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Sample records for channel molecular dynamics

  1. Calculating Conductance of Ion Channels - Linking Molecular Dynamics and Electrophysiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Michael A.; Pohorille, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Molecular dynamics computer simulations were combined with an electrodiffusion model to compute conduction of simple ion channels. The main assumptions of the model, and the consistency, efficiency and accuracy of the ion current calculations were tested and found satisfactory. The calculated current-voltage dependence for a synthetic peptide channel is in agreement with experiments and correctly captures the asymmetry of current with respect to applied field.

  2. Insights into channel dysfunction from modelling and molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Musgaard, Maria; Paramo, Teresa; Domicevica, Laura; Andersen, Ole Juul; Biggin, Philip C

    2017-06-29

    Developments in structural biology mean that the number of different ion channel structures has increased significantly in recent years. Structures of ion channels enable us to rationalize how mutations may lead to channelopathies. However, determining the structures of ion channels is still not trivial, especially as they necessarily exist in many distinct functional states. Therefore, the use of computational modelling can provide complementary information that can refine working hypotheses of both wild type and mutant ion channels. The simplest but still powerful tool is homology modelling. Many structures are available now that can provide suitable templates for many different types of ion channels, allowing a full three-dimensional interpretation of mutational effects. These structural models, and indeed the structures themselves obtained by X-ray crystallography, and more recently cryo-electron microscopy, can be subjected to molecular dynamics simulations, either as a tool to help explore the conformational dynamics in detail or simply as a means to refine the models further. Here we review how these approaches have been used to improve our understanding of how diseases might be linked to specific mutations in ion channel proteins. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. Substrate Channel in Nitrogenase Revealed by a Molecular Dynamics Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Dayle; Danyal, Karamatullah; Raugei, Simone; Seefeldt, Lance C.

    2014-03-22

    Mo-dependent nitrogenase catalyzes the biological reduction of N2 to 2NH3 at the FeMo-cofactor buried deep inside the MoFe protein. Access of substrates, such as N2, to the active site is likely restricted by the surrounding protein, requiring substrate channels that lead from the surface to the active site. Earlier studies on crystallographic structures of the MoFe protein have suggested three putative substrate channels. Here, we have utilized sub-microsecond atomistic molecular dynamics simulations to allow the nitrogenase MoFe protein to explore its conformational space in an aqueous solution at physiological ionic strength, revealing a putative substrate channel not previously reported. The viability of the proposed channel was tested by examining the free energy of passage of N2 from the surface through the channel to FeMo-cofactor, with discovery of a very low energy barrier. These studies point to a viable substrate channel in nitrogenase that appears during thermal motions of the protein in an aqueous environment that approaches a face of FeMo-cofactor earlier implicated in substrate binding.

  4. Molecular modeling and dynamics of the sodium channel inactivation gate.

    PubMed Central

    Sirota, Fernanda L; Pascutti, Pedro G; Anteneodo, Celia

    2002-01-01

    The intracellular linker L(III-IV) of voltage-gated sodium channels is known to be involved in their mechanism of inactivation. Its primary sequence is well conserved in sodium channels from different tissues and species. However, the role of charged residues in this region, first thought to play an important role in inactivation, has not been well identified, whereas the IFM triad (I1488-M1490) has been characterized as the crucial element for inactivation. In this work, we constructed theoretical models and performed molecular dynamics simulations, exploring the role of L(III-IV)-charged residues in the presence of a polar/nonpolar planar interface represented by a dielectric discontinuity. From structural predictions, two alpha-helical segments are proposed. Moreover, from dynamics simulations, a time-conserved motif is detected and shown to play a relevant role in guiding the inactivation particle toward its receptor site. PMID:11867438

  5. Molecular dynamics insights into human aquaporin 2 water channel.

    PubMed

    Binesh, A R; Kamali, R

    2015-12-01

    In this study, the first molecular dynamics simulation of the human aquaporin 2 is performed and for a better understanding of the aquaporin 2 permeability performance, the characteristics of water transport in this protein channel and key biophysical parameters of AQP2 tetramer including osmotic and diffusive permeability constants and the pore radius are investigated. For this purpose, recently recovered high resolution X-ray crystal structure of` the human aquaporin 2 is used to perform twenty nanosecond molecular dynamics simulation of fully hydrated tetramer of this protein embedded in a lipid bilayer. The resulting water permeability characteristics of this protein channel showed that the water permeability of the human AQP2 is in a mean range in comparison with other human aquaporins family. Finally, the results reported in this research demonstrate that molecular dynamics simulation of human AQP2 provided useful insights into the mechanisms of water permeation and urine concentration in the human kidney. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. An alamethicin channel in a lipid bilayer: molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed Central

    Tieleman, D P; Berendsen, H J; Sansom, M S

    1999-01-01

    We present the results of 2-ns molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of a hexameric bundle of Alm helices in a 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoylphosphatidylcholine bilayer. These simulations explore the dynamic properties of a model of a helix bundle channel in a complete phospholipid bilayer in an aqueous environment. We explore the stability and conformational dynamics of the bundle in a phospholipid bilayer. We also investigate the effect on bundle stability of the ionization state of the ring of Glu18 side chains. If all of the Glu18 side chains are ionised, the bundle is unstable; if none of the Glu18 side chains are ionized, the bundle is stable. pKA calculations suggest that either zero or one ionized Glu18 is present at neutral pH, correlating with the stable form of the helix bundle. The structural and dynamic properties of water in this model channel were examined. As in earlier in vacuo simulations (Breed et al., 1996 .Biophys. J. 70:1643-1661), the dipole moments of water molecules within the pore were aligned antiparallel to the helix dipoles. This contributes to the stability of the helix bundle. PMID:10096876

  7. Molecular dynamics simulations of water within models of ion channels.

    PubMed

    Breed, J; Sankararamakrishnan, R; Kerr, I D; Sansom, M S

    1996-04-01

    The transbilayer pores formed by ion channel proteins contain extended columns of water molecules. The dynamic properties of such waters have been suggested to differ from those of water in its bulk state. Molecular dynamics simulations of ion channel models solvated within and at the mouths of their pores are used to investigate the dynamics and structure of intra-pore water. Three classes of channel model are investigated: a) parallel bundles of hydrophobic (Ala20) alpha-helices; b) eight-stranded hydrophobic (Ala10) antiparallel beta-barrels; and c) parallel bundles of amphipathic alpha-helices (namely, delta-toxin, alamethicin, and nicotinic acetylcholine receptor M2 helix). The self-diffusion coefficients of water molecules within the pores are reduced significantly relative to bulk water in all of the models. Water rotational reorientation rates are also reduced within the pores, particularly in those pores formed by alpha-helix bundles. In the narrowest pore (that of the Ala20 pentameric helix bundle) self-diffusion coefficients and reorientation rates of intra-pore waters are reduced by approximately an order of magnitude relative to bulk solvent. In Ala20 helix bundles the water dipoles orient antiparallel to the helix dipoles. Such dipole/dipole interaction between water and pore may explain how water-filled ion channels may be formed by hydrophobic helices. In the bundles of amphipathic helices the orientation of water dipoles is modulated by the presence of charged side chains. No preferential orientation of water dipoles relative to the pore axis is observed in the hydrophobic beta-barrel models.

  8. A structural and dynamic molecular model for the sodium channel of Electrophorus electricus.

    PubMed

    Kosower, E M

    1985-03-25

    Chemical logic and single group rotation (SGR) theory are applied to the primary structure determined by Noda et al. [(1984) Nature 312, 121-127] to construct a molecular model of the sodium channel of Electrophorus electricus. Both structural and dynamic aspects of the channel are accounted for, including gating current, sensitivity to changes in membrane potential, channel opening, a binding site for sodium, selectivity for sodium over potassium, capacity for rapid sodium flow, sensitivity to batrachotoxin (or other toxins) and inactivation.

  9. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of the Antiamoebin Ion Channel: Linking Structure and Conductance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Michael A.; Wei, Chenyu; Bjelkmar, Paer; Wallace, B. A.; Pohorille, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were carried out in order to ascertain which of the potential multimeric forms of the transmembrane peptaibol channel, antiamoebin, is consistant with its measured conductance. Estimates of the conductance obtained through counting ions that cross the channel and by solving the Nernst-Planck equation yield consistent results, indicating that the motion of ions inside the channel can be satisfactorily described as diffusive.The calculated conductance of octameric channels is markedly higher than the conductance measured in single channel recordings, whereas the tetramer appears to be non-conducting. The conductance of the hexamer was estimated to be 115+/-34 pS and 74+/-20 pS, at 150 mV and 75 mV, respectively, in satisfactory agreement with the value of 90 pS measured at 75 mV. On this basis we propose that the antiamoebin channel consists of six monomers. Its pore is large enough to accommodate K(+) and Cl(-) with their first solvation shells intact. The free energy barrier encountered by K(+) is only 2.2 kcal/mol whereas Cl(-) encounters a substantially higher barrier of nearly 5 kcal/mol. This difference makes the channel selective for cations. Ion crossing events are shown to be uncorrelated and follow Poisson statistics. keywords: ion channels, peptaibols, channel conductance, molecular dynamics

  10. Parallel helix bundles and ion channels: molecular modeling via simulated annealing and restrained molecular dynamics.

    PubMed Central

    Kerr, I D; Sankararamakrishnan, R; Smart, O S; Sansom, M S

    1994-01-01

    A parallel bundle of transmembrane (TM) alpha-helices surrounding a central pore is present in several classes of ion channel, including the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR). We have modeled bundles of hydrophobic and of amphipathic helices using simulated annealing via restrained molecular dynamics. Bundles of Ala20 helices, with N = 4, 5, or 6 helices/bundle were generated. For all three N values the helices formed left-handed coiled coils, with pitches ranging from 160 A (N = 4) to 240 A (N = 6). Pore radius profiles revealed constrictions at residues 3, 6, 10, 13, and 17. A left-handed coiled coil and a similar pattern of pore constrictions were observed for N = 5 bundles of Leu20. In contrast, N = 5 bundles of Ile20 formed right-handed coiled coils, reflecting loosened packing of helices containing beta-branched side chains. Bundles formed by each of two classes of amphipathic helices were examined: (a) M2a, M2b, and M2c derived from sequences of M2 helices of nAChR; and (b) (LSSLLSL)3, a synthetic channel-forming peptide. Both classes of amphipathic helix formed left-handed coiled coils. For (LSSLLSL)3 the pitch of the coil increased as N increased from 4 to 6. The M2c N = 5 helix bundle is discussed in the context of possible models of the pore domain of nAChR. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 3 PMID:7529585

  11. The Implementation of Slab Geometry for Membrane-Channel Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Bostick, David; Berkowitz, Max L.

    2003-01-01

    Slab geometric boundary conditions are applied in the molecular dynamics simulation of a simple membrane-channel system. The results of the simulation were compared to those of an analogous system using normal three-dimensional periodic boundary conditions. Analysis of the dynamics and electrostatics of the system show that slab geometric periodicity eliminates the artificial bulk water orientational polarization that is present while using normal three-dimensional periodicity. Furthermore, even though the water occupancy and volume of our simple channel is the same when using either method, the electrostatic properties are considerably different when using slab geometry. In particular, the orientational polarization of water is seen to be different in the interior of the channel. This gives rise to a markedly different electric field within the channel. We discuss the implications of slab geometry for the future simulation of this type of system and for the study of channel transport properties. PMID:12829468

  12. Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels: Mechanistic Insights From Atomistic Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Oakes, V; Furini, S; Domene, C

    2016-01-01

    The permeation of ions and other molecules across biological membranes is an inherent requirement of all cellular organisms. Ion channels, in particular, are responsible for the conduction of charged species, hence modulating the propagation of electrical signals. Despite the universal physiological implications of this property, the molecular functioning of ion channels remains ambiguous. The combination of atomistic structural data with computational methodologies, such as molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, is now considered routine to investigate structure-function relationships in biological systems. A fuller understanding of conduction, selectivity, and gating, therefore, is steadily emerging due to the applicability of these techniques to ion channels. However, because their structure is known at atomic resolution, studies have consistently been biased toward K(+) channels, thus the molecular determinants of ionic selectivity, activation, and drug blockage in Na(+) channels are often overlooked. The recent increase of available crystallographic data has eminently encouraged the investigation of voltage-gated sodium (NaV) channels via computational methods. Here, we present an overview of simulation studies that have contributed to our understanding of key principles that underlie ionic conduction and selectivity in Na(+) channels, in comparison to the K(+) channel analogs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Gating motions in voltage-gated potassium channels revealed by coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Treptow, Werner; Marrink, Siewert-J; Tarek, Mounir

    2008-03-20

    Voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels are ubiquitous transmembrane proteins involved in electric signaling of excitable tissues. A fundamental property of these channels is the ability to open or close in response to changes in the membrane potential. To date, their structure-based activation mechanism remains unclear, and there is a large controversy on how these gates function at the molecular level, in particular, how movements of the voltage sensor domain are coupled to channel gating. So far, all mechanisms proposed for this coupling are based on the crystal structure of the open voltage-gated Kv1.2 channel and structural models of the closed form based on electrophysiology experiments. Here, we use coarse-grain (CG) molecular dynamics simulations that allow conformational changes from the open to the closed form of the channel (embedded in its membrane environment) to be followed. Despite the low specificity of the CG force field, the obtained closed structure satisfies several experimental constraints. The overall results suggest a gating mechanism in which a lateral displacement the S4-S5 linker leads to a closing of the gate. Only a small up-down movement of the S4 helices is noticed. Additionally, the study suggests a peculiar upward motion of the intracellular tetramerization domain of the channel, hence providing a molecular view on how this domain may further regulate conduction in Kv channels.

  14. Combining molecular dynamics and an electrodiffusion model to calculate ion channel conductance.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Michael A; Nguyen, Thuy Hien; Pohorille, Andrew

    2014-12-14

    Establishing the relation between the structures and functions of protein ion channels, which are protein assemblies that facilitate transmembrane ion transport through water-filled pores, is at the forefront of biological and medical sciences. A reliable way to determine whether our understanding of this relation is satisfactory is to reproduce the measured ionic conductance over a broad range of applied voltages. This can be done in molecular dynamics simulations by way of applying an external electric field to the system and counting the number of ions that traverse the channel per unit time. Since this approach is computationally very expensive we develop a markedly more efficient alternative in which molecular dynamics is combined with an electrodiffusion equation. This alternative approach applies if steady-state ion transport through channels can be described with sufficient accuracy by the one-dimensional diffusion equation in the potential given by the free energy profile and applied voltage. The theory refers only to line densities of ions in the channel and, therefore, avoids ambiguities related to determining the surface area of the channel near its endpoints or other procedures connecting the line and bulk ion densities. We apply the theory to a simple, model system based on the trichotoxin channel. We test the assumptions of the electrodiffusion equation, and determine the precision and consistency of the calculated conductance. We demonstrate that it is possible to calculate current/voltage dependence and accurately reconstruct the underlying (equilibrium) free energy profile, all from molecular dynamics simulations at a single voltage. The approach developed here applies to other channels that satisfy the conditions of the electrodiffusion equation.

  15. Molecular Dynamics Study for Channel Size Dependence of Shear Stress Between Droplet and Wall.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Akinori; Mima, Toshiki; Kinefuchi, Ikuya; Tokumasu, Takashi

    2015-04-01

    In this study, the channel size dependence of the shear stress between water droplets and solid walls in nm-order channel was analyzed. We considered a several different-sized and highly hydrophobic channel whose macroscopic contact angle was about 150 degrees. We have evaluated the shear stress and the normal pressure by molecular dynamics simulation. Analyzing shear stress and normal pressure based on the macroscopic model, we have discussed the difference between the macroscopic model based on hydrodynamics and the microscopic model. As a result, in the high hydrophobic case, it became clear that the shear stress depends on the channel size due to the large Laplace pressure. Furthermore, in the case that the channel size was less than 50 A, the normal pressure by the molecular simulation didn't agree with the expected value from the Young-Laplace equation. From this study it was clear that molecular simulation is needed when the channel size is less than 40 A.

  16. Conduction of Na+ and K+ through the NaK Channel: Molecular and Brownian Dynamics Studies

    PubMed Central

    Vora, Taira; Bisset, David; Chung, Shin-Ho

    2008-01-01

    Conduction of ions through the NaK channel, with M0 helix removed, was studied using both Brownian dynamics and molecular dynamics. Brownian dynamics simulations predict that the truncated NaK has approximately a third of the conductance of the related KcsA K+ channel, is outwardly rectifying, and has a Michaelis-Menten current-concentration relationship. Current magnitude increases when the glutamine residue located near the intracellular gate is replaced with a glutamate residue. The channel is blocked by extracellular Ca2+. Molecular dynamics simulations show that, under the influence of a strong applied potential, both Na+ and K+ move across the selectivity filter, although conduction rates for Na+ ions are somewhat lower. The mechanism of conduction of Na+ differs significantly from that of K+ in that Na+ is preferentially coordinated by single planes of pore-lining carbonyl oxygens, instead of two planes as in the usual K+ binding sites. The water-containing filter pocket resulting from a single change in the selectivity filter sequence (compared to potassium channels) disrupts several of the planes of carbonyl oxygens, and thus reduces the filter's ability to discriminate against sodium. PMID:18456826

  17. Conduction of Na+ and K+ through the NaK channel: molecular and Brownian dynamics studies.

    PubMed

    Vora, Taira; Bisset, David; Chung, Shin-Ho

    2008-08-01

    Conduction of ions through the NaK channel, with M0 helix removed, was studied using both Brownian dynamics and molecular dynamics. Brownian dynamics simulations predict that the truncated NaK has approximately a third of the conductance of the related KcsA K+ channel, is outwardly rectifying, and has a Michaelis-Menten current-concentration relationship. Current magnitude increases when the glutamine residue located near the intracellular gate is replaced with a glutamate residue. The channel is blocked by extracellular Ca2+. Molecular dynamics simulations show that, under the influence of a strong applied potential, both Na+ and K+ move across the selectivity filter, although conduction rates for Na+ ions are somewhat lower. The mechanism of conduction of Na+ differs significantly from that of K+ in that Na+ is preferentially coordinated by single planes of pore-lining carbonyl oxygens, instead of two planes as in the usual K+ binding sites. The water-containing filter pocket resulting from a single change in the selectivity filter sequence (compared to potassium channels) disrupts several of the planes of carbonyl oxygens, and thus reduces the filter's ability to discriminate against sodium.

  18. Ion transport in the gramicidin channel: molecular dynamics study of single and double occupancy.

    PubMed Central

    Roux, B; Prod'hom, B; Karplus, M

    1995-01-01

    The structural and thermodynamic factors responsible for the singly and doubly occupied saturation states of the gramicidin channel are investigated with molecular dynamics simulations and free energy perturbation methods. The relative free energy of binding of all of the five common cations Li+, Na+, K+, Rb+, and Cs+ is calculated in the singly and doubly occupied channel and in bulk water. The atomic system, which includes the gramicidin channel, a model membrane made of neutral Lennard-Jones particles and 190 explicit water molecules to form the bulk region, is similar to the one used in previous work to calculate the free energy profile of a Na+ ion along the axis of the channel. In all of the calculations, the ions are positioned in the main binding sites located near the entrances of the channel. The calculations reveal that the doubly occupied state is relatively more favorable for the larger ions. Thermodynamic decomposition is used to show that the origin of the trend observed in the calculations is due to the loss of favorable interactions between the ion and the single file water molecules inside the channel. Small ions are better solvated by the internal water molecules in the singly occupied state than in the doubly occupied state; bigger ions are solvated almost as well in both occupation states. Water-channel interactions play a role in the channel response. The observed trends are related to general thermodynamical properties of electrolyte solutions. Images FIGURE 2 PMID:7538804

  19. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of the Antiamoebin Ion Channel: Linking Structure and Conductance

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Michael A.; Wei, Chenyu; Bjelkmar, Pär; Wallace, B.A.; Pohorille, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Molecular-dynamics simulations were carried out to ascertain which of the potential multimeric forms of the transmembrane peptaibol channel, antiamoebin, is consistent with its measured conductance. Estimates of the conductance obtained through counting ions that cross the channel and by solving the Nernst-Planck equation yield consistent results, indicating that the motion of ions inside the channel can be satisfactorily described as diffusive. The calculated conductance of octameric channels is markedly higher than the conductance measured in single channel recordings, whereas the tetramer appears to be nonconducting. The conductance of the hexamer was estimated to be 115 ± 34 pS and 74 ± 20 pS, at 150 mV and 75 mV, respectively, in satisfactory agreement with the value of 90 pS measured at 75 mV. On this basis, we propose that the antiamoebin channel consists of six monomers. Its pore is large enough to accommodate K+ and Cl− with their first solvation shells intact. The free energy barrier encountered by K+ is only 2.2 kcal/mol whereas Cl− encounters a substantially higher barrier of nearly 5 kcal/mol. This difference makes the channel selective for cations. Ion crossing events are shown to be uncorrelated and follow Poisson statistics. PMID:21575573

  20. Investigation of polarization effects in the gramicidin A channel from ab initio molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Timko, Jeff; Kuyucak, Serdar

    2012-11-28

    Polarization is an important component of molecular interactions and is expected to play a particularly significant role in inhomogeneous environments such as pores and interfaces. Here we investigate the effects of polarization in the gramicidin A ion channel by performing quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and comparing the results with those obtained from classical MD simulations with non-polarizable force fields. We consider the dipole moments of backbone carbonyl groups and channel water molecules as well as a number of structural quantities of interest. The ab initio results show that the dipole moments of the carbonyl groups and water molecules are highly sensitive to the hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) they participate in. In the absence of a K(+) ion, water molecules in the channel are quite mobile, making the H-bond network highly dynamic. A central K(+) ion acts as an anchor for the channel waters, stabilizing the H-bond network and thereby increasing their average dipole moments. In contrast, the K(+) ion has little effect on the dipole moments of the neighboring carbonyl groups. The weakness of the ion-peptide interactions helps to explain the near diffusion-rate conductance of K(+) ions through the channel. We also address the sampling issue in relatively short ab initio MD simulations. Results obtained from a continuous 20 ps ab initio MD simulation are compared with those generated by sampling ten windows from a much longer classical MD simulation and running each window for 2 ps with ab initio MD. Both methods yield similar results for a number of quantities of interest, indicating that fluctuations are fast enough to justify the short ab initio MD simulations.

  1. Investigation of polarization effects in the gramicidin A channel from ab initio molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timko, Jeff; Kuyucak, Serdar

    2012-11-01

    Polarization is an important component of molecular interactions and is expected to play a particularly significant role in inhomogeneous environments such as pores and interfaces. Here we investigate the effects of polarization in the gramicidin A ion channel by performing quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and comparing the results with those obtained from classical MD simulations with non-polarizable force fields. We consider the dipole moments of backbone carbonyl groups and channel water molecules as well as a number of structural quantities of interest. The ab initio results show that the dipole moments of the carbonyl groups and water molecules are highly sensitive to the hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) they participate in. In the absence of a K+ ion, water molecules in the channel are quite mobile, making the H-bond network highly dynamic. A central K+ ion acts as an anchor for the channel waters, stabilizing the H-bond network and thereby increasing their average dipole moments. In contrast, the K+ ion has little effect on the dipole moments of the neighboring carbonyl groups. The weakness of the ion-peptide interactions helps to explain the near diffusion-rate conductance of K+ ions through the channel. We also address the sampling issue in relatively short ab initio MD simulations. Results obtained from a continuous 20 ps ab initio MD simulation are compared with those generated by sampling ten windows from a much longer classical MD simulation and running each window for 2 ps with ab initio MD. Both methods yield similar results for a number of quantities of interest, indicating that fluctuations are fast enough to justify the short ab initio MD simulations.

  2. Molecular dynamics study of ion transport through an open model of voltage-gated sodium channel.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Sun, Ruining; Liu, Huihui; Gong, Haipeng

    2017-05-01

    Voltage-gated sodium (NaV) channels are critical in the signal transduction of excitable cells. In this work, we modeled the open conformation for the pore domain of a prokaryotic NaV channel (NaVRh), and used molecular dynamics simulations to track the translocation of dozens of Na(+) ions through the channel in the presence of a physiological transmembrane ion concentration gradient and a transmembrane electrical field that was closer to the physiological one than previous studies. Channel conductance was then estimated from simulations on the wide-type and DEKA mutant of NaVRh. Interestingly, the conductivity predicted from the DEKA mutant agrees well with experimental measurement on eukaryotic NaV1.4 channel. Moreover, the wide-type and DEKA mutant of NaVRh exhibited markedly distinct ion permeation patterns, which thus implies the mechanistic difference between prokaryotic and eukaryotic NaV channels. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Molecular dynamics study of free energy profiles for organic cations in gramicidin A channels.

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Y; Pear, M R; Busath, D D

    1997-01-01

    The free energy profiles for four organic cations in right-handed single-helix gramicidin A dimers were computed by using umbrella sampling molecular dynamics with CHARMM. Ion-water column translocations were facilitated by using a novel "water-tunnel" approach. The overlapping pieces of free energy profile for adjacent windows were selected from three trajectories that differed in initial ion rotation and were aligned by the method of umbrella potential differences. Neglected long-range electrostatic energies from the bulk water and the bilayer were computed with DelPhi and added to the profile. The approach was corroborated for the formamidinium-guanidinium pair by using perturbation dynamics at axial positions 0, 6, 12, and 15 A from the channel center. The barrier to ethylammonium entry was prohibitive at 21 kcal/mol, whereas for methylammonium it was 5.5 kcal/mol, and the profile was quite flat through the channel, roughly consistent with conductance measurements. The profile for formamidinium was very similar to that of methylammonium. Guanidinium had a high entry barrier (deltaF = +8.6 kcal/mol) and a narrow deep central well (deltaF = -2.6 kcal/mol), qualitatively consistent with predictions from voltage-dependent potassium current block measurements. Its deep central well, contrasting with the flat profile for formamidinium, was verified with perturbation dynamics and was correlated with its high propensity to form hydrogen bonds with the channel at the dimer junction (not shared by the other three cations). Analysis of the ensemble average radial forces on the ions demonstrates that all four ions undergo compressive forces in the channel that are at maximum at the center of the monomer and relieved at the dimer junction, illustrating increased flexibility of the channel walls in the center of the channel. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 PMID:9336167

  4. Gramicidin A channel as a test ground for molecular dynamics force fields.

    PubMed

    Allen, Toby W; Baştuğ, Turgut; Kuyucak, Serdar; Chung, Shin-Ho

    2003-04-01

    We use the well-known structural and functional properties of the gramicidin A channel to test the appropriateness of force fields commonly used in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of ion channels. For this purpose, the high-resolution structure of the gramicidin A dimer is embedded in a dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine bilayer, and the potential of mean force of a K(+) ion is calculated along the channel axis using the umbrella sampling method. Calculations are performed using two of the most common force fields in MD simulations: CHARMM and GROMACS. Both force fields lead to large central barriers for K(+) ion permeation, that are substantially higher than those deduced from the physiological data by inverse methods. In long MD simulations lasting over 60 ns, several ions are observed to enter the binding site but none of them crossed the channel despite the presence of a large driving field. The present results, taken together with many earlier studies, highlights the shortcomings of the standard force fields used in MD simulations of ion channels and calls for construction of more appropriate force fields for this purpose.

  5. Homology modeling and molecular dynamics simulation studies of an inward rectifier potassium channel.

    PubMed Central

    Capener, C E; Shrivastava, I H; Ranatunga, K M; Forrest, L R; Smith, G R; Sansom, M S

    2000-01-01

    A homology model has been generated for the pore-forming domain of Kir6.2, a component of an ATP-sensitive K channel, based on the x-ray structure of the bacterial channel KcsA. Analysis of the lipid-exposed and pore-lining surfaces of the model reveals them to be compatible with the known features of membrane proteins and Kir channels, respectively. The Kir6.2 homology model was used as the starting point for nanosecond-duration molecular dynamics simulations in a solvated phospholipid bilayer. The overall drift from the model structure was comparable to that seen for KcsA in previous similar simulations. Preliminary analysis of the interactions of the Kir6.2 channel model with K(+) ions and water molecules during these simulations suggests that concerted single-file motion of K(+) ions and water through the selectivity filter occurs. This is similar to such motion observed in simulations of KcsA. This suggests that a single-filing mechanism is conserved between different K channel structures and may be robust to changes in simulation details. Comparison of Kir6.2 and KcsA suggests some degree of flexibility in the filter, thus complicating models of ion selectivity based upon a rigid filter. PMID:10827973

  6. Mechanism and energetics of charybdotoxin unbinding from a potassium channel from molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Chen, Po-Chia; Kuyucak, Serdar

    2009-04-08

    Ion channel-toxin complexes are ideal systems for computational studies of protein-ligand interactions, because, in most cases, the channel axis provides a natural reaction coordinate for unbinding of a ligand and a wealth of physiological data is available to check the computational results. We use a recently determined structure of a potassium channel-charybdotoxin complex in molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the mechanism and energetics of unbinding. Pairs of residues on the channel protein and charybdotoxin that are involved in the binding are identified, and their behavior is traced during umbrella-sampling simulations as charybdotoxin is moved away from the binding site. The potential of mean force for the unbinding of charybdotoxin is constructed from the umbrella sampling simulations using the weighted histogram analysis method, and barriers observed are correlated with specific breaking of interactions and influx of water molecules into the binding site. Charybdotoxin is found to undergo conformational changes as a result of the reaction coordinate choice--a nontrivial decision for larger ligands--which we explore in detail, and for which we propose solutions. Agreement between the calculated and the experimental binding energies is obtained once the energetic consequences of these conformational changes are included in the calculations.

  7. Mechanism and Energetics of Charybdotoxin Unbinding from a Potassium Channel from Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Po-chia; Kuyucak, Serdar

    2009-01-01

    Ion channel-toxin complexes are ideal systems for computational studies of protein-ligand interactions, because, in most cases, the channel axis provides a natural reaction coordinate for unbinding of a ligand and a wealth of physiological data is available to check the computational results. We use a recently determined structure of a potassium channel-charybdotoxin complex in molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the mechanism and energetics of unbinding. Pairs of residues on the channel protein and charybdotoxin that are involved in the binding are identified, and their behavior is traced during umbrella-sampling simulations as charybdotoxin is moved away from the binding site. The potential of mean force for the unbinding of charybdotoxin is constructed from the umbrella sampling simulations using the weighted histogram analysis method, and barriers observed are correlated with specific breaking of interactions and influx of water molecules into the binding site. Charybdotoxin is found to undergo conformational changes as a result of the reaction coordinate choice—a nontrivial decision for larger ligands—which we explore in detail, and for which we propose solutions. Agreement between the calculated and the experimental binding energies is obtained once the energetic consequences of these conformational changes are included in the calculations. PMID:19348743

  8. Molecular dynamics simulation of liquid water confined inside graphite channels: dielectric and dynamical properties.

    PubMed

    Martí, J; Nagy, G; Guàrdia, E; Gordillo, M C

    2006-11-30

    Electric and dielectric properties and microscopic dynamics of liquid water confined between graphite slabs are analyzed by means of molecular dynamics simulations for several graphite-graphite separations at ambient conditions. The electric potential across the interface shows oscillations due to water layering, and the overall potential drop is about -0.28 V. The total dielectric constant is larger than the corresponding value for the bulklike internal region of the system. This is mainly due to the preferential orientations of water nearest the graphite walls. Estimation of the capacitance of the system is reported, indicating large variations for the different adsorption layers. The main trend observed concerning water diffusion is 2-fold: on one hand, the overall diffusion of water is markedly smaller for the closest graphite-graphite separations, and on the other hand, water molecules diffuse in interfaces slightly slower than those in the bulklike internal areas. Molecular reorientational times are generally larger than those corresponding to those of unconstrained bulk water. The analysis of spectral densities revealed significant spectral shifts, compared to the bands in unconstrained water, in different frequency regions, and associated to confinement effects. These findings are important because of the scarce information available from experimental, theoretical, and computer simulation research into the dielectric and dynamical properties of confined water.

  9. Targeted Molecular Dynamics Study of C-Loop Closure and Channel Gating in Nicotinic Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xiaolin; Wang, Hailong; Grant, Barry; Sine, Steven M; McCammon, J. Andrew

    2006-01-01

    The initial coupling between ligand binding and channel gating in the human α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) has been investigated with targeted molecular dynamics (TMD) simulation. During the simulation, eight residues at the tip of the C-loop in two alternating subunits were forced to move toward a ligand-bound conformation as captured in the crystallographic structure of acetylcholine binding protein (AChBP) in complex with carbamoylcholine. Comparison of apo- and ligand-bound AChBP structures shows only minor rearrangements distal from the ligand-binding site. In contrast, comparison of apo and TMD simulation structures of the nAChR reveals significant changes toward the bottom of the ligand-binding domain. These structural rearrangements are subsequently translated to the pore domain, leading to a partly open channel within 4 ns of TMD simulation. Furthermore, we confirmed that two highly conserved residue pairs, one located near the ligand-binding pocket (Lys145 and Tyr188), and the other located toward the bottom of the ligand-binding domain (Arg206 and Glu45), are likely to play important roles in coupling agonist binding to channel gating. Overall, our simulations suggest that gating movements of the α7 receptor may involve relatively small structural changes within the ligand-binding domain, implying that the gating transition is energy-efficient and can be easily modulated by agonist binding/unbinding. PMID:17009865

  10. Dynamic Channel Allocation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-09-01

    7 1 . Fixed Channel Allocation (FCA) ........................................................7 2. Dynamic Channel ...19 7. CSMA/CD-Based Multiple Network Lines .....................................20 8. Hybrid Channel Allocation in Wireless Networks...28 1 . Channel Allocation

  11. Toward elucidating the heat activation mechanism of the TRPV1 channel gating by molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Wen, Han; Qin, Feng; Zheng, Wenjun

    2016-12-01

    As a key cellular sensor, the TRPV1 cation channel undergoes a gating transition from a closed state to an open state in response to various physical and chemical stimuli including noxious heat. Despite years of study, the heat activation mechanism of TRPV1 gating remains enigmatic at the molecular level. Toward elucidating the structural and energetic basis of TRPV1 gating, we have performed molecular dynamics (MD) simulations (with cumulative simulation time of 3 μs), starting from the high-resolution closed and open structures of TRPV1 solved by cryo-electron microscopy. In the closed-state simulations at 30°C, we observed a stably closed channel constricted at the lower gate (near residue I679), while the upper gate (near residues G643 and M644) is dynamic and undergoes flickery opening/closing. In the open-state simulations at 60°C, we found higher conformational variation consistent with a large entropy increase required for the heat activation, and both the lower and upper gates are dynamic with transient opening/closing. Through ensemble-based structural analyses of the closed state versus the open state, we revealed pronounced closed-to-open conformational changes involving the membrane proximal domain (MPD) linker, the outer pore, and the TRP helix, which are accompanied by breaking/forming of a network of closed/open-state specific hydrogen bonds. By comparing the closed-state simulations at 30°C and 60°C, we observed heat-activated conformational changes in the MPD linker, the outer pore, and the TRP helix that resemble the closed-to-open conformational changes, along with partial formation of the open-state specific hydrogen bonds. Some of the residues involved in the above key hydrogen bonds were validated by previous mutational studies. Taken together, our MD simulations have offered rich structural and dynamic details beyond the static structures of TRPV1, and promising targets for future mutagenesis and functional studies of the TRPV1 channel

  12. Mechanisms of Selectivity in Channels and Enzymes Studied with Interactive Molecular Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Grayson, Paul; Tajkhorshid, Emad; Schulten, Klaus

    2003-01-01

    Interactive molecular dynamics, a new modeling tool for rapid investigation of the physical mechanisms of biological processes at the atomic level, is applied to study selectivity and regulation of the membrane channel protein GlpF and the enzyme glycerol kinase. These proteins facilitate the first two steps of Escherichia coli glycerol metabolism. Despite their different function and architecture the proteins are found to employ common mechanisms for substrate selectivity: an induced geometrical fit by structurally homologous binding sites and an induced rapid dipole moment reversal. Competition for hydrogen bonding sites with water in both proteins is critical for substrate motion. In glycerol kinase, it is shown that the proposed domain motion prevents competition with water, in turn regulating the binding of glycerol. PMID:12829462

  13. Activator-induced dynamic disorder and molecular memory in human two-pore domain hTREK1 K channel.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Tapan Kumar; Dana, Saswati; Raha, Soumyendu; Sikdar, Sujit K

    2011-04-01

    Ion channels are fundamental molecules in the nervous system that catalyze the flux of ions across the cell membrane. Ion channel flux activity is comparable to the catalytic activity of enzyme molecules. Saturating concentrations of substrate induce "dynamic disorder" in the kinetic rate processes of single-enzyme molecules and consequently, develop correlative "memory" of the previous history of activities. Similarly, binding of ions as substrate alone or in presence of agonists affects the catalytic turnover of single-ion channels. Here, we investigated the possible existence of dynamic disorder and molecular memory in the single human-TREK1-channel due to binding of substrate/agonist using the excised inside-out patch-clamp technique. Our results suggest that the single-hTREK1-channel behaves as a typical Michaelis-Menten enzyme molecule with a high-affinity binding site for K(+) ion as substrate. But, in contrast to enzyme, dynamic disorder in single-hTREK1-channel was not induced by substrate K(+) binding, but required allosteric modification of the channel molecule by the agonist, trichloroethanol. In addition, interaction of trichloroethanol with hTREK1 induced strong correlation in the waiting time and flux intensity, exemplified by distinct mode-switching between high and low flux activities. This suggested the induction of molecular memory in the channel molecule by the agonist, which persisted for several decades in time. Our mathematical modeling studies identified the kinetic rate processes associated with dynamic disorder. It further revealed the presence of multiple populations of distinct conformations that contributed to the "heterogeneity" and consequently, to the molecular memory phenomenon that we observed. The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s12154-010-0053-3) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

  14. Molecular dynamics simulations on the interaction of the transmembrane NavAb channel with cholesterol and lipids in the membrane.

    PubMed

    Suwattanasophon, Chonticha; Wolschann, Peter; Faller, Roland

    2016-01-01

    Increased cholesterol levels are associated with multiple pathological conditions. In this work, molecular dynamics simulations were applied to observe the influence of membrane cholesterol levels on a voltage-gated sodium channel. Different lipid compositions are modeled around the channel to obtain information about the possible effects by which cholesterol influences NavAb channels. Cholesterol was normally not directly interacting with either the closed or inactivated conformation. Cholesterol increased lipid packing implying that it plays a crucial role in restricting lipid movement in the region around 1 nm of the channel in a 1-palmitoyl-2-oeleoyl phosphatidylcholine matrix. Our results provide the first computational indication of an indirect modulation of NavAb channels by membrane cholesterol.

  15. Applied-field molecular dynamics study of a model calcium channel selectivity filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yan; Henderson, Douglas; Busath, David

    2003-03-01

    The calcium channel is thought to have a short selectivity filter containing charged glutamate side chains. This filter was modeled using an atomistic cylinder of length 10 Å in which were confined eight half-charged oxygen anions representing glutamate carboxylate oxygens. Current flow through the filter was computed using applied field nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations at various mole fractions of Na+ and Ca2+ in 2 M chloride solutions with simple point charge/extended model water. The filter was cation selective and had conductances in the range of those extrapolated from experimental results. For this model, unlike implicit solvent models at lower voltages and concentrations, the mole fraction behavior was not anomalous and cation binding was nonselective at 2.2 V. Perturbations of filter diameter and confined charge resulted in similar behaviors. At physiological voltages, mole fraction conductance behavior could not be reliably simulated in 100 ns runs, but nonselective cation binding persisted. Nevertheless, it is of interest that ion entry into the confinement region was limited by an energy barrier and at least, in the case of Ca2+, led to an increase in the energy of the other Ca2+ ion in the confinement region and prompt exit of one of them. The filter was most commonly occupied by 2 or 3 Na+ ions in pure Na+ solutions or 1 or 2 Ca2+ ions in pure Ca2+ solutions. For CaCl2 solution, the additional ion, if present, was most commonly stalled behind the entry barrier, i.e., within the channel filter but not yet having entered the confinement region. Thus, the simulations demonstrate the concept that entry of a new mobile Ca2+ ion into the selectivity filter serves to release the prior occupant that was tightly bound.

  16. [Molecular dynamics simulations of migration of ions and molecules through the acetylcholine receptor channel].

    PubMed

    Shaĭtan, K V; Li, A; Tershkina, K B; Kirpichnikov, M P

    2007-01-01

    A dynamic model of the channel of an acetylcholine receptor in a closed state has been proposed. The channel is formed by five a-helices of subunit M2 and stabilized by the cyclic hydrocarbon (CH2)105. The migration of charged and unchanged van der Waals particles with a diameter of 7.72 A equivalent to the diameter of a hydrated sodium ion has been studied. The migration occurred by the action of external force applied to the complex along the channel axis. In the closed state, the inhibition of ions is due to two components: electrostatic interaction and steric constraints. The van der Waals channel gate is formed by residues 13'-A-Val255, B-Val261, C-Val269, D-Val255, and E-Ile264, and the negatively changed residues occurring in the upper part of the channel have a great effect on ion selectivity.

  17. Capsaicin interaction with TRPV1 channels in a lipid bilayer: molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Sonya M; Newstead, Simon; Swartz, Kenton J; Sansom, Mark S P

    2015-03-24

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1 (TRPV1) is a heat-sensitive ion channel also involved in pain sensation, and is the receptor for capsaicin, the active ingredient of hot chili peppers. The recent structures of TRPV1 revealed putative ligand density within the S1 to S4 voltage-sensor-like domain of the protein. However, questions remain regarding the dynamic role of the lipid bilayer in ligand binding to TRPV1. Molecular dynamics simulations were used to explore behavior of capsaicin in a 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl phosphatidylcholine bilayer and with the target S1-S4 transmembrane helices of TRPV1. Equilibrium simulations reveal a preferred interfacial localization for capsaicin. We also observed a capsaicin molecule flipping from the extracellular to the intracellular leaflet, and subsequently able to access the intracellular TRPV1 binding site. Calculation of the potential of mean force (i.e., free energy profile) of capsaicin along the bilayer normal confirms that it prefers an interfacial localization. The free energy profile indicates that there is a nontrivial but surmountable barrier to the flipping of capsaicin between opposing leaflets of the bilayer. Molecular dynamics of the S1-S4 transmembrane helices of the TRPV1 in a lipid bilayer confirm that Y511, known to be crucial to capsaicin binding, has a distribution along the bilayer normal similar to that of the aromatic group of capsaicin. Simulations were conducted of the TRPV1 S1-S4 transmembrane helices in the presence of capsaicin placed in the aqueous phase, in the lipid, or docked to the protein. No stable interaction between ligand and protein was seen for simulations initiated with capsaicin in the bilayer. However, interactions were seen between TRPV1 and capsaicin starting from the cytosolic aqueous phase, and capsaicin remained stable in the majority of simulations from the docked pose. We discuss the significance of capsaicin flipping from the extracellular to the intracellular

  18. Effect of sensor domain mutations on the properties of voltage-gated ion channels: molecular dynamics studies of the potassium channel Kv1.2.

    PubMed

    Delemotte, Lucie; Treptow, Werner; Klein, Michael L; Tarek, Mounir

    2010-11-03

    The effects on the structural and functional properties of the Kv1.2 voltage-gated ion channel, caused by selective mutation of voltage sensor domain residues, have been investigated using classical molecular dynamics simulations. Following experiments that have identified mutations of voltage-gated ion channels involved in state-dependent omega currents, we observe for both the open and closed conformations of the Kv1.2 that specific mutations of S4 gating-charge residues destabilize the electrostatic network between helices of the voltage sensor domain, resulting in the formation of hydrophilic pathways linking the intra- and extracellular media. When such mutant channels are subject to transmembrane potentials, they conduct cations via these so-called "omega pores." This study provides therefore further insight into the molecular mechanisms that lead to omega currents, which have been linked to certain channelopathies.

  19. Molecular dynamics - potential of mean force calculations as a tool for understanding ion permeation and selectivity in narrow channels.

    PubMed

    Allen, Toby W; Andersen, Olaf S; Roux, Benoit

    2006-12-01

    Ion channels catalyze the permeation of charged molecules across cell membranes and are essential for many vital physiological functions, including nerve and muscle activity. To understand better the mechanisms underlying ion conduction and valence selectivity of narrow ion channels, we have employed free energy techniques to calculate the potential of mean force (PMF) for ion movement through the prototypical gramicidin A channel. Employing modern all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) force fields with umbrella sampling methods that incorporate one hundred 1-2 ns trajectories, we find that it is possible to achieve semi-quantitative agreement with experimental binding and conductance measurements. We also examine the sensitivity of the MD-PMF results to the choice of MD force field and compare PMFs for potassium, calcium and chloride ions to explore the basis for the valence selectivity of this narrow and uncharged ion channel. A large central barrier is observed for both anions and divalent ions, consistent with lack of experimental conductance. Neither anion or divalent cation is seen to be stabilized inside the channel relative to the bulk electrolyte and each leads to large disruptions to the protein and membrane structure when held deep inside the channel. Weak binding of calcium ions outside the channel corresponds to a free energy well that is too shallow to demonstrate channel blocking. Our findings emphasize the success of the MD-PMF approach and the sensitivity of ion energetics to the choice of biomolecular force field.

  20. Exploring conformational states of the bacterial voltage-gated sodium channel NavAb via molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Amaral, Cristiano; Carnevale, Vincenzo; Klein, Michael L; Treptow, Werner

    2012-12-26

    The X-ray structure of the bacterial voltage-gated sodium channel NavAb has been reported in a conformation with a closed conduction pore. Comparison between this structure and the activated-open and resting-closed structures of the voltage-gated Kv1.2 potassium channel suggests that the voltage-sensor domains (VSDs) of the reported structure are not fully activated. Using the aforementioned structures of Kv1.2 as templates, molecular dynamics simulations are used to identify analogous functional conformations of NavAb. Specifically, starting from the NavAb crystal structure, conformations of the membrane-bound channel are sampled along likely pathways for activation of the VSD and opening of the pore domain. Gating charge computations suggest that a structural rearrangement comparable to that occurring between activated-open and resting-closed states is required to explain experimental values of the gating charge, thereby confirming that the reported VSD structure is likely an intermediate along the channel activation pathway. Our observation that the X-ray structure exhibits a low pore domain-opening propensity further supports this notion. The present molecular dynamics study also identifies conformations of NavAb that are seemingly related to the resting-closed and activated-open states. Our findings are consistent with recent structural and functional studies of the orthologous channels NavRh, NaChBac, and NavMs and offer possible structures for the functionally relevant conformations of NavAb.

  1. Nanoscale flow past a colloidal cylinder confined in a slit channel: Lubrication theory and molecular dynamics analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmani, Amir M.; Shao, Yang; Jupiterwala, Mehlam; Colosqui, Carlos E.

    2015-08-01

    Plane Poiseuille flow past a nanoscale cylinder that is arbitrarily confined (i.e., symmetrically or asymmetrically confined) in a slit channel is studied via hydrodynamic lubrication theory and molecular dynamics simulations, considering cases where the cylinder remains static or undergoes thermal motion. Analytical expressions for the drag force and volumetric flow rate valid for high confinement and arbitrary off-center displacements are derived for the first time in this work. Lubrication theory predictions are in close agreement with molecular dynamics simulations of flows having molecularly thin lubrication gaps, despite the presence of significant structural forces induced by the crystalline structure of the modeled solid. While the maximum drag force is observed in symmetric confinement, i.e., when the cylinder is equidistant from both channel walls, the drag decays significantly as the cylinder moves away from the channel centerline and approaches a wall. Hence, significant reductions in the mean drag force on the cylinder and hydraulic resistance of the channel can be observed when thermal motion induces random off-center displacements. Analytical expressions and numerical results in this work provide useful insights into the hydrodynamics of colloidal solids and macromolecules in confinement.

  2. Modelling of ion permeation in K+ channels by nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations: I. Permeation energetics and structure stability.

    PubMed

    Neamţu, A; Suciu, Daniela

    2004-01-01

    Because of the great importance of physiological and pathophysiological processes in which ion channels are involved and because their operation is described by physicochemical laws, there have been many attempts to develop physical models able to describe the membrane permeability and also the structural and functional properties of the channel protein structures. In this study (in two parts) we present a series of simulations on a K+ channel model (KcsA) using Nonequilibrium Molecular Dynamics simulations (NEMD), in order to follow structure stability, permeation energetics and the possibility of obtaining quantitative information about the permeation process using the Linear Response Theory (LRT). On K+ ions were applied external forces to determine them to pass through the channel in a relatively small amount of time, accessible computationally. We ascertained a high resistance of the protein to deformation even in conditions when great forces were applied on ions (the system was far from equilibrium). The estimation of energy profiles in the course of ions passage through the channel demonstrates that these proteins create a conductivity pathway with no energetic barriers for ions movement across the channel (which could be present due to ions dehydration). The dynamic model used demonstrates (as proposed before in the literature after the examination of the static KcsA structure obtained by X-Ray crystallography) that this is due to the interaction of ions with the negatively charged carbonyl oxygens of the main polypeptide chain in the selectivity filter region.

  3. Lipid Interaction Sites on Channels, Transporters and Receptors: Recent Insights from Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Hedger, George; Sansom, Mark S. P.

    2017-01-01

    Lipid molecules are able to selectively interact with specific sites on integral membrane proteins, and modulate their structure and function. Identification and characterisation of these sites is of importance for our understanding of the molecular basis of membrane protein function and stability, and may facilitate the design of lipid-like drug molecules. Molecular dynamics simulations provide a powerful tool for the identification of these sites, complementing advances in membrane protein structural biology and biophysics. We describe recent notable biomolecular simulation studies which have identified lipid interaction sites on a range of different membrane proteins. The sites identified in these simulation studies agree well with those identified by complementary experimental techniques. This demonstrates the power of the molecular dynamics approach in the prediction and characterization of lipid interaction sites on integral membrane proteins. PMID:26946244

  4. Ion-water and ion-polypeptide correlations in a gramicidin-like channel. A molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, P C

    1990-01-01

    This work describes a molecular dynamics study of ion-water and ion-polypeptide correlation in a model gramicidin-like channel (the polyglycine analogue) based upon interaction between polarizable, multipolar groups. The model suggests that the vicinity of the dimer junction and of the ethanolamine tail are regions of unusual flexibility. Cs+ binds weakly in the mouth of the channel: there it coordinates five water molecules and the #11CO group with which it interacts strongly and is ideally aligned. In the channel interior it is generally pentacoordinate; at the dimer junction, because of increased channel flexibility, it again becomes essentially hexacoordinate. The ion is also strongly coupled to the #13 CO but not to either #9 or #15, consistent with 13C NMR data. Water in the channel interior is strikingly different from bulk water; it has a much lower mean dipole moment. This correlates with our observation (which differs from that of previous studies) that water-water angular correlations do not persist within the channel, a result independent of ion occupancy or ionic polarity. In agreement with streaming potential measurements, there are seven single file water molecules associated with Cs+ permeation; one of these is always in direct contact with bulk water. At the mouth of an ion-free channel, there is a pattern of dipole moment alteration among the polar groups. Due to differential interaction with water, exo-carbonyls have unusually large dipole moments whereas those of the endo-carbonyls are low. The computed potential of mean force for CS+ translocation is qualitatively reasonable. However, it only exhibits a weakly articulated binding site and it does not quantitatively account for channel energetics. Correction for membrane polarization reduces, but does not eliminate, these problems. PMID:1705448

  5. Interactions of lipids and detergents with a viral ion channel protein: molecular dynamics simulation studies.

    PubMed

    Rouse, Sarah L; Sansom, Mark S P

    2015-01-22

    Structural studies of membrane proteins have highlighted the likely influence of membrane mimetic environments (i.e., lipid bilayers versus detergent micelles) on the conformation and dynamics of small α-helical membrane proteins. We have used molecular dynamics simulations to compare the conformational dynamics of BM2 (a small α-helical protein from the membrane of influenza B) in a model phospholipid bilayer environment with its behavior in protein-detergent complexes with either the zwitterionic detergent dihexanoylphosphatidylcholine (DHPC) or the nonionic detergent dodecylmaltoside (DDM). We find that DDM more closely resembles the lipid bilayer in terms of its interaction with the protein, while the short-tailed DHPC molecule forms "nonphysiological" interactions with the protein termini. We find that the intrinsic micelle properties of each detergent are conserved upon formation of the protein-detergent complex. This implies that simulations of detergent micelles may be used to help select optimal conditions for experimental studies of membrane proteins.

  6. Application of Brownian motion theory to the analysis of membrane channel ionic trajectories calculated by molecular dynamics.

    PubMed Central

    Jakobsson, E; Chiu, S W

    1988-01-01

    This paper shows how Brownian motion theory can be used to analyze features of individual ion trajectories in channels as calculated by molecular dynamics, and that its use permits more precise determinations of diffusion coefficients than would otherwise be possible. We also show how a consideration of trajectories of single particles can distinguish between effects due to the magnitude of the diffusion coefficient and effects due to barriers and wells in the potential profile, effects which can not be distinguished by consideration of average fluxes. PMID:2465032

  7. ORF8a of SARS-CoV forms an ion channel: experiments and molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cheng-Chang; Krüger, Jens; Sramala, Issara; Hsu, Hao-Jen; Henklein, Peter; Chen, Yi-Ming Arthur; Fischer, Wolfgang B

    2011-02-01

    ORF8a protein is 39 residues long and contains a single transmembrane domain. The protein is synthesized using solid phase peptide synthesis and reconstituted into artificial lipid bilayers that forms cation-selective ion channels with a main conductance level of 8.9±0.8pS at elevated temperature (38.5°C). Computational modeling studies including multi nanosecond molecular dynamics simulations in a hydrated POPC lipid bilayer are done with a 22 amino acid transmembrane helix to predict a putative homooligomeric helical bundle model. A structural model of a pentameric bundle is proposed with cysteines, serines and threonines facing the pore.

  8. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Voltage-Gated Cation Channels: Insights on Voltage-Sensor Domain Function and Modulation

    PubMed Central

    Delemotte, Lucie; Klein, Michael L.; Tarek, Mounir

    2012-01-01

    Since their discovery in the 1950s, the structure and function of voltage-gated cation channels (VGCC) has been largely understood thanks to results stemming from electrophysiology, pharmacology, spectroscopy, and structural biology. Over the past decade, computational methods such as molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have also contributed, providing molecular level information that can be tested against experimental results, thereby allowing the validation of the models and protocols. Importantly, MD can shed light on elements of VGCC function that cannot be easily accessed through “classical” experiments. Here, we review the results of recent MD simulations addressing key questions that pertain to the function and modulation of the VGCC’s voltage-sensor domain (VSD) highlighting: (1) the movement of the S4-helix basic residues during channel activation, articulating how the electrical driving force acts upon them; (2) the nature of the VSD intermediate states on transitioning between open and closed states of the VGCC; and (3) the molecular level effects on the VSD arising from mutations of specific S4 positively charged residues involved in certain genetic diseases. PMID:22654756

  9. Interactions of Lipids and Detergents with a Viral Ion Channel Protein: Molecular Dynamics Simulation Studies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Structural studies of membrane proteins have highlighted the likely influence of membrane mimetic environments (i.e., lipid bilayers versus detergent micelles) on the conformation and dynamics of small α-helical membrane proteins. We have used molecular dynamics simulations to compare the conformational dynamics of BM2 (a small α-helical protein from the membrane of influenza B) in a model phospholipid bilayer environment with its behavior in protein–detergent complexes with either the zwitterionic detergent dihexanoylphosphatidylcholine (DHPC) or the nonionic detergent dodecylmaltoside (DDM). We find that DDM more closely resembles the lipid bilayer in terms of its interaction with the protein, while the short-tailed DHPC molecule forms “nonphysiological” interactions with the protein termini. We find that the intrinsic micelle properties of each detergent are conserved upon formation of the protein–detergent complex. This implies that simulations of detergent micelles may be used to help select optimal conditions for experimental studies of membrane proteins. PMID:25286030

  10. Structural characteristics of hydrated protons in the conductive channels: effects of confinement and fluorination studied by molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ning; Song, Yuechun; Ruan, Xuehua; Yan, Xiaoming; Liu, Zhao; Shen, Zhuanglin; Wu, Xuemei; He, Gaohong

    2016-09-21

    The relationship between the proton conductive channel and the hydrated proton structure is of significant importance for understanding the deformed hydrogen bonding network of the confined protons which matches the nanochannel. In general, the structure of hydrated protons in the nanochannel of the proton exchange membrane is affected by several factors. To investigate the independent effect of each factor, it is necessary to eliminate the interference of other factors. In this paper, a one-dimensional carbon nanotube decorated with fluorine was built to investigate the independent effects of nanoscale confinement and fluorination on the structural properties of hydrated protons in the nanochannel using classical molecular dynamics simulation. In order to characterize the structure of hydrated protons confined in the channel, the hydrogen bonding interaction between water and the hydrated protons has been studied according to suitable hydrogen bond criteria. The hydrogen bond criteria were proposed based on the radial distribution function, angle distribution and pair-potential energy distribution. It was found that fluorination leads to an ordered hydrogen bonding structure of the hydrated protons near the channel surface, and confinement weakens the formation of the bifurcated hydrogen bonds in the radial direction. Besides, fluorination lowers the free energy barrier of hydronium along the nanochannel, but slightly increases the barrier for water. This leads to disintegration of the sequential hydrogen bond network in the fluorinated CNTs with small size. In the fluorinated CNTs with large diameter, the lower degree of confinement produces a spiral-like sequential hydrogen bond network with few bifurcated hydrogen bonds in the central region. This structure might promote unidirectional proton transfer along the channel without random movement. This study provides the cooperative effect of confinement dimension and fluorination on the structure and hydrogen

  11. IBiSA_Tools: A Computational Toolkit for Ion-Binding State Analysis in Molecular Dynamics Trajectories of Ion Channels.

    PubMed

    Kasahara, Kota; Kinoshita, Kengo

    2016-01-01

    Ion conduction mechanisms of ion channels are a long-standing conundrum. Although the molecular dynamics (MD) method has been extensively used to simulate ion conduction dynamics at the atomic level, analysis and interpretation of MD results are not straightforward due to complexity of the dynamics. In our previous reports, we proposed an analytical method called ion-binding state analysis to scrutinize and summarize ion conduction mechanisms by taking advantage of a variety of analytical protocols, e.g., the complex network analysis, sequence alignment, and hierarchical clustering. This approach effectively revealed the ion conduction mechanisms and their dependence on the conditions, i.e., ion concentration and membrane voltage. Here, we present an easy-to-use computational toolkit for ion-binding state analysis, called IBiSA_tools. This toolkit consists of a C++ program and a series of Python and R scripts. From the trajectory file of MD simulations and a structure file, users can generate several images and statistics of ion conduction processes. A complex network named ion-binding state graph is generated in a standard graph format (graph modeling language; GML), which can be visualized by standard network analyzers such as Cytoscape. As a tutorial, a trajectory of a 50 ns MD simulation of the Kv1.2 channel is also distributed with the toolkit. Users can trace the entire process of ion-binding state analysis step by step. The novel method for analysis of ion conduction mechanisms of ion channels can be easily used by means of IBiSA_tools. This software is distributed under an open source license at the following URL: http://www.ritsumei.ac.jp/~ktkshr/ibisa_tools/.

  12. IBiSA_Tools: A Computational Toolkit for Ion-Binding State Analysis in Molecular Dynamics Trajectories of Ion Channels

    PubMed Central

    Kasahara, Kota; Kinoshita, Kengo

    2016-01-01

    Ion conduction mechanisms of ion channels are a long-standing conundrum. Although the molecular dynamics (MD) method has been extensively used to simulate ion conduction dynamics at the atomic level, analysis and interpretation of MD results are not straightforward due to complexity of the dynamics. In our previous reports, we proposed an analytical method called ion-binding state analysis to scrutinize and summarize ion conduction mechanisms by taking advantage of a variety of analytical protocols, e.g., the complex network analysis, sequence alignment, and hierarchical clustering. This approach effectively revealed the ion conduction mechanisms and their dependence on the conditions, i.e., ion concentration and membrane voltage. Here, we present an easy-to-use computational toolkit for ion-binding state analysis, called IBiSA_tools. This toolkit consists of a C++ program and a series of Python and R scripts. From the trajectory file of MD simulations and a structure file, users can generate several images and statistics of ion conduction processes. A complex network named ion-binding state graph is generated in a standard graph format (graph modeling language; GML), which can be visualized by standard network analyzers such as Cytoscape. As a tutorial, a trajectory of a 50 ns MD simulation of the Kv1.2 channel is also distributed with the toolkit. Users can trace the entire process of ion-binding state analysis step by step. The novel method for analysis of ion conduction mechanisms of ion channels can be easily used by means of IBiSA_tools. This software is distributed under an open source license at the following URL: http://www.ritsumei.ac.jp/~ktkshr/ibisa_tools/ PMID:27907142

  13. Kinetics of water filling the hydrophobic channels of narrow carbon nanotubes studied by molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kefei; Zhou, Bo; Xiu, Peng; Qi, Wenpeng; Wan, Rongzheng; Fang, Haiping

    2010-11-28

    The kinetics of water filling narrow single-walled carbon nanotubes was studied using molecular dynamics simulations. The time required to fully fill a nanotube was linear with respect to the tube length. We observed that water molecules could enter into nanotubes of different lengths, either from one end or from both ends. The probability of having a nanotube filled completely from both ends increased exponentially with the tube length. For short tubes, filling usually proceeded from only one end. For long tubes, filling generally proceeded from both tube ends over three stages, i.e., filling from one end, filling from both ends, and filling from both ends with the dipole reorientation of water molecules to give a concerted ordering within the fully filled tube. The water molecules in the partially filled nanotube were hydrogen bonded similarly to those in the fully filled nanotube. Simulations for the reference Lennard-Jones fluid without hydrogen bonds were also performed and showed that the filling behavior of water molecules can be attributed to strong intermolecular hydrogen bonding.

  14. Kinetics of water filling the hydrophobic channels of narrow carbon nanotubes studied by molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Kefei; Zhou, Bo; Xiu, Peng; Qi, Wenpeng; Wan, Rongzheng; Fang, Haiping

    2010-11-01

    The kinetics of water filling narrow single-walled carbon nanotubes was studied using molecular dynamics simulations. The time required to fully fill a nanotube was linear with respect to the tube length. We observed that water molecules could enter into nanotubes of different lengths, either from one end or from both ends. The probability of having a nanotube filled completely from both ends increased exponentially with the tube length. For short tubes, filling usually proceeded from only one end. For long tubes, filling generally proceeded from both tube ends over three stages, i.e., filling from one end, filling from both ends, and filling from both ends with the dipole reorientation of water molecules to give a concerted ordering within the fully filled tube. The water molecules in the partially filled nanotube were hydrogen bonded similarly to those in the fully filled nanotube. Simulations for the reference Lennard-Jones fluid without hydrogen bonds were also performed and showed that the filling behavior of water molecules can be attributed to strong intermolecular hydrogen bonding.

  15. Molecular dynamics calculations suggest a conduction mechanism for the M2 proton channel from influenza A virus.

    PubMed

    Khurana, Ekta; Dal Peraro, Matteo; DeVane, Russell; Vemparala, Satyavani; DeGrado, William F; Klein, Michael L

    2009-01-27

    The M2 protein of the influenza A virus is activated by low endosomal pH and performs the essential function of proton transfer into the viral interior. The resulting decrease in pH within the virion is essential for the uncoating and further replication of the viral genetic material. The x-ray crystal [Stouffer AL, et al. (2008) Nature 451:596-599] and solution NMR [Schnell JR, Chou JJ (2008) Nature 451:591-595] structures of the transmembrane region of the M2 homo-tetrameric bundle both revealed pores with narrow constrictions at one end, leaving a question as to how protons enter the channel. His-37, which is essential for proton-gating and selective conduction of protons, lies in the pore of the crystallographic and NMR structures. Here, we explore the different protonation states of the His-37 residues of the M2 bundle in a bilayer using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. When the His-37 residues are neutral, the protein prefers an Open(out)-Closed(in) conformation in which the channel is open to the environment on the outside of the virus but closed to the interior environment of the virus. Diffusion of protons into the channel from the outside of the virus and protonation of His-37 residues in the tetramer stabilizes an oppositely gated Closed(out)-Open(in) conformation. Thus, protons might be conducted through a transporter-like mechanism, in which the protein alternates between Open(out)-Closed(in) and Closed(out)-Open(in) conformations, and His-37 is protonated/deprotonated during each turnover. The transporter-like mechanism is consistent with the known properties of the M2 bundle, including its relatively low rate of proton flux and its strong rectifying behavior.

  16. Simulation of polymer translocation through small channels: A molecular dynamics study and a new Monte Carlo approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauthier, Michel G.

    With the recent completion of the Human Genome Project and the announcement of the $1000 Genome Race in 2003, the interest for developing faster and cheaper sequencing technologies is continuously growing. Nanopore sequencing offers one of the most promising new ideas. This method consists in reading DNA as it passes through a small aperture perforated through a membrane; a technique similar to decoding a magnetic tape in a tape player. The process of linearly moving a flexible chain from one side of a small channel to the other is called polymer translocation. However, the physics behind this process is still not well understood. During the last ten years, theorists proposed several scaling laws in order to describe this problem and explain experimental observations. The goal of this thesis is to shed light on some of these interesting theoretical predictions. One of the most important questions addressed in this thesis is the role of the hydrodynamic interactions in the polymer translocation process. Even though the impact of such interactions have been theoretically considered, they are neglected in most simulation models. One of our aims in this thesis is to look at the implications of increasing the pore diameter in the presence of hydrodynamic interactions. We use Molecular Dynamics simulations with explicit solvent particles to generate unbiased translocation events in order to characterize the screening of the hydrodynamic interactions by the membrane and to test the hypothesis that polymer translocation is a quasi-equilibrium process. The latter question is quite fundamental since this assumption is at the origin of most theoretical approaches. Another major goal of this thesis is to clarify the nature of the transition between the two translocation regimes dominated by the pore-polymer friction and the hydrodynamic drag of the subchains outside the channel, respectively. However, such an investigation requires the ability to simulate translocation events

  17. Thermodynamic coupling between activation and inactivation gating in potassium channels revealed by free energy molecular dynamics simulations

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Albert C.; Cuello, Luis G.; Perozo, Eduardo

    2011-01-01

    The amount of ionic current flowing through K+ channels is determined by the interplay between two separate time-dependent processes: activation and inactivation gating. Activation is concerned with the stimulus-dependent opening of the main intracellular gate, whereas inactivation is a spontaneous conformational transition of the selectivity filter toward a nonconductive state occurring on a variety of timescales. A recent analysis of multiple x-ray structures of open and partially open KcsA channels revealed the mechanism by which movements of the inner activation gate, formed by the inner helices from the four subunits of the pore domain, bias the conformational changes at the selectivity filter toward a nonconductive inactivated state. This analysis highlighted the important role of Phe103, a residue located along the inner helix, near the hinge position associated with the opening of the intracellular gate. In the present study, we use free energy perturbation molecular dynamics simulations (FEP/MD) to quantitatively elucidate the thermodynamic basis for the coupling between the intracellular gate and the selectivity filter. The results of the FEP/MD calculations are in good agreement with experiments, and further analysis of the repulsive, van der Waals dispersive, and electrostatic free energy contributions reveals that the energetic basis underlying the absence of inactivation in the F103A mutation in KcsA is the absence of the unfavorable steric interaction occurring with the large Ile100 side chain in a neighboring subunit when the intracellular gate is open and the selectivity filter is in a conductive conformation. Macroscopic current analysis shows that the I100A mutant indeed relieves inactivation in KcsA, but to a lesser extent than the F103A mutant. PMID:22124115

  18. Probing a Structural Model of the Nuclear Pore Complex Channel through Molecular Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Lingling; Schulten, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The central pore of a nuclear pore complex (NPC) is filled with unstructured proteins that contain many FG-repeats separated by hydrophilic regions. An example of such protein is nsp1. By simulating an array of nsp1 segments, we identified, in an earlier study, a spontaneously formed brushlike structure that promises to explain selective transport in the NPC channel. Here we report four (350,000 atom, 200 ns) simulations probing this structure via its interaction with transport receptor NTF2 as well as with an inert protein. NTF2 dimers are observed to gradually enter the brush, but the inert protein is not. Both NTF2 and the inert protein are found to bind to FG-repeats, but binding periods lasted more briefly for the inert protein. A simulation also investigated the behavior of a brush made of mutant nsp1 that is known to be less effective in NPC-selective transport, finding that this brush does not attract NTF2. PMID:20409487

  19. Zeolites: Exploring Molecular Channels

    SciTech Connect

    Arslan, Ilke; Derewinski, Mirek

    2015-05-22

    Synthetic zeolites contain microscopic channels, sort of like a sponge. They have many uses, such as helping laundry detergent lather, absorbing liquid in kitty litter, and as catalysts to produce fuel. Of the hundreds of types of zeolites, only about 15 are used for catalysis. PNNL catalysis scientists Ilke Arslan and Mirek Derewinksi are studying these zeolites to understand what make them special. By exploring the mystery of these microscopic channels, their fundamental findings will help design better catalysts for applications such as biofuel production.

  20. Zeolites: Exploring Molecular Channels

    ScienceCinema

    Arslan, Ilke; Derewinski, Mirek

    2016-07-12

    Synthetic zeolites contain microscopic channels, sort of like a sponge. They have many uses, such as helping laundry detergent lather, absorbing liquid in kitty litter, and as catalysts to produce fuel. Of the hundreds of types of zeolites, only about 15 are used for catalysis. PNNL catalysis scientists Ilke Arslan and Mirek Derewinksi are studying these zeolites to understand what make them special. By exploring the mystery of these microscopic channels, their fundamental findings will help design better catalysts for applications such as biofuel production.

  1. Laser IR fragmentation of molecular clusters: the role of channels for energy input and relaxation, the influence of surroundings, and the dynamics of fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarov, G. N.

    2017-06-01

    The results of research into the infrared (IR) laser fragmentation of molecular clusters by resonant vibrational excitation of their constituent molecules are presented with special attention given to the role of cluster environment, the energy input and relaxation channels, and dynamical aspects. For this purpose, the results of experiments with free homogeneous and mixed molecular clusters and of experiments with clusters inside or on the surface of large inert gas clusters are analyzed, the laser excitation pulses varying in wavelength and duration. Data on the character and rate of cluster fragmentation, and on the intramolecular and intracluster vibrational energy relaxation times in clusters are discussed. Results of an investigation into the structure and dynamics of molecular clusters and atomic-molecular complexes obtained by IR photodissociation spectroscopy and the spectroscopy of photofragments are analyzed. Methods for generating heterogeneous molecular clusters, for size-selecting clusters. and for studying the IR dissociation and IR fragmentation of clusters are also briefly considered.

  2. Carbon-based ion and molecular channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sint, Kyaw; Wang, Boyang; Kral, Petr

    2008-03-01

    We design ion and molecular channels based on layered carboneous materials, with chemically-functionalized pore entrances. Our molecular dynamics simulations demonstrate that these ultra-narrow pores, with diameters around 1 nm, are highly selective to the charges and sizes of the passing (Na^+ and Cl^-) ions and short alkanes. We demonstrate that the molecular flows through these pores can be easily controlled by electrical and mechanical means. These artificial pores could be integrated in fluidic nanodevices and lab-on-a-chip techniques with numerous potential applications. [1] Kyaw Sint, Boyang Wang and Petr Kral, submitted. [2] Boyang Wang and Petr Kral, JACS 128, 15984 (2006).

  3. Exploring O2 Diffusion in A-Type Cytochrome c Oxidases: Molecular Dynamics Simulations Uncover Two Alternative Channels towards the Binuclear Site

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, A. Sofia F.; Damas, João M.; Baptista, António M.; Soares, Cláudio M.

    2014-01-01

    Cytochrome c oxidases (Ccoxs) are the terminal enzymes of the respiratory chain in mitochondria and most bacteria. These enzymes couple dioxygen (O2) reduction to the generation of a transmembrane electrochemical proton gradient. Despite decades of research and the availability of a large amount of structural and biochemical data available for the A-type Ccox family, little is known about the channel(s) used by O2 to travel from the solvent/membrane to the heme a3-CuB binuclear center (BNC). Moreover, the identification of all possible O2 channels as well as the atomic details of O2 diffusion is essential for the understanding of the working mechanisms of the A-type Ccox. In this work, we determined the O2 distribution within Ccox from Rhodobacter sphaeroides, in the fully reduced state, in order to identify and characterize all the putative O2 channels leading towards the BNC. For that, we use an integrated strategy combining atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations (with and without explicit O2 molecules) and implicit ligand sampling (ILS) calculations. Based on the 3D free energy map for O2 inside Ccox, three channels were identified, all starting in the membrane hydrophobic region and connecting the surface of the protein to the BNC. One of these channels corresponds to the pathway inferred from the X-ray data available, whereas the other two are alternative routes for O2 to reach the BNC. Both alternative O2 channels start in the membrane spanning region and terminate close to Y288I. These channels are a combination of multiple transiently interconnected hydrophobic cavities, whose opening and closure is regulated by the thermal fluctuations of the lining residues. Furthermore, our results show that, in this Ccox, the most likely (energetically preferred) routes for O2 to reach the BNC are the alternative channels, rather than the X-ray inferred pathway. PMID:25474152

  4. Molecular dynamics study of binding of µ-conotoxin GIIIA to the voltage-gated sodium channel Na(v)1.4.

    PubMed

    Mahdavi, Somayeh; Kuyucak, Serdar

    2014-01-01

    Homology models of mammalian voltage-gated sodium (NaV) channels based on the crystal structures of the bacterial counterparts are needed to interpret the functional data on sodium channels and understand how they operate. Such models would also be invaluable in structure-based design of therapeutics for diseases involving sodium channels such as chronic pain and heart diseases. Here we construct a homology model for the pore domain of the NaV1.4 channel and use the functional data for the binding of µ-conotoxin GIIIA to NaV1.4 to validate the model. The initial poses for the NaV1.4-GIIIA complex are obtained using the HADDOCK protein docking program, which are then refined in molecular dynamics simulations. The binding mode for the final complex is shown to be in broad agreement with the available mutagenesis data. The standard binding free energy, determined from the potential of mean force calculations, is also in good agreement with the experimental value. Because the pore domains of NaV1 channels are highly homologous, the model constructed for NaV1.4 will provide an excellent template for other NaV1 channels.

  5. Coordination numbers of K(+) and Na(+) Ions inside the selectivity filter of the KcsA potassium channel: insights from first principles molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Bucher, Denis; Guidoni, Leonardo; Carloni, Paolo; Rothlisberger, Ursula

    2010-05-19

    Quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) Car-Parrinello simulations were performed to estimate the coordination numbers of K(+) and Na(+) ions in the selectivity filter of the KcsA channel, and in water. At the DFT/BLYP level, K(+) ions were found to display an average coordination number of 6.6 in the filter, and 6.2 in water. Na(+) ions displayed an average coordination number of 5.2 in the filter, and 5.0 in water. A comparison was made with the average coordination numbers obtained from using classical molecular dynamics (6.7 for K(+) in the filter, 6.6 for K(+) in water, 6.0 for Na(+) in the filter, and 5.2 for Na(+) in water). The observation that different coordination numbers were displayed by the ions in QM/MM simulations and in classical molecular dynamics is relevant to the discussion of selectivity in K-channels.

  6. Coordination Numbers of K+ and Na+ Ions Inside the Selectivity Filter of the KcsA Potassium Channel: Insights from First Principles Molecular Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Bucher, Denis; Guidoni, Leonardo; Carloni, Paolo; Rothlisberger, Ursula

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) Car-Parrinello simulations were performed to estimate the coordination numbers of K+ and Na+ ions in the selectivity filter of the KcsA channel, and in water. At the DFT/BLYP level, K+ ions were found to display an average coordination number of 6.6 in the filter, and 6.2 in water. Na+ ions displayed an average coordination number of 5.2 in the filter, and 5.0 in water. A comparison was made with the average coordination numbers obtained from using classical molecular dynamics (6.7 for K+ in the filter, 6.6 for K+ in water, 6.0 for Na+ in the filter, and 5.2 for Na+ in water). The observation that different coordination numbers were displayed by the ions in QM/MM simulations and in classical molecular dynamics is relevant to the discussion of selectivity in K-channels. PMID:20483308

  7. Molecular modelling and molecular dynamics of CFTR.

    PubMed

    Callebaut, Isabelle; Hoffmann, Brice; Lehn, Pierre; Mornon, Jean-Paul

    2017-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein is a member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily that functions as an ATP-gated channel. Considerable progress has been made over the last years in the understanding of the molecular basis of the CFTR functions, as well as dysfunctions causing the common genetic disease cystic fibrosis (CF). This review provides a global overview of the theoretical studies that have been performed so far, especially molecular modelling and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. A special emphasis is placed on the CFTR-specific evolution of an ABC transporter framework towards a channel function, as well as on the understanding of the effects of disease-causing mutations and their specific modulation. This in silico work should help structure-based drug discovery and design, with a view to develop CFTR-specific pharmacotherapeutic approaches for the treatment of CF in the context of precision medicine.

  8. Molecular approaches for structural characterization of a new potassium channel blocker from Tityus stigmurus venom: cDNA cloning, homology modeling, dynamic simulations and docking.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Diego Dantas; Torres, Taffarel Melo; Barbosa, Euzébio Guimarães; Lima, João Paulo Matos Santos; de Freitas Fernandes-Pedrosa, Matheus

    2013-01-04

    Potassium channels are involved in the maintenance of resting membrane potential, control of cardiac and neuronal excitability, neurotransmitters release, muscle contractility and hormone secretion. The Tityus stigmurus scorpion is widely distributed in Northeastern Brazil and known to cause severe human envenomations, inducing pain, hypoesthesia, edema, erythema, paresthesia, headaches and vomiting. Most potassium channel blocking peptides that have been purified from scorpion venoms contain 30-40 amino acids with three or four disulfide bridges. These peptides belong to α-KTx subfamily. On the other hand, the β-KTx subfamily is poorly characterized, though it is very representative in some scorpion venoms. A transcriptomic approach of T.stigmurus scorpions developed by our group revealed the repertoire of possible molecules present in the venom, including many toxins of the β-KTx subfamily. One of the ESTs found, named TSTI0003C has a cDNA sequence of 538 bp codifying a mature protein with 47 amino acid residues, corresponding to 5299 Da. This β-KTx peptide is a new member of the BmTXKβ-related toxins, and was here named TstKMK. The three-dimensional structure of this potassium channel toxin of the T. stigmurus scorpion was obtained by computational modeling and refined by molecular dynamic simulations. Furthermore, we have made docking simulations using a Shaker kV-1.2 potassium channel from rats as receptor model and proposed which amino acid residues and interactions could be involved in its blockade.

  9. Conductance simulation of the purinergic P2X2, P2X4, and P2X7 ionic channels using a combined Brownian dynamics and molecular dynamics approach.

    PubMed

    Turchenkov, Dmitry A; Bystrov, Vladimir S

    2014-08-07

    This paper investigates the application of an original combined approach of molecular and Brownian dynamic methods with quantum chemistry calculations for modeling the process of conductance of ion channels using purinergic P2X family receptors P2X2, P2X4, and P2X7 as a case study. A simplified model of the ionic channel in the lipid bilayer has been developed. A high level of conductance (30 pS) of P2X2 ionic channel together with the key role of Asp349 in forming the selectivity filter of P2X2 has been shown by using this approach. Calculated P2X2 permeability to monovalent cations Li(+), Na(+), and K(+) conforms to the free diffusion coefficient of these ions, which shows the low selectivity of P2X2 ionic channel.

  10. Ring-polymer molecular dynamics studies on the rate coefficient of the abstraction channel of hydrogen plus ethane, propane, and dimethyl ether

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Qingyong; Chen, Jun

    2017-01-01

    To accurately compute the rates of the abstraction channels of hydrogen plus ethane (Et), propane (Pr), and dimethyl ether (DME), ring-polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD) method is used in conjunction with the recently constructed local permutation invariant polynomial neural-networks potential energy surface of the parent H + CH4 system [Q. Meng et al., J. Chem. Phys. 144, 154312 (2016)]. For H + Et, one of the H atoms in CH4 of the parent system is replaced by a methyl group, while for the H + DME reaction, it is replaced by the methoxyl group. For the H + Pr reaction, replacing one of the H atoms in CH4 by an ethyl group, the terminal channel is built, meanwhile the middle channel is considered through replacing two H atoms in CH4 by two methyl groups. Since the potential energy barriers of the title reactions must differ from the H + CH4 barrier, the corrections have to be made by computing the ratio of free-energy barriers between H + CH4 and the title reactions at coupled cluster with a full treatment singles and doubles (where the triples contribution is calculated by perturbation theory, that is, CCSD(T)) level. Comparing the present RPMD rates with the previous theoretical and experimental results, good agreement can be found. Moreover, probable reasons for the deviation between the present RPMD rates and the previous experimental ones are discussed.

  11. Model channel ion currents in NaCl-extended simple point charge water solution with applied-field molecular dynamics.

    PubMed Central

    Crozier, P S; Henderson, D; Rowley, R L; Busath, D D

    2001-01-01

    Using periodic boundary conditions and a constant applied field, we have simulated current flow through an 8.125-A internal diameter, rigid, atomistic channel with polar walls in a rigid membrane using explicit ions and extended simple point charge water. Channel and bath currents were computed from 10 10-ns trajectories for each of 10 different conditions of concentration and applied voltage. An electric field was applied uniformly throughout the system to all mobile atoms. On average, the resultant net electric field falls primarily across the membrane channel, as expected for two conductive baths separated by a membrane capacitance. The channel is rarely occupied by more than one ion. Current-voltage relations are concentration dependent and superlinear at high concentrations. PMID:11720976

  12. Structure and functional dynamics characterization of the ion channel of the human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) small hydrophobic protein (SH) transmembrane domain by combining molecular dynamics with excited normal modes.

    PubMed

    Araujo, Gabriela C; Silva, Ricardo H T; Scott, Luis P B; Araujo, Alexandre S; Souza, Fatima P; de Oliveira, Ronaldo Junio

    2016-12-01

    The human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) is the major cause of lower respiratory tract infection in children and elderly people worldwide. Its genome encodes 11 proteins including SH protein, whose functions are not well known. Studies show that SH protein increases RSV virulence degree and permeability to small compounds, suggesting it is involved in the formation of ion channels. The knowledge of SH structure and function is fundamental for a better understanding of its infection mechanism. The aim of this study was to model, characterize, and analyze the structural behavior of SH protein in the phospholipids bilayer environment. Molecular modeling of SH pentameric structure was performed, followed by traditional molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the protein immersed in the lipid bilayer. Molecular dynamics with excited normal modes (MDeNM) was applied in the resulting system in order to investigate long time scale pore dynamics. MD simulations support that SH protein is stable in its pentameric form. Simulations also showed the presence of water molecules within the bilayer by density distribution, thus confirming that SH protein is a viroporin. This water transport was also observed in MDeNM studies with histidine residues of five chains (His22 and His51), playing a key role in pore permeability. The combination of traditional MD and MDeNM was a very efficient protocol to investigate functional conformational changes of transmembrane proteins that act as molecular channels. This protocol can support future investigations of drug candidates by acting on SH protein to inhibit viral infection. Graphical Abstract The ion channel of the human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) small hydrophobic protein (SH) transmembrane domainᅟ.

  13. Single-Molecule Ion Channel Conformational Dynamics in Living Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, H. Peter

    2014-03-01

    Stochastic and inhomogeneous conformational changes regulate the function and dynamics of ion channels that are crucial for cell functions, neuronal signaling, and brain functions. Such complexity makes it difficult, if not impossible, to characterize ion channel dynamics using conventional electrical recording alone since that the measurement does not specifically interrogate the associated conformational changes but rather the consequences of the conformational changes. Recently, new technology developments on single-molecule spectroscopy, and especially, the combined approaches of using single ion channel patch-clamp electrical recording and single-molecule fluorescence imaging have provided us the capability of probing ion channel conformational changes simultaneously with the electrical single channel recording. By combining real-time single-molecule fluorescence imaging measurements with real-time single-channel electric current measurements in artificial lipid bilayers and in living cell membranes, we were able to probe single ion-channel-protein conformational changes simultaneously, and thus providing an understanding the dynamics and mechanism of ion-channel proteins at the molecular level. The function-regulating and site-specific conformational changes of ion channels are now measurable under physiological conditions in real-time, one molecule at a time. We will focus our discussion on the new development and results of real-time imaging of the dynamics of gramicidin, colicin, and NMDA receptor ion channels in lipid bilayers and living cells. Our results shed light on new perspectives of the intrinsic interplay of lipid membrane dynamics, solvation dynamics, and the ion channel functions.

  14. Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Hoover, W.G. . Dept. of Applied Science Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA )

    1990-11-01

    The development of nonequilibrium molecular dynamics is described, with emphasis on massively-parallel simulations involving the motion of millions, soon to be billions, of atoms. Corresponding continuum simulations are also discussed. 14 refs., 8 figs.

  15. All-atom molecular dynamics simulations of an artificial sodium channel in a lipid bilayer: the effect of water solvation/desolvation of the sodium ion.

    PubMed

    Skelton, A A; Khedkar, V M; Fried, J R

    2016-01-01

    All-atom molecular dynamics is used to investigate the transport of Na(+) across a 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine lipid bilayer facilitated by a diazacrown hydraphile. Specifically, the free energy of Na(+) passing through the bilayer is calculated using the adaptive biasing force method to study the free energy associated with the increase in Na(+) transport in the presence of the hydraphile molecule. The results show that water interaction greatly influences Na(+) transport through the lipid bilayer as water is pulled through the bilayer with Na(+) forming a water channel. The hydraphile causes a reduction in the free energy barrier for the transport of Na(+) through the head group part of the lipid bilayer since it complexes the Na(+) reducing the necessity for water to be complexed and, therefore, dragged through with Na(+), an energetically unfavorable process. The free energy associated with Na(+) being desolvated within the bilayer is significantly decreased in the presence of the hydraphile molecule; the hydraphile increases the number of solvation states of Na(+) that can be adopted, and this increase in the number of available configurations provides an entropic explanation for the success of the hydraphile.

  16. Substructured multibody molecular dynamics.

    SciTech Connect

    Grest, Gary Stephen; Stevens, Mark Jackson; Plimpton, Steven James; Woolf, Thomas B. (Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD); Lehoucq, Richard B.; Crozier, Paul Stewart; Ismail, Ahmed E.; Mukherjee, Rudranarayan M. (Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY); Draganescu, Andrei I.

    2006-11-01

    We have enhanced our parallel molecular dynamics (MD) simulation software LAMMPS (Large-scale Atomic/Molecular Massively Parallel Simulator, lammps.sandia.gov) to include many new features for accelerated simulation including articulated rigid body dynamics via coupling to the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute code POEMS (Parallelizable Open-source Efficient Multibody Software). We use new features of the LAMMPS software package to investigate rhodopsin photoisomerization, and water model surface tension and capillary waves at the vapor-liquid interface. Finally, we motivate the recipes of MD for practitioners and researchers in numerical analysis and computational mechanics.

  17. Molecular Biophysics of Orai Store-Operated Ca2+ Channels

    PubMed Central

    Amcheslavsky, Anna; Wood, Mona L.; Yeromin, Andriy V.; Parker, Ian; Freites, J. Alfredo; Tobias, Douglas J.; Cahalan, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    Upon endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ store depletion, Orai channels in the plasma membrane are activated directly by endoplasmic reticulum-resident STIM proteins to generate the Ca2+-selective, Ca2+ release-activated Ca2+ (CRAC) current. After the molecular identification of Orai, a plethora of functional and biochemical studies sought to compare Orai homologs, determine their stoichiometry, identify structural domains responsible for the biophysical fingerprint of the CRAC current, identify the physiological functions, and investigate Orai homologs as potential therapeutic targets. Subsequently, the solved crystal structure of Drosophila Orai (dOrai) substantiated many findings from structure-function studies, but also revealed an unexpected hexameric structure. In this review, we explore Orai channels as elucidated by functional and biochemical studies, analyze the dOrai crystal structure and its implications for Orai channel function, and present newly available information from molecular dynamics simulations that shed light on Orai channel gating and permeation. PMID:25606672

  18. Computational Studies of Molecular Permeation through Connexin26 Channels.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yun; Rossi, Angelo R; Harris, Andrew L

    2016-02-02

    A signal property of connexin channels is the ability to mediate selective diffusive movement of molecules through plasma membrane(s), but the energetics and determinants of molecular movement through these channels have yet to be understood. Different connexin channels have distinct molecular selectivities that cannot be explained simply on the basis of size or charge of the permeants. To gain insight into the forces and interactions that underlie selective molecular permeation, we investigated the energetics of two uncharged derivatized sugars, one permeable and one impermeable, through a validated connexin26 (Cx26) channel structural model, using molecular dynamics and associated analytic tools. The system is a Cx26 channel equilibrated in explicit membrane/solvent, shown by Brownian dynamics to reproduce key conductance characteristics of the native channel. The results are consistent with the known difference in permeability to each molecule. The energetic barriers extend through most of the pore length, rather than being highly localized as in ion-specific channels. There is little evidence for binding within the pore. Force decomposition reveals how, for each tested molecule, interactions with water and the Cx26 protein vary over the length of the pore and reveals a significant contribution from hydrogen bonding and interaction with K(+). The flexibility of the pore width varies along its length, and the tested molecules have differential effects on pore width as they pass through. Potential sites of interaction within the pore are defined for each molecule. The results suggest that for the tested molecules, differences in hydrogen bonding and entropic factors arising from permeant flexibility substantially contribute to the energetics of permeation. This work highlights factors involved in selective molecular permeation that differ from those that define selectivity among atomic ions.

  19. Ion channels: molecular targets of neuroactive insecticides.

    PubMed

    Raymond-Delpech, Valérie; Matsuda, Kazuhiko; Sattelle, Benedict M; Rauh, James J; Sattelle, David B

    2005-11-01

    Many of the insecticides in current use act on molecular targets in the insect nervous system. Recently, our understanding of these targets has improved as a result of the complete sequencing of an insect genome, i.e., Drosophila melanogaster. Here we examine the recent work, drawing on genetics, genomics and physiology, which has provided evidence that specific receptors and ion channels are targeted by distinct chemical classes of insect control agents. The examples discussed include, sodium channels (pyrethroids, p,p'-dichlorodiphenyl-trichloroethane (DDT), dihydropyrazoles and oxadiazines); nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (cartap, spinosad, imidacloprid and related nitromethylenes/nitroguanidines); gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors (cyclodienes, gamma-BHC and fipronil) and L-glutamate receptors (avermectins). Finally, we have examined the molecular basis of resistance to these molecules, which in some cases involves mutations in the molecular target, and we also consider the future impact of molecular genetic technologies in our understanding of the actions of neuroactive insecticides.

  20. Molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Lindahl, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Molecular dynamics has evolved from a niche method mainly applicable to model systems into a cornerstone in molecular biology. It provides us with a powerful toolbox that enables us to follow and understand structure and dynamics with extreme detail-literally on scales where individual atoms can be tracked. However, with great power comes great responsibility: Simulations will not magically provide valid results, but it requires a skilled researcher. This chapter introduces you to this, and makes you aware of some potential pitfalls. We focus on the two basic and most used methods; optimizing a structure with energy minimization and simulating motion with molecular dynamics. The statistical mechanics theory is covered briefly as well as limitations, for instance the lack of quantum effects and short timescales. As a practical example, we show each step of a simulation of a small protein, including examples of hardware and software, how to obtain a starting structure, immersing it in water, and choosing good simulation parameters. You will learn how to analyze simulations in terms of structure, fluctuations, geometrical features, and how to create ray-traced movies for presentations. With modern GPU acceleration, a desktop can perform μs-scale simulations of small proteins in a day-only 15 years ago this took months on the largest supercomputer in the world. As a final exercise, we show you how to set up, perform, and interpret such a folding simulation.

  1. Molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Lindahl, Erik R

    2008-01-01

    Molecular simulation is a very powerful toolbox in modern molecular modeling, and enables us to follow and understand structure and dynamics with extreme detail--literally on scales where motion of individual atoms can be tracked. This chapter focuses on the two most commonly used methods, namely, energy minimization and molecular dynamics, that, respectively, optimize structure and simulate the natural motion of biological macromolecules. The common theoretical framework based on statistical mechanics is covered briefly as well as limitations of the computational approach, for instance, the lack of quantum effects and limited timescales accessible. As a practical example, a full simulation of the protein lysozyme in water is described step by step, including examples of necessary hardware and software, how to obtain suitable starting molecular structures, immersing it in a solvent, choosing good simulation parameters, and energy minimization. The chapter also describes how to analyze the simulation in terms of potential energies, structural fluctuations, coordinate stability, geometrical features, and, finally, how to create beautiful ray-traced movies that can be used in presentations.

  2. Functional diversity and evolutionary dynamics of thermoTRP channels.

    PubMed

    Saito, Shigeru; Tominaga, Makoto

    2015-03-01

    Animals have evolved sophisticated physiological systems for sensing ambient temperature since changes in environmental temperatures affect various biological processes. Thermosensitive transient receptor potential (thermoTRP) channels serve as thermal sensors in diverse animal species. They are multimodal receptors that are activated by temperature as well as other physical and chemical stimuli. Since thermoTRP channels are calcium permeable non-selective cation channels, their activation leads to an influx of calcium and sodium ions into the cell and triggers downstream signal transduction. ThermoTRP channels have been characterized in diverse animal species over the past several years, illuminating the diversification of thermoTRP channels in the course of evolution. The gene repertoires of thermoTRP channels differ among animal species. Additionally, in some cases, the temperature and chemical sensitivities among orthologous thermoTRP channels vary among species. The evolutionary flexibility of thermoTRP channels enabled them to contribute to unique physiological systems such as infrared sensation in snakes and bats and seasonal adaptation in silk moth. On the other hand, the functional differences of thermoTRP channels among species have been utilized for understanding the molecular basis for their activation (or inhibition) mechanisms, and amino acid residues (or domains) responsible for the respective channel properties have been identified in various thermoTRP channels. Here we summarize the current understanding of the functional diversity and evolutionary dynamics of thermoTRP channels.

  3. Modelling Martian surface channel dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coulthard, T. J.; Skinner, C.; Kim, J.; Schumann, G.; Neal, J. C.; Bates, P. D.

    2014-12-01

    Extensive and large surface channel features found at Athabasca and Kasei have previously been attributed to the erosional power of flowing water with palaeoflood discharges being estimated from the surface channel dimensions. However, in order for these channels to be alluvial there are several basic questions to be answered. Are water flows under Martian conditions capable of eroding the amounts of sediment required to leave these channels? Are our present estimates of palaeoflood discharge of correct magnitude to carry out this erosion? And are the channels a product of one or many flood events? Here, we use a numerical model (CAESAR-Lisflood) that links a two-dimensional hydrodynamic flow scheme to a sediment transport model to simulate fluvial morphodynamics in the Athabasca and Kasei regions. CAESAR-Lisflood has been successfully applied to simulating flooding, erosion and deposition on Earth in a number of locations, and allows the development of channels, bars, braids and other fluvial features to be modelled. The numerical scheme of the model was adapted to Martian conditions by adjusting gravity, drag co-efficient, roughness and grainsize terms. Preliminary findings indicate that fluvial erosion and deposition is capable of creating mega channel features found at these sites and that existing palaeflood estimates are commensurate with channel forming discharges for these features.

  4. Multiscale reactive molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, Chris; Lindberg, Gerrick E.; Voth, Gregory A.

    2012-12-01

    Many processes important to chemistry, materials science, and biology cannot be described without considering electronic and nuclear-level dynamics and their coupling to slower, cooperative motions of the system. These inherently multiscale problems require computationally efficient and accurate methods to converge statistical properties. In this paper, a method is presented that uses data directly from condensed phase ab initio simulations to develop reactive molecular dynamics models that do not require predefined empirical functions. Instead, the interactions used in the reactive model are expressed as linear combinations of interpolating functions that are optimized by using a linear least-squares algorithm. One notable benefit of the procedure outlined here is the capability to minimize the number of parameters requiring nonlinear optimization. The method presented can be generally applied to multiscale problems and is demonstrated by generating reactive models for the hydrated excess proton and hydroxide ion based directly on condensed phase ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. The resulting models faithfully reproduce the water-ion structural properties and diffusion constants from the ab initio simulations. Additionally, the free energy profiles for proton transfer, which is sensitive to the structural diffusion of both ions in water, are reproduced. The high fidelity of these models to ab initio simulations will permit accurate modeling of general chemical reactions in condensed phase systems with computational efficiency orders of magnitudes greater than currently possible with ab initio simulation methods, thus facilitating a proper statistical sampling of the coupling to slow, large-scale motions of the system.

  5. Multiscale reactive molecular dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Knight, Chris; Lindberg, Gerrick E.; Voth, Gregory A.

    2012-01-01

    Many processes important to chemistry, materials science, and biology cannot be described without considering electronic and nuclear-level dynamics and their coupling to slower, cooperative motions of the system. These inherently multiscale problems require computationally efficient and accurate methods to converge statistical properties. In this paper, a method is presented that uses data directly from condensed phase ab initio simulations to develop reactive molecular dynamics models that do not require predefined empirical functions. Instead, the interactions used in the reactive model are expressed as linear combinations of interpolating functions that are optimized by using a linear least-squares algorithm. One notable benefit of the procedure outlined here is the capability to minimize the number of parameters requiring nonlinear optimization. The method presented can be generally applied to multiscale problems and is demonstrated by generating reactive models for the hydrated excess proton and hydroxide ion based directly on condensed phase ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. The resulting models faithfully reproduce the water-ion structural properties and diffusion constants from the ab initio simulations. Additionally, the free energy profiles for proton transfer, which is sensitive to the structural diffusion of both ions in water, are reproduced. The high fidelity of these models to ab initio simulations will permit accurate modeling of general chemical reactions in condensed phase systems with computational efficiency orders of magnitudes greater than currently possible with ab initio simulation methods, thus facilitating a proper statistical sampling of the coupling to slow, large-scale motions of the system. PMID:23249062

  6. Interactive molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeder, Daniel V.

    2015-03-01

    Physics students now have access to interactive molecular dynamics simulations that can model and animate the motions of hundreds of particles, such as noble gas atoms, that attract each other weakly at short distances but repel strongly when pressed together. Using these simulations, students can develop an understanding of forces and motions at the molecular scale, nonideal fluids, phases of matter, thermal equilibrium, nonequilibrium states, the Boltzmann distribution, the arrow of time, and much more. This article summarizes the basic features and capabilities of such a simulation, presents a variety of student exercises using it at the introductory and intermediate levels, and describes some enhancements that can further extend its uses. A working simulation code, in html5 and javascript for running within any modern Web browser, is provided as an online supplement.

  7. Robust Synchronization Schemes for Dynamic Channel Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xiong, Fugin

    2003-01-01

    Professor Xiong will investigate robust synchronization schemes for dynamic channel environment. A sliding window will be investigated for symbol timing synchronizer and an open loop carrier estimator for carrier synchronization. Matlab/Simulink will be used for modeling and simulations.

  8. Introduction to Accelerated Molecular Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, Danny

    2012-07-10

    Molecular Dynamics is the numerical solution of the equations of motion of a set of atoms, given an interatomic potential V and some boundary and initial conditions. Molecular Dynamics is the largest scale model that gives unbiased dynamics [x(t),p(t)] in full atomistic detail. Molecular Dynamics: is simple; is 'exact' for classical dynamics (with respect to a given V); can be used to compute any (atomistic) thermodynamical or dynamical properties; naturally handles complexity -- the system does the right thing at the right time. The physics derives only from the interatomic potential.

  9. Molecular Dynamics Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The development of thermodynamics and statistical mechanics is very important in the history of physics, and it underlines the difficulty in dealing with systems involving many bodies, even if those bodies are identical. Macroscopic systems of atoms typically contain so many particles that it would be virtually impossible to follow the behavior of all of the particles involved. Therefore, the behavior of a complete system can only be described or predicted in statistical ways. Under a grant to the NASA Lewis Research Center, scientists at the Case Western Reserve University have been examining the use of modern computing techniques that may be able to investigate and find the behavior of complete systems that have a large number of particles by tracking each particle individually. This is the study of molecular dynamics. In contrast to Monte Carlo techniques, which incorporate uncertainty from the outset, molecular dynamics calculations are fully deterministic. Although it is still impossible to track, even on high-speed computers, each particle in a system of a trillion trillion particles, it has been found that such systems can be well simulated by calculating the trajectories of a few thousand particles. Modern computers and efficient computing strategies have been used to calculate the behavior of a few physical systems and are now being employed to study important problems such as supersonic flows in the laboratory and in space. In particular, an animated video (available in mpeg format--4.4 MB) was produced by Dr. M.J. Woo, now a National Research Council fellow at Lewis, and the G-VIS laboratory at Lewis. This video shows the behavior of supersonic shocks produced by pistons in enclosed cylinders by following exactly the behavior of thousands of particles. The major assumptions made were that the particles involved were hard spheres and that all collisions with the walls and with other particles were fully elastic. The animated video was voted one of two

  10. Dynamics of quantum entanglement in quantum channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Shi-Dong

    2017-08-01

    Based on the von Neumann entropy, we give a computational formalism of the quantum entanglement dynamics in quantum channels, which can be applied to a general finite systems coupled with their environments in quantum channels. The quantum entanglement is invariant in the decoupled local unitary quantum channel, but it is variant in the non-local coupled unitary quantum channel. The numerical investigation for two examples, two-qubit and two-qutrit models, indicates that the quantum entanglement evolution in the quantum non-local coupling channel oscillates with the coupling strength and time, and depends on the quantum entanglement of the initial state. It implies that quantum information loses or gains when the state of systems evolves in the quantum non-local coupling channel.

  11. Construction dynamics of a lava channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Andrew J. L.; Favalli, Massimiliano; Mazzarini, Francesco; Hamilton, Christopher W.

    2009-05-01

    We use a kinematic GPS and laser range finder survey of a 200 m-long section of the Muliwai a Pele lava channel (Mauna Ulu, Kilauea) to examine the construction processes and flow dynamics responsible for the channel-levee structure. The levees comprise three packages. The basal package comprises an 80-150 m wide 'a'a flow in which a ˜2 m deep and ˜11 m wide channel became centred. This is capped by a second package of thin (<45 cm thick) sheets of pahoehoe extending no more than 50 m from the channel. The upper-most package comprises localised 'a'a overflows. The channel itself contains two blockages located 130 m apart and composed of levee chunks veneered with overflow lava. The channel was emplaced over 50 h, spanning 30 May-2 June, 1974, with the flow front arriving at our section (4.4 km from the vent) 8 h after the eruption began. The basal 'a'a flow thickness yields effusion rates of 35 m3 s-1 for the opening phase, with the initial flow advancing across the mapped section at ˜10 m/min. Short-lived overflows of fluid pahoehoe then built the levee cap, increasing the apparent channel depth to 4.8 m. There were at least six pulses at 90-420 m3 s-1, causing overflow of limited extent lasting no more than 5 min. Brim-full flow conditions were thus extremely short-lived. During a dominant period of below-bank flow, flow depth was ˜2 m with an effusion rate of ˜35 m3 s-1, consistent with the mean output rate (obtained from the total flow bulk volume) of 23-54 m3 s-1. During pulses, levee chunks were plucked and floated down channel to form blockages. In a final low effusion rate phase, lava ponded behind the lower blockage to form a syn-channel pond that fed 'a'a overflow. After the end of the eruption the roofed-over pond continued to drain through the lower blockage, causing the roof to founder. Drainage emplaced inflated flows on the channel floor below the lower blockage for a further ˜10 h. The complex processes involved in levee-channel construction

  12. Dynamic Digital Channelizer Based on Spectrum Sensing.

    PubMed

    Hu, Junpeng; Zuo, Zhen; Huang, Zhiping; Dong, Zhi

    2015-01-01

    The ability to efficiently channelize a received signal with dynamic sub-channel bandwidths is a key requirement of software defined radio (SDR) systems. The digital channelizer, which is used to split the received signal into a number of sub-channels, plays an important role in SDR systems. In this paper, a design of dynamic digital channelizer is presented. The proposed method is novel in that it employs a cosine modulated filter bank (CMFB) to divide the received signal into multiple frequency sub-bands and a spectrum sensing technique, which is mostly used in cognitive radio, is introduced to detect the presence of signal of each sub-band. The method of spectrum sensing is carried out based on the eigenvalues of covariance matrix of received signal. The ratio of maximum-minimum eigenvalue of each sub-band is vulnerable to noise fluctuation. This paper suggests an optimized method to calculate the ratio of maximum-minimum eigenvalue. The simulation results imply that the design of digital channelizer can effectively separate the received signal with dynamically changeable sub-channel signals.

  13. Attosecond Molecular Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Fernando

    2015-05-01

    The development of attosecond laser pulses allows one to probe the inner working of atoms, molecules and surfaces on the timescale of the electronic response. In molecules, attosecond pump-probe spectroscopy enables investigations of the prompt charge redistribution and localization that accompany photo-excitation processes, where a molecule is lifted from the ground Born-Oppenheimer potential energy surface to one or more excited surfaces, and where subsequent photochemistry evolves on femto- and attosecond timescales. In this talk I will present a few theoretical examples of realistic molecular attosecond pump-probe experiments in which simple molecules are ionized with a single attosecond pulse (or a train of attosecond pulses) and are subsequently probed by one or several infrared or xuv few-cycle pulses. The evolution of the electronic and nuclear densities in the photo-excited molecule or remaining molecular ions is calculated with attosecond time-resolution and is visualized by varying the delay between the pump and probe pulses. The results of these calculations allow us to explain several experimental observations as well as to guide future experimental efforts to uncover ultrafast electron and nuclear dynamics in molecules.

  14. VMD: visual molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Humphrey, W; Dalke, A; Schulten, K

    1996-02-01

    VMD is a molecular graphics program designed for the display and analysis of molecular assemblies, in particular biopolymers such as proteins and nucleic acids. VMD can simultaneously display any number of structures using a wide variety of rendering styles and coloring methods. Molecules are displayed as one or more "representations," in which each representation embodies a particular rendering method and coloring scheme for a selected subset of atoms. The atoms displayed in each representation are chosen using an extensive atom selection syntax, which includes Boolean operators and regular expressions. VMD provides a complete graphical user interface for program control, as well as a text interface using the Tcl embeddable parser to allow for complex scripts with variable substitution, control loops, and function calls. Full session logging is supported, which produces a VMD command script for later playback. High-resolution raster images of displayed molecules may be produced by generating input scripts for use by a number of photorealistic image-rendering applications. VMD has also been expressly designed with the ability to animate molecular dynamics (MD) simulation trajectories, imported either from files or from a direct connection to a running MD simulation. VMD is the visualization component of MDScope, a set of tools for interactive problem solving in structural biology, which also includes the parallel MD program NAMD, and the MDCOMM software used to connect the visualization and simulation programs. VMD is written in C++, using an object-oriented design; the program, including source code and extensive documentation, is freely available via anonymous ftp and through the World Wide Web.

  15. In search of the mutual relationship between the structure, solid-state spectroscopy and molecular dynamics in selected calcium channel blockers.

    PubMed

    Drużbicki, Kacper; Pajzderska, Aleksandra; Kiwilsza, Anna; Jenczyk, Jacek; Chudoba, Dorota; Jarek, Marcin; Mielcarek, Jadwiga; Wąsicki, Jan

    2016-03-31

    Three isostructural 1,4-dihydropyridines (DHPs), namely, nifedipine, nitrendipine and nimodipine were selected to characterize their structure, intermolecular interactions and molecular dynamics. The studied samples were analyzed using powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), neutron (INS) and infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) as well as solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), where each technique was supported by the state-of-the-art theoretical calculations for solid-state. By combining multiple experimental techniques with advanced theoretical calculations we were able to shed light on the mutual relation between the structure, stabilizing intermolecular interactions and their spectral response. For the first time, unambiguous computationally-supported assignment of the most prominent spectral features in DHPs is presented to give a valuable support for polymorph screening and drug control. Molecular motions were interpreted in details, revealing that a dynamic reservoir of each compound is dominated by intra-molecular reorientations of methyl groups and large-amplitude oscillations in terminal chains. Our study successfully validates the realm of applicability of first-principles solid-state calculations in search of the mutual relation between the structure and spectroscopy in this important class of drugs. Such approach gives a first necessary step to gather combined structure-dynamics data on functionalized DHPs, which are of importance to better understand crystallization and binding tendency. The NMR relaxation experiments reveal that nitro groups significantly hinder the reorientation of methyl rotors and provide the first evidence of low-temperature methyl-group tunneling in DHPs, an intriguing quantum-effect which is to be further explored.

  16. Design of a Gated Molecular Proton Channel

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Wei; Zhou, Bo; Geyer, Tihamer; Hutter, Michael C.; Fang, Haiping; Helms, Volkhard H.

    2011-01-17

    The generation of an electrochemical pH gradient across biological membranes using energy from photosynthesis and respiration provides the universal driving force in cells for the production of adenosine triphosphate (ATP), the energy unit of life. Creating such an electrochemical potential requires the transportation of protons against a thermodynamic gradient. In biological proton pumps, chemical energy is used to induce protein conformational changes during each catalytic cycle where one or a few protons are pumped against a proton concentration gradient across the membrane. On the other hand, membrane channels also exist that mediate continuous particle exchange and may be switched between open and closed states. Being able to design nanochannels with similar functions would be of great importance for creating novel molecular devices with a wide range of applications such as molecular motors, fuel cells, rechargeable nanobatteries that provide energy to other nanomachines, and the generation of locally and temporally controlled pH jumps on microfluidic chips.

  17. Molecular biophysics of Orai store-operated Ca2+ channels.

    PubMed

    Amcheslavsky, Anna; Wood, Mona L; Yeromin, Andriy V; Parker, Ian; Freites, J Alfredo; Tobias, Douglas J; Cahalan, Michael D

    2015-01-20

    Upon endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) store depletion, Orai channels in the plasma membrane are activated directly by endoplasmic reticulum-resident STIM proteins to generate the Ca(2+)-selective, Ca(2+) release-activated Ca(2+) (CRAC) current. After the molecular identification of Orai, a plethora of functional and biochemical studies sought to compare Orai homologs, determine their stoichiometry, identify structural domains responsible for the biophysical fingerprint of the CRAC current, identify the physiological functions, and investigate Orai homologs as potential therapeutic targets. Subsequently, the solved crystal structure of Drosophila Orai (dOrai) substantiated many findings from structure-function studies, but also revealed an unexpected hexameric structure. In this review, we explore Orai channels as elucidated by functional and biochemical studies, analyze the dOrai crystal structure and its implications for Orai channel function, and present newly available information from molecular dynamics simulations that shed light on Orai channel gating and permeation. Copyright © 2015 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Floating orbital molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Perlt, Eva; Brüssel, Marc; Kirchner, Barbara

    2014-04-21

    We introduce an alternative ab initio molecular dynamics simulation as a unification of Hartree-Fock molecular dynamics and the floating orbital approach. The general scheme of the floating orbital molecular dynamics method is presented. Moreover, a simple but sophisticated guess for the orbital centers is provided to reduce the number of electronic structure optimization steps at each molecular dynamics step. The conservation of total energy and angular momentum is investigated in order to validate the floating orbital molecular dynamics approach with and without application of the initial guess. Finally, a water monomer and a water dimer are simulated, and the influence of the orbital floating on certain properties like the dipole moment is investigated.

  19. MDplot: Visualise Molecular Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Margreitter, Christian; Oostenbrink, Chris

    2017-05-10

    The MDplot package provides plotting functions to allow for automated visualisation of molecular dynamics simulation output. It is especially useful in cases where the plot generation is rather tedious due to complex file formats or when a large number of plots are generated. The graphs that are supported range from those which are standard, such as RMsD/RMsF (root-mean-square deviation and root-mean-square fluctuation, respectively) to less standard, such as thermodynamic integration analysis and hydrogen bond monitoring over time. All told, they address many commonly used analyses. In this article, we set out the MDplot package's functions, give examples of the function calls, and show the associated plots. Plotting and data parsing is separated in all cases, i.e. the respective functions can be used independently. Thus, data manipulation and the integration of additional file formats is fairly easy. Currently, the loading functions support GROMOS, GROMACS, and AMBER file formats. Moreover, we also provide a Bash interface that allows simple embedding of MDplot into Bash scripts as the final analysis step. The package can be obtained in the latest major version from CRAN (https://cran.r-project.org/package=MDplot) or in the most recent version from the project's GitHub page at https://github.com/MDplot/MDplot, where feedback is also most welcome. MDplot is published under the GPL-3 license.

  20. Small Ion Channel Linking Molecular Simulations and Electrophysiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, Andrzej

    2017-01-01

    Ion channels are pore-forming protein assemblies that mediate the transport of small ions across cell membranes. Otherwise, membrane bilayers would be almost impermeable to ions incapable to traverse the low dielectric constant, hydrophobic membrane core. Ion channels are ubiquitous to all life forms. In humans and other higher organisms they play the central role in conducting nerve impulses, cardiac functions, muscle contraction and apoptosis. On the other extreme of biological complexity, viral ion channels (viroporins) influence many stages of the virus infection cycle either through regulating virus replication, such as entry, assembly and release or modulating the electrochemical balance in the subcellular compartments of host cells. Ion channels were crucial components of protocells. Their emergence facilitated adaptation of nascent life to different environmental conditions. The earliest ion channels must have been much simpler than most of their modern ancestors. Viral channels are among only a few naturally occurring models to study the structure, function and evolution of primordial channels. Experimental studies of these properties are difficult and often unreliable. In principle, computational methods, and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in particular, can aid in providing information about both the structure and the function of ion channels. However, MD suffers from its own problems, such as inability to access sufficiently long time scales or limited accuracy of force fields. It is, therefore, essential to determine the reliability of MD simulations. We propose to do so on the basis of two criteria. One is channel stability on time scales that extend for several microseconds or longer. The other is the ability to reproduce the measured ionic conductance as a function of applied voltage. If both the stability and the calculated ionic conductance are satisfactory it will greatly increase our confidence that the structure and the function of a

  1. Thermodynamics of competitive molecular channel transport: application to artificial nuclear pores.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Wolfgang R; Nadler, Walter

    2010-12-13

    In an analytical model channel transport is analyzed as a function of key parameters, determining efficiency and selectivity of particle transport in a competitive molecular environment. These key parameters are the concentration of particles, solvent-channel exchange dynamics, as well as particle-in-channel- and interparticle interaction. These parameters are explicitly related to translocation dynamics and channel occupation probability. Slowing down the exchange dynamics at the channel ends, or elevating the particle concentration reduces the in-channel binding strength necessary to maintain maximum transport. Optimized in-channel interaction may even shift from binding to repulsion. A simple equation gives the interrelation of access dynamics and concentration at this transition point. The model is readily transferred to competitive transport of different species, each of them having their individual in-channel affinity. Combinations of channel affinities are determined which differentially favor selectivity of certain species on the cost of others. Selectivity for a species increases if its in-channel binding enhances the species' translocation probability when compared to that of the other species. Selectivity increases particularly for a wide binding site, long channels, and fast access dynamics. Recent experiments on competitive transport of in-channel binding and inert molecules through artificial nuclear pores serve as a paradigm for our model. It explains qualitatively and quantitatively how binding molecules are favored for transport at the cost of the transport of inert molecules.

  2. Thermodynamics of Competitive Molecular Channel Transport: Application to Artificial Nuclear Pores

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Wolfgang R.; Nadler, Walter

    2010-01-01

    In an analytical model channel transport is analyzed as a function of key parameters, determining efficiency and selectivity of particle transport in a competitive molecular environment. These key parameters are the concentration of particles, solvent-channel exchange dynamics, as well as particle-in-channel- and interparticle interaction. These parameters are explicitly related to translocation dynamics and channel occupation probability. Slowing down the exchange dynamics at the channel ends, or elevating the particle concentration reduces the in-channel binding strength necessary to maintain maximum transport. Optimized in-channel interaction may even shift from binding to repulsion. A simple equation gives the interrelation of access dynamics and concentration at this transition point. The model is readily transferred to competitive transport of different species, each of them having their individual in-channel affinity. Combinations of channel affinities are determined which differentially favor selectivity of certain species on the cost of others. Selectivity for a species increases if its in-channel binding enhances the species' translocation probablity when compared to that of the other species. Selectivity increases particularly for a wide binding site, long channels, and fast access dynamics. Recent experiments on competitive transport of in-channel binding and inert molecules through artificial nuclear pores serve as a paradigm for our model. It explains qualitatively and quantitatively how binding molecules are favored for transport at the cost of the transport of inert molecules. PMID:21179205

  3. Molecular dynamics with quantum fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Georgescu, Ionut; Mandelshtam, Vladimir A.

    2010-09-01

    A quantum dynamics approach, called Gaussian molecular dynamics, is introduced. As in the centroid molecular dynamics, the N-body quantum system is mapped to an N-body classical system with an effective Hamiltonian arising within the variational Gaussian wave-packet approximation. The approach is exact for the harmonic oscillator and for the high-temperature limit, accurate in the short-time limit and is computationally very efficient.

  4. Flow Dynamics in the Cozumel Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabriela, C.; Candela, J.; Ochoa, J.; Badan, A.; Sheinbaum, J.

    2001-12-01

    The Cozumel Channel is a narrow passage (15 km wide by 50 km long and 400 m deep) about 70 km southwest of the Yucatan Channel in the Caribbean Sea. It is bounded by the Yucatan Peninsula on the west and the Cozumel Island on the east. There are no known reports about the physical oceanography of this channel, although its dyna-mics should be closely linked to the Yucatan Current in its approach to the Yucatan Channel. This study is mostly about the dynamic balance in the Cozumel Channel using currents, sea level, meteorological and hydrographic observations, collected over a 5 month period between December 1996 and May 1997. The momentum balance across the channel shows periods when it is mainly geostrophic, and other periods where large ageostrophic fluctuations occur. These ageostrophic fluctuations have velocities on the order of 1 m/s and last longer than a week. Other terms in the across-channel momentum equation are estimated to explain this ageostrophy; in particular, the non-turbulent advective terms are found to be the most likely source. The local rate of change and wind stress are confidently dismissed in the ageostrophic behavior, also the Reynolds stresses seem to contribute insignificantly. A mean transport of about 5 Sv towards the Gulf of Mexico is estimated for this period, although with a high degree of variability: a minimum of approximately 1.2 Sv around mid-January and a maximum of 7.5 at the beginning of May. An additional set of current observations collected between October 2000 and June 2001, that comprise data from both Cozumel and Yucatan Channels, indicate the correlation of flow fluctuations in both channels.

  5. Tidal dynamics in channels: 2. Complex channel networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, A. E.; Souza, A. J.

    2006-11-01

    Intricate networks of tidal channels such as those found in fjordic, barrier island, and branching estuarine systems are often at risk from contaminant inputs and can be important as spawning grounds or migration pathways for marine organisms. These intricate systems are rarely spatially resolved in regional-scale numerical tidal models, and setting up a specific detailed numerical model for the purpose of rapidly assessing the likely tidal behavior of such geometrically complex systems carries a high overhead. Here we describe a straightforward algorithm (implemented in MATLAB) which permits rapid assessment of the linear tidal dynamics in an arbitrarily complex network of tidal channels. The method needs only a minimum of input data, namely, (1) the forcing tidal elevation amplitude and phase at the entrances of those channels directly exposed to the open sea and (2) the length, width, and depth of each channel. The performance of the method is tested against results from the finite element regional-scale numerical model of Foreman et al. (1993) in the fjordic region of western Canada.

  6. A molecular dynamics investigation into the adsorption behavior inside {001} kaolinite and {1014} calcite nano-scale channels: the case with confined hydrocarbon liquid, acid gases, and water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazelabdolabadi, Babak; Alizadeh-Mojarad, Aliasghar

    2017-06-01

    A set of molecular dynamics simulations was conducted, as the first comparative study of the adsorption behavior of liquid hydrocarbon/acid gases/water molecules over { 10\\bar{1}4} calcite surface and {001} octahedral kaolinite surface in nano-confined slit. According to atomic z-density profiles, hydrocarbon molecules have higher tendency towards the { 10\\bar{1}4} calcite surface than the {001} octahedral kaolinite surface. In addition, water molecules form stronger adsorption layer over calcite surface than kaolinite. In contrast, acid gas molecules have higher tendency towards kaolinite surface than calcite. This behavior was spotted within nanometer-sized slit pores. The results also point to reduction in self-diffusion coefficient of molecules with strong adsorption over mineral surfaces in nano-confined environment.

  7. Mechanism of Interaction between the General Anesthetic Halothane and a Model Ion Channel Protein, III: Molecular Dynamics Simulation Incorporating a Cyanophenylalanine Spectroscopic Probe

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Hongling; Liu, Jing; Blasie, J. Kent

    2009-01-01

    A nitrile-derived amino acid, PheCN, has been used as an internal spectroscopic probe to study the binding of an inhalational anesthetic to a model membrane protein. The infrared spectra from experiment showed a blue-shift of the nitrile vibrational frequency in the presence of the anesthetic halothane. To interpret the infrared results and explore the nature of the interaction between halothane and the model protein, all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been used to probe the structural and dynamic properties of the protein in the presence and absence of one halothane molecule. The frequency shift analyzed from MD simulations agrees well with the experimental infrared results. Decomposition of the forces acting on the nitrile probes demonstrates an indirect impact on the probes from halothane, namely a change of the protein's electrostatic local environment around the probes induced by halothane. Although the halothane remains localized within the designed hydrophobic binding cavity, it undergoes a significant amount of translational and rotational motion, modulated by the interaction of the trifluorine end of halothane with backbone hydrogens of the residues forming the cavity. This dominant interaction between halothane and backbone hydrogens outweighs the direct interaction between halothane and the nitrile groups, making it a good “spectator” probe of the halothane-protein interaction. These MD simulations provide insight into action of anesthetic molecules on the model membrane protein, and also support the further development of nitrile-labeled amino acids as spectroscopic probes within the designed binding cavity. PMID:19450489

  8. Liquid Jet Cavitation via Molecular Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashurst, W. T.

    1997-11-01

    A two-dimensional molecular dynamics simulation of a liquid jet is used to investigate cavitation in a diesel-like fuel injector. A channel with a length four times its width has been examined at various system sizes (widths of 20 to 160 σ, where σ is the zero energy location in the Lennard-Jones potential). The wall boundary condition is Maxwell's diffuse reflection, similar to the work by Sun & Ebner (Phys. Rev A 46, 4813, 1992). Currently, the jet exhausts into a vacuum, but a second, low density gas will be incorporated to represent the compressed air in a diesel chamber. Four different flow rates are examined. With ρ U equal to √mɛ/σ^2 (the largest flow rate) the static pressure decreases by a factor of twenty between the channel entrance and exit. The largest flow rate has a parabolic velocity profile with almost constant density across the channel. The smallest flow rate has the same velocity profile but the density exhibits a large variation, with the minimum value in the channel center. Thus, the product ρ U is nearly constant across the channel at this flow rate. The discharge coefficient CD has a small variation with flow rate, but the velocity coefficient CV varies with the amount of two-phase fluid within the channel. The ratio of CV to CD varies from 1.3 (largest flow rate) to 2.0 (the smallest flow rate, which is one-eighth of the largest).

  9. Thermal transpiration: A molecular dynamics study

    SciTech Connect

    T, Joe Francis; Sathian, Sarith P.

    2014-12-09

    Thermal transpiration is a phenomenon where fluid molecules move from the cold end towards the hot end of a channel under the influence of longitudinal temperature gradient alone. Although the phenomenon of thermal transpiration is observed at rarefied gas conditions in macro systems, the phenomenon can occur at atmospheric pressure if the characteristic dimensions of the channel is less than 100 nm. The flow through these nanosized channels is characterized by the free molecular flow regimes and continuum theory is inadequate to describe the flow. Thus a non-continuum method like molecular dynamics (MD) is necessary to study such phenomenon. In the present work, MD simulations were carried out to investigate the occurance of thermal transpiration in copper and platinum nanochannels at atmospheric pressure conditions. The mean pressure of argon gas confined inside the nano channels was maintained around 1 bar. The channel height is maintained at 2nm. The argon atoms interact with each other and with the wall atoms through the Lennard-Jones potential. The wall atoms are modelled using an EAM potential. Further, separate simulations were carried out where a Harmonic potential is used for the atom-atom interaction in the platinum channel. A thermally insulating wall was introduced between the low and high temperature regions and those wall atoms interact with fluid atoms through a repulsive potential. A reduced cut off radius were used to achieve this. Thermal creep is induced by applying a temperature gradient along the channel wall. It was found that flow developed in the direction of the increasing temperature gradient of the wall. An increase in the volumetric flux was observed as the length of the cold and the hot regions of the wall were increased. The effect of temperature gradient and the wall-fluid interaction strength on the flow parameters have been studied to understand the phenomenon better.

  10. Molecular dynamics of silicon indentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallman, J. S.; Hoover, W. G.; Hoover, C. G.; de Groot, A. J.; Lee, S. M.; Wooten, F.

    1993-04-01

    We use nonequilibrium molecular dynamics to simulate the elastic-plastic deformation of silicon under tetrahedral nanometer-sized indentors. The results are described in terms of a rate-dependent and temperature-dependent phenomenological yield strength. We follow the structural change during indentation with a computer technique that allows us to model the dynamic simulation of diffraction patterns.

  11. Water Channel Facility for Fluid Dynamics Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eslam-Panah, Azar; Sabatino, Daniel

    2016-11-01

    This study presents the design, assembly, and verification process of the circulating water channel constructed by undergraduate students at the Penn State University at Berks. This work was significantly inspired from the closed-loop free-surface water channel at Lafayette College (Sabatino and Maharjan, 2015) and employed for experiments in fluid dynamics. The channel has a 11 ft length, 2.5 ft width, and 2 ft height glass test section with a maximum velocity of 3.3 ft/s. First, the investigation justifies the needs of a water channel in an undergraduate institute and its potential applications in the whole field of engineering. Then, the design procedures applied to find the geometry and material of some elements of the channel, especially the contraction, the test section, the inlet and end tanks, and the pump system are described. The optimization of the contraction design, including the maintenance of uniform exit flow and avoidance of flow separation, is also included. Finally, the discussion concludes by identifying the problems with the undergraduate education through this capstone project and suggesting some new investigations to improve flow quality.

  12. Dynamic Modeling of Meandering Alluvial Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Yongqiang

    1990-01-01

    The migration of meandering alluvial channels is investigated theoretically, numerically, and experimentally. An equation for the rate of bank erosion is derived from a two-dimensional continuity equation for sediment transport linked with the depth-averaged dynamic flow equations. A simple one-dimensional theoretical analysis of meander migration leads to a relationship between the migration rate and the relative channel curvature and sediment properties. The simple model appropriately simulates the pattern and rate of meander expansion and migrations of the White River, Indiana and the East Nishnabotna River, Iowa. Application of the one-dimensional model to sine -generated alluvial channels indicates that meander migration reaches its maximum when the relative radius of curvature reaches about 4.8, or when the sinuosity of meander approaches 1.3. A two-dimensional numerical model, DYNAMIC, which predicts both lateral and longitudinal migration of alluvial channels is then developed, based on a system of quasi -steady depth-averaged flow dynamic equations, a sediment continuity equation, and a bank erosion equation. A linear analysis of the two-dimensional model leads to a convolutional relation between the rate of meander migration and flow and sediment properties. In the two-dimensional numerical analysis, a numerical algorithm called FLOWSOL is developed to solve the flow dynamic equations. The flow algorithm is then linked to the sediment continuity equation and bank erosion equation to simulate bed deformation and bank erosion. The developed two-dimensional model is applied to calculate the velocity profiles in Rozovskii's experiments and the bed deformation and shear stress in Hooke's experiments. Good agreement is obtained between the calculated and measured velocities, shear stresses and bed profiles in all experiments. Small scaled meandering rivers are developed successfully on a floodplain with or without cohesive materials (about 3%) in a wide

  13. Modeling Molecular Dynamics from Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Hinrichs, Nina Singhal

    2009-01-28

    Many important processes in biology occur at the molecular scale. A detailed understanding of these processes can lead to significant advances in the medical and life sciences. For example, many diseases are caused by protein aggregation or misfolding. One approach to studying these systems is to use physically-based computational simulations to model the interactions and movement of the molecules. While molecular simulations are computationally expensive, it is now possible to simulate many independent molecular dynamics trajectories in a parallel fashion by using super- or distributed- computing methods such as Folding@Home or Blue Gene. The analysis of these large, high-dimensional data sets presents new computational challenges. In this seminar, I will discuss a novel approach to analyzing large ensembles of molecular dynamics trajectories to generate a compact model of the dynamics. This model groups conformations into discrete states and describes the dynamics as Markovian, or history-independent, transitions between the states. I will discuss why the Markovian state model (MSM) is suitable for macromolecular dynamics, and how it can be used to answer many interesting and relevant questions about the molecular system. I will also discuss many of the computational and statistical challenges in building such a model, such as how to appropriately cluster conformations, determine the statistical reliability, and efficiently design new simulations.

  14. The molecular physiology of CRAC channels

    PubMed Central

    Prakriya, Murali

    2011-01-01

    Summary The Ca2+release-activated Ca2+ (CRAC) channel is a highly Ca2+-selective store-operated channel expressed in T cells, mast cells, and various other tissues. CRAC channels regulate critical cellular processes such as gene expression, motility, and the secretion of inflammatory mediators. The identification of Orai1, a key subunit of the CRAC channel pore, and STIM1, the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca2+ sensor, have provided the tools to illuminate the mechanisms of regulation and the pore properties of CRAC channels. Recent evidence indicates that the activation of CRAC channels by store depletion involves a coordinated series of steps, which include the redistributions of STIM1 and Orai1, direct physical interactions between these proteins, and conformational changes in Orai1, culminating in channel activation. Additional studies have revealed that the high Ca2+ selectivity of CRAC channels arises from the presence of an intrapore Ca2+ binding site, the properties of which are finely honed to occlude the permeation of the much more prevalent Na+. Structure-function studies have led to the identification of the potential pore-binding sites for Ca2+, providing a firm framework for understanding the mechanisms of selectivity and gating of the CRAC channel. This review summarizes recent progress in understanding the mechanisms of CRAC channel activation, pore properties, and modulation. PMID:19754891

  15. Molecular dynamics simulation of pyridine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trumpakaj, Zygmunt; Linde, Bogumił

    2015-04-01

    Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations are used for the investigation of molecular motions in pyridine in the temperature range 20-480 K under normal pressure. The results obtained are analyzed within the frame of the Mori Zwanzig memory function formalism. An analytical approximation of the first memory function K(t) is applied to predict some dependences on temperature. Experimental results of the Rayleigh scattering of depolarized light from liquid pyridine are used as the main base for the comparison.

  16. Intra-membrane molecular interactions of K+ channel proteins :

    SciTech Connect

    Moczydlowski, Edward G.

    2013-07-01

    Ion channel proteins regulate complex patterns of cellular electrical activity and ionic signaling. Certain K+ channels play an important role in immunological biodefense mechanisms of adaptive and innate immunity. Most ion channel proteins are oligomeric complexes with the conductive pore located at the central subunit interface. The long-term activity of many K+ channel proteins is dependent on the concentration of extracellular K+; however, the mechanism is unclear. Thus, this project focused on mechanisms underlying structural stability of tetrameric K+ channels. Using KcsA of Streptomyces lividans as a model K+ channel of known structure, the molecular basis of tetramer stability was investigated by: 1. Bioinformatic analysis of the tetramer interface. 2. Effect of two local anesthetics (lidocaine, tetracaine) on tetramer stability. 3. Molecular simulation of drug docking to the ion conduction pore. The results provide new insights regarding the structural stability of K+ channels and its possible role in cell physiology.

  17. Mechanosensory hair cells express two molecularly distinct mechanotransduction channels

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Bo; Cunningham, Christopher; Harkins-Perry, Sarah; Coste, Bertrand; Ranade, Sanjeev; Zebarjadi, Navid; Beurg, Maryline; Fettiplace, Robert; Patapoutian, Ardem; Mueller, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Auditory hair cells contain mechanotransduction channels that rapidly open in response to sound-induced vibrations. Surprisingly, we report here that auditory hair cells contain two molecularly distinct mechanotransduction channels. One ion channel is activated by sound and is responsible for sensory transduction. This sensory transduction channel is expressed in hair-cell stereocilia and previous studies show that its activity is affected by mutations in the genes encoding the transmembrane proteins TMHS/LHFPL5, TMIE and TMC1/2. We show here that the second ion channel is expressed at the apical surface of hair cells and contains the Piezo2 protein. The activity of the Piezo2-dependent channel is controlled by the intracellular Ca2+ concentration and can be recorded following disruption of the sensory transduction machinery or more generally by disruption of the sensory epithelium. We thus conclude that hair cells express two molecularly and functionally distinct mechanotransduction channels with different subcellular distribution. PMID:27893727

  18. Mechanosensory hair cells express two molecularly distinct mechanotransduction channels.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zizhen; Grillet, Nicolas; Zhao, Bo; Cunningham, Christopher; Harkins-Perry, Sarah; Coste, Bertrand; Ranade, Sanjeev; Zebarjadi, Navid; Beurg, Maryline; Fettiplace, Robert; Patapoutian, Ardem; Mueller, Ulrich

    2017-01-01

    Auditory hair cells contain mechanotransduction channels that rapidly open in response to sound-induced vibrations. We report here that auditory hair cells contain two molecularly distinct mechanotransduction channels. One ion channel is activated by sound and is responsible for sensory transduction. This sensory transduction channel is expressed in hair cell stereocilia, and previous studies show that its activity is affected by mutations in the genes encoding the transmembrane proteins TMHS, TMIE, TMC1 and TMC2. We show here that the second ion channel is expressed at the apical surface of hair cells and that it contains the Piezo2 protein. The activity of the Piezo2-dependent channel is controlled by the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration and can be recorded following disruption of the sensory transduction machinery or more generally by disruption of the sensory epithelium. We thus conclude that hair cells express two molecularly and functionally distinct mechanotransduction channels with different subcellular distributions.

  19. Molecular biology of insect sodium channels and pyrethroid resistance.

    PubMed

    Dong, Ke; Du, Yuzhe; Rinkevich, Frank; Nomura, Yoshiko; Xu, Peng; Wang, Lingxin; Silver, Kristopher; Zhorov, Boris S

    2014-07-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are essential for the initiation and propagation of the action potential in neurons and other excitable cells. Because of their critical roles in electrical signaling, sodium channels are targets of a variety of naturally occurring and synthetic neurotoxins, including several classes of insecticides. This review is intended to provide an update on the molecular biology of insect sodium channels and the molecular mechanism of pyrethroid resistance. Although mammalian and insect sodium channels share fundamental topological and functional properties, most insect species carry only one sodium channel gene, compared to multiple sodium channel genes found in each mammalian species. Recent studies showed that two posttranscriptional mechanisms, alternative splicing and RNA editing, are involved in generating functional diversity of sodium channels in insects. More than 50 sodium channel mutations have been identified to be responsible for or associated with knockdown resistance (kdr) to pyrethroids in various arthropod pests and disease vectors. Elucidation of molecular mechanism of kdr led to the identification of dual receptor sites of pyrethroids on insect sodium channels. Many of the kdr mutations appear to be located within or close to the two receptor sites. The accumulating knowledge of insect sodium channels and their interactions with insecticides provides a foundation for understanding the neurophysiology of sodium channels in vivo and the development of new and safer insecticides for effective control of arthropod pests and human disease vectors.

  20. Molecular Biology of Insect Sodium Channels and Pyrethroid Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Ke; Du, Yuzhe; Rinkevich, Frank; Nomura, Yoshiko; Xu, Peng; Wang, Lingxin; Silver, Kristopher; Zhorov, Boris S.

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are essential for the initiation and propagation of the action potential in neurons and other excitable cells. Because of their critical roles in electrical signaling, sodium channels are targets of a variety of naturally occurring and synthetic neurotoxins, including several classes of insecticides. This review is intended to provide an update on the molecular biology of insect sodium channels and the molecular mechanism of pyrethroid resistance. Although mammalian and insect sodium channels share fundamental topological and functional properties, most insect species carry only one sodium channel gene, compared to multiple sodium channel genes found in each mammalian species. Recent studies showed that two posttranscriptional mechanisms, alternative splicing and RNA editing, are involved in generating functional diversity of sodium channels in insects. More than 50 sodium channel mutations have been identified to be responsible for or associated with knockdown resistance (kdr) to pyrethroids in various arthropod pests and disease vectors. Elucidation of molecular mechanism of kdr led to the identification of dual receptor sites of pyrethroids on insect sodium channels. Most of the kdr mutations appear to be located within or close to the two receptor sites. The accumulating knowledge of insect sodium channels and their interactions with insecticides provides a foundation for understanding the neurophysiology of sodium channels in vivo and the development of new and safer insecticides for effective control of arthropod pests and human disease vectors. PMID:24704279

  1. Integration methods for molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Leimkuhler, B.J.; Reich, S.; Skeel, R.D.

    1996-12-31

    Classical molecular dynamics simulation of a macromolecule requires the use of an efficient time-stepping scheme that can faithfully approximate the dynamics over many thousands of timesteps. Because these problems are highly nonlinear, accurate approximation of a particular solution trajectory on meaningful time intervals is neither obtainable nor desired, but some restrictions, such as symplecticness, can be imposed on the discretization which tend to imply good long term behavior. The presence of a variety of types and strengths of interatom potentials in standard molecular models places severe restrictions on the timestep for numerical integration used in explicit integration schemes, so much recent research has concentrated on the search for alternatives that possess (1) proper dynamical properties, and (2) a relative insensitivity to the fastest components of the dynamics. We survey several recent approaches. 48 refs., 2 figs.

  2. GAS PHASE MOLECULAR DYNAMICS

    SciTech Connect

    SEARS,T.J.; HALL,G.E.; PRESES,J.M.; WESTON,R.E.,JR.

    1999-06-09

    The goal of this research is the understanding of elementary chemical and physical processes important in the combustion of fossil fuels. Interest centers on reactions involving short-lived chemical intermediates and their properties. High-resolution, high-sensitivity, laser absorption methods are augmented by high temperature flow-tube reaction kinetics studies with mass-spectrometric sampling. These experiments provide information on the energy levels, structures and reactivity of molecular free radical species and, in turn, provide new tools for the study of energy flow and chemical bond cleavage in the radicals in chemical systems. The experimental work is supported by theoretical and computational work using time-dependent quantum wavepacket calculations that provide insights into energy flow between the vibrational modes of the molecule. The work of group members Fockenberg and Muckerman is described in separate abstracts of this volume.

  3. Molecular aspects of human brain sodium channel.

    PubMed

    De Rycker, C; Schoffeniels, E

    1990-01-01

    The sodium channel content of human brain was measured by tritiated tetrodotoxin specific binding. After solubilization, the sodium channel was submitted to chromatography on diethylaminoethyl(cellulose) Sephadex, hydroxylapatite and wheat germ agglutinin sepharose. An increase of tritiated tetrodotoxin binding specific activity was subsequently observed. Eluted sodium channels from wheat germ agglutinin sepharose were overlaid on a sucrose gradient. Electrophoretical analysis of the material obtained after the sedimentation step revealed two co-purified peptides, alpha (Mr = 275,000 mol. wt) and beta (Mr = 30,000-36,000 mol. wt.). Alpha showed an exceptionally high free electrophoretic mobility, which is a common feature for all sodium channels previously described. However, the high denaturation rate of the solubilized tetrodotoxin receptor site 1 did not allow tetrodotoxin receptor quantification by the tritiated toxin binding in sucrose fractions. Sodium channel effective reconstitution in liposomes was demonstrated: (1) 22Na+ influx in proteoliposomes was sensitive to sodium channel-specific neurotoxins: (2) reconstituted proteins showed a cation selectivity similar to that previously described for animal sodium channels. The sodium channel preparation obtained after four chromatographic steps shows two peptides on the electrophoretic analysis. Reconstituted sodium channels displayed some physiological properties found in intact conducting membranes.

  4. Dynamic molecular graphs: "hopping" structures.

    PubMed

    Cortés-Guzmán, Fernando; Rocha-Rinza, Tomas; Guevara-Vela, José Manuel; Cuevas, Gabriel; Gómez, Rosa María

    2014-05-05

    This work aims to contribute to the discussion about the suitability of bond paths and bond-critical points as indicators of chemical bonding defined within the theoretical framework of the quantum theory of atoms in molecules. For this purpose, we consider the temporal evolution of the molecular structure of [Fe{C(CH2 )3 }(CO)3 ] throughout Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics (BOMD), which illustrates the changing behaviour of the molecular graph (MG) of an electronic system. Several MGs with significant lifespans are observed across the BOMD simulations. The bond paths between the trimethylenemethane and the metallic core are uninterruptedly formed and broken. This situation is reminiscent of a "hopping" ligand over the iron atom. The molecular graph wherein the bonding between trimethylenemethane and the iron atom takes place only by means of the tertiary carbon atom has the longest lifespan of all the considered structures, which is consistent with the MG found by X-ray diffraction experiments and quantum chemical calculations. In contrast, the η(4) complex predicted by molecular-orbital theory has an extremely brief lifetime. The lifespan of different molecular structures is related to bond descriptors on the basis of the topology of the electron density such as the ellipticities at the FeCH2 bond-critical points and electron delocalisation indices. This work also proposes the concept of a dynamic molecular graph composed of the different structures found throughout the BOMD trajectories in analogy to a resonance hybrid of Lewis structures. It is our hope that the notion of dynamic molecular graphs will prove useful in the discussion of electronic systems, in particular for those in which analysis on the basis of static structures leads to controversial conclusions.

  5. Molecular dynamics simulations of microscale fluid transport

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, C.C.; Lopez, A.R.; Stevens, M.J.; Plimpton, S.J.

    1998-02-01

    Recent advances in micro-science and technology, like Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS), have generated a group of unique liquid flow problems that involve characteristic length scales of a Micron. Also, in manufacturing processes such as coatings, current continuum models are unable to predict microscale physical phenomena that appear in these non-equilibrium systems. It is suspected that in these systems, molecular-level processes can control the interfacial energy and viscoelastic properties at the liquid/solid boundary. A massively parallel molecular dynamics (MD) code has been developed to better understand microscale transport mechanisms, fluid-structure interactions, and scale effects in micro-domains. Specifically, this MD code has been used to analyze liquid channel flow problems for a variety of channel widths, e.g. 0.005-0.05 microns. This report presents results from MD simulations of Poiseuille flow and Couette flow problems and addresses both scaling and modeling issues. For Poiseuille flow, the numerical predictions are compared with existing data to investigate the variation of the friction factor with channel width. For Couette flow, the numerical predictions are used to determine the degree of slip at the liquid/solid boundary. Finally, the results also indicate that shear direction with respect to the wall lattice orientation can be very important. Simulation results of microscale Couette flow and microscale Poiseuille flow for two different surface structures and two different shear directions will be presented.

  6. Molecular pharmacology of store-operated CRAC channels

    PubMed Central

    Jairaman, Amit; Prakriya, Murali

    2013-01-01

    Calcium influx through store-operated Ca2+ release-activated Ca2+ channels (CRAC channels) is a well-defined mechanism of generating cellular Ca2+ elevations that regulates many functions including gene expression, exocytosis and cell proliferation. The identifications of the ER Ca2+ sensing proteins, STIM1-2 and the CRAC channel proteins, Orai1-3, have led to improved understanding of the physiological roles and the activation mechanism of CRAC channels. Defects in CRAC channel function are associated with serious human diseases such as immunodeficiency and auto-immunity. In this review, we discuss several pharmacological modulators of CRAC channels, focusing specifically on the molecular mechanism of drug action and their utility in illuminating the mechanism of CRAC channel operation and their physiological roles in different cells. PMID:23807116

  7. Oleuropein: Molecular Dynamics and Computation.

    PubMed

    Gentile, Luigi; Uccella, Nicola A; Sivakumar, Ganapathy

    2017-09-11

    Olive oil and table olive biophenols have been shown to significantly enrich the hedonic-sensory and nutritional quality of the Mediterranean diet. Oleuropein is one of the predominate biophenols in green olives and leaves, which not only has noteworthy free-radical quenching activity but also putatively reduces the incidence of various cancers. Clinical trials suggest that the consumption of extra virgin olive oil reduces the risk of several degenerative diseases. The oleuropein-based bioactives in olive oil could reduce tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin-1β and nitric oxide. Therefore, olive bioactives quality should be preserved and even improved due to their disease-fighting properties. Understanding the molecular dynamics of oleuropein is crucial to increase olive oil and table olive quality. The objective of this review is to provide the molecular dynamics and computational mapping of oleuropein. It is a biophenol-secoiridoid expressing different functionalities such as two π-bonds, two esters, two acetals, one catechol, and four hexose hydroxyls within 540 mw. The molecular bond sequential breaking mechanisms were analyzed through unimolecular reactions under electron spray ionization, collision activated dissociations, and fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry. The oleuropein solvent-free reactivity is leading to glucose loss and bioactive aglycone-dialdehydes via secoiridoid ring opening. Oleuropein electron distribution revealed that the free-radical non-polar processes occur from its highest occupied molecular orbital, while the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital is clearly devoted to nucleophilic and base site reactivity. This molecular dynamics and computational mapping of oleuropein could contribute to the engineering of olive-based biomedicine and/or functional food. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  8. Two classes of alamethicin transmembrane channels: molecular models from single-channel properties.

    PubMed

    Mak, D O; Webb, W W

    1995-12-01

    Molecular structures of transmembrane channels formed by alamethicin polypeptide aggregates were analyzed by measuring open-channel conductances and state-transition kinetics using voltage-clamp technique with artificial phospholipid bilayers isolated onto micropipettes by a novel solvent-free tip-dip method. Two distinct classes of alamethicin channels, each with a unique set of conductance states and kinetic properties, were identified. Alamethicin Rf50 at low temperatures forms mostly nonpersistent channels with lifetimes of < 1 min. Long-lasting persistent channels are formed by alamethicin Rf30 at all temperatures and by alamethicin Rf50 at room temperature. In the "modified barrel-stave" model for persistent channels based on the crystalline alamethicin secondary structure, the aqueous pore of the channel surrounded by parallel alamethicin monomers has a constriction generated by amino acid side chains protruding from the alamethicin helices into the pore. The model explains quantitatively the nonohmic channel conductance at high applied voltages and the conductance values and ion selectivities of various persistent channel states. The kinetic properties of nonpersistent channels are explained qualitatively by the "reversed-molecule" model in which nonpersistent channels differ from persistent channels by having one of the channel-forming alamethicin monomers oriented antiparallel to the others.

  9. Two classes of alamethicin transmembrane channels: molecular models from single-channel properties.

    PubMed Central

    Mak, D O; Webb, W W

    1995-01-01

    Molecular structures of transmembrane channels formed by alamethicin polypeptide aggregates were analyzed by measuring open-channel conductances and state-transition kinetics using voltage-clamp technique with artificial phospholipid bilayers isolated onto micropipettes by a novel solvent-free tip-dip method. Two distinct classes of alamethicin channels, each with a unique set of conductance states and kinetic properties, were identified. Alamethicin Rf50 at low temperatures forms mostly nonpersistent channels with lifetimes of < 1 min. Long-lasting persistent channels are formed by alamethicin Rf30 at all temperatures and by alamethicin Rf50 at room temperature. In the "modified barrel-stave" model for persistent channels based on the crystalline alamethicin secondary structure, the aqueous pore of the channel surrounded by parallel alamethicin monomers has a constriction generated by amino acid side chains protruding from the alamethicin helices into the pore. The model explains quantitatively the nonohmic channel conductance at high applied voltages and the conductance values and ion selectivities of various persistent channel states. The kinetic properties of nonpersistent channels are explained qualitatively by the "reversed-molecule" model in which nonpersistent channels differ from persistent channels by having one of the channel-forming alamethicin monomers oriented antiparallel to the others. PMID:8599639

  10. Ultraviolet Channeling Dynamics in Gaseous Media for X -- Ray Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCorkindale, John Charters

    The development of a coherent high brightness / short duration X -- ray source has been of considerable interest to the scientific community as well as various industries since the invention of the technology. Possible applications include X -- ray lithography, biological micro-imaging and the probing of molecular and atomic dynamics. One such source under investigation involves the interaction of a high pulsed power KrF UV laser with a noble gas target (krypton or xenon), producing a photon energy from 1 -- 5 keV. Amplification in this regime requires materials with very special properties found in spatially organized hollow atom clusters. One of the driving forces behind X -- ray production is the UV laser. Theoretical analysis shows that above a critical laser power, the formation of a stable plasma channel in the gaseous medium will occur which can act as a guide for the X-ray pulse and co-propagating UV beam. These plasma channels are visualized with a triple pinhole camera, axial and transverse von Hamos spectrometers and a Thomson scattering setup. In order to understand observed channel morphologies, full characterization of the drive laser was achieved using a Transient Grating -- Frequency Resolved Optical Gating (TG-FROG) technique which gives a full temporal representation of the electric field and associated phase of the ultrashort pulse. Insights gleaned from the TG -- FROG data as well as analysis of photodiode diagnostics placed along the UV laser amplification chain provide explanations for the plasma channel morphology and X -- ray output.

  11. Dynamics of Ceramide Channels Detected Using a Microfluidic System

    PubMed Central

    DeVoe, Don L.; Colombini, Marco

    2012-01-01

    Ceramide, a proapoptotic sphingolipid, has been shown to form channels, in mitochondrial outer membranes, large enough to translocate proteins. In phospholipid membranes, electrophysiological studies and electron microscopic visualization both report that these channels form in a range of sizes with a modal value of 10 nm in diameter. A hydrogen bonded barrel-like structure consisting of hundreds of ceramide molecules has been proposed for the structure of the channel and this is supported by electrophysiological studies and molecular dynamic simulations. To our knowledge, the mechanical strength and deformability of such a large diameter but extremely thin cylindrical structure has never been reported. Here we present evidence for a reversible mechanical distortion of the cylinder following the addition of La3+. A microfluidic system was used to repeatedly lower and then restore the conductance by alternatively perfusing La3+ and EDTA. Although aspects of the kinetics of conductance drop and recovery are consistent with a disassembly/diffusion/reassembly model, others are inconsistent with the expected time scale of lateral diffusion of disassembled channel fragments in the membrane. The presence of a residual conductance following La3+ treatment and the relationship between the residual conductance and the initial conductance were both indicative of a distortion/recovery process in analogy with a pressure-induced distortion of a flexible cylinder. PMID:22984432

  12. Available Instruments for Analyzing Molecular Dynamics Trajectories

    PubMed Central

    Likhachev, I. V.; Balabaev, N. K.; Galzitskaya, O. V.

    2016-01-01

    Molecular dynamics trajectories are the result of molecular dynamics simulations. Trajectories are sequential snapshots of simulated molecular system which represents atomic coordinates at specific time periods. Based on the definition, in a text format trajectory files are characterized by their simplicity and uselessness. To obtain information from such files, special programs and information processing techniques are applied: from molecular dynamics animation to finding characteristics along the trajectory (versus time). In this review, we describe different programs for processing molecular dynamics trajectories. The performance of these programs, usefulness for analyses of molecular dynamics trajectories, strong and weak aspects are discussed. PMID:27053964

  13. Molecular analysis of a thylakoid K+ channel

    SciTech Connect

    2000-05-01

    The work undertaken during the prior granting period sought to use a novel probe to identify and clone plant ion (K) channels. It was also proposed that in vitro biochemical studies of cation transport across purified preparations of thylakoid membrane be employed to characterize a putative K channel in this membrane system. Over the last several years (including those of the previous grant period), an enormous data base of partially-sequenced mRNAs and numerous genomes (including those of plants) has evolved and provides a powerful alternative to this brute-force approach to identify and clone cDNAs ending physiologically important membrane proteins such as channels. The utility of searching genetic databases for relevant sequences, in addition to the difficulty of working with membrane proteins, led to changes in research focus during the prior granting period, and has resulted in the identification of a new class of plant ion channels, which will be the focus of research during the proposed new granting period.

  14. Novel methods for molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Elber, R

    1996-04-01

    In the past year, significant progress was made in the development of molecular dynamics methods for the liquid phase and for biological macromolecules. Specifically, faster algorithms to pursue molecular dynamics simulations were introduced and advances were made in the design of new optimization algorithms guided by molecular dynamics protocols. A technique to calculate the quantum spectra of protein vibrations was introduced.

  15. Scalable Molecular Dynamics with NAMD

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, James C.; Braun, Rosemary; Wang, Wei; Gumbart, James; Tajkhorshid, Emad; Villa, Elizabeth; Chipot, Christophe; Skeel, Robert D.; Kalé, Laxmikant; Schulten, Klaus

    2008-01-01

    NAMD is a parallel molecular dynamics code designed for high-performance simulation of large biomolecular systems. NAMD scales to hundreds of processors on high-end parallel platforms, as well as tens of processors on low-cost commodity clusters, and also runs on individual desktop and laptop computers. NAMD works with AMBER and CHARMM potential functions, parameters, and file formats. This paper, directed to novices as well as experts, first introduces concepts and methods used in the NAMD program, describing the classical molecular dynamics force field, equations of motion, and integration methods along with the efficient electrostatics evaluation algorithms employed and temperature and pressure controls used. Features for steering the simulation across barriers and for calculating both alchemical and conformational free energy differences are presented. The motivations for and a roadmap to the internal design of NAMD, implemented in C++ and based on Charm++ parallel objects, are outlined. The factors affecting the serial and parallel performance of a simulation are discussed. Next, typical NAMD use is illustrated with representative applications to a small, a medium, and a large biomolecular system, highlighting particular features of NAMD, e.g., the Tcl scripting language. Finally, the paper provides a list of the key features of NAMD and discusses the benefits of combining NAMD with the molecular graphics/sequence analysis software VMD and the grid computing/collaboratory software BioCoRE. NAMD is distributed free of charge with source code at www.ks.uiuc.edu. PMID:16222654

  16. Scalable molecular dynamics with NAMD.

    PubMed

    Phillips, James C; Braun, Rosemary; Wang, Wei; Gumbart, James; Tajkhorshid, Emad; Villa, Elizabeth; Chipot, Christophe; Skeel, Robert D; Kalé, Laxmikant; Schulten, Klaus

    2005-12-01

    NAMD is a parallel molecular dynamics code designed for high-performance simulation of large biomolecular systems. NAMD scales to hundreds of processors on high-end parallel platforms, as well as tens of processors on low-cost commodity clusters, and also runs on individual desktop and laptop computers. NAMD works with AMBER and CHARMM potential functions, parameters, and file formats. This article, directed to novices as well as experts, first introduces concepts and methods used in the NAMD program, describing the classical molecular dynamics force field, equations of motion, and integration methods along with the efficient electrostatics evaluation algorithms employed and temperature and pressure controls used. Features for steering the simulation across barriers and for calculating both alchemical and conformational free energy differences are presented. The motivations for and a roadmap to the internal design of NAMD, implemented in C++ and based on Charm++ parallel objects, are outlined. The factors affecting the serial and parallel performance of a simulation are discussed. Finally, typical NAMD use is illustrated with representative applications to a small, a medium, and a large biomolecular system, highlighting particular features of NAMD, for example, the Tcl scripting language. The article also provides a list of the key features of NAMD and discusses the benefits of combining NAMD with the molecular graphics/sequence analysis software VMD and the grid computing/collaboratory software BioCoRE. NAMD is distributed free of charge with source code at www.ks.uiuc.edu. (c) 2005 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Better, Cheaper, Faster Molecular Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, Andrew; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Recent, revolutionary progress in genomics and structural, molecular and cellular biology has created new opportunities for molecular-level computer simulations of biological systems by providing vast amounts of data that require interpretation. These opportunities are further enhanced by the increasing availability of massively parallel computers. For many problems, the method of choice is classical molecular dynamics (iterative solving of Newton's equations of motion). It focuses on two main objectives. One is to calculate the relative stability of different states of the system. A typical problem that has' such an objective is computer-aided drug design. Another common objective is to describe evolution of the system towards a low energy (possibly the global minimum energy), "native" state. Perhaps the best example of such a problem is protein folding. Both types of problems share the same difficulty. Often, different states of the system are separated by high energy barriers, which implies that transitions between these states are rare events. This, in turn, can greatly impede exploration of phase space. In some instances this can lead to "quasi non-ergodicity", whereby a part of phase space is inaccessible on time scales of the simulation. To overcome this difficulty and to extend molecular dynamics to "biological" time scales (millisecond or longer) new physical formulations and new algorithmic developments are required. To be efficient they should account for natural limitations of multi-processor computer architecture. I will present work along these lines done in my group. In particular, I will focus on a new approach to calculating the free energies (stability) of different states and to overcoming "the curse of rare events". I will also discuss algorithmic improvements to multiple time step methods and to the treatment of slowly decaying, log-ranged, electrostatic effects.

  18. Better, Cheaper, Faster Molecular Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, Andrew; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Recent, revolutionary progress in genomics and structural, molecular and cellular biology has created new opportunities for molecular-level computer simulations of biological systems by providing vast amounts of data that require interpretation. These opportunities are further enhanced by the increasing availability of massively parallel computers. For many problems, the method of choice is classical molecular dynamics (iterative solving of Newton's equations of motion). It focuses on two main objectives. One is to calculate the relative stability of different states of the system. A typical problem that has' such an objective is computer-aided drug design. Another common objective is to describe evolution of the system towards a low energy (possibly the global minimum energy), "native" state. Perhaps the best example of such a problem is protein folding. Both types of problems share the same difficulty. Often, different states of the system are separated by high energy barriers, which implies that transitions between these states are rare events. This, in turn, can greatly impede exploration of phase space. In some instances this can lead to "quasi non-ergodicity", whereby a part of phase space is inaccessible on time scales of the simulation. To overcome this difficulty and to extend molecular dynamics to "biological" time scales (millisecond or longer) new physical formulations and new algorithmic developments are required. To be efficient they should account for natural limitations of multi-processor computer architecture. I will present work along these lines done in my group. In particular, I will focus on a new approach to calculating the free energies (stability) of different states and to overcoming "the curse of rare events". I will also discuss algorithmic improvements to multiple time step methods and to the treatment of slowly decaying, log-ranged, electrostatic effects.

  19. The Digital Material: Molecular Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Nicholas P.; Cretegny, Thierry; Dolgert, Andrew J.; Myers, Christopher R.; Schiøtz, Jakob; Sethna, James P.

    2001-03-01

    We announce the release of the molecular dynamics component of the Digital Material. The Digital Material is our multiscale modeling software infrastructure, designed for flexibility, extensibility, and for compatibility between simulations on disparate length scales. We illustrate how we use the high-level scripting language Python to control our low-level numerical kernals, and to interface them with standard visualization and data repository tools. Our use of design-patterns methodology leads us to decompose the MD simulation into a few weakly-coupled classes, such as AtomsMover, NeighborLocator, Potential, Constraint, and BoundaryConditions.

  20. Non-Equilibrium Molecular Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciccotti, Giovanni; Kapral, Raymond; Sergi, Alessandro

    Statistical mechanics provides a well-established link between microscopic equilibrium states and thermodynamics. If one considers systems out of equilibrium, the link between microscopic dynamical properties and non-equilibrium macroscopic states is more difficult to establish [1,2]. For systems lying near equilibrium, linear response theory provides a route to derive linear macroscopic laws and the microscopic expressions for the transport properties that enter the constitutive relations. If the system is displaced far from equilibrium, no fully general theory exists to treat such systems. By restricting consideration to a class of non-equilibrium states which arise from perturbations (linear or non-linear) of an equilibrium state, methods can be developed to treat non-equilibrium states. Furthermore, non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) simulation methods can be devised to provide estimates for the transport properties of these systems.

  1. CERAMIDE CHANNELS: INFLUENCE OF MOLECULAR STRUCTURE ON CHANNEL FORMATION IN MEMBRANES

    PubMed Central

    Perera, Meenu N.; Ganesan, Vidyaramanan; Siskind, Leah J.; Szulc, Zdzislaw M.; Bielawski, Jacek; Bielawska, Alicja; Bittman, Robert; Colombini, Marco

    2012-01-01

    The sphingolipid, ceramide, self-assembles in the mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM), forming large channels capable of translocating proteins. These channels are believed to be involved in protein release from mitochondria, a key decision-making step. Synthetic analogs of ceramide, bearing modifications in each of the major structural features of ceramide were used to probe the molecular basis for the stability of ceramide channels. Channel stability and mitochondrial permeabilization were disrupted by methylation of the C1-hydroxyl group whereas modifications of the C3 allylic hydroxyl group were well tolerated. A change in chirality at C2 that would influence the orientation of the C1-hydroxyl group resulted in a strong reduction of channel-forming ability. Similarly, methylation of the amide nitrogen is also detrimental to channel formation. Many changes in the degree, location and nature of the unsaturation of ceramide had little effect on mitochondrial permeabilization. Competition experiments between ceramide and analogs resulted in synergy with structures compatible with the ceramide channel model and antagonism with incompatible structures. The results are consistent with ceramide channels being highly organized structures, stabilized by specific inter-molecular interactions, similar to the interactions responsible for protein folding. PMID:22365970

  2. Channel Pattern and the Dynamics of River-floodplain Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beechie, T.; Pollock, M.; Baker, S.; Morley, S.; Pess, G.

    2006-05-01

    Channel pattern is both a reflection of fluvial geomorphic processes and a predictor of ecological diversity in river-floodplain ecosystems. Channel slope, discharge, sediment supply, and sediment size are dominant drivers of channel pattern (straight, meandering, island-braided, or braided), and the spatial distribution of channel patterns in Pacific Northwest River networks typically reflects downstream declines in channel slope and ratio of bed load to suspended load. Straight channels are least dynamic, with relatively slow floodplain turnover and floodplains dominated by old surfaces. Braided channels are most dynamic, with floodplain turnover as low as 25 years and predominantly young floodplain surfaces. Island-braided and meandering channels have intermediate dynamics and a mix of young and old patches. Floodplain erosion return intervals increase in the order of braided, island-braided, meandering, and straight (8, 33, 60, and 89 years, respectively). These dynamics drive two important aspects of environmental complexity, which in turn drive biological diversity in river floodplain ecosystems: diversity of patch ages, and diversity of patch types. High diversity of patch ages in island-braided channels predicts high forest diversity, following the intermediate disturbance hypothesis (IDH). Diversity of aquatic invertebrates should also be highest in island-braided channels, in part due to shifting composition of detrital resources entering floodplain channels of varying ages. Diversity of habitat types is also highest in island-braided channels, where side channel lengths can be as much as five times greater than main channel length. We expect highest fish diversity where varied size and connectivity of side channels is greatest.

  3. Molecular dynamics of interface rupture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koplik, Joel; Banavar, Jayanth R.

    1993-01-01

    Several situations have been studied in which a fluid-vapor or fluid-fluid interface ruptures, using molecular dynamics simulations of 3000 to 20,000 Lennard-Jones molecules in three dimensions. The cases studied are the Rayleigh instability of a liquid thread, the burst of a liquid drop immersed in a second liquid undergoing shear, and the rupture of a liquid sheet in an extensional flow. The late stages of the rupture process involve the gradual withdrawal of molecules from a thinning neck, or the appearance and growth of holes in a sheet. In all cases, it is found that despite the small size of the systems studied, tens of angstroms, the dynamics is in at least qualitative accord with the behavior expected from continuum calculations, and in some cases the agreement is to within tens of percent. Remarkably, this agreement occurs even though the Eulerian velocity and stress fields are essentially unmeasurable - dominated by thermal noise. The limitations and prospects for such molecular simulation techniques are assessed.

  4. Molecular dynamics of interface rupture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koplik, Joel; Banavar, Jayanth R.

    1993-03-01

    Several situations have been studied in which a fluid-vapor or fluid-fluid interface ruptures, using molecular dynamics simulations of 3000 to 20,000 Lennard-Jones molecules in three dimensions. The cases studied are the Rayleigh instability of a liquid thread, the burst of a liquid drop immersed in a second liquid undergoing shear, and the rupture of a liquid sheet in an extensional flow. The late stages of the rupture process involve the gradual withdrawal of molecules from a thinning neck, or the appearance and growth of holes in a sheet. In all cases, it is found that despite the small size of the systems studied, tens of angstroms, the dynamics is in at least qualitative accord with the behavior expected from continuum calculations, and in some cases the agreement is to within tens of percent. Remarkably, this agreement occurs even though the Eulerian velocity and stress fields are essentially unmeasurable - dominated by thermal noise. The limitations and prospects for such molecular simulation techniques are assessed.

  5. Molecular dynamics of interface rupture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koplik, Joel; Banavar, Jayanth R.

    1993-01-01

    Several situations have been studied in which a fluid-vapor or fluid-fluid interface ruptures, using molecular dynamics simulations of 3000 to 20,000 Lennard-Jones molecules in three dimensions. The cases studied are the Rayleigh instability of a liquid thread, the burst of a liquid drop immersed in a second liquid undergoing shear, and the rupture of a liquid sheet in an extensional flow. The late stages of the rupture process involve the gradual withdrawal of molecules from a thinning neck, or the appearance and growth of holes in a sheet. In all cases, it is found that despite the small size of the systems studied, tens of angstroms, the dynamics is in at least qualitative accord with the behavior expected from continuum calculations, and in some cases the agreement is to within tens of percent. Remarkably, this agreement occurs even though the Eulerian velocity and stress fields are essentially unmeasurable - dominated by thermal noise. The limitations and prospects for such molecular simulation techniques are assessed.

  6. The "Collisions Cube" Molecular Dynamics Simulator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nash, John J.; Smith, Paul E.

    1995-01-01

    Describes a molecular dynamics simulator that employs ping-pong balls as the atoms or molecules and is suitable for either large lecture halls or small classrooms. Discusses its use in illustrating many of the fundamental concepts related to molecular motion and dynamics and providing a three-dimensional perspective of molecular motion. (JRH)

  7. NMR and restrained molecular dynamics study of the three-dimensional solution structure of toxin FS2, a specific blocker of the L-type calcium channel, isolated from black mamba venom.

    PubMed

    Albrand, J P; Blackledge, M J; Pascaud, F; Hollecker, M; Marion, D

    1995-05-02

    The three-dimensional solution structure of toxin FS2, a 60-residue polypeptide isolated from the venom of black mamba snake (Dendroaspis polylepis polylepis), has been determined by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Using 600 NOE constraints and 55 dihedral angle constraints, a set of 20 structures obtained from distance-geometry calculations was further refined by molecular dynamics calculations using a combined simulated annealing-restrained MD protocol. The resulting 20 conformers, taken to represent the solution structure, give an average rmsd of 1.2 A for their backbone atoms, relative to the average structure. The overall resulting three-fingered structure is similar to those already observed in several postsynaptic neurotoxins, cardiotoxins, and fasciculins, which all share with toxin FS2 the same network of four disulfide bridges. The overall concavity of the molecule, considered as a flat bottomed dish, is oriented toward the C-terminal loop of the molecule. This orientation is similar to that of fasciculins and cardiotoxins but opposite to that of neurotoxins. On the basis of the local rms displacements between the 20 conformers, the structure of the first loop appears to be less well defined in FS2 than in the previously reported neurotoxin structures, but fasciculin 1 shows a similar trend with particularly high temperature factors for this part of the X-ray structure. The concave side which presents most of the positively charged residues is quite similar in FS2 and fasciculin 1. The main difference is shown by the convex side of the third loop, mostly hydrophobic in FS2, in contrast to the pair of negatively charged aspartates in fasciculin 1. This difference could be one of the factors leading to the distinct pharmacological properties-L-type calcium channel blocker for FS2 and cholinesterase inhibitor for fasciculin--observed for these two subgroups of the "angusticeps-type" toxins.

  8. Recent molecular insights from mutated IKS channels in cardiac arrhythmia.

    PubMed

    Dvir, Meidan; Peretz, Asher; Haitin, Yoni; Attali, Bernard

    2014-04-01

    Co-assembly of KCNQ1 with KCNE1 generates the IKS potassium current that is vital for the proper repolarization of the cardiac action potential. Mutations in either KCNQ1 or KCNE1 genes lead to life-threatening cardiac arrhythmias causing long QT syndrome, short QT syndrome, sinus bradycardia and atrial fibrillation. Findings emerging from recent studies are beginning to provide a picture of how gain-of-function and loss-of-function mutations are associated with pleiotropic cardiac phenotypes in the clinics. In this review, we discuss recent molecular insights obtained from mutations altering different structural modules of the channel complex that are essential for proper IKS function. We present the possible molecular mechanisms underlying mutations impairing the voltage sensing functions, as well as those altering the channel regulation by phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate, calmodulin and protein kinase A. We also discuss the significance of diseased IKS channels for adequate pharmacological targeting of cardiac arrhythmias.

  9. Nonadiabatic Molecular Dynamics with Trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavernelli, Ivano

    2012-02-01

    In the mixed quantum-classical description of molecular systems, only the quantum character of the electronic degrees of freedom is considered while the nuclear motion is treated at a classical level. In the adiabatic case, this picture corresponds to the Born-Oppenheimer limit where the nuclei move as point charges on the potential energy surface (PES) associated with a given electronic state. Despite the success of this approximation, many physical and chemical processes do not fall in the regime where nuclei and electrons can be considered decoupled. In particular, most photoreactions pass through regions of the PES in which electron-nuclear quantum interference effects are sizeable and often crucial for a correct description of the phenomena. Recently, we have developed a trajectory-based nonadiabatic molecular dynamics scheme that describes the nuclear wavepacket as an ensemble of particles following classical trajectories on PESs derived from time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) [1]. The method is based on Tully's fewest switches trajectories surface hopping (TSH) where the nonadiabatic coupling elements between the different potential energy surfaces are computed on-the-fly as functionals of the ground state electron density or, equivalently, of the corresponding Kohn-Sham orbitals [2]. Here, we present the theoretical fundamentals of our approach together with an extension that allows for the direct coupling of the dynamics to an external electromagnetic field [3] as well as to the external potential generated by the environment (solvent effects) [4]. The method is applied to the study of the photodissociation dynamics of simple molecules in gas phase and to the description of the fast excited state dynamics of molecules in solution (in particular Ruthenium (II) tris(bipyridine) in water). [4pt] [1] E. Tapavicza, I. Tavernelli, U. Rothlisberger, Phys. Rev. Lett., 98, (2007) 023001. [0pt] [2] Tavernelli I.; Tapavicza E.; Rothlisberger U., J. Chem

  10. Modeling Nanocomposites for Molecular Dynamics (MD) Simulations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    Maximum 200 Words) The minimum energy configuration for Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations is found for a carbon nanotube (CNT)/polymer... Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs), Molecular Dynamics Simulations 15. NUMBER OF PAGES 18 16. PRICE CODE 17. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF REPORT... Carbon Nanotubes ,” Macromolecules, Volume 39, Number 16, pp. 5194-5205, July 2006. 6. “VMD-Visual Molecular Dynamics ,” March 2014, http

  11. Molecular dynamics simulation of benzene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trumpakaj, Zygmunt; Linde, Bogumił B. J.

    2016-03-01

    Intermolecular potentials and a few models of intermolecular interaction in liquid benzene are tested by Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations. The repulsive part of the Lennard-Jones 12-6 (LJ 12-6) potential is too hard, which yields incorrect results. The exp-6 potential with a too hard repulsive term is also often used. Therefore, we took an expa-6 potential with a small Gaussian correction plus electrostatic interactions. This allows to modify the curvature of the potential. The MD simulations are carried out in the temperature range 280-352 K under normal pressure and at experimental density. The Rayleigh scattering of depolarized light is used for comparison. The results of MD simulations are comparable with the experimental values.

  12. Uncertainty quantification in molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzi, Francesco

    This dissertation focuses on uncertainty quantification (UQ) in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The application of UQ to molecular dynamics is motivated by the broad uncertainty characterizing MD potential functions and by the complexity of the MD setting, where even small uncertainties can be amplified to yield large uncertainties in the model predictions. Two fundamental, distinct sources of uncertainty are investigated in this work, namely parametric uncertainty and intrinsic noise. Intrinsic noise is inherently present in the MD setting, due to fluctuations originating from thermal effects. Averaging methods can be exploited to reduce the fluctuations, but due to finite sampling, this effect cannot be completely filtered, thus yielding a residual uncertainty in the MD predictions. Parametric uncertainty, on the contrary, is introduced in the form of uncertain potential parameters, geometry, and/or boundary conditions. We address the UQ problem in both its main components, namely the forward propagation, which aims at characterizing how uncertainty in model parameters affects selected observables, and the inverse problem, which involves the estimation of target model parameters based on a set of observations. The dissertation highlights the challenges arising when parametric uncertainty and intrinsic noise combine to yield non-deterministic, noisy MD predictions of target macroscale observables. Two key probabilistic UQ methods, namely Polynomial Chaos (PC) expansions and Bayesian inference, are exploited to develop a framework that enables one to isolate the impact of parametric uncertainty on the MD predictions and, at the same time, properly quantify the effect of the intrinsic noise. Systematic applications to a suite of problems of increasing complexity lead to the observation that an uncertain PC representation built via Bayesian regression is the most suitable model for the representation of uncertain MD predictions of target observables in the

  13. Molecular Simulations of Disulfide-Rich Venom Peptides with Ion Channels and Membranes.

    PubMed

    Deplazes, Evelyne

    2017-02-27

    Disulfide-rich peptides isolated from the venom of arthropods and marine animals are a rich source of potent and selective modulators of ion channels. This makes these peptides valuable lead molecules for the development of new drugs to treat neurological disorders. Consequently, much effort goes into understanding their mechanism of action. This paper presents an overview of how molecular simulations have been used to study the interactions of disulfide-rich venom peptides with ion channels and membranes. The review is focused on the use of docking, molecular dynamics simulations, and free energy calculations to (i) predict the structure of peptide-channel complexes; (ii) calculate binding free energies including the effect of peptide modifications; and (iii) study the membrane-binding properties of disulfide-rich venom peptides. The review concludes with a summary and outlook.

  14. Molecular dynamics of membrane proteins.

    SciTech Connect

    Woolf, Thomas B.; Crozier, Paul Stewart; Stevens, Mark Jackson

    2004-10-01

    Understanding the dynamics of the membrane protein rhodopsin will have broad implications for other membrane proteins and cellular signaling processes. Rhodopsin (Rho) is a light activated G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR). When activated by ligands, GPCRs bind and activate G-proteins residing within the cell and begin a signaling cascade that results in the cell's response to external stimuli. More than 50% of all current drugs are targeted toward G-proteins. Rho is the prototypical member of the class A GPCR superfamily. Understanding the activation of Rho and its interaction with its Gprotein can therefore lead to a wider understanding of the mechanisms of GPCR activation and G-protein activation. Understanding the dark to light transition of Rho is fully analogous to the general ligand binding and activation problem for GPCRs. This transition is dependent on the lipid environment. The effect of lipids on membrane protein activity in general has had little attention, but evidence is beginning to show a significant role for lipids in membrane protein activity. Using the LAMMPS program and simulation methods benchmarked under the IBIG program, we perform a variety of allatom molecular dynamics simulations of membrane proteins.

  15. Efficient mapping of ligand migration channel networks in dynamic proteins.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tu-Liang; Song, Guang

    2011-08-01

    For many proteins such as myoglobin, the binding site lies in the interior, and there is no obvious route from the exterior to the binding site in the average structure. Although computer simulations for a limited number of proteins have found some transiently open channels, it is not clear if there exist more channels elsewhere or how the channels are regulated. A systematic approach that can map out the whole ligand migration channel network is lacking. Ligand migration in a dynamic protein resembles closely a well-studied problem in robotics, namely, the navigation of a mobile robot in a dynamic environment. In this work, we present a novel robotic motion planning inspired approach that can map the ligand migration channel network in a dynamic protein. The method combines an efficient spatial mapping of protein inner space with a temporal exploration of protein structural heterogeneity, which is represented by a structure ensemble. The spatial mapping of each conformation in the ensemble produces a partial map of protein inner cavities and their inter-connectivity. These maps are then merged to form a super map that contains all the channels that open dynamically. Results on the pathways in myoglobin for gaseous ligands demonstrate the efficiency of our approach in mapping the ligand migration channel networks. The results, obtained in a significantly less amount of time than trajectory-based approaches, are in agreement with previous simulation results. Additionally, the method clearly illustrates how and what conformational changes open or close a channel.

  16. Molecular Determinants of BK Channel Functional Diversity and Functioning.

    PubMed

    Latorre, Ramon; Castillo, Karen; Carrasquel-Ursulaez, Willy; Sepulveda, Romina V; Gonzalez-Nilo, Fernando; Gonzalez, Carlos; Alvarez, Osvaldo

    2017-01-01

    Large-conductance Ca(2+)- and voltage-activated K(+) (BK) channels play many physiological roles ranging from the maintenance of smooth muscle tone to hearing and neurosecretion. BK channels are tetramers in which the pore-forming α subunit is coded by a single gene (Slowpoke, KCNMA1). In this review, we first highlight the physiological importance of this ubiquitous channel, emphasizing the role that BK channels play in different channelopathies. We next discuss the modular nature of BK channel-forming protein, in which the different modules (the voltage sensor and the Ca(2+) binding sites) communicate with the pore gates allosterically. In this regard, we review in detail the allosteric models proposed to explain channel activation and how the models are related to channel structure. Considering their extremely large conductance and unique selectivity to K(+), we also offer an account of how these two apparently paradoxical characteristics can be understood consistently in unison, and what we have learned about the conduction system and the activation gates using ions, blockers, and toxins. Attention is paid here to the molecular nature of the voltage sensor and the Ca(2+) binding sites that are located in a gating ring of known crystal structure and constituted by four COOH termini. Despite the fact that BK channels are coded by a single gene, diversity is obtained by means of alternative splicing and modulatory β and γ subunits. We finish this review by describing how the association of the α subunit with β or with γ subunits can change the BK channel phenotype and pharmacology.

  17. Molecular dynamics simulations of cluster nucleation during inert gas condensation.

    PubMed

    Krasnochtchekov, Pavel; Averback, R S

    2005-01-22

    Molecular dynamics simulations of vapor-phase nucleation of germanium in an argon atmosphere were performed and a unexpected channel of nucleation was observed. This channel, vapor-induced cluster splitting, is important for more refractory materials since the critical nucleus size can fall below the size of a dimer. As opposed to conventional direct vapor nucleation of the dimer, which occurs by three-body collisions, cluster-splitting nucleation is a second-order reaction. The most important cluster-splitting reaction is the collision of a vapor atom and a trimer that leads to the formation of two dimers. The importance of the cluster-splitting nucleation channel relative to the direct vapor nucleation channel is observed to increase with decreasing vapor density and increasing ratio of vapor to carrier gas atoms.

  18. Molecular basis of potassium channels in pancreatic duct epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Mikio; Novak, Ivana

    2013-01-01

    Potassium channels regulate excitability, epithelial ion transport, proliferation, and apoptosis. In pancreatic ducts, K(+) channels hyperpolarize the membrane potential and provide the driving force for anion secretion. This review focuses on the molecular candidates of functional K(+) channels in pancreatic duct cells, including KCNN4 (KCa 3.1), KCNMA1 (KCa 1.1), KCNQ1 (Kv 7.1), KCNH2 (Kv 11.1), KCNH5 (Kv 10.2), KCNT1 (KCa 4.1), KCNT2 (KCa 4.2), and KCNK5 (K 2P 5.1). We will give an overview of K(+) channels with respect to their electrophysiological and pharmacological characteristics and regulation, which we know from other cell types, preferably in epithelia, and, where known, their identification and functions in pancreatic ducts and in adenocarcinoma cells. We conclude by pointing out some outstanding questions and future directions in pancreatic K(+) channel research with respect to the physiology of secretion and pancreatic pathologies, including pancreatitis, cystic fibrosis, and cancer, in which the dysregulation or altered expression of K(+) channels may be of importance.

  19. Molecular basis of potassium channels in pancreatic duct epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Mikio; Novak, Ivana

    2013-01-01

    Potassium channels regulate excitability, epithelial ion transport, proliferation, and apoptosis. In pancreatic ducts, K+ channels hyperpolarize the membrane potential and provide the driving force for anion secretion. This review focuses on the molecular candidates of functional K+ channels in pancreatic duct cells, including KCNN4 (KCa3.1), KCNMA1 (KCa1.1), KCNQ1 (Kv7.1), KCNH2 (Kv11.1), KCNH5 (Kv10.2), KCNT1 (KCa4.1), KCNT2 (KCa4.2), and KCNK5 (K2P5.1). We will give an overview of K+ channels with respect to their electrophysiological and pharmacological characteristics and regulation, which we know from other cell types, preferably in epithelia, and, where known, their identification and functions in pancreatic ducts and in adenocarcinoma cells. We conclude by pointing out some outstanding questions and future directions in pancreatic K+ channel research with respect to the physiology of secretion and pancreatic pathologies, including pancreatitis, cystic fibrosis, and cancer, in which the dysregulation or altered expression of K+ channels may be of importance. PMID:23962792

  20. Channel-facilitated molecular transport: The role of strength and spatial distribution of interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uppulury, Karthik; Kolomeisky, Anatoly B.

    2016-12-01

    Molecular transport across channels and pores is critically important for multiple natural and industrial processes. Recent advances in single-molecule techniques have allowed researchers to probe translocation through nanopores with unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution. However, our understanding of the mechanisms of channel-facilitated molecular transport is still not complete. We present a theoretical approach that investigates the role of molecular interactions in the transport through channels. It is based on the discrete-state stochastic analysis that provides a fully analytical description of this complex process. It is found that a spatial distribution of the interactions strongly influences the translocation dynamics. We predict that there is the optimal distribution that leads to the maximal flux through the channel. It is also argued that the channel transport depends on the strength of the molecule-pore interactions, on the shape of interaction potentials and on the relative contributions of entrance and diffusion processes in the system. These observations are discussed using simple physical-chemical arguments.

  1. A molecular dynamics study of freezing in a confined geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, Wen-Jong; Banavar, Jayanth R.; Koplik, Joel

    1992-01-01

    The dynamics of freezing of a Lennard-Jones liquid in narrow channels bounded by molecular walls is studied by computer simulation. The time development of ordering is quantified and a novel freezing mechanism is observed. The liquid forms layers and subsequent in-plane ordering within a layer is accompanied by a sharpening of the layer in the transverse direction. The effects of channel size, the methods of quench, the liquid-wall interaction and the roughness of walls on the freezing mechanism are elucidated. Comparison with recent experiments on freezing in confined geometries is presented.

  2. A molecular dynamics study of freezing in a confined geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, Wen-Jong; Banavar, Jayanth R.; Koplik, Joel

    1992-01-01

    The dynamics of freezing of a Lennard-Jones liquid in narrow channels bounded by molecular walls is studied by computer simulation. The time development of ordering is quantified and a novel freezing mechanism is observed. The liquid forms layers and subsequent in-plane ordering within a layer is accompanied by a sharpening of the layer in the transverse direction. The effects of channel size, the methods of quench, the liquid-wall interaction and the roughness of walls on the freezing mechanism are elucidated. Comparison with recent experiments on freezing in confined geometries is presented.

  3. Dynamical Localization in Molecular Systems.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xidi

    In the first four chapters of this thesis we concentrate on the Davydov model which describes the vibrational energy quanta of Amide I bonds (C=O bonds on the alpha -helix) coupled to the acoustic phonon modes of the alpha-helix backbone in the form of a Frohlich Hamiltonian. Following a brief introduction in chapter one, in chapter two we formulate the dynamics of vibrational quanta at finite temperature by using coherent state products. The fluctuation-dissipation relation is derived. At zero temperature, in the continuum limit, we recover the original results of Davydov. We also achieve good agreement with numerical simulations. In chapter three, the net contraction of the lattice is calculated exactly at any temperature, and its relation to the so -call "topological stability" of the Davydov soliton is discussed. In the second section of the chapter three we calculate the overtone spectra of crystalline acetanilide (according to some opinions ACN provides experimental evidence for the existence of Davydov solitons). Good agreement with experimental data has been obtained. In chapter four we study the self-trapped vibrational excitations by the Quantum Monte Carlo technique. For a single excitation, the temperature dependence of different physical observables is calculated. The quasi-particle which resembles the Davydov soliton has been found to be fairly narrow using the most commonly used data for the alpha -helix; at temperatures above a few Kelvin, the quasi-particle reaches its smallest limit (extends over three sites), which implies diffusive motion of the small polaron-like quasi-particle at high temperatures. For the multi-excitation case, bound pairs and clusters of excitations are found at low temperatures; they gradually dissociate when the temperature of the system is increased as calculated from the density-density correlation function. In the last chapter of this thesis, we study a more general model of dynamical local modes in molecular systems

  4. [Molecular identification of Ca2+ channels in human ejaculated sperm].

    PubMed

    Li, Lu; Liu, Ji-Hong; Li, Jia-Gui; Ye, Zhang-Qun; Wang, Xiu-Lai

    2006-10-01

    To identify the types of voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels (VDCCs) in human ejaculated sperm using molecular technology. Based on the WHO criteria, the donated semen was screened by computer-aided sperm analysis (CASA), the sperm optimized by swim-up method, and the VDCCs' alpha1 subunits examined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Such mRNA messages as alpha1H, alpha1G, alpha1E, alpha1B and alpha1C were detected, but alpha1A and alpha1D were not. Human motile sperms express multiple VDCC RNAs, among which T-type and non-L-type channel messages are likely to be predominantly expressed. Not only T-type but also non-L-type calcium channels may be major gates for the external calcium influx, which helps regulate sperm motility and acrosome reaction.

  5. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Supercritical Spray Phenomena

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-26

    Dynamics of the Rheological and Structural Properties of Linear and Branched Molecules. Simple Shear and Poiseuille Flows ; Instabilities and Slip...Michael Barrucco Publications: "Comparison of Wall Models for the Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Micro flows ," R. D. Branam and M. M...Performance 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 1 Dec. 2003 - 31 May 2008 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Supercritical

  6. Molecular mapping of general anesthetic sites in a voltage-gated ion channel.

    PubMed

    Barber, Annika F; Liang, Qiansheng; Amaral, Cristiano; Treptow, Werner; Covarrubias, Manuel

    2011-10-05

    Several voltage-gated ion channels are modulated by clinically relevant doses of general anesthetics. However, the structural basis of this modulation is not well understood. Previous work suggested that n-alcohols and inhaled anesthetics stabilize the closed state of the Shaw2 voltage-gated (Kv) channel (K-Shaw2) by directly interacting with a discrete channel site. We hypothesize that the inhibition of K-Shaw2 channels by general anesthetics is governed by interactions between binding and effector sites involving components of the channel's activation gate. To investigate this hypothesis, we applied Ala/Val scanning mutagenesis to the S4-S5 linker and the post-PVP S6 segment, and conducted electrophysiological analysis to evaluate the energetic impact of the mutations on the inhibition of the K-Shaw2 channel by 1-butanol and halothane. These analyses identified residues that determine an apparent binding cooperativity and residue pairs that act in concert to modulate gating upon anesthetic binding. In some instances, due to their critical location, key residues also influence channel gating. Complementing these results, molecular dynamics simulations and in silico docking experiments helped us visualize possible anesthetic sites and interactions. We conclude that the inhibition of K-Shaw2 by general anesthetics results from allosteric interactions between distinct but contiguous binding and effector sites involving inter- and intrasubunit interfaces.

  7. Communication: Relation of centroid molecular dynamics and ring-polymer molecular dynamics to exact quantum dynamics.

    PubMed

    Hele, Timothy J H; Willatt, Michael J; Muolo, Andrea; Althorpe, Stuart C

    2015-05-21

    We recently obtained a quantum-Boltzmann-conserving classical dynamics by making a single change to the derivation of the "Classical Wigner" approximation. Here, we show that the further approximation of this "Matsubara dynamics" gives rise to two popular heuristic methods for treating quantum Boltzmann time-correlation functions: centroid molecular dynamics (CMD) and ring-polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD). We show that CMD is a mean-field approximation to Matsubara dynamics, obtained by discarding (classical) fluctuations around the centroid, and that RPMD is the result of discarding a term in the Matsubara Liouvillian which shifts the frequencies of these fluctuations. These findings are consistent with previous numerical results and give explicit formulae for the terms that CMD and RPMD leave out.

  8. Time-Dependent Molecular Reaction Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Öhrn, Yngve

    2007-11-01

    This paper is a brief review of a time-dependent, direct, nonadiabatic theory of molecular processes called Electron Nuclear Dynamics (END). This approach to the study of molecular reaction dynamics is a hierarchical theory that can be applied at various levels of approximation. The simplest level of END uses classical nuclei and represents all electrons by a single, complex, determinantal wave function. The wave function parameters such as average nuclear positions and momenta, and molecular orbital coefcients carry the time dependence and serve as dynamical variables. Examples of application are given of the simplest level of END to ion-atom and ion-molecule reactions.

  9. The Dynamic TRPA1 Channel: A Suitable Pharmacological Pain Target?

    PubMed Central

    Garrison, Sheldon R.; Stucky, Cheryl L.

    2014-01-01

    Acute pain detection is vital to navigate and survive in one’s environment. Protection and preservation occur because primary afferent nociceptors transduce adverse environmental stimuli into electrical impulses that are transmitted to and interpreted within high levels of the central nervous system. Therefore, it is critical that the molecular mechanisms that convert noxious information into neural signals be identified and their specific functional roles delineated in both acute and chronic pain settings. The Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) channel family member TRP ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) is an excellent candidate molecule to explore and intricately understand how single channel properties can tailor behavioral nociceptive responses. TRPA1 appears to dynamically respond to an amazingly wide range of diverse stimuli that include apparently unrelated modalities such as mechanical, chemical and thermal stimuli that activate somatosensory neurons. How such dissimilar stimuli activate TRPA1, yet result in modality-specific signals to the CNS is unclear. Furthermore, TRPA1 is also involved in persistent to chronic painful states such as inflammation, neuropathic pain, diabetes, fibromyalgia, bronchitis and emphysema. Yet how TRPA1’s role changes from an acute sensor of physical stimuli to its contribution to these diseases that are concomitant with implacable, chronic pain is unknown. TRPA1’s involvement in the nociceptive machinery that relays the adverse stimuli during painful disease states is of considerable interest for drug delivery and design by many pharmaceutical entities. In this review, we will assess the current knowledge base of TRPA1 in acute nociception and persistent inflammatory pain states, and explore its potential as a therapeutic pharmacological target in chronic pervasive conditions such neuropathic pain, persistent inflammation and diabetes. PMID:21466445

  10. The dynamic TRPA1 channel: a suitable pharmacological pain target?

    PubMed

    Garrison, Sheldon R; Stucky, Cheryl L

    2011-10-01

    Acute pain detection is vital to navigate and survive in one's environment. Protection and preservation occur because primary afferent nociceptors transduce adverse environmental stimuli into electrical impulses that are transmitted to and interpreted within high levels of the central nervous system. Therefore, it is critical that the molecular mechanisms that convert noxious information into neural signals be identified, and their specific functional roles delineated in both acute and chronic pain settings. The Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) channel family member TRP ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) is an excellent candidate molecule to explore and intricately understand how single channel properties can tailor behavioral nociceptive responses. TRPA1 appears to dynamically respond to an amazingly wide range of diverse stimuli that include apparently unrelated modalities such as mechanical, chemical and thermal stimuli that activate somatosensory neurons. How such dissimilar stimuli activate TRPA1, yet result in modality-specific signals to the CNS is unclear. Furthermore, TRPA1 is also involved in persistent to chronic painful states such as inflammation, neuropathic pain, diabetes, fibromyalgia, bronchitis and emphysema. Yet how TRPA1's role changes from an acute sensor of physical stimuli to its contribution to these diseases that are concomitant with implacable, chronic pain is unknown. TRPA1's involvement in the nociceptive machinery that relays the adverse stimuli during painful disease states is of considerable interest for drug delivery and design by many pharmaceutical entities. In this review, we will assess the current knowledge base of TRPA1 in acute nociception and persistent inflammatory pain states, and explore its potential as a therapeutic pharmacological target in chronic pervasive conditions such neuropathic pain, persistent inflammation and diabetes.

  11. Communication: Relation of centroid molecular dynamics and ring-polymer molecular dynamics to exact quantum dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Hele, Timothy J. H.; Willatt, Michael J.; Muolo, Andrea; Althorpe, Stuart C.

    2015-05-21

    We recently obtained a quantum-Boltzmann-conserving classical dynamics by making a single change to the derivation of the “Classical Wigner” approximation. Here, we show that the further approximation of this “Matsubara dynamics” gives rise to two popular heuristic methods for treating quantum Boltzmann time-correlation functions: centroid molecular dynamics (CMD) and ring-polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD). We show that CMD is a mean-field approximation to Matsubara dynamics, obtained by discarding (classical) fluctuations around the centroid, and that RPMD is the result of discarding a term in the Matsubara Liouvillian which shifts the frequencies of these fluctuations. These findings are consistent with previous numerical results and give explicit formulae for the terms that CMD and RPMD leave out.

  12. Surface dynamics of voltage-gated ion channels

    PubMed Central

    Heine, Martin; Ciuraszkiewicz, Anna; Voigt, Andreas; Heck, Jennifer; Bikbaev, Arthur

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Neurons encode information in fast changes of the membrane potential, and thus electrical membrane properties are critically important for the integration and processing of synaptic inputs by a neuron. These electrical properties are largely determined by ion channels embedded in the membrane. The distribution of most ion channels in the membrane is not spatially uniform: they undergo activity-driven changes in the range of minutes to days. Even in the range of milliseconds, the composition and topology of ion channels are not static but engage in highly dynamic processes including stochastic or activity-dependent transient association of the pore-forming and auxiliary subunits, lateral diffusion, as well as clustering of different channels. In this review we briefly discuss the potential impact of mobile sodium, calcium and potassium ion channels and the functional significance of this for individual neurons and neuronal networks. PMID:26891382

  13. Dynamical coupled channel approach to omega meson production

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Paris

    2007-09-10

    The dynamical coupled channel approach of Matsuyama, Sato, and Lee is used to study the $\\omega$--meson production induced by pions and photons scattering from the proton. The parameters of the model are fixed in a two-channel (\\omega N,\\pi N) calculation for the non-resonant and resonant contributions to the $T$ matrix by fitting the available unpolarized differential cross section data. The polarized photon beam asymmetry is predicted and compared to existing data.

  14. Dynamic Phenylalanine Clamp Interactions Define Single-Channel Polypeptide Translocation through the Anthrax Toxin Protective Antigen Channel.

    PubMed

    Ghosal, Koyel; Colby, Jennifer M; Das, Debasis; Joy, Stephen T; Arora, Paramjit S; Krantz, Bryan A

    2017-03-24

    Anthrax toxin is an intracellularly acting toxin where sufficient detail is known about the structure of its channel, allowing for molecular investigations of translocation. The toxin is composed of three proteins, protective antigen (PA), lethal factor (LF), and edema factor (EF). The toxin's translocon, PA, translocates the large enzymes, LF and EF, across the endosomal membrane into the host cell's cytosol. Polypeptide clamps located throughout the PA channel catalyze the translocation of LF and EF. Here, we show that the central peptide clamp, the ϕ clamp, is a dynamic site that governs the overall peptide translocation pathway. Single-channel translocations of a 10-residue, guest-host peptide revealed that there were four states when peptide interacted with the channel. Two of the states had intermediate conductances of 10% and 50% of full conductance. With aromatic guest-host peptides, the 50% conducting intermediate oscillated with the fully blocked state. A Trp guest-host peptide was studied by manipulating its stereochemistry and prenucleating helix formation with a covalent linkage in the place of a hydrogen bond or hydrogen-bond surrogate (HBS). The Trp peptide synthesized with ʟ-amino acids translocated more efficiently than peptides synthesized with D- or alternating D,ʟ-amino acids. HBS stapled Trp peptide exhibited signs of steric hindrance and difficulty translocating. However, when mutant ϕ clamp (F427A) channels were tested, the HBS peptide translocated normally. Overall, peptide translocation is defined by dynamic interactions between the peptide and ϕ clamp. These dynamics require conformational flexibility, such that the peptide productively forms both extended-chain and helical states during translocation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The Molecular Basis of Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Interactions with the Shaker Voltage-Gated Potassium Channel

    PubMed Central

    Yazdi, Samira; Stein, Matthias; Elinder, Fredrik; Andersson, Magnus; Lindahl, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated potassium (KV) channels are membrane proteins that respond to changes in membrane potential by enabling K+ ion flux across the membrane. Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) induce channel opening by modulating the voltage-sensitivity, which can provide effective treatment against refractory epilepsy by means of a ketogenic diet. While PUFAs have been reported to influence the gating mechanism by electrostatic interactions to the voltage-sensor domain (VSD), the exact PUFA-protein interactions are still elusive. In this study, we report on the interactions between the Shaker KV channel in open and closed states and a PUFA-enriched lipid bilayer using microsecond molecular dynamics simulations. We determined a putative PUFA binding site in the open state of the channel located at the protein-lipid interface in the vicinity of the extracellular halves of the S3 and S4 helices of the VSD. In particular, the lipophilic PUFA tail covered a wide range of non-specific hydrophobic interactions in the hydrophobic central core of the protein-lipid interface, while the carboxylic head group displayed more specific interactions to polar/charged residues at the extracellular regions of the S3 and S4 helices, encompassing the S3-S4 linker. Moreover, by studying the interactions between saturated fatty acids (SFA) and the Shaker KV channel, our study confirmed an increased conformational flexibility in the polyunsaturated carbon tails compared to saturated carbon chains, which may explain the specificity of PUFA action on channel proteins. PMID:26751683

  16. Silicon photonic dynamic optical channel leveler with external feedback loop.

    PubMed

    Doylend, J K; Jessop, P E; Knights, A P

    2010-06-21

    We demonstrate a dynamic optical channel leveler composed of a variable optical attenuator (VOA) integrated monolithically with a defect-mediated photodiode in a silicon photonic waveguide device. An external feedback loop mimics an analog circuit such that the photodiode directly controls the VOA to provide blind channel leveling within +/-1 dB across a 7-10 dB dynamic range for wavelengths from 1530 nm to 1570 nm. The device consumes approximately 50 mW electrical power and occupies a 6 mm x 0.1 mm footprint per channel. Dynamic leveling is accomplished without tapping optical power from the output path to the photodiode and thus the loss penalty is minimized.

  17. Molecular rheology of perfluoropolyether lubricant via nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Qian; Chung, Pil Seung; Chen, Haigang; Jhon, Myung S.

    2006-04-01

    Molecular rheology of perfluoropolyether (PFPE) systems is particularly important in designing effective lubricants that control the friction and wear in tribological applications. Using the coarse-grained, bead-spring model, equilibrium molecular dynamics based on the Langevin equation in a quiescent flow was first employed to examine the nanostructure of PFPE. Further, by integrating the modified Langevin equation and imposing the Lees-Edwards boundary condition, nonequilibrium molecular dynamics of steady shear was investigated. We observe that the shear viscosity of PFPE system depends strongly on molecular architecture (e.g., molecular weight and endgroup functionality) and external conditions (e.g., temperature and shear rate). Our study of the flow activation energy/entropy and their correlations with nanostructure visualization showed that the PFPE structure was substantially modified.

  18. The quantum dynamic capacity formula of a quantum channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilde, Mark M.; Hsieh, Min-Hsiu

    2012-12-01

    The dynamic capacity theorem characterizes the reliable communication rates of a quantum channel when combined with the noiseless resources of classical communication, quantum communication, and entanglement. In prior work, we proved the converse part of this theorem by making contact with many previous results in the quantum Shannon theory literature. In this work, we prove the theorem with an "ab initio" approach, using only the most basic tools in the quantum information theorist's toolkit: the Alicki-Fannes' inequality, the chain rule for quantum mutual information, elementary properties of quantum entropy, and the quantum data processing inequality. The result is a simplified proof of the theorem that should be more accessible to those unfamiliar with the quantum Shannon theory literature. We also demonstrate that the "quantum dynamic capacity formula" characterizes the Pareto optimal trade-off surface for the full dynamic capacity region. Additivity of this formula reduces the computation of the trade-off surface to a tractable, textbook problem in Pareto trade-off analysis, and we prove that its additivity holds for the quantum Hadamard channels and the quantum erasure channel. We then determine exact expressions for and plot the dynamic capacity region of the quantum dephasing channel, an example from the Hadamard class, and the quantum erasure channel.

  19. Modeling ion channel dynamics through reflected stochastic differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dangerfield, Ciara E.; Kay, David; Burrage, Kevin

    2012-05-01

    Ion channels are membrane proteins that open and close at random and play a vital role in the electrical dynamics of excitable cells. The stochastic nature of the conformational changes these proteins undergo can be significant, however current stochastic modeling methodologies limit the ability to study such systems. Discrete-state Markov chain models are seen as the “gold standard,” but are computationally intensive, restricting investigation of stochastic effects to the single-cell level. Continuous stochastic methods that use stochastic differential equations (SDEs) to model the system are more efficient but can lead to simulations that have no biological meaning. In this paper we show that modeling the behavior of ion channel dynamics by a reflected SDE ensures biologically realistic simulations, and we argue that this model follows from the continuous approximation of the discrete-state Markov chain model. Open channel and action potential statistics from simulations of ion channel dynamics using the reflected SDE are compared with those of a discrete-state Markov chain method. Results show that the reflected SDE simulations are in good agreement with the discrete-state approach. The reflected SDE model therefore provides a computationally efficient method to simulate ion channel dynamics while preserving the distributional properties of the discrete-state Markov chain model and also ensuring biologically realistic solutions. This framework could easily be extended to other biochemical reaction networks.

  20. Molecular Diversity and Functional Evolution of Scorpion Potassium Channel Toxins*

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Shunyi; Peigneur, Steve; Gao, Bin; Luo, Lan; Jin, Di; Zhao, Yong; Tytgat, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Scorpion toxins affecting K+ channels (KTxs) represent important pharmacological tools and potential drug candidates. Here, we report molecular characterization of seven new KTxs in the scorpion Mesobuthus eupeus by cDNA cloning combined with biochemical approaches. Comparative modeling supports that all these KTxs share a conserved cysteine-stabilized α-helix/β-sheet structural motif despite the differences in protein sequence and size. We investigated functional diversification of two orthologous α-KTxs (MeuTXKα1 from M. eupeus and BmP01 from Mesobuthus martensii) by comparing their K+ channel-blocking activities. Pharmacologically, MeuTXKα1 selectively blocked Kv1.3 channel with nanomolar affinity (IC50, 2.36 ± 0.9 nm), whereas only 35% of Kv1.1 currents were inhibited at 3 μm concentration, showing more than 1271-fold selectivity for Kv1.3 over Kv1.1. This peptide displayed a weak effect on Drosophila Shaker channel and no activity on Kv1.2, Kv1.4, Kv1.5, Kv1.6, and human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG) K+ channels. Although BmB01 and MeuTXKα1 have a similar channel spectrum, their affinity and selectivity for these channels largely varies. In comparison with MeuTXKα1, BmP01 only exhibits a submicromolar affinity (IC50, 133.72 ± 10.98 nm) for Kv1.3, showing 57-fold less activity than MeuTXKα1. Moreover, it lacks the ability to distinguish between Kv1.1 and Kv1.3. We also found that MeuTXKα1 inhibited the proliferation of activated T cells induced by phorbol myristate acetate and ionomycin at micromolar concentrations. Our results demonstrate that accelerated evolution drives affinity variations of orthologous α-KTxs on Kv channels and indicate that MeuTXKα1 is a promising candidate to develop an immune modulation agent for human autoimmune diseases. PMID:20889474

  1. Molecular dynamics on hypercube parallel computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, W.

    1991-03-01

    The implementation of molecular dynamics on parallel computers is described, with particular reference to hypercube computers. Three particular algorithms are described: replicated data (RD); systolic loop (SLS-G), and parallelised link-cells (PLC), all of which have good load balancing. The performance characteristics of each algorithm and the factors affecting their scaling properties are discussed. The article is pedagogic in intent, to introduce a novice to the main aspects of parallel computing in molecular dynamics.

  2. Collective sub-diffusive dynamics in bacterial carpet microfluidic channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsiao, Yi-Teng; Wang, Jing-Hui; Hsu, Yi-Chun; Chiu, Chien-Chun; Lo, Chien-Jung; Tsao, Chia-Wen; Yen Woon, Wei

    2012-05-01

    We experimentally investigate the collective dynamics in bacterial carpet microfluidic channel. The microfluidic channel is composed of single polar flagellated Vibrio alginolyticus deposited glass substrates. The individual flagellum swimming speed is tuned by varying buffer sodium concentration. Hydrodynamic coupling strength is tuned by varying buffer viscosity. The attached bacteria constantly perform two major modes in flagellum motion, namely, the local rotation and large angle flick. Particle tracking statistics shows high flagellum rotational rate and strong hydrodynamic coupling strength lead to collective sub-diffusive dynamics. The observed effect is strongly correlated to hydrodynamic coupling of flick motions between nearby bacteria.

  3. Molecular dynamics studies on nanoscale gas transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barisik, Murat

    wall force penetration region at different flow conditions. Shear stress results are utilized to calculate the tangential momentum accommodation coefficient (TMAC) between argon gas and FCC walls. The TMAC value is shown to he independent of the now properties and Knudsen number in all simulations. Velocity profiles show distinct deviations from the kinetic theory based solutions inside the wall force penetration depth, while they match the linearized Boltzmann equation solution outside these zones. Afterwards, surface effects are studied as a function of the surface-gas potential strength ratio (epsilon wf/epsilonff) for the shear driven argon gas flows in the early transition and tree molecular flow regimes. Results show that increased epsilonwf/epsilon ff results in increased gas density, leading towards monolayer adsorption on surfaces. The near wall velocity profile shows reduced gas slip, and eventually velocity stick with increased epsilonwf/epsilon ff. Similarly, using MD predicted shear stress values and kinetic theory, TMAC are calculated as a function of epsilonwf/epsilon ff and TMAC values are shown to be independent of the Knudsen number. Results indicate emergence of the wall force field penetration depth as an additional length scale for gas flows in nano-channels, breaking the dynamic similarity between rarefied and nano-scale gas flows solely based on the Knudsen and Mach numbers.

  4. Permeation of ions across the potassium channel: Brownian dynamics studies.

    PubMed

    Chung, S H; Allen, T W; Hoyles, M; Kuyucak, S

    1999-11-01

    The physical mechanisms underlying the transport of ions across a model potassium channel are described. The shape of the model channel corresponds closely to that deduced from crystallography. From electrostatic calculations, we show that an ion permeating the channel, in the absence of any residual charges, encounters an insurmountable energy barrier arising from induced surface charges. Carbonyl groups along the selectivity filter, helix dipoles near the oval chamber, and mouth dipoles near the channel entrances together transform the energy barrier into a deep energy well. Two ions are attracted to this well, and their presence in the channel permits ions to diffuse across it under the influence of an electric field. Using Brownian dynamics simulations, we determine the magnitude of currents flowing across the channel under various conditions. The conductance increases with increasing dipole strength and reaches its maximum rapidly; a further increase in dipole strength causes a steady decrease in the channel conductance. The current also decreases systematically when the effective dielectric constant of the channel is lowered. The conductance with the optimal choice of dipoles reproduces the experimental value when the dielectric constant of the channel is assumed to be 60. The current-voltage relationship obtained with symmetrical solutions is linear when the applied potential is less than approximately 100 mV but deviates from Ohm's law at a higher applied potential. The reversal potentials obtained with asymmetrical solutions are in agreement with those predicted by the Nernst equation. The conductance exhibits the saturation property observed experimentally. We discuss the implications of these findings for the transport of ions across the potassium channels and membrane channels in general.

  5. Modeling the Hydrogen Bond within Molecular Dynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lykos, Peter

    2004-01-01

    The structure of a hydrogen bond is elucidated within the framework of molecular dynamics based on the model of Rahman and Stillinger (R-S) liquid water treatment. Thus, undergraduates are exposed to the powerful but simple use of classical mechanics to solid objects from a molecular viewpoint.

  6. Molecular ions, Rydberg spectroscopy and dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Jungen, Ch.

    2015-01-22

    Ion spectroscopy, Rydberg spectroscopy and molecular dynamics are closely related subjects. Multichannel quantum defect theory is a theoretical approach which draws on this close relationship and thereby becomes a powerful tool for the study of systems consisting of a positively charged molecular ion core interacting with an electron which may be loosely bound or freely scattering.

  7. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Simple Liquids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Speer, Owner F.; Wengerter, Brian C.; Taylor, Ramona S.

    2004-01-01

    An experiment, in which students were given the opportunity to perform molecular dynamics simulations on a series of molecular liquids using the Amber suite of programs, is presented. They were introduced to both physical theories underlying classical mechanics simulations and to the atom-atom pair distribution function.

  8. Modeling the Hydrogen Bond within Molecular Dynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lykos, Peter

    2004-01-01

    The structure of a hydrogen bond is elucidated within the framework of molecular dynamics based on the model of Rahman and Stillinger (R-S) liquid water treatment. Thus, undergraduates are exposed to the powerful but simple use of classical mechanics to solid objects from a molecular viewpoint.

  9. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Simple Liquids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Speer, Owner F.; Wengerter, Brian C.; Taylor, Ramona S.

    2004-01-01

    An experiment, in which students were given the opportunity to perform molecular dynamics simulations on a series of molecular liquids using the Amber suite of programs, is presented. They were introduced to both physical theories underlying classical mechanics simulations and to the atom-atom pair distribution function.

  10. Fermionic Molecular Dynamics for Nuclear Dynamics and Thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasnaoui, K. H. O.; Chomaz, Ph; Gulminelli, F.

    A new Fermionic Molecular Dynamics (FMD) model based on a Skyrme functional is proposed in this paper. After introducing the basic formalism, some first applications to nuclear structure and nuclear thermodynamics are presented.

  11. Stochastic Evaluation of Riparian Vegetation Dynamics in River Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamoto, H.; Kimura, R.; Toshimori, N.

    2013-12-01

    Vegetation overgrowth in sand bars and floodplains has been a serious problem for river management in Japan. From the viewpoints of flood control and ecological conservation, it would be necessary to accurately predict the vegetation dynamics for a long period of time. In this study, we have developed a stochastic model for predicting the dynamics of trees in floodplains with emphasis on the interaction with flood impacts. The model consists of the following four processes in coupling ecohydrology with biogeomorphology: (i) stochastic behavior of flow discharge, (ii) hydrodynamics in a channel with vegetation, (iii) variation of riverbed topography and (iv) vegetation dynamics on the floodplain. In the model, the flood discharge is stochastically simulated using a Poisson process, one of the conventional approaches in hydrological time-series generation. The model for vegetation dynamics includes the effects of tree growth, mortality by flood impacts, and infant tree invasion. To determine the model parameters, vegetation conditions have been observed mainly before and after flood impacts since 2008 at a field site located between 23.2-24.0 km from the river mouth in Kako River, Japan. This site is one of the vegetation overgrowth locations in Kako River floodplains, where the predominant tree species are willows and bamboos. In this presentation, sensitivity of the vegetation overgrowth tendency is investigated in Kako River channels. Through the Monte Carlo simulation for several cross sections in Kako River, responses of the vegetated channels are stochastically evaluated in terms of the changes of discharge magnitude and channel geomorphology. The expectation and standard deviation of vegetation areal ratio are compared in the different channel cross sections for different river discharges and relative floodplain heights. The result shows that the vegetation status changes sensitively in the channels with larger discharge and insensitive in the lower floodplain

  12. Molecular dynamics simulations of nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Zaoshi

    This dissertation is focused on multimillion-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of nanoscale materials. In the past decade, nanoscale materials have made significant commercial impacts, which will potentially lead to the next industrial revolution. The interest lies in the novel and promising features nanoscale materials exhibit due to their confined sizes. However, not all novel behaviors are understood or controllable. Many uncontrollable parameters, e.g. defects and dangling bonds, are known to hinder the performance of nanodevices. Solutions to these problems rely on our understanding of fundamental elements in nanoscience: isolated individual nanostructures and their assemblies. In this dissertation, we will address atomistic foundations of several problems of technological importance in nanoscience. Specifically, three basic problems are discussed: (1) embrittlement of nanocrystalline metal; (2) novel thermo-mechanical behaviors of nanowires (NWs); and (3) planar defect generation in NWs. With a scalable algorithm implemented on massively parallel computing platforms and various data mining methods, MD simulations can provide valuable insights into these problems. An essential role of sulfur segregation-induced amorphization of crystalline nickel was recently discovered experimentally, but the atomistic mechanism of the amorphization remains unexplained. Our MD simulations reveal that the large steric size of sulfur impurity causes strong sulfur-sulfur interaction mediated by lattice distortion, which leads to amorphization near the percolation threshold at the sulfur-sulfur network in nickel crystal. The generality of the mechanism due to the percolation of an impurity network is further confirmed by a model binary system. In our study of novel behaviors of semiconductor NWs, MD simulations construct a rich size-temperature `phase diagram' for the mechanical response of a zinc-oxide NW under tension. For smaller diameters and higher temperatures, novel

  13. Adsorption dynamics of molecular nitrogen at an Fe(111) surface.

    PubMed

    Nosir, M A; Martin-Gondre, L; Bocan, G A; Díez Muiño, R

    2017-03-08

    We present an extensive theoretical study of N2 adsorption mechanisms on an Fe(111) surface. We combine the static analysis of a six-dimensional potential energy surface (6D-PES), based on ab initio density functional theory (DFT) calculations for the system, with quasi-classical trajectory (QCT) calculations to simulate the adsorption dynamics. There are four molecular adsorption states, usually called γ, δ, α, and ε, arising from our DFT calculations. We find that N2 adsorption in the γ-state is non-activated, while the threshold energy is associated with the entrance channel for the other three adsorption states. Our QCT calculations confirm that there are activated and nonactivated paths for the adsorption of N2 on the Fe(111) surface, which is in agreement with previous experimental investigations. Molecular dynamics at a surface temperature Ts = 300 K and impact energies Ei in the 0-5 eV range show the relative occupancy of the γ, δ, α, and ε states. The δ-state, however, is only marginally populated despite its adsorption energy being very similar to that of the γ-state. Our QCT calculations trace the dependence of molecular trapping on the surface temperature Ts and initial impact energy Ei and quantify the rates of the different competitive channels that eventually lead to molecular adsorption.

  14. Modeling hybrid perovskites by molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Mattoni, Alessandro; Filippetti, Alessio; Caddeo, Claudia

    2017-02-01

    The topical review describes the recent progress in the modeling of hybrid perovskites by molecular dynamics simulations. Hybrid perovskites and in particular methylammonium lead halide (MAPI) have a tremendous technological relevance representing the fastest-advancing solar material to date. They also represent the paradigm of an organic-inorganic crystalline material with some conceptual peculiarities: an inorganic semiconductor for what concerns the electronic and absorption properties with a hybrid and solution processable organic-inorganic body. After briefly explaining the basic concepts of ab initio and classical molecular dynamics, the model potential recently developed for hybrid perovskites is described together with its physical motivation as a simple ionic model able to reproduce the main dynamical properties of the material. Advantages and limits of the two strategies (either ab initio or classical) are discussed in comparison with the time and length scales (from pico to microsecond scale) necessary to comprehensively study the relevant properties of hybrid perovskites from molecular reorientations to electrocaloric effects. The state-of-the-art of the molecular dynamics modeling of hybrid perovskites is reviewed by focusing on a selection of showcase applications of methylammonium lead halide: molecular cations disorder; temperature evolution of vibrations; thermally activated defects diffusion; thermal transport. We finally discuss the perspectives in the modeling of hybrid perovskites by molecular dynamics.

  15. Modeling hybrid perovskites by molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattoni, Alessandro; Filippetti, Alessio; Caddeo, Claudia

    2017-02-01

    The topical review describes the recent progress in the modeling of hybrid perovskites by molecular dynamics simulations. Hybrid perovskites and in particular methylammonium lead halide (MAPI) have a tremendous technological relevance representing the fastest-advancing solar material to date. They also represent the paradigm of an organic-inorganic crystalline material with some conceptual peculiarities: an inorganic semiconductor for what concerns the electronic and absorption properties with a hybrid and solution processable organic-inorganic body. After briefly explaining the basic concepts of ab initio and classical molecular dynamics, the model potential recently developed for hybrid perovskites is described together with its physical motivation as a simple ionic model able to reproduce the main dynamical properties of the material. Advantages and limits of the two strategies (either ab initio or classical) are discussed in comparison with the time and length scales (from pico to microsecond scale) necessary to comprehensively study the relevant properties of hybrid perovskites from molecular reorientations to electrocaloric effects. The state-of-the-art of the molecular dynamics modeling of hybrid perovskites is reviewed by focusing on a selection of showcase applications of methylammonium lead halide: molecular cations disorder; temperature evolution of vibrations; thermally activated defects diffusion; thermal transport. We finally discuss the perspectives in the modeling of hybrid perovskites by molecular dynamics.

  16. Molecular dynamics simulations: advances and applications

    PubMed Central

    Hospital, Adam; Goñi, Josep Ramon; Orozco, Modesto; Gelpí, Josep L

    2015-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have evolved into a mature technique that can be used effectively to understand macromolecular structure-to-function relationships. Present simulation times are close to biologically relevant ones. Information gathered about the dynamic properties of macromolecules is rich enough to shift the usual paradigm of structural bioinformatics from studying single structures to analyze conformational ensembles. Here, we describe the foundations of molecular dynamics and the improvements made in the direction of getting such ensemble. Specific application of the technique to three main issues (allosteric regulation, docking, and structure refinement) is discussed. PMID:26604800

  17. Local dynamic subgrid-scale models in channel flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cabot, William H.

    1994-01-01

    The dynamic subgrid-scale (SGS) model has given good results in the large-eddy simulation (LES) of homogeneous isotropic or shear flow, and in the LES of channel flow, using averaging in two or three homogeneous directions (the DA model). In order to simulate flows in general, complex geometries (with few or no homogeneous directions), the dynamic SGS model needs to be applied at a local level in a numerically stable way. Channel flow, which is inhomogeneous and wall-bounded flow in only one direction, provides a good initial test for local SGS models. Tests of the dynamic localization model were performed previously in channel flow using a pseudospectral code and good results were obtained. Numerical instability due to persistently negative eddy viscosity was avoided by either constraining the eddy viscosity to be positive or by limiting the time that eddy viscosities could remain negative by co-evolving the SGS kinetic energy (the DLk model). The DLk model, however, was too expensive to run in the pseudospectral code due to a large near-wall term in the auxiliary SGS kinetic energy (k) equation. One objective was then to implement the DLk model in a second-order central finite difference channel code, in which the auxiliary k equation could be integrated implicitly in time at great reduction in cost, and to assess its performance in comparison with the plane-averaged dynamic model or with no model at all, and with direct numerical simulation (DNS) and/or experimental data. Other local dynamic SGS models have been proposed recently, e.g., constrained dynamic models with random backscatter, and with eddy viscosity terms that are averaged in time over material path lines rather than in space. Another objective was to incorporate and test these models in channel flow.

  18. Molecular Dynamics Studies of Matrix Metalloproteases.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Natalia; Suárez, Dimas

    2017-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteases are multidomain enzymes with a remarkable proteolytic activity located in the extracellular environment. Their catalytic activity and structural properties have been intensively studied during the last few decades using both experimental and theoretical approaches, but many open questions still remain. Extensive molecular dynamics simulations enable the sampling of the configurational space of a molecular system, thus contributing to the characterization of the structure, dynamics, and ligand binding properties of a particular MMP. Based on previous computational experience, we provide in this chapter technical and methodological guidelines that may be useful to and stimulate other researchers to perform molecular dynamics simulations to help address unresolved questions concerning the molecular mode of action of MMPs.

  19. Dynamic molecular crystals with switchable physical properties.

    PubMed

    Sato, Osamu

    2016-06-21

    The development of molecular materials whose physical properties can be controlled by external stimuli - such as light, electric field, temperature, and pressure - has recently attracted much attention owing to their potential applications in molecular devices. There are a number of ways to alter the physical properties of crystalline materials. These include the modulation of the spin and redox states of the crystal's components, or the incorporation within the crystalline lattice of tunable molecules that exhibit stimuli-induced changes in their molecular structure. A switching behaviour can also be induced by changing the molecular orientation of the crystal's components, even in cases where the overall molecular structure is not affected. Controlling intermolecular interactions within a molecular material is also an effective tool to modulate its physical properties. This Review discusses recent advances in the development of such stimuli-responsive, switchable crystalline compounds - referred to here as dynamic molecular crystals - and suggests how different approaches can serve to prepare functional materials.

  20. Improving flow distribution in influent channels using computational fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Park, No-Suk; Yoon, Sukmin; Jeong, Woochang; Lee, Seungjae

    2016-10-01

    Although the flow distribution in an influent channel where the inflow is split into each treatment process in a wastewater treatment plant greatly affects the efficiency of the process, and a weir is the typical structure for the flow distribution, to the authors' knowledge, there is a paucity of research on the flow distribution in an open channel with a weir. In this study, the influent channel of a real-scale wastewater treatment plant was used, installing a suppressed rectangular weir that has a horizontal crest to cross the full channel width. The flow distribution in the influent channel was analyzed using a validated computational fluid dynamics model to investigate (1) the comparison of single-phase and two-phase simulation, (2) the improved procedure of the prototype channel, and (3) the effect of the inflow rate on flow distribution. The results show that two-phase simulation is more reliable due to the description of the free-surface fluctuations. It should first be considered for improving flow distribution to prevent a short-circuit flow, and the difference in the kinetic energy with the inflow rate makes flow distribution trends different. The authors believe that this case study is helpful for improving flow distribution in an influent channel.

  1. The vanilloid receptor family of calcium-permeable channels: molecular integrators of microenvironmental stimuli.

    PubMed

    O'Neil, Roger G; Brown, Rachel C

    2003-12-01

    The TRPV subfamily of calcium-permeable channels is widely distributed in sensory and nonsensory cells from nematodes to mammals. These channels can be variably activated by a diverse range of stimuli (osmotic/mechanical stress, noxious chemicals and heat, endogenous mediators) that often converge on the same channel. Evidence is presented that TRPV channels function as novel "molecular integrators" of diverse microenvironmental stimuli.

  2. Transport Phenomena of Water in Molecular Fluidic Channels

    PubMed Central

    Vo, Truong Quoc; Kim, BoHung

    2016-01-01

    In molecular-level fluidic transport, where the discrete characteristics of a molecular system are not negligible (in contrast to a continuum description), the response of the molecular water system might still be similar to the continuum description if the time and ensemble averages satisfy the ergodic hypothesis and the scale of the average is enough to recover the classical thermodynamic properties. However, even in such cases, the continuum description breaks down on the material interfaces. In short, molecular-level liquid flows exhibit substantially different physics from classical fluid transport theories because of (i) the interface/surface force field, (ii) thermal/velocity slip, (iii) the discreteness of fluid molecules at the interface and (iv) local viscosity. Therefore, in this study, we present the result of our investigations using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with continuum-based energy equations and check the validity and limitations of the continuum hypothesis. Our study shows that when the continuum description is subjected to the proper treatment of the interface effects via modified boundary conditions, the so-called continuum-based modified-analytical solutions, they can adequately predict nanoscale fluid transport phenomena. The findings in this work have broad effects in overcoming current limitations in modeling/predicting the fluid behaviors of molecular fluidic devices. PMID:27650138

  3. Fluctuation driven active molecular transport in passive channel proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosztin, Ioan

    2006-03-01

    Living cells interact with their extracellular environment through the cell membrane, which acts as a protective permeability barrier for preserving the internal integrity of the cell. However, cell metabolism requires controlled molecular transport across the cell membrane, a function that is fulfilled by a wide variety of transmembrane proteins, acting as either passive or active transporters. In this talk it is argued that, contrary to the general belief, in active cell membranes passive and spatially asymmetric channel proteins can act as active transporters by consuming energy from nonequilibrium fluctuations fueled by cell metabolism. This assertion is demonstrated in the case of the E. coli aquaglyceroporin GlpF channel protein, whose high resolution crystal structure is manifestly asymmetric. By calculating the glycerol flux through GlpF within the framework of a stochastic model, it is found that, as a result of channel asymmetry, glycerol uptake driven by a concentration gradient is enhanced significantly in the presence of non-equilibrium fluctuations. Furthermore, the enhancement caused by a ratchet-like mechanism is larger for the outward, i.e., from the cytoplasm to the periplasm, flux than for the inward one, suggesting that the same non-equilibrium fluctuations also play an important role in protecting the interior of the cell against poisoning by excess uptake of glycerol. Preliminary data on water and sugar transport through aquaporin and maltoporin channels, respectively, are indicative of the universality of the proposed nonequilibrium-fluctuation-driven active transport mechanism. This work was supported by grants from the Univ. of Missouri Research Board, the Institute for Theoretical Sciences and the Department of Energy (DOE Contract W-7405-ENG-36), and the National Science Foundation (FIBR-0526854).

  4. Random Matrix Theory in molecular dynamics analysis.

    PubMed

    Palese, Luigi Leonardo

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that, in some situations, principal component analysis (PCA) carried out on molecular dynamics data results in the appearance of cosine-shaped low index projections. Because this is reminiscent of the results obtained by performing PCA on a multidimensional Brownian dynamics, it has been suggested that short-time protein dynamics is essentially nothing more than a noisy signal. Here we use Random Matrix Theory to analyze a series of short-time molecular dynamics experiments which are specifically designed to be simulations with high cosine content. We use as a model system the protein apoCox17, a mitochondrial copper chaperone. Spectral analysis on correlation matrices allows to easily differentiate random correlations, simply deriving from the finite length of the process, from non-random signals reflecting the intrinsic system properties. Our results clearly show that protein dynamics is not really Brownian also in presence of the cosine-shaped low index projections on principal axes.

  5. Dynamics of excited molecular states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Hans-Dieter

    2005-01-01

    The photo-excitation or photo-ionization of a polyatomic molecule is typically accompanied by a strong excitation of the vibrational modes. In particular when a conical intersection of the electronic potential energy surfaces involved lies within or close to the Frank-Condon zone, the nuclear motion becomes very complicated, often chaotic, and the spectra become irregular and dense. An accurate simulation of the dynamics of such excited molecules requires firstly that the multi-dimensional and multi-state potential energy surface - or a reliable model thereof - can be determined. Secondly, the multi-dimensional quantum dynamics have to be solved. This is a very difficult task, because of the high dimensionality of the problem (6 to 30 degrees of freedom, say). The multi-configuration time-dependent Hartree (MCTDH) method has proven to be very useful for the study of such problems. In fact, an accurate treatment of the quantal dynamics of molecules like the allene cation (C3 H+4, 15D), the butatriene cation (C4 H+4, 18D), or the pyrazine molecule (C4N2H4, 24D) in their full dimensionality, is - up to date - only possible with MCTDH. (The acronym n D denotes the dimensionality.) The construction of the vibronic model Hamiltonian and the MCTDH method will be briefly discussed. After this, the excited state dynamics of the butatriene and pyrazine molecules will be discussed.

  6. Simulation of field-induced molecular dissociation in atom-probe tomography: Identification of a neutral emission channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanuttini, David; Blum, Ivan; Rigutti, Lorenzo; Vurpillot, François; Douady, Julie; Jacquet, Emmanuelle; Anglade, Pierre-Matthieu; Gervais, Benoit

    2017-06-01

    We investigate the dynamics of dicationic metal-oxide molecules under large electric-field conditions, on the basis of ab initio calculations coupled to molecular dynamics. Applied to the case of ZnO2 + in the field of atom probe tomography (APT), our simulation reveals the dissociation into three distinct exit channels. The proportions of these channels depend critically on the field strength and on the initial molecular orientation with respect to the field. For typical field strength used in APT experiments, an efficient dissociation channel leads to emission of neutral oxygen atoms, which escape detection. The calculated composition biases and their dependence on the field strength show remarkable consistency with recent APT experiments on ZnO crystals. Our work shows that bond breaking in strong static fields may lead to significant neutral atom production, and therefore to severe elemental composition biases in measurements.

  7. Non-Equilibrium Dynamics Contribute to Ion Selectivity in the KcsA Channel

    PubMed Central

    Haas, Stephan; Farley, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    The ability of biological ion channels to conduct selected ions across cell membranes is critical for the survival of both animal and bacterial cells. Numerous investigations of ion selectivity have been conducted over more than 50 years, yet the mechanisms whereby the channels select certain ions and reject others are not well understood. Here we report a new application of Jarzynski’s Equality to investigate the mechanism of ion selectivity using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of Na+ and K+ ions moving through the KcsA channel. The simulations show that the selectivity filter of KcsA adapts and responds to the presence of the ions with structural rearrangements that are different for Na+ and K+. These structural rearrangements facilitate entry of K+ ions into the selectivity filter and permeation through the channel, and rejection of Na+ ions. A mechanistic model of ion selectivity by this channel based on the results of the simulations relates the structural rearrangement of the selectivity filter to the differential dehydration of ions and multiple-ion occupancy and describes a mechanism to efficiently select and conduct K+. Estimates of the K+/Na+ selectivity ratio and steady state ion conductance for KcsA from the simulations are in good quantitative agreement with experimental measurements. This model also accurately describes experimental observations of channel block by cytoplasmic Na+ ions, the “punch through” relief of channel block by cytoplasmic positive voltages, and is consistent with the knock-on mechanism of ion permeation. PMID:24465882

  8. Dynamical Coupled-channels Effects on Pion Photoproduction

    SciTech Connect

    Julia-Diaz, B; Lee, T -S. H.; Matsuyama, A; Sato, T; Smith, L C

    2007-12-18

    The electromagnetic pion production reactions are investigated within the dynamical coupled-channels model developed in {\\bf Physics Reports, 439, 193 (2007)}. The meson-baryon channels included in this study are $\\gamma N$, $\\pi N$, $\\eta N$, and the $\\pi\\Delta$, $\\rho N$ and $\\sigma N$ resonant components of the $\\pi\\pi N$ channel. With the hadronic parameters of the model determined in a recent study of $\\pi N$ scattering, we show that the pion photoproduction data up to the second resonance region can be described to a very large extent by only adjusting the bare $\\gamma N \\rightarrow N^*$ helicity amplitudes, while the non-resonant electromagnetic couplings are taken from previous works. It is found that the coupled-channels effects can contribute about 10 - 20 $\\%$ of the production cross sections in the $\\Delta$ (1232) resonance region, and can drastically change the magnitude and shape of the cross sections in the second resonance region. The importance of the off-shell effects in a dynamical approach is also demonstrated. The meson cloud effects as well as the coupled-channels contributions to the $\\gamma N \\rightarrow N^*$ form factors are found to be mainly in the low $Q^2$ region. For the magnetic M1 $\\gamma N \\rightarrow \\Delta$ (1232) form factor, the results are close to that of the Sato-Lee Model. Necessary improvements to the model and future developments are discussed.

  9. Molecular origins of conduction channels observed in shot-noise measurements.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Gemma C; Gagliardi, Alessio; Pecchia, Alessandro; Frauenheim, Thomas; Di Carlo, Aldo; Reimers, Jeffrey R; Hush, Noel S

    2006-11-01

    Measurements of shot noise from single molecules have indicated the presence of various conduction channels. We present three descriptions of these channels in molecular terms showing that the number of conduction channels is limited by bottlenecks in the molecule and that the channels can be linked to transmission through different junction states. We introduce molecular-conductance orbitals, which allow the transmission to be separated into contributions from individual orbitals and contributions from interference between pairs of orbitals.

  10. Dynamic Quantum Tomography Model for Phase-Damping Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czerwiński, Artur; Jamiołkowski, Andrzej

    In this paper we propose a dynamic quantum tomography model for open quantum systems with evolution given by phase-damping channels. Mathematically, these channels correspond to completely positive trace-preserving maps defined by the Hadamard product of the initial density matrix with a time-dependent matrix which carries the knowledge about the evolution. Physically, there is a strong motivation for considering this kind of evolution because such channels appear naturally in the theory of open quantum systems. The main idea behind a dynamic approach to quantum tomography claims that by performing the same kind of measurement at some time instants one can obtain new data for state reconstruction. Thus, this approach leads to a decrease in the number of distinct observables which are required for quantum tomography; however, the exact benefit for employing the dynamic approach depends strictly on how the quantum system evolves in time. Algebraic analysis of phase-damping channels allows one to determine criteria for quantum tomography of systems in question. General theorems and observations presented in the paper are accompanied by a specific example, which shows step by step how the theory works. The results introduced in this paper can potentially be applied in experiments where there is a tendency to look at quantum tomography from the point of view of economy of measurements, because each distinct kind of measurement requires, in general, preparing a separate setup.

  11. Reflectionless wave dynamics in channels of variable depth and width

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelinovsky, Efim; Didenkulova, Ira; Shurgalina, Ekaterina

    2017-04-01

    In this work we discuss long wave dynamics in rectangular channels of variable depth and width. Demonstrated, that for conditions of "self-consistent channel" when Bc = const (B is a channel width, and c is a celerity), the wave propagates without inner reflection from the channel bottom and walls even if the function c(x) is arbitrary. It is shown, in the framework of the linear shallow-water theory, that the temporal shape of the travelling wave does not change with the distance; its amplitude and duration are constant. However, the spatial shape of the wave varies due to the change in celerity along the channel. In the framework of the nonlinear shallow-water theory, it is shown that the travelling wave deforms while the inner reflection from the channel bottom and walls is still absent. In this case dispersive effects lead to a disintegration of the initial wave into solitons. This process is studied in detail. Such unusual waves may propagate over long distances without loss of energy.

  12. Molecular dynamics simulations of substitutional diffusion

    DOE PAGES

    Zhou, Xiaowang; Jones, Reese E.; Gruber, Jacob

    2016-12-18

    In atomistic simulations, diffusion energy barriers are usually calculated for each atomic jump path using a nudged elastic band method. Practical materials often involve thousands of distinct atomic jump paths that are not known a priori. Hence, it is often preferred to determine an overall diffusion energy barrier and an overall pre-exponential factor from the Arrhenius equation constructed through molecular dynamics simulations of mean square displacement of the diffusion species at different temperatures. This approach has been well established for interstitial diffusion, but not for substitutional diffusion at the same confidence. Using In 0.1 Ga 0.9 N as an example,more » we have identified conditions where molecular dynamics simulations can be used to calculate highly converged Arrhenius plots for substitutional alloys. As a result, this may enable many complex diffusion problems to be easily and reliably studied in the future using molecular dynamics, provided that moderate computing resources are available.« less

  13. Molecular dynamics simulations of substitutional diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Xiaowang; Jones, Reese E.; Gruber, Jacob

    2016-12-18

    In atomistic simulations, diffusion energy barriers are usually calculated for each atomic jump path using a nudged elastic band method. Practical materials often involve thousands of distinct atomic jump paths that are not known a priori. Hence, it is often preferred to determine an overall diffusion energy barrier and an overall pre-exponential factor from the Arrhenius equation constructed through molecular dynamics simulations of mean square displacement of the diffusion species at different temperatures. This approach has been well established for interstitial diffusion, but not for substitutional diffusion at the same confidence. Using In 0.1 Ga 0.9 N as an example, we have identified conditions where molecular dynamics simulations can be used to calculate highly converged Arrhenius plots for substitutional alloys. As a result, this may enable many complex diffusion problems to be easily and reliably studied in the future using molecular dynamics, provided that moderate computing resources are available.

  14. Discrete Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Biomolecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Feng

    2011-10-01

    Discrete molecular dynamics (DMD) simulation of hard spheres was the first implementation of molecular dynamics (MD) in history. DMD simulations are computationally more efficient than continuous MD simulations due to simplified interaction potentials. However, also due to these simplified potentials, DMD has often been associated with coarse-grained modeling, and hence continuous MD has become the dominant approach used to study the internal dynamics of biomolecules. With the recent advances in DMD methodology, including the development of high-resolution models for biomolecules and approaches to increase DMD efficiency, DMD simulations are emerging as an important tool in the field of molecular modeling, including the study of protein folding, protein misfolding and aggregation, and protein engineering. Recently, DMD methodology has been applied to modeling RNA folding and protein-ligand recognition. With these improvements to DMD methodology and the continuous increase in available computational power, we expect a growing role of DMD simulations in our understanding of biology.

  15. Liouville-von Neumann molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Jakowski, Jacek; Morokuma, Keiji

    2009-06-14

    We present a novel first principles molecular dynamics scheme, called Liouville-von Neumann molecular dynamics, based on Liouville-von Neumann equation for density matrices propagation and Magnus expansion of the time-evolution operator. The scheme combines formally accurate quantum propagation of electrons represented via density matrices and a classical propagation of nuclei. The method requires a few iterations per each time step where the Fock operator is formed and von Neumann equation is integrated. The algorithm (a) is free of constraint and fictitious parameters, (b) avoids diagonalization of the Fock operator, and (c) can be used in the case of fractional occupation as in metallic systems. The algorithm is very stable, and has a very good conservation of energy even in cases when a good quality conventional Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics trajectories is difficult to obtain. Test simulations include initial phase of fullerene formation from gaseous C(2) and retinal system.

  16. Liouville-von Neumann molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakowski, Jacek; Morokuma, Keiji

    2009-06-01

    We present a novel first principles molecular dynamics scheme, called Liouville-von Neumann molecular dynamics, based on Liouville-von Neumann equation for density matrices propagation and Magnus expansion of the time-evolution operator. The scheme combines formally accurate quantum propagation of electrons represented via density matrices and a classical propagation of nuclei. The method requires a few iterations per each time step where the Fock operator is formed and von Neumann equation is integrated. The algorithm (a) is free of constraint and fictitious parameters, (b) avoids diagonalization of the Fock operator, and (c) can be used in the case of fractional occupation as in metallic systems. The algorithm is very stable, and has a very good conservation of energy even in cases when a good quality conventional Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics trajectories is difficult to obtain. Test simulations include initial phase of fullerene formation from gaseous C2 and retinal system.

  17. Wavelet Analysis for Molecular Dynamics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    factor of 1,000. Ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene offers a classic example of the scale challenge: despite its simple chemical makeup , CnH2n+2...below, but also disconnected graphs from individual molecules . 6 Linear homopolymers can be ordered to have block tridiagonal structure where each...solutions for this simple system; r̃(0)1 = √ 2rOH , r̃ (0) 2 = 0, which leads to a symmetric linear molecule , and r̃(0)1 = 0, r̃ (0) 2 = rOH √ 4+2mO

  18. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Hexadecane/Silicalite Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Grest, G.S.; Webb, E.B.

    1999-01-20

    The interface between liquid hexadecane and the (010) surface of silicalite was studied by molecular dynamics. The structure of molecules in the interracial region is influenced by the presence of pore mouths on the silicalite surface. For this surface, whose pores are the entrances to straight channels, the concentration profile for partially absorbed molecules is peaked around 10 monomers inside the zeolite. No preference to enter or exit the zeolite based on absorption length is observed except for very small or very large absorption lengths. We also found no preferential conformation of the unabsorbed tails for partially absorbed molecules.

  19. The classical and quantum dynamics of molecular spins on graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cervetti, Christian; Rettori, Angelo; Pini, Maria Gloria; Cornia, Andrea; Repollés, Ana; Luis, Fernando; Dressel, Martin; Rauschenbach, Stephan; Kern, Klaus; Burghard, Marko; Bogani, Lapo

    2016-02-01

    Controlling the dynamics of spins on surfaces is pivotal to the design of spintronic and quantum computing devices. Proposed schemes involve the interaction of spins with graphene to enable surface-state spintronics and electrical spin manipulation. However, the influence of the graphene environment on the spin systems has yet to be unravelled. Here we explore the spin-graphene interaction by studying the classical and quantum dynamics of molecular magnets on graphene. Whereas the static spin response remains unaltered, the quantum spin dynamics and associated selection rules are profoundly modulated. The couplings to graphene phonons, to other spins, and to Dirac fermions are quantified using a newly developed model. Coupling to Dirac electrons introduces a dominant quantum relaxation channel that, by driving the spins over Villain’s threshold, gives rise to fully coherent, resonant spin tunnelling. Our findings provide fundamental insight into the interaction between spins and graphene, establishing the basis for electrical spin manipulation in graphene nanodevices.

  20. Modeling diverse range of potassium channels with Brownian dynamics.

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Shin-Ho; Allen, Toby W; Kuyucak, Serdar

    2002-01-01

    Using the experimentally determined KcsA structure as a template, we propose a plausible explanation for the diversity of potassium channels seen in nature. A simplified model of KcsA is constructed from its atomic resolution structure by smoothing out the protein-water boundary and representing the atoms forming the channel protein as a homogeneous, low dielectric medium. The properties of the simplified and atomic-detail models, deduced from electrostatic calculations and Brownian dynamics simulations, are shown to be qualitatively similar. We then study how the current flowing across the simplified model channel changes as the shape of the intrapore region is modified. This is achieved by increasing the radius of the intracellular pore systematically from 1.5 to 5 A while leaving the dimensions of the selectivity filter and inner chamber unaltered. The strengths of the dipoles located near the entrances of the channel, the carbonyl groups lining the selectivity filter, and the helix macrodipoles are kept constant. The channel conductance increases steadily as the radius of the intracellular pore is increased. The rate-limiting step for both the outward and inward current is the time it takes for an ion to cross the residual energy barrier located in the intrapore region. The current-voltage relationship obtained with symmetrical solutions is linear when the applied potential is less than approximately 100 mV but deviates slightly from Ohm's law at higher applied potentials. The nonlinearity in the current-voltage curve becomes less pronounced as the radius of the intracellular pore is increased. When the strengths of the dipoles near the intracellular entrance are reduced, the channel shows a pronounced inward rectification. Finally, the conductance exhibits the saturation property observed experimentally. We discuss the implications of these findings on the transport of ions across the potassium channels and membrane channels in general. PMID:12080118

  1. Molecular dynamics study of the archaeal aquaporin AqpM

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Aquaporins are a large family of transmembrane channel proteins that are present throughout all domains of life and are implicated in human disorders. These channels, allow the passive but selective movement of water and other small neutral solutes across cell membranes. Aquaporins have been classified into two sub-families: i) strict aquaporins that only allow the passage of water and ii) the less selective aquaglyceroporins that transport water and other neutral solutes, such as glycerol, CO2 or urea. Recently, the identification and characterization of a number of archaeal and bacterial aquaporins suggested the existence of a third sub-family; one that is neither a strict aquaporin nor an aquaglyceroporin. The function and phylogeny of this third family is still a matter of debate. Results Twenty nanosecond molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of a fully hydrated tetramer of AqpM embedded in a lipid bilayer permitted predictions to be made of key biophysical parameters including: single channel osmotic permeability constant (pf), single channel diffusive permeability constant (pd), channel radius, potential water occupancy of the channel and water orientation inside the pore. These properties were compared with those of well characterized representatives of the two main aquaporin sub-families. Results show that changes in the amino acid composition of the aromatic/arginine region affect the size and polarity of the selectivity filter (SF) and could help explain the difference in water permeability between aquaporins. In addition, MD simulation results suggest that AqpM combines characteristics of strict aquaporins, such as the narrow SF and channel radius, with those of aquaglyceroporins, such as a more hydrophobic and less polar SF. Conclusions MD simulations of AqpM extend previous evidence that this archaeal aquaporin exhibits hybrid features intermediate between the two known aquaporin sub-families, supporting the idea that it may constitute a

  2. Molecular Biodynamers: Dynamic Covalent Analogues of Biopolymers

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Conspectus Constitutional dynamic chemistry (CDC) features the use of reversible linkages at both molecular and supramolecular levels, including reversible covalent bonds (dynamic covalent chemistry, DCC) and noncovalent interactions (dynamic noncovalent chemistry, DNCC). Due to its inherent reversibility and stimuli-responsiveness, CDC has been widely utilized as a powerful tool for the screening of bioactive compounds, the exploitation of receptors or substrates driven by molecular recognition, and the fabrication of constitutionally dynamic materials. Implementation of CDC in biopolymer science leads to the generation of constitutionally dynamic analogues of biopolymers, biodynamers, at the molecular level (molecular biodynamers) through DCC or at the supramolecular level (supramolecular biodynamers) via DNCC. Therefore, biodynamers are prepared by reversible covalent polymerization or noncovalent polyassociation of biorelevant monomers. In particular, molecular biodynamers, biodynamers of the covalent type whose monomeric units are connected by reversible covalent bonds, are generated by reversible polymerization of bio-based monomers and can be seen as a combination of biopolymers with DCC. Owing to the reversible covalent bonds used in DCC, molecular biodynamers can undergo continuous and spontaneous constitutional modifications via incorporation/decorporation and exchange of biorelevant monomers in response to internal or external stimuli. As a result, they behave as adaptive materials with novel properties, such as self-healing, stimuli-responsiveness, and tunable mechanical and optical character. More specifically, molecular biodynamers combine the biorelevant characters (e.g., biocompatibility, biodegradability, biofunctionality) of bioactive monomers with the dynamic features of reversible covalent bonds (e.g., changeable, tunable, controllable, self-healing, and stimuli-responsive capacities), to realize synergistic properties in one system. In addition

  3. Molecular Biodynamers: Dynamic Covalent Analogues of Biopolymers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yun; Lehn, Jean-Marie; Hirsch, Anna K H

    2017-02-21

    Constitutional dynamic chemistry (CDC) features the use of reversible linkages at both molecular and supramolecular levels, including reversible covalent bonds (dynamic covalent chemistry, DCC) and noncovalent interactions (dynamic noncovalent chemistry, DNCC). Due to its inherent reversibility and stimuli-responsiveness, CDC has been widely utilized as a powerful tool for the screening of bioactive compounds, the exploitation of receptors or substrates driven by molecular recognition, and the fabrication of constitutionally dynamic materials. Implementation of CDC in biopolymer science leads to the generation of constitutionally dynamic analogues of biopolymers, biodynamers, at the molecular level (molecular biodynamers) through DCC or at the supramolecular level (supramolecular biodynamers) via DNCC. Therefore, biodynamers are prepared by reversible covalent polymerization or noncovalent polyassociation of biorelevant monomers. In particular, molecular biodynamers, biodynamers of the covalent type whose monomeric units are connected by reversible covalent bonds, are generated by reversible polymerization of bio-based monomers and can be seen as a combination of biopolymers with DCC. Owing to the reversible covalent bonds used in DCC, molecular biodynamers can undergo continuous and spontaneous constitutional modifications via incorporation/decorporation and exchange of biorelevant monomers in response to internal or external stimuli. As a result, they behave as adaptive materials with novel properties, such as self-healing, stimuli-responsiveness, and tunable mechanical and optical character. More specifically, molecular biodynamers combine the biorelevant characters (e.g., biocompatibility, biodegradability, biofunctionality) of bioactive monomers with the dynamic features of reversible covalent bonds (e.g., changeable, tunable, controllable, self-healing, and stimuli-responsive capacities), to realize synergistic properties in one system. In addition, molecular

  4. VUV studies of molecular photofragmentation dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    White, M.G.

    1993-12-01

    State-resolved, photoion and photoelectron methods are used to study the neutral fragmentation and ionization dynamics of small molecules relevant to atmospheric and combustion chemistry. Photodissociation and ionization are initiated by coherent VUV radiation and the fragmentation dynamics are extracted from measurements of product rovibronic state distributions, kinetic energies and angular distributions. The general aim of these studies is to investigate the multichannel interactions between the electronic and nuclear motions which determine the evolution of the photoexcited {open_quotes}complex{close_quotes} into the observed asymptotic channels.

  5. Dynamic signature of molecular association in methanol.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, C E; Self, J L; Copley, J R D; Faraone, A

    2016-07-07

    Quasielastic neutron scattering measurements and molecular dynamics simulations were combined to investigate the collective dynamics of deuterated methanol, CD3OD. In the experimentally determined dynamic structure factor, a slow, non-Fickian mode was observed in addition to the standard density-fluctuation heat mode. The simulation results indicate that the slow dynamical process originates from the hydrogen bonding of methanol molecules. The qualitative behavior of this mode is similar to the previously observed α-relaxation in supercooled water [M. C. Bellissent-Funel et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 85, 3644 (2000)] which also originates from the formation and dissolution of hydrogen-bonded associates (supramolecular clusters). In methanol, however, this mode is distinguishable well above the freezing transition. This finding indicates that an emergent slow mode is not unique to supercooled water, but may instead be a general feature of hydrogen-bonding liquids and associating molecular liquids.

  6. Molecular scale dynamics of large ring polymers.

    PubMed

    Gooßen, S; Brás, A R; Krutyeva, M; Sharp, M; Falus, P; Feoktystov, A; Gasser, U; Pyckhout-Hintzen, W; Wischnewski, A; Richter, D

    2014-10-17

    We present neutron scattering data on the structure and dynamics of melts from polyethylene oxide rings with molecular weights up to ten times the entanglement mass of the linear counterpart. The data reveal a very compact conformation displaying a structure approaching a mass fractal, as hypothesized by recent simulation work. The dynamics is characterized by a fast Rouse relaxation of subunits (loops) and a slower dynamics displaying a lattice animal-like loop displacement. The loop size is an intrinsic property of the ring architecture and is independent of molecular weight. This is the first experimental observation of the space-time evolution of segmental motion in ring polymers illustrating the dynamic consequences of their topology that is unique among all polymeric systems of any other known architecture.

  7. Molecular Scale Dynamics of Large Ring Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gooßen, S.; Brás, A. R.; Krutyeva, M.; Sharp, M.; Falus, P.; Feoktystov, A.; Gasser, U.; Pyckhout-Hintzen, W.; Wischnewski, A.; Richter, D.

    2014-10-01

    We present neutron scattering data on the structure and dynamics of melts from polyethylene oxide rings with molecular weights up to ten times the entanglement mass of the linear counterpart. The data reveal a very compact conformation displaying a structure approaching a mass fractal, as hypothesized by recent simulation work. The dynamics is characterized by a fast Rouse relaxation of subunits (loops) and a slower dynamics displaying a lattice animal-like loop displacement. The loop size is an intrinsic property of the ring architecture and is independent of molecular weight. This is the first experimental observation of the space-time evolution of segmental motion in ring polymers illustrating the dynamic consequences of their topology that is unique among all polymeric systems of any other known architecture.

  8. Molecular dynamic simulations of ocular tablet dissolution.

    PubMed

    Ru, Qian; Fadda, Hala M; Li, Chung; Paul, Daniel; Khaw, Peng T; Brocchini, Steve; Zloh, Mire

    2013-11-25

    Small tablets for implantation into the subconjunctival space in the eye are being developed to inhibit scarring after glaucoma filtration surgery (GFS). There is a need to evaluate drug dissolution at the molecular level to determine how the chemical structure of the active may correlate with dissolution in the nonsink conditions of the conjunctival space. We conducted molecular dynamics simulations to study the dissolution process of tablets derived from two drugs that can inhibit fibrosis after GFS, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and the matrix metalloprotease inhibitor (MMPi), ilomastat. The dissolution was simulated in the presence of simple point charge (SPC) water molecules, and the liquid turnover of the aqueous humor in the subconjunctival space was simulated by removal of the dissolved drug molecules at regular intervals and replacement by new water molecules. At the end of the simulation, the total molecular solvent accessible surface area of 5-FU tablets increased by 60 times more than that of ilomastat as a result of tablet swelling and release of molecules into solution. The tablet dissolution pattern shown in our molecular dynamic simulations tends to correlate with experimental release profiles. This work indicates that a series of molecular dynamic simulations can be used to predict the influence of the molecular properties of a drug on its dissolution profile and could be useful during preformulation where sufficient amounts of the drug are not always available to perform dissolution studies.

  9. Understanding Modularity in Molecular Networks Requires Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Roger P.; Kim, Philip M.; Emonet, Thierry; Gerstein, Mark B.

    2014-01-01

    The era of genome sequencing has produced long lists of the molecular parts from which cellular machines are constructed. A fundamental goal in systems biology is to understand how cellular behavior emerges from the interaction in time and space of genetically encoded molecular parts, as well as non-genetically encoded small molecules. Networks provide a natural framework for the organization and quantitative representation of all the available data about molecular interactions. The structural and dynamic properties of molecular networks have been the subject of intense research. Despite major advances, bridging network structure to dynamics – and therefore to behavior – remains challenging. A key concept of modern engineering that recurs in the functional analysis of biological networks is modularity. Most approaches to molecular network analysis rely to some extent on the assumption that molecular networks are modular – that is, they are separable and can be studied to some degree in isolation. We describe recent advances in the analysis of modularity in biological networks, focusing on the increasing realization that a dynamic perspective is essential to grouping molecules into modules and determining their collective function. PMID:19638611

  10. Numerical methods for molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Skeel, R.D.

    1991-01-01

    This report summarizes our research progress to date on the use of multigrid methods for three-dimensional elliptic partial differential equations, with particular emphasis on application to the Poisson-Boltzmann equation of molecular biophysics. This research is motivated by the need for fast and accurate numerical solution techniques for three-dimensional problems arising in physics and engineering. In many applications these problems must be solved repeatedly, and the extremely large number of discrete unknowns required to accurately approximate solutions to partial differential equations in three-dimensional regions necessitates the use of efficient solution methods. This situation makes clear the importance of developing methods which are of optimal order (or nearly so), meaning that the number of operations required to solve the discrete problem is on the order of the number of discrete unknowns. Multigrid methods are generally regarded as being in this class of methods, and are in fact provably optimal order for an increasingly large class of problems. The fundamental goal of this research is to develop a fast and accurate numerical technique, based on multi-level principles, for the solutions of the Poisson-Boltzmann equation of molecular biophysics and similar equations occurring in other applications. An outline of the report is as follows. We first present some background material, followed by a survey of the literature on the use of multigrid methods for solving problems similar to the Poisson-Boltzmann equation. A short description of the software we have developed so far is then given, and numerical results are discussed. Finally, our research plans for the coming year are presented.

  11. Semiclassical guided optimal control of molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Kondorskiy, A.; Mil'nikov, G.; Nakamura, H.

    2005-10-15

    An efficient semiclassical optimal control theory applicable to multidimensional systems is formulated for controlling wave packet dynamics on a single adiabatic potential energy surface. The approach combines advantages of different formulations of optimal control theory: quantum and classical on one hand and global and local on the other. Numerical applications to the control of HCN-CNH isomerization demonstrate that this theory can provide an efficient tool to manipulate molecular dynamics of many degrees of freedom by laser pulses.

  12. Event scale variability of mixed alluvial-bedrock channel dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Kristen; Turowski, Jens; Hovius, Niels

    2015-04-01

    between sediment supply, channel width, and flood characteristics on aggradation and erosion of the channel bed. Heimann, F. U. M., Rickenmann, D., Turowski, J. M., and Kirchner, J. W.: sedFlow - an efficient tool for simulating bedload transport, bed roughness, and longitudinal profile evolution in mountain streams, Earth Surf. Dynam. Discuss., 2, 733-772, doi:10.5194/esurfd-2-733-2014, 2014.

  13. Isolating strong-field dynamics in molecular systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orenstein, Gal; Pedatzur, Oren; Uzan, Ayelet J.; Bruner, Barry D.; Mairesse, Yann; Dudovich, Nirit

    2017-05-01

    Strong-field ionization followed by recollision provides a unique pump-probe measurement which reveals a range of electronic processes, combining sub-Angstrom spatial and attosecond temporal resolution. A major limitation of this approach is imposed by the coupling between the spatial and temporal degrees of freedom. In this paper we focus on the study of high harmonic generation and demonstrate the ability to isolate the internal dynamics—decoupling the temporal information from the spatial one. By applying an in situ approach we reveal the universality of the intrinsic pump-probe measurement and establish its validity in molecular systems. When several orbitals are involved we identify the fingerprint of the transition from the single-channel case into the multiple-channel dynamics, where complex multielectron phenomena are expected to be observed.

  14. Photodissociation of vinyl cyanide at 193 nm: Nascent product distributions of the molecular elimination channels

    SciTech Connect

    Wilhelm, Michael J.; Nikow, Matthew; Letendre, Laura; Dai Hailung

    2009-01-28

    The photodissociation dynamics of vinyl cyanide (H{sub 2}CCHCN, acrylonitrile) and deuterated vinyl cyanide (D{sub 2}CCDCN) at 193 nm are examined using time-resolved Fourier transform infrared emission spectroscopy. Prior photofragment translational spectroscopy studies [D. A. Blank et al., J. Chem. Phys. 108, 5784 (1998)] of the dissociation have observed the presence of four main dissociation channels; two molecular and two radical in nature. However, with the exception of a<0.01 quantum yield determined for the CN radical loss channel, the branching ratios of the remaining three elimination channels were not measured. The time-resolved emission spectra, including those from the deuterated samples, revealed the presence of acetylene, hydrogen cyanide (HCN), as well as the energetically less stable isomer hydrogen isocyanide (HNC). Acetylene is found in two distinct energetic distributions, suggesting that both three- and four-centered elimination reactions are occurring significantly in the dissociation. In contrast to prior ab initio studies that have suggested the dominant nature of the three-center elimination of molecular hydrogen (H{sub 2}) and cyanovinylidene (:C=CHCN), we find this reaction channel to be of little importance as there is no evidence to support any significant presence of rovibrationally excited cyanoacetylene. Spectral modeling of the product distributions allows for the first experimental determination of the relative occurrence of the three-centered (resulting in HCN+vinylidene) versus four-centered (HNC+acetylene) elimination channels as 3.34 to 1.00, in contrast to the previously calculated value of 126:1. Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus analysis depicts that the transition state energy of the four-centered reaction should be about 10 kcal mole{sup -1} lower than the three-centered reaction.

  15. Multi-Dielectric Brownian Dynamics and Design-Space-Exploration Studies of Permeation in Ion Channels.

    PubMed

    Siksik, May; Krishnamurthy, Vikram

    2017-09-01

    This paper proposes a multi-dielectric Brownian dynamics simulation framework for design-space-exploration (DSE) studies of ion-channel permeation. The goal of such DSE studies is to estimate the channel modeling-parameters that minimize the mean-squared error between the simulated and expected "permeation characteristics." To address this computational challenge, we use a methodology based on statistical inference that utilizes the knowledge of channel structure to prune the design space. We demonstrate the proposed framework and DSE methodology using a case study based on the KcsA ion channel, in which the design space is successfully reduced from a 6-D space to a 2-D space. Our results show that the channel dielectric map computed using the framework matches with that computed directly using molecular dynamics with an error of 7%. Finally, the scalability and resolution of the model used are explored, and it is shown that the memory requirements needed for DSE remain constant as the number of parameters (degree of heterogeneity) increases.

  16. Rigid body Brownian dynamics as a tool for studying ion channel blockers.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Dan; Chen, Rong; Ho, Junming; Coote, Michelle L; Chung, Shin-Ho

    2012-02-16

    Using a novel rigid body Brownian dynamics algorithm, we investigate how a spherically asymmetrical polyamine molecule, a branched analogue of spermine, interacts with the external vestibule of the voltage-gated potassium channel, Kv1.2. Simulations reveal that the blocker, with a charge of +4e, inserts one of its charged amine groups into the selectivity filter, while another forms a salt bridge with an aspartate residue located just outside the entrance of the pore. This binding mode mimics features of the binding of polypeptides such as the scorpion venom charybdotoxin to the channel. The potential of mean force constructed with Brownian dynamics is a reasonable match to that obtained from molecular dynamics simulations, with dissociation constants of 4.7 and 22 μM, respectively. The current-voltage relationships obtained with and without a blocker in the external reservoir show that the inward current is severely attenuated by the presence of the blocker, whereas the outward current is only moderately reduced. The computational molecular modeling technique we introduce here can provide detailed insights into ligand-channel interactions and can be used for rapidly screening potential blocker molecules.

  17. Analysis of molecular oxygen exit pathways in cyanobacterial photosystem II: Molecular dynamics studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabdulkhakov, A. G.; Kljashtorny, V. G.; Dontsova, M. V.

    2015-11-01

    In thylakoids of cyanobacteria and other photosynthetic organisms, the light-induced production of molecular oxygen is catalyzed by the giant lipid-pigment-protein complex called photosystem II (PSII). The oxygen-evolving complex is buried deep in the lumenal part of PSII, and dioxygen molecules need to pass through the protein environment in order to leave the active site of the enzyme free. Previous studies aimed at finding oxygen channels in PSII were based on either an analysis of the cavities within is static structure or experiments on the insertion of noble gas molecules into PSII crystals under elevated pressure. In these studies, some possible exit pathways for the molecules were found and the static positions of molecular oxygen were determined. In the present work, the oxygen movement in the transport system of PSII is simulated by molecular dynamics.

  18. Mechanisms of molecular transport through the urea channel of Helicobacter pylori

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNulty, Reginald; Ulmschneider, Jakob P.; Luecke, Hartmut; Ulmschneider, Martin B.

    2013-12-01

    Helicobacter pylori survival in acidic environments relies on cytoplasmic hydrolysis of gastric urea into ammonia and carbon dioxide, which buffer the pathogen’s periplasm. Urea uptake is greatly enhanced and regulated by HpUreI, a proton-gated inner membrane channel protein essential for gastric survival of H. pylori. The crystal structure of HpUreI describes a static snapshot of the channel with two constriction sites near the center of the bilayer that are too narrow to allow passage of urea or even water. Here we describe the urea transport mechanism at atomic resolution, revealed by unrestrained microsecond equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of the hexameric channel assembly. Two consecutive constrictions open to allow conduction of urea, which is guided through the channel by interplay between conserved residues that determine proton rejection and solute selectivity. Remarkably, HpUreI conducts water at rates equivalent to aquaporins, which might be essential for efficient transport of urea at small concentration gradients.

  19. Mechanisms of molecular transport through the urea channel of Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    McNulty, Reginald; Ulmschneider, Jakob P.; Luecke, Hartmut; Ulmschneider, Martin B.

    2013-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori survival in acidic environments relies on cytoplasmic hydrolysis of gastric urea into ammonia and carbon dioxide, which buffer the pathogen’s periplasm. Urea uptake is greatly enhanced and regulated by HpUreI, a proton-gated inner membrane channel protein essential for gastric survival of H. pylori. The crystal structure of HpUreI describes a static snapshot of the channel with two constriction sites near the center of the bilayer that are too narrow to allow passage of urea or even water. Here we describe the urea transport mechanism at atomic resolution, revealed by unrestrained microsecond equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of the hexameric channel assembly. Two consecutive constrictions open to allow conduction of urea, which is guided through the channel by interplay between conserved residues that determine proton rejection and solute selectivity. Remarkably, HpUreI conducts water at rates equivalent to aquaporins, which might be essential for efficient transport of urea at small concentration gradients. PMID:24305683

  20. The dynamics of Bax channel formation: influence of ionic strength.

    PubMed

    Ganesan, Vidyaramanan; Walsh, Timothy; Chang, Kai-Ti; Colombini, Marco

    2012-08-08

    Mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization (MOMP) is a complex multistep process. Studies of MOMP in vivo are limited by the stochastic variability of MOMP between cells and rapid completion of IMS protein release within single cells. In vitro models have provided useful insights into MOMP. We have investigated the dynamics of Bax-mediated MOMP in isolated mitochondria using ionic strength as a tool to control the rate of MOMP. We find that Bax can induce both transient permeabilization, detected by protein release, and more substantial long-lasting permeabilization, measured by the rate of oxidation of added cytochrome c. We found that higher ionic strength causes Bax to form small channels quickly but the expansion of these early channels is impeded. This inhibitory effect of ionic strength is independent of tBid. Channels formed under low ionic strength are not destabilized by raising the ionic strength. Increase in ionic strength also increases the ability of Bcl-xL to inhibit Bax-mediated MOMP. Ionic strength does not affect Bax insertion into mitochondria. Thus, ionic strength influences the assembly of Bax molecules already in membrane into channels. Ionic strength can be used as an effective biophysical tool to study Bax-mediated channel formation.

  1. Evaluation of Dynamic Channel and Power Assignment for Cognitive Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Syed A. Ahmad; Umesh Shukla; Ryan E. Irwin; Luiz A. DaSilva; Allen B. MacKenzie

    2011-03-01

    In this paper, we develop a unifying optimization formulation to describe the Dynamic Channel and Power Assignment (DCPA) problem and evaluation method for comparing DCPA algorithms. DCPA refers to the allocation of transmit power and frequency channels to links in a cognitive network so as to maximize the total number of feasible links while minimizing the aggregate transmit power. We apply our evaluation method to five algorithms representative of DCPA used in literature. This comparison illustrates the tradeoffs between control modes (centralized versus distributed) and channel/power assignment techniques. We estimate the complexity of each algorithm. Through simulations, we evaluate the effectiveness of the algorithms in achieving feasible link allocations in the network, as well as their power efficiency. Our results indicate that, when few channels are available, the effectiveness of all algorithms is comparable and thus the one with smallest complexity should be selected. The Least Interfering Channel and Iterative Power Assignment (LICIPA) algorithm does not require cross-link gain information, has the overall lowest run time, and highest feasibility ratio of all the distributed algorithms; however, this comes at a cost of higher average power per link.

  2. Reaction dynamics in polyatomic molecular systems

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, W.H.

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this program is the development of theoretical methods and models for describing the dynamics of chemical reactions, with specific interest for application to polyatomic molecular systems of special interest and relevance. There is interest in developing the most rigorous possible theoretical approaches and also in more approximate treatments that are more readily applicable to complex systems.

  3. Cooperative Nature of Gating Transitions in K+ Channels as seen from Dynamic Importance Sampling Calculations

    PubMed Central

    Denning, Elizabeth J.; Woolf, Thomas B.

    2009-01-01

    The growing dataset of K+ channel x-ray structures provides an excellent opportunity to begin a detailed molecular understanding of voltage-dependent gating. These structures, while differing in sequence, represent either a stable open or closed state. However, an understanding of the molecular details of gating will require models for the transitions and experimentally testable predictions for the gating transition. To explore these ideas, we apply Dynamic Importance Sampling (DIMS) to a set of homology models for the molecular conformations of K+ channels for four different sets of sequences and eight different states. In our results, we highlight the importance of particular residues upstream from the PVP region to the gating transition. This supports growing evidence that the PVP region is important for influencing the flexibility of the S6 helix and thus the opening of the gating domain. The results further suggest how gating on the molecular level depends on intra-subunit motions to influence the cooperative behavior of all four subunits of the K+ channel. We hypothesize that the gating process occurs in steps: first sidechain movement, then inter- S5-S6 subunit motions, and lastly the large-scale domain rearrangements. PMID:19950367

  4. Multi-channel electronic and vibrational dynamics in polyatomic resonant high-order harmonic generation

    PubMed Central

    Ferré, A.; Boguslavskiy, A. E.; Dagan, M.; Blanchet, V.; Bruner, B. D.; Burgy, F.; Camper, A.; Descamps, D.; Fabre, B.; Fedorov, N.; Gaudin, J.; Geoffroy, G.; Mikosch, J.; Patchkovskii, S.; Petit, S.; Ruchon, T.; Soifer, H.; Staedter, D.; Wilkinson, I.; Stolow, A.; Dudovich, N.; Mairesse, Y.

    2015-01-01

    High-order harmonic generation in polyatomic molecules generally involves multiple channels of ionization. Their relative contribution can be strongly influenced by the presence of resonances, whose assignment remains a major challenge for high-harmonic spectroscopy. Here we present a multi-modal approach for the investigation of unaligned polyatomic molecules, using SF6 as an example. We combine methods from extreme-ultraviolet spectroscopy, above-threshold ionization and attosecond metrology. Fragment-resolved above-threshold ionization measurements reveal that strong-field ionization opens at least three channels. A shape resonance in one of them is found to dominate the signal in the 20–26 eV range. This resonance induces a phase jump in the harmonic emission, a switch in the polarization state and different dynamical responses to molecular vibrations. This study demonstrates a method for extending high-harmonic spectroscopy to polyatomic molecules, where complex attosecond dynamics are expected. PMID:25608712

  5. Multi-channel electronic and vibrational dynamics in polyatomic resonant high-order harmonic generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferré, A.; Boguslavskiy, A. E.; Dagan, M.; Blanchet, V.; Bruner, B. D.; Burgy, F.; Camper, A.; Descamps, D.; Fabre, B.; Fedorov, N.; Gaudin, J.; Geoffroy, G.; Mikosch, J.; Patchkovskii, S.; Petit, S.; Ruchon, T.; Soifer, H.; Staedter, D.; Wilkinson, I.; Stolow, A.; Dudovich, N.; Mairesse, Y.

    2015-01-01

    High-order harmonic generation in polyatomic molecules generally involves multiple channels of ionization. Their relative contribution can be strongly influenced by the presence of resonances, whose assignment remains a major challenge for high-harmonic spectroscopy. Here we present a multi-modal approach for the investigation of unaligned polyatomic molecules, using SF6 as an example. We combine methods from extreme-ultraviolet spectroscopy, above-threshold ionization and attosecond metrology. Fragment-resolved above-threshold ionization measurements reveal that strong-field ionization opens at least three channels. A shape resonance in one of them is found to dominate the signal in the 20-26 eV range. This resonance induces a phase jump in the harmonic emission, a switch in the polarization state and different dynamical responses to molecular vibrations. This study demonstrates a method for extending high-harmonic spectroscopy to polyatomic molecules, where complex attosecond dynamics are expected.

  6. Adaptively restrained molecular dynamics in LAMMPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kant Singh, Krishna; Redon, Stephane

    2017-07-01

    Adaptively restrained molecular dynamics (ARMD) is a recently introduced particles simulation method that switches positional degrees of freedom on and off during simulation in order to speed up calculations. In the NVE ensemble, ARMD allows users to trade between precision and speed while, in the NVT ensemble, it makes it possible to compute statistical averages faster. Despite the conceptual simplicity of the approach, however, integrating it in existing molecular dynamics packages is non-trivial, in particular since implemented potentials should a priori be rewritten to take advantage of frozen particles and achieve a speed-up. In this paper, we present novel algorithms for integrating ARMD in LAMMPS, a popular multi-purpose molecular simulation package. In particular, we demonstrate how to enable ARMD in LAMMPS without having to re-implement all available force fields. The proposed algorithms are assessed on four different benchmarks, and show how they allow us to speed up simulations up to one order of magnitude.

  7. Excited State Quantum-Classical Molecular Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krstic, Predrag

    2005-05-01

    The development of a new theoretical, algorithmic, and computational framework is reported describing the corresponding excited state many-body dynamics by applying multiphysics described by classical equations of motion for nuclei and Hartree-Fock/Multi-Configuration Hartree-Fock and multiresolution techniques for solving the quantum part of the problem (i.e. the motion of the electrons). We primarily have in mind reactive and electron-transition dynamics which involves molecular clusters, containing hundreds of atoms, perturbed by a slow ionic/atomic/molecular projectile, with possible applications in plasma-surface interactions, cluster physics, chemistry and biotechnology. The validation of the developed technique is performed at three-body systems. Application to the transition dynamics in small carbon clusters and hydrocarbons perturbed by slow carbon ions resolves some long-standing issues in the ion-surface interactions in fusion tokamaks.

  8. On the putative binding site of RFamide-family neuropeptides from the western Atlantic clam Sunray Venus and cephalopods on acid-sensing ion channels. An automated docking and molecular-dynamics study with hASIC1a homology model.

    PubMed

    Pietra, Francesco

    2011-05-01

    Investigated here are interactions of C-terminal amidated peptides with the hASIC1a acid-sensing ion channel. The peptides comprise endogenous FMRFa, present in the western Atlantic clam Sunray Venus, and FIRFa, present in cephalopods, as well as non-endogenous ones for comparison. The interaction is investigated by automated docking. The resulting key hASIC1a-FMRFa complex, set in a lipidic POPC (=1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) membrane surrounded by H(2) O and Na(+) -neutralized, was also investigated by molecular dynamics. It was observed that all investigated peptides become encapsulated into the ion channel, on one side by the thumb and finger of a subunit, and, on the opposite side, by the knuckle and β-ball of a second subunit. The third subunit is not involved. This is much the same binding site that was disclosed previously by both a similar computational approach, and electrophysiological and binding experiments for the hASIC1a ion channel-blocker tarantula toxin PCTX1. This paves the way to a better understanding of the role of these peptides in invertebrates.

  9. Molecular mechanism of H+ conduction in the single-file water chain of the gramicidin channel.

    PubMed Central

    Pomès, Régis; Roux, Benoît

    2002-01-01

    The conduction of protons in the hydrogen-bonded chain of water molecules (or "proton wire") embedded in the lumen of gramicidin A is studied with molecular dynamics free energy simulations. The process may be described as a "hop-and-turn" or Grotthuss mechanism involving the chemical exchange (hop) of hydrogen nuclei between hydrogen-bonded water molecules arranged in single file in the lumen of the pore, and the subsequent reorganization (turn) of the hydrogen-bonded network. Accordingly, the conduction cycle is modeled by two complementary steps corresponding respectively to the translocation 1) of an ionic defect (H+) and 2) of a bonding defect along the hydrogen-bonded chain of water molecules in the pore interior. The molecular mechanism and the potential of mean force are analyzed for each of these two translocation steps. It is found that the mobility of protons in gramicidin A is essentially determined by the fine structure and the dynamic fluctuations of the hydrogen-bonded network. The translocation of H+ is mediated by spontaneous (thermal) fluctuations in the relative positions of oxygen atoms in the wire. In this diffusive mechanism, a shallow free-energy well slightly favors the presence of the excess proton near the middle of the channel. In the absence of H+, the water chain adopts either one of two polarized configurations, each of which corresponds to an oriented donor-acceptor hydrogen-bond pattern along the channel axis. Interconversion between these two conformations is an activated process that occurs through the sequential and directional reorientation of water molecules of the wire. The effect of hydrogen-bonding interactions between channel and water on proton translocation is analyzed from a comparison to the results obtained previously in a study of model nonpolar channels, in which such interactions were missing. Hydrogen-bond donation from water to the backbone carbonyl oxygen atoms lining the pore interior has a dual effect: it

  10. Molecular dynamics study of the M412 intermediate of bacteriorhodopsin.

    PubMed Central

    Xu, D; Sheves, M; Schulten, K

    1995-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been carried out to study the M412 intermediate of bacteriorhodopsin's (bR) photocycle. The simulations start from two simulated structures for the L550 intermediate of the photocycle, one involving a 13-cis retinal with strong torsions, the other a 13,14-dicis retinal, from which the M412 intermediate is initiated through proton transfer to Asp-85. The simulations are based on a refined structure of bR568 obtained through all-atom molecular dynamics simulations and placement of 16 waters inside the protein. The structures of the L550 intermediates were obtained through simulated photoisomerization and subsequent molecular dynamics, and simulated annealing. Our simulations reveal that the M412 intermediate actually comprises a series of conformations involving 1) a motion of retinal; 2) protein conformational changes; and 3) diffusion and reconfiguration of water in the space between the retinal Schiff base nitrogen and the Asp-96 side group. (1) turns the retinal Schiff base nitrogen from an early orientation toward Asp-85 to a late orientation toward Asp-96; (2) disconnects the hydrogen bond network between retinal and Asp-85 and tilts the helix F of bR, enlarging bR's cytoplasmic channel; (3) adds two water molecules to the three water molecules existing in the cytoplasmic channel at the bR568 stage and forms a proton conduction pathway. The conformational change (2) of the protein involves a 60 degrees bent of the cytoplasmic side of helix F and is induced through a break of a hydrogen bond between Tyr-185 and a water-side group complex in the counterion region. Images FIGURE 3 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 FIGURE 12 FIGURE 14 FIGURE 15 FIGURE 16 PMID:8599681

  11. Permeation properties of the hair cell mechanotransducer channel provide insight into its molecular structure

    PubMed Central

    Pan, B.; Waguespack, J.; Schnee, M. E.; LeBlanc, C.

    2012-01-01

    Mechanoelectric transducer (MET) channels, located near stereocilia tips, are opened by deflecting the hair bundle of sensory hair cells. Defects in this process result in deafness. Despite this critical function, the molecular identity of MET channels remains a mystery. Inherent channel properties, particularly those associated with permeation, provide the backbone for the molecular identification of ion channels. Here, a novel channel rectification mechanism is identified, resulting in a reduced pore size at positive potentials. The apparent difference in pore dimensions results from Ca2+ binding within the pore, occluding permeation. Driving force for permeation at hyperpolarized potentials is increased because Ca2+ can more easily be removed from binding within the pore due to the presence of an electronegative external vestibule that dehydrates and concentrates permeating ions. Alterations in Ca2+ binding may underlie tonotopic and Ca2+-dependent variations in channel conductance. This Ca2+-dependent rectification provides targets for identifying the molecular components of the MET channel. PMID:22323630

  12. Computationally Efficient Multiconfigurational Reactive Molecular Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Takefumi; Peng, Yuxing; Knight, Chris; Voth, Gregory A

    2012-12-11

    It is a computationally demanding task to explicitly simulate the electronic degrees of freedom in a system to observe the chemical transformations of interest, while at the same time sampling the time and length scales required to converge statistical properties and thus reduce artifacts due to initial conditions, finite-size effects, and limited sampling. One solution that significantly reduces the computational expense consists of molecular models in which effective interactions between particles govern the dynamics of the system. If the interaction potentials in these models are developed to reproduce calculated properties from electronic structure calculations and/or ab initio molecular dynamics simulations, then one can calculate accurate properties at a fraction of the computational cost. Multiconfigurational algorithms model the system as a linear combination of several chemical bonding topologies to simulate chemical reactions, also sometimes referred to as "multistate". These algorithms typically utilize energy and force calculations already found in popular molecular dynamics software packages, thus facilitating their implementation without significant changes to the structure of the code. However, the evaluation of energies and forces for several bonding topologies per simulation step can lead to poor computational efficiency if redundancy is not efficiently removed, particularly with respect to the calculation of long-ranged Coulombic interactions. This paper presents accurate approximations (effective long-range interaction and resulting hybrid methods) and multiple-program parallelization strategies for the efficient calculation of electrostatic interactions in reactive molecular simulations.

  13. Computationally Efficient Multiconfigurational Reactive Molecular Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Takefumi; Peng, Yuxing; Knight, Chris; Voth, Gregory A.

    2012-01-01

    It is a computationally demanding task to explicitly simulate the electronic degrees of freedom in a system to observe the chemical transformations of interest, while at the same time sampling the time and length scales required to converge statistical properties and thus reduce artifacts due to initial conditions, finite-size effects, and limited sampling. One solution that significantly reduces the computational expense consists of molecular models in which effective interactions between particles govern the dynamics of the system. If the interaction potentials in these models are developed to reproduce calculated properties from electronic structure calculations and/or ab initio molecular dynamics simulations, then one can calculate accurate properties at a fraction of the computational cost. Multiconfigurational algorithms model the system as a linear combination of several chemical bonding topologies to simulate chemical reactions, also sometimes referred to as “multistate”. These algorithms typically utilize energy and force calculations already found in popular molecular dynamics software packages, thus facilitating their implementation without significant changes to the structure of the code. However, the evaluation of energies and forces for several bonding topologies per simulation step can lead to poor computational efficiency if redundancy is not efficiently removed, particularly with respect to the calculation of long-ranged Coulombic interactions. This paper presents accurate approximations (effective long-range interaction and resulting hybrid methods) and multiple-program parallelization strategies for the efficient calculation of electrostatic interactions in reactive molecular simulations. PMID:25100924

  14. Importance of Hydration and Dynamics on the Selectivity of the KcsA and NaK Channels

    PubMed Central

    Noskov, Sergei Yu.; Roux, Benoît

    2007-01-01

    Fundamental concepts governing ion selectivity in narrow pores are reviewed and the microscopic factors responsible for the lack of selectivity of the NaK channel, which is structurally similar to the K+-selective KcsA channel, are elucidated on the basis of all-atom molecular dynamics free energy simulations. The results on NaK are contrasted and compared with previous studies of the KcsA channel. Analysis indicates that differences in hydration of the cation in the pore of NaK is at the origin of the lack of selectivity of NaK. PMID:17227917

  15. Importance of hydration and dynamics on the selectivity of the KcsA and NaK channels.

    PubMed

    Noskov, Sergei Yu; Roux, Benoît

    2007-02-01

    Fundamental concepts governing ion selectivity in narrow pores are reviewed and the microscopic factors responsible for the lack of selectivity of the NaK channel, which is structurally similar to the K+-selective KcsA channel, are elucidated on the basis of all-atom molecular dynamics free energy simulations. The results on NaK are contrasted and compared with previous studies of the KcsA channel. Analysis indicates that differences in hydration of the cation in the pore of NaK is at the origin of the lack of selectivity of NaK.

  16. Origin of the Shape of Current-Voltage Curve through Nanopores: A Molecular Dynamics Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumikama, Takashi

    2016-05-01

    Ion transports through ion channels, biological nanopores, are essential for life: Living cells generate electrical signals by utilizing ion permeation through channels. The measured current-voltage (i-V) relations through most ion channels are sublinear, however, its physical meaning is still elusive. Here we calculated the i-V curves through anion-doped carbon nanotubes, a model of an ion channel, using molecular dynamics simulation. It was found the i-V curve reflects the physical origin of the rate-determining step: the i-V curve is sublinear when the permeation is entropy bottlenecked, while it is superlinear in the case of the energy bottlenecked permeation. Based on this finding, we discuss the relation between the molecular mechanism of ion permeation through the biological K+ channels and the shape of the i-V curves through them. This work also provides a clue for a novel design of nanopores that show current rectification.

  17. Origin of the Shape of Current-Voltage Curve through Nanopores: A Molecular Dynamics Study

    PubMed Central

    Sumikama, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Ion transports through ion channels, biological nanopores, are essential for life: Living cells generate electrical signals by utilizing ion permeation through channels. The measured current-voltage (i-V) relations through most ion channels are sublinear, however, its physical meaning is still elusive. Here we calculated the i-V curves through anion-doped carbon nanotubes, a model of an ion channel, using molecular dynamics simulation. It was found the i-V curve reflects the physical origin of the rate-determining step: the i-V curve is sublinear when the permeation is entropy bottlenecked, while it is superlinear in the case of the energy bottlenecked permeation. Based on this finding, we discuss the relation between the molecular mechanism of ion permeation through the biological K+ channels and the shape of the i-V curves through them. This work also provides a clue for a novel design of nanopores that show current rectification. PMID:27167118

  18. Dynamic assembly of molecularly imprinted polymer nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Gong, Haiyue; Hajizadeh, Solmaz; Jiang, Lingdong; Ma, Huiting; Ye, Lei

    2017-09-11

    Manipulation of specific binding and recycling of materials are two important aspects for practical applications of molecularly imprinted polymers. In this work, we developed a new approach to control the dynamic assembly of molecularly imprinted nanoparticles by surface functionalization. Molecularly imprinted polymer nanoparticles with a well-controlled core-shell structure were synthesized using precipitation polymerization. The specific binding sites were created in the core during the first step imprinting reaction. In the second polymerization step, epoxide groups were introduced into the particle shell to act asan intermediate linker to immobilize phenylboronic acids, as well as to introduce cis-diol structures on surface. The imprinted polymer nanoparticles modified with boronic acid and cis-diol structures maintained high molecular binding specificity, and the nanoparticles could be induced to form dynamic particle aggregation that responded to pH variation and chemical stimuli. The possibility of modulating molecular binding and nanoparticle assembly in a mutually independent fashion can be exploited in a number of applications where repeated use of precious nanoparticles is needed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Dynamic strength of molecular adhesion bonds.

    PubMed

    Evans, E; Ritchie, K

    1997-04-01

    In biology, molecular linkages at, within, and beneath cell interfaces arise mainly from weak noncovalent interactions. These bonds will fail under any level of pulling force if held for sufficient time. Thus, when tested with ultrasensitive force probes, we expect cohesive material strength and strength of adhesion at interfaces to be time- and loading rate-dependent properties. To examine what can be learned from measurements of bond strength, we have extended Kramers' theory for reaction kinetics in liquids to bond dissociation under force and tested the predictions by smart Monte Carlo (Brownian dynamics) simulations of bond rupture. By definition, bond strength is the force that produces the most frequent failure in repeated tests of breakage, i.e., the peak in the distribution of rupture forces. As verified by the simulations, theory shows that bond strength progresses through three dynamic regimes of loading rate. First, bond strength emerges at a critical rate of loading (> or = 0) at which spontaneous dissociation is just frequent enough to keep the distribution peak at zero force. In the slow-loading regime immediately above the critical rate, strength grows as a weak power of loading rate and reflects initial coupling of force to the bonding potential. At higher rates, there is crossover to a fast regime in which strength continues to increase as the logarithm of the loading rate over many decades independent of the type of attraction. Finally, at ultrafast loading rates approaching the domain of molecular dynamics simulations, the bonding potential is quickly overwhelmed by the rapidly increasing force, so that only naked frictional drag on the structure remains to retard separation. Hence, to expose the energy landscape that governs bond strength, molecular adhesion forces must be examined over an enormous span of time scales. However, a significant gap exists between the time domain of force measurements in the laboratory and the extremely fast scale

  20. Dynamic propagation channel characterization and modeling for human body communication.

    PubMed

    Nie, Zedong; Ma, Jingjing; Li, Zhicheng; Chen, Hong; Wang, Lei

    2012-12-18

    This paper presents the first characterization and modeling of dynamic propagation channels for human body communication (HBC). In-situ experiments were performed using customized transceivers in an anechoic chamber. Three HBC propagation channels, i.e., from right leg to left leg, from right hand to left hand and from right hand to left leg, were investigated under thirty-three motion scenarios. Snapshots of data (2,800,000) were acquired from five volunteers. Various path gains caused by different locations and movements were quantified and the statistical distributions were estimated. In general, for a given reference threshold è = -10 dB, the maximum average level crossing rate of the HBC was approximately 1.99 Hz, the maximum average fade time was 59.4 ms, and the percentage of bad channel duration time was less than 4.16%. The HBC exhibited a fade depth of -4 dB at 90% complementary cumulative probability. The statistical parameters were observed to be centered for each propagation channel. Subsequently a Fritchman model was implemented to estimate the burst characteristics of the on-body fading. It was concluded that the HBC is motion-insensitive, which is sufficient for reliable communication link during motions, and therefore it has great potential for body sensor/area networks.

  1. Accurate Langevin approaches to simulate Markovian channel dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yandong; Rüdiger, Sten; Shuai, Jianwei

    2015-12-01

    The stochasticity of ion-channels dynamic is significant for physiological processes on neuronal cell membranes. Microscopic simulations of the ion-channel gating with Markov chains can be considered to be an accurate standard. However, such Markovian simulations are computationally demanding for membrane areas of physiologically relevant sizes, which makes the noise-approximating or Langevin equation methods advantageous in many cases. In this review, we discuss the Langevin-like approaches, including the channel-based and simplified subunit-based stochastic differential equations proposed by Fox and Lu, and the effective Langevin approaches in which colored noise is added to deterministic differential equations. In the framework of Fox and Lu’s classical models, several variants of numerical algorithms, which have been recently developed to improve accuracy as well as efficiency, are also discussed. Through the comparison of different simulation algorithms of ion-channel noise with the standard Markovian simulation, we aim to reveal the extent to which the existing Langevin-like methods approximate results using Markovian methods. Open questions for future studies are also discussed.

  2. Dynamic Propagation Channel Characterization and Modeling for Human Body Communication

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Zedong; Ma, Jingjing; Li, Zhicheng; Chen, Hong; Wang, Lei

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the first characterization and modeling of dynamic propagation channels for human body communication (HBC). In-situ experiments were performed using customized transceivers in an anechoic chamber. Three HBC propagation channels, i.e., from right leg to left leg, from right hand to left hand and from right hand to left leg, were investigated under thirty-three motion scenarios. Snapshots of data (2,800,000) were acquired from five volunteers. Various path gains caused by different locations and movements were quantified and the statistical distributions were estimated. In general, for a given reference threshold è = −10 dB, the maximum average level crossing rate of the HBC was approximately 1.99 Hz, the maximum average fade time was 59.4 ms, and the percentage of bad channel duration time was less than 4.16%. The HBC exhibited a fade depth of −4 dB at 90% complementary cumulative probability. The statistical parameters were observed to be centered for each propagation channel. Subsequently a Fritchman model was implemented to estimate the burst characteristics of the on-body fading. It was concluded that the HBC is motion-insensitive, which is sufficient for reliable communication link during motions, and therefore it has great potential for body sensor/area networks. PMID:23250278

  3. Chaotic dynamics in cardiac aggregates induced by potassium channel block

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quail, Thomas; McVicar, Nevin; Aguilar, Martin; Kim, Min-Young; Hodge, Alex; Glass, Leon; Shrier, Alvin

    2012-09-01

    Chaotic rhythms in deterministic models can arise as a consequence of changes in model parameters. We carried out experimental studies in which we induced a variety of complex rhythms in aggregates of embryonic chick cardiac cells using E-4031 (1.0-2.5 μM), a drug that blocks the hERG potassium channel. Following the addition of the drug, the regular rhythm evolved to display a spectrum of complex dynamics: irregular rhythms, bursting oscillations, doublets, and accelerated rhythms. The interbeat intervals of the irregular rhythms can be described by one-dimensional return maps consistent with chaotic dynamics. A Hodgkin-Huxley-style cardiac ionic model captured the different types of complex dynamics following blockage of the hERG mediated potassium current.

  4. Exciton dynamics in perturbed vibronic molecular aggregates

    PubMed Central

    Brüning, C.; Wehner, J.; Hausner, J.; Wenzel, M.; Engel, V.

    2015-01-01

    A site specific perturbation of a photo-excited molecular aggregate can lead to a localization of excitonic energy. We investigate this localization dynamics for laser-prepared excited states. Changing the parameters of the electric field significantly influences the exciton localization which offers the possibility for a selective control of this process. This is demonstrated for aggregates possessing a single vibrational degree of freedom per monomer unit. It is shown that the effects identified for the molecular dimer can be generalized to larger aggregates with a high density of vibronic states. PMID:26798840

  5. Three-dimensional flow dynamics of an active submarine channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumner, E. J.; Dorrell, R. M.; Peakall, J.; Darby, S. E.; Parsons, D. R.; Wynn, R.

    2012-12-01

    Field scale submarine channel gravity currents are notoriously difficult to measure and thus directly investigate due to their inaccessible location and infrequent nature, which is compounded by present sea-level high-stand. An exception to this is the almost continuous density-driven current that results from the inflow of saline Mediterranean water, via the Bosporus strait, into the Black Sea. This flow has carved a sinuous channel system in water depths of 70 to 120 m. The relatively shallow depths of the channel and the continuous nature of this current provide a rare opportunity to study three-dimensional flow dynamics and the interaction of the flow with a seafloor channel network. Thus, it provides a rare analogue for channelized dilute sediment-laden turbidity currents. Sediment erosion, transport and deposition within submarine channel bends is primarily controlled by the magnitude and direction of near bed flow. Flow around channel bends is characterized by a helical or spiralling structure. In rivers this helical flow is characterized by near-surface fluid moving toward the outer bank and near-bed fluid moving toward the inner bank. Following fierce debate over the last decade, it is now accepted that helical flow in submarine channel bends can display a variety of complex structures. Most importantly for understanding sediment transport, near bed flow can be directed towards the outer bank, which is in the opposite sense to in a river. The next challenge is to understand what the exact controls on the orientation of helical flow cells within submarine flows are, and their spatial evolution around bends. We present data from the Black Sea showing how the three-dimensional velocity and density of a submarine gravity current evolves at multiple cross sections as the flow travels around a bend. We use this data to calculate the magnitude, relative importance and interaction of centrifugal, coriolis and pressure gradients in controlling the structure of

  6. Stochastic dynamics of electrical membrane with voltage-dependent ion channel fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Hong; Zhang, Xue-Juan; Qian, Min

    2014-04-01

    A Brownian-ratchet-like stochastic theory for the electrochemical membrane system of Hodgkin-Huxley (HH) is developed. The system is characterized by a continuous variable Q_m(t) , representing mobile membrane charge density, and a discrete variable Kt representing ion channel conformational dynamics. A Nernst-Planck-Nyquist-Johnson-type equilibrium is obtained when multiple conducting ions have a common reversal potential. Detailed balance yields a previously unknown relation between the channel switching rates and membrane capacitance, bypassing an Eyring-type explicit treatment of gating charge kinetics. From a molecular structural standpoint, the membrane charge Qm is a more natural dynamic variable than the potential Vm; our formalism treats Qm-dependent conformational transition rates \\lambda_{ij} as intrinsic parameters. Therefore, in principle, \\lambda_{ij} vs. Vm is experimental-protocol-dependent, e.g., different from voltage or charge clamping measurements. For constant membrane capacitance per unit area Cm and neglecting the membrane potential induced by gating charges, V_m=Q_m/C_m , and HH's formalism is recovered. The presence of two types of ions, with different channels and reversal potentials, gives rise to a nonequilibrium steady state with positive entropy production ep. For rapidly fluctuating channels, an expression for ep is obtained.

  7. Choice of timestep in molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fincham, David

    1986-06-01

    In molecular dynamics computer simulation of liquids it is important to use as large a timestep as possible in order to sample phase space rapidly and save on computer expense. The effect of the resulting algorithm errors in the trajectories of the molecules is not well understood. An empirical investigation into this question is reported. Several simulations differing only in the timestep used are compared. It is found that much larger timesteps than usual can be employed without producing significant errors in observed thermodynamic, structural or dynamic properties.

  8. Water Transport in Aquaporins: Osmotic Permeability Matrix Analysis of Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Hashido, Masanori; Kidera, Akinori; Ikeguchi, Mitsunori

    2007-01-01

    Single-channel osmotic water permeability (pf) is a key quantity for investigating the transport capability of the water channel protein, aquaporin. However, the direct connection between the single scalar quantity pf and the channel structure remains unclear. In this study, based on molecular dynamics simulations, we propose a pf-matrix method, in which pf is decomposed into contributions from each local region of the channel. Diagonal elements of the pf matrix are equivalent to the local permeability at each region of the channel, and off-diagonal elements represent correlated motions of water molecules in different regions. Averaging both diagonal and off-diagonal elements of the pf matrix recovers pf for the entire channel; this implies that correlated motions between distantly-separated water molecules, as well as adjacent water molecules, influence the osmotic permeability. The pf matrices from molecular dynamics simulations of five aquaporins (AQP0, AQP1, AQP4, AqpZ, and GlpF) indicated that the reduction in the water correlation across the Asn-Pro-Ala region, and the small local permeability around the ar/R region, characterize the transport efficiency of water. These structural determinants in water permeation were confirmed in molecular dynamics simulations of three mutants of AqpZ, which mimic AQP1. PMID:17449664

  9. Dynamics of premixed hydrogen/air flames in mesoscale channels

    SciTech Connect

    Pizza, Gianmarco; Frouzakis, Christos E.; Boulouchos, Konstantinos; Mantzaras, John; Tomboulides, Ananias G.

    2008-10-15

    Direct numerical simulation with detailed chemistry and transport is used to study the stabilization and dynamics of lean ({phi}=0.5) premixed hydrogen/air atmospheric pressure flames in mesoscale planar channels. Channel heights of h=2, 4, and 7 mm, and inflow velocities in the range 0.3{<=}U{sub IN}{<=}1100cm/ s are investigated. Six different burning modes are identified: mild combustion, ignition/extinction, closed steady symmetric flames, open steady symmetric flames, oscillating and, finally, asymmetric flames. Chaotic behavior of cellular flame structures is observed for certain values of U{sub IN}. Stability maps delineating the regions of the different flame types are finally constructed. (author)

  10. Partial synchronization in stochastic dynamical networks with switching communication channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chi; Ho, Daniel W. C.; Lu, Jianquan; Kurths, Jürgen

    2012-06-01

    In this paper, the partial synchronization problem of stochastic dynamical networks (SDNs) is investigated. Unlike the existing models, the SDN considered in this paper suffers from a class of communication constraint—only part of nodes' states can be transmitted. Thus, less nodes' states can be used to synchronize the SDN, which makes the analysis of the synchronization problem much harder. A set of channel matrices are introduced to reflect such kind of constraint. Furthermore, due to unpredictable environmental changes, the channel matrices can switch among some communication modes. The switching considered here is governed by a Markov process. To overcome the difficulty, a regrouping method is employed to derive our main results. The obtained conditions guarantee that partial synchronization can be achieved for SDNs under switching communication constraint. Finally, numerical examples are given to illustrate the effectiveness of the theoretical results and how the communication constraint influences synchronization result.

  11. Viscoelastic droplet dynamics in a Y-shaped capillary channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuli; Do-Quang, Minh; Amberg, Gustav

    2016-03-01

    Non-Newtonian droplet dynamics commonly exist in microfluidic systems. We report simulations of viscoelastic (VE) droplets traveling in a two dimensional capillary bifurcation channel. A numerical system combining phase field method, VE rheology, and Stokes flow equations is built. As a generic microfluidic two-phase problem, we study how a non-Newtonian droplet that approaches a channel bifurcation will behave. We identify conditions for when a droplet will either split into two or be directed into one of the branches. In particular, we study the importance of the non-Newtonian properties. Our results reveal two different non-Newtonian mechanisms that can enhance splitting and non-splitting of droplets with respect to Newtonian droplets, depending on the size of droplet and capillary number.

  12. Surface Effect on Oil Transportation in Nanochannel: a Molecular Dynamics Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Haixia; Du, Yonggang; Xue, Qingzhong; Zhu, Lei; Li, Xiaofang; Lu, Shuangfang; Jin, Yakang

    2017-06-01

    In this work, we investigate the dynamics mechanism of oil transportation in nanochannel using molecular dynamics simulations. It is demonstrated that the interaction between oil molecules and nanochannel has a great effect on the transportation properties of oil in nanochannel. Because of different interactions between oil molecules and channel, the center of mass (COM) displacement of oil in a 6-nm channel is over 30 times larger than that in a 2-nm channel, and the diffusion coefficient of oil molecules at the center of a 6-nm channel is almost two times more than that near the channel surface. Besides, it is found that polarity of oil molecules has the effect on impeding oil transportation, because the electrostatic interaction between polar oil molecules and channel is far larger than that between nonpolar oil molecules and channel. In addition, channel component is found to play an important role in oil transportation in nanochannel, for example, the COM displacement of oil in gold channel is very few due to great interaction between oil and gold substrate. It is also found that nano-sized roughness of channel surface greatly influences the speed and flow pattern of oil. Our findings would contribute to revealing the mechanism of oil transportation in nanochannels and therefore are very important for design of oil extraction in nanochannels.

  13. Surface Effect on Oil Transportation in Nanochannel: a Molecular Dynamics Study.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Haixia; Du, Yonggang; Xue, Qingzhong; Zhu, Lei; Li, Xiaofang; Lu, Shuangfang; Jin, Yakang

    2017-12-01

    In this work, we investigate the dynamics mechanism of oil transportation in nanochannel using molecular dynamics simulations. It is demonstrated that the interaction between oil molecules and nanochannel has a great effect on the transportation properties of oil in nanochannel. Because of different interactions between oil molecules and channel, the center of mass (COM) displacement of oil in a 6-nm channel is over 30 times larger than that in a 2-nm channel, and the diffusion coefficient of oil molecules at the center of a 6-nm channel is almost two times more than that near the channel surface. Besides, it is found that polarity of oil molecules has the effect on impeding oil transportation, because the electrostatic interaction between polar oil molecules and channel is far larger than that between nonpolar oil molecules and channel. In addition, channel component is found to play an important role in oil transportation in nanochannel, for example, the COM displacement of oil in gold channel is very few due to great interaction between oil and gold substrate. It is also found that nano-sized roughness of channel surface greatly influences the speed and flow pattern of oil. Our findings would contribute to revealing the mechanism of oil transportation in nanochannels and therefore are very important for design of oil extraction in nanochannels.

  14. Molecular dynamics at constant Cauchy stress.

    PubMed

    Miller, Ronald E; Tadmor, Ellad B; Gibson, Joshua S; Bernstein, Noam; Pavia, Fabio

    2016-05-14

    The Parrinello-Rahman algorithm for imposing a general state of stress in periodic molecular dynamics simulations is widely used in the literature and has been implemented in many readily available molecular dynamics codes. However, what is often overlooked is that this algorithm controls the second Piola-Kirchhoff stress as opposed to the true (Cauchy) stress. This can lead to misinterpretation of simulation results because (1) the true stress that is imposed during the simulation depends on the deformation of the periodic cell, (2) the true stress is potentially very different from the imposed second Piola-Kirchhoff stress, and (3) the true stress can vary significantly during the simulation even if the imposed second Piola-Kirchhoff is constant. We propose a simple modification to the algorithm that allows the true Cauchy stress to be controlled directly. We then demonstrate the efficacy of the new algorithm with the example of martensitic phase transformations under applied stress.

  15. Molecular dynamics studies of polyurethane nanocomposite hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strankowska, J.; Piszczyk, Ł.; Strankowski, M.; Danowska, M.; Szutkowski, K.; Jurga, S.; Kwela, J.

    2013-10-01

    Polyurethane PEO-based hydrogels have a broad range of biomedical applicability. They are attractive for drug-controlled delivery systems, surgical implants and wound healing dressings. In this study, a PEO based polyurethane hydrogels containing Cloisite® 30B, an organically modified clay mineral, was synthesized. Structure of nanocomposite hydrogels was determined using XRD technique. Its molecular dynamics was studied by means of NMR spectroscopy, DMA and DSC analysis. The mechanical properties and thermal stability of the systems were improved by incorporation of clay and controlled by varying the clay content in polymeric matrix. Molecular dynamics of polymer chains depends on interaction of Cloisite® 30B nanoparticles with soft segments of polyurethanes. The characteristic nanosize effect is observed.

  16. Molecular dynamics modelling of solidification in metals

    SciTech Connect

    Boercker, D.B.; Belak, J.; Glosli, J.

    1997-12-31

    Molecular dynamics modeling is used to study the solidification of metals at high pressure and temperature. Constant pressure MD is applied to a simulation cell initially filled with both solid and molten metal. The solid/liquid interface is tracked as a function of time, and the data are used to estimate growth rates of crystallites at high pressure and temperature in Ta and Mg.

  17. Vacuum Ultraviolet Studies of Molecular Dynamics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-15

    the Journal of Chemical Physics . Vacuum Ultraviolet Studies of Molecular Dynamics Page 4 B. Quenching of S(’D) by N2...An article on this work has been published in the Journal of Chemical Physics . E. The 157 am Photodissoclation of OCS The photodissociation of OCS...angular momentum vectors are perpendicular to one another. A report of this work has been published in the Journal of Chemical Physics . Vacuum

  18. New faster CHARMM molecular dynamics engine

    PubMed Central

    Hynninen, Antti-Pekka; Crowley, Michael F

    2014-01-01

    We introduce a new faster molecular dynamics (MD) engine into the CHARMM software package. The new MD engine is faster both in serial (i.e., single CPU core) and parallel execution. Serial performance is approximately two times higher than in the previous version of CHARMM. The newly programmed parallelization method allows the MD engine to parallelize up to hundreds of CPU cores. PMID:24302199

  19. Molecular crowding and protein enzymatic dynamics.

    PubMed

    Echeverria, Carlos; Kapral, Raymond

    2012-05-21

    The effects of molecular crowding on the enzymatic conformational dynamics and transport properties of adenylate kinase are investigated. This tridomain protein undergoes large scale hinge motions in the course of its enzymatic cycle and serves as prototype for the study of crowding effects on the cyclic conformational dynamics of proteins. The study is carried out at a mesoscopic level where both the protein and the solvent in which it is dissolved are treated in a coarse grained fashion. The amino acid residues in the protein are represented by a network of beads and the solvent dynamics is described by multiparticle collision dynamics that includes effects due to hydrodynamic interactions. The system is crowded by a stationary random array of hard spherical objects. Protein enzymatic dynamics is investigated as a function of the obstacle volume fraction and size. In addition, for comparison, results are presented for a modification of the dynamics that suppresses hydrodynamic interactions. Consistent with expectations, simulations of the dynamics show that the protein prefers a closed conformation for high volume fractions. This effect becomes more pronounced as the obstacle radius decreases for a given volume fraction since the average void size in the obstacle array is smaller for smaller radii. At high volume fractions for small obstacle radii, the average enzymatic cycle time and characteristic times of internal conformational motions of the protein deviate substantially from their values in solution or in systems with small density of obstacles. The transport properties of the protein are strongly affected by molecular crowding. Diffusive motion adopts a subdiffusive character and the effective diffusion coefficients can change by more than an order of magnitude. The orientational relaxation time of the protein is also significantly altered by crowding.

  20. Molecular Dynamics, Monte Carlo Simulations, and Langevin Dynamics: A Computational Review

    PubMed Central

    Paquet, Eric; Viktor, Herna L.

    2015-01-01

    Macromolecular structures, such as neuraminidases, hemagglutinins, and monoclonal antibodies, are not rigid entities. Rather, they are characterised by their flexibility, which is the result of the interaction and collective motion of their constituent atoms. This conformational diversity has a significant impact on their physicochemical and biological properties. Among these are their structural stability, the transport of ions through the M2 channel, drug resistance, macromolecular docking, binding energy, and rational epitope design. To assess these properties and to calculate the associated thermodynamical observables, the conformational space must be efficiently sampled and the dynamic of the constituent atoms must be simulated. This paper presents algorithms and techniques that address the abovementioned issues. To this end, a computational review of molecular dynamics, Monte Carlo simulations, Langevin dynamics, and free energy calculation is presented. The exposition is made from first principles to promote a better understanding of the potentialities, limitations, applications, and interrelations of these computational methods. PMID:25785262

  1. Bead-Fourier path integral molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Sergei D; Lyubartsev, Alexander P; Laaksonen, Aatto

    2003-06-01

    Molecular dynamics formulation of Bead-Fourier path integral method for simulation of quantum systems at finite temperatures is presented. Within this scheme, both the bead coordinates and Fourier coefficients, defining the path representing the quantum particle, are treated as generalized coordinates with corresponding generalized momenta and masses. Introduction of the Fourier harmonics together with the center-of-mass thermostating scheme is shown to remove the ergodicity problem, known to pose serious difficulties in standard path integral molecular dynamics simulations. The method is tested for quantum harmonic oscillator and hydrogen atom (Coulombic potential). The simulation results are compared with the exact analytical solutions available for both these systems. Convergence of the results with respect to the number of beads and Fourier harmonics is analyzed. It was shown that addition of a few Fourier harmonics already improves the simulation results substantially, even for a relatively small number of beads. The proposed Bead-Fourier path integral molecular dynamics is a reliable and efficient alternative to simulations of quantum systems.

  2. Monoamine transporters: insights from molecular dynamics simulations

    PubMed Central

    Grouleff, Julie; Ladefoged, Lucy Kate; Koldsø, Heidi; Schiøtt, Birgit

    2015-01-01

    The human monoamine transporters (MATs) facilitate the reuptake of the neurotransmitters serotonin, dopamine, and norepinephrine from the synaptic cleft. Imbalance in monoaminergic neurotransmission is linked to various diseases including major depression, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, schizophrenia, and Parkinson’s disease. Inhibition of the MATs is thus an important strategy for treatment of such diseases. The MATs are sodium-coupled transport proteins belonging to the neurotransmitter/Na+ symporter (NSS) family, and the publication of the first high-resolution structure of a NSS family member, the bacterial leucine transporter LeuT, in 2005, proved to be a major stepping stone for understanding this family of transporters. Structural data allows for the use of computational methods to study the MATs, which in turn has led to a number of important discoveries. The process of substrate translocation across the membrane is an intrinsically dynamic process. Molecular dynamics simulations, which can provide atomistic details of molecular motion on ns to ms timescales, are therefore well-suited for studying transport processes. In this review, we outline how molecular dynamics simulations have provided insight into the large scale motions associated with transport of the neurotransmitters, as well as the presence of external and internal gates, the coupling between ion and substrate transport, and differences in the conformational changes induced by substrates and inhibitors. PMID:26528185

  3. Equipartition Principle for Internal Coordinate Molecular Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Jain, Abhinandan; Park, In-Hee; Vaidehi, Nagarajan

    2012-08-14

    The principle of equipartition of (kinetic) energy for all-atom Cartesian molecular dynamics states that each momentum phase space coordinate on the average has ½kT of kinetic energy in a canonical ensemble. This principle is used in molecular dynamics simulations to initialize velocities, and to calculate statistical properties such as entropy. Internal coordinate molecular dynamics (ICMD) models differ from Cartesian models in that the overall kinetic energy depends on the generalized coordinates and includes cross-terms. Due to this coupled structure, no such equipartition principle holds for ICMD models. In this paper we introduce non-canonical modal coordinates to recover some of the structural simplicity of Cartesian models and develop a new equipartition principle for ICMD models. We derive low-order recursive computational algorithms for transforming between the modal and physical coordinates. The equipartition principle in modal coordinates provides a rigorous method for initializing velocities in ICMD simulations thus replacing the ad hoc methods used until now. It also sets the basis for calculating conformational entropy using internal coordinates.

  4. Bead-Fourier path integral molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Sergei D.; Lyubartsev, Alexander P.; Laaksonen, Aatto

    2003-06-01

    Molecular dynamics formulation of Bead-Fourier path integral method for simulation of quantum systems at finite temperatures is presented. Within this scheme, both the bead coordinates and Fourier coefficients, defining the path representing the quantum particle, are treated as generalized coordinates with corresponding generalized momenta and masses. Introduction of the Fourier harmonics together with the center-of-mass thermostating scheme is shown to remove the ergodicity problem, known to pose serious difficulties in standard path integral molecular dynamics simulations. The method is tested for quantum harmonic oscillator and hydrogen atom (Coulombic potential). The simulation results are compared with the exact analytical solutions available for both these systems. Convergence of the results with respect to the number of beads and Fourier harmonics is analyzed. It was shown that addition of a few Fourier harmonics already improves the simulation results substantially, even for a relatively small number of beads. The proposed Bead-Fourier path integral molecular dynamics is a reliable and efficient alternative to simulations of quantum systems.

  5. Learning generative models of molecular dynamics

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    We introduce three algorithms for learning generative models of molecular structures from molecular dynamics simulations. The first algorithm learns a Bayesian-optimal undirected probabilistic model over user-specified covariates (e.g., fluctuations, distances, angles, etc). L1 reg-ularization is used to ensure sparse models and thus reduce the risk of over-fitting the data. The topology of the resulting model reveals important couplings between different parts of the protein, thus aiding in the analysis of molecular motions. The generative nature of the model makes it well-suited to making predictions about the global effects of local structural changes (e.g., the binding of an allosteric regulator). Additionally, the model can be used to sample new conformations. The second algorithm learns a time-varying graphical model where the topology and parameters change smoothly along the trajectory, revealing the conformational sub-states. The last algorithm learns a Markov Chain over undirected graphical models which can be used to study and simulate kinetics. We demonstrate our algorithms on multiple molecular dynamics trajectories. PMID:22369071

  6. Learning generative models of molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Razavian, Narges Sharif; Kamisetty, Hetunandan; Langmead, Christopher J

    2012-01-01

    We introduce three algorithms for learning generative models of molecular structures from molecular dynamics simulations. The first algorithm learns a Bayesian-optimal undirected probabilistic model over user-specified covariates (e.g., fluctuations, distances, angles, etc). L1 regularization is used to ensure sparse models and thus reduce the risk of over-fitting the data. The topology of the resulting model reveals important couplings between different parts of the protein, thus aiding in the analysis of molecular motions. The generative nature of the model makes it well-suited to making predictions about the global effects of local structural changes (e.g., the binding of an allosteric regulator). Additionally, the model can be used to sample new conformations. The second algorithm learns a time-varying graphical model where the topology and parameters change smoothly along the trajectory, revealing the conformational sub-states. The last algorithm learns a Markov Chain over undirected graphical models which can be used to study and simulate kinetics. We demonstrate our algorithms on multiple molecular dynamics trajectories.

  7. Control-volume representation of molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Smith, E R; Heyes, D M; Dini, D; Zaki, T A

    2012-05-01

    A molecular dynamics (MD) parallel to the control volume (CV) formulation of fluid mechanics is developed by integrating the formulas of Irving and Kirkwood [J. Chem. Phys. 18, 817 (1950)] over a finite cubic volume of molecular dimensions. The Lagrangian molecular system is expressed in terms of an Eulerian CV, which yields an equivalent to Reynolds' transport theorem for the discrete system. This approach casts the dynamics of the molecular system into a form that can be readily compared to the continuum equations. The MD equations of motion are reinterpreted in terms of a Lagrangian-to-control-volume (LCV) conversion function ϑ(i) for each molecule i. The LCV function and its spatial derivatives are used to express fluxes and relevant forces across the control surfaces. The relationship between the local pressures computed using the volume average [Lutsko, J. Appl. Phys. 64, 1152 (1988)] techniques and the method of planes [Todd et al., Phys. Rev. E 52, 1627 (1995)] emerges naturally from the treatment. Numerical experiments using the MD CV method are reported for equilibrium and nonequilibrium (start-up Couette flow) model liquids, which demonstrate the advantages of the formulation. The CV formulation of the MD is shown to be exactly conservative and is, therefore, ideally suited to obtain macroscopic properties from a discrete system.

  8. Molecular dynamics studies of heterogeneous dynamics and dynamic crossover in supercooled atomic liquids

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Hans C.

    2005-01-01

    Supercooled liquids near the glass transition exhibit the phenomenon of heterogeneous relaxation; at any specific time, a nominally homogeneous equilibrium fluid undergoes dynamic fluctuations in its structure on a molecular distance scale with rates that are very different in different regions of the sample. Several theoretical and simulation studies have suggested a change in the nature of the dynamics of fluids as they are supercooled, leading to the concept of a dynamic crossover that is often associated with mode coupling theory. Here, we will review the use of molecular dynamics computer simulation methods to investigate heterogeneous dynamics and dynamic crossovers in models of atomic liquids. PMID:15870201

  9. Fragment Molecular Orbital Nonadiabatic Molecular Dynamics for Condensed Phase Systems.

    PubMed

    Nebgen, Ben; Prezhdo, Oleg V

    2016-09-15

    A method for efficiently simulating nonadiabatic molecular dynamics (NAMD) of nanoscale and condensed phase systems is developed and tested. The electronic structure, including force and nonadiabatic coupling, are obtained with the fragment molecular orbital (FMO) approximation, which provides significant computational savings by splitting the system into fragments and computing electronic properties of each fragment subject to the external field due to other all other fragments. The efficiency of the developed technique is demonstrated by studying the effect of explicit solvent molecules on excited state relaxation in the Fe(CO)4 complex. The relaxation in the gas phase occurs on a 50 fs time scale, which is in excellent agreement with previously recorded femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy. Adding a solvation shell of ethanol molecules to the simulation results in an increase in the excited state lifetime to 100 fs, in agreement with recent femtosecond X-ray spectroscopy measurements.

  10. The dynamic behaviors of complementary correlations under decoherence channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Ming-Ming; Wang, Dong; Ye, Liu

    2017-01-01

    Complementary correlations can reveal the genuine quantum correlations present in a composite quantum system. Here, we explore an effective method to identify the entangled Bell diagonal states by means of Pearson correlation, one of the complementary correlations. Then, we extend this method to expose the dynamic behavior of complementary correlations under various kinds of decoherence channels. The sudden death and revival of entanglement can be explained by the idea of Pearson correlation. The threshold that is used to identify entanglement is proposed. Furthermore, we put forward a new method to expound the underlying physical mechanisms for which classical and quantum correlations suffer a sudden change in the decoherence process.

  11. The dynamic behaviors of complementary correlations under decoherence channels

    PubMed Central

    Du, Ming-Ming; Wang, Dong; Ye, Liu

    2017-01-01

    Complementary correlations can reveal the genuine quantum correlations present in a composite quantum system. Here, we explore an effective method to identify the entangled Bell diagonal states by means of Pearson correlation, one of the complementary correlations. Then, we extend this method to expose the dynamic behavior of complementary correlations under various kinds of decoherence channels. The sudden death and revival of entanglement can be explained by the idea of Pearson correlation. The threshold that is used to identify entanglement is proposed. Furthermore, we put forward a new method to expound the underlying physical mechanisms for which classical and quantum correlations suffer a sudden change in the decoherence process. PMID:28134291

  12. Molecular Dynamics Studies of Caspase-3

    PubMed Central

    Sulpizi, M.; Rothlisberger, U.; Carloni, P.

    2003-01-01

    Caspase-3 is a fundamental target for pharmaceutical interventions against a variety of diseases involving disregulated apoptosis. The enzyme is active as a dimer with two symmetry-related active sites, each featuring a Cys-His catalytic dyad and a selectivity loop, which recognizes the characteristic DEVD pattern of the substrate. Here, a molecular dynamics study of the enzyme in complex with two pentapeptide substrates DEVDG is presented, which provides a characterization of the dynamic properties of the active form in aqueous solution. The mobility of the substrate and that of the catalytic residues are rather low indicating a distinct preorganization effect of the Michaelis complex. An essential mode analysis permits us to identify coupled motions between the two monomers. In particular, it is found that the motions of the two active site loops are correlated and tend to steer the substrate toward the reactive center, suggesting that dimerization has a distinct effect on the dynamic properties of the active site regions. The selectivity loop of one monomer turns out to be correlated with the N-terminal region of the p12 subunit of the other monomer, an interaction that is also found to play a fundamental role in the electrostatic stabilization of the quaternary structure. To further characterize the specific influence of dimerization on the enzyme essential motions, a molecular dynamics analysis is also performed on the isolated monomer. PMID:12668429

  13. Dissociation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons: molecular dynamics studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, A.; Rapacioli, M.; Rouaut, G.; Trinquier, G.; Gadéa, F. X.

    2017-03-01

    We present dynamical studies of the dissociation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) radical cations in their ground electronic states with significant internal energy. Molecular dynamics simulations are performed, the electronic structure being described on-the-fly at the self-consistent-charge density functional-based tight binding (SCC-DFTB) level of theory. The SCC-DFTB approach is first benchmarked against DFT results. Extensive simulations are achieved for naphthalene , pyrene and coronene at several energies. Such studies enable one to derive significant trends on branching ratios, kinetics, structures and hints on the formation mechanism of the ejected neutral fragments. In particular, dependence of branching ratios on PAH size and energy were retrieved. The losses of H and C2H2 (recognized as the ethyne molecule) were identified as major dissociation channels. The H/C2H2 ratio was found to increase with PAH size and to decrease with energy. For , which is the most interesting PAH from the astrophysical point of view, the loss of H was found as the quasi-only channel for an internal energy of 30 eV. Overall, in line with experimental trends, decreasing the internal energy or increasing the PAH size will favour the hydrogen loss channels with respect to carbonaceous fragments. This article is part of the themed issue 'Theoretical and computational studies of non-equilibrium and non-statistical dynamics in the gas phase, in the condensed phase and at interfaces'.

  14. Molecular dynamics simulations of magnetized dusty plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piel, Alexander; Reichstein, Torben; Wilms, Jochen

    2012-10-01

    The combination of the electric field that confines a dust cloud with a static magnetic field generally leads to a rotation of the dust cloud. In weak magnetic fields, the Hall component of the ion flow exerts a drag force that sets the dust in rotation. We have performed detailed molecular-dynamics simulations of the dynamics of torus-shaped dust clouds in anodic plasmas. The stationary flow [1] is characterized by a shell structure in the laminar dust flow and by the spontaneous formation of a shear-flow around a stationary vortex. Here we present new results on dynamic phenomena, among them fluctuations due to a Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in the shear-flow. The simulations are compared with experimental results. [4pt] [1] T. Reichstein, A. Piel, Phys. Plasmas 18, 083705 (2011)

  15. Extensional channel flow revisited: a dynamical systems perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marques, Francisco; Meseguer, Alvaro; Mellibovsky, Fernando; Weidman, Patrick D.

    2017-06-01

    Extensional self-similar flows in a channel are explored numerically for arbitrary stretching-shrinking rates of the confining parallel walls. The present analysis embraces time integrations, and continuations of steady and periodic solutions unfolded in the parameter space. Previous studies focused on the analysis of branches of steady solutions for particular stretching-shrinking rates, although recent studies focused also on the dynamical aspects of the problems. We have adopted a dynamical systems perspective, analysing the instabilities and bifurcations the base state undergoes when increasing the Reynolds number. It has been found that the base state becomes unstable for small Reynolds numbers, and a transitional region including complex dynamics takes place at intermediate Reynolds numbers, depending on the wall acceleration values. The base flow instabilities are constitutive parts of different codimension-two bifurcations that control the dynamics in parameter space. For large Reynolds numbers, the restriction to self-similarity results in simple flows with no realistic behaviour, but the flows obtained in the transition region can be a valuable tool for the understanding of the dynamics of realistic Navier-Stokes solutions.

  16. Application of optimal prediction to molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Barber, IV, John Letherman

    2004-12-01

    Optimal prediction is a general system reduction technique for large sets of differential equations. In this method, which was devised by Chorin, Hald, Kast, Kupferman, and Levy, a projection operator formalism is used to construct a smaller system of equations governing the dynamics of a subset of the original degrees of freedom. This reduced system consists of an effective Hamiltonian dynamics, augmented by an integral memory term and a random noise term. Molecular dynamics is a method for simulating large systems of interacting fluid particles. In this thesis, I construct a formalism for applying optimal prediction to molecular dynamics, producing reduced systems from which the properties of the original system can be recovered. These reduced systems require significantly less computational time than the original system. I initially consider first-order optimal prediction, in which the memory and noise terms are neglected. I construct a pair approximation to the renormalized potential, and ignore three-particle and higher interactions. This produces a reduced system that correctly reproduces static properties of the original system, such as energy and pressure, at low-to-moderate densities. However, it fails to capture dynamical quantities, such as autocorrelation functions. I next derive a short-memory approximation, in which the memory term is represented as a linear frictional force with configuration-dependent coefficients. This allows the use of a Fokker-Planck equation to show that, in this regime, the noise is δ-correlated in time. This linear friction model reproduces not only the static properties of the original system, but also the autocorrelation functions of dynamical variables.

  17. Spectroscopy and molecular dynamics in nonpolar fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Everitt, Karl Frederick

    This thesis considers the mechanisms by which molecular dynamics in nonpolar liquids influences solvation dynamics and vibrational energy relaxation. We use semiclassical molecular dynamics simulations to calculate photon echo signals for two simple fluids. We demonstrate that two new observables are directly related to the relevant molecular quantity, the frequency- frequency time correlation function (TCF), in contrast to the commonly measured 3PEPS, which cannot be simply related to this TCF at short times. We also present a semianalytic photon echo theory, based on an ansatz which determines the full time dependence from the short time expansion coefficients of the TCF. We demonstrate that this theory accurately predicts most photon echo observables, even when the theory's gaussian approximation is not accurate. We also consider vibrational energy relaxation (VER) in liquid oxygen. Using semiclassical molecular dynamics simulations and an intermolecular potential from the literature, we evaluate the required quantity (the spectral density of a certain force-force TCF) using the same ansatz described above. We demonstrate numerically that this procedure is accurate. Approximately relating this semiclassical rate to the fully quantum mechanical VER rate, using one of the more accurate ``quantum corrections'' available in the literature, yields a result which is in order-of-magnitude agreement with the experimental VER rate. We also calculate the VER rate for liquid oxygen/argon mixtures. The rotations of the solvent near a vibrationally excited molecule, and of that molecule itself, have important consequences for the short-time dynamics of the force-force TCF. We propose a simple statistical model which quantitatively explains the mole- fraction dependence of the observed VER rate. Next, we demonstrate that a newly-developed model for oxygen very accurately describes the liquid, by comparing to experimental measures of microscopic structure and dynamics. We also

  18. Polymer Fluid Dynamics: Continuum and Molecular Approaches.

    PubMed

    Bird, R B; Giacomin, A J

    2016-06-07

    To solve problems in polymer fluid dynamics, one needs the equations of continuity, motion, and energy. The last two equations contain the stress tensor and the heat-flux vector for the material. There are two ways to formulate the stress tensor: (a) One can write a continuum expression for the stress tensor in terms of kinematic tensors, or (b) one can select a molecular model that represents the polymer molecule and then develop an expression for the stress tensor from kinetic theory. The advantage of the kinetic theory approach is that one gets information about the relation between the molecular structure of the polymers and the rheological properties. We restrict the discussion primarily to the simplest stress tensor expressions or constitutive equations containing from two to four adjustable parameters, although we do indicate how these formulations may be extended to give more complicated expressions. We also explore how these simplest expressions are recovered as special cases of a more general framework, the Oldroyd 8-constant model. Studying the simplest models allows us to discover which types of empiricisms or molecular models seem to be worth investigating further. We also explore equivalences between continuum and molecular approaches. We restrict the discussion to several types of simple flows, such as shearing flows and extensional flows, which are of greatest importance in industrial operations. Furthermore, if these simple flows cannot be well described by continuum or molecular models, then it is not necessary to lavish time and energy to apply them to more complex flow problems.

  19. Influence of solid-liquid interactions on dynamic wetting: a molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, Emilie; Blake, Terence D; Coninck, Joël De

    2009-11-18

    Large-scale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of liquid drops spreading on a solid substrate have been carried out for a very wide range of solid-liquid interactions and equilibrium contact angles. The results for these systems are shown to be consistent with the molecular-kinetic theory (MKT) of dynamic wetting, which emphasizes the role of contact-line friction as the principal channel of energy dissipation. Several predictions have been confirmed. These include a quantitative link between the dynamics of wetting and the work of adhesion and the existence of an optimum equilibrium contact angle that maximizes the speed of wetting. A feature of the new work is that key parameters (κ(0) and λ), normally accessible only by fitting the MKT to dynamic contact angle data, are also obtained directly from the simulations, with good agreement between the two sources. This validates the MKT at some fundamental level. Further verification is provided by contact angle relaxation studies, which also lend support to the interfacial tension relaxation process invoked in Shikhmurzaev's hydrodynamic model of dynamic wetting.

  20. Influence of solid-liquid interactions on dynamic wetting: a molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertrand, Emilie; Blake, Terence D.; De Coninck, Joël

    2009-11-01

    Large-scale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of liquid drops spreading on a solid substrate have been carried out for a very wide range of solid-liquid interactions and equilibrium contact angles. The results for these systems are shown to be consistent with the molecular-kinetic theory (MKT) of dynamic wetting, which emphasizes the role of contact-line friction as the principal channel of energy dissipation. Several predictions have been confirmed. These include a quantitative link between the dynamics of wetting and the work of adhesion and the existence of an optimum equilibrium contact angle that maximizes the speed of wetting. A feature of the new work is that key parameters (κ0 and λ), normally accessible only by fitting the MKT to dynamic contact angle data, are also obtained directly from the simulations, with good agreement between the two sources. This validates the MKT at some fundamental level. Further verification is provided by contact angle relaxation studies, which also lend support to the interfacial tension relaxation process invoked in Shikhmurzaev's hydrodynamic model of dynamic wetting.

  1. Dynamic regulation of aquaporin-4 water channels in neurological disorders

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Ying; Tran, Minh; Linninger, Andreas A.

    2015-01-01

    Aquaporin-4 water channels play a central role in brain water regulation in neurological disorders. Aquaporin-4 is abundantly expressed at the astroglial endfeet facing the cerebral vasculature and the pial membrane, and both its expression level and subcellular localization significantly influence brain water transport. However, measurements of aquaporin-4 levels in animal models of brain injury often report opposite trends of change at the injury core and the penumbra. Furthermore, aquaporin-4 channels play a beneficial role in brain water clearance in vasogenic edema, but a detrimental role in cytotoxic edema and exacerbate cell swelling. In light of current evidence, we still do not have a complete understanding of the role of aquaporin-4 in brain water transport. In this review, we propose that the regulatory mechanisms of aquaporin-4 at the transcriptional, translational, and post-translational levels jointly regulate water permeability in the short and long time scale after injury. Furthermore, in order to understand why aquaporin-4 channels play opposing roles in cytotoxic and vasogenic edema, we discuss experimental evidence on the dynamically changing osmotic gradients between blood, extracellular space, and the cytosol during the formation of cytotoxic and vasogenic edema. We conclude with an emerging picture of the distinct osmotic environments in cytotoxic and vasogenic edema, and propose that the directions of aquaporin-4-mediated water clearance in these two types of edema are distinct. The difference in water clearance pathways may provide an explanation for the conflicting observations of the roles of aquaporin-4 in edema resolution. PMID:26526878

  2. Dynamical coupled channels calculation of pion and omega meson production

    SciTech Connect

    Paris, Mark W.

    2009-02-15

    The dynamical coupled-channels approach developed at the Excited Baryon Analysis Center is extended to include the {omega}N channel to study {pi}- and {omega}-meson production induced by scattering pions and photons from the proton. Six intermediate channels, including {pi}N, {eta}N, {pi}{delta}, {sigma}N, {rho}N, and {omega}N, are employed to describe unpolarized and polarized data. Bare parameters in an effective hadronic Lagrangian are determined in a fit to the data for {pi}N{yields}{pi}N, {gamma}N{yields}{pi}N, {pi}{sup -}p{yields}{omega}n, and {gamma}p{yields}{omega}p reactions at center-of-mass energies from threshold to W<2.0 GeV. The T matrix determined in these fits is used to calculate the photon beam asymmetry for {omega}-meson production and the {omega}N{yields}{omega}N total cross section and {omega}N-scattering lengths. The calculated beam asymmetry is in good agreement with the observed in the range of energies near threshold to W < or approx. 2.0 GeV.

  3. Virtual-Wall Model for Molecular Dynamics Simulation.

    PubMed

    Qian, Lijuan; Tu, Chengxu; Bao, Fubing; Zhang, Yonghao

    2016-12-09

    A large number of molecules are usually required to model atomic walls in molecular dynamics simulations. A virtual-wall model is proposed in this study to describe fluid-wall molecular interactions, for reducing the computational time. The infinite repetition of unit cell structures within the atomic wall causes the periodicity of the force acting on a fluid molecule from the wall molecules. This force is first calculated and then stored in the memory. A fluid molecule appearing in the wall force field is subjected to the force from the wall molecules. The force can then be determined by the position of the molecule relative to the wall. This model avoids excessive calculations of fluid-wall interactions and reduces the computational time drastically. The time reduction is significant for small fluid density and channel height. The virtual-wall model is applied to Poiseuille and Couette flows, and to a flow in a channel with a rough surface. Results of the virtual and atomic wall simulations agree well with each other, thereby indicating the usefulness of the virtual-wall model. The appropriate bin size and cut-off radius in the virtual-wall model are also discussed.

  4. The molecular choreography of a store-operated calcium channel.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Richard S

    2007-03-15

    Store-operated calcium channels (SOCs) serve essential functions from secretion and motility to gene expression and cell growth. A fundamental mystery is how the depletion of Ca2+ from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) activates Ca2+ entry through SOCs in the plasma membrane. Recent studies using genetic approaches have identified genes encoding the ER Ca2+ sensor and a prototypic SOC, the Ca2+-release-activated Ca2+ (CRAC) channel. New findings reveal a unique mechanism for channel activation, in which the CRAC channel and its sensor migrate independently to closely apposed sites of interaction in the ER and the plasma membrane.

  5. Four-channel, high-dynamic-range downconverter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Askew, R. E.; Paglione, R. W.; Denlinger, E. J.

    1991-11-01

    The David Sarnoff Research Center has developed, under a 24-month Naval Research Laboratory sponsored program, a four-channel, high-dynamic-range down-converter (HDRD) that will advance the state of the art in electronic warfare receivers by achieving a two-tone, spur-free dynamic range of 65 dB in a 50-MHz bandwidth. A spot check of the linear dynamic range measured 92 dB from the noise floor to the 1 dB compression point. There are several design features that lead to these excellent results. They include: (1) the use of wideband, low-noise, high intercept point MMIC amplifier chips for all of the amplifiers in the downconverter; (2) low-loss MMIC PIN-diode switches; (3) low-loss filters and diplexers; and (4) a high-dynamic-range mixer. The input frequency range of the HDRD is 6 to 18 GHz, and the output frequency (IF) is 3 to 5 GHz. It uses four local oscillator (LO) frequencies, 11, 13, 15, and 17 GHz, to downconvert the six, 2-GHz-wide subbands to the intermediate frequency. A switched filter bank, consisting of six 2-GHz-wide bandpass filters, provides the required frequency selection for the downconverter. Each branch of the filter bank includes an amplitude and phase trimming module to allow for the adjustment of the tracking among the four channels. The trimming module consists of T-pad attenuator chips and an adjustable length of 50-ohm transmission line.

  6. Planform dynamics of meandering channels based on Wavelet analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abad, J. D.

    2009-12-01

    Meandering rivers migrate along the floodplain describing upstream-, laterally, and downstream-valley bend orientations. The prediction of these features is still unresolved, therefore not allowing their direct integration into the river restoration framework. Abad and Garcia (2008a, b) investigated experimentally the implications of bend orientation (upstream- and downstream-valley) on hydrodynamics and bed morphodynamics of periodic asymmetric meandering channels. Downstream-valley bends produce a more coherent secondary flow and higher erosional power near the outer bank. Therefore, downstream oriented bends might migrate much faster than upstream oriented bends. Based on digital information of meandering planform dynamics, spectral analysis (Fast Fourier Transform, FFT) and wavelet analysis are carried out to describe the planform dynamics of meandering channels. Additional relevant parameters and observations based on these metrics (dominant modes along the planform configuration, location of oriented bends along the valley centerline, change of migration rate along the valley, among others) are also discussed in the present work. This work is relevant for river restoration such as the development of design criteria of in-stream structures taking into consideration not only hydraulic and morphologic parameters but also the impact of such structures on stream ecosystem.

  7. Dynamics of tandem bubble interaction in a microfluidic channel

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Fang; Sankin, Georgy; Zhong, Pei

    2011-01-01

    The dynamics of tandem bubble interaction in a microfluidic channel (800 × 21 μm, W × H) have been investigated using high-speed photography, with resultant fluid motion characterized by particle imaging velocimetry. A single or tandem bubble is produced reliably via laser absorption by micron-sized gold dots (6 μm in diameter with 40 μm in separation distance) coated on a glass surface of the microfluidic channel. Using two pulsed Nd:YAG lasers at λ = 1064 nm and ∼10 μJ/pulse, the dynamics of tandem bubble interaction (individual maximum bubble diameter of 50 μm with a corresponding collapse time of 5.7 μs) are examined at different phase delays. In close proximity (i.e., interbubble distance = 40 μm or γ = 0.8), the tandem bubbles interact strongly with each other, leading to asymmetric deformation of the bubble walls and jet formation, as well as the production of two pairs of vortices in the surrounding fluid rotating in opposite directions. The direction and speed of the jet (up to 95 m/s), as well as the orientation and strength of the vortices can be varied by adjusting the phase delay. PMID:22088007

  8. Dynamics of tandem bubble interaction in a microfluidic channel.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Fang; Sankin, Georgy; Zhong, Pei

    2011-11-01

    The dynamics of tandem bubble interaction in a microfluidic channel (800  ×  21 μm, W × H) have been investigated using high-speed photography, with resultant fluid motion characterized by particle imaging velocimetry. A single or tandem bubble is produced reliably via laser absorption by micron-sized gold dots (6 μm in diameter with 40 μm in separation distance) coated on a glass surface of the microfluidic channel. Using two pulsed Nd:YAG lasers at λ = 1064 nm and ∼10 μJ/pulse, the dynamics of tandem bubble interaction (individual maximum bubble diameter of 50 μm with a corresponding collapse time of 5.7 μs) are examined at different phase delays. In close proximity (i.e., interbubble distance = 40 μm or γ = 0.8), the tandem bubbles interact strongly with each other, leading to asymmetric deformation of the bubble walls and jet formation, as well as the production of two pairs of vortices in the surrounding fluid rotating in opposite directions. The direction and speed of the jet (up to 95 m/s), as well as the orientation and strength of the vortices can be varied by adjusting the phase delay.

  9. Flame dynamics in a micro-channeled combustor

    SciTech Connect

    Hussain, Taaha; Balachandran, Ramanarayanan; Markides, Christos N.

    2015-01-22

    The increasing use of Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) has generated a significant interest in combustion-based power generation technologies, as a replacement of traditional electrochemical batteries which are plagued by low energy densities, short operational lives and low power-to-size and power-to-weight ratios. Moreover, the versatility of integrated combustion-based systems provides added scope for combined heat and power generation. This paper describes a study into the dynamics of premixed flames in a micro-channeled combustor. The details of the design and the geometry of the combustor are presented in the work by Kariuki and Balachandran [1]. This work showed that there were different modes of operation (periodic, a-periodic and stable), and that in the periodic mode the flame accelerated towards the injection manifold after entering the channels. The current study investigates these flames further. We will show that the flame enters the channel and propagates towards the injection manifold as a planar flame for a short distance, after which the flame shape and propagation is found to be chaotic in the middle section of the channel. Finally, the flame quenches when it reaches the injector slots. The glow plug position in the exhaust side ignites another flame, and the process repeats. It is found that an increase in air flow rate results in a considerable increase in the length (and associated time) over which the planar flame travels once it has entered a micro-channel, and a significant decrease in the time between its conversion into a chaotic flame and its extinction. It is well known from the literature that inside small channels the flame propagation is strongly influenced by the flow conditions and thermal management. An increase of the combustor block temperature at high flow rates has little effect on the flame lengths and times, whereas at low flow rates the time over which the planar flame front can be observed decreases and the time of

  10. Flame dynamics in a micro-channeled combustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Taaha; Markides, Christos N.; Balachandran, Ramanarayanan

    2015-01-01

    The increasing use of Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) has generated a significant interest in combustion-based power generation technologies, as a replacement of traditional electrochemical batteries which are plagued by low energy densities, short operational lives and low power-to-size and power-to-weight ratios. Moreover, the versatility of integrated combustion-based systems provides added scope for combined heat and power generation. This paper describes a study into the dynamics of premixed flames in a micro-channeled combustor. The details of the design and the geometry of the combustor are presented in the work by Kariuki and Balachandran [1]. This work showed that there were different modes of operation (periodic, a-periodic and stable), and that in the periodic mode the flame accelerated towards the injection manifold after entering the channels. The current study investigates these flames further. We will show that the flame enters the channel and propagates towards the injection manifold as a planar flame for a short distance, after which the flame shape and propagation is found to be chaotic in the middle section of the channel. Finally, the flame quenches when it reaches the injector slots. The glow plug position in the exhaust side ignites another flame, and the process repeats. It is found that an increase in air flow rate results in a considerable increase in the length (and associated time) over which the planar flame travels once it has entered a micro-channel, and a significant decrease in the time between its conversion into a chaotic flame and its extinction. It is well known from the literature that inside small channels the flame propagation is strongly influenced by the flow conditions and thermal management. An increase of the combustor block temperature at high flow rates has little effect on the flame lengths and times, whereas at low flow rates the time over which the planar flame front can be observed decreases and the time of

  11. Langevin approach for stochastic Hodgkin-Huxley dynamics with discretization of channel open fraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yandong; Rüdiger, Sten; Shuai, Jianwei

    2013-12-01

    The random opening and closing of ion channels establishes channel noise, which can be approximated and included into stochastic differential equations (Langevin approach). The Langevin approach is often incorporated to model stochastic ion channel dynamics for systems with a large number of channels. Here, we introduce a discretization procedure of a channel-based Langevin approach to simulate the stochastic channel dynamics with small and intermediate numbers of channels. We show that our Langevin approach with discrete channel open fractions can give a good approximation of the original Markov dynamics even for only 10 K channels. We suggest that the better approximation by the discretized Langevin approach originates from the improved representation of events that trigger action potentials.

  12. Molecular mechanism of pharmacological activation of BK channels

    PubMed Central

    Gessner, Guido; Cui, Yong-Mei; Otani, Yuko; Ohwada, Tomohiko; Soom, Malle; Hoshi, Toshinori; Heinemann, Stefan H.

    2012-01-01

    Large-conductance voltage- and Ca2+-activated K+ (Slo1 BK) channels serve numerous cellular functions, and their dysregulation is implicated in various diseases. Drugs activating BK channels therefore bear substantial therapeutic potential, but their deployment has been hindered in part because the mode of action remains obscure. Here we provide mechanistic insight into how the dehydroabietic acid derivative Cym04 activates BK channels. As a representative of NS1619-like BK openers, Cym04 reversibly left-shifts the half-activation voltage of Slo1 BK channels. Using an established allosteric BK gating model, the Cym04 effect can be simulated by a shift of the voltage sensor and the ion conduction gate equilibria toward the activated and open state, respectively. BK activation by Cym04 occurs in a splice variant-specific manner; it does not occur in such Slo1 BK channels using an alternative neuronal exon 9, which codes for the linker connecting the transmembrane segment S6 and the cytosolic RCK1 domain—the S6/RCK linker. In addition, Cym04 does not affect Slo1 BK channels with a two-residue deletion within this linker. Mutagenesis and model-based gating analysis revealed that BK openers, such as Cym04 and NS1619 but not mallotoxin, activate BK channels by functionally interacting with the S6/RCK linker, mimicking site-specific shortening of this purported passive spring, which transmits force from the cytosolic gating ring structure to open the channel's gate. PMID:22331907

  13. Ab initio centroid path integral molecular dynamics: Application to vibrational dynamics of diatomic molecular systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohta, Yasuhito; Ohta, Koji; Kinugawa, Kenichi

    2004-01-01

    An ab initio centroid molecular dynamics (CMD) method is developed by combining the CMD method with the ab initio molecular orbital method. The ab initio CMD method is applied to vibrational dynamics of diatomic molecules, H2 and HF. For the H2 molecule, the temperature dependence of the peak frequency of the vibrational spectral density is investigated. The results are compared with those obtained by the ab initio classical molecular dynamics method and exact quantum mechanical treatment. It is shown that the vibrational frequency obtained from the ab initio CMD approaches the exact first excitation frequency as the temperature lowers. For the HF molecule, the position autocorrelation function is also analyzed in detail. The present CMD method is shown to well reproduce the exact quantum result for the information on the vibrational properties of the system.

  14. Low dimensional molecular dynamics of water inside a carbon nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiomi, Junichiro; Lin, Yuan; Amberg, Gustav; Maruyama, Shigeo

    2008-11-01

    While carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have attracted a number of researches as the key building blocks for nanotechnology, they have also caught attentions as ideal materials that realize quasi-one-dimensional channel environment, a key system in bioscience. Such materials stimulate studies in fluid dynamics under low dimensional confinement, which is restricted and departs significantly from that in three-dimension. The current study serves to explore such atomic scale dynamics by performing a series of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on water confined in a CNT with a diameter of the order of 1 nm. The MD simulations have successfully probed the phase transition of a water cluster confined in a CNT to an ice-nanotube with anomalous diameter dependence. It has also been applied to investigate the possibility of transporting water through a CNT by a temperature gradient. In this study, we particularly highlight the dielectric properties of water confined inside a CNT. The confinement gives rise to strongly anisotropic dielectric relaxation, where the relaxation becomes faster and slower in the cross sectional and axial directions, respectively. The diameter dependences of the dielectric properties are discussed in connection with water dynamics and structures in quasi-one-dimension.

  15. Proton Transport Behavior through the Influenza A M2 Channel: Insights from Molecular Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hanning; Wu, Yujie; Voth, Gregory A.

    2007-01-01

    The structural properties of the influenza A virus M2 transmembrane channel in dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine bilayer for each of the four protonation states of the proton-gating His-37 tetrad and their effects on proton transport for this low-pH activated, highly proton-selective channel are studied by classical molecular dynamics with the multistate empirical valence-bond (MS-EVB) methodology. The excess proton permeation free energy profile and maximum ion conductance calculated from the MS-EVB simulation data combined with the Poisson-Nernst-Planck theory indicates that the triply protonated His-37 state is the most likely open state via a significant side-chain conformational change of the His-37 tetrad. This proposed open state of M2 has a calculated proton permeation free energy barrier of 7 kcal/mol and a maximum conductance of 53 pS compared to the experimental value of 6 pS. By contrast, the maximum conductance for Na+ is calculated to be four orders of magnitude lower, in reasonable agreement with the experimentally observed proton selectivity. The pH value to activate the channel opening is estimated to be 5.5 from dielectric continuum theory, which is also consistent with experimental results. This study further reveals that the Ala-29 residue region is the primary binding site for the antiflu drug amantadine (AMT), probably because that domain is relatively spacious and hydrophobic. The presence of AMT is calculated to reduce the proton conductance by 99.8% due to a significant dehydration penalty of the excess proton in the vicinity of the channel-bound AMT. PMID:17693473

  16. Molecular dynamics in high electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apostol, M.; Cune, L. C.

    2016-06-01

    Molecular rotation spectra, generated by the coupling of the molecular electric-dipole moments to an external time-dependent electric field, are discussed in a few particular conditions which can be of some experimental interest. First, the spherical-pendulum molecular model is reviewed, with the aim of introducing an approximate method which consists in the separation of the azimuthal and zenithal motions. Second, rotation spectra are considered in the presence of a static electric field. Two particular cases are analyzed, corresponding to strong and weak fields. In both cases the classical motion of the dipoles consists of rotations and vibrations about equilibrium positions; this motion may exhibit parametric resonances. For strong fields a large macroscopic electric polarization may appear. This situation may be relevant for polar matter (like pyroelectrics, ferroelectrics), or for heavy impurities embedded in a polar solid. The dipolar interaction is analyzed in polar condensed matter, where it is shown that new polarization modes appear for a spontaneous macroscopic electric polarization (these modes are tentatively called "dipolons"); one of the polarization modes is related to parametric resonances. The extension of these considerations to magnetic dipoles is briefly discussed. The treatment is extended to strong electric fields which oscillate with a high frequency, as those provided by high-power lasers. It is shown that the effect of such fields on molecular dynamics is governed by a much weaker, effective, renormalized, static electric field.

  17. A molecular dynamics simulation of the turbulent Couette minimal flow unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, E. R.

    2015-11-01

    A molecular dynamics simulation of planar Couette flow is presented for the minimal channel in which turbulence structures can be sustained. Evolution over a single breakdown and regeneration cycle is compared to computational fluid dynamics simulations. Qualitative similar structures are observed and turbulent statistics show excellent quantitative agreement. The molecular scale law of the wall is presented in which stick-slip molecular wall-fluid interactions replace the no-slip conditions. The impact of grid resolution is explored and the observed structures are seen to be dependent on averaging time and length scales. The kinetic energy spectra show that a range of scales are present in the molecular system and that spectral content is dependent on the grid resolution employed. The subgrid velocity of the molecules is studied using joint probability density functions, molecular trajectories, diffusion, and Lagrangian statistics. The importance of sub-grid scales, relevance of the Kolmogorov lengthscale, and implications of molecular turbulence are discussed.

  18. Dynamic Molecular Invasion into Multiply Interlocked Catenane.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Yasuyuki; Ito, Ryohei; Ogino, Sayaka; Kato, Tatsuhisa; Tanaka, Kentaro

    2017-09-14

    A multiply interlocked catenane with a novel molecular topology was synthesized; a phthalocyanine bearing four peripheral crown ethers was quadruply interlocked with a cofacial porphyrin dimer bridged with four alkylammonium chains. The supramolecular conjugate has two nanospaces surrounded by a porphyrin, a phthalocyanine, and four alkyl chains to accommodate guest molecules. Because the phthalocyanine is movable along the alkyl chains, it acts as an adjustable wall, permitting the invasion of large molecules to the nanospaces without spoiling the affinity of the association. The dynamic molecular invasion allowed the intercalation of dianionic porphyrins into both the nanospaces with a high affinity. A photometric titration experiment revealed the two-step inclusion phenomenon. The multiply interlocked catenane complexed with three Cu2+ ions, and the spin-spin interaction was switched off by the intercalation of dianionic porphyrins. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Combining molecular dynamics with mesoscopic Green's function reaction dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijaykumar, Adithya; Bolhuis, Peter G.; ten Wolde, Pieter Rein

    2015-12-01

    In many reaction-diffusion processes, ranging from biochemical networks, catalysis, to complex self-assembly, the spatial distribution of the reactants and the stochastic character of their interactions are crucial for the macroscopic behavior. The recently developed mesoscopic Green's Function Reaction Dynamics (GFRD) method enables efficient simulation at the particle level provided the microscopic dynamics can be integrated out. Yet, many processes exhibit non-trivial microscopic dynamics that can qualitatively change the macroscopic behavior, calling for an atomistic, microscopic description. We propose a novel approach that combines GFRD for simulating the system at the mesoscopic scale where particles are far apart, with a microscopic technique such as Langevin dynamics or Molecular Dynamics (MD), for simulating the system at the microscopic scale where reactants are in close proximity. This scheme defines the regions where the particles are close together and simulated with high microscopic resolution and those where they are far apart and simulated with lower mesoscopic resolution, adaptively on the fly. The new multi-scale scheme, called MD-GFRD, is generic and can be used to efficiently simulate reaction-diffusion systems at the particle level.

  20. Reactive molecular dynamics models from ab initio molecular dynamics data using relative entropy minimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arntsen, Christopher; Chen, Chen; Voth, Gregory A.

    2017-09-01

    We present two new multiscale molecular dynamics (MS-RMD) models for the hydrated excess proton in water developed directly from ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulation data of the same system. The potential of mean force along the proton transfer reaction coordinate and radial distribution functions for the MS-RMD models are shown to faithfully reproduce those of AIMD. The models are developed using an algorithm based on relative entropy minimization, thus demonstrating the ability of the method to rapidly generate accurate and highly efficient reactive MD force fields.

  1. Reactive molecular dynamics models from ab initio molecular dynamics data using relative entropy minimization.

    PubMed

    Arntsen, Christopher; Chen, Chen; Voth, Gregory A

    2017-09-01

    We present two new multiscale molecular dynamics (MS-RMD) models for the hydrated excess proton in water developed directly from ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulation data of the same system. The potential of mean force along the proton transfer reaction coordinate and radial distribution functions for the MS-RMD models are shown faithfully reproduce those of AIMD. The models are developed using an algorithm based on relative entropy minimization, thus demonstrating the ability of the method to rapidly generate accurate and highly efficient reactive MD force fields.

  2. Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of nanoconfined fluids at solid-liquid interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morciano, M.; Fasano, M.; Nold, A.; Braga, C.; Yatsyshin, P.; Sibley, D. N.; Goddard, B. D.; Chiavazzo, E.; Asinari, P.; Kalliadasis, S.

    2017-06-01

    We investigate the hydrodynamic properties of a Lennard-Jones fluid confined to a nanochannel using molecular dynamics simulations. For channels of different widths and hydrophilic-hydrophobic surface wetting properties, profiles of the fluid density, stress, and viscosity across the channel are obtained and analysed. In particular, we propose a linear relationship between the density and viscosity in confined and strongly inhomogeneous nanofluidic flows. The range of validity of this relationship is explored in the context of coarse grained models such as dynamic density functional-theory.

  3. Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of nanoconfined fluids at solid-liquid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Morciano, M; Fasano, M; Nold, A; Braga, C; Yatsyshin, P; Sibley, D N; Goddard, B D; Chiavazzo, E; Asinari, P; Kalliadasis, S

    2017-06-28

    We investigate the hydrodynamic properties of a Lennard-Jones fluid confined to a nanochannel using molecular dynamics simulations. For channels of different widths and hydrophilic-hydrophobic surface wetting properties, profiles of the fluid density, stress, and viscosity across the channel are obtained and analysed. In particular, we propose a linear relationship between the density and viscosity in confined and strongly inhomogeneous nanofluidic flows. The range of validity of this relationship is explored in the context of coarse grained models such as dynamic density functional-theory.

  4. Molecular Communication over Gas Stream Channels using Portable Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannoukos, Stamatios; Marshall, Alan; Taylor, Stephen; Smith, Jeremy

    2017-07-01

    The synthetic generation/coding and transmission of olfactory information over a gas stream or an odor network is a new and unexplored field. Application areas vary from the entertainment or advertisement industry to security and telemedicine. However, current technological limitations frustrate the accurate reproduction of decoded and transmitted olfactory data. This study describes the development, testing, and characterization of a novel odor emitter (OE) that is used to investigate the generation-encoding of gaseous standards with odorous characteristics with a regulatable way, for scent transmission purposes. The calibration and the responses of a developed OE were examined using a portable quadrupole mass spectrometer (MS). Experiments were undertaken for a range of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) at different temperatures and flow rates. Individual compounds and mixtures were tested to investigate periodic and dynamic transmission characteristics within two different size tubular containers for distances up to 3 m. Olfactory information transmission is demonstrated using MS as the main molecular sensor for odor detection and monitoring and for the first time spatial encryption of olfactory information is shown.

  5. Molecular Dynamics: New Frontier in Personalized Medicine.

    PubMed

    Sneha, P; Doss, C George Priya

    2016-01-01

    The field of drug discovery has witnessed infinite development over the last decade with the demand for discovery of novel efficient lead compounds. Although the development of novel compounds in this field has seen large failure, a breakthrough in this area might be the establishment of personalized medicine. The trend of personalized medicine has shown stupendous growth being a hot topic after the successful completion of Human Genome Project and 1000 genomes pilot project. Genomic variant such as SNPs play a vital role with respect to inter individual's disease susceptibility and drug response. Hence, identification of such genetic variants has to be performed before administration of a drug. This process requires high-end techniques to understand the complexity of the molecules which might bring an insight to understand the compounds at their molecular level. To sustenance this, field of bioinformatics plays a crucial role in revealing the molecular mechanism of the mutation and thereby designing a drug for an individual in fast and affordable manner. High-end computational methods, such as molecular dynamics (MD) simulation has proved to be a constitutive approach to detecting the minor changes associated with an SNP for better understanding of the structural and functional relationship. The parameters used in molecular dynamic simulation elucidate different properties of a macromolecule, such as protein stability and flexibility. MD along with docking analysis can reveal the synergetic effect of an SNP in protein-ligand interaction and provides a foundation for designing a particular drug molecule for an individual. This compelling application of computational power and the advent of other technologies have paved a promising way toward personalized medicine. In this in-depth review, we tried to highlight the different wings of MD toward personalized medicine.

  6. Exploring Hamiltonian dielectric solvent molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Sebastian; Tavan, Paul; Mathias, Gerald

    2014-09-01

    Hamiltonian dielectric solvent (HADES) is a recent method [7,25], which enables Hamiltonian molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of peptides and proteins in dielectric continua. Sample simulations of an α-helical decapeptide with and without explicit solvent demonstrate the high efficiency of HADES-MD. Addressing the folding of this peptide by replica exchange MD we study the properties of HADES by comparing melting curves, secondary structure motifs and salt bridges with explicit solvent results. Despite the unoptimized ad hoc parametrization of HADES, calculated reaction field energies correlate well with numerical grid solutions of the dielectric Poisson equation.

  7. Exchange frequency in replica exchange molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sindhikara, Daniel; Meng, Yilin; Roitberg, Adrian E.

    2008-01-01

    The effect of the exchange-attempt frequency on sampling efficiency is studied in replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD). We show that sampling efficiency increases with increasing exchange-attempt frequency. This conclusion is contrary to a commonly expressed view in REMD. Five peptides (1-21 residues long) are studied with a spectrum of exchange-attempt rates. Convergence rates are gauged by comparing ensemble properties between fixed length test REMD simulations and longer reference simulations. To show the fundamental correlation between exchange frequency and convergence time, a simple model is designed and studied, displaying the same basic behavior of much more complex systems.

  8. 8B structure in Fermionic Molecular Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henninger, K. R.; Neff, T.; Feldmeier, H.

    2015-04-01

    The structure of the light exotic nucleus 8B is investigated in the Fermionic Molecular Dynamics (FMD) model. The decay of 8B is responsible for almost the entire high- energy solar-neutrino flux, making structure calculations of 8B important for determining the solar core temperature. 8B is a proton halo candidate thought to exhibit clustering. FMD uses a wave-packet basis and is well-suited for modelling clustering and halos. For a multiconfiguration treatment we construct the many-body Hilbert space from antisymmetrised angular-momentum projected 8-particle states. First results show formation of a proton halo.

  9. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Interface Failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachlechner, Martina E.; Cao, Deng; Leonard, Robert H.; Owens, Eli T.; Swan, Wm. Trevor, III; Ducatman, Samuel C.

    2007-03-01

    The mechanical integrity of silicon/silicon nitride interfaces is of great importance in their applications in micro electronics and solar cells. Large-scale molecular dynamics simulations are an excellent tool to study mechanical and structural failure of interfaces subjected to externally applied stresses and strains. When pulling the system parallel to the interface, cracks in silicon nitride and slip and pit formation in silicon are typical failure mechanisms. Hypervelocity impact perpendicular to the interface plane leads to structural transformation and delamination at the interface. Influence of system temperature, strain rate, impact velocity, and system size on type and characteristics of failure will be discussed.

  10. Molecular beam studies of reaction dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.T.

    1987-03-01

    Purpose of this research project is two-fold: (1) to elucidate detailed dynamics of simple elementary reactions which are theoretically important and to unravel the mechanism of complex chemical reactions or photo chemical processes which play an important role in many macroscopic processes and (2) to determine the energetics of polyatomic free radicals using microscopic experimental methods. Most of the information is derived from measurement of the product fragment translational energy and angular distributions using unique molecular beam apparati designed for these purposes.

  11. Molecular dynamics simulations of dense plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, L.A.; Kress, J.D.; Kwon, I.; Lynch, D.L.; Troullier, N.

    1993-12-31

    We have performed quantum molecular dynamics simulations of hot, dense plasmas of hydrogen over a range of temperatures(0.1-5eV) and densities(0.0625-5g/cc). We determine the forces quantum mechanically from density functional, extended Huckel, and tight binding techniques and move the nuclei according to the classical equations of motion. We determine pair-correlation functions, diffusion coefficients, and electrical conductivities. We find that many-body effects predominate in this regime. We begin to obtain agreement with the OCP and Thomas-Fermi models only at the higher temperatures and densities.

  12. Charge transport network dynamics in molecular aggregates

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Nicholas E.; Chen, Lin X.; Ratner, Mark A.

    2016-07-20

    Due to the nonperiodic nature of charge transport in disordered systems, generating insight into static charge transport networks, as well as analyzing the network dynamics, can be challenging. Here, we apply time-dependent network analysis to scrutinize the charge transport networks of two representative molecular semiconductors: a rigid n-type molecule, perylenediimide, and a flexible p-type molecule, bBDT(TDPP)2. Simulations reveal the relevant timescale for local transfer integral decorrelation to be ~100 fs, which is shown to be faster than that of a crystalline morphology of the same molecule. Using a simple graph metric, global network changes are observed over timescales competitive with charge carrier lifetimes. These insights demonstrate that static charge transport networks are qualitatively inadequate, whereas average networks often overestimate network connectivity. Finally, a simple methodology for tracking dynamic charge transport properties is proposed.

  13. Collective dynamics of interacting molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Campàs, O; Kafri, Y; Zeldovich, K B; Casademunt, J; Joanny, J-F

    2006-07-21

    The collective dynamics of N interacting processive molecular motors are considered theoretically when an external force is applied to the leading motor. We show, using a discrete lattice model, that the force-velocity curves strongly depend on the effective dynamic interactions between motors and differ significantly from those of a simple approach where the motors equally share the force. Moreover, they become essentially independent of the number of motors if N is large enough (N> or approximately 5 for conventional kinesin). We show that a two-state ratchet model has a very similar behavior to that of the coarse-grained lattice model with effective interactions. The general picture is unaffected by motor attachment and detachment events.

  14. Charge transport network dynamics in molecular aggregates

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Nicholas E.; Chen, Lin X.; Ratner, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    Due to the nonperiodic nature of charge transport in disordered systems, generating insight into static charge transport networks, as well as analyzing the network dynamics, can be challenging. Here, we apply time-dependent network analysis to scrutinize the charge transport networks of two representative molecular semiconductors: a rigid n-type molecule, perylenediimide, and a flexible p-type molecule, bBDT(TDPP)2. Simulations reveal the relevant timescale for local transfer integral decorrelation to be ∼100 fs, which is shown to be faster than that of a crystalline morphology of the same molecule. Using a simple graph metric, global network changes are observed over timescales competitive with charge carrier lifetimes. These insights demonstrate that static charge transport networks are qualitatively inadequate, whereas average networks often overestimate network connectivity. Finally, a simple methodology for tracking dynamic charge transport properties is proposed. PMID:27439871

  15. Molecular dynamics simulation of biomembranes in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostick, David Lee

    In recent years, the developments in classical molecular dynamics simulation have allowed for an atomistic depiction of mesoscopic biological systems. With the awareness of such developments, the natural strive of the scientific community has been to increase the size of such simulated systems [70]. Nonetheless, the subtleties in the properties of biomembranes require an unusually thoughtful approach [70, 203]. In this work, a hierarchical approach is taken, with respect to system complexity, in the classical molecular dynamics simulation of biomembrane systems in aqueous solution. A progression of simulation studies is presented that begins with the analysis of the interfacial properties of neat bilayers composed of zwitterionic (phosphatidylcholine) lipids in both pure water and in electrolyte. We move on to study mixed bilayers containing zwitterionic (phosphatidylcholine) and acidic (phosphatidylserine) lipids with counterions immersed in electrolyte. Yet another layer of complexity is added to the problem by studying hydrated bilayers containing phosphatidylcholine lipids and cholesterol. Finally, we address the semipermeable nature of biomembranes by studying two membrane-channel systems. We start with a simple model membrane-channel consisting of a six-helix alamethicin bundle embedded in a hydrated phosphatidylcholine bilayer. The knowledge gained from this study is then carried over to the simulation of a large membrane-embedded prokaryotic ClC Cl-/H + antiporter, utilizing a free-energetic analysis to reveal the role of protons in the Cl- transport mechanism. Throughout the progression, methods are developed and used in the analysis of interfacial aqueous solution structure, ion-membrane binding, lipid structural properties, inter-lipid hydrogen bonded complexation, and electrostatics at the membrane interface. The developments reveal the layered nature of water near the rugged, molecularscale aqueous solution/membrane interface and its electrostatic

  16. Molecular dynamics and dynamic Monte-Carlo simulation of irradiation damage with focused ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohya, Kaoru

    2017-03-01

    The focused ion beam (FIB) has become an important tool for micro- and nanostructuring of samples such as milling, deposition and imaging. However, this leads to damage of the surface on the nanometer scale from implanted projectile ions and recoiled material atoms. It is therefore important to investigate each kind of damage quantitatively. We present a dynamic Monte-Carlo (MC) simulation code to simulate the morphological and compositional changes of a multilayered sample under ion irradiation and a molecular dynamics (MD) simulation code to simulate dose-dependent changes in the backscattering-ion (BSI)/secondary-electron (SE) yields of a crystalline sample. Recent progress in the codes for research to simulate the surface morphology and Mo/Si layers intermixing in an EUV lithography mask irradiated with FIBs, and the crystalline orientation effect on BSI and SE yields relating to the channeling contrast in scanning ion microscopes, is also presented.

  17. Dynamic multi-channel TMS with reconfigurable coil.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ruoli; Jansen, Ben H; Sheth, Bhavin R; Chen, Ji

    2013-05-01

    Investigations of the causal involvement of particular brain areas and interconnections in behavior require an external stimulation system with reasonable spatio-temporal resolution. Current transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) technology is limited to stimulating a single brain area once in a given trial. Here, we present a feasibility study for a novel TMS system based on multi-channel reconfigurable coils. With this hardware, researchers will be able to stimulate multiple brain sites in any temporal order in a trial. The system employs a wire-mesh coil, constructed using x- and y-directional wires. By varying the current direction and/or strength on each wire, we can configure the proposed mesh-wire coil into a standard loop coil and figure-eight coil of varying size. This provides maximum flexibility to the experimenter in that the location and extent of stimulation on the brain surface can be modified depending on experimental requirement. Moreover, one can dynamically and automatically modify the site(s) of stimulation several times within the span of seconds. By pre-storing various sequences of excitation patterns inside a control unit, one can explore the effect of dynamic TMS on behavior, in associative learning, and as rehabilitative therapy. Here, we present a computer simulation and bench experiments that show the feasibility of the dynamically-reconfigurable coil.

  18. Molecular identification of Ca2+ channels in human sperm.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin-Yong; Ahn, Hyun-Jong; Gu, Jung-Gyu; Lee, Keun-Ho; Kim, Jin-Sung; Kang, Ho-Won; Lee, Jung-Ha

    2003-08-31

    The acrosome reaction is a Ca(2+)-dependent exocytotic process that is a prerequisite step for fertilization. External calcium entry through voltage-activated Ca(2+) channels is known to be essential in inducing the acrosome reaction of mammalian spermatozoa. Due to their complex geometry, however, electrophysiological identification of sperm Ca(2+) channels has been limited. Here we identified Ca(2+) channel mRNAs expressed in motile human sperm using RT-PCR and their levels were compared using RNase protection assays. L-type, non- L-type, and T-type Ca(2+) channel mRNAs were detected by RT-PCR using degenerate primers. Cloning and sequencing of the PCR products revealed alpha1B, alpha1C, alpha1E, alpha1G, and alpha1H sequences. RT-PCR using specific primers repeatedly detected alpha1B, alpha1C, alpha1E, alpha1G, and alpha1H mRNAs, and additionally alpha1I mRNA. But alpha1A and alpha1D messages were not detected. Relative expression levels of the detected Ca(2+) channel subtypes were compared by RNase protection assays. The abundance of detected mRNA messages was in the following order: alpha1H alpha1G alpha1E alpha1B alpha1C alpha1I. These findings indicated that human motile sperm express multiple voltage-activated Ca(2+) channel RNAs among which T-type and non-L-type channel messages are likely to be predominantly expressed. Based on their relative expression levels, we propose that not only T-type but also non-L-type calcium channels may be major gates for the external calcium influx, required for the acrosome reaction.

  19. Molecular Beam Surface Scattering of Formaldehyde from Au(111): Characterization of the Direct Scatter and Trapping-Desorption Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krueger, Bastian C.; Park, Barratt; Meyer, Sven; Wagner, Roman J. V.; Wodtke, Alec; Schaefer, Tim

    2017-06-01

    Quantum state resolved molecular beam scattering studies of small polyatomic molecules from metal surfaces present new challenges for experimentalists, but provide unprecedented new opportunities for detailed study of polyatomic molecular dynamics at surfaces. In the current work, we report preliminary characterization of the scattering of formaldehyde from the Au(111) surface. We report the measured desorption energy (0.31 eV), and characterize the distinct trapping-desorption and direct scattering channels, via the dependence of the scattered velocity and rotational distributions on surface temperature and incident molecular beam energy. Finally, we estimate the trapping probability as a function of incidence energy, which indicates the importance of molecular degrees of freedom in the mechanism for trapping.

  20. Allosteric dynamics of SAMHD1 studied by molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patra, K. K.; Bhattacharya, A.; Bhattacharya, S.

    2016-10-01

    SAMHD1 is a human cellular enzyme that blocks HIV-1 infection in myeloid cells and non-cycling CD4+T cells. The enzyme is an allosterically regulated triphosphohydrolase that modulates the level of cellular dNTP. The virus restriction is attributed to the lowering of the pool of dNTP in the cell to a point where reverse-transcription is impaired. Mutations in SAMHD1 are also implicated in Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome. A mechanistic understanding of the allosteric activation of the enzyme is still elusive. We have performed molecular dynamics simulations to examine the allosteric site dynamics of the protein and to examine the connection between the stability of the tetrameric complex and the Allosite occupancy.

  1. Coarse-grained protein molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Derreumaux, Philippe; Mousseau, Normand

    2007-01-14

    A limiting factor in biological science is the time-scale gap between experimental and computational trajectories. At this point, all-atom explicit solvent molecular dynamics (MD) are clearly too expensive to explore long-range protein motions and extract accurate thermodynamics of proteins in isolated or multimeric forms. To reach the appropriate time scale, we must then resort to coarse graining. Here we couple the coarse-grained OPEP model, which has already been used with activated methods, to MD simulations. Two test cases are studied: the stability of three proteins around their experimental structures and the aggregation mechanisms of the Alzheimer's Abeta16-22 peptides. We find that coarse-grained isolated proteins are stable at room temperature within 50 ns time scale. Based on two 220 ns trajectories starting from disordered chains, we find that four Abeta16-22 peptides can form a three-stranded beta sheet. We also demonstrate that the reptation move of one chain over the others, first observed using the activation-relaxation technique, is a kinetically important mechanism during aggregation. These results show that MD-OPEP is a particularly appropriate tool to study qualitatively the dynamics of long biological processes and the thermodynamics of molecular assemblies.

  2. Coarse-grained protein molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derreumaux, Philippe; Mousseau, Normand

    2007-01-01

    A limiting factor in biological science is the time-scale gap between experimental and computational trajectories. At this point, all-atom explicit solvent molecular dynamics (MD) are clearly too expensive to explore long-range protein motions and extract accurate thermodynamics of proteins in isolated or multimeric forms. To reach the appropriate time scale, we must then resort to coarse graining. Here we couple the coarse-grained OPEP model, which has already been used with activated methods, to MD simulations. Two test cases are studied: the stability of three proteins around their experimental structures and the aggregation mechanisms of the Alzheimer's Aβ16-22 peptides. We find that coarse-grained isolated proteins are stable at room temperature within 50ns time scale. Based on two 220ns trajectories starting from disordered chains, we find that four Aβ16-22 peptides can form a three-stranded β sheet. We also demonstrate that the reptation move of one chain over the others, first observed using the activation-relaxation technique, is a kinetically important mechanism during aggregation. These results show that MD-OPEP is a particularly appropriate tool to study qualitatively the dynamics of long biological processes and the thermodynamics of molecular assemblies.

  3. MDLab: a molecular dynamics simulation prototyping environment.

    PubMed

    Cickovski, Trevor; Chatterjee, Santanu; Wenger, Jacob; Sweet, Christopher R; Izaguirre, Jesús A

    2010-05-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation involves solving Newton's equations of motion for a system of atoms, by calculating forces and updating atomic positions and velocities over a timestep Deltat. Despite the large amount of computing power currently available, the timescale of MD simulations is limited by both the small timestep required for propagation, and the expensive algorithm for computing pairwise forces. These issues are currently addressed through the development of efficient simulation methods, some of which make acceptable approximations and as a result can afford larger timesteps. We present MDLab, a development environment for MD simulations built with Python which facilitates prototyping, testing, and debugging of these methods. MDLab provides constructs which allow the development of propagators, force calculators, and high level sampling protocols that run several instances of molecular dynamics. For computationally demanding sampling protocols which require testing on large biomolecules, MDL includes an interface to the OpenMM libraries of Friedrichs et al. which execute on graphical processing units (GPUs) and achieve considerable speedup over execution on the CPU. As an example of an interesting high level method developed in MDLab, we present a parallel implementation of the On-The-Fly string method of Maragliano and Vanden-Eijnden. MDLab is available at http://mdlab.sourceforge.net. Copyright 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Accelerated molecular dynamics simulations of protein folding.

    PubMed

    Miao, Yinglong; Feixas, Ferran; Eun, Changsun; McCammon, J Andrew

    2015-07-30

    Folding of four fast-folding proteins, including chignolin, Trp-cage, villin headpiece and WW domain, was simulated via accelerated molecular dynamics (aMD). In comparison with hundred-of-microsecond timescale conventional molecular dynamics (cMD) simulations performed on the Anton supercomputer, aMD captured complete folding of the four proteins in significantly shorter simulation time. The folded protein conformations were found within 0.2-2.1 Å of the native NMR or X-ray crystal structures. Free energy profiles calculated through improved reweighting of the aMD simulations using cumulant expansion to the second-order are in good agreement with those obtained from cMD simulations. This allows us to identify distinct conformational states (e.g., unfolded and intermediate) other than the native structure and the protein folding energy barriers. Detailed analysis of protein secondary structures and local key residue interactions provided important insights into the protein folding pathways. Furthermore, the selections of force fields and aMD simulation parameters are discussed in detail. Our work shows usefulness and accuracy of aMD in studying protein folding, providing basic references in using aMD in future protein-folding studies. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Flow and plasticity via nonequilibrium molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Hoover, W.G.

    1984-06-11

    The viscous flow of fluids and the plastic flow of solids, such as metals, are interesting from both the practical and the theoretical points of view. Atomistic molecular dynamics simulations provide a way of visualizing and understanding these flows in a detailed microscopic way. Simulations are necessarily carried out at relatively high rates of strain. For this reason they are ideally suited to the study of nonlinear flow phenomena: normal stresses induced by shear deformation, stress rotation, and the coupling of stress with heat flow, for instance. The simulations require appropriate boundary conditions, forces, and equations of motion. Newtonian mechanics is relatively inefficient for this simulation task. A modification, Nonequilibrium Molecular Dynamics, has been developed to simulate nonequilibrium flows. By now, many high-strain-rate rheological studies of flowing (viscous) fluids and (plastic) solids have been carried out. Here I describe the new methods used in the simulations and some results obtained in this way. A three-body shear-flow exercise is appended to make these ideas more concrete.

  6. Exact dynamic properties of molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Boon, N J; Hoyle, R B

    2012-08-28

    Molecular motors play important roles within a biological cell, performing functions such as intracellular transport and gene transcription. Recent experimental work suggests that there are many plausible biochemical mechanisms that molecules such as myosin-V could use to achieve motion. To account for the abundance of possible discrete-stochastic frameworks that can arise when modeling molecular motor walks, a generalized and straightforward graphical method for calculating their dynamic properties is presented. It allows the calculation of the velocity, dispersion, and randomness ratio for any proposed system through analysis of its structure. This article extends work of King and Altman ["A schematic method of deriving the rate laws of enzyme-catalyzed reactions," J. Phys. Chem. 60, 1375-1378 (1956)] on networks of enzymatic reactions by calculating additional dynamic properties for spatially hopping systems. Results for n-state systems are presented: single chain, parallel pathway, divided pathway, and divided pathway with a chain. A novel technique for combining multiple system architectures coupled at a reference state is also demonstrated. Four-state examples illustrate the effectiveness and simplicity of these methods.

  7. Exact dynamic properties of molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boon, N. J.; Hoyle, R. B.

    2012-08-01

    Molecular motors play important roles within a biological cell, performing functions such as intracellular transport and gene transcription. Recent experimental work suggests that there are many plausible biochemical mechanisms that molecules such as myosin-V could use to achieve motion. To account for the abundance of possible discrete-stochastic frameworks that can arise when modeling molecular motor walks, a generalized and straightforward graphical method for calculating their dynamic properties is presented. It allows the calculation of the velocity, dispersion, and randomness ratio for any proposed system through analysis of its structure. This article extends work of King and Altman ["A schematic method of deriving the rate laws of enzyme-catalyzed reactions," J. Phys. Chem. 60, 1375-1378 (1956)], 10.1021/j150544a010 on networks of enzymatic reactions by calculating additional dynamic properties for spatially hopping systems. Results for n-state systems are presented: single chain, parallel pathway, divided pathway, and divided pathway with a chain. A novel technique for combining multiple system architectures coupled at a reference state is also demonstrated. Four-state examples illustrate the effectiveness and simplicity of these methods.

  8. Structure and Dynamics of Cellulose Molecular Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Howard; Zhang, Xin; Tyagi, Madhusudan; Mao, Yimin; Briber, Robert

    Molecular dissolution of microcrystalline cellulose has been achieved through mixing with ionic liquid 1-Ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate (EMIMAc), and organic solvent dimethylformamide (DMF). The mechanism of cellulose dissolution in tertiary mixtures has been investigated by combining quasielastic and small angle neutron scattering (QENS and SANS). As SANS data show that cellulose chains take Gaussian-like conformations in homogenous solutions, which exhibit characteristics of having an upper critical solution temperature, the dynamic signals predominantly from EMIMAc molecules indicate strong association with cellulose in the dissolution state. The mean square displacement quantities support the observation of the stoichiometric 3:1 EMIMAc to cellulose unit molar ratio, which is a necessary criterion for the molecular dissolution of cellulose. Analyses of dynamics structure factors reveal the temperature dependence of a slow and a fast process for EMIMAc's bound to cellulose and in DMF, respectively, as well as a very fast process due possibly to the rotational motion of methyl groups, which persisted to near the absolute zero.

  9. Dynamics of energy distribution in three channel alpha helix protein based on Davydov’s ansatz

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, Faozan; Alatas, Husin

    2015-04-16

    An important aspect of many biological processes at molecular level is the transfer and storage mechanism of bioenergy released in the reaction of the hydrolysis of Adenosinetriphosphate (ATP) by biomacromolecule especially protein. Model of Soliton Davydov is a new break-through that could describe that mechanism. Here we have reformulated quantum mechanical the Davydov theory, using least action principle. Dynamical aspect of the model is analyzed by numerical calculation. We found two dynamical cases: the traveling and pinning soliton that we suggest they are related to the energy transfer and storage mechanism in the protein. Traveling and pinning soliton can be controlled by strength of coupling. In 3- channel approach, we found the breather phenomena in which its frequency is determined by interchannel coupling parameter.

  10. Dynamics of energy distribution in three channel alpha helix protein based on Davydov's ansatz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Faozan; Alatas, Husin

    2015-04-01

    An important aspect of many biological processes at molecular level is the transfer and storage mechanism of bioenergy released in the reaction of the hydrolysis of Adenosinetriphosphate (ATP) by biomacromolecule especially protein. Model of Soliton Davydov is a new break-through that could describe that mechanism. Here we have reformulated quantum mechanical the Davydov theory, using least action principle. Dynamical aspect of the model is analyzed by numerical calculation. We found two dynamical cases: the traveling and pinning soliton that we suggest they are related to the energy transfer and storage mechanism in the protein. Traveling and pinning soliton can be controlled by strength of coupling. In 3- channel approach, we found the breather phenomena in which its frequency is determined by interchannel coupling parameter.

  11. Dynamic Wetting on Graphene-Coated Surface: Molecular Dynamics Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Shih-Wei; Shiomi, Junichiro

    2015-11-01

    Wettability of graphene-coated surface gained significant attention recently due to discussion on the ``transparency'' (whether the wetting characteristics follow that of graphene or the underlying surface) and practical applications of graphene. In terms of static contact angle, the wettability of graphene-coated surfaces have been widely studied by experiments, simulations, and theory in recent years. However, the studies of dynamic wetting on graphene-coated surfaces are limited. In the present study, molecular dynamics simulation was performed to study the dynamic wetting of water droplet on graphene-coated surfaces from a microscopic point of view. The results show that the degree of similarity between the spreading behavior on graphene-coated surface and that on pure graphene (or that on the underlying surface) depends on time, i.e. how nonequilibrium the interface dynamics is. We also found that this feature can be altered by introducing defects into graphene. The work is partially supported by Grant-in-Aid for JSPS Fellows 26-04364 and JST CREST.

  12. Dynamic transitions in molecular dynamics simulations of supercooled silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Xiaojun; Eapen, Jacob

    2013-04-01

    Two dynamic transitions or crossovers, one at a low temperature (T* ≈ 1006 K) and the other at a high temperature (T0 ≈ 1384 K), are shown to emerge in supercooled liquid silicon using molecular dynamics simulations. The high-temperature transition (T0) marks the decoupling of stress, density, and energy relaxation mechanisms. At the low-temperature transition (T*), depending on the cooling rate, supercooled silicon can either undergo a high-density-liquid to low-density-liquid (HDL-LDL) phase transition or experience an HDL-HDL crossover. Dynamically heterogeneous domains that emerge with supercooling become prominent across the HDL-HDL transition at 1006 K, with well-separated mobile and immobile regions. Interestingly, across the HDL-LDL transition, the most mobile atoms form large prominent aggregates while the least mobile atoms get spatially dispersed akin to that in a crystalline state. The attendant partial return to spatial uniformity with the HDL-LDL phase transition indicates a dynamic mechanism for relieving the frustration in supercooled states.

  13. Connecting exact coherent states to turbulent dynamics in channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jae Sung; Graham, Michael D.

    2015-11-01

    The discovery of nonlinear traveling wave solutions to the Navier-Stokes equations or exact coherent states has greatly advanced the understanding of the nature of turbulent shear flows. These solutions are unstable saddle points in state space, while the time evolution of a turbulent flow is a dynamical trajectory wandering around them. In this regard, it is of interest to investigate how closely the turbulent trajectories approach these invariant states. Here, we present connections between turbulent trajectories and one intriguing solution family in channel flow. A state space visualization of turbulent trajectories is presented in a three-dimensional space. The lifetime of the trajectories is well represented by closeness to two distinct solutions resembling in many ways the active and hibernating phases of minimal channel turbulence (Xi & Graham PRL 2010). The connections are then examined by comparing mean profiles and flow structures. More importantly, the connections are confirmed by calculating the L2 distance between the trajectories and the traveling waves. Lastly, paths of an intermittent bursting phenomenon are identified in state space and the relationship between bursting paths and the traveling waves or hibernating turbulence is further discussed. This work was supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research through grant FA9550-15-1-0062 (Flow Interactions and Control Program).

  14. A channel dynamics model for real-time flood forecasting

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoos, A.B.; Koussis, A.D.; Beale, G.O.

    1989-01-01

    A new channel dynamics scheme ASPIRE (alternative system predictor in real time), designed specifically for real-time river flow forecasting, is introduced to reduce uncertainty in the forecast. ASPIRE is a storage routing model that limits the influence of catchment model forecast errors to the downstream station closest to the catchment. Comparisons with the Muskingum routing scheme in field tests suggest that the ASPIRE scheme can provide more accurate forecasts, probably because discharge observations are used to a maximum advantage and routing reaches (and model errors in each reach) are uncoupled. Using ASPIRE in conjunction with the Kalman filter did not improve forecast accuracy relative to a deterministic updating procedure. Theoretical analysis suggests that this is due to a large process noise to measurement noise ratio. -Authors

  15. Multiscale Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Polaritonic Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Luk, Hoi Ling; Feist, Johannes; Toppari, J Jussi; Groenhof, Gerrit

    2017-09-12

    When photoactive molecules interact strongly with confined light modes as found in plasmonic structures or optical cavities, new hybrid light-matter states can form, the so-called polaritons. These polaritons are coherent superpositions (in the quantum mechanical sense) of excitations of the molecules and of the cavity photon or surface plasmon. Recent experimental and theoretical works suggest that access to these polaritons in cavities could provide a totally new and attractive paradigm for controlling chemical reactions that falls in between traditional chemical catalysis and coherent laser control. However, designing cavity parameters to control chemistry requires a theoretical model with which the effect of the light-matter coupling on the molecular dynamics can be predicted accurately. Here we present a multiscale quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) molecular dynamics simulation model for photoactive molecules that are strongly coupled to confined light in optical cavities or surface plasmons. Using this model we have performed simulations with up to 1600 Rhodamine molecules in a cavity. The results of these simulations reveal that the contributions of the molecules to the polariton are time-dependent due to thermal fluctuations that break symmetry. Furthermore, the simulations suggest that in addition to the cavity quality factor, also the Stokes shift and number of molecules control the lifetime of the polariton. Because large numbers of molecules interacting with confined light can now be simulated in atomic detail, we anticipate that our method will lead to a better understanding of the effects of strong coupling on chemical reactivity. Ultimately the method may even be used to systematically design cavities to control photochemistry.

  16. The 2011 Dynamics of Molecular Collisions Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Nesbitt, David J.

    2011-07-11

    The Dynamics of Molecular Collisions Conference focuses on all aspects of molecular collisions--experimental & theoretical studies of elastic, inelastic, & reactive encounters involving atoms, molecules, ions, clusters, & surfaces--as well as half collisions--photodissociation, photo-induced reaction, & photodesorption. The scientific program for the meeting in 2011 included exciting advances in both the core & multidisciplinary forefronts of the study of molecular collision processes. Following the format of the 2009 meeting, we also invited sessions in special topics that involve interfacial dynamics, novel emerging spectroscopies, chemical dynamics in atmospheric, combustion & interstellar environments, as well as a session devoted to theoretical & experimental advances in ultracold molecular samples. Researchers working inside & outside the traditional core topics of the meeting are encouraged to join the conference. We invite contributions of work that seeks understanding of how inter & intra-molecular forces determine the dynamics of the phenomena under study. In addition to invited oral sessions & contributed poster sessions, the scientific program included a formal session consisting of five contributed talks selected from the submitted poster abstracts. The DMC has distinguished itself by having the Herschbach Medal Symposium as part of the meeting format. This tradition of the Herschbach Medal was first started in the 2007 meeting chaired by David Chandler, based on a generous donation of funds & artwork design by Professor Dudley Herschbach himself. There are two such awards made, one for experimental & one for theoretical contributions to the field of Molecular Collision Dynamics, broadly defined. The symposium is always held on the last night of the meeting & has the awardees are asked to deliver an invited lecture on their work. The 2011 Herschbach Medal was dedicated to the contributions of two long standing leaders in Chemical Physics, Professor

  17. The classical and quantum dynamics of molecular spins on graphene

    PubMed Central

    Cervetti, Christian; Rettori, Angelo; Pini, Maria Gloria; Cornia, Andrea; Repollés, Ana; Luis, Fernando; Dressel, Martin; Rauschenbach, Stephan; Kern, Klaus; Burghard, Marko; Bogani, Lapo

    2015-01-01

    Controlling the dynamics of spins on surfaces is pivotal to the design of spintronic1 and quantum computing2 devices. Proposed schemes involve the interaction of spins with graphene to enable surface-state spintronics3,4, and electrical spin-manipulation4-11. However, the influence of the graphene environment on the spin systems has yet to be unraveled12. Here we explore the spin-graphene interaction by studying the classical and quantum dynamics of molecular magnets13 on graphene. While the static spin response remains unaltered, the quantum spin dynamics and associated selection rules are profoundly modulated. The couplings to graphene phonons, to other spins, and to Dirac fermions are quantified using a newly-developed model. Coupling to Dirac electrons introduces a dominant quantum-relaxation channel that, by driving the spins over Villain’s threshold, gives rise to fully-coherent, resonant spin tunneling. Our findings provide fundamental insight into the interaction between spins and graphene, establishing the basis for electrical spin-manipulation in graphene nanodevices. PMID:26641019

  18. Free energy landscape remodeling of the cardiac pacemaker channel explains the molecular basis of familial sinus bradycardia

    PubMed Central

    Boulton, Stephen; Akimoto, Madoka; Akbarizadeh, Sam; Melacini, Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    The hyperpolarization-activated and cyclic nucleotide-modulated ion channel (HCN) drives the pacemaker activity in the heart, and its malfunction can result in heart disorders. One such disorder, familial sinus bradycardia, is caused by the S672R mutation in HCN, whose electrophysiological phenotypes include a negative shift in the channel activation voltage and an accelerated HCN deactivation. The outcomes of these changes are abnormally low resting heart rates. However, the molecular mechanism underlying these electrophysiological changes is currently not fully understood. Crystallographic investigations indicate that the S672R mutation causes limited changes in the structure of the HCN intracellular gating tetramer, but its effects on protein dynamics are unknown. Here, we utilize comparative S672R versus WT NMR analyses to show that the S672R mutation results in extensive perturbations of the dynamics in both apo- and holo-forms of the HCN4 isoform, reflecting how S672R remodels the free energy landscape for the modulation of HCN4 by cAMP, i.e. the primary cyclic nucleotide modulator of HCN channels. We show that the S672R mutation results in a constitutive shift of the dynamic auto-inhibitory equilibrium toward inactive states of HCN4 and broadens the free-energy well of the apo-form, enhancing the millisecond to microsecond dynamics of the holo-form at sites critical for gating cAMP binding. These S672R-induced variations in dynamics provide a molecular basis for the electrophysiological phenotypes of this mutation and demonstrate that the pathogenic effects of the S672R mutation can be rationalized primarily in terms of modulations of protein dynamics. PMID:28174302

  19. Detecting Allosteric Networks Using Molecular Dynamics Simulation.

    PubMed

    Bowerman, S; Wereszczynski, J

    2016-01-01

    Allosteric networks allow enzymes to transmit information and regulate their catalytic activities over vast distances. In principle, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations can be used to reveal the mechanisms that underlie this phenomenon; in practice, it can be difficult to discern allosteric signals from MD trajectories. Here, we describe how MD simulations can be analyzed to reveal correlated motions and allosteric networks, and provide an example of their use on the coagulation enzyme thrombin. Methods are discussed for calculating residue-pair correlations from atomic fluctuations and mutual information, which can be combined with contact information to identify allosteric networks and to dynamically cluster a system into highly correlated communities. In the case of thrombin, these methods show that binding of the antagonist hirugen significantly alters the enzyme's correlation landscape through a series of pathways between Exosite I and the catalytic core. Results suggest that hirugen binding curtails dynamic diversity and enforces stricter venues of influence, thus reducing the accessibility of thrombin to other molecules. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Molecular structures and intramolecular dynamics of pentahalides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ischenko, A. A.

    2017-03-01

    This paper reviews advances of modern gas electron diffraction (GED) method combined with high-resolution spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations in studies of the impact of intramolecular dynamics in free molecules of pentahalides. Some recently developed approaches to the electron diffraction data interpretation, based on direct incorporation of the adiabatic potential energy surface parameters to the diffraction intensity are described. In this way, complementary data of different experimental and computational methods can be directly combined for solving problems of the molecular structure and its dynamics. The possibility to evaluate some important parameters of the adiabatic potential energy surface - barriers to pseudorotation and saddle point of intermediate configuration from diffraction intensities in solving the inverse GED problem is demonstrated on several examples. With increasing accuracy of the electron diffraction intensities and the development of the theoretical background of electron scattering and data interpretation, it has become possible to investigate complex nuclear dynamics in fluxional systems by the GED method. Results of other research groups are also included in the discussion.

  1. Partial hydrodynamic representation of quantum molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Bing; Franco, Ignacio

    2017-05-01

    A hybrid method is proposed to propagate system-bath quantum dynamics that use both basis functions and coupled quantum trajectories. In it, the bath is represented with an ensemble of Bohmian trajectories while the system degrees of freedom are accounted through reduced density matrices. By retaining the Hilbert space structure for the system, the method is able to capture interference processes that are challenging to describe in Bohmian dynamics due to singularities that these processes introduce in the quantum potential. By adopting quantum trajectories to represent the bath, the method beats the exponential scaling of the computational cost with the bath size. This combination makes the method suitable for large-scale ground and excited state fully quantum molecular dynamics simulations. Equations of motion for the quantum trajectories and reduced density matrices are derived from the Schrödinger equation and a computational algorithm to solve these equations is proposed. Through computations in two-dimensional model systems, the method is shown to offer an accurate description of subsystem observables and of quantum decoherence, which is difficult to obtain when the quantum nature of the bath is ignored. The scaling of the method is demonstrated using a model with 21 degrees of freedom. The limit of independent trajectories is recovered when the mass of bath degrees of freedom is much larger than the one of the system, in agreement with mixed quantum-classical descriptions.

  2. Molecular analysis of a thylakoid K+channel

    SciTech Connect

    1999-09-10

    The work undertaken sought to use a novel probe to identify and clone plant ion (K) channels. It was also proposed that in vitro biochemical studies of cation transport across purified preparations of thylakoid membrane be employed to characterize a putative K channel in this membrane system. Over the last several years, an enormous data base of partially-sequenced mRNAs and numerous genomes (including those of plants) has evolved and provides a powerful alternative to this brute-force approach to identify and clone cDNAs encoding physiologically important membrane proteins such as channels. The utility of searching genetic databases for relevant sequences, in addition to the difficulty of working with membrane proteins, led to changes in research focus during the granting period. During the course of the funding period, work was finished up which documented the presence of a K channel in the thylakoid membrane and demonstrated that K fluxes through this channel were required for optimal photosynthetic activity, likely due to the requirement for charge balancing of proton flux.

  3. The molecular interactions of pyrethroid insecticides with insect and mammalian sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Vais, H; Williamson, M S; Devonshire, A L; Usherwood, P N

    2001-10-01

    Recent progress in the cloning of alpha (para) and beta (TipE) Na channel sub-units from Drosophila melanogaster (fruit fly) and Musca domestica (housefly) have facilitated functional expression studies of insect Na channels in Xenopus laevis oocytes, assayed by voltage clamp techniques. The effects of Type I and Type III pyrethroids on the biophysical properties of these channels are critically reviewed. Pyrethroid resistance mutations (termed kdr and super-kdr) that reduce the sensitivity of the insect Na channel to pyrethroids have been identified in a range of insect species. Some of these mutations (e.g. L1014F, M918T and T929I) have been incorporated into the para Na channel of Drosophila, either individually or in combination, to investigate their effects on the sensitivity of this channel to pyrethroids. The kdr mutation (L1014F) shifts the voltage dependence of both activation and steady-state inactivation by approximately 5 mV towards more positive potentials and facilitates Na channel inactivation. Incorporation of the super-kdr mutation (M918T) into the Drosophila Na channel also increases channel inactivation and causes a > 100-fold reduction in deltamethrin sensitivity. These effects are shared by T929I, an alternative mutation that confers super-kdr-like resistance. Parallel studies have been undertaken using the rat IIA Na channel to investigate the molecular basis for the low sensitivity of mammalian brain Na channels to pyrethroids. Rat IIA channels containing the mutation L1014F exhibit a shift in their mid-point potential for Na activation, but their overall sensitivity to permethrin remains similar to that of the wild-type rat channel (i.e. both are 1000-fold less sensitive than the wild-type insect channel). Mammalian neuronal Na channels have an isoleucine rather than a methionine at the position (874) corresponding to the super-kdr (M918) residue of the insect channel. Replacement of the isoleucine of the wild-type rat IIA Na channel with a

  4. Channel Protein Engineering: A Novel Approach Towards the Molecular Dissection Determinants in Ligand-Regulated Channels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-01-23

    also carried out on a tetrameric potassium channel (of the delayed rectifier type) and on a tetrameric calcium channel (of the dihydropyridine ...structurally related dihydropyridine enantiomers of BayK 8644 [ (+) - antagonist and (-) - agonist] may cause opposite actions. Binding sites for drugs are...interactions, simultaneously. We identified a potential binding site for the 1, 4- dihydropyridine located in the middle of the bundle and formed by a serine

  5. Hydration dynamics in water clusters via quantum molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Turi, László

    2014-05-28

    We have investigated the hydration dynamics in size selected water clusters with n = 66, 104, 200, 500, and 1000 water molecules using molecular dynamics simulations. To study the most fundamental aspects of relaxation phenomena in clusters, we choose one of the simplest, still realistic, quantum mechanically treated test solute, an excess electron. The project focuses on the time evolution of the clusters following two processes, electron attachment to neutral equilibrated water clusters and electron detachment from an equilibrated water cluster anion. The relaxation dynamics is significantly different in the two processes, most notably restoring the equilibrium final state is less effective after electron attachment. Nevertheless, in both scenarios only minor cluster size dependence is observed. Significantly different relaxation patterns characterize electron detachment for interior and surface state clusters, interior state clusters relaxing significantly faster. This observation may indicate a potential way to distinguish surface state and interior state water cluster anion isomers experimentally. A comparison of equilibrium and non-equilibrium trajectories suggests that linear response theory breaks down for electron attachment at 200 K, but the results converge to reasonable agreement at higher temperatures. Relaxation following electron detachment clearly belongs to the linear regime. Cluster relaxation was also investigated using two different computational models, one preferring cavity type interior states for the excess electron in bulk water, while the other simulating non-cavity structure. While the cavity model predicts appearance of several different hydrated electron isomers in agreement with experiment, the non-cavity model locates only cluster anions with interior excess electron distribution. The present simulations show that surface isomers computed with the cavity predicting potential show similar dynamical behavior to the interior clusters of

  6. Molecular dynamics simulations of membrane proteins under asymmetric ionic concentrations.

    PubMed

    Khalili-Araghi, Fatemeh; Ziervogel, Brigitte; Gumbart, James C; Roux, Benoît

    2013-10-01

    A computational method is developed to allow molecular dynamics simulations of biomembrane systems under realistic ionic gradients and asymmetric salt concentrations while maintaining the conventional periodic boundary conditions required to minimize finite-size effects in an all-atom explicit solvent representation. The method, which consists of introducing a nonperiodic energy step acting on the ionic species at the edge of the simulation cell, is first tested with illustrative applications to a simple membrane slab model and a phospholipid membrane bilayer. The nonperiodic energy-step method is then used to calculate the reversal potential of the bacterial porin OmpF, a large cation-specific β-barrel channel, by simulating the I-V curve under an asymmetric 10:1 KCl concentration gradient. The calculated reversal potential of 28.6 mV is found to be in excellent agreement with the values of 26-27 mV measured from lipid bilayer experiments, thereby demonstrating that the method allows realistic simulations of nonequilibrium membrane transport with quantitative accuracy. As a final example, the pore domain of Kv1.2, a highly selective voltage-activated K(+) channel, is simulated in a lipid bilayer under conditions that recreate, for the first time, the physiological K(+) and Na(+) concentration gradients and the electrostatic potential difference of living cells.

  7. Molecular dynamics study of phonon screening in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javvaji, Brahmanandam; Roy Mahapatra, D.; Raha, S.

    2014-04-01

    Phonon interaction with electrons or phonons or with structural defects result in a phonon mode conversion. The mode conversion is governed by the frequency wave-vector dispersion relation. The control over phonon mode or the screening of phonon in graphene is studied using the propagation of amplitude modulated phonon wave-packet. Control over phonon properties like frequency and velocity opens up several wave guiding, energy transport and thermo-electric applications of graphene. One way to achieve this control is with the introduction of nano-structured scattering in the phonon path. Atomistic model of thermal energy transport is developed which is applicable to devices consisting of source, channel and drain parts. Longitudinal acoustic phononmode is excited fromone end of the device. Molecular dynamics based time integration is adopted for the propagation of excited phonon to the other end of the device. The amount of energy transfer is estimated from the relative change of kinetic energy. Increase in the phonon frequency decreases the kinetic energy transmission linearly in the frequency band of interest. Further reduction in transmission is observed with the tuning of channel height of the device by increasing the boundary scattering. Phonon mode selective transmission control have potential application in thermal insulation or thermo-electric application or photo-thermal amplification.

  8. Molecular Dynamics of Mouse Acetylcholinesterase Complexed with Huperzine A

    SciTech Connect

    Tara, Sylvia; Helms, Volkhard H.; Straatsma, TP; Mccammon, J Andrew A.

    1999-03-16

    Two molecular dynamics simulations were performed for a modeled complex of mouse acetylcholinesterase liganded with huperzine A (HupA). Analysis of these simulations shows that HupA shifts in the active site toward Tyr 337 and Phe 338, and that several residues in the active site area reach out to make hydrogen bonds with the inhibitor. Rapid fluctuations of the gorge width are observed, ranging from widths that allow substrate access to the active site, to pinched structures that do not allow access of molecules as small as water. Additional openings or channels to the active site are found. One opening is formed in the side wall of the active site gorge by residues Val 73, Asp 74, Thr 83, Glu 84, and Asn 87. Another opening is formed at the base of the gorge by residues Trp 86, Val 132, Glu 202, Gly 448, and Ile 451. Both of these openings have been observed separately in the Torpedo californica form of the enzyme. These channels could allow transport of waters and ions to and from the bulk solution.

  9. Molecular action of sulphonylureas on KATP channels: a real partnership between drugs and nucleotides

    PubMed Central

    de Wet, Heidi; Proks, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Sulphonylureas stimulate insulin secretion from pancreatic β-cells primarily by closing ATP-sensitive K+ channels in the β-cell plasma membrane. The mechanism of channel inhibition by these drugs is unusually complex. As direct inhibitors of channel activity, sulphonylureas act only as partial antagonists at therapeutic concentrations. However, they also exert an additional indirect inhibitory effect via modulation of nucleotide-dependent channel gating. In this review, we summarize current knowledge and recent advances in our understanding of the molecular mechanism of action of these drugs. PMID:26517901

  10. Molecular dynamics studies of nanofluidics and nanomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ki-Ho

    Developing a membrane that can successfully filter molecules such as hydrocarbons, oxygen, and carbon dioxide from gaseous mixtures is an important issue for the environmental and economic industries. This potential selectivity can be predicted from atomistic simulations of the diffusion and adsorption of gases into and within carbon nanotubes. The computational nanofluidics of hydrocarbons, oxygen, and carbon dioxide have been studied with molecular dynamics simulations in the work reported here. The interactions in the system are modeled by a classical reactive empirical bond-order potential coupled to Lennard-Jones and Coulombic potentials. The transport of gas molecules for long time periods is characterized by initial non-equilibrium states followed by equilibrium states. The non-equilibrium state is induced by the diffusive motion of gas molecules from one end of the nanotubes into the vacuum or low-pressure region at the other end of the nanotubes, and lasts until the gases are evenly distributed in the nanotubes. During the non-equilibrium state, the gas molecules move back and forth through the nanotubes. It is found that this behavior, the time needed for the attainment of equilibrium, and the molecular motions at the openings of the nanotubes are affected by the density (or pressure) of gas molecules both inside and outside of the carbon nanotubes. When the gas molecules reach the end of the nanotubes, the attractive force between the tube end and the gas molecules prevents the molecules from exiting. The mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes have extended the potential applications of nanoelectromechanical systems (HEMS) such as nano-switches, nanosensors, nano-actuators, and nano-tweezers. In this study, the bending motion from externally incident Ar atom impacts on nanotubes with one firmly-fixed end is examined with classical molecular dynamics simulations. The deformation of the carbon nanotubes in the direction perpendicular to their axis is

  11. Osmosis : a molecular dynamics computer simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lion, Thomas

    Osmosis is a phenomenon of critical importance in a variety of processes ranging from the transport of ions across cell membranes and the regulation of blood salt levels by the kidneys to the desalination of water and the production of clean energy using potential osmotic power plants. However, despite its importance and over one hundred years of study, there is an ongoing confusion concerning the nature of the microscopic dynamics of the solvent particles in their transfer across the membrane. In this thesis the microscopic dynamical processes underlying osmotic pressure and concentration gradients are investigated using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. I first present a new derivation for the local pressure that can be used for determining osmotic pressure gradients. Using this result, the steady-state osmotic pressure is studied in a minimal model for an osmotic system and the steady-state density gradients are explained using a simple mechanistic hopping model for the solvent particles. The simulation setup is then modified, allowing us to explore the timescales involved in the relaxation dynamics of the system in the period preceding the steady state. Further consideration is also given to the relative roles of diffusive and non-diffusive solvent transport in this period. Finally, in a novel modification to the classic osmosis experiment, the solute particles are driven out-of-equilibrium by the input of energy. The effect of this modification on the osmotic pressure and the osmotic ow is studied and we find that active solute particles can cause reverse osmosis to occur. The possibility of defining a new "osmotic effective temperature" is also considered and compared to the results of diffusive and kinetic temperatures..

  12. Molecular determinants of common gating of a ClC chloride channel.

    PubMed

    Bennetts, Brett; Parker, Michael W

    2013-01-01

    Uniquely, the ClC family harbours dissipative channels and anion/H(+) transporters that share unprecedented functional characteristics. ClC-1 channels are homodimers in which each monomer supports an identical pore carrying three anion-binding sites. Transient occupancy of the extracellular binding site by a conserved glutamate residue, E232, independently gates each pore. A common gate, the molecular basis of which is unknown, closes both pores simultaneously. Mutations affecting common gating underlie myotonia congenita in humans. Here we show that the common gate likely occludes the channel pore via interaction of E232 with a highly conserved tyrosine, Y578, at the central anion-binding site. We also identify structural linkages important for coordination of common gating between subunits and modulation by intracellular molecules. Our data reveal important molecular determinants of common gating of ClC channels and suggest that the molecular mechanism is an evolutionary vestige of coupled anion/H(+) transport.

  13. A molecular determinant of phosphoinositide affinity in mammalian TRPV channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velisetty, Phanindra; Borbiro, Istvan; Kasimova, Marina A.; Liu, Luyu; Badheka, Doreen; Carnevale, Vincenzo; Rohacs, Tibor

    2016-06-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2] is an important cofactor for ion channels. Affinity for this lipid is a major determinant of channel inhibition by depletion of PI(4,5)P2 upon phospholipase C (PLC) activation. Little is known about what determines PI(4,5)P2 affinity in mammalian ion channels. Here we report that two members of the Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid (TRPV) ion channel family, TRPV5 and TRPV6 lack a positively charged residue in the TM4-TM5 loop that was shown to interact with PI(4,5)P2 in TRPV1, which shows high affinity for this lipid. When this positively charged residue was introduced to either TRPV6 or TRPV5, they displayed markedly higher affinities for PI(4,5)P2, and were largely resistant to inhibition by PI(4,5)P2 depletion. Furthermore, Ca2+-induced inactivation of TRPV6 was essentially eliminated in the G488R mutant, showing the importance of PLC-mediated PI(4,5)P2 depletion in this process. Computational modeling shows that the introduced positive charge interacts with PI(4,5)P2 in TRPV6.

  14. Molecular tectonics: tubular crystals with controllable channel size and orientation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Mei-Jin; Jouaiti, Abdelaziz; Pocic, David; Kyritsakas, Nathalie; Planeix, Jean-Marc; Hosseini, Mir Wais

    2010-01-07

    The combination of flexible neutral organic tectons based on two pyridines interconnected by a thioether or thioester type spacer with an inorganic ZnSiF(6) pillar leads to the formation of 2-D coordination networks and the packing of the latter generates crystals offering controllable tubular channels with imposed orientation along the pillar axis.

  15. A molecular determinant of phosphoinositide affinity in mammalian TRPV channels

    PubMed Central

    Velisetty, Phanindra; Borbiro, Istvan; Kasimova, Marina A.; Liu, Luyu; Badheka, Doreen; Carnevale, Vincenzo; Rohacs, Tibor

    2016-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2] is an important cofactor for ion channels. Affinity for this lipid is a major determinant of channel inhibition by depletion of PI(4,5)P2 upon phospholipase C (PLC) activation. Little is known about what determines PI(4,5)P2 affinity in mammalian ion channels. Here we report that two members of the Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid (TRPV) ion channel family, TRPV5 and TRPV6 lack a positively charged residue in the TM4-TM5 loop that was shown to interact with PI(4,5)P2 in TRPV1, which shows high affinity for this lipid. When this positively charged residue was introduced to either TRPV6 or TRPV5, they displayed markedly higher affinities for PI(4,5)P2, and were largely resistant to inhibition by PI(4,5)P2 depletion. Furthermore, Ca2+-induced inactivation of TRPV6 was essentially eliminated in the G488R mutant, showing the importance of PLC-mediated PI(4,5)P2 depletion in this process. Computational modeling shows that the introduced positive charge interacts with PI(4,5)P2 in TRPV6. PMID:27291418

  16. Nanodrop contact angles from molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravipati, Srikanth; Aymard, Benjamin; Yatsyshin, Petr; Galindo, Amparo; Kalliadasis, Serafim

    2016-11-01

    The contact angle between three phases being in thermodynamic equilibrium is highly sensitive to the nature of the intermolecular forces as well as to various fluctuation effects. Determining the Young contact angle of a sessile drop sitting on a substrate from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations is a highly non-trivial task. Most commonly employed methods for finding droplet contact angles from MD simulation data either require large numbers of particles or are system-dependent. We propose a systematic geometry based methodology for extracting the contact angle from simulated sessile droplets by analysing an appropriately coarse-grained density field. To demonstrate the method, we consider Lennard-Jones (LJ) and SPC/E water nanodroplets of different sizes sitting on planar LJ walls. Our results are in good agreement with Young contact angle values computed employing test-area perturbation method.

  17. Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics: The first 25 years

    SciTech Connect

    Hoover, W.G. |

    1992-08-01

    Equilibrium Molecular Dynamics has been generalized to simulate Nonequilibrium systems by adding sources of thermodynamic heat and work. This generalization incorporates microscopic mechanical definitions of macroscopic thermodynamic and hydrodynamic variables, such as temperature and stress, and augments atomistic forces with special boundary, constraint, and driving forces capable of doing work on, and exchanging heat with, an otherwise Newtonian system. The underlying Lyapunov instability of these nonequilibrium equations of motion links microscopic time-reversible deterministic trajectories to macroscopic time-irreversible hydrodynamic behavior as described by the Second Law of Thermodynamics. Green-Kubo linear-response theory has been checked. Nonlinear plastic deformation, intense heat conduction, shockwave propagation, and nonequilibrium phase transformation have all been simulated. The nonequilibrium techniques, coupled with qualitative improvements in parallel computer hardware, are enabling simulations to approximate real-world microscale and nanoscale experiments.

  18. Assessing Electrolyte Transport Properties with Molecular Dynamics

    DOE PAGES

    Jones, R. E.; Ward, D. K.; Gittleson, F. S.; ...

    2017-04-15

    Here in this work we use estimates of ionic transport properties obtained from molecular dynamics to rank lithium electrolytes of different compositions. We develop linear response methods to obtain the Onsager diffusivity matrix for all chemical species, its Fickian counterpart, and the mobilities of the ionic species. We apply these methods to the well-studied propylene carbonate/ethylene carbonate solvent with dissolved LiBF4 and O2. The results show that, over a range of lithium concentrations and carbonate mixtures, trends in the transport coefficients can be identified and optimal electrolytes can be selected for experimental focus; however, refinement of these estimation techniques ismore » necessary for a reliable ranking of a large set of electrolytes.« less

  19. Molecular dynamics simulation of aluminium melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novak, Jakob

    2016-06-01

    Solid-liquid phase transition has been simulated by the molecular dynamics method, using isobaric-isoenthalpic ensemble. For interatomic potential, glue potential has been selected. The original algorithm for bookkeeping of the information on neighbouring relationships of the atoms has been developed and used in this research. Time consumption for calculation of interatomic forces has been reduced from o(N2) to o(N) by the use of this algorithm. Calculations show that phase transition from solid to liquid occurs between 1,000 K and 1,300 K. The simulated temperature of phase transition is higher than the experimental value due to the absence of crystal defects. If constant heat flux is supplied, temperature decreases during melting because the superheated state becomes unstable. During the cooling process, no significant changes of the observed variables were detected due to the high cooling rate, which prevents crystallisation.

  20. Cell list algorithms for nonequilibrium molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobson, Matthew; Fox, Ian; Saracino, Alexandra

    2016-06-01

    We present two modifications of the standard cell list algorithm that handle molecular dynamics simulations with deforming periodic geometry. Such geometry naturally arises in the simulation of homogeneous, linear nonequilibrium flow modeled with periodic boundary conditions, and recent progress has been made developing boundary conditions suitable for general 3D flows of this type. Previous works focused on the planar flows handled by Lees-Edwards or Kraynik-Reinelt boundary conditions, while the new versions of the cell list algorithm presented here are formulated to handle the general 3D deforming simulation geometry. As in the case of equilibrium, for short-ranged pairwise interactions, the cell list algorithm reduces the computational complexity of the force computation from O(N2) to O(N), where N is the total number of particles in the simulation box. We include a comparison of the complexity and efficiency of the two proposed modifications of the standard algorithm.

  1. Classical Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Devanathan, Ram; Krack, Matthias; Bertolus, Marjorie

    2015-10-10

    Molecular dynamics simulation is well suited to study primary damage production by irradiation, defect interactions with fission gas atoms, gas bubble nucleation, grain boundary effects on defect and gas bubble evolution in nuclear fuel, and the resulting changes in thermo-mechanical properties. In these simulations, the forces on the ions are dictated by interaction potentials generated by fitting properties of interest to experimental data. The results obtained from the present generation of potentials are qualitatively similar, but quantitatively different. There is a need to refine existing potentials to provide a better representation of the performance of polycrystalline fuel under a variety of operating conditions, and to develop models that are equipped to handle deviations from stoichiometry. In addition to providing insights into fundamental mechanisms governing the behaviour of nuclear fuel, MD simulations can also provide parameters that can be used as inputs for mesoscale models.

  2. Cluster production within antisymmetrized molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Akira

    2016-06-01

    Clusters are quite important at various situations in heavy-ion collisions. Antisymmetrized molecular dynamics was improved to take into account the correlations to form light clusters, such as deuterons and α particles, and light nuclei composed of several clusters. The momentum fluctuations of emitted particles are also taken into account by a simple method. Formation of fragments and light clusters in a wide range of heavy-ion collisions was well described with a single set of model parameters. Fragmentation in a proton induced reaction was also well reproduced by introducing cluster correlations. Calculated results demonstrate strong impacts of clusters in various observables including those usually regarded as probes of the density dependence of symmetry energy.

  3. Ion mobility analysis of molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Wyttenbach, Thomas; Pierson, Nicholas A; Clemmer, David E; Bowers, Michael T

    2014-01-01

    The combination of mass spectrometry and ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) employing a temperature-variable drift cell or a drift tube divided into sections to make IMS-IMS experiments possible allows information to be obtained about the molecular dynamics of polyatomic ions in the absence of a solvent. The experiments allow the investigation of structural changes of both activated and native ion populations on a timescale of 1-100 ms. Five different systems representing small and large, polar and nonpolar molecules, as well as noncovalent assemblies, are discussed in detail: a dinucleotide, a sodiated polyethylene glycol chain, the peptide bradykinin, the protein ubiquitin, and two types of peptide oligomers. Barriers to conformational interconversion can be obtained in favorable cases. In other cases, solution-like native structures can be observed, but care must be taken in the experimental protocols. The power of theoretical modeling is demonstrated.

  4. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Hypervelocity Impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owens, Eli T.; Bachlechner, Martina E.

    2007-03-01

    Outer space silicon solar cells are exposed to impacts with micro meteors that can destroy the surface leading to device failure. A protective coating of silicon nitride will protect against such failure. Large-scale molecular dynamics simulations are used to study how silicon/silicon nitride fails due to hypervelocity impacts. Three impactors made of silicon nitride are studied. Their cross-sectional areas, relative to the target, are as follows: the same as the target, half of the target, and a quarter of the target. Impactor speeds from 5 to 11 km/second yield several modes of failure, such as deformation of the target by the impactor and delimitation of the silicon nitride from the silicon at the interface. These simulations will give a much clearer picture of how solar cells composed of a silicon/silicon nitride interface will respond to impacts in outer space. This will ultimately lead to improved devices with longer life spans.

  5. Molecular-dynamics simulations of lead clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendy, S. C.; Hall, B. D.

    2001-08-01

    Molecular-dynamics simulations of nanometer-sized lead clusters have been performed using the Lim-Ong-Ercolessi glue potential [Surf. Sci. 269/270, 1109 (1992)]. The binding energies of clusters forming crystalline (fcc), decahedron and icosahedron structures are compared, showing that fcc cuboctahedra are the most energetically favored of these polyhedral model structures. However, simulations of the freezing of liquid droplets produced a characteristic form of surface-reconstructed ``shaved'' icosahedron, in which atoms are absent at the edges and apexes of the polyhedron. This arrangement is energetically favored for 600-4000 atom clusters. Larger clusters favor crystalline structures. Indeed, simulated freezing of a 6525-atom liquid droplet produced an imperfect fcc Wulff particle, containing a number of parallel stacking faults. The effects of temperature on the preferred structure of crystalline clusters below the melting point have been considered. The implications of these results for the interpretation of experimental data is discussed.

  6. On the parallelization of molecular dynamics codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trabado, G. P.; Plata, O.; Zapata, E. L.

    2002-08-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) codes present a high degree of spatial data locality and a significant amount of independent computations. However, most of the parallelization strategies are usually based on the manual transformation of sequential programs either by completely rewriting the code with message passing routines or using specific libraries intended for writing new MD programs. In this paper we propose a new library-based approach (DDLY) which supports parallelization of existing short-range MD sequential codes. The novelty of this approach is that it can directly handle the distribution of common data structures used in MD codes to represent data (arrays, Verlet lists, link cells), using domain decomposition. Thus, the insertion of run-time support for distribution and communication in a MD program does not imply significant changes to its structure. The method is simple, efficient and portable. It may be also used to extend existing parallel programming languages, such as HPF.

  7. Fiber lubrication: A molecular dynamics simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hongyi

    Molecular and mesoscopic level description of friction and lubrication remains a challenge because of difficulties in the phenomenological understanding of to the behaviors of solid-liquid interfaces during sliding. Fortunately, there is the computational simulation approach opens an opportunity to predict and analyze interfacial phenomena, which were studied with molecular dynamics (MD) and mesoscopic dynamics (MesoDyn) simulations. Polypropylene (PP) and cellulose are two of most common polymers in textile fibers. Confined amorphous surface layers of PP and cellulose were built successfully with xenon crystals which were used to compact the polymers. The physical and surface properties of the PP and cellulose surface layers were investigated by MD simulations, including the density, cohesive energy, volumetric thermal expansion, and contact angle with water. The topology method was employed to predict the properties of poly(alkylene glycol) (PAG) diblock copolymers and Pluronic triblock copolymers used as lubricants on surfaces. Density, zero shear viscosity, shear module, cohesive energy and solubility parameter were predicted with each block copolymer. Molecular dynamics simulations were used to study the interaction energy per unit contact area of block copolymer melts with PP and cellulose surfaces. The interaction energy is defined as the ratio of interfacial interaction energy to the contact area. Both poly(proplene oxide) (PPO) and poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) segments provided a lipophilic character to both PP and cellulose surfaces. The PPO/PEO ratio and the molecular weight were found to impact the interaction energy on both PP and cellulose surfaces. In aqueous solutions, the interaction energy is complicated due to the presence of water and the cross interactions between the multiple molecular components. The polymer-water-surface (PWS) calculation method was proposed to calculate such complex systems. In a contrast with a vacuum condition, the presence

  8. Dynamics and energetics of permeation through aquaporins. What do we learn from molecular dynamics simulations?

    PubMed

    Hub, Jochen S; Grubmüller, Helmut; de Groot, Bert L

    2009-01-01

    Aquaporins (AQPs) are a family of integral membrane proteins, which facilitate the rapid and yet highly selective flux of water and other small solutes across biological membranes. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations contributed substantially to the understanding of the molecular mechanisms that underlie this remarkable efficiency and selectivity of aquaporin channels. This chapter reviews the current state of MD simulations of aquaporins and related aquaglyceroporins as well as the insights these simulations have provided. The mechanism of water permeation through AQPs and methods to determine channel permeabilities from simulations are described. Protons are strictly excluded from AQPs by a large electrostatic barrier and not by an interruption of the Grotthuss mechanism inside the pore. Both the protein's electric field and desolvation effects contribute to this barrier. Permeation of apolar gas molecules such as CO(2) through AQPs is accompanied by a large energetic barrier and thus can only be expected in membranes with a low intrinsic gas permeability. Additionally, the insights from simulations into the mechanism of glycerol permeation through the glycerol facilitator GlpF from E. coli are summarized. Finally, MD simulations are discussed that revealed that the aro-matic/arginine constriction region is generally the filter for uncharged solutes, and that AQP selectivity is controlled by a hydrophobic effect and steric restraints.

  9. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of a RNA Aptasensor.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Min; Seydou, Mahamadou; Noel, Vincent; Piro, Benoit; Maurel, François; Barbault, Florent

    2017-04-14

    Single-stranded RNA aptamers have emerged as novel biosensor tools. However, the immobilization procedure of the aptamer onto a surface generally induces a loss of affinity. To understand this molecular process, we conducted a complete simulation study for the Flavin mononucleotide aptamer for which experimental data are available. Several molecular dynamics simulations (MD) of the Flavin in complex with its RNA aptamer were conducted in solution, linked with six thymidines (T6) and, finally, immobilized on an hexanol-thiol-functionalized gold surface. First, we demonstrated that our MD computations were able to reproduce the experimental solution structure and to provide a meaningful estimation of the Flavin free energy of binding. We also demonstrated that the T6 linkage, by itself, does not generate a perturbation of the Flavin recognition process. From the simulation of the complete biosensor system, we observed that the aptamer stays oriented parallel to the surface at a distance around 36 Å avoiding, this way, interaction with the surface. We evidenced a structural reorganization of the Flavin aptamer binding mode related to the loss of affinity and induced by an anisotropic distribution of sodium cationic densities. This means that ionic diffusion is different between the surface and the aptamer than above this last one. We suggest that these findings might be extrapolated to other nucleic acids systems for the future design of biosensors with higher efficiency and selectivity.

  10. Molecular dynamics modelling of radiation damage in zircon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grechanovsky, A. E.

    2009-04-01

    Zircon (ZrSiO4) is among actinide-bearing phases which has been proposed as a crystalline confinement matrix for nuclear waste management, especially for weapon-grade plutonium and UO2 spent fuel in the USA. Zircon is also widely used in geochronology. But, with accumulating α-decay damage, zircon undergoes a radiation induced transition to an amorphous (or metamict) state. So, in the present work molecular dynamics simulations (MD simulations) of zircon structure have been performed to study radiation damage in zircon. In this technique, one simulates the propagation of an energetic particle in a system of atoms interacting via model potentials, by integrating the Newton equations of motion. Author has used version 3.09 of the DL_POLY molecular simulation package. Zircon structure containing 181944 atoms (19x19x21 unit cells) was equilibrated at 300 K for 10 ps, and one Zr atom (usually called the primary knock-on atom, PKA) was given a velocity corresponding to an implantation energy of about 20 keV. MD simulations were performed in the microcanonical ensemble that is under conditions of constant particle number, volume and energy. Results of the MD simulations show that the number of interstitials is equal to 840 atoms. This is very close (4000-5000 atoms for 70 keV recoil atom 234Th) to what is measured in the diffuse x-ray scattering and NMR experiments on amorphous metamict samples (damaged by natural irradiation) of geological age. It has been shown that the damaged structure contains several depleted regions with characteristic sized up to 2,5 nm after single event and up to 4,5 nm after three overlapping events. Furthermore, these events produce channels of depleted matter between the overlapping damaged regions. These channels provide a high-diffusivity path for radiogenic Pb (percolation effect). Loss of radiogenic Pb may result in to incorrect dating of rocks.

  11. Molecular beam studies of reaction dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.T.

    1993-12-01

    The major thrust of this research project is to elucidate detailed dynamics of simple elementary reactions that are theoretically important and to unravel the mechanism of complex chemical reactions or photochemical processes that play important roles in many macroscopic processes. Molecular beams of reactants are used to study individual reactive encounters between molecules or to monitor photodissociation events in a collision-free environment. Most of the information is derived from measurement of the product fragment energy, angular, and state distributions. Recent activities are centered on the mechanisms of elementary chemical reactions involving oxygen atoms with unsaturated hydrocarbons, the dynamics of endothermic substitution reactions, the dependence of the chemical reactivity of electronically excited atoms on the alignment of excited orbitals, the primary photochemical processes of polyatomic molecules, intramolecular energy transfer of chemically activated and locally excited molecules, the energetics of free radicals that are important to combustion processes, the infrared-absorption spectra of carbonium ions and hydrated hydronium ions, and bond-selective photodissociation through electric excitation.

  12. Molecular-dynamic study of liquid ethylenediamine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balabaev, N. K.; Kraevskii, S. V.; Rodnikova, M. N.; Solonina, I. A.

    2016-10-01

    Models of liquid ethylenediamine (ED) are built using the molecular dynamics approach at temperatures of 293-363 K and a size of 1000 molecules in a basic cell as a cuboid. The structural and dynamic characteristics of liquid ED versus temperature are derived. The gauche conformation of the ED molecule that is characteristic of the gas phase is shown to transition easily into the trans conformation of the molecules in the liquid. NH···N hydrogen bonds are analyzed in liquid ED. The number of H-bonds per ED molecule is found to vary from 5.02 at 293 K to 3.86 at 363 K. The lifetimes in the range of the temperatures and dissociation activation energy for several H-bonds in liquid ED are found to range from 0.574 to 4.524 ps at 293 K; the activation energies are 8.8 kJ/mol for 50% of the H-bonds and 16.3 kJ/mol for 6.25% of them. A weaker and more mobile spatial grid of H-bonds in liquid ED is observed, compared to data calculated earlier for monoethanolamine.

  13. Molecular beam studies of reaction dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.T.

    1990-03-01

    The major thrust of this research project is to elucidate detailed dynamics of simple reactions that are theoretically important and to unravel the mechanism of complex chemical reactions or photochemical processes that play important roles in many macroscopic processes. Molecular beams of reactants are used to study individual reactive encounters between molecules or to monitor photodissociation events in a collision-free environment. Most of the information is derived from measurement of the product fragment energy, angular, and state distributions. Recent activities are centered on the mechanisms of elementary chemical reactions involving oxygen atoms with unsaturated hydrocarbons, the dynamics of endothermic substitution reactions, the dependence of the chemical reactivity of electronically excited atoms on the alignment of excited orbitals, the primary photochemical processes of polyatomic molecules, intramolecular energy transfer of chemically activated and locally excited molecules, the energetics of free radicals that are important to combustion processes, the infrared-absorption spectra of carbonium ions and hydrated hydronium ions, and bond-selective photodissociation through electric excitation. 34 refs.

  14. Molecular beam studies of reaction dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Yuan T.

    1991-03-01

    The major thrust of this research project is to elucidate detailed dynamics of simple elementary reactions that are theoretically important and to unravel the mechanism of complex chemical reactions or photochemical processes that play important roles in many macroscopic processes. Molecular beams of reactants are used to study individual reactive encounters between molecules or to monitor photodissociation events in a collision-free environment. Most of the information is derived from measurement of the product fragment energy, angular, and state distributions. Recent activities are centered on the mechanisms of elementary chemical reactions involving oxygen atoms with unsaturated hydrocarbons, the dynamics of endothermic substitution reactions, the dependence of the chemical reactivity of electronically excited atoms on the alignment of excited orbitals, the primary photochemical processes of polyatomic molecules, intramolecular energy transfer of chemically activated and locally excited molecules, the energetics of free radicals that are important to combustion processes, the infrared-absorption spectra of carbonium ions and hydrated hydronium ions, and bond-selective photodissociation through electric excitation.

  15. A molecular dynamics approach to barrodiffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooley, James; Marciante, Mathieu; Murillo, Michael

    2016-10-01

    Unexpected phenomena in the reaction rates for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) capsules have led to a renewed interest in the thermo-dynamically driven diffusion process for the past 10 years, often described collectively as barodiffusion. In the current context, barodiffusion would manifest as a process that separates ions of differing mass and charge ratios due to pressure and temperature gradients set-up through shock structures in the capsule core. Barrodiffusion includes additional mass transfer terms that account for the irreversible transport of species due to gradients in the system, both thermodynamic and electric e.g, i = - ρD [ ∇c +kp ∇ln(pi) +kT(i) ∇ln(Ti) +kt(e) ∇ln(Te) +eke/Ti ∇ϕ ] . Several groups have attacked this phenomena using continuum scale models and supplemented with kinetic theory to derive coefficients for the different diffusion terms based on assumptions about the collisional processes. In contrast, we have applied a molecular dynamics (MD) simulation to this system to gain a first-principle understanding of the rate kinetics and to assess the accuracy of the differin

  16. Molecular dynamics simulation in virus research

    PubMed Central

    Ode, Hirotaka; Nakashima, Masaaki; Kitamura, Shingo; Sugiura, Wataru; Sato, Hironori

    2012-01-01

    Virus replication in the host proceeds by chains of interactions between viral and host proteins. The interactions are deeply influenced by host immune molecules and anti-viral compounds, as well as by mutations in viral proteins. To understand how these interactions proceed mechanically and how they are influenced by mutations, one needs to know the structures and dynamics of the proteins. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation is a powerful computational method for delineating motions of proteins at an atomic-scale via theoretical and empirical principles in physical chemistry. Recent advances in the hardware and software for biomolecular simulation have rapidly improved the precision and performance of this technique. Consequently, MD simulation is quickly extending the range of applications in biology, helping to reveal unique features of protein structures that would be hard to obtain by experimental methods alone. In this review, we summarize the recent advances in MD simulations in the study of virus–host interactions and evolution, and present future perspectives on this technique. PMID:22833741

  17. GAS-PHASE MOLECULAR DYNAMICS: VIBRATIONAL DYNAMICS OF POLYATOMIC MOLECULES

    SciTech Connect

    MUCKERMAN,J.T.

    1999-06-09

    The goal of this research is the understanding of elementary chemical and physical processes important in the combustion of fossil fuels. Interest centers on reactions and properties of short-lived chemical intermediates. High-resolution, high-sensitivity, laser absorption methods are augmented by high-temperature, flow-tube reaction kinetics studies with mass-spectrometric sampling. These experiments provide information on the energy levels, structures and reactivity of molecular free radical species and, in turn, provide new tools for the study of energy flow and chemical bond cleavage in radicals involved in chemical systems. The experimental work is supported by theoretical studies using time-dependent quantum wavepacket calculations, which provide insight into energy flow among the vibrational modes of polyatomic molecules and interference effects in multiple-surface dynamics.

  18. Structural Refinement of Proteins by Restrained Molecular Dynamics Simulations with Non-interacting Molecular Fragments

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Rong; Han, Wei; Fiorin, Giacomo; Islam, Shahidul M.; Schulten, Klaus; Roux, Benoît

    2015-01-01

    The knowledge of multiple conformational states is a prerequisite to understand the function of membrane transport proteins. Unfortunately, the determination of detailed atomic structures for all these functionally important conformational states with conventional high-resolution approaches is often difficult and unsuccessful. In some cases, biophysical and biochemical approaches can provide important complementary structural information that can be exploited with the help of advanced computational methods to derive structural models of specific conformational states. In particular, functional and spectroscopic measurements in combination with site-directed mutations constitute one important source of information to obtain these mixed-resolution structural models. A very common problem with this strategy, however, is the difficulty to simultaneously integrate all the information from multiple independent experiments involving different mutations or chemical labels to derive a unique structural model consistent with the data. To resolve this issue, a novel restrained molecular dynamics structural refinement method is developed to simultaneously incorporate multiple experimentally determined constraints (e.g., engineered metal bridges or spin-labels), each treated as an individual molecular fragment with all atomic details. The internal structure of each of the molecular fragments is treated realistically, while there is no interaction between different molecular fragments to avoid unphysical steric clashes. The information from all the molecular fragments is exploited simultaneously to constrain the backbone to refine a three-dimensional model of the conformational state of the protein. The method is illustrated by refining the structure of the voltage-sensing domain (VSD) of the Kv1.2 potassium channel in the resting state and by exploring the distance histograms between spin-labels attached to T4 lysozyme. The resulting VSD structures are in good agreement with

  19. Molecular dynamics of narrow, liquid-filled pores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magda, J. J.; Tirrell, M.; Davis, H. T.

    1985-08-01

    Molecular dynamics studies are reported for a 6-12 Lennard-Jones liquid in pore channels ranging from about 2-12 molecules wide. The pore walls are modeled as flat surfaces interacting with the fluid molecules via a continuous potential varying only with perpendicular distance from the wall. Liquid density profiles, solvation forces, interfacial tensions, and self-diffusion coefficients along the pore axis were computed. The density profiles indicate multilayer adsorption in the pore, whereas the locally defined diffusion coefficients do not vary significantly across the pore. The pore-averaged diffusivity as well as the solvation force oscillate with varying pore width at constant chemical potential. For pore widths greater than ten molecular diameters, the average diffusion coefficient is almost equal to its bulk value, and the solvation force equals the bulk pressure. In the smaller pores the mean square displacement normal to the pore walls never achieves linearity in time, and thus does not reach a diffusive limit. Thermodynamic equations relating the solvation force to the interfacial tension are derived, and the appropriate mechanical expressions for these quantities are identified. Simulation results are shown to be consistent with these thermodynamic equations. The simulations presented here will be useful in the development of the theory of fluid structure and transport in the tight pores occurring in such materials as vicor glass, clay dispersions, and biological pores and membranes.

  20. Internal coordinate molecular dynamics: a foundation for multiscale dynamics.

    PubMed

    Vaidehi, Nagarajan; Jain, Abhinandan

    2015-01-29

    Internal coordinates such as bond lengths, bond angles, and torsion angles (BAT) are natural coordinates for describing a bonded molecular system. However, the molecular dynamics (MD) simulation methods that are widely used for proteins, DNA, and polymers are based on Cartesian coordinates owing to the mathematical simplicity of the equations of motion. However, constraints are often needed with Cartesian MD simulations to enhance the conformational sampling. This makes the equations of motion in the Cartesian coordinates differential-algebraic, which adversely impacts the complexity and the robustness of the simulations. On the other hand, constraints can be easily placed in BAT coordinates by removing the degrees of freedom that need to be constrained. Thus, the internal coordinate MD (ICMD) offers an attractive alternative to Cartesian coordinate MD for developing multiscale MD method. The torsional MD method is a special adaptation of the ICMD method, where all the bond lengths and bond angles are kept rigid. The advantages of ICMD simulation methods are the longer time step size afforded by freezing high frequency degrees of freedom and performing a conformational search in the more important low frequency torsional degrees of freedom. However, the advancements in the ICMD simulations have been slow and stifled by long-standing mathematical bottlenecks. In this review, we summarize the recent mathematical advancements we have made based on spatial operator algebra, in developing a robust long time scale ICMD simulation toolkit useful for various applications. We also present the applications of ICMD simulations to study conformational changes in proteins and protein structure refinement. We review the advantages of the ICMD simulations over the Cartesian simulations when used with enhanced sampling methods and project the future use of ICMD simulations in protein dynamics.

  1. Internal Coordinate Molecular Dynamics: A Foundation for Multiscale Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Internal coordinates such as bond lengths, bond angles, and torsion angles (BAT) are natural coordinates for describing a bonded molecular system. However, the molecular dynamics (MD) simulation methods that are widely used for proteins, DNA, and polymers are based on Cartesian coordinates owing to the mathematical simplicity of the equations of motion. However, constraints are often needed with Cartesian MD simulations to enhance the conformational sampling. This makes the equations of motion in the Cartesian coordinates differential-algebraic, which adversely impacts the complexity and the robustness of the simulations. On the other hand, constraints can be easily placed in BAT coordinates by removing the degrees of freedom that need to be constrained. Thus, the internal coordinate MD (ICMD) offers an attractive alternative to Cartesian coordinate MD for developing multiscale MD method. The torsional MD method is a special adaptation of the ICMD method, where all the bond lengths and bond angles are kept rigid. The advantages of ICMD simulation methods are the longer time step size afforded by freezing high frequency degrees of freedom and performing a conformational search in the more important low frequency torsional degrees of freedom. However, the advancements in the ICMD simulations have been slow and stifled by long-standing mathematical bottlenecks. In this review, we summarize the recent mathematical advancements we have made based on spatial operator algebra, in developing a robust long time scale ICMD simulation toolkit useful for various applications. We also present the applications of ICMD simulations to study conformational changes in proteins and protein structure refinement. We review the advantages of the ICMD simulations over the Cartesian simulations when used with enhanced sampling methods and project the future use of ICMD simulations in protein dynamics. PMID:25517406

  2. Molecular determinants on the insect sodium channel for the specific action of type II pyrethroid insecticides

    SciTech Connect

    Du Yuzhe; Nomura, Yoshiko; Luo Ningguang; Liu Zhiqi; Lee, Jung-Eun; Khambay, Bhupinder; Dong Ke

    2009-01-15

    Pyrethroid insecticides are classified as type I or type II based on their distinct symptomology and effects on sodium channel gating. Structurally, type II pyrethroids possess an {alpha}-cyano group at the phenylbenzyl alcohol position, which is lacking in type I pyrethroids. Both type I and type II pyrethroids inhibit deactivation consequently prolonging the opening of sodium channels. However, type II pyrethroids inhibit the deactivation of sodium channels to a greater extent than type I pyrethroids inducing much slower decaying of tail currents upon repolarization. The molecular basis of a type II-specific action, however, is not known. Here we report the identification of a residue G{sup 1111} and two positively charged lysines immediately downstream of G{sup 1111} in the intracellular linker connecting domains II and III of the cockroach sodium channel that are specifically involved in the action of type II pyrethroids, but not in the action of type I pyrethroids. Deletion of G{sup 1111}, a consequence of alternative splicing, reduced the sodium channel sensitivity to type II pyrethroids, but had no effect on channel sensitivity to type I pyrethroids. Interestingly, charge neutralization or charge reversal of two positively charged lysines (Ks) downstream of G{sup 1111} had a similar effect. These results provide the molecular insight into the type II-specific interaction of pyrethroids with the sodium channel at the molecular level.

  3. Molecular model of the action potential sodium channel.

    PubMed Central

    Guy, H R; Seetharamulu, P

    1986-01-01

    Secondary and tertiary structural models of sodium channel transmembrane segments were developed from its recently determined primary sequence in Electrophorus electricus. The model has four homologous domains, and each domain has eight homologous transmembrane segments, S1 through S8. Each domain contains three relatively apolar segments (S1, S2 and S3) and two very apolar segments (S5 and S8), all postulated to be transmembrane alpha-helices. S4 segments have positively charged residues, mainly arginines, at every third residue. The model channel lining is formed by four S4 transmembrane alpha-helices and four negatively charged S7 segments. S7 segments are postulated to be short, partially transmembrane amphipathic alpha-helices in three domains and a beta-strand in the last domain. S7 segments are preceded by short apolar segments (S6) postulated to be alpha-helices in three domains and a beta-strand in the last domain. Positively charged side chains of S4 form salt bridges with negatively charged side chains on S7 and near the ends of S1 and S3. Putative extracellular segments that contain 5 of the 10 potential N-glycosylation sites link S5 to S6. Channel activation may involve a 'helical screw' mechanism in which S4 helices rotate around their axes as they move toward the extracellular surface. Images PMID:2417247

  4. Brownian dynamics study of a multiply-occupied cation channel: application to understanding permeation in potassium channels.

    PubMed Central

    Bek, S; Jakobsson, E

    1994-01-01

    The behavior of a multiply-occupied cation-selective channel has been computed by Brownian dynamics. The length, cross-section, ion-ion repulsion force, and ionic mobility within the channel are all estimated from data and physical reasoning. The only free parameter is a partition energy at the mouth of the channel, defining the free energy of an ion in the channel compared to the bath. It is presumed that this partition energy is associated with the energetics of exchanging a bulk hydration environment for a channel hydration environment. Varying the partition energy alone, keeping all other parameters fixed, gives approximately the full range of magnitudes of single channel conductances seen experimentally for K channels. Setting the partition energy at -11 kT makes the computed channel look similar to a squid axon K channel with respect to magnitude of conductance, shape of the I-V curve, non-unity of Ussing flux ratio exponents, decrease of current and increase of conductance with extracellular ion accumulation, and saturation at high ion concentration in the bathing solution. The model includes no preferred binding sites (local free energy minima) for ions in the channel. Therefore it follows that none of the above-mentioned properties of K channels are strong evidence for the existence of such sites. The model does not show supersaturation of current at very high bathing concentrations nor any pronounced voltage-dependence of the Ussing flux ratio exponent, suggesting that these features would require additional details not included in the model presented herein. PMID:7518703

  5. High-resolution polypeptide structure and dynamics in anisotropic environments: The gramicidin channel

    SciTech Connect

    Cross, T.A.; Lee, K.C.; Ketchem, R.R.; Hu, W.; Lazo, N.D.; Huo, S.

    1994-12-01

    To understand the details of macromolecular function, high-resolution structural and dynamic detail is essential. The polypeptide fold of the gramicidin channel has been effectively modeled for the past 20 years, yet the functional changes in conductance and channel lifetime associated with amino acid substitutions cannot be predicted. To accomplish this goal, high-resolution electrostatic modeling and the precise orientation of all dipoles are required. Furthermore, an enhanced knowledge of the complex molecular environment of this membrane-bound peptide is needed. An aqueous environment is relatively uniform and achiral. The membrane environment is very heterogenous and chiral. A knowledge of the interactions, specific and nonspecific, between peptide and lipid will aid in developing a better understanding of this environment. To accomplish this goal, it is necessary to study the peptide in an extended lipid bilayer, rather than in a vesicular or micellar form. These latter environments are likely to possess increased dynamics, increased water penetration, and distorted interactions between the polypeptide and membrane surface. To perform NMR studies on bilayer bound peptides, solid state NMR methods are required, and for specific site information, isotopic labels are incorporated using solid phase peptide synthesis.

  6. Time-dependent molecular memory in single voltage-gated sodium channel.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Tapan K; Sikdar, S K

    2007-10-01

    Excitability in neurons is associated with firing of action potentials and requires the opening of voltage-gated sodium channels with membrane depolarization. Sustained membrane depolarization, as seen in pathophysiological conditions like epilepsy, can have profound implications on the biophysical properties of voltage-gated ion channels. Therefore, we sought to characterize the effect of sustained membrane depolarization on single voltage-gated Na+ channels. Single-channel activity was recorded in the cell-attached patch-clamp mode from the rNa(v)1.2 alpha channels expressed in CHO cells. Classical statistical analysis revealed complex nonlinear changes in channel dwell times and unitary conductance of single Na+ channels as a function of conditioning membrane depolarization. Signal processing tools like weighted wavelet Z (WWZ) and discrete Fourier transform analyses attributed a "pseudo-oscillatory" nature to the observed nonlinear variation in the kinetic parameters. Modeling studies using the hidden Markov model (HMM) illustrated significant changes in kinetic states and underlying state transition rate constants upon conditioning depolarization. Our results suggest that sustained membrane depolarization induces novel nonlinear properties in voltage-gated Na+ channels. Prolonged membrane depolarization also induced a "molecular memory" phenomenon, characterized by clusters of dwell time events and strong autocorrelation in the dwell time series similar to that reported recently for single enzyme molecules. The persistence of such molecular memory was found to be dependent on the duration of depolarization. Voltage-gated Na+ channel with the observed time-dependent nonlinear properties and the molecular memory phenomenon may determine the functional state of the channel and, in turn, the excitability of a neuron.

  7. Parametrizing linear generalized Langevin dynamics from explicit molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gottwald, Fabian; Karsten, Sven; Ivanov, Sergei D.; Kühn, Oliver

    2015-06-01

    Fundamental understanding of complex dynamics in many-particle systems on the atomistic level is of utmost importance. Often the systems of interest are of macroscopic size but can be partitioned into a few important degrees of freedom which are treated most accurately and others which constitute a thermal bath. Particular attention in this respect attracts the linear generalized Langevin equation, which can be rigorously derived by means of a linear projection technique. Within this framework, a complicated interaction with the bath can be reduced to a single memory kernel. This memory kernel in turn is parametrized for a particular system studied, usually by means of time-domain methods based on explicit molecular dynamics data. Here, we discuss that this task is more naturally achieved in frequency domain and develop a Fourier-based parametrization method that outperforms its time-domain analogues. Very surprisingly, the widely used rigid bond method turns out to be inappropriate in general. Importantly, we show that the rigid bond approach leads to a systematic overestimation of relaxation times, unless the system under study consists of a harmonic bath bi-linearly coupled to the relevant degrees of freedom.

  8. A quantum molecular dynamics study of aqueous solvation dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Videla, Pablo E.; Rossky, Peter J.; Laria, D.

    2013-10-01

    Ring polymer molecular dynamics experiments have been carried out to examine effects derived from nuclear quantum fluctuations at ambient conditions on equilibrium and non-equilibrium dynamical characteristics of charge solvation by a popular simple, rigid, water model, SPC/E, and for a more recent, and flexible, q-TIP4P/F model, to examine the generality of conclusions. In particular, we have recorded the relaxation of the solvent energy gap following instantaneous, ±e charge jumps in an initially uncharged Lennard-Jones-like solute. In both charge cases, quantum effects are reflected in sharper decays at the initial stages of the relaxation, which produce up to a ˜20% reduction in the characteristic timescales describing the solvation processes. For anionic solvation, the magnitude of polarization fluctuations controlling the extent of the water proton localization in the first solvation shell is somewhat more marked than for cations, bringing the quantum solvation process closer to the classical case. Effects on the solvation response from the explicit incorporation of flexibility in the water Hamiltonian are also examined. Predictions from linear response theories for the overall relaxation profile and for the corresponding characteristic timescales are reasonably accurate for the solvation of cations, whereas we find that they are much less satisfactory for the anionic case.

  9. Accessing gap-junction channel structure-function relationships through molecular modeling and simulations.

    PubMed

    Villanelo, F; Escalona, Y; Pareja-Barrueto, C; Garate, J A; Skerrett, I M; Perez-Acle, T

    2017-01-17

    Gap junction channels (GJCs) are massive protein channels connecting the cytoplasm of adjacent cells. These channels allow intercellular transfer of molecules up to ~1 kDa, including water, ions and other metabolites. Unveiling structure-function relationships coded into the molecular architecture of these channels is necessary to gain insight on their vast biological function including electrical synapse, inflammation, development and tissular homeostasis. From early works, computational methods have been critical to analyze and interpret experimental observations. Upon the availability of crystallographic structures, molecular modeling and simulations have become a valuable tool to assess structure-function relationships in GJCs. Modeling different connexin isoforms, simulating the transport process, and exploring molecular variants, have provided new hypotheses and out-of-the-box approaches to the study of these important channels. Here, we review foundational structural studies and recent developments on GJCs using molecular modeling and simulation techniques, highlighting the methods and the cross-talk with experimental evidence. By comparing results obtained by molecular modeling and simulations techniques with structural and functional information obtained from both recent literature and structural databases, we provide a critical assesment of structure-function relationships that can be obtained from the junction between theoretical and experimental evidence.

  10. Structure and dynamics of layered molecular assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horne, Jennifer Conrad

    This dissertation focuses on the goal of understanding and controlling layered material properties from a molecular perspective. With this understanding, materials can be synthetically tailored to exhibit predetermined bulk properties. This investigation describes the optical response of a family of metal-phosphonate (MP) monolayers and multilayers, materials that are potentially useful because the films are easy to synthesize and are chemically and thermally stable. MP films have shown potential in a variety of chemical sensing and optical applications, and in this dissertation, the suitability of MP films for optical information storage is explored For this application, the extent of photonic energy transport within and between optically active layers is an important factor in determining the stability and specificity of optical modifications made to a material. Intralayer and interlayer energy transport processes can be studied selectively in MP films because the composition, and thus the properties, of each layer are controlled synthetically. It was determined by fluorescence relaxation dynamics in conjunction with atomic force microscopy (AFM) that the substrate and layer morphologies are key factors in determining the layer optical and physical properties. The initial MP layers in a multilayer are structurally heterogeneous, characterized by randomly distributed islands that are ~50 A in diameter. The population dynamics measured for these layers are non-exponential, chromophore concentration-independent, and identical for two different chromophores. The data is explained in the context of an excitation hopping model in a system where the surface is characterized by islands of aggregated chromophores as well as non-aggregated monomers. Within a MP monolayer, the dynamics are dominated by intra-island excitation hopping. Forster (dipolar) energy transfer between the energetically overlapped chromophores does not play a significant role in determining the

  11. Identification of the Molecular Site of Ivabradine Binding to HCN4 Channels

    PubMed Central

    Nardini, Marco; Barbuti, Andrea; Micheloni, Stefano; Bolognesi, Martino; DiFrancesco, Dario

    2013-01-01

    Ivabradine is a specific heart rate-reducing agent approved as a treatment of chronic stable angina. Its mode of action involves a selective and specific block of HCN channels, the molecular components of sinoatrial "funny" (f)-channels. Different studies suggest that the binding site of ivabradine is located in the inner vestibule of HCN channels, but the molecular details of ivabradine binding are unknown. We thus sought to investigate by mutagenesis and in silico analysis which residues of the HCN4 channel, the HCN isoform expressed in the sinoatrial node, are involved in the binding of ivabradine. Using homology modeling, we verified the presence of an inner cavity below the channel pore and identified residues lining the cavity; these residues were replaced with alanine (or valine) either alone or in combination, and WT and mutant channels were expressed in HEK293 cells. Comparison of the block efficiency of mutant vs WT channels, measured by patch-clamp, revealed that residues Y506, F509 and I510 are involved in ivabradine binding. For each mutant channel, docking simulations correctly explain the reduced block efficiency in terms of proportionally reduced affinity for ivabradine binding. In summary our study shows that ivabradine occupies a cavity below the channel pore, and identifies specific residues facing this cavity that interact and stabilize the ivabradine molecule. This study provides an interpretation of known properties of f/HCN4 channel block by ivabradine such as the “open channel block”, the current-dependence of block and the property of "trapping" of drug molecules in the closed configuration. PMID:23308150

  12. Superelevation and overspill control secondary flow dynamics in submarine channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorrell, R. M.; Darby, S. E.; Peakall, J.; Sumner, E. J.; Parsons, D. R.; Wynn, R. B.

    2013-08-01

    In subaerial and submarine meander bends, fluid flow travels downstream in a helical spiral, the structure of which is determined by centrifugal, hydrostatic, baroclinic, and Coriolis forces that together balance frictional stresses generated by the flow. The sense of rotation of this helical flow, and in particular, whether the near bed flow is directed toward the inner bank, e.g., "river-normal," or outer bank, e.g., "river-reversed," is crucial to the morphodynamic evolution of the channel. However, in recent years, there has been a debate over the river-normal or river-reversed nature of submarine flows. Herein, we develop a novel three-dimensional closure of secondary flow dynamics, incorporating downstream convective material transport, to cast new light on this debate. Specifically, we show that the presence of net radial material transport, arising from flow superelevation and overspill, exerts a key control on the near bed orientation of secondary flow in submarine meanders. Our analysis implies that river-reversed flows are likely to be much more prevalent throughout submarine-canyon fan systems than prior studies have indicated.

  13. Dynamics of capillary transport in semi-solid channels.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Johanna; Ström, Anna; Gebäck, Tobias; Larsson, Anette

    2017-02-08

    Capillary action has been described by Lucas and Washburn and extensively studied experimentally in hard materials, but few studies have examined capillary action in soft materials such as hydrogels. In tissue engineering, cells or dispersions must be often distributed within a hydrogel via microporous paths. Capillary action is one way to disperse such substances. Here, we examine the dynamics of capillary action in a model system of straight capillaries in two hydrogels. The channels had a circular cross-section in the micrometer size range (180-630 μm). The distance travelled over time was recorded and compared with the predictions of Lucas and Washburn. Besides water, we used a sucrose solution and a hydroxyethyl cellulose solution, both with viscosities slightly higher than that of water. The results showed that the distance travelled is proportional to the square root of time, , and that larger capillaries and lower viscosities result, as expected, in faster speeds. However, the absolute experimental values display large discrepancies from the predictions. We demonstrate that several possible reasons for these discrepancies can be ruled out and we describe a novel hypothesis for the cause of the retarded meniscus movement.

  14. Molecular Dynamics Modeling of Hydrated Calcium-Silicate-Hydrate (CSH) Cement Molecular Structure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-30

    properties of key hydrated cement constituent calcium-silicate-hydrate (CSH) at the molecular, nanometer scale level. Due to complexity, still unknown...public release; distribution is unlimited. Molecular Dynamics Modeling of Hydrated Calcium-Silicate- Hydrate (CSH) Cement Molecular Structure The views... Cement Molecular Structure Report Title Multi-scale modeling of complex material systems requires starting from fundamental building blocks to

  15. Molecular simulation studies of hydrophobic gating in nanopores and ion channels.

    PubMed

    Trick, Jemma L; Aryal, Prafulla; Tucker, Stephen J; Sansom, Mark S P

    2015-04-01

    Gating in channels and nanopores plays a key role in regulating flow of ions across membranes. Molecular simulations provide a 'computational microscope' which enables us to examine the physical nature of gating mechanisms at the level of the single channel molecule. Water enclosed within the confines of a nanoscale pore may exhibit unexpected behaviour. In particular, if the molecular surfaces lining the pore are hydrophobic this promotes de-wetting of the pore. De-wetting is observed as stochastic liquid-vapour transitions within a pore, and may lead to functional closure of a pore to the flow of ions and/or water. Such behaviour was first observed in simulations of simple model nanopores and referred to as 'hydrophobic gating'. Simulations of both the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and of TWIK-1 potassium channels (the latter alongside experimental studies) suggest hydrophobic gating may occur in some biological ion channels. Current studies are focused on designing hydrophobic gates into biomimetic nanopores.

  16. Molecular dynamics and spectra. II. Diatomic Raman

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berens, Peter H.; White, Steven R.; Wilson, Kent R.

    1981-07-01

    This paper and paper I in this series [P.H. Berens and K.R. Wilison, J. Chem. Phys. 74, 4872 (1981)] indicate that infrared and Raman rotational and fundamental vibrational-rotational spectra of dense systems (high pressure gases, liquids, and solids) are essentially classical, in that they can be computed and understood from a basically classical mechanical viewpoint, with some caveats for features in which anharmonicity is important, such as the detailed shape of Q branches. It is demonstrated here, using the diatomic case as an example, that ordinary, i.e., nonresonant, Raman band contours can be computed from classical mechanics plus simple quantum corrections. Classical versions of molecular dynamics, linear response theory, and ensemble averaging, followed by straightforward quantum corrections, are used to compute the pure rotational and fundamental vibration-rotational Raman band contours of N2 for the gas phase and for solutions of N2 in different densities of gas phase Ar and in liquid Ar. The evolution is seen from multiple peaked line shapes characteristic of free rotation in the gas phase to single peaks characteristic of hindered rotation in the liquid phase. Comparison is made with quantum and correspondence principle classical gas phase spectral calculations and with experimental measurements for pure N2 and N2 in liquid Ar. Three advantages are pointed out for a classical approach to infrared and Raman spectra. First, a classical approach can be used to compute the spectra of complex molecular systems, e.g., of large molecules, clusters, liquids, solutions, and solids. Second, this classical approach can be extended to compute the spectra of nonequilibrium and time-dependent systems, e.g., infrared and Raman spectra during the course of chemical reactions. Third, a classical viewpoint allows experimental infrared and Raman spectra to be understood and interpreted in terms of atomic motions with the considerable aid of classical models and of our

  17. Molecular dynamics simulations of ballistic He penetration into W fuzz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaver, T. P. C.; Nordlund, K.; Morgan, T. W.; Westerhof, E.; Thijsse, B. J.; van de Sanden, M. C. M.

    2016-12-01

    Results are presented of large-scale Molecular Dynamics simulations of low-energy He bombardment of W nanorods, or so-called ‘fuzz’ structures. The goal of these simulations is to see if ballistic He penetration through W fuzz offers a more realistic scenario for how He moves through fuzz layers than He diffusion through fuzz nanorods. Instead of trying to grow a fuzz layer starting from a flat piece of bulk W, a new approach of creating a fully formed fuzz structure 0.43 µm thick out of ellipsoidal pieces of W is employed. Lack of detailed experimental knowledge of the 3D structure of fuzz is dealt with by simulating He bombardment on five different structures of 15 vol% W and determining the variation in He penetration for each case. The results show that by far the most important factor determining He penetration is the amount of open channels through which He ions can travel unimpeded. For a more or less even W density distribution He penetration into fuzz falls off exponentially with distance and can thus be described by a ‘half depth’. In a 15 vol% fuzz structure, the half depth can reach 0.18 µm. In the far sparser fuzz structures that were recently reported, the half depth might be 1 µm or more. This means that ballistic He penetration offers a more likely scenario than He diffusion through nanorods for how He moves through fuzz and may provide an adequate explanation for how He penetrates through the thickest fuzz layers reported so far. Furthermore, the exponential decrease in penetration with depth would follow a logarithmic dependence on fluence which is compatible with experiments. A comparison of these results and molecular dynamics calculations carried out in the recoil interaction approximation shows that results for W fuzz are qualitatively very different from conventional stopping power calculations on W with a similarly low but homogeneous density distribution.

  18. Nanoscale deicing by molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Senbo; He, Jianying; Zhang, Zhiliang

    2016-07-01

    Deicing is important to human activities in low-temperature circumstances, and is critical for combating the damage caused by excessive accumulation of ice. The aim of creating anti-icing materials, surfaces and applications relies on the understanding of fundamental nanoscale ice adhesion mechanics. Here in this study, we employ all-atom modeling and molecular dynamics simulation to investigate ice adhesion. We apply force to detach and shear nano-sized ice cubes for probing the determinants of atomistic adhesion mechanics, and at the same time investigate the mechanical effect of a sandwiched aqueous water layer between ice and substrates. We observe that high interfacial energy restricts ice mobility and increases both ice detaching and shearing stresses. We quantify up to a 60% decrease in ice adhesion strength by an aqueous water layer, and provide atomistic details that support previous experimental studies. Our results contribute quantitative comparison of nanoscale adhesion strength of ice on hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces, and supply for the first time theoretical references for understanding the mechanics at the atomistic origins of macroscale ice adhesion.Deicing is important to human activities in low-temperature circumstances, and is critical for combating the damage caused by excessive accumulation of ice. The aim of creating anti-icing materials, surfaces and applications relies on the understanding of fundamental nanoscale ice adhesion mechanics. Here in this study, we employ all-atom modeling and molecular dynamics simulation to investigate ice adhesion. We apply force to detach and shear nano-sized ice cubes for probing the determinants of atomistic adhesion mechanics, and at the same time investigate the mechanical effect of a sandwiched aqueous water layer between ice and substrates. We observe that high interfacial energy restricts ice mobility and increases both ice detaching and shearing stresses. We quantify up to a 60% decrease in ice

  19. Nonlinear Resonance Artifacts in Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlick, Tamar; Mandziuk, Margaret; Skeel, Robert D.; Srinivas, K.

    1998-02-01

    The intriguing phenomenon of resonance, a pronounced integrator-induced corruption of a system's dynamics, is examined for simple molecular systems subject to the classical equations of motion. This source of timestep limitation is not well appreciated in general, and certainly analyses of resonance patterns have been few in connection to biomolecular dynamics. Yet resonances are present in the commonly used Verlet integrator, in symplectic implicit schemes, and also limit the scope of current multiple-timestep methods that are formulated as symplectic and reversible. The only general remedy to date has been to reduce the timestep. For this purpose, we derive method-dependent timestep thresholds (e.g., Tables 1 and 2) that serve as useful guidelines in practice for biomolecular simulations. We also devise closely related symplectic implicit schemes for which the limitation on the discretization stepsize is much less severe. Specifically, we design methods to remove third-order, or both the third- and fourth-order, resonances. These severe low-order resonances can lead to instability or very large energies. Our tests on two simple molecular problems (Morse and Lennard-Jones potentials), as well as a 22-atom molecule, N-acetylalanyl-N '-methylamide, confirm this prediction; our methods can delay resonances so that they occur only at larger timesteps (EW method) or are essentially removed (LIM2 method). Although stable for large timesteps by this approach, trajectories show large energy fluctuations, perhaps due to the coupling with other factors that induce instability in complex nonlinear systems. Thus, the methods developed here may be more useful for conformational sampling of biomolecular structures. The analysis presented here for the blocked alanine model emphasizes that one-dimensional analysis of resonances can be applied to a more complex, multimode system to analyze resonance behavior, but that resonance due to frequency coupling is more complex to pinpoint

  20. How Dynamic Visualization Technology Can Support Molecular Reasoning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Dalit

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a study aimed at exploring the advantages of dynamic visualization for the development of better understanding of molecular processes. We designed a technology-enhanced curriculum module in which high school chemistry students conduct virtual experiments with dynamic molecular visualizations of solid, liquid, and…

  1. How Dynamic Visualization Technology Can Support Molecular Reasoning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Dalit

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a study aimed at exploring the advantages of dynamic visualization for the development of better understanding of molecular processes. We designed a technology-enhanced curriculum module in which high school chemistry students conduct virtual experiments with dynamic molecular visualizations of solid, liquid, and…

  2. Exploring inhibitor release pathways in histone deacetylases using random acceleration molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Kalyaanamoorthy, Subha; Chen, Yi-Ping Phoebe

    2012-02-27

    Molecular channel exploration perseveres to be the prominent solution for eliciting structure and accessibility of active site and other internal spaces of macromolecules. The volume and silhouette characterization of these channels provides answers for the issues of substrate access and ligand swapping between the obscured active site and the exterior of the protein. Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are metal-dependent enzymes that are involved in the cell growth, cell cycle regulation, and progression, and their deregulations have been linked with different types of cancers. Hence HDACs, especially the class I family, are widely recognized as the important cancer targets, and the characterizations of their structures and functions have been of special interest in cancer drug discovery. The class I HDACs are known to possess two different protein channels, an 11 Å and a 14 Å (named channels A and B1, respectively), of which the former is a ligand or substrate occupying tunnel that leads to the buried active site zinc ion and the latter is speculated to be involved in product release. In this work, we have carried out random acceleration molecular dynamics (RAMD) simulations coupled with the classical molecular dynamics to explore the release of the ligand, N-(2-aminophenyl) benzamide (LLX) from the active sites of the recently solved X-ray crystal structure of HDAC2 and the computationally modeled HDAC1 proteins. The RAMD simulations identified significant structural and dynamic features of the HDAC channels, especially the key 'gate-keeping' amino acid residues that control these channels and the ligand release events. Further, this study identified a novel and unique channel B2, a subchannel from channel B1, in the HDAC1 protein structure. The roles of water molecules in the LLX release from the HDAC1 and HDAC2 enzymes are also discussed. Such structural and dynamic properties of the HDAC protein channels that govern the ligand escape reactions will provide

  3. Molecular dynamics simulations of glycoclusters and glycodendrimers.

    PubMed

    von der Lieth, Claus W; Frank, Martin; Lindhorst, Thisbe K

    2002-05-01

    Protein-carbohydrate recognition plays a crucial role in a wide range of biological processes, required both for normal physiological functions and the onset of disease. Nature uses multivalency in carbohydrate-protein interactions as a strategy to overcome the low affinity found for singular binding of an individual saccharide epitope to a single carbohydrate recognition domain of a lectin. To mimic the complex multi-branched oligosaccharides found in glycoconjugates, which form the structural basis of multivalent carbohydrate-protein interactions, so-called glycoclusters and glycodendrimers have been designed to serve as high-affinity ligands of the respective receptor proteins. To allow a rational design of glycodendrimer-type molecules with regard to the receptor structures involved in carbohydrate recognition, a deeper knowledge of the dynamics of such molecules is desirable. Most glycodendrimers have to be considered highly flexible molecules with their conformational preferences most difficult to elucidate by experimental methods. Longtime molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with inclusion of explicit solvent molecules are suited to explore the conformational space accessible to glycodendrimers. Here, a detailed geometric and conformational analysis of 15 glycodendrimers and glycoclusters has been accomplished, which differ with regard to their core moieties, spacer characteristics and the type of terminal carbohydrate units. It is shown that the accessible conformational space depends strongly on the structural features of the core and spacer moieties and even on the type of terminating sugars. The obtained knowledge about possible spatial distributions of the sugar epitopes exposed on the investigated hyperbranched neoglycoconjugates is detailed for all examples and forms important information for the interpretation and prediction of affinity data, which can be deduced from biological testing of these multivalent neoglycoconjugates.

  4. Microsecond Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Lipid Mixing

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of membranes are often hindered by the slow lateral diffusion of lipids and the limited time scale of MD. In order to study the dynamics of mixing and characterize the lateral distribution of lipids in converged mixtures, we report microsecond-long all-atom MD simulations performed on the special-purpose machine Anton. Two types of mixed bilayers, POPE:POPG (3:1) and POPC:cholesterol (2:1), as well as a pure POPC bilayer, were each simulated for up to 2 μs. These simulations show that POPE:POPG and POPC:cholesterol are each fully miscible at the simulated conditions, with the final states of the mixed bilayers similar to a random mixture. By simulating three POPE:POPG bilayers at different NaCl concentrations (0, 0.15, and 1 M), we also examined the effect of salt concentration on lipid mixing. While an increase in NaCl concentration is shown to affect the area per lipid, tail order, and lipid lateral diffusion, the final states of mixing remain unaltered, which is explained by the largely uniform increase in Na+ ions around POPE and POPG. Direct measurement of water permeation reveals that the POPE:POPG bilayer with 1 M NaCl has reduced water permeability compared with those at zero or low salt concentration. Our calculations provide a benchmark to estimate the convergence time scale of all-atom MD simulations of lipid mixing. Additionally, equilibrated structures of POPE:POPG and POPC:cholesterol, which are frequently used to mimic bacterial and mammalian membranes, respectively, can be used as starting points of simulations involving these membranes. PMID:25237736

  5. Molecular dynamics simulations of xDNA.

    PubMed

    Varghese, Mathew K; Thomas, Renjith; Unnikrishnan, N V; Sudarsanakumar, C

    2009-05-01

    xDNA is a modified DNA, which contains natural as well as expanded bases. Expanded bases are generated by the addition of a benzene spacer to the natural bases. A set of AMBER force-field parameters were derived for the expanded bases and the structural dynamics of the xDNA decamer (xT5' G xT A xC xG C xA xG T3').(xA5' C T xG C G xT A xC A3') was explored using a 22 ns molecular dynamics simulation in explicit solvent. During the simulation, the duplex retained its Watson-Crick base-pairing and double helical structure, with deviations from the starting B-form geometry towards A-form; the deviations are mainly in the backbone torsion angles and in the helical parameters. The sugar pucker of the residues were distributed among a variety of modes; C2' endo, C1' exo, O4' endo, C4' exo, C2' exo, and C3' endo. The enhanced stacking interactions on account of the modification in the bases could help to retain the duplex nature of the helix with minor deviations from the ideal geometry. In our simulation, the xDNA showed a reduced minor groove width and an enlarged major groove width in comparison with the NMR structure. Both the grooves are larger than that of standard B-DNA, but major groove width is larger than that of A-DNA with almost equal minor groove width. The enlarged groove widths and the possibility of additional hydration in the grooves makes xDNA a potential molecule for various applications. Copyright (c) 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. The Dynamic Behavior of the P2X4 Ion Channel in the Closed Conformation.

    PubMed

    Pierdominici-Sottile, Gustavo; Moffatt, Luciano; Palma, Juliana

    2016-12-20

    We present the results of a detailed molecular dynamics study of the closed form of the P2X4 receptor. The fluctuations observed in the simulations were compared with the changes that occur in the transition from the closed to the open structure. To get further insight on the opening mechanism, the actual displacements were decomposed into interchain motions and intrachain deformations. This analysis revealed that the iris-like expansion of the transmembrane helices mainly results from interchain motions that already take place in the closed conformation. However, these movements cannot reach the amplitude required for the opening of the channel because they are impeded by interactions occurring around the ATP binding pocket. This suggests that the union of ATP produces distortions in the chains that eliminate the restrictions on the interchain displacements, leading to the opening of the pore. Copyright © 2016 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Computer simulations of channel meandering and the formation of point bars: Linking channel dynamics to the preserved stratigraphy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, T.; Covault, J. A.; Pyrcz, M.; Sullivan, M.

    2012-12-01

    Meandering rivers are probably one of the most recognizable geomorphic features on earth. As they meander across alluvial and delta plains, channels migrate laterally and develop point bars, splays, levees and other geomorphic and sedimentary features that compose substantial portions of the fill within many sedimentary basins. These basins can include hydrocarbon producing fields. Therefore, a good understanding of the processes of meandering channels and their associated deposits is critical for exploiting these reservoirs in the subsurface. In the past couple of decades, significant progress has been made in our understanding of the morphodynamics of channel meandering. Basic fluid dynamics and sediment transport (Ikeda and Parker, 1981; Howard, 1992) has shown that many characteristic features of meandering rivers, such as the meandering wavelength, growth rate and downstream migration rate, can be predicted quantitatively. As a result, a number of variations and improvement of the theory have emerged (e.g., Blondeaux and Seminara, 1985; Parker and Andrews, 1985, 1986; and Sun et al., 2001a, b).The main improvements include the recognition of so called "bar-bend" interactions, where the development of bars on the channel bed and their interactions with the channel bend is recognized as a primary cause for meandering channels to develop greater complexity than the classic goose-neck meander bend shapes, such as compound bend. Recently, Sun and others have shown that the spatial patterns of width variations in meandering channels can be explained by an extrinsic periodic flow variations coupled with the intrinsic bend instability dynamics. In contrast to the significant improvement of our understanding of channel meandering, little work has been done to link the geomorphic features of meandering channels to the geometry and heterogeneity of the deposits they form and ultimately preserves. A computer simulation model based on the work of Sun and others (1996, 2001

  8. Ion channels or aquaporins as novel molecular targets in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Xia, Jianling; Wang, Hongqiang; Li, Shi; Wu, Qinghui; Sun, Li; Huang, Hongxiang; Zeng, Ming

    2017-03-06

    Gastric cancer (GC) is a common disease with few effective treatment choices and poor prognosis, and has the second-highest mortality rates among all cancers worldwide. Dysregulation and/or malfunction of ion channels or aquaporins (AQPs) are common in various human cancers. Furthermore, ion channels are involved in numerous important aspects of the tumor aggressive phonotype, such as proliferation, cell cycle, apoptosis, motility, migration, and invasion. Indeed, by localizing in the plasma membrane, ion channels or AQPs can sense and respond to extracellular environment changes; thus, they play a crucial role in cell signaling and cancer progression. These findings have expanded a new area of pharmaceutical exploration for various types of cancer, including GC. The involvement of multiple ion channels, such as voltage-gated potassium and sodium channels, intracellular chloride channels, 'transient receptor potential' channels, and AQPs, which have been shown to facilitate the pathogenesis of other tumors, also plays a role in GC. In this review, an overview of ion channel and aquaporin expression and function in carcinogenesis of GC is presented. Studies of ion channels or AQPs will advance our understanding of the molecular genesis of GC and may identify novel and effective targets for the clinical application of GC.

  9. Molecular Information of charybdotoxin blockade in the large conductance calcium-activated potassium channel.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Su; Yi, Hong; Liu, Hui; Cao, Zhijian; Wu, Yingliang; Li, Wenxin

    2009-07-01

    The scorpion toxin, charybdotoxin (ChTX), is the first identified peptide inhibitor for the large-conductance Ca2+ and voltage-dependent K+ (BK) channel, and the chemical information of the interaction between ChTX and BK channel remains unclear today. Using combined computational methods, we obtained a ChTX-BK complex structure model, which correlated well with the mutagenesis data. In this complex, ChTX mainly used its beta-sheet domains to associate the BK channel with a conserved pore-blocking Lys27. Another crucial Tyr36 residue of ChTX lied over the loop connecting selectivity filter and S6 helix of BK channel, forming a hydrogen bond with Gly291 of BK channel. Besides, the unique turret region of BK channel was found to be far away from bound ChTX, which could explain the fact that many BK channel blockers show less selectivity over Kv channels. Together, all these information is helpful to reveal the diverse interactions between scorpion toxins and potassium channels and can accelerate the molecular engineering of specific inhibitor design.

  10. Molecular Mechanisms of Large-Conductance Ca2+-Activated Potassium Channel Activation by Ginseng Gintonin

    PubMed Central

    Choi, S. H.; Lee, B. H.; Hwang, S. H.; Kim, H. J.; Lee, S. M.; Kim, H. C.; Rhim, H. W.; Nah, S. Y.

    2013-01-01

    Gintonin is a unique lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) receptor ligand found in Panax ginseng. Gintonin induces transient [Ca2+]i through G protein-coupled LPA receptors. Large-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (BKCa) channels are expressed in blood vessels and neurons and play important roles in blood vessel relaxation and attenuation of neuronal excitability. BKCa channels are activated by transient [Ca2+]i and are regulated by various Ca2+-dependent kinases. We investigated the molecular mechanisms of BKCa channel activation by gintonin. BKCa channels are heterologously expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Gintonin treatment induced BKCa channel activation in oocytes expressing the BKCa channel α subunit in a concentration-dependent manner (EC50 = 0.71 ± 0.08 µg/mL). Gintonin-mediated BKCa channel activation was blocked by a PKC inhibitor, calphostin, and by the calmodulin inhibitor, calmidazolium. Site-directed mutations in BKCa channels targeting CaM kinase II or PKC phosphorylation sites but not PKA phosphorylation sites attenuated gintonin action. Mutations in the Ca2+ bowl and the regulator of K+ conductance (RCK) site also blocked gintonin action. These results indicate that gintonin-mediated BKCa channel activations are achieved through LPA1 receptor-phospholipase C-IP3-Ca2+-PKC-calmodulin-CaM kinase II pathways and calcium binding to the Ca2+ bowl and RCK domain. Gintonin could be a novel contributor against blood vessel constriction and over-excitation of neurons. PMID:23662129

  11. Molecular mechanism of voltage sensor movements in a potassium channel.

    PubMed

    Elliott, David J S; Neale, Edward J; Aziz, Qadeer; Dunham, James P; Munsey, Tim S; Hunter, Malcolm; Sivaprasadarao, Asipu

    2004-12-08

    Voltage-gated potassium channels are six-transmembrane (S1-S6) proteins that form a central pore domain (4 x S5-S6) surrounded by four voltage sensor domains (S1-S4), which detect changes in membrane voltage and control pore opening. Upon depolarization, the S4 segments move outward carrying charged residues across the membrane field, thereby leading to the opening of the pore. The mechanism of S4 motion is controversial. We have investigated how S4 moves relative to the pore domain in the prototypical Shaker potassium channel. We introduced pairs of cysteines, one in S4 and the other in S5, and examined proximity changes between each pair of cysteines during activation, using Cd2+ and copper-phenanthroline, which crosslink the cysteines with metal and disulphide bridges, respectively. Modelling of the results suggests a novel mechanism: in the resting state, the top of the S3b-S4 voltage sensor paddle lies close to the top of S5 of the adjacent subunit, but moves towards the top of S5 of its own subunit during depolarization--this motion is accompanied by a reorientation of S4 charges to the extracellular phase.

  12. Statistical coarse-graining of molecular dynamics into peridynamics.

    SciTech Connect

    Silling, Stewart Andrew; Lehoucq, Richard B.

    2007-10-01

    This paper describes an elegant statistical coarse-graining of molecular dynamics at finite temperature into peridynamics, a continuum theory. Peridynamics is an efficient alternative to molecular dynamics enabling dynamics at larger length and time scales. In direct analogy with molecular dynamics, peridynamics uses a nonlocal model of force and does not employ stress/strain relationships germane to classical continuum mechanics. In contrast with classical continuum mechanics, the peridynamic representation of a system of linear springs and masses is shown to have the same dispersion relation as the original spring-mass system.

  13. Multimillion atom molecular dynamics simulations of glasses and ceramic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vashishta, Priya; Kalia, Rajiv K.; Nakano, Aiichiro

    1999-11-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are a powerful tool for studying physical and chemical phenomena in materials. In these lectures we shall review the molecular dynamics method and its implementation on parallel computer architectures. Using the molecular dynamics method we will study a number of materials in different ranges of density, temperature, and uniaxial strain. These include structural correlations in silica glass under pressure, crack propagation in silicon nitride films, sintering of silicon nitride nanoclusters, consolidation of nanophase materials, and dynamic fracture. Multimillion atom simulations of oxidation of aluminum nanoclusters and nanoindentation in silicon nitride will also be discussed.

  14. Molecular dynamics simulation of fractal aggregate diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pranami, Gaurav; Lamm, Monica H.; Vigil, R. Dennis

    2010-11-01

    The diffusion of fractal aggregates constructed with the method by Thouy and Jullien [J. Phys. A 27, 2953 (1994)10.1088/0305-4470/27/9/012] comprised of Np spherical primary particles was studied as a function of the aggregate mass and fractal dimension using molecular dynamics simulations. It is shown that finite-size effects have a strong impact on the apparent value of the diffusion coefficient (D) , but these can be corrected by carrying out simulations using different simulation box sizes. Specifically, the diffusion coefficient is inversely proportional to the length of a cubic simulation box, and the constant of proportionality appears to be independent of the aggregate mass and fractal dimension. Using this result, it is possible to compute infinite dilution diffusion coefficients (Do) for aggregates of arbitrary size and fractal dimension, and it was found that Do∝Np-1/df , as is often assumed by investigators simulating Brownian aggregation of fractal aggregates. The ratio of hydrodynamic radius to radius of gyration is computed and shown to be independent of mass for aggregates of fixed fractal dimension, thus enabling an estimate of the diffusion coefficient for a fractal aggregate based on its radius of gyration.

  15. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Ferroelectric Phase Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Rici; Krakauer, Henry

    1997-03-01

    Based on an analysis of the wavevector dependence of the lattice instabilities in KNbO_3, we proposed a real-space chain-like instability and a scenario of sequential freezing out or onset of coherence of these instabilities, which qualitatively explains the sequence of observed temperature-dependent ferroelectric phases.(R. Yu and H. Krakauer, Phys. Rev. Lett. 74), 4067 (1995). We suggested that this chain-like instability should also be found in BaTiO_3, and this has been subsequently confirmed by Ghosez et al.(P. Ghosez et al.), Proc. 4th Williamsburg Workshop on First-Principles Calculations for Ferroelectrics, to be published We will present molecular dynamics simulations on BaTiO_3, using effective Hamiltonians constructed from first-principles calculations,(W. Zhong, D. Vanderbilt, and K. M. Rabe, Phys. Rev. Lett. 73), 1861 (1994). that reproduce the essential features of diffuse x-ray scattering measurements in the cubic, tetragonal, orthorhombic, and rhombohedral phases. The good agreement supports the interpretation of real-space chain-formation. Simulations for KNbO3 may also be reported.

  16. Integrating influenza antigenic dynamics with molecular evolution

    PubMed Central

    Bedford, Trevor; Suchard, Marc A; Lemey, Philippe; Dudas, Gytis; Gregory, Victoria; Hay, Alan J; McCauley, John W; Russell, Colin A; Smith, Derek J; Rambaut, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Influenza viruses undergo continual antigenic evolution allowing mutant viruses to evade host immunity acquired to previous virus strains. Antigenic phenotype is often assessed through pairwise measurement of cross-reactivity between influenza strains using the hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay. Here, we extend previous approaches to antigenic cartography, and simultaneously characterize antigenic and genetic evolution by modeling the diffusion of antigenic phenotype over a shared virus phylogeny. Using HI data from influenza lineages A/H3N2, A/H1N1, B/Victoria and B/Yamagata, we determine patterns of antigenic drift across viral lineages, showing that A/H3N2 evolves faster and in a more punctuated fashion than other influenza lineages. We also show that year-to-year antigenic drift appears to drive incidence patterns within each influenza lineage. This work makes possible substantial future advances in investigating the dynamics of influenza and other antigenically-variable pathogens by providing a model that intimately combines molecular and antigenic evolution. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01914.001 PMID:24497547

  17. Quantum molecular dynamics simulations of dense matter

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, L.; Kress, J.; Troullier, N.; Lenosky, T.; Kwon, I.

    1997-12-31

    The authors have developed a quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) simulation method for investigating the properties of dense matter in a variety of environments. The technique treats a periodically-replicated reference cell containing N atoms in which the nuclei move according to the classical equations-of-motion. The interatomic forces are generated from the quantum mechanical interactions of the (between?) electrons and nuclei. To generate these forces, the authors employ several methods of varying sophistication from the tight-binding (TB) to elaborate density functional (DF) schemes. In the latter case, lengthy simulations on the order of 200 atoms are routinely performed, while for the TB, which requires no self-consistency, upwards to 1000 atoms are systematically treated. The QMD method has been applied to a variety cases: (1) fluid/plasma Hydrogen from liquid density to 20 times volume-compressed for temperatures of a thousand to a million degrees Kelvin; (2) isotopic hydrogenic mixtures, (3) liquid metals (Li, Na, K); (4) impurities such as Argon in dense hydrogen plasmas; and (5) metal/insulator transitions in rare gas systems (Ar,Kr) under high compressions. The advent of parallel versions of the methods, especially for fast eigensolvers, presage LDA simulations in the range of 500--1000 atoms and TB runs for tens of thousands of particles. This leap should allow treatment of shock chemistry as well as large-scale mixtures of species in highly transient environments.

  18. Fundamental frequency from classical molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Tomonori; Aida, Misako

    2015-02-07

    We give a theoretical validation for calculating fundamental frequencies of a molecule from classical molecular dynamics (MD) when its anharmonicity is small enough to be treated by perturbation theory. We specifically give concrete answers to the following questions: (1) What is the appropriate initial condition of classical MD to calculate the fundamental frequency? (2) From that condition, how accurately can we extract fundamental frequencies of a molecule? (3) What is the benefit of using ab initio MD for frequency calculations? Our analytical approaches to those questions are classical and quantum normal form theories. As numerical examples we perform two types of MD to calculate fundamental frequencies of H2O with MP2/aug-cc-pVTZ: one is based on the quartic force field and the other one is direct ab initio MD, where the potential energies and the gradients are calculated on the fly. From those calculations, we show comparisons of the frequencies from MD with the post vibrational self-consistent field calculations, second- and fourth-order perturbation theories, and experiments. We also apply direct ab initio MD to frequency calculations of C-H vibrational modes of tetracene and naphthalene. We conclude that MD can give the same accuracy in fundamental frequency calculation as second-order perturbation theory but the computational cost is lower for large molecules.

  19. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Coulomb Explosion

    SciTech Connect

    Bringa, E M

    2002-05-17

    A swift ion creates a track of electronic excitations in the target material. A net repulsion inside the track can cause a ''Coulomb Explosion'', which can lead to damage and sputtering of the material. Here we report results from molecular-dynamics (MD) simulations of Coulomb explosion for a cylindrical track as a function of charge density and neutralization/quenching time, {tau}. Screening by the free electrons is accounted for using a screened Coulomb potential for the interaction among charges. The yield exhibits a prompt component from the track core and a component, which dominates at higher excitation density, from the heated region produced. For the cases studied, the number of atoms ejected per incident ion, i.e. the sputtering yield Y, is quadratic with charge density along the track as suggested by simple models. Y({tau} = 0.2 Debye periods) is nearly 20% of the yield when there is no neutralization ({tau} {yields} {infinity}). The connections between ''Coulomb explosions'', thermal spikes and measurements of electronic sputtering are discussed.

  20. Molecular chaperone-mediated nuclear protein dynamics.

    PubMed

    Echtenkamp, Frank J; Freeman, Brian C

    2014-05-01

    Homeostasis requires effective action of numerous biological pathways including those working along a genome. The variety of processes functioning in the nucleus is considerable, yet the number of employed factors eclipses this total. Ideally, individual components assemble into distinct complexes and serially operate along a pathway to perform work. Adding to the complexity is a multitude of fluctuating internal and external signals that must be monitored to initiate, continue or halt individual activities. While cooperative interactions between proteins of the same process provide a mechanism for rapid and precise assembly, the inherent stability of such organized structures interferes with the proper timing of biological events. Further prolonging the longevity of biological complexes are crowding effects resulting from the high concentration of intracellular macromolecules. Hence, accessory proteins are required to destabilize the various assemblies to efficiently transition between structures, avoid off-pathway competitive interactions, and to terminate pathway activity. We suggest that molecular chaperones have evolved, in part, to manage these challenges by fostering a general and continuous dynamic protein environment within the nucleus.

  1. Dynamics, flexibility, and allostery in molecular chaperonins.

    PubMed

    Skjærven, Lars; Cuellar, Jorge; Martinez, Aurora; Valpuesta, José María

    2015-09-14

    The chaperonins are a family of molecular chaperones present in all three kingdoms of life. They are classified into Group I and Group II. Group I consists of the bacterial variants (GroEL) and the eukaryotic ones from mitochondria and chloroplasts (Hsp60), while Group II consists of the archaeal (thermosomes) and eukaryotic cytosolic variants (CCT or TRiC). Both groups assemble into a dual ring structure, with each ring providing a protective folding chamber for nascent and denatured proteins. Their functional cycle is powered by ATP binding and hydrolysis, which drives a series of structural rearrangements that enable encapsulation and subsequent release of the substrate protein. Chaperonins have elaborate allosteric mechanisms to regulate their functional cycle. Long-range negative cooperativity between the two rings ensures alternation of the folding chambers. Positive intra-ring cooperativity, which facilitates concerted conformational transitions within the protein subunits of one ring, has only been demonstrated for Group I chaperonins. In this review, we describe our present understanding of the underlying mechanisms and the structure-function relationships in these complex protein systems with a particular focus on the structural dynamics, allostery, and associated conformational rearrangements.

  2. Parallel Molecular Dynamics of Coulomb Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishimoto, Tokunari; Totsuji, Chieko; Tsuruta, Kenji; Totsuji, Hiroo

    2000-10-01

    Using parallel computers, we perform large-scale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of Coulomb clusters in a spherical trapping field. Long-range Coulomb forces are calculated efficiently using the fast multipole method (FMM). Previously Hasse and Avilov [1] have performed numerical analysis of Coulomb clusters, and predicted a crossover between the energy curve of Coulomb clusters and that of finite bcc crystals around N = 10^6. Another prediction [2] has been reported around N = 10^5. Recently, experimental observation of Be^+ clusters in ion trap [3] indicated that structure of N = 8 *10^4 was similar to bcc single crystal. We perform direct simulations of Coulomb clusters of system sizes N = 10^5-10^6. We report preliminary results on 10^5 system: Radial distribution and the Laue-pattern analysis indicates structural evolution of the cluster. The correlation energy of the cluster is found to be lower than finite bcc crystal of the same size. We will show results for larger systems (10^6) and the N dependence of structure and energy of the Coulomb clusters around the crossover region. [1] R. W. Hasse and V. V. Avilov, Phys. Rev. A 44, 4506 (1991). [2] D. H. E. Dubin, Phys. Rev. A 40, 1140 (1989). [3] W. M. Itano et al., Science 279, 686 (1998).

  3. Direct anharmonic correction method by molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhong-Li; Li, Rui; Zhang, Xiu-Lu; Qu, Nuo; Cai, Ling-Cang

    2017-04-01

    The quick calculation of accurate anharmonic effects of lattice vibrations is crucial to the calculations of thermodynamic properties, the construction of the multi-phase diagram and equation of states of materials, and the theoretical designs of new materials. In this paper, we proposed a direct free energy interpolation (DFEI) method based on the temperature dependent phonon density of states (TD-PDOS) reduced from molecular dynamics simulations. Using the DFEI method, after anharmonic free energy corrections we reproduced the thermal expansion coefficients, the specific heat, the thermal pressure, the isothermal bulk modulus, and the Hugoniot P- V- T relationships of Cu easily and accurately. The extensive tests on other materials including metal, alloy, semiconductor and insulator also manifest that the DFEI method can easily uncover the rest anharmonicity that the quasi-harmonic approximation (QHA) omits. It is thus evidenced that the DFEI method is indeed a very efficient method used to conduct anharmonic effect corrections beyond QHA. More importantly it is much more straightforward and easier compared to previous anharmonic methods.

  4. Molecular Dynamics Study of Helicobacter pylori Urease.

    PubMed

    Minkara, Mona S; Ucisik, Melek N; Weaver, Michael N; Merz, Kenneth M

    2014-05-13

    Helicobacter pylori have been implicated in an array of gastrointestinal disorders including, but not limited to, gastric and duodenal ulcers and adenocarcinoma. This bacterium utilizes an enzyme, urease, to produce copious amounts of ammonia through urea hydrolysis in order to survive the harsh acidic conditions of the stomach. Molecular dynamics (MD) studies on the H. pylori urease enzyme have been employed in order to study structural features of this enzyme that may shed light on the hydrolysis mechanism. A total of 400 ns of MD simulation time were collected and analyzed in this study. A wide-open flap state previously observed in MD simulations on Klebsiella aerogenes [Roberts et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc.2012, 134, 9934] urease has been identified in the H. pylori enzyme that has yet to be experimentally observed. Critical distances between residues on the flap, contact points in the closed state, and the separation between the active site Ni(2+) ions and the critical histidine α322 residue were used to characterize flap motion. An additional flap in the active site was elaborated upon that we postulate may serve as an exit conduit for hydrolysis products. Finally we discuss the internal hollow cavity and present analysis of the distribution of sodium ions over the course of the simulation.

  5. Phycodnavirus Potassium Ion Channel Proteins Question the Virus Molecular Piracy Hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Hamacher, Kay; Greiner, Timo; Ogata, Hiroyuki; Van Etten, James L.; Gebhardt, Manuela; Villarreal, Luis P.; Cosentino, Cristian; Moroni, Anna; Thiel, Gerhard

    2012-01-01

    Phycodnaviruses are large dsDNA, algal-infecting viruses that encode many genes with homologs in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Among the viral gene products are the smallest proteins known to form functional K+ channels. To determine if these viral K+ channels are the product of molecular piracy from their hosts, we compared the sequences of the K+ channel pore modules from seven phycodnaviruses to the K+ channels from Chlorella variabilis and Ectocarpus siliculosus, whose genomes have recently been sequenced. C. variabilis is the host for two of the viruses PBCV-1 and NY-2A and E. siliculosus is the host for the virus EsV-1. Systematic phylogenetic analyses consistently indicate that the viral K+ channels are not related to any lineage of the host channel homologs and that they are more closely related to each other than to their host homologs. A consensus sequence of the viral channels resembles a protein of unknown function from a proteobacterium. However, the bacterial protein lacks the consensus motif of all K+ channels and it does not form a functional channel in yeast, suggesting that the viral channels did not come from a proteobacterium. Collectively, our results indicate that the viruses did not acquire their K+ channel-encoding genes from their current algal hosts by gene transfer; thus alternative explanations are required. One possibility is that the viral genes arose from ancient organisms, which served as their hosts before the viruses developed their current host specificity. Alternatively the viral proteins could be the origin of K+ channels in algae and perhaps even all cellular organisms. PMID:22685610

  6. Phycodnavirus potassium ion channel proteins question the virus molecular piracy hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Hamacher, Kay; Greiner, Timo; Ogata, Hiroyuki; Van Etten, James L; Gebhardt, Manuela; Villarreal, Luis P; Cosentino, Cristian; Moroni, Anna; Thiel, Gerhard

    2012-01-01

    Phycodnaviruses are large dsDNA, algal-infecting viruses that encode many genes with homologs in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Among the viral gene products are the smallest proteins known to form functional K(+) channels. To determine if these viral K(+) channels are the product of molecular piracy from their hosts, we compared the sequences of the K(+) channel pore modules from seven phycodnaviruses to the K(+) channels from Chlorella variabilis and Ectocarpus siliculosus, whose genomes have recently been sequenced. C. variabilis is the host for two of the viruses PBCV-1 and NY-2A and E. siliculosus is the host for the virus EsV-1. Systematic phylogenetic analyses consistently indicate that the viral K(+) channels are not related to any lineage of the host channel homologs and that they are more closely related to each other than to their host homologs. A consensus sequence of the viral channels resembles a protein of unknown function from a proteobacterium. However, the bacterial protein lacks the consensus motif of all K(+) channels and it does not form a functional channel in yeast, suggesting that the viral channels did not come from a proteobacterium. Collectively, our results indicate that the viruses did not acquire their K(+) channel-encoding genes from their current algal hosts by gene transfer; thus alternative explanations are required. One possibility is that the viral genes arose from ancient organisms, which served as their hosts before the viruses developed their current host specificity. Alternatively the viral proteins could be the origin of K(+) channels in algae and perhaps even all cellular organisms.

  7. Diffusion, molecular separation, and drug delivery from lipid mesophases with tunable water channels.

    PubMed

    Negrini, Renata; Mezzenga, Raffaele

    2012-11-27

    Lyotropic liquid crystals characterized by a bicontinuous cubic phase (BCP) have a structure characterized by interpenetrated water channels following triply periodic minimal surfaces, which can be stable in excess water conditions and thus suitable in a multitude of applications. The control of the water channels size in these systems has a direct impact on their use for drug delivery, crystallization, and membrane separation processes. In this work we carry out systematic diffusion studies to show how the control on the water channel dimensions directly correlates with the release and separation performance of bicontinuous cubic phases. Specifically, we tune the water channels diameter of the monolinolein/water system by adding different amounts of sucrose stearate, which, having hydration-enhancing properties, can shift the boundaries of the phase diagram. We then design a model bicontinuous cubic phase lipidic membrane of the Im3m space group, having a sugar ester to monolinolein ratio of 20%, and we follow the diffusion within its water channels, by using molecules that differ systematically in size and molecular conformation, and we demonstrate, for each class of molecules, a diffusion-enhanced process upon increase of the water channel diameter. Finally, we also show the ability of the bicontinuous cubic phase to efficiently and selectively separate nanoparticles of a target size, by choosing an amount of sucrose stearate for which the water channel diameter and the nanoparticle dimensions match, demonstrating the possible use of these systems as filtering membranes of tunable molecular cutoff.

  8. Molecular Evolution of Slow and Quick Anion Channels (SLACs and QUACs/ALMTs)

    PubMed Central

    Dreyer, Ingo; Gomez-Porras, Judith Lucia; Riaño-Pachón, Diego Mauricio; Hedrich, Rainer; Geiger, Dietmar

    2012-01-01

    Electrophysiological analyses conducted about 25 years ago detected two types of anion channels in the plasma membrane of guard cells. One type of channel responds slowly to changes in membrane voltage while the other responds quickly. Consequently, they were named SLAC, for SLow Anion Channel, and QUAC, for QUick Anion Channel. Recently, genes SLAC1 and QUAC1/ALMT12, underlying the two different anion current components, could be identified in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Expression of the gene products in Xenopus oocytes confirmed the quick and slow current kinetics. In this study we provide an overview on our current knowledge on slow and quick anion channels in plants and analyze the molecular evolution of ALMT/QUAC-like and SLAC-like channels. We discovered fingerprints that allow screening databases for these channel types and were able to identify 192 (177 non-redundant) SLAC-like and 422 (402 non-redundant) ALMT/QUAC-like proteins in the fully sequenced genomes of 32 plant species. Phylogenetic analyses provided new insights into the molecular evolution of these channel types. We also combined sequence alignment and clustering with predictions of protein features, leading to the identification of known conserved phosphorylation sites in SLAC1-like channels along with potential sites that have not been yet experimentally confirmed. Using a similar strategy to analyze the hydropathicity of ALMT/QUAC-like channels, we propose a modified topology with additional transmembrane regions that integrates structure and function of these membrane proteins. Our results suggest that cross-referencing phylogenetic analyses with position-specific protein properties and functional data could be a very powerful tool for genome research approaches in general. PMID:23226151

  9. Wetting and dewetting of narrow hydrophobic channels by orthogonal electric fields: Structure, free energy, and dynamics for different water models.

    PubMed

    Kayal, Abhijit; Chandra, Amalendu

    2015-12-14

    Wetting and dewetting of a (6,6) carbon nanotube in presence of an orthogonal electric field of varying strengths are studied by means of molecular dynamics simulations using seven different models of water. We have looked at filling of the channel, occupancy and structure of water inside it, associated free energy profiles, and also dynamical properties like the time scales of collective dipole flipping and residence dynamics. For the current systems where the entire simulation box is under the electric field, the nanotube is found to undergo electrodrying, i.e., transition from filled to empty states on increase of the electric field. The free energy calculations show that the empty state is the most stable one at higher electric field as it raptures the hydrogen bond environment inside the carbon nanotube by reorienting water molecules to its direction leading to a depletion of water molecules inside the channel. We investigated the collective flipping of water dipoles inside the channel and found that it follows a fast stepwise mechanism. On the dynamical side, the dipole flipping is found to occur at a faster rate with increase of the electric field. Also, the rate of water flow is found to decrease dramatically as the field strength is increased. The residence time of water molecules inside the channel is also found to decrease with increasing electric field. Although the effects of electric field on different water models are found to be qualitatively similar, the quantitative details can be different for different models. In particular, the dynamics of water molecules inside the channel can vary significantly for different water models. However, the general behavior of wetting and dewetting transitions, enhanced dipole flips, and shorter residence times on application of an orthogonal electric field hold true for all water models considered in the current work.

  10. Molecular basis of HHQ biosynthesis: molecular dynamics simulations, enzyme kinetic and surface plasmon resonance studies

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background PQS (PseudomonasQuinolone Signal) and its precursor HHQ are signal molecules of the P. aeruginosa quorum sensing system. They explicate their role in mammalian pathogenicity by binding to the receptor PqsR that induces virulence factor production and biofilm formation. The enzyme PqsD catalyses the biosynthesis of HHQ. Results Enzyme kinetic analysis and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor experiments were used to determine mechanism and substrate order of the biosynthesis. Comparative analysis led to the identification of domains involved in functionality of PqsD. A kinetic cycle was set up and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were used to study the molecular bases of the kinetics of PqsD. Trajectory analysis, pocket volume measurements, binding energy estimations and decompositions ensured insights into the binding mode of the substrates anthraniloyl-CoA and β-ketodecanoic acid. Conclusions Enzyme kinetics and SPR experiments hint at a ping-pong mechanism for PqsD with ACoA as first substrate. Trajectory analysis of different PqsD complexes evidenced ligand-dependent induced-fit motions affecting the modified ACoA funnel access to the exposure of a secondary channel. A tunnel-network is formed in which Ser317 plays an important role by binding to both substrates. Mutagenesis experiments resulting in the inactive S317F mutant confirmed the importance of this residue. Two binding modes for β-ketodecanoic acid were identified with distinct catalytic mechanism preferences. PMID:23916145

  11. Molecular biology and biophysical properties of ion channel gating pores.

    PubMed

    Moreau, Adrien; Gosselin-Badaroudine, Pascal; Chahine, Mohamed

    2014-11-01

    The voltage sensitive domain (VSD) is a pivotal structure of voltage-gated ion channels (VGICs) and plays an essential role in the generation of electrochemical signals by neurons, striated muscle cells, and endocrine cells. The VSD is not unique to VGICs. Recent studies have shown that a VSD regulates a phosphatase. Similarly, Hv1, a voltage-sensitive protein that lacks an apparent pore domain, is a self-contained voltage sensor that operates as an H⁺ channel. VSDs are formed by four transmembrane helices (S1-S4). The S4 helix is positively charged due to the presence of arginine and lysine residues. It is surrounded by two water crevices that extend into the membrane from both the extracellular and intracellular milieus. A hydrophobic septum disrupts communication between these water crevices thus preventing the permeation of ions. The septum is maintained by interactions between the charged residues of the S4 segment and the gating charge transfer center. Mutating the charged residue of the S4 segment allows the water crevices to communicate and generate gating pore or omega pore. Gating pore currents have been reported to underlie several neuronal and striated muscle channelopathies. Depending on which charged residue on the S4 segment is mutated, gating pores are permeant either at depolarized or hyperpolarized voltages. Gating pores are cation selective and seem to converge toward Eisenmann's first or second selectivity sequences. Most gating pores are blocked by guanidine derivatives as well as trivalent and quadrivalent cations. Gating pores can be used to study the movement of the voltage sensor and could serve as targets for novel small therapeutic molecules.

  12. Ultrafast Molecular Dynamics Studied with Vacuum Ultraviolet Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Travis William

    Studying the ultrafast dynamics of small molecules can serve as the first step in understanding the dynamics in larger chemically and biologically relevant molecules. To make direct comparisons with existing computational techniques, the photons used in pump-probe spectroscopy must make perturbative transitions between the electronic states of isolated small molecules. In this dissertation experimental investigations of ultrafast dynamics in electronic excitations of neutral ethylene and carbon dioxide are discussed. These experiments are performed using VUV/XUV femtosecond pulses as pump and probe. To make photons with sufficient energy for single photon transitions, VUV and XUV light is generated by high harmonic generation (HHG) using a high pulse energy (≈30--40 mJ) Ti:sapphire femtosecond laser. Sufficient flux must be generated to enable splitting of the HHG light into pump and probe arms. The system produces >1010 photons per shot, corresponding to nearly 10 MW of peak power in the XUV. Using a high flux of high energy photons creates a unique set of challenges when designing a detector capable of performing pump-probe experiments. A velocity map imaging (VMI) detector has been designed to address these challenges, and has become a successful tool facilitating studies into molecular dynamics that were not possible before its implementation. The emphasis on using high energy, single photon transitions allowed theoretical calculations to be directly compared to experimental yields for the first time. This comparison resolved a long standing issue in the excited state lifetime of ethylene, and provided a confirmation of the branching ratio between the two nonadiabatic relaxation pathways that return ethylene back to its ground state from the pi*. The participation of the 3s Rydberg state has also been measured by collecting the time resolved photoelectron spectrum during the dynamics on ethylene's pi* excited state, confirming calculations predicting the

  13. STRUCTURE AND DYNAMICS OF QUIESCENT FILAMENT CHANNELS OBSERVED BY HINODE/XRT AND STEREO/EUVI

    SciTech Connect

    Su Yingna; Van Ballegooijen, Adriaan; Golub, Leon

    2010-09-20

    We present a study of the structure and dynamics of quiescent filament channels observed by Hinode/XRT and STEREO/EUVI at the solar minimum 23/24 from 2006 November to 2008 December. For 12 channels identified on the solar disk (Group I channels), we find that the morphology of the structure on the two sides of the channel is asymmetric in both X-rays and EUV: the eastern side has curved features while the western side has straight features. We interpret the results in terms of a magnetic flux rope model. The asymmetry in the morphology is due to the variation in axial flux of the flux rope along the channel, which causes the field lines from one polarity to turn into the flux rope (curved feature), while the field lines from the other polarity are connected to very distant sources (straight). For most of the 68 channels identified by cavities at the east and west limbs (Group II channels), the asymmetry cannot be clearly identified, which is likely due to the fact that the axial flux may be relatively constant along such channels. Corresponding cavities are identified only for 5 of the 12 Group I channels, while Group II channels are identified for all of the 68 cavity pairs. The studied filament channels are often observed as dark channels in X-rays and EUV. Sheared loops within Group I channels are often seen in X-rays, but are rarely seen in Group II channels as shown in the X-ray Telescope daily synoptic observations. A survey of the dynamics of studied filament channels shows that filament eruptions occur at an average rate of 1.4 filament eruptions per channel per solar rotation.

  14. Role of chaos in quantum communication through a dynamical dephasing channel

    SciTech Connect

    Barreto Lemos, Gabriela; Benenti, Giuliano

    2010-06-15

    In this article we treat the subject of chaotic environments with few degrees of freedom in quantum communication by investigating a conservative dynamical map as a model of a dephasing quantum channel. When the channel's dynamics is chaotic, we investigate the model's semi-classical limit and show that the entropy exchange grows at a constant rate which depends on a single parameter (the interaction strength), analogous to stochastic models of dephasing channels. We analyze memory effects in the channel and present strong physical arguments to support that the present model is forgetful in the chaotic regime while memory effects in general cannot be ignored when channel dynamics is regular. In order to render the nonchaotic channel forgetful, it becomes necessary to apply a reset to the channel and this reset can efficiently be modeled by application of a chaotic map. We may then refer to encoding theorems (valid in the case of forgetful channels) to present evidence of a transition from noiseless to noisy channel due to the environment's transition from regular to chaotic dynamics.

  15. Environmental Variability and Plankton Community Dynamics in the English Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, A.; Gonzalez, F.; Atkinson, A.; Stock, C. A.

    2016-02-01

    Temporal environmental variation plays a key role in shaping plankton community structure and dynamics. In some cases, these ecological changes may be abrupt and long-lived, and constitute a significant change in overall ecosystem structure and function. The "Double Integration Hypothesis", posed recently by Di Lorenzo and Ohman to help explain these complex biophysical linkages, holds that atmospheric variability is filtered first through the ocean surface before secondarily imprinting on plankton communities. In this perspective, physical properties of the surface ocean, such as sea surface temperature (SST), integrate atmospheric white noise, resulting in a time series that is smoother and has more low than high frequency variability (red noise). Secondarily, long-lived zooplankton integrate over oceanographic conditions and further redden the power spectra. We test the generality of this hypothesis with extensive environmental and ecological data from the L4 station in the Western English Channel (1988-present), calculating power spectral slopes from anomaly time series for atmospheric forcing (wind stress and net heat fluxes), surface ocean conditions (SST and macronutrients), and the biomasses of well over 100 phytoplankton and zooplankton taxa. As expected, we find that SST and macronutrient concentrations are redder in character than white noise atmospheric forcing. However, we find that power spectral slopes for phytoplankton and zooplankton are generally not significantly less than found for oceanographic conditions. Moreover, we find a considerable range in power spectral slopes within the phytoplankton and zooplankton, reflecting the diversity of body sizes, traits, life histories, and predator-prey interactions. We interpret these findings using an idealized trait-based model with a single phytoplankton prey and zooplankton predator, configured to capture essential oceanographic properties at the L4 station, and discuss how changes in power spectral

  16. Dynamic evolution process of turbulent channel flow after opposition control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Mingwei; Tian, De; Yongqian, Liu

    2017-02-01

    Dynamic evolution of turbulent channel flow after application of opposition control (OC), together with the mechanism of drag reduction, is studied through direct numerical simulation (DNS). In the simulation, the pressure gradient is kept constant, and the flow rate increases due to drag reduction. In the transport of mean kinetic energy (MKE), one part of the energy from the external pressure is dissipated by the mean shear, and the other part is transported to the turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) through a TKE production term (TKP). It is found that the increase of MKE is mainly induced by the reduction of TKP that is directly affected by OC. Further analysis shows that the suppression of the redistribution term of TKE in the wall normal direction plays a key role in drag reduction, which represses the wall normal velocity fluctuation and then reduces TKP through the attenuation of its main production term. When OC is suddenly applied, an acute imbalance of energy in space is induced by the wall blowing and suction. Both the skin-friction and TKP terms exhibit a transient growth in the initial phase of OC, which can be attributed to the local effect of and <-u‧v‧> in the viscous sublayer. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11402088 and Grant No. 51376062) , State Key Laboratory of Alternate Electrical Power System with Renewable Energy Sources (Grant No. LAPS15005), and ‘the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities’ (Grant No.2014MS33).

  17. Results of Nucleon Resonance Extraction via Dynamical Coupled-Channels Analysis from Collaboration @ EBAC

    SciTech Connect

    Hiroyuki Kamano

    2012-04-01

    We review a global analysis of meson production reactions off the nucleons by a collaboration at Excited Baryon Analysis Center of Jefferson Lab. The analysis is pursued with a dynamical coupled-channels approach, within which the dynamics of multi-channel reaction processes are taken into account in a fully consistent way with the two-body as well as three-body unitarity of the S-matrix. With this approach, new features of nucleon excitations are revealed as resonant particles originating from the non-trivial multi-channel reaction dynamics, which cannot be addressed by static hadron models where the nucleon excitations are treated as stable particles.

  18. Combined molecular dynamics-spin dynamics simulations of bcc iron

    SciTech Connect

    Perera, Meewanage Dilina N; Yin, Junqi; Landau, David P; Nicholson, Don M; Stocks, George Malcolm; Eisenbach, Markus; Brown, Greg

    2014-01-01

    Using a classical model that treats translational and spin degrees of freedom on an equal footing, we study phonon-magnon interactions in BCC iron with combined molecular and spin dynamics methods. The atomic interactions are modeled via an empirical many-body potential while spin dependent interactions are established through a Hamiltonian of the Heisenberg form with a distance dependent magnetic exchange interaction obtained from first principles electronic structure calculations. The temporal evolution of translational and spin degrees of freedom was determined by numerically solving the coupled equations of motion, using an algorithm based on the second order Suzuki-Trotter decomposition of the exponential operators. By calculating Fourier transforms of space- and time-displaced correlation functions, we demonstrate that the the presence of lattice vibrations leads to noticeable softening and damping of spin wave modes. As a result of the interplay between lattice and spin subsystems, we also observe additional longitudinal spin wave excitations, with frequencies which coincide with that of the longitudinal lattice vibrations.

  19. Dynamic aspects of large woody debris in river channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergaro, Alexandra; Caporali, Enrica; Becchi, Ignazio

    2015-04-01

    Large Woody Debris (LWD) are an integral component of the fluvial environment. They represent an environmental resource, but without doubt they represent also a risk factor for the amplification that could give to the destructive power of a flood event. While countless intervention in river channels have reintroduced wood in rivers with restoration and banks protection aims, during several flash flood events LWD have had a great part in catastrophic consequences, pointing out the urgency of an adequate risk assessment procedure. At present wood dynamics in rivers is not systematically considered within the procedures for the elaboration of hazard maps resulting in loss of prediction accuracy and underestimation of hazard impacts. The assessment inconsistency comes from the complexity of the question: several aspects in wood processes are not yet well known and the superposition of different physical phenomena results in great difficulty to predict critical scenarios. The presented research activity has been aimed to improve management skills for the assessment of the hydrologic risk associated to the presence of large woody debris in rivers, improving knowledge about LWD dynamic processes and proposing effective tools for monitoring and mapping river catchments vulnerability. Utilizing critical review of the published works, field surveys and experimental investigations LWD damaging potential has been analysed to support the identification of the exposed sites and the redaction of hazard maps, taking into account that a comprehensive procedure has to involve: a) Identification of the critical cross sections; b) Evaluation of wood availability in the river catchment; c) Prediction of hazard scenarios through the estimation of water discharge, wood recruitment and entrainment, wood transport and destination. Particularly, a survey sheets form for direct measurements has been implemented and tested in field to provide an investigation instruments for wood and river

  20. Capacity and Delay Spread in Multilayer Diffusion-Based Molecular Communication (DBMC) Channel.

    PubMed

    Md Mustam, Saizalmursidi; Syed-Yusof, Sharifah K; Zubair, Suleiman

    2016-10-01

    In nanoscale communication, diffusion-based molecular communication (DBMC) in which information is encoded into molecule patterns by a transmitter nanomachine, has emerged as a promising communication system, particularly for biomedical and healthcare applications. Although, numerous studies have been conducted to evaluate and analyze DBMC systems, investigation on DBMC system through a multilayer channel has received less attention. The aims of this paper are to formulate channel characteristics and to evaluate the performance of multilayer DBMC channel in terms of delay spread and capacity. In this paper, the propagation of molecules over an n- layer channel is assumed to follow the Brownian motion and subjected to Fick's law of diffusion. Fourier transform is used to convert time to frequency domain functions. Besides, the multilayer channel is considered as a linear and deterministic channel. For the performance evaluation, the air-water-blood plasma medium representing the simplified multilayer diffusion model in the respiratory system was chosen. It was found that a high channel capacity can be achieved with wide transmission bandwidth, short transmission distance, and high averaged transmitted power. In addition, the findings showed that channel delay spread increases as both the transmission distance, and the pulse duration increased. By setting the symbol duration greater than the pulse duration or delay spread, an inter-symbol interference problem due to previous molecules transmission can be mitigated. These findings can be used as a guide in the development and fabrication of future artificial nanocommunication and nanonetworks systems involving multilayer transmission medium.

  1. Molecular determinants of anion selectivity in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator chloride channel pore.

    PubMed Central

    Linsdell, P; Evagelidis, A; Hanrahan, J W

    2000-01-01

    Ionic selectivity in many cation channels is achieved over a short region of the pore known as the selectivity filter, the molecular determinants of which have been identified in Ca(2+), Na(+), and K(+) channels. However, a filter controlling selectivity among different anions has not previously been identified in any Cl(-) channel. In fact, because Cl(-) channels are only weakly selective among small anions, and because their selectivity has proved so resistant to site-directed mutagenesis, the very existence of a discrete anion selectivity filter has been called into question. Here we show that mutation of a putative pore-lining phenylalanine residue, F337, in the sixth membrane-spanning region of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl(-) channel, dramatically alters the relative permeabilities of different anions in the channel. Specifically, mutations that reduce the size of the amino acid side chain present at this position virtually abolish the relationship between anion permeability and hydration energy, a relationship that characterizes the anion selectivity not only of wild-type CFTR, but of most classes of Cl(-) channels. These results suggest that the pore of CFTR may indeed contain a specialized region, analogous to the selectivity filter of cation channels, at which discrimination between different permeant anions takes place. Because F337 is adjacent to another amino acid residue, T338, which also affects anion selectivity in CFTR, we suggest that selectivity is predominantly determined over a physically discrete region of the pore located near these important residues. PMID:10827976

  2. Molecular origin of the cation selectivity in OmpF porin: single channel conductances vs. free energy calculation.

    PubMed

    Danelon, Christophe; Suenaga, Atsushi; Winterhalter, Mathias; Yamato, Ichiro

    2003-07-01

    Ion current through single outer membrane protein F (OmpF) trimers was recorded and compared to molecular dynamics simulation. Unidirectional insertion was revealed from the asymmetry in channel conductance. Single trimer conductance showed particularly high values at low symmetrical salt solution. The conductance values of various alkali metal ion solutions were proportional to the monovalent cation mobility values in the bulk phase, LiClchannels favored permeation of alkali metal ions over chloride and suggested size preference for smaller cations. These results suggest that there are specific interactions between the permeating cation and charged residues lining the channel walls. This hypothesis was supported by computational study which predicted that monovalent cations bind to Asp113 at low concentration. Here, free energy calculations revealed that the affinity of the alkali metal ions to its binding site increased with their atomic radii, Li(+) approximately Na(+)channel increases the translocation rate of cations under applied voltage by increasing their local concentration relative to the bulk solution.

  3. Brownian dynamics simulations of the recognition of the scorpion toxin maurotoxin with the voltage-gated potassium ion channels.

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Wei; Cui, Meng; Briggs, James M; Huang, Xiaoqin; Xiong, Bing; Zhang, Yingmin; Luo, Xiaomin; Shen, Jianhua; Ji, Ruyun; Jiang, Hualiang; Chen, Kaixian

    2002-01-01

    The recognition of the scorpion toxin maurotoxin (MTX) by the voltage-gated potassium (Kv1) channels, Kv1.1, Kv1.2, and Kv1.3, has been studied by means of Brownian dynamics (BD) simulations. All of the 35 available structures of MTX in the Protein Data Bank (http://www.rcsb.org/pdb) determined by nuclear magnetic resonance were considered during the simulations, which indicated that the conformation of MTX significantly affected both the recognition and the binding between MTX and the Kv1 channels. Comparing the top five highest-frequency structures of MTX binding to the Kv1 channels, we found that the Kv1.2 channel, with the highest docking frequencies and the lowest electrostatic interaction energies, was the most favorable for MTX binding, whereas Kv1.1 was intermediate, and Kv1.3 was the least favorable one. Among the 35 structures of MTX, the 10th structure docked into the binding site of the Kv1.2 channel with the highest probability and the most favorable electrostatic interactions. From the MTX-Kv1.2 binding model, we identified the critical residues for the recognition of these two proteins through triplet contact analyses. MTX locates around the extracellular mouth of the Kv1 channels, making contacts with its beta-sheets. Lys23, a conserved amino acid in the scorpion toxins, protrudes into the pore of the Kv1.2 channel and forms two hydrogen bonds with the conserved residues Gly401(D) and Tyr400(C) and one hydrophobic contact with Gly401(C) of the Kv1.2 channel. The critical triplet contacts for recognition between MTX and the Kv1.2 channel are Lys23(MTX)-Asp402(C)(Kv1), Lys27(MTX)-Asp378(D)(Kv1), and Lys30(MTX)-Asp402(A)(Kv1). In addition, six hydrogen-bonding interactions are formed between residues Lys23, Lys27, Lys30, and Tyr32 of MTX and residues Gly401, Tyr400, Asp402, Asp378, and Thr406 of Kv1.2. Many of them are formed by side chains of residues of MTX and backbone atoms of the Kv1.2 channel. Five hydrophobic contacts exist between residues Pro

  4. Brownian dynamics simulations of the recognition of the scorpion toxin maurotoxin with the voltage-gated potassium ion channels.

    PubMed

    Fu, Wei; Cui, Meng; Briggs, James M; Huang, Xiaoqin; Xiong, Bing; Zhang, Yingmin; Luo, Xiaomin; Shen, Jianhua; Ji, Ruyun; Jiang, Hualiang; Chen, Kaixian

    2002-11-01

    The recognition of the scorpion toxin maurotoxin (MTX) by the voltage-gated potassium (Kv1) channels, Kv1.1, Kv1.2, and Kv1.3, has been studied by means of Brownian dynamics (BD) simulations. All of the 35 available structures of MTX in the Protein Data Bank (http://www.rcsb.org/pdb) determined by nuclear magnetic resonance were considered during the simulations, which indicated that the conformation of MTX significantly affected both the recognition and the binding between MTX and the Kv1 channels. Comparing the top five highest-frequency structures of MTX binding to the Kv1 channels, we found that the Kv1.2 channel, with the highest docking frequencies and the lowest electrostatic interaction energies, was the most favorable for MTX binding, whereas Kv1.1 was intermediate, and Kv1.3 was the least favorable one. Among the 35 structures of MTX, the 10th structure docked into the binding site of the Kv1.2 channel with the highest probability and the most favorable electrostatic interactions. From the MTX-Kv1.2 binding model, we identified the critical residues for the recognition of these two proteins through triplet contact analyses. MTX locates around the extracellular mouth of the Kv1 channels, making contacts with its beta-sheets. Lys23, a conserved amino acid in the scorpion toxins, protrudes into the pore of the Kv1.2 channel and forms two hydrogen bonds with the conserved residues Gly401(D) and Tyr400(C) and one hydrophobic contact with Gly401(C) of the Kv1.2 channel. The critical triplet contacts for recognition between MTX and the Kv1.2 channel are Lys23(MTX)-Asp402(C)(Kv1), Lys27(MTX)-Asp378(D)(Kv1), and Lys30(MTX)-Asp402(A)(Kv1). In addition, six hydrogen-bonding interactions are formed between residues Lys23, Lys27, Lys30, and Tyr32 of MTX and residues Gly401, Tyr400, Asp402, Asp378, and Thr406 of Kv1.2. Many of them are formed by side chains of residues of MTX and backbone atoms of the Kv1.2 channel. Five hydrophobic contacts exist between residues Pro

  5. Channels

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-04-29

    Two channels are visible in this image from NASA 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft . The smaller one near the bottom did not carve as deeply as the larger channel at the top. The channel near the top of the image is near the origin of Mamers Valles.

  6. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Disordered Zircon

    SciTech Connect

    Devanathan, Ram; Corrales, Louis R.; Weber, William J.; Chartier, Alain; Meis, Constantin

    2004-02-27

    The melting of zircon and the amorphous state produced by quenching from the melt were simulated by molecular dynamics using a new partial charge model combined with the Ziegler-Biersack-Littmark potential. The model has been established for the description of the crystalline and aperiodic structures of zircon in order to be used for the simulation of displacement cascades. It provides an excellent fit to the structure, and accounts with convenient precision the mechanical and thermodynamic properties of zircon. The calculated melting temperature is about 2100 K. The activation energy for self-diffusion of ions in the liquid state was determined to be 190-200 kJ/mole. Melt quenching was employed to produce two different disordered states with distinct densities and structures. In the high density disordered state, the zircon structure is intact but the bond angle distributions are broader, 4% of the Si units are polymerized, and the volume swelling is about 8%. In the low density amorphous state, the Zr and Si coordination numbers are lower, and the Zr-O and Si-O bond lengths are shorter than corresponding values for the crystal. In addition, a highly polymerized Si network, with average connectivity of two, is observed in the low density amorphous state. These features have all been experimentally observed in natural metamict zircon. The present findings, when considered in light of experimental radiation effects studies, suggest that the swelling in zircon arises initially from disorder in the zircon crystal, and at high doses the disordered crystal is unable to accommodate the volume expansion and transforms to the amorphous state.

  7. Structure and dynamics underlying elementary ligand binding events in human pacemaking channels

    PubMed Central

    Goldschen-Ohm, Marcel P; Klenchin, Vadim A; White, David S; Cowgill, John B; Cui, Qiang; Goldsmith, Randall H; Chanda, Baron

    2016-01-01

    Although molecular recognition is crucial for cellular signaling, mechanistic studies have relied primarily on ensemble measures that average over and thereby obscure underlying steps. Single-molecule observations that resolve these steps are lacking due to diffraction-limited resolution of single fluorophores at relevant concentrations. Here, we combined zero-mode waveguides with fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) to directly observe binding at individual cyclic nucleotide-binding domains (CNBDs) from human pacemaker ion channels critical for heart and brain function. Our observations resolve the dynamics of multiple distinct steps underlying cyclic nucleotide regulation: a slow initial binding step that must select a 'receptive' conformation followed by a ligand-induced isomerization of the CNBD. X-ray structure of the apo CNBD and atomistic simulations reveal that the isomerization involves both local and global transitions. Our approach reveals fundamental mechanisms underpinning ligand regulation of pacemaker channels, and is generally applicable to weak-binding interactions governing a broad spectrum of signaling processes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.20797.001 PMID:27858593

  8. Functional analysis and molecular modeling of a cloned urate transporter/channel.

    PubMed

    Leal-Pinto, E; Cohen, B E; Abramson, R G

    1999-05-01

    Recombinant protein, designated UAT, prepared from a cloned rat renal cDNA library functions as a selective voltage-sensitive urate transporter/channel when fused with lipid bilayers. Since we previously suggested that UAT may represent the mammalian electrogenic urate transporter, UAT has been functionally characterized in the presence and absence of potential channel blockers, several of which are known to block mammalian electrogenic urate transport. Two substrates, oxonate (a competitive uricase inhibitor) and pyrazinoate, that inhibit renal electrogenic urate transport also block UAT activity. Of note, oxonate selectively blocks from the cytoplasmic side of the channel while pyrazinoate only blocks from the channel's extracellular face. Like oxonate, anti-uricase (an electrogenic transport inhibitor) also selectively blocks channel activity from the cytoplasmic side. Adenosine blocks from the extracellular side exclusively while xanthine blocks from both sides. These effects are consistent with newly identified regions of homology to uricase and the adenosine A1/A3 receptor in UAT and localize these homologous regions to the cytoplasmic and extracellular faces of UAT, respectively. Additionally, computer analyses identified four putative alpha-helical transmembrane domains, two beta sheets, and blocks of homology to the E and B loops of aquaporin-1 within UAT. The experimental observations substantiate our proposal that UAT is the molecular representation of the renal electrogenic urate transporter and, in conjunction with computer algorithms, suggest a possible molecular structure for this unique channel.

  9. Ion Channels in Plant Bioenergetic Organelles, Chloroplasts and Mitochondria: From Molecular Identification to Function.

    PubMed

    Carraretto, Luca; Teardo, Enrico; Checchetto, Vanessa; Finazzi, Giovanni; Uozumi, Nobuyuki; Szabo, Ildiko

    2016-03-07

    Recent technical advances in electrophysiological measurements, organelle-targeted fluorescence imaging, and organelle proteomics have pushed the research of ion transport a step forward in the case of the plant bioenergetic organelles, chloroplasts and mitochondria, leading to the molecular identification and functional characterization of several ion transport systems in recent years. Here we focus on channels that mediate relatively high-rate ion and water flux and summarize the current knowledge in this field, focusing on targeting mechanisms, proteomics, electrophysiology, and physiological function. In addition, since chloroplasts evolved from a cyanobacterial ancestor, we give an overview of the information available about cyanobacterial ion channels and discuss the evolutionary origin of chloroplast channels. The recent molecular identification of some of these ion channels allowed their physiological functions to be studied using genetically modified Arabidopsis plants and cyanobacteria. The view is emerging that alteration of chloroplast and mitochondrial ion homeostasis leads to organelle dysfunction, which in turn significantly affects the energy metabolism of the whole organism. Clear-cut identification of genes encoding for channels in these organelles, however, remains a major challenge in this rapidly developing field. Multiple strategies including bioinformatics, cell biology, electrophysiology, use of organelle-targeted ion-sensitive probes, genetics, and identification of signals eliciting specific ion fluxes across organelle membranes should provide a better understanding of the physiological role of organellar channels and their contribution to signaling pathways in plants in the future.

  10. An Adaptive Channel Access Method for Dynamic Super Dense Wireless Sensor Networks.

    PubMed

    Lei, Chunyang; Bie, Hongxia; Fang, Gengfa; Zhang, Xuekun

    2015-12-03

    Super dense and distributed wireless sensor networks have become very popular with the development of small cell technology, Internet of Things (IoT), Machine-to-Machine (M2M) communications, Vehicular-to-Vehicular (V2V) communications and public safety networks. While densely deployed wireless networks provide one of the most important and sustainable solutions to improve the accuracy of sensing and spectral efficiency, a new channel access scheme needs to be designed to solve the channel congestion problem introduced by the high dynamics of competing nodes accessing the channel simultaneously. In this paper, we firstly analyzed the channel contention problem using a novel normalized channel contention analysis model which provides information on how to tune the contention window according to the state of channel contention. We then proposed an adaptive channel contention window tuning algorithm in which the contention window tuning rate is set dynamically based on the estimated channel contention level. Simulation results show that our proposed adaptive channel access algorithm based on fast contention window tuning can achieve more than 95 % of the theoretical optimal throughput and 0 . 97 of fairness index especially in dynamic and dense networks.

  11. An Adaptive Channel Access Method for Dynamic Super Dense Wireless Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Chunyang; Bie, Hongxia; Fang, Gengfa; Zhang, Xuekun

    2015-01-01

    Super dense and distributed wireless sensor networks have become very popular with the development of small cell technology, Internet of Things (IoT), Machine-to-Machine (M2M) communications, Vehicular-to-Vehicular (V2V) communications and public safety networks. While densely deployed wireless networks provide one of the most important and sustainable solutions to improve the accuracy of sensing and spectral efficiency, a new channel access scheme needs to be designed to solve the channel congestion problem introduced by the high dynamics of competing nodes accessing the channel simultaneously. In this paper, we firstly analyzed the channel contention problem using a novel normalized channel contention analysis model which provides information on how to tune the contention window according to the state of channel contention. We then proposed an adaptive channel contention window tuning algorithm in which the contention window tuning rate is set dynamically based on the estimated channel contention level. Simulation results show that our proposed adaptive channel access algorithm based on fast contention window tuning can achieve more than 95% of the theoretical optimal throughput and 0.97 of fairness index especially in dynamic and dense networks. PMID:26633421

  12. Deformation localization and dislocation channel dynamics in neutron-irradiated austenitic stainless steels

    DOE PAGES

    Gussev, Maxim N.; Field, Kevin G.; Busby, Jeremy T.

    2015-02-24

    We investigated dynamics of deformation localization and dislocation channel formation in situ in a neutron irradiated AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel and a model 304-based austenitic alloy by combining several analytical techniques including optic microscopy and laser confocal microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, electron backscatter diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. Channel formation was observed at 70% of the formal tensile yield stress for both alloys. It was shown that triple junction points do not always serve as a source of dislocation channels; at stress levels below the yield stress, channels often formed near the middle of the grain boundary. For amore » single grain, the role of elastic stiffness value (Young modulus) in the channel formation was analyzed; it was shown that in the irradiated 304 steels the initial channels appeared in soft grains with a high Schmid factor located near stiff grains with high elastic stiffness. Moreover, the spatial organization of channels in a single grain was analyzed; it was shown that secondary channels operating in the same slip plane as primary channels often appeared at the middle or at one third of the way between primary channels. The twinning nature of dislocation channels was analyzed for grains of different orientation using TEM. Finally, it was shown that in the AISI 304 steel, channels were twin-free in grains oriented close to [001] and [101] of standard unit triangle; [111]-grains and grains oriented close to Schmid factor maximum contained deformation twins.« less

  13. Deformation localization and dislocation channel dynamics in neutron-irradiated austenitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Gussev, Maxim N.; Field, Kevin G.; Busby, Jeremy T.

    2015-02-24

    We investigated dynamics of deformation localization and dislocation channel formation in situ in a neutron irradiated AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel and a model 304-based austenitic alloy by combining several analytical techniques including optic microscopy and laser confocal microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, electron backscatter diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. Channel formation was observed at 70% of the formal tensile yield stress for both alloys. It was shown that triple junction points do not always serve as a source of dislocation channels; at stress levels below the yield stress, channels often formed near the middle of the grain boundary. For a single grain, the role of elastic stiffness value (Young modulus) in the channel formation was analyzed; it was shown that in the irradiated 304 steels the initial channels appeared in soft grains with a high Schmid factor located near stiff grains with high elastic stiffness. Moreover, the spatial organization of channels in a single grain was analyzed; it was shown that secondary channels operating in the same slip plane as primary channels often appeared at the middle or at one third of the way between primary channels. The twinning nature of dislocation channels was analyzed for grains of different orientation using TEM. Finally, it was shown that in the AISI 304 steel, channels were twin-free in grains oriented close to [001] and [101] of standard unit triangle; [111]-grains and grains oriented close to Schmid factor maximum contained deformation twins.

  14. Deformation localization and dislocation channel dynamics in neutron-irradiated austenitic stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gussev, Maxim N.; Field, Kevin G.; Busby, Jeremy T.

    2015-05-01

    The dynamics of deformation localization and dislocation channel formation were investigated in situ in a neutron-irradiated AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel and a model 304-based austenitic alloy by combining several analytical techniques including optic microscopy and laser confocal microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, electron backscatter diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Channel formation was observed at ∼70% of the polycrystalline yield stress of the irradiated materials (σ0.2). It was shown that triple junction points do not always serve as a source of dislocation channels; at stress levels below the σ0.2, channels often formed near the middle of the grain boundary. For a single grain, the role of elastic stiffness value (Young's modulus) in channel formation was analyzed; it was shown that in the irradiated 304 steels the initial channels appeared in "soft" grains with a high Schmid factor located near "stiff" grains with high elastic stiffness. The spatial organization of channels in a single grain was analyzed; it was shown that secondary channels operating in the same slip plane as primary channels often appeared at the middle or at one-third of the way between primary channels. The twinning nature of dislocation channels was analyzed for grains of different orientation using TEM. In the AISI 304 steel, channels in grains oriented close to <0 0 1>||TA (tensile axis) and <1 0 1>||TA were twin free and grain with <1 1 1>||TA and grains oriented close to a Schmid factor maximum contained deformation twins.

  15. Dynamical coupled-channels study of meson production reactions from EBAC@Jlab

    SciTech Connect

    Hiroyuki Kamano

    2011-10-01

    We present the current status of a combined and simultaneous analysis of meson production reactions based on a dynamical coupled-channels (DCC) model, which is conducted at Excited Baryon Analysis Center (EBAC) of Jefferson Lab.

  16. Dynamical coupled-channels study of meson production reactions from EBACatJLab

    SciTech Connect

    Kamano, Hiroyuki

    2011-10-24

    We present the current status of a combined and simultaneous analysis of meson production reactions based on a dynamical coupled-channels (DCC) model, which is conducted at Excited Baryon Analysis Center (EBAC) of Jefferson Lab.

  17. Molecular simulation of the interaction of kappa-conotoxin-PVIIA with the Shaker potassium channel pore.

    PubMed

    Moran, O

    2001-12-01

    Molecular simulation techniques were appplied to predict the interaction of the voltage-dependent Shaker potassium channel with the channel-blocking toxin kappa-conotoxin-PVIIA (PVIIA). A structural thee-dimensional model of the extracellular vestibule of the potassium channel was constructed based on structural homologies with the bacterial potassium channel Kcsa, whose structure has been solved by X-ray crystallography. The docking of the PVIIA molecule was obtained by a geometric recognition algorithm, yielding 100 possible conformations. A series of residue-residue distance restraints, predicted from mutation-cycle experiments, were used to select a small set of a plausible channel-toxin complex models among the resulting possible conformations. The four final conformations, with similar characteristics, can explain most of the single-point mutation experiments done with this system. The models of the Shaker-PVIIA interaction predict two clusters of amino acids, critical for the binding of the toxin to the channel. The first cluster is the amino acids R2, I3, Q6 and K7 that form the plug of the toxin that interacts with the entrance to the selectivity filter of the channel. The second cluster of residues, R22, F23, N24 and K25, interacts with a channel region near to the external entrance of the pore vestibule. The consistency of the obtained models and the experimental data indicate that the Shaker-PVIIA complex model is reasonable and can be used in further biological studies such as the rational design of blocking agents of potassium channels and the mutagenesis of both toxins and potassium channels.

  18. Molecular heterogeneity of large-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels in canine intracardiac ganglia.

    PubMed

    Selga, Elisabet; Pérez-Serra, Alexandra; Moreno-Asso, Alba; Anderson, Seth; Thomas, Kristen; Desai, Mayurika; Brugada, Ramon; Pérez, Guillermo J; Scornik, Fabiana S

    2013-01-01

    Large conductance calcium-activated potassium (BK) channels are widely expressed in the nervous system. We have recently shown that principal neurons from canine intracardiac ganglia (ICG) express a paxilline- and TEA-sensitive BK current, which increases neuronal excitability. In the present work, we further explore the molecular constituents of the BK current in canine ICG. We found that the β1 and β4 regulatory subunits are expressed in ICG. Single channel voltage-dependence at different calcium concentrations suggested that association of the BKα with a particular β subunit was not enough to explain the channel activity in this tissue. Indeed, we detected the presence of several splice variants of the BKα subunit. In conclusion, BK channels in canine ICG may result from the arrangement of different BKα splice variants, plus accessory β subunits. The particular combinations expressed in canine IC neurons likely rule the excitatory role of BK current in this tissue.

  19. Peptide dynamics by molecular dynamics simulation and diffusion theory method with improved basis sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Po Jen; Lai, S. K.; Rapallo, Arnaldo

    2014-03-01

    Improved basis sets for the study of polymer dynamics by means of the diffusion theory, and tests on a melt of cis-1,4-polyisoprene decamers, and a toluene solution of a 71-mer syndiotactic trans-1,2-polypentadiene were presented recently [R. Gaspari and A. Rapallo, J. Chem. Phys. 128, 244109 (2008)]. The proposed hybrid basis approach (HBA) combined two techniques, the long time sorting procedure and the maximum correlation approximation. The HBA takes advantage of the strength of these two techniques, and its basis sets proved to be very effective and computationally convenient in describing both local and global dynamics in cases of flexible synthetic polymers where the repeating unit is a unique type of monomer. The question then arises if the same efficacy continues when the HBA is applied to polymers of different monomers, variable local stiffness along the chain and with longer persistence length, which have different local and global dynamical properties against the above-mentioned systems. Important examples of this kind of molecular chains are the proteins, so that a fragment of the protein transthyretin is chosen as the system of the present study. This peptide corresponds to a sequence that is structured in β-sheets of the protein and is located on the surface of the channel with thyroxin. The protein transthyretin forms amyloid fibrils in vivo, whereas the peptide fragment has been shown [C. P. Jaroniec, C. E. MacPhee, N. S. Astrof, C. M. Dobson, and R. G. Griffin, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 99, 16748 (2002)] to form amyloid fibrils in vitro in extended β-sheet conformations. For these reasons the latter is given considerable attention in the literature and studied also as an isolated fragment in water solution where both experimental and theoretical efforts have indicated the propensity of the system to form β turns or α helices, but is otherwise predominantly unstructured. Differing from previous computational studies that employed implicit

  20. Peptide dynamics by molecular dynamics simulation and diffusion theory method with improved basis sets

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, Po Jen; Lai, S. K.; Rapallo, Arnaldo

    2014-03-14

    Improved basis sets for the study of polymer dynamics by means of the diffusion theory, and tests on a melt of cis-1,4-polyisoprene decamers, and a toluene solution of a 71-mer syndiotactic trans-1,2-polypentadiene were presented recently [R. Gaspari and A. Rapallo, J. Chem. Phys. 128, 244109 (2008)]. The proposed hybrid basis approach (HBA) combined two techniques, the long time sorting procedure and the maximum correlation approximation. The HBA takes advantage of the strength of these two techniques, and its basis sets proved to be very effective and computationally convenient in describing both local and global dynamics in cases of flexible synthetic polymers where the repeating unit is a unique type of monomer. The question then arises if the same efficacy continues when the HBA is applied to polymers of different monomers, variable local stiffness along the chain and with longer persistence length, which have different local and global dynamical properties against the above-mentioned systems. Important examples of this kind of molecular chains are the proteins, so that a fragment of the protein transthyretin is chosen as the system of the present study. This peptide corresponds to a sequence that is structured in β-sheets of the protein and is located on the surface of the channel with thyroxin. The protein transthyretin forms amyloid fibrils in vivo, whereas the peptide fragment has been shown [C. P. Jaroniec, C. E. MacPhee, N. S. Astrof, C. M. Dobson, and R. G. Griffin, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 99, 16748 (2002)] to form amyloid fibrils in vitro in extended β-sheet conformations. For these reasons the latter is given considerable attention in the literature and studied also as an isolated fragment in water solution where both experimental and theoretical efforts have indicated the propensity of the system to form β turns or α helices, but is otherwise predominantly unstructured. Differing from previous computational studies that employed implicit

  1. Claudin-2-dependent paracellular channels are dynamically gated

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Christopher R; Liang, Guo Hua; Wang, Yitang; Das, Sudipto; Shen, Le; Yu, Alan S L; Nelson, Deborah J; Turner, Jerrold R

    2015-01-01

    Intercellular tight junctions form selectively permeable barriers that seal the paracellular space. Trans-tight junction flux has been measured across large epithelial surfaces, but conductance across individual channels has never been measured. We report a novel trans-tight junction patch clamp technique that detects flux across individual claudin-2 channels within the tight junction of cultured canine renal tubule or human intestinal epithelial monolayers. In both cells, claudin-2 channels display conductances of ~90 pS. The channels are gated, strictly dependent on claudin-2 expression, and display size- and charge-selectivity typical of claudin-2. Kinetic analyses indicate one open and two distinct closed states. Conductance is symmetrical and reversible, characteristic of a passive, paracellular process, and blocked by reduced temperature or site-directed mutagene