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Sample records for change empiric treatment

  1. A recent evaluation of empirical cephalosporin treatment and antibiotic resistance of changing bacterial profiles in spontaneous bacterial peritonitis.

    PubMed

    Yakar, Tolga; Güçlü, Mustafa; Serin, Ender; Alişkan, Hikmet; Husamettin, Erdamar

    2010-04-01

    The aim of this research is to evaluate the recent changes in microorganisms causing spontaneous bacterial peritonitis in cirrhotic patients, antibiotic resistance, and response to empirical cephalosporin therapy. A total of 218 patients with ascites secondary to cirrhosis were enrolled. Parenteral cefotaxime or cefepime was given to patients who had a neutrophil count of 250/mm(3) or more or a positive bacterial culture of ascitic fluid. Antibiotic failure was defined by an absence of clinical improvement and an insufficient decrease in neutrophil count of ascites (<25% of initial value) by the third day of therapy. Of all the patients, 44.6% had culture-negative neutrocytic ascites, 24.8% had spontaneous bacterial peritonitis, and 10.1% had monomicrobial nonneutrocytic bacterascites. Growth in culture was observed in 76 patients (34.9%). The two most common isolated bacteria were Escherichia coli (33.8%) and coagulase-negative Staphylococcus (CoNS; 19.7%). The two cephalosporins were effective against E. coli (82%) and but not against CoNS (44%), while levofloxacin showed reasonable activity against both E. coli (71%) and CoNS (90%) in vitro. We confirmed a recent increased incidence of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis caused by Gram-positive bacteria. Levofloxacin seems to be a good alternative treatment for patients with uncomplicated spontaneous ascites infections.

  2. Empirical studies on changes in oil governance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemal, Mohammad

    Regulation of the oil and gas sector is consequential to the economies of oil-producing countries. In the literature, there are two types of regulation: indirect regulation through taxes and tariffs or direct regulation through the creation of a National Oil Company (NOC). In the 1970s, many oil-producing countries nationalized their oil and gas sectors by creating and giving ownership rights of oil and gas resources to NOCs. In light of the success of Norway in regulating its oil and gas resources, over the past two decades several countries have changed their oil governance by changing the rights given to NOC from ownership right to mere access rights like other oil companies. However, empirical literature on these changes in oil governance is quite thin. Thus, this dissertation will explore three research questions to investigate empirically these changes in oil governance. First, I investigate empirically the impact of the changes in oil governance on aggregate domestic income. By employing a difference-in-difference method, I will show that a country which changed its oil governance increases its GDP per-capita by 10%. However, the impact is different for different types of political institution. Second, by observing the changes in oil governance in Indonesia , I explore the impact of the changes on learning-by-doing and learning spillover effect in offshore exploration drilling. By employing an econometric model which includes interaction terms between various experience variables and changes in an oil governance dummy, I will show that the change in oil governance in Indonesia enhances learning-by-doing by the rigs and learning spillover in a basin. Lastly, the impact of the changes in oil governance on expropriation risk and extraction path will be explored. By employing a difference-in-difference method, this essay will show that the changes in oil governance reduce expropriation and the impact of it is different for different sizes of resource stock.

  3. Identifying and developing empirically supported child and adolescent treatments.

    PubMed

    Kazdin, A E; Weisz, J R

    1998-02-01

    Child and adolescent therapy outcome research findings attest to the efficacy of a variety of treatments. This article illustrates promising treatments for selected internalizing (anxiety and depression), externalizing (oppositional, and antisocial behavior), and other (obesity and autism) conditions, and for other aims (preparation for medical and dental procedures). Studies in these areas illustrate worthwhile characteristics that can help inform the search for empirically supported treatments. These characteristics include randomized controlled trials, well-described and replicable treatments, tests with clinical samples, tests of clinical significance, broad-based outcome assessment including measures of real-world functioning, and others. Continued research progress will depend on greater attention to magnitude and maintenance of therapeutic change, long-term follow-up, moderators and mediators of change, and development and testing of treatment in conditions relevant to clinical practice.

  4. Issues and Controversies that Surround Recent Texts on Empirically Supported and Empirically Based Treatments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paul, Howard A.

    2004-01-01

    Since the 1993 APA task force of the Society of Clinical Psychology developed guidelines to apply data-based psychology to the identification of effective psychotherapy, there has been an increasing number of texts focussing on Empirically based Psychotherapy and Empirically Supported Treatments. This manuscript examines recent key texts and…

  5. Empirically Supported Treatment's Impact on Organizational Culture and Climate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patterson-Silver Wolf, David A.; Dulmus, Catherine N.; Maguin, Eugene

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: With the continued push to implement empirically supported treatments (ESTs) into community-based organizations, it is important to investigate whether working condition disruptions occur during this process. While there are many studies investigating best practices and how to adopt them, the literature lacks studies investigating the…

  6. An Exploration of Students' Perceptions of Empirically Supported Treatments: The Significance of Gender and Ethnicity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simons, Lori; Giorgio, Tina; Houston, Hank; Jacobucci, Ray

    2007-01-01

    A secondary analysis of a quasi-experimental study was conducted to evaluate differences in students 'perceptions of empirically supported treatments (ESTS) randomized to experimental (n= 10) and attention-control (n= 10) manual-based therapy interventions. The results indicated that attitudinal changes took place for both groups. The results…

  7. Empirically supported psychological treatments: the challenge of evaluating clinical innovations.

    PubMed

    Church, Dawson; Feinstein, David; Palmer-Hoffman, Julie; Stein, Phyllis K; Tranguch, Anthony

    2014-10-01

    Clear and transparent standards are required to establish whether a therapeutic method is "evidence based." Even when research demonstrates a method to be efficacious, it may not become available to patients who could benefit from it, a phenomenon known as the "translational gap." Only 30% of therapies cross the gap, and the lag between empirical validation and clinical implementation averages 17 years. To address these problems, Division 12 of the American Psychological Association published a set of standards for "empirically supported treatments" in the mid-1990s that allows the assessment of clinical modalities. This article reviews these criteria, identifies their strengths, and discusses their impact on the translational gap, using the development of a clinical innovation called Emotional Freedom Techniques (EFT) as a case study. Twelve specific recommendations for updates of the Division 12 criteria are made based on lessons garnered from the adoption of EFT within the clinical community. These recommendations would shorten the cycle from the research setting to clinical practice, increase transparency, incorporate recent scientific advances, and enhance the capacity for succinct comparisons among treatments.

  8. Quantifying uncertainty in climate change science through empirical information theory

    PubMed Central

    Majda, Andrew J.; Gershgorin, Boris

    2010-01-01

    Quantifying the uncertainty for the present climate and the predictions of climate change in the suite of imperfect Atmosphere Ocean Science (AOS) computer models is a central issue in climate change science. Here, a systematic approach to these issues with firm mathematical underpinning is developed through empirical information theory. An information metric to quantify AOS model errors in the climate is proposed here which incorporates both coarse-grained mean model errors as well as covariance ratios in a transformation invariant fashion. The subtle behavior of model errors with this information metric is quantified in an instructive statistically exactly solvable test model with direct relevance to climate change science including the prototype behavior of tracer gases such as CO2. Formulas for identifying the most sensitive climate change directions using statistics of the present climate or an AOS model approximation are developed here; these formulas just involve finding the eigenvector associated with the largest eigenvalue of a quadratic form computed through suitable unperturbed climate statistics. These climate change concepts are illustrated on a statistically exactly solvable one-dimensional stochastic model with relevance for low frequency variability of the atmosphere. Viable algorithms for implementation of these concepts are discussed throughout the paper. PMID:20696940

  9. Quantifying uncertainty in climate change science through empirical information theory.

    PubMed

    Majda, Andrew J; Gershgorin, Boris

    2010-08-24

    Quantifying the uncertainty for the present climate and the predictions of climate change in the suite of imperfect Atmosphere Ocean Science (AOS) computer models is a central issue in climate change science. Here, a systematic approach to these issues with firm mathematical underpinning is developed through empirical information theory. An information metric to quantify AOS model errors in the climate is proposed here which incorporates both coarse-grained mean model errors as well as covariance ratios in a transformation invariant fashion. The subtle behavior of model errors with this information metric is quantified in an instructive statistically exactly solvable test model with direct relevance to climate change science including the prototype behavior of tracer gases such as CO(2). Formulas for identifying the most sensitive climate change directions using statistics of the present climate or an AOS model approximation are developed here; these formulas just involve finding the eigenvector associated with the largest eigenvalue of a quadratic form computed through suitable unperturbed climate statistics. These climate change concepts are illustrated on a statistically exactly solvable one-dimensional stochastic model with relevance for low frequency variability of the atmosphere. Viable algorithms for implementation of these concepts are discussed throughout the paper.

  10. Well-Established and Empirically Supported Behavioral Treatments for Migraine.

    PubMed

    Penzien, Donald B; Irby, Megan B; Smitherman, Todd A; Rains, Jeanetta C; Houle, Timothy T

    2015-07-01

    This paper provides an overview of the well-established and empirically supported behavioral interventions for the treatment of migraine. The considerable evidence base addressing behavioral interventions amassed since 1969 has conclusively established the efficacy of therapies featuring combinations of relaxation, biofeedback, and stress management training, and demonstrated they are capable of yielding benefits on par with pharmacological therapies for migraine. Behavioral interventions also are well suited for delivery across a variety of different contexts (e.g., group vs. individual, standard clinic vs. limited therapist contact, face-to-face vs. technology-assisted). Despite the amply established efficacy and effectiveness of these self-management interventions for the treatment of migraine, the availability and implementation of these approaches remain limited for many headache sufferers. We anticipate the technological advances in delivery platforms will provide better access to behavioral self-management strategies for migraine.

  11. Empirically Supported Treatment's Impact on Organizational Culture and Climate.

    PubMed

    Patterson-Silver Wolf, David A; Dulmus, Catherine N; Maguin, Eugene

    2012-11-01

    OBJECTIVES: With the continued push to implement empirically supported treatments (ESTs) into community-based organizations, it is important to investigate whether working condition disruptions occur during this process. While there are many studies investigating best practices and how to adopt them, the literature lacks studies investigating the working conditions in programs that currently use ESTs. METHOD: This study compared the culture and climate scores of a large organization's programs that use ESTs and those programs indicating no EST usage. RESULTS: Of the total 55 different programs (1,273 frontline workers), 27 programs used ESTs. Results indicate that the programs offering an EST had significantly more rigid and resistant cultures, compared to those without any ESTs. In regard to climate, programs offering an EST were significantly less engaged, less functional, and more stressed. CONCLUSION: Outcomes indicate a significant disruption in organizational culture and climate for programs offering ESTs.

  12. Familiarizing Students with the Empirically Supported Treatment Approaches for Childhood Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkins, Victoria; Chambliss, Catherine

    The clinical research literature exploring the efficacy of particular treatment approaches is reviewed with the intent to facilitate the training of counseling students. Empirically supported treatments (ESTs) is defined operationally as evidence-based treatments following the listing of empirically validated psychological treatments reported by…

  13. Flood risk changes over centuries in Rome: an empirical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Baldassarre, Giuliano; Saccà, Smeralda; Tito Aronica, Giuseppe; Grimaldi, Salvatore; Crisci, Massimiliano

    2015-04-01

    Over centuries, the development of the historical city of Rome -close to one of the largest Italian rivers, the Tiber- has been intertwined with the magnitude and frequency of flooding events. The ancient Rome mostly developed on the (seven) hills, while the Tiber's floodplain was mainly exploited for agricultural purposes. A few small communities did settle in the riparian areas of the Tiber, but they had a relatively peaceful relationships with the frequent occurrence of flooding events. Nowadays, numerous people live in modern districts in the Tiber's floodplain, unaware of their exposure to potentially catastrophic flooding. The main goal of this research is to explore the dynamics of changing flood risk over the centuries between these two extreme pictures of the ancient and contemporary Rome. To this end, we carried out a socio-hydrological study by exploiting long time series of physical (flooding, river morphology) and social (urbanization, population dynamics) processes together with information about human interactions with the environment (flood defense structures). This empirical analysis showed how human and physical systems have been co-evolving over time, while being abruptly altered by the occurrence of extreme events. For instance, a large flooding event occurred in 1870 and contributed to the constructions of levees, which in turn facilitated the development of new urban areas in the Tiber's floodplain, while changed the societal memory of floods as well as the communities' perception of risk. This research work was also used to test the hypotheses of recent-developed models conceptualizing the interplay between floods and societies and simulating the long-term behavior of coupled human-water systems. The outcomes of this test provided interesting insights about the dynamics of flood risk, which are expected to support a better anticipation of future changes.

  14. Treatments for Sleep Changes

    MedlinePlus

    ... use the bed only for sleep Discourage watching television during periods of wakefulness Medications for sleep changes In some cases, non-drug approaches fail to work or the sleep changes are accompanied by disruptive nighttime behaviors. For those individuals who do require medication, experts ...

  15. Do high rates of empirical treatment undermine the potential effect of new diagnostic tests for tuberculosis in high-burden settings?

    PubMed

    Theron, Grant; Peter, Jonny; Dowdy, David; Langley, Ivor; Squire, S Bertel; Dheda, Keertan

    2014-06-01

    In tuberculosis-endemic settings, patients are often treated empirically, meaning that they are placed on treatment based on clinical symptoms or tests that do not provide a microbiological diagnosis (eg, chest radiography). New tests for tuberculosis, such as the Xpert MTB/RIF assay (Cepheid, Sunnyvale, CA, USA), are being implemented at substantial cost. To inform policy and rationally drive implementation, data are needed for how these tests affect morbidity, mortality, transmission, and population-level tuberculosis burden. If people diagnosed by use of new diagnostics would have received empirical treatment a few days later anyway, then the incremental benefit might be small. Will new diagnostics substantially improve outcomes and disease burden, or simply displace empirical treatment? Will the extent and accuracy of empirical treatment change with the introduction of a new test? In this Personal View, we review emerging data for how empirical treatment is frequently same-day, and might still be the predominant form of treatment in high-burden settings, even after Xpert implementation; and how Xpert might displace so-called true-positive, rather than false-positive, empirical treatment. We suggest types of studies needed to accurately assess the effect of new tuberculosis tests and the role of empirical treatment in real-world settings. Until such questions can be addressed, and empirical treatment is appropriately characterised, we postulate that the estimated population-level effect of new tests such as Xpert might be substantially overestimated.

  16. Psychodynamic and behavior modification approaches to the treatment of infantile autism empirical similarities.

    PubMed

    Helm, D

    1976-03-01

    In the treatment of infantile autism, behaviorists emphasize directed behavioral change while psychodynamic therapists tend to focus attention on the worker-child relationship. A review of the literature suggests that both of these aspects of intervention are important, and that both play a role in virtually all therapeutic efforts. The similarities in methods of intervention found in the work of investigators of very different theoretical persuasion raise the possibility that most treatment methods owe more to empirical clinical experience than to their presumed derivation from a theoretical model. This thesis is further examined with respect to a 50-year-old case history by Lightmer Witmer, and the work of the present writer with an 11-year-old autistic boy.

  17. Familiarizing Students with the Empirically Supported Treatment Approaches for Substance Abuse Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkins, Victoria; Chambliss, Catherine

    When training counseling students, it is important to familiarize them with the clinical research literature exploring the efficacy of particular treatments. The bulk of the document is comprised of a review of empirically supported treatments (ESTs). ESTs or evidence-based treatments are grounded in studies recommended by the American…

  18. Hypnosis Treatment of Gastrointestinal Disorders: A Comprehensive Review of the Empirical Evidence.

    PubMed

    Palsson, Olafur S

    2015-10-01

    Hypnotherapy has been investigated for 30 years as a treatment for gastrointestinal (GI) disorders. There are presently 35 studies in the published empirical literature, including 17 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that have assessed clinical outcomes of such treatment. This body of research is reviewed comprehensively in this article. Twenty-four of the studies have tested hypnotherapy for adult irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and 5 have focused on IBS or abdominal pain in children. All IBS hypnotherapy studies have reported significant improvement in gastrointestinal symptoms, and 7 out of 10 RCTs in adults and all 3 RCTs in pediatric patient samples found superior outcomes for hypnosis compared to control groups. Collectively this body of research shows unequivocally that for both adults and children with IBS, hypnosis treatment is highly efficacious in reducing bowel symptoms and can offer lasting and substantial symptom relief for a large proportion of patients who do not respond adequately to usual medical treatment approaches. For other GI disorders the evidence is more limited, but preliminary indications of therapeutic potential can be seen in the single randomized controlled trials published to date on hypnotherapy for functional dyspepsia, functional chest pain, and ulcerative colitis. Further controlled hypnotherapy trials in those three disorders should be a high priority. The mechanisms underlying the impact of hypnosis on GI problems are still unclear, but findings from a number of studies suggest that they involve both modulation of gut functioning and changes in the brain's handling of sensory signals from the GI tract.

  19. Empirically defining rapid response to intensive treatment to maximize prognostic utility for bulimia nervosa and purging disorder.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, Danielle E; Trottier, Kathryn; McFarlane, Traci; Olmsted, Marion P

    2015-05-01

    Rapid response (RR) to eating disorder treatment has been reliably identified as a predictor of post-treatment and sustained remission, but its definition has varied widely. Although signal detection methods have been used to empirically define RR thresholds in outpatient settings, RR to intensive treatment has not been investigated. This study investigated the optimal definition of RR to day hospital treatment for bulimia nervosa and purging disorder. Participants were 158 patients who completed ≥6 weeks of day hospital treatment. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to create four definitions of RR that could differentiate between remission and nonremission at the end of treatment. Definitions were based on binge/vomit episode frequency or percent reduction from pre-treatment, during either the first four or first two weeks of treatment. All definitions were associated with higher remission rates in rapid compared to nonrapid responders. Only one definition (i.e., ≤3 episodes in the first four weeks of treatment) predicted sustained remission (versus relapse) at 6- and 12-month follow-up. These findings provide an empirically derived definition of RR to intensive eating disorder treatment, and provide further evidence that early change is an important prognostic indicator.

  20. Empiric validation of a process for behavior change.

    PubMed

    Elliot, Diane L; Goldberg, Linn; MacKinnon, David P; Ranby, Krista W; Kuehl, Kerry S; Moe, Esther L

    2016-09-01

    Most behavior change trials focus on outcomes rather than deconstructing how those outcomes related to programmatic theoretical underpinnings and intervention components. In this report, the process of change is compared for three evidence-based programs' that shared theories, intervention elements and potential mediating variables. Each investigation was a randomized trial that assessed pre- and post- intervention variables using survey constructs with established reliability. Each also used mediation analyses to define relationships. The findings were combined using a pattern matching approach. Surprisingly, knowledge was a significant mediator in each program (a and b path effects [p<0.01]). Norms, perceived control abilities, and self-monitoring were confirmed in at least two studies (p<0.01 for each). Replication of findings across studies with a common design but varied populations provides a robust validation of the theory and processes of an effective intervention. Combined findings also demonstrate a means to substantiate process aspects and theoretical models to advance understanding of behavior change.

  1. Treating Asian American women with eating disorders: multicultural competency and empirically supported treatment.

    PubMed

    Smart, Rebekah

    2010-01-01

    Disordered eating and body dissatisfaction are occurring among Asian American women, but the vast majority of treatment literature is based on White Western women. Empirically supported treatments are increasingly encouraged for eating disorders, but therapists find little guidance for implementing them in a culturally sensitive manner. This paper reviews eating problems in Asian American women and explores concepts important to cultural competency in therapy. Examples of how cultural adaptations could be made to an empirically supported treatment are illustrated in a case scenario using aspects of C. G. Fairburn's Enhanced Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Eating Disorders (2008).

  2. Identifying Empirically Supported Treatments for Pica in Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagopian, Louis P.; Rooker, Griffin W.; Rolider, Natalie U.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to critically examine the existing literature on the treatment of pica displayed by individuals with intellectual disabilities. Criteria for empirically supported treatments as described by Divisions 12 and 16 of APA, and adapted for studies employing single-case designs were used to review this body of…

  3. Familiarizing Students with the Empirically Supported Treatment Approaches for Eating Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkins, Victoria; Urban, Greg; Zanotti, Mary; Chambliss, Catherine

    In recent years, bulimia nervosa has plagued young women and become a major issue in mental health care. Strategies for training counseling students so as to acquaint them with clinical research on treatments for bulimia are presented in this report. It reviews empirically supported treatments (ESTs) concerning eating disorders in order to…

  4. Familiarizing Students with the Empirically Supported Treatment Approaches for Psychophysiological Disorders and Chronic Pain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkins, Victoria; Chambliss, Catherine

    In training counseling students, it is increasingly important to acquaint them with the clinical research literature exploring the efficacy of particular treatments. This review of empirically supported treatments (EST's) concerning psychophysiological disorders and chronic pain is intended to facilitate the educational process. EST's, or…

  5. Empirical Examination of a Multicomponent Treatment for Pediatric Food Refusal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoch, Theodore A.; Babbitt, Roberta L.; Farrar-Schneider, Debra; Berkowitz, Merrill J.; Owens, J. Carl; Knight, Terry L.; Snyder, Angela M.; Rizol, Laura M.; Wise, David T.

    2001-01-01

    This paper reports on assessment and treatment of food refusal for four inpatient boys (ages 2,3,3, and 9) receiving tube feedings. It used a contingency contacting procedure extended by a component analysis. Data suggest that food refusal appeared to be maintained primarily by negative reinforcement contingencies. Caregiver responses indicated a…

  6. Assessment and treatment of PTSD after a motor vehicle collision: Empirical findings and clinical observations

    PubMed Central

    Beck, J. Gayle; Coffey, Scott F.

    2007-01-01

    Individuals who experience a serious motor vehicle accident (MVA) are at increased risk for psychological problems, particularly Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). In this article, we review the literature on PTSD among MVA survivors, with particular attention to available instruments to screen for and assess symptomatology of the disorder. Approaches to the treatment of PTSD in this population are reviewed, separated into interventions designed to prevent PTSD in unselected samples, treatment targeting individuals with Acute Stress Disorder that are designed to prevent subsequent development of PTSD, and therapy for individuals with chronic PTSD. Treatment process issues are discussed, in an effort to integrate empirical findings with clinical observations. The empirical literature suggests several approaches to treatment that have good potential outcomes, although continued work is needed to identify factors that predict treatment response, as well as augment individual-based treatment formats. PMID:18509507

  7. High Feasibility of Empiric HIV Treatment for Patients With Suspected Acute HIV in an Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Kathleen R; Arora, Sanjay; Walsh, Kristin B; Lora, Meredith; Merjavy, Stephen; Livermore, Shanna; Menchine, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Earlier intervention in acute HIV infection limits HIV reservoirs and may decrease HIV transmission. We developed criteria for empiric antiretroviral therapy (ART) in an emergency department (ED) routine HIV screening program. We assessed the feasibility and willingness of patients with suspected acute HIV infection in the ED to begin ART. A suspected acute HIV infection was defined as a positive HIV antigen antibody combination immunoassay with pending HIV-antibody differentiation test results and HIV RNA viral load. During the study period, there were 16 confirmed cases of acute HIV infection: 11 met our criteria for empiric ART and agreed to treatment, 10 were prescribed ART, and 1 left the ED against medical advice without a prescription for ART. Eight patients completed at least one follow-up visit. Empiric HIV treatment in an ED is feasible, well received by patients, and offers a unique entry point into the HIV care continuum.

  8. A Summary of Research on Test Changes: An Empirical Basis for Defining Accommodations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tindal, Gerald; Fuchs, Lynn

    This document summarizes the research on test changes to provide an empirical basis for defining accommodations for students with disabilities. It begins by providing an historical overview of special education accountability. It describes how separate special education accountability systems have evolved and summarizes information on the…

  9. Changes in Anatomy Instruction and USMLE Performance: Empirical Evidence on the Absence of a Relationship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuddy, Monica M.; Swanson, David B.; Drake, Richard L.; Pawlina, Wojciech

    2013-01-01

    Anatomy instruction has evolved over the past two decades as many medical schools have undergone various types of curricular reform. To provide empirical evidence about whether or not curricular changes impact the acquisition and retention of anatomy knowledge, this study investigated the effect of variation in gross anatomy course hours,…

  10. The DSM-5 debate over the bereavement exclusion: psychiatric diagnosis and the future of empirically supported treatment.

    PubMed

    Wakefield, Jerome C

    2013-11-01

    Valid diagnostic criteria support generalizations about treatment effectiveness, allowing progress in developing empirically supported treatments. The DSM-5 revision provides an opportunity to consider whether diagnostic changes are increasing validity. In this paper, I first offer broad suggestions for conceptually advancing diagnostic validity while awaiting greater etiological understanding. These include, for example, improving "conceptual validity" (disorder/nondisorder differentiation); extending diagnosis beyond disorders to include mismatches between normal variation and social demands ("psychological justice"); placing disorder etiology in evolutionary context as harmful failure of biologically designed functioning ("harmful dysfunction"); and taking an integrative theoretical approach to human meaning systems. The paper then examines the DSM-5's controversial decision to eliminate the major depression bereavement exclusion (BE), detailing the evidence and attendant debate. Elimination was defended by citing several hypotheses (e.g., excluded cases are similar to other MDD; exclusions risk missing suicidal cases; medication works with excluded cases), all of which were either empirically falsified or based on faulty arguments. Most dramatically, excluded cases were empirically demonstrated to have no more depression on follow-up than those who never had MDD. I conclude that BE elimination undermined rather than increased conceptual validity and usefulness for treatment research. Finally, I draw some general lessons from the DSM-5 BE debacle.

  11. A Survey of Graduate Training in Empirically Supported and Manualized Treatments: A Preliminary Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karekla, Maria; Lundgren, Jennifer D.; Forsyth, John P.

    2004-01-01

    The promotion and dissemination of empirically supported (ESTs) and manualized therapies are important, albeit controversial, developments within clinical science and practice. To date, studies evaluating training opportunities and attitudes about such treatments at the graduate, predoctoral internship, and postdoctoral levels have focused on the…

  12. Identifying Empirically Supported Treatments for Phobic Avoidance in Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jennett, Heather K.; Hagopian, Louis P.

    2008-01-01

    This paper reviews the literature regarding the treatment of phobic avoidance in individuals with intellectual disabilities. Criteria for classifying interventions as empirically supported, developed by the American Psychological Association (APA) Division 12 Task Force on Promotion and Dissemination of Psychological Procedures, were used. For…

  13. Perspectives on empirical approaches for ocean color remote sensing of chlorophyll in a changing climate

    PubMed Central

    Dierssen, Heidi M.

    2010-01-01

    Phytoplankton biomass and productivity have been continuously monitored from ocean color satellites for over a decade. Yet, the most widely used empirical approach for estimating chlorophyll a (Chl) from satellites can be in error by a factor of 5 or more. Such variability is due to differences in absorption and backscattering properties of phytoplankton and related concentrations of colored-dissolved organic matter (CDOM) and minerals. The empirical algorithms have built-in assumptions that follow the basic precept of biological oceanography—namely, oligotrophic regions with low phytoplankton biomass are populated with small phytoplankton, whereas more productive regions contain larger bloom-forming phytoplankton. With a changing world ocean, phytoplankton composition may shift in response to altered environmental forcing, and CDOM and mineral concentrations may become uncoupled from phytoplankton stocks, creating further uncertainty and error in the empirical approaches. Hence, caution is warranted when using empirically derived Chl to infer climate-related changes in ocean biology. The Southern Ocean is already experiencing climatic shifts and shows substantial errors in satellite-derived Chl for different phytoplankton assemblages. Accurate global assessments of phytoplankton will require improved technology and modeling, enhanced field observations, and ongoing validation of our “eyes in space.” PMID:20861445

  14. Perspectives on empirical approaches for ocean color remote sensing of chlorophyll in a changing climate.

    PubMed

    Dierssen, Heidi M

    2010-10-05

    Phytoplankton biomass and productivity have been continuously monitored from ocean color satellites for over a decade. Yet, the most widely used empirical approach for estimating chlorophyll a (Chl) from satellites can be in error by a factor of 5 or more. Such variability is due to differences in absorption and backscattering properties of phytoplankton and related concentrations of colored-dissolved organic matter (CDOM) and minerals. The empirical algorithms have built-in assumptions that follow the basic precept of biological oceanography--namely, oligotrophic regions with low phytoplankton biomass are populated with small phytoplankton, whereas more productive regions contain larger bloom-forming phytoplankton. With a changing world ocean, phytoplankton composition may shift in response to altered environmental forcing, and CDOM and mineral concentrations may become uncoupled from phytoplankton stocks, creating further uncertainty and error in the empirical approaches. Hence, caution is warranted when using empirically derived Chl to infer climate-related changes in ocean biology. The Southern Ocean is already experiencing climatic shifts and shows substantial errors in satellite-derived Chl for different phytoplankton assemblages. Accurate global assessments of phytoplankton will require improved technology and modeling, enhanced field observations, and ongoing validation of our "eyes in space."

  15. The effect of empiric antimicrobial treatment duration on detection of bacterial DNA in sterile surgical specimens

    PubMed Central

    Farrell, John Joseph; Wang, Huaping; Sampath, Rangarajan; Lowery, Kristin S.; Bonomo, Robert A.

    2017-01-01

    Initial antimicrobial treatment of patients with deep seated or invasive infections is typically empiric. Usually, cultures of specimens obtained from the suspected source of infection are performed to identify pathogens and guide continued antimicrobial treatment. When patients present with signs and symptoms of infection, but sterile body fluid or tissue specimens cannot be obtained in a timely fashion, growth of bacterial pathogens in culture may be inhibited following initiation of empiric antibiotic treatment. To address this clinical dilemma, we performed a prospective evaluation of conventional culture vs. PCR coupled to electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (PCR/ESI-MS) on sterile body fluids and tissues submitted to the diagnostic microbiology lab following initiation of empiric antibiotic treatment for patients with suspected infection. In this series of surgical samples, PCR/ESI-MS identified bacterial pathogen(s) in 56% (49/87) of patients with non-diagnostic cultures. Examination of patients stratified by antibiotic treatment duration demonstrated that PCR/ESI-MS sustains high rates of bacterial DNA detection over time by generalized estimating equation models (p<0.0001). PMID:28170436

  16. Training and Consultation to Promote Implementation of an Empirically Supported Treatment: A Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Beidas, Rinad S.; Edmunds, Julie M.; Marcus, Steven C.; Kendall, Philip C.

    2012-01-01

    Objective The study evaluated the efficacy of three training modalities and the impact of ongoing consultation after training. Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for anxiety among youths, an empirically supported treatment, was used as the exemplar. Participants were randomly assigned to one of three one-day workshops to examine the efficacy of training modality: routine training (training as usual), computer training (computerized version of training as usual), and augmented training (training that emphasized active learning). After training, all participants received three months of ongoing consultation that included case consultation, didactics, and problem solving. Methods Participants were 115 community therapists (mean age of 35.9 years; 90% were women). Outcome measures included the Adherence and Skill Checklist, used to rate a performance-based role-play; a knowledge test; and the Training Satisfaction Rating Scale. Results All three training modalities resulted in limited gains in therapist adherence, skill, and knowledge. There was no significant effect of modality on adherence, skill, or knowledge from pretraining to posttraining. Participants were more satisfied with augmented and routine training than with computer training. Most important, number of consultation hours after training significantly predicted higher therapist adherence and skill at the three-month follow-up. Conclusions The findings suggest that training alone did not result in therapist behavior change. The inclusion of ongoing consultation was critical to influencing therapist adherence and skill. Implications for implementation science and mental health services research are discussed. PMID:22549401

  17. Using change-point models to estimate empirical critical loads for nitrogen in mountain ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Roth, Tobias; Kohli, Lukas; Rihm, Beat; Meier, Reto; Achermann, Beat

    2017-01-01

    To protect ecosystems and their services, the critical load concept has been implemented under the framework of the Convention on Long-range Transboundary Air Pollution (UNECE) to develop effects-oriented air pollution abatement strategies. Critical loads are thresholds below which damaging effects on sensitive habitats do not occur according to current knowledge. Here we use change-point models applied in a Bayesian context to overcome some of the difficulties when estimating empirical critical loads for nitrogen (N) from empirical data. We tested the method using simulated data with varying sample sizes, varying effects of confounding variables, and with varying negative effects of N deposition on species richness. The method was applied to the national-scale plant species richness data from mountain hay meadows and (sub)alpine scrubs sites in Switzerland. Seven confounding factors (elevation, inclination, precipitation, calcareous content, aspect as well as indicator values for humidity and light) were selected based on earlier studies examining numerous environmental factors to explain Swiss vascular plant diversity. The estimated critical load confirmed the existing empirical critical load of 5-15 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1) for (sub)alpine scrubs, while for mountain hay meadows the estimated critical load was at the lower end of the current empirical critical load range. Based on these results, we suggest to narrow down the critical load range for mountain hay meadows to 10-15 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1).

  18. Factors influencing the utilization of empirically supported treatments for eating disorders.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Angela M; Milnes, Suzanne M; Anderson, Drew A

    2008-01-01

    This study expands upon previous research investigating the use of empirically supported treatments (ESTs) for eating disorders by surveying a large sample of clinicians who specialize in treating eating disorders. Surveys developed for this study were sent to 698 members of a large, professional, eating disorder organization who were listed as treatment providers on the organization's website. Despite clinicians reporting frequently using CBT techniques, most identified something other than CBT or IPT as their primary approach to treatment. In contrast with previous research, the majority had received prior training in the use of manual-based treatments. However, consistent with previous investigations, most denied regular use of such treatments. Although manual-based CBT and IPT are referred to as "treatments of choice," professional clinicians in the field are not consistently using them. Responses suggest several barriers to the utilization of ESTs in practice.

  19. Sampling of empirically supported psychological treatments from health psychology: smoking, chronic pain, cancer, and bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Compas, B E; Haaga, D A; Keefe, F J; Leitenberg, H; Williams, D A

    1998-02-01

    Interventions in health psychology and behavioral medicine represent an integral area of research for the development of psychological therapies to enhance health behaviors, manage symptoms and sequelae of disease, treat psychological symptoms and disorders, prolong survival in the face of a life-threatening illness, and improve quality of life. A sampling of interventions in health psychology and behavioral medicine is offered that meet the criteria for empirically supported treatments for smoking cessation, chronic pain, cancer, and bulimia nervosa. Evidence for empirically supported treatments is identified, along with promising interventions that do not yet meet the criteria as outlined by D. L. Chambless and S. D. Hollon (1998). Evidence for the effectiveness and clinical significance of these interventions is reviewed, and issues in this area of research are outlined.

  20. Evaluating Process Quality Based on Change Request Data - An Empirical Study of the Eclipse Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schackmann, Holger; Schaefer, Henning; Lichter, Horst

    The information routinely collected in change request management systems contains valuable information for monitoring of the process quality. However this data is currently utilized in a very limited way. This paper presents an empirical study of the process quality in the product portfolio of the Eclipse project. It is based on a systematic approach for the evaluation of process quality characteristics using change request data. Results of the study offer insights into the development process of Eclipse. Moreover the study allows assessing applicability and limitations of the proposed approach for the evaluation of process quality.

  1. Different recommendations for empiric first-choice antibiotic treatment of uncomplicated urinary tract infections in Europe

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective Uncomplicated urinary tract infection (uUTI) is a common reason for antibiotic treatment in primary health care. Due to the increasing prevalence of antibiotic-resistant uropathogens it is crucial to use the most appropriate antibiotics for first-choice empiric treatment of uUTI. Particularly, it is important to avoid antibiotics associated with a high rate of antimicrobial resistance. This study compares national recommendations from six European countries, investigating recommendations for first-choice antibiotic therapy of uUTI. Setting General practice in six European countries. Method Searches were undertaken on PubMed, the Cochrane Library databases, Google, and Google Scholar. Recommendations from different geographical regions in Europe were investigated: Northern Europe (Denmark, Sweden), Western Europe (Scotland), Central Europe (Germany), Southern Europe (Spain), and Eastern Europe (Croatia). Results The six countries recommended seven different antibiotics. Five countries recommended more than one antibiotic as first-choice treatment. Half of the countries recommended antibiotics associated with a high rate (> 10–20%) of resistant E. coli. All countries recommended at least one antibiotic associated with a low (< 5%) resistance rate. Discussion The differences in first-choice treatment of uUTI could not be explained by differences in local bacterial aetiology or by different patterns of antimicrobial resistance. Despite resistance rates exceeding 10–20%, sulphamethizole, trimethoprim. or fluoroquinolones were recommended in half of the countries. Conclusion Within the European countries there are considerable differences in recommendations for empiric first-choice antibiotic treatment of uUTI. In order to reduce the increasing antimicrobial resistance in Europe, it is important to agree on the most appropriate antibiotics for empiric treatment of uUTI. PMID:24102498

  2. Pharmacoeconomic evaluation of caspofungin versus liposomal amphotericin B in empirical treatment of invasive fungal infections in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Turner, S J; Senol, E; Kara, A; Al-Badriyeh, D; Kong, D C M; Dinleyici, E C

    2013-09-01

    Invasive fungal infections (IFIs) are a major concern within healthcare systems. This pharmacoeconomic study evaluated the use of caspofungin (CAS) versus liposomal amphotericin B (L-AmB) in the empirical treatment of IFIs within the Turkish healthcare system. A decision-analytic model was adopted, utilising data from a randomised, non-inferiority clinical trial and a panel of clinical experts in Turkey. A five-point composite outcome measure was used to evaluate both agents. Sensitivity analyses were performed. In the base-case scenario, CAS was preferred over L-AmB by Turkish Lira (TL) 3961 per patient treated, TL 12 904 per successfully treated patient and TL 3972 per death averted. One-way sensitivity analysis did not change the study outcome. Monte Carlo simulation concluded a 71.0% chance of the outcome favouring CAS. The results were most sensitive to changes in length of stay. This is the first economic evaluation of the empirical treatment of IFIs in Turkey and suggests that CAS is more cost effective than L-AmB.

  3. Estimating the Importance of Private Adaptation to Climate Change in Agriculture: A Review of Empirical Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, F.; Burke, M.

    2015-12-01

    A wide range of studies using a variety of methods strongly suggest that climate change will have a negative impact on agricultural production in many areas. Farmers though should be able to learn about a changing climate and to adjust what they grow and how they grow it in order to reduce these negative impacts. However, it remains unclear how effective these private (autonomous) adaptations will be, or how quickly they will be adopted. Constraining the uncertainty on this adaptation is important for understanding the impacts of climate change on agriculture. Here we review a number of empirical methods that have been proposed for understanding the rate and effectiveness of private adaptation to climate change. We compare these methods using data on agricultural yields in the United States and western Europe.

  4. ESTIMATION OF TREATMENT EFFECT IN A SUB-POPULATION: AN EMPIRICAL BAYES APPROACH

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Changyu; Li, Xiaochun; Jeong, Jaesik

    2016-01-01

    It is well recognized that the benefit of a medical intervention may not be distributed evenly in the target population due to patient heterogeneity and conclusions based on conventional randomized clinical trials may not apply to every person. Given the increasing cost of randomized trials and difficulties in recruiting patients, there is a strong need to develop analytical approaches to estimate treatment effect in sub-populations. In particular, due to limited sample size for sub-populations and the need for multiple comparisons, standard analysis tends to yield wide confidence intervals of the treatment effect that are often non-informative. We propose an empirical Bayes approach to combine both information embedded in a target sub-population and information from other subjects to construct confidence intervals of the treatment effect. The method is appealing in its simplicity and tangibility in characterizing the uncertainty about the true treatment effect. Simulation studies and a real data analysis are presented. PMID:26010422

  5. Impact of climate change on human infectious diseases: Empirical evidence and human adaptation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaoxu; Lu, Yongmei; Zhou, Sen; Chen, Lifan; Xu, Bing

    2016-01-01

    Climate change refers to long-term shifts in weather conditions and patterns of extreme weather events. It may lead to changes in health threat to human beings, multiplying existing health problems. This review examines the scientific evidences on the impact of climate change on human infectious diseases. It identifies research progress and gaps on how human society may respond to, adapt to, and prepare for the related changes. Based on a survey of related publications between 1990 and 2015, the terms used for literature selection reflect three aspects--the components of infectious diseases, climate variables, and selected infectious diseases. Humans' vulnerability to the potential health impacts by climate change is evident in literature. As an active agent, human beings may control the related health effects that may be effectively controlled through adopting proactive measures, including better understanding of the climate change patterns and of the compound disease-specific health effects, and effective allocation of technologies and resources to promote healthy lifestyles and public awareness. The following adaptation measures are recommended: 1) to go beyond empirical observations of the association between climate change and infectious diseases and develop more scientific explanations, 2) to improve the prediction of spatial-temporal process of climate change and the associated shifts in infectious diseases at various spatial and temporal scales, and 3) to establish locally effective early warning systems for the health effects of predicated climate change.

  6. Evaluating the use of empirical error analyses on terrestrial lidar data for geomorphic change detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbett, S.; Collins, B. D.

    2011-12-01

    The use of both terrestrial and airborne laser scanning as tools for determining geomorphic change has greatly increased the resolution at which "true" change can be determined. The data, similar to any other survey data, are subject to analytical errors originating from both the data collection and post-processing methodologies. In many cases this analytical error is the summation of three independent errors: (1) the error associated with the georeferenced position of the laser source, (2) the error associated with the projection of the laser beam, and (3) in some cases (terrestrial lidar) the error associated with combining point cloud data from multiple geospatially distinct locations. The difficulty with using the summation (RMSE) of the analytical errors is that the calculated number can be so great that actual changes are masked. Alternatively, by empirically quantifying the relative distance of key stationary objects (e.g. large rocks or other distinct objects visible in the scan data) from one scan period to another, a more robust error analysis can be calculated, where the actual change occurring can be better quantified. To explore these different methods of error analysis we use terrestrial lidar data collected multiple (5) times over a 5-year period from archeological sites in Grand Canyon National Park (GCNP), Arizona. The sites are being monitored as part of a larger effort to understand the natural and anthropogenic effects on archaeological site stability within the Colorado River corridor of the GCNP. The results show that whereas analytical errors can be as high as 5 to 8 cm (as determined by doubling the RMSE for two temporally different datasets), empirical errors indicate that actual change detection thresholds are as low as 2 cm. This improvement of the error assessment gives greater confidence and allows much lower change detection thresholding, which has improved our ability to monitor and understand ongoing geomorphic changes in the Grand

  7. Motivation Change in Therapeutic Community Residential Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgen, Keith; Kressel, David

    2010-01-01

    Latent growth curve analysis was used to assess motivation change across 3 time points for 120 therapeutic community residents. Models included the time-invariant predictor of readiness for treatment, which significantly predicted initial treatment motivation but not the rate of motivation change over time. (Contains 1 figure and 2 tables.)

  8. Climate change and the collapse of the Akkadian empire: Evidence from the deep sea

    SciTech Connect

    Cullen, H.M.; Menocal, P.B. de; Hemming, S.; Hemming, G.; Brown, F.H.; Guilderson, T.; Sirocko, F.

    2000-04-01

    The Akkadian empire ruled Mesopotamia from the headwaters of the Tigris-Euphrates Rivers to the Persian Gulf during the late third millennium B.C. Archeological evidence has shown that this highly developed civilization collapsed abruptly near 4,170 {+-} 150 calendar yr B.P., perhaps related to a shift to more arid conditions. Detailed paleoclimate records to test this assertion from Mesopotamia are rare, but changes in regional aridity are preserved in adjacent ocean basins. The authors document Holocene changes in regional aridity using mineralogic and geochemical analyses of a marine sediment core from the Gulf of Oman, which is directly downwind of Mesopotamian dust source areas and archeological sites. Results document a very abrupt increase in eolian dust and Mesopotamian aridity, accelerator mass spectrometer radiocarbon dates to 4,025 {+-} 125 calendar yr B.P., which persisted for {approximately} 300 yr. Radiogenic (Nd and Sr) isotope analyses confirm that the observed increase in mineral dust was derived from Mesopotamian source areas. Geochemical correlation of volcanic ash shards between the archeological site and marine sediment record establishes a direct temporal link between Mesopotamian aridification and social collapse, implicating a sudden shift to more arid conditions as a key factor contributing to the collapse of the Akkadian empire.

  9. Empirical likelihood based detection procedure for change point in mean residual life functions under random censorship.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying-Ju; Ning, Wei; Gupta, Arjun K

    2016-05-01

    The mean residual life (MRL) function is one of the basic parameters of interest in survival analysis that describes the expected remaining time of an individual after a certain age. The study of changes in the MRL function is practical and interesting because it may help us to identify some factors such as age and gender that may influence the remaining lifetimes of patients after receiving a certain surgery. In this paper, we propose a detection procedure based on the empirical likelihood for the changes in MRL functions with right censored data. Two real examples are also given: Veterans' administration lung cancer study and Stanford heart transplant to illustrate the detecting procedure. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Rape Treatment Outcome Research: Empirical Findings and State of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Vickerman, Katrina A.; Margolin, Gayla

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews empirical support for treatments targeting women sexually assaulted during adolescence or adulthood. Thirty-two articles were located using data from 20 separate samples. Of the 20 samples, 12 targeted victims with chronic symptoms, three focused on the acute period post-assault, two included women with chronic and acute symptoms, and three were secondary prevention programs. The majority of studies focus on posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression, and/or anxiety as treatment targets. Cognitive Processing Therapy and Prolonged Exposure have garnered the most support with this population. Stress Inoculation Training and Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing also show some efficacy. Of the four studies that compared active treatments, few differences were found. Overall, cognitive behavioral interventions lead to better PTSD outcomes than supportive counseling does. However, even in the strongest treatments more than one-third of women retain a PTSD diagnosis at post-treatment or drop out of treatment. Discussion highlights the paucity of research in this area, methodological limitations of examined studies, generalizability of findings, and important directions for future research at various stages of trauma recovery. PMID:19442425

  11. AN EMPIRICAL METHOD FOR MATERIALITY: WOULD CONFLICT OF INTEREST DISCLOSURES CHANGE PATIENT DECISIONS?

    PubMed

    Spece, Roy; Yokum, David; Okoro, Andrea-Gale; Robertson Christopher

    2014-01-01

    The law has long been concerned with the agency problems that arise when advisors, such as attorneys or physicians, put themselves in financial relationships that create conflicts of interest. If the financial relationship is "material" to the transactions proposed by the advisor, then non-disclosure of the relationship may be pertinent to claims of malpractice, informed consent, and even fraud, as well as to professional discipline. In these sorts of cases, materiality is closely related to the question of causation, roughly turning on whether the withheld information might have changed the decision of a reasonable advisee (i.e., a patient). The injured plaintiff will predictably testify that the information would have impacted his or her choice, but that self-serving testimony may be unreliable. The fact finder is left to speculate about the counterfactual world in which the information was disclosed. This Article shows how randomized vignette-based experimentation may create a valuable form of evidence to address these questions, for both litigation and policymaking. To demonstrate this method and investigate conflicts of interest in healthcare in particular, we recruited 691 human subjects and asked them to imagine themselves as patients facing a choice about whether to undergo a cardiac stenting procedure recommended by a cardiologist. We manipulated the vignettes in a 2 x 3 between-subjects design, where we systematically varied the appropriateness of the proposed treatment, which was described in terms of patient risk without the procedure (low or high), and manipulated the type of disclosure provided by the physician (none, standard, or enhanced). We used physician ownership of the specialty hospital where the surgery would be performed as the conflict of interest, disclosed or not, and the "enhanced" disclosure included notice that such relationships have been associated with biases in prescribing behavior. We found that the mock patients were

  12. Testing the robustness of the anthropogenic climate change detection statements using different empirical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imbers, J.; Lopez, A.; Huntingford, C.; Allen, M. R.

    2013-04-01

    This paper aims to test the robustness of the detection and attribution of anthropogenic climate change using four different empirical models that were previously developed to explain the observed global mean temperature changes over the last few decades. These studies postulated that the main drivers of these changes included not only the usual natural forcings, such as solar and volcanic, and anthropogenic forcings, such as greenhouse gases and sulfates, but also other known Earth system oscillations such as El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) or the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO). In this paper, we consider these signals, or forced responses, and test whether or not the anthropogenic signal can be robustly detected under different assumptions for the internal variability of the climate system. We assume that the internal variability of the global mean surface temperature can be described by simple stochastic models that explore a wide range of plausible temporal autocorrelations, ranging from short memory processes exemplified by an AR(1) model to long memory processes, represented by a fractional differenced model. In all instances, we conclude that human-induced changes to atmospheric gas composition is affecting global mean surface temperature changes.

  13. Clinical Feedback About Empirically Supported Treatments for Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Nicholas C; Newman, Michelle G; Goldfried, Marvin R

    2016-01-01

    Previous evidence for the treatment of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) has been derived principally from randomized controlled trials. As such, evidence about the treatment of OCD has unilaterally flowed from researchers to clinicians. Despite often having decades of experience treating OCD, clinicians' feedback on their clinical observations in using these treatments has not been solicited. The current study contacted clinicians for their clinical observations on empirically supported treatments for OCD to identify commonly used cognitive-behavioral techniques and their limitations in their practices. One hundred eighty-one psychotherapists completed an online survey. The average participant practiced psychotherapy for 15 years, worked in private practice, held a doctorate, and treated an average of 25 clients with OCD in their lifetime. In regard to the most common techniques, behavioral strategies involving exposure to a feared outcome and prevention of a compulsive ritual were the most frequent group of interventions, followed by techniques that attempted to identify and challenge irrational thoughts. However, the majority of participants also reported incorporating mindfulness or acceptance-based methods. Based on therapists' reports, the most common barriers to the efficacy of cognitive-behavioral interventions included limited premorbid functioning, chaotic lifestyles, controlling and critical families, OCD symptom severity, OCD symptom chronicity, and comorbidities. This study provides insight into common practices and limitations in clinical practice to inform future clinically relevant treatment research.

  14. Empirical support for a treatment program for families of young children with externalizing problems.

    PubMed

    Feinfield, Kristin Abbott; Baker, Bruce L

    2004-03-01

    We evaluated the efficacy of a manualized multimodal treatment program for young externalizing children. Families were assigned randomly to an immediate 12-week parent and child treatment condition (n = 24) or to a delayed-treatment condition (n = 23). Parents had high attendance, high satisfaction with treatment, and increased knowledge of behavior management principles. Relative to the waitlist condition, treatment parents reported statistically and clinically significant reductions in child behavior problems, improved parenting practices (i.e., increased consistency, decreased power assertive techniques), an increased sense of efficacy, and reduced parenting stress. There was a trend toward parents improving their attitudes toward their children. In considering the process of change, we found evidence that improved parenting practices mediated reductions in child behavior problems and that child improvements mediated changes in parent attitudes and stress. Five months following treatment, teachers reported significant improvements in child behaviors, whereas parents reported that reductions in child behavior problems and parenting stress were maintained.

  15. Moxifloxacin pharmacokinetic profile and efficacy evaluation in empiric treatment of community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Öbrink-Hansen, Kristina; Hardlei, Tore Forsingdal; Brock, Birgitte; Jensen-Fangel, Søren; Kragh Thomsen, Marianne; Petersen, Eskild; Kreilgaard, Mads

    2015-04-01

    When antimicrobials are used empirically, pathogen MICs equal to clinical breakpoints or epidemiological cutoff values must be considered. This is to ensure that the most resistant pathogen subpopulation is appropriately targeted to prevent emergence of resistance. Accordingly, we determined the pharmacokinetic (PK) profile of moxifloxacin at 400 mg/day in 18 patients treated empirically for community-acquired pneumonia. We developed a population pharmacokinetic model to assess the potential efficacy of moxifloxacin and to simulate the maximal MICs for which recommended pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) estimates are obtained. Moxifloxacin plasma concentrations were determined the day after therapy initiation using ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography. Peak drug concentrations (Cmax) and area under the free drug concentration-time curve from 0 to 24 h (fAUC0-24) values predicted for each patient were evaluated against epidemiological cutoff MIC values for Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Legionella pneumophila. PK-PD targets adopted were a Cmax/MIC of ≥12.2 for all pathogens, an fAUC0-24/MIC of >34 for S. pneumoniae, and an fAUC0-24/MIC of >75 for H. influenzae and L. pneumophila. Individual predicted estimates for Cmax/MIC and fAUC0-24/MIC as well as simulated maximal MICs resulting in target attainment for oral and intravenous administration of the drug were suitable for S. pneumoniae and H. influenzae but not for L. pneumophila. These results indicate that caution must be taken when moxifloxacin is used as monotherapy to treat community-acquired pneumonia caused by L. pneumophila. In conclusion, this report reveals key information relevant to the empirical treatment of community-acquired pneumonia while highlighting the robust and flexible nature of this population pharmacokinetic model to predict therapeutic success. (Clinical Trials Registration no. NCT01983839.).

  16. An Analysis of Functional Communication Training as an Empirically Supported Treatment for Problem Behavior Displayed by Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurtz, Patricia F.; Boelter, Eric W.; Jarmolowicz, David P.; Chin, Michelle D.; Hagopian, Louis P.

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines the literature on the use of functional communication training (FCT) as a treatment for problem behavior displayed by individuals with intellectual disabilities (ID). Criteria for empirically supported treatments developed by Divisions 12 and 16 of the American Psychological Association (Kratochwill & Stoiber, 2002; Task Force,…

  17. Body Composition Changes Associated With Methadone Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Sadek, Gamal E.; Chiu, Simon; Cernovsky, Zack Z.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Methadone is associated with a statistically significant increase in BMI in the first 2 years of treatment. Objectives: To evaluate the changes of body composition (bone mass, % fat, % muscle mass, % water, and basal metabolic rate) related to this increase. Patients and Methods: Changes in body composition were monitored, via bioelectrical impedance, in 29 patients in methadone treatment for opiate dependency (age 18 to 44, mean = 29.3, SD = 7.0, 13 men, 16 women). Results: Within one year from admission to treatment, a statistically significant (t-tests, P < 0.05) increase was noted in their body mass index (BMI), % of body fat, average body mass, and average basal metabolic rate, and relative decrease in their % of muscle mass and % of bone mass. Neither absolute bone mass nor muscle mass changed significantly. Conclusions: Physicians involved in care of methadone patients should recommend dietary and lifestyle changes to improve their overall health. PMID:27162765

  18. Empirical Model for Predicting Concentrations of Refractory Hydrophobic Organic Compounds in Digested Sludge from Municipal Wastewater Treatment Plants

    PubMed Central

    Deo, Randhir P.; Halden, Rolf U.

    2009-01-01

    An empirical model is presented allowing for the prediction of concentrations of hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs) prone to accumulate and persist in digested sludge (biosolids) generated during conventional municipal wastewater treatment. The sole input requirements of the model are the concentrations of the individual HOCs entering the wastewater treatment plant in raw sewage, the compound’s respective pH-dependent octanol-water partitioning coefficient (DOW), and an empirically determined fitting parameter (pfit) that reflects persistence of compounds in biosolids after accounting for all potential removal mechanisms during wastewater treatment. The accuracy of the model was successfully confirmed at the 99% confidence level in a paired t test that compared predicted concentrations in biosolids to empirical measurements reported in the literature. After successful validation, the resultant model was applied to predict levels of various HOCs for which occurrence data in biosolids thus far are lacking. PMID:20161626

  19. On the pathophysiology of migraine--links for "empirically based treatment" with neurofeedback.

    PubMed

    Kropp, Peter; Siniatchkin, Michael; Gerber, Wolf-Dieter

    2002-09-01

    Psychophysiological data support the concept that migraine is the result of cortical hypersensitivity, hyperactivity, and a lack of habituation. There is evidence that this is a brain-stem related information processing dysfunction. This cortical activity reflects a periodicity between 2 migraine attacks and it may be due to endogenous or exogenous factors. In the few days preceding the next attack slow cortical potentials are highest and habituation delay experimentally recorded during contingent negative variation is at a maximum. These striking features of slow cortical potentials are predictors of the next attack. The pronounced negativity can be fed back to the patient. The data support the hypothesis that a change in amplitudes of slow cortical potentials is caused by altered habituation during the recording session. This kind of neurofeedback can be characterized as "empirically based" because it improves habituation and it proves to be clinically efficient.

  20. Modes of response to environmental change and the elusive empirical evidence for bet hedging

    PubMed Central

    Simons, Andrew M.

    2011-01-01

    Uncertainty is a problem not only in human decision-making, but is a prevalent quality of natural environments and thus requires evolutionary response. Unpredictable natural selection is expected to result in the evolution of bet-hedging strategies, which are adaptations to long-term fluctuating selection. Despite a recent surge of interest in bet hedging, its study remains mired in conceptual and practical difficulties, compounded by confusion over what constitutes evidence for its existence. Here, I attempt to resolve misunderstandings about bet hedging and its relationship with other modes of response to environmental change, identify the challenges inherent to its study and assess the state of existing empirical evidence. The variety and distribution of plausible bet-hedging traits found across 16 phyla in over 100 studies suggest their ubiquity. Thus, bet hedging should be considered a specific mode of response to environmental change. However, the distribution of bet-hedging studies across evidence categories—defined according to potential strength—is heavily skewed towards weaker categories, underscoring the need for direct appraisals of the adaptive significance of putative bet-hedging traits in nature. PMID:21411456

  1. Treatments for Autism: Parental Choices and Perceptions of Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowker, Anne; D'Angelo, Nadia M.; Hicks, Robin; Wells, Kerry

    2011-01-01

    Empirically conducted studies of the efficacy of various treatments for autism are limited, which leaves parents with little evidence on which to base their treatment decisions (Kasari, "Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders," 32: 447-461, 2002). The purpose of this study was to examine the types of treatments in current use by families of…

  2. Globally efficient non-parametric inference of average treatment effects by empirical balancing calibration weighting.

    PubMed

    Chan, Kwun Chuen Gary; Yam, Sheung Chi Phillip; Zhang, Zheng

    2016-06-01

    The estimation of average treatment effects based on observational data is extremely important in practice and has been studied by generations of statisticians under different frameworks. Existing globally efficient estimators require non-parametric estimation of a propensity score function, an outcome regression function or both, but their performance can be poor in practical sample sizes. Without explicitly estimating either functions, we consider a wide class calibration weights constructed to attain an exact three-way balance of the moments of observed covariates among the treated, the control, and the combined group. The wide class includes exponential tilting, empirical likelihood and generalized regression as important special cases, and extends survey calibration estimators to different statistical problems and with important distinctions. Global semiparametric efficiency for the estimation of average treatment effects is established for this general class of calibration estimators. The results show that efficiency can be achieved by solely balancing the covariate distributions without resorting to direct estimation of propensity score or outcome regression function. We also propose a consistent estimator for the efficient asymptotic variance, which does not involve additional functional estimation of either the propensity score or the outcome regression functions. The proposed variance estimator outperforms existing estimators that require a direct approximation of the efficient influence function.

  3. Colonialism, Education and Social Change in the British Empire: The Cases of Australia, Papua New Guinea and Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Donoghue, Tom

    2009-01-01

    This paper focuses on the history of relations between colonialism, schooling and social change in Australia, Papua New Guinea and Ireland, countries that were once part of the British Empire. It indicates that responses to schooling ranged from acceptance and tolerance, to modification and rejection, depending on the country, the issue, and the…

  4. Changing Healthcare Providers’ Behavior during Pediatric Inductions with an Empirically-based Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Sarah R.; Chorney, Jill MacLaren; Tan, Edwin T.; Fortier, Michelle A.; Blount, Ronald L.; Wald, Samuel H.; Shapiro, Nina L.; Strom, Suzanne L.; Patel, Swati; Kain, Zeev N.

    2011-01-01

    Background Each year over 4 million children experience significant levels of preoperative anxiety, which has been linked to poor recovery outcomes. Healthcare providers (HCP) and parents represent key resources for children to help them manage their preoperative anxiety. The present study reports on the development and preliminary feasibility testing of a new intervention designed to change HCP and parent perioperative behaviors that have been previously reported to be associated with children’s coping and stress behaviors before surgery. Methods An empirically-derived intervention, Provider-Tailored Intervention for Perioperative Stress, was developed to train HCPs to increase behaviors that promote children’s coping and decrease behaviors that may exacerbate children’s distress. Rates of HCP behaviors were coded and compared between pre-intervention and post-intervention. Additionally, rates of parents’ behaviors were compared between those that interacted with HCPs before training to those interacting with HCPs post-intervention. Results Effect sizes indicated that HCPs that underwent training demonstrated increases in rates of desired behaviors (range: 0.22 to 1.49) and decreases in rates of undesired behaviors (range: 0.15 to 2.15). Additionally, parents, who were indirectly trained, also demonstrated changes to their rates of desired (range: 0.30 to 0.60) and undesired behaviors (range: 0.16 to 0.61). Conclusions The intervention successfully modified HCP and parent behaviors. It represents a potentially new clinical way to decrease anxiety in children. A recently National Institute of Child Health and Development funded multi-site randomized control trial will examine the efficacy of this intervention in reducing children’s preoperative anxiety and improving children’s postoperative recovery is about to start. PMID:21606826

  5. Developing empirically supported theories of change for housing investment and health.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Hilary; Thomas, Sian

    2015-01-01

    The assumption that improving housing conditions can lead to improved health may seem a self-evident hypothesis. Yet evidence from intervention studies suggests small or unclear health improvements, indicating that further thought is required to refine this hypothesis. Articulation of a theory can help avoid a black box approach to research and practice and has been advocated as especially valuable for those evaluating complex social interventions like housing. This paper presents a preliminary theory of housing improvement and health based on a systematic review conducted by the authors. Following extraction of health outcomes, data on all socio-economic impacts were extracted by two independent reviewers from both qualitative and quantitative studies. Health and socio-economic outcome data from the better quality studies (n = 23/34) were mapped onto a one page logic models by two independent reviewers and a final model reflecting reviewer agreement was prepared. Where there was supporting evidence of links between outcomes these were indicated in the model. Two models of specific improvements (warmth & energy efficiency; and housing led renewal), and a final overall model were prepared. The models provide a visual map of the best available evidence on the health and socio-economic impacts of housing improvement. The use of a logic model design helps to elucidate the possible pathways between housing improvement and health and as such might be described as an empirically based theory. Changes in housing factors were linked to changes in socio-economic determinants of health. This points to the potential for longer term health impacts which could not be detected within the lifespan of the evaluations. The developed theories are limited by the available data and need to be tested and refined. However, in addition to providing one page summaries for evidence users, the theory may usefully inform future research on housing and health.

  6. Use of Evidence-Based Practice Resources and Empirically Supported Treatments for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder among University Counseling Center Psychologists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Juel, Morgen Joray

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, an attempt was made to determine the degree to which psychologists at college and university counseling centers (UCCs) utilized empirically supported treatments with their posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) clients. In addition, an attempt was made to determine how frequently UCC psychologists utilized a number of…

  7. Empirically Guided Coordination of Multiple Evidence-Based Treatments: An Illustration of Relevance Mapping in Children's Mental Health Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chorpita, Bruce F.; Bernstein, Adam; Daleiden, Eric L.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Despite substantial progress in the development and identification of psychosocial evidence-based treatments (EBTs) in mental health, there is minimal empirical guidance for selecting an optimal "set" of EBTs maximally applicable and generalizable to a chosen service sample. Relevance mapping is a proposed methodology that…

  8. A Model of Therapist Competencies for the Empirically Supported Cognitive Behavioral Treatment of Child and Adolescent Anxiety and Depressive Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sburlati, Elizabeth S.; Schniering, Carolyn A.; Lyneham, Heidi J.; Rapee, Ronald M.

    2011-01-01

    While a plethora of cognitive behavioral empirically supported treatments (ESTs) are available for treating child and adolescent anxiety and depressive disorders, research has shown that these are not as effective when implemented in routine practice settings. Research is now indicating that is partly due to ineffective EST training methods,…

  9. Empirically supported treatments for panic disorder with agoraphobia in a Spanish psychology clinic.

    PubMed

    Ballesteros, Francisco; Labrador, Francisco J

    2014-10-27

    The aim of this work is to study the sociodemographic and clinical characteristics of patients diagnosed with Panic Disorder with Agoraphobia (PD/Ag), as well as the characteristics of the treatment and its results and cost in a University Psychology Clinic. Fifty patients demanded psychological assistance for PD/Ag; 80% were women, with an average age of 29.22 years (SD = 9.03). Mean number of evaluation sessions was 3.26 (SD = 1.03), and of treatment sessions, 13.39 (SD = 9.237). Of the patients, 83.33% were discharged (that is, questionnaire scores were below the cut-off point indicated by the authors, and no PD/Ag was observed at readministration of the semistructured interview), 5.5% refused treatment, and 11% were dropouts. The average number of treatment sessions of patients who achieved therapeutic success was 15.13 (SD = 8.98). Effect sizes (d) greater than 1 were obtained in all the scales. Changes in all scales were significant (p < .05). The estimated cost of treatment for patients who achieved therapeutic success was 945.12€. The treatment results are at least similar to those of studies of efficacy and effectiveness for PD/Ag. The utility of generalizing treatments developed in research settings to a welfare clinic is discussed.

  10. Type of Antifungals: Does it Matter in Empirical Treatment of Otomycosis?

    PubMed

    Navaneethan, Nagendran; YaadhavaKrishnan, Raj Prakash Dharmapuri

    2015-03-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of clotrimazole, miconazole and fluconazole in empirical treatment of otomycosis in our tertiary care hospital and to appraise possible better outcome in otomycosis. Two hundred and ninety five patients who presented with clinical otomycosis at our Melmaruvathur Adiparasakthi Institute of medical sciences were incorporated in this study. Two hundred and fourteen patients who satisfied our criteria were recognized and they were randomly alienated into three groups A, B, C. Group A patients were advised to instill clotrimazole ear drops by themselves. Miconazole cream instillation were done by our trained personal in group B patients. Group C patients were advised to use fluconazole ear drops. Patients were educated to keep ear dry and instructed to come for evaluation in first and second week after initial visit. A randomized double blinded prospective study. In the first week, clotrimazole had a good response than miconazole and fluconazole in our patients and in the second week, our patients showed a drastic response in patients instilling flucanozole ear drops compared to those using micanozole and clotrimazole. This better outcome doesn't show statistical significance since p value is 0.882. Clotrimazole drops, miconazole cream and Fluconazole drops showed almost same therapeutic efficacy in Otomycosis.

  11. Empirically Supported Family-Based Treatments for Conduct Disorder and Delinquency in Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Henggeler, Scott W.; Sheidow, Ashli J.

    2011-01-01

    Several family-based treatments of conduct disorder and delinquency in adolescents have emerged as evidence-based and, in recent years, have been transported to more than 800 community practice settings. These models include multisystemic therapy, functional family therapy, multidimensional treatment foster care, and, to a lesser extent, brief strategic family therapy. In addition to summarizing the theoretical and clinical bases of these treatments, their results in efficacy and effectiveness trials are examined with particular emphasis on any demonstrated capacity to achieve favorable outcomes when implemented by real world practitioners in community practice settings. Special attention is also devoted to research on purported mechanisms of change as well as the long-term sustainability of outcomes achieved by these treatment models. Importantly, we note that the developers of each of the models have developed quality assurance systems to support treatment fidelity and youth and family outcomes; and the developers have formed purveyor organizations to facilitate the large scale transport of their respective treatments to community settings nationally and internationally. PMID:22283380

  12. Mindfulness Meditation Training for Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder in Adulthood: Current Empirical Support, Treatment Overview, and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, John T.; Zylowska, Lidia; Kollins, Scott H.

    2015-01-01

    Research examining nonpharmacological interventions for adults diagnosed with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) has expanded in recent years and provides patients with more treatment options. Mindfulness-based training is an example of an intervention that is gaining promising preliminary empirical support and is increasingly administered in clinical settings. The aim of this review is to provide a rationale for the application of mindfulness to individuals diagnosed with ADHD, describe the current state of the empirical basis for mindfulness training in ADHD, and summarize a treatment approach specific to adults diagnosed with ADHD: the Mindful Awareness Practices (MAPs) for ADHD Program. Two case study examples are provided to demonstrate relevant clinical issues for practitioners interested in this approach. Directions for future research, including mindfulness meditation as a standalone treatment and as a complementary approach to cognitive-behavioral therapy, are provided. PMID:25908900

  13. Amoxicillin plus temocillin as an alternative empiric therapy for the treatment of severe hospital-acquired pneumonia: results from a retrospective audit.

