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Sample records for channelopathies increase resurgent

  1. Channelopathies

    PubMed Central

    Kim, June-Bum

    2014-01-01

    Channelopathies are a heterogeneous group of disorders resulting from the dysfunction of ion channels located in the membranes of all cells and many cellular organelles. These include diseases of the nervous system (e.g., generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus, familial hemiplegic migraine, episodic ataxia, and hyperkalemic and hypokalemic periodic paralysis), the cardiovascular system (e.g., long QT syndrome, short QT syndrome, Brugada syndrome, and catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia), the respiratory system (e.g., cystic fibrosis), the endocrine system (e.g., neonatal diabetes mellitus, familial hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia, thyrotoxic hypokalemic periodic paralysis, and familial hyperaldosteronism), the urinary system (e.g., Bartter syndrome, nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease, and hypomagnesemia with secondary hypocalcemia), and the immune system (e.g., myasthenia gravis, neuromyelitis optica, Isaac syndrome, and anti-NMDA [N-methyl-D-aspartate] receptor encephalitis). The field of channelopathies is expanding rapidly, as is the utility of molecular-genetic and electrophysiological studies. This review provides a brief overview and update of channelopathies, with a focus on recent advances in the pathophysiological mechanisms that may help clinicians better understand, diagnose, and develop treatments for these diseases. PMID:24578711

  2. Neurological channelopathies

    PubMed Central

    Graves, T; Hanna, M

    2005-01-01

    Ion channels are membrane-bound proteins that perform key functions in virtually all human cells. Such channels are critically important for the normal function of the excitable tissues of the nervous system, such as muscle and brain. Until relatively recently it was considered that dysfunction of ion channels in the nervous system would be incompatible with life. However, an increasing number of human diseases associated with dysfunctional ion channels are now recognised. Such neurological channelopathies are frequently genetically determined but may also arise through autoimmune mechanisms. In this article clinical, genetic, immunological, and electrophysiological aspects of this expanding group of neurological disorders are reviewed. Clinical situations in which a neurological channelopathy should enter into the differential diagnosis are highlighted. Some practical guidance on how to investigate and treat this complex group of disorders is also included. PMID:15640425

  3. Resurgence of target responding does not exceed increases in inactive responding in a forced-choice alternative reinforcement procedure in humans.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Mary M; Shahan, Timothy A

    2016-03-01

    Resurgence following removal of alternative reinforcement has been studied in non-human animals, children with developmental disabilities, and typically functioning adults. Adult human laboratory studies have included responses without a controlled history of reinforcement, included only two response options, or involved extensive training. Arbitrary responses allow for control over history of reinforcement. Including an inactive response never associated with reinforcement allows the conclusion that resurgence exceeds extinction-induced variability. Although procedures with extensive training produce reliable resurgence, a brief procedure with the same experimental control would allow more efficient examination of resurgence in adult humans. We tested the acceptability of a brief, single-session, three-alternative forced-choice procedure as a model of resurgence in undergraduates. Selecting a shape was the target response (reinforced in Phase I), selecting another shape was the alternative response (reinforced in Phase II), and selecting a third shape was never reinforced. Despite manipulating number of trials and probability of reinforcement, resurgence of the target response did not consistently exceed increases in the inactive response. Our findings reiterate the importance of an inactive control response and call for reexamination of resurgence studies using only two response options. We discuss potential approaches to generate an acceptable, brief human laboratory resurgence procedure. PMID:26724752

  4. Genetic neurological channelopathies: molecular genetics and clinical phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Spillane, J; Kullmann, D M; Hanna, M G

    2016-01-01

    Evidence accumulated over recent years has shown that genetic neurological channelopathies can cause many different neurological diseases. Presentations relating to the brain, spinal cord, peripheral nerve or muscle mean that channelopathies can impact on almost any area of neurological practice. Typically, neurological channelopathies are inherited in an autosomal dominant fashion and cause paroxysmal disturbances of neurological function, although the impairment of function can become fixed with time. These disorders are individually rare, but an accurate diagnosis is important as it has genetic counselling and often treatment implications. Furthermore, the study of less common ion channel mutation-related diseases has increased our understanding of pathomechanisms that is relevant to common neurological diseases such as migraine and epilepsy. Here, we review the molecular genetic and clinical features of inherited neurological channelopathies. PMID:26558925

  5. Potassium Channelopathies and Gastrointestinal Ulceration

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jaeyong; Lee, Seung Hun; Giebisch, Gerhard; Wang, Tong

    2016-01-01

    Potassium channels and transporters maintain potassium homeostasis and play significant roles in several different biological actions via potassium ion regulation. In previous decades, the key revelations that potassium channels and transporters are involved in the production of gastric acid and the regulation of secretion in the stomach have been recognized. Drugs used to treat peptic ulceration are often potassium transporter inhibitors. It has also been reported that potassium channels are involved in ulcerative colitis. Direct toxicity to the intestines from nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs has been associated with altered potassium channel activities. Several reports have indicated that the long-term use of the antianginal drug Nicorandil, an adenosine triphosphate-sensitive potassium channel opener, increases the chances of ulceration and perforation from the oral to anal regions throughout the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Several of these drug features provide further insights into the role of potassium channels in the occurrence of ulceration in the GI tract. The purpose of this review is to investigate whether potassium channelopathies are involved in the mechanisms responsible for ulceration that occurs throughout the GI tract. PMID:27784845

  6. [Potassium channelopathies and Morvan's syndromes].

    PubMed

    Serratrice, Georges; Pellissier, Jean-François; Serra-Trice, Jacques; Weiller, Pierre-Jean

    2010-02-01

    Interest in Morvan's disease or syndrome has grown, owing to its close links with various potassium channelopathies. Potassium is crucial for gating mechanisms (channel opening and closing), and especially for repolarization. Defective potassium regulation can lead to neuronal hyperexcitability. There are three families of potassium channels: voltage-gated potassium channels or VGKC (Kv1.1-Kv1.8), inward rectifier K+ channels (Kir), and two-pore channels (K2p). VGK channels are the commonest, and especially those belonging to the Shaker group (neuromyotonia and Morvan's syndrome, limbic encephalitis, and type 1 episodic ataxia). Brain and heart K+ channelopathies are a separate group due to KCNQ1 mutation (severe type 2 long QT syndrome). Kv7 channel mutations (in KNQ2 and KCNQ3) are responsible for benign familial neonatal seizures. Mutation of the Ca+ activated K+ channel gene causes epilepsy and paroxysmal dyskinesia. Inward rectifier K+ channels regulate intracellular potassium levels. The DEND syndrome, a treatable channelopathy of the brain and pancreas, is due to KCNJ1 mutation. Andersen's syndrome, due to KCNJ2 mutation, is characterized by periodic paralysis, cardiac arrythmia, and dysmorphia. Voltage-insensitive K2p channelopathies form a final group. PMID:21166127

  7. Painful Na-channelopathies: an expanding universe.

    PubMed

    Waxman, Stephen G

    2013-07-01

    The universe of painful Na-channelopathies--human disorders caused by mutations in voltage-gated sodium channels--has recently expanded in three dimensions. We now know that mutations of sodium channels cause not only rare genetic 'model disorders' such as inherited erythromelalgia and channelopathy-associated insensitivity to pain but also common painful neuropathies. We have learned that mutations of NaV1.8, as well as mutations of NaV1.7, can cause painful Na-channelopathies. Moreover, recent studies combining atomic level structural models and pharmacogenomics suggest that the goal of genomically guided pain therapy may not be unrealistic.

  8. HERG1 channelopathies

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Human ether a go-go-related gene type 1 (hERG1) K+ channels conduct the rapid delayed rectifier K+ current and mediate action potential repolarization in the heart. Mutations in KCNH2 (the gene that encodes hERG1) causes LQT2, one of the most common forms of long QT syndrome, a disorder of cardiac repolarization that predisposes affected subjects to ventricular arrhythmia and increases the risk of sudden cardiac death. Hundreds of LQT2-associated mutations have been described, and most cause a loss of function by disrupting subunit folding, assembly, or trafficking of the channel to the cell surface. Loss-of-function mutations in hERG1 channels have also recently been implicated in epilepsy. A single gain-of-function mutation has been described that causes short QT syndrome and cardiac arrhythmia. In addition, up-regulation of hERG1 channel expression has been demonstrated in specific tumors and has been associated with skeletal muscle atrophy in mice. PMID:20544339

  9. Channelopathies: Summary of the hot topic keynotes session

    EPA Science Inventory

    The "Hot Topic Keynotes: Channelopathies" session of the 26th International Neurotoxicology Conference brought together toxicologists studying interactions of environmental toxicants with ion channels, to review the state of the science of channelopathies and to discuss the poten...

  10. Inherited arrhythmias: The cardiac channelopathies.

    PubMed

    Behere, Shashank P; Weindling, Steven N

    2015-01-01

    Ion channels in the myocardial cellular membrane are responsible for allowing the cardiac action potential. Genetic abnormalities in these channels can predispose to life-threatening arrhythmias. We discuss the basic science of the cardiac action potential; outline the different clinical entities, including information regarding overlapping diagnoses, touching upon relevant genetics, new innovations in screening, diagnosis, risk stratification, and management. The special considerations of sudden unexplained death and sudden infant death syndrome are discussed. Scientists and clinicians continue to reconcile the rapidly growing body of knowledge regarding the molecular mechanisms and genetics while continuing to improve our understanding of the various clinical entities and their diagnosis and management in clinical setting. Two separate searches were run on the National Center for Biotechnology Information's website. The first using the term cardiac channelopathies was run on the PubMed database using filters for time (published in past 5 years) and age (birth-18 years), yielding 47 results. The second search using the medical subject headings (MeSH) database with the search terms "Long QT Syndrome" (MeSH) and "Short QT Syndrome" (MeSH) and "Brugada Syndrome" (MeSH) and "Catecholaminergic Polymorphic Ventricular Tachycardia" (MeSH), applying the same filters yielded 467 results. The abstracts of these articles were studied, and the articles were categorized and organized. Articles of relevance were read in full. As and where applicable, relevant references and citations from the primary articles where further explored and read in full. PMID:26556967

  11. Inherited arrhythmias: The cardiac channelopathies

    PubMed Central

    Behere, Shashank P; Weindling, Steven N

    2015-01-01

    Ion channels in the myocardial cellular membrane are responsible for allowing the cardiac action potential. Genetic abnormalities in these channels can predispose to life-threatening arrhythmias. We discuss the basic science of the cardiac action potential; outline the different clinical entities, including information regarding overlapping diagnoses, touching upon relevant genetics, new innovations in screening, diagnosis, risk stratification, and management. The special considerations of sudden unexplained death and sudden infant death syndrome are discussed. Scientists and clinicians continue to reconcile the rapidly growing body of knowledge regarding the molecular mechanisms and genetics while continuing to improve our understanding of the various clinical entities and their diagnosis and management in clinical setting. Two separate searches were run on the National Center for Biotechnology Information's website. The first using the term cardiac channelopathies was run on the PubMed database using filters for time (published in past 5 years) and age (birth-18 years), yielding 47 results. The second search using the medical subject headings (MeSH) database with the search terms “Long QT Syndrome” (MeSH) and “Short QT Syndrome” (MeSH) and “Brugada Syndrome” (MeSH) and “Catecholaminergic Polymorphic Ventricular Tachycardia” (MeSH), applying the same filters yielded 467 results. The abstracts of these articles were studied, and the articles were categorized and organized. Articles of relevance were read in full. As and where applicable, relevant references and citations from the primary articles where further explored and read in full. PMID:26556967

  12. Inherited arrhythmias: The cardiac channelopathies.

    PubMed

    Behere, Shashank P; Weindling, Steven N

    2015-01-01

    Ion channels in the myocardial cellular membrane are responsible for allowing the cardiac action potential. Genetic abnormalities in these channels can predispose to life-threatening arrhythmias. We discuss the basic science of the cardiac action potential; outline the different clinical entities, including information regarding overlapping diagnoses, touching upon relevant genetics, new innovations in screening, diagnosis, risk stratification, and management. The special considerations of sudden unexplained death and sudden infant death syndrome are discussed. Scientists and clinicians continue to reconcile the rapidly growing body of knowledge regarding the molecular mechanisms and genetics while continuing to improve our understanding of the various clinical entities and their diagnosis and management in clinical setting. Two separate searches were run on the National Center for Biotechnology Information's website. The first using the term cardiac channelopathies was run on the PubMed database using filters for time (published in past 5 years) and age (birth-18 years), yielding 47 results. The second search using the medical subject headings (MeSH) database with the search terms "Long QT Syndrome" (MeSH) and "Short QT Syndrome" (MeSH) and "Brugada Syndrome" (MeSH) and "Catecholaminergic Polymorphic Ventricular Tachycardia" (MeSH), applying the same filters yielded 467 results. The abstracts of these articles were studied, and the articles were categorized and organized. Articles of relevance were read in full. As and where applicable, relevant references and citations from the primary articles where further explored and read in full.

  13. Action potential broadening in a presynaptic channelopathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Begum, Rahima; Bakiri, Yamina; Volynski, Kirill E.; Kullmann, Dimitri M.

    2016-07-01

    Brain development and interictal function are unaffected in many paroxysmal neurological channelopathies, possibly explained by homoeostatic plasticity of synaptic transmission. Episodic ataxia type 1 is caused by missense mutations of the potassium channel Kv1.1, which is abundantly expressed in the terminals of cerebellar basket cells. Presynaptic action potentials of small inhibitory terminals have not been characterized, and it is not known whether developmental plasticity compensates for the effects of Kv1.1 dysfunction. Here we use visually targeted patch-clamp recordings from basket cell terminals of mice harbouring an ataxia-associated mutation and their wild-type littermates. Presynaptic spikes are followed by a pronounced afterdepolarization, and are broadened by pharmacological blockade of Kv1.1 or by a dominant ataxia-associated mutation. Somatic recordings fail to detect such changes. Spike broadening leads to increased Ca2+ influx and GABA release, and decreased spontaneous Purkinje cell firing. We find no evidence for developmental compensation for inherited Kv1.1 dysfunction.

  14. Action potential broadening in a presynaptic channelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Begum, Rahima; Bakiri, Yamina; Volynski, Kirill E.; Kullmann, Dimitri M.

    2016-01-01

    Brain development and interictal function are unaffected in many paroxysmal neurological channelopathies, possibly explained by homoeostatic plasticity of synaptic transmission. Episodic ataxia type 1 is caused by missense mutations of the potassium channel Kv1.1, which is abundantly expressed in the terminals of cerebellar basket cells. Presynaptic action potentials of small inhibitory terminals have not been characterized, and it is not known whether developmental plasticity compensates for the effects of Kv1.1 dysfunction. Here we use visually targeted patch-clamp recordings from basket cell terminals of mice harbouring an ataxia-associated mutation and their wild-type littermates. Presynaptic spikes are followed by a pronounced afterdepolarization, and are broadened by pharmacological blockade of Kv1.1 or by a dominant ataxia-associated mutation. Somatic recordings fail to detect such changes. Spike broadening leads to increased Ca2+ influx and GABA release, and decreased spontaneous Purkinje cell firing. We find no evidence for developmental compensation for inherited Kv1.1 dysfunction. PMID:27381274

  15. Action potential broadening in a presynaptic channelopathy.

    PubMed

    Begum, Rahima; Bakiri, Yamina; Volynski, Kirill E; Kullmann, Dimitri M

    2016-01-01

    Brain development and interictal function are unaffected in many paroxysmal neurological channelopathies, possibly explained by homoeostatic plasticity of synaptic transmission. Episodic ataxia type 1 is caused by missense mutations of the potassium channel Kv1.1, which is abundantly expressed in the terminals of cerebellar basket cells. Presynaptic action potentials of small inhibitory terminals have not been characterized, and it is not known whether developmental plasticity compensates for the effects of Kv1.1 dysfunction. Here we use visually targeted patch-clamp recordings from basket cell terminals of mice harbouring an ataxia-associated mutation and their wild-type littermates. Presynaptic spikes are followed by a pronounced afterdepolarization, and are broadened by pharmacological blockade of Kv1.1 or by a dominant ataxia-associated mutation. Somatic recordings fail to detect such changes. Spike broadening leads to increased Ca(2+) influx and GABA release, and decreased spontaneous Purkinje cell firing. We find no evidence for developmental compensation for inherited Kv1.1 dysfunction. PMID:27381274

  16. Behavioral momentum and resurgence: Effects of time in extinction and repeated resurgence tests.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Mary M; Shahan, Timothy A

    2013-12-01

    Resurgence is an increase in a previously extinguished operant response that occurs if an alternative reinforcement introduced during extinction is removed. Shahan and Sweeney (2011) developed a quantitative model of resurgence based on behavioral momentum theory that captures existing data well and predicts that resurgence should decrease as time in extinction and exposure to the alternative reinforcement increases. Two experiments tested this prediction. The data from Experiment 1 suggested that without a return to baseline, resurgence decreases with increased exposure to alternative reinforcement and to extinction of the target response. Experiment 2 tested the predictions of the model across two conditions, one with constant alternative reinforcement for five sessions, and the other with alternative reinforcement removed three times. In both conditions, the alternative reinforcement was removed for the final test session. Experiment 2 again demonstrated a decrease in relapse across repeated resurgence tests. Furthermore, comparably little resurgence was observed at the same time point in extinction in the final test, despite dissimilar previous exposures to alternative reinforcement removal. The quantitative model provided a good description of the observed data in both experiments. More broadly, these data suggest that increased exposure to extinction may be a successful strategy to reduce resurgence. The relationship between these data and existing tests of the effect of time in extinction on resurgence is discussed.

  17. Behavioral momentum and resurgence: Effects of time in extinction and repeated resurgence tests

    PubMed Central

    Shahan, Timothy A.

    2014-01-01

    Resurgence is an increase in a previously extinguished operant response that occurs if an alternative reinforcement introduced during extinction is removed. Shahan and Sweeney (2011) developed a quantitative model of resurgence based on behavioral momentum theory that captures existing data well and predicts that resurgence should decrease as time in extinction and exposure to the alternative reinforcement increases. Two experiments tested this prediction. The data from Experiment 1 suggested that without a return to baseline, resurgence decreases with increased exposure to alternative reinforcement and to extinction of the target response. Experiment 2 tested the predictions of the model across two conditions, one with constant alternative reinforcement for five sessions, and the other with alternative reinforcement removed three times. In both conditions, the alternative reinforcement was removed for the final test session. Experiment 2 again demonstrated a decrease in relapse across repeated resurgence tests. Furthermore, comparably little resurgence was observed at the same time point in extinction in the final test, despite dissimilar previous exposures to alternative reinforcement removal. The quantitative model provided a good description of the observed data in both experiments. More broadly, these data suggest that increased exposure to extinction may be a successful strategy to reduce resurgence. The relationship between these data and existing tests of the effect of time in extinction on resurgence is discussed. PMID:23982985

  18. Behavioral momentum and resurgence: Effects of time in extinction and repeated resurgence tests.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Mary M; Shahan, Timothy A

    2013-12-01

    Resurgence is an increase in a previously extinguished operant response that occurs if an alternative reinforcement introduced during extinction is removed. Shahan and Sweeney (2011) developed a quantitative model of resurgence based on behavioral momentum theory that captures existing data well and predicts that resurgence should decrease as time in extinction and exposure to the alternative reinforcement increases. Two experiments tested this prediction. The data from Experiment 1 suggested that without a return to baseline, resurgence decreases with increased exposure to alternative reinforcement and to extinction of the target response. Experiment 2 tested the predictions of the model across two conditions, one with constant alternative reinforcement for five sessions, and the other with alternative reinforcement removed three times. In both conditions, the alternative reinforcement was removed for the final test session. Experiment 2 again demonstrated a decrease in relapse across repeated resurgence tests. Furthermore, comparably little resurgence was observed at the same time point in extinction in the final test, despite dissimilar previous exposures to alternative reinforcement removal. The quantitative model provided a good description of the observed data in both experiments. More broadly, these data suggest that increased exposure to extinction may be a successful strategy to reduce resurgence. The relationship between these data and existing tests of the effect of time in extinction on resurgence is discussed. PMID:23982985

  19. Therapeutic Approaches to Genetic Ion Channelopathies and Perspectives in Drug Discovery.

    PubMed

    Imbrici, Paola; Liantonio, Antonella; Camerino, Giulia M; De Bellis, Michela; Camerino, Claudia; Mele, Antonietta; Giustino, Arcangela; Pierno, Sabata; De Luca, Annamaria; Tricarico, Domenico; Desaphy, Jean-Francois; Conte, Diana

    2016-01-01

    In the human genome more than 400 genes encode ion channels, which are transmembrane proteins mediating ion fluxes across membranes. Being expressed in all cell types, they are involved in almost all physiological processes, including sense perception, neurotransmission, muscle contraction, secretion, immune response, cell proliferation, and differentiation. Due to the widespread tissue distribution of ion channels and their physiological functions, mutations in genes encoding ion channel subunits, or their interacting proteins, are responsible for inherited ion channelopathies. These diseases can range from common to very rare disorders and their severity can be mild, disabling, or life-threatening. In spite of this, ion channels are the primary target of only about 5% of the marketed drugs suggesting their potential in drug discovery. The current review summarizes the therapeutic management of the principal ion channelopathies of central and peripheral nervous system, heart, kidney, bone, skeletal muscle and pancreas, resulting from mutations in calcium, sodium, potassium, and chloride ion channels. For most channelopathies the therapy is mainly empirical and symptomatic, often limited by lack of efficacy and tolerability for a significant number of patients. Other channelopathies can exploit ion channel targeted drugs, such as marketed sodium channel blockers. Developing new and more specific therapeutic approaches is therefore required. To this aim, a major advancement in the pharmacotherapy of channelopathies has been the discovery that ion channel mutations lead to change in biophysics that can in turn specifically modify the sensitivity to drugs: this opens the way to a pharmacogenetics strategy, allowing the development of a personalized therapy with increased efficacy and reduced side effects. In addition, the identification of disease modifiers in ion channelopathies appears an alternative strategy to discover novel druggable targets. PMID:27242528

  20. Therapeutic Approaches to Genetic Ion Channelopathies and Perspectives in Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Imbrici, Paola; Liantonio, Antonella; Camerino, Giulia M.; De Bellis, Michela; Camerino, Claudia; Mele, Antonietta; Giustino, Arcangela; Pierno, Sabata; De Luca, Annamaria; Tricarico, Domenico; Desaphy, Jean-Francois; Conte, Diana

    2016-01-01

    In the human genome more than 400 genes encode ion channels, which are transmembrane proteins mediating ion fluxes across membranes. Being expressed in all cell types, they are involved in almost all physiological processes, including sense perception, neurotransmission, muscle contraction, secretion, immune response, cell proliferation, and differentiation. Due to the widespread tissue distribution of ion channels and their physiological functions, mutations in genes encoding ion channel subunits, or their interacting proteins, are responsible for inherited ion channelopathies. These diseases can range from common to very rare disorders and their severity can be mild, disabling, or life-threatening. In spite of this, ion channels are the primary target of only about 5% of the marketed drugs suggesting their potential in drug discovery. The current review summarizes the therapeutic management of the principal ion channelopathies of central and peripheral nervous system, heart, kidney, bone, skeletal muscle and pancreas, resulting from mutations in calcium, sodium, potassium, and chloride ion channels. For most channelopathies the therapy is mainly empirical and symptomatic, often limited by lack of efficacy and tolerability for a significant number of patients. Other channelopathies can exploit ion channel targeted drugs, such as marketed sodium channel blockers. Developing new and more specific therapeutic approaches is therefore required. To this aim, a major advancement in the pharmacotherapy of channelopathies has been the discovery that ion channel mutations lead to change in biophysics that can in turn specifically modify the sensitivity to drugs: this opens the way to a pharmacogenetics strategy, allowing the development of a personalized therapy with increased efficacy and reduced side effects. In addition, the identification of disease modifiers in ion channelopathies appears an alternative strategy to discover novel druggable targets. PMID:27242528

  1. Genome-wide gene expression analysis of Bordetella pertussis isolates associated with a resurgence in pertussis: elucidation of factors involved in the increased fitness of epidemic strains.

    PubMed

    King, Audrey J; van der Lee, Saskia; Mohangoo, Archena; van Gent, Marjolein; van der Ark, Arno; van de Waterbeemd, Bas

    2013-01-01

    Bordetella pertussis (B. pertussis) is the causative agent of whooping cough, which is a highly contagious disease in the human respiratory tract. Despite vaccination since the 1950s, pertussis remains the most prevalent vaccine-preventable disease in developed countries. A recent resurgence pertussis is associated with the expansion of B. pertussis strains with a novel allele for the pertussis toxin (ptx) promoter ptxP3 in place of resident ptxP1 strains. The recent expansion of ptxP3 strains suggests that these strains carry mutations that have increased their fitness. Compared to the ptxP1 strains, ptxP3 strains produce more Ptx, which results in increased virulence and immune suppression. In this study, we investigated the contribution of gene expression changes of various genes on the increased fitness of the ptxP3 strains. Using genome-wide gene expression profiling, we show that several virulence genes had higher expression levels in the ptxP3 strains compared to the ptxP1 strains. We provide the first evidence that wildtype ptxP3 strains are better colonizers in an intranasal mouse infection model. This study shows that the ptxP3 mutation and the genetic background of ptxP3 strains affect fitness by contributing to the ability to colonize in a mouse infection model. These results show that the genetic background of ptxP3 strains with a higher expression of virulence genes contribute to increased fitness.

  2. Hydrodynamics, resurgence, and transasymptotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Başar, Gökçe; Dunne, Gerald V.

    2015-12-01

    The second order hydrodynamical description of a homogeneous conformal plasma that undergoes a boost-invariant expansion is given by a single nonlinear ordinary differential equation, whose resurgent asymptotic properties we study, developing further the recent work of Heller and Spalinski [Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 072501 (2015)]. Resurgence clearly identifies the nonhydrodynamic modes that are exponentially suppressed at late times, analogous to the quasinormal modes in gravitational language, organizing these modes in terms of a trans-series expansion. These modes are analogs of instantons in semiclassical expansions, where the damping rate plays the role of the instanton action. We show that this system displays the generic features of resurgence, with explicit quantitative relations between the fluctuations about different orders of these nonhydrodynamic modes. The imaginary part of the trans-series parameter is identified with the Stokes constant, and the real part with the freedom associated with initial conditions.

  3. Resurgent deformation quantisation

    SciTech Connect

    Garay, Mauricio; Goursac, Axel de; Straten, Duco van

    2014-03-15

    We construct a version of the complex Heisenberg algebra based on the idea of endless analytic continuation. The algebra would be large enough to capture quantum effects that escape ordinary formal deformation quantisation. -- Highlights: •We construct resurgent deformation quantisation. •We give integral formulæ. •We compute examples which show that hypergeometric functions appear naturally in quantum computations.

  4. Concurrent Resurgence and Behavioral History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    da Silva, Stephanie P.; Maxwell, Megan E.; Lattal, Kennon A.

    2008-01-01

    The contribution of past experiences to concurrent resurgence was investigated in three experiments. In Experiment 1, resurgence was related to the length of reinforcement history as well as the reinforcement schedule that previously maintained responding. Specifically, more resurgence occurred when key pecks had been reinforced on a…

  5. Resurgence in extended hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aniceto, Inês; Spaliński, Michał

    2016-04-01

    It has recently been understood that the hydrodynamic series generated by the Müller-Israel-Stewart theory is divergent and that this large-order behavior is consistent with the theory of resurgence. Furthermore, it was observed that the physical origin of this is the presence of a purely damped nonhydrodynamic mode. It is very interesting to ask whether this picture persists in cases where the spectrum of nonhydrodynamic modes is richer. We take the first step in this direction by considering the simplest hydrodynamic theory which, instead of the purely damped mode, contains a pair of nonhydrodynamic modes of complex conjugate frequencies. This mimics the pattern of black brane quasinormal modes which appear on the gravity side of the AdS/CFT description of N =4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills plasma. We find that the resulting hydrodynamic series is divergent in a way consistent with resurgence and precisely encodes information about the nonhydrodynamic modes of the theory.

  6. Extinction-Induced Response Resurgence: A Selective Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doughty, Adam H.; Oken, Gabriella

    2008-01-01

    Resurgence refers to the recovery of previously extinguished responding when a recently reinforced response is extinguished. Although the topic of resurgence has received limited experimental attention, there recently have been an increased number of investigations involving the topic. This increased experimental attention also has been…

  7. Channelopathy pathogenesis in autism spectrum disorders

    PubMed Central

    Schmunk, Galina; Gargus, J. Jay

    2013-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a syndrome that affects normal brain development and is characterized by impaired social interaction as well as verbal and non-verbal communication and by repetitive, stereotypic behavior. ASD is a complex disorder arising from a combination of multiple genetic and environmental factors that are independent from racial, ethnic and socioeconomical status. The high heritability of ASD suggests a strong genetic basis for the disorder. Furthermore, a mounting body of evidence implies a role of various ion channel gene defects (channelopathies) in the pathogenesis of autism. Indeed, recent genome-wide association, and whole exome- and whole-genome resequencing studies linked polymorphisms and rare variants in calcium, sodium and potassium channels and their subunits with susceptibility to ASD, much as they do with bipolar disorder, schizophrenia and other neuropsychiatric disorders. Moreover, animal models with these genetic variations recapitulate endophenotypes considered to be correlates of autistic behavior seen in patients. An ion flux across the membrane regulates a variety of cell functions, from generation of action potentials to gene expression and cell morphology, thus it is not surprising that channelopathies have profound effects on brain functions. In the present work, we summarize existing evidence for the role of ion channel gene defects in the pathogenesis of autism with a focus on calcium signaling and its downstream effects. PMID:24204377

  8. Ion channels, channelopathies, and tooth formation.

    PubMed

    Duan, X

    2014-02-01

    The biological functions of ion channels in tooth development vary according to the nature of their gating, the species of ions passing through those gates, the number of gates, localization of channels, tissue expressing the channel, and interactions between cells and microenvironment. Ion channels feature unique and specific ion flux in ameloblasts, odontoblasts, and other tooth-specific cell lineages. Both enamel and dentin have active chemical systems orchestrating a variety of ion exchanges and demineralization and remineralization processes in a stage-dependent manner. An important role for ion channels is to regulate and maintain the calcium and pH homeostasis that are critical for proper enamel and dentin biomineralization. Specific functions of chloride channels, TRPVs, calcium channels, potassium channels, and solute carrier superfamily members in tooth formation have been gradually clarified in recent years. Mutations in these ion channels or transporters often result in disastrous changes in tooth development. The channelopathies of tooth include altered eruption (CLCN7, KCNJ2, TRPV3), root dysplasia (CLCN7, KCNJ2), amelogenesis imperfecta (KCNJ1, CFTR, AE2, CACNA1C, GJA1), dentin dysplasia (CLCN5), small teeth (CACNA1C, GJA1), tooth agenesis (CLCN7), and other impairments. The mechanisms leading to tooth channelopathies are primarily related to pH regulation, calcium homeostasis, or other alterations of the niche for tooth eruption and development. PMID:24076519

  9. Channelopathy pathogenesis in autism spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Schmunk, Galina; Gargus, J Jay

    2013-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a syndrome that affects normal brain development and is characterized by impaired social interaction as well as verbal and non-verbal communication and by repetitive, stereotypic behavior. ASD is a complex disorder arising from a combination of multiple genetic and environmental factors that are independent from racial, ethnic and socioeconomical status. The high heritability of ASD suggests a strong genetic basis for the disorder. Furthermore, a mounting body of evidence implies a role of various ion channel gene defects (channelopathies) in the pathogenesis of autism. Indeed, recent genome-wide association, and whole exome- and whole-genome resequencing studies linked polymorphisms and rare variants in calcium, sodium and potassium channels and their subunits with susceptibility to ASD, much as they do with bipolar disorder, schizophrenia and other neuropsychiatric disorders. Moreover, animal models with these genetic variations recapitulate endophenotypes considered to be correlates of autistic behavior seen in patients. An ion flux across the membrane regulates a variety of cell functions, from generation of action potentials to gene expression and cell morphology, thus it is not surprising that channelopathies have profound effects on brain functions. In the present work, we summarize existing evidence for the role of ion channel gene defects in the pathogenesis of autism with a focus on calcium signaling and its downstream effects. PMID:24204377

  10. Emerging and resurging vector-borne diseases.

    PubMed

    Gratz, N G

    1999-01-01

    Over the last four decades, a number of arthropod-borne infections have been recognized for the first time. Some have become of considerable public health importance, such as dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF), and others are spreading geographically and their incidence is increasing. There has been an important recrudescence of several long-known vector-borne diseases. Malaria, leishmaniasis, dengue, and plague have resurged in numerous foci, in some cases where they were thought to be under effective control. In most instances, the appearance of new diseases and syndromes and the resurgence of old can be associated with ecological changes that have favored increased vector densities. Dam construction, irrigation and other development projects, urbanization, and deforestation have all resulted in changes in vector population densities that appear to have enabled the emergence of new diseases and the resurgence of old diseases. Greatly increased human travel has spread infectious agents, introducing them into areas in which they had been hitherto absent. It is essential to understand the factors that caused increased vector densities and hence the transmission of disease to prevent the emergence and resurgence of more diseases, as well as to serve as a basis for effective control.

  11. Atrial fibrillation in inherited cardiac channelopathies: From mechanisms to management.

    PubMed

    Enriquez, Andres; Antzelevitch, Charles; Bismah, Verdah; Baranchuk, Adrian

    2016-09-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is prevalent in cardiac channelopathies and may be the presenting feature in some patients. The pathogenesis is related to the primary ion channel dysfunction in atrial myocytes that affects atrial conduction or repolarization. The development of AF is associated with adverse outcomes, and its management is challenging in these patients. In this article we review the current information on the prevalence, risk factors, pathophysiology, and treatment of AF in specific cardiac channelopathies. PMID:27291509

  12. Resurgence of Infant Caregiving Responses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruzek, Jennifer L.; Thompson, Rachel H.; Peters, Lindsay C.

    2009-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted to identify the conditions likely to produce resurgence among adult human participants. The preparation was a simulated caregiving context, wherein a recorded infant cry sounded and was terminated contingent upon targeted caregiving responses. Results of Experiment 1 demonstrated resurgence with human participants in…

  13. [The electrophysiologic diagnosis for muscle ion channelopathies].

    PubMed

    Arimura, Yumiko; Nakamura, Tomonori; Yoshimura, Michiyoshi; Uehara, Akiko; Arimura, Kimiyoshi; Sakoda, Shin-Ichi; Takashima, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    The periodic paralysis (PP) and myotonic syndromes have been recognized as muscle ion channelopathies (MIC) consequent to the discovery of genetic abnormalities of muscle ion channels. Genetic studies are therefore indispensable in the diagnosis of MIC. However, it is not practical to examine all muscle ion channels immediately upon identification of clinical symptoms. Clinical symptoms of MIC occur due to the abnormal excitability of the muscle membrane which is in turn related to abnormal ion channel genes. Therefore, a series of electrophysiologic tests is useful in examining the characteristics of abnormal excitability and predicting the abnormal ion channel Needle EMG studies can detect myotonic discharges while the prolonged exercise test can distinguish between primary and secondary PP. For myotonia, pattern I which includes the repeated short exercise test at room temperature or at cold skin temperature is specific for paramyotonia congenita, pattern II is characteristic for myotonia congenita, and pattern III is useful for Na channel myotonia. The decrement of CMAP with 10 Hz repetitive stimulation is related to mutation type in myotonia congenita. Thus, these electrophysiological tests may be of use in screening for MIC to narrow down the diagnosis and the selection of candidates for gene analysis. PMID:23196580

  14. [From Morvan's disease to potassium channelopathies].

    PubMed

    Serratrice, Georges; Azulay, Jean-Philippe; Serratrice, Jacques; Attarian, Sharam

    2004-01-01

    The term Morvan's disease, first coined in 1890, is still in use, although the generic term neuromyotonia--which is not exempt from criticism--has largely superseded it. Symptoms and signs are variable, ranging from benign painful fasciculations, pseudomyotonic cases, rigid forms, cases in which central nervous system features are also present (with, in addition to nerve hyperexcitability, agitation, confusion, delirium, insomnia, hyperhidrosis and tachycardia). A distal peripheral motor nerve is the origin of nerve hyperexcitability. There is growing evidence that autoimmunity is involved in the pathogenesis of many cases. Antibodies to voltage-gated potassium channels are detected in the serum of many patients with peripheral nerve hyperexcitability. Other cases are probably genetic. Inherited disorders are related to episodic dominant ataxia type 1, with the same mutation of a gene coding for potassium channel subunit Kv 1-1. Many inappropriate or non specific names are used to refer to peripheral nerve hyperexcitability. Isaacs syndrome, voltage-gated potassium channelopathy, or Morvan's syndrome are suggested. PMID:15506715

  15. Resurgence in Siamese fighting fish, Betta splendens.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Stephanie P; Cançado, Carlos R X; Lattal, Kennon A

    2014-03-01

    Resurgence of previously reinforced responding was investigated in male Siamese fighting fish (Betta splendens). Swimming through a ring produced 15-s mirror presentations according to, with different fish, either a fixed-ratio 1 or a variable-interval 60-s schedule of reinforcement. When responding was stable, a differential-reinforcement-of-other-behavior schedule was substituted for the mirror-presentation schedule. Following this, mirror presentations were discontinued (extinction). During this latter phase, there were transient increases in the ring-swim response relative to the frequency of such responding during the differential-reinforcement-of-other behavior schedule. Resurgence was similar for the fish exposed previously to the fixed-ratio or to the variable-interval schedule. These results extend to Siamese fighting fish a well-established behavioral phenomenon previously not observed in this species or with this response topography, and only rarely reported following the removal of a non-consumable reinforcer.

  16. Resurgence in Siamese fighting fish, Betta splendens.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Stephanie P; Cançado, Carlos R X; Lattal, Kennon A

    2014-03-01

    Resurgence of previously reinforced responding was investigated in male Siamese fighting fish (Betta splendens). Swimming through a ring produced 15-s mirror presentations according to, with different fish, either a fixed-ratio 1 or a variable-interval 60-s schedule of reinforcement. When responding was stable, a differential-reinforcement-of-other-behavior schedule was substituted for the mirror-presentation schedule. Following this, mirror presentations were discontinued (extinction). During this latter phase, there were transient increases in the ring-swim response relative to the frequency of such responding during the differential-reinforcement-of-other behavior schedule. Resurgence was similar for the fish exposed previously to the fixed-ratio or to the variable-interval schedule. These results extend to Siamese fighting fish a well-established behavioral phenomenon previously not observed in this species or with this response topography, and only rarely reported following the removal of a non-consumable reinforcer. PMID:24462710

  17. Follistatin in chondrocytes: the link between TRPV4 channelopathies and skeletal malformations

    PubMed Central

    Leddy, Holly A.; McNulty, Amy L.; Lee, Suk Hee; Rothfusz, Nicole E.; Gloss, Bernd; Kirby, Margaret L.; Hutson, Mary R.; Cohn, Daniel H.; Guilak, Farshid; Liedtke, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Point mutations in the calcium-permeable TRPV4 ion channel have been identified as the cause of autosomal-dominant human motor neuropathies, arthropathies, and skeletal malformations of varying severity. The objective of this study was to determine the mechanism by which TRPV4 channelopathy mutations cause skeletal dysplasia. The human TRPV4V620I channelopathy mutation was transfected into primary porcine chondrocytes and caused significant (2.6-fold) up-regulation of follistatin (FST) expression levels. Pore altering mutations that prevent calcium influx through the channel prevented significant FST up-regulation (1.1-fold). We generated a mouse model of theTRPV4V620I mutation, and found significant skeletal deformities (e.g., shortening of tibiae and digits, similar to the human disease brachyolmia) and increases in Fst/TRPV4 mRNA levels (2.8-fold). FST was significantly up-regulated in primary chondrocytes transfected with 3 different dysplasia-causing TRPV4 mutations (2- to 2.3-fold), but was not affected by an arthropathy mutation (1.1-fold). Furthermore, FST-loaded microbeads decreased bone ossification in developing chick femora (6%) and tibiae (11%). FST gene and protein levels were also increased 4-fold in human chondrocytes from an individual natively expressing the TRPV4T89I mutation. Taken together, these data strongly support that up-regulation of FST in chondrocytes by skeletal dysplasia-inducing TRPV4 mutations contributes to disease pathogenesis.—Leddy, H. A., McNulty, A. L., Lee, S. H., Rothfusz, N. E., Gloss, B., Kirby, M. L., Hutson, M. R., Cohn, D. H., Guilak, F., Liedtke, W. Follistatin in chondrocytes: the link between TRPV4 channelopathies and skeletal malformations. PMID:24577120

  18. Malaria resurgence in India: a critical study.

    PubMed

    Sharma, V P; Mehrotra, K N

    1986-01-01

    In 1953, the Indian National Malaria Control Programme (NMCP) was started. Encouraged by the results, and the fact that insecticide resistance in vector species may evolve and become an obstacle, in 1958 a control programme was converted to the National Malaria Eradication Programme (NMEP). By 1964, malaria was eradicated from 88% of the area and it was in the advanced stage of spraying in the remaining parts. At that time, focal outbreaks that occurred in 1965 and increased in later years, could not be contained due to the shortages of DDT. As a result, large areas in consolidation and maintenance phases were reverted to the attack phase. Besides, the infrastructure in general health services was not adequate and mature enough to take up surveillance and vigilance. This produced a large number of secondary cases due to the re-introduction and relapse of malaria. Added to this was the problem of urban malaria, the control of which was the responsibility of local bodies. Malaria cases increased in towns, and started diffusing to the rural areas, due to inadequate staff and the shortages of malarial larvicidal oil (MLO). Later, it turned out, that while it was technically feasible to eradicate malaria from 91% of the population, the strategy of indoor spraying of DDT to interrupt transmission did not succeed in 9.0% of the population, despite more than 12-14 years of regular spraying. During the years of resurgence, there was no research support to the programme, so that technical problems were not properly appreciated, understood and tackled. The reservoir of parasites that were present throughout the country started multiplying and spreading to newer areas due to the presence of vectors in high densities. Thus malaria resurged and re-established itself even in areas that were at one time freed from the disease. The analysis of the pattern of malaria resurgence revealed that malaria outbreaks preceded the true problem of insecticide resistance. It is noteworthy to

  19. Pathophysiological Role of Omega Pore Current in Channelopathies

    PubMed Central

    Jurkat-Rott, Karin; Groome, James; Lehmann-Horn, Frank

    2012-01-01

    In voltage-gated cation channels, a recurrent pattern for mutations is the neutralization of positively charged residues in the voltage-sensing S4 transmembrane segments. These mutations cause dominant ion channelopathies affecting many tissues such as brain, heart, and skeletal muscle. Recent studies suggest that the pathogenesis of associated phenotypes is not limited to alterations in the gating of the ion-conducting alpha pore. Instead, aberrant so-called omega currents, facilitated by the movement of mutated S4 segments, also appear to contribute to symptoms. Surprisingly, these omega currents conduct cations with varying ion selectivity and are activated in either a hyperpolarized or depolarized voltage range. This review gives an overview of voltage sensor channelopathies in general and focuses on pathogenesis of skeletal muscle S4 disorders for which current knowledge is most advanced. PMID:22701429

  20. Determining the Pathogenicity of Genetic Variants Associated with Cardiac Channelopathies

    PubMed Central

    Campuzano, Oscar; Allegue, Catarina; Fernandez, Anna; Iglesias, Anna; Brugada, Ramon

    2015-01-01

    Advancements in genetic screening have generated massive amounts of data on genetic variation; however, a lack of clear pathogenic stratification has left most variants classified as being of unknown significance. This is a critical limitation for translating genetic data into clinical practice. Genetic screening is currently recommended in the guidelines for diagnosis and treatment of cardiac channelopathies, which are major contributors to sudden cardiac death in young people. We propose to characterize the pathogenicity of genetic variants associated with cardiac channelopathies using a stratified scoring system. The development of this system was considered by using all of the tools currently available to define pathogenicity. The use of this scoring system could help clinicians to understand the limitations of genetic associations with a disease, and help them better define the role that genetics can have in their clinical routine. PMID:25608792

  1. A model of resurgence based on behavioral momentum theory.

    PubMed

    Shahan, Timothy A; Sweeney, Mary M

    2011-01-01

    Resurgence is the reappearance of an extinguished behavior when an alternative behavior reinforced during extinction is subsequently placed on extinction. Resurgence is of particular interest because it may be a source of relapse to problem behavior following treatments involving alternative reinforcement. In this article we develop a quantitative model of resurgence based on the augmented model of extinction provided by behavioral momentum theory. The model suggests that alternative reinforcement during extinction of a target response acts as both an additional source of disruption during extinction and as a source of reinforcement in the context that increases the future strength of the target response. The model does a good job accounting for existing data in the resurgence literature and makes novel and testable predictions. Thus, the model appears to provide a framework for understanding resurgence and serves to integrate the phenomenon into the existing theoretical account of persistence provided by behavioral momentum theory. In addition, we discuss some potential implications of the model for further development of behavioral momentum theory. PMID:21541118

  2. A model of resurgence based on behavioral momentum theory.

    PubMed

    Shahan, Timothy A; Sweeney, Mary M

    2011-01-01

    Resurgence is the reappearance of an extinguished behavior when an alternative behavior reinforced during extinction is subsequently placed on extinction. Resurgence is of particular interest because it may be a source of relapse to problem behavior following treatments involving alternative reinforcement. In this article we develop a quantitative model of resurgence based on the augmented model of extinction provided by behavioral momentum theory. The model suggests that alternative reinforcement during extinction of a target response acts as both an additional source of disruption during extinction and as a source of reinforcement in the context that increases the future strength of the target response. The model does a good job accounting for existing data in the resurgence literature and makes novel and testable predictions. Thus, the model appears to provide a framework for understanding resurgence and serves to integrate the phenomenon into the existing theoretical account of persistence provided by behavioral momentum theory. In addition, we discuss some potential implications of the model for further development of behavioral momentum theory.

  3. Effects of Response Effort on Resurgence.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Alyssa N; Glassford, Tyler S; Koerkenmeier, Sarah M

    2016-06-01

    The present study examined response effort during resurgence tests. Six children were trained to place balls in baskets that were placed either close (.0254 m) or far away (1.829 m or .9 m). Resurgence was assessed using a linear strip design, where responses were reinforced on a variable-interval 10-s schedule or put on extinction. During resurgence tests, minimal to low rates of resurgence associated with the greater response effort (i.e., placing a ball in the basket further way) were observed across all six participants, regardless of distance.

  4. Effects of Response Effort on Resurgence.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Alyssa N; Glassford, Tyler S; Koerkenmeier, Sarah M

    2016-06-01

    The present study examined response effort during resurgence tests. Six children were trained to place balls in baskets that were placed either close (.0254 m) or far away (1.829 m or .9 m). Resurgence was assessed using a linear strip design, where responses were reinforced on a variable-interval 10-s schedule or put on extinction. During resurgence tests, minimal to low rates of resurgence associated with the greater response effort (i.e., placing a ball in the basket further way) were observed across all six participants, regardless of distance. PMID:27606253

  5. Resurgence flows in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adler, Pierre; Mityushev, Vladimir

    2010-05-01

    Porous media are generally described by the Darcy equation when the length scales are sufficiently large with respect to the pore scale. This approach is also applicable when the media are heterogeneous, i.e., when permeability varies with space which is the most common case. In addition, real media are very often fractured; for a long time, this complex physical problem has been schematized by the double porosity model devised by Barenblatt. More recently, these fractured media have been addressed with a detailed description of the fractures and of their hydrodynamic interaction with the surrounding porous medium. This approach will be briefly summarized and the main recent progress surveyed (2). There is another situation which occurs frequently in underground studies. One well is connected to a distant well while it is not connected to closer wells. Such a situation can only be understood if there is a direct link between the two connected wells and if this link has little if any hydrodynamic interaction with the porous medium that it crosses. This link can be a fracture or more likely a set of fractures. This phenomenon is called resurgence because of the obvious analogy with rivers which suddenly disappear underground and go out at the ground surface again. Similar ideas have already been developed in other fields. In Physics, random networks limited to nearest neighbors have been recently extended to small world models where distant vertices can be related directly by a link. The electrical testing of porous media by electrical probes located at the walls (electrical tomography) has been used frequently in Geophysics since it is a non-invasive technique; this classical technique corresponds exactly to the situation addressed here from a different perspective. Media with resurgences consist of a double structure (3). The first one which is continuous is described by Darcy law as usual. The second one models the resurgences by capillaries with impermeable walls

  6. Clinical Features of Genetic Cardiac Diseases Related to Potassium Channelopathies.

    PubMed

    Adler, Arnon; Viskin, Sami

    2016-06-01

    Genetic cardiac diseases related to potassium channelopathies are a group of relatively rare syndromes that includes long QT syndrome, short QT syndrome, Brugada syndrome, and early repolarization syndrome. Patients with these syndromes share a propensity for the development of life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias in the absence of significant cardiac structural abnormalities. Familial atrial fibrillation has also been associated with potassium channel dysfunction but differs from the other syndromes by being a rare cause of a common condition. This article focuses on the clinical features, diagnosis, and management of these syndromes. PMID:27261827

  7. Muscle channelopathies and critical points in functional and genetic studies

    PubMed Central

    Jurkat-Rott, Karin; Lehmann-Horn, Frank

    2005-01-01

    Muscle channelopathies are caused by mutations in ion channel genes, by antibodies directed against ion channel proteins, or by changes of cell homeostasis leading to aberrant splicing of ion channel RNA or to disturbances of modification and localization of channel proteins. As ion channels constitute one of the only protein families that allow functional examination on the molecular level, expression studies of putative mutations have become standard in confirming that the mutations cause disease. Functional changes may not necessarily prove disease causality of a putative mutation but could be brought about by a polymorphism instead. These problems are addressed, and a more critical evaluation of the underlying genetic data is proposed. PMID:16075040

  8. Resurgence flows in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adler, P. M.; Mityushev, V.

    2009-12-01

    Porous media are generally described by the Darcy equation when the length scales are sufficiently large with respect to the pore scale. This approach is also applicable when the media are heterogeneous, i.e., when permeability varies with space which is the most common case. In addition, real media are very often fractured; for a long time, this complex physical problem has been schematized by the double porosity model devised by Barenblatt. More recently, these fractured media have been addressed with a detailed description of the fractures and of their hydrodynamic interaction with the surrounding porous medium. There is another situation which occurs frequently in underground studies. One well is connected to a distant well while it is not connected to closer wells. Such a situation can only be understood if there is a direct link between the two connected wells and if this link has little if any hydrodynamic interaction with the porous medium that it crosses. This link can be a fracture or more likely a set of fractures. This phenomenon is called resurgence because of the obvious analogy with rivers which suddenly disappear underground and go out at the ground surface again. Similar ideas have already been developed in other fields. In Physics, random networks limited to nearest neighbors have been recently extended to small world models where distant vertices can be related directly by a link. The electrical testing of porous media by electrical probes located at the walls (electrical tomography) has been used frequently in Geophysics since it is a non-invasive technique; this classical technique corresponds exactly to the situation addressed here from a different perspective. Media with resurgences consist of a double structure. The first one which is continuous is described by Darcy law as usual. The second one models the resurgences by capillaries with impermeable walls which relate distant points of the continuous medium. These two structures have already

  9. Sodium channelopathies of skeletal muscle result from gain or loss of function.

    PubMed

    Jurkat-Rott, Karin; Holzherr, Boris; Fauler, Michael; Lehmann-Horn, Frank

    2010-07-01

    Five hereditary sodium channelopathies of skeletal muscle have been identified. Prominent symptoms are either myotonia or weakness caused by an increase or decrease of muscle fiber excitability. The voltage-gated sodium channel NaV1.4, initiator of the muscle action potential, is mutated in all five disorders. Pathogenetically, both loss and gain of function mutations have been described, the latter being the more frequent mechanism and involving not just the ion-conducting pore, but aberrant pores as well. The type of channel malfunction is decisive for therapy which consists either of exerting a direct effect on the sodium channel, i.e., by blocking the pore, or of restoring skeletal muscle membrane potential to reduce the fraction of inactivated channels.

  10. Genetics of channelopathies associated with sudden cardiac death

    PubMed Central

    Campuzano, Oscar; Sarquella-Brugada, Georgia; Brugada, Ramon; Brugada, Josep

    2015-01-01

    Recent technological advances in cardiology have resulted in new guidelines for the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of diseases. Despite these improvements, sudden death remains one of the main challenges to clinicians because the majority of diseases associated with sudden cardiac death are characterized by incomplete penetrance and variable expressivity. Hence, patients may be unaware of their illness, and physical activity can be the trigger for syncope as first symptom of the disease. Most common causes of sudden cardiac death are congenital alterations and structural heart diseases, although a significant number remain unexplained after comprehensive autopsy. In these unresolved cases, channelopathies are considered the first potential cause of death. Since all these diseases are of genetic origin, family members could be at risk, despite being asymptomatic. Genetics has also benefited from technological advances, and genetic testing has been incorporated into the sudden death field, identifying the cause in clinically affected patients, asymptomatic family members and post-mortem cases without conclusive diagnosis. This review focuses on recent advances in the genetics of channelopathies associated with sudden cardiac death. PMID:26566530

  11. Tetrodotoxin-resistant sodium channels in sensory neurons generate slow resurgent currents that are enhanced by inflammatory mediators.

    PubMed

    Tan, Zhi-Yong; Piekarz, Andrew D; Priest, Birgit T; Knopp, Kelly L; Krajewski, Jeffrey L; McDermott, Jeff S; Nisenbaum, Eric S; Cummins, Theodore R

    2014-05-21

    Resurgent sodium currents contribute to the regeneration of action potentials and enhanced neuronal excitability. Tetrodotoxin-sensitive (TTX-S) resurgent currents have been described in many different neuron populations, including cerebellar and dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons. In most cases, sodium channel Nav1.6 is the major contributor to these TTX-S resurgent currents. Here we report a novel TTX-resistant (TTX-R) resurgent current recorded from rat DRG neurons. The TTX-R resurgent currents are similar to classic TTX-S resurgent currents in many respects, but not all. As with TTX-S resurgent currents, they are activated by membrane repolarization, inhibited by lidocaine, and enhanced by a peptide-mimetic of the β4 sodium channel subunit intracellular domain. However, the TTX-R resurgent currents exhibit much slower kinetics, occur at more depolarized voltages, and are sensitive to the Nav1.8 blocker A803467. Moreover, coimmunoprecipitation experiments from rat DRG lysates indicate the endogenous sodium channel β4 subunits associate with Nav1.8 in DRG neurons. These results suggest that slow TTX-R resurgent currents in DRG neurons are mediated by Nav1.8 and are generated by the same mechanism underlying TTX-S resurgent currents. We also show that both TTX-S and TTX-R resurgent currents in DRG neurons are enhanced by inflammatory mediators. Furthermore, the β4 peptide increased excitability of small DRG neurons in the presence of TTX. We propose that these slow TTX-R resurgent currents contribute to the membrane excitability of nociceptive DRG neurons under normal conditions and that enhancement of both types of resurgent currents by inflammatory mediators could contribute to sensory neuronal hyperexcitability associated with inflammatory pain. PMID:24849353

  12. Malaria resurgence: a systematic review and assessment of its causes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Considerable declines in malaria have accompanied increased funding for control since the year 2000, but historical failures to maintain gains against the disease underscore the fragility of these successes. Although malaria transmission can be suppressed by effective control measures, in the absence of active intervention malaria will return to an intrinsic equilibrium determined by factors related to ecology, efficiency of mosquito vectors, and socioeconomic characteristics. Understanding where and why resurgence has occurred historically can help current and future malaria control programmes avoid the mistakes of the past. Methods A systematic review of the literature was conducted to identify historical malaria resurgence events. All suggested causes of these events were categorized according to whether they were related to weakened malaria control programmes, increased potential for malaria transmission, or technical obstacles like resistance. Results The review identified 75 resurgence events in 61 countries, occurring from the 1930s through the 2000s. Almost all resurgence events (68/75 = 91%) were attributed at least in part to the weakening of malaria control programmes for a variety of reasons, of which resource constraints were the most common (39/68 = 57%). Over half of the events (44/75 = 59%) were attributed in part to increases in the intrinsic potential for malaria transmission, while only 24/75 (32%) were attributed to vector or drug resistance. Conclusions Given that most malaria resurgences have been linked to weakening of control programmes, there is an urgent need to develop practical solutions to the financial and operational threats to effectively sustaining today’s successful malaria control programmes. PMID:22531245

  13. Effects of high, low, and thinning rates of alternative reinforcement on response elimination and resurgence.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Mary M; Shahan, Timothy A

    2013-07-01

    A common treatment for operant problem behavior is alternative reinforcement. When alternative reinforcement is removed or reduced, however, resurgence of the target behavior can occur. Shahan and Sweeney (2011) developed a quantitative model of resurgence based on behavioral momentum theory that suggests higher rates of alternative reinforcement result in faster response elimination and greater resurgence when removed, whereas lower rates of alternative reinforcement result in slower response elimination but are followed by less resurgence. Thus, the present study was designed to examine whether faster target response elimination and less resurgence could be achieved by beginning with a high rate of alternative reinforcement and gradually thinning it such that a low rate is ultimately removed during a simulated treatment lapse. Results showed that high rates of alternative reinforcement were more effective than low or thinning rates at target response suppression but resulted in resurgence when discontinued. Low and thinning rates, on the other hand, were less effective at response suppression but target responding did not increase when alternative reinforcement was discontinued. The quantitative model cannot currently account for the finding that lower-rate alternative reinforcement may not effectively disrupt behavior relative to an extinction only control. Relative advantages of high, low, thinning, or no alternative reinforcement are discussed with respect to suppression of target response rate during treatment, resurgence when alternative reinforcement is removed, and alternative response persistence, while taking into account differences between this animal model and modern applied behavior analytic treatments.

  14. Effects of high, low, and thinning rates of alternative reinforcement on response elimination and resurgence.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Mary M; Shahan, Timothy A

    2013-07-01

    A common treatment for operant problem behavior is alternative reinforcement. When alternative reinforcement is removed or reduced, however, resurgence of the target behavior can occur. Shahan and Sweeney (2011) developed a quantitative model of resurgence based on behavioral momentum theory that suggests higher rates of alternative reinforcement result in faster response elimination and greater resurgence when removed, whereas lower rates of alternative reinforcement result in slower response elimination but are followed by less resurgence. Thus, the present study was designed to examine whether faster target response elimination and less resurgence could be achieved by beginning with a high rate of alternative reinforcement and gradually thinning it such that a low rate is ultimately removed during a simulated treatment lapse. Results showed that high rates of alternative reinforcement were more effective than low or thinning rates at target response suppression but resulted in resurgence when discontinued. Low and thinning rates, on the other hand, were less effective at response suppression but target responding did not increase when alternative reinforcement was discontinued. The quantitative model cannot currently account for the finding that lower-rate alternative reinforcement may not effectively disrupt behavior relative to an extinction only control. Relative advantages of high, low, thinning, or no alternative reinforcement are discussed with respect to suppression of target response rate during treatment, resurgence when alternative reinforcement is removed, and alternative response persistence, while taking into account differences between this animal model and modern applied behavior analytic treatments. PMID:23605776

  15. The resurgence of tuberculosis in Russia.

    PubMed

    Shilova, M V; Dye, C

    2001-07-29

    This paper documents and attempts to explain the epidemic spread of tuberculosis (TB) in Russia during the 1990s. After several decades of decline, the notification rate of all new TB cases among permanent residents increased by 7.5% per year from 1991-1999 and the death rate by 11% per year. Growth was quickest from 1993-1995 but increased again after the economic crisis of August 1998. Approximately 120 000 new cases and 30 000 deaths were reported in 1999. Case detection and cure rates have fallen in Russia since the mid-1980s; the fall has been accompanied by a higher frequency of severe disease among cases, and higher death and case fatality rates. With a mathematical model describing the deterioration in case finding and cure rates we could replicate the average rate of increase in incidence 1991-1999 but not the precise timing of the observed changes. Other factors that probably helped to shape the observed rise in caseload include enhanced transmission due to the mixing of prison and civilian populations, an increase in susceptibility to disease, and changes in the proportion of cases detected by surveillance. Although our explanation for the resurgence of TB is incomplete, we have identified a set of measures that can be implemented now to cut transmission, incidence and deaths. PMID:11516384

  16. Climatic factors in resurgence of Mediterranean spotted fever

    SciTech Connect

    Arenas, E.E.; Creus, B.F.; Cueto, F.B.; Porta, F.S.

    1986-06-07

    There has been a recent resurgence of Mediterranean spotted fever in areas bordering the Mediterranean Sea. This disease is caused by Rickettsia conorii, the dog tick being the vector and main reservoir. Ticks prefer warm weather and their activity increases with rising temperature. In the Valles Occidental, Spain, the incidence of the disease is correlated with hotter and drier summers in the past ten years.

  17. Renewal, resurgence, and alternative reinforcement context.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Mary M; Shahan, Timothy A

    2015-07-01

    Resurgence, relapse induced by the removal of alternative reinforcement, and renewal, relapse induced by a change in contextual stimuli, are typically studied separately in operant conditioning paradigms. In analogous treatments of operant problem behavior, aspects of both relapse phenomena can operate simultaneously. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine a novel method for studying resurgence and renewal in the same experimental preparation. An alternative source of reinforcement was available during extinction for one group of rats (a typical resurgence preparation). Another group experienced an operant renewal preparation in which the extinction context was distinguished via olfactory and visual stimuli. A third group experienced alternative reinforcement delivery in the new context, a novel combination of typical resurgence and renewal preparations. Removal of alternative reinforcement and/or a change in context induced relapse relative to an extinction-only control group. When alternative reinforcement was delivered in a novel context, the alternative response was less persistent relative to when extinction of the alternative response took place in the context in which it was trained. This methodology might be used to illustrate shared (or distinct) mechanisms of resurgence and renewal, and to determine how delivering alternative reinforcement in another context may affect persistence and relapse.

  18. Recency, repeatability, and reinforcer retrenchment: an experimental analysis of resurgence.

    PubMed

    Lieving, Gregory A; Lattal, Kennon A

    2003-09-01

    Four experiments were conducted with pigeons to assess the experimental conditions necessary for the occurrence of resurgence. The general procedure consisted of the following conditions: Condition 1--reinforcement of key pecking; Condition 2--reinforcement of treadle pressing and concurrent extinction of key pecking; and Condition 3--the resurgence condition wherein resurgence was defined as the recovery of key pecking. In Experiments 1 and 2, the resurgence condition was conventional extinction. The effect of recency on resurgence magnitude was examined in Experiment 1 by manipulating the number of sessions of Condition 2, above. Resurgence was not a function of recency with the parameters used. Repeating the three conditions revealed resurgence to be a repeatable effect in Experiment 2. In Experiment 3, a variable-time schedule was in effect for the resurgence condition. Resurgence was not produced by response-independent food delivery. In Experiment 4, the resurgence condition was a variable-interval schedule for treadle pressing that arranged a lower reinforcement rate than in Condition 2 (92% reduction in reinforcers per minute). Resurgence was lower in magnitude relative to conventional extinction, although resurgence was obtained with 2 out of 3 pigeons. The results are discussed in terms of the variables controlling resurgence and the relations between behavioral history, resurgence, and other forms of response recovery.

  19. The resurgence of the cusp anomalous dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aniceto, Inês

    2016-02-01

    This work addresses the resurgent properties of the cusp anomalous dimension’s strong coupling expansion, obtained from the integral Beisert-Eden-Staudacher (BES) equation. This expansion is factorially divergent, and its first non-perturbative corrections are related to the mass gap of the O(6)σ -model. The factorial divergence can also be analyzed from a resurgence perspective. Building on the work of Basso and Korchemsky, a transseries ansatz for the cusp anomalous dimension is proposed and the corresponding expected large-order behaviour studied. One finds non-perturbative phenomena in both the positive and negative real coupling directions, which need to be included to address the analyticity conditions coming from the BES equation. After checking the resurgence structure of the proposed transseries, it is shown that it naturally leads to an unambiguous resummation procedure, furthermore allowing for a strong/weak coupling interpolation.

