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Sample records for characterization defines human

  1. Defining the Human Microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Ursell, Luke K; Metcalf, Jessica L; Parfrey, Laura Wegener; Knight, Rob

    2012-01-01

    Rapidly developing sequencing methods and analytical techniques are enhancing our ability to understand the human microbiome, and, indeed, how we define the microbiome and its constituents. In this review we highlight recent research that expands our ability to understand the human microbiome on different spatial and temporal scales, including daily timeseries datasets spanning months. Furthermore, we discuss emerging concepts related to defining operational taxonomic units, diversity indices, core versus transient microbiomes and the possibility of enterotypes. Additional advances in sequencing technology and in our understanding of the microbiome will provide exciting prospects for exploiting the microbiota for personalized medicine. PMID:22861806

  2. Defining, characterizing, and establishing "safe enough" risk thresholds for human space flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ocampo, Robert Paul

    No spacecraft will ever be perfectly safe. Consequently, engineers must strive to design, develop, and operate spacecraft that are safe enough. This thesis presents a conceptual framework for defining and characterizing "safe" and distinguishing "safe enough" from "not safe enough." Space Shuttle and Soyuz safety records are presented in the context of this framework, and compared to the safety records of various modes of transportation (automotive, rail, boating, general aviation, commercial aviation) and adventure sport activities (skydiving, mountaineering, SCUBA diving). From these comparisons, a heuristic method for predicting space flight risk is derived. This method, which is built upon the inverse correlation between risk and usage, can coarsely predict risk in the absence of detailed spacecraft data. Based on these predictions, spacecraft risk can either be accepted as "safe enough" or rejected as "not safe enough."

  3. A new human natural killer leukemia cell line, IMC-1. A complex chromosomal rearrangement defined by spectral karyotyping: functional and cytogenetic characterization.

    PubMed

    Chen, I-Ming; Whalen, Margaret; Bankhurst, Arthur; Sever, Cordelia E; Doshi, Rashmi; Hardekopf, David; Montgomery, Karen; Willman, Cheryl L

    2004-03-01

    A new human IL-2 dependent leukemic cell line with a natural killer (NK) cell phenotype, IMC-1, was established from an adult patient with aggressive NK cell leukemia. The IMC-1 cell line expresses the CD56, CD2, CD11a, CD38 and HLA-DR cell surface antigens, whereas the CD16 and CD8 antigens expressed on the primary leukemic blasts from which the cell line was derived were lost after 7 and 28 weeks of culture, respectively. The IMC-1 cell line displays functional NK cytotoxicity and lyses target cells in a non-MHC restricted, antibody-independent manner with equal or superior efficiency to freshly isolated NK cells. Cytogenetic analysis at presentation and after 55 weeks in culture revealed complex structural and numerical abnormalities, defined by classic G-banding and by spectral karyotyping (SKY). Three apparently intact copies of chromosome 8 occurred in the diagnostic bone marrow specimen; the cell line also contains three copies of chromosome 8 but each was structurally altered. The development and detailed characterization of this new NK leukemic cell line will facilitate biologic and functional studies of NK cells and chromosomal aberrations potentially important in leukemic transformation.

  4. Defining International Human Resource Development: A Proposal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLean, Gary N.; Wang, Xiaohui

    2007-01-01

    From the beginning of the use of the term, there have been struggles over the meaning of human resource development (HRD). In recent years, there has been increased attention to the field's definition. This paper moves this exploration one more step to an exploration of the dilemma of defining international and cross-national HRD. A beginning…

  5. Monoclonal Antibody That Defines Human Myoepithelium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dairkee, Shahnaz Hashmi; Blayney, Carlene; Smith, Helene S.; Hackett, Adeline J.

    1985-11-01

    We have isolated a mouse monoclonal antibody that, upon immunohistochemical localization in frozen sections, displays specificity for human myoepithelial cells in the resting mammary gland, sweat glands, and salivary glands. Furthermore, this antibody was strongly and homogeneously reactive with frozen sections of 3 of 60 breast carcinoma specimens. Using immunolocalization techniques in conjunction with polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, we have determined that the reactivity of this monoclonal antibody is directed toward a 51,000-dalton keratin polypeptide. The potential uses of this antibody in the prognosis of human mammary carcinoma and in understanding the role of the myoepithelium in development and differentiation are discussed.

  6. A novel IFN-gamma regulated human melanoma associated antigen gp33-38 defined by monoclonal antibody Me14/D12. I. Identification and immunochemical characterization.

    PubMed

    Giuffré, L; Isler, P; Mach, J P; Carrel, S

    1988-09-15

    A novel melanoma-associated differentiation Ag whose surface expression can be enhanced or induced by IFN-gamma was identified by mAb Me14/D12. Testing of numerous tumor cell lines and tumor tissue sections showed that Me14/D12-defined Ag was present not only on melanoma but also on other tumor lines of neuroectodermal origin such as gliomas and neuroblastomas and on some lymphoblastic B cell lines, on monocytes and macrophages. Immunoprecipitation by mAb Me14/D12 of lysates from [35S]methionine-labeled melanoma cells analyzed by SDS-PAGE revealed two polypeptide chains of 33 and 38 KDa, both under reducing and nonreducing conditions. Cross-linking experiments indicated that the two chains were present at the cell surface as a dimeric structure. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis showed that the two chains of 33 and 38 KDa had isoelectric points of 6.2 and 5.7, respectively. Treatment of the melanoma cells with tunicamycin, an inhibitor of N-linked glycosylation, resulted in a reduction of the Mr from 33 to 24 KDa and from 38 to 26 KDa. Peptide maps obtained after Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease digestion showed no shared peptides between the two chains. Although biochemical data indicate that Me14/D12 molecules do not correspond to any known MHC class II Ag, their dimeric structure, tissue distribution, and regulation of IFN-gamma suggest that they could represent a new member of the MHC class II family. PMID:3139751

  7. Derivation of human embryonic stem cells in defined conditions.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, Tenneille E; Levenstein, Mark E; Jones, Jeffrey M; Berggren, W Travis; Mitchen, Erika R; Frane, Jennifer L; Crandall, Leann J; Daigh, Christine A; Conard, Kevin R; Piekarczyk, Marian S; Llanas, Rachel A; Thomson, James A

    2006-02-01

    We have previously reported that high concentrations of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) support feeder-independent growth of human embryonic stem (ES) cells, but those conditions included poorly defined serum and matrix components. Here we report feeder-independent human ES cell culture that includes protein components solely derived from recombinant sources or purified from human material. We describe the derivation of two new human ES cell lines in these defined culture conditions.

  8. Space Software Defined Radio Characterization to Enable Reuse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mortensen, Dale J.; Bishop, Daniel W.; Chelmins, David

    2012-01-01

    NASA's Space Communication and Navigation Testbed is beginning operations on the International Space Station this year. The objective is to promote new software defined radio technologies and associated software application reuse, enabled by this first flight of NASA's Space Telecommunications Radio System architecture standard. The Space Station payload has three software defined radios onboard that allow for a wide variety of communications applications; however, each radio was only launched with one waveform application. By design the testbed allows new waveform applications to be uploaded and tested by experimenters in and outside of NASA. During the system integration phase of the testbed special waveform test modes and stand-alone test waveforms were used to characterize the SDR platforms for the future experiments. Characterization of the Testbed's JPL SDR using test waveforms and specialized ground test modes is discussed in this paper. One of the test waveforms, a record and playback application, can be utilized in a variety of ways, including new satellite on-orbit checkout as well as independent on-board testbed experiments.

  9. Defining Human Failure Events for Petroleum Risk Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ronald L. Boring; Knut Øien

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, an identification and description of barriers and human failure events (HFEs) for human reliability analysis (HRA) is performed. The barriers, called target systems, are identified from risk significant accident scenarios represented as defined situations of hazard and accident (DSHAs). This report serves as the foundation for further work to develop petroleum HFEs compatible with the SPAR-H method and intended for reuse in future HRAs.

  10. Developing defined culture systems for human pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Valamehr, Bahram; Tsutsui, Hideaki; Ho, Chih-Ming; Wu, Hong

    2013-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells hold promising potential in many therapeutics applications including regenerative medicine and drug discovery. Over the past three decades, embryonic stem cell research has illustrated that embryonic stem cells possess two important and distinct properties: the ability to continuously self-renew and the ability to differentiate into all specialized cell types. In this article, we will discuss the continuing evolution of human pluripotent stem cell culture by examining requirements needed for the maintenance of self-renewal in vitro. We will also elaborate on the future direction of the field toward generating a robust and completely defined culture system, which has brought forth collaborations amongst biologists and engineers. As human pluripotent stem cell research progresses towards identifying solutions for debilitating diseases, it will be critical to establish a defined, reproducible and scalable culture system to meet the requirements of these clinical applications. PMID:21916597

  11. Identifying gene expression modules that define human cell fates.

    PubMed

    Germanguz, I; Listgarten, J; Cinkornpumin, J; Solomon, A; Gaeta, X; Lowry, W E

    2016-05-01

    Using a compendium of cell-state-specific gene expression data, we identified genes that uniquely define cell states, including those thought to represent various developmental stages. Our analysis sheds light on human cell fate through the identification of core genes that are altered over several developmental milestones, and across regional specification. Here we present cell-type specific gene expression data for 17 distinct cell states and demonstrate that these modules of genes can in fact define cell fate. Lastly, we introduce a web-based database to disseminate the results.

  12. Role of the gut microbiota in defining human health

    PubMed Central

    Fujimura, Kei E; Slusher, Nicole A; Cabana, Michael D; Lynch, Susan V

    2010-01-01

    The human superorganism is a conglomerate of mammalian and microbial cells, with the latter estimated to outnumber the former by ten to one and the microbial genetic repertoire (microbiome) to be approximately 100-times greater than that of the human host. Given the ability of the immune response to rapidly counter infectious agents, it is striking that such a large density of microbes can exist in a state of synergy within the human host. This is particularly true of the distal gastrointestinal (GI) tract, which houses up to 1000 distinct bacterial species and an estimated excess of 1 × 1014 microorganisms. An ever-increasing body of evidence implicates the GI microbiota in defining states of health and disease. Here, we review the literature in adult and pediatric GI microbiome studies, the emerging links between microbial community structure, function, infection and disease, and the approaches to manipulate this crucial ecosystem to improve host health. PMID:20377338

  13. Role of the gut microbiota in defining human health.

    PubMed

    Fujimura, Kei E; Slusher, Nicole A; Cabana, Michael D; Lynch, Susan V

    2010-04-01

    The human superorganism is a conglomerate of mammalian and microbial cells, with the latter estimated to outnumber the former by ten to one and the microbial genetic repertoire (microbiome) to be approximately 100-times greater than that of the human host. Given the ability of the immune response to rapidly counter infectious agents, it is striking that such a large density of microbes can exist in a state of synergy within the human host. This is particularly true of the distal gastrointestinal (GI) tract, which houses up to 1000 distinct bacterial species and an estimated excess of 1 x 10(14) microorganisms. An ever-increasing body of evidence implicates the GI microbiota in defining states of health and disease. Here, we review the literature in adult and pediatric GI microbiome studies, the emerging links between microbial community structure, function, infection and disease, and the approaches to manipulate this crucial ecosystem to improve host health.

  14. The manned transportation system study - Defining human pathways into space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lance, Nick; Geyer, Mark S.; Gaunce, Michael T.; Anson, H. W.; Bienhoff, D. G.; Carey, D. A.; Emmett, B. R.; Mccandless, B.; Wetzel, E. D.

    1992-01-01

    Substantiating data developed by a NASA-industry team (NIT) for subsequent NASA decisions on the 'right' set of manned transportation elements needed for human access to space are discussed. Attention is given to the framework for detailed definition of these manned transportation elements. Identifying and defining architecture evaluation criteria, i.e., attributes, specified the amount and type of data needed for each concept under consideration. Several architectures, each beginning with today's transportation systems, were defined using representative systems to explore future options and address specific questions currently being debated. The present solutions emphasize affordability, safety, routineness, and reliability. Key issues associated with current business practices were challenged and the impact associated with these practices quantified.

  15. Defining the Genetic Architecture of Human Developmental Language Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ning; Bartlett, Christopher W.

    2012-01-01

    Language is a uniquely human trait, which poses limitations on animal models for discovering biological substrates and pathways. Despite this challenge, rapidly developing biotechnology in the field of genomics has made human genetics studies a viable alternative route for defining the molecular neuroscience of human language. This is accomplished by studying families that transmit both normal and disordered language across generations. The language disorder reviewed here is specific language impairment (SLI), a developmental deficiency in language acquisition despite adequate opportunity, normal intelligence, and without any apparent neurological etiology. Here, we describe disease gene discovery paradigms as applied to SLI families and review the progress this field has made. After review the evidence that genetic factors influence SLI, we discuss methods and findings from scans of the human chromosomes, including the main replicated regions on chromosomes 13, 16 and 19 and two identified genes, ATP2C2 and CMIP that appear to account for the language variation on chromosome 16. Additional work has been done on candidate genes, i.e., genes chosen a priori and not through a genome scanning studies, including several studies of CNTNAP2 and some recent work implicating BDNF as a gene × gene interaction partner of genetic variation on chromosome 13 that influences language. These recent developments may allow for better use of post-mortem human brain samples functional studies and animal models for circumscribed language subcomponents. In the future, the identification of genetic variation associated with language phenotypes will provide the molecular pathways to understanding human language. PMID:22365959

  16. Defining the human gallbladder proteome by transcriptomics and affinity proteomics.

    PubMed

    Kampf, Caroline; Mardinoglu, Adil; Fagerberg, Linn; Hallström, Björn M; Danielsson, Angelika; Nielsen, Jens; Pontén, Fredrik; Uhlen, Mathias

    2014-11-01

    Global protein analysis of human gallbladder tissue is vital for identification of molecular regulators and effectors of its physiological activity. Here, we employed a genome-wide deep RNA sequencing analysis in 28 human tissues to identify the genes overrepresented in the gallbladder and complemented it with antibody-based immunohistochemistry in 48 human tissues. We characterized human gallbladder proteins and identified 140 gallbladder-specific proteins with an elevated expression in the gallbladder as compared to the other analyzed tissues. Five genes were categorized as enriched, with at least fivefold higher levels in gallbladder, 60 genes were categorized as group enriched with elevated transcript levels in gallbladder shared with at least one other tissue and 75 genes were categorized as enhanced with higher expression than the average expression in other tissues. We explored the localization of the genes within the gallbladder through cell-type specific antibody-based protein profiling and the subcellular localization of the genes through immunofluorescent-based profiling. Finally, we revealed the biological processes and metabolic functions carried out by these genes through the use of GO, KEGG Pathway, and HMR2.0 that is compilation of the human metabolic reactions. We demonstrated the results of the combined analysis of the transcriptomics and affinity proteomics.

  17. Plasmodium falciparum: characterization of defined antigens by monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Perrin, L H; Ramirez, E; Er-Hsiang, L; Lambert, P H

    1980-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies directed against Plasmodium falciparum detect stage-specific, species-specific and common antigenic determinants of Plasmodia. These antibodies provide new tools for purification and characterization of Plasmodium falciparum antigens in relation to future procedures for immunoprophylaxis. Images Fig. 2 PMID:6160002

  18. Serologically defined V region subgroups of human lambda light chains.

    PubMed

    Solomon, A; Weiss, D T

    1987-08-01

    The availability of numerous antisera prepared against lambda-type Bence Jones proteins and lambda chains of known amino acid sequence has led to the differentiation and classification of human lambda light chains into one of five V lambda subgroups. The five serologically defined subgroups, V lambda I, V lambda II, V lambda III, V lambda IV, and V lambda VI, correspond to the chemical classification that is based on sequence homologies in the first framework region (FR1). Proteins designated by sequence as lambda V react with specific anti-lambda II antisera and are thus included in the V lambda II subgroup classification. The isotypic nature of the five V lambda subgroups was evidenced through analyses of lambda-type light chains that were isolated from the IgG of normal individuals. Based on analyses of 116 Bence Jones proteins, the frequency of distribution of the lambda I, lambda II/V, lambda III, lambda IV, and lambda VI proteins in the normal lambda chain population is estimated to be 27%, 37%, 23%, 3%, and 10%, respectively. This distribution of V lambda subgroups was comparable to that found among 82 monoclonal Ig lambda proteins. Considerable V lambda intragroup antigenic heterogeneity was also apparent. At least two sub-subgroups were identified among each of the five major V lambda subgroups, implying the existence of multiple genes in the human V lambda genome. The V lambda classification of 54 Ig lambda proteins obtained from patients with primary or multiple myeloma-associated amyloidosis substantiated the preferential association of lambda VI light chains with amyloidosis AL and the predominance of the normally rare V lambda VI subgroup in this disease. PMID:3110284

  19. Defining and characterizing protein surface using alpha shapes.

    PubMed

    Albou, Laurent-Philippe; Schwarz, Benjamin; Poch, Olivier; Wurtz, Jean Marie; Moras, Dino

    2009-07-01

    The alpha shape of a molecule is a geometrical representation that provides a unique surface decomposition and a means to filter atomic contacts. We used it to revisit and unify the definition and computation of surface residues, contiguous patches, and curvature. These descriptors are evaluated and compared with former approaches on 85 proteins for which both bound and unbound forms are available. Based on the local density of interactions, the detection of surface residues shows a sensibility of 98%, whereas preserving a well-formed protein core. A novel conception of surface patch is defined by traveling along the surface from a central residue or atom. By construction, all surface patches are contiguous and, therefore, allows to cope with common problems of wrong and nonselection of neighbors. In the case of protein-binding site prediction, this new definition has improved the signal-to-noise ratio by 2.6 times compared with a widely used approach. With most common approaches, the computation of surface curvature can be locally biased by the presence of subsurface cavities and local variations of atomic densities. A novel notion of surface curvature is specifically developed to avoid such bias and is parametrizable to emphasize either local or global features. It defines a molecular landscape composed on average of 38% knobs and 62% clefts where interacting residues (IR) are 30% more frequent in knobs. A statistical analysis shows that residues in knobs are more charged, less hydrophobic and less aromatic than residues in clefts. IR in knobs are, however, much more hydrophobic and aromatic and less charged than noninteracting residues (non-IR) in knobs. Furthermore, IR are shown to be more accessible than non-IR both in clefts and knobs. The use of the alpha shape as a unifying framework allows for formal definitions, and fast and robust computations desirable in large-scale projects. This swiftness is not achieved to the detriment of quality, as proven by

  20. Design and characterization of well-defined supramolecular polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, Kathleen; Kade, Matthew; Hawker, Craig; Kramer, Edward

    2007-03-01

    Polymeric materials with well-defined and controllable temperature dependent properties are of interest both for technological applications and fundamental physical studies. Melt processing requires low viscosity, while resistance to fracture is desirable at material operating temperatures, and these two properties are often mutually exclusive. Through controlled radical polymerization (ATRP) we have synthesized tailor-made polymers with MHB groups specifically located at one or both chain ends or randomly along the backbone to provide thermal tunability, and by changing the nature of the MHB group (complementary or self-complementary) we can control the specificity and type of the polymer-polymer interaction. As a simple model system, we investigate the case of two end-functional MHB homopolymers that form a novel supramolecular diblock copolymer. Two energies are expected to be important in this system---χN, the Flory-Huggins interaction parameter times the degree of polymerization, which describes the polymer-polymer interaction, and ɛ, the binding energy of the MHB group. Using deuterium labeled polymers in various multilayer thin film structures, dynamic secondary ion mass spectrometry (dSIMS) allows each of these parameters to be measured independently and these values used to design technologically and physically interesting new materials.

  1. A gene recently inactivated in human defines a new olfactory receptor family in mammals.

    PubMed

    Rouquier, S; Friedman, C; Delettre, C; van den Engh, G; Blancher, A; Crouau-Roy, B; Trask, B J; Giorgi, D

    1998-09-01

    The olfactory receptor (OR) gene family constitutes one of the largest multigene families and is distributed among many chromosomal sites in the human genome. Four OR families have been defined in mammals. We previously demonstrated that a high fraction of human OR sequences have incurred deleterious mutations, thus reducing the repertoire of functional OR genes. In this study, we have characterized a new OR gene, 912-93, in primates. This gene is unique and it defines a new OR family. It localizes to human chromosome 11q11-12 and at syntenical sites in other hominoids. The sequence marks a previously unrecognized rearrangement of pericentromeric material from chromosome 11 to the centromeric region of gibbon chromosome 5. The human gene contains a nonsense point mutation in the region corresponding to the extracellular N-terminus of the receptor. This mutation is present in humans of various ethnic groups, but is absent in apes, suggesting that it probably appeared during the divergence of humans from other apes, <4 000 000-5 000 000 years ago. A second mutation, a frameshift at a different location, has occurred in the gorilla copy of this gene. These observations suggest that OR 912-93 has been recently silenced in human and gorilla, adding to a pool of OR pseudogenes whose growth may parallel a reduction in the sense of smell in primates.

  2. Defining And Characterizing Sample Representativeness For DWPF Melter Feed Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Shine, E. P.; Poirier, M. R.

    2013-10-29

    statisticians used carefully thought out designs that systematically and economically provided plans for data collection from the DWPF process. Key shared features of the sampling designs used at DWPF and the Gy sampling methodology were the specification of a standard for sample representativeness, an investigation that produced data from the process to study the sampling function, and a decision framework used to assess whether the specification was met based on the data. Without going into detail with regard to the seven errors identified by Pierre Gy, as excellent summaries are readily available such as Pitard [1989] and Smith [2001], SRS engineers understood, for example, that samplers can be biased (Gy's extraction error), and developed plans to mitigate those biases. Experiments that compared installed samplers with more representative samples obtained directly from the tank may not have resulted in systematically partitioning sampling errors into the now well-known error categories of Gy, but did provide overall information on the suitability of sampling systems. Most of the designs in this report are related to the DWPF vessels, not the large SRS Tank Farm tanks. Samples from the DWPF Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME), which contains the feed to the DWPF melter, are characterized using standardized analytical methods with known uncertainty. The analytical error is combined with the established error from sampling and processing in DWPF to determine the melter feed composition. This composition is used with the known uncertainty of the models in the Product Composition Control System (PCCS) to ensure that the wasteform that is produced is comfortably within the acceptable processing and product performance region. Having the advantage of many years of processing that meets the waste glass product acceptance criteria, the DWPF process has provided a considerable amount of data about itself in addition to the data from many special studies. Demonstrating representative sampling

  3. A New Approach to Defining Human Touch Temperature Standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ungar, Eugene; Stroud, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    Defining touch temperature limits for skin contact with both hot and cold objects is important to prevent pain and skin damage, which may affect task performance or become a safety concern. Pain and skin damage depend on the skin temperature during contact, which depends on the contact thermal conductance, the object's initial temperature, and its material properties. However, previous spacecraft standards have incorrectly defined touch temperature limits in terms of a single object temperature value for all materials, or have provided limited material-specific values which do not cover the gamut of likely designs. A new approach has been developed for updated NASA standards, which defines touch temperature limits in terms of skin temperature at pain onset for bare skin contact with hot and cold objects. The authors have developed an analytical verification method for safe hot and cold object temperatures for contact times from 1 second to infinity.

  4. Reduced DNA methylation patterning and transcriptional connectivity define human skin aging.

    PubMed

    Bormann, Felix; Rodríguez-Paredes, Manuel; Hagemann, Sabine; Manchanda, Himanshu; Kristof, Boris; Gutekunst, Julian; Raddatz, Günter; Haas, Rainer; Terstegen, Lara; Wenck, Horst; Kaderali, Lars; Winnefeld, Marc; Lyko, Frank

    2016-06-01

    Epigenetic changes represent an attractive mechanism for understanding the phenotypic changes associated with human aging. Age-related changes in DNA methylation at the genome scale have been termed 'epigenetic drift', but the defining features of this phenomenon remain to be established. Human epidermis represents an excellent model for understanding age-related epigenetic changes because of its substantial cell-type homogeneity and its well-known age-related phenotype. We have now generated and analyzed the currently largest set of human epidermis methylomes (N = 108) using array-based profiling of 450 000 methylation marks in various age groups. Data analysis confirmed that age-related methylation differences are locally restricted and characterized by relatively small effect sizes. Nevertheless, methylation data could be used to predict the chronological age of sample donors with high accuracy. We also identified discontinuous methylation changes as a novel feature of the aging methylome. Finally, our analysis uncovered an age-related erosion of DNA methylation patterns that is characterized by a reduced dynamic range and increased heterogeneity of global methylation patterns. These changes in methylation variability were accompanied by a reduced connectivity of transcriptional networks. Our findings thus define the loss of epigenetic regulatory fidelity as a key feature of the aging epigenome.

  5. Defining Information Needs of Computer Users: A Human Communication Problem.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimbrough, Kenneth L.

    This exploratory investigation of the process of defining the information needs of computer users and the impact of that process on information retrieval focuses on communication problems. Six sites were visited that used computers to process data or to provide information, including the California Department of Transportation, the California…

  6. Defining dignity and its place in human rights.

    PubMed

    Michael, Lucy

    2014-01-01

    The concept of dignity is widely used in society, particularly in reference to human rights law and bioethics. Several conceptions of dignity are identified, falling broadly within two categories: full inherent dignity (FID) and non-inherent dignity (NID). FID is a quality belonging equally to every being with full moral status, including all members of the human natural kind; it is permanent, unconditional, indivisible and inviolable. Those beings with FID ought to be treated deferentially by others by virtue of their belonging to a noble caste. FID grounds fundamental human rights, such as the rights to freedom and equality. The concept of dignity forms a network of interconnected ideas related to worth and value particularly within legal and ethical discourse; it is a rich and meaningful concept, irreducible to one or two quasi-legal principles. Fundamentally, dignity matters because it forms the foundation of civilized society; without it, serious abuse of people is more likely to occur.

  7. Directed Endothelial Progenitor Differentiation from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells Via Wnt Activation Under Defined Conditions.

    PubMed

    Bao, Xiaoping; Lian, Xiaojun; Palecek, Sean P

    2016-01-01

    Efficient derivation of endothelial cells and their progenitors from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) can facilitate studies of human vascular development, disease modeling, drug discovery, and cell-based therapy. Here we provide a detailed protocol for directing hPSCs to functional endothelial cells and their progenitors in a completely defined, growth factor- and serum-free system by temporal modulation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling via small molecules. We demonstrate a 10-day, two-stage process that recapitulates endothelial cell development, in which hPSCs first differentiate to endothelial progenitors that then generate functional endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells. Methods to characterize endothelial cell identity and function are also described. PMID:27590162

  8. Defining cell culture conditions to improve human norovirus infectivity assays.

    PubMed

    Straub, T M; Hutchison, J R; Bartholomew, R A; Valdez, C O; Valentine, N B; Dohnalkova, A; Ozanich, R M; Bruckner-Lea, C J

    2013-01-01

    Significant difficulties remain for determining whether human noroviruses (hNoV) recovered from water, food, and environmental samples are infectious. Three-dimensional (3-D) tissue culture of human intestinal cells has shown promise in developing an infectivity assay, but reproducibility, even within a single laboratory, remains problematic. From the literature and our observations, we hypothesized that the common factors that lead to more reproducible hNoV infectivity in vitro requires that the cell line be (1) of human gastrointestinal origin, (2) expresses apical microvilli, and (3) be a positive secretor cell line. The C2BBe1 cell line, which is a brush-border producing clone of Caco-2, meets these three criteria. When challenged with Genogroup II viruses, we observed a 2 Log(10) increase in viral RNA titer. A passage experiment with GII viruses showed evidence of the ability to propagate hNoV by both quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and microscopy. In our hands, using 3-D C2BBe1 cells improves reproducibility of the infectivity assay for hNoV, but the assay can still be variable. Two sources of variability include the cells themselves (mixed phenotypes of small and large intestine) and initial titer measurements using qRT-PCR that measures all RNA vs. plaque assays that measure infectious virus. PMID:23306266

  9. Defining cell culture conditions to improve human norovirus infectivity assays

    SciTech Connect

    Straub, Tim M.; Hutchison, Janine R.; Bartholomew, Rachel A.; Valdez, Catherine O.; Valentine, Nancy B.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Ozanich, Richard M.; Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.

    2013-01-10

    Significant difficulties remain for determining whether human noroviruses (hNoV) recovered from water, food, and environmental samples are infectious. Three-dimensional tissue culture of human intestinal cells has shown promise in developing an infectivity assay, but reproducibility, even within a single laboratory, remains problematic. From the literature and our observations, we hypothesized that the common factors that leads to more reproducible hNoV infectivity in vitro requires that the cell line be 1) of human gastrointestinal origin, 2) expresses apical microvilli, and 3) be a positive secretor cell line. The C2BBe1 cell line, which is a brush-border producing clone of Caco-2, meets these three criteria. When challenged with Genogroup II viruses, we observed a 2 Log10 increase in viral RNA titer. A passage experiment with GII viruses showed evidence of the ability to propagate hNoV by both reverse transcription quantitative PCR (qRT-PCR) and microscopy. Using 3-D C2BBe1 cells improves reproducibility of the infectivity assay for hNoV, but the assay can still be variable. Two sources of variability include the cells themselves (mixed phenotypes of small and large intestine) and initial titer measurements using quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) that measures all RNA vs. plaque assays that measure infectious virus.

  10. Defining cell culture conditions to improve human norovirus infectivity assays.

    PubMed

    Straub, T M; Hutchison, J R; Bartholomew, R A; Valdez, C O; Valentine, N B; Dohnalkova, A; Ozanich, R M; Bruckner-Lea, C J

    2013-01-01

    Significant difficulties remain for determining whether human noroviruses (hNoV) recovered from water, food, and environmental samples are infectious. Three-dimensional (3-D) tissue culture of human intestinal cells has shown promise in developing an infectivity assay, but reproducibility, even within a single laboratory, remains problematic. From the literature and our observations, we hypothesized that the common factors that lead to more reproducible hNoV infectivity in vitro requires that the cell line be (1) of human gastrointestinal origin, (2) expresses apical microvilli, and (3) be a positive secretor cell line. The C2BBe1 cell line, which is a brush-border producing clone of Caco-2, meets these three criteria. When challenged with Genogroup II viruses, we observed a 2 Log(10) increase in viral RNA titer. A passage experiment with GII viruses showed evidence of the ability to propagate hNoV by both quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and microscopy. In our hands, using 3-D C2BBe1 cells improves reproducibility of the infectivity assay for hNoV, but the assay can still be variable. Two sources of variability include the cells themselves (mixed phenotypes of small and large intestine) and initial titer measurements using qRT-PCR that measures all RNA vs. plaque assays that measure infectious virus.

  11. Monoclonal antibody-defined human pancreatic cancer-associated antigens.

    PubMed

    Schmiegel, W H; Kalthoff, H; Arndt, R; Gieseking, J; Greten, H; Klöppel, G; Kreiker, C; Ladak, A; Lampe, V; Ulrich, S

    1985-03-01

    Three pancreatic cancer-associated antigens were characterized by use of monoclonal antibodies in immunobinding studies with various cellular and soluble target antigens, in immunoprecipitation, and in immunoperoxidase staining. C54-0 represents a tumor-associated Mr 122,000 antigen, which appears to be widely distributed on various epithelial tumors and to a lower extent on normal tissue. C1-N3 antigen exhibited a more restricted distribution, reacting with pancreatic and various gastrointestinal tract tumors as well as with chronically inflamed pancreatic tissue. The most specific antigen expression was observed for C1-P83 antigen, found on all exocrine tumors of the pancreas, but not on normal or chronically inflamed pancreatic tissue.

  12. The transcriptional regulator network of human inflammatory macrophages is defined by open chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Susanne V; Krebs, Wolfgang; Ulas, Thomas; Xue, Jia; Baßler, Kevin; Günther, Patrick; Hardt, Anna-Lena; Schultze, Hartmut; Sander, Jil; Klee, Kathrin; Theis, Heidi; Kraut, Michael; Beyer, Marc; Schultze, Joachim L

    2016-01-01

    Differentiation of inflammatory macrophages from monocytes is characterized by an orderly integration of epigenetic and transcriptional regulatory mechanisms guided by lineage-determining transcription factors such as PU.1. Further activation of macrophages leads to a stimulus- or microenvironment-specific signal integration with subsequent transcriptional control established by the action of tissue- or signal-associated transcription factors. Here, we assess four histone modifications during human macrophage activation and integrate this information with the gene expression data from 28 different macrophage activation conditions in combination with GM-CSF. Bioinformatically, for inflammatory macrophages we define a unique network of transcriptional and epigenetic regulators (TRs), which was characterized by accessible promoters independent of the activation signal. In contrast to the general accessibility of promoters of TRs, mRNA expression of central TRs belonging to the TR network displayed stimulus-specific expression patterns, indicating a second level of transcriptional regulation beyond epigenetic chromatin changes. In contrast, stringent integration of epigenetic and transcriptional regulation was observed in networks of TRs established from somatic tissues and tissue macrophages. In these networks, clusters of TRs with permissive histone marks were associated with high gene expression whereas clusters with repressive chromatin marks were associated with absent gene expression. Collectively, these results support that macrophage activation during inflammation in contrast to lineage determination is mainly regulated transcriptionally by a pre-defined TR network. PMID:26729620

  13. The transcriptional regulator network of human inflammatory macrophages is defined by open chromatin.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Susanne V; Krebs, Wolfgang; Ulas, Thomas; Xue, Jia; Baßler, Kevin; Günther, Patrick; Hardt, Anna-Lena; Schultze, Hartmut; Sander, Jil; Klee, Kathrin; Theis, Heidi; Kraut, Michael; Beyer, Marc; Schultze, Joachim L

    2016-02-01

    Differentiation of inflammatory macrophages from monocytes is characterized by an orderly integration of epigenetic and transcriptional regulatory mechanisms guided by lineage-determining transcription factors such as PU.1. Further activation of macrophages leads to a stimulus- or microenvironment-specific signal integration with subsequent transcriptional control established by the action of tissue- or signal-associated transcription factors. Here, we assess four histone modifications during human macrophage activation and integrate this information with the gene expression data from 28 different macrophage activation conditions in combination with GM-CSF. Bioinformatically, for inflammatory macrophages we define a unique network of transcriptional and epigenetic regulators (TRs), which was characterized by accessible promoters independent of the activation signal. In contrast to the general accessibility of promoters of TRs, mRNA expression of central TRs belonging to the TR network displayed stimulus-specific expression patterns, indicating a second level of transcriptional regulation beyond epigenetic chromatin changes. In contrast, stringent integration of epigenetic and transcriptional regulation was observed in networks of TRs established from somatic tissues and tissue macrophages. In these networks, clusters of TRs with permissive histone marks were associated with high gene expression whereas clusters with repressive chromatin marks were associated with absent gene expression. Collectively, these results support that macrophage activation during inflammation in contrast to lineage determination is mainly regulated transcriptionally by a pre-defined TR network.

  14. Chromosomal Aberrations in Canine Gliomas Define Candidate Genes and Common Pathways in Dogs and Humans.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, Peter J; York, Dan; Higgins, Robert J; LeCouteur, Richard A; Joshi, Nikhil; Bannasch, Danika

    2016-07-01

    Spontaneous gliomas in dogs occur at a frequency similar to that in humans and may provide a translational model for therapeutic development and comparative biological investigations. Copy number alterations in 38 canine gliomas, including diffuse astrocytomas, glioblastomas, oligodendrogliomas, and mixed oligoastrocytomas, were defined using an Illumina 170K single nucleotide polymorphism array. Highly recurrent alterations were seen in up to 85% of some tumor types, most notably involving chromosomes 13, 22, and 38, and gliomas clustered into 2 major groups consisting of high-grade IV astrocytomas, or oligodendrogliomas and other tumors. Tumor types were characterized by specific broad and focal chromosomal events including focal loss of the INK4A/B locus in glioblastoma and loss of the RB1 gene and amplification of the PDGFRA gene in oligodendrogliomas. Genes associated with the 3 critical pathways in human high-grade gliomas (TP53, RB1, and RTK/RAS/PI3K) were frequently associated with canine aberrations. Analysis of oligodendrogliomas revealed regions of chromosomal losses syntenic to human 1p involving tumor suppressor genes, such as CDKN2C, as well as genes associated with apoptosis, autophagy, and response to chemotherapy and radiation. Analysis of high frequency chromosomal aberrations with respect to human orthologues may provide insight into both novel and common pathways in gliomagenesis and response to therapy.

  15. Chromosomal Aberrations in Canine Gliomas Define Candidate Genes and Common Pathways in Dogs and Humans.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, Peter J; York, Dan; Higgins, Robert J; LeCouteur, Richard A; Joshi, Nikhil; Bannasch, Danika

    2016-07-01

    Spontaneous gliomas in dogs occur at a frequency similar to that in humans and may provide a translational model for therapeutic development and comparative biological investigations. Copy number alterations in 38 canine gliomas, including diffuse astrocytomas, glioblastomas, oligodendrogliomas, and mixed oligoastrocytomas, were defined using an Illumina 170K single nucleotide polymorphism array. Highly recurrent alterations were seen in up to 85% of some tumor types, most notably involving chromosomes 13, 22, and 38, and gliomas clustered into 2 major groups consisting of high-grade IV astrocytomas, or oligodendrogliomas and other tumors. Tumor types were characterized by specific broad and focal chromosomal events including focal loss of the INK4A/B locus in glioblastoma and loss of the RB1 gene and amplification of the PDGFRA gene in oligodendrogliomas. Genes associated with the 3 critical pathways in human high-grade gliomas (TP53, RB1, and RTK/RAS/PI3K) were frequently associated with canine aberrations. Analysis of oligodendrogliomas revealed regions of chromosomal losses syntenic to human 1p involving tumor suppressor genes, such as CDKN2C, as well as genes associated with apoptosis, autophagy, and response to chemotherapy and radiation. Analysis of high frequency chromosomal aberrations with respect to human orthologues may provide insight into both novel and common pathways in gliomagenesis and response to therapy. PMID:27251041

  16. On the significance of contaminant plume-scale and dose-response models in defining hydrogeological characterization needs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Barros, F.; Rubin, Y.; Maxwell, R.; Bai, H.

    2007-12-01

    Defining rational and effective hydrogeological data acquisition strategies is of crucial importance since financial resources available for such efforts are always limited. Usually such strategies are developed with the goal of reducing uncertainty, but less often they are developed in the context of the impacts of uncertainty. This paper presents an approach for determining site characterization needs based on human health risk factors. The main challenge is in striking a balance between improved definition of hydrogeological, behavioral and physiological parameters. Striking this balance can provide clear guidance on setting priorities for data acquisition and for better estimating adverse health effects in humans. This paper addresses this challenge through theoretical developments and numerical testing. We will report on a wide range of factors that affect the site characterization needs including contaminant plume's dimensions, travel distances and other length scales that characterize the transport problem, as well as health risk models. We introduce a new graphical tool that allows one to investigate the relative impact of hydrogeological and physiological parameters in risk. Results show that the impact of uncertainty reduction in the risk-related parameters decreases with increasing distances from the contaminant source. Also, results indicate that human health risk becomes less sensitive to hydrogeological measurements when dealing with ergodic plumes. This indicates that under ergodic conditions, uncertainty reduction in human health risk may benefit from better understanding of the physiological component as opposed to a detailed hydrogeological characterization

  17. Characterization of human milk donors.

    PubMed

    Osbaldiston, Richard; Mingle, Leigh A

    2007-11-01

    The primary objective of this research was to create a detailed characterization of human milk donors, including descriptive information about demographics and lifestyle, involvement with the milk bank, reasons for donating, problems encountered while breastfeeding and pumping milk, barriers to donating milk, affective experiences, and personal values. Data were collected via telephone interview of 87 donors and 19 nondonor controls. Few relationships were found between the descriptive information and amount of milk donated. Donors reported fewer problems pumping milk than nondonors. Strategies for recruiting new donors and strategies for increasing donation amounts are presented.

  18. Involuntary Euthanasia and Current Attempts to Define Persons with Mental Retardation as Less Than Human.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lusthaus, Evelyn W.

    1985-01-01

    The author examines current attempts to define mentally retarded persons as less than human and suggests that these ideologies are being used to justify euthanasia practices and to formulate euthanasia policies. (CL)

  19. Characterization of pilin genes from seven serologically defined prototype strains of Moraxella bovis.

    PubMed Central

    Atwell, J L; Tennent, J M; Lepper, A W; Elleman, T C

    1994-01-01

    Numerous field isolates of Moraxella bovis have previously been classified by serological techniques into seven serogroups, each defined by homologous cross-reaction with antisera prepared against purified pili of a single prototype strain. The gene encoding pilin from each of the prototype strains has been characterized by nucleotide sequence determination. The coding sequences show extensive homology (70 to 80%) while the proximal downstream sequences show a dichotomy into nonhomologous sets. The pilin genes of three more strains were also characterized. The presence of an additional, partial pilin gene in each prototype strain was confirmed by Southern blot analysis, and the partial pilin genes from two strains of one serogroup were characterized by sequence determination. Features of the pilin gene sequences are considered in relation to pilin gene inversion and the serological variants of strains which may arise from gene inversion events. Images PMID:8051000

  20. Cross-species transcriptional network analysis defines shared inflammatory responses in murine and human lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Berthier, Celine C; Bethunaickan, Ramalingam; Gonzalez-Rivera, Tania; Nair, Viji; Ramanujam, Meera; Zhang, Weijia; Bottinger, Erwin P; Segerer, Stephan; Lindenmeyer, Maja; Cohen, Clemens D; Davidson, Anne; Kretzler, Matthias

    2012-07-15

    Lupus nephritis (LN) is a serious manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus. Therapeutic studies in mouse LN models do not always predict outcomes of human therapeutic trials, raising concerns about the human relevance of these preclinical models. In this study, we used an unbiased transcriptional network approach to define, in molecular terms, similarities and differences among three lupus models and human LN. Genome-wide gene-expression networks were generated using natural language processing and automated promoter analysis and compared across species via suboptimal graph matching. The three murine models and human LN share both common and unique features. The 20 commonly shared network nodes reflect the key pathologic processes of immune cell infiltration/activation, endothelial cell activation/injury, and tissue remodeling/fibrosis, with macrophage/dendritic cell activation as a dominant cross-species shared transcriptional pathway. The unique nodes reflect differences in numbers and types of infiltrating cells and degree of remodeling among the three mouse strains. To define mononuclear phagocyte-derived pathways in human LN, gene sets activated in isolated NZB/W renal mononuclear cells were compared with human LN kidney profiles. A tissue compartment-specific macrophage-activation pattern was seen, with NF-κB1 and PPARγ as major regulatory nodes in the tubulointerstitial and glomerular networks, respectively. Our study defines which pathologic processes in murine models of LN recapitulate the key transcriptional processes active in human LN and suggests that there are functional differences between mononuclear phagocytes infiltrating different renal microenvironments.

  1. Human tumour antigens defined by cytotoxicity and proliferative responses of cultured lymphoid cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vose, Brent M.; Bonnard, Guy D.

    1982-03-01

    The long-term goal of many laboratories has been to develop cellular reagents having specific reactivity against human tumour cells. Such immune cells should prove useful for defining the antigenicity of human malignancies and may have important therapeutic potential, as has been clearly shown in some animal models1. Here we describe methods of initiating continued lymphocyte cultures (CLC) having specific anti-tumour reactivity using conditioned media containing interleukin-2 (IL-2).

  2. A Cellular GWAS Approach to Define Human Variation in Cellular Pathways Important to Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Miller, Samuel I; Chaudhary, Anu

    2016-01-01

    An understanding of common human diversity in innate immune pathways should be beneficial in understanding autoimmune diseases, susceptibility to infection, and choices of anti-inflammatory treatment. Such understanding could also result in definition of currently unknown components of human inflammation pathways. A cellular genome-wide association studies (GWAS) platform, termed Hi-HOST (High-throughput human in vitro susceptibility testing), was developed to assay in vitro cellular phenotypes of infection in genotyped lymphoblastoid cells from genetically diverse human populations. Hi-HOST allows for measurement of multiple host and pathogen parameters of infection/inflammation including: bacterial invasion and intracellular replication, host cell death, and cytokine production. Hi-HOST has been used to successfully define a significant portion of the heritable human diversity in inflammatory cell death in response to Salmonella typhimurium. It also led to the discovery of genetic variants important to protection against systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and protection against death and bacteremia in individuals with SIRS. Our laboratory is currently using this platform to define human diversity in autophagy and the NLPR3 inflammasome pathways, and to define new components that can impact the expression of phenotypes related to these pathways. PMID:27128945

  3. A Cellular GWAS Approach to Define Human Variation in Cellular Pathways Important to Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Samuel I.; Chaudhary, Anu

    2016-01-01

    An understanding of common human diversity in innate immune pathways should be beneficial in understanding autoimmune diseases, susceptibility to infection, and choices of anti-inflammatory treatment. Such understanding could also result in definition of currently unknown components of human inflammation pathways. A cellular genome-wide association studies (GWAS) platform, termed Hi-HOST (High-throughput human in vitro susceptibility testing), was developed to assay in vitro cellular phenotypes of infection in genotyped lymphoblastoid cells from genetically diverse human populations. Hi-HOST allows for measurement of multiple host and pathogen parameters of infection/inflammation including: bacterial invasion and intracellular replication, host cell death, and cytokine production. Hi-HOST has been used to successfully define a significant portion of the heritable human diversity in inflammatory cell death in response to Salmonella typhimurium. It also led to the discovery of genetic variants important to protection against systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and protection against death and bacteremia in individuals with SIRS. Our laboratory is currently using this platform to define human diversity in autophagy and the NLPR3 inflammasome pathways, and to define new components that can impact the expression of phenotypes related to these pathways. PMID:27128945

  4. PKH26 Staining Defines Distinct Subsets of Normal Human Colon Epithelial Cells at Different Maturation Stages

    PubMed Central

    Pastò, Anna; Marchesi, Maddalena; Diamantini, Adamo; Frasson, Chiara; Curtarello, Matteo; Lago, Claudia; Pilotto, Giorgia; Parenti, Anna Rosita; Esposito, Giovanni; Agostini, Marco; Nitti, Donato; Amadori, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aim Colon crypts are characterized by a hierarchy of cells distributed along the crypt axis. Aim of this paper was to develop an in vitro system for separation of epithelial cell subsets in different maturation stages from normal human colon. Methodology and Major Findings Dissociated colonic epithelial cells were stained with PKH26, which allows identification of distinct populations based on their proliferation rate, and cultured in vitro in the absence of serum. The cytofluorimetric expression of CK20, Msi-1 and Lgr5 was studied. The mRNA levels of several stemness-associated genes were also compared in cultured cell populations and in three colon crypt populations isolated by microdissection. A PKHpos population survived in culture and formed spheroids; this population included subsets with slow (PKHhigh) and rapid (PKHlow) replicative rates. Molecular analysis revealed higher mRNA levels of both Msi-1 and Lgr-5 in PKHhigh cells; by cytofluorimetric analysis, Msi-1+/Lgr5+ cells were only found within PKHhigh cells, whereas Msi-1+/Lgr5− cells were also observed in the PKHlow population. As judged by qRT-PCR analysis, the expression of several stemness-associated markers (Bmi-1, EphB2, EpCAM, ALDH1) was highly enriched in Msi-1+/Lgr5+ cells. While CK20 expression was mainly found in PKHlow and PKHneg cells, a small PKHhigh subset co-expressed both CK20 and Msi-1, but not Lgr5; cells with these properties also expressed Mucin, and could be identified in vivo in colon crypts. These results mirrored those found in cells isolated from different crypt portions by microdissection, and based on proliferation rates and marker expression they allowed to define several subsets at different maturation stages: PKHhigh/Lgr5+/Msi-1+/CK20−, PKHhigh/Lgr5−/Msi-1+/CK20+, PKHlow/Lgr5−/Msi-1+/Ck20−, and PKHlow/Lgr5−/Msi-1−/CK20+ cells. Conclusions Our data show the possibility of deriving in vitro, without any selection strategy, several distinct cell

  5. Characterization of cultured rat oligodendrocytes proliferating in a serum-free, chemically defined medium

    SciTech Connect

    Saneto, R.P.; de Vellis, J.

    1985-05-01

    A serumless, chemically defined medium has been developed for the culture of oligodendrocytes isolated from primary neonatal rat cerebral cultures. Combined together, insulin, transferrin, and fibroblast growth factor synergistically induced an essentially homogeneous population (95-98%) of cells expressing glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase activity to undergo cell division. Proliferating cells were characterized by several criteria: (i) ultrastructural analysis by transmission electron microscopy identified the cell type as an oligodendrocyte; (ii) biochemical assays showed expression of three oligodendrocyte biochemical markers, induction of both glycerol phosphate dehydrogenase and lactate dehydrogenase, and presence of 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase; and (iii) immunocytochemical staining showed cultures to be 95-98% positive for glycerol phosphate dehydrogenase, 90% for myelin basic protein, 60-70% for galactocerebroside, and 70% for A2B5.

  6. Characterization of a gate-defined double quantum dot in a Si/SiGe nanomembrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapp, T. J.; Mohr, R. T.; Li, Yize Stephanie; Thorgrimsson, Brandur; Foote, Ryan H.; Wu, Xian; Ward, Daniel R.; Savage, D. E.; Lagally, M. G.; Friesen, Mark; Coppersmith, S. N.; Eriksson, M. A.

    2016-04-01

    We report the fabrication and characterization of a gate-defined double quantum dot formed in a Si/SiGe nanomembrane. In the past, all gate-defined quantum dots in Si/SiGe heterostructures were formed on top of strain-graded virtual substrates. The strain grading process necessarily introduces misfit dislocations into a heterostructure, and these defects introduce lateral strain inhomogeneities, mosaic tilt, and threading dislocations. The use of a SiGe nanomembrane as the virtual substrate enables the strain relaxation to be entirely elastic, eliminating the need for misfit dislocations. However, in this approach the formation of the heterostructure is more complicated, involving two separate epitaxial growth procedures separated by a wet-transfer process that results in a buried non-epitaxial interface 625 nm from the quantum dot. We demonstrate that in spite of this buried interface in close proximity to the device, a double quantum dot can be formed that is controllable enough to enable tuning of the inter-dot tunnel coupling, the identification of spin states, and the measurement of a singlet-to-triplet transition as a function of an applied magnetic field.

  7. Characterization of a gate-defined double quantum dot in a Si/SiGe nanomembrane.

    PubMed

    Knapp, T J; Mohr, R T; Li, Yize Stephanie; Thorgrimsson, Brandur; Foote, Ryan H; Wu, Xian; Ward, Daniel R; Savage, D E; Lagally, M G; Friesen, Mark; Coppersmith, S N; Eriksson, M A

    2016-04-15

    We report the fabrication and characterization of a gate-defined double quantum dot formed in a Si/SiGe nanomembrane. In the past, all gate-defined quantum dots in Si/SiGe heterostructures were formed on top of strain-graded virtual substrates. The strain grading process necessarily introduces misfit dislocations into a heterostructure, and these defects introduce lateral strain inhomogeneities, mosaic tilt, and threading dislocations. The use of a SiGe nanomembrane as the virtual substrate enables the strain relaxation to be entirely elastic, eliminating the need for misfit dislocations. However, in this approach the formation of the heterostructure is more complicated, involving two separate epitaxial growth procedures separated by a wet-transfer process that results in a buried non-epitaxial interface 625 nm from the quantum dot. We demonstrate that in spite of this buried interface in close proximity to the device, a double quantum dot can be formed that is controllable enough to enable tuning of the inter-dot tunnel coupling, the identification of spin states, and the measurement of a singlet-to-triplet transition as a function of an applied magnetic field.

  8. Toward defining the anatomo-proteomic puzzle of the human brain: An integrative analysis.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Irigoyen, Joaquín; Labarga, Alberto; Zabaleta, Aintzane; de Morentin, Xabier Martínez; Perez-Valderrama, Estela; Zelaya, María Victoria; Santamaria, Enrique

    2015-10-01

    The human brain is exceedingly complex, constituted by billions of neurons and trillions of synaptic connections that, in turn, define ∼900 neuroanatomical subdivisions in the adult brain (Hawrylycz et al. An anatomically comprehensive atlas of the human brain transcriptome. Nature 2012, 489, 391-399). The human brain transcriptome has revealed specific regional transcriptional signatures that are regulated in a spatiotemporal manner, increasing the complexity of the structural and molecular organization of this organ (Kang et al. Spatio-temporal transcriptome of the human brain. Nature 2011, 478, 483-489). During the last decade, neuroproteomics has emerged as a powerful approach to profile neural proteomes using shotgun-based MS, providing complementary information about protein content and function at a global level. Here, we revise recent proteome profiling studies performed in human brain, with special emphasis on proteome mapping of anatomical macrostructures, specific subcellular compartments, and cerebrospinal fluid. Moreover, we have performed an integrative functional analysis of the protein compilation derived from these large-scale human brain proteomic studies in order to obtain a comprehensive view of human brain biology. Finally, we also discuss the potential contribution of our meta-analysis to the Chromosome-centric Human Proteome Project initiative.

  9. An experimental characterization of human torso motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cafolla, Daniele; Chen, I.-Ming; Ceccarelli, Marco

    2015-12-01

    The torso plays an important role in the human-like operation of humanoids. In this paper, a method is proposed to analyze the behavior of the human torso by using inertial and magnetic sensing tools. Experiments are conducted to characterize the motion performance of the human torso during daily routine operations. Furthermore, the forces acting on the human body during these operations are evaluated to design and validate the performance of a humanoid robot.

  10. Regeneration and characterization of adult mouse hippocampal neurons in a defined in vitro system.

    PubMed

    Varghese, Kucku; Das, Mainak; Bhargava, Neelima; Stancescu, Maria; Molnar, Peter; Kindy, Mark S; Hickman, James J

    2009-02-15

    Although the majority of human illnesses occur during adulthood, most of the available in vitro disease models are based upon cells obtained from embryonic/fetal tissues because of the difficulties involved with culturing adult cells. Development of adult mouse neuronal cultures has a special significance because of the abundance of transgenic disease models that use this species. In this study a novel cell culture method has been developed that supports the long-term survival and physiological regeneration of adult mouse hippocampal cells in a serum-free defined environment. In this well-defined, controlled system, adult mouse hippocampal cells survived for up to 21 days in culture. The cultured cells exhibited typical hippocampal neuronal morphology and electrophysiological properties after recovery from the trauma of dissociation, and stained positive for the expected neuronal markers. This system has great potential as an investigative tool for in vitro studies of adult diseases, the aging brain or transgenic models of age-associated disorders. PMID:18955083

  11. Proteomic comparison defines novel markers to characterize heterogeneous populations of extracellular vesicle subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Kowal, Joanna; Arras, Guillaume; Colombo, Marina; Jouve, Mabel; Morath, Jakob Paul; Primdal-Bengtson, Bjarke; Dingli, Florent; Tkach, Mercedes; Théry, Clotilde

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) have become the focus of rising interest because of their numerous functions in physiology and pathology. Cells release heterogeneous vesicles of different sizes and intracellular origins, including small EVs formed inside endosomal compartments (i.e., exosomes) and EVs of various sizes budding from the plasma membrane. Specific markers for the analysis and isolation of different EV populations are missing, imposing important limitations to understanding EV functions. Here, EVs from human dendritic cells were first separated by their sedimentation speed, and then either by their behavior upon upward floatation into iodixanol gradients or by immuno-isolation. Extensive quantitative proteomic analysis allowing comparison of the isolated populations showed that several classically used exosome markers, like major histocompatibility complex, flotillin, and heat-shock 70-kDa proteins, are similarly present in all EVs. We identified proteins specifically enriched in small EVs, and define a set of five protein categories displaying different relative abundance in distinct EV populations. We demonstrate the presence of exosomal and nonexosomal subpopulations within small EVs, and propose their differential separation by immuno-isolation using either CD63, CD81, or CD9. Our work thus provides guidelines to define subtypes of EVs for future functional studies. PMID:26858453

  12. A thermoresponsive and chemically defined hydrogel for long-term culture of human embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rong; Mjoseng, Heidi K.; Hoeve, Marieke A.; Bauer, Nina G.; Pells, Steve; Besseling, Rut; Velugotla, Srinivas; Tourniaire, Guilhem; Kishen, Ria E. B.; Tsenkina, Yanina; Armit, Chris; Duffy, Cairnan R. E.; Helfen, Martina; Edenhofer, Frank; de Sousa, Paul A.; Bradley, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Cultures of human embryonic stem cell typically rely on protein matrices or feeder cells to support attachment and growth, while mechanical, enzymatic or chemical cell dissociation methods are used for cellular passaging. However, these methods are ill defined, thus introducing variability into the system, and may damage cells. They also exert selective pressures favouring cell aneuploidy and loss of differentiation potential. Here we report the identification of a family of chemically defined thermoresponsive synthetic hydrogels based on 2-(diethylamino)ethyl acrylate, which support long-term human embryonic stem cell growth and pluripotency over a period of 2–6 months. The hydrogels permitted gentle, reagent-free cell passaging by virtue of transient modulation of the ambient temperature from 37 to 15 °C for 30 min. These chemically defined alternatives to currently used, undefined biological substrates represent a flexible and scalable approach for improving the definition, efficacy and safety of human embryonic stem cell culture systems for research, industrial and clinical applications. PMID:23299885

  13. BAC transgenesis in human embryonic stem cells as a novel tool to define the human neural lineage.

    PubMed

    Placantonakis, Dimitris G; Tomishima, Mark J; Lafaille, Fabien; Desbordes, Sabrina C; Jia, Fan; Socci, Nicholas D; Viale, Agnes; Lee, Hyojin; Harrison, Neil; Tabar, Viviane; Studer, Lorenz

    2009-03-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) have enormous potential for applications in basic biology and regenerative medicine. However, harnessing the potential of hESCs toward generating homogeneous populations of specialized cells remains challenging. Here we describe a novel technology for the genetic identification of defined hESC-derived neural cell types using bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) transgenesis. We generated hESC lines stably expressing Hes5::GFP, Dll1::GFP, and HB9::GFP BACs that yield green fluorescent protein (GFP)(+) neural stem cells, neuroblasts, and motor neurons, respectively. Faithful reporter expression was confirmed by cell fate analysis and appropriate transgene regulation. Prospective isolation of HB9::GFP(+) cells yielded purified human motor neurons with proper marker expression and electrophysiological activity. Global mRNA and microRNA analyses of Hes5::GFP(+) and HB9::GFP(+) populations revealed highly specific expression signatures, suggesting that BAC transgenesis will be a powerful tool for establishing expression libraries that define the human neural lineage and for accessing defined cell types in applications of human disease. PMID:19074416

  14. Functional characterization of human bitter taste receptors

    PubMed Central

    Sainz, Eduardo; Cavenagh, Margaret M.; Gutierrez, Joanne; Battey, James F.; Northup, John K.; Sullivan, Susan L.