    PubMed

    Habayeb, H; Sajin, B; Patel, K; Grundy, C; Al-Dujaili, A; Van de Velde, S

    2015-08-01

    A formulary decision was made at a large provider of acute hospital services in Surrey to replace piperacillin/tazobactam with amoxicillin+temocillin for the empiric treatment of severe hospital-acquired pneumonia. This decision was made because the use of broad-spectrum-β-lactam antibiotics is a known risk factor for Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) and for the selection of resistance. After the antibiotic formulary was changed, a retrospective audit was conducted to assess the effect of this change. Data from patients hospitalised between January 2011 and July 2012 for severe hospital-acquired pneumonia and treated empirically with piperacillin/tazobactam or amoxicillin+temocillin were reviewed retrospectively. Clinical characteristics of patients, data related to the episode of pneumonia, clinical success and incidence of significant diarrhoea and CDI were analysed. One hundred ninety-two episodes of severe hospital-acquired pneumonia in 188 patients were identified from hospital records. Ninety-eight patients received piperacillin/tazobactam and 94 amoxicillin+temocillin. At baseline, the two treatment groups were comparable, except that more patients with renal insufficiency were treated with piperacillin/tazobactam. Clinical success was comparable (80 versus 82 %; P = 0.86), but differences were observed between piperacillin/tazobactam and amoxicillin+temocillin for the rates of significant diarrhoea (34 versus 4 %, respectively; P < 0.0001) and for CDI (7 versus 0 %, respectively; P < 0.0028). This preliminary study suggests that the combination amoxicillin+temocillin is a viable alternative to piperacillin/tazobactam for the treatment of severe hospital-acquired pneumonia. This combination appears to be associated with fewer gastrointestinal adverse events. Further studies are needed to evaluate the place of amoxicillin+temocillin as empiric treatment of severe hospital-acquired pneumonia.

  14. Upscaling Empirically Based Conceptualisations to Model Tropical Dominant Hydrological Processes for Historical Land Use Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toohey, R.; Boll, J.; Brooks, E.; Jones, J.

    2009-12-01

    Surface runoff and percolation to ground water are two hydrological processes of concern to the Atlantic slope of Costa Rica because of their impacts on flooding and drinking water contamination. As per legislation, the Costa Rican Government funds land use management from the farm to the regional scale to improve or conserve hydrological ecosystem services. In this study, we examined how land use (e.g., forest, coffee, sugar cane, and pasture) affects hydrological response at the point, plot (1 m2), and the field scale (1-6ha) to empirically conceptualize the dominant hydrological processes in each land use. Using our field data, we upscaled these conceptual processes into a physically-based distributed hydrological model at the field, watershed (130 km2), and regional (1500 km2) scales. At the point and plot scales, the presence of macropores and large roots promoted greater vertical percolation and subsurface connectivity in the forest and coffee field sites. The lack of macropores and large roots, plus the addition of management artifacts (e.g., surface compaction and a plough layer), altered the dominant hydrological processes by increasing lateral flow and surface runoff in the pasture and sugar cane field sites. Macropores and topography were major influences on runoff generation at the field scale. Also at the field scale, antecedent moisture conditions suggest a threshold behavior as a temporal control on surface runoff generation. However, in this tropical climate with very intense rainstorms, annual surface runoff was less than 10% of annual precipitation at the field scale. Significant differences in soil and hydrological characteristics observed at the point and plot scales appear to have less significance when upscaled to the field scale. At the point and plot scales, percolation acted as the dominant hydrological process in this tropical environment. However, at the field scale for sugar cane and pasture sites, saturation-excess runoff increased as

  15. Organizational Readiness for Change and Opinions toward Treatment Innovations

    PubMed Central

    Fuller, Bret E.; Rieckmann, Traci; Nunes, Edward V.; Miller, Michael; Arfken, Cynthia; Edmundson, Eldon; McCarty, Dennis

    2007-01-01

    Program administrators and staff in treatment programs participating in the National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network (CTN) completed surveys to characterize participating programs and practitioners. A two-level random effects regression model assessed the influence of Organizational Readiness for Change (ORC) and organizational attributes on opinions toward the use of four evidence-based practices (manualized treatments, medication, integrated mental health services, and motivational incentives) and practices with less empirical support (confrontation and noncompliance discharge). The ORC Scales suggested greater support for evidence-based practices in programs where staff perceived more program need for improvement, better Internet access, higher levels of peer influence, more opportunities for professional growth, a stronger sense of organizational mission and more organizational stress. Support for confrontation and noncompliance discharge, in contrast, was strong when staff saw less opportunity for professional growth, weaker peer influence, less Internet access, and perceived less organizational stress. The analysis provides evidence of the ORC’s utility in assessing agency strengths and needs during the implementation of evidence-based practices. PMID:17434708

  16. An Empirical Assessment of an Activity to Teach Sensory Change in Aging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickinson, Paige E.; Schwarzmueller, April; Martin, Bret

    2014-01-01

    This study empirically tested the effectiveness of a brief, inexpensive aging simulation activity to educate traditional-aged students about sensory declines and their potential causes in older adulthood development. Students in a life-span development course wore specific props (e.g., thick gloves, earplugs, and obscured glasses) to simulate…

  17. Treatment of specific phobias with Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR): protocol, empirical status, and conceptual issues.

    PubMed

    De Jongh, A; Ten Broeke, E; Renssen, M R

    1999-01-01

    This paper considers the current empirical status of Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) as a treatment method for specific phobias, along with some conceptual and practical issues in relation to its use. Both uncontrolled and controlled studies on the application of EMDR with specific phobias demonstrate that EMDR can produce significant improvements within a limited number of sessions. With regard to the treatment of childhood spider phobia, EMDR has been found to be more effective than a placebo control condition, but less effective than exposure in vivo. The empirical support for EMDR with specific phobias is still meagre, therefore, one should remain cautious. However, given that there is insufficient research to validate any method for complex or trauma related phobias, that EMDR is a time-limited procedure, and that it can be used in cases for which an exposure in vivo approach is difficult to administer, the application of EMDR with specific phobias merits further clinical and research attention.

  18. Abnormal epidermal changes after argon laser treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Neumann, R.A.; Knobler, R.M.; Aberer, E.; Klein, W.; Kocsis, F.; Ott, E. )

    1991-02-01

    A 26-year-old woman with a congenital port-wine stain on the forehead was treated three times at 2-month intervals with an argon laser. Six months after the last treatment, moderate blanching and mild scaling confined to the treated area was observed. A biopsy specimen of the treated area revealed a significant decrease in ectatic vessels. However, epidermal changes similar to those of actinic keratosis with disorganized cell layers and marked cytologic abnormalities were seen. Analysis of peripheral blood lymphocytes for a defect in DNA repair was negative. Multiple, argon laser-induced photothermal effects may be responsible for the changes observed in our case and may lead to premalignant epidermal transformation.

  19. Routine Treatment of Cervical Cytological Cell Changes

    PubMed Central

    Huber, J.; Pötsch, B.; Gantschacher, M.; Templ, M.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Diagnosis and treatment of vaginal and cervical cytological cell changes are described in European and national guidelines. The aim of this data collection was to evaluate the remission rates of PAP III and PAP III D cytological findings in patients over a period of 3–4 months. Method: The current state of affairs in managing suspicious and cytological findings (PAP III, and III D) in gynecological practice was assessed in the context of a data collection survey. An evaluation over a period of 24 months was conducted on preventative measures, the occurrence and changes to normal/suspect/pathological findings and therapy management (for suspicious or pathological findings). Results: 307 female patients were included in the analysis. At the time of the survey 186 patients (60.6 %) had PAP III and 119 (38.8 %) had PAP III D findings. The spontaneous remission rate of untreated PAP III patients was 6 % and that of untreated PAP III D patients was 11 %. The remission rates of patients treated with a vaginal gel were 77 % for PAP III and 71 % for PAP III D. Conclusion: A new treatment option was used in gynecological practice on patients with PAP III and PAP III D findings between confirmation and the next follow-up with excellent success. PMID:27761030

  20. A prospective, randomized study of empirical antifungal therapy for the treatment of chemotherapy-induced febrile neutropenia in children.

    PubMed

    Caselli, Désirée; Cesaro, Simone; Ziino, Ottavio; Ragusa, Pietro; Pontillo, Alfredo; Pegoraro, Anna; Santoro, Nicola; Zanazzo, Giulio; Poggi, Vincenzo; Giacchino, Mareva; Livadiotti, Susanna; Melchionda, Fraia; Chiodi, Marcello; Aricò, Maurizio

    2012-07-01

    Given that the rationale for empirical antifungal therapy in neutropenic children is limited and based on adult patient data, we performed a prospective, randomized, controlled trial that evaluated 110 neutropenic children with persistent fever. Those at high risk for invasive fungal infections (IFI) received caspofungin (Arm C) or liposomal amphotericinB (Arm B); those with a lower risk were randomized to receive Arm B, C, or no antifungal treatment (Arm A). Complete response to empirical antifungal therapy was achieved in 90/104 patients (86·5%): 48/56 at high risk (85·7%) [88·0% in Arm B; 83·9% in Arm C (P = 0·72)], and 42/48 at low risk (87·5%) [87·5% in control Arm A, 80·0% Arm B, 94·1% Arm C; (P = 0·41)]. None of the variables tested by multiple logistic regression analysis showed a significant effect on the probability to achieve complete response. IFI was diagnosed in nine patients (8·2%, 95% confidence interval, 3·8-15·0). This randomized controlled study showed that empirical antifungal therapy was of no advantage in terms of survival without fever and IFI in patients aged <18 years and defined with low risk of IFI. Higher risk patients, including those with relapsed cancer, appear to be the target for empirical antifungal therapy during protracted febrile neutropenia.

  1. Two Simple Rules for Improving the Accuracy of Empiric Treatment of Multidrug-Resistant Urinary Tract Infections.

    PubMed

    Linsenmeyer, Katherine; Strymish, Judith; Gupta, Kalpana

    2015-12-01

    The emergence of multidrug-resistant (MDR) uropathogens is making the treatment of urinary tract infections (UTIs) more challenging. We sought to evaluate the accuracy of empiric therapy for MDR UTIs and the utility of prior culture data in improving the accuracy of the therapy chosen. The electronic health records from three U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs facilities were retrospectively reviewed for the treatments used for MDR UTIs over 4 years. An MDR UTI was defined as an infection caused by a uropathogen resistant to three or more classes of drugs and identified by a clinician to require therapy. Previous data on culture results, antimicrobial use, and outcomes were captured from records from inpatient and outpatient settings. Among 126 patient episodes of MDR UTIs, the choices of empiric therapy against the index pathogen were accurate in 66 (52%) episodes. For the 95 patient episodes for which prior microbiologic data were available, when empiric therapy was concordant with the prior microbiologic data, the rate of accuracy of the treatment against the uropathogen improved from 32% to 76% (odds ratio, 6.9; 95% confidence interval, 2.7 to 17.1; P < 0.001). Genitourinary tract (GU)-directed agents (nitrofurantoin or sulfa agents) were equally as likely as broad-spectrum agents to be accurate (P = 0.3). Choosing an agent concordant with previous microbiologic data significantly increased the chance of accuracy of therapy for MDR UTIs, even if the previous uropathogen was a different species. Also, GU-directed or broad-spectrum therapy choices were equally likely to be accurate. The accuracy of empiric therapy could be improved by the use of these simple rules.

  2. Two Simple Rules for Improving the Accuracy of Empiric Treatment of Multidrug-Resistant Urinary Tract Infections

    PubMed Central

    Strymish, Judith; Gupta, Kalpana

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of multidrug-resistant (MDR) uropathogens is making the treatment of urinary tract infections (UTIs) more challenging. We sought to evaluate the accuracy of empiric therapy for MDR UTIs and the utility of prior culture data in improving the accuracy of the therapy chosen. The electronic health records from three U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs facilities were retrospectively reviewed for the treatments used for MDR UTIs over 4 years. An MDR UTI was defined as an infection caused by a uropathogen resistant to three or more classes of drugs and identified by a clinician to require therapy. Previous data on culture results, antimicrobial use, and outcomes were captured from records from inpatient and outpatient settings. Among 126 patient episodes of MDR UTIs, the choices of empiric therapy against the index pathogen were accurate in 66 (52%) episodes. For the 95 patient episodes for which prior microbiologic data were available, when empiric therapy was concordant with the prior microbiologic data, the rate of accuracy of the treatment against the uropathogen improved from 32% to 76% (odds ratio, 6.9; 95% confidence interval, 2.7 to 17.1; P < 0.001). Genitourinary tract (GU)-directed agents (nitrofurantoin or sulfa agents) were equally as likely as broad-spectrum agents to be accurate (P = 0.3). Choosing an agent concordant with previous microbiologic data significantly increased the chance of accuracy of therapy for MDR UTIs, even if the previous uropathogen was a different species. Also, GU-directed or broad-spectrum therapy choices were equally likely to be accurate. The accuracy of empiric therapy could be improved by the use of these simple rules. PMID:26416859

  3. Treatment Utility of Functional versus Empiric Assessment within Consultation for Reading Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beavers, Karen F.; Kratochwill, Thomas R.; Braden, Jeffery P.

    2004-01-01

    In this study, 18 teachers and 32 of their students who had reading difficulties were randomly assigned to one of two assessment conditions. In the functional assessment condition, consultants identified functional relationships among environmental events and targeted reading behaviors to develop an intervention plan. In the empiric condition,…

  4. Naturalistic Developmental Behavioral Interventions: Empirically Validated Treatments for Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schreibman, Laura; Dawson, Geraldine; Stahmer, Aubyn C.; Landa, Rebecca; Rogers, Sally J.; McGee, Gail G.; Kasari, Connie; Ingersoll, Brooke; Kaiser, Ann P.; Bruinsma, Yvonne; McNerney, Erin; Wetherby, Amy; Halladay, Alycia

    2015-01-01

    Earlier autism diagnosis, the importance of early intervention, and development of specific interventions for young children have contributed to the emergence of similar, empirically supported, autism interventions that represent the merging of applied behavioral and developmental sciences. "Naturalistic Developmental Behavioral Interventions…

  5. Evaluating the Validity of Systematic Reviews to Identify Empirically Supported Treatments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slocum, Timothy A.; Detrich, Ronnie; Spencer, Trina D.

    2012-01-01

    The "best available evidence" is one of the three basic inputs into evidence-based practice. This paper sets out a framework for evaluating the quality of systematic reviews that are intended to identify empirically supported interventions as a way of summarizing the best available evidence. The premise of this paper is that the process of…

  6. Identification of sudden stiffness changes in the acceleration response of a bridge to moving loads using ensemble empirical mode decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aied, H.; González, A.; Cantero, D.

    2016-01-01

    The growth of heavy traffic together with aggressive environmental loads poses a threat to the safety of an aging bridge stock. Often, damage is only detected via visual inspection at a point when repairing costs can be quite significant. Ideally, bridge managers would want to identify a stiffness change as soon as possible, i.e., as it is occurring, to plan for prompt measures before reaching a prohibitive cost. Recent developments in signal processing techniques such as wavelet analysis and empirical mode decomposition (EMD) have aimed to address this need by identifying a stiffness change from a localised feature in the structural response to traffic. However, the effectiveness of these techniques is limited by the roughness of the road profile, the vehicle speed and the noise level. In this paper, ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD) is applied by the first time to the acceleration response of a bridge model to a moving load with the purpose of capturing sudden stiffness changes. EEMD is more adaptive and appears to be better suited to non-linear signals than wavelets, and it reduces the mode mixing problem present in EMD. EEMD is tested in a variety of theoretical 3D vehicle-bridge interaction scenarios. Stiffness changes are successfully identified, even for small affected regions, relatively poor profiles, high vehicle speeds and significant noise. The latter is due to the ability of EEMD to separate high frequency components associated to sudden stiffness changes from other frequency components associated to the vehicle-bridge interaction system.

  7. Mindfulness-based treatment to prevent addictive behavior relapse: theoretical models and hypothesized mechanisms of change.

    PubMed

    Witkiewitz, Katie; Bowen, Sarah; Harrop, Erin N; Douglas, Haley; Enkema, Matthew; Sedgwick, Carly

    2014-04-01

    Mindfulness-based treatments are growing in popularity among addiction treatment providers, and several studies suggest the efficacy of incorporating mindfulness practices into the treatment of addiction, including the treatment of substance use disorders and behavioral addictions (i.e., gambling). The current paper provides a review of theoretical models of mindfulness in the treatment of addiction and several hypothesized mechanisms of change. We provide an overview of mindfulness-based relapse prevention (MBRP), including session content, treatment targets, and client feedback from participants who have received MBRP in the context of empirical studies. Future research directions regarding operationalization and measurement, identifying factors that moderate treatment effects, and protocol adaptations for specific populations are discussed.

  8. Naturalistic Developmental Behavioral Interventions: Empirically Validated Treatments for Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    PubMed

    Schreibman, Laura; Dawson, Geraldine; Stahmer, Aubyn C; Landa, Rebecca; Rogers, Sally J; McGee, Gail G; Kasari, Connie; Ingersoll, Brooke; Kaiser, Ann P; Bruinsma, Yvonne; McNerney, Erin; Wetherby, Amy; Halladay, Alycia

    2015-08-01

    Earlier autism diagnosis, the importance of early intervention, and development of specific interventions for young children have contributed to the emergence of similar, empirically supported, autism interventions that represent the merging of applied behavioral and developmental sciences. "Naturalistic Developmental Behavioral Interventions (NDBI)" are implemented in natural settings, involve shared control between child and therapist, utilize natural contingencies, and use a variety of behavioral strategies to teach developmentally appropriate and prerequisite skills. We describe the development of NDBIs, their theoretical bases, empirical support, requisite characteristics, common features, and suggest future research needs. We wish to bring parsimony to a field that includes interventions with different names but common features thus improving understanding and choice-making among families, service providers and referring agencies.

  9. Recommendations for the Empirical Treatment of Complicated Urinary Tract Infections Using Surveillance Data on Antimicrobial Resistance in the Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    Koningstein, Maike; van der Bij, Akke K.; de Kraker, Marlieke E. A.; Monen, Jos C.; Muilwijk, Jan; de Greeff, Sabine C.; Geerlings, Suzanne E.; van Hall, Maurine A. Leverstein-

    2014-01-01

    Background Complicated urinary tract infections (c-UTIs) are among the most common nosocomial infections and a substantial part of the antimicrobial agents used in hospitals is for the treatment of c-UTIs. Data from surveillance can be used to guide the empirical treatment choices of clinicians when treating c-UTIs. We therefore used nation-wide surveillance data to evaluate antimicrobial coverage of agents for the treatment of c-UTI in the Netherlands. Methods We included the first isolate per patient of urine samples of hospitalised patients collected by the Infectious Disease Surveillance Information System for Antibiotic Resistance (ISIS-AR) in 2012, and determined the probability of inadequate coverage for antimicrobial agents based on species distribution and susceptibility. Analyses were repeated for various patient groups and hospital settings. Results The most prevalent bacteria in 27,922 isolates of 23,357 patients were Escherichia coli (47%), Enterococcus spp. (14%), Proteus mirabilis (8%), and Klebsiella pneumoniae (7%). For all species combined, the probability of inadequate coverage was <5% for amoxicillin or amoxicillin-clavulanic acid combined with gentamicin and the carbapenems. When including gram-negative bacteria only, the probability of inadequate coverage was 4.0%, 2.7%, 2.3% and 1.7%, respectively, for amoxicillin, amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, a second or a third generation cephalosporin in combination with gentamicin, and the carbapenems (0.4%). There were only small variations in results among different patient groups and hospital settings. Conclusions When excluding Enterococcus spp., considered as less virulent, and the carbapenems, considered as last-resort drugs, empirical treatment for c-UTI with the best chance of adequate coverage are one of the studied beta-lactam-gentamicin combinations. This study demonstrates the applicability of routine surveillance data for up-to-date clinical practice guidelines on empirical antimicrobial

  10. [Amoxicillin and clavulanic acid versus amoxicillin plus gentamicin in the empirical initial treatment of urinary tract infections in hospitalized patients].

    PubMed

    Verzasconi, R; Rodoni, P; Monotti, R; Marone, C; Mombelli, G

    1995-08-19

    We compared the fixed combination amoxicillin plus clavulanic acid with that of amoxicillin plus gentamicin in the empirical initial treatment of severe urinary tract infections. The study included 87 hospitalized patients (51 women and 36 men, mean age 58 +/- 22 years) with acute uncomplicated pyelonephritis (n = 48) or with complicated urinary tract infections (n = 39). 80 patients (92%) had fever and 31 patients (36%) positive blood cultures. 45 patients were randomly assigned to amoxicillin plus clavulanic acid and 42 to amoxicillin plus gentamicin. Overall, 18 patients (21%) were infected with organisms resistant in vitro to amoxicillin plus clavulanic acid, whereas no pathogen was isolated with resistance to amoxicillin plus gentamicin (p < 0.0001). At the end of the empirical treatment (4.2 +/- 1.5 days after the start), significant bacteriuria was present in 6/39 patients (15%) assigned to amoxicillin plus clavulanic acid, compared to 0/34 patients assigned to amoxicillin plus gentamicin (p < 0.05). The clinical response was satisfactory in both groups, and the time from start of therapy to resolution of fever was 2.2 +/- 1.4 days in the amoxicillin plus clavulanic acid group and 2.3 +/- 1.7 days in the amoxicillin plus gentamicin group. Although the in-vitro resistance did not result in a lower clinical efficacy of amoxicillin plus clavulanic acid compared to amoxicillin plus gentamicin in our relatively small sample of patients, the data indicate that the antimicrobial activity of amoxicillin plus clavulanic acid is inadequate to cover the spectrum of causative agents in hospitalized patients with pyelonephritis or complicated urinary tract infections. Amoxicillin plus clavulanic acid should therefore not be used in the initial empirical treatment of these infections.

  11. An Empirical Study on the Role of Context Factors in Employees' Commitment to Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soumyaja, Devi; Kamlanabhan, T. J.; Bhattacharyya, Sanghamitra

    2011-01-01

    The study attempts to address the gap of exploring the possible antecedents of employees' commitment to change and its three dimensions. The role of context factors--participation in decision making, quality of communication, trust in management and history of change--are tested on overall commitment to change and also on its three…

  12. Behavior Change Outcomes of Marathon Group Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uhlemann, Max R.; Weigel, Richard G.

    1977-01-01

    This study evaluated behavior change occurring after a marathon group experience, with a focus on individualized rather than shared behavioral change criteria. The individualization of behavior change criteria is based on the assertion that few, if any, single change criteria are appropriate or realistic for assessing change in all individuals.…

  13. Treating Pediatric Obesity Using an Empirically Supported Treatment: A Case Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, Phillippe B.; Ellis, Deborah A.; Naar-King, Sylvie

    2010-01-01

    Overweight and obesity are increasing dramatically in the United States of America, especially among children. Effective treatment of the multiple risk factors that promote youth obesity requires treatment approaches that are flexible and comprehensive enough to address each of these factors. One such treatment approach is Multisystemic Therapy…

  14. Very empirical treatment of solvation and entropy: a force field derived from Log Po/w

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellogg, Glen Eugene; Burnett, James C.; Abraham, Donald J.

    2001-04-01

    A non-covalent interaction force field model derived from the partition coefficient of 1-octanol/water solubility is described. This model, HINT for Hydropathic INTeractions, is shown to include, in very empirical and approximate terms, all components of biomolecular associations, including hydrogen bonding, Coulombic interactions, hydrophobic interactions, entropy and solvation/desolvation. Particular emphasis is placed on: (1) demonstrating the relationship between the total empirical HINT score and free energy of association, ΔG interaction; (2) showing that the HINT hydrophobic-polar interaction sub-score represents the energy cost of desolvation upon binding for interacting biomolecules; and (3) a new methodology for treating constrained water molecules as discrete independent small ligands. An example calculation is reported for dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) bound with methotrexate (MTX). In that case the observed very tight binding, ΔG interaction≤-13.6 kcal mol-1, is largely due to ten hydrogen bonds between the ligand and enzyme with estimated strength ranging between -0.4 and -2.3 kcal mol-1. Four water molecules bridging between DHFR and MTX contribute an additional -1.7 kcal mol-1 stability to the complex. The HINT estimate of the cost of desolvation is +13.9 kcal mol-1.

  15. Economic evaluation of linezolid, flucloxacillin and vancomycin in the empirical treatment of cellulitis in UK hospitals: a decision analytical model.

    PubMed

    Vinken, A; Li, Z; Balan, D; Rittenhouse, B; Wilike, R; Nathwani, D

    2001-12-01

    Standard antibiotic treatment of infections has become more difficult and costly due to treatment failure associated with the rise in bacterial resistance. New antibiotics that can overcome such resistant pathogens have the potential for great clinical and economic impact. Linezolid is a new antibiotic that is effective in the treatment of both antibiotic-susceptible and antibiotic-resistant Gram-positive bacterial infections, including those resistant to other available antibiotics. This breadth of activity is unique in existing antibiotics for Gram-positive bacteria and serves as the rationale for exploring the hypothesis that linezolid is an appropriate choice when considering empirical treatment of cellulitis in complicated or compromised patients in the nosocomial setting. A decision-modelling approach was used to compare the predicted first-line treatment efficacy and direct medical costs of linezolid with standard treatment of cellulitis among hospitalized patients. For the purposes of this analysis, standard care is defined along two main pathways: (1) initiating care with intravenous (iv) flucloxacillin, switching to vancomycin if the pathogen is found to be resistant to flucloxacillin, or maintaining flucloxacillin if the pathogen is found susceptible, or when culture and sensitivity analysis is inconclusive; or (2) initiating care with vancomycin, switching to iv flucloxacillin if the pathogen is found susceptible to flucloxacillin, maintaining vancomycin if the infection is found resistant, or when culture and sensitivity are inconclusive. For those patients taking iv flucloxacillin, a switch to oral flucloxacillin was allowed when clinically appropriate. We hypothesized that the cost of care of initiating treatment with linezolid would be less than that for both vancomycin and flucloxacillin in resistance risk ranges typically encountered in UK hospitals. In addition, while the registration trials showed equivalence of linezolid with the comparators in

  16. Soil carbon sequestration and land use change associated with biofuel production: Empirical evidence

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, Zhangcai; Dunn, Jennifer B.; Kwon, Hoyoung; Mueller, Steffen; Wander, Michelle M.

    2016-01-01

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) change can be a major impact of land use change (LUC) associated with biofuel feedstock production. By collecting and analyzing data from worldwide field observations with major LUCs from cropland, grassland and forest to lands producing biofuel crops (i.e., corn, switchgrass, Miscanthus, poplar and willow), we were able to estimate SOC response ratios and sequestration rates and evaluate the effects of soil depth and time scale on SOC change. Both the amount and rate of SOC change were highly dependent on the specific land transition. Irrespective of soil depth or time horizon, cropland conversions resulted in an overall SOC gain of 6-14% relative to initial SOC level, while conversion from grassland or forest to corn (without residue removal) or poplar caused significant carbon loss (9-35%). No significant SOC changes were observed in land converted from grasslands or forests to switchgrass, Miscanthus or willow. The SOC response ratios were similar in both 0-30 and 0-100 cm soil depths in most cases, suggesting SOC changes in deep soil and that use of top soil only for SOC accounting in biofuel life cycle analysis (LCA) might underestimate total SOC changes. Soil carbon sequestration rates varied greatly among studies and land transition types. Generally, the rates of SOC change tended to be the greatest during the 10 years following land conversion, and had declined to approach 0 within about 20 years for most LUCs. Observed trends in SOC change were generally consistent with previous reports. Soil depth and duration of study significantly influence SOC change rates and so should be considered in carbon emission accounting in biofuel LCA. High uncertainty remains for many perennial systems, field trials and modeling efforts are needed to determine the site- and system-specific rates and direction of change associated with their production.

  17. Participation’s Effect on Organizational Readiness for Change: An Empirical Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-03-01

    theory, termed The Mark Twain Dilemma, is so named because he suggests initiating change at a time when the organization is most successful and...stress process. Journal of Health and Social Behavior, 22, 337-356. Pietersen, W. (2002). The Mark Twain dilemma: The theory and practice of change

  18. Language Change in the Wake of Empire: Syriac in Its Greco-Roman Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butts, Aaron Michael

    2013-01-01

    Greek-Aramaic bilingualism was wide-spread throughout Late Antique Syria and Mesopotamia. Among the various Aramaic dialects, Syriac underwent a particularly intense and prolonged period of contact with Greek. This contact led to changes in both languages. The present study provides a new analysis of contact-induced changes in Syriac due to Greek,…

  19. An empirical examination of women's empowerment and transformative change in the context of international development.

    PubMed

    Grabe, Shelly

    2012-03-01

    This paper responds to calls from social scientists in the area of globalization and women's empowerment to test a model that investigates both structural and individual components of women's empowerment in the context of globalization. The investigation uses a liberation psychology framework by taking into account the effects of globalization, human rights discourse, and women's activism within social movements to identify how structural inequities may be related to empowerment. Surveys conducted in rural Nicaragua revealed that land ownership and organizational participation among women were related to more progressive gender ideology, and in turn, women's power and control within the marital relationship, individual levels of agency, and subjective well-being. The study demonstrates that psychology can bridge the theoretical arguments surrounding human rights with the practical implementation of development interventions, and provide empirical support that has yet to be demonstrated elsewhere. The findings have important implications for strategies and interventions that can improve conditions for women and contribute to the aims of social justice articulated in the Beijing Platform for Action.

  20. Melting empires? Climate change and politics in Antarctica since the International Geophysical Year.

    PubMed

    Howkins, Adrian

    2011-01-01

    This article examines the relationship between climate change and politics in Antarctica since the International Geophysical Year of 1957-8, paying particular attention to the work of the British Antarctic Survey. Research conducted in Antarctica has played an important role in the understanding of climate change on a global scale. In turn, fears about the consequences of global climate change have radically changed perceptions of Antarctica and profoundly shaped scientific research agendas: a continent that until fifty years ago was perceived largely as an inhospitable wilderness has come to be seen as a dangerously vulnerable environment. This radical shift in perception contrasts with a fundamental continuity in the political power structures of the continent. This article argues that the severity of the threat of climate change has reinforced the privileged political position of the "insider" nations within the Antarctic Treaty System.

  1. Fringes of the empire: Diet and cultural change at the Roman to post-Roman transition in NW Iberia.

    PubMed

    López-Costas, Olalla; Müldner, Gundula

    2016-09-01

    A growing number of paleodiet investigations over recent years have begun to reveal the stark dietary differences that existed between regions of the Roman Empire, as well as significant changes in subsistence strategies after its fall. The present study explores the dietary changes at the Roman to post-Roman (Germanic) transition in the Northwest Iberian Peninsula, in order to improve our understanding of the changes that occurred at end of the Roman Empire in different regions across Europe and to also consider the influence of climate had on them. The carbon and nitrogen stable isotope investigation in bone collagen from A Lanzada, NW Spain (100-700 AD), which was an important commercial, coastal settlement has been presented. A human sample of 59 individuals, 6 of them subadults, is compared with 31 faunal specimens, which include a number of marine fish. Isotope data for the terrestrial fauna reveal the influence of the sea on the local isotope baseline. Analysis of the human samples indicates a mixed marine-terrestrial diet. A shift in mean human δ(13) C values from -16.7‰ to -14.3‰ provides clear evidence for a significant change in diet in the post-Roman period, probably through the intensification of both marine resources exploitation and C4 -plant consumption (presumably millet). A deterioration of paleoenvironmental conditions, together with a poor socioeconomic situation and the arrival of new people, the Sueves, who brought a new political and socioeconomic system have been discussed as the main causes for the dietary modification in post-Roman times.

  2. Is preemptive antifungal therapy a good alternative to empirical treatment in prolonged febrile neutropenia?

    PubMed

    Koch, Erica; Rada, Gabriel

    2016-06-09

    Patients with prolonged febrile neutropenia are at high risk of invasive fungal infection, so it has been standard practice to initiate empirical antifungal therapy in these cases. However, this strategy is associated with important toxicity, so diagnostic test-guided preemptive antifungal therapy has been proposed as an alternative. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified three systematic reviews including twelve studies overall. Four randomized controlled trials addressed the question of this article. We combined the evidence using meta-analysis and generated a summary of findings following the GRADE approach. We concluded it is not clear whether preemptive strategy affects mortality because the certainty of the evidence is very low, but it might slightly decrease the use of antifungal agents in patients with prolonged febrile neutropenia.

  3. Empirically Supported Treatments in Psychotherapy: Towards an Evidence-Based or Evidence-Biased Psychology in Clinical Settings?

    PubMed Central

    Castelnuovo, Gianluca

    2010-01-01

    The field of research and practice in psychotherapy has been deeply influenced by two different approaches: the empirically supported treatments (ESTs) movement, linked with the evidence-based medicine (EBM) perspective and the “Common Factors” approach, typically connected with the “Dodo Bird Verdict”. About the first perspective, since 1998 a list of ESTs has been established in mental health field. Criterions for “well-established” and “probably efficacious” treatments have arisen. The development of these kinds of paradigms was motivated by the emergence of a “managerial” approach and related systems for remuneration also for mental health providers and for insurance companies. In this article ESTs will be presented underlining also some possible criticisms. Finally complementary approaches, that could add different evidence in the psychotherapy research in comparison with traditional EBM approach, are presented. PMID:21833197

  4. Cultural change and traditional ecological knowledge. An empirical analysis from the Tsimane’ in the Bolivian Amazon

    PubMed Central

    Reyes-García, Victoria; Paneque-Gálvez, Jaime; Luz, Ana C.; Gueze, Maximilien; Macía, Manuel J.; Orta-Martínez, Martí; Pino, Joan

    2016-01-01

    Among the different factors associated to change in traditional ecological knowledge, the study of the relations between cultural change and traditional ecological knowledge has received scan and inadequate scholarly attention. Using data from indigenous peoples of an Amazonian society facing increasing exposure to the mainstream Bolivian society, we analyzed the relation between traditional ecological knowledge, proxied with individual plant use knowledge (n=484), and cultural change, proxied with individual- and village-level (n=47) measures of attachment to traditional beliefs and values. We found that both the individual level of detachment to traditional values and the village level of agreement in detachment to traditional values were associated with individual levels of plant use knowledge, irrespective of other proxy measures for cultural change. Because both the individual- and the village-level variables bear statistically significant associations with plant use knowledge, our results suggest that both the individual- and the supra-individual level processes of cultural change are related to the erosion of plant use knowledge. Results from our work highlight the importance of analyzing processes that happen at intermediary social units -the village in our case study- to explain changes in traditional ecological knowledge. PMID:27642188

  5. The Current State of Empirical Support for the Pharmacological Treatment of Selective Mutism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, John S.; Mitchell, Angela D.; Segool, Natasha

    2008-01-01

    This article reviews the current state of evidence for the psychopharmacological treatment of children diagnosed with selective mutism within the context of its link to social anxiety disorder. An increased focus on potential medication treatment for this disorder has resulted from significant monetary and resource limitations in typical practice,…

  6. Mechanisms of change in psychotherapy for depression: An empirical update and evaluation of research aimed at identifying psychological mediators.

    PubMed

    Lemmens, Lotte H J M; Müller, Viola N L S; Arntz, Arnoud; Huibers, Marcus J H

    2016-12-01

    We present a systematic empirical update and critical evaluation of the current status of research aimed at identifying a variety of psychological mediators in various forms of psychotherapy for depression. We summarize study characteristics and results of 35 relevant studies, and discuss the extent to which these studies meet several important requirements for mechanism research. Our review indicates that in spite of increased attention for the topic, advances in theoretical consensus about necessities for mechanism research, and sophistication of study designs, research in this field is still heterogeneous and unsatisfactory in methodological respect. Probably the biggest challenge in the field is demonstrating the causal relation between change in the mediator and change in depressive symptoms. The field would benefit from a further refinement of research methods to identify processes of therapeutic change. Recommendations for future research are discussed. However, even in the most optimal research designs, explaining psychotherapeutic change remains a challenge. Psychotherapy is a multi-dimensional phenomenon that might work through interplay of multiple mechanisms at several levels. As a result, it might be too complex to be explained in relatively simple causal models of psychological change.

  7. Empirical support for global integrated assessment modeling: Productivity trends and technological change in developing countries' agriculture and electric power sectors

    SciTech Connect

    Sathaye, Jayant A.

    2000-04-01

    Integrated assessment (IA) modeling of climate policy is increasingly global in nature, with models incorporating regional disaggregation. The existing empirical basis for IA modeling, however, largely arises from research on industrialized economies. Given the growing importance of developing countries in determining long-term global energy and carbon emissions trends, filling this gap with improved statistical information on developing countries' energy and carbon-emissions characteristics is an important priority for enhancing IA modeling. Earlier research at LBNL on this topic has focused on assembling and analyzing statistical data on productivity trends and technological change in the energy-intensive manufacturing sectors of five developing countries, India, Brazil, Mexico, Indonesia, and South Korea. The proposed work will extend this analysis to the agriculture and electric power sectors in India, South Korea, and two other developing countries. They will also examine the impact of alternative model specifications on estimates of productivity growth and technological change for each of the three sectors, and estimate the contribution of various capital inputs--imported vs. indigenous, rigid vs. malleable-- in contributing to productivity growth and technological change. The project has already produced a data resource on the manufacturing sector which is being shared with IA modelers. This will be extended to the agriculture and electric power sectors, which would also be made accessible to IA modeling groups seeking to enhance the empirical descriptions of developing country characteristics. The project will entail basic statistical and econometric analysis of productivity and energy trends in these developing country sectors, with parameter estimates also made available to modeling groups. The parameter estimates will be developed using alternative model specifications that could be directly utilized by the existing IAMs for the manufacturing

  8. Valuing Climate Change Impacts on Human Health: Empirical Evidence from the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Markandya, Anil; Chiabai, Aline

    2009-01-01

    There is a broad consensus that climate change will increase the costs arising from diseases such as malaria and diarrhea and, furthermore, that the largest increases will be in developing countries. One of the problems is the lack of studies measuring these costs systematically and in detail. This paper critically reviews a number of studies about the costs of planned adaptation in the health context, and compares current health expenditures with MDGs which are felt to be inadequate when considering climate change impacts. The analysis serves also as a critical investigation of the methodologies used and aims at identifying research weaknesses and gaps. PMID:19440414

  9. Liposomal amphotericin B: a review of its use as empirical therapy in febrile neutropenia and in the treatment of invasive fungal infections.

    PubMed

    Moen, Marit D; Lyseng-Williamson, Katherine A; Scott, Lesley J

    2009-01-01

    some extent by these adverse events. Both echinocandins were better tolerated than liposomal amphotericin B. The cost of liposomal amphotericin B therapy may also restrict its use, but further pharmacoeconomic studies are required to fully define its cost effectiveness compared with other antifungal agents. Based on comparative data from well controlled trials, extensive clinical experience and its broad spectrum of activity, liposomal amphotericin B remains a first-line option for empirical therapy in patients with febrile neutropenia and in those with disseminated histoplasmosis, and is an option for the treatment of AIDS-associated cryptococcal meningitis, and for invasive Candida spp. or Aspergillus spp. infections. Amphotericin B, a macrocyclic, polyene antifungal agent, is thought to act by binding to ergosterol, the principal sterol in fungal cell membranes and Leishmania cells. This results in a change in membrane permeability, causing metabolic disturbance, leakage of small molecules and, as a consequence, cell death. In vitro and in vivo studies have shown that liposomal amphotericin B remains closely associated with the liposomes in the circulation, thereby reducing the potential for nephrotoxicity and infusion-related toxicity associated with conventional amphotericin B. Amphotericin B shows very good in vitro activity against a broad spectrum of clinically relevant fungal isolates, including most strains of Candida spp. and Aspergillus spp., and other filamentous fungi such as Zygomycetes. Liposomal amphotericin B has proven effective in various animal models of fungal infections, including those for candidiasis, aspergillosis, fusariosis and zygomycosis. Liposomal amphotericin B also shows immunomodulatory effects, although the mechanisms involved are not fully understood, and differ from those of amphotericin B deoxycholate and amphotericin B colloidal dispersion. In adult patients with febrile neutropenia, intravenous liposomal amphotericin B has

  10. Total factor productivity change in dairy farming: Empirical evidence from southern Chile.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Víctor H; Bravo-Ureta, Boris E

    2016-10-01

    Despite the importance of productivity growth, many studies carried out at the farm level focus primarily on the technical efficiency (TE) component of farm productivity. Therefore, the general purpose of this paper is to measure total factor productivity change and then to decompose this change into several distinct elements. The data were an unbalanced panel for the period from 2005 to 2010 containing 477 farms and 1,426 observations obtained from TODOAGRO, a farm-management center created in 1996 in the southern part of Chile. The region where the data come from accounts for 20% of the total milk processed in the country. Stochastic production frontiers along with the translog functional form were used to analyze total factor productivity change. The econometric evidence indicates that farms exhibit decreasing returns to size implying that costs of production rise as farm size increases, which suggests that the motivation for farm growth stems from the search for income rather than from lowering costs. The main results indicated that productivity gains through TE improvements are limited, with an average TE for the whole sample of 91.0%, and average technical efficiency change of 0.05% per year. By contrast, average technological progress at the sample mean was rather high at 1.90%, which suggests that additional investments in research and subsequent adoption of improved technologies would have a positive effect on productivity growth. The findings also revealed that farm size is not associated with productivity growth for the dairy farms in the sample.

  11. Why Do Firms Train? Empirical Evidence on the Relationship between Training and Technological and Organizational Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neirotti, Paolo; Paolucci, Emilio

    2013-01-01

    We explore the relationship between training and innovation using key insights from the resource-based approach, organizational learning and labour studies. By using data from 304 large enterprises in Italy, the study highlights a twofold role of training in favouring technological and organizational changes. First, training plays a role in…

  12. Adaptability: Conceptual and Empirical Perspectives on Responses to Change, Novelty and Uncertainty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Andrew J.; Nejad, Harry; Colmar, Susan; Liem, Gregory Arief D.

    2012-01-01

    Adaptability is proposed as individuals' capacity to constructively regulate psycho-behavioral functions in response to new, changing, and/or uncertain circumstances, conditions and situations. The present investigation explored the internal and external validity of an hypothesised adaptability scale. The sample comprised 2,731 high school…

  13. Global climate changes recorded in coastal wetland sediments: Empirical observations linked to theoretical predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolker, Alexander S.; Kirwan, Matthew L.; Goodbred, Steven L.; Cochran, J. Kirk

    2010-07-01

    Whether coastal areas are experiencing, and responding to, an accelerated rate of global sea-level rise (GSLR) is critically important for the ˜2 billion people living near Earth's oceans. Accretion rates from a suite of physiographically diverse coastal wetlands surrounding Long Island, NY accelerated during the 20th century at 2.3 ± 0.2 × 10-2 mm yr-2, which is comparable to reported rates of GSLR acceleration and global temperature changes. Wetlands varied in tidal range, salinity and geomorphic setting, and were located in embayments with limited human impacts in a region with limited and constant rates of subsidence. From geochronologies with temporal resolutions of 2-5 yr, we constructed new composite histories of sediment accretion and mineral deposition. Wetland dynamics are consistent with predictions from sedimentology and a numerical model of ecogeomorphic response, suggesting that these systems, and likely others worldwide, are responding to accelerated GSLR and related climatic changes.

  14. An empirical approach to defining loss to follow-up among patients enrolled in antiretroviral treatment programs.

    PubMed

    Chi, Benjamin H; Cantrell, Ronald A; Mwango, Albert; Westfall, Andrew O; Mutale, Wilbroad; Limbada, Mohammed; Mulenga, Lloyd B; Vermund, Sten H; Stringer, Jeffrey S A

    2010-04-15

    In many programs providing antiretroviral therapy (ART), clinicians report substantial patient attrition; however, there are no consensus criteria for defining patient loss to follow-up (LTFU). Data on a multisite human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) treatment cohort in Lusaka, Zambia, were used to determine an empirical "days-late" definition of LTFU among patients on ART. Cohort members were classified as either "in care" or LTFU as of December 31, 2007, according to a range of days-late intervals. The authors then looked forward in the database to determine which patients actually returned to care at any point over the following year. The interval that best minimized LTFU misclassification was described as "best-performing." Overall, 33,704 HIV-infected adults on ART were included. Nearly one-third (n = 10,196) were at least 1 day late for an appointment. The best-performing LTFU definition was 56 days after a missed visit, which had a sensitivity of 84.1% (95% confidence interval (CI): 83.2, 85.0), specificity of 97.5% (95% CI: 97.3, 97.7), and misclassification of 5.1% (95% CI: 4.8, 5.3). The 60-day threshold performed similarly well, with only a marginal difference (<0.1%) in misclassification. This analysis suggests that > or =60 days since the last appointment is a reasonable definition of LTFU. Standardization to empirically derived definitions of LTFU will permit more reliable comparisons within and across programs.

  15. Economic valuation of environmental benefits from wastewater treatment processes: an empirical approach for Spain.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Sancho, Francesc; Molinos-Senante, María; Sala-Garrido, Ramón

    2010-01-15

    Economic research into the design and implementation of policies for the efficient management of water resources has been emphasized by the European Water Framework Directive (Directive 2000/60/EC). The efficient implementation of policies to prevent the degradation and depletion of water resources requires determining their value in social and economic terms and incorporating this information into the decision-making process. A process of wastewater treatment has many associated environmental benefits. However, these benefits are often not calculated because they are not set by the market, due to inadequate property rights, the presence of externalities, and the lack of perfect information. Nevertheless, the valuation of these benefits is necessary to justify a suitable investment policy and a limited number of studies exist on the subject of the economic valuation of environmental benefits. In this paper, we propose a methodology based on the estimation of shadow prices for the pollutants removed in a treatment process. This value represents the environmental benefit (avoided cost) associated with undischarged pollution. This is a pioneering approach to the economic valuation of wastewater treatment. The comparison of these benefits with the internal costs of the treatment process will provide a useful indicator for the feasibility of wastewater treatment projects.

  16. Three empirical essays on consumer behavior related to climate change and energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobsen, Grant Douglas

    This dissertation consists of three essays. All of the chapters address a topic in the area of household and consumer behavior related to climate change or energy. The first chapter is titled "The Al Gore Effect: An Inconvenient Truth and Voluntary Carbon Offsets". This chapter examines the relationship between climate change awareness and household behavior by testing whether Al Gore's documentary An Inconvenient Truth caused an increase in the purchase of voluntary carbon offsets. The analysis shows that in the two months following the film's release, zip codes within a 10-mile radius of a zip code where the film was shown experienced a 50 percent relative increase in the purchase of voluntary carbon offsets. The second chapter is titled "Are Building Codes Effective at Saving Energy? Evidence from Residential Billing Data in Florida". The analysis shows that Florida's energy-code change that took effect in 2002 is associated with a 4-percent decrease in electricity consumption and a 6-percent decrease in natural-gas consumption in Gainesville, FL. The estimated private payback period for the average residence is 6.4 years and the social payback period ranges between 3.5 and 5.3 years. The third chapter in this dissertation is titled "Do Environmental Offsets Increase Demand for Dirty Goods? Evidence from Residential Electricity Demand". This study evaluates the relationship between green products and existing patterns of consumer behavior by examining the relationship between household enrollment in a green electricity program and consumption of residential electricity. The results suggest there are two different types of green consumers. One type makes a small monthly donation and partially views the donation as a substitute for a previously existing pattern of green behavior, in this case, energy conservation. The other type makes a larger monthly donation and views the donation as a way to make strictly additional improvements in environmental quality.

  17. The Serengeti food web: empirical quantification and analysis of topological changes under increasing human impact.

    PubMed

    de Visser, Sara N; Freymann, Bernd P; Olff, Han

    2011-03-01

    1. To address effects of land use and human overexploitation on wildlife populations, it is essential to better understand how human activities have changed species composition, diversity and functioning. Theoretical studies modelled how network properties change under human-induced, non-random species loss. However, we lack data on realistic species-loss sequences in threatened, real-world food webs to parameterize these models. 2. Here, we present a first size-structured topological food web of one of the most pristine terrestrial ecosystems in the world, the Serengeti ecosystem (Tanzania). The food web consists of 95 grouped nodes and includes both invertebrates and vertebrates ranging from body masses between 10(-7) and 10(4) kg. 3. We study the topological changes in this food web that result from the simulated IUCN-based species-loss sequence representing current species vulnerability to human disturbances in and around this savanna ecosystem. We then compare this realistic extinction scenario with other extinction sequences based on body size and connectance and perform an analysis of robustness of this savanna food web. 4. We demonstrate that real-world species loss in this case starts with the biggest (mega) herbivores and top predators, causing higher predator-prey mass ratios. However, unlike theoretically modelled linear species deletion sequences, this causes poor-connected species to be lost first, while more highly connected species become lost as human impact progresses. This food web shows high robustness to decreasing body size and increasing connectance deletion sequences compared with a high sensitivity to the decreasing connectance deletion scenario. 5. Furthermore, based on the current knowledge of the Serengeti ecosystem, we discuss how the focus on food web topology alone, disregarding nontrophic interactions, may lead to an underestimation of human impacts on wildlife communities, with the number of trophic links affected by a

  18. Changing treatment of pediatric splenic trauma

    SciTech Connect

    Kakkasseril, J.S.; Stewart, D.; Cox, J.A.; Gelfand, M.

    1982-06-01

    A review of splenic injuries at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center from July 1978 to June 1980 revealed this form of injury in 29 patients. Treatment without surgery was successful in 21 patients. Seven patients required operation. One patient died shortly after admission of severe associated injuries. All patients admitted with blunt abdominal trauma were initially treated conservatively. If the clinical state improved, after transfusions if necessary, or remained stable and there were no objective signs of further blood loss, conservative therapy was continued. Liver-spleen scans were obtained on an urgent basis to confirm the diagnosis of splenic injury in patients who did not undergo surgery. No complications of treatment without surgery were recognized. The satisfactory outcome in these patients suggests that there is a place for treatment without surgery in some children with splenic injury.

  19. An Investigation of Different Treatment Strategies for Item Category Collapsing in Calibration: An Empirical Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tay-lim, Brenda Siok-Hoon; Zhang, Jinming

    2015-01-01

    To ensure the statistical result validity, model-data fit must be evaluated for each item. In practice, certain actions or treatments are needed for misfit items. If all misfit items are treated, much item information would be lost during calibration. On the other hand, if only severely misfit items are treated, the inclusion of misfit items may…

  20. Noncontingent Reinforcement Is an Empirically Supported Treatment for Problem Behavior Exhibited by Individuals with Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, James E.; Severtson, Jamie M.; Lepper, Tracy L.

    2009-01-01

    Noncontingent reinforcement (NCR) is a function-based treatment for problem behavior that has produced robust effects across a variety of response topographies and reinforcement functions among individuals with developmental disabilities. Several narrative reviews have adequately described this literature. The purpose of the present article was to…

  1. Empirically and Clinically Useful Decision Making in Psychotherapy: Differential Predictions with Treatment Response Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lutz, Wolfgang; Saunders, Stephen M.; Leon, Scott C.; Martinovich, Zoran; Kosfelder, Joachim; Schulte, Dietmar; Grawe, Klaus; Tholen, Sven

    2006-01-01

    In the delivery of clinical services, outcomes monitoring (i.e., repeated assessments of a patient's response to treatment) can be used to support clinical decision making (i.e., recurrent revisions of outcome expectations on the basis of that response). Outcomes monitoring can be particularly useful in the context of established practice research…

  2. [Orthodontic treatment as prevention of periodontal changes].

    PubMed

    Dénes, J

    1992-02-01

    Even the general dental practitioners consider the orthodontic therapeutical interventions carried out with removable appliances as a harmful procedure. It is much less known how the lack of adequate orthodontic treatment endangers the peridontium. Clinical data show a cause related correlation between the maxillary incisor protrusion, mandibular frontal jammed dentition, deep vertical overbite, openbite, crossbite early deciduous tooth extractions and the periodontal pathological happenings. So it is very important to start an early orthodontic treatment to avoid the periodontal consequences of malocclusion before it has become irreversible.

  3. Empirical Records of Environmental Change across the Archean-Proterozoic Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufman, A. J.

    2011-12-01

    Time-series geochemical analyses of scientific drill cores intersecting the Archean-Proterozoic transition suggest a coupling of environmental and biological change that culminated in the pervasive oxygenation of Earth's atmosphere and oceans. Elemental and multiple isotope measurements of sedimentary archives, including carbonate, shale, and banded iron-formation from Western Australia, South Africa, Brazil, and southern Canada, indicate important changes in the carbon, sulfur, and nitrogen cycles that monitor the redox state of the oceans and the cyanobacterial buildup of atmospheric oxygen and ozone. In response, continental weathering would have increased, resulting in the enhanced delivery of sulfate and nutrients to seawater, further stimulating photoautotrophic fluxes of oxygen to surface environments. The positive feedback may additionally be responsible for the decline of atmospheric methane and surface refrigeration, represented by a series of discrete ice ages beginning around 2.4 billion years ago, due to the loss of greenhouse capacity during a time of lower solar luminosity. While speculative, the linkage of surface oxidation with enhanced nutrient supply and development of stratospheric sunscreen soon after the Archean-Proterozoic boundary suggests that the earliest perturbation in the carbon cycle may be associated with the rapid expansion of single-celled eukaryotes. Both sterol synthesis in eukaryotes and aerobic respiration require significant levels of oxygen in the ambient environment. Hence, Earth's earliest ice age(s) and onset of a modern and far more energetic carbon cycle may have been directly related to the global expansion of cyanobacteria that released oxygen to the environment, and of eukaryotes that respired it.

  4. Empirically supported treatments in rural community mental health centers: a preliminary report on current utilization and attitudes toward adoption.

    PubMed

    Jameson, John Paul; Chambless, Dianne L; Blank, Michael B

    2009-12-01

    Rural community mental health centers (CMHCs) face numerous problems that might be alleviated by the dissemination of empirically supported treatments (ESTs). The current study lays the groundwork for EST dissemination by examining current treatment practices in rural clinics as well as the attitudes of decision makers toward ESTs and perceived barriers to their adoption. Twenty-five rural and 38 non-rural clinical directors responded to a mailed survey. Rural respondents were as likely as non-rural respondents to report EST use in their clinic for most anxiety disorders, and more likely to report use of an EST for major depressive disorder and obsessive-compulsive disorder. However, ESTs represent a relatively small proportion of the treatments reported for depression and anxiety disorders. Attitudes toward manualized ESTs did not differ between groups. Further, rural and nonrural clinics did not see the barriers to the adoption of ESTs as insurmountable. These preliminary results suggest that rural CMHCs are open to the use of ESTs and should be included in widespread dissemination initiatives.

  5. Response in the water quality of the Salton Sea, California, to changes in phosphorus loading: An empirical modeling approach

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robertson, D.M.; Schladow, S.G.

    2008-01-01

    Salton Sea, California, like many other lakes, has become eutrophic because of excessive nutrient loading, primarily phosphorus (P). A Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) is being prepared for P to reduce the input of P to the Sea. In order to better understand how P-load reductions should affect the average annual water quality of this terminal saline lake, three different eutrophication programs (BATHTUB, WiLMS, and the Seepage Lake Model) were applied. After verifying that specific empirical models within these programs were applicable to this saline lake, each model was calibrated using water-quality and nutrient-loading data for 1999 and then used to simulate the effects of specific P-load reductions. Model simulations indicate that a 50% decrease in external P loading would decrease near-surface total phosphorus concentrations (TP) by 25-50%. Application of other empirical models demonstrated that this decrease in loading should decrease near-surface chlorophyll a concentrations (Chl a) by 17-63% and increase Secchi depths (SD) by 38-97%. The wide range in estimated responses in Chl a and SD were primarily caused by uncertainty in how non-algal turbidity would respond to P-load reductions. If only the models most applicable to the Salton Sea are considered, a 70-90% P-load reduction is required for the Sea to be classified as moderately eutrophic (trophic state index of 55). These models simulate steady-state conditions in the Sea; therefore, it is difficult to ascertain how long it would take for the simulated changes to occur after load reductions. ?? 2008 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  6. A propensity score analysis shows that empirical treatment with linezolid does not increase the thirty-day mortality rate in patients with Gram-negative bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Ternavasio-de la Vega, Hugo-Guillermo; Mateos-Díaz, Ana-María; Martinez, Jose-Antonio; Almela, Manel; Cobos-Trigueros, Nazaret; Morata, Laura; De-la-Calle, Cristina; Sala, Marta; Mensa, Josep; Marcos, Miguel; Soriano, Alex

    2014-12-01

    The role of linezolid in empirical therapy of suspected bacteremia remains unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of empirical use of linezolid or glycopeptides in addition to other antibiotics on the 30-day mortality rates in patients with Gram-negative bacteremia. For this purpose, 1,126 patients with Gram-negative bacteremia in the Hospital Clinic of Barcelona from 2000 to 2012 were included in this study. In order to compare the mortality rates between patients who received linezolid or glycopeptides, the propensity scores on baseline variables were used to balance the treatment groups, and both propensity score matching and propensity-adjusted logistic regression were used to compare the 30-day mortality rates between the groups. The overall 30-day mortality rate was 16.0% during the study period. Sixty-eight patients received empirical treatment with linezolid, and 1,058 received glycopeptides. The propensity score matching included 64 patients in each treatment group. After matching, the mortality rates were 14.1% (9/64) in patients who received glycopeptides and 21.9% (14/64) in those who received linezolid, and a nonsignificant association between empirical linezolid treatment and mortality rate (odds ratio [OR], 1.63; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.69 to 3.82; P = 0.275, McNemar's test) was found. This association remained nonsignificant when variables that remained unbalanced after matching were included in a conditional logistic regression model. Further, the stratified propensity score analysis did not show any significant relationship between empirical linezolid treatment and the mortality rate after adjustment by propensity score quintiles or other variables potentially associated with mortality. In conclusion, the propensity score analysis showed that empirical treatment with linezolid compared with that with glycopeptides was not associated with 30-day mortality rates in patients with Gram-negative bacteremia.

  7. An Empirical Study of Personality Disorders Among Treatment-Seeking Problem Gamblers.

    PubMed

    Brown, M; Oldenhof, E; Allen, J S; Dowling, N A

    2016-12-01

    The primary aims of this study were to examine the prevalence of personality disorders in problem gamblers, to explore the relationship between personality disorders and problem gambling severity, and to explore the degree to which the psychological symptoms highlighted in the biosocial developmental model of borderline personality disorder (impulsivity, distress tolerance, substance use, PTSD symptoms, psychological distress and work/social adjustment) are associated with problem gambling. A secondary aim was to explore the strength of the relationships between these symptoms and problem gambling severity in problem gamblers with and without personality disorder pathology. Participants were 168 consecutively admitted problem gamblers seeking treatment from a specialist outpatient gambling service in Australia. The prevalence of personality disorders using the self-report version of the Iowa Personality Disorders Screen was 43.3 %. Cluster B personality disorders, but not Cluster A or C personality disorders, were associated with problem gambling severity. All psychological symptoms, except alcohol and drug use, were significantly higher among participants with personality disorder pathology compared to those without. Finally, psychological distress, and work and social adjustment were significantly associated with problem gambling severity for problem gamblers with personality disorder pathology, while impulsivity, psychological distress, and work and social adjustment were significantly associated with problem gambling severity for those without personality disorder pathology. High rates of comorbid personality disorders, particularly Cluster B disorders, necessitate routine screening in gambling treatment services. More complex psychological profiles may complicate treatment for problem gamblers with comorbid personality disorders. Future research should examine the applicability of the biosocial developmental model to problem gambling in community studies.

  8. Empirical Treatment of Shigella Dysentery with Trimethoprim: Five-Day Course Versus Single Dose

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-06-18

    been ade- used because it is 4-5 times more expensive than quately evaluated in the treatment of shigellosis. ampicillin, sulfa drugs , chloramphenicol...tablets of a sulfa drug the preceding day and NMC, NCR, work units 3M464758D849.- 622 OLDFIELD ET AL. BH.062 and 3Ml61102BSIO.AA.421. The views 1974. A...because of increasing resistance to commonly ducted a randomized double-blind placebo con- prescribed drugs . Sulfonamides were the drug of trolled

  9. Stages of change: interactions with treatment compliance and involvement.

    PubMed

    DiClemente, C C; Scott, C W

    1997-01-01

    Current perspectives on compliance and involvement in treatment often overlook the fact that treatment occurs in the context of a process of change and not vice versa. Each individual moves at a unique pace through a series of stages of change and in a cyclical fashion over a substantial period of time. Treatment personnel and programs should recognize the diversity of stage status in their clients and address each one in a manner compatible with the client's current stage of change, the tasks needed to move forward in the process of change, and an understanding of the course of change. Such considerations should assist the therapist in developing strategies to increase the engagement of a wide variety of clients, to improve retention of these clients in a realistic course of treatment, and to foster participation in stage-appropriate tasks that promote successful movement through the stages to sustained, long-term change.

  10. Family Transitions Following the Birth of a Sibling: An Empirical Review of Changes in the Firstborn’s Adjustment

    PubMed Central

    Volling, Brenda L.

    2012-01-01

    Nearly 80% of children in the U.S. have at least one sibling, indicating that the birth of a baby sibling is a normative ecological transition for most children. Many clinicians and theoreticians believe the transition is stressful, constituting a developmental crisis for most children. Yet, a comprehensive review of the empirical literature on children’s adjustment over the transition to siblinghood (TTS) has not been done for several decades. The current review summarized research examining change in firstborns’ adjustment to determine whether there was evidence that the TTS was disruptive for most children. Thirty studies addressing the transition to siblinghood were found and of those studies, the evidence did not support a crisis model of developmental transitions, nor was there overwhelming evidence of consistent changes in firstborn adjustment. Although there were decreases in children’s affection and responsiveness toward mothers, the results were more equivocal for many other behaviors (e.g., sleep problems, anxiety, aggression, regression). An inspection of the scientific literature indicated there are large individual differences in children’s adjustment and that the TTS can be a time of disruption, an occasion for developmental advances, or a period of quiescence with no noticeable changes. The TTS may be a developmental turning point for some children that portends future psychopathology or growth depending on the transactions between children and the changes in the ecological context over time. A developmental ecological systems framework guided the discussion of how child, parent, and contextual factors may contribute to the prediction of firstborn children’s successful adaptation to the birth of a sibling. PMID:22289107

  11. Short- and long-term effectiveness of an empirically supported treatment for agoraphobia.

    PubMed

    Hahlweg, K; Fiegenbaum, W; Frank, M; Schroeder, B; von Witzleben, I

    2001-06-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of individual high-density exposure (2-3 weeks, all day) for panic disorder with agoraphobia (PDAG). Participants were 416 unselected patients with a primary diagnosis of PDAG who were treated by 52 therapists in 3 outpatient clinics of the Christoph-Dornier Foundation of Clinical Psychology in Germany. Results 6 weeks after the end of therapy and at the 1-year follow-up showed highly significant reductions in anxiety symptoms, anxious cognition, agoraphobic avoidance, general symptomatology, and depressive symptoms. Results did not differ significantly between the 3 outpatient clinics and are comparable with the average effect sizes reported by meta-analytic studies of controlled efficacy research, using selected patients and specifically trained therapists. Effectiveness was not dependent on duration of disorder, number of treatment sessions, and therapist experience. The study suggests that high-density exposure can be transported from research settings to the mental health field.

  12. Substance Use in Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Populations: An Update on Empirical Research and Implications for Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Green, Kelly E.; Feinstein, Brian A.

    2011-01-01

    Historically, substance use problems were thought to be more prevalent in lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) populations, and correcting skewed perceptions about substance abuse among LGB individuals is critically important. This review provides an update on empirical evidence on LGB substance use patterns and treatment outcome, with specific focus on clinical implications of findings. Compared to earlier studies, the recent research included in this review has used more sophisticated methodologies, more representative samples, and also has investigated multiple dimensions of sexual orientation in relation to substance use patterns. Findings from recent research suggest that lesbians and bisexual women are at greater risk for alcohol and drug use disorders and related problems, and that gay and bisexual men are at greater risk for illicit drug use and related problems. Several sociocultural factors have emerged as correlates of substance use patterns in LGB populations (e.g., affiliation with gay culture, HIV-status), and several demographic characteristics (e.g., female, older age) do not appear to be as robust of protective factors against substance abuse for LGB individuals compared to heterosexual populations. Bisexual identity and/or behavior in particular seem to be related to increased risk for substance abuse. In terms of treatment outcome, limitations of extant research prevent conclusions about the relative impact of LGB-specific interventions, and further research that includes women and uses more equivalent comparison interventions is needed. Clinical implications of research findings are discussed for case identification, selection of treatment goals (e.g., moderation versus abstinence), targets for intervention, and specific treatment modalities. PMID:22061339

  13. Clinical Predictors and Accuracy of Empiric Tuberculosis Treatment among Sputum Smear-Negative HIV-Infected Adult TB Suspects in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Nakiyingi, Lydia; Bwanika, John Mark; Kirenga, Bruce; Nakanjako, Damalie; Katabira, Catherine; Lubega, Gloria; Sempa, Joseph; Nyesiga, Barnabas; Albert, Heidi; Manabe, Yukari C.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The existing diagnostic algorithms for sputum smear-negative tuberculosis (TB) are complicated, time-consuming, and often difficult to implement. The decision to initiate TB treatment in resource-limited countries is often largely based on clinical predictors. We sought to determine the clinical predictors and accuracy of empiric TB treatment initiation in HIV-infected sputum smear-negative TB suspects using sputum culture as a reference standard. Setting Out-patient HIV-TB integrated urban clinic in Kampala, Uganda. Methods HIV-infected TB suspects were screened using sputum smear microscopy, and mycobacterial sputum liquid and solid cultures were performed. Smear results were made available to the clinician who made a clinical decision on empiric TB treatment initiation for sputum smear-negative patients. Clinic records were reviewed for patients whose sputum smears were negative to collect data on socio-demographics, TB symptomatology, chest X-ray findings, CD4 cell counts and TB treatment initiation. Results Of 253 smear-negative TB suspects, 56% (142/253) were females, median age 38 IQR (31–44) years, with a median CD4 cell count of 291 IQR (150–482) cells/mm3. Of the 85 (33.6%) smear-negative patients empirically initiated on TB treatment, 35.3% (n = 30) were sputum culture positive compared to only 18 (10.7%) of the 168 untreated patients (p<0.001). Abnormal chest X-ray [aOR 10.18, 95% CI (3.14–33.00), p<0.001] and advanced HIV clinical stage [aOR 3.92, 95% CI (1.20–12.85), p = 0.024] were significantly associated with empiric TB treatment initiation. The sensitivity and specificity of empiric TB treatment initiation in the diagnosis of TB in HIV-infected patients after negative smear microscopy was 62.5% and 73.7% respectively. Conclusion In resource-limited settings, clinically advanced HIV and abnormal chest X-ray significantly predict a clinical decision to empirically initiate TB treatment in smear-negative HIV

  14. Changing the public perception of physiotherapeutic treatment.

    PubMed

    Sheppard, L

    1994-01-01

    Market research was undertaken to establish the public perception of physiotherapy. Using this market research strategic recommendations for the future marketing of physiotherapy are made within the professional context. Marketing will be used to contribute to changing the public perception of physiotherapy. The market research involved a qualitative study of five focus groups of the general public and one focus group of physiotherapists. The responses from the focus groups were used to construct an appropriate questionnaire for the qualitative study. A random sample of 510 members of the general public were then surveyed. The market research results yielded the following key features: The best known conditions treated by physiotherapists are musculoskeletal. The least known are women and children. Client-centered care is sought. The importance of location gives potential for physiotherapists to capitalise on tailoring to clients in their area. Doctors are important for referral and communication about physiotherapy. Marketing should be used to inform doctors of what physiotherapy has to offer. A marketing orientation has begun within physiotherapy; however, it must 'fit' the culture initially to be successful. A marketing strategy should be developed on national, state and individual levels based on a strategic intent. At the state level, strategies must be responsive to area or regional needs. Marketing needs to target identified market segments such as workers compensation organisations. Individual physiotherapists must promote themselves within their region, particularly to doctors and clients with the use of relationship marketing. Informal presentations to community groups and school students about physiotherapy will increase their profile.

  15. An empirical method that separates irreversible stem radial growth from bark water content changes in trees: theory and case studies.

    PubMed

    Mencuccini, Maurizio; Salmon, Yann; Mitchell, Patrick; Hölttä, Teemu; Choat, Brendan; Meir, Patrick; O'Grady, Anthony; Tissue, David; Zweifel, Roman; Sevanto, Sanna; Pfautsch, Sebastian

    2017-02-01

    Substantial uncertainty surrounds our knowledge of tree stem growth, with some of the most basic questions, such as when stem radial growth occurs through the daily cycle, still unanswered. We employed high-resolution point dendrometers, sap flow sensors, and developed theory and statistical approaches, to devise a novel method separating irreversible radial growth from elastic tension-driven and elastic osmotically driven changes in bark water content. We tested this method using data from five case study species. Experimental manipulations, namely a field irrigation experiment on Scots pine and a stem girdling experiment on red forest gum trees, were used to validate the theory. Time courses of stem radial growth following irrigation and stem girdling were consistent with a-priori predictions. Patterns of stem radial growth varied across case studies, with growth occurring during the day and/or night, consistent with the available literature. Importantly, our approach provides a valuable alternative to existing methods, as it can be approximated by a simple empirical interpolation routine that derives irreversible radial growth using standard regression techniques. Our novel method provides an improved understanding of the relative source-sink carbon dynamics of tree stems at a sub-daily time scale.

  16. Comparing Child, Parent, and Family Characteristics in Usual Care and Empirically Supported Treatment Research Samples for Children with Disruptive Behavior Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker-Ericzen, Mary J.; Hurlburt, Michael S.; Brookman-Frazee, Lauren; Jenkins, Melissa M.; Hough, Richard L.