  20. RESURGENCE OF MANDS FOLLOWING FUNCTIONAL COMMUNICATION TRAINING

    PubMed Central

    BERG, WENDY K.; RINGDAHL, JOEL E.; RYAN, STEPHEN E.; ING, ANNA D.; LUSTIG, NICOLE; ROMANI, PATRICK; WACKER, DAVID P.; ANDERSEN, JENNIFER K.; DURAKO, EMILY

    2015-01-01

    Experimental conditions similar to those described by Lieving and Lattal (2003) were used within two experiments to evaluate the resurgence of mands with humans. Two mands from the same operant class were trained with three participants with developmental disabilities during Experiment 1 and with two participants with developmental disabilities and a history of problem behavior during Experiment 2. The two mands were then placed on extinction. Both persisted, but showed different response strength during extinction. The mand with the weaker response strength was targeted for additional functional communication training and the alternative mand was placed on extinction. Following steady levels of occurrence of the targeted mand and no occurrences of the alternative mand, both mands were placed on extinction again. At least one instance of resurgence of the alternative mand occurred with every participant and resurgence of problem behavior occurred for both participants during Experiment 2. PMID:26640311

  1. Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels: Biophysics, Pharmacology, and Related Channelopathies

    PubMed Central

    Savio-Galimberti, Eleonora; Gollob, Michael H.; Darbar, Dawood

    2012-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSC) are multi-molecular protein complexes expressed in both excitable and non-excitable cells. They are primarily formed by a pore-forming multi-spanning integral membrane glycoprotein (α-subunit) that can be associated with one or more regulatory β-subunits. The latter are single-span integral membrane proteins that modulate the sodium current (INa) and can also function as cell adhesion molecules. In vitro some of the cell-adhesive functions of the β-subunits may play important physiological roles independently of the α-subunits. Other endogenous regulatory proteins named “channel partners” or “channel interacting proteins” (ChiPs) like caveolin-3 and calmodulin/calmodulin kinase II (CaMKII) can also interact and modulate the expression and/or function of VGSC. In addition to their physiological roles in cell excitability and cell adhesion, VGSC are the site of action of toxins (like tetrodotoxin and saxitoxin), and pharmacologic agents (like antiarrhythmic drugs, local anesthetics, antiepileptic drugs, and newly developed analgesics). Mutations in genes that encode α- and/or β-subunits as well as the ChiPs can affect the structure and biophysical properties of VGSC, leading to the development of diseases termed sodium “channelopathies”.  This review will outline the structure, function, and biophysical properties of VGSC as well as their pharmacology and associated channelopathies and highlight some of the recent advances in this field. PMID:22798951

  2. Resurgence of Temporal Patterns of Responding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cancado, Carlos R. X.; Lattal, Kennon A.

    2011-01-01

    The resurgence of temporal patterns of key pecking by pigeons was investigated in two experiments. In Experiment 1, positively accelerated and linear patterns of responding were established on one key under a discrete-trial multiple fixed-interval variable-interval schedule. Subsequently, only responses on a second key produced reinforcers…

  3. Neural network modelling of the influence of channelopathies on reflex visual attention.

    PubMed

    Gravier, Alexandre; Quek, Chai; Duch, Włodzisław; Wahab, Abdul; Gravier-Rymaszewska, Joanna

    2016-02-01

    This paper introduces a model of Emergent Visual Attention in presence of calcium channelopathy (EVAC). By modelling channelopathy, EVAC constitutes an effort towards identifying the possible causes of autism. The network structure embodies the dual pathways model of cortical processing of visual input, with reflex attention as an emergent property of neural interactions. EVAC extends existing work by introducing attention shift in a larger-scale network and applying a phenomenological model of channelopathy. In presence of a distractor, the channelopathic network's rate of failure to shift attention is lower than the control network's, but overall, the control network exhibits a lower classification error rate. The simulation results also show differences in task-relative reaction times between control and channelopathic networks. The attention shift timings inferred from the model are consistent with studies of attention shift in autistic children.

  4. The resurgence of mumps and pertussis.

    PubMed

    Sabbe, Martine; Vandermeulen, Corinne

    2016-04-01

    Vaccines and extended vaccination programs have had an extensive impact on morbidity and mortality rates due to infectious diseases. Because of the continuous and extensive use of vaccines in industrialized countries, many infectious diseases such as poliomyelitis, diphtheria and measles have been reduced to near-extinction. However, in recent years, many countries including the United States of America, the United Kingdom and Belgium, have been confronted with a resurgence of mumps and pertussis, despite high vaccination coverage for both vaccines. In this commentary, possible causes of this resurgence will be discussed, such as the occurrence of adapted microbes, failure to vaccinate and primary and secondary vaccine failure. Additional research of the immunological mechanisms is clearly needed to support the development of possible new and more immunogenic vaccines against mumps and pertussis. Meanwhile, extensive vaccination campaigns with both vaccines remain necessary.

  5. The resurgence of mumps and pertussis

    PubMed Central

    Sabbe, Martine; Vandermeulen, Corinne

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Vaccines and extended vaccination programs have had an extensive impact on morbidity and mortality rates due to infectious diseases. Because of the continuous and extensive use of vaccines in industrialized countries, many infectious diseases such as poliomyelitis, diphtheria and measles have been reduced to near-extinction. However, in recent years, many countries including the United States of America, the United Kingdom and Belgium, have been confronted with a resurgence of mumps and pertussis, despite high vaccination coverage for both vaccines. In this commentary, possible causes of this resurgence will be discussed, such as the occurrence of adapted microbes, failure to vaccinate and primary and secondary vaccine failure. Additional research of the immunological mechanisms is clearly needed to support the development of possible new and more immunogenic vaccines against mumps and pertussis. Meanwhile, extensive vaccination campaigns with both vaccines remain necessary. PMID:26751186

  6. Bordetella pertussis epidemiology and evolution in the light of pertussis resurgence.

    PubMed

    Sealey, Katie L; Belcher, Thomas; Preston, Andrew

    2016-06-01

    Whooping cough, or pertussis, is resurgent in many countries world-wide. This is linked to switching from the use of whole cell vaccines to acellular vaccines in developed countries. Current evidence suggests that this has resulted in the earlier waning of vaccine-induced immunity, an increase in asymptomatic infection with concomitant increases in transmission and increased selection pressure for Bordetellapertussis variants that are better able to evade vaccine-mediated immunity than older isolates. This review discusses recent findings in B. pertussis epidemiology and evolution in the light of pertussis resurgence, and highlights the important role for genomics-based studies in monitoring B. pertussis adaptation.

  7. Bordetella pertussis epidemiology and evolution in the light of pertussis resurgence.

    PubMed

    Sealey, Katie L; Belcher, Thomas; Preston, Andrew

    2016-06-01

    Whooping cough, or pertussis, is resurgent in many countries world-wide. This is linked to switching from the use of whole cell vaccines to acellular vaccines in developed countries. Current evidence suggests that this has resulted in the earlier waning of vaccine-induced immunity, an increase in asymptomatic infection with concomitant increases in transmission and increased selection pressure for Bordetellapertussis variants that are better able to evade vaccine-mediated immunity than older isolates. This review discusses recent findings in B. pertussis epidemiology and evolution in the light of pertussis resurgence, and highlights the important role for genomics-based studies in monitoring B. pertussis adaptation. PMID:26932577

  8. Fish faunal resurgence in Lake Nabugabo, East Africa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chapman, L.J.; Chapman, Colin A.; Schofield, P.J.; Olowo, J.P.; Kaufman, L.S.; Seehausen, O.; Ogutu-Ohwayo., R.

    2003-01-01

     In Lake Nabugabo, Uganda, a small satellite of the equatorial Lake Victoria, approximately 50% of the indigenous fish species disappeared from the open waters subsequent to establishment of the introduced predatory Nile perch (   Lates niloticus ). However, several of these species persisted in wetland refugia. Over the past decade, Nile perch in Lake Nabugabo have been intensively fished. Herein we report a resurgence of some indigenous species in open waters. In a multiyear study, we used annual transects in inshore and offshore waters of exposed ( no wetland ) and wetland habitats to document the pattern of resurgence. In 1995, haplochromine cichlids were largely confined to inshore areas, particularly wetland ecotones, and were rare in Nile perch stomachs, as were most other indigenous species. By 2000 haplochromine cichlids were abundant in inshore and offshore areas of both exposed and wetland transects. Several indigenous noncichlids also reappeared in the main lake, including three of the four original mormyrid species. Between 1995 and 1999, there was a dramatic increase in the proportion of haplochromines in the diet of Nile perch. When haplochromines were rare ( 1995 ), Nile perch switched from an invertebrate-dominated diet to piscivory at a large size ( 30 cm total length ). In 2000, however, Nile perch were strongly piscivorous by 5–10 cm total length. The pattern of faunal loss and recovery in Lake Nabugabo demonstrates the importance of refugia in providing the seeds of resurgence and provides a model with which to understand some changes in Lake Victoria.

  9. Cancer as a channelopathy: ion channels and pumps in tumor development and progression

    PubMed Central

    Litan, Alisa; Langhans, Sigrid A.

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that ion channels and pumps not only regulate membrane potential, ion homeostasis, and electric signaling in excitable cells but also play important roles in cell proliferation, migration, apoptosis and differentiation. Consistent with a role in cell signaling, channel proteins and ion pumps can form macromolecular complexes with growth factors, and cell adhesion and other signaling molecules. And while cancer is still not being cataloged as a channelopathy, as the non-traditional roles of ion pumps and channels are being recognized, it is increasingly being suggested that ion channels and ion pumps contribute to cancer progression. Cancer cell migration requires the regulation of adhesion complexes between migrating cells and surrounding extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. Cell movement along solid surfaces requires a sequence of cell protrusions and retractions that mainly depend on regulation of the actin cytoskeleton along with contribution of microtubules and molecular motor proteins such as mysoin. This process is triggered and modulated by a combination of environmental signals, which are sensed and integrated by membrane receptors, including integrins and cadherins. Membrane receptors transduce these signals into downstream signaling pathways, often involving the Rho GTPase protein family. These pathways regulate the cytoskeletal rearrangements necessary for proper timing of adhesion, contraction and detachment of cells in order to find their way through extracellular spaces. Migration and adhesion involve continuous modulation of cell motility, shape and volume, in which ion channels and pumps play major roles. Research on cancer cells suggests that certain ion channels may be involved in aberrant tumor growth and channel inhibitors often lead to growth arrest. This review will describe recent research into the role of ion pumps and ion channels in cell migration and adhesion, and how they may contribute to tumor development

  10. Implications for practice: Resurgence and differential reinforcement of alternative responding.

    PubMed

    Bloom, Sarah E; Lambert, Joseph M

    2015-12-01

    During the maintenance stages of differential reinforcement of alternative responding (DRA), failure to reinforce alternative responses could result in a resurgence of problem behavior. However, translational work done with arbitrary human responses suggests that teaching individuals to emit multiple alternative responses in sequential order may facilitate the resurgence of appropriate, rather than problem, behavior. This paper discusses the practical implications of serial DRA training on problem and appropriate behavior resurgence, as presented in the preceding article, "Serial Alternative Response Training As Intervention for Target Response Resurgence." Clinical scenarios as well as implications for self-advocacy and acceptability of behavioral interventions are considered. PMID:26477525

  11. Implications for practice: Resurgence and differential reinforcement of alternative responding.

    PubMed

    Bloom, Sarah E; Lambert, Joseph M

    2015-12-01

    During the maintenance stages of differential reinforcement of alternative responding (DRA), failure to reinforce alternative responses could result in a resurgence of problem behavior. However, translational work done with arbitrary human responses suggests that teaching individuals to emit multiple alternative responses in sequential order may facilitate the resurgence of appropriate, rather than problem, behavior. This paper discusses the practical implications of serial DRA training on problem and appropriate behavior resurgence, as presented in the preceding article, "Serial Alternative Response Training As Intervention for Target Response Resurgence." Clinical scenarios as well as implications for self-advocacy and acceptability of behavioral interventions are considered.

  12. Resurgence: Response competition, stimulus control, and reinforcer control.

    PubMed

    Podlesnik, Christopher A; Kelley, Michael E

    2014-09-01

    Resurgence is the relapse of a previously reinforced and then extinguished target response when extinguishing a more recently reinforced alternative response. We designed the present study to assess the contribution of stimulus-control and reinforcer-control processes in determining resurgence. In a modified resurgence procedure, we removed the alternative discriminative stimulus signaling alternative reinforcement when extinguishing the alternative response. This produced more abrupt resurgence of target responding than in a typical resurgence procedure maintaining the alternative discriminative stimulus when extinguishing the alternative response. The overall amount of resurgence did not differ. Importantly, a "renewal" control added and removed the alternative stimulus during extinction, identically as in the modified resurgence procedure. However, alternative responding was never reinforced, which produced no relapse of target responding. Therefore, the more abrupt resurgence with the modified procedure than with the typical procedure suggests removing the alternative stimulus reduced the competition between alternative and target responding. These findings revealed the importance of adding and removing alternative reinforcement in producing resurgence (reinforcer control) but little influence of simply adding and removing the alternative stimulus (stimulus control). These data suggest that clinicians should consider the long-term availability of the alternative response option when developing differential-reinforcement interventions.

  13. Resurgence: Response competition, stimulus control, and reinforcer control.

    PubMed

    Podlesnik, Christopher A; Kelley, Michael E

    2014-09-01

    Resurgence is the relapse of a previously reinforced and then extinguished target response when extinguishing a more recently reinforced alternative response. We designed the present study to assess the contribution of stimulus-control and reinforcer-control processes in determining resurgence. In a modified resurgence procedure, we removed the alternative discriminative stimulus signaling alternative reinforcement when extinguishing the alternative response. This produced more abrupt resurgence of target responding than in a typical resurgence procedure maintaining the alternative discriminative stimulus when extinguishing the alternative response. The overall amount of resurgence did not differ. Importantly, a "renewal" control added and removed the alternative stimulus during extinction, identically as in the modified resurgence procedure. However, alternative responding was never reinforced, which produced no relapse of target responding. Therefore, the more abrupt resurgence with the modified procedure than with the typical procedure suggests removing the alternative stimulus reduced the competition between alternative and target responding. These findings revealed the importance of adding and removing alternative reinforcement in producing resurgence (reinforcer control) but little influence of simply adding and removing the alternative stimulus (stimulus control). These data suggest that clinicians should consider the long-term availability of the alternative response option when developing differential-reinforcement interventions. PMID:25125267

  14. Studying channelopathies at the functional level using a system identification approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faisal, A. Aldo

    2007-09-01

    The electrical activity of our brain's neurons is controlled by voltage-gated ion channels. Mutations in these ion channels have been recently associated with clinical conditions, so called channelopathies. The involved ion channels have been well characterised at a molecular and biophysical level. However, the impact of these mutations on neuron function have been only rudimentary studied. It remains unclear how operation and performance (in terms of input-output characteristics and reliability) are affected. Here, I show how system identification techniques provide neuronal performance measures which allow to quantitatively asses the impact of channelopathies by comparing whole cell input-output relationships. I illustrate the feasibility of this approach by comparing the effects on neuronal signalling of two human sodium channel mutations (NaV 1.1 W1204R, R1648H), linked to generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures, to the wild-type NaV 1.1 channel.

  15. A Model of Resurgence Based on Behavioral Momentum Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shahan, Timothy A.; Sweeney, Mary M.

    2011-01-01

    Resurgence is the reappearance of an extinguished behavior when an alternative behavior reinforced during extinction is subsequently placed on extinction. Resurgence is of particular interest because it may be a source of relapse to problem behavior following treatments involving alternative reinforcement. In this article we develop a quantitative…

  16. Alabama's Appalachian overthrust amid exploratory drilling resurgence

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, J.D. ); Epsman, M.L.

    1991-06-24

    Oil and gas exploration has been carried out sporadically in the Appalachian overthrust region of Alabama for years, but recently interest in the play has had a major resurgence. The Appalachian overthrust region of Alabama is best exposed in the valley and ridge physiographic province in the northeast part of the state. Resistant ridges of sandstone and chert and valleys of shales and carbonate have been thrust toward the northwest. Seismic data show that this structural style continues under the Cretaceous overlap. The surface and subsurface expression of the Alabama overthrust extends for more than 4,000 sq miles. Oil and gas have been produced for many years from Cambro-Ordovician, Ordovician, Mississippian, and Pennsylvanian rocks in the nearby Black Warrior basin in Alabama and Mississippi and the Cumberland plateau in Tennessee. The same zones are also potential producing horizons in the Alabama overthrust region.

  17. Resurgent transseries & Dyson-Schwinger equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaczynski, Lutz

    2016-09-01

    We employ resurgent transseries as algebraic tools to investigate two self-consistent Dyson-Schwinger equations, one in Yukawa theory and one in quantum electrodynamics. After a brief but pedagogical review, we derive fixed point equations for the associated anomalous dimensions and insert a moderately generic log-free transseries ansatz to study the possible strictures imposed. While proceeding in various stages, we develop an algebraic method to keep track of the transseries' coefficients. We explore what conditions must be violated in order to stay clear of fixed point theorems to eschew a unique solution, if so desired, as we explain. An interesting finding is that the flow of data between the different sectors of the transseries shows a pattern typical of resurgence, i.e. the phenomenon that the perturbative sector of the transseries talks to the nonperturbative ones in a one-way fashion. However, our ansatz is not exotic enough as it leads to trivial solutions with vanishing nonperturbative sectors, even when logarithmic monomials are included. We see our result as a harbinger of what future work might reveal about the transseries representations of observables in fully renormalised four-dimensional quantum field theories and adduce a tentative yet to our mind weighty argument as to why one should not expect otherwise. This paper is considerably self-contained. Readers with little prior knowledge are let in on the basic reasons why perturbative series in quantum field theory eventually require an upgrade to transseries. Furthermore, in order to acquaint the reader with the language utilised extensively in this work, we also provide a concise mathematical introduction to grid-based transseries.

  18. Resurgence of instrumental behavior after an abstinence contingency.

    PubMed

    Bouton, Mark E; Schepers, Scott T

    2014-06-01

    In resurgence, an extinguished instrumental behavior (R1) recovers when a behavior that has replaced it (R2) is also extinguished. The phenomenon may be relevant to understanding relapse that can occur after the termination of "contingency management" treatments, in which an unwanted behavior (e.g., substance abuse) is reduced by reinforcing an alternative behavior. When reinforcement is discontinued, the unwanted behavior might resurge. However, unlike most resurgence experiments, contingency management treatments also introduce a negative contingency, in which reinforcers are not delivered unless the client has abstained from the unwanted behavior. In two experiments with rats, we therefore examined the effects of adding a negative "abstinence" contingency to the resurgence design. During response elimination, R2 was not reinforced unless R1 had not been emitted for a minimum period of time (45, 90, or 135 s). In both experiments, adding such a contingency to simple R1 extinction reduced, but did not eliminate, resurgence. In Experiment 2, we found the same effect in a yoked group that could earn reinforcers for R2 at the same points in time as the negative-contingency group, but without the requirement to abstain from R1. Thus, the negative contingency per se did not contribute to the reduction in resurgence. These results suggest that the contingency reduced resurgence by making reinforcers more difficult to earn and more widely spaced in time. This could have allowed the animal to learn that R1 was extinguished in the "context" of infrequent reinforcement-a context more like that of resurgence testing. The results are thus consistent with a contextual (renewal) account of resurgence. The method might provide a better model of relapse after termination of a contingency management treatment. PMID:24366673

  19. Fosfomycin: Resurgence of an old companion.

    PubMed

    Sastry, Sangeeta; Doi, Yohei

    2016-05-01

    Fosfomycin was discovered over four decades ago, yet has drawn renewed interest as an agent active against a range of multidrug-resistant (MDR) and extensively drug-resistant (XDR) pathogens. Its unique mechanism of action and broad spectrum of activity makes it a promising candidate in the treatment of various MDR/XDR infections. There has been a surge of in vitro data on its activity against MDR/XDR organisms, both when used as a single agent and in combination with other agents. In the United States, fosfomycin is only approved in an oral formulation for the treatment of acute uncomplicated urinary tract infections (UTIs), whereas in some countries both oral and intravenous formulations are available for various indications. Fosfomycin has minimal interactions with other medications and has a relatively favorable safety profile, with diarrhea being the most common adverse reaction. Fosfomycin has low protein binding and is excreted primarily unchanged in the urine. The clinical outcomes of patients treated with fosfomycin are favorable for uncomplicated UTIs, but data are limited for use in other conditions. Fosfomycin maintains activity against most Enterobacteriaceae including Escherichia coli, but plasmid-mediated resistance due to inactivation have appeared in recent years, which has the potential to compromise its use in the future. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of this resurgent agent and its role in our antimicrobial armamentarium.

  20. Resurgence of instrumental behavior after an abstinence contingency

    PubMed Central

    Bouton, Mark E.; Schepers, Scott T.

    2014-01-01

    In resurgence, an extinguished instrumental behavior (R1) recovers when a behavior that replaced it (R2) is also extinguished. The phenomenon may be relevant to understanding relapse that can occur after the termination of “contingency management” treatments, in which unwanted behavior (e.g., substance abuse) is reduced by reinforcing alternative behavior. When reinforcement is discontinued, the unwanted behavior might resurge. However, unlike most resurgence experiments, contingency management treatments also introduce a negative contingency in which reinforcers are not delivered unless the client has abstained from the unwanted behavior. Two experiments with rats therefore examined the effects of adding a negative “abstinence” contingency to the resurgence design. During response elimination, R2 was not reinforced unless R1 had not been emitted for a minimum period of time (45, 90, or 135 s). In both experiments, adding such a contingency to simple R1 extinction reduced, but did not eliminate, resurgence. Experiment 2 found the same effect in a yoked group that could earn reinforcers for R2 at the same points in time, but without the requirement to abstain from R1. Thus, the negative contingency per se did not contribute. Results suggest that the contingency reduced resurgence by making reinforcers more difficult to earn and more widely spaced in time. This could have allowed the animal to learn that R1 was extinguished in the “context” of infrequent reinforcement—a context more like that of resurgence testing. The results are thus consistent with a contextual (renewal) account of resurgence. The method might provide a better model of relapse after termination of a contingency management treatment. PMID:24366673

  1. Pathophysiology of movement disorders due to gravity transitions: the channelopathy linkage in human balance and locomotion.

    PubMed

    Rizzo-Sierra, Carlos V; Leon-Sarmiento, Fidias E

    2011-07-01

    Despite theoretical and experimental efforts to understand the space adaptation syndrome (SAS), which is responsible for spatial disorientation that severely affects physical and cognitive performance in astronauts, most of its pathophysiology is still unknown. As a consequence, countermeasures for SAS are not completely effective. Accordingly, in addition to the sensory-motor conflict theories, we propose that microgravity would affect the potassium channels of inner ear hair cells that would result in a temporal channelopathy as the most likely molecular origin for SAS, as well as being responsible for perpetuating movement disorders in gravity transition environments including those to be experienced by people visiting or living on the earth, moon, mars and beyond.

  2. Role of the discriminative properties of the reinforcer in resurgence.

    PubMed

    Bouton, Mark E; Trask, Sydney

    2016-06-01

    In three experiments with rat subjects, we examined the effects of the discriminative effects of reinforcers that were presented during or after operant extinction. Experiments 1 and 2 examined resurgence, in which an extinguished operant response (R1) recovers when a second behavior (R2) that has been reinforced to replace it is also placed in extinction. The results of Experiment 1 suggest that the amount of R1's resurgence is a decreasing linear function of the interreinforcement interval used during the reinforcement of R2. In Experiment 2, R1 was reinforced with one outcome (O1), and R2 was then reinforced with a second outcome (O2) while R1 was extinguished. In resurgence tests, response-independent (noncontingent) presentations of O2 prevented resurgence of R1, which otherwise occurred when testing was conducted with either no reinforcers or noncontingent presentations of O1. In Experiment 3, we then examined the effects of noncontingent O1 and O2 presentations after simple extinction in either the presence or the absence of noncontingent presentations of O2. Overall, the results are consistent with a role for the discriminative properties of the reinforcer in controlling operant behavior. In resurgence, the reinforcer used during response elimination provides a distinct context that controls the inhibition of R1. The results are less consistent with an alternative view emphasizing the disrupting effects of alternative reinforcement. PMID:26486932

  3. Pertussis: the resurgence of a public health threat.

    PubMed

    Torre, Jackeline Aparecida Grando Della; Benevides, Gabriel Nuncio; de Melo, Ana Maria Andrello Gonçalves Pereira; Ferreira, Cristiane Rúbia

    2015-01-01

    Pertussis is an acute and very contagious pulmonary disease, clinically characterized by periods of coughing and paroxysms that may cause death. The disease afflicts mainly the pediatric population and is life threatening to children under the age of 1 year. Since the beginning of the second millennium, the number of cases of pertussis has increased, menacing public health, despite the availability of the pertussis vaccine. The resurgence of the disease among adults and older children creates a reservoir of infection that will afflict the unimmunized or incompletely immunized children. As newborns and infants show the highest mortality rate, immunization during pregnancy is a new strategy to reduce the burden of pertussis. The authors report the case of a newborn that presented respiratory distress accompanied by marked leukocytosis. Bronchiolitis was the initial diagnostic hypothesis, but the clinical picture became typical of pertussis when paroxysmal coughing ensued. Isolation of the Bordetella pertussis and antigenic demonstration by polymerase chain reaction were positive from respiratory secretion. Despite appropriate antibiotic therapy and intensive care management the child died and the autopsy showed characteristic diagnostic findings. The authors call attention to this diagnosis when facing respiratory failure among young children, mainly in the presence of marked leukocytosis. Thorough research on the immunization status of the patient's social environment is of crucial importance. PMID:26484329

  4. Resurgence and holomorphy: From weak to strong coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Cherman, Aleksey; Koroteev, Peter; Ünsal, Mithat

    2015-05-15

    We analyze the resurgence properties of finite-dimensional exponential integrals which are prototypes for partition functions in quantum field theories. In these simple examples, we demonstrate that perturbation theory, even at arbitrarily weak coupling, fails as the argument of the coupling constant is varied. It is well-known that perturbation theory also fails at stronger coupling. We show that these two failures are actually intimately related. The formalism of resurgent transseries, which takes into account global analytic continuation properties, fixes both problems and provides an arbitrarily accurate description of exact result for any value of coupling. This means that strong coupling results can be deduced by using merely weak coupling data. Finally, we give another perspective on resurgence theory by showing that the monodromy properties of the weak coupling results are in precise agreement with the monodromy properties of the strong-coupling expansions, obtained using analysis of the holomorphy structure of Picard-Fuchs equations.

  5. Can vaccine legacy explain the British pertussis resurgence?

    PubMed

    Riolo, Maria A; King, Aaron A; Rohani, Pejman

    2013-12-01

    Pertussis incidence has been rising in some countries, including the UK, despite sustained high vaccine coverage. We questioned whether it is possible to explain the resurgence without recourse to complex hypotheses about pathogen evolution, subclinical infections, or trends in surveillance efficiency. In particular, we investigated the possibility that the resurgence is a consequence of the legacy of incomplete pediatric immunization, in the context of cohort structure and age-dependent transmission. We constructed a model of pertussis transmission in England and Wales based on data on age-specific contact rates and historical vaccine coverage estimates. We evaluated the agreement between model-predicted and observed patterns of age-specific pertussis incidence under a variety of assumptions regarding the duration of immunity. Under the assumption that infection-derived immunity is complete and lifelong, and regardless of the duration of vaccine-induced immunity, the model consistently predicts a resurgence of pertussis incidence comparable to that which has been observed. Interestingly, no resurgence is predicted when infection- and vaccine-derived immunities wane at the same rate. These results were qualitatively insensitive to rates of primary vaccine failure. We conclude that the alarming resurgence of pertussis among adults and adolescents in Britain and elsewhere may simply be a legacy of historically inadequate coverage employing imperfect vaccines. Indeed, we argue that the absence of resurgence at this late date would be more surprising. Our analysis shows that careful accounting for age dependence in contact rates and susceptibility is prerequisite to the identification of which features of pertussis epidemiology want additional explanation.

  6. Potassium channelopathy-like defect underlies early-stage cerebrovascular dysfunction in a genetic model of small vessel disease.

    PubMed

    Dabertrand, Fabrice; Krøigaard, Christel; Bonev, Adrian D; Cognat, Emmanuel; Dalsgaard, Thomas; Domenga-Denier, Valérie; Hill-Eubanks, David C; Brayden, Joseph E; Joutel, Anne; Nelson, Mark T

    2015-02-17

    Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL), caused by dominant mutations in the NOTCH3 receptor in vascular smooth muscle, is a genetic paradigm of small vessel disease (SVD) of the brain. Recent studies using transgenic (Tg)Notch3(R169C) mice, a genetic model of CADASIL, revealed functional defects in cerebral (pial) arteries on the surface of the brain at an early stage of disease progression. Here, using parenchymal arterioles (PAs) from within the brain, we determined the molecular mechanism underlying the early functional deficits associated with this Notch3 mutation. At physiological pressure (40 mmHg), smooth muscle membrane potential depolarization and constriction to pressure (myogenic tone) were blunted in PAs from TgNotch3(R169C) mice. This effect was associated with an ∼ 60% increase in the number of voltage-gated potassium (KV) channels, which oppose pressure-induced depolarization. Inhibition of KV1 channels with 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) or treatment with the epidermal growth factor receptor agonist heparin-binding EGF (HB-EGF), which promotes KV1 channel endocytosis, reduced KV current density and restored myogenic responses in PAs from TgNotch3(R169C) mice, whereas pharmacological inhibition of other major vasodilatory influences had no effect. KV1 currents and myogenic responses were similarly altered in pial arteries from TgNotch3(R169C) mice, but not in mesenteric arteries. Interestingly, HB-EGF had no effect on mesenteric arteries, suggesting a possible mechanistic basis for the exclusive cerebrovascular manifestation of CADASIL. Collectively, our results indicate that increasing the number of KV1 channels in cerebral smooth muscle produces a mutant vascular phenotype akin to a channelopathy in a genetic model of SVD. PMID:25646445

  7. The clinical approach to small fibre neuropathy and painful channelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Themistocleous, Andreas C; Ramirez, Juan D; Serra, Jordi; Bennett, David L H

    2014-01-01

    Small fibre neuropathy (SFN) is characterised by structural injury selectively affecting small diameter sensory and/or autonomic axons. The clinical presentation is dominated by pain. SFN complicates a number of common diseases such as diabetes mellitus and is likely to be increasingly encountered. The diagnosis of SFN is demanding as clinical features can be vague and nerve conduction studies normal. New diagnostic techniques, in particular measurement of intraepidermal nerve fibre density, have significantly improved the diagnostic efficiency of SFN. Management is focused on the treatment of the underlying cause and analgesia, as there is no neuroprotective therapy. A recent and significant advance is the finding that a proportion of cases labelled as idiopathic SFN are in fact associated with gain of function mutations of the voltage-gated sodium channels Nav1.7 and Nav1.8 (encoded by the genes SCN9A and SCN10A, respectively). There is a further group of heritable painful conditions in which gain of function mutations in ion channels alter excitability of sensory neurones but do not cause frank axon degeneration; these include mutations in Nav1.7 (causing erythromelalgia and paroxysmal extreme pain disorder) and TRPA1 (resulting in familial episodic pain disorder). These conditions are exceptionally rare but have provided great insight into the nociceptive system as well as yielding potential analgesic drug targets. In patients with no pre-existing risk factor, the investigation of an underlying cause of SFN should be systematic and appropriate for the patient population. In this review, we focus on how to incorporate recent developments in the diagnosis and pathophysiology of SFN into clinical practice. PMID:24778270

  8. Autism-Associated SHANK3 Haploinsufficiency Causes Ih-Channelopathy in Human Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Fei; Danko, Tamas; Botelho, Salome Calado; Patzke, Christopher; Pak, ChangHui; Wernig, Marius; Südhof, Thomas C.

    2016-01-01

    Heterozygous SHANK3 mutations are associated with idiopathic autism and Phelan-McDermid syndrome. SHANK3 is a ubiquitously expressed scaffolding protein that is enriched in postsynaptic excitatory synapses. Here we used engineered conditional mutations in human neurons to show that heterozygous and homozygous SHANK3 mutations severely and specifically impair Ih-channels. SHANK3 mutations caused alterations in neuronal morphology and synaptic connectivity; chronic pharmacological blockage of Ih-channels reproduced these phenotypes, suggesting they may be secondary to Ih-channel impairment. Moreover, mouse Shank3-deficient neurons also exhibited severe decreases in Ih-currents. SHANK3 protein interacted with hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channel proteins (HCN proteins) forming Ih-channels, indicating that SHANK3 functions to organize HCN-channels. Our data suggest SHANK3 mutations predispose to autism, at least partially, by inducing an Ih-channelopathy that may be amenable to pharmacological intervention. PMID:26966193

  9. Carotid body overactivity induces respiratory neurone channelopathy contributing to neurogenic hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Moraes, Davi J A; Machado, Benedito H; Paton, Julian F R

    2015-01-01

    Why sympathetic activity rises in neurogenic hypertension remains unknown. It has been postulated that changes in the electrical excitability of medullary pre-sympathetic neurones are the main causal mechanism for the development of sympathetic overactivity in experimental hypertension. Here we review recent data suggesting that enhanced sympathetic activity in neurogenic hypertension is, at least in part, dependent on alterations in the electrical excitability of medullary respiratory neurones and their central modulation of sympatho-excitatory networks. We also present results showing a critical role for carotid body tonicity in the aetiology of enhanced central respiratory modulation of sympathetic activity in neurogenic hypertension. We propose a novel hypothesis of respiratory neurone channelopathy induced by carotid body overactivity in neurogenic hypertension that may contribute to sympathetic excess. Moreover, our data support the notion of targeting the carotid body as a potential novel therapeutic approach for reducing sympathetic vasomotor tone in neurogenic hypertension. PMID:25900825

  10. Carotid body overactivity induces respiratory neurone channelopathy contributing to neurogenic hypertension.

    PubMed

    Moraes, Davi J A; Machado, Benedito H; Paton, Julian F R

    2015-07-15

    Why sympathetic activity rises in neurogenic hypertension remains unknown. It has been postulated that changes in the electrical excitability of medullary pre-sympathetic neurones are the main causal mechanism for the development of sympathetic overactivity in experimental hypertension. Here we review recent data suggesting that enhanced sympathetic activity in neurogenic hypertension is, at least in part, dependent on alterations in the electrical excitability of medullary respiratory neurones and their central modulation of sympatho-excitatory networks. We also present results showing a critical role for carotid body tonicity in the aetiology of enhanced central respiratory modulation of sympathetic activity in neurogenic hypertension. We propose a novel hypothesis of respiratory neurone channelopathy induced by carotid body overactivity in neurogenic hypertension that may contribute to sympathetic excess. Moreover, our data support the notion of targeting the carotid body as a potential novel therapeutic approach for reducing sympathetic vasomotor tone in neurogenic hypertension. PMID:25900825

  11. Diagnostics and Therapy of Muscle Channelopathies – Guidelines of the Ulm Muscle Centre

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann-Horn, F; Jurkat-Rott, K; Rüdel, R

    2008-01-01

    Summary This article is dedicated to our teacher, Prof. Erich Kuhn, Heidelberg, on the occasion of his 88th birthday on 23th November 2008. In contrast to muscular dystrophies, the muscle channelopathies, a group of diseases characterised by impaired muscle excitation or excitation-contraction coupling, can fairly well be treated with a whole series of pharmacological drugs. However, for a proper treatment proper diagnostics are essential. This article lists state-of-the-art diagnostics and therapies for the two types of myotonic dystrophies, for recessive and dominant myotonia congenita, for the sodium channel myotonias, for the primary dyskalemic periodic paralyses, for central core disease and for malignant hyperthermia susceptibility in detail. In addition, for each disorder a short summary of aetiology, symptomatology, and pathogenesis is provided. PMID:19472919

  12. Secondary neurotransmitter deficiencies in epilepsy caused by voltage-gated sodium channelopathies: A potential treatment target?

    PubMed

    Horvath, Gabriella A; Demos, Michelle; Shyr, Casper; Matthews, Allison; Zhang, Linhua; Race, Simone; Stockler-Ipsiroglu, Sylvia; Van Allen, Margot I; Mancarci, Ogan; Toker, Lilah; Pavlidis, Paul; Ross, Colin J; Wasserman, Wyeth W; Trump, Natalie; Heales, Simon; Pope, Simon; Cross, J Helen; van Karnebeek, Clara D M

    2016-01-01

    We describe neurotransmitter abnormalities in two patients with drug-resistant epilepsy resulting from deleterious de novo mutations in sodium channel genes. Whole exome sequencing identified a de novo SCN2A splice-site mutation (c.2379+1G>A, p.Glu717Gly.fs*30) resulting in deletion of exon 14, in a 10-year old male with early onset global developmental delay, intermittent ataxia, autism, hypotonia, epileptic encephalopathy and cerebral/cerebellar atrophy. In the cerebrospinal fluid both homovanillic acid and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid were significantly decreased; extensive biochemical and genetic investigations ruled out primary neurotransmitter deficiencies and other known inborn errors of metabolism. In an 8-year old female with an early onset intractable epileptic encephalopathy, developmental regression, and progressive cerebellar atrophy, a previously unreported de novo missense mutation was identified in SCN8A (c.5615G>A; p.Arg1872Gln), affecting a highly conserved residue located in the C-terminal of the Nav1.6 protein. Aside from decreased homovanillic acid and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, 5-methyltetrahydrofolate was also found to be low. We hypothesize that these channelopathies cause abnormal synaptic mono-amine metabolite secretion/uptake via impaired vesicular release and imbalance in electrochemical ion gradients, which in turn aggravate the seizures. Treatment with oral 5-hydroxytryptophan, l-Dopa/Carbidopa, and a dopa agonist resulted in mild improvement of seizure control in the male case, most likely via dopamine and serotonin receptor activated signal transduction and modulation of glutamatergic, GABA-ergic and glycinergic neurotransmission. Neurotransmitter analysis in other sodium channelopathy patients will help validate our findings, potentially yielding novel treatment opportunities.

  13. MLC1 protein: a likely link between leukodystrophies and brain channelopathies

    PubMed Central

    Brignone, Maria S.; Lanciotti, Angela; Camerini, Serena; De Nuccio, Chiara; Petrucci, Tamara C.; Visentin, Sergio; Ambrosini, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Megalencephalic leukoencephalopathy with subcortical cysts (MLCs) disease is a rare inherited, autosomal recessive form of childhood-onset spongiform leukodystrophy characterized by macrocephaly, deterioration of motor functions, epileptic seizures and mental decline. Brain edema, subcortical fluid cysts, myelin and astrocyte vacuolation are the histopathological hallmarks of MLC. Mutations in either the MLC1 gene (>75% of patients) or the GlialCAM gene (<20% of patients) are responsible for the disease. Recently, the GlialCAM adhesion protein was found essential for the membrane expression and function of the chloride channel ClC-2 indicating MLC disease caused by mutation in GlialCAM as the first channelopathy among leukodystrophies. On the contrary, the function of MLC1 protein, which binds GlialCAM, its functional relationship with ClC-2 and the molecular mechanisms underlying MLC1 mutation-induced functional defects are not fully understood yet. The human MLC1 gene encodes a 377-amino acid membrane protein with eight predicted transmembrane domains which shows very low homology with voltage-dependent potassium (K+) channel subunits. The high expression of MLC1 in brain astrocytes contacting blood vessels and meninges and brain alterations observed in MLC patients have led to hypothesize a role for MLC1 in the regulation of ion and water homeostasis. Recent studies have shown that MLC1 establishes structural and/or functional interactions with several ion/water channels and transporters and ion channel accessory proteins, and that these interactions are affected by MLC1 mutations causing MLC. Here, we review data on MLC1 functional properties obtained in in vitro and in vivo models and discuss evidence linking the effects of MLC1 mutations to brain channelopathies. PMID:25883547

  14. NALCN channelopathies

    PubMed Central

    Bend, Eric G.; Si, Yue; Stevenson, David A.; Bayrak-Toydemir, Pinar; Newcomb, Tara M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To perform genotype–phenotype analysis in an infant with congenital arthrogryposis due to a de novo missense mutation in the NALCN ion channel and explore the mechanism of pathogenicity using a Caenorhabditis elegans model. Methods: We performed whole-exome sequencing in a preterm neonate with congenital arthrogryposis and a severe life-threatening clinical course. We examined the mechanism of pathogenicity of the associated NALCN mutation by engineering the orthologous mutation into the nematode C elegans using CRISPR-Cas9. Results: We identified a de novo missense mutation in NALCN, c.1768C>T, in an infant with a severe neonatal lethal form of the recently characterized CLIFAHDD syndrome (congenital contractures of the limbs and face with hypotonia and developmental delay). We report novel phenotypic features including prolonged episodes of stimulus-sensitive sustained muscular contraction associated with life-threatening episodes of desaturation and autonomic instability, extending the severity of previously described phenotypes associated with mutations in NALCN. When engineered into the C elegans ortholog, this mutation results in a severe gain-of-function phenotype, with hypercontraction and uncoordinated movement. We engineered 6 additional CLIFAHDD syndrome mutations into C elegans and the mechanism of action could be divided into 2 categories: half phenocopied gain-of-function mutants and half phenocopied loss-of-function mutants. Conclusions: The clinical phenotype of our patient and electrophysiologic studies show sustained muscular contraction in response to transient sensory stimuli. In C elegans, this mutation causes neuronal hyperactivity via a gain-of-function NALCN ion channel. Testing human variants of NALCN in C elegans demonstrates that CLIFAHDD can be caused by dominant loss- or gain-of-function mutations in ion channel function. PMID:27558372

  15. An Evaluation of Resurgence during Treatment with Functional Communication Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Volkert, Valerie M.; Lerman, Dorothea C.; Call, Nathan A.; Trosclair-Lasserre, Nicole

    2009-01-01

    Extinction-induced resurgence is the recurrence of previously reinforced behavior when another behavior is placed on extinction (Lieving, Hagopian, Long, & O'Connor, 2004). This phenomenon may account for some instances of treatment relapse when problem behavior recovers during extinction-based treatments. The current study sought to determine…

  16. Context change explains resurgence after the extinction of operant behavior

    PubMed Central

    Trask, Sydney; Schepers, Scott T.; Bouton, Mark E.

    2016-01-01

    Extinguished operant behavior can return or “resurge” when a response that has replaced it is also extinguished. Typically studied in nonhuman animals, the resurgence effect may provide insight into relapse that is seen when reinforcement is discontinued following human contingency management (CM) and functional communication training (FCT) treatments, which both involve reinforcing alternative behaviors to reduce behavioral excess. Although the variables that affect resurgence have been studied for some time, the mechanisms through which they promote relapse are still debated. We discuss three explanations of resurgence (response prevention, an extension of behavioral momentum theory, and an account emphasizing context change) as well as studies that evaluate them. Several new findings from our laboratory concerning the effects of different temporal distributions of the reinforcer during response elimination and the effects of manipulating qualitative features of the reinforcer pose a particular challenge to the momentum-based model. Overall, the results are consistent with a contextual account of resurgence, which emphasizes that reinforcers presented during response elimination have a discriminative role controlling behavioral inhibition. Changing the “reinforcer context” at the start of testing produces relapse if the organism has not learned to suppress its responding under conditions similar to the ones that prevail during testing. PMID:27429503

  17. Response-Class Hierarchies and Resurgence of Severe Problem Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lieving, Gregory A.; Hagopian, Louis P.; Long, Ethan S.; O'Connor, Julia

    2004-01-01

    Resurgence may be defined generally as the extinction-induced recurrence of previously learned response patterns. Understanding the conditions under which this phenomenon occurs has theoretical, clinical, and applied implications, particularly with respect to a related area of research on response-class hierarchies. In the current study, we…

  18. Resurgence of malaria in Bombay (Mumbai) in the 1990s: a historical perspective.

    PubMed

    Kamat, V

    2000-06-01

    Bombay has achieved extraordinary success in controlling its malaria problem for nearly six decades by relying primarily on legislative measures and non-insecticidal methods of mosquito abatement. In 1992, however, malaria reemerged in Bombay with a vengeance. During 1992-1997, the city witnessed a manifold increase in the number of malaria cases diagnosed and treated by the public health system. The large number of malaria patients treated by private practitioners was not recorded by the municipal malaria surveillance system during this period. In 1995, at the peak of the resurgence, public health officials of the Municipal Corporation of Greater Bombay (MCGB) confirmed that 170 persons in the city had died due to malaria. The crisis was unprecedented in Bombay's modern public health history. In response to intense criticism from the media, the city's public health officials attributed the resurgence to the global phenomenon of mosquito-vector resistance to insecticides, and Plasmodium resistance to antimalarial chemoprophylaxis and treatment. Local scientists who investigated the problem offered no support to this explanation. So what might explain the resurgence? What factors led the problem to reach an epidemic level in a matter of two or three years? In addressing the above principal questions, this paper adopts a historical perspective and argues that in the resurgence of malaria in Bombay in the 1990s, there is an element of the 'presence of the past'. In many ways the present public health crisis in Bombay resembles the health scenario that characterized the city at the turn of the 19th century. It is possible to draw parallels between the early public health history of malaria control in Bombay, which was punctuated by events that followed the bubonic plague epidemic of 1896, and the present-day malaria epidemic punctuated by the threat of a plague epidemic in 1994. As such, the paper covers a long period, of almost 100 years. This time-depth is used to

  19. Magmatic recharge during formation and resurgence of the Valles caldera, New Mexico, USA: evidence from quartz compositional zoning and geothermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcock, Jack

    The Valles caldera complex in north-central New Mexico, USA, represents the type example of resurgent caldera system, characterised by eruption of two voluminous high-silica rhyolite ignimbrites (the Otowi and Tshirege Members of the Bandelier Tuff) at 1.608 +/- 0.010 Ma and 1.256 +/- 0.010 Ma, respectively. Refined dating has shown that resurgence occurred shortly after eruption of the Tshirege, or Upper Bandelier Tuff (UBT). Central resurgence of ~1000 m was accompanied by small-volume eruptions of the Deer Canyon Rhyolite, followed closely by the Redondo Creek Rhyodacite. The Cerro del Medio Rhyolite lava dome complex is a product of ring fracture volcanism following resurgence, erupting at 1.229 +/- 0.017 Ma. A central aim of this study was to find evidence for magmatic recharge during this geologically short (~ 27 ka) time period. We have combined cathodoluminescence (CL) imaging and titanium-in-quartz geothermometry techniques to individual quartz crystals from 1) different stratigraphic horizons of the UBT ignimbrite, 2) samples of the Deer Canyon Rhyolite and 3) the Cerro del Medio Rhyolite lavas. CL imaging reveals that ~80% of the erupted volume UBT ignimbrite contains unzoned quartz crystals (average concentration = 28 +/- 2 ppm Ti), recording relatively isothermal temperatures of 647-696°C. An abrupt occurrence of compositionally zoned quartz crystals) within the mid-to-late erupted UBT ignimbrite units 3-5 reveals evidence for interaction with hotter magma. Corresponding titanium-in-quartz measurements of outer, bright CL rims (71 +/- 9 ppm Ti) reveal temperature increases of ~100°C relative to the start of the UBT eruption. We have discovered an interesting heterogeneity within the Deer Canyon Rhyolite lavas, with strong spatial control on eruption of porphyritic lavas containing complexly zoned quartz crystals onto the western regions of the resurgent dome. Conversely, crystal-poor to aphyric lavas containing small, unzoned quartz crystals are

  20. Resurgence of derived stimulus relations: replication and extensions.

    PubMed

    Doughty, Adam H; Kastner, Rebecca M; Bismark, Bryan D

    2011-01-01

    Resurgence typically refers to the recovery of a previously reinforced response when a more recently reinforced response is extinguished. Under conditions of punishment, Wilson and Hayes (1996) observed the recovery of derived stimulus relations that never had been correlated with differential consequences. The present study systematically replicated the findings of Wilson and Hayes by observing the recovery of derived stimulus relations under extinction conditions and with an additional equivalence class. College students received arbitrary-matching-to-sample training in Phase 1 that resulted in four 4-member stimulus-equivalence classes. These derived relations were not correlated with differential consequences. In Phase 2, with the same stimuli, the students received training that resulted in four different 4-member stimulus-equivalence classes. After the emergence and reinforcement of the latter derived relations, their extinction generated the recurrence of the derived relations from Phase 1. The implications of these findings for conceptualizing resurgence are discussed. PMID:20801199

  1. Response elimination, reinforcement rate and resurgence of operant behavior.

    PubMed

    Cançado, Carlos R X; Lattal, Kennon A

    2013-11-01

    The effects of reinforcement rate of alternative responding on resurgence were studied in six experiments with pigeons. In Experiment 1A, key pecking was maintained on a multiple variable-interval (VI) VI schedule in the Training phase. In the Response-Elimination phase, a variable differential-reinforcement-of-other-behavior (DRO) schedule was in effect in each component. Reinforcement rates were equal and then, higher in one (rich) component, and lower in the other (lean), than in the Training phase. More resurgence occurred in the lean component, but this could have resulted from response-rate differences between components in the Training-phase. Experiment 1B was a replication of Experiment 1A, but with experimentally-naïve pigeons. Response-Elimination phase reinforcement rates were manipulated systematically in subsequent experiments: In Experiment 2, reinforcement rate was equal, in one component, and lower or higher in the other, than in the Training phase. In Experiment 3, reinforcers were discontinued before differential reinforcement rates were effected. In Experiment 4, reinforcement rates first were differential and, then, equal to those in the Training phase. In Experiments 5 and 6, differential reinforcement rates were arranged by using fixed-DROs and VIs for pecking a different key, respectively. Even though resurgence was not obtained with every pigeon, at least some small-magnitude resurgence occurred in each experiment and was not related systematically to reinforcement rates of alternative responding. Schedule differences, response topography, order of conditions and the length of each phase were not sufficient to account for these results.

  2. A review of dengue fever: a resurging tropical disease.

    PubMed

    Mangold, Karen A; Reynolds, Sally L

    2013-05-01

    Dengue is a resurging mosquito-borne disease that is often contracted in U.S. travelers to Latin America, Asia, and the Caribbean. The clinical symptoms range from a simple febrile illness to hemorrhagic fever or shock. The clinical course has a wide range of outcomes, and adequate supportive care can reduce mortality rates dramatically. Repeated exposures to the virus can lead to a more complicated clinical course.

  3. Mechanisms of resurgence II: Response-contingent reinforcers can reinstate a second extinguished behavior

    PubMed Central

    Winterbauer, Neil E.; Bouton, Mark E.

    2011-01-01

    Three experiments with rat subjects examined resurgence of an extinguished instrumental response using the procedure introduced by Epstein (1983) with pigeons. There were three phases: (1) initial acquisition of pressing on a lever (L1) for pellet reward, (2) extinction of L1, and (3) a test session in which a second lever (L2) was inserted, briefly reinforced, and then extinguished. Experiment 1 confirmed that if pressing L2 delivered 20 pellets followed by extinction, rats would resume L1 responding in the final test. Experiment 2 compared the effects of response-contingent and non-contingent rewards delivered upon insertion of L2. Although insertion of L2 alone did not increase L1 responding, response-contingent and non-contingent rewards led to comparable increases in L1 responding. Experiment 3 found that the delivery of non-contingent pellets during extinction of L1, which would be expected to reduce the ability of pellets to set the occasion for the L1 response, also reduced the effects of both response-contingent and non-contingent rewards during the final test. The results indicate that in this method, the resurgence treatment leads to an increase in L1 pressing due to simple presentation of the pellet; delivering the reinforcer after extinction of L1 reinstates L1 responding by setting the occasion for the L1 response. PMID:21479120

  4. Some Factors Modulating the Strength of Resurgence After Extinction of an Instrumental Behavior.

    PubMed

    Winterbauer, Neil E; Lucke, Sara; Bouton, Mark E

    2013-02-01

    In resurgence, an operant behavior that has undergone extinction can return ("resurge") when a second operant that has replaced it itself undergoes extinction. The phenomenon may provide insight into relapse that may occur after incentive or contingency management therapies in humans. Three experiments with rats examined the impact of several variables on the strength of the resurgence effect. In each, pressing one lever (L1) was first reinforced and then extinguished while pressing a second, alternative, lever (L2) was now reinforced. When L2 responding was then itself extinguished, L1 responses resurged. Experiment 1 found that resurgence was especially strong after an extensive amount of L1 training (12 as opposed to 4 training sessions) and after L1 was reinforced on a random ratio schedule as opposed to a variable interval schedule that was matched on reinforcement rate. Experiment 2 found that after 12 initial sessions of L1 training, 4, 12, or 36 sessions of Phase 2 each allowed substantial (and apparently equivalent) resurgence. Experiment 3 found no effect of changing the identity of the reinforcer (from grain pellet to sucrose pellet or sucrose to grain) on the amount of resurgence. The results suggest that resurgence can be robust; in the natural world, an operant behavior with an extensive reinforcement history may still resurge after extensive incentive-based therapy. The results are discussed in terms of current explanations of the resurgence effect. PMID:23515657

  5. A resurgence of congenital rubella in Australia?

    PubMed

    Forrest, Jill M; Burgess, Margaret; Donovan, Tim

    2003-01-01

    Two infants with congenital rubella defects (congenital rubella syndrome) have been reported from Queensland in 2003, after an increase in rubella in that State in 2001-2002. The national Measles Control Campaign in 1998 aimed to give measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine to all unvaccinated preschoolers and a second dose to primary schoolchildren. Following the Campaign no children with congenital rubella defects were born to Australian-born mothers during the five years 1998 to 2002, according to reports to the Australian Paediatric Surveillance Unit. However, three imported cases occurred. Broad immunisation coverage and detection and vaccination of susceptible women of child-bearing age before they become pregnant are necessary to prevent further cases.

  6. Resurgence of emerald shiners Notropis atherinoides in Lake Huron's main basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schaeffer, J.S.; Warner, D.M.; O'Brien, T. P.

    2008-01-01

    Emerald shiners Notropis atherinoides were formerly common in Lakes Huron and Michigan, but declined during the 1960s as the exotic alewife Alosa pseudoharengus proliferated. The Lake Huron emerald shiner population was chronically depressed through 2004; however, we detected resurgence in emerald shiner density and biomass in Lake Huron during acoustic and midwater trawl surveys conducted during 2004-2006. Emerald shiners were not found during 2004, but by 2006 main basin density exceeded 500 fish/ha, biomass estimates exceeded 0.5 kg/ha, and emerald shiners contributed more to pelagic biomass than alewives or rainbow smelt Osmerus mordax. Length frequency distributions suggested that increased density was the result of two consecutive strong year classes in 2005 and 2006. Emerald shiner distributions also expanded from a focus in western Lake Huron in 2005 to a lakewide distribution in 2006. Emerald shiners occurred offshore, but were nearly always associated with epilimnetic surface waters warmer than 19??C. Resurgence of emerald shiners was likely a consequence of reduced alewife abundance, as they declined concurrently with alewife proliferation during the early 1960s. Return of this species may benefit native nearshore piscivores; however, benefits to Pacific salmonids Oncorhynchus spp. are uncertain because emerald shiners are smaller and still less abundant than historically important prey species, and they may be thermally segregated from salmonines.

  7. [Measles, mumps, and rubella vaccine. Resurgence of measles in Europe].

    PubMed

    Garcés-Sánchez, María; Renales-Toboso, María; Bóveda-García, María; Díez-Domingo, Javier

    2015-12-01

    Measles is a rash illness of moderate severity and high risk of serious complications, with recovery in several weeks. It is a viral disease caused by one of the most infectious and contagious pathogens that exists, whose only known reservoir is human. In 1998, the European Region of the WHO set a target of eliminating measles by 2010. This goal has not been achieved. Furthermore, it has been observed the resurgence of the disease in some parts of Europe. We review the disease and its vaccines as well as the epidemiological and social factors that have so far prevented the total control of the disease.

  8. Hydrodynamics Beyond the Gradient Expansion: Resurgence and Resummation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heller, Michal P.; Spaliński, Michał

    2015-08-01

    Consistent formulations of relativistic viscous hydrodynamics involve short-lived modes, leading to asymptotic rather than convergent gradient expansions. In this Letter we consider the Müller-Israel-Stewart theory applied to a longitudinally expanding quark-gluon plasma system and identify hydrodynamics as a universal attractor without invoking the gradient expansion. We give strong evidence for the existence of this attractor and then show that it can be recovered from the divergent gradient expansion by Borel summation. This requires careful accounting for the short-lived modes which leads to an intricate mathematical structure known from the theory of resurgence.

  9. Some Factors Modulating the Strength of Resurgence After Extinction of an Instrumental Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Winterbauer, Neil E.; Lucke, Sara; Bouton, Mark E.

    2012-01-01

    In resurgence, an operant behavior that has undergone extinction can return (“resurge”) when a second operant that has replaced it itself undergoes extinction. The phenomenon may provide insight into relapse that may occur after incentive or contingency management therapies in humans. Three experiments with rats examined the impact of several variables on the strength of the resurgence effect. In each, pressing one lever (L1) was first reinforced and then extinguished while pressing a second, alternative, lever (L2) was now reinforced. When L2 responding was then itself extinguished, L1 responses resurged. Experiment 1 found that resurgence was especially strong after an extensive amount of L1 training (12 as opposed to 4 training sessions) and after L1 was reinforced on a random ratio schedule as opposed to a variable interval schedule that was matched on reinforcement rate. Experiment 2 found that after 12 initial sessions of L1 training, 4, 12, or 36 sessions of Phase 2 each allowed substantial (and apparently equivalent) resurgence. Experiment 3 found no effect of changing the identity of the reinforcer (from grain pellet to sucrose pellet or sucrose to grain) on the amount of resurgence. The results suggest that resurgence can be robust; in the natural world, an operant behavior with an extensive reinforcement history may still resurge after extensive incentive-based therapy. The results are discussed in terms of current explanations of the resurgence effect. PMID:23515657

  10. Genetic purgatory and the cardiac channelopathies: Exposing the variants of uncertain/unknown significance issue.

    PubMed

    Ackerman, Michael J

    2015-11-01

    Merriam-Webster's online dictionary defines purgatory as "an intermediate state after death for expiatory purification" or more specifically as "a place or state of punishment wherein according to Roman Catholic doctrine the souls of those who die in God׳s grace may make satisfaction for past sins and so become fit for heaven." Alternatively, it is defined as "a place or state of temporary suffering or misery." Either way, purgatory is a place where you are stuck, and you don't want to be stuck there. It is in this context that the term genetic purgatory is introduced. Genetic purgatory is a place where the genetic test-ordering physician and patients and their families are stuck when a variant of uncertain/unknown significance (VUS) has been elucidated. It is in this dark place where suffering and misery are occurring because of unenlightened handling of a VUS, which includes using the VUS for predictive genetic testing and making radical treatment recommendations based on the presence or absence of a so-called maybe mutation. Before one can escape from this miserable place, one must first recognize that one is stuck there. Hence, the purpose of this review article is to fully expose the VUS issue as it relates to the cardiac channelopathies and make the cardiologists/geneticists/genetic counselors who order such genetic tests believers in genetic purgatory. Only then can one meaningfully attempt to get out of that place and seek to promote a VUS to disease-causative mutation status or demote it to an utterly innocuous and irrelevant variant. PMID:26144349

  11. Canine CNGA3 Gene Mutations Provide Novel Insights into Human Achromatopsia-Associated Channelopathies and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Miyadera, Keiko; Delemotte, Lucie; MacDermaid, Christopher M.; Reinstein, Shelby L.; Crumley, William R.; Dixon, Christopher J.; Casal, Margret L.; Klein, Michael L.; Aguirre, Gustavo D.; Tanaka, Jacqueline C.; Guziewicz, Karina E.

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) ion channels are key mediators underlying signal transduction in retinal and olfactory receptors. Genetic defects in CNGA3 and CNGB3, encoding two structurally related subunits of cone CNG channels, lead to achromatopsia (ACHM). ACHM is a congenital, autosomal recessive retinal disorder that manifests by cone photoreceptor dysfunction, severely reduced visual acuity, impaired or complete color blindness and photophobia. Here, we report the first canine models for CNGA3-associated channelopathy caused by R424W or V644del mutations in the canine CNGA3 ortholog that accurately mimic the clinical and molecular features of human CNGA3-associated ACHM. These two spontaneous mutations exposed CNGA3 residues essential for the preservation of channel function and biogenesis. The CNGA3-R424W results in complete loss of cone function in vivo and channel activity confirmed by in vitro electrophysiology. Structural modeling and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations revealed R424-E306 salt bridge formation and its disruption with the R424W mutant. Reversal of charges in a CNGA3-R424E-E306R double mutant channel rescued cGMP-activated currents uncovering new insights into channel gating. The CNGA3-V644del affects the C-terminal leucine zipper (CLZ) domain destabilizing intersubunit interactions of the coiled-coil complex in the MD simulations; the in vitro experiments showed incompetent trimeric CNGA3 subunit assembly consistent with abnormal biogenesis of in vivo channels. These newly characterized large animal models not only provide a valuable system for studying cone-specific CNG channel function in health and disease, but also represent prime candidates for proof-of-concept studies of CNGA3 gene replacement therapy for ACHM patients. PMID:26407004

  12. Canine CNGA3 Gene Mutations Provide Novel Insights into Human Achromatopsia-Associated Channelopathies and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Naoto; Dutrow, Emily V; Miyadera, Keiko; Delemotte, Lucie; MacDermaid, Christopher M; Reinstein, Shelby L; Crumley, William R; Dixon, Christopher J; Casal, Margret L; Klein, Michael L; Aguirre, Gustavo D; Tanaka, Jacqueline C; Guziewicz, Karina E

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) ion channels are key mediators underlying signal transduction in retinal and olfactory receptors. Genetic defects in CNGA3 and CNGB3, encoding two structurally related subunits of cone CNG channels, lead to achromatopsia (ACHM). ACHM is a congenital, autosomal recessive retinal disorder that manifests by cone photoreceptor dysfunction, severely reduced visual acuity, impaired or complete color blindness and photophobia. Here, we report the first canine models for CNGA3-associated channelopathy caused by R424W or V644del mutations in the canine CNGA3 ortholog that accurately mimic the clinical and molecular features of human CNGA3-associated ACHM. These two spontaneous mutations exposed CNGA3 residues essential for the preservation of channel function and biogenesis. The CNGA3-R424W results in complete loss of cone function in vivo and channel activity confirmed by in vitro electrophysiology. Structural modeling and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations revealed R424-E306 salt bridge formation and its disruption with the R424W mutant. Reversal of charges in a CNGA3-R424E-E306R double mutant channel rescued cGMP-activated currents uncovering new insights into channel gating. The CNGA3-V644del affects the C-terminal leucine zipper (CLZ) domain destabilizing intersubunit interactions of the coiled-coil complex in the MD simulations; the in vitro experiments showed incompetent trimeric CNGA3 subunit assembly consistent with abnormal biogenesis of in vivo channels. These newly characterized large animal models not only provide a valuable system for studying cone-specific CNG channel function in health and disease, but also represent prime candidates for proof-of-concept studies of CNGA3 gene replacement therapy for ACHM patients. PMID:26407004

  13. Resurgence in η-deformed Principal Chiral Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demulder, Saskia; Dorigoni, Daniele; Thompson, Daniel C.

    2016-07-01

    We study the SU(2) Principal Chiral Model (PCM) in the presence of an integrable η-deformation. We put the theory on {R}× {S}^1 with twisted boundary conditions and then reduce the circle to obtain an effective quantum mechanics associated with the Whittaker-Hill equation. Using resurgent analysis we study the large order behaviour of perturbation theory and recover the fracton events responsible for IR renormalons. The fractons are modified from the standard PCM due to the presence of this η-deformation but they are still the constituents of uniton-like solutions in the deformed quantum field theory. We also find novel SL(2,{C}) saddles, thus strengthening the conjecture that the semi-classical expansion of the path integral gives rise to a resurgent transseries once written as a sum over Lefschetz thimbles living in a complexification of the field space. We conclude by connecting our quantum mechanics to a massive deformation of the {N} = 2 4-d gauge theory with gauge group SU(2) and N f = 2.

  14. Higher rate alternative non-drug reinforcement produces faster suppression of cocaine seeking but more resurgence when removed.

