Science.gov

Sample records for changing environment workshop

  1. The Future of Nonproliferation in a Changed and Changing Environment: A Workshop Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Dreicer, M.

    2016-08-30

    The Center for Global Security Research and Global Security Principal Directorate at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory convened a workshop in July 2016 to consider “The Future of Nonproliferation in a Changed and Changing Security Environment.” We took a broad view of nonproliferation, encompassing not just the treaty regime but also arms control, threat reduction, counter-­proliferation, and countering nuclear terrorism. We gathered a group of approximately 60 experts from the technical, academic, political, defense and think tank communities and asked them what—and how much—can reasonably be accomplished in each of these areas in the 5 to 10 years ahead. Discussion was on a not-­for-­attribution basis. This document provides a summary of key insights and lessons-­learned and is provided to help stimulate broader public discussion of these issues. It is a collection of ideas as informally discussed and debated among a group of experts. The ideas reported here are the personal views of individual experts and should not be attributed to Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

  2. Ecotones in a changing environment: Workshop on ecotones and global change

    SciTech Connect

    Risser, P.G.

    1990-02-01

    The Scientific Committee on Problems of the Environment (SCOPE) has organized an international project to synthesize and advance current theory on the influence of ecotones, or transition zones between ecosystems, on biodiversity and flows of energy, nutrients, water, and project is other materials between ecosystems. In particular, the entire project is designed to evaluate the influence of global climate change and land-use practices on biodiversity and ecological flows associated with ecotones, and will assess the feasibility of monitoring ecotones as early indicators of global change. The later stages of the project will recommend landscape management strategies for ecotones that produce desirable patterns of biodiversity and ecological flows. The result of the project--a comprehensive body of information on the theory and management of biodiversity and ecological flows associated with ecotones--will be part of the planning for research to be carried out under the International Geosphere-Biosphere Program.

  3. Environments. Beginnings Workshop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenman, Jim; And Others

    2001-01-01

    Four articles suggest ways to create good child care environments: (1) "What Kind of Place for Child Care in the 21st Century?" (Greenman); (2) "Strategies for Enhancing Children's Use of the Environment" (Curtis); (3) "Designing the Family Child Care Environment" (Osborn); (4) "Imagine! Child Care--A Great Place for Teachers, Too" (Haack,…

  4. Outdoor Environments. Beginnings Workshop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Child Care Information Exchange, 2003

    2003-01-01

    Presents seven articles on outdoor play environments: "Are We Losing Ground?" (Greenman); "Designing and Creating Natural Play Environments for Young Children" (Keeler); "Adventure Playgrounds and Outdoor Safety Issues" (McGinnis); "Trust, the Earth and Children: Birth to Three" (Young); "Outdoor Magic…

  5. Visual Computing Environment Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawrence, Charles (Compiler)

    1998-01-01

    The Visual Computing Environment (VCE) is a framework for intercomponent and multidisciplinary computational simulations. Many current engineering analysis codes simulate various aspects of aircraft engine operation. For example, existing computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes can model the airflow through individual engine components such as the inlet, compressor, combustor, turbine, or nozzle. Currently, these codes are run in isolation, making intercomponent and complete system simulations very difficult to perform. In addition, management and utilization of these engineering codes for coupled component simulations is a complex, laborious task, requiring substantial experience and effort. To facilitate multicomponent aircraft engine analysis, the CFD Research Corporation (CFDRC) is developing the VCE system. This system, which is part of NASA's Numerical Propulsion Simulation System (NPSS) program, can couple various engineering disciplines, such as CFD, structural analysis, and thermal analysis.

  6. Energy and the Environment. Citizens' Workshop Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Energy Research and Development Administration, Oak Ridge, TN.

    This publication was produced for the Citizens' Workshop Program on Energy and the Environment. Included in this monograph are sections on: (1) energy and the environment; (2) the energy problem (amount remaining, how it is used); (3) Environmental problems of energy use; an energy-environmental quiz; (4) energy for the future (types, sources,…

  7. Environment, Education and Sustainable Development: Workshop Proposal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Convergence, 2006

    2006-01-01

    This article discusses the 7th World Assembly of the International Council of Adult Education. It also presents a workshop proposal on Environment, Ecology and Sustainable Development, based mainly on the Treaty of Environmental Education for Sustainable Societies and Global Responsibility. The proposal emphasizes on an inclusive, permanent and…

  8. Workshop III: Improving the Workplace Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gledhill, Igle; Butcher, Gillian

    2015-12-01

    Research has shown that companies with more diversity and a better workplace perform better. So what makes a good workplace in physics, where women and men can work to their full potential? In the Improving the Workplace Environment workshop of the 5th IUPAP International Conference on Women in Physics, participants heard about initiatives taking place in Canada, the UK, Japan, and India to improve the workplace environment and shared good practices from around the world. Some of the less tangible aspects of the workplace environment, such as unconscious bias and accumulation of advantage and disadvantage, were explored.

  9. International Lighting in Controlled Environments Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tibbits, Ted W. (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    Lighting is a central and critical aspect of control in environmental research for plant research and is gaining recognition as a significant factor to control carefully for animal and human research. Thus this workshop was convened to reevaluate the technology that is available today and to work toward developing guidelines for the most effective use of lighting in controlled environments with emphasis on lighting for plants but also to initiate interest in the development of improved guidelines for human and animal research.

  10. Mars Recent Climate Change Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haberle, Robert M.; Owen, Sandra J.

    2012-11-01

    Mars Recent Climate Change Workshop NASA/Ames Research Center May 15-17, 2012 Climate change on Mars has been a subject of great interest to planetary scientists since the 1970's when orbiting spacecraft first discovered fluvial landforms on its ancient surfaces and layered terrains in its polar regions. By far most of the attention has been directed toward understanding how "Early Mars" (i.e., Mars >~3.5 Gya) could have produced environmental conditions favorable for the flow of liquid water on its surface. Unfortunately, in spite of the considerable body of work performed on this subject, no clear consensus has emerged on the nature of the early Martian climate system because of the difficulty in distinguishing between competing ideas given the ambiguities in the available geological, mineralogical, and isotopic records. For several reasons, however, the situation is more tractable for "Recent Mars" (i.e., Mars during past 20 My or so). First, the geologic record is better preserved and evidence for climate change on this time scale has been building since the rejuvenation of the Mars Exploration Program in the late 1990's. The increasing coverage of the planet from orbit and the surface, coupled with accurate measurements of surface topography, increasing spatial resolution of imaging cameras, improved spectral resolution of infrared sensors, and the ability to probe the subsurface with radar, gamma rays, and neutron spectroscopy, has not only improved the characterization of previously known climate features such as polar layered terrains and glacier-related landforms, but has also revealed the existence of many new features related to recent climate change such as polygons, gullies, concentric crater fill, and a latitude dependent mantle. Second, the likely cause of climate change - spin axis/orbital variations - is more pronounced on Mars compared to Earth. Spin axis/orbital variations alter the seasonal and latitudinal distribution of sunlight, which can

  11. Man and His Environment (Environmental Workshop).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Paula; Dillner, Harry

    This monograph presents what was originally designed as a nine-week course in population ecology. The course guide is intended to provide the teacher and student with a basic framework for an environmental workshop. Learning objectives are not listed, based on the intent that they be developed as teachers and students interact during the workshop.…

  12. Light in Thermal Environments (LITE) Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Light emitted from high temperature black smokers (350 C) at mid-ocean ridge spreading centers has been documented, but the source of this light and its photochemical and biological consequences have yet to be investigated. Preliminary studies indicate that thermal radiation alone might account for the 'glow' and that a novel photoreceptor in shrimp colonizing black smoker chimneys may detect this 'glow.' A more controversial question is whether there may be sufficient photon flux of appropriate wavelengths to support geothermally-driven photosynthesis (GDP) by microorganisms. Although only a very low level of visible and near infrared light may be emitted from any single hydrothermal vent, several aspects of the light make it of more than enigmatic interest. First, the light is clearly linked to geophysical (and perhaps geochemical) processes; its attributes may serve as powerful index parameters for monitoring change in these processes. Second, while the glow at a vent orifice is a very local phenomenon, more expansive subsurface environments may be illuminated, thereby increasing the spatial scale at which biological consequences of this light might be considered. Third, in contrast to intermittent bioluminescent light sources in the deep sea, the light emitted at vents almost certainly glows or flickers continuously over the life of the individual black smokers (years to decades); collectively, light emitted from black smokers along the ocean's spreading centers superimposed on background Cerenkov radiation negates the concept of the deep sea as an environment devoid of abiotic light. Finally, the history of hydrothermal activity predates the origin of life; light in the deep sea has been a continuous phenomenon on a geological time scale and may have served either as a seed or refugium for the evolution of biological photochemical reactions or adaptations.

  13. Evaluating a Gender Diversity Workshop to Promote Positive Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burford, James; Lucassen, Mathijs F. G.; Hamilton, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Drawing on data from an Aotearoa/New Zealand study of more than 230 secondary students, this article evaluates the potential of a 60-min gender diversity workshop to address bullying and promote positive environments for learning. Students completed pre- and postworkshop questionnaires. The authors used descriptive statistics to summarize results…

  14. PREFACE: Soil Change Matters International Workshop - Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacEwan, R.; Alexander, J.

    2015-07-01

    Soils change in response to land use, land management and climate. Understanding the mechanisms and rates of change in fundamental soil properties, their extent across landscapes, and the drivers of change, is critical for management of soil and land to ensure enduring productivity and the provision of ecosystem services. A reliable evidence base for soil change can be created through research into fundamental soil properties and processes, which coupled with monitoring, can be used to develop models to support management and policy decisions. Soil scientists, land managers and policy makers occupy different intellectual domains and each can contribute to a soil change dialogue focussed on providing the best science for managers, policy and decision-making. Clarity is needed concerning the knowledge needs of policy makers and the latter need to understand what is achievable by science and at what cost. However, communication is often limited by the discipline-specific language used by each group. Facilitated communication would improve the impact of science on policy by enabling scientists to better understand policy maker needs and enabling policy makers to better understand scientific data interpretations, limitations, and gaps. The international workshop 'Soil Change Matters' in Bendigo, Australia 24-27 March 2014, brought together 200 delegates across these intellectual domains to talk to each other, share conclusions, questions and data, and to learn about scenarios for soil change and for soil policies.

  15. PHOTOVOLTAICS AND THE ENVIRONMENT 1998. REPORT ON THE WORKSHOP PHOTOVOLTAICS AND THE ENVIRONMENT 1999

    SciTech Connect

    FTHENAKIS,V.; ZWEIBEL,K.; MOSKOWITZ,P.

    1999-02-01

    The objective of the workshop ``Photovoltaics and the Environment'' was to bring together PV manufacturers and industry analysts to define EH and S issues related to the large-scale commercialization of PV technologies.

  16. Environments with Families in Mind: Beginnings Workshop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pelo, Ann; Garrett, Julie; Hilliard, Deadru; Cecil, Jane; Cothran, Kimberly; White, Lynn; Bergman, Roberta; Gainer, Sue; Albrecht, Kay

    2002-01-01

    Five articles suggest ways to design welcoming, comforting, supporting, stimulating caregiving environments that are respectful to children and families: (1) "From Borders to Bridges: Transforming Our Relationships with Parents" (Ann Pelo); (2) "Supporting Multicultural, Multilingual Families" (Julie Garrett); (3) "Making Families Welcome" (Deadru…

  17. Passive Wireless Hermetic Environment Monitoring System for Spray Painting Workshop.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lifeng; Ma, Jingjing; Huang, Yan; Tang, Dan; Huang, Qing-An

    2016-08-01

    Passive wireless sensors have the advantages of operating without a power supply and remote sensing capability. Hence, they are very suitable for some harsh environments, such as hermetic environments, rotating parts, or very high temperature environments. The spray painting workshop is such a harsh environment, containing a large amount of flammable paint mist and organic gas. Aiming at this special environment of spray painting workshop, a passive wireless hermetic environment monitoring system was designed, fabricated, and demonstrated. The proposed system is composed of a transponder and a reader, and the circuit design of each part is given in detail in this paper. The power and the data transmission between the transponder and the reader are realized by the inductive coupling mechanism. Utilizing the back scatter modulation and channel multiplexing, the frequency signals generated by three different environmental sensors-together with their interfaces in the transponder-are wirelessly read out by the reader. Because of the harsh environment of the spray painting room, the package of the monitoring system is quite important. Three different kinds of filter films for the system package were compared. The experimental results show that the composite filter film aluminum anodic oxide/polytetrafluoroethylene (AAO/PTFE) has the best performance. After fabrication, the measured temperature, humidity, and pressure sensitivities were measured and found to be 180 Hz/°C in the range of 0~60 °C, 100 Hz/%RH in the range of 15~95 %RH, and 42 Hz/hPa in the range of 600~1100 hPa, respectively. Additionally, the remote sensing distance of the monitoring system reaches 4 cm. Finally, the passive wireless hermetic environment monitoring system was installed on the glass wall of the spray painting workshop and was successfully demonstrated.

  18. Passive Wireless Hermetic Environment Monitoring System for Spray Painting Workshop

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lifeng; Ma, Jingjing; Huang, Yan; Tang, Dan; Huang, Qing-An

    2016-01-01

    Passive wireless sensors have the advantages of operating without a power supply and remote sensing capability. Hence, they are very suitable for some harsh environments, such as hermetic environments, rotating parts, or very high temperature environments. The spray painting workshop is such a harsh environment, containing a large amount of flammable paint mist and organic gas. Aiming at this special environment of spray painting workshop, a passive wireless hermetic environment monitoring system was designed, fabricated, and demonstrated. The proposed system is composed of a transponder and a reader, and the circuit design of each part is given in detail in this paper. The power and the data transmission between the transponder and the reader are realized by the inductive coupling mechanism. Utilizing the back scatter modulation and channel multiplexing, the frequency signals generated by three different environmental sensors—together with their interfaces in the transponder—are wirelessly read out by the reader. Because of the harsh environment of the spray painting room, the package of the monitoring system is quite important. Three different kinds of filter films for the system package were compared. The experimental results show that the composite filter film aluminum anodic oxide/polytetrafluoroethylene (AAO/PTFE) has the best performance. After fabrication, the measured temperature, humidity, and pressure sensitivities were measured and found to be 180 Hz/°C in the range of 0~60 °C, 100 Hz/%RH in the range of 15~95 %RH, and 42 Hz/hPa in the range of 600~1100 hPa, respectively. Additionally, the remote sensing distance of the monitoring system reaches 4 cm. Finally, the passive wireless hermetic environment monitoring system was installed on the glass wall of the spray painting workshop and was successfully demonstrated. PMID:27490546

  19. Office productivity and workstation environment control workshop: Research planning

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-11-01

    The purpose of this R D planning workshop was to identify and define specific office building industry research that will lead to new and/or improved uses of electricity to provide individual (local) office environment control and increase office worker productivity. The workshop conducted October 11--12, 1988 was the third in a series of meetings held to identify research needs related to office productivity. Participants included experts in the fields of office acoustics, lighting, thermal comfort, air quality, environmental system controls, space planning, automation, and productivity. The first meeting was held May 31--June 1 to broadly define issues related to office productivity research and limitations in existing office environmental systems. A second meeting was held August 22--23 with another group of experts to define the state of the art in office environmental systems and productivity measurement and to begin to identify specific research that could lead to improved systems (and increased productivity). Recommendations from this group became the basis for workshop discussions. The October workshop combined the participants from the first two meetings and added a new group of experts to respond to the conclusions being developed from the earlier work. 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Changing Teachers' Feedback Practices: A Workshop Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fonseca, Jesuína; Carvalho, Carolina; Conboy, Joseph; Valente, Maria Odete; Gama, Ana Paula; Salema, Maria Helena; Fiúza, Edite

    2015-01-01

    Feedback can promote teacher-student relations and student academic involvement, performance and self-regulation. However, some research indicates that teachers do not always employ feedback effectively. There is a need to promote teachers' appropriate use of feedback in the classroom. We describe a long-term workshop designed to enhance teachers'…

  1. Workshop on Mercury: Space Environment, Surface, and Interior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This volume contains abstracts that have been accepted for presentation at the Workshop on Mercury: Space Environment, Surface, and Interior, October 4-5, 2001. The Scientific Organizing Committee consisted of Mark Robinson (Northwestern University), Marty Slade (Jet Propulsion Laboratory), Jim Slavin (NASA Goddard Space Flight Center), Sean Solomon (Carnegie Institution), Ann Sprague (University of Arizona), Paul Spudis (Lunar and Planetary Institute), G. Jeffrey Taylor (University of Hawai'i), Faith Vilas (NASA Johnson Space Center), Meenakshi Wadhwa (The Field Museum), and Thomas Watters (National Air and Space Museum). Logistics, administrative, and publications support were provided by the Publications and Program Services Departments of the Lunar and Planetary Institute.

  2. Recommendations from the Workshop: Environment, Ecology and Sustainable Development ICAE 7th World Assembly

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Viezzer, Moema L.

    2006-01-01

    One of the workshops presented at the 7th International Council for Adult Education (ICAE) Assembly was focused on environment, ecology, and sustainable development. The workshop had participants from Asia, Africa, Europe, South America, North America and the South Pacific. This article presents a list of recommendations from the workshop.

  3. Finding the Right Direction: Using Career Development Workshops in Managing Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Alan; Rollin, Christine

    1997-01-01

    Individuals with a strong career direction are more likely to be positive about organizational change. A career development workshop involving psychometrics helps individuals create personal development plans that encompass both personal needs/aspirations and the impact of the organizational environment. (SK)

  4. Workshop Report on Virtual Worlds and Immersive Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langhoff, Stephanie R.; Cowan-Sharp, Jessy; Dodson, Karen E.; Damer, Bruce; Ketner, Bob

    2009-01-01

    The workshop revolved around three framing ideas or scenarios about the evolution of virtual environments: 1. Remote exploration: The ability to create high fidelity environments rendered from external data or models such that exploration, design and analysis that is truly interoperable with the physical world can take place within them. 2. We all get to go: The ability to engage anyone in being a part of or contributing to an experience (such as a space mission), no matter their training or location. It is the creation of a new paradigm for education, outreach, and the conduct of science in society that is truly participatory. 3. Become the data: A vision of a future where boundaries between the physical and the virtual have ceased to be meaningful. What would this future look like? Is this plausible? Is it desirable? Why and why not?

  5. Native Peoples-Native Homelands Climate Change Workshop: Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maynard, Nancy G.

    2003-01-01

    The Native Peoples-Native Homelands Climate Change Workshop was held on October 28 through November 01,1998, as part of a series of workshops being held around the U.S. to improve the understanding of the potential consequences of climate variability and change for the Nation. This workshop was specifically designed by Native Peoples to examine the impacts of climate change and extreme weather variability on Native Peoples and Native Homelands from an indigenous cultural and spiritual perspective and to develop recommendations as well as identify potential response actions. The workshop brought together interested Native Peoples, representatives of Tribal governments, traditional elders, Tribal leaders, natural resource managers, Tribal College faculty and students, and climate scientists fiom government agencies and universities. It is clear that Tribal colleges and universities play a unique and critical role in the success of these emerging partnerships for decision-making in addition to the important education function for both Native and non-Native communities such as serving as a culturally-appropriate vehicle for access, analysis, control, and protection of indigenous cultural and intellectual property. During the discussions between scientists and policy-makers from both Native and non-Native communities, a number of important lessons emerged which are key to building more effective partnerships between Native and non-Native communities for collaboration and decision-making for a more sustainable future. This talk summarizes the key issues, recommendations, and lessons learned during this workshop.

  6. Native Peoples-Native Homelands Climate Change Workshop: Lessons Learned

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maynard, N. G.

    2003-12-01

    The Native Peoples-Native Homelands Climate Change Workshop was held on October 28 through November 01, 1998, as part of a series of workshops being held around the U.S. to improve the understanding of the potential consequences of climate variability and change for the Nation. This workshop was specifically designed by Native Peoples to examine the impacts of climate change and extreme weather variability on Native Peoples and Native Homelands from an indigenous cultural and spiritual perspective and to develop recommendations as well as identify potential response actions. The workshop brought together interested Native Peoples, representatives of Tribal governments, traditional elders, Tribal leaders, natural resource managers, Tribal College faculty and students, and climate scientists from government agencies and universities. It is clear that Tribal colleges and universities play a unique and critical role in the success of these emerging partnerships for decision-making in addition to the important education function for both Native and non-Native communities such as serving as a culturally- appropriate vehicle for access, analysis, control, and protection of indigenous cultural and intellectual property. During the discussions between scientists and policy-makers from both Native and non-Native communities, a number of important lessons emerged which are key to building more effective partnerships between Native and non-Native communities for collaboration and decision-making for a more sustainable future. This talk summarizes the key issues, recommendations, and lessons learned during this workshop.

  7. Changes in knowledge after attending a community pharmacists’ asthma workshop

    PubMed Central

    García Corpas, Jose P; Ocaña Arenas, Ana; González García, Lorena; López Domínguez, Estefania; García Jiménez, Emilio; Amariles, Pedro; Faus, Maria J.

    Background Pharmacists can play an important role in both the detection of asthma and its monitoring in patients with asthma. Objective To assess the change in asthma knowledge, and associated variables, of pharmacists attending the “Pharmacotherapy follow- up of Adult Bronchial Asthma” workshops run by the Pharmaceutical Care Center of Stada Laboratories. Methods All participants in the “Pharmacotherapy follow-up of Adult Bronchial Asthma” workshops completed a pre-test and a post-test. Those who left the workshop and those who did not complete the tests were not included in the analysis. Tests were scored from 0 to 10, and the change in scores was analyzed. Results Of the 90 participating pharmacists, 79 fulfilled the inclusion criteria. 81% (64) were female, and their average age was 38.8 years [CI95%= 36.65-40.81]. The average pre-test score was 3.65 [CI95%=3.29-4.01]; 72.2% of the pharmacists scored less than 5 points. The average post-test score was 7.33 [CI95%=7.01-7.65]. The average change in scores was 3.68 [CI95%=3.29-4.07]. No statistical significance was found between this change in scores and other variables analyzed (age, gender, previous training, or position in the pharmacy). Conclusion CAF Stada “Adult Bronchial Asthma” workshops increased pharmacists’ general knowledge. PMID:25214901

  8. Changing Systems To Personalize Learning: Introduction to the Personalization Workshops.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, John; Miles, Sherri, Ed.

    This is a workshop designed to help high school change teams increase their understanding of personalized learning and learn ways to adapt existing practices to improve student engagement. The series draws from six years of assisting schools that have been struggling to find ways for their diverse students to meet uniform expectations. It is also…

  9. Climate variability and climate change vulnerability and adaptation. Workshop summary

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatti, N.; Cirillo, R.R.; Dixon, R.K.

    1995-12-31

    Representatives from fifteen countries met in Prague, Czech Republic, on September 11-15, 1995, to share results from the analysis of vulnerability and adaptation to global climate change. The workshop focused on the issues of global climate change and its impacts on various sectors of a national economy. The U.N. Framework Convention on Climate Change (FCCC), which has been signed by more than 150 governments worldwide, calls on signatory parties to develop and communicate measures they are implementing to respond to global climate change. An analysis of a country`s vulnerability to changes in the climate helps it identify suitable adaptation measures. These analyses are designed to determine the extent of the impacts of global climate change on sensitive sectors such as agricultural crops, forests, grasslands and livestock, water resources, and coastal areas. Once it is determined how vulnerable a country may be to climate change, it is possible to identify adaptation measures for ameliorating some or all of the effects.The objectives of the vulnerability and adaptation workshop were to: The objectives of the vulnerability and adaptation workshop were to: Provide an opportunity for countries to describe their study results; Encourage countries to learn from the experience of the more complete assessments and adjust their studies accordingly; Identify issues and analyses that require further investigation; and Summarize results and experiences for governmental and intergovernmental organizations.

  10. Workshop on the Impacts of Aviation on Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wuebbles, D. J.; Gupta, M.; Ko, M.

    2006-12-01

    Projections indicate that demand for aviation transportation will increase by more than two fold over the next few decades. Timely action is needed to understand and quantify the potential climate impacts of aviation emissions particularly given the sustained lapse over the last several years in U.S. research activities in this area. In response to the stated needs, Environmental Integrated Product Team of Next Generation Air Transportation System/Joint Planning and Development Office and PARTNER (Partnership for AiR Transportation Noise and Emissions Reduction, FAA/NASA/Transport Canada sponsored Center of Excellence) convened a group of international experts to participate in the "Workshop on the Impacts of Aviation on Climate Change" during June 7-9, 2006 in Boston, MA. The workshop focus was on the impacts of subsonic aircraft emissions in the UT/LS region and on the potential response of the climate system. The goals of the workshop were to assess and document the present state of scientific knowledge, to identify the key underlying uncertainties and gaps, to identify ongoing and further research needed, to explore the development of climate impact metrics, and to help focus the scientific community on the aviation-climate change research needs. The workshop concluded that the major ways that aviation can affect climate, in agreement with the 1999 assessment by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), are the direct climate effects from CO2 and water vapor emissions, the indirect forcing on climate resulting from changes in the distributions and concentrations of ozone and methane as a primary consequence of aircraft nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions, the direct effects (and indirect effects on clouds) from emitted aerosols and aerosol precursors, and the climate effects associated with contrails and cirrus cloud formation. The workshop was organized in three subgroups: (1) Effects of aircraft emissions on the UT/LS chemical composition, (2) Effects

  11. Workshop on Planning and Learning in Multi- Agent Environments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-31

    environments, Day 1 28 G Multi-Agency in uncertain environments, Day 2 31 2 1 Introduction An increasingly important problem is how to plan courses of...were nominally on different topics, several issues came up re- peatedly in the group discussions. The following subsections summarize the most important ...unusable in about a week). An important problem is how to reason about the robots’ performance constraints when those constraints change over time

  12. Workshop on the Impacts of Aviation on Climate Change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wuebbles, Don; Gupta, Mohan; Ko, Malcolm

    2006-01-01

    Projections indicate that demand for aviation transportation will increase by more than two fold over the next few decades. Timely action is needed to understand and quantify the potential climate impacts of aviation emissions particularly given the sustained lapse over the last several years in U.S. research activities in this area. In response to the stated needs, a group of international experts participated in the Workshop on the Impacts of Aviation on Climate Change during June 7-9, 2006 in Boston, MA. The workshop focus was on the impacts of subsonic aircraft emissions in the UT/LS region and on the potential response of the climate system. The goals of the workshop were to assess and document the present state of scientific knowledge, to identify the key underlying uncertainties and gaps, to identify ongoing and further research needed, to explore the development of climate impact metrics, and to help focus the scientific community on the aviation-climate change research needs. The workshop concluded that the major ways that aviation can affect climate, in agreement with the 1999 assessment by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), are the direct climate effects from CO2 and water vapor emissions, the indirect forcing on climate resulting from changes in the distributions and concentrations of ozone and methane as a primary consequence of aircraft nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions, the direct effects (and indirect effects on clouds) from emitted aerosols and aerosol precursors, and the climate effects associated with contrails and cirrus cloud formation. The workshop was organized in three subgroups: (1) Effects of aircraft emissions on the UT/LS chemical composition, (2) Effects of water and particle emissions on contrails and on cirrus clouds, and (3) Impacts on climate from aircraft emissions and identification of suitable metrics to measure these impacts. The workshop participants acknowledged the need for focused research specifically to

  13. Does a brief workshop change clinical associate students’ resilience?

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Clinical associates resilience is important as many will work in adverse circumstances. There is some evidence that educational interventions can improve health care student resilience although it is conflicting. There is no previously published research on educational interventions for resilience in clinical associate students. Objective To investigate whether a brief resilience workshop could improve resilience in clinical associate students. Methods A single cohort pre-post design was used. Resilience scores were calculated using the Connor-Davidson 25-item resilience scale in a cohort of clinical associate students before and 8 weeks after a brief resilience workshop. Results Although no statistically significant changes were observed after a brief resilience workshop, this study adds to the existing body of knowledge on resilience in African health care training. Conclusion The evidence for education interventions to improve resilience is conflicting and complex. Given the relevance to health care workers and their educators, interventions to improve resilience should continue to be evaluated and the outcomes should be reported. PMID:27796118

  14. East Africa seminar and workshop of remote sensing of natural resources and environment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Deutsch, Morris

    1975-01-01

    Report on total program covering East Africa Seminar and Workshop on remote sensing of natural resources and the environment held in Nairobi, Kenya, March 21 April 3, 1974, attended by participants from 10 English-speaking African nations. Appendices are included for Seminar proceedings, workshop lectures and outlines, field trip reports and critiques by participants, and reports on potential applications of an operational earth resources satellite for the participating countries.

  15. Learning in a Changing Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Speekenbrink, Maarten; Shanks, David R.

    2010-01-01

    Multiple cue probability learning studies have typically focused on stationary environments. We present 3 experiments investigating learning in changing environments. A fine-grained analysis of the learning dynamics shows that participants were responsive to both abrupt and gradual changes in cue-outcome relations. We found no evidence that…

  16. Fruit and vegetable environment, policy, and pricing workshop: introduction to the conference proceedings.

    PubMed

    Seymour, Jennifer D; Fenley, Mary Ann; Yaroch, Amy Lazarus; Khan, Laura Kettel; Serdula, Mary

    2004-09-01

    Americans' consumption of fruits and vegetables has increased slightly over the last 10 years, but most people still do not meet the Dietary Guidelines recommendation to consume 5 to 9 servings per day. New and innovative strategies are needed if we are to significantly increase the mean population intake of fruits and vegetables. To help formulate such strategies as well as to evaluate evidence and identify research gaps, the American Cancer Society and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention convened the Fruit and Vegetable Environment, Policy, and Pricing Workshop, which brought together experts in how environmental change, policy, and pricing affect fruit and vegetable consumption. The papers in this supplement consist of a review of environmental interventions to improve nutrition and papers covering pricing and consumer value and how fruit and vegetable consumption can be promoted at worksites, restaurants, grocery stores and other community settings, and schools. Conclusions from the workshop were that existing intervention strategies need to be evaluated, promising example programs need to be disseminated, and new innovative interventions and programs need to be created and evaluated.

  17. Proceedings of the Workshop on Change of Representation and Problem Reformulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowry, Michael R.

    1992-01-01

    The proceedings of the third Workshop on Change of representation and Problem Reformulation is presented. In contrast to the first two workshops, this workshop was focused on analytic or knowledge-based approaches, as opposed to statistical or empirical approaches called 'constructive induction'. The organizing committee believes that there is a potential for combining analytic and inductive approaches at a future date. However, it became apparent at the previous two workshops that the communities pursuing these different approaches are currently interested in largely non-overlapping issues. The constructive induction community has been holding its own workshops, principally in conjunction with the machine learning conference. While this workshop is more focused on analytic approaches, the organizing committee has made an effort to include more application domains. We have greatly expanded from the origins in the machine learning community. Participants in this workshop come from the full spectrum of AI application domains including planning, qualitative physics, software engineering, knowledge representation, and machine learning.

  18. Plants and the changing environment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this Special Issue of Plant Biology, current trends in research on plant responses to the changing environment are highlighted. Several studies consider plant responses to the mixture of interacting stresses that will accompany climate change, including drought, heat, high light and increased CO2...

  19. Engendering Behavior Change through Single-Session Workshops: Lessons Learned from Extension's Private well Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCann, Alyson; Gold, Arthur J.

    2012-01-01

    Based on a follow-up mail survey conducted in 2009, we found that structured, one-time workshops can influence and impact participant behavior change. Survey results suggest that brief workshops, staffed by key resource personnel, can have a powerful influence on participant behavior change and fill an important gap in rural drinking water…

  20. Managing the Environmental Impacts of Growth Under Climate Change: A Workshop for State and Local Decision-Makers--Workshop Summary

    EPA Science Inventory

    From November 8/9, 2011, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) hosted a workshop titled "Managing the Environmental Impacts of Growth Under Climate Change." The Office of Research and Development (ORD) organized the meeting, which was held in Research Triangle Park, Nort...

  1. School Environment Handbook Part I: Overview and Workshop Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillespie, Judith; And Others

    This handbook, produced by the School Environmental Impact Program (Indiana) was developed to improve school environments and to create more positive attitudes and behaviors in school participants (all those involved in the school and its environment). It is designed to help in the assessment of school conditions by individuals, groups, or school…

  2. Proceedings of the NASA Workshop on Atomic Oxygen Effects. [low earth orbital environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinza, David E. (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    A workshop was held to address the scientific issues concerning the effects of atomic oxygen on materials in the low Earth orbital (LEO) environment. The program included 18 invited speakers plus contributed posters covering topics such as LEO spaceflight experiments, interaction mechanisms, and atomic oxygen source development. Discussion sessions were also held to organize a test program to evaluate atomic oxygen exposure facilities. The key issues raised in the workshop were: (1) the need to develop a reliable predictive model of the effects of long-term exposure of materials to the LEO environment; (2) the ability of ground-based exposure facilities to provide useful data for development of durable materials; and (3) accurate determination of the composition of the LEO environment. These proceedings include the invited papers, the abstracts for the contributed posters, and an account of the test program discussion sessions.

  3. Workshop on Strategies for Calibration and Validation of Global Change Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guenther, Bruce; Butler, James; Ardanuy, Philip

    1997-01-01

    The Committee on Environment and Natural Resources (CENR) Task Force on Observations and Data Management hosted a Global Change Calibration/Validation Workshop on May 10-12, 1995, in Arlington, Virginia. This Workshop was convened by Robert Schiffer of NASA Headquarters in Washington, D.C., for the CENR Secretariat with a view toward assessing and documenting lessons learned in the calibration and validation of large-scale, long-term data sets in land, ocean, and atmospheric research programs. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) hosted the meeting on behalf of the Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS)/Working Group on Calibration/walidation, the Global Change Observing System (GCOS), and the U. S. CENR. A meeting of experts from the international scientific community was brought together to develop recommendations for calibration and validation of global change data sets taken from instrument series and across generations of instruments and technologies. Forty-nine scientists from nine countries participated. The U. S., Canada, United Kingdom, France, Germany, Japan, Switzerland, Russia, and Kenya were represented.

  4. PRELIMINARY ANNOUNCEMENT AND CALL FOR ABSTRACTS - WORKSHOP ON THE FATE, TRANSPORT, AND TRANSFORMATION OF MERCURY IN AQUATIC AND TERRESTRIAL ENVIRONMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This publication is a preliminary announcement and call-for-abstracts for the 5/2001 Workshop on the Fate, Transport, and Transformation of Mercury in Aquatic and Terrestrial Environments. This workshop will 1) describe the current state of knowledge, gaps, and areas of consensus...

  5. Acadia National Park Climate Change Scenario Planning Workshop summary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Star, Jonathan; Fisichelli, Nicholas; Bryan, Alexander; Babson, Amanda; Cole-Will, Rebecca; Miller-Rushing, Abraham J.

    2016-01-01

    This report summarizes outcomes from a two-day scenario planning workshop for Acadia National Park, Maine (ACAD). The primary objective of the workshop was to help ACAD senior leadership make management and planning decisions based on up-to-date climate science and assessments of future uncertainty. The workshop was also designed as a training program, helping build participants' capabilities to develop and use scenarios. The details of the workshop are given in later sections. The climate scenarios presented here are based on published global climate model output. The scenario implications for resources and management decisions are based on expert knowledge distilled through scientist-manager interaction during workgroup break-out sessions at the workshop. Thus, the descriptions below are from these small-group discussions in a workshop setting and should not be taken as vetted research statements of responses to the climate scenarios, but rather as insights and examinations of possible futures (Martin et al. 2011, McBride et al. 2012).

  6. Recruiting student in Sciences in Rural Environment: The Air Pollution Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubatova, A.; Pedersen, D.

    2011-12-01

    The number of students in sciences is declining and thus it is critical to employ a variety of initiatives to familiarize students with various topics in sciences as well as the university environment. In particular, this is a challenge in rural communities where many students do not have easy access to university campuses. Therefore, we have implemented a workshop for junior and senior high school students. We decided to run this workshop on the campus, as this provided not only exposure of the students to scientific and lecturing facilities, but also to life at the university. Holding the workshop on the university campus also enabled faculty and graduate students from several departments to participate, thus allowing for presentation of a wide variety of topics within atmospheric sciences. Our experiences with the continuously growing workshops - from 50 to 180 participating students - will be shared. Participants were students from both rural and urban areas. These workshops, therefore, contributed to our outreach and service to the local community and to students coming from the rural communities of the upper Midwest and Western states. The workshops are organized annually over the spring break, thus ensuring availability of facilities on the campus. The one-day workshop includes a short cycle of presentations focused on the characterization of atmospheric PM and several critical issues connected with it. The expert faculty members from several departments involved in such research present on global warming, air pollution, aerosol formation, measurement using an aircraft, the relation of emissions and energy production, and on modeling of atmospheric processes. This lecture series (each no longer than 15 min) was broken down by fun demonstrations to break the ice and attract students' attention. Following the presentations, students participated in demonstrations performed in the Chemistry Department. The demonstrations included several hands-on activities

  7. Informal Workshop on Burial and Mobility Modeling of Munitions in the Underwater Environment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    sediments, large cobbles, and coral reefs . Heterogeneous bottom types (or mixtures) are also prevalent, complicating mobility modeling, as well as detection...managers, the concept may not apply to all sites of interest (e.g., coral reefs and rocky coasts). There was little confidence that any model would...WORKSHOP ON BURIAL AND MOBILITY MODELING 6 2.3. Past Projects MR-201003: Vortex Lattice UXO Mobility Model for Reef -Type Range Environments

  8. PREFACE: First International Workshop on Nonequilibrium Processes in Plasma Physics and Studies of Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrović, Z. Lj; Malović, G.; Tasić, M.; Nikitović, Ž.

    2007-06-01

    This volume is a collection of papers associated with a series of invited lectures presented at the First Workshop on Nonequilibrium processes in Plasma Physics and studies of Environment that was held at Mt Kopaonik in August 2006. The workshop originated as a part of the FP6 COE 026328 which had the basic aim of promoting centers of excellence in Western Balkan countries, to facilitate dissemination of their results and to help them establish themselves in the broader arena of European and international science. So the best way to achieve all those goals was to prepare a workshop associated with the local conference SPIG (Symposium on Physics of Ionized Gases) where the participants could attend sessions in which the host Laboratory presented progress reports and papers and thereby gain a full perspective of our results. At the same time this allowed participants in the COE the opportunity to compare their results with the results of external speakers and to gain new perspectives and knowledge. The program of the workshop was augmented by inviting some of our colleagues who visited the COE in recent years or have an active collaboration with a participating member. In that respect this volume is not only a proceedings of the workshop but a collection of papers related to the topic of the workshop: Non-equilibrium phenomena in plasmas and in the science of our environment. The idea is to offer review articles either summarizing a broader area of published or about to be published work or to give overviews showing preliminary results of the works in progress. The refereeing of the papers consisted of two parts, first in selection of the invitees and second in checking the submitted manuscripts. The papers were refereed to the standard of the Journal. As the program of the COE covers a wide area of topics from application of plasmas in nano- electronics to monitoring and removal of pollutants in the atmosphere, so the program of the workshop covered an even broader

  9. Connecting Changes in Secondary Mathematics Teachers' Knowledge to Their Experiences in a Professional Development Workshop

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boston, Melissa D.

    2013-01-01

    This investigation describes secondary mathematics teachers' learning and instructional change following their participation in a professional development workshop, the Enhancing Secondary Mathematics Teacher Preparation Project (ESP) (2004-2005), specifically focused on the selection and implementation of cognitively challenging mathematical…

  10. Workshop on Radar Investigations of Planetary and Terrestrial Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Contents include the following: Salt Kinematics and InSAR. SAR Interferometry as a Tool for Monitoring Coastal Changes in the Nile River Delta of Egypt. Modem Radar Techniques for Geophysical Applications: Two Examples. WISDOM Experiment on the EXOMARS ESA Mission. An Ice Thickness Study Utilizing Ground Penetrating Radar on the Lower Jamapa. Probing the Martian Subsurface with Synthetic Aperture Radar. Planetary Surface Properties from Radar Polarimetric Observations. Imaging the Sub-surface Reflectors : Results From the RANETA/NETLANDER Field Test on the Antarctic Ice Shelf. Strategy for Selection of Mars Geophysical Analogue Sites. Observations of Low Frequency Low Altitude Plasma Oscillations at Mars and Implications for Electromagnetic Sounding of the Subsurface. Ionospheric Transmission Losses Associated with Mars-orbiting Radar. A Polarimetric Scattering Model for the 2-Layer Problem. Radars for Imaging and Sounding of Polar Ice Sheets. Strata: Ground Penetrating Radar for Mars Rovers. Scattering Limits to Depth of Radar Investigation: Lessons from the Bishop Tuff.

  11. Life In Far-out Environments (LIFE): an IDEA Sponsored Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Meer, B. W.; Alletto, J. J.; Byrant, F. D.; Carini, M. T.; Elliott, L. P.; Gelderman, R.; Mason, W. M.; McDaniel, K. L.; McGruder, C. H., III; Rinehart, C. R.; Tyler, R. T.

    1999-05-01

    The Biology and Physics & Astronomy departments of Western Kentucky University are collaborating to host an IDEA sponsored workshop for high-school students and their teachers. The goal of our workshop is to use activities and hands-on experiences to allow the participants to explore the question "what is life?". This workshop will be held on two weekends in the Fall of 1999. Up to 20 participants are being recruited as teacher-student teams. We are recruiting academically motivated high school students from Kentucky and surrounding states, with a goal of a 50 qualified minority students. It is our expectation that the teacher-student teams will take their favorite activities back to their home classroom and spread their experience among their peers. Activities will include: inspecting cultures of fingerprints to visualize microbial life on human bodies, researching and discussing the answer to "what is life?", constructing and using a 2-inch refracting telescope, collection and culture of terrestrial microbiota, discussing the harshness of space environments, experiments on microbes in extreme environments, constructing and using a van Leeuwenhoek type microscope and a discussion of problems related to constructing a Lunar base.

  12. Changing polar environments: Interdisciplinary challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepson, Paul B.; Ariya, Parisa A.; Deal, Clara J.; Donaldson, D. James; Douglas, Thomas A.; Loose, Brice; Maksym, Ted; Matrai, Patricia A.; Russell, Lynn M.; Saenz, Benjamin; Stefels, Jacqueline; Steiner, Nadja

    2012-03-01

    In the past few decades, there has been enormous growth in scientific studies of physical, chemical, and biological interactions among reservoirs in polar regions. This has come, in part, as a result of a few significant discoveries: There is dramatic halogen chemistry that occurs on and above the sea ice in the springtime that destroys lower tropospheric ozone and mercury [Simpson et al., 2007; Steffen et al., 2008], the sunlit snowpack is very photochemically active [Grannas et al., 2007], biology as a source of organic compounds plays a pivotal role in these processes, and these processes are occurring in the context of rapidly changing polar regions under climate feedbacks that are as of yet not fully understood [Serreze and Barry, 2011]. Stimulated by the opportunities of the International Polar Year (IPY, 2007-2009), a number of large-scale field studies in both polar environments have been undertaken, aimed at the study of the complex biotic and abiotic processes occurring in all phases (see Figure 1). Sea ice plays a critical role in polar environments: It is a highly reflective surface that interacts with radiation; it provides a habitat for mammals and micro-organisms alike, thus playing a key role in polar trophic processes and elemental cycles; and it creates a saline environment for chemical processes that facilitate release of halogenated gases that contribute to the atmosphere's ability to photochemically cleanse itself in an otherwise low-radiation environment. Ocean-air and sea ice-air interfaces also produce aerosol particles that provide cloud condensation nuclei.

  13. 76 FR 38360 - Workshop-Monitoring Changes in Extreme Storm Statistics: State of Knowledge; Notice of Open...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-30

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Workshop--Monitoring Changes in Extreme Storm Statistics... website at https://sites.google.com/a/noaa.gov/severe-storms-workshop/ . FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT... available, they may be found at https://sites.google.com/a/noaa.gov/severe-storms-workshop/ . Topics To...

  14. Looking for Life in Extreme Environments on Earth and Beyond: Professional Development Workshop for Educators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Droppo, R.; Pratt, L.; Suchecki, P. C.

    2010-08-01

    The Looking for Life in Extreme Environments workshop held at Indiana University Bloomington in July of 2009 was the first in a series of workshops for high-school teachers that are currently in development. The workshops' modules are based on the research of faculty members in the Departments of Geological Sciences, Biology, and Astronomy, the School of Education, and the School of Public and Environmental Affairs at Indiana University Bloomington; the modules use lessons from Exploring Deep-Subsurface Life. Earth Analogues for Possible Life on Mars: Lessons and Activities, curricular materials that were produced and edited by Lisa Pratt and Ruth Droppo and published by NASA in 2008. Exploring Deep-Subsurface Life is a workbook, a DVD (with closed-captioning), and a CD with the lessons in digital text format for adaptation to classroom needs and printing. Each lesson includes the National Education Standards that apply to the materials. The workbook's lessons are written with three considerations: Life Domains, Cellular Metabolism, and Extreme Environments and Microbes. Students are challenged to build, draw, measure, discuss, and participate in laboratory processes and experiments that help them understand and describe microbes and their environments. In the Capstone, the students write a grant proposal based on the three lessons' analogues. The DVD is collection of videotaped interviews with scientists in laboratories at Michigan State, Princeton, and Indiana University, who are working on water and gas samples they collected from deep gold mines in South Africa and the Canadian Arctic. The interview materials and some animated graphics are compiled into four video pieces that support and compliment the accompanying workbook lessons and activities, and offer students insight into the excitement of scientific discovery.

  15. Workshop on the Space Environment: The Effects on the Optical Properties of Airless Bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hapke, B. (Editor); Clark, B. (Editor); Benedix, G. (Editor); Domingue, D. (Editor); Cintala, M. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    Reflectance spectrophotometry and polarimetry are major tools in remote sensing studies of surfaces of solar system bodies. The interpretations of such measurements are often based on laboratory studies of meteoritic, lunar, and terrestrial materials. However, the optical properties of regoliths are known to be affected by the space environment. Thus, some of the major questions addressed in the workshop include identity of the soil component responsible for alteration of the optical properties, the process that produced this component, and how reliably the effects of these processes could be extrapolated to other bodies of the solar system.

  16. PROCEEDINGS AND SUMMARY REPORT OF THE USEPA WORKSHOP ON MANAGING ARSENIC RISKS TO THE ENVIRONMENT: CHARACTERIZATION OF WASTE, CHEMISTRY AND TREATMENT AND DISPOSAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The workshop "Managing Arsenic Risks to the Environment: Charaterization of Waste, Chemistry and Treatment and Disposal," was held 5/1-3/2001 in Denver, CO. This workshop was sponsored and facilitated by USEPA's ORD and OSWER. The purpose of the workshop was to achieve three goal...

  17. Managing change in a changing environment.

    PubMed

    Bruning, L

    1993-01-01

    Change comes from different directions and must be managed in different ways. Change may come from the top down (eg, from parents to children) or from the bottom up (eg, from staff to management). Introduced change is initiated by you; imposed change is initiated by someone else. Change is necessary to move forward and remain effective. If change is resisted, there is the risk of becoming complacent, outdated, or obsolete. There is no room for obsolescence in health care. Even under the best of circumstances, change will be met with resistance. To overcome resistance, involve people in planning for the change and ensure understanding through verbal and written communications. Be prepared to revise the plan, and always remain flexible.

  18. RTP Speakers Bureau hosts EPA’s 5th Annual Science of Climate Change Workshop

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    On June 15-19, 2015, the Speakers Bureau hosted EPA’s 5th Annual Science of Climate Change Workshop in Research Triangle Park, bringing in a group of high-school students eager to learn about the science behind taking action on climate change.

  19. A Continuing Medical Education Lecture and Workshop, Physician Behavior, and Barriers To Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paprockas, Ken; Parochka, Jacqueline

    2001-01-01

    A 6-month follow-up study of 176 physicians who attended a breast cancer lecture/workshop found that 92 changed practice regarding tamoxifen; many now performed risk assessments on all patients. Barriers to change included lack of colleague consensus, lack of time for assessment and patient counseling, and lack of insurance reimbursement. (SK)

  20. Workshop on the preparation of climate change action plans. Workshop summary

    SciTech Connect

    1999-05-24

    Over 130 participants from more than 27 countries shared experiences of developing and transition countries in preparation and development of their climate change national action plans. International experts guided countries in preparation of their climate change national action plans.

  1. Insects in a changing environment

    SciTech Connect

    Harrington, R.; Stork, N.

    1995-12-31

    This book, from a 1993 symposium, focuses on current, anthropogenic changes in insect populations using five major sections: introduction; changes in climate; changes in gas/pollutant levels; changes in land use; and a section of shorter papers. The effects of climate change on insects are assessed using techniques ranging from fossil evidence to simulation models to remote sensing. The section on changes in gas levels addresses a series of individually studies of insect responses to atmospheric gases and other pollutants. The section focusing on the effects of environmental change on insects is well documented.

  2. Changing Behaviors by Changing the Classroom Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guardino, Caroline A.; Fullerton, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    This case study explores the possibility of affecting classroom behaviors by modifying the classroom environment. Although this type of research previously has been conducted in self-contained special education classrooms (Guardino, 2009), this is the first study to explore modifications in an inclusive classroom. The results of this study align…

  3. PREFACE: India-Japan Workshop on Biomolecular Electronics & Organic Nanotechnology for Environment Preservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onoda, Mitsuyoshi; Malhotra, Bansi D.

    2012-04-01

    The 'India-Japan Workshop on Biomolecular Electronics & Organic Nanotechnology for Environment Preservation' (IJWBME 2011) will be held on 7-10 December 2011 at EGRET Himeji, Himeji, Hyogo, Japan. This workshop was held for the first time on 17-19 December 2009 at NPL, New Delhi. Keeping in mind the importance of organic nanotechnology and biomolecular electronics for environmental preservation and their anticipated impact on the economics of both the developing and the developed world, IJWBME 2009 was jointly organized by the Department of Biological Functions, Graduate School of Life Sciences and Systems Engineering, the Kyushu Institute of Technology (KIT), Kitakyushu, Japan, and the Department of Science & Technology Centre on Biomolecular Electronics (DSTCBE), National Physical Laboratory (NPL). Much progress in the field of biomolecular electronics and organic nanotechnology for environmental preservation is expected for the 21st Century. Organic optoelectronic devices, such as organic electroluminescent devices, organic thin-film transistors, organic sensors, biological systems and so on have especially attracted much attention. The main purpose of this workshop is to provide an opportunity for researchers interested in biomolecular electronics and organic nanotechnology for environmental preservation, to come together in an informal and friendly atmosphere and exchange technical knowledge and experience. We are sure that this workshop will be very useful and fruitful for all participants in summarizing the recent progress in biomolecular electronics and organic nanotechnology for environmental preservation and preparing new ground for the next generation. Many papers have been submitted from India and Japan and more than 30 papers have been accepted for presentation. The main topics of interest are as follows: Bioelectronics Biomolecular Electronics Fabrication Techniques Self-assembled Monolayers Nano-sensors Environmental Monitoring Organic Devices

  4. US/Japan workshop on mitigation and adaptation technologies related to global climate change

    SciTech Connect

    Bernthal, F.M.

    1993-12-31

    It is a great pleasure for me to have the honor of delivering the keynote address for this important gathering, an honor enhanced further because of the many activities and historic relationships represented by this workshop. First of all, it represents the spirit of continuing cooperation and good relations between the United States and Japan. With the aid of the framework provided by the U.S./Japan Science and Technology Agreement, our two nations can come together to address a problem that has no national boundaries {hor_ellipsis} and we can think about solutions of potential benefit to all citizens of the global community. This workshop also symbolizes the spirit of cooperation so characteristic of the conduct of research in science and technology -- cooperation between us as individual scientists and engineers, between the various institutions we represent, and across our diverse disciplines. This workshop is only the second of its kind. The first US/Japan Workshop on global climate change was held last year in Japan. That workshop focused on cooperative scientific research in the United States and Japan. Out of it came a general agreement to continue collaborative work and to extend cooperation into the area of global change-related technologies, in particular those technologies that hold promise for mitigation and adaptation.

  5. The Challenge to Change: From Vision to Action in Canadian Education. 2014 Regional Workshop Follow Up Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurley, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    To answer the question: "What's Standing in the Way of Change in Education?", the Canadian Education Association convened a series of Regional Workshops designed to expand the conversation about change in Canada's education systems. Using a qualitative approach, practically every word written in each of the workshops was entered, coded,…

  6. Third International Workshop on Low-Temperature Physics in Microgravity Environment (CWS-2002)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osip'yan, Yu. A.; Mezhov-Deglin, L. P.

    2003-06-01

    The Third International Workshop on Low-Temperature Physics in Microgravity Environment (CWS-2002) was held at the Chernogolovka Research Center of the Russian Academy of Sciences from the twelfth through the eighteenth of August 2002. CWS-2002 was one of the satellite conferences and seminars devoted to some rapidly developing area of low-temperature physics which are traditionally held in conjunction with the International Conference on Low-Temperature Physics, which meets once every three years (LT-23 was held in Hiroshima, Japan on August 20-27, 2002). CWS-2002 was organized by the Institute of Solid State Physics of the Russian Academy of Sciences (ISSP RAS) and the Space Materials Science Section of the Space Council of the RAS, with the support of the RAS, the Ministry of Industry, Science and Technology of the Russian Federation, the Russian Foundation for Basic Research, and the Russian Aerospace Agency (Rosaviakosmos). We are also grateful to the Organizing Committee of LT-23 (especially to Prof. Shun-ichi Kobayashi and Dr. Kimitoshi Kono), the U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) (Dr. M. C. Lee and Dr. U. E. Israelsson), and to the INTAS foundation (Grant 02-MO-263, principal investigator Prof. L. Esquivias). At the Workshop, roundtable discussions were held with participants from the various projects supported by INTAS in 2001 and 2002.