    2010-01-01

    This study compared data from 34 research trials of five empirically supported treatments (ESTs) with one large usual care (UC) sample on child, parent, and family characteristics for children with Disruptive Behavior Disorders. Large variations were found within and across ESTs on sample characteristics during the past two decades. Most parent…

  17. Impact of empirical treatment in extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli and Klebsiella spp. bacteremia. A multicentric cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The objective of this study is to analyze the factors that are associated with the adequacy of empirical antibiotic therapy and its impact in mortality in a large cohort of patients with extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) - producing Escherichia coli and Klebsiella spp. bacteremia. Methods Cases of ESBL producing Enterobacteriaceae (ESBL-E) bacteremia collected from 2003 through 2008 in 19 hospitals in Spain. Statistical analysis was performed using multivariate logistic regression. Results We analyzed 387 cases ESBL-E bloodstream infections. The main sources of bacteremia were urinary tract (55.3%), biliary tract (12.7%), intra-abdominal (8.8%) and unknown origin (9.6%). Among all the 387 episodes, E. coli was isolated from blood cultures in 343 and in 45.71% the ESBL-E was multidrug resistant. Empirical antibiotic treatment was adequate in 48.8% of the cases and the in hospital mortality was 20.9%. In a multivariate analysis adequacy was a risk factor for death [adjusted OR (95% CI): 0.39 (0.31-0.97); P = 0.04], but not in patients without severe sepsis or shock. The class of antibiotic used empirically was not associated with prognosis in adequately treated patients. Conclusion ESBL-E bacteremia has a relatively high mortality that is partly related with a low adequacy of empirical antibiotic treatment. In selected subgroups the relevance of the adequacy of empirical therapy is limited. PMID:23038999

  18. On the gap between an empirical distribution and an exponential distribution of waiting times for price changes in a financial market

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sazuka, Naoya

    2007-03-01

    We analyze waiting times for price changes in a foreign currency exchange rate. Recent empirical studies of high-frequency financial data support that trades in financial markets do not follow a Poisson process and the waiting times between trades are not exponentially distributed. Here we show that our data is well approximated by a Weibull distribution rather than an exponential distribution in the non-asymptotic regime. Moreover, we quantitatively evaluate how much an empirical data is far from an exponential distribution using a Weibull fit. Finally, we discuss a transition between a Weibull-law and a power-law in the long time asymptotic regime.

  19. The Effect of Inadequate Initial Empiric Antimicrobial Treatment on Mortality in Critically Ill Patients with Bloodstream Infections: A Multi-Centre Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Savage, Rachel D.; Fowler, Robert A.; Rishu, Asgar H.; Bagshaw, Sean M.; Cook, Deborah; Dodek, Peter; Hall, Richard; Kumar, Anand; Lamontagne, François; Lauzier, François; Marshall, John; Martin, Claudio M.; McIntyre, Lauralyn; Muscedere, John; Reynolds, Steven; Stelfox, Henry T.; Daneman, Nick

    2016-01-01

    Hospital mortality rates are elevated in critically ill patients with bloodstream infections. Given that mortality may be even higher if appropriate treatment is delayed, we sought to determine the effect of inadequate initial empiric treatment on mortality in these patients. A retrospective cohort study was conducted across 13 intensive care units in Canada. We defined inadequate initial empiric treatment as not receiving at least one dose of an antimicrobial to which the causative pathogen(s) was susceptible within one day of initial blood culture. We evaluated the association between inadequate initial treatment and hospital mortality using a random effects multivariable logistic regression model. Among 1,190 patients (1,097 had bacteremia and 93 had candidemia), 476 (40%) died and 266 (22%) received inadequate initial treatment. Candidemic patients more often had inadequate initial empiric therapy (64.5% versus 18.8%), as well as longer delays to final culture results (4 vs 3 days) and appropriate therapy (2 vs 0 days). After adjustment, there was no detectable association between inadequate initial treatment and mortality among bacteremic patients (Odds Ratio (OR): 1.02, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) 0.70–1.48); however, candidemic patients receiving inadequate treatment had nearly three times the odds of death (OR: 2.89, 95% CI: 1.05–7.99). Inadequate initial empiric antimicrobial treatment was not associated with increased mortality in bacteremic patients, but was an important risk factor in the subgroup of candidemic patients. Further research is warranted to improve early diagnostic and risk prediction methods in candidemic patients. PMID:27152615

  20. Changes in affect during treatment for depression and anxiety.

    PubMed

    Kring, Ann M; Persons, Jacqueline B; Thomas, Cannon

    2007-08-01

    We tested the hypothesis that the tripartite model [Clark, L. A., & Watson, D. (1991). Tripartite model of anxiety and depression: Psychometric evidence and psychometric implications. Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 100, 316-336] can be extended to account for change during treatment for anxiety and depression. Forty-one patients treated naturalistically in private practice with cognitive behavior therapy completed weekly measures of depression, anxiety, negative affect (NA), positive affect (PA), and anxious arousal (AA). Consistent with the model, NA was associated with anxiety and depression during treatment, PA was more strongly related to depression than to anxiety, and AA was more strongly related to anxiety than to depression. As predicted, symptoms of depression and anxiety and NA all decreased during treatment. As predicted, AA also decreased, particularly for patients with panic disorder. PA increased during treatment, but only for patients who showed a significant decline in depression and only over an extended period of treatment. Nearly two-thirds of the variance in anxiety change was accounted for by changes in depression and NA, and just over three-fourths of the variance in depression change was accounted for by changes in anxiety and NA, indicating that much of the change in anxiety and depression across the course of treatment is shared in common.

  1. The Dimensions of Change in Therapeutic Community Treatment Instrument

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orlando, Maria; Wenzel, Suzanne L.; Ebener, Pat; Edwards, Michael C.; Mandell, Wallace; Becker, Kirsten

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe the refinement and preliminary evaluation of the Dimensions of Change in Therapeutic Community Treatment Instrument (DCI), a measure of treatment process. In Study 1, a 99-item DCI, administered to a cross-sectional sample of substance abuse clients (N = 990), was shortened to 54 items on the basis of results…

  2. Adolescent Substance Abuse Treatment: Organizational Change and Quality of Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rieckmann, Traci; Fussell, Holly; Doyle, Kevin; Ford, Jay; Riley, Katherine J.; Henderson, Stuart

    2011-01-01

    Substance abuse treatment agencies serving youth face unique barriers to providing quality care. Interviews with 17 adolescent programs found that family engagement, community involvement, and gender and diversity issues affected treatment delivery. Programs report organizational change efforts with implications for future process improvement…

  3. The Military’s Role in Enabling Political Transformation: a Catalyst for Change from Republic to Empire

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-13

    democracy by tyrannical government . For the Romans, it led to the transformation from informal republican empire to formal empire - from a society...standing professional military is not necessarily the cause of the transition from republican to imperial government , it can enable the...characteristics of imperial governance . For Athens and Rome, the rapid expansion and professionalization of the military exerted an influence that transformed

  4. Final Technical Report for "Collaborative Research: Regional climate-change projections through next-generation empirical and dynamical models"

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, A.W.; Ghil, M.; Kravtsov, K.; Smyth, P.J.

    2011-04-08

    This project was a continuation of previous work under DOE CCPP funding in which we developed a twin approach of non-homogeneous hidden Markov models (NHMMs) and coupled ocean-atmosphere (O-A) intermediate-complexity models (ICMs) to identify the potentially predictable modes of climate variability, and to investigate their impacts on the regional-scale. We have developed a family of latent-variable NHMMs to simulate historical records of daily rainfall, and used them to downscale seasonal predictions. We have also developed empirical mode reduction (EMR) models for gaining insight into the underlying dynamics in observational data and general circulation model (GCM) simulations. Using coupled O-A ICMs, we have identified a new mechanism of interdecadal climate variability, involving the midlatitude oceans mesoscale eddy field and nonlinear, persistent atmospheric response to the oceanic anomalies. A related decadal mode is also identified, associated with the oceans thermohaline circulation. The goal of the continuation was to build on these ICM results and NHMM/EMR model developments and software to strengthen two key pillars of support for the development and application of climate models for climate change projections on time scales of decades to centuries, namely: (a) dynamical and theoretical understanding of decadal-to-interdecadal oscillations and their predictability; and (b) an interface from climate models to applications, in order to inform societal adaptation strategies to climate change at the regional scale, including model calibration, correction, downscaling and, most importantly, assessment and interpretation of spread and uncertainties in multi-model ensembles. Our main results from the grant consist of extensive further development of the hidden Markov models for rainfall simulation and downscaling specifically within the non-stationary climate change context together with the development of parallelized software; application of NHMMs to

  5. Final Technical Report for "Collaborative Research. Regional climate-change projections through next-generation empirical and dynamical models"

    SciTech Connect

    Kravtsov, S.; Robertson, Andrew W.; Ghil, Michael; Smyth, Padhraic J.

    2011-04-08

    This project was a continuation of previous work under DOE CCPP funding in which we developed a twin approach of non-homogeneous hidden Markov models (NHMMs) and coupled ocean-atmosphere (O-A) intermediate-complexity models (ICMs) to identify the potentially predictable modes of climate variability, and to investigate their impacts on the regional-scale. We have developed a family of latent-variable NHMMs to simulate historical records of daily rainfall, and used them to downscale seasonal predictions. We have also developed empirical mode reduction (EMR) models for gaining insight into the underlying dynamics in observational data and general circulation model (GCM) simulations. Using coupled O-A ICMs, we have identified a new mechanism of interdecadal climate variability, involving the midlatitude oceans mesoscale eddy field and nonlinear, persistent atmospheric response to the oceanic anomalies. A related decadal mode is also identified, associated with the oceans thermohaline circulation. The goal of the continuation was to build on these ICM results and NHMM/EMR model developments and software to strengthen two key pillars of support for the development and application of climate models for climate change projections on time scales of decades to centuries, namely: (a) dynamical and theoretical understanding of decadal-to-interdecadal oscillations and their predictability; and (b) an interface from climate models to applications, in order to inform societal adaptation strategies to climate change at the regional scale, including model calibration, correction, downscaling and, most importantly, assessment and interpretation of spread and uncertainties in multi-model ensembles. Our main results from the grant consist of extensive further development of the hidden Markov models for rainfall simulation and downscaling specifically within the non-stationary climate change context together with the development of parallelized software; application of NHMMs to

  6. Does empirical treatment of community-acquired pneumonia with fluoroquinolones delay tuberculosis treatment and result in fluoroquinolone resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis? Controversies and solutions.

    PubMed

    Shen, Gwan-Han; Tsao, Thomas Chang-Yao; Kao, Shang-Jyh; Lee, Jen-Jyh; Chen, Yen-Hsu; Hsieh, Wei-Chung; Hsu, Gwo-Jong; Hsu, Yen-Tao; Huang, Ching-Tai; Lau, Yeu-Jun; Tsao, Shih-Ming; Hsueh, Po-Ren

    2012-03-01

    The role of fluoroquinolones (FQs) as empirical therapy for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) remains controversial in countries with high tuberculosis (TB) endemicity owing to the possibility of delayed TB diagnosis and treatment and the emergence of FQ resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Although the rates of macrolide-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae and amoxicillin/clavulanic acid-resistant Haemophilus influenzae have risen to alarming levels, the rates of respiratory FQ (RFQ) resistance amongst these isolates remain relatively low. It is reported that ca. 1-7% of CAP cases are re-diagnosed as pulmonary TB in Asian countries. A longer duration (≥ 7 days) of symptoms, a history of night sweats, lack of fever (> 38 °C), infection involving the upper lobe, presence of cavitary infiltrates, opacity in the lower lung without the presence of air, low total white blood cell count and the presence of lymphopenia are predictive of pulmonary TB. Amongst patients with CAP who reside in TB-endemic countries who are suspected of having TB, imaging studies as well as aggressive microbiological investigations need to be performed early on. Previous exposure to a FQ for >10 days in patients with TB is associated with the emergence of FQ-resistant M. tuberculosis isolates. However, rates of M. tuberculosis isolates with FQ resistance are significantly higher amongst multidrug-resistant M. tuberculosis isolates than amongst susceptible isolates. Consequently, in Taiwan and also in other countries with TB endemicity, a short-course (5-day) regimen of a RFQ is still recommended for empirical therapy for CAP patients if the patient is at low risk for TB.

  7. An empirical analysis of autobiographical memory specificity subtypes in brief emotion-focused and client-centered treatments of depression.

    PubMed

    Boritz, Tali Zweig; Angus, Lynne; Monette, Georges; Hollis-Walker, Laurie

    2008-09-01

    Overgeneral autobiographical memory (ABM) disclosure has been established as a key cognitive marker of clinical depression in experimental research studies. To determine the ecological validity of these findings for psychotherapy treatments of depression, the present study investigated the relationship between change in level of depression and ABM specificity in the context of early, middle, and late therapy session transcripts selected from 34 clients undergoing emotion-focused therapy and client-centered therapy in the York I Depression Study. A hierarchical linear modeling analysis demonstrated that clients disclosed significantly more specific ABMs over the course of therapy. There were no differences in ABM specificity between treatment groups. There was also no evidence that increased specificity differentiated between recovered and unchanged clients at treatment termination.

  8. Active Ingredients of Treatment and Client Mechanisms of Change in Behavioral Treatments for Alcohol Use Disorders: Progress 10 Years Later

    PubMed Central

    Magill, M.; Kiluk, B.D.; McCrady, B.; Tonigan, J.S.; Longabaugh, R.

    2015-01-01

    Background The current review revisits the article entitled: Active Ingredients of Behavioral Treatments for Alcohol Use Disorders (AUDs) published in Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research. This work summarized proceedings from a 2004 Symposium of the same name that was held at the Annual Meeting of the Research Society on Alcoholism (RSA). A decade has passed, which provides occasion for an evaluation of progress. In 2014, an RSA symposium titled Active Treatment Ingredients and Client Mechanisms of Change in Behavioral Treatments for Alcohol Use Disorders: Progress 10 Years Later did just that. Overview The current review revisits state-of-the-art research on the three treatments examined 10 years ago: Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT), Alcohol Behavior Couples Therapy (ABCT), and Twelve Step Facilitation (TSF). Because of its empirically-validated effectiveness and robust research agenda on the study of process-outcome, Motivational Interviewing (MI) has been selected as the fourth treatment modality to be discussed. For each of these four treatments, the reviewers provide a critical assessment of current theory and research with a special emphasis on key recommendations for the future. Conclusions Noteworthy progress has been made in identifying AITs and MOBCs in these four behavioral interventions for alcohol and other drug use disorders. Not only have we established some of the mechanisms through which these evidence-based treatments work, but we have also uncovered some of the limitations in our existing frameworks and methods. Further progress in this area will require a broader view with respect to conceptual frameworks, analytic methods, and measurement instrumentation. PMID:26344200

  9. Empiric treatment of protracted idiopathic purpura fulminans in an infant: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    etiologies. In the absence of etiology for protracted idiopathic purpura fulminans, management should include tissue biopsy, in which thrombotic findings warrant a trial of empiric anti-coagulation. Some infants, including our patient, may need long-term anti-coagulation, especially when the underlying etiology of coagulation remains unidentified and symptoms recur when treatment is halted. Given that our patient still requires anti-coagulation, he may have a yet to be identified autoimmune-mediated mechanism for his truly idiopathic case of protracted purpura fulminans. PMID:21605440

  10. Assessing changes to South African maize production areas in 2055 using empirical and process-based crop models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estes, L.; Bradley, B.; Oppenheimer, M.; Beukes, H.; Schulze, R. E.; Tadross, M.

    2010-12-01

    Rising temperatures and altered precipitation patterns associated with climate change pose a significant threat to crop production, particularly in developing countries. In South Africa, a semi-arid country with a diverse agricultural sector, anthropogenic climate change is likely to affect staple crops and decrease food security. Here, we focus on maize production, South Africa’s most widely grown crop and one with high socio-economic value. We build on previous coarser-scaled studies by working at a finer spatial resolution and by employing two different modeling approaches: the process-based DSSAT Cropping System Model (CSM, version 4.5), and an empirical distribution model (Maxent). For climate projections, we use an ensemble of 10 general circulation models (GCMs) run under both high and low CO2 emissions scenarios (SRES A2 and B1). The models were down-scaled to historical climate records for 5838 quinary-scale catchments covering South Africa (mean area = 164.8 km2), using a technique based on self-organizing maps (SOMs) that generates precipitation patterns more consistent with observed gradients than those produced by the parent GCMs. Soil hydrological and mechanical properties were derived from textural and compositional data linked to a map of 26422 land forms (mean area = 46 km2), while organic carbon from 3377 soil profiles was mapped using regression kriging with 8 spatial predictors. CSM was run using typical management parameters for the several major dryland maize production regions, and with projected CO2 values. The Maxent distribution model was trained using maize locations identified using annual phenology derived from satellite images coupled with airborne crop sampling observations. Temperature and precipitation projections were based on GCM output, with an additional 10% increase in precipitation to simulate higher water-use efficiency under future CO2 concentrations. The two modeling approaches provide spatially explicit projections of

  11. Women's steps of change and entry into drug abuse treatment. A multidimensional stages of change model.

    PubMed

    Brown, V B; Melchior, L A; Panter, A T; Slaughter, R; Huba, G J

    2000-04-01

    The Transtheoretical, or Stages of Change Model, has been applied to the investigation of help-seeking related to a number of addictive behaviors. Overall, the model has shown to be very important in understanding the process of help-seeking. However, substance abuse rarely exists in isolation from other health, mental health, and social problems. The present work extends the original Stages of Change Model by proposing "Steps of Change" as they relate to entry into substance abuse treatment programs for women. Readiness to make life changes in four domains-domestic violence, HIV sexual risk behavior, substance abuse, and mental health-is examined in relation to entry into four substance abuse treatment modalities (12-step, detoxification, outpatient, and residential). The Steps of Change Model hypothesizes that help-seeking behavior of substance-abusing women may reflect a hierarchy of readiness based on the immediacy, or time urgency, of their treatment issues. For example, women in battering relationships may be ready to make changes to reduce their exposure to violence before admitting readiness to seek substance abuse treatment. The Steps of Change Model was examined in a sample of 451 women contacted through a substance abuse treatment-readiness program in Los Angeles, California. A series of logistic regression analyses predict entry into four separate treatment modalities that vary. Results suggest a multidimensional Stages of Change Model that may extend to other populations and to other types of help-seeking behaviors.

  12. Shape of the self-concept clarity change during group psychotherapy predicts the outcome: an empirical validation of the theoretical model of the self-concept change

    PubMed Central

    Styła, Rafał

    2015-01-01

    Background: Self-Concept Clarity (SCC) describes the extent to which the schemas of the self are internally integrated, well defined, and temporally stable. This article presents a theoretical model that describes how different shapes of SCC change (especially stable increase and “V” shape) observed in the course of psychotherapy are related to the therapy outcome. Linking the concept of Jean Piaget and the dynamic systems theory, the study postulates that a stable SCC increase is needed for the participants with a rather healthy personality structure, while SCC change characterized by a “V” shape or fluctuations is optimal for more disturbed patients. Method: Correlational study in a naturalistic setting with repeated measurements (M = 5.8) was conducted on the sample of 85 patients diagnosed with neurosis and personality disorders receiving intensive eclectic group psychotherapy under routine inpatient conditions. Participants filled in the Self-Concept Clarity Scale (SCCS), Symptoms' Questionnaire KS-II, and Neurotic Personality Questionnaire KON-2006 at the beginning and at the end of the course of psychotherapy. The SCCS was also administered every 2 weeks during psychotherapy. Results: As hypothesized, among the relatively healthiest group of patients the stable SCC increase was related to positive treatment outcome, while more disturbed patients benefited from the fluctuations and “V” shape of SCC change. Conclusions: The findings support the idea that for different personality dispositions either a monotonic increase or transient destabilization of SCC is a sign of a good treatment prognosis. PMID:26579001

  13. NEW INSIGHTS INTO LEAD CORROSION CONTROL AND TREATMENT CHANGE IMPACTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation will summarize recent research into the chemistry of lead corrosion control, and focus on five different areas that could impact the prediction of whether or not particular treatment changes are likely to either disturb existing lead corrosion scales, or to actu...

  14. Enhancing Motivation for Change in Substance Abuse Treatment. Treatment Improvement Protocol (TIP) Series 35.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CDM Group, Inc.

    This TIP on the guidelines for treatment of substance use disorders is based on a fundamental rethinking of the concept of motivation. It suggests that the cognitive-behavioral approach to treatment requires a different perspective on the problem and on the prerequisites for change, while placing greater responsibility on the counselor whose job…

  15. Onychomycosis: epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment in a changing landscape.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Theodore; Friedlander, Sheila Fallon; Kircik, Leon; Zirwas, Matthew J; Stein Gold, Linda; Bhatia, Neal; Gupta, Aditya K

    2015-03-01

    Onychomycosis is an often overlooked and/or undertreated disease. This may be in part due to an under appreciation among both physicians and patients of its impact on quality of life and the potential for significant complications, from tinea corporis and cruris, to bacterial superinfection. Some health care providers are unaware of the effective low-risk treatments currently available. Changing demographic characteristics such as the relative aging of the population; the increasing prevalence of diabetes and peripheral vascular disease, and widespread iatrogenic immunosuppression; and changes in lifestyle practices such as earlier and greater participation in sports, are likely to lead to an increased prevalence of onychomycosis in both adults and children. Two topical onychomycosis treatments, efinaconazole 10% solution, and tavaborole 5% solution were recently approved by the FDA. This article reviews the state of knowledge and describes, briefly, these new treatment options.

  16. High-dose amoxicillin should be included in the empirical treatment of suspected meningitis in patients at risk of HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Talbot, Ben Edward Michael; Webster, Daniel; Fisher, Martin; Alexander, Eliza

    2011-01-01

    The authors report on a case of Listeria rhomboencepahlitis in a previously undiagnosed HIV positive man. This case is of interest as the incidence of Listeria has increased dramatically in recent years and so may increase in the HIV-infected population. The organism is inherently resistant to cephalosporin antibiotics, empirically employed in the treatment of central nervous system infections and thus highlights the need to include amoxicillin in meningitis treatment regimes in patients at risk of HIV infection as well as the older and those known to be immuno-compromised. PMID:22696737

  17. Changing Donor Funding and the Challenges of Integrated HIV Treatment.

    PubMed

    Nattrass, Nicoli; Hodes, Rebecca; Cluver, Lucie

    2016-07-01

    Donor financing for HIV prevention and treatment has shifted from supporting disease-specific ("vertical") programs to health systems strengthening ("horizontal") programs intended to integrate all aspects of care. We examine the consequences of shifting resources from three perspectives: first, through a broad analysis of the changing policy context of health care financing; second, through an account of changing priorities for HIV treatment in South Africa; and third, through a description of some clinical consequences that the authors observed in a research study examining adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) and sexual health among adolescents. We note that AIDS responses are neither completely vertical nor horizontal but rather increasingly diagonal, as disease-specific protocols operate alongside integrated supply chain management, human resource development, and preventive screening. We conclude that health care programs are better conceived of as networks of policies requiring different degrees of integration into communities.

  18. Changes in pharmaceutical treatment of diabetes and family financial burdens.

    PubMed

    Sarpong, Eric M; Bernard, Didem M; Miller, G Edward

    2012-08-01

    Recent changes in diabetes treatment guidelines and the introduction of new, more expensive pharmaceuticals appear to increase the financial challenges for nonelderly adults with diabetes. The authors used Medical Expenditure Panel Survey data to examine changes in the prevalence of diabetes and comorbidities, diabetes treatment, financial burdens, and the relationship between high financial burdens and patient characteristics. From 1997-1998 to 2006-2007, the total number of nonelderly adults treated for diabetes nearly doubled, from 5.4 to 10.7 million, and the proportion of diabetes patients using multiple drugs to treat their condition increased significantly. About a fifth of diabetes patients spent 10% or more of their family income on health care, and about one in nine spent 20% or more of their family income on health care. In 2006-2007, diabetes patients who were older, female, in poor health, or lacked insurance were more likely than others to have high burdens.

  19. An improved empirical dynamic control system model of global mean sea level rise and surface temperature change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qing; Luu, Quang-Hung; Tkalich, Pavel; Chen, Ge

    2017-03-01

    Having great impacts on human lives, global warming and associated sea level rise are believed to be strongly linked to anthropogenic causes. Statistical approach offers a simple and yet conceptually verifiable combination of remotely connected climate variables and indices, including sea level and surface temperature. We propose an improved statistical reconstruction model based on the empirical dynamic control system by taking into account the climate variability and deriving parameters from Monte Carlo cross-validation random experiments. For the historic data from 1880 to 2001, we yielded higher correlation results compared to those from other dynamic empirical models. The averaged root mean square errors are reduced in both reconstructed fields, namely, the global mean surface temperature (by 24-37%) and the global mean sea level (by 5-25%). Our model is also more robust as it notably diminished the unstable problem associated with varying initial values. Such results suggest that the model not only enhances significantly the global mean reconstructions of temperature and sea level but also may have a potential to improve future projections.

  20. Malaria treatment policy change and implementation: the case of Uganda.

    PubMed

    Nanyunja, Miriam; Nabyonga Orem, Juliet; Kato, Frederick; Kaggwa, Mugagga; Katureebe, Charles; Saweka, Joaquim

    2011-01-01

    Malaria due to P. falciparum is the number one cause of morbidity and mortality in Uganda where it is highly endemic in 95% of the country. The use of efficacious and effective antimalarial medicines is one of the key strategies for malaria control. Until 2000, Chloroquine (CQ) was the first-line drug for treatment of uncomplicated malaria in Uganda. Due to progressive resistance to CQ and to a combination of CQ with Sulfadoxine-Pyrimethamine, Uganda in 2004 adopted the use of ACTs as first-line drug for treating uncomplicated malaria. A review of the drug policy change process and postimplementation reports highlight the importance of managing the policy change process, generating evidence for policy decisions and availability of adequate and predictable funding for effective policy roll-out. These and other lessons learnt can be used to guide countries that are considering anti-malarial drug change in future.

  1. Epigenetic changes in the rat livers induced by pyrazinamide treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Kovalenko, V.M.; Bagnyukova, T.V.; Sergienko, O.V.; Bondarenko, L.B.; Shayakhmetova, G.M.; Matvienko, A.V.; Pogribny, I.P.

    2007-12-15

    Drug-induced liver injury, including drug-induced hepatotoxicity during the treatment of tuberculosis infection, is a major health problem with increasingly significant challenges to modern hepatology. Therefore, the assessment and monitoring of the hepatotoxicity of antituberculosis drugs for prevention of liver injury are great concerns during disease treatment. The recently emerged data showing the ability of toxicants, including pharmaceutical agents, to alter cellular epigenetic status, open a unique opportunity for early detection of drug hepatotoxicity. Here we report that treatment of male Wistar rats with antituberculosis drug pyrazinamide at doses of 250, 500 or 1000 mg/kg/day body weight for 45 days leads to an early and sustained decrease in cytosine DNA methylation, progressive hypomethylation of long interspersed nucleotide elements (LINE-1), and aberrant promoter hypermethylation of placental form glutathione-S-transferase (GSTP) and p16{sup INK4A} genes in livers of pyrazinamide-treated rats, while serum levels of bilirubin and activity of aminotransferases changed modestly. The early occurrence of these epigenetic alterations and their association with progression of liver injury specific pathological changes indicate that alterations in DNA methylation may be useful predictive markers for the assessment of drug hepatotoxicity.

  2. Structural changes of synthetic opal by heat treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arasuna, Akane; Okuno, Masayuki; Okudera, Hiroki; Mizukami, Tomoyuki; Arai, Shoji; Katayama, Shin'ichi; Koyano, Mikio; Ito, Nobuaki

    2013-10-01

    The structural changes of synthetic opal by heat treatment up to 1,400 °C were investigated using scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and Fourier transform infrared and Raman spectroscopies. The results indicate that the dehydration and condensation of silanol in opal are very important factors in the structural evolution of heat-treated synthetic opal. Synthetic opal releases water molecules and silanols by heat treatment up to 400 °C, where the dehydration of silanol may lead to the condensation of a new Si-O-Si network comprising a four-membered ring structure of SiO4 tetrahedra, even at 400 °C. Above 600 °C, water molecules are lost and the opal surface and internal silanol molecules are completely dehydrated by heat effect, and the medium-temperature range structure of opal may begin to thermally reconstruct to six-membered rings of SiO4 tetrahedra. Above 1,000 °C, the opal structure almost approaches that of silica glass with an average structure of six-membered rings. Above 1,200 °C, the opal changes to low-cristobalite; however, minor evidence of low-tridymite stacking was evident after heat treatment at 1,400 °C.

  3. Clostridium difficile: Changing Epidemiology, Treatment and Infection Prevention Measures.

    PubMed

    Cecil, Jane A

    2012-12-01

    Clostridium difficile was first reported as a cause of antibiotic-associated colitis in 1978. In more recent years we have witnessed disturbing trends associated with C. difficile infection (CDI). CDI has become more common, affecting populations previously considered at low risk, more severe with an associated increase in mortality, and more difficult to treat with some patients experiencing multiple relapses and a reduced responsiveness to previously effective antibiotics. These trends have been coincident with the emergence of a new hypervirulent strain responsible for several outbreaks in the last decade. Fortunately, we have also seen promising developments, particularly with regard to testing and treatment. This review discusses recent changes in the epidemiology of CDI and recent developments in the testing, treatment and prevention of CDI.

  4. CO2 laser microsurgeries in treatment of larynx pathological changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kus, Jan; Osmolski, Antoni; Kubiczek-Jagielska, Marzena; Frenkiel, Zofia; Milczarek, Katarzyna

    1996-03-01

    The results of the laser microsurgical treatment of the 273 patients with different pathological changes in the larynx are presented in the paper. In this number are included cases with tumors (80), precancers (40), papillomatosis (17), and stenosis of the larynx (71). Patients were treated with carbon-dioxide surgical laser with the laser beam power ranging from 12 to 28 watts depending on the pathology and its advance. Positive results of the treatment were observed in 73% to 100% of cases in different groups of patients. The authors suggest that in some cases the carbon-dioxide laser is only an alternative tool but in many cases, e.g., in papillomatosis, it is much better than traditional equipment. There are also cases such as hemangioma where the laser is an unreplaceable surgical technique.

  5. Knowledge-driven institutional change: an empirical study on combating desertification in northern China from 1949 to 2004.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lihua; Wu, Jianguo

    2012-11-15

    Understanding institutional changes is crucial for environmental management. Here we investigated how institutional changes influenced the process and result of desertification control in northern China between 1949 and 2004. Our analysis was based on a case study of 21 field sites and a meta-analysis of additional 29 sites reported in the literature. Our results show that imposed knowledge-driven institutional change was often perceived as a more progressive, scientific, and rational type of institutional change by entrepreneurs, scholars, experts, and technicians, while voluntary, knowledge-driven institutional change based on indigenous knowledge and experiences of local populations was discouraged. Our findings also demonstrate that eight working rules of imposed knowledge-driven institutional change can be applied to control desertification effectively. These rules address the issues of perception of potential gains, entrepreneurs' appeals and support, coordination of multiple goals, collaboration among multiple organizations, interest distribution and conflict resolution, incremental institutional change, external intervention, and coordination among the myriad institutions involved. Imposed knowledge-driven institutional change tended to be more successful when these rules were thoroughly implemented. These findings provide an outline for implementing future institutional changes and policy making to combat desertification and other types of ecological and environmental management.

  6. Structural changes in microcrystalline cellulose in subcritical water treatment.

    PubMed

    Tolonen, Lasse K; Zuckerstätter, Gerhard; Penttilä, Paavo A; Milacher, Walter; Habicht, Wilhelm; Serimaa, Ritva; Kruse, Andrea; Sixta, Herbert

    2011-07-11

    Subcritical water is a high potential green chemical for the hydrolysis of cellulose. In this study microcrystalline cellulose was treated in subcritical water to study structural changes of the cellulose residues. The alterations in particle size and appearance were studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and those in the degree of polymerization (DP) and molar mass distributions by gel permeation chromatography (GPC). Further, changes in crystallinity and crystallite dimensions were quantified by wide-angle X-ray scattering and (13)C solid-state NMR. The results showed that the crystallinity remained practically unchanged throughout the treatment, whereas the size of the remaining cellulose crystallites increased. Microcrystalline cellulose underwent significant depolymerization in subcritical water. However, depolymerization leveled off at a relatively high degree of polymerization. The molar mass distributions of the residues showed a bimodal form. We infer that cellulose gets dissolved in subcritical water only after extensive depolymerization.

  7. Land Use Change Impacts to Flows and Hydropower at the Southern Fringe of the Brazilian Amazon: A Regional, Empirical Study of Land-Water-Energy Nexus Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, M. C.; Thompson, S. E.; Cohn, A.

    2014-12-01

    Land use/cover change (LUCC) has occurred extensively in the Brazilian Amazon rainforest-savanna transition. Agricultural development-driven LUCC at regional scales can alter surface energy budgets, evapotranspiration (ET) and rainfall; these hydroclimatic changes impact streamflows, and thus hydropower. To date, there is only limited empirical understanding of these complex land-water-energy nexus dynamics, yet understanding is important to developing countries where both agriculture and hydropower are expanding and intensifying. To observe these changes and their interconnections, we synthesize a novel combination of ground network, remotely sensed, and empirically modeled data for LUCC, rainfall, flows, and hydropower potential. We connect the extensive temporal and spatial trends in LUCC occurring from 2000-2012 (and thus observable in the satellite record) to long-term historical flow records and run-of-river hydropower generation potential estimates. Changes in hydrologic condition are observed in terms of dry and wet season moments, extremes, and flow duration curves. Run-of-river hydropower generation potential is modeled at basin gauge points using equation models parameterized with literature-based low-head turbine efficiencies, and simple algorithms establishing optimal head and capacity from elevation and flows, respectively. Regression analyses are used to demonstrate a preliminary causal analysis of LUCC impacts to flow and energy, and discuss extension of the analysis to ungauged basins. The results are transferable to tropical and transitional forest regions worldwide where simultaneous agricultural and hydropower development potentially compete for coupled components of regional water cycles, and where policy makers and planners require an understanding of LUCC impacts to hydroclimate-dependent industries and ecosystems.

  8. Changes in optical behaviour of iron pyritohedron upon microwave treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arvind, Hemant K.; Choudhary, B. L.; Dolia, S. N.; Dalela, S.; Jakhar, S. R.; Kumar, Sudhish

    2016-05-01

    We have utilized the volumetric heating of materials by microwave energy absorption for investigating the changes in the optical behavior of a well characterized natural crystal of iron pyritohedron (FeS2). For microwave treatment virgin central core pieces of the FeS2 crystal were ground to fine powder and then heated in a microwave oven for half an hour. Powder XRD measurements confirmed that the microwave treatment on FeS2 does not affect the face centered cubic structure of FeS2. The UV-Visible optical spectrum of the microwave treated FeS2 display a narrow optical absorption peak at ˜315 nm, on the other hand in the UV-Vis spectrum of pure FeS2 a broad absorption band with a maximum centered ˜310-330 nm was observed. The band gap energies for pure and microwave treated FeS2 are estimated to be 1.09 eV and 1.35 eV respectively. This study clearly indicates that microwave treatment results in a blue shift in the absorption edge and enhancement in the band gap energy.

  9. Interstitial capillary changes in lithium nephropathy: effects of antihypertensive treatment.

    PubMed

    Skyum, Helle; Marcussen, Niels; Nielsen, Steen Horne; Christensen, Sten

    2004-10-01

    Histopathological changes were investigated in the tubulointerstitium and in the capillaries of male Wistar rats with lithium-induced nephropathy using stereological methods. Two antihypertensive drugs with opposite effects on the renin-angiotensin system, an ACE inhibitor (angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor) and a thiazide diuretic, modified the nephropathy. Generally, there was a significant positive correlation between the reduction in GFR (glomerular filtration rate) and the reduction in the volume of intact tubular structures and interstitial capillaries. A significant negative correlation was seen between the reduction in GFR and the increase in tubulocapillary distance and the absolute volume of interstitial connective tissue, respectively. Treatment with perindopril, and to some extent hydrochlorothiazide, reversed the rise in systolic blood pressure associated with lithium-induced nephropathy but did not affect the progression to terminal uraemia, the structural renal changes or the mortality. In conclusion, severe tubular and capillary changes are seen in this model of chronic renal failure. Tubular atrophy is associated with a decrease in interstitial capillaries and with an increase in the tubulocapillary distance. Systemic hypertension or activation of the renin-angiotensin system may not be important factors for the progression to terminal renal failure.

  10. Impact of farm level adaptation to climate change on agricultural productivity and farmers' wellbeing: Empirical evidence from Pakistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abid, Muhammad; Scheffran, Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    Climate change is projected to adversely affect the agricultural sector and attached rural livelihoods, particularly in the developing countries. Hence adaptation to climate change is crucial to support agricultural productivity and rural livelihoods. The current study is based on comprehensive cross sectional data collected through 450 face-to-face interviews with farmers from three agro-ecological zones of Punjab province, Pakistan. This paper aims to examine the factors that influence the farmers' adaptation decisions and to assess the impact of farm level adaptation on crop productivity and farmers' wellbeing. The paper uses correlation analysis, binary logistic regression and propensity score matching techniques in order to explore the study objectives. The results of the study indicate that education, age, land holdings, farmer-to-farmer interaction, access to weather forecasting information and location in agro-ecological zone does have significant impact on farmers' decision to adapt to climate change. Major adaptation measures adopted by farmers were changing planting dates, changing cropping varieties, planting shaded trees and changing input-mix. Moreover the study found a positive and significant impact of adaptation on productivity of all major crops (wheat, sugarcane, maize and rice) and on farmers' wellbeing in term of farm income. Furthermore, the study also found that the extent of adaptation benefits increases with the number of adaptation measures. The findings of the study suggest to focus on farmers' education and easy access to climate-specific information for better adaptation at farm level and improved farm wellbeing. Key words: Climate change; Farm level adaptation; crop productivity; farmers' wellbeing; Pakistan

  11. Changes in Transformational Leadership and Empirical Quality Outcomes in a Finnish Hospital over a Two-Year Period: A Longitudinal Study.

    PubMed

    Mäntynen, Raija; Vehviläinen-Julkunen, Katri; Partanen, Pirjo; Turunen, Hannele; Miettinen, Merja; Kvist, Tarja

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the changes in transformational leadership and quality outcomes that occurred between 2008 and 2011 in a Finnish university hospital that is aiming to meet the Magnet standards. Measurements were conducted in 2008-2009 and subsequently in 2010-2011 by surveying nursing staff and patients. Nursing staff were surveyed using web-based surveys to collect data on transformational leadership (n 1 = 499, n 2 = 498) and patient safety culture (n 1 = 234, n 2 = 512) and using both postal and web-based surveys to gather information on job satisfaction (n 1 = 1176, n 2 = 779). Questionnaires were used to collect data on care satisfaction from patients (n 1 = 678, n 2 = 867). Transformational leadership was measured using the 54-item TLS, job satisfaction with the 37-item KUHJSS, patient safety culture with the 42-item HSPSC, and patient satisfaction using the 42-item RHCS questionnaire. Transformational leadership, which was the weakest area, was at the same level between the two measurement occasions. Job satisfaction scores increased between 2008 and 2010, although they were generally excellent in 2008. The scores for nonpunitive responses to errors and events reported were also higher in the 2010-2011 surveys. The highest empirical outcome scores related to patient satisfaction. The project and the development initiatives undertaken since 2008 seem to have had positive effects on empirical quality outcomes.

  12. Evaluation of treatment and posttreatment changes of protraction facemask treatment using the PAR index.

    PubMed

    Ngan, P; Yiu, C

    2000-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to use the Peer Assesment Rating (PAR) index score to evaluate the treatment and posttreatment changes of Class III patients treated by protraction facemask. The sample consisted of 20 Chinese children, 6 to 11 years old, with Class III skeletal malocclusion who had been treated with maxillary expansion and a protraction facemask. The average treatment time was 8.2 months, followed by 1 year of retention with a Class III functional appliance. Study casts were taken pretreatment (T1), posttreatment (T2), 1 year follow-up (T3), and 2 years follow-up (T4). After treatment, PAR scores were calculated for each time period. Differences among the 4 time periods were analyzed with the Wilcoxin matched-pairs test. Significant reductions in PAR scores were found at T2 (56%), T3 (70%), and T4 (63%) compared with T1. Immediately posttreatment (T2), 17 (85%) of 20 patients had improved PAR scores by a reduction of at least 30%. Reductions were caused primarily by correction of the anterior crossbite. One year after treatment (T3), further reductions in PAR score were noted (P <.01) as a result of better alignment of the anterior segment, improvement of the buccal occlusion, and overbite and midline corrections. Two years after treatment (T4), PAR scores were higher than at the previous time period. The increases were due to relapses in overjet (4 of 20 patients), overbite, and centerline corrections. These results indicate that significant reductions in the severity of Class III malocclusion can be achieved with early orthopedic facemask treatment. In most cases, further improvement in the PAR score can be expected 1 and 2 years after treatment. In a few patients, the benefits of early treatment are negated by relapses in overjet, overbite, and centerline corrections during the follow-up period.

  13. Changing Bilingual Self-Perceptions from Early Adolescence to Early Adulthood: Empirical Evidence from a Mixed-Methods Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caldas, Stephen J.

    2008-01-01

    In the emerging tradition of language socialization research, this study examines the changing bilingual self-perceptions of three children, identical twin girls and their older brother, from early adolescence through early adulthood. The children were reared in a predominantly French-speaking home in south Louisiana by French/English bilingual…

  14. The Changing Landscape of Lung Cancer Research and Treatment

    Cancer.gov

    Along with the Lung Cancer Social Media (#LCSM) community, the National Cancer Institute will be co-hosting a lively and interactive Google Hangout on Air about the changing landscape of lung cancer research and treatment. During the chat, viewers will have the opportunity to pose questions to a panel of lung cancer experts including NCI's Dr. Shakun Malik, the head of thoracic oncology therapeutics, Roy S. Herbst, MD, PhD, Chief of Medical Oncology, Yale Cancer Center and Smilow Cancer Hospital at Yale-New Haven and David Tom Cooke MD FACS, Head, Section of General Thoracic Surgery University of California, Davis. You can also learn more and follow along on the #LCSM Chat page. The chat will be moderated by lung cancer advocate and #LCSM co-founder, Janet Freeman-Daily. To ask questions of our experts, simply use the #LCSM hashtag during the chat.

  15. Blood Pressure and Heart Rate Changes During Clozapine Treatment.

    PubMed

    Norman, Sarah M; Sullivan, Kelli M; Liu, Fang; DiPaula, Bethany A; Jose, Pedro A; Kitchen, Christopher A; Feldman, Stephanie M; Kelly, Deanna L

    2016-09-27

    People with schizophrenia are 3-4 times more likely to die from cardiovascular disease than the general population. Clozapine (CLZ) is the gold standard of treatment for refractory schizophrenia. It has been associated with tachycardia and recent evidence shows individuals prescribed CLZ may develop blood pressure (BP) elevation and hypertension. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of CLZ on BP and heart rate (HR). This was a retrospective chart review of patients 18-75 years old with a DSM IV diagnosis of Schizophrenia or Schizoaffective disorder. Primary outcomes were systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), and HR measured 12 weeks before and 24 weeks during CLZ treatment. Eighteen patient records were included in this study. The mean stabilized CLZ dose was 441.7 ± 171.8 mg/day. DBP (t = 1.02, df = 79.5, = 2.00, 0.049) and HR (t = 1.32, df = 355  = -4.61, < 0.0001) were significantly higher after CLZ initiation. A trend was noted for increase in SBP (p = 0.071). 22 % of patients met criteria for hypertension before CLZ and 67 % during CLZ treatment (Chi Square = 6.25, df = 1, p = 0.0124). No significant changes in weight or renal function occured during CLZ treatment. No patients had evidence of cardiomyopathy. The data suggest CLZ may be associated with a rise in BP and HR. The results of this study support previous literature that found an increase in SBP/DBP regardless of CLZ dose, occurring early in treatment. Due to high risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, more work is needed to determine risk factors and understand the mechanism of action that may cause this side effect.

  16. Multidisciplinary approach to the treatment of invasive fungal infections in adult patients. Prophylaxis, empirical, preemptive or targeted therapy, which is the best in the different hosts?

    PubMed Central

    Zaragoza, Rafael; Pemán, Javier; Salavert, Miguel; Viudes, Ángel; Solé, Amparo; Jarque, Isidro; Monte, Emilio; Romá, Eva; Cantón, Emilia

    2008-01-01

    The high morbidity, mortality, and health care costs associated with invasive fungal infections, especially in the critical care setting and immunocompromised host, have made it an excellent target for prophylactic, empiric, and preemptive therapy interventions principally based on early identification of risk factors. Early diagnosis and treatment are associated with a better prognosis. In the last years there have been important developments in antifungal pharmacotherapy. An approach to the new diagnosis tools in the clinical mycology laboratory and an analysis of the use new antifungal agents and its application in different clinical situations has been made. Furthermore, an attempt of developing a state of the art in each clinical scenario (critically ill, hematological, and solid organ transplant patients) has been performed, trying to choose the best strategy for each clinical situation (prophylaxis, pre-emptive, empirical, or targeted therapy). The high mortality rates in these settings make mandatory the application of early de-escalation therapy in critically ill patients with fungal infection. In addition, the possibility of antifungal combination therapy might be considered in solid organ transplant and hematological patients. PMID:19337433

  17. Comparative Case Study of Diffusion of Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing in Two Clinical Settings: Empirically Supported Treatment Status Is Not Enough.

    PubMed

    Cook, Joan M; Biyanova, Tatyana; Coyne, James C

    2009-01-01

    An in-depth comparative case study was conducted of two attempts at diffusion of an empirically supported, but controversial, psychotherapy: eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR). One Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) treatment setting in which there was substantial uptake was compared with a second VA setting in which it was not adopted. Qualitative interviews were conducted with 10 mental health clinicians at the first site, and 19 at the second. Critical selling points for EMDR were a highly regarded champion, the observability of effects with patients, and personally experiencing its effects during a role training session. Compatibility with existing psychotherapist practices and values further allowed the therapy to become embedded in the organizational culture. At the second site, a sense that EMDR was not theoretically coherent or compelling overwhelmed other considerations, including its empirical status. Comparative studies contrasting settings in which innovative therapies are implemented versus those in which they were rejected may aid in refining theories of and strategies for dissemination.

  18. Changes in rhizosphere bacterial gene expression following glyphosate treatment.

    PubMed

    Newman, Molli M; Lorenz, Nicola; Hoilett, Nigel; Lee, Nathan R; Dick, Richard P; Liles, Mark R; Ramsier, Cliff; Kloepper, Joseph W

    2016-05-15

    In commercial agriculture, populations and interactions of rhizosphere microflora are potentially affected by the use of specific agrichemicals, possibly by affecting gene expression in these organisms. To investigate this, we examined changes in bacterial gene expression within the rhizosphere of glyphosate-tolerant corn (Zea mays) and soybean (Glycine max) in response to long-term glyphosate (PowerMAX™, Monsanto Company, MO, USA) treatment. A long-term glyphosate application study was carried out using rhizoboxes under greenhouse conditions with soil previously having no history of glyphosate exposure. Rhizosphere soil was collected from the rhizoboxes after four growing periods. Soil microbial community composition was analyzed using microbial phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis. Total RNA was extracted from rhizosphere soil, and samples were analyzed using RNA-Seq analysis. A total of 20-28 million bacterial sequences were obtained for each sample. Transcript abundance was compared between control and glyphosate-treated samples using edgeR. Overall rhizosphere bacterial metatranscriptomes were dominated by transcripts related to RNA and carbohydrate metabolism. We identified 67 differentially expressed bacterial transcripts from the rhizosphere. Transcripts downregulated following glyphosate treatment involved carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism, and upregulated transcripts involved protein metabolism and respiration. Additionally, bacterial transcripts involving nutrients, including iron, nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium, were also affected by long-term glyphosate application. Overall, most bacterial and all fungal PLFA biomarkers decreased after glyphosate treatment compared to the control. These results demonstrate that long-term glyphosate use can affect rhizosphere bacterial activities and potentially shift bacterial community composition favoring more glyphosate-tolerant bacteria.

  19. A survey of the infrastructure for children's mental health services: implications for the implementation of empirically supported treatments (ESTs).

    PubMed

    Schoenwald, Sonja K; Chapman, Jason E; Kelleher, Kelly; Hoagwood, Kimberly Eaton; Landsverk, John; Stevens, Jack; Glisson, Charles; Rolls-Reutz, Jennifer

    2008-03-01

    A structured interview survey of directors of a large national sample (n = 200) of mental health service organizations treating children examined the governance, financing, staffing, services, and implementation practices of these organizations; and, director ratings of factors important to implementation of new treatments and services. Descriptive analyses showed private organizations financing services with public (particularly Medicaid) funds are prevalent and that employment of professional staff, clinical supervision and training, productivity requirements, and outcomes monitoring are common. Results of random effects regression models (RRMs) evaluating associations between governance, financing, and organizational characteristics and the use of new treatments and services showed for-profit organizations more likely to implement such treatments, and organizations with more licensed clinical staff and weekly clinical supervision in place less likely to do so. Results of RRMs evaluating relations between director ratings of the importance to new treatment and service implementation of three factors-fit with existing implementation practices, infrastructure support, and organizational mission and support-suggest greater importance to public than private organizations of these factors. Implications for EST implementation and future research are described.

  20. Translating Empirically Supported Strategies into Accessible Interventions: The Potential Utility of Exercise for the Treatment of Panic Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smits, Jasper A. J.; Powers, Mark B.; Berry, Angela C.; Otto, Michael W.

    2007-01-01

    Many patients suffering from panic disorder do not receive adequate care. Advances in the conceptualization and treatment of panic disorder encourage innovative strategies for targeting core fears (fears of anxiety sensations) that underlie this disorder. In this article, we discuss the use of exercise as a potential strategy for therapeutic…

  1. Fluctuating Arctic Sea ice thickness changes estimated by an in situ learned and empirically forced neural network model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Belchansky, G.I.; Douglas, D.C.; Platonov, N.G.

    2008-01-01

    Sea ice thickness (SIT) is a key parameter of scientific interest because understanding the natural spatiotemporal variability of ice thickness is critical for improving global climate models. In this paper, changes in Arctic SIT during 1982-2003 are examined using a neural network (NN) algorithm trained with in situ submarine ice draft and surface drilling data. For each month of the study period, the NN individually estimated SIT of each ice-covered pixel (25-km resolution) based on seven geophysical parameters (four shortwave and longwave radiative fluxes, surface air temperature, ice drift velocity, and ice divergence/convergence) that were cumulatively summed at each monthly position along the pixel's previous 3-yr drift track (or less if the ice was <3 yr old). Average January SIT increased during 1982-88 in most regions of the Arctic (+7.6 ?? 0.9 cm yr-1), decreased through 1996 Arctic-wide (-6.1 ?? 1.2 cm yr-1), then modestly increased through 2003 mostly in the central Arctic (+2.1 ?? 0.6 cm yr-1). Net ice volume change in the Arctic Ocean from 1982 to 2003 was negligible, indicating that cumulative ice growth had largely replaced the estimated 45 000 km3 of ice lost by cumulative export. Above 65??N, total annual ice volume and interannual volume changes were correlated with the Arctic Oscillation (AO) at decadal and annual time scales, respectively. Late-summer ice thickness and total volume varied proportionally until the mid-1990s, but volume did not increase commensurate with the thickening during 1996-2002. The authors speculate that decoupling of the ice thickness-volume relationship resulted from two opposing mechanisms with different latitudinal expressions: a recent quasi-decadal shift in atmospheric circulation patterns associated with the AO's neutral state facilitated ice thickening at high latitudes while anomalously warm thermal forcing thinned and melted the ice cap at its periphery. ?? 2008 American Meteorological Society.

  2. Energetics and structure in solvent: A dielectric continuum model of solvation combined with molecular mechanics, Ab Initio, and Semi-empirical molecular orbital treatments of the solute

    SciTech Connect

    Tawa, G.J.; Pratt, L.R.; Martin, R.L.

    1996-12-31

    We present a method for computing the electrostatic component of the solvation free energy, {Delta}G{sup el}, of a solute molecule in the presence of solvent modeled as a dielectric continuum. The method is based on an integral form of Poisson`s equation which is solved to obtain a distribution of induced polarization charge at the solute-solvent dielectric interface. The solution of Poisson`s equation is obtained by application of a boundary element procedure. The method is tested by comparing its predictions of {Delta}G{sup el} to exact values for several model problems. The method is then used in a variety of contexts to assess its qualitative prediction ability. It is first combined with a molecular mechanics treatment of the solute to evaluate the effects of aqueous solvent on the conformational equilibria of several small molecules of interest-these are N-methyl acetamide and alanine dipeptide. For both molecules dielectric continuum solvation predicts torsional free energies of solvation that are in accord with other more complete treatments of solvation. The method is then combined with ab initio and semi-empirical molecular orbital theory for the solute. Self consistent reaction field calculations (SCRF) are performed to evaluate the correlation is in general very good. Relative agreement with experiment is best for ions where electrostatics predominate and worst for non-polar neutral molecules were electrostatics are minor. Semi-empirical configuration interaction SCRF calculations are also performed in the presence of solvent in order to determine ground-to-excited state absorption energy shifts for formaldehyde and indole mine ground-to-excited state absorption energy shifts for formaldehyde and indole when placed in water. We find a rough correlation between transition energy shifts and the dipole moments of the initial and final states involved in the transition.

  3. Changes in Trypanosoma cruzi-specific immune responses following treatment: surrogate markers of treatment efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Laucella, Susana A.; Mazliah, Damián Pérez; Bertocchi, Graciela; Alvarez, María G.; Cooley, Gretchen; Viotti, Rodolfo; Albareda, María C.; Lococo, Bruno; Postan, Miriam; Armenti, Alejandro; Tarleton, Rick L.

    2009-01-01

    Background As many as 20 million people are living with Trypanosoma cruzi infection in Latin American, yet few receive any treatment. The major limitation in developing and evaluating potential new drugs for their efficacy is the lack of reliable tests to assess parasite burden and elimination. Methods Adults volunteers with chronic T. cruzi infection were evaluated clinically and stratified according to the Kuschnir classification. Individuals in group 0 and group 1 clinical status were treated with 5 mg benznidazole/kg/day for 30 days. The changes in T. cruzi-specific T cell and antibody responses, as well as in clinical status, were measured periodically over the 3-5 year follow-up period and compared to pre-treatment conditions and to an untreated control group. Results The frequency of peripheral IFN- g-producing T cells specific for T. cruzi declined as early as 12 months after BZ treatment and subsequently became undetectable in a substantial proportion of treated subjects. Addtionally decreases in antibody responses to a pool of recombinant T. cruzi proteins also declined in many of these same subjects. The shift to negative IFN- g T cell responses was highly associated with an early increase in IFN- g-producing T cells with phenotypic features of effector/effector memory cells in a subset of subjects. Benznidazole treatment also resulted in an increase in naïve and early differentiated memory-like CD8+ T cells in a majority of subjects. Conclusions BZ treatment during chronic Chagas disease has a substantial impact on parasite-specific immune response that is likely to be indicative of treatment efficacy and cure. PMID:19877967

  4. Reconstructing Holocene sea-level change from coastal freshwater peat: A combined empirical and model-based approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, William; Gehrels, Roland

    2014-05-01

    Freshwater environments have long been considered to be unsuitable for the reconstruction of Holocene sea-level changes as they provide limiting, rather than precise, sea-level index points. We recorded the stratigraphy of a small beach and backbarrier coastal Phragmites marsh at Hallsands, south Devon, southwest England, using hand-drilled cores and ground penetrating radar, and collected five new sea-level index points from the base of a Holocene peat sequence to refine the regional Holocene relative sea-level curve. We demonstrate that the samples, despite their freshwater origin, represent accurate sea-level index points due to the quantifiable relationship between tide levels and groundwater. By means of water-table monitoring and groundwater modelling we show that the primary controls on the water table in the marsh are: (1) stratigraphy; (2) peat permeability; and (3) recharge rates in the backbarrier marsh. The five index points document relative sea-level positions between 7200 and 2400 cal yr BP. Three points are in good agreement with previously collected regional data from intertidal deposits and two points usefully fill gaps in the existing reconstruction. We present an amended Holocene relative sea-level curve for south Devon, based on 30 data points. We conclude that the base of Holocene freshwater peat sequences in small backbarrier systems provide reliable index points for the reconstruction of relative Holocene sea-level changes provided that: (1) the backbarrier stratigraphy show uninterrupted peat sequences demonstrating that the barrier has remain closed; (2) the water table in the backbarrier marsh is controlled by the tidally-oscillating sea level; (3) values of recharge and peat permeability are such that ponding and drying of the backbarrier marsh is limited; and (4) the beach is relatively thin and its permeability is not the primary control of water-table elevations in the backbarrier marsh. The combined approach of data collection and

  5. Identifying significant covariates for anti-HIV treatment response: mechanism-based differential equation models and empirical semiparametric regression models.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yangxin; Liang, Hua; Wu, Hulin

    2008-10-15

    In this paper, the mechanism-based ordinary differential equation (ODE) model and the flexible semiparametric regression model are employed to identify the significant covariates for antiretroviral response in AIDS clinical trials. We consider the treatment effect as a function of three factors (or covariates) including pharmacokinetics, drug adherence and susceptibility. Both clinical and simulated data examples are given to illustrate these two different kinds of modeling approaches. We found that the ODE model is more powerful to model the mechanism-based nonlinear relationship between treatment effects and virological response biomarkers. The ODE model is also better in identifying the significant factors for virological response, although it is slightly liberal and there is a trend to include more factors (or covariates) in the model. The semiparametric mixed-effects regression model is very flexible to fit the virological response data, but it is too liberal to identify correct factors for the virological response; sometimes it may miss the correct factors. The ODE model is also biologically justifiable and good for predictions and simulations for various biological scenarios. The limitations of the ODE models include the high cost of computation and the requirement of biological assumptions that sometimes may not be easy to validate. The methodologies reviewed in this paper are also generally applicable to studies of other viruses such as hepatitis B virus or hepatitis C virus.

  6. Typology of Couples Entering Alcohol Behavioral Couple Therapy: An Empirical Approach and Test of Predictive Validity on Treatment Response

    PubMed Central

    Ladd, Benjamin O.; McCrady, Barbara S.

    2016-01-01

    The current study aimed to examine whether classification of couples in which one partner has an alcohol problem is similar to that reported in the general couples literature. Typologies of couples seeking Alcohol Behavioral Couple Therapy (ABCT) were developed via hierarchical cluster analysis using behavioral codes of couple interactions during their first ABCT session. Four couples types based on in-session behavior were established reliably, labeled Avoider, Validator, Hostile, and Ambivalent-Detached. These couple types resembled couples types found in previous research. Couple type was associated with baseline relationship satisfaction, but not alcohol use. Results suggest heterogeneity in couples with alcohol problems presenting to treatment; further study is needed to investigate the function of alcohol within these different types. PMID:25808432

  7. Evidence for Adverse Phonatory Change Following an Inhaled Combination Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erickson, Elizabeth; Sivasankar, Mahalakshmi

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Voice problems are reported as a frequent side effect of inhaled combination (IC) treatments. The purpose of this experimental study was to investigate whether IC treatments are detrimental to phonation. We hypothesized that IC treatment would significantly increase phonation threshold pressure (PTP) and perceived phonatory effort (PPE),…

  8. Ticarcillin-clavulanic acid plus amikacin versus ceftazidime plus amikacin in the empirical treatment of fever in acute leukemia: a prospective randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Fanci, R; Paci, C; Leoni, F; Casini, C; Longo, G

    2003-06-01

    We evaluated the efficacy of ticarcillin-clavulanic acid plus amikacin (TCA) with ceftazidime plus amikacin (CFA) as empiric therapy of fever in acute leukemia in a total of 127 episodes. The overall success rate of the therapy (survival) was 93% in TCA group and 92% in CFA group. Success without therapy modifications (afebrile at 72 hours) was 39% for TCA, 31% for CFA; success with modifications was 55% and 61% respectively. Failure (death due to documented or presumed infection) was 6% for TCA and 8% for CFA. Differences were not statistically significant. The success without modifications was higher in the group of patients with fever of unknown origin (FUO) than in documented infections (DI), mainly with CFA. No differences were documented in the resistance rate and in clinical outcome during severe neutropenia (ANC <100 microl). In our experience TCA is as effective as CFA as first-line treatment in severe neutropenic patients with acute leukemia, although in both regimens patients with DI are likely to require modifications in treatment.

  9. [Treatment of depressive patients in private practice--empirical results, health political and social conditions and recommendations].

    PubMed

    Goesmann, Cornelia; Bühren, Astrid; Neuy-Bartmann, Astrid

    2007-09-01

    Although depression and symptoms of depression belong to the most common disorders in private practice, affected patients are not always diagnosed as early as possible in Germany and often not sufficiently treated. In order to improve the care for persons with depression it is necessary that family doctors are prepared to guide these patients with empathy, treat them adequately pharmacologically both in respect to the depression and to all other somatic aspects and to refer them in time to specialists for psychiatry, psychosomatic medicine or psychotherapy. Political and social conditions that have pathogenic effects should be changed and the shortage of psychotherapy needs to be overcome. In future, the integrated care in ambulant and clinical settings will probably be successful, first trials and test setups have shown good results.

  10. Advanced Wastewater Treatment Engineering—Investigating Membrane Fouling in both Rotational and Static Membrane Bioreactor Systems Using Empirical Modelling

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Parneet; Jones, Franck Anderson

    2016-01-01

    Advanced wastewater treatment using membranes are popular environmental system processes since they allow reuse and recycling. However, fouling is a key limiting factor and so proprietary systems such as Avanti’s RPU-185 Flexidisks membrane bioreactor (MBR) use novel rotating membranes to assist in ameliorating it. In earlier research, this rotating process was studied by creating a simulation model based on first principles and traditional fouling mechanisms. In order to directly compare the potential benefits of this rotational system, this follow-up study was carried out using Avanti’s newly developed static (non-rotating) Flexidisks MBR system. The results from operating the static pilot unit were simulated and modelled using the rotational fouling model developed earlier however with rotational switching functions turned off and rotational parameters set to a static mode. The study concluded that a rotating MBR system could increase flux throughput when compared against a similar static system. It is thought that although the slowly rotating spindle induces a weak crossflow shear, it is still able to even out cake build up across the membrane surface, thus reducing the likelihood of localised critical flux being exceeded at the micro level and lessening the potential of rapid trans-membrane pressure increases at the macro level. PMID:26742053

  11. Advanced Wastewater Treatment Engineering-Investigating Membrane Fouling in both Rotational and Static Membrane Bioreactor Systems Using Empirical Modelling.

    PubMed

    Paul, Parneet; Jones, Franck Anderson

    2016-01-05

    Advanced wastewater treatment using membranes are popular environmental system processes since they allow reuse and recycling. However, fouling is a key limiting factor and so proprietary systems such as Avanti's RPU-185 Flexidisks membrane bioreactor (MBR) use novel rotating membranes to assist in ameliorating it. In earlier research, this rotating process was studied by creating a simulation model based on first principles and traditional fouling mechanisms. In order to directly compare the potential benefits of this rotational system, this follow-up study was carried out using Avanti's newly developed static (non-rotating) Flexidisks MBR system. The results from operating the static pilot unit were simulated and modelled using the rotational fouling model developed earlier however with rotational switching functions turned off and rotational parameters set to a static mode. The study concluded that a rotating MBR system could increase flux throughput when compared against a similar static system. It is thought that although the slowly rotating spindle induces a weak crossflow shear, it is still able to even out cake build up across the membrane surface, thus reducing the likelihood of localised critical flux being exceeded at the micro level and lessening the potential of rapid trans-membrane pressure increases at the macro level.

  12. Fleet Fatality Risk and its Sensitivity to Vehicle Mass Change in Frontal Vehicle-to-Vehicle Crashes, Using a Combined Empirical and Theoretical Model.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yibing; Nusholtz, Guy S

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this study is to analytically model the fatality risk in frontal vehicle-to-vehicle crashes of the current vehicle fleet, and its sensitivity to vehicle mass change. A model is built upon an empirical risk ratio-mass ratio relationship from field data and a theoretical mass ratio-velocity change ratio relationship dictated by conservation of momentum. The fatality risk of each vehicle is averaged over the closing velocity distribution to arrive at the mean fatality risks. The risks of the two vehicles are summed and averaged over all possible crash partners to find the societal mean fatality risk associated with a subject vehicle of a given mass from a fleet specified by a mass distribution function. Based on risk exponent and mass distribution from a recent fleet, the subject vehicle mean fatality risk is shown to increase, while at the same time that for the partner vehicles decreases, as the mass of the subject vehicle decreases. The societal mean fatality risk, the sum of these, incurs a penalty with respect to a fleet with complete mass equality. This penalty reaches its minimum (~8% for the example fleet) for crashes with a subject vehicle whose mass is close to the fleet mean mass. The sensitivity, i.e., the rate of change of the societal mean fatality risk with respect to the mass of the subject vehicle is assessed. Results from two sets of fully regression-based analyses, Kahane (2012) and Van Auken and Zellner (2013), are approximately compared with the current result. The general magnitudes of the results are comparable, but differences exist at a more detailed level. The subject vehicle-oriented societal mean fatality risk is averaged over all possible subject vehicle masses of a given fleet to obtain the overall mean fatality risk of the fleet. It is found to increase approximately linearly at a rate of about 0.8% for each 100 lb decrease in mass of all vehicles in the fleet.

  13. The impact of pathological narcissism on psychotherapy utilization, initial symptom severity, and early-treatment symptom change: a naturalistic investigation.

    PubMed

    Ellison, William D; Levy, Kenneth N; Cain, Nicole M; Ansell, Emily B; Pincus, Aaron L

    2013-01-01

    The impact of pathological narcissism on psychotherapy has seldom been investigated empirically, despite extensive clinical theory proposing that highly narcissistic individuals should be reluctant to engage in treatment and derive smaller benefits from therapy. In this study, we investigate the relationship between scores on the Pathological Narcissism Inventory (PNI; Pincus et al., 2009), which assesses both narcissistic grandiosity and narcissistic vulnerability, and clinical variables in a sample of outpatients (N=60) at a community mental health center. Results indicated that grandiosity, but not vulnerability, was negatively related to the use of adjunctive services and positively predicted client-initiated termination of psychotherapy. In addition, grandiosity and vulnerability were related to initial levels of different symptoms in multilevel models using a subsample (n=41) but not generally related to the linear rate of symptom change in early psychotherapy. The results highlight the clinical utility of assessing pathological narcissism in a real-world psychotherapeutic context.

  14. The Essence of Residential Treatment: III. Change and Adaptation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leichtman, Martin

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines four challenges facing residential treatment programs: Providing short-term treatment, increasing family involvement, preparing children for life in the community, and offering a "hospital level of care." It shows that past problems in these areas have arisen from the social conditions and historical circumstances in which…

  15. 76 FR 17617 - Changes to Treatments for Citrus Fruit From Australia

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-30

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service Changes to Treatments for Citrus Fruit... phytosanitary treatments. SUMMARY: We are advising the public that we are adding new approved phytosanitary treatment schedules to the Plant Protection and Quarantine Treatment Manual for certain species of...

  16. Changes in treatment plan for carpal tunnel syndrome based on electrodiagnostic test results.

    PubMed

    Becker, S J E; Makanji, H S; Ring, D

    2014-02-01

    This study evaluated how often the treatment plan for carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) changed based on electrodiagnostic test results. Secondly, we assessed factors associated with a change in the treatment plan for CTS. One-hundred-and-thirty English-speaking adult patients underwent electrodiagnostic testing in a prospective cohort study. Treatment plan was recorded before and after testing. Treatment plan changed in 25 patients (19%) based on electrodiagnostic test results. The plan for operative treatment before testing decreased significantly after testing (83% versus 72%). The best logistic regression model for no change in treatment plan included a prolonged or non-recordable median distal sensory latency (normal, prolonged, or non-recordable), and explained 24% of the variation. For surgeons that manage CTS on the basis of objective pathophysiology rather than symptoms, electrodiagnostic test results often lead to changes in recommended treatment.

  17. [Personality changes of neurotic patients as outcome of the treatment].

    PubMed

    Jodzio, K

    1993-01-01

    The present article attempted to assess the importance of outcomes which appeared during the treatment of 30 neurotic patients. This study specially concentrates on measures of emotional empathy, self-confidence and introspection. There were two surveys in the clinical group: before and after the treatment was completed. Data were compared with a control group, also consisting of 30 persons (15 male and 15 female) matched for age and education. All patients attending group psychotherapy were also treated by pharmacotherapy. As it appeared from the analysis before treatment high empathy in patients was found, but this declined after therapy, however it was still significantly higher than in the control group. The first survey revealed also that patients demonstrated lower levels of self-confidence and introspection. After treatment there were no important differences between the groups. Relationships between the studied qualities were not statistically significant.

  18. Assessing the Impacts of Climate Change on Drinking Water Treatment

    EPA Science Inventory

    Climate change may affect both surface water and ground water quality. Increases (or decreases) in precipitation and related changes in flow can result in problematic turbidity levels, increased levels of organic matter, high levels of bacteria, virus and parasites and increased...

  19. One-year treatment patterns and change trajectories for adolescents participating in outpatient treatment for the first time.

    PubMed

    Godley, Susan H; Passetti, Lora L; Funk, Rodney R; Garner, Bryan R; Godley, Mark D

    2008-03-01

    The American Society on Addiction Medicine's Patient Placement criteria are commonly used in adolescent treatment. However, the use of these criteria and how they affect the course of treatment and interact with adolescent change has not been examined. Twelve-month treatment patterns were examined for 176 adolescents who entered their first ever episode in a treatment system using these criteria. Forty-one percent of the adolescents received additional treatment after their initial outpatient episode with over 30 unique treatment sequences (i.e., various combinations of outpatient, intensive outpatient, and residential treatment). Significant differences in treatment patterns were found between the change trajectory groups. For example, adolescents who participated in only one outpatient treatment episode were more likely to be in the low alcohol and drug use (AOD) group and less likely to have high rates of time in a controlled environment or to report moderate AOD use. Over one-third of the adolescents participated in additional treatment and almost one-quarter of those who only participated in outpatient treatment had problematic use. These findings suggest the need for clinical monitoring protocols that can be used to identify adolescents needing additional treatment or recovery services.

  20. Are Small Reimbursement Changes Enough to Change Cancer Care? Reimbursement Variation in Prostate Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ronald C.; Dusetzina, Stacie B.; Wheeler, Stephanie B.; Jackson, George L.; Nielsen, Matthew E.; Carpenter, William R.; Weinberger, Morris

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services recently initiated small reimbursement adjustments to improve the value of care delivered under fee-for-service. To estimate the degree to which reimbursement influences physician decision making, we examined utilization of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonists among urologists as Part B drug reimbursement varied in a fee-for-service environment. Methods: We analyzed treatment patterns of urologists treating 15,128 men included in SEER-linked Medicare claims who were diagnosed with localized prostate cancer between January 1, 2000, and December 31, 2003. We calculated a reimbursement generosity index to measure differences in GnRH agonist reimbursement among regional Medicare carriers and over time. We used multilevel analysis to control for patient and provider characteristics. Results: Among urologists treating early-stage and lower grade prostate cancer, variation in reimbursement was not associated with overuse of GnRH agonists from 2000 to 2003, a period of guideline stability (odds ratio, 1.00; 95% CI, 0.99 to 1.00). Conclusion: Small differences in androgen-deprivation therapy reimbursement generosity were not associated with differential use. Fee-for-service reimbursement changes currently being implemented to improve quality in fee-for-service Medicare may not affect patterns of cancer care. PMID:26957641

  1. Very large treatment effects in randomised trials as an empirical marker to indicate whether subsequent trials are necessary: meta-epidemiological assessment

    PubMed Central

    Nagendran, Myura; Pereira, Tiago V; Kiew, Grace; Altman, Douglas G; Maruthappu, Mahiben; Ioannidis, John P A

    2016-01-01

    Objective To examine whether a very large effect (VLE; defined as a relative risk of ≤0.2 or ≥5) in a randomised trial could be an empirical marker that subsequent trials are unnecessary. Design Meta-epidemiological assessment of existing published data on randomised trials. Data sources Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (2010, issue 7) with data on subsequent large trials updated to 2015, issue 12. Eligibility criteria All binary outcome forest plots were selected, which contained an index randomised trial with a VLE that was nominally statistically significant (P<0.05), included a subsequent large randomised trial (≥200 events and ≥200 non-events) for validation of the effect, assessed a primary outcome of the review, and was not a subgroup or sensitivity analysis. Results Of 3082 reviews yielding 85 002 forest plots, only 44 (0.05%) satisfied the inclusion criteria. Index trials were generally small, with a median sample of 99 (median 14 events). Few index trials were rated at low risk of bias (9 of 44; 20%). The relative risk was closer to the null in the subsequent large trials in 43 of 44 cases. Subsequent large trial data failed to find a statistically significant (P<0.05) effect in the same direction in 19 cases (43%, 95% confidence interval 29% to 58%). Even when the subsequent large trials did find a significant effect in the same direction, the additional primary outcomes in most of these trials would have to be considered before deciding in favour of using the intervention. Subsequent large trial data found a statistically significant effect in the same direction in 19 of 21 cases when the index trial also had a value of P<0.001. Conclusions The frequency of VLEs followed by a large trial is vanishingly small, and where they occur they do not appear to be a reliable marker for a benefit that is reproducible and directly actionable. An empirical rule using a VLE in a randomised controlled trial as a marker that further trials are

  2. Ultrasonic verification of microstructural changes due to heat treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Generazio, E. R.

    1986-01-01

    Ultrasonic attenuation was measured for polycrystalline samples of nickel and copper with various grain-size distributions produced by heat treatment. Attenuation as a function of frequency was determined for a sample having a known mean grain diameter. Once this function was determined, it could be scaled to determine the mean grain size of other samples of the same material with different mean grain diameters. These results were obtained by using broadband pulse-echo ultrasound in the 25 to 100 MHz frequency range. The results suggest an ultrasonic, nondestructive approach for verifying heat treatment of metals.

  3. Physiological Changes in Older Adults and Their Effect on Diabetes Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Gates, Brian J.; Walker, Kevin M.

    2014-01-01

    In Brief Physiological changes associated with aging have the potential to affect the treatment of diabetes. However, evidence regarding treatment of diabetes in geriatric patients has been limited, especially for “oldest-old” patients. Recent research has provided greater insight into the risks and benefits of treatment, and new guidelines provide more specific information regarding treatment goals in older people with diabetes and encourage greater individualization of treatment. PMID:26246752

  4. [CHANGES OF A TREATMENT PROGRAM FOR AN ACUTE PANCREATITIS].

    PubMed

    Kostyrnoy, O V; Kosenko, A V; Bayomi, Imad Mokhamed Abdel S K

    2015-11-01

    Pathogenetically substantiated program of complex diagnosis, prophylaxis and treatment of purulent-necrotic complications (PNC) was elaborated for improvement of results of the necrotic pancreatitis treatment. With the objective to study the PNC pathogenesis and a probation of new preparations for local treatment the experimantal simulation of the disease was accomplished. There was proved, that during the disease course the integrity of pancreatic ductal system is disordered . A 42-year experience of treatment of an acute pancreatitis was analyzed. In I period (1970 - 1980) the operative interventions were conducted; in 11 period (1981 - 1991)--a scientifically substantiated conservative therapy; in III period (1992 - 2000)--the diagnostic procedures possibilities were extended, and operative intervention were performed in accordance to severe indications. There was established, that the main cause of PNC is a secondary microbal contamination occurrence on the third-fifth postoperative days, the immediate manipulations on pancreatic gland are forbidden; a one-time surgical processing of the necrosis foci is insufficient; the staged necrsequestrectomy constitutes the optimal operation.

  5. Changing Needle Practices in Community Outreach and Methadone Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wechsberg, Wendee M.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    This pretest/posttest study used two samples of injecting drug users (184 from street outreach and 103 from a methadone program) to assess drug use and human immunodeficiency virus risk practices. The improvement in risk behaviors at posttest suggests that intervention programs were agents of change. (SLD)

  6. Changes in vitamin D metabolites during teriparatide treatment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective was to assess changes in serum 1,25(OH)2D and 25(OH)D concentrations during teriparatide 20 g/day (teriparatide) therapy in the double-blind Fracture Prevention Trial of postmenopausal women with osteoporosis and male study of men with osteoporosis. Patients were randomized to teripara...

  7. Towards empirical identification of a clinically meaningful indicator of treatment outcome: Features of candidate indicators and evaluation of sensitivity to treatment effects and relationship to one year follow up cocaine use outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Kathleen M.; Kiluk, Brian D.; Nich, Charla; DeVito, Elise E.; Decker, Suzanne; LaPaglia, Donna; Duffey, Dianne; Babuscio, Theresa A.; Ball, Samuel A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Selection of an appropriate indictor of treatment response in clinical trials is complex, particularly for the various illicit drugs of abuse. Most widely-used indicators have been selected based on expert group recommendation or convention rather than systematic empirical evaluation. Absence of an evidence-based, clinically meaningful index of treatment outcome hinders cross-study evaluations necessary for progress in addiction treatment science. Method Fifteen candidate indicators used in multiple clinical trials as well as some proposed recently are identified and discussed in terms of relative strengths and weaknesses (practicality, cost, verifiability, sensitivity to missing data). Using pooled data from five randomized controlled trials of cocaine dependence (N = 434), the indicators were compared in terms of sensitivity to the effects of treatment and relationship to cocaine use and general functioning during follow-up. Results Commonly used outcome measures (percent negative urine screens; percent days of abstinence) performed relatively well in that they were sensitive to the effects of the therapies evaluated. Others, including complete abstinence and reduction in frequency of use, were less sensitive to effects of specific therapies and were very weakly related to cocaine use or functioning during follow-up. Indicators more strongly related to cocaine use during follow-up were those that reflected achievement of sustained periods of abstinence, particularly at the end of treatment. Conclusions These analyses did not demonstrate overwhelming superiority of any single indicator, but did identify several that performed particularly poorly. Candidates for elimination included retention, complete abstinence, and indicators of reduced frequency of cocaine use. PMID:24556275

  8. Common misconceptions about cognitive mediation of treatment change: a commentary to Longmore and Worrell (2007).

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Stefan G

    2008-01-01

    The article by Richard J. Longmore and Michael Worrell [Clinical Psychology Review, Volume 27, 2007, pp. 173-187] reviews a selection of studies showing no significant difference between treatment conditions that include formal cognitive restructuring techniques and other behavioral treatment modalities that do not include techniques to directly challenge cognitions. Based on this literature, Longmore and Worrell question the validity of the cognitive behavioral treatment model and argue that changes in symptoms are not mediated by changes in cognitions. Longmore and Worrell's arguments are based on common misconceptions about mediation models of treatment change. This commentary discusses and clarifies these misconceptions.

  9. Identifying Patients Who Need a Change in Depression Treatment and Implementing That Change.

    PubMed

    Papakostas, George I

    2016-08-01

    For patients whose depression is difficult to treat or treatment-resistant, physicians must make an educated choice to switch, augment, or combine therapies to help patients adequately respond after initial treatment selections fail. Uncover some of the complexities of this challenging diagnosis by following the case of Robert, a 55-year-old accountant whose inadequate response to treatment by his primary care doctor has prompted a referral to a specialist.

  10. 78 FR 69694 - Changing Regulatory and Reimbursement Paradigms for Medical Devices in the Treatment of Obesity...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-20

    ... Devices in the Treatment of Obesity and Metabolic Diseases: How To Estimate and Reward True Patient... ``Changing Regulatory and Reimbursement Paradigms for Medical Devices in the Treatment of Obesity and... medical devices for the treatment of morbid obesity and other metabolic diseases and evolving...

  11. Respiratory and Cognitive Mediators of Treatment Change in Panic Disorder: Evidence for Intervention Specificity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meuret, Alicia E.; Rosenfield, David; Seidel, Anke; Bhaskara, Lavanya; Hofmann, Stefan G.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: There are numerous theories of panic disorder, each proposing a unique pathway of change leading to treatment success. However, little is known about whether improvements in proposed mediators are indeed associated with treatment outcomes and whether these mediators are specific to particular treatment modalities. Our purpose in this…

  12. The Interpersonal-Psychological Theory of Suicide in Adolescents: A Preliminary Report of Changes Following Treatment.

    PubMed

    King, Jessica D; Horton, Sarah E; Hughes, Jennifer L; Eaddy, Michael; Kennard, Betsy D; Emslie, Graham J; Stewart, Sunita M

    2017-03-31

    This study investigated change in suicide risk in the framework of the interpersonal theory of suicide. Fifty-four adolescents completed measures of interpersonal needs, acquired capability, depressive symptoms, and suicide risk at entry and exit from treatment. There was a significant drop following treatment in unmet interpersonal needs but not in acquired capability, consistent with the theory. Both change in the interaction between interpersonal needs and in depressive symptoms contributed unique prediction to change in suicide risk. These findings extend the research in understanding changes in suicide risk and inform treatment by suggesting cognitive targets for intervention.

  13. Evaluating Marginal Policy Changes and the Average Effect of Treatment for Individuals at the Margin.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, Pedro; Heckman, James J; Vytlacil, Edward

    2010-01-01

    This paper develops methods for evaluating marginal policy changes. We characterize how the effects of marginal policy changes depend on the direction of the policy change, and show that marginal policy effects are fundamentally easier to identify and to estimate than conventional treatment parameters. We develop the connection between marginal policy effects and the average effect of treatment for persons on the margin of indifference between participation in treatment and nonparticipation, and use this connection to analyze both parameters. We apply our analysis to estimate the effect of marginal changes in tuition on the return to going to college.

  14. Endovascular treatment of chronic arterial mesenteric ischemia: a changing perspective?

    PubMed

    Gibbons, C P; Roberts, D E

    2010-03-01

    Endovascular treatment for chronic mesenteric ischemia is growing in popularity because of its lower periprocedural morbidity and mortality than open surgery. It is especially suitable for the high-risk surgical candidate and for those who have a poor nutritional state, although endovascular surgery may not be possible in patients with ostial occlusions or heavily calcified vessels. A positive response to angioplasty is helpful to secure a diagnosis in patients with slightly atypical symptoms. There are little data at present to suggest that primary stenting is better than angioplasty alone, but insertion of a stent may be valuable as a rescue procedure following dissection, vascular recoil, or thrombosis during angioplasty. The superior mesenteric artery is probably the most important vessel to treat but, where this is impossible, celiac or inferior mesenteric artery dilatation may have therapeutic benefit. However, there is some evidence at present favoring multiple, as opposed to single-vessel, angioplasty or stenting. Long-term patency is better after mesenteric bypass, which may be preferred in the younger and fitter patient. Treatment of the celiac artery compression syndrome is primarily surgical, but stent insertion may have a role as a secondary procedure where there is a residual stenosis after median arcuate ligament division.

  15. Changing the Paradigm of Cancer Screening, Prevention, and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The war on cancer has been fought during the past several decades primarily based on the somatic mutation model of cancer. This has resulted in the emphasis on cancer screening and elimination of any detected cancerous/precancerous cells as the primary method of cancer prevention. This approach has reduced mortality from some cancers, but age-adjusted cancer mortality rates continue to be high. The lack of significant progress in reducing cancer mortality rates may be indicative of a fundamental flaw in the cancer model used. An alternative model of cancer is the immune suppression model of cancer based on the tremendous increase in cancers when the immune system is suppressed. According to this model, the key carcinogenic event is the suppression of the immune system which enables the already existing covert cancers to grow uncontrollably, causing cancer. Hence, cancer screening would consist of identifying those with weak immune system response. The primary mode of cancer prevention and treatment would be boosting of the immune system, for example, through exercise, infection, and low-dose radiation, as they are all known to enhance immune system response and reduce cancers. There is sufficient evidence to justify clinical trials of this approach for cancer screening, prevention, and treatment. PMID:27928220

  16. Empiric Piperacillin-Tazobactam versus Carbapenems in the Treatment of Bacteraemia Due to Extended-Spectrum Beta-Lactamase-Producing Enterobacteriaceae.

    PubMed

    Ng, Tat Ming; Khong, Wendy X; Harris, Patrick N A; De, Partha P; Chow, Angela; Tambyah, Paul A; Lye, David C

    2016-01-01

    Extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Enterobacteriaceae are a common cause of bacteraemia in endemic countries and may be associated with high mortality; carbapenems are considered the drug of choice. Limited data suggest piperacillin-tazobactam could be equally effective. We aimed to compare 30-day mortality of patients treated empirically with piperacillin-tazobactam versus a carbapenem in a multi-centre retrospective cohort study in Singapore. Only patients with active empiric monotherapy with piperacillin-tazobactam or a carbapenem were included. A propensity score for empiric carbapenem therapy was derived and an adjusted multivariate analysis of mortality was conducted. A total of 394 patients had ESBL-Escherichia.coli and ESBL-Klebsiella pneumoniae bacteraemia of which 23.1% were community acquired cases. One hundred and fifty-one received initial active monotherapy comprising piperacillin-tazobactam (n = 94) or a carbapenem (n = 57). Patients who received carbapenems were less likely to have health-care associated risk factors and have an unknown source of bacteraemia, but were more likely to have a urinary source. Thirty-day mortality was comparable between those who received empiric piperacillin-tazobactam and a carbapenem (29 [30.9%] vs. 17 [29.8%]), P = 0.89). Those who received empiric piperacillin-tazobactam had a lower 30-day acquisition of multi-drug resistant and fungal infections (7 [7.4%] vs. 14 [24.6%]), P<0.01). After adjusting for confounders, use of empiric piperacillin-tazobactam was not associated with increased 30-day mortality (OR 1.00, 95% CI; 0.45-2.17). Empiric piperacillin-tazobactam was not associated with increased 30-day mortality and may result in fewer multi-drug resistant and fungal infections when compared with a carbapenem.

  17. [Change of attitude in the surgical treatment of lung metastases].

    PubMed

    Czeyda-Pommersheim, Ferenc; Kovács, Tibor; Sulyok, Zoltán; Farkas, Emil; Besznyák, István; Köves, István

    2004-12-01

    There has been no major change in surgical technique of lung metastasectomy till the last decades. In the latest years the variety of diagnostic tools and methods grew significantly. There are more chemotherapy possibilities and more palliative surgical techniques (VATS, ITP, RFTA) to treat certain types of lung metastases. Based on data of the International Registry of Lung Metastases the most important prognostic factor for metastasectomy is how radical the procedure was (clear resection margin). The more aggressive approach (even pneumonectomy for R0 resection) is becoming more popular.

  18. Attachment-Based Family Therapy: A Review of the Empirical Support.

    PubMed

    Diamond, Guy; Russon, Jody; Levy, Suzanne

    2016-09-01

    Attachment-based family therapy (ABFT) is an empirically supported treatment designed to capitalize on the innate, biological desire for meaningful and secure relationships. The therapy is grounded in attachment theory and provides an interpersonal, process-oriented, trauma-focused approach to treating adolescent depression, suicidality, and trauma. Although a process-oriented therapy, ABFT offers a clear structure and road map to help therapists quickly address attachment ruptures that lie at the core of family conflict. Several clinical trials and process studies have demonstrated empirical support for the model and its proposed mechanism of change. This article provides an overview of the clinical model and the existing empirical support for ABFT.

  19. Comparative assessment of organic and conventional production of row crops under climate change: Empirical and simulated yield variation in the Chippewa River Watershed, MN

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The long-term provision of ecosystem services, including stable temporal crop yields, provided by the traditional corn-soybean cropping system in the Chippewa River Watershed (CRW) in west-central Minnesota are being threatened by several anthropogenic and climatic factors. We conducted an empirical...

  20. Measuring changes in client-level treatment process in the therapeutic community (TC) with the Dimensions of Change Instrument (DCI).

    PubMed

    Paddock, Susan M; Edelen, Maria O; Wenzel, Suzanne L; Ebener, Patricia; Mandell, Wallace; Dahl, James

    2007-01-01

    The Dimensions of Change Instrument (DCI) measures treatment process in residential therapeutic community (TC) settings. It summarizes eight factors of treatment process from a client perspective. We present evidence of the reliability of the DCI for assessing both adult (N = 519) and adolescent (N = 474) client perceptions of treatment process. The DCI factors significantly increase over time, with increases consistently seen across all DCI factors for adults. We highlight areas for future DCI modifications to broaden its applicability to adolescents. Our findings show that clinicians can use the DCI to evaluate adult client progress and target areas for improving quality of care.

  1. Changing Treatment Paradigms in Metastatic Breast Cancer: Lessons Learned.

    PubMed

    Santa-Maria, Cesar A; Gradishar, William J

    2015-07-01

    Advances in understanding tumor biology, particularly signaling pathways, have led to the development and approval of many novel agents and have changed the landscape of therapy for patients with metastatic breast cancer. This review highlights some of the recent successes and failures in breast cancer drug development, including strategies to overcome endocrine and human epidermal growth factor 2-neu (HER2) resistance, targeting triple-negative breast cancers (which do not express the HER2, estrogen, and progesterone receptors) through novel receptors, harnessing the immune system, and new ways of targeting angiogenesis. For patients with metastatic breast cancer, expanding therapeutic options through clinical trial participation is a crucial part of modern oncology practice. As we continue to learn how to use targeted therapies in the context of genomic medicine, analysis of the tumor in real-time may become increasingly important, giving researchers the information needed to start combining therapies in a biologically informed manner.

  2. Does change in readiness influence retention among African American women and men in substance abuse treatment?

    PubMed

    Montgomery, LaTrice; Burlew, A Kathleen; Korte, Jeffrey E

    2017-04-03

    African Americans are less likely than other racial groups to engage in and complete outpatient substance abuse treatment. The current study, conducted as a secondary analysis of a multisite randomized clinical trial, examined whether readiness to change (RTC) over time influences retention and whether gender moderates the relationship between changes in RTC and retention among 194 African American women and men. Participants completed the University of Rhode Island Change Assessment at baseline and at the end of the 16-week study. Findings revealed a significant relationship between RTC over time and retention. Specifically, the more RTC increased throughout the 16-week study, the longer participants remained in treatment. In addition, gender moderated the relationship between changes in RTC and retention, with a stronger association between changes in RTC and retention among men relative to women. One approach to improving substance abuse treatment retention rates is to focus on increasing RTC during treatment, especially among African American men.

  3. Changes after Multidisciplinary Pain Treatment in Patient Pain Beliefs and Coping Are Associated with Concurrent Changes in Patient Functioning

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Mark P.; Turner, Judith A.; Romano, Joan M.

    2007-01-01

    Little is known about how patient functioning changes after completion of multidisciplinary pain programs, and what factors are associated with such changes when they occur; for example, whether improvement or deterioration in functioning corresponds to changes in patient beliefs and coping during this period. The objective of this study was to examine the extent to which changes in patient pain and functioning were associated with changes in beliefs and coping after multidisciplinary pain treatment. Patients with chronic pain (N = 141) completed outcome (pain, functioning) and process (beliefs, catastrophizing, coping) measures at the end of multidisciplinary pain treatment and 12 months posttreatment. On average, patients reported similar levels of pain at both times, but showed a small worsening in disability and depression outcomes between posttreatment and follow-up, which were associated significantly with concurrent changes in the process measures. In particular, increased belief in oneself as disabled by pain, catastrophizing, and increased use of resting, guarding and asking for assistance in response to pain were linked with increased disability and depression. Decreased perceived control over pain was also consistently associated with worsening of these outcomes. The results highlight the potential importance of specific pain-related beliefs and coping responses in long-term patient pain and adjustment. Research is needed to determine whether booster interventions after the end of intensive multidisciplinary treatment that target these beliefs and coping responses improve long-term outcomes. PMID:17250963

  4. Stages of change, self-stigma, and treatment compliance among Chinese adults with severe mental illness.

    PubMed

    Tsang, H W H

    2013-12-01

    1. Individuals with higher global functioning, better readiness for action, and lower self-esteem decrement tend to have better psychosocial treatment participation. 2. Individuals with lesser psychiatric symptoms are more likely to have better treatment attendance. 3. Self-stigmatisation undermines treatment compliance. Its indirect effects can be mediated via stages of change and insight. 4. The self-stigma reduction programme may reduce self-esteem decrement, promote readiness for changing own problematic behaviours, and enhance psychosocial treatment compliance. However, its therapeutic effects were not maintained during the 6-month follow-up.

  5. Upper-tract changes after treatment of posterior urethral valves.

    PubMed

    Lal, R; Bhatnagar, V; Mitra, D K

    1998-07-01

    This paper discusses the long-term sequelae in the upper urinary tract with respect to hydroureteronephrosis (HUN), vesicoureteral reflux (VUR), renal parenchymal disease, and their correlation with renal function in 84 boys with posterior urethral valves followed for 1 to 21 years. Thirty-one boys (39.3%) were adolescents or older at the time of review. The incidence of high-grade VUR (grade III or more) was 47.6% at presentation, and resolution following decompression of the lower urinary tract occurred in 38.7% of refluxing units. VUR was associated with a high incidence of chronic renal failure (CRF) (30%) on long-term follow up; however, 16% of non-refluxing patients also progressed to CRF. The incidences of renal parenchymal disease and persistent upper-tract dilatation in the non-refluxing group were 25% and 50% of renal units respectively. Gross HUN persisted in 12.3% of patients despite decompression and reconstructive surgery, with vesicoureteral junction (VUJ) obstruction being documented in 1 patient only. Moderate and mild upper-tract dilatation persisted in 31.6% and 43.9% of patients, respectively. Persistent gross HUN was associated with a very high incidence of CRF (92.3%), while 88.4% of those with persistent mild/moderate dilatation maintained normal renal function over a follow-up period ranging from 1 to 21 years. This study emphasizes the need for systematic evaluation to exclude VUJ obstruction and abnormal urodynamics as a cause of persistent HUN so that effective therapy can be instituted early to relieve back-pressure and to provide a low-pressure reservoir with effective emptying. In the absence of either of these causes, persistent ureterectasis after treatment is presumably due to secondary peristaltic failure as a consequence of ureteral fibrosis, ureteral tortuosity, or developmental dysplasia.

  6. Sensitivity changes after morphine treatment in the mouse uterus.

    PubMed

    Contreras, E; Tamayo, L; Juica, S

    1982-01-01

    The addition of morphine to a bath containing the vas deferens from chronically morphinized mice induces a facilitatory effect on noradrenaline contractile responses. This facilitatory effect of morphine has been thought to be a dependence-like effect. In the present work the possibility that a pretreatment with morphine might induce a similar effect on the contractile responses of the mouse uterus to acetylcholine and serotonin was examined. The acute effect of morphine on the uteri of untreated mice consisted in an attenuation of the responses to both substances, whereas a long term pretreatment with morphine induced a supersensitivity state. Tolerance to the depressant action of morphine on the contractile responses induced by the stimulating compounds was also observed. Acute morphine in the uteri from morphinized mice did not induce a facilitatory effect on acetylcholine or serotonin responses. Naloxone did not modify the effects of morphine in the naive or chronically treated mice. The supersensitivity state and the intensity of tolerance were unaffected by changes in the concentration of calcium in the bath medium. Caffeine or theophylline decreased the tolerance observed in the uterus from chronically morphinized mice. The attenuation of tolerance suggests that methylxanthines induce effects opposed to those of chronic morphine in the calcium distribution within the cell.

  7. Effectiveness of the Treatment Readiness and Induction Program for Increasing Adolescent Motivation for Change

    PubMed Central

    Becan, Jennifer E.; Knight, Danica K.; Crawley, Rachel D.; Joe, George W.; Flynn, Patrick M.

    2014-01-01

    Success in substance abuse treatment is improved by problem recognition, desire to seek help, and readiness to engage in treatment, all of which are important aspects of motivation. Interventions that facilitate these at treatment induction for adolescents are especially needed. The purpose of this study is to assess the effectiveness of TRIP (Treatment Readiness and Induction Program) in promoting treatment motivation. Data represent 519 adolescents from 6 residential programs who completed assessments at treatment intake (Time 1) and 35 days after admission (Time 2). The design consisted of a comparison sample (n = 281) that had enrolled in treatment prior to implementation of TRIP (standard operating practice) and a sample of clients that had entered treatment after TRIP began and received standard operating practice enhanced by TRIP (n = 238). Repeated measures ANCOVAs were conducted using each Time 2 motivation scale as a dependent measure. Motivation scales were conceptualized as representing sequential stages of change. LISREL was used to test a structural model involving TRIP participation, gender, drug use severity, juvenile justice involvement, age, race-ethnicity, prior treatment, and urgency as predictors of the stages of treatment motivation. Compared to standard practice, adolescents receiving TRIP demonstrated greater gains in problem recognition, even after controlling for the other variables in the model. The model fit was adequate, with TRIP directly affecting problem recognition and indirectly affecting later stages of change (desire for help and treatment readiness). Future studies should examine which specific components of TRIP affect change in motivation. PMID:25456094

  8. Effectiveness of the Treatment Readiness and Induction Program for increasing adolescent motivation for change.

    PubMed

    Becan, Jennifer E; Knight, Danica K; Crawley, Rachel D; Joe, George W; Flynn, Patrick M

    2015-03-01

    Success in substance abuse treatment is improved by problem recognition, desire to seek help, and readiness to engage in treatment, all of which are important aspects of motivation. Interventions that facilitate these at treatment induction for adolescents are especially needed. The purpose of this study is to assess the effectiveness of TRIP (Treatment Readiness and Induction Program) in promoting treatment motivation. Data represent 519 adolescents from 6 residential programs who completed assessments at treatment intake (time 1) and 35 days after admission (time 2). The design consisted of a comparison sample (n=281) that had enrolled in treatment prior to implementation of TRIP (standard operating practice) and a sample of clients that had entered treatment after TRIP began and received standard operating practice enhanced by TRIP (n=238). Repeated measures ANCOVAs were conducted using each time 2 motivation scale as a dependent measure. Motivation scales were conceptualized as representing sequential stages of change. LISREL was used to test a structural model involving TRIP participation, gender, drug use severity, juvenile justice involvement, age, race-ethnicity, prior treatment, and urgency as predictors of the stages of treatment motivation. Compared to standard practice, adolescents receiving TRIP demonstrated greater gains in problem recognition, even after controlling for the other variables in the model. The model fit was adequate, with TRIP directly affecting problem recognition and indirectly affecting later stages of change (desire for help and treatment readiness). Future studies should examine which specific components of TRIP affect change in motivation.

  9. The role of readiness to change in response to treatment of adolescent depression.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Cara C; Simons, Anne D; Silva, Susan G; Rohde, Paul; Small, David M; Murakami, Jessica L; High, Robin R; March, John S

    2009-06-01

    The effect of readiness to change on treatment outcome was examined among 332 adolescents (46% male, 74% Caucasian), ages 12 through 17 years (M = 14.6, SD = 1.5), with major depressive disorder who were participating in the Treatment for Adolescents With Depression Study (TADS). TADS is a randomized clinical trial comparing the effectiveness of fluoxetine (an antidepressant medication), cognitive-behavioral therapy, their combination, and a pill placebo. An abbreviated Stages of Change Questionnaire was used to obtain 4 readiness to change scores: precontemplation, contemplation, action, and maintenance. The association between each readiness score and depression severity across 12 weeks of acute treatment for depression, as measured by the Children's Depression Rating Scale--Revised, was examined. Although treatment response was not moderated by any of the readiness scores, baseline action scores predicted outcome: Higher action scores were associated with better outcome regardless of treatment modality. Furthermore, treatment effects were mediated by change in action scores during the first 6 weeks of treatment, with increases in action scores related to greater improvement in depression. Assessing readiness to change may have implications for tailoring treatments for depressed adolescents.

  10. Trajectories of change across outcomes in intensive treatment for adolescent panic disorder and agoraphobia.

    PubMed

    Gallo, Kaitlin P; Cooper-Vince, Christine E; Hardway, Christina L; Pincus, Donna B; Comer, Jonathan S

    2014-01-01

    Much remains to be learned about typical and individual growth trajectories across treatment for adolescent panic disorder with and without agoraphobia and about critical treatment points associated with key changes. The present study examined the rate and shape of change across an 8-day intensive cognitive behavioral therapy for adolescent panic disorder with and without agoraphobia (N = 56). Participants ranged in age from 12 to 17 (M = 15.14, SD = 1.70; 58.9% female, 78.6% Caucasian). Multilevel modeling evaluated within-treatment linear and nonlinear changes across three treatment outcomes: panic severity, fear, and avoidance. Overall panic severity showed linear change, decreasing throughout treatment. In contrast, fear and avoidance ratings both showed cubic change, peaking slightly at the first session of treatment, starting to decrease at the second session of treatment, and with large gains continuing then plateauing at the fourth session. Findings are considered with regard to the extent to which they may elucidate critical treatment components and sessions for adolescents with panic disorder with and without agoraphobia.

  11. Neural and behavioural changes in male periadolescent mice after prolonged nicotine-MDMA treatment.

    PubMed

    Adeniyi, Philip A; Ishola, Azeez O; Laoye, Babafemi J; Olatunji, Babawale P; Bankole, Oluwamolakun O; Shallie, Philemon D; Ogundele, Olalekan M

    2016-02-01

    The interaction between MDMA and Nicotine affects multiple brain centres and neurotransmitter systems (serotonin, dopamine and glutamate) involved in motor coordination and cognition. In this study, we have elucidated the effect of prolonged (10 days) MDMA, Nicotine and a combined Nicotine-MDMA treatment on motor-cognitive neural functions. In addition, we have shown the correlation between the observed behavioural change and neural structural changes induced by these treatments in BALB/c mice. We observed that MDMA (2 mg/Kg body weight; subcutaneous) induced a decline in motor function, while Nicotine (2 mg/Kg body weight; subcutaneous) improved motor function in male periadolescent mice. In combined treatment, Nicotine reduced the motor function decline observed in MDMA treatment, thus no significant change in motor function for the combined treatment versus the control. Nicotine or MDMA treatment reduced memory function and altered hippocampal structure. Similarly, a combined Nicotine-MDMA treatment reduced memory function when compared with the control. Ultimately, the metabolic and structural changes in these neural systems were seen to vary for the various forms of treatment. It is noteworthy to mention that a combined treatment increased the rate of lipid peroxidation in brain tissue.

  12. Constructing Unit-Specific Empiric Treatment Guidelines for Catheter-Related and Primary Bacteremia by Determining the Likelihood of Inadequate Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Megan E.; Anderson, Deverick J.; Sharpe, Michelle; Chen, Luke F.; Drew, Richard H.

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the feasibility of using likelihood of inadequate therapy (LIT), a parameter calculated by using pathogen frequency and in vitro susceptibility for determination of appropriate empiric antibiotic therapy for primary bloodstream infections. Our study demonstrates that LIT may reveal differences in traditional antibiograms. PMID:22418641

  13. Assessing Change Readiness and Treatment Eagerness among Psychoactive Substance Users in Northern Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Abiola, Tajudeen; Udofia, Owoidoho; Sheikh, Taiwo L; Sanni, Kamaldeen

    2015-11-01

    Studies on psychoactive substance use in Nigeria had focused on prevalence and rarely on treatment implication(s) of large rates reported. Further challenge was to find suitable instruments to monitor change readiness as well as predict treatment outcomes along motivation continuum and according to resilience characteristics. Such ability will not only help to match treatment strategy with stage of change but also come with a more satisfactory outcome. This study therefore provided psychometric properties of one of such measuring scales: Stage of Change Readiness and Treatment Eagerness Scale version 8 (SOCRATES-8) and the accompanying change in resilience among Nigerians using psychoactive substances. Participants were 111 psychoactive substance dependent users in three treatment centers in Northern Nigeria. All respondents filled sociodemographic questionnaire, SOCRATES-8 and 14-item Resilience Scale. The study found overall motivation for change among participants to be medium on the three subscales of SOCRATES-8: ambivalence (median=14.00; range=7-20); recognition (median=31.00; range=7-35); and taking steps (median=35.00; range=12-40). More than half (61.3%) scored moderately on resilience. The Internal reliability of SOCRATES-8's subscales fell into acceptable range (ambivalence=0.54; recognition=0.87; taking steps=0.84). Pearson correlation coefficients of subscales with resilience are positive and in moderate range except for ambivalence with very low coefficient. Hierarchical cluster analysis based on participants' resilience characteristics yields five distinct profiles corresponding to five stages of motivational change. ANOVA of these five profiles based on SOCRATES' 3 subscales was significant. The study demonstrates utility of SOCRATES-8 to assess change readiness and treatment eagerness of psychoactive substance abusers according to stages of change and their resilience characteristics. This will aid treatment planning and can also measure treatment

  14. Family Involvement and Changes in Child Behavior during Residential Mental Health Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robst, John; Rohrer, Lodi; Armstrong, Mary; Dollard, Norin; Sharrock, Patty; Batsche, Catherine; Reader, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Background: Family involvement is viewed as an important component of the treatment process for children in residential treatment centers, but little is known about the impact of contact with family members on changes in youth functioning. Objective: The goal of this study was to use administrative data to examine the association between family…

  15. Motivating Treatment Seeking and Behavior Change by Untreated Military Personnel Abusing Alcohol or Drugs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    intervention , motivational enhancement therapy 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: U 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a. NAME OF...military personnel who are not currently in substance abuse treatment . The intervention is designed to prompt: (a) a willingness to participate voluntarily...Motivating Treatment Seeking and Behavior Change by Untreated Military Personnel Abusing Alcohol or Drugs PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Denise

  16. Microscopic morphological changes of the tooth surface in relation to fixed orthodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Preoteasa, Cristina Teodora; NiŢoi, Dan Florin; Preoteasa, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Orthodontic treatment has, as any other medical intervention, in addition to its benefits, side effects, some of them being perceived as unavoidable. The aim of this case series was to microscopically evaluate the changes of the tooth surface in relation to fixed orthodontic treatment. A case series study was implemented by the usage of four extracted first maxillary premolars, from patients with previous orthodontic treatment, of 12 and 23 months. Analysis was performed using the high precision stereomicroscope (Axiovert, Carl Zeiss, Germany), at magnifications from 10× to 50×. The tooth surface corresponding to the bracket bonding area registered numerous disorderly grooves and cracks, with various directions and depths, and was flattened, having lower convexity compared to teeth surfaces where brackets were not bonded. Root resorption lacunae were more frequently observed in teeth under orthodontic treatment, these having various depths, and sizes considerably larger than those observed in teeth without orthodontic treatment. Following orthodontic treatment, teeth exhibit changes that can be perceived as being directly linked to this medical intervention. These teeth changes usually have low or moderate severity, which can be influenced at some degree by the clinical conduct of the orthodontic treatment. The stereomicroscope proved to be a high sensitivity tool for the analysis of morphological changes of teeth in relation to the fixed orthodontic treatment.

  17. The Role of Readiness to Change in Response to Treatment of Adolescent Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Cara C.; Simons, Anne D.; Silva, Susan G.; Rohde, Paul; Small, David M.; Murakami, Jessica L.; High, Robin R.; March, John S.

    2009-01-01

    The effect of readiness to change on treatment outcome was examined among 332 adolescents (46% male, 74% Caucasian), ages 12 through 17 years (M = 14.6, SD = 1.5), with major depressive disorder who were participating in the Treatment for Adolescents With Depression Study (TADS). TADS is a randomized clinical trial comparing the effectiveness of…

  18. Change in Depressive Symptoms among Treatment-Seeking College Students Who Are Sexual Minorities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Effrig, Jessica C.; Maloch, Janelle K.; McAleavey, Andrew; Locke, Benjamin D.; Bieschke, Kathleen J.

    2014-01-01

    Changes in students' depressive symptoms during the course of treatment at college counseling centers were examined by sexual orientation. In Study 1, results showed that depressive symptoms decreased similarly across sexual orientation groups during the course of treatment. In Study 2, family support did not moderate the relationship between…

  19. Law of Empires.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martz, Carlton

    2001-01-01

    This issue of "Bill of Rights in Action" explores issues raised by empires and imperial law. The first article, "Clash of Empires: The Fight for North America," looks at the clash of empires and the fight for North America during the 18th century. The second article, "When Roman Law Ruled the Western World," examines…

  20. Risk reduction treatment of high-risk psychopathic offenders: the relationship of psychopathy and treatment change to violent recidivism.

    PubMed

    Olver, Mark E; Lewis, Kathy; Wong, Stephen C P

    2013-04-01

    The relationships of psychopathy, therapeutic change, and violent recidivism were examined in a sample of 152 high-risk violent offenders treated in a high-intensity violence reduction program at the Regional Psychiatric Centre (RPC) in Saskatoon, SK. The Violence Risk Scale (VRS; Wong & Gordon, 1999-2003) and Psychopathy Checklist-Revised (PCL-R; Hare, 1991, 2003) were rated on the sample. As an extension on a prior psychometric study of the VRS (Lewis, Olver, & Wong, 2012), the associations of therapeutic change scores, obtained from pre- and posttreatment ratings of VRS dynamic items, and violent recidivism were examined among high-risk psychopathic offenders (mean PCL-R >25) over approximately 5 years' follow-up. Positive therapeutic change correlated negatively with the PCL-R, particularly Factor 1 and the Affective facet, and was significantly associated with reductions in violent recidivism after controlling for psychopathy. The association of change to violent outcome decreased, however, when controlling for the Affective facet. Taken together, the present results suggest that risk-related treatment changes demonstrated by high-risk psychopathic offenders can be predictive of reductions in violent recidivism, and that reliable measurements of therapeutic change may be informative about treatment outcome in a high-risk violent offender group.

  1. Translucency changes of direct esthetic restorative materials after curing, aging and treatment

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to review the changes in translucency of direct esthetic restorative materials after curing, aging and treatment. As a criterion for the evaluation of clinical translucency changes, visual perceptibility threshold in translucency parameter difference (ΔTP) of 2 was used. Translucency changes after curing were perceivable depending on experimental methods and products (largest ΔTP in resin composites = 15.9). Translucency changes after aging were reported as either relatively stable or showed perceivable changes by aging protocols (largest ΔTP in resin composites = -3.8). Translucency changes after curing, aging and treatment were perceivable in several products and experimental methods. Therefore, shade matching of direct esthetic materials should be performed considering these instabilities of translucency in direct esthetic materials. PMID:27847744

  2. Translucency changes of direct esthetic restorative materials after curing, aging and treatment.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong-Keun

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this article was to review the changes in translucency of direct esthetic restorative materials after curing, aging and treatment. As a criterion for the evaluation of clinical translucency changes, visual perceptibility threshold in translucency parameter difference (ΔTP) of 2 was used. Translucency changes after curing were perceivable depending on experimental methods and products (largest ΔTP in resin composites = 15.9). Translucency changes after aging were reported as either relatively stable or showed perceivable changes by aging protocols (largest ΔTP in resin composites = -3.8). Translucency changes after curing, aging and treatment were perceivable in several products and experimental methods. Therefore, shade matching of direct esthetic materials should be performed considering these instabilities of translucency in direct esthetic materials.

  3. Psychoanalysis and empirical research.

    PubMed

    Giannoni, Massimo

    2003-11-01

    At the beginning of the nineteenth century, the idea of reason began to lose its universal and absolute value, undermining the view of science as a form of objective knowledge that reveals a fundamental reality. These changes have also had an impact on psychoanalysis, leading to a proliferation of theories and the end of a positivistic approach, epitomized by a 'neutral' analyst who knows the contents of the patient's mind. Hermeneutic philosophy provides a tool with which to explore both theoretical multiplicity and the contribution of the analyst's subjectivity to the analytic process. Furthermore, a hermeneutic approach does not have to be hostile to empirical science, but can be integrated with it in a 'scientific-hermeneutic model' in which historical and biological principles are given equal value.

  4. SU-E-J-267: Change in Mean CT Intensity of Lung Tumors During Radiation Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Mahon, R; Tennyson, N; Weiss, E; Hugo, G

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate CT intensity change of lung tumors during radiation therapy. Methods: Repeated 4D CT images were acquired on a CT simulator during the course of therapy for 27 lung cancer patients on IRB approved protocols. All subjects received definitive radiation treatment ± chemotherapy. CT scans were completed prior to treatment, and 2–7 times during the treatment course. Primary tumor was delineated by an experienced Radiation Oncologist. Contours were thresholded between −100 HU and 200 HU to remove airways and bone. Correlations between the change in the mean tumor intensity and initial tumor intensity, SUVmax, and tumor volume change rate were investigated. Reproducibility was assessed by evaluating the variation in mean intensity over all phases in 4DCT, for a subgroup of 19 subjects. Results: Reproducibility of tumor intensity between phases as characterized by the root mean square of standard deviation across 19 subjects was 1.8 HU. Subjects had a mean initial tumor intensity of 16.5 ± 11.6 HU and an overall reduction in HU by 10.3 ± 8.5 HU. Evaluation of the changes in tumor intensity during treatment showed a decrease of 0.3 ± 0.3 HU/day for all subjects, except three. No significant correlation was found between change in HU/day and initial HU intensity (p=0.53), initial PET SUVmax (p=0.69), or initial tumor volume (p=0.70). The rate of tumor volume change was weakly correlated (R{sup 2}=0.05) with HU change (p=0.01). Conclusion: Most lung cancer subjects showed a marked trend of decreasing mean tumor CT intensity throughout radiotherapy, including early in the treatment course. Change in HU/day is not correlated with other potential early predictors for response, such as SUV and tumor volume change. This Result supports future studies to evaluate change in tumor intensity on CT as an early predictor of response.

  5. Changes of the Mandible after Orthodontic Treatment with and without Extraction of Four Premolars

    PubMed Central

    Hosseinzadeh-Nik, Tahereh; Eftekhari, Armin; Shahroudi, Atefe Saffar; Kharrazifard, Mahammad Javad

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: This study was designed to assess the changes of the mandible of patients who underwent orthodontic treatment with or without extraction of four premolars. Materials and Methods: Eighteen Class I bimaxillary protrusion patients treated with extraction of four first premolars and retraction of anterior teeth and 18 Class I non-extraction patients with a mean age of 16.38±0.4 years were selected. Cephalometric analysis was performed before and after treatment. Twenty-four variables for analyzing the hard and soft tissues of the mandible were compared between the two groups. Repeated measures ANOVA was used for the comparison of the two groups fallowed by paired t-test. The relationship between the soft and hard tissue variables was studied using the Pearson’s correlation coefficient. Results: In both groups, the mean value of angular measurements related to B point and Pogonion (Pog) decreased with treatment (P<0.05). Similarly, the symphysis depth of soft tissue decreased (P=0.008). The mean angular value of Y-axis increased in both groups after treatment (P=0.007). The mean changes in hard tissue symphysis depth after treatment were different in the two groups (P=0.021). Vertical, horizontal and rotational changes in soft tissue B point (B’) and Pogonion (pog’) followed their underlying hard tissue changes (P<0.05). Conclusions: Points B and Pog showed backward movement after orthodontic treatments in both extraction and non-extraction patients. Changes in B’ and Pog’ were directly influenced by the changes in the corresponding points of the underlying hard tissue. Orthodontic treatments with and without extraction of premolars produced insignificant changes in vertical facial dimension. PMID:28392817

  6. Systematic review of behavior change research on point-of-use water treatment interventions in countries categorized as low- to medium-development on the human development index.

    PubMed

    Fiebelkorn, Amy Parker; Person, Bobbie; Quick, Robert E; Vindigni, Stephen M; Jhung, Michael; Bowen, Anna; Riley, Patricia L

    2012-08-01

    Point-of-use water treatment (i.e., water purification at the point of consumption) has proven effective in preventing diarrhea in developing countries. However, widespread adoption has not occurred, suggesting that implementation strategies have not motivated sustained behavior change. We conducted a systematic literature review of published behavioral research on factors influencing adoption of point-of-use water treatment in countries categorized as low- to medium-development on the United Nations Development Programme Human Development Index. We used 22 key words to search peer-reviewed literature from 1950 to 2010 from OVID Medline, CINAHL, and PsycINFO. Twenty-six (1.7%) of 1551 papers met our four inclusion criteria: 1) implemented a point-of-use water treatment intervention, 2) applied a behavioral intervention, 3) evaluated behavior change as the outcome, and 4) occurred in a low- or medium-development country. We reviewed these 26 publications for detailed descriptions of the water treatment intervention, theoretical rationales for the behavioral intervention, and descriptions of the evaluation. In 5 (19%) papers, details of the behavioral intervention were fully specified. Seven (27%) papers reported using a behavioral theory in the design of the intervention and evaluation of its impact. Ten (38%) studies used a comparison or control group; 5 provided detailed descriptions. Seven (27%) papers reported high sustained use of point-of-use water treatment with rates >50% at the last recorded follow-up. Despite documented health benefits of point-of-use water treatment interventions in reducing diarrheal diseases, we found limited peer-reviewed behavioral research on the topic. In addition, we found the existing literature often lacked detailed descriptions of the intervention for replication, seldom described the theoretical and empirical rationale for the implementation and evaluation of the intervention, and often had limitations in the evaluation

  7. Changes in brain activation in breast cancer patients depend on cognitive domain and treatment type

    PubMed Central

    Menning, Sanne; de Ruiter, Michiel B.; Veltman, Dick J.; Boogerd, Willem; Oldenburg, Hester S. A.; Reneman, Liesbeth

    2017-01-01

    Background Cognitive problems in breast cancer patients are common after systemic treatment, particularly chemotherapy. An increasing number of fMRI studies show altered brain activation in breast cancer patients after treatment, suggestive of neurotoxicity. Previous prospective fMRI studies administered a single cognitive task. The current study employed two task paradigms to evaluate whether treatment-induced changes depend on the probed cognitive domain. Methods Participants were breast cancer patients scheduled to receive systemic treatment (anthracycline-based chemotherapy +/- endocrine treatment, n = 28), or no systemic treatment (n = 24) and no-cancer controls (n = 31). Assessment took place before adjuvant treatment and six months after chemotherapy, or at similar intervals. Blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) activation and performance were measured during an executive functioning task and an episodic memory task. Group-by-time interactions were analyzed using a flexible factorial design. Results Task performance did not differ between patient groups and did not change over time. Breast cancer patients who received systemic treatment, however, showed increased parietal activation compared to baseline with increasing executive functioning task load compared to breast cancer patients who did not receive systemic treatment. This hyperactivation was accompanied by worse physical functioning, higher levels of fatigue and more cognitive complaints. In contrast, in breast cancer patients who did not receive systemic treatment, parietal activation normalized over time compared to the other two groups. Conclusions Parietal hyperactivation after systemic treatment in the context of stable levels of executive task performance is compatible with a compensatory processing account of hyperactivation or maintain adequate performance levels. This over-recruitment of brain regions depends on the probed cognitive domain and may represent a response to decreased neural

  8. Change in expressed emotion and treatment outcome in adolescent anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Moskovich, Ashley A; Timko, C Alix; Honeycutt, Lisa K; Zucker, Nancy L; Merwin, Rhonda M

    2017-01-01

    Expressed emotion (EE) has been associated with poor outcomes in anorexia nervosa (AN); however, whether changes in EE predict superior treatment outcomes is unknown. The current study examined whether decreases in EE during an open trial of a novel family-based treatment for AN predicted symptoms at end of treatment. Forty-seven adolescents (12-18 years of age) with AN or sub-threshold AN and their parents (mothers: n = 47, fathers: n = 39) participated in 6 months of family treatment. Measures of AN symptomatology (Eating Disorder Examination completed by adolescent and end of treatment recovery status) and parental EE (Family Questionnaire completed by parents which measures two facets of EE: critical communication [CC] and emotional over-involvement [EOI]) were collected at baseline and end of treatment. Parental EOI, but not CC, significantly decreased during the course of treatment. Change in mothers', but not fathers', EE accounted for additional variance in AN symptomatology at end of treatment above baseline EE and baseline AN symptom levels. Findings suggest a greater emphasis on parent support during treatment may improve outcomes.

  9. The Heart of Change: Acceptance and Intimacy Mediate Treatment Response in a Brief Couples Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Hawrilenko, Matt; Gray, Tatiana D.; Cordova, James V.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined mediators of a brief couples intervention. Intimate safety, acceptance, and activation were examined in two roles: their contribution to marital satisfaction gains in the first two weeks after treatment (contemporaneous effects), and how early changes in the mediators influenced longer-term changes in marital satisfaction over two years of follow-up (lagged effects). Married couples (N = 215) were randomized to intervention or wait-list control and followed for two years. Latent change score models were used to examine contemporaneous and time-lagged mediation. A booster intervention in the second year was used for a replication study. Changes in intimate safety and acceptance were uniquely associated with contemporaneous treatment effects on relationship satisfaction in year one, but only acceptance was uniquely associated with contemporaneous effects in year two. With respect to lagged effects, early changes in acceptance partially mediated later changes in marital satisfaction in year one, whereas the same effect for intimate safety was marginally significant. These lagged paths were moderate in size and indirect effects were small. No lagged effects were significant in year two. Changes in activation were not significant as either a contemporaneous or lagged predictor of changes in relationship satisfaction. This study found moderate support for acceptance and more limited support for intimate safety as mediators of short and long-term treatment response, suggesting that these processes play an important role in sustaining marital health. PMID:26524618

  10. Dietary changes and food intake in the first year after breast cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Vance, Vivienne; Campbell, Sharon; McCargar, Linda; Mourtzakis, Marina; Hanning, Rhona

    2014-06-01

    Understanding dietary habits of women after breast cancer is a critical first step in developing nutrition guidelines that will support weight management and optimal health in survivorship; however, limited data are available. The objective of this study was to describe changes in diet among breast cancer survivors in the first year after treatment, and to evaluate these changes in the context of current dietary intake. Changes in diet were assessed in 28 early stage breast cancer survivors, using a self-reported survey in which women identified changes in food intake since their diagnosis. Current dietary intake was estimated from 3-day food records and described relative to current recommendations. The majority of women reported changes in diet after diagnosis, most common being an increase in vegetables/fruit and fish, lower intake of red meat, and reduced alcohol. Many women reported that these changes were initiated during active treatment. Dietary changes were largely consistent with current recommendations for cancer prevention; however, some women were still above the guidelines for total and saturated fat, and many were below recommendations for vegetables/fruit, milk/alternatives, calcium, and vitamin D. Evidence that some women are willing and able to initiate positive changes in diet early in the treatment trajectory suggests that early intervention may be effective in promoting dietary habits that will assist with weight management and overall health. Data on current dietary intake highlights several possible targets for dietary intervention in this population.

  11. The Eating Disorder Recovery Self-Efficacy Questionnaire (EDRSQ): change with treatment and prediction of outcome.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Angela Marinilli; Heinberg, Leslie J; Coughlin, Janelle W; Fava, Joseph L; Guarda, Angela S

    2008-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the predictive validity of the Eating Disorder Recovery Self-Efficacy Questionnaire (EDRSQ), an empirically-derived self-report instrument that assesses confidence to eat without engaging in eating disordered behavior or experiencing undue emotional distress (Normative Eating Self-Efficacy) and confidence to maintain a realistic body image that is not dominated by pursuit of thinness (Body Image Self-Efficacy). Participants were 104 female inpatients with anorexia nervosa (AN), subthreshold AN, or underweight bulimia nervosa who were treated at a specialized eating disorder clinic and completed the EDRSQ and Eating Disorder Inventory-2 (EDI-2) Drive for Thinness (DT) and Body Dissatisfaction (BD) subscales upon admission. A subset of patients completed the EDRSQ (n=81) and EDI-2 subscales (n=70) following inpatient treatment. Self-efficacy increased significantly during treatment. EDRSQ scores at admission were inversely related to length of hospital stay and posttreatment DT and BD subscales and positively related to partial hospital weight gain rate. The EDRSQ significantly predicted length of hospital stay and posttreatment BD above and beyond clinical indicators and eating disorder psychopathology at inpatient admission. Findings support the validity of the EDRSQ and suggest it is a useful predictor of short-term hospital treatment outcome in underweight eating disorder patients.

  12. Secondary structure and conformational change of mushroom polyphenol oxidase during thermosonication treatment by using FTIR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Baltacıoğlu, Hande; Bayındırlı, Alev; Severcan, Feride

    2017-01-01

    To understand the conformational changes of mushroom PPO, the secondary structural change of the enzyme during thermosonication treatment at different power (60, 80 and 100%), temperature (20-60°C) and time (0-30min) combinations was investigated by using FTIR spectroscopy and compared with the change in enzyme activity. The enzyme inactivation higher than 99% was obtained at 100% amplitude at 60°C for 10min. FTIR studies showed that marked spectral changes were noted after ultrasound treatment at 20°C. The α-helix and β-sheet contents decreased, while aggregated β-sheet, turns and random coil contents increased as temperature increased up to 60°C during thermosonication treatment for 10min indicating protein denaturation. Aggregated bands located at 1683 and 1616cm(-1) became evident after ultrasound treatment at 40°C. When temperature was lowered back to 25°C, from ultrasound treatment at 60°C, these bands were still observed, indicating the irreversible change in the structure.

  13. Changes in Body Composition in Anorexia Nervosa: Predictors of Recovery and Treatment Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Arcelus, Jon; Sánchez, Isabel; Riesco, Nadine; Jiménez-Murcia, Susana; González-Gómez, Jana; Granero, Roser; Custal, Nuria; Montserrat-Gil de Bernabé, Monica; Tárrega, Salomé; Baños, Rosa M.; Botella, Cristina; de la Torre, Rafael; Fernández-García, José C.; Fernández-Real, José M.; Frühbeck, Gema; Gómez-Ambrosi, Javier; Tinahones, Francisco J.; Crujeiras, Ana B.; Casanueva, Felipe F.; Menchón, José M.; Fernández-Aranda, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    The restoration of body composition (BC) parameters is considered to be one of the most important goals in the treatment of patients with anorexia nervosa (AN). However, little is known about differences between AN diagnostic subtypes [restricting (AN-R) and binge/purging (AN-BP)] and weekly changes in BC during refeeding treatment. Therefore, the main objectives of our study were twofold: 1) to assess the changes in BC throughout nutritional treatment in an AN sample and 2) to analyze predictors of BC changes during treatment, as well as predictors of treatment outcome. The whole sample comprised 261 participants [118 adult females with AN (70 AN-R vs. 48 AN-BP), and 143 healthy controls]. BC was measured weekly during 15 weeks of day-hospital treatment using bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA). Assessment measures also included the Eating Disorders Inventory-2, as well as a number of other clinical indices. Overall, the results showed that AN-R and AN-BP patients statistically differed in all BC measures at admission. However, no significant time×group interaction was found for almost all BC parameters. Significant time×group interactions were only found for basal metabolic rate (p = .041) and body mass index (BMI) (p = .035). Multiple regression models showed that the best predictors of pre-post changes in BC parameters (namely fat-free mass, muscular mass, total body water and BMI) were the baseline values of BC parameters. Stepwise predictive logistic regressions showed that only BMI and age were significantly associated with outcome, but not with the percentage of body fat. In conclusion, these data suggest that although AN patients tended to restore all BC parameters during nutritional treatment, only AN-BP patients obtained the same fat mass values as healthy controls. Put succinctly, the best predictors of changes in BC were baseline BC values, which did not, however, seem to influence treatment outcome. PMID:26600309

  14. Does psychological well-being change following treatment? An exploratory study on outpatients with eating disorders.

    PubMed

    Tomba, Elena; Tecuta, Lucia; Schumann, Romana; Ballardini, Donatella

    2017-04-01

    Psychological well-being changes following cognitive-behavioral therapy-based treatment were investigated in outpatients with eating disorders (ED). While it is known that CBT reduces symptomatology in EDs, less is known about how changes in positive functioning may ensue. One-hundred and eighty five ED outpatients were analyzed for pre-treatment and post-treatment changes in psychological well-being (PWB) by last observation carried forward - Wilcoxon signed rank tests. Significant gains in all PWB dimensions were found, with moderate effect size correlations in environmental mastery (r=-.418), personal growth (r=-.351) and self-acceptance (r=-.341). A subsample of patients in remission (n=51) was selected and compared to healthy controls in PWB post-treatment scores through Mann-Whitney U tests. Remitted patients showed significantly lower psychological well-being in two dimensions compared to controls: PWB-positive relations (r=-.360) and PWB-self-acceptance (r=-.288). However, more than 50% of ED outpatients in remission had PWB scores that fell below the 50th percentile of healthy controls in all psychological well-being dimensions, despite significant treatment response. Several mechanisms of psychological well-being change following CBT-based treatment are discussed. The assessment of treatment outcome in EDs may benefit from considering changes in positive functioning such as psychological well-being, in addition to the standard measurement of BMI, symptomatology and behavioral parameters. CBT-based treatment outcomes may be strengthened by promoting the development of optimal domains particularly in the interpersonal realm, such as building of quality and warm relationships and focusing on enhancing self-acceptance.

  15. Determinants for changing the treatment of COPD: a regression analysis from a clinical audit

    PubMed Central

    López-Campos, Jose Luis; Abad Arranz, María; Calero Acuña, Carmen; Romero Valero, Fernando; Ayerbe García, Ruth; Hidalgo Molina, Antonio; Aguilar Perez-Grovas, Ricardo I; García Gil, Francisco; Casas Maldonado, Francisco; Caballero Ballesteros, Laura; Sánchez Palop, María; Pérez-Tejero, Dolores; Segado, Alejandro; Calvo Bonachera, Jose; Hernández Sierra, Bárbara; Doménech, Adolfo; Arroyo Varela, Macarena; González Vargas, Francisco; Cruz Rueda, Juan J

    2016-01-01

    Introduction This study is an analysis of a pilot COPD clinical audit that evaluated adherence to guidelines for patients with COPD in a stable disease phase during a routine visit in specialized secondary care outpatient clinics in order to identify the variables associated with the decision to step-up or step-down pharmacological treatment. Methods This study was a pilot clinical audit performed at hospital outpatient respiratory clinics in the region of Andalusia, Spain (eight provinces with over eight million inhabitants), in which 20% of centers in the area (catchment population 3,143,086 inhabitants) were invited to participate. Treatment changes were evaluated in terms of the number of prescribed medications and were classified as step-up, step-down, or no change. Three backward stepwise binominal multivariate logistic regression analyses were conducted to evaluate variables associated with stepping up, stepping down, and inhaled corticosteroids discontinuation. Results The present analysis evaluated 565 clinical records (91%) of the complete audit. Of those records, 366 (64.8%) cases saw no change in pharmacological treatment, while 99 patients (17.5%) had an increase in the number of drugs, 55 (9.7%) had a decrease in the number of drugs, and 45 (8.0%) noted a change to other medication for a similar therapeutic scheme. Exacerbations were the main factor in stepping up treatment, as were the symptoms themselves. In contrast, rather than symptoms, doctors used forced expiratory volume in 1 second and previous treatment with long-term antibiotics or inhaled corticosteroids as the key determinants to stepping down treatment. Conclusion The majority of doctors did not change the prescription. When changes were made, a number of related factors were noted. Future trials must evaluate whether these therapeutic changes impact clinically relevant outcomes at follow-up. PMID:27330285

  16. Changes of wood cell walls in response to hygro-mechanical steam treatment.

    PubMed

    Guo, Juan; Song, Kunlin; Salmén, Lennart; Yin, Yafang

    2015-01-22

    The effects of compression combined with steam treatment (CS-treatment), i.e. a hygro-mechanical steam treatment on Spruce wood were studied on a cell-structure level to understand the chemical and physical changes of the secondary cell wall occurring under such conditions. Specially, imaging FT-IR microscopy, nanoindentation and dynamic vapour absorption were used to track changes in the chemical structure, in micromechanical and hygroscopic properties. It was shown that CS-treatment resulted in different changes in morphological, chemical and physical properties of the cell wall, in comparison with those under pure steam treatment. After CS-treatment, the cellular structure displayed significant deformations, and the biopolymer components, e.g. hemicellulose and lignin, were degraded, resulting in decreased hygroscopicity and increased mechanical properties of the wood compared to both untreated and steam treated wood. Moreover, CS-treatment resulted in a higher degree of degradation especially in earlywood compared to a more uniform behaviour of wood treated only by steam.

  17. Orthodontic treatment effects on inflammatory marker profiles in saliva before and after 2 archwire changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Zulham; Jaafar, Ikmal Mohamad; Rohaya, M. A. W.; Abidin, Intan Zarina Zainol; Senafi, Sahidan; Ariffin, Zaidah Zainal; Ariffin, Shahrul Hisham Zainal

    2013-11-01

    Periodontal tissue changes exerted by external forces in orthodontic treatment allow tooth movement. The changes in periodontal tissues i.e. inflammation can be monitored using gingival crevicular fluid (GCF). GCF is a component of saliva. Saliva could be used to monitor periodontal disease progression. The use of saliva to monitor periodontal tissues changes during orthodontic treatment is still unknown. Therefore, we observed the profiles of inflammatory markers namely creatine kinase ('CK), nitric oxide (NO), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) in saliva of orthodontic patients to evaluate their importance in orthodontic treatment. A total of 21 subjects (13 female and 8 male) participated in this study. Samples were collected from gingival crevicular fluid at three period of archwire changes: baseline (M0), 2 weeks after 0.014" NiTi archwire (M1), and 2 weeks after 0.018" NiTi archwire (M2). All enzyme activities i.e. CK, LDH and AST were measured spectrophotometrically at 340 nm. Griess assay was used to measure nitric oxide level. CK activity, NO level, LDH activity and AST activity in saliva samples did not show significant differences among period of archwire changes. The use of inflammatory marker profiles in saliva may not represent the changes in periodontal tissues during orthodontic treatment.

  18. Predicting Treatment Seekers Readiness to Change their Drinking Behavior in the COMBINE Study

    PubMed Central

    DiClemente, Carlo C.; Doyle, Suzanne R.; Donovan, Dennis

    2010-01-01

    Background Initial motivation and readiness to change are complex constructs and have been important but inconsistent predictors of treatment attendance and drinking outcomes in studies of alcoholism treatment. Motivation can be described in multiple ways as simply the accumulation of consequences that push change, a shift in intentions, or engagement in various tasks that are part of a larger process of change. Method Using baseline data from participants in the COMBINE Study, this study re-evaluated the psychometric properties of a 24-item, measure of motivation derived from the URICA that yielded four subscales representing attitudes and experiences related to tasks of stages of Precontemplation, Contemplation, Action, and Maintenance Striving as well as a second order factor score representing a multidimensional view of readiness to change drinking. A variety of hypothesized predictors of readiness and the stage subscales were examined using multiple regression analyses in order to better understand the nature of this measure of motivation. Results Findings supported the basic subscale structure and the overall motivational readiness score derived from this measure. Readiness to change drinking behavior was predicted by baseline measures of perceived stress, drinking severity, psychiatric co-morbidity, self-efficacy, craving, and with positive treatment outcome expectancies. However, absolute values were small indicating that readiness for change is not explained simply by demographic, drinking severity, treatment, change process, or contextual variables. Conclusion This measure demonstrated good psychometric properties and results supported the independence as well as convergent and divergent validity of the measured constructs. Predictors of overall readiness and subscale scores indicate that a variety of personal and contextual factors contribute to treatment seekers motivation to change in an understandable but complex manner. PMID:19320633

  19. Risk-Taking Propensity Changes Throughout the Course of Residential Substance Abuse Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Aklin, Will M.; Tull, Matthew T.; Kahler, Christopher W.; Lejuez, C.W.

    2009-01-01

    High rates of relapse following treatment have compelled researchers to elucidate the individual difference factors that change among those who receive substance abuse treatment. Previous research has suggested that trait-disinhibition variables may be of particular relevance. Given that these variables are primarily considered to be trait-level factors, the extent to which they are malleable by treatment is an important consideration. Thus, the purpose of this study was to examine the effect of a residential substance abuse treatment program on specific trait-disinhibition variables (e.g., risk-taking, impulsivity). A sample of 81 inner-city substance users were assessed on self-report and behavioral indicators of trait-disinhibition over a 30-day course of treatment. Risk-taking propensity was found to significantly decrease from pre- to post-treatment. Results are discussed with respect to implications for better understanding the factors that may operate as mechanisms of change during treatment, thereby having the potential to inform substance abuse prevention and treatment programs. PMID:20161264

  20. Changes in Diarrheal Disease and Treatment Among Brazilian Children from 1986 to 1996

    PubMed Central

    Sastry, Narayan; Burgard, Sarah

    2010-01-01

    We examined changes in diarrhea prevalence and treatment in Brazil between 1986 and 1996. Over this 10-year period there was a small decline in diarrhea prevalence but treatment with oral rehydration therapy (ORT) increased greatly. Deaths due to dehydration were thus averted, although the costly burden of morbidity remained high. The decline in diarrhea prevalence was largely due to changes in the effects of several key covariates, such as breastfeeding, with only a modest role played by socioeconomic change, infrastructure improvements, and other behavioral factors. ORT treatment of diarrhea was essentially unrelated to child and family characteristics, suggesting that the large increase was due to the success of public health efforts to promote its use widely. Our results suggest that the most effective policies for reducing diarrhea prevalence are likely to be further increases in education and the promotion of breastfeeding. Persistent disparities in diarrhea prevalence mean that policies to prevent the disease should be targeted at disadvantaged socioeconomic groups. PMID:21359099

  1. Changing global essential medicines norms to improve access to AIDS treatment: lessons from Brazil.

    PubMed

    Nunn, A; Fonseca, E Da; Gruskin, S

    2009-01-01

    Brazil's large-scale, successful HIV/AIDS treatment programme is considered by many to be a model for other developing countries aiming to improve access to AIDS treatment. Far less is known about Brazil's important role in changing global norms related to international pharmaceutical policy, particularly international human rights, health and trade policies governing access to essential medicines. Prompted by Brazil's interest in preserving its national AIDS treatment policies during World Trade Organisation trade disputes with the USA, these efforts to change global essential medicines norms have had important implications for other countries, particularly those scaling up AIDS treatment. This paper analyses Brazil's contributions to global essential medicines policy and explains the relevance of Brazil's contributions to global health policy today.

  2. Changing global essential medicines norms to improve access to AIDS treatment: Lessons from Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Nunn, A.; Fonseca, E. Da; Gruskin, S.

    2009-01-01

    Brazil's large-scale, successful HIV/AIDS treatment programme is considered by many to be a model for other developing countries aiming to improve access to AIDS treatment. Far less is known about Brazil's important role in changing global norms related to international pharmaceutical policy, particularly international human rights, health and trade policies governing access to essential medicines. Prompted by Brazil's interest in preserving its national AIDS treatment policies during World Trade Organisation trade disputes with the USA, these efforts to change global essential medicines norms have had important implications for other countries, particularly those scaling up AIDS treatment. This paper analyses Brazil's contributions to global essential medicines policy and explains the relevance of Brazil's contributions to global health policy today. PMID:19333805

  3. Changes in cognitive symptoms after a buspirone-melatonin combination treatment for Major Depressive Disorder.

    PubMed

    Targum, Steven D; Wedel, Pamela C; Fava, Maurizio

    2015-09-01

    Cognitive deficits are often associated with acute depressive episodes and contribute to the functional impairment seen in patients with Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). Many patients sustain residual cognitive deficits after treatment that may be independent of the core MDD disorder. We tracked changes in cognitive deficits relative to antidepressant treatment response using the patient self-rated Massachusetts General Hospital Cognitive and Physical Functioning Questionnaire (MGH-CPFQ) during a 6-week, double-blind trial of a combination antidepressant treatment (buspirone 15 mg with melatonin-SR 3 mg) versus buspirone (15 mg) monotherapy versus placebo in MDD patients with acute depressive episodes. The CPFQ includes distinct cognitive and physical functioning dimension subscales. Treatment response was determined using the Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology (IDSc30). Treatment responders improved significantly more on the total CPFQ than non-responders (p < 0.0001) regardless of treatment assignment. The cognitive dimension of the CPFQ score favored the combination treatment over the other two groups (ANCOVA: p = 0.050). Among the treatment non-responders, the effect size for the CPFQ cognitive dimension was 0.603 favoring the combination treatment over the over two groups and 0.113 for the CPFQ physical dimension. These preliminary findings suggest that a combination of buspirone with melatonin may benefit cognitive function distinct from mood symptoms and that some aspects of cognition may be specific targets for treatment within a population of patients with MDD.

  4. Application of empirically supported treatments to clinical settings. In: Jelalian, E., Steele, R.G., editors. Handbook of Childhood and Adolescent Obesity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This book chapter identifies treatments for pediatric obesity that have been shown to be effective in research settings and discusses how these treatments can be implemented in an applied clinical setting. Behavior-based treatments have demonstrated the best outcomes. Commonly used behavioral strate...

  5. [Training model for integral treatment of patients with eating disorders resistant to change].

    PubMed

    Calvo Sagardoy, R; Gallego Morales, L T; García de Lorenzo y Mateos, A

    2012-01-01

    The need to find effective treatments for patients with Anorexia or Bulimia nervosa has led to the professionals who care for them to develop new forms of treatment that take into account the variables that cause resistance to change. Patients in this study (2006-2009) have the following characteristics: 340 patients who have 7 or more years of evolution and/or have tried numerous previous treatments without having succeeded in starting and / or maintaining the desired changes, that allowed them to recover steadily. As the proposed treatment, the patient-treatment team is based on the principles of the training model. It considers the patient holistically, it informs and provides him with resources to increase its commitment to change. Teaches the patient to take care physically and mentally as a way to regain their health and leave the disorder in a stable way. Includes family members as essential support in the recovery of their closest. Therapists require extensive experience in the treatment of ED, flexibility, ability to integrate with other team members even if they use different theoretical models, skills for group sessions, ability to handle negative emotions and frustration tolerance. Finally, the model presented below has been implemented, recovered patients whose stay in the disorder exceeded 15 years of development and led to permanent occupational disability.

  6. The proper treatment of language acquisition and change in a population setting

    PubMed Central

    Niyogi, Partha; Berwick, Robert C.

    2009-01-01

    Language acquisition maps linguistic experience, primary linguistic data (PLD), onto linguistic knowledge, a grammar. Classically, computational models of language acquisition assume a single target grammar and one PLD source, the central question being whether the target grammar can be acquired from the PLD. However, real-world learners confront populations with variation, i.e., multiple target grammars and PLDs. Removing this idealization has inspired a new class of population-based language acquisition models. This paper contrasts 2 such models. In the first, iterated learning (IL), each learner receives PLD from one target grammar but different learners can have different targets. In the second, social learning (SL), each learner receives PLD from possibly multiple targets, e.g., from 2 parents. We demonstrate that these 2 models have radically different evolutionary consequences. The IL model is dynamically deficient in 2 key respects. First, the IL model admits only linear dynamics and so cannot describe phase transitions, attested rapid changes in languages over time. Second, the IL model cannot properly describe the stability of languages over time. In contrast, the SL model leads to nonlinear dynamics, bifurcations, and possibly multiple equilibria and so suffices to model both the case of stable language populations, mixtures of more than 1 language, as well as rapid language change. The 2 models also make distinct, empirically testable predictions about language change. Using historical data, we show that the SL model more faithfully replicates the dynamics of the evolution of Middle English. PMID:19497883

  7. The proper treatment of language acquisition and change in a population setting.

    PubMed

    Niyogi, Partha; Berwick, Robert C

    2009-06-23

    Language acquisition maps linguistic experience, primary linguistic data (PLD), onto linguistic knowledge, a grammar. Classically, computational models of language acquisition assume a single target grammar and one PLD source, the central question being whether the target grammar can be acquired from the PLD. However, real-world learners confront populations with variation, i.e., multiple target grammars and PLDs. Removing this idealization has inspired a new class of population-based language acquisition models. This paper contrasts 2 such models. In the first, iterated learning (IL), each learner receives PLD from one target grammar but different learners can have different targets. In the second, social learning (SL), each learner receives PLD from possibly multiple targets, e.g., from 2 parents. We demonstrate that these 2 models have radically different evolutionary consequences. The IL model is dynamically deficient in 2 key respects. First, the IL model admits only linear dynamics and so cannot describe phase transitions, attested rapid changes in languages over time. Second, the IL model cannot properly describe the stability of languages over time. In contrast, the SL model leads to nonlinear dynamics, bifurcations, and possibly multiple equilibria and so suffices to model both the case of stable language populations, mixtures of more than 1 language, as well as rapid language change. The 2 models also make distinct, empirically testable predictions about language change. Using historical data, we show that the SL model more faithfully replicates the dynamics of the evolution of Middle English.

  8. Changes induced in spice paprika powder by treatment with ionizing radiation and saturated steam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kispéter, J.; Bajúsz-Kabók, K.; Fekete, M.; Szabó, G.; Fodor, E.; Páli, T.

    2003-12-01

    The changes in spice paprika powder induced by ionizing radiation, saturated steam (SS) and their combination were studied as a function of the absorbed radiation dose and the storage time. The SS treatment lead to a decrease in color content (lightening) after 12 weeks of storage, together with the persistence of free radicals and viscosity changes for a longer period. The results suggest that ionizing radiation is a more advantageous method as concerns preservation of the quality of spice paprika.

  9. Changes in the pattern of patients receiving surgical-orthodontic treatment

    PubMed Central

    Proffit, William R.; Jackson, Tate H.; Turvey, Timothy A.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The characteristics of patients who seek and accept orthognathic surgery appear to be changing over time but have not been well documented in the 21st century. Methods Records for patients who had orthognathic surgery at the University of North Carolina from 1996 to 2000 and from 2006 to 2010 were reviewed to collect data for changes in the prevalence of patients with mandibular deficiency (Class II), maxillary deficiency or mandibular prognathism (Class III), long face, and asymmetry problems. The changes were compared with those in previous time periods and at other locations. Results Between 1996 and 2000 and between 2006 and 2010, the percentage of Class III patients increased from 35% to 54%, and the percentage of Class II patients decreased from 59% to 41%, while the percentages for long face and asymmetry showed little change. The decrease in Class II patients was accentuation of a long-term trend; the increase in Class III patients occurred only after the turn of the century. Conclusions A similar but less-marked change has been noted at some but not all other locations in the United States. It appears to be related primarily to an increase in the numbers of African Americans, Native Americans, Hispanics, and Asians who now are seeking surgical treatment, but it also has been affected by changes in where orthognathic surgery is performed, decisions by third-party payers (insurance and Medicaid) about coverage for treatment, and the availability of nonsurgical orthodontic treatment options for Class II patients. PMID:23726329

  10. Parent predictors of child weight change in family based behavioral obesity treatment.

    PubMed

    Boutelle, Kerri N; Cafri, Guy; Crow, Scott J

    2012-07-01

    Family based behavioral treatment for overweight and obese children includes parenting skills targeting the modification of child eating and activity change. The purpose of this study was to examine parenting skills and parent weight change as predictors of child weight change in a sample of 80 parent/child dyads who were enrolled in a family based behavioral weight loss program for childhood obesity. Eighty overweight and obese children and their parents who enrolled in treatment in two sites were included in the study. Variables included those related to parent modeling (parent BMI), home food environment, parenting (parent and child report), and demographics. Results suggested that parent BMI change was a significant predictor of child weight, in that a reduction of 1 BMI unit in the parent was associated with a 0.255 reduction in child BMI. None of the other variables were significant in the final model. This study is consistent with other research showing that parent weight change is a key contributor to child weight change in behavioral treatment for childhood obesity. Researchers and clinicians should focus on encouraging parents to lose weight to assist their overweight and obese child in weight management.

  11. Stability of changes in mandibular intermolar and intercuspid distances following orthodontic treatment

    PubMed Central

    Motamedi, Alimohammad K.; Dadgar, Sepideh; Teimouri, Fatemeh; Aslani, Farzin

    2015-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to determine the pattern and amount of change exhibited in mandibular intercanine and intermolar width during treatment and assessing its stability1-3 years post-retention. Materials and Methods: The material consisted of 70 cases of which 20 cases were treated without extraction and 30 cases were treated with extraction, which were compared with 20 untreated cases which served as a control group. A series of three measurements were made for each case of the treated group: At the beginning of treatment, end of active treatment and 1-3 years post-retention; and for the control group: At 12, 15 and 18 years of age. The Wilcoxon signed ranks test was used to evaluate treatment changes in each group. The Kruskal-Wallis H test was used to compare the treatment changes between the 3 groups (α = 0.05). SPSS 16 software (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA) was used to evaluate the data. Results: Mean changes of intercanine width for three groups was −0.5 mm for control group, −0.26 mm for non-extraction group and +0.18 mm for extraction group. Intermolar width of the extraction group decreased significantly during treatment. In contrast to the extraction group, the control and non-extraction groups both demonstrated an increase in mean intermolar width which was 0.66 mm and 0.91 mm respectively. Conclusion: It was concluded that although mean changes of intercanine and intermolar width were statistically significant but they were not perceptible clinically. PMID:25709678

  12. Changes in Temporal Attention Inhibition Following Prolonged Exposure and Sertraline in the Treatment of PTSD

    PubMed Central

    Echiverri-Cohen, Aileen; Zoellner, Lori A.; Gallop, Robert; Feeny, Norah; Jaeger, Jeffrey; Bedard-Gilligan, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Objective Attentional inhibitory deficits expressed as difficulty ignoring irrelevant stimuli in the pursuit of goal-directed behavior may serve as a fundamental mechanism of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Evidence of inhibitory processes as central to extinction suggests that exposure-based treatments may act more directly on the inhibitory deficits implicated in PTSD, whereas, in facilitating serotonergic neurotransmission, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) may be less direct and bring about general neurochemical changes in the fear circuitry. If these inhibitory deficits underlie PTSD, then inhibition should improve with successful treatment, with those treated with prolonged exposure (PE) potentially resulting in greater changes in inhibition than those treated with sertraline. Method Changes in temporal attentional inhibition, using an attentional blink (AB) paradigm, were examined at pre-and post-treatment in 49 individuals (74.5% female, 66.7% Caucasian, age M = 37.69, SD = 12.8 years) with chronic PTSD. Participants completed 10 weeks of either PE or sertraline. Results Individuals who made greater improvements with PE showed faster improvements in temporal inhibition on the critical inhibitory lag of AB than those who made greater improvements with sertraline (d = 0.94). These changes could not be accounted for by basic attention. Conclusions Greater improvement in fundamental attentional inhibitory processes with better treatment response to PE, compared to sertraline, suggests potential specificity in how PTSD treatments normalize inhibitory processes, such that exposure-based treatments like PE may target inhibitory processes and improve basic inhibitory functioning. Public Health Significance Statement Inhibitory processes, particularly related to temporal attention, may play a critical role in response to exposure therapy for PTSD. The main finding that individuals with PTSD who made more clinical improvement showed faster

  13. Depression, Readiness for Change, and Treatment Among Court-Mandated DUI Offenders

    PubMed Central

    Nochajski, Thomas H.; Stasiewicz, Paul R.; Patterson, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The current study is part of a larger study that was designed to evaluate the impact of brief interventions on subsequent alcohol and drug use of individuals convicted of driving under the influence (DUI). This element considers the interaction of depression levels with treatment on subsequent substance use and problems related to substance use. Methods Subjects were referred to the Research Institute on Addictions from various courts in the Western New York area for clinical evaluation and treatment referral, if further treatment was indicated. A total of 765 individuals were referred to the program, with 549 agreeing to participate. Participants were assessed at baseline using a number of different measures, with depression and readiness to change among them. A follow-up assessment took place 18–24 months following the baseline, with subsequent treatment experiences being one of the primary measures of interest for this study. A total of 443 participants were successfully interviewed at follow-up. Results The high depression group had greater readiness to change and a greater likelihood of entering treatment than the low depression group (p’s < .001). ANCOVAs showed depression by treatment interactions for drug problem severity, drug use, DUI risk, alcohol expectancies, abstinence self-efficacy, and psychiatric distress (all p’s < .05). Furthermore, the treated high depression group made the largest positive gains across all outcomes (all p’s < .01). Conclusions The readiness to change, treatment entry, and ANCOVA results, all support Wells-Parker and her colleagues’ approach that depression may be a strong indicator of DUI offenders’ readiness to change their substance use behavior. PMID:24058303

  14. Adapting water treatment design and operations to the impacts of global climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Robert M.; Li, Zhiwei; Buchberger, Steven G.

    2011-12-01

    It is anticipated that global climate change will adversely impact source water quality in many areas of the United States and will therefore, potentially, impact the design and operation of current and future water treatment systems. The USEPA has initiated an effort called the Water Resources Adaptation Program (WRAP) which is intended to develop tools and techniques that can assess the impact of global climate change on urban drinking water and wastewater infrastructure. A three step approach for assessing climate change impacts on water treatment operation and design is being persude in this effort. The first step is the stochastic characterization of source water quality, the second step is the application of the USEPA Water Treatment Plant model and the third step is the application of cost algorithms to provide a metric that can be used to assess the coat impact of climate change. A model has been validated using data collected from Cincinnati's Richard Miller Water Treatment Plant for the USEPA Information Collection Rule (ICR) database. An analysis of the water treatment processes in response to assumed perturbations in raw water quality identified TOC, pH, and bromide as the three most important parameters affecting performance of the Miller WTP. The Miller Plant was simulated using the EPA WTP model to examine the impact of these parameters on selected regulated water quality parameters. Uncertainty in influent water quality was analyzed to estimate the risk of violating drinking water maximum contaminant levels (MCLs).Water quality changes in the Ohio River were projected for 2050 using Monte Carlo simulation and the WTP model was used to evaluate the effects of water quality changes on design and operation. Results indicate that the existing Miller WTP might not meet Safe Drinking Water Act MCL requirements for certain extreme future conditions. However, it was found that the risk of MCL violations under future conditions could be controlled by

  15. Changes in social adjustment with cognitive processing therapy: effects of treatment and association with PTSD symptom change.

    PubMed

    Monson, Candice M; Macdonald, Alexandra; Vorstenbosch, Valerie; Shnaider, Philippe; Goldstein, Elizabeth S R; Ferrier-Auerbach, Amanda G; Mocciola, Katharine E

    2012-10-01

    The current study sought to determine if different spheres of social adjustment, social and leisure, family, and work and income improved immediately following a course of cognitive processing therapy (CPT) when compared with those on a waiting list in a sample of 46 U.S. veterans diagnosed with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). We also sought to determine whether changes in different PTSD symptom clusters were associated with changes in these spheres of social adjustment. Overall social adjustment, extended family relationships, and housework completion significantly improved in the CPT versus waiting-list condition, η(2) = .08 to .11. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses revealed that improvements in total clinician-rated PTSD symptoms were associated with improvements in overall social and housework adjustment. When changes in reexperiencing, avoidance, emotional numbing, and hyperarousal were all in the model accounting for changes in total social adjustment, improvements in emotional numbing symptoms were associated with improvements in overall social, extended family, and housework adjustment (β = .38 to .55). In addition, improvements in avoidance symptoms were associated with improvements in housework adjustment (β = .30), but associated with declines in extended family adjustment (β = -.34). Results suggest that it is important to consider the extent to which PTSD treatments effectively reduce specific types of symptoms, particularly emotional numbing and avoidance, to generally improve social adjustment.

  16. Diminished Wastewater Treatment: Evaluation of Septic System Performance Under a Climate Change Scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, J.; Loomis, G.; Kalen, D.; Boving, T. B.; Morales, I.; Amador, J.

    2015-12-01

    The effects of climate change are expected to reduce the ability of soil-based onsite wastewater treatment systems (OWTS), to treat domestic wastewater. In the northeastern U.S., the projected increase in atmospheric temperature, elevation of water tables from rising sea levels, and heightened precipitation will reduce the volume of unsaturated soil and oxygen available for treatment. Incomplete removal of contaminants may lead to transport of pathogens, nutrients, and biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) to groundwater, increasing the risk to public health and likelihood of eutrophying aquatic ecosystems. Advanced OWTS, which include pre-treatment steps and provide unsaturated drainfields of greater volume relative to conventional OWTS, are expected to be more resilient to climate change. We used intact soil mesocosms to quantify water quality functions for two advanced shallow narrow drainfield types and a conventional drainfield under a current climate scenario and a moderate climate change scenario of 30 cm rise in water table and 5°C increase in soil temperature. While no fecal coliform bacteria (FCB) was released under the current climate scenario, up to 109 CFU FCB/mL (conventional) and up to 20 CFU FCB/mL (shallow narrow) were released under the climate change scenario. Total P removal rates dropped from 100% to 54% (conventional) and 71% (shallow narrow) under the climate change scenario. Total N removal averaged 17% under both climate scenarios in the conventional, but dropped from 5.4% to 0% in the shallow narrow under the climate change scenario, with additional leaching of N in excess of inputs indicating release of previously held N. No significant difference was observed between scenarios for BOD removal. The initial data indicate that while advanced OWTS retain more function under the climate change scenario, all three drainfield types experience some diminished treatment capacity.

  17. Automatic associations and panic disorder: Trajectories of change over the course of treatment

    PubMed Central

    Teachman, Bethany A.; Marker, Craig D.; Smith-Janik, Shannan B.

    2008-01-01

    Cognitive models of anxiety and panic suggest that symptom reduction during treatment should be preceded by changes in cognitive processing, including modifying the anxious schema. The current study tests these hypotheses by using a repeated measures design to evaluate whether the trajectory of change in automatic panic associations over the course of 12-week cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) is related to the trajectory of change in panic symptoms. Individuals with panic disorder (N=43) completed a measure of automatic panic associations (the Implicit Association Test, which reflects elements of the schema construct) every three weeks over the course of therapy, and measures of panic symptoms each week. Dynamic bivariate latent difference score modeling indicated that automatic panic associations not only changed over the course of CBT for panic disorder, but showed these changes were correlated with symptom reduction. Moreover, change in automatic panic associations was a significant predictor of change in panic symptom severity. These findings permit inferences about the temporality of change, suggesting that cognitive change does in fact precede and contribute to symptom change. PMID:19045967

  18. NEW INSIGHTS INTO LEAD AND COPPER CORROSION CONTROL AND TREATMENT CHANGE IMPACTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation summarizes recent research into the chemistry of lead corrosion control, and focus on different areas that could impact the prediction of whether or not particular treatment changes are likely to either disturb existing lead corrosion scales, or to actually impr...

  19. Multi-dimensional self-esteem and magnitude of change in the treatment of anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Collin, Paula; Karatzias, Thanos; Power, Kevin; Howard, Ruth; Grierson, David; Yellowlees, Alex

    2016-03-30

    Self-esteem improvement is one of the main targets of inpatient eating disorder programmes. The present study sought to examine multi-dimensional self-esteem and magnitude of change in eating psychopathology among adults participating in a specialist inpatient treatment programme for anorexia nervosa. A standardised assessment battery, including multi-dimensional measures of eating psychopathology and self-esteem, was completed pre- and post-treatment for 60 participants (all white Scottish female, mean age=25.63 years). Statistical analyses indicated that self-esteem improved with eating psychopathology and weight over the course of treatment, but that improvements were domain-specific and small in size. Global self-esteem was not predictive of treatment outcome. Dimensions of self-esteem at baseline (Lovability and Moral Self-approval), however, were predictive of magnitude of change in dimensions of eating psychopathology (Shape and Weight Concern). Magnitude of change in Self-Control and Lovability dimensions were predictive of magnitude of change in eating psychopathology (Global, Dietary Restraint, and Shape Concern). The results of this study demonstrate that the relationship between self-esteem and eating disorder is far from straightforward, and suggest that future research and interventions should focus less exclusively on self-esteem as a uni-dimensional psychological construct.

  20. Therapeutic Communications and the Process of Change in a Psychoanalytic Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vegas, Monica

    2013-01-01

    This study looked at the interplay of the analyst verbal speech acts and the process of change in a psychoanalytic treatment. Using a single case design on the session transcripts of the well studied case of Mrs. C., following Halfon and Weinstein's (2013) methodology the study tracked linguistic patterns as represented by the interaction of…

  1. Mediation of Changes in Anxiety and Depression During Treatment of Social Phobia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moscovitch, David A.; Stefan G. Hofmann, Michael K.; Suvak, Michael K.; In-Albon, Tina

    2005-01-01

    To investigate the interactive process of changes in social anxiety and depression during treatment, the authors assessed weekly symptoms in 66 adult outpatients with social phobia (social anxiety disorder) who participated in cognitive- behavioral group therapy. Multilevel mediational analyses revealed that improvements in social anxiety mediated…

  2. Therapeutic Responses of Psychopathic Sexual Offenders: Treatment Attrition, Therapeutic Change, and Long-Term Recidivism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olver, Mark E.; Wong, Stephen C. P.

    2009-01-01

    The authors examined the therapeutic responses of psychopathic sex offenders (greater than or equal to 25 Psychopathy Checklist-Revised; PCL-R) in terms of treatment dropout and therapeutic change, as well as sexual and violent recidivism over a 10-year follow-up among 156 federally incarcerated sex offenders treated in a high-intensity inpatient…

  3. Changes in Illness-Related Behavior and Dysphoria Accompanying Behavioral Treatment of Recurrent Headache.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rains, Jeanetta C.; Lohr, Jeffrey M.

    Psychophysiologic research indicates that muscle-contraction headache often is not characterized by excessive or unusual muscular activity, and muscular changes seldom accompany headache improvement resulting from treatment. Multidimensional models have been proposed, which emphasize the interdependence of physiological and psychological systems…

  4. Emotion Regulatory Brain Function and SSRI Treatment in PTSD: Neural Correlates and Predictors of Change.

    PubMed

    MacNamara, Annmarie; Rabinak, Christine A; Kennedy, Amy E; Fitzgerald, Daniel A; Liberzon, Israel; Stein, Murray B; Phan, K Luan

    2016-01-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD)-a chronic, debilitating condition, broadly characterized by emotion dysregulation-is prevalent among US military personnel who have returned from Operations Enduring Freedom (OEF) and Iraqi Freedom (OIF). Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are a first-line treatment for PTSD, but treatment mechanisms are unknown and patient response varies. SSRIs may exert their effects by remediating emotion regulatory brain activity and individual differences in patient response might be explained, in part, by pre-treatment differences in neural systems supporting the downregulation of negative affect. Thirty-four OEF/OIF veterans, 17 with PTSD and 17 without PTSD underwent 2 functional magnetic resonance imaging scans 12 weeks apart. At each scan, they performed an emotion regulation task; in the interim, veterans with PTSD were treated with the SSRI, paroxetine. SSRI treatment increased activation in both the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (PFC) and supplementary motor area (SMA) during emotion regulation, although only change in the SMA over time occurred in veterans with PTSD and not those without PTSD. Less activation of the right ventrolateral PFC/inferior frontal gyrus during pre-treatment emotion regulation was associated with greater reduction in PTSD symptoms with SSRI treatment, irrespective of pre-treatment severity. Patients with the least recruitment of prefrontal emotion regulatory brain regions may benefit most from treatment with SSRIs, which appear to augment activity in these regions.

  5. Codependency and family cohesion and adaptability: changes during treatment in a therapeutic community.

    PubMed

    Teichman, M; Basha, U

    1996-04-01

    Codependency is a significant factor in the understanding of addiction to psychoactive substances. The present study examined changes in the level of codependency and perceived family relationships of drug-using residents in the three therapeutic communities in Israel in the course of their treatment. The findings indicate significant changes in both the level of codependency and the residents' perceptions of their family relationships between the beginning and the reentry stages of their treatment. On the other hand, no significant associations were found between their level of codependency and their perceptions of their family relationships. The findings are discussed in relation to the nature of addiction, the family processes, the treatment in the therapeutic community, and the addicted person's perseverance in that community.

  6. Changes in plasma cytokines after treatment of ascaris lumbricoides infection in individuals with HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Blish, Catherine A; Sangaré, Laura; Herrin, Bradley R; Richardson, Barbra A; John-Stewart, Grace; Walson, Judd L

    2010-06-15

    Albendazole treatment of individuals with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and Ascaris lumbricoides co-infection has led to significantly improved CD4(+) cell counts and a trend for lower plasma HIV-1 RNA levels in a previous randomized placebo-controlled trial. To define mechanisms by which deworming contributed to changes in markers of HIV-1 disease progression, plasma cytokine levels were evaluated. Albendazole treatment, compared with placebo, was associated with significantly decreased plasma interleukin (IL) 10 levels (P = .01)ot associated with significant changes in levels of IL-1beta, IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-7, IL-8, IL-12p70, IL-13, interferon gamma, tumor necrosis factor alpha, or thymic stromal lymphopoietin. Treatment of A. lumbricoides co-infection may delay HIV-1 disease progression by reducing helminth-induced, IL-10-mediated immunosuppression.

  7. Early treatment outcomes of class II malocclusion with twin-block facial profile and cephalometric changes

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Mousumi Goswami; Vashisth, Pallavi; Chaudhary, Seema; Sinha, Ashish

    2012-01-01

    Esthetic improvement is highly valued by patients seeking orthodontic treatment. Subjects with a class II malocclusion are a good example of patients who seek treatment primarily for esthetic improvement. A young growing child with convex profile due to a small, retropositioned mandible, normal midface and lower tip trap is more suitable for functional appliance treatment. Functional appliances encourage adaptive skeletal growth by maintaining the mandible in a corrected forward position for a sufficient period of time to allow adaptive skeletal changes to occur in response to a functional stimulus. The aim of this article is to describe two cases of class II malocclusion in late mixed dentition period treated with twin-block. The cephalometric and facial profile changes have been discussed PMID:25756036

  8. Mechanisms of Change in Written Exposure Treatment of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Wisco, Blair E.; Baker, Aaron S.; Sloan, Denise M.

    2016-01-01

    Although the effectiveness of exposure therapy for PTSD is recognized, treatment mechanisms are not well understood. Emotional processing theory (EPT) posits that fear reduction within and between sessions creates new learning, but evidence is limited by self-report assessments and inclusion of treatment components other than exposure. We examined trajectories of physiological arousal and their relation to PTSD treatment outcome in a randomized controlled trial of written exposure treatment, a protocol focused on exposure to trauma memories. Hierarchical linear modeling was used to model reduction in Clinician Administered PTSD Scale score as a predictor of initial activation and within- and between-session change in physiological arousal. Treatment gains were significantly associated with initial physiological activation, but not with within- or between-session changes in physiological arousal. Treatment gains were associated with larger between-session reductions in self-reported arousal. These findings highlight the importance of multimethod arousal assessment and add to a growing literature suggesting refinements of EPT. PMID:26763498

  9. Mediators of Change in the Child/Adolescent Anxiety Multimodal Treatment Study

    PubMed Central

    Kendall, Philip C.; Cummings, Colleen M.; Villabø, Marianne A.; Narayanan, Martina K.; Treadwell, Kimberli; Birmaher, Boris; Compton, Scott; Piacentini, John; Sherrill, Joel; Walkup, John; Gosch, Elizabeth; Keeton, Courtney; Ginsburg, Golda; Suveg, Cindy; Albano, Anne Marie

    2015-01-01

    Objective Test changes in (a) coping efficacy and (b) anxious self-talk as potential mediators of treatment gains at 3-month follow-up in the Child/Adolescent Anxiety Multimodal Treatment Study (CAMS). Method Participants were 488 youth (ages 7-17; 50.4% male) randomized to cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT; Coping cat program), pharmacotherapy (sertraline), their combination, or pill placebo. Participants met DSM-IV criteria for generalized anxiety disorder, social phobia, and/or separation anxiety disorder. Coping efficacy (reported ability to manage anxiety provoking situations) was measured by youth and parent reports on the Coping Questionnaire, and anxious self-talk was measured by youth report on the Negative Affectivity Self-Statement Questionnaire. Outcome was measured using the Pediatric Anxiety Rating Scale (completed by Independent Evaluators blind to condition). For temporal precedence, residualized treatment gains were assessed at 3-month follow-up. Results Residualized gains in coping efficacy mediated gains in the CBT, sertraline, and combination conditions. In the combination condition, some unique effect of treatment remained. Treatment assignment was not associated with a reduction in anxious self-talk, nor did anxious self-talk predict changes in anxiety symptoms. Conclusions The findings suggest that improvements in coping efficacy are a mediator of treatment gains. Anxious self-talk did not emerge as a mediator. PMID:26460572

  10. Metabonomic analysis identifies molecular changes associated with the pathophysiology and drug treatment of bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Lan, M J; McLoughlin, G A; Griffin, J L; Tsang, T M; Huang, J T J; Yuan, P; Manji, H; Holmes, E; Bahn, S

    2009-03-01

    Bipolar affective disorder is a severe and debilitating psychiatric condition characterized by the alternating mood states of mania and depression. Both the molecular pathophysiology of the disorder and the mechanism of action of the mainstays of its treatment remain largely unknown. Here, (1)H NMR spectroscopy-based metabonomic analysis was performed to identify molecular changes in post-mortem brain tissue (dorsolateral prefrontal cortex) of patients with a history of bipolar disorder. The observed changes were then compared to metabolic alterations identified in rat brain following chronic oral treatment with either lithium or valproate. This is the first study to use (1)H NMR spectroscopy to study post-mortem bipolar human brain tissue, and it is the first to compare changes in disease brain with changes induced in rat brain following mood stabilizer treatment. Several metabolites were found to be concordantly altered in both the animal and human tissues. Glutamate levels were increased in post-mortem bipolar brain, while the glutamate/glutamine ratio was decreased following valproate treatment, and gamma-aminobutyric acid levels were increased after lithium treatment, suggesting that the balance of excitatory/inhibitory neurotransmission is central to the disorder. Both creatine and myo-inositol were increased in the post-mortem brain but depleted with the medications. Lastly, the level of N-acetyl aspartate, a clinically important metabolic marker of neuronal viability, was found to be unchanged following chronic mood stabilizer treatment. These findings promise to provide new insight into the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder and may be used to direct research into novel therapeutic strategies.

  11. Treatment Changes among Users of Non-Vitamin K Antagonist Oral Anticoagulants in Atrial Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Hellfritzsch, Maja; Husted, Steen Elkjaer; Grove, Erik Lerkevang; Rasmussen, Lotte; Poulsen, Birgitte Klindt; Johnsen, Søren Paaske; Hallas, Jesper; Pottegård, Anton

    2017-02-01

    Patients with atrial fibrillation discontinuing anticoagulant therapy are left unprotected against ischaemic stroke. Further, switching between oral anticoagulants may be associated with a transiently increased risk of bleeding or thromboembolism. However, there is a paucity of real-life data on pattern of switching and discontinuation of oral anticoagulants. To address this, we conducted a nationwide drug utilization study including all registered Danish atrial fibrillation patients initiating a non-VKA oral anticoagulant (NOAC) between August 2011 and February 2016. We assessed changes in anticoagulant treatment, including switching between oral anticoagulants and discontinuation of NOACs, and explored patient characteristics predicting these changes. We identified 50,632 patients with atrial fibrillation initiating NOAC therapy within the study period. The majority initiated dabigatran (49.9%) and one-third had previously used VKA. Within 1 year, 10.1% switched to VKA, 4.8% switched to another NOAC and 14.4% discontinued treatment. The frequencies of switching to VKA and discontinuation were highest among NOAC users of young age (<55 years) and with low CHA2 DS2 -VASc score (=0). However, the majority of patients (87.3%) stopping NOAC treatment had a CHA2 DS2 -VASc score ≥1. We conclude that switching from VKA to NOAC, and to a lesser extent from NOAC to VKA, is common, as is early treatment discontinuation. The majority of treatment changes are observed in patients at increased risk of stroke. More research is warranted on the risks of bleeding and thromboembolism associated with switching and discontinuation of NOACs as well as the underlying reasons why these treatment changes occur.

  12. Retrospective analysis of changing characteristics of treatment-seeking smokers: implications for further reducing smoking prevalence

    PubMed Central

    Leyro, Teresa M; Crew, Erin E; Bryson, Susan W; Lembke, Anna; Bailey, Steffani R; Prochaska, Judith J; Henriksen, Lisa; Fortmann, Stephen P; Killen, Joel D; Killen, Diana T; Hall, Sharon M; David, Sean P

    2016-01-01

    Objective The goal of the current study was to empirically compare successive cohorts of treatment-seeking smokers who enrolled in randomised clinical trials in a region of the USA characterised by strong tobacco control policies and low smoking prevalence, over the past three decades. Design Retrospective treatment cohort comparison. Setting Data were collected from 9 randomised clinical trials conducted at Stanford University and the University of California, San Francisco, between 1990 and 2013. Participants Data from a total of 2083 participants were included (Stanford, n=1356; University of California San Francisco, n=727). Primary and secondary outcomes One-way analysis of variance and covariance, χ2 and logistic regression analyses were used to examine relations between nicotine dependence, cigarettes per day, depressive symptoms and demographic characteristics among study cohorts. Results Similar trends were observed at both settings. When compared to earlier trials, participants in more recent trials smoked fewer cigarettes, were less nicotine-dependent, reported more depressive symptoms, were more likely to be male and more likely to be from a minority ethnic/racial group, than those enrolled in initial trials (all p's<0.05). Analysis of covariances revealed that cigarettes per day, nicotine dependence and current depressive symptom scores were each significantly related to trial (all p's<0.001). Conclusions Our findings suggest that more recent smoking cessation treatment-seeking cohorts in a low prevalence region were characterised by less smoking severity, more severe symptoms of depression and were more likely to be male and from a minority racial/ethnic group. PMID:27357195

  13. Early changes in emotional processing as a marker of clinical response to SSRI treatment in depression.

    PubMed

    Godlewska, B R; Browning, M; Norbury, R; Cowen, P J; Harmer, C J

    2016-11-22

    Antidepressant treatment reduces behavioural and neural markers of negative emotional bias early in treatment and has been proposed as a mechanism of antidepressant drug action. Here, we provide a critical test of this hypothesis by assessing whether neural markers of early emotional processing changes predict later clinical response in depression. Thirty-five unmedicated patients with major depression took the selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitor (SSRI), escitalopram (10 mg), over 6 weeks, and were classified as responders (22 patients) versus non-responders (13 patients), based on at least a 50% reduction in symptoms by the end of treatment. The neural response to fearful and happy emotional facial expressions was assessed before and after 7 days of treatment using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Changes in the neural response to these facial cues after 7 days of escitalopram were compared in patients as a function of later clinical response. A sample of healthy controls was also assessed. At baseline, depressed patients showed greater activation to fear versus happy faces than controls in the insula and dorsal anterior cingulate. Depressed patients who went on to respond to the SSRI had a greater reduction in neural activity to fearful versus happy facial expressions after just 7 days of escitalopram across a network of regions including the anterior cingulate, insula, amygdala and thalamus. Mediation analysis confirmed that the direct effect of neural change on symptom response was not mediated by initial changes in depressive symptoms. These results support the hypothesis that early changes in emotional processing with antidepressant treatment are the basis of later clinical improvement. As such, early correction of negative bias may be a key mechanism of antidepressant drug action and a potentially useful predictor of therapeutic response.

  14. Early changes in emotional processing as a marker of clinical response to SSRI treatment in depression

    PubMed Central

    Godlewska, B R; Browning, M; Norbury, R; Cowen, P J; Harmer, C J

    2016-01-01

    Antidepressant treatment reduces behavioural and neural markers of negative emotional bias early in treatment and has been proposed as a mechanism of antidepressant drug action. Here, we provide a critical test of this hypothesis by assessing whether neural markers of early emotional processing changes predict later clinical response in depression. Thirty-five unmedicated patients with major depression took the selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitor (SSRI), escitalopram (10 mg), over 6 weeks, and were classified as responders (22 patients) versus non-responders (13 patients), based on at least a 50% reduction in symptoms by the end of treatment. The neural response to fearful and happy emotional facial expressions was assessed before and after 7 days of treatment using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Changes in the neural response to these facial cues after 7 days of escitalopram were compared in patients as a function of later clinical response. A sample of healthy controls was also assessed. At baseline, depressed patients showed greater activation to fear versus happy faces than controls in the insula and dorsal anterior cingulate. Depressed patients who went on to respond to the SSRI had a greater reduction in neural activity to fearful versus happy facial expressions after just 7 days of escitalopram across a network of regions including the anterior cingulate, insula, amygdala and thalamus. Mediation analysis confirmed that the direct effect of neural change on symptom response was not mediated by initial changes in depressive symptoms. These results support the hypothesis that early changes in emotional processing with antidepressant treatment are the basis of later clinical improvement. As such, early correction of negative bias may be a key mechanism of antidepressant drug action and a potentially useful predictor of therapeutic response. PMID:27874847

  15. Induction of Female-to-Male Sex Change in Adult Zebrafish by Aromatase Inhibitor Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takatsu, Kanae; Miyaoku, Kaori; Roy, Shimi Rani; Murono, Yuki; Sago, Tomohiro; Itagaki, Hideyuki; Nakamura, Masaru; Tokumoto, Toshinobu

    2013-12-01

    This study investigated whether undifferentiated germ and/or somatic stem cells remain in the differentiated ovary of a species that does not undergo sex changes under natural conditions and retain their sexual plasticity. The effect of aromatase inhibitor (AI)-treatment on sexually mature female zebrafish was examined. A 5-month AI treatment caused retraction of the ovaries after which testes-like organs appeared, and cyst structures filled with spermatozoa-like cells were observed in sections of these tissues. Electron microscopic observations revealed that these cells appeared as large sperm heads without tails. Sperm formation was re-examined after changing the diet to an AI-free food. A large number of normal sperm were obtained after eight weeks, and no formation of ovarian tissue was observed. Artificial fertilization using sperm from the sex-changed females was successful. These results demonstrated that sex plasticity remains in the mature ovaries of this species.

  16. Induction of female-to-male sex change in adult zebrafish by aromatase inhibitor treatment.

    PubMed

    Takatsu, Kanae; Miyaoku, Kaori; Roy, Shimi Rani; Murono, Yuki; Sago, Tomohiro; Itagaki, Hideyuki; Nakamura, Masaru; Tokumoto, Toshinobu

    2013-12-02

    This study investigated whether undifferentiated germ and/or somatic stem cells remain in the differentiated ovary of a species that does not undergo sex changes under natural conditions and retain their sexual plasticity. The effect of aromatase inhibitor (AI)-treatment on sexually mature female zebrafish was examined. A 5-month AI treatment caused retraction of the ovaries after which testes-like organs appeared, and cyst structures filled with spermatozoa-like cells were observed in sections of these tissues. Electron microscopic observations revealed that these cells appeared as large sperm heads without tails. Sperm formation was re-examined after changing the diet to an AI-free food. A large number of normal sperm were obtained after eight weeks, and no formation of ovarian tissue was observed. Artificial fertilization using sperm from the sex-changed females was successful. These results demonstrated that sex plasticity remains in the mature ovaries of this species.

  17. The Challenge of Fostering Healthy Organizations: An Empirical Study on the Role of Workplace Relational Civility in Acceptance of Change and Well-Being

    PubMed Central

    Di Fabio, Annamaria; Giannini, Marco; Loscalzo, Yura; Palazzeschi, Letizia; Bucci, Ornella; Guazzini, Andrea; Gori, Alessio

    2016-01-01

    The world of work in the twenty-first century is characterized by globalization, instability, and unavoidable change. Organizations need to develop a positive relational environment in the workplace thereby enabling workers to enhance their personal resources in order to face with on-going changes in the sphere of work for promoting their well-being. Against this background, the aim of this research was to examine the relationship between workplace relational civility and both acceptance of change and well-being (hedonic well-being as well as eudaimonic well-being) beyond the effect of personality traits. The following instruments were administered to 261 Italian workers: the Ten Item Personality Inventory (TIPI), the Acceptance of Change Scale (ACS), the Satisfaction With Life Scale (SWLS), and the Meaningful Life Measure (MLM). The results of hierarchical regression analyses revealed that workplace relational civility explained a percentage of incremental variance beyond personality traits in relation to acceptance of change, life satisfaction, and meaning in life. These results underscore the positive relationship between workplace relational civility and acceptance of change, hedonic well-being, and eudaimonic well-being, offering new research and intervention opportunities to meet the challenge of fostering healthy organizations. PMID:27917131

  18. The Challenge of Fostering Healthy Organizations: An Empirical Study on the Role of Workplace Relational Civility in Acceptance of Change and Well-Being.

    PubMed

    Di Fabio, Annamaria; Giannini, Marco; Loscalzo, Yura; Palazzeschi, Letizia; Bucci, Ornella; Guazzini, Andrea; Gori, Alessio

    2016-01-01

    The world of work in the twenty-first century is characterized by globalization, instability, and unavoidable change. Organizations need to develop a positive relational environment in the workplace thereby enabling workers to enhance their personal resources in order to face with on-going changes in the sphere of work for promoting their well-being. Against this background, the aim of this research was to examine the relationship between workplace relational civility and both acceptance of change and well-being (hedonic well-being as well as eudaimonic well-being) beyond the effect of personality traits. The following instruments were administered to 261 Italian workers: the Ten Item Personality Inventory (TIPI), the Acceptance of Change Scale (ACS), the Satisfaction With Life Scale (SWLS), and the Meaningful Life Measure (MLM). The results of hierarchical regression analyses revealed that workplace relational civility explained a percentage of incremental variance beyond personality traits in relation to acceptance of change, life satisfaction, and meaning in life. These results underscore the positive relationship between workplace relational civility and acceptance of change, hedonic well-being, and eudaimonic well-being, offering new research and intervention opportunities to meet the challenge of fostering healthy organizations.

  19. Lignin changes after steam explosion and laccase-mediator treatment of eucalyptus wood chips.

    PubMed

    Martin-Sampedro, Raquel; Capanema, Ewellyn A; Hoeger, Ingrid; Villar, Juan C; Rojas, Orlando J

    2011-08-24

    Eucalyptus globulus chips were steam exploded followed by treatment with a laccase-mediator system (LMS) under different experimental conditions. Removal of hemicelluloses and, to a lesser extent, lignin was observed. Thermogravimetic analyses of whole meal obtained from chips before and after steam explosion indicated an increase in lignin degradation temperature due to lignin condensation. In contrast, application of LMS treatment caused a reduction in lignin and polysaccharide degradation temperatures. Lignins were isolated from wood samples before and after each treatment and analyzed by 2D NMR and (13)C NMR. An increase in carboxyl and phenolic hydroxyl groups and a significant decrease in β-O-4 structures were found in steam-exploded samples. The most relevant changes observed after laccase treatment were increased secondary OH and degree of condensation.

  20. Global Proteome Changes in Liver Tissue 6 Weeks after FOLFOX Treatment of Colorectal Cancer Liver Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Urdzik, Jozef; Vildhede, Anna; Wiśniewski, Jacek R.; Duraj, Frans; Haglund, Ulf; Artursson, Per; Norén, Agneta

    2016-01-01

    (1) Oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy for colorectal cancer liver metastasis is associated with sinusoidal injury of liver parenchyma. The effects of oxaliplatin-induced liver injury on the protein level remain unknown. (2) Protein expression in liver tissue was analyzed—from eight patients treated with FOLFOX (combination of fluorouracil, leucovorin, and oxaliplatin) and seven controls—by label-free liquid chromatography mass spectrometry. Recursive feature elimination–support vector machine and Welch t-test were used to identify classifying and relevantly changed proteins, respectively. Resulting proteins were analyzed for associations with gene ontology categories and pathways. (3) A total of 5891 proteins were detected. A set of 184 (3.1%) proteins classified the groups with a 20% error rate, but relevant change was observed only in 55 (0.9%) proteins. The classifying proteins were associated with changes in DNA replication (p < 0.05) through upregulation of the minichromosome maintenance complex and with the innate immune response (p < 0.05). The importance of DNA replication changes was supported by the results of Welch t-test (p < 0.05). (4) Six weeks after FOLFOX treatment, less than 1% of identified proteins showed changes in expression associated with DNA replication, cell cycle entry, and innate immune response. We hypothesize that the changes remain after recovery from FOLFOX treatment injury. PMID:28248240

  1. Stability and structural changes of horseradish peroxidase: microwave versus conventional heating treatment.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Lucas C; Barreto, Maria T M; Gonçalves, Karen M; Alvarez, Heiddy M; Heredia, Montserrat Fortuny; de Souza, Rodrigo Octavio M A; Cordeiro, Yraima; Dariva, Cláudio; Fricks, Alini T

    2015-02-01

    Effects of conventional heating (CH) and microwave (MW) on the structure and activity of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) in buffer solution were studied. CH incubation between 30 and 45 °C increased activity of HRP, reaching 170% of residual activity (RA) after 4-6 h at 45 °C. CH treatment at 50 and 60 °C caused HRP inactivation: RA was 5.7 and 16.7% after 12 h, respectively. Secondary and tertiary HRP structural changes were analyzed by circular dichroism (CD) and intrinsic fluorescence emission, respectively. Under CH, activation of the enzyme was attributed to conformational changes in secondary and tertiary structures. MW treatment had significant effects on the residual activity of HRP. MW treatment at 45 °C/30W followed by CH treatment 45 °C regenerated the enzyme activity. The greatest loss in activity occurred at 60 °C/60 W/30 min (RA 16.9%); without recovery of the original activity. The inactivation of MW-treated HRP was related to the loss of tertiary structure, indicating changes around the tryptophan environment.

  2. Growth hormone (GH) and atherosclerosis: changes in morphology and function of major arteries during GH treatment.

    PubMed

    Pfeifer, M; Verhovec, R; Zizek, B

    1999-04-01

    Patients with hypopituitarism have increased carotid artery intima-media thickness and reduced arterial distensibility. The effect of 2 years of growth hormone (GH) replacement therapy on these parameters was studied in 11 GH-deficient men (age range, 24-49 years) with hypopituitarism and compared with 12 healthy, age-matched men with no evidence of pituitary or vascular disease. Before treatment the intima-media of the common carotid arteries and the carotid bifurcations were significantly thicker in patients (P < 0.001) than in the control group. Treatment with GH normalized the intima-media thickness of the common carotid artery within 6 months and of the carotid bifurcation within 3 months. The changes in intima-media thickness of the carotid artery were negatively correlated with changes in serum levels of insulin-like growth factor I during treatment. There was a significant improvement in flow-mediated, endothelium-dependent dilation of the brachial artery at 3 months, which was sustained at 6, 18 and 24 months of GH treatment (P < 0.05). Thus, GH replacement therapy in GH-deficient men reverses early morphological and functional atherosclerotic changes in major arteries, and may reduce rates of vascular morbidity and mortality.

  3. Semi-arid aquifer responses to forest restoration treatments and climate change.

    PubMed

    Wyatt, Clinton J W; O'Donnell, Frances C; Springer, Abraham E

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop an interpretive groundwater-flow model to assess the impacts that planned forest restoration treatments and anticipated climate change will have on large regional, deep (>400 m), semi-arid aquifers. Simulations were conducted to examine how tree basal area reductions impact groundwater recharge from historic conditions to 2099. Novel spatial analyses were conducted to determine areas and rates of potential increases in groundwater recharge. Changes in recharge were applied to the model by identifying zones of basal area reduction from planned forest restoration treatments and applying recharge-change factors to these zones. Over a 10-year period of forest restoration treatment, a 2.8% increase in recharge to one adjacent groundwater basin (the Verde Valley sub-basin) was estimated, compared to conditions that existed from 2000 to 2005. However, this increase in recharge was assumed to quickly decline after treatment due to regrowth of vegetation and forest underbrush and their associated increased evapotranspiration. Furthermore, simulated increases in groundwater recharge were masked by decreases in water levels, stream baseflow, and groundwater storage resulting from surface water diversions and groundwater pumping. These results indicate that there is an imbalance between water supply and demand in this regional, semi-arid aquifer. Current water management practices may not be sustainable into the far future and comprehensive action should be taken to minimize this water budget imbalance.

  4. Empirically Derived Subtypes of Adolescent Depression: Latent Profile Analysis of Co-Occurring Symptoms in the Treatment for Adolescents with Depression Study (TADS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herman, Keith C.; Ostrander, Rick; Walkup, John T.; Silva, Susan G.; March, John S.

    2007-01-01

    A latent profile analysis was conducted on the co-occurring symptoms of 423 adolescents diagnosed with major depressive disorder as part of the Treatment for Adolescents with Depression Study (TADS), a multisite, randomized treatment trial. The participants had a mean (SD) age of 14.6 (1.5) years; of the sample, 45.6% was male and 73.8% was white.…

  5. Weight change and clinical markers of cardiovascular disease risk during preventive treatment of migraine.

    PubMed

    Bigal, M E; Lipton, R B; Biondi, D M; Xiang, J; Hulihan, J

    2009-11-01

    Migraine, particularly migraine with aura, and increased body weight are independent risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD). The association of weight change and clinical markers of CVD risk was evaluated in subjects participating in a randomized double-blind, parallel-group study of migraine-preventive treatment comparing 100 mg/day of topiramate and amitriptyline. Individuals from both treatment groups were pooled and stratified into three groups. The 'major weight gain' group gained > or = 5% of their baseline body weight at the conclusion of the study; the 'major weight loss' group lost > or = 5% of their baseline body weight. The third group had < 5% of weight change. The influence of weight change in headache outcomes, as well as in markers of CVD (blood pressure, cholesterol, C-reactive protein), was assessed using analysis of covariance. Of 331 subjects, 52 (16%) experienced major weight gain and 56 (17%) experienced major weight loss. Weight change was not associated with differential efficacy for the treatment of headache. However, contrasted with those with major weight loss, those who gained weight experienced elevations in mean diastolic blood pressure (+2.5 vs. -1.2 mmHg), heart rate (+7.6 vs. -1.3 beats per minute), glycosylated haemoglobin (+0.09% vs. -0.04%), total cholesterol (+6.4 vs. -6.3 mg/dl), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (+7.0 vs. -4.4 mg/dl) and triglycerides (+15.3 vs. -10.4 mg/dl) and an increase in high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (+1.8 vs. -1.9 mg/l). Both groups experienced decreases in systolic blood pressure (-4.0 vs. -1.3 mmHg) and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (-3.7 vs. -0.8 mg/dl). Increased weight during migraine treatment is not associated with poor headache treatment outcomes, but is associated with deterioration of CVD risk markers.

  6. Serum Inflammatory Mediators in Pregnancy: Changes Following Periodontal Treatment and Association with Pregnancy Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Michalowicz, Bryan S.; Novak, M. John; Hodges, James S.; DiAngelis, Anthony; Buchanan, William; Papapanou, Panos N.; Mitchell, Dennis A.; Ferguson, James E.; Lupo, Virginia; Bofill, James; Matseoane, Stephen; Steffen, Michelle; Ebersole, Jeffrey L.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To determine: 1) if periodontal treatment in pregnant women before 21 weeks of gestation alters levels of inflammatory mediators in serum; and 2) if changes in these mediators are associated with birth outcomes. Methods 823 pregnant women with periodontitis were randomly assigned to receive scaling and root planing before 21 weeks of gestation or after delivery. Serum obtained between 13 weeks and 16 weeks 6 days (study baseline) and 29–32 weeks gestation was analyzed for C-reactive protein, prostaglandin E2, matrix metalloproteinase-9, fibrinogen, endotoxin, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-8, and tumor necrosis factor-α. Cox regression, multiple linear regression, t-tests, chi-square and Fisher’s exact tests were used to examine associations between the biomarkers, periodontal treatment, and gestational age at delivery and birthweight. Results 796 women had baseline serum data; 620 had baseline and follow-up serum and birth data. Periodontal treatment did not significantly alter the level of any biomarker (P>0.05). Neither baseline levels nor change from baseline in any biomarker was significantly associated with preterm birth or infant birthweight (P>0.05). In treatment subjects, change in endotoxin was negatively associated with change in probing depth (P<0.05). Conclusions Non-surgical mechanical periodontal treatment in pregnant women delivered before 21 weeks of gestation did not reduce systemic (serum) markers of inflammation. In pregnant women with periodontitis, levels of these markers at 13–17 weeks and 29–32 weeks gestation were not associated with risk for preterm birth or with infant birthweight. PMID:19905943

  7. Growth and treatment changes distal to the mandibular first molar: a lateral cephalometric study.

    PubMed

    Sable, Daniel L; Woods, Michael G

    2004-06-01

    This study examined space changes occurring distal to the mandibular first molar in growing patients treated using two different approaches. Two groups of 50 patients were selected for the study. The patients in group I were treated with the extraction of mandibular second premolars, whereas those in group II were treated without mandibular premolar extractions, by holding E-spaces with utility arches. Lateral cephalograms taken before and after treatment were used to measure space changes within the mandible. Follow-up written treatment records and radiographs were also examined to ascertain whether the mandibular third molars were ultimately extracted or retained. A greater mean space increase between Xi point and the mandibular first molar was found in boys and girls treated with second premolar extractions. The mean space increase between Xi point and the mandibular first molar, as well as the average increase in total mandibular length, was greater in boys than in girls for both treatment modalities. This reflects a greater amount of growth in boys during the treatment period. The greater mean space increase in the groups treated with second premolar extractions could be attributed to the fact that the first molar generally moved further mesially during treatment in the extraction subjects, whereas in the E-space subjects, the first molars were perhaps held back. It was noted that the mandibular third molars were ultimately more likely to have been extracted in the E-space groups than in the second premolar extraction groups within this sample.

  8. Change of Voice Handicap Index after treatment of benign laryngeal disorders.

    PubMed

    Stuut, Marijn; Tjon Pian Gi, Robin E A; Dikkers, Frederik G

    2014-05-01

    Voice disorders can have major impact on quality of life. Problems caused by these disorders can be experienced in different domains. The Voice Handicap Index (VHI) is a well-known voice-related quality of life instrument to measure physical, emotional and functional complaints. VHI change after treatment in seven separate benign laryngeal disorders was studied. In addition, correlation between the three domains was examined. VHI forms were completed before and 3 months after treatment. In a 5-year-period, 143 patients with seven specific diagnoses were retrospectively included. VHI improved for six diagnoses polyp (p < 0.000), cyst (p = 0.001), unilateral paralysis (p = 0.001), Reinke edema (p = 0.016), papillomatosis (p = 0.001), nodules (p = 0.002). Sulcus glottidis did not change (p = 0.897). Mean VHI after treatment was higher for females (p = 0.021). The values of the three domains correlate statistically significant. For each diagnosis, the mean VHI after treatment remained higher than in subjects with a healthy voice. Because the domains are interdependent, their absolute values could not be compared. After treatment, VHI improved in six of the seven diagnoses. The scores on the physical, emotional, and functional domain are interdependent. Scores of the different domains cannot be compared.

  9. Psychopathic traits and change on indicators of dynamic risk factors during inpatient forensic psychiatric treatment.

    PubMed

    Hildebrand, Martin; de Ruiter, Corine

    2012-01-01

    The main objective of the present study was to investigate the impact of treatment on forensic psychiatric inpatients, examining changes on 22 indicators of five dynamic risk factors for violence (i.e., egocentrism, hostility, impulsivity, lack of insight, and negative distrustful attitudes), and to relate these potential changes to level of psychopathy assessed with the Hare Psychopathy Checklist - Revised (PCL-R). Also, we studied the relationship between psychopathy and treatment compliance, as indicated by the attendance rate of therapeutic activities. Eighty-seven male patients (due to missing data on at least one measure, sample size varies from 58 to 87; 42 patients have complete datasets) were administered a standardized psychological assessment battery (self-report inventories, performance-based personality test, observer ratings) upon admission (T1) and after on average 20 months of treatment (T2). Upon admission, psychopathy (median split, PCL-R score≥22) was significantly related to a higher score on five of the 22 indicators of dynamic risk. The analyses showed no significant differences between psychopathic and non-psychopathic patients on the indicators of dynamic risk factors during 20 months of inpatient forensic psychiatric treatment. However, psychopaths showed the expected pattern of treatment noncompliance, compared to non-psychopaths. The clinical and research implications of these findings are discussed.

  10. Analysis of changes in MR properties of tissues after heat treatment.

    PubMed

    Graham, S J; Stanisz, G J; Kecojevic, A; Bronskill, M J; Henkelman, R M

    1999-12-01

    To characterize changes in the MR parameters of tissues due to thermal coagulation, a series of T(1), T(2), diffusion, and magnetization transfer measurements were performed on a variety of ex vivo tissues: murine slow twitch skeletal muscle, murine cardiac muscle, murine cerebral hemisphere, bovine white matter, murine liver tissue, bovine retroperitoneal adipose tissue, hen egg white, human prostate and human blood. Standardized heat treatments were performed for each tissue type, over the temperature range from 37 degrees C to 90 degrees C. For all tissues, changes in each MR measurement resulting from thermal coagulation were observed above a threshold temperature of approximately 60 degrees C. These changes are explained based on biophysical knowledge of thermal damage mechanisms and the MR properties of normal tissues, and are particularly relevant for interpreting the changes in image contrast that are observed when MRI is used to guide and monitor thermal coagulation therapy procedures. Magn Reson Med 42:1061-1071, 1999.

  11. The implications of starvation induced psychological changes for the ethical treatment of hunger strikers

    PubMed Central

    Fessler, D

    2003-01-01

    Design: Electronic databases were searched for (a) editorials and ethical proclamations on hunger strikers and their treatment; (b) studies of voluntary and involuntary starvation, and (c) legal cases pertaining to hunger striking. Additional studies were gathered in a snowball fashion from the published material cited in these databases. Material was included if it (a) provided ethical or legal guidelines; (b) shed light on psychological changes accompanying starvation, or (c) illustrated the practice of hunger striking. Authors' observations, opinions, and conclusions were noted. Conclusions: Although the heterogeneous nature of the sources precluded statistical analysis, starvation appears to be accompanied by marked psychological changes. Some changes clearly impair competence, in which case physicians are advised to follow advance directives obtained early in the hunger strike. More problematic are increases in impulsivity and aggressivity, changes which, while not impairing competence, enhance the likelihood that patients will starve themselves to death. PMID:12930863

  12. Correlates of having never been HIV tested among entrants to substance abuse treatment clinics: empiric findings from real-world New England settings.

    PubMed

    Chadwick, Jeanne J; Andrade, Leonardo F; Altice, Frederick L; Petry, Nancy M

    2014-01-01

    Routine testing is the cornerstone to identifying HIV, but not all substance abuse treatment patients have been tested. This study is a real-world evaluation of predictors of having never been HIV tested among patients initiating substance abuse treatment. Participants (N = 614) from six New England clinics were asked whether they had ever been HIV tested. Eighty-five patients (13.8%) reported having never been tested and were compared to those who had undergone testing. Clinic, male gender (adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 1.91, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.07-3.41), and having fewer employment (AOR = 0.31; 95% CI = 0.11-0.88) and medical problems (AOR = 0.40, 95% CI = 0.17-0.99) were independently correlated with having never been HIV tested. Thus, there is still considerable room for improved testing strategies as a clinically significant minority of substance abuse patients have never undergone HIV testing when they initiate treatment.

  13. Stories of change in drug treatment: a narrative analysis of 'whats' and 'hows' in institutional storytelling.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Ditte

    2015-06-01

    Addiction research has demonstrated how recovering individuals need narratives that make sense of past drug use and enable constructions of future, non-addict identities. However, there has not been much investigation into how these recovery narratives actually develop moment-to-moment in drug treatment. Building on the sociology of storytelling and ethnographic fieldwork conducted at two drug treatment institutions for young people in Denmark, this article argues that studying stories in the context of their telling brings forth novel insights. Through a narrative analysis of both 'the whats' (story content) and 'the hows' (storying process) the article presents four findings: (1) stories of change function locally as an institutional requirement; (2) professional drug treatment providers edit young people's storytelling through different techniques; (3) the narrative environment of the drug treatment institution shapes how particular stories make sense of the past, present and future; and (4) storytelling in drug treatment is an interactive achievement. A fine-grained analysis illuminates in particular how some stories on gender and drug use are silenced, while others are encouraged. The demonstration of how local narrative environments shape stories contributes to the general understanding of interactive storytelling in encounters between professionals and clients in treatment settings.

  14. Estimation of wildfire size and risk changes due to fuels treatments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cochrane, M.A.; Moran, C.J.; Wimberly, M.C.; Baer, A.D.; Finney, M.A.; Beckendorf, K.L.; Eidenshink, J.; Zhu, Z.

    2012-01-01

    Human land use practices, altered climates, and shifting forest and fire management policies have increased the frequency of large wildfires several-fold. Mitigation of potential fire behaviour and fire severity have increasingly been attempted through pre-fire alteration of wildland fuels using mechanical treatments and prescribed fires. Despite annual treatment of more than a million hectares of land, quantitative assessments of the effectiveness of existing fuel treatments at reducing the size of actual wildfires or how they might alter the risk of burning across landscapes are currently lacking. Here, we present a method for estimating spatial probabilities of burning as a function of extant fuels treatments for any wildland fire-affected landscape. We examined the landscape effects of more than 72 000 ha of wildland fuel treatments involved in 14 large wildfires that burned 314 000 ha of forests in nine US states between 2002 and 2010. Fuels treatments altered the probability of fire occurrence both positively and negatively across landscapes, effectively redistributing fire risk by changing surface fire spread rates and reducing the likelihood of crowning behaviour. Trade offs are created between formation of large areas with low probabilities of increased burning and smaller, well-defined regions with reduced fire risk.

  15. Main occluding area in partially edentulous patients: changes before and after implant treatment.

    PubMed

    Goto, T; Nishinaka, H; Kashiwabara, T; Nagao, K; Ichikawa, T

    2012-09-01

    The 'main occluding area', the location where food crushing occurs during the first stroke of mastication, is reported to be an important concept; however, it is currently limited to findings in individuals with normal dentition. The purpose of this study was to assess the changes in the location, area and bite force of the main occluding area before and after implant treatments. We enrolled 50 partially edentulous and 22 normally dentate subjects. To identify the location of the main occluding area, each subject was instructed to freely bite once on a dental stopping using the partially edentulous side or the normally dentate area. The location, occluding contact area and bite force of the main occluding area before and after the implant treatments were analysed. The main occluding area was located at a reproducible location in the partially edentulous and normally dentate subjects. This location was principally the first molar region, and for the partially edentulous patients with missing teeth in the molar regions, it moved from the premolar region to the first molar region after treatment. The occluding contact area and bite force for the main occluding area increased (P < 0·05) after the implant treatment in the partially edentulous patients with missing teeth in the molar regions. These results suggest that the main occluding area can be restored to the first molar region after implant treatment and may be an important factor in the assessment of prosthodontic treatment.

  16. Non-Empirical Confirmation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawid, Richard

    2016-06-01

    In fundamental physics today, some theories are taken to be probably viable despite a lack of strong (or any) empirical confirmation. This situation suggests, I argue, an extension of the concept of theory confirmation that allows for confirmation by observations that are not predicted by the theory in question. "Non-empirical confirmation", as I call the latter form of confirmation, plays a more conspicuous role today than in earlier periods of physics. It has always constituted a significant albeit implicit element of the assessment of physical theory, however, that has not been adequately accounted for in canonical reconstructions of the scientific method. The talk discusses the core argumentative structure of non-empirical confirmation, analyses the concept’s reliance on the empirical testability of the theories in question and addresses some worries that have been raised in its regard.

  17. Defining Empirically Based Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegel, Deborah H.

    1984-01-01

    Provides a definition of empirically based practice, both conceptually and operationally. Describes a study of how research and practice were integrated in the graduate social work program at the School of Social Service Administration, University of Chicago. (JAC)

  18. Long-term antidepressant treatment in general practice: changes in body mass index

    PubMed Central

    Chiwanda, Laura; Cordiner, Matthew; Thompson, Anne T.; Shajahan, Polash

    2016-01-01

    Aims and method To discern changes in body mass index (BMI) in patients on long-term antidepressant treatment in a general practice population and establish BMI changes in patients with and without a diagnosis of diabetes. We used a retrospective observational method and identified patients on four antidepressants of interest. We excluded those who did not have start and current BMI readings within the past 3 years and noted whether or not patients had a diagnosis of diabetes. Results Long-term treatment with citalopram, fluoxetine, mirtazapine and sertraline was associated with increased BMI in two-thirds of patients. There was reduction in BMI in patients with diabetes and an increase in BMI for patients who did not have diabetes. Clinical implications Awareness of environmental factors and their impact on individuals is important. Medication is not the only cause of abnormal metabolic effects. Overall monitoring of physical health is important in all groups of patients.

  19. Brain mechanisms of Change in Addictions Treatment: Models, Methods, and Emerging Findings.

    PubMed

    Chung, Tammy; Noronha, Antonio; Carroll, Kathleen M; Potenza, Marc N; Hutchison, Kent; Calhoun, Vince D; Gabrieli, John D E; Morgenstern, Jon; Nixon, Sara Jo; Wexler, Bruce E; Brewer, Judson; Ray, Lara; Filbey, Francesca; Strauman, Timothy J; Kober, Hedy; Feldstein Ewing, Sarah W

    2016-09-01

    Increased understanding of "how" and "for whom" treatment works at the level of the brain has potential to transform addictions treatment through the development of innovative neuroscience-informed interventions. The 2015 Science of Change meeting bridged the fields of neuroscience and psychotherapy research to identify brain mechanisms of behavior change that are "common" across therapies, and "specific" to distinct behavioral interventions. Conceptual models of brain mechanisms underlying effects of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, mindfulness interventions, and Motivational Interviewing were discussed. Presentations covered methods for integrating neuroimaging into psychotherapy research, and novel analytic approaches. Effects of heavy substance use on the brain, and recovery of brain functioning with sustained abstinence, which may be facilitated by cognitive training, were reviewed. Neuroimaging provides powerful tools for determining brain mechanisms underlying psychotherapy and medication effects, predicting and monitoring outcomes, developing novel interventions that target specific brain circuits, and identifying for whom an intervention will be effective.

  20. Late treatment of a dorsal transscaphoid, transtriquetral perilunate wrist dislocation with avascular changes of the lunate.

    PubMed

    Gellman, H; Schwartz, S D; Botte, M J; Feiwell, L

    1988-12-01

    The outcome of delayed treatment of an unreduced transscaphoid, transtriquetral, perilunate fracture dislocation of the carpus is unpredictable. Long-term follow-up observations in a 22-year-old man treated three months postinjury showed changes in the lunate consistent with avascular necrosis at the time of open reduction and internal fixation. Early resolution of this was evident by nine months, and complete resolution was seen at the follow-up examination (four years and two months). Despite delay in treatment, this patient had full, pain-free wrist motion. Consequently, avascular changes of the carpus following wrist dislocation do not preclude a good result. Anatomic reduction of the scaphoid, as well as the midcarpal joint, and restoration of the articular surface of the lunate, are most important in determining prognosis.

  1. Changes in Bone Health During the First Year of Cancer Treatment in Children.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyoung Soo; Chang, Eun Jae; Lee, Eun Hye; Yang, Hye Ran

    This study aimed to evaluate longitudinal changes in bone mineral density (BMD) and bone mineral content (BMC) in children with cancer during the first year of treatment. Thirty pediatric cancer patients (median age 11.2 [range 3.8-17.4] yr; 21 boys, 9 girls; 19 hematologic malignancies, 11 solid tumors) and 30 healthy controls were enrolled. Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry was performed at baseline and at 1, 6, and 12 mo for each pediatric cancer patient. There were no significant differences in age, sex, body weight, height, body mass index, serum vitamin D levels, BMD, and BMC among children with hematologic malignancies, those with solid tumors, and the controls at baseline. When the medians of BMD Z-scores were compared between different time intervals, whole-body BMD Z-score significantly decreased during the first year of cancer treatment (p = 0.001) in children with hematologic malignancies, especially during the first month (p = 0.002), and between 1 and 6 mo (p = 0.006). In children with solid tumors, whole-body BMD Z-score changed significantly only between 6 and 12 mo after treatment (p = 0.043). Generalized estimation equations for the analysis of trends in the whole-body BMD Z-scores revealed that there were significant downward trends between BMD Z-scores at baseline and those at 12 mo in children with hematologic malignancies and those with solid tumors. Cancer treatment significantly affects the bone health status at least during the first year, causing a significant decrease in BMD, especially during the first 6 mo for patients with hematologic malignancies and during the last 6 mo for those with solid tumors. Better strategies for treating changes in BMD based on the underlying cancer are necessary during cancer treatment in children.

  2. Global changes in the rat heart proteome induced by prolonged morphine treatment and withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Drastichova, Zdenka; Skrabalova, Jitka; Jedelsky, Petr; Neckar, Jan; Kolar, Frantisek; Novotny, Jiri

    2012-01-01

    Morphine belongs among the most commonly used opioids in medical practice due to its strong analgesic effects. However, sustained administration of morphine leads to the development of tolerance and dependence and may cause long-lasting alterations in nervous tissue. Although proteomic approaches enabled to reveal changes in multiple gene expression in the brain as a consequence of morphine treatment, there is lack of information about the effect of this drug on heart tissue. Here we studied the effect of 10-day morphine exposure and subsequent drug withdrawal (3 or 6 days) on the rat heart proteome. Using the iTRAQ technique, we identified 541 proteins in the cytosol, 595 proteins in the plasma membrane-enriched fraction and 538 proteins in the mitochondria-enriched fraction derived from the left ventricles. Altogether, the expression levels of 237 proteins were altered by morphine treatment or withdrawal. The majority of changes (58 proteins) occurred in the cytosol after a 3-day abstinence period. Significant alterations were found in the expression of heat shock proteins (HSP27, α-B crystallin, HSP70, HSP10 and HSP60), whose levels were markedly up-regulated after morphine treatment or withdrawal. Besides that morphine exposure up-regulated MAPK p38 (isoform CRA_b) which is a well-known up-stream mediator of phosphorylation and activation of HSP27 and α-B crystallin. Whereas there were no alterations in the levels of proteins involved in oxidative stress, several changes were determined in the levels of pro- and anti-apoptotic proteins. These data provide a complex view on quantitative changes in the cardiac proteome induced by morphine treatment or withdrawal and demonstrate great sensitivity of this organ to morphine.

  3. Global Changes in the Rat Heart Proteome Induced by Prolonged Morphine Treatment and Withdrawal

    PubMed Central

    Drastichova, Zdenka; Skrabalova, Jitka; Jedelsky, Petr; Neckar, Jan; Kolar, Frantisek; Novotny, Jiri

    2012-01-01

    Morphine belongs among the most commonly used opioids in medical practice due to its strong analgesic effects. However, sustained administration of morphine leads to the development of tolerance and dependence and may cause long-lasting alterations in nervous tissue. Although proteomic approaches enabled to reveal changes in multiple gene expression in the brain as a consequence of morphine treatment, there is lack of information about the effect of this drug on heart tissue. Here we studied the effect of 10-day morphine exposure and subsequent drug withdrawal (3 or 6 days) on the rat heart proteome. Using the iTRAQ technique, we identified 541 proteins in the cytosol, 595 proteins in the plasma membrane-enriched fraction and 538 proteins in the mitochondria-enriched fraction derived from the left ventricles. Altogether, the expression levels of 237 proteins were altered by morphine treatment or withdrawal. The majority of changes (58 proteins) occurred in the cytosol after a 3-day abstinence period. Significant alterations were found in the expression of heat shock proteins (HSP27, α-B crystallin, HSP70, HSP10 and HSP60), whose levels were markedly up-regulated after morphine treatment or withdrawal. Besides that morphine exposure up-regulated MAPK p38 (isoform CRA_b) which is a well-known up-stream mediator of phosphorylation and activation of HSP27 and α-B crystallin. Whereas there were no alterations in the levels of proteins involved in oxidative stress, several changes were determined in the levels of pro- and anti-apoptotic proteins. These data provide a complex view on quantitative changes in the cardiac proteome induced by morphine treatment or withdrawal and demonstrate great sensitivity of this organ to morphine. PMID:23056601

  4. A Review and Empirical Comparison of Three Treatments for Adolescent Males with Conduct and Personality Disorder: Mode Deactivation Therapy, Cognitive Behavior Therapy and Social Skills Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Apsche, Jack A.; Bass, Christopher K.; Siv, Alexander M.

    2005-01-01

    This treatment research study extended the results of Apsche, Bass, Jennings, Murphy, Hunter, and Siv (2005), from behavioral data to standard measures of psychological distress. In Apsche, et. al. (2005) results suggest that Mode Deactivation Therapy (MDT) was more effective than Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT) and Social Skills Therapy (SST) in…

  5. The Key to Individualized Addiction Treatment is Comprehensive Assessment and Monitoring of Symptoms and Behavioral Change

    PubMed Central

    Hilton, Thomas F.; Pilkonis, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    Modern health services now strive for individualized treatment. This approach has been enabled by the increase in knowledge derived from neuroscience and genomics. Substance use disorders are no exception to individualized treatment even though there are no gene-specific medications yet available. What is available is the ability to quickly and precisely assess and monitor biopsychosocial variables known to vary during addiction recovery and which place addicts at increased risk of relapse. Monitoring a broad spectrum of biopsychosocial health enables providers to address diverse genome-specific changes that might trigger withdrawal from treatment or recovery relapse in time to prevent that from occurring. This paper describes modern measurement tools contained in the NIH Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) and the NIH Toolbox and suggests how they might be applied to support recovery from alcohol and other substance use disorders in both pharmacological and abstinence-oriented modalities of care. PMID:26529025

  6. A latent class approach to treatment readiness corresponds to a transtheoretical ("Stages of Change") model.

    PubMed

    Harrell, Paul Truman; Trenz, R C; Scherer, M; Martins, S S; Latimer, W W

    2013-09-01

    Motivation for treatment among people with substance use problems is an important aspect of treatment success. Models for treatment motivation are widely debated. Latent Class Analysis can help to demonstrate the appropriateness of available models. The current study utilizes Latent Class Analysis to analyze treatment readiness statements as they relate to the reduction or cessation of marijuana, cocaine, and opioid use among 539 cocaine and opioid users recruited from the community of Baltimore, MD, USA. Participants completed an in-person structured interview including demographic questions, a treatment readiness questionnaire with items on Intention to Stop Use (ISU) and Problem Recognition (PR), current substance abuse treatment utilization, and urinalysis testing for marijuana, cocaine, and heroin. Latent class models were fit to the treatment readiness questionnaire. A four-class model provided the best fit with one class low on both ISU and PR ("Pre-contemplative"), a second class low on ISU but high on PR ("Contemplative"), a third class high on both ("Preparation/Action"), and a final class high on ISU but low on PR ("Post-Action"). Compared to the "Contemplative" class, the "Pre-contemplative" class was significantly more likely to be positive for marijuana, and the "Post-Action" class was significantly less likely to be positive for opioids. The "Preparation/Action" class was significantly more likely to be in treatment. With the exception of the "Post-Action" class, the analysis appears similar to the "Stages of Change" model and suggests that problem recognition and intention to stop use are important domains in the model. However, further longitudinal research is needed to assess predictive validity of model.

  7. Parenting as a Mechanism of Change in Psychosocial Treatment for Youth with ADHD, Predominantly Inattentive Presentation.

    PubMed

    Haack, Lauren M; Villodas, Miguel; McBurnett, Keith; Hinshaw, Stephen; Pfiffner, Linda J

    2016-09-15

    We investigated whether parenting and child behavior improve following psychosocial treatment for Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder, Predominantly Inattentive Presentation (ADHD-I) and whether parenting improvements mediate child outcomes. We analyzed data from a randomized clinical trial investigating the efficacy of a multicomponent psychosocial intervention (Child Life and Attention Skills, CLAS, n = 74) in comparison to Parent-Focused Treatment (PFT, n = 74) and treatment as usual (TAU, n = 51) for youth with ADHD-I (average child age = 8.6 years, range 7-11 years, 58 % boys). Child and parent/family functioning were assessed prior to treatment, immediately following treatment, and at follow-up into the subsequent school year using parent and teacher reports of inattention, organization, social skills, academic competency (teachers only), parenting daily hassles, and positive and negative parenting behaviors (parents only). Both treatment groups improved on negative parenting and home impairment, but only CLAS families also improved on positive parenting as well as academic impairment. Improvements in positive and negative parenting mediated treatment effects on child impairment independent of improvements in child inattention, implicating parenting as an important mechanism of change in psychosocial treatment for ADHD-I. Further, whereas parent-focused training produces improvements in negative parenting and impairment at home for children with ADHD-I, a multicomponent approach (incorporating child skills training and teacher consultation) more consistently produces improvements at school and in positive parenting, which may contribute to improvements in social skills into the next school year.

  8. [Morphological changes of the intestine in experimental acute intestinal infection in the treatment of colloidal silver].

    PubMed

    Polov'ian, E S; Chemich, N D; Moskalenko, R A; Romaniuk, A N

    2012-06-01

    At the present stage of infectionist practice in the treatment of acute intestinal infections caused by opportunistic microorganisms, colloidal silver is used with a particle size of 25 nm as an alternative to conventional causal therapy. In 32 rats, distributed in 4 groups of 8 animals each (intact; healthy, got colloidal silver; with a modeled acute intestinal infection in the basic treatment and with the addition of colloidal silver), histological examination was performed of small and large intestine of rats. Oral administration of colloidal silver at a dose of 0.02 mg/day to intact rats did not lead to changes in morphometric parameters compared to the norm, and during early convalescence in rats with acute intestinal infections were observed destructive and compensatory changes in the intestine, which depended on the treatment regimen. With the introduction of colloidal silver decreased activity of the inflammatory process and the severity of morphological changes in tissues of small and large intestine, indicating that the positive effect of study drug compared with baseline therapy.

  9. Physiological and molecular changes of detached wheat leaves in responding to various treatments.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lifeng; Zhang, Haoshan; Zhang, Bingjing; Bai, Xiaojuan; Zhou, Chunjiang

    2012-08-01

    Leaf senescence is induced or accelerated when leaves are detached. However, the senescence process and expression pattern of senescence-associated genes (SAGs) when leaves are detached are not clearly understood. To detect senescence-associated physiological changes and SAG expression, wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) leaves were detached and treated with light, darkness, low temperature (4 °C), jasmonic acid (JA), abscisic acid (ABA), and salicylic acid (SA). The leaf phenotypes, chlorophyll content, delayed fluorescence (DF), and expression levels of two SAGs, namely, TaSAG3 and TaSAG5, were analyzed. Under these different treatments, the detached leaves turned yellow with different patterns and varying chlorophyll content. DF significantly decreased after the dark, ABA, JA and SA treatments. TaSAG3 and TaSAG5, which are expressed in natural senescent leaves, showed different expression patterns under various treatments. However, both TaSAG3 and TaSAG5 were upregulated after leaf detachment. Our results revealed senescence-associated physiological changes and molecular differences in leaves, which induced leaf senescence during different stress treatments.

  10. Changes of Corneal Wavefront Aberrations in Dry Eye Patients after Treatment with Artificial Lubricant Drops.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ning; Lin, Fangyu; Huang, Zhu; He, Qin; Han, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the corneal aberration changes in dry eye patients after treatment with artificial eye drops. Methods. Thirty mild to moderate dry eye patients treated with artificial eye drops and twenty comparable dry eye patients were recruited as controls. Anterior corneal aberrations over 3 mm and 5 mm analytical zones including total, 3rd to 5th high order aberrations (HOAs), spherical aberration (SA), and vertical (V-coma) and horizontal coma (H-coma) obtained from corneal topography data at baseline and 2 weeks after treatment were evaluated. Results. For 3 mm zone, trefoils, V-coma, H-coma terms, and 3rd and 5th HOAs were significantly decreased (p < 0.05) in the treatment group. For 5 mm zone, instillation of eye drops reduced H-coma, SA terms, 3rd to 5th orders, and total HOAs all showed a significant decrease (p < 0.05). The root mean square analysis of the Zernike terms also showed similar statistical results. For control group, all individual terms and total HOAs did not have significant changes over 3 mm and 5 mm zones (p > 0.05). Conclusions. Treatment with artificial eye drops can effectively improve the corneal optical quality of dry eye patients by ameliorating the HOAs of anterior corneal surface.

  11. Functional properties and structure changes of soybean protein isolate after subcritical water treatment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiu-Ting; Tu, Zong-Cai; Wang, Hui; Huang, Xiao-Qin; Fan, Liang-Liang; Bao, Zhong-Yu; Xiao, Hui

    2015-06-01

    Subcritical water is an emerging method in food industry. In this study, soybean protein isolate (SPI) was treated by subcritical water (SBW) at various temperatures (0, 120, 160, 200 °C) for 20 min. The changes in the appearances, physicochemical properties and structural changes were investigated. After SBW treatment, the color of SPI solution modified turned to be yellow. The mean particle size and turbidity of SPI had similar behaviors. The mean particle size was decreased from 263.7 nm to 116.8 nm at 120 °C and then reached the maximum at 160 °C (1446.1 nm) due to the aggregation of protein. Then it was decreased to 722.9 nm at 200 °C caused by the protein degradation. SBW treatment could significantly enhance the solubility, emulsifying and foaming properties of SPI. With increasing temperature, the crystalline structure of protein was gradually collapsed. The degradation of the protein advanced structure occurred, especially at 200 °C revealed by ultra-high resolution mass spectrometry. Better functional properties exhibited in hydrolysis products indicating that SBW treatment could be used as a good method to modify the properties of soy proteins isolate for specific purposes under appropriate treatment condition.

  12. Changes in Blood Lead Levels Associated with Use of Chloramines in Water Treatment Systems

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Marie Lynn; Kim, Dohyeong; Hull, Andrew P.; Paul, Christopher J.; Galeano, M. Alicia Overstreet

    2007-01-01

    Background More municipal water treatment plants are using chloramines as a disinfectant in order to reduce carcinogenic by-products. In some instances, this has coincided with an increase in lead levels in drinking water in those systems. Lead in drinking water can be a significant health risk. Objectives We sought to test the potential effect of switching to chloramines for disinfection in water treatment systems on childhood blood lead levels using data from Wayne County, located in the central Coastal Plain of North Carolina. Methods We constructed a unified geographic information system (GIS) that links blood lead screening data with age of housing, drinking water source, and census data for 7,270 records. The data were analyzed using both exploratory methods and more formal multivariate techniques. Results The analysis indicates that the change to chloramine disinfection may lead to an increase in blood lead levels, the impact of which is progressively mitigated in newer housing. Conclusions Introducing chloramines to reduce carcinogenic by-products may increase exposure to lead in drinking water. Our research provides guidance on adjustments in the local childhood lead poisoning prevention program that should accompany changes in water treatment. As similar research is conducted in other areas, and the underlying environmental chemistry is clarified, water treatment strategies can be optimized across the multiple objectives that municipalities face in providing high quality drinking water to local residents. PMID:17384768

  13. Hemorheological changes in solid tumor patients after treatment with recombinant erythropoetin.

    PubMed

    Muravyov, A V; Cheporov, S V; Kislov, N V; Volkova, E L

    2009-01-01

    The subject of this study was the effect of erythropoetin (Epoetin) treatment of anemic patients (n=30) with solid tumors on parameters of hemorheological profile. Both prior to and following Epoetin treatment (10,000 units subcutaneously thrice weekly) for four weeks hemorheological measurements included plasma and red blood cell (RBC) suspension viscosity; high and low shear whole blood viscosity; hematocrit (Hct), hemoglobin, RBC aggregation (RBCA) and deformation. It was found that the patients had reduced Hb up to 92.96+/-2.99 g/l, and the Hct - 28.2%. These parameters were significant increased after four weeks of Epoetin treatment: Hb by 28% (p<0.01) and Hct by 31% (p<0.01). In macrorheological part of the profile, both the high shear blood viscosity, and the low one were increased by 23 and 27% (p<0.05), respectively. These changes were mainly associated with the Hct rise. As for microrheological part of profile after Epoetin treatment, RBCA was decreased by 25% (p<0.05). While the red cell rigidity index (Tk) was lowered only slightly (by 8%). RBC incubation with Epoetin (10.0 I.E./ml) was accompanied by 10% decrease of Tk. It is important to note that before Epoetin treatment incubation with it led to decrease of RBCA by 30% (p<0.05), whereas after four week of the treatment period a 27% (p<0.05) rise of aggregation was found in majority of patients. Thus these results suggest that Epoetin is an effective, safe and convenient therapy for the management of anaemia in patients with cancer. And this drug has a moderate positive hemorheological effect on RBC and on the microrheological properties in particular. These data suggested that Epoetin has an effect on the membrane properties regulating RBC aggregation and deformation and affects by the signal transduction system, including Ca2+-dependant signaling pathway and tyrosine kinase and phosphotase activity change.

  14. An empirical study of the impact of human activity on long-term temperature change in China: A perspective from energy consumption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan; Zhao, Xinyi

    2012-09-01

    Human activity is an important contributor to local temperature change, especially in urban areas. Energy consumption is treated here as an index of the intensity of human induced local thermal forcing. The relationship between energy consumption and temperature change is analyzed in China by Observation Minus Reanalysis (OMR) method. Temperature trends for observation, reanalysis and OMR are estimated from meteorological records and 2 m-temperature from NCEP/NCAR Reanalysis 1 for the period 1979-2007. A spatial mapping scheme based on the spatial and temporal relationship between energy consumption and Gross Domestic Production (GDP) is developed to derive the spatial distribution of energy consumption of China in 2003. A positive relationship between energy consumption and OMR trends is found in high and mid energy consumption region. OMR trends decline with the decreasing intensity of human activity from 0.20°C/decade in high energy consumption region to 0.13°C/decade in mid energy consumption region. Forty-four stations in high energy consumption region that are exposed to the largest human impact are selected to investigate the impact of energy consumption spatial pattern on temperature change. Results show human impact on temperature trends is highly dependent on spatial pattern of energy consumption. OMR trends decline from energy consumption center to surrounding areas (0.26 to 0.04°C/decade) and get strengthened as the spatial extent of high energy consumption area expands (0.14 to 0.25°C/decade).

  15. An empirical link between the spectral colour of climate and the spectral colour of field populations in the context of climate change.

    PubMed

    García-Carreras, Bernardo; Reuman, Daniel C

    2011-09-01

    1. The spectral colour of population dynamics and its causes have attracted much interest. The spectral colour of a time series can be determined from its power spectrum, which shows what proportion of the total variance in the time series occurs at each frequency. A time series with a red spectrum (a negative spectral exponent) is dominated by low-frequency oscillations, and a time series with a blue spectrum (a positive spectral exponent) is dominated by high-frequency oscillations. 2. Both climate variables and population time series are characterised by red spectra, suggesting that a population's environment might be partly responsible for its spectral colour. Laboratory experiments and models have been used to investigate this potential link. However, no study using field data has directly tested whether populations in redder environments are redder. 3. This study uses the Global Population Dynamics Database together with climate data to test for this effect. We found that the spectral exponent of mean summer temperatures correlates positively and significantly with population spectral exponent. 4. We also found that over the last century, temperature climate variables on most continents have become bluer. 5. Although population time series are not long or abundant enough to judge directly whether their spectral colours are changing, our two results taken together suggest that population spectral colour may be affected by the changing spectral colour of climate variables. Population spectral colour has been linked to extinction; we discuss the potential implications of our results for extinction probability.

  16. Coupling of remote sensing, field campaign, and mechanistic and empirical modeling to monitor spatiotemporal carbon dynamics of a Mediterranean watershed in a changing regional climate.

    PubMed

    Berberoglu, S; Donmez, C; Evrendilek, F

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to simulate impacts of regional climate change in the 2070s on carbon (C) cycle of a Mediterranean watershed combining field measurements, Envisat MERIS and IKONOS data, and the Carnegie Ames Stanford Approach model. Simulation results indicated that the present total C sink status (1.36 Mt C year(-1)) of Mediterranean evergreen needleleaf forest, grassland and cropland ecosystems is expected to weaken by 7.6% in response to the climate change in the 2070s (Mt=10(12) g). This decreasing trend was mirrored in soil respiration (R H), aboveground and belowground net primary production (NPP), NEP, and net biome production (NBP). The decrease in NEP in the 2070s was the highest (21.9%) for mixed forest where the smallest present C sink of 0.03 Mt C year(-1) was estimated. The average present net ecosystem production (NEP) values were estimated at 110±15, 75±19, and 41±25 g C m(-2) years(-1) in forest, grassland, and cropland, respectively, with a watershed-scale mean of 95±30 g C m(-2) years(-1). The largest present C sink was in grassland, with a total C pool of 0.55 Mt C year(-1), through its greater spatial extent.

  17. Melatonin treatment reverts age-related changes in Guinea pig gallbladder neuromuscular transmission and contractility.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Pinilla, Pedro J; Camello-Almaraz, Cristina; Moreno, Rosario; Camello, Pedro J; Pozo, María J

    2006-11-01

    The incidence of gallbladder illness increases with age, but the altered mechanisms leading to gallbladder dysfunction are poorly understood. Here we determine the age-related alterations in gallbladder contractility and the impact of melatonin treatment. Isometric tension changes in response to electrical field stimulation and to agonists were recorded from guinea pig gallbladder muscle strips. [Ca(2+)](i) was determined by epifluorescence microscopy in fura-2 loaded isolated gallbladder smooth muscle cells, and F-actin content was quantified by confocal microscopy. Aging reduced neurogenic contractions, which was associated with the impairment of nitrergic innervation and with increased responsiveness of capsaicin-sensitive relaxant nerves, possibly involving calcitonin gene-related peptide. Melatonin treatment for 4 weeks restored neurogenic responses to normal values, with an associated recovery of nitrergic function and the disappearance of the capsaicin-sensitive component. Aging also reduced the contractile responses to cholecystokinin and Ca(2+) influx. The impaired contractility only correlated with diminished Ca(2+) mobilization in response to activation of Ca(2+) influx. Melatonin improved contractility and increased smooth muscle F-actin content without changing Ca(2+) homeostasis. In conclusion, aging impairs gallbladder function as the result of changes in the inhibitory neuromodulation of smooth muscle contractility and the reduction in the myogenic response to contractile agonists. Impaired contractility seems to be related to decreased Ca(2+) influx and damage of contractile proteins. Melatonin significantly ameliorated these age-related changes.

  18. Censored Median Regression and Profile Empirical Likelihood

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Sundarraman

    2007-01-01

    We implement profile empirical likelihood based inference for censored median regression models. Inference for any specified sub-vector is carried out by profiling out the nuisance parameters from the “plug-in” empirical likelihood ratio function proposed by Qin and Tsao. To obtain the critical value of the profile empirical likelihood ratio statistic, we first investigate its asymptotic distribution. The limiting distribution is a sum of weighted chi square distributions. Unlike for the full empirical likelihood, however, the derived asymptotic distribution has intractable covariance structure. Therefore, we employ the bootstrap to obtain the critical value, and compare the resulting confidence intervals with the ones obtained through Basawa and Koul’s minimum dispersion statistic. Furthermore, we obtain confidence intervals for the age and treatment effects in a lung cancer data set. PMID:19112527

  19. Proteome changes in banana fruit peel tissue in response to ethylene and high-temperature treatments

    PubMed Central

    Du, Lina; Song, Jun; Forney, Charles; Palmer, Leslie Campbell; Fillmore, Sherry; Zhang, ZhaoQi

    2016-01-01

    Banana (Musa AAA group) is one of the most consumed fruits in the world due to its flavor and nutritional value. As a typical climacteric fruit, banana responds to ethylene treatment, which induces rapid changes of color, flavor (aroma and taste), sweetness and nutritional composition. It has also been reported that ripening bananas at temperatures above 24 °C inhibits chlorophyll breakdown and color formation but increases the rate of senescence. To gain fundamental knowledge about the effects of high temperature and ethylene on banana ripening, a quantitative proteomic study employing multiplex peptide stable isotope dimethyl labeling was conducted. In this study, green (immature) untreated banana fruit were subjected to treatment with 10 μL L−1 of ethylene for 24 h. After ethylene treatment, treated and untreated fruit were stored at 20 or 30 °C for 24 h. Fruit peel tissues were then sampled after 0 and 1 day of storage, and peel color and chlorophyll fluorescence were evaluated. Quantitative proteomic analysis was conducted on the fruit peels after 1 day of storage. In total, 413 common proteins were identified and quantified from two biological replicates. Among these proteins, 91 changed significantly in response to ethylene and high-temperature treatments. Cluster analysis on these 91 proteins identified 7 groups of changed proteins. Ethylene treatment and storage at 20 °C induced 40 proteins that are correlated with pathogen resistance, cell wall metabolism, ethylene biosynthesis, allergens and ribosomal proteins, and it repressed 36 proteins that are associated with fatty acid and lipid metabolism, redox–oxidative responses, and protein biosynthesis and modification. Ethylene treatment and storage at 30 °C induced 32 proteins, which were mainly similar to those in group 1 but also included 8 proteins in group 3 (identified as chitinase, cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase 1, cysteine synthase, villin-2, leucine-transfer RNA ligase, CP47

  20. Empiric Antibiotic Treatment of Erythema Migrans-Like Skin Lesions As a Function of Geography: A Clinical and Cost Effectiveness Modeling Study

    PubMed Central

    Brinkerhoff, R. Jory; Wormser, Gary P.; Clemen, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The skin lesion of early Lyme disease, erythema migrans (EM), is so characteristic that routine practice is to treat all such patients with antibiotics. Because other skin lesions may resemble EM, it is not known whether presumptive treatment of EM is appropriate in regions where Lyme disease is rare. We constructed a decision model to compare the cost and clinical effectiveness of three strategies for the management of EM: Treat All, Observe, and Serology as a function of the probability that an EM-like lesion is Lyme disease. Treat All was found to be the preferred strategy in regions that are endemic for Lyme disease. Where Lyme disease is rare, Observe is the preferred strategy, as presumptive treatment would be expected to produce excessive harm and increased costs. Where Lyme disease is rare, clinicians and public health officials should consider observing patients with EM-like lesions who lack travel to Lyme disease-endemic areas. PMID:24107201

  1. Empiric antibiotic treatment of erythema migrans-like skin lesions as a function of geography: a clinical and cost effectiveness modeling study.

    PubMed

    Lantos, Paul M; Brinkerhoff, R Jory; Wormser, Gary P; Clemen, Robert

    2013-12-01

    The skin lesion of early Lyme disease, erythema migrans (EM), is so characteristic that routine practice is to treat all such patients with antibiotics. Because other skin lesions may resemble EM, it is not known whether presumptive treatment of EM is appropriate in regions where Lyme disease is rare. We constructed a decision model to compare the cost and clinical effectiveness of three strategies for the management of EM: Treat All, Observe, and Serology as a function of the probability that an EM-like lesion is Lyme disease. Treat All was found to be the preferred strategy in regions that are endemic for Lyme disease. Where Lyme disease is rare, Observe is the preferred strategy, as presumptive treatment would be expected to produce excessive harm and increased costs. Where Lyme disease is rare, clinicians and public health officials should consider observing patients with EM-like lesions who lack travel to Lyme disease-endemic areas.

  2. Modeling Manganese Silicate Inclusion Composition Changes during Ladle Treatment Using FactSage Macros

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piva, Stephano P. T.; Kumar, Deepoo; Pistorius, P. Chris

    2017-02-01

    This work investigated the use of FactSage macros to simulate steel-slag and steel-inclusion reaction kinetics in silicon-manganese killed steels, and predict oxide inclusion composition changes during ladle treatment. These changes were assessed experimentally using an induction furnace to simulate deoxidation and slag addition. The average steel mass transfer coefficient for the experimental setup was calculated from the analyzed aluminum pick-up by steel. Average oxide inclusion composition was measured using scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Confocal laser scanning microscopy was used to assess the physical state (solid or liquid) of oxide inclusions in selected samples. The changes in the chemical compositions of the oxide inclusions and the steel agreed with the FactSage macro simulations.

  3. The empirical war on drugs.

    PubMed

    Vitellone, Nicole

    2013-05-01

    In a special issue of the journal Addictions (1995) academics, researchers and health care professionals debated the status of the empirical in socially orientated drugs research. A number of researchers noted that our knowledge and understanding of drugs and drug users has changed significantly since the 1990s. Post AIDS this shift is identified as a consequence of the development of qualitative research methods. The qualitative turn in drugs research has involved a shift away form traditional epidemiological approaches and the pursuit of more socially focused methods. Whilst qualitative research has yielded important empirical data on risk behavior the pursuit of these methods has not been without controversy. In addressing the debate on methods in the drugs field this article investigates the effects of social science methods for research on injecting drug use. In so doing I examine what counts and what gets left out of research on injecting beaviour. Drawing on Actor Network Theory (ANT) I suggest Bruno Latour's methodological approach offers critical insights for addressing the empirical objects of injecting drug use.

  4. Growth hormone (GH) treatment reverses early atherosclerotic changes in GH-deficient adults.

    PubMed

    Pfeifer, M; Verhovec, R; Zizek, B; Prezelj, J; Poredos, P; Clayton, R N

    1999-02-01

    Hypopituitary patients have increased mortality from vascular disease, and in these patients, early markers of atherosclerosis [increased carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT) and reduced distensibility] are more prevalent. As GH replacement can reverse some risk factors of atherosclerosis, the present study examined the effect of GH treatment on morphological and functional changes in the carotid and brachial arteries of GH-deficient (GHD) adults. Eleven GHD hypopituitary men (24-49 yr old) were treated with recombinant human GH (0.018 U/kg BW x day) for 18 months. IMT of the common carotid artery (CCA) and the carotid bifurcation (CB), and flow-mediated endothelium-dependent dilation (EDD) of the brachial artery were measured by B mode ultrasound before and at 3, 6, 12, and 18 months of treatment, and values were compared with those in 12 age-matched control men. Serum concentrations of lipids, lipoprotein(a), insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), and IGF-binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) were also measured. In GHD men before treatment the IMTs of the CCA [mean(SD), 0.67(0.05) mm] and CB [0.75(0.04) mm] were significantly greater (P < 0.001) than those in control men [0.52(0.07) and 0.65(0.07) mm, respectively]. GH treatment normalized the IMT of the CCA by 6 months [0.53(0.04) mm] and that of the CB by 3 months [0.68(0.05) mm]. The IMT of the carotid artery (CCA and CB) was negatively correlated with serum IGF-I (r = -0.53; P < 0.0001). There was a significant improvement in flow-mediated EDD of the brachial artery at 3 months, which was sustained at 6 and 18 months of GH treatment (P < 0.05). GH treatment increased high density lipoprotein cholesterol at 3 and 6 months, but did not reduce total or low density lipoprotein cholesterol and was without effect on lipoprotein(a). There was no correlation between plasma lipids and changes in IMT or EDD of the arteries examined. In conclusion, GH treatment of hypopituitary GHD men reverses early morphological and

  5. Changes in microbial diversity of brined green asparagus upon treatment with high hydrostatic pressure.

    PubMed

    Toledo Del Árbol, Julia; Pérez Pulido, Rubén; La Storia, Antonietta; Grande Burgos, Maria José; Lucas, Rosario; Ercolini, Danilo; Gálvez, Antonio

    2016-01-04

    The application of high hydrostatic pressure (HHP, 600MPa, 8 min) on brined green asparagus and the changes in bacterial diversity after treatments and during storage at 4 °C (30 days) or 22 °C (10 days) were studied. HHP treatments reduced viable cell counts by 3.6 log cycles. The residual surviving population did not increase during storage at 4 °C. However, bacterial counts significantly increased at 22 °C by day 3, leading to rapid spoilage. The microbiota of green asparagus was composed mainly by Proteobacteria (mainly Pantoea and Pseudomonas), followed by Firmicutes (mainly Lactococcus and Enterococcus) and to a less extent Bacteroidetes and Actinobacteria. During chill storage of untreated asparagus, the relative abundance of Proteobacteria as well as Enterococcus and Lactococcus decreased while Lactobacillus increased. During storage of untreated asparagus at 22 °C, the abundance of Bacteroidetes decreased while Proteobacteria increased during late storage. The HHP treatment determined a reduction of the Proteobacteria both early after treatment and during chill storage. In the HHP treated samples stored at 22 °C, the relative abundance of Pseudomonas rapidly decreased at day 1, with an increase of Bacteroidetes. This was followed by a marked increase in Enterobacteriaceae (Escherichia) simultaneously with increase in viable counts and spoilage. Results from the study indicate that the effect of HHP treatments on the viability ofmicrobial populations in foods also has an impact on the dynamics of microbial populations during the storage of the treated foods.

  6. Final Technical Report for Collaborative Research: Regional climate-change projections through next-generation empirical and dynamical models, DE-FG02-07ER64429

    SciTech Connect

    Smyth, Padhraic

    2013-07-22

    This is the final report for a DOE-funded research project describing the outcome of research on non-homogeneous hidden Markov models (NHMMs) and coupled ocean-atmosphere (O-A) intermediate-complexity models (ICMs) to identify the potentially predictable modes of climate variability, and to investigate their impacts on the regional-scale. The main results consist of extensive development of the hidden Markov models for rainfall simulation and downscaling specifically within the non-stationary climate change context together with the development of parallelized software; application of NHMMs to downscaling of rainfall projections over India; identification and analysis of decadal climate signals in data and models; and, studies of climate variability in terms of the dynamics of atmospheric flow regimes.

  7. Changes in water quality in the Owabi water treatment plant in Ghana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akoto, Osei; Gyamfi, Opoku; Darko, Godfred; Barnes, Victor Rex

    2014-09-01

    The study was conducted on the status of the quality of water from the Owabi water treatment plant that supplies drinking water to Kumasi, a major city in Ghana, to ascertain the change in quality of water from source to point-of-use. Physico-chemical, bacteriological water quality parameters and trace metal concentration of water samples from five different treatment points from the Owabi water treatment plant were investigated. The raw water was moderately hard with high turbidity and colour that exceeds the WHO guideline limits. Nutrient concentrations were of the following order: NH3 < NO2 - < NO3 - < PO4 3- < SO4 2- and were all below WHO permissible level for drinking water in all the samples at different stages of treatment. Trace metal concentrations of the reservoir were all below WHO limit except chromium (0.06 mg/L) and copper (0.24 mg/L). The bacteriological study showed that the raw water had total coliform (1,766 cfu/100 mL) and faecal coliform (257 cfu/100 mL) that exceeded the WHO standard limits, rendering it unsafe for domestic purposes without treatment. Colour showed strong positive correlation with turbidity (r = 0.730), TSS (r ≥ 0.922) and alkalinity (0.564) significant at p < 0.01. The quality of the treated water indicates that colour, turbidity, Cr and Cu levels reduced and fall within the WHO permissible limit for drinking water. Treatment process at the water treatment plant is adjudged to be good.

  8. Effective treatment with rituximab for the maintenance of remission in frequently relapsing minimal change disease

    PubMed Central

    Shendi, Ali M.; Salama, Alan D.; Khosravi, Maryam; Connolly, John O.; Trompeter, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aim Treatment of frequently relapsing or steroid‐dependent minimal change disease (MCD) in children and adults remains challenging. Glucocorticoids and/or other immunosuppressive agents are the mainstay of treatment, but patients often experience toxicity from prolonged exposure and may either become treatment dependent and/or resistant. Increasing evidence suggests that rituximab (RTX) can be a useful alternative to standard immunosuppression and allow withdrawal of maintenance immunosuppressants; however, data on optimal treatment regimens, long‐term efficacy and safety are still limited. Methods We undertook a prospective study of RTX to allow immunosuppression minimization in 15 young adults with frequently relapsing or steroid‐dependent, biopsy‐proven MCD. All patients were in remission at the start of treatment and on a calcineurin inhibitor. Two doses of RTX (1 gr) were given 6 months apart. A subset of patients also received an additional dose 12 months later, in order to examine the benefit of re‐treatment. Biochemical and clinical parameters were monitored over an extended follow‐up period of up to 43 months. Results Median steroid‐free survival after RTX was 25 months (range 4–34). Mean relapse frequency decreased from 2.60 ± 0.28 to 0.4 ± 0.19 (P < 0.001) after RTX. Seven relapses occurred, five of which (71%) when CD19 counts were greater than 100 µ. Immunoglobulin levels remained unchanged, and no major side effects were observed throughout the follow‐up period. Conclusions Rituximab therapy is effective at maintaining prolonged steroid‐free remission and reducing relapse frequency in this group of patients. Our study lends further support for the role of RTX in the treatment of patients with frequently relapsing or steroid‐dependent MCD. PMID:26860320

  9. Personality and symptom change in treatment-refractory inpatients: evaluation of the phase model of change using Rorschach,TAT, and DSM-IV Axis V.

    PubMed

    Fowler, J Christopher; Ackerman, Steven J; Speanburg, Stefanie; Bailey, Adrian; Blagys, Matthew; Conklin, Adam C

    2004-12-01

    In this study, we examined global treatment outcomes during 16 months of intensive, psychodynamic treatment for 77 inpatients suffering from treatment-refractory disorders. Hypotheses based on the phase model of treatment change (Howard, Lueger, Maling, & Martinovich, 1993; Howard, Moras, Brill, Martinovich, & Lutz, 1996) were supported in the study results. Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed.; American Psychiatric Association, 1994) Axis V scales assessing behavioral functioning demonstrated large and medium effect size change, whereas stable, enduring personality functioning assessed by psychoanalytic Rorschach scales and the Social Cognition and Object Relations Scale (Westen, 1995) for the Thematic Apperception Test (Murray, 1943) demonstrated small and medium effect size change. We also report assessment of reliable change index and clinical significance. The ecological validity of Rorschach measures is supported by significant validity coefficients (in the hypothesized directions) between implicit measures of personality functioning and behavioral ratings.

  10. Structural changes in the hippocampus in major depressive disorder: contributions of disease and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Malykhin, Nikolai V.; Carter, Rawle; Seres, Peter; Coupland, Nicholas J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Previous magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies of patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) have consistently shown bilateral and unilateral reductions in hippocampal volume relative to healthy controls. Recent structural MRI studies have addressed the question of whether changes in the volume of hippocampal subregions may be associated with MDD. Methods We used a comprehensive and reliable 3-dimensional tracing protocol that enables delineation of hippocampal subregions (head, body, tail) to study changes in the hippocampus of patients with MDD. We recruited 39 MDD patients (16 medicated, 23 unmedicated) and 34 healthy age- and sex-matched controls. We acquired images using a magnetization-prepared rapid acquisition gradient echo sequence on a 1.5-T scanner with a spatial resolution of 1.5 mm × 0.5 mm × 0.5 mm. We performed volumetric analyses, blinded to diagnosis, using the interactive software package Display. All volumes were adjusted for intracranial volume. Results We found a significant reduction in the volume of the hippocampal tail bilaterally, right hippocampal head and right total hippocampus in MDD patients. Medicated MDD patients showed increased hippocampal body volume compared with both healthy controls and unmedicated patients. Limitations This study was cross-sectional. Further prospective studies are needed to determine the direct effect of antidepressant treatment. Conclusion Our results suggest that decreased hippocampal tail and hippocampal head volumes could be trait changes, whereas hippocampal body changes may be dependent on treatment. We showed that long-term antidepressant treatment may affect hippocampal volume in patients with MDD. PMID:20731966

  11. Changing paradigms in breast cancer management: introducing molecular genetics into the treatment algorithm.

    PubMed

    Rayhanabad, Jessica A; Difronzo, L Andrew; Haigh, Phillip I; Romero, Lina

    2008-10-01

    Advances in molecular genetics aimed at individualizing breast cancer treatment have been validated. We examined the use of gene assays predictive of distant recurrence in breast cancer and their impact on adjuvant treatment. A retrospective chart review of 58 T1/T2, node-negative, estrogen-receptor positive breast cancer patients that underwent Oncotype DX gene assay testing between January and December 2006 was performed. We compared treatment received after gene assay evaluation to treatment based on National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines. Patients were grouped using these recommendations: Low-risk group (T1a/T1b), no chemotherapy; High-risk group (T1c/T2), chemotherapy. Oncotype DX recommendations are as follows: Low recurrence risk, no chemotherapy; high recurrence risk, chemotherapy. A change in management was defined as chemotherapy for T1a/T1b disease and no chemotherapy for T1c/T2 disease. Two T1a/T1b patients had high risk of recurrence per gene assay scores and were treated with chemotherapy (P < 0.05). Eighteen T1c/T2 patients had low recurrence risk scores; 13 (72%) were spared chemotherapy. The recurrence score increased the number of patients classified as low risk of recurrence by 12 per cent and downstaged 63 per cent of high-risk patients (P < 0.003). Gene assay results changed management in 15 of 58 (26%) patients (P < 0.05). The use of gene assays allowed us to better tailor treatment in a significant number of our patients.

  12. Morphological changes of the dermatophyte Trichophyton rubrum after photodynamic treatment: a scanning electron microscopy study.

    PubMed

    Smijs, Threes G M; Mulder, Aat A; Pavel, Stan; Onderwater, Jos J M; Koerten, Henk K; Bouwstra, Joke A

    2008-06-01

    Treatment strategies for superficial mycosis caused by the dermatophyte Trichophyton rubrum consist of the use of topical or oral antifungal preparations. We have recently discovered that T. rubrum is susceptible to photodynamic treatment (PDT), with 5,10,15-tris(4-methylpyridinium)-20-phenyl-[21H,23H]-porphine trichloride (Sylsens B) as a photosensitizer. The susceptibility appeared to depend on the fungal growth stage, with PDT efficacy higher with microconidia when compared to mycelia. The aim of this study was to investigate, with the use of scanning electron microscopy, the morphological changes caused by a lethal PDT dose to T. rubrum when grown on isolated human stratum corneum. Corresponding dark treatment and light treatment without photosensitizer were used as controls. A sub-lethal PDT dose was also included in this investigation The morphologic changes were followed at various time points after the treatment of different fungal growth stages. Normal fungal growth was characterized by a fiber-like appearance of the surface of the hyphae and microconidia with the exception of the hyphal tips in full mycelia and the microconidia shortly after attachment to the stratum corneum. Here, densely packed globular structures were observed. The light dose (108 J/cm2) in the absence of Sylsens B, or the application of the photosensitizer in the absence of light, caused reversible fungal wall deformations and bulge formation. However, after a lethal PDT, a sequence of severe disruptions and deformations of both microconidia and the mycelium were observed leading to extrusion of cell material and emptied fungal elements. In case of a non-lethal PDT, fungal re-growth started on the remnants of the treated mycelium.

  13. Global control of hepatitis B virus: does treatment-induced antigenic change affect immunization?

    PubMed

    Clements, C John; Coghlan, Ben; Creati, Mick; Locarnini, Stephen; Tedder, Richard S; Torresi, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    Since its widespread introduction, the hepatitis B vaccine has become an essential part of infant immunization programmes globally. The vaccine has been particularly important for countries where the incidence of hepatitis B virus-related hepatocellular carcinoma is high. Effective treatment options for individuals with chronic hepatitis B infection were limited until 1998 when lamivudine, the first nucleoside analogue drug, was introduced. As a single treatment agent, however, lamivudine has a significant drawback: it induces lamivudine-resistant hepatitis B virus strains that may pose a risk to the global hepatitis B immunization programme. Mutations associated with drug treatment can cause changes to the surface antigen protein, the precise part of the virus that the hepatitis B vaccine mimics. However, the emergence of antiviral drug-associated potential vaccine escape mutants (ADAP-VEMs) in treated patients does not necessarily pose a significant, imminent threat to the global hepatitis B immunization programme. Nonetheless, there is already evidence that current treatment regimens have resulted in the selection of stable ADAP-VEMs. Treatment is currently intended to prevent the long-term complications of hepatitis B virus infection, with little consideration given to potential adverse public health impacts. To address individual and public health concerns, trials are urgently needed to find the optimal combination of existing drugs that are effective but do not induce the emergence of ADAP-VEMs. This paper examines the mechanism of antiviral drug-selected changes in the portion of the viral genome that also affects the surface antigen, and explores their potential impact on current hepatitis B immunization programmes.

  14. Resilient appliance-therapy treatment outcome in patients with TMD pain correlated to MRI-determined changes in condyle position.

    PubMed

    Limchaichana, Napat; Nilsson, Håkan; Petersson, Arne; Ekberg, EwaCarin

    2009-07-01

    The aim of this research was to study if changes in condyle position in temporomandibular disorders (TMD) patients could be a factor that is affected by resilient appliance therapy and if it influences the treatment outcome. The study investigated 48 patients randomly assigned to a treatment group (T group = 21 patients, using resilient appliance) or a control group (C group = 27 patients, using nonoccluding appliance). Changes in the condyle-fossa relationship (with and without the appliance) were determined in an MRI examination. Ten weeks after treatment, the treatment outcome was measured. The results showed that with the appliance, change in condyle position occurred in 76% of the T group and 22% of the C group (p < 0.001). Sixty-seven percent (67%) of the T group and 44% of the C group experienced a successful treatment outcome. Treatment outcome was not related to changes in condyle position in patients with TMD pain.

  15. Gender Differences in Substance Use, Consequences, Motivation to Change, and Treatment Seeking in People With Serious Mental Illness

    PubMed Central

    Drapalski, Amy; Bennett, Melanie; Bellack, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Gender differences in patterns and consequences of substance use, treatment-seeking, and motivation to change were examined in two samples of people with serious mental illness (SMI) and comorbid substance use disorders (SUDs): a community sample not currently seeking substance abuse treatment (N = 175) and a treatment-seeking sample (N = 137). In both groups, women and men demonstrated more similarities in the pattern and severity of their substance use than differences. However, treatment-seeking women showed greater readiness to change their substance use. Mental health problems and traumatic experiences may prompt people with SMI and SUD to enter substance abuse treatment, regardless of gender. PMID:21174496

  16. Trajectories of change during a randomized controlled trial of internet-delivered psychological treatment for adolescent chronic pain: how does change in pain and function relate?

    PubMed

    Palermo, Tonya M; Law, Emily F; Zhou, Chuan; Holley, Amy Lewandowski; Logan, Deirdre; Tai, Gabrielle

    2015-04-01

    Although pain and function improve at immediate posttreatment for youth receiving cognitive behavioral therapy for chronic pain, limited data are available to understand changes that youth make during psychological treatment. We sought to characterize distinct trajectory patterns of change in pain and function to understand the temporal association of these changes during internet-delivered cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT). Weekly repeated assessments of pain and function were conducted during 8 weeks of treatment among 135 adolescents, aged 11 to 17 years, with chronic pain who were randomized to the cognitive behavioral intervention arm of an ongoing trial of internet-delivered CBT (Web-based management of adolescent pain; Web-MAP2). Using random-effects growth mixture models, we characterized pain and functional disability trajectories finding distinct trajectory groups indicating patterns of both linear and quadratic effects. Trajectories of change showed that some patients' pain and functional disability were improving, others worsened or changed minimally. Paired t tests compared the within-subject relative change rate in pain and function demonstrating similar change range for pain and function during the treatment period. There was no support for improvements in either pain or function to precede changes in the other domain. Findings may be useful in informing future studies of psychosocial treatments for pediatric chronic pain to consider how to target treatment strategies to distinct patient response profiles. This may lead to the development of intervention strategies that can both more effectively target children's pain and function during treatment and lead to sustained changes after treatment.

  17. An evaluation of the treatment of risk and uncertainties in the IPCC reports on climate change.

    PubMed

    Aven, Terje; Renn, Ortwin

    2015-04-01

    Few global threats rival global climate change in scale and potential consequence. The principal international authority assessing climate risk is the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). Through repeated assessments the IPCC has devoted considerable effort and interdisciplinary competence to articulating a common characterization of climate risk and uncertainties. We have reviewed the assessment and its foundation for the Fifth Assessment Reports published in 2013 and 2014, in particular the guidance note for lead authors of the fifth IPCC assessment report on consistent treatment of uncertainties. Our analysis shows that the work carried out by the ICPP is short of providing a theoretically and conceptually convincing foundation on the treatment of risk and uncertainties. The main reasons for our assessment are: (i) the concept of risk is given a too narrow definition (a function of consequences and probability/likelihood); and (ii) the reports lack precision in delineating their concepts and methods. The goal of this article is to contribute to improving the handling of uncertainty and risk in future IPCC studies, thereby obtaining a more theoretically substantiated characterization as well as enhanced scientific quality for risk analysis in this area. Several suggestions for how to improve the risk and uncertainty treatment are provided.

  18. Climate change impacts on activated sludge wastewater treatment: a case study from Norway.

    PubMed

    Plósz, Benedek Gy; Liltved, Helge; Ratnaweera, Harsha

    2009-01-01

    We present an investigation on climate change effects on a wastewater treatment system that receive sewage collected in a combined sewer system in Oslo, Norway, during winter operation. Results obtained, by contrasting meteorological data with sewage data, show that wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) influent flow rates are significantly increased during temporary snow melting periods above a critical daily air mean temperature of approx. -1.5 degrees C degree (T(Crit)) identified in the area. In order to assess melting patterns, the number of days above and below T(Crit) was assessed, and the annual number of melting periods was additionally evaluated using meteorological data obtained in the last decade. A striking thing about the daily air temperature pattern is that, despite the progressively warmer winter temperatures in the last decade, an increasing number of days with temperatures below -1.5 degrees C could be observed. The frequency of melting periods is shown to increase in wintertime, and it is identified as an additional climate change related factor in the Oslo region. We demonstrate that these impacts can deteriorate the WWTP operation through progressively increasing the relative frequencies of very high influent flow rate and of the very low influent sewage temperature. Such climate change related effects on sewage treatment processes can be characterised as shock-conditions, i.e. significant changes in a system's boundary conditions, occurring in a relatively short period of time. In the six year period examined, biological nitrogen removal and secondary clarification processes are shown to be significantly affected by the climate factors. A striking thing about using the state-of-the-art mathematical models of wastewater treatment processes in decision support systems is their inability of describing, and thus predicting the effects of such shock-loading events, as they have not been studied so far. Adaptation and optimisation of process models

  19. Radiological changes following second-line zoledronic acid treatment in breast cancer patients with bone metastases.

    PubMed

    Amir, E; Whyne, C; Freedman, O C; Fralick, M; Kumar, R; Hardisty, M; Clemons, M

    2009-01-01

    Initiation of bisphosphonate therapy in bisphosphonate-naïve patients is known to be associated with radiological changes such as increased bone density in both osteolytic and osteoblastic metastases. It is not known, however, whether switching from a second-generation bisphosphonate to a more potent agent is associated with similar changes. This study aimed to prospectively explore radiological changes, as assessed by thoracolumbar CT scanning, in patients switching from an early generation bisphosphonate (i.e., oral clodronate or intravenous pamidronate) to intravenous zoledronic acid. Patients with progressive bone metastases despite use of an earlier generation bisphosphonate were switched to zoledronic acid as part of a study to evaluate the palliative benefit of this intervention. Quantitative computed tomography (QCT) scanning of the thoracolumbar spine was carried out at baseline, and repeated 4 months after commencing zoledronic acid. The effect of this change of therapy was explored in terms of bone density, as well as volume of osteolytic and osteoblastic disease. Fifteen patients were assessed. Switching of bisphosphonate therapy was associated with a significant increase in bone density, and an increase in osteoblastic volume. There was an insignificant trend towards reduced osteolytic volume. In conclusion, switching from early generation bisphosphonates to a more potent agent is associated with radiological changes similar to those seen when commencing a bisphosphonate in treatment-naïve patients. This is consistent with the observed palliative benefit. The use of QCT may be of benefit in the monitoring of bone metastases.

  20. Developing empirical monthly groundwater recharge equations based on modeling and remote sensing data - Modeling future groundwater recharge to predict potential climate change impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gemitzi, Alexandra; Ajami, Hoori; Richnow, Hans-Hermann

    2017-03-01

    Groundwater recharge is one of main components of the water budget that is difficult to quantify due to complexity of recharge processes and limited observations. In the present work a simple regression equation for monthly groundwater recharge estimation is developed by relating simulated recharge from a calibrated Soil and Water Assessment tool (SWAT) model to effective precipitation. Monthly groundwater recharge and actual evapotranspiration (AET) were computed by applying a calibrated (SWAT) model for a ten year period (2005-2015) in Vosvozis river basin in NE Greece. SWAT actual evapotranspiration (AET) results were compared to remotely sensed AET values from the MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), indicating the integrity of the modeling process. Water isotopes of 2H and 18O, originally presented herein, were used to infer recharge resources in the basin and provided additional evidence of the applicability of the developed formula. Results showed that the developed recharge estimation method can be effectively applied using MODIS evapotranspiration data, without having to adhere to numerical modeling which is many times constrained by the lack of available data especially in poorly gauged basins. Future trends of groundwater recharge up to 2100 using an ensemble of five downscaled climate change projections indicated that annual recharge will increase up to the middle of the present century and gradually decrease thereafter. However, the predicted magnitude is highly variable depending on the Global Climate Model (GCM) used. While winter recharge will likely increase in the future, summer recharge is expected to decrease as a result of temperature rise in the future.

  1. Dimensional changes of Nb3Sn Rutherford cables during heat treatment

    DOE PAGES

    Rochepault, E.; Ferracin, P.; Ambrosio, G.; ...

    2016-06-01

    In high field magnet applications, Nb3Sn coils undergo a heat treatment step after winding. During this stage, coils radially expand and longitudinally contract due to the Nb3Sn phase change. In order to prevent residual strain from altering superconducting performances, the tooling must provide the adequate space for these dimensional changes. The aim of this paper is to understand the behavior of cable dimensions during heat treatment and to provide estimates of the space to be accommodated in the tooling for coil expansion and contraction. In addition, this paper summarizes measurements of dimensional changes on strands, single Rutherford cables, cable stacks,more » and coils performed between 2013 and 2015. These samples and coils have been performed within a collaboration between CERN and the U.S. LHC Accelerator Research Program to develop Nb3Sn quadrupole magnets for the HiLumi LHC. The results are also compared with other high field magnet projects.« less

  2. Dimensional changes of Nb3Sn Rutherford cables during heat treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Rochepault, E.; Ferracin, P.; Ambrosio, G.; Anerella, M.; Ballarino, A.; Bonasia, A.; Bordini, B.; Cheng, D.; Dietderich, D. R.; Felice, H.; Fajardo, L. Garcia; Ghosh, A.; Holik, E. F.; Bermudez, S. Izquierdo; Perez, J. C.; Pong, I.; Schmalzle, J.; Yu, M.

    2016-06-01

    In high field magnet applications, Nb3Sn coils undergo a heat treatment step after winding. During this stage, coils radially expand and longitudinally contract due to the Nb3Sn phase change. In order to prevent residual strain from altering superconducting performances, the tooling must provide the adequate space for these dimensional changes. The aim of this paper is to understand the behavior of cable dimensions during heat treatment and to provide estimates of the space to be accommodated in the tooling for coil expansion and contraction. In addition, this paper summarizes measurements of dimensional changes on strands, single Rutherford cables, cable stacks, and coils performed between 2013 and 2015. These samples and coils have been performed within a collaboration between CERN and the U.S. LHC Accelerator Research Program to develop Nb3Sn quadrupole magnets for the HiLumi LHC. The results are also compared with other high field magnet projects.

  3. Changes of the blood lymphocyte population following /sup 131/I treatment for nodular goiter

    SciTech Connect

    Blomgren, H.; Petrini, B.; Wasserman, J.; Schnell, P.O.; Lundell, G.

    1987-02-01

    The blood lymphocyte population was examined in 34 patients who were treated with /sup 131/I for toxic or atoxic nodular goiter. The patients received one to three doses of 300-550 MBq of /sup 131/I administered at 1 week intervals. Lymphocyte counts were significantly reduced both 1 and 6 weeks after treatment. This reduction was accompanied by a changed composition of the lymphocyte population. The frequency of lymphocytes expressing membrane receptors for C'3 (EAC-rosette forming) was significantly reduced 1 and 6 weeks after /sup 131/I-administration. At 6 weeks there was a slight but statistically significant increase of the frequency of T-cells as identified by Leu 1 monoclonal antibodies. This was largely caused by an increased proportion of helper/induced T-cells as identified by Leu 3a monoclonals. /sup 131/I-treatment also reduced the capacity of lymphocytes to secrete immunoglobulins (Ig) upon PWM-stimulation. The most pronounced effect was observed for IgM. Secretion of IgG and IgA were less reduced. Mitogenic stimulations of lymphocytes with PHA and ConA were not significantly changed. We conclude that these changes observed, with the exception of mitogen reactivity, are essentially similar to those occurring after external radiation therapy for cancer. We speculate that blood lymphocytes passing through the continuously irradiated gland are damaged mainly by emitted beta-particles.

  4. Electrogastrography associated with symptomatic changes after prokinetic drug treatment for functional dyspepsia

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Hyun Chul; Lee, Sang In; Chen, Jiande DZ; Park, Hyojin

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effect of prokinetic drugs on electrogastrography (EGG) parameters according to symptomatic changes in patients with functional dyspepsia (FD). METHODS: Seventy-four patients with FD were prospectively enrolled in this study between December 2006 and December 2010. We surveyed the patients using a questionnaire on dyspeptic symptoms before and after an 8-wk course of prokinetic drug treatment. We also measured cutaneous pre-prandial and post-prandial EGG recordings including percentage of gastric waves (normogastria, bradygastria, tachygastria), dominant frequency (DF), dominant power (DP), dominant frequency instability coefficient (DFIC), dominant power instability coefficient (DPIC), and the ratio of post-prandial to fasting in DP before and after the 8-wk course of prokinetic drug treatment. RESULTS: Fifty-two patients (70%) achieved symptomatic improvement after prokinetic drug treatment. Patients who had normal gastric slow waves showed symptom improvement group after treatment. Post-prandial DF showed a downward trend in the symptom improvement group, especially in the itopride group. Post-prandial DP was increased regardless of symptom improvement, especially in the itopride group and mosapride group. Post-prandial DFIC and DPIC in the symptom improvement group were significantly increased after the treatment. The EGG power ratio was increased after treatment in the symptom improvement group (0.50 ± 0.70 vs 0.93 ± 1.77, P = 0.002), especially in the itopride and levosulpiride groups. CONCLUSION: Prokinetics could improve the symptoms of FD by regulating gastric myoelectrical activity, and EGG could be a useful tool in evaluating the effects of various prokinetics. PMID:23139612

  5. Spectroscopic characterization of changes of DOM deprotonation-protonation properties in water treatment processes.

    PubMed

    Yan, Mingquan; Dryer, Deborah; Korshin, Gregory V

    2016-04-01

    The deprotonation-protonation properties of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in drinking water produced at critical treatment points were quantified using absorbance spectra in combination with DOM fractionation data. Analysis of differential spectra of DOM present in inlet, settled and filtered waters from two large treatment plants and their fractions were obtained. The data demonstrated the presence of six Gaussian bands largely associated with carboxylic and phenolic DOM functionalities. Properties of the protonation-active groups of DOM in raw and treated waters were further examined based on data of potentiometric titrations at pH from 2.5 to 10. Interpretation of the differential log-transformed absorbance at wavelength 350 nm (DlnA350) based on the NICA-Donnan model showed that the normalized concentrations of low- and high-affinity protonation-active groups in residual DOMs increases as a result of water treatment. This was consistent with the results of DOM fractionation. This study demonstrates that changes of the composition and reactivity of DOM found in drinking water treatment sequences can be quantified based on the examination of their optical properties.

  6. Long-term pharyngeal airway changes after bionator treatment in adolescents with skeletal Class II malocclusions

    PubMed Central

    Han, Seimin; Choi, Yoon Jeong; Chung, Chooryung J.; Kim, Ji Young

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate long-term changes in the pharyngeal airway dimensions after functional appliance treatment in adolescents with skeletal Class II malocclusions. Methods Pharyngeal airway dimensions were compared between subjects with skeletal Class II malocclusions (n = 24; mean age: 11.6 ± 1.29 years) treated with a Class II bionator and age-matched control subjects with skeletal Class I occlusions (n = 24; mean age: 11.0 ± 1.21 years) using a series of lateral cephalograms obtained at the initial visit (T0), after treatment (T1), and at the completion of growth (T2). Results The length of the nasopharyngeal region was similar between adolescents with skeletal Class I and Class II malocclusions at all time points, while the lengths of the upper and lower oropharyngeal regions and the pharyngeal airway areas were significantly smaller in the skeletal Class II adolescents before treatment when compared to the control adolescents (p < 0.05). However, following treatment with a functional appliance, the skeletal Class II adolescents had increased pharyngeal airway dimensions, which became similar to those of the control subjects. Conclusions Functional appliance therapy can increase the pharyngeal airway dimensions in growing adolescents with skeletal Class II malocclusions, and this effect is maintained until the completion of growth. PMID:24511511

  7. Chemical and antimicrobial treatments change the viscoelastic properties of bacterial biofilms.

    PubMed

    Jones, Warren L; Sutton, Michael P; McKittrick, Ladean; Stewart, Philip S

    2011-02-01

    Changes in the viscoelastic material properties of bacterial biofilms resulting from chemical and antimicrobial treatments were measured by rheometry. Colony biofilms of Staphylococcus epidermidis or a mucoid Pseudomonas aeruginosa were subjected to a classical creep test performed using a parallel plate rheometer. Data were fit to the 4-parameter Burger model to quantify the material properties. Biofilms were exposed to the chloride salts of several common mono-, di-, and tri- valent cations, and to urea, industrial biocides, and antibiotics. Many of these treatments resulted in statistically significant alterations in the material properties of the biofilm. Multivalent cations stiffened the P. aeruginosa biofilm, while ciprofloxacin and glutaraldehyde weakened it. Urea, rifampin, and a quaternary ammonium biocide weakened the S. epidermidis biofilm. In general, there was no correspondence between the responses of the two different types of biofilms to a particular treatment. These results underscore the distinction between the killing power of an antimicrobial agent and its ability to alter biofilm mechanical properties and thereby influence biofilm removal. Understanding biofilm rheology and how it is affected by chemical treatment could lead to improvements in biofilm control.

  8. Alliance-focused therapy for anorexia nervosa: integrative relational and behavioral change treatments in a single-case experimental design.

    PubMed

    Satir, Dana A; Goodman, David M; Shingleton, Rebecca M; Porcerelli, John H; Gorman, Bernard S; Pratt, Elizabeth M; Barlow, David H; Thompson-Brenner, Heather

    2011-12-01

    Evidence supporting outpatient treatments for anorexia nervosa (AN) is severely lacking, due to low retention and poor outcome. One explanation for drop-out is weak treatment alliances. A single-case experimental analysis accompanied by in-depth qualitative description is presented for Ms. O, who received a novel treatment for AN called Alliance Focused Treatment (AFT) that attends to ruptures in the alliance, interpersonal difficulties and emotional avoidance. At intake Ms. O met diagnostic criteria for AN, Major Depressive Disorder, and Social Phobia. She was characterized as having symptoms of Obsessive Compulsive, Avoidant, and Depressive personality disorders. Treatment began with a Baseline followed by the experimental (AFT) and comparison treatments (Behavioral Change Treatment [BCT]) using a replicated experimental single-case phase change design. Graphs of slopes of kilocalorie and alliance change facilitated observation of treatment effects. Ms. O participated in 16 sessions of AFT and 8 sessions of BCT with specific benefits. Ratings of the treatment alliance were consistently high and she evidenced significant changes in weight, quality of life, and personality pathology. Associations between rupture/repair episodes and kilocalorie increases were observed. The utility of the treatment relationship in facilitating emotional expression was evident. At posttreatment, Ms. O endorsed cognitive AN symptoms, although these were not explicitly treated. This study provides preliminary support for the feasibility and effect of AFT and BCT, and highlights the importance of the alliance in treating adults with AN. Further research on emotion regulation in AN and its effect on the treatment relationship are needed.

  9. Aggregation and conformational change of mushroom (Agaricus bisporus) polyphenoloxidase subjected to thermal treatment.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lei; Liu, Wei; Zou, Liqiang; Xiong, Zhiqiang; Hu, Xiuting; Chen, Jun

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated changes in the activity, conformation and microstructure of mushroom polyphenoloxidase (PPO) subjected to thermal treatment. The inactivation of PPO can be achieved by high temperature-short time or mild temperature-long time treatment. Circular dichroism and fluorescence spectra suggested that heating process induced the rearrangement of secondary structure and the disruption of tertiary structure. Red shifts of fluorescence spectra showed positive correlations with the inactivation rate of PPO. There were significant differences in the conformation and molecular microstructure among PPO samples with the same relative activity, which were obtained by treating PPO at 45, 55 and 65°C for different times. In summary, PPO molecules were deformed at mild temperature, while higher temperature induced the formation of large aggregates. PPO with the same relative activity might exist in different forms.

  10. Changes in rat epiphyseal cartilage after treatment with dexamethasone and glycosaminoglycan-peptide complex.

    PubMed

    Annefeld, M

    1992-06-01

    In 3-month-old rats, systemic administration of glucocorticosteroids induced regressive changes in the epiphyseal plate cartilage. Dexamethasone treatment resulted in inhibition of both chondrocyte proliferation and cartilage matrix production. The inhibition of chondrocyte proliferation was determined histologically from the thickness of the epiphyseal plate, the number of cell columns and the ratio of proliferating to hypertrophied chondrocytes. The decrease in cartilage matrix production was measured autoradiographically by incorporation of radioactive 35S-sulphate. Concomitant treatment with glycosaminoglycan-peptide complex (GP-C = RUMALON) overcame the negative effect of dexamethasone. The values in the dexamethasone + GP-C group approached those of the control group and differed significantly from the group given dexamethasone alone.

  11. What is changing in radiotherapy for the treatment of locally advanced nonsmall cell lung cancer patients? A review.

    PubMed

    Giaj-Levra, Niccoló; Ricchetti, Francesco; Alongi, Filippo

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy treatment continues to have a relevant impact in the treatment of nonsmall cell cancer (NSCLC). Use of concurrent chemotherapy and radiotherapy is considered the gold standard in the treatment of locally advanced NSCLC but clinical outcomes are not satisfactory. Introduction of new radiotherapy technology and chemotherapy regimens are under investigation in this setting with the goal to improve unsatisfactory results. We report how radiotherapy is changing in the treatment of locally advanced NSCLC.

  12. Hippocampal Neurophysiologic Changes after Mild Traumatic Brain Injury and Potential Neuromodulation Treatment Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Girgis, Fady; Pace, Jonathan; Sweet, Jennifer; Miller, Jonathan P.

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the leading cause of death and disability in individuals below age 45, and five million Americans live with chronic disability as a result. Mild TBI (mTBI), defined as TBI in the absence of major imaging or histopathological defects, is responsible for a majority of cases. Despite the lack of overt morphological defects, victims of mTBI frequently suffer lasting cognitive deficits, memory difficulties, and behavioral disturbances. There is increasing evidence that cognitive and memory dysfunction is related to subtle physiological changes that occur in the hippocampus, and these impact both the phenotype of deficits observed and subsequent recovery. Therapeutic modulation of physiological activity by means of medications commonly used for other indications or brain stimulation may represent novel treatment approaches. This review summarizes the present body of knowledge regarding neurophysiologic changes that occur in the hippocampus after mTBI, as well as potential targets for therapeutic modulation of neurologic activity. PMID:26903824

  13. Structural Changes in Clostridium botulinum Type E After Treatment with Boticin S51

    PubMed Central

    Ellison, Jane S.; Mattern, Carl F. T.; Daniel, Wendell A.

    1971-01-01

    Treatment with boticin S51, a bacteriocin produced by a nontoxigenic organism closely related to Clostridium botulinum type E, caused extensive changes in the structure of a sensitive C. botulinum type E strain. Nucleoid deoxyribonucleic acid, normally seen as fine filaments scattered throughout the cell, was aggregated into dense deoxyribonucleic acid masses. Mesosomes appeared to undergo structural rearrangement from lamellar to vesicular configuration. Eventual dissolution of cell contents left bacterial ghosts composed of seemingly intact cell walls with remnants of the cytoplasmic membrane and internal structures. The morphological changes observed in boticin-treated strain 070 cells were very similar to those produced by a bacteriocin-like substance from phage type 71 Staphylococcus aureus on sensitive β-hemolytic streptococci. A similarity in the mode of action of the two bactericidal agents is suggested. Images PMID:4107815

  14. Chronic ethanol treatment changes the number of beta-receptors in rat brain microvessels

    SciTech Connect

    Lucchi, L.; Cazzaniga, A.; Picotti, G.B.; Covelli, V.; Magnoni, M.S.; Borriero, L.; Spano, P.F.; Trabucchi, M.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of chronic ethanol consumption on the binding (125I)-iodohydroxybenzylpindolol to beta-adrenergic receptors in rat brain microvessels has been studied. The results show that chronic ethanol treatment increases the number of beta-receptors present in brain microvessels without changing the binding affinity of the binding site for the beta-adrenoceptor ligand. This effect is apparently not associated with changes in peripheral adrenergic tone, since no differences in platelet epinephrine or norepinephrine concentrations were found between ethanol-treated and control animals. An increase in beta-receptor density in brain microvessels might contribute to the alterations of cerebral blood flow and oxygen consumption reported during chronic ethanol intoxication.

  15. Chronic treatment with varenicline changes expression of four nAChR binding sites in mice

    PubMed Central

    Marks, Michael J.; O’Neill, Heidi C.; Wynalda-Camozzi, Kelly M.; Ortiz, Nick C.; Simmons, Emily E.; Short, Caitlin A.; Butt, Christopher M.; McIntosh, J. Michael; Grady, Sharon R.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Chronic treatment with nicotine is known to increase the α4β2-nAChR sites in brain, to decrease α6β2-nAChR sites and to have minimal effect on α3β4- and α7-nAChR populations. Varenicline is now used as a smoking cessation treatment, with and without continued smoking or nicotine replacement therapy. Varenicline, like nicotine, upregulates the α4β2-nAChR sites; however, it is not known whether varenicline treatment changes expression of the other nAChR subtypes. Methods Using a mouse model, chronic treatments (10 days) with varenicline (0.12mg/kg/hr) and/or nicotine (1 mg/kg/hr), alone or in combination, were compared for plasma and brain levels of drugs, tolerance to subsequent acute nicotine and expression of four subtypes of nAChR using autoradiography. Results The upregulation of α4β2-nAChR sites elicited by chronic varenicline was very similar to that elicited by chronic nicotine. Treatment with both drugs somewhat increased up-regulation, indicating that these doses were not quite at maximum effect. Similar down-regulation was seen for α6β2-nAChR sites. Varenicline significantly increased both α3β4- and α7-nAChR sites while nicotine had less effect on these sites. The drug combination was similar to varenicline alone for α3β4-nAChR sites, while for α7 sites the drug combination was less effective than varenicline alone. Varenicline had small but significant effects on tolerance to acute nicotine. Conclusions Effects of varenicline in vivo may not be limited to the α4β2*-nAChR subtype. In addition, smoking cessation treatment with varenicline may not allow receptor numbers to be restored to baseline and may, in addition, change expression of other receptor subtypes. PMID:26192545

  16. Medium-long term soil resilience against different disturbances: wildfires, silvicultural treatments and climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedo de Santiago, Javier; Borja, Manuel Esteban Lucas; de las Heras, Jorge

    2016-04-01

    Soils of semiarid Mediterranean forest ecosystems are very fragile and sensitive to changes due to different anthropogenic and natural disturbances. The increasing vulnerability of semiarid lands within this world framework has generated growing awareness in the field of research, with highly intensified study into soils properties. One of the main problems of Mediterranean forests is wildfire disturbance. Fire should be considered more an ecological factor but, in contrast to the role of fire, it is now a closely related factor to human action. On the other hand, to improve the recovery of forest communities after fire, silvicultural treatments are needed and, for that matter, another disturbance is added to the ecosystem. By last, climate change is also affecting the fire regime increasing fire frequency and burned area, enhancing the destructiveness to Mediterranean ecosystems. After all of these three disturbances, changes in vegetation dynamics and soil properties are expected to occur due to the plant-soil feedback. Soil plays an essential role in the forest ecosystem's fertility and stability and specifically soil microorganisms, which accomplish reactions to release soil nutrients for vegetation development, for that is essential to enlarge knowledge about soil properties resilience in semiarid forest ecosystems. Physico-chemical and microbiological soil properties, and enzyme activities have been studied in two Aleppo pine forest stands that have suffered three disturbances: 1) a wildfire event, 2) silvicultural treatments (thinning) and 3) an artificial drought (simulating climate change) and results showed that soil recovered after 15 years. Final results showed that soils have been recovered from the three disturbances at the medium-long term.

  17. Changes in behavior as side effects in methylphenidate treatment: review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Konrad-Bindl, Doris Susanne; Gresser, Ursula; Richartz, Barbara Maria

    2016-01-01

    Background Our review of the scientific literature focused on an analysis of studies describing instances of methylphenidate treatment leading (or not) to behavioral changes in the pediatric, adolescent, and adult populations. Materials and methods We conducted a literature search in PubMed, Medline, and Google using the keywords “methylphenidate”, “behavioral changes”, “adverse effects”, and “side effects”. A total of 44 studies were identified as reporting on the effects and adverse effects of methylphenidate administration, and were included in the analysis. Results Five studies specifically set out to study, record, and discuss changes in behavior. Eight studies did not set out to study behavioral effects, but record and discuss them. A total of 28 studies recorded behavioral effects, but failed to discuss these further. Three studies did not include behavioral effects. Conclusion This review records what data have been published in respect of changes in behavior in association with the use of methylphenidate. While there is some evidence to suggest that methylphenidate causes changes in behavior, the majority of the studies reviewed paid little or no attention to this issue. Based on the available data, it is impossible to determine the point at which such behavioral effects occur. The frequency of occurrence of behavioral effects is also impossible to determine with certainty. Based on the available data, it is not possible to rule out whether behavioral effects may persist or not persist once treatment is discontinued. In conclusion, despite countless publications and extensive administration, especially to children, we have insufficient data to judge the long-term effects and risks of methylphenidate taking. PMID:27789952

  18. Motivation for Treatment and Motivation for Change in Substance-Dependent Patients with Co-Occurring Psychiatric Disorders.

    PubMed

    de Weert-van Oene, Gerdien H; Gongora, Vanesa; von Sternberg, Kirk; de Jong, Cor A J

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this study were to examine the relationship between motivation for treatment and for change, and to explore their role in the prediction of treatment completion. The sample was composed of 560 predominantly polydrug-using inpatients with co-occurring psychiatric disorders. Motivation for treatment was assessed with the Motivation for Treatment Scales, and motivation for change was measured with the Readiness to Change Questionnaire. Patients indicated strong motivation to change illegal drug and alcohol use. In initial factor analysis, motivation for treatment and for change did not load on the same factors, confirming that these are distinct domains. Four categories were discerned with respect to readiness for treatment and for change, with low agreement between the two. In performing survival analysis, we found that being in readiness category 4 (RT↑RC↑) was associated with a greater chance of remaining in treatment for a period of 105 days without premature attrition (Log Rank chi-sq=5.000; p=0.02). To a limited extent, intake measures of motivation can be used to predict attrition from treatment. Clinicians can use motivation assessment both for clinical purposes and in the prediction of those who need extra monitoring due to increased risk of premature attrition.

  19. Change in body image and psychological well-being during behavioral obesity treatment: Associations with weight loss and maintenance.

    PubMed

    Palmeira, António L; Branco, Teresa L; Martins, Sandra C; Minderico, Cláudia S; Silva, Marlene N; Vieira, Paulo N; Barata, José T; Serpa, Sidónio O; Sardinha, Luís B; Teixeira, Pedro J

    2010-06-01

    This study reports on outcomes from a behavioral obesity treatment program, evaluating if treatment-related changes in body image and psychological well-being are predictors of weight change during treatment and after follow-up. Participants were 142 overweight/obese women (BMI=30.2+/-3.7kg/m(2); age=38.3+/-5.8 years) participants in a behavioral treatment program consisting of a 4-month treatment period and a 12-month follow-up. Psychosocial variables improved during treatment and these changes were correlated with 4-month weight reduction. Short-term changes in body size dissatisfaction (p=.002) and mood (p=.003) predicted long-term weight loss. Additional results suggest that there might be a predictive role of short-term changes in body size dissatisfaction and self-esteem on long-term weight loss after accounting for initial weight change (p<.028). We conclude that, along with weight changes, cognitive and affect-related processes influenced during obesity treatment may be related long-term success, in some cases independently of initial weight loss.

  20. Changes in DNA properties due to treatment with the pesticides malathion and DDVP.

    PubMed

    Oliński, R; Walter, Z; Wiaderkiewicz, R; Lukásová, E; Palecek, E

    1980-01-01

    Properties of calf thymus DNA were investigated after treatment with the pesticides malathion (0,0-dimethyl-S-(1,2-bis ethoxycarbonyl ethyl)dithiophosphate) and DDVP (0,0-dimethyl-0-(2,2 dichlorovinyl)phosphate) in vitro by means of derivative (differential) pulse polarography (DPP), thermal denaturation curves recorded spectrophotometrically (Tm), viscometric measurements, and chromatography on the hydroxyapatite column. Changes in the properties of DNA were observed by means of DPP after only a few hours incubation with the pesticides, whereas the other methods did not detect any changes even after 48 h. The results obtained by DPP indicate that single-stranded segments and thermolabile regions are formed in DNA due to the action of the pesticides. This behaviour could perhaps be a consequence of guanine alkylation followed by depurination and chain scission at elevated temperatures. Malathion and DDVP differ in the kinetics of reaction with double-helical DNA. DDVP is more reactive and its action is also manifested after 72 h in changes in viscosity, Tm, and chromatographic behaviour on the hydroxyapatite column. The changes induced by malathion were, under identical conditions, not detectable by these methods.

  1. Responses of ecosystem carbon cycling to climate change treatments along an elevation gradient

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wu, Zhuoting; Koch, George W.; Dijkstra, Paul; Bowker, Matthew A.; Hungate, Bruce A.

    2011-01-01

    Global temperature increases and precipitation changes are both expected to alter ecosystem carbon (C) cycling. We tested responses of ecosystem C cycling to simulated climate change using field manipulations of temperature and precipitation across a range of grass-dominated ecosystems along an elevation gradient in northern Arizona. In 2002, we transplanted intact plant–soil mesocosms to simulate warming and used passive interceptors and collectors to manipulate precipitation. We measured daytime ecosystem respiration (ER) and net ecosystem C exchange throughout the growing season in 2008 and 2009. Warming generally stimulated ER and photosynthesis, but had variable effects on daytime net C exchange. Increased precipitation stimulated ecosystem C cycling only in the driest ecosystem at the lowest elevation, whereas decreased precipitation showed no effects on ecosystem C cycling across all ecosystems. No significant interaction between temperature and precipitation treatments was observed. Structural equation modeling revealed that in the wetter-than-average year of 2008, changes in ecosystem C cycling were more strongly affected by warming-induced reduction in soil moisture than by altered precipitation. In contrast, during the drier year of 2009, warming induced increase in soil temperature rather than changes in soil moisture determined ecosystem C cycling. Our findings suggest that warming exerted the strongest influence on ecosystem C cycling in both years, by modulating soil moisture in the wet year and soil temperature in the dry year.

  2. Predictors of Staff Turnover and Turnover Intentions within Addiction Treatment Settings: Change Over Time Matters.

    PubMed

    Garner, Bryan R; Hunter, Brooke D

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the extent to which changes over time in clinicians' responses to measures of work attitude (eg, job satisfaction) and psychological climate (eg, supervisor support) could predict actual turnover and turnover intentions above and beyond absolute levels of these respective measures. Longitudinal data for this study were collected from a sample of clinicians (N = 96) being trained to implement an evidence-based treatment for adolescent substance use disorders. Supporting findings from a recent staff turnover study, we found job satisfaction change was able to predict actual turnover above and beyond average levels of job satisfaction. Representing new contributions to the staff turnover literature, we also found that change over time in several other key measures (eg, job satisfaction, role manageability, role clarity) explained a significant amount of variance in turnover intentions above and beyond the absolute level of each respective measure. A key implication of the current study is that organizations seeking to improve their ability to assess risk for staff turnover may want to consider assessing staff at multiple points in time in order to identify systematic changes in key employee attitudes like turnover intentions and job satisfaction.

  3. Changing the malaria treatment protocol policy in Timor-Leste: an examination of context, process, and actors’ involvement

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In 2007 Timor-Leste, a malaria endemic country, changed its Malaria Treatment Protocol for uncomplicated falciparum malaria from sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine to artemether-lumefantrine. The change in treatment policy was based on the rise in morbidity due to malaria and perception of increasing drug resistance. Despite a lack of nationally available evidence on drug resistance, the Ministry of Health decided to change the protocol. The policy process leading to this change was examined through a qualitative study on how the country developed its revised treatment protocol for malaria. This process involved many actors and was led by the Timor-Leste Ministry of Health and the WHO country office. This paper examines the challenges and opportunities identified during this period of treatment protocol change. PMID:23672371

  4. Giant cell tumors of the spine: has denosumab changed the treatment paradigm?

    PubMed

    Goldschlager, Tony; Dea, Nicolas; Boyd, Michael; Reynolds, Jeremy; Patel, Shreyaskumar; Rhines, Laurence D; Mendel, Ehud; Pacheco, Marina; Ramos, Edwin; Mattei, Tobias A; Fisher, Charles G

    2015-05-01

    OBJECT Giant cell tumors (GCTs) of the spine are rare and complex to treat. They have a propensity for local recurrence and the potential to metastasize. Treatment is currently surgical and presents unique challenges due to the proximity of neural structures and the need for reconstruction. Denosumab has been shown in clinical trials to be an effective treatment for GCT, but has not yet been studied specifically in GCT of the spine or as a surgical adjunct. To the authors' knowledge this is the first such reported series. METHODS A multicenter, prospective series of 5 patients with GCT of the spine treated with denosumab were included. Patient demographic data, oncological history, neurological status, tumor staging, treatment details and adverse events, surgical procedure, complications, radiological and histological responses, and patient outcome were analyzed. RESULTS All patients were women, with a mean age of 38 years, and presented with pain; 2 patients had additional neurological signs and symptoms. The mean duration of symptoms was 62 weeks. No patient had a prior tumor or metastatic disease at presentation. All patients had Enneking Stage III tumors and were treated with monthly cycles of 120 mg of denosumab, with initial additional loading doses on Days 8 and 15. Patients were given daily supplements of calcium (500 mg) and vitamin D (400 IU). There were no denosumab-related adverse events. All patients had a radiological response to denosumab. One patient failed to have a histological response to denosumab, with > 90% of tumor cells found to be viable on histological investigation. CONCLUSIONS This study reports the early experience of using denosumab in the treatment of spinal GCT. The results demonstrate a clinically beneficial radiological response and an impressive histological response in most but not all patients. Further experience with denosumab and longer patient follow-up is required. Denosumab has the potential to change the treatment paradigm

  5. Empirical research and logotherapy.

    PubMed

    Schulenberg, Stefan E

    2003-08-01

    The purpose of this paper was to outline suggestions for future logotherapy applications and research. Empirical studies are available on logotherapy constructs, but additional research is sorely needed. The psychometrics of logotherapy measures need to be expanded. Carefully conducted experimental studies may aid in refining long-standing logotherapy concepts and supporting or refuting new ones.

  6. Auditory Imagery: Empirical Findings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubbard, Timothy L.

    2010-01-01

    The empirical literature on auditory imagery is reviewed. Data on (a) imagery for auditory features (pitch, timbre, loudness), (b) imagery for complex nonverbal auditory stimuli (musical contour, melody, harmony, tempo, notational audiation, environmental sounds), (c) imagery for verbal stimuli (speech, text, in dreams, interior monologue), (d)…

  7. An Empirical Kaiser Criterion.

    PubMed

    Braeken, Johan; van Assen, Marcel A L M

    2016-03-31

    In exploratory factor analysis (EFA), most popular methods for dimensionality assessment such as the screeplot, the Kaiser criterion, or-the current gold standard-parallel analysis, are based on eigenvalues of the correlation matrix. To further understanding and development of factor retention methods, results on population and sample eigenvalue distributions are introduced based on random matrix theory and Monte Carlo simulations. These results are used to develop a new factor retention method, the Empirical Kaiser Criterion. The performance of the Empirical Kaiser Criterion and parallel analysis is examined in typical research settings, with multiple scales that are desired to be relatively short, but still reliable. Theoretical and simulation results illustrate that the new Empirical Kaiser Criterion performs as well as parallel analysis in typical research settings with uncorrelated scales, but much better when scales are both correlated and short. We conclude that the Empirical Kaiser Criterion is a powerful and promising factor retention method, because it is based on distribution theory of eigenvalues, shows good performance, is easily visualized and computed, and is useful for power analysis and sample size planning for EFA. (PsycINFO Database Record

  8. Empirically Based Myths: Astrology, Biorhythms, and ATIs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ragsdale, Ronald G.

    1980-01-01

    A myth may have an empirical basis through chance occurrence; perhaps Aptitude Treatment Interactions (ATIs) are in this category. While ATIs have great utility in describing, planning, and implementing instruction, few disordinal interactions have been found. Article suggests narrowing of ATI research with replications and estimates of effect…

  9. Searching for the mechanisms of change: a protocol for a realist review of batterer treatment programmes

    PubMed Central

    Cheff, Rebecca; Finn, Debbie; Davloor, Whitney; O'Campo, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Conflicting results reported by evaluations of typical batterer intervention programmes leave many judicial officials and policymakers uncertain about the best way to respond to domestic violence, and whether to recommend and fund these programmes. Traditional evaluations and systematic reviews tend to focus predominantly on whether the programmes ‘worked’ (eg, reduced recidivism) often at the exclusion of understanding for whom they may or may not have worked, under what circumstances, and why. Methods and analysis We are undertaking a realist review of the batterer treatment programme literature with the aim of addressing this gap. Keeping with the goals of realist review, our primary aims are to identify the theory that underlies these programmes, highlight the mechanisms that trigger changes in participant behaviour and finally explain why these programmes help some individuals reduce their use of violence and under what conditions they are effective or not effective. We begin by describing the process of perpetrator treatment, and by proposing an initial theoretical model of behaviour change that will be tested by our review. We then describe the criteria for inclusion of an evaluation into the review, the search strategy we will use to identify the studies, and the plan for data extraction and analysis. Ethics and dissemination The results of this review will be written up using the RAMESES Guidelines for Realist Synthesis, and disseminated through peer-reviewed publications aimed at the practitioner community as well as presented at community forums, and at violence against women conferences. Ethics approval was not needed. PMID:27053268

  10. Histone modifications change with age, dietary restriction and rapamycin treatment in mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Huan; Qian, Hong; Ertl, Robin; Astle, Clinton M.; Wang, Gang G.; Harrison, David E.; Xu, Xiangru

    2015-01-01

    The risk of developing neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) increases dramatically with age. Understanding the underlying mechanisms of brain aging is crucial for developing preventative and/or therapeutic approaches for age-associated neurological diseases. Recently, it has been suggested that epigenetic factors, such as histone modifications, maybe be involved in brain aging and age-related neurodegenerations. In this study, we investigated 14 histone modifications in brains of a cohort of young (3 months), old (22 months), and old age-matched dietary restricted (DR) and rapamycin treated BALB/c mice. Results showed that 7 out of all measured histone markers were changed drastically with age. Intriguingly, histone methylations in brain tissues, including H3K27me3, H3R2me2, H3K79me3 and H4K20me2 tend to disappear with age but can be partially restored by both DR and rapamycin treatment. However, both DR and rapamycin treatment also have a significant impact on several other histone modifications such as H3K27ac, H4K16ac, H4R3me2, and H3K56ac, which do not change as animal ages. This study provides the first evidence that a broad spectrum of histone modifications may be involved in brain aging. Besides, this study suggests that both DR and rapamycin may slow aging process in mouse brain via these underlying epigenetic mechanisms. PMID:26021816

  11. Vulnerability of Quebec drinking-water treatment plants to cyanotoxins in a climate change context.

    PubMed

    Carrière, Annie; Prévost, Michèle; Zamyadi, Arash; Chevalier, Pierre; Barbeau, Benoit

    2010-09-01

    Cyanobacteria are a growing concern in the province of Quebec due to recent highly publicised bloom episodes. The health risk associated with the consumption of drinking water coming from contaminated sources was unknown. A study was undertaken to evaluate treatment plants' capacity to treat cyanotoxins below the maximum recommended concentrations of 1.5 microg/L microcystin-LR (MC-LR) and the provisional concentration of 3.7 microg/L anatoxin-a, respectively. The results showed that close to 80% of the water treatment plants are presently able to treat the maximum historical concentration measured in Quebec (5.35 microg/L MC-LR equ.). An increase, due to climate change or other factors, would not represent a serious threat because chlorine, the most popular disinfectant, is effective in treating MC-LR under standard disinfection conditions. The highest concentration of anatoxin-a (2.3 microg/L) measured in natural water thus far in source water is below the current guideline for treated waters. However, higher concentrations of anatoxin-a would represent a significant challenge for the water industry as chlorine is not an efficient treatment option. The use of ozone, potassium permanganate or powder activated carbon would have to be considered.

  12. Changing Clinician Practices and Attitudes Regarding the Use of Antiretroviral Therapy for HIV Treatment and Prevention.

    PubMed

    Buchacz, Kate; Farrior, Jennifer; Beauchamp, Geetha; McKinstry, Laura; Kurth, Ann E; Zingman, Barry S; Gordin, Fred M; Donnell, Deborah; Mayer, Kenneth H; El-Sadr, Wafaa M; Branson, Bernard

    As part of the HPTN 065 study in the Bronx, New York and Washington, the authors, we surveyed clinicians to assess for shifts in their practices and attitudes around HIV treatment and prevention. Antiretroviral therapy (ART)-prescribing clinicians at 39 HIV care sites were offered an anonymous Web-based survey at baseline (2010-2011) and at follow-up (2013). The 165 respondents at baseline and 141 respondents at follow-up had similar characteristics-almost 60% were female, median age was 47 years, two-thirds were physicians, and nearly 80% were HIV specialists. The percentage who reported recommending ART irrespective of CD4 count was higher at follow-up (15% versus 68%), as was the percentage who would initiate ART earlier for patients having unprotected sex with partners of unknown HIV status (64% versus 82%), and for those in HIV-discordant partnerships (75% versus 87%). In line with changing HIV treatment guidelines during 2010 to 2013, clinicians increasingly supported early ART for treatment and prevention.

  13. Cellular changes, molecular pathways and the immune system following photodynamic treatment.

    PubMed

    Skupin-Mrugalska, P; Sobotta, L; Kucinska, M; Murias, M; Mielcarek, J; Düzgüneş, N

    2014-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a novel medical technique involving three key components: light, a photosensitizer molecule and molecular oxygen, which are essential to achieve the therapeutic effect. There has been great interest in the use of PDT in the treatment of many cancers and skin disorders. Upon irradiation with light of a specific wavelength, the photosensitizer undergoes several reactions resulting in the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). ROS may react with different biomolecules, causing defects in many cellular structures and biochemical pathways. PDT-mediated tumor destruction in vivo involves cellular mechanisms with photodamage of mitochondria, lysosomes, nuclei, and cell membranes that activate apoptotic, necrotic and autophagic signals, leading to cell death. PDT is capable of changing the tumor microenvironment, thereby diminishing the supply of oxygen, which explains the antiangiogenic effect of PDT. Finally, inflammatory and immune responses play a crucial role in the long-lasting consequences of PDT treatment. This review is focused on the biochemical effects exerted by photodynamic treatment on cell death signaling pathways, destruction of the vasculature, and the activation of the immune system.

  14. Cognitive and emotional behavioural changes associated with methylphenidate treatment: a review of preclinical studies.

    PubMed

    Britton, Gabrielle B

    2012-02-01

    There is evidence from animal studies that repeated exposure to methylphenidate (MPH), a widely used psychostimulant for the treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), produces behavioural, structural and neurochemical changes that persist long after drug administration has ended. However, the translational utility of much of this work is compromised by the use of drug doses and routes of administration that produce plasma and brain MPH levels that fall outside the clinical range, i.e. experimental parameters more relevant to drug abuse than ADHD. We used PubMed to identify pre-clinical studies that employed repeated MPH administration at low doses in young rodents and examined long-term effects on cognition, emotion, and brain structure and function. A review of this work suggests that repeated MPH treatment during early development can modify a number of cognitive, behavioural and brain processes, but these are reduced when low therapeutic doses are employed. Moreover, MPH sites of action extend beyond those implicated in ADHD. Studies that combined neurobiological and behavioural approaches provide important insights into the mechanisms underlying MPH-produced effects on cognitive and behavioural processes, which may be relevant to MPH therapeutic efficacy. There is an emerging consensus that pharmacological treatment of childhood psychiatric disorders produces persistent neuroadaptations, highlighting the need for studies that assess long-term effects of early developmental pharmacotherapy. In this regard, studies that mimic clinical therapy with rodents are useful experimental approaches for defining the behavioural and neural plasticity associated with stimulant therapy in paediatric populations.

  15. Impact of DSM-5 Changes on the Diagnosis and Acute Treatment of Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Mattila, Taina; Koeter, Maarten; Wohlfarth, Tamar; Storosum, Jitschak; van den Brink, Wim; de Haan, Lieuwe; Derks, Eske; Leufkens, Hubertus; Denys, Damiaan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To examine the consequences and validity of changes in Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM)-5 diagnostic criteria for schizophrenia, eg, omission of subtypes, using a large dataset of double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled schizophrenia trials. Methods: Data from 22 short-term efficacy registration trials of second generation antipsychotics for the treatment of acute psychotic episodes in patients with schizophrenia (N = 5233), submitted to the Dutch regulatory authority were analyzed. We examined whether patients in these pre-DSM-5 trials met the diagnostic criteria for schizophrenia according to DSM-5. Using linear regression, we examined differences in effect size between DSM-IV subtypes and between DSM-5 symptom dimensions. Results: Over 99.5% of the patients met DSM-5 diagnostic criteria for schizophrenia and no differences in effect size were found between schizophrenia subtypes (P = .65). Symptom dimensions that respond best to treatment with second generation antipsychotics were hallucinations, delusions, disorganized speech, and mania (Hedge’s g −0.23 to −0.31). Conclusions: Results of clinical trials in patients with pre-DSM-5 schizophrenia also apply to patients diagnosed with DSM-5 schizophrenia. Omission of the classic subtypes is justified as they are not predictive of response to treatment. The DSM-5 C-RDPSS scale adds valuable information to the categorical diagnosis of schizophrenia, which is relevant for antipsychotic response. PMID:25528758

  16. Effects of land use and municipal wastewater treatment changes on stream water quality.

    PubMed

    Ha, S R; Bae, M S

    2001-07-01

    This study was undertaken to analyze the quantitative impact of a municipal wastewater treatment operation on the long-term water quality changes in a tributary of the Han-river, Korea from 1994 to 1999. Changes of land use pattern in the study watershed are quantitatively analyzed on the basis of land use maps that were created by classifying Landsat TM images acquired in April 1994 and March 1999. During this period, the average increase of land use area in terms of residence, cultivation, and barren was 5.89, 0.13, and 0.12%, respectively, and the corresponding decrease in water and forest area was 0.21 and 0.16%. The annual average reductions of BOD, T-N, and T-P by the municipal wastewater treatment operation were about 89, 11 and 27%, respectively. Spatial analysis of the pollution discharge from watershed was undertaken using a geographic information system (GIS) based model. A clear reciprocal relationship was found between the basin-wide self-purification coefficient and the watershed form ratio excepting a catchment area with water drain facilities. Due to land use changes over the five year study period, water quality change in terms of BOD, T-N, and T-P were (+)1.04 mg l(-1) (corresponding to a 13.7% increase of pollution), (+)0.58 mgl(-1) (10.0% increase), and (-)0.01 mg l(-1) (1.6% decrease). On the other hand, the effect of water quality restoration assessed by outward appearance during the same period was about 67.6, 39, and 36.5%, respectively. Consequently, it is understood that total stream water quality recovery in terms of BOD, T-N, and T-P were 81.3, 49.0, and 38.1% respectively, and that this included a negative contribution resulting from increased land use and a positive contribution due to the wastewater treatment operation at Inchon.

  17. Cholesterol biosynthesis regulation and protein changes in rat liver following treatment with fluvastatin.

    PubMed

    Steiner, S; Gatlin, C L; Lennon, J J; McGrath, A M; Seonarain, M D; Makusky, A J; Aponte, A M; Esquer-Blasco, R; Anderson, N L

    2001-03-31

    The enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase is a key regulator in cholesterol biosynthesis and HMG CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) have become a widely prescribed family of lipid lowering agents. Cholesterol synthesis occurs predominantly in liver which is the target organ of statins. We studied the effects of fluvastatin (Lescol), a member of the statin family, on hepatic protein regulation. Male F344 rats treated with 0.8 mg/kg per day fluvastatin or 24 mg/kg per day fluvastatin for 7 days showed treatment-related changes in 58 liver proteins (P<0.005). Major effects were evident in the cholesterol biosynthesis pathway including the induction of enzymes upstream and downstream of the target enzyme HMG CoA reductase. Treatment also triggered alterations in key enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism and was associated with changes in a heterogeneous set of cellular stress proteins involved in cytoskeletal structure, calcium homeostasis and protease activity. The latter set of protein alterations indicates that hepatotoxicity is associated with high-dose treatment. Based on the results it is suggested that HMG-CoA synthase and isopentenyl-diphosphate delta-isomerase may be explored as alternative drug targets and that the induction levels of these enzymes may serve as a measure of potency of individual statin drugs. It is proposed that efficacy and cellular stress markers discovered in this study may be used in a high throughput screen (HTS) assay format to compare efficiently and accurately the therapeutic windows of different members of the statin family.

  18. Insulin receptor changes in type 2 diabetes after short term insulin treatment.

    PubMed

    Rizkalla, S W; Weissbrodt, P; Tchobroutsky, G; Slama, G

    1985-10-01

    We have studied erythrocyte insulin receptor changes before and after 8 days of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion by a pump in 11 uncontrolled obese non-insulin-dependent diabetics (type 2), diet and drug resistant for at least three months previously. All the patients were hospitalized. On day 1 of the study, their oral hypoglycemic agents were stopped and hypocaloric diet (1000 Kcal/day) was maintained (strictly reinforced). This period of reinforced treatment was not accompanied by correction of hyperglycemia. On day 9 patients were placed for 12 hours on artificial pancreas in order to bring their fasting blood glucose levels down to normal values. Then they were submitted to a continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) for the following 8 days. There was a significant decrease in mean fasting plasma glucose (P less than 0.001) and a rise in insulin (P less than 0.05) levels after insulin treatment. Mean specific insulin binding was also significantly increased (P less than 0.01). The increase in binding (with insulin therapy) correlated with the fall in fasting hyperglycemia (r = 0.786, P less than 0.01). In addition, the increase in binding correlated negatively with changes in fasting plasma insulin levels (r = -0.867, P less than 0.01), under treatment, on one hand and with the dose of exogenous insulin administered (r = -0.681, P less than 0.05) on the other hand. There was no correlation between binding and fasting plasma insulin levels (before and after insulin therapy), or between diabetes duration and any of the previous parameters.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Raman spectroscopy detects biomolecular changes associated with nanoencapsulated hesperetin treatment in experimental oral carcinogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurushankar, K.; Gohulkumar, M.; Kumar, Piyush; Krishna, C. Murali; Krishnakumar, N.

    2016-03-01

    Recently it has been shown that Raman spectroscopy possesses great potential in the investigation of biomolecular changes of tumor tissues with therapeutic drug response in a non-invasive and label-free manner. The present study is designed to investigate the antitumor effect of hespertin-loaded nanoparticles (HETNPs) relative to the efficacy of native hesperetin (HET) in modifying the biomolecular changes during 7,12-dimethyl benz(a)anthracene (DMBA)-induced oral carcinogenesis using a Raman spectroscopic technique. Significant differences in the intensity and shape of the Raman spectra between the control and the experimental tissues at 1800-500 cm-1 were observed. Tumor tissues are characterized by an increase in the relative amount of proteins, nucleic acids, tryptophan and phenylalanine and a decrease in the percentage of lipids when compared to the control tissues. Further, oral administration of HET and its nanoparticulates restored the status of the lipids and significantly decreased the levels of protein and nucleic acid content. Treatment with HETNPs showed a more potent antitumor effect than treatment with native HET, which resulted in an overall reduction in the intensity of several biochemical Raman bands in DMBA-induced oral carcinogenesis being observed. Principal component and linear discriminant analysis (PC-LDA), together with leave-one-out cross validation (LOOCV) on Raman spectra yielded diagnostic sensitivities of 100%, 80%, 91.6% and 65% and specificities of 100%, 65%, 60% and 55% for classification of control versus DMBA, DMBA versus DMBA  +  HET, DMBA versus DMBA  +  HETNPs and DMBA  +  HET versus DMBA  +  HETNPs treated tissue groups, respectively. These results further demonstrate that Raman spectroscopy associated with multivariate statistical algorithms could be a valuable tool for developing a comprehensive understanding of the process of biomolecular changes, and could reveal the signatures of the

  20. Microbial control of soil organic matter mineralization responses to labile carbon in subarctic climate change treatments.

    PubMed

    Rousk, Kathrin; Michelsen, Anders; Rousk, Johannes

    2016-12-01

    Half the global soil carbon (C) is held in high-latitude systems. Climate change will expose these to warming and a shift towards plant communities with more labile C input. Labile C can also increase the rate of loss of native soil organic matter (SOM); a phenomenon termed 'priming'. We investigated how warming (+1.1 °C over ambient using open top chambers) and litter addition (90 g m(-2)  yr(-1) ) treatments in the subarctic influenced the susceptibility of SOM mineralization to priming, and its microbial underpinnings. Labile C appeared to inhibit the mineralization of C from SOM by up to 60% within hours. In contrast, the mineralization of N from SOM was stimulated by up to 300%. These responses occurred rapidly and were unrelated to microbial successional dynamics, suggesting catabolic responses. Considered separately, the labile C inhibited C mineralization is compatible with previously reported findings termed 'preferential substrate utilization' or 'negative apparent priming', while the stimulated N mineralization responses echo recent reports of 'real priming' of SOM mineralization. However, C and N mineralization responses derived from the same SOM source must be interpreted together: This suggested that the microbial SOM-use decreased in magnitude and shifted to components richer in N. This finding highlights that only considering SOM in terms of C may be simplistic, and will not capture all changes in SOM decomposition. The selective mining for N increased in climate change treatments with higher fungal dominance. In conclusion, labile C appeared to trigger catabolic responses of the resident microbial community that shifted the SOM mining to N-rich components; an effect that increased with higher fungal dominance. Extrapolating from these findings, the predicted shrub expansion in the subarctic could result in an altered microbial use of SOM, selectively mining it for N-rich components, and leading to a reduced total SOM-use.

  1. Deep brain stimulation effects in dystonia: time course of electrophysiological changes in early treatment.

    PubMed

    Ruge, Diane; Tisch, Stephen; Hariz, Marwan I; Zrinzo, Ludvic; Bhatia, Kailash P; Quinn, Niall P; Jahanshahi, Marjan; Limousin, Patricia; Rothwell, John C

    2011-08-15

    Deep brain stimulation to the internal globus pallidus is an effective treatment for primary dystonia. The optimal clinical effect often occurs only weeks to months after starting stimulation. To better understand the underlying electrophysiological changes in this period, we assessed longitudinally 2 pathophysiological markers of dystonia in patients prior to and in the early treatment period (1, 3, 6 months) after deep brain stimulation surgery. Transcranial magnetic stimulation was used to track changes in short-latency intracortical inhibition, a measure of excitability of GABA(A) -ergic corticocortical connections and long-term potentiation-like synaptic plasticity (as a response to paired associative stimulation). Deep brain stimulation remained on for the duration of the study. Prior to surgery, inhibition was reduced and plasticity increased in patients compared with healthy controls. Following surgery and commencement of deep brain stimulation, short-latency intracortical inhibition increased toward normal levels over the following months with the same monotonic time course as the patients' clinical benefit. In contrast, synaptic plasticity changed rapidly, following a nonmonotonic time course: it was absent early (1 month) after surgery, and then over the following months increased toward levels observed in healthy individuals. We postulate that before surgery preexisting high levels of plasticity form strong memories of dystonic movement patterns. When deep brain stimulation is turned on, it disrupts abnormal basal ganglia signals, resulting in the absent response to paired associative stimulation at 1 month. Clinical benefit is delayed because engrams of abnormal movement persist and take time to normalize. Our observations suggest that plasticity may be a driver of long-term therapeutic effects of deep brain stimulation in dystonia.

  2. Detection of Treatment-Induced Changes in Signaling Pathways in Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors using Transcriptomic Data

    PubMed Central

    Ochs, Michael F.; Rink, Lori; Tarn, Chi; Mburu, Sarah; Taguchi, Takahiro; Eisenberg, Burton; Godwin, Andrew K.

    2009-01-01

    Cell signaling plays a central role in the etiology of cancer. Numerous therapeutics in use or under development target signaling proteins, however off-target effects often limit assignment of positive clinical response to the intended target. As direct measurements of signaling protein activity are not generally feasible during treatment, there is a need for more powerful methods to determine if therapeutics inhibit their targets and when off-target effects occur. We have used the Bayesian Decomposition algorithm and data on transcriptional regulation to create a novel methodology, DESIDE (Differential Expression for SIgnaling DEtermination), for inferring signaling activity from microarray measurements. We applied DESIDE to deduce signaling activity in gastrointestinal stromal tumor cell lines treated with the targeted therapeutic imatinib mesylate (Gleevec). We detected the expected reduced activity in the KIT pathway, as well as unexpected changes in the P53 pathway. Pursuing these findings, we have determined that imatinib-induced DNA damage is responsible for the increased activity of P53, identifying a novel off-target activity for this drug. We then used DESIDE on data from resected, post-imatinib treatment tumor samples and identified a pattern in these tumors similar to that at late time points in the cell lines, and this pattern correlated with initial clinical response. The pattern showed increased activity of ELK1 and STAT3 transcription factors, which are associated with the growth of side population cells. DESIDE infers the global reprogramming of signaling networks during treatment, permitting treatment modification that leverages ongoing drug development efforts, which is crucial for personalized medicine. PMID:19903850

  3. Clinical and endocrinological changes after electro-acupuncture treatment in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee.

    PubMed

    Ahsin, Sadia; Saleem, Salman; Bhatti, Ahsin Manzoor; Iles, Ray K; Aslam, Mohammad

    2009-12-15

    Neurobiological mechanisms invoking the release of endogenous opioids and depression of stress hormone release are believed to be the basis of acupuncture analgesia. This study compared plasma beta-endorphin and cortisol levels with self assessment scores of intensity of pain, before and after 10 days of electro-acupuncture treatment in patients suffering from chronic pain as a result of osteoarthritis knees. Forty patients of either sex over 40 years with primary osteoarthritis knee were recruited into a single-blinded, sham-controlled study. For electro-acupuncture group the points were selected according to the Traditional Chinese Medicine Meridian Theory. In the sham group needles were inserted at random points away from true acupoints and no current was passed. Both groups were treated for 10 days with one session every day lasting for 20-25min. Pre- and post-treatment Western Ontario and McMaster Universities (WOMAC) index of osteoarthritis knee and Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) for pain were recorded and blood samples were taken for the measurement of plasma cortisol and beta-endorphin levels. Following electro-acupuncture treatment there was a significant improvement in WOMAC index and VAS (p=0.001), a significant rise in plasma beta-endorphin (p=0.001), and a significant fall in plasma cortisol (p=0.016). In conclusion electro-acupuncture resulted in an improvement in pain, stiffness and disability. Of clinical importance is that an improvement in objective measures of pain and stress/pain associated biomarkers was shown above that of a sham treatment; hence demonstrating acupuncture associated physiological changes beyond that of the placebo effects.

  4. Changes in the structure and antioxidant properties of onions by high pressure treatment.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Gutiérrez, José Luis; Plaza, Lucía; Hernando, Isabel; Sánchez-Moreno, Concepción; Quiles, Amparo; de Ancos, Begoña; Cano, M Pilar

    2013-04-25

    Onions have antioxidant properties and they are an important source of bioactive compounds such as phenols. The aim of this work was to study the effect of high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) (100-600 MPa/1-3 min/25 °C) on the microstructure and antioxidant properties of onions (cv. Doux) and its relationship with changes in the extractability of potential health-related compounds. Cryo scanning electron microscopy was used to study the microstructure. Vitamin C, total phenolic content and antioxidant activity (DPPH˙, ABTS˙(+), FRAP) were also analyzed. Tonoplast, plasmalemma and cell walls were affected by the HHP treatment and it favored the diffusion of the cellular content to the intercellular spaces. Vitamin C did not show significant changes, whereas the extracted phenolic content and antioxidant activity increased at pressures of 300 or 600 MPa. Therefore, it could be concluded that HHP produced changes in membrane permeability and disruption of cell walls favoring the release of phenolic compounds from tissue and, in consequence, improving their extractability.

  5. Surface changes of biopolymers PHB and PLLA induced by Ar+ plasma treatment and wet etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slepičková Kasálková, N.; Slepička, P.; Sajdl, P.; Švorčík, V.

    2014-08-01

    Polymers, especially group of biopolymers find potential application in a wide range of disciplines due to their biodegradability. In biomedical applications these materials can be used as a scaffold or matrix. In this work, the influence of the Ar+ plasma treatment and subsequent wet etching (acetone/water) on the surface properties of polymers were studied. Two biopolymers - polyhydroxybutyrate with 8% polyhydroxyvalerate (PHB) and poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA) were used in these experiments. Modified surface layers were analyzed by different methods. Surface wettability was characterized by determination of water contact angle. Changes in elemental composition of modified surfaces were performed by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). Surface morphology and roughness was examined using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). Gravimetry method was used to study the mass loss. It was found that the modification from both with plasma and wet etching leads to dramatic changes of surface properties (surface chemistry, morphology and roughness). Rate of changes of these features strongly depends on the modification parameters.

  6. Changes in hypertension prevalence, awareness, treatment, and control rates in Turkey from 2003 to 2012

    PubMed Central

    Sengul, Sule; Akpolat, Tekin; Erdem, Yunus; Derici, Ulver; Arici, Mustafa; Sindel, Sukru; Karatan, Oktay; Turgan, Cetin; Hasanoglu, Enver; Caglar, Sali; Erturk, Sehsuvar

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The study aimed to assess the current epidemiology of hypertension, including its prevalence, the awareness of the condition and its treatment and control, in Turkey to evaluate changes in these factors over the last 10 years by comparing the results with the prevalence, awareness, treatment, and control of hypertension in Turkey (PatenT) study data (2003), as well as to assess parameters affecting awareness and the control of hypertension. Methods: The PatenT 2 study was conducted on a representative sample of the Turkish adult population (n = 5437) in 2012. Specifically trained staff performed the data collection. Hypertension was defined as mean SBP or DBP at least 140/90 mmHg, previously diagnosed disease or the use of antihypertensive medication. Awareness and treatment were assessed by self-reporting, and control was defined as SBP/DBP less than 140/90 mmHg. Results: Although the prevalence of hypertension in the PatenT and PatenT 2 surveys was stable at approximately 30%, hypertension awareness, treatment, and control rates have improved in Turkey. Overall, 54.7% of hypertensive patients were aware of their diagnosis in 2012 compared with 40.7% in 2003. The hypertension treatment rate increased from 31.1% in 2003 to 47.4% in 2012, and the control rate in hypertensives increased from 8.1% in 2003 to 28.7% in 2012. The rate of hypertension control in treated patients improved between 2003 (20.7%) and 2012 (53.9%). Awareness of hypertension was positively associated with older age, being a woman, residing in an urban area, a history of parental hypertension, being a nonsmoker, admittance by a physician, presence of diabetes mellitus, and being obese or overweight; it was inversely associated with a higher amount of daily bread consumption. Factors associated with better control of hypertension were younger age, female sex, residing in an urban area, and higher education level in Turkey. Conclusion: Although some progress has been made in

  7. Changes in somatic disease incidents during opioid maintenance treatment: results from a Norwegian cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Brekke, Mette; Gossop, Michael; Lindbaek, Morten; Reinertsen, Even; Thoresen, Magne; Waal, Helge

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To examine the effect of opioid maintenance treatment (OMT) on somatic morbidity in a cohort of OMT patients. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting OMT programme in two Norwegian counties. Participants 200 OMT patients, participation rate 71.2%. Main outcome measures Incidence rates (IR) before, during and after OMT for acute/subacute hospital-treated somatic disease incidents (drug-related, non-drug-related, injuries) and rates for inpatient days and outpatient treatment contacts. Results IR for drug-related hospital treatment episodes were 76% lower during compared to before OMT (before versus during incidence rate ratio (IRR) 4.2 (95% CI 2.9 to 6.2), p<0.001) and 11 times higher after compared to during OMT (after versus during IRR 11.1 (6.6 to 18.5), p<0.001). For non-drug-related treatment episodes, IR were 35% higher during than before OMT (before versus during IRR 0.7 (0.6 to 1.0), p=0.02) and 32% higher after compared to during OMT (IRR 1.4 (0.9 to 2.2), p=0.15), while injuries showed little change according to OMT status. Although patients with on-going drug-taking during OMT showed less reduction in drug-related hospital-treated incidents during treatment than patients not using illicit drugs, the quartile with most drug-taking showed a significant reduction (before versus during IRR 3.6 (2.4 to 5.3)). Patients who had experienced cessation of OMT showed a significant reduction in drug-related treatment episodes during OMT (before versus during IRR 1.7 (1.0 to 2.9)), although less than patients without OMT interruptions (before versus during IRR 6.1 (3.6 to 10.6)), and a significant increase after OMT cessation compared with during OMT (IRR 5.4 (3.0 to 9.7)). Conclusion Acute/subacute drug-related somatic morbidity is reduced during compared to before OMT. This was also found for patients with on-going drug-taking during OMT. However, acute drug-related health problems show an increase after OMT cessation, and this is a matter of concern

  8. Assessing the impacts of changes in treatment technology on energy and greenhouse gas balances for organic waste and wastewater treatment using historical data.

    PubMed

    Poulsen, Tjalfe G; Hansen, Jens Aage

    2009-11-01

    Historical data on organic waste and wastewater treatment during the period of 1970-2020 were used to assess the impact of treatment on energy and greenhouse gas (GHG) balances. The assessment included the waste fractions: Sewage sludge, food waste, yard waste and other organic waste (paper, plastic, etc.). Data were collected from Aalborg, a municipality located in Northern Denmark. During the period from 1970-2005, Aalborg Municipality has changed its waste treatment strategy from landfilling of all wastes toward composting of yard waste and incineration with combined heat and power production from the remaining organic municipal waste. Wastewater treatment has changed from direct discharge of untreated wastewater to full organic matter and nutrient (N, P) removal combined with anaerobic digestion of the sludge for biogas production with power and heat generation. These changes in treatment technology have resulted in the waste and wastewater treatment systems in Aalborg progressing from being net consumers of energy and net emitters of GHG, to becoming net producers of energy and net savers of GHG emissions (due to substitution of fossil fuels elsewhere). If it is assumed that the organic waste quantity and composition is the same in 1970 and 2005, the technology change over this time period has resulted in a progression from a net annual GHG emission of 200 kg CO( 2)-eq. capita(-1) in 1970 to a net saving of 170 kg CO(2)-eq. capita(-1) in 2005 for management of urban organic wastes.

  9. Impact of drug classes and treatment availability on the rate of antiretroviral treatment change in the TREAT Asia HIV Observational Database (TAHOD)

    PubMed Central

    Srasuebkul, Preeyaporn; Calmy, Alexandra; Zhou, Jialun; Kumarasamy, Nagalingeswaran; Law, Matthew; Lim, Poh Lian

    2007-01-01

    Background It is critical to understand the pattern of antiretroviral treatment (ART) prescription in different regions of the world as ART procurement needs to be anticipated. We aimed at exploring rates and predictors of ART combination changes in clinical practice in Treat Asia HIV Observational Database (TAHOD). Methods Rates of ART changes were examined in patients who started first line triple or more ART combination in TAHOD, and had at least one follow-up visit. Rates of ART changes were summarised per follow-up year, and factors associated with changes assessed using random-effect Poisson regression. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to determine durations of patients in their first, second and third regimen. Results A total of 1846 patients initiated an ART combination with at least three drugs. Median follow up time for the first treatment was 3.2 years. The overall rate of ART change was 29 per 100-person-year. In univariate analyses, rate of treatment change was significantly associated with exposure category, the country income category, the drug class combination, calendar year and the number of combinations. In multivariate analysis, compared to d4T/3TC/NVP, starting ART with another NNRTI-containing regimen, with PI only or with a triple NRTI regimen was associated with a higher risk of combination change (relative risk (RR) 1.6 (95% CI 1.64 – 1.96), p < 0.001, RR 3.39 (2.76 – 4.16) p < 0.001, RR 6.37 (4.51 – 9.00), p < 0.001). Being on a second or a third combination regimen was also associated with a decreased rate of ART change, compared with first ART combination (RR 0.82 (0.68 – 0.99), p = 0.035, RR 0.77 (0.61 – 0.97), p = 0.024). Sites with fewer than 12 drugs used had an increased rate of treatment changes (1.31 (1.13 – 1.51), p < 0.001). Injecting drug users, and other/unknown exposure was found to increase rate of treatment change (1.24 (1.00 – 1.54), p = 0.055). Percentages of patients who stopped treatment due to adverse

  10. Changes in brain connectivity related to the treatment of depression measured through fMRI: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Gudayol-Ferré, Esteve; Peró-Cebollero, Maribel; González-Garrido, Andrés A.; Guàrdia-Olmos, Joan

    2015-01-01

    Depression is a mental illness that presents alterations in brain connectivity in the Default Mode Network (DMN), the Affective Network (AN) and other cortical-limbic networks, and the Cognitive Control Network (CCN), among others. In recent years the interest in the possible effect of the different antidepressant treatments on functional connectivity has increased substantially. The goal of this paper is to conduct a systematic review of the studies on the relationship between the treatment of depression and brain connectivity. Nineteen studies were found in a systematic review on this topic. In all of them, there was improvement of the clinical symptoms after antidepressant treatment. In 18 out of the 19 studies, clinical improvement was associated to changes in brain connectivity. It seems that both DMN and the connectivity between cortical and limbic structures consistently changes after antidepressant treatment. However, the current evidence does not allow us to assure that the treatment of depression leads to changes in the CCN. In this regard, some papers report a positive correlation between changes in brain connectivity and improvement of depressive symptomatology, particularly when they measure cortical-limbic connectivity, whereas the changes in DMN do not significantly correlate with clinical improvement. Finally, some papers suggest that changes in connectivity after antidepressant treatment might be partly related to the mechanisms of action of the treatment administered. This effect has been observed in two studies with stimulation treatment (one with rTMS and one with ECT), and in two papers that administered three different pharmacological treatments. Our review allows us to make a series of recommendations that might guide future researchers exploring the effect of anti-depression treatments on brain connectivity. PMID:26578927

  11. Deprenyl treatment attenuates long-term pre- and post-synaptic changes evoked by chronic methamphetamine.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Colin; Chen, Qiang; Zhang, Xiuwn; Xiong, Xueying; Lazarus, Cindy; Lee, Tong H; Ellinwood, Everett H

    2007-11-14

    Deprenyl, used clinically in Parkinson's disease, has multiple pharmacological effects which make it a good candidate to treat neurotoxicity. Thus, we investigated deprenyl's ability to attenuate methamphetamine-induced dopamine neurotoxicity. We also examined deprenyl's effect in changing markers associated with psychostimulant sensitization. A potential therapeutic effect on either pathological domain would be a boon in developing novel treatments for methamphetamine abuse. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were split into 6 groups. Three groups received a 7-day saline minipump with saline, 0.05 or 0.25 mg/kg SC deprenyl injections given for 10 days before, during and 5 days after the 7-day saline minipump implant. Similarly, 3 groups received methamphetamine pumps (25 mg/kg/day) with escalating daily injections of methamphetamine (0-6 mg/kg) in addition to the minipump treatment. These rats also received saline, 0.05 or 0.25 mg/kg deprenyl injections given before, during and the 7-day minipump treatment. Rats were killed on day 28 of withdrawal and brain samples taken. HPLC analysis for dopamine and 3,4-Dihydroxy-Phenylacetic Acid (DOPAC) revealed a loss of dopamine in the caudate and accumbens which was partially reversed by high dose deprenyl. Tyrosine hydroxylase immunostaining in the midbrain was unaffected by methamphetamine, suggesting that dopamine neurotoxicity was localized to the caudate. Western blot analysis of the caudate after methamphetamine revealed little change in Alpha-Amino-3-Hydroxy-5-Methyl-4-Isoxazole Propionic Acid (AMPA) GluR1 or N-Methyl-d-Aspartate (NMDA) NR2B subunits, or their phosphorylation state. However, methamphetamine increased levels of GluR1 and its phosphorylation state in the prefrontal cortex (PFC), and these increases were attenuated by deprenyl. Methamphetamine also increased levels of PFC NR2B subunit, but these increases were not attenuated by deprenyl. We suggest that deprenyl may be effective in reducing the neurotoxic

  12. Changes in conceptions and attitudes during five years of intensified conventional insulin treatment in the Stockholm Diabetes Intervention Study (SDIS).

    PubMed

    Reichard, P; Toomingas, B; Rosenqvist, U

    1994-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that intensified treatment can result in lower blood glucose concentrations and retard microvascular complications. In the Stockholm Diabetes Intervention Study, 96 patients were followed for 5 years; 44 patients received intensified, conventional treatment and 52 patients received regular treatment. Changes in conceptions and attitudes that accompanied intensified treatment were evaluated with questionnaires and semistructured interviews. After education and personal tutoring, HbAlc was significantly lower in patients in the intensified treatment group compared with patients in the regular treatment group. Self-rated well-being and perceived ability to control the diabetes increased more in the patients in the intensified treatment group. Blood glucose testing became more important to the patients in the intensified treatment group, who used the blood glucose tests more frequently whenever necessary, and who acted on the test results. Microvascular complications were retarded or halted.

  13. [Change in human visceral leishmaniasis treatment in Italy: retrospective study of 630 patients].

    PubMed

    Gradoni, L; Gramiccia, M; Scalone, A

    2004-06-01

    Since the 1940s meglumine antimoniate (MA) has been the only first-line drug for visceral leishmaniasis (VL) treatment in Italy. From 1991 through 1994, several patients of all ages, representing 1/3 of all immunocompetent VL patients reported during that period, were enrolled in clinical trials of liposomal amphotericin B (L-AmB), which led to a novel, safe, short course of VL treatment as an alternative to MA. In the same period, other lipid-associated AmB drugs were registered in Italy for the treatment of fungal infections, i.e., AmB colloidal dispersion (ABCD) and AmB lipid complex (ABLC). A retrospective analysis was performed on data collected at the Unit of Protozoology of Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Rome, to assess whether changes have occurred in first-line drug regimens adopted in Italy for routine VL treatment, during the 1995-2002 period. The sample consisted of immunocompetent individuals clinically suspected for VL, in whom the disease was confirmed by the examination of serum and bone marrow specimens sent to the Unit by hospitals from throughout the country. Relevant information on patients was then recorded, which included drug regimens used and post-therapy results. We recorded treatment information for 630 patients, representing a large proportion (55.5%) of 1,135 immunocompetent individuals with VL reported in Italy from 1995 through 2002. About half were children (306). Every year, patients were referred by 19 to 42 hospitals, with a range of 1 to 30 patients per hospital. MA was the first-line drug used in 159 patients (25.2%). However, the proportion of MA-treated patients has steadily decreased from 55.9% in 1995 to 1.0% in 2002. We recorded the failure of MA therapy in 16 patients (10.1%), who were successfully retreated with a L-AmB regimen. The rate of MA failures significantly increased in recent years, from 5.3% in 1995 to 36.4% in 2000 (p = 0.01). AmB drugs have been the only alternative drugs used in the remaining 471 patients (74

  14. Treatment-associated changes in body composition, health behaviors, and mood as predictors of change in body satisfaction in obese women: effects of age and race/ethnicity.

    PubMed

    Annesi, James J; Tennant, Gisèle A; Mareno, Nicole

    2014-12-01

    A lack of satisfaction with one's body is common among women with obesity, often prompting unhealthy "dieting." Beyond typically slow improvements in weight and body composition, behavioral factors might also affect change in body satisfaction. Age and race/ethnicity (African American vs. White) might moderate such change. Obese women (N = 246; M(age) = 43 years; M BMI = 39 kg/m(2)) initiating a 6-month cognitive-behaviorally based physical activity and nutrition treatment were assessed on possible predictors of body satisfaction change. At baseline, African American and younger women had significantly higher body satisfaction. The treatment was associated with significant within-group improvements in mood, health behaviors (physical activity and fruit/vegetable intake), and body composition (waist circumference). A multiple regression analysis indicated that mood, health behavior, and body composition changes explained a significant 27% of the variance in body satisfaction change. Of these predictors, changes in mood (β = -.36, p < .001) and health behaviors (β = .18, p = .01) made significant, unique contributions to the variance in change in body satisfaction that was accounted for, while only the measure of actual physiological change (body composition) did not. Neither age nor race/ethnicity was a significant moderator when each was entered separately into the multiple regression equation. Practical implications for leveraging manageable changes in behavioral factors for improving body satisfaction were discussed.

  15. Does group cognitive-behavioral therapy module type moderate depression symptom changes in substance abuse treatment clients?

    PubMed

    Paddock, Susan M; Hunter, Sarah B; Leininger, Thomas J

    2014-07-01

    Little is known about the effect of group therapy treatment modules on symptom change during treatment and on outcomes post-treatment. Secondary analyses of depressive symptoms collected from two group therapy studies conducted in substance use treatment settings were examined (n=132 and n=44). Change in PHQ-9 scores was modeled using longitudinal growth modeling combined with random effects modeling of session effects, with time-in-treatment interacted with module theme to test moderation. In both studies, depressive symptoms significantly decreased during the active treatment phase. Symptom reductions were not significantly moderated by module theme in the larger study. However, the smaller pilot study's results suggest that future examination of module effects is warranted, given the data are compatible with differential reductions in reported symptoms being associated with attending people-themed module sessions versus thoughts-themed sessions.

  16. Toll Like Receptor 4 Affects the Cerebral Biochemical Changes Induced by MPTP Treatment.

    PubMed

    Conte, Carmela; Roscini, Luca; Sardella, Roccaldo; Mariucci, Giuseppina; Scorzoni, Stefania; Beccari, Tommaso; Corte, Laura

    2017-02-01

    The etiology and pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD) are still unclear. However, multiple lines of evidence suggest a critical role of the toll like receptor 4 (TLR4) in inflammatory response and neuronal death. Neuroinflammation may be associated with the misfolding and aggregation of proteins accompanied by a change in their secondary structure. Recent findings also suggest that biochemical perturbations in cerebral lipid content could contribute to the pathogenesis of central nervous system (CNS) disorders, including PD. Thus, it is of great importance to determine the biochemical changes that occur in PD. In this respect, Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy represents a useful tool to detect molecular alterations in biological systems in response to stress stimuli. By relying upon FTIR approach, this study was designed to elucidate the potential role of TLR4 in biochemical changes induced by methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) neurotoxin in a mouse model of PD. The analysis of the FTIR spectra was performed in different brain regions of both wild type (WT) and toll like receptor 4-deficient (TLR4(-/-)) mice. It revealed that each brain region exhibited a characteristic molecular fingerprint at baseline, with no significant differences between genotypes. Conversely, WT and TLR4(-/-) mice showed differential biochemical response to MPTP toxicity, principally related to lipid and protein composition. These differences appeared to be characteristic for each brain area. Furthermore, the present study showed that WT mice resulted more vulnerable than TLR4(-/-) animals to striatal dopamine (DA) depletion following MPTP treatment. These results support the hypothesis of a possible involvement of TLR4 in biochemical changes occurring in neurodegeneration.

  17. Changes in causal attributions and relationship representations: Are they specific or common mechanisms in the treatment of depression?

    PubMed Central

    Zilcha-Mano, Sigal; Chui, Harold; Dolev, Tohar; McCarthy, Kevin S.; Dinger, Ulrike; Barber, Jacques P.

    2016-01-01

    Background The goal of the study was to examine two central theory-driven mechanisms of change, causal attributions and relational representations, to account for symptomatic improvement in psychodynamic treatment and supportive clinical management, combined with either pharmacotherapy or placebo, in a randomized control trial (RCT) for depression. Method We used data from an RCT for depression, which reported non-significant differences in outcome among patients (N=149) who received supportive-expressive psychotherapy (SET), clinical management combined with pharmacotherapy (CM+MED), or clinical management with placebo pill (CM+PBO) (Barber et al., 2012). Mechanism and outcome measures were administered at intake, mid-treatment, end of treatment, and at a 4-month follow-up. Results Improvements in causal attributions and in relational representations were found across treatments. Changes in causal attributions did not predict subsequent symptomatic level when controlling for prior symptomatic level. In contrast, decrease in negative relational representations predicted subsequent symptom reduction across all treatments, and increase in positive relational representations predicted subsequent symptom reduction only in SET. Limitations The study is limited by its moderate sample size. Additional studies are needed to examine the same questions using additional treatment orientations, such as cognitive treatments. Conclusions Findings demonstrate that changes in negative relational representations may act as a common mechanism of change and precede symptom reduction across psychodynamic therapy and supportive case management combined with either pharmacotherapy or placebo, whereas an increase in positive relational representation may be a mechanism of change specific to psychodynamic therapy. PMID:26771947

  18. Incontinence Treatment: Surgical Treatments

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bowel Incontinence Signs & Symptoms Symptoms of Incontinence Diarrhea Treatment Lifestyle Changes Dietary Tips Medication Bowel Management Biofeedback Surgical Treatments Newer Treatment Options Tips on Finding a Doctor ...

  19. CBT for Childhood Anxiety Disorders: Differential Changes in Selective Attention between Treatment Responders and Non-Responders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Legerstee, Jeroen S.; Tulen, Joke H. M.; Dierckx, Bram; Treffers, Philip D. A.; Verhulst, Frank C.; Utens, Elisabeth M. W. J.

    2010-01-01

    Background: This study examined whether treatment response to stepped-care cognitive-behavioural treatment (CBT) is associated with changes in threat-related selective attention and its specific components in a large clinical sample of anxiety-disordered children. Methods: Ninety-one children with an anxiety disorder were included in the present…

  20. The changing role of surgery in the treatment of primary liver cancer.

    PubMed

    Tang, Z Y; Yu, Y Q; Zhou, X D

    1986-01-01

    For decades, the role of surgery in the treatment of primary liver cancer (PLC) was important but limited. However, a comparison of pathologically proven PLC during the three periods 1958-1966, 1967-1975, and 1976-1984 revealed that as a result of alpha fetoprotein (AFP) serosurvey, changing concepts in surgical oncology, and introduction of new surgical modalities, the role of surgery has become greater. The increasing proportion of subclinical PLC (0, 7.2, and 21.2%) has favored the increasing series resection rate (16.1, 34.7, and 39.6%) and palliative surgery (13.7, 17.0, and 29.8%). The results indicated that early resection, reoperation for subclinical recurrence, resection of huge PLC in stages, and combination of palliative surgery other than resection might be responsible for the increasing 5-year survival rate (1.7, 7.1, and 19.5%) in the entire series.

  1. Dynamical changes of occlusion and articulation during treatment of mandibular angle fractures.

    PubMed

    Baltrusaityte, Ausra; Surna, Algimantas; Pileicikiene, Gaivile; Kubilius, Ricardas; Gleiznys, Alvydas; Baltrusaitis, Marijus

    2013-01-01

    Outcomes of mandibular fractures were stated as frequent reason of temporomandibular joint dysfunctions. The objective of this study was to evaluate dynamical changes of occlusion and articulation during treatment of mandibular angle fractures. 12 subjects with mandibular angle fractures underwent analysis of occlusion and articulation in all stages of healing. Findings of investigations were presented in Posselt's and intercondylar axis diagrams, occlusiograms and relative force vs. time graphs. Comparison of results in first day, 1, 3 and 6 months after trauma showed that despite typical process of fragments healing and good fixation but with insufficiently balanced occlusion and posttraumatic discoordination of muscle activity first signs of TMJ articular discs dysfunction were found. Our results confirm the concept that early rehabilitation of mandibular function and occlusion are essential to prevent developing functional disorders of TMJ.

  2. Surface profile changes of scuffed bearing surfaces. [before and after acid treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauer, J. L.; Fung, S. S.; Jones, W. R., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    A phase locked interference microscope capable of resolving depth differences to 30 A and planar displacements of 6000 A was constructed for the examination of the profiles of bearing surfaces without physical contact. This instrument was used to determine surface chemical reactivity by applying a drop of dilute alcoholic hydrochloric acid and measuring the profile of the solid surface before and after application of this probe. Scuffed bearing surfaces reacted much faster than unscuffed ones, but bearing surfaces which had been previously exposed to lubricants containing an organic chloride reacted much more slowly. In a separate series of experiments, a number of stainless steel plates were heated in a nitrogen atmosphere to different temperatures and their reactivity examined later at room temperature. The change of surface contour as a result of the probe reaction followed an Arrhenius type relation with respect to heat treatment temperature. This result could have implications on the scuffing mechanism.

  3. Expert opinion vs. empirical evidence

    PubMed Central

    Herman, Rod A; Raybould, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Expert opinion is often sought by government regulatory agencies when there is insufficient empirical evidence to judge the safety implications of a course of action. However, it can be reckless to continue following expert opinion when a preponderance of evidence is amassed that conflicts with this opinion. Factual evidence should always trump opinion in prioritizing the information that is used to guide regulatory policy. Evidence-based medicine has seen a dramatic upturn in recent years spurred by examples where evidence indicated that certain treatments recommended by expert opinions increased death rates. We suggest that scientific evidence should also take priority over expert opinion in the regulation of genetically modified crops (GM). Examples of regulatory data requirements that are not justified based on the mass of evidence are described, and it is suggested that expertise in risk assessment should guide evidence-based regulation of GM crops. PMID:24637724

  4. Patients' satisfaction in early breast cancer treatment: Change in treatment over time and impact of HER2-targeted therapy.

    PubMed

    Spano, Jean-Philippe; Azria, David; Gonçalves, Anthony

    2015-06-01

    Although breast cancer remains a major cause of cancer death, its related death rate has dropped in the last years through early tumor detection and better available treatments. With the development of innovative techniques and new molecules as well as new routes of administration, local treatment and adjuvant therapy of early breast cancer have evolved, from mutilating, time-consuming and/or painful procedures to breast-conservative ones, sparing healthy tissues, reducing the total dose of treatment and the treatment time which in turn reduce the occurrence and severity of toxicity. In parallel with these improvements leading to an increase in survival rate, patients' health-related quality of life has become a major concern. This review aims at describing the evolution of early breast cancer treatment, and its impact on patients' quality of life, convenience, and satisfaction, including a special insight into emerging human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-targeted therapy.

  5. Treatment with dexamethasone and vitamin D3 attenuates neuroinflammatory age-related changes in rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Moore, Michelle; Piazza, Alessia; Nolan, Yvonne; Lynch, Marina A

    2007-10-01

    Among the changes which occur in the brain with age is an increase in hippocampal concentration of proinflammatory cytokines like interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) and an increase in IL-1beta-induced signaling. Here we demonstrate that the increase in IL-1beta concentration is accompanied by an increase in expression of IL-1 type I receptor (IL-1RI) and an age-related increase in microglial activation, as shown by increased expression of the cell surface marker, major histocompatibility complex II (MHCII) and increased MHCII staining. The evidence indicates that these age-related changes were abrogated in hippocampus of aged rats treated with dexamethasone and vitamin D3. Similarly, the age-related increases in activation of the stress-activated protein kinase, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), as well as caspase-3 and PARP were all attenuated in hippocampal tissue prepared from rats that received dexamethasone and vitamin D3. The data indicate that dexamethasone and vitamin D3 ameliorated the age-related increase in IFNgamma and suggest that IFNgamma may be the trigger leading to microglial activation, since it increases MHCII mRNA and IL-1beta release from cultured glia. In parallel with its ability to decrease microglial activation in vivo, we report that treatment of cultured glia with dexamethasone and vitamin D3 blocked the lipopolysaccharide increased MHCII mRNA and IL-1beta concentration, while the IL-1beta-induced increases in activation of JNK and caspase 3 in cultured neurons were also reversed by treatment with dexamethasone and vitamin D3. The data suggest that the antiinflammatory effect of dexamethasone and vitamin D3 derives from their ability to downreguate microglial activation.

  6. Changes in Initial Treatment for Prostate Cancer Among Medicare Beneficiaries, 1999-2007

    SciTech Connect

    Dinan, Michaela A.; Robinson, Timothy J.; Zagar, Timothy M.; Scales, Charles D.; Curtis, Lesley H.; Reed, Shelby D.; Lee, W. Robert; Schulman, Kevin A.

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: In the absence of evidence from large clinical trials, optimal therapy for localized prostate cancer remains unclear; however, treatment patterns continue to change. We examined changes in the management of patients with prostate cancer in the Medicare population. Methods and Materials: We conducted a retrospective claims-based analysis of the use of radiation therapy, surgery, and androgen deprivation therapy in the 12 months after diagnosis of prostate cancer in a nationally representative 5% sample of Medicare claims. Patients were Medicare beneficiaries 67 years or older with incident prostate cancer diagnosed between 1999 and 2007. Results: There were 20,918 incident cases of prostate cancer between 1999 and 2007. The proportion of patients receiving androgen deprivation therapy decreased from 55% to 36%, and the proportion of patients receiving no active therapy increased from 16% to 23%. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy replaced three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy as the most common method of radiation therapy, accounting for 77% of external beam radiotherapy by 2007. Minimally invasive radical prostatectomy began to replace open surgical approaches, being used in 49% of radical prostatectomies by 2007. Conclusions: Between 2002 and 2007, the use of androgen deprivation therapy decreased, open surgical approaches were largely replaced by minimally invasive radical prostatectomy, and intensity-modulated radiation therapy replaced three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy as the predominant method of radiation therapy in the Medicare population. The aging of the population and the increasing use of newer, higher-cost technologies in the treatment of patients with prostate cancer may have important implications for nationwide health care costs.

  7. Effect of chelation treatment with dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) on lead-related blood pressure changes

    SciTech Connect

    Khalil-Manesh, F.; Gonick, H.C.; Weiler, E.W.J. Univ. of California, Los Angeles ); Prins, B.; Purdy, R. ); Weber, M.A. Univ. of California, Irvine ); Ren, Qing )

    1994-04-01

    An elevation in mean blood pressure was found in rats treated with low lead (0.01%) for 6 months and then only water for an additional 6 months (discontinuous low lead). Not change in blood pressure was found in rats similarly treated with high lead (0.5%) (discontinuous high lead). Administration of DMSA (0.5% in drinking water), for 5 days every 2 months following cessation of lead administration, resulted in a significant lowering of blood pressure in both groups of animals. In the low-lead but not the high-lead group, this was associated with an increase in plasma cyclic GMP (acting as a second messenger for endothelium-derived relaxing factor, EDRF) and a decrease in the plasma concentration of 12-kDa hypertension-associated protein. Plasma endothelin-3 (ET-3) levels were decreased in discontinuous high-lead rats, increased in dicontinuous low-lead rats, but were unaltered by DMSA treatment. We infer that the elevated blood pressure in the discontinuous low-lead rats is related to an increase in the putative vasoconstrictors, ET-3 and the hypertension-associated protein, without a change in the vasodilator, EDRF. With DMSA treatment, plasma cyclic GMP in low-lead rats increased above normal, and the hypertension-associated protein decreased, resulting in lowered blood pressure. DMSA was shown to act as an antioxidant in vitro. Thus the DMSA effect on plasma cGMP (EDRF) may occur via a scavenging effect on EDRF-inactivating reactive oxygen species. 34 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  8. Multimodality treatment of malignant pleural mesothelioma with or without immunotherapy: does it change anything?

    PubMed

    Lucchi, Marco; Picchi, Alessandro; Alí, Greta; Chella, Antonio; Guglielmi, Giovanni; Cristaudo, Alfonso; Fontanini, Gabriella; Mussi, Alfredo

    2010-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate immunological effector cells and angiogenesis in malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) patients, who underwent multimodality treatments. Clinical and pathological characteristics of 57 patients, with International Mesothelioma Interest Group stage II-III MPM, who underwent two different multimodality treatments (with and without immunotherapy) between 1999 and 2008 were analyzed. CD8+, CD4+ and Foxp3+ tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes, tryptase and chymase mast cells (MCs), CD34, number of microvessels and vascular endothelial growth factor were determined by immunohistochemistry. The histology was 51 epitheliomorf and 6 biphasic. The stage was III in 41 cases and II in 16 cases. With an average follow-up of 69 months (range 9-115) 14 patients are still alive and the overall median actuarial survival is 21.4 months. Tryptase MCs, CD8+ and Foxp3+ lymphocytes had significantly increased in the interleukin 2 (IL-2) treated group. Moreover, the number of microvessels was significantly lower in IL-2 treated patients. This study indicates that immunotherapy leads to an increase in cytotoxic CD8+ lymphocytes and tryptase MCs and to a decrease of the tumoral neoangiogenesis. Changes in MPM microenvironment induced by immunotherapy may play a major role in the local control of this disease and need further investigations.

  9. Microstructural changes of Zr702 induced by pulsed laser surface treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Linjiang; Chen, Baofeng; Wang, Shuyan; Guo, Ning; Huang, Can; Zhou, Zhiming; Huang, Weijiu

    2016-02-01

    In this work, the surface of a fully recrystallized Zr702 is treated by pulsed laser following which microstructural changes are investigated by use of electron backscatter diffraction and electron channeling contrast imaging techniques. The pulsed laser treatment results in three distinctly different microstructural features from the surface to the substrate: fine α plates with a few hundred nanometers in width (zone I), irregular-shaped grains with varied sizes (zone II), and essentially unchanged equiaxed grains (zone III). The α plates result from rapid phase transformation due to easy heat extraction of the pulsed laser with dense nanoscale twins inside those plates closer to the surface. The origin of the irregular-shaped grains is found to be related to insufficient recrystallization of antecedently formed α plates near the substrate. Hardness tests reveal highest value (∼356.7 HV) near the surface in zone I and the lowest value (∼165.2 HV) in zone II. Reasons accounting for the difference are discussed in terms of various microstructural characteristics induced by the pulsed laser surface treatment.

  10. Structural and biomechanical changes in the Achilles tendon after chronic treatment with statins.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, L P; Vieira, C P; Guerra, F D; Almeida, M S; Pimentel, E R

    2015-03-01

    Cases of tendinopathy and tendon ruptures have been reported as side effects associated with statin therapy. This work assessed possible changes in the structural and biomechanical properties of the tendons after chronic treatment with statins. Wistar rats were divided into the following groups: treated with atorvastatin (A-20 and A-80), simvastatin (S-20 and S-80) and the group that received no treatment (C). The doses of statins were calculated using allometric scaling, based on the doses of 80 mg/day and 20 mg/day recommended for humans. The morphological aspect of the tendons in A-20, S-20 and S-80 presented signals consistent with degeneration. Both the groups A-80 and S-80 showed a less pronounced metachromasia in the compression region of the tendons. Measurements of birefringence showed that A-20, A-80 and S-80 groups had a lower degree of organization of the collagen fibers. In all of the groups treated with statins, the thickness of the epitenon was thinner when compared to the C group. In the biomechanical tests the tendons of the groups A-20, A-80 and S-20 were less resistant to rupture. Therefore, statins affected the organization of the collagen fibers and decreased the biomechanical strength of the tendons, making them more predisposed to ruptures.

  11. BnNHL18A shows a localization change by stress-inducing chemical treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Suk-Bae; Ham, Byung-Kook; Park, Jeong Mee; Kim, Young Jin; Paek, Kyung-Hee . E-mail: khpaek95@korea.ac.kr

    2006-01-06

    The two genes, named BnNHL18A and BnNHL18B, showing sequence homology with Arabidopsis NDR1/HIN1-like (NHL) genes, were isolated from cDNA library prepared with oilseed rape (Brassica napus) seedlings treated with NaCl. The transcript level of BnNHL18A was increased by sodium chloride, ethephon, hydrogen peroxide, methyl jasmonate, or salicylic acid treatment. The coding regions of BnNHL18A and BnNHL18B contain a sarcolipin (SLN)-like sequence. Analysis of the localization of smGFP fusion proteins showed that BnNHL18A is mainly localized to endoplasmic reticulum (ER). This result suggests that the SLN-like sequence plays a role in retaining proteins in ER membrane in plants. In response to NaCl, hydrogen peroxide, ethephon, and salicylic acid treatments, the protein localization of BnNHL18A was changed. Our findings suggest a common function of BnNHL18A in biotic and abiotic stresses, and demonstrate the presence of the shared mechanism of protein translocalization between the responses to plant pathogen and to osmotic stress.

  12. Anthelmintic Treatment Does Not Change Foraging Strategies of Female Eastern Grey Kangaroos, Macropus giganteus

    PubMed Central

    Cripps, Jemma K.; Martin, Jennifer K.; Coulson, Graeme

    2016-01-01

    Large mammalian herbivores are commonly infected with gastrointestinal helminths. Heavily parasitised hosts are likely to have increased nutritional requirements and would be predicted to increase their food intake to compensate for costs of being parasitised, but experimental tests of the impacts of these parasites on the foraging efficiency of hosts are lacking, particularly in free-ranging wildlife. We conducted a field experiment on a population of free-ranging eastern grey kangaroos (Macropus giganteus) to test this prediction, removing nematodes from one group of adult females using an anthelmintic treatment. We then carried out observations before and following treatment to assess the influence of parasites on foraging behaviour. Contrary to our predictions, the manipulation of parasite burdens did not result in changes in any of the key foraging variables we measured. Our results suggest that despite carrying large burdens of gastrointestinal parasites, the foraging strategy of female kangaroos is likely be driven by factors unrelated to parasitism, and that kangaroos in high nutritional environments may be able acquire sufficient nutrients to offset the costs of parasitism. We conclude that the drivers of forage intake likely differ between domesticated and free-ranging herbivores, and that free-ranging hosts are likely more resilient to parasitism. PMID:26784582

  13. Anterior segment changes following intravitreal bevacizumab injection for treatment of neovascular glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Canut, MI; Alvarez, A; Nadal, J; Abreu, R; Abreu, JA; Pulido, JS

    2011-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to describe anterior segment changes in a prospective, interventional, noncomparative case series of patients with neovascular glaucoma secondary to proliferative diabetic retinopathy treated with intravitreal bevacizumab. Methods: Five consecutive patients with neovascular glaucoma and a refractory, symptomatic elevation of intraocular pressure and pronounced anterior segment congestion received intravitreal bevacizumab 1.25 mg/0.05 mL. Follow-up examinations were performed at 4–16 weeks by the same specialists, with testing performed at hour 48, week 1, and months 1, 3, and 6 after intravitreal bevacizumab. Results: We observed a significant difference (P = 0.021) between initial and mean neovascularization at three months in all the quadrants. At three months, median intraocular pressure was 19 ± 5.38 (range 12–26) mmHg. In three of the five cases, diode laser cyclophotocoagulation was required, and in one case a trabeculectomy was performed. One patient showed complete synechial angle closure 48 hours after treatment which required cyclodestructive procedures to normalize intraocular pressure. Conclusion: Intravitreal bevacizumab achieves complete regression of neovascularization in neovascular glaucoma secondary to proliferative diabetic retinopathy, and this regression is stable when associated with treatment of the underlying disease and should be investigated more thoroughly as an adjunct in the management of neovascular glaucoma. PMID:21629579

  14. Statins induce biochemical changes in the Achilles tendon after chronic treatment.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Letícia Prado; Vieira, Cristiano Pedrozo; Da Ré Guerra, Flávia; de Almeida, Marcos dos Santos; Pimentel, Edson Rosa

    2013-09-15

    Statins have been widely prescribed as lipid-lowering drugs and are associated with tendon rupture. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the possible biochemical changes in the Achilles tendon of rats after chronic treatment with statins. Dosages of statins were calculated using allometric scaling with reference to the 80mg/day and 20mg/day, doses recommended for humans. The rats were divided into the following groups: treated with simvastatin (S-20 and S-80), treated with atorvastatin (A-20 and A-80), and the control group that received no treatment (C). Measurements of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) in the plasma were performed. The levels of non-collagenous proteins, glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) and hydroxyproline were quantified. Western blotting for collagen I was performed, and the presence of metalloproteinases (MMPs)-2 and -9 was investigated through zymography. The concentration of non-collagenous proteins in S-20 was less than the C group. There was a significant increase in pro-MMP-2 activity in A-80 group and in active MMP-2 in S-20 group compared to the C group. A significant increase in latent MMP-9 activity was observed in both the A-80 and S-20 groups when compared to C group. In the A-20 group, there was a lower amount of collagen I in relation to C group. In addition, a higher concentration of hydroxyproline was found in the S-20 group than the C group. The analysis of GAGs showed a significant increase in the A-20 group when compared to C group. The treatment induced remarkable alterations in the Achilles tendon and the response of the tissue seems to depend of the used statin dosage. The presence of MMP-2 and MMP-9 is evidence of the degradation and remodeling processes in the extracellular matrix of the tendons. Our results show that statins induce imbalance of extracellular matrix components and possibly induce microdamage in tendons.

  15. [Obstructive sleep apnea in the child: an interdisciplinary treatment concept with special reference to craniofacial changes].

    PubMed

    Hochban, W; Hoch, B

    1998-03-01

    Diagnosis and therapy of obstructive sleep-related breathing disturbances SRBD in adults may not be applied without hesitation to children. SRBD in newborn and infants are often due to craniofacial disturbances (Pierre Robin syndrome, Goldenhars syndrome etc.), obesity is of minor importance. More than 30 infants with SRBD and craniofacial changes have been diagnosed and successfully treated over a 2-year period. Conservative therapy starts immediately after birth. The first step in newborn with Pierre Robin syndrome, for instance, is prone position for protrusion of tongue and mandible and mandibular growth stimulation. Intermediate nightly nasopharyngeal tubes are an alternative to nCPAP-/BiPAP treatment. Conventional orthopaedic/orthodontic treatment should not be neglected, even if it takes years to become effective. Surgical therapies are able to support, sometimes to replace or at least to shorten conservative methods. In rare cases when prone position in combination with palatal plates in cases of Robin syndrome, for instance, are not fully effective, mandibular extension is indicated. Aplasia or defects demand adequate surgical reconstruction, even if this does not necessarily mean abolishment of SRBD. In contrast to adults adenotonsillectomy is highly effective in infants and does not only reduce SRBD, but also improves nasal breathing and thus positively influences facial growth. A relatively new method is gradual mandibular distraction osteogenesis according to Ilizarov, which also enhances soft tissue growth. Maxillary and mandibular advancement osteotomies should not be considered before the termination of facial growth. Thanks to this refined treatment concept we were able to avoid tracheotomies in children during the past few years.

  16. The curious conversion of Empire Blue Cross.

    PubMed

    Robinson, James C

    2003-01-01

    The for-profit conversion of Empire Blue Cross in New York challenges the case law and conventional policy wisdom that financial assets from formerly nonprofit organizations should be used to endow independent charitable foundations. The appropriation of Empire's assets by state government itself, and their subsequent deployment to subsidize health care institutions and repay political obligations, changes the conversion process from one that pits nonprofits against for-profits to one that pits private, nonprofit organizations against public-sector programs in the competition for new financial resources.

  17. Empirically Based Comprehensive Treatment Program for Parasuicide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clum, George A.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Suggests secondary parasuicide prevention is the most viable path for future research. Aggressive case findings and primary prevention approaches have failed to reduce suicide attempt rates. A secondary prevention model, based on factors predictive of parasuicide, was developed. Stress reduction and cognitive restructuring were primary goals of…

  18. Reasons for changes in the value of unit pressure of compression products supporting external treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalski, K.; Ilska, A.; Kłonowska, M.

    2016-07-01

    The paper presents the basics of modelling compression products with intended values of unit pressure for body circumferences with fixed and variable radius of curvature. The derived relationships referring to the dimensions of the fabric's circumferences in a relaxed state of the product were based on Laplace law, local values of the radius of curvature, and the characteristics of stretching and relaxing (deformation) of the knitted fabric, described by experimental relation for the stress and relaxation phase for the 6th hysteresis loop, taking into account confidence intervals. The article indicates the possibilities of using 3D scanning techniques of the human body to identify the radius of curvature of various circumference of the human silhouette, for which the intended value of the unit pressure is designed, and quantitative changes in the body deformation due to compression. Classic method of modelling and design of compression products, based on a cylindrical model of the human body does not provide in each case the intended value of unit pressure, according to specific normative requirements, because it neglects the effect of different values of the radius of curvature of the body circumference and the properties of the viscoelastic knitted fabrics. The model and experimental research allowed for a quantitative and qualitative assessment of the reasons for the changes in the value of unit pressure of compression products supporting the process of external treatment.

  19. Drinking-water treatment, climate change, and childhood gastrointestinal illness projections for northern Wisconsin (USA) communities drinking untreated groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uejio, Christopher K.; Christenson, Megan; Moran, Colleen; Gorelick, Mark

    2017-01-01

    This study examined the relative importance of climate change and drinking-water treatment for gastrointestinal illness incidence in children (age <5 years) from period 2046-2065 compared to 1991-2010. The northern Wisconsin (USA) study focused on municipalities distributing untreated groundwater. A time-series analysis first quantified the observed (1991-2010) precipitation and gastrointestinal illness associations after controlling for seasonality and temporal trends. Precipitation likely transported pathogens into drinking-water sources or into leaking water-distribution networks. Building on observed relationships, the second analysis projected how climate change and drinking-water treatment installation may alter gastrointestinal illness incidence. Future precipitation values were modeled by 13 global climate models and three greenhouse-gas emissions levels. The second analysis was rerun using three pathways: (1) only climate change, (2) climate change and the same slow pace of treatment installation observed over 1991-2010, and (3) climate change and the rapid rate of installation observed over 2011-2016. The results illustrate the risks that climate change presents to small rural groundwater municipalities without drinking water treatment. Climate-change-related seasonal precipitation changes will marginally increase the gastrointestinal illness incidence rate (mean: ˜1.5%, range: -3.6-4.3%). A slow pace of treatment installation somewhat decreased precipitation-associated gastrointestinal illness incidence (mean: ˜3.0%, range: 0.2-7.8%) in spite of climate change. The rapid treatment installation rate largely decreases the gastrointestinal illness incidence (mean: ˜82.0%, range: 82.0-83.0%).

  20. Molecular and histological changes in cerebral cortex and lung tissues under the effect of tramadol treatment.

    PubMed

    Awadalla, Eatemad A; Salah-Eldin, Alaa-Eldin

    2016-08-01

    Tramadol abuse is one of the most frequent health problems in Egypt and worldwide. In most cases, tramadol abused by men face a problem with premature ejaculation. Tramadol like other opioids induces a decrease in plasma antioxidant levels, which may reflect a failure of the antioxidant defense mechanism against oxidative damage. The present work aimed to study the possible deleterious effects of oral administration of tramadol on brain and lung tissues in rats. Twenty adult male albino rats were divided into two groups; a control administered with normal saline and tramadol-treated (40mg/kg b.w.) group for 20 successive days. At the end of experimental period, blood was collected and specimens from brains and lungs were taken for histopathological and molecular studies. Malondialdehyde (MDA), reduced glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activities were measured in serum of control and tramadol-treated groups. Brain and lung specimens were histopathological evaluated using light microscopy. The expression levels of apoptotic related genes; Bcl-2, Bax and Caspase-3 were study in brain and lung tissues using RT-PCR analysis. We recorded a significant increase MDA level, while antioxidant enzymes; GSH, SOD and CAT were significantly decreased after tramadol-treatment. The obtained results revealed that tramadol induced a remarkable histomorphological changes in rats' brains (cerebral cortex and hippocampus) and severe histopathological changes in rats' lung when compared to that of control. On molecular level, the expression of the pro-apoptotic Bax and Caspase-3 showed a significant increase whereas the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 decreased markedly indicating that tramadol is harmful at cellular level and can induce apoptotic changes in brain tissues. Our data confirmed the risk of increased oxidative stress, neuronal and pulmonary damage due to tramadol abuse. Although tramadol is reported to be effective in pain management, its toxicity should

  1. Bone changes due to glucocorticoid application in an ovariectomized animal model for fracture treatment in osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Lill, C A; Gerlach, U V; Eckhardt, C; Goldhahn, J; Schneider, E

    2002-05-01

    In a pilot experiment comparing four different modalities for inducing osteoporosis in the sheep, a combination of ovariectomy, calcium/vitamin D-restricted diet and steroid administration was found to generate the highest decrease in bone mineral density (BMD). The aim of the present study was to quantify the outcome of this triple treatment in an animal model of osteoporosis in terms of alteration in bone mass, bone structure and bone mechanics. A total of 32 sheep were divided into two equal groups. Group 1 (age 3-5 years) was used as a normal control. Group 2 (age 7-9 years) was ovariectomized, fed a calcium/vitamin D-restricted diet and injected with methylprednisolone (MP) over 7 months (22 weeks MP solution, 6 weeks MP suspension). The BMD at the distal radius and tibia was determined preoperatively and at repeated intervals bilaterally using quantitative computed tomography. Steroid blood levels were determined 4 and 24 h after selected injections. BMD was measured at L3 and L4 after 7 months. Biopsies were taken from iliac crests, vertebral bodies and femoral heads, and bone structure parameters investigated by three-dimensional micro-CT. Compressive mechanical properties of cancellous bone were determined from biopsies of vertebral bodies and femoral heads. After 7 months of osteoporosis induction the BMD of cancellous bone decreased 36 +/- 3% in the radius and 39 +/- 4% in the tibia. Steroid blood levels 24 h after injection of MP suspension were significantly higher than after injection of MP solution. Changes in structural parameters of cancellous bone from the iliac crest, lumbar spine and femoral head in group 2 indicated osteoporosis-associated changes. In group 2 there was a significant reduction in BMD of the lumbar spine and a significant reduction in stiffness and failure load in compression testing of biopsies of lumbar vertebrae. In sheep, changes in the structural parameters of bone such as trabecular number and separation during osteoporosis

  2. Oestrus synchronization treatment induces histomorphological changes on the uterine tube epithelium of the gilt.

    PubMed

    Juárez-Mosqueda, M L; Anzaldúa Arce, S R; Palma Lara, I; García Dalmán, C; Cornejo Cortés, M A; Córdova Izquierdo, A; Villaseñor Gaona, H; Trujillo Ortega, M E

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the histomorphological changes that occurred in response to two treatments for oestrus synchronization in three different regions of the gilt's uterine tubes epithelium: the ampulla (AMP), ampulla-isthmic junction (AIJ) and isthmus (IST). Nine prepuberal gilts were divided into three groups (n = 3): (1) eCG 400 IU and hCG 200 IU (eCG/hCG), (2) progesterone agonist (P4) and (3) control group. The number of secretory cells (stained with periodic acid-Schiff reaction or PAS-positive cells) decreased in the AMP in the P4 treated group when compared to the control group, whereas, no difference was observed in the number of PAS-negative cells in the AMP of the three groups. A significant decrease in the number of PAS-positive cells was observed in the AIJ and IST of the P4 treated group when compared to the eCG/hCG and control groups. An increase in the number of PAS-negative cells was observed in the AIJ and IST in the P4 treated group. The epithelium height in the AMP and AIJ was increased in the eCG/hCG group when compared to the control and P4 groups. In this last group, we observed a reduced height compared with the other two groups for the AIJ. In the IST, there were no significant changes in the epithelium height of the control or the other two groups (eCG/hCG and P4). The epithelial cells of the P4 treated group had the least amount of cytoplasmic granules and the lowest intensity of PAS staining in the AMP, AIJ and IST. Animals treated with eCG/hCG showed an intermediate number of cytoplasmic granules and intensity in all regions evaluated. These data show that P4 treatment for synchronization induces a significant (P < 0.001) decrease of PAS-positive cells and staining intensity of cytoplasmic granules in the different regions studied and an increased number of PAS-negative cells in the AIJ and IST epithelium. Moreover, eCG/hCG treatment increased the height of the epithelium in the AMP and AIJ, while in this last

  3. Metabolic changes in lipids of rat plasma and hepatocytes induced by 17 alpha-ethynylestradiol treatment.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, K; Koide, K; Hirata, Y; Ohtani, H; Yamada, K; Kajiyama, G

    1986-11-14

    Cultured hepatocytes isolated from livers of 17 alpha-ethynylestradiol-treated rats were used to investigate the change of lipid metabolism induced by administration of 17 alpha-ethynylestradiol. Treatment with 17 alpha-ethynylestradiol caused a decrease of rat plasma lipids (free cholesterol, cholesterol ester, triacylglycerol and phosphatidylcholine). No difference in the ability of urea nitrogen synthesis could be demonstrated between cultured hepatocytes isolated from livers of 17 alpha-ethynylestradiol-treated rats and propylene glycol-treated rats (control). Total cholesterol and cholesterol ester contents of cultured hepatocytes isolated from livers of 17 alpha-ethynylestradiol-treated rats were increased in comparison with those of the control. Triacylglycerol content of cultured hepatocytes was not affected by 17 alpha-ethynylestradiol treatment. There was no difference in the composition of lipid content between liver tissues and cultured hepatocytes. These results suggest that hepatocytes isolated from livers maintain the character of livers treated with 17 alpha-ethynylestradiol or livers treated with propylene glycol. Free cholesterol and cholesterol ester synthesis from [14C]acetic acid by cultured hepatocytes isolated from livers of 17 alpha-ethynylestradiol-treated rats were decreased to about 30% of the control. Triacylglycerol and polar lipid (phospholipid) synthesis from [14C]acetic acid were not affected by 17 alpha-ethynylestradiol treatment. Microsomal hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA reductase activity of rat liver treated with 17 alpha-ethynylestradiol was decreased to about 50% of control. The secretions of free cholesterol, cholesterol ester, triacylglycerol, phosphatidylcholine, apolipoprotein BL and BS by cultured hepatocytes isolated from livers of 17 alpha-ethynylestradiol treated rats were not decreased when compared with the control. Because lipid and apolipoprotein secretions from cultured hepatocytes treated with 17 alpha

  4. Assessment of potential climate change impacts on peatland dissolved organic carbon release and drinking water treatment from laboratory experiments.

    PubMed

    Tang, R; Clark, J M; Bond, T; Graham, N; Hughes, D; Freeman, C

    2013-02-01

    Catchments draining peat soils provide the majority of drinking water in the UK. Over the past decades, concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) have increased in surface waters. Residual DOC can cause harmful carcinogenic disinfection by-products to form during water treatment processes. Increased frequency and severity of droughts combined with and increased temperatures expected as the climate changes, have potentials to change water quality. We used a novel approach to investigate links between climate change, DOC release and subsequent effects on drinking water treatment. We designed a climate manipulation experiment to simulate projected climate changes and monitored releases from peat soil and litter, then simulated coagulation used in water treatment. We showed that the 'drought' simulation was the dominant factor altering DOC release and affected the ability to remove DOC. Our results imply that future short-term drought events could have a greater impact than increased temperature on DOC treatability.

  5. What 'empirical turn in bioethics'?

    PubMed

    Hurst, Samia

    2010-10-01

    Uncertainty as to how we should articulate empirical data and normative reasoning seems to underlie most difficulties regarding the 'empirical turn' in bioethics. This article examines three different ways in which we could understand 'empirical turn'. Using real facts in normative reasoning is trivial and would not represent a 'turn'. Becoming an empirical discipline through a shift to the social and neurosciences would be a turn away from normative thinking, which we should not take. Conducting empirical research to inform normative reasoning is the usual meaning given to the term 'empirical turn'. In this sense, however, the turn is incomplete. Bioethics has imported methodological tools from empirical disciplines, but too often it has not imported the standards to which researchers in these disciplines are held. Integrating empirical and normative approaches also represents true added difficulties. Addressing these issues from the standpoint of debates on the fact-value distinction can cloud very real methodological concerns by displacing the debate to a level of abstraction where they need not be apparent. Ideally, empirical research in bioethics should meet standards for empirical and normative validity similar to those used in the source disciplines for these methods, and articulate these aspects clearly and appropriately. More modestly, criteria to ensure that none of these standards are completely left aside would improve the quality of empirical bioethics research and partly clear the air of critiques addressing its theoretical justification, when its rigour in the particularly difficult context of interdisciplinarity is what should be at stake.

  6. Changes in endocrine profiles during ovsynch and ovsynch plus norprolac treatment in Murrah buffalo heifers at hot summer season.

    PubMed

    Roy, K S; Prakash, B S

    2009-04-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the changes in hormonal profiles during ovsynch and ovsynch plus norprolac treatment in Murrah buffalo heifers following timed artificial insemination (TAI) at stressful summer months, through intensive endocrine analysis. The norprolac (an anti-prolactin drug) at the dose rate of 10.0 mg/animal /day effectively suppressed the level of prolactin upto 30 hours. The hormones quantified in blood plasma samples collected before, during and after ovsynch and ovsynch plus norprolac treatment were LH, prolactin, progesterone, estradiol-17beta and total estrogens. The plasma prolactin and progesterone concentrations were negatively correlated (r = - 0.24) during summer estrous cycle, which indicated prolactin-induced suppression of progesterone secretion through poor luteal development. The ovsynch treatment reduced the incidence of anestrous from 45% before treatment to only 18% after treatment. The norprolac induced prolactin suppression improved the efficiency of ovsynch treatment upto 100% cyclicity after treatment in comparison to 36% acyclicity before treatment. In both the treatments 45% and 55% of animal became pregnant after TAI, respectively. The high prolactin secretion contributed to poor fertility by lowering gonadal hormones (estradiol-17beta, total estrogens and progesterone) production in summer months. This finding of endocrine changes suggests that ovsynch protocol for estrus synchronization has potential application for improvement of fertility in repeat breeding buffaloes even during extreme summer months through suppression of prolactin secretion.

  7. Deterioration of Intellect among Children Surviving Leukemia: IQ Test Changes Modify Estimates of Treatment Toxicity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulhern, Raymond, K; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Assessed association of young age at treatment, cranial irradiation, and time since treatment with intellectual deterioration among 49 long-term survivors of childhood leukemia. Found no significant effects of treatment group (low-dose cranial irradiation versus high-dose chemotherapy) or age at treatment. Small but statistically significant…

  8. Psychopathy, Treatment Change, and Recidivism in High-Risk, High-Need Sexual Offenders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Looman, Jan; Abracen, Jeffrey; Serin, Ralph; Marquis, Peter

    2005-01-01

    The present study investigated 154 consecutive admissions to the Regional Treatment Center (Ontario) Sex Offender Treatment Program with reference to psychopathy and outcome. Ratings of treatment behavior, as well as clinical judgments as to whether risk was reduced, were coded based on treatment reports. With reference to Psychopathy…

  9. Diel changes in water chemistry in an arsenic-rich stream and treatment-pond system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gammons, C.H.; Grant, T.M.; Nimick, D.A.; Parker, S.R.; DeGrandpre, M.D.

    2007-01-01

    Arsenic concentrations are elevated in surface waters of the Warm Springs Ponds Operable Unit (WSPOU), located at the head of the upper Clark Fork River Superfund site, Montana, USA. Arsenic is derived from historical deposition of smelter emissions (Mill and Willow Creeks) and historical mining and milling wastes (Silver Bow Creek). Although long-term monitoring has characterized the general seasonal and flow-related trends in As concentrations in these streams and the pond system used to treat Silver Bow Creek water, little is known about solubility controls and sorption processes that influence diel cycles in As concentrations. Diel (24-h) sampling was conducted in July 2004 and August 2005 at the outlet of the treatment ponds, at two locations along a nearby reconstructed stream channel that diverts tributary water around the ponds, and at Silver Bow Creek 2??km below the ponds. Dissolved As concentration increased up to 51% during the day at most of the stream sites, whereas little or no diel change was displayed at the treatment-pond outlet. The strong cycle in streams is explained by pH- and temperature-dependent sorption of As onto hydrous metal oxides or biofilms on the streambed. Concentrations of dissolved Ca2+ and HCO3- at the stream sites showed a diel temporal pattern opposite to that of As, and geochemical modeling supports the hypothesis that the concentrations of Ca2+ and HCO3- were controlled by precipitation of calcite during the warm afternoon hours when pH rose above 9.0. Nightly increases in dissolved Mn and Fe(II) concentrations were out of phase with concentrations of other divalent cations and are more likely explained by redox phenomena. ?? 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Weight change therapy as a potential treatment for end-stage ovarian carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Oshakbayev, Kuat Pernekulovich; Alibek, Kenneth; Ponomarev, Igor Olegovich; Uderbayev, Nurlybek Nurlanovich; Dukenbayeva, Bibazhar Abayevna

    2014-01-01

    Patient: Female, 41 Final Diagnosis: Ovarian carcinoma Symptoms: Ascites • hepatomegaly • weight loss Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Oncology Objective: Unusual or unexpected effect of treatment Background: The aim of this case report is to present the results of treatment of end-stage ovarian carcinoma in a 41-year-old women using weight loss therapy. Case Report: We describe the case of a female aged 41 years with epithelial invasive ovarian cancer of III–IV stage, T3N2M1. Concurrent diseases were: abdominal carcinomatosis; hepatomegaly; ascites; condition after laparocentesis and skin-abdominal fistula; condition after 6 courses of neo-adjuvant polychemotherapy; hypertension II stage, risk factor of 3–4; dyslipidemia; and metabolic syndrome. A weight loss method based on a very-low-calorie diet and physical activity was used. Body weight was reduced from 74 kg to 53 due to loss of adipose tissue after 6 months of therapy. At the same time, the percentages of water and muscle tissue were increased significantly. While overweight was reducing, clinical, laboratory, and instrumental results were improving. As a result of the weight loss therapy, about ≈100 mm-sized ovarian cancer was transformed into smaller-sized ovarian cysts. Conclusions: An analgesic effect was also achieved without use of narcotic or non-narcotic analgesics. These cyto-reversible processes were documented by laboratory and instrumental data. The mechanisms behind these differences remain to be elucidated. Future research with a larger study cohort and longer follow-up is needed to further investigate the role of caloric restriction diet in cancer cell changes in ovarian cancer. PMID:24847411

  11. Change in nasal congestion index after treatment in patients with chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyposis

    PubMed Central

    Sahin-Onder, Serap; Oysu, Cagatay; Deveci, Ildem; Sahin, Samil; Aktas, Betul

    2016-01-01

    Background: The management of chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyposis (CRSwNP) involves both surgical and medical approaches, and remains a controversial subject. Objective: The objective of this prospective, randomized, controlled trial was to compare the medical and surgical treatments of CRSwNP in terms of their effect on the nasal congestion index (NCI). Methods: Forty-eight patients with CRSwNP were randomized either to medical or surgical therapy. Pretreatment and 3- and 6-month posttreatment assessments of the visual analog scale score, the 20-Item Sino-Nasal Outcome Test, saccharine clearance time, nasal endoscopy, and NCI measurement with acoustic rhinometry were performed. Forty-one subjects were included in the analysis. Results: Both the medical and surgical interventions for CRSwNP resulted in significant improvement in the visual analog scale score, 20-Item Sino-Nasal Outcome Test, saccharine clearance time, and nasal endoscopic examination scores. There was no difference between the two groups in terms of the percentage change from baseline for any of the parameters at the 6-month posttreatment assessment. NCI showed no significant difference from baseline. Similarly, no significant difference was found between the medical and surgical groups in terms of their effect on the NCI (p > 0.05). Conclusion: Because NCI does not correlate with standard subjective measures in outcomes for this group of patients, it cannot be used as an outcome measurement of treatment of subjects with CRSwNP. Results of this prospective randomized study did not find any additional benefit of surgical therapy over medical therapy in subjects with CRSwNP.

  12. Empirical microeconomics action functionals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baaquie, Belal E.; Du, Xin; Tanputraman, Winson

    2015-06-01

    A statistical generalization of microeconomics has been made in Baaquie (2013), where the market price of every traded commodity, at each instant of time, is considered to be an independent random variable. The dynamics of commodity market prices is modeled by an action functional-and the focus of this paper is to empirically determine the action functionals for different commodities. The correlation functions of the model are defined using a Feynman path integral. The model is calibrated using the unequal time correlation of the market commodity prices as well as their cubic and quartic moments using a perturbation expansion. The consistency of the perturbation expansion is verified by a numerical evaluation of the path integral. Nine commodities drawn from the energy, metal and grain sectors are studied and their market behavior is described by the model to an accuracy of over 90% using only six parameters. The paper empirically establishes the existence of the action functional for commodity prices that was postulated to exist in Baaquie (2013).

  13. Differential changes in functional disability and pain intensity over the course of psychological treatment for children with chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Lynch-Jordan, Anne M; Sil, Soumitri; Peugh, James; Cunningham, Natoshia; Kashikar-Zuck, Susmita; Goldschneider, Kenneth R

    2014-10-01

    Patients presenting for treatment of chronic pain often believe that pain reduction must be achieved before returning to normal functioning. However, treatment programs for chronic pain typically take a rehabilitative approach, emphasizing decreasing pain-related disability first with the expectation that pain reduction will follow. This information is routinely provided to patients, yet no studies have systematically examined the actual trajectories of pain and disability in a clinical care setting. In this study of youth with chronic pain (N=94, 8 to 18 years), it was hypothesized that 1) functional disability and pain would decrease over the course of psychological treatment for chronic pain and 2) functional disability would decrease more quickly than pain intensity. Participants received cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for pain management (M=5.6 sessions) plus standard medical care. The Functional Disability Inventory and a Numeric Rating Scale of average pain intensity were completed by the child at every CBT session. Hierarchical linear modeling was conducted to examine the longitudinal trajectories of disability and pain. Standardized estimates of the slopes of change were obtained to test differences in rates of change between pain and disability. Results showed an overall significant decline in functional disability over time. Although pain scores reduced slightly from pretreatment to posttreatment, the longitudinal decline over treatment was not statistically significant. As expected, the rate of change of disability was significantly more rapid than pain. Evidence for variability in treatment response was noted, suggesting the need for additional research into individual trajectories of change in pediatric pain treatment.

  14. Evaluation of dental arch width and form changes after orthodontic treatment and retention with a new computerized method.

    PubMed

    Taner, Tülin Ugur; Ciger, Semra; El, Hakan; Germeç, Derya; Es, Alphan

    2004-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate longitudinal arch width and form changes and to define arch form types with a new computerized method. Maxillary and mandibular models of 21 Class II Division 1 patients were examined before treatment (T(0)), after treatment (T(1)), and an average of 3 years after retention (T(2)). Arch width measurements were made directly on scanned images of maxillary and mandibular models. Arch form changes at T(0)-T(1) and T(1)-T(2) were evaluated by superimposing the computer-generated Bezier arch curves with a computer program. Types of dental arch forms were defined by superimposing them with the pentamorphic arch system, which included 5 different types of arch forms: normal, ovoid, tapered, narrow ovoid, and narrow tapered. Maxillary arch widths were increased during orthodontic treatment. Mandibular posterior arch widths were also increased. The expansion of the mandibular arch forms was less than in the maxillary arch forms. Arch width changes were generally stable, except for reduction in maxillary and mandibular interlateral, inter-first premolar, and mandibular intercanine widths. Pretreatment maxillary arch forms were mostly tapered; mandibular arch forms were tapered and narrow tapered. In maxillary arch forms, 76% of the treatment changes were maintained. Mandibular arch form was maintained in 67% of the sample, both during treatment and after retention. In mandibular arches, 71% of orthodontically induced arch form changes were maintained.

  15. Evaluating the effect of wood ultrastructural changes from mechanical treatment on kinetics of monomeric sugars and chemicals production in acid bisulfite treatment.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yalan; Wang, Jinwu; Wolcott, Michael P

    2017-02-01

    Currently, various chemical-mechanical treatments were widely used in biofuel production to achieve high total sugar yields. However, the interaction between two treatments was scarcely investigated. In this study, we employed a ball milling process to create ultrastructural changes for Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) micronized wood powders. The 0, 30, and 60min ball milled wood powders resulted in a crystallinity index of 0.41, 0.21, and 0.10 respectively. It was found that the ultrastructural changes accelerate monomeric sugars production without influencing the yield of sugar degradation products. The optimal acid bisulfite treatment time was substantially decreased from 120min to 40min as the cellulose crystallinity decreased. Meanwhile, total sugar yield increased from 65% to 92% and had a linear relation with a decrease of the cellulose crystallinity.

  16. Change of mandibular position during two-phase orthodontic treatment of skeletal class II in the Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Rhonda Nga Yi; Hägg, Urban; Wong, Ricky Wing Kit; Liao, Chongshan; Yang, Yanqi

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the change in mandibular position during a two-phase orthodontic treatment of skeletal Class II malocclusion. Thirty consecutively treated Chinese male adolescents who had undergone two-phase treatment with Herbst appliance and fixed appliance and fulfilled the specific selection criteria were sampled. Cephalograms taken at T0 (before treatment), T1 (at the end of functional appliance treatment), and T2 (at the end of fixed appliance treatment) were analyzed. The change in sagittal positioning of the mandible was 6.8 ± 3.44 mm in phase I (T0-T1), 0.4 ± 2.79 mm in phase II (T1-T2), and 7.2 ± 4.61 mm in total. The mandible came forward in 100% of the patients at T1. In phase II, it came forward in one-third (positive group) remained unchanged in one-third (stable group) and went backward in one-third (negative group) of the patients. At T2, it came forward twice as much in the positive group compared to the negative group. Mandibular length was significantly increased in 100% of the patients in both phases. In conclusion, during the treatment with functional appliance, the mandibular prognathism increases in all patients, whereas during the treatment with fixed appliance there is no significant change in mandibular prognathism.

  17. Changes in skin barrier during treatment with systemic alitretinoin: focus on skin susceptibility and stratum corneum ceramides.

    PubMed

    Jungersted, Jakob Mutanu; Høgh, Julie K; Hellgren, Lars I; Jemec, Gregor B E; Agner, Tove

    2010-11-01

    Alitretinoin is a new drug for systemic treatment of chronic hand eczema. Previous functional tests of skin topically treated with retinoids have indicated impaired skin barrier function, but no data are available on barrier parameters after systemic alitretinoin treatment. To investigate the effect of systemic alitretinoin on skin barrier function and response to irritants, a secondary objective was to determine if changes occur in the lipid profile of stratum corneum after treatment with systemic alitretinoin. We conducted an open clinical intervention study on eight people ascribed to systemic alitretinoin treatment. The criteria for being ascribed to alitretinoin were chronic hand eczema and insufficient therapeutic response to potent topical corticosteroids. Before initiation and after 2 months of systemic treatment with 30 mg alitretinoin, a challenge with sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS) was performed on the volar forearm and evaluated by trans-epidermal water loss (TEWL), erythema, and a cyanoacrylate skin sample was obtained for lipid analysis. We found no significant changes in response to SLS irritation as evaluated by TEWL and erythema, after treatment with alitretinoin for 2 months. No significant changes in stratum corneum lipids were found after 2 months of treatment. In conclusion, systemic alitretinoin does not influence skin susceptibility to irritants or the ceramide profile of stratum corneum.

  18. Changes in perception of treatment efficacy are associated to the magnitude of the nocebo effect and to personality traits.

    PubMed

    Corsi, Nicole; Emadi Andani, Mehran; Tinazzi, Michele; Fiorio, Mirta

    2016-07-29

    The nocebo effect in motor performance consists in a reduction of force and increase of fatigue following the application of an inert treatment that the recipient believes to be effective. This effect is variable across individuals and it is usually stronger if conditioning -exposure to the active effect of the treatment- precedes a test session, in which the treatment is inert. In the current explorative study we used a conditioning procedure to investigate whether subjective perception of treatment effectiveness changes between the conditioning and the test session and whether this change is related to dispositional traits and to the nocebo-induced reduction of force. Results showed that 56.1% of participants perceived the treatment as more effective in the test than in the conditioning session, had a more pronounced reduction of force, felt more effort and sense of weakness and were characterized by lower levels of optimism and higher anxiety traits compared to the other 43.9% of participants, who conversely perceived the treatment as less effective in the test session than in the conditioning. These findings highlight for the first time a link between changes in perception of treatment effectiveness, personality traits and the magnitude of the nocebo response in motor performance.

  19. Change of Mandibular Position during Two-Phase Orthodontic Treatment of Skeletal Class II in the Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Hägg, Urban; Wong, Ricky Wing Kit; Liao, Chongshan; Yang, Yanqi

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the change in mandibular position during a two-phase orthodontic treatment of skeletal Class II malocclusion. Thirty consecutively treated Chinese male adolescents who had undergone two-phase treatment with Herbst appliance and fixed appliance and fulfilled the specific selection criteria were sampled. Cephalograms taken at T0 (before treatment), T1 (at the end of functional appliance treatment), and T2 (at the end of fixed appliance treatment) were analyzed. The change in sagittal positioning of the mandible was 6.8±3.44 mm in phase I (T0-T1), 0.4±2.79 mm in phase II (T1-T2), and 7.2±4.61 mm in total. The mandible came forward in 100% of the patients at T1. In phase II, it came forward in one-third (positive group) remained unchanged in one-third (stable group) and went backward in one-third (negative group) of the patients. At T2, it came forward twice as much in the positive group compared to the negative group. Mandibular length was significantly increased in 100% of the patients in both phases. In conclusion, during the treatment with functional appliance, the mandibular prognathism increases in all patients, whereas during the treatment with fixed appliance there is no significant change in mandibular prognathism. PMID:25695103

  20. Change in Brain Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy after Treatment during Acute HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Sailasuta, Napapon; Ross, William; Ananworanich, Jintanat; Chalermchai, Thep; DeGruttola, Victor; Lerdlum, Sukalaya; Pothisri, Mantana; Busovaca, Edgar; Ratto-Kim, Silvia; Jagodzinski, Linda; Spudich, Serena; Michael, Nelson; Kim, Jerome H.; Valcour, Victor

    2012-01-01

    Objective Single voxel proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) can be used to monitor changes in brain inflammation and neuronal integrity associated with HIV infection and its treatments. We used MRS to measure brain changes during the first weeks following HIV infection and in response to antiretroviral therapy (ART). Methods Brain metabolite levels of N-acetyl aspartate (NAA), choline (tCHO), creatine (CR), myoinositol (MI), and glutamate and glutamine (GLX) were measured in acute HIV subjects (n = 31) and compared to chronic HIV+individuals (n = 26) and HIV negative control subjects (n = 10) from Bangkok, Thailand. Metabolites were measured in frontal gray matter (FGM), frontal white matter (FWM), occipital gray matter (OGM), and basal ganglia (BG). Repeat measures were obtained in 17 acute subjects 1, 3 and 6 months following initiation of ART. Results After adjustment for age we identified elevated BG tCHO/CR in acute HIV cases at baseline (median 14 days after HIV infection) compared to control (p = 0.0014), as well as chronic subjects (p = 0.0023). A similar tCHO/CR elevation was noted in OGM; no other metabolite abnormalities were seen between acute and control subjects. Mixed longitudinal models revealed resolution of BG tCHO/CR elevation after ART (p = 0.022) with tCHO/CR similar to control subjects at 6 months. Interpretation We detected cellular inflammation in the absence of measurable neuronal injury within the first month of HIV infection, and normalization of this inflammation following acutely administered ART. Our findings suggest that early ART may be neuroprotective in HIV infection by mitigating processes leading to CNS injury. PMID:23229129

  1. Pulmonary Changes After Radiotherapy for Conservative Treatment of Breast Cancer: A Prospective Study

    SciTech Connect

    Krengli, Marco Sacco, Mariano; Loi, Gianfranco; Masini, Laura; Ferrante, Daniela; Gambaro, Giuseppina; Ronco, Marco; Magnani, Corrado; Carriero, Alessandro

    2008-04-01

    Purpose: Radiotherapy (RT) after conservative surgery for breast cancer involves part of the pulmonary parenchyma with a potential detrimental effect of reducing the normal functional reserve. Such an effect deserves to be studied in depth, considering the given long life expectancy of these women. We prospectively analyzed high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) and pulmonary function tests (PFTs) with correlation with dosimetric data from RT. Methods and Materials: Lung HRCT and PFTs were performed in 41 women who had undergone conservative surgery for breast cancer before and 3 and 9 months after postoperative RT. The PFTs included forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in 1 s, total lung capacity, maximal expiratory flow at 50% and 25% of vital capacity, and the diffusion capacity of carbon monoxide. HRCT was matched with the RT treatment plan images to analyze the dosimetric correlation. Results: At 3 months after RT, the lung alterations were classified at HRCT as follows: 46.3% were Grade 1, 24.4% Grade 2, and 7.3% Grade 3, and at 9 months, 58.5% were Grade 1, 19.5% Grade 2, and 0% Grade 3. The PFTs showed a significant decrease at 3 months, with only partial recovery at 9 months. Chemotherapy, but not hormonal therapy, was associated with PFT changes. The grade of fibrosis increased with increasing lung volume treated to a dose {>=}25 Gy. Conclusion: Lung changes, mainly related to damage to the alveolar-capillary barrier and smallest airway ramifications, were observed at 3 months, with only partial recovery at 9 months after RT. Minimizing the lung volume receiving {>=}25 Gy could reduce pulmonary toxicity.

  2. Determinants of weight change in patients on basal insulin treatment: an analysis of the DIVE registry

    PubMed Central

    Bramlage, Peter; Bluhmki, Tobias; Fleischmann, Holger; Kaltheuner, Matthias; Beyersmann, Jan; Holl, Reinhard W; Danne, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Objective We aimed to describe patterns of weight change in insulin-naive patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) starting basal insulin (BI) treatment. Research design and methods Diabetes Versorgungs-Evaluation (DIVE) is an observational, multicenter, prospective registry in patients with T2DM. Patients were divided into those initiating BI therapy for the first time (with optional oral antidiabetic drugs (OADs)) and those initiating OADs only (OADo). Results 521 patients were included in the analysis, 113 in the BI arm and 408 in the OADo arm. Relative to baseline, the BI group gained an average of 0.98±7.1 kg at 1 year, compared with a loss of 1.52±11.8 kg in the OADo group (p<0.001). This difference remained statistically significant when expressed as a proportional change from baseline (+0.014±0.08 vs −0.015±0.12, respectively (p<0.001)). Baseline weight (regression coefficient (RC) 0.89; 95% CI 0.81 to 0.97; p<0.001) and diabetes duration (RC 2.52; 95% CI 0.53 to 4.52; p=0.01) were the only factors identified as significant predictors of weight gain between baseline and 1 year follow-up in BI patients. Conclusions Though BI therapy leads to modest weight gain over the subsequent year, this may be limited by BI initiation at an early stage of the disease. As such, delaying the start of insulin therapy based on fears of weight gain appears counter-productive, and should be reconsidered. PMID:28176957

  3. Using enhanced and integrated services to improve response to standard methadone treatment: changing the clinical infrastructure of treatment networks.

    PubMed

    Neufeld, Karin; Kidorf, Michael; King, Van; Stoller, Ken; Clark, Michael; Peirce, Jessica; Brooner, Robert K

    2010-03-01

    Outcomes are presented from opioid-dependent outpatients (N = 81) participating in a new community-based initiative designed to improve access to enhanced substance abuse and psychiatric services in a publicly supported methadone maintenance treatment network in Baltimore, MD. The initiative, entitled Community Access to Specialized Treatment (CAST), is located at the Addiction Treatment Services, a program within this network. Network programs referred patients engaged in unremitting drug use who are at risk for discharge to CAST, where they received methadone substitution, individual and group counseling within an adaptive platform, behavioral contingencies to reinforce adherence, and on-site psychiatric evaluation and care. Patients returned to their referring program after producing at least two consecutive weeks of drug-negative urine samples and full counseling adherence. CAST was well utilized by the community. Patients had high rates of adherence to scheduled individual and group counseling services (93% and 73%, respectively); 43% of referrals successfully completed the program in an average of 101 days. This community-wide service delivery approach is a novel alternative to integrating intensive substance abuse and psychiatric care at each program within a treatment network.

  4. Darwinism and cultural change

    PubMed Central

    Godfrey-Smith, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Evolutionary models of cultural change have acquired an important role in attempts to explain the course of human evolution, especially our specialization in knowledge-gathering and intelligent control of environments. In both biological and cultural change, different patterns of explanation become relevant at different ‘grains’ of analysis and in contexts associated with different explanatory targets. Existing treatments of the evolutionary approach to culture, both positive and negative, underestimate the importance of these distinctions. Close attention to grain of analysis motivates distinctions between three possible modes of cultural evolution, each associated with different empirical assumptions and explanatory roles. PMID:22734059

  5. Darwinism and cultural change.

    PubMed

    Godfrey-Smith, Peter

    2012-08-05

    Evolutionary models of cultural change have acquired an important role in attempts to explain the course of human evolution, especially our specialization in knowledge-gathering and intelligent control of environments. In both biological and cultural change, different patterns of explanation become relevant at different 'grains' of analysis and in contexts associated with different explanatory targets. Existing treatments of the evolutionary approach to culture, both positive and negative, underestimate the importance of these distinctions. Close attention to grain of analysis motivates distinctions between three possible modes of cultural evolution, each associated with different empirical assumptions and explanatory roles.

  6. Regional brain activity change predicts responsiveness to treatment for stuttering in adults.

    PubMed

    Ingham, Roger J; Wang, Yuedong; Ingham, Janis C; Bothe, Anne K; Grafton, Scott T

    2013-12-01

    Developmental stuttering is known to be associated with aberrant brain activity, but there is no evidence that this knowledge has benefited stuttering treatment. This study investigated whether brain activity could predict progress during stuttering treatment for 21 dextral adults who stutter (AWS). They received one of two treatment programs that included periodic H2(15)O PET scanning (during oral reading, monologue, and eyes-closed rest conditions). All participants successfully completed an initial treatment phase and then entered a phase designed to transfer treatment gains; 9/21 failed to complete this latter phase. The 12 pass and 9 fail participants were similar on speech and neural system variables before treatment, and similar in speech performance after the initial phase of their treatment. At the end of the initial treatment phase, however, decreased activation within a single region, L. putamen, in all 3 scanning conditions was highly predictive of successful treatment progress.

  7. Sleep In Older Adults: Normative Changes, Sleep Disorders, and Treatment Options

    PubMed Central

    Gooneratne, Nalaka S.; Vitiello, Michael V.

    2014-01-01

    1 Synopsis Sleep disorders are common in older adults: Approximately 5% of older adults meet criteria for clinically significant insomnia disorders and 20% for sleep apnea syndromes. When considering insomnia symptoms, it is important to distinguish age-appropriate changes in sleep from clinically significant insomnia, with the latter distinguished by the presence of significant daytime symptoms such as fatigue. Evaluation with a sleep diary and screening for comorbid conditions, especially mood disorders, is essential. Non-pharmacologic therapies, such as cognitive-behavioral therapy for insomnia, can be highly effective and have sustained benefit. A broad range of pharmacologic therapies are also available but can have unwanted psychomotor effects. If left untreated, insomnia can be associated with increased risk of depression and significant impairments in quality of life. In regards to sleep apnea, a high index of suspicion is crucial for effective diagnosis because symptoms commonly noted in younger patients, such as obesity or loud snoring, may not be present in older patients. Diagnosis and management is fairly similar across age groups, except that a more nuanced approach to weight loss is warranted in older adults. The increasing use of home-based portable polysomnography and auto-titrating positive-airway pressure therapy can reduce barriers to treatment. PMID:25037297

  8. Proteome Changes in Maize Embryo (Zea mays L) Induced by Ion Beam Implantation Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yongliang; Tang, Jihua; Qin, Guangyong; Huo, Yuping; Tian, Shuangqi

    2009-08-01

    Low energy ion beam implantation was applied to the maize (Zea mays L) embryo proteome using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Protein profile analysis detected more than 1100 protein spots, 72 of which were determined to be expressed differently in the treated and control (not exposed to ion beam implantation) embryos. Of the 72 protein spots, 53 were up-regulated in the control and 19 were more abundantly expressed in the ion beam-treated embryos. The spots of up- or down-regulated proteins were identified by matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). Among the identified proteins, 11 were up-regulated in the treated embryos. Four of these up-regulated proteins were antioxidant molecules, three were related to stress response, two to sugar metabolism and two were associated with heat shock response. Of the five proteins up-regulated in the control embryos, three were functionally related to carbohydrate metabolism; the functions of the remaining two proteins were unknown. The data collected during this study indicate that treatment of maize embryos with low energy ion beam implantation induces changes in stress tolerance enzymes/proteins, possibly as a result of alterations in metabolism.

  9. A Pilot Study of Bacteriological Population Changes through Potable Water Treatment and Distribution

    PubMed Central

    Norton, Cheryl D.; LeChevallier, Mark W.

    2000-01-01

    This pilot study compares the compositions of bacterial biofilms in pipe networks supplied with water containing either high levels of biodegradable organic matter (BOM) or low levels of BOM (conventionally or biologically treated, respectively). The Microbial Identification System for fatty acid analysis was utilized in this study to identify a large number of organisms (>1,400) to determine population changes in both conventionally and biologically treated water and biofilms. Data generated during this study indicated that suspended bacteria have little impact on biofilms, and despite treatment (conventional or biological), suspended microbial populations were similar following disinfection. Prechlorination with free chlorine resulted not only in reduced plate count values but also in a dramatic shift in the composition of the bacterial population to predominately gram-positive bacteria. Chlorination of biologically treated water produced the same shifts toward gram-positive bacteria. Removal of assimilable organic carbon by the biologically active filters slowed the rate of biofilm accumulation, but biofilm levels were similar to those found in conventionally treated water within several weeks. Iron pipes stimulated the rate of biofilm development, and bacterial levels on disinfected iron pipes exceeded those for chlorinated polyvinyl chloride pipes. The study showed that the iron pipe surface dramatically influenced the composition, activity, and disinfection resistance of biofilm bacteria. PMID:10618235

  10. Drug-Induced Sleep Endoscopy Changes the Treatment Concept in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnoea

    PubMed Central

    Jor, Ondřej; Novák, Vilém; Matoušek, Petr

    2016-01-01

    The present study evaluated whether drug-induced sleep endoscopy (DISE) helps identify the site of obstruction in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). A total of 51 consecutive patients with polysomnography-confirmed OSA were enrolled in this prospective study. The presumed site of obstruction was determined according to history, otorhinolaryngologic examination, and polysomnography and a therapeutic plan designed before DISE. In 11 patients with severe OSA and/or previously failed continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment, DISE with simultaneous CPAP was performed. Multilevel collapse was noted in 49 patients (96.1%). The most frequent multilevel collapse was palatal, oropharyngeal, and tongue base collapse (n = 17, 33.3%), followed by palatal and oropharyngeal collapse (n = 12, 23.5%). Pathology of the larynx (epiglottis) was observed in 16 patients (31.4%). The laryngeal obstruction as a reason for intolerance of CPAP was observed in 3/11 (27.3%) patients. After DISE, the surgical plan was changed in 31 patients (60.8%). The results indicate that DISE helps identify the site of obstruction in the upper airways in patients with OSA more accurately and that the larynx plays an important role in OSA. PMID:28070516

  11. Drug-Induced Sleep Endoscopy Changes the Treatment Concept in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnoea.

    PubMed

    Hybášková, Jaroslava; Jor, Ondřej; Novák, Vilém; Zeleník, Karol; Matoušek, Petr; Komínek, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    The present study evaluated whether drug-induced sleep endoscopy (DISE) helps identify the site of obstruction in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). A total of 51 consecutive patients with polysomnography-confirmed OSA were enrolled in this prospective study. The presumed site of obstruction was determined according to history, otorhinolaryngologic examination, and polysomnography and a therapeutic plan designed before DISE. In 11 patients with severe OSA and/or previously failed continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment, DISE with simultaneous CPAP was performed. Multilevel collapse was noted in 49 patients (96.1%). The most frequent multilevel collapse was palatal, oropharyngeal, and tongue base collapse (n = 17, 33.3%), followed by palatal and oropharyngeal collapse (n = 12, 23.5%). Pathology of the larynx (epiglottis) was observed in 16 patients (31.4%). The laryngeal obstruction as a reason for intolerance of CPAP was observed in 3/11 (27.3%) patients. After DISE, the surgical plan was changed in 31 patients (60.8%). The results indicate that DISE helps identify the site of obstruction in the upper airways in patients with OSA more accurately and that the larynx plays an important role in OSA.

  12. Age-related longitudinal changes in depressive symptoms following breast cancer diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Avis, Nancy E; Levine, Beverly; Naughton, Michelle J; Case, L Douglas; Naftalis, Elizabeth; Van Zee, Kimberly J

    2013-05-01

    Younger women being treated for breast cancer consistently show greater depression shortly after diagnosis than older women. In this longitudinal study, we examine whether these age differences persist over the first 26 months following diagnosis and identify factors related to change in depressive symptoms. A total of 653 women within 8 months of a first time breast cancer diagnosis completed questionnaires at baseline and three additional timepoints (6, 12, and 18 months after baseline) on contextual/patient characteristics, symptoms, and psychosocial variables. Chart reviews provided cancer and treatment-related data. The primary outcome was depressive symptomatology assessed by the Beck Depression Inventory. Among women younger than age 65, depressive symptoms were highest soon after diagnosis and significantly decreased over time. Depressive symptoms remained stable and low for women aged 65 and older. Age was no longer significantly related to depressive symptoms in multivariable analyses controlling for a wide range of covariates. The primary factors related to levels of and declines in depressive symptomatology were the ability to pay for basics; completing chemotherapy with doxorubicin; and decreases in pain, vasomotor symptoms, illness intrusiveness, and passive coping. Increased sense of meaning/peace and social support were related to decreased depression. Interventions to reduce symptoms and illness intrusiveness, improve a sense of meaning and peace, and increase social support, may help reduce depression and such interventions may be especially relevant for younger women.

  13. Psychological mechanisms of effective cognitive-behavioral treatments for PTSD.

    PubMed

    Zalta, Alyson K

    2015-04-01

    Several psychotherapies have been established as effective treatments for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) including prolonged exposure, cognitive processing therapy, and cognitive therapy for PTSD. Understanding the key mechanisms of these treatments, i.e., how these treatments lead to therapeutic benefits, will enable us to maximize the efficacy, effectiveness, and efficiency of these therapies. This article provides an overview of the theorized mechanisms for each of these treatments, reviews the recent empirical evidence on psychological mechanisms of these treatments, discusses the ongoing debates in the field, and provides recommendations for future research. Few studies to date have examined whether changes in purported treatment mechanisms predict subsequent changes in treatment outcomes. Future clinical trials examining treatments for PTSD should use study designs that enable researchers to establish the temporal precedence of change in treatment mechanisms prior to symptom reduction. Moreover, further research is needed that explores the links between specific treatment components, underlying change mechanisms, and treatment outcomes.

  14. Changes in the profiles of smokers seeking cessation treatment and in its effectiveness in Galicia (Spain) 2001–10

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In recent years, the prevalence of daily smokers has decreased in all developed countries due to a great variety of factors. Despite this decrease, the effectiveness of clinical treatments has decreased and several studies report a change in smokers’ characteristics. The purpose of the present study is to analyze the changes in the characteristics of Spanish smokers who seek smoking cessation treatment between 2001 and 2010 and the changes in the effectiveness of such treatment. Methods The sample was made up of 870 smokers who sought psychological treatment for giving up smoking at the Smoking Cessation Unit in the Faculty of Psychology of the University of Santiago de Compostela (Spain) during the period 2001 to 2010. Results Smokers in the 2006–2010 group, compared to those in the 2001–2005 group, were older, smoked fewer cigarettes per day and of a brand with fewer mg/nicotine, had been smoking longer, were less motivated to give up smoking, and had more antecedents of depression. Quit rates were validated by testing smokers' carbon monoxide (CO) levels. Percentages of abstinence were higher in the 2001–2005 group than in the 2006–2010 group (58.7% vs. 52.15 at the end of treatment, p = 0.05); 30.8% vs. 24.2% at 6 months follow-up, p = 0.031; 27.5% vs. 22% at 12 months follow-up, p = 0.059). Although abstinence decreased more than 5% in the 2006–2010 group there were no differences between the two groups in nicotine dependence. Those participants who did not assist to the follow-up were considered smokers at pretreatment level. Conclusions In Spain there has been a qualitative change in the profile of the smokers seeking smoking cessation treatment. Treatment effectiveness has decreased, and the variables predicting intervention outcome have changed. PMID:24938635

  15. Migraine Preventive Treatment and Its Influence on the Change in Therapeutic Intensity with Disease-Specific Abortive Agents

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-09

    the headache allowing a return to normal function. Despite availability of effective abortive medication, several problems with this treatment have...Working Title: MIGRAINE PREVENTIVE TREATMENT AND ITS INFLUENCE ON THE CHANGE IN THERAPEUTIC INTENSITY WITH DISEASE-SPECIFIC ABORTIVE AGENTS ABSTRACT...Objective: To (1) examine prescribing patterns of migraine-specific abortive medication among new users and non-users of migraine preventive therapy

  16. Subchronic treatment with aldosterone induces depression-like behaviours and gene expression changes relevant to major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Hlavacova, Natasa; Wes, Paul D; Ondrejcakova, Maria; Flynn, Marianne E; Poundstone, Patricia K; Babic, Stanislav; Murck, Harald; Jezova, Daniela

    2012-03-01

    The potential role of aldosterone in the pathophysiology of depression is unclear. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that prolonged elevation of circulating aldosterone induces depression-like behaviour accompanied by disease-relevant changes in gene expression in the hippocampus. Subchronic (2-wk) treatment with aldosterone (2 μg/100 g body weight per day) or vehicle via subcutaneous osmotic minipumps was used to induce hyperaldosteronism in male rats. All rats (n = 20/treatment group) underwent a modified sucrose preference test. Half of the animals from each treatment group were exposed to the forced swim test (FST), which served both as a tool to assess depression-like behaviour and as a stress stimulus. Affymetrix microarray analysis was used to screen the entire rat genome for gene expression changes in the hippocampus. Aldosterone treatment induced an anhedonic state manifested by decreased sucrose preference. In the FST, depressogenic action of aldosterone was manifested by decreased latency to immobility and increased time spent immobile. Aldosterone treatment resulted in transcriptional changes of genes in the hippocampus involved in inflammation, glutamatergic activity, and synaptic and neuritic remodelling. Furthermore, aldosterone-regulated genes substantially overlapped with genes affected by stress in the FST. This study demonstrates the existence of a causal relationship between the hyperaldosteronism and depressive behaviour. In addition, aldosterone treatment induced changes in gene expression that may be relevant to the aetiology of major depressive disorder. Subchronic treatment with aldosterone represents a new animal model of depression, which may contribute to the development of novel targets for the treatment of depression.

  17. Pulmonary function changes and its influencing factors after preoperative brace treatment in patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis

    PubMed Central

    Ran, Bo; Fan, Yuxin; Yuan, Feng; Guo, Kaijin; Zhu, Xiaodong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: The aim of the study was to retrospectively investigate the changes in pulmonary function and its influencing factors in patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) undergoing preoperative brace treatment or not. Methods: Total 237 AIS patients (43 boys, 194 girls) who underwent operations and had a complete record of pulmonary function tests were enrolled and were divided into preoperative brace treatment group (brace treatment group, n = 60) and without preoperative brace treatment group (control group, n = 177). The pulmonary function parameters were compared between the 2 groups. Multiple linear regression analysis was performed to explore whether the variables, including age at operation, height, coronal Cobb's angle of main curve, number of involved vertebrae, sagittal Cobb's angle of thoracic curve, brace treatment time per day and brace treatment duration, influenced pulmonary function in the brace treatment group. Results: No significant differences were observed in both predicted and actually measured value of forced vital capacity (FVC) and predicted value of forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) between 2 groups (P > 0.05), but actually measured FEV1, the percentage of actually measured and predicted value of FVC (FVC%) and FEV1 (FEV1%) were significantly lower in the brace treatment group than those in the control group (P < 0.05). Importantly, the above changes in actually measured FEV1 and FEV1% were obvious in AIS patients presented with a main thoracic curve (P < 0.05), but not in patients with a primary thoracolumbar/lumbar curve. Multiple linear regression analysis indicated that only the sagittal Cobb's angle of the thoracic curve was positively, but preoperative brace treatment duration was negatively associated with both the FVC% and FEV1% (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Preoperative brace treatment may deteriorate pulmonary function in AIS patients with thoracic curve. The small sagittal Cobb angle and

  18. Neural Rhythms of Change: Long-Term Improvement after Successful Treatment in Children with Disruptive Behavior Problems

    PubMed Central

    Woltering, Steven; Liao, Victoria; Liu, Zhong-Xu; Granic, Isabela

    2015-01-01

    Neural changes were investigated for children with disruptive behavior problems one year after a treatment program ended. Thirty-nine children and their parents visited the research lab before, after, and a year after treatment ended. During those lab visits, electroencephalography (EEG) was recorded during a challenging Go/No-go task. Treatment consisted of intensive 14-week combined cognitive behavioral therapy and parent management training sessions. For the analysis, participants were divided into long-term improvers (IMPs) and long-term nonimprovers (NIMPs) based on changes in their externalizing problem scores. The results showed early no-go theta power (4–8 Hz, 100–250 ms) decreased for long-term IMPs compared to NIMPs. When participants were divided based on changes in their comorbid internalizing symptoms, effects were stronger and reductions in theta power were found for early as well as later phases (250–650 ms). We provided preliminary evidence that theta power is a useful neural measure to trace behavioral change