    PubMed

    Craig, Andrew R; Nall, Rusty W; Madden, Gregory J; Shahan, Timothy A

    2016-06-01

    Relapse following removal of an alternative source of reinforcement introduced during extinction of a target behavior is called resurgence. This form of relapse may be related to relapse of drug taking following loss of alternative non-drug reinforcement in human populations. Laboratory investigations of factors mediating resurgence with food-maintained behavior suggest higher rates of alternative reinforcement produce faster suppression of target behavior but paradoxically generate more relapse when alternative reinforcement is discontinued. At present, it is unknown if a similar effect occurs when target behavior is maintained by drug reinforcement and the alternative is a non-drug reinforcer. In the present experiment three groups of rats were trained to lever press for infusions of cocaine during baseline. Next, during treatment, cocaine reinforcement was suspended and an alternative response was reinforced with either high-rate, low-rate, or no alternative food reinforcement. Finally, all reinforcement was suspended to test for relapse of cocaine seeking. Higher rate alternative reinforcement produced faster elimination of cocaine seeking than lower rates or extinction alone, but when treatment was suspended resurgence of cocaine seeking occurred following only high-rate alternative reinforcement. Thus, although higher rate alternative reinforcement appears to more effectively suppress drug seeking, should it become unavailable, it can have the unfortunate effect of increasing relapse. PMID:26988268

  15. Ataxia and myoclonic epilepsy due to a heterozygous new mutation in KCNA2: proposal for a new channelopathy.

    PubMed

    Pena, S D J; Coimbra, R L M

    2015-02-01

    We have recently performed exome analysis in a 7 year boy who presented in infancy with an encephalopathy characterized by ataxia and myoclonic epilepsy. Parents were not consanguineous and there was no family history of the disease. Exome analysis did not show any pathogenic variants in genes known to be associated with seizures and/or ataxia in children, including all known human channelopathies. However, we have identified a mutation in KCNA2 that we believe to be responsible for the disease in our patient. This gene, which encodes a member of the potassium channel, voltage-gated, shaker-related subfamily, has not been previously described as a cause of disease in humans, but mutations of the orthologous gene in mice (Kcna2) are known to cause both ataxia and convulsions. The mutation is c.890C>A, leading to the amino acid substitution p.Arg297Gln, which involves the second of the critical arginines in the S4 voltage sensor. This mutation is characterized as pathogenic by five different prediction programs. RFLP analysis and Sanger sequencing confirmed the presence of the mutation in the patient, but not in his parents, characterizing it as de novo. We believe that this discovery characterizes a new channelopathy.

  16. Comparison of clast frequency and size in the resurge deposits at the Chesapeake Bay impact structure (Eyreville A and Langley cores): Clues to the resurge process

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ormo, J.; Sturkell, E.; Horton, J.W.; Powars, D.S.; Edwards, L.E.

    2009-01-01

    Collapse and inward slumping of unconsolidated sedimentary strata expanded the Chesapeake Bay impact structure far beyond its central basement crater. During crater collapse, sediment-loaded water surged back to fill the crater. Here, we analyze clast frequency and granulometry of these resurge deposits in one core hole from the outermost part of the collapsed zone (i.e., Langley) as well as a core hole from the moat of the basement crater (i.e., Eyreville A). Comparisons of clast provenance and flow dynamics show that at both locations, there is a clear change in clast frequency and size between a lower unit, which we interpret to be dominated by slumped material, and an upper, water-transported unit, i.e., resurge deposit. The contribution of material to the resurge deposit was primarily controlled by stripping and erosion. This includes entrainment of fallback ejecta and sediments eroded from the surrounding seafloor, found to be dominant at Langley, and slumped material that covered the annular trough and basement crater, found to be dominant at Eyreville. Eyreville shows a higher content of crystalline clasts than Langley. There is equivocal evidence for an anti-resurge from a collapsing central water plume or, alternatively, a second resurge pulse, as well as a transition into oscillating resurge. The resurge material shows more of a debris-flow-like transport compared to resurge deposits at some other marine target craters, where the ratio of sediment to water has been relatively low. This result is likely a consequence of the combination of easily disaggregated host sediments and a relatively shallow target water depth. ?? 2009 The Geological Society of America.

  17. Some Factors Modulating the Strength of Resurgence after Extinction of an Instrumental Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winterbauer, Neil E.; Lucke, Sara; Bouton, Mark E.

    2013-01-01

    In resurgence, an operant behavior that has undergone extinction can return ("resurge") when a second operant that has replaced it itself undergoes extinction. The phenomenon may provide insight into relapse that may occur after incentive or contingency management therapies in humans. Three experiments with rats examined the impact of several…

  18. Effects of fixed-time reinforcement schedules on resurgence of problem behavior.

    PubMed

    Marsteller, Tonya M; St Peter, Claire C

    2014-01-01

    Resurgence of problem behavior following the discontinuation of differential reinforcement of alternative behavior (DRA) may be prevented by response-independent reinforcer delivery. In basic research, response-independent reinforcer delivery following DRA prevented resurgence of the initially reinforced response and maintained alternative responding (Lieving & Lattal, 2003, Experiment 3). We evaluated the generality of these results by assessing if fixed-time (FT) reinforcer delivery following DRA would prevent resurgence of problem behavior and maintain appropriate behavior with 4 children with disabilities. For all participants, extinction following DRA produced resurgence of previously reinforced problem behavior and reduced appropriate requests, but FT reinforcer delivery following DRA mitigated resurgence of problem behavior and maintained appropriate requests.

  19. Resurgent malaria at the millennium: control strategies in crisis.

    PubMed

    Baird, J K

    2000-04-01

    Completion of the Panama Canal in 1914 marked the beginning of an era of vector control that achieved conspicuous success against malaria. In 1955 the World Health Organization (WHO) adopted the controversial Global Eradication Campaign emphasising DDT (dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane) spraying in homes. The incidence of malaria fell sharply where the programme was implemented, but the strategy was not applied in holoendemic Africa. This, along with the failure to achieve eradication in larger tropical regions, contributed to disillusionment with the policy. The World Health Assembly abandoned the eradication strategy in 1969. A resurgence of malaria began at about that time and today reaches into areas where eradication or control had been achieved. A global malaria crisis looms. In 1993 the WHO adopted a Global Malaria Control Strategy that placed priority in control of disease rather than infection. This formalises a policy that emphasises diagnosis and treatment in a primary healthcare setting, while de-emphasising spraying of residual insecticides. The new policy explicitly stresses malaria in Africa, but expresses the intent to bring control programmes around the world into line with the strategy. This review raises the argument that a global control strategy conceived to address the extraordinary malaria situation in Africa may not be suitable elsewhere. The basis of argument lies in the accomplishments of the Global Eradication Campaign viewed in an historical and geographical context. Resurgent malaria accompanying declining vector control activities in Asia and the Americas suggests that the abandonment of residual spraying may be premature given the tools now at hand. The inadequacy of vector control as the primary instrument of malaria control in holoendemic Africa does not preclude its utility in Asia and the Americas. PMID:10804031

  20. Early malaria resurgence in pre-elimination areas in Kokap Subdistrict, Kulon Progo, Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Indonesia is among those countries committed to malaria eradication, with a continuously decreasing incidence of malaria. However, at district level the situation is different. This study presents a case of malaria resurgence Kokap Subdistrict of the Kulon Progo District in Yogyakarta Province, Java after five years of low endemicity. This study also aims to describe the community perceptions and health services delivery situation that contribute to this case. Methods All malaria cases (2007–2011) in Kulon Progo District were stratified to annual parasite incidence (API). Two-hundred and twenty-six cases during an outbreak (May 2011 to April 2012) were geocoded by household addresses using a geographic information system (GIS) technique and clusters were identified by SaTScan software analysis (Arc GIS 10.1). Purposive random sampling was conducted on respondents living inside the clusters to identify community perceptions and behaviour related to malaria. Interviews were conducted with malaria health officers to understand the challenges of malaria surveillance and control. Results After experiencing three consecutive years with API less than 1 per thousand, malaria in Kokap subdistrict increased almost ten times higher than API in the district level and five times higher than national API. Malaria cases were found in all five villages in 2012. One primary and two secondary malaria clusters in Hargotirto and Kalirejo villages were identified during the 2011–2012 outbreak. Most of the respondents were positively aware with malaria signs and activities of health workers to prevent malaria, although some social economic activities could not be hindered. Return transmigrants or migrant workers entering to their villages, reduced numbers of village malaria workers and a surge in malaria cases in the neighbouring district contributed to the resurgence. Conclusion Community perception, awareness and participation could constitute a solid foundation for

  1. Effects of reinforcer distribution during response elimination on resurgence of an instrumental behavior

    PubMed Central

    Schepers, Scott T.; Bouton, Mark E.

    2015-01-01

    Resurgence has commonly been viewed as the recovery of an extinguished instrumental behavior that occurs when an alternative behavior that has replaced it is also extinguished. Three experiments with rat subjects examined the effects on resurgence of the temporal distribution of reinforcement for the alternative behavior that is presented while the first response is being eliminated. Experiments 1 and 2 examined resurgence when rich rates of reinforcement at the onset of response elimination became leaner over sessions (i.e., forward thinning) and when lean rates became richer (i.e., reverse thinning). Both procedures weakened resurgence compared to that in a group that received the richest rate during all sessions. However, forward thinning was more effective than reverse thinning at reducing the resurgence effect. Experiment 3 found that final resurgence was eliminated when the alternative behavior was reinforced and extinguished in alternating response elimination sessions. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that reinforcer delivery during response elimination provides a contextual stimulus for the extinction of the original behavior; its removal during resurgence testing causes ABC renewal to occur. The results are less consistent with an alternative account that emphasizes the removal of response disruption caused by alternative reinforcement (Shahan & Sweeney, 2011). Other theoretical and applied implications are discussed. PMID:25798714

  2. Subsurface structure of Valles Caldera; a resurgent cauldron in northern New Mexico. [Abstract only

    SciTech Connect

    Goff, F.

    1983-03-01

    Valles Caldera is a 1.1 My old silicic cauldron lying at the intersection of the Rio Grande rift and northeast-trending Jemez Lineament. Geothermal exploration in the caldera region during the last 10 years provides subsurface data which refine our knowledge of deep caldera structure, but raise some questions concerning current models of resurgent cauldrons. For example, a detailed gravity investigation using 730 stations (Segar, 1974) shows a circular negative gravity anomaly centered over the caldera (as expected) but also indicates a strong northeast-trending grain of fault blocks in pre-caldera rocks, that are generally down-faulted to the southeast toward the Rift. Gravity data do not define a diapir structure beneath the resurgent dome attributable to tumescent magma; instead of a northeast-trending horst underlies the Redondo Peak segment of the dome. Interpretation of stratigraphy from many geothermal wells suggests that the caldera and resurgent dome are floored by untilted fault blocks (Hulen and Nielson, 1982). In addition, drilling to Precambrian basement and depths of 3.2 km has not encountered a large intrusive rhyolite that might logically produce tumescence of the dome. The new data indicate that the subsurface structural configuration of Valles Caldera is controlled by pre-caldera tectonics and that a more complicated mechanism is required to explain the resurgent dome standing high inside the caldera. A refined mechanism of resurgence might be one result of CSDP drilling at Valles Caldera.

  3. Profiling neuronal ion channelopathies with non-invasive brain imaging and dynamic causal models: Case studies of single gene mutations

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Jessica R.; Symmonds, Mkael; Hanna, Michael G.; Dolan, Raymond J.; Friston, Karl J.; Moran, Rosalyn J.

    2016-01-01

    Clinical assessments of brain function rely upon visual inspection of electroencephalographic waveform abnormalities in tandem with functional magnetic resonance imaging. However, no current technology proffers in vivo assessments of activity at synapses, receptors and ion-channels, the basis of neuronal communication. Using dynamic causal modeling we compared electrophysiological responses from two patients with distinct monogenic ion channelopathies and a large cohort of healthy controls to demonstrate the feasibility of assaying synaptic-level channel communication non-invasively. Synaptic channel abnormality was identified in both patients (100% sensitivity) with assay specificity above 89%, furnishing estimates of neurotransmitter and voltage-gated ion throughput of sodium, calcium, chloride and potassium. This performance indicates a potential novel application as an adjunct for clinical assessments in neurological and psychiatric settings. More broadly, these findings indicate that biophysical models of synaptic channels can be estimated non-invasively, having important implications for advancing human neuroimaging to the level of non-invasive ion channel assays. PMID:26342528

  4. Transient scaling and resurgence of chimera states in networks of Boolean phase oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosin, David P.; Rontani, Damien; Haynes, Nicholas D.; Schöll, Eckehard; Gauthier, Daniel J.

    2014-09-01

    We study networks of nonlocally coupled electronic oscillators that can be described approximately by a Kuramoto-like model. The experimental networks show long complex transients from random initial conditions on the route to network synchronization. The transients display complex behaviors, including resurgence of chimera states, which are network dynamics where order and disorder coexists. The spatial domain of the chimera state moves around the network and alternates with desynchronized dynamics. The fast time scale of our oscillators (on the order of 100ns) allows us to study the scaling of the transient time of large networks of more than a hundred nodes, which has not yet been confirmed previously in an experiment and could potentially be important in many natural networks. We find that the average transient time increases exponentially with the network size and can be modeled as a Poisson process in experiment and simulation. This exponential scaling is a result of a synchronization rate that follows a power law of the phase-space volume.

  5. Resurgence and persistence of Dorymyrmex flavus after reduction of Solenopsis invicta buren with a broadcast bait.

    PubMed

    Calixto, Alejandro A; Harris, Marvin K; Barr, Charles

    2007-06-01

    The effects of bait treatment(s) on population dynamics of Solenopsis invicta and Dorymyrmex flavus were studied, and various factors underlying the resurgence and persistence of D. flavus to reinvasion by S. invicta were studied in more detail. Pitfall traps, bait vials, transect sampling, and direct inspections were used to monitor densities of these two species, and inspections of D. flavus midden contents, video monitoring of D. flavus colonies, and studies of the fate of marked S. invicta were used to further clarify interactions of these two species, D. flavus abundance increased after the reduction of S. invicta with baits. D. flavus was also observed to sustain higher densities for an extended period (2 yr) after cessation of bait treatment and to exhibit antagonistic behaviors toward S. invicta, showing an ability to resist reinvasion of the treated area by S. invicta. Given these findings, D. flavus may retard domination of the ant assemblage by S. invicta. Additional studies are justified regarding how to enhance the role of this species in affected ecosystems. PMID:17540063

  6. Resurgence of response sequences during extinction in rats shows a primacy effect.

    PubMed

    Reed, Phil; Morgan, Theresa A

    2006-11-01

    Rats were trained to emit a series of three-response sequences to a criterion (i.e., more than 80% of all emitted sequences correct over five successive sessions). Each rat was trained on a series of different, three-response sequences. After the final three-response sequence was acquired, two extinction tests were administered, and the three-response sequences that re-emerged during these extinction tests were noted. Resurgence effects during extinction were observed; that is, the previously trained sequences were emitted. These resurgence effects followed an orderly pattern, which involved a primacy effect. The rats initially emitted the immediately previously trained response, but then started to emit the response sequence they first were trained to emit. Thus, resurgence behavior during extinction can be an orderly function of previous training history. These results replicate those previously obtained with human subjects.

  7. A structural outline of the Yenkahe volcanic resurgent dome (Tanna Island, Vanuatu Arc, South Pacific)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merle, O.; Brothelande, E.; Lénat, J.-F.; Bachèlery, P.; Garaébiti, E.

    2013-12-01

    A structural study has been conducted on the resurgent Yenkahe dome (5 km long by 3 km wide) located in the heart of the Siwi caldera of Tanna Island (Vanuatu arc, south Pacific). This spectacular resurgent dome hosts a small caldera and a very active strombolian cinder cone - the Yasur volcano - in the west and exhibits an intriguing graben in its central part. Detailed mapping and structural observations make it possible to unravel the volcano-tectonic history of the dome. It is shown that, following the early formation of a resurgent dome in the west, a complex collapse (caldera plus graben) occurred and this was associated with the recent uplift of the eastern part of the present dome. Eastward migration of the underlying magma related to regional tectonics is proposed to explain this evolution.

  8. The control of overburden thickness on resurgent domes: insights from analogue models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acocella, V.; Cifelli, F.; Funiciello, R.

    2001-11-01

    Resurgent doming consists of the uplift, usually accompanied by volcanic activity, of part of a collapse caldera. Analogue models were used to investigate the architecture of resurgent domes. Dry sand simulates the brittle crust; uprising silicone, located at the base of the sand-pack, simulates magma. The deformation pattern depends mainly upon: (1) the ratio (aspect ratio) between the thickness of the sand overburden and the width of the silicone intrusion; (2) the duration of experiment. For aspect ratios ≈1, two concentric domes develop; the first-formed outer dome is bordered by inward-dipping reverse ring faults, while the inner dome by outward-dipping normal ring faults. The layers inside the dome are uniformly dipping. For aspect ratios ≈0.4, the dome shows a crestal depression, surrounded by radial fractures, followed by an apical extrusion of silicone. The internal structure of the dome is made up of domed layers. Independently from the aspect ratio, the duration of the experiment enhances silicone extrusion. A consistent structure is observed in most resurgent domes in nature. The comparison between experiments and nature suggests that two distinct resurgence modes occur, mainly depending on the aspect ratio (thickness/width) of the crust overlying the magma chamber. Aspect ratios ≈1 develop a resurgent block with uniformly-dipping layers and peripheral volcanic activity (Ischia and Pantelleria type). Aspect ratios ≈0.4 develop a resurgent dome with a crestal depression, domed layers within and peripheral and internal volcanic activity (Valles and Long Valley type).

  9. Behavioral momentum theory fails to account for the effects of reinforcement rate on resurgence.

    PubMed

    Craig, Andrew R; Shahan, Timothy A

    2016-05-01

    The behavioral-momentum model of resurgence predicts reinforcer rates within a resurgence preparation should have three effects on target behavior. First, higher reinforcer rates in baseline (Phase 1) produce more persistent target behavior during extinction plus alternative reinforcement. Second, higher rate alternative reinforcement during Phase 2 generates greater disruption of target responding during extinction. Finally, higher rates of either reinforcement source should produce greater responding when alternative reinforcement is suspended in Phase 3. Recent empirical reports have produced mixed results in terms of these predictions. Thus, the present experiment further examined reinforcer-rate effects on persistence and resurgence. Rats pressed target levers for high-rate or low-rate variable-interval food during Phase 1. In Phase 2, target-lever pressing was extinguished, an alternative nose-poke became available, and nose-poking produced either high-rate variable-interval, low-rate variable-interval, or no (an extinction control) alternative reinforcement. Alternative reinforcement was suspended in Phase 3. For groups that received no alternative reinforcement, target-lever pressing was less persistent following high-rate than low-rate Phase-1 reinforcement. Target behavior was more persistent with low-rate alternative reinforcement than with high-rate alternative reinforcement or extinction alone. Finally, no differences in Phase-3 responding were observed for groups that received either high-rate or low-rate alternative reinforcement, and resurgence occurred only following high-rate alternative reinforcement. These findings are inconsistent with the momentum-based model of resurgence. We conclude this model mischaracterizes the effects of reinforcer rates on persistence and resurgence of operant behavior. PMID:27193242

  10. Behavioral momentum theory fails to account for the effects of reinforcement rate on resurgence.

    PubMed

    Craig, Andrew R; Shahan, Timothy A

    2016-05-01

    The behavioral-momentum model of resurgence predicts reinforcer rates within a resurgence preparation should have three effects on target behavior. First, higher reinforcer rates in baseline (Phase 1) produce more persistent target behavior during extinction plus alternative reinforcement. Second, higher rate alternative reinforcement during Phase 2 generates greater disruption of target responding during extinction. Finally, higher rates of either reinforcement source should produce greater responding when alternative reinforcement is suspended in Phase 3. Recent empirical reports have produced mixed results in terms of these predictions. Thus, the present experiment further examined reinforcer-rate effects on persistence and resurgence. Rats pressed target levers for high-rate or low-rate variable-interval food during Phase 1. In Phase 2, target-lever pressing was extinguished, an alternative nose-poke became available, and nose-poking produced either high-rate variable-interval, low-rate variable-interval, or no (an extinction control) alternative reinforcement. Alternative reinforcement was suspended in Phase 3. For groups that received no alternative reinforcement, target-lever pressing was less persistent following high-rate than low-rate Phase-1 reinforcement. Target behavior was more persistent with low-rate alternative reinforcement than with high-rate alternative reinforcement or extinction alone. Finally, no differences in Phase-3 responding were observed for groups that received either high-rate or low-rate alternative reinforcement, and resurgence occurred only following high-rate alternative reinforcement. These findings are inconsistent with the momentum-based model of resurgence. We conclude this model mischaracterizes the effects of reinforcer rates on persistence and resurgence of operant behavior.

  11. Resurgent Transseries and the Holomorphic Anomaly: Nonperturbative Closed Strings in Local

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couso-Santamaría, Ricardo; Edelstein, José D.; Schiappa, Ricardo; Vonk, Marcel

    2015-08-01

    The holomorphic anomaly equations describe B-model closed topological strings in Calabi-Yau geometries. Having been used to construct perturbative expansions, it was recently shown that they can also be extended past perturbation theory by making use of resurgent transseries. These yield formal nonperturbative solutions, showing integrability of the holomorphic anomaly equations at the nonperturbative level. This paper takes such constructions one step further by working out in great detail the specific example of topological strings in the mirror of the local toric Calabi-Yau background, and by addressing the associated (resurgent) large-order analysis of both perturbative and multi-instanton sectors. In particular, analyzing the asymptotic growth of the perturbative free energies, one finds contributions from three different instanton actions related by symmetry, alongside another action related to the Kähler parameter. Resurgent transseries methods then compute, from the extended holomorphic anomaly equations, higher instanton sectors and it is shown that these precisely control the asymptotic behavior of the perturbative free energies, as dictated by resurgence. The asymptotic large-order growth of the one-instanton sector unveils the presence of resonance, i.e., each instanton action is necessarily joined by its symmetric contribution. The structure of different resurgence relations is extensively checked at the numerical level, both in the holomorphic limit and in the general nonholomorphic case, always showing excellent agreement with transseries data computed out of the nonperturbative holomorphic anomaly equations. The resurgence relations further imply that the string free energy displays an intricate multi-branched Borel structure, and that resonance must be properly taken into account in order to describe the full transseries solution.

  12. How medium-size resurgent calderas work: the case of Pantelleria, Ischia and the unrest Campi Flegrei structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orsi, Giovanni; Civetta, Lucia; Arienzo, Ilenia; Carandente, Antonio; D'Antonio, Massimo; de Vita, Sandro; di Renzo, Valeria; di Vito, Mauro; Marotta, Enrica; Belviso, Pasquale

    2010-05-01

    Assessment of time and space relationships among magmatism, volcanism, and resurgence of medium-size calderas is a necessary tool to formulate a general model for their dynamics which also permits to forecast their evolution. To define a general hypothesis for the Campi Flegrei caldera, in a persistent state of unrest, the Ischia and Pantelleria medium-size resurgent structures, in variable stages of evolution, have been investigated. In particular some parameters such as the structural and volcanological evolution, with emphasis on resurgence dynamics and coeval volcanism, and the evolution, present state and role of the magmatic system in resurgence, have been defined. For the Campi Flegrei caldera, the data collected during unrest episodes have also been taken into account. This innovative approach adds a time-perspective on how resurgent calderas behave. The proposed general hypothesis will help in long- and short-term volcanic hazards assessment and will support Civil Defence Authorities in elaborating actions devoted to volcanic risk reduction.

  13. Resistance to change and resurgence in humans engaging in a computer task.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Toshikazu; Cançado, Carlos R X; Podlesnik, Christopher A

    2016-04-01

    The relation between persistence, as measured by resistance to change, and resurgence has been examined with nonhuman animals but not systematically with humans. The present study examined persistence and resurgence with undergraduate students engaging in a computer task for points exchangeable for money. In Phase 1, a target response was maintained on a multiple variable-interval (VI) 15-s (Rich) VI 60-s (Lean) schedule of reinforcement. In Phase 2, the target response was extinguished while an alternative response was reinforced at equal rates in both schedule components. In Phase 3, the target and the alternative responses were extinguished. In an additional test of persistence (Phase 4), target responding was reestablished as in Phase 1 and then disrupted by access to videos in both schedule components. In Phases 2 and 4, target responding was more persistent in the Rich than in the Lean component. Also, resurgence generally was greater in the Rich than in the Lean component in Phase 3. The present findings with humans extend the generality of those obtained with nonhuman animals showing that higher reinforcement rates produce both greater persistence and resurgence, and suggest that common processes underlie response persistence and relapse. PMID:26836390

  14. Resistance to change and resurgence in humans engaging in a computer task.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Toshikazu; Cançado, Carlos R X; Podlesnik, Christopher A

    2016-04-01

    The relation between persistence, as measured by resistance to change, and resurgence has been examined with nonhuman animals but not systematically with humans. The present study examined persistence and resurgence with undergraduate students engaging in a computer task for points exchangeable for money. In Phase 1, a target response was maintained on a multiple variable-interval (VI) 15-s (Rich) VI 60-s (Lean) schedule of reinforcement. In Phase 2, the target response was extinguished while an alternative response was reinforced at equal rates in both schedule components. In Phase 3, the target and the alternative responses were extinguished. In an additional test of persistence (Phase 4), target responding was reestablished as in Phase 1 and then disrupted by access to videos in both schedule components. In Phases 2 and 4, target responding was more persistent in the Rich than in the Lean component. Also, resurgence generally was greater in the Rich than in the Lean component in Phase 3. The present findings with humans extend the generality of those obtained with nonhuman animals showing that higher reinforcement rates produce both greater persistence and resurgence, and suggest that common processes underlie response persistence and relapse.

  15. The Lebanese Brevet Professionnel: Resurgence of a Lower Secondary Vocational Track

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vlaardingerbroek, Barend; Jaber, Lama Ziad; El-Masri, Yasmine Hachem

    2008-01-01

    The Lebanese Brevet Professionnel (BP) is an occupationally-specific vocational qualification at lower secondary level. Despite being on the margins of Lebanese education, the BP has been showing signs of a resurgence over the past few years. This paper discusses the structure and role of the BP in the context of the Lebanese education system and…

  16. Recent Trends in Intergovernmental Relations: The Resurgence of Local Actors in Education Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marsh, Julie A.; Wohlstetter, Priscilla

    2013-01-01

    In this essay, the authors explore trends in intergovernmental relations (IGR) by analyzing recent education policies--No Child Left Behind Act, Common Core State Standards, and local empowerment policies. Identifying a resurgent role for local actors in education policy, the authors argue that recent federal efforts to exert more control have in…

  17. Mechanisms of Resurgence II: Response-Contingent Reinforcers Can Reinstate a Second Extinguished Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winterbauer, Neil E.; Bouton, Mark E.

    2011-01-01

    Three experiments with rat subjects examined resurgence of an extinguished instrumental response using the procedure introduced by Epstein (1983) with pigeons. There were three phases: (1) initial acquisition of pressing on a lever (L1) for pellet reward, (2) extinction of L1, and (3) a test session in which a second lever (L2) was inserted,…

  18. Resurgence, operator product expansion, and remarks on renormalons in supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory

    SciTech Connect

    Shifman, M.

    2015-03-15

    We discuss similarities and differences between the resurgence program in quantum mechanics and the operator product expansion in strongly coupled Yang-Mills theories. In N = 1 super-Yang-Mills theories, renormalons are peculiar and are not quite similar to renormalons in QCD.

  19. Megabreccias, Early Lakes, and Duration of Resurgence Recorded in Valles Caldera, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goff, F.; Goff, C. J.; Phillips, E. H.; Kyle, P. R.; McIntosh, W. C.; Chipera, S.; Gardner, J. N.

    2003-12-01

    New 1:24,000 scale geologic mapping combined with previous and ongoing geoscientific studies are revealing significant new findings on intracaldera stratigraphy and structure, initial development of intracaldera lakes, and the duration of resurgence within the ca. 1.25 Myr Valles caldera. The caldera is about 22 km in diameter and contains a resurgent dome that is a northeast-trending oval roughly11 x 9 km in dimension. Maximum resurgence (uplift) was more than 1000 m, during which the dome split into three principal segments herein named the Redondo Peak, Redondo Border, and Valle San Luis segments. These segments are separated from each other by long, narrow grabens herein called the Redondo Creek, Jaramillo Creek, and San Luis Creek grabens. Differential uplift accompanied by intense faulting has exposed large, rootless megabreccia (Mbx) blocks composed of precaldera rocks submerged in densely welded, intracaldera upper Bandelier Tuff. The largest Mbx blocks are roughly 0.2 to 2.0 km long and consist primarily of Abo Fm (Permian), Gallisteo Fm (?) (Eocene), Santa Fe Group (Miocene), Paliza Canyon Fm (late Miocene) and lower Bandelier Tuff (ca. 1.62 Ma). Deep geothermal wells drilled within the Redondo Creek graben from 1970 to 1983 penetrate as much as 2032 m of intracaldera Bandelier Tuff and post-Bandelier rocks before intersecting caldera floor rocks (average = 1646 m, n = 23 wells). Evidence that a lake developed within the caldera depression is preserved in finely laminated lacustrine beds and rhyolitic, hydromagmatic tuffs that overlie intracaldera Bandelier Tuff on the resurgent dome. The lacustrine rocks contain organic remains and the hydromagmatic tuffs contain accretionary lapilli. In some locations, lacustrine and hydromagmatic rocks are interbedded. Earliest post-caldera rhyolite lavas (Deer Canyon Member) display occasional pepperite and pillow textures. Many lavas contain significant amounts of fine, opalized flow breccia indicating interaction

  20. Rapid resurgence of marine productivity after the Cretaceous-Paleogene mass extinction.

    PubMed

    Sepúlveda, Julio; Wendler, Jens E; Summons, Roger E; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe

    2009-10-01

    The course of the biotic recovery after the impact-related disruption of photosynthesis and mass extinction event at the Cretaceous-Paleogene boundary has been intensely debated. The resurgence of marine primary production in the aftermath remains poorly constrained because of the paucity of fossil records tracing primary producers that lack skeletons. Here we present a high-resolution record of geochemical variation in the remarkably thick Fiskeler (also known as the Fish Clay) boundary layer at Kulstirenden, Denmark. Converging evidence from the stable isotopes of carbon and nitrogen and abundances of algal steranes and bacterial hopanes indicates that algal primary productivity was strongly reduced for only a brief period of possibly less than a century after the impact, followed by a rapid resurgence of carbon fixation and ecological reorganization.

  1. Resurgence of Pseudoperonospora cubensis: The Causal Agent of Cucurbit Downy Mildew.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Yigal; Van den Langenberg, Kyle M; Wehner, Todd C; Ojiambo, Peter S; Hausbeck, Mary; Quesada-Ocampo, Lina M; Lebeda, Aleš; Sierotzki, Helge; Gisi, Ulrich

    2015-07-01

    The downy mildew pathogen, Pseudoperonospora cubensis, which infects plant species in the family Cucurbitaceae, has undergone major changes during the last decade. Disease severity and epidemics are far more destructive than previously reported, and new genotypes, races, pathotypes, and mating types of the pathogen have been discovered in populations from around the globe as a result of the resurgence of the disease. Consequently, disease control through host plant resistance and fungicide applications has become more complex. This resurgence of P. cubensis offers challenges to scientists in many research areas including pathogen biology, epidemiology and dispersal, population structure and population genetics, host preference, host-pathogen interactions and gene expression, genetic host plant resistance, inheritance of host and fungicide resistance, and chemical disease control. This review serves to summarize the current status of this major pathogen and to guide future management and research efforts within this pathosystem.

  2. The global emergence/resurgence of arboviral diseases as public health problems.

    PubMed

    Gubler, Duane J

    2002-01-01

    During the past 20 years there has been a dramatic resurgence or emergence of epidemic arboviral diseases affecting both humans and domestic animals. These epidemics have been caused primarily by viruses thought to be under control such as dengue, Japanese encephalitis, yellow fever, and Venezuelan equine encephalitis, or viruses that have expanded their geographic distribution such as West Nile and Rift Valley fever. Several of these viruses are presented as case studies to illustrate the changing epidemiology. The factors responsible for the dramatic resurgence of arboviral diseases in the waning years of the 20th century are discussed, as is the need for rebuilding the public health infrastructure to deal with epidemic vector-borne diseases in the 21st century.

  3. A channelopathy mechanism revealed by direct calmodulin activation of TrpV4

    PubMed Central

    Loukin, Stephen H.; Teng, Jinfeng; Kung, Ching

    2015-01-01

    Ca2+-calmodulin (CaM) regulates varieties of ion channels, including Transient Receptor Potential vanilloid subtype 4 (TrpV4). It has previously been proposed that internal Ca2+ increases TrpV4 activity through Ca2+-CaM binding to a C-terminal Ca2+-CaM binding domain (CBD). We confirmed this model by directly presenting Ca2+-CaM protein to membrane patches excised from TrpV4-expressing oocytes. Over 50 TRPV4 mutations are now known to cause heritable skeletal dysplasia (SD) and other diseases in human. We have previously examined 14 SD alleles and found them to all have gain-of-function effects, with the gain of constitutive open probability paralleling disease severity. Among the 14 SD alleles examined, E797K and P799L are located immediate upstream of the CBD. They not only have increase basal activity, but, unlike the wild-type or other SD-mutant channels examined, they were greatly reduced in their response to Ca2+-CaM. Deleting a 10-residue upstream peptide (Δ795–804) that covers the two SD mutant sites resulted in strong constitutive activity and the complete lack of Ca2+-CaM response. We propose that the region immediately upstream of CBD is an autoinhibitory domain that maintains the closed state through electrostatic interactions, and adjacent detachable Ca2+-CaM binding to CBD sterically interferes with this autoinhibition. This work further supports the notion that TrpV4 mutations cause SD by constitutive leakage. However, the closed conformation is likely destabilized by various mutations by different mechanisms, including the permanent removal of an autoinhibition documented here. PMID:26170305

  4. Resurgence of the cotton bollworm Helicoverpa armigera in northern Greece associated with insecticide resistance.

    PubMed

    Mironidis, George K; Kapantaidaki, Despina; Bentila, Maria; Morou, Evangelia; Savopoulou-Soultani, M; Vontas, John

    2013-08-01

    Helicoverpa armigera has been controlled effectively with chemical insecticides in the major cotton crop production areas of northern Greece for many years. However, a resurgence of the pest was observed in 2010, which significantly affected crop production. During a 4-year survey (2007-2010), we examined the insecticide resistance status of H. armigera populations from two major and representative cotton production areas in northern Greece against seven insecticides (chlorpyrifos, diazinon, methomyl, alpha-cypermethrin, cypermethrin, gamma-cyhalothrin and endosulfan). Full dose-response bioassays on third instar larvae were performed by topical application. Lethal doses at 50% were estimated by probit analysis and resistance factors (RF) were calculated, compared to a susceptible laboratory reference strain. Resistance levels were relatively moderate until 2009, with resistance ratios below 10-fold for organophosphates and carbamates and up to 16-fold for the pyrethroid alpha-cypermethrin. However, resistance rose to 46- and 81-fold for chlorpyrifos and alpha-cypermethrin, respectively in 2010, when the resurgence of the pest was observed. None of the known pyrethroid resistance mutations were found in the pyrethroid-resistant insects. The possible association between resistance and H. armigera resurgence in Greece is discussed.

  5. Examination of the Role of Dopamine D2 and Adrenergic α2 Receptors in Resurgence of Food Seeking

    PubMed Central

    Pyszczynski, Adam D.; Shahan, Timothy A.

    2014-01-01

    Resurgence refers to the reappearance of an extinguished operant behavior when reinforcement for an alternative behavior is also subsequently discontinued. Resurgence has been noted as a source of relapse to problem behavior following interventions involving alternative reinforcement, and has also been recently used as an animal model of relapse to drug seeking induced by reinforcement loss. Existing information about the neuropharmacology of resurgence is scarce, but suggests overlap between relapse observed in the resurgence model and relapse observed in reinstatement and renewal models. In the present experiment rats earned food pellets for pressing a target lever in Phase I. In Phase II lever pressing no longer produced food, but food was delivered for an alterative nose poke response. Finally in Phase III, neither response produced food deliveries. Prior to these Phase III sessions, separate groups of rats were injected with 0, 50, or 100 μg/kg of the dopamine D2 receptor antagonist raclopride or 0, 20, or 40 μg/kg of α2 agonist clonidine. Both doses of raclopride were effective in blocking resurgence, but there was evidence that the higher dose did so via motor rather than motivational impairment. Only the higher dose of clonidine blocked resurgence, but did so with no evidence of motor impairment. Raclopride significantly impacted extinction of the alternative poke at both doses tested, whereas clonidine had no effect at either dose. The results of the present study provide additional information about the neuropharmacology of resurgence, as well as additional evidence of overlap between resurgence, reinstatement, and renewal. PMID:24914462

  6. Bed Bug Infestations and Control Practices in China: Implications for Fighting the Global Bed Bug Resurgence.

    PubMed

    Wang, Changlu; Wen, Xiujun

    2011-01-01

    The bed bug resurgence in North America, Europe, and Australia has elicited interest in investigating the causes of the widespread and increasing infestations and in developing more effective control strategies. In order to extend global perspectives on bed bug management, we reviewed bed bug literature in China by searching five Chinese language electronic databases. We conducted telephone interviews of staff from 77 Health and Epidemic Prevention Stations in six Chinese cities in November 2010. We also conducted telephone interviews of 68 pest control firms in two cities during March 2011. Two species of bed bugs (Cimex lectularius L. and Cimex hemipterus (F.)) are known to occur in China. These were common urban pests before the early1980s. Nationwide "Four-Pest Elimination" campaigns (bed bugs being one of the targeted pests) were implemented in China from 1960 to the early 1980s. These campaigns succeeded in the elimination of bed bug infestations in most communities. Commonly used bed bug control methods included applications of hot water, sealing of bed bug harborages, physical removal, and applications of residual insecticides (mainly organophosphate sprays or dusts). Although international and domestic travel has increased rapidly in China over the past decade (2000-2010), there have only been sporadic new infestations reported in recent years. During 1999-2009, all documented bed bug infestations were found in group living facilities (military dormitories, worker dormitories, and prisons), hotels, or trains. One city (Shenzhen city near Hong Kong) experienced significantly higher number of bed bug infestations. This city is characterized by a high concentration of migratory factory workers. Current bed bug control practices include educating residents, washing, reducing clutter, putting items under the hot sun in summer, and applying insecticides (pyrethroids or organophosphates). There have not been any studies or reports on bed bug insecticide

  7. The Role of Ceramics in a Resurgent Nuclear Industry

    SciTech Connect

    Marra, J

    2006-02-28

    With fuel oil and natural gas prices near record highs and worldwide energy demands increasing at an alarming rate, there is growing interest in revitalization of the nuclear power industry within the United States and across the globe. Ceramic materials have long played a very important part in the commercial nuclear industry with applications throughout the entire fuel cycle; from fuel fabrication to waste stabilization. As the international community begins to look at advanced fuel cycles that minimize waste and increase proliferation resistance, ceramic materials will play an even larger role. Many of the advanced reactor concepts being evaluated operate at high-temperature requiring the use of durable, heat-resistant materials. Ceramic fuels are being investigated for a variety of Generation IV reactor concepts. These include the traditional TRISO-coated particles as well as advanced inert-matrix fuels. In order to minimize wastes and legacy materials, ceramic processes are also being applied to fuel reprocessing operations. Ceramic materials continue to provide a vital contribution in ''closing the fuel cycle'' by stabilization of associated low-level and high-level wastes in highly durable grout, ceramics, and glass. In the next five years, programs that are currently in the conceptual phase will begin laboratory- and engineering-scale demonstrations. This will require production-scale demonstrations of several ceramic technologies from fuel form development to advanced stabilization methods. Within the next five to ten years, these demonstrations will move to even larger scales and will also include radioactive demonstrations of these advanced technologies. These radioactive demonstrations are critical to program success and will require advances in ceramic materials associated with nuclear energy applications.

  8. Multidisciplinary study of a new ClC-1 mutation causing myotonia congenita: a paradigm to understand and treat ion channelopathies

    PubMed Central

    Imbrici, Paola; Altamura, Concetta; Camerino, Giulia Maria; Mangiatordi, Giuseppe Felice; Conte, Elena; Maggi, Lorenzo; Brugnoni, Raffaella; Musaraj, Kejla; Caloiero, Roberta; Alberga, Domenico; Marsano, Renè Massimiliano; Ricci, Giulia; Siciliano, Gabriele; Nicolotti, Orazio; Mora, Marina; Bernasconi, Pia; Desaphy, Jean-Francois; Mantegazza, Renato; Camerino, Diana Conte

    2016-01-01

    Myotonia congenita is an inherited disease that is characterized by impaired muscle relaxation after contraction caused by loss-of-function mutations in the skeletal muscle ClC-1 channel. We report a novel ClC-1 mutation, T335N, that is associated with a mild phenotype in 1 patient, located in the extracellular I-J loop. The purpose of this study was to provide a solid correlation between T335N dysfunction and clinical symptoms in the affected patient as well as to offer hints for drug development. Our multidisciplinary approach includes patch-clamp electrophysiology on T335N and ClC-1 wild-type channels expressed in tsA201 cells, Western blot and quantitative PCR analyses on muscle biopsies from patient and unaffected individuals, and molecular dynamics simulations using a homology model of the ClC-1 dimer. T335N channels display reduced chloride currents as a result of gating alterations rather than altered surface expression. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest that the I-J loop might be involved in conformational changes that occur at the dimer interface, thus affecting gating. Finally, the gene expression profile of T335N carrier showed a diverse expression of K+ channel genes, compared with control individuals, as potentially contributing to the phenotype. This experimental paradigm satisfactorily explained myotonia in the patient. Furthermore, it could be relevant to the study and therapy of any channelopathy.—Imbrici, P., Altamura, C., Camerino, G. M., Mangiatordi, G. F., Conte, E., Maggi, L., Brugnoni, R., Musaraj, K., Caloiero, R., Alberga, D., Marsano, R. M., Ricci, G., Siciliano, G., Nicolotti, O., Mora, M., Bernasconi, P., Desaphy, J.-F., Mantegazza, R., Camerino, D. C. Multidisciplinary study of a new ClC-1 mutation causing myotonia congenita: a paradigm to understand and treat ion channelopathies. PMID:27324117

  9. Are we headed for a resurgence of the HIV epidemic among men who have sex with men?

    PubMed Central

    Wolitski, R J; Valdiserri, R O; Denning, P H; Levine, W C

    2001-01-01

    HIV remains a critical health issue for men who have sex with men (MSM). In the United States, an estimated 365,000 to 535,000 MSM are living with HIV, and 42% of new HIV infections occur in this population. Recent data on sexually transmitted diseases and on sexual behavior indicate the potential for a resurgence in HIV infections among MSM. Outbreaks of gonorrhea and syphilis have been reported in a growing number of cities, and several studies have observed an increase in unprotected anal intercourse among MSM. These increases in HIV risk behavior may be attributed to several factors that have affected the sexual practices of MSM, including changes in beliefs regarding the severity of HIV disease. These emerging data have implications for surveillance and intervention research activities and indicate a need to reevaluate, refocus, and reinvigorate HIV prevention efforts for MSM. Our recommendations for addressing the HIV prevention needs of MSM include the need to consider HIV-related issues within the broader context of the physical, mental, and sexual health of MSM. PMID:11392927

  10. Three cases of ocular syphilis and the resurgence of the disease in Queensland

    PubMed Central

    Sara, Sergio A; McAllister, Andrew S

    2016-01-01

    The past few years has seen a resurgence of syphilis. It is predominantly associated within men who have sex with men and also within heterosexual Indigenous Australians. Possessing the ability to mimic a variety of ocular diseases, it typically manifests as uveitis, although it can affect any structure within the eye. Thus, a high degree of clinical suspicion by ophthalmologists is required to prevent disease progression and ocular morbidity. Patients require prolonged antibiotic treatment with intravenous benzylpenicillin and outpatient monitoring to successfully resolve the infection. We describe a case series of ocular syphilis presentations in Queensland, Australia. PMID:27672343

  11. Three cases of ocular syphilis and the resurgence of the disease in Queensland

    PubMed Central

    Sara, Sergio A; McAllister, Andrew S

    2016-01-01

    The past few years has seen a resurgence of syphilis. It is predominantly associated within men who have sex with men and also within heterosexual Indigenous Australians. Possessing the ability to mimic a variety of ocular diseases, it typically manifests as uveitis, although it can affect any structure within the eye. Thus, a high degree of clinical suspicion by ophthalmologists is required to prevent disease progression and ocular morbidity. Patients require prolonged antibiotic treatment with intravenous benzylpenicillin and outpatient monitoring to successfully resolve the infection. We describe a case series of ocular syphilis presentations in Queensland, Australia.

  12. Three cases of ocular syphilis and the resurgence of the disease in Queensland.

    PubMed

    Sara, Sergio A; McAllister, Andrew S

    2016-01-01

    The past few years has seen a resurgence of syphilis. It is predominantly associated within men who have sex with men and also within heterosexual Indigenous Australians. Possessing the ability to mimic a variety of ocular diseases, it typically manifests as uveitis, although it can affect any structure within the eye. Thus, a high degree of clinical suspicion by ophthalmologists is required to prevent disease progression and ocular morbidity. Patients require prolonged antibiotic treatment with intravenous benzylpenicillin and outpatient monitoring to successfully resolve the infection. We describe a case series of ocular syphilis presentations in Queensland, Australia. PMID:27672343

  13. Malaria resurgence risk in southern Europe: climate assessment in an historically endemic area of rice fields at the Mediterranean shore of Spain

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background International travel and immigration have been related with an increase of imported malaria cases. This fact and climate change, prolonging the period favouring vector development, require an analysis of the malaria transmission resurgence risk in areas of southern Europe. Such a study is made for the first time in Spain. The Ebro Delta historically endemic area was selected due to its rice field landscape, the presence of only one vector, Anopheles atroparvus, with densities similar to those it presented when malaria was present, in a situation which pronouncedly differs from already assessed potential resurgence areas in other Mediterranean countries, such as France and Italy, where many different Anopheles species coexist and a different vector species dominates. Methods The transmission risk was assessed analysing: 1) climate diagrams including the minimum temperature for Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax development; 2) monthly evolution of the Gradient Model Risk (GMR) index, specifying transmission risk period and number of potential Plasmodium generations; 3) ecological characteristics using remote sensing images with the Eurasia Land Cover characteristics database and the monthly evolution of the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI); 4) evaluation of A. atroparvus population dynamics. Results Climatological analyses and GMR index show that a transmission risk presently exists, lasting from May until September for P. falciparum, and from May until October for P. vivax. The GMR index shows that the temperature increase does not actually mean a transmission risk increase if accompanied by a precipitation decrease reducing the number of parasite generations and transmission period. Nevertheless, this limitation is offset by the artificial flooding of the rice fields. Maximum NDVI values and A. atroparvus maximum abundance correspond to months with maximum growth of the rice fields. Conclusions The Ebro Delta presents the ecological

  14. Using complexity theory to analyse the organisational response to resurgent tuberculosis across London.

    PubMed

    Trenholm, Susan; Ferlie, Ewan

    2013-09-01

    We employ complexity theory to analyse the English National Health Service (NHS)'s organisational response to resurgent tuberculosis across London. Tennison (2002) suggests that complexity theory could fruitfully explore a healthcare system's response to this complex and emergent phenomenon: we explore this claim here. We also bring in established New Public Management principles to enhance our empirical analysis, which is based on data collected between late 2009 and mid-2011. We find that the operation of complexity theory based features, especially self-organisation, are significantly impacted by the macro context of a New Public Management-based regime which values control, measurement and risk management more than innovation, flexibility and lateral system building. We finally explore limitations and suggest perspectives for further research.

  15. Resurgence in quantum field theory: nonperturbative effects in the principal chiral model.

    PubMed

    Cherman, Aleksey; Dorigoni, Daniele; Dunne, Gerald V; Ünsal, Mithat

    2014-01-17

    We explain the physical role of nonperturbative saddle points of path integrals in theories without instantons, using the example of the asymptotically free two-dimensional principal chiral model (PCM). Standard topological arguments based on homotopy considerations suggest no role for nonperturbative saddles in such theories. However, the resurgence theory, which unifies perturbative and nonperturbative physics, predicts the existence of several types of nonperturbative saddles associated with features of the large-order structure of the perturbation theory. These points are illustrated in the PCM, where we find new nonperturbative "fracton" saddle point field configurations, and suggest a quantum interpretation of previously discovered "uniton" unstable classical solutions. The fractons lead to a semiclassical realization of IR renormalons in the circle-compactified theory and yield the microscopic mechanism of the mass gap of the PCM.

  16. Grizzly Peak cauldron, Colorado: structure and petrology of a deeply dissected resurgent ash-flow caldera

    SciTech Connect

    Fridrich, C.J.

    1987-01-01

    The 34-Ma-old Grizzly Peak cauldron is a deeply eroded 17- by 23-k caldera structure on the crest of the Sawatch Range in west-central Colorado. Subsidence of the cauldron along bounding ring faults resulted from eruption of the Grizzly Peak Tuff, which ponded in the caldera as it formed. An inner ring fracture zone divides the cauldron into two segments and is a growth fault in the intracaldera tuff. Following subsidence, the cauldron was uplifted to form a complexely faulted resurgent dome. Intracaldera Grizzly Peak Tuff, as thick as 2.7 km, is a single cooling unit zoned from high-silica rhyolite at the base to low-silica rhyolite at the eroded top and, further, contains dacite to mafic latite welded pumice clasts (fiamme) in two heterogeneous tuff horizons in the upper half of the unit. Tuff zoning defined by fiamme is unusually strong for a single volcanic unit: 77 to 57% SiO2. Major-element trends can be modeled by crystal fractionation using observed phenocrysts. Inflections in the trends of Zr, Hf, Th, REE, Y, Mn, and Sc correlated with changes in phenocryst mineralogy and composition, indicating control by crystal-liquid equilibria. Trends for some trace-element cannot be fit with the crystal-fractionation model; over different portions of the zonation, Zr, Hf, LREE, and Rb enrich at too high a rate, and Ta, Nb, and Ba enrich at too low a rate. Progressive batch melting of a single source can also be eliminated because Co, Cr, Eu, and Sr, and Ba are too strongly depleted over different silica intervals. The zonation must therefore be the result of a combination of processes. Compositional trends defined by a series of intracaldera intrusions can be explained by hybridization, during resurgence, of the unerupted portion of the zoned magma column sampled in the tuff eruption.

  17. Fluid flow in the resurgent dome of Long Valley Caldera: Implications from thermal data and deep electrical sounding

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pribnow, D.F.C.; Schutze, C.; Hurter, S.J.; Flechsig, C.; Sass, J.H.

    2003-01-01

    Temperatures of 100??C are measured at 3 km depth in a well located on the resurgent dome in the center of Long Valley Caldera, California, despite an assumed >800??C magma chamber at 6-8 km depth. Local downflow of cold meteoric water as a process for cooling the resurgent dome is ruled out by a Pecle??t-number analysis of temperature logs. These analyses reveal zones with fluid circulation at the upper and lower boundaries of the Bishop Tuff, and an upflow zone in the metasedimentary rocks. Vertical Darcy velocities range from 10 to 70 cm a-1. A 21-km-long geoelectrical profile across the caldera provides resistivity values to the order of 100 to >103 ??m down to a depth of 6 km, as well as variations of self-potential. Interpretation of the electrical data with respect to hydrothermal fluid movement confirms that there is no downflow beneath the resurgent dome. To explain the unexpectedly low temperatures in the resurgent dome, we challenge the common view that the caldera as a whole is a regime of high temperatures and the resurgent dome is a local cold anomaly. Instead, we suggest that the caldera was cooled to normal thermal conditions by vigorous hydrothermal activity in the past, and that a present-day hot water flow system is responsible for local hot anomalies, such as Hot Creek and the area of the Casa Diablo geothermal power plant. The source of hot water has been associated with recent shallow intrusions into the West Moat. The focus of planning for future power plants should be to locate this present-day flow system instead of relying on heat from the old magma chamber. ?? 2003 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Studies of Resurgent Bed Bugs: Population Genetic Structure, Impact of Aggregation on Development and Molecular Screening for Bartonella

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saenz, Virna Lisa

    . Here we describe the development of 24 high resolution microsatellite markers and their application to elucidate infestation dynamics within three multistory apartment buildings in the United States. Results reveal contrasting characteristics potentially representative of geographic or locale differences. In Raleigh, NC, an infestation within an apartment building seemed to have started from a single introduction followed by extensive spread throughout the building. In Jersey City, NJ, two or more introductions followed by extensive spread. Populations within single apartments in all buildings showed low levels of genetic diversity suggesting that few individuals are starting these infestations, possibly a singly mated female or her progeny. This work is described in Chapter 3 and was published in the Journal of Medical Entomology in 2012. Third, we studied the impact of aggregation in bed bug development. Although it is well known that bed bugs live in aggregations, the adaptive benefits of this behavior are not well understood. In this study, we reared first instars either in isolation or in groups of five from hatching to adult eclosion and recorded their development time. Additionally, we investigated the effects of group-housing on same age nymphs versus nymphs reared with adults. Nymphal development was 2.2 d faster in grouped nymphs than in solitary-housed nymphs, representing 7.3% faster overall development. However, this grouping effect did not appear to be influenced by group composition (nymphs vs. adults). Thus, similar to other gregarious insect species, nymph development in bed bugs is faster in aggregations than in isolation. This work is described in Chapter 4. Fourth, we investigated the prevalence of a re-emergent bacterial pathogen in United States bed bugs populations. Because reports of both bed bugs and Bartonella have been increasing in the United States, and because their host ranges can overlap, we investigated whether the resurgence of these

  19. The lethal ovitrap: a response to the resurgence of dengue and chikungunya.

    PubMed

    Zeichner, Brian C; Debboun, Mustapha

    2011-01-01

    There has been a global resurgence in dengue fever since the 1960s and now more than one third of the world's population lives in dengue endemic areas. Chikungunya, another mosquito-borne disease, had been limited to sub-Saharan Africa and Southeast Asia, but recently spread to Italy and France, raising concerns that it could spread to many more countries in Europe and the Americas. There are currently no vaccines available to prevent infection with either virus and medical care is limited to symptomatic and supportive treatments. Suppression of the mosquito vector populations reduces disease transmission, however, the tools currently available to control the main vectors of dengue and chikungunya are inadequate. Larval control is very labor intensive and pesticide sprays do not adequately penetrate the microhabitats where adult mosquitoes are sequestered. The lethal ovitrap addresses these shortcomings by luring the potentially viremic female mosquitoes to an egg laying site where they are exposed to a toxic insecticide dose. It is a safe, environmentally sound, economical, and simple means of dengue and chikungunya vector control whose efficacy has been documented in 9 research papers. Management programs using the lethal ovitrap have been shown to halt dengue and chikungunya transmission. Efforts are underway to mass produce the lethal ovitrap under the registered trade name Trap-N-Kill which will ensure its availability to our armed forces deployed in dengue and chikungunya endemic areas. PMID:21805450

  20. Relapse processes after the extinction of instrumental learning: Renewal, resurgence, and reacquisition

    PubMed Central

    Bouton, Mark E.; Winterbauer, Neil E.; Todd, Travis P.

    2012-01-01

    It is widely recognized that extinction (the procedure in which a Pavlovian conditioned stimulus or an instrumental action is repeatedly presented without its reinforcer) weakens behavior without erasing the original learning. Most of the experiments that support this claim have focused on several “relapse” effects that occur after Pavlovian extinction, which collectively suggest that the original learning is saved through extinction. However, although such effects do occur after instrumental extinction, they have not been explored there in as much detail. This article reviews recent research in our laboratory that has investigated three relapse effects that occur after the extinction of instrumental (operant) learning. In renewal, responding returns after extinction when the behavior is tested in a different context; in resurgence, responding recovers when a second response that has been reinforced during extinction of the first is itself put on extinction; and in rapid reacquisition, extinguished responding returns rapidly when the response is reinforced again. The results provide new insights into extinction and relapse, and are consistent with principles that have been developed to explain extinction and relapse as they occur after Pavlovian conditioning. Extinction of instrumental learning, like Pavlovian learning, involves new learning that is relatively dependent on the context for expression. PMID:22450305

  1. A Reevaluation of the Question: Is the Pubertal Resurgence in Pulsatile GnRH Release in the Male Rhesus Monkey (Macaca mulatta) Associated With a Gonad-Independent Augmentation of GH Secretion?

    PubMed

    Shahab, M; Trujillo, M Vargas; Plant, T M

    2015-10-01

    A somatic signal has been posited to trigger the pubertal resurgence in pulsatile GnRH secretion that initiates puberty in highly evolved primates. That GH might provide such a signal emerged in 2000 as a result of a study reporting that circulating nocturnal GH concentrations in castrated juvenile male monkeys increased in a 3-week period immediately preceding the pubertal resurgence of LH secretion. The present study was conducted to reexamine this intriguing relationship, again in an agonadal model. Four castrated juvenile male monkeys were implanted with indwelling jugular catheters, housed in remote sampling cages, and subjected to 24 hours of sequential blood sampling (every 30 min) every 2 weeks from 19.5 to 22 months of age. Twenty-four-hour profiles of circulating GH concentrations were analyzed using the pulse detection algorithm, PULSAR, and developmental changes in pulsatile GH release with respect to the initiation of the pubertal rise of LH secretion (week 0; observed between 22.5 and 32 mo of age) were examined for significance by a repeated-measures ANOVA. Changes in the parameters of pulsatile GH secretion, including mean 24-hour GH concentration and GH pulse frequency and pulse amplitude for 3 (n = 4) and 6 (n = 3) months before week 0 were unremarkable and nonsignificant. These findings fail to confirm those of the earlier study and lead us to conclude that the timing of the pubertal resurgence of GnRH release in the male monkey is not dictated by GH. Reasons for the discrepancy between the two studies are unclear. PMID:26181107

  2. Resurgence of Persisting Non-Cultivable Borrelia burgdorferi following Antibiotic Treatment in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hodzic, Emir; Imai, Denise; Feng, Sunlian; Barthold, Stephen W.

    2014-01-01

    The agent of Lyme borreliosis, Borrelia burgdorferi, evades host immunity and establishes persistent infections in its varied mammalian hosts. This persistent biology may pose challenges to effective antibiotic treatment. Experimental studies in dogs, mice, and non-human primates have found persistence of B. burgdorferi DNA following treatment with a variety of antibiotics, but persisting spirochetes are non-cultivable. Persistence of B. burgdorferi DNA has been documented in humans following treatment, but the significance remains unknown. The present study utilized a ceftriaxone treatment regimen in the C3H mouse model that resulted in persistence of non-cultivable B. burgdorferi in order to determine their long-term fate, and to examine their effects on the host. Results confirmed previous studies, in which B. burgdorferi could not be cultured from tissues, but low copy numbers of B. burgdorferi flaB DNA were detectable in tissues at 2, 4 and 8 months after completion of treatment, and the rate of PCR-positive tissues appeared to progressively decline over time. However, there was resurgence of spirochete flaB DNA in multiple tissues at 12 months, with flaB DNA copy levels nearly equivalent to those found in saline-treated mice. Despite the continued non-cultivable state, RNA transcription of multiple B. burgdorferi genes was detected in host tissues, flaB DNA was acquired by xenodiagnostic ticks, and spirochetal forms could be visualized within ticks and mouse tissues by immunofluorescence and immunohistochemistry, respectively. A number of host cytokines were up- or down-regulated in tissues of both saline- and antibiotic-treated mice in the absence of histopathology, indicating host response to the presence of non-cultivable, despite the lack of inflammation in tissues. PMID:24466286

  3. Resurgence in sine-Gordon quantum mechanics: exact agreement between multi-instantons and uniform WKB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misumi, Tatsuhiro; Nitta, Muneto; Sakai, Norisuke

    2015-09-01

    We compute multi-instanton amplitudes in the sine-Gordon quantum mechanics (periodic cosine potential) by integrating out quasi-moduli parameters corresponding to separations of instantons and anti-instantons. We propose an extension of Bogomolnyi-Zinn-Justin prescription for multi-instanton configurations and an appropriate subtraction scheme. We obtain the multi-instanton contributions to the energy eigenvalue of the lowest band at the zeroth order of the coupling constant. For the configurations with only instantons (anti-instantons), we obtain unambiguous results. For those with both instantons and anti-instantons, we obtain results with imaginary parts, which depend on the path of analytic continuation. We show that the imaginary parts of the multi-instanton amplitudes precisely cancel the imaginary parts of the Borel resummation of the perturbation series, and verify that our results completely agree with those based on the uniform-WKB calculations, thus confirming the resurgence structure: divergent perturbation series combined with the nonperturbative multi-instanton contributions conspire to give unambiguous results. We also study the neutral bion contributions in the {C}{P}^{N-1} model on {{R}}^1× {S}^1 with a small circumference, taking account of the relative phase moduli between the fractional instanton and anti-instanton. We find that the sign of the interaction potential depends on the relative phase moduli, and that both the real and imaginary parts resulting from quasi-moduli integral of the neutral bion get quantitative corrections compared to the sine-Gordon quantum mechanics.

  4. In Flanders fields: the Great War, Antoine Depage, and the resurgence of débridement.

    PubMed Central

    Helling, T S; Daon, E

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The care of traumatic wounds has evolved over hundreds of years, largely as a result of armed conflicts. The lessons learned during World War I in the treatment of extensive soft-tissue injuries proved invaluable in reducing infection and preventing loss of limb and life. Foremost among these was the use of debridement. This report reviews the development of debridement as standard treatment of war wounds and highlights the surgeon largely responsible for its resurgence during one of this century's saddest chapters. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Before World War I, the care of wounds consisted of minimal exploration and liberal use of then-new antiseptics. For limited injuries, this approach appeared adequate. World War I saw the introduction of devastating weapons that produced injuries that caused extensive devitalization of tissue. Standard treatment of these patients proved woefully inadequate to prevent life-threatening infections. METHODS: This is a historical review of the conditions that occurred during World War I that prompted a change in wound management. One of those responsible for this change was the Belgian surgeon Antoine Depage. His life and contributions to the care of war wounds are profiled. Depage reintroduced the discarded French practice of wound incision and exploration (debridement) and combined it with excision of devitalized tissue. RESULTS: Through the use of debridement, excision, and delayed wound closure based on bacteriologic survey, Depage was able to reduce the incidence of infectious complications of soft-tissue injuries, particularly those involving fractures. CONCLUSIONS: Through his experiences in the Great War, Antoine Depage was able to formulate a treatment plan for wounds of war. All such injuries were assumed to be contaminated and, as such, they required early and careful debridement. Depage thought that wound closure should often be delayed and based his decision to close on the bacteriologic status of the wound

  5. Studies of Resurgent Bed Bugs: Population Genetic Structure, Impact of Aggregation on Development and Molecular Screening for Bartonella

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saenz, Virna Lisa

    . Here we describe the development of 24 high resolution microsatellite markers and their application to elucidate infestation dynamics within three multistory apartment buildings in the United States. Results reveal contrasting characteristics potentially representative of geographic or locale differences. In Raleigh, NC, an infestation within an apartment building seemed to have started from a single introduction followed by extensive spread throughout the building. In Jersey City, NJ, two or more introductions followed by extensive spread. Populations within single apartments in all buildings showed low levels of genetic diversity suggesting that few individuals are starting these infestations, possibly a singly mated female or her progeny. This work is described in Chapter 3 and was published in the Journal of Medical Entomology in 2012. Third, we studied the impact of aggregation in bed bug development. Although it is well known that bed bugs live in aggregations, the adaptive benefits of this behavior are not well understood. In this study, we reared first instars either in isolation or in groups of five from hatching to adult eclosion and recorded their development time. Additionally, we investigated the effects of group-housing on same age nymphs versus nymphs reared with adults. Nymphal development was 2.2 d faster in grouped nymphs than in solitary-housed nymphs, representing 7.3% faster overall development. However, this grouping effect did not appear to be influenced by group composition (nymphs vs. adults). Thus, similar to other gregarious insect species, nymph development in bed bugs is faster in aggregations than in isolation. This work is described in Chapter 4. Fourth, we investigated the prevalence of a re-emergent bacterial pathogen in United States bed bugs populations. Because reports of both bed bugs and Bartonella have been increasing in the United States, and because their host ranges can overlap, we investigated whether the resurgence of these

  6. Homeostasis or channelopathy? Acquired cell type-specific ion channel changes in temporal lobe epilepsy and their antiepileptic potential

    PubMed Central

    Wolfart, Jakob; Laker, Debora

    2015-01-01

    Neurons continuously adapt the expression and functionality of their ion channels. For example, exposed to chronic excitotoxicity, neurons homeostatically downscale their intrinsic excitability. In contrast, the “acquired channelopathy” hypothesis suggests that proepileptic channel characteristics develop during epilepsy. We review cell type-specific channel alterations under different epileptic conditions and discuss the potential of channels that undergo homeostatic adaptations, as targets for antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). Most of the relevant studies have been performed on temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), a widespread AED-refractory, focal epilepsy. The TLE patients, who undergo epilepsy surgery, frequently display hippocampal sclerosis (HS), which is associated with degeneration of cornu ammonis subfield 1 pyramidal cells (CA1 PCs). Although the resected human tissue offers insights, controlled data largely stem from animal models simulating different aspects of TLE and other epilepsies. Most of the cell type-specific information is available for CA1 PCs and dentate gyrus granule cells (DG GCs). Between these two cell types, a dichotomy can be observed: while DG GCs acquire properties decreasing the intrinsic excitability (in TLE models and patients with HS), CA1 PCs develop channel characteristics increasing intrinsic excitability (in TLE models without HS only). However, thorough examination of data on these and other cell types reveals the coexistence of protective and permissive intrinsic plasticity within neurons. These mechanisms appear differentially regulated, depending on the cell type and seizure condition. Interestingly, the same channel molecules that are upregulated in DG GCs during HS-related TLE, appear as promising targets for future AEDs and gene therapies. Hence, GCs provide an example of homeostatic ion channel adaptation which can serve as a primer when designing novel anti-epileptic strategies. PMID:26124723

  7. The role of B. pertussis vaccine antigen gene variants in pertussis resurgence and possible consequences for vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Preston, Andrew

    2016-05-01

    Whooping cough, or pertussis, caused by Bordetella pertussis is considered resurgent in a number of countries world-wide, despite continued high level vaccine coverage. Among a number of causes for this that have been proposed, is the emergence of B. pertussis strains expressing variants of the antigens contained in acellular pertussis vaccines; i.e. the evolution of B. pertussis toward vaccine escape. This commentary highlights the contradictory nature of evidence for this but also discusses the importance of understanding the role of B. pertussis adaptation to vaccine-mediated immune selection pressures for vaccine-mediated pertussis control strategies.

  8. Carbon dioxide emissions from vegetation-kill zones around the resurgent dome of Long Valley caldera, eastern California, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bergfeld, Deborah; Evans, William C.; Howle, James F.; Farrar, Christopher D.

    2006-01-01

    A survey of diffuse CO2 efflux, soil temperature and soil-gas chemistry over areas of localized vegetation-kill on and around the resurgent dome of Long Valley caldera California was performed to evaluate the premise that gaseous and thermal anomalies are related to renewed intrusion of magma. Some kill sites are long-lived features and others have developed in the past few years. Total anomalous CO2 emissions from the thirteen areas average around 8.7 t per day; but the majority of the emissions come from four sites west of the Casa Diablo geothermal power plant. Geochemical analyses of the soil-gases from locations west and east of the plant revealed the presence of isobutane related to plant operations. The δ13C values of diffuse CO2 range from − 5.7‰ to − 3.4‰, similar to values previously reported for CO2 from hot springs and thermal wells around Long Valley.At many of the vegetation-kill sites soil temperatures reach boiling at depths ≤ 20 cm. Soil temperature/depth profiles at two of the high-emissions areas indicate that the conductive thermal gradient in the center of the areas is around 320 °C m− 1. We estimate total heat loss from the two areas to be about 6.1 and 2.3 MW. Given current thinking on the rate of hydrothermal fluid flow across the caldera and using the CO2 concentration in the thermal fluids, the heat and CO2 loss from the kill areas is easily provided by the shallow hydrothermal system, which is sourced to the west of the resurgent dome. We find no evidence that the development of new areas of vegetation kill across the resurgent dome are related to new input of magma or magmatic fluids from beneath the resurgent dome. Our findings indicate that the areas have developed as a response to changes in the shallow hydrologic system. Some of the changes are likely related to fluid production at the power plant, but at distal sites the changes are more likely related to seismicity and uplift of the dome.

  9. The role of B. pertussis vaccine antigen gene variants in pertussis resurgence and possible consequences for vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Preston, Andrew

    2016-05-01

    Whooping cough, or pertussis, caused by Bordetella pertussis is considered resurgent in a number of countries world-wide, despite continued high level vaccine coverage. Among a number of causes for this that have been proposed, is the emergence of B. pertussis strains expressing variants of the antigens contained in acellular pertussis vaccines; i.e. the evolution of B. pertussis toward vaccine escape. This commentary highlights the contradictory nature of evidence for this but also discusses the importance of understanding the role of B. pertussis adaptation to vaccine-mediated immune selection pressures for vaccine-mediated pertussis control strategies. PMID:26889694

  10. Channelopathies of skeletal muscle excitability

    PubMed Central

    Cannon, Stephen C.

    2016-01-01

    Familial disorders of skeletal muscle excitability were initially described early in the last century and are now known to be caused by mutations of voltage-gated ion channels. The clinical manifestations are often striking, with an inability to relax after voluntary contraction (myotonia) or transient attacks of severe weakness (periodic paralysis). An essential feature of these disorders is fluctuation of symptoms that are strongly impacted by environmental triggers such as exercise, temperature, or serum K+ levels. These phenomena have intrigued physiologists for decades, and in the past 25 years the molecular lesions underlying these disorders have been identified and mechanistic studies are providing insights for therapeutic strategies of disease modification. These familial disorders of muscle fiber excitability are “channelopathies” caused by mutations of a chloride channel (ClC-1), sodium channel (NaV1.4), calcium channel (CaV1.1) and several potassium channels (Kir2.1, Kir2.6, Kir3.4). This review provides a synthesis of the mechanistic connections between functional defects of mutant ion channels, their impact on muscle excitability, how these changes cause clinical phenotypes, and approaches toward therapeutics. PMID:25880512

  11. La Pacana caldera and the Atana Ignimbrite — a major ash-flow and resurgent caldera complex in the Andes of northern Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardeweg, Moyra; Ramírez, Carlos F.

    1987-06-01

    The recently discovered La Pacana caldera, 60 × 35 km, is the largest caldera yet described in South America. This resurgent caldera of Pliocene age developed in a continental platemargin environment in a major province of ignimbrite volcanism in the Central Andes of northern Chile at about 23° S latitude. Collapse of La Pacana caldera was initiated by the eruption of about 900 km3 of the rhyodacitic Atana Ignimbrite. The Atana Ignimbrite was erupted from a composite ring fracture system and formed at least four major ash-flow tuff units that are separated locally by thin air-fall and surge deposits; all four sheets were emplaced in rapid succession about 4.1 ± 0.4 Ma ago. Caldera collapse was followed closely by resurgent doming of the caldera floor, accompanied by early postcaldera eruptions of dacitic to rhyolitic lava domes along the ring fractures. The resurgent dome is an elongated, asymmetrical uplift, 48.5 × 12 km, which is broken by a complex system of normal faults locally forming a narrow discontinuous apical graben. Later, postcaldera eruptions produced large andesitic and dacitic stratocones along the caldera margins and dacitic domes on the resurgent dome beginning about 3.5 Ma ago and persisting into the Quaternary. Hydrothermally altered rocks occur in the eroded cores of precaldera and postcaldera stratovolcanoes and along fractures in the resurgent dome, but no ore deposits are known. A few warm springs located in salars within the caldera moat appear to be vestiges of the caldera geothermal system.

  12. The thermal regime in the resurgent dome of Long Valley Caldera, California: Inferences from precision temperature logs in deep wells

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hurwitz, S.; Farrar, C.D.; Williams, C.F.

    2010-01-01

    Long Valley Caldera in eastern California formed 0.76Ma ago in a cataclysmic eruption that resulted in the deposition of 600km3 of Bishop Tuff. The total current heat flow from the caldera floor is estimated to be ~290MW, and a geothermal power plant in Casa Diablo on the flanks of the resurgent dome (RD) generates ~40MWe. The RD in the center of the caldera was uplifted by ~80cm between 1980 and 1999 and was explained by most models as a response to magma intrusion into the shallow crust. This unrest has led to extensive research on geothermal resources and volcanic hazards in the caldera. Here we present results from precise, high-resolution, temperature-depth profiles in five deep boreholes (327-1,158m) on the RD to assess its thermal state, and more specifically 1) to provide bounds on the advective heat transport as a guide for future geothermal exploration, 2) to provide constraints on the occurrence of magma at shallow crustal depths, and 3) to provide a baseline for future transient thermal phenomena in response to large earthquakes, volcanic activity, or geothermal production. The temperature profiles display substantial non-linearity within each profile and variability between the different profiles. All profiles display significant temperature reversals with depth and temperature gradients <50??C/km at their bottom. The maximum temperature in the individual boreholes ranges between 124.7??C and 129.5??C and bottom hole temperatures range between 99.4??C and 129.5??C. The high-temperature units in the three Fumarole Valley boreholes are at the approximate same elevation as the high-temperature unit in borehole M-1 in Casa Diablo indicating lateral or sub-lateral hydrothermal flow through the resurgent dome. Small differences in temperature between measurements in consecutive years in three of the wells suggest slow cooling of the shallow hydrothermal flow system. By matching theoretical curves to segments of the measured temperature profiles, we calculate

  13. Outwitting dengue threat and epidemics resurgence in Asia-Pacific countries: strengthening integrated dengue surveillance, monitoring and response systems.

    PubMed

    Tambo, Ernest; Chen, Jun-Hu; Zhou, Xiao-Nong; Khater, Emad I M

    2016-05-27

    Dengue is still a substantial vector-borne viral disease threat and burden of public health importance worldwide. This situation is complicated by dengue virus unprecedented resurgence and persistence of varied serotypes in endemic-prone areas, and man-made and natural activities consequences that promote vector emergence, transmission dynamics and spread across the Asia-Pacific region. There is an urgent need to strengthen operational and contextual surveillance-response research in improving early detection of active reservoir detection, novel drug in case management and quality evidence-based response including the deployment of dengue mass vaccination. Moreover, sustained mapping and watching of dengue risk factors or determinants, performance and outcome indicators of control or elimination programs effectiveness in defining minimum effective data towards community knowledge-based decision-making policy and effective response packages is imperative. Moreover, implementation of a robust, integrated dengue early warning surveillance, monitoring and response systems metrics is required for evidence-based, timely and cost-effective contextual mitigation strategies, and innovative interventions.

  14. Outwitting dengue threat and epidemics resurgence in Asia-Pacific countries: strengthening integrated dengue surveillance, monitoring and response systems.

    PubMed

    Tambo, Ernest; Chen, Jun-Hu; Zhou, Xiao-Nong; Khater, Emad I M

    2016-01-01

    Dengue is still a substantial vector-borne viral disease threat and burden of public health importance worldwide. This situation is complicated by dengue virus unprecedented resurgence and persistence of varied serotypes in endemic-prone areas, and man-made and natural activities consequences that promote vector emergence, transmission dynamics and spread across the Asia-Pacific region. There is an urgent need to strengthen operational and contextual surveillance-response research in improving early detection of active reservoir detection, novel drug in case management and quality evidence-based response including the deployment of dengue mass vaccination. Moreover, sustained mapping and watching of dengue risk factors or determinants, performance and outcome indicators of control or elimination programs effectiveness in defining minimum effective data towards community knowledge-based decision-making policy and effective response packages is imperative. Moreover, implementation of a robust, integrated dengue early warning surveillance, monitoring and response systems metrics is required for evidence-based, timely and cost-effective contextual mitigation strategies, and innovative interventions. PMID:27233238

  15. La Pacana caldera, N. Chile: a re-evaluation of the stratigraphy and volcanology of one of the world's largest resurgent calderas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindsay, J. M.; de Silva, S.; Trumbull, R.; Emmermann, R.; Wemmer, K.

    2001-04-01

    La Pacana caldera in the Central Andes of northern Chile is one of the largest and best exposed resurgent calderas in the world. The caldera had previously been recognised as the source of the regionally-extensive Atana ignimbrite, but additional field and stratigraphic evidence, along with new K-Ar age determinations and geochemical data have led to a revision of the geology and development of this major Andean caldera. In particular, this information allows more realistic estimates of eruptive volumes and has implications for the style of ignimbrite eruption. Two major ignimbrites appear to have originated from La Pacana caldera, based on their thickness variations, lateral distributions and stratigraphic relations: the crystal-poor, rhyolitic Toconao ignimbrite (4-5 Ma) and the crystal-rich, dacitic Atana ignimbrite (4 Ma). Following caldera collapse and formation of the resurgent Atana block, several crystal-rich dacitic-rhyolitic domes formed along the margin of the resurgent block. New K-Ar ages show that this post-caldera volcanism continued from 4 to 2 Ma, indicating that the La Pacana magmatic system was active for at least 2 Ma after the main eruption. The Atana ignimbrite extends west, south and east of La Pacana caldera. Our work shows that the ignimbrite sequence northeast of the caldera, formerly mapped as Atana outflow, represents two new units which we name the upper and lower Tara ignimbrites. The distribution of the Tara ignimbrites points to a source to the north. The upper Tara ignimbrite comprises four flow units with interbedded surge and fall deposits and a characteristic, heterogeneous pumice population. It occurs in the La Pacana moat and onlaps the resurgent block. These field relations and a new K-Ar age of 3.8 Ma show convincingly that this ignimbrite erupted after formation of La Pacana caldera. The lower Tara ignimbrite is a single extensive flow unit, and has an age of 5.6 Ma. Two outcrops of lag breccia occur adjacent to the caldera

  16. Inferences on the hydrothermal system beneath the resurgent dome in Long Valley Caldera, east-central California, USA, from recent pumping tests and geochemical sampling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Farrar, C.D.; Sorey, M.L.; Roeloffs, E.; Galloway, D.L.; Howle, J.F.; Jacobson, R.

    2003-01-01

    Quaternary volcanic unrest has provided heat for episodic hydrothermal circulation in the Long Valley caldera, including the present-day hydrothermal system, which has been active over the past 40 kyr. The most recent period of crustal unrest in this region of east-central California began around 1980 and has included periods of intense seismicity and ground deformation. Uplift totaling more than 0.7 m has been centered on the caldera's resurgent dome, and is best modeled by a near-vertical ellipsoidal source centered at depths of 6-7 km. Modeling of both deformation and microgravity data now suggests that (1) there are two inflation sources beneath the caldera, a shallower source 7-10 km beneath the resurgent dome and a deeper source ???15 km beneath the caldera's south moat and (2) the shallower source may contain components of magmatic brine and gas. The Long Valley Exploration Well (LVEW), completed in 1998 on the resurgent dome, penetrates to a depth of 3 km directly above this shallower source, but bottoms in a zone of 100??C fluid with zero vertical thermal gradient. Although these results preclude extrapolations of temperatures at depths below 3 km, other information obtained from flow tests and fluid sampling at this well indicates the presence of magmatic volatiles and fault-related permeability within the metamorphic basement rocks underlying the volcanic fill. In this paper, we present recently acquired data from LVEW and compare them with information from other drill holes and thermal springs in Long Valley to delineate the likely flow paths and fluid system properties under the resurgent dome. Additional information from mineralogical assemblages in core obtained from fracture zones in LVEW documents a previous period of more vigorous and energetic fluid circulation beneath the resurgent dome. Although this system apparently died off as a result of mineral deposition and cooling (and/or deepening) of magmatic heat sources, flow testing and tidal

  17. Cushing's syndrome and fetal features resurgence in adrenal cortex-specific Prkar1a knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Sahut-Barnola, Isabelle; de Joussineau, Cyrille; Val, Pierre; Lambert-Langlais, Sarah; Damon, Christelle; Lefrançois-Martinez, Anne-Marie; Pointud, Jean-Christophe; Marceau, Geoffroy; Sapin, Vincent; Tissier, Frédérique; Ragazzon, Bruno; Bertherat, Jérôme; Kirschner, Lawrence S; Stratakis, Constantine A; Martinez, Antoine

    2010-06-01

    Carney complex (CNC) is an inherited neoplasia syndrome with endocrine overactivity. Its most frequent endocrine manifestation is primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease (PPNAD), a bilateral adrenocortical hyperplasia causing pituitary-independent Cushing's syndrome. Inactivating mutations in PRKAR1A, a gene encoding the type 1 alpha-regulatory subunit (R1alpha) of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) have been found in 80% of CNC patients with Cushing's syndrome. To demonstrate the implication of R1alpha loss in the initiation and development of PPNAD, we generated mice lacking Prkar1a specifically in the adrenal cortex (AdKO). AdKO mice develop pituitary-independent Cushing's syndrome with increased PKA activity. This leads to autonomous steroidogenic genes expression and deregulated adreno-cortical cells differentiation, increased proliferation and resistance to apoptosis. Unexpectedly, R1alpha loss results in improper maintenance and centrifugal expansion of cortisol-producing fetal adrenocortical cells with concomitant regression of adult cortex. Our data provide the first in vivo evidence that loss of R1alpha is sufficient to induce autonomous adrenal hyper-activity and bilateral hyperplasia, both observed in human PPNAD. Furthermore, this model demonstrates that deregulated PKA activity favors the emergence of a new cell population potentially arising from the fetal adrenal, giving new insight into the mechanisms leading to PPNAD. PMID:20548949

  18. Resurgence of duckweed research and applications: report from the 3rd International Duckweed Conference.

    PubMed

    Appenroth, Klaus-J; Sree, K Sowjanya; Fakhoorian, Tamra; Lam, Eric

    2015-12-01

    Duckweed, flowering plants in the Lemnaceae family, comprises the smallest angiosperms in the plant kingdom. They have some of the fastest biomass accumulation rates reported to date for plants and have the demonstrated ability to thrive on wastewater rich in dissolved organic compounds and thus could help to remediated polluted water resources and prevents eutrophication. With a high quality genome sequence now available and increased commercial interest worldwide to develop duckweed biomass for renewables such as protein and fuel, the 3rd International Duckweed Conference convened at Kyoto, Japan, in July of 2015, to update the community of duckweed researchers and developers on the progress in the field. In addition to sharing results and ideas, the conference also provided ample opportunities for new-comers as well as established workers in the field to network and create new aliances. We hope this meeting summary will also help to disseminate the key advances and observations that have been presented in this conference to the broader plant biology community in order to encourage increased cross-fertilization of ideas and technologies. PMID:26506824

  19. Resurgence of duckweed research and applications: report from the 3rd International Duckweed Conference.

    PubMed

    Appenroth, Klaus-J; Sree, K Sowjanya; Fakhoorian, Tamra; Lam, Eric

    2015-12-01

    Duckweed, flowering plants in the Lemnaceae family, comprises the smallest angiosperms in the plant kingdom. They have some of the fastest biomass accumulation rates reported to date for plants and have the demonstrated ability to thrive on wastewater rich in dissolved organic compounds and thus could help to remediated polluted water resources and prevents eutrophication. With a high quality genome sequence now available and increased commercial interest worldwide to develop duckweed biomass for renewables such as protein and fuel, the 3rd International Duckweed Conference convened at Kyoto, Japan, in July of 2015, to update the community of duckweed researchers and developers on the progress in the field. In addition to sharing results and ideas, the conference also provided ample opportunities for new-comers as well as established workers in the field to network and create new aliances. We hope this meeting summary will also help to disseminate the key advances and observations that have been presented in this conference to the broader plant biology community in order to encourage increased cross-fertilization of ideas and technologies.

  20. Entomological investigation following the resurgence of human visceral leishmaniasis in southern Algeria.

    PubMed

    Benallal, K; Gassen, B; Bouiba, L; Depaquit, J; Harrat, Z

    2013-12-01

    Visceral and cutaneous leishmaniasis are the main endemic vector born diseases in Algeria. In the Hoggar region (extreme south of the country) human visceral leishmaniasis (HVL) is known to be sporadic but during the last decade the number of cases has increased significantly. In 2010, a peak of HVL cases was registered mostly among children. Therefore an entomological survey and a retrospective study on HVL cases were carried out in order to explore the transmission of the disease. Among the sand fly caught Phlebotomus bergeroti was the most frequent species (68%) followed by Sergentomyia schwetzi (22%). In this work we describe the presence of Phlebotomus (Paraphlebotomus) kazeruni for the first time in the Hoggar region.

  1. Rabid epidemiologies: the emergence and resurgence of rabies in twentieth century South Africa.

    PubMed

    Brown, Karen

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses the history of rabies in South Africa since the early twentieth century. It argues that rabies is a zoonotic disease that traverses rural and urban spaces, that transfers itself between wild and domestic animals and remains a potential threat to human life in the region. Scientists discovered an indigenous form of rabies, found primarily in the yellow mongoose, after the first biomedically confirmed human fatalities in 1928. Since the 1950s canine rabies, presumed to have moved southwards from across the Zambezi River, has become endemic also. South Africa is home to a comparatively large number of rabies strains and animal carriers, making it a particularly interesting case study. Environmental changes during the colonial and apartheid periods have helped to explain the increase in rabies cases since the mid-twentieth century. Moreover, developments in the biological and ecological sciences have provided insights into why the rabies virus has become endemic in certain wildlife species.

  2. Hand-held cow horn: resurgence of an old arm or apotential terrorist weapon

    PubMed Central

    Khalid, Lawal; Ahmed, Adamu

    2012-01-01

    Abstract: A 23 year old man presented with intestinal evisceration from stab injury to the left side of the abdomen with a hand-held cow horn at a local night party. He complained of severe abdominal pain and bleeding at the site of injury. He was hemodynamically stable. At emergency exploration, the eviscerated bowel was viable with no adjacent mesenteric tear. Other intra abdominal organs were normal. The eviscerated bowel was lavaged and reduced into the abdomen through the 7cm anterior abdominal wall laceration. The laceration was repaired and abdomen closed in layers. Post operative recovery was uneventful. The hand-held cow horn can easily be concealed and may pass through security checks undetected. It should be added to the ever increasing list of weapons of small scale terror. PMID:21502787

  3. Hand-held cow horn: resurgence of an old arm or a potential terrorist weapon.

    PubMed

    Khalid, Lawal; Ahmed, Adamu

    2012-01-01

    A 23 year old man presented with intestinal evisceration from stab injury to the left side of the abdomen with a hand-held cow horn at a local night party. He complained of severe abdominal pain and bleeding at the site of injury. He was hemodynamically stable. At emergency exploration, the eviscerated bowel was viable with no adjacent mesenteric tear. Other intra abdominal organs were normal. The eviscerated bowel was lavaged and reduced into the abdomen through the 7 cm anterior abdominal wall laceration. The laceration was repaired and abdomen closed in layers. Post operative recovery was uneventful. The hand-held cow horn can easily be concealed and may pass through security checks undetected. It should be added to the ever increasing list of weapons of small scale terror.

  4. [Imported malaria in Tunisia: consequences on the risk of resurgence of the disease].

    PubMed

    Aoun, K; Siala, E; Tchibkere, D; Ben Abdallah, R; Zallagua, N; Chahed, M K; Bouratbine, A

    2010-02-01

    Although malaria has been eradicated in Tunisia since 1979, the disease is still a health issue due to the persistence of mosquitoes and coexistence with a potential parasite reservoir in the form of imported cases. From 1999 to 2006, 98 cases of imported malaria were diagnosed at the Pasteur Institute in Tunis where nearly 30% of national cases are recorded. Tunisians accounted for 24.5% of these cases versus 75.5% involving foreigners. The occurrence rate has steadily increased in volunteer workers, businessmen, diplomats and athletes who together accounted for 41.7% of cases in 1995 as compared to only 17.4% in 1980 (p<0.01). Most cases (96.5%) were imported from sub-Saharan Africa. The most frequent countries involved in importation were Cote d'Ivoire (23 cases) and Mali (8 cases) that are now linked to Tunisia by regular flights. About one third of patients were asymptomatic at the time of diagnosis. This finding underlines the importance of recommending systematic screening in high-risk groups. Fever (70.6%) and gastro-intestinal manifestations (27.9%) were the most frequent clinical findings in the 69 symptomatic cases. Plasmodium falciparum (71.4%) was the most common species followed by Plasmodium ovale (19.4%). Gametocytes were detected in 9.2% of subjects, thus creating a theoretical source of infection for mosquitoes especially since 60.2% of all cases were recorded between June and October when mosquitoes are active in Tunisia. Due to increasing exchange with endemic malaria areas in Africa that has resulted in a higher incidence of imported cases and a futher risk of introduction of tropical mosquito species as well as to global warming that promotes plasmodium transmission, greater vigilance is necessary to ensure eradication of malaria in Tunisia.

  5. Reappearance of deepwater sculpin in Lake Ontario: Resurgence or last gasp of a doomed population?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lantry, B.F.; O'Gorman, R.; Walsh, M.G.; Casselman, J.M.; Hoyle, J.A.; Keir, M.J.; Lantry, J.R.

    2007-01-01

    Deepwater sculpin (Myoxocephalus thompsonii) were abundant in Lake Ontario in the 1920s and at least common into the 1940s. By the 1960s they were rare and, thereafter, some considered the population extirpated even though a synoptic survey of the lake in 1972 produced three, relatively large (148–165 mm total length, TL), and presumably old, specimens from the northern half of the lake. Deepwater sculpin were absent from annual survey catches in the 1980s and did not reappear until 1996, when three were caught in northern Lake Ontario. Isolated collections of deepwater sculpin continued during 1998–2004. Catches during 1996–2004 included five smaller individuals, 89–118 mm TL. In 2005, catches increased sharply, with 18 deepwater sculpin collected from southern waters and one from northern waters. Moreover, young, small sculpin were dominant in 2005—16 of the 19 sculpins averaged 68 ± 12 mm total length (± 1 s.d.). The young fish observed since 1996 could have originated from reproduction by the small in-lake population, from downstream drift of planktonic larvae from Lake Huron, or both. The presence of juveniles is a clear sign that conditions for survival of young deepwater sculpin are becoming more favorable, perhaps because of reduced abundance of alewife (Alosa pseudoharengus), a pelagic planktivore linked to depression of deepwater sculpin in Lake Michigan, and also low abundances of burbot (Lota lota) and lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush), benthic piscivores.

  6. The Oligocene Creede Formation, Colorado: The sedimentary record of a deep lake within a resurgent caldera

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, D.; Smith, G.A. . Dept. of Earth and Planetary Sciences)

    1993-04-01

    The Oligocene Creede Formation is the sedimentary fill of the Creede caldera in the Tertiary San Juan volcanic field in southern Colorado. Scientific drill core and outcrop studies of Creede strata allow an evaluation of the post-collapse sedimentary environments present within a caldera. Although the Creede Formation is structurally disrupted, correlation of fallout tuffs in exposed strata to those in the cores has clarified stratigraphic relationships. Following ash-fallout from the caldera-forming eruption, up to 121 meters of coarse grained debris-flow strata and rockfall debris with interstratified basinward ephemeral lake deposits were deposited. The presence of pseudomorphs after ikaite and up-section increase in carbonate facies suggest that the lake water was somewhat alkaline and cold (near freezing), and evolved chemically with time. A late-stage drop in lake level combined with integration of basin-feeding drainages and decreased subsidence lead to basinward progradation of coarser deltaic and lacustrine fan deposits. Sedimentation patterns suggest that subsidence occurred largely in the northern half of the caldera, and decreased late in the lake's history allowing the basin to fill with sediment.

  7. [Catatonia: resurgence of a concept. A review of the international literature].

    PubMed

    Pommepuy, N; Januel, D

    2002-01-01

    Catatonia was first described in 1874 by Kahlbaum as being a cyclic disease mixing motor features and mood variations. Because most cases ended in dementia, Kraepelin recognized catatonia as a form of dementia praecox and Bleuler included it within his wide group of schizophrenias. This view influenced the psychiatric practice for more than 70 years. But catatonia was recently reconsidered and this because of the definition of more precise diagnosis criteria, the discovery of a striking association with mood disorders, and the emphasis on effective therapeutics. Peralta et al empirically developed a performant diagnostic instrument with the 11 most discriminant signs among catatonic features. Diagnostic threshold is three or more signs with sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 99%. These signs are: immobility/stupor (extreme passivity, marked hypokinesia); mutism (includes inaudible whisper); negativism (resistance to instructions, contrary comportment to whose asked); oppositionism, other called gegenhalten (resistance to passive movement which increases with the force exerted); posturing (patient adopts spontaneously odd postures); catalepsy (patient retains limb positions passively imposed during examination; waxy flexibility); automatic obedience (exaggerated co-operation to instructed movements); echo phenomena (movements, mimic and speech of the examiner are copied with modification and amplifications); rigidity (increased muscular tone); verbigeration (continuous and directionless repetition of single words or phrases); withdrawal/refusal to eat or drink (turning away from examiner, no eye contact, refusal to take food or drink when offered). Using this diagnostic tool, prevalence of catatonic syndrome appears to be close to 8% of psychiatric admissions. Other signs are also common but less specific: staring, ambitendance, iterations, stereotypes, mannerism, overactivity/excitement, impulsivity, combativeness. Some authors complete this description by

  8. The Late Cretaceous Middle Fork caldera, its resurgent intrusion, and enduring landscape stability in east-central Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bacon, Charles R.; Dusel-Bacon, Cynthia; Aleinikoff, John N.; Slack, John F.

    2014-01-01

    The Middle Fork is a relatively well preserved caldera within a broad region of Paleozoic metamorphic rocks and Mesozoic plutons bounded by northeast-trending faults. In the relatively downdropped and less deeply exhumed crustal blocks, Cretaceous–Early Tertiary silicic volcanic rocks attest to long-term stability of the landscape. Within the Middle Fork caldera, the granite porphyry is interpreted to have been exposed by erosion of thick intracaldera tuff from an asymmetric resurgent dome. The Middle Fork of the North Fork of the Fortymile River incised an arcuate valley into and around the caldera fill on the west and north and may have cut down from within an original caldera moat. The 70 Ma land surface is preserved beneath proximal outflow tuff at the west margin of the caldera structure and beneath welded outflow tuff 16–23 km east-southeast of the caldera in a paleovalley. Within ∼50 km of the Middle Fork caldera are 14 examples of Late Cretaceous (?)–Tertiary felsic volcanic and hypabyssal intrusive rocks that range in area from <1 km2 to ∼100 km2. Rhyolite dome clusters north and northwest of the caldera occupy tectonic basins associated with northeast-trending faults and are relatively little eroded. Lava of a latite complex, 12–19 km northeast of the caldera, apparently flowed into the paleovalley of the Middle Fork of the North Fork of the Fortymile River. To the northwest of the Middle Fork caldera, in the Mount Harper crustal block, mid-Cretaceous plutonic rocks are widely exposed, indicating greater total exhumation. To the southeast of the Middle Fork block, the Mount Veta block has been uplifted sufficiently to expose a ca. 68–66 Ma equigranular granitic pluton. Farther to the southeast, in the Kechumstuk block, the flat-lying outflow tuff remnant in Gold Creek and a regionally extensive high terrace indicate that the landscape there has been little modified since 70 Ma other than entrenchment of tributaries in response to post–2

  9. Resurgence of measles in a country of elimination: interim assessment and current control measures in the Republic of Korea in early 2014.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tae Un; Kim, Ju Whi; Eom, Hye Eun; Oh, Hyun-Kyung; Kim, Eun Seong; Kang, Hae Ji; Nam, Jeong-Gu; Kim, Ki Soon; Kim, Sung Soon; Lee, Chan Kyu; Park, Young-Joon; Park, Ok

    2015-04-01

    Since the beginning of 2014, the Republic of Korea has experienced a resurgence of measles cases. Among the 220 cases confirmed as measles during epidemiological weeks 1-20 (December 29, 2013 to May 17, 2014), 10 imported cases were identified. The predominant genotype was B3, which reflects the circulating measles virus in adjacent countries. Even with the verification of measles elimination in March 2014 by the World Health Organization, recent importation has been related to international travel. Targeted control measures have been implemented in addition to proper isolation and patient care. A vigilant surveillance system and high levels of vaccine coverage should be maintained to sustain the measles elimination status.

  10. Reconstruction of caldera collapse and resurgence processes in the offshore sector of the Campi Flegrei caldera (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinmann, Lena; Spiess, Volkhard; Sacchi, Marco

    2015-04-01

    Large collapse calderas are associated with exceptionally explosive volcanic eruptions, which are capable of triggering a global catastrophe second only to that from a giant meteorite impact. Therefore, active calderas have attracted significant attention in both scientific communities and governmental institutions worldwide. One prime example of a large collapse caldera can be found in southern Italy, more precisely in the northern Bay of Naples within the Campi Flegrei Volcanic Area. The Campi Flegrei caldera covers an area of approximately 200 km² defined by a quasi-circular depression, half onland, half offshore. It is still under debate whether the caldera formation was related to only one ignimbritic eruption namely the Neapolitan Yellow Tuff (NYT) eruption at 15 ka or if it is a nested-caldera system related to the NYT and the Campanian Ignimbrite eruption at 39 ka. During the last 40 years, the Campi Flegrei caldera has experienced episodes of unrest involving significant ground deformation and seismicity, which have nevertheless not yet led to an eruption. Besides these short-term episodes of unrest, long-term ground deformation with rates of several tens of meters within a few thousand years can be observed in the central part of the caldera. The source of both short-term and long-term deformation is still under debate and possibly related to a shallow hydrothermal system and caldera resurgence attributed to a deeper magma chamber, respectively. Understanding the mechanisms for unrest and eruptions is of paramount importance as a future eruption of the Campi Flegrei caldera would expose more than 500,000 people to the risk of pyroclastic flows. This study is based on a dense grid (semi-3D) of high-resolution multi-channel seismic profiles acquired in the offshore sector of the Campi Flegrei caldera. The seismic lines show evidence for the escape of fluids and/or gases along weak zones such as faults, thereby supporting the existence of a hydrothermal

  11. Characteristics of brain Kv1 channels tailored to mimic native counterparts by tandem linkage of alpha subunits: implications for K+ channelopathies.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, Sobia; Shamotienko, Oleg; Papakosta, Marianthi; Ali, Farooq; Dolly, J Oliver

    2002-05-10

    Most neuronal Kv1 channels contain Kv1.1, Kv1.2 alpha, and Kvbeta2.1 subunits, yet the influences of their stoichiometries on properties of the (alpha)(4)(beta)(4) variants remain undefined. cDNAs were engineered to contain 0, 1, 2, or 4 copies of Kv1.1 with the requisite number of Kv1.2 and co-expressed in mammalian cells with Kvbeta2.1 to achieve "native-like" hetero-oligomers. The monomeric (Kv1.1 or 1.2), dimeric (Kv1.1-1.2 or 1.2-1.2), and tetrameric (Kv1.1-(1.2)(3)) constructs produced proteins of M(r) approximately 62,000, 120,000, and 240,000, which assembled into (alpha)(4)(beta)(4) complexes. Each alpha cRNA yielded a distinct K(+) current in oocytes, with voltage dependence of activation being shifted negatively as the Kv1.1 content in tetramers was increased. Channels containing 1, 2, or 4 copies of Kv1.1 were blocked by dendrotoxin k (DTX)(k) with similarly high potencies, whereas Kv(1.2)(4) proved nonsusceptible. Accordingly, Kv1.2/beta2.1 expressed in baby hamster kidney cells failed to bind DTX(k); in contrast, oligomers containing only one Kv1.1 subunit in a tetramer exhibited high affinity, with additional copies causing modest increases. Thus, one Kv1.1 subunit largely confers high affinity for DTX(k), whereas channel electrophysiological properties are tailored by the content of Kv1.1 relative to Kv1.2. This notable advance could explain the diversity of symptoms of human episodic ataxia I, which is often accompanied by myokymia, due to mutated Kv1.1 being assembled in different combinations with wild-type and Kv1.2.

  12. Rock-avalanche and ocean-resurge deposits in the late Eocene Chesapeake Bay impact structure: Evidence from the ICDP-USGS Eyreville cores, Virginia, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gohn, G.S.; Powars, D.S.; Dypvik, H.; Edwards, L.E.

    2009-01-01

    An unusually thick section of sedimentary breccias dominated by target-sediment clasts is a distinctive feature of the late Eocene Chesapeake Bay impact structure. A cored 1766-m-deep section recovered from the central part of this marine-target structure by the International Continental Scientific Drilling Program (ICDP)-U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) drilling project contains 678 m of these breccias and associated sediments and an intervening 275-m-thick granite slab. Two sedimentary breccia units consist almost entirely of Cretaceous nonmarine sediments derived from the lower part of the target sediment layer. These sediments are present as coherent clasts and as autoclastic matrix between the clasts. Primary (Cretaceous) sedimentary structures are well preserved in some clasts, and liquefaction and fluidization structures produced at the site of deposition occur in the clasts and matrix. These sedimentary breccias are interpreted as one or more rock avalanches from the upper part of the transient-cavity wall. The little-deformed, unshocked granite slab probably was transported as part of an extremely large slide or avalanche. Water-saturated Cretaceous quartz sand below the slab was transported into the seafloor crater prior to, or concurrently with, the granite slab. Two sedimentary breccia units consist of polymict diamictons that contain cobbles, boulders, and blocks of Cretaceous nonmarine target sediments and less common shocked-rock and melt ejecta in an unsorted, unstratified, muddy, fossiliferous, glauconitic quartz matrix. Much of the matrix material was derived from Upper Cretaceous and Paleogene marine target sediments. These units are interpreted as the deposits of debris flows initiated by the resurge of ocean water into the seafloor crater. Interlayering of avalanche and debris-flow units indicates a partial temporal overlap of the earlier avalanche and later resurge processes. A thin unit of stratified turbidite deposits and overlying laminated

  13. Neuromuscular junction channelopathies: a brief overview.

    PubMed

    Newsom-Davis, John

    2005-12-01

    The neuromuscular junction lacks the protection of the blood-nerve barrier and is vulnerable to antibody-mediated disorders. In myasthenia gravis (MG), 85% of patients have IgG antibodies to acetylcholine receptors (AChRs). About half the remaining patients have IgG antibodies to Muscle Specific Kinase (MuSK), an AChR-associated transmembrane post-synaptic protein concerned in AChR aggregation. Bulbar weakness is typically predominant in this form of MG, and females are more often affected. The Lambert-Eaton Myasthenic Syndrome (LEMS) can occur in a paraneoplastic form (P-LEMS) usually with small cell lung cancer, or in a non-paraneoplastic form (NP-LEMS). In both, IgG antibodies to nerve terminal voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs), detectable in over 90% of patients, lead to VGCC loss and impaired quantal release of transmitter and may be implicated in the occasionally associated cerebellar ataxia. Neuromyotonia (NMT) and Cramp-Fasciculation syndrome (C-FS) are manifestations of peripheral nerve hyperexcitability and share some clinical and electromyographic features. Antibodies to voltage-gated potassium channels (VGKCs) are present in about 40% of NMT patients, but less frequently in C-FS, and appear to cause loss of functional VGKCs. They may also be implicated in the Maladie de Morvan and limbic encephalitis that can associate with NMT: The antibodies described here provide valuable aids to diagnosis and management. The Congenital Myasthenic Syndromes are a group of genetically determined heterogeneous disorders, usually recessively inherited. The commonest mutation sites appear to be the acetylcholine receptor epsilon-subunit and rapsyn.

  14. [Epidemiology of emerging and resurging vector-borne diseases with special attention to climate change in Germany (review)].

    PubMed

    Schwaiger, Karin; Bauer, Johann

    2009-01-01

    Vector-borne diseases gained importance in Germany during the past years. Borreliosis and tick-borne encephalitis are already well-known infectious diseases, transmitted by Ixodes ricinus. But reports on severe diseases, formerly only known as so-called "travel sickness" from tropical countries, markedly increased in the recent years. Several climate models predict a global warming of 1.4 degrees C up to 5.8 degrees C until the year 2100, and as climate-typical temperature barriers restrict the distribution of the vectors, especially arthropod-borne diseases are strongly influenced by the climate. Due to the growing clinical importance, the present state of information concerning the epidemiological situation of all known vector-borne diseases in Germany is summarized in this review.

  15. A resurgence in field research is essential to better understand the diversity, ecology, and evolution of microbial eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Heger, Thierry J; Edgcomb, Virginia P; Kim, Eunsoo; Lukeš, Julius; Leander, Brian S; Yubuki, Naoji

    2014-01-01

    The discovery and characterization of protist communities from diverse environments are crucial for understanding the overall evolutionary history of life on earth. However, major questions about the diversity, ecology, and evolutionary history of protists remain unanswered, notably because data obtained from natural protist communities, especially of heterotrophic species, remain limited. In this review, we discuss the challenges associated with "field protistology", defined here as the exploration, characterization, and interpretation of microbial eukaryotic diversity within the context of natural environments or field experiments, and provide suggestions to help fill this important gap in knowledge. We also argue that increased efforts in field studies that combine molecular and microscopical methods offer the most promising path toward (1) the discovery of new lineages that expand the tree of eukaryotes; (2) the recognition of novel evolutionary patterns and processes; (3) the untangling of ecological interactions and functions, and their roles in larger ecosystem processes; and (4) the evaluation of protist adaptations to a changing climate.

  16. Monitoring CO2 emissions in tree kill areas near the resurgent dome at Long Valley Caldera, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bergfeld, D.; Evans, William C.

    2011-01-01

    We report results of yearly measurements of the diffuse CO2 flux and shallow soil temperatures collected since 2006 across two sets of tree-kill areas at Long Valley Caldera, California. These data provide background information about CO2 discharge during a period with moderate seismicity, but little to no deformation. The tree kills are located at long-recognized areas of weak thermal fluid upflow, but have expanded in recent years, possibly in response to geothermal fluid production at Casa Diablo. The amount of CO2 discharged from the older kill area at Basalt Canyon is fairly constant and is around 3-5 tonnes of CO2 per day from an area of about 15,000 m2. The presence of isobutane in gas samples from sites in and around Basalt Canyon suggests that geothermal fluid production directly effects fluid upflow in the region close to the power plant. The average fluxes at Shady Rest are lower than average fluxes at Basalt Canyon, but the area affected by fluid upflow is larger. Total CO2 discharged from the central portion of the kill area at Shady Rest has been variable, ranging from 6 to11 tonnes per day across 61,000 m2. Gas collected at Shady Rest contains no detectable isobutane to link emissions chemically to geothermal fluid production, but two samples from 2009-10 have detectable H2S and suggest an increasing geothermal character of emitted gas. The appearance of this gas at the surface may signal increased drawdown of water levels near the geothermal productions wells.

  17. Resurgence of submersed aquatic macrophytes in the tidal Potomac River, Maryland, Virginia, and the District of Columbia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carter, V.; Rybicki, N.

    1986-01-01

    A 1978-81 survey of submersed aquatic macrophytes in the tidal Potomac River showed that there were virtually no plants in the freshwater tidal river between Chain Bridge and Quantico, Virginia, decades after the disappearance of plants in the late 1930's. Plant populations were monitored in subsequent years (1983-85) using qualitative shoreline surveys and quantitative resampling of the original 1978-81 transects. In 1983, 12 species of submersed aquatic macrophytes were found in the tidal river. Population increases were dramatic; by fall 1985, plants had colonized all shallow areas between Alexandria and Gunston Cove, Virginia. Hydrilla verticillata dominated in Dyke Marsh-Hunting Creek and Swan Creek. Most other areas contained a variable mixture of Heteranthera dubia, Myriophyllum spicatum, Ceratophyllum demersum, Vallisneria americana, Najas guadalupensis and Hydrilla verticillata. No plants were found along the main river or in tidal embayments in the reach between Gunston Cove and Quantico, Virginia. Total dry weight collected in the upper tidal river in fall 1985 was 14.5 times that of spring 1985, and four times that of fall 1984. ?? 1986 Estuarine Research Federation.

  18. The Resurgence of Cosmic Storytellers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swimme, Brian

    2013-01-01

    Brian Swimme's insights about the Story of the Universe look to the unifying impact of a "cosmic story" that speaks to all cultures and nations. Swimme suggests that humans are now able, through science and narrative, to present a story which will make us all a "cohesive tribe" while answering the universal questions of…

  19. Ampicillin: Rise Fall and Resurgence

    PubMed Central

    Kaushik, Dwarikadhish; Mohan, Mudit; Borade, Dhammraj M

    2014-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a global problem. AMR has posed new challenges in treatment of infectious diseases. Antimicrobials are losing efficacy due to development of resistant pathogens. It has lead to re-emergence of certain infectious diseases. Treatment of such diseases has undergone changes with use of alternative antimicrobials and drug combinations. Pathogens are likely to develop resistance to alternative antimicrobials also and risk of infections with nonexistent treatment is real. Salmonella showed widespread resistant to ampicillin which resulted in use of alternative antimicrobials like fluroquinolones and cephalosporins in the treatment of enteric fever in last two decades. Unfortunately there are growing reports of resistance to these antimicrobials. Interestingly there are numerous reports of ampicillin regaining activity against Salmonella. Speculatively lack of exposure of Salmonella to ampicillin for long time resulted in the loss of plasmid mediated resistance in the pathogen. There may have been emergence of de novo ampicillin susceptible strains. This is assuring in the era where problem of AMR is compounded by the scarcity of new antimicrobial development. PMID:24995206

  20. Resurgence of Integrated Behavioral Units

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bacha-Mendez, Gustavo; Reid, Alliston K.; Mendoza-Soylovna, Adela

    2007-01-01

    Two experiments with rats examined the dynamics of well-learned response sequences when reinforcement contingencies were changed. Both experiments contained four phases, each of which reinforced a 2-response sequence of lever presses until responding was stable. The contingencies then were shifted to a new reinforced sequence until responding was…

  1. The Resurgence of Biological Determinism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Segal, Elizabeth A.; Kilty, Keith M.

    1998-01-01

    Addresses two areas where science has been and still is used to justify policies and attitudes that are discriminatory and oppressive: homosexuality and alcoholism. This article analyzes the debate over whether these correlations are biologically or socially determined. Of particular concern is the potential impact of biological determinism on the…

  2. The Resurgence of Cosmic Storytellers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swimme, Brian T.

    1998-01-01

    Argues that children and society as a whole have an inherent need for a cosmic story whose purpose is to provide insight into people's place in the universe. Describes the importance, role, and place for a cosmic storyteller in modern society. (SD)

  3. Pharmacological approach to the treatment of long and short QT syndromes.

    PubMed

    Patel, Chinmay; Antzelevitch, Charles

    2008-04-01

    Inherited channelopathies have received increasing attention in recent years. The past decade has witnessed impressive progress in our understanding of the molecular and cellular basis of arrhythmogenesis associated with inherited channelopathies. An imbalance in ionic forces induced by these channelopathies affects the duration of ventricular repolarization and amplifies the intrinsic electrical heterogeneity of the myocardium, creating an arrhythmogenic milieu. Today, many of the channelopathies have been linked to mutations in specific genes encoding either components of ion channels or membrane or regulatory proteins. Many of the channelopathies are genetically heterogeneous with a variable degree of expression of the disease. Defining the molecular basis of channelopathies can have a profound impact on patient management, particularly in cases in which genotype-specific pharmacotherapy is available. The long QT syndrome (LQTS) is one of the first identified and most studied channelopathies where abnormal prolongation of ventricular repolarization predisposes an individual to life threatening ventricular arrhythmia called Torsade de Pointes. On the other hand of the spectrum, molecular defects favoring premature repolarization lead to Short QT syndrome (SQTS), a recently described inherited channelopathy. Both of these channelopathies are associated with a high risk of sudden cardiac death due to malignant ventricular arrhythmia. Whereas pharmacological therapy is first line treatment for LQTS, defibrillators are considered as primary treatment for SQTS. This review provides a comprehensive review of the molecular genetics, clinical features, genotype-phenotype correlations and genotype-specific approach to pharmacotherapy of these two mirror-image channelopathies, SQTS and LQTS. PMID:18378319

  4. β-Site APP-cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) cleaves cerebellar Na+ channel β4-subunit and promotes Purkinje cell firing by slowing the decay of resurgent Na+ current.

    PubMed

    Huth, Tobias; Rittger, Andrea; Saftig, Paul; Alzheimer, Christian

    2011-03-01

    In cerebellar Purkinje cells, the β4-subunit of voltage-dependent Na(+) channels has been proposed to serve as an open-channel blocker giving rise to a "resurgent" Na(+) current (I (NaR)) upon membrane repolarization. Notably, the β4-subunit was recently identified as a novel substrate of the β-secretase, BACE1, a key enzyme of the amyloidogenic pathway in Alzheimer's disease. Here, we asked whether BACE1-mediated cleavage of β4-subunit has an impact on I (NaR) and, consequently, on the firing properties of Purkinje cells. In cerebellar tissue of BACE1-/- mice, mRNA levels of Na(+) channel α-subunits 1.1, 1.2, and 1.6 and of β-subunits 1-4 remained unchanged, but processing of β4 peptide was profoundly altered. Patch-clamp recordings from acutely isolated Purkinje cells of BACE1-/- and WT mice did not reveal any differences in steady-state properties and in current densities of transient, persistent, and resurgent Na(+) currents. However, I (NaR) was found to decay significantly faster in BACE1-deficient Purkinje cells than in WT cells. In modeling studies, the altered time course of I (NaR) decay could be replicated when we decreased the efficiency of open-channel block. In current-clamp recordings, BACE1-/- Purkinje cells displayed lower spontaneous firing rate than normal cells. Computer simulations supported the hypothesis that the accelerated decay kinetics of I (NaR) are responsible for the slower firing rate. Our study elucidates a novel function of BACE1 in the regulation of neuronal excitability that serves to tune the firing pattern of Purkinje cells and presumably other neurons endowed with I (NaR).

  5. Increasing numbers of migrants challenge policymakers worldwide.

    PubMed

    Martin, P

    1996-05-01

    International migration has increased greatly in the 1990s. In the mid-1990s there were about 125 million migrants (about 2% of the world's population) not living in their country of birth or citizenship. There are 2-4 million new migrants each year. The global migrant population is concentrated in only a few countries. In many Middle Eastern countries, foreign workers make up most of the labor force (60-90%). Africa and western Asia have more than 50% of all 27 million refugees and displaced persons. Germany, France, the UK, the US, Italy, Japan, and Canada have about 33% of the migrant population. Newly arriving immigrants make up a large percentage of annual population growth in industrialized countries with low birth rates (100% in Germany and about 33% in the US). Major migration flows are from Mexico, Central America, and Asia to the US; from North Africa and eastern Europe to western Europe; and from the Philippines and India to the Middle East. Two US legalization programs contributed to a resurgence in immigration in the early 1990s. Many of the world's top economic powers are very concerned about immigration. Economic growth can cut down on economic migration. Many specialists think that freer trade, more foreign investment, and, in some cases, aid can spark economic growth. Many residents of countries receiving migrants want immigration curtailed. Many industrial democracies handle difficult migration issues by making trade-offs, particularly combine stricter immigration controls with more assistance to integrate new immigrants and liberalize trade so countries can export goods instead of people.

  6. Beyond membrane channelopathies: alternative mechanisms underlying complex human disease

    PubMed Central

    Boudoulas, Konstantinos Dean; Mohler, Peter J

    2011-01-01

    Over the past fifteen years, our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying human disease has flourished in large part due to the discovery of gene mutations linked with membrane ion channels and transporters. In fact, ion channel defects (“channelopathies” — the focus of this review series) have been associated with a spectrum of serious human disease phenotypes including cystic fibrosis, cardiac arrhythmia, diabetes, skeletal muscle defects, and neurological disorders. However, we now know that human disease, particularly excitable cell disease, may be caused by defects in non-ion channel polypeptides including in cellular components residing well beneath the plasma membrane. For example, over the past few years, a new class of potentially fatal cardiac arrhythmias has been linked with cytoplasmic proteins that include sub-membrane adapters such as ankyrin-B (ANK2), ankyrin-G (ANK3), and alpha-1 syntrophin, membrane coat proteins including caveolin-3 (CAV3), signaling platforms including yotiao (AKAP9), and cardiac enzymes (GPD1L). The focus of this review is to detail the exciting role of lamins, yet another class of gene products that have provided elegant new insight into human disease. PMID:21642948

  7. Channelopathies - Emerging Trends in The Management of Inherited Arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Chockalingam, Priya; Mizusawa, Yuka; Wilde, Arthur A.M.

    2016-01-01

    In spite of their relative rarity, inheritable arrhythmias have come to the forefront as a group of potentially fatal but preventable cause of sudden cardiac death in children and (young) adults. Comprehensive management of inherited arrhythmias includes diagnosing and treating the proband and identifying and protecting affected family members. This has been made possible by the vast advances in the field of molecular biology enabling better understanding of the genetic underpinnings of some of these disease groups, namely congenital long QT syndrome, catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia and Brugada syndrome. The ensuing knowledge of the genotype-phenotype correlations enables us to risk-stratify, prognosticate and treat based on the genetic test results. The various diagnostic modalities currently available to us, including clinical tools and genetic technologies, have to be applied judiciously in order to promptly identify those affected and to spare the emotional burden of a potentially lethal disease in the unaffected individuals. The therapeutic armamentarium of inherited arrhythmias includes pharmacological agents, device therapies and surgical interventions. A treatment strategy keeping in mind the risk profile of the patients, the local availability of drugs and the expertise of the treating personnel is proving effective. While opportunities for research are numerous in this expanding field of medicine, there is also tremendous scope for incorporating the emerging trends in managing patients and families with inherited arrhythmias in the Indian subcontinent. PMID:25852242

  8. First record of the Asian malaria vector Anopheles stephensi and its possible role in the resurgence of malaria in Djibouti, Horn of Africa.

    PubMed

    Faulde, Michael K; Rueda, Leopoldo M; Khaireh, Bouh A

    2014-11-01

    Anopheles stephensi is an important vector of urban malaria in India and the Persian Gulf area. Its previously known geographical range includes southern Asia and the Arab Peninsula. For the first time, we report A. stephensi from the African continent, based on collections made in Djibouti, on the Horn of Africa, where this species' occurrence was linked to an unusual urban outbreak of Plasmodium falciparum malaria, with 1228 cases reported from February to May 2013, and a second, more severe epidemic that emerged in November 2013 and resulted in 2017 reported malaria cases between January and February 2014. Anopheles stephensi was initially identified using morphological identification keys, followed by sequencing of the Barcode cytochrome c-oxidase I (COI) gene and the rDNA second internal transcribed spacer (ITS2). Positive tests for P. falciparum circumsporozoite antigen in two of six female A. stephensi trapped in homes of malaria patients in March 2013 are evidence that autochthonous urban malaria transmission by A. stephensi has occurred. Concurrent with the second malaria outbreak, P. falciparum-positive A. stephensi females were detected in Djibouti City starting in November 2013. In sub-Saharan Africa, newly present A. stephensi may pose a significant future health threat because of this species' high susceptibility to P. falciparum infection and its tolerance of urban habitats. This may lead to increased malaria outbreaks in African cities. Rapid interruption of the urban malaria transmission cycle, based on integrated vector surveillance and control programs aimed at the complete eradication of A. stephensi from the African continent, is strongly recommended. PMID:25004439

  9. Private practitioners and their role in the resurgence of malaria in Mumbai (Bombay) and Navi Mumbai (New Bombay), India: serving the affected or aiding an epidemic?

    PubMed

    Kamat, V R

    2001-03-01

    The increased emphasis on privatization of the health care sector in many developing countries by international financial institutions and national governments expects an expanding role for private health care practitioners in the management of major communicable diseases such as tuberculosis, malaria, acute respiratory infections (ARIs) and sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). Largely unexamined in the Indian context, however, is the socio-cultural context, the micro-level political environment in which private practitioners carry out their activities, and the quality of care they provide to their patients. Examining these aspects is significant given the impressive growth of the country's private health sector during the past decade. This paper reports the results of an ethnographic study carried out in Mumbai (Bombay) and Nav Mumbai (New Bombay), India on private general practitioners (GPs) and their role in the management of malaria at a time when these two neighboring cities were in the midst of the worst malaria epidemic in over 60 years. Described are the characteristics of a sample of 48 private practitioners from the two cities, and their clinics. This is followed by a discussion of the data gathered through untructured interviews with practitioners and patients, and complemented by observational data on doctor-patient encounters gathered at 16 clinics over a 9-month period. The findings of the study suggest that many practitioners in Mumbai and Navi Mumbai were poorly qualified and did not play a supportive role in the two cities' public health departments to bring the epidemic under control. The majority of the practitioners adopted diagnostic and treatment practices that were not consistent with the guidelines laid down by WHO and India's National Malaria Eradication Programme. Very few practitioners, especially those practicing in low-income areas, relied on a peripheral blood-smear test to make a diagnosis. Practitioners whose clientele was mostly

  10. The decline and resurgence of vascular dementia.

    PubMed Central

    Hachinski, V C

    1990-01-01

    Arteriosclerotic narrowing of cerebral arteries was once viewed as the key to mental decline. As Alzheimer's disease gained recognition and the concept of multi-infarct dementia achieved acceptance, vascular dementia came to be regarded as uncommon. The changing nature of cerebral vascular disease, the aging of the population and the widespread use of brain imaging techniques have brought new prominence to vascular dementia, chiefly in the form of an epidemic of "Binswanger's disease". Growing evidence suggests that not only grey matter lesions but also white matter lesions contribute to dementia, that vascular factors commonly coexist and interact with Alzheimer changes and that Alzheimer's disease has a vascular and potentially treatable component. Vascular dementia needs to be redefined, reappraised and reinvestigated. PMID:2403832

  11. Geoscience Field Education: A Recent Resurgence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitmeyer, Steven J.; Mogk, David W.

    2009-10-01

    Field education traditionally has been an integral component of undergraduate geoscience curricula. Students have learned the fundamentals of field techniques during core geology courses and have honed their field credentials during class-specific field trips, semester-long field courses, and capstone summer field camps. In many geoscience departments, field camp remains a graduation requirement, and more than 100 field camps currently are offered by U.S. universities and colleges (see http://geology.com/field-camp.shtml). During the past several decades, however, many geoscience departments have moved away from traditional geologic fieldwork and toward a broader theoretical and laboratory-intensive focus that encompasses a range of subdisciplines. Trends that have influenced these shifts include (1) the decline in the late twentieth century of the petroleum and mining industries, which have consistently championed the values of fieldwork; (2) a decrease in the number of professional jobs that incorporate field mapping; (3) a decline in the number of geoscience majors nationwide [American Geological Institute (AGI), 2009]; and (4) barriers to fieldwork, including time requirements, cost, liability, and decreasing access to field sites.

  12. Mumps: a resurgent disease with protean manifestations.

    PubMed

    Senanayake, Sanjaya N

    2008-10-20

    Mumps has re-emerged as an infection in the developed world. Its epidemiology has changed, with the majority of cases now primarily affecting adolescents and adults. While mumps is easily suspected if parotitis is present, parotitis is absent in 10%-30% of symptomatic cases. Mumps is a systemic infection with a variety of extra-parotid complications. In Australia, mumps diagnosis is confirmed by antibody testing and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction techniques. Suitable specimens for testing are serum, saliva, urine and cerebrospinal fluid. Treatment is generally supportive, although intravenous immunoglobulin therapy may have a future role in mumps management. Interferon alpha-2b treatment may be considered specifically for mumps epididymo-orchitis. Mumps vaccine is included in the measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine. In Australia, this vaccine is routinely administered at the ages of 1 and 4 years. Serious reactions to the mumps components of the MMR vaccine are rare.

  13. The Resurgence of America's Auto Industry

    ScienceCinema

    Zimmer, Stephen; Cischke, Sue

    2016-07-12

    A look at how strategic investments and partnerships between the Energy Department and automakers have helped the American auto industry become a leader in advanced and fuel-efficient vehicles — creating jobs and boosting profits in the process.

  14. The Resurgence of America's Auto Industry

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmer, Stephen; Cischke, Sue

    2012-01-01

    A look at how strategic investments and partnerships between the Energy Department and automakers have helped the American auto industry become a leader in advanced and fuel-efficient vehicles — creating jobs and boosting profits in the process.

  15. Resurgence of natural colourants: a holistic view.

    PubMed

    Kumar, J K; Sinha, A K

    2004-02-01

    Today, natural colourants are emerging globally, leaving synthetic colourants behind in the race, due to the realisation that are safer and ecofriendly in nature. In this context, a brief review of natural colourant sources, their classification, chemical constituents responsible for producing different colours, its activities and effect of different mordants on the hue is discussed.

  16. Increased sugar uptake promotes oncogenesis via EPAC/RAP1 and O-GlcNAc pathways

    PubMed Central

    Onodera, Yasuhito; Nam, Jin-Min; Bissell, Mina J.

    2013-01-01

    There is a considerable resurgence of interest in the role of aerobic glycolysis in cancer; however, increased glycolysis is frequently viewed as a consequence of oncogenic events that drive malignant cell growth and survival. Here we provide evidence that increased glycolytic activation itself can be an oncogenic event in a physiologically relevant 3D culture model. Overexpression of glucose transporter type 3 (GLUT3) in nonmalignant human breast cells activated known oncogenic signaling pathways, including EGFR, β1 integrin, MEK, and AKT, leading to loss of tissue polarity and increased growth. Conversely, reduction of glucose uptake in malignant cells promoted the formation of organized and growth-arrested structures with basal polarity, and suppressed oncogenic pathways. Unexpectedly and importantly, we found that unlike reported literature, in 3D the differences between “normal” and malignant phenotypes could not be explained by HIF-1α/2α, AMPK, or mTOR pathways. Loss of epithelial integrity involved activation of RAP1 via exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (EPAC), involving also O-linked N-acetylglucosamine modification downstream of the hexosamine biosynthetic pathway. The former, in turn, was mediated by pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) interaction with soluble adenylyl cyclase. Our findings show that increased glucose uptake activates known oncogenic pathways to induce malignant phenotype, and provide possible targets for diagnosis and therapeutics. PMID:24316969

  17. Increased intracranial pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... rupture and subarachnoid hemorrhage Brain tumor Encephalitis Head injury Hydrocephalus (increased fluid around the brain) Hypertensive brain hemorrhage Intraventricular hemorrhage Meningitis Subdural hematoma Status epilepticus Stroke

  18. Increasing hygiene productivity.

    PubMed

    Levin, Roger P

    2003-03-01

    Dentists have many opportunities to expand the role of dental hygienists and provide patients with better oral health care, while increasing production and profits. But the proper business systems and verbal skills need to be incorporated. You must train hygienists to do all they can do for every patient. Begin with one service and add others, as the hygienists becomes familiar with each one. Set a goal of a 15% increase in production per year for the hygiene department. Clinicians using these strategies have experienced as much as a 100% to 200% increase in hygiene revenue during the first year of incorporating these services. An added benefit is that these dentists often see a substantial increase in dental treatment diagnosis and case acceptance. An effective and efficient hygiene department will often identify and help secure more than 50% of a doctor's production.

  19. Increasing productivity: Another approach

    SciTech Connect

    Norton, F.J.

    1996-06-10

    An engineering information (EI) and information technology (IT) organization that must improve its productivity should work to further its business goals. This paper explores a comprehensive model for increasing EI/IT productivity by supporting organizational objectives.

  20. Increasing Public Library Productivity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samuelson, Howard

    1981-01-01

    Suggests ways of improving productivity for public libraries faced with increased accountability, dwindling revenues, and continuing inflation. Techniques described include work simplification, work analysis, improved management, and employee motivation. (RAA)

  1. Increases in Problem Drinking

    MedlinePlus

    ... review our exit disclaimer . Subscribe Increases in Problem Drinking Alcohol use disorder is becoming more common, a ... the need to better educate people about problem drinking and its treatment. Alcohol use disorder, or AUD, ...

  2. Seismic waves increase permeability.

    PubMed

    Elkhoury, Jean E; Brodsky, Emily E; Agnew, Duncan C

    2006-06-29

    Earthquakes have been observed to affect hydrological systems in a variety of ways--water well levels can change dramatically, streams can become fuller and spring discharges can increase at the time of earthquakes. Distant earthquakes may even increase the permeability in faults. Most of these hydrological observations can be explained by some form of permeability increase. Here we use the response of water well levels to solid Earth tides to measure permeability over a 20-year period. At the time of each of seven earthquakes in Southern California, we observe transient changes of up to 24 degrees in the phase of the water level response to the dilatational volumetric strain of the semidiurnal tidal components of wells at the Piñon Flat Observatory in Southern California. After the earthquakes, the phase gradually returns to the background value at a rate of less than 0.1 degrees per day. We use a model of axisymmetric flow driven by an imposed head oscillation through a single, laterally extensive, confined, homogeneous and isotropic aquifer to relate the phase response to aquifer properties. We interpret the changes in phase response as due to changes in permeability. At the time of the earthquakes, the permeability at the site increases by a factor as high as three. The permeability increase depends roughly linearly on the amplitude of seismic-wave peak ground velocity in the range of 0.21-2.1 cm s(-1). Such permeability increases are of interest to hydrologists and oil reservoir engineers as they affect fluid flow and might determine long-term evolution of hydrological and oil-bearing systems. They may also be interesting to seismologists, as the resulting pore pressure changes can affect earthquakes by changing normal stresses on faults.

  3. Increased global financings

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, J.

    1994-10-01

    The results of a financial rankings survey for the first half of 1994 show increased financial activity over the second half of 1993. More than $10.5 billion is reported by developers and financial firms for 62 transactions during 1994`s first six months.

  4. Productivity increases in science

    SciTech Connect

    Danko, J.E.; Young, J.K.; Molton, P.M.; Dirks, J.A.

    1993-02-01

    The study quantifies the impact on the cost of experimentation of synergistic advancements in instrumentation, theory, and computation over the last two decades. The study finds that the productivity of experimental investigation (experimental results/$) is increasing as science is transformed from a linear, isolated approach to a hierarchical, multidisciplinary approach. Developments such as massively parallel processors coupled with instrumental systems with multiple probes and diverse data analysis capabilities will further this transformation and increase the productivity of scientific studies. The complexities and scale of today`s scientific challenges are much greater than in the past, however, so that the costs of research are increasing. Even though science is much more productive in terms of the experimental results, the challenges facing scientific investigators are increasing at an even faster pace. New approaches to infrastructure investments must capitalize on the changing dynamics of research and allow the scientific community to maximize gains in productivity so that complex problems can be attacked cost-effectively. Research strategies that include user facilities and coordinated experimental, computational, and theoretical research are needed.

  5. Productivity increases in science

    SciTech Connect

    Danko, J.E.; Young, J.K.; Molton, P.M.; Dirks, J.A.

    1993-02-01

    The study quantifies the impact on the cost of experimentation of synergistic advancements in instrumentation, theory, and computation over the last two decades. The study finds that the productivity of experimental investigation (experimental results/$) is increasing as science is transformed from a linear, isolated approach to a hierarchical, multidisciplinary approach. Developments such as massively parallel processors coupled with instrumental systems with multiple probes and diverse data analysis capabilities will further this transformation and increase the productivity of scientific studies. The complexities and scale of today's scientific challenges are much greater than in the past, however, so that the costs of research are increasing. Even though science is much more productive in terms of the experimental results, the challenges facing scientific investigators are increasing at an even faster pace. New approaches to infrastructure investments must capitalize on the changing dynamics of research and allow the scientific community to maximize gains in productivity so that complex problems can be attacked cost-effectively. Research strategies that include user facilities and coordinated experimental, computational, and theoretical research are needed.

  6. Designer drilling increases recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Eck-Olsen, J.; Drevdal, K.E.

    1995-04-01

    Implementation of a new designer-well profile has resulted in increased recovery and production rates. The geologically complex Gullfaks field, located in the Norwegian sector of the North Sea, required a new type of well profile to increase total recovery and production rates from Gullfaks A, B and C platforms. Advances in steerable technology and directional drilling performance enabled a 3-D horizontal, extended-reach well profile, now designated as a designer well, to penetrate multiple targets. This article presents the concept, implementation and conclusions drawn from designer well application. Gullfaks field, in Norwegian North Sea Block 34/10, is the first license ever run by a fully Norwegian joint venture corporation. The license group consists of Statoil (operator), Norsk Hydro and Saga Petroleum. The field currently produces more than 535,000 bopd from three main Jurassic reservoirs.

  7. Revamps increase efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Marschner, F.; Moertel, H.G.

    1986-01-01

    In many cases, idle capacities throughout the work and lack of financing capital forbid the construction of new chemical plants that are more profitable and reflect the latest state-of-the-art. On the other hand, the glut of cheap raw materials over the past 20 years led to the construction of numerous plants according to the motto, ''make it cheap-energy consumption is of secondary importance.'' Such projects included, above all, hydrogen plants based on natural gas and plants to produce syngases for methanol, ammonia and oxo alcohols. As raw materials are becoming scarcer almost everywhere in the work and raw material prices keep rising, taking such plants out of service in many instances can be avoided only by increasing their efficiency, sometimes by increasing their capacity (debottlenecking) or by revamping them to use cheaper feedstocks.

  8. High population increase rates.

    PubMed

    1991-09-01

    In addition to its economic and ethnic difficulties, the USSR faces several pressing demographic problems, including high population increase rates in several of its constituent republics. It has now become clear that although the country's rigid centralized planning succeeded in covering the basic needs of people, it did not lead to welfare growth. Since the 1970s, the Soviet economy has remained sluggish, which as led to increase in the death and birth rates. Furthermore, the ideology that held that demography could be entirely controlled by the country's political and economic system is contradicted by current Soviet reality, which shows that religion and ethnicity also play a significant role in demographic dynamics. Currently, Soviet republics fall under 2 categories--areas with high or low natural population increase rates. Republics with low rates consist of Christian populations (Armenia, Moldavia, Georgia, Byelorussia, Russia, Lithuania, Estonia, Latvia, Ukraine), while republics with high rates are Muslim (Tadzhikistan, Uzbekistan, Turkmenistan, Kirgizia, Azerbaijan Kazakhstan). The later group has natural increase rates as high as 3.3%. Although the USSR as a whole is not considered a developing country, the later group of republics fit the description of the UNFPA's priority list. Another serious demographic issue facing the USSR is its extremely high rate of abortion. This is especially true in the republics of low birth rates, where up to 60% of all pregnancies are terminated by induced abortions. Up to 1/5 of the USSR's annual health care budget is spent on clinical abortions -- money which could be better spent on the production of contraceptives. Along with the recent political and economic changes, the USSR is now eager to deal with its demographic problems. PMID:12284289

  9. Increase in family allowances.

    PubMed

    1989-01-01

    In July 1989 the family allowance structure in Australia was changed from a 4-rate to a 2-rate structure. The new rates were increased to $A9 a week for the 1st 3 children and $A12 for each additional child. The Family Allowance Supplment rate for children 13-15 years old was raised from $A31 to $A34.10/week. PMID:12344544

  10. Increasing student success

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Gay; Stewart, John

    2013-03-01

    A more scientifically literate society benefits all STEM disciplines, as well as society as a whole. It is best realized by better serving all undergraduate STEM students. In better-serving all students, a physics department also benefits. The University of Arkansas, Fayetteville physics department has seen a drastic change in number of majors, the number of students active in research and the number of graduates pursuing graduate work, while also increasing the number of majors who decide to teach. Prior to our involvement with the Physics Teacher Education Coalition, graduation rates had increased by more than a factor of 4 in 4 years. After the increased efforts when we became a part of PhysTEC (http://PhysTEC.org) our graduation numbers doubled again. Specific attention to class policy to impact student learning in our introductory courses and strong preparation of the graduate teaching assistants, and quality advising were our primary areas of emphasis. What worked to build these numbers and strengthen these resources at Arkansas will be discussed. This work was supported in part by the National Science Foundation and through the Physics Teacher Education Coalition.

  11. Condom use increasing.

    PubMed

    Finger, W R

    1998-01-01

    Condom use is central to the prevention of AIDS among people at risk for contracting HIV. As such, condom use is increasing dramatically even though many men say that they do not like using them. Condom sales through social marketing campaigns have increased dramatically in some countries, where tens of millions of condoms are sold annually. For example, during the period 1991-96, annual social marketing sales increased about five-fold in Ethiopia to 21 million, and nine-fold in Brazil to 27 million. These sales reflect the success of condom social marketing campaigns in making condoms accessible and largely affordable. There is also a greater general awareness of AIDS than there used to be, and communication campaigns have shown that condoms are an effective solution. More condoms still need to be used in the ongoing struggle against HIV/AIDS. The author discusses the factors which affect the limited acceptance of condoms, condom use outside of marriage, social marketing, and family planning programs. PMID:12293530

  12. Alarming increase in refugees.

    PubMed

    1992-01-01

    Over the past decade and half there has been an alarming worldwide increase in refugees. The total rose form 2.8 million in 1976 to 8.2 million in 1980, to 17.3 million in 1990. Africa's refugees rose from 1.2 million in 1976 to 5.6 million in 1990. Asia's increase over this period was much more rapid--from a mere 180,000 to 8 million. In the Americas the numbers more than trebled, from 770,000 to 2.7 million. Europe was the smallest increase, from 570,000 to 894,000. International law defines a refugee as someone outside of their own country, who has a well-founded fear of persecution because of their political or religious beliefs or ethnic origin, and who cannot turn to their own country for protection. Most refugees are genuine by this definition. The increase reflects, in part, fallout from the cold war. Ethiopia, Mozambique and Angola accounted for almost 1/2 of Africa's refugees; Afghanistan alone for 3/4 of Asia's total. They fled, for the most part, from 1 poor country into another, where they added to shortages of land and fuelwood, and intensified environmental pressure. Malawi, 1 of the poorest countries in the world, is sheltering perhaps as many as 750,000 refugees from the war in Mozambique. But among these refugees--especially among those who turned to the rich countries for asylum--were an increasing number of people who were not suffering political persecution. Driven out of their homes by the collapse of their environment or economic despair, and ready to take any means to get across borders, they are a new category: economic and environmental refugees. The most spectacular attempts hit the television screens: the Vietnamese boat people, ships festooned with Albanians. Behind the headlines there was a growing tide of asylum seekers. The numbers rose 10-fold in Germany from 1983 to 1990. In Switzerland they multiplied by 4 times. In Europe, as a whole, they grew from 71,000 in 1983 to an estimated 550,000 in 1990. In 1990 the numbers threatened to

  13. Increasing Childhood Influenza Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Nowalk, Mary Patricia; Lin, Chyongchiou J.; Hannibal, Kristin; Reis, Evelyn C.; Gallik, Gregory; Moehling, Krissy K.; Huang, Hsin-Hui; Allred, Norma J.; Wolfson, David H.; Zimmerman, Richard K.

    2014-01-01

    Background Since the 2008 inception of universal childhood influenza vaccination, national rates have risen more dramatically among younger children than older children and reported rates across racial/ethnic groups are inconsistent. Interventions may be needed to address age and racial disparities to achieve the recommended childhood influenza vaccination target of 70%. Purpose To evaluate an intervention to increase childhood influenza vaccination across age and racial groups. Methods In 2011–2012, 20 primary care practices treating children were randomly assigned to Intervention and Control arms of a cluster randomized controlled trial to increase childhood influenza vaccination uptake using a toolkit and other strategies including early delivery of donated vaccine, in-service staff meetings, and publicity. Results The average vaccination differences from pre-intervention to the intervention year were significantly larger in the Intervention arm (n=10 practices) than the Control arm (n=10 practices), for children aged 2–8 years (10.2 percentage points (pct pts) Intervention vs 3.6 pct pts Control) and 9–18 years (11.1 pct pts Intervention vs 4.3 pct pts Control, p<0.05), for non-white children (16.7 pct pts Intervention vs 4.6 pct pts Control, p<0.001), and overall (9.9 pct pts Intervention vs 4.2 pct pts Control, p<0.01). In multi-level modeling that accounted for person- and practice-level variables and the interactions among age, race and intervention, the likelihood of vaccination increased with younger age group (6–23 months), white race, commercial insurance, the practice’s pre-intervention vaccination rate, and being in the Intervention arm. Estimates of the interaction terms indicated that the intervention increased the likelihood of vaccination for non-white children in all age groups and white children aged 9–18 years. Conclusions A multi-strategy intervention that includes a practice improvement toolkit can significantly improve influenza

  14. Core Noise - Increasing Importance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.

    2011-01-01

    This presentation is a technical summary of and outlook for NASA-internal and NASA-sponsored external research on core (combustor and turbine) noise funded by the Fundamental Aeronautics Program Subsonic Fixed Wing (SFW) Project. Sections of the presentation cover: the SFW system-level noise metrics for the 2015, 2020, and 2025 timeframes; turbofan design trends and their aeroacoustic implications; the emerging importance of core noise and its relevance to the SFW Reduced-Perceived-Noise Technical Challenge; and the current research activities in the core-noise area, with additional details given about the development of a high-fidelity combustor-noise prediction capability as well as activities supporting the development of improved reduced-order, physics-based models for combustor-noise prediction. The need for benchmark data for validation of high-fidelity and modeling work and the value of a potential future diagnostic facility for testing of core-noise-reduction concepts are indicated. The NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program has the principal objective of overcoming today's national challenges in air transportation. The SFW Reduced-Perceived-Noise Technical Challenge aims to develop concepts and technologies to dramatically reduce the perceived aircraft noise outside of airport boundaries. This reduction of aircraft noise is critical to enabling the anticipated large increase in future air traffic. Noise generated in the jet engine core, by sources such as the compressor, combustor, and turbine, can be a significant contribution to the overall noise signature at low-power conditions, typical of approach flight. At high engine power during takeoff, jet and fan noise have traditionally dominated over core noise. However, current design trends and expected technological advances in engine-cycle design as well as noise-reduction methods are likely to reduce non-core noise even at engine-power points higher than approach. In addition, future low-emission combustor

  15. China update: HIV increasing.

    PubMed

    Gil, V E

    1993-01-01

    The HIV/AIDS case rate in China increased 117% over the period 1990-1992, from 446 to 957 HIV infections. While the majority of cases in 1990 were localized in Yunnan among minority farmers and manual laborers, infection is now found in 19 provinces, counties, and urban areas over a wider spectrum of society. The concentration of cases among IV-drug users has decreased from 83.4% to 72.6%. HIV monitoring and prevention stations have been in place in the country since 1986. The government also encouraged special zones and semiautonomous cities as well as the World Health Organization to take steps to monitor and prevent the spread of HIV. While these effort have served to augment the degree of sex education previously provided, low budgets, bureaucracy, and ambivalence have impeded control efforts. Only 1.25 million of the 1.16 billion population has been serosampled over 8 years and 100,000 fewer serosamples were taken in 1992 compared to in 1991. Neither the general population nor health workers have sufficient knowledge about HIV/AIDS to prevent its continued spread. While gay men sampled in Beijing were better informed about transmission means and risk groups, over two thirds believed they were not at risk if they avoided having sex with foreigners. Recent economic reform measures allowing large movements of population from rural to urban areas, increased disposable income available for prostitutes, and greater exposure to alternative sexual norms and behaviors through the media and music further increase the risk of HIV transmission, especially among the younger generation. To counter these risks, an AIDS hotline for information and referrals has been established in Beijing which openly reaches out to the homosexual community and fields 8-12 calls/day. Training programs for doctors, counselors, professors, and social workers have been attended by people from more than 30 provinces and regions. In addition, modest research into sexual behavior is also being

  16. Elenoside increases intestinal motility

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, E; Alonso, SJ; Navarro, R; Trujillo, J; Jorge, E

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To study the effects of elenoside, an arylnaph-thalene lignan from Justicia hyssopifolia, on gastro-intestinal motility in vivo and in vitro in rats. METHODS: Routine in vivo experimental assessments were catharsis index, water percentage of boluses, intestinal transit, and codeine antagonism. The groups included were vehicle control (propylene glycol-ethanol-plant oil-tween 80), elenoside (i.p. 25 and 50 mg/kg), cisapride (i.p. 10 mg/kg), and codeine phosphate (intragastric route, 50 mg/kg). In vitro approaches used isolated rat intestinal tissues (duodenum, jejunum, and ileum). The effects of elenoside at concentrations of 3.2 x 10-4, 6.4 x 10-4 and 1.2 x 10-3 mol/L, and cisapride at 10-6 mol/L were investigated. RESULTS: Elenoside in vivo produced an increase in the catharsis index and water percentage of boluses and in the percentage of distance traveled by a suspension of activated charcoal. Codeine phosphate antagonized the effect of 25 mg/kg of elenoside. In vitro, elenoside in duodenum, jejunum and ileum produced an initial decrease in the contraction force followed by an increase. Elenoside resulted in decreased intestinal frequency in duodenum, jejunum, and ileum. The in vitro and in vivo effects of elenoside were similar to those produced by cisapride. CONCLUSION: Elenoside is a lignan with an action similar to that of purgative and prokinetics drugs. Elenoside, could be an alternative to cisapride in treatment of gastrointestinal diseases as well as a preventive therapy for the undesirable gastrointestinal effects produced by opioids used for mild to moderate pain. PMID:17131476

  17. Catalyst increases COS conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Goodboy, K.P.

    1985-02-18

    Increasingly stringent air quality legislation is placing greater emphasis on conversion of COS and CS/sub 2/ in Claus plants for the maximum sulfur recovery. Overall sulfur recovery goals are dependent upon outstanding service from the Claus catalyst in each reactor because catalyst activity is a major factor influencing plant performance. Today's catalyst are much improved over those used 10 years ago for the Claus (H/sub 2/S/SO/sub 2/) reaction. Recent technical efforts have focused on the conversion of COS and CS/sub 2/. These carbon-sulfur compounds can account for as much as 50% of the sulfur going to the incinerator, which essentially converts all remaining sulfur species to SO/sub 2/ for atmospheric dispersion. Previously, the mechanism of Claus COS conversion, i.e., hydrolysis or oxidation by SO/sub 2/, was studied and the conclusion was that oxidation by SO/sub 2/ appears to be the predominate mode of COS conversion on sulfated alumina catalysts.

  18. Stress increases periodontal inflammation

    PubMed Central

    RIVERA, CÉSAR; MONSALVE, FRANCISCO; SUAZO, IVÁN; BECERRA, JAVIERA

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the effect of chronic restraint stress (RS) on the severity of experimental periodontal disease in rats. A total of 32 male Sprague Dawley (SD) rats were divided into four groups: i) Rats receiving two treatment regimens, chronic stress induced by movement restriction in acrylic cylinders for 1–1.5 h daily and induction of experimental periodontal disease, using a nylon ligature which was placed around the first left mandibular molars (n=8); ii) induction of periodontal disease, without RS (n=8); iii) RS (n=8) and iv) control (n=8). After 15 days, blood samples were obtained, and blood glucose levels and the corticosterone concentration were measured as stress markers. The severity of periodontal disease was analyzed according to the level of gingival and bone inflammation, leading to compromise of the teeth involved. Chronic stress was induced with movement restriction (P≤0.05, Mann-Whitney U-test) and increased the severity (P≤0.05, Mann-Whitney U-test) of experimental perio dontal disease in rats, according to the level of gingival and bone inflammation around the first left mandibular molars. The results of the present study showed that RS modulates periodontal inflammation and that the rat model described herein is suitable for investigating the association between stress and periodontal disease. PMID:23226743

  19. The shifting landscape of KATP channelopathies and the need for 'sharper' therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Kharade, Sujay V; Nichols, Colin; Denton, Jerod S

    2016-05-01

    ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels play fundamental roles in the regulation of endocrine, neural and cardiovascular function. Small-molecule inhibitors (e.g., sulfonylurea drugs) or activators (e.g., diazoxide) acting on SUR1 or SUR2 have been used clinically for decades to manage the inappropriate secretion of insulin in patients with Type 2 diabetes, hyperinsulinism and intractable hypertension. More recently, the discovery of rare disease-causing mutations in KATP channel-encoding genes has highlighted the need for new therapeutics for the treatment of certain forms of neonatal diabetes mellitus, congenital hyperinsulinism and Cantu syndrome. Here, we provide a high-level overview of the pathophysiology of these diseases and discuss the development of a flexible high-throughput screening platform to enable the development of new classes of KATP channel modulators. PMID:27161588

  20. The shifting landscape of KATP channelopathies and the need for 'sharper' therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Kharade, Sujay V; Nichols, Colin; Denton, Jerod S

    2016-05-01

    ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels play fundamental roles in the regulation of endocrine, neural and cardiovascular function. Small-molecule inhibitors (e.g., sulfonylurea drugs) or activators (e.g., diazoxide) acting on SUR1 or SUR2 have been used clinically for decades to manage the inappropriate secretion of insulin in patients with Type 2 diabetes, hyperinsulinism and intractable hypertension. More recently, the discovery of rare disease-causing mutations in KATP channel-encoding genes has highlighted the need for new therapeutics for the treatment of certain forms of neonatal diabetes mellitus, congenital hyperinsulinism and Cantu syndrome. Here, we provide a high-level overview of the pathophysiology of these diseases and discuss the development of a flexible high-throughput screening platform to enable the development of new classes of KATP channel modulators.

  1. Neurological manifestations of oculodentodigital dysplasia: a Cx43 channelopathy of the central nervous system?

    PubMed Central

    De Bock, Marijke; Kerrebrouck, Marianne; Wang, Nan; Leybaert, Luc

    2013-01-01

    The coordination of tissue function is mediated by gap junctions (GJs) that enable direct cell–cell transfer of metabolic and electric signals. GJs are formed by connexins of which Cx43 is most widespread in the human body. In the brain, Cx43 GJs are mostly found in astroglia where they coordinate the propagation of Ca2+ waves, spatial K+ buffering, and distribution of glucose. Beyond its role in direct intercellular communication, Cx43 also forms unapposed, non-junctional hemichannels in the plasma membrane of glial cells. These allow the passage of several neuro- and gliotransmitters that may, combined with downstream paracrine signaling, complement direct GJ communication among glial cells and sustain glial-neuronal signaling. Mutations in the GJA1 gene encoding Cx43 have been identified in a rare, mostly autosomal dominant syndrome called oculodentodigital dysplasia (ODDD). ODDD patients display a pleiotropic phenotype reflected by eye, hand, teeth, and foot abnormalities, as well as craniofacial and bone malformations. Remarkably, neurological symptoms such as dysarthria, neurogenic bladder (manifested as urinary incontinence), spasticity or muscle weakness, ataxia, and epilepsy are other prominent features observed in ODDD patients. Over 10 mutations detected in patients diagnosed with neurological disorders are associated with altered functionality of Cx43 GJs/hemichannels, but the link between ODDD-related abnormal channel activities and neurologic phenotype is still elusive. Here, we present an overview on the nature of the mutants conveying structural and functional changes of Cx43 channels and discuss available evidence for aberrant Cx43 GJ and hemichannel function. In a final step, we examine the possibilities of how channel dysfunction may lead to some of the neurological manifestations of ODDD. PMID:24133447

  2. The Resurgence of Genetic Determinism: Is It a Distraction?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Jacquelyne F.

    1998-01-01

    Argues that there is a wealth of little known but rapidly growing evidence that contradicts the assumptions and claims of genetic determinism. Recent research showing the impacts of child maltreatment and environmental pollutants suggest interventions that might alleviate the problems sometimes attributed to genetic deficiencies. (SLD)

  3. The resurgence of A2B adenosine receptor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Aherne, Carol M.; Kewley, Emily M.; Eltzschig, Holger K.

    2010-01-01

    Since its discovery as a low-affinity adenosine receptor (AR), the A2B receptor (A2BAR), has proven enigmatic in its function. The previous discovery of the A2AAR, which shares many similarities with the A2BAR but demonstrates significantly greater affinity for its endogenous ligand, led to the original perception that the A2BAR was not of substantial physiologic relevance. In addition, lack of specific pharmacological agents targeting the A2BAR made its initial characterization challenging. However, the importance of this receptor was reconsidered when it was observed that the A2BAR is highly transcriptionally regulated by factors implicated in inflammatory hypoxia. Moreover, the notion that during ischemia or inflammation extracellular adenosine is dramatically elevated to levels sufficient for A2BAR activation, indicated that A2BAR signaling may be important to dampen inflammation particularly during tissue hypoxia. In addition, the recent advent of techniques for murine genetic manipulation along with development of pharmacological agents with enhanced A2BAR specificity has provided invaluable tools for focused studies on the explicit role of A2BAR signaling in different disease models. Currently, studies performed with combined genetic and pharmacological approaches have demonstrated that A2BAR signaling plays a tissue protective role in many models of acute diseases e.g. myocardial ischemia, or acute lung injury. These studies indicate that the A2BAR is expressed on a wide variety of cell types and exerts tissue/cell specific effects. This is an important consideration for future studies where tissue or cell type specific targeting of the A2BAR may be used as therapeutic approach. PMID:20546702

  4. Burial and resurgence of projective identification in French psychoanalysis.

    PubMed

    Widlöcher, Daniel

    2014-08-01

    Curiously enough, the concept of projective identification was ignored, and even rejected in France for at least two decades after the publication of the founding texts of Melanie Klein and Herbert Rosenfeld. This rejection was due to a critique from child psychoanalysts close to Anna Freud and also from the teaching of Lacan: the first took the real mother-child relation extensively into account, while the latter only saw the internal object as a signifier. The fact that during this period the countertransference was a concept reduced to its negative content no doubt explains this deliberate ignorance. With the dissemination of a broader and more positive conception of the countertransference, a renewal of interest could be observed in the 1980s with references to empathic listening and to the effects of thought-induction.

  5. Disease emergence and resurgence: the wildlife-human connection

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friend, Milton

    2006-01-01

    In 2000, the Global Outbreak Alert and Response Network (GOARN) was organized as a global disease watchdog group to coordinate disease outbreak information and health crisis response. The World Health Organization (WHO) is the headquarters for this network.2 Understandably, the primary focus for WHO is human health. However, diseases such as the H5N1 avian influenza epizootic in Asian bird populations demonstrate the need for integrating knowledge about disease emergence in animals and in humans.

  6. An Evaluation of Resurgence during Functional Communication Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wacker, David P.; Harding, Jay W.; Morgan, Theresa A.; Berg, Wendy K.; Schieltz, Kelly M.; Lee, John F.; Padilla, Yaniz C.

    2013-01-01

    Three children who displayed destructive behavior maintained by negative reinforcement received functional communication training (FCT). During FCT, the children were required to complete a demand and then to mand (touch a card attached to a microswitch, sign, or vocalize) to receive brief play breaks. Prior to and 1 to 3 times following the…

  7. Polycrystalline lead selenide: the resurgence of an old infrared detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergara, G.; Montojo, M. T.; Torquemada, M. C.; Rodrigo, M. T.; Sánchez, F. J.; Gómez, L. J.; Almazán, R. M.; Verdú, M.; Rodríguez, P.; Villamayor, V.; Álvarez, M.; Diezhandino, J.; Plaza, J.; Catalán, I.

    2007-06-01

    The existing technology for uncooled MWIR photon detectors based on polycrystalline lead salts is stigmatized for being a 50-year-old technology. It has been traditionally relegated to single-element detectors and relatively small linear arrays due to the limitations imposed by its standard manufacture process based on a chemical bath deposition technique (CBD) developed more than 40 years ago. Recently, an innovative method for processing detectors, based on a vapour phase deposition (VPD) technique, has allowed manufacturing the first 2D array of polycrystalline PbSe with good electro optical characteristics. The new method of processing PbSe is an all silicon technology and it is compatible with standard CMOS circuitry. In addition to its affordability, VPD PbSe constitutes a perfect candidate to fill the existing gap in the photonic and uncooled IR imaging detectors sensitive to the MWIR photons. The perspectives opened are numerous and very important, converting the old PbSe detector in a serious alternative to others uncooled technologies in the low cost IR detection market. The number of potential applications is huge, some of them with high commercial impact such as personal IR imagers, enhanced vision systems for automotive applications and other not less important in the security/defence domain such as sensors for active protection systems (APS) or low cost seekers. Despite the fact, unanimously accepted, that uncooled will dominate the majority of the future IR detection applications, today, thermal detectors are the unique plausible alternative. There is plenty of room for photonic uncooled and complementary alternatives are needed. This work allocates polycrystalline PbSe in the current panorama of the uncooled IR detectors, underlining its potentiality in two areas of interest, i.e., very low cost imaging IR detectors and MWIR fast uncooled detectors for security and defence applications. The new method of processing again converts PbSe into an emerging technology.

  8. The diversity of microbes: resurgence of the phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Fenchel, Tom; Finlay, Bland J

    2006-01-01

    The introduction of molecular genetic methods has caused confusion about the nature of microbial species. Environmental DNA extraction has indicated the existence of a vast diversity of genotypes, but how this relates to functional and phenotypic diversity has not been sufficiently explored. It has been implied that genetic distance per se correlates with phenotypic differentiation and thus reflects subtle (but undiscovered) adaptive fine-tuning to the environment, and that microbes may show biogeographic patterns at the genetic level. Here, we argue that no theoretically based species concept exists; species represent only the basic unit in the taxonomic hierarchy. The significance of naming species is that it organizes biological information. The reason why microbial species collectively represent large genetic differences is owing to huge absolute population sizes, absence of allopatric speciation and low extinction rates. Microbial phenotypes are, therefore, ancient in terms of the geological time-scale and have been maintained through stabilizing selection. These problems are discussed with special reference to eukaryotic micro-organisms. PMID:17062414

  9. Dengue fever: a resurgent risk for the international traveler.

    PubMed

    Lange, W R; Beall, B; Denny, S C

    1992-03-01

    The incidence of dengue fever, an acute febrile illness transmitted by the Aedes aegypti mosquito, is on the rise. High fever, severe headache, skin rash and a variety of constitutional symptoms are hallmarks of classic dengue fever. Dengue hemorrhagic fever, a severe manifestation associated with secondary infection, most often occurs in children. Treatment of classic dengue fever is supportive, whereas urgent rehydration therapy is often required in more severe forms. Community-based and personal strategies for avoiding the mosquito vector represent the best methods of prevention, although vaccine development programs are under way.

  10. Resurgence of HPAI in birds and mechanisms of transmission

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High pathogenicity avian influenza (HPAI) viruses typically produce a similar severe, systemic disease with high mortality in chickens and other gallinaceous birds, but either no disease or only mild disease in domestic ducks and wild birds. However with emergence of H5N1 HPAI viruses and their mai...

  11. Burial and resurgence of projective identification in French psychoanalysis.

    PubMed

    Widlöcher, Daniel

    2014-08-01

    Curiously enough, the concept of projective identification was ignored, and even rejected in France for at least two decades after the publication of the founding texts of Melanie Klein and Herbert Rosenfeld. This rejection was due to a critique from child psychoanalysts close to Anna Freud and also from the teaching of Lacan: the first took the real mother-child relation extensively into account, while the latter only saw the internal object as a signifier. The fact that during this period the countertransference was a concept reduced to its negative content no doubt explains this deliberate ignorance. With the dissemination of a broader and more positive conception of the countertransference, a renewal of interest could be observed in the 1980s with references to empathic listening and to the effects of thought-induction. PMID:25229546

  12. Restart: The Resurgence of Computer Science in UK Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Neil C. C.; Sentance, Sue; Crick, Tom; Humphreys, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Computer science in UK schools is undergoing a remarkable transformation. While the changes are not consistent across each of the four devolved nations of the UK (England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland), there are developments in each that are moving the subject to become mandatory for all pupils from age 5 onwards. In this article, we…

  13. Increasing FCC regenerator catalyst level

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, R.F. )

    1993-11-01

    A Peruvian FCC unit's operations were improved by increasing the regenerator's catalyst level. This increase resulted in lower stack losses, an improved temperature profile, increased catalyst activity and a lower catalyst consumption rate. A more stable operation saved this Peruvian refiner over $131,000 per year in catalyst alone. These concepts and data may be suitable for your FCC unit as well.

  14. Is asthma prevalence still increasing?

    PubMed

    Lundbäck, Bo; Backman, Helena; Lötvall, Jan; Rönmark, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Increased awareness of asthma in society and altered diagnostic practices makes evaluation of data on prevalence change difficult. In most parts of the world the asthma prevalence seems to still be increasing. The increase is associated with urbanization and has been documented particularly among children and teenagers in urban areas of middle- and low-level income countries. Use of validated questionnaires has enabled comparisons of studies. Among adults there are few studies based on representative samples of the general population which allow evaluation of time trends of prevalence. This review focuses mainly on studies of asthma prevalence and symptoms among adults. Parallel with increased urbanization, we can assume that the increase in asthma prevalence in most areas of the world will continue. However, in Australia and North-West Europe studies performed, particularly among children and adolescents, indicate that the increase in asthma prevalence may now be leveling off. PMID:26610152

  15. Increasing point-count duration increases standard error

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, W.P.; Twedt, D.J.; Hamel, P.B.; Ford, R.P.; Wiedenfeld, D.A.; Cooper, R.J.

    1998-01-01

    We examined data from point counts of varying duration in bottomland forests of west Tennessee and the Mississippi Alluvial Valley to determine if counting interval influenced sampling efficiency. Estimates of standard error increased as point count duration increased both for cumulative number of individuals and species in both locations. Although point counts appear to yield data with standard errors proportional to means, a square root transformation of the data may stabilize the variance. Using long (>10 min) point counts may reduce sample size and increase sampling error, both of which diminish statistical power and thereby the ability to detect meaningful changes in avian populations.

  16. Increased airway glucose increases airway bacterial load in hyperglycaemia.

    PubMed

    Gill, Simren K; Hui, Kailyn; Farne, Hugo; Garnett, James P; Baines, Deborah L; Moore, Luke S P; Holmes, Alison H; Filloux, Alain; Tregoning, John S

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is associated with increased frequency of hospitalization due to bacterial lung infection. We hypothesize that increased airway glucose caused by hyperglycaemia leads to increased bacterial loads. In critical care patients, we observed that respiratory tract bacterial colonisation is significantly more likely when blood glucose is high. We engineered mutants in genes affecting glucose uptake and metabolism (oprB, gltK, gtrS and glk) in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, strain PAO1. These mutants displayed attenuated growth in minimal medium supplemented with glucose as the sole carbon source. The effect of glucose on growth in vivo was tested using streptozocin-induced, hyperglycaemic mice, which have significantly greater airway glucose. Bacterial burden in hyperglycaemic animals was greater than control animals when infected with wild type but not mutant PAO1. Metformin pre-treatment of hyperglycaemic animals reduced both airway glucose and bacterial load. These data support airway glucose as a critical determinant of increased bacterial load during diabetes. PMID:27273266

  17. Increased airway glucose increases airway bacterial load in hyperglycaemia

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Simren K.; Hui, Kailyn; Farne, Hugo; Garnett, James P.; Baines, Deborah L.; Moore, Luke S.P.; Holmes, Alison H.; Filloux, Alain; Tregoning, John S.

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is associated with increased frequency of hospitalization due to bacterial lung infection. We hypothesize that increased airway glucose caused by hyperglycaemia leads to increased bacterial loads. In critical care patients, we observed that respiratory tract bacterial colonisation is significantly more likely when blood glucose is high. We engineered mutants in genes affecting glucose uptake and metabolism (oprB, gltK, gtrS and glk) in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, strain PAO1. These mutants displayed attenuated growth in minimal medium supplemented with glucose as the sole carbon source. The effect of glucose on growth in vivo was tested using streptozocin-induced, hyperglycaemic mice, which have significantly greater airway glucose. Bacterial burden in hyperglycaemic animals was greater than control animals when infected with wild type but not mutant PAO1. Metformin pre-treatment of hyperglycaemic animals reduced both airway glucose and bacterial load. These data support airway glucose as a critical determinant of increased bacterial load during diabetes. PMID:27273266

  18. Assessing and Increasing Physical Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Camp, Carole M.; Hayes, Lynda B.

    2012-01-01

    Increasing physical activity is a crucial component of any comprehensive approach to combat the growing obesity epidemic. This review summarizes recent behavioral research on the measurement of physical activity and interventions aimed at increasing physical activity and provides directions for future research.

  19. Increased hedonic differences despite increases in hedonic range.

    PubMed

    Zellner, Debra A; Jones, Ke'Nesha; Morino, Jennifer; Cogan, Elizabeth S; Jennings, Emily M; Parker, Scott

    2010-07-01

    Viewing hedonically negative paintings increased the hedonic ratings of subsequently viewed test paintings (positive hedonic contrast; Experiment 1) and also increased the degree of preference between the test paintings (Experiments 2 and 3). This result differs from the reduction in hedonic preference (hedonic condensation) that accompanies negative hedonic contrast. It also differs from the reduction in perceived differences that usually accompanies expansion of stimulus range and that is predicted by numerous theories.

  20. Volatiles Which Increase Magma Viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, S.

    2015-12-01

    The standard model of an erupting volcano is one in which the viscosity of a decompressing magma increases as the volatiles leave the melt structure to form bubbles. It has now been observed that the addition of the "volatiles" P, Cl and F result in an increase in silicate melt viscosity. This observation would mean that the viscosity of selected degassing magmas would decrease rather than increase. Here we look at P, Cl and F as three volatiles which increase viscosity through different structural mechanisms. In all three cases the volatiles increase the viscosity of peralkaline composition melts, but appear to always decrease the viscosity of peraluminous melts. Phosphorus causes the melt to unmix into a Na-P rich phase and a Na-poor silicate phase. Thus as the network modifying Na (or Ca) are removed to the phosphorus-rich melt, the matrix melt viscosity increases. With increasing amounts of added phosphorus (at network modifying Na ~ P) the addition of further phosphorus causes a decrease in viscosity. The addition of chlorine to Fe-free aluminosilicate melts results in an increase in viscosity. NMR data on these glass indicates that the chlorine sits in salt-like structures surrounded by Na and/or Ca. Such structures would remove network-modifying atoms from the melt structure and thus result in an increase in viscosity. The NMR spectra of fluorine-bearing glasses shows that F takes up at least 5 different structural positions in peralkaline composition melts. Three of these positions should result in a decrease in viscosity due to the removal of bridging oxygens. Two of the structural positons of F, however, should result in an increase in viscosity as they require the removal of network-modifying atoms from the melt structure (with one of the structures being that observed for Cl). This would imply that increasing amounts of F might result in an increase in viscosity. This proposed increase in viscosity with increasing F has now been experimentally confirmed.

  1. Increasing diversity in radiologic technology.

    PubMed

    Carwile, Laura

    2003-01-01

    Diversity is increasingly important in the radiologic technology workplace. For significant changes to occur in work force diversity, educators must first recruit and retain students from a wide variety of backgrounds. This article examines personality, race and gender as factors affecting career choice and how educators can use these factors to increase diversity in their programs. An overview of the ASRT's efforts to improve diversity within the profession is presented, along with suggestions for developing effective recruitment and retention plans to increase diversity. PMID:14671827

  2. Increasing Learning from TV News.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perloff, Richard M.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Describes an experiment that manipulated two variables, repetition and pausing for viewer "digestion" of information in a news telecast. Concludes that the use of repetition increased viewers' retention of information, but that pauses did not. (FL)

  3. Clinton proposes science funding increase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    President Bill Clinton proposed a major increase in science funding and several science and environment initiatives during his State of the Union address on January 28.As part of the White House Millennium Program the administration established to promote the nation's creativity and innovation, the President proposed a 21st Century Research Fund for scientific inquiry that would provide the largest one-year funding increase in history for the National Science Foundation (NSF), National Institutes of Health, and National Cancer Institute.

  4. Pulsed electric field increases reproduction.

    PubMed

    Panagopoulos, Dimitris J

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To study the effect of pulsed electric field - applied in corona discharge photography - on Drosophila melanogaster reproduction, possible induction of DNA fragmentation, and morphological alterations in the gonads. Materials and methods Animals were exposed to different field intensities (100, 200, 300, and 400 kV/m) during the first 2-5 days of their adult lives, and the effect on reproductive capacity was assessed. DNA fragmentation during early- and mid-oogenesis was investigated by application of the TUNEL (Terminal deoxynucleotide transferase dUTP Nick End Labeling) assay. Sections of follicles after fixation and embedding in resins were observed for possible morphological/developmental abnormalities. Results The field increased reproduction by up to 30% by increasing reproductive capacity in both sexes. The effect increased with increasing field intensities. The rate of increase diminished at the strongest intensities. Slight induction of DNA fragmentation was observed exclusively in the nurse (predominantly) and follicle cells, and exclusively at the two most sensitive developmental stages, i.e., germarium and predominantly stage 7-8. Sections of follicles from exposed females at stages of early and mid-oogennesis other than germarium and stages 7-8 did not reveal abnormalities. Conclusions (1) The specific type of electric field may represent a mild stress factor, inducing DNA fragmentation and cell death in a small percentage of gametes, triggering the reaction of the animal's reproductive system to increase the rate of gametogenesis in order to compensate the loss of a small number of gametes. (2) The nurse cells are the most sensitive from all three types of egg chamber cells. (3) The mid-oogenesis checkpoint (stage 7-8) is more sensitive to this field than the early oogenesis one (germarium) in contrast to microwave exposure. (4) Possible therapeutic applications, or applications in increasing fertility, should be investigated.

  5. Pulsed electric field increases reproduction.

    PubMed

    Panagopoulos, Dimitris J

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To study the effect of pulsed electric field - applied in corona discharge photography - on Drosophila melanogaster reproduction, possible induction of DNA fragmentation, and morphological alterations in the gonads. Materials and methods Animals were exposed to different field intensities (100, 200, 300, and 400 kV/m) during the first 2-5 days of their adult lives, and the effect on reproductive capacity was assessed. DNA fragmentation during early- and mid-oogenesis was investigated by application of the TUNEL (Terminal deoxynucleotide transferase dUTP Nick End Labeling) assay. Sections of follicles after fixation and embedding in resins were observed for possible morphological/developmental abnormalities. Results The field increased reproduction by up to 30% by increasing reproductive capacity in both sexes. The effect increased with increasing field intensities. The rate of increase diminished at the strongest intensities. Slight induction of DNA fragmentation was observed exclusively in the nurse (predominantly) and follicle cells, and exclusively at the two most sensitive developmental stages, i.e., germarium and predominantly stage 7-8. Sections of follicles from exposed females at stages of early and mid-oogennesis other than germarium and stages 7-8 did not reveal abnormalities. Conclusions (1) The specific type of electric field may represent a mild stress factor, inducing DNA fragmentation and cell death in a small percentage of gametes, triggering the reaction of the animal's reproductive system to increase the rate of gametogenesis in order to compensate the loss of a small number of gametes. (2) The nurse cells are the most sensitive from all three types of egg chamber cells. (3) The mid-oogenesis checkpoint (stage 7-8) is more sensitive to this field than the early oogenesis one (germarium) in contrast to microwave exposure. (4) Possible therapeutic applications, or applications in increasing fertility, should be investigated. PMID:26651869

  6. Somatosensory loss increases vestibulospinal sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Horak, F B; Hlavacka, F

    2001-08-01

    To determine whether subjects with somatosensory loss show a compensatory increase in sensitivity to vestibular stimulation, we compared the amplitude of postural lean in response to four different intensities of bipolar galvanic stimulation in subjects with diabetic peripheral neuropathy (PNP) and age-matched control subjects. To determine whether healthy and neuropathic subjects show similar increases in sensitivity to galvanic vestibular stimulation when standing on unstable surfaces, both groups were exposed to galvanic stimulation while standing on a compliant foam surface. In these experiments, a 3-s pulse of galvanic current was administered to subjects standing with eyes closed and their heads turned toward one shoulder (anodal current on the forward mastoid). Anterior body tilt, as measured by center of foot pressure (CoP), increased proportionately with increasing galvanic vestibular stimulation intensity for all subjects. Subjects with peripheral neuropathy showed larger forward CoP displacement in response to galvanic stimulation than control subjects. The largest differences between neuropathy and control subjects were at the highest galvanic intensities, indicating an increased sensitivity to vestibular stimulation. Neuropathy subjects showed a larger increase in sensitivity to vestibular stimulation when standing on compliant foam than control subjects. The effect of galvanic stimulation was larger on the movement of the trunk segment in space than on the body's center of mass (CoM) angle, suggesting that the vestibular system acts to control trunk orientation rather than to control whole body posture. This study provides evidence for an increase in the sensitivity of the postural control system to vestibular stimulation when somatosensory information from the surface is disrupted either by peripheral neuropathy or by standing on an unstable surface. Simulations from a simple model of postural orientation incorporating feedback from the vestibular

  7. Hydrologic effects of increased urbanization

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Guay, Joel R.

    1995-01-01

    Urban areas in Perris Valley, California, have more than tripled during the last 20 years, resulting in increased storm-runoff volumes and peak discharges. To quantify the effects of increased urbanization, rainfall-runoff models of the basin were developed to simulate runoff for 1970-75 and 1990-93 conditions. Hourly rainfall data for 1949-93 were used with the rainfall-runoff models to simulate a long-term record of storm runoff. The hydrologic effects of increased urbanization from 1970-75 to 1990-93 conditions were analyzed by comparing the frequency of annual peak discharges and runoff volumes, and a duration analysis of storm peak discharges. The maximum annual-peak discharge for the 1990-93 model simulation was 32 percent higher than the discharge for 1970-75 model simulation. However, the frequency analysis of each time series indicated the 100-year peak discharges for each study period were identical.

  8. Increasing population, limited dental insurance, but increasing use of services.

    PubMed

    Waldman, H Barry; Truhlar, Mary Rose

    2010-01-01

    During the careers of many current and soon-to-be dental practitioners, one-in-five residents of the U.S. will be 65-plus years of age. Although the current population of seniors has limited dental insurance coverage, older Americans are increasing their use of services. Demographic variations are reviewed in terms of the need for services, dental visit patterns and expenditures for services. A challenge is presented to prepare practitioners for the care of this burgeoning population. PMID:20359067

  9. Fires increase Amazon forest productivity through increases in diffuse radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rap, A.; Spracklen, D. V.; Mercado, L.; Reddington, C. L.; Haywood, J. M.; Ellis, R. J.; Phillips, O. L.; Artaxo, P.; Bonal, D.; Restrepo Coupe, N.; Butt, N.

    2015-06-01

    Atmospheric aerosol scatters solar radiation increasing the fraction of diffuse radiation and the efficiency of photosynthesis. We quantify the impacts of biomass burning aerosol (BBA) on diffuse radiation and plant photosynthesis across Amazonia during 1998-2007. Evaluation against observed aerosol optical depth allows us to provide lower and upper BBA emissions estimates. BBA increases Amazon basin annual mean diffuse radiation by 3.4-6.8% and net primary production (NPP) by 1.4-2.8%, with quoted ranges driven by uncertainty in BBA emissions. The enhancement of Amazon basin NPP by 78-156 Tg C a-1 is equivalent to 33-65% of the annual regional carbon emissions from biomass burning. This NPP increase occurs during the dry season and acts to counteract some of the observed effect of drought on tropical production. We estimate that 30-60 Tg C a-1 of this NPP enhancement is within woody tissue, accounting for 8-16% of the observed carbon sink across mature Amazonian forests.

  10. Increasing Public Understanding of Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Isobel

    1998-01-01

    The Science of Genes workshop is a program designed to increase public understanding of science by demystifying the language used to describe it. Methods include analogies, models, simple experiments, and opportunities for discussion of controversial topics such as genetic engineering. (JOW)

  11. Increased Spreading Activation in Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Paul S.; Yung, Raegan C.; Branch, Kaylei K.; Stringer, Kristi; Ferguson, Brad J.; Sullivan, William; Drago, Valeria

    2011-01-01

    The dopaminergic system is implicated in depressive disorders and research has also shown that dopamine constricts lexical/semantic networks by reducing spreading activation. Hence, depression, which is linked to reductions of dopamine, may be associated with increased spreading activation. However, research has generally found no effects of…

  12. Increasing Originality in Written Expression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belasco, Jack Thomas

    This study partially replicated Moss's "A Study of the Effect of Selected Methods of Instruction Designed to Increase Originality in Written Expression," except for the fact that this investigator taught a 5th grade and an 11th grade class for most of a school year. Some of the conclusions of the study were: no particular teaching technique was…

  13. Nutritional zinc increases platelet reactivity.

    PubMed

    Marx, G; Krugliak, J; Shaklai, M

    1991-11-01

    After ingestion of 220 mg zinc sulfate, platelet aggregation was evaluated at various time intervals (i.e., T = 0, 1, and 3 hr) and the autologous plasma analyzed by atomic absorption analysis. The zinc levels increased maximally some 0.4 +/- 0.2 microgram/ml within 3 hr after ingestion, which for the entire blood pool corresponds to only 5% of the ingested zinc. Aggregation responses of platelet rich plasma (PRP), instigated with suboptimal levels of thrombin (less than 0.2 U/ml), ADP (less than 2 microM), epinephrine (less than 2 microM), collagen (less than 2 micrograms/ml), or PAF (less than 50 ng/ml), show significant improvement to at least one aggregant. Mean +/- SEM values for delta % aggregation increase are as follows: thrombin, 51 +/- 10%; epinephrine, 21 +/- 6%; ADP, 31 +/- 6%; collagen 23 +/- 6%; and platelet aggregating factor (PAF), 56 +/- 6%. For controls, the platelets from one individual with Glanzmann thrombasthenia as well as four undosed volunteers exhibited no significant changes in platelet responsiveness. Increased platelet responsiveness to agonists after zinc sulfate ingestion was observed in PRP from blood collected in either citrate or heparin. We demonstrate that within a relatively short time period, single bolus of nutritional zinc intake can significantly increase platelet reactivity. These findings show that nutritional zinc availability is relevant to hemostasis and may pertain to the viability of platelet concentrates in blood banks.

  14. Increasing Reservation Attendance: Ganado's Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Carl; And Others

    Based on recommendations of a District Attendance Task Force, in 1980 the Ganado School District (a Navajo Reservation District) formulated an Attendance Improvement Plan which decreased the primary school's absentee rate 37% over previous years and which dramatically increased Friday attendance. The primary school targeted "high risk" chronic…

  15. Crop Diversity for Yield Increase

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chengyun; He, Xiahong; Zhu, Shusheng; Zhou, Huiping; Wang, Yunyue; Li, Yan; Yang, Jing; Fan, Jinxiang; Yang, Jincheng; Wang, Guibin; Long, Yunfu; Xu, Jiayou; Tang, Yongsheng; Zhao, Gaohui; Yang, Jianrong; Liu, Lin; Sun, Yan; Xie, Yong; Wang, Haining; Zhu, Youyong

    2009-01-01

    Traditional farming practices suggest that cultivation of a mixture of crop species in the same field through temporal and spatial management may be advantageous in boosting yields and preventing disease, but evidence from large-scale field testing is limited. Increasing crop diversity through intercropping addresses the problem of increasing land utilization and crop productivity. In collaboration with farmers and extension personnel, we tested intercropping of tobacco, maize, sugarcane, potato, wheat and broad bean – either by relay cropping or by mixing crop species based on differences in their heights, and practiced these patterns on 15,302 hectares in ten counties in Yunnan Province, China. The results of observation plots within these areas showed that some combinations increased crop yields for the same season between 33.2 and 84.7% and reached a land equivalent ratio (LER) of between 1.31 and 1.84. This approach can be easily applied in developing countries, which is crucial in face of dwindling arable land and increasing food demand. PMID:19956624

  16. STEM Talent Increases, Jobs Decrease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawchuk, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    Across the nation, alternative-route program officials say they are seeing increasing enrollments from career-changers with strong backgrounds in the highly sought-after fields of math, science, and technology. But the extent to which school district administrators are primed to take advantage of larger--and in some cases stronger--talent pools in…

  17. PMR Composites Of Increased Toughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vannucci, Raymond D.; Bowles, Kenneth J.

    1988-01-01

    Toughness increased without sacrificing processability or hot strength. Resin composition provides best overall balance of composite toughness and retention of mechanical properties at 600 degree F (316 degree C) with processability obtained by substituting 20 mole percent of diamine used in PMR-15 resins with diamine containing twice number of flexible phenyl connecting groups.

  18. Emergency contraception: increasing public awareness.

    PubMed

    2003-02-01

    This article begins by addressing misperceptions that emergency contraception is something new and untested or inherently unsafe, and that it is comparable to an abortion. It then describes efforts that are underway to increase awareness among consumers and health care providers alike.

  19. Family limitation and fertility increase.

    PubMed

    Chojnacka, H; Adegbola, O

    1990-01-01

    Researchers used data from a survey of women patients in the maternity ward during 1968-1969 and August 1978 of a hospital in Lagos, Nigeria and from the 1897 and 1926 censuses of 50 rural and urban populations in European russia to demonstrate that modernization factors that reduce mortality also increase fertility under early marital patterns. The researchers learned by examining the Nigerian data that, in a population that has recently experienced an improved standard of living just prior to the demographic transition, natural fertility rises. The pregnancy rate also increases which leads to a greater incidence of pregnancy complications. Hence more infants are born at a low birth weight and consequentially an increase in infant mortality. Yet not all populations witness this pattern. The most important find of the study was that the direction of change in fertility essentially hinges on the marital pattern current before the demographic transition begins. For example, in European Russia, 33% of the eastern provinces' rural population experienced a decline in marriages between 1897-1926 while marital fertility increased. Yet the opposite occurred among the rural marital fertility increased. Yet the opposite occurred among the rural population of the western provinces in the same period: both marital fertility and marriages fell, although the decline was stronger in fertility than in nuptiality. Presently the demographic transition theory excludes nuptiality as 1 of its consequential components. It also assumes interaction only between morality and fertility and that changes in fertility reflect changes in nuptiality. Yet evidence shows that if policy planners would include nuptiality into the theory, they could better predict the timing of sustained fertility decline. Hence population policy should be aimed at marital patterns, since affecting these more directly results in reduced fertility.

  20. How to increase living donation.

    PubMed

    Davis, Connie L

    2011-04-01

    Living donation is the key to increasing access to successful solid organ transplantation worldwide. However, the means to expanding the number of living donors on a global scale are not known. Although there have been many suggestions for the best approach, cultural issues may limit the effectiveness of some strategies. Only a few ideas have been studied, and one in particular- outright payment to donors - may raise ethical issues that are difficult to surmount and might negatively alter altruistic behavior. With respect to the present environment, this article will describe some of the approaches that are being discussed to increase the number of living donors, with a particular focus on kidney transplantation. PMID:21210867

  1. Increasing Accuracy in Environmental Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacksier, Tracey; Fernandes, Adelino; Matthew, Matt; Lehmann, Horst

    2016-04-01

    Human activity is increasing the concentrations of green house gases (GHG) in the atmosphere which results in temperature increases. High precision is a key requirement of atmospheric measurements to study the global carbon cycle and its effect on climate change. Natural air containing stable isotopes are used in GHG monitoring to calibrate analytical equipment. This presentation will examine the natural air and isotopic mixture preparation process, for both molecular and isotopic concentrations, for a range of components and delta values. The role of precisely characterized source material will be presented. Analysis of individual cylinders within multiple batches will be presented to demonstrate the ability to dynamically fill multiple cylinders containing identical compositions without isotopic fractionation. Additional emphasis will focus on the ability to adjust isotope ratios to more closely bracket sample types without the reliance on combusting naturally occurring materials, thereby improving analytical accuracy.

  2. Construction costs continue slow increase

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, J.M.

    1986-03-31

    Oil-pipeline construction costs for third quarter 1985, as measured by the OGJ-Morgan Pipeline Cost Index, continued the moderation evident in the year's first half. Although some cost elements showed signs of moving ahead at a faster clip during the quarter, the primary forces holding down inflation, especially moderate labor increases and competitive material prices, appeared stronger than ever. The worldwide oil glut, which had been keeping a cap on oil energy costs, was expected to continue. And some economists in the quarter were even then predicting a major crude oil price cut by the end of 1985. Furthermore, the cost of borrowing construction funds remained at its lowest level in years. The composite cost index for building oil pipelines showed a minor increase of 0.45% during third quarter 1985.

  3. Lead exposure increases blood pressure by increasing angiotensinogen expression.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Jiandong; Wang, Miaomiao; Wang, Yiqing; Sun, Na; Li, Chunping

    2016-01-01

    Lead exposure can induce increased blood pressure. Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain lead-induced hypertension. Changes in angiotensinogen (AGT) expression levels or gene variants may also influence blood pressure. In this study, we hypothesized that AGT expression levels or gene variants contribute to lead-induced hypertension. A preliminary HEK293 cell model experiment was performed to analyze the association between AGT expression and lead exposure. In a population-based study, serum AGT level was measured in both lead-exposed and control populations. To further detect the influence of AGT gene single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in lead-induced hypertension, two SNPs (rs699 and rs4762) were genotyped in a case-control study including 219 lead-exposed subjects and 393 controls. Lead exposure caused an increase in AGT expression level in HEK 293 cell models (P < 0.001) compared to lead-free cells, and individuals exposed to lead had higher systolic and diastolic blood pressure (P < 0.001). Lead-exposed individuals had higher serum AGT levels compared to controls (P < 0.001). However, no association was found between AGT gene SNPs (rs699 and rs4762) and lead exposure. Nevertheless, the change in AGT expression level may play an important role in the development of lead-induced hypertension.

  4. Increasing productivity through performance evaluation.

    PubMed

    Lachman, V D

    1984-12-01

    Four components form the base for a performance evaluation system. A discussion of management/organizational shortcomings creating performance problems is followed by a focus on the importance of an ongoing discussion of goals between the manager and the subordinate. Six components that impact performance are identified, and practical suggestions are given to increase motivation. A coaching analysis process, as well as counseling and disciplining models, define the steps for solving performance problems.

  5. NSF and NASA budgets increased

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Peter M.

    Research budgets of several of the federal government agencies were increased significantly over the Reagan administration's requests in the House of Representative's appropriations bill H.R. 4034. These budgets had been removed from the Reagan administration's omnibus reconciliation bill, and thus there were worries expressed that certain research funding could be in jeopardy. The rationale was that because the requests were voted on individually on the floor of the House, many sections of the budgets would be subjected to extra scrutiny, which would lead to more cuts.The National Science Foundation (NSF) budget request had been cut and reordered by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) by making sharp reductions in programs of the social sciences and in programs of science and engineering education. There were fears that these programs would be reinstated to the original request level, at the expense of the budgets of other research activities. These fears materialized, but only momentarily. Efforts to cut the research activities by the House Appropriations Committee were soundly defeated. The budget was supported, with additional increases to provide for the education programs, by a high margin, which included most Republican and Democratic members of the House of Representatives. The overall NSF budget, as passed, has a total appropriation of $1103.5 million, compared with the Administration's request of $1033.5 million (the Fiscal Year 1981 appropriation for the NSF was $1022.4 million). The House approved budget included increases of $44.9 million in research and $25.1 million in science and engineering education. Included in the research budget increase were recommendations by the House Appropriations Committee for support of the social sciences and for the international affairs programs. Also included in the recommendations was support of interdisciplinary research programs that cut across the directorates of the NSF.

  6. Increasing diversity in our profession

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davis, Ronald D.; Diswood, Samuel; Dominguez, Annette; Engel-Wilson, Ronald W.; Jefferson, Keith; Miles, A. Keith; Moore, Elizabeth F.; Reidinger, Russell; Ruther, Sherry; Valdez, Raul; Wilson, Kenneth; Zablan, Marilet A.

    2002-01-01

    The Wildlife Society's (TWS) Ethnic and Gender Diversity Committee (previously the Minority Affairs Committee) was established in 1998 and given several charges by TWS Council. This paper responds to our original charge to consider possi- ble actions and programs that TWS might undertake to increase minority participation in the wildlife profession and TWS (R.Anthony, 13 February 1998, Memo to MinorityAffairs Committee).

  7. Increasing the dimensions of metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurer, Wilhelm; Blaesing-Bangert, Carola; Paul, Hans-Helmut

    1990-06-01

    In any process that generates or measures pattern-placement (overlay), these parameters need to be regarded at least as two-dimensional. We show this on our procedure bringing a mask repeater under statistical process control SPC). In order to increase the accuracy of the overlay measurement process itself, plate bending has to be included as a third dimension. By taking the third dimension into account, the LMS 2000 Metrology System significantly reduces the maximum uncertainity of measurement results.

  8. Experiencing discrimination increases risk taking.

    PubMed

    Jamieson, Jeremy P; Koslov, Katrina; Nock, Matthew K; Mendes, Wendy Berry

    2013-02-01

    Prior research has revealed racial disparities in health outcomes and health-compromising behaviors, such as smoking and drug abuse. It has been suggested that discrimination contributes to such disparities, but the mechanisms through which this might occur are not well understood. In the research reported here, we examined whether the experience of discrimination affects acute physiological stress responses and increases risk-taking behavior. Black and White participants each received rejecting feedback from partners who were either of their own race (in-group rejection) or of a different race (out-group rejection, which could be interpreted as discrimination). Physiological (cardiovascular and neuroendocrine) changes, cognition (memory and attentional bias), affect, and risk-taking behavior were assessed. Significant participant race × partner race interactions were observed. Cross-race rejection, compared with same-race rejection, was associated with lower levels of cortisol, increased cardiac output, decreased vascular resistance, greater anger, increased attentional bias, and more risk-taking behavior. These data suggest that perceived discrimination is associated with distinct profiles of physiological reactivity, affect, cognitive processing, and risk taking, implicating direct and indirect pathways to health disparities.

  9. [How to increase food production?].

    PubMed

    Gahamanyi, L

    1984-12-01

    Pressure of population on cultivable land, serious soil erosion, and low productivity due to scarcity of inputs have hampered efforts to provide an adequate diet for the population of Rwanda. Until the present, production has increased about as rapidly as population, but Rwanda is not totally self-sufficient in food, future climatic conditions may be less favorable than those of the past, technical and resource constraints are likely to increase, and little new land will be available for cultivation. Between 1970-80, hectares devoted to bananas and beans have increased considerably, but the marginal nature of much new land has seriously lowered productivity. Sweet potatoes are more extensively grown but their productivity is limited, and productivity of manioc has stagnated despite efforts to increase it. Peas are less frequently cultivated because the fallow land on they they are grown has almost disappeared due to population pressure. Agriculture in Rwanda has always been associated with herding, but population pressure is eliminating pastureland. Firewood for cooking is also becoming more scarce and reforestation is not proceeding rapidly enough to fill projected demand. Between 1978-80 and the year 2000, preliminary goals are to increase production in tons from 2,005,900 to 3,375,000 for bananas, from 177,400 to 330,000 for beans, from 15,200 to 45,500 for ground nuts, from 4000 to 25,000 for soybeans, from 174,800 to 288,000 for sorghum, from 81,300 to 250,000 for maize, from 3700 to 45,000 for rice, from 837,100 to 2,148,000 for sweet potatoes, from 506,600 to 1,200,000 for manioc, and from 216,000 to 600,000 for potatoes. Reaching these goals will require doubling of overall productivity per hectare. Different strategies will be required for increasing the yields of the principal crops. Priority should be given to developing strains of beans that will grow well in the poor soils, dry or cold regions, and acidic soils where they are usually planted in Rwanda

  10. RANGE INCREASER FOR PNEUMATIC GAUGES

    DOEpatents

    Fowler, A.H.; Seaborn, G.B. Jr.

    1960-09-27

    An improved pneumatic gage is offered in which the linear range has been increased without excessive air consumption. This has been accomplished by providing an expansible antechamber connected to the nozzle of the gage so that the position of the nozzle with respect to the workpiece is varied automatically by variation in pressure within the antechamber. This arrangement ensures that the nozzle-to-workpiece clearance is maintained within certain limits, thus obtaining a linear relation of air flow to nozzle-to-workpiece clearance over a wider range.

  11. [Ozone decline and UV increase].

    PubMed

    Winkler, P; Trepte, S

    2004-02-01

    The following results have been obtained from long-term observations on the ozone layer and UV at the Meteorological Observatory Hohenpeigenberg:The seasonally varying decline of the ozone layer determines the maximum exposure to UV. Since ozone decline shows the highest rates in the spring months the UV exposure has most strongly increased in this time of the year. This is especially important because in spring the human skin is not adapted to UV exposure. Weather changes from day to day can induce rapid ozone reductions in spring about -30% which in turn is followed by an increase in UV of about 40%. Clouds, especially the transparent cirrus clouds (high clouds consisting of ice particles) have increased in frequency during spring and fall while a decrease is observed in summer. This change in cloudiness reduces the daily UV dose in spring and fall while it is enhanced in summer. With increasing height above sea level UV rises by roughly 10% per 1000 m (rule of thumb). Snow reflects the UV-radiation by up to 80% enhancing the UV-doses at relevant conditions. Strong volcano eruptions destroy ozone in the stratosphere additionally during 1-2 years after the eruption. Therafter the ozone layer recovers. In April 1993, after the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo (1991), the UV burden was still 40% higher than average. Miniholes and streamers can appear unexpected on a short-time scale and cross over Central Europe within 1-2 days, thus enhancing UV irradiation. The human skin reacts to UV exposure depending on the type of skin. The campaign "Sonne(n) mit Verstand" of the Bavarian Ministries for Environment, for Health and for Education informs about the danger of UV radiation (see www.sonne-mit-ver-stand.de). The German Weather Service informs the public on present developments of the ozone layer and relevant topics byits ozone bulletin, which is also available via internet under (www.dwd.de/deFundE/Observator/MOHp/hp2/ozon/bulletin.htm).

  12. Increase Productivity Through Knowledge Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrikova, N. A.; Dolgih, I. N.; Dyrina, E. N.

    2016-04-01

    Increase in competition level requires companies to improve the efficiency of work force use characterized by labor productivity. Professional knowledge of staff and its experience play the key role in it. The results of Extrusion Line operator’s working time analysis are performed in this article. The analysis revealed that the reasons of working time ineffective use connected with inadequate information exchange and knowledge management in the company. Authors suggest the way to solve this problem: the main sources of knowledge in engineering enterprise have been defined, the conditions of success and the stages of knowledge management control have been stated.

  13. [Ozone decline and UV increase].

    PubMed

    Winkler, P; Trepte, S

    2004-02-01

    The following results have been obtained from long-term observations on the ozone layer and UV at the Meteorological Observatory Hohenpeigenberg:The seasonally varying decline of the ozone layer determines the maximum exposure to UV. Since ozone decline shows the highest rates in the spring months the UV exposure has most strongly increased in this time of the year. This is especially important because in spring the human skin is not adapted to UV exposure. Weather changes from day to day can induce rapid ozone reductions in spring about -30% which in turn is followed by an increase in UV of about 40%. Clouds, especially the transparent cirrus clouds (high clouds consisting of ice particles) have increased in frequency during spring and fall while a decrease is observed in summer. This change in cloudiness reduces the daily UV dose in spring and fall while it is enhanced in summer. With increasing height above sea level UV rises by roughly 10% per 1000 m (rule of thumb). Snow reflects the UV-radiation by up to 80% enhancing the UV-doses at relevant conditions. Strong volcano eruptions destroy ozone in the stratosphere additionally during 1-2 years after the eruption. Therafter the ozone layer recovers. In April 1993, after the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo (1991), the UV burden was still 40% higher than average. Miniholes and streamers can appear unexpected on a short-time scale and cross over Central Europe within 1-2 days, thus enhancing UV irradiation. The human skin reacts to UV exposure depending on the type of skin. The campaign "Sonne(n) mit Verstand" of the Bavarian Ministries for Environment, for Health and for Education informs about the danger of UV radiation (see www.sonne-mit-ver-stand.de). The German Weather Service informs the public on present developments of the ozone layer and relevant topics byits ozone bulletin, which is also available via internet under (www.dwd.de/deFundE/Observator/MOHp/hp2/ozon/bulletin.htm). PMID:14770335

  14. Increase in lake trout reproduction in lake huron following the collapse of alewife: Relief from thiamine deficiency or larval predation?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fitzsimons, J.D.; Brown, S.; Brown, L.; Honeyfield, D.; He, J.; Johnson, J.E.

    2010-01-01

    In the Great Lakes there is still uncertainty as to the population level effects of a thiamine deficiency on salmonines caused by high consumption of alewives Alosa pseudoharengus. A resurgence of lake trout Salvelinus namaycush reproduction in Lake Huron following the crash of alewife stocks between 2002 and 2004 provided an opportunity to evaluate the relative effects of this crash on reproduction through relief from either alewife mediated thiamine deficiency or alewife predation on larval lake trout relative to possible changes in the size of the lake trout spawning stock. Changes in mean lake trout egg thiamine concentration post crash at one spawning reef in Parry Sound, wheremean thiamine concentration increased by almost two fold, were consistent with diet switching from alewives to rainbow smelt Osmerus mordax, the next most abundant prey fish in Lake Huron. Although thiamine levels for lake trout collected at a second reef in Parry Sound did not change post-crash, levels both pre- and post-crash were consistent with a rainbow smelt diet. A reef specific fry emergence index was found to be positively related to reef specific egg thiamine concentration but negatively related to reef specific occurrence of EMS, a thiamine deficiency related mortality syndrome. We found little evidence for overlap between the timing of spring shoreward migration of alewives and lake trout emergence, suggesting that relief from alewife predation effects had relatively little effect on the observed increase in lake trout recruitment. Numbers of spawners in the north, north-central, and southern zones of the lake increased from 2000 onwards. Overall the abundance post-2003 was higher than from pre-2004, suggesting that spawner abundance may also have contributed to increased lake trout reproduction. However, predicted numbers of spawners and measured abundance of wild recruits in assessment gear were poorly correlated suggesting that the increase in reproduction was not totally

  15. Increasing situational awareness using smartphones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boddhu, Sanjay K.; Williams, Robert L.; Wasser, Edward; Kode, Niranjan

    2012-06-01

    In recent years, the United States Armed Services and various law enforcement agencies have shown increasing interest in evaluating the feasibility of using smartphones and hand-held devices as part of the standard gear for its personnel, who are actively engaged on battlefield or in crime-prone areas. The primary motive driving analysis efforts to employ smartphone-based technologies is the prospect of the increased "Situational Awareness" achievable thru a digitally connected network of armed personnel. Personnel would be equipped with customized smart applications that use the device's sensors (GPS, camera, compass, etc...) to sense the hostile environments as well as enabling them to perform collaborative tasks to effectively complete a given mission. In this vein, as part of the Summer At The Edge (SATE) program, a group of student interns under the guidance of mentors from Qbase and AFRL, have employed smartphones and built three smart applications to tackle three real-world scenarios: PinPoint, IStream, and Cooperative GPS. This paper provides implementation details for these prototype applications, along with the supporting visualization and sensor cloud platforms and discusses results obtained from field testing of the same. Further, the paper concludes by providing the implications of the present work and insights into future work.

  16. Hybridization increases invasive knotweed success

    PubMed Central

    Parepa, Madalin; Fischer, Markus; Krebs, Christine; Bossdorf, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    Hybridization is one of the fundamental mechanisms by which rapid evolution can occur in exotic species. If hybrids show increased vigour, this could significantly contribute to invasion success. Here, we compared the success of the two invasive knotweeds, Fallopia japonica and F. sachalinensis, and their hybrid, F. × bohemica, in competing against experimental communities of native plants. Using plant material from multiple clones of each taxon collected across a latitudinal gradient in Central Europe, we found that knotweed hybrids performed significantly better in competition with a native community and that they more strongly reduced the growth of the native plants. One of the parental species, F. sachalinensis, regenerated significantly less well from rhizomes, and this difference disappeared if activated carbon was added to the substrate, which suggests allelopathic inhibition of F. sachalinensis regeneration by native plants. We found substantial within-taxon variation in competitive success in all knotweed taxa, but variation was generally greatest in the hybrid. Interestingly, there was also significant variation within the genetically uniform F. japonica, possibly reflecting epigenetic differences. Our study shows that invasive knotweed hybrids are indeed more competitive than their parents and that hybridization increased the invasiveness of the exotic knotweed complex. PMID:24665343

  17. Public knowledge about AIDS increasing.

    PubMed

    Campbell, M J; Waters, W E

    1987-04-01

    In response to concern over the perceived limited effectiveness of Department of Health and Social Security (UK) advertising campaigns to inform the public of the basic facts of Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS), a prospective questionnaire study was undertaken in Southampton, England to test the effectiveness of government education prior to a January, 1987 government television/leaflet advertising campaign. 300 questionnaires about AIDS were mailed in December of 1986 to a sample drawn from electoral rolls. The response rate was 61%. Most of the questions were drawn from material covered in the campaign. The results seemed to indicate a small overall increase in knowledge about AIDS. Some changes from a June survey were noted, e.g.: more people were aware that AIDS is a virus for which there is no cure and that it is not readily transmitted by sharing washing, eating or drinking utensils; more people believed that the statement that women are at greater risk for catching AIDS is false. Respondents were generally favorable to the government's continued use of television, even with explicit language, and to its use of the schools, for AIDS education. Many were not aware of the dangers to intravenous drug users or of the symptoms of AIDS. Other surveys have shown an increasing knowledge of AIDS dangers. It is possible that television coverage of the problem will continue to be necessary, in order that less literate populations be reached. Further AIDS health education in general is needed. PMID:3105789

  18. Hybridization increases invasive knotweed success.

    PubMed

    Parepa, Madalin; Fischer, Markus; Krebs, Christine; Bossdorf, Oliver

    2014-03-01

    Hybridization is one of the fundamental mechanisms by which rapid evolution can occur in exotic species. If hybrids show increased vigour, this could significantly contribute to invasion success. Here, we compared the success of the two invasive knotweeds, Fallopia japonica and F. sachalinensis, and their hybrid, F. × bohemica, in competing against experimental communities of native plants. Using plant material from multiple clones of each taxon collected across a latitudinal gradient in Central Europe, we found that knotweed hybrids performed significantly better in competition with a native community and that they more strongly reduced the growth of the native plants. One of the parental species, F. sachalinensis, regenerated significantly less well from rhizomes, and this difference disappeared if activated carbon was added to the substrate, which suggests allelopathic inhibition of F. sachalinensis regeneration by native plants. We found substantial within-taxon variation in competitive success in all knotweed taxa, but variation was generally greatest in the hybrid. Interestingly, there was also significant variation within the genetically uniform F. japonica, possibly reflecting epigenetic differences. Our study shows that invasive knotweed hybrids are indeed more competitive than their parents and that hybridization increased the invasiveness of the exotic knotweed complex. PMID:24665343

  19. [Patients' increasing role in healthcare].

    PubMed

    Colombo, Cinzia

    2016-03-01

    Since the late '90s citizens have been increasingly involved in healthcare, thanks to a shift in access to healthcare information, greater patients' and citizens' awareness about their rights and needs, and a change in physicians' attitudes and behavior. At the same time, to ensure the sustainability of the national health services, patients' needs are increasingly being examined in relation to the services and interventions needed, and to foster informed demand by patients and citizens, and appropriate prescriptions by physicians. Nowadays, patients already have a section in an authoritative medical journal. Working with clinicians, they set research priorities and the outcomes to be studied. Especially in UK and USA, they are invited to participate in the design and development of trials and in deciding which trials should be funded. The situation varies widely in different countries, though involving citizens in healthcare decisions is a common mantra. Even when they consult a clinician, the patients' role has evolved. People ask for information more often and want an active part in decisions about their health. Physicians start to pay more attention to the person and the social context, feelings and emotions, and person-centered care has become a reference in the doctor-patient relationship. This article offers an overview of the changing roles of patients and citizens in healthcare.

  20. Strategies to Increase Physical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Tuso, Phillip

    2015-01-01

    The benefits of physical activity are well known and well publicized. Healthy People 2020 has determined that physical activity is one of their key interventions to improve health in America. Despite wide acceptance that physical activity is a low-cost alternative to disease treatment and prevention, most Americans still do not exercise the recommended minimum of 150 minutes per week. Underpinning such recommendations is the growing concern that unless we change our behavior around active living, health care costs to treat preventable disease will become unsustainable and have a substantial impact on the financial health of the US. For this reason, physicians, health care executives, and community leaders are working together to improve total health for all Americans. One key intervention to prevent preventable diseases and to make health care more affordable is to increase the percentage of Americans who are physically active. No single intervention will increase activity rates, but a group of interventions working together in synergy may be the stimulus needed to get Americans moving. The five strategies discussed in this paper include 1) measure physical activity as a vital sign; 2) encourage patients to be physically active at least 150 minutes per week; 3) create healthy environments by making it easier for patients to be physically active where they live, learn, work, play, and pray; 4) monitor disease incidence of patients who are physically active vs those who are not physically active; and 5) spread best practices. PMID:26517440

  1. Skiing injuries: the increasing workload.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, R L; Sweetnam, D I; Stanislas, M

    1995-01-01

    All skiing injuries presenting to a fracture clinic during the period December 1992 to April 1993 were studied. Fifty five patients with 59 injuries were treated during this period. Thirty (54.5%) were male and 25 (45.5%) female. The mean age was 34 years (range 9-61). The anatomical distribution of injuries seen corresponded very closely with those seen in much larger studies abroad. There were 35 upper limb injuries (59.3%), 22 lower limb injuries (37.3%), with only two spine and trunk injuries (3.4%). While only two patients underwent surgery abroad, a further 12 needed surgical intervention on return, requiring a total stay of 61 'inpatient days'. The bulk of the workload was, however, on an outpatient basis, with a total of 172 appointments. Many advances have been made towards improving the safety of skiing. However with skiing becoming increasingly popular we can expect an increasing workload and cost associated with such injuries. PMID:8808539

  2. Revising probability estimates: Why increasing likelihood means increasing impact.

    PubMed

    Maglio, Sam J; Polman, Evan

    2016-08-01

    Forecasted probabilities rarely stay the same for long. Instead, they are subject to constant revision-moving upward or downward, uncertain events become more or less likely. Yet little is known about how people interpret probability estimates beyond static snapshots, like a 30% chance of rain. Here, we consider the cognitive, affective, and behavioral consequences of revisions to probability forecasts. Stemming from a lay belief that revisions signal the emergence of a trend, we find in 10 studies (comprising uncertain events such as weather, climate change, sex, sports, and wine) that upward changes to event-probability (e.g., increasing from 20% to 30%) cause events to feel less remote than downward changes (e.g., decreasing from 40% to 30%), and subsequently change people's behavior regarding those events despite the revised event-probabilities being the same. Our research sheds light on how revising the probabilities for future events changes how people manage those uncertain events. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27281350

  3. Thunderstorms Increase Mercury Wet Deposition.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Christopher D; Krishnamurthy, Nishanth P; Caffrey, Jane M; Landing, William M; Edgerton, Eric S; Knapp, Kenneth R; Nair, Udaysankar S

    2016-09-01

    Mercury (Hg) wet deposition, transfer from the atmosphere to Earth's surface by precipitation, in the United States is highest in locations and seasons with frequent deep convective thunderstorms, but it has never been demonstrated whether the connection is causal or simple coincidence. We use rainwater samples from over 800 individual precipitation events to show that thunderstorms increase Hg concentrations by 50% relative to weak convective or stratiform events of equal precipitation depth. Radar and satellite observations reveal that strong convection reaching the upper troposphere (where high atmospheric concentrations of soluble, oxidized mercury species (Hg(II)) are known to reside) produces the highest Hg concentrations in rain. As a result, precipitation meteorology, especially thunderstorm frequency and total rainfall, explains differences in Hg deposition between study sites located in the eastern United States. Assessing the fate of atmospheric mercury thus requires bridging the scales of global transport and convective precipitation. PMID:27464305

  4. Increased damping in irregular resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapoval, Bernard; Asch, Mark; Felix, Simon; Filoche, Marcel

    2005-04-01

    The relation between shape and damping of shallow acoustical cavities has been studied numerically in the case where the dissipation occurs only on the cavity walls. It is first found that whatever the type of geometrical irregularity, many, but not all the modes are localized. It is shown that the localization mechanism is what is called weak localization. The more irregular, the smaller the quality factors are found. However this effect is very different for the non-localized and the localized modes. For non-localized modes the damping increases roughly proportionally to the cavity surface. The localized modes are even more damped. These results generalize the results already obtained both numerically and experimentally on prefractal acoustical cavities. [B. Sapoval, O. Haeberle, and S. Russ, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 102, 2014-2019 (1997); B. Hebert, B. Sapoval, and S. Russ, ibid. 105, 1567-1576 (1999)].

  5. Advertising increases demand for vasectomy.

    PubMed

    Mehta, M; Mckenzie, M

    1996-01-01

    The recent evaluation of a 2-year no-scalpel vasectomy (NSV) training program providing on-site, hands-on training for physicians working in 43 publicly funded health centers in 17 states found that demand for vasectomy in low-income and minority communities in the US increased following the implementation of innovative advertising strategies. The program also provided sites with surgical instruments, training materials, a press kit, and some help with public information activities. Participating clinics used a range of formal and informal advertising strategies, including radio and printed advertisements, to inform potential clients about vasectomy services. Many interested clients presented to clinics to undergo vasectomy once they had been made aware of the service and its availability. Several providers even stated that advertising caused the demand for vasectomy to exceed their capacity to provide services. The provision of low- or no-cost procedures helped to attract new clients. PMID:12321999

  6. Interest for sterilization keeps increasing.

    PubMed

    1987-07-01

    Interest in sterilization continues to increase, as illustrated by the fact that some 50 doctors in Indonesia recently wanted to be trained in sterilization in order to meet the needs of transmigrants requesting this method. 1 objective of the National Family Planning Control Board is to help the younger generation understand the norm of a small, happy, and prosperous family. Another objective is to strengthen the family planning institutionalization process so that program utilization becomes an integral part of community activities. A 3rd objective is to strengthen the mental, spiritual, and psychological institutionalization process. Problems include the need to change attitudes toward contraceptives and to present all difficulties in the family planning program honestly. The role of the Indonesian Planned Parenthood Association (IPPA) can stay the same, and the experience and capability of IPPA can be used to assist other implementing units and groups in the community in the transfer of their management.

  7. Thunderstorms Increase Mercury Wet Deposition.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Christopher D; Krishnamurthy, Nishanth P; Caffrey, Jane M; Landing, William M; Edgerton, Eric S; Knapp, Kenneth R; Nair, Udaysankar S

    2016-09-01

    Mercury (Hg) wet deposition, transfer from the atmosphere to Earth's surface by precipitation, in the United States is highest in locations and seasons with frequent deep convective thunderstorms, but it has never been demonstrated whether the connection is causal or simple coincidence. We use rainwater samples from over 800 individual precipitation events to show that thunderstorms increase Hg concentrations by 50% relative to weak convective or stratiform events of equal precipitation depth. Radar and satellite observations reveal that strong convection reaching the upper troposphere (where high atmospheric concentrations of soluble, oxidized mercury species (Hg(II)) are known to reside) produces the highest Hg concentrations in rain. As a result, precipitation meteorology, especially thunderstorm frequency and total rainfall, explains differences in Hg deposition between study sites located in the eastern United States. Assessing the fate of atmospheric mercury thus requires bridging the scales of global transport and convective precipitation.

  8. Increasing the Overall Quality and the Number of Women and Hispanic Geoscientists for the Workforce: Rebuilding an Undergraduate Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, M. T.; McGehee, T. L.

    2014-12-01

    Over the past ten years, the Geosciences Program at Texas A&M University-Kingsville has increased the number of Geology majors 400%, and in the past five years we have graduated 62 students, an increase of 800%. Of these graduates, 37% were Hispanic or African-American and 26% were women. Our graduates are high-achievers with 13% also graduating from the Honor's College (campus-wide rate is less than 1.5%) and that included three women and two Hispanic graduates. Two of these recent graduates are doctoral candidates and eleven are master's candidates at major universities. Of these, three master's candidates are Hispanic, including two women, and one doctoral candidate is a Hispanic woman. The recent productivity and quality changes in this program are attributed to our shift toward an undergraduate, student-centered focus. The increases in productivity resulted from the development of strong relationships with community colleges across the state and significant efforts in recruitment and retention. The major changes in quality included implementation of a strong field-oriented focus with full faculty participation, a strong undergraduate research program, a well-developed recruitment and retention plan, a GIS Certification incorporated into the geology degree, and a culture change to further student professional development. We have maintained over 50 majors in our program for the past three years through increased faculty presentations at high-schools and community colleges, a good University recruiting staff, and quarterly newsletters, focused on student achievements, sent to all prospective students and parents inquiring about the geology major. The resurgence of the oil and gas industry and the retirement of geoscientists have provided a steady stream of job opportunities for our graduates. The 79% that are not pursuing a graduate education accepted jobs after graduation. These include oil and gas entry level jobs, mining jobs, teaching jobs, and geospatial

  9. Slow motion increases perceived intent.

    PubMed

    Caruso, Eugene M; Burns, Zachary C; Converse, Benjamin A

    2016-08-16

    To determine the appropriate punishment for a harmful action, people must often make inferences about the transgressor's intent. In courtrooms and popular media, such inferences increasingly rely on video evidence, which is often played in "slow motion." Four experiments (n = 1,610) involving real surveillance footage from a murder or broadcast replays of violent contact in professional football demonstrate that viewing an action in slow motion, compared with regular speed, can cause viewers to perceive an action as more intentional. This slow motion intentionality bias occurred, in part, because slow motion video caused participants to feel like the actor had more time to act, even when they knew how much clock time had actually elapsed. Four additional experiments (n = 2,737) reveal that allowing viewers to see both regular speed and slow motion replay mitigates the bias, but does not eliminate it. We conclude that an empirical understanding of the effect of slow motion on mental state attribution should inform the life-or-death decisions that are currently based on tacit assumptions about the objectivity of human perception.

  10. Slow motion increases perceived intent

    PubMed Central

    Caruso, Eugene M.; Burns, Zachary C.; Converse, Benjamin A.

    2016-01-01

    To determine the appropriate punishment for a harmful action, people must often make inferences about the transgressor’s intent. In courtrooms and popular media, such inferences increasingly rely on video evidence, which is often played in “slow motion.” Four experiments (n = 1,610) involving real surveillance footage from a murder or broadcast replays of violent contact in professional football demonstrate that viewing an action in slow motion, compared with regular speed, can cause viewers to perceive an action as more intentional. This slow motion intentionality bias occurred, in part, because slow motion video caused participants to feel like the actor had more time to act, even when they knew how much clock time had actually elapsed. Four additional experiments (n = 2,737) reveal that allowing viewers to see both regular speed and slow motion replay mitigates the bias, but does not eliminate it. We conclude that an empirical understanding of the effect of slow motion on mental state attribution should inform the life-or-death decisions that are currently based on tacit assumptions about the objectivity of human perception. PMID:27482091

  11. Slow motion increases perceived intent.

    PubMed

    Caruso, Eugene M; Burns, Zachary C; Converse, Benjamin A

    2016-08-16

    To determine the appropriate punishment for a harmful action, people must often make inferences about the transgressor's intent. In courtrooms and popular media, such inferences increasingly rely on video evidence, which is often played in "slow motion." Four experiments (n = 1,610) involving real surveillance footage from a murder or broadcast replays of violent contact in professional football demonstrate that viewing an action in slow motion, compared with regular speed, can cause viewers to perceive an action as more intentional. This slow motion intentionality bias occurred, in part, because slow motion video caused participants to feel like the actor had more time to act, even when they knew how much clock time had actually elapsed. Four additional experiments (n = 2,737) reveal that allowing viewers to see both regular speed and slow motion replay mitigates the bias, but does not eliminate it. We conclude that an empirical understanding of the effect of slow motion on mental state attribution should inform the life-or-death decisions that are currently based on tacit assumptions about the objectivity of human perception. PMID:27482091

  12. Vocal attractiveness increases by averaging.

    PubMed

    Bruckert, Laetitia; Bestelmeyer, Patricia; Latinus, Marianne; Rouger, Julien; Charest, Ian; Rousselet, Guillaume A; Kawahara, Hideki; Belin, Pascal

    2010-01-26

    Vocal attractiveness has a profound influence on listeners-a bias known as the "what sounds beautiful is good" vocal attractiveness stereotype [1]-with tangible impact on a voice owner's success at mating, job applications, and/or elections. The prevailing view holds that attractive voices are those that signal desirable attributes in a potential mate [2-4]-e.g., lower pitch in male voices. However, this account does not explain our preferences in more general social contexts in which voices of both genders are evaluated. Here we show that averaging voices via auditory morphing [5] results in more attractive voices, irrespective of the speaker's or listener's gender. Moreover, we show that this phenomenon is largely explained by two independent by-products of averaging: a smoother voice texture (reduced aperiodicities) and a greater similarity in pitch and timbre with the average of all voices (reduced "distance to mean"). These results provide the first evidence for a phenomenon of vocal attractiveness increases by averaging, analogous to a well-established effect of facial averaging [6, 7]. They highlight prototype-based coding [8] as a central feature of voice perception, emphasizing the similarity in the mechanisms of face and voice perception.

  13. Vocal attractiveness increases by averaging.

    PubMed

    Bruckert, Laetitia; Bestelmeyer, Patricia; Latinus, Marianne; Rouger, Julien; Charest, Ian; Rousselet, Guillaume A; Kawahara, Hideki; Belin, Pascal

    2010-01-26

    Vocal attractiveness has a profound influence on listeners-a bias known as the "what sounds beautiful is good" vocal attractiveness stereotype [1]-with tangible impact on a voice owner's success at mating, job applications, and/or elections. The prevailing view holds that attractive voices are those that signal desirable attributes in a potential mate [2-4]-e.g., lower pitch in male voices. However, this account does not explain our preferences in more general social contexts in which voices of both genders are evaluated. Here we show that averaging voices via auditory morphing [5] results in more attractive voices, irrespective of the speaker's or listener's gender. Moreover, we show that this phenomenon is largely explained by two independent by-products of averaging: a smoother voice texture (reduced aperiodicities) and a greater similarity in pitch and timbre with the average of all voices (reduced "distance to mean"). These results provide the first evidence for a phenomenon of vocal attractiveness increases by averaging, analogous to a well-established effect of facial averaging [6, 7]. They highlight prototype-based coding [8] as a central feature of voice perception, emphasizing the similarity in the mechanisms of face and voice perception. PMID:20129047

  14. Global market integration increases likelihood that a future African Green Revolution could increase crop land use and CO2 emissions.

    PubMed

    Hertel, Thomas W; Ramankutty, Navin; Baldos, Uris Lantz C

    2014-09-23

    There has been a resurgence of interest in the impacts of agricultural productivity on land use and the environment. At the center of this debate is the assertion that agricultural innovation is land sparing. However, numerous case studies and global empirical studies have found little evidence of higher yields being accompanied by reduced area. We find that these studies overlook two crucial factors: estimation of a true counterfactual scenario and a tendency to adopt a regional, rather than a global, perspective. This paper introduces a general framework for analyzing the impacts of regional and global innovation on long run crop output, prices, land rents, land use, and associated CO2 emissions. In so doing, it facilitates a reconciliation of the apparently conflicting views of the impacts of agricultural productivity growth on global land use and environmental quality. Our historical analysis demonstrates that the Green Revolution in Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East was unambiguously land and emissions sparing, compared with a counterfactual world without these innovations. In contrast, we find that the environmental impacts of a prospective African Green Revolution are potentially ambiguous. We trace these divergent outcomes to relative differences between the innovating region and the rest of the world in yields, emissions efficiencies, cropland supply response, and intensification potential. Globalization of agriculture raises the potential for adverse environmental consequences. However, if sustained for several decades, an African Green Revolution will eventually become land sparing. PMID:25201962

  15. Global market integration increases likelihood that a future African Green Revolution could increase crop land use and CO2 emissions.

    PubMed

    Hertel, Thomas W; Ramankutty, Navin; Baldos, Uris Lantz C

    2014-09-23

    There has been a resurgence of interest in the impacts of agricultural productivity on land use and the environment. At the center of this debate is the assertion that agricultural innovation is land sparing. However, numerous case studies and global empirical studies have found little evidence of higher yields being accompanied by reduced area. We find that these studies overlook two crucial factors: estimation of a true counterfactual scenario and a tendency to adopt a regional, rather than a global, perspective. This paper introduces a general framework for analyzing the impacts of regional and global innovation on long run crop output, prices, land rents, land use, and associated CO2 emissions. In so doing, it facilitates a reconciliation of the apparently conflicting views of the impacts of agricultural productivity growth on global land use and environmental quality. Our historical analysis demonstrates that the Green Revolution in Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East was unambiguously land and emissions sparing, compared with a counterfactual world without these innovations. In contrast, we find that the environmental impacts of a prospective African Green Revolution are potentially ambiguous. We trace these divergent outcomes to relative differences between the innovating region and the rest of the world in yields, emissions efficiencies, cropland supply response, and intensification potential. Globalization of agriculture raises the potential for adverse environmental consequences. However, if sustained for several decades, an African Green Revolution will eventually become land sparing.

  16. Voltage-gated ion channelopathies: inherited disorders caused by abnormal sodium, chloride, and calcium regulation in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, E P

    1995-01-01

    The pathological genetic defects in the inherited myotonias and periodic paralyses were recently elucidated using molecular genetic studies. These disorders are usually transmitted as a dominant trait from an affected parent to a child. The many clinical symptoms include cold-induced uncontrollable contraction of muscle, potassium-induced contraction and paralysis, myotonia with dramatic muscular hypertrophy, muscle stiffness, and insulin-induced paralysis (in males). Horses afflicted with the disorder can suddenly collapse, despite an impressive physique. In the past three years, these clinically defined disorders have been shown to share a common etiology: subtle defects of ion channels in the muscle-fiber membrane. Although the specific ion channel involved varies depending on the disease, most patients have single amino acid changes in the channel proteins, with both normal and mutant channels present in each muscle fiber. For each patient, we can now establish a precise molecular diagnosis in the face of overlapping clinical symptoms and begin specific pharmacological treatment based on the primary problem. These studies have also provided insight into basic muscle biology and emphasize the careful regulation of ions in muscle excitation.

  17. Functional interaction between S1 and S4 segments in voltage-gated sodium channels revealed by human channelopathies.

    PubMed

    Amarouch, Mohamed-Yassine; Kasimova, Marina A; Tarek, Mounir; Abriel, Hugues

    2014-01-01

    The p.I141V mutation of the voltage-gated sodium channel is associated with several clinical hyper-excitability phenotypes. To understand the structural bases of the p.I141V biophysical alterations, molecular dynamics simulations were performed. These simulations predicted that the p.I141V substitution induces the formation of a hydrogen bond between the Y168 residue of the S2 segment and the R225 residue of the S4 segment. We generated a p.I141V-Y168F double mutant for both the Nav1.4 and Nav1.5 channels. The double mutants demonstrated the abolition of the functional effects of the p.I141V mutation, consistent with the formation of a specific interaction between Y168-S2 and R225-S4. The single p.Y168F mutation, however, positively shifted the activation curve, suggesting a compensatory role of these residues on the stability of the voltage-sensing domain.

  18. Will Fiction Classification Schemes Increase Use?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Sharon L.

    1988-01-01

    A study of genre fiction classification used circulation data and a patron questionnaire to test whether physically separating fiction into categories will increase use; marking spines with category labels will increase use; use of classified fiction will increase with library size; and classification will increase the number of different books…

  19. 14 CFR 381.13 - Price increases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Price increases. 381.13 Section 381.13... REGULATIONS SPECIAL EVENT TOURS § 381.13 Price increases. (a) Should the tour operator increase a participant's tour price by more than 10 percent (aggregate of all increases to that participant),...

  20. Bimaterial Thermal Strip With Increased Flexing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Andrew D.

    1994-01-01

    In proposed bimaterial thermal strip, one layer has negative coefficient of thermal expansion, thereby increasing difference between coefficients of thermal expansion of two outer layers and consequently increasing flexing caused by change in temperature. Proposed bimaterial strips used in thermostats.

  1. Increasing revenue through fee review and adjustment.

    PubMed

    Wild, J; Cimerola, J

    1996-08-01

    Medical group practices are under increasing pressure to deliver care more cost-efficiently. To remain competitive, practices must find ways to increase their fee-for-service revenue. One way for medical group practices to increase revenue is to review fees in accordance with industry standards and to adjust them, as needed.

  2. Increasing ideological tolerance in social psychology.

    PubMed

    Inbar, Yoel; Lammers, Joris

    2015-01-01

    We argue that recognizing current ideological diversity in social psychology and promoting tolerance of minority views is just as important as increasing the number of non-liberal researchers. Increasing tolerance will allow individuals in the minority to express dissenting views, which will improve psychological science by reducing bias. We present four recommendations for increasing tolerance.

  3. Are diseases increasing in the ocean?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lafferty, Kevin D.; Porter, James W.; Ford, Susan E.

    2004-01-01

    Many factors (climate warming, pollution, harvesting, introduced species) can contribute to disease outbreaks in marine life. Concomitant increases in each of these makes it difficult to attribute recent changes in disease occurrence or severity to any one factor. For example, the increase in disease of Caribbean coral is postulated to be a result of climate change and introduction of terrestrial pathogens. Indirect evidence exists that (a) warming increased disease in turtles; (b) protection, pollution, and terrestrial pathogens increased mammal disease; (c) aquaculture increased disease in mollusks; and (d) release from overfished predators increased sea urchin disease. In contrast, fishing and pollution may have reduced disease in fishes. In other taxa (e.g., sea grasses, crustaceans, sharks), there is little evidence that disease has changed over time. The diversity of patterns suggests there are many ways that environmental change can interact with disease in the ocean.

  4. Increased chronic acceleration exposure enhances work capacity.

    PubMed

    Burton, R R; Smith, A H

    1997-10-01

    Adult male chickens adapted to 1.75 or 2.5 G from long term centrifugation, were maximally exercised on an animal treadmill at 1 g (Earth's gravity) and compared with the exercise capacities of control chickens raised at 1 g. The increased-G birds had statistically significantly greater exercise capacities than the controls during the first 3 weeks of the study after the initial exercise exposure. Thereafter however for the following two months of the study, there was no difference in either group's exercise capacities. This early increased work capacity was attributed to the increased-G birds improved ability to maximize their muscular strength with neurological adaptation. The increased-G birds lost body mass at a 31% greater rate during exercise than the controls although this difference was not statistically significant. This increased body mass loss was considered to have resulted from increased use of glycogen during exercise.

  5. Newer approaches in increasing life span.

    PubMed

    Dhar, H L

    1999-09-01

    Based on ideal conditions technical life span of human kind is approximately 110-120 years. Although number of studies including calorie restriction and antiparkinsonism drug (deprenyl) have indicated increased life span in animals, it is premature to expect them to increase life span in man. However, current studies like activation of immune system with DHEA in man and anticipation of antioxidant therapy contributing to increased life span are encouraging. Practice of meditation particularly TM and balanced diet might be contributory.

  6. Fasting Increases Tobramycin Oral Absorption in Mice▿

    PubMed Central

    De Leo, Luigina; Di Toro, Nicola; Decorti, Giuliana; Malusà, Noelia; Ventura, Alessandro; Not, Tarcisio

    2010-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of the aminoglycoside tobramycin was evaluated after oral administration to fed or fasting (15 h) mice. As expected, under normal feeding conditions, oral absorption was negligible; however, fasting induced a dramatic increase in tobramycin bioavailability. The dual-sugar test with lactulose and l-rhamnose confirmed increased small bowel permeability via the paracellular route in fasting animals. When experiments aimed at increasing the oral bioavailability of hydrophilic compounds are performed, timing of fasting should be extremely accurate. PMID:20086144

  7. Familial skin cancer syndromes: Increased melanoma risk.

    PubMed

    Ransohoff, Katherine J; Jaju, Prajakta D; Jaju, Prajaka D; Tang, Jean Y; Carbone, Michele; Leachman, Sancy; Sarin, Kavita Y

    2016-03-01

    Phenotypic traits, such as red hair and freckling, increase melanoma risk by 2- to 3-fold. In addition, approximately 10% of melanomas are caused by inherited germline mutations that increase melanoma risk from 4- to >1000-fold. This review highlights the key genes responsible for inherited melanoma, with an emphasis on when a patient should undergo genetic testing. Many genetic syndromes associated with increased melanoma risk are also associated with an increased risk of other cancers. Identification of these high-risk patients is essential for preventive behavior reinforcement, genetic counseling, and ensuring other required cancer screenings.

  8. Faculty Policies for Granting Salary Increases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, John D.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Profiles of thirty faculty members, including background information, student evaluations, publications, and service activities were constructed. Twelve faculty members served as judges regarding salary increases for the ensuing school year. Salary increases were found and analyzed through judgment analysis, a useful technique for identifying the…

  9. Exergames: Increasing Physical Activity through Effective Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudella, Jennifer L.; Butz, Jennifer V.

    2015-01-01

    Due to the growing obesity epidemic in the United States, educators must consider new ways to increase physical activity in an effort to address obesity. There are a variety of ways educators can increase physical activity in the classroom, and exergames--video games that require physical movement in order to play--are a modern-day approach to…

  10. Cyberbullying: An Increasing Challenge for Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Marees, Nandoli; Petermann, Franz

    2012-01-01

    The use of information and communication technology (ICT) has not only brought advantages to mankind. One downside is the emergence and increase of cyberbullying in schools. Affecting students of all ages, teachers, parents, and other educators, this special form of bullying is an increasing challenge for schools. This article offers an overview…

  11. Separating Fact from Fiction: Increasing Running Speed

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murgia, Carla

    2008-01-01

    From a biomechanical point of view, this article explores the common belief that one must increase stride length and frequency in order to increase running speed. The limb length, explosive power, and anaerobic capacity of the athlete, as well as the type of running (sprinting vs. long distance) must be considered before making such a…

  12. Wilson's disease; increased aluminum in liver.

    PubMed

    Yasui, M; Yoshimasu, F; Yase, Y; Uebayashi, Y

    1979-01-01

    Interaction of trace metal metabolism was studied in a patient with Wilson's dease. Atomic absorption analysis showed markedly increased urinary excretion of copper and aluminum and an increased aluminum content was found in the biopsied liver by neutron activation analysis. These findings suggest a complicated pathogenetic mechanism involving other metals besides copper in the Wilson's disease.

  13. Board Seeks $300 Million Increase in Appropriations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Vocational Journal, 1978

    1978-01-01

    The American Vocational Association (AVA) Board of Directors met during the annual convention and took action on several fronts. Given high priority were increasing vocational education appropriations for 1979, improving CETA, increasing AVA membership, and strengthening black vocational education participation. (Editor)

  14. New apparatus increases ion beam power density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baldwin, L. V.; Sandborn, V. A.

    1964-01-01

    To increase ion engine or rocket power, an ion source and emitter, an ion beam focusing electrode, and an ion accelerator are incorporated into the system. In operation the space charge surrounding the ion emitter decreases, the ion beam density accelerates, and engine power increases.

  15. Increasing Response Diversity in Children with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Napolitano, Deborah A.; Smith, Tristram; Zarcone, Jennifer R.; Goodkin, Karen; McAdam, David B.

    2010-01-01

    Repetitive and invariant behavior is a diagnostic feature of autism. We implemented a lag reinforcement schedule to increase response diversity for 6 participants with autism aged 6 to 10 years, 4 of whom also received prompting plus additional training. These procedures appeared to increase the variety of building-block structures, demonstrating…

  16. Exercising self-control increases approach motivation.

    PubMed

    Schmeichel, Brandon J; Harmon-Jones, Cindy; Harmon-Jones, Eddie

    2010-07-01

    The present research tested the hypothesis that exercising self-control causes an increase in approach motivation. Study 1 found that exercising (vs. not exercising) self-control increases self-reported approach motivation. Study 2a identified a behavior--betting on low-stakes gambles--that is correlated with approach motivation but is relatively uncorrelated with self-control, and Study 2b observed that exercising self-control temporarily increases this behavior. Last, Study 3 found that exercising self-control facilitates the perception of a reward-relevant symbol (i.e., a dollar sign) but not a reward-irrelevant symbol (i.e., a percent sign). Altogether, these results support the hypothesis that exercising self-control temporarily increases approach motivation. Failures of self-control that follow from prior efforts at self-control (i.e., ego depletion) may be explained in part by increased approach motivation.

  17. Oral stimulation with aspartame increases hunger.

    PubMed

    Tordoff, M G; Alleva, A M

    1990-03-01

    We evaluated whether "sweetness" increases hunger. Groups of 10 male and 10 female subjects chewed a gum base containing one of four concentrations of aspartame (0.05%, 0.3%, 0.5%, or 1.0%) for 15 min. Relative to groups given nothing or unsweetened gum base to chew, groups given the sweetened gum bases increased hunger ratings, but not in a manner monotonically related to aspartame concentration. The most effective aspartame concentration to increase hunger was 0.3% for females and 0.5% for males. The highest aspartame concentrations had a time-dependent, biphasic effect on appetite, producing a transient decrease followed by a sustained increase in hunger ratings. Thus, the concentration of the sweetener, the sex of the subject and the time after chewing, were all important determinants of whether "sweetness" increased hunger.

  18. Are increases in cigarette taxation regressive?

    PubMed

    Borren, P; Sutton, M

    1992-12-01

    Using the latest published data from Tobacco Advisory Council surveys, this paper re-evaluates the question of whether or not increases in cigarette taxation are regressive in the United Kingdom. The extended data set shows no evidence of increasing price-elasticity by social class as found in a major previous study. To the contrary, there appears to be no clear pattern in the price responsiveness of smoking behaviour across different social classes. Increases in cigarette taxation, while reducing smoking levels in all groups, fall most heavily on men and women in the lowest social class. Men and women in social class five can expect to pay eight and eleven times more of a tax increase respectively, than their social class one counterparts. Taken as a proportion of relative incomes, the regressive nature of increases in cigarette taxation is even more pronounced.

  19. Adiponectin Lowers Glucose Production by Increasing SOGA

    PubMed Central

    Cowerd, Rachael B.; Asmar, Melissa M.; Alderman, J. McKee; Alderman, Elizabeth A.; Garland, Alaina L.; Busby, Walker H.; Bodnar, Wanda M.; Rusyn, Ivan; Medoff, Benjamin D.; Tisch, Roland; Mayer-Davis, Elizabeth; Swenberg, James A.; Zeisel, Steven H.; Combs, Terry P.

    2010-01-01

    Adiponectin is a hormone that lowers glucose production by increasing liver insulin sensitivity. Insulin blocks the generation of biochemical intermediates for glucose production by inhibiting autophagy. However, autophagy is stimulated by an essential mediator of adiponectin action, AMPK. This deadlock led to our hypothesis that adiponectin inhibits autophagy through a novel mediator. Mass spectrometry revealed a novel protein that we call suppressor of glucose by autophagy (SOGA) in adiponectin-treated hepatoma cells. Adiponectin increased SOGA in hepatocytes, and siRNA knockdown of SOGA blocked adiponectin inhibition of glucose production. Furthermore, knockdown of SOGA increased late autophagosome and lysosome staining and the secretion of valine, an amino acid that cannot be synthesized or metabolized by liver cells, suggesting that SOGA inhibits autophagy. SOGA decreased in response to AICAR, an activator of AMPK, and LY294002, an inhibitor of the insulin signaling intermediate, PI3K. AICAR reduction of SOGA was blocked by adiponectin; however, adiponectin did not increase SOGA during PI3K inhibition, suggesting that adiponectin increases SOGA through the insulin signaling pathway. SOGA contains an internal signal peptide that enables the secretion of a circulating fragment of SOGA, providing a surrogate marker for intracellular SOGA levels. Circulating SOGA increased in parallel with adiponectin and insulin activity in both humans and mice. These results suggest that adiponectin-mediated increases in SOGA contribute to the inhibition of glucose production. PMID:20813965

  20. NSF to receive 10% funding increase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Richard M.

    Work is almost complete on the fiscal year 1994 funding bill for the National Science Foundation. On October 1, Conference Committee Chairs Louis Stokes (D-Ohio) and Barbara Mikulski (D-Md.) and their colleagues completed work on the final version of HR2491, the VA, HUD, Independent Agencies Appropriations Bill. The House and Senate will soon give their final approval to the conference report for HR2491, after which it will lack only the president's signature. NSF's overall budget increase of 10%, raising total funding to %3,005.3 million, is the highest increase among all departments and agencies. Last year's increase in NSF funding was 6.3%.Funding for research and related activities will increase 7% to $1,986 million, a compromise between the 10% House increase and the 4% Senate figure. Last year's bill cut research funding. Education and human resources funding will increase 17% to $569.6 million. This is $13.5 million above the Clinton administration's request. Last year's increase for education and human resources was 4.7%.

  1. Herbivore pressure increases toward the equator.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Diego; Marquis, Robert J

    2012-07-31

    Increases in species diversity and density from higher to lower latitudes are well documented. Nevertheless, the consequences of these changes in diversity for structuring ecological communities and influencing biotic evolution are largely unknown. It is widely believed that this increase in species diversity is associated with increased intensity of ecological interactions closer to the equator. For plant-herbivore interactions in particular, the predictions are that, at lower latitudes, plants will be attacked by more individual herbivores, more herbivore species, and more specialized herbivores and, therefore, will suffer greater damage. We used a large-scale latitudinal transect from Mexico to Bolivia to quantify changes in leaf damage, diversity, and abundance of lepidopteran larvae on two widely distributed host species of the genus Piper (Piperaceae). We show that both density and species richness of herbivores were highest at the equator and decreased with increasing latitude, both northward and southward. Contrary to expectation, however, this increase in herbivore diversity was attributable to the addition of generalist not specialist species. Finally, and again contrary to expectation, the increase in herbivore density with decreasing latitude did not produce a corresponding damage gradient. We propose that the lack of a latitudinal concordance between increases in herbivore density and diversity with decreasing latitude, and the resulting herbivore damage, supports the hypothesis of better plant antiherbivore defenses at lower latitudes. Furthermore, the changes in the relative abundance of generalist vs. specialist species suggest that the nature of the selective pressure is intrinsically different between higher and lower latitudes.

  2. Atrial natriuretic factor increases vascular permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Lockette, W.; Brennaman, B. )

    1990-12-01

    An increase in central blood volume in microgravity may result in increased plasma levels of atrial natriuretic factor (ANF). Since elevations in plasma ANF are found in clinical syndromes associated with edema, and since space motion sickness induced by microgravity is associated with an increase in central blood volume and facial edema, we determined whether ANF increases capillary permeability to plasma protein. Conscious, bilaterally nephrectomized male rats were infused with either saline, ANF + saline, or hexamethonium + saline over 2 h following bolus injections of 125I-albumin and 14C-dextran of similar molecular size. Blood pressure was monitored and serial determinations of hematocrits were made. Animals infused with 1.0 micrograms.kg-1.min-1 ANF had significantly higher hematocrits than animals infused with saline vehicle. Infusion of ANF increased the extravasation of 125I-albumin, but not 14C-dextran from the intravascular compartment. ANF also induced a depressor response in rats, but the change in blood pressure did not account for changes in capillary permeability to albumin; similar depressor responses induced by hexamethonium were not accompanied by increased extravasation of albumin from the intravascular compartment. ANF may decrease plasma volume by increasing permeability to albumin, and this effect of ANF may account for some of the signs and symptoms of space motion sickness.

  3. Medicare case-mix index increase

    PubMed Central

    Ginsburg, Paul B.; Carter, Grace M.

    1986-01-01

    Medicare paid hospitals a higher amount per admission in 1984 than had been planned because the case-mix index (CMI), which reflects the proportion of patients in high-weighted DRG's versus low-weighted ones, increased more than had been projected. This study estimated the degree to which the increase in the CMI from 1981 reflected medical practice changes, the aging of the Medicare inpatient population, changes in coding practices of physicians and hospitals, and changes in the way that the Health Care Financing Administration collects the data on case-mix. All of the above, except for aging, contributed to the increase in the CMI. PMID:10311672

  4. FEASIBILITY OF INCREASING THE ENERGY OF RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    MACKAY,W.W.; JAIN,A.; LUCCIO,A.U.; PILAT,F.; ROSER,T.; TEPIKIAN,S.; TROBOJEVIC,D.

    2001-06-18

    In this paper we discuss the possibility of increasing the energy of beams in RHIC by as much as 30% with a modest trade-off in luminosity. The arc dipoles and quadrupoles were designed with considerable margin. For higher energies (>100 GeV/nucleon) the minimum {beta}* may be required to increase as the interaction region triplets saturate. The separator magnets (DX) have the least margin for increased field, so we consider three scenarios: allowing for a small crossing angle with the present DX magnets, upgrading the DX magnets to higher strength, and permitting a crossing angle of {approximately}1{degree} by removing the DX magnets altogether.

  5. Products to safely increase lean muscle mass.

    PubMed

    1998-01-01

    Pharmaceutical companies are promoting injectable HGH or rHGH to promote the gain of muscle mass in persons with AIDS. Side effects can include high triglycerides, thyroid dysfunction, and increased tumor growth. A possible alternative is a Homeopathic HGH produced by Biomed Comm. Contact information for Biomed Comm is provided. Marinol, which contains THC, the active ingredient in marijuana, also promotes appetite and an increase in body mass. Immunocal, Optimune, and Designer Protein also appear effective in increasing lean muscle mass. Whole lemon olive oil drink is also discussed. PMID:11366553

  6. Adolescent impatience decreases with increased frontostriatal connectivity.

    PubMed

    van den Bos, Wouter; Rodriguez, Christian A; Schweitzer, Julie B; McClure, Samuel M

    2015-07-21

    Adolescence is a developmental period associated with an increase in impulsivity. Impulsivity is a multidimensional construct, and in this study we focus on one of the underlying components: impatience. Impatience can result from (i) disregard of future outcomes and/or (ii) oversensitivity to immediate rewards, but it is not known which of these evaluative processes underlie developmental changes. To distinguish between these two causes, we investigated developmental changes in the structural and functional connectivity of different frontostriatal tracts. We report that adolescents were more impatient on an intertemporal choice task and reported less future orientation, but not more present hedonism, than young adults. Developmental increases in structural connectivity strength in the right dorsolateral prefrontal tract were related to increased negative functional coupling with the striatum and an age-related decrease in discount rates. Our results suggest that mainly increased control, and the integration of future-oriented thought, drives the reduction in impatience across adolescence. PMID:26100897

  7. Increase in the Array Television Camera Sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakhrukhanov, O. S.

    A simple adder circuit for successive television frames that enables to considerably increase the sensitivity of such radiation detectors is suggested by the example of array television camera QN902K.

  8. Ethanologenic bacteria with increased resistance to furfural

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Elliot Norman; Jarboe, Laura R.; Yomano, Lorraine P.; York, Sean W.; Shanmugam, Keelnatham; Ingram, Lonnie O'Neal

    2015-10-06

    The invention relates to bacterium that have increased resistance to furfural and methods of preparation. The invention also relates to methods of producing ethanol using the bacterium and corresponding kits.

  9. Loving-kindness meditation increases social connectedness.

    PubMed

    Hutcherson, Cendri A; Seppala, Emma M; Gross, James J

    2008-10-01

    The need for social connection is a fundamental human motive, and it is increasingly clear that feeling socially connected confers mental and physical health benefits. However, in many cultures, societal changes are leading to growing social distrust and alienation. Can feelings of social connection and positivity toward others be increased? Is it possible to self-generate these feelings? In this study, the authors used a brief loving-kindness meditation exercise to examine whether social connection could be created toward strangers in a controlled laboratory context. Compared with a closely matched control task, even just a few minutes of loving-kindness meditation increased feelings of social connection and positivity toward novel individuals on both explicit and implicit levels. These results suggest that this easily implemented technique may help to increase positive social emotions and decrease social isolation.

  10. Adolescent impatience decreases with increased frontostriatal connectivity

    PubMed Central

    van den Bos, Wouter; Rodriguez, Christian A.; Schweitzer, Julie B.; McClure, Samuel M.

    2015-01-01

    Adolescence is a developmental period associated with an increase in impulsivity. Impulsivity is a multidimensional construct, and in this study we focus on one of the underlying components: impatience. Impatience can result from (i) disregard of future outcomes and/or (ii) oversensitivity to immediate rewards, but it is not known which of these evaluative processes underlie developmental changes. To distinguish between these two causes, we investigated developmental changes in the structural and functional connectivity of different frontostriatal tracts. We report that adolescents were more impatient on an intertemporal choice task and reported less future orientation, but not more present hedonism, than young adults. Developmental increases in structural connectivity strength in the right dorsolateral prefrontal tract were related to increased negative functional coupling with the striatum and an age-related decrease in discount rates. Our results suggest that mainly increased control, and the integration of future-oriented thought, drives the reduction in impatience across adolescence. PMID:26100897

  11. The ways of SOFC systems efficiency increasing

    SciTech Connect

    Demin, A.K.; Timofeyeva, N.

    1996-04-01

    The efficiency of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) is described. This paper considers methods to lift the fuel utilization and/or the average cell voltage with the goal of increasing the cell efficiency by improved cell designs.

  12. Increased DNA methylation in the suicide brain.

    PubMed

    Haghighi, Fatemeh; Xin, Yurong; Chanrion, Benjamin; O'Donnell, Anne H; Ge, Yongchao; Dwork, Andrew J; Arango, Victoria; Mann, J John

    2014-09-01

    Clinical studies find that childhood adversity and stressful life events in adulthood increase the risk for major depression and for suicide. The predispositions to either major depression or suicide are thought to depend on genetic risk factors or epigenetic effects. We investigated DNA methylation signatures postmortem in brains of suicides with diagnosis of major depressive disorder. DNA methylation levels were determined at single C-phosphate-G (CpG) resolution sites within ventral prefrontal cortex of 53 suicides and nonpsychiatric controls, aged 16 to 89 years. We found that DNA methylation increases throughout the lifespan. Suicides showed an 8-fold greater number of methylated CpG sites relative to controls (P < 2.2 x 10(-16)), with greater DNA methylation changes over and above the increased methylation observed in normal aging. This increased DNA methylation may be a significant contributor to the neuropathology and psychopathology underlying the risk of suicide in depression.

  13. Autism overflows: increasing prevalence and proliferating theories.

    PubMed

    Waterhouse, Lynn

    2008-12-01

    This selective review examines the lack of an explanation for the sharply increasing prevalence of autism, and the lack of any synthesis of the proliferating theories of autism. The most controversial and most widely disseminated notion for increasing prevalence is the measles-mumps-rubella/thimerosal vaccine theory. Less controversial causes that have been proposed include changes in autism diagnostic criteria, increasing services for autism, and growing awareness of the disorder. Regardless of its causes, the increasing prevalence of autism has put pressure on the field of autism research to generate productive and predictive theories of autism. However, the heterogeneity of brain deficits, impaired behaviors, and genetic variants in autism have challenged researchers and theorists, and despite 45 years of research, no standard causal synthesis has emerged. Research going forward should assume that autism is an aggregation of myriad independent disorders of impaired sociality, social cognition, communication, and motor and cognitive skills.

  14. Worldwide trends show oropharyngeal cancer rates increasing

    Cancer.gov

    NCI scientists report that the incidence of oropharyngeal cancer significantly increased during the period 1983-2002 among people in countries that are economically developed. Oropharyngeal cancer occurs primarily in the middle part of the throat behind t

  15. Increased aldosterone: mechanism of hypertension in obesity.

    PubMed

    Flynn, Colleen

    2014-05-01

    The prevalence of both obesity and hypertension are increasing worldwide. Hypertension is a common consequence of obesity. Increased central adiposity is associated with increased aldosterone levels and blood pressure in human beings. A number of small studies have shown an association between obesity-mediated hypertension and mechanisms directly linked to increased levels of aldosterone. These studies have shown a trend toward relatively greater blood pressure reduction using aldosterone-receptor blockers compared with other classes of antihypertensive agents. Other than treatment for weight loss, treatment of hypertension with specific antihypertensive medications that block or reduce aldosterone action are appropriate in obese patients. Further research is needed to understand the exact role of the adipocyte in obesity-mediated hypertension.

  16. An experimental increase in stuttering frequency.

    PubMed

    Martin, R R; Haroldson, S K

    1988-06-01

    The purpose of the present experiment was to investigate whether stuttering frequency could be increased from baseline by an experimental condition. Initially, 10 adult stutterers spoke spontaneously while alone. Next, they continued speaking, but with an adult, male conversationalist. Finally, the subjects again spoke while alone. Percent stuttering increased in the conversational situation compared with the baseline (alone) situation, and decreased in the final baseline (alone) situation compared with the conversational situation.

  17. Heterostructure optimization for increasing LED efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabinovich, Oleg; Legotin, Sergey; Didenko, Sergey; Yakimov, Evgeniy; Osipov, Yuriy; Fedorchenko, Irina

    2016-05-01

    Computer simulations were performed to increase the quantum efficiency of LED by optimizing the nanoheterostructure (NH). Furthermore, the InGaN and AlGaP NHs for LEDs were optimized. On the basis of the optimum NH, ways to further increase the efficiency and the influence of impurities and indium atoms doped into barriers between quantum wells were investigated. The optimum impurity and indium atom concentrations to achieve higher flux were determined.

  18. The Way to Increased Airplane Engine Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vohrer, Eugen

    1939-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to give an outline of the present state of development and point out the possibilities available for the further increase in the power/displacement ratio, the economy, and the reliability of the engine. Some of the aspects discussed are methods of increasing take-off power, the various methods of preparation of the fuel mixture and their effect on power, economy, and safety.

  19. The Effect of Increasing Mass upon Locomotion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeWitt, John; Hagan, Donald

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine if increasing body mass while maintaining bodyweight would affect ground reaction forces and joint kinetics during walking and running. It was hypothesized that performing gait with increased mass while maintaining body weight would result in greater ground reaction forces, and would affect the net joint torques and work at the ankle, knee and hip when compared to gait with normal mass and bodyweight. Vertical ground reaction force was measured for ten subjects (5M/5F) during walking (1.34 m/s) and running (3.13 m/s) on a treadmill. Subjects completed one minute of locomotion at normal mass and bodyweight and at four added mass (AM) conditions (10%, 20%, 30% and 40% of body mass) in random order. Three-dimensional joint position data were collected via videography. Walking and running were analyzed separately. The addition of mass resulted in several effects. Peak impact forces and loading rates increased during walking, but decreased during running. Peak propulsive forces decreased during walking and did not change during running. Stride time increased and hip extensor angular impulse and positive work increased as mass was added for both styles of locomotion. Work increased at a greater rate during running than walking. The adaptations to additional mass that occur during walking are different than during running. Increasing mass during exercise in microgravity may be beneficial to increasing ground reaction forces during walking and strengthening hip musculature during both walking and running. Future study in true microgravity is required to determine if the adaptations found would be similar in a weightless environment.

  20. Antioxidants can increase melanoma metastasis in mice.

    PubMed

    Le Gal, Kristell; Ibrahim, Mohamed X; Wiel, Clotilde; Sayin, Volkan I; Akula, Murali K; Karlsson, Christin; Dalin, Martin G; Akyürek, Levent M; Lindahl, Per; Nilsson, Jonas; Bergo, Martin O

    2015-10-01

    Antioxidants in the diet and supplements are widely used to protect against cancer, but clinical trials with antioxidants do not support this concept. Some trials show that antioxidants actually increase cancer risk and a study in mice showed that antioxidants accelerate the progression of primary lung tumors. However, little is known about the impact of antioxidant supplementation on the progression of other types of cancer, including malignant melanoma. We show that administration of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) increases lymph node metastases in an endogenous mouse model of malignant melanoma but has no impact on the number and size of primary tumors. Similarly, NAC and the soluble vitamin E analog Trolox markedly increased the migration and invasive properties of human malignant melanoma cells but did not affect their proliferation. Both antioxidants increased the ratio between reduced and oxidized glutathione in melanoma cells and in lymph node metastases, and the increased migration depended on new glutathione synthesis. Furthermore, both NAC and Trolox increased the activation of the small guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase) RHOA, and blocking downstream RHOA signaling abolished antioxidant-induced migration. These results demonstrate that antioxidants and the glutathione system play a previously unappreciated role in malignant melanoma progression.

  1. Vasopressin increases human risky cooperative behavior.

    PubMed

    Brunnlieb, Claudia; Nave, Gideon; Camerer, Colin F; Schosser, Stephan; Vogt, Bodo; Münte, Thomas F; Heldmann, Marcus

    2016-02-23

    The history of humankind is an epic of cooperation, which is ubiquitous across societies and increasing in scale. Much human cooperation occurs where it is risky to cooperate for mutual benefit because successful cooperation depends on a sufficient level of cooperation by others. Here we show that arginine vasopressin (AVP), a neuropeptide that mediates complex mammalian social behaviors such as pair bonding, social recognition and aggression causally increases humans' willingness to engage in risky, mutually beneficial cooperation. In two double-blind experiments, male participants received either AVP or placebo intranasally and made decisions with financial consequences in the "Stag hunt" cooperation game. AVP increases humans' willingness to cooperate. That increase is not due to an increase in the general willingness to bear risks or to altruistically help others. Using functional brain imaging, we show that, when subjects make the risky Stag choice, AVP down-regulates the BOLD signal in the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC), a risk-integration region, and increases the left dlPFC functional connectivity with the ventral pallidum, an AVP receptor-rich region previously associated with AVP-mediated social reward processing in mammals. These findings show a previously unidentified causal role for AVP in social approach behavior in humans, as established by animal research. PMID:26858433

  2. Vasopressin increases human risky cooperative behavior

    PubMed Central

    Brunnlieb, Claudia; Nave, Gideon; Camerer, Colin F.; Schosser, Stephan; Vogt, Bodo; Münte, Thomas F.; Heldmann, Marcus

    2016-01-01

    The history of humankind is an epic of cooperation, which is ubiquitous across societies and increasing in scale. Much human cooperation occurs where it is risky to cooperate for mutual benefit because successful cooperation depends on a sufficient level of cooperation by others. Here we show that arginine vasopressin (AVP), a neuropeptide that mediates complex mammalian social behaviors such as pair bonding, social recognition and aggression causally increases humans’ willingness to engage in risky, mutually beneficial cooperation. In two double-blind experiments, male participants received either AVP or placebo intranasally and made decisions with financial consequences in the “Stag hunt” cooperation game. AVP increases humans’ willingness to cooperate. That increase is not due to an increase in the general willingness to bear risks or to altruistically help others. Using functional brain imaging, we show that, when subjects make the risky Stag choice, AVP down-regulates the BOLD signal in the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC), a risk-integration region, and increases the left dlPFC functional connectivity with the ventral pallidum, an AVP receptor-rich region previously associated with AVP-mediated social reward processing in mammals. These findings show a previously unidentified causal role for AVP in social approach behavior in humans, as established by animal research. PMID:26858433

  3. Chronic methamphetamine increases fighting in mice.

    PubMed

    Sokolov, Boris P; Schindler, Charles W; Cadet, Jean Lud

    2004-02-01

    A propensity for violent behaviors to develop in chronic methamphetamine (METH) abusers has been noted. The idea that increased aggressiveness might result from chronic METH administration was tested in mice after chronic (long-term intermittent, 8 weeks) or single exposures to the drug. A single injection of METH (6 mg/kg) did not augment fighting. In contrast, chronic METH administration significantly increased the number of animals that initiated bite attacks. This regimen also shortened the latency before the first attack. Latency before the first attack was shorter at 20 h after the METH injection than at 15 min after injection. Locomotor activity was not different at 20 h after METH injection, indicating that increased fighting was not secondary to METH-induced hyperactivity. METH-induced increases in fighting were not related to the duration of persistent sniffing after the initial encounter with an intruder since the duration of this behavior was significantly increased at 15 min after METH but not at 20 h post drug. These results indicate that repeated injections of METH can increase fighting behaviors and also alter social interactions in mice. Thus, intermittent administration of METH might be useful as a pharmacological model to study the biochemical and molecular bases of aggressiveness.

  4. Atrial natriuretic factor increases vascular permeability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockette, Warren; Brennaman, Bruce

    1990-01-01

    An increase in central blood volume in microgravity may result in increased plasma levels of atrial natriuretic factor (ANF). In this study, it was determined whether ANF increases capillary permeability to plasma protein. Conscious, bilaterally nephrectomized male rats were infused with either saline, ANF + saline, or hexamethonium + saline over 2 h following bolus injections of (I-125)-albumin and (C-14)-dextran of similar molecular size. Blood pressure was monitored, and serial determinations of hematocrits were made. Animals infused with 1.0 microg/kg per min ANF had significantly higher hematocrits than animals infused with saline vehicle. Infusion of ANF increased the extravasation of (I-125)-albumin, but not (C-14)-dextran from the intravascular compartment. ANF also induced a depressor response in rats, but the change in blood pressure did not account for changes in capillary permeability to albumin; similar depressor responses induced by hexamethonium were not accompanied by increased extravasation of albumin from the intravascular compartment. ANF may decrease plasma volume by increasing permeability to albumin, and this effect of ANF may account for some of the signs and symptoms of space motion sickness.

  5. Wind increases leaf water use efficiency.

    PubMed

    Schymanski, Stanislaus J; Or, Dani

    2016-07-01

    A widespread perception is that, with increasing wind speed, transpiration from plant leaves increases. However, evidence suggests that increasing wind speed enhances carbon dioxide (CO2 ) uptake while reducing transpiration because of more efficient convective cooling (under high solar radiation loads). We provide theoretical and experimental evidence that leaf water use efficiency (WUE, carbon uptake per water transpired) commonly increases with increasing wind speed, thus improving plants' ability to conserve water during photosynthesis. Our leaf-scale analysis suggests that the observed global decrease in near-surface wind speeds could have reduced WUE at a magnitude similar to the increase in WUE attributed to global rise in atmospheric CO2 concentrations. However, there is indication that the effect of long-term trends in wind speed on leaf gas exchange may be compensated for by the concurrent reduction in mean leaf sizes. These unintuitive feedbacks between wind, leaf size and water use efficiency call for re-evaluation of the role of wind in plant water relations and potential re-interpretation of temporal and geographic trends in leaf sizes. PMID:26714739

  6. Vasopressin increases human risky cooperative behavior.

    PubMed

    Brunnlieb, Claudia; Nave, Gideon; Camerer, Colin F; Schosser, Stephan; Vogt, Bodo; Münte, Thomas F; Heldmann, Marcus

    2016-02-23

    The history of humankind is an epic of cooperation, which is ubiquitous across societies and increasing in scale. Much human cooperation occurs where it is risky to cooperate for mutual benefit because successful cooperation depends on a sufficient level of cooperation by others. Here we show that arginine vasopressin (AVP), a neuropeptide that mediates complex mammalian social behaviors such as pair bonding, social recognition and aggression causally increases humans' willingness to engage in risky, mutually beneficial cooperation. In two double-blind experiments, male participants received either AVP or placebo intranasally and made decisions with financial consequences in the "Stag hunt" cooperation game. AVP increases humans' willingness to cooperate. That increase is not due to an increase in the general willingness to bear risks or to altruistically help others. Using functional brain imaging, we show that, when subjects make the risky Stag choice, AVP down-regulates the BOLD signal in the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC), a risk-integration region, and increases the left dlPFC functional connectivity with the ventral pallidum, an AVP receptor-rich region previously associated with AVP-mediated social reward processing in mammals. These findings show a previously unidentified causal role for AVP in social approach behavior in humans, as established by animal research.

  7. Insulin Increases Ceramide Synthesis in Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, M. E.; Tippetts, T. S.; Anderson, M. C.; Holub, Z. E.; Moulton, E. R.; Swensen, A. C.; Prince, J. T.; Bikman, B. T.

    2014-01-01

    Aims. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of insulin on ceramide metabolism in skeletal muscle. Methods. Skeletal muscle cells were treated with insulin with or without palmitate for various time periods. Lipids (ceramides and TAG) were isolated and gene expression of multiple biosynthetic enzymes were quantified. Additionally, adult male mice received daily insulin injections for 14 days, followed by muscle ceramide analysis. Results. In muscle cells, insulin elicited an increase in ceramides comparable to palmitate alone. This is likely partly due to an insulin-induced increase in expression of multiple enzymes, particularly SPT2, which, when knocked down, prevented the increase in ceramides. In mice, 14 days of insulin injection resulted in increased soleus ceramides, but not TAG. However, insulin injections did significantly increase hepatic TAG compared with vehicle-injected animals. Conclusions. This study suggests that insulin elicits an anabolic effect on sphingolipid metabolism in skeletal muscle, resulting in increased ceramide accumulation. These findings reveal a potential mechanism of the deleterious consequences of the hyperinsulinemia that accompanies insulin resistance and suggest a possible novel therapeutic target to mitigate its effects. PMID:24949486

  8. Wind increases leaf water use efficiency.

    PubMed

    Schymanski, Stanislaus J; Or, Dani

    2016-07-01

    A widespread perception is that, with increasing wind speed, transpiration from plant leaves increases. However, evidence suggests that increasing wind speed enhances carbon dioxide (CO2 ) uptake while reducing transpiration because of more efficient convective cooling (under high solar radiation loads). We provide theoretical and experimental evidence that leaf water use efficiency (WUE, carbon uptake per water transpired) commonly increases with increasing wind speed, thus improving plants' ability to conserve water during photosynthesis. Our leaf-scale analysis suggests that the observed global decrease in near-surface wind speeds could have reduced WUE at a magnitude similar to the increase in WUE attributed to global rise in atmospheric CO2 concentrations. However, there is indication that the effect of long-term trends in wind speed on leaf gas exchange may be compensated for by the concurrent reduction in mean leaf sizes. These unintuitive feedbacks between wind, leaf size and water use efficiency call for re-evaluation of the role of wind in plant water relations and potential re-interpretation of temporal and geographic trends in leaf sizes.

  9. Nutritional supplements to increase muscle mass.

    PubMed

    Clarkson, P M; Rawson, E S

    1999-07-01

    Although nutritional supplements purported to increase muscle mass are widely available at health food stores, gyms, by mail order, and over the Internet, many of these supplements have little or no data to support their claims. This article reviews the theory and research behind popular nutritional supplements commonly marketed as muscle mass builders. Included are the minerals chromium, vanadyl sulfate, and boron, the steroid hormone dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), beta-methyl-hydroxy-beta-methylbutyrate (HMB), creatine, protein supplements, and amino acids. Research has shown that chromium vanadyl sulfate, and boron do not appear to be effective in increasing lean body mass. The few studies examining DHEA have not supported the claim of increased muscle gain. Preliminary work on HMB supports an anticatabolic effect, but only one human study is currently available. Many studies reported increased body mass and several have reported increased lean body mass following creatine ingestion. This weight gain is most likely water retention in muscle but could also be due to some new muscle protein. Although athletes have a greater protein requirement than sedentary individuals, this is easily obtained through the diet, negating the use of protein supplements. Studies on amino acids have not supported their claim to increase growth hormone or insulin secretion. Nutritional supplements can be marketed without FDA approval of safety or effectiveness. Athletes who choose to ingest these supplements should be concerned with unsubstantiated claims, questionable quality control, and safety of long-term use.

  10. Increased ocean heat transports and warmer climate

    SciTech Connect

    Rind, D. ); Chandler, M. )

    1991-04-20

    The authors investigated the effect of increased ocean heat transports on climate in the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) general circulation model (GCM). The warming is driven by the decreased sea ice/planetary albedo, a feedback which would appear to be instrumental for producing extreme high-latitude amplification of temperature changes. Resulting hydrologic and wind stress changes suggest that qualitatively the increased transports might be self-sustaining. As such, they would represent a possible mechanism to help account for the high-latitude warmth of climates in the Mesozoic and Tertiary, and decadal-scale climate fluctuations during the Holocene, as well as a powerful feedback to amplify other climate forcings. It is estimated that ocean transport increases of 50-70% would have been necessary to reproduce the warmth of various Mesozoic (65-230 m.y. ago) climates without changes in atmospheric composition, while the 15% increase used in these experiments would have been sufficient to reproduce the general climatic conditions of the Eocene (40-55 Ma). A companion experiment indicates that increased topography during the Cenozoic (0-65 Ma) might have altered the surface wind stress in a manner that led to reduced heat transports; this effect would then need to be considered in understanding the beginning of ice ages. The large high-latitude amplification associated with ocean heat transport and sea ice changes differs significantly from that forecast for increased trace gases, for which water vapor increase is the primary feedback mechanism. The different signatures might allow for discrimination of these different forcings; e.g., the warming of the 1930s looks more like the altered ocean heat transport signal, while the warming of the 1980s is more like the trace gas effect.

  11. Increase in mercury in Pacific yellowfin tuna.

    PubMed

    Drevnick, Paul E; Lamborg, Carl H; Horgan, Martin J

    2015-04-01

    Mercury is a toxic trace metal that can accumulate to levels that threaten human and environmental health. Models and empirical data suggest that humans are responsible for a great deal of the mercury actively cycling in the environment at present. Thus, one might predict that the concentration of mercury in fish should have increased dramatically since the Industrial Revolution. Evidence in support of this hypothesis has been hard to find, however, and some studies have suggested that analyses of fish show no change in mercury concentration. By compiling and re-analyzing published reports on yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares) caught near Hawaii (USA) over the past half century, the authors found that the concentration of mercury in these fish currently is increasing at a rate of at least 3.8% per year. This rate of increase is consistent with a model of anthropogenic forcing on the mercury cycle in the North Pacific Ocean and suggests that fish mercury concentrations are keeping pace with current loading increases to the ocean. Future increases in mercury in yellowfin tuna and other fishes can be avoided by reductions in atmospheric mercury emissions from point sources.

  12. Eating increases oxidative damage in a reptile.

    PubMed

    Butler, Michael W; Lutz, Thomas J; Fokidis, H Bobby; Stahlschmidt, Zachary R

    2016-07-01

    While eating has substantial benefits in terms of both nutrient and energy acquisition, there are physiological costs associated with digesting and metabolizing a meal. Frequently, these costs have been documented in the context of energy expenditure while other physiological costs have been relatively unexplored. Here, we tested whether the seemingly innocuous act of eating affects either systemic pro-oxidant (reactive oxygen metabolite, ROM) levels or antioxidant capacity of corn snakes (Pantherophis guttatus) by collecting plasma during absorptive (peak increase in metabolic rate due to digestion of a meal) and non-absorptive (baseline) states. When individuals were digesting a meal, there was a minimal increase in antioxidant capacity relative to baseline (4%), but a substantial increase in ROMs (nearly 155%), even when controlling for circulating nutrient levels. We report an oxidative cost of eating that is much greater than that due to long distance flight or mounting an immune response in other taxa. This result demonstrates the importance of investigating non-energetic costs associated with meal processing, and it begs future work to identify the mechanism(s) driving this increase in ROM levels. Because energetic costs associated with eating are taxonomically widespread, identifying the taxonomic breadth of eating-induced ROM increases may provide insights into the interplay between oxidative damage and life history theory. PMID:27099366

  13. Birch Stands Growth Increase in Western Siberia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kharuk, Viacheslav I.; Kuzmichev, Valeriy V.; Im, Sergey T.; Ranson, Kenneth J.

    2014-01-01

    Birch (Betula pendula Roth) growth within the Western Siberia forest-steppe was analyzed based on long-term (1897-2006) inventory data (height, diameter at breast height [dbh], and stand volume). Analysis of biometry parameters showed increased growth at the beginning of twenty-first century compared to similar stands (stands age = 40-60 years) at the end of nineteenth century. Mean height, dbh, and stem volume increased from 14 to 20 m, from 16 to 22 cm, and from approx. 63 to approx. 220 cu m/ha, respectively. Significant correlations were found between the stands mean height, dbh, and volume on the one hand, and vegetation period length (r(sub s) = 0.71 to 0.74), atmospheric CO2 concentration (r(sub s) = 0.71 to 0.76), and drought index (Standardized Precipitation-Evapotranspiration Index, r(sub s) = -0.33 to -0.51) on the other hand. The results obtained have revealed apparent climate-induced impacts (e.g. increase of vegetation period length and birch habitat drying due to drought increase) on the stands growth. Along with this, a high correlation of birch biometric parameters and [CO2] in ambient air indicated an effect of CO2 fertilization. Meanwhile, further drought increase may switch birch stand growth into decline and greater mortality as has already been observed within the Trans-Baikal forest-steppe ecotone.

  14. Increase in Pneumococcus Macrolide Resistance, United States

    PubMed Central

    Farrell, David J.

    2009-01-01

    During year 6 (2005–2006) of the Prospective Resistant Organism Tracking and Epidemiology for the Ketolide Telithromycin surveillance study, 6,747 Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates were collected at 119 centers. The susceptibility of these isolates to macrolides was compared with data from previous years. Macrolide resistance increased significantly in year 6 (35.3%) from the stable rate of ≈30% for the previous 3 years (p<0.0001). Macrolide resistance increased in all regions of the United States and for all patient age groups. Rates were highest in the south and for children 0–2 years of age. Lower-level efflux [mef(A)]–mediated macrolide resistance decreased in prevalence to ≈50%, and highly resistant [erm(B) + mef(A)] strains increased to 25%. Telithromycin and levofloxacin susceptibility rates were >99% and >98%, respectively, irrespective of genotype. Pneumococcal macrolide resistance in the United States showed its first significant increase since 2000. High-level macrolide resistance is also increasing. PMID:19751588

  15. Exploring Increased Productivity Through Employee Engagement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, Wayne K., Jr.

    Disengaged employees cost U.S. companies billions of dollars annually in lowered productivity, a cost which has been compounded by the difficult economic situations in the country. The potential for increasing productivity through increased employee engagement was examined in this study. Using personal engagement theory and the theory of planned behavior, the purpose of this phenomenological study was to explore how the experiences of salaried aerospace employees affected productivity and the financial performance of an organization. Interviews were conducted with a purposive sample of 20 aerospace employees whose responses were codified and analyzed to identify themes. The analysis indicated that (a) the lived experiences of employees influenced employee engagement, (b) employee engagement affects organizational commitment and performance, and (c) trust and respect and leadership are essential components to keep employees engaged. Eighty percent of the participants indicated that as employee engagement increases so too does organizational performance. The implications for positive social change include new insights for leaders seeking to increase productivity and financial performance, and to support employee engagement for maintaining sustainability, retaining talent, increasing profits, and improving the economy.

  16. Increase in mercury in Pacific yellowfin tuna.

    PubMed

    Drevnick, Paul E; Lamborg, Carl H; Horgan, Martin J

    2015-04-01

    Mercury is a toxic trace metal that can accumulate to levels that threaten human and environmental health. Models and empirical data suggest that humans are responsible for a great deal of the mercury actively cycling in the environment at present. Thus, one might predict that the concentration of mercury in fish should have increased dramatically since the Industrial Revolution. Evidence in support of this hypothesis has been hard to find, however, and some studies have suggested that analyses of fish show no change in mercury concentration. By compiling and re-analyzing published reports on yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares) caught near Hawaii (USA) over the past half century, the authors found that the concentration of mercury in these fish currently is increasing at a rate of at least 3.8% per year. This rate of increase is consistent with a model of anthropogenic forcing on the mercury cycle in the North Pacific Ocean and suggests that fish mercury concentrations are keeping pace with current loading increases to the ocean. Future increases in mercury in yellowfin tuna and other fishes can be avoided by reductions in atmospheric mercury emissions from point sources. PMID:25645441

  17. Randomness in Sequence Evolution Increases over Time.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guangyu; Sun, Shixiang; Zhang, Zhang

    2016-01-01

    The second law of thermodynamics states that entropy, as a measure of randomness in a system, increases over time. Although studies have investigated biological sequence randomness from different aspects, it remains unknown whether sequence randomness changes over time and whether this change consists with the second law of thermodynamics. To capture the dynamics of randomness in molecular sequence evolution, here we detect sequence randomness based on a collection of eight statistical random tests and investigate the randomness variation of coding sequences with an application to Escherichia coli. Given that core/essential genes are more ancient than specific/non-essential genes, our results clearly show that core/essential genes are more random than specific/non-essential genes and accordingly indicate that sequence randomness indeed increases over time, consistent well with the second law of thermodynamics. We further find that an increase in sequence randomness leads to increasing randomness of GC content and longer sequence length. Taken together, our study presents an important finding, for the first time, that sequence randomness increases over time, which may provide profound insights for unveiling the underlying mechanisms of molecular sequence evolution. PMID:27224236

  18. Randomness in Sequence Evolution Increases over Time

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guangyu; Sun, Shixiang; Zhang, Zhang

    2016-01-01

    The second law of thermodynamics states that entropy, as a measure of randomness in a system, increases over time. Although studies have investigated biological sequence randomness from different aspects, it remains unknown whether sequence randomness changes over time and whether this change consists with the second law of thermodynamics. To capture the dynamics of randomness in molecular sequence evolution, here we detect sequence randomness based on a collection of eight statistical random tests and investigate the randomness variation of coding sequences with an application to Escherichia coli. Given that core/essential genes are more ancient than specific/non-essential genes, our results clearly show that core/essential genes are more random than specific/non-essential genes and accordingly indicate that sequence randomness indeed increases over time, consistent well with the second law of thermodynamics. We further find that an increase in sequence randomness leads to increasing randomness of GC content and longer sequence length. Taken together, our study presents an important finding, for the first time, that sequence randomness increases over time, which may provide profound insights for unveiling the underlying mechanisms of molecular sequence evolution. PMID:27224236

  19. Increased Mercury Bioaccumulation Follows Water Quality Improvement

    SciTech Connect

    Bogle, M.A.; Peterson, M.J.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth, G.R.

    1999-09-15

    Changes in physical and chemical characteristics of aquatic habitats made to reduce or eliminate ecological risks can sometimes have unforeseen consequences. Environmental management activities on the U.S. Dept. of Energy reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee,have succeeded in improving water quality in streams impacted by discharges fi-om industrial facilities and waste disposal sites. The diversity and abundance of pollution-sensitive components of the benthic macroinvertebrate communities of three streams improved after new waste treatment systems or remedial actions reduced inputs of various toxic chemicals. Two of the streams were known to be mercury-contaminated from historical spills and waste disposal practices. Waterborne mercury concentrations in the third were typical of uncontaminated systems. In each case, concentrations of mercury in fish, or the apparent biological availability of mercury increased over the period during which ecological metrics indicated improved water quality. In the system where waterborne mercury concentrations were at background levels, increased mercury bioaccumulation was probably a result of reduced aqueous selenium concentrations; however, the mechanisms for increased mercury accumulation in the other two streams remain under investigation. In each of the three systems, reduced inputs of metals and inorganic anions was followed by improvements in the health of aquatic invertebrate communities. However, this reduction in risk to aquatic invertebrates was accompanied by increased risk to humans and piscivorous wildlife related to increased mercury concentrations in fish.

  20. Emergency management of increased intracranial pressure.

    PubMed

    Pitfield, Alexander Fraser; Carroll, Allison B; Kissoon, Niranjan

    2012-02-01

    Primary neurological injury in children can be induced by diverse intrinsic and extrinsic factors including brain trauma, tumors, and intracranial infections. Regardless of etiology, increased intracranial pressure (ICP) as a result of the primary injury or delays in treatment may lead to secondary (preventable) brain injury. Therefore, early diagnosis and aggressive treatment of increased ICP is vital in preventing or limiting secondary brain injury in children with a neurological insult. Present management strategies to improve survival and neurological outcome focus on reducing ICP while optimizing cerebral perfusion and meeting cerebral metabolic demands. Targeted therapies for increased ICP must be considered and implemented as early as possible during and after the initial stabilization of the child. Thus, the emergency physician has a critical role to play in early identification and treatment of increased ICP. This article intends to identify those patients at risk of intracranial hypertension and present a framework for the emergency department investigation and treatment, in keeping with contemporary guidelines. Intensive care management and the treatment of refractory increases in ICP are also outlined.

  1. Smoking Prevalence Increases following Canterbury Earthquakes

    PubMed Central

    Erskine, Nick; Daley, Vivien; Stevenson, Sue; Rhodes, Bronwen

    2013-01-01

    Background. A magnitude 7.1 earthquake hit Canterbury in September 2010. This earthquake and associated aftershocks took the lives of 185 people and drastically changed residents' living, working, and social conditions. Aim. To explore the impact of the earthquakes on smoking status and levels of tobacco consumption in the residents of Christchurch. Methods. Semistructured interviews were carried out in two city malls and the central bus exchange 15 months after the first earthquake. A total of 1001 people were interviewed. Results. In August 2010, prior to any earthquake, 409 (41%) participants had never smoked, 273 (27%) were currently smoking, and 316 (32%) were ex-smokers. Since the September 2010 earthquake, 76 (24%) of the 316 ex-smokers had smoked at least one cigarette and 29 (38.2%) had smoked more than 100 cigarettes. Of the 273 participants who were current smokers in August 2010, 93 (34.1%) had increased consumption following the earthquake, 94 (34.4%) had not changed, and 86 (31.5%) had decreased their consumption. 53 (57%) of the 93 people whose consumption increased reported that the earthquake and subsequent lifestyle changes as a reason to increase smoking. Conclusion. 24% of ex-smokers resumed smoking following the earthquake, resulting in increased smoking prevalence. Tobacco consumption levels increased in around one-third of current smokers. PMID:24311978

  2. World ethylene capacity increased marginally in 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1996-05-13

    Although ethylene capacity increased little the past year, the industry is perched on the edge of a construction boom. US producers have announced plans to build 5.9 million mty of capacity by the year 2000, while proposals in Thailand call for as much as 2.8 million mty. On the demand side, China`s booming economy is supporting a capacity increase of 1.7 million mty over the period. The Journal`s annual Petrochemical Report, written and analyzed by Petrochemical Editor Anne K. Rhodes, also reveals that planned expansion of the polyolefins industry will cause loose markets until 1997/1998, when operating rates will begin to improve. A technological overview of a VCM plant revamp shows how a producer in the Ukraine plans to increase capacity and reduce emissions.

  3. Nutrient Enrichment Increases Mortality of Mangroves

    PubMed Central

    Lovelock, Catherine E.; Ball, Marilyn C.; Martin, Katherine C.; C. Feller, Ilka

    2009-01-01

    Nutrient enrichment of the coastal zone places intense pressure on marine communities. Previous studies have shown that growth of intertidal mangrove forests is accelerated with enhanced nutrient availability. However, nutrient enrichment favours growth of shoots relative to roots, thus enhancing growth rates but increasing vulnerability to environmental stresses that adversely affect plant water relations. Two such stresses are high salinity and low humidity, both of which require greater investment in roots to meet the demands for water by the shoots. Here we present data from a global network of sites that documents enhanced mortality of mangroves with experimental nutrient enrichment at sites where high sediment salinity was coincident with low rainfall and low humidity. Thus the benefits of increased mangrove growth in response to coastal eutrophication is offset by the costs of decreased resilience due to mortality during drought, with mortality increasing with soil water salinity along climatic gradients. PMID:19440554

  4. Climate impact of increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Hansen, J; Johnson, D; Lacis, A; Lebedeff, S; Lee, P; Rind, D; Russell, G

    1981-08-28

    The global temperature rose by 0.2 degrees C between the middle 1960's and 1980, yielding a warming of 0.4 degrees C in the past century. This temperature increase is consistent with the calculated greenhouse effect due to measured increases of atmospheric carbon dioxide. Variations of volcanic aerosols and possibly solar luminosity appear to be primary causes of observed fluctuations about the mean trend of increasing temperature. It is shown that the anthropogenic carbon dioxide warming should emerge from the noise level of natural climate variability by the end of the century, and there is a high probability of warming in the 1980's. Potential effects on climate in the 21st century include the creation of drought-prone regions in North America and central Asia as part of a shifting of climatic zones, erosion of the West Antarctic ice sheet with a consequent worldwide rise in sea level, and opening of the fabled Northwest Passage. PMID:17789014

  5. Climate impact of increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Hansen, J; Johnson, D; Lacis, A; Lebedeff, S; Lee, P; Rind, D; Russell, G

    1981-08-28

    The global temperature rose by 0.2 degrees C between the middle 1960's and 1980, yielding a warming of 0.4 degrees C in the past century. This temperature increase is consistent with the calculated greenhouse effect due to measured increases of atmospheric carbon dioxide. Variations of volcanic aerosols and possibly solar luminosity appear to be primary causes of observed fluctuations about the mean trend of increasing temperature. It is shown that the anthropogenic carbon dioxide warming should emerge from the noise level of natural climate variability by the end of the century, and there is a high probability of warming in the 1980's. Potential effects on climate in the 21st century include the creation of drought-prone regions in North America and central Asia as part of a shifting of climatic zones, erosion of the West Antarctic ice sheet with a consequent worldwide rise in sea level, and opening of the fabled Northwest Passage.

  6. Isofagomine increases lysosomal delivery of exogenous glucocerebrosidase.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jin-Song; Edwards, Nancy J; Hong, Young Bin; Murray, Gary J

    2008-05-16

    Intravenous enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) with purified glucocerebrosidase (GLA) leads to significant improvement of the clinical manifestations in patients with Type 1 Gaucher disease. However, the high doses required, slow response and inability to recover most of the infused enzyme in the target tissues may be attributed to losses occurring during transit en route to the lysosome. Preincubation of GLA with isofagomine (IFG), a slow-binding inhibitor, significantly increased stability of the enzyme to heat, neutral pH and denaturing agents in vitro. Preincubation of GLA with isofagomine prior to uptake by cultured cells results in increased intracellular enzyme activity accompanied by an increase in enzyme protein suggesting that reduced denaturation of GLA in the presence of isofagomine leads to a decrease in the degradation of the enzyme after internalization. Preincubation of GLA with slow-binding inhibitors before infusion may improve the effectiveness of ERT for Gaucher disease.

  7. Gravity increase at the south pole

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Behrendt, John C.

    1967-01-01

    Abstract. Measurements made between December 1957 and January 1966 of the gravity difference between the McMurdo Sound pendulum station, which is on bedrock, and the South Pole station, which is on the Antarctic ice sheet, show a gravity increase at the South Pole of 0.11 milligals per year. The most likely hypothesis for the increase is that it was caused by ice flowing downslope across a gravity gradient and by the sinking of the South Pole station as a result of accumulation of ice. An alternate hypothesis that the gravity increase was caused by a decrease in ice thickness, of about 40 centimeters per year, is theoretically possible but is not supported by direct evidence.

  8. In Brief: Report finds hypoxia increasing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2010-09-01

    The occurrence of hypoxia is increasing in coastal waters worldwide and represents a significant threat to the health and economy of U.S. coasts and the Great Lakes, according to a 3 September report issued by the U.S. Interagency Working Group on Harmful Algal Blooms, Hypoxia, and Human Health. The report found that the incidence of hypoxia—low dissolved oxygen that can negatively affect fish and other aquatic species—has increased tenfold globally in the past 50 years and almost thirtyfold in the United States since 1960. Noting that federal research programs are addressing many aspects of eutrophication, enrichment, and hypoxia, the report indicates, “Despite decades of research, however, management efforts to reduce nutrients—particularly from nonpoint sources—and their adverse impacts on coastal ecosystems have not made significant headway, in part due to increased development and population in coastal watersheds.”

  9. Climate impact of increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, J.; Johnson, D.; Lacis, A.; Lebedeff, S.; Lee, P.; Rind, D.; Russell, G.

    1981-08-28

    The global temperature rose by 0.2/sup 0/C between the middle 1960's and 1980, yielding a warming of 0.4/sup 0/C in the past century. This temperature increase is consistent with the calculated greenhouse effect due to measured increases of atmospheric carbon dioxide. Variations of volcanic aerosols and possibly solar luminosity appear to be primary causes of observed fluctuations about the mean trend of increasing temperature. It is shown that the anthropogenic carbon dioxide warming should emerge from the noise level of natural climate variability by the end of the century, and there is a high probability of warming in the 1980's. Potential effects on climate in the 21st century include the creation of drought-prone regions in North America and central Asia as part of a shifting of climatic zones, erosion of the West Antarctic ice sheet with a consequent worldwide rise in sea level, and opening of the fabled Northwest Passage.

  10. Alanine increases blood pressure during hypotension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conlay, L. A.; Maher, T. J.; Wurtman, R. J.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of L-alanine administration on blood pressure (BP) during haemorrhagic shock was investigated using anesthetized rats whose left carotid arteries were cannulated for BP measurement, blood removal, and drug administration. It was found that L-alanine, in doses of 10, 25, 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg, increased the systolic BP of hypotensive rats by 38 to 80 percent (while 100 mg/kg pyruvate increased BP by only 9.4 mmhg, not significantly different from saline). The results suggest that L-alanine might influence cardiovascular function.

  11. Increased productivity in flight with voice commanding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, W. T.

    1985-01-01

    Automatic Speech Recognition technology has matured to the point where it can provide a viable means of increasing productivity by naturalizing the man-machine interface. With ever increasing workloads being placed on astronauts, speech recognition may provide an alternative means of system controlling that would reduce the task burden. Voice commanding, allowing hands-free operation, can be especially effective during operations requiring simultaneous system control. A flight experiment is under development to demonstrate the operational effectiveness of voice control by commanding the Space Shuttle's Closed Circuit Television (CCIV) system. This experiment will help direct future applications of voice entry to space operations.

  12. Holographic entropy increases in quadratic curvature gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharjee, Srijit; Sarkar, Sudipta; Wall, Aron C.

    2015-09-01

    Standard methods for calculating the black hole entropy beyond general relativity are ambiguous when the horizon is nonstationary. We fix these ambiguities in all quadratic curvature gravity theories, by demanding that the entropy be increasing at every time, for linear perturbations to a stationary black hole. Our result matches with the entropy formula found previously in holographic entanglement entropy calculations. We explicitly calculate the entropy increase for Vaidya-like solutions in Ricci-tensor gravity to show that (unlike the Wald entropy) the holographic entropy obeys a second law.

  13. Elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide increases soil carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Norby, Richard J; Jastrow, Julie D; Miller, Michael R; Matamala, Roser; Boutton, Thomas W; Rice, Charles W; Owensby, Clenton E

    2005-01-01

    In a study funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science, researchers from Argonne and Oak Ridge National Laboratories and Kansas State and Texas A&M Universities evaluated the collective results of earlier studies by using a statistical procedure called meta-analysis. They found that on average elevated CO2 increased soil carbon by 5.6 percent over a two to nine year period. They also measured comparable increases in soil carbon for Tennessee deciduous forest and Kansas grassland after five to eight years of experimental exposure to elevated CO2.

  14. Increase in friction force with sliding speed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Rod

    2005-09-01

    A block sliding down an inclined plane normally accelerates. However, if the friction force increases with speed, then the block can slide at a constant terminal speed in a manner similar to the fall of an object through a fluid. Measurements of the increase in the coefficient of friction for tennis ball cloth sliding on a smooth surface are described over speeds varying by a factor of 9000. For the low speed measurements, the ball cloth was attached to the bottom of a weighted box and pulled along a horizontal surface by a constant horizontal force. Results at higher speeds were obtained by bouncing a tennis ball off the surface.

  15. Potential transgenic routes to increase tree biomass.

    PubMed

    Dubouzet, Joseph G; Strabala, Timothy J; Wagner, Armin

    2013-11-01

    Biomass is a prime target for genetic engineering in forestry because increased biomass yield will benefit most downstream applications such as timber, fiber, pulp, paper, and bioenergy production. Transgenesis can increase biomass by improving resource acquisition and product utilization and by enhancing competitive ability for solar energy, water, and mineral nutrients. Transgenes that affect juvenility, winter dormancy, and flowering have been shown to influence biomass as well. Transgenic approaches have increased yield potential by mitigating the adverse effects of prevailing stress factors in the environment. Simultaneous introduction of multiple genes for resistance to various stress factors into trees may help forest trees cope with multiple or changing environments. We propose multi-trait engineering for tree crops, simultaneously deploying multiple independent genes to address a set of genetically uncorrelated traits that are important for crop improvement. This strategy increases the probability of unpredictable (synergistic or detrimental) interactions that may substantially affect the overall phenotype and its long-term performance. The very limited ability to predict the physiological processes that may be impacted by such a strategy requires vigilance and care during implementation. Hence, we recommend close monitoring of the resultant transgenic genotypes in multi-year, multi-location field trials. PMID:24094056

  16. Examining Increased Flexibility in Assessment Formats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irwin, Brian; Hepplestone, Stuart

    2012-01-01

    There have been calls in the literature for changes to assessment practices in higher education, to increase flexibility and give learners more control over the assessment process. This article explores the possibilities of allowing student choice in the format used to present their work, as a starting point for changing assessment, based on…

  17. Increasing Efficiency: A Process-Oriented Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harbour, Jerry L.

    1993-01-01

    Discussion of the need to increase efficiency focuses on a process-oriented approach for systematically identifying and minimizing non-value-adding process steps to analyze and improve tasks, services, and production. Highlights include a historical perspective, a discussion of wasted efforts, and a case study. (Contains 16 references.) (LRW)

  18. Increasing Sales by Developing Production Consortiums.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Christopher A.; Russo, Robert

    Intended to help rehabilitation facility administrators increase organizational income from manufacturing and/or contracted service sources, this document provides a decision-making model for the development of a production consortium. The document consists of five chapters and two appendices. Chapter 1 defines the consortium concept, explains…

  19. Increased Gonorrhea Cases - Utah, 2009-2014.

    PubMed

    Watson, Joanna; Carlile, Jerry; Dunn, Angela; Evans, Megan; Fratto, Erin; Hartsell, Joel; Meinor, Lynn; Mietchen, Matthew; Nakashima, Allyn

    2016-01-01

    Gonorrhea (caused by infection with Neisseria gonorrhoeae) is the second most commonly reported notifiable disease in the United States (1). Left untreated, gonorrhea is associated with serious long-term adverse health effects, including pelvic inflammatory disease, ectopic pregnancy, and infertility. Infection also facilitates transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (2,3). Effective gonorrhea control relies upon early detection and effective antimicrobial treatment. To assess gonorrhea rate trends in Utah, the Utah Department of Health (UDOH) analyzed Utah National Electronic Disease Surveillance System (UT-NEDSS) data for the state during 2009-2014. After declining during 2009-2011, the statewide gonorrhea rate increased fivefold to 49 cases per 100,000 population in 2014. During 2009-2014, the proportion of cases among women increased from 21% to 39% (decreasing among males from 79% to 61%). Among male patients, the proportion who identified as men who have sex with men (MSM) decreased from 67% to 42%. These demographic changes suggest that increased heterosexual transmission of gonorrhea in Utah might be occurring. Health departments need to work with providers to ensure populations at high risk are being screened and properly treated for gonorrhea. Clinicians need to be aware of increases in the risk for infection among women and non-MSM males when making screening and testing decisions and educate their patients regarding gonorrhea transmission and prevention practices. PMID:27583786

  20. Drug and Alcohol Arrests Increased in 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicklin, Julie L.

    2001-01-01

    U.S. Department of Education (DOE) data showed a 1999 increase in drug and alcohol arrests on college campuses. Also, the number of reported sex offenses rose by 6 percent from 1998-99. Some experts question the validity of the year-to-year comparisons and the DOE data. Presents statistics on sex offenses, drug use, and drinking and football. (SM)

  1. Porous radiant burners having increased radiant output

    DOEpatents

    Tong, Timothy W.; Sathe, Sanjeev B.; Peck, Robert E.

    1990-01-01

    Means and methods for enhancing the output of radiant energy from a porous radiant burner by minimizing the scattering and increasing the adsorption, and thus emission of such energy by the use of randomly dispersed ceramic fibers of sub-micron diameter in the fabrication of ceramic fiber matrix burners and for use therein.

  2. Glucagon receptor antagonism induces increased cholesterol absorption.

    PubMed

    Guan, Hong-Ping; Yang, Xiaodong; Lu, Ku; Wang, Sheng-Ping; Castro-Perez, Jose M; Previs, Stephen; Wright, Michael; Shah, Vinit; Herath, Kithsiri; Xie, Dan; Szeto, Daphne; Forrest, Gail; Xiao, Jing Chen; Palyha, Oksana; Sun, Li-Ping; Andryuk, Paula J; Engel, Samuel S; Xiong, Yusheng; Lin, Songnian; Kelley, David E; Erion, Mark D; Davis, Harry R; Wang, Liangsu

    2015-11-01

    Glucagon and insulin have opposing action in governing glucose homeostasis. In type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), plasma glucagon is characteristically elevated, contributing to increased gluconeogenesis and hyperglycemia. Therefore, glucagon receptor (GCGR) antagonism has been proposed as a pharmacologic approach to treat T2DM. In support of this concept, a potent small-molecule GCGR antagonist (GRA), MK-0893, demonstrated dose-dependent efficacy to reduce hyperglycemia, with an HbA1c reduction of 1.5% at the 80 mg dose for 12 weeks in T2DM. However, GRA treatment was associated with dose-dependent elevation of plasma LDL-cholesterol (LDL-c). The current studies investigated the cause for increased LDL-c. We report findings that link MK-0893 with increased glucagon-like peptide 2 and cholesterol absorption. There was not, however, a GRA-related modulation of cholesterol synthesis. These findings were replicated using structurally diverse GRAs. To examine potential pharmacologic mitigation, coadministration of ezetimibe (a potent inhibitor of cholesterol absorption) in mice abrogated the GRA-associated increase of LDL-c. Although the molecular mechanism is unknown, our results provide a novel finding by which glucagon and, hence, GCGR antagonism govern cholesterol metabolism.

  3. Increasing the quantitative bandwidth of NMR measurements.

    PubMed

    Power, J E; Foroozandeh, M; Adams, R W; Nilsson, M; Coombes, S R; Phillips, A R; Morris, G A

    2016-02-18

    The frequency range of quantitative NMR is increased from tens to hundreds of kHz by a new pulse sequence, CHORUS. It uses chirp pulses to excite uniformly over very large bandwidths, yielding accurate integrals even for nuclei such as (19)F that have very wide spectra. PMID:26789115

  4. Increased textural complexity in food enhances satiation.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Danaé S; Tang, Jingyuan; Ferguson, Lynnette R; James, Bryony J

    2016-10-01

    For the first time this study has shown a direct effect of food textural complexity on satiation. Independent of oral processing time, increasing the textural complexity of a food significantly decreased food intake. Foods with complex textures stimulate many sensory perceptions during oral processing, with a succession of textures perceived between first bite and swallow. Previously the impact of texture on satiation (commonly tested by increasing viscosities of semi-solids) has been explained by texture's influence on oral processing time; a long oral processing time enhances satiation. The results of the current study show that subjects in a randomised cross-over trial who consumed a "starter" (preload) model food with high textural complexity went on to eat significantly less of a two course ad libitum meal. Subjects who consumed a "starter" model food with low textural complexity, but with the same flavour, energy density and oral processing time, ate significantly more of the same ad libitum meal. The results show that increasing the number of textures perceived during chewing of a solid food triggers the satiation response earlier than when chewing a less texturally complex food. Increasing textural complexity of manufactured foods, to allow for greater sensory stimulation per bite, could potentially be used as a tool to enhance the satiation response and decrease food intake. PMID:27235823

  5. Increasing Student Participation in Science Fair Competitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miles, Rhea

    2012-01-01

    In the summer of 2009, 22 African American middle school students in eastern North Carolina became participants in the Reach Up program to increase the number of underrepresented students participating in science-, technology-, engineering-, and mathematics-related activities. One of the goals of the program was for these students to participate…

  6. Can improvement in photosynthesis increase crop yields?

    PubMed

    Long, Stephen P; Zhu, Xin-Guang; Naidu, Shawna L; Ort, Donald R

    2006-03-01

    The yield potential (Yp) of a grain crop is the seed mass per unit ground area obtained under optimum growing conditions without weeds, pests and diseases. It is determined by the product of the available light energy and by the genetically determined properties: efficiency of light capture (epsilon i), the efficiency of conversion of the intercepted light into biomass (epsilon c) and the proportion of biomass partitioned into grain (eta). Plant breeding brings eta7 and epsilon i close to their theoretical maxima, leaving epsilon c, primarily determined by photosynthesis, as the only remaining major prospect for improving Yp. Leaf photosynthetic rate, however, is poorly correlated with yield when different genotypes of a crop species are compared. This led to the viewpoint that improvement of leaf photosynthesis has little value for improving Yp. By contrast, the many recent experiments that compare the growth of a genotype in current and future projected elevated [CO2] environments show that increase in leaf photosynthesis is closely associated with similar increases in yield. Are there opportunities to achieve similar increases by genetic manipulation? Six potential routes of increasing epsilon c by improving photosynthetic efficiency were explored, ranging from altered canopy architecture to improved regeneration of the acceptor molecule for CO2. Collectively, these changes could improve epsilon c and, therefore, Y p by c. 50%. Because some changes could be achieved by transgenic technology, the time of the development of commercial cultivars could be considerably less than by conventional breeding and potentially, within 10-15 years.

  7. Increasing the quantitative bandwidth of NMR measurements.

    PubMed

    Power, J E; Foroozandeh, M; Adams, R W; Nilsson, M; Coombes, S R; Phillips, A R; Morris, G A

    2016-02-18

    The frequency range of quantitative NMR is increased from tens to hundreds of kHz by a new pulse sequence, CHORUS. It uses chirp pulses to excite uniformly over very large bandwidths, yielding accurate integrals even for nuclei such as (19)F that have very wide spectra.

  8. Increasing Math Achievement through Use of Music.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryant-Jones, Marian; Shimmins, Kymberley J.; Vega, Jill D.

    This report describes a program for increasing math achievement through the use of musical interventions including repeated exposure to Mozart classical music and School House Rock, and introduction to teacher-made songs that introduce mathematical concepts in the music classroom. The students of the targeted second and fourth grade classes…

  9. Increasing the Minority CTE Teacher Pipeline

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sims, Cynthia

    2010-01-01

    A great deal of attention has been given to the need for more minority teachers. This issue deserves serious consideration as the K-12 minority student population increases and the number of minority teachers does not. Various states have implemented programs designed to recruit minority teachers, including teacher shadowing initiatives in South…

  10. Increasing Diversity in Geoscience Through Research Internships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charlevoix, Donna J.; Morris, Aisha R.

    2014-02-01

    Over the past 9 years, UNAVCO—a university-governed consortium fostering geoscience research and education focused on geodesy—supported 44 interns through the Research Experiences in Solid Earth Science for Students (RESESS) program. The primary goal of the program is to increase the number of historically underrepresented students entering the geosciences.

  11. Why Block Grants Should Increase Administrative Costs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Keith

    1983-01-01

    Federal education programs increase costs because they attach fewer strings to funds than state or local grants, and this is likely to lead to administrative empire-building. Bureaucracy tends pathologically as it grows to generate more work for itself independent of true administrative needs. Some policy implications are drawn. (MJL)

  12. Increased Gonorrhea Cases - Utah, 2009-2014.

    PubMed

    Watson, Joanna; Carlile, Jerry; Dunn, Angela; Evans, Megan; Fratto, Erin; Hartsell, Joel; Meinor, Lynn; Mietchen, Matthew; Nakashima, Allyn

    2016-09-02

    Gonorrhea (caused by infection with Neisseria gonorrhoeae) is the second most commonly reported notifiable disease in the United States (1). Left untreated, gonorrhea is associated with serious long-term adverse health effects, including pelvic inflammatory disease, ectopic pregnancy, and infertility. Infection also facilitates transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (2,3). Effective gonorrhea control relies upon early detection and effective antimicrobial treatment. To assess gonorrhea rate trends in Utah, the Utah Department of Health (UDOH) analyzed Utah National Electronic Disease Surveillance System (UT-NEDSS) data for the state during 2009-2014. After declining during 2009-2011, the statewide gonorrhea rate increased fivefold to 49 cases per 100,000 population in 2014. During 2009-2014, the proportion of cases among women increased from 21% to 39% (decreasing among males from 79% to 61%). Among male patients, the proportion who identified as men who have sex with men (MSM) decreased from 67% to 42%. These demographic changes suggest that increased heterosexual transmission of gonorrhea in Utah might be occurring. Health departments need to work with providers to ensure populations at high risk are being screened and properly treated for gonorrhea. Clinicians need to be aware of increases in the risk for infection among women and non-MSM males when making screening and testing decisions and educate their patients regarding gonorrhea transmission and prevention practices.

  13. Energy: Can We Meet the Increasing Demand?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2006-01-01

    Energy is the lifeblood of the United States. It powers its industries and keeps its economy humming. The nation's progress has relied on making energy abundantly available to support the growth of new ideas and products, and the issue of renewable energy is an increasingly important one. In this article, the author discusses some of the basics of…

  14. Increasing Sensitivity In Continuous-Flow Electrophoresis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharnez, Rizwan; Sammons, David W.

    1994-01-01

    Sensitivity of continuous-flow electrophoresis (CFE) chamber increased by introducing lateral gradients in concentration of buffer solution and thickness of chamber. Such gradients, with resulting enhanced separation, achieved in CFE chamber with wedge-shaped cross section and collateral flow. Enables improved separations of homogeneous components of mixtures of variety of biologically important substances.

  15. Coal liquefaction to increase jet fuel production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Processing concept that increases supply of jet fuel has been developed as part of study on methods for converting coal to hydrogen, methane, and jet fuel. Concept takes advantage of high aromatic content of coal-derived liquids to make high-octane gasoline, instead of destroying aromatics to make jet fuel.

  16. Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant capacity increase options

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, D.E.

    1996-04-01

    Studies are being conducted by the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) Project on ways to increase the waste processing capacity within the current Vitrification Building structural design. The Phase 1 study on remote systems concepts identification and extent of capacity increase was completed. The study concluded that the HWVP capacity could be increased to four times the current capacity with minor design adjustments to the fixed facility design, and the required design changes would not impact the current footprint of the vitrification building. A further increase in production capacity may be achievable but would require some technology development, verification testing, and a more systematic and extensive engineering evaluation. The primary changes included a single advance melter with a higher capacity, new evaporative feed tank, offgas quench collection tank, ejector venturi scrubbers, and additional inner canister closure station,a smear test station, a new close- coupled analytical facility, waste hold capacity of 400,000 gallon, the ability to concentrate out-of-plant HWVP feed to 90 g/L waste oxide concentration, and limited changes to the current base slab construction package.

  17. Roadmap to increased cover crop adoption

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cover crops are increasingly utilized by farmers and promoted by agronomists for the multiple benefits they contribute to soil and crop management systems. Yet, only a small percentage of cropland is planted to cover crops. In June of 2012, the National Wildlife Federation brought together 36 of the...

  18. Increasing image resolution using the pyramidal detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isakson, Steve; Sahagun, Luis Roberto; Wade, Glen

    2002-11-01

    The knife-edge detector (KED) has been used in transverse wave, scanning laser acoustic microscopes (SLAM) successfully for many years. It possesses a good balance between spatial bandwidth, detector noise insensitivity, and detector grain stability. Many detectors have tried to increase the bandwidth to improve the image resolution, only to be difficult to use and susceptible to vibration and mechanical variations. The authors have invented and designed a pyramidal detector (PD) that combines the stability and noise insensitivity of the KED with a significantly improved bandwidth in both axes of the object plane. The detector uses the entire signal provided at the detector to increase the signal to noise ratio and significantly decrease the cover slip spatial frequencies that are difficult to detect. The increased bandwidth allows image resolution approaching what an ideal detector could achieve. Additionally, unlike the KED, the PD spatial bandwidth is approximately isotropic to waves traveling in the cover slip. Increased spatial resolution and uniformity result. This property is particularly useful for back-propagation in tomographic applications.

  19. Educational Strategies to Increase Racial Tolerance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buchignani, Norman

    This paper reviews the effectiveness and practicality of various educational approaches for increasing racial tolerance and calls for developing strategies that have been formally evaluated to avoid the waste of time and limited resources. The first section discusses the racial inadequacies of most programs which purport to affect racial…

  20. Human Cortical Excitability Increases with Time Awake

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Reto; Mäki, Hanna; Rosanova, Mario; Casarotto, Silvia; Canali, Paola; Casali, Adenauer G.; Tononi, Giulio

    2013-01-01

    Prolonged wakefulness is associated not only with obvious changes in the way we feel and perform but also with well-known clinical effects, such as increased susceptibility to seizures, to hallucinations, and relief of depressive symptoms. These clinical effects suggest that prolonged wakefulness may be associated with significant changes in the state of cortical circuits. While recent animal experiments have reported a progressive increase of cortical excitability with time awake, no conclusive evidence could be gathered in humans. In this study, we combine transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and electroencephalography (EEG) to monitor cortical excitability in healthy individuals as a function of time awake. We observed that the excitability of the human frontal cortex, measured as the immediate (0–20 ms) EEG reaction to TMS, progressively increases with time awake, from morning to evening and after one night of total sleep deprivation, and that it decreases after recovery sleep. By continuously monitoring vigilance, we also found that this modulation in cortical responsiveness is tonic and not attributable to transient fluctuations of the level of arousal. The present results provide noninvasive electrophysiological evidence that wakefulness is associated with a steady increase in the excitability of human cortical circuits that is rebalanced during sleep. PMID:22314045

  1. Voluntary attention increases perceived spatial frequency.

    PubMed

    Abrams, Jared; Barbot, Antoine; Carrasco, Marisa

    2010-08-01

    Voluntary covert attention selects relevant sensory information for prioritized processing. The behavioral and neural consequences of such selection have been extensively documented, but its phenomenology has received little empirical investigation. Involuntary attention increases perceived spatial frequency (Gobell & Carrasco, 2005), but involuntary attention can differ from voluntary attention in its effects on performance in tasks mediated by spatial resolution (Yeshurun, Montagna, & Carrasco, 2008). Therefore, we ask whether voluntary attention affects the subjective appearance of spatial frequency--a fundamental dimension of visual perception underlying spatial resolution. We used a demanding rapid serial visual presentation task to direct voluntary attention and measured perceived spatial frequency at the attended and unattended locations. Attention increased the perceived spatial frequency of suprathreshold stimuli and also improved performance on a concurrent orientation discrimination task. In the control experiment, we ruled out response bias as an alternative account by using a lengthened interstimulus interval, which allows observers to disengage attention from the cued location. In contrast to the main experiment, the observers showed neither increased perceived spatial frequency nor improved orientation discrimination at the attended location. Thus, this study establishes that voluntary attention increases perceived spatial frequency. This phenomenological consequence links behavioral and neurophysiological studies on the effects of attention.

  2. Smart Partnerships to Increase Equity in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leahy, Margaret; Davis, Niki; Lewin, Cathy; Charania, Amina; Nordin, Hasniza; Orlic, Davor; Butler, Deirdre; Lopez-Fernadez, Olatz

    2016-01-01

    This exploratory analysis of smart partnerships identifies the risk of increasing the digital divide with the deployment of data analytics. Smart partnerships in education appear to include a process of evolution into a synergy of strategic and holistic approaches that enhance the quality of education with digital technologies, harnessing ICT…

  3. Increasing Access and Relevance in Distance Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendenhall, Robert W.

    2009-01-01

    Access to higher education is subject to many factors including affordability, time and geography. Distance education can deliver education to those that live far from a campus. Some of that distance education may be synchronous, or live, requiring students to be available at certain times. Flexibility and access are increased when the instruction…

  4. Using Mobile Phones to Increase Classroom Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cobb, Stephanie; Heaney, Rose; Corcoran, Olivia; Henderson-Begg, Stephanie

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the possible benefits of using mobile phones to increase interaction and promote active learning in large classroom settings. First year undergraduate students studying Cellular Processes at the University of East London took part in a trial of a new text-based classroom interaction system and evaluated their experience by…

  5. Increasing security in inter-chip communication

    DOEpatents

    Edwards, Nathan J; Hamlet, Jason; Bauer, Todd; Helinski, Ryan

    2014-10-28

    An apparatus for increasing security in inter-chip communication includes a sending control module, a communication bus, and a receiving control module. The communication bus is coupled between the sending control module and the receiving control module. The sending control module operates to send data on the communication bus, disable the communication bus when threats are detected, or both.

  6. MERIT RATING FOR SALARY INCREASES AND PROMOTIONS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BOLIN, JOHN G.; MUIR, JOHN W.

    DEMANDS FOR QUALITY EDUCATION HAVE EMPHASIZED THE NEED FOR OBJECTIVE MERIT RATING OF TEACHERS FOR PROMOTION AND SALARY INCREASES. THE STUDY REVIEWS MERIT-RATING LITERATURE, ANALYZES RATING SCALES AND PROCEDURES, AND MAKES RECOMMENDATIONS FOR DEVELOPING AND IMPLEMENTING MERIT PROGRAMS. THE WRITERS CONCLUDE THAT A COMBINATION OF SUPERORDINATE, PEER,…

  7. Using Mobile Learning to Increase Environmental Awareness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uzunboylu, Huseyin; Cavus, Nadire; Ercag, Erinc

    2009-01-01

    Mobile learning or m-learning, a relatively new concept, has attracted the interest of educators, researchers, and companies developing learning systems and instructional materials. This study investigated the use of integrating use of mobile technologies, data services, and multimedia messaging systems to increase students' use of mobile…

  8. Increasing Staff Participation in Curriculum Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marsh, C. J.

    1977-01-01

    A challenge facing school staffs is the development of school-based curriculum. Some guidelines and incentives for increasing staff participation in curriculum development are presented. Available from: Australian College of Education, 916 Swanston Street, Carlton, Victoria 3053, Australia, $2.50 single copy. (Author/MLF)

  9. Novelty Seeking in Adulthood: Increases Accompany Decline

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reio, Thomas G., Jr.; Choi, Namok

    2004-01-01

    Using stereotypes, researchers have predicted that novelty seeking declines in adulthood. Through this cross-sectional study, the authors revealed that only the external sensational type of novelty seeking declined, whereas the internal sensational and internal and external cognitive types remained stable or increased. A population of 233 adults…

  10. Weight loss causes increased mortality: pros.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, T I A

    2003-02-01

    There are many good reasons to expect that weight loss in overweight and obese subjects should lead to reduced mortality, not least because the general risk factor profile of several diseases responsible for the excess mortality associated with overweight and obesity improves with weight loss. However, observational long-term population studies have shown that weight loss in overweight subjects leads to increased long-term mortality, even if the studies are well controlled with regard to known confounding factors, including hazardous behaviour and underlying diseases that may lead to both weight loss and increased mortality. It seems unfeasible to wait for the multiple randomized clinical trials of sufficient quality, size and duration that may resolve this question. Therefore, the recommendations about weight loss must be based on the weaker evidence that can be obtained in short-term clinical trials and the observational population studies. Several studies have tried to address the problem by distinguishing intentional from unintentional weight loss, but only few do so by gathering information about the intention to lose weight before weight loss is observed. These studies suggest that intentional weight loss is associated with increased mortality. Recommendations to healthy overweight and obese subjects to lose weight must be based on an explicit weighing of the short-term well-documented benefits of weight loss, including improvement of quality of life, against the possible risk of an increased mortality in the long-term

  11. Increasing resourcefulness: the key to declining resources.

    PubMed

    Vestal, K

    1989-01-01

    Nurse executives face many daily issues related to balancing scarce resources with an ever-increasing demand for high quality services and programs. Never before have nursing organizations been faced with such relentless pressure to conserve resources and control costs in the process to meet organizational missions.

  12. Mechanism by which hydralazine increases propranolol bioavailability

    SciTech Connect

    Schneck, D.W.; Vary, J.E.

    1984-04-01

    Five healthy subjects were given oral /sup 14/C-propranolol (10 microCi, 40 mg) alone and in combination with hydralazine, 25 and 50 mg. Hydralazine increased propranolol peak concentrations from 25 +/- 7 ng/ml to 61 +/- 10 and 85 +/- 11 ng/ml, reduced time to peak concentrations from 2.2 +/- 0.2 hr to 0.7 +/- 0.1 and 0.8 +/- 0.1 hr, and increased area under the propranolol concentration: time curves from 153 +/- 38 ng X ml-1 X hr to 246 +/- 64 and 324 ng X ml-1 X hr (in all cases P less than 0.05). Hydralazine did not change the fraction of the /sup 14/C-propranolol dose recovered in the urine as basic, acidic, and polar metabolites: 0.28 +/- 0.2, 0.27 +/- 0.03, and 0.44 +/- 0.03. The urinary excretion rate of radioactive metabolites of propranolol in acid, basic, and residue fractions increased in the 0 . to . 2-hr time interval after hydralazine but there was no change in the relative proportion of each metabolite fraction at any time. Similar results were obtained by HPLC. Studies with radioactive propranolol indicate that a major acid and basic metabolite remains to be defined in addition to unextracted polar metabolites. Our data indicate that hydralazine increases propranolol bioavailability by its hemodynamic actions rather than by inhibition of its metabolism.

  13. Object detectability at increased ambient lighting conditions.

    PubMed

    Pollard, Benjamin J; Chawla, Amarpreet S; Delong, David M; Hashimoto, Noriyuki; Samei, Ehsan

    2008-06-01

    Under typical dark conditions encountered in diagnostic reading rooms, a reader's pupils will contract and dilate as the visual focus intermittently shifts between the high luminance display and the darker background wall, resulting in increased visual fatigue and the degradation of diagnostic performance. A controlled increase of ambient lighting may, however, reduce the severity of these pupillary adjustments by minimizing the difference between the luminance level to which the eyes adapt while viewing an image (L(adp)) and the luminance level of diffusely reflected light from the area surrounding the display (L(s)). Although ambient lighting in reading rooms has conventionally been kept at a minimum to maintain the perceived contrast of film images, proper Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) calibration of modern medical-grade liquid crystal displays can compensate for minor lighting increases with very little loss of image contrast. This paper describes two psychophysical studies developed to evaluate and refine optimum reading room ambient lighting conditions through the use of observational tasks intended to simulate real clinical practices. The first study utilized the biologic contrast response of the human visual system to determine a range of representative L(adp) values for typical medical images. Readers identified low contrast horizontal objects in circular foregrounds of uniform luminance (5, 12, 20, and 30 cd/m2) embedded within digitized mammograms. The second study examined the effect of increased ambient lighting on the detection of subtle objects embedded in circular foregrounds of uniform luminance (5, 12, and 35 cd/m2) centered within a constant background of 12 cd/m2 luminance. The images were displayed under a dark room condition (1 lux) and an increased ambient lighting level (50 lux) such that the luminance level of the diffusely reflected light from the background wall was approximately equal to the image L(adp) value of

  14. Amphetamine enhances endurance by increasing heat dissipation.

    PubMed

    Morozova, Ekaterina; Yoo, Yeonjoo; Behrouzvaziri, Abolhassan; Zaretskaia, Maria; Rusyniak, Daniel; Zaretsky, Dmitry; Molkov, Yaroslav

    2016-09-01

    Athletes use amphetamines to improve their performance through largely unknown mechanisms. Considering that body temperature is one of the major determinants of exhaustion during exercise, we investigated the influence of amphetamine on the thermoregulation. To explore this, we measured core body temperature and oxygen consumption of control and amphetamine-trea ted rats running on a treadmill with an incrementally increasing load (both speed and incline). Experimental results showed that rats treated with amphetamine (2 mg/kg) were able to run significantly longer than control rats. Due to a progressively increasing workload, which was matched by oxygen consumption, the control group exhibited a steady increase in the body temperature. The administration of amphetamine slowed down the temperature rise (thus decreasing core body temperature) in the beginning of the run without affecting oxygen consumption. In contrast, a lower dose of amphetamine (1 mg/kg) had no effect on measured parameters. Using a mathematical model describing temperature dynamics in two compartments (the core and the muscles), we were able to infer what physiological parameters were affected by amphetamine. Modeling revealed that amphetamine administration increases heat dissipation in the core. Furthermore, the model predicted that the muscle temperature at the end of the run in the amphetamine-treated group was significantly higher than in the control group. Therefore, we conclude that amphetamine may mask or delay fatigue by slowing down exercise-induced core body temperature growth by increasing heat dissipation. However, this affects the integrity of thermoregulatory system and may result in potentially dangerous overheating of the muscles.

  15. Increasing biomass in Amazonian forest plots.

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Timothy R; Phillips, Oliver L; Malhi, Yadvinder; Almeida, Samuel; Arroyo, Luzmila; Di Fiore, Anthony; Erwin, Terry; Higuchi, Niro; Killeen, Timothy J; Laurance, Susan G; Laurance, William F; Lewis, Simon L; Monteagudo, Abel; Neill, David A; Vargas, Percy Núñez; Pitman, Nigel C A; Silva, J Natalino M; Martínez, Rodolfo Vásquez

    2004-01-01

    A previous study by Phillips et al. of changes in the biomass of permanent sample plots in Amazonian forests was used to infer the presence of a regional carbon sink. However, these results generated a vigorous debate about sampling and methodological issues. Therefore we present a new analysis of biomass change in old-growth Amazonian forest plots using updated inventory data. We find that across 59 sites, the above-ground dry biomass in trees that are more than 10 cm in diameter (AGB) has increased since plot establishment by 1.22 +/- 0.43 Mg per hectare per year (ha(-1) yr(-1), where 1 ha = 10(4) m2), or 0.98 +/- 0.38 Mg ha(-1) yr(-1) if individual plot values are weighted by the number of hectare years of monitoring. This significant increase is neither confounded by spatial or temporal variation in wood specific gravity, nor dependent on the allometric equation used to estimate AGB. The conclusion is also robust to uncertainty about diameter measurements for problematic trees: for 34 plots in western Amazon forests a significant increase in AGB is found even with a conservative assumption of zero growth for all trees where diameter measurements were made using optical methods and/or growth rates needed to be estimated following fieldwork. Overall, our results suggest a slightly greater rate of net stand-level change than was reported by Phillips et al. Considering the spatial and temporal scale of sampling and associated studies showing increases in forest growth and stem turnover, the results presented here suggest that the total biomass of these plots has on average increased and that there has been a regional-scale carbon sink in old-growth Amazonian forests during the previous two decades. PMID:15212090

  16. Increasing halothane concentrations reduce nitroprusside dose requirement.

    PubMed

    Bedford, R F

    1978-01-01

    There has been no description of the hemodynamic dose-response relationship between halothane and sodium nitroprusside (SNP), although these drugs are used together frequently for induction of deliberate hypotension. Utilizing aortic root cannulation and thermister-tipped pulmonary artery catheterization, this relationship was studied in 6 beagles receiving a standard 100 microgram/kg infusion of SNP solution administered at 3 different infusion rates (5, 10, and 20 microgram/kg/min) while anesthetized with 3 different concentrations of halothane (0.5, 1, and 2%). Sodium nitroprusside infusion resulted in dose-related reductions in mean arterial pressure, systemic vascular resistance, and left ventricular stroke work. Increasing concentrations of halothane significantly potentiated the hypotensive effects of SNP. Cardiac output increase as the SNP infusion rate increased, whereas increasing the halothane concentration resulted in a reduction of cardiac output at each SNP infusion rate studied. Pulmonary artery wedge pressure was significantly reduced by SNP infusion at all 3 halothane concentrations, whereas mean pulmonary artery pressure was unchanged. Arterial pH fell in response to each SNP infusion, from 7.46 at the beginning of the study to 7.32 at the end (p less than 0.001). Sodium nitroprusside predictably induced hypotension during halothane anesthesia at the cost of a dose-related metabolic acidosis. Increasing the depth of halothane anesthesia afforded a greater percentage reduction in arterial pressure at each SNP infusion rate studied. Metabolic acidosis, however, developed no more rapidly at 2% halothane than it did at 0.5 or 1%.

  17. Amphetamine enhances endurance by increasing heat dissipation.

    PubMed

    Morozova, Ekaterina; Yoo, Yeonjoo; Behrouzvaziri, Abolhassan; Zaretskaia, Maria; Rusyniak, Daniel; Zaretsky, Dmitry; Molkov, Yaroslav

    2016-09-01

    Athletes use amphetamines to improve their performance through largely unknown mechanisms. Considering that body temperature is one of the major determinants of exhaustion during exercise, we investigated the influence of amphetamine on the thermoregulation. To explore this, we measured core body temperature and oxygen consumption of control and amphetamine-trea ted rats running on a treadmill with an incrementally increasing load (both speed and incline). Experimental results showed that rats treated with amphetamine (2 mg/kg) were able to run significantly longer than control rats. Due to a progressively increasing workload, which was matched by oxygen consumption, the control group exhibited a steady increase in the body temperature. The administration of amphetamine slowed down the temperature rise (thus decreasing core body temperature) in the beginning of the run without affecting oxygen consumption. In contrast, a lower dose of amphetamine (1 mg/kg) had no effect on measured parameters. Using a mathematical model describing temperature dynamics in two compartments (the core and the muscles), we were able to infer what physiological parameters were affected by amphetamine. Modeling revealed that amphetamine administration increases heat dissipation in the core. Furthermore, the model predicted that the muscle temperature at the end of the run in the amphetamine-treated group was significantly higher than in the control group. Therefore, we conclude that amphetamine may mask or delay fatigue by slowing down exercise-induced core body temperature growth by increasing heat dissipation. However, this affects the integrity of thermoregulatory system and may result in potentially dangerous overheating of the muscles. PMID:27604402

  18. Fire increases dust production from chaparral soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabet, Emmanuel J.

    2014-07-01

    By altering the physical and chemical properties of a landscape, fire may increase its vulnerability to erosive processes. Whereas sediment transport by surface runoff after fires has been often investigated, less is known about the role of wind erosion in burned terrain. To examine how fire might increase a soil's vulnerability to aeolian transport, intact soil samples were collected from a chaparral landscape in southern California and heated with a propane torch with temperatures ranging from 250 to 1025 °C and for durations of 5-60 min to simulate a variety of burn severities. The samples were then subjected to simulated wind and the amounts of eroded sediment were measured. Results indicate a linear increase in the production of wind-erodible sediment with applied heat up to ~ 10 MJ/m2. The increase was not due to a reduction in the threshold shear velocity of the soil surface but, instead, to the role of heat in detaching erodible material. In these soils, organic material may be an important binding agent destroyed at high temperatures. The relationship between fire and erodibility is complex, however, because heating may also help to aggregate soil particles. Experiments performed here also suggest a synergistic effect between fire and rain whereby heated soils are more vulnerable to the erosive power of raindrop impacts. Additionally, the soil heating experiments were used to measure and compare the thermal conductivities of intact and disturbed soils. Finally, it is concluded that soil heating may increase the emission of dust through the detachment of erodible particles, a result that may help in the anticipation of respiratory problems for those living downwind of burned areas.

  19. A mechanistic study to increase understanding of titanium dioxide nanoparticles-increased plasma glucose in mice.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hailong; Li, Li; Guo, Qian; Jin, Sanli; Zhou, Ying; Oh, Yuri; Feng, Yujie; Wu, Qiong; Gu, Ning

    2016-09-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticle (TiO2 NP) is an authorized food additive. Previous studies determined oral administration of TiO2 NPs increases plasma glucose in mice via inducing insulin resistance. An increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) has been considered the possible mechanism of increasing plasma glucose. However, persistently high plasma glucose is also a mechanism of increasing ROS. This study aims to explore whether TiO2 NPs increase plasma glucose via ROS. We found after oral administration of TiO2 NPs, an increase in ROS preceded an increase in plasma glucose. Subsequently, mice were treated with two antioxidants (resveratrol and vitamin E) at the same time as oral administration of TiO2 NPs. Results showed resveratrol and vitamin E reduced TiO2 NPs-increased ROS. An increase in plasma glucose was also inhibited. Further research showed resveratrol and vitamin E inhibited the secretion of TNF-α and IL-6, and the phosphorylation of JNK and p38 MAPK, resulting in improved insulin resistance. These results suggest TiO2 NPs increased ROS levels, and then ROS activated inflammatory cytokines and phosphokinases, and thus induced insulin resistance, resulting in an increase in plasma glucose. Resveratrol and vitamin E can reduce TiO2 NPs-increased ROS and thereby inhibit an increase in plasma glucose in mice. PMID:27430421

  20. A mechanistic study to increase understanding of titanium dioxide nanoparticles-increased plasma glucose in mice.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hailong; Li, Li; Guo, Qian; Jin, Sanli; Zhou, Ying; Oh, Yuri; Feng, Yujie; Wu, Qiong; Gu, Ning

    2016-09-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticle (TiO2 NP) is an authorized food additive. Previous studies determined oral administration of TiO2 NPs increases plasma glucose in mice via inducing insulin resistance. An increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) has been considered the possible mechanism of increasing plasma glucose. However, persistently high plasma glucose is also a mechanism of increasing ROS. This study aims to explore whether TiO2 NPs increase plasma glucose via ROS. We found after oral administration of TiO2 NPs, an increase in ROS preceded an increase in plasma glucose. Subsequently, mice were treated with two antioxidants (resveratrol and vitamin E) at the same time as oral administration of TiO2 NPs. Results showed resveratrol and vitamin E reduced TiO2 NPs-increased ROS. An increase in plasma glucose was also inhibited. Further research showed resveratrol and vitamin E inhibited the secretion of TNF-α and IL-6, and the phosphorylation of JNK and p38 MAPK, resulting in improved insulin resistance. These results suggest TiO2 NPs increased ROS levels, and then ROS activated inflammatory cytokines and phosphokinases, and thus induced insulin resistance, resulting in an increase in plasma glucose. Resveratrol and vitamin E can reduce TiO2 NPs-increased ROS and thereby inhibit an increase in plasma glucose in mice.

  1. Do Fat Supplements Increase Physical Performance?

    PubMed Central

    Macaluso, Filippo; Barone, Rosario; Catanese, Patrizia; Carini, Francesco; Rizzuto, Luigi; Farina, Felicia; Felice, Valentina Di

    2013-01-01

    Fish oil and conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) belong to a popular class of food supplements known as “fat supplements”, which are claimed to reduce muscle glycogen breakdown, reduce body mass, as well as reduce muscle damage and inflammatory responses. Sport athletes consume fish oil and CLA mainly to increase lean body mass and reduce body fat. Recent evidence indicates that this kind of supplementation may have other side-effects and a new role has been identified in steroidogenensis. Preliminary findings demonstrate that fish oil and CLA may induce a physiological increase in testosterone synthesis. The aim of this review is to describe the effects of fish oil and CLA on physical performance (endurance and resistance exercise), and highlight the new results on the effects on testosterone biosynthesis. In view of these new data, we can hypothesize that fat supplements may improve the anabolic effect of exercise. PMID:23434906

  2. Increased ocean heat transports and warmer climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rind, D.; Chandler, M.

    1991-01-01

    The impact of an increased ocean heat transport on climate is investigated in the framework of the GISS GMC model described by Hansen et al. (1983), using two scenarios: one starting from warmer polar temperatures/no sea ice and the other from the current ocean conditions. A 20-percent increase in cross-equatorial heat transport was sufficient to melt all sea ice; it resulted in a climate that was 2 C warmer for the global average, with values some 20-deg warmer at high altitudes and 1-deg warmer near the equator. It is suggested that the hydrological and dynamical changes associated with this different climate regime may be self-sustaining and, as such, would account for the high-latitude warmth of climates in the Mesozoic and Tertiary periods and the decadenal-scale climate fluctuations during the Holocene.

  3. Does nitrogen dioxide exposure increase airways responsiveness

    SciTech Connect

    Folinsbee, L.J.

    1992-01-01

    A number of reports have suggested that exposure to nitrogen dioxide (NO2) may cause increased airways responsiveness (AR). Twenty studies of asthmatics and five studies of healthy subjects exposed to NO[sub 2] were used to test the hypothesis using a simple method of meta-analysis. Individual data were obtained for the above studies and the direction of change in AR was determined for each subject. Only studies with available individual data were used. Subjects from these studies whose directional change in AR could not be determined were excluded. The fraction of positive responses (i.e. increased AR) was determined for all subjects within a group and tested for significance using a sign test. Data were also grouped according to NO[sub 2] concentration and by whether the exposure included exercise.

  4. Cyclosporine increases calcium in kidney medulla

    SciTech Connect

    Borowitz, J.L.

    1988-01-01

    Treatment of rats with 20, 50, or 100 mg/kg of cyclosporine p.o. markedly increased /sup 45/Ca accumulation in kidney slices especially in medulla. The effect was related to dose and duration of treatment, and was also observed in slices of kidney medulla from cyclosporine-treated mice. Total calcium was elevated in kidney medulla of cyclosporine-treated rats so that the effect is not merely an increased exchange but a build-up of calcium in the tissue. No histopathologic evidence of cyclosporine-related cell necrosis was present in mouse kidney, showing that calcium accumulation is not dystrophic in character. Accumulation of /sup 45/Ca in slices of rat heart, liver, or brain was not affected by cyclosporine pretreatment of the animals. It is suggested that cyclosporine-induced changes in calcium metabolism in kidney medulla may influence kidney function.

  5. Increasing the efficiency of solar thermal panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrnjac, M.; Latinović, T.; Dobrnjac, S.; Živković, P.

    2016-08-01

    The popularity of solar heating systems is increasing for several reasons. These systems are reliable, adaptable and pollution-free, because the renewable solar energy is used. There are many variants of solar systems in the market mainly constructed with copper pipes and absorbers with different quality of absorption surface. Taking into account the advantages and disadvantages of existing solutions, in order to increase efficiency and improve the design of solar panel, the innovative solution has been done. This new solar panel presents connection of an attractive design and the use of constructive appropriate materials with special geometric shapes. Hydraulic and thermotechnical tests that have been performed on this panel showed high hydraulic and structural stability. Further development of the solar panel will be done in the future in order to improve some noticed disadvantages.

  6. Do fat supplements increase physical performance?

    PubMed

    Macaluso, Filippo; Barone, Rosario; Catanese, Patrizia; Carini, Francesco; Rizzuto, Luigi; Farina, Felicia; Di Felice, Valentina

    2013-02-07

    Fish oil and conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) belong to a popular class of food supplements known as "fat supplements", which are claimed to reduce muscle glycogen breakdown, reduce body mass, as well as reduce muscle damage and inflammatory responses. Sport athletes consume fish oil and CLA mainly to increase lean body mass and reduce body fat. Recent evidence indicates that this kind of supplementation may have other side-effects and a new role has been identified in steroidogenensis. Preliminary findings demonstrate that fish oil and CLA may induce a physiological increase in testosterone synthesis. The aim of this review is to describe the effects of fish oil and CLA on physical performance (endurance and resistance exercise), and highlight the new results on the effects on testosterone biosynthesis. In view of these new data, we can hypothesize that fat supplements may improve the anabolic effect of exercise.

  7. Increased Ribozyme Activity in Crowded Solutions*

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Ravi; Kilburn, Duncan; Lee, Hui-Ting; Woodson, Sarah A.

    2014-01-01

    Noncoding RNAs must function in the crowded environment of the cell. Previous small-angle x-ray scattering experiments showed that molecular crowders stabilize the structure of the Azoarcus group I ribozyme, allowing the ribozyme to fold at low physiological Mg2+ concentrations. Here, we used an RNA cleavage assay to show that the PEG and Ficoll crowder molecules increased the biochemical activity of the ribozyme, whereas sucrose did not. Crowding lowered the Mg2+ threshold at which activity was detected and increased total RNA cleavage at high Mg2+ concentrations sufficient to fold the RNA in crowded or dilute solution. After correcting for solution viscosity, the observed reaction rate was proportional to the fraction of active ribozyme. We conclude that molecular crowders stabilize the native ribozyme and favor the active structure relative to compact inactive folding intermediates. PMID:24337582

  8. INCREASING DIVERSITY IN OUR SCHOOLS OF NURSING.

    PubMed

    Neubrander, Judy; Metcalfe, Sharon E

    2016-01-01

    This article will review one school's quest to address the multi-level social, historical, environmental and structural determinants faced by under-represented ethnic minorities (UREM) and disadvantaged background (DB) students as they seek entrance into a nursing program. Nursing Network Careers and Technology (NN-CAT) provides a nursing career network for underrepresented and disadvantaged students in western North Carolina and has increased the number of underrepresented and disadvantaged students who are admitted, retained and graduate with a bachelor's degree in nursing from Western Carolina University. Initial data from this NN-CAT program have demonstrated that addressing social determinants and eliminating barriers can increase the number of UREM and educationally disadvantaged students who successfully matriculate in our schools of Nursing and subsequently graduate. These nurses then enter the workforce and provide culturally meaningful care in their local communities. PMID:27439229

  9. Increasing the Size of Microwave Popcorn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smoyer, Justin

    2005-03-01

    Each year Americans consume approximately 17 billion quarts of popcorn. Since the 1940s, microwaves have been the heating source of choice for most. By treating the popcorn mechanism as a thermodynamic system, it has been shown mathematically and experimentally that reducing the surrounding pressure of the unpopped kernels, results in an increased volume of the kernels [Quinn et al, http://xxx.lanl.gov/abs/cond-mat/0409434 v1 2004]. In this project an alternate method of popping with the microwave was used to further test and confirm this hypothesis. Numerous experimental trials where run to test the validity of the theory. The results show that there is a significant increase in the average kernel size as well as a reduction in the number of unpopped kernels.

  10. Minimal Increase Network Coding for Dynamic Networks.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guoyin; Fan, Xu; Wu, Yanxia

    2016-01-01

    Because of the mobility, computing power and changeable topology of dynamic networks, it is difficult for random linear network coding (RLNC) in static networks to satisfy the requirements of dynamic networks. To alleviate this problem, a minimal increase network coding (MINC) algorithm is proposed. By identifying the nonzero elements of an encoding vector, it selects blocks to be encoded on the basis of relationship between the nonzero elements that the controls changes in the degrees of the blocks; then, the encoding time is shortened in a dynamic network. The results of simulations show that, compared with existing encoding algorithms, the MINC algorithm provides reduced computational complexity of encoding and an increased probability of delivery. PMID:26867211

  11. Playing violent video games increases intergroup bias.

    PubMed

    Greitemeyer, Tobias

    2014-01-01

    Previous research has shown how, why, and for whom violent video game play is related to aggression and aggression-related variables. In contrast, less is known about whether some individuals are more likely than others to be the target of increased aggression after violent video game play. The present research examined the idea that the effects of violent video game play are stronger when the target is a member of an outgroup rather than an ingroup. In fact, a correlational study revealed that violent video game exposure was positively related to ethnocentrism. This relation remained significant when controlling for trait aggression. Providing causal evidence, an experimental study showed that playing a violent video game increased aggressive behavior, and that this effect was more pronounced when the target was an outgroup rather than an ingroup member. Possible mediating mechanisms are discussed. PMID:24085715

  12. Playing violent video games increases intergroup bias.

    PubMed

    Greitemeyer, Tobias

    2014-01-01

    Previous research has shown how, why, and for whom violent video game play is related to aggression and aggression-related variables. In contrast, less is known about whether some individuals are more likely than others to be the target of increased aggression after violent video game play. The present research examined the idea that the effects of violent video game play are stronger when the target is a member of an outgroup rather than an ingroup. In fact, a correlational study revealed that violent video game exposure was positively related to ethnocentrism. This relation remained significant when controlling for trait aggression. Providing causal evidence, an experimental study showed that playing a violent video game increased aggressive behavior, and that this effect was more pronounced when the target was an outgroup rather than an ingroup member. Possible mediating mechanisms are discussed.

  13. Minimal Increase Network Coding for Dynamic Networks.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guoyin; Fan, Xu; Wu, Yanxia

    2016-01-01

    Because of the mobility, computing power and changeable topology of dynamic networks, it is difficult for random linear network coding (RLNC) in static networks to satisfy the requirements of dynamic networks. To alleviate this problem, a minimal increase network coding (MINC) algorithm is proposed. By identifying the nonzero elements of an encoding vector, it selects blocks to be encoded on the basis of relationship between the nonzero elements that the controls changes in the degrees of the blocks; then, the encoding time is shortened in a dynamic network. The results of simulations show that, compared with existing encoding algorithms, the MINC algorithm provides reduced computational complexity of encoding and an increased probability of delivery.

  14. Minimal Increase Network Coding for Dynamic Networks

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yanxia

    2016-01-01

    Because of the mobility, computing power and changeable topology of dynamic networks, it is difficult for random linear network coding (RLNC) in static networks to satisfy the requirements of dynamic networks. To alleviate this problem, a minimal increase network coding (MINC) algorithm is proposed. By identifying the nonzero elements of an encoding vector, it selects blocks to be encoded on the basis of relationship between the nonzero elements that the controls changes in the degrees of the blocks; then, the encoding time is shortened in a dynamic network. The results of simulations show that, compared with existing encoding algorithms, the MINC algorithm provides reduced computational complexity of encoding and an increased probability of delivery. PMID:26867211

  15. Optogenetic stimulation of MCH neurons increases sleep.

    PubMed

    Konadhode, Roda Rani; Pelluru, Dheeraj; Blanco-Centurion, Carlos; Zayachkivsky, Andrew; Liu, Meng; Uhde, Thomas; Glen, W Bailey; van den Pol, Anthony N; Mulholland, Patrick J; Shiromani, Priyattam J

    2013-06-19

    Melanin concentrating hormone (MCH) is a cyclic neuropeptide present in the hypothalamus of all vertebrates. MCH is implicated in a number of behaviors but direct evidence is lacking. To selectively stimulate the MCH neurons the gene for the light-sensitive cation channel, channelrhodopsin-2, was inserted into the MCH neurons of wild-type mice. Three weeks later MCH neurons were stimulated for 1 min every 5 min for 24 h. A 10 Hz stimulation at the start of the night hastened sleep onset, reduced length of wake bouts by 50%, increased total time in non-REM and REM sleep at night, and increased sleep intensity during the day cycle. Sleep induction at a circadian time when all of the arousal neurons are active indicates that MCH stimulation can powerfully counteract the combined wake-promoting signal of the arousal neurons. This could be potentially useful in treatment of insomnia.

  16. Increases in cerebrovascular impedance in older adults.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yong-Sheng; Tseng, Benjamin Y; Shibata, Shigeki; Levine, Benjamin D; Zhang, Rong

    2011-08-01

    This study explored a novel method for measuring cerebrovascular impedance to quantify the relationship between pulsatile changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF) and arterial pressure. Arterial pressure in the internal or common carotid artery (applanation tonometry), CBF velocity in the middle cerebral artery (transcranial Doppler), and end-tidal CO(2) (capnography) were measured in six young (28 ± 4 yr) and nine elderly subjects (70 ± 6 yr). Transfer function method was used to estimate cerebrovascular impedance. Under supine resting conditions, CBF velocity was reduced in the elderly despite the fact that they had higher arterial pressure than young subjects. As expected, cerebrovascular resistance index was increased in the elderly. In both young and elderly subjects, impedance modulus was reduced gradually in the frequency range of 0.78-8 Hz. Phase was negative in the range of 0.78-4.3 Hz and fluctuated at high frequencies. Compared with the young, impedance modulus increased by 38% in the elderly in the range of 0.78-2 Hz and by 39% in the range of 2-4 Hz (P < 0.05). Moreover, increases in impedance were correlated with reductions in CBF velocity. Collectively, these findings demonstrate the feasibility of assessing cerebrovascular impedance using the noninvasive method developed in this study. The estimated impedance modulus and phase are similar to those observed in the systemic circulation and other vascular beds. Moreover, increases in impedance in the elderly suggest that arterial stiffening, besides changes in cerebrovascular resistance, contributes to reduction in CBF with age.

  17. Paliperidone Induced Hypoglycemia by Increasing Insulin Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Riku, Keisen; Fukumoto, Motoyuki; Kanai, Koji; Omura, Yumi; Matunaga, Hidenori

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a 41-year-old woman with schizophrenia who developed persistent hypoglycemia following paliperidone administration. After discontinuing paliperidone, the hypoglycemia resolved, but symptoms of diabetes emerged. Therefore, it appears that the hypoglycemia induced by paliperidone may mask symptoms of diabetes. Paliperidone may induce hypoglycemia by increasing insulin secretion. This report could help elucidate the relationship between atypical antipsychotics and glucose metabolism. PMID:27478670

  18. Mechanisms by which diabetes increases cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Gleissner, Christian A.; Galkina, Elena; Nadler, Jerry L.; Ley, Klaus

    2008-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is one of the major risk factors for cardiovascular disease which is the leading cause of death in the U.S. Increasing prevalence of diabetes and diabetic atherosclerosis makes identification of molecular mechanisms by which diabetes promotes atherogenesis an important task. Targeting common pathways may ameliorate both diseases. This review focuses on well known as well as newly discovered mechanisms which may represent promising therapeutic targets. PMID:18695749

  19. Increasing hope by addressing clients' outcome expectations.

    PubMed

    Swift, Joshua K; Derthick, Annie O

    2013-09-01

    Addressing clients' outcome expectations is an important clinical process that can lead to a strong therapeutic alliance, more positive treatment outcomes, and decreased rates of premature termination from psychotherapy. Five interventions designed to foster appropriate outcome expectations are discussed, including presenting a convincing treatment rationale, increasing clients' faith in their therapists, expressing faith in clients, providing outcome education, and comparing progress with expectations. Clinical examples and research support are provided for each. PMID:24000836

  20. The increasing complexity of the ubiquitin code.

    PubMed

    Yau, Richard; Rape, Michael

    2016-05-27

    Ubiquitylation is essential for signal transduction as well as cell division and differentiation in all eukaryotes. Substrate modifications range from a single ubiquitin molecule to complex polymeric chains, with different types of ubiquitylation often eliciting distinct outcomes. The recent identification of novel chain topologies has improved our understanding of how ubiquitylation establishes precise communication within cells. Here, we discuss how the increasing complexity of ubiquitylation is employed to ensure robust and faithful signal transduction in eukaryotic cells. PMID:27230526

  1. Increased gasoline octane in FCC reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Beech, J.H.; Gross, B.; Ramage, M.P.

    1984-07-10

    The operation of FCC apparatus is improved by decreasing oil partial pressure in the FCC reactor riser by about 10 psia, as compared to the normal oil partial pressure in the riser, thereby increasing octane rating of the gasoline produced in the FCC unit. The oil partial pressure may be reduced by injecting a suitable amount of an inert diluent into the riser, or by decreasing throughput of the FCC reactor.

  2. Paliperidone Induced Hypoglycemia by Increasing Insulin Secretion.

    PubMed

    Omi, Tsubasa; Riku, Keisen; Fukumoto, Motoyuki; Kanai, Koji; Omura, Yumi; Takada, Hiromune; Matunaga, Hidenori

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a 41-year-old woman with schizophrenia who developed persistent hypoglycemia following paliperidone administration. After discontinuing paliperidone, the hypoglycemia resolved, but symptoms of diabetes emerged. Therefore, it appears that the hypoglycemia induced by paliperidone may mask symptoms of diabetes. Paliperidone may induce hypoglycemia by increasing insulin secretion. This report could help elucidate the relationship between atypical antipsychotics and glucose metabolism. PMID:27478670

  3. Increasing identical particle entanglement by fuzzy measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Cavalcanti, D.; Franca Santos, M.; Terra Cunha, M. O.; Lunkes, C.; Vedral, V.

    2005-12-15

    We investigate the effects of fuzzy measurements on spin entanglement for identical particles, both fermions and bosons. We first consider an ideal measurement apparatus and define operators that detect the symmetry of the spatial and spin part of the density matrix as a function of particle distance. Then, moving on to realistic devices that can only detect the position of the particle to within a certain spread, it was surprisingly found that the entanglement between particles increases with the broadening of detection.

  4. Heat stress increases insulin sensitivity in pigs

    PubMed Central

    Sanz Fernandez, M Victoria; Stoakes, Sara K; Abuajamieh, Mohannad; Seibert, Jacob T; Johnson, Jay S; Horst, Erin A; Rhoads, Robert P; Baumgard, Lance H

    2015-01-01

    Proper insulin homeostasis appears critical for adapting to and surviving a heat load. Further, heat stress (HS) induces phenotypic changes in livestock that suggest an increase in insulin action. The current study objective was to evaluate the effects of HS on whole-body insulin sensitivity. Female pigs (57 ± 4 kg body weight) were subjected to two experimental periods. During period 1, all pigs remained in thermoneutral conditions (TN; 21°C) and were fed ad libitum. During period 2, pigs were exposed to: (i) constant HS conditions (32°C) and fed ad libitum (n = 6), or (ii) TN conditions and pair-fed (PFTN; n = 6) to eliminate the confounding effects of dissimilar feed intake. A hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp (HEC) was conducted on d3 of both periods; and skeletal muscle and adipose tissue biopsies were collected prior to and after an insulin tolerance test (ITT) on d5 of period 2. During the HEC, insulin infusion increased circulating insulin and decreased plasma C-peptide and nonesterified fatty acids, similarly between treatments. From period 1 to 2, the rate of glucose infusion in response to the HEC remained similar in HS pigs while it decreased (36%) in PFTN controls. Prior to the ITT, HS increased (41%) skeletal muscle insulin receptor substrate-1 protein abundance, but did not affect protein kinase B or their phosphorylated forms. In adipose tissue, HS did not alter any of the basal or stimulated measured insulin signaling markers. In summary, HS increases whole-body insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. PMID:26243213

  5. Sensors Increase Productivity in Harsh Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    California's San Juan Capistrano-based Endevco Corporation licensed three patents covering high-temperature, harsh-environment silicon carbide (Si-C) pressure sensors from Glenn Research Center. The company is exploring their use in government markets, as well as in commercial markets, including commercial jet testing, deep well drilling applications where pressure and temperature increase with drilling depth, and in automobile combustion chambers.

  6. Aridity under conditions of increased CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greve, Peter; Roderick, Micheal L.; Seneviratne, Sonia I.

    2016-04-01

    A string of recent of studies led to the wide-held assumption that aridity will increase under conditions of increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations and associated global warming. Such results generally build upon analyses of changes in the 'aridity index' (the ratio of potential evaporation to precipitation) and can be described as a direct thermodynamic effect on atmospheric water demand due to increasing temperatures. However, there is widespread evidence that contradicts the 'warmer is more arid' interpretation, leading to the 'global aridity paradox' (Roderick et al. 2015, WRR). Here we provide a comprehensive assessment of modeled changes in a broad set of dryness metrics (primarily based on a range of measures of water availability) over a large range of realistic atmospheric CO2 concentrations. We use an ensemble of simulations from of state-of-the-art climate models to analyse both equilibrium climate experiments and transient historical simulations and future projections. Our results show that dryness is, under conditions of increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations and related global warming, generally decreasing at global scales. At regional scales we do, however, identify areas that undergo changes towards drier conditions, located primarily in subtropical climate regions and the Amazon Basin. Nonetheless, the majority of regions, especially in tropical and mid- to northern high latitudes areas, display wetting conditions in a warming world. Our results contradict previous findings and highlight the need to comprehensively assess all aspects of changes in hydroclimatological conditions at the land surface. Roderick, M. L., P. Greve, and G. D. Farquhar (2015), On the assessment of aridity with changes in atmospheric CO2, Water Resour. Res., 51, 5450-5463

  7. Proposed rate increase -- Jim Woodruff Project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-12-01

    The Jim Woodruff Project consists of three 10,000 kw hydroelectric power units located on the Apalachicola River 0.2 miles below the confluence of the Chattahoochee and Flint rivers where the reservoir crosses the Georgia-Florida state line. Overload capability allows the Government to sell 36,000 kw of capacity and associated energy to six Preference Customers in the Florida Power Corporation service area. A Preference Customer is defined as an electric cooperative or a public body having its own distribution system and marketing power at retail to its constituents. Any surplus energy in excess of Preference Customer commitments is marketed to Florida Power Corporation. In accordance with the Flood Control Act of 1944, the Southeastern Power Administration (Southeastern) is required to charge rates sufficient to recover costs expended by the US Treasury in the construction, maintenance and operation of hydroelectric power projects, together with applicable interest charges. Rate studies indicate that the current rates charged for electricity produced at the Jim Woodruff Project and sold to the Preference Customers and/or the Florida Power Corporation is not meeting this requirement. The proposed rate increase would increase the cost of electricity to the Preference Customers and Ultimate Consumers. However, the increase would still be significantly less expensive than electricity purchased from alternate sources and, therefore, there is no economic inducement for purchasers to seek other sources of power that could result in environmental impacts. Finally, in implementing the proposed rate increase, no generation or transmission facility changes at the Jim Woodruff Project are required which could affect the environment.

  8. Programs to Increase High School Completion

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Robert A.; Knopf, John A.; Wilson, Sandra Jo; Truman, Benedict I.; Milstein, Bobby; Johnson, Robert L.; Fielding, Jonathan E.; Muntaner, Carles J.M.; Jones, Camara Phyllis; Fullilove, Mindy T.; Moss, Regina Davis; Uefffng, Erin; Hunt, Pete C.

    2015-01-01

    Context High school completion (HSC) is an established predictor of long-term morbidity and mortality. U.S. rates of HSC are substantially lower among students from low-income families and most racial/ethnic minority populations than students from high-income families and the non-Hispanic white population. This systematic review assesses the effectiveness of programs to increase HSC and the potential of these programs to improve lifelong health among at-risk students. Evidence acquisition A search located a meta-analysis (search period 1985–2010/2011) on the effects of programs to increase HSC or General Educational Development (GED) diploma receipt; the meta-analysis was concordant with Community Guide definitions and methodologic standards. Programs were assessed separately for the general student population (152 studies) and students who were parents or pregnant (15 studies). A search for studies published between 2010 and August 2012 located ten more recent studies, which were assessed for consistency with the meta-analysis. Analyses were conducted in 2013. Evidence synthesis The review focused on the meta-analysis. Program effectiveness was measured as the increased rate of HSC (or GED receipt) by the intervention group compared with controls. All assessed program types were effective in increasing HSC in the general student population: vocational training, alternative schooling, social–emotional skills training, college-oriented programming, mentoring and counseling, supplemental academic services, school and class restructuring, multiservice packages, attendance monitoring and contingencies, community service, and case management. For students who had children or were pregnant, attendance monitoring and multiservice packages were effective. Ten studies published after the search period for the meta-analysis were consistent with its findings. Conclusions There is strong evidence that a variety of HSC programs can improve high school or GED completion

  9. Global warming without global mean precipitation increase?

    PubMed

    Salzmann, Marc

    2016-06-01

    Global climate models simulate a robust increase of global mean precipitation of about 1.5 to 2% per kelvin surface warming in response to greenhouse gas (GHG) forcing. Here, it is shown that the sensitivity to aerosol cooling is robust as well, albeit roughly twice as large. This larger sensitivity is consistent with energy budget arguments. At the same time, it is still considerably lower than the 6.5 to 7% K(-1) decrease of the water vapor concentration with cooling from anthropogenic aerosol because the water vapor radiative feedback lowers the hydrological sensitivity to anthropogenic forcings. When GHG and aerosol forcings are combined, the climate models with a realistic 20th century warming indicate that the global mean precipitation increase due to GHG warming has, until recently, been completely masked by aerosol drying. This explains the apparent lack of sensitivity of the global mean precipitation to the net global warming recently found in observations. As the importance of GHG warming increases in the future, a clear signal will emerge. PMID:27386558

  10. Will Climate Change Increase Transatlantic Aviation Turbulence?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, P. D.; Joshi, M. M.

    2013-12-01

    Atmospheric turbulence causes most weather-related aircraft incidents. Commercial aircraft encounter moderate-or-greater turbulence tens of thousands of times each year world-wide, injuring probably hundreds of passengers (occasionally fatally), costing airlines tens of millions of dollars, and causing structural damage to planes. Clear-air turbulence is especially difficult to avoid, because it cannot be seen by pilots or detected by satellites or on-board radar. Clear-air turbulence is linked to atmospheric storm tracks and jet streams, which are projected to be strengthened by anthropogenic climate change. However, the response of clear-air turbulence to climate change has not previously been studied. Here we show using computer simulations that clear-air turbulence changes significantly within the transatlantic flight corridor when the concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere is doubled. At cruise altitudes within 50-75°N and 10-60°W in winter, most clear-air turbulence measures show a 10-40% increase in the median strength of turbulence and a 40-170% increase in the frequency of occurrence of moderate-or-greater turbulence. Our results suggest that climate change will lead to bumpier transatlantic flights by the middle of this century. Journey times may lengthen and fuel consumption and emissions may increase. Aviation is partly responsible for changing the climate, but our findings show for the first time how climate change could affect aviation.

  11. Will climate change increase transatlantic aviation turbulence?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Paul; Joshi, Manoj

    2013-04-01

    Atmospheric turbulence causes most weather-related aircraft incidents. Commercial aircraft encounter moderate-or-greater turbulence tens of thousands of times each year world-wide, injuring probably hundreds of passengers (occasionally fatally), costing airlines tens of millions of dollars, and causing structural damage to planes. Clear-air turbulence is especially difficult to avoid, because it cannot be seen by pilots or detected by satellites or on-board radar. Clear-air turbulence is linked to atmospheric jet streams, which are projected to be strengthened by anthropogenic climate change. However, the response of clear-air turbulence to climate change has not previously been studied. Here we show using computer simulations that clear-air turbulence changes significantly within the transatlantic flight corridor when the concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere is doubled. At cruise altitudes within 50-75°N and 10-60°W in winter, most clear-air turbulence measures show a 10-40% increase in the median strength of turbulence and a 40-170% increase in the frequency of occurrence of moderate-or-greater turbulence. Our results suggest that climate change will lead to bumpier transatlantic flights by the middle of this century. Journey times may lengthen and fuel consumption and emissions may increase. Aviation is partly responsible for changing the climate, but our findings show for the first time how climate change could affect aviation.

  12. Physical activity increases bone mass during growth

    PubMed Central

    Karlsson, Magnus K.; Nordqvist, Anders; Karlsson, Caroline

    2008-01-01

    Background The incidence of fragility fractures has increased during the last half of the 1990′s. One important determinant of fractures is the bone mineral content (BMC) or bone mineral density (BMD), the amount of mineralised bone. If we could increase peak bone mass (the highest value of BMC reached during life) and/or decrease the age-related bone loss, we could possibly improve the skeletal resistance to fracture. Objective This review evaluates the importance of exercise as a strategy to improve peak bone mass, including some aspects of nutrition. Design Publications within the field were searched through Medline (PubMed) using the search words: exercise, physical activity, bone mass, bone mineral content, bone mineral density, BMC, BMD, skeletal structure and nutrition. We included studies dealing with exercise during growth and young adolescence. We preferably based our inferences on randomised controlled trials (RCT), which provide the highest level of evidence. Results Exercise during growth increases peak bone mass. Moderate intensity exercise intervention programs are beneficial for the skeletal development during growth. Adequate nutrition must accompany the exercise to achieve the most beneficial skeletal effects by exercise. Conclusion Exercise during growth seems to enhance the building of a stronger skeleton through a higher peak bone mass and a larger bone size. PMID:19109652

  13. Happiness increases distraction by auditory deviant stimuli.

    PubMed

    Pacheco-Unguetti, Antonia Pilar; Parmentier, Fabrice B R

    2016-08-01

    Rare and unexpected changes (deviants) in an otherwise repeated stream of task-irrelevant auditory distractors (standards) capture attention and impair behavioural performance in an ongoing visual task. Recent evidence indicates that this effect is increased by sadness in a task involving neutral stimuli. We tested the hypothesis that such effect may not be limited to negative emotions but reflect a general depletion of attentional resources by examining whether a positive emotion (happiness) would increase deviance distraction too. Prior to performing an auditory-visual oddball task, happiness or a neutral mood was induced in participants by means of the exposure to music and the recollection of an autobiographical event. Results from the oddball task showed significantly larger deviance distraction following the induction of happiness. Interestingly, the small amount of distraction typically observed on the standard trial following a deviant trial (post-deviance distraction) was not increased by happiness. We speculate that happiness might interfere with the disengagement of attention from the deviant sound back towards the target stimulus (through the depletion of cognitive resources and/or mind wandering) but help subsequent cognitive control to recover from distraction. PMID:26302716

  14. Happiness increases distraction by auditory deviant stimuli.

    PubMed

    Pacheco-Unguetti, Antonia Pilar; Parmentier, Fabrice B R

    2016-08-01

    Rare and unexpected changes (deviants) in an otherwise repeated stream of task-irrelevant auditory distractors (standards) capture attention and impair behavioural performance in an ongoing visual task. Recent evidence indicates that this effect is increased by sadness in a task involving neutral stimuli. We tested the hypothesis that such effect may not be limited to negative emotions but reflect a general depletion of attentional resources by examining whether a positive emotion (happiness) would increase deviance distraction too. Prior to performing an auditory-visual oddball task, happiness or a neutral mood was induced in participants by means of the exposure to music and the recollection of an autobiographical event. Results from the oddball task showed significantly larger deviance distraction following the induction of happiness. Interestingly, the small amount of distraction typically observed on the standard trial following a deviant trial (post-deviance distraction) was not increased by happiness. We speculate that happiness might interfere with the disengagement of attention from the deviant sound back towards the target stimulus (through the depletion of cognitive resources and/or mind wandering) but help subsequent cognitive control to recover from distraction.

  15. Global warming without global mean precipitation increase?

    PubMed Central

    Salzmann, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Global climate models simulate a robust increase of global mean precipitation of about 1.5 to 2% per kelvin surface warming in response to greenhouse gas (GHG) forcing. Here, it is shown that the sensitivity to aerosol cooling is robust as well, albeit roughly twice as large. This larger sensitivity is consistent with energy budget arguments. At the same time, it is still considerably lower than the 6.5 to 7% K−1 decrease of the water vapor concentration with cooling from anthropogenic aerosol because the water vapor radiative feedback lowers the hydrological sensitivity to anthropogenic forcings. When GHG and aerosol forcings are combined, the climate models with a realistic 20th century warming indicate that the global mean precipitation increase due to GHG warming has, until recently, been completely masked by aerosol drying. This explains the apparent lack of sensitivity of the global mean precipitation to the net global warming recently found in observations. As the importance of GHG warming increases in the future, a clear signal will emerge. PMID:27386558

  16. Apparent speed increases at low luminance

    PubMed Central

    Vaziri-Pashkam, Maryam; Cavanagh, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    To investigate the effect of luminance on apparent speed, subjects adjusted the speed of a low-luminance rotating grating (0.31 cd/m2) to match that of a high-luminance one (1260 cd/m2). Above 4 Hz, subjects overestimated the speed of the low-luminance grating. This overestimation increased as a function of temporal rate and reached 30% around 10 Hz temporal rates. The speed overestimation became significant once the lower luminance was 2.4 log units lower than the high luminance comparison. Next the role of motion smear in speed overestimation was examined. First it was shown that the length of the perceived motion smear increased at low luminances. Second, the length of the visible smear was manipulated by changing the presentation time of the stimuli. Speed overestimation was reduced at shorter presentation times. Third the speed of a blurred stimulus was compared to a stimulus with sharp edges and the blurred stimulus was judged to move faster. These results indicate that the length of motion smear following a target contributes to its perceived speed and that this leads to speed overestimation at low luminance where motion traces lengthen because of increased persistence. PMID:19146275

  17. Global warming without global mean precipitation increase?

    PubMed

    Salzmann, Marc

    2016-06-01

    Global climate models simulate a robust increase of global mean precipitation of about 1.5 to 2% per kelvin surface warming in response to greenhouse gas (GHG) forcing. Here, it is shown that the sensitivity to aerosol cooling is robust as well, albeit roughly twice as large. This larger sensitivity is consistent with energy budget arguments. At the same time, it is still considerably lower than the 6.5 to 7% K(-1) decrease of the water vapor concentration with cooling from anthropogenic aerosol because the water vapor radiative feedback lowers the hydrological sensitivity to anthropogenic forcings. When GHG and aerosol forcings are combined, the climate models with a realistic 20th century warming indicate that the global mean precipitation increase due to GHG warming has, until recently, been completely masked by aerosol drying. This explains the apparent lack of sensitivity of the global mean precipitation to the net global warming recently found in observations. As the importance of GHG warming increases in the future, a clear signal will emerge.

  18. Circulating omentin concentration increases after weight loss

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Omentin-1 is a novel adipokine expressed in visceral adipose tissue and negatively associated with insulin resistance and obesity. We aimed to study the effects of weight loss-induced improved insulin sensitivity on circulating omentin concentrations. Methods Circulating omentin-1 (ELISA) concentration in association with metabolic variables was measured in 35 obese subjects (18 men, 17 women) before and after hypocaloric weight loss. Results Baseline circulating omentin-1 concentrations correlated negatively with BMI (r = -0.58, p < 0.001), body weight (r = -0.35, p = 0.045), fat mass (r = -0.67, p < 0.001), circulating leptin (r = -0.7, p < 0.001) and fasting insulin (r = -0.37, p = 0.03). Circulating omentin-1 concentration increased significantly after weight loss (from 44.9 ± 9.02 to 53.41 ± 8.8 ng/ml, p < 0.001). This increase in circulating omentin after weight loss was associated with improved insulin sensitivity (negatively associated with HOMA value and fasting insulin, r = -0.42, p = 0.02 and r = -0.45, p = 0.01, respectively) and decreased BMI (r = -0.54, p = 0.001). Conclusion As previously described with adiponectin, circulating omentin-1 concentrations increase after weight loss-induced improvement of insulin sensitivity. PMID:20380714

  19. The increased risk of predation enhances cooperation

    PubMed Central

    Krams, Indrikis; Bērziņš, Arnis; Krama, Tatjana; Wheatcroft, David; Igaune, Kristīne; Rantala, Markus J.

    2010-01-01

    Theory predicts that animals in adverse conditions can decrease individual risks and increase long-term benefits by cooperating with neighbours. However, some empirical studies suggest that animals often focus on short-term benefits, which can reduce the likelihood that they will cooperate with others. In this experimental study, we tested between these two alternatives by evaluating whether increased predation risk (as a correlate of environmental adversity) enhances or diminishes the occurrence of cooperation in mobbing, a common anti-predator behaviour, among breeding pied flycatchers Ficedula hypoleuca. We tested whether birds would join their mobbing neighbours more often and harass a stuffed predator placed near their neighbours' nests more intensely in areas with a higher perceived risk of predation. Our results show that birds attended mobs initiated by their neighbours more often, approached the stuffed predator significantly more closely, and mobbed it at a higher intensity in areas where the perceived risk of predation was experimentally increased. In such high-risk areas, birds also were more often involved in between-pair cooperation. This study demonstrates the positive impact of predation risk on cooperation in breeding songbirds, which might help in explaining the emergence and evolution of cooperation. PMID:19846454

  20. Increasing Incidence of Canine Leptospirosis in Switzerland

    PubMed Central

    Major, Andrea; Schweighauser, Ariane; Francey, Thierry

    2014-01-01

    A marked increase in canine leptospirosis was observed in Switzerland over 10 years with a peak incidence of 28.1 diagnosed cases/100,000 dogs/year in the most affected canton. With 95% affected dogs living at altitudes <800 m, the disease presented a seasonal pattern associated with temperature (r2 0.73) and rainfall (r2 0.39), >90% cases being diagnosed between May and October. The increasing yearly incidence however was only weakly correlated with climatic data including number of summer (r2 0.25) or rainy days (r2 0.38). Serovars Australis and Bratislava showed the highest seropositivity rates with 70.5% and 69.1%, respectively. Main clinical manifestations included renal (99.6%), pulmonary (76.7%), hepatic (26.0%), and hemorrhagic syndromes (18.2%), leading to a high mortality rate (43.3%). Similar to the human disease, liver involvement had the strongest association with negative outcome (OR 16.3). Based on these data, canine leptospirosis presents similar features and severity as the human infection for which it therefore can be considered a model. Its re-emergence in a temperate country with very high incidence rates in canines should thus be viewed as a warning and emphasize the need for increased awareness in other species. PMID:25032740

  1. Increasing incidence of canine leptospirosis in Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Major, Andrea; Schweighauser, Ariane; Francey, Thierry

    2014-07-01

    A marked increase in canine leptospirosis was observed in Switzerland over 10 years with a peak incidence of 28.1 diagnosed cases/100,000 dogs/year in the most affected canton. With 95% affected dogs living at altitudes <800 m, the disease presented a seasonal pattern associated with temperature (r2 0.73) and rainfall (r2 0.39), >90% cases being diagnosed between May and October. The increasing yearly incidence however was only weakly correlated with climatic data including number of summer (r2 0.25) or rainy days (r2 0.38). Serovars Australis and Bratislava showed the highest seropositivity rates with 70.5% and 69.1%, respectively. Main clinical manifestations included renal (99.6%), pulmonary (76.7%), hepatic (26.0%), and hemorrhagic syndromes (18.2%), leading to a high mortality rate (43.3%). Similar to the human disease, liver involvement had the strongest association with negative outcome (OR 16.3). Based on these data, canine leptospirosis presents similar features and severity as the human infection for which it therefore can be considered a model. Its re-emergence in a temperate country with very high incidence rates in canines should thus be viewed as a warning and emphasize the need for increased awareness in other species. PMID:25032740

  2. Calculating merit increases: a structured approach.

    PubMed

    Seithel, W W; Emans, J S

    1983-01-01

    Determining the amount of salary increase appropriate for each employee poses a major dilemma for many human resources managers and/or compensation managers (not to mention the employee's supervisor). This task requires complying with the company's compensation philosophy, meeting market competition, and rewarding employees fairly and equitably. Authors William W. Seithel, vice president, personnel of the Midwest Stock Exchange, Inc., and Jeff S. Emans, director, employee compensation of the Kemper Group, describe a method for pinpointing a salary rate increase that is not only structured enough to move people through the salary range in accordance with a reward philosophy, but precise enough to provide a basis for projecting costs and flexible enough to meet the needs of various performance levels. The method entails the use of a structured matrix that spells out the target percentage raises for various levels of performance. By using both the matrix-which is constructed to meet the individual company's needs-and a guide chart provided by the authors, it is possible to calculate a specific percentage increase for each employee. The manager who uses this system will find that the matrix is a mechanism for control as well as a means for projecting costs. PMID:10262948

  3. Another call to increase STEM education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2011-07-01

    As science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education becomes increasingly important, U.S. students are lagging behind other nations on international assessments, according to a recent Trends in International Mathematics and Science study. A 22 June report from the U.S. National Research Council (NRC) calls for increasing the focus on STEM education in the United States. “To make progress in improving STEM education for all students, policy makers at the national, state, and local levels should elevate science to the same level of importance as reading and mathematics,” states the report, “Successful K-12 STEM Education: Identifying Effective Approaches in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics.” It outlines several goals: expand the number of students who pursue advanced degrees and careers in STEM fields; expand the STEM-capable workforce, while also broadening the participation of women and minorities; and increase STEM literacy for all students, whether or not they pursue STEM-related careers or additional study in those areas.

  4. Symbiosis increases coral tolerance to ocean acidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohki, S.; Irie, T.; Inoue, M.; Shinmen, K.; Kawahata, H.; Nakamura, T.; Kato, A.; Nojiri, Y.; Suzuki, A.; Sakai, K.; van Woesik, R.

    2013-04-01

    Increasing the acidity of ocean waters will directly threaten calcifying marine organisms such as reef-building scleractinian corals, and the myriad of species that rely on corals for protection and sustenance. Ocean pH has already decreased by around 0.1 pH units since the beginning of the industrial revolution, and is expected to decrease by another 0.2-0.4 pH units by 2100. This study mimicked the pre-industrial, present, and near-future levels of pCO2 using a precise control system (±5% pCO2), to assess the impact of ocean acidification on the calcification of recently-settled primary polyps of Acropora digitifera, both with and without symbionts, and adult fragments with symbionts. The increase in pCO2 of 100 μatm between the pre-industrial period and the present had more effect on the calcification rate of adult A. digitifera than the anticipated future increases of several hundreds of micro-atmospheres of pCO2. The primary polyps with symbionts showed higher calcification rates than primary polyps without symbionts, suggesting that (i) primary polyps housing symbionts are more tolerant to near-future ocean acidification than organisms without symbionts, and (ii) corals acquiring symbionts from the environment (i.e. broadcasting species) will be more vulnerable to ocean acidification than corals that maternally acquire symbionts.

  5. Increased Science Instrumentation Funding Strengthens Mars Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graham, Lee D.; Graff, T. G.

    2012-01-01

    As the strategic knowledge gaps mature for the exploration of Mars, Mars sample return (MSR), and Phobos/Deimos missions, one approach that becomes more probable involves smaller science instrumentation and integrated science suites. Recent technological advances provide the foundation for a significant evolution of instrumentation; however, the funding support is currently too small to fully utilize these advances. We propose that an increase in funding for instrumentation development occur in the near-term so that these foundational technologies can be applied. These instruments would directly address the significant knowledge gaps for humans to Mars orbit, humans to the Martian surface, and humans to Phobos/ Deimos. They would also address the topics covered by the Decadal Survey and the Mars scientific goals, objectives, investigations and priorities as stated by the MEPAG. We argue that an increase of science instrumentation funding would be of great benefit to the Mars program as well as the potential for human exploration of the Mars system. If the total non-Earth-related planetary science instrumentation budget were increased 100% it would not add an appreciable amount to the overall NASA budget and would provide the real potential for future breakthroughs. If such an approach were implemented in the near-term, NASA would benefit greatly in terms of science knowledge of the Mars, Phobos/Deimos system, exploration risk mitigation, technology development, and public interest.

  6. Lymphocytic Esophagitis: A Diagnosis of Increasing Frequency

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Shirley; Saxena, Aditi; Waljee, Akbar; Piraka, Cyrus; Purdy, Julianne; Appelman, Henry; McKenna, Barbara; Elmunzer, B. Joseph; Singal, Amit G.

    2012-01-01

    Background Despite being found with increasing frequency on esophageal biopsies, the clinical significance of lymphocytic esophagitis (LE) remains poorly understood. Goals The primary aim of our study was to characterize the clinical presentation and natural history of LE among adult patients. Study We retrospectively reviewed records for all 81 adult patients at the University of Michigan Medical Center who had a histopathological diagnosis of LE between January 1998 and November 2009. Patient demographics, clinical history, laboratory data, and imaging results from the time of diagnosis were obtained through review of computerized medical records. A telephone survey was conducted to collect natural history data. Results The number of LE diagnoses increased over time, with 81.5% (n=66) of patients being diagnosed in the last three years. The most frequent symptoms at the time of presentation were dysphagia (n=54), chest/abdominal pain (n=36), and heartburn (n=38). The majority (58.6%) of patients reported improvement in their initial gastrointestinal symptoms – most commonly associated with initiation of a proton pump inhibitor. Upon follow-up, most patients reported a good quality of life and satisfaction with their current health status. Conclusions Lymphocytic esophagitis is a new clinical entity with an increasing incidence. LE appears to have a benign natural history, with most patients reporting an improvement in symptoms and satisfaction with their health-related quality of life. Prospective studies are needed to better characterize the natural history and potential treatments for this clinical entity. PMID:22751335

  7. Topical menthol increases cutaneous blood flow.

    PubMed

    Craighead, Daniel H; Alexander, Lacy M

    2016-09-01

    Menthol, the active ingredient in several topically applied analgesics, activates transient receptor potential melastatin 8 (TRPM8) receptors on sensory nerves and on the vasculature inducing a cooling sensation on the skin. Ilex paraguariensis is also a common ingredient in topical analgesics that has potential vasoactive properties and may alter the mechanisms of action of menthol. We sought to characterize the microvascular effects of topical menthol and ilex application and to determine the mechanism(s) through which these compounds may independently and combined alter cutaneous blood flow. We hypothesized that menthol would induce vasoconstriction and that ilex would not alter skin blood flow (SkBF). Three separate protocols were conducted to examine menthol and ilex-mediated changes in SkBF. In protocol 1, placebo, 4% menthol, 0.7% ilex, and combination menthol+ilex gels were applied separately to the skin and red cell flux was continuously measured utilizing laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI). In protocol 2, seven concentrations of menthol gel (0.04%, 0.4%, 1%, 2%, 4%, 7%, 8%) were applied to the skin to model the dose-response curve. In protocol 3, placebo, menthol, ilex, and menthol+ilex gels were applied to skin under local thermal control (34°C) both with and without sensory nerve blockage (topical lidocaine 4%). Post-occlusive reactive hyperemia (PORH) and local heating (42°C) protocols were conducted to determine the relative contribution of endothelium derived hyperpolarizing factors (EDHFs)/sensory nerves and nitric oxide (NO), respectively. Red cell flux was normalized to mean arterial pressure expressed as cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC: flux·mmHg(-1)) in all protocols. Topical menthol application increased SkBF compared to placebo (3.41±0.33 vs 1.1±0.19CVC: p<0.001). During the dose-response, SkBF increased with increasing doses of menthol (main effect, p<0.05) with an ED50 of 1.0%. Similarly, SkBF was increased after menthol

  8. Increased alveolar plasminogen activator in early asbestosis

    SciTech Connect

    Cantin, A.; Allard, C.; Begin, R.

    1989-03-01

    Alveolar macrophage-derived plasminogen activator (PA) activity is decreased in some chronic interstitial lung diseases such as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and sarcoidosis but increased in experimental models of acute alveolitis. Although asbestos fibers can stimulate alveolar macrophages (AM) to release PA in vitro, the effect of chronic asbestos exposure of the lower respiratory tract on lung PA activity remains unknown. The present study was designed to evaluate PA activity of alveolar macrophages and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid in asbestos-exposed sheep and asbestos workers. Forty-three sheep were exposed to either 100 mg UICC chrysotile B asbestos in 100 ml phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) or to 100 ml PBS by tracheal infusion every 2 wk for 18 months. At Month 18, chest roentgenograms were analyzed and alveolar macrophage and extracellular fluid PA activity were measured in samples obtained by BAL. Alveolar macrophage PA activity was increased in the asbestos-exposed sheep compared to control sheep (87.2 +/- 17.3 versus 41.1 +/- 7.2 U/10(5) AM-24 h, p less than 0.05) as was the BAL fluid PA activity (674.9 +/- 168.4 versus 81.3 +/- 19.7 U/mg alb-24 h, p less than 0.01). Among the asbestos-exposed sheep, 10 had normal chest roentgenograms (Group SA) and 15 had irregular interstitial opacities (Group SB). Strikingly, whereas Group SA did not differ from the control group in BAL cellularity or PA activity, Group SB had marked increases in alveolar macrophages (p less than 0.005), AM PA activity (p less than 0.02), and BAL PA activity (p less than 0.001) compared to the control group.

  9. Increased cardiovascular mortality following early bilateral oophorectomy

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, Cathleen M.; Grossardt, Brandon R.; Rhodes, Deborah J.; Brown, Robert D.; Roger, Véronique L.; Melton, L. Joseph; Rocca, Walter A.

    2008-01-01

    Objective To investigate the mortality associated with cardiovascular diseases and the effect of estrogen treatment in women who underwent unilateral or bilateral oophorectomy before menopause. Design We conducted a cohort study with long-term follow-up of women in Olmsted County, MN, who underwent either unilateral or bilateral oophorectomy before the onset of menopause from 1950 through 1987. Each member of the oophorectomy cohort was matched by age to a referent woman from the same population who had not undergone any oophorectomy. We studied the mortality associated with cardiovascular disease in a total of 1,274 women with unilateral oophorectomy, 1,091 women with bilateral oophorectomy, and 2,383 referent women. Results Women who underwent unilateral oophorectomy experienced a reduced mortality associated with cardiovascular disease compared with referent women (hazard ratio [HR], 0.82; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.67–0.99; P = 0.04). By contrast, women who underwent bilateral oophorectomy before age 45 years experienced an increased mortality associated with cardiovascular disease compared with referent women (HR, 1.44; 95% CI, 1.01–2.05; P = 0.04). Within this age stratum, the HR for mortality was significantly elevated in women who were not treated with estrogen through age 45 years or longer (HR, 1.84; 95% CI, 1.27–2.68; P = 0.001) but not in women treated (HR, 0.65; 95% CI, 0.30–1.41; P = 0.28; test of interaction, P = 0.01). Mortality was further increased after excluding deaths associated with cerebrovascular causes. Conclusions Bilateral oophorectomy performed before age 45 years is associated with increased cardiovascular mortality, especially with cardiac mortality. However, estrogen treatment may reduce this risk. PMID:19034050

  10. Running with a load increases leg stiffness.

    PubMed

    Silder, Amy; Besier, Thor; Delp, Scott L

    2015-04-13

    Spring-mass models have been used to characterize running mechanics and leg stiffness in a variety of conditions, yet it remains unknown how running while carrying a load affects running mechanics and leg stiffness. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that running with a load increases leg stiffness. Twenty-seven subjects ran at a constant speed on a force-measuring treadmill while carrying no load, and while wearing weight vests loaded with 10%, 20%, and 30% of body weight. We measured lower extremity motion and created a scaled musculoskeletal model of each subject, which we used to estimate lower extremity joint angles and leg length. We estimated dimensionless leg stiffness as the ratio of the peak vertical ground reaction force (normalized to body weight) and the change in stance phase leg length (normalized to leg length at initial foot contact). Leg length was calculated as the distance from the center of the pelvis to the center-of-pressure under the foot. We found that dimensionless leg stiffness increased when running with load (p=0.001); this resulted from an increase in the peak vertical ground reaction force (p<0.001) and a smaller change in stance phase leg length (p=0.025). When running with load, subjects had longer ground contact times (p<0.020), greater hip (p<0.001) and knee flexion (p=0.048) at the time of initial foot contact, and greater peak stance phase hip, knee, and ankle flexion (p<0.05). Our results reveal that subjects run in a more crouched posture and with higher leg stiffness to accommodate an added load.

  11. Running with a load increases leg stiffness.

    PubMed

    Silder, Amy; Besier, Thor; Delp, Scott L

    2015-04-13

    Spring-mass models have been used to characterize running mechanics and leg stiffness in a variety of conditions, yet it remains unknown how running while carrying a load affects running mechanics and leg stiffness. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that running with a load increases leg stiffness. Twenty-seven subjects ran at a constant speed on a force-measuring treadmill while carrying no load, and while wearing weight vests loaded with 10%, 20%, and 30% of body weight. We measured lower extremity motion and created a scaled musculoskeletal model of each subject, which we used to estimate lower extremity joint angles and leg length. We estimated dimensionless leg stiffness as the ratio of the peak vertical ground reaction force (normalized to body weight) and the change in stance phase leg length (normalized to leg length at initial foot contact). Leg length was calculated as the distance from the center of the pelvis to the center-of-pressure under the foot. We found that dimensionless leg stiffness increased when running with load (p=0.001); this resulted from an increase in the peak vertical ground reaction force (p<0.001) and a smaller change in stance phase leg length (p=0.025). When running with load, subjects had longer ground contact times (p<0.020), greater hip (p<0.001) and knee flexion (p=0.048) at the time of initial foot contact, and greater peak stance phase hip, knee, and ankle flexion (p<0.05). Our results reveal that subjects run in a more crouched posture and with higher leg stiffness to accommodate an added load. PMID:25728581

  12. Increased risk of Graves' disease after pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Benhaim Rochester, Dana; Davies, Terry F

    2005-11-01

    The improvement in autoimmune thyroid disease during pregnancy and the subsequent exacerbation postpartum is secondary to immune system changes necessary to a normal pregnancy. Prior studies have shown that a clinically significant number of women develop Graves' disease (GD) in the postpartum period. The aim of this study was to examine the risk of post pregnancy GD and define patient characteristics that may impact the diagnosis and treatment strategies for this group. We performed a retrospective review of 152 consecutive women, aged 18-39 years when diagnosed with GD, to examine the relation between disease diagnosis and prior pregnancy. Differences in patient characteristics and treatment outcomes of women were analyzed. New York City population data were used to estimate a relative risk for the development of postpartum GD. We found that in parous women, 45% were diagnosed with GD in the postpartum period and 55% had an onset in subsequent years. No significant differences were noted in patient characteristics or treatment outcomes. We found that the risk of women developing post pregnancy GD was greatest in the older patients (35-39 years), with 56% developing GD compared to 42% of nulliparous women. These data, therefore, suggest an increased risk for older women. We were able to calculate the increase in estimated relative risk for postpartum disease by using control population data. The risk maximized at 5.6 for the age group 35-39 years when compared to the control population. These data support earlier studies that showed that a clinically significant number of women develop GD after childbirth compared to nulliparous women and extends this risk for many years. The mechanism of this long-standing increased susceptibility requires further delineation.

  13. NASA InterCenter Collaboration Increases ROI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lankford, Kimberly; Best, Susan; Felton, Larry; Newhouse, Marilyn

    2012-01-01

    Funding for National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) space mission operations is tighter than ever in the current environment of federal government deficit reductions. Conventional wisdom would expect this environment to drive increasing competition between NASA centers for the limited available funds. However, recent inter-center activities at the Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center emphasize collaboration rather than competition and demonstrate the value of partnerships to increase the return on shrinking investments. These efforts cover a variety of activities and potential returns. To facilitate sharing data from test and verification through operations without levying requirements on data format or software tools, the HOSC is working with multiple centers on an evolutionary path toward a distributed data architecture and archive. The approach reduces the required investment by allowing the partners to reuse their existing formats and tools, while facilitating gone ]stop h user visibility into and controlled access to the full complement of data regardless of user or data location. The HOSC is also working on two activities to promote sharing operations implementations and leveraging the experts and expertise across multiple NASA sites. In one, the use of Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS) standards for the message abstraction layer provides an interoperability layer on top of existing ground data system communication architectures. This allows missions to select the most appropriate solutions for their requirements with a minimal investment in rehosting the components in a coherent operational environment. The other emphasizes shared tools and increased remote access to minimize travel for tests and critical activities and reduce the floor space required for a dedicated operations center. This paper summarizes these and other inter-center collaboration activities at the HOSC and the

  14. Nanolaminates: increasing dielectric breakdown strength of composites.

    PubMed

    Fillery, Scott P; Koerner, Hilmar; Drummy, Lawrence; Dunkerley, Erik; Durstock, Michael F; Schmidt, Daniel F; Vaia, Richard A

    2012-03-01

    Processable, low-cost, high-performance hybrid dielectrics are enablers for a vast array of green technologies, including high-temperature electrical insulation and pulsed power capacitors for all-electric transportation vehicles. Maximizing the dielectric breakdown field (E(BD)), in conjunction with minimization of leakage current, directly impacts system performance because of the field's quadratic relationship with electrostatic energy storage density. On the basis of the extreme internal interfacial area and ultrafine morphology, polymer-inorganic nanocomposites (PNCs) have demonstrated modest increases in E(BD) at very low inorganic loadings, but because of insufficient control of the hierarchal morphology of the blend, have yielded a precipitous decline in E(BD) at intermediate and high inorganic volume fractions. Here in, we demonstrate that E(BD) can be increased up to these intermediate inorganic volume fractions by creating uniform one-dimensional nanocomposites (nanolaminates) rather than blends of spherical inorganic nanoparticles and polymers. Free standing nanolaminates of highly aligned and dispersed montmorillonite in polyvinyl butyral exhibited enhancements in E(BD) up to 30 vol % inorganic (70 wt % organically modified montmorillonite). These relative enhancements extend up to five times the inorganic fraction observed for random nanoparticle dispersions, and are anywhere from two to four times greater than observed at comparable volume fraction of nanoparticles. The breakdown characteristics of this model system suggested a trade-off between increased path tortuosity and polymer-deficient structural defects. This implies that an idealized PNC morphology to retard the breakdown cascade perpendicular to the electrodes will occur at intermediate volume fractions and resemble a discotic nematic phase where highly aligned, high-aspect ratio nanometer thick plates are uniformly surrounded by nanoscopic regions of polymer.

  15. Olfactory Stimuli Increase Presence in Virtual Environments

    PubMed Central

    Munyan, Benson G.; Neer, Sandra M.; Beidel, Deborah C.; Jentsch, Florian

    2016-01-01

    Background Exposure therapy (EXP) is the most empirically supported treatment for anxiety and trauma-related disorders. EXP consists of repeated exposure to a feared object or situation in the absence of the feared outcome in order to extinguish associated anxiety. Key to the success of EXP is the need to present the feared object/event/situation in as much detail and utilizing as many sensory modalities as possible, in order to augment the sense of presence during exposure sessions. Various technologies used to augment the exposure therapy process by presenting multi-sensory cues (e.g., sights, smells, sounds). Studies have shown that scents can elicit emotionally charged memories, but no prior research has examined the effect of olfactory stimuli upon the patient’s sense of presence during simulated exposure tasks. Methods 60 adult participants navigated a mildly anxiety-producing virtual environment (VE) similar to those used in the treatment of anxiety disorders. Participants had no autobiographical memory associated with the VE. State anxiety, Presence ratings, and electrodermal (EDA) activity were collected throughout the experiment. Results Utilizing a Bonferroni corrected Linear Mixed Model, our results showed statistically significant relationships between olfactory stimuli and presence as assessed by both the Igroup Presence Questionnaire (IPQ: R2 = 0.85, (F(3,52) = 6.625, p = 0.0007) and a single item visual-analogue scale (R2 = 0.85, (F(3,52) = 5.382, p = 0.0027). State anxiety was unaffected by the presence or absence of olfactory cues. EDA was unaffected by experimental condition. Conclusion Olfactory stimuli increase presence in virtual environments that approximate those typical in exposure therapy, but did not increase EDA. Additionally, once administered, the removal of scents resulted in a disproportionate decrease in presence. Implications for incorporating the use of scents to increase the efficacy of exposure therapy is discussed. PMID

  16. Increasing the availability of national mapping products.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roney, J.I.; Ogilvie, B.C.

    1981-01-01

    A discussion of the means employed by the US Geological Survey to facilitate map usage, covering aspects of project Map Accessibility Program including special rolled and folded map packaging, new market testing, parks and campgrounds program, expanded map dealer program, new booklet-type State sales index and catalog and new USGS map reference code. The USGS is seen as the producer of a tremendous nation-wide inventory of topographic and related map products available in unprecedented types, formats and scales, and as endeavouring to increase access to its products. The new USGS map reference code is appended. -J.C.Stone

  17. Nerve impulses increase glial intercellular permeability.

    PubMed

    Marrero, H; Orkand, R K

    1996-03-01

    Coordinating the activity of neurons and their satellite glial cells requires mechanisms by which glial cells detect neuronal activity and change their properties as a result. This study monitors the intercellular diffusion of the fluorescent dye Lucifer Yellow (LY), following its injection into glial cells of the frog optic nerve, and demonstrates that nerve impulses increase the permeability of interglial gap junctions. Consequently, the spatial buffer capacity of the neuroglial cell syncytium for potassium, other ions, and small molecules will be enhanced; this may facilitate glial function in maintaining homeostasis of the neuronal microenvironment. PMID:8833199

  18. Increasing Receipt of Women's Preventive Services.

    PubMed

    Stolp, Haley; Fox, Jared

    2015-11-01

    The receipt of clinical preventive services is important for health promotion and prevention of illness, death, and disability for women in the United States. Today, the Affordable Care Act makes a variety of evidence-based preventive services available with no out-of-pocket cost to women with certain health insurance plans. Nevertheless, available service receipt data suggest receipt of the services for all American adults remains suboptimal. This article seeks to raise awareness about the critical gaps in the delivery of preventive services to women and highlight opportunities for women, primary care providers, and public health professionals to increase receipt of clinical preventive services among women. PMID:26447836

  19. Increase productivity with novel reactor design

    SciTech Connect

    Arakawa, S.T.; Mulvaney, R.C.; Felch, D.E.; Petri, J.A.; Vandenbussche, K.; Dandekar, H.W.

    1998-03-01

    Hydrocarbon processing industry (HPI) operators have always desired flexible control over process temperature as the chemical reactions proceeded. By managing reaction temperature, petrochemical manufacturers can optimize other processing variables, thus increasing product yields and minimizing wastes and byproducts. Diverse requirements of the HPI have spawned many different reactor types. Each design has benefits but also limitations. Ongoing challenges in reactor development include large pressure drop, high catalyst inventory, labor-intensive change-out of catalysts, etc. Two case histories explore using adiabatic and nonadiabatic reactor technology for exothermic and endothermic reactions.

  20. Offshore drilling to increase in 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-05-01

    A mid-year report presents a worldwide overview of offshore drilling operations. The Gulf of Mexico and the North Sea are posting substantial gains as companies rush to drill the millions of acres acquired in those sectors both last year and in previous offerings. The Middle East, Latin America and the Asia/Pacific offshore theaters will see only slight increases. The Mediterranean and African regions are expected to sustain declines. A region-by-region summary of the 1984 offshore forecast is presented showing exploration and appraisal activities, as well as development for all of these areas.