    2007-01-01

    The T2Rs belong to a multi-gene family of G-protein-coupled receptors responsible for the detection of ingested bitter-tasting compounds. The T2Rs are conserved among mammals with the human and mouse gene families consisting of about 25 members. In the present study we address the signalling properties of human and mouse T2Rs using an in vitro reconstitution system in which both the ligands and G-proteins being assayed can be manipulated independently and quantitatively assessed. We confirm that the mT2R5, hT2R43 and hT2R47 receptors respond selectively to micromolar concentrations of cycloheximide, aristolochic acid and denatonium respectively. We also demonstrate that hT2R14 is a receptor for aristolochic acid and report the first characterization of the ligand specificities of hT2R7, which is a broadly tuned receptor responding to strychnine, quinacrine, chloroquine and papaverine. Using these defined ligand–receptor interactions, we assayed the ability of the ligand-activated T2Rs to catalyse GTP binding on divergent members of the Gα family including three members of the Gαi subfamily (transducin, Gαi1 and Gαo) as well as Gαs and Gαq. The T2Rs coupled with each of the three Gαi members tested. However, none of the T2Rs coupled to either Gαs or Gαq, suggesting the T2Rs signal primarily through Gαi-mediated signal transduction pathways. Furthermore, we observed different G-protein selectivities among the T2Rs with respect to both Gαi subunits and Gβγ dimers, suggesting that bitter taste is transduced by multiple G-proteins that may differ among the T2Rs. PMID:17253962

  15. A new region of conservation is defined between human and mouse X chromosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Dinulos, M.B.; Disteche, C.M.; Bassi, M.T.

    1996-07-01

    Comparative mapping of the X chromosome in eutherian mammals have revealed distinct regions of conservation as well as evolutionary rearrangements between human and mouse. Recently, we and others mapped the murine homologue of CLCN4 (Chloride channel 4) to band F4 of the X chromosome in Mus spretus but to chromosome 7 in laboratory strains. We now report the mapping of the murine homologues of APXL (Apical protein Xenopus laevis-like) and OA1 (Ocular albinism type I), two genes that are located on the human X chromosome at band p22.3 and in close proximity to CLCN4. Interestingly, Oa1 and Apxl map to bands F2-F3 in both M. spretus and the laboratory strain C57BL/6J, defining a new rearrangement between human and mouse X chromosomes. 17 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Chemically Defined and Small Molecule-Based Generation of Human Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Burridge, Paul W.; Matsa, Elena; Shukla, Praveen; Lin, Ziliang C.; Churko, Jared M.; Ebert, Antje D.; Lan, Feng; Diecke, Sebastian; Huber, Bruno; Mordwinkin, Nicholas M.; Plews, Jordan R.; Abilez, Oscar J.; Cui, Bianxiao; Gold, Joseph D.; Wu, Joseph C.

    2014-01-01

    Existing methodologies for human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC) cardiac differentiation are efficient but require the use of complex, undefined medium constituents that hinder further elucidation of the molecular mechanisms of cardiomyogenesis. Using hiPSCs derived under chemically defined conditions on synthetic matrices, we systematically developed a highly optimized cardiac differentiation strategy, employing a chemically defined medium consisting of just three components: the basal medium RPMI 1640, L-ascorbic acid 2-phosphate, and rice-derived recombinant human albumin. Along with small molecule-based differentiation induction, this protocol produced contractile sheets of up to 95% TNNT2+ cardiomyocytes at a yield of up to 100 cardiomyocytes for every input pluripotent cell, and was effective in 11 hiPSC lines tested. This is the first fully chemically defined platform for cardiac specification of hiPSCs, and allows the elucidation of cardiomyocyte macromolecular and metabolic requirements whilst providing a minimally complex system for the study of maturation and subtype specification. PMID:24930130

  17. Surface-engineered substrates for improved human pluripotent stem cell culture under fully defined conditions.

    PubMed

    Saha, Krishanu; Mei, Ying; Reisterer, Colin M; Pyzocha, Neena Kenton; Yang, Jing; Muffat, Julien; Davies, Martyn C; Alexander, Morgan R; Langer, Robert; Anderson, Daniel G; Jaenisch, Rudolf

    2011-11-15

    The current gold standard for the culture of human pluripotent stem cells requires the use of a feeder layer of cells. Here, we develop a spatially defined culture system based on UV/ozone radiation modification of typical cell culture plastics to define a favorable surface environment for human pluripotent stem cell culture. Chemical and geometrical optimization of the surfaces enables control of early cell aggregation from fully dissociated cells, as predicted from a numerical model of cell migration, and results in significant increases in cell growth of undifferentiated cells. These chemically defined xeno-free substrates generate more than three times the number of cells than feeder-containing substrates per surface area. Further, reprogramming and typical gene-targeting protocols can be readily performed on these engineered surfaces. These substrates provide an attractive cell culture platform for the production of clinically relevant factor-free reprogrammed cells from patient tissue samples and facilitate the definition of standardized scale-up friendly methods for disease modeling and cell therapeutic applications.

  18. Surface-engineered substrates for improved human pluripotent stem cell culture under fully defined conditions.

    PubMed

    Saha, Krishanu; Mei, Ying; Reisterer, Colin M; Pyzocha, Neena Kenton; Yang, Jing; Muffat, Julien; Davies, Martyn C; Alexander, Morgan R; Langer, Robert; Anderson, Daniel G; Jaenisch, Rudolf

    2011-11-15

    The current gold standard for the culture of human pluripotent stem cells requires the use of a feeder layer of cells. Here, we develop a spatially defined culture system based on UV/ozone radiation modification of typical cell culture plastics to define a favorable surface environment for human pluripotent stem cell culture. Chemical and geometrical optimization of the surfaces enables control of early cell aggregation from fully dissociated cells, as predicted from a numerical model of cell migration, and results in significant increases in cell growth of undifferentiated cells. These chemically defined xeno-free substrates generate more than three times the number of cells than feeder-containing substrates per surface area. Further, reprogramming and typical gene-targeting protocols can be readily performed on these engineered surfaces. These substrates provide an attractive cell culture platform for the production of clinically relevant factor-free reprogrammed cells from patient tissue samples and facilitate the definition of standardized scale-up friendly methods for disease modeling and cell therapeutic applications. PMID:22065768

  19. Using autonomous replication to physically and genetically define human origins of replication

    SciTech Connect

    Krysan, P.J.

    1993-01-01

    The author previously developed a system for studying autonomous replication in human cells involving the use of sequences from the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) genome to provide extrachromosomal plasmids with a nuclear retention function. Using this system, it was demonstrated that large fragments of human genomic DNA could be isolated which replicate autonomously in human cells. In this study the DNA sequences which function as origins of replication in human cells are defined physically and genetically. These experiments demonstrated that replication initiates at multiple locations distributed throughout the plasmid. Another line of experiments addressed the DNA sequence requirements for autonomous replication in human cells. These experiments demonstrated that human DNA fragments have a higher replication activity than bacterial fragments do. It was also found, however, that the bacterial DNA sequence could support efficient replication if enough copies of it were present on the plasmid. These findings suggested that autonomous replication in human cells does not depend on extensive, specific DNA sequences. The autonomous replication system which the author has employed for these experiments utilizes a cis-acting sequence from the EBV origin and the trans-acting EBNA-1 protein to provide plasmids with a nuclear retention function. It was therefore relevant to verify that the autonomous replication of human DNA fragments did not depend on the replication activity associated with the EBV sequences utilized for nuclear retention. To accomplish this goal, the author demonstrated that plasmids carrying the EBV sequences and large fragments of human DNA could support long-term autonomous replication in hamster cells, which are not permissive for EBV replication.

  20. Characterization of a gate-defined double quantum dot in a Si/SiGe nanomembrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapp, T. J.; Mohr, R. T.; Li, Yize Stephanie; Thorgrimsson, Brandur; Foote, Ryan H.; Wu, Xian; Ward, Daniel R.; Savage, D. E.; Lagally, M. G.; Friesen, Mark; Coppersmith, S. N.; Eriksson, M. A.

    We report the characterization of a gate-defined double quantum dot formed in a Si/SiGe nanomembrane. Previously, all heterostructures used to form quantum dots were created using the strain-grading method of strain relaxation, a method that necessarily introduces misfit dislocations into a heterostructure and thereby degrades the reproducibility of quantum devices. Using a SiGe nanomembrane as a virtual substrate eliminates the need for misfit dislocations but requires a wet-transfer process that results in a non-epitaxial interface in close proximity to the quantum dots. We show that this interface does not prevent the formation of quantum dots, and is compatible with a tunable inter-dot tunnel coupling, the identification of spin states, and the measurement of a singlet-to-triplet transition as a function of the applied magnetic field. This work was supported in part by ARO (W911NF-12-0607), NSF (DMR-1206915, PHY-1104660), and the United States Department of Defense. The views and conclusions contained in this document are those of the author and should not be interpreted as representing the official policies, either expressly or implied, of the US Government. T.J. Knapp et al. (2015). arXiv:1510.08888 [cond-mat.mes-hall].

  1. Comprehensive characterization of well-defined silk fibroin surfaces: Toward multitechnique studies of surface modification effects.

    PubMed

    Amornsudthiwat, Phakdee; Nitschke, Mirko; Zimmermann, Ralf; Friedrichs, Jens; Grundke, Karina; Pöschel, Kathrin; Damrongsakkul, Siriporn; Werner, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    The study aims at a comprehensive surface characterization of untreated and oxygen plasma-treated silk fibroin with a particular focus on phenomena relevant to biointeraction and cell adhesion. For that purpose, a range of advanced surface diagnostic techniques is employed to thoroughly investigate well-defined and especially clean silk fibroin samples in a comparable setting. This includes surface chemistry and surface charges as factors, which control protein adsorption, but also hydration and swelling of the material as important parameters, which govern the mechanical stiffness at the interface with aqueous media. Oxygen plasma exposure of silk fibroin surfaces reveals that material ablation strongly predominates over the introduction of functional groups even for mild plasma conditions. A substantial increase in mechanical stiffness is identified as the most prominent effect upon this kind of plasma treatment. Regarding the experimental approach and the choice of techniques, the work goes beyond previous studies in this field and paves the way for well-founded investigations of other surface-selective modification procedures that enhance the applicability of silk fibroin in biomedical applications.

  2. Comprehensive characterization of well-defined silk fibroin surfaces: Toward multitechnique studies of surface modification effects.

    PubMed

    Amornsudthiwat, Phakdee; Nitschke, Mirko; Zimmermann, Ralf; Friedrichs, Jens; Grundke, Karina; Pöschel, Kathrin; Damrongsakkul, Siriporn; Werner, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    The study aims at a comprehensive surface characterization of untreated and oxygen plasma-treated silk fibroin with a particular focus on phenomena relevant to biointeraction and cell adhesion. For that purpose, a range of advanced surface diagnostic techniques is employed to thoroughly investigate well-defined and especially clean silk fibroin samples in a comparable setting. This includes surface chemistry and surface charges as factors, which control protein adsorption, but also hydration and swelling of the material as important parameters, which govern the mechanical stiffness at the interface with aqueous media. Oxygen plasma exposure of silk fibroin surfaces reveals that material ablation strongly predominates over the introduction of functional groups even for mild plasma conditions. A substantial increase in mechanical stiffness is identified as the most prominent effect upon this kind of plasma treatment. Regarding the experimental approach and the choice of techniques, the work goes beyond previous studies in this field and paves the way for well-founded investigations of other surface-selective modification procedures that enhance the applicability of silk fibroin in biomedical applications. PMID:25899685

  3. Maintenance of Hepatic Functions in Primary Human Hepatocytes Cultured on Xeno-Free and Chemical Defined Human Recombinant Laminins.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Masaaki; Zemack, Helen; Johansson, Helene; Hagbard, Louise; Jorns, Carl; Li, Meng; Ellis, Ewa

    2016-01-01

    Refined methods for maintaining specific functions of isolated hepatocytes under xeno-free and chemical defined conditions is of great importance for the development of hepatocyte research and regenerative therapy. Laminins, a large family of heterotrimeric basement membrane adhesion proteins, are highly cell and tissue type specific components of the extracellular matrix and strongly influence the behavior and function of associated cells and/or tissues. However, detailed biological functions of many laminin isoforms are still to be evaluated. In this study, we determined the distribution of laminin isoforms in human liver tissue and isolated primary human hepatocytes by western blot analysis, and investigated the efficacy of different human recombinant laminin isoforms on hepatic functions during culture. Protein expressions of laminin-chain α2, α3, α4, β1, β3, γ1, and γ2 were detected in both isolated human hepatocytes and liver tissue. No α1 and α5 expression could be detected in liver tissue or hepatocytes. Hepatocytes were isolated from five different individual livers, and cultured on human recombinant laminin isoforms -111, -211, -221, -332, -411, -421, -511, and -521 (Biolamina AB), matrigel (extracted from Engelbreth-Holm-Swarm sarcoma), or collagen type IV (Collagen). Hepatocytes cultured on laminin showed characteristic hexagonal shape in a flat cell monolayer. Viability, double stranded DNA concentration, and Ki67 expression for hepatocytes cultured for six days on laminin were comparable to those cultured on EHS and Collagen. Hepatocytes cultured on laminin also displayed production of human albumin, alpha-1-antitrypsin, bile acids, and gene expression of liver-enriched factors, such as hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 alpha, glucose-6-phosphate, cytochrome P450 3A4, and multidrug resistance-associated protein 2. We conclude that all forms of human recombinant laminin tested maintain cell viability and liver-specific functions of primary human

  4. Maintenance of Hepatic Functions in Primary Human Hepatocytes Cultured on Xeno-Free and Chemical Defined Human Recombinant Laminins

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Masaaki; Zemack, Helen; Johansson, Helene; Hagbard, Louise; Jorns, Carl; Li, Meng; Ellis, Ewa

    2016-01-01

    Refined methods for maintaining specific functions of isolated hepatocytes under xeno-free and chemical defined conditions is of great importance for the development of hepatocyte research and regenerative therapy. Laminins, a large family of heterotrimeric basement membrane adhesion proteins, are highly cell and tissue type specific components of the extracellular matrix and strongly influence the behavior and function of associated cells and/or tissues. However, detailed biological functions of many laminin isoforms are still to be evaluated. In this study, we determined the distribution of laminin isoforms in human liver tissue and isolated primary human hepatocytes by western blot analysis, and investigated the efficacy of different human recombinant laminin isoforms on hepatic functions during culture. Protein expressions of laminin-chain α2, α3, α4, β1, β3, γ1, and γ2 were detected in both isolated human hepatocytes and liver tissue. No α1 and α5 expression could be detected in liver tissue or hepatocytes. Hepatocytes were isolated from five different individual livers, and cultured on human recombinant laminin isoforms -111, -211, -221, -332, -411, -421, -511, and -521 (Biolamina AB), matrigel (extracted from Engelbreth-Holm-Swarm sarcoma), or collagen type IV (Collagen). Hepatocytes cultured on laminin showed characteristic hexagonal shape in a flat cell monolayer. Viability, double stranded DNA concentration, and Ki67 expression for hepatocytes cultured for six days on laminin were comparable to those cultured on EHS and Collagen. Hepatocytes cultured on laminin also displayed production of human albumin, alpha-1-antitrypsin, bile acids, and gene expression of liver-enriched factors, such as hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 alpha, glucose-6-phosphate, cytochrome P450 3A4, and multidrug resistance-associated protein 2. We conclude that all forms of human recombinant laminin tested maintain cell viability and liver-specific functions of primary human

  5. Defining the HLA class I-associated viral antigen repertoire from HIV-1-infected human cells.

    PubMed

    Ternette, Nicola; Yang, Hongbing; Partridge, Thomas; Llano, Anuska; Cedeño, Samandhy; Fischer, Roman; Charles, Philip D; Dudek, Nadine L; Mothe, Beatriz; Crespo, Manuel; Fischer, William M; Korber, Bette T M; Nielsen, Morten; Borrow, Persephone; Purcell, Anthony W; Brander, Christian; Dorrell, Lucy; Kessler, Benedikt M; Hanke, Tomáš

    2016-01-01

    Recognition and eradication of infected cells by cytotoxic T lymphocytes is a key defense mechanism against intracellular pathogens. High-throughput definition of HLA class I-associated immunopeptidomes by mass spectrometry is an increasingly important analytical tool to advance our understanding of the induction of T-cell responses against pathogens such as HIV-1. We utilized a liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry workflow including de novo-assisted database searching to define the HLA class I-associated immunopeptidome of HIV-1-infected human cells. We here report for the first time the identification of 75 HIV-1-derived peptides bound to HLA class I complexes that were purified directly from HIV-1-infected human primary CD4(+) T cells and the C8166 human T-cell line. Importantly, one-third of eluted HIV-1 peptides had not been previously known to be presented by HLA class I. Over 82% of the identified sequences originated from viral protein regions for which T-cell responses have previously been reported but for which the precise HLA class I-binding sequences have not yet been defined. These results validate and expand the current knowledge of virus-specific antigenic peptide presentation during HIV-1 infection and provide novel targets for T-cell vaccine development. PMID:26467324

  6. Utility of cheiloscopy, rugoscopy, and dactyloscopy for human identification in a defined cohort

    PubMed Central

    Mutalik, Vimi S.; Menon, Aparna; Jayalakshmi, N.; Kamath, Asha; Raghu, A. R.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Identification is of paramount importance in any forensic investigation. Positive identification of living or deceased using distinctive traits is a cornerstone of forensic science. The uniqueness of these patterns and subtle distinction between traits has offered worthy supplemental tools in establishing the true nature of facts. Aim: The first aim of our study was to determine the most common pattern of lip prints, palatal rugae, and finger prints in the study subjects. Secondly, to determine if any specific pattern of lip print, palatal rugae, or the finger print concurs in individuals, and thereby establish a database of these prototypes for human identification from a defined cohort. Materials and Methods: The sample size comprised 100 female students of a dental college staying together in the hostel. Lip prints were recorded on a white bond sheet using lipstick, palatal rugae on dental casts, and finger prints using printer's blue ink. Results: Our observation suggested that the reticular pattern of lip print, the wavy pattern of palatal rugae, and the loop pattern of finger prints were the predominant patterns. Correlation of the three parameters did not reveal significant differences. Conclusions: This approach of human identification utilizing conventional techniques and relevant parameters is pertinent in defined groups. However, larger representative sample with robust analytical tools may provide a necessary blueprint of human identification. PMID:23960407

  7. What Is Trophoblast? A Combination of Criteria Define Human First-Trimester Trophoblast.

    PubMed

    Lee, Cheryl Q E; Gardner, Lucy; Turco, Margherita; Zhao, Nancy; Murray, Matthew J; Coleman, Nicholas; Rossant, Janet; Hemberger, Myriam; Moffett, Ashley

    2016-02-01

    Controversy surrounds reports describing the derivation of human trophoblast cells from placentas and embryonic stem cells (ESC), partly due to the difficulty in identifying markers that define cells as belonging to the trophoblast lineage. We have selected criteria that are characteristic of primary first-trimester trophoblast: a set of protein markers, HLA class I profile, methylation of ELF5, and expression of microRNAs (miRNAs) from the chromosome 19 miRNA cluster (C19MC). We tested these criteria on cells previously reported to show some phenotypic characteristics of trophoblast: bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-treated human ESC and 2102Ep, an embryonal carcinoma cell line. Both cell types only show some, but not all, of the four trophoblast criteria. Thus, BMP-treated human ESC have not fully differentiated to trophoblast. Our study identifies a robust panel, including both protein and non-protein-coding markers that, in combination, can be used to reliably define cells as characteristic of early trophoblast. PMID:26862703

  8. What Is Trophoblast? A Combination of Criteria Define Human First-Trimester Trophoblast

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Cheryl Q.E.; Gardner, Lucy; Turco, Margherita; Zhao, Nancy; Murray, Matthew J.; Coleman, Nicholas; Rossant, Janet; Hemberger, Myriam; Moffett, Ashley

    2016-01-01

    Summary Controversy surrounds reports describing the derivation of human trophoblast cells from placentas and embryonic stem cells (ESC), partly due to the difficulty in identifying markers that define cells as belonging to the trophoblast lineage. We have selected criteria that are characteristic of primary first-trimester trophoblast: a set of protein markers, HLA class I profile, methylation of ELF5, and expression of microRNAs (miRNAs) from the chromosome 19 miRNA cluster (C19MC). We tested these criteria on cells previously reported to show some phenotypic characteristics of trophoblast: bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-treated human ESC and 2102Ep, an embryonal carcinoma cell line. Both cell types only show some, but not all, of the four trophoblast criteria. Thus, BMP-treated human ESC have not fully differentiated to trophoblast. Our study identifies a robust panel, including both protein and non-protein-coding markers that, in combination, can be used to reliably define cells as characteristic of early trophoblast. PMID:26862703

  9. Human immunoglobulin allotypes: previously unrecognized determinants and alleles defined with monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Zelaschi, D; Newby, C; Parsons, M; van West, B; Cavalli-Sforza, L L; Herzenberg, L A; Herzenberg, L A

    1983-01-01

    The highly polymorphic system of serologically defined genetic markers on human IgG heavy chains (Gm allotypes) is second only to the HLA complex in terms of the large number of determinants, alleles, and haplotypes that can be used for analyses of disease associations and other genetic studies. However, present typing methods are based on the use of anti-Gm antisera that are derived mainly from fortuitously immunized human donors, often requiring processing before use, and must be used in a hemagglutination-inhibition assay that cannot be used in typing for isoallotypic determinants (currently termed "non-markers"). In studies presented here, we describe an allotyping system that utilizes monoclonal antibodies in a "sandwich" modification of the solid-phase radioimmunoassay, which is capable of reliable quantitative typing of allotypic, isoallotypic, and isotypic immunoglobulin determinants. We show that these highly reproducible, easily disseminated, and essentially inexhaustible reagents can be used for rapid, sensitive, and quantitative Gm typing. Using this system we define two previously unrecognized Gm determinants, one of which, found to date only in Caucasians, is different from all known Gm markers and thus defines previously unrecognized alleles and haplotypes. The other determinant co-segregates with the conventional G3m(b1) marker but is distinct from that marker on serological grounds. The successful preparation of mouse monoclonal antibodies that detect human Gm allotypic differences and the development of an assay system capable of typing isoallotypic as well as allotypic determinants opens the way to further dissection and application of this rich genetic system. PMID:6190180

  10. Defining the Relationship Between Human Error Classes and Technology Intervention Strategies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiegmann, Douglas A.; Rantanen, Eas M.

    2003-01-01

    The modus operandi in addressing human error in aviation systems is predominantly that of technological interventions or fixes. Such interventions exhibit considerable variability both in terms of sophistication and application. Some technological interventions address human error directly while others do so only indirectly. Some attempt to eliminate the occurrence of errors altogether whereas others look to reduce the negative consequences of these errors. In any case, technological interventions add to the complexity of the systems and may interact with other system components in unforeseeable ways and often create opportunities for novel human errors. Consequently, there is a need to develop standards for evaluating the potential safety benefit of each of these intervention products so that resources can be effectively invested to produce the biggest benefit to flight safety as well as to mitigate any adverse ramifications. The purpose of this project was to help define the relationship between human error and technological interventions, with the ultimate goal of developing a set of standards for evaluating or measuring the potential benefits of new human error fixes.

  11. Epidemiology of human brucellosis in a defined area of Northwestern Greece.

    PubMed

    Avdikou, I; Maipa, V; Alamanos, Y

    2005-10-01

    Despite a European co-financial programme for control and eradication of brucellosis in Southern Europe, there is evidence that foci of brucellosis still exists in Greece and other Southern European countries. Human brucellosis cases are probably underreported in these countries. A local surveillance system was implemented in a defined region of Northwestern Greece, in order to record and study all human brucellosis cases, using several sources of retrieval. A total of 152 newly diagnosed cases were recorded during a 2-year study period (from 1 April 2002 to 31 March 2004). The age- and sex-adjusted mean annual incidence rate for the population of the study area was 17.3 cases/10(5) inhabitants. Incomplete application of the control and eradication programme in livestock, and the possible illegal trafficking of animals and their products across the Greek-Albanian border could be responsible for the persistence of foci of brucellosis in the area. PMID:16181512

  12. Epidemiology of human brucellosis in a defined area of Northwestern Greece.

    PubMed Central

    Avdikou, I.; Maipa, V.; Alamanos, Y.

    2005-01-01

    Despite a European co-financial programme for control and eradication of brucellosis in Southern Europe, there is evidence that foci of brucellosis still exists in Greece and other Southern European countries. Human brucellosis cases are probably underreported in these countries. A local surveillance system was implemented in a defined region of Northwestern Greece, in order to record and study all human brucellosis cases, using several sources of retrieval. A total of 152 newly diagnosed cases were recorded during a 2-year study period (from 1 April 2002 to 31 March 2004). The age- and sex-adjusted mean annual incidence rate for the population of the study area was 17.3 cases/10(5) inhabitants. Incomplete application of the control and eradication programme in livestock, and the possible illegal trafficking of animals and their products across the Greek-Albanian border could be responsible for the persistence of foci of brucellosis in the area. PMID:16181512

  13. Derivation of iPSCs after culture of human dental pulp cells under defined conditions.

    PubMed

    Takeda-Kawaguchi, Tomoko; Sugiyama, Ken; Chikusa, Shunji; Iida, Kazuki; Aoki, Hitomi; Tamaoki, Naritaka; Hatakeyama, Daijiro; Kunisada, Takahiro; Shibata, Toshiyuki; Fusaki, Noemi; Tezuka, Ken-Ichi

    2014-01-01

    Human dental pulp cells (hDPCs) are a promising resource for regenerative medicine and tissue engineering and can be used for derivation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). However, current protocols use reagents of animal origin (mainly fetal bovine serum, FBS) that carry the potential risk of infectious diseases and unwanted immunogenicity. Here, we report a chemically defined protocol to isolate and maintain the growth and differentiation potential of hDPCs. hDPCs cultured under these conditions showed significantly less primary colony formation than those with FBS. Cell culture under stringently defined conditions revealed a donor-dependent growth capacity; however, once established, the differentiation capabilities of the hDPCs were comparable to those observed with FBS. DNA array analyses indicated that the culture conditions robustly altered hDPC gene expression patterns but, more importantly, had little effect on neither pluripotent gene expression nor the efficiency of iPSC induction. The chemically defined culture conditions described herein are not perfect serum replacements, but can be used for the safe establishment of iPSCs and will find utility in applications for cell-based regenerative medicine. PMID:25521610

  14. Characterizing humans on Riemannian manifolds.

    PubMed

    Tosato, Diego; Spera, Mauro; Cristani, Marco; Murino, Vittorio

    2013-08-01

    In surveillance applications, head and body orientation of people is of primary importance for assessing many behavioral traits. Unfortunately, in this context people are often encoded by a few, noisy pixels so that their characterization is difficult. We face this issue, proposing a computational framework which is based on an expressive descriptor, the covariance of features. Covariances have been employed for pedestrian detection purposes, actually a binary classification problem on Riemannian manifolds. In this paper, we show how to extend to the multiclassification case, presenting a novel descriptor, named weighted array of covariances, especially suited for dealing with tiny image representations. The extension requires a novel differential geometry approach in which covariances are projected on a unique tangent space where standard machine learning techniques can be applied. In particular, we adopt the Campbell-Baker-Hausdorff expansion as a means to approximate on the tangent space the genuine (geodesic) distances on the manifold in a very efficient way. We test our methodology on multiple benchmark datasets, and also propose new testing sets, getting convincing results in all the cases.

  15. Characterizing humans on Riemannian manifolds.

    PubMed

    Tosato, Diego; Spera, Mauro; Cristani, Marco; Murino, Vittorio

    2013-08-01

    In surveillance applications, head and body orientation of people is of primary importance for assessing many behavioral traits. Unfortunately, in this context people are often encoded by a few, noisy pixels so that their characterization is difficult. We face this issue, proposing a computational framework which is based on an expressive descriptor, the covariance of features. Covariances have been employed for pedestrian detection purposes, actually a binary classification problem on Riemannian manifolds. In this paper, we show how to extend to the multiclassification case, presenting a novel descriptor, named weighted array of covariances, especially suited for dealing with tiny image representations. The extension requires a novel differential geometry approach in which covariances are projected on a unique tangent space where standard machine learning techniques can be applied. In particular, we adopt the Campbell-Baker-Hausdorff expansion as a means to approximate on the tangent space the genuine (geodesic) distances on the manifold in a very efficient way. We test our methodology on multiple benchmark datasets, and also propose new testing sets, getting convincing results in all the cases. PMID:23787347

  16. Production of human pluripotent stem cell therapeutics under defined xeno-free conditions: progress and challenges.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yongjia; Wu, Jincheng; Ashok, Preeti; Hsiung, Michael; Tzanakakis, Emmanuel S

    2015-02-01

    Recent advances on human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs), including human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) have brought us closer to the realization of their clinical potential. Nonetheless, tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications will require the generation of hPSC products well beyond the laboratory scale. This also mandates the production of hPSC therapeutics in fully-defined, xeno-free systems and in a reproducible manner. Toward this goal, we summarize current developments in defined media free of animal-derived components for hPSC culture. Bioinspired and synthetic extracellular matrices for the attachment, growth and differentiation of hPSCs are also reviewed. Given that most progress in xeno-free medium and substrate development has been demonstrated in two-dimensional rather than three dimensional culture systems, translation from the former to the latter poses unique difficulties. These challenges are discussed in the context of cultivation platforms of hPSCs as aggregates, on microcarriers or after encapsulation in biocompatible scaffolds.

  17. BLVRB redox mutation defines heme degradation in a metabolic pathway of enhanced thrombopoiesis in humans.

    PubMed

    Wu, Song; Li, Zongdong; Gnatenko, Dmitri V; Zhang, Beibei; Zhao, Lu; Malone, Lisa E; Markova, Nedialka; Mantle, Timothy J; Nesbitt, Natasha M; Bahou, Wadie F

    2016-08-01

    Human blood cell counts are tightly maintained within narrow physiologic ranges, largely controlled by cytokine-integrated signaling and transcriptional circuits that regulate multilineage hematopoietic specification. Known genetic loci influencing blood cell production account for <10% of platelet and red blood cell variability, and thrombopoietin/cellular myeloproliferative leukemia virus liganding is dispensable for definitive thrombopoiesis, establishing that fundamentally important modifier loci remain unelucidated. In this study, platelet transcriptome sequencing and extended thrombocytosis cohort analyses identified a single loss-of-function mutation (BLVRB(S111L)) causally associated with clonal and nonclonal disorders of enhanced platelet production. BLVRB(S111L) encompassed within the substrate/cofactor [α/β dinucleotide NAD(P)H] binding fold is a functionally defective redox coupler using flavin and biliverdin (BV) IXβ tetrapyrrole(s) and results in exaggerated reactive oxygen species accumulation as a putative metabolic signal leading to differential hematopoietic lineage commitment and enhanced thrombopoiesis. These data define the first physiologically relevant function of BLVRB and implicate its activity and/or heme-regulated BV tetrapyrrole(s) in a unique redox-regulated bioenergetic pathway governing terminal megakaryocytopoiesis; these observations also define a mechanistically restricted drug target retaining potential for enhancing human platelet counts. PMID:27207795

  18. Production of Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Therapeutics Under Defined Xeno-free Conditions: Progress and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yongjia; Wu, Jincheng; Ashok, Preeti; Hsiung, Michael; Tzanakakis, Emmanuel S.

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances on human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs), including human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) have brought us closer to the realization of their clinical potential. Nonetheless, tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications will require the generation of hPSC products well beyond the laboratory scale. This also mandates the production of hPSC therapeutics in fully-defined, xeno-free systems and in a reproducible manner. Toward this goal, we summarize current developments in defined media free of animal-derived components for hPSC culture. Bioinspired and synthetic extracellular matrices for the attachment growth and differentiation of hPSCs are also reviewed. Given that most progress in xeno-free medium and substrate development has been demonstrated in two-dimensional rather than three dimensional culture systems, translation from the former to the latter poses unique difficulties. These challenges are discussed in the context of cultivation platforms of hPSCs as aggregates, on microcarriers or after encapsulation in biocompatible scaffolds. PMID:25077810

  19. Characterize Human Forward Contamination Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rucker, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Let's face it: wherever we go, we will inevitably carry along the little critters that live in and on us. Conventional wisdom has long held that it's unlikely those critters could survive the space environment, but in 2007 microscopic animals called Tardigrades survived exposure to space and in 2008 Cyanobacteria lived for 548 days outside the International Space Station (ISS). But what about the organisms we might reasonably expect a crewed spacecraft to leak or vent? Do we even know what they are? How long might our tiny hitch-hikers survive in close proximity to a warm spacecraft that periodically leaks/vents water or oxygen-and how might they mutate with long-duration exposure? Unlike the Mars rovers that we cleaned once and sent on their way, crew members will provide a constantly regenerating contaminant source. Are we prepared to certify that we can meet forward contamination protocols as we search for life at new destinations? This project has four technical objectives: 1. TEST: Develop a test plan to leverage existing equipment (i.e. ISS) to characterize the kinds of organisms we can reasonably expect pressurized, crewed volumes to vent or leak overboard; 2. ANALYSIS: Develop an analysis plan to study those organisms in relevant destination environments, including spacecraft-induced conditions; 3. MODEL: Develop a modeling plan to model organism transport mechanisms in relevant destination environments; 4. SHARE: Develop a plan to disseminate findings and integrate recommendations into exploration requirements & ops. In short, we propose a system engineering approach to roadmap the necessary experiments, analysis, and modeling up front--rather than try to knit together disparate chunks of data into a sensible conclusion after the fact.

  20. Characterize Human Forward Contamination Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rucker, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Let's face it: wherever we go, we will inevitably carry along the little critters that live in and on us. Conventional wisdom has long held that it's unlikely those critters could survive the space environment, but in 2007 microscopic animals called Tardigrades survived exposure to space and in 2008 Cyanobacteria lived for 548 days outside the International Space Station (ISS). But what about the organisms we might reasonably expect a crewed spacecraft to leak or vent? Do we even know what they are? How long might our tiny hitch-hikers survive in close proximity to a warm spacecraft that periodically leaks/vents water or oxygen-and how might they mutate with long-duration exposure? Unlike the Mars rovers that we cleaned once and sent on their way, crew members will provide a constantly regenerating contaminant source. Are we prepared to certify that we can meet forward contamination protocols as we search for life at new destinations? This project has four technical objectives: 1. TEST: Develop a test plan to leverage existing equipment (i.e. ISS) to characterize the kinds of organisms we can reasonably expect pressurized, crewed volumes to vent or leak overboard; as part of testing, we'll need to develop an Extravehicular Activity (EVA)-compatible tool that can withstand the pressure and temperature extremes of space, as well as collect, separate, and store multiple samples; 2. ANALYSIS: Develop an analysis plan to study those organisms in relevant destination environments, including spacecraft-induced conditions; 3. MODEL: Develop a modeling plan to model organism transport mechanisms in relevant destination environments; 4. SHARE: Develop a plan to disseminate findings and integrate recommendations into exploration requirements & ops. In short, we propose a system engineering approach to roadmap the necessary experiments, analysis, and modeling up front--rather than try to knit together disparate chunks of data into a sensible conclusion after the fact.

  1. Sleeping Beauty mutagenesis in a mouse medulloblastoma model defines networks that discriminate between human molecular subgroups

    PubMed Central

    Genovesi, Laura A.; Ng, Ching Ging; Davis, Melissa J.; Remke, Marc; Taylor, Michael D.; Adams, David J.; Rust, Alistair G.; Ward, Jerrold M.; Ban, Kenneth H.; Jenkins, Nancy A.; Copeland, Neal G.; Wainwright, Brandon J.

    2013-01-01

    The Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon mutagenesis screen is a powerful tool to facilitate the discovery of cancer genes that drive tumorigenesis in mouse models. In this study, we sought to identify genes that functionally cooperate with sonic hedgehog signaling to initiate medulloblastoma (MB), a tumor of the cerebellum. By combining SB mutagenesis with Patched1 heterozygous mice (Ptch1lacZ/+), we observed an increased frequency of MB and decreased tumor-free survival compared with Ptch1lacZ/+ controls. From an analysis of 85 tumors, we identified 77 common insertion sites that map to 56 genes potentially driving increased tumorigenesis. The common insertion site genes identified in the mutagenesis screen were mapped to human orthologs, which were used to select probes and corresponding expression data from an independent set of previously described human MB samples, and surprisingly were capable of accurately clustering known molecular subgroups of MB, thereby defining common regulatory networks underlying all forms of MB irrespective of subgroup. We performed a network analysis to discover the likely mechanisms of action of subnetworks and used an in vivo model to confirm a role for a highly ranked candidate gene, Nfia, in promoting MB formation. Our analysis implicates candidate cancer genes in the deregulation of apoptosis and translational elongation, and reveals a strong signature of transcriptional regulation that will have broad impact on expression programs in MB. These networks provide functional insights into the complex biology of human MB and identify potential avenues for intervention common to all clinical subgroups. PMID:24167280

  2. Sleeping Beauty mutagenesis in a mouse medulloblastoma model defines networks that discriminate between human molecular subgroups.

    PubMed

    Genovesi, Laura A; Ng, Ching Ging; Davis, Melissa J; Remke, Marc; Taylor, Michael D; Adams, David J; Rust, Alistair G; Ward, Jerrold M; Ban, Kenneth H; Jenkins, Nancy A; Copeland, Neal G; Wainwright, Brandon J

    2013-11-12

    The Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon mutagenesis screen is a powerful tool to facilitate the discovery of cancer genes that drive tumorigenesis in mouse models. In this study, we sought to identify genes that functionally cooperate with sonic hedgehog signaling to initiate medulloblastoma (MB), a tumor of the cerebellum. By combining SB mutagenesis with Patched1 heterozygous mice (Ptch1(lacZ/+)), we observed an increased frequency of MB and decreased tumor-free survival compared with Ptch1(lacZ/+) controls. From an analysis of 85 tumors, we identified 77 common insertion sites that map to 56 genes potentially driving increased tumorigenesis. The common insertion site genes identified in the mutagenesis screen were mapped to human orthologs, which were used to select probes and corresponding expression data from an independent set of previously described human MB samples, and surprisingly were capable of accurately clustering known molecular subgroups of MB, thereby defining common regulatory networks underlying all forms of MB irrespective of subgroup. We performed a network analysis to discover the likely mechanisms of action of subnetworks and used an in vivo model to confirm a role for a highly ranked candidate gene, Nfia, in promoting MB formation. Our analysis implicates candidate cancer genes in the deregulation of apoptosis and translational elongation, and reveals a strong signature of transcriptional regulation that will have broad impact on expression programs in MB. These networks provide functional insights into the complex biology of human MB and identify potential avenues for intervention common to all clinical subgroups. PMID:24167280

  3. Microfluidic perfusion culture of human induced pluripotent stem cells under fully defined culture conditions.

    PubMed

    Yoshimitsu, Ryosuke; Hattori, Koji; Sugiura, Shinji; Kondo, Yuki; Yamada, Rotaro; Tachikawa, Saoko; Satoh, Taku; Kurisaki, Akira; Ohnuma, Kiyoshi; Asashima, Makoto; Kanamori, Toshiyuki

    2014-05-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) are a promising cell source for drug screening. For this application, self-renewal or differentiation of the cells is required, and undefined factors in the culture conditions are not desirable. Microfluidic perfusion culture allows the production of small volume cultures with precisely controlled microenvironments, and is applicable to high-throughput cellular environment screening. Here, we developed a microfluidic perfusion culture system for hiPSCs that uses a microchamber array chip under defined extracellular matrix (ECM) and culture medium conditions. By screening various ECMs we determined that fibronectin and laminin are appropriate for microfluidic devices made out of the most popular material, polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). We found that the growth rate of hiPSCs under pressure-driven perfusion culture conditions was higher than under static culture conditions in the microchamber array. We applied our new system to self-renewal and differentiation cultures of hiPSCs, and immunocytochemical analysis showed that the state of the hiPSCs was successfully controlled. The effects of three antitumor drugs on hiPSCs were comparable between microchamber array and 96-well plates. We believe that our system will be a platform technology for future large-scale screening of fully defined conditions for differentiation cultures on integrated microfluidic devices.

  4. Chromatin states reveal functional associations for globally defined transcription start sites in four human cell lines

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Deciphering the most common modes by which chromatin regulates transcription, and how this is related to cellular status and processes is an important task for improving our understanding of human cellular biology. The FANTOM5 and ENCODE projects represent two independent large scale efforts to map regulatory and transcriptional features to the human genome. Here we investigate chromatin features around a comprehensive set of transcription start sites in four cell lines by integrating data from these two projects. Results Transcription start sites can be distinguished by chromatin states defined by specific combinations of both chromatin mark enrichment and the profile shapes of these chromatin marks. The observed patterns can be associated with cellular functions and processes, and they also show association with expression level, location relative to nearby genes, and CpG content. In particular we find a substantial number of repressed inter- and intra-genic transcription start sites enriched for active chromatin marks and Pol II, and these sites are strongly associated with immediate-early response processes and cell signaling. Associations between start sites with similar chromatin patterns are validated by significant correlations in their global expression profiles. Conclusions The results confirm the link between chromatin state and cellular function for expressed transcripts, and also indicate that active chromatin states at repressed transcripts may poise transcripts for rapid activation during immune response. PMID:24669905

  5. Growth factor-defined culture medium for human mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Mimura, Sumiyo; Kimura, Naohiro; Hirata, Mitsuhi; Tateyama, Daiki; Hayashida, Midori; Umezawa, Akihiro; Kohara, Arihiro; Nikawa, Hiroki; Okamoto, Tetsuji; Furue, Miho K

    2011-01-01

    Human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) are potential cellular sources of therapeutic stem cells as they have the ability to proliferate and differentiate into a wide array of mesenchymal cell types such as osteoblasts, chondroblasts and adipocytes. hMSCs have been used clinically to treat patients with graft vs. host disease, osteogenesis imperfect, or alveolar cleft, suggesting that transplantation of hMSCs is comparatively safe as a stem cell-based therapy. However, conventional culture medium for hMSCs contains fetal bovine serum (FBS). In the present study, we developed a growth factor-defined, serum-free medium for culturing hMSCs. Under these conditions, TGF-beta1 promoted proliferation of hMSCs. The expanded hMSC population expressed the human pluripotency markers SSEA-3, -4, NANOG, OCT3/4 and SOX2. Furthermore, double positive cells for SSEA-3 and a mesenchymal cell marker, CD105, were detected in the population. The potential to differentiate into osteoblasts and adipocytes was confirmed. This work provides a useful tool to understand the basic biological properties of hMSCs in culture. PMID:21305471

  6. Rapid Reprogramming of Primary Human Astrocytes into Potent Tumor-Initiating Cells with Defined Genetic Factors.

    PubMed

    Li, Fang; Liu, Xinjian; Sampson, John H; Bigner, Darell D; Li, Chuan-Yuan

    2016-09-01

    Cancer stem-like cells (CSC) are thought to drive brain cancer, but their cellular and molecular origins remain uncertain. Here, we report the successful generation of induced CSC (iCSC) from primary human astrocytes through the expression of defined genetic factors. Combined transduction of four factors, Myc, Oct-4, p53DD, and Ras, induced efficient transformation of primary human astrocytes into malignant cells with powerful tumor-initiating capabilities. Notably, transplantation of 100 transduced cells into nude mice was sufficient for tumor formation. The cells showed unlimited self-renewal ability with robust telomerase activities. In addition, they expressed typical glioma stem-like cell markers, such as CD133, CD15, and CD90. Moreover, these cells could form spheres in culture and differentiate into neuron-like, astrocyte-like, and oligodendrocyte-like cells. Finally, they also displayed resistance to the widely used brain cancer drug temozolomide. These iCSCs could provide important tools for studies of glioma biology and therapeutics development. Cancer Res; 76(17); 5143-50. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27364552

  7. New models to define factors determining the growth and spread of human prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Passaniti, A; Adler, S H; Martin, G R

    1992-01-01

    The incidence of many cancers shows a sharp increase with age. This is particularly true of prostate cancer, which arises in many older males. Little or no morbidity is observed as the tumor develops in situ in the prostate. However, once malignant cells escape from the primary lesion and metastasize, the disease assumes a much more serious course. Here we report on the activity of human prostate cancer cells in culture as well as their behavior when transplanted into nude mice. In vitro, several lines of prostate carcinoma cells obtained from metastatic lesions were embedded in reconstituted basement membrane proteins (Matrigel) and found to exhibit highly invasive activity as observed with malignant cells from other types of tumors. Also, we report an improved method for obtaining an increased growth of human prostate cancer cells in nude mice by injecting these cells in Matrigel. Since there are no adequate animal models of prostate cancer, the systems described here may prove useful in defining events underlying the development and progression of the tumor cells to malignant status, as well as facilitate the analyses of novel therapeutic agents to prevent the growth and the spread of this cancer.

  8. Gamma-carboxylation and fragmentation of osteocalcin in human serum defined by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Rehder, Douglas S; Gundberg, Caren M; Booth, Sarah L; Borges, Chad R

    2015-06-01

    Serum osteocalcin (Oc) concentration is a highly specific measure of bone turnover, but its circulating proteoform(s) have not been well defined. Based on immunological methods, the major forms are thought to be the intact polypeptide and a large N-terminal-mid molecule fragment for which there is no consensus on the precise sequence. Vitamin K-dependent gamma (γ)-carboxylated variants of Oc are also found in circulation but there have been no methods that can define how many of the three potential γ-carboxyglutamic acid (Gla) residues are γ-carboxylated or provide their relative abundances. Recent reports that uncarboxylated and partially γ-carboxylated Oc forms have hormonal function underscore the need for precise evaluation of Oc at all three potential γ-carboxylation sites. Herein, mass spectrometric immunoassay (MSIA) was used to provide qualitative and semiquantitative (relative percent abundance) information on Oc molecular variants as they exist in individual plasma and serum samples. Following verification that observable Oc proteoforms were accurately assigned and not simply ex vivo artifacts, MALDI-MSIA and ESI-MSIA were used to assess the relative abundance of Oc truncation and γ-carboxylation, respectively, in plasma from 130 patients enrolled in vitamin K supplementation trials. Human Oc was found to circulate in over a dozen truncated forms with each of these displaying anywhere from 0-3 Gla residues. The relative abundance of truncated forms was consistent and unaffected by vitamin K supplementation. In contrast, when compared with placebo, vitamin K supplementation dramatically increased the fractional abundance of Oc with three Gla residues, corresponding to a decrease in the fractional abundance of Oc with zero Gla residues. These findings unequivocally document that increased vitamin K intake reduces the uncarboxylated form of Oc. Several reports of a positive effect of vitamin K intake on insulin sensitivity in humans have shown that un

  9. Defining the nature of human γδ T cells: a biographical sketch of the highly empathetic

    PubMed Central

    Kalyan, Shirin; Kabelitz, Dieter

    2013-01-01

    The elusive task of defining the character of γδ T cells has been an evolving process for immunologists since stumbling upon their existence during the molecular characterization of the α and β T cell receptor genes of their better understood brethren. Defying the categorical rules used to distinctly characterize lymphocytes as either innate or adaptive in nature, γδ T cells inhabit a hybrid world of their own. At opposing ends of the simplified spectrum of modes of antigen recognition used by lymphocytes, natural killer and αβ T cells are particularly well equipped to respond to the ‘missing self' and the ‘dangerous non-self', respectively. However, between these two reductive extremes, we are chronically faced with the challenge of making peace with the ‘safe non-self' and dealing with the inevitable ‘distressed self', and it is within this more complex realm γδ T cells excel thanks to their highly empathetic nature. This review gives an overview of the latest insights revealing the unfolding story of human γδ T cells, providing a biographical sketch of these unique lymphocytes in an attempt to capture the essence of their fundamental nature and events that influence their life trajectory. What hangs in their balance is their nuanced ability to differentiate the friends from the foe and the pathological from the benign to help us adapt swiftly and efficiently to life's many stresses. PMID:23085947

  10. The human pancreas proteome defined by transcriptomics and antibody-based profiling.

    PubMed

    Danielsson, Angelika; Pontén, Fredrik; Fagerberg, Linn; Hallström, Björn M; Schwenk, Jochen M; Uhlén, Mathias; Korsgren, Olle; Lindskog, Cecilia

    2014-01-01

    The pancreas is composed of both exocrine glands and intermingled endocrine cells to execute its diverse functions, including enzyme production for digestion of nutrients and hormone secretion for regulation of blood glucose levels. To define the molecular constituents with elevated expression in the human pancreas, we employed a genome-wide RNA sequencing analysis of the human transcriptome to identify genes with elevated expression in the human pancreas. This quantitative transcriptomics data was combined with immunohistochemistry-based protein profiling to allow mapping of the corresponding proteins to different compartments and specific cell types within the pancreas down to the single cell level. Analysis of whole pancreas identified 146 genes with elevated expression levels, of which 47 revealed a particular higher expression as compared to the other analyzed tissue types, thus termed pancreas enriched. Extended analysis of in vitro isolated endocrine islets identified an additional set of 42 genes with elevated expression in these specialized cells. Although only 0.7% of all genes showed an elevated expression level in the pancreas, this fraction of transcripts, in most cases encoding secreted proteins, constituted 68% of the total mRNA in pancreas. This demonstrates the extreme specialization of the pancreas for production of secreted proteins. Among the elevated expression profiles, several previously not described proteins were identified, both in endocrine cells (CFC1, FAM159B, RBPJL and RGS9) and exocrine glandular cells (AQP12A, DPEP1, GATM and ERP27). In summary, we provide a global analysis of the pancreas transcriptome and proteome with a comprehensive list of genes and proteins with elevated expression in pancreas. This list represents an important starting point for further studies of the molecular repertoire of pancreatic cells and their relation to disease states or treatment effects.

  11. Direct Conversion of Pluripotent Human Embryonic Stem Cells Under Defined Culture Conditions into Human Neuronal or Cardiomyocyte Cell Therapy Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Xuejun H

    2016-01-01

    Developing novel strategies for well-controlled efficiently directing pluripotent human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) exclusively and uniformly towards clinically relevant cell types in a lineage-specific manner is not only crucial for unveiling the molecular and cellular cues that direct human embryogenesis but also vital to harnessing the power of hESC biology for tissue engineering and cell-based therapies. Conventional hESC differentiation methods require uncontrollable simultaneous multi-lineage differentiation of pluripotent cells, which yield embryoid bodies (EB) or aggregates consisting of a mixed population of cell types of three embryonic germ layers, among which only a very small fraction of cells display targeted differentiation, impractical for commercial and clinical applications. Here, a protocol for lineage-specific differentiation of hESCs, maintained under defined culture systems, direct from the pluripotent stage using small-molecule induction exclusively and uniformly to a neural or a cardiac lineage is described. Lineage-specific differentiation of pluripotent hESCs by small-molecule induction enables well-controlled highly efficient direct conversion of nonfunctional pluripotent hESCs into a large supply of high-purity functional human neuronal or cardiomyocyte cell therapy derivatives for commercial and therapeutic uses.

  12. Scalable cultivation of human pluripotent stem cells on chemically-defined surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsiung, Michael Chi-Wei

    Human stem cells (SCs) are classified as self-renewing cells possessing great ability in therapeutic applications due of their ability to differentiate along any major cell lineage in the human body. Despite their restorative potential, widespread use of SCs is hampered by strenuous control issues. Along with the need for strict xeno-free environments to sustain growth in culture, current methods for growing human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) rely on platforms which impede large-scale cultivation and therapeutic delivery. Hence, any progress towards development of large-scale culture systems is severely hindered. In a concentrated effort to develop a scheme that can serve as a model precursor for large scale SC propagation in clinical use, we have explored methods for cultivating hPSCs on completely defined surfaces. We discuss novel approaches with the potential to go beyond the limitations presented by current methods. In particular, we studied the cultivation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) on surface which underwent synthetic or chemical modification. Current methods for hPSCs rely on animal-based extracellular matrices (ECMs) such as mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) or feeders and murine sacoma cell-derived substrates to facilitate their growth. While these layers or coatings can be used to maximize the output of hPSC production, they cannot be considered for clinical use because they risk introducing foreign pathogens into culture. We have identified and developed conditions for a completely defined xeno-free substrate used for culturing hPSCs. By utilizing coupling chemistry, we can functionalize ester groups on a given surface and conjugate synthetic peptides containing the arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) motif, known for their role in cell adhesion. This method offers advantages over traditional hPSC culture by keeping the modified substrata free of xenogenic response and can be scaled up in

  13. Application of value of information of tank waste characterization: A new paradigm for defining tank waste characterization requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Fassbender, L.L.; Brewster, M.E.; Brothers, A.J.

    1996-11-01

    This report presents the rationale for adopting a recommended characterization strategy that uses a risk-based decision-making framework for managing the Tank Waste Characterization program at Hanford. The risk-management/value-of-information (VOI) strategy that is illustrated explicitly links each information-gathering activity to its cost and provides a mechanism to ensure that characterization funds are spent where they can produce the largest reduction in risk. The approach was developed by tailoring well-known decision analysis techniques to specific tank waste characterization applications. This report illustrates how VOI calculations are performed and demonstrates that the VOI approach can definitely be used for real Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) characterization problems.

  14. Characterization of human pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Gokhale, Paul J; Andrews, Peter W

    2013-12-18

    Human pluripotent stem cells (PSCs), whether embryonic stem cells or induced PSCs, offer enormous opportunities for regenerative medicine and other biomedical applications once we have developed the ability to harness their capacity for extensive differentiation. Central to this is our ability to identify and characterize such PSCs, but this is fraught with potential difficulties that arise from a tension between functional definitions of pluripotency and the more convenient use of 'markers', a problem exacerbated by ethical issues, our lack of knowledge of early human embryonic development, and differences from the mouse paradigm.