  7. Educational Technology Training Workshops for Mathematics Teachers: An Exploration of Perception Changes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lau, Wilfred Wing Fat; Yuen, Allan Hoi Kau

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the effects of educational technology training workshops on perception changes of mathematics teachers. Three perceptions, namely, pedagogical orientation, efficacy, and liking in relation to technology integration, were explored in this study. Two research questions were addressed: Do educational technology training workshops…

  8. Designing an Educational Game, Simulation or Workshop: A Change Theory Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cryer, Patricia

    1986-01-01

    Presents theoretical perspectives of change of Benne, Chin, Lewin, and Rogers, and draws out strategies that designers of games, simulations, and workshops may find useful. Highlights include rational/empirical, normative/re-educative, and power/coercive strategies; Lewin's force-field model; and Rogers' stage model. (MBR)

  9. Communication for Change with the Rural Disadvantaged. A Workshop (Washington, D.C., November 1970).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brubaker, Robert S.; And Others

    Recognizing that there is a growing communications gap in the nation, the Agricultural Board of the National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council organized a Workshop on Communication for Change with the Rural Disadvantaged held in early November of 1970. Because communication has many facets, participants were chosen from a diverse…

  10. Biological and Environmental Research: Climate and Environmental Sciences Division: U.S./European Workshop on Climate Change Challenges and Observations

    SciTech Connect

    Mather, James; McCord, Raymond; Sisterson, Doug; Voyles, Jimmy

    2012-11-08

    The workshop aimed to identify outstanding climate change science questions and the observational strategies for addressing them. The scientific focus was clouds, aerosols, and precipitation, and the required ground- and aerial-based observations. The workshop findings will be useful input for setting priorities within the Department of Energy (DOE) and the participating European centers. This joint workshop was envisioned as the first step in enhancing the collaboration among these climate research activities needed to better serve the science community.

  11. Workshop on Two-Phase Fluid Behavior in a Space Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanson, Theodore D.; Juhasz, Al; Long, W. Russ; Ottenstein, Laura

    The Workshop was successful in achieving its main objective of identifying a large number of technical issues relating to the design of two-phase systems for space applications. The principal concern expressed was the need for verified analytical tools that will allow an engineer to confidently design a system to a known degree of accuracy. New and improved materials, for such applications as thermal storage and as heat transfer fluids, were also identified as major needs. In addition to these research efforts, a number of specific hardware needs were identified which will require development. These include heat pumps, low weight radiators, advanced heat pipes, stability enhancement devices, high heat flux evaporators, and liquid/vapor separators. Also identified was the need for a centralized source of reliable, up-to-date information on two-phase flow in a space environment.

  12. Workshop on Two-Phase Fluid Behavior in a Space Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, Theodore D. (Editor); Juhasz, AL (Editor); Long, W. Russ (Editor); Ottenstein, Laura (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    The Workshop was successful in achieving its main objective of identifying a large number of technical issues relating to the design of two-phase systems for space applications. The principal concern expressed was the need for verified analytical tools that will allow an engineer to confidently design a system to a known degree of accuracy. New and improved materials, for such applications as thermal storage and as heat transfer fluids, were also identified as major needs. In addition to these research efforts, a number of specific hardware needs were identified which will require development. These include heat pumps, low weight radiators, advanced heat pipes, stability enhancement devices, high heat flux evaporators, and liquid/vapor separators. Also identified was the need for a centralized source of reliable, up-to-date information on two-phase flow in a space environment.

  13. Space Agency Workshop Considers Effect of Climate Change on Infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenzweig, Cynthia; Brown, Molly

    2009-10-01

    Climate Change Impacts and Adaptation: NASA Mission and Infrastructure; Kennedy Space Center, Florida, 28-30 July 2009; With centers located throughout the country, NASA could experience a range of climate change hazards. Depending on the region, these hazards are likely to include more extreme and frequent high temperatures, more frequent and intense precipitation events, changing water availability, and sea level rise. These changing climate hazards could undermine key NASA missions by damaging operations and critical infrastructure assets. The specific effects of climate change may include shifting availability, reliability, and cost of water and energy; and changes in safety and operations related to more extreme events (e.g., floods, fire).

  14. 77 FR 20872 - Enabling a Secure Environment for Vehicle-to-Infrastructure Research Workshop; Notice of Public...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Enabling a Secure Environment for Vehicle-to-Infrastructure Research Workshop; Notice of Public Meeting AGENCY: ITS Joint Program Office, Research and Innovative Technology Administration, U.S. Department...

  15. Climate change, environment and allergy.

    PubMed

    Behrendt, Heidrun; Ring, Johannes

    2012-01-01

    Climate change with global warming is a physicometeorological fact that, among other aspects, will also affect human health. Apart from cardiovascular and infectious diseases, allergies seem to be at the forefront of the sequelae of climate change. By increasing temperature and concomitant increased CO(2) concentration, plant growth is affected in various ways leading to prolonged pollination periods in the northern hemisphere, as well as to the appearance of neophytes with allergenic properties, e.g. Ambrosia artemisiifolia (ragweed), in Central Europe. Because of the effects of environmental pollutants, which do not only act as irritants to skin and mucous membranes, allergen carriers such as pollen can be altered in the atmosphere and release allergens leading to allergen-containing aerosols in the ambient air. Pollen has been shown not only to be an allergen carrier, but also to release highly active lipid mediators (pollen-associated lipid mediators), which have proinflammatory and immunomodulating effects enhancing the initiation of allergy. Through the effects of climate change in the future, plant growth may be influenced in a way that more, new and altered pollens are produced, which may affect humans.

  16. Development and evaluation of a workshop to support evidence-based practice change in long-term care.

    PubMed

    Higuchi, Kathryn Smith; Edwards, Nancy; Carr, Tracy; Marck, Patricia; Abdullah, Ghadah

    2015-01-01

    To support evidence-based practice changes in long-term care, we used a practice development approach with interactive workshops to engage teams from 10 organizations in participatory change. Data from postworkshop surveys and subsequent semistructured interviews indicated that participants felt empowered to identify a priority challenge and initiate change. Notably, the workshop intervention enhanced collaboration between professional and unregulated staff, fostered the development of shared vision, and provided the impetus to tackle workplace barriers to change.

  17. Florida-focused climate change lesson demonstrations from the ASK Florida global and regional climate change professional development workshops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weihs, R. R.

    2013-12-01

    A variety of Florida-focused climate change activities will be featured as part of the ASK Florida global and regional climate change professional development workshops. In a combined effort from Florida State University's Center for Ocean-Atmospheric Prediction Studies (COAPS) and University of South Florida's Coalition for Science Literacy (CSL), and supported by NASA's NICE initiative, the ASK Florida professional development workshops are a series of workshops designed to enhance and support climate change information and related pedagogical skills for middle school science teachers from Title-I schools in Florida. These workshops took place during a two-year period from 2011 to 2013 and consisted of two cohorts in Hillsborough and Volusia counties in Florida. Featured activities include lab-style exercises demonstrating topics such as storm surge and coastal geometry, sea level rise from thermal expansion, and the greenhouse effect. These types of labs are modified so that they allow more independent, inquiry thinking as they require teachers to design their own experiment in order to test a hypothesis. Lecture based activities are used to cover a broad range of topics including hurricanes, climate modeling, and sink holes. The more innovative activities are group activities that utilize roll-playing, technology and resources, and group discussion. For example, 'Climate Gallery Walk' is an activity that features group discussions on each of the climate literacy principles established by the United States Global Change Research Program. By observing discussions between individuals and groups, this activity helps the facilitators gather information on their previous knowledge and identify possible misconceptions that will be addressed within the workshops. Furthermore, 'Fact or Misconception' presents the challenge of identifying whether a given statement is fact or misconception based on the material covered throughout the workshops. It serves as a way to

  18. Advancing Women Scientists: Exploring a Theoretically Grounded Climate Change Workshop Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silver, Barbara; Prochaska, Janice; Mederer, Helen; Harlow, Lisa; Sherman, Karen

    Universities in the United States have an increasing need to recruit the best and the brightest faculty to remain globally competitive, but the majority of schools share a profile that includes a low percentage of women in most of the science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) disciplines. Changes in university culture are needed to enable departmental diversity growth, to expand offerings and perspectives, and to strengthen the view that STEM is an attractive choice for female students and prospective faculty. This paper describes the theoretical models used to develop a prototype workshop series implemented in departments to help faculty progress in their readiness to advance women scientists, defined as collaborating, mentoring, sharing resources, and generating support through community. The three theoretical underpinnings are the gender-as-structure theory of organizational change, Appreciative Inquiry, and the Transtheoretical Model. These workshops are one aspect of the climate change efforts implemented by the ADVANCE program of the University of Rhode Island.

  19. Volcano deformation and gravity workshop synopsis and outcomes: the 2008 volcano deformation and temporal gravity change workshop

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dzurisin, Daniel; Lu, Zhong

    2009-01-01

    A volcano workshop was held in Washington State, near the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Cascades Volcano Observatory. The workshop, hosted by the USGS Volcano Hazards Program (VHP), included more than 40 participants from the United States, the European Union, and Canada. Goals were to promote (1) collaboration among scientists working on active volcanoes and (2) development of new tools for studying volcano deformation. The workshop focused on conventional and emerging techniques, including the Global Positioning System (GPS), borehole strain, interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR), gravity, and electromagnetic imaging, and on the roles of aqueous and magmatic fluids.

  20. A Seismic Shift: Evaluating Changes in Scientists' Attitudes Regarding Journalists and Science Communication After Media Workshops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBride, S.; Herbulock, D.

    2015-12-01

    Providing natural hazards scientists the opportunity to question and engage directly with journalists in a workshop setting proved effective at shifting scientists' attitudes on their role in media and public communication during natural disasters. Scientists surveyed after the encounter expressed a more responsive attitude to communicating during crises, increased willingness to support scientific peers' communication efforts and more realistic perspectives on journalists' needs and objectives. Geoscientists experienced unprecedented and intensive media and public scrutiny during the Canterbury, New Zealand earthquakes of 2010-2012. Following major quakes and aftershocks, there was a sustained high level of public demand for information and expert analysis of the underlying geological events and ongoing hazards and risks. Once the crisis ended, a period of reflection gave rise to understanding of the need for further media and communication training amongst natural hazards scientists. A workshop designed to explore scientists' attitudes to public communication during disasters and challenge their views on media, press offices and the expectations of the public was developed and implemented by the Science Media Centre, New Zealand and Massey University. This research was developed as an evaluation of this workshop. Quantitative analysis with some qualititive analysis were the methods used. Some findings include: a shift in how journalists were perceived by scientists after the workshop, largely influenced by perspectives shared during a panel where invited journalists reflected on their own experiences and answered questions from scientists. discussions on different spokespeople from different science institutions contributing to the public discussion showed a change in perception from a preference for one central spokesperson to increased support for a variety of perspectives from multiple scientists. This was influenced by insight provided by journalists during

  1. Collaborative Problem-Solving Environments; Proceedings for the Workshop CPSEs for Scientific Research, San Diego, California, June 20 to July 1, 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, George

    1999-01-11

    A workshop on collaborative problem-solving environments (CPSEs) was held June 29 through July 1, 1999, in San Diego, California. The workshop was sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy and the High Performance Network Applications Team of the Large Scale Networking Working Group. The workshop brought together researchers and developers from industry, academia, and government to identify, define, and discuss future directions in collaboration and problem-solving technologies in support of scientific research.

  2. Teaching about Climate Change and Energy with Online Materials and Workshops from On the Cutting Edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, K. B.; Manduca, C. A.; Myers, J. D.; Loxsom, F.

    2009-12-01

    Global climate change and energy use are among the most relevant and pressing issues in today’s science curriculum, yet they are also complex topics to teach. The underlying science spans multiple disciplines and is quickly evolving. Moreover, a comprehensive treatment of climate change and energy use must also delve into perspectives not typically addressed in geosciences courses, such as public policy and economics. Thus, faculty attempting to address these timely issues face many challenges. To support faculty in teaching these subjects, the On the Cutting Edge faculty development program has created a series of websites and workshop opportunities to provide faculty with information and resources for teaching about climate and energy. A web-based collection of teaching materials was developed in conjunction with the On the Cutting Edge workshops “Teaching about Energy in Geoscience Courses: Current Research and Pedagogy.” The website is designed to provide faculty with examples, references and ideas for either incorporating energy topics into existing geoscience courses or for designing or refining a course about energy. The website contains a collection of over 30 classroom and lab activities contributed by faculty and covering such diverse topics as renewable energy, energy policy and energy conservation. Course descriptions and syllabi for energy courses address audiences ranging from introductory courses to advanced seminars. Other materials available on the website include a collection of visualizations and animations, a catalog of recommended books, presentations and related references from the teaching energy workshops, and ideas for novel approaches or new topics for teaching about energy in the geosciences. The Teaching Climate Change website hosts large collections of teaching materials spanning many different topics within climate change, climatology and meteorology. Classroom activities highlight diverse pedagogic approaches such as role

  3. Regional Climate Variations and Change for Terrestrial Ecosystems Workshop Review

    EPA Science Inventory

    North Carolina State University, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, in partnership with the U.S. Department of the Interior Southeast Climate Science Center (SECSC), hosted the Regional Climate Variations and Change for ...

  4. Workshop on Micro and Nano Structures for Phase Change Heat Transfer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-23

    workshop was structured to provide ample opportunities to educate researchers from different fields on topics related to this important subject and...advance liquid-vapor phase change systems and are important to enable thermal management of ultra-high heat flux systems, such as computer processing...understanding. One approach is to select a critically important rudimentary problem or several problems (e.g., flow boiling in a micro gap under specific

  5. Workshop: Improving the Assessment and Valuation of Climate Change Impacts for Policy and Regulatory Analysis: Research on Climate Change Impacts and Associated Economic Damages (part 2)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This is a workshop titled Improving the Assessment and Valuation of Climate Change Impacts for Policy and Regulatory Analysis: Research on Climate Change Impacts and Associated Economic Damages (part 2)

  6. PROCEEDINGS AND SUMMARY REPORT: WORKSHOP ON THE FATE, TRANSPORT, AND TRANSFORMATION OF MERCURY IN AQUATIC AND TERRESTRIAL ENVIRONMENTS, MAY 8-10, 2001, WEST PALM BEACH, FLORIDA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Workshop on the Fate, Transport, and Transformation of Mercury in Aquatic and Terrestrial Environments was held on May 8-10, 2001 in West Palm Beach, Florida. The workshop was conducted by the USEPA's Office of Research and Development and cosponsored by the U.S. Geological S...

  7. Impediments to Data Discovery in a Distributed Environment: A Workshop Report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornillon, P.

    2006-12-01

    Data discovery is often compartmentalized into discovery at the "catalog" level - high level, broad descriptions of data sets or collections - and discovery at the "inventory" level - detailed listings of granules in data sets. The catalog and inventory levels are also generally viewed as distinct from the data level, where the actual data granules reside. With an increase in on-line access to data such as that offered by OPeNDAP, WFS, WCS and WMS, there has been an increase in interest in discovery capabilities that provide the data, or lists of URLs for the data, meeting a variety of search criteria - in other words, a seamless capability to find and retrieve data of interest. In order to address issues related to discovery in a distributed environment, a workshop was held in May 2006 at Unidata/UCAR in Boulder, Colorado. Participants were drawn from 8 organizations dealing with various issues related to data discovery. The workshop began with the description of a number of different data discovery capabilities, including ECHO, GCMD, THREDDS, and ADL. This was followed by the analysis of two case studies with specific attention given to the ability, or lack thereof, of current data discovery components to find data relevant to the case studies. Several key findings resulted from this analysis which, although obvious in retrospect, we believe to be major deficiencies in the way data discovery is being approached today. These findings are: There is no consistency in the inventorying of data. Links between the catalog, inventory and data levels are tenuous at best; moving from the catalog to the inventory level and from the inventory to the data level is tedious at best. There is little to no consistency in the access protocols that are used by data discovery components. This is especially true at the inventory level. These findings suggest that the level of effort involved in finding data of interest could be substantially reduced by either reducing the number of

  8. An official American Thoracic Society workshop report: Climate change and human health.

    PubMed

    Pinkerton, Kent E; Rom, William N; Akpinar-Elci, Muge; Balmes, John R; Bayram, Hasan; Brandli, Otto; Hollingsworth, John W; Kinney, Patrick L; Margolis, Helene G; Martin, William J; Sasser, Erika N; Smith, Kirk R; Takaro, Tim K

    2012-03-01

    This document presents the proceedings from the American Thoracic Society Climate Change and Respiratory Health Workshop that was held on May 15, 2010, in New Orleans, Louisiana. The purpose of the one-day meeting was to address the threat to global respiratory health posed by climate change. Domestic and international experts as well as representatives of international respiratory societies and key U.S. federal agencies convened to identify necessary research questions concerning climate change and respiratory health and appropriate mechanisms and infrastructure needs for answering these questions. After much discussion, a breakout group compiled 27 recommendations for physicians, researchers, and policy makers. These recommendations are listed under main issues that the workshop participants deemed of key importance to respiratory health. Issues include the following: (1) the health impacts of climate change, with specific focus on the effect of heat waves, air pollution, and natural cycles; (2) mitigation and adaptation measures to be taken, with special emphasis on recommendations for the clinical and research community; (3) recognition of challenges specific to low-resource countries when coping with respiratory health and climate change; and (4) priority research infrastructure needs, with special discussion of international needs for cooperating with present and future environmental monitoring and alert systems.

  9. Unidata Workshop: Demonstrating Democratization of Numerical Weather Prediction Capabilities Using Linked Environments for Atmospheric Discovery (LEAD) Capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baltzer, T.; Wilson, A.; Marru, S.; Rossi, A.; Christi, M.; Hampton, S.; Gannon, D.; Alameda, J.; Ramamurthy, M.; Droegemeier, K.

    2006-12-01

    On July 13th 2006 during the triannual Unidata Workshop, members of the Unidata community got their first experience with capabilities being developed under the Linked Environments for Atmospheric Discovery (LEAD) project (see: http://lead.ou.edu). The key LEAD goal demonstrated during the workshop was that of "Democratization," that is, providing capabilities that typically have a high barrier to entry to the larger meteorological community. At the workshop, participants worked with software that demonstrated the specific concepts of: 1) Lowering the barrier to entry by making it easy for users to: - Experiment using meteorological tools - Create meteorological forecasts - Perform mesoscale modeling and forecasting - Access data (source and product) - Make use of large scale cyberinfrastructure (E.g. TeraGrid) 2) Giving users the freedom from technological issues such as: - Hassle-free access to supercomputing resources - Hassle-free execution of forecast models and related tools - Data format independence This talk will overview the capabilities presented to the Unidata workshop participants as well as capabilities developed since the workshop. There will also be a lessons-learned section. This overview will be accomplished with a live demonstration of some of the capabilities. Capabilities that will be discussed and demonstrated have applicability across many disciplines e.g. discovering, acquiring and using data and orchestrating of complex workflow. Acknowledgement: The LEAD project involves the work of nearly 100 individuals whose dedication has resulted in the capabilities that will be shown here. The authors would like to recognize all of them, but in particular we'd like to recognize: John Caron, Rich Clark, Ethan Davis, Charles Hart, Yuan Ho, Scott Jenson, Rob Kambic, Brian Kelly, Ning Liu, Jeff McWhirter, Don Murray, Beth Plale, Rahul Ramachandran, Yogesh Simmhan, Kevin Thomas, Nithya Vijayakumar, Yunheng Wang, Dan Weber, and Bob Wilhelmson.

  10. G x E: a NIAAA workshop on gene-environment interactions.

    PubMed

    Gunzerath, Lorraine; Goldman, David

    2003-03-01

    The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) sponsored a May 2002 workshop on gene-environment interaction (G x E) research to identify potential roadblocks to further research and to propose solutions to those roadblocks, to optimize investigative opportunities and multidisciplinary or multi-institution collaborations, and to explore ways that NIAAA can facilitate G x E studies. Sessions included panels on animal models; phenotypes; genetic findings in humans; study designs and analytical methods; and assessment of environmental risk. Key among the identified challenges to progress in G x E research were issues of study design and sampling strategies; logistic and methodological costs and constraints; availability and understanding of data analysis techniques; potential stigmatization of study populations; and organizational/bureaucratic structures that are inadequate to address the unique needs of large-scale, multicenter, longitudinal projects. Participants proposed a series of recommendations to address these issues. Session coordinators included: Gayle Boyd, Kendall Bryant, Page Chiapella, Vivian Faden, David Goldman, and Antonio Noronha. Session participants included: Laura Almasy, Henri Begleiter, Raul Caetano, Bruce Dudek, Mary Dufour, Cindy Ehlers, Mary-Anne Enoch, Joel Gelernter, David Goldman, Bridget Grant, Lorraine Gunzerath, Deborah Hasin, Andrew Heath, Victor Hesselbrock, J. Dee Higley, Shirley Hill, Kerry Jang, Raynard S. Kington, Rick Kittles, George Koob, Kenneth Leonard, Ting-Kai Li, Jeffrey Long, William McBride, Matthew McGue, Kathleen Merikangas, Tamara Phillips, Bernice Porjesz, Carol Prescott, Theodore Reich, John Rice, Richard Rose, Charmaine Royal, Arnold Sameroff, Marc Schuckit, Kenneth Sher, Renee Sieving, Robert Taylor, Michael Windle, and Robert Zucker.

  11. Climate Change Adaptation in the Urban Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Wilbanks, Thomas J

    2011-01-01

    This overview chapter considers five questions that cut across the four case studies in the section to follow: (1) why are urban environments of particular interest; (2) what does an 'urban environment' mean as a focus for adaptation actions, (3) what do we know about climate change vulnerabilities and adaptation potentials in urban areas; (4) what can we expect in the future with adaptation in urban areas; and (5) what is happening with climate change adaptation in urban areas? After decades of inattention, adaptation to risks and impacts of climate change is now receiving long overdue attention, and it is only natural that a considerable share of this attention is focused on the places where most people live. This section considers climate change adaptation in the urban environment, defined as settings where human populations cluster - generally implying relatively large clusters, but not excluding smaller settlements that operate as coherent geopolitical and economic entities. Consistent with the topic of the book, the emphasis of this overview will be on urban environments in developed countries, but it will also draw on knowledge being developed from urban experiences across the globe.

  12. Radio's Changing Environment. Info. Packets No. 22.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, George

    The purpose of this report is to identify changes in the radio environment, especially those which affect public radio's ability to compete. In Boston and other markets around the country, most formats have subdivided into targeted niches. The effect has been to even out station shares, so that rather than trying to reach mass audiences,…

  13. Managing change within the healthcare environment.

    PubMed

    Lipcamon, James D

    2003-01-01

    In the healthcare environment, there are many catalysts for change, including federal and state regulations, increased utilization, patients' expectations, competition, declining reimbursement and the technologist shortage. Regardless of what organization you work in, change creates pressure internally. This is especially true of organizations that have not had to deal with much change. The three most common responses are: 1) senior managers tend to isolate themselves from the effects of change on staff members; 2) middle managers tend to feel squeezed between the need to implement change and the need to support staff members; and 3) employees tend to feel attacked and betrayed by change. The following five steps will help you work with your staff as you introduce and implement change: prepare your employees, plan thoroughly, develop a transitional line of authority, stay flexible during implementation, and encourage self-management, acknowledging those who helped make the change work. When change is implemented, it is important to understand that people will move through four stages of reaction: denial, resistance, exploration and commitment. As a general rule, individuals will go through all four stages, but the speed at which they move through them will be different. Managers need to assist employees who get stuck in certain stages. To implement change as successfully as possible, follow these four steps: communicate about change, deal with resistance, increase team involvement, and use visionary leadership.

  14. Probabilistic adaptation in changing microbial environments

    PubMed Central

    Springer, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Microbes growing in animal host environments face fluctuations that have elements of both randomness and predictability. In the mammalian gut, fluctuations in nutrient levels and other physiological parameters are structured by the host’s behavior, diet, health and microbiota composition. Microbial cells that can anticipate environmental fluctuations by exploiting this structure would likely gain a fitness advantage (by adapting their internal state in advance). We propose that the problem of adaptive growth in structured changing environments, such as the gut, can be viewed as probabilistic inference. We analyze environments that are “meta-changing”: where there are changes in the way the environment fluctuates, governed by a mechanism unobservable to cells. We develop a dynamic Bayesian model of these environments and show that a real-time inference algorithm (particle filtering) for this model can be used as a microbial growth strategy implementable in molecular circuits. The growth strategy suggested by our model outperforms heuristic strategies, and points to a class of algorithms that could support real-time probabilistic inference in natural or synthetic cellular circuits. PMID:27994963

  15. An evolution of cooperation in changing environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amirjanov, Adil

    The paper modeled an evolution of cooperation in changing environment. A cooperation model of the evolving population was used. In this model, the individuals base the decisions to donate their resources solely on the similarity of evolved “tags” which are relative to evolved tag-difference tolerances. Two options of the cooperation model were analyzed with constant and random alterations of receiver’s and donor’s resources that change as a result of an interaction between the individuals. In both options of the cooperation model, the average of resources and the average cooperation rate follow the environmental changes, but in different ways. A comparison of the two models makes it evident that a common period of an adaptation for the changing environment is significantly greater for a cooperation model with constant alterations of the donor’s and the receiver’s resources than for a cooperation model with random alterations of them. Quantitative evaluation of the models to assess the influence of an environment on an evolution of cooperation is also provided.

  16. Adaptive path planning in changing environments

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Pang C.

    1993-10-01

    Path planning needs to be fast to facilitate real-time robot programming. Unfortunately, current planning techniques are still too slow to be effective, as they often require several minutes, if not hours of computation. To overcome this difficulty, we present an adaptive algorithm that uses previous experience to speed up future performance. It is a learning algorithm suitable for incrementally-changing environments such as those encountered in manufacturing of evolving products and waste-site remediation. The algorithm extends our previous work for stationary environments in two directions: For minor environmental change, an object-attached experience abstraction scheme is introduced to increase the flexibility of the learned experience; for major environmental change, an on-demand experience repair scheme is also introduced to retain those experiences that remain valid and useful. In addition to presenting this algorithm, we identify three other variants with different repair strategies. To compare these algorithms, we develop an analytic model to compare the costs and benefits of the corresponding repair processes. Using this model, we formalize the concept of incremental change, and prove the optimality of our proposed algorithm under such change. Empirically, we also characterize the performance curve of each variant, confirm our theoretical optimality results, and demonstrate the practicality of our algorithm.

  17. Animal-Microbial Symbioses in Changing Environments

    PubMed Central

    Carey, Hannah V.; Duddleston, Khrystyne N.

    2014-01-01

    The environments in which animals have evolved and live have profound effects on all aspects of their biology. Predictable rhythmic changes in the physical environment are arguably among the most important forces shaping the evolution of behavior and physiology of animals, and to anticipate and prepare for these predictable changes animals have evolved biological clocks. Unpredictable changes in the physical environment have important impacts on animal biology as well. The ability of animals to cope with and survive unpredictable perturbations depends on phenotypic plasticity and/or microevolution. From the time metazoans first evolved from their protistan ancestors they have lived in close association with a diverse array of microbes that have influenced, in some way, all aspects of the evolution of animal structure, function and behavior. Yet, few studies have addressed whether daily or seasonal rhythms may affect, or be affected by, an animal’s microbial symbionts. This survey highlights how biologists interested in the ecological and evolutionary physiology of animals whose lifestyles are influenced by environmental cycles may benefit from considering whether symbiotic microbes have shaped the features they study. PMID:25086977

  18. Pathways to Community Sustainability. A Workshop Guide. Environments for Life Conservation Issues Forum Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hren, Benedict J.

    This booklet is one in a series of publications designed to support the efforts of community sustainability advocates. It describes five activities through which community members can work together to apply sustainability principles to community development initiatives. Guidelines are provided for organizing and conducting a 6-hour workshop for…

  19. Sustaining Change in Upper Level Courses: Peer-Led Workshops in Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Platt, Terry; Roth, Vicki; Kampmeier, Jack A.

    2008-01-01

    Our peer-led collaborative learning groups, called Workshops, have now had extended success in two upper-level courses in chemistry and biochemistry. These Workshops are in turn supported by a third upper-level course for training peer-leaders. Our data confirm that the initial positive results from the introduction of Workshops in organic…

  20. Creating dialogue: a workshop on "Uncertainty in Decision Making in a Changing Climate"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewen, Tracy; Addor, Nans; Johnson, Leigh; Coltekin, Arzu; Derungs, Curdin; Muccione, Veruska

    2014-05-01

    Uncertainty is present in all fields of climate research, spanning from projections of future climate change, to assessing regional impacts and vulnerabilities, to adaptation policy and decision-making. In addition to uncertainties, managers and planners in many sectors are often confronted with large amounts of information from climate change research whose complex and interdisciplinary nature make it challenging to incorporate into the decision-making process. An overarching issue in tackling this problem is the lack of institutionalized dialogue between climate researchers, decision-makers and user groups. Forums that facilitate such dialogue would allow climate researchers to actively engage with end-users and researchers in different disciplines to better characterize uncertainties and ultimately understand which ones are critically considered and incorporated into decisions made. We propose that the introduction of students to these challenges at an early stage of their education and career is a first step towards improving future dialogue between climate researchers, decision-makers and user groups. To this end, we organized a workshop at the University of Zurich, Switzerland, entitled "Uncertainty in Decision Making in a Changing Climate". It brought together 50 participants, including Bachelor, Master and PhD students and academic staff, and nine selected speakers from academia, industry, government, and philanthropy. Speakers introduced participants to topics ranging from uncertainties in climate model scenarios to managing uncertainties in development and aid agencies. The workshop consisted of experts' presentations, a panel discussion and student group work on case studies. Pedagogical goals included i) providing participants with an overview of the current research on uncertainty and on how uncertainty is dealt with by decision-makers, ii) fostering exchange between practitioners, students, and scientists from different backgrounds, iii) exposing

  1. Hypoxia in the changing marine environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Cowie, G.; Naqvi, S. W. A.

    2013-03-01

    The predicted future of the global marine environment, as a combined result of forcing due to climate change (e.g. warming and acidification) and other anthropogenic perturbation (e.g. eutrophication), presents a challenge to the sustainability of ecosystems from tropics to high latitudes. Among the various associated phenomena of ecosystem deterioration, hypoxia can cause serious problems in coastal areas as well as oxygen minimum zones in the open ocean (Diaz and Rosenberg 2008 Science 321 926-9, Stramma et al 2008 Science 320 655-8). The negative impacts of hypoxia include changes in populations of marine organisms, such as large-scale mortality and behavioral responses, as well as variations of species distributions, biodiversity, physiological stress, and other sub-lethal effects (e.g. growth and reproduction). Social and economic activities that are related to services provided by the marine ecosystems, such as tourism and fisheries, can be negatively affected by the aesthetic outcomes as well as perceived or real impacts on seafood quality (STAP 2011 (Washington, DC: Global Environment Facility) p 88). Moreover, low oxygen concentration in marine waters can have considerable feedbacks to other compartments of the Earth system, like the emission of greenhouse gases to the atmosphere, and can affect the global biogeochemical cycles of nutrients and trace elements. It is of critical importance to prediction and adaptation strategies that the key processes of hypoxia in marine environments be precisely determined and understood (cf Zhang et al 2010 Biogeosciences 7 1-24).

  2. Adaptive robot path planning in changing environments

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, P.C.

    1994-08-01

    Path planning needs to be fast to facilitate real-time robot programming. Unfortunately, current planning techniques are still too slow to be effective, as they often require several minutes, if not hours of computation. To overcome this difficulty, we present an adaptive algorithm that uses past experience to speed up future performance. It is a learning algorithm suitable for incrementally-changing environments such as those encountered in manufacturing of evolving products and waste-site remediation. The algorithm allows the robot to adapt to its environment by having two experience manipulation schemes: For minor environmental change, we use an object-attached experience abstraction scheme to increase the flexibility of the learned experience; for major environmental change, we use an on-demand experience repair scheme to retain those experiences that remain valid and useful. Using this algorithm, we can effectively reduce the overall robot planning time by re-using the computation result for one task to plan a path for another.

  3. System Software and Tools for High Performance Computing Environments: A report on the findings of the Pasadena Workshop, April 14--16, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Sterling, T.; Messina, P.; Chen, M.

    1993-04-01

    The Pasadena Workshop on System Software and Tools for High Performance Computing Environments was held at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory from April 14 through April 16, 1992. The workshop was sponsored by a number of Federal agencies committed to the advancement of high performance computing (HPC) both as a means to advance their respective missions and as a national resource to enhance American productivity and competitiveness. Over a hundred experts in related fields from industry, academia, and government were invited to participate in this effort to assess the current status of software technology in support of HPC systems. The overall objectives of the workshop were to understand the requirements and current limitations of HPC software technology and to contribute to a basis for establishing new directions in research and development for software technology in HPC environments. This report includes reports written by the participants of the workshop`s seven working groups. Materials presented at the workshop are reproduced in appendices. Additional chapters summarize the findings and analyze their implications for future directions in HPC software technology development.

  4. Summary Report for National Aeronautics Space Administration (NASA) and Centro Para Prevencao da Poluicao (C3P) 2011 International Workshop on Environment and Alternative Energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, Brian

    2011-01-01

    The C3P &. NASA International Workshop on Environment and Alternative Energy was held on November 15-18, 2011 at the European Space Agency (ESA)'s Research and Technology Centre (ESTEC) in Noordwijk, The Netherlands. The theme of the workshop was "Global Collaboration in Environmental and Alternative Energy Strategies". The workshop was held at ESTEC's conference center. More than 110 individuals from eleven countries attended the workshop. For the first time since the inception of NASA-C3P workshops, a full day was dedicated to a student session. Fifteen students from around the globe gave oral presentations along with poster displays relating to the latest technologies in environmental and alternative energy strategies. Judges from NASA, C3P and ESA awarded plaques to the top three students. In addition to the students, thirty eight U.S. and international subject matter experts presented on the following general environmental-related topics: (1) Hazardous materials management and substitution in support of space operations (2) Emerging renewable and alternative energy technologies (3) Sustainable development and redevelopment (4) Remediation technologies and strategies The workshop also included a panel discussion on the topic of the challenges of operating installations across borders. Throughout the workshop, attendees heard about the scope of environmental and energy challenges that industry and governments face. They heard about technologies for increasing energy efficiency and increasing use of renewable energy. They learned about ways companies and government agencies are using materials, processes, goods and services in a manner more respectful with the environment and in compliance with health and safety rules. The concept of partnerships and their inherent benefits was evidenced throughout the workshop. Partnering is a key aspect of sustainability because sustainable development is complicated. Through formal presentations and side discussions, attendees

  5. An Environment-based Education Approach to Professional Development: A Mixed Methods Analysis of the Creeks and Kids Watershed Workshop and Its Impact on K-12 Teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, Tiffany Bridgette

    This research is an in-depth study of an environment-based education (EBE) professional development program titled "Creeks and Kids" that models how to employ thematic instruction about watersheds using the environment of a school and its community as a context to integrate teaching and learning about water across core subject areas. This case study investigates the EBE characteristics of the Creeks and Kids Workshop and explores how they adhere to the National Research Council's Standards for Professional Development for Teachers of Science. A mixed-methods analysis gathered qualitative data about the overall experience of teacher-participants during the Creeks and Kids Workshop and employed quantitative measures to identify evidence of success related to teachers' gains in knowledge, affect, confidence and intent to act to implement water-focused EBE curriculum in their classrooms. The findings of the study build upon existing research about what teachers need to implement EBE and their beliefs regarding what professional development should provide in relation to those needs. Qualitative results revealed that teachers need an EBE professional development program to include: 1) practical ways to integrate environmental education into their existing curricula and school settings; and, 2) direct experience with activities and field studies that are interdisciplinary, hands-on and inquiry-driven. Teacher-participants identified these characteristics as vital for them to effect a change in teaching practice and build their confidence to engage their students in EBE when they return to the classroom. Quantitative results revealed statistically significant gains across knowledge, affect, confidence and intent to act variables using the t-test statistic to compare means of participants' responses from the pre- to post-workshop questionnaires. The results of this study have broader implications for future educational research on: 1) the ways in which EBE professional

  6. The influence of global climate change on the scientific foundations and applications of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry: Introduction to a SETAC international workshop

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stahl, Ralph G.; Hooper, Michael J.; Balbus, John M.; Clements, William; Fritz, Alyce; Gouin, Todd; Helm, Roger; Hickey, Christopher; Landis, Wayne; Moe, S. Jannicke

    2013-01-01

    This is the first of seven papers resulting from a Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry (SETAC) international workshop titled “The Influence of Global Climate Change on the Scientific Foundations and Applications of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry.” The workshop involved 36 scientists from 11 countries and was designed to answer the following question: How will global climate change influence the environmental impacts of chemicals and other stressors and the way we assess and manage them in the environment? While more detail is found in the complete series of articles, some key consensus points are as follows: (1) human actions (including mitigation of and adaptation to impacts of global climate change [GCC]) may have as much influence on the fate and distribution of chemical contaminants as does GCC, and modeled predictions should be interpreted cautiously; (2) climate change can affect the toxicity of chemicals, but chemicals can also affect how organisms acclimate to climate change; (3) effects of GCC may be slow, variable, and difficult to detect, though some populations and communities of high vulnerability may exhibit responses sooner and more dramatically than others; (4) future approaches to human and ecological risk assessments will need to incorporate multiple stressors and cumulative risks considering the wide spectrum of potential impacts stemming from GCC; and (5) baseline/reference conditions for estimating resource injury and restoration/rehabilitation will continually shift due to GCC and represent significant challenges to practitioners.

  7. The influence of global climate change on the scientific foundations and applications of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry: introduction to a SETAC international workshop.

    PubMed

    Stahl, Ralph G; Hooper, Michael J; Balbus, John M; Clements, William; Fritz, Alyce; Gouin, Todd; Helm, Roger; Hickey, Christopher; Landis, Wayne; Moe, S Jannicke

    2013-01-01

    This is the first of seven papers resulting from a Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry (SETAC) international workshop titled "The Influence of Global Climate Change on the Scientific Foundations and Applications of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry." The workshop involved 36 scientists from 11 countries and was designed to answer the following question: How will global climate change influence the environmental impacts of chemicals and other stressors and the way we assess and manage them in the environment? While more detail is found in the complete series of articles, some key consensus points are as follows: (1) human actions (including mitigation of and adaptation to impacts of global climate change [GCC]) may have as much influence on the fate and distribution of chemical contaminants as does GCC, and modeled predictions should be interpreted cautiously; (2) climate change can affect the toxicity of chemicals, but chemicals can also affect how organisms acclimate to climate change; (3) effects of GCC may be slow, variable, and difficult to detect, though some populations and communities of high vulnerability may exhibit responses sooner and more dramatically than others; (4) future approaches to human and ecological risk assessments will need to incorporate multiple stressors and cumulative risks considering the wide spectrum of potential impacts stemming from GCC; and (5) baseline/reference conditions for estimating resource injury and restoration/rehabilitation will continually shift due to GCC and represent significant challenges to practitioners.

  8. An efficient hybrid planner in changing environments

    SciTech Connect

    Barbehenn, M.; Hutchinson, S. |; Chen, P.C.

    1993-11-01

    In this paper, we present a new hybrid motion planner than is capable of exploiting previous planning episodes when confronted with new planning problems. Our approach is applicable when several (similar) problems are successively posed for the same static environment, or when the environment changes incrementally between planning episodes. At the heart of our system lie two low-level motion planners: a fast, but incomplete planner (which we call LOCAL), and a computationally costly (possibly resolution) complete planner (which we call GLOBAL). When a new planning problem is presented to our planner, a meta-level planner (which we call MANAGER) decomposes the problem into segments that are amenable to solution by LOCAL. This decomposition is made by exploiting a task graph, in which successful planning episodes have been recorded. In cases where the decomposition fails, GLOBAL is invoked. The key to our planner`s success is a novel representation of solution trajectories, in which segments of collision-free paths are associated with the boundary of nearby obstacles.

  9. NCSE's 15th National Conference and Global Forum on Science, Policy, and the Environment: Energy and Climate Change, Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, Ellen

    2016-07-08

    The National Council for Science and the Environment (NCSE) held its 15th National Conference and Global Forum on Science, Policy and the Environment: Energy and Climate Change, on January 27-29, 2015, at the Hyatt Regency Hotel, Crystal City, VA. The National Conference: Energy and Climate Change developed and advanced partnerships that focused on transitioning the world to a new “low carbon” and “climate resilient” energy system. It emphasized advancing research and technology, putting ideas into action, and moving forward on policy and practice. More than 900 participants from the scientific research, policy and governance, business and civil society, and education communities attended. The Conference was organized around four themes: (1) a new energy system (including energy infrastructure, technologies and efficiencies, changes in distribution of energy sources, and low carbon transportation); (2) energy, climate and sustainable development; (3) financing and markets; and (4) achieving progress (including ideas for the 21st Conference of Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change). The program featured six keynote presentations, six plenary sessions, 41 symposia and 20 workshops. Conference participants were involved in the 20 workshops, each on a specific energy and climate-related issue. The workshops were designed as interactive sessions, with each workshop generating 10-12 recommendations on the topic. The recommendations were prepared in the final conference report, were disseminated nationally, and continue to be available for public use. The conference also featured an exhibition and poster sessions. The National Conference on Energy and Climate Change addressed a wide range of issues specific to the U.S. Department of Energy’s programs; involved DOE’s scientists and program managers in sessions and workshops; and reached out to a broad array of DOE stakeholders.

  10. Stable implementation agreements for open systems interconnection protocols. Change pages to version 5, edition 1. Output from the September 1992 OSE implementors' workshop (OIW)

    SciTech Connect

    Boland, T.

    1992-11-01

    The document records current stable agreements for Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) protocols among the organizations participating in the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Open Systems Environment (OSE) Implementors' Workshop (OIW) series.

  11. Educating for a Change. An ANC Skillshop in Popular Education. Workshop Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doris Marshall Inst. for Education and Action, Toronto (Ontario).

    This manual provides materials for a 6-day workshop to develop skills in democratic learning and teaching practices. Goals of the workshop are as follows: (1) train facilitators to use the methodology; (2) introduce people in the African National Congress (ANC) to the potential of popular education methodology; (3) determine follow-up action to…

  12. Changes in Teaching Practices: What Happens after the Writing Across the Curriculum Workshop?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soven, Margot

    The question of what to do "after the workshop" has been treated only in passing by writing across the curriculum experts. When planning the writing across the curriculum program at La Salle University (Philadelphia), the writing faculty decided to make continued "after the workshop" interaction with the writing specialist an integral part of the…

  13. EMSL Science Theme Advisory Panel Workshop - Atmospheric Aerosol Chemistry, Climate Change, and Air Quality

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, Donald R.; Finlayson-Pitts, Barbara J.; Allen, Heather C.; Bertram, Allan K.; Grassian, Vicki H.; Martin, Scot T.; Penner, Joyce E.; Prather, Kimberly; Rasch, Philip J.; Signorell, Ruth; Smith, James N.; Wyslouzil, Barbara; Ziemann, Paul; Dabdub, Donald; Furche, Filipp; Nizkorodov, Sergey; Tobias, Douglas J.; Laskin, Julia; Laskin, Alexander

    2013-07-01

    This report contains the workshop scope and recommendations from the workshop attendees in identifying scientific gaps in new particle formation, growth and properties of particles and reactions in and on particles as well as the laboratory-focused capabilities, field-deployable capabilities and modeling/theory tools along with linking of models to fundamental data.

  14. Educating Parents of Gifted Children: Designing Effective Workshops for Changing Parent Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Christine L.; Stanley, Laurel

    2012-01-01

    The focus of this study was to determine the effectiveness of a series of free workshops for parents of gifted children. The parent education workshops provided research-based information as recognized by experts in the field of counseling gifted children. Content areas include the characteristics of gifted children, identification, appropriate…

  15. Reclaiming Power in the Writers' Workshop: Defending Curricula, Countering Narratives, and Changing Identities in Prekindergarten Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kissel, Brian T.; Miller, Erin T.

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we examine how young writers and their teachers transformed the language arts curriculum by asserting their power within a familiar framework--the writer's workshop. We present three narratives in which multiple pre-kindergarten agents (students, teachers, and administrators) used their power within the Writer's Workshop to a)…

  16. Putting Research into Practice: Pedagogy Development Workshops Change the Teaching Philosophy of Graduate Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Peter J. T.; Syncox, David; Heppleston, Audrey; Isaac, Siara; Alters, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Teaching competence is an important skill for graduate students to acquire and is often considered a precursor to an academic career. In this study, we evaluated the effects of a multi-day teaching workshop on graduate teaching philosophies by surveying 200 graduate students, 79 of whom had taken the workshops and 121 who had not. We found no…

  17. Climate Change Education: Preparing Future and Current Business Leaders--A Workshop Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Storksdieck, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Climate change poses challenges as well as opportunities for businesses and, broadly speaking for the entire economy. Businesses will be challenged to provide services or products with less harmful influence on the climate; respond to a changing policy, regulatory, and market environment; and provide new services and products to help address the…

  18. Drosophila larvae: Thermal ecology in changing environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, George

    Temperature affects almost all aspects of life. Although much work has been done to assess the impact of temperature on organismal performance, relatively little is known about how organisms behaviorally regulate temperature, how these behaviors effect population fitness, or how changing climate may interact with these behaviors. I explore these questions with the model system Drosophila larvae. Larvae are small, with a low thermal mass and limited capacity for physiological thermoregulation. Mortality is generally high in larvae, with large potential impacts on population growth rate. Thus behavioral thermoregulation in larvae should be of critical selective importance. I present a review of the current knowledge of Drosophila thermal preference. I describe quantifiable thermoregulatory behaviors ( TMV and TW) unique to larvae. I show interspecific variation of these behaviors in Drosophila melanogaster and several close relatives, and intraspecific variation between populations collected from different environments. I also investigate these behaviors in two mutant lines, ssa and biz, to investigate the genetic basis of these behaviors. I show that larval thermoregulatory systems are independent of those of adults. Further these thermoregulatory behaviors differ between two sister species, D. yakuba and D. santomea. Although these two species readily hybridize in laboratory conditions, very few hybrids are observed in the field. The surprising result that hybrids of D. yakuba and D. santomea seem to inherit TMV from D. yakuba suggests a novel extrinsic isolation mechanism between the two species. I explore how fitness is the result of the interaction between genetics and the environment. I utilize Monte Carlo simulation to show how non-linear norms of reaction generate variation in populations even in the absence of behavior or epigenetic evolutionary mechanisms. Finally I investigate the global distribution of temperatures in which these organisms exist using

  19. Management and monitoring of the endangered Shenandoah salamander under climate change: Workshop report 10-12 April 2012

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grant, Evan H. Campbell; Wofford, John E.B.; Smith, D.R.; Dennis, J.; Hawkins-Hoffman, C.; Schaberl, J.; Foley, M.; Bogle, M.

    2014-01-01

    Here we report on a structured decision making (SDM) process to identify management strategies to ensure persistence of the federally endangered Shenandoah salamander (Plethodon shenandoah), given that it may be at increased extinction risk under projected climate change. The focus of this report is the second of two SDM workshops; in the first workshop, participants developed a prototype of the decision, including problem frame, management objectives and a suite of potential management strategies, predictive models to inform the decision and link alternatives with the objectives to identify potential solutions, and identified data needs to reduce key uncertainties in the decision. Participants in this second workshop included experts in National Park Service policy at multiple administrative levels, who refined objectives, further evaluated the initial management alternatives, and discussed policy constraints on implementing active management for the species and its high-elevation habitat. The conclusion of the second workshop was similar to that of the first: the current state of information and objectives suggest that there is some value in considering active management to reduce the long-term extinction risk for the species, though there are institutional conservative policies to implementing active management at range-wide scales. The workshop participants also emphasized a conservative NPS management philosophy, including caution in implementing management actions that may ultimately harm the system, a stated assumption that ecosystem changes were “natural” unless demonstrated otherwise (therefore not warranting active management to mitigate), and a need to demonstrate that extinction risk is tied to anthropogenic influence prior to taking active management to mitigate specific anthropogenic influences. Even within a protected area having minimal human disturbance, intertwined environmental variables and interspecific relationships that drive population

  20. Fourth annual workshop on management in basic and applied research environments

    SciTech Connect

    Bodnarczuk, M.W.

    1993-11-01

    The struggle to develop quality management concepts that ``map`` onto the cultural and work practices found in basic and applied research environments has been (for better or for worse) an attempt to differentiate basic and applied research from the nuclear industry. In the first (1990) edition of this ``Music Book`` proceedings, almost every laboratory that participated had a quality program that was traceable to, based on, influenced by, or in reaction to the nuclear quality standard ASME-NQA-1. This 1993 edition of the ``Music Book`` is very different in that almost every laboratory has developed a quality program that is based on, traceable to, or heavily influenced by DOE 5700.6C (Quality Assurance) and the DOE Standard; Implementation Guide for Quality Assurance Programs for Basic and Applied Research (DOE-ER-STD-6001-92). In order to construct a context for what follows and properly introduce the contents of this book, we want to briefly recount some of the highlights of the events that brought about this change, from the perspective of one who participated in the process.

  1. A healthy turn in urban climate change policies; European city workshop proposes health indicators as policy integrators

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The EU FP6 HENVINET project reviewed the potential relevance of a focus on climate change related health effects for climate change policies at the city region level. This was undertaken by means of a workshop with both scientists, city representatives from several EU-countries, representatives of EU city networks and EU-experts. In this paper we introduce some important health related climate change issues, and discuss the current city policies of the participating cities. Methods The workshop used a backcasting format to analyse the future relevance of a health perspective, and the main benefits and challenges this would bring to urban policy making. Results It was concluded that health issues have an important function as indicators of success for urban climate change policies, given the extent to which climate change policies contribute to public health and as such to quality of life. Simultaneously the health perspective may function as a policy integrator in that it can combine several related policy objectives, such as environmental policies, health policies, urban planning and economic development policies, in one framework for action. Furthermore, the participants to the workshop considered public health to be of strategic importance in organizing public support for climate change policies. One important conclusion of the workshop was the view that the connection of science and policy at the city level is inadequate, and that the integration of scientific knowledge on climate change related health effects and local policy practice is in need of more attention. In conclusion, the workshop was viewed as a constructive advance in the process of integration which hopefully will lead to ongoing cooperation. Conclusions The workshop had the ambition to bring together a diversity of actor perspectives for exchange of knowledge and experiences, and joint understanding as a basis for future cooperation. Next to the complementarities in experience and

  2. Cardiovascular state changes in simulated work environments

    PubMed Central

    Stuiver, Arjan; Mulder, Ben

    2014-01-01

    The usefulness of cardiovascular measures as indicators of changes in cognitive workload has been addressed in several studies. In this paper the question is explored whether cardiovascular patterns in heart rate, blood pressure, baroreflex sensitivity and HRV that are found are consistent within and between two simulated working environments. Two studies, were performed, both with 21 participants: one in an ambulance dispatch simulation and one in a driving simulator. In the ambulance dispatcher task an initial strong increase in blood pressure is followed by a moderate on-going increase in blood pressure during the next hour of task performance. This pattern is accompanied by a strong increase in baroreflex sensitivity while heart rate decreases. In the driving simulator study, blood pressure initially increases but decreases almost to baseline level in the next hour. This pattern is accompanied by a decrease in baroreflex sensitivity, while heart rate decreases. Results of both studies are interpreted in terms of autonomic control (related to both sympathetic and para-sympathetic effects), using a simplified simulation of a baroreflex regulation model. Interpretation of the results leads to the conclusion that the cardiovascular response patterns in both tasks are a combination of an initial defensive reaction, in combination with compensatory blood pressure control. The level of compensatory blood pressure control, however, is quite different for the two tasks. This helps to understand the differences in response patterns between the two studies in this paper and may be helpful as well for understanding differences in cardiovascular response patterns in general. A substantial part of the effects observed during task performance are regulatory effects and are not always directly related to workload manipulations. Making this distinction may also contribute to the understanding of differences in cardiovascular response patterns during cognitive workload. PMID

  3. Building Strong Geoscience Departments Through the Visiting Workshop Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ormand, C. J.; Manduca, C. A.; Macdonald, H.; Bralower, T. J.; Clemens-Knott, D.; Doser, D. I.; Feiss, P. G.; Rhodes, D. D.; Richardson, R. M.; Savina, M. E.

    2011-12-01

    The Building Strong Geoscience Departments project focuses on helping geoscience departments adapt and prosper in a changing and challenging environment. From 2005-2009, the project offered workshop programs on topics such as student recruitment, program assessment, preparing students for the workforce, and strengthening geoscience programs. Participants shared their departments' challenges and successes. Building on best practices and most promising strategies from these workshops and on workshop leaders' experiences, from 2009-2011 the project ran a visiting workshop program, bringing workshops to 18 individual departments. Two major strengths of the visiting workshop format are that it engages the entire department in the program, fostering a sense of shared ownership and vision, and that it focuses on each department's unique situation. Departments applied to have a visiting workshop, and the process was highly competitive. Selected departments chose from a list of topics developed through the prior workshops: curriculum and program design, program elements beyond the curriculum, recruiting students, preparing students for the workforce, and program assessment. Two of our workshop leaders worked with each department to customize and deliver the 1-2 day programs on campus. Each workshop incorporated exercises to facilitate active departmental discussions, presentations incorporating concrete examples drawn from the leaders' experience and from the collective experiences of the geoscience community, and action planning to scaffold implementation. All workshops also incorporated information on building departmental consensus and assessing departmental efforts. The Building Strong Geoscience Departments website complements the workshops with extensive examples from the geoscience community. Of the 201 participants in the visiting workshop program, 140 completed an end of workshop evaluation survey with an overall satisfaction rating of 8.8 out of a possible 10

  4. Results of an adaptive environmental assessment modeling workshop concerning potential impacts of drilling muds and cuttings on the marine environment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Auble, Gregor T.; Andrews, Austin K.; Ellison, Richard A.; Hamilton, David B.; Johnson, Richard A.; Roelle, James E.; Marmorek, David R.

    1983-01-01

    Drilling fluids or "muds" are essential components of modern drilling operations. They provide integrity for the well bore, a medium for removal of formation cuttings, and lubrication and cooling of the drill bit and pipe. The modeling workshop described in this report was conducted September 14-18, 1981 in Gulf Breeze, Florida to consider potential impacts of discharged drilling muds and cuttings on the marine environment. The broad goals of the workshop were synthesis of information on fate and effects, identification of general relationships between drilling fluids and the marine environment, and identification of site-specific variables likely to determine impacts of drilling muds and cuttings in various marine sites. The workshop was structured around construction of a model simulating fate and effects of discharges from a single rig into open water areas of the Gulf of Mexico, and discussion of factors that might produce different fate and effects in enclosed areas such as bays and estuaries. The simulation model was composed of four connected submodels. A Discharge/Fate submodel dealt with the discharge characteristics of the rig and the subsequent fate of discharged material. Three effects submodels then calculated biological responses at distances away from the rig for the water column, soft bottom benthos (assuming the rig was located over a soft bottom environment), and hard bottom benthos (assuming the rig was located over a hard bottom environment). The model focused on direct linkages between the discharge and various organisms rather than on how the marine ecosystem itself is interconnected. Behavior of the simulation model indicated relatively localized effects of drilling muds and cuttings discharged from a single platform into open water areas. Water column fate and effects were dominated by rapid dilution. Effects from deposition of spent mud and cuttings were spatially limited with relatively rapid recovery, especially in soft bottom benthic

  5. Climate Change, Indoor Environment and Health

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Climate change is becoming a driving force for improving energy efficiency because saving energy can help reduce the greenhouse gas emissions that contribute to climate change. However, it is important to balance energy saving measures with ventilation...

  6. Workshop on an Assessment of Gas-Side Fouling in Fossil Fuel Exhaust Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marner, W. J. (Editor); Webb, R. L. (Editor)

    1982-01-01

    The state of the art of gas side fouling in fossil fuel exhaust environments was assessed. Heat recovery applications were emphasized. The deleterious effects of gas side fouling including increased energy consumption, increased material losses, and loss of production were identified.

  7. Seagrass meadows in a globally changing environment.

    PubMed

    Unsworth, Richard K F; van Keulen, Mike; Coles, Rob G

    2014-06-30

    Seagrass meadows are valuable ecosystem service providers that are now being lost globally at an unprecedented rate, with water quality and other localised stressors putting their future viability in doubt. It is therefore critical that we learn more about the interactions between seagrass meadows and future environmental change in the anthropocene. This needs to be with particular reference to the consequences of poor water quality on ecosystem resilience and the effects of change on trophic interactions within the food web. Understanding and predicting the response of seagrass meadows to future environmental change requires an understanding of the natural long-term drivers of change and how these are currently influenced by anthropogenic stress. Conservation management of coastal and marine ecosystems now and in the future requires increased knowledge of how seagrass meadows respond to environmental change, and how they can be managed to be resilient to these changes. Finding solutions to such issues also requires recognising people as part of the social-ecological system. This special issue aims to further enhance this knowledge by bringing together global expertise across this field. The special issues considers issues such as ecosystem service delivery of seagrass meadows, the drivers of long-term seagrass change and the socio-economic consequences of environmental change to seagrass.

  8. Workshop on Pervasive Computing and Cooperative Environments in a Global Context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvarajah, Kirusnapillai; Speirs, Neil

    The increasing number of devices that are invisibly embedded into our surrounding environment as well as the proliferation of wireless communication and sensing technologies are the basis for visions like ambient intelligence, ubiquitous and pervasive computing. In this context, the objective of PECES EU project is the creation of a comprehensive software layer to enable the seamless cooperation of embedded devices across various smart spaces on a global scale in a context-dependent, secure and trustworthy manner.

  9. Counting whales in a challenging, changing environment.

    PubMed

    Williams, R; Kelly, N; Boebel, O; Friedlaender, A S; Herr, H; Kock, K-H; Lehnert, L S; Maksym, T; Roberts, J; Scheidat, M; Siebert, U; Brierley, A S

    2014-03-13

    Estimating abundance of Antarctic minke whales is central to the International Whaling Commission's conservation and management work and understanding impacts of climate change on polar marine ecosystems. Detecting abundance trends is problematic, in part because minke whales are frequently sighted within Antarctic sea ice where navigational safety concerns prevent ships from surveying. Using icebreaker-supported helicopters, we conducted aerial surveys across a gradient of ice conditions to estimate minke whale density in the Weddell Sea. The surveys revealed substantial numbers of whales inside the sea ice. The Antarctic summer sea ice is undergoing rapid regional change in annual extent, distribution, and length of ice-covered season. These trends, along with substantial interannual variability in ice conditions, affect the proportion of whales available to be counted by traditional shipboard surveys. The strong association between whales and the dynamic, changing sea ice requires reexamination of the power to detect trends in whale abundance or predict ecosystem responses to climate change.

  10. Remote sensing in the coastal and marine environment. Proceedings of the US North Atlantic Regional Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaitzeff, J. B. (Editor); Cornillon, P. (Editor); Aubrey, D. A. (Editor)

    1980-01-01

    Presentations were grouped in the following categories: (1) a technical orientation of Earth resources remote sensing including data sources and processing; (2) a review of the present status of remote sensing technology applicable to the coastal and marine environment; (3) a description of data and information needs of selected coastal and marine activities; and (4) an outline of plans for marine monitoring systems for the east coast and a concept for an east coast remote sensing facility. Also discussed were user needs and remote sensing potentials in the areas of coastal processes and management, commercial and recreational fisheries, and marine physical processes.

  11. Reuseable Objects Software Environment (ROSE): Introduction to Air Force Software Reuse Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cottrell, William L.

    1994-01-01

    The Reusable Objects Software Environment (ROSE) is a common, consistent, consolidated implementation of software functionality using modern object oriented software engineering including designed-in reuse and adaptable requirements. ROSE is designed to minimize abstraction and reduce complexity. A planning model for the reverse engineering of selected objects through object oriented analysis is depicted. Dynamic and functional modeling are used to develop a system design, the object design, the language, and a database management system. The return on investment for a ROSE pilot program and timelines are charted.

  12. "Change My Thinking Patterns towards Maths": A Bibliotherapy Workshop for Pre-Service Teachers' Mathematics Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Sue; Raven, Monica

    2014-01-01

    In small-group workshops, a joint initiative of the researcher and the student counsellor, primary (elementary) pre-service teachers (PSTs) wrote about critical incidents in their mathematics learning, and shared them with the group. Then, PSTs read extracts about mathematics anxiety (maths anxiety), and wrote and shared their reflections…

  13. "Sometimes the Perspective Changes": Reflections on a Photography Workshop with Multicultural Students in Italy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danzak, Robin L.

    2015-01-01

    This article describes and evaluates an 8-week photography workshop, FotoLab, conducted in Italy at an afterschool-tutoring program for students acquiring Italian as an additional language. Seventeen students, age 8-17 and originating from 9 countries, participated. Co-facilitated by three international educator-researchers, FotoLab's purpose was…

  14. Can Brief Workshop Interventions Change Care Staff Understanding of Challenging Behaviours?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowey, Alan; Toogood, Sandy; Hastings, Richard P.; Nash, Susie

    2007-01-01

    Background: The working culture surrounding challenging behaviour may have a strong effect on staff behaviour. As a first step to influencing staff talk about challenging behaviour, the aim of the present study was to explore whether a 1-day training workshop could have an effect on staff causal explanations. Methods: Fifty-four front line staff,…

  15. Acquaintance Rape Workshops: Their Effectiveness in Changing the Attitudes of First Year College Men.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Earle, James P.

    1996-01-01

    Studies the effect of three different types of acquaintance rape prevention programs on men's attitudes concerning women and sexual assault. Examined single-sex versus coed workshops, small groups versus large groups, and other types of formats. Findings show that some program features are more effective than others. (RJM)

  16. NASA Partnership with JSU and MSU to Promote Remote Sensing Applications and Global Climate Change Education: 2013 Summer Course/Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, S. R.

    2014-12-01

    NASA Innovations in Climate Education (NICE) is a competitive project to promote climate and Earth system science literacy and seeks to increase the access of underrepresented minority groups to science careers and educational opportunities. A three year funding was received from NASA to partnership with JSU and MSU under cooperative agreement "Strengthening Global Climate Change education through Remote Sensing Application in Coastal Environment using NASA Satellite Data and Models". The goal is to increase the number of undergraduate students at Jackson State University, a Historically Black University, who are prepared to pursue higher academic degrees and careers in the fields relevant to earth system science global climate change, marine and environmental sciences. A two week summer course/workshop was held during May 20-31, 2013 at JSU, focusing on historical and technical concepts of remote sensing technology and applications to climate and global climate change. Nine students from meteorology, biology, industrial technology and computer science/engineering of JSU participated in the course/workshop. The lecture topics include: introduction to remote sensing and GIS, introduction to atmospheric science and climate, introduction to NASA innovations in climate education, introduction to remote sensing technology for bio-geosphere, introduction to earth system science, principles of paleoclimatology and global change, daily weather briefing, satellite image interpretation and so on. In addition to lectures, lab sessions were held for hand-on experiences for remote sensing applications to atmosphere, biosphere, earth system science and climate change using ERDAS/ENVI GIS software and satellite tools. Field trip to Barnett reservoir and National weather Service (NWS) was part of the workshop. Some of the activities of the sessions will be presented. Basics of Earth System Science is a non-mathematical introductory course designed for high school seniors, high

  17. Phytoplankton adapt to changing ocean environments.

    PubMed

    Irwin, Andrew J; Finkel, Zoe V; Müller-Karger, Frank E; Troccoli Ghinaglia, Luis

    2015-05-05

    Model projections indicate that climate change may dramatically restructure phytoplankton communities, with cascading consequences for marine food webs. It is currently not known whether evolutionary change is likely to be able to keep pace with the rate of climate change. For simplicity, and in the absence of evidence to the contrary, most model projections assume species have fixed environmental preferences and will not adapt to changing environmental conditions on the century scale. Using 15 y of observations from Station CARIACO (Carbon Retention in a Colored Ocean), we show that most of the dominant species from a marine phytoplankton community were able to adapt their realized niches to track average increases in water temperature and irradiance, but the majority of species exhibited a fixed niche for nitrate. We do not know the extent of this adaptive capacity, so we cannot conclude that phytoplankton will be able to adapt to the changes anticipated over the next century, but community ecosystem models can no longer assume that phytoplankton cannot adapt.

  18. 77 FR 8324 - Applications for the Environment: Real-Time Information Synthesis (AERIS) User Needs Workshop...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-14

    .... Transformative Concepts are intended to change the way surface transportation systems operate, with an emphasis.... ACTION: Notice. The U.S. Department of Transportation (USDOT) Intelligent Transportation System Joint... transportation system users and operators. Employing a multi-modal approach, the AERIS Program will work...

  19. Role of proline under changing environments

    PubMed Central

    Hayat, Shamsul; Hayat, Qaiser; Alyemeni, Mohammed Nasser; Wani, Arif Shafi; Pichtel, John; Ahmad, Aqil

    2012-01-01

    When exposed to stressful conditions, plants accumulate an array of metabolites, particularly amino acids. Amino acids have traditionally been considered as precursors to and constituents of proteins, and play an important role in plant metabolism and development. A large body of data suggests a positive correlation between proline accumulation and plant stress. Proline, an amino acid, plays a highly beneficial role in plants exposed to various stress conditions. Besides acting as an excellent osmolyte, proline plays three major roles during stress, i.e., as a metal chelator, an antioxidative defense molecule and a signaling molecule. Review of the literature indicates that a stressful environment results in an overproduction of proline in plants which in turn imparts stress tolerance by maintaining cell turgor or osmotic balance; stabilizing membranes thereby preventing electrolyte leakage; and bringing concentrations of reactive oxygen species (ROS) within normal ranges, thus preventing oxidative burst in plants. Reports indicate enhanced stress tolerance when proline is supplied exogenously at low concentrations. However, some reports indicate toxic effects of proline when supplied exogenously at higher concentrations. In this article, we review and discuss the effects of exogenous proline on plants exposed to various abiotic stresses. Numerous examples of successful application of exogenous proline to improve stress tolerance are presented. The roles played by exogenous proline under varying environments have been critically examined and reviewed. PMID:22951402

  20. Department Chairs as Change Agents: Leading Change in Resistant Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaubatz, Julie A.; Ensminger, David C.

    2017-01-01

    Change process research often discusses barriers that impede organizational change (e.g., Banta, 1997; Cavacuiti and Locke, 2013; Mutchler, 1990; Stewart et al., 2012); however, no empirical research has addressed how behaviors established in leadership models counteract these barriers. This study explored these two interconnected constructs of…

  1. Complex Flow Workshop Report

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2012-05-01

    This report documents findings from a workshop on the impacts of complex wind flows in and out of wind turbine environments, the research needs, and the challenges of meteorological and engineering modeling at regional, wind plant, and wind turbine scales.

  2. Improving User Notification on Frequently Changing HPC Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Fuson, Christopher B; Renaud, William A

    2016-01-01

    Today s HPC centers user environments can be very complex. Centers often contain multiple large complicated computational systems each with their own user environment. Changes to a system s environment can be very impactful; however, a center s user environment is, in one-way or another, frequently changing. Because of this, it is vital for centers to notify users of change. For users, untracked changes can be costly, resulting in unnecessary debug time as well as wasting valuable compute allocations and research time. Communicating frequent change to diverse user communities is a common and ongoing task for HPC centers. This paper will cover the OLCF s current processes and methods used to communicate change to users of the center s large Cray systems and supporting resources. The paper will share lessons learned and goals as well as practices, tools, and methods used to continually improve and reach members of the OLCF user community.

  3. Improving Scientific Communication and Publication Output in a Multidisciplinary Laboratory: Changing Culture Through Staff Development Workshops

    SciTech Connect

    Noonan, Christine F.; Stratton, Kelly G.

    2015-07-13

    Communication plays a fundamental role in science and engineering disciplines. However, many higher education programs provide little, if any, technical communication coursework. Without strong communication skills scientists and engineers have less opportunity to publish, obtain competitive research funds, or grow their careers. This article describes the role of scientific communication training as an innovative staff development program in a learning-intensive workplace – a national scientific research and development laboratory. The findings show that involvement in the workshop has increased overall participating staff annual publications by an average of 61 percent compared to their pre-workshop publishing performance as well as confidence level in their ability to write and publish peer-reviewed literature. Secondary benefits include improved information literacy skills and the development of informal communities of practice. This work provides insight into adult education in the workplace.

  4. Controlling risk in a changing environment

    SciTech Connect

    Keaten, R.W. ); Rone, A.H. )

    1992-01-01

    Competitive pressures in the electric utility industry today demand an unprecedented focus on improving efficiency and cost effectiveness. Work processes and practices that, in some cases, have been in place for years are now being examined and changed in attempts to achieve better results. When such changes are made in nuclear plant work processes, however, the resulting impact on nuclear risk is a potential concern. Two types of risk must be considered: (a) the direct impact of new processes that might inadvertently introduce new safety concerns and (b) the indirect effects on safety due to worker morale and motivation. Work processes and practices at the GPU nuclear stations at Oyster Creek and Three Mile Island (TMI) were developed and put in place in the period following the TMI-2 accident. During this period, great emphasis was placed on installing work processes that attempted to avoid errors through a multiplicity of checks and overchecks. During 1991, GPUN senior management initiated a substantial effort to achieve major improvements in efficiency and effectiveness of key work processes, while maintaining and even enhancing nuclear safety.

  5. Essays in energy, environment and technological change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yichen Christy

    This dissertation studies technological change in the context of energy and environmental economics. Technology plays a key role in reducing greenhouse gas emissions from the transportation sector. Chapter 1 estimates a structural model of the car industry that allows for endogenous product characteristics to investigate how gasoline taxes, R&D subsidies and competition affect fuel efficiency and vehicle prices in the medium-run, both through car-makers' decisions to adopt technologies and through their investments in knowledge capital. I use technology adoption and automotive patents data for 1986-2006 to estimate this model. I show that 92% of fuel efficiency improvements between 1986 and 2006 were driven by technology adoption, while the role of knowledge capital is largely to reduce the marginal production costs of fuel-efficient cars. A counterfactual predicts that an additional 1/gallon gasoline tax in 2006 would have increased the technology adoption rate, and raised average fuel efficiency by 0.47 miles/gallon, twice the annual fuel efficiency improvement in 2003-2006. An R&D subsidy that would reduce the marginal cost of knowledge capital by 25% in 2006 would have raised investment in knowledge capital. This subsidy would have raised fuel efficiency only by 0.06 miles/gallon in 2006, but would have increased variable profits by 2.3 billion over all firms that year. Passenger vehicle fuel economy standards in the United States will require substantial improvements in new vehicle fuel economy over the next decade. Economic theory suggests that vehicle manufacturers adopt greater fuel-saving technologies for vehicles with larger market size. Chapter 2 documents a strong connection between market size, measured by sales, and technology adoption. Using variation consumer demographics and purchasing pattern to account for the endogeneity of market size, we find that a 10 percent increase in market size raises vehicle fuel efficiency by 0.3 percent, as compared

  6. Evaluation of change detection techniques for monitoring coastal zone environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weismiller, R. A.; Kristof, S. J.; Scholz, D. K.; Anuta, P. E.; Momin, S. M.

    1977-01-01

    Development of satisfactory techniques for detecting change in coastal zone environments is required before operational monitoring procedures can be established. In an effort to meet this need a study was directed toward developing and evaluating different types of change detection techniques, based upon computer aided analysis of LANDSAT multispectral scanner (MSS) data, to monitor these environments. The Matagorda Bay estuarine system along the Texas coast was selected as the study area. Four change detection techniques were designed and implemented for evaluation: (1) post classification comparison change detection, (2) delta data change detection, (3) spectral/temporal change classification, and (4) layered spectral/temporal change classification. Each of the four techniques was used to analyze a LANDSAT MSS temporal data set to detect areas of change of the Matagorda Bay region.

  7. The Shuttle Environment Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lehmann, J.; Tanner, S. G. (Editor); Wilkerson, T. (Editor)

    1983-01-01

    Results of shuttle environmental measurement programs were presented. The implications for plasma, infrared and ultraviolet experiments were discussed. The prelaunch environmental conditions, results of key environmental measurements made during the flights of STS 1, 2, 3, 4, and postlanding environmental conditions were covered.

  8. Astrobiology Workshop: Leadership in Astrobiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeVincenzi, D. (Editor); Briggs, G.; Cohen, M.; Cuzzi, J.; DesMarais, D.; Harper, L.; Morrison, D.; Pohorille, A.

    1996-01-01

    Astrobiology is defined in the 1996 NASA Strategic Plan as 'The study of the living universe.' At NASA's Ames Research Center, this endeavor encompasses the use of space to understand life's origin, evolution, and destiny in the universe. Life's origin refers to understanding the origin of life in the context of the origin and diversity of planetary systems. Life's evolution refers to understanding how living systems have adapted to Earth's changing environment, to the all-pervasive force of gravity, and how they may adapt to environments beyond Earth. Life's destiny refers to making long-term human presence in space a reality, and laying the foundation for understanding and managing changes in Earth's environment. The first Astrobiology Workshop brought together a diverse group of researchers to discuss the following general questions: Where and how are other habitable worlds formed? How does life originate? How have the Earth and its biosphere influenced each other over time? Can terrestrial life be sustained beyond our planet? How can we expand the human presence to Mars? The objectives of the Workshop included: discussing the scope of astrobiology, strengthening existing efforts for the study of life in the universe, identifying new cross-disciplinary programs with the greatest potential for scientific return, and suggesting steps needed to bring this program to reality. Ames has been assigned the lead role for astrobiology by NASA in recognition of its strong history of leadership in multidisciplinary research in the space, Earth, and life sciences and its pioneering work in studies of the living universe. This initial science workshop was established to lay the foundation for what is to become a national effort in astrobiology, with anticipated participation by the university community, other NASA centers, and other agencies. This workshop (the first meeting of its kind ever held) involved life, Earth, and space scientists in a truly interdisciplinary sharing

  9. Rural Development, Poverty, and Natural Resources: Workshop Paper Series. Part I. Sociodemographic and Economic Changes in Rural America; Rural Policy: An Independent View.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deavers, Kenneth L.; And Others

    A paper examining recent changes in the social and economic development of rural America--with comments by a different author--and a paper discussing rural policy comprise this workshop collection. Placing the changes of the 1970s in a broader historical perspective and developing a general framework within which to consider the influence of…

  10. Agricultural Structural Change: Impact on the Rural Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knickel, Karlheim

    1990-01-01

    Examines indicators and impacts of agricultural change on environment. Links environmental quality to farm structure and size, and rural cultural values. Examines correlation between part-time farming and land structure and quality. Examines policies' effect on agricultural change. Recommends incorporation of environmental policies into…

  11. Impact of Globalization on Sugarcane Pests, Biodiversity and the Environment: A Review of the 2009 Entomology Workshop

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The 7th International Society of Sugar Cane Technologists (ISSCT) Entomology Workshop was held from 20 to 24 April 2009 in San Miguel de Tucumán, Argentina under the theme: “Impact of Globalization on Sugar Cane Pests, Biodiversity and the Environment”. Technical sessions held over three days were g...

  12. Shaped by the environment--adaptation in plants: meeting report based on the presentations at the FEBS Workshop 'Adaptation Potential in Plants' 2009 (Vienna, Austria).

    PubMed

    Siomos, Maria F

    2009-09-01

    As sessile organisms that are unable to escape from inhospitable environments, plants are at the mercy of the elements. Nonetheless, plants have managed to adapt, evolve and survive in some of the harshest conditions on earth. The FEBS Workshop 'Adaptation Potential in Plants', held at the Gregor Mendel Institute of Molecular Plant Biology, Vienna, Austria from 19 to 21 March 2009, provided a forum (including 18 invited talks, 8 selected short talks and 69 posters) for about 100 plant biologists from 32 countries, working in the diverse fields of genetics, epigenetics, stress signalling, and growth and development, to come together and discuss adaptation potential in plants at all its levels.

  13. Workshop Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Aerospace Education, 1977

    1977-01-01

    Reviews a leadership development aerospace educators workshop held at Maxwell Air Force Base, Alabama, July 22, 1977, and an introductory/advanced aerospace workshop held at Central Washington State College. (SL)

  14. Part I. The Delivery of Information Services within a Changing Information Environment. The Changing Information Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Rosann; Straub, Detmar W.

    1991-01-01

    Outlines the impact of current divisions in the information infrastructure of the information environment on the ability of knowledge workers to integrate information across media and sources of information. Discussion covers information "seams," inaccessible information, information overload/impoverishment, and bottlenecks. The…

  15. Vegetation change in dryland environments: understanding changes in fluvial fluxes via changes in hydrological connectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puttock, A.; Brazier, R. E.; Dungait, J. A. J.; Bol, R.; Macleod, C. J. A.

    2012-04-01

    Dryland environments are estimated to cover around 40% of the global land surface (Okin et al, 2009) and are home to approximately 2.5 billion people (Reynolds et al. 2007). Many of these areas have recently experienced extensive land degradation. One such area and the focus of this project is the semi-arid US Southwest, where degradation over the past 150 years has been characterised by the invasion of woody vegetation into grasslands. The transition from grass to woody vegetation results in a change in ecosystem structure and function (Turnbull et al, 2008). Structural change is typically characterised by an increased heterogeneity of soil and vegetation resources, associated with reduced vegetation coverage. Functional change is characterised by an increased vulnerability to soil erosion and the potential loss of key nutrients to adjacent fluvial systems. Such loss of resources may impact heavily upon the amount of carbon that is sequestered by these environments and the amount of carbon that is lost as the land becomes more degraded. Therefore, understanding these vegetation transitions is significant for sustainable land use and global biogeochemical cycling. Connectivity is a key concept in understanding the hydrological response to this vegetation change, with reduced vegetation coverage in woody environments being associated with longer and more connected overland flow pathways. This increase in hydrological connectivity results in an accentuated rainfall-runoff response and increased fluvial fluxes of eroded sediment and associated soil organic carbon and other nutrients. This project uses an ecohydrological approach, characterising ecological structure and monitoring natural rainfall-runoff events over bounded plots with different vegetation covering the transitions from C4 pure-grass (Bouteloua eriopoda) to C3 creosote (Larrea tridentate) shrubland and C3 piñon-juniper (Pinus edulis-Juniperus monosperma) mixed stand woodland. Data collected quantifies

  16. Expert Panel Workshop Consensus Statement on the Role of the Environment in the Development of Autoimmune Disease

    PubMed Central

    Parks, Christine G.; Miller, Frederick W.; Pollard, Kenneth Michael; Selmi, Carlo; Germolec, Dori; Joyce, Kelly; Rose, Noel R.; Humble, Michael C.

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases include 80 or more complex disorders characterized by self-reactive, pathologic immune responses in which genetic susceptibility is largely insufficient to determine disease onset. In September 2010, the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) organized an expert panel workshop to evaluate the role of environmental factors in autoimmune diseases, and the state of the science regarding relevant mechanisms, animal models, and human studies. The objective of the workshop was to analyze the existing data to identify conclusions that could be drawn regarding environmental exposures and autoimmunity and to identify critical knowledge gaps and areas of uncertainty for future study. This consensus document summarizes key findings from published workshop monographs on areas in which “confident” and “likely” assessments were made, with recommendations for further research. Transcribed notes and slides were reviewed to synthesize an overview on exposure assessment and questions addressed by interdisciplinary panels. Critical advances in the field of autoimmune disease research have been made in the past decade. Collaborative translational and interdisciplinary research is needed to elucidate the role of environmental factors in autoimmune diseases. A focus on exposure assessment methodology is needed to improve the effectiveness of human studies, and more experimental studies are needed to focus on causal mechanisms underlying observed associations of environmental factors with autoimmune disease in humans. PMID:25196523

  17. Proceedings of a USGS Workshop on Facing Tomorrow's Challenges Along the U.S.-Mexico Border - Monitoring, Modeling, and Forecasting Change Within the Arizona-Sonora Transboundary Watersheds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Norman, Laura M.; Hirsch, Derrick D.; Ward, A. Wesley

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION TO THE WORKSHOP PROCEEDINGS Competition for water resources, habitats, and urban areas in the Borderlands has become an international concern. In the United States, Department of Interior Bureaus, Native American Tribes, and other State and Federal partners rely on the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to provide unbiased science and leadership in the Borderlands region. Consequently, the USGS hosted a workshop, ?Facing Tomorrow?s Challenges along the U.S.-Mexico Border,? on March 20?22, 2007, in Tucson, Ariz., focused specifically on monitoring, modeling, and forecasting change within the Arizona-Sonora Transboundary Watersheds

  18. Curriculum Change in Black Colleges VIII. A Report on a Cooperative Academic Planning Curriculum Development Workshop (Bethune-Cookman College, Daytona Beach, Florida, June 5-8, 1974).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calbert, Roosevelt; Epps, Willie J.

    This publication includes the proceedings of the June 5-8, 1974 curriculum development workshop of the Cooperative Academic Planning (CAP) program. Emphasis is placed on curriculum change and improvement. Topics discussed include indicators for academic planning; competency-based education; research centers as a mechanism for strengthening…

  19. Proceedings of the Patterns Workshop on Career/Goal Changing and Transfer/Articulation Implications (Rochester Institute of Technology, October 16-18, 1977).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rochester Inst. of Tech., NY.

    The 1977 Patterns Workshop focused upon the special problems of those students who change, adjust and revise their career goals in the middle of their college experience. Texts of five speeches given at the conference are presented and include: (1) Articulation In an Anarchical World, keynote address by Dorothy M. Knoell, discussing major areas of…

  20. The Changing Fiscal Environment for Academic Veterinary Medicine.

    PubMed

    Zimmel, Dana N; Lloyd, James W

    2015-01-01

    The fiscal environment for academic veterinary medicine has changed substantially over the past 50 years. Understanding the flux of state and federal government support and the implications for student debt, academic programs, and scholarly work is critical for planning for the future. The recent precipitous decline in public funding highlights the urgent need to develop and maintain an economically sustainable model that can adapt to the changing landscape and serve societal needs.

  1. Ocean margins workshop

    SciTech Connect

    1990-12-31

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is announcing the refocusing of its marine research program to emphasize the study of ocean margins and their role in modulating, controlling, and driving Global Change phenomena. This is a proposal to conduct a workshop that will establish priorities and an implementation plan for a new research initiative by the Department of Energy on the ocean margins. The workshop will be attended by about 70 scientists who specialize in ocean margin research. The workshop will be held in the Norfolk, Virginia area in late June 1990.

  2. Climate Change Education: Goals, Audiences, and Strategies--A Workshop Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forest, Sherrie; Feder, Michael A.

    2011-01-01

    The global scientific and policy community now unequivocally accepts that human activities cause global climate change. Although information on climate change is readily available, the nation still seems unprepared or unwilling to respond effectively to climate change, due partly to a general lack of public understanding of climate change issues…

  3. Quality of Undergraduate Management Studies in a Changing University Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skudiene, Vida

    2005-01-01

    The environment for teaching management in Baltic States' universities has undergone profound changes. The factors involved are: greater interaction between classroom teaching and the "real world", market expansion, internationalization, and increasingly diverse students. The author reports on the survey findings from the three…

  4. Biodiversity inhibits species' evolutionary responses to changing environments.

    PubMed

    de Mazancourt, C; Johnson, E; Barraclough, T G

    2008-04-01

    Despite growing interplay between ecological and evolutionary studies, the question of how biodiversity influences evolutionary dynamics within species remains understudied. Here, using a classical model of phenotypic evolution in species occupying a patchy environment, but introducing global change affecting patch conditions, we show that biodiversity can inhibit species' evolution during global change. The presence of several species increases the chance that one or more species are pre-adapted to new conditions, which restricts the ecological opportunity for evolutionary responses in all the species. Consequently, environmental change tends to select for changes in species abundances rather than for changing phenotypes within each species. The buffering effects of species diversity that we describe might be one important but neglected explanation for widely observed niche conservatism in natural systems. Furthermore, the results show that attempts to understand biotic responses to environmental change need to consider both ecological and evolutionary processes in a realistically diverse setting.

  5. A Death Awareness Workshop: Theory, Application, and Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whelan, W. Michael; Warren, William M.

    1980-01-01

    Describes an experimental death awareness workshop based on Kubler-Ross' theory. The effects of the workshop reveal cognitive and emotional changes indicating participants in the workshop to be moving towards an acceptance of death. (Author)

  6. Changing the Chairs: Impact of Workshop Activities in Assisting Chemistry Department Chairs in Achieving Racial and Ethnic Diversity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greene, Jessica; Lewis, Priscilla A.; Richmond, Geraldine L.; Stockard, Jean

    2011-01-01

    To address the low levels of underrepresented minority (URM) faculty in top-ranked chemistry departments, the National Science Foundation, the U.S. Department of Energy, and the National Institutes of Health jointly sponsored a workshop for academic chemistry leaders in September 2007. The goal of the two-and-a-half-day workshop was to create an…

  7. Geometric change detection in urban environments using images.

    PubMed

    Taneja, Aparna; Ballan, Luca; Pollefeys, Marc

    2015-11-01

    We propose a method to detect changes in the geometry of a city using panoramic images captured by a car driving around the city. The proposed method can be used to significantly optimize the process of updating the 3D model of an urban environment that is changing over time, by restricting this process to only those areas where changes are detected. With this application in mind, we designed our algorithm to specifically detect only structural changes in the environment, ignoring any changes in its appearance, and ignoring also all the changes which are not relevant for update purposes such as cars, people etc. The approach also accounts for the challenges involved in a large scale application of change detection, such as inaccuracies in the input geometry, errors in the geo-location data of the images as well as the limited amount of information due to sparse imagery. We evaluated our approach on a small scale setup using high resolution, densely captured images and a large scale setup covering an entire city using instead the more realistic scenario of low resolution, sparsely captured images. A quantitative evaluation was also conducted for the large scale setup consisting of 14,000 images.

  8. Technology transfer in a changing national security environment. Final report May-Nov 90

    SciTech Connect

    Finkler, R.A.; Boezer, G.L.; Foss, E.J.; Jorstad, N.D.; Ramsbotham, A.J.

    1990-12-01

    This paper examines U.S. export control, with particular emphasis on technology transfer as it affects our relationship with Japan. It describes the evolution of export control in the United States, including the Bucy Report, the impact of Afghanistan, and policy changes regarding the People's Republic of China. U.S. control mechanisms for critical technology currently in place are described; these include the Export Administration Regulations, the International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR), and the Militarily Critical Technologies List (MCTL). The evolution of Japan's technology base and export control mechanisms are discussed, as well as its military capabilities. Japan and the United States have had different philosophies regarding export control, with the United States more likely to use controls as part of its foreign policy. However, U.S. export control policy is increasingly seen as having an important economic security aspect in addition to its national security objectives. Changes in Eastern Europe and the Soviet Union have placed the issue of export control in a new perspective. Therefore, the paper also examines in some detail the major developments in the European community which will affect the future technology environment and its relationship to national security. This paper was originally presented at a workshop of the Japan-U.S. Joint Study Group on Trade, Finance and Technology in East-West Economic Relations. A primary purpose of the paper was to enhance mutual understanding between the United States and Japan, and to facilitate the resolution of differences in the technology security arena.

  9. Mars Sample Quarantine Protocol Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Editor); Bagby, John (Editor); Race, Margaret (Editor); Rummel, John (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    The Mars Sample Quarantine Protocol (QP) Workshop was convened to deal with three specific aspects of the initial handling of a returned Mars sample: 1) biocontainment, to prevent uncontrolled release of sample material into the terrestrial environment; 2) life detection, to examine the sample for evidence of live organisms; and 3) biohazard testing, to determine if the sample poses any threat to terrestrial life forms and the Earth's biosphere. During the first part of the Workshop, several tutorials were presented on topics related to the workshop in order to give all participants a common basis in the technical areas necessary to achieve the objectives of the Workshop.

  10. Human emotions track changes in the acoustic environment.

    PubMed

    Ma, Weiyi; Thompson, William Forde

    2015-11-24

    Emotional responses to biologically significant events are essential for human survival. Do human emotions lawfully track changes in the acoustic environment? Here we report that changes in acoustic attributes that are well known to interact with human emotions in speech and music also trigger systematic emotional responses when they occur in environmental sounds, including sounds of human actions, animal calls, machinery, or natural phenomena, such as wind and rain. Three changes in acoustic attributes known to signal emotional states in speech and music were imposed upon 24 environmental sounds. Evaluations of stimuli indicated that human emotions track such changes in environmental sounds just as they do for speech and music. Such changes not only influenced evaluations of the sounds themselves, they also affected the way accompanying facial expressions were interpreted emotionally. The findings illustrate that human emotions are highly attuned to changes in the acoustic environment, and reignite a discussion of Charles Darwin's hypothesis that speech and music originated from a common emotional signal system based on the imitation and modification of environmental sounds.

  11. Human emotions track changes in the acoustic environment

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Weiyi; Thompson, William Forde

    2015-01-01

    Emotional responses to biologically significant events are essential for human survival. Do human emotions lawfully track changes in the acoustic environment? Here we report that changes in acoustic attributes that are well known to interact with human emotions in speech and music also trigger systematic emotional responses when they occur in environmental sounds, including sounds of human actions, animal calls, machinery, or natural phenomena, such as wind and rain. Three changes in acoustic attributes known to signal emotional states in speech and music were imposed upon 24 environmental sounds. Evaluations of stimuli indicated that human emotions track such changes in environmental sounds just as they do for speech and music. Such changes not only influenced evaluations of the sounds themselves, they also affected the way accompanying facial expressions were interpreted emotionally. The findings illustrate that human emotions are highly attuned to changes in the acoustic environment, and reignite a discussion of Charles Darwin’s hypothesis that speech and music originated from a common emotional signal system based on the imitation and modification of environmental sounds. PMID:26553987

  12. Testing take-the-best in new and changing environments.

    PubMed

    Lee, Michael D; Blanco, Gabrielle; Bo, Nikole

    2016-09-07

    Take-the-best is a decision-making strategy that chooses between alternatives, by searching the cues representing the alternatives in order of cue validity, and choosing the alternative with the first discriminating cue. Theoretical support for take-the-best comes from the "fast and frugal" approach to modeling cognition, which assumes decision-making strategies need to be fast to cope with a competitive world, and be simple to be robust to uncertainty and environmental change. We contribute to the empirical evaluation of take-the-best in two ways. First, we generate four new environments-involving bridge lengths, hamburger prices, theme park attendances, and US university rankings-supplementing the relatively limited number of naturally cue-based environments previously considered. We find that take-the-best is as accurate as rival decision strategies that use all of the available cues. Secondly, we develop 19 new data sets characterizing the change in cities and their populations in four countries. We find that take-the-best maintains its accuracy and limited search as the environments change, even if cue validities learned in one environment are used to make decisions in another. Once again, we find that take-the-best is as accurate as rival strategies that use all of the cues. We conclude that these new evaluations support the theoretical claims of the accuracy, frugality, and robustness for take-the-best, and that the new data sets provide a valuable resource for the more general study of the relationship between effective decision-making strategies and the environments in which they operate.

  13. Climate change on arctic environment, ecosystem services and society (CLICHE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weckström, J.; Korhola, A.; Väliranta, M.; Seppä, H.; Luoto, M.; Tuittila, E.-S.; Leppäranta, M.; Kahilainen, K.; Saarinen, J.; Heikkinen, H.

    2012-04-01

    The predicted climate warming has raised many questions and concerns about its impacts on the environment and society. As a respond to the need of holistic studies comprising both of these areas, The Academy of Finland launched The Finnish Research Programme on Climate Change (FICCA 2011-2014) in spring 2010 with the main aim to focus on the interaction between the environment and society. Ultimately 11 national consortium projects were funded (total budget 12 million EUR). Here we shortly present the main objectives of the largest consortium project "Climate change on arctic environment, ecosystem services and society" (CLICHE). The CLICHE consortium comprises eight interrelated work packages (treeline, diversity, peatlands, snow, lakes, fish, tourism, and traditional livelihoods), each led by a prominent research group and a team leader. The research consortium has three main overall objectives: 1) Investigate, map and model the past, present and future climate change-induced changes in central ecosystems of the European Arctic with unprecedented precision 2) Deepen our understanding of the basic principles of ecosystem and social resilience and dynamics; identify key taxa, structures or processes that clearly indicate impending or realised global change through their loss, occurrence or behaviour, using analogues from the past (e.g. Holocene Thermal Maximum, Medieval Warm Period), experiments, observations and models 3) Develop adaptation and mitigation strategies to minimize the adverse effects of climate change on local communities, traditional livelihoods, fisheries, and tourism industry, and promote sustainable development of local community structures and enhance the quality of life of local human populations. As the project has started only recently no final results are available yet. However, the fieldwork as well as the co-operation between the research teams has thus far been very successful. Thus, the expectations for the final outcome of the project

  14. Cosmic Rays Variation Before Changes in Sun-Earth Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, S.

    2011-12-01

    Influence of cosmic rays variations on the Sun-Earth Environment has been observed before the changes in the atmospheric temperature, outbreak of influenza, cyclone, earthquake and tsunami. It has been recorded by Sun Observatory Heleospheric Observatory (SOHO) satellite data. Before the earthquake and tsunami the planetary indices (Kp) and Electron flux (E-flux) shows sudden changes followed by the atmospheric perturbations including very high temperature rise to sudden fall resulting snowfall in high altitude and rainfall in tropical areas. The active fault zones shows sudden faulting after the sudden drop in cosmic ray intensity and rise in Kp and E-flux. Besides the geo-environment the extraterrestrial influence on outbreak of H1N1 influenza has also been recorded based on the Mexico Cosmic ray data and its correlation with SOHO records. Distant stars have the potential to influence the heliophysical parameters by showering cosmic rays.

  15. Climate Change Education in Formal Settings, K-14: A Workshop Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beatty, Alexandra

    2012-01-01

    Climate change is occurring, is very likely caused by human activities, and poses significant risks for a broad range of human and natural systems. Each additional ton of greenhouse gases emitted commits us to further change and greater risks. In the judgment of the Committee on America's Climate Choices, the environmental, economic, and…

  16. Changing the Environment Based on Empowerment as Intrinsic Motivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salge, Christoph; Glackin, Cornelius; Polani, Daniel

    2014-05-01

    One aspect of intelligence is the ability to restructure your own environment so that the world you live in becomes more beneficial to you. In this paper we investigate how the information-theoretic measure of agent empowerment can provide a task-independent, intrinsic motivation to restructure the world. We show how changes in embodiment and in the environment change the resulting behaviour of the agent and the artefacts left in the world. For this purpose, we introduce an approximation of the established empowerment formalism based on sparse sampling, which is simpler and significantly faster to compute for deterministic dynamics. Sparse sampling also introduces a degree of randomness into the decision making process, which turns out to beneficial for some cases. We then utilize the measure to generate agent behaviour for different agent embodiments in a Minecraft-inspired three dimensional block world. The paradigmatic results demonstrate that empowerment can be used as a suitable generic intrinsic motivation to not only generate actions in given static environments, as shown in the past, but also to modify existing environmental conditions. In doing so, the emerging strategies to modify an agent's environment turn out to be meaningful to the specific agent capabilities, i.e., de facto to its embodiment.

  17. Plasticity-Mediated Persistence in New and Changing Environments

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Matthew R. J.

    2014-01-01

    Baldwin's synthesis of the Organicist position, first published in 1896 and elaborated in 1902, sought to rescue environmentally induced phenotypes from disrepute by showing their Darwinian significance. Of particular interest to Baldwin was plasticity's mediating role during environmental change or colonization—plastic individuals were more likely to successfully survive and reproduce in new environments than were nonplastic individuals. Once a population of plastic individuals had become established, plasticity could further mediate the future course of evolution. The evidence for plasticity-mediated persistence (PMP) is reviewed here with a particular focus on evolutionary rescue experiments, studies on invasive success, and the role of learning in survival. Many PMP studies are methodologically limited, showing that preexistent plasticity has utility in new environments (soft PMP) rather than directly demonstrating that plasticity is responsible for persistence (hard PMP). An ideal PMP study would be able to demonstrate that (1) plasticity preexisted environmental change, (2) plasticity was fortuitously beneficial in the new environment, (3) plasticity was responsible for individual persistence in the new environment, and (4) plasticity was responsible for population persistence in succeeding generations. Although PMP is not ubiquitous, Baldwin's hypotheses have been largely vindicated in theoretical and empirical studies, but much work remains. PMID:25386380

  18. Simple learning rules to cope with changing environments.

    PubMed

    Gross, Roderich; Houston, Alasdair I; Collins, Edmund J; McNamara, John M; Dechaume-Moncharmont, François-Xavier; Franks, Nigel R

    2008-10-06

    We consider an agent that must choose repeatedly among several actions. Each action has a certain probability of giving the agent an energy reward, and costs may be associated with switching between actions. The agent does not know which action has the highest reward probability, and the probabilities change randomly over time. We study two learning rules that have been widely used to model decision-making processes in animals-one deterministic and the other stochastic. In particular, we examine the influence of the rules' 'learning rate' on the agent's energy gain. We compare the performance of each rule with the best performance attainable when the agent has either full knowledge or no knowledge of the environment. Over relatively short periods of time, both rules are successful in enabling agents to exploit their environment. Moreover, under a range of effective learning rates, both rules are equivalent, and can be expressed by a third rule that requires the agent to select the action for which the current run of unsuccessful trials is shortest. However, the performance of both rules is relatively poor over longer periods of time, and under most circumstances no better than the performance an agent could achieve without knowledge of the environment. We propose a simple extension to the original rules that enables agents to learn about and effectively exploit a changing environment for an unlimited period of time.

  19. Evaluation of change detection techniques for monitoring coastal zone environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weismiller, R. A.; Kristof, S. J.; Scholz, D. K.; Anuta, P. E.; Momin, S. M.

    1977-01-01

    Procedures for detecting changes in Landsat multispectral scanning imagery of coastal zone environments are discussed. Four detection procedures are examined: a comparison of independently produced spectral classifications; a classification of a multispectral difference data set; a single analysis of a multidate data set; and a maximum likelihood classification using multistage decision logic. The relatively complex maximum likelihood classification technique was found to yield results closest to those obtained with the comparison of independently produced spectral classifications, the chosen standard.

  20. One earth, one future. Our changing global environment

    SciTech Connect

    Silver, C.S.; Defries, R.S.

    1990-12-31

    This book reports on deforestation, ozone depletion, global warming, and other matters concerning the global environment. From the perspective that humankind is an increasingly powerful agent changing the planet, the volume describes the Earth as a unified system - exploring the interactions between the atmosphere, land, and water and the snowballing impact that human activity is having on the system - and points out the seemingly paradoxical need for economic growth to alleviate such global environmental problems.

  1. Detecting changes in dynamic and complex acoustic environments

    PubMed Central

    Boubenec, Yves; Lawlor, Jennifer; Górska, Urszula; Shamma, Shihab; Englitz, Bernhard

    2017-01-01

    Natural sounds such as wind or rain, are characterized by the statistical occurrence of their constituents. Despite their complexity, listeners readily detect changes in these contexts. We here address the neural basis of statistical decision-making using a combination of psychophysics, EEG and modelling. In a texture-based, change-detection paradigm, human performance and reaction times improved with longer pre-change exposure, consistent with improved estimation of baseline statistics. Change-locked and decision-related EEG responses were found in a centro-parietal scalp location, whose slope depended on change size, consistent with sensory evidence accumulation. The potential's amplitude scaled with the duration of pre-change exposure, suggesting a time-dependent decision threshold. Auditory cortex-related potentials showed no response to the change. A dual timescale, statistical estimation model accounted for subjects' performance. Furthermore, a decision-augmented auditory cortex model accounted for performance and reaction times, suggesting that the primary cortical representation requires little post-processing to enable change-detection in complex acoustic environments. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.24910.001 PMID:28262095

  2. Detecting changes in dynamic and complex acoustic environments.

    PubMed

    Boubenec, Yves; Lawlor, Jennifer; Górska, Urszula; Shamma, Shihab; Englitz, Bernhard

    2017-03-06

    Natural sounds such as wind or rain, are characterized by the statistical occurrence of their constituents. Despite their complexity, listeners readily detect changes in these contexts. We here address the neural basis of statistical decision-making using a combination of psychophysics, EEG and modelling. In a texture-based, change-detection paradigm, human performance and reaction times improved with longer pre-change exposure, consistent with improved estimation of baseline statistics. Change-locked and decision-related EEG responses were found in a centro-parietal scalp location, whose slope depended on change size, consistent with sensory evidence accumulation. The potential's amplitude scaled with the duration of pre-change exposure, suggesting a time-dependent decision threshold. Auditory cortex-related potentials showed no response to the change. A dual timescale, statistical estimation model accounted for subjects' performance. Furthermore, a decision-augmented auditory cortex model accounted for performance and reaction times, suggesting that the primary cortical representation requires little post-processing to enable change-detection in complex acoustic environments.

  3. Targeted Workshops Improve Marketing Knowledge and Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flaskerud, George

    1995-01-01

    Most of the 201 agricultural producers who attended 2-day targeted workshops learned marketing concepts and changed their attitudes about marketing. Refresher workshops were recommended to help them use the marketing techniques learned. (SK)

  4. Summary Report for the Workshop on Integrating Climate Change Adaption into Air Quality Decision Making

    EPA Science Inventory

    Over the past few decades, air quality planners have forecasted future air pollution levels based on information about changing emissions from stationary and mobile sources, population trends, transportation demand, natural sources of emissions, and other pressures on air quality...

  5. Implications of climate change for northern Canada: the physical environment.

    PubMed

    Prowse, Terry D; Furgal, Chris; Melling, Humfrey; Smith, Sharon L

    2009-07-01

    The physical environment of the Canadian North is particularly sensitive to changes in climate because of a large concentration of cryospheric elements including both seasonal and multiyear forms of freshwater and sea ice, permafrost, snow, glaciers, and small ice caps. Because the cryosphere responds directly to changes in air temperature and precipitation, it is a primary indicator of the effects of climate variability and change. This article reviews the major changes that have occurred in the recent historical record of these cryospheric components at high latitudes in Canada. Some changes have been less pronounced in the Canadian North than elsewhere, such as changes in sea-ice coverage, whereas others have been potentially more significant, such as ablation of the extensive alpine and high-Arctic small glaciers and ice caps. Projections of future changes are also reviewed for each cryospheric component. Discussion about two other physical components of the North intrinsically linked to the cryosphere is also included, specifically: i) freshwater discharge to the Arctic Ocean via major river networks that are fed primarily by various forms of snow and ice, and ii) the related rise in sea level, which is strongly influenced by ablation of the cryosphere, and coastal stability, which also depends on the thermal integrity of coastal permafrost.

  6. Family Workshops

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Dave; Rees-Jones, Tanny

    1978-01-01

    A Family Workshop is an informal, multidisciplined educational program for adults and children, organized by a team of teachers. This article discusses the Lavender Hill Family Workshop, one of many, which attempts to provide education in various subject areas for adults and for children while also integrating both objectives in order to educate…

  7. A case study: Integrated work environment and organizational change

    SciTech Connect

    Heubach, J.G.; Montgomery, J.C.; Weimer, W.C.; Heerwagen, J.H.

    1995-02-01

    The failure to integrate environmental and organizational interventions may help explain the lack of success of many change efforts. The high rate of failure for change efforts (50% to 90% failure rates) has been noted by many writers. While specific causes of failure are diverse, a common theme has been failure to consider the organization as a system. That is, either significant aspects of the organization were ignored during the intervention or potential impacts of changes on the elements were overlooked or underestimated. Our own training, technical literature, and professional culture lead us to limited understandings of complex organizations. Change agents must consider all relevant components of organizational performance if interventions are to be meaningful and successful. This study demonstrated the value of an integrated organizational intervention involving redesign of the physical environment, introduction of a new information system, work process improvement, and extended organizational development intervention. The outcomes were extremely positive. The cost of improvement efforts was found to be recaptured within a short time, easily justifying the expenditures. One conclusion from the study is that integrated interventions are very powerful. Integrating improvement of the physical environment with organizational development and technological innovation greatly enhances the likelihood of achieving a successful intervention.

  8. Cognitive change in aging: identifying gene-environment correlation and nonshared environment mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Deater-Deckard, Kirby; Mayr, Ulrich

    2005-03-01

    We describe gene-environment processes that may help account for individual differences in successful aging. Our emphasis is on successful aging in the cognitive domain, wherein individuals come to use a variety of strategies to cope with changes in cognitive capacities. We focus on the role of executive control in particular and define gene-environment correlation and nonshared environmental mechanisms. The quantitative genetic methods used to identify these mechanisms are described, with examples from research in childhood, where such studies are now common. Future work will be most effective if it is guided by life-span development frameworks that address these processes, such as the developmental genotype-->environment theory of Scarr and McCartney and the selection/optimization/compensation theory of Baltes and Baltes.

  9. Climate change and forest fires in a Mediterranean environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turco, Marco; Llasat, Maria-Carmen; von Hardenberg, Jost; Provenzale, Antonello

    2014-05-01

    The Mediterranean region is a "hot-spot" of climate change and wildfires, where about 50000 fires burn 500000 hectares every year. However, in spite of the growing concerns of the climate change impacts on Mediterranean wildfires, there are aspects of this topic that remain largely to be investigated. The main scientific objective of this study is to investigate the climate-driven changes on fires in a typical Mediterranean environment (Catalonia, NE of Spain). To achieve this goal, the following specific aims have been identified: (1) Analysis of the recent evolution of fires; (2) Evaluation of the climate-fire relationship; (3) Estimation of the impacts of observed and future climate change. First, we examine a homogeneous series of forest fires in the period 1970-2010. Our analysis shows that both the burned area and number of fire series display a decreasing trend. After the large fires of 1986 and 1994, the increased effort in fire prevention and suppression could explain part of this decreasing trend. Although it is often stated that fires have increased in Mediterranean regions, the higher efficiency in fire detection could have led to spurious trends and misleading conclusions [1]. Secondly, we show that the interannual variability of summer fires is significantly related to antecedent and concurrent climate conditions, highlighting the importance of climate not only in regulating fuel flammability, but also fuel load. On the basis of these results, we develop a simple regression model that produces reliable out-of-sample predictions of the impact of climate variability on summer forest fires [2]. Finally we apply this model to estimate the impacts of observed climate trends on summer fires and the possible fire response to different regional climate change scenarios. We show that a transition toward warmer conditions has already started to occur and it is possible that they continue by mid-century (under the A1B scenario), and that these changes promote

  10. Change in the family food environment is associated with positive dietary change in children

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The family food environment is an important influence in the development of children’s dietary habits. Research suggests that influences of current dietary behaviour and behaviour change may differ. The aims of this paper were to: (1) investigate the association between the food environment at baseline and change in children’s saturated fat intake; and (2) to explore whether a change in the food environment was associated with a change in children’s saturated fat intake. Method Secondary analysis of a 12 week cluster randomised controlled trial in 133 4-13 year old children. Families were randomly allocated to parental education regarding changing to reduced-fat dairy foods or a comparison non-dietary behaviour. The interventions were family focused. Parents received education from a dietitian in 3x30minute sessions to facilitate behaviour change. Parents completed a comprehensive questionnaire capturing three domains of the food environment – Parent knowledge and attitudes; shaping practices; and behaviours and role modelling. Children’s dietary intake was assessed via multiple 24-hour recalls at baseline and week 12. Changes in the family food environment and primary outcome (saturated fat) were calculated. Hierarchical linear regression models were performed to explore the association between baseline and change in food environment constructs and change in saturated fat intake. Standardised Beta are presented (p<0.05). Results After adjustments for child and family demographics, higher levels of perceived food availability (β=-0.2) at baseline was associated with greater reduction in saturated fat intake, where as higher perceived responsibility (β=0.2), restriction (β=0.3) and pressure to eat (β=0.3) were associated with lesser change in saturated fat. An increase in nutrition knowledge (β=-0.2), perceived responsibility (β=-0.3) and restriction (β=-0.3) from baseline to week 12 were associated with greater reduction in saturated fat

  11. First National Expert and Stakeholder Workshop on Water Infrastructure Sustainability and Adaptation to Climate Change

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA Office of Research and Development (ORD) and EPA Office of Water (OW) joinined efforts to assess and evaluate programmatic, research & development (R&D) needs for sustainable water infrastructure development and effective adaptation to climate changes. The purpose of this pr...

  12. Supporting the Process of Change: It Takes More Than a Workshop or Two.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosen, Lois M.; Wright, Marian E.

    The Flind Middle Schools Writing Inservice Project grew out of the conviction that improving students' writing was a matter not of increased emphasis on sentence structure, grammar, or form, but rather of a change in the thinking about how writing should be taught. The project grew from a brief conference to a two-year commitment on the part of…

  13. Exploring Changes to a Teacher's Teaching Practices and Student Learning through a Volleyball Content Knowledge Workshop

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Insook

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes how improving a teacher's content knowledge changes his teaching practices and its subsequent effects on student learning during a middle school volleyball instructional unit. The study was designed to challenge teacher educators' thinking about the importance of in-depth content knowledge for effective teaching by…

  14. Leading change to create a healthy and satisfying work environment.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Carolyn L; Krugman, Mary; Schloffman, Danielle H

    2013-01-01

    Nurse executives must take a leadership role in creating a healthy work environment for nurses and all disciplines. Engaging in partnerships and empowering clinical nurses to construct the solutions to barriers that may stand in the way of the goal of a satisfied and healthy workforce are important strategies toward success. This publication outlines many projects a 3-time Magnet-designated academic hospital has implemented, working with our shared leadership councils, to meet the standards for a healthy work environment. These initiatives, from the unit to the hospital level, included standardizing a culture change of uninterrupted meal breaks, the creation of intensive care unit Zen rooms, strategies to better manage increased patient volumes, best practices for facility design, enhancing physician-nurse relations, and a hospital wellness program. Data were benchmarked against national nurse and employee surveys to compare progress and report outcomes. Two important nursing organization structures that have contributed to the success of a healthy and satisfied nursing work environment include UEXCEL, a longstanding clinical nurse professional practice program, and the hospital's 11-year participation in the University HealthSystem Consortium/American Association of Colleges of Nursing National Post-Baccalaureate Nurse Residency Program. A highly engaged, well-educated, and committed nursing workforce, nurtured by a strong leadership team, has created a positive work environment characterized by low turnover and high retention.

  15. Dynamic membrane protein topological switching upon changes in phospholipid environment

    PubMed Central

    Vitrac, Heidi; MacLean, David M.; Jayaraman, Vasanthi; Bogdanov, Mikhail; Dowhan, William

    2015-01-01

    A fundamental objective in membrane biology is to understand and predict how a protein sequence folds and orients in a lipid bilayer. Establishing the principles governing membrane protein folding is central to understanding the molecular basis for membrane proteins that display multiple topologies, the intrinsic dynamic organization of membrane proteins, and membrane protein conformational disorders resulting in disease. We previously established that lactose permease of Escherichia coli displays a mixture of topological conformations and undergoes postassembly bidirectional changes in orientation within the lipid bilayer triggered by a change in membrane phosphatidylethanolamine content, both in vivo and in vitro. However, the physiological implications and mechanism of dynamic structural reorganization of membrane proteins due to changes in lipid environment are limited by the lack of approaches addressing the kinetic parameters of transmembrane protein flipping. In this study, real-time fluorescence spectroscopy was used to determine the rates of protein flipping in the lipid bilayer in both directions and transbilayer flipping of lipids triggered by a change in proteoliposome lipid composition. Our results provide, for the first time to our knowledge, a dynamic picture of these events and demonstrate that membrane protein topological rearrangements in response to lipid modulations occur rapidly following a threshold change in proteoliposome lipid composition. Protein flipping was not accompanied by extensive lipid-dependent unfolding of transmembrane domains. Establishment of lipid bilayer asymmetry was not required but may accelerate the rate of protein flipping. Membrane protein flipping was found to accelerate the rate of transbilayer flipping of lipids. PMID:26512118

  16. Workshop introduction

    SciTech Connect

    Streeper, Charles

    2010-01-01

    Category I and II) sources in thousands of devices; and there are many more tens of thousands of smaller sources scattered among thousands of other NRC licensees. As a result of the ubiquitous nature and undeterminable number of current and legacy sources, even in developed countries they can be abandoned, disposed of in a haphazard manner, lost, stolen, and/or otherwise fallout of regulatory control. Supply and demand of sources, being market based, is more or less fluid. Normative security of radioactive sources exists, but varies in each country, and is loosely implemented through non-legally binding recommendations and standards provided by International Atomic Energy Agency technical documents and cooperation and through bilateral efforts such as this workshop where we share best-practices with one another. Much of the reason for the difficulty in securing sealed sources rests in the enormous need for their beneficial applications in the medical, industrial, and agricultural sectors. Alternative technologies to replace high-risk sources continue to be explored, but very few of these alternative solutions have reached the development stage for common usage and distribution. The beneficial uses of sources must be allowed to continue; however, to minimize the potential for their misuse, current controls and regulating mechanisms must be constantly evaluated to ensure the benefits gained outweigh potential risks. From a global perspective, an evaluation and modification of requirements over the entire life cycle of sources from their manufacture to their final disposition is required. The proper removal and disposal of vulnerable disused or orphan sources is essential to maintaining a safe operating environment. One of our goals in this workshop is to share our methodologies for recovering sources and learn how they differ or are similar to the challenges faced in recovering, storing, and disposing of sources in the Republic of Georgia . The suggestions we will make are

  17. Designing for Change: Interoperability in a scaling and adapting environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarmey, L.

    2015-12-01

    The Earth Science cyberinfrastructure landscape is constantly changing. Technologies advance and technical implementations are refined or replaced. Data types, volumes, packaging, and use cases evolve. Scientific requirements emerge and mature. Standards shift while systems scale and adapt. In this complex and dynamic environment, interoperability remains a critical component of successful cyberinfrastructure. Through the resource- and priority-driven iterations on systems, interfaces, and content, questions fundamental to stable and useful Earth Science cyberinfrastructure arise. For instance, how are sociotechnical changes planned, tracked, and communicated? How should operational stability balance against 'new and shiny'? How can ongoing maintenance and mitigation of technical debt be managed in an often short-term resource environment? The Arctic Data Explorer is a metadata brokering application developed to enable discovery of international, interdisciplinary Arctic data across distributed repositories. Completely dependent on interoperable third party systems, the Arctic Data Explorer publicly launched in 2013 with an original 3000+ data records from four Arctic repositories. Since then the search has scaled to 25,000+ data records from thirteen repositories at the time of writing. In the final months of original project funding, priorities shift to lean operations with a strategic eye on the future. Here we present lessons learned from four years of Arctic Data Explorer design, development, communication, and maintenance work along with remaining questions and potential directions.

  18. Workshop Reports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2012-04-01

    19 Workshops were held during IAU S285. 15 submitted reports of the discussions that took place, while for the remaining 4 we have reproduced the summaries that were available on our wiki prior to the Symposium.

  19. Workshop Summaries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dandes, Herbert

    1970-01-01

    Workshop titles are: (1) "Authenticity in Communication ; (2) "Inter Cultural Communication ; (3) "Enticements to Eupsychia ; (4) "Psychoneurosensory Problems in Education ; (5) "Why Education for Family Life and Human Sexuality ; and (6) "Communication in the Hazards of Drug Abuse . (EK)

  20. Elevated Building Lift Systems on Permanent Snowfields: A Report on the Elevated Building Lift Systems in Polar Environments Workshop

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-18

    Differential settlement measurements are col- lected on both the elevated station and the connecting vertical tower twice during each Austral summer. When...polar environments. Though long-term measurements are im- portant and are being collected, the current model for scientific study is focused on the...efficiently as technically possible to protect the environment; to maintain the integrity of scientific measurements (e.g., clean air and clean snow); and

  1. Ice at the Interface: Atmosphere-Ice-Ocean Boundary Layer Processes and Their Role in Polar Change---Workshop Report

    SciTech Connect

    Hunke, Elizabeth C.

    2012-07-23

    The atmosphere-ocean boundary layer in which sea ice resides includes many complex processes that require a more realistic treatment in GCMs, particularly as models move toward full earth system descriptions. The primary purpose of the workshop was to define and discuss such coupled processes from observational and modeling points of view, including insight from both the Arctic and Antarctic systems. The workshop met each of its overarching goals, including fostering collaboration among experimentalists, theorists and modelers, proposing modeling strategies, and ascertaining data availability and needs. Several scientific themes emerged from the workshop, such as the importance of episodic or extreme events, precipitation, stratification above and below the ice, and the marginal ice zone, whose seasonal Arctic migrations now traverse more territory than in the past.

  2. US energy policy in a changing market environment

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, T.R.

    1986-09-01

    The drop in oil prices has brought energy policy issues back into discussion. The diversity of policy proposals suggests that clearly defined objectives are needed to avoid quick-fix solutions. The analysis traces the history of policies affecting the US oil industry, then focuses on recent changes in the policy environment. The author weighs recent proposals against those policy objectives he considers appropriate for the US. The three objectives of national security, efficient extraction of energy resources, and economic stability provide a common frame of reference for this purpose. Policymakers should only intervene in the energy market when they can improve the allocation of resources in accordance with these objectives. 3 figures, 3 tables.

  3. Dynamic defense workshop :

    SciTech Connect

    Crosby, Sean Michael; Doak, Justin E.; Haas, Jason Juedes.; Helinski, Ryan; Lamb, Christopher C.

    2013-02-01

    On September 5th and 6th, 2012, the Dynamic Defense Workshop: From Research to Practice brought together researchers from academia, industry, and Sandia with the goals of increasing collaboration between Sandia National Laboratories and external organizations, de ning and un- derstanding dynamic, or moving target, defense concepts and directions, and gaining a greater understanding of the state of the art for dynamic defense. Through the workshop, we broadened and re ned our de nition and understanding, identi ed new approaches to inherent challenges, and de ned principles of dynamic defense. Half of the workshop was devoted to presentations of current state-of-the-art work. Presentation topics included areas such as the failure of current defenses, threats, techniques, goals of dynamic defense, theory, foundations of dynamic defense, future directions and open research questions related to dynamic defense. The remainder of the workshop was discussion, which was broken down into sessions on de ning challenges, applications to host or mobile environments, applications to enterprise network environments, exploring research and operational taxonomies, and determining how to apply scienti c rigor to and investigating the eld of dynamic defense.

  4. Impact of climate change on runoff pollution in urban environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coutu, S.; Kramer, S.; Barry, D. A.; Roudier, P.

    2012-12-01

    Runoff from urban environments is generally contaminated. These contaminants mostly originate from road traffic and building envelopes. Facade envelopes generate lead, zinc and even biocides, which are used for facade protection. Road traffic produces particles from tires and brakes. The transport of these pollutants to the environment is controlled by rainfall. The interval, duration and intensity of rainfall events are important as the dynamics of the pollutants are often modeled with non-linear buildup/washoff functions. Buildup occurs during dry weather when pollution accumulates, and is subsequently washed-off at the time of the following rainfall, contaminating surface runoff. Climate predictions include modified rainfall distributions, with changes in both number and intensity of events, even if the expected annual rainfall varies little. Consequently, pollutant concentrations in urban runoff driven by buildup/washoff processes will be affected by these changes in rainfall distributions. We investigated to what extent modifications in future rainfall distributions will impact the concentrations of pollutants present in urban surface runoff. The study used the example of Lausanne, Switzerland (temperate climate zone). Three emission scenarios (time horizon 2090), multiple combinations of RCM/GCM and modifications in rain event frequency were used to simulate future rainfall distributions with various characteristics. Simulated rainfall events were used as inputs for four pairs of buildup/washoff models, in order to compare future pollution concentrations in surface runoff. In this way, uncertainty in model structure was also investigated. Future concentrations were estimated to be between ±40% of today's concentrations depending on the season and, importantly, on the choice of the RCM/GCM model. Overall, however, the dominant factor was the uncertainty inherent in buildup/washoff models, which dominated over the uncertainty in future rainfall distributions

  5. Resource management and operations in southwest South Dakota: Climate change scenario planning workshop summary January 20-21, 2016, Rapid City, SD

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fisichelli, Nicholas A.; Schuurman, Gregor W; Symstad, Amy; Ray, Andrea; Miller, Brian; Cross, Molly; Rowland, Erika

    2016-01-01

    The Scaling Climate Change Adaptation in the Northern Great Plains through Regional Climate Summaries and Local Qualitative-Quantitative Scenario Planning Workshops project synthesizes climate data into 3-5 distinct but plausible climate summaries for the northern Great Plains region; crafts quantitative summaries of these climate futures for two focal areas; and applies these local summaries by developing climate-resource-management scenarios through participatory workshops and, where possible, simulation models. The two focal areas are central North Dakota and southwest South Dakota (Figure 1). The primary objective of this project is to help resource managers and scientists in a focal area use scenario planning to make management and planning decisions based on assessments of critical future uncertainties.This report summarizes project work for public and tribal lands in the southwest South Dakota grasslands focal area, with an emphasis on Badlands National Park and Buffalo Gap National Grassland. The report explains scenario planning as an adaptation tool in general, then describes how it was applied to the focal area in three phases. Priority resource management and climate uncertainties were identified in the orientation phase. Local climate summaries for relevant, divergent, and challenging climate scenarios were developed in the second phase. In the final phase, a two-day scenario planning workshop held January 20-21, 2016 in Rapid City, South Dakota, featured scenario development and implications, testing management decisions, and methods for operationalizing scenario planning outcomes.

  6. Resource management and operations in central North Dakota: Climate change scenario planning workshop summary November 12-13, 2015, Bismarck, ND

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fisichelli, Nicholas A.; Shuurman, Gregor; Symstad, Amy; Ray, Andrea; Friedman, Jonathan M.; Miller, Brian; Rowland, Erika

    2016-01-01

    The Scaling Climate Change Adaptation in the Northern Great Plains through Regional Climate Summaries and Local Qualitative-Quantitative Scenario Planning Workshops project synthesizes climate data into 3-5 distinct but plausible climate summaries for the northern Great Plains region; crafts quantitative summaries of these climate futures for two focal areas; and applies these local summaries by developing climate-resource-management scenarios through participatory workshops and, where possible, simulation models. The two focal areas are central North Dakota and southwest South Dakota (Figure 1). The primary objective of this project is to help resource managers and scientists in a focal area use scenario planning to make management and planning decisions based on assessments of critical future uncertainties.This report summarizes project work for public and tribal lands in the central North Dakota focal area, with an emphasis on Knife River Indian Villages National Historic Site. The report explainsscenario planning as an adaptation tool in general, then describes how it was applied to the central North Dakota focal area in three phases. Priority resource management and climate uncertainties were identified in the orientation phase. Local climate summaries for relevant, divergent, and challenging climate scenarios were developed in the second phase. In the final phase, a two-day scenario planning workshop held November 12-13, 2015 in Bismarck, ND, featured scenario development and implications, testing management decisions, and methods for operationalizing scenario planning outcomes.

  7. State of the Science Workshop to Discuss Environmental Health and Protection: Personalized Tools to Support Potential and Actual Health Hazards in the Megacity Operational Environment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-27

    Panel Discussion Note: Panelists were speaker participants on Session 3. A series of question-answer exchanges were candidly captured. Comment...State of the Science Workshop to Discuss Environmental Health and Protection: Personalized Tools to Support Potential and Actual Health Hazards in...Physics Laboratory REDD-2015-491 State of the Science Workshop to Discuss Environmental Health and Protection: Personalized Tools

  8. Technology Leadership Workshop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Technology & Innovations in Education, Rapid City, SD.

    This Technology & Innovations in Education (TIE) workshop, presented in Kansas City, Missouri, on May 2, 1997, was designed to help participants gain a valid big picture of current school technology change issues, acquire current materials, clarify their beliefs, vision, and needs for their district's technology efforts, learn strategies for…

  9. Fourth Airborne Geoscience Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The focus of the workshop was on how the airborne community can assist in achieving the goals of the Global Change Research Program. The many activities that employ airborne platforms and sensors were discussed: platforms and instrument development; airborne oceanography; lidar research; SAR measurements; Doppler radar; laser measurements; cloud physics; airborne experiments; airborne microwave measurements; and airborne data collection.

  10. t4 Workshop Report*

    PubMed Central

    Kleensang, Andre; Maertens, Alexandra; Rosenberg, Michael; Fitzpatrick, Suzanne; Lamb, Justin; Auerbach, Scott; Brennan, Richard; Crofton, Kevin M.; Gordon, Ben; Fornace, Albert J.; Gaido, Kevin; Gerhold, David; Haw, Robin; Henney, Adriano; Ma’ayan, Avi; McBride, Mary; Monti, Stefano; Ochs, Michael F.; Pandey, Akhilesh; Sharan, Roded; Stierum, Rob; Tugendreich, Stuart; Willett, Catherine; Wittwehr, Clemens; Xia, Jianguo; Patton, Geoffrey W.; Arvidson, Kirk; Bouhifd, Mounir; Hogberg, Helena T.; Luechtefeld, Thomas; Smirnova, Lena; Zhao, Liang; Adeleye, Yeyejide; Kanehisa, Minoru; Carmichael, Paul; Andersen, Melvin E.; Hartung, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Summary Despite wide-spread consensus on the need to transform toxicology and risk assessment in order to keep pace with technological and computational changes that have revolutionized the life sciences, there remains much work to be done to achieve the vision of toxicology based on a mechanistic foundation. A workshop was organized to explore one key aspect of this transformation – the development of Pathways of Toxicity (PoT) as a key tool for hazard identification based on systems biology. Several issues were discussed in depth in the workshop: The first was the challenge of formally defining the concept of a PoT as distinct from, but complementary to, other toxicological pathway concepts such as mode of action (MoA). The workshop came up with a preliminary definition of PoT as “A molecular definition of cellular processes shown to mediate adverse outcomes of toxicants”. It is further recognized that normal physiological pathways exist that maintain homeostasis and these, sufficiently perturbed, can become PoT. Second, the workshop sought to define the adequate public and commercial resources for PoT information, including data, visualization, analyses, tools, and use-cases, as well as the kinds of efforts that will be necessary to enable the creation of such a resource. Third, the workshop explored ways in which systems biology approaches could inform pathway annotation, and which resources are needed and available that can provide relevant PoT information to the diverse user communities. PMID:24127042

  11. Preface: Bulk nitride workshop 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freitas, Jaime A.; Pasova, Tania; Bockowski, Michal; Fujioka, Hiroshi

    2016-12-01

    The 9th ;International Workshop on Bulk Nitride Semiconductors; (IWBNS-IX) was held in Wonju, South Korea, from November 2-6, 2015, following the eight previous workshops held in November 2000 (Brazil), May 2002 (Brazil), September 2004 (Poland), October 2006 (Japan), September 2007 (Brazil), August 2009 (Poland), March 2011 (Japan), and October 2013 (Germany). The quietude and the beautiful surrounding nature of the Hansol Oak Valley provided the right environment to host the latest edition of this workshop series, the first one held in South Korea.

  12. Mycotoxins in a changing global environment--a review.

    PubMed

    Marroquín-Cardona, A G; Johnson, N M; Phillips, T D; Hayes, A W

    2014-07-01

    Mycotoxins are toxic metabolites produced by fungal species that commonly contaminate staple foods and feeds. They represent an unavoidable problem due to their presence in globally consumed cereals such as rice, maize and wheat. Most mycotoxins are immunosuppressive agents and some are carcinogens, hepatotoxins, nephrotoxins, and neurotoxins. Worldwide trends envision a stricter control of mycotoxins, however, the changing global environment may not be the ideal setting to control and reduce the exposure to these toxins. Although new technologies allow us to inspect the multi-mycotoxin presence in foods, new sources of exposure, gaps in knowledge of mycotoxins interactions, appearance of "emergent" mycotoxins and elucidation of consequent health effects can complicate their control even more. While humans are adapting to cope with environmental changes, such as food scarcity, decreased food quality, mycotoxin regulations, crop production and seasonality, and other climate related modifications, fungal species are also adapting and increased cases of mycotoxin adverse health effects are likely to occur in the future. To guarantee access to quality food for all, we need a way to balance global mycotoxin standards with the realistic feasibility of reaching them, considering limitations of producers and designing strategies to reduce mycotoxin exposure based on sound research.

  13. Street environment change detection from mobile laser scanning point clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Wen; Vallet, Bruno; Brédif, Mathieu; Paparoditis, Nicolas

    2015-09-01

    Mobile laser scanning (MLS) has become a popular technique for road inventory, building modelling, infrastructure management, mobility assessment, etc. Meanwhile, due to the high mobility of MLS systems, it is easy to revisit interested areas. However, change detection using MLS data of street environment has seldom been studied. In this paper, an approach that combines occupancy grids and a distance-based method for change detection from MLS point clouds is proposed. Unlike conventional occupancy grids, our occupancy-based method models space based on scanning rays and local point distributions in 3D without voxelization. A local cylindrical reference frame is presented for the interpolation of occupancy between rays according to the scanning geometry. The Dempster-Shafer theory (DST) is utilized for both intra-data evidence fusion and inter-data consistency assessment. Occupancy of reference point cloud is fused at the location of target points and then the consistency is evaluated directly on the points. A point-to-triangle (PTT) distance-based method is combined to improve the occupancy-based method. Because it is robust to penetrable objects, e.g. vegetation, which cause self-conflicts when modelling occupancy. The combined method tackles irregular point density and occlusion problems, also eliminates false detections on penetrable objects.

  14. Interaction of Drugs in the Hyperbaric Environment, Bethesda, Maryland, 13-14 September 1979. The Undersea Medical Workshop (21st),

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-10-01

    anticoagulation becomes excessive and bleeding develops in the hyperbaric environment, then, reverse of the anticoagulation is important. The classic reverse agent ...block by some drugs, including general anesthetic agents and some local anesthetics (Fig. 1). 2. At least in some nerves, repetitive action potential...terminal, but this is not yet firmly established. General anesthetic agents not m I II I only do not relieve pressure-induced block of synaptic

  15. Impact of a changing environment on the built heritage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossi, C. M.; Brimblecombe, P.; Bonazza, A.

    2012-04-01

    Stone monuments are degraded by both climate and pollution. Deterioration by pollution was especially intense from the 1700s and until the late 20th century the dominant impact of air pollution was the sulfation of surfaces. The parallel deposition of soot caused blackening and on some surfaces dark coloured crusts. The decrease of sulfur and soot from coal combustion during the last decades of the 20th century led to cleaner air in cities, a decrease of pollution-decay rates on building stones and a public desire for cleaner buildings. Although there were decreases in SO2, it was replaced by ozone, nitrogen oxides and particles richer in organic compounds, the result of an extensive use of automobiles. Deposited organic compounds can oxidise in modern urban environments in a yellowing process. The future may reveal variation in building colour from biological growth in a changing climate. In urban atmospheres with less sulfur, biological growth is more effective. A greater rate of delivery of nitrate to building surfaces that acts as "airborne fertiliser" favours colonisation. Depending on climate, there might be different processes (e.g. greening or reddening) and patterns of colouration. Climate is also a relevant factor in the weathering of monuments. Recent research suggests the concept of Heritage Climatology in the study of climate interactions with monuments, materials and sites. These parameters concentrate on aspects and combinations of meteorological variables that relate to material damage. The Köppen-Geiger climate classification can be a good approximation for some heritage risks. For instance, the number of salt transitions shows distinct seasonality which can be related to Köppen-Geiger climate types and their change during the 21th century. The study of changing pollution and climate impacts on the built heritage needs the output of pollution emissions and climate change models, which are prone to uncertainties. The use of multiple climate models

  16. Dynamics and life histories of northern ungulates in changing environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendrichsen, D. K.

    2011-12-01

    Regional climate and local weather conditions can profoundly influence life history parameters (growth, survival, fecundity) and population dynamics in northern ungulates (Post and Stenseth 1999, Coulson et al. 2001). The influence is both direct, for example through reduced growth or survival (Aanes et al. 2000, Tyler et al. 2008), and indirect, for example through changes in resource distribution, phenology and quality, changes which subsequently influence consumer dynamics (Post et al. 2008). By comparing and contrasting data from three spatially independent populations of ungulates, I discuss how variation in local weather parameters and vegetation growth influence spatial and temporal dynamics through changes in life history parameters and/or behavioural dynamics. The data originate from long term (11-15 years) monitoring data from three populations of ungulates in one subarctic and two high Arctic sites; semi-domesticated reindeer (Rangifer tarandus tarandus) in northern Norway, Svalbard reindeer (R. t. platyrhynchus) on Spitsbergen and muskoxen (Ovibos moschatus) in Northeast Greenland. The results show that juvenile animals can be particularly vulnerable to changes in their environment, and that this is mirrored to different degrees in the spatio-temporal dynamics of the three populations. Adverse weather conditions, acting either directly or mediated through access to and quality of vegetation, experienced by young early in life, or even by their dams during pregnancy, can lead to reduced growth, lower survival and reduced reproductive performance later in life. The influence of current climatic variation, and the predictions of how local weather conditions may change over time, differs between the three sites, resulting in potentially different responses in the three populations. Aanes R, Saether BE and Øritsland NA. 2000. Fluctuations of an introduced population of Svalbard reindeer: the effects of density dependence and climatic variation. Ecography

  17. Virtual Workshop Environment (VWE): A Taxonomy and Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) Framework for Modularized Virtual Learning Environments (VLE)--Applying the Learning Object Concept to the VLE

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paulsson, Fredrik; Naeve, Ambjorn

    2006-01-01

    Based on existing Learning Object taxonomies, this article suggests an alternative Learning Object taxonomy, combined with a general Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) framework, aiming to transfer the modularized concept of Learning Objects to modularized Virtual Learning Environments. The taxonomy and SOA-framework exposes a need for a clearer…

  18. The Worldviews Network: Transformative Global Change Education in Immersive Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, H.; Yu, K. C.; Gardiner, N.; McConville, D.; Connolly, R.; "Irving, Lindsay", L. S.

    2011-12-01

    Our modern age is defined by an astounding capacity to generate scientific information. From DNA to dark matter, human ingenuity and technologies create an endless stream of data about ourselves and the world of which we are a part. Yet we largely founder in transforming information into understanding, and understanding into rational action for our society as a whole. Earth and biodiversity scientists are especially frustrated by this impasse because the data they gather often point to a clash between Earth's capacity to sustain life and the decisions that humans make to garner the planet's resources. Immersive virtual environments offer an underexplored link in the translation of scientific data into public understanding, dialogue, and action. The Worldviews Network is a collaboration of scientists, artists, and educators focused on developing best practices for the use of immersive environments for science-based ecological literacy education. A central tenet of the Worldviews Network is that there are multiple ways to know and experience the world, so we are developing scientifically accurate, geographically relevant, and culturally appropriate programming to promote ecological literacy within informal science education programs across the United States. The goal of Worldviews Network is to offer transformative learning experiences, in which participants are guided on a process integrating immersive visual explorations, critical reflection and dialogue, and design-oriented approaches to action - or more simply, seeing, knowing, and doing. Our methods center on live presentations, interactive scientific visualizations, and sustainability dialogues hosted at informal science institutions. Our approach uses datasets from the life, Earth, and space sciences to illuminate the complex conditions that support life on earth and the ways in which ecological systems interact. We are leveraging scientific data from federal agencies, non-governmental organizations, and our

  19. Carbon Dioxide Effects Research and Assessment Program. Workshop on environmental and societal consequences of a possible CO/sub 2/-induced climate change

    SciTech Connect

    1980-10-01

    The Workshop was part of a process of elucidating areas of uncertainty where research is needed before meaningful forecasts and sound decisions can be made about the CO/sub 2/ issue. The conferees were divided into five panels dealing with the ocean and the cryosphere: the less managed biosphere; the managed biosphere (chiefly agricultural, forest, and grazing lands); the ways society and its institutions might respond to climate changes; and issues involving the economic and geopolitical consequences of CO/sub 2/ build-up. Also, 28 papers or discussion drafts dealing with a wide variety of topics were contributed to the conference.

  20. Physiological changes in women during exercise in cold environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, S. J.; Shephard, R. J.; Radomski, M. W. M.

    1986-12-01

    Both the stress of exercise and the stress of a cold environment have been shown to increase the mobilization and utilization of body fat, thereby reducing body fat stores. Much of the research has been done on either rats or male human subjects. The purpose of this research was to show the physiological changes which occur to young, relatively obese, women who exercised during five consecutive days, for 200 min per day, in each of three environmental, chamber conditions: (1) warm-warm (WW), +15‡C; (2) cold-cold (CC), -20‡C; and (3) cold-warm (CW), -20‡C ambient temperature, with +18‡C air pumped to face masks for warmed air breathing. Oxygen cost of exercise, respiratory quotients, energy intake and utilization, and body composition changes were measured before, during, and after each environmental condition. While the respiratory quotients and the skinfold measurements decreased in the colder conditions, the underwater weighing determined percentage body fat did not show the same decrement as the skinfold measures, indicating a possible translocation of body fat from the subcutaneous depots to the deep body fat depots. Body mass loss was significant (P<0.05) only in the WW condition. Thermogenesis would have been centred in the skeletal muscle and liver during the CW condition; however, with facial and upper airway cooling in the CC condition; brown adipose tissue (BAT) hypertrophy may be postulated at this more intense level of cold stress. Due to a greater stability of depot fat in the female, a longer cold exposure would be required to observe the fully developed BAT thermogenesis which would follow after the consequences of fat translocation which we have documented.

  1. Applied Reverberation Modeling Workshop

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    Reverberation Modeling Workshop 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f...included both propagation and reverberation with the receiver on a transect perpendicular to the wedge (3-D effects were ignored). The ASTRAL /ASPM...by the PI. The interest was in determining how the operational models ( ASTRAL /ASPM) performed in a sloping environment. ASTRAL is extremely fast

  2. Timely Topics: Hypertension Education--A Summative Evaluation of Direct and Indirect Care Providers' Knowledge, Roles, and Attitudes; Effects of Enforced Behavior Change on Attitudes; Evaluation of a Workshop on Patient Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cattron, Judith M.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Three articles discuss (1) an investigation of how nurses' attitudes, knowledge, and practice changed after a continuing education program on nursing management of adults with essential hypertension; (2) a study showing that even with enforced behavior changes, attitudes are slow to change; and (3) a workshop on principles of effective patient…

  3. Evolution of migration in a periodically changing environment.

    PubMed

    Blanquart, F; Gandon, S

    2011-02-01

    The ability to migrate can evolve in response to various forces. In particular, when selection is heterogeneous in space but constant in time, local adaptation induces a fitness cost on immigrants and selects against migration. The evolutionary outcome, however, is less clear when selection also varies temporally. Here, we present a two-locus model analyzing the effects of spatial and temporal variability in selection on the evolution of migration. The first locus is under temporally varying selection (various periodic functions are considered, but a general nonparametric framework is used), and the second locus is a modifier controlling migration ability. First, we study the dynamics of local adaptation and derive the migration rate that maximizes local adaptation as a function of the speed and geometry of the fluctuations in the environment. Second, we derive an analytical expression for the evolutionarily stable migration rate. When there is no cost of migration, we show that higher migration rates are favored when selection changes fast. When migration is costly, however, the evolutionarily stable migration rate is maximal for an intermediate speed of the variation of selection. This model may help in understanding the evolution of migration in a broad range of scenarios and, in particular, in host-parasite systems, where selection is thought to vary quickly in both space and time.

  4. The changing environment for technological innovation in health care.

    PubMed

    Goodman, C S; Gelijns, A C

    1996-01-01

    A distinguishing feature of American health care is its emphasis on advanced technology. Yet today's changing health care environment is overhauling the engine of technological innovation. The rate and direction of technological innovation are affected by a complex of supply- and demandside factors, including biomedical research, education, patent law, regulation, health care payment, tort law, and more. Some distinguishing features of technological innovation in health care are now at increased risk. Regulatory requirements and rising payment hurdles are especially challenging to small technology companies. Closer management of health care delivery and payment, particularly the standardization that may derive from practice guidelines and clamping down on payment for investigational technologies, curtails opportunities for innovation. Levels and distribution of biomedical research funding in government and industry are changing. Financial constraints are limiting the traditional roles of academic health centers in fostering innovation. Despite notable steps in recent years to lower regulatory barriers and speed approvals, especially for products for life-threatening conditions, the Food and Drug Administration is under great pressure from Congress, industry, and patients to do more. Technology gatekeeping is shifting from hundreds of thousands of physicians acting on behalf of their patients to fewer, yet more powerful, managed care organizations and health care networks. Beyond its direct effects on adoption, payment, and use of technologies, the extraordinary buying leverage of these large providers is cutting technology profit margins and heightening competition among technology companies. It is contributing to unprecedented restructuring of the pharmaceutical and medical device industries, leading to unprecedented alliances with generic product companies, health care providers, utilization review companies, and other agents. These industry changes are already

  5. Can lichen species of BSC acclimate to changing environments?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Laura; Colesie, Claudia; Büdel, Burkhard

    2015-04-01

    The Soil Crust INternational (SCIN) project aims to achieve improved appreciation of the importance and functioning of Biological Soil Crusts (BSC) in Europe. Four sites throughout Europe were identified for having important, yet diverse BSC communities: Gössenheim in Germany, Almeria in Spain, Öland in Sweden and Hochtor in Austria. These sites vary greatly in geographic and environmental conditions; and constitute, along with cyanobacteria, algae, bryophytes and fungi a host of green algal and cyanobacterial lichen species. Many of the lichen species occur in two-four locations, despite the climatic differences, and it has been observed that species are morphologically distinctive between sites. Lichens may be adapted to different environmental conditions by symbiosis with photobionts that are suited to the local conditions. Therefore, we may expect to find that a lichen species that can survive in diverse habitats to be less photobiont specific than species with a narrow range. In recent years it has been discovered that lichens can switch their photobiont throughout the course of their lives. Whether lichens can associate with an available photobiont and switch when a preferred photobiont becomes available is not conclusively known, or whether as habitats are affected by climate change, lichens will be able to switch to a new photobiont to survive changing conditions. A transplantation experiment of lichens between biomes was installed in each of the SCIN sites to investigate the potential of different lichen species to assimilate to a new environment. Where the same lichen species occurred in 2 or more locations samples were transplanted from their natural location to the foreign for a period of 2 years. Controls were also applied; this consisted of samples being transplanted within their own site to assess the effect of the transplantation itself. The photobionts of key species are sequenced to analyse diversity of photobiont interactions within/between the

  6. Wordland Workshop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perlish, Harvey Neil

    Can and should the preschool child learn to read? To answer this and related questions, a study was conducted to determine the effectiveness of a television program and parental home assistance in teaching reading skills to three-year-old children. For five days a week over a 39-week period, an experimental group watched "Wordland Workshop," a…

  7. Writers' Workshop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherris, Arieh

    1998-01-01

    Israeli 12th graders studying English as a Second Language benefit from writers' workshops where they compose written portfolios and learn to express themselves fluently in writing. Students write with paper and pen or work via the Internet. They write on selected issues and send letters and articles to various online and print journals and…

  8. Poetry Workshop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janeczko, Paul B.

    2000-01-01

    This workshop offers activities to teach students about poetry. After describing haiku as a brief snapshot rather than a story, it explains how to teach poetry using an attached reproducible and poster. The tear-out reproducible sheet teaches students how to write their own haiku, offering a sample one as a model. The poster presents three sample…

  9. Teacher workshops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Education specialists with the NASA Educator Resource Center conduct a wide variety of workshops throughout the year to aid teachers and educators in coming up with new ideas to inspire their students and also in aiding in the integration of technology into their classrooms.

  10. Women's Workshop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karelius, Karen

    The Women's Workshop Notebook is the tool used in the nine-week course designed for the mature woman returning to school at Antelope Valley College. The notebook exercises along with the group interaction and instruction stress the importance of personal assessment of strengths, weaknesses, dreams, deliberations and life history in…

  11. Winter Workshop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council of Outdoor Educators of Quebec, Montreal.

    Materials on 11 topics presented at a winter workshop for Quebec outdoor educators have been compiled into this booklet. Action story, instant replay, shoe factory, sound and action, and find an object to fit the description are described and recommended as group dynamic activities. Directions for five games (Superlative Selection; Data…

  12. Evaluation of change detection techniques for monitoring coastal zone environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weismiller, R. A. (Principal Investigator); Kristof, S. J.; Scholz, D. K.; Anuta, P. E.; Momin, S. M.

    1977-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Four change detection techniques were designed and implemented for evaluation: (1) post classification comparison change detection, (2) delta data change detection, (3) spectral/temporal change classification, and (4) layered spectral/temporal change classification. The post classification comparison technique reliably identified areas of change and was used as the standard for qualitatively evaluating the other three techniques. The layered spectral/temporal change classification and the delta data change detection results generally agreed with the post classification comparison technique results; however, many small areas of change were not identified. Major discrepancies existed between the post classification comparison and spectral/temporal change detection results.

  13. The Second Chernogolovka Workshop on Low Temperature Physics in Microgravity Environment (CWS-99), July 28-August 2, 1999

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezhov-Deglin, L. P.

    2000-03-01

    The International Seminar CWS-99, devoted to a discussion of the current status and prospects for development of fundamental research in the field of low-temperature physics in a microgravity environment, was held in at the Research Center of the Russian Academy of Sciences (RCC RAN) in Chernogolovka, Moscow District on July 28-August 2, 1999. This seminar was organized by the Institute of Solid State Physics and the Space Materials Science section of the Space Council of the Russian Academy of Sciences with the financial support of the Russian Fund for Fundamental Research, the Ministry of Science and Technology of the Russian Federation, The Russian Aviation & Space Agency, and the Council on Low Temperature Physics of the Russian Academy of Sciences. The CWS-99 Seminar preceded the International Conference on Low Temperature Physics LT-22, and, as one of the satellite activities of LT-22 conducted in the framework of international scientific cooperation, it received substantial support from the Organizing Committee of LT-22 and from the OLMSA Division of the National Aeronoutics and Space Administration (NASA), USA.

  14. National Postirradiation Examination Workshop Report

    SciTech Connect

    Schulthess, Jason L

    2011-06-01

    A National Post-Irradiation-Examination (PIE) Workshop was held March 29-30, 2011, in Washington D.C., stimulated by the DOE Acting Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Energy approval on January 31, 2011 of the “Mission Need Statement for Advanced Post-Irradiation Examination Capability”. As stated in the Mission Need, “A better understanding of nuclear fuels and material performance in the nuclear environment, at the nanoscale and lower, is critical to the development of innovative fuels and materials required for tomorrow’s nuclear energy systems.” (2011) Developing an advanced post-irradiation capability is the most important thing we can do to advance nuclear energy as an option to meeting national energy goals. Understanding the behavior of fuels and materials in a nuclear reactor irradiation environment is the limiting factor in nuclear plant safety, longevity, efficiency, and economics. The National PIE Workshop is part of fulfilling or addressing Department of Energy (DOE) missions in safe and publically acceptable nuclear energy. Several presentations were given during the opening of the workshop. Generally speaking, these presentations established that we cannot continue to rely on others in the world to provide the capabilities we need to move forward with nuclear energy technology. These presentations also generally identified the need for increased microstructural understanding of fuels and materials to be coupled with modeling and simulation, and increased accessibility and infrastructure to facilitate the interaction between national laboratories and participating organizations. The overall results of the work of the presenters and panels was distilled into four primary needs 1. Understanding material changes in the extreme nuclear environment at the nanoscale. Nanoscale studies have significant importance due to the mechanisms that cause materials to degrade, which actually occur on the nanoscale. 2. Enabling additional proficiency in

  15. Workshop on Mars Telescopic Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, J. F., III (Editor); Moersch, J. E. (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    The Mars Telescopic Observations Workshop, held August 14-15, 1995, at Cornell University in Ithaca, New York, was organized and planned with two primary goals in mind: The first goal was to facilitate discussions among and between amateur and professional observers and to create a workshop environment fostering collaborations and comparisons within the Mars observing community. The second goal was to explore the role of continuing telescopic observations of Mars in the upcoming era of increased spacecraft exploration. The 24 papers presented at the workshop described the current NASA plans for Mars exploration over the next decade, current and recent Mars research being performed by professional astronomers, and current and past Mars observations being performed by amateur observers and observing associations. The workshop was divided into short topical sessions concentrating on programmatic overviews, groundbased support of upcoming spacecraft experiments, atmospheric observations, surface observations, modeling and numerical studies, and contributions from amateur astronomers.

  16. Thriving or Surviving? Managing Pro-Active Environments for Nursing. Midwest Alliance in Nursing Fall Workshop (Columbus, Ohio, September 7-8, 1984).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minckley, Barbara B., Ed.; Young, Lu Ann, Ed.

    Underscoring the importance of active planning for constructive change in the nursing profession, the papers in these proceedings highlight the need for nursing to remain pro-active in the management of nursing education and patient care environments. The proceedings contain: (1) "Pro-Active Planning for Nursing at the Federal Level," by Jo…

  17. Workshop on Molecular Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cummings, Michael P.

    2004-01-01

    Molecular evolution has become the nexus of many areas of biological research. It both brings together and enriches such areas as biochemistry, molecular biology, microbiology, population genetics, systematics, developmental biology, genomics, bioinformatics, in vitro evolution, and molecular ecology. The Workshop provides an important contribution to these fields in that it promotes interdisciplinary research and interaction, and thus provides a glue that sticks together disparate fields. Due to the wide range of fields addressed by the study of molecular evolution, it is difficult to offer a comprehensive course in a university setting. It is rare for a single institution to maintain expertise in all necessary areas. In contrast, the Workshop is uniquely able to provide necessary breadth and depth by utilizing a large number of faculty with appropriate expertise. Furthermore, the flexible nature of the Workshop allows for rapid adaptation to changes in the dynamic field of molecular evolution. For example, the 2003 Workshop included recently emergent research areas of molecular evolution of development and genomics.

  18. Imaging Sciences Workshop Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Candy, J.V.

    1996-11-21

    This report contains the proceedings of the Imaging Sciences Workshop sponsored by C.A.S.LS., the Center for Advanced Signal & Image Sciences. The Center, established primarily to provide a forum where researchers can freely exchange ideas on the signal and image sciences in a comfortable intellectual environment, has grown over the last two years with the opening of a Reference Library (located in Building 272). The Technical Program for the 1996 Workshop include a variety of efforts in the Imaging Sciences including applications in the Microwave Imaging, highlighted by the Micro-Impulse Radar (MIR) system invented at LLNL, as well as other applications in this area. Special sessions organized by various individuals in Speech, Acoustic Ocean Imaging, Radar Ocean Imaging, Ultrasonic Imaging, and Optical Imaging discuss various applica- tions of real world problems. For the more theoretical, sessions on Imaging Algorithms and Computed Tomography were organized as well as for the more pragmatic featuring a session on Imaging Systems.

  19. AASTRA Leadership Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemenway, M. K.

    1998-05-01

    American Astronomical Society Teacher Resource Agent Institutes were held in the summers of 1994-1996. From the 215 Agents, sixteen were selected to attend a follow-up leadership workshop for three weeks in July, 1997 at University of Texas at Austin. The workshop followed the recommendations of both the AASTRA formative evaluator and the National Science Education Standards in allowing the participants time to reflect on their practice as teachers and as teacher-leaders. At no financial charge to the project, the Southwest Educational Development Laboratory contributed three workshops of three hours each. These workshops, plus one given by the PI, were taken from "Facilitating Systemic Change in Science and Mathematics Education : A Toolkit for Professional Developers" [ISBN 1-878234-08-0]. In addition, McDonald Observatory contributed six nights of telescope time on the 30-inch telescope with a CCD prime focus camera. In Austin, several astronomers lectured on their research; most of the lectures correlated with the research projects in progress at the Observatory during the teachers' observing run. Several observers allowed the teachers to participate in their observing sessions on the larger telescopes. Participant evaluation of the Leadership Workshop was very positive, both in terms of enhancing their self-image as leaders, enriching their repertoire of activities to use within their classrooms, and introducing them to modern astronomical research techniques. AASTRA is supported by NSF under grant ESI 93- 53377 and the AAS. Additional support is provided by Loyola University of Chicago, Northern Arizona University of Flagstaff, University of Maryland at College Park, and the University of Texas at Austin.

  20. Mars Sample Handling Protocol Workshop Series: Workshop 2a (Sterilization)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rummel, John D. (Editor); Brunch, Carl W. (Editor); Setlow, Richard B. (Editor); DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Space Studies Board of the National Research Council provided a series of recommendations to NASA on planetary protection requirements for future Mars sample return missions. One of the Board's key findings suggested, although current evidence of the martian surface suggests that life as we know it would not tolerate the planet's harsh environment, there remain 'plausible scenarios for extant microbial life on Mars.' Based on this conclusion, all samples returned from Mars should be considered potentially hazardous until it has been demonstrated that they are not. In response to the National Research Council's findings and recommendations, NASA has undertaken a series of workshops to address issues regarding NASA's proposed sample return missions. Work was previously undertaken at the Mars Sample Handling and Protocol Workshop 1 (March 2000) to formulate recommendations on effective methods for life detection and/or biohazard testing on returned samples. The NASA Planetary Protection Officer convened the Mars Sample Sterilization Workshop, the third in the Mars Sample Handling Protocol Workshop Series, on November 28-30, 2000 at the Holiday Inn Rosslyn Westpark, Arlington, Virginia. Because of the short timeframe between this Workshop and the second Workshop in the Series, which was convened in October 2000 in Bethesda, Maryland, they were developed in parallel, so the Sterilization Workshop and its report have therefore been designated as '2a'). The focus of Workshop 2a was to make recommendations for effective sterilization procedures for all phases of Mars sample return missions, and to answer the question of whether we can sterilize samples in such a way that the geological characteristics of the samples are not significantly altered.

  1. Bushfires and human health in a changing environment.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Fay H

    2009-09-01

    Bushfires are an integral part of the Australian environment. While the immediate health impacts of these fires can be devastatingly obvious, there are many other serious aspects of bushfires that remain less well understood. A holistic perspective of bushfires is essential for minimising harm and ensuring public safety in an environment that is becoming increasingly conducive to major bushfire catastrophes. This review summarises the current evidence about the immediate health risks of bushfires and the special health needs of survivors. It also looks at the health risks of smoke haze and other environmental hazards associated with bushfires.

  2. Creating Fantastic PI Workshops

    SciTech Connect

    Biedermann, Laura B.; Clark, Blythe G.; Colbert, Rachel S.; Dagel, Amber Lynn; Gupta, Vipin P.; Hibbs, Michael R.; Perkins, David Nikolaus; West, Roger Derek

    2015-10-01

    The goal of this SAND report is to provide guidance for other groups hosting workshops and peerto-peer learning events at Sandia. Thus this SAND report provides detail about our team structure, how we brainstormed workshop topics and developed the workshop structure. A Workshop “Nuts and Bolts” section provides our timeline and check-list for workshop activities. The survey section provides examples of the questions we asked and how we adapted the workshop in response to the feedback.

  3. Planning Intentionally for Children's Outdoor Environments: The Gift of Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenow, Nancy

    2011-01-01

    When the author was a child 50 years ago, nobody planned her outdoor environment. Her home was close to flower-filled meadows that she could explore freely, and her preschool and elementary school classrooms opened onto beautiful woodlands that children used as an important part of their day-to-day learning. The last time she visited her old…

  4. Changing Paradigms Managed Learning Environments and Web 2.0

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craig, Emory M.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to understand how emerging technologies and Web 2.0 services are transforming the structure of the web and their potential impact on managed learning environments (MLS) and learning content management systems (LCMS). Design/methodology/approach: Innovative Web 2.0 applications are reviewed in the paper to…

  5. Distributed Computing Environment: An Architecture For Supporting Change?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-11-01

    Distributed Computing Environment (DCE) has been in development for about five years but has only been widely used in the last two years. It consists...these services form an architecture for distributed computing that enables users to carry out the new, cheaper operations they require with the

  6. School Social Workers and Multiculturalism: Changing the Environment for Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joseph, Alfred L.; Slovak, Karen; Broussard, C. Anne; Webster, Paula Sunanon

    2012-01-01

    Dropping out, a phenomenon heavily concentrated in communities of color, hampers the academic success of multicultural students. Multiculturalism can help make school an inviting place for vulnerable youths, and school social workers (SSWRs) are in a position to advocate for school environments that are conducive to academic success. The present…

  7. Breaking the Code: Changing Our Thinking about Children's Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, Sandra

    2011-01-01

    It is the responsibility of educators and architects of classrooms to create spaces that promote positive relationships between people and their environments. Life in early childhood classrooms organizes and clusters around the relationships between adults, children, and the space they occupy. Classrooms become living systems, which experience…

  8. Finding What Works: Leadership Competencies for the Changing Healthcare Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herd, Ann M.; Adams-Pope, Brittany L.; Bowers, Amanda; Sims, Brittany

    2016-01-01

    As the world of healthcare changes rapidly, healthcare leaders and managers must hone their leadership competencies in order to remain effective in their organizations. With changes such as the Affordable Care Act, increasing medical school costs, decreased graduation rates, and increased needs for care, how are current and future healthcare…

  9. Climate Change and Societal Response: Livelihoods, Communities, and the Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molnar, Joseph J.

    2010-01-01

    Climate change may be considered a natural disaster evolving in slow motion on a global scale. Increasing storm intensities, shifting rainfall patterns, melting glaciers, rising sea levels, and other manifold alterations are being experienced around the world. Climate has never been constant in any location, but human-induced changes associated…

  10. Managing in a Change Environment: From Coping to Comfort.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goble, David S.

    1997-01-01

    Discusses the accelerating pace of change that librarians must cope with and suggests looking to the private sector for strategies to become more comfortable with change. Describes the five disciplines comprising the learning organization culture: systems thinking, personal mastery, mental models, shared vision, and team learning. (LRW)

  11. Labor and Technology: Union Response to Changing Environments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Donald, Ed.; And Others

    This collection of papers, which is intended as a contribution to the body of knowledge known as labor studies, examines the ways in which labor unions have and are continuing to respond to technological change in the workplace. The introduction by Donald Kennedy, Charles Craypo, and Mary Lehman traces the impact of technological change on the…

  12. Assessing and managing stressors in a changing marine environment.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Peter M

    2016-10-16

    We are facing a dynamic future in the face of multiple stressors acting individually and in combination: climate change; habitat change/loss; overfishing; invasive species; harmful algal blooms/eutrophication; and, chemical contaminants. Historic assessment and management approaches will be inadequate for addressing risks from climate change and other stressors. Wicked problems (non-linear, complex, competing risks and benefits, not easily solvable), will become increasingly common. We are facing irreversible changes to our planetary living conditions. Agreed protection goals and considering both the negatives (risks) and the positives (benefits) of all any and all actions are required, as is judicious and appropriate use of the Precautionary Principle. Researchers and managers need to focus on: determining tipping points (alternative stable points); maintaining ecosystem services; and, managing competing ecosystem services. Marine (and other) scientists are urged to focus their research on wicked problems to allow for informed decision-making on a planetary basis.

  13. Changed Learning through Changed Space: When Can a Participatory Approach to the Learning Environment Challenge Preconceptions and Alter Practice?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woolner, Pamela; McCarter, Sheila; Wall, Kate; Higgins, Steve

    2012-01-01

    School premises make a difference to learning, but it is important to understand the relationship between setting and educational activities. Physical space has been found to entrench practice, making it harder to reflect and make changes. Yet changes made to the physical environment may not lead to changes in teaching or learning. This may be…

  14. Dystrophic muscle environment induces changes in cell plasticity.

    PubMed

    Faralli, Herve; Dilworth, F Jeffrey

    2014-04-15

    Fibro-adipogenic progenitors (FAPs) reside in the muscle, where they facilitate myofiber regeneration. Under normal conditions, FAPs lack myogenic potential and thus do not directly contribute to regenerated myofibers. Surprisingly, Saccone and colleagues (pp. 841-857) demonstrated that the dystrophic muscle environment causes FAPs to adopt a chromatin state that imparts these cells with myogenic potential. In this context, treatment of muscle with deacetylase inhibitors activates a BAF60c-myomiR transcriptional network in FAPs, blocking adipogenesis and driving muscle differentiation.

  15. Space Weather Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, D. L.

    2004-01-01

    This workshop will focus on what space weather is about and its impact on society. An overall picture will be "painted" describing the Sun's influence through the solar wind on the near-Earth space environment, including the aurora, killer electrons at geosynchronous orbit, million ampere electric currents through the ionosphere and along magnetic field lines, and the generation of giga-Watts of natural radio waves. Reference material in the form of Internet sites will be provided so that teachers can discuss space weather in the classroom and enable students to learn more about this topic.

  16. Maintaining space shuttle safety within an environment of change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenfield, Michael A.

    1999-09-01

    In the 10 years since the Challenger accident, NASA has developed a set of stable and capable processes to prepare the Space Shuttle for safe launch and return. Capitalizing on the extensive experience gained from a string of over 50 successful flights, NASA today is changing the way it does business in an effort to reduce cost. A single Shuttle Flight Operations Contractor (SFOC) has been chosen to operate the Shuttle. The Government role will change from direct "oversight" to "insight" gained through understanding and measuring the contractor's processes. This paper describes the program management changes underway and the NASA Safety and Mission Assurance (S&MA) organization's philosophy, role, and methodology for pursuing this new approach. It describes how audit and surveillance will replace direct oversight and how meaningful performance metrics will be implemented.

  17. Food systems change and the environment: local and global connections.

    PubMed

    Freedman, Darcy A; Bess, Kimberly D

    2011-06-01

    Making changes to the way food is produced, distributed, and processed is one strategy for addressing global climate change. In this case study, we examine the "forming" stage of an emergent and locally-based coalition that is both participatory and focused on promoting food security by creating food systems change. Social network analysis is used to compare network density, centrality, and centralization among coalition partners before the formation of the coalition and at its one-year anniversary. Findings reveal that the coalition facilitated information seeking, assistance seeking, and collaborative efforts related to food security among a group of organizational stakeholders that were relatively disconnected pre-coalition. Results also illuminate tensions related to increased centralization of the network, coalition efficiency, and the goals of democratic decision-making. This study highlights the utility of social network analysis as a tool for evaluating the aims and trajectory of locally-based coalitions focused on global concerns.

  18. 1998 federal technical standards workshop: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    1998-10-01

    The theme for the 1998 workshop was Standards Management -- A World of Change and Opportunities. The workshop`s goal was to further the implementation of the National Technology Transfer and Advancement Act of 1995 (Public Law 104-113) through the sharing of standards management success stories, lessons learned, and emerging initiatives within the Executive Branch of the Federal Government. The target audience for this workshop included agency/department and contractor personnel and representatives of standards developing organizations that either used technical standards in their work for the Federal Government of participated in standards writing/management activities in support of the missions and programs of Federal agencies/departments. As with previous standards workshops sponsored by the DOE, views on the technical subject areas under the workshop theme were solicited from and provided by agency Standards Executives and standards program managers, voluntary standards organizations, and the private sector. This report includes vugraphs of the presentations.

  19. The Networked University: The Structure, Culture, and Policy of Universities in a Changing Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Wit, Kurt

    2010-01-01

    The universities in Europe are finding themselves in a turbulent environment. They are exposed to global and European developments. This article links changes in the structure, culture, and policy of universities to these developments and changes in the broader-than-national environment. The central question is, in short: what is globalisation…

  20. Tracking Changing Environments: Innovators Are Fast, but Not Flexible Learners

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, Andrea S.; Guez, David; Lermite, Françoise; Patience, Madeleine

    2013-01-01

    Behavioural innovations are increasingly thought to provide a rich source of phenotypic plasticity and evolutionary change. Innovation propensity shows substantial variation across avian taxa and provides an adaptive mechanism by which behaviour is flexibly adjusted to changing environmental conditions. Here, we tested for the first time the prediction that inter-individual variation in innovation propensity is equally a measure of behavioural flexibility. We used Indian mynas, Sturnus tristis, a highly successful worldwide invader. Results revealed that mynas that solved an extractive foraging task more quickly learnt to discriminate between a cue that predicted food, and one that did not more quickly. However, fast innovators were slower to change their behaviour when the significance of the food cues changed. This unexpected finding appears at odds with the well-established view that avian taxa with larger brains relative to their body size, and therefore greater neural processing power, are both faster, and more flexible learners. We speculate that the existence of this relationship across taxa can be reconciled with its absence within species by assuming that fast, innovative learners and non innovative, slow, flexible learners constitute two separate individual strategies, which are both underpinned by enhanced neural processing power. This idea is consistent with the recent proposal that individuals may differ consistently in ‘cognitive style’, differentially trading off speed against accuracy in cognitive tasks. PMID:24391981

  1. Microgravity flight research in a dynamic and changing environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitz, Robert A.; Newcomb, John F.

    1993-01-01

    NASA's Microgravity Science and Applications Division conducts both basic and applied low-g research encompassing biotechnology, fluid physics, combustion, and materials science, in industry, university, and government research settings. The present evaluation of such a diverse research program's management gives attention to the fiscal constraints, polical factors, technological changes, international cooperation requirements, and educational responsibilities that must be addressed.

  2. Climatic Change and the Future of the Human Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kotlyakov, Vladimir M.

    1996-01-01

    Evaluates the latest glaciological and oceanological data and demonstrates a strict correlation between global changes of temperature and gas composition of the atmosphere over the last climatic cycle. Concludes that global warming may not create an environmental crisis but will alter drastically the life people lead. (MJP)

  3. Communicating Climate Change to Visitors of Informal Science Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koepfler, Jes A.; Heimlich, Joe E.; Yocco, Victor S.

    2010-01-01

    This article reports findings on visitors' preferences for content presentation of a future global warming and climate change exhibit. The study was conducted with two groups: one from the Marian Koshland Science Museum of the National Academy of Sciences in Washington, DC, and the other at the Center of Science and Industry in Columbus, Ohio. The…

  4. Changing environments and structure–property relationships in marine biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Waite, J. Herbert; Broomell, Christopher C.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Most marine organisms make functional biomolecular materials that extend to varying degrees ‘beyond their skins’. These materials are very diverse and include shells, spines, frustules, tubes, mucus trails, egg capsules and byssal threads, to mention a few. Because they are devoid of cells, these materials lack the dynamic maintenance afforded intra-organismic tissues and thus are usually assumed to be inherently more durable than their internalized counterparts. Recent advances in nanomechanics and submicron spectroscopic imaging have enabled the characterization of structure–property relationships in a variety of extra-organismic materials and provided important new insights about their adaptive functions and stability. Some structure–property relationships in byssal threads are described to show how available analytical methods can reveal hitherto unappreciated interdependences between these materials and their prevailing chemical, physical and ecological environments. PMID:22357581

  5. The dynamic replicon: adapting to a changing cellular environment.

    PubMed

    Herrick, John

    2010-02-01

    Eukaryotic cells are often exposed to fluctuations in growth conditions as well as endogenous and exogenous stress-related agents. During development, global patterns of gene transcription change substantially, and these changes are associated with altered patterns of DNA replication and larger distances between replication origins in somatic cells compared to embryos. Conversely, when cells experience difficulties while replicating DNA, the replication program is dramatically altered and distances between replication origins decrease. Recent evidence indicates that each unit of replication, or replicon, can correspond to one or more potential replication origins, but in the case of multiple potential origins, only one is selected to initiate replication of the replicon. How one origin is selected from multiple potential origins and how origin densities are regulated during genome duplication remains unclear. The following review addresses some of the mechanisms involved in regulating replication origins during both a normal and perturbed eukaryotic cell cycle.

  6. Essentials of negotiating for employment in a changing environment.

    PubMed

    Satiani, Bhagwan; Nair, Deepak G; Starr, Jean E; Samson, Russell H

    2014-07-01

    Evolving changes in health care in the United States are causing new graduates and self-employed physicians to consider employment with large groups and health systems. Familiarity with the principles, proper conduct, and mechanics of negotiating an employment agreement will be important for vascular surgeons making such a decision. The various components of compensation packages and contract language need to be critically evaluated. To facilitate an understanding of the complexities involved in employment contracts, strategies to avoid making negotiating mistakes are discussed.

  7. Climate change, marine environments, and the US Endangered species act.

    PubMed

    Seney, Erin E; Rowland, Melanie J; Lowery, Ruth Ann; Griffis, Roger B; McClure, Michelle M

    2013-12-01

    Climate change is expected to be a top driver of global biodiversity loss in the 21st century. It poses new challenges to conserving and managing imperiled species, particularly in marine and estuarine ecosystems. The use of climate-related science in statutorily driven species management, such as under the U.S. Endangered Species Act (ESA), is in its early stages. This article provides an overview of ESA processes, with emphasis on the mandate to the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) to manage listed marine, estuarine, and anadromous species. Although the ESA is specific to the United States, its requirements are broadly relevant to conservation planning. Under the ESA, species, subspecies, and "distinct population segments" may be listed as either endangered or threatened, and taking of most listed species (harassing, harming, pursuing, wounding, killing, or capturing) is prohibited unless specifically authorized via a case-by-case permit process. Government agencies, in addition to avoiding take, must ensure that actions they fund, authorize, or conduct are not likely to jeopardize a listed species' continued existence or adversely affect designated critical habitat. Decisions for which climate change is likely to be a key factor include: determining whether a species should be listed under the ESA, designating critical habitat areas, developing species recovery plans, and predicting whether effects of proposed human activities will be compatible with ESA-listed species' survival and recovery. Scientific analyses that underlie these critical conservation decisions include risk assessment, long-term recovery planning, defining environmental baselines, predicting distribution, and defining appropriate temporal and spatial scales. Although specific guidance is still evolving, it is clear that the unprecedented changes in global ecosystems brought about by climate change necessitate new information and approaches to conservation of imperiled species. El

  8. Manager-Organization Linkages: The Impact of Changing Work Environments.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-11-01

    creation of the rest of the occupational characteristics that have come to be associated with the professions (cf. Ritzer , 1977). One of the more...Institute for Social Research, Ann Arbor, Mi. Ritzer , G. (1977). Working: Conflict and Change, Second Edition, Prentice-Hall, Englewood Cliffs, NJ. Schein, E... George E. Rowland Temple University, The Merit Center Ritter Annex, 9th Floor College of Education Philadephia, PA 19122 Dr. Irwin G. Sarason

  9. Dynamics of choice and frequency of environment change.

    PubMed

    Aparicio, Carlos F

    2008-06-01

    Recent research has examined the effects on behavioral adjustment of a range of within-session changes in the reinforcer ratio available from two alternatives. Regularities between extended patterns of behavior (choice) and a distribution of food deliveries (expressed as a food-rate ratio) have emerged from such studies. To assess the generality of these findings, the present study manipulated rats' experience in the choice situation. Sixteen rats were divided into two groups of eight rats each. Seven non-signaled food-rate ratios were arranged to occur for responses on two concurrently available levers. Group 1 experienced a different food-rate ratio every day; each ratio provided 70 food deliveries, and none of the seven ratios operated for 2 consecutive days. Group 2 experienced the same sequence of food-rate ratios, except that each food-rate ratio remained in effect for 17 consecutive days (providing 70 food deliveries per session), after which a different food-rate ratio was selected for the next 17 sessions. In all cases, preference was adjusted to changes in food-rate ratios. Estimates of sensitivity to changes in food-rate ratios increased with an increasing number of sessions (i.e., experience in the choice situation).

  10. Changing Environments by Changing Individuals: The Emergent Effects of Psychological Intervention.

    PubMed

    Powers, Joseph T; Cook, Jonathan E; Purdie-Vaughns, Valerie; Garcia, Julio; Apfel, Nancy; Cohen, Geoffrey L

    2016-02-01

    The two studies reported here tested whether a classroom-based psychological intervention that benefited a few African American 7th graders could trigger emergent ecological effects that benefited their entire classrooms. Multilevel analyses were conducted on data that previously documented the benefits of values affirmations on African American students' grades. The density of African American students who received the intervention in each classroom (i.e., treatment density) was used as an independent predictor of grades. Within a classroom, the greater the density of African American students who participated in the intervention exercise, the higher the grades of all classmates on average, regardless of their race or whether they participated in the intervention exercise. Benefits of treatment density were most pronounced among students with a history of poor performance. Results suggest that the benefits of psychological intervention do not end with the individual. Changed individuals can improve their social environments, and such improvements can benefit others regardless of whether they participated in the intervention. These findings have implications for understanding the emergence of ecological consequences from psychological processes.

  11. Satellite Instrument Calibration for Measuring Global Climate Change. Report of a Workshop at the University of Maryland Inn and Conference Center, College Park, MD. , November 12-14, 2002

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohring, G.; Wielicki, B.; Spencer, R.; Emery, B.; Datla, R.

    2004-01-01

    Measuring the small changes associated with long-term global climate change from space is a daunting task. To address these problems and recommend directions for improvements in satellite instrument calibration some 75 scientists, including researchers who develop and analyze long-term data sets from satellites, experts in the field of satellite instrument calibration, and physicists working on state of the art calibration sources and standards met November 12 - 14, 2002 and discussed the issues. The workshop defined the absolute accuracies and long-term stabilities of global climate data sets that are needed to detect expected trends, translated these data set accuracies and stabilities to required satellite instrument accuracies and stabilities, and evaluated the ability of current observing systems to meet these requirements. The workshop's recommendations include a set of basic axioms or overarching principles that must guide high quality climate observations in general, and a roadmap for improving satellite instrument characterization, calibration, inter-calibration, and associated activities to meet the challenge of measuring global climate change. It is also recommended that a follow-up workshop be conducted to discuss implementation of the roadmap developed at this workshop.

  12. Countermeasures for mitigating the effects of global environment changes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, Lyle M.

    1991-01-01

    Environmental countermeasures for preventing the negative effects of global climate change and ozone depletion are discussed with special emphasis on the possibilities of space-based actions. Among the programs addressed are the Mission to Planet Earth, the Solar Power Satellite (and linkage to the Space Exploration Initiative), and proposed projects such as a lunar-based power generator that utilizes He-3 as a fusion fuel when combined with deuterium. The concept of regional working groups is proposed for initiating the programs for effective countermeasures.

  13. Changing the light environment: chloroplast signalling and response mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Spetea, Cornelia; Rintamäki, Eevi; Schoefs, Benoît

    2014-04-19

    Light is an essential environmental factor required for photosynthesis, but it also mediates signals to control plant development and growth and induces stress tolerance. The photosynthetic organelle (chloroplast) is a key component in the signalling and response network in plants. This theme issue of Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London B: Biology provides updates, highlights and summaries of the most recent findings on chloroplast-initiated signalling cascades and responses to environmental changes, including light and biotic stress. Besides plant molecular cell biology and physiology, the theme issue includes aspects from the cross-disciplinary fields of environmental adaptation, ecology and agronomy.

  14. Breeding blueberries for a changing global environment: a review

    PubMed Central

    Lobos, Gustavo A.; Hancock, James F.

    2015-01-01

    Today, blueberries are recognized worldwide as one of the foremost health foods, becoming one of the crops with the highest productive and commercial projections. Over the last 100 years, the geographical area where highbush blueberries are grown has extended dramatically into hotter and drier environments. The expansion of highbush blueberry growing into warmer regions will be challenged in the future by increases in average global temperature and extreme fluctuations in temperature and rainfall patterns. Considerable genetic variability exists within the blueberry gene pool that breeders can use to meet these challenges, but traditional selection techniques can be slow and inefficient and the precise adaptations of genotypes often remain hidden. Marker assisted breeding (MAB) and phenomics could aid greatly in identifying those individuals carrying adventitious traits, increasing selection efficiency and shortening the rate of cultivar release. While phenomics have begun to be used in the breeding of grain crops in the last 10 years, their use in fruit breeding programs it is almost non-existent. PMID:26483803

  15. Changing the Food Environment: The French Experience12

    PubMed Central

    Chauliac, Michel; Hercberg, Serge

    2012-01-01

    The French National Nutrition and Health Program was launched in 2001. To achieve its objectives, 2 main preventive strategies were identified: 1) provide information and education to help individuals make healthy food and physical activity choices; and 2) improve the food and physical environment so that making healthy choices is easier. School regulations have been established to improve the nutritional quality of meals served to children and adolescents, and vending machines have been banned. Since 2007, companies in France’s food industry have had the option of signing the national government’s “Charte d'engagement volontaire de progrès nutritionnel” (charter of commitments to nutritional improvements) which aims to benefit all consumers. A standard reference document, developed by public authorities as the basis for decisions made by a committee of experts in the food industry, aims to validate the voluntary commitments made by companies to improve the nutrient content of the foods they produce. There is strict follow-up. A Food Quality Observatory was created in 2009 to monitor the nutrient quality of the food supply in France. Various results show the positive impact of these actions. PMID:22798000

  16. GLOBE Hydrology Workshop SEIP program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Matt Krigbaum (left), a teacher at Mitchell Elementary in Ann Arbor, Mich., pours water from the Pearl River into a turbidity tube to measure the river's light penetration. Krigbaum, along with Lois Williams, principal at Elizabeth Courville Elementary in Detroit, Mich.; and Carolyn Martin and Arlene Wittmer, teachers at Elizabeth Courville Elementary; conducted the experiment during a GLOBE (Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment) hydrology workshop. GLOBE is a worldwide, hands-on science education program in which teachers can become certified to implement the program at their schools after taking hydrology, land cover/biology, atmosphere/climate and soil protocol workshops. Twelve teachers from across the country attended the recent weeklong GLOBE training at SSC, offered through its Educator Resource Center and the NASA Explorer Schools program. All workshops are free and offer continuing education units.

  17. Changes in macrophage function modulated by the lipid environment

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Michael R; Cauvi, David M; Rivera, Isabel; Hawisher, Dennis; De Maio, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages (Mϕs) play a critical role in the defense against pathogens, orchestrating the inflammatory response during injury and maintaining tissue homeostasis. During these processes, macrophages encounter a variety of environmental conditions that are likely to change their gene expression pattern, which modulates their function. In this study, we found that murine Mϕs displayed two different subpopulations characterized by differences in morphologies, expression of surface markers and phagocytic capacity under non-stimulated conditions. These two subpopulations could be recapitulated by changes in the culture conditions. Thus, Mϕs grown in suspension in the presence of serum were highly phagocytic, whereas subtraction of serum resulted in rapid attachment and reduced phagocytic activity. The difference in phagocytosis between these subpopulations was correlated with the expression levels of FcγR. These two cell subpopulations also differed in their responses to LPS and the expression of surface markers, including CD14, CD86, scavenger receptor A1, TLR4 and low-density lipoprotein receptor. Moreover, we found that the lipid/cholesterol content in the culture medium mediated the differences between these two cell subpopulations. Thus, we described a mechanism that modulates Mϕ function depending on the exposure to lipids within their surrounding microenvironment. PMID:26951856

  18. The role of the hospital in a changing environment.

    PubMed Central

    McKee, M.; Healy, J.

    2000-01-01

    Hospitals pose many challenges to those undertaking reform of health care systems. This paper examines the evolving role of the hospital within the health care system in industrialized countries and explores the evidence on which policy-makers might base their decisions. It begins by tracing the evolving concept of the hospital, concluding that hospitals must continue to evolve in response to factors such as changing health care needs and emerging technologies. The size and distribution of hospitals are matters for ongoing debate. This paper concludes that evidence in favour of concentrating hospital facilities, whether as a means of enhancing effectiveness or efficiency, is less robust than is often assumed. Noting that care provided in hospitals is often less than satisfactory, this paper summarizes the evidence underlying three reform strategies: (i) behavioural interventions such as quality assurance programmes; (ii) changing organizational culture; and (iii) the use of financial incentives. Isolated behavioural interventions have a limited impact, but are more effective when combined. Financial incentives are blunt instruments that must be monitored. Organizational culture, which has previously received relatively little attention, appears to be an important determinant of quality of care and is threatened by ill-considered policies intended to 're-engineer' hospital services. Overall, evidence on the effectiveness of policies relating to hospitals is limited and this paper indicates where such evidence can be found. PMID:10916917

  19. A Family of Origin Workshop: Process and Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rovers, Martin; DesRoches, Loran; Hunter, Philip E.; Taylor, Brenda

    2000-01-01

    Examines the effectiveness of family of origin therapy as experienced in a workshop format. A description of the Family of Origin Workshop, a 6-hour session that strives for the goal of increasing personal authority, is included. Participants reported increased ability to individuate and attributed changes resulting from the workshop to…

  20. Change in ocean subsurface environment to suppress tropical cyclone intensification under global warming.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ping; Lin, I-I; Chou, Chia; Huang, Rong-Hui

    2015-05-18

    Tropical cyclones (TCs) are hazardous natural disasters. Because TC intensification is significantly controlled by atmosphere and ocean environments, changes in these environments may cause changes in TC intensity. Changes in surface and subsurface ocean conditions can both influence a TC's intensification. Regarding global warming, minimal exploration of the subsurface ocean has been undertaken. Here we investigate future subsurface ocean environment changes projected by 22 state-of-the-art climate models and suggest a suppressive effect of subsurface oceans on the intensification of future TCs. Under global warming, the subsurface vertical temperature profile can be sharpened in important TC regions, which may contribute to a stronger ocean coupling (cooling) effect during the intensification of future TCs. Regarding a TC, future subsurface ocean environments may be more suppressive than the existing subsurface ocean environments. This suppressive effect is not spatially uniform and may be weak in certain local areas.

  1. The programmable (logic) controller: Adapting in an environment of change

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, P.S.

    1995-03-01

    Reports of the imminent death of the PLC (programmable logic controller) were greatly exaggerated, to paraphrase Mark Twain. In fact, the PLC is not only alive and working worldwide in thousands of applications, but it is also integrating well with related technologies. Long-term survival is a larger question - probably unanswerable given the pace of technological change. However, a few questions arise about the PLC today and in the immediate future: (1) What`s happening with programming languages? (2) Will there continue to be a {open_quotes}blurring of the lines{close_quotes} between the PLC and other technologies, and what role will software play in this integration? (3) How will the PLC`s cost and size affect the market?

  2. Ages of celiac disease: from changing environment to improved diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Tommasini, Alberto; Not, Tarcisio; Ventura, Alessandro

    2011-08-28

    From the time of Gee's landmark writings, the recent history of celiac disease (CD) can be divided into many ages, each driven by a diagnostic advance and a deeper knowledge of disease pathogenesis. At the same time, these advances were paralleled by the identification of new clinical patterns associated with CD and by a continuous redefinition of the prevalence of the disease in population. In the beginning, CD was considered a chronic indigestion, even if the causative food was not known; later, the disease was proven to depend on an intolerance to wheat gliadin, leading to typical mucosal changes in the gut and to a malabsorption syndrome. This knowledge led to curing the disease with a gluten-free diet. After the identification of antibodies to gluten (AGA) in the serum of patients and the identification of gluten-specific lymphocytes in the mucosa, CD was described as an immune disorder, resembling a chronic "gluten infection". The use of serological testing for AGA allowed identification of the higher prevalence of this disorder, revealing atypical patterns of presentation. More recently, the characterization of autoantibodies to endomysium and to transglutaminase shifted the attention to a complex autoimmune pathogenesis and to the increased risk of developing autoimmune disorders in untreated CD. New diagnostic assays, based on molecular technologies, will introduce new changes, with the promise of better defining the spectrum of gluten reactivity and the real burden of gluten related-disorders in the population. Herein, we describe the different periods of CD experience, and further developments for the next celiac age will be proposed.

  3. Introduction and Highlights of the Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K.; Venneri, Samuel L.

    1997-01-01

    Four generations of CAD/CAM systems can be identified, corresponding to changes in both modeling functionality and software architecture. The systems evolved from 2D and wireframes to solid modeling, to parametric/variational modelers to the current simulation-embedded systems. Recent developments have enabled design engineers to perform many of the complex analysis tasks, typically performed by analysis experts. Some of the characteristics of the current and emerging CAD/CAM/CAE systems are described in subsequent presentations. The focus of the workshop is on the potential of CAD/CAM/CAE systems for use in simulating the entire mission and life-cycle of future aerospace systems, and the needed development to realize this potential. First, the major features of the emerging computing, communication and networking environment are outlined; second, the characteristics and design drivers of future aerospace systems are identified; third, the concept of intelligent synthesis environment being planned by NASA, the UVA ACT Center and JPL is presented; and fourth, the objectives and format of the workshop are outlined.

  4. Estimation of vapor concentration in a changing environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Russell E.; Vanderbeek, Richard G.

    2003-08-01

    A key limitation on the use of two-wavelength DIAL or its multi-spectral generalization is the unknown spectral structure of the topographically backscattered lidar signals in the absence of the target materials. Although some of the factors responsible for the background spectral structure can be measured in advance, others, such as the terrain differences are highly variable and usually unknown. For applications to tactical reconnainssance and high-altitude surveillance where the background is continuously changing, the inability to account for the background can seriously degrade sensor performance. This study describes a method for estimating both the spectral dependence of the background as well as the path-integrated concentration, or CL, from the same data set using dual Kalman filtering. The idea is to run parallel filters that estimate the background and CL using input from the other filter. The approach is illustrated on a variety of synthetic data sets and signal injections into background data collected by the U.S. Army WILDCAT sensor at Dugway Proving Ground.

  5. Physiological changes, sleep, and morning mood in an isolated environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraft, Norbert O.; Inoue, Natsuhiko; Mizuno, Koh; Ohshima, Hiroshi; Murai, Tadashi; Sekiguchi, Chiharu; Orasanu, J. M. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous isolation studies have shown increased 24-h urine volumes and body weight gains in subjects. This project examined those and other physiological variables in relationship to sleep motor activity, subjective sleep quality, mood, and complaints during confinement. METHODS: Six male and two female subjects lived for 7 d in the National Space Development Agency of Japan's isolation chamber, which simulates the interior of the Japanese Experiment Module. Each 24-h period included 6 h of sleep, 3 meals, and 20 min of exercise. Each morning, subjects completed Sleep Sensation and Complaint Index questionnaires. Catecholamine and creatinine excretion, urine volume, and body weight were measured on the 2 d before and 2 d after confinement, and sleep motor activity was measured during confinement. RESULTS: Confinement produced no significant change in body weight, urine volume, or questionnaire results. In contrast, epinephrine, norepinephrine, and sleep motor activity exhibited significant differences during confinement (p < 0.05). Higher nocturnal norepinephrine excretion correlated with higher sleep motor activity. CONCLUSION: The 24-h epinephrine values were slightly higher than normal throughout the experiment, but lower than for subjects working under time-stress. High sympathetic activity (as indicated by norepinephrine) may have interfered with sleep.

  6. Respiratory changes due to extreme cold in the Arctic environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandopadhyay, P.; Selvamurthy, W.

    1993-03-01

    Effects of acute exposure and acclimatisation to cold stress on respiratory functions were investigated in healthy tropical Indian men ( n=10). Initial baseline recordings were carried out at Delhi and thereafter serially thrice at the arctic region and once on return to Delhi. For comparison the respiratory functions were also evaluated on Russian migrants (RM; n=7) and Russian natives (RN; n=6). The respiratory functions were evaluated using standard methodology on a Vitalograph: In Indians, there was an initial decrease in lung vital capacity (VC), forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume 1st s (FEV1), peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) and maximum voluntary ventilation (MVV) on acute exposure to cold stress, followed by gradual recovery during acclimatisation for 4 weeks and a further significant improvement after 9 weeks of stay at the arctic region. On return to India all the parameters reached near baseline values except for MVV which remained slightly elevated. RM and RN showed similar respiratory functions at the beginning of acute cold exposure at the arctic zone. RN showed an improvement after 10 weeks of stay whereas RM did not show much change. The respiratory responses during acute cold exposure are similar to those of initial altitude responses.

  7. Interactions of Changing Solar Ultraviolet Radiation and Climate with Light Induced Chemical Reactions in Aquatic Environments

    EPA Science Inventory

    Changes in the ozone layer over the past two decades have resulted in increases in solar ultraviolet radiation that reach the surface of North American aquatic environments. Concurrent changes in atmospheric CO2 are resulting in changes in stratification and precipitation that ar...

  8. Welding in Space Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L.

    1990-01-01

    The potential was discussed for welding in space, its advantages and disadvantages, and what type of programs can benefit from the capability. Review of the various presentations and comments made in the course of the workshop suggests several routes to obtaining a better understanding of how welding processes can be used in NASA's initiatives in space. They are as follows: (1) development of a document identifying well processes and equipment requirements applicable to space and lunar environments; (2) more demonstrations of welding particular hardware which are to be used in the above environments, especially for space repair operations; (3) increased awareness among contractors responsible for building space equipment as to the potential for welding operations in space and on other planetary bodies; and (4) continuation of space welding research projects is important to maintain awareness within NASA that welding in space is viable and beneficial.

  9. Scaling Climate Change Adaptation in the Northern Great Plains through Regional Climate Summaries and Local Qualitative-quantitative Scenario Planning Workshops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    This presentation will describe a project to between ecologists and climate scientists to inform National Park Service managers who are developing scenario planning for their parks and surrounding areas; this effort is advancing scenario methodologies and improving delivery mechanisms and applications to decision-making for National Parks. Climate change is expressed in both regional climatic shifts (e.g., temperature and precipitation changes) and local resource impacts. Resource management in a changing climate is challenging because future climate change and resource responses cannot be precisely predicted. Scenario planning is a tool to assess the range of plausible future conditions. However, selecting, acquiring, synthesizing, and scaling climate information for scenario planning requires significant time and skills. This project, which was recently selected for funding by the NC CSC, has three goals: 1) synthesize climate data into 3-5 distinctly different but plausible climate summaries for the northern Great Plains region; 2) craft summaries of these climate futures that are relevant to local land management units; and 3) apply these local summaries to further develop quantitative climate-resource-management scenarios through participatory workshops and simulation models. We will engage multiple stakeholders in two focal areas within the region: southwestern South Dakota in the vicinity of Badlands National Park, and central North Dakota in the vicinity of Knife River Indian Villages National Historic Site. This effort will increase climate change planning efficiency in the region; promote collaborations across jurisdictions; and develop a prototype for a novel, efficient, and replicable form of scenario planning that could serve additional management units.

  10. The changing rural environment and the relationship between health services and rural development.

    PubMed Central

    Cordes, S M

    1989-01-01

    Author summarizes today's changing rural America and the challenges that health services researchers and policymakers face in relating the rural environment to the problems and possibilities of rural health services delivery. PMID:2917874

  11. The Effects of Curriculum Changes and Teacher Structuring on Pupils' Perceptions of Australian Learning Environments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tisher, Richard P.; Power, Colin N.

    The studies reported in this paper provide evidence that the introduction of self-paced curriculum materials into learning environments where they had not been previously used produces changes in pupils' perceptions of their environments and in the manner in which these function, even when the teachers' beliefs about effective teaching are…

  12. Providing Real-Time Response, State Recency and Temporal Consistency in Databases for Rapidly Changing Environments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Datta, Anindya; Viguier, Igor R.

    1997-01-01

    In environments where the state of the system changes rapidly, such as stock trading, air traffic control, network management, and process control, databases have been proposed as the platform to develop automated control systems. Information in such systems consists of "updates," reporting on the state of the environment and…

  13. Social Technologies in Shipbuilding Workshop

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-05-01

    oriented ( behavior modification ) approaches. Process discussions covered topics ranging from preconditions to undertaking a change project, to start...quality circles, quality of work life, 2) work redesign or sociotechnical systems (autonomous work groups, multi-skilled workers), and 3) behavior ... modification (human performance engineering, performance management). The overall objective of the workshop was to examine both the process and content

  14. Optical Network Testbeds Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Joe Mambretti

    2007-06-01

    technologies. Several years ago, when many of these optical networking research topics were first being investigated, they were the subject of controversial debate. The new techniques challenged many long-held concepts related to architecture and technology. However, today all major networking organizations are transitioning toward infrastructure that incorporates these new concepts. This progress has been assisted through the series of Optical Networking Testbed Workshops (ONT). The first (ONT1) outlined a general framework of key issues and topics and developed a series of recommendations (www.nren.nasa.gov/workshop7). The second (ONT2) developed a common vision of optical network technologies, services, infrastructure, and organizations (www.nren.nasa.gov/workshop8). Processes that allow for a common vision encourage widespread deployment of these types of resources among advanced networking communities. Also, such a shared vision enables key concepts and technologies to migrate from basic research testbeds to wider networking communities. The ONT-3 workshop built on these earlier activities by expanding discussion to include additional considerations of the international interoperability and of greater impact of optical networking technology on networking in general. In accordance with this recognition, the workshop confirmed that future-oriented research and development is indispensable to fundamentally change the current Internet architecture to create a global network incorporating completely new concepts. The workshop also recognized that the first priority to allow for this progress is basic research and development, including international collaborative activities, which are important for the global realization of interoperability of a new generation architecture.

  15. Yeast adapts to a changing stressful environment by evolving cross-protection and anticipatory gene regulation.

    PubMed

    Dhar, Riddhiman; Sägesser, Rudolf; Weikert, Christian; Wagner, Andreas

    2013-03-01

    Organisms can protect themselves against future environmental change. An example is cross-protection, where physiological adaptation against a present environmental stressor can protect an organism against a future stressor. Another is anticipation, where an organism uses information about its present environment to trigger gene expression and other physiological changes adaptive in future environments. "Predictive" abilities like this exist in organisms that have been exposed to periodic changes in environments. It is unknown how readily they can evolve. To answer this question, we carried out laboratory evolution experiments in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Specifically, we exposed three replicate populations of yeast to environments that varied cyclically between two stressors, salt stress and oxidative stress, every 10 generations, for a total of 300 generations. We evolved six replicate control populations in only one of these stressors for the same amount of time. We analyzed fitness changes and genome-scale expression changes in all these evolved populations. Our populations evolved asymmetric cross protection, where oxidative stress protects against salt stress but not vice versa. Gene expression data also suggest the evolution of anticipation and basal gene expression changes that occur uniquely in cyclic environments. Our study shows that highly complex physiological states that are adaptive in future environments can evolve on very short evolutionary time scales.

  16. Aspen Global Change Institute (AGCI) Interdisciplinary Science Workshop: Decadal Climate Prediction; Aspen, CO; June 22-28, 2008

    SciTech Connect

    Katzenberger, John

    2010-03-12

    Decadal prediction lies between seasonal/interannual forecasting and longer-term climate change projections, and focuses on time-evolving regional climate conditions over the next 10?30 yr. Numerous assessments of climate information user needs have identified this time scale as being important to infrastructure planners, water resource managers, and many others. It is central to the information portfolio required to adapt effectively to and through climatic changes.

  17. What future for nuclear power? Workshop report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-31

    A Workshop on this highly controversial subject, organized by the Energy and Environment Programme of the RIIA, was held on 10th November 1997 at Green College, Oxford. The meeting was attended by some forty people from eight countries, coming from the nuclear and electricity generating industry, governments, research organizations, academic institutions, environmental pressure groups and inter-governmental organizations. In addition, subsequent to this Workshop, there have been a number of smaller, more informal discussions on various aspects of the subject. This paper summarizes the main conclusions arising from the Workshop and from these later discussions.

  18. The extent of functional redundancy changes as species’ roles shift in different environments

    PubMed Central

    Fetzer, Ingo; Johst, Karin; Schäwe, Robert; Banitz, Thomas; Harms, Hauke; Chatzinotas, Antonis

    2015-01-01

    Assessing the ecological impacts of environmental change requires knowledge of the relationship between biodiversity and ecosystem functioning. The exact nature of this relationship can differ considerably between ecosystems, with consequences for the efficacy of species diversity as a buffer against environmental change. Using a microbial model system, we show that the relationship can vary depending on environmental conditions. Shapes suggesting functional redundancy in one environment can change, suggesting functional differences in another environment. We find that this change is due to shifting species roles and interactions. Species that are functionally redundant in one environment may become pivotal in another. Thus, caution is advised in drawing conclusions about functional redundancy based on a single environmental situation. It also implies that species richness is important because it provides a pool of species with potentially relevant traits. These species may turn out to be essential performers or partners in new interspecific interactions after environmental change. Therefore, our results challenge the generality of functional redundancy. PMID:26578806

  19. IPHE Infrastructure Workshop Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    2010-02-01

    This proceedings contains information from the IPHE Infrastructure Workshop, a two-day interactive workshop held on February 25-26, 2010, to explore the market implementation needs for hydrogen fueling station development.

  20. Formaldehyde Workshop Agenda

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This is the agenda for the Formaldehyde Workshop hosted by the Office of Research and Development's National Center for Environmental Assessments in cooperation with the IRIS Program. The workshop was held in April 2014

  1. The Environment Changes in the Southwestern Taiwan Since the Last Glacial Maximum Epoch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yung-Jan; Chen, Wen-Shan

    2015-04-01

    We use 31 boreholes to reconstruct the depositional environments in the southwestern Taiwan. Based on the sedimentary structures, it is divided into eight facies associations that is important to reconstruct depositional environment. Based on the depositional environment, sequence stratigraphy and radiocarbon dating data, it can be implied significant environment and shoreline changes. (1) The southwestern Taiwan is characterized by a subaerial environment and formed two incised valleys during the sea-level fall in the last glacial maximum epoch. (2) The shoreline was migrated to the landward and close to the frontal foothills, and the environment changed deepen into tidal flat and lagoon during 18,000-10,000 years ago. (3) The area occurred the deepest environment from shoreface to offshore transition during 8,000-7,000 years ago. (4) The shoreline was retreated to the seaward. The environment changed shallowen into barrier island, lagoon, and coastal plain since 7,000 years ago. This study confirm the decreasing accommodation space in this area result from huge sediment inputs and decreased eustatic sea-level rise, which cause the maximum flooding epoch appear earlier.

  2. Large space-based systems for dealing with global environment change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, Lyle M.

    1992-01-01

    Increased concern over the effects of global climate change and depletion of the ozone layer has resulted in support for the Global Change Research Program and the Mission to Planet Earth. Research to understand Earth system processes is critical, but it falls short of providing ways of mitigating the effects of change. Geoengineering options and alternatives to interactively manage change need to be developed. Space-based concepts for dealing with changes to the environment should be considered in addition to Earth-based actions. 'Mission for Planet Earth' describes those space-based geoengineering solutions that may combine with an international global change program to stabilize the Global environment. Large space systems that may be needed for this response challenge guidance and control engineering and technology. Definition, analysis, demonstration, and preparation of geoengineering technology will provide a basis for policy response if global change consequences are severe.

  3. Biomedical Polar Research Workshop Minutes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    This workshop was conducted to provide a background of NASA and National Science Foundation goals, an overview of previous and current biomedical research, and a discussion about areas of potential future joint activities. The objectives of the joint research were: (1) to develop an understanding of the physiological, psychological, and behavioral alterations and adaptations to extreme environments of the polar regions; (2) to ensure the health, well-being, and performance of humans in these environments; and (3) to promote the application of biomedical research to improve the quality of life in all environments.

  4. Systems thinking for understanding and predicting regional and local climate change effects on human health & well being: workshop process

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA’s Systems Thinking Advisory Team (STAT) was engaged to guide a multi-disciplinary (health officials, modelers, climate change scientists, city planners, ecologists, and architects), multi-agency (EPA, CDC, State and Country officials) team in the use systems thinking, diagram...

  5. Reading Workshop Survival Kit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muschla, Gary Robert

    Intended for reading and classroom teachers, this book, organized in two parts, is a complete, step-by-step guide to setting up and running a reading workshop for grades 5-12 where reading is "the" priority. Part 1, "Management of the Reading Workshop," shows how to create a reading workshop, offers specific tools and…

  6. Thematic Issue: Workshops.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirby, Michael, Ed.

    1978-01-01

    The articles in this publication trace the historical development of the theatre workshop, explain the relationship between the workshop and experimental theatre, and analyze the ways in which current drama workshops teach and develop the dramatic skills of the participants. The topics discussed include the special skills, production-oriented, and…

  7. ICP-MS Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Carman, April J.; Eiden, Gregory C.

    2014-11-01

    This is a short document that explains the materials that will be transmitted to LLNL and DNN HQ regarding the ICP-MS Workshop held at PNNL June 17-19th. The goal of the information is to pass on to LLNL information regarding the planning and preparations for the Workshop at PNNL in preparation of the SIMS workshop at LLNL.

  8. Adaptation to a Changing Environment by Modifications in Organizational Decision Unit Structure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, Robert B.

    This paper presents a model of how organizations adapt to the uncertainty in their environment by making changes in the way they structure themselves for decisionmaking. The research reported here indicates that it is not just a single change in organizational structure, but rather a shifting between a more rigid and more flexible decision…

  9. One Program's Journey: Using the Change Process To Implement Service in Natural Environments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brault, Linda M. J.; Ashley, Melinda; Gallo, Jan

    2001-01-01

    This article profiles the Hope Infant Family Support Program in San Diego, California, and its shift to providing educational services in the natural environment. How the program managed this complex change process is discussed, including the development of a vision statement, incentives, skill development, resource allocation changes, and action…

  10. Obesity and the built environment: changes in environmental cues cause energy imbalances.

    PubMed

    Cohen, D A

    2008-12-01

    The past 30 years have seen dramatic changes in the food and physical activity environments, both of which contribute to the changes in human behavior that could explain obesity. This paper reviews documented changes in the food environment, changes in the physical activity environment and the mechanisms through which people respond to these environments, often without conscious awareness or control. The most important environmental changes have been increases in food accessibility, food salience and decreases in the cost of food. The increases in food marketing and advertising create food cues that artificially stimulate people to feel hungry. The existence of a metabolic pathway that allows excess energy to be stored as fat suggests that people were designed to overeat. Many internal mechanisms favor neurophysiologic responses to food cues that result in overconsumption. External cues, such as food abundance, food variety and food novelty, cause people to override internal signals of satiety. Other factors, such as conditioning and priming, tie food to other desirable outcomes, and thus increase the frequency that hunger is stimulated by environmental cues. People's natural response to the environmental cues are colored by framing, and judgments are flawed and biased depending on how information is presented. People lack insight into how the food environment affects them, and subsequently are unable to change the factors that are responsible for excessive energy consumption. Understanding the causal pathway for overconsumption will be necessary to interrupt the mechanisms that lead to obesity.

  11. Learning Is Change: Creating an Environment for Sustainable Organizational Change in Continuing and Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, Christie

    2014-01-01

    This article explores the ways in which learning itself is a form of organizational change and, as such, supports organizational readiness for change. The study considers a continuing education unit within a major Canadian university that managed to transform its decentralized and independent student records and administration system (student…

  12. Photosynthesis, environmental change, and plant adaptation: Research topics in plant molecular ecology. Summary report of a workshop

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-01

    As we approach the 21st Century, it is becoming increasingly clear that human activities, primarily related to energy extraction and use, will lead to marked environmental changes at the local, regional, and global levels. The realized and the potential photosynthetic performance of plants is determined by a combination of intrinsic genetic information and extrinsic environmental factors, especially climate. It is essential that the effects of environmental changes on the photosynthetic competence of individual species, communities, and ecosystems be accurately assessed. From October 24 to 26, 1993, a group of scientists specializing in various aspects of plant science met to discuss how our predictive capabilities could be improved by developing a more rational, mechanistic approach to relating photosynthetic processes to environmental factors. A consensus emerged that achieving this goal requires multidisciplinary research efforts that combine tools and techniques of genetics, molecular biology, biophysics, biochemistry, and physiology to understand the principles, mechanisms, and limitations of evolutional adaptation and physiological acclimation of photosynthetic processes. Many of these basic tools and techniques, often developed in other fields of science, already are available but have not been applied in a coherent, coordinated fashion to ecological research. The efforts of this research program are related to the broader efforts to develop more realistic prognostic models to forecast climate change that include photosynthetic responses and feedbacks at the regional and ecosystem levels.

  13. MIT-NASA Workshop: Transformational Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mankins, J. C. (Editor); Christensen, C. B.; Gresham, E. C.; Simmons, A.; Mullins, C. A.

    2005-01-01

    As a space faring nation, we are at a critical juncture in the evolution of space exploration. NASA has announced its Vision for Space Exploration, a vision of returning humans to the Moon, sending robots and eventually humans to Mars, and exploring the outer solar system via automated spacecraft. However, mission concepts have become increasingly complex, with the potential to yield a wealth of scientific knowledge. Meanwhile, there are significant resource challenges to be met. Launch costs remain a barrier to routine space flight; the ever-changing fiscal and political environments can wreak havoc on mission planning; and technologies are constantly improving, and systems that were state of the art when a program began can quickly become outmoded before a mission is even launched. This Conference Publication describes the workshop and featured presentations by world-class experts presenting leading-edge technologies and applications in the areas of power and propulsion; communications; automation, robotics, computing, and intelligent systems; and transformational techniques for space activities. Workshops such as this one provide an excellent medium for capturing the broadest possible array of insights and expertise, learning from researchers in universities, national laboratories, NASA field Centers, and industry to help better our future in space.

  14. Applied antineutrino physics workshop.

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, James C.

    2008-01-01

    This workshop is the fourth one of a series that includes the Neutrino Geophysics Conference at Honolulu, Hawaii, which I attended in 2005. This workshop was organized by the Astro-Particle and Cosmology laboratory in the recently opened Condoret building of the University of Paris. More information, including copies of the presentations, on the workshop is available on the website: www.apc.univ-paris7.fr/AAP2007/. The workshop aims at opening neutrino physics to various fields such that it can be applied in geosciences, nuclear industry (reactor and spent fuel monitoring) and non-proliferation. The workshop was attended by over 60 people from Europe, USA, Asia and Brazil. The meeting was also attended by representatives of the Comprehensive nuclear-Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The workshop also included a workshop dinner on board of a river boat sailing the Seine river.

  15. Reinforcement learning and counterfactual reasoning explain adaptive behavior in a changing environment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yunfeng; Paik, Jaehyon; Pirolli, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Animals routinely adapt to changes in the environment in order to survive. Though reinforcement learning may play a role in such adaptation, it is not clear that it is the only mechanism involved, as it is not well suited to producing rapid, relatively immediate changes in strategies in response to environmental changes. This research proposes that counterfactual reasoning might be an additional mechanism that facilitates change detection. An experiment is conducted in which a task state changes over time and the participants had to detect the changes in order to perform well and gain monetary rewards. A cognitive model is constructed that incorporates reinforcement learning with counterfactual reasoning to help quickly adjust the utility of task strategies in response to changes. The results show that the model can accurately explain human data and that counterfactual reasoning is key to reproducing the various effects observed in this change detection paradigm.

  16. Dousing our inflammatory environment(s): is personal carbon trading an option for reducing obesity--and climate change?

    PubMed

    Egger, G

    2008-09-01

    Obesity and climate change are two problems currently challenging humanity. Although apparently unrelated, an epidemiological approach to both shows a similar environmental aetiology, based in modern human lifestyles and their driving economic forces. One way of analysing this is through inflammation (defined as '. . . a disturbance of function following insult or injury') of both the internal (biological) and external (ecological) environments. Chronic, low-grade, systemic inflammation has recently been shown to accompany obesity, as well as a range of biological pathologies associated with obesity (diabetes, heart disease, some cancers, etc.). This is influenced by the body's inability to soak up excess glucose as a result of insulin resistance. In a broader sense, inflammation is a metaphor for ecological 'pathologies', manifest particularly in unnatural disturbances like climate change, ocean acidity, rising temperatures and species extinction, associated with the inability of the world's environmental 'sinks' to soak up carbon dioxide ('carbon resistance'?). The use of such a metaphorical analysis opens the possibilities for dealing with two interdisciplinary problems simultaneously. Strategies for managing climate change, including personal carbon trading, could provide a 'stealth intervention' for reducing population levels of obesity by increasing personal energy expenditure and decreasing energy-dense food intake, as well as reducing the carbon emissions causing climate change.

  17. Complex Genotype by Environment interactions and changing genetic architectures across thermal environments in the Australian field cricket, Teleogryllus oceanicus

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Biologists studying adaptation under sexual selection have spent considerable effort assessing the relative importance of two groups of models, which hinge on the idea that females gain indirect benefits via mate discrimination. These are the good genes and genetic compatibility models. Quantitative genetic studies have advanced our understanding of these models by enabling assessment of whether the genetic architectures underlying focal phenotypes are congruent with either model. In this context, good genes models require underlying additive genetic variance, while compatibility models require non-additive variance. Currently, we know very little about how the expression of genotypes comprised of distinct parental haplotypes, or how levels and types of genetic variance underlying key phenotypes, change across environments. Such knowledge is important, however, because genotype-environment interactions can have major implications on the potential for evolutionary responses to selection. Results We used a full diallel breeding design to screen for complex genotype-environment interactions, and genetic architectures underlying key morphological traits, across two thermal environments (the lab standard 27°C, and the cooler 23°C) in the Australian field cricket, Teleogryllus oceanicus. In males, complex three-way interactions between sire and dam parental haplotypes and the rearing environment accounted for up to 23 per cent of the scaled phenotypic variance in the traits we measured (body mass, pronotum width and testes mass), and each trait harboured significant additive genetic variance in the standard temperature (27°C) only. In females, these three-way interactions were less important, with interactions between the paternal haplotype and rearing environment accounting for about ten per cent of the phenotypic variance (in body mass, pronotum width and ovary mass). Of the female traits measured, only ovary mass for crickets reared at the cooler

  18. Population transcriptomics uncovers the regulation of gene expression variation in adaptation to changing environment

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qin; Zhu, Caiyun; Fan, Yangyang; Song, Zhihong; Xing, Shilai; Liu, Wei; Yan, Juan; Sang, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Expression variation plays an important role in plant adaptation, but little is known about the factors impacting the expression variation when population adapts to changing environment. We used RNA-seq data from 80 individuals in 14 Miscanthus lutarioriparius populations, which were transplanted into a harsh environment from native habitat, to investigate the expression level, expression diversity and genetic diversity for genes expressed in both environments. The expression level of genes with lower expression level or without SNP tended to be more changeable in new environment, which suggested highly expressed genes experienced stronger purifying selection than those at lower level. Low proportion of genes with population effect confirmed the weak population structure and frequent gene flow in these populations. Meanwhile, the number of genes with environment effect was the most frequent compared with that with population effect. Our results showed that environment and genetic diversity were the main factors determining gene expression variation in population. This study could facilitate understanding the mechanisms of global gene expression variation when plant population adapts to changing environment. PMID:27150248

  19. Proceedings of the 1989 ADAM Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chipperfield, Alan

    ADAM is now a major software project; it provides a fully integrated environment for both data reduction and data acquisition. It is being used in Hawaii, Australia and the Canary Islands, as well as the UK, and has been adopted by Starlink as the environment in which Starlink data reduction software should run. One of the most remarkable things about ADAM is that it has been developed as a co-operative effort between groups that are spread across the world. Although the initial system came out of RGO, and ROE provided by far the major effort in designing and implementing the VAX version, various parts of what is now regarded as 'ADAM' have also come from other establishments. Co-ordinating a project being developed in this way is not an easy job, but the somewhat varied parentage of ADAM - although sometimes an administrative nightmare - is also one of its strengths; it is not a system developed in one place to serve the specific needs of that one place. One way in which this development is co-ordinated is by a series of workshops. These have taken place at about 18 month intervals since the first one in late 1985. The workshops are attended by people actively developing and/or making extensive use of ADAM, and provide a forum for detailed discussion of the problems in the current system and plans for its extension. The 1989 ADAM Workshop was held at Cosener's House, Abingdon from 3rd to 7th July 1989. An 'Open Meeting' was held on Friday 30th June at RAL to enable members of the Starlink community to provide input to the Workshop discussions. Before the previous workshop, in Hawaii, a trend had started to emerge for different establishments to plug the gaps in ADAM (which at the time was missing a number of important facilities) with local solutions. The Hawaii Workshop consolidated these local extensions, adopting some and rejecting others. As a result, ADAM, as reviewed by this third workshop, was a much more complete and uniform system, and it was possible to

  20. The ADAM workshops and meeting summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chipperfield, Alan J.

    1990-01-01

    ADAM is now a major software project; it provides a fully integrated environment for both data reduction and data acquisition. It is being used in Hawaii, Australia and the Canary Islands, as well as the UK, and has been adopted by Starlink as the environment in which Starlink data reduction software should run. One of the most remarkable things about ADAM is that it has been developed as a co-operative effort between groups that are spread across the world. Although the initial system came out of RGO, and ROE provided by far the major effort in designing and implementing the VAX version, various parts of what is now regarded as 'ADAM' have also come from other establishments. Co-ordinating a project being developed in this way is not an easy job, but the somewhat varied parentage of ADAM - although sometimes an administrative nightmare - is also one of its strengths; it is not a system developed in one place to serve the specific needs of that one place. One way in which this development is co-ordinated is by a series of workshops. These have taken place at about 18 month intervals since the first one in late 1985. The workshops are attended by people actively developing and/or making extensive use of ADAM, and provide a forum for detailed discussion of the problems in the current system and plans for its extension. The 1989 ADAM Workshop was held at Cosener's House, Abingdon from 3rd to 7th July 1989. An 'Open Meeting' was held on Friday 30th June at RAL to enable members of the Starlink community to provide input to the Workshop discussions. Before the previous workshop, in Hawaii, a trend had started to emerge for different establishments to plug the gaps in ADAM (which at the time was missing a number of important facilities) with local solutions. The Hawaii Workshop consolidated these local extensions, adopting some and rejecting others. As a result, ADAM, as reviewed by this third workshop, was a much more complete and uniform system, and it was possible to

  1. Changing surgical education strategies in an environment of changing health care delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Dunnington, G L; DaRosa, D A

    1994-01-01

    Emerging changes in health care delivery will have a significant impact on the structure of surgical education in academic departments of surgery. Based on some assumptions as to the probable nature of the final product of this reform, this article encourages a proactive stance by surgical educators to anticipate changes and move toward restructuring in areas of curricular content, the teaching process, performance evaluation strategies, and faculty infrastructure of the academic department. Curriculum changes must bridge the gap between public health and medicine and continue the aggressive trend toward teaching in the outpatient setting. Surgical educators must adapt to evolving computer and instructional technology that will make multimedia presentations, distance education, teleconferencing, hypermedia, and virtual reality commonplace in the teaching setting. Increased emphasis on accountability and accreditation will require stringent criteria in performance and program evaluation methodology. The academic infrastructure will need to adapt to the changing goal of training more general surgeons and fewer specialists and yet maintain the fundamental responsibility of an academic surgeon for mentoring the medical student and surgical resident.

  2. Does Changing School Environments Change the Academic Performance of Minority Students? Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frelich, Alan; Anderson, Barry D.

    This paper describes a study that was conducted in the St. Louis elementary schools to examine the effects of environmental changes accompanying the relocation of black students to new schools. Students' academic gain in the year prior to relocation was compared with their growth rate in the year following relocation. The study produced five major…

  3. Changing the home nutrition environment: effects of a nutrition and media literacy pilot intervention.

    PubMed

    Evans, Alexandra E; Dave, Jayna; Tanner, Andrea; Duhe, Sonya; Condrasky, Margaret; Wilson, Dawn; Griffin, Sarah; Palmer, Meredith; Evans, Martin

    2006-01-01

    The specific aim for this pilot study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a nutrition and media literacy intervention targeting elementary students and their parents. The purpose of the intervention was to increase child fruit and vegetables (FV) consumption and change the home nutrition environment (measured with FV availability and accessibility and parental social support). During the intervention, students learned about nutrition, the role media plays in shaping values concerning nutrition, and developed a media campaign for their parents. A quasi-experimental research design was used to evaluate the effectiveness of the intervention. The media intervention was effective in changing the home environment.

  4. Molecular and cellular bases of adaptation to a changing environment in microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Bleuven, Clara

    2016-01-01

    Environmental heterogeneity constitutes an evolutionary challenge for organisms. While evolutionary dynamics under variable conditions has been explored for decades, we still know relatively little about the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved. It is of paramount importance to examine these molecular bases because they may play an important role in shaping the course of evolution. In this review, we examine the diversity of adaptive mechanisms in the face of environmental changes. We exploit the recent literature on microbial systems because those have benefited the most from the recent emergence of genetic engineering and experimental evolution followed by genome sequencing. We identify four emerging trends: (i) an adaptive molecular change in a pathway often results in fitness trade-off in alternative environments but the effects are dependent on a mutation's genetic background; (ii) adaptive changes often modify transcriptional and signalling pathways; (iii) several adaptive changes may occur within the same molecular pathway but be associated with pleiotropy of different signs across environments; (iv) because of their large associated costs, macromolecular changes such as gene amplification and aneuploidy may be a rapid mechanism of adaptation in the short-term only. The course of adaptation in a variable environment, therefore, depends on the complexity of the environment but also on the molecular relationships among the genes involved and between the genes and the phenotypes under selection. PMID:27798299

  5. Molecular and cellular bases of adaptation to a changing environment in microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Bleuven, Clara; Landry, Christian R

    2016-10-26

    Environmental heterogeneity constitutes an evolutionary challenge for organisms. While evolutionary dynamics under variable conditions has been explored for decades, we still know relatively little about the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved. It is of paramount importance to examine these molecular bases because they may play an important role in shaping the course of evolution. In this review, we examine the diversity of adaptive mechanisms in the face of environmental changes. We exploit the recent literature on microbial systems because those have benefited the most from the recent emergence of genetic engineering and experimental evolution followed by genome sequencing. We identify four emerging trends: (i) an adaptive molecular change in a pathway often results in fitness trade-off in alternative environments but the effects are dependent on a mutation's genetic background; (ii) adaptive changes often modify transcriptional and signalling pathways; (iii) several adaptive changes may occur within the same molecular pathway but be associated with pleiotropy of different signs across environments; (iv) because of their large associated costs, macromolecular changes such as gene amplification and aneuploidy may be a rapid mechanism of adaptation in the short-term only. The course of adaptation in a variable environment, therefore, depends on the complexity of the environment but also on the molecular relationships among the genes involved and between the genes and the phenotypes under selection.

  6. Mars Telescopic Observations Workshop II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sprague, A. L. (Editor); Bell, J. F., III (Editor)

    1997-01-01

    Mars Telescopic Observations Workshop E convened in Tucson, Arizona, in October 1997 by popular demand slightly over two years following the first successful Mars Telescopic Observations Workshop, held in Ithaca, New York, in August 1995. Experts on Mars from the United Kingdom, Japan, Germany, and the United States were present. Twenty-eight oral presentations were made and generous time allotted for useful discussions among participants. The goals of the workshop were to (1) summarize active groundbased observing programs and evaluate them in the context of current and future space missions to Mars, (2) discuss new technologies and instrumentation in the context of changing emphasis of observations and theory useful for groundbased observing, and (3) more fully understand capabilities of current and planned Mars missions to better judge which groundbased observations are and will continue to be of importance to our overall Mars program. In addition, the exciting new discoveries presented from the Pathfinder experiments and the progress report from the Mars Global Surveyor infused the participants with satisfaction for the successes achieved in the early stages of these missions. Just as exciting was the enthusiasm for new groundbased programs designed to address new challenges resulting from mission science results. We would like to thank the National Aeronautics and Space Administration as well as Dr. David Black, director of the Lunar and Planetary Institute, and the staff of the Institute's Publications and Program Services Department for providing logistical, administrative, and publication support services for this workshop.

  7. Fifth International Microgravity Combustion Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sacksteder, Kurt (Compiler)

    1999-01-01

    This conference proceedings document is a compilation of 120 papers presented orally or as poster displays to the Fifth International Microgravity Combustion Workshop held in Cleveland, Ohio on May 18-20, 1999. The purpose of the workshop is to present and exchange research results from theoretical and experimental work in combustion science using the reduced-gravity environment as a research tool. The results are contributed by researchers funded by NASA throughout the United States at universities, industry and government research agencies, and by researchers from at least eight international partner countries that are also participating in the microgravity combustion science research discipline. These research results are intended for use by public and private sector organizations for academic purposes, for the development of technologies needed for the Human Exploration and Development of Space, and to improve Earth-bound combustion and fire-safety related technologies.

  8. Sixth International Microgravity Combustion Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sacksteder, Kurt (Compiler)

    2001-01-01

    This conference proceedings document is a compilation of papers presented orally or as poster displays to the Sixth International Microgravity Combustion Workshop held in Cleveland, Ohio on May 22-24, 2001. The purpose of the workshop is to present and exchange research results from theoretical and experimental work in combustion science using the reduced-gravity environment as a research tool. The results are contributed by researchers funded by NASA throughout the United States at universities, industry and government research agencies, and by researchers from international partner countries that are also participating in the microgravity combustion science research discipline. These research results are intended for use by public and private sector organizations for academic purposes, for the development of technologies needed for Human Exploration and Development of Space, and to improve Earth-bound combustion and fire-safety related technologies.

  9. National and international organization of phenology as a tool for science, management and education in a changing environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weltzin, J. F.; National Coordinating Office Of Usa National Phenology Network

    2010-12-01

    on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS) Land Product Validation (LPV) Phenology Focus Group. Partnerships with a variety of other organizations benefit from recent development and distribution of standard operating procedures (SOPs) and web services with data input and output functions. USA-NPN facilitates research and the development of decision support tools through provision of communication, coordination and collaboration in a data-rich environment. Education and outreach are facilitated by new on-line training materials, in-person and distance workshops, and a strategic education plan in development. Finally, USA-NPN is collaborating with other national phenology networks around the globe to create an international community of practice for phenology within the collaborative infrastructure created by Group on Earth Observations (GEO).

  10. NASA Laser Light Scattering Advanced Technology Development Workshop, 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, William V. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    The major objective of the workshop was to explore the capabilities of existing and prospective laser light scattering hardware and to assess user requirements and needs for a laser light scattering instrument in a reduced gravity environment. The workshop addressed experimental needs and stressed hardware development.

  11. Life-Writing: Writing Workshops and Outreach Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillis, Candida; Wagner, Linda

    The ongoing project described in this paper seeks to develop an economical, effective means through which communities can establish writing workshops that will provide the aged with constructive environments for life review. It is aimed at identifying the methods and materials useful in a workshop setting for stimulating reminiscence and personal…

  12. 76 FR 58281 - Magnetic Resonance Imaging Safety; Public Workshop

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-20

    ... Imaging (MRI) Safety Public Workshop.'' The purpose of the public workshop is to discuss factors affecting the safe use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and approaches to mitigate risks. The overall goal is to discuss strategies to minimize patient and staff risk in the MRI environment. DATES: The...

  13. Intellectual Property and Copyright: Protecting Educational Interests and Managing Changing Environments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruwelheide, Janis H.

    The electronic environment is currently forcing educators at all levels to revisit issues concerning intellectual property. Quick availability of information and data through the Internet has changed the way the general public views information since it seems to be in endless supply from any computer on any individual desktop. This paper presents…

  14. Climate Change Education: Quantitatively Assessing the Impact of a Botanical Garden as an Informal Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sellmann, Daniela; Bogner, Franz X.

    2013-01-01

    Although informal learning environments have been studied extensively, ours is one of the first studies to quantitatively assess the impact of learning in botanical gardens on students' cognitive achievement. We observed a group of 10th graders participating in a one-day educational intervention on climate change implemented in a botanical garden.…

  15. Environment for Innovation: Exploring Associations with Individual Disposition toward Change, Organizational Conflict, Justice and Trust

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinert, Daniel James

    2013-01-01

    The environment in higher education and healthcare is rapidly changing. Adaptation through innovation is critical for organizations responsible for the education of healthcare providers. This study examined the climate for innovation at chiropractic colleges and health sciences universities offering a doctor of chiropractic program. The…

  16. Nursing Workload and the Changing Health Care Environment: A Review of the Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neill, Denise

    2011-01-01

    Changes in the health care environment have impacted nursing workload, quality of care, and patient safety. Traditional nursing workload measures do not guarantee efficiency, nor do they adequately capture the complexity of nursing workload. Review of the literature indicates nurses perceive the quality of their work has diminished. Research has…

  17. Understanding Students' Changing Perceptions of Their Learning Environments in Four FE Colleges in England

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Postlethwaite, Keith; Maull, Wendy

    2007-01-01

    As part of the Transforming Learning Cultures in Further Education (TLC) project, questionnaire data were collected from three consecutive cohorts of students in a wide range of learning sites, initially four in each of four Further Education (FE) colleges in England. This paper focuses on changes in perceived learning environment as mapped by…

  18. Changes in Primary School Children's Behaviour, Knowledge, Attitudes, and Environments Related to Nutrition and Physical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Magarey, Anthea Margaret; Pettman, Tahna Lee; Mastersson, Nadia

    2013-01-01

    Rigorous evaluation of large-scale community-based obesity interventions can provide important guidance to policy and decision makers. The eat well be active (ewba) Community Programs, a five-year multilevel, multistrategy community-based obesity intervention targeting children in a range of settings, was delivered in two communities. A comprehensive mixed-methods evaluation using a quasiexperimental design with nonmatched comparison communities was undertaken. This paper describes the changes in primary school children's attitudes, behaviours, knowledge, and environments associated with healthy eating and physical activity, based on data from six questionnaires completed pre- and postintervention by students, parents, and school representatives. As self-reported by students in years from five to seven there were few significant improvements over time in healthy eating and physical activity behaviours, attitudes, knowledge, and perceived environments, and there were few changes in the home environment (parent report). Overall there were considerably more improvements in intervention compared with comparison schools affecting all environmental areas, namely, policy, physical, financial, and sociocultural, in addition to improvements in teacher skill and knowledge. These improvements in children's learning environments are important and likely to be sustainable as they reflect a change of school culture. More sensitive evaluation tools may detect behaviour changes. PMID:24555153

  19. E. coli DH5α cell response to a sudden change in microfluidic chemical environment.

    PubMed

    Murugesan, Nithya; Panda, Tapobrata; Das, Sarit K

    2015-01-01

    Motile bacteria respond to changing chemical environment by moving towards or away from a particular location. Bacterial migration under chemical gradient is one of the most studied areas in biomedical field. In this work we looked into how bacterial cells respond to sudden change in the microfluidic chemical environment. E. coli DH5α cells were subjected to an attractant gradient (0.1 mM sorbitol--attractant to E. coli cells) and after 120 min the same cells were exposed to an inhibitor (0.1 mM NiSO4) gradient in the same microfluidic device. Our studies revealed that when the E. coli DH5α cells were exposed to 0.1 mM sorbitol, they showed faster chemotaxis towards the attractant (0.1 mM sorbitol) and achieved steady state by 60 min. When we replaced 0.1 mM sorbitol with 0.1 mM NiSO4 in the device we found that that the E. coli DH5α cells started responding to change in chemical environment within 10 min and achieved steady state at the end of 60 min. This shows that the bacterial cells respond to change in local chemical environment is within few minutes.

  20. Evaluation of the Career Planning Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, L.W.

    1986-04-01

    People who apply to participate in this workshop appear to be genuinely interested in personal development. Participants reported that they were not very happy with several aspects of their jobs prior to the workshop. Predominant personality characteristics of the participants were shyness, communication anxiety, reserved style, cautiousness, moodiness, energetic, hard-working and analytical minded. Participants were favorably impressed with the workshop. One of the most potent ways that the workshop impacts participants is through improved self understanding and enhanced self-esteem. Many people did change jobs following the workshop. Of those who did not actually change jobs, almost half reported that they had modified their present job to achieve a better person-job fit. Participants did not report many changes in their routine behavior although they kept the supervisor more informed of their job activity. Current job satisfaction is good among the participants. Although the workshop is fairly expensive to provide, the long range benefits in terms of enhanced levels of performance far outweigh the costs.

  1. Sacred Architecture as a Narrative for Defining Religion, Culture and Social and Educational Change: A Proposal for a Series of Workshops for Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shields, James J.

    Sacred architecture provides a compelling narrative for explaining the ways religious belief and practice contribute to the construction of self identity and of lived cultural values in all societies. This paper proposes a collaborative and ethnographic research workshop series focused on the intersections among culture, religious meaning and…

  2. Forum for Change. An Articulation Workshop for Secondary and Post-Secondary Educators to Promote Equal Access in Vocational Education (Harlingen, Texas, February 17, 1984).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Service Center Region 2, Corpus Christi, TX.

    This volume contains materials for use in conducting an articulation workshop to train secondary and postsecondary educators to promote equal access to vocational education. Addressed in the individual sections of the guide are the following topics: inequalities in the workplace, the role of articulation in promoting equal access, outreach, career…

  3. Climate Change and Our Environment: The Effect on Respiratory and Allergic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Charles S.; Alexis, Neil E.; Bernstein, Jonathan A.; Cohn, John R.; Demain, Jeffrey G.; Horner, Elliott; Levetin, Estelle; Nel, Andre; Phipatanakul, Wanda

    2013-01-01

    Climate change is a constant and ongoing process. It is postulated that human activities have reached a point at which we are producing global climate change. This article provides suggestions to help the allergist/environmental physician integrate recommendations about improvements in outdoor and indoor air quality and the likely response to predicted alterations in the earth’s environment into their patient’s treatment plan. Many changes that affect respiratory disease are anticipated. Examples of responses to climate change include energy reduction retrofits in homes that could potentially affect exposure to allergens and irritants, more hot sunny days that increase ozone-related difficulties, and rises in sea level or altered rainfall patterns that increase exposure to damp indoor environments. Climate changes can also affect ecosystems, manifested as the appearance of stinging and biting arthropods in new areas. Higher ambient carbon dioxide concentrations, warmer temperatures, and changes in floristic zones could potentially increase exposure to ragweed and other outdoor allergens, whereas green practices such as composting can increase allergen and irritant exposure. Finally, increased energy costs may result in urban crowding and human source pollution, leading to changes in patterns of infectious respiratory illnesses. Improved governmental controls on airborne pollutants could lead to cleaner air and reduced respiratory diseases but will meet strong opposition because of their effect on business productivity. The allergy community must therefore adapt, as physician and research scientists always have, by anticipating the needs of patients and by adopting practices and research methods to meet changing environmental conditions. PMID:23687635

  4. Tandem mirror theory workshop

    SciTech Connect

    1981-05-01

    The workshop was divided into three sections which were constituted according to subject matter: RF Heating, MHD Equilibrium and Stability, and Transport and Microstability. An overview from Livermore's point of view was given at the beginning of each session. Each session was assigned a secretary to take notes. These notes have been used in preparing this report on the workshop. The report includes the activities, conclusions, and recommendations of the workshop.

  5. Lunar Commercialization Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Gary L.

    2008-01-01

    This slide presentation describes the goals and rules of the workshop on Lunar Commercialization. The goal of the workshop is to explore the viability of using public-private partnerships to open the new space frontier. The bulk of the workshop was a team competition to create a innovative business plan for the commercialization of the moon. The public private partnership concept is reviewed, and the open architecture as an infrastructure for potential external cooperation. Some possible lunar commercialization elements are reviewed.

  6. Solar education project workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.B.

    1980-10-31

    A summary of proceedings of the Solar Education Project Workshop is presented. The workshop had as its focus the dissemination of curriculum materials developed by the Solar Energy Project of the New York State Department of Education under the sponsorship of the US Department of Energy. It includes, in addition to presentations by speakers and workshop leaders, specific comments from participants regarding materials available and energy-related activities underway in their respective states and suggested strategies from them for ongoing dissemination efforts.

  7. Workshop on Early Mars: How Warm and How Wet?, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Squyres, S. (Editor); Kasting, J. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    This volume contains papers that have been accepted for presentation at the Workshop on Early Mars: How Warm and How Wet?, 26-28 Jul. 1993, in Breckenridge, CO. The following topics are covered: the Martian water cycle; Martian paleoclimatology; CO2/CH4 atmosphere on early Mars; Noachian hydrology; early Martian environment; Martian weathering; nitrogen isotope ratios; CO2 evolution on Mars; and climate change.

  8. CARE 3 User's Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    A user's workshop for CARE 3, a reliability assessment tool designed and developed especially for the evaluation of high reliability fault tolerant digital systems, was held at NASA Langley Research Center on October 6 to 7, 1987. The main purpose of the workshop was to assess the evolutionary status of CARE 3. The activities of the workshop are documented and papers are included by user's of CARE 3 and NASA. Features and limitations of CARE 3 and comparisons to other tools are presented. The conclusions to a workshop questionaire are also discussed.

  9. Thermal Barrier Coating Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brindley, W. J. (Compiler); Lee, W. Y. (Compiler); Goedjen, J. G. (Compiler); Dapkunas, S. J. (Compiler)

    1995-01-01

    This document contains the agenda and presentation abstracts for the Thermal Barrier Coating Workshop, sponsored by NASA, DOE, and NIST. The workshop covered thermal barrier coating (TBC) issues related to applications, processing, properties, and modeling. The intent of the workshop was to highlight the state of knowledge on TBC's and to identify critical gaps in knowledge that may hinder TBC use in advanced applications. The workshop goals were achieved through presentations by 22 speakers representing industry, academia, and government as well as through extensive discussion periods.

  10. Fermilab Cryogenic Workshop Report

    SciTech Connect

    Hassenzahl, W. V.

    1980-06-18

    A workshop to discuss recent pressing problems experienced in the operation of helium refrigerators at the national laboratories was proposed by DOE. Early in 1980 it was decided that the workshop should be held at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab). The reasoning behind the selection of Fermilab included the proposed initial tests of the Central Liquefier, the recently experienced problems with refrigeration systems at Fermilab, and the fact that a previous workshop had been held at the Brookhaven National Laboratory, which, at present, would be the other logical choice for the workshop.

  11. Alternate fusion fuels workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-06-01

    The workshop was organized to focus on a specific confinement scheme: the tokamak. The workshop was divided into two parts: systems and physics. The topics discussed in the systems session were narrowly focused on systems and engineering considerations in the tokamak geometry. The workshop participants reviewed the status of system studies, trade-offs between d-t and d-d based reactors and engineering problems associated with the design of a high-temperature, high-field reactor utilizing advanced fuels. In the physics session issues were discussed dealing with high-beta stability, synchrotron losses and transport in alternate fuel systems. The agenda for the workshop is attached.

  12. Experiments with digital organisms on the origin and maintenance of sex in changing environments.

    PubMed

    Misevic, Dusan; Ofria, Charles; Lenski, Richard E

    2010-01-01

    Many theories have been proposed to explain the evolution of sex, but the question remains unsettled owing to a paucity of compelling empirical tests. The crux of the problem is to understand the prevalence of sexual reproduction in the natural world, despite obvious costs relative to asexual reproduction. Here we perform experiments with digital organisms (evolving computer programs) to test the hypothesis that sexual reproduction is advantageous in changing environments. We varied the frequency and magnitude of environmental change, while the digital organisms could evolve their mode of reproduction as well as the traits affecting their fitness (reproductive rate) under the various conditions. Sex became the dominant mode of reproduction only when the environment changed rapidly and substantially (with particular functions changing from maladaptive to adaptive and vice versa). Even under these conditions, it was easier to maintain sexual reproduction than for sex to invade a formerly asexual population, although sometimes sex did invade and spread despite the obstacles to becoming established. Several diverse properties of the ancestral genomes, including epistasis and modularity, had no effect on the subsequent evolution of reproductive mode. Our study provides some limited support for the importance of changing environments to the evolution of sex, while also reinforcing the difficulty of evolving and maintaining sexual reproduction.

  13. Improving Productivity in Dietary Departments Workshop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGhee, Barbara

    Instructional materials are provided for a workshop to enable participants to explain how productivity can be achieved through the practical use of performance standards and behavior changes. Another purpose is to enable participants to make changes by using methods that involve employees and thereby minimize employee resistance to change.…

  14. 11th National Conference on Science, Policy, and the Environment: Our Changing Oceans

    SciTech Connect

    Peter Saundry

    2012-04-17

    On January 19-21, 2011, The National Council for Science and the Environment (NCSE) successfully convened its 11th National Conference on Science, Policy and the Environment: Our Changing Oceans in Washington, DC at the Ronald Reagan Building and International Trade Center. Over 1,247 participants attended the conference, representing federal, state and local governments, university and colleges across the US, civil society organizations, the business community, and international entities. In addition, the conference was webcast to an audience across several states. The conference provided a forum to examine the profound changes our ocean will undergo over the next 25-50 years and share various perspectives on the new research, tools, and policy initiatives to protect and sustain our ocean. Conference highlights and recommendations are available to the public on NCSE's conference website, www.OurChangingOceans.org.

  15. The Central California Regional Obesity Prevention Program: Changing Nutrition and Physical Activity Environments in California's Heartland

    PubMed Central

    Samuels, Sarah E.; Capitman, John; Ruwe, Mathilda; Boyle, Maria; Flores, George

    2010-01-01

    The goals of the Central California Regional Obesity Prevention Program (CCROPP) are to promote safe places for physical activity, increase access to fresh fruits and vegetables, and support community and youth engagement in local and regional efforts to change nutrition and physical activity environments for obesity prevention. CCROPP has created a community-driven policy and environmental change model for obesity prevention with local and regional elements in low-income, disadvantaged ethnic and rural communities in a climate of poor resources and inadequate infrastructure. Evaluation data collected from 2005–2009 demonstrate that CCROPP has made progress in changing nutrition and physical activity environments by mobilizing community members, engaging and influencing policymakers, and forming organizational partnerships. PMID:20864732

  16. Risk Management Techniques and Practice Workshop Workshop Report

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, T; Zosel, M

    2008-12-02

    vendor technical or business problems. HPC, by its very nature, is an exercise in multi-level risk management. Every aspect of stewarding HPCCs into the petascale era, from identification of the program drivers to the details of procurement actions and simulation environment component deployments, represents unprecedented challenges and requires effective risk management. The fundamental purpose of this workshop was to go beyond risk management processes as such and learn how to weave effective risk management practices, techniques, and methods into all aspects of migrating HPCCs into the next generation of leadership computing systems. This workshop was a follow-on to the Petascale System Integration Workshop hosted by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)/NERSC last year. It was intended to leverage and extend the risk management experience of the participants by looking for common best practices and unique processes that have been especially successful. This workshop assessed the effectiveness of tools and techniques that are or could be helpful in HPCC risk management, with a special emphasis on how practice meets process. As the saying goes: 'In theory, there is no difference between theory and practice. In practice there is'. Finally, the workshop brought together a network of experts who shared information as technology moves into the petascale era and beyond.

  17. Improving the adaptability of simulated evolutionary swarm robots in dynamically changing environments.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yao; Marchal, Kathleen; Van de Peer, Yves

    2014-01-01

    One of the important challenges in the field of evolutionary robotics is the development of systems that can adapt to a changing environment. However, the ability to adapt to unknown and fluctuating environments is not straightforward. Here, we explore the adaptive potential of simulated swarm robots that contain a genomic encoding of a bio-inspired gene regulatory network (GRN). An artificial genome is combined with a flexible agent-based system, representing the activated part of the regulatory network that transduces environmental cues into phenotypic behaviour. Using an artificial life simulation framework that mimics a dynamically changing environment, we show that separating the static from the conditionally active part of the network contributes to a better adaptive behaviour. Furthermore, in contrast with most hitherto developed ANN-based systems that need to re-optimize their complete controller network from scratch each time they are subjected to novel conditions, our system uses its genome to store GRNs whose performance was optimized under a particular environmental condition for a sufficiently long time. When subjected to a new environment, the previous condition-specific GRN might become inactivated, but remains present. This ability to store 'good behaviour' and to disconnect it from the novel rewiring that is essential under a new condition allows faster re-adaptation if any of the previously observed environmental conditions is reencountered. As we show here, applying these evolutionary-based principles leads to accelerated and improved adaptive evolution in a non-stable environment.

  18. Climate Change Potential Impacts on the Built Environment and Possible Adaptation Strategies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quattrochi, Dale A.

    2014-01-01

    The built environment consists of components that exist at a range of scales from small (e.g., houses, shopping malls) to large (e.g., transportation networks) to highly modified landscapes such as cities. Thus, the impacts of climate change on the built environment may have a multitude of effects on humans and the land. The impact of climate change may be exacerbated by the interaction of different events that singly may be minor, but together may have a synergistic set of impacts that are significant. Also, mechanisms may exist wherein the built environment, particularly in the form of cities, may affect weather and the climate on local and regional scales. Hence, a city may be able to cope with prolonged heat waves, but if this is combined with severe drought, the overall result could be significant or even catastrophic, as accelerating demand for energy to cooling taxes water supplies needed both for energy supply and municipal water needs. This presentation surveys potential climate change impacts on the built environment from the perspective of the National Climate Assessment, and explores adaptation measures that can be employed to mitigate these impacts.

  19. LLNL Workshop on TEM of Pu

    SciTech Connect

    King, W.E.

    1996-09-10

    On Sept. 10, 1996, LLNL hosted a workshop aimed at answering the question: Is it possible to carry out transmission electron microscopy (TEM) on plutonium metal in an electron microscope located outside the LLNL plutonium facility. The workshop focused on evaluation of a proposed plan for Pu microscopy both from a technical and environment, health, and safety point of view. After review and modification of the plan, workshop participants unanimously concluded that: (1) the technical plan is sound, (2) this technical plan, including a proposal for a new TEM, provides significant improvements and unique capabilities compared with the effort at LANL and is therefore complementary, (3) there is no significant environment, health, and safety obstacle to this plan.

  20. Changes in the acoustic environment alter the foraging and sheltering behaviour of the cichlid Amititlania nigrofasciata.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, Kirsty Elizabeth; Kunc, Hansjoerg P

    2015-07-01

    Anthropogenic noise can affect behaviour across a wide range of species in both terrestrial and aquatic environments. However, behaviours might not be affected in isolation. Therefore, a more holistic approach investigating how environmental stressors, such as noise pollution, affect different behaviours in concert is necessary. Using tank-based noise exposure experiments, we tested how changes in the acoustic environment affect the behaviour of the cichlid Amatitlania nigrofasciata. We found that exposure to anthropogenic noise affected a couple of behaviours: an increase in sheltering was accompanied by a decrease in foraging. Our results highlight the multiple negative effects of an environmental stressor on an individual's behaviour.

  1. Change detection in coastal zone environments. [by Landsat MSS data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weismiller, R. A.; Kristof, S. J.; Scholz, D. K.; Anuta, P. E.; Momin, S. A.

    1977-01-01

    A study was conducted with the objective to develop and evaluate various change detection techniques based upon computer-aided analysis of Landsat multispectral scanner (MSS) data to monitor coastal zone environments. The study site selected includes a portion of the Matagorda Bay estuarine system located along the Texas Coast. The principal data sources for the study were MSS data collected on November, 27, 1972 and February 25, 1975. The MSS data were processed and a multidata eight-channel data set at a scale of 1:24,000 was obtained. A description is presented of four change detection techniques which were designed and implented for evaluation, taking into account postclassification comparison change detection, delta data change detection, spectral/temporal change classification, and layered spectral/temporal approach. The results of the investigation are discussed.

  2. Effects of Changing Meteoric Precipitation Patterns on Groundwater Temperature in Karst Environments.

    PubMed

    Brookfield, A E; Macpherson, G L; Covington, M D

    2017-03-01

    Climate predictions indicate that precipitation patterns will change and average air temperatures will increase across much of the planet. These changes will alter surface water and groundwater temperatures which can significantly affect the local and regional environment. Here, we examine the role of precipitation timing in changes to groundwater temperature in carbonate-karst aquifers using measured groundwater level and temperature data from the Konza Prairie Long-Term Ecological Research Site, Kansas. We demonstrate that shifts to increased cool-season precipitation may mitigate the increases in groundwater temperature produced by increases in average annual air temperature. In karst, the solution-enlarged conduits allow faster and focused recharge, and the recharge-event temperature can strongly influence the groundwater temperature in the aquifer. Our field data and analysis show that predictions of future groundwater conditions in karst aquifers need to consider changes in precipitation patterns, in addition to changes to average annual air temperature.

  3. [Identification of coupling relationship between urbanization and ecological environment in Jilin from entropy change perspective].

    PubMed

    Sun, Ping-Jun; Xiu, Chun-Liang; Zhang, Tian-Jiao

    2014-03-01

    By using the entropy change equation of the second law of thermodynamics, entropy method and PSE model, this article made an analysis on coupling relationship between urbanization and ecological environment in Jilin Province from 2001 to 2011. In the study period, the urbanization development had been out of normal evolution track: The economic urbanization and space urbanization dominated the whole urbanization process, while population urbanization was neglected too seriously, with an apparent characteristic of extensive and inefficient input of resources (especially land resource). According to the levels of ecological environment on the basis of PSE model, not only the pressure index, sensitivity index and the elasticity index, but also the comprehensive index showed considerable growth with obvious stage characteristics: ascending-descending-ascending. The total entropy values of the urbanization were less than zero during the time, which meant an unstable rising curve. While the total trophy values of the ecological environment varied below and above zero, and 2003, 2006, 2010 and 2011 were the "turning points", reflecting the instability of the ecological environment. The coupling total entropy values between urbanization and ecological environment had the same characteristics with the ecological environment: the same "turning points" and shape of the curve, in which, the "turning points" corresponded to the type of antagonistic evolution pattern, while the rest of years responded to the type of coordination evolution pattern.

  4. The Astronomy Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Douglas P.

    2012-05-01

    The Astronomy Workshop (http://janus.astro.umd.edu) is a collection of interactive online educational tools developed for use by students, educators, professional astronomers, and the general public. The more than 20 tools in the Astronomy Workshop are rated for ease-of-use, and have been extensively tested in large university survey courses as well as more specialized classes for undergraduate majors and graduate students. Here we briefly describe the tools most relevant for the Professional Dynamical Astronomer. Solar Systems Visualizer: The orbital motions of planets, moons, and asteroids in the Solar System as well as many of the planets in exoplanetary systems are animated at their correct relative speeds in accurate to-scale drawings. Zoom in from the chaotic outer satellite systems of the giant planets all the way to their innermost ring systems. Orbital Integrators: Determine the orbital evolution of your initial conditions for a number of different scenarios including motions subject to general central forces, the classic three-body problem, and satellites of planets and exoplanets. Zero velocity curves are calculated and automatically included on relevant plots. Orbital Elements: Convert quickly and easily between state vectors and orbital elements with Changing the Elements. Use other routines to visualize your three-dimensional orbit and to convert between the different commonly used sets of orbital elements including the true, mean, and eccentric anomalies. Solar System Calculators: These tools calculate a user-defined mathematical expression simultaneously for all of the Solar System's planets (Planetary Calculator) or moons (Satellite Calculator). Key physical and orbital data are automatically accessed as needed.

  5. The Astronomy Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Douglas P.

    2013-05-01

    Abstract (2,250 Maximum Characters): The Astronomy Workshop (http://janus.astro.umd.edu) is a collection of interactive online educational tools developed for use by students, educators, professional astronomers, and the general public. The more than 20 tools in the Astronomy Workshop are rated for ease-of-use, and have been extensively tested in large university survey courses as well as more specialized classes for undergraduate majors and graduate students. Here we briefly describe the tools most relevant for the Professional Dynamical Astronomer. Solar Systems Visualizer: The orbital motions of planets, moons, and asteroids in the Solar System as well as many of the planets in exoplanetary systems are animated at their correct relative speeds in accurate to-scale drawings. Zoom in from the chaotic outer satellite systems of the giant planets all the way to their innermost ring systems. Orbital Integrators: Determine the orbital evolution of your initial conditions for a number of different scenarios including motions subject to general central forces, the classic three-body problem, and satellites of planets and exoplanets. Zero velocity curves are calculated and automatically included on relevant plots. Orbital Elements: Convert quickly and easily between state vectors and orbital elements with Changing the Elements. Use other routines to visualize your three-dimensional orbit and to convert between the different commonly used sets of orbital elements including the true, mean, and eccentric anomalies. Solar System Calculators: These tools calculate a user-defined mathematical expression simultaneously for all of the Solar System's planets (Planetary Calculator) or moons (Satellite Calculator). Key physical and orbital data are automatically accessed as needed.

  6. Climate change and our environment: the effect on respiratory and allergic disease.

    PubMed

    Barne, Charles; Alexis, Neil E; Bernstein, Jonathan A; Cohn, John R; Demain, Jeffrey G; Horner, Elliot; Levetin, Estelle; Nei, Andre; Phipatanakul, Wanda

    2013-03-01

    Climate change is a constant and ongoing process. It is postulated that human activities have reached a point at which we are producing global climate change. It provides suggestions to help the allergist/environmental physician integrate recommendations about improvements in outdoor and indoor air quality and the likely response to predicted alterations in the earth's environment into his or her patient's treatment plan. It incorporates references retrieved from Pub Med searches for topics, including:climate change, global warming, global climate change, greenhouse gasses, air pollution, particulates, black carbon, soot and sea level, as well as references contributed by the individual authors. Many changes that affect respiratory disease are anticipated.Examples of responses to climate change include energy reduction retrofits in homes that could potentially affect exposure to allergens and irritants, more hot sunny days that increase ozone-related difficulties, and rises in sea level or altered rainfall patterns that increase exposure to damp indoor environments.Climate changes can also affect ecosystems, manifested as the appearance of stinging and biting arthropods in new areas.Higher ambient carbon dioxide concentrations, warmer temperatures, and changes in floristic zones could potentially increase exposure to ragweed and other outdoor allergens,whereas green practices such as composting can increase allergen and irritant exposure. Finally, increased energy costs may resultin urban crowding and human source pollution, leading to changes in patterns of infectious respiratory illnesses. Improved governmental controls on airborne pollutants could lead to cleaner air and reduced respiratory diseases but will meet strong opposition because of their effect on business productivity. The allergy community must therefore adapt, as physician and research scientists always have, by anticipating the needs of patients and by adopting practices and research methods to

  7. Advanced Training Technologies and Learning Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K. (Compiler); Malone, John B. (Compiler)

    1999-01-01

    This document contains the proceedings of the Workshop on Advanced Training Technologies and Learning Environments held at NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia, March 9-10, 1999. The workshop was jointly sponsored by the University of Virginia's Center for Advanced Computational Technology and NASA. Workshop attendees were from NASA, other government agencies, industry, and universities. The objective of the workshop was to assess the status and effectiveness of different advanced training technologies and learning environments.

  8. Nanotribological and Nanomechanical Properties Changes of Tooth After Bleaching and Remineralization in Wet Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Dandan; Gao, Shanshan; Min, Jie; Zhang, Qianqian; Gao, Shuai; Yu, Haiyang

    2015-12-01

    Teeth bleaching cases had increased with people's desire for oral aesthetic; however, bleached teeth would still undertake chewing actions and remineralizing process in saliva. Nanotribological and nanomechanical properties are proper displays for dental performance of bleached teeth. The purpose of the research was to reveal the effect of bleaching and remineralization on the nanotribological and nanomechanical properties of teeth in wet environment. The specimens were divided into four groups according to the bleaching products used: 12 % hydrogen peroxide (HP) (12HP group); 15 % carbamide peroxide (CP) (15CP group); 35 % CP (35CP group); and artificial saliva (control group). The nanotribological and nanomechanical property changes of tooth enamel after bleaching and remineralization were evaluated respectively by nanoscratch and nanoindentation tests in wet environment, imitating the wet oral environment. The morphology changes were evaluated by statistical parametric mapping (SPM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). After bleaching, 12HP group and 15CP group showed increased scratch depth with more pile ups on the scratch edges, decreased nanohardness, and corroded surface appearance. While the 35CP group showed an increase in nanoscratch depth, no change in nanohardness and surface appearance was observed. The control group showed no change in these measurements. After remineralization, the three bleaching groups showed decreased nanoscratch depth and no change of nanohardness compared with the bleached teeth. And the control group showed no changes in nanotribological and nanomechanical properties. The nanotribological and nanomechanical properties of the 12HP group and 15CP group were affected by bleaching, but the nanotribological properties recovered partly and the nanomechanical properties got no change after 1 week of remineralization. As for the 35CP group, the nanotribological properties were influenced and the nanomechanical properties were not

  9. Nanotribological and Nanomechanical Properties Changes of Tooth After Bleaching and Remineralization in Wet Environment.

    PubMed

    Yu, Dandan; Gao, Shanshan; Min, Jie; Zhang, Qianqian; Gao, Shuai; Yu, Haiyang

    2015-12-01

    Teeth bleaching cases had increased with people's desire for oral aesthetic; however, bleached teeth would still undertake chewing actions and remineralizing process in saliva. Nanotribological and nanomechanical properties are proper displays for dental performance of bleached teeth. The purpose of the research was to reveal the effect of bleaching and remineralization on the nanotribological and nanomechanical properties of teeth in wet environment. The specimens were divided into four groups according to the bleaching products used: 12 % hydrogen peroxide (HP) (12HP group); 15 % carbamide peroxide (CP) (15CP group); 35 % CP (35CP group); and artificial saliva (control group). The nanotribological and nanomechanical property changes of tooth enamel after bleaching and remineralization were evaluated respectively by nanoscratch and nanoindentation tests in wet environment, imitating the wet oral environment. The morphology changes were evaluated by statistical parametric mapping (SPM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). After bleaching, 12HP group and 15CP group showed increased scratch depth with more pile ups on the scratch edges, decreased nanohardness, and corroded surface appearance. While the 35CP group showed an increase in nanoscratch depth, no change in nanohardness and surface appearance was observed. The control group showed no change in these measurements. After remineralization, the three bleaching groups showed decreased nanoscratch depth and no change of nanohardness compared with the bleached teeth. And the control group showed no changes in nanotribological and nanomechanical properties. The nanotribological and nanomechanical properties of the 12HP group and 15CP group were affected by bleaching, but the nanotribological properties recovered partly and the nanomechanical properties got no change after 1 week of remineralization. As for the 35CP group, the nanotribological properties were influenced and the nanomechanical properties were

  10. The influence of recent climate change on tree height growth differs with species and spatial environment.

    PubMed

    Messaoud, Yassine; Chen, Han Y H

    2011-02-16

    Tree growth has been reported to increase in response to recent global climate change in controlled and semi-controlled experiments, but few studies have reported response of tree growth to increased temperature and atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO₂) concentration in natural environments. This study addresses how recent global climate change has affected height growth of trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx) and black spruce (Picea mariana Mill B.S.) in their natural environments. We sampled 145 stands dominated by aspen and 82 dominated by spruce over the entire range of their distributions in British Columbia, Canada. These stands were established naturally after fire between the 19th and 20th centuries. Height growth was quantified as total heights of sampled dominant and co-dominant trees at breast-height age of 50 years. We assessed the relationships between 50-year height growth and environmental factors at both spatial and temporal scales. We also tested whether the tree growth associated with global climate change differed with spatial environment (latitude, longitude and elevation). As expected, height growth of both species was positively related to temperature variables at the regional scale and with soil moisture and nutrient availability at the local scale. While height growth of trembling aspen was not significantly related to any of the temporal variables we examined, that of black spruce increased significantly with stand establishment date, the anomaly of the average maximum summer temperature between May-August, and atmospheric CO₂ concentration, but not with the Palmer Drought Severity Index. Furthermore, the increase of spruce height growth associated with recent climate change was higher in the western than in eastern part of British Columbia. This study demonstrates that the response of height growth to recent climate change, i.e., increasing temperature and atmospheric CO₂ concentration, did not only differ with tree species, but

  11. Changes to the school food and physical activity environment after guideline implementation in British Columbia, Canada

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background High rates of childhood obesity have generated interest among policy makers to improve the school food environment and increase students’ levels of physical activity. The purpose of this study was to examine school-level changes associated with implementation of the Food and Beverage Sales in Schools (FBSS) and Daily Physical Activity (DPA) guidelines in British Columbia, Canada. Methods Elementary and middle/high school principals completed a survey on the school food and physical activity environment in 2007–08 (N = 513) and 2011–12 (N = 490). Hierarchical mixed effects regression was used to examine changes in: 1) availability of food and beverages; 2) minutes per day of Physical Education (PE); 3) delivery method of PE; and 4) school community support. Models controlled for school enrollment and community type, education and income. Results After policy implementation was expected, more elementary schools provided access to fruits and vegetables and less to 100% fruit juice. Fewer middle/high schools provided access to sugar-sweetened beverages, French fries, baked goods, salty snacks and chocolate/candy. Schools were more likely to meet 150 min/week of PE for grade 6 students, and offer more minutes of PE per week for grade 8 and 10 students including changes to PE delivery method. School community support for nutrition and physical activity policies increased over time. Conclusion Positive changes to the school food environment occurred after schools were expected to implement the FBSS and DPA guidelines. Reported changes to the school environment are encouraging and provide support for guidelines and policies that focus on increasing healthy eating and physical activity in schools. PMID:24731514

  12. Energy and Environment as Related to Chemistry Teaching. Proceeding of the UNESCO International Workshop/Symposium (Berkeley, California, December 1-8, 1989).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Univ., Berkeley. Board of Regents.

    The proceedings of a program on teaching chemistry through energy and the environment that included plenary lectures, country and commission reports, introductions to new programs and materials, and an experimental approach to curriculum development across national boundaries via the production of an instruction unit are provided. The workshop…

  13. Strategic Environmental Assessment Framework for Landscape-Based, Temporal Analysis of Wetland Change in Urban Environments.

    PubMed

    Sizo, Anton; Noble, Bram F; Bell, Scott

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents and demonstrates a spatial framework for the application of strategic environmental assessment (SEA) in the context of change analysis for urban wetland environments. The proposed framework is focused on two key stages of the SEA process: scoping and environmental baseline assessment. These stages are arguably the most information-intense phases of SEA and have a significant effect on the quality of the SEA results. The study aims to meet the needs for proactive frameworks to assess and protect wetland habitat and services more efficiently, toward the goal of advancing more intelligent urban planning and development design. The proposed framework, adopting geographic information system and remote sensing tools and applications, supports the temporal evaluation of wetland change and sustainability assessment based on landscape indicator analysis. The framework was applied to a rapidly developing urban environment in the City of Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada, analyzing wetland change and land-use pressures from 1985 to 2011. The SEA spatial scale was rescaled from administrative urban planning units to an ecologically meaningful area. Landscape change assessed was based on a suite of indicators that were subsequently rolled up into a single, multi-dimensional, and easy to understand and communicate index to examine the implications of land-use change for wetland sustainability. The results show that despite the recent extremely wet period in the Canadian prairie region, land-use change contributed to increasing threats to wetland sustainability.

  14. Strategic Environmental Assessment Framework for Landscape-Based, Temporal Analysis of Wetland Change in Urban Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sizo, Anton; Noble, Bram F.; Bell, Scott

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents and demonstrates a spatial framework for the application of strategic environmental assessment (SEA) in the context of change analysis for urban wetland environments. The proposed framework is focused on two key stages of the SEA process: scoping and environmental baseline assessment. These stages are arguably the most information-intense phases of SEA and have a significant effect on the quality of the SEA results. The study aims to meet the needs for proactive frameworks to assess and protect wetland habitat and services more efficiently, toward the goal of advancing more intelligent urban planning and development design. The proposed framework, adopting geographic information system and remote sensing tools and applications, supports the temporal evaluation of wetland change and sustainability assessment based on landscape indicator analysis. The framework was applied to a rapidly developing urban environment in the City of Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada, analyzing wetland change and land-use pressures from 1985 to 2011. The SEA spatial scale was rescaled from administrative urban planning units to an ecologically meaningful area. Landscape change assessed was based on a suite of indicators that were subsequently rolled up into a single, multi-dimensional, and easy to understand and communicate index to examine the implications of land-use change for wetland sustainability. The results show that despite the recent extremely wet period in the Canadian prairie region, land-use change contributed to increasing threats to wetland sustainability.

  15. Assessing conservation relevance of organism-environment relations using predicted changes in response variables

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gutzwiller, Kevin J.; Barrow, Wylie C.; White, Joseph D.; Johnson-Randall, Lori; Cade, Brian S.; Zygo, Lisa M.

    2010-01-01

    1. Organism–environment models are used widely in conservation. The degree to which they are useful for informing conservation decisions – the conservation relevance of these relations – is important because lack of relevance may lead to misapplication of scarce conservation resources or failure to resolve important conservation dilemmas. Even when models perform well based on model fit and predictive ability, conservation relevance of associations may not be clear without also knowing the magnitude and variability of predicted changes in response variables. 2. We introduce a method for evaluating the conservation relevance of organism–environment relations that employs confidence intervals for predicted changes in response variables. The confidence intervals are compared to a preselected magnitude of change that marks a threshold (trigger) for conservation action. To demonstrate the approach, we used a case study from the Chihuahuan Desert involving relations between avian richness and broad-scale patterns of shrubland. We considered relations for three winters and two spatial extents (1- and 2-km-radius areas) and compared predicted changes in richness to three thresholds (10%, 20% and 30% change). For each threshold, we examined 48 relations. 3. The method identified seven, four and zero conservation-relevant changes in mean richness for the 10%, 20% and 30% thresholds respectively. These changes were associated with major (20%) changes in shrubland cover, mean patch size, the coefficient of variation for patch size, or edge density but not with major changes in shrubland patch density. The relative rarity of conservation-relevant changes indicated that, overall, the relations had little practical value for informing conservation decisions about avian richness. 4. The approach we illustrate is appropriate for various response and predictor variables measured at any temporal or spatial scale. The method is broadly applicable across ecological

  16. Catchment Prediction In Changing Environments (CAPICHE): A collaborative experiment in an open water science laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutton, Christopher; Wagener, Thorsten; Freer, Jim; Han, Dawei

    2015-04-01

    Predicting the function of hydrological systems under near-stationary conditions faces a number of challenges due to incomplete system understanding, and uncertainty in models and measurements. However, due to changes in climate, land use/land cover, and water demand, the hydrological function of many catchments cannot be considered as stationary. Such changes make modelling catchment systems more difficult, as models need to account for non-stationary forcing and boundary conditions, which in turn can change internal catchment function, and the states and processes that dominate hydrological response. In addition, such models may need to be used to make predictions beyond a range of conditions for which they were originally calibrated. Despite these problems, deriving accurate hydrological predictions under changing conditions is increasingly important for future water resource and flood hazard assessment. Simulating catchments under changing conditions may require more complex distributed models in order to adequately represent spatial changes in boundary conditions (e.g. land cover change). However, the potential for complex models to address these issues cannot be realised in many places because of data problems, which may result from a lack of data, data access issues, and time-consuming problems in bringing diverse sources of data together and into a useable format. A greater understanding of the link between model complexity and data is required to make appropriate modelling choices. Virtual water science laboratories offer the ideal opportunity to explore the issues of model complexity and data availability in the context of predictions under changing environments because they: (1) provide an opportunity to share open data; (2) provide a platform to compare different models; (3) facilitate collaboration between different modelling research groups. This paper introduces a new collaborative experiment, conducted in an open virtual water science laboratory as

  17. Productivity Workshop Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drewes, Donald W.

    This document presents a plan for conducting productivity workshops sponsored by state vocational education agencies for state agency staff, field vocational educators, and representatives of businesses and industry. The rationale is discussed, and workshop goals and objectives are stated. Suggested procedures are described for the attainment of…

  18. Workshop in Translating Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corson, Michael; And Others

    1975-01-01

    A workshop dealing with literature in translation took place in 1974 at the German Department of the University of Cincinnati. This is a report on its procedures and methods. The workshop dealt with discussion of texts, translation of texts, critique of existing translations and interpretation of content. (TL)

  19. Warehouse Sanitation Workshop Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Food and Drug Administration (DHHS/PHS), Washington, DC.

    This workshop handbook contains information and reference materials on proper food warehouse sanitation. The materials have been used at Food and Drug Administration (FDA) food warehouse sanitation workshops, and are selected by the FDA for use by food warehouse operators and for training warehouse sanitation employees. The handbook is divided…

  20. Sensors Workshop summary report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A review of the efforts of three workshops is presented. The presentation describes those technological developments that would contribute most to sensor subsystem optimization and improvement of NASA's data acquisition capabilities, and summarizes the recommendations of the sensor technology panels from the most recent workshops.

  1. Impact of climate change on the domestic indoor environment and associated health risks in the UK.

    PubMed

    Vardoulakis, Sotiris; Dimitroulopoulou, Chrysanthi; Thornes, John; Lai, Ka-Man; Taylor, Jonathon; Myers, Isabella; Heaviside, Clare; Mavrogianni, Anna; Shrubsole, Clive; Chalabi, Zaid; Davies, Michael; Wilkinson, Paul

    2015-12-01

    There is growing evidence that projected climate change has the potential to significantly affect public health. In the UK, much of this impact is likely to arise by amplifying existing risks related to heat exposure, flooding, and chemical and biological contamination in buildings. Identifying the health effects of climate change on the indoor environment, and risks and opportunities related to climate change adaptation and mitigation, can help protect public health. We explored a range of health risks in the domestic indoor environment related to climate change, as well as the potential health benefits and unintended harmful effects of climate change mitigation and adaptation policies in the UK housing sector. We reviewed relevant scientific literature, focusing on housing-related health effects in the UK likely to arise through either direct or indirect mechanisms of climate change or mitigation and adaptation measures in the built environment. We considered the following categories of effect: (i) indoor temperatures, (ii) indoor air quality, (iii) indoor allergens and infections, and (iv) flood damage and water contamination. Climate change may exacerbate health risks and inequalities across these categories and in a variety of ways, if adequate adaptation measures are not taken. Certain changes to the indoor environment can affect indoor air quality or promote the growth and propagation of pathogenic organisms. Measures aimed at reducing greenhouse gas emissions have the potential for ancillary public health benefits including reductions in health burdens related heat and cold, indoor exposure to air pollution derived from outdoor sources, and mould growth. However, increasing airtightness of dwellings in pursuit of energy efficiency could also have negative effects by increasing concentrations of pollutants (such as PM2.5, CO and radon) derived from indoor or ground sources, and biological contamination. These effects can largely be ameliorated by mechanical

  2. Facilitation among plants in alpine environments in the face of climate change

    PubMed Central

    Anthelme, Fabien; Cavieres, Lohengrin A.; Dangles, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    While there is a large consensus that plant–plant interactions are a crucial component of the response of plant communities to the effects of climate change, available data remain scarce, particularly in alpine systems. This represents an important obstacle to making consistent predictions about the future of plant communities. Here, we review current knowledge on the effects of climate change on facilitation among alpine plant communities and propose directions for future research. In established alpine communities, while warming seemingly generates a net facilitation release, earlier snowmelt may increase facilitation. Some nurse plants are able to buffer microenvironmental changes in the long term and may ensure the persistence of other alpine plants through local migration events. For communities migrating to higher elevations, facilitation should play an important role in their reorganization because of the harsher environmental conditions. In particular, the absence of efficient nurse plants might slow down upward migration, possibly generating chains of extinction. Facilitation–climate change relationships are expected to shift along latitudinal gradients because (1) the magnitude of warming is predicted to vary along these gradients, and (2) alpine environments are significantly different at low vs. high latitudes. Data on these expected patterns are preliminary and thus need to be tested with further studies on facilitation among plants in alpine environments that have thus far not been considered. From a methodological standpoint, future studies will benefit from the spatial representation of the microclimatic environment of plants to predict their response to climate change. Moreover, the acquisition of long-term data on the dynamics of plant–plant interactions, either through permanent plots or chronosequences of glacial recession, may represent powerful approaches to clarify the relationship between plant interactions and climate change. PMID

  3. Facilitation among plants in alpine environments in the face of climate change.

    PubMed

    Anthelme, Fabien; Cavieres, Lohengrin A; Dangles, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    While there is a large consensus that plant-plant interactions are a crucial component of the response of plant communities to the effects of climate change, available data remain scarce, particularly in alpine systems. This represents an important obstacle to making consistent predictions about the future of plant communities. Here, we review current knowledge on the effects of climate change on facilitation among alpine plant communities and propose directions for future research. In established alpine communities, while warming seemingly generates a net facilitation release, earlier snowmelt may increase facilitation. Some nurse plants are able to buffer microenvironmental changes in the long term and may ensure the persistence of other alpine plants through local migration events. For communities migrating to higher elevations, facilitation should play an important role in their reorganization because of the harsher environmental conditions. In particular, the absence of efficient nurse plants might slow down upward migration, possibly generating chains of extinction. Facilitation-climate change relationships are expected to shift along latitudinal gradients because (1) the magnitude of warming is predicted to vary along these gradients, and (2) alpine environments are significantly different at low vs. high latitudes. Data on these expected patterns are preliminary and thus need to be tested with further studies on facilitation among plants in alpine environments that have thus far not been considered. From a methodological standpoint, future studies will benefit from the spatial representation of the microclimatic environment of plants to predict their response to climate change. Moreover, the acquisition of long-term data on the dynamics of plant-plant interactions, either through permanent plots or chronosequences of glacial recession, may represent powerful approaches to clarify the relationship between plant interactions and climate change.

  4. A novel algorithm for quick and continuous tracing the change of radon concentration in environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Yanliang; Xiao, Detao

    2011-04-01

    Several measurements of the radon concentration are performed by RAD7 in the University of South China. We find that 30-40 min is needed for RAD7 for tracing the concentration of the standard radon chamber. There are two reasons. The first is that the sufficient time of air cycle is needed for the radon concentration in internal cell of RAD7 equal to that of the environment; and the second is that the sufficient decay time is needed for the 218Po concentration in internal cell of RAD7 equal to that of the radon. We used a zeroth order approximation to describe the evolution of the environment radon concentration, and obtained a novel algorithm for quick and continuous tracing the change of radon concentration. The corrected radon concentration obtained through this method is in good agreement with the reference value. This method can be applied to develop and improve the instruments for tracing the change of radon concentration quickly.

  5. Evolution of Population with Sexual and Asexual Reproduction in Changing Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Mingfeng; Yu, Changliang; Ruan, Hongbo; Yao, Lei

    Using a lattice model based on Monte Carlo simulations, we study the role of the reproduction pattern on the fate of an evolving population. Each individual is under the selection pressure from the environment and random mutations. The habitat ("climate") is changing periodically. Evolutions of populations following two reproduction patterns are compared, asexual and sexual. We show, via Monte Carlo simulations, that sexual reproduction by keeping more diversified populations gives them better chances to adapt themselves to the changing environment. However, in order to obtain a greater chance to mate, the birth rate should be high. In the case of low birth rate and high mutation probability there is a preference for the asexual reproduction.

  6. Nanotechnology and the Environment: Report of a National Nanotechnology Initiative Workshop Held in Arlington, Virginia on 8-9 May 2003

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    environment, Rev. Mineral. Geochem. 44, 1–58 (2001). A. Navrotsky, Thermochemistry of nanomaterials, Rev. Mineral. Geochem. 44, 73–103 (2001). J. N...materials and hands-on demonstration tools that K-12 teachers could use to teach students about nanotechnology. This could be accomplished with a...K-12 teachers would be able to use to teach nanotechnology; and (4) a variety of one- or two-day programs for continuing teacher education that

  7. Proceedings of the DoD (Department of Defense) Combined Environment Reliability Test (CERT) Workshop, 2-4 June 1981, Atlanta, Georgia,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-01

    Vibrational Environment", S. A. Ogden, Shock and Vibration Bulletin 48, Part 4. 4. "Dual Shaker Vibration Facility’, C. V. Ryden , Shock and Vibration... marked bars represent Production. The numbers superimposed on the clear bars represent the projected assignment of a fulltime CERT facility. The total...opposite the FSED at the foot of each column consists of tmo numbers separated by a slash mark . The first number is the total of active programs. The

  8. Porter's generic strategies, discontinuous environments, and performance: a longitudinal study of changing strategies in the hospital industry.

    PubMed Central

    Lamont, B T; Marlin, D; Hoffman, J J

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. Changes in generic strategies in response to discontinuous environments have been relatively ignored in the management literature. This study reports an examination of the relationships between Porter's (1980) generic strategies, discontinuous environments, and performance. DATA SOURCES. Archival data for 1984 and 1988 were collected for 172 acute care hospitals in Florida in order to test these relationships. STUDY DESIGN. To examine fully the performance impact of changes in strategy in a discontinuous environment, a longitudinal research design that identified a firm's strategy at two points in time, 1984 and 1988, was used. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS. Results indicate that firms with a proper strategy environment fit performed the highest, firms that did not change their strategy had no change in performance, and firms that changed their strategy toward a proper strategy environment showed an increase in performance. CONCLUSION. Findings support the notion that hospitals with appropriate strategy-environment combinations will exhibit higher performance. PMID:8270424

  9. Developing patient and family education services. Innovations for the changing healthcare environment.

    PubMed

    Kantz, B; Wandel, J; Fladger, A; Folcarelli, P; Burger, S; Clifford, J C

    1998-02-01

    As the healthcare environment changes, systems that have served hospitals well for many years no longer meet the current needs of patients, families, and communities. This is particularly true with regard to health education. The authors describe an innovative learning center that offers comprehensive health education services and programs designed to empower consumers with the information and skills needed to maintain health or recover from illness or injury.

  10. 33 CFR 157.12f - Workshop functional test requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION RULES FOR THE PROTECTION OF THE MARINE ENVIRONMENT RELATING TO TANK VESSELS CARRYING OIL IN BULK Design, Equipment, and Installation § 157.12f Workshop functional test requirements... exceed the capacity of the system....

  11. 33 CFR 157.12f - Workshop functional test requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION RULES FOR THE PROTECTION OF THE MARINE ENVIRONMENT RELATING TO TANK VESSELS CARRYING OIL IN BULK Design, Equipment, and Installation § 157.12f Workshop functional test requirements... exceed the capacity of the system....

  12. 33 CFR 157.12f - Workshop functional test requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION RULES FOR THE PROTECTION OF THE MARINE ENVIRONMENT RELATING TO TANK VESSELS CARRYING OIL IN BULK Design, Equipment, and Installation § 157.12f Workshop functional test requirements... exceed the capacity of the system....

  13. 33 CFR 157.12f - Workshop functional test requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION RULES FOR THE PROTECTION OF THE MARINE ENVIRONMENT RELATING TO TANK VESSELS CARRYING OIL IN BULK Design, Equipment, and Installation § 157.12f Workshop functional test requirements... exceed the capacity of the system....

  14. Air-Based Remediation Workshop - Section 6 Thermal Systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pursuant to the EPA-AIT Implementing Arrangement 7 for Technical Environmental Collaboration, Activity 11 "Remediation of Contaminated Sites," the USEPA Office of International Affairs Organized a Forced Air Remediation Workshop in Taipei to deliver expert training to the Environ...

  15. Air-Based Remediation Workshop - Section 2 Soil Vapor Extraction

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pursuant to the EPA-AIT Implementing Arrangement 7 for Technical Environmental Collaboration, Activity 11 "Remediation of Contaminated Sties," the USEPA Office of International Affairs Organized a Forced Air Remediation Workshop in Taipei to deliver expert training to the Environ...

  16. Air-Base Remediation Workshop - Section 3 Bioventig

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pursuant to the EPA-AIT Implementing Arrangement 7 for Technical Environmental Collaboration, Activity 11 "Remediation of Contaminated Sites," the USEPA Office of International Affairs Organized a Forced Air Remediation Workshop in Taipei to deliver expert training to the Environ...

  17. 76 FR 60505 - Food Defense Workshop; Public Workshop

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-29

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food Defense Workshop; Public Workshop AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of public workshop. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA), Office of... M. Kerr Food & Agricultural Products Center (FAPC), is announcing a public workshop entitled...

  18. 3. Neural changes in different gravity and ecophysiological environments - A survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slenzka, K.

    Neural changes or neuronal plasticity occur after and during different stimulations and inputs in general. Gravity is one major input to the brain transferred from the vestibular system. However, often also direct effects of gravity on the cellular level are discussed. Our group was investigating the influence of different gravity environments on a large variety of neuronal enzymes in the developing fish brain. Long-term space travel or bases on Moon and Mars will have to deal not only with neural changes based on the different gravity environment, but also with potential negative or even toxic changes in the respective life support system. Our goal is now to identify reported enzyme activity changes in the brain based for example on potential toxic drugs or endocrine disruptors in combination with gravity induced changes. In this paper a survey will be undertaken discussing recent results obtained in ecotoxicology, gravitational biology combined with new data from our group regarding potential differences in brain glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase of medaka and zebrafish.

  19. Joint Probability Analysis of Extreme Precipitation and Storm Tide in a Coastal City under Changing Environment

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Kui; Ma, Chao; Lian, Jijian; Bin, Lingling

    2014-01-01

    Catastrophic flooding resulting from extreme meteorological events has occurred more frequently and drawn great attention in recent years in China. In coastal areas, extreme precipitation and storm tide are both inducing factors of flooding and therefore their joint probability would be critical to determine the flooding risk. The impact of storm tide or changing environment on flooding is ignored or underestimated in the design of drainage systems of today in coastal areas in China. This paper investigates the joint probability of extreme precipitation and storm tide and its change using copula-based models in Fuzhou City. The change point at the year of 1984 detected by Mann-Kendall and Pettitt’s tests divides the extreme precipitation series into two subsequences. For each subsequence the probability of the joint behavior of extreme precipitation and storm tide is estimated by the optimal copula. Results show that the joint probability has increased by more than 300% on average after 1984 (α = 0.05). The design joint return period (RP) of extreme precipitation and storm tide is estimated to propose a design standard for future flooding preparedness. For a combination of extreme precipitation and storm tide, the design joint RP has become smaller than before. It implies that flooding would happen more often after 1984, which corresponds with the observation. The study would facilitate understanding the change of flood risk and proposing the adaption measures for coastal areas under a changing environment. PMID:25310006

  20. Book Review: Late Cenozoic Climate Change in Asia: Loess, Monsoon and Monsoon-arid Environment Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clemens, Steven C.

    2015-01-01

    Loess-Paleosol deposits drape >500,000 km2 of eastern China, spanning environments from the humid, monsoon-influenced regions near the coast to the arid, westerlies-dominated regions inland. Sections, up to hundreds of meters thick, are exposed in deeply incised river valleys and can be accessed as well by drilling. Combined, the high sedimentation rates and extensive geographic coverage make these sections unique among global terrestrial sediment archives. The Chinese loess-paleosol sequences, and the arid interior regions to the northwest, record diverse aspects of geologic and environmental change ranging from the tectonic evolution of the Tibetan Plateau (106 year time scale) through glacial-interglacial scale changes in global ice volume and greenhouse gasses (105 year time scale) on down through the orbital (104 years) to millennial and centennial scale events (103-102 year) relevant to the underpinnings of human interactions with changing environmental pressures. 'Late Cenozoic Climate Chang in Asia: Loess, Monsoon and Monsoon-arid Environment Evolution' is a timely contribution that synthesizes findings derived from the extensive work in these areas, places the findings in the broader context of global climate change and helps to define avenues for future research.

  1. Identifying changing aviation threat environments within an adaptive Homeland Security Advisory System.

    PubMed

    Lee, Adrian J; Jacobson, Sheldon H

    2012-02-01

    A critical component of aviation security consists of screening passengers and baggage to protect airports and aircraft from terrorist threats. Advancements in screening device technology have increased the ability to detect these threats; however, specifying the operational configurations of these devices in response to changes in the threat environment can become difficult. This article proposes to use Fisher information as a statistical measure for detecting changes in the threat environment. The perceived risk of passengers, according to prescreening information and behavior analysis, is analyzed as the passengers sequentially enter the security checkpoint. The alarm responses from the devices used to detect threats are also analyzed to monitor significant changes in the frequency of threat items uncovered. The key results are that this information-based measure can be used within the Homeland Security Advisory System to indicate changes in threat conditions in real time, and provide the flexibility of security screening detection devices to responsively and automatically adapt operational configurations to these changing threat conditions.

  2. Joint probability analysis of extreme precipitation and storm tide in a coastal city under changing environment.

    PubMed

    Xu, Kui; Ma, Chao; Lian, Jijian; Bin, Lingling

    2014-01-01

    Catastrophic flooding resulting from extreme meteorological events has occurred more frequently and drawn great attention in recent years in China. In coastal areas, extreme precipitation and storm tide are both inducing factors of flooding and therefore their joint probability would be critical to determine the flooding risk. The impact of storm tide or changing environment on flooding is ignored or underestimated in the design of drainage systems of today in coastal areas in China. This paper investigates the joint probability of extreme precipitation and storm tide and its change using copula-based models in Fuzhou City. The change point at the year of 1984 detected by Mann-Kendall and Pettitt's tests divides the extreme precipitation series into two subsequences. For each subsequence the probability of the joint behavior of extreme precipitation and storm tide is estimated by the optimal copula. Results show that the joint probability has increased by more than 300% on average after 1984 (α = 0.05). The design joint return period (RP) of extreme precipitation and storm tide is estimated to propose a design standard for future flooding preparedness. For a combination of extreme precipitation and storm tide, the design joint RP has become smaller than before. It implies that flooding would happen more often after 1984, which corresponds with the observation. The study would facilitate understanding the change of flood risk and proposing the adaption measures for coastal areas under a changing environment.

  3. Ants adjust their pheromone deposition to a changing environment and their probability of making errors.

    PubMed

    Czaczkes, Tomer J; Heinze, Jürgen

    2015-07-07

    Animals must contend with an ever-changing environment. Social animals, especially eusocial insects such as ants and bees, rely heavily on communication for their success. However, in a changing environment, communicated information can become rapidly outdated. This is a particular problem for pheromone trail using ants, as once deposited pheromones cannot be removed. Here, we study the response of ant foragers to an environmental change. Ants were trained to one feeder location, and the feeder was then moved to a different location. We found that ants responded to an environmental change by strongly upregulating pheromone deposition immediately after experiencing the change. This may help maintain the colony's foraging flexibility, and allow multiple food locations to be exploited simultaneously. Our treatment also caused uncertainty in the foragers, by making their memories less reliable. Ants which had made an error but eventually found the food source upregulated pheromone deposition when returning to the nest. Intriguingly, ants on their way towards the food source downregulated pheromone deposition if they were going to make an error. This may suggest that individual ants can measure the reliability of their own memories and respond appropriately.

  4. EPA Workshop on Epigenetics and Cumulative Risk ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Agenda Download the Workshop Agenda (PDF) The workshop included presentations and discussions by scientific experts pertaining to three topics (i.e., epigenetic changes associated with diverse stressors, key science considerations in understanding epigenetic changes, and practical application of epigenetic tools to address cumulative risks from environmental stressors), to address several questions under each topic, and included an opportunity for attendees to participate in break-out groups, provide comments and ask questions. Workshop Goals The workshop seeks to examine the opportunity for use of aggregate epigenetic change as an indicator in cumulative risk assessment for populations exposed to multiple stressors that affect epigenetic status. Epigenetic changes are specific molecular changes around DNA that alter expression of genes. Epigenetic changes include DNA methylation, formation of histone adducts, and changes in micro RNAs. Research today indicates that epigenetic changes are involved in many chronic diseases (cancer, cardiovascular disease, obesity, diabetes, mental health disorders, and asthma). Research has also linked a wide range of stressors including pollution and social factors with occurrence of epigenetic alterations. Epigenetic changes have the potential to reflect impacts of risk factors across multiple stages of life. Only recently receiving attention is the nexus between the factors of cumulative exposure to environmental

  5. Diurnal changes in epidermal UV transmittance of plants in naturally high UV environments.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Paul W; Flint, Stephan D; Slusser, James R; Gao, Wei; Ryel, Ronald J

    2008-06-01

    Studies were conducted on three herbaceous plant species growing in naturally high solar UV environments in the subalpine of Mauna Kea, Hawaii, USA, to determine if diurnal changes in epidermal UV transmittance (T(UV)) occur in these species, and to test whether manipulation of the solar radiation regime could alter these diurnal patterns. Additional field studies were conducted at Logan, Utah, USA, to determine if solar UV was causing diurnal T(UV) changes and to evaluate the relationship between diurnal changes in T(UV) and UV-absorbing pigments. Under clear skies, T(UV), as measured with a UV-A-pulse amplitude modulation fluorometer for leaves of Verbascum thapsus and Oenothera stricta growing in native soils and Vicia faba growing in pots, was highest at predawn and sunset and lowest at midday. These patterns in T(UV) closely tracked diurnal changes in solar radiation and were the result of correlated changes in fluorescence induced by UV-A and blue radiation but not photochemical efficiency (F(v)/F(m)) or initial fluorescence yield (F(o)). The magnitude of the midday reduction in T(UV) was greater for young leaves than for older leaves of Verbascum. Imposition of artificial shade eliminated the diurnal changes in T(UV) in Verbascum, but reduction in solar UV had no effect on diurnal T(UV) changes in Vicia. In Vicia, the diurnal changes in T(UV) occurred without detectable changes in the concentration of whole-leaf UV-absorbing compounds. Results suggest that plants actively control diurnal changes in UV shielding, and these changes occur in response to signals other than solar UV; however, the underlying mechanisms responsible for rapid changes in T(UV) remain unclear.

  6. Land change variability and human-environment dynamics in the United States Great Plains

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Drummond, M.A.; Auch, R.F.; Karstensen, K.A.; Sayler, K.L.; Taylor, J.L.; Loveland, T.R.

    2012-01-01

    Land use and land cover changes have complex linkages to climate variability and change, biophysical resources, and socioeconomic driving forces. To assess these land change dynamics and their causes in the Great Plains, we compare and contrast contemporary changes across 16 ecoregions using Landsat satellite data and statistical analysis. Large-area change analysis of agricultural regions is often hampered by change detection error and the tendency for land conversions to occur at the local-scale. To facilitate a regional-scale analysis, a statistical sampling design of randomly selected 10 km ?? 10 km blocks is used to efficiently identify the types and rates of land conversions for four time intervals between 1973 and 2000, stratified by relatively homogenous ecoregions. Nearly 8% of the overall Great Plains region underwent land-use and land-cover change during the study period, with a substantial amount of ecoregion variability that ranged from less than 2% to greater than 13%. Agricultural land cover declined by more than 2% overall, with variability contingent on the differential characteristics of regional human-environment systems. A large part of the Great Plains is in relatively stable land cover. However, other land systems with significant biophysical and climate limitations for agriculture have high rates of land change when pushed by economic, policy, technology, or climate forcing factors. The results indicate the regionally based potential for land cover to persist or fluctuate as land uses are adapted to spatially and temporally variable forcing factors. ?? 2011.

  7. Land change variability and human-environment dynamics in the United States Great Plains

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Drummond, Mark A.; Auch, Roger F.; Karstensen, Krista A.; Sayler, Kristi L.; Taylor, Janis L.; Loveland, Thomas R.

    2012-01-01

    Land use and land cover changes have complex linkages to climate variability and change, biophysical resources, and socioeconomic driving forces. To assess these land change dynamics and their causes in the Great Plains, we compare and contrast contemporary changes across 16 ecoregions using Landsat satellite data and statistical analysis. Large-area change analysis of agricultural regions is often hampered by change detection error and the tendency for land conversions to occur at the local-scale. To facilitate a regional-scale analysis, a statistical sampling design of randomly selected 10 km × 10 km blocks is used to efficiently identify the types and rates of land conversions for four time intervals between 1973 and 2000, stratified by relatively homogenous ecoregions. Nearly 8% of the overall Great Plains region underwent land-use and land-cover change during the study period, with a substantial amount of ecoregion variability that ranged from less than 2% to greater than 13%. Agricultural land cover declined by more than 2% overall, with variability contingent on the differential characteristics of regional human–environment systems. A large part of the Great Plains is in relatively stable land cover. However, other land systems with significant biophysical and climate limitations for agriculture have high rates of land change when pushed by economic, policy, technology, or climate forcing factors. The results indicate the regionally based potential for land cover to persist or fluctuate as land uses are adapted to spatially and temporally variable forcing factors.

  8. Land change variability and human-environment dynamics in the United States Great Plains

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Drummond, Mark A.; Auch, Roger F.; Karstensen, Krista A.; Sayler, Kristi L.; Taylor, Janis L.; Loveland, Thomas R.

    2012-01-01

    Land use and land cover changes have complex linkages to climate variability and change, biophysical resources, and socioeconomic driving forces. To assess these land change dynamics and their causes in the Great Plains, we compare and contrast contemporary changes across 16 ecoregions using Landsat satellite data and statistical analysis. Large-area change analysis of agricultural regions is often hampered by change detection error and the tendency for land conversions to occur at the local-scale. To facilitate a regional-scale analysis, a statistical sampling design of randomly selected 10 km x 10 km blocks is used to efficiently identify the types and rates of land conversions for four time intervals between 1973 and 2000, stratified by relatively homogenous ecoregions. Nearly 8% of the overall Great Plains region underwent land-use and land-cover change during the study period, with a substantial amount of ecoregion variability that ranged from less than 2% to greater than 13%. Agricultural land cover declined by more than 2% overall, with variability contingent on the differential characteristics of regional human–environment systems. A large part of the Great Plains is in relatively stable land cover. However, other land systems with significant biophysical and climate limitations for agriculture have high rates of land change when pushed by economic, policy, technology, or climate forcing factors. The results indicate the regionally based potential for land cover to persist or fluctuate as land uses are adapted to spatially and temporally variable forcing factors.

  9. Ninth International Workshop on Plant Membrane Biology

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-31

    This report is a compilation of abstracts from papers which were discussed at a workshop on plant membrane biology. Topics include: plasma membrane ATP-ases; plant-environment interactions, membrane receptors; signal transduction; ion channel physiology; biophysics and molecular biology; vaculor H+ pumps; sugar carriers; membrane transport; and cellular structure and function.

  10. [Massage and sophrology workshops for haematology professionals].

    PubMed

    Bannier, Christine; Sachot, Claudine; Simon, Armelle

    2014-04-01

    In haematology, the caregivers are confronted with the death of patients and the distress of their families. It is a working environment in which it is essential for the professionals to be taken care of in order to optimise the care provided to patients. At Nantes general hospital, massage and sophrology workshops enable the caregivers to recharge their batteries.

  11. Workshop on indoor air quality research needs

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    Workshop participants report on indoor air quality research needs including the monitoring of indoor air quality, report of the instrumentation subgroup of indoor air quality, health effects, and the report of the control technology session. Risk analysis studies addressing indoor environments were also summarized. (DLS)

  12. Changes in school environments with implementation of Arkansas Act 1220 of 2003.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Martha M; Raczynski, James M; West, Delia S; Pulley, LeaVonne; Bursac, Zoran; Gauss, C Heath; Walker, Jada F

    2010-02-01

    Changes in school nutrition and physical activity policies and environments are important to combat childhood obesity. Arkansas Act 1220 of 2003 was among the first and most comprehensive statewide legislative initiatives to combat childhood obesity through school-based change. Annual surveys of principals and superintendents have been analyzed to document substantial and important changes in school environments, policies, and practices. For example, results indicate that schools are more likely to require that healthy options be provided for student parties (4.5% in 2004, 36.9% in 2008; P changes were noted in foods and beverages offered in the cafeteria, in classrooms, and at school events, as well as in fund-raising and physical activity practices. A significant number of school districts have modified physical education requirements for elementary schools and developed policies prohibiting the use of physical activity as a punishment. We conclude that Arkansas Act 1220 of 2003 is associated with a number of changes in school environments and policies, resulting from both statewide and local initiatives spawned by the Act.

  13. Constitutive versus responsive gene expression strategies for growth in changing environments.

    PubMed

    Geisel, Nico

    2011-01-01

    Microbes respond to changing environments by adjusting gene expression levels to the demand for the corresponding proteins. Adjusting protein levels is slow, consequently cells may reach the optimal protein level only by a time when the demand changed again. It is therefore not a priori clear whether expression "on demand" is always the optimal strategy. Indeed, many genes are constitutively expressed at intermediate levels, which represents a permanent cost but provides an immediate benefit when the protein is needed. Which are the conditions that select for a responsive or a constitutive expression strategy, what determines the optimal constitutive expression level in a changing environment, and how is the fitness of the two strategies affected by gene expression noise? Based on an established model of the lac- and gal-operon expression dynamics, we study the fitness of a constitutive and a responsive expression strategy in time-varying environments. We find that the optimal constitutive expression level differs from the average demand for the gene product and from the average optimal expression level; depending on the shape of the growth rate function, the optimal expression level either provides intermediate fitness in all environments, or maximizes fitness in only one of them. We find that constitutive expression can provide higher fitness than responsive expression even when regulatory machinery comes at no cost, and we determine the minimal response rate necessary for "expression on demand" to confer a benefit. Environmental and inter-cellular noise favor the responsive strategy while reducing fitness of the constitutive one. Our results show the interplay between the demand-frequency for a gene product, the genetic response rate, and the fitness, and address important questions on the evolution of gene regulation. Some of our predictions agree with recent yeast high throughput data, for others we propose the experiments that are needed to verify them.

  14. Pharmaceuticals and personal care products in the environment: agents of subtle change?

    PubMed Central

    Daughton, C G; Ternes, T A

    1999-01-01

    During the last three decades, the impact of chemical pollution has focused almost exclusively on the conventional "priority" pollutants, especially those acutely toxic/carcinogenic pesticides and industrial intermediates displaying persistence in the environment. This spectrum of chemicals, however, is only one piece of the larger puzzle in "holistic" risk assessment. Another diverse group of bioactive chemicals receiving comparatively little attention as potential environmental pollutants includes the pharmaceuticals and active ingredients in personal care products (in this review collectively termed PPCPs), both human and veterinary, including not just prescription drugs and biologics, but also diagnostic agents, "nutraceuticals," fragrances, sun-screen agents, and numerous others. These compounds and their bioactive metabolites can be continually introduced to the aquatic environment as complex mixtures via a number of routes but primarily by both untreated and treated sewage. Aquatic pollution is particularly troublesome because aquatic organisms are captive to continual life-cycle, multigenerational exposure. The possibility for continual but undetectable or unnoticed effects on aquatic organisms is particularly worrisome because effects could accumulate so slowly that major change goes undetected until the cumulative level of these effects finally cascades to irreversible change--change that would otherwise be attributed to natural adaptation or ecologic succession. As opposed to the conventional, persistent priority pollutants, PPCPs need not be persistent if they are continually introduced to surface waters, even at low parts-per-trillion/parts-per-billion concentrations (ng-microg/L). Even though some PPCPs are extremely persistent and introduced to the environment in very high quantities and perhaps have already gained ubiquity worldwide, others could act as if they were persistent, simply because their continual infusion into the aquatic environment

  15. Changes in Communication between Muscle Stem Cells and their Environment with Aging

    PubMed Central

    Thorley, Matthew; Malatras, Apostolos; Duddy, William; Le Gall, Laura; Mouly, Vincent; Butler Browne, Gillian; Duguez, Stéphanie

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aging is associated with both muscle weakness and a loss of muscle mass, contributing towards overall frailty in the elderly. Aging skeletal muscle is also characterised by a decreasing efficiency in repair and regeneration, together with a decline in the number of adult stem cells. Commensurate with this are general changes in whole body endocrine signalling, in local muscle secretory environment, as well as in intrinsic properties of the stem cells themselves. The present review discusses the various mechanisms that may be implicated in these age-associated changes, focusing on aspects of cell-cell communication and long-distance signalling factors, such as levels of circulating growth hormone, IL-6, IGF1, sex hormones, and inflammatory cytokines. Changes in the local environment are also discussed, implicating IL-6, IL-4, FGF-2, as well as other myokines, and processes that lead to thickening of the extra-cellular matrix. These factors, involved primarily in communication, can also modulate the intrinsic properties of muscle stem cells, including reduced DNA accessibility and repression of specific genes by methylation. Finally we discuss the decrease in the stem cell pool, particularly the failure of elderly myoblasts to re-quiesce after activation, and the consequences of all these changes on general muscle homeostasis. PMID:27858742

  16. Mars Sample Handling Protocol Workshop Series: Workshop 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rummel, John D. (Editor); Acevedo, Sara E. (Editor); Kovacs, Gregory T. A. (Editor); Race, Margaret S. (Editor); DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Numerous NASA reports and studies have identified Planetary Protection (PP) as an important part of any Mars sample return mission. The mission architecture, hardware, on-board experiments, and related activities must be designed in ways that prevent both forward- and back-contamination and also ensure maximal return of scientific information. A key element of any PP effort for sample return missions is the development of guidelines for containment and analysis of returned sample(s). As part of that effort, NASA and the Space Studies Board (SSB) of the National Research Council (NRC) have each assembled experts from a wide range of scientific fields to identify and discuss issues pertinent to sample return. In 1997, the SSB released its report on recommendations for handling and testing of returned Mars samples. In particular, the NRC recommended that: a) samples returned from Mars by spacecraft should be contained and treated as potentially hazardous until proven otherwise, and b) rigorous physical, chemical, and biological analyses [should] confirm that there is no indication of the presence of any exogenous biological entity. Also in 1997, a Mars Sample Quarantine Protocol workshop was convened at NASA Ames Research Center to deal with three specific aspects of the initial handling of a returned Mars sample: 1) biocontainment, to prevent 'uncontrolled release' of sample material into the terrestrial environment; 2) life detection, to examine the sample for evidence of organisms; and 3) biohazard testing, to determine if the sample poses any threat to terrestrial life forms and the Earth's biosphere. In 1999, a study by NASA's Mars Sample Handling and Requirements Panel (MSHARP) addressed three other specific areas in anticipation of returning samples from Mars: 1) sample collection and transport back to Earth; 2) certification of the samples as non-hazardous; and 3) sample receiving, curation, and distribution. To further refine the requirements for sample

  17. Environment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    biodiversity . Consequently, the major environmental challenges facing us in the 21st century include: global climate change, energy, population and food...combustion of fossil fuels and deforestation .14 Expectations are that continued 7 accumulation of greenhouse gases is expected to lead to rising...primary ecological services coastal ecosystems provide are biodiversity both on land and underwater and pollutant filtering. Coastal wetlands, mangroves

  18. Proceedings of the SMRM Degradation Study Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The proceedings of the Solar Maximum Repair Mission Degradation Study Workshop, held at the Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland on May 9 to 10, 1985 are contained. The results of tests and studies of the returned Solar Maximum Mission hardware and materials are reported. Specifically, the workshop was concerned with the effects of four years' exposure to a low-Earth orbit environment. To provide a background for the reported findings, the summary includes a short description of the Solar Maximum Mission and the Solar Maximum Repair Mission.

  19. Report on the Second Catalog Interoperability Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thieman, James R.; James, Mary E.

    1988-01-01

    The events, resolutions, and recommendations of the Second Catalog Interoperability Workshop, held at JPL in January, 1988, are discussed. This workshop dealt with the issues of standardization and communication among directories, catalogs, and inventories in the earth and space science data management environment. The Directory Interchange Format, being constructed as a standard for the exchange of directory information among participating data systems, is discussed. Involvement in the Interoperability effort by NASA, NOAA, ISGS, and NSF is described, and plans for future interoperability considered. The NASA Master Directory prototype is presented and critiqued and options for additional capabilities debated.

  20. Adapting to a changing environment: non-obvious thresholds in multi-scale systems.

    PubMed

    Perryman, Clare; Wieczorek, Sebastian

    2014-10-08

    Many natural and technological systems fail to adapt to changing external conditions and move to a different state if the conditions vary too fast. Such 'non-adiabatic' processes are ubiquitous, but little understood. We identify these processes with a new nonlinear phenomenon-an intricate threshold where a forced system fails to adiabatically follow a changing stable state. In systems with multiple time scales, we derive existence conditions that show such thresholds to be generic, but non-obvious, meaning they cannot be captured by traditional stability theory. Rather, the phenomenon can be analysed using concepts from modern singular perturbation theory: folded singularities and canard trajectories, including composite canards. Thus, non-obvious thresholds should explain the failure to adapt to a changing environment in a wide range of multi-scale systems including: tipping points in the climate system, regime shifts in ecosystems, excitability in nerve cells, adaptation failure in regulatory genes and adiabatic switching in technology.

  1. Soil Moisture Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heilman, J. L. (Editor); Moore, D. G. (Editor); Schmugge, T. J. (Editor); Friedman, D. B. (Editor)

    1978-01-01

    The Soil Moisture Workshop was held at the United States Department of Agriculture National Agricultural Library in Beltsville, Maryland on January 17-19, 1978. The objectives of the Workshop were to evaluate the state of the art of remote sensing of soil moisture; examine the needs of potential users; and make recommendations concerning the future of soil moisture research and development. To accomplish these objectives, small working groups were organized in advance of the Workshop to prepare position papers. These papers served as the basis for this report.

  2. Nuclear Innovation Workshops Report

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, John Howard; Allen, Todd Randall; Hildebrandt, Philip Clay; Baker, Suzanne Hobbs

    2015-09-01

    The Nuclear Innovation Workshops were held at six locations across the United States on March 3-5, 2015. The data collected during these workshops has been analyzed and sorted to bring out consistent themes toward enhancing innovation in nuclear energy. These themes include development of a test bed and demonstration platform, improved regulatory processes, improved communications, and increased public-private partnerships. This report contains a discussion of the workshops and resulting themes. Actionable steps are suggested at the end of the report. This revision has a small amount of the data in Appendix C removed in order to avoid potential confusion.

  3. Writing across the Curriculum: Faculty Workshop Practices (1977-1997)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, Owen Brian

    2010-01-01

    During the Writing Across the Curriculum (WAC) movement's formative years, programs were launched at hundreds of higher education institutions across North America. WAC programs incorporated workshops as the primary delivery mechanism to introduce participants to WAC pedagogy. To explore how workshops changed teaching practices, this study…

  4. Pre-Semester Workshops and Student Nurse Retention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Steven

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine if student confidence levels change when attending a series of five pre-semester orientation success workshops. This research was conducted at a Canadian Community College whose attrition rates for the Practical Nursing program within the host college average 36%. The workshop sessions occur prior to the…

  5. Planning safer suburbs: do changes in the built environment influence residents' perceptions of crime risk?

    PubMed

    Foster, Sarah; Wood, Lisa; Christian, Hayley; Knuiman, Matthew; Giles-Corti, Billie

    2013-11-01

    A growing body of evidence has reiterated the negative impacts that crime and perceptions of insecurity can have on the health and wellbeing of local residents. Strategies that reduce residents' perceived crime risk may contribute to improved health outcomes; however interventions require a better understanding of the neighbourhood influences on residents perceptions of crime and safety. We examined the impact of changes in the objective built environment following relocation on changes in residents' perceived crime risk for participants in a longitudinal study of people moving to new neighbourhoods in Perth, Western Australia (n = 1159). They completed a questionnaire before moving to their new neighbourhood, and again 36 months after relocation. Individual-level objective environmental measures were generated at both time points using Geographic Information Systems, focussing on the characteristics that comprise a 'walkable neighbourhood'. Linear regression models examined the influence of objective environmental changes between the two environments on perceived crime risk, with progressive adjustment for other change variables (i.e., perceptions of the physical and social environment, reported crime). We found that increases in the proportion of land allocated to shopping/retail land-uses increased residents' perceived crime risk (β = 11.875, p = 0.001), and this relationship remained constant, despite controlling for other influences on perceived crime risk (β = 9.140, p = 0.004). The findings highlight an important paradox: that the neighbourhood characteristics known to enhance one outcome, such as walking, may negatively impact another. In this instance, the 'strangers' that retail destinations attract to a neighbourhood may be interpreted by locals as a threat to safety. Thus, in areas with more retail destinations, it is vital that other environmental strategies be employed to balance any negative effects that retail may have on residents' perceptions of

  6. The Asia-Pacific Maritime Security Strategy: Achieving U.S. National Security Objectives in a Changing Environment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-27

    ACHIEVING U.S. NATIONAL SECURITY OBJECTIVES IN A CHANGING ENVIRONMENT Indian Ocean In sharp contrast to the South and East China Seas, the Indian ... ENVIRONMENT Second, we are working together with our allies and partners from Northeast Asia to the Indian Ocean to build their maritime capacity. We...Pacific Maritime Security Strategy: Achieving U.S. National Security Objectives in a Changing Environment 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c

  7. [Impact of changes in the environment on vector-transmitted diseases].

    PubMed

    Mouchet, J; Carnevale, P

    1997-01-01

    We have defined the relationship between infectious diseases and environmental conditions and considered the development of this relationship to its current situation, where human intervention is occurring more often and is becoming more aggressive. The increase in the transport of freight and passengers by air has allowed parasite vectors to spread quickly and easily over large distances. Every country can now be reached from any other country within a couple of days. Usually, foreign species are unable to establish themselves and to persist in the new environment; but the recent arrival of Aedes albopictus in Albania, Italy and the Americas is a cause for concern. Demographic pressure has increased the need for land and the exploitation of new areas leads to large changes in the vegetation. The classic example of this man-made damage is the destruction of tropical forest in Western Africa, but the destruction of herbaceous vegetation, such as papyrus, in East Africa, could also have serious epidemiological consequences. Streams and rivers have been managed for power production and irrigation. The use of dams, both large and small, and the culture of rice in paddy-fields produces large expanses of water which are suitable breeding grounds for mosquitoes and snails, the vectors of human diseases such as malaria and schistosomiasis in sub-Saharan Africa. They are, however, of lesser importance in Asia and the Americas. Urbanization imposes a set of very similar structures on a specific rural environment. The effect of these two factors on each other determines the pathologies associated with each town. The suburban area is a specific environment where both urban and rural diseases occur and are made worse by poor hygiene conditions (waste, sewage, etc.). However, not all man-made changes to the environment cause a deterioration in public health. Urban and agricultural development projects must consider these issues and should use medical and environmental studies to

  8. Post-tsunami changes in the littoral environment along the southeast coast of India.

    PubMed

    Jaya Kumar, S; Naik, K A; Ramanamurthy, M V; Ilangovan, D; Gowthaman, R; Jena, B K

    2008-10-01

    The 26th December 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami devastated coastal regions of the Indian subcontinent. Andaman and Nicobar Islands, coastal stretches of Tamil Nadu, Andhra Pradesh and Kerala were the most affected regions of India. Changes in the beach profiles, long shore currents, breaking wave characteristics in the surf zone at selected locations along the Tamil Nadu coast were studied during January, April, October 2005 and January 2006. Long shore sediment transport rates were estimated from the observed parameters. Studies were carried out earlier (1995-1996 and 1998) to understand the coastal environment over a one-year cycle in the study region. The post-tsunami observations were compared with the earlier studies to establish the variations in the littoral environment and to ascertain the normalcy of the littoral environment in the post-tsunami scenario. From the changes in the beach profiles, the shoreline was observed to recede by about 20 m and built-up of backshore by about 0.5 m at most locations. Observations from the field investigations and comparisons with earlier studies along this stretch of the coastline indicate that the coastline is yet to return completely to normalcy.

  9. Footprints of air pollution and changing environment on the sustainability of built infrastructure.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Prashant; Imam, Boulent

    2013-02-01

    Over 150 research articles relating three multi-disciplinary topics (air pollution, climate change and civil engineering structures) are reviewed to examine the footprints of air pollution and changing environment on the sustainability of building and transport structures (referred as built infrastructure). The aim of this review is to synthesize the existing knowledge on this topic, highlight recent advances in our understanding and discuss research priorities. The article begins with the background information on sources and emission trends of global warming (CO(2), CH(4), N(2)O, CFCs, SF(6)) and corrosive (SO(2), O(3), NO(X)) gases and their role in deterioration of building materials (e.g. steel, stone, concrete, brick and wood) exposed in outdoor environments. Further section covers the impacts of climate- and pollution-derived chemical pathways, generally represented by dose-response functions (DRFs), and changing environmental conditions on built infrastructure. The article concludes with the discussions on the topic areas covered and research challenges. A comprehensive inventory of DRFs is compiled. The case study carried out for analysing the inter-comparability of various DRFs on four different materials (carbon steel, limestone, zinc and copper) produced comparable results. Results of another case study revealed that future projected changes in temperature and/or relatively humidity are expected to have a modest effect on the material deterioration rate whereas changes in precipitation were found to show a more dominant impact. Evidences suggest that both changing and extreme environmental conditions are expected to affect the integrity of built infrastructure both in terms of direct structural damage and indirect losses of transport network functionality. Unlike stone and metals, substantially limited information is available on the deterioration of brick, concrete and wooden structures. Further research is warranted to develop more robust and

  10. Challenges of remote sensing for quantifying changes in large complex seagrass environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roelfsema, Chris; Kovacs, Eva M.; Saunders, Megan I.; Phinn, Stuart; Lyons, Mitchell; Maxwell, Paul

    2013-11-01

    Managing seagrass environments and understanding and responding to coastal impacts such as floods or cyclones, requires assessment of seagrass distribution and its biophysical properties in time and space. Comparable assessments of seagrass distribution over time are often lacking as the information is present for separate dates, or created following different mapping approaches, and this makes it difficult to conduct quantitative comparisons. We provide an assessment of available data sets and approaches, and their suitability for monitoring and quantifying change in seagrass percentage cover and extent for a large coastal embayment (Moreton Bay, Australia, 1582 km2). Seagrass percentage cover maps were created for 2011 and 2004 and compared to map and measure the extent of seagrass percentage cover change, and changes in the extent of seagrass environments. Total extent of seagrass was shown to be higher in 2011 compared to 2004. Potential sources of these differences may be: mapping inaccuracy; actual change in extent and cover; and, monthly to seasonal variations in seagrass cover. A qualitative comparison of the 2004 and 2011 maps was performed against maps of seagrass extent maps from 1975, 1986 and 1999, which were created using a range of different methods and data. The output maps show changes in seagrass extent, but a lack of detail arising from variable mapping methods and differing mapping extents prevented a reliable comparison. We conclude that robust mapping of seasonal and inter-annual variation in seagrass percentage cover distribution or extent, as well as impacts of episodic and stochastic disturbance events, requires a thorough understanding of the mapping approaches used so that data sets can be compared. Additional complimentary information is required to help understand the drivers of changes.

  11. Bivalve aquaculture-environment interactions in the context of climate change.

    PubMed

    Filgueira, Ramón; Guyondet, Thomas; Comeau, Luc A; Tremblay, Réjean

    2016-12-01

    Coastal embayments are at risk of impacts by climate change drivers such as ocean warming, sea level rise and alteration in precipitation regimes. The response of the ecosystem to these drivers is highly dependent on their magnitude of change, but also on physical characteristics such as bay morphology and river discharge, which play key roles in water residence time and hence estuarine functioning. These considerations are especially relevant for bivalve aquaculture sites, where the cultured biomass can alter ecosystem dynamics. The combination of climate change, physical and aquaculture drivers can result in synergistic/antagonistic and nonlinear processes. A spatially explicit model was constructed to explore effects of the physical environment (bay geomorphic type, freshwater inputs), climate change drivers (sea level, temperature, precipitation) and aquaculture (bivalve species, stock) on ecosystem functioning. A factorial design led to 336 scenarios (48 hydrodynamic × 7 management). Model outcomes suggest that the physical environment controls estuarine functioning given its influence on primary productivity (bottom-up control dominated by riverine nutrients) and horizontal advection with the open ocean (dominated by bay geomorphic type). The intensity of bivalve aquaculture ultimately determines the bivalve-phytoplankton trophic interaction, which can range from a bottom-up control triggered by ammonia excretion to a top-down control via feeding. Results also suggest that temperature is the strongest climate change driver due to its influence on the metabolism of poikilothermic organisms (e.g. zooplankton and bivalves), which ultimately causes a concomitant increase of top-down pressure on phytoplankton. Given the different thermal tolerance of cultured species, temperature is also critical to sort winners from losers, benefiting Crassostrea virginica over Mytilus edulis under the specific conditions tested in this numerical exercise. In general, it is

  12. Trajectories of collaborative scientific conceptual change: Middle school students learning about ecosystems in a CSCL environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lei

    The dissertation aims to achieve two goals. First, it attempts to establish a new theoretical framework---the collaborative scientific conceptual change model, which explicitly attends to social factor and epistemic practices of science, to understand conceptual change. Second, it report the findings of a classroom study to investigate how to apply this theoretical framework to examine the trajectories of collaborative scientific conceptual change in a CSCL environment and provide pedagogical implications. Two simulations were designed to help students make connections between the macroscopic substances and the aperceptual microscopic entities and underlying processes. The reported study was focused on analyzing the aggregated data from all participants and the video and audio data from twenty focal groups' collaborative activities and the process of their conceptual development in two classroom settings. Mixed quantitative and qualitative analyses were applied to analyze the video/audio data. The results found that, overall participants showed significant improvements from pretest to posttest on system understanding. Group and teacher effect as well as group variability were detected in both students' posttest performance and their collaborative activities, and variability emerged in group interaction. Multiple data analyses found that attributes of collaborative discourse and epistemic practices made a difference in student learning. Generating warranted claims in discourse as well as the predicting, coordinating theory-evidence, and modifying knowledge in epistemic practices had an impact on student's conceptual understanding. However, modifying knowledge was found negatively related to students' learning effect. The case studies show how groups differed in using the computer tools as a medium to conduct collaborative discourse and epistemic practices. Only with certain combination of discourse features and epistemic practices can the group interaction lead to

  13. Climate Change Impacts on the Built Environment in the United States and Implications for Sustainability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quattrochi, Dale A.

    2012-01-01

    As an integral part of the National Climate Assessment (NCA), technical assessment reports for 13 regions in the U.S. that describe the scientific rationale to support climate change impacts within the purview of these regions, and provide adaptation or mitigation measures in response to these impacts. These technical assessments focus on climate change impacts on sectors that are important environmental, biophysical, and social and economic aspects of sustainability within the U.S.: Climate change science, Ecosystems and biodiversity, Water resources, Human health, Energy supply and use, Water/energy/land use, Transportation, Urban/infrastructure/vulnerability, Agriculture, Impacts of climate change on tribal/indigenous and native lands and resources, Forestry, Land use/land cover change, Rural communities development, and Impacts on biogeochemical cycles, with implications for ecosystems and biodiversity. There is a critical and timely need for the development of mitigation and adaptation strategies in response to climate change by the policy and decision making communities, to insure resiliency and sustainability of the built environment in the future.

  14. Maladaptive sex ratio adjustment by a sex-changing shrimp in selective-fishing environments.

    PubMed

    Chiba, Susumu; Yoshino, Kenji; Kanaiwa, Minoru; Kawajiri, Toshifumi; Goshima, Seiji

    2013-05-01

    1. Selective harvesting is acknowledged as a serious concern in efforts to conserve wild animal populations. In fisheries, most studies have focused on gradual and directional changes in the life-history traits of target species. While such changes represent the ultimate response of harvested animals, it is also well known that the life history of target species plastically alters with harvesting. However, research on the adaptive significance of these types of condition-dependent changes has been limited. 2. We explored the adaptive significance of annual changes in the age at sex-change of the protandrous (male-first) hermaphroditic shrimp and examined how selective harvesting affects life-history variation, by conducting field observations across 13 years and a controlled laboratory experiment. In addition, we considered whether plastic responses by the shrimp would be favourable, negligible or negative with respect to the conservation of fishery resources. 3. The age at sex-change and the population structure of the shrimp fluctuated between years during the study period. The results of the field observations and laboratory experiment both indicated that the shrimp could plastically change the timing of sex-change in accordance with the age structure of the population. These findings provide the first concrete evidence of adult sex ratio adjustment by pandalid shrimp, a group that has been treated as a model in the sex allocation theory. 4. The sex ratio adjustment by the shrimp did not always seem to be sufficient, however, as the supplement of females is restricted by their annual somatic growth rate. In addition, adjusted sex ratios are further skewed by the unintentional female-selectivity of fishing activity prior to the breeding season, indicating that the occurrence of males that have postponed sex-change causes sex ratio adjustment to become unfavourable. 5. We conclude that the plastic responses of harvested animals in selective fishing environments

  15. ASCR Workshop on Quantum Computing for Science

    SciTech Connect

    Aspuru-Guzik, Alan; Van Dam, Wim; Farhi, Edward; Gaitan, Frank; Humble, Travis; Jordan, Stephen; Landahl, Andrew J; Love, Peter; Lucas, Robert; Preskill, John; Muller, Richard P.; Svore, Krysta; Wiebe, Nathan; Williams, Carl

    2015-06-01

    This report details the findings of the DOE ASCR Workshop on Quantum Computing for Science that was organized to assess the viability of quantum computing technologies to meet the computational requirements of the DOE’s science and energy mission, and to identify the potential impact of quantum technologies. The workshop was held on February 17-18, 2015, in Bethesda, MD, to solicit input from members of the quantum computing community. The workshop considered models of quantum computation and programming environments, physical science applications relevant to DOE's science mission as well as quantum simulation, and applied mathematics topics including potential quantum algorithms for linear algebra, graph theory, and machine learning. This report summarizes these perspectives into an outlook on the opportunities for quantum computing to impact problems relevant to the DOE’s mission as well as the additional research required to bring quantum computing to the point where it can have such impact.

  16. The Analysis of Moonborne Cross Track Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry for Global Environment Change Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yixing, Ding; Huadong, Guo; Guang, Liu; Daowei, Zhang

    2014-03-01

    Faced to the earth observation requirement of large scale global environment change, a SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) antenna system is proposed to set on Moon's surface for interferometry in this paper. With several advantages superior to low earth obit SAR, such as high space resolution, large range swath and short revisit interval, the moonborne SAR could be a potential data resource of global changes monitoring and environment change research. Due to the high stability and ease of maintenance, the novel system is competent for offering a long and continuous time series of remote sensing imagery. The Moonborne SAR system performance is discussed at the beginning. Then, the peculiarity of interferometry is analyzed in both repeat pass and single pass cases. The chief distinguishing feature which is worth to research the potentiality of repeat pass interferometry is that the revisit interval is reduced to one day in most cases, and in worst case one month. Decorrelation deriving from geometry variety is discussed in detail. It turns out that the feasibility of moonborne SAR repeat pass interferometry depends on the declination of Moon. The severity of shift effects in radar echoes increased as Moon approaches to the equatorial plane. Moreover, referring to the single pass interferometry, two antennas are assumed to set on different latitude of Moon. There is enough space on Moon to form a long baseline, which is highly related to the interferogram precision.

  17. Changes in the Luminal Environment of the Colonic Epithelial Cells and Physiopathological Consequences.

    PubMed

    Blachier, François; Beaumont, Martin; Andriamihaja, Mireille; Davila, Anne-Marie; Lan, Annaïg; Grauso, Marta; Armand, Lucie; Benamouzig, Robert; Tomé, Daniel

    2017-03-01

    Evidence, mostly from experimental models, has accumulated, indicating that modifications of bacterial metabolite concentrations in the large intestine luminal content, notably after changes in the dietary composition, may have important beneficial or deleterious consequences for the colonic epithelial cell metabolism and physiology in terms of mitochondrial energy metabolism, reactive oxygen species production, gene expression, DNA integrity, proliferation, and viability. Recent data suggest that for some bacterial metabolites, like hydrogen sulfide and butyrate, the extent of their oxidation in colonocytes affects their capacity to modulate gene expression in these cells. Modifications of the luminal bacterial metabolite concentrations may, in addition, affect the colonic pH and osmolarity, which are known to affect colonocyte biology per se. Although the colonic epithelium appears able to face, up to some extent, changes in its luminal environment, notably by developing a metabolic adaptive response, some of these modifications may likely affect the homeostatic process of colonic epithelium renewal and the epithelial barrier function. The contribution of major changes in the colonocyte luminal environment in pathological processes, like mucosal inflammation, preneoplasia, and neoplasia, although suggested by several studies, remains to be precisely evaluated, particularly in a long-term perspective.

  18. Changing the environment to improve population health: a framework for considering exposure in natural experimental studies.

    PubMed

    Humphreys, David K; Panter, Jenna; Sahlqvist, Shannon; Goodman, Anna; Ogilvie, David

    2016-09-01

    There is renewed optimism regarding the use of natural experimental studies to generate evidence as to the effectiveness of population health interventions. Natural experimental studies capitalise on environmental and policy events that alter exposure to certain social, economic or environmental factors that influence health. Natural experimental studies can be useful for examining the impact of changes to 'upstream' determinants, which may not be amenable to controlled experiments. However, while natural experiments provide opportunities to generate evidence, they often present certain conceptual and methodological obstacles. Population health interventions that alter the physical or social environment are usually administered broadly across populations and communities. The breadth of these interventions means that variation in exposure, uptake and impact may be complex. Yet many evaluations of natural experiments focus narrowly on identifying suitable 'exposed' and 'unexposed' populations for comparison. In this paper, we discuss conceptual and analytical issues relating to defining and measuring exposure to interventions in this context, including how recent advances in technology may enable researchers to better understand the nature of population exposure to changes in the built environment. We argue that when it is unclear whether populations are exposed to an intervention, it may be advantageous to supplement traditional impact assessments with observational approaches that investigate differing levels of exposure. We suggest that an improved understanding of changes in exposure will assist the investigation of the impact of complex natural experiments in population health.

  19. Cometary environments; Proceedings of Symposium 5, Workshop IV, and Topical Meeting of the 27th COSPAR Plenary Meeting, Espoo, Finland, July 18-29, 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gombosi, T. I. (Editor); Atreya, S. K. (Editor); Gruen, E. (Editor); Hanner, M. S. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    Papers on the environment of comets are presented, covering topics such as constraints on the interstellar dust model of comet dust, dust particles and comet nuclei, models of cometary nuclei, subliming gas in the near-nuclear layer of the comet coma, the nucleus and rotation of Comet Halley, the surface albedo of comet nuclei, observational studies on Comet Halley, comet simulations, comet ion composition, and chemical abundances in comets. Additional topics include the O 1D and H2O production rate from comets, collisional coma models, the gas coma of Comet Giacobini-Zinner, IR properties of rough comet grains, studies of Comet Halley by Giotto, the impact of large dust particles on the Vega spacecraft, and carbonaceous materials as components of comet dust. Also, consideration is given to comet plasma boundaries, the comet ionopause, the solar wind-comet interaction, MHD turbulence and particle acceleration in a mass-loaded solar wind, combined first and second order Fermi acceleration at comets, discrete wave packets upstream from the earth and comets, and the visual appearance of comets under varying solar wind conditions.

  20. Potential Climate Change Impacts on the Built Environment in the United States and Implications for Sustainability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quattrochi, D.

    2012-12-01

    The built environment consists of components that have been made by humans at a range of scales from small (e.g., houses, shopping malls) to large (e.g., transportation networks) to highly modified landscapes such as cities. The impacts of climate change on the built environment, therefore, may have a multitude of effects on humans and the land. The impact of climate change may be exacerbated by the interaction of different events that singly may be minor, but together may have a synergistic set of impacts that are significant. Also, there may be feedback mechanisms wherein the built environment, particularly in the form of cities, may affect weather and the climate on local and regional scales. Besides having a host of such interactions, the impacts of climate change on urban areas will likely have thresholds, below which effects are incidental or of mild consequence, but beyond which the effects quickly become major. Hence, a city may be able to cope with prolonged heat waves, but if this is combined with severe drought, the overall result could be significant or even catastrophic, as accelerating demand for energy to cooling taxes water supplies needed both for energy supply and municipal water needs. Moreover, urban areas may be affected by changes in daily and seasonal high or low temperatures or precipitation, which may have a much more prolonged impact than the direct effect of these events. Thus, the cumulative impacts of multiple events may be more severe than those of any single event. Primary hazards include sea level rise and coastal storms, heat waves, intense precipitation, drought, extreme wind events, urban heat islands, and secondary air pollutants, and cold air events including frozen precipitation. Indicators need to be developed to provide a consistent, objective, and transparent overview of major variations in climate impacts, vulnerabilities, adaptation, and mitigation activities. Overall, indicators of climate change on the built environment

  1. Urban Waters Workshop

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This page will house information leading up to the 2017 Urban Waters National Training Workshop. The agenda, hotel and other quarterly updates will be posted to this page including information about how to register.

  2. Workshop: Teaching Primitive Arts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordison, Jerry

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the concrete and spiritual aspects of teaching workshops on survival skills or primitive arts. Gives details on lostproofing, or ways to teach a child not to get lost in the outdoors; building a survival shelter; and wilderness cooking. (CDS)

  3. The Career Development Workshop

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marsh, P. J.

    1973-01-01

    This article describes a career planning workshop for managers and its purpose is to support and accelerate the process of individual development without organizational coercion or manipulation. (Author/RK)

  4. An Aerospace Workshop

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Bill

    1972-01-01

    Describes the 16-day, 10,000 mile national tour of the nation's major aerospace research and development centers by 65 students enrolled in Central Washington State College's Summer Aerospace Workshop. (Author/MB)

  5. Colorado Model Rocketry Workshop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galindez, Peter

    1978-01-01

    Describes a summer workshop course in rocketry offered to educators and sponsored by industry. The participants built various model rockets and equipment and worked on challenging practical problems and activities. (GA)

  6. Special parallel processing workshop

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-01

    This report contains viewgraphs from the Special Parallel Processing Workshop. These viewgraphs deal with topics such as parallel processing performance, message passing, queue structure, and other basic concept detailing with parallel processing.

  7. Cybernetics and Workshop Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eckstein, Daniel G.

    1979-01-01

    Cybernetic sessions allow for the investigation of several variables concurrently, resulting in a large volume of input compacted into a concise time frame. Three session questions are reproduced to illustrate the variety of ideas generated relative to workshop design. (Author)

  8. ISIS Workshops Using Virtualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, K. J.; Becker, T. L.

    2015-06-01

    ISIS workshops are now using virtualization technology to improve the user experience and create a stable, consistent and useful ISIS installation for educational purposes as well as future processing needs.

  9. Transportation Management Workshop: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    This report is a compilation of discussions presented at the Transportation Management Workshop held in Gaithersburg, Maryland. Topics include waste packaging, personnel training, robotics, transportation routing, certification, containers, and waste classification.

  10. Appalachian Stream Mitigation Workshop

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    A 5 day workshop in 2011 developed for state and federal regulatory and resource agencies, who review, comment on and/or approve compensatory mitigation plans for surface coal mining projects in Appalachia

  11. Influence of Enriched Environment on Viral Encephalitis Outcomes: Behavioral and Neuropathological Changes in Albino Swiss Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bento-Torres, João; Trévia, Nonata; de Almeida Lins, Nara Alves; Passos, Aline; Santos, Zaire; Diniz, José Antonio Picanço; da Costa Vasconcelos, Pedro Fernando; Cunningham, Colm; Perry, Victor Hugh; Picanço Diniz, Cristovam Wanderley

    2011-01-01

    An enriched environment has previously been described as enhancing natural killer cell activity of recognizing and killing virally infected cells. However, the effects of environmental enrichment on behavioral changes in relation to virus clearance and the neuropathology of encephalitis have not been studied in detail. We tested the hypothesis that environmental enrichment leads to less CNS neuroinvasion and/or more rapid viral clearance in association with T cells without neuronal damage. Stereology-based estimates of activated microglia perineuronal nets and neurons in CA3 were correlated with behavioral changes in the Piry rhabdovirus model of encephalitis in the albino Swiss mouse. Two-month-old female mice maintained in impoverished (IE) or enriched environments (EE) for 3 months were behaviorally tested. After the tests, an equal volume of Piry virus (IEPy, EEPy)-infected or normal brain homogenates were nasally instilled. Eight days post-instillation (dpi), when behavioral changes became apparent, brains were fixed and processed to detect viral antigens, activated microglia, perineuronal nets, and T lymphocytes by immuno- or histochemical reactions. At 20 or 40 dpi, the remaining animals were behaviorally tested and processed for the same markers. In IEPy mice, burrowing activity decreased and recovered earlier (8–10 dpi) than open field (20–40 dpi) but remained unaltered in the EEPy group. EEPy mice presented higher T-cell infiltration, less CNS cell infection by the virus and/or faster virus clearance, less microgliosis, and less damage to the extracellular matrix than IEPy. In both EEPy and IEPy animals, CA3 neuronal number remained unaltered. The results suggest that an enriched environment promotes a more effective immune response to clear CNS virus and not at the cost of CNS damage. PMID:21264301

  12. Workshop I: Gender Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennessey, Eden; Kurup, Anitha; Meza-Montes, Lilia; Shastri, Prajval; Ghose, Shohini

    2015-12-01

    Participants in the Gender Studies workshop of the 5th IUPAP International Conference on Women in Physics discussed the gender question in science practice from a policy perspective, informed by investigations from the social science disciplines. The workshop's three sessions—"Equity and Education: Examining Gender Stigma in Science," "A Comparative Study of Women Scientists and Engineers: Experiences in India and the US," and "Toward Gender Equity Through Policy: Characterizing the Social Impact of Interventions—are summarized, and the resulting recommendations presented.

  13. Space Mechanisms Technology Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oswald, Fred B. (Editor)

    2001-01-01

    The Mechanical Components Branch at NASA Glenn Research Center hosted a workshop to discuss the state of drive systems technology needed for space exploration. The Workshop was held Thursday, November 2, 2000. About 70 space mechanisms experts shared their experiences from working in this field and considered technology development that will be needed to support future space exploration in the next 10 to 30 years.

  14. OEXP Analysis Tools Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrett, L. Bernard; Wright, Robert L.; Badi, Deborah; Findlay, John T.

    1988-01-01

    This publication summarizes the software needs and available analysis tools presented at the OEXP Analysis Tools Workshop held at the NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia on June 21 to 22, 1988. The objective of the workshop was to identify available spacecraft system (and subsystem) analysis and engineering design tools, and mission planning and analysis software that could be used for various NASA Office of Exploration (code Z) studies, specifically lunar and Mars missions.

  15. Space Mechanisms Technology Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oswald, Fred B. (Editor)

    2002-01-01

    The Mechanical Components Branch at NASA Glenn Research Center hosted a workshop on Tuesday, May 14, 2002, to discuss space mechanisms technology. The theme for this workshop was 'Working in the Cold,' a focus on space mechanisms that must operate at low temperatures. We define 'cold' as below -60C (210 K), such as would be found near the equator of Mars. However, we are also concerned with much colder temperatures such as in permanently dark craters of the Moon (about 40 K).

  16. Industrial Fuel Flexibility Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2006-09-01

    On September 28, 2006, in Washington, DC, ITP and Booz Allen Hamilton conducted a fuel flexibility workshop with attendance from various stakeholder groups. Workshop participants included representatives from the petrochemical, refining, food and beverage, steel and metals, pulp and paper, cement and glass manufacturing industries; as well as representatives from industrial boiler manufacturers, technology providers, energy and waste service providers, the federal government and national laboratories, and developers and financiers.

  17. Atomic Environment Changes Induced by Iron Addition to Gallium Bismuthate Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, V.; BarzǍ, L.; Simon, S.; ChiuzbǍIAN, S. G.; Neumann, M.

    Atomic environment of xFe2O3·(80-x)Bi2O3·20Ga2O3 heavy glasses (0≤x≤20 mol%) was investigated with respect to electronic structure of the samples. Data obtained from Bi 4f, Ga 2p, Fe 2p, and O 1s core-level photoelectron spectra indicate changes in the local order on the account of partial substitution of bismuth by iron. The bismuth cations behave essentially as network formers while the iron and gallium ones acts as network modifiers. The number of nonbridging oxygens depends on Fe2O3 content.

  18. Indonesian students' participation in an interprofessional learning workshop.

    PubMed

    Ernawati, Desak Ketut; Lee, Ya Ping; Hughes, Jeffery

    2015-01-01

    Interprofessional learning activities, such as workshops allow students to learn from, with and about each other. This study assessed the impact on Indonesian health students' attitudes towards interprofessional education (IPE) from participating in a workshop on medication safety. The students attended a two-day IPE workshop on medication safety. Thirty-five (48.6%) students completed pre-/post-workshop surveys using a modified Readiness for Interprofessional Learning Scale (RIPLS) survey. The post-workshop survey also had a series of open-ended questions. Students' responses to each RIPLS statement pre-/post-workshop were compared, whilst their responses to open-ended questions in post-workshop survey were thematically analysed. Students reported positive attitudinal changes on statements of shared learning and teamwork sub-scale (Wilcoxon p value <0.05). Analysis of the open-ended questions indicated that students perceived the workshop as having improved their understanding on the importance of teamwork and communication skills. This study found that learning with other health students through an IPE workshop improved medical, nursing and pharmacy students' attitudes towards the importance of shared learning, teamwork and communication in healthcare service.

  19. Climate change and health in the urban environment: adaptation opportunities in Australian cities.

    PubMed

    Bambrick, Hilary Jane; Capon, Anthony Guy; Barnett, Guy Bruce; Beaty, R Matthew; Burton, Anthony John

    2011-03-01

    Urban populations are growing rapidly throughout the Asia-Pacific region. Cities are vulnerable to the health impacts of climate change because of their concentration of people and infrastructure, the physical (geographical, material, and structural) attributes of the built environment, and the ecological interdependence with the urban ecosystem. Australia is one of the most highly urbanized countries in the region and its already variable climate is set to become hotter and drier with climate change. Climate change in Australia is expected to increase morbidity and mortality from thermal stress, bacterial gastroenteritis, vector-borne disease, air pollution, flooding, and bushfires. The cost and availability of fresh water, food, and energy will also likely be affected. The more vulnerable urban populations, including the elderly, socioeconomically disadvantaged groups, and those with underlying chronic disease, will be most affected. Adaptation strategies need to address this underlying burden of disease and inequity as well as implement broad structural changes to building codes and urban design, and infrastructure capacity. In doing so, cities provide opportunities to realize "co-benefits" for health (eg, from increased levels of physical activity and improved air quality). With evidence that climate change is underway, the need for cities to be a focus in the development of climate adaptation strategies is becoming more urgent.

  20. Pressures on the marine environment and the changing climate of ocean biogeochemistry.

    PubMed

    Rees, Andrew P

    2012-12-13

    The oceans are under pressure from human activities. Following 250 years of industrial activity, effects are being seen at the cellular through to regional and global scales. The change in atmospheric CO(2) from 280 ppm in pre-industrial times to 392 ppm in 2011 has contributed to the warming of the upper 700 m of the ocean by approximately 0.1°C between 1961 and 2003, to changes in sea water chemistry, which include a pH decrease of approximately 0.1, and to significant decreases in the sea water oxygen content. In parallel with these changes, the human population has been introducing an ever-increasing level of nutrients into coastal waters, which leads to eutrophication, and by 2008 had resulted in 245,000 km(2) of severely oxygen-depleted waters throughout the world. These changes are set to continue for the foreseeable future, with atmospheric CO(2) predicted to reach 430 ppm by 2030 and 750 ppm by 2100. The cycling of biogeochemical elements has proved sensitive to each of these effects, and it is proposed that synergy between stressors may compound this further. The challenge, within the next few decades, for the marine science community, is to elucidate the scope and extent that biological processes can adapt or acclimatize to a changing chemical and physical marine environment.

  1. Did the short PETM trigger long-lasting changes in terrestrial environments?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fricke, H. C.; Clyde, W. C.

    2012-12-01

    The Paleocene Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) is a well-documented episode of warming where average temperatures increased 5-8 C in both marine and terrestrial settings before returning to pre-PETM values. As a result the PETM is generally thought of as a transient event that is superimposed on a longer-term trend of global change. Nevertheless not all aspects of the climatic-hydrologic-biologic system experienced a transient response to this event. For example, the well-known dispersal of mammals (Artiodactyls, Perrisopdactyls and Primates = APP taxa) at the beginning of the PETM resulted in fundamentally different terrestrial ecosystems dafter the PETM compared to before it. In this case the PETM can be considered not just a transient event, but a triggering, or threshold, event that resulted in long-term biotic change. Here we consider the possibility that the PETM acted as a threshold event for parts of the climatic and hydrologic system as well as the biologic system. A review of terrestrial/fluvial sections from Laramide basins of western North America (Bighorn, Green River, Huerfano/Raton, Piceance Creek, Powder River, San Juan, Tornillo, Uintah, Washakie, Williston, Wind River), reveals a pronounced difference between rocks of Paleocene and of Eocene age. Common differences include absence of lignites/coal beds in the Eocene, and the occurrence of highly oxidized paleosols and relatively fewer organic-rich mudstones compared to the Paleocene. These suggest drier conditions, either a decrease in mean annual precipitation or enhanced seasonal drying. In sections where the PETM can be identified on the basis of biostratigraphic indicators and carbon isotope excursions (Bighorn, Piceance Creek, Powder River and Williston Basins), and where the PETM can be inferred based on carbon isotope data alone (Huerfano/Raton?, Tornillo, Wind River Basins), it is associated with this transition from one long-lasting lithofacies (environment?) to another. This association

  2. The global tobacco control 'endgame': change the policy environment to implement the FCTC.

    PubMed

    Cairney, Paul; Mamudu, Hadii

    2014-11-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) Framework Convention for Tobacco Control (FCTC) has prompted major change in tobacco control globally. However, policy implementation has been uneven, making 'smoke free' outcomes possible in some countries, but not others. We identify the factors that would improve implementation. We describe an ideal type of 'comprehensive tobacco control regimes', where policy environments are conducive to the implementation of tobacco control measures designed to eradicate tobacco use. The ideal type requires that a country have certain policy processes: the department of health takes the policy lead; tobacco is 'framed' as a public health problem; public health groups are consulted at the expense of tobacco interests; socioeconomic conditions are conducive to policy change; and, the scientific evidence is 'set in stone' within governments. No country will meet all these criteria in the short term, and the gap between the ideal type and the current state is wide in many countries. However, the WHO experience provides a model for progress.

  3. Crowded, cell-like environment induces shape changes in aspherical protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Margaret

    2009-03-01

    How the crowded environment inside cells affects the structures of proteins with aspherical shapes is a vital question because many proteins and protein--protein complexes in vivo adopt anisotropic shapes. Here we address this question by combining computational and experimental studies of a football-shaped protein (i.e. Borrelia burgdorferi VlsE) under crowded, cell-like conditions. The results show that macromolecular crowding affects protein-folding dynamics as well as overall protein shape. In crowded milieus, distinct conformational changes in VlsE are accompanied by secondary structure alterations that lead to exposure of a hidden antigenic region. Our work demonstrates the malleability of ``native'' proteins and implies that crowding-induced shape changes may be important for protein function and malfunction in vivo.

  4. [Analysis of urban thermal environment change characteristics during the total solar eclipse].

    PubMed

    Lu, Jun; Chen, Shi-Ling; Bu, Cui-Wen; Liu, Yu-Xi

    2011-04-01

    There was a very good observation area in Chongqing for the total solar eclipse along the Changjiang river on 22 July, 2009. Through the experiments, the outdoor meteorological data (solar radiation, air temperature and relative humidity) were observed and recorded on 21 July and 22 July. Based on the experimental observation data, the effect of thermal environment in Chongqing area was to analyzed and discussed. Experiment indicates that the reduction of air temperature and surface temperature resulted in the decrease in the solar radiation intensity, and the amplitude of the air temperature change is 2.4 degrees C during the total solar eclipse. Compared with the two days' air temperature, the amplitude of the air temperature change reached 4.6 degrees C on account of the total solar eclipse.

  5. Teachers and Teaching: Speech Production Accommodations Due to Changes in the Acoustic Environment

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Eric J.; Bottalico, Pasquale; Graetzer, Simone; Leishman, Timothy W.; Berardi, Mark L.; Eyring, Nathan G.; Jensen, Zachary R.; Rolins, Michael K.; Whiting, Jennifer K.

    2016-01-01

    School teachers have an elevated risk of voice problems due to the vocal demands in the workplace. This manuscript presents the results of three studies investigating teachers’ voice use at work. In the first study, 57 teachers were observed for 2 weeks (waking hours) to compare how they used their voice in the school environment and in non-school environments. In a second study, 45 participants performed a short vocal task in two different rooms: a variable acoustic room and an anechoic chamber. Subjects were taken back and forth between the two rooms. Each time they entered the variable acoustics room, the reverberation time and/or the background noise condition had been modified. In this latter study, subjects responded to questions about their vocal comfort and their perception of changes in the acoustic environment. In a third study, 20 untrained vocalists performed a simple vocal task in the following conditions: with and without background babble and with and without transparent plexiglass shields to increase the first reflection. Relationships were examined between [1] the results for the room acoustic parameters; [2] the subjects’ perception of the room; and [3] the recorded speech acoustic. Several differences between male and female subjects were found; some of those differences held for each room condition (at school vs. not at school, reverberation level, noise level, and early reflection). PMID:26949426

  6. Report of the new alternatives workshop GPALS and the international security environment held in Fairfax, Virginia on 6-7 March 1991. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, K.

    1991-12-01

    President Bush's introduction on the GPALS concept in his State-of-the-Union Address culminated a lengthy policy review responding to perceptions that, while the potential for a Soviet ballistic missile attack is growing more remote, proliferation of ballistic missile technologies makes a Third World ballistic missile threat more immediate. Technical progress made under the SDI holds the potential for mounting effective defenses against limited, accidental or unauthorized ballistic missile attacks in the programmatically relevant future. Patriot's success against Iraqi Scuds in the Gulf War and the political significance of this combat give further credence to this idea as being both technically feasible and politically sound. Affordability of wide-area defenses under the GPALS concepts depends heavily on hybrid surface- and space-basing. Development of an operational GPALS capability requires readdressing provisions of the ABM Treaty, but there is reason to believe that the Soviets, more immediately affected by the Third World ballistic missile threat than the United States, would be amenable to renegotiating treaty provisions. The present reshaping of the U.S. defense establishment in response to a changing strategic situation and tighter resource constraints should be seen as a propitious moment to pursue Executive/Congressional accord on GPALS.

  7. Gamified Design for Health Workshop.

    PubMed

    Giunti, Guido

    2016-01-01

    Increasing lifespans for chronic disease sufferers means a population of young patients who require lifestyle intervention from an early age. For multiple sclerosis (MS) patients, social problems begin with the decline of cognitive skills and their quality of life is affected. In this workshop, organizers will propose participants to work on different gamification design approachs to solve MS patients' engagement problem. Participants will obtain skills that can be extrapolated to other conditions that require patients change to adopt a different behavior. At the end, participants will present their proposed gamification design and discuss and comment each solution, assessing potential unintended outcomes and advantages.

  8. The Climate-G testbed: towards a large scale data sharing environment for climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aloisio, G.; Fiore, S.; Denvil, S.; Petitdidier, M.; Fox, P.; Schwichtenberg, H.; Blower, J.; Barbera, R.

    2009-04-01

    The Climate-G testbed provides an experimental large scale data environment for climate change addressing challenging data and metadata management issues. The main scope of Climate-G is to allow scientists to carry out geographical and cross-institutional climate data discovery, access, visualization and sharing. Climate-G is a multidisciplinary collaboration involving both climate and computer scientists and it currently involves several partners such as: Centro Euro-Mediterraneo per i Cambiamenti Climatici (CMCC), Institut Pierre-Simon Laplace (IPSL), Fraunhofer Institut für Algorithmen und Wissenschaftliches Rechnen (SCAI), National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), University of Reading, University of Catania and University of Salento. To perform distributed metadata search and discovery, we adopted a CMCC metadata solution (which provides a high level of scalability, transparency, fault tolerance and autonomy) leveraging both on P2P and grid technologies (GRelC Data Access and Integration Service). Moreover, data are available through OPeNDAP/THREDDS services, Live Access Server as well as the OGC compliant Web Map Service and they can be downloaded, visualized, accessed into the proposed environment through the Climate-G Data Distribution Centre (DDC), the web gateway to the Climate-G digital library. The DDC is a data-grid portal allowing users to easily, securely and transparently perform search/discovery, metadata management, data access, data visualization, etc. Godiva2 (integrated into the DDC) displays 2D maps (and animations) and also exports maps for display on the Google Earth virtual globe. Presently, Climate-G publishes (through the DDC) about 2TB of data related to the ENSEMBLES project (also including distributed replicas of data) as well as to the IPCC AR4. The main results of the proposed work are: wide data access/sharing environment for climate change; P2P/grid metadata approach; production-level Climate-G DDC; high quality tools for

  9. Numerical solution for melting of unfixed rectangular phase-change material under low-gravity environment

    SciTech Connect

    Asako, Y. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Faghri, M. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Charmchi, M. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Bahrami, P.A. )

    1994-02-01

    An enthalpy method is employed to solve transport processes associated with melting of an unfixed rectangular phase change material (PCM) in a low-gravitational environment. This method permits the phase-change problems to be solved within fixed numerical grids, hence eliminating the need for coordinate transformation. The PCM, initially at its melting temperature, is placed inside a rectangular enclosure. The lower surface of the container is then exposed to a uniform temperature higher than the PCM melting temperature. The difference in densities of solid and liquid causes a force imbalance on the solid phase exceeds that of the liquid, the solid continually moves downward as melting progresses and hence generates a flow field within the liquid. The problem is formulated as a one-domain problem with the possibility of melting from all the PCM surfaces, and no approximation is made about the liquid film thickness under the melt. The governing equations are discretized by using a control-volume-based finite difference scheme with a new iterative method to correct for the downward solid-phase velocity. This will also speed up the convergence of the numerical procedure. The results are presented in the form of a parametric study of the effects of Archimedes number, Stefan number, Prandtl number, and the geometric parameters on the melt thickness, the downward solid velocity, the elevation of the top surface, and the volume of the solid PCM. They show that in a low-gravitational environment, the melting rate is very slow.

  10. Is average chain length of plant lipids a potential proxy for vegetation, environment and climate changes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, M.; Zhang, W.; Hou, J.

    2015-04-01

    Average chain length (ACL) of leaf wax components preserved in lacustrine sediments and soil profiles has been widely adopted as a proxy indicator for past changes in vegetation, environment and climate during the late Quaternary. The fundamental assumption is that woody plants produce leaf waxes with shorter ACL values than non-woody plants. However, there is a lack of systematic survey of modern plants to justify the assumption. Here, we investigated various types of plants at two lakes, Blood Pond in the northeastern USA and Lake Ranwu on the southeastern Tibetan Plateau, and found that the ACL values were not significantly different between woody and non-woody plants. We also compiled the ACL values of modern plants in the literatures and performed a meta-analysis to determine whether a significant difference exists between woody and non-woody plants at single sites. The results showed that the ACL values of plants at 19 out of 26 sites did not show a significant difference between the two major types of plants. This suggests that extreme caution should be taken in using ACL as proxy for past changes in vegetation, environment and climate.

  11. The Effect of Time and Storage Environment on Dimensional Changes of Acrylic Resin Post Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Sabouhi, Mahmoud; Nosouhian, Saied; Dakhilalian, Mansour; Davoudi, Amin; Mehrad, Ramin

    2015-01-01

    Introduction : Post and core are needed to regain retentions and functions after endodontic therapies. Also, risk of cross contamination from dental prosthesis is so high. The aim of this study was to compare dimensional changes of acrylic resin patterns (ARP) in three different storing environments. Materials and methods : conventional root canal therapy was done on one first premolar tooth and the canal filled with Guttapercha. 2/3 of the filling was expelled and 30 direct APRs were prepared by Duralay. The samples were divided into 3 groups based on storing environments: water, NaOCl 5% and air. Finally dimensional changes in coronoapical length (CAL), coronal (CD) and apical diameter (AD) of APRs were measured in 7 consecutive times (immediately after polymerization, 1, 2, 4, 8, 24, 48 hours later). All the data were analyzed by Paired T-test and Duncon test using SPSS software ver.13 at significant level of 0.05. Results : After 24 hours, the ARPs, which were stored in air, contracted 0.07, 0.06 and 0.12 mm in AD, CD and CAL; the ARPs, which were stored in water, showed 0.03, 0.06 and 0.12 mm decrease in AD, CD and CAL; But the ARPs, which were stored in NaOCl 5%, showed significant expansion in AD, CD and CAL (0.03, 0.06 and 0.10 mm) (all P values < 0.01). Conclusion : It is better not to use NaOCl for disinfecting; also the best time for storing APRs is 8 hours for water and 2 hours for air environments after setting time. PMID:25713636

  12. Gender and the environment. Women's time use as a measure of environmental change.

    PubMed

    Awumbila, M; Momsen, J H

    1995-09-01

    These case studies pertain to marginal dry land rural areas in developing countries. The evidence suggests that women have shorter rest periods, greater intensity and fragmentation of work, and greater use of multiple simultaneous occupations than men. Macroeconomic policies have increased the work burden for women and for the poorest populations and have contributed to environmental deterioration. This paper focuses on women's use of time as a factor in explaining women's changing gender role under conditions of environmental stress. The women and the environment debate encompasses two philosophical positions. The ecofeminist theory is that women are one with nature and are unlike men, who manipulate and exploit the environment. The other theory posits that women are managers of the environment and should be approached as separate groups. The developmentalist improves on theory by offering the view that there are differences in resource allocation, entitlements, and responsibilities. The case studies deny that women's roles are fixed and generalized. The case study in Sri Lanka reveals that the Mahaweli irrigation and settlement project brought widespread deforestation and forced women to spend more time and energy in seeking fuel wood. Women adjusted to the changes by reducing the number of trips for wood, increasing the amount of the load, and involving men in the process. The number of families who switched to alternative cooking methods increased. During the dry season more of women's time is spent in washing clothes and cleaning the house. Kitchen gardening is only a wet season activity. A Burkina Faso study found that the average daily hours of work for women was 10.6 in the wet season and 12.4 in the dry season in 1991. In the Caribbean, life revolves around crop and no-crop time. Multiple job holding is a common strategy for small farmers. Gender division of labor and time use are determined by household, local context, family structure, and stage in the

  13. Adaptation of mammalian host-pathogen interactions in a changing arctic environment

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Many arctic mammals are adapted to live year-round in extreme environments with low winter temperatures and great seasonal variations in key variables (e.g. sunlight, food, temperature, moisture). The interaction between hosts and pathogens in high northern latitudes is not very well understood with respect to intra-annual cycles (seasons). The annual cycles of interacting pathogen and host biology is regulated in part by highly synchronized temperature and photoperiod changes during seasonal transitions (e.g., freezeup and breakup). With a warming climate, only one of these key biological cues will undergo drastic changes, while the other will remain fixed. This uncoupling can theoretically have drastic consequences on host-pathogen interactions. These poorly understood cues together with a changing climate by itself will challenge host populations that are adapted to pathogens under the historic and current climate regime. We will review adaptations of both host and pathogens to the extreme conditions at high latitudes and explore some potential consequences of rapid changes in the Arctic. PMID:21392401

  14. Mechanisms of cell shape change: the cytomechanics of cellular response to chemical environment and mechanical loading

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Processes such as cell locomotion and morphogenesis depend on both the generation of force by cytoskeletal elements and the response of the cell to the resulting mechanical loads. Many widely accepted theoretical models of processes involving cell shape change are based on untested hypotheses about the interaction of these two components of cell shape change. I have quantified the mechanical responses of cytoplasm to various chemical environments and mechanical loading regimes to understand better the mechanisms of cell shape change and to address the validity of these models. Measurements of cell mechanical properties were made with strands of cytoplasm submerged in media containing detergent to permeabilize the plasma membrane, thus allowing control over intracellular milieu. Experiments were performed with equipment that generated sinusoidally varying length changes of isolated strands of cytoplasm from Physarum polycephalum. Results indicate that stiffness, elasticity, and viscosity of cytoplasm all increase with increasing concentration of Ca2+, Mg2+, and ATP, and decrease with increasing magnitude and rate of deformation. These results specifically challenge assumptions underlying mathematical models of morphogenetic events such as epithelial folding and cell division, and further suggest that gelation may depend on both actin cross-linking and actin polymerization. PMID:1556158

  15. Fluorescent probe environment and the structural and charge changes in energy coupling of mitochondrial membranes.

    PubMed

    Chance, B

    1970-10-01

    The use of fluorescent probes to give continuous readouts of the structural states of mitochondrial membranes during energy coupling seems a logical extension of their use in the study of protein structural changes. A clear correlation of the probes' fluorescence characteristics with the acquisition of energy coupling can be demonstrated in fragmented and natural membrane using 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonate (ANS) and ethidium bromide respectively. The present contribution attempts to bring together contemporary viewpoints of this and other laboratories and the recent experimental data and give some detailed information on probe environment and on the structural or charge changes occurring upon energization. The energy-dependent region of the membrane is located at an aqueous interface between an outer layer of proteins (presumably cytochromes) and the membrane permeability barrier; the aromatic portion of ANS appears to be located in the lipid phase and the sulfonic acid group in the aqueous phase. The aqueous phase is probably a structured water region near paramagnetic membrane components such as cytochrome. Membrane energization arising from altered redox potential changes of cytochromes (b(T)) is communicated to the water structure through altered structural states of the hemoproteins, causing a decreased volume of the structured water region and increased interaction with the paramagnetic components in the energized state. Attendant alterations of protonic equilibria of membrane components induce both local and transmembrane changes in charge distribution, with consequent movements of ions, including the probe molecules themselves.

  16. Beginning a dialogue on the changing environment for the physical and mathematical sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Although it was our purpose to outline the issues and to improve the focus of our concerns rather than to develop solutions, we did agree that an era of important change is upon us and we should continue to meet to improve our focus on the mathematical and physical sciences, to develop a better set of data, and to think through some responses that address areas where the interests and activities of the universities, government, and industry overlap. It was generally believed that the current dynamic of the research enterprise cannot be sustained. Important changes are already under way in industrial laboratories, the U.S. administration is considering a new approach to science policy and new roles for government laboratories, and universities are experiencing considerable distress in trying to maintain quality and vitality in carrying out their responsibilities within the overall research system. In this rapidly changing environment, new ideas and flexibilities are required, but the greatest need is a better understanding of how our national innovation system, which was greatly changed and vastly expanded after World War 2, needs to be reshaped to meet the civic responsibilities of the science enterprise in the next decade.

  17. How Are Changing Solar Ultraviolet Radiation and Climate Affecting Light-induced Chemical Processes in Aquatic Environments?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Changes in the ozone layer over the past three decades have resulted in increases in solar UV-B radiation (280-315 nm) that reach the surface of aquatic environments. These changes have been accompanied by unprecedented changes in temperature and precipitation patterns around the...

  18. Workshop on Discovery Lessons-Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saunders, M. (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    As part of the Discovery Program's continuous improvement effort, a Discovery Program Lessons-Learned workshop was designed to review how well the Discovery Program is moving toward its goal of providing low-cost research opportunities to the planetary science community while ensuring continued U.S. leadership in solar system exploration. The principal focus of the workshop was on the recently completed Announcement of Opportunity (AO) cycle, but the program direction and program management were also open to comment. The objective of the workshop was to identify both the strengths and weaknesses of the process up to this point, with the goal of improving the process for the next AO cycle. The process for initializing the workshop was to solicit comments from the communities involved in the program and to use the feedback as the basis for establishing the workshop agenda. The following four sessions were developed after reviewing and synthesizing both the formal feedback received and informal feedback obtained during discussions with various participants: (1) Science and Return on Investment; (2) Technology vs. Risk; Mission Success and Other Factors; (3) Cost; and (4) AO.AO Process Changes and Program Management.

  19. t4 workshop report: Pathways of Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Kleensang, Andre; Maertens, Alexandra; Rosenberg, Michael; Fitzpatrick, Suzanne; Lamb, Justin; Auerbach, Scott; Brennan, Richard; Crofton, Kevin M; Gordon, Ben; Fornace, Albert J; Gaido, Kevin; Gerhold, David; Haw, Robin; Henney, Adriano; Ma'ayan, Avi; McBride, Mary; Monti, Stefano; Ochs, Michael F; Pandey, Akhilesh; Sharan, Roded; Stierum, Rob; Tugendreich, Stuart; Willett, Catherine; Wittwehr, Clemens; Xia, Jianguo; Patton, Geoffrey W; Arvidson, Kirk; Bouhifd, Mounir; Hogberg, Helena T; Luechtefeld, Thomas; Smirnova, Lena; Zhao, Liang; Adeleye, Yeyejide; Kanehisa, Minoru; Carmichael, Paul; Andersen, Melvin E; Hartung, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Despite wide-spread consensus on the need to transform toxicology and risk assessment in order to keep pace with technological and computational changes that have revolutionized the life sciences, there remains much work to be done to achieve the vision of toxicology based on a mechanistic foundation. To this end, a workshop was organized to explore one key aspect of this transformation - the development of Pathways of Toxicity as a key tool for hazard identification based on systems biology. Several issues were discussed in depth in the workshop: The first was the challenge of formally defining the concept of a Pathway of Toxicity (PoT), as distinct from, but complementary to, other toxicological pathway concepts such as mode of action (MoA). The workshop came up with a preliminary definition of PoT as "A molecular definition of cellular processes shown to mediate adverse outcomes of toxicants". It is further recognized that normal physiological pathways exist that maintain homeostasis and these, sufficiently perturbed, can become PoT. Second, the workshop sought to define the adequate public and commercial resources for PoT information, including data, visualization, analyses, tools, and use-cases, as well as the kinds of efforts that will be necessary to enable the creation of such a resource. Third, the workshop explored ways in which systems biology approaches could inform pathway annotation, and which resources are needed and available that can provide relevant PoT information to the diverse user communities.

  20. Southwest Washington coastal erosion workshop report 2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gelfenbaum, Guy; Kaminsky, George M.

    2002-01-01

    This report is a compilation of abstracts that correspond to oral presentations and posters presented at the fifth principal investigators workshop of the Southwest Washington Coastal Erosion Study. The workshop was held November 15 - 17, 2000 at the Department of Ecology headquarters building in Olympia, WA. For the fourth consecutive year in November, the workshop convened the entire multi-disciplinary group of scientists and engineers working on the Study or on related projects within the Columbia River littoral cell (CRLC) (Figures 1 and 2). The workshop participants are listed in the List of Attendees section towards the end of this report. The purpose of this workshop was to bring all Study investigators and associated engineers and scientists together to discuss recent work, ongoing tasks, and future research plans in the CRLC. Investigators were asked to present recent data, preliminary interpretations, and research results to invoke discussion and correlation with parallel scientific efforts. The abstracts compiled in this report represent a wealth of information on the CRLC, but because much of the work is in progress, the reader is advised that the information provided herein is preliminary and subject to change.

  1. Collaboration tools for the global accelerator network: Workshop Report

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, Deborah; Olson, Gary; Olson, Judy

    2002-09-15

    The concept of a ''Global Accelerator Network'' (GAN) has been put forward as a means for inter-regional collaboration in the operation of internationally constructed and operated frontier accelerator facilities. A workshop was held to allow representatives of the accelerator community and of the collaboratory development community to meet and discuss collaboration tools for the GAN environment. This workshop, called the Collaboration Tools for the Global Accelerator Network (GAN) Workshop, was held on August 26, 2002 at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The goal was to provide input about collaboration tools in general and to provide a strawman for the GAN collaborative tools environment. The participants at the workshop represented accelerator physicists, high-energy physicists, operations, technology tool developers, and social scientists that study scientific collaboration.

  2. Developing an Understanding of Vegetation Change and Fluvial Carbon Fluxes in Semi-Arid Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puttock, A.; Brazier, R. E.; Dungait, J. A. J.; Bol, R.; Macleod, C. J. A.

    2012-04-01

    Dryland environments are estimated to cover around 40% of the global land surface (Okin et al, 2009) and are home to approximately 2.5 billion people (Reynolds et al. 2007). Many of these areas have recently experienced extensive land degradation. One such area and the focus of this project is the semi-arid US Southwest, where degradation over the past 150 years has been characterised by the invasion of woody vegetation into grasslands. Transition from grass to woody vegetation results in a change in ecosystem structure and function (Turnbull et al, 2008). Structural change is typically characterised by an increased heterogeneity of soil and vegetation resources, associated with reduced vegetation coverage and an increased vulnerability to soil erosion and the potential loss of key nutrients to adjacent fluvial systems. Such loss of resources may impact heavily upon the amount of carbon that is sequestered by these environments and the amount of carbon that is lost as the land becomes more degraded. Therefore, understanding these vegetation transitions is significant for sustainable land use and global biogeochemical cycling. This project uses an ecohydrological approach, monitoring natural rainfall-runoff events over six bounded plots with different vegetation coverage. The experiment takes advantage of a natural abundance stable 13C isotope shift from C3 piñon-juniper (Pinus edulis-Juniperus monosperma) mixed stand through a C4 pure-grass (Bouteloua eriopoda) to C3 shrub (Larrea tridentata). Data collected quantify fluvial fluxes of sediment and associated soil organic matter and carbon that is lost from across the grass-to-shrub and grass-to-woodland transition (where change in space is taken to indicate a similar change through time). Results collected during the 2010 and 2011 monsoon seasons will be presented, illustrating that soil and carbon losses are greater as the ecosystem becomes more dominated by woody plants. Additionally this project utilises novel

  3. The QED Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Pieper, G.W.

    1994-07-01

    On May 18--20, 1994, Argonne National Laboratory hosted the QED Workshop. The workshop was supported by special funding from the Office of Naval Research. The purpose of the workshop was to assemble of a group of researchers to consider whether it is desirable and feasible to build a proof-checked encyclopedia of mathematics, with an associated facility for theorem proving and proof checking. Among the projects represented were Coq, Eves, HOL, ILF, Imps, MathPert, Mizar, NQTHM, NuPrl, OTTER, Proof Pad, Qu-Prolog, and RRL. Although the content of the QED project is highly technical rigorously proof-checked mathematics of all sorts the discussions at the workshop were rarely technical. No prepared talks or papers were given. Instead, the discussions focused primarily on such political, sociological, practical, and aesthetic questions, such as Why do it? Who are the customers? How can one get mathematicians interested? What sort of interfaces are desirable? The most important conclusion of the workshop was that QED is an idea worthy pursuing, a statement with which virtually all the participants agreed. In this document, the authors capture some of the discussions and outline suggestions for the start of a QED scientific community.

  4. International magnetic pulse compression workshop: (Proceedings)

    SciTech Connect

    Kirbie, H.C.; Newton, M.A.; Siemens, P.D.

    1991-04-01

    A few individuals have tried to broaden the understanding of specific and salient pulsed-power topics. One such attempt is this documentation of a workshop on magnetic switching as it applies primarily to pulse compression (power transformation), affording a truly international perspective by its participants under the initiative and leadership of Hugh Kirbie and Mark Newton of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and supported by other interested organizations. During the course of the Workshop at Granlibakken, a great deal of information was amassed and a keen insight into both the problems and opportunities as to the use of this switching approach was developed. The segmented workshop format proved ideal for identifying key aspects affecting optimum performance in a variety of applications. Individual groups of experts addressed network and system modeling, magnetic materials, power conditioning, core cooling and dielectrics, and finally circuits and application. At the end, they came together to consolidate their input and formulate the workshop's conclusions, identifying roadblocks or suggesting research projects, particularly as they apply to magnetic switching's trump card--its high-average-power-handling capability (at least on a burst-mode basis). The workshop was especially productive both in the quality and quantity of information transfer in an environment conducive to a free and open exchange of ideas. We will not delve into the organization proper of this meeting, rather we wish to commend to the interested reader this volume, which provides the definitive and most up-to-date compilation on the subject of magnetic pulse compression from underlying principles to current state of the art as well as the prognosis for the future of magnetic pulse compression as a consensus of the workshop's organizers and participants.

  5. EDITORIAL: Siberia Integrated Regional Study: multidisciplinary investigations of the dynamic relationship between the Siberian environment and global climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordov, E. P.; Vaganov, E. A.

    2010-03-01

    This is an editorial overview of the Siberia Integrated Regional Study (SIRS), which is a large-scale investigation of ongoing and future environmental change in Siberia and its relationship to global processes, approaches, existing challenges and future direction. Introduction The SIRS is a mega-project within the Northern Eurasia Earth Science Partnership Initiative (NEESPI), which coordinates interdisciplinary, national and international activities in Northern Eurasia that follow the Earth System Science Program (ESSP) approach. Under the direction of the International Geosphere-Biosphere Program (IGBP), SIRS is one of the Integrated Regional Studies (IRS) that aims to investigate environmental change in Siberia under the current environment of global change, and the potential impact on Earth system dynamics [1]. The regions of interest are those that may function as 'choke or switch points' for the global Earth system, where changes in regional biophysical, biogeochemical and anthropogenic components may have significant consequences for the Earth system at the global scale. Siberia is a large and significant region that may compel change [2]. Regional consequences of global warming (e.g. anomalous increases in cold season temperatures) have already been documented for Siberia [3]. This result is also supported by climate modeling results for the 20th-22nd centuries [4]. Future climatic change threatens Siberia with the shift of permafrost boundaries northward, dramatic changes in land cover (redistribution among boreal forest, wetlands, tundra, and steppe zones often precipitated by fire regime change) and the entire hydrological regime of the territory [5-8]. These processes feed back to and influence climate dynamics through the exchange of energy, water, greenhouse gases and aerosols [9]. Even though there have been a handful of national and international projects focused on the Siberian environment, scientists have minimal knowledge about the processes

  6. Modeling Changing Morphology and Density Dependent Groundwater Flow in a Dynamic Environment: case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huizer, S.; Bierkens, M. F.; Oude Essink, G.

    2014-12-01

    In many coastal regions around the world climate change will lead to a sea level rise and an increase in extreme weather conditions. This prospect has resulted in a new focus on coastal protection in the Netherlands, resulting in the initiation of an innovative coastal defence project called the Sand Motor. In this project a large body of sand or so-called mega-nourishment has been constructed along the Dutch coast. This body of sand will be distributed slowly along the coastline by wind, waves and currents. Keeping the coastal defence structures in place and creating a unique, dynamic environment with changing morphology over time. Because of the large size of the body of sand (21.5 million m3) and the position at the coastline and near coastal dunes, the Sand Motor might cause a substantial increase of the fresh water availability by increasing the volume fresh water lens underneath the dunes. This creates an opportunity to combine coastal protection with an increase of fresh water resources in coastal regions. With a three dimensional, density dependent, groundwater model the effects of changing morphology over time and the potential increase in fresh water availability have been studied.

  7. Modeling Changing Morphology and Density Dependent Groundwater Flow in a Dynamic Environment: case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huizer, Sebastian; Bierkens, Marc; Oude Essink, Gualbert

    2015-04-01

    The prospect of sea level rise and increase in extreme weather conditions has led to a new focus on coastal defense in the Netherlands. As an innovative solution for coastal erosion a mega-nourishment named the Sand Motor (or Sand Engine) has been constructed at the Dutch coast. This body of sand will be distributed slowly along the coastline by wind, waves and currents; keeping the coastal defense structures in place and creating a unique, dynamic environment with changing morphology over time. The large size and position of the Sand Motor might lead to a substantial increase of fresh ground water resources. This creates an opportunity to combine coastal protection with an increase of fresh water resources in coastal regions. With a three dimensional, density dependent, groundwater model the effects of changing morphology over time and the potential increase in fresh water availability have been studied. The preliminary model calculations show that in a period of 20 years volume of fresh water gradually increases to ca. 12 Mm3. In the nearby dune area 7-8 Mm3 is abstracted yearly, therefore the first results are promising in increasing fresh groundwater resources. More model calculations will be performed to investigate the sensitivity of the change in the fresh, brackish and salt water distribution.

  8. Change Detection, Multiple Controllers, and Dynamic Environments: Insights from the brain

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, John M.; Platt, Michael L.

    2014-01-01

    Foundational studies in decision making focused on behavior as the most accessible and reliable data on which to build theories of choice. More recent work, however, has incorporated neural data to provide insights unavailable from behavior alone. Among other contributions, these studies have validated reinforcement learning models by demonstrating neural signals posited on the basis of behavioral work in classical and operant conditioning. In such models, the values of actions or options are updated incrementally based on the difference between expectations and outcomes, resulting in the gradual acquisition of stable behavior. By contrast, natural environments are often dynamic, including sudden, unsignaled shifts in reinforcement contingencies. Such rapid changes may necessitate frequent shifts in the behavioral mode, requiring dynamic sensitivity to environmental changes. Recently, we proposed a model in which cingulate cortex plays a key role in detecting behaviorally-relevant environmental changes and facilitating the update of multiple behavioral strategies. Here, we connect this framework to a model developed to handle the analogous problem in motor control. We offer a tentative dictionary of control signals in terms of brain structures and highlight key differences between motor and decision systems that may be important in evaluating the model. PMID:23344989

  9. Organizational Adaptation to the Rapidly Changing External Environment: A Case Study of Strategic Marketing at Notre Dame College in Ohio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Shawn M.

    2012-01-01

    This thesis examined the role of strategic marketing in organizational adaptation to a rapidly changing and competitive external environment among institutions of higher education. Colleges and universities adapt to external pressures as open systems operating within a broader external environment (Bess & Dee, 2008; Keller, 1983). How does…

  10. 77 FR 31371 - Public Workshop: Privacy Compliance Workshop

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-25

    ... compliance fundamentals, privacy and data security, and the privacy compliance life cycle. A learning lunch... SECURITY Office of the Secretary Public Workshop: Privacy Compliance Workshop AGENCY: Privacy Office, DHS. ACTION: Notice Announcing Public Workshop. SUMMARY: The Department of Homeland Security Privacy...

  11. 77 FR 12313 - Food Labeling Workshop; Public Workshop

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-29

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food Labeling Workshop; Public Workshop AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of public workshop. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA... University (OSU), Robert M. Kerr Food & Agricultural Products Center (FAPC), is announcing a public...

  12. Spatiotemporal dynamics of giant panda habitat: Implications for panda conservation under a changing environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuan Mu, Mao-Ning

    Under the current rapidly changing environment, effective and efficient actions for biodiversity conservation rely on detailed knowledge on the spatiotemporal dynamics of species distribution and habitat. However, inadequate spatiotemporal information on species habitat has compromised conservation effectiveness, even for one of the most endangered species on Earth, the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca). To address this information gap, the objectives of this dissertation were to: (1) develop an approach for remotely detecting the distribution of understory bamboo, the panda's staple food, across large geographic regions; (2) develop a modeling approach for monitoring panda habitat changes across space and time; (3) evaluate the effects of current conservation efforts on short-term panda habitat changes; and (4) assess the potential impacts of climate change on long-term panda habitat dynamics. Using two dominant bamboo species in Wolong Nature Reserve, China, I showed that an integration of species distribution modeling with land surface phenology obtained from high temporal resolution remotely sensed data is a promising approach for providing detailed information on understory bamboo distribution across large geographic regions. Derived from time series data acquired by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), eleven land surface phenology metrics successfully captured the phenological characteristics of vegetation caused by understory bamboo. In addition, a species distribution model (SDM) built using the maximum entropy modeling approach (Maxent) accurately captured the distribution of understory bamboo species across the reserve based on their phenological characteristics. I further demonstrated the usefulness of the phenology-based model for not only characterizing panda habitat across space, but also monitoring its dynamics over time. By quantitatively examining the effects of different predictor variables portraying land surface

  13. Proceedings of the geosciences workshop

    SciTech Connect

    1991-01-01

    The manuscripts in these proceedings represent current understanding of geologic issues associated with the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project (WSSRAP). The Weldon Spring site is in St. Charles County, Missouri. The proceedings are the record of the information presented during the WSSRAP Geosciences Workshop conducted on February 21, 1991. The objective of the workshop and proceedings is to provide the public and scientific community with technical information that will facilitate a common understanding of the geology of the Weldon Spring site, of the studies that have been and will be conducted, and of the issues associated with current and planned activities at the site. This coverage of geologic topics is part of the US Department of Energy overall program to keep the public fully informed of the status of the project and to address public concerns as we clean up the site and work toward the eventual release of the property for use by this and future generations. Papers in these proceedings detail the geology and hydrology of the site. The mission of the WSSRAP derives from the US Department of Energy's Surplus Facilities Management Program. The WSSRAP will eliminate potential hazards to the public and the environment and make surplus real property available for other uses to the extent possible. This will be accomplished by conducting remedial actions which will place the quarry, the raffinate pits, the chemical plant, and the vicinity properties in a radiologically and chemically safe condition. The individual papers have been catalogued separately.

  14. Workshop on Marine Research Drilling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spezzaferri, Silvia

    2009-06-01

    Cold-Water Carbonate Reservoir Systems in Deep Environments (COCARDE): A Pilot Industry-Academia Partnership in Marine Research Drilling; Fribourg, Switzerland, 21-24 January 2009; Cold-water carbonate mounds supporting cold-water coral ecosystems, often dominated by Lophelia pertusa and Madrepora oculata, are widespread along the Atlantic margins from Norway to Mauritania. During the past 10 years, the scientific community has accumulated new insights on their occurrence and development and identified their potential role in reservoir formation, thus establishing a framework for collaboration with the hydrocarbon industry. A Magellan workshop, sponsored by the European Science Foundation (ESF; http://www.esf.org/), was held in Switzerland in January. The workshop gathered 35 scientists from 10 European and two extra-European countries (Canada and Morocco), representing 20 research teams, including members of two Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) proposals. Some of the participants were also involved with two ESF European Collaborative Research (EUROCORES) projects [Microbial Diversity and Functionality in Cold-Water Coral Reef Ecosystems (MiCROSYSTEMS) and Mid-Latitude Carbonate Systems: Complete Sequences From Cold-Water Coral Carbonate Mounds in the Northeast Atlantic (CARBONATE)], and the European Union Framework Program 6 integrated project Hotspot Ecosystem Research on the Margins of European Seas (HERMES).

  15. Conducting Effective Staff Development Workshops

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bishop, Kay; Janczak, Sue

    2005-01-01

    Staff development workshops conducted by library media specialists can assist teachers to integrate information literacy skills and technology into their curricula. Guidelines are presented on the planning and implementation of such workshops.

  16. Measurement control workshop instructional materials

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbs, Philip; Crawford, Cary; McGinnis, Brent

    2014-04-01

    A workshop to teach the essential elements of an effective nuclear materials control and accountability (MC&A) programs are outlined, along with the modes of Instruction, and the roles and responsibilities of participants in the workshop.

  17. Thin film solar cell workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, Joe; Jeffrey, Frank

    1993-01-01

    A summation of responses to questions posed to the thin-film solar cell workshop and the ensuing discussion is provided. Participants in the workshop included photovoltaic manufacturers (both thin film and crystalline), cell performance investigators, and consumers.

  18. Global warming in the palliative care research environment: adapting to change.

    PubMed

    Fainsinger, R L

    2008-06-01

    Advocates of palliative care research have often described the cold and difficult environment that has constrained the development of research internationally. The development of palliative care research has been slow over the last few decades and has met with resistance and sometimes hostility to the idea of conducting research in 'vulnerable populations'. The seeds of advocacy for research can be found in palliative care literature from the 1980s and early 1990s. Although we have much to do, we need to recognize that palliative care research development has come a long way. Of particular note is the development of well-funded collaboratives that now exist in Europe, Canada, Australia and the USA. The European Association for Palliative Care and the International Association for Hospice and Palliative Care has recognized the need to develop and promote global research initiatives, with a special focus on developing countries. Time is needed to develop good research evidence and in a more complex healthcare environment takes increasingly more resources to be productive. The increased support (global warming) evident in the increased funding opportunities available to palliative care researchers in a number of countries brings both benefits and challenges. There is evidence that the advocacy of individuals such as Kathleen Foley, Neil MacDonald, Balfour Mount, Vittorio Ventafridda, Robert Twycross and Geoff Hanks is now providing fertile ground and a much friendlier environment for a new generation of interdisciplinary palliative care research. We have achieved many of the goals necessary to avoid failure of the 'palliative care experiment', and need to accept the challenge of our present climate and adapt and take advantage of the change.

  19. Overcoming barriers in online workshop development: an ELITE experience.

    PubMed

    Talcott, Kimberly S; O'Donnell, John M; Burns, Helen K

    2013-06-01

    The Emerging Learning and Integrated Technologies Education (ELITE) Faculty Development Program created eight online workshops to assist nurse educators in using technology within their organization's nurse education program. Continuing education units were provided for completion of the individual online workshops. The ELITE program worked through several barriers to transform content that was previously presented during face-to-face workshops into standalone online offerings. Barriers and implementation strategies for the on-site to online transition included restructuring workshop objectives, keeping current with rapid technology changes, altering a course management system to meet the needs of the program and the learner, and crafting independent practice opportunities for the online learner. The online workshop development experience of the ELITE program may assist other continuing education and staff development professionals who are updating their program offerings or pursuing online education for the first time.

  20. Research on countermeasures to global environment change in the field of urban planning

    SciTech Connect

    Kawanaka, Takashi

    1993-12-31

    There are a lot of research themes in the field of urban planning and related fields as mitigation of global environment change. Main theme is reduction method of CO{sub 2} gas emission as a countermeasure against global warming. Some groups research on estimation of CO{sub 2} emission caused by construction activities both in building engineering and civil engineering and also on evaluation of countermeasures. They investigate reduction of CO{sub 2} emission by fossil fuel combustion and by building materials (cement, steel and so on) production process. But we cannot use data fitted to a spatial scale of urban planning. Many researches are focused on nation wide analysis. We, BRI, make a study of {open_quotes}Research on CO{sub 2} Emission in Urban Development and the Control Technologies{close_quotes} as will be seen later at 2. (2). There are two ways of research to reduce CO{sub 2} emission caused by daily activities to urban planning field. One is research on positive utilizing of natural environment in urban areas without depending to energy consuming artificial facilities. There is a research on mitigation of heat island phenomenon for instance. The other ways are research on improvement of energy consumption effect and on reusing of wasted energy In energy consuming type urban space for instance. There s a research on promoting District Heating and Cooling (DHC) and cogeneration.