL(-1). What's more, the specificity of this method was confirmed by detecting other fecal specimens of patients with nonrotavirus-associated gastroenteritis. We anticipate that the proposed magnetic primer based RT-PCR with ECL detection strategy will find numerous applications in food safety field and clinical diagnosis.

  6. Molecular typing for blood group antigens within 40 min by direct polymerase chain reaction from plasma or serum.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Franz F; Flegel, Willy A; Bittner, Rita; Döscher, Andrea

    2017-03-01

    Determining blood group antigens by serological methods may be unreliable in certain situations, such as in patients after chronic or massive transfusion. Red cell genotyping offers a complementary approach, but current methods may take much longer than conventional serological typing, limiting their utility in urgent situations. To narrow this gap, we devised a rapid method using direct polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification while avoiding the DNA extraction step. DNA was amplified by PCR directly from plasma or serum of blood donors followed by a melting curve analysis in a capillary rapid-cycle PCR assay. We evaluated the single nucleotide polymorphisms underlying the clinically relevant Fy(a) , Fy(b) , Jk(a) and Jk(b) antigens, with our analysis being completed within 40 min of receiving a plasma or serum sample. The positive predictive value was 100% and the negative predictive value at least 84%. Direct PCR with melting point analysis allowed faster red cell genotyping to predict blood group antigens than any previous molecular method. Our assay may be used as a screening tool with subsequent confirmatory testing, within the limitations of the false-negative rate. With fast turnaround times, the rapid-cycle PCR assay may eventually be developed and applied to red cell genotyping in the hospital setting.

  7. Use of extremely short Förster resonance energy transfer probes in real-time polymerase chain reaction

    PubMed Central

    Kutyavin, Igor V.

    2013-01-01

    Described in the article is a new approach for the sequence-specific detection of nucleic acids in real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using fluorescently labeled oligonucleotide probes. The method is based on the production of PCR amplicons, which fold into dumbbell-like secondary structures carrying a specially designed ‘probe-luring’ sequence at their 5′ ends. Hybridization of this sequence to a complementary ‘anchoring’ tail introduced at the 3′ end of a fluorescent probe enables the probe to bind to its target during PCR, and the subsequent probe cleavage results in the florescence signal. As it has been shown in the study, this amplicon-endorsed and guided formation of the probe-target duplex allows the use of extremely short oligonucleotide probes, up to tetranucleotides in length. In particular, the short length of the fluorescent probes makes possible the development of a ‘universal’ probe inventory that is relatively small in size but represents all possible sequence variations. The unparalleled cost-effectiveness of the inventory approach is discussed. Despite the short length of the probes, this new method, named Angler real-time PCR, remains highly sequence specific, and the results of the study indicate that it can be effectively used for quantitative PCR and the detection of polymorphic variations. PMID:24013564

  8. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis: a simple method for species identification in food.

    PubMed

    Meyer, R; Höfelein, C; Lüthy, J; Candrian, U

    1995-01-01

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique was applied to meat species identification in marinated and heat-treated or fermented products and to the differentiation of closely related species. DNA was isolated from meat samples by using a DNA-binding resin and was subjected to PCR analysis. Primers used were complementary to conserved areas of the vertebrate mitochondrial cytochrome b (cytb) gene and yielded a 359 base-pair (bp) fragment, including a variable 307 bp region. Restriction endonuclease analysis based on sequence data of those fragments was used for differentiation among species. Restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) were detected when pig, cattle, wild boar, buffalo, sheep, goat, horse, chicken, and turkey amplicons were cut with AluI, RsaI, TaqI, and HinfI. Analysis of sausages indicates the applicability of this approach to food products containing meat from 3 different species. The PCR-RFLP analytical method detected pork in heated meat mixtures with beef at levels below 1%, and the method was confirmed with porcine- and bovine-specific PCR assays by amplifying fragments of their growth hormone genes. Inter- and intraspecific differences of more than 22 animal species with nearly unknown cytb DNA sequences, including hoofed mammals (ungulates), and poultry were determined with PCR-RFLP typing by using 20 different endonucleases. This typing method allowed the discrimination of game meats, including stag, roe deer, chamois, moose, reindeer, kangaroo, springbok, and other antelopes in marinated and heat-treated products.

  9. Lab-on-a-Chip-Based PCR-RFLP Assay for the Detection of Malayan Box Turtle (Cuora amboinensis) in the Food Chain and Traditional Chinese Medicines.

    PubMed

    Asing; Ali, Md Eaqub; Abd Hamid, Sharifah Bee; Hossain, M A Motalib; Mustafa, Shuhaimi; Kader, Md Abdul; Zaidul, I S M

    2016-01-01

    The Malayan box turtle (Cuora amboinensis) (MBT) is a vulnerable and protected turtle species, but it is a lucrative item in the illegal wildlife trade because of its great appeal as an exotic food item and in traditional medicine. Although several polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays to identify MBT by various routes have been documented, their applicability for forensic authentication remains inconclusive due to the long length of the amplicon targets, which are easily broken down by natural decomposition, environmental stresses or physiochemical treatments during food processing. To address this research gap, we developed, for the first time, a species-specific PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) assay with a very short target length (120 bp) to detect MBT in the food chain; this authentication ensured better security and reliability through molecular fingerprints. The PCR-amplified product was digested with Bfa1 endonuclease, and distinctive restriction fingerprints (72, 43 and 5 bp) for MBT were found upon separation in a microfluidic chip-based automated electrophoresis system, which enhances the resolution of short oligos. The chances of any false negative identifications were eliminated through the use of a universal endogenous control for eukaryotes, and the limit of detection was 0.0001 ng DNA or 0.01% of the meat under admixed states. Finally, the optimized PCR-RFLP assay was validated for the screening of raw and processed commercial meatballs, burgers and frankfurters, which are very popular in most countries. The optimized PCR-RFLP assay was further used to screen MBT materials in 153 traditional Chinese medicines of 17 different brands and 62 of them were found MBT positive; wherein the ingredients were not declared in product labels. Overall, the novel assay demonstrated sufficient merit for use in any forensic and/or archaeological authentication of MBT, even under a state of decomposition.

  10. Lab-on-a-Chip-Based PCR-RFLP Assay for the Detection of Malayan Box Turtle (Cuora amboinensis) in the Food Chain and Traditional Chinese Medicines

    PubMed Central

    Asing; Ali, Md. Eaqub; Abd Hamid, Sharifah Bee; Hossain, M. A. Motalib; Mustafa, Shuhaimi; Kader, Md. Abdul; Zaidul, I. S. M.

    2016-01-01

    The Malayan box turtle (Cuora amboinensis) (MBT) is a vulnerable and protected turtle species, but it is a lucrative item in the illegal wildlife trade because of its great appeal as an exotic food item and in traditional medicine. Although several polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays to identify MBT by various routes have been documented, their applicability for forensic authentication remains inconclusive due to the long length of the amplicon targets, which are easily broken down by natural decomposition, environmental stresses or physiochemical treatments during food processing. To address this research gap, we developed, for the first time, a species-specific PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) assay with a very short target length (120 bp) to detect MBT in the food chain; this authentication ensured better security and reliability through molecular fingerprints. The PCR-amplified product was digested with Bfa1 endonuclease, and distinctive restriction fingerprints (72, 43 and 5 bp) for MBT were found upon separation in a microfluidic chip-based automated electrophoresis system, which enhances the resolution of short oligos. The chances of any false negative identifications were eliminated through the use of a universal endogenous control for eukaryotes, and the limit of detection was 0.0001 ng DNA or 0.01% of the meat under admixed states. Finally, the optimized PCR-RFLP assay was validated for the screening of raw and processed commercial meatballs, burgers and frankfurters, which are very popular in most countries. The optimized PCR-RFLP assay was further used to screen MBT materials in 153 traditional Chinese medicines of 17 different brands and 62 of them were found MBT positive; wherein the ingredients were not declared in product labels. Overall, the novel assay demonstrated sufficient merit for use in any forensic and/or archaeological authentication of MBT, even under a state of decomposition. PMID:27716792

  11. Real-Time PCR (qPCR) Primer Design Using Free Online Software

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thornton, Brenda; Basu, Chhandak

    2011-01-01

    Real-time PCR (quantitative PCR or qPCR) has become the preferred method for validating results obtained from assays which measure gene expression profiles. The process uses reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), coupled with fluorescent chemistry, to measure variations in transcriptome levels between samples. The four most…

  12. Detection of Erysiphe necator in Air Samples Using the Polymerase Chain Reaction and Species-Specific Primers.

    PubMed

    Falacy, Jennifer S; Grove, Gary G; Mahaffee, Walter F; Galloway, Heather; Glawe, Dean A; Larsen, Richard C; Vandemark, George J

    2007-10-01

    ABSTRACT A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay employing species-specific primers was developed to differentiate Erysiphe necator from other powdery mildews common in the northwest United States. DNA was extracted from mycelia, conidia, and/or chasmothecia that were collected from grape leaves with a Burkard cyclonic surface sampler. To differentiate E. necator from other erysiphaeceous fungi, primer pairs Uncin144 and Uncin511 were developed to select unique sequences of the internal transcribed spacer regions of E. necator. Using these primers in PCR amplifications, a 367-bp amplicon specific to E. necator was generated, but no amplicons were generated from other erysiphaceous species collected from 48 disparate hosts representing 26 vascular plant families. The PCR limit of detection was one to five conidia of E. necator placed directly into reaction mixtures or 100 to 250 conidia placed on glass rods coated with silicon grease. During field studies, this PCR assay facilitated the detection of E. necator inoculum in air samples within hours of sample rod collection and prior to disease onset. Amplification of E. necator DNA did not occur when the PCR assay was conducted on vineyard air samples collected while grapes were dormant or during periods when vine growth occurred but E. necator remained dormant. The initial PCR detection of E. necator of the season occurred during seasonal ascospore releases caused by precipitation events between bud burst and the prebloom period during the 3 years of the study. Detection ceased for 7 to 11 days following ascospore release and then resumed several days prior to the observance of microscopic symptoms and signs of powdery mildew in the field. Results of this study represent the initial step toward the goal of incorporating an inoculum availability component into current and future grapevine powdery mildew risk assessment models.

  13. Two-step polymerase chain reactions and restriction endonuclease analyses detect and differentiate ompA DNA of Chlamydia spp.

    PubMed Central

    Kaltenboeck, B; Kousoulas, K G; Storz, J

    1992-01-01

    Specific and sensitive amplification of major outer membrane protein (MOMP) gene (ompA) DNA sequences of Chlamydia species with various MOMP genotypes was achieved by a two-step polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Degenerate, inosine-containing oligonucleotide primers homologous to the 5' and 3' ends of the translated regions of all chlamydial MOMP genes were used in a PCR to amplify a DNA fragment of approximately 1,120 bp. A portion of this DNA fragment was amplified in a second genus-specific reaction that yielded a DNA fragment of approximately 930 bp. A pair of degenerate oligonucleotide primers homologous to internal sequences of the primary DNA fragment was used in this PCR. This method detected three cognate chlamydial genomes in a background of 1 microgram of unrelated DNA. MOMP genes of 13 representative chlamydial MOMP genotypes of the species C. trachomatis, C. pneumoniae, and C. psittaci were amplified. In a secondary PCR, group-specific detection was achieved by the simultaneous use of one genus-specific primer and three primers derived from different fingerprint regions of three major groups of chlamydiae. This multiplex PCR differentiated the groups by the length of the amplified DNA fragments and detected the simultaneous presence of DNA sequences of the Chlamydia spp. with different MOMP genotypes. Further differentiation as ompA restriction fragment length polymorphism types among all chlamydial strains with the various MOMP genotypes analyzed here was achieved by restriction endonuclease analysis of the secondary PCR products. DNA sequences corresponding to the ompA restriction fragment length polymorphism type B577 of C. psittaci were detected in two of seven milk samples from cases of bovine mastitis. Images PMID:1349899

  14. Development of a Droplet Digital Polymerase Chain Reaction for Rapid and Simultaneous Identification of Common Foodborne Pathogens in Soft Cheese

    PubMed Central

    Cremonesi, Paola; Cortimiglia, Claudia; Picozzi, Claudia; Minozzi, Giulietta; Malvisi, Michela; Luini, Mario; Castiglioni, Bianca

    2016-01-01

    Dairy products can harbor various microorganisms (e.g., Campylobacter spp., Salmonella spp., Listeria monocytogenes, verocytotoxin-producing Escherichia coli) arising from animal reservoirs, and which can become important sources of foodborne illness. Therefore, early detection of food pathogens is crucial to prevent diseases. We wished to develop an accurate quantitative protocol based on a droplet digital polymerase chain reaction (ddPCR) involving eight individual TaqMan™ reactions to detect simultaneously, without selective enrichment, Listeria spp., L. monocytogenes, Salmonella spp., verocytotoxin-producing E. coli and Campylobacter spp. in cheese. ddPCR (a “third-generation PCR”) provides absolute quantification of target DNAs without requirement of a standard curve, which simplifies experimentation and data comparability. The accuracy, specificity and sensitivity of the developed ddPCR system were assessed using purified DNA from 50 reference pathogenic and non-pathogenic strains from international or Italian collections and analyzing soft cheese samples artificially contaminated with serial dilutions (from 4 × 106 to 4 × 101 CFU/g) of pure cultures from the American Type Culture Collection. Finally, the performance of our ddPCR system was compared by parallel testing with quantitative PCR: it gave higher sensitivity (102 CFU/g for the Listeria spp. assay) without the necessity of a standard curve. In conclusion, this is the first ddPCR system developed for simultaneous detection of common foodborne pathogens in cheese using a single set of amplification conditions. As such, it could become a useful strategy for high-throughput screening of microorganisms to evaluate the quality and safety of food products. PMID:27840628

  15. A sensitive, specific and reproducible real-time polymerase chain reaction method for detection of Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum infection in field-collected anophelines.

    PubMed

    Bickersmith, Sara A; Lainhart, William; Moreno, Marta; Chu, Virginia M; Vinetz, Joseph M; Conn, Jan E

    2015-06-01

    We describe a simple method for detection of Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum infection in anophelines using a triplex TaqMan real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay (18S rRNA). We tested the assay on Anopheles darlingi and Anopheles stephensi colony mosquitoes fed with Plasmodium-infected blood meals and in duplicate on field collected An. darlingi. We compared the real-time PCR results of colony-infected and field collected An. darlingi, separately, to a conventional PCR method. We determined that a cytochrome b-PCR method was only 3.33% as sensitive and 93.38% as specific as our real-time PCR assay with field-collected samples. We demonstrate that this assay is sensitive, specific and reproducible.

  16. Diagnosis of. alpha. sub 1 -antitrypsin deficiency by enzymatic amplification of human genomic DNA and direct sequencing of polymerase chain reaction products

    SciTech Connect

    Newton, C.R.; Graham, A.; Powell, S.; Gammack, A.; Riley, J.; Markham, A.F. ); Kalsheker, N. )

    1988-09-12

    The authors have compared sequencing of cloned polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products and the direct sequencing of PCR products in the examination of individuals from six families affected with {alpha}{sub 1}-antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency. In families where paternity was in question they confirmed consanguinity by DNA fingerprinting using a panel of locus-specific minisatellite probes. They demonstrate that direct sequencing of PCR amplification products is the method of choice for the absolutely specific diagnosis of AAT deficiency and can distinguish normals, heterozygotes and homozygotes in a single, rapid and facile assay. Furthermore, they demonstrate the reproducibility of the PCR and a rapid DNA isolation procedure. They have also shown that two loci can be simultaneously amplified and that the PCR product from each locus can be independently examined by direct DNA sequencing.

  17. Detection of Leptospira spp. in wildlife reservoir hosts in Ontario through comparison of immunohistochemical and polymerase chain reaction genotyping methods

    PubMed Central

    Shearer, Karen E.; Harte, Michael J.; Ojkic, Davor; DeLay, Josepha; Campbell, Douglas

    2014-01-01

    A total of 460 kidney samples from wildlife (beavers, coyotes, deer, foxes, opossums, otters, raccoons, skunks) were obtained from road-kill and hunter/trapper donations in Ontario between January 2010 and November 2012. The objectives of the study were to detect Leptospira spp. by immunohistochemistry and polymerase chain reaction (PCR), to map presence of leptospires in wildlife relative to livestock and human populations, and to characterize positive samples by sequencing and comparison to leptospires known to affect domestic animals and humans. The proportion of samples that tested positive ranged from 0% to 42%, with the highest rates in skunks and raccoons. Leptospira spp. were present in kidneys of wildlife across Ontario, particularly in areas of high human density, and areas in which livestock populations are abundant. The PCR was too weak in most samples to permit genotyping and examination of the relationship between the leptospires found in this study and those affecting domestic animals and humans. PMID:24587507

  18. Clinical validation of a real-time polymerase chain reaction assay for rapid detection of Acinetobacter baumannii colonization.

    PubMed

    Blanco-Lobo, P; González-Galán, V; García-Quintanilla, M; Valencia, R; Cazalla, A; Martín, C; Alonso, I; Pérez-Romero, P; Cisneros, J M; Aznar, J; McConnell, M J

    2016-09-01

    Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based approaches have not been assessed in terms of their ability to detect patients colonized by Acinetobacter baumannii during active surveillance. This prospective, double-blind study demonstrated that a real-time PCR assay had high sensitivity (100%) and specificity (91.2%) compared with conventional culture for detecting A. baumannii in 397 active surveillance samples, and provided results within 3h. Receiver-operator curve analyses demonstrated that the technique has diagnostic accuracy of 97.7% (95% confidence interval 96.0-99.3%). This method could facilitate the rapid implementation of infection control measures for preventing the transmission of A. baumannii.

  19. Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction-based System for Simultaneous Detection of Multiple Lily-infecting Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Ji Yeon; Ryu, Ki Hyun; Choi, Sun Hee

    2013-01-01

    A detection system based on a multiplex reverse transcription (RT) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was developed to simultaneously identify multiple viruses in the lily plant. The most common viruses infecting lily plants are the cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), lily mottle virus (LMoV), lily symptomless virus (LSV). Leaf samples were collected at lily-cultivation facilities located in the Kangwon province of Korea and used to evaluate the detection system. Simplex and multiplex RT-PCR were performed using virus-specific primers to detect single-or mixed viral infections in lily plants. Our results demonstrate the selective detection of 3 different viruses (CMV, LMoV and LSV) by using specific primers as well as the potential of simultaneously detecting 2 or 3 different viruses in lily plants with mixed infections. Three sets of primers for each target virus, and one set of internal control primers were used to evaluate the detection system for efficiency, reliability, and reproducibility. PMID:25288961

  20. Multiplex polymerase chain reaction assay for the detection of minute virus of mice and mouse parvovirus infections in laboratory mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, K W; Chueh, L L; Wang, M H; Huang, Y T; Fang, B H; Chang, C Y; Fang, M C; Chou, J Y; Hsieh, S C; Wan, C H

    2013-04-01

    Mouse parvoviruses are among the most prevalent infectious pathogens in contemporary mouse colonies. To improve the efficiency of routine screening for mouse parvovirus infections, a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay targeting the VP gene was developed. The assay detected minute virus of mice (MVM), mouse parvovirus (MPV) and a mouse housekeeping gene (α-actin) and was able to specifically detect MVM and MPV at levels as low as 50 copies. Co-infection with the two viruses with up to 200-fold differences in viral concentrations can easily be detected. The multiplex PCR assay developed here could be a useful tool for monitoring mouse health and the viral contamination of biological materials.

  1. Analysis of ancient DNA from coprolites: a perspective with random amplified polymorphic DNA-polymerase chain reaction approach.

    PubMed

    Iñiguez, Alena M; Araújo, Adauto; Ferreira, Luiz Fernando; Vicente, Ana Carolina P

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this work was to determine approaches that would improve the quality of ancient DNA (aDNA) present in coprolites to enhance the possibility of success in retrieving specific sequence targets. We worked with coprolites from South American archaeological sites in Brazil and Chile dating up to 7,000 years ago. Using established protocols for aDNA extraction we obtained samples showing high degradation as usually happens with this kind of material. The reconstructive polymerization pretreatment was essential to overcome the DNA degradation and the serial dilutions helped with to prevent polymerase chain reaction (PCR) inhibitors. Moreover, the random amplified polymorphic DNA-PCR has been shown to be a reliable technique for further experiments to recover specific aDNA sequences.

  2. Exploring the limits of ultrafast polymerase chain reaction using liquid for thermal heat exchange: A proof of principle

    PubMed Central

    Maltezos, George; Johnston, Matthew; Taganov, Konstantin; Srichantaratsamee, Chutatip; Gorman, John; Baltimore, David; Chantratita, Wasun; Scherer, Axel

    2010-01-01

    Thermal ramp rate is a major limiting factor in using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for routine diagnostics. We explored the limits of speed by using liquid for thermal exchange rather than metal as in traditional devices, and by testing different polymerases. In a clinical setting, our system equaled or surpassed state-of-the-art devices for accuracy in amplifying DNA∕RNA of avian influenza, cytomegalovirus, and human immunodeficiency virus. Using Thermococcus kodakaraensis polymerase and optimizing both electrical and chemical systems, we obtained an accurate, 35 cycle amplification of an 85-base pair fragment of E. coli O157:H7 Shiga toxin gene in as little as 94.1 s, a significant improvement over a typical 1 h PCR amplification. PMID:21267083

  3. Scrub typhus induced by peripheral blood stem cell transplantation in the immunocompromised patient: diagnostic usefulness of nested polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Kang, Seung-Ji; Park, Kyung-Hwa; Jung, Sook-In; Jang, Hee Chang; Ji, Soo Young; Ahn, Jae Sook; Kim, Hyeoung Joon; Shin, Jong-Hee; Kim, Dong Min

    2010-02-01

    Scrub typhus (Orientia tsutsugamushi) is a Gram-negative rickettsial disease in parts of Asia, transmitted from wild rodents to human by mites. This is a case report of scrub typhus contraction in an acute leukemia patient by transfusion of peripheral blood stem cells collected during the incubation period. Although human-to-human transmission of scrub typhus by needle-stick injury or transplacental transmission has previously been reported, this is the first case confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and DNA sequencing. This type of incident shows the need to heighten awareness of the threat of rickettsial agents in transfused blood. Nested PCR is a useful diagnostic method to confirm the diagnosis during incubation period and in the early phase of disease, especially for immunocompromised patients.

  4. Exploring the limits of ultrafast polymerase chain reaction using liquid for thermal heat exchange: A proof of principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maltezos, George; Johnston, Matthew; Taganov, Konstantin; Srichantaratsamee, Chutatip; Gorman, John; Baltimore, David; Chantratita, Wasun; Scherer, Axel

    2010-12-01

    Thermal ramp rate is a major limiting factor in using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for routine diagnostics. We explored the limits of speed by using liquid for thermal exchange rather than metal as in traditional devices, and by testing different polymerases. In a clinical setting, our system equaled or surpassed state-of-the-art devices for accuracy in amplifying DNA/RNA of avian influenza, cytomegalovirus, and human immunodeficiency virus. Using Thermococcus kodakaraensis polymerase and optimizing both electrical and chemical systems, we obtained an accurate,