  15. Defining the role of common variation in the genomic and biological architecture of adult human height.

    PubMed

    Wood, Andrew R; Esko, Tonu; Yang, Jian; Vedantam, Sailaja; Pers, Tune H; Gustafsson, Stefan; Chu, Audrey Y; Estrada, Karol; Luan, Jian'an; Kutalik, Zoltán; Amin, Najaf; Buchkovich, Martin L; Croteau-Chonka, Damien C; Day, Felix R; Duan, Yanan; Fall, Tove; Fehrmann, Rudolf; Ferreira, Teresa; Jackson, Anne U; Karjalainen, Juha; Lo, Ken Sin; Locke, Adam E; Mägi, Reedik; Mihailov, Evelin; Porcu, Eleonora; Randall, Joshua C; Scherag, André; Vinkhuyzen, Anna A E; Westra, Harm-Jan; Winkler, Thomas W; Workalemahu, Tsegaselassie; Zhao, Jing Hua; Absher, Devin; Albrecht, Eva; Anderson, Denise; Baron, Jeffrey; Beekman, Marian; Demirkan, Ayse; Ehret, Georg B; Feenstra, Bjarke; Feitosa, Mary F; Fischer, Krista; Fraser, Ross M; Goel, Anuj; Gong, Jian; Justice, Anne E; Kanoni, Stavroula; Kleber, Marcus E; Kristiansson, Kati; Lim, Unhee; Lotay, Vaneet; Lui, Julian C; Mangino, Massimo; Mateo Leach, Irene; Medina-Gomez, Carolina; Nalls, Michael A; Nyholt, Dale R; Palmer, Cameron D; Pasko, Dorota; Pechlivanis, Sonali; Prokopenko, Inga; Ried, Janina S; Ripke, Stephan; Shungin, Dmitry; Stancáková, Alena; Strawbridge, Rona J; Sung, Yun Ju; Tanaka, Toshiko; Teumer, Alexander; Trompet, Stella; van der Laan, Sander W; van Setten, Jessica; Van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V; Wang, Zhaoming; Yengo, Loïc; Zhang, Weihua; Afzal, Uzma; Arnlöv, Johan; Arscott, Gillian M; Bandinelli, Stefania; Barrett, Amy; Bellis, Claire; Bennett, Amanda J; Berne, Christian; Blüher, Matthias; Bolton, Jennifer L; Böttcher, Yvonne; Boyd, Heather A; Bruinenberg, Marcel; Buckley, Brendan M; Buyske, Steven; Caspersen, Ida H; Chines, Peter S; Clarke, Robert; Claudi-Boehm, Simone; Cooper, Matthew; Daw, E Warwick; De Jong, Pim A; Deelen, Joris; Delgado, Graciela; Denny, Josh C; Dhonukshe-Rutten, Rosalie; Dimitriou, Maria; Doney, Alex S F; Dörr, Marcus; Eklund, Niina; Eury, Elodie; Folkersen, Lasse; Garcia, Melissa E; Geller, Frank; Giedraitis, Vilmantas; Go, Alan S; Grallert, Harald; Grammer, Tanja B; Gräßler, Jürgen; Grönberg, Henrik; de Groot, Lisette C P G M; Groves, Christopher J; Haessler, Jeffrey; Hall, Per; Haller, Toomas; Hallmans, Goran; Hannemann, Anke; Hartman, Catharina A; Hassinen, Maija; Hayward, Caroline; Heard-Costa, Nancy L; Helmer, Quinta; Hemani, Gibran; Henders, Anjali K; Hillege, Hans L; Hlatky, Mark A; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hoffmann, Per; Holmen, Oddgeir; Houwing-Duistermaat, Jeanine J; Illig, Thomas; Isaacs, Aaron; James, Alan L; Jeff, Janina; Johansen, Berit; Johansson, Åsa; Jolley, Jennifer; Juliusdottir, Thorhildur; Junttila, Juhani; Kho, Abel N; Kinnunen, Leena; Klopp, Norman; Kocher, Thomas; Kratzer, Wolfgang; Lichtner, Peter; Lind, Lars; Lindström, Jaana; Lobbens, Stéphane; Lorentzon, Mattias; Lu, Yingchang; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Mahajan, Anubha; Maillard, Marc; McArdle, Wendy L; McKenzie, Colin A; McLachlan, Stela; McLaren, Paul J; Menni, Cristina; Merger, Sigrun; Milani, Lili; Moayyeri, Alireza; Monda, Keri L; Morken, Mario A; Müller, Gabriele; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Musk, Arthur W; Narisu, Narisu; Nauck, Matthias; Nolte, Ilja M; Nöthen, Markus M; Oozageer, Laticia; Pilz, Stefan; Rayner, Nigel W; Renstrom, Frida; Robertson, Neil R; Rose, Lynda M; Roussel, Ronan; Sanna, Serena; Scharnagl, Hubert; Scholtens, Salome; Schumacher, Fredrick R; Schunkert, Heribert; Scott, Robert A; Sehmi, Joban; Seufferlein, Thomas; Shi, Jianxin; Silventoinen, Karri; Smit, Johannes H; Smith, Albert Vernon; Smolonska, Joanna; Stanton, Alice V; Stirrups, Kathleen; Stott, David J; Stringham, Heather M; Sundström, Johan; Swertz, Morris A; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Tayo, Bamidele O; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Tyrer, Jonathan P; van Dijk, Suzanne; van Schoor, Natasja M; van der Velde, Nathalie; van Heemst, Diana; van Oort, Floor V A; Vermeulen, Sita H; Verweij, Niek; Vonk, Judith M; Waite, Lindsay L; Waldenberger, Melanie; Wennauer, Roman; Wilkens, Lynne R; Willenborg, Christina; Wilsgaard, Tom; Wojczynski, Mary K; Wong, Andrew; Wright, Alan F; Zhang, Qunyuan; Arveiler, Dominique; Bakker, Stephan J L; Beilby, John; Bergman, Richard N; Bergmann, Sven; Biffar, Reiner; Blangero, John; Boomsma, Dorret I; Bornstein, Stefan R; Bovet, Pascal; Brambilla, Paolo; Brown, Morris J; Campbell, Harry; Caulfield, Mark J; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Collins, Rory; Collins, Francis S; Crawford, Dana C; Cupples, L Adrienne; Danesh, John; de Faire, Ulf; den Ruijter, Hester M; Erbel, Raimund; Erdmann, Jeanette; Eriksson, Johan G; Farrall, Martin; Ferrannini, Ele; Ferrières, Jean; Ford, Ian; Forouhi, Nita G; Forrester, Terrence; Gansevoort, Ron T; Gejman, Pablo V; Gieger, Christian; Golay, Alain; Gottesman, Omri; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Gyllensten, Ulf; Haas, David W; Hall, Alistair S; Harris, Tamara B; Hattersley, Andrew T; Heath, Andrew C; Hengstenberg, Christian; Hicks, Andrew A; Hindorff, Lucia A; Hingorani, Aroon D; Hofman, Albert; Hovingh, G Kees; Humphries, Steve E; Hunt, Steven C; Hypponen, Elina; Jacobs, Kevin B; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jousilahti, Pekka; Jula, Antti M; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kastelein, John J P; Kayser, Manfred; Kee, Frank; Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka M; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Kooner, Jaspal S; Kooperberg, Charles; Koskinen, Seppo; Kovacs, Peter; Kraja, Aldi T; Kumari, Meena; Kuusisto, Johanna; Lakka, Timo A; Langenberg, Claudia; Le Marchand, Loic; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lupoli, Sara; Madden, Pamela A F; Männistö, Satu; Manunta, Paolo; Marette, André; Matise, Tara C; McKnight, Barbara; Meitinger, Thomas; Moll, Frans L; Montgomery, Grant W; Morris, Andrew D; Morris, Andrew P; Murray, Jeffrey C; Nelis, Mari; Ohlsson, Claes; Oldehinkel, Albertine J; Ong, Ken K; Ouwehand, Willem H; Pasterkamp, Gerard; Peters, Annette; Pramstaller, Peter P; Price, Jackie F; Qi, Lu; Raitakari, Olli T; Rankinen, Tuomo; Rao, D C; Rice, Treva K; Ritchie, Marylyn; Rudan, Igor; Salomaa, Veikko; Samani, Nilesh J; Saramies, Jouko; Sarzynski, Mark A; Schwarz, Peter E H; Sebert, Sylvain; Sever, Peter; Shuldiner, Alan R; Sinisalo, Juha; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Stolk, Ronald P; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Tönjes, Anke; Tremblay, Angelo; Tremoli, Elena; Virtamo, Jarmo; Vohl, Marie-Claude; Amouyel, Philippe; Asselbergs, Folkert W; Assimes, Themistocles L; Bochud, Murielle; Boehm, Bernhard O; Boerwinkle, Eric; Bottinger, Erwin P; Bouchard, Claude; Cauchi, Stéphane; Chambers, John C; Chanock, Stephen J; Cooper, Richard S; de Bakker, Paul I W; Dedoussis, George; Ferrucci, Luigi; Franks, Paul W; Froguel, Philippe; Groop, Leif C; Haiman, Christopher A; Hamsten, Anders; Hayes, M Geoffrey; Hui, Jennie; Hunter, David J; Hveem, Kristian; Jukema, J Wouter; Kaplan, Robert C; Kivimaki, Mika; Kuh, Diana; Laakso, Markku; Liu, Yongmei; Martin, Nicholas G; März, Winfried; Melbye, Mads; Moebus, Susanne; Munroe, Patricia B; Njølstad, Inger; Oostra, Ben A; Palmer, Colin N A; Pedersen, Nancy L; Perola, Markus; Pérusse, Louis; Peters, Ulrike; Powell, Joseph E; Power, Chris; Quertermous, Thomas; Rauramaa, Rainer; Reinmaa, Eva; Ridker, Paul M; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rotter, Jerome I; Saaristo, Timo E; Saleheen, Danish; Schlessinger, David; Slagboom, P Eline; Snieder, Harold; Spector, Tim D; Strauch, Konstantin; Stumvoll, Michael; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uusitupa, Matti; van der Harst, Pim; Völzke, Henry; Walker, Mark; Wareham, Nicholas J; Watkins, Hugh; Wichmann, H-Erich; Wilson, James F; Zanen, Pieter; Deloukas, Panos; Heid, Iris M; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Mohlke, Karen L; Speliotes, Elizabeth K; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Barroso, Inês; Fox, Caroline S; North, Kari E; Strachan, David P; Beckmann, Jacques S; Berndt, Sonja I; Boehnke, Michael; Borecki, Ingrid B; McCarthy, Mark I; Metspalu, Andres; Stefansson, Kari; Uitterlinden, André G; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Franke, Lude; Willer, Cristen J; Price, Alkes L; Lettre, Guillaume; Loos, Ruth J F; Weedon, Michael N; Ingelsson, Erik; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; Abecasis, Goncalo R; Chasman, Daniel I; Goddard, Michael E; Visscher, Peter M; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Frayling, Timothy M

    2014-11-01

    Using genome-wide data from 253,288 individuals, we identified 697 variants at genome-wide significance that together explained one-fifth of the heritability for adult height. By testing different numbers of variants in independent studies, we show that the most strongly associated ∼2,000, ∼3,700 and ∼9,500 SNPs explained ∼21%, ∼24% and ∼29% of phenotypic variance. Furthermore, all common variants together captured 60% of heritability. The 697 variants clustered in 423 loci were enriched for genes, pathways and tissue types known to be involved in growth and together implicated genes and pathways not highlighted in earlier efforts, such as signaling by fibroblast growth factors, WNT/β-catenin and chondroitin sulfate-related genes. We identified several genes and pathways not previously connected with human skeletal growth, including mTOR, osteoglycin and binding of hyaluronic acid. Our results indicate a genetic architecture for human height that is characterized by a very large but finite number (thousands) of causal variants.

  16. Defining the role of common variation in the genomic and biological architecture of adult human height

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Audrey Y; Estrada, Karol; Luan, Jian’an; Kutalik, Zoltán; Amin, Najaf; Buchkovich, Martin L; Croteau-Chonka, Damien C; Day, Felix R; Duan, Yanan; Fall, Tove; Fehrmann, Rudolf; Ferreira, Teresa; Jackson, Anne U; Karjalainen, Juha; Lo, Ken Sin; Locke, Adam E; Mägi, Reedik; Mihailov, Evelin; Porcu, Eleonora; Randall, Joshua C; Scherag, André; Vinkhuyzen, Anna AE; Westra, Harm-Jan; Winkler, Thomas W; Workalemahu, Tsegaselassie; Zhao, Jing Hua; Absher, Devin; Albrecht, Eva; Anderson, Denise; Baron, Jeffrey; Beekman, Marian; Demirkan, Ayse; Ehret, Georg B; Feenstra, Bjarke; Feitosa, Mary F; Fischer, Krista; Fraser, Ross M; Goel, Anuj; Gong, Jian; Justice, Anne E; Kanoni, Stavroula; Kleber, Marcus E; Kristiansson, Kati; Lim, Unhee; Lotay, Vaneet; Lui, Julian C; Mangino, Massimo; Leach, Irene Mateo; Medina-Gomez, Carolina; Nalls, Michael A; Nyholt, Dale R; Palmer, Cameron D; Pasko, Dorota; Pechlivanis, Sonali; Prokopenko, Inga; Ried, Janina S; Ripke, Stephan; Shungin, Dmitry; Stancáková, Alena; Strawbridge, Rona J; Sung, Yun Ju; Tanaka, Toshiko; Teumer, Alexander; Trompet, Stella; van der Laan, Sander W; van Setten, Jessica; Van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V; Wang, Zhaoming; Yengo, Loïc; Zhang, Weihua; Afzal, Uzma; Ärnlöv, Johan; Arscott, Gillian M; Bandinelli, Stefania; Barrett, Amy; Bellis, Claire; Bennett, Amanda J; Berne, Christian; Blüher, Matthias; Bolton, Jennifer L; Böttcher, Yvonne; Boyd, Heather A; Bruinenberg, Marcel; Buckley, Brendan M; Buyske, Steven; Caspersen, Ida H; Chines, Peter S; Clarke, Robert; Claudi-Boehm, Simone; Cooper, Matthew; Daw, E Warwick; De Jong, Pim A; Deelen, Joris; Delgado, Graciela; Denny, Josh C; Dhonukshe-Rutten, Rosalie; Dimitriou, Maria; Doney, Alex SF; Dörr, Marcus; Eklund, Niina; Eury, Elodie; Folkersen, Lasse; Garcia, Melissa E; Geller, Frank; Giedraitis, Vilmantas; Go, Alan S; Grallert, Harald; Grammer, Tanja B; Gräßler, Jürgen; Grönberg, Henrik; de Groot, Lisette C.P.G.M.; Groves, Christopher J; Haessler, Jeffrey; Hall, Per; Haller, Toomas; Hallmans, Goran; Hannemann, Anke; Hartman, Catharina A; Hassinen, Maija; Hayward, Caroline; Heard-Costa, Nancy L; Helmer, Quinta; Hemani, Gibran; Henders, Anjali K; Hillege, Hans L; Hlatky, Mark A; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hoffmann, Per; Holmen, Oddgeir; Houwing-Duistermaat, Jeanine J; Illig, Thomas; Isaacs, Aaron; James, Alan L; Jeff, Janina; Johansen, Berit; Johansson, Åsa; Jolley, Jennifer; Juliusdottir, Thorhildur; Junttila, Juhani; Kho, Abel N; Kinnunen, Leena; Klopp, Norman; Kocher, Thomas; Kratzer, Wolfgang; Lichtner, Peter; Lind, Lars; Lindström, Jaana; Lobbens, Stéphane; Lorentzon, Mattias; Lu, Yingchang; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Magnusson, Patrik KE; Mahajan, Anubha; Maillard, Marc; McArdle, Wendy L; McKenzie, Colin A; McLachlan, Stela; McLaren, Paul J; Menni, Cristina; Merger, Sigrun; Milani, Lili; Moayyeri, Alireza; Monda, Keri L; Morken, Mario A; Müller, Gabriele; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Musk, Arthur W; Narisu, Narisu; Nauck, Matthias; Nolte, Ilja M; Nöthen, Markus M; Oozageer, Laticia; Pilz, Stefan; Rayner, Nigel W; Renstrom, Frida; Robertson, Neil R; Rose, Lynda M; Roussel, Ronan; Sanna, Serena; Scharnagl, Hubert; Scholtens, Salome; Schumacher, Fredrick R; Schunkert, Heribert; Scott, Robert A; Sehmi, Joban; Seufferlein, Thomas; Shi, Jianxin; Silventoinen, Karri; Smit, Johannes H; Smith, Albert Vernon; Smolonska, Joanna; Stanton, Alice V; Stirrups, Kathleen; Stott, David J; Stringham, Heather M; Sundström, Johan; Swertz, Morris A; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Tayo, Bamidele O; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Tyrer, Jonathan P; van Dijk, Suzanne; van Schoor, Natasja M; van der Velde, Nathalie; van Heemst, Diana; van Oort, Floor VA; Vermeulen, Sita H; Verweij, Niek; Vonk, Judith M; Waite, Lindsay L; Waldenberger, Melanie; Wennauer, Roman; Wilkens, Lynne R; Willenborg, Christina; Wilsgaard, Tom; Wojczynski, Mary K; Wong, Andrew; Wright, Alan F; Zhang, Qunyuan; Arveiler, Dominique; Bakker, Stephan JL; Beilby, John; Bergman, Richard N; Bergmann, Sven; Biffar, Reiner; Blangero, John; Boomsma, Dorret I; Bornstein, Stefan R; Bovet, Pascal; Brambilla, Paolo; Brown, Morris J; Campbell, Harry; Caulfield, Mark J; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Collins, Rory; Collins, Francis S; Crawford, Dana C; Cupples, L Adrienne; Danesh, John; de Faire, Ulf; den Ruijter, Hester M; Erbel, Raimund; Erdmann, Jeanette; Eriksson, Johan G; Farrall, Martin; Ferrannini, Ele; Ferrières, Jean; Ford, Ian; Forouhi, Nita G; Forrester, Terrence; Gansevoort, Ron T; Gejman, Pablo V; Gieger, Christian; Golay, Alain; Gottesman, Omri; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Gyllensten, Ulf; Haas, David W; Hall, Alistair S; Harris, Tamara B; Hattersley, Andrew T; Heath, Andrew C; Hengstenberg, Christian; Hicks, Andrew A; Hindorff, Lucia A; Hingorani, Aroon D; Hofman, Albert; Hovingh, G Kees; Humphries, Steve E; Hunt, Steven C; Hypponen, Elina; Jacobs, Kevin B; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jousilahti, Pekka; Jula, Antti M; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kastelein, John JP; Kayser, Manfred; Kee, Frank; Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka M; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Kooner, Jaspal S; Kooperberg, Charles; Koskinen, Seppo; Kovacs, Peter; Kraja, Aldi T; Kumari, Meena; Kuusisto, Johanna; Lakka, Timo A; Langenberg, Claudia; Le Marchand, Loic; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lupoli, Sara; Madden, Pamela AF; Männistö, Satu; Manunta, Paolo; Marette, André; Matise, Tara C; McKnight, Barbara; Meitinger, Thomas; Moll, Frans L; Montgomery, Grant W; Morris, Andrew D; Morris, Andrew P; Murray, Jeffrey C; Nelis, Mari; Ohlsson, Claes; Oldehinkel, Albertine J; Ong, Ken K; Ouwehand, Willem H; Pasterkamp, Gerard; Peters, Annette; Pramstaller, Peter P; Price, Jackie F; Qi, Lu; Raitakari, Olli T; Rankinen, Tuomo; Rao, DC; Rice, Treva K; Ritchie, Marylyn; Rudan, Igor; Salomaa, Veikko; Samani, Nilesh J; Saramies, Jouko; Sarzynski, Mark A; Schwarz, Peter EH; Sebert, Sylvain; Sever, Peter; Shuldiner, Alan R; Sinisalo, Juha; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Stolk, Ronald P; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Tönjes, Anke; Tremblay, Angelo; Tremoli, Elena; Virtamo, Jarmo; Vohl, Marie-Claude; Amouyel, Philippe; Asselbergs, Folkert W; Assimes, Themistocles L; Bochud, Murielle; Boehm, Bernhard O; Boerwinkle, Eric; Bottinger, Erwin P; Bouchard, Claude; Cauchi, Stéphane; Chambers, John C; Chanock, Stephen J; Cooper, Richard S; de Bakker, Paul IW; Dedoussis, George; Ferrucci, Luigi; Franks, Paul W; Froguel, Philippe; Groop, Leif C; Haiman, Christopher A; Hamsten, Anders; Hayes, M Geoffrey; Hui, Jennie; Hunter, David J.; Hveem, Kristian; Jukema, J Wouter; Kaplan, Robert C; Kivimaki, Mika; Kuh, Diana; Laakso, Markku; Liu, Yongmei; Martin, Nicholas G; März, Winfried; Melbye, Mads; Moebus, Susanne; Munroe, Patricia B; Njølstad, Inger; Oostra, Ben A; Palmer, Colin NA; Pedersen, Nancy L; Perola, Markus; Pérusse, Louis; Peters, Ulrike; Powell, Joseph E; Power, Chris; Quertermous, Thomas; Rauramaa, Rainer; Reinmaa, Eva; Ridker, Paul M; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rotter, Jerome I; Saaristo, Timo E; Saleheen, Danish; Schlessinger, David; Slagboom, P Eline; Snieder, Harold; Spector, Tim D; Strauch, Konstantin; Stumvoll, Michael; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uusitupa, Matti; van der Harst, Pim; Völzke, Henry; Walker, Mark; Wareham, Nicholas J; Watkins, Hugh; Wichmann, H-Erich; Wilson, James F; Zanen, Pieter; Deloukas, Panos; Heid, Iris M; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Mohlke, Karen L; Speliotes, Elizabeth K; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Barroso, Inês; Fox, Caroline S; North, Kari E; Strachan, David P; Beckmann, Jacques S.; Berndt, Sonja I; Boehnke, Michael; Borecki, Ingrid B; McCarthy, Mark I; Metspalu, Andres; Stefansson, Kari; Uitterlinden, André G; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Franke, Lude; Willer, Cristen J; Price, Alkes L.; Lettre, Guillaume; Loos, Ruth JF; Weedon, Michael N; Ingelsson, Erik; O’Connell, Jeffrey R; Abecasis, Goncalo R; Chasman, Daniel I; Goddard, Michael E

    2014-01-01

    Using genome-wide data from 253,288 individuals, we identified 697 variants at genome-wide significance that together explain one-fifth of heritability for adult height. By testing different numbers of variants in independent studies, we show that the most strongly associated ~2,000, ~3,700 and ~9,500 SNPs explained ~21%, ~24% and ~29% of phenotypic variance. Furthermore, all common variants together captured the majority (60%) of heritability. The 697 variants clustered in 423 loci enriched for genes, pathways, and tissue-types known to be involved in growth and together implicated genes and pathways not highlighted in earlier efforts, such as signaling by fibroblast growth factors, WNT/beta-catenin, and chondroitin sulfate-related genes. We identified several genes and pathways not previously connected with human skeletal growth, including mTOR, osteoglycin and binding of hyaluronic acid. Our results indicate a genetic architecture for human height that is characterized by a very large but finite number (thousands) of causal variants. PMID:25282103

  17. Defining the role of common variation in the genomic and biological architecture of adult human height.

    PubMed

    Wood, Andrew R; Esko, Tonu; Yang, Jian; Vedantam, Sailaja; Pers, Tune H; Gustafsson, Stefan; Chu, Audrey Y; Estrada, Karol; Luan, Jian'an; Kutalik, Zoltán; Amin, Najaf; Buchkovich, Martin L; Croteau-Chonka, Damien C; Day, Felix R; Duan, Yanan; Fall, Tove; Fehrmann, Rudolf; Ferreira, Teresa; Jackson, Anne U; Karjalainen, Juha; Lo, Ken Sin; Locke, Adam E; Mägi, Reedik; Mihailov, Evelin; Porcu, Eleonora; Randall, Joshua C; Scherag, André; Vinkhuyzen, Anna A E; Westra, Harm-Jan; Winkler, Thomas W; Workalemahu, Tsegaselassie; Zhao, Jing Hua; Absher, Devin; Albrecht, Eva; Anderson, Denise; Baron, Jeffrey; Beekman, Marian; Demirkan, Ayse; Ehret, Georg B; Feenstra, Bjarke; Feitosa, Mary F; Fischer, Krista; Fraser, Ross M; Goel, Anuj; Gong, Jian; Justice, Anne E; Kanoni, Stavroula; Kleber, Marcus E; Kristiansson, Kati; Lim, Unhee; Lotay, Vaneet; Lui, Julian C; Mangino, Massimo; Mateo Leach, Irene; Medina-Gomez, Carolina; Nalls, Michael A; Nyholt, Dale R; Palmer, Cameron D; Pasko, Dorota; Pechlivanis, Sonali; Prokopenko, Inga; Ried, Janina S; Ripke, Stephan; Shungin, Dmitry; Stancáková, Alena; Strawbridge, Rona J; Sung, Yun Ju; Tanaka, Toshiko; Teumer, Alexander; Trompet, Stella; van der Laan, Sander W; van Setten, Jessica; Van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V; Wang, Zhaoming; Yengo, Loïc; Zhang, Weihua; Afzal, Uzma; Arnlöv, Johan; Arscott, Gillian M; Bandinelli, Stefania; Barrett, Amy; Bellis, Claire; Bennett, Amanda J; Berne, Christian; Blüher, Matthias; Bolton, Jennifer L; Böttcher, Yvonne; Boyd, Heather A; Bruinenberg, Marcel; Buckley, Brendan M; Buyske, Steven; Caspersen, Ida H; Chines, Peter S; Clarke, Robert; Claudi-Boehm, Simone; Cooper, Matthew; Daw, E Warwick; De Jong, Pim A; Deelen, Joris; Delgado, Graciela; Denny, Josh C; Dhonukshe-Rutten, Rosalie; Dimitriou, Maria; Doney, Alex S F; Dörr, Marcus; Eklund, Niina; Eury, Elodie; Folkersen, Lasse; Garcia, Melissa E; Geller, Frank; Giedraitis, Vilmantas; Go, Alan S; Grallert, Harald; Grammer, Tanja B; Gräßler, Jürgen; Grönberg, Henrik; de Groot, Lisette C P G M; Groves, Christopher J; Haessler, Jeffrey; Hall, Per; Haller, Toomas; Hallmans, Goran; Hannemann, Anke; Hartman, Catharina A; Hassinen, Maija; Hayward, Caroline; Heard-Costa, Nancy L; Helmer, Quinta; Hemani, Gibran; Henders, Anjali K; Hillege, Hans L; Hlatky, Mark A; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hoffmann, Per; Holmen, Oddgeir; Houwing-Duistermaat, Jeanine J; Illig, Thomas; Isaacs, Aaron; James, Alan L; Jeff, Janina; Johansen, Berit; Johansson, Åsa; Jolley, Jennifer; Juliusdottir, Thorhildur; Junttila, Juhani; Kho, Abel N; Kinnunen, Leena; Klopp, Norman; Kocher, Thomas; Kratzer, Wolfgang; Lichtner, Peter; Lind, Lars; Lindström, Jaana; Lobbens, Stéphane; Lorentzon, Mattias; Lu, Yingchang; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Mahajan, Anubha; Maillard, Marc; McArdle, Wendy L; McKenzie, Colin A; McLachlan, Stela; McLaren, Paul J; Menni, Cristina; Merger, Sigrun; Milani, Lili; Moayyeri, Alireza; Monda, Keri L; Morken, Mario A; Müller, Gabriele; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Musk, Arthur W; Narisu, Narisu; Nauck, Matthias; Nolte, Ilja M; Nöthen, Markus M; Oozageer, Laticia; Pilz, Stefan; Rayner, Nigel W; Renstrom, Frida; Robertson, Neil R; Rose, Lynda M; Roussel, Ronan; Sanna, Serena; Scharnagl, Hubert; Scholtens, Salome; Schumacher, Fredrick R; Schunkert, Heribert; Scott, Robert A; Sehmi, Joban; Seufferlein, Thomas; Shi, Jianxin; Silventoinen, Karri; Smit, Johannes H; Smith, Albert Vernon; Smolonska, Joanna; Stanton, Alice V; Stirrups, Kathleen; Stott, David J; Stringham, Heather M; Sundström, Johan; Swertz, Morris A; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Tayo, Bamidele O; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Tyrer, Jonathan P; van Dijk, Suzanne; van Schoor, Natasja M; van der Velde, Nathalie; van Heemst, Diana; van Oort, Floor V A; Vermeulen, Sita H; Verweij, Niek; Vonk, Judith M; Waite, Lindsay L; Waldenberger, Melanie; Wennauer, Roman; Wilkens, Lynne R; Willenborg, Christina; Wilsgaard, Tom; Wojczynski, Mary K; Wong, Andrew; Wright, Alan F; Zhang, Qunyuan; Arveiler, Dominique; Bakker, Stephan J L; Beilby, John; Bergman, Richard N; Bergmann, Sven; Biffar, Reiner; Blangero, John; Boomsma, Dorret I; Bornstein, Stefan R; Bovet, Pascal; Brambilla, Paolo; Brown, Morris J; Campbell, Harry; Caulfield, Mark J; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Collins, Rory; Collins, Francis S; Crawford, Dana C; Cupples, L Adrienne; Danesh, John; de Faire, Ulf; den Ruijter, Hester M; Erbel, Raimund; Erdmann, Jeanette; Eriksson, Johan G; Farrall, Martin; Ferrannini, Ele; Ferrières, Jean; Ford, Ian; Forouhi, Nita G; Forrester, Terrence; Gansevoort, Ron T; Gejman, Pablo V; Gieger, Christian; Golay, Alain; Gottesman, Omri; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Gyllensten, Ulf; Haas, David W; Hall, Alistair S; Harris, Tamara B; Hattersley, Andrew T; Heath, Andrew C; Hengstenberg, Christian; Hicks, Andrew A; Hindorff, Lucia A; Hingorani, Aroon D; Hofman, Albert; Hovingh, G Kees; Humphries, Steve E; Hunt, Steven C; Hypponen, Elina; Jacobs, Kevin B; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jousilahti, Pekka; Jula, Antti M; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kastelein, John J P; Kayser, Manfred; Kee, Frank; Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka M; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Kooner, Jaspal S; Kooperberg, Charles; Koskinen, Seppo; Kovacs, Peter; Kraja, Aldi T; Kumari, Meena; Kuusisto, Johanna; Lakka, Timo A; Langenberg, Claudia; Le Marchand, Loic; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lupoli, Sara; Madden, Pamela A F; Männistö, Satu; Manunta, Paolo; Marette, André; Matise, Tara C; McKnight, Barbara; Meitinger, Thomas; Moll, Frans L; Montgomery, Grant W; Morris, Andrew D; Morris, Andrew P; Murray, Jeffrey C; Nelis, Mari; Ohlsson, Claes; Oldehinkel, Albertine J; Ong, Ken K; Ouwehand, Willem H; Pasterkamp, Gerard; Peters, Annette; Pramstaller, Peter P; Price, Jackie F; Qi, Lu; Raitakari, Olli T; Rankinen, Tuomo; Rao, D C; Rice, Treva K; Ritchie, Marylyn; Rudan, Igor; Salomaa, Veikko; Samani, Nilesh J; Saramies, Jouko; Sarzynski, Mark A; Schwarz, Peter E H; Sebert, Sylvain; Sever, Peter; Shuldiner, Alan R; Sinisalo, Juha; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Stolk, Ronald P; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Tönjes, Anke; Tremblay, Angelo; Tremoli, Elena; Virtamo, Jarmo; Vohl, Marie-Claude; Amouyel, Philippe; Asselbergs, Folkert W; Assimes, Themistocles L; Bochud, Murielle; Boehm, Bernhard O; Boerwinkle, Eric; Bottinger, Erwin P; Bouchard, Claude; Cauchi, Stéphane; Chambers, John C; Chanock, Stephen J; Cooper, Richard S; de Bakker, Paul I W; Dedoussis, George; Ferrucci, Luigi; Franks, Paul W; Froguel, Philippe; Groop, Leif C; Haiman, Christopher A; Hamsten, Anders; Hayes, M Geoffrey; Hui, Jennie; Hunter, David J; Hveem, Kristian; Jukema, J Wouter; Kaplan, Robert C; Kivimaki, Mika; Kuh, Diana; Laakso, Markku; Liu, Yongmei; Martin, Nicholas G; März, Winfried; Melbye, Mads; Moebus, Susanne; Munroe, Patricia B; Njølstad, Inger; Oostra, Ben A; Palmer, Colin N A; Pedersen, Nancy L; Perola, Markus; Pérusse, Louis; Peters, Ulrike; Powell, Joseph E; Power, Chris; Quertermous, Thomas; Rauramaa, Rainer; Reinmaa, Eva; Ridker, Paul M; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rotter, Jerome I; Saaristo, Timo E; Saleheen, Danish; Schlessinger, David; Slagboom, P Eline; Snieder, Harold; Spector, Tim D; Strauch, Konstantin; Stumvoll, Michael; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uusitupa, Matti; van der Harst, Pim; Völzke, Henry; Walker, Mark; Wareham, Nicholas J; Watkins, Hugh; Wichmann, H-Erich; Wilson, James F; Zanen, Pieter; Deloukas, Panos; Heid, Iris M; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Mohlke, Karen L; Speliotes, Elizabeth K; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Barroso, Inês; Fox, Caroline S; North, Kari E; Strachan, David P; Beckmann, Jacques S; Berndt, Sonja I; Boehnke, Michael; Borecki, Ingrid B; McCarthy, Mark I; Metspalu, Andres; Stefansson, Kari; Uitterlinden, André G; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Franke, Lude; Willer, Cristen J; Price, Alkes L; Lettre, Guillaume; Loos, Ruth J F; Weedon, Michael N; Ingelsson, Erik; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; Abecasis, Goncalo R; Chasman, Daniel I; Goddard, Michael E; Visscher, Peter M; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Frayling, Timothy M

    2014-11-01

    Using genome-wide data from 253,288 individuals, we identified 697 variants at genome-wide significance that together explained one-fifth of the heritability for adult height. By testing different numbers of variants in independent studies, we show that the most strongly associated ∼2,000, ∼3,700 and ∼9,500 SNPs explained ∼21%, ∼24% and ∼29% of phenotypic variance. Furthermore, all common variants together captured 60% of heritability. The 697 variants clustered in 423 loci were enriched for genes, pathways and tissue types known to be involved in growth and together implicated genes and pathways not highlighted in earlier efforts, such as signaling by fibroblast growth factors, WNT/β-catenin and chondroitin sulfate-related genes. We identified several genes and pathways not previously connected with human skeletal growth, including mTOR, osteoglycin and binding of hyaluronic acid. Our results indicate a genetic architecture for human height that is characterized by a very large but finite number (thousands) of causal variants. PMID:25282103

  18. Comparison of defined culture systems for feeder cell free propagation of human embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Akopian, Veronika; Beil, Stephen; Benvenisty, Nissim; Brehm, Jennifer; Christie, Megan; Ford, Angela; Fox, Victoria; Gokhale, Paul J.; Healy, Lyn; Holm, Frida; Hovatta, Outi; Knowles, Barbara B.; Ludwig, Tenneille E.; McKay, Ronald D. G.; Miyazaki, Takamichi; Nakatsuji, Norio; Oh, Steve K. W.; Pera, Martin F.; Rossant, Janet; Stacey, Glyn N.; Suemori, Hirofumi

    2010-01-01

    There are many reports of defined culture systems for the propagation of human embryonic stem cells in the absence of feeder cell support, but no previous study has undertaken a multi-laboratory comparison of these diverse methodologies. In this study, five separate laboratories, each with experience in human embryonic stem cell culture, used a panel of ten embryonic stem cell lines (including WA09 as an index cell line common to all laboratories) to assess eight cell culture methods, with propagation in the presence of Knockout Serum Replacer, FGF-2, and mouse embryonic fibroblast feeder cell layers serving as a positive control. The cultures were assessed for up to ten passages for attachment, death, and differentiated morphology by phase contrast microscopy, for growth by serial cell counts, and for maintenance of stem cell surface marker expression by flow cytometry. Of the eight culture systems, only the control and those based on two commercial media, mTeSR1 and STEMPRO, supported maintenance of most cell lines for ten passages. Cultures grown in the remaining media failed before this point due to lack of attachment, cell death, or overt cell differentiation. Possible explanations for relative success of the commercial formulations in this study, and the lack of success with other formulations from academic groups compared to previously published results, include: the complex combination of growth factors present in the commercial preparations; improved development, manufacture, and quality control in the commercial products; differences in epigenetic adaptation to culture in vitro between different ES cell lines grown in different laboratories. PMID:20186512

  19. Inherited human sex reversal due to impaired nucleocytoplasmic trafficking of SRY defines a male transcriptional threshold.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yen-Shan; Racca, Joseph D; Phillips, Nelson B; Weiss, Michael A

    2013-09-17

    Human testis determination is initiated by SRY (sex determining region on Y chromosome). Mutations in SRY cause gonadal dysgenesis with female somatic phenotype. Two subtle variants (V60L and I90M in the high-mobility group box) define inherited alleles shared by an XY sterile daughter and fertile father. Whereas specific DNA binding and bending are unaffected in a rat embryonic pre-Sertoli cell line, the variants exhibited selective defects in nucleocytoplasmic shuttling due to impaired nuclear import (V60L; mediated by Exportin-4) or export (I90M; mediated by chromosome region maintenance 1). Decreased shuttling limits nuclear accumulation of phosphorylated (activated) SRY, in turn reducing occupancy of DNA sites regulating Sertoli-cell differentiation [the testis-specific SRY-box 9 (Sox9) enhancer]. Despite distinct patterns of biochemical and cell-biological perturbations, V60L and I90M each attenuated Sox9 expression in transient transfection assays by twofold. Such attenuation was also observed in studies of V60A, a clinical variant associated with ovotestes and hence ambiguity between divergent cell fates. This shared twofold threshold is reminiscent of autosomal syndromes of transcription-factor haploinsufficiency, including XY sex reversal associated with mutations in SOX9. Our results demonstrate that nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of SRY is necessary for robust initiation of testicular development. Although also characteristic of ungulate orthologs, such shuttling is not conserved among rodents wherein impaired nuclear export of the high-mobility group box and import-dependent phosphorylation are compensated by a microsatellite-associated transcriptional activation domain. Human sex reversal due to subtle defects in the nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of SRY suggests that its transcriptional activity lies near the edge of developmental ambiguity. PMID:24003159

  20. Preparation and characterization of 15N-enriched, size-defined heparan sulfate precursor oligosaccharides

    PubMed Central

    Sigulinsky, Crystal; Babu, Ponnusamy; Victor, Xylophone V.; Kuberan, Balagurunathan

    2009-01-01

    We report the preparation of size-defined [15N]N-acetylheparosan oligosaccharides from Escherichia coli-derived 15N-enriched N-acetylheparosan. Optimized growth conditions of E. coli in minimal media containing 15NH4Cl yielded [15N]N-acetylheparosan on a preparative scale. Depolymerization of [15N]N-acetylheparosan by heparitinase I yielded resolvable, even-numbered oligosaccharides ranging from disaccharide to icosaccharide. Anion-exchange chromatography-assisted fractionation afforded size-defined [15N]N-acetylheparosan oligosaccharides identifiable by ESI-TOFMS. These isotopically labeled oligosaccharides will prove to be valuable research tools for the chemoenzymatic synthesis of heparin and heparan sulfate oligosaccharides and for the study of their structural biology. PMID:19945695

  1. Attachment, Growth, and Detachment of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells in a Chemically Defined Medium

    PubMed Central

    Salzig, Denise; Leber, Jasmin; Merkewitz, Katharina; Lange, Michaela C.; Köster, Natascha; Czermak, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The manufacture of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) for clinical applications requires an appropriate growth surface and an optimized, preferably chemically defined medium (CDM) for expansion. We investigated a new protein/peptide-free CDM that supports the adhesion, growth, and detachment of an immortalized hMSC line (hMSC-TERT) as well as primary cells derived from bone marrow (bm-hMSCs) and adipose tissue (ad-hMSCs). We observed the rapid attachment and spreading of hMSC-TERT cells and ad-hMSCs in CDM concomitant with the expression of integrin and actin fibers. Cell spreading was promoted by coating the growth surface with collagen type IV and fibronectin. The growth of hMSC-TERT cells was similar in CDM and serum-containing medium whereas the lag phase of bm-hMSCs was prolonged in CDM. FGF-2 or surface coating with collagen type IV promoted the growth of bm-hMSCs, but laminin had no effect. All three cell types retained their trilineage differentiation capability in CDM and were detached by several enzymes (but not collagenase in the case of hMSC-TERT cells). The medium and coating did not affect detachment efficiency but influenced cell survival after detachment. CDM combined with cell-specific surface coatings and/or FGF-2 supplements is therefore as effective as serum-containing medium for the manufacture of different hMSC types. PMID:27006663

  2. Common antigenic determinants on human melanoma, glioma, neuroblastoma, and sarcoma cells defined with monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Seeger, R C; Rosenblatt, H M; Imai, K; Ferrone, S

    1981-07-01

    Antigenic determinants that are common to melanomas, gliomas, neuroblastomas, and sarcomas but that are minimally or not detectably expressed by adult tissues were defined with monoclonal antibodies. Quantitative absorption of monoclonal antibody (Ab 165) with adult tissues followed by testing on antigen-positive UCLA-SO-M14 melanoma cells did not demonstrate antigenic determinant (Ag 165) in brain, lung, liver, kidney, intestine, adrenal, and muscle, Absorption of Ab 376 demonstrated Ag 376 in adult lung but minimal or no antigen in other tissues. Both antigens were associated with a variety of fetal tissues. Assessment of 28 human tumor cell lines with the 131I-staphylococcal Protein A-binding test demonstrated that Ab 165 reacted strongly with melanomas and gliomas and weakly with sarcomas. Ab 376 reacted strongly with melanomas, gliomas, neuroblastomas, and sarcomas. Neither of these antibodies reacted appreciably with carcinoma or teratoma cell lines. Absorption of Ab 165 and Ab 376 with noncultured tumors demonstrated that melanomas, sarcomas, and neuroblastomas can have greater quantities of these antigens in vivo than do normal adult tissues. Qualitative and quantitative antigenic heterogeneity within positive classes of tumors was demonstrated for both cultured and noncultured tumors. The differences in antigen expression in vivo between normal and neoplastic cells suggest potential value for these antibodies in immunodiagnosis and possibly immunotherapy.

  3. Defining the identity of human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Montelatici, Elisa; Baluce, Barbara; Ragni, Enrico; Lavazza, Cristiana; Parazzi, Valentina; Mazzola, Riccardo; Cantarella, Giovanna; Brambilla, Massimiliano; Giordano, Rosaria; Lazzari, Lorenza

    2015-02-01

    Adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADMSCs) are an ideal population for regenerative medical application. Both the isolation procedure and the culturing conditions are crucial steps, since low yield can limit further cell therapies, especially when minimal adipose tissue harvests are available for cell expansion. To date, a standardized procedure encompassing both isolation sites and expansion methods is missing, thus making the choice of the most appropriate conditions for the preparation of ADMSCs controversial, especially in view of the different applications needed. In this study, we compared the effects of three different commercial media (DMEM, aMEM, and EGM2), routinely used for ADMSCs expansion, and two supplements, FBS and human platelet lysate, recently proven to be an effective alternative to prevent xenogeneic antibody transfer and immune alloresponse in the host. Notably, all the conditions resulted in being safe for ADMSCs isolation and expansion with platelet lysate supplementation giving the highest isolation and proliferation rates, together with a commitment for osteogenic lineage. Then, we proved that the high ADMSC hematopoietic supportive potential is performed through a constant and abundant secretion of both GCSF and SCF. In conclusion, this study further expands the knowledge on ADMSCs, defining their identity definition and offers potential options for in vitro protocols for clinical production, especially related to HSC expansion without use of exogenous cytokines or genetic modifications. PMID:25472894

  4. Transplantation of Defined Populations of Differentiated Human Neural Stem Cell Progeny

    PubMed Central

    Fortin, Jeff M.; Azari, Hassan; Zheng, Tong; Darioosh, Roya P.; Schmoll, Michael E.; Vedam-Mai, Vinata; Deleyrolle, Loic P.; Reynolds, Brent A.

    2016-01-01

    Many neurological injuries are likely too extensive for the limited repair capacity of endogenous neural stem cells (NSCs). An alternative is to isolate NSCs from a donor, and expand them in vitro as transplantation material. Numerous groups have already transplanted neural stem and precursor cells. A caveat to this approach is the undefined phenotypic distribution of the donor cells, which has three principle drawbacks: (1) Stem-like cells retain the capacity to proliferate in vivo. (2) There is little control over the cells’ terminal differentiation, e.g., a graft intended to replace neurons might choose a predominantly glial fate. (3) There is limited ability of researchers to alter the combination of cell types in pursuit of a precise treatment. We demonstrate a procedure for differentiating human neural precursor cells (hNPCs) in vitro, followed by isolation of the neuronal progeny. We transplanted undifferentiated hNPCs or a defined concentration of hNPC-derived neurons into mice, then compared these two groups with regard to their survival, proliferation and phenotypic fate. We present evidence suggesting that in vitro-differentiated-and-purified neurons survive as well in vivo as their undifferentiated progenitors, and undergo less proliferation and less astrocytic differentiation. We also describe techniques for optimizing low-temperature cell preservation and portability. PMID:27030542

  5. Attachment, Growth, and Detachment of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells in a Chemically Defined Medium.

    PubMed

    Salzig, Denise; Leber, Jasmin; Merkewitz, Katharina; Lange, Michaela C; Köster, Natascha; Czermak, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The manufacture of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) for clinical applications requires an appropriate growth surface and an optimized, preferably chemically defined medium (CDM) for expansion. We investigated a new protein/peptide-free CDM that supports the adhesion, growth, and detachment of an immortalized hMSC line (hMSC-TERT) as well as primary cells derived from bone marrow (bm-hMSCs) and adipose tissue (ad-hMSCs). We observed the rapid attachment and spreading of hMSC-TERT cells and ad-hMSCs in CDM concomitant with the expression of integrin and actin fibers. Cell spreading was promoted by coating the growth surface with collagen type IV and fibronectin. The growth of hMSC-TERT cells was similar in CDM and serum-containing medium whereas the lag phase of bm-hMSCs was prolonged in CDM. FGF-2 or surface coating with collagen type IV promoted the growth of bm-hMSCs, but laminin had no effect. All three cell types retained their trilineage differentiation capability in CDM and were detached by several enzymes (but not collagenase in the case of hMSC-TERT cells). The medium and coating did not affect detachment efficiency but influenced cell survival after detachment. CDM combined with cell-specific surface coatings and/or FGF-2 supplements is therefore as effective as serum-containing medium for the manufacture of different hMSC types. PMID:27006663

  6. Osteogenic response of human mesenchymal stem cells to well-defined nanoscale topography in vitro

    PubMed Central

    de Peppo, Giuseppe Maria; Agheli, Hossein; Karlsson, Camilla; Ekström, Karin; Brisby, Helena; Lennerås, Maria; Gustafsson, Stefan; Sjövall, Peter; Johansson, Anna; Olsson, Eva; Lausmaa, Jukka; Thomsen, Peter; Petronis, Sarunas

    2014-01-01

    Background Patterning medical devices at the nanoscale level enables the manipulation of cell behavior and tissue regeneration, with topographic features recognized as playing a significant role in the osseointegration of implantable devices. Methods In this study, we assessed the ability of titanium-coated hemisphere-like topographic nanostructures of different sizes (approximately 50, 100, and 200 nm) to influence the morphology, proliferation, and osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). Results We found that the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs was influenced by the size of the underlying structures, suggesting that size variations in topographic features at the nanoscale level, independently of chemistry, can be exploited to control hMSC behavior in a size-dependent fashion. Conclusion Our studies demonstrate that colloidal lithography, in combination with coating technologies, can be exploited to investigate the cell response to well defined nanoscale topography and to develop next-generation surfaces that guide tissue regeneration and promote implant integration. PMID:24904210

  7. Large-scale production of megakaryocytes from human pluripotent stem cells by chemically defined forward programming.

    PubMed

    Moreau, Thomas; Evans, Amanda L; Vasquez, Louella; Tijssen, Marloes R; Yan, Ying; Trotter, Matthew W; Howard, Daniel; Colzani, Maria; Arumugam, Meera; Wu, Wing Han; Dalby, Amanda; Lampela, Riina; Bouet, Guenaelle; Hobbs, Catherine M; Pask, Dean C; Payne, Holly; Ponomaryov, Tatyana; Brill, Alexander; Soranzo, Nicole; Ouwehand, Willem H; Pedersen, Roger A; Ghevaert, Cedric

    2016-01-01

    The production of megakaryocytes (MKs)--the precursors of blood platelets--from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) offers exciting clinical opportunities for transfusion medicine. Here we describe an original approach for the large-scale generation of MKs in chemically defined conditions using a forward programming strategy relying on the concurrent exogenous expression of three transcription factors: GATA1, FLI1 and TAL1. The forward programmed MKs proliferate and differentiate in culture for several months with MK purity over 90% reaching up to 2 × 10(5) mature MKs per input hPSC. Functional platelets are generated throughout the culture allowing the prospective collection of several transfusion units from as few as 1 million starting hPSCs. The high cell purity and yield achieved by MK forward programming, combined with efficient cryopreservation and good manufacturing practice (GMP)-compatible culture, make this approach eminently suitable to both in vitro production of platelets for transfusion and basic research in MK and platelet biology. PMID:27052461

  8. Large-scale production of megakaryocytes from human pluripotent stem cells by chemically defined forward programming

    PubMed Central

    Moreau, Thomas; Evans, Amanda L.; Vasquez, Louella; Tijssen, Marloes R.; Yan, Ying; Trotter, Matthew W.; Howard, Daniel; Colzani, Maria; Arumugam, Meera; Wu, Wing Han; Dalby, Amanda; Lampela, Riina; Bouet, Guenaelle; Hobbs, Catherine M.; Pask, Dean C.; Payne, Holly; Ponomaryov, Tatyana; Brill, Alexander; Soranzo, Nicole; Ouwehand, Willem H.; Pedersen, Roger A.; Ghevaert, Cedric

    2016-01-01

    The production of megakaryocytes (MKs)—the precursors of blood platelets—from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) offers exciting clinical opportunities for transfusion medicine. Here we describe an original approach for the large-scale generation of MKs in chemically defined conditions using a forward programming strategy relying on the concurrent exogenous expression of three transcription factors: GATA1, FLI1 and TAL1. The forward programmed MKs proliferate and differentiate in culture for several months with MK purity over 90% reaching up to 2 × 105 mature MKs per input hPSC. Functional platelets are generated throughout the culture allowing the prospective collection of several transfusion units from as few as 1 million starting hPSCs. The high cell purity and yield achieved by MK forward programming, combined with efficient cryopreservation and good manufacturing practice (GMP)-compatible culture, make this approach eminently suitable to both in vitro production of platelets for transfusion and basic research in MK and platelet biology. PMID:27052461

  9. Human serum-derived protein removes the need for coating in defined human pluripotent stem cell culture

    PubMed Central

    Pijuan-Galitó, Sara; Tamm, Christoffer; Schuster, Jens; Sobol, Maria; Forsberg, Lars; Merry, Catherine L. R.; Annerén, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    Reliable, scalable and time-efficient culture methods are required to fully realize the clinical and industrial applications of human pluripotent stem (hPS) cells. Here we present a completely defined, xeno-free medium that supports long-term propagation of hPS cells on uncoated tissue culture plastic. The medium consists of the Essential 8 (E8) formulation supplemented with inter-α-inhibitor (IαI), a human serum-derived protein, recently demonstrated to activate key pluripotency pathways in mouse PS cells. IαI efficiently induces attachment and long-term growth of both embryonic and induced hPS cell lines when added as a soluble protein to the medium at seeding. IαI supplementation efficiently supports adaptation of feeder-dependent hPS cells to xeno-free conditions, clonal growth as well as single-cell survival in the absence of Rho-associated kinase inhibitor (ROCKi). This time-efficient and simplified culture method paves the way for large-scale, high-throughput hPS cell culture, and will be valuable for both basic research and commercial applications. PMID:27405751

  10. Structural characterization of the human proteome.

    PubMed

    Müller, Arne; MacCallum, Robert M; Sternberg, Michael J E

    2002-11-01

    This paper reports an analysis of the encoded proteins (the proteome) of the genomes of human, fly, worm, yeast, and representatives of bacteria and archaea in terms of the three-dimensional structures of their globular domains together with a general sequence-based study. We show that 39% of the human proteome can be assigned to known structures. We estimate that for 77% of the proteome, there is some functional annotation, but only 26% of the proteome can be assigned to standard sequence motifs that characterize function. Of the human protein sequences, 13% are transmembrane proteins, but only 3% of the residues in the proteome form membrane-spanning regions. There are substantial differences in the composition of globular domains of transmembrane proteins between the proteomes we have analyzed. Commonly occurring structural superfamilies are identified within the proteome. The frequencies of these superfamilies enable us to estimate that 98% of the human proteome evolved by domain duplication, with four of the 10 most duplicated superfamilies specific for multicellular organisms. The zinc-finger superfamily is massively duplicated in human compared to fly and worm, and occurrence of domains in repeats is more common in metazoa than in single cellular organisms. Structural superfamilies over- and underrepresented in human disease genes have been identified. Data and results can be downloaded and analyzed via web-based applications at http://www.sbg.bio.ic.ac.uk.

  11. Using entropy measures to characterize human locomotion.

    PubMed

    Leverick, Graham; Szturm, Tony; Wu, Christine Q

    2014-12-01

    Entropy measures have been widely used to quantify the complexity of theoretical and experimental dynamical systems. In this paper, the value of using entropy measures to characterize human locomotion is demonstrated based on their construct validity, predictive validity in a simple model of human walking and convergent validity in an experimental study. Results show that four of the five considered entropy measures increase meaningfully with the increased probability of falling in a simple passive bipedal walker model. The same four entropy measures also experienced statistically significant increases in response to increasing age and gait impairment caused by cognitive interference in an experimental study. Of the considered entropy measures, the proposed quantized dynamical entropy (QDE) and quantization-based approximation of sample entropy (QASE) offered the best combination of sensitivity to changes in gait dynamics and computational efficiency. Based on these results, entropy appears to be a viable candidate for assessing the stability of human locomotion.

  12. Magnetic Resonance Diffusion Characteristics of Histologically Defined Prostate Cancer in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Junqian; Humphrey, Peter A.; Kibel, Adam S.; Snyder, Abraham Z.; Narra, Vamsidhar R.; Ackerman, Joseph J.H.; Song, Sheng-Kwei

    2010-01-01

    The contrast provided by diffusion-sensitive magnetic resonance offers the promise of improved tumor localization in organ-confined human prostate cancer (PCa). Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) measurements of PCa were performed in vivo, in patients undergoing radical prostatectomy, and later, ex vivo, in the same patients’ prostatectomy specimens. The imaging data were coregistered to histological sections of the prostatectomy specimens, thereby enabling unambiguous characterization of diffusion parameters in cancerous and benign tissues. Increased cellularity, and hence decreased luminal spaces, in peripheral zone PCa led to approximately 40% and 50% apparent diffusion policy (ADC) decrease compared with benign peripheral zone tissues in vivo and ex vivo, respectively. In contrast, no significant diffusion anisotropy differences were observed between the cancerous and noncancerous peripheral zone tissues. However, the dense fibromuscular tissues in prostate, such as stromal tissues in benign prostatic hyperplasia in central gland, exhibited high diffusion anisotropy. A tissue classification method is proposed to combine DTI and T2-weighted image contrasts that may provide improved specificity of PCa detection over T2-weighted imaging alone. PCa identified in volume rendered MR images qualitatively correlates well with histologically determined PCa foci. PMID:19215051

  13. Genetically defined subsets of human pancreatic cancer demonstrate unique in vitro chemosensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Yunfeng; Brosnan, Jacqueline A.; Blackford, Amanda; Sur, Surojit; Hruban, Ralph H.; Kinzler, Kenneth W.; Vogelstein, Bert; Maitra, Anirban; Diaz, Luis A.; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A.; Eshleman, James R.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Pancreatic cancer (PC) is the fourth cause of death from cancer in the western world. Majority of patients present with advanced unresectable disease responding poorly to most chemotherapeutic agents. Chemotherapy for PC might be improved by adjusting it to individual genetic profiles. We attempt to identify genetic predictors of chemosensitivity to broad classes of anticancer drugs. Experimental Design Using a panel of genetically defined human PC cell lines, we tested gemcitabine (anti-metabolite), docetaxel (anti-microtubule), mitomycin C (alkylating), irinotecan (topoisomerase I inhibitor), cisplatin (crosslinking), KU0058948 (Parp1 inhibitor), triptolide (terpenoid drug) and artemisinin (control). Results All PC cell lines were sensitive to triptolide and docetaxel. Most PC cells were also sensitive to gemcitabine and MMC. The vast majority of PC cell lines were insensitive to cisplatin, irinotecan, and a Parp1 inhibitor. However, individual cell lines were often sensitive to these compounds in unique ways. We found that DPC4/SMAD4 inactivation sensitized PC cells to cisplatin and irinotecan by 2–4 fold, but they were modestly less sensitive to gemcitabine. PC cells were all sensitive to triptolide and 18% were sensitive to the Parp1 inhibitor. P16/CDKN2A inactivated PC cells were 3–4 fold less sensitive to gemcitabine and MMC. Conclusions Chemosensitivity of PC cells correlated with some specific genetic profiles. These results support the hypothesis that genetic subsets of pancreatic cancer exist, and these genetic backgrounds may permit one to personalize the chemotherapy of PC in the future. Further work will need to confirm these responses and determine their magnitude in vivo. PMID:22753594

  14. Polymorphic Expression of a Human Superficial Bladder Tumor Antigen Defined by Mouse Monoclonal Antibodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fradet, Yves; Islam, Nazrul; Boucher, Lucie; Parent-Vaugeois, Carmen; Tardif, Marc

    1987-10-01

    Three mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), which define a highly restricted antigen, were obtained by simultaneous immunizations with superficial papillary bladder tumor cells and mouse polyclonal serum against normal urothelium. The antigen was detected by the avidin/biotin/peroxidase method in 30/44 superficial bladder tumors (68%) but in only 4/27 infiltrating urothelial cancers (with much less intensity). No normal adult or fetal tissues tested expressed the antigen, including normal urothelium from 40 individuals, 13 of whom had a bladder tumor positive for the antigen. Only 1 of 45 nonbladder tumors showed some reactivity with one of the three mAbs. Serological tests on a large panel of human cancer cell lines and normal cultured cells were negative. The antigen is highly stable and well preserved on paraffin-embedded tissues. Electrophoretic transfer blot experiments with fresh tumor extracts showed that all three mAbs react with a determinant on a component of 300,000 Mr (pI 9.5) and 62,000 Mr (pI 6.5). The antigen shows polymorphic expression at the cellular level on tissue sections and also at a molecular level on immunoblots where the two bands are differentially detected on extracts of a series of tumors but are not visualized on normal urothelium extracts. The characteristics of this antigenic system suggest that it may provide some insights about the biology of bladder cancer. Specific detection of the antigen on 70% of superficial bladder tumors with normal cytology may be useful for their diagnosis and follow-up.

  15. Characterization of Francisella tularensis Schu S4 defined mutants as live-attenuated vaccine candidates.

    PubMed

    Santiago, Araceli E; Mann, Barbara J; Qin, Aiping; Cunningham, Aimee L; Cole, Leah E; Grassel, Christen; Vogel, Stefanie N; Levine, Myron M; Barry, Eileen M

    2015-08-01

    Francisella tularensis (Ft), the etiological agent of tularemia and a Tier 1 select agent, has been previously weaponized and remains a high priority for vaccine development. Ft tularensis (type A) and Ft holarctica (type B) cause most human disease. We selected six attenuating genes from the live vaccine strain (LVS; type B), F. novicida and other intracellular bacteria: FTT0507, FTT0584, FTT0742, FTT1019c (guaA), FTT1043 (mip) and FTT1317c (guaB) and created unmarked deletion mutants of each in the highly human virulent Ft strain Schu S4 (Type A) background. FTT0507, FTT0584, FTT0742 and FTT1043 Schu S4 mutants were not attenuated for virulence in vitro or in vivo. In contrast, Schu S4 gua mutants were unable to replicate in murine macrophages and were attenuated in vivo, with an i.n. LD50 > 10(5) CFU in C57BL/6 mice. However, the gua mutants failed to protect mice against lethal challenge with WT Schu S4, despite demonstrating partial protection in rabbits in a previous study. These results contrast with the highly protective capacity of LVS gua mutants against a lethal LVS challenge in mice, and underscore differences between these strains and the animal models in which they are evaluated, and therefore have important implications for vaccine development.

  16. Bioenergetic properties of human sarcoma cells help define sensitivity to metabolic inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Issaq, Sameer H; Teicher, Beverly A; Monks, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Sarcomas represent a diverse group of malignancies with distinct molecular and pathological features. A better understanding of the alterations associated with specific sarcoma subtypes is critically important to improve sarcoma treatment. Renewed interest in the metabolic properties of cancer cells has led to an exploration of targeting metabolic dependencies as a therapeutic strategy. In this study, we have characterized key bioenergetic properties of human sarcoma cells in order to identify metabolic vulnerabilities between sarcoma subtypes. We have also investigated the effects of compounds that inhibit glycolysis or mitochondrial respiration, either alone or in combination, and examined relationships between bioenergetic parameters and sensitivity to metabolic inhibitors. Using 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG), a competitive inhibitor of glycolysis, oligomycin, an inhibitor of mitochondrial ATP synthase, and metformin, a widely used anti-diabetes drug and inhibitor of complex I of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, we evaluated the effects of metabolic inhibition on sarcoma cell growth and bioenergetic function. Inhibition of glycolysis by 2-DG effectively reduced the viability of alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma cells vs. embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma, osteosarcoma, and normal cells. Interestingly, inhibitors of mitochondrial respiration did not significantly affect viability, but were able to increase sensitivity of sarcomas to inhibition of glycolysis. Additionally, inhibition of glycolysis significantly reduced intracellular ATP levels, and sensitivity to 2-DG-induced growth inhibition was related to respiratory rates and glycolytic dependency. Our findings demonstrate novel relationships between sarcoma bioenergetics and sensitivity to metabolic inhibitors, and suggest that inhibition of metabolic pathways in sarcomas should be further investigated as a potential therapeutic strategy.

  17. Water use regimes: Characterizing direct human interaction with hydrologic systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weiskel, P.K.; Vogel, R.M.; Steeves, P.A.; Zarriello, P.J.; DeSimone, L.A.; Ries, Kernell G.

    2007-01-01

    [1] The sustainability of human water use practices is a rapidly growing concern in the United States and around the world. To better characterize direct human interaction with hydrologic systems (stream basins and aquifers), we introduce the concept of the water use regime. Unlike scalar indicators of anthropogenic hydrologic stress in the literature, the water use regime is a two-dimensional, vector indicator that can be depicted on simple x-y plots of normalized human withdrawals (hout) versus normalized human return flows (hin). Four end-member regimes, natural-flow-dominated (undeveloped), human-flow-dominated (churned), withdrawal-dominated (depleted), and return-flow-dominated (surcharged), are defined in relation to limiting values of hout and hin. For illustration, the water use regimes of 19 diverse hydrologic systems are plotted and interpreted. Several of these systems, including the Yellow River Basin, China, and the California Central Valley Aquifer, are shown to approach particular end-member regimes. Spatial and temporal regime variations, both seasonal and long-term, are depicted. Practical issues of data availability and regime uncertainty are addressed in relation to the statistical properties of the ratio estimators hout and hin. The water use regime is shown to be a useful tool for comparative water resources assessment and for describing both historic and alternative future pathways of water resource development at a range of scales. Copyright 2007 by the American Geophysical Union.

  18. Biochemical and pharmacological characterizations of ESI-09 based EPAC inhibitors: defining the ESI-09 "therapeutic window".

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yingmin; Chen, Haijun; Boulton, Stephen; Mei, Fang; Ye, Na; Melacini, Giuseppe; Zhou, Jia; Cheng, Xiaodong

    2015-03-20

    The cAMP signaling cascade is one of the most frequently targeted pathways for the development of pharmaceutics. A plethora of recent genetic and pharmacological studies suggest that exchange proteins directly activated by cAMP (EPACs) are implicated in multiple pathologies. Selective EPAC inhibitors have been recently developed. One specific inhibitor, ESI-09, has been shown to block EPAC activity and functions, as well as to recapitulate genetic phenotypes of EPAC knockout mice when applied in vivo. However, a recent study raised concern that ESI-09 might act as a non-specific protein denaturant. Herein, we present a detailed biochemical and pharmacological characterization, as well as a structure-activity relationship (SAR) analysis of ESI-09. Our studies show that ESI-09 dose-dependently inhibits activity of both EPAC1 and EPAC2 with apparent IC50 values well below the concentrations shown to induce "protein denaturation". Moreover, the ESI-09's action towards EPAC proteins is highly sensitive to minor modifications of the 3-chlorophenyl moiety. Taken together, these results demonstrate that ESI-09 indeed acts as an EPAC specific antagonist and does not significantly destabilize/denature proteins at pharmacological effective concentrations. This conclusion is further supported by NMR data showing that ESI-09 induces residue-dependent chemical shift changes at low concentrations, while preserving well dispersed peaks.

  19. Defining the three cell lineages of the human blastocyst by single-cell RNA-seq

    PubMed Central

    Blakeley, Paul; Fogarty, Norah M. E.; del Valle, Ignacio; Wamaitha, Sissy E.; Hu, Tim Xiaoming; Elder, Kay; Snell, Philip; Christie, Leila; Robson, Paul; Niakan, Kathy K.

    2015-01-01

    Here, we provide fundamental insights into early human development by single-cell RNA-sequencing of human and mouse preimplantation embryos. We elucidate conserved transcriptional programs along with those that are human specific. Importantly, we validate our RNA-sequencing findings at the protein level, which further reveals differences in human and mouse embryo gene expression. For example, we identify several genes exclusively expressed in the human pluripotent epiblast, including the transcription factor KLF17. Key components of the TGF-β signalling pathway, including NODAL, GDF3, TGFBR1/ALK5, LEFTY1, SMAD2, SMAD4 and TDGF1, are also enriched in the human epiblast. Intriguingly, inhibition of TGF-β signalling abrogates NANOG expression in human epiblast cells, consistent with a requirement for this pathway in pluripotency. Although the key trophectoderm factors Id2, Elf5 and Eomes are exclusively localized to this lineage in the mouse, the human orthologues are either absent or expressed in alternative lineages. Importantly, we also identify genes with conserved expression dynamics, including Foxa2/FOXA2, which we show is restricted to the primitive endoderm in both human and mouse embryos. Comparison of the human epiblast to existing embryonic stem cells (hESCs) reveals conservation of pluripotency but also additional pathways more enriched in hESCs. Our analysis highlights significant differences in human preimplantation development compared with mouse and provides a molecular blueprint to understand human embryogenesis and its relationship to stem cells. PMID:26293300

  20. Defining Advancement Career Paths and Succession Plans: Critical Human Capital Retention Strategies for High-Performing Advancement Divisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Croteau, Jon Derek; Wolk, Holly Gordon

    2010-01-01

    There are many factors that can influence whether a highly talented staff member will build a career within an institution or use it as a stepping stone. This article defines and explores the notions of developing career paths and succession planning and why they are critical human capital investment strategies in retaining the highest performers…

  1. NIH Human Microbiome Project defines normal bacterial makeup of the body

    Cancer.gov

    Microbes inhabit just about every part of the human body, living on the skin, in the gut, and up the nose. Sometimes they cause sickness, but most of the time, microorganisms live in harmony with their human hosts, providing vital functions essential for

  2. Can we define an infant's need from the composition of human milk?

    PubMed

    Stam, José; Sauer, Pieter Jj; Boehm, Günther

    2013-08-01

    Human milk is recommended as the optimal nutrient source for infants and is associated with several short- and long-term benefits for child health. When accepting that human milk is the optimal nutrition for healthy term infants, it should be possible to calculate the nutritional needs of these infants from the intake of human milk. These data can then be used to design the optimal composition of infant formulas. In this review we show that the composition of human milk is rather variable and is dependent on factors such as beginning or end of feeding, duration of lactation, diet and body composition of the mother, maternal genes, and possibly infant factors such as sex. In particular, the composition of fatty acids in human milk is quite variable. It therefore seems questionable to estimate the nutritional needs of an infant exclusively from the intake of human milk. The optimal intake for infants must be based, at least in part, on other information-eg, balance or stable-isotope studies. The present recommendation that the composition of infant formulas should be based on the composition of human milk needs revision.

  3. Transformation of the human ovarian surface epithelium with genetically defined elements.

    PubMed

    Shan, Weiwei; Liu, Jinsong

    2013-01-01

    Success in in vitro transformation of primary cells from the human ovarian surface epithelium (OSE) has provided significant insight to the study of human ovarian cancer. Here, we describe the method used to immortalize and transform OSE by serial introduction of viral and nonviral genetic elements as well as to test the tumorigenicity of hence established cell lines in appropriate animal models. Successful transformation of OSE cells in the laboratory is of critical significance to the study of ovarian cancer. It not only allows for testing the roles of numerous potential oncogenes in initiating and promoting human ovarian cancer but provides a convenient tool to comprehensively dissect ovarian tumorigenesis in the laboratory.

  4. Gonococcal and meningococcal pathogenesis as defined by human cell, cell culture, and organ culture assays.

    PubMed Central

    Stephens, D S

    1989-01-01

    Human cells, cell cultures, and organ cultures have been extremely useful for studying the events that occur when gonococci and meningococci encounter human mucosal surfaces. The specificity and selectivity of these events for human cells are striking and correlate with the adaptation of these pathogens for survival on human mucous membranes. To colonize these sites, meningococci and gonococci have developed mechanisms to damage local host defenses such as the mucociliary blanket, to attach to epithelial cells, and to invade these cells. Attachment to epithelial cells mediated by pili, and to some types of cells mediated by PIIs, serves to anchor the organism close to sources of nutrition and allows multiplication. Intracellular invasion, possibly initiated by the major porin protein, may provide additional nutritional support and protection from host defenses. Mucosal invasion may also result in access of gonococci and meningococci to the bloodstream, leading to dissemination. Images PMID:2497953

  5. Chemically Defined and Xeno-Free Cryopreservation of Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    López, Melany; Bollag, Roni J.; Yu, Jack C.; Isales, Carlos M.; Eroglu, Ali

    2016-01-01

    The stromal compartment of adipose tissue harbors multipotent cells known as adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs). These cells can differentiate into various lineages including osteogenic, chrondrogenic, adipogenic, and neurogenic; this cellular fraction may be easily obtained in large quantities through a clinically safe liposuction procedure. Therefore, ASCs offer exceptional opportunities for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. However, current practices involving ASCs typically use fetal bovine serum (FBS)-based cryopreservation solutions that are associated with risks of immunological reactions and of transmitting infectious diseases and prions. To realize clinical applications of ASCs, serum- and xeno-free defined cryopreservation methods are needed. To this end, an animal product-free chemically defined cryopreservation medium was formulated by adding two antioxidants (reduced glutathione and ascorbic acid 2-phosphate), two polymers (PVA and ficoll), two permeating cryoprotectants (ethylene glycol and dimethylsulfoxide), a disaccharide (trehalose), and a calcium chelator (EGTA) to HEPES-buffered DMEM/F12. To limit the number of experimental groups, the concentration of trehalose, both polymers, and EGTA was fixed while the presence of the permeating CPAs and antioxidants was varied. ASCs suspended either in different versions of the defined medium or in the conventional undefined cryopreservation medium (10% dimethylsulfoxide+10% DMEM/F12+80% serum) were cooled to -70°C at 1°C/min before being plunged into liquid nitrogen. Samples were thawed either in air or in a water bath at 37°C. The presence of antioxidants along with 3.5% concentration of each penetrating cryoprotectant improved the freezing outcome to the level of the undefined cryopreservation medium, but the plating efficiency was still lower than that of unfrozen controls. Subsequently, increasing the concentration of both permeating cryoprotectants to 5% further improved the plating

  6. Chemically Defined and Xeno-Free Cryopreservation of Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    López, Melany; Bollag, Roni J; Yu, Jack C; Isales, Carlos M; Eroglu, Ali

    2016-01-01

    The stromal compartment of adipose tissue harbors multipotent cells known as adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs). These cells can differentiate into various lineages including osteogenic, chrondrogenic, adipogenic, and neurogenic; this cellular fraction may be easily obtained in large quantities through a clinically safe liposuction procedure. Therefore, ASCs offer exceptional opportunities for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. However, current practices involving ASCs typically use fetal bovine serum (FBS)-based cryopreservation solutions that are associated with risks of immunological reactions and of transmitting infectious diseases and prions. To realize clinical applications of ASCs, serum- and xeno-free defined cryopreservation methods are needed. To this end, an animal product-free chemically defined cryopreservation medium was formulated by adding two antioxidants (reduced glutathione and ascorbic acid 2-phosphate), two polymers (PVA and ficoll), two permeating cryoprotectants (ethylene glycol and dimethylsulfoxide), a disaccharide (trehalose), and a calcium chelator (EGTA) to HEPES-buffered DMEM/F12. To limit the number of experimental groups, the concentration of trehalose, both polymers, and EGTA was fixed while the presence of the permeating CPAs and antioxidants was varied. ASCs suspended either in different versions of the defined medium or in the conventional undefined cryopreservation medium (10% dimethylsulfoxide+10% DMEM/F12+80% serum) were cooled to -70°C at 1°C/min before being plunged into liquid nitrogen. Samples were thawed either in air or in a water bath at 37°C. The presence of antioxidants along with 3.5% concentration of each penetrating cryoprotectant improved the freezing outcome to the level of the undefined cryopreservation medium, but the plating efficiency was still lower than that of unfrozen controls. Subsequently, increasing the concentration of both permeating cryoprotectants to 5% further improved the plating

  7. Met-regulated expression signature defines a subset of human hepatocellular carcinomas with poor prognosis and aggressive phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Kaposi-Novak, Pal; Lee, Ju-Seog; Gòmez-Quiroz, Luis; Coulouarn, Cédric; Factor, Valentina M.; Thorgeirsson, Snorri S.

    2006-01-01

    Identification of specific gene expression signatures characteristic of oncogenic pathways is an important step toward molecular classification of human malignancies. Aberrant activation of the Met signaling pathway is frequently associated with tumor progression and metastasis. In this study, we defined the Met-dependent gene expression signature using global gene expression profiling of WT and Met-deficient primary mouse hepatocytes. Newly identified transcriptional targets of the Met pathway included genes involved in the regulation of oxidative stress responses as well as cell motility, cytoskeletal organization, and angiogenesis. To assess the importance of a Met-regulated gene expression signature, a comparative functional genomic approach was applied to 242 human hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) and 7 metastatic liver lesions. Cluster analysis revealed that a subset of human HCCs and all liver metastases shared the Met-induced expression signature. Furthermore, the presence of the Met signature showed significant correlation with increased vascular invasion rate and microvessel density as well as with decreased mean survival time of HCC patients. We conclude that the genetically defined gene expression signatures in combination with comparative functional genomics constitute an attractive paradigm for defining both the function of oncogenic pathways and the clinically relevant subgroups of human cancers. PMID:16710476

  8. FTIR microspectroscopy defines early drug resistant human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cells.

    PubMed

    Junhom, Cholpajsorn; Weerapreeyakul, Natthida; Tanthanuch, Waraporn; Thumanu, Kanjana

    2016-01-01

    Characterization and identification of cancer cell, chemotherapy, resistance is important for both routine cancer therapy and trouble-shooting the medication treatment regimen. Present techniques for characterizing cancer cell resistance require multiple methods and steps, which are time-consuming and expensive. We present a protocol for simple sample handling, rapid detection, and spectral characterization of early resistant hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cells, using Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy (FTIR). Studies on alteration of the biochemical properties in a resistant HepG2 cell were evaluated-viz., increase efflux proteins (MRP-1 and P-gp) activity, total GSH content, anti-apoptotic (Bcl2) expression, and reduction of pro-apoptotic (Bax) proteins. Principle component analysis (PCA) was used to discriminate resistant HepG2 cells from parental HepG2 cells. Three important FTIR spectral regions were evaluated for reproducibility and discrimination ability-viz., lipid (3,000-2,800 cm(-1)), protein (1,700-1,500 cm(-1)) and carbohydrate and nucleic acid (1,300-900 cm(-1)). These 3 spectral regions can be used as spectroscopic biomarkers for differentiation of early or low resistance. This work presents a novel concept for high-throughput, FTIR spectroscopic discrimination of early resistance; thus enabling identification and characterization of cancer cell resistance. PMID:26708618

  9. Defining the Protein-Protein Interaction Network of the Human Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase Family.

    PubMed

    Li, Xu; Tran, Kim My; Aziz, Kathryn E; Sorokin, Alexey V; Chen, Junjie; Wang, Wenqi

    2016-09-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphorylation, which plays a vital role in a variety of human cellular processes, is coordinated by protein tyrosine kinases and protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs). Genomic studies provide compelling evidence that PTPs are frequently mutated in various human cancers, suggesting that they have important roles in tumor suppression. However, the cellular functions and regulatory machineries of most PTPs are still largely unknown. To gain a comprehensive understanding of the protein-protein interaction network of the human PTP family, we performed a global proteomic study. Using a Minkowski distance-based unified scoring environment (MUSE) for the data analysis, we identified 940 high confidence candidate-interacting proteins that comprise the interaction landscape of the human PTP family. Through a gene ontology analysis and functional validations, we connected the PTP family with several key signaling pathways or cellular functions whose associations were previously unclear, such as the RAS-RAF-MEK pathway, the Hippo-YAP pathway, and cytokinesis. Our study provides the first glimpse of a protein interaction network for the human PTP family, linking it to a number of crucial signaling events, and generating a useful resource for future studies of PTPs.

  10. Defining the Genomic Signature of Totipotency and Pluripotency during Early Human Development

    PubMed Central

    Galan, Amparo; Diaz-Gimeno, Patricia; Poo, Maria Eugenia; Valbuena, Diana; Sanchez, Eva; Ruiz, Veronica; Dopazo, Joaquin; Montaner, David; Conesa, Ana; Simon, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    The genetic mechanisms governing human pre-implantation embryo development and the in vitro counterparts, human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), still remain incomplete. Previous global genome studies demonstrated that totipotent blastomeres from day-3 human embryos and pluripotent inner cell masses (ICMs) from blastocysts, display unique and differing transcriptomes. Nevertheless, comparative gene expression analysis has revealed that no significant differences exist between hESCs derived from blastomeres versus those obtained from ICMs, suggesting that pluripotent hESCs involve a new developmental progression. To understand early human stages evolution, we developed an undifferentiation network signature (UNS) and applied it to a differential gene expression profile between single blastomeres from day-3 embryos, ICMs and hESCs. This allowed us to establish a unique signature composed of highly interconnected genes characteristic of totipotency (61 genes), in vivo pluripotency (20 genes), and in vitro pluripotency (107 genes), and which are also proprietary according to functional analysis. This systems biology approach has led to an improved understanding of the molecular and signaling processes governing human pre-implantation embryo development, as well as enabling us to comprehend how hESCs might adapt to in vitro culture conditions. PMID:23614026

  11. Direct conversion of mouse and human fibroblasts to functional melanocytes by defined factors.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ruifeng; Zheng, Ying; Li, Ling; Liu, Shujing; Burrows, Michelle; Wei, Zhi; Nace, Arben; Herlyn, Meenhard; Cui, Rutao; Guo, Wei; Cotsarelis, George; Xu, Xiaowei

    2014-01-01

    Direct reprogramming provides a fundamentally new approach for the generation of patient-specific cells. Here, by screening a pool of candidate transcription factors, we identify that a combination of the three factors, MITF, SOX10 and PAX3, directly converts mouse and human fibroblasts to functional melanocytes. Induced melanocytes (iMels) activate melanocyte-specific networks, express components of pigment production and delivery system and produce melanosomes. Human iMels properly integrate into the dermal-epidermal junction and produce and deliver melanin pigment to surrounding keratinocytes in a 3D organotypic skin reconstruct. Human iMels generate pigmented epidermis and hair follicles in skin reconstitution assays in vivo. The generation of iMels has important implications for studies of melanocyte lineage commitment, pigmentation disorders and cell replacement therapies. PMID:25510211

  12. Recombinant human albumin supports single cell cloning of CHO cells in chemically defined media.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jiang; Wooh, Jong Wei; Hou, Jeff Jia Cheng; Hughes, Benjamin S; Gray, Peter P; Munro, Trent P

    2012-01-01

    Biologic drugs, such as monoclonal antibodies, are commonly made using mammalian cells in culture. The cell lines used for manufacturing should ideally be clonal, meaning derived from a single cell, which represents a technically challenging process. Fetal bovine serum is often used to support low cell density cultures, however, from a regulatory perspective, it is preferable to avoid animal-derived components to increase process consistency and reduce the risk of contamination from adventitious agents. Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells are the most widely used cell line in industry and a large number of serum-free, protein-free, and fully chemically defined growth media are commercially available, although these media alone do not readily support efficient single cell cloning. In this work, we have developed a simple, fully defined, single-cell cloning media, specifically for CHO cells, using commercially available reagents. Our results show that a 1:1 mixture of CD-CHO™ and DMEM/F12 supplemented with 1.5 g/L of recombinant albumin (Albucult®) supports single cell cloning. This formulation can support recovery of single cells in 43% of cultures compared to 62% in the presence of serum.

  13. Defining the Relationship Between Human Error Classes and Technology Intervention Strategies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiegmann, Douglas A.; Rantanen, Esa; Crisp, Vicki K. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    One of the main factors in all aviation accidents is human error. The NASA Aviation Safety Program (AvSP), therefore, has identified several human-factors safety technologies to address this issue. Some technologies directly address human error either by attempting to reduce the occurrence of errors or by mitigating the negative consequences of errors. However, new technologies and system changes may also introduce new error opportunities or even induce different types of errors. Consequently, a thorough understanding of the relationship between error classes and technology "fixes" is crucial for the evaluation of intervention strategies outlined in the AvSP, so that resources can be effectively directed to maximize the benefit to flight safety. The purpose of the present project, therefore, was to examine the repositories of human factors data to identify the possible relationship between different error class and technology intervention strategies. The first phase of the project, which is summarized here, involved the development of prototype data structures or matrices that map errors onto "fixes" (and vice versa), with the hope of facilitating the development of standards for evaluating safety products. Possible follow-on phases of this project are also discussed. These additional efforts include a thorough and detailed review of the literature to fill in the data matrix and the construction of a complete database and standards checklists.

  14. Characterization of the human blood plasma proteome

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Yufeng; Kim, Jeongkwon; Strittmatter, Eric F.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Camp, David G.; Fang, Ruihua; Tolic, Nikola; Moore, Ronald J.; Smith, Richard D.

    2005-10-15

    We describe methods for broad characterization of the human plasma proteome. The combination of stepwise IgG and albumin protein depletion by affinity chromatography and ultrahigh-efficiency capillary liquid chromatography separations coupled to ion trap-tandem mass spectrometry enabled identification of 2392 proteins from a single plasma sample with an estimated confidence level of >94%, and an additional 2198 proteins with an estimated confidence level of 80%. The relative abundances of the identified proteins span a range of over eight orders of magnitude in concentration (<30 pg/mL to {approx}30 mg/mL), facilitated by the attomole-level sensitivity of the analysis methods. More than 80% of the observed proteins demonstrate interactions with IgG and/or albumin. The results from this study provide a basis for a wide range of plasma proteomics studies, including broad quantitation of relative abundances in comparative studies for the identification of novel protein disease markers, as well as further studies of protein-protein interactions.

  15. 3,4-Methylenedioxy analogues of amphetamine: defining the risks to humans.

    PubMed

    Hegadoren, K M; Baker, G B; Bourin, M

    1999-03-01

    The 3,4-methylenedioxy analogues of amphetamine [MDMA ("Ecstasy", "Adam"), MDA ("Love") and MDE ("Eve")] are recreational drugs that produce feelings of euphoria and energy and a desire to socialize, which go far to explain their current popularity as "rave drugs". In addition to these positive effects, the drugs are relatively inexpensive to purchase and have the reputation of being safe compared to other recreational drugs. Yet there is mounting evidence that these drugs do not deserve this reputation of being safe. This review examines the relevant human and animal literature to delineate the possible risks MDMA, MDA and MDE engender with oral consumption in humans. Following a summary of the behavioral and cognitive effects of MDMA, MDA and MDE, risks will be discussed in terms of toxicity, psychopathology, neurotoxicity, abuse potential and the potential for drug-drug interactions associated with acute and chronic use.

  16. Hemocompatibility of polyampholyte copolymers with well-defined charge bias in human blood.

    PubMed

    Shih, Yu-Ju; Chang, Yung; Quemener, Damien; Yang, Hui-Shan; Jhong, Jheng-Fong; Ho, Feng-Ming; Higuchi, Akon; Chang, Yu

    2014-06-10

    In this work, the hemocompatibility of polyampholyte copolymers from the mixed-charge copolymerization of negatively charged 3-sulfopropyl methacrylate (SA) and positively charged [2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl] trimethylammonium (TMA) was studied. Charge-bias variation of the prepared poly(SA-co-TMA) copolymers can be controlled using the regulated SA and TMA monomer ratio via homogeneous free radical copolymerization. A systematic study of how charge-bias variations in poly(SA-co-TMA) copolymers affect the hemocompatibility in human blood plasma was reported. The hydrodynamic size of prepared polymers and copolymers is determined to illustrate the correlations between intermolecular cationic/anionic associations and the blood compatibility of polySA, poly(SA-co-TMA), and polyTMA suspensions in human blood plasma. It was found that the protein resistance and hydration capability of prepared copolymers can be effectively controlled by regulating the charge balance of the SA/TMA compositions in poly(SA-co-TMA). The results suggest that polyampholyte copolymers of poly(SA-co-TMA) with overall charge neutrality have a high hydration capability and the best antifouling, anticoagulant, and antihemolytic activities as well as zwitterionic sulfobetaine-based homopolymers when in contact with blood plasma at human body temperature. PMID:24832682

  17. X-ray structures define human P2X3 receptor gating cycle and antagonist action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansoor, Steven E.; Lü, Wei; Oosterheert, Wout; Shekhar, Mrinal; Tajkhorshid, Emad; Gouaux, Eric

    2016-10-01

    P2X receptors are trimeric, non-selective cation channels activated by ATP that have important roles in the cardiovascular, neuronal and immune systems. Despite their central function in human physiology and although they are potential targets of therapeutic agents, there are no structures of human P2X receptors. The mechanisms of receptor desensitization and ion permeation, principles of antagonism, and complete structures of the pore-forming transmembrane domains of these receptors remain unclear. Here we report X-ray crystal structures of the human P2X3 receptor in apo/resting, agonist-bound/open-pore, agonist-bound/closed-pore/desensitized and antagonist-bound/closed states. The open state structure harbours an intracellular motif we term the ‘cytoplasmic cap’, which stabilizes the open state of the ion channel pore and creates lateral, phospholipid-lined cytoplasmic fenestrations for water and ion egress. The competitive antagonists TNP-ATP and A-317491 stabilize the apo/resting state and reveal the interactions responsible for competitive inhibition. These structures illuminate the conformational rearrangements that underlie P2X receptor gating and provide a foundation for the development of new pharmacological agents.

  18. Defining minimum essential factors to derive highly pure human endothelial cells from iPS/ES cells in an animal substance-free system.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yu-Ting; I-Shing Yu; Tsai, Kuen-Jer; Shih, Chien-Yu; Hwang, Shiaw-Min; Su, Ih-Jen; Chiang, Po-Min

    2015-04-13

    It is desirable to obtain unlimited supplies of endothelial cells for research and therapeutics. However, current methods of deriving endothelial cells from humans suffer from issues, such as limited supplies, contamination from animal substances, and lengthy/complicated procedures. In this article we developed a way to differentiate human iPS and ES cells to highly pure endothelial cells in 5 days. The chemically defined system is robust, easy to perform, and free of animal substances. Using the system, we verified that combined TGFβ and canonical Wnt agonists are essential and sufficient for iPS/ES cell-to-mesoderm transition. Besides, VEGF-KDR signaling alone is required for endothelial formation at high density while supplementation with FGF allows for colonial endothelial differentiation. Finally, anti-adsorptive agents could enrich the endothelial output by allowing selective attachment of the endothelial precursors. The system was validated to work on multiple iPS/ES cells lines to produce endothelial cells capable of forming capillary-like structures in vitro and integrating into host vasculature in vivo. In sum, the simple yet robust differentiation system permits the unlimited supply of human endothelial cells. The defined and animal substance-free nature of the system is compatible with clinical applications and characterization of endothelial differentiation in an unbiased manner.

  19. Defining Minimum Essential Factors to Derive Highly Pure Human Endothelial Cells from iPS/ES Cells in an Animal Substance-Free System

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yu-Ting; I.-Shing Yu; Tsai, Kuen-Jer; Shih, Chien-Yu; Hwang, Shiaw-Min; Su, Ih-Jen; Chiang, Po-Min

    2015-01-01

    It is desirable to obtain unlimited supplies of endothelial cells for research and therapeutics. However, current methods of deriving endothelial cells from humans suffer from issues, such as limited supplies, contamination from animal substances, and lengthy/complicated procedures. In this article we developed a way to differentiate human iPS and ES cells to highly pure endothelial cells in 5 days. The chemically defined system is robust, easy to perform, and free of animal substances. Using the system, we verified that combined TGFβ and canonical Wnt agonists are essential and sufficient for iPS/ES cell-to-mesoderm transition. Besides, VEGF-KDR signaling alone is required for endothelial formation at high density while supplementation with FGF allows for colonial endothelial differentiation. Finally, anti-adsorptive agents could enrich the endothelial output by allowing selective attachment of the endothelial precursors. The system was validated to work on multiple iPS/ES cells lines to produce endothelial cells capable of forming capillary-like structures in vitro and integrating into host vasculature in vivo. In sum, the simple yet robust differentiation system permits the unlimited supply of human endothelial cells. The defined and animal substance-free nature of the system is compatible with clinical applications and characterization of endothelial differentiation in an unbiased manner. PMID:25864432

  20. Defined plant extracts can protect human cells against combined xenobiotic effects

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Pollutants representative of common environmental contaminants induce intracellular toxicity in human cells, which is generally amplified in combinations. We wanted to test the common pathways of intoxication and detoxification in human embryonic and liver cell lines. We used various pollutants such as Roundup residues, Bisphenol-A and Atrazine, and five precise medicinal plant extracts called Circ1, Dig1, Dig2, Sp1, and Uro1 in order to understand whether specific molecular actions took place or not. Methods Kidney and liver are major detoxification organs. We have studied embryonic kidney and hepatic human cell lines E293 and HepG2. The intoxication was induced on the one hand by a formulation of one of the most common herbicides worldwide, Roundup 450 GT+ (glyphosate and specific adjuvants), and on the other hand by a mixture of Bisphenol-A and Atrazine, all found in surface waters, feed and food. The prevention and curative effects of plant extracts were also measured on mitochondrial succinate dehydrogenase activity, on the entry of radiolabelled glyphosate (in Roundup) in cells, and on cytochromes P450 1A2 and 3A4 as well as glutathione-S-transferase. Results Clear toxicities of pollutants were observed on both cell lines at very low sub-agricultural dilutions. The prevention of such phenomena took place within 48 h with the plant extracts tested, with success rates ranging between 25-34% for the E293 intoxicated by Roundup, and surprisingly up to 71% for the HepG2. By contrast, after intoxication, no plant extract was capable of restoring E293 viability within 48 h, however, two medicinal plant combinations did restore the Bisphenol-A/Atrazine intoxicated HepG2 up to 24-28%. The analysis of underlying mechanisms revealed that plant extracts were not capable of preventing radiolabelled glyphosate from entering cells; however Dig2 did restore the CYP1A2 activity disrupted by Roundup, and had only a mild preventive effect on the CYP3A4, and no effect

  1. Improvement of Traceability of Widely-Defined Measurements in the Field of Humanities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapozhnikova, K.; Taymanov, R.

    2010-01-01

    In the last decades, a tendency to extend the domain of "fuzzy" measurements of multiparametric quantities to the field of humanities has been observed. In the measurement process, the "fuzzy" measurements should meet the requirements of metrological traceability. The paper deals with the approach proposed for developing a measurement model of "fuzzy" measurements. The approach suggested is illustrated by an example of a model for measuring the emotions contained in musical fragments. The model is based on the hypothesis that permits to explain the origination of emotions in the evolution process.

  2. Wide-field retinotopy defines human cortical visual area v6.

    PubMed

    Pitzalis, Sabrina; Galletti, Claudio; Huang, Ruey-Song; Patria, Fabiana; Committeri, Giorgia; Galati, Gaspare; Fattori, Patrizia; Sereno, Martin I

    2006-07-26

    The retinotopic organization of a newly identified visual area near the midline in the dorsalmost part of the human parieto-occipital sulcus was mapped using high-field functional magnetic resonance imaging, cortical surface-based analysis, and wide-field retinotopic stimulation. This area was found in all 34 subjects that were mapped. It represents the contralateral visual hemifield in both hemispheres of all subjects, with upper fields located anterior and medial to areas V2/V3, and lower fields medial and slightly anterior to areas V3/V3A. It contains a representation of the center of gaze distinct from V3A, a large representation of the visual periphery, and a mirror-image representation of the visual field. Based on similarity in position, visuotopic organization, and relationship with the neighboring extrastriate visual areas, we suggest it might be the human homolog of macaque area V6, and perhaps of area M (medial) or DM (dorsomedial) of New World primates.

  3. NKp80 Defines a Critical Step during Human Natural Killer Cell Development.

    PubMed

    Freud, Aharon G; Keller, Karen A; Scoville, Steven D; Mundy-Bosse, Bethany L; Cheng, Stephanie; Youssef, Youssef; Hughes, Tiffany; Zhang, Xiaoli; Mo, Xiaokui; Porcu, Pierluigi; Baiocchi, Robert A; Yu, Jianhua; Carson, William E; Caligiuri, Michael A

    2016-07-12

    Human natural killer (NK) cells develop in secondary lymphoid tissues (SLTs) through distinct stages. We identified two SLT lineage (Lin)(-)CD34(-)CD117(+/-)CD94(+)CD16(-) "stage 4" subsets according to expression of the C-type lectin-like surface-activating receptor, NKp80: NKp80(-) (stage "4a") and NKp80(+) (stage "4b"). Whereas stage 4b cells expressed more of the transcription factors T-BET and EOMES, produced interferon-gamma, and were cytotoxic, stage 4a cells expressed more of the transcription factors RORγt and AHR and produced interleukin-22, similar to SLT Lin(-)CD34(-)CD117(+)CD94(-)CD16(-) "stage 3" cells, whose phenotype overlaps with that of group 3 innate lymphoid cells (ILC3s). Co-culture with dendritic cells or transplantation into immunodeficient mice produced mature NK cells from stage 3 and stage 4a populations. These data identify NKp80 as a marker of NK cell maturity in SLTs and support a model of human NK cell development through a stage 4a intermediate with ILC3-associated features.

  4. Expression of the MyoD1 muscle determination gene defines differentiation capability but not tumorigenicity of human rhabdomyosarcomas.

    PubMed Central

    Hiti, A L; Bogenmann, E; Gonzales, F; Jones, P A

    1989-01-01

    Several human rhabdomyosarcoma cell lines, cultured primary tumor explants, and biopsies of tumor and normal skeletal muscle tissue expressed a 2.0-kilobase transcript that hybridized to the mouse muscle determination gene MyoD1. This transcript was found in tumor cell lines and primary explants that developed multinucleated myotubes but was absent in Wilms' tumors or cell lines and primary explants that developed multinucleated myotubes but was absent in Wilms' tumors or cell lines derived from other mesenchymal tumor cell types. Expression of the human homolog of MyoD1 therefore can define a tumor as a rhabdomyosarcoma. Transfection of the mouse MyoD1 gene into the human rhabdomyosarcoma cell line RD increased the ability of the tumor cells to differentiate into multinucleated myotubes and enhanced myosin heavy-chain gene expression but did not decrease tumorigenicity in nude mice. Images PMID:2601695

  5. Tenascin C Promotes Hematoendothelial Development and T Lymphoid Commitment from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells in Chemically Defined Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Uenishi, Gene; Theisen, Derek; Lee, Jeong-Hee; Kumar, Akhilesh; Raymond, Matt; Vodyanik, Maxim; Swanson, Scott; Stewart, Ron; Thomson, James; Slukvin, Igor

    2014-01-01

    Summary The recent identification of hemogenic endothelium (HE) in human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC) cultures presents opportunities to investigate signaling pathways that are essential for blood development from endothelium and provides an exploratory platform for de novo generation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). However, the use of poorly defined human or animal components limits the utility of the current differentiation systems for studying specific growth factors required for HE induction and manufacturing clinical-grade therapeutic blood cells. Here, we identified chemically defined conditions required to produce HE from hPSCs growing in Essential 8 (E8) medium and showed that Tenascin C (TenC), an extracellular matrix protein associated with HSC niches, strongly promotes HE and definitive hematopoiesis in this system. hPSCs differentiated in chemically defined conditions undergo stages of development similar to those previously described in hPSCs cocultured on OP9 feeders, including the formation of VE-Cadherin+CD73−CD235a/CD43− HE and hematopoietic progenitors with myeloid and T lymphoid potential. PMID:25448067

  6. Oncogenic MITF dysregulation in clear cell sarcoma: defining the MiT family of human cancers.

    PubMed

    Davis, Ian J; Kim, Jessica J; Ozsolak, Fatih; Widlund, Hans R; Rozenblatt-Rosen, Orit; Granter, Scott R; Du, Jinyan; Fletcher, Jonathan A; Denny, Christopher T; Lessnick, Stephen L; Linehan, W Marston; Kung, Andrew L; Fisher, David E

    2006-06-01

    Clear cell sarcoma (CCS) harbors a pathognomonic chromosomal translocation fusing the Ewing's sarcoma gene (EWS) to the CREB family transcription factor ATF1 and exhibits melanocytic features. We show that EWS-ATF1 occupies the MITF promoter, mimicking melanocyte-stimulating hormone (MSH) signaling to induce expression of MITF, the melanocytic master transcription factor and an amplified oncogene in melanoma. Knockdown/rescue studies revealed that MITF mediates the requirement of EWS-ATF1 for CCS survival in vitro and in vivo as well as for melanocytic differentiation. Moreover, MITF and TFE3 reciprocally rescue one another in lines derived from CCS or pediatric renal carcinoma. Seemingly unrelated tumors thus employ distinct strategies to oncogenically dysregulate the MiT family, collectively broadening the definition of MiT-associated human cancers.

  7. Defining the Interaction of Human Soluble Lectin ZG16p and Mycobacterial Phosphatidylinositol Mannosides.

    PubMed

    Hanashima, Shinya; Götze, Sebastian; Liu, Yan; Ikeda, Akemi; Kojima-Aikawa, Kyoko; Taniguchi, Naoyuki; Varón Silva, Daniel; Feizi, Ten; Seeberger, Peter H; Yamaguchi, Yoshiki

    2015-07-01

    ZG16p is a soluble mammalian lectin that interacts with mannose and heparan sulfate. Here we describe detailed analysis of the interaction of human ZG16p with mycobacterial phosphatidylinositol mannosides (PIMs) by glycan microarray and NMR. Pathogen-related glycan microarray analysis identified phosphatidylinositol mono- and di-mannosides (PIM1 and PIM2) as novel ligand candidates of ZG16p. Saturation transfer difference (STD) NMR and transferred NOE experiments with chemically synthesized PIM glycans indicate that PIMs preferentially interact with ZG16p by using the mannose residues. The binding site of PIM was identified by chemical-shift perturbation experiments with uniformly (15)N-labeled ZG16p. NMR results with docking simulations suggest a binding mode of ZG16p and PIM glycan; this will help to elucidate the physiological role of ZG16p. PMID:25919894

  8. Onset of immune senescence defined by unbiased pyrosequencing of human immunoglobulin mRNA repertoires.

    PubMed

    Rubelt, Florian; Sievert, Volker; Knaust, Florian; Diener, Christian; Lim, Theam Soon; Skriner, Karl; Klipp, Edda; Reinhardt, Richard; Lehrach, Hans; Konthur, Zoltán

    2012-01-01

    The immune system protects us from foreign substances or pathogens by generating specific antibodies. The variety of immunoglobulin (Ig) paratopes for antigen recognition is a result of the V(D)J rearrangement mechanism, while a fast and efficient immune response is mediated by specific immunoglobulin isotypes obtained through class switch recombination (CSR). To get a better understanding on how antibody-based immune protection works and how it changes with age, the interdependency between these two parameters need to be addressed. Here, we have performed an in depth analysis of antibody repertoires of 14 healthy donors representing different gender and age groups. For this task, we developed a unique pyrosequencing approach, which is able to monitor the expression levels of all immunoglobulin V(D)J recombinations of all isotypes including subtypes in an unbiased and quantitative manner. Our results show that donors have individual immunoglobulin repertoires and cannot be clustered according to V(D)J recombination patterns, neither by age nor gender. However, after incorporating isotype-specific analysis and considering CSR information into hierarchical clustering the situation changes. For the first time the donors cluster according to age and separate into young adults and elderly donors (>50). As a direct consequence, this clustering defines the onset of immune senescence at the age of fifty and beyond. The observed age-dependent reduction of CSR ability proposes a feasible explanation why reduced efficacy of vaccination is seen in the elderly and implies that novel vaccine strategies for the elderly should include the "Golden Agers". PMID:23226220

  9. The chemical interactome space between the human host and the genetically defined gut metabotypes.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, Ulrik Plesner; Nielsen, Henrik Bjørn; Hildebrand, Falk; Raes, Jeroen; Sicheritz-Ponten, Thomas; Kouskoumvekaki, Irene; Panagiotou, Gianni

    2013-04-01

    The bacteria that colonize the gastrointestinal tracts of mammals represent a highly selected microbiome that has a profound influence on human physiology by shaping the host's metabolic and immune system activity. Despite the recent advances on the biological principles that underlie microbial symbiosis in the gut of mammals, mechanistic understanding of the contributions of the gut microbiome and how variations in the metabotypes are linked to the host health are obscure. Here, we mapped the entire metabolic potential of the gut microbiome based solely on metagenomics sequencing data derived from fecal samples of 124 Europeans (healthy, obese and with inflammatory bowel disease). Interestingly, three distinct clusters of individuals with high, medium and low metabolic potential were observed. By illustrating these results in the context of bacterial population, we concluded that the abundance of the Prevotella genera is a key factor indicating a low metabolic potential. These metagenome-based metabolic signatures were used to study the interaction networks between bacteria-specific metabolites and human proteins. We found that thirty-three such metabolites interact with disease-relevant protein complexes several of which are highly expressed in cells and tissues involved in the signaling and shaping of the adaptive immune system and associated with squamous cell carcinoma and bladder cancer. From this set of metabolites, eighteen are present in DrugBank providing evidence that we carry a natural pharmacy in our guts. Furthermore, we established connections between the systemic effects of non-antibiotic drugs and the gut microbiome of relevance to drug side effects and health-care solutions.

  10. Defining the HLA class I‐associated viral antigen repertoire from HIV‐1‐infected human cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hongbing; Partridge, Thomas; Llano, Anuska; Cedeño, Samandhy; Fischer, Roman; Charles, Philip D.; Dudek, Nadine L.; Mothe, Beatriz; Crespo, Manuel; Fischer, William M.; Korber, Bette T. M.; Nielsen, Morten; Borrow, Persephone; Purcell, Anthony W.; Brander, Christian; Dorrell, Lucy; Kessler, Benedikt M.; Hanke, Tomáš

    2015-01-01

    Recognition and eradication of infected cells by cytotoxic T lymphocytes is a key defense mechanism against intracellular pathogens. High‐throughput definition of HLA class I‐associated immunopeptidomes by mass spectrometry is an increasingly important analytical tool to advance our understanding of the induction of T‐cell responses against pathogens such as HIV‐1. We utilized a liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry workflow including de novo‐assisted database searching to define the HLA class I‐associated immunopeptidome of HIV‐1‐infected human cells. We here report for the first time the identification of 75 HIV‐1‐derived peptides bound to HLA class I complexes that were purified directly from HIV‐1‐infected human primary CD4+ T cells and the C8166 human T‐cell line. Importantly, one‐third of eluted HIV‐1 peptides had not been previously known to be presented by HLA class I. Over 82% of the identified sequences originated from viral protein regions for which T‐cell responses have previously been reported but for which the precise HLA class I‐binding sequences have not yet been defined. These results validate and expand the current knowledge of virus‐specific antigenic peptide presentation during HIV‐1 infection and provide novel targets for T‐cell vaccine development. PMID:26467324

  11. Defining the human hippocampus in cerebral magnetic resonance images—An overview of current segmentation protocols

    PubMed Central

    Konrad, C.; Ukas, T.; Nebel, C.; Arolt, V.; Toga, A.W.; Narr, K.L.

    2011-01-01

    Due to its crucial role for memory processes and its relevance in neurological and psychiatric disorders, the hippocampus has been the focus of neuroimaging research for several decades. In vivo measurement of human hippocampal volume and shape with magnetic resonance imaging has become an important element of neuroimaging research. Nevertheless, volumetric findings are still inconsistent and controversial for many psychiatric conditions including affective disorders. Here we review the wealth of anatomical protocols for the delineation of the hippocampus in MR images, taking into consideration 71 different published protocols from the neuroimaging literature, with an emphasis on studies of affective disorders. We identified large variations between protocols in five major areas. 1) The inclusion/exclusion of hippocampal white matter (alveus and fimbria), 2) the definition of the anterior hippocampal–amygdala border, 3) the definition of the posterior border and the extent to which the hippocampal tail is included, 4) the definition of the inferior medial border of the hippocampus, and 5) the use of varying arbitrary lines. These are major sources of variance between different protocols. In contrast, the definitions of the lateral, superior, and inferior borders are less disputed. Directing resources to replication studies that incorporate characteristics of the segmentation protocols presented herein may help resolve seemingly contradictory volumetric results between prior neuroimaging studies and facilitate the appropriate selection of protocols for manual or automated delineation of the hippocampus for future research purposes. PMID:19447182

  12. Self-renewal of human embryonic stem cells on defined synthetic electrospun nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Deepak; Dale, Tina P; Yang, Ying; Forsyth, Nicholas R

    2015-12-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are conventionally expanded and maintained in vitro on biological substrates. Synthetic electrospun polymer nanofibers have the potential to act as non-biological substrates in the culture of hESCs. Three synthetic, FDA approved polymers: poly-ɛ-caprolactone (PCL), poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA) and poly lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) were electrospun as nanofibers (random or aligned conformations) on glass coverslips and their supportive role in hESC culture examined. Clonogenicity experiments demonstrated that nanofibrous scaffolds (PCL aligned and random, PLLA aligned and PLGA aligned) supported hESC adhesion and expansion. A significantly greater number of colonies were observed on PCL-aligned nanofibrous scaffolds in comparison to PLLA-aligned and PLGA-aligned substrates (p < 0.05). hESC colonies were significantly larger on PCL aligned nanofibrous substrates when compared to other polymer substrates (p < 0.05-0.001), where fiber diameter played a pivotal role in support of hESC clonogenicity (on PCL). Retention of pluripotentiality was confirmed by expression of Alkaline phosphatase, OCT-3/4 and Nanog expression on PCL scaffolds and the expression of transcripts representative of mesoderm (ACTC1), ectoderm (SOX1) and endoderm (AFP) during subsequent spontaneous in vitro differentiation. These results demonstrate the potential of nanofibers as xeno-free scaffolds supportive of hESC adhesion, self-renewal and differentiation in in vitro culture conditions. PMID:26610861

  13. Defining the proteome of human iris, ciliary body, retinal pigment epithelium, and choroid.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pingbo; Kirby, David; Dufresne, Craig; Chen, Yan; Turner, Randi; Ferri, Sara; Edward, Deepak P; Van Eyk, Jennifer E; Semba, Richard D

    2016-04-01

    The iris is a fine structure that controls the amount of light that enters the eye. The ciliary body controls the shape of the lens and produces aqueous humor. The retinal pigment epithelium and choroid (RPE/choroid) are essential in supporting the retina and absorbing light energy that enters the eye. Proteins were extracted from iris, ciliary body, and RPE/choroid tissues of eyes from five individuals and fractionated using SDS-PAGE. After in-gel digestion, peptides were analyzed using LC-MS/MS on an Orbitrap Elite mass spectrometer. In iris, ciliary body, and RPE/choroid, we identified 2959, 2867, and 2755 nonredundant proteins with peptide and protein false-positive rates of <0.1% and <1%, respectively. Forty-three unambiguous protein isoforms were identified in iris, ciliary body, and RPE/choroid. Four "missing proteins" were identified in ciliary body based on ≥2 proteotypic peptides. The mass spectrometric proteome database of the human iris, ciliary body, and RPE/choroid may serve as a valuable resource for future investigations of the eye in health and disease. The MS proteomics data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium via the PRIDE partner repository with the dataset identifiers PXD001424 and PXD002194. PMID:26834087

  14. DEAD-box helicase DP103 defines metastatic potential of human breast cancers

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Eun Myoung; Sin Hay, Hui; Lee, Moon Hee; Goh, Jen Nee; Tan, Tuan Zea; Sen, Yin Ping; Lim, See Wee; Yousef, Einas M.; Ong, Hooi Tin; Thike, Aye Aye; Kong, Xiangjun; Wu, Zhengsheng; Mendoz, Earnest; Sun, Wei; Salto-Tellez, Manuel; Lim, Chwee Teck; Lobie, Peter E.; Lim, Yoon Pin; Yap, Celestial T.; Zeng, Qi; Sethi, Gautam; Lee, Martin B.; Tan, Patrick; Goh, Boon Cher; Miller, Lance D.; Thiery, Jean Paul; Zhu, Tao; Gaboury, Louis; Tan, Puay Hoon; Hui, Kam Man; Yip, George Wai-Cheong; Miyamoto, Shigeki; Kumar, Alan Prem; Tergaonkar, Vinay

    2014-01-01

    Despite advancement in breast cancer treatment, 30% of patients with early breast cancers experience relapse with distant metastasis. It is a challenge to identify patients at risk for relapse; therefore, the identification of markers and therapeutic targets for metastatic breast cancers is imperative. Here, we identified DP103 as a biomarker and metastasis-driving oncogene in human breast cancers and determined that DP103 elevates matrix metallopeptidase 9 (MMP9) levels, which are associated with metastasis and invasion through activation of NF-κB. In turn, NF-κB signaling positively activated DP103 expression. Furthermore, DP103 enhanced TGF-β–activated kinase-1 (TAK1) phosphorylation of NF-κB–activating IκB kinase 2 (IKK2), leading to increased NF-κB activity. Reduction of DP103 expression in invasive breast cancer cells reduced phosphorylation of IKK2, abrogated NF-κB–mediated MMP9 expression, and impeded metastasis in a murine xenograft model. In breast cancer patient tissues, elevated levels of DP103 correlated with enhanced MMP9, reduced overall survival, and reduced survival after relapse. Together, these data indicate that a positive DP103/NF-κB feedback loop promotes constitutive NF-κB activation in invasive breast cancers and activation of this pathway is linked to cancer progression and the acquisition of chemotherapy resistance. Furthermore, our results suggest that DP103 has potential as a therapeutic target for breast cancer treatment. PMID:25083991

  15. Characterization of AFLP Sequences From Regions of Maize B Chromosome Defined by 12 B-10L Translocations

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Shu-Fen; Lin, Yao-Pin; Lin, Bor-yaw

    2005-01-01

    Maize B chromosome sequences have been previously cloned by microdissection, and all are proven to be highly repetitive, to be homologous to the normal complement, and to show no similarity to any published gene other than mobile elements. In this study, we isolated sequences from defined B regions. The strategy involved identification and then mapping of AFLP-derived B fragments before cloning. Of 14 B AFLPs, 13 were mapped by 12 B-10L translocations: 3 around the centromeric knob region, 3 in the proximal euchromatic, 1 around the border of proximal euchromatic and distal heterochromatic, and 6 in the distal heterochromatic region of the B long arm. The AFLP fragments were cloned and sequenced. Analogous to the microdissected sequences, all sequences were repetitive, and all but two were highly homologous to the A chromosomes. FISH signals of all but three clones appeared in pachytene B as well as in somatic A and B chromosomes. None of these clones exhibits identity to any published gene. Six clones displayed homology to two centromeric BACs, four to sequences of chromosomes 3, 4, 7, and 10, four to retrotransposons, and three to no sequence deposited in GenBank. Furthermore, flanking regions of two highly B-specific clones were characterized, showing extension of a B-exclusive nature. The possibility of the presence of novel B repeat(s) is discussed. PMID:15489531

  16. Defining global syndromes of fire and the relationship of these to biomes, climate and human activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmann, C.; Archibald, S.; Gomez-Dans, J.; Bradstock, R.

    2012-12-01

    . There were, however, striking correlations between particular pyromes and biomes. For example frequent, intense, large fires were associated with grasslands and tropical savanna in 75% of instances. Rare intense, large fires were dominantly associated with boreal forests. Crucially, we identified a fifth pyrome that we consider to represent human-engineered modifications to fire characteristics. This pyrome, characterised by infrequent, cool, small fires that can occur throughout the year, occurs within all biomes, and was dominant in regions of extensive land transformation. Our research presents a conceptual framework that may help develop capacity to predict future fire, as our analysis suggests that pathways of change in future fire regimes are unlikely to be unilaterally responsive to climate in a deterministic way.

  17. Gene Expression Correlations in Human Cancer Cell Lines Define Molecular Interaction Networks for Epithelial Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Kohn, Kurt W.; Zeeberg, Barry M.; Reinhold, William C.; Pommier, Yves

    2014-01-01

    Using gene expression data to enhance our knowledge of control networks relevant to cancer biology and therapy is a challenging but urgent task. Based on the premise that genes that are expressed together in a variety of cell types are likely to functions together, we derived mutually correlated genes that function together in various processes in epithelial-like tumor cells. Expression-correlated genes were derived from data for the NCI-60 human tumor cell lines, as well as data from the Broad Institute’s CCLE cell lines. NCI-60 cell lines that selectively expressed a mutually correlated subset of tight junction genes served as a signature for epithelial-like cancer cells. Those signature cell lines served as a seed to derive other correlated genes, many of which had various other epithelial-related functions. Literature survey yielded molecular interaction and function information about those genes, from which molecular interaction maps were assembled. Many of the genes had epithelial functions unrelated to tight junctions, demonstrating that new function categories were elicited. The most highly correlated genes were implicated in the following epithelial functions: interactions at tight junctions (CLDN7, CLDN4, CLDN3, MARVELD3, MARVELD2, TJP3, CGN, CRB3, LLGL2, EPCAM, LNX1); interactions at adherens junctions (CDH1, ADAP1, CAMSAP3); interactions at desmosomes (PPL, PKP3, JUP); transcription regulation of cell-cell junction complexes (GRHL1 and 2); epithelial RNA splicing regulators (ESRP1 and 2); epithelial vesicle traffic (RAB25, EPN3, GRHL2, EHF, ADAP1, MYO5B); epithelial Ca(+2) signaling (ATP2C2, S100A14, BSPRY); terminal differentiation of epithelial cells (OVOL1 and 2, ST14, PRSS8, SPINT1 and 2); maintenance of apico-basal polarity (RAB25, LLGL2, EPN3). The findings provide a foundation for future studies to elucidate the functions of regulatory networks specific to epithelial-like cancer cells and to probe for anti-cancer drug targets. PMID:24940735

  18. Biological consequences from interaction of nanosized titanium(iv) oxides with defined human blood components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stella, Aaron

    The utility of engineered nanomaterials is growing, particularly the titanium(iv) oxide (titanium dioxide, TiO2) nanoparticles. TiO 2 is very useful for brightening paints, and coloring foods. Nano-sized TiO2 is also useful for sunscreens, cosmetics, and can be utilized as a photocatalyst. However, the nanometer size of the TiO2 nanoparticle is a characteristic that may contribute oxidative stress to red blood cells (RBCs) in humans. This study utilized screening methods to evaluate different forms of TiO2 nanoparticles which differ by primary particle size, specific surface area, crystalline phase, and surface polarity. RBCs are rich in the intracellular antioxidant glutathione (GSH). HPLC analysis revealed that some TiO2 nanoparticles caused oxidation of GSH to glutathione disulfide (GSSG). Vitamin E is a major membrane-bound antioxidant. Vitamin E levels were then determined by HPLC in the RBC membrane after exposure to TiO2 nanoparticles. The HPLC results showed that each nanoparticle oxidized RBC glutathione and membrane vitamin E at different rates. When hemoglobin was mixed with each TiO2 nanoparticle, hemoglobin was adsorbed at varying rates to the surface of the nanoparticles. Similarly, the aminothiol homocysteine was also adsorbed at different rates by the TiO2 nanoparticles. Using light microscopy, some TiO2 nanoparticles caused the formation of RBC aggregates which significantly changed the RBC morphology. The aggregation data was quantified using a hemacytometer. The TiO2 nanoparticles also caused hemolysis of RBCs. Hemolysis is considered to be a toxic endpoint for RBCs. Changes in the nucleated lymphocyte gene expression of certain oxidative stress genes were also observed using real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). The data indicates that RBCs can ultimately be hemolyzed by biological oxidative damage resulting from a combination of oxidative mechanisms. Additionally, the TiO2 nanoparticles demonstrated the ability to adsorb biomolecules to

  19. Characterizing metabolic changes in human colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Williams, Michael D; Zhang, Xing; Park, Jeong-Jin; Siems, William F; Gang, David R; Resar, Linda M S; Reeves, Raymond; Hill, Herbert H

    2015-06-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) remains a leading cause of cancer death worldwide, despite the fact that it is a curable disease when diagnosed early. The development of new screening methods to aid in early diagnosis or identify precursor lesions at risk for progressing to CRC will be vital to improving the survival rate of individuals predisposed to CRC. Metabolomics is an advancing area that has recently seen numerous applications to the field of cancer research. Altered metabolism has been studied for many years as a means to understand and characterize cancer. However, further work is required to establish standard procedures and improve our ability to identify distinct metabolomic profiles that can be used to diagnose CRC or predict disease progression. The present study demonstrates the use of direct infusion traveling wave ion mobility mass spectrometry to distinguish metabolic profiles from CRC samples and matched non-neoplastic epithelium as well as metastatic and primary tumors at different stages of disease (T1-T4). By directly infusing our samples, the analysis time was reduced significantly, thus increasing the speed and efficiency of this method compared to traditional metabolomics platforms. Partial least squares discriminant analysis was used to visualize differences between the metabolic profiles of sample types and to identify the specific m/z features that led to this differentiation. Identification of the distinct m/z features was made using the human metabolome database. We discovered alterations in fatty acid biosynthesis and oxidative, glycolytic, and polyamine pathways that distinguish tumors from non-malignant colonic epithelium as well as various stages of CRC. Although further studies are needed, our results indicate that colonic epithelial cells undergo metabolic reprogramming during their evolution to CRC, and the distinct metabolites could serve as diagnostic tools or potential targets in therapy or primary prevention. Graphical Abstract

  20. Characterizing metabolic changes in human colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Williams, Michael D; Zhang, Xing; Park, Jeong-Jin; Siems, William F; Gang, David R; Resar, Linda M S; Reeves, Raymond; Hill, Herbert H

    2015-06-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) remains a leading cause of cancer death worldwide, despite the fact that it is a curable disease when diagnosed early. The development of new screening methods to aid in early diagnosis or identify precursor lesions at risk for progressing to CRC will be vital to improving the survival rate of individuals predisposed to CRC. Metabolomics is an advancing area that has recently seen numerous applications to the field of cancer research. Altered metabolism has been studied for many years as a means to understand and characterize cancer. However, further work is required to establish standard procedures and improve our ability to identify distinct metabolomic profiles that can be used to diagnose CRC or predict disease progression. The present study demonstrates the use of direct infusion traveling wave ion mobility mass spectrometry to distinguish metabolic profiles from CRC samples and matched non-neoplastic epithelium as well as metastatic and primary tumors at different stages of disease (T1-T4). By directly infusing our samples, the analysis time was reduced significantly, thus increasing the speed and efficiency of this method compared to traditional metabolomics platforms. Partial least squares discriminant analysis was used to visualize differences between the metabolic profiles of sample types and to identify the specific m/z features that led to this differentiation. Identification of the distinct m/z features was made using the human metabolome database. We discovered alterations in fatty acid biosynthesis and oxidative, glycolytic, and polyamine pathways that distinguish tumors from non-malignant colonic epithelium as well as various stages of CRC. Although further studies are needed, our results indicate that colonic epithelial cells undergo metabolic reprogramming during their evolution to CRC, and the distinct metabolites could serve as diagnostic tools or potential targets in therapy or primary prevention. Graphical Abstract

  1. Transforming human gait for signature signals characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arshad, Atika; Fadzil Ismail, Ahmad; Khan, Sheroz; Zahirul Alam, A. H. M.; Tasnim, Rumana; Samnan Haider, Syed; Shobaki, Mohammed M.; Shahid, Zeeshan

    2013-12-01

    An integrated wireless inductive sensor is reported based on a system for monitoring human movement and body size. The proposed system senses the presence of human beings using electromagnetic field by making use of basic inductive coupling approach, hence analysing the performance of human monitoring. The amalgamation of the integrated system proposed will help in providing better services to the elderly people resided in healthcare centres. The developed sensing system is of low cost, flexible, robust, and easily implantable and capable of inductive sensing through marking signature waveforms as a result of human movements.

  2. Efficient generation of region-specific forebrain neurons from human pluripotent stem cells under highly defined condition

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Fang; Fang, Kai-Heng; Cao, Shi-Ying; Qu, Zhuang-Yin; Li, Qi; Krencik, Robert; Xu, Min; Bhattacharyya, Anita; Su, Yu-Wen; Zhu, Dong-Ya; Liu, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) have potential to differentiate to unlimited number of neural cells, which provide powerful tools for neural regeneration. To date, most reported protocols were established with an animal feeder system. However, cells derived on this system are inappropriate for the translation to clinical applications because of the introduction of xenogenetic factors. In this study, we provided an optimized paradigm to generate region-specific forebrain neurons from hPSCs under a defined system. We assessed five conditions and found that a vitronectin-coated substrate was the most efficient method to differentiate hPSCs to neurons and astrocytes. More importantly, by applying different doses of purmorphamine, a small-molecule agonist of sonic hedgehog signaling, hPSCs were differentiated to different region-specific forebrain neuron subtypes, including glutamatergic neurons, striatal medium spiny neurons, and GABA interneurons. Our study offers a highly defined system without exogenetic factors to produce human neurons and astrocytes for translational medical studies, including cell therapy and stem cell-based drug discovery. PMID:26670131

  3. A defined synthetic substrate for serum-free culture of human stem cell derived cardiomyocytes with improved functional maturity identified using combinatorial materials microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Asha K.; Celiz, Adam D.; Rajamohan, Divya; Anderson, Daniel G.; Langer, Robert; Davies, Martyn C.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiomyocytes from human stem cells have applications in regenerative medicine and can provide models for heart disease and toxicity screening. Soluble components of the culture system such as growth factors within serum and insoluble components such as the substrate on which cells adhere to are important variables controlling the biological activity of cells. Using a combinatorial materials approach we develop a synthetic, chemically defined cellular niche for the support of functional cardiomyocytes derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESC-CMs) in a serum-free fully defined culture system. Almost 700 polymers were synthesized and evaluated for their utility as growth substrates. From this group, 20 polymers were identified that supported cardiomyocyte adhesion and spreading. The most promising 3 polymers were scaled up for extended culture of hESC-CMs for 15 days and were characterized using patch clamp electrophysiology and myofibril analysis to find that functional and structural phenotype was maintained on these synthetic substrates without the need for coating with extracellular matrix protein. In addition, we found that hESC-CMs cultured on a co-polymer of isobornyl methacrylate and tert-butylamino-ethyl methacrylate exhibited significantly longer sarcomeres relative to gelatin control. The potential utility of increased structural integrity was demonstrated in an in vitro toxicity assay that found an increase in detection sensitivity of myofibril disruption by the anti-cancer drug doxorubicin at a concentration of 0.05 µM in cardiomyocytes cultured on the co-polymer compared to 0.5 µM on gelatin. The chemical moieties identified in this large-scale screen provide chemically defined conditions for the culture and manipulation of hESC-CMs, as well as a framework for the rational design of superior biomaterials. PMID:26005764

  4. A defined synthetic substrate for serum-free culture of human stem cell derived cardiomyocytes with improved functional maturity identified using combinatorial materials microarrays.

    PubMed

    Patel, Asha K; Celiz, Adam D; Rajamohan, Divya; Anderson, Daniel G; Langer, Robert; Davies, Martyn C; Alexander, Morgan R; Denning, Chris

    2015-08-01

    Cardiomyocytes from human stem cells have applications in regenerative medicine and can provide models for heart disease and toxicity screening. Soluble components of the culture system such as growth factors within serum and insoluble components such as the substrate on which cells adhere to are important variables controlling the biological activity of cells. Using a combinatorial materials approach we develop a synthetic, chemically defined cellular niche for the support of functional cardiomyocytes derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESC-CMs) in a serum-free fully defined culture system. Almost 700 polymers were synthesized and evaluated for their utility as growth substrates. From this group, 20 polymers were identified that supported cardiomyocyte adhesion and spreading. The most promising 3 polymers were scaled up for extended culture of hESC-CMs for 15 days and were characterized using patch clamp electrophysiology and myofibril analysis to find that functional and structural phenotype was maintained on these synthetic substrates without the need for coating with extracellular matrix protein. In addition, we found that hESC-CMs cultured on a co-polymer of isobornyl methacrylate and tert-butylamino-ethyl methacrylate exhibited significantly longer sarcomeres relative to gelatin control. The potential utility of increased structural integrity was demonstrated in an in vitro toxicity assay that found an increase in detection sensitivity of myofibril disruption by the anti-cancer drug doxorubicin at a concentration of 0.05 μM in cardiomyocytes cultured on the co-polymer compared to 0.5 μM on gelatin. The chemical moieties identified in this large-scale screen provide chemically defined conditions for the culture and manipulation of hESC-CMs, as well as a framework for the rational design of superior biomaterials.

  5. A fully defined and scalable 3D culture system for human pluripotent stem cell expansion and differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Yuguo; Schaffer, David V.

    2013-12-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs), including human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells, are promising for numerous biomedical applications, such as cell replacement therapies, tissue and whole-organ engineering, and high-throughput pharmacology and toxicology screening. Each of these applications requires large numbers of cells of high quality; however, the scalable expansion and differentiation of hPSCs, especially for clinical utilization, remains a challenge. We report a simple, defined, efficient, scalable, and good manufacturing practice-compatible 3D culture system for hPSC expansion and differentiation. It employs a thermoresponsive hydrogel that combines easy manipulation and completely defined conditions, free of any human- or animal-derived factors, and entailing only recombinant protein factors. Under an optimized protocol, the 3D system enables long-term, serial expansion of multiple hPSCs lines with a high expansion rate (∼20-fold per 5-d passage, for a 1072-fold expansion over 280 d), yield (∼2.0 × 107 cells per mL of hydrogel), and purity (∼95% Oct4+), even with single-cell inoculation, all of which offer considerable advantages relative to current approaches. Moreover, the system enabled 3D directed differentiation of hPSCs into multiple lineages, including dopaminergic neuron progenitors with a yield of ∼8 × 107 dopaminergic progenitors per mL of hydrogel and ∼80-fold expansion by the end of a 15-d derivation. This versatile system may be useful at numerous scales, from basic biological investigation to clinical development.

  6. A fully defined and scalable 3D culture system for human pluripotent stem cell expansion and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Lei, Yuguo; Schaffer, David V

    2013-12-24

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs), including human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells, are promising for numerous biomedical applications, such as cell replacement therapies, tissue and whole-organ engineering, and high-throughput pharmacology and toxicology screening. Each of these applications requires large numbers of cells of high quality; however, the scalable expansion and differentiation of hPSCs, especially for clinical utilization, remains a challenge. We report a simple, defined, efficient, scalable, and good manufacturing practice-compatible 3D culture system for hPSC expansion and differentiation. It employs a thermoresponsive hydrogel that combines easy manipulation and completely defined conditions, free of any human- or animal-derived factors, and entailing only recombinant protein factors. Under an optimized protocol, the 3D system enables long-term, serial expansion of multiple hPSCs lines with a high expansion rate (~20-fold per 5-d passage, for a 10(72)-fold expansion over 280 d), yield (~2.0 × 10(7) cells per mL of hydrogel), and purity (~95% Oct4+), even with single-cell inoculation, all of which offer considerable advantages relative to current approaches. Moreover, the system enabled 3D directed differentiation of hPSCs into multiple lineages, including dopaminergic neuron progenitors with a yield of ~8 × 10(7) dopaminergic progenitors per mL of hydrogel and ~80-fold expansion by the end of a 15-d derivation. This versatile system may be useful at numerous scales, from basic biological investigation to clinical development. PMID:24248365

  7. Insights from characterizing extinct human gut microbiomes.

    PubMed

    Tito, Raul Y; Knights, Dan; Metcalf, Jessica; Obregon-Tito, Alexandra J; Cleeland, Lauren; Najar, Fares; Roe, Bruce; Reinhard, Karl; Sobolik, Kristin; Belknap, Samuel; Foster, Morris; Spicer, Paul; Knight, Rob; Lewis, Cecil M

    2012-01-01

    In an effort to better understand the ancestral state of the human distal gut microbiome, we examine feces retrieved from archaeological contexts (coprolites). To accomplish this, we pyrosequenced the 16S rDNA V3 region from duplicate coprolite samples recovered from three archaeological sites, each representing a different depositional environment: Hinds Cave (~8000 years B.P.) in the southern United States, Caserones (1600 years B.P.) in northern Chile, and Rio Zape in northern Mexico (1400 years B.P.). Clustering algorithms grouped samples from the same site. Phyletic representation was more similar within sites than between them. A Bayesian approach to source-tracking was used to compare the coprolite data to published data from known sources that include, soil, compost, human gut from rural African children, human gut, oral and skin from US cosmopolitan adults and non-human primate gut. The data from the Hinds Cave samples largely represented unknown sources. The Caserones samples, retrieved directly from natural mummies, matched compost in high proportion. A substantial and robust proportion of Rio Zape data was predicted to match the gut microbiome found in traditional rural communities, with more minor matches to other sources. One of the Rio Zape samples had taxonomic representation consistent with a child. To provide an idealized scenario for sample preservation, we also applied source tracking to previously published data for Ötzi the Iceman and a soldier frozen for 93 years on a glacier. Overall these studies reveal that human microbiome data has been preserved in some coprolites, and these preserved human microbiomes match more closely to those from the rural communities than to those from cosmopolitan communities. These results suggest that the modern cosmopolitan lifestyle resulted in a dramatic change to the human gut microbiome.

  8. Insights from Characterizing Extinct Human Gut Microbiomes

    PubMed Central

    Tito, Raul Y.; Knights, Dan; Metcalf, Jessica; Obregon-Tito, Alexandra J.; Cleeland, Lauren; Najar, Fares; Roe, Bruce; Reinhard, Karl; Sobolik, Kristin; Belknap, Samuel; Foster, Morris; Spicer, Paul; Knight, Rob; Lewis, Cecil M.

    2012-01-01

    In an effort to better understand the ancestral state of the human distal gut microbiome, we examine feces retrieved from archaeological contexts (coprolites). To accomplish this, we pyrosequenced the 16S rDNA V3 region from duplicate coprolite samples recovered from three archaeological sites, each representing a different depositional environment: Hinds Cave (∼8000 years B.P.) in the southern United States, Caserones (1600 years B.P.) in northern Chile, and Rio Zape in northern Mexico (1400 years B.P.). Clustering algorithms grouped samples from the same site. Phyletic representation was more similar within sites than between them. A Bayesian approach to source-tracking was used to compare the coprolite data to published data from known sources that include, soil, compost, human gut from rural African children, human gut, oral and skin from US cosmopolitan adults and non-human primate gut. The data from the Hinds Cave samples largely represented unknown sources. The Caserones samples, retrieved directly from natural mummies, matched compost in high proportion. A substantial and robust proportion of Rio Zape data was predicted to match the gut microbiome found in traditional rural communities, with more minor matches to other sources. One of the Rio Zape samples had taxonomic representation consistent with a child. To provide an idealized scenario for sample preservation, we also applied source tracking to previously published data for Ötzi the Iceman and a soldier frozen for 93 years on a glacier. Overall these studies reveal that human microbiome data has been preserved in some coprolites, and these preserved human microbiomes match more closely to those from the rural communities than to those from cosmopolitan communities. These results suggest that the modern cosmopolitan lifestyle resulted in a dramatic change to the human gut microbiome. PMID:23251439

  9. Comparable frequencies of coding mutations and loss of imprinting in human pluripotent cells derived by nuclear transfer and defined factors.

    PubMed

    Johannesson, Bjarki; Sagi, Ido; Gore, Athurva; Paull, Daniel; Yamada, Mitsutoshi; Golan-Lev, Tamar; Li, Zhe; LeDuc, Charles; Shen, Yufeng; Stern, Samantha; Xu, Nanfang; Ma, Hong; Kang, Eunju; Mitalipov, Shoukhrat; Sauer, Mark V; Zhang, Kun; Benvenisty, Nissim; Egli, Dieter

    2014-11-01

    The recent finding that reprogrammed human pluripotent stem cells can be derived by nuclear transfer into human oocytes as well as by induced expression of defined factors has revitalized the debate on whether one approach might be advantageous over the other. Here we compare the genetic and epigenetic integrity of human nuclear-transfer embryonic stem cell (NT-ESC) lines and isogenic induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) lines, derived from the same somatic cell cultures of fetal, neonatal, and adult origin. The two cell types showed similar genome-wide gene expression and DNA methylation profiles. Importantly, NT-ESCs and iPSCs had comparable numbers of de novo coding mutations, but significantly more than parthenogenetic ESCs. As iPSCs, NT-ESCs displayed clone- and gene-specific aberrations in DNA methylation and allele-specific expression of imprinted genes. The occurrence of these genetic and epigenetic defects in both NT-ESCs and iPSCs suggests that they are inherent to reprogramming, regardless of derivation approach.

  10. Defining antigen-specific plasmablast and memory B cell subsets in human blood after viral infection or vaccination.

    PubMed

    Ellebedy, Ali H; Jackson, Katherine J L; Kissick, Haydn T; Nakaya, Helder I; Davis, Carl W; Roskin, Krishna M; McElroy, Anita K; Oshansky, Christine M; Elbein, Rivka; Thomas, Shine; Lyon, George M; Spiropoulou, Christina F; Mehta, Aneesh K; Thomas, Paul G; Boyd, Scott D; Ahmed, Rafi

    2016-10-01

    Antigen-specific B cells bifurcate into antibody-secreting cells (ASCs) and memory B cells (MBCs) after infection or vaccination. ASCs (plasmablasts) have been extensively studied in humans, but less is known about B cells that become activated but do not differentiate into plasmablasts. Here we have defined the phenotype and transcriptional program of a subset of antigen-specific B cells, which we have called 'activated B cells' (ABCs), that were distinct from ASCs and were committed to the MBC lineage. We detected ABCs in humans after infection with Ebola virus or influenza virus and also after vaccination. By simultaneously analyzing antigen-specific ASCs and ABCs in human blood after vaccination against influenza virus, we investigated the clonal overlap and extent of somatic hypermutation (SHM) in the ASC (effector) and ABC (memory) lineages. Longitudinal tracking of vaccination-induced hemagglutinin (HA)-specific clones revealed no overall increase in SHM over time, which suggested that repeated annual immunization might have limitations in enhancing the quality of influenza-virus-specific antibody.

  11. Defining antigen-specific plasmablast and memory B cell subsets in human blood after viral infection or vaccination.

    PubMed

    Ellebedy, Ali H; Jackson, Katherine J L; Kissick, Haydn T; Nakaya, Helder I; Davis, Carl W; Roskin, Krishna M; McElroy, Anita K; Oshansky, Christine M; Elbein, Rivka; Thomas, Shine; Lyon, George M; Spiropoulou, Christina F; Mehta, Aneesh K; Thomas, Paul G; Boyd, Scott D; Ahmed, Rafi

    2016-10-01

    Antigen-specific B cells bifurcate into antibody-secreting cells (ASCs) and memory B cells (MBCs) after infection or vaccination. ASCs (plasmablasts) have been extensively studied in humans, but less is known about B cells that become activated but do not differentiate into plasmablasts. Here we have defined the phenotype and transcriptional program of a subset of antigen-specific B cells, which we have called 'activated B cells' (ABCs), that were distinct from ASCs and were committed to the MBC lineage. We detected ABCs in humans after infection with Ebola virus or influenza virus and also after vaccination. By simultaneously analyzing antigen-specific ASCs and ABCs in human blood after vaccination against influenza virus, we investigated the clonal overlap and extent of somatic hypermutation (SHM) in the ASC (effector) and ABC (memory) lineages. Longitudinal tracking of vaccination-induced hemagglutinin (HA)-specific clones revealed no overall increase in SHM over time, which suggested that repeated annual immunization might have limitations in enhancing the quality of influenza-virus-specific antibody. PMID:27525369

  12. Characterization of Mesenchymal Stem Cells from Human Vocal Fold Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, Summer; Kim, Jaehyup; Quinchia Johnson, Beatriz H.; Bradley, Bridget; Breunig, Melissa; Hematti, Peiman; Thibeault, Susan L.

    2009-01-01

    Objective/Hypothesis Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) originally isolated from bone marrow, are fibroblast-looking cells that are now assumed to be present in the stromal component of many tissues. MSCs are characterized by a certain set of criteria including their growth culture characteristics, a combination of cell surface markers, and the ability to differentiate along multiple mesenchymal tissue lineages. We hypothesized that human vocal fold fibroblasts (hVFF) isolated from the lamina propria meet the criteria established to define MSCs and are functionally similar to MSCs derived from BM and adipose tissue. Study Design In vitro study Methods HVFF were previously derived from human vocal fold tissues. MSCs were derived from adipose tissue (AT), and BM of healthy donors, based on their attachment to culture dishes and their morphology, and expanded in culture. Cells were analyzed for standard cell surface markers identified on BM-derived MSCs as well as the ability to differentiate into cells of mesenchymal lineage, i.e. fat, bone and cartilage. We investigated the immunophenotype of these cells before and after interferon-γ (INF- γ) stimulation. Results HVFF displayed cell surface markers and multipotent differentiation capacity characteristic of MSCs. Furthermore, these cells exhibited similar patterns of expression of HLA and co-stimulatory molecules, after stimulation with INF- γ compared to MSCs derived from BM and AT. Conclusions Based on our findings hVFF derived from lamina propria have the same cell surface markers, immunophenotypic characteristics, and differentiation potential as BM- and AT-derived MSCs. We propose VF fibroblasts are MSCs resident in the vocal fold lamina propria. PMID:20131365

  13. Defining as a Mathematical Activity: A Framework for Characterizing Progress from Informal to More Formal Ways of Reasoning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zandieh, Michelle; Rasmussen, Chris

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to further the notion of defining as a mathematical activity by elaborating a framework that structures the role of defining in student progress from informal to more formal ways of reasoning. The framework is the result of a retrospective account of a significant learning experience that occurred in an undergraduate…

  14. Characterization of monoclonal antibodies against human lactoferrin.

    PubMed

    van Berkel, Patrick H C; van Veen, Harrie A; Geerts, Marlieke E J; Nuijens, Jan H

    2002-09-15

    The iron-binding glycoprotein human lactoferrin (hLF) is involved in the host defense against infection and is a modulator of inflammatory reactions. We generated monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to hLF as tools to assist both structure-function studies and the development of recombinant human lactoferrin for applications in human health care. Binding experiments with ten distinct anti-hLF mAbs to tryptic and recombinant hLF fragments in ELISA and/or on immunoblots revealed that five mAbs bound to conformational epitopes residing in the N-lobe (residues 1 to 334), whereas the other five bound to C-lobe conformational epitopes (residues 335 to 692). None of the mAbs bound to hLF denatured upon reduction. Monoclonal antibody E11 appeared to bind to the arginine-rich N-terminus of hLF, which is the binding site for heparin, bacterial lipopolysaccharide, human lysozyme, DNA and receptors. The dissociation constant of the distinct mAbs for hLF ranged from 0.5 to 18 nM, without differences in affinity for unsaturated or iron-saturated hLF, indicating that the conformational changes subject to incorporation of iron do not seem to affect the exposure and/or conformation of the antibody epitopes. The mAbs did not bind to human transferrin, a protein closely related to hLF in size, primary amino acid sequence and structure. Two C-lobe specific mAbs, E2 and E8, cross-reacted with bovine and/or porcine lactoferrin, indicating that human, bovine and porcine lactoferrin share antigenic determinants. This panel of mAbs will be used to develop quantitative and qualitative immunoassays for hLF and to delineate which regions of hLF are relevant to its anti-infective and anti-inflammatory properties. PMID:12165435

  15. Using the Human Eye to Characterize Displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gille, Jennifer; Larimer, James

    2001-01-01

    Monitor characterization has taken on new importance for non-professional users, who are not usually equipped to make photometric measurements. Our purpose was to examine some of the visual judgments used in characterization schemes that have been proposed for web users. We studied adjusting brightness to set the black level, banding effects due to digitization, and gamma estimation in the light and in the dark, and a color-matching task in the light, on a desktop CRT and a laptop LCD. Observers demonstrated the sensitivity of the visual system for comparative judgments in black-level adjustment, banding visibility, and gamma estimation. The results of the color-matching task were ambiguous. In the brightness adjustment task, the action of the adjustment was not as presumed; however, perceptual judgments were as expected under the actual conditions. When the gamma estimates of observers were compared to photometric measurements, problems with the definition of gamma were identified. Information about absolute light levels that would be important for characterizing a display, given the shortcomings of gamma in measuring apparent contrast, are not measurable by eye alone. The LCD was not studied as extensively as the CRT because of viewing-angle problems, and its transfer function did not follow a power law, rendering gamma estimation meaningless.

  16. Monolayer culturing and cloning of human pluripotent stem cells on laminin-521-based matrices under xeno-free and chemically defined conditions.

    PubMed

    Rodin, Sergey; Antonsson, Liselotte; Hovatta, Outi; Tryggvason, Karl

    2014-10-01

    A robust method for culturing human pluripotent stem (hPS) cells under chemically defined and xeno-free conditions is an important tool for stem cell research and for the development of regenerative medicine. Here, we describe a protocol for monolayer culturing of Oct-4-positive hPS cells on a specific laminin-521 (LN-521) isoform, under xeno-free and chemically defined conditions. The cells are dispersed into single-cell suspension and then plated on LN-521 isoform at densities higher than 5,000 cells per cm², where they attach, migrate and survive by forming small monolayer cell groups. The cells avidly divide and expand horizontally until the entire dish is covered by a confluent monolayer. LN-521, in combination with E-cadherin, allows cloning of individual hPS cells in separate wells of 96-well plates without the presence of rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK) inhibitors or any other inhibitors of anoikis. Characterization of cells maintained for several months in culture reveals pluripotency with a minimal degree of genetic abnormalities.

  17. Monolayer culturing and cloning of human pluripotent stem cells on laminin-521-based matrices under xeno-free and chemically defined conditions.

    PubMed

    Rodin, Sergey; Antonsson, Liselotte; Hovatta, Outi; Tryggvason, Karl

    2014-10-01

    A robust method for culturing human pluripotent stem (hPS) cells under chemically defined and xeno-free conditions is an important tool for stem cell research and for the development of regenerative medicine. Here, we describe a protocol for monolayer culturing of Oct-4-positive hPS cells on a specific laminin-521 (LN-521) isoform, under xeno-free and chemically defined conditions. The cells are dispersed into single-cell suspension and then plated on LN-521 isoform at densities higher than 5,000 cells per cm², where they attach, migrate and survive by forming small monolayer cell groups. The cells avidly divide and expand horizontally until the entire dish is covered by a confluent monolayer. LN-521, in combination with E-cadherin, allows cloning of individual hPS cells in separate wells of 96-well plates without the presence of rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK) inhibitors or any other inhibitors of anoikis. Characterization of cells maintained for several months in culture reveals pluripotency with a minimal degree of genetic abnormalities. PMID:25211513

  18. A Simple and Universal Gel Permeation Chromatography Technique for Precise Molecular Weight Characterization of Well-Defined Poly(ionic liquid)s

    SciTech Connect

    He, Hongkun; Zhong, Mingjiang; Adzima, Brian; Luebke, David; Nulwala, Hunaid; Matyjaszewski, Krzysztof

    2013-03-20

    Poly(ionic liquid)s (PILs) are an important class of technologically relevant materials. However, characterization of well-defined polyionic materials remains a challenge. Herein, we have developed a simple and versatile gel permeation chromatography (GPC) methodology for molecular weight (MW) characterization of PILs with a variety of anions. PILs with narrow MW distributions were synthesized via atom transfer radical polymerization, and the MWs obtained from GPC were further confirmed via nuclear magnetic resonance end group analysis.

  19. Role of inhalation studies with animals in defining human health risks for vehicle and power plant emissions

    SciTech Connect

    McClellan, R.O.

    1983-01-01

    Automotive vehicles and power plants using fossil fuels emit a complex array of gases and particulate material. The physical and chemical characteristics of these emissions vary markedly between sources and comprise only a portion of the contributors to air pollution exposure of people. Further, it is well recognized that a single form of self-inflicted air pollution, cigarette smoking, is the dominant cause of air pollution-induced disease. These factors minimize our potential for developing an adequate understanding of the health effects of vehicle and power plant emissions by studying only people. The alternative is to use the human data to the extent feasible and complement it with information gained in studies with macromolecules, organelles, cells, tissues and whole animals. Within this context, this paper reviews the use of inhalation studies with animals for defining human health risks of airborne materials, especially particulate materials. The major areas covered are: the fate of inhaled materials, the pathogenesis of disease induced by inhaled materials and long-term animal studies to identify late-occurring effects. Emphasis is placed on the utility of studies in whole animals as integrative models in which the multiple processes such as xenobiotic metabolism, cell injury, repair, transformation and promotion under the influence of many host factors interact in a manner that may not be directly observed in isolated cells or tissues. 60 references, 3 figures, 1 table.

  20. Using the Human Eye to Characterize Displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gille, Jennifer; Larimer, James; Rutkowski, Michael (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Monitor characterization has taken on new importance for non-professional users, who are not usually equipped to make photometric measurements. We studied adjusting brightness to set the black level, banding effects due to digitization, and gamma estimation in the light and in the dark, and a color-matching task in the light, on a desktop CRT (Cathode-Ray Tube) and a laptop LCD (Liquid Crystal Display). Observers demonstrated the sensitivity of the visual system for comparative judgments in black-level adjustment, banding visibility, and gamma estimation. The results of the color-matching task were ambiguous. In the brightness adjustment task, the action of the adjustment was not as presumed; however, perceptual judgments were as expected under the actual conditions. When the gamma estimates of observers were compared to photometric measurements, problems with the definition of gamma were identified. Information about absolute light levels that would be important for characterizing a displays, given the shortcomings of gamma in measuring apparent contrast, are not measurable by eye alone. The LCD was not studied as extensively as the CRT because of viewing-angle problems, and its transfer function did not follow a power law, rendering gamma estimation meaningless.

  1. Neurochemical organization of the human basal ganglia: anatomofunctional territories defined by the distributions of calcium-binding proteins and SMI-32.

    PubMed

    Morel, Anne; Loup, Fabienne; Magnin, Michel; Jeanmonod, Daniel

    2002-01-28

    The distribution of the calcium-binding proteins calbindin-D28K (CB), parvalbumin (PV) and calretinin (CR), and of the nonphosphorylated neurofilament protein (with SMI-32) was investigated in the human basal ganglia to identify anatomofunctional territories. In the striatum, gradients of neuropil immunostaining define four major territories: The first (T1) includes all but the rostroventral half of the putamen and is characterized by enhanced matriceal PV and SMI-32 immunoreactivity (-ir). The second territory (T2) encompasses most part of the caudate nucleus (Cd) and rostral putamen (PuT), which show enhanced matriceal CB-ir. The third and fourth territories (T3 and T4) comprise rostroventral parts of Cd and PuT characterized by complementary patch/matrix distributions of CB- and CR-ir, and the accumbens nucleus (Acb), respectively. The latter is separated into lateral (prominently enhanced in CB-ir) and medial (prominently enhanced in CR-ir) subdivisions. In the pallidum, parallel gradients also delimit four territories, T1 in the caudal half of external (GPe) and internal (GPi) divisions, characterized by enhanced PV- and SMI-32-ir; T2 in their rostral half, characterized by enhanced CB-ir; and T3 and T4 in their rostroventral pole and in the subpallidal area, respectively, both expressing CB- and CR-ir but with different intensities. The subthalamic nucleus (STh) shows contrasting patterns of dense PV-ir (sparing only the most medial part) and low CB-ir. Expression of CR-ir is relatively low, except in the medial, low PV-ir, part of the nucleus, whereas SMI-32-ir is moderate across the whole nucleus. The substantia nigra is characterized by complementary patterns of high neuropil CB- and SMI-32-ir in pars reticulata (SNr) and high CR-ir in pars compacta (SNc) and in the ventral tegmental area (VTA). The compartmentalization of calcium-binding proteins and SMI-32 in the human basal ganglia, in particular in the striatum and pallidum, delimits anatomofunctional

  2. Purification and characterization of human ribonuclease HII.

    PubMed Central

    Frank, P; Albert, S; Cazenave, C; Toulmé, J J

    1994-01-01

    A ribonuclease H activity from human placenta has been separated by ion exchange chromatography from the major RNase HI enzyme. Additional chromatographic steps allowed further purification, more than 3,000 fold compared to the crude extract in which it represents about 15% of the total RNase H activity. The enzyme requires Mg2+ ions for its activity, is strongly inhibited by the addition of Mn2+ ions or other divalent transition metal ions, and exhibits a pH optimum between 8.5 and 9. It shows a strong sensitivity to the SH-blocking agent N-ethylmaleimide. It has a strict specificity for double-stranded RNA-DNA duplexes and exhibits neither single-stranded nor double-stranded RNase (or DNase) activities. Therefore, this enzyme displays the characteristics of class II RNase H and is now termed RNase HII. Renaturation gel assays and gel filtration experiments proved a monomeric structure for the active enzyme with a native molecular weight of about 33 kDa. The human RNase HII acts as an endonuclease and releases oligoribonucleotides with 3'-OH and 5'-phosphate ends. It is therefore a candidate for the RNase H-mediated effect of antisense oligodeoxynucleotides. Images PMID:7816613

  3. Wavelet analysis for characterizing human electroencephalogram signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bai-Lian; Wu, Hsin-i.

    1995-04-01

    Wavelet analysis is a recently developed mathematical theory and computational method for decomposing a nonstationary signal into components that have good localization properties both in time and frequency domains and hierarchical structures. Wavelet transform provides local information and multiresolution decomposition on a signal that cannot be obtained using traditional methods such as Fourier transforms and distribution-based statistical methods. Hence the change in complex biological signals can be detected. We use wavelet analysis as an innovative method for identifying and characterizing multiscale electroencephalogram signals in this paper. We develop a wavelet-based stationary phase transition method to extract instantaneous frequencies of the signal that vary in time. The results under different clinical situations show that the brian triggers small bursts of either low or high frequency immediately prior to changing on the global scale to that behavior. This information could be used as a diagnostic for detecting the onset of an epileptic seizure.

  4. Measuring and Characterizing the Human Nasal Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Kahana-Zweig, Roni; Geva-Sagiv, Maya; Weissbrod, Aharon; Secundo, Lavi; Soroker, Nachum; Sobel, Noam

    2016-01-01

    Nasal airflow is greater in one nostril than in the other because of transient asymmetric nasal passage obstruction by erectile tissue. The extent of obstruction alternates across nostrils with periodicity referred to as the nasal cycle. The nasal cycle is related to autonomic arousal and is indicative of asymmetry in brain function. Moreover, alterations in nasal cycle periodicity have been linked to various diseases. There is therefore need for a tool allowing continuous accurate measurement and recording of airflow in each nostril separately. Here we provide detailed instructions for constructing such a tool at minimal cost and effort. We demonstrate application of the tool in 33 right-handed healthy subjects, and derive several statistical measures for nasal cycle characterization. Using these measures applied to 24-hour recordings we observed that: 1: subjects spent slightly longer in left over right nostril dominance (left = 2.63 ± 0.89 hours, right = 2.17 ± 0.89 hours, t(32) = 2.07, p < 0.05), 2: cycle duration was shorter in wake than in sleep (wake = 2.02 ± 1.7 hours, sleep = 4.5 ± 1.7 hours, (t(30) = 5.73, p < 0.0001). 3: slower breathing was associated with a more powerful cycle (the extent of difference across nostrils) (r = 0.4, p < 0.0001), and 4: the cycle was influenced by body posture such that lying on one side was associated with greater flow in the contralateral nostril (p < 0.002). Finally, we provide evidence for an airflow cycle in each nostril alone. These results provide characterization of an easily obtained measure that may have diagnostic implications for neurological disease and cognitive state. PMID:27711189

  5. Defining the mechanisms by which the reactive oxygen species by-product, 4-hydroxynonenal, affects human sperm cell function.

    PubMed

    Baker, Mark A; Weinberg, Anita; Hetherington, Louise; Villaverde, Ana-Izabel; Velkov, Tony; Baell, Jonathan; Gordon, Christopher P

    2015-04-01

    Lipid peroxidation products such as the naturally occurring aldehyde 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) are known to be cytotoxic toward different cell types, including spermatozoa. In order to understand this at the molecular level, we have employed a proteomic approach to characterize direct 4-HNE adducts on human spermatozoa. Several proteins were identified to be of particular interest, including aldehyde labeling of histone methyltransferase and dynein heavy chain. In addition, we found that 4-HNE bound to part of the activation segment, cysteine residue 199, of protein kinase A (PKA). Interestingly, at low levels, addition of 4-HNE had a stimulatory effect on PKA. However, this did not correlate to increased phosphotyrosine levels during capacitation. This data explains the link between reactive oxygen species and sperm toxicity. Given that epigenetic regulation is likely affected in oxidative-stressed spermatozoa, this data show that spermatozoa appear to shut down under these conditions before reaching the egg.

  6. Defining the RNA polymerase III transcriptome: Genome-wide localization of the RNA polymerase III transcription machinery in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Canella, Donatella; Praz, Viviane; Reina, Jaime H.; Cousin, Pascal; Hernandez, Nouria

    2010-01-01

    Our view of the RNA polymerase III (Pol III) transcription machinery in mammalian cells arises mostly from studies of the RN5S (5S) gene, the Ad2 VAI gene, and the RNU6 (U6) gene, as paradigms for genes with type 1, 2, and 3 promoters. Recruitment of Pol III onto these genes requires prior binding of well-characterized transcription factors. Technical limitations in dealing with repeated genomic units, typically found at mammalian Pol III genes, have so far hampered genome-wide studies of the Pol III transcription machinery and transcriptome. We have localized, genome-wide, Pol III and some of its transcription factors. Our results reveal broad usage of the known Pol III transcription machinery and define a minimal Pol III transcriptome in dividing IMR90hTert fibroblasts. This transcriptome consists of some 500 actively transcribed genes including a few dozen candidate novel genes, of which we confirmed nine as Pol III transcription units by additional methods. It does not contain any of the microRNA genes previously described as transcribed by Pol III, but reveals two other microRNA genes, MIR886 (hsa-mir-886) and MIR1975 (RNY5, hY5, hsa-mir-1975), which are genuine Pol III transcription units. PMID:20413673

  7. Native fluorescence characterization of human liver abnormalities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesan, Singaravelu; Madhuri, S.; Aruna, Prakasa R.; Suchitra, S.; Srinivasan, T. G.

    1999-05-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy of intrinsic biomolecules has been extensively used in biology and medicine for the past several decades. In the present study, we report the native fluorescence characteristics of blood plasma from normal human subjects and patients with different liver abnormalities such as hepatitis, leptospirosis, jaundice, cirrhosis and liver cell failure. Native fluorescence spectra of blood plasma -- acetone extract were measured at 405 nm excitation. The average spectrum of normal blood plasma has a prominent emission peak around 464 nm whereas in the case of liver diseased subjects, the primary peak is red shifted with respect to normal. In addition, liver diseased cases show distinct secondary emission peak around 615 nm, which may be attributed to the presence of endogenous porphyrins. The red shift of the prominent emission peak with respect to normal is found to be maximum for hepatitis and minimum for cirrhosis whereas the secondary emission peak around 615 nm was found to be more prominent in the case of cirrhosis than the rest. The ratio parameter I465/I615 is found to be statistically significant (p less than 0.001) in discriminating liver abnormalities from normal.

  8. Circulating Vitamin D3 and 25-hydroxyvitamin D in Humans: An Important Tool to Define Adequate Nutritional Vitamin D Status

    PubMed Central

    Hollis, Bruce W.; Wagner, Carol L.; Drezner, Mark K.; Binkley, Neil C.

    2007-01-01

    Circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] is generally considered the means by which we define nutritional vitamin D status. There is much debate, however, with respect to what a healthy minimum level of circulation 25(OH)D should be. Recent data using various biomarkers such as intact parathyroid hormone (PTH), intestinal calcium absorption, and skeletal density measurements suggest this minimum level to be 80 nmol (32 ng/mL). Surprisingly, the relationship between circulating vitamin D3 and its metabolic product—25(OH)D3 has not been studied. We investigated this relationship in two separate populations: the first, individuals from Hawaii who received significant sun exposure; the second, subjects from a lactation study who received up to 6,400 IU vitamin D3/day for six months. Results: 1) The relationship between circulating vitamin D3 and 25(OH)D in both groups was not linear, but appeared saturable and controlled; 2) Optimal nutritional vitamin D status appeared to occur when molar ratios of circulating vitamin D3 and 25(OH)D exceeded 0.3; at this point, the Vmax of the 25-hydroxylase appeared to be achieved. This was achieved when circulating 25(OH)D exceeded 100 nmol. We hypothesize that as humans live today, the 25-hydroxylase operates well below its Vmax because of chronic substrate deficiency, namely vitamin D3. When humans are sun (or dietary) replete, the vitamin D endocrine system will function in a fashion as do these other steroid synthetic pathways, not limited by substrate. Thus, the relationship between circulating vitamin D and 25(OH)D may represent what “normal” vitamin D status should be. PMID:17218096

  9. Complete Genome Sequence of Germline Chromosomally Integrated Human Herpesvirus 6A and Analyses Integration Sites Define a New Human Endogenous Virus with Potential to Reactivate as an Emerging Infection.

    PubMed

    Tweedy, Joshua; Spyrou, Maria Alexandra; Pearson, Max; Lassner, Dirk; Kuhl, Uwe; Gompels, Ursula A

    2016-01-15

    Human herpesvirus-6A and B (HHV-6A, HHV-6B) have recently defined endogenous genomes, resulting from integration into the germline: chromosomally-integrated "CiHHV-6A/B". These affect approximately 1.0% of human populations, giving potential for virus gene expression in every cell. We previously showed that CiHHV-6A was more divergent than CiHHV-6B by examining four genes in 44 European CiHHV-6A/B cardiac/haematology patients. There was evidence for gene expression/reactivation, implying functional non-defective genomes. To further define the relationship between HHV-6A and CiHHV-6A we used next-generation sequencing to characterize genomes from three CiHHV-6A cardiac patients. Comparisons to known exogenous HHV-6A showed CiHHV-6A genomes formed a separate clade; including all 85 non-interrupted genes and necessary cis-acting signals for reactivation as infectious virus. Greater single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) density was defined in 16 genes and the direct repeats (DR) terminal regions. Using these SNPs, deep sequencing analyses demonstrated superinfection with exogenous HHV-6A in two of the CiHHV-6A patients with recurrent cardiac disease. Characterisation of the integration sites in twelve patients identified the human chromosome 17p subtelomere as a prevalent site, which had specific repeat structures and phylogenetically related CiHHV-6A coding sequences indicating common ancestral origins. Overall CiHHV-6A genomes were similar, but distinct from known exogenous HHV-6A virus, and have the capacity to reactivate as emerging virus infections.

  10. Defining pathogenic verocytotoxin-producing Escherichia coli (VTEC) from cases of human infection in the European Union, 2007-2010.

    PubMed

    Messens, W; Bolton, D; Frankel, G; Liebana, E; McLAUCHLIN, J; Morabito, S; Oswald, E; Threlfall, E J

    2015-06-01

    During 2007-2010, 13 545 confirmed human verocytotoxin (VT)-producing Escherichia coli (VTEC) infections were reported in the European Union, including 777 haemolytic uraemic syndrome (HUS) cases. Clinical manifestations were reported for 53% of cases, 64% of which presented with diarrhoea alone and 10% with HUS. Isolates from 85% of cases were not fully serotyped and could not be classified on the basis of the Karmali seropathotype concept. There is no single or combination of phenotypic or genetic marker(s) that fully define 'pathogenic' VTEC. Isolates which contain the vtx2 (verocytotoxin 2) gene in combination with the eae (intimin-encoding) gene or aaiC (secreted protein of enteroaggregative E. coli) and aggR (plasmid-encoded regulator) genes have been associated with a higher risk of more severe illness. A molecular approach targeting genes encoding VT and other virulence determinants is thus proposed to allow an assessment of the potential severity of disease that may be associated with a given VTEC isolate. PMID:25921781

  11. Defining pathogenic verocytotoxin-producing Escherichia coli (VTEC) from cases of human infection in the European Union, 2007-2010.

    PubMed

    Messens, W; Bolton, D; Frankel, G; Liebana, E; McLAUCHLIN, J; Morabito, S; Oswald, E; Threlfall, E J

    2015-06-01

    During 2007-2010, 13 545 confirmed human verocytotoxin (VT)-producing Escherichia coli (VTEC) infections were reported in the European Union, including 777 haemolytic uraemic syndrome (HUS) cases. Clinical manifestations were reported for 53% of cases, 64% of which presented with diarrhoea alone and 10% with HUS. Isolates from 85% of cases were not fully serotyped and could not be classified on the basis of the Karmali seropathotype concept. There is no single or combination of phenotypic or genetic marker(s) that fully define 'pathogenic' VTEC. Isolates which contain the vtx2 (verocytotoxin 2) gene in combination with the eae (intimin-encoding) gene or aaiC (secreted protein of enteroaggregative E. coli) and aggR (plasmid-encoded regulator) genes have been associated with a higher risk of more severe illness. A molecular approach targeting genes encoding VT and other virulence determinants is thus proposed to allow an assessment of the potential severity of disease that may be associated with a given VTEC isolate.

  12. Comparison of human and porcine skin for characterization of sunscreens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weigmann, Hans-Jürgen; Schanzer, Sabine; Patzelt, Alexa; Bahaban, Virginie; Durat, Fabienne; Sterry, Wolfram; Lademann, Jürgen

    2009-03-01

    The universal sun protection factor (USPF) characterizing sunscreen efficacy based on spectroscopically determined data, which were obtained using the tape stripping procedure. The USPF takes into account the complete ultraviolet (UV) spectral range in contrast to the classical sun protection factor (SPF). Until now, the USPF determination has been evaluated only in human skin. However, investigating new filters not yet licensed excludes in vivo investigation on human skin but requires the utilization of a suitable skin model. The penetration behavior and the protection efficacy of 10 commercial sunscreens characterized by USPF were investigated, comparing human and porcine skin. The penetration behavior found for typical UV filter substances is nearly identical for both skin types. The comparison of the USPF obtained for human and porcine skin results in a linear relation between both USPF values with a correlation factor R2=0.98. The results demonstrate the possibility for the use of porcine skin to determine the protection efficacy of sunscreens.

  13. Isolation and characterization of endothelial progenitor cells from human blood.

    PubMed

    Mead, Laura E; Prater, Daniel; Yoder, Mervin C; Ingram, David A

    2008-07-01

    Circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) in adult human peripheral blood were originally identified in 1997 by Asahara et al., which challenged the paradigm that vasculogenesis is a process restricted to embryonic development. Since their original identification, EPCs have been extensively studied as biomarkers to assess the risk of cardiovascular disease in human subjects and as a potential cell therapeutic for vascular regeneration. Endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs), which are a subtype of EPCs, were recently identified from circulating adult and human umbilical cord blood. In contrast to other types of EPCs, which display various monocyte/macrophage phenotypes and functions, ECFCs are characterized by robust proliferative potential, secondary and tertiary colony formation upon replating, and de novo blood vessel formation in vivo when transplanted into immunodeficient mice. In this unit, we describe detailed methodologies for isolation and characterization of ECFCs from both human peripheral and umbilical cord blood.

  14. Dynamic Asia: Coupling of climate, tectonics, rivers, and people defines risk and opportunity for the world's largest human populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodbred, S. L., Jr.; Steckler, M. S.; Gilligan, J. M.; Ackerly, B.; Ayers, J. C.; Wilson, C.; Small, C.; Seeber, L.

    2014-12-01

    Coupling between the Himalayan-Tibetan uplift and intense Asian monsoon yields tremendous regional runoff and sediment supply. This vigorous mass-transfer system sustains 7 of the world's 10 largest riverine sediment loads, which in turn have constructed vast, fertile fluvial-deltaic lowlands. These environments across south and east Asia host about 1/3 of all people on Earth. Such large and dense populations have flourished amidst the region's generally abundant water supplies, fisheries, and agricultural production. Yet the same environmental attributes that are so rich in resources also define a uniquely dynamic region, where rates of change are rapid and punctuated by frequent, intense events. Indeed, 8 of the world's 10 deadliest natural disasters have occurred in this region, involving a combination of earthquakes, tropical cyclones, river floods, and tsunamis. Other stresses that regularly impact the region include periods of monsoon collapse and drought, widespread arsenic contamination of groundwater, relative sea-level rise and coastal inundation, and groundwater salinization. Thus the communities of this region persistently face the challenge of balancing the carrying capacity of a resource-rich environment with its associated hazards and challenges. One important concept that has become increasingly more apparent is the connection within watersheds that transmits local effects both upstream and downstream within the system. Here we emphasize two additional points that we believe are essential in developing plausible strategies for sustaining health, resilience, and stability of the region. First, problems related to the natural environment are closely coupled with human activities and our concurrent responses to environmental change. Thus resulting issues are complex and multifaceted in ways that require natural scientists to better engage with researchers in the humanities and social sciences. Second, despite similar risks affecting many millions of

  15. Structural characterization of human Uch37

    SciTech Connect

    Burgie, E. Sethe; Bingman, Craig A.; Soni, Ameet B.; Phillips, Jr., George N.

    2012-06-28

    Uch37 is a deubiquitylating enzyme (DUB) that is functionally linked with multiple protein complexes and signal transduction pathways. Uch37 associates with the 26S proteasome through Rpn13 where it serves to remove distal ubiquitin moeities from polyubiquitylated proteins. Uch37's proteasome associated activity was shown to liberate proteins from destruction. However, Uch37 may also specifically facilitate the destruction of inducible nitric oxide synthase and I{kappa}B-{alpha} at the proteasome. Wicks et al. established Uch37's potential to modulate the transforming growth factor-{beta}(TGF-{beta}) signaling cascade, through tis interaction with SMAD7. Yao et al. demonstrated that Uch37 also associates with the Ino80 chromatin-remodeling complex (Ino80 complex), which is involved in DNA repair and transcriptional regulation. Uch37's importance in metazoan development was underscored recently as Uch37 knockouts in mice result in prenatal lethality, where mutant embryos had severe defects in brain development. Protein ubiquitylation is an ATP-dependent post-translational modification that serves to signal a wide variety of cellular processes in eukaryotes. A protein cascade, generally comprising three enzymes, functions to activate, transport and specifically transfer ubiquitin to the targeted protein, culminating in an isopeptide linkage between the {epsilon}-amino group of a target protein's lysysl residue and the ubiquitin's terminal carboxylate. Monoubiquitination plays an important role in histone regulation, endocytosis, and viral budding. Further processing of the target protein may be accomplished by ubiquitylation of the protein on a different lysine, or through the formation of polyubiquitin chains, where the best-characterized outcome is destruction of the polyubiquitin-labeled protein in the proteasome. DUBs catalyze the removal of ubiquitin from proteins. This activity serves to reverse the effects of ubiquitination, permit ubiquitin recycling, or

  16. Characterization of human plasma proteome dynamics using deuterium oxide

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ding; Liem, David A; Lau, Edward; Ng, Dominic CM; Bleakley, Brian J; Cadeiras, Martin; Deng, Mario C; Lam, Maggie PY; Ping, Peipei

    2016-01-01

    Purpose High-throughput quantification of human protein turnover via in vivo administration of deuterium oxide (2H2O) is a powerful new approach to examine potential disease mechanisms. Its immediate clinical translation is contingent upon characterizations of the safety and hemodynamic effects of in vivo administration of 2H2O to human subjects. Experimental design We recruited 10 healthy human subjects with a broad demographic variety to evaluate the safety, feasibility, efficacy, and reproducibility of 2H2O intake for studying protein dynamics. We designed a protocol where each subject orally consumed weight-adjusted doses of 70% 2H2O daily for 14 days to enrich body water and proteins with deuterium. Plasma proteome dynamics was measured using a high-resolution MS method we recently developed. Results This protocol was successfully applied in 10 human subjects to characterize the endogenous turnover rates of 542 human plasma proteins, the largest such human dataset to-date. Throughout the study, we did not detect physiological effects or signs of discomfort from 2H2O consumption. Conclusions and clinical relevance Our investigation supports the utility of a 2H2O intake protocol that is safe, accessible, and effective for clinical investigations of large-scale human protein turnover dynamics. This workflow shows promising clinical translational value for examining plasma protein dynamics in human diseases. PMID:24946186

  17. Generation and Characterization of Human Cryptorchid-Specific Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells from Urine

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Junmei; Wang, Xue; Zhang, Shengli; Gu, Yijun; Yu, Ling; Wu, Jing; Gao, Tongbin

    2013-01-01

    Cryptorchidism is a common congenital birth defect in human beings with the possible complication of infertility. An in vitro model of cryptorchidism might be valuable due to the inaccessibility of human embryos for research purposes. In this study, we reprogrammed urine cells containing genetic variations in insulin-like factor 3, zinc finger (ZNF) 214, and ZNF215 from a cryptorchid patient by introducing human OCT4, SOX2, C-MYC, and KLF4 with lentivirus. The cells were then replated on irradiated mouse embryonic fibroblasts and cultured with the human embryonic stem (ES) cell medium. The compact colonies with well-defined borders were manually picked, and 2 induced pluripotent cell lines were fully characterized. Our results demonstrated that these 2 cell lines were similar to human ES cells in morphological appearance, marker expression, and epigenetic status of the pluripotent cell-specific gene, OCT4. These cells could be differentiated into cells of all 3 germ layers in teratomas and in vitro, including into the VASA-positive germ cell lineage. Both parental urine cells and the reprogrammed cells possessed the normal karyotype and the same short tandem repeat loci, indicating that these 2 cell population share the same genetic identity. This establishment and characterization of human urine-derived cryptorchid-specific induced pluripotent stem cells could present a good human genetic system for future studies investigating the molecular mechanism of cryptorchidism. PMID:23025704

  18. Microbial community proteomics for characterizing the range of metabolic functions and activities of human gut microbiota

    DOE PAGES

    Xiong, Weili; Abraham, Paul E.; Li, Zhou; Pan, Chongle; Robert L. Hettich

    2015-01-01

    We found that the human gastrointestinal (GI) tract is a complex, dynamic ecosystem that consists of a carefully tuned balance of human host and microbiota membership. The microbiome component is not insignificant, but rather provides important functions that are absolutely critical to many aspects of human health, including nutrient transformation and absorption, drug metabolism, pathogen defense, and immune system development. Microbial community proteomics (sometimes referred to as metaproteomics) provides a powerful approach to measure the range and details of human gut microbiota functions and metabolic activities, revealing information about microbiome development and stability especially with regard to human health vs.more » disease states. In most cases, both microbial and human proteins are extracted from fecal samples and then measured by the high performance MS-based proteomics technology. We review the field of human gut microbiome community proteomics, with a focus on the experimental and informatics considerations involved in characterizing systems that range from low complexity defined model gut microbiota in gnotobiotic mice, to the simple gut microbiota in the GI tract of newborn infants, and finally to the complex gut microbiota in adults. Moreover, the current state-of-the-art in experimental and bioinformatics capabilities for community proteomics enable a detailed measurement of the gut microbiota, yielding valuable insights into the broad functional profiles of even complex microbiota. Future developments are likely to expand into improved analysis throughput and coverage depth, as well as post-translational modification characterizations.« less

  19. Microbial community proteomics for characterizing the range of metabolic functions and activities of human gut microbiota

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, Weili; Abraham, Paul E.; Li, Zhou; Pan, Chongle; Robert L. Hettich

    2015-01-01

    We found that the human gastrointestinal (GI) tract is a complex, dynamic ecosystem that consists of a carefully tuned balance of human host and microbiota membership. The microbiome component is not insignificant, but rather provides important functions that are absolutely critical to many aspects of human health, including nutrient transformation and absorption, drug metabolism, pathogen defense, and immune system development. Microbial community proteomics (sometimes referred to as metaproteomics) provides a powerful approach to measure the range and details of human gut microbiota functions and metabolic activities, revealing information about microbiome development and stability especially with regard to human health vs. disease states. In most cases, both microbial and human proteins are extracted from fecal samples and then measured by the high performance MS-based proteomics technology. We review the field of human gut microbiome community proteomics, with a focus on the experimental and informatics considerations involved in characterizing systems that range from low complexity defined model gut microbiota in gnotobiotic mice, to the simple gut microbiota in the GI tract of newborn infants, and finally to the complex gut microbiota in adults. Moreover, the current state-of-the-art in experimental and bioinformatics capabilities for community proteomics enable a detailed measurement of the gut microbiota, yielding valuable insights into the broad functional profiles of even complex microbiota. Future developments are likely to expand into improved analysis throughput and coverage depth, as well as post-translational modification characterizations.

  20. Generation and characterization of human cryptorchid-specific induced pluripotent stem cells from urine.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Junmei; Wang, Xue; Zhang, Shengli; Gu, Yijun; Yu, Ling; Wu, Jing; Gao, Tongbin; Chen, Fang

    2013-03-01

    Cryptorchidism is a common congenital birth defect in human beings with the possible complication of infertility. An in vitro model of cryptorchidism might be valuable due to the inaccessibility of human embryos for research purposes. In this study, we reprogrammed urine cells containing genetic variations in insulin-like factor 3, zinc finger (ZNF) 214, and ZNF215 from a cryptorchid patient by introducing human OCT4, SOX2, C-MYC, and KLF4 with lentivirus. The cells were then replated on irradiated mouse embryonic fibroblasts and cultured with the human embryonic stem (ES) cell medium. The compact colonies with well-defined borders were manually picked, and 2 induced pluripotent cell lines were fully characterized. Our results demonstrated that these 2 cell lines were similar to human ES cells in morphological appearance, marker expression, and epigenetic status of the pluripotent cell-specific gene, OCT4. These cells could be differentiated into cells of all 3 germ layers in teratomas and in vitro, including into the VASA-positive germ cell lineage. Both parental urine cells and the reprogrammed cells possessed the normal karyotype and the same short tandem repeat loci, indicating that these 2 cell population share the same genetic identity. This establishment and characterization of human urine-derived cryptorchid-specific induced pluripotent stem cells could present a good human genetic system for future studies investigating the molecular mechanism of cryptorchidism. PMID:23025704

  1. Functional analysis of highly defined, FACS-isolated populations of human regulatory CD4+ CD25+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Baecher-Allan, Clare; Wolf, Elizabeth; Hafler, David A

    2005-04-01

    The importance of CD4+ CD25+ regulatory T cells (Treg) in maintaining immune homeostasis has been directly demonstrated in vivo by their manipulation in a number of autoimmune disease models in the mouse. In the study of human regulatory cells, we have found that the cells that consistently demonstrate the in vitro regulatory activity most similar to that described for murine cells in vitro are best identified by restricting the isolation of CD25+ CD4 T cells to those cells expressing only the highest levels of CD25, representing approximately 2-3% of total CD4 T cells. Thus, it is the CD4+ CD25high subset that exhibits the in vitro characteristics that are identical to the CD4+ CD25+ regulatory cells initially characterized in mice. Furthermore, the cells expressing medium to low levels of CD25 not only do not exhibit suppressive activity directly ex vivo, but also actually contain a significant proportion of CD62L- CD4 T cells which are believed to be in vivo activated T cells. Due to the inherent difficulties in using CD25 as a marker for the purification of Treg cells, the finding that selection of the CD25high subset of CD4+ CD25+ T cells minimizes the co-isolation of contaminating activated CD4 T cells is important for future studies of these Treg cells in human disease. In order to perform these studies, we first had to establish a highly reproducible 'micro in vitro co-culture' assay system to enable the functional analysis of high-purity, but low-yield regulatory populations derived from FACS sorting. With this system in place, we are poised to dissect the potential heterogeneity of mechanisms employed by highly specific subpopulations of CD4+ CD25+ cells.

  2. Defined culture of human embryonic stem cells and xeno-free derivation of retinal pigmented epithelial cells on a novel, synthetic substrate.

    PubMed

    Pennington, Britney O; Clegg, Dennis O; Melkoumian, Zara K; Hikita, Sherry T

    2015-02-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a leading cause of blindness, is characterized by the death of the retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE), which is a monolayer posterior to the retina that supports the photoreceptors. Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) can generate an unlimited source of RPE for cellular therapies, and clinical trials have been initiated. However, protocols for RPE derivation using defined conditions free of nonhuman derivatives (xeno-free) are preferred for clinical translation. This avoids exposing AMD patients to animal-derived products, which could incite an immune response. In this study, we investigated the maintenance of hESCs and their differentiation into RPE using Synthemax II-SC, which is a novel, synthetic animal-derived component-free, RGD peptide-containing copolymer compliant with good manufacturing practices designed for xeno-free stem cell culture. Cells on Synthemax II-SC were compared with cultures grown with xenogeneic and xeno-free control substrates. This report demonstrates that Synthemax II-SC supports long-term culture of H9 and H14 hESC lines and permits efficient differentiation of hESCs into functional RPE. Expression of RPE-specific markers was assessed by flow cytometry, quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and immunocytochemistry, and RPE function was determined by phagocytosis of rod outer segments and secretion of pigment epithelium-derived factor. Both hESCs and hESC-RPE maintained normal karyotypes after long-term culture on Synthemax II-SC. Furthermore, RPE generated on Synthemax II-SC are functional when seeded onto parylene-C scaffolds designed for clinical use. These experiments suggest that Synthemax II-SC is a suitable, defined substrate for hESC culture and the xeno-free derivation of RPE for cellular therapies. PMID:25593208

  3. Application of carbon nanotubes to human breath dynamics characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Zhongyu; Cai, Bingchu; Xu, Dong

    2006-07-01

    The carbon nanotube composite material and its fabrication techniques are introduced to construct a chip-based electrode system for human breath dynamics characterization. The application of 10V dc bias can generate electric field high enough to effectively collect the charged particles in the human breath. Without using breath collecting tubes, the field tests in the open air exhibit that the system is technologically promising for long-time and noncontact human breath dynamics monitoring, due to its high stability, sensitivity, and safety operation performance with power consumption in the order of 10-5W.

  4. The functional importance of a cap site-proximal region of the human prointerleukin 1[beta] gene is defined

    SciTech Connect

    Hunninghake, G.W.; Geist, L.J.; Monick, M.M.; Stinski, M.F. ); Monks, B.G.; Monroy, M.A.; Fenton, M.J. ); Webb, A.C. ); Dayer, J.M. ); Auron, P.E. )

    1992-08-01

    Prointerleukin 1[beta] (IL-1[beta]) is a cytokine that mediates a broad range of biological activities. Genomic sequences that regulate IL-1[beta] transcription include both inducible regulatory elements located more than 2,700 bp upstream of the transcriptional start site (cap site) and proximal elements located near the TATA box of this gene. In this study, we focused on the identification and characterization of trans-acting nuclear regulatory proteins that bind to the cap site-proximal region of the human IL-1[beta] gene. We identified a protein, termed NFIL-1[beta]A (NF[beta]A), that binds to a highly conserved 12-bp DNA sequence (-49 to -38) located upstream of the TATA box motif in both the human and murine IL-1[beta] genes. The IL-1[alpha] gene, which lacks a TATA motif, does not possess an NF[beta]A-binding sequence within the promoter region, suggesting that NF[beta]A may selectively regulate IL-1[beta] expression. Using electrophoretic mobility shift assays, we identified several distinct DNA-protein complexes that are expressed in a cell-type-specific manner. In monocytic cell lines, the relative abundance of these complexes varied rapidly following stimulation of the cells with phorbol esters or lipopolysaccharide. UV cross-linking analysis identified two distinct DNA-binding polypeptides that comprise distinct complexes. The functional role of NF[beta]A was assessed in transient transfection assays. These data indicate the NF[beta]A is required for both basal and inducible promoter activity in monocytic cells. Furthermore, the human cytomegalovirus immediate-early 1 gene product requires the presence of NF[beta]A in order to trans-activate the proximal IL-1[beta] promoter in a monocytic cell line. We propose that NF[beta]A is a factor that mediates either direct or indirect activation by the immediate-early 1 gene product. The proximity of this essential factor to the TATA motif suggests a possible role in transcriptional initiation.

  5. Monoclonal antibodies to human lymphocyte homing receptors define a novel class of adhesion molecules on diverse cell types

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    A 90-kD lymphocyte surface glycoprotein, defined by monoclonal antibodies of the Hermes series, is involved in lymphocyte recognition of high endothelial venules (HEV). Lymphocyte gp90Hermes binds in a saturable, reversible fashion to the mucosal vascular addressin (MAd), a tissue-specific endothelial cell adhesion molecule for lymphocytes. We and others have recently shown that the Hermes antigen is identical to or includes CD44 (In[Lu]-related p80), human Pgp-1, and extracellular matrix receptor III-molecules reportedly expressed on diverse cell types. Here, we examine the relationship between lymphoid and nonlymphoid Hermes antigens using serologic, biochemical, and, most importantly, functional assays. Consistent with studies using mAbs to CD44 or Pgp-1, mAbs against five different epitopes on lymphocyte gp90Hermes reacted with a wide variety of nonhematolymphoid cells in diverse normal human tissues, including many types of epithelium, mesenchymal elements such as fibroblasts and smooth muscle, and a subset of glia in the central nervous system. To ask whether these non- lymphoid molecules might also be functionally homologous to lymphocyte homing receptors, we assessed their ability to interact with purified MAd using fluorescence energy transfer techniques. The Hermes antigen isolated from both glial cells and fibroblasts--which express a predominant 90-kD form similar in relative molecular mass, isoelectric point, and protease sensitivity to lymphocyte gp90Hermes--was able to bind purified MAd. In contrast, a 140-160-kD form of the Hermes antigen isolated from squamous epithelial cells lacked this capability. Like lymphocyte binding to mucosal HEV, the interaction between glial gp90Hermes and MAd is inhibited by mAb Hermes-3, but not Hermes-1, suggesting that similar molecular domains are involved in the two binding events. The observation that the Hermes/CD44 molecules derived from several nonlymphoid cell types display binding domains homologous to those

  6. Interaction of electrolyte molecules with carbon materials of well-defined porosity: characterization by solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Borchardt, Lars; Oschatz, Martin; Paasch, Silvia; Kaskel, Stefan; Brunner, Eike

    2013-09-28

    Electrochemical double-layer capacitors (EDLCs or supercapacitors) are of special potential interest with respect to energy storage. Nearly all EDLCs make use of porous carbons as electrode materials. Further tuning of their performance in EDLC applications requires a better understanding of their properties. In particular, the understanding of the interactions between carbon-based materials and electrolyte solutions is of fundamental interest with respect to future applications. Since the capacitance of carbon-based electrode materials is known to depend on the pore size, we have studied different porous carbon materials of well-defined, variable pore size loaded with 1 M TEABF4 in acetonitrile or with pure acetonitrile using solid-state magic angle spinning (MAS) (1)H, (11)B, and (13)C NMR spectroscopy. PMID:23925570

  7. Interaction of electrolyte molecules with carbon materials of well-defined porosity: characterization by solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Borchardt, Lars; Oschatz, Martin; Paasch, Silvia; Kaskel, Stefan; Brunner, Eike

    2013-09-28

    Electrochemical double-layer capacitors (EDLCs or supercapacitors) are of special potential interest with respect to energy storage. Nearly all EDLCs make use of porous carbons as electrode materials. Further tuning of their performance in EDLC applications requires a better understanding of their properties. In particular, the understanding of the interactions between carbon-based materials and electrolyte solutions is of fundamental interest with respect to future applications. Since the capacitance of carbon-based electrode materials is known to depend on the pore size, we have studied different porous carbon materials of well-defined, variable pore size loaded with 1 M TEABF4 in acetonitrile or with pure acetonitrile using solid-state magic angle spinning (MAS) (1)H, (11)B, and (13)C NMR spectroscopy.

  8. Isolation and proteomic characterization of the Arabidopsis Golgi defines functional and novel components involved in plant cell wall biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Harriet T; Christiansen, Katy; Knierim, Bernhard; Carroll, Andrew; Ito, Jun; Batth, Tanveer S; Smith-Moritz, Andreia M; Morrison, Stephanie; McInerney, Peter; Hadi, Masood Z; Auer, Manfred; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila; Petzold, Christopher J; Scheller, Henrik V; Loqué, Dominique; Heazlewood, Joshua L

    2012-05-01

    The plant Golgi plays a pivotal role in the biosynthesis of cell wall matrix polysaccharides, protein glycosylation, and vesicle trafficking. Golgi-localized proteins have become prospective targets for reengineering cell wall biosynthetic pathways for the efficient production of biofuels from plant cell walls. However, proteomic characterization of the Golgi has so far been limited, owing to the technical challenges inherent in Golgi purification. In this study, a combination of density centrifugation and surface charge separation techniques have allowed the reproducible isolation of Golgi membranes from Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) at sufficiently high purity levels for in-depth proteomic analysis. Quantitative proteomic analysis, immunoblotting, enzyme activity assays, and electron microscopy all confirm high purity levels. A composition analysis indicated that approximately 19% of proteins were likely derived from contaminating compartments and ribosomes. The localization of 13 newly assigned proteins to the Golgi using transient fluorescent markers further validated the proteome. A collection of 371 proteins consistently identified in all replicates has been proposed to represent the Golgi proteome, marking an appreciable advancement in numbers of Golgi-localized proteins. A significant proportion of proteins likely involved in matrix polysaccharide biosynthesis were identified. The potential within this proteome for advances in understanding Golgi processes has been demonstrated by the identification and functional characterization of the first plant Golgi-resident nucleoside diphosphatase, using a yeast complementation assay. Overall, these data show key proteins involved in primary cell wall synthesis and include a mixture of well-characterized and unknown proteins whose biological roles and importance as targets for future research can now be realized. PMID:22430844

  9. Identification and characterization of glycosylation sites in human serum clusterin.

    PubMed Central

    Kapron, J. T.; Hilliard, G. M.; Lakins, J. N.; Tenniswood, M. P.; West, K. A.; Carr, S. A.; Crabb, J. W.

    1997-01-01

    Clusterin is a ubiquitous, heterodimeric glycoprotein with multiple possible functions that are likely influenced by glycosylation. Identification of oligosaccharide attachment sites and structural characterization of oligosaccharides in human serum clusterin has been performed by mass spectrometry and Edman degradation. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry revealed two molecular weight species of holoclusterin (58,505 +/- 250 and 63,507 +/- 200). Mass spectrometry also revealed molecular heterogeneity associated with both the alpha and beta subunits of clusterin, consistent with the presence of multiple glycoforms. The data indicate that clusterin contains 17-27% carbohydrate by weight, the alpha subunit contains 0-30% carbohydrate and the beta subunit contains 27-30% carbohydrate. Liquid chromatography electrospray mass spectrometry with stepped collision energy scanning was used to selectively identify and preparatively fractionate tryptic glycopeptides. Edman sequence analysis was then used to confirm the identities of the glycopeptides and to define the attachment sites within each peptide. A total of six N-linked glycosylation sites were identified, three in the alpha subunit (alpha 64N, alpha 81N, alpha 123N) and three in the beta subunit (beta 64N, beta 127N, and beta 147N). Seven different possible types of oligosaccharide structures were identified by mass including: a monosialobiantennary structure, bisialobiantennary structures without or with one fucose, trisialotriantennary structures without or with one fucose, and possibly a trisialotriantennary structure with two fucose and/or a tetrasialotriantennary structure. Site beta 64N exhibited the least glycosylation diversity, with two detected types of oligosaccharides, and site beta 147N exhibited the greatest diversity, with five or six detected types of oligosaccharides. Overall, the most abundant glycoforms detected were bisialobiantennary without fucose and the least

  10. Re-Defining the Subsurface Biosphere: Characterization of Fungal Populations from Energy Limited Deep Marine Subsurface Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reese, B. K.; Ariza, M.; St. Peter, C.; Hoffman, C.; Edwards, K. J.; Mills, H. J.

    2012-12-01

    The detection and characterization of metabolically active fungal populations within the deep marine subsurface will alter current ecosystem models that are limited to bacterial and archaeal populations. Although marine fungi have been studied for over fifty years, a detailed description of fungal populations within the deep subsurface is lacking. Fungi possess metabolic pathways capable of utilizing previously considered non-bioavailable energy reserves. Therefore, metabolically active fungi would occupy a unique niche within subsurface ecosystems, with the potential to provide an organic carbon source for heterotrophic prokaryotic populations not currently being considered in subsurface energy budgets. Sediments from the South Pacific Gyre subsurface, one of the most energy-limited environments on Earth, were collected during the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 329. Anaerobic and aerobic sediment slurry cultures using fresh sediment began directly following the completion of the Expedition (December 2010). From these cultures, multiple fungal lineages have been isolated on several media types that vary in carbon concentrations. Physical growth parameters of these subsurface fungal isolates were determined and compared to previously characterized lineages. Additionally, the overall diversity of metabolically active and dormant fungal populations was determined using high throughput sequencing of nucleic acids extracted from in situ cryopreserved South Pacific Gyre sediments. This project provides a robust step in determining the importance and impact of fungal populations within the marine subsurface biosphere.

  11. Purification, characterization and crystallization of the human 80S ribosome

    PubMed Central

    Khatter, Heena; Myasnikov, Alexander G.; Mastio, Leslie; Billas, Isabelle M. L.; Birck, Catherine; Stella, Stefano; Klaholz, Bruno P.

    2014-01-01

    Ribosomes are key macromolecular protein synthesis machineries in the cell. Human ribosomes have so far not been studied to atomic resolution because of their particularly complex structure as compared with other eukaryotic or prokaryotic ribosomes, and they are difficult to prepare to high homogeneity, which is a key requisite for high-resolution structural work. We established a purification protocol for human 80S ribosomes isolated from HeLa cells that allows obtaining large quantities of homogenous samples as characterized by biophysical methods using analytical ultracentrifugation and multiangle laser light scattering. Samples prepared under different conditions were characterized by direct single particle imaging using cryo electron microscopy, which helped optimizing the preparation protocol. From a small data set, a 3D reconstruction at subnanometric resolution was obtained showing all prominent structural features of the human ribosome, and revealing a salt concentration dependence of the presence of the exit site tRNA, which we show is critical for obtaining crystals. With these well-characterized samples first human 80S ribosome crystals were obtained from several crystallization conditions in capillaries and sitting drops, which diffract to 26 Å resolution at cryo temperatures and for which the crystallographic parameters were determined, paving the way for future high-resolution work. PMID:24452798

  12. Proteogenomics: Integrating Next-Generation Sequencing and Mass Spectrometry to Characterize Human Proteomic Variation

    PubMed Central

    Sheynkman, Gloria M.; Shortreed, Michael R.; Cesnik, Anthony J.; Smith, Lloyd M.

    2016-01-01

    Mass spectrometry–based proteomics has emerged as the leading method for detection, quantification, and characterization of proteins. Nearly all proteomic workflows rely on proteomic databases to identify peptides and proteins, but these databases typically contain a generic set of proteins that lack variations unique to a given sample, precluding their detection. Fortunately, proteogenomics enables the detection of such proteomic variations and can be defined, broadly, as the use of nucleotide sequences to generate candidate protein sequences for mass spectrometry database searching. Proteogenomics is experiencing heightened significance due to two developments: (a) advances in DNA sequencing technologies that have made complete sequencing of human genomes and transcriptomes routine, and (b) the unveiling of the tremendous complexity of the human proteome as expressed at the levels of genes, cells, tissues, individuals, and populations. We review here the field of human proteogenomics, with an emphasis on its history, current implementations, the types of proteomic variations it reveals, and several important applications. PMID:27049631

  13. Proteogenomics: Integrating Next-Generation Sequencing and Mass Spectrometry to Characterize Human Proteomic Variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheynkman, Gloria M.; Shortreed, Michael R.; Cesnik, Anthony J.; Smith, Lloyd M.

    2016-06-01

    Mass spectrometry-based proteomics has emerged as the leading method for detection, quantification, and characterization of proteins. Nearly all proteomic workflows rely on proteomic databases to identify peptides and proteins, but these databases typically contain a generic set of proteins that lack variations unique to a given sample, precluding their detection. Fortunately, proteogenomics enables the detection of such proteomic variations and can be defined, broadly, as the use of nucleotide sequences to generate candidate protein sequences for mass spectrometry database searching. Proteogenomics is experiencing heightened significance due to two developments: (a) advances in DNA sequencing technologies that have made complete sequencing of human genomes and transcriptomes routine, and (b) the unveiling of the tremendous complexity of the human proteome as expressed at the levels of genes, cells, tissues, individuals, and populations. We review here the field of human proteogenomics, with an emphasis on its history, current implementations, the types of proteomic variations it reveals, and several important applications.

  14. Proteogenomics: Integrating Next-Generation Sequencing and Mass Spectrometry to Characterize Human Proteomic Variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheynkman, Gloria M.; Shortreed, Michael R.; Cesnik, Anthony J.; Smith, Lloyd M.

    2016-06-01

    Mass spectrometry–based proteomics has emerged as the leading method for detection, quantification, and characterization of proteins. Nearly all proteomic workflows rely on proteomic databases to identify peptides and proteins, but these databases typically contain a generic set of proteins that lack variations unique to a given sample, precluding their detection. Fortunately, proteogenomics enables the detection of such proteomic variations and can be defined, broadly, as the use of nucleotide sequences to generate candidate protein sequences for mass spectrometry database searching. Proteogenomics is experiencing heightened significance due to two developments: (a) advances in DNA sequencing technologies that have made complete sequencing of human genomes and transcriptomes routine, and (b) the unveiling of the tremendous complexity of the human proteome as expressed at the levels of genes, cells, tissues, individuals, and populations. We review here the field of human proteogenomics, with an emphasis on its history, current implementations, the types of proteomic variations it reveals, and several important applications.

  15. Molecular characterization of the human microbiome from a reproductive perspective.

    PubMed

    Mor, Amir; Driggers, Paul H; Segars, James H

    2015-12-01

    The process of reproduction inherently poses unique microbial challenges because it requires the transfer of gametes from one individual to the other, meanwhile preserving the integrity of the gametes and individuals from harmful microbes during the process. Advances in molecular biology techniques have expanded our understanding of the natural organisms living on and in our bodies, including those inhabiting the reproductive tract. Over the past two decades accumulating evidence has shown that the human microbiome is tightly related to health and disease states involving the different body systems, including the reproductive system. Here we introduce the science involved in the study of the human microbiome. We examine common methods currently used to characterize the human microbiome as an inseparable part of the reproductive system. Finally, we consider a few limitations, clinical implications, and the critical need for additional research in the field of human fertility.

  16. Molecular characterization of Cryptosporidium isolates from humans in Equatorial Guinea.

    PubMed

    Blanco, María Alejandra; Iborra, Asunción; Vargas, Antonio; Nsie, Eugenia; Mbá, Luciano; Fuentes, Isabel

    2009-12-01

    The aim of the study was to perform a molecular characterization of clinical isolates of Cryptosporidium species from Equatorial Guinea. Standard laboratory methods were used to identify 35 cryptosporidiosis cases among 185 patients. PCR-RFLP successfully identified 34 Cryptosporidium species from these 35 cases, comprising C. parvum (52.9%), C. hominis (44.1%) and C. meleagridis (2.9%); over 90% of the species were isolated from HIV-positive patients. This is the first report of the molecular characterization of Cryptosporidium species isolated from humans in Equatorial Guinea and shows that zoonotic and anthroponotic transmission is present in this country.

  17. Generation and Characterization of an Immortalized Human Esophageal Myofibroblast Line.

    PubMed

    Niu, Chao; Chauhan, Uday; Gargus, Matthew; Shaker, Anisa

    2016-01-01

    Stromal cells with a myofibroblast phenotype present in the normal human esophagus are increased in individuals with gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD). We have previously demonstrated that myofibroblasts stimulated with acid and TLR4 agonists increase IL-6 and IL-8 secretion using primary cultures of myofibroblasts established from normal human esophagus. While primary cultures have the advantage of reflecting the in vivo environment, a short life span and unavoidable heterogeneity limits the usefulness of this model in larger scale in vitro cellular signaling studies. The major aim of this paper therefore was to generate a human esophageal myofibroblast line with an extended lifespan. In the work presented here we have generated and characterized an immortalized human esophageal myofibroblast line by transfection with a commercially available GFP-hTERT lentivirus. Immortalized human esophageal myofibroblasts demonstrate phenotypic, genotypic and functional similarity to primary cultures of esophageal myofibroblasts we have previously described. We found that immortalized esophageal myofibroblasts retain myofibroblast spindle-shaped morphology at low and high confluence beyond passage 80, and express α-SMA, vimentin, and CD90 myofibroblast markers. Immortalized human esophageal myofibroblasts also express the putative acid receptor TRPV1 and TLR4 and retain the functional capacity to respond to stimuli encountered in GERD with secretion of IL-6. Finally, immortalized human esophageal myofibroblasts also support the stratified growth of squamous esophageal epithelial cells in 3D organotypic cultures. This newly characterized immortalized human esophageal myofibroblast cell line can be used in future cellular signaling and co-culture studies. PMID:27055018

  18. Defining "Development".

    PubMed

    Pradeu, Thomas; Laplane, Lucie; Prévot, Karine; Hoquet, Thierry; Reynaud, Valentine; Fusco, Giuseppe; Minelli, Alessandro; Orgogozo, Virginie; Vervoort, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Is it possible, and in the first place is it even desirable, to define what "development" means and to determine the scope of the field called "developmental biology"? Though these questions appeared crucial for the founders of "developmental biology" in the 1950s, there seems to be no consensus today about the need to address them. Here, in a combined biological, philosophical, and historical approach, we ask whether it is possible and useful to define biological development, and, if such a definition is indeed possible and useful, which definition(s) can be considered as the most satisfactory.

  19. On characterizing adaptive events unique to modern humans.

    PubMed

    Crisci, Jessica L; Wong, Alex; Good, Jeffrey M; Jensen, Jeffrey D

    2011-01-01

    Ever since the first draft of the human genome was completed in 2001, there has been increased interest in identifying genetic changes that are uniquely human, which could account for our distinct morphological and cognitive capabilities with respect to other apes. Recently, draft sequences of two extinct hominin genomes, a Neanderthal and Denisovan, have been released. These two genomes provide a much greater resolution to identify human-specific genetic differences than the chimpanzee, our closest extant relative. The Neanderthal genome paper presented a list of regions putatively targeted by positive selection around the time of the human-Neanderthal split. We here seek to characterize the evolutionary history of these candidate regions-examining evidence for selective sweeps in modern human populations as well as for accelerated adaptive evolution across apes. Results indicate that 3 of the top 20 candidate regions show evidence of selection in at least one modern human population (P < 5 × 10(5)). Additionally, four genes within the top 20 regions show accelerated amino acid substitutions across multiple apes (P < 0.01), suggesting importance across deeper evolutionary time. These results highlight the importance of evaluating evolutionary processes across both recent and ancient evolutionary timescales and intriguingly suggest a list of candidate genes that may have been uniquely important around the time of the human-Neanderthal split.

  20. Defining the Boundaries and Characterizing the Landscape of Genome Expression in Vascular Tissues of Populus using Shotgun Proteomics

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham, Paul E; Adams, Rachel M; Giannone, Richard J; Kalluri, Udaya C; Ranjan, Priya; Erickson, Brian K; Shah, Manesh B; Tuskan, Gerald A; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L

    2012-01-01

    Current state-of-the-art experimental and computational proteomic approaches were integrated to obtain a comprehensive protein profile of Populus vascular tissue. This featured: 1) a large sample set consisting of two genotypes grown under normal and tension stress conditions, 2) bioinformatics clustering to effectively handle gene duplication, and 3) an informatics approach to track and identify single amino acid polymorphisms (SAAPs). By applying a clustering algorithm to the Populus database, the number of protein entries decreased from 64,689 proteins to a total of 43,069 protein groups, thereby reducing 7,505 identified proteins to a total of 4,226 protein groups, in which 2,016 were singletons. This reduction implies that ~50% of the measured proteins were clustered into groups that shared extensive sequence homology. Using conservative search criteria, we were able to identify 1,354 peptides containing a SAAP and 201 peptides that become tryptic due to a K or R substitution. These newly identified peptides correspond to 502 proteins, including 97 proteins that were not previously identified. In total, the integration of deep proteome measurements on an extensive sample set with protein clustering and peptide sequence variants provided an unprecedented level of proteome characterization for Populus, allowing us to spatially resolve the vascular tissue proteome.

  1. In Vivo Characterization of Human APOA5 Haplotypes

    SciTech Connect

    Ahituv, Nadav; Akiyama, Jennifer; Chapman-Helleboid, Audrey; Fruchart, Jamila; Pennacchio, Len A.

    2006-10-01

    Increased plasma triglycerides concentrations are an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Numerous studies support a reproducible genetic association between two minor haplotypes in the human apolipoprotein A5 gene (APOA5) and increased plasma triglyceride concentrations. We thus sought to investigate the effect of these minor haplotypes (APOA5*2 and APOA5*3) on ApoAV plasma levels through the precise insertion of single-copy intact APOA5 haplotypes at a targeted location in the mouse genome. While we found no difference in the amount of human plasma ApoAV in mice containing the common APOA5*1 and minor APOA5*2 haplotype, the introduction of the single APOA5*3 defining allele (19W) resulted in 3-fold lower ApoAV plasma levels consistent with existing genetic association studies. These results indicate that S19W polymorphism is likely to be functional and explain the strong association of this variant with plasma triglycerides supporting the value of sensitive in vivo assays to define the functional nature of human haplotypes.

  2. Defining Infertility

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine Defining infertility What is infertility? Infertility is “the inability to conceive after 12 months ... to conceive after 6 months is generally considered infertility. How common is it? Infertility affects 10%-15% ...

  3. Functional characterization of protein 4.1 homolog in amphioxus: defining a cryptic spectrin-actin-binding site.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lixia; Wang, Yuan; Li, Zhaohe; Gao, Zhan; Zhang, Shicui

    2013-10-07

    Vertebrate 4.1 proteins have a spectrin-actin-binding (SAB) domain, which is lacking in all the invertebrate 4.1 proteins indentified so far, and it was therefore proposed that the SAB domain emerged with the advent of vertebrates during evolution. Here we demonstrated for the first time that amphioxus (an invertebrate chordate) protein 4.1, though lacking a recognizable SAB, was able to bind both spectrin and actin, with a binding capacity comparable to that of human protein 4.1. Detailed structure-activity analyses revealed that the unique domain U2/3 was a newly identified SAB-like domain capable of interacting with spectrin and actin, suggesting the presence of a "cryptic" SAB domain in amphioxus 4.1 protein. We also showed that amphioxus 4.1 protein gene was the common ancestor of vertebrate 4.1 protein genes, from which 4.1R, 4.1N, 4.1G, and 4.1B genes originated. This work will encourage further study on the structure-activity of invertebrate 4.1 protein and its interacting proteins.

  4. Functional characterization of protein 4.1 homolog in amphioxus: defining a cryptic spectrin-actin-binding site.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lixia; Wang, Yuan; Li, Zhaohe; Gao, Zhan; Zhang, Shicui

    2013-01-01

    Vertebrate 4.1 proteins have a spectrin-actin-binding (SAB) domain, which is lacking in all the invertebrate 4.1 proteins indentified so far, and it was therefore proposed that the SAB domain emerged with the advent of vertebrates during evolution. Here we demonstrated for the first time that amphioxus (an invertebrate chordate) protein 4.1, though lacking a recognizable SAB, was able to bind both spectrin and actin, with a binding capacity comparable to that of human protein 4.1. Detailed structure-activity analyses revealed that the unique domain U2/3 was a newly identified SAB-like domain capable of interacting with spectrin and actin, suggesting the presence of a "cryptic" SAB domain in amphioxus 4.1 protein. We also showed that amphioxus 4.1 protein gene was the common ancestor of vertebrate 4.1 protein genes, from which 4.1R, 4.1N, 4.1G, and 4.1B genes originated. This work will encourage further study on the structure-activity of invertebrate 4.1 protein and its interacting proteins. PMID:24096627

  5. Characterization of novel Staphylococcus aureus lytic phage and defining their combinatorial virulence using the OmniLog® system

    PubMed Central

    Estrella, Luis A.; Quinones, Javier; Henry, Matthew; Hannah, Ryan M.; Pope, Robert K.; Hamilton, Theron; Teneza-mora, Nimfa; Hall, Eric; Biswajit, Biswas

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Skin and soft tissue infections (SSTI) caused by methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) are difficult to treat. Bacteriophage (phage) represent a potential alternate treatment for antibiotic resistant bacterial infections. In this study, 7 novel phage with broad lytic activity for S. aureus were isolated and identified. Screening of a diverse collection of 170 clinical isolates by efficiency of plating (EOP) assays shows that the novel phage are virulent and effectively prevent growth of 70–91% of MRSA and methicillin sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) isolates. Phage K, which was previously identified as having lytic activity on S. aureus was tested on the S. aureus collection and shown to prevent growth of 82% of the isolates. These novel phage group were examined by electron microscopy, the results of which indicate that the phage belong to the Myoviridae family of viruses. The novel phage group requires β-N-acetyl glucosamine (GlcNac) moieties on cell wall teichoic acids for infection. The phage were distinct from, but closely related to, phage K as characterized by restriction endonuclease analysis. Furthermore, growth rate analysis via OmniLog® microplate assay indicates that a combination of phage K, with phage SA0420ᶲ1, SA0456ᶲ1 or SA0482ᶲ1 have a synergistic phage-mediated lytic effect on MRSA and suppress formation of phage resistance. These results indicate that a broad spectrum lytic phage mixture can suppress the emergence of resistant bacterial populations and hence have great potential for combating S. aureus wound infections. PMID:27738555

  6. Characterization of an Alphamesonivirus 3C-Like Protease Defines a Special Group of Nidovirus Main Proteases

    PubMed Central

    Blanck, Sandra; Stinn, Anne; Tsiklauri, Lali; Zirkel, Florian; Junglen, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    known lineages of large nidoviruses. Despite their smaller genome size (20 kb), mesoniviruses retained most of the replicative domains conserved in large nidoviruses; thus, they are considered interesting models for studying possible key events in the evolution of RNA genomes of exceptional size and complexity. Our study provides the first characterization of a mesonivirus replicase gene-encoded nonstructural protein. The data confirm and extend previous phylogenetic studies of mesoniviruses and related viruses and pave the way for studies into the formation of the mesonivirus replication complex and functional and structural studies of its functional subunits. PMID:25231310

  7. Mesenchymal stem cell isolation and characterization from human spinal ligaments.

    PubMed

    Asari, Toru; Furukawa, Ken-Ichi; Tanaka, Sunao; Kudo, Hitoshi; Mizukami, Hiroki; Ono, Atsushi; Numasawa, Takuya; Kumagai, Gentaro; Motomura, Shigeru; Yagihashi, Soroku; Toh, Satoshi

    2012-01-27

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have a fibroblast-like morphology, multilineage potential, long-term viability and capacity for self-renewal. While several articles describe isolating MSCs from various human tissues, there are no reports of isolating MSCs from human spinal ligaments, and their localization in situ. If MSCs are found in human spinal ligaments, they could be used to investigate hypertrophy or ossification of spinal ligaments. To isolate and characterize MSCs from human spinal ligaments, spinal ligaments were harvested aseptically from eight patients during surgery for lumbar spinal canal stenosis and ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament. After collagenase digestion, nucleated cells were seeded at an appropriate density to avoid colony-to-colony contact. Cells were cultured in osteogenic, adipogenic or chondrogenic media to evaluate their multilineage differentiation potential. Immunophenotypic analysis of cell surface markers was performed by flow cytometry. Spinal ligaments were processed for immunostaining using MSC-related antibodies. Cells from human spinal ligaments could be extensively expanded with limited senescence. They were able to differentiate into osteogenic, adipogenic or chondrogenic cells. Flow cytometry revealed that their phenotypic characteristics met the minimum criteria of MSCs. Immunohistochemistry revealed the localization of CD90-positive cells in the collagenous matrix of the ligament, and in adjacent small blood vessels. We isolated and expanded MSCs from human spinal ligaments and demonstrated localization of MSCs in spinal ligaments. These cells may play an indispensable role in elucidating the pathogenesis of numerous spinal diseases.

  8. Defining cure.

    PubMed

    Hilton, Paul; Robinson, Dudley

    2011-06-01

    This paper is a summary of the presentations made as Proposal 2-"Defining cure" to the 2nd Annual meeting of the ICI-Research Society, in Bristol, 16th June 2010. It reviews definitions of 'cure' and 'outcome', and considers the impact that varying definition may have on prevalence studies and cure rates. The difference between subjective and objective outcomes is considered, and the significance that these different outcomes may have for different stakeholders (e.g. clinicians, patients, carers, industry etc.) is discussed. The development of patient reported outcome measures and patient defined goals is reviewed, and consideration given to the use of composite end-points. A series of proposals are made by authors and discussants as to how currently validated outcomes should be applied, and where our future research activity in this area might be directed.

  9. An Integrated Analysis of the Genome-Wide Profiles of DNA Methylation and mRNA Expression Defining the Side Population of a Human Malignant Mesothelioma Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Myung-Chul; Kim, Na-Yon; Seo, Yu-Ri; Kim, Yongbaek

    2016-01-01

    Intratumoral heterogeneity is a hallmark of all cancers and functions as the major barrier against effective cancer therapy. In contrast to genetic mutations, the role of epigenetic modifications in the generation and maintenance of heterogeneous cancer cells remains largely undetermined. This study was performed to evaluate the epigenetic mechanisms involved in the tumor cell heterogeneity using side population (SP) and non-SP cells isolated from a human malignant mesothelioma (HMM) cell line. The subpopulations of cancer cells were analyzed by methylated DNA immunoprecipitation combined with high-throughput sequencing (MeDIP-seq) and RNA-seq methodology. The RNA-seq data were analyzed with the MeDIP-seq data in an integrated way to identify the epigenetically modified genes that defined the SP. Concomitant changes in mRNA expression and DNA methylation were found in 122 genes, including 118 down-regulated genes with hypermethylation and 4 up-regulated genes with hypomethylation. Gene ontology revealed that a large portion of the genes belonged to the groups of biological processes such as stem cell maintenance, stem cell development, stem cell differentiation, and the negative regulation of the developmental process. Among these genes, BNC1, RPS6KA3, TWSG1 and DUSP15 contained aberrant methylation in the CpG islands of the promoter region, indicating that the genes regulated by DNA methylation characterized a distinct subpopulation of HMM cells. The present study provided valuable information to shed light on the epigenetic contributions to the generation and maintenance of tumor cell heterogeneity. PMID:27698904

  10. An Integrated Analysis of the Genome-Wide Profiles of DNA Methylation and mRNA Expression Defining the Side Population of a Human Malignant Mesothelioma Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Myung-Chul; Kim, Na-Yon; Seo, Yu-Ri; Kim, Yongbaek

    2016-01-01

    Intratumoral heterogeneity is a hallmark of all cancers and functions as the major barrier against effective cancer therapy. In contrast to genetic mutations, the role of epigenetic modifications in the generation and maintenance of heterogeneous cancer cells remains largely undetermined. This study was performed to evaluate the epigenetic mechanisms involved in the tumor cell heterogeneity using side population (SP) and non-SP cells isolated from a human malignant mesothelioma (HMM) cell line. The subpopulations of cancer cells were analyzed by methylated DNA immunoprecipitation combined with high-throughput sequencing (MeDIP-seq) and RNA-seq methodology. The RNA-seq data were analyzed with the MeDIP-seq data in an integrated way to identify the epigenetically modified genes that defined the SP. Concomitant changes in mRNA expression and DNA methylation were found in 122 genes, including 118 down-regulated genes with hypermethylation and 4 up-regulated genes with hypomethylation. Gene ontology revealed that a large portion of the genes belonged to the groups of biological processes such as stem cell maintenance, stem cell development, stem cell differentiation, and the negative regulation of the developmental process. Among these genes, BNC1, RPS6KA3, TWSG1 and DUSP15 contained aberrant methylation in the CpG islands of the promoter region, indicating that the genes regulated by DNA methylation characterized a distinct subpopulation of HMM cells. The present study provided valuable information to shed light on the epigenetic contributions to the generation and maintenance of tumor cell heterogeneity.

  11. Characterization factors for global warming in life cycle assessment based on damages to humans and ecosystems.

    PubMed

    De Schryver, An M; Brakkee, Karin W; Goedkoop, Mark J; Huijbregts, Mark A J

    2009-03-15

    Human and ecosystem health damage due to greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions is generally poorly quantified in the life cycle assessment of products, preventing an integrated comparison of the importance of GHGs with other stressor types, such as ozone depletion and acidifying emissions. In this study, we derived new characterization factors for 63 GHGs that quantify the impact of an emission change on human and ecosystem health damage. For human health damage, the Disability Adjusted Life Years (DALYs) per unit emission related to malaria, diarrhea, malnutrition, drowning, and cardiovascular diseases were quantified. For ecosystem health damage, the Potentially Disappeared Fraction (PDF) over space and time of various species groups, including plants, butterflies, birds, and mammals, per unit emission was calculated. The influence of value choices in the modeling procedure was analyzed by defining three coherent scenarios, based on Cultural theory perspectives. It was found that the characterization factor for human health damage by carbon dioxide (CO2) ranges from 1.1 x 10(-2) to 1.8 x 10(+1) DALY per kton of emission, while the characterization factor for ecosystem damage by CO2 ranges from 5.4 x 10(-2) to 1.2 x 10(+1) disappeared fraction of species over space and time ((km2 x year)/kton), depending on the scenario chosen. The characterization factor of a GHG can change up to 4 orders of magnitude, depending on the scenario. The scenario-specific differences are mainly explained by the choice for a specific time horizon and stresses the importance of dealing with value choices in the life cycle impact assessment of GHG emissions.

  12. Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) immediate-early enhancer/promoter specificity during embryogenesis defines target tissues of congenital HCMV infection.

    PubMed Central

    Koedood, M; Fichtel, A; Meier, P; Mitchell, P J

    1995-01-01

    Congenital human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection is a common cause of deafness and neurological disabilities. Many aspects of this prenatal infection, including which cell types are infected and how infection proceeds, are poorly understood. Transcription of HCMV immediate-early (IE) genes is required for expression of all other HCMV genes and is dependent on host cell transcription factors. Cell type-specific differences in levels of IE transcription are believed to underlie differences in infection permissivity. However, DNA transfection experiments have paradoxically suggested that the HCMV major IE enhancer/promoter is a broadly active transcriptional element with little cell type specificity. In contrast, we show here that expression of a lacZ gene driven by the HCMV major IE enhancer/promoter -524 to +13 segment is restricted in transgenic mouse embryos to sites that correlate with known sites of congenital HCMV infection in human fetuses. This finding suggests that the IE enhancer/promoter is a major determinant of HCMV infection sites in humans and that transcription factors responsible for its regulation are cell type-specifically conserved between humans and mice. The lacZ expression patterns of these transgenic embryos yield insight into congenital HCMV pathogenesis by providing a spatiotemporal map of the sets of vascular, neural, and epithelial cells that are likely targets of infection. These transgenic mice may constitute a useful model system for investigating IE enhancer/promoter regulation in vivo and for identifying factors that modulate active and latent HCMV infections in humans. PMID:7884867

  13. Defining chaos

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, Brian R.; Ott, Edward

    2015-09-15

    In this paper, we propose, discuss, and illustrate a computationally feasible definition of chaos which can be applied very generally to situations that are commonly encountered, including attractors, repellers, and non-periodically forced systems. This definition is based on an entropy-like quantity, which we call “expansion entropy,” and we define chaos as occurring when this quantity is positive. We relate and compare expansion entropy to the well-known concept of topological entropy to which it is equivalent under appropriate conditions. We also present example illustrations, discuss computational implementations, and point out issues arising from attempts at giving definitions of chaos that are not entropy-based.

  14. Molecular Characterization of First Human Bartonella Strain Isolated in Italy

    PubMed Central

    Ciervo, Alessandra; Petrucca, Andrea; Ciarrocchi, Simonetta; Pinto, Antonella; Bonazzi, Lucio; Fabio, Anna; Farnetti, Enrico; Chomel, Bruno B.; Ciceroni, Lorenzo

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize a Bartonella strain (BA-1) isolated from a blood culture of an Italian, human immunodeficiency virus-positive patient with bacillary angiomatosis. We analyzed the isolate using molecular biology methods such as whole-cell fatty acid analysis, PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis, type-specific 16S rRNA PCRs, sequence analysis of the 16S rRNA, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, and arbitrarily primed PCR. The BA-1 isolate turned out to be a Bartonella quintana strain, similar but not identical to B. quintana Oklahoma, which was used as a control strain. PMID:11724882

  15. Defining biobank.

    PubMed

    Hewitt, Robert; Watson, Peter

    2013-10-01

    The term "biobank" first appeared in the scientific literature in 1996 and for the next five years was used mainly to describe human population-based biobanks. In recent years, the term has been used in a more general sense and there are currently many different definitions to be found in reports, guidelines and regulatory documents. Some definitions are general, including all types of biological sample collection facilities. Others are specific and limited to collections of human samples, sometimes just to population-based collections. In order to help resolve the confusion on this matter, we conducted a survey of the opinions of people involved in managing sample collections of all types. This survey was conducted using an online questionnaire that attracted 303 responses. The results show that there is consensus that the term biobank may be applied to biological collections of human, animal, plant or microbial samples; and that the term biobank should only be applied to sample collections with associated sample data, and to collections that are managed according to professional standards. There was no consensus on whether a collection's purpose, size or level of access should determine whether it is called a biobank. Putting these findings into perspective, we argue that a general, broad definition of biobank is here to stay, and that attention should now focus on the need for a universally-accepted, systematic classification of the different biobank types. PMID:24835262

  16. Molecular Diagnostic Methods for Detection and Characterization of Human Noroviruses

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Haifeng; Hu, Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Human noroviruses are a group of viral agents that afflict people of all age groups. The viruses are now recognized as the most common causative agent of nonbacterial acute gastroenteritis and foodborne viral illness worldwide. However, they have been considered to play insignificant roles in the disease burden of acute gastroenteritis for the past decades until the recent advent of new and more sensitive molecular diagnostic methods. The availability and application of the molecular diagnostic methods have led to enhanced detection of noroviruses in clinical, food and environmental samples, significantly increasing the recognition of noroviruses as an etiologic agent of epidemic and sporadic acute gastroenteritis. This article aims to summarize recent efforts made for the development of molecular methods for the detection and characterization of human noroviruses. PMID:27335620

  17. The monitoring of gene functions on a cell-defined siRNA microarray in human bone marrow stromal and U2OS cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hi Chul; Kim, Gi-Hwan; Shum, David; Cho, Ssang-Goo; Lee, Eun Ju; Kwon, Yong-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Here, we developed a cell defined siRNA microarray (CDSM) for human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs) designed to control the culture of cells inside the spot area without reducing the efficiency of siRNA silencing, “Development of a cell-defined siRNA microarray for analysis of gene functionin human bone marrow stromal cells” (Kim et al., 2016 [1]). First, we confirmed that p65 protein inhibition efficiency was maintained when hBMSCs were culture for 7 days on the siRNA spot, and siRNA spot activity remained in spite of long term storage (10 days and 2 months). Additionally, we confirmed p65 protein inhibition in U2OS cells after 48 h reverse transfection. PMID:27054175

  18. Characterization of a human antigen specific helper factor

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, B.

    1986-03-01

    While antigen (Ag) specific helper factors have been characterized in mice, similar molecules have not been identified in humans. To characterize human antigen specific helper molecules, an IL-2 dependent tetanus toxoid (T.T.) reactive T cell line was fused with a 6-thioguanine resistant CEM line, and hybrids selected in medium containing hypoxanthine and azaserine. Hybrids were screened by culturing the cells with /sup 35/S-Met then reacting the supernatants with T.T. or hepatitis vaccine immobilized on nitrocellulose. One hybrid, TT6BA-O, was identified which secreted a Met-containing molecule which bound T.T. but not hepatitis vaccine. Supernatants from TT6BA-O, but not the parent CEM line, when added to autologous peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC's) stimulated secretion of T.T. specific antibodies (Abs). Specificity controls demonstrated that TT6BA-O supernatant did not induce antibodies to diphtheria toxoid, hepatitis vaccine or pneumococcal polysaccharide, and total immunoglobulin (lg) synthesis was minimally increased. In contrast, pokeweed mitogen stimulated significant lg synthesis as well as Ab's to pneumococcal polysaccharide and T.T. TT6BA-O supernatant induced anti-T.T.Ab's in autologous PBMC's but not PBMC's from 3 unrelated donors, suggesting that the activity of the helper factor is restricted, possibly by the MHC. The molecular weight of the helper factor was estimated at 100,000-150,000 by Sephacryl S-300 chromatography. Finally, the helper factor could be demonstrated to bind and elute from sephorose-immobilized T.T. and anti-DR antisera, but not anti-lg antisera or the T40/25 monoclonal antibody, which binds a nonpolymorphic determinant on the human T cell receptor. These results demonstrate that human Ag specific helper factors exist, bind antigen and bear class II MHC determinants.

  19. Characterization of NAADP-mediated calcium signaling in human spermatozoa

    SciTech Connect

    Sánchez-Tusie, A.A.; Vasudevan, S.R.; Churchill, G.C.; Nishigaki, T.; Treviño, C.L.

    2014-01-10

    Highlights: •Human sperm cells synthesize NAADP. •NAADP-AM mediates [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} increases in human sperm in the absence of [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o}. •Human sperm have two acidic compartments located in the head and midpiece. -- Abstract: Ca{sup 2+} signaling in spermatozoa plays a crucial role during processes such as capacitation and release of the acrosome, but the underlying molecular mechanisms still remain unclear. Nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP) is a potent Ca{sup 2+}-releasing second messenger in a variety of cellular processes. The presence of a NAADP synthesizing enzyme in sea urchin sperm has been previously reported, suggesting a possible role of NAADP in sperm Ca{sup 2+} signaling. In this work we used in vitro enzyme assays to show the presence of a novel NAADP synthesizing enzyme in human sperm, and to characterize its sensitivity to Ca{sup 2+} and pH. Ca{sup 2+} fluorescence imaging studies demonstrated that the permeable form of NAADP (NAADP-AM) induces intracellular [Ca{sup 2+}] increases in human sperm even in the absence of extracellular Ca{sup 2+}. Using LysoTracker®, a fluorescent probe that selectively accumulates in acidic compartments, we identified two such stores in human sperm cells. Their acidic nature was further confirmed by the reduction in staining intensity observed upon inhibition of the endo-lysosomal proton pump with Bafilomycin, or after lysosomal bursting with glycyl-L-phenylalanine-2-naphthylamide. The selective fluorescent NAADP analog, Ned-19, stained the same subcellular regions as LysoTracker®, suggesting that these stores are the targets of NAADP action.

  20. Successful fertilization, embryo development, and pregnancy in human in vitro fertilization (IVF) using a chemically defined culture medium containing no protein.

    PubMed

    Caro, C M; Trounson, A

    1986-08-01

    A randomized control trial involving the fertilization and culture of human embryos in culture medium (T6) containing either 10% maternal serum or no protein or amino acid supplement was carried out to assess the effect of deletion from culture of all fixed nitrogen on fertilization, embryo development, and embryo viability. There was no difference in fertilization rates (68 vs 69%), development of apparently normal embryos (96 vs 97%), pregnancy rate (18 vs 14%), or birth rate (13 vs 11%) between protein-containing and protein-free media. Deletion of protein from the culture medium may enable the constitution of more appropriate and defined culture media for human in vitro fertilization (IVF).

  1. Defining Face Perception Areas in the Human Brain: A Large-Scale Factorial fMRI Face Localizer Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossion, Bruno; Hanseeuw, Bernard; Dricot, Laurence

    2012-01-01

    A number of human brain areas showing a larger response to faces than to objects from different categories, or to scrambled faces, have been identified in neuroimaging studies. Depending on the statistical criteria used, the set of areas can be overextended or minimized, both at the local (size of areas) and global (number of areas) levels. Here…

  2. Understanding the apothecaries within: the necessity of a systematic approach for defining the chemical output of the human microbiome.

    PubMed

    Beebe, Kirk; Sampey, Brante; Watkins, Steven M; Milburn, Michael; Eckhart, Andrea D

    2014-02-01

    The human microbiome harbors a massive diversity of microbes that effectively form an "organ" that strongly influences metabolism and immune function and hence, human health. Although the growing interest in the microbiome has chiefly arisen due to its impact on human physiology, the probable rules of operation are embedded in the roots of microbiology where chemical communication (i.e., with metabolites) is a dominant feature of coexistence. Indeed, recent examples in microbiome research offer the impression that the collective microbiome operates as an "apothecary," creating chemical concoctions that influence health and alter drug response. Although these principles are not unappreciated, the majority of emphasis is on metagenomics and research efforts often omit systematic efforts to interrogate the chemical component of the complex equation between microbial community and host phenotype. One of the reasons for this omission may be due to the inaccessibility to high-breadth, high-throughput, and scalable technologies. Since these technologies are now available, we propose that a more systematic effort to survey the host-microbiota chemical output be embedded into microbiome research as there is strong likelihood, and growing precedence, that this component may often be integral to developing our understanding of these ultimate apothecaries and how they impact human health. PMID:24422665

  3. Inhibition of apoptosis in human induced pluripotent stem cells during expansion in a defined culture using angiopoietin-1 derived peptide QHREDGS

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Lan T. H.; Feric, Nicole; Laschinger, Carol; Chang, Wing Y.; Zhang, Boyang; Wood, Geoffrey A.; Stanford, William L.; Radisic, Milica

    2014-01-01

    Adhesion molecule signaling is critical to human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC) survival, self-renewal, and differentiation. Thus, hPSCs are grown as clumps of cells on feeder cell layers or poorly defined extracellular matrices such as Matrigel. We sought to define a small molecule that would initiate adhesion-based signaling to serve as a basis for a defined substrate for hPSC culture. Soluble angiopoeitin-1 (Ang-1)-derived peptide QHREDGS added to defined serum-free media increased hPSC colony cell number and size during long- and short-term culture when grown on feeder cell layers or Matrigel, i.e. on standard substrates, without affecting hPSC morphology, growth rate or the ability to differentiate into multiple lineages both in vitro and in vivo. Importantly, QHREDGS treatment decreased hPSC apoptosis during routine passaging and single-cell dissociation. Mechanistically, the interaction of QHREDGS with β1-integrins increased expression of integrin-linked kinase (ILK), increased expression and activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2), and decreased caspase-3/7 activity. QHREDGS immobilization to polyethylene glycol hydrogels significantly increased cell adhesion in a dose-dependent manner. We propose QHREDGS as a small molecule inhibitor of hPSC apoptosis and the basis of an affordable defined substrate for hPSC maintenance. PMID:24930852

  4. Characterization of novel neutralizing monoclonal antibodies specific to human neurturin.

    PubMed

    Hongo, J A; Tsai, S P; Moffat, B; Schroeder, K A; Jung, C; Chuntharapai, A; Lampe, P A; Johnson, E M; de Sauvage, F J; Armanini, M; Phillips, H; Devaux, B

    2000-08-01

    Neurturin (NTN) a structural and functional relative of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor, was originally identified based on its ability to support the survival of sympathetic neurons in culture. Similar to glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), Neurturin has been shown to bind to a high affinity glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-linked receptor (GFRalpha2) and induce phosphorylation of the tyrosine kinase receptor Ret, resulting in the activation of the mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) signalling pathway. A panel of six novel murine monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) specific to human Neurturin has been developed and characterized. Four of the MAbs tested inhibit, to varying degrees, binding of NTN to the GPI-linked GFRalpha2 receptor. Three MAbs cross-react with the murine homolog. These antibodies have been shown to be useful reagents for Western blotting, immunohistochemistry, and also for the development of a sensitive, quantitative enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for human NTN. Novel, specific MAbs with varying epitope specificities and blocking activity will be valuable tools for both the in vitro and in vivo characterization of NTN and its relationship to the GFRalpha2 and Ret receptors.

  5. Characterization of novel neutralizing monoclonal antibodies specific to human neurturin.

    PubMed

    Hongo, J A; Tsai, S P; Moffat, B; Schroeder, K A; Jung, C; Chuntharapai, A; Lampe, P A; Johnson, E M; de Sauvage, F J; Armanini, M; Phillips, H; Devaux, B

    2000-08-01

    Neurturin (NTN) a structural and functional relative of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor, was originally identified based on its ability to support the survival of sympathetic neurons in culture. Similar to glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), Neurturin has been shown to bind to a high affinity glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-linked receptor (GFRalpha2) and induce phosphorylation of the tyrosine kinase receptor Ret, resulting in the activation of the mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) signalling pathway. A panel of six novel murine monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) specific to human Neurturin has been developed and characterized. Four of the MAbs tested inhibit, to varying degrees, binding of NTN to the GPI-linked GFRalpha2 receptor. Three MAbs cross-react with the murine homolog. These antibodies have been shown to be useful reagents for Western blotting, immunohistochemistry, and also for the development of a sensitive, quantitative enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for human NTN. Novel, specific MAbs with varying epitope specificities and blocking activity will be valuable tools for both the in vitro and in vivo characterization of NTN and its relationship to the GFRalpha2 and Ret receptors. PMID:11001403

  6. [Defining trials of medicinal products according to the revised Dutch Medical Research in Human Subjects Act (WMO)].

    PubMed

    Vos, E J; Huitema, A D R

    2006-09-23

    The revised Dutch Medical Research in Human Subjects Act (WMO), which implements the European directive regarding 'good clinical practice in the conduct of clinical trials on medicinal products for human use' (2001/20/EC), became effective on March 1, 2006. The revision places additional requirements on trials of medicinal products. Whether a trial should be regarded as a trial of a medicinal product is therefore an important question. The law does not provide adequate guidance for the classification of trials in which biological samples are collected, e.g. for genomic, proteomic or pharmacokinetic studies, while a medicinal product is given for a registered indication. Classifying these types of trials as trials of medicinal products does not enhance the safety of the participants. Therefore, these studies should not be considered as trials of medicinal products to avoid the increased administrative burden required by the revised WMO.

  7. The precedence of syntax in the rapid emergence of human language in evolution as defined by the integration hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Nóbrega, Vitor A.; Miyagawa, Shigeru

    2015-01-01

    Our core hypothesis is that the emergence of human language arose very rapidly from the linking of two pre-adapted systems found elsewhere in the animal world—an expression system, found, for example, in birdsong, and a lexical system, suggestively found in non-human primate calls (Miyagawa et al., 2013, 2014). We challenge the view that language has undergone a series of gradual changes—or a single preliminary protolinguistic stage—before achieving its full character. We argue that a full-fledged combinatorial operation Merge triggered the integration of these two pre-adapted systems, giving rise to a fully developed language. This goes against the gradualist view that there existed a structureless, protolinguistic stage, in which a rudimentary proto-Merge operation generated internally flat words. It is argued that compounds in present-day language are a fossilized form of this prior stage, a point which we will question. PMID:25852595

  8. The precedence of syntax in the rapid emergence of human language in evolution as defined by the integration hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Nóbrega, Vitor A; Miyagawa, Shigeru

    2015-01-01

    Our core hypothesis is that the emergence of human language arose very rapidly from the linking of two pre-adapted systems found elsewhere in the animal world-an expression system, found, for example, in birdsong, and a lexical system, suggestively found in non-human primate calls (Miyagawa et al., 2013, 2014). We challenge the view that language has undergone a series of gradual changes-or a single preliminary protolinguistic stage-before achieving its full character. We argue that a full-fledged combinatorial operation Merge triggered the integration of these two pre-adapted systems, giving rise to a fully developed language. This goes against the gradualist view that there existed a structureless, protolinguistic stage, in which a rudimentary proto-Merge operation generated internally flat words. It is argued that compounds in present-day language are a fossilized form of this prior stage, a point which we will question.

  9. Metabolomic analysis of human fecal microbiota: a comparison of feces-derived communities and defined mixed communities.

    PubMed

    Yen, Sandi; McDonald, Julie A K; Schroeter, Kathleen; Oliphant, Kaitlyn; Sokolenko, Stanislav; Blondeel, Eric J M; Allen-Vercoe, Emma; Aucoin, Marc G

    2015-03-01

    The extensive impact of the human gut microbiota on its human host calls for a need to understand the types of communication that occur among the bacteria and their host. A metabolomics approach can provide a snapshot of the microbe-microbe interactions occurring as well as variations in the microbes from different hosts. In this study, metabolite profiles from an anaerobic continuous stirred-tank reactors (CSTR) system supporting the growth of several consortia of bacteria representative of the human gut were established and compared. Cell-free supernatant samples were analyzed by 1D (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, producing spectra representative of the metabolic activity of a particular community at a given time. Using targeted profiling, specific metabolites were identified and quantified on the basis of NMR analyses. Metabolite profiles discriminated each bacterial community examined, demonstrating that there are significant differences in the microbiota metabolome between each cultured community. We also found unique compounds that were identifying features of individual bacterial consortia. These findings are important because they demonstrate that metabolite profiles of gut microbial ecosystems can be constructed by targeted profiling of NMR spectra. Moreover, examination of these profiles sheds light on the type of microbes present in the gut and their metabolic interactions.

  10. Controlled infection with a therapeutic virus defines the activation kinetics of human natural killer cells in vivo

    PubMed Central

    El-Sherbiny, Y M; Holmes, T D; Wetherill, L F; Black, E V I; Wilson, E B; Phillips, S L; Scott, G B; Adair, R A; Dave, R; Scott, K J; Morgan, R S M; Coffey, M; Toogood, G J; Melcher, A A; Cook, G P

    2015-01-01

    Human natural killer (NK) cells play an important role in anti-viral immunity. However, studying their activation kinetics during infection is highly problematic. A clinical trial of a therapeutic virus provided an opportunity to study human NK cell activation in vivo in a controlled manner. Ten colorectal cancer patients with liver metastases received between one and five doses of oncolytic reovirus prior to surgical resection of their tumour. NK cell surface expression of the interferon-inducible molecules CD69 and tetherin peaked 24–48 h post-infection, coincident with a peak of interferon-induced gene expression. The interferon response and NK cell activation were transient, declining by 96 h post-infection. Furthermore, neither NK cell activation nor the interferon response were sustained in patients undergoing multiple rounds of virus treatment. These results show that reovirus modulates human NK cell activity in vivo and suggest that this may contribute to any therapeutic effect of this oncolytic virus. Detection of a single, transient peak of activation, despite multiple treatment rounds, has implications for the design of reovirus-based therapy. Furthermore, our results suggest the existence of a post-infection refractory period when the interferon response and NK cell activation are blunted. This refractory period has been observed previously in animal models and may underlie the enhanced susceptibility to secondary infections that is seen following viral infection. PMID:25469725

  11. Formation of Osteogenic Colonies on Well-Defined Adhesion Peptides by Freshly-Isolated Human Marrow Cells

    PubMed Central

    Au, Ada; Boehm, Cynthia A.; Mayes, Anne M.; Muschler, George F.; Griffith, Linda G.

    2007-01-01

    Bone graft performance can be enhanced by addition of connective tissue progenitors (CTPs) from fresh bone marrow in a manner that concentrates the CTP cell population within the graft. Here, we used small peptide adhesion ligands presented against an otherwise adhesion-resistant synthetic polymer background in order to illuminate the molecular basis for the attachment and colony formation by osteogenic CTPs from fresh human marrow, and contrast the behavior of fresh marrow to many commonly-used osteogenic cell sources. The linear GRGDSPY ligand was as effective as tissue culture polystyrene in fostering attachment of culture-expanded porcine CTPs. Although this GRGDSPY peptide was more effective than control peptides in fostering alkaline phosphatase-positive (AP) colony formation from primary human marrow in 5 of the 7 patients tested, GRGDSPY was as effective as the control glass substrate in only one patient of 7. Thus, the peptide appears capable of enabling osteoblastic development from only a subpopulation of CTPs in marrow. The bone sialoprotein-derived peptide FHRRIKA was ineffective in fostering attachment of primary culture-expanded pig CTPs, although it was as effective as GRGDSPY in fostering AP-positive colonies from fresh human marrow. This study provides insights into integrin-mediated behaviors of CTPs and highlights differences between freshly-isolated marrow and culture-expanded cells. PMID:17222453

  12. Characterization of an aerosol chamber for human exposures to endotoxin.

    PubMed

    Taylor, L; Reist, P C; Boehlecke, B A; Jacobs, R R

    2000-03-01

    The objective of this study was to develop and characterize an exposure chamber in which human subjects could be exposed to low dust concentrations carrying an endotoxin coating. An exposure chamber, dust dispersion method, and endotoxin characterization technique were developed for inhalation exposures. A 6.27 m3 exposure chamber was designed and constructed from cinder block, glass windows, and Plexiglas. Using an acetone adhesion process, Enterobacter agglomerans were adsorbed onto respirable cellulose particles to create the endotoxin aerosol. The size distribution of the endotoxin-treated particles was verified using light microscopy and cascade impactors. A dry powder dust generator was refined to consistently disperse small quantities of the aerosol into the chamber to maintain dust concentrations at approximately 250 micrograms/m3. Dust levels during the chamber exposures were monitored using a portable continuous aerosol monitor (PCAM). During initial exposure runs, PCAM monitoring stations were positioned at different locations within a 0.5-meter matrix to document mixing patterns. Total dust and cascade impactor samples were collected throughout each exposure period to characterize the chamber operating system and insure the mean airborne dust concentration fulfilled target levels. A one-factor analysis of variance at the 95 percent confidence interval illustrated that there was not a statistically significant difference in the mean dust concentration throughout the exposure runs compared to the individual runs. Together the consistency of the total dust filters, endotoxin concentrations, and aerosol-monitoring instrument were adequate to allow use of the chamber for experimental studies involving human volunteers.

  13. Genetic Characterization and Classification of Human and Animal Sapoviruses.

    PubMed

    Oka, Tomoichiro; Lu, Zhongyan; Phan, Tung; Delwart, Eric L; Saif, Linda J; Wang, Qiuhong

    2016-01-01

    Sapoviruses (SaVs) are enteric caliciviruses that have been detected in multiple mammalian species, including humans, pigs, mink, dogs, sea lions, chimpanzees, and rats. They show a high level of diversity. A SaV genome commonly encodes seven nonstructural proteins (NSs), including the RNA polymerase protein NS7, and two structural proteins (VP1 and VP2). We classified human and animal SaVs into 15 genogroups (G) based on available VP1 sequences, including three newly characterized genomes from this study. We sequenced the full length genomes of one new genogroup V (GV), one GVII and one GVIII porcine SaV using long range RT-PCR including newly designed forward primers located in the conserved motifs of the putative NS3, and also 5' RACE methods. We also determined the 5'- and 3'-ends of sea lion GV SaV and canine GXIII SaV. Although the complete genomic sequences of GIX-GXII, and GXV SaVs are unavailable, common features of SaV genomes include: 1) "GTG" at the 5'-end of the genome, and a short (9~14 nt) 5'-untranslated region; and 2) the first five amino acids (M [A/V] S [K/R] P) of the putative NS1 and the five amino acids (FEMEG) surrounding the putative cleavage site between NS7 and VP1 were conserved among the chimpanzee, two of five genogroups of pig (GV and GVIII), sea lion, canine, and human SaVs. In contrast, these two amino acid motifs were clearly different in three genogroups of porcine (GIII, GVI and GVII), and bat SaVs. Our results suggest that several animal SaVs have genetic similarities to human SaVs. However, the ability of SaVs to be transmitted between humans and animals is uncertain. PMID:27228126

  14. Genetic Characterization and Classification of Human and Animal Sapoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Oka, Tomoichiro; Lu, Zhongyan; Phan, Tung; Delwart, Eric L.; Saif, Linda J.; Wang, Qiuhong

    2016-01-01

    Sapoviruses (SaVs) are enteric caliciviruses that have been detected in multiple mammalian species, including humans, pigs, mink, dogs, sea lions, chimpanzees, and rats. They show a high level of diversity. A SaV genome commonly encodes seven nonstructural proteins (NSs), including the RNA polymerase protein NS7, and two structural proteins (VP1 and VP2). We classified human and animal SaVs into 15 genogroups (G) based on available VP1 sequences, including three newly characterized genomes from this study. We sequenced the full length genomes of one new genogroup V (GV), one GVII and one GVIII porcine SaV using long range RT-PCR including newly designed forward primers located in the conserved motifs of the putative NS3, and also 5' RACE methods. We also determined the 5’- and 3’-ends of sea lion GV SaV and canine GXIII SaV. Although the complete genomic sequences of GIX-GXII, and GXV SaVs are unavailable, common features of SaV genomes include: 1) “GTG” at the 5′-end of the genome, and a short (9~14 nt) 5′-untranslated region; and 2) the first five amino acids (M [A/V] S [K/R] P) of the putative NS1 and the five amino acids (FEMEG) surrounding the putative cleavage site between NS7 and VP1 were conserved among the chimpanzee, two of five genogroups of pig (GV and GVIII), sea lion, canine, and human SaVs. In contrast, these two amino acid motifs were clearly different in three genogroups of porcine (GIII, GVI and GVII), and bat SaVs. Our results suggest that several animal SaVs have genetic similarities to human SaVs. However, the ability of SaVs to be transmitted between humans and animals is uncertain. PMID:27228126

  15. Mapping of Variable DNA Methylation Across Multiple Cell Types Defines a Dynamic Regulatory Landscape of the Human Genome

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Junchen; Stevens, Michael; Xing, Xiaoyun; Li, Daofeng; Zhang, Bo; Payton, Jacqueline E.; Oltz, Eugene M.; Jarvis, James N.; Jiang, Kaiyu; Cicero, Theodore; Costello, Joseph F.; Wang, Ting

    2016-01-01

    DNA methylation is an important epigenetic modification involved in many biological processes and diseases. Many studies have mapped DNA methylation changes associated with embryogenesis, cell differentiation, and cancer at a genome-wide scale. Our understanding of genome-wide DNA methylation changes in a developmental or disease-related context has been steadily growing. However, the investigation of which CpGs are variably methylated in different normal cell or tissue types is still limited. Here, we present an in-depth analysis of 54 single-CpG-resolution DNA methylomes of normal human cell types by integrating high-throughput sequencing-based methylation data. We found that the ratio of methylated to unmethylated CpGs is relatively constant regardless of cell type. However, which CpGs made up the unmethylated complement was cell-type specific. We categorized the 26,000,000 human autosomal CpGs based on their methylation levels across multiple cell types to identify variably methylated CpGs and found that 22.6% exhibited variable DNA methylation. These variably methylated CpGs formed 660,000 variably methylated regions (VMRs), encompassing 11% of the genome. By integrating a multitude of genomic data, we found that VMRs enrich for histone modifications indicative of enhancers, suggesting their role as regulatory elements marking cell type specificity. VMRs enriched for transcription factor binding sites in a tissue-dependent manner. Importantly, they enriched for GWAS variants, suggesting that VMRs could potentially be implicated in disease and complex traits. Taken together, our results highlight the link between CpG methylation variation, genetic variation, and disease risk for many human cell types. PMID:26888867

  16. Defining redox centers in human electron transfer flavoprotein: ubiquinone oxidoreductase (ETF:QO) by expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Frerman, F.E.; Beard, S.; Goodman, S.I.

    1994-09-01

    Mutations in ETF or ETC:QO cause glutaric acidemia type II (GA2). ETF:QO is an iron-sulfur flavoprotein in the inner mitochondrial membrane which transfers electrons from ETF in the mitochondrial matrix to ubiquinone (Q). The human ETF:QO gene is on chromosome 4q32{r_arrow}qter, and encodes a 617 amino acid precursor which is processed to the 64 kDa mature form in the mitochondrion. One ETF:QO mutation in GA2 is a G{r_arrow}T transversion in a donor splice site, deleting the 222 bp upstream exon from the transcript. The deleted 74 amino acids are near the carboxyl terminus just beyond a predicted membrane helix, and include C561, one of four cysteine residues predicted to ligate the 4Fe4S cluster. The mutant protein is not stable in patient fibroblasts. We have expressed cDNAs encoding wild type (wt) ETF:QO, ETF:QO with the 74 amino acid deletion, and ETFF:QO with only a C561A mutation, in S cerevisiae. In all instances, precursor and mature ETF:QOs were stably inserted into the mitochondrial membrane. ETF:QO (C561A) is extracted from the membrane under the same conditions as wt ETF:QO, but ETF:QO with the deletion is much more difficult to extract. Wt ETF:QO accepts electrons from ETF and reduces Q but, while both mutant proteins accept electrons from ETF, neither of them reduces Q. This work demonstrates that C561 in human ETF:QO is essential for Q reduction (probably because it ligands the 4Fe4S cluster), that mutant proteins that are unstable in man may be stable in other systems, that cleavage of signal peptide from precursor proteins can occur within the inner mitochondrial membrane, and the general usefulness of expressing human mitochondrial proteins in yeast.

  17. Differential DNA methylation profiles of coding and non-coding genes define hippocampal sclerosis in human temporal lobe epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Miller-Delaney, Suzanne F.C.; Bryan, Kenneth; Das, Sudipto; McKiernan, Ross C.; Bray, Isabella M.; Reynolds, James P.; Gwinn, Ryder; Stallings, Raymond L.

    2015-01-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy is associated with large-scale, wide-ranging changes in gene expression in the hippocampus. Epigenetic changes to DNA are attractive mechanisms to explain the sustained hyperexcitability of chronic epilepsy. Here, through methylation analysis of all annotated C-phosphate-G islands and promoter regions in the human genome, we report a pilot study of the methylation profiles of temporal lobe epilepsy with or without hippocampal sclerosis. Furthermore, by comparative analysis of expression and promoter methylation, we identify methylation sensitive non-coding RNA in human temporal lobe epilepsy. A total of 146 protein-coding genes exhibited altered DNA methylation in temporal lobe epilepsy hippocampus (n = 9) when compared to control (n = 5), with 81.5% of the promoters of these genes displaying hypermethylation. Unique methylation profiles were evident in temporal lobe epilepsy with or without hippocampal sclerosis, in addition to a common methylation profile regardless of pathology grade. Gene ontology terms associated with development, neuron remodelling and neuron maturation were over-represented in the methylation profile of Watson Grade 1 samples (mild hippocampal sclerosis). In addition to genes associated with neuronal, neurotransmitter/synaptic transmission and cell death functions, differential hypermethylation of genes associated with transcriptional regulation was evident in temporal lobe epilepsy, but overall few genes previously associated with epilepsy were among the differentially methylated. Finally, a panel of 13, methylation-sensitive microRNA were identified in temporal lobe epilepsy including MIR27A, miR-193a-5p (MIR193A) and miR-876-3p (MIR876), and the differential methylation of long non-coding RNA documented for the first time. The present study therefore reports select, genome-wide DNA methylation changes in human temporal lobe epilepsy that may contribute to the molecular architecture of the epileptic brain. PMID

  18. Defining the pathogenesis of the human Atp12p W94R mutation using a Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast model.

    PubMed

    Meulemans, Ann; Seneca, Sara; Pribyl, Thomas; Smet, Joel; Alderweirldt, Valerie; Waeytens, Anouk; Lissens, Willy; Van Coster, Rudy; De Meirleir, Linda; di Rago, Jean-Paul; Gatti, Domenico L; Ackerman, Sharon H

    2010-02-01

    Studies in yeast have shown that a deficiency in Atp12p prevents assembly of the extrinsic domain (F(1)) of complex V and renders cells unable to make ATP through oxidative phosphorylation. De Meirleir et al. (De Meirleir, L., Seneca, S., Lissens, W., De Clercq, I., Eyskens, F., Gerlo, E., Smet, J., and Van Coster, R. (2004) J. Med. Genet. 41, 120-124) have reported that a homozygous missense mutation in the gene for human Atp12p (HuAtp12p), which replaces Trp-94 with Arg, was linked to the death of a 14-month-old patient. We have investigated the impact of the pathogenic W94R mutation on Atp12p structure/function. Plasmid-borne wild type human Atp12p rescues the respiratory defect of a yeast ATP12 deletion mutant (Deltaatp12). The W94R mutation alters the protein at the most highly conserved position in the Pfam sequence and renders HuAtp12p insoluble in the background of Deltaatp12. In contrast, the yeast protein harboring the corresponding mutation, ScAtp12p(W103R), is soluble in the background of Deltaatp12 but not in the background of Deltaatp12Deltafmc1, a strain that also lacks Fmc1p. Fmc1p is a yeast mitochondrial protein not found in higher eukaryotes. Tryptophan 94 (human) or 103 (yeast) is located in a positively charged region of Atp12p, and hence its mutation to arginine does not alter significantly the electrostatic properties of the protein. Instead, we provide evidence that the primary effect of the substitution is on the dynamic properties of Atp12p.

  19. Characterizing the Human Cone Photoreceptor Mosaic via Dynamic Photopigment Densitometry

    PubMed Central

    Sabesan, Ramkumar; Hofer, Heidi; Roorda, Austin

    2015-01-01

    Densitometry is a powerful tool for the biophysical assessment of the retina. Until recently, this was restricted to bulk spatial scales in living humans. The application of adaptive optics (AO) to the conventional fundus camera and scanning laser ophthalmoscope (SLO) has begun to translate these studies to cellular scales. Here, we employ an AOSLO to perform dynamic photopigment densitometry in order to characterize the optical properties and spectral types of the human cone photoreceptor mosaic. Cone-resolved estimates of optical density and photosensitivity agree well with bulk estimates, although show smaller variability than previously reported. Photopigment kinetics of individual cones derived from their selective bleaching allowed efficient mapping of cone sub-types in human retina. Estimated uncertainty in identifying a cone as long vs middle wavelength was less than 5%, and the total time taken per subject ranged from 3–9 hours. Short wavelength cones were delineated in every subject with high fidelity. The lack of a third cone-type was confirmed in a protanopic subject. In one color normal subject, cone assignments showed 91% correspondence against a previously reported cone-typing method from more than a decade ago. Combined with cone-targeted stimulation, this brings us closer in studying the visual percept arising from a specific cone type and its implication for color vision circuitry. PMID:26660894

  20. Characterization of membrane antigens on human cytomegalovirus-infected fibroblasts recognized by human antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    van der Voort, L.H.M.; de Leij, L.F.M.H.; The T.H.

    1989-03-01

    The antigens on the surface of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV)-infected fibroblasts which are recognized by human HCMV antibody-positive sera were characterized. Three HCMV-induced polypeptides, with apparent molecular masses of 53 to 63, 94, and 94 to 120 kilodaltons, were precipitated from /sup 125/I-surface-labeled cell extracts with different sera obtained from healthy individuals. Renal transplant recipients who were suffering from active HCMV infections recognized the same set of antigens. By the use of monoclonal antibodies, these antigens were identified as polypeptides belonging to the gcI and gcIII families of HCMV glycoproteins.

  1. Characterization of Inhibitor of differentiation (Id) proteins in human cornea.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Rajiv R; Morgan, Brandie R; Anumanthan, Govindaraj; Sharma, Ajay; Chaurasia, Shyam S; Rieger, Frank G

    2016-05-01

    Inhibitor of differentiation (Id) proteins are DNA-binding transcription factors involved in cellular proliferation, migration, inflammation, angiogenesis and fibrosis. However, their expression and role in the cornea is unknown. The present study was undertaken to characterize the expression of Id proteins and their interactions with the pro-fibrotic cytokine Transforming Growth Factor β1 (TGFβ1) and anti-fibrotic cytokine, bone morphogenic protein 7 (BMP7) in human cornea. Human donor corneas procured from Eye Bank were used. Id proteins were localized in human corneal sections using immunofluorescence. Primary cultures of human corneal fibroblasts (HCF) were established and treated with either TGFβ1 (5 ng/ml) or BMP7 (10 ng/ml) for 24 h in serum free medium. Expression of Id's in response to TGFβ1, BMP7 and TGFβ1 + BMP7 was analyzed by quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR) and western blot analysis. Id1 and Id2 proteins were ubiquitously expressed in the epithelial cells and stromal keratocytes in human cornea. The Id1 was localized to the basal epithelial cells as seen by immunohistochemistry. HCF expressed all known mammalian Id genes (Id1-Id4). In addition, Id1 and Id2 are selectively expressed in HCF. Treatment of human recombinant TGFβ1 (5 ng/ml) to serum-starved HCF showed a significant increase in Id genes (Id1, Id2 and Id4) at 2 h time point compared to BMP7 treatment, which showed time dependent increase in the expression of Id1-Id3 at 24-48 h. Combined treatment with TGFβ1 + BMP7 to HCF showed a significant increase in Id1 transcript and an increasing trend in Id3 and Id4 expression. The results of this study suggest that Id family of genes (Id1-Id4) are localized in the human cornea and expressed in the corneal fibroblasts. Also, Id's were differentially regulated with TGFβ1 and/or BMP7 in a time dependent manner and might serve as a therapeutic target in corneal fibrosis.

  2. Unsolved Mysteries of the Human Mammary Gland: Defining and Redefining the Critical Questions from the Lactation Consultant's Perspective.

    PubMed

    Marasco, Lisa Ann

    2014-12-01

    Despite advances in knowledge about human lactation, clinicians face many problems when advising mothers who are experiencing breastfeeding difficulties that do not respond to normal management strategies. Primary insufficient milk production is now being acknowledged, but incidence rates have not been well studied. Many women have known histories of infertility, polycystic ovary syndrome, obesity, hypertension, insulin resistance, thyroid dysfunction, hyperandrogenism or other hormonal imbalances, while others have no obvious risk factors. Some present with obviously abnormal breasts that are pubescent, tuberous/tubular or asymmetric in shape, raising the question of insufficient mammary gland tissue. Other women have breasts that appear within normal limits yet do not lactate normally. Endocrine disruptors may underlie some of these cases but their impact on human milk production has not been well explored. Similarly, any problem with prolactin such as a deficiency in serum prolactin or receptor number, receptor resistance, or poor bioavailability or bioactivity could underlie some cases of insufficient lactation, yet these possibilities are rarely investigated. A weak or suppressed milk ejection reflex, often assumed to be psychosomatic, could be related to thyroid dysfunction or caused by downstream post-receptor pathway problems. In the absence of sufficient data regarding these situations, desperate mothers may turn to non-evidence-based remedies, sometimes at considerable cost and unknown risk. Research targeted to these clinical dilemmas is critical in order to develop evidence-based strategies and increase breastfeeding duration and success rates. PMID:26084427

  3. Unsolved Mysteries of the Human Mammary Gland: Defining and Redefining the Critical Questions from the Lactation Consultant's Perspective.

    PubMed

    Marasco, Lisa Ann

    2014-12-01

    Despite advances in knowledge about human lactation, clinicians face many problems when advising mothers who are experiencing breastfeeding difficulties that do not respond to normal management strategies. Primary insufficient milk production is now being acknowledged, but incidence rates have not been well studied. Many women have known histories of infertility, polycystic ovary syndrome, obesity, hypertension, insulin resistance, thyroid dysfunction, hyperandrogenism or other hormonal imbalances, while others have no obvious risk factors. Some present with obviously abnormal breasts that are pubescent, tuberous/tubular or asymmetric in shape, raising the question of insufficient mammary gland tissue. Other women have breasts that appear within normal limits yet do not lactate normally. Endocrine disruptors may underlie some of these cases but their impact on human milk production has not been well explored. Similarly, any problem with prolactin such as a deficiency in serum prolactin or receptor number, receptor resistance, or poor bioavailability or bioactivity could underlie some cases of insufficient lactation, yet these possibilities are rarely investigated. A weak or suppressed milk ejection reflex, often assumed to be psychosomatic, could be related to thyroid dysfunction or caused by downstream post-receptor pathway problems. In the absence of sufficient data regarding these situations, desperate mothers may turn to non-evidence-based remedies, sometimes at considerable cost and unknown risk. Research targeted to these clinical dilemmas is critical in order to develop evidence-based strategies and increase breastfeeding duration and success rates.

  4. Injectable hybrid hydrogels of hyaluronic Acid crosslinked by well-defined synthetic polycations: preparation and characterization in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Cross, Daisy; Jiang, Xiaoze; Ji, Weihang; Han, Wenqing; Wang, Chun

    2015-05-01

    An injectable hybrid hydrogel system was developed consisting of hyaluronic acid (HA) crosslinked by well-defined block copolymers of the cationic poly(2-aminoethyl methacrylate) (PAEM) and polyethylene glycol (PEG). Robust, shear-thinning hybrid hydrogel was produced by mixing HA and 4-arm star PEG-PAEM block copolymer at 1:1 charge ratio. The encapsulation and release of highly viable human mesenchymal stem cells in physiological media was demonstrated. After subcutaneous injection of the hybrid gel in mice, mild but resolvable inflammatory response was observed. This hybrid gel could serve as a model system for studying structure-function relationship of polyelectrolyte hydrogels and as a practical injectable biomaterial for medical applications.

  5. Use of Osmotic Pumps to Establish the Pharmacokinetic-Pharmacodynamic Relationship and Define Desirable Human Performance Characteristics for Aggrecanase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Wiley, Michael R; Durham, Timothy B; Adams, Lisa A; Chambers, Mark G; Lin, Chaohua; Liu, Chin; Marimuthu, Jothirajah; Mitchell, Peter G; Mudra, Daniel R; Swearingen, Craig A; Toth, James L; Weller, Jennifer M; Thirunavukkarasu, Kannan

    2016-06-23

    The development of reliable relationships between in vivo target engagement, pharmacodynamic activity, and efficacy in chronic disease models is beneficial for enabling hypothesis-driven drug discovery and facilitating the development of patient-focused candidate selection criteria. Toward those ends, osmotic infusion pumps can be useful for overcoming limitations in the PK properties of proof-of-concept (POC) compounds to accelerate the development of such relationships. In this report, we describe the application of this strategy to the development of hydantoin-derived aggrecanase inhibitors (eg, 3) for the treatment of osteoarthiritis (OA). Potent, selective inhibitors were efficacious in both chemical and surgical models of OA when exposures were sustained in excess of 10 times the plasma IC50. The use of these data for establishing patient-focused candidate selection criteria is exemplified with the characterization of compound 8, which is projected to sustain the desired level of target engagement at a dose of 45 mg qd.

  6. Use of Osmotic Pumps to Establish the Pharmacokinetic-Pharmacodynamic Relationship and Define Desirable Human Performance Characteristics for Aggrecanase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Wiley, Michael R; Durham, Timothy B; Adams, Lisa A; Chambers, Mark G; Lin, Chaohua; Liu, Chin; Marimuthu, Jothirajah; Mitchell, Peter G; Mudra, Daniel R; Swearingen, Craig A; Toth, James L; Weller, Jennifer M; Thirunavukkarasu, Kannan

    2016-06-23

    The development of reliable relationships between in vivo target engagement, pharmacodynamic activity, and efficacy in chronic disease models is beneficial for enabling hypothesis-driven drug discovery and facilitating the development of patient-focused candidate selection criteria. Toward those ends, osmotic infusion pumps can be useful for overcoming limitations in the PK properties of proof-of-concept (POC) compounds to accelerate the development of such relationships. In this report, we describe the application of this strategy to the development of hydantoin-derived aggrecanase inhibitors (eg, 3) for the treatment of osteoarthiritis (OA). Potent, selective inhibitors were efficacious in both chemical and surgical models of OA when exposures were sustained in excess of 10 times the plasma IC50. The use of these data for establishing patient-focused candidate selection criteria is exemplified with the characterization of compound 8, which is projected to sustain the desired level of target engagement at a dose of 45 mg qd. PMID:27194201

  7. Xeno-Free and Defined Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells Functionally Integrate in a Large-Eyed Preclinical Model.

    PubMed

    Plaza Reyes, Alvaro; Petrus-Reurer, Sandra; Antonsson, Liselotte; Stenfelt, Sonya; Bartuma, Hammurabi; Panula, Sarita; Mader, Theresa; Douagi, Iyadh; André, Helder; Hovatta, Outi; Lanner, Fredrik; Kvanta, Anders

    2016-01-12

    Human embryonic stem cell (hESC)-derived retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells could replace lost tissue in geographic atrophy (GA) but efficacy has yet to be demonstrated in a large-eyed model. Also, production of hESC-RPE has not yet been achieved in a xeno-free and defined manner, which is critical for clinical compliance and reduced immunogenicity. Here we describe an effective differentiation methodology using human laminin-521 matrix with xeno-free and defined medium. Differentiated cells exhibited characteristics of native RPE including morphology, pigmentation, marker expression, monolayer integrity, and polarization together with phagocytic activity. Furthermore, we established a large-eyed GA model that allowed in vivo imaging of hESC-RPE and host retina. Cells transplanted in suspension showed long-term integration and formed polarized monolayers exhibiting phagocytic and photoreceptor rescue capacity. We have developed a xeno-free and defined hESC-RPE differentiation method and present evidence of functional integration of clinically compliant hESC-RPE in a large-eyed disease model. PMID:26724907

  8. The meta-epigenomic structure of purified human stem cell populations is defined at cis-regulatory sequences

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yong Mei; Golden, Aaron; Mar, Jessica C.; Einstein, Francine H.; Greally, John M.

    2014-01-01

    The mechanism and significance of epigenetic variability in the same cell type between healthy individuals are not clear. Here, we purify human CD34+ hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) from different individuals and find that there is increased variability of DNA methylation at loci with properties of promoters and enhancers. The variability is especially enriched at candidate enhancers near genes transitioning between silent and expressed states, and encoding proteins with leukocyte differentiation properties. Our findings of increased variability at loci with intermediate DNA methylation values, at candidate “poised” enhancers, and at genes involved in HSPC lineage commitment suggest that CD34+ cell subtype heterogeneity between individuals is a major mechanism for the variability observed. Epigenomic studies performed on cell populations, even when purified, are testing collections of epigenomes, or meta-epigenomes. Our findings show that meta-epigenomic approaches to data analysis can provide insights into cell subpopulation structure. PMID:25327398

  9. The meta-epigenomic structure of purified human stem cell populations is defined at cis-regulatory sequences.

    PubMed

    Wijetunga, N Ari; Delahaye, Fabien; Zhao, Yong M; Golden, Aaron; Mar, Jessica C; Einstein, Francine H; Greally, John M

    2014-10-20

    The mechanism and significance of epigenetic variability in the same cell type between healthy individuals are not clear. Here we purify human CD34+ haematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) from different individuals and find that there is increased variability of DNA methylation at loci with properties of promoters and enhancers. The variability is especially enriched at candidate enhancers near genes transitioning between silent and expressed states, and encoding proteins with leukocyte differentiation properties. Our findings of increased variability at loci with intermediate DNA methylation values, at candidate 'poised' enhancers and at genes involved in HSPC lineage commitment suggest that CD34+ cell subtype heterogeneity between individuals is a major mechanism for the variability observed. Epigenomic studies performed on cell populations, even when purified, are testing collections of epigenomes, or meta-epigenomes. Our findings show that meta-epigenomic approaches to data analysis can provide insights into cell subpopulation structure.

  10. Isolation and characterization of a processed gene for human ceruloplasmin

    SciTech Connect

    Koschinsky, M.L.; Chow, B.K.C.; Schwartz, J.; Hamerton, J.L.; MacGillivray, R.T.A.

    1987-12-01

    A processed pseudogene for human ceruloplasmin has been isolated that contains DNA corresponding to the functional gene sequence encoding the carboxy-terminal 563 amino acid residues and the 3' untranslated region. The pseudogene appears to have arisen from a processed RNA species, since intervening sequences coincident with those of the functional gene have been removed, with the exception of a short segment of intronic sequence which denotes the 5' boundary of the pseudogene. The nucleotide sequence of the pseudogene is highly homologous (97% sequence identity) with that of the wild-type gene, suggesting that pseudogene formation was a relatively recent evolutionary event. In addition to single base substitutions, there is a large 213 base pair (bp) deletion in the pseudogene sequence which corresponds to the location of an intron-exon junction in the functional gene. A 4 bp duplication that occurs at amino acid residue 683 of the wild-type coding sequence results in a frameshift mutation and introduces a premature translational termination codon at this point. This is concordant with the inability to detect a human liver transcript corresponding to the pseudogene by nuclease S1 mapping analysis. The 3' end of the pseudogene is characterized by a 62 bp segment composed mainly of repeated TC dinucleotides. On the basis of genomic Southern blot analysis performed under high-stringency conditions, the pseudogene that the authors have identified seems to comprise the only sequence in the human genome that is closely related to the wild-type gene. Using somatic cell hybridization, they have mapped the pseudogene to human chromosome 8. This differs from the site of the wild-type ceruloplasmin locus, which has been assigned to chromosome 3.

  11. Characterization of lipoproteins in human and canine cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)

    SciTech Connect

    Pitas, R.E.; Weisgraber, K.H.; Boyles, J.K.; Lee, S.; Mahley, R.W.

    1986-03-01

    Previously the authors demonstrated that rat brain astrocytes in vitro synthesize and secrete apo-E and possess apo-B,E(LDL) receptors. The apo-E secreted by astrocytes and apo-E in rat brain extracts differed from serum apo-E in two respects. Brain apo-E had a higher apparent molecular weight and a higher percentage of more acidic isoforms. To characterize further the apo-E within the central nervous system, apo-E in human and canine CSF was investigated. Compared to plasma apo-E, CSF apo-E had a higher apparent M/sub r/ and a higher percentage of acidic isoforms which were sialylated, as shown by neuraminidase digestion. The apo-E in human CSF was approx.5-10% of the plasma level. In CSF 60-80% of the apo-E was in lipoproteins with d = 1.09-1.15. The remainder of the apo-E was in the d > 1.21 fraction. Human CSF lipoproteins were primarily spherical (110-190 A) while canine CSF lipoproteins were a mixture of discs (205 x 65 A) while canine CSF lipoproteins were a mixture of discs (205 x 65 A) and spheres (100-150 A). The CSF also contained apo-AI in the d = 1.09-1.15 g/ml fraction. Human CSF lipoproteins containing both apo-E and apo-AI were isolated on an anti-apo-E affinity column, suggesting that apo-E and AI occurred in the same particles. The CSF apo-E-containing lipoproteins competed for binding of /sup 125/I-LDL to the apo-B,E(LDL) receptor. There was no detectable apo-B in CSF. These data suggest that CSF lipoproteins might transport lipid and regulate lipid homeostasis within the brain.

  12. Chromatin Insulator Elements Block Transgene Silencing in Engineered Human Embryonic Stem Cell Lines at a Defined Chromosome 13 Locus

    PubMed Central

    MacArthur, Chad C.; Xue, Haipeng; Van Hoof, Dennis; Lieu, Pauline T.; Dudas, Miroslav; Fontes, Andrew; Swistowski, Andrzej; Touboul, Thomas; Seerke, Rina; Laurent, Louise C.; Loring, Jeanne F.; German, Michael S.; Zeng, Xianmin; Rao, Mahendra S.; Lakshmipathy, Uma; Chesnut, Jonathan D.

    2012-01-01

    Lineage reporters of human embryonic stem cell (hESC) lines are useful for differentiation studies and drug screening. Previously, we created reporter lines driven by an elongation factor 1 alpha (EF1α) promoter at a chromosome 13q32.3 locus in the hESC line WA09 and an abnormal hESC line BG01V in a site-specific manner. Expression of reporters in these lines was maintained in long-term culture at undifferentiated state. However, when these cells were differentiated into specific lineages, reduction in reporter expression was observed, indicating transgene silencing. To develop an efficient and reliable genetic engineering strategy in hESCs, we used chromatin insulator elements to flank single-copy transgenes and integrated the combined expression constructs via PhiC31/R4 integrase-mediated recombination technology to the chromosome 13 locus precisely. Two copies of cHS4 double-insulator sequences were placed adjacent to both 5′ and 3′ of the promoter reporter constructs. The green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene was driven by EF1α or CMV early enhancer/chicken β actin (CAG) promoter. In the engineered hESC lines, for both insulated CAG-GFP and EF1α-GFP, constitutive expression at the chromosome 13 locus was maintained during prolonged culture and in directed differentiation assays toward diverse types of neurons, pancreatic endoderm, and mesodermal progeny. In particular, described here is the first normal hESC fluorescent reporter line that robustly expresses GFP in both the undifferentiated state and throughout dopaminergic lineage differentiation. The dual strategy of utilizing insulator sequences and integration at the constitutive chromosome 13 locus ensures appropriate transgene expression. This is a valuable tool for lineage development study, gain- and loss-of-function experiments, and human disease modeling using hESCs. PMID:21699412

  13. Long-term self-renewal of human pluripotent stem cells on peptide-decorated poly(OEGMA-co-HEMA) brushes under fully defined conditions.

    PubMed

    Deng, Y; Zhang, X; Zhao, X; Li, Q; Ye, Z; Li, Z; Liu, Y; Zhou, Y; Ma, H; Pan, G; Pei, D; Fang, J; Wei, S

    2013-11-01

    Realization of the full potential of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC) in clinical applications requires the development of well-defined culture conditions for their long-term growth and directed differentiation. This paper describes a novel fully defined synthetic peptide-decorated substrate that supports self-renewal of hiPSC in commercially available xeno-free, chemically defined medium. The Au surface was deposited by a poly(OEGMA-co-HEMA) film, using the surface-initiated polymerization method (SIP) with the further step of carboxylation. The hiPSC generated from umbilical cord mesenchymal cells were successfully cultured for 10 passages on the peptide-tethered poly(OEGMA-co-HEMA) brushes for the first time. Cells maintained their characteristic morphology, proliferation and expressed high levels of markers of pluripotency, similar to the cells cultured on Matrigel™. Moreover, the cell adhesion could be tuned by the pattern and peptide concentration on the substrate. This well-defined, xeno-free and safe substrate, which supports long-term proliferation and self-renewal of hiPSC, will not only help to accelerate the translational perspectives of hiPSC, but also provide a platform to elucidate the underlying molecular mechanisms that regulate stem cell proliferation and differentiation via SIP technology. PMID:23891809

  14. Characterization of Pancreatic Ductal Cell in Human Islet Preparations

    PubMed Central

    Ichii, Hirohito; Miki, Atsushi; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki; Molano, R. Damaris; Barker, Scott; Mita, Atsuyoshi; Rodriguez-Diaz, Rayner; Klein, Dagmar; Pastori, Ricardo; Alejandro, Rodolfo; Inverardi, Luca; Pileggi, Antonello; Ricordi 6, Camillo

    2013-01-01

    Substantial amounts of non-endocrine cells are implanted as part of human islet grafts, and possible influence of non-endocrine cells on clinical islet transplantation outcome has been postulated. There are currently no product release criteria specific for non-endocrine cells due to lack of available methods. Aims of this study were to develop a method for the evaluation of pancreatic ductal cells (PDC) for clinical islet transplantation, and to characterize them regarding phenotype, viability and function. We assessed 161 human islet preparations using laser scanning cytometer (LSC/iCys) for phenotypic analysis of non-endocrine cells and flow cytometer (FACS) for PDC viability. PDC and β-cells obtained from different density fractions during the islet cell purification were compared in terms of viability. Furthermore, we examined PDC ability to produce pro-inflammatory cytokines/chemokines, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and tissue factor (TF), relevant to islet graft outcome. Phenotypic analysis by LSC/iCys indicated that single staining for CK19 or CA19-9 was not enough for identifying PDC, and that double staining for amylase and CK19 or CA19-9 allowed for quantitative evaluation of acinar cells and PDC content in human islet preparation. PDC showed a significantly higher viability than β-cells (PDC vs. β-cell: 75.5±13.9 and 62.7±18.7 %; p<0.0001). Although β-cells viability was independent from the density, that of PDC was higher as the density from which they were recovered increased. There was no correlation between PDC and β-cells viability (R2=0.0078). PDC sorted from high-density fractions produced significantly higher amount of pro-inflammatory mediators and VEGF, but not TF. PDC isolated from different fractions had different viability and function. The precise characterization and assessment of these cells in addition to β-cells in human islet cell products may be of assistance in understanding their contribution to islet

  15. Defining GERD.

    PubMed

    Sontag, S J

    1999-01-01

    "It is not the death of GERD that I seek, but that it turns from its evil ways and follows the path of righteousness." The reflux world is fully aware of what GERD is and what GERD does. What the world does not know, however, is the answer to the most important yet least asked question surrounding GERD's raison-d'etre: Why is GERD here and why do we have it? What GERD is: abnormal gastric reflux into the esophagus that causes any type of mischief. What GERD does: causes discomfort and/or pain with or without destroying the mucosa; causes stricture or stenosis, preventing food from being swallowed; sets the stage for the development of esophageal adenocarcinoma; invades the surrounding lands to harass the peaceful oropharyngeal, laryngeal and broncho-pulmonary territories; reminds us that we are not only human, but that we are dust and ashes. Why GERD is here: We propose three separate and distinct etiologies of GERD, and we offer the following three hypotheses to explain why, after 1.5 million years of standing erect, we have evolved into a species (specifically Homosapiens sapiens) that is destined to live with the scourge of GERD. Hypothesis 1: congenital. The antireflux barrier, comprising the smooth-muscled lower esophageal sphincter, the skeletal-muscled right crural diaphragm and the phreno-esophageal ligament does not completely develop due to a developmental anomaly or incomplete gestation. Hypothesis 2: acute trauma: The antireflux barrier in adults suffering acute traumatic injury to the abdomen or chest is permanently disrupted by unexpected forces, such as motor vehicle accidents (with steering wheel crush impact), blows to the abdomen (from activities such as boxing, etc.), heavy lifting or moving (e.g., pianos, refrigerators) or stress positions (e.g., hand stands on parallel gym bars). The trauma creates a hiatal hernia that renders the antireflux mechanism useless and incapable of preventing GERD. Hypothesis 3: chronic trauma: The antireflux barrier

  16. Isolation and Characterization of Human Lung Lymphatic Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Lorusso, Bruno; Falco, Angela; Madeddu, Denise; Frati, Caterina; Cavalli, Stefano; Graiani, Gallia; Gervasi, Andrea; Rinaldi, Laura; Lagrasta, Costanza; Maselli, Davide; Gnetti, Letizia; Silini, Enrico M; Quaini, Eugenio; Ampollini, Luca; Carbognani, Paolo; Quaini, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Characterization of lymphatic endothelial cells from the respiratory system may be crucial to investigate the role of the lymphatic system in the normal and diseased lung. We describe a simple and inexpensive method to harvest, isolate, and expand lymphatic endothelial cells from the human lung (HL-LECs). Fifty-five samples of healthy lung selected from patients undergoing lobectomy were studied. A two-step purification tool, based on paramagnetic sorting with monoclonal antibodies to CD31 and Podoplanin, was employed to select a pure population of HL-LECs. The purity of HL-LECs was assessed by morphologic criteria, immunocytochemistry, flow cytometry, and functional assays. Interestingly, these cells retain in vitro several receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) implicated in cell survival and proliferation. HL-LECs represent a clinically relevant cellular substrate to study lymphatic biology, lymphoangiogenesis, interaction with microbial agents, wound healing, and anticancer therapy. PMID:26137493

  17. Isolation and Characterization of Human Lung Lymphatic Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lorusso, Bruno; Falco, Angela; Madeddu, Denise; Frati, Caterina; Cavalli, Stefano; Graiani, Gallia; Gervasi, Andrea; Rinaldi, Laura; Lagrasta, Costanza; Maselli, Davide; Gnetti, Letizia; Silini, Enrico M.; Quaini, Eugenio; Ampollini, Luca; Carbognani, Paolo; Quaini, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Characterization of lymphatic endothelial cells from the respiratory system may be crucial to investigate the role of the lymphatic system in the normal and diseased lung. We describe a simple and inexpensive method to harvest, isolate, and expand lymphatic endothelial cells from the human lung (HL-LECs). Fifty-five samples of healthy lung selected from patients undergoing lobectomy were studied. A two-step purification tool, based on paramagnetic sorting with monoclonal antibodies to CD31 and Podoplanin, was employed to select a pure population of HL-LECs. The purity of HL-LECs was assessed by morphologic criteria, immunocytochemistry, flow cytometry, and functional assays. Interestingly, these cells retain in vitro several receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) implicated in cell survival and proliferation. HL-LECs represent a clinically relevant cellular substrate to study lymphatic biology, lymphoangiogenesis, interaction with microbial agents, wound healing, and anticancer therapy. PMID:26137493

  18. Characterization of human carbonic anhydrase III from skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Carter, N; Jeffery, S; Shiels, A; Edwards, Y; Tipler, T; Hopkinson, D A

    1979-10-01

    A third form of human carbonic anhydrase (CA III), found at high concentrations in skeletal muscle, has been purified and characterized. This isozyme shows relatively poor hydratase and esterase activities compared to the red cell isozymes, CA I and CA II, but is similar to these isozymes in subunit structure (monomer) and molecular size (28,000). CA III is liable to posttranslational modification by thiol group interaction. Monomeric secondary isozymes, sensitive to beta-mercaptoethanol, are found in both crude and purified material and can be generated in vitro by the addition of thiol reagents. Active dimeric isozymes, generated apparently by the formation of intermolecular disulfide bridges, also occur but account for only a small proportion of the total protein and appear only when the concentration of CA III is particularly high.

  19. Characterization of the centroidal geometry of human ribs.

    PubMed

    Kindig, Matthew W; Kent, Richard W

    2013-11-01

    While a number of studies have quantified overall ribcage morphology (breadth, depth, kyphosis/lordosis) and rib cross-sectional geometry in humans, few studies have characterized the centroidal geometry of individual ribs. In this study, a novel model is introduced to describe the centroidal path of a rib (i.e., the sequence of centroids connecting adjacent cross-sections) in terms of several physically-meaningful and intuitive geometric parameters. Surface reconstructions of rib levels 2-10 from 16 adult male cadavers (aged 31-75 years) were first extracted from CT scans, and the centroidal path was calculated in 3D for each rib using a custom numerical method. The projection of the centroidal path onto the plane of best fit (i.e., the "in-plane" centroidal path) was then modeled using two geometric primitives (a circle and a semiellipse) connected to give C1 continuity. Two additional parameters were used to describe the deviation of the centroidal path from this plane; further, the radius of curvature was calculated at various points along the rib length. This model was fit to each of the 144 extracted ribs, and average trends in rib size and shape with rib level were reported. In general, upper ribs (levels 2-5) had centroidal paths which were closer to circular, while lower ribs (levels 6-10) tended to be more elliptical; further the centroidal curvature at the posterior extremity was less pronounced for lower ribs. Lower ribs also tended to exhibit larger deviations from the best-fit plane. The rib dimensions and trends with subject stature were found to be consistent with findings previously reported in the literature. This model addresses a critical need in the biomechanics literature for the accurate characterization of rib geometry, and can be extended to a larger population as a simple and accurate way to represent the centroidal shape of human ribs.

  20. Differentiation and characterization of human facial subcutaneous adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Chon, Su-Hyoun; Pappas, Apostolos

    2015-01-01

    Aging is associated with the loss of facial subcutaneous fat and with increased abdominal subcutaneous fat. Site specific differences in adipocyte phenotype and/or gene expression may play a role in these age-related changes. In this study, we isolated and characterized human facial preadipocytes and investigated distinct metabolic properties such as a differentiation pattern in relation to abdominal preadipocytes. Subcutaneous preadipocytes were isolated from human facial and abdominal skin and cultured in the presence of differentiation factors including rosiglitazone, a known peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR-γ) agonist, isobutyl-methyl xanthine (IBMX) and insulin. Differentiation was characterized microscopically and by quantitative real-time PCR. Unexpected superior adipogenic capacity of facial preadipocytes was observed; more facial preadipocytes differentiated in response to rosiglitazone than abdominal preadipocytes and facial preadipocytes retained their ability to differentiate through passage 11 compared with passage 5 for abdominal preadipocytes. Experiments confirmed a reduced lipolysis response in facial versus abdominal adipocytes after exposure to isoproterenol, which was consistent with the reduced β2-adrenergic receptor expression by 60% in the facial cells. The expression of other lipid metabolic gene markers was similar in both facial and abdominal adipocytes with the exception of β3-adrenergic receptor which was only found in abdominal adipose tissue. Gene profiling, by microarray analysis, identified that several HOX genes are robustly reduced in facial adipocytes compared to abdominal adipocytes, suggesting different characteristics between the 2 fat depots. These differences may have implications for development of treatments for facial fat loss during aging.

  1. Differentiation and characterization of human facial subcutaneous adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Chon, Su-Hyoun; Pappas, Apostolos

    2014-01-01

    Aging is associated with the loss of facial subcutaneous fat and with increased abdominal subcutaneous fat. Site specific differences in adipocyte phenotype and/or gene expression may play a role in these age-related changes. In this study, we isolated and characterized human facial preadipocytes and investigated distinct metabolic properties such as a differentiation pattern in relation to abdominal preadipocytes. Subcutaneous preadipocytes were isolated from human facial and abdominal skin and cultured in the presence of differentiation factors including rosiglitazone, a known peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR-γ) agonist, isobutyl-methyl xanthine (IBMX) and insulin. Differentiation was characterized microscopically and by quantitative real-time PCR. Unexpected superior adipogenic capacity of facial preadipocytes was observed; more facial preadipocytes differentiated in response to rosiglitazone than abdominal preadipocytes and facial preadipocytes retained their ability to differentiate through passage 11 compared with passage 5 for abdominal preadipocytes. Experiments confirmed a reduced lipolysis response in facial versus abdominal adipocytes after exposure to isoproterenol, which was consistent with the reduced β2-adrenergic receptor expression by 60% in the facial cells. The expression of other lipid metabolic gene markers was similar in both facial and abdominal adipocytes with the exception of β3-adrenergic receptor which was only found in abdominal adipose tissue. Gene profiling, by microarray analysis, identified that several HOX genes are robustly reduced in facial adipocytes compared to abdominal adipocytes, suggesting different characteristics between the 2 fat depots. These differences may have implications for development of treatments for facial fat loss during aging. PMID:26167398

  2. Characterizing human retinotopic mapping with conformal geometry: a preliminary study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ta, Duyan; Shi, Jie; Barton, Brian; Brewer, Alyssa; Lu, Zhong-Lin; Wang, Yalin

    2014-03-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has been widely used to measure the retinotopic organization of early visual cortex in the human brain. Previous studies have identified multiple visual field maps (VFMs) based on statistical analysis of fMRI signals, but the resulting geometry has not been fully characterized with mathematical models. Here we test whether VFMs V1 and V2 obey the least restrictive of all geometric mappings; that is, whether they are anglepreserving and therefore maintain conformal mapping. We measured retinotopic organization in individual subjects using standard traveling-wave fMRI methods. Visual stimuli consisted of black and white, drifting checkerboards comprising rotating wedges and expanding rings to measure the cortical representations of polar angle and eccentricity, respectively. These representations were then projected onto a 3D cortical mesh of each hemisphere. By generating a mapped unit disk that is conformal of the VFMs using spherical stereographic projection and computing the parameterized coordinates of the eccentricity and polar angle gradients, we computed Beltrami coefficients to check whether the mapping from the visual field to the V1 and V2 cortical representations is conformal. We find that V1 and V2 exhibit local conformality. Our analysis of the Beltrami coefficient shows that selected regions of V1 and V2 that contain reasonably smooth eccentricity and polar angle gradients do show significant local conformality, warranting further investigation of this approach for analysis of early and higher visual cortex. These results suggest that such a mathematical model can be used to characterize the early VFMs in human visual cortex.

  3. Towards spatially smart abatement of human pharmaceuticals in surface waters: Defining impact of sewage treatment plants on susceptible functions.

    PubMed

    Coppens, Lieke J C; van Gils, Jos A G; Ter Laak, Thomas L; Raterman, Bernard W; van Wezel, Annemarie P

    2015-09-15

    For human pharmaceuticals, sewage treatment plants (STPs) are a major point of entry to surface waters. The receiving waters provide vital functions. Modeling the impact of STPs on susceptible functions of the surface water system allows for a spatially smart implementation of abatement options at, or in the service area of, STPs. This study was performed on a nation-wide scale for the Netherlands. Point source emissions included were 345 Dutch STPs and nine rivers from neighboring countries. The Dutch surface waters were represented by 2511 surface water units. Modeling was performed for two extreme discharge conditions. Monitoring data of 7 locations along the rivers Rhine and Meuse fall mostly within the range of modeled concentrations. Half of the abstracted volumes of raw water for drinking water production, and a quarter of the Natura 2000 areas (European Union nature protection areas) hosted by the surface waters, are influenced by STPs at low discharge. The vast majority of the total impact of all Dutch STPs during both discharge conditions can be attributed to only 19% of the STPs with regard to the drinking water function, and to 39% of the STPs with regard to the Natura 2000 function. Attributing water treatment technologies to STPs as one of the possible measures to improve water quality and protect susceptible functions can be done in a spatially smart and cost-effective way, using consumption-based detailed hydrological and water quality modeling.

  4. Human Immunodeficiency Virus as a Chronic Disease: Evaluation and Management of Nonacquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome-Defining Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Serrano-Villar, Sergio; Gutiérrez, Félix; Miralles, Celia; Berenguer, Juan; Rivero, Antonio; Martínez, Esteban; Moreno, Santiago

    2016-01-01

    In the modern antiretroviral therapy (ART) era, motivated people living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) who have access to therapy are expected to maintain viral suppression indefinitely and to receive treatment for decades. Hence, the current clinical scenario has dramatically shifted since the early 1980s, from treatment and prevention of opportunistic infections and palliative care to a new scenario in which most HIV specialists focus on HIV primary care, ie, the follow up of stable patients, surveillance of long-term toxicities, and screening and prevention of age-related conditions. The median age of HIV-infected adults on ART is progressively increasing. By 2030, 3 of every 4 patients are expected to be aged 50 years or older in many countries, more than 80% will have at least 1 age-related disease, and approximately one third will have at least 3 age-related diseases. Contemporary care of HIV-infected patients is evolving, and questions about how we might monitor and perhaps even treat HIV-infected adults have emerged. Through key published works, this review briefly describes the most prevalent comorbidities and age-associated conditions and highlights the differential features in the HIV-infected population. We also discuss the most critical aspects to be considered in the care of patients with HIV for the management and prevention of age-associated disease. PMID:27419169

  5. Human Immunodeficiency Virus as a Chronic Disease: Evaluation and Management of Nonacquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome-Defining Conditions.

    PubMed

    Serrano-Villar, Sergio; Gutiérrez, Félix; Miralles, Celia; Berenguer, Juan; Rivero, Antonio; Martínez, Esteban; Moreno, Santiago

    2016-04-01

    In the modern antiretroviral therapy (ART) era, motivated people living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) who have access to therapy are expected to maintain viral suppression indefinitely and to receive treatment for decades. Hence, the current clinical scenario has dramatically shifted since the early 1980s, from treatment and prevention of opportunistic infections and palliative care to a new scenario in which most HIV specialists focus on HIV primary care, ie, the follow up of stable patients, surveillance of long-term toxicities, and screening and prevention of age-related conditions. The median age of HIV-infected adults on ART is progressively increasing. By 2030, 3 of every 4 patients are expected to be aged 50 years or older in many countries, more than 80% will have at least 1 age-related disease, and approximately one third will have at least 3 age-related diseases. Contemporary care of HIV-infected patients is evolving, and questions about how we might monitor and perhaps even treat HIV-infected adults have emerged. Through key published works, this review briefly describes the most prevalent comorbidities and age-associated conditions and highlights the differential features in the HIV-infected population. We also discuss the most critical aspects to be considered in the care of patients with HIV for the management and prevention of age-associated disease. PMID:27419169

  6. An effective freezing/thawing method for human pluripotent stem cells cultured in chemically-defined and feeder-free conditions

    PubMed Central

    Nishishita, Naoki; Muramatsu, Marie; Kawamata, Shin

    2015-01-01

    Culturing human Pluripotent Stem Cells (hPSC)s in chemically defined medium and feeder-free condition can facilitate metabolome and proteome analysis of culturing cells and medium, and reduce regulatory concerns for clinical application of cells. And in addition, if hPSC are passaged and cryopreserved in single cells it also facilitates quality control of cells at single cell level. Here we report a robust single cell freezing and thawing method of hPSCs cultured in chemically-defined medium TeSRTM-E8TM and on cost-effective recombinant human Vitronectin-N (rhVTN-N)-coated dish. Cells are dissociated into single cells with recombinant TrypLETM Select and 0.5 mM EDTA/PBS (3:1 solution) in the presence of Rock inhibitor and cryopreserved with chemically defined CryoStemTM. Approximately 60% of cells were viable after dissociation. AggrewellTM 400 was used to form cell clumps of 500 cells after thaw in the presence of Rock inhibitor and cells were cultured for two days with TeSR-E8. Cells clumps were then seeded on rhVTN-N-coated dish and cultured with TeSR-E8 for two days prior to the first passage after thawing. Number of viable cells at the first passage increased around 10 times of that just before freezing. This robust single cell freezing method for hPSCs cultured in chemically defined medium will facilitate quality control of cultured cells at single cell level before cryopreservation and consequently assure the quality of cells in frozen vials for further manipulation after thawing. PMID:25973330

  7. Proteogenomic characterization of human colon and rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bing; Wang, Jing; Wang, Xiaojing; Zhu, Jing; Liu, Qi; Shi, Zhiao; Chambers, Matthew C; Zimmerman, Lisa J; Shaddox, Kent F; Kim, Sangtae; Davies, Sherri R; Wang, Sean; Wang, Pei; Kinsinger, Christopher R; Rivers, Robert C; Rodriguez, Henry; Townsend, R Reid; Ellis, Matthew J C; Carr, Steven A; Tabb, David L; Coffey, Robert J; Slebos, Robbert J C; Liebler, Daniel C

    2014-09-18

    Extensive genomic characterization of human cancers presents the problem of inference from genomic abnormalities to cancer phenotypes. To address this problem, we analysed proteomes of colon and rectal tumours characterized previously by The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and perform integrated proteogenomic analyses. Somatic variants displayed reduced protein abundance compared to germline variants. Messenger RNA transcript abundance did not reliably predict protein abundance differences between tumours. Proteomics identified five proteomic subtypes in the TCGA cohort, two of which overlapped with the TCGA 'microsatellite instability/CpG island methylation phenotype' transcriptomic subtype, but had distinct mutation, methylation and protein expression patterns associated with different clinical outcomes. Although copy number alterations showed strong cis- and trans-effects on mRNA abundance, relatively few of these extend to the protein level. Thus, proteomics data enabled prioritization of candidate driver genes. The chromosome 20q amplicon was associated with the largest global changes at both mRNA and protein levels; proteomics data highlighted potential 20q candidates, including HNF4A (hepatocyte nuclear factor 4, alpha), TOMM34 (translocase of outer mitochondrial membrane 34) and SRC (SRC proto-oncogene, non-receptor tyrosine kinase). Integrated proteogenomic analysis provides functional context to interpret genomic abnormalities and affords a new paradigm for understanding cancer biology.

  8. Coherent 40-Hz Oscillation Characterizes Dream State in Humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llinas, Rodolfo; Ribary, Urs

    1993-03-01

    Magnetic recording from five normal human adults demonstrates large 40-Hz coherent magnetic activity in the awake and in rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep states that is very reduced during delta sleep (deep sleep characterized by delta waves in the electroencephalogram). This 40-Hz magnetic oscillation has been shown to be reset by sensory stimuli in the awake state. Such resetting is not observed during REM or delta sleep. The 40 Hz in REM sleep is characterized, as is that in the awake state, by a fronto-occiptal phase shift over the head. This phase shift has a maximum duration of thickapprox12-13 msec. Because 40-Hz oscillation is seen in wakefulness and in dreaming, we propose it to be a correlate of cognition, probably resultant from coherent 40-Hz resonance between thalamocortical-specific and nonspecific loops. Moreover, we proposed that the specific loops give the content of cognition, and a nonspecific loop gives the temporal binding required for the unity of cognitive experience.

  9. Significant clinical, neuropathological and behavioural recovery from acute spinal cord trauma by transplantation of a well-defined somatic stem cell from human umbilical cord blood.

    PubMed

    Schira, Jessica; Gasis, Marcia; Estrada, Veronica; Hendricks, Marion; Schmitz, Christine; Trapp, Thorsten; Kruse, Fabian; Kögler, Gesine; Wernet, Peter; Hartung, Hans-Peter; Müller, Hans Werner

    2012-02-01

    Stem cell therapy is a potential treatment for spinal cord injury and different stem cell types have been grafted into animal models and humans suffering from spinal trauma. Due to inconsistent results, it is still an important and clinically relevant question which stem cell type will prove to be therapeutically effective. Thus far, stem cells of human sources grafted into spinal cord mostly included barely defined heterogeneous mesenchymal stem cell populations derived from bone marrow or umbilical cord blood. Here, we have transplanted a well-defined unrestricted somatic stem cell isolated from human umbilical cord blood into an acute traumatic spinal cord injury of adult immune suppressed rat. Grafting of unrestricted somatic stem cells into the vicinity of a dorsal hemisection injury at thoracic level eight resulted in hepatocyte growth factor-directed migration and accumulation within the lesion area, reduction in lesion size and augmented tissue sparing, enhanced axon regrowth and significant functional locomotor improvement as revealed by three behavioural tasks (open field Basso-Beattie-Bresnahan locomotor score, horizontal ladder walking test and CatWalk gait analysis). To accomplish the beneficial effects, neither neural differentiation nor long-lasting persistence of the grafted human stem cells appears to be required. The secretion of neurite outgrowth-promoting factors in vitro further suggests a paracrine function of unrestricted somatic stem cells in spinal cord injury. Given the highly supportive functional characteristics in spinal cord injury, production in virtually unlimited quantities at GMP grade and lack of ethical concerns, unrestricted somatic stem cells appear to be a highly suitable human stem cell source for clinical application in central nervous system injuries. PMID:21903726

  10. Integrating mechanistic and polymorphism data to characterize human genetic susceptibility for environmental chemical risk assessment in the 21st century.

    PubMed

    Mortensen, Holly M; Euling, Susan Y

    2013-09-15

    Response to environmental chemicals can vary widely among individuals and between population groups. In human health risk assessment, data on susceptibility can be utilized by deriving risk levels based on a study of a susceptible population and/or an uncertainty factor may be applied to account for the lack of information about susceptibility. Defining genetic susceptibility in response to environmental chemicals across human populations is an area of interest in the NAS' new paradigm of toxicity pathway-based risk assessment. Data from high-throughput/high content (HT/HC), including -omics (e.g., genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics) technologies, have been integral to the identification and characterization of drug target and disease loci, and have been successfully utilized to inform the mechanism of action for numerous environmental chemicals. Large-scale population genotyping studies may help to characterize levels of variability across human populations at identified target loci implicated in response to environmental chemicals. By combining mechanistic data for a given environmental chemical with next generation sequencing data that provides human population variation information, one can begin to characterize differential susceptibility due to genetic variability to environmental chemicals within and across genetically heterogeneous human populations. The integration of such data sources will be informative to human health risk assessment.

  11. Integrating mechanistic and polymorphism data to characterize human genetic susceptibility for environmental chemical risk assessment in the 21st century

    SciTech Connect

    Mortensen, Holly M.; Euling, Susan Y.

    2013-09-15

    Response to environmental chemicals can vary widely among individuals and between population groups. In human health risk assessment, data on susceptibility can be utilized by deriving risk levels based on a study of a susceptible population and/or an uncertainty factor may be applied to account for the lack of information about susceptibility. Defining genetic susceptibility in response to environmental chemicals across human populations is an area of interest in the NAS' new paradigm of toxicity pathway-based risk assessment. Data from high-throughput/high content (HT/HC), including -omics (e.g., genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics) technologies, have been integral to the identification and characterization of drug target and disease loci, and have been successfully utilized to inform the mechanism of action for numerous environmental chemicals. Large-scale population genotyping studies may help to characterize levels of variability across human populations at identified target loci implicated in response to environmental chemicals. By combining mechanistic data for a given environmental chemical with next generation sequencing data that provides human population variation information, one can begin to characterize differential susceptibility due to genetic variability to environmental chemicals within and across genetically heterogeneous human populations. The integration of such data sources will be informative to human health risk assessment.

  12. Preliminary characterization of human skin microbiome in healthy Egyptian individuals.

    PubMed

    Ramadan, M; Solyman, S; Taha, M; Hanora, A

    2016-01-01

    Human skin is a large, complex ecosystem that harbors diverse microbial communities. The rapid advances in molecular techniques facilitate the exploration of skin associated bacterial populations. The objective of this study was to perform a preliminary characterization of skin associated bacterial populations in Egyptian individuals. Samples were collected from five healthy subjects from two skin sites; Antecubital Fossa (AF) and Popliteal Fossa (PF). Genomic DNA was extracted and used to amplify bacterial 16S rRNA genes which were sequenced on Illumina MiSeq platform. The two sites showed distinct diversity where PF was more diverse than AF. Taxonomic analysis of sequences revealed four main phyla Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Actinobacteria and Deinococcus-Thermus, with Proteobacteria presenting the highest diversity. Klebsiella, Bacillus, Pseudomonas and Escherichia were the most predominant genera. Our data suggest that environmental factors can shape the composition of the skin microbiome in certain geographical regions. This study presents a new insight for subsequent analyses of human microbiome in Egypt. PMID:27545210

  13. Immunohistochemical and Molecular Characterization of the Human Periosteum

    PubMed Central

    Frey, Sönke Percy; Jansen, Hendrik; Doht, Stefanie; Filgueira, Luis; Zellweger, Rene

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. The aim of the present study was to characterize the cell of the human periosteum using immunohistological and molecular methods. Methods. Phenotypic properties and the distribution of the cells within the different layers were investigated with immunohistochemical staining techniques and RT-PCR, focussing on markers for stromal stem cells, osteoblasts, osteoclasts and immune cells. Results. Immunohistochemical results revealed that all stained cells were located in the cambium layer and that most cells were positive for vimentin. The majority of cells consisted of stromal stem cells and osteoblastic precursor cells. The density increased towards the deeper layers of the cambium. In addition, cells positive for markers of the osteoblast, chondrocyte, and osteoclast lineages were found. Interestingly, there were MHC class II-expressing immune cells suggesting the presence of dendritic cells. Using lineage-specific primer pairs RT-PCR confirmed the immunofluorescence microscopy results, supporting that human periosteum serves as a reservoir of stromal stem cells, as well as cells of the osteoblastic, and the chondroblastic lineage, osteoclasts, and dendritic cells. Conclusion. Our work elucidates the role of periosteum as a source of cells with a high regenerative capacity. Undifferentiated stromal stem cells as well as osteoblastic precursor cells are dominating in the cambium layer. A new outlook is given towards an immune response coming from the periosteum as MHC II positive immune cells were detected. PMID:23737713

  14. Characterization of Disease-Associated Mutations in Human Transmembrane Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Molnár, János; Szakács, Gergely; Tusnády, Gábor E.

    2016-01-01

    Transmembrane protein coding genes are commonly associated with human diseases. We characterized disease causing mutations and natural polymorphisms in transmembrane proteins by mapping missense genetic variations from the UniProt database on the transmembrane protein topology listed in the Human Transmembrane Proteome database. We found characteristic differences in the spectrum of amino acid changes within transmembrane regions: in the case of disease associated mutations the non-polar to non-polar and non-polar to charged amino acid changes are equally frequent. In contrast, in the case of natural polymorphisms non-polar to charged amino acid changes are rare while non-polar to non-polar changes are common. The majority of disease associated mutations result in glycine to arginine and leucine to proline substitutions. Mutations to positively charged amino acids are more common in the center of the lipid bilayer, where they cause more severe structural and functional anomalies. Our analysis contributes to the better understanding of the effect of disease associated mutations in transmembrane proteins, which can help prioritize genetic variations in personal genomic investigations. PMID:26986070

  15. Ultrathin conformal devices for precise and continuous thermal characterization of human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, R. Chad; Bonifas, Andrew P.; Behnaz, Alex; Zhang, Yihui; Yu, Ki Jun; Cheng, Huanyu; Shi, Mingxing; Bian, Zuguang; Liu, Zhuangjian; Kim, Yun-Soung; Yeo, Woon-Hong; Park, Jae Suk; Song, Jizhou; Li, Yuhang; Huang, Yonggang; Gorbach, Alexander M.; Rogers, John A.

    2013-10-01

    Precision thermometry of the skin can, together with other measurements, provide clinically relevant information about cardiovascular health, cognitive state, malignancy and many other important aspects of human physiology. Here, we introduce an ultrathin, compliant skin-like sensor/actuator technology that can pliably laminate onto the epidermis to provide continuous, accurate thermal characterizations that are unavailable with other methods. Examples include non-invasive spatial mapping of skin temperature with millikelvin precision, and simultaneous quantitative assessment of tissue thermal conductivity. Such devices can also be implemented in ways that reveal the time-dynamic influence of blood flow and perfusion on these properties. Experimental and theoretical studies establish the underlying principles of operation, and define engineering guidelines for device design. Evaluation of subtle variations in skin temperature associated with mental activity, physical stimulation and vasoconstriction/dilation along with accurate determination of skin hydration through measurements of thermal conductivity represent some important operational examples.

  16. Ex vivo differential phase contrast and magnetic resonance imaging for characterization of human carotid atherosclerotic plaques.

    PubMed

    Meletta, Romana; Borel, Nicole; Stolzmann, Paul; Astolfo, Alberto; Klohs, Jan; Stampanoni, Marco; Rudin, Markus; Schibli, Roger; Krämer, Stefanie D; Herde, Adrienne Müller

    2015-10-01

    Non-invasive detection of specific atherosclerotic plaque components related to vulnerability is of high clinical relevance to prevent cerebrovascular events. The feasibility of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for characterization of plaque components was already demonstrated. We aimed to evaluate the potential of ex vivo differential phase contrast X-ray tomography (DPC) to accurately characterize human carotid plaque components in comparison to high field multicontrast MRI and histopathology. Two human plaque segments, obtained from carotid endarterectomy, classified according to criteria of the American Heart Association as stable and unstable plaque, were examined by ex vivo DPC tomography and multicontrast MRI (T1-, T2-, and proton density-weighted imaging, magnetization transfer contrast, diffusion-weighted imaging). To identify specific plaque components, the plaques were subsequently sectioned and stained for fibrous and cellular components, smooth muscle cells, hemosiderin, and fibrin. Histological data were then matched with DPC and MR images to define signal criteria for atherosclerotic plaque components. Characteristic structures, such as the lipid and necrotic core covered by a fibrous cap, calcification and hemosiderin deposits were delineated by histology and found with excellent sensitivity, resolution and accuracy in both imaging modalities. DPC tomography was superior to MRI regarding resolution and soft tissue contrast. Ex vivo DPC tomography allowed accurate identification of structures and components of atherosclerotic plaques at different lesion stages, in good correlation with histopathological findings.

  17. Kinetic characterization of human butyrylcholinesterase mutants for hydrolysis of cocaethylene

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Shurong; Zhan, Max; Zheng, Xirong; Zhan, Chang-Guo; Zheng, Fang

    2015-01-01

    It is known that majority of cocaine users also consume alcohol. Alcohol can react with cocaine to produce a significantly more cytotoxic compound, cocaethylene. Hence, a truly valuable cocaine-metabolizing enzyme for cocaine abuse/overdose treatment should be efficient for not only cocaine itself, but also cocaethylene. The catalytic parameters (kcat and KM) of human butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) and two mutants (known as cocaine hydrolases E14-3 and E12-7) for cocaethylene have been characterized in the present study, for the first time, in comparison with those for cocaine. Based on the obtained kinetic data, wild-type human BChE has a lower catalytic activity for cocaethylene (kcat = 3.3 min−1, KM = 7.5 μM, and kcat/KM = 4.40 × 105 M−1 min−1) compared to its catalytic activity for (−)-cocaine. E14-3 and E12-7 have a considerably improved catalytic activity against cocaethylene compared to the wild-type BChE. E12-7 is identified as the most efficient enzyme for hydrolyzing cocaethylene in addition to its high activity for (−)-cocaine. E12-7 has an 861-fold improved catalytic efficiency for cocaethylene (kcat = 3600 min−1, KM = 9.5 μM, and kcat/KM = 3.79 × 108 M−1 min−1). It has been demonstrated that E12-7 as an exogenous enzyme can indeed rapidly metabolize cocaethylene in rats. Further kinetic modeling has suggested that E12-7 with an identical concentration as that of the endogenous BChE in human plasma can effectively eliminate (−)-cocaine, cocaethylene, and norcocaine in simplified kinetic models of cocaine abuse and overdose associated with the concurrent use of cocaine and alcohol. PMID:24870023

  18. Preliminary molecular characterization of the human pathogen Angiostrongylus cantonensis

    PubMed Central

    He, Hualiang; Cheng, Mei; Yang, Xiao; Meng, Jinxiu; He, Ai; Zheng, Xiaoying; Li, Zhuoya; Guo, Pengjuan; Pan, Zhihua; Zhan, Ximei

    2009-01-01

    Background Human angiostrongyliasis is an emerging food-borne public health problem, with the number of cases increasing worldwide, especially in mainland China. Angiostrongylus cantonensis is the causative agent of this severe disease. However, little is known about the genetics and basic biology of A. cantonensis. Results A cDNA library of A. cantonensis fourth-stage larvae was constructed, and ~1,200 clones were sequenced. Bioinformatic analyses revealed 378 cDNA clusters, 54.2% of which matched known genes at a cutoff expectation value of 10-20. Of these 378 unique cDNAs, 168 contained open reading frames encoding proteins containing an average of 238 amino acids. Characterization of the functions of these encoded proteins by Gene Ontology analysis showed enrichment in proteins with binding and catalytic activity. The observed pattern of enzymes involved in protein metabolism, lipid metabolism and glycolysis may reflect the central nervous system habitat of this pathogen. Four proteins were tested for their immunogenicity using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and histopathological examinations. The specificity of each of the four proteins was superior to that of crude somatic and excretory/secretory antigens of larvae, although their sensitivity was relatively low. We further showed that mice immunized with recombinant cystatin, a product of one of the four cDNA candidate genes, were partially protected from A. cantonensis infection. Conclusion The data presented here substantially expand the available genetic information about the human pathogen A. cantonensis, and should be a significant resource for angiostrongyliasis researchers. As such, this work serves as a starting point for molecular approaches for diagnosing and controlling human angiostrongyliasis. PMID:19852860

  19. Mechanism of metabolic activation and DNA adduct formation by the human carcinogen diethylstilbestrol: The defining link to natural estrogens

    PubMed Central

    Saeed, Muhammad; Rogan, Eleanor

    2009-01-01

    Diethylstilbestrol (DES) is a human carcinogen, based on sufficient epidemiological evidence. DES is mainly metabolized to its catechol, 3′-hydroxyDES (3′-OH-DES), which can further oxidize to DES-3′,4′-quinone (DES-3′,4′-Q). Similarly to estradiol-3,4-quinone, the reaction of DES-3′,4′-Q with DNA would form the depurinating 3′-OH-DES-6′-N3Ade and 3′-OH-DES-6′-N7Gua adducts. To prove this hypothesis, synthesis of DES-3′,4′-Q by oxidation of 3′-OH-DES with Ag2O was tried; this failed due to instantaneous formation of a spiro-quinone. Oxidation of 3′-OH-DES by lactoperoxidase or tyrosinase in the presence of DNA led to the formation of 3′-OH-DES-6′-N3Ade and 3′-OH-DES-6′-N7Gua adducts. These adducts were tentatively identified by LC-MS/MS as 3′-OH-DES-6′-N3Ade, m/z = 418 [M+H]+, and 3′-OH-DES-6′-N7Gua, m/z = 434 [M+H]+. Demonstration of their structures derived from their oxidation by MnO2 to the DES quinone adducts and subsequent tautomerization to the dienestrol (DIES) catechol adducts, which are identical to the standard 3′-OH-DIES-6′-N3Ade, m/z = 416 [M+H]+, and 3′-OH-DIES-6′-N7Gua, m/z = 432 [M+H]+, adducts. The reaction of DIES-3′,4′-Q or lactoperoxidase-activated 3′-OH-DIES with DNA did not produce any depurinating adducts, due to the dienic chain being perpendicular to the phenyl planes, which impedes the intercalation of DIES into the DNA. Enzymic oxidation of 3′-OH-DES suggests that the catechol of DES intercalates into DNA and is then oxidized to its quinone to yield N3Ade and N7Gua adducts. These results suggest that the common denominator of tumor initiation by the synthetic estrogen DES and the natural estrogen estradiol is formation of their catechol quinones, which react with DNA to afford the depurinating N3Ade and N7Gua adducts. PMID:19089919

  20. A novel in vitro human microglia model: characterization of human monocyte-derived microglia.

    PubMed

    Etemad, Samar; Zamin, Rasheeda Mohd; Ruitenberg, Marc J; Filgueira, Luis

    2012-07-30

    Microglia are the innate immune cells of the central nervous system. They help maintaining physiological homeostasis and contribute significantly to inflammatory responses in the course of infection, injury and degenerative processes. To date, there is no standardized simple model available to investigate the biology of human microglia. The aim of this study was to establish a new human microglia model. For that purpose, human peripheral blood monocytes were cultured in serum free medium in the presence of M-CSF, GM-CSF, NGF and CCL2 to generate monocyte-derived microglia (M-MG). M-MG were clearly different in morphology, phenotype and function from freshly isolated monocytes, cultured monocytes in the absence of the cytokines and monocyte-derived dendritic cells (M-DC) cultured in the presence of GM-CSF and IL-4. M-MG acquired a ramified morphology with primary and secondary processes. M-MG displayed a comparable phenotype to the human microglia cell line HMC3, expressing very low levels of CD45, CD14 and HLA-DR, CD11b and CD11c; and undetectable levels of CD40, CD80 and CD83, and a distinct pattern of chemokine receptors (positive for CCR1, CCR2, CCR4, CCR5, CXCR1, CXCR3, CX3CR1; negative for CCR6 and CCR7). In comparison with M-DC, M-MG displayed lower T-lymphocyte stimulatory capacity, as well as lower phagocytosis activity. The described protocol for the generation of human monocyte-derived microglia is feasible, well standardized and reliable, as it uses well defined culture medium and recombinant cytokines, but no serum or conditioned medium. This protocol will certainly be very helpful for future studies investigating the biology and pathology of human microglia. PMID:22659341

  1. Defined chromosomal assignment of CLN5 demonstrates that at least four genetic loci are involved in the pathogenesis of human ceroid lipofuscinoses

    SciTech Connect

    Savukoski, M.; Peltonen, L.; Santavuori, P.; Kestilae, M. |; Williams, R.; Jaervelae, I.; Sharp, J.; Harris, J.; Gardiner, M.

    1994-10-01

    We demonstrate here that at least four genetically separate loci are involved in the pathogenesis of human neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCLs), fatal brain disorders of children. Earlier the assignments of the infantile and juvenile subtypes of NCL to 1p32 and 16p12 had revealed two loci; and here a variant subtype of the late-infantile form of NCL is mapped to a well-defined region on 13q21.1-q32, whereas the clinically similar, classical form of late-infantile NCL was found to represent the fourth, yet-unidentified NCL locus. The linkage disequilibrium was crucial for locus assignment in our highly limited family material, and the data exemplify the significance of this phenomenon in the random mapping of rare human diseases. 22 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. The Development of Dynamic Human Reliability Analysis Simulations for Inclusion in Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization Frameworks

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey C. Joe; Diego Mandelli; Ronald L. Boring; Curtis L. Smith; Rachel B. Shirley

    2015-07-01

    The United States Department of Energy is sponsoring the Light Water Reactor Sustainability program, which has the overall objective of supporting the near-term and the extended operation of commercial nuclear power plants. One key research and development (R&D) area in this program is the Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization pathway, which combines probabilistic risk simulation with thermohydraulic simulation codes to define and manage safety margins. The R&D efforts to date, however, have not included robust simulations of human operators, and how the reliability of human performance or lack thereof (i.e., human errors) can affect risk-margins and plant performance. This paper describes current and planned research efforts to address the absence of robust human reliability simulations and thereby increase the fidelity of simulated accident scenarios.

  3. Characterization of diverse forms of myosin heavy chain expressed in adult human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Saez, L; Leinwand, L A

    1986-01-01

    In an attempt to define myosin heavy chain (MHC) gene organization and expression in adult human skeletal muscle, we have isolated and characterized genomic sequences corresponding to different human sarcomeric MHC genes (1). In this report, we present the complete DNA sequence of two different adult human skeletal muscle MHC cDNA clones, one of which encodes the entire light meromyosin (LMM) segment of MHC and represents the longest described MHC cDNA sequence. Additionally, both clones provide new sequence data from a 228 amino acid segment of the MHC tail for which no protein or DNA sequence has been previously available. One clone encodes a "fast" form of skeletal muscle MHC while the other clone most closely resembles a MHC form described in rat cardiac ventricles. We show that the 3' untranslated region of skeletal MHC cDNAs are homologous from widely separated species as are cardiac MHC cDNAs. However, there is no homology between the 3' untranslated region of cardiac and skeletal muscle MHCs. Isotype-specific preservation of MHC 3' untranslated sequences during evolution suggests a functional role for these regions. Images PMID:2421254

  4. Transformation of human epidermal cells by transfection with plasmid containing simian virus 40 DNA linked to a neomycin gene is a defined medium

    SciTech Connect

    Su, R.T.; Yen-Chu Chang )

    1989-01-01

    A human epidermal cell culture was transformed by transfection with a recombinant plasmid containing simian virus 40 DNA with a deletion at the origin and an antibiotic (neomycin or G418) marker. A calcium phosphate-mediated DNA transfection method was optimized for introducing exogenous DNA into cells maintained in a fully defined medium. The transformed cells were propagated for more than 200 population doublings and did not appear to go through a crisis period. The growth characteristics of the transformed cells were similar to those found in normal epidermal cells. Transformed cells initially transfected with the recombinant plasmid could be propagated for more than 30 passages. Actively growing cells could then be repeatedly selected from cell populations based upon their neomycin (G418)-resistant phenotype for at least another 30 passages. Simian virus 40 T-antigen and extrachromosomal DNA containing plasmid- and SV40-specific DNA sequences were detected in the transformed cells. Because of their nononcogenic phenotype and defined growth requirements, the transformed cells provide a model for examining structural changes during cell proliferation and differentiation, and for exploring the multistage carcinogenesis of human epithelial cells.

  5. Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Derived Neuronal Cells Cultured on Chemically-Defined Hydrogels for Sensitive In Vitro Detection of Botulinum Neurotoxin

    PubMed Central

    Pellett, Sabine; Schwartz, Michael P.; Tepp, William H.; Josephson, Richard; Scherf, Jacob M.; Pier, Christina L.; Thomson, James A.; Murphy, William L.; Johnson, Eric A.

    2015-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) detection provides a useful model for validating cell-based neurotoxicity screening approaches, as sensitivity is dependent on functionally competent neurons and clear quantitative endpoints are available for correlating results to approved animal testing protocols. Here, human induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived neuronal cells were cultured on chemically-defined poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogels formed by “thiol-ene” photopolymerization and tested as a cell-based neurotoxicity assay by determining sensitivity to active BoNT/A1. BoNT/A1 sensitivity was comparable to the approved in vivo mouse bioassay for human iPSC-derived neurons and neural stem cells (iPSC-NSCs) cultured on PEG hydrogels or treated tissue culture polystyrene (TCP) surfaces. However, maximum sensitivity for BoNT detection was achieved two weeks earlier for iPSC-NSCs that were differentiated and matured on PEG hydrogels compared to TCP. Therefore, chemically-defined synthetic hydrogels offer benefits over standard platforms when optimizing culture conditions for cell-based screening and achieve sensitivities comparable to an approved animal testing protocol. PMID:26411797

  6. The episode of genetic drift defining the migration of humans out of Africa is derived from a large east African population size.

    PubMed

    Elhassan, Nuha; Gebremeskel, Eyoab Iyasu; Elnour, Mohamed Ali; Isabirye, Dan; Okello, John; Hussien, Ayman; Kwiatksowski, Dominic; Hirbo, Jibril; Tishkoff, Sara; Ibrahim, Muntaser E

    2014-01-01

    Human genetic variation particularly in Africa is still poorly understood. This is despite a consensus on the large African effective population size compared to populations from other continents. Based on sequencing of the mitochondrial Cytochrome C Oxidase subunit II (MT-CO2), and genome wide microsatellite data we observe evidence suggesting the effective size (Ne) of humans to be larger than the current estimates, with a foci of increased genetic diversity in east Africa, and a population size of east Africans being at least 2-6 fold larger than other populations. Both phylogenetic and network analysis indicate that east Africans possess more ancestral lineages in comparison to various continental populations placing them at the root of the human evolutionary tree. Our results also affirm east Africa as the likely spot from which migration towards Asia has taken place. The study reflects the spectacular level of sequence variation within east Africans in comparison to the global sample, and appeals for further studies that may contribute towards filling the existing gaps in the database. The implication of these data to current genomic research, as well as the need to carry out defined studies of human genetic variation that includes more African populations; particularly east Africans is paramount. PMID:24845801

  7. The episode of genetic drift defining the migration of humans out of Africa is derived from a large east African population size.

    PubMed

    Elhassan, Nuha; Gebremeskel, Eyoab Iyasu; Elnour, Mohamed Ali; Isabirye, Dan; Okello, John; Hussien, Ayman; Kwiatksowski, Dominic; Hirbo, Jibril; Tishkoff, Sara; Ibrahim, Muntaser E

    2014-01-01

    Human genetic variation particularly in Africa is still poorly understood. This is despite a consensus on the large African effective population size compared to populations from other continents. Based on sequencing of the mitochondrial Cytochrome C Oxidase subunit II (MT-CO2), and genome wide microsatellite data we observe evidence suggesting the effective size (Ne) of humans to be larger than the current estimates, with a foci of increased genetic diversity in east Africa, and a population size of east Africans being at least 2-6 fold larger than other populations. Both phylogenetic and network analysis indicate that east Africans possess more ancestral lineages in comparison to various continental populations placing them at the root of the human evolutionary tree. Our results also affirm east Africa as the likely spot from which migration towards Asia has taken place. The study reflects the spectacular level of sequence variation within east Africans in comparison to the global sample, and appeals for further studies that may contribute towards filling the existing gaps in the database. The implication of these data to current genomic research, as well as the need to carry out defined studies of human genetic variation that includes more African populations; particularly east Africans is paramount.

  8. Translating human embryonic stem cells from 2-dimensional to 3-dimensional cultures in a defined medium on laminin- and vitronectin-coated surfaces.

    PubMed

    Heng, Boon Chin; Li, Jian; Chen, Allen Kuan-Liang; Reuveny, Shaul; Cool, Simon M; Birch, William R; Oh, Steve Kah-Weng

    2012-07-01

    While defining the environment for human embryonic stem cell (hESC) culture on 2-dimensional (2D) surfaces has made rapid progress, the industrial-scale implementation of this technology will benefit from translating this knowledge into a 3-dimensional (3D) system, thus enabling better control, automation, and volumetric scale-up in bioreactors. The current study describes a system with defined conditions that are capable of supporting the long-term 2D culture of hESCs and the transposing of these conditions to 3D microcarrier (MC) cultures. Vitronectin (VN) and laminin (LN) were chosen as matrices for the long-term propagation of hESCs in a defined culture medium (STEMPRO(®)) for conventional 2D culture. Adsorption of these proteins onto 2D tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS) indicated that surface density saturation of 510 and 850 ng/cm(2) for VN and LN, respectively, was attained above 20 μg/mL deposition solution concentration. Adsorption of these proteins onto spherical (97±10 μm), polystyrene MC followed a similar trend and coating surface densities of 450 and 650 ng/cm(2) for VN and LN, respectively, were used to support hESC propagation. The long-term expansion of hESCs was equally successful on TCPS and MC, with consistently high expression (>90%) of pluripotent markers (OCT-4, MAB-84, and TRA-1-60) over 20 passages and maintenance of karyotypic normality. The average fold increase in cell numbers on VN-coated MC per serial passage was 8.5±1.0, which was similar to LN-coated MC (8.5±0.9). Embryoid body differentiation assays and teratoma formation confirmed that hESCs retained the ability to differentiate into lineages of all 3 germ layers, thus demonstrating the first translation to a fully defined MC-based environment for the expansion of hESCs.

  9. Characterization of intracellular pteroylpolyglutamate hydrolase (PPH) from human intestinal mucosa

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, T.T.Y.; Chandler, C.J.; Halsted, C.H.

    1986-03-01

    There are two forms of pteroylpolyglutamate hydrolase (PPH) in the human intestinal mucosa, one in the brush border membrane and the other intracellular; brush border PPH is an exopeptidase with optimal activity at pH 6.5 and a requirement for zinc. The presence study characterized human intracellular PPH and compared its properties to those of brush border PPH. Intracellular PPH was purified 30-fold. The enzyme had a MW of 75,000 by gel filtration, was optimally active at pH 4.5, and had an isoelectric point at pH 8.0. In contrast to brush border PPH, intracellular PPH was unstable at increasing temperatures, was unaffected by dialysis against chelating agents and showed no requirement for Zn/sup 2 +/. Using PteGlu/sub 2/(/sup 14/C)Glu as substrate, they demonstrated a K/sub m/ of 1.2 ..mu..M and increasing affinity for folates with longer glutamate chains. Intracellular PPH required the complete folic acid (PteGlu) moiety and a ..gamma..-glutamyl linkage for activity. Using ion exchange chromatography and an HPLC method to determine the hydrolytic products of the reaction, they found intracellular PPH could cleave both internal and terminal ..gamma..-glutamyl linkages, with PteGlu as an end product. After subcellular fractionation of the mucosa, PPH was found in the lysosomes. In summary, the distinct characteristics of brush border and intracellular PPH suggest that the two hydrolases serve different roles in folate metabolism.

  10. Morphological and Molecular Characterization of Human Dermal Lymphatic Collectors

    PubMed Central

    Buttler, Kerstin; Ströbel, Philipp; Becker, Jürgen; Aung, Thiha; Felmerer, Gunther; Wilting, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    Millions of patients suffer from lymphedema worldwide. Supporting the contractility of lymphatic collectors is an attractive target for pharmacological therapy of lymphedema. However, lymphatics have mostly been studied in animals, while the cellular and molecular characteristics of human lymphatic collectors are largely unknown. We studied epifascial lymphatic collectors of the thigh, which were isolated for autologous transplantations. Our immunohistological studies identify additional markers for LECs (vimentin, CCBE1). We show and confirm differences between initial and collecting lymphatics concerning the markers ESAM1, D2-40 and LYVE-1. Our transmission electron microscopic studies reveal two types of smooth muscle cells (SMCs) in the media of the collectors with dark and light cytoplasm. We observed vasa vasorum in the media of the largest collectors, as well as interstitial Cajal-like cells, which are highly ramified cells with long processes, caveolae, and lacking a basal lamina. They are in close contact with SMCs, which possess multiple caveolae at the contact sites. Immunohistologically we identified such cells with antibodies against vimentin and PDGFRα, but not CD34 and cKIT. With Next Generation Sequencing we searched for highly expressed genes in the media of lymphatic collectors, and found therapeutic targets, suitable for acceleration of lymphatic contractility, such as neuropeptide Y receptors 1, and 5; tachykinin receptors 1, and 2; purinergic receptors P2RX1, and 6, P2RY12, 13, and 14; 5-hydroxytryptamine receptors HTR2B, and 3C; and adrenoceptors α2A,B,C. Our studies represent the first comprehensive characterization of human epifascial lymphatic collectors, as a prerequisite for diagnosis and therapy. PMID:27764183

  11. Generation and characterization of a human nanobody against VEGFR-2

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Lin; Gu, Kai; Zhang, Cheng-hai; Chen, Xue-tao; Jiang, Yi; Melcher, Karsten; Zhang, Juan; Wang, Min; Xu, H Eric

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Nanobody is an antibody fragment consisting of a single monomeric variable antibody domain, which can be used for a variety of biotechnological and therapeutic purposes. The aim of this work was to isolate and characterize a human signal domain antibody against VEGFR-2 domain3 (VEGFR D3) from a phage display library. Methods: To produce antigen-specific recombinant nanobodies with high affinity to VEGFR2 D3, a liquid phase panning strategy was used for all rounds of panning. For nanobody expression and purification, four VEGFR2 D3-blocking clones were subcloned into a pETduet-biotin-MBP expression vector. The recombinant proteins carried an MBP tag to facilitate purification by affinity chromatography. Recombinant NTV(1–4) was obtained after an additional gel filtration chromatography step. The interactions between VEGFR2 D3 and NTV(1–4) were assessed with luminescence-based AlphaScreen assay and SPR assay. Anti-angiogenesis effects were examined in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Results: In the AlphaScreen assay, NTV1 (100 and 200 nmol/L) elicited the highest binding signal with VEGFR2 D3; NTV2 showed moderate interactions with VEGFR2 D3; NTV3 and NTV4 exhibited little or no interaction with VEGFR2 D3. In the SPR assay, NTV1 displayed a high affinity for VEGFR2 D3 with an equilibrium dissociation constant (KD) of 49±1.8 nmol/L. NTV1 (1–1000 nmol/L) dose-dependently inhibited the proliferation of HUVECs and the endothelial tube formation by the HUVECs. Conclusion: The nanobody NTV1 is a potential therapeutic candidate for blocking VEGFR2. This study provides a novel and promising strategy for development of VEGFR2-targeted nanobody-based cancer therapeutics. PMID:27108602

  12. Fine binding characteristics of human autoantibodies-partial molecular characterization.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sanjeev; Kalsi, Jatinderpal; Bunting, Karen; Ravirajan, Chelliah T; Latchman, David S; Pearl, Laurence H; Isenberg, David A

    2004-07-01

    The fine binding characteristics of three well-characterized human autoantibodies B3, RH14 (anti-DNA) and UK4 (anti-cardiolipin) in their IgG and cloned Fab formats, were investigated. Although in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice B3 and RH14 both induce proteinuria, only RH14 induces early features of lupus nephritis, whereas UK4 exhibits lupus anticoagulant activity. RH14 exhibited up to 10 fold higher binding to DNA compared to that shown by B3 or UK4 and involved significant electrostatic and phosphate group interactions. Only RH14 exhibited strong anti-Sm cross-reactivity residing on the C-terminus of the antigen as determined by the use of 76 overlapping 15mer peptides. Chain shuffling experiments indicate that anti-Sm/RNP and anti-Jo-1 activities of B3 and UK4 co-exist on one of the two chains (light, B3; heavy, UK4). The present study provides evidence that a human anti-DNA antibody can also be an anti-ENA antibody. Furthermore, the anti-DNA antibodies also exhibited cross-reactivity against glutathione-S-transferase and DNA polymerase PolIV of bacterial origin. This is the first demonstration of the presence of such cross-reactivities on lupus anti-DNA antibodies. We now demonstrate that subsets of sera from the patients with lupus, recognise these antigens. This observation may in some cases provide a mechanism for the common expression of a variety of autoantibodies observed in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE).

  13. Characterization of golimumab, a human monoclonal antibody specific for human tumor necrosis factor α.

    PubMed

    Shealy, David J; Cai, Ann; Staquet, Kim; Baker, Audrey; Lacy, Eilyn R; Johns, Laura; Vafa, Omid; Gunn, George; Tam, Susan; Sague, Sarah; Wang, Dana; Brigham-Burke, Mike; Dalmonte, Paul; Emmell, Eva; Pikounis, Bill; Bugelski, Peter J; Zhou, Honghui; Scallon, Bernard J; Giles-Komar, Jill

    2010-01-01

    We prepared and characterized golimumab (CNTO148), a human IgG1 tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) antagonist monoclonal antibody chosen for clinical development based on its molecular properties. Golimumab was compared with infliximab, adalimumab and etanercept for affinity and in vitro TNFα neutralization. The affinity of golimumab for soluble human TNFα, as determined by surface plasmon resonance, was similar to that of etanercept (18 pM versus 11 pM), greater than that of infliximab (44 pM) and significantly greater than that of adalimumab (127 pM, p=0.018).  The concentration of golimumab necessary to neutralize TNFα-induced E-selectin expression on human endothelial cells by 50% was significantly less than those for infliximab (3.2 fold; p=0.017) and adalimumab (3.3-fold; p=0.008) and comparable to that for etanercept. The conformational stability of golimumab was greater than that of infliximab (primary melting temperature [Tm] 74.8 °C vs. 69.5 °C) as assessed by differential scanning calorimetry.  In addition, golimumab showed minimal aggregation over the intended shelf life when formulated as a high concentration liquid product (100 mg/mL) for subcutaneous administration.  In vivo, golimumab at doses of 1 and 10 mg/kg significantly delayed disease progression in a mouse model of human TNFα-induced arthritis when compared with untreated mice, while infliximab was effective only at 10 mg/kg. Golimumab also significantly reduced histological scores for arthritis severity and cartilage damage, as well as serum levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines associated with arthritis. Thus, we have demonstrated that golimumab is a highly stable human monoclonal antibody with high affinity and capacity to neutralize human TNFα in vitro and in vivo.

  14. Proteomic characterization of human platelet-derived microparticles.

    PubMed

    Capriotti, Anna Laura; Caruso, Giuseppe; Cavaliere, Chiara; Piovesana, Susy; Samperi, Roberto; Laganà, Aldo

    2013-05-01

    Microparticles (MPs) are small fragments of apoptotic or activated cells that may contribute to pathological processes in many diseases. Platelet-derived MPs (PMPs) are the most abundant type of MPs in human blood. To characterize the proteins in PMPs we used a shotgun proteomics approach by nanoHPLC separation followed by MS analysis on an LTQ Orbitrap XL. PMPs were produced from isolated platelets stimulated with adenosine diphosphate (ADP). We developed an analytical platform constituted by two different steps: in the first one we used a standard shotgun strategy; in the second one, to improve low-molecular weight, low-abundance-proteins identification, the samples were fractionated using hydrogel nanoparticles, an enrichment system based on a mixed mechanism of dimensional exclusion and colorant affinity. This was chosen to tackle a common issue with shotgun approaches, in which the low-abundance proteins are not detected when surveys are on a broad scale. By means of the entire analytical platform, we identified 603 proteins, 243 of which were not previously identified. A simple and straightforward procedure for the study of PMPs was provided, producing a tool for further understanding their biological and pathological roles, and a baseline for future studies aimed at discovering biomarkers involved in several diseases.

  15. Isolation and characterization of migratory human skin dendritic cells.

    PubMed Central

    Richters, C D; Hoekstra, M J; van Baare, J; Du Pont, J S; Hoefsmit, E C; Kamperdijk, E W

    1994-01-01

    A method is described to isolate and characterize human skin dendritic cells (DC). This method is based on the migratory capacities of these cells. The cells migrated 'spontaneously' out of split-skin explants into the medium during a 24-h culture period and contained up to 75% CD1a+ cells. After removal of co-migrated T cells and macrophages, the highly enriched (> 95% CD1a+) DC showed potent allo-antigen-presenting capacities. About 25% of the CD1a+ cells were also positive for the dermal DC marker CD1b, whereas only 15-20% of the cells contained Birbeck granules, the characteristic cell organelle of the epidermal Langerhans cell. Before culture, CD1a+ DC were observed on cryostat sections not only in the epidermis but also in the dermis. After culture, the number of CD1a+ cells in both epidermis and dermis had decreased. Not all the cells had migrated during the culture period; some CD1a+ cells could still be detected in the epidermis and dermis after culture. Thus, using this method, potent allo-stimulating CD1a+ cells, migrating from both epidermis and dermis, can be obtained without the use of enzymes. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7955541

  16. Phenotypical characterization of regulatory T cells in humans and rodents.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Perea, A L; Arcia, E D; Rueda, C M; Velilla, P A

    2016-09-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs ) constitute a fascinating subpopulation of CD4(+) T cells due to their ability to limit the immune response against self and non-self antigens. Murine models and antibodies directed against surface and intracellular molecules have allowed elucidation of the mechanisms that govern their development and function. However, these markers used to their classification lack of specificity, as they can be expressed by activated T cells. Similarly, there are slight differences between animal models, in steady state and pathological conditions, anatomical localization and strategy of analysis by flow cytometry. Here, we revised the most common markers utilized for Treg typification by flow cytometry such as CD25, forkhead box protein 3 (FoxP3) and CD127, along with our data obtained in different body compartments of humans, mice and rats. Furthermore, we revised and determined the expression of other molecules important for the phenotypical characterization of Treg cells. We draw attention to the drawbacks of those markers used in chronic states of inflammation. However, until a specific marker for the identification of Tregs is discovered, the best combination of markers will depend upon the tissue or the degree of inflammation from which Tregs derive. PMID:27124481

  17. Expression, purification, and characterization of recombinant human glutamine synthetase.

    PubMed Central

    Listrom, C D; Morizono, H; Rajagopal, B S; McCann, M T; Tuchman, M; Allewell, N M

    1997-01-01

    A bacterial expression system has been engineered for human glutamine synthetase (EC 6.3.1.2) that produces approximately 60 mg of enzyme (20% of the bacterial soluble protein) and yields approx. 8 mg of purified enzyme per litre of culture. The recombinant enzyme was purified 5-fold to apparent homogeneity and characterized. It has a subunit molecular mass of approx. 45000 Da. The Vmax value obtained using a radioactive assay with ammonia and l-[G-3H]glutamic acid as substrates was 15.9 micromol/min per mg, 40% higher than that obtained in the colorimetric assay (9.9 micromol/min per mg) with hydroxylamine replacing ammonia as a substrate. Km values for glutamate were 3.0 mM and 3.5 mM, and for ATP they were 2.0 mM and 2. 9 mM for the radioactive and spectrophotometric assays respectively. The Km for ammonia in the radioactive assay was 0.15 mM. The midpoint of thermal inactivation was 49.7 degrees C. Hydroxylamine, Mg(II) and Mg(II)-ATP stabilized the enzyme against thermal inactivation, whereas ATP promoted inactivation. The pure enzyme is stable for several months in storage and provides a source for additional studies, including X-ray crystallography. PMID:9359847

  18. Dynamic propagation channel characterization and modeling for human body communication.

    PubMed

    Nie, Zedong; Ma, Jingjing; Li, Zhicheng; Chen, Hong; Wang, Lei

    2012-12-18

    This paper presents the first characterization and modeling of dynamic propagation channels for human body communication (HBC). In-situ experiments were performed using customized transceivers in an anechoic chamber. Three HBC propagation channels, i.e., from right leg to left leg, from right hand to left hand and from right hand to left leg, were investigated under thirty-three motion scenarios. Snapshots of data (2,800,000) were acquired from five volunteers. Various path gains caused by different locations and movements were quantified and the statistical distributions were estimated. In general, for a given reference threshold è = -10 dB, the maximum average level crossing rate of the HBC was approximately 1.99 Hz, the maximum average fade time was 59.4 ms, and the percentage of bad channel duration time was less than 4.16%. The HBC exhibited a fade depth of -4 dB at 90% complementary cumulative probability. The statistical parameters were observed to be centered for each propagation channel. Subsequently a Fritchman model was implemented to estimate the burst characteristics of the on-body fading. It was concluded that the HBC is motion-insensitive, which is sufficient for reliable communication link during motions, and therefore it has great potential for body sensor/area networks.

  19. Characterization of Bacillus probiotics available for human use.

    PubMed

    Duc, Le H; Hong, Huynh A; Barbosa, Teresa M; Henriques, Adriano O; Cutting, Simon M

    2004-04-01

    Bacillus species (Bacillus cereus, Bacillus clausii, Bacillus pumilus) carried in five commercial probiotic products consisting of bacterial spores were characterized for potential attributes (colonization, immunostimulation, and antimicrobial activity) that could account for their claimed probiotic properties. Three B. cereus strains were shown to persist in the mouse gastrointestinal tract for up to 18 days postadministration, demonstrating that these organisms have some ability to colonize. Spores of one B. cereus strain were extremely sensitive to simulated gastric conditions and simulated intestinal fluids. Spores of all strains were immunogenic when they were given orally to mice, but the B. pumilus strain was found to generate particularly high anti-spore immunoglobulin G titers. Spores of B. pumilus and of a laboratory strain of B. subtilis were found to induce the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-6 in a cultured macrophage cell line, and in vivo, spores of B. pumilus and B. subtilis induced the proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha and the Th1 cytokine gamma interferon. The B. pumilus strain and one B. cereus strain (B. cereus var. vietnami) were found to produce a bacteriocin-like activity against other Bacillus species. The results that provided evidence of colonization, immunostimulation, and antimicrobial activity support the hypothesis that the organisms have a potential probiotic effect. However, the three B. cereus strains were also found to produce the Hbl and Nhe enterotoxins, which makes them unsafe for human use. PMID:15066809

  20. Demonstration and partial characterization of the interferon-gamma receptor on human mononuclear phagocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Celada, A; Allen, R; Esparza, I; Gray, P W; Schreiber, R D

    1985-01-01

    Radioiodinated recombinant human interferon-gamma (IFN gamma) bound to human monocytes, U937, and HL60 cells in a specific, saturable, and reversible manner. At 4 degrees C, the different cell types bound 3,000-7,000 molecules of IFN gamma, and binding was of comparable affinity (Ka = 4-12 X 10(8) M-1). No change in the receptor was observed after monocytes differentiated to macrophages or when the cell lines were pharmacologically induced to differentiate. The functional relevance of the receptor was validated by the demonstration that receptor occupancy correlated with induction of Fc receptors on U937. Binding studies using U937 permeabilized with digitonin showed that only 46% of the total receptor pool was expressed at the cell surface. The receptor appears to be a protein, since treatment of U937 with trypsin or pronase reduced 125I-IFN gamma binding by 87 and 95%, respectively. At 37 degrees C, ligand was internalized, since 32% of the cell-associated IFN gamma became resistant to trypsin stripping. Monocytes degraded 125I-IFN gamma into trichloroacetic acid-soluble counts at 37 degrees C but not at 4 degrees C, at an approximate rate of 5,000 molecules/cell per h. The receptor was partially characterized by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis of purified U937 membranes that had been incubated with 125I-IFN gamma. After cross-linking, the receptor-ligand complex migrated as a broad band that displayed an Mr of 104,000 +/- 18,000 at the top and 84,000 +/- 6,000 at the bottom. These results thereby define and partially characterize the IFN gamma receptor of human mononuclear phagocytes. Images PMID:2934408

  1. A Newly Defined and Xeno-Free Culture Medium Supports Every-Other-Day Medium Replacement in the Generation and Long-Term Cultivation of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Scotty Cadet, Jean; Shah, Kevan; Walde, Amy; Tran, Huan; Kovarcik, Don Paul; Clarke, Diana; Fellner, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) present an unprecedented opportunity to advance human health by offering an alternative and renewable cell resource for cellular therapeutics and regenerative medicine. The present demand for high quality hPSCs for use in both research and clinical studies underscores the need to develop technologies that will simplify the cultivation process and control variability. Here we describe the development of a robust, defined and xeno-free hPSC medium that supports reliable propagation of hPSCs and generation of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) from multiple somatic cell types; long-term serial subculturing of hPSCs with every-other-day (EOD) medium replacement; and banking fully characterized hPSCs. The hPSCs cultured in this medium for over 40 passages are genetically stable, retain high expression levels of the pluripotency markers TRA-1-60, TRA-1-81, Oct-3/4 and SSEA-4, and readily differentiate into ectoderm, mesoderm and endoderm. Importantly, the medium plays an integral role in establishing a cGMP-compliant process for the manufacturing of hiPSCs that can be used for generation of clinically relevant cell types for cell replacement therapy applications. PMID:27606941

  2. A Newly Defined and Xeno-Free Culture Medium Supports Every-Other-Day Medium Replacement in the Generation and Long-Term Cultivation of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Ahmadian Baghbaderani, Behnam; Tian, Xinghui; Scotty Cadet, Jean; Shah, Kevan; Walde, Amy; Tran, Huan; Kovarcik, Don Paul; Clarke, Diana; Fellner, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) present an unprecedented opportunity to advance human health by offering an alternative and renewable cell resource for cellular therapeutics and regenerative medicine. The present demand for high quality hPSCs for use in both research and clinical studies underscores the need to develop technologies that will simplify the cultivation process and control variability. Here we describe the development of a robust, defined and xeno-free hPSC medium that supports reliable propagation of hPSCs and generation of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) from multiple somatic cell types; long-term serial subculturing of hPSCs with every-other-day (EOD) medium replacement; and banking fully characterized hPSCs. The hPSCs cultured in this medium for over 40 passages are genetically stable, retain high expression levels of the pluripotency markers TRA-1-60, TRA-1-81, Oct-3/4 and SSEA-4, and readily differentiate into ectoderm, mesoderm and endoderm. Importantly, the medium plays an integral role in establishing a cGMP-compliant process for the manufacturing of hiPSCs that can be used for generation of clinically relevant cell types for cell replacement therapy applications. PMID:27606941

  3. A Newly Defined and Xeno-Free Culture Medium Supports Every-Other-Day Medium Replacement in the Generation and Long-Term Cultivation of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Scotty Cadet, Jean; Shah, Kevan; Walde, Amy; Tran, Huan; Kovarcik, Don Paul; Clarke, Diana; Fellner, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) present an unprecedented opportunity to advance human health by offering an alternative and renewable cell resource for cellular therapeutics and regenerative medicine. The present demand for high quality hPSCs for use in both research and clinical studies underscores the need to develop technologies that will simplify the cultivation process and control variability. Here we describe the development of a robust, defined and xeno-free hPSC medium that supports reliable propagation of hPSCs and generation of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) from multiple somatic cell types; long-term serial subculturing of hPSCs with every-other-day (EOD) medium replacement; and banking fully characterized hPSCs. The hPSCs cultured in this medium for over 40 passages are genetically stable, retain high expression levels of the pluripotency markers TRA-1-60, TRA-1-81, Oct-3/4 and SSEA-4, and readily differentiate into ectoderm, mesoderm and endoderm. Importantly, the medium plays an integral role in establishing a cGMP-compliant process for the manufacturing of hiPSCs that can be used for generation of clinically relevant cell types for cell replacement therapy applications. PMID:27606941

  4. Formation of Well-defined Embryoid Bodies from Dissociated Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells using Microfabricated Cell-repellent Microwell Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Pettinato, Giuseppe; Wen, Xuejun; Zhang, Ning

    2014-01-01

    A simple, scalable, and reproducible technology that allows direct formation of large numbers of homogeneous and synchronized embryoid bodies (EBs) of defined sizes from dissociated human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) was developed. Non-cell-adhesive hydrogels were used to create round-bottom microwells to host dissociated hiPSCs. No Rho-associated kinase inhibitor (ROCK-i), or centrifugation was needed and the side effects of ROCK-i can be avoided. The key requirement for the successful EB formation in addition to the non-cell-adhesive round-bottom microwells is the input cell density per microwell. Too few or too many cells loaded into the microwells will compromise the EB formation process. In parallel, we have tested our microwell-based system for homogeneous hEB formation from dissociated human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). Successful production of homogeneous hEBs from dissociated hESCs in the absence of ROCK-i and centrifugation was achieved within an optimal range of input cell density per microwell. Both the hiPSC- and hESC-derived hEBs expressed key proteins characteristic of all the three developmental germ layers, confirming their EB identity. This novel EB production technology may represent a versatile platform for the production of homogeneous EBs from dissociated human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs). PMID:25492588

  5. Genetically-Defined Deficiency of Mannose-Binding Lectin Is Associated with Protection after Experimental Stroke in Mice and Outcome in Human Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Cervera, Alvaro; Planas, Anna M.; Justicia, Carles; Urra, Xabier; Jensenius, Jens C.; Torres, Ferran; Lozano, Francisco; Chamorro, Angel

    2010-01-01

    Background The complement system is a major effector of innate immunity that has been involved in stroke brain damage. Complement activation occurs through the classical, alternative and lectin pathways. The latter is initiated by mannose-binding lectin (MBL) and MBL-associated serine proteases (MASPs). Here we investigated whether the lectin pathway contributes to stroke outcome in mice and humans. Methodology/Principal Findings Focal cerebral ischemia/reperfusion in MBL-null mice induced smaller infarctions, better functional outcome, and diminished C3 deposition and neutrophil infiltration than in wild-type mice. Accordingly, reconstitution of MBL-null mice with recombinant human MBL (rhMBL) enhanced brain damage. In order to investigate the clinical relevance of these experimental observations, a study of MBL2 and MASP-2 gene polymorphism rendering the lectin pathway dysfunctional was performed in 135 stroke patients. In logistic regression adjusted for age, gender and initial stroke severity, unfavourable outcome at 3 months was associated with MBL-sufficient genotype (OR 10.85, p = 0.008) and circulating MBL levels (OR 1.29, p = 0.04). Individuals carrying MBL-low genotypes (17.8%) had lower C3, C4, and CRP levels, and the proinflammatory cytokine profile was attenuated versus MBL-sufficient genotypes. Conclusions/Significance In conclusion, genetically defined MBL-deficiency is associated with a better outcome after acute stroke in mice and humans. PMID:20140243

  6. Production, Characterization, and Biological Evaluation of Well-Defined IgG1 Fc Glycoforms as a Model System for Biosimilarity Analysis.

    PubMed

    Okbazghi, Solomon Z; More, Apurva S; White, Derek R; Duan, Shaofeng; Shah, Ishan S; Joshi, Sangeeta B; Middaugh, C Russell; Volkin, David B; Tolbert, Thomas J

    2016-02-01

    Four different well-defined IgG1 Fc glycoforms are proposed as a model system to examine important biological and physicochemical features for protein drug biosimilar analyses. The IgG1 Fc glycoforms were produced by yeast expression combined with in vitro enzymatic synthesis as a series of sequentially truncated high-mannose IgG1 Fc glycoforms with an anticipated range of biological activity and structural stability. Initial characterization with mass spectrometry, SDS-PAGE, size exclusion HPLC, and capillary isoelectric focusing confirmed that the glycoproteins are overall highly similar with the only major difference being glycosylation state. Binding to the activating Fc receptor, FcγRIIIa was used to evaluate the potential biological activity of the IgG1 Fc glycoproteins. Two complementary methods using biolayer interferometry, 1 with protein G-immobilized IgG1 Fc and the other with streptavidin-immobilized FcγRIIIa, were developed to assess FcγRIIIa affinity in kinetic binding studies. The high-mannose IgG1 Fc and Man5-IgG1 Fc glycoforms were highly similar to one another with high affinity for FcγRIIIa, whereas GlcNAc-Fc had weak affinity, and the nonglycosylated N297Q-Fc had no measurable affinity for FcγRIIIa. These 4 IgG1 Fc glycoforms were also evaluated in terms of physical and chemical stability profiles and then used as a model system to mathematically assess overall biosimilarity, as described in a series of companion articles. PMID:26869419

  7. Structural, Mechanistic, and Antigenic Characterization of the Human Astrovirus Capsid

    PubMed Central

    York, Royce L.; Yousefi, Payam A.; Bogdanoff, Walter; Haile, Sara; Tripathi, Sarvind

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human astroviruses (HAstVs) are nonenveloped, positive-sense, single-stranded RNA viruses that are a leading cause of viral gastroenteritis. HAstV particles display T=3 icosahedral symmetry formed by 180 copies of the capsid protein (CP), which undergoes proteolytic maturation to generate infectious HAstV particles. Little is known about the molecular features that govern HAstV particle assembly, maturation, infectivity, and immunogenicity. Here we report the crystal structures of the two main structural domains of the HAstV CP: the core domain at 2.60-Å resolution and the spike domain at 0.95-Å resolution. Fitting of these structures into the previously determined 25-Å-resolution electron cryomicroscopy density maps of HAstV allowed us to characterize the molecular features on the surfaces of immature and mature T=3 HAstV particles. The highly electropositive inner surface of HAstV supports a model in which interaction of the HAstV CP core with viral RNA is a driving force in T=3 HAstV particle formation. Additionally, mapping of conserved residues onto the HAstV CP core and spike domains in the context of the immature and mature HAstV particles revealed dramatic changes to the exposure of conserved residues during virus maturation. Indeed, we show that antibodies raised against mature HAstV have reactivity to both the HAstV CP core and spike domains, revealing for the first time that the CP core domain is antigenic. Together, these data provide new molecular insights into HAstV that have practical applications for the development of vaccines and antiviral therapies. IMPORTANCE Astroviruses are a leading cause of viral diarrhea in young children, immunocompromised individuals, and the elderly. Despite the prevalence of astroviruses, little is known at the molecular level about how the astrovirus particle assembles and is converted into an infectious, mature virus. In this paper, we describe the high-resolution structures of the two main astrovirus

  8. Operationally defined species characterization and bioaccessibility evaluation of cobalt, copper and selenium in Cape gooseberry (Physalis Peruviana L.) by SEC-ICP MS.

    PubMed

    Wojcieszek, Justyna; Ruzik, Lena

    2016-03-01

    Physalis peruviana could attract great interest because of its nutritional and industrial properties. It is an excellent source of vitamins, minerals, essential fatty acids and carotenoids. Physalis Peruviana is also known to have a positive impact on human health. Unfortunately, still little is known about trace elements present in Physalis Peruviana and their forms available for the human body. Thus, the aim of this study was to estimate bioaccessibility and characterization of species of cobalt, copper and selenium in Physalis Peruviana fruits. Total and extractable contents of elements were determined by mass spectrometer with inductively coupled plasma (ICP MS). In order to separate the different types of metal complexes Physalis peruviana fruits were treated with the following solvents: Tris-HCl (pH 7.4), sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) (pH 7.4) and ammonium acetate (pH 5.5). The best efficiency of extraction of: cobalt was obtained for ammonium acetate (56%) and Tris-HCl (60%); for copper was obtained for SDS (66%), for selenium the best extraction efficiency was obtained after extraction with SDS (48%). To obtain information about bioaccessibility of investigated elements, enzymatic extraction based on in vitro simulation of gastric (pepsin) and intestinal (pancreatin) digestion was performed. For copper and selenium the simulation of gastric digestion leads to the extraction yield above 90%, while both steps of digestion method were necessary to obtain satisfactory extraction yield in the case of cobalt. Size exclusion chromatography (SEC) coupled to on-line ICP MS detection was used to investigate collected metal species. The main fraction of metal compounds was found in the 17 kDa region. Cobalt and copper create complexes mostly with compounds extracted by means of ammonium acetate and SDS, respectively. Cobalt, copper and selenium were found to be highly bioaccessible from Physalis Peruviana. Investigation of available standards of cobalt and selenium

  9. Operationally defined species characterization and bioaccessibility evaluation of cobalt, copper and selenium in Cape gooseberry (Physalis Peruviana L.) by SEC-ICP MS.

    PubMed

    Wojcieszek, Justyna; Ruzik, Lena

    2016-03-01

    Physalis peruviana could attract great interest because of its nutritional and industrial properties. It is an excellent source of vitamins, minerals, essential fatty acids and carotenoids. Physalis Peruviana is also known to have a positive impact on human health. Unfortunately, still little is known about trace elements present in Physalis Peruviana and their forms available for the human body. Thus, the aim of this study was to estimate bioaccessibility and characterization of species of cobalt, copper and selenium in Physalis Peruviana fruits. Total and extractable contents of elements were determined by mass spectrometer with inductively coupled plasma (ICP MS). In order to separate the different types of metal complexes Physalis peruviana fruits were treated with the following solvents: Tris-HCl (pH 7.4), sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) (pH 7.4) and ammonium acetate (pH 5.5). The best efficiency of extraction of: cobalt was obtained for ammonium acetate (56%) and Tris-HCl (60%); for copper was obtained for SDS (66%), for selenium the best extraction efficiency was obtained after extraction with SDS (48%). To obtain information about bioaccessibility of investigated elements, enzymatic extraction based on in vitro simulation of gastric (pepsin) and intestinal (pancreatin) digestion was performed. For copper and selenium the simulation of gastric digestion leads to the extraction yield above 90%, while both steps of digestion method were necessary to obtain satisfactory extraction yield in the case of cobalt. Size exclusion chromatography (SEC) coupled to on-line ICP MS detection was used to investigate collected metal species. The main fraction of metal compounds was found in the 17 kDa region. Cobalt and copper create complexes mostly with compounds extracted by means of ammonium acetate and SDS, respectively. Cobalt, copper and selenium were found to be highly bioaccessible from Physalis Peruviana. Investigation of available standards of cobalt and selenium

  10. Characterization of ASKP1240, a Fully Human Antibody Targeting Human CD40 With Potent Immunosuppressive Effects

    PubMed Central

    Okimura, K; Maeta, K; Kobayashi, N; Goto, M; Kano, N; Ishihara, T; Ishikawa, T; Tsumura, H; Ueno, A; Miyao, Y; Sakuma, S; Kinugasa, F; Takahashi, N; Miura, T

    2014-01-01

    Blocking the CD40–CD154 interaction is reported to be effective for transplantation management and autoimmune disease models in rodents and nonhuman primates. However, clinical trials with anti-CD154 mAbs were halted because of high incidence of thromboembolic complications. Thus, we generated and characterized a fully human anti-CD40 mAb ASKP1240, as an alternative to anti-CD154 mAb. In vitro ASKP1240 concentration-dependently inhibited human peripheral blood mononuclear cell proliferation induced by soluble CD154. In addition, ASKP1240 did not destabilize platelet thrombi under physiological high shear conditions while mouse anti-human CD154 mAb (mu5C8) did. And ASKP1240 itself did not activate platelet and endothelial cells. In vivo administration of ASKP1240 (1 or 10 mg/kg, intravenously) to cynomolgus monkeys, weekly for 3 weeks, significantly attenuated both delayed-type hypersensitivity and specific antibody formation evoked by tetanus toxoid. The immunosuppressive effect was well correlated with the CD40 receptor saturation. Thus, these results suggest that ASKP1240 is immunosuppressive but not prothromboembolic, and as such appears to be a promising therapeutic candidate for the management of solid organ transplant rejection and autoimmune diseases therapy. PMID:24731050

  11. Characterization of primary human keratinocytes transformed by human papillomavirus type 18

    SciTech Connect

    Kaur, P.; McDougall, J.K. )

    1988-06-01

    Primary human epithelial cells were cotransfected with pHPV-18 and pSV2neo, and cell strains were generated by selecting in G418. Southern blot analysis revealed the presence of at least one intact, integrated viral genome in these cells. FE-A cells showed altered growth properties, characterized by a change in morphology, and clonal density. Differentiation markers analyzed by Western blotting (immunoblotting), such as cytokeratins and involucrin, indicated that the cells resembled a partially differentiated epithelial population. Increased expression of the 40-kilodalton cytokeratin was observed in FE-A cells, similar to that observed in simian virus 40-immortalized human keratinocytes. Calcium and 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate treatment induced normal epithelial cells to differentiate, whereas the human papillomavirus 18 (HPV-18)-containing keratinocytes were resistant to these signals, indicating their partially transformed nature. These cells were not able to induce tumors in nude mice over a period of up to 8 months. A second cell strain, FE-H18L, also generated by transfecting HPV-18, also exhibited an extended life span and similar alterations in morphology. Viral RNA transcribed from the early region of HPV-18 was detected in both cell strains by Northern (RNA) blot analysis. These cell strains should provide a useful model for determining the role of HPV in carcinogenesis.

  12. Non-integrating episomal plasmid-based reprogramming of human amniotic fluid stem cells into induced pluripotent stem cells in chemically defined conditions.

    PubMed

    Slamecka, Jaroslav; Salimova, Lilia; McClellan, Steven; van Kelle, Mathieu; Kehl, Debora; Laurini, Javier; Cinelli, Paolo; Owen, Laurie; Hoerstrup, Simon P; Weber, Benedikt

    2016-01-01

    Amniotic fluid stem cells (AFSC) represent an attractive potential cell source for fetal and pediatric cell-based therapies. However, upgrading them to pluripotency confers refractoriness toward senescence, higher proliferation rate and unlimited differentiation potential. AFSC were observed to rapidly and efficiently reacquire pluripotency which together with their easy recovery makes them an attractive cell source for reprogramming. The reprogramming process as well as the resulting iPSC epigenome could potentially benefit from the unspecialized nature of AFSC. iPSC derived from AFSC also have potential in disease modeling, such as Down syndrome or β-thalassemia. Previous experiments involving AFSC reprogramming have largely relied on integrative vector transgene delivery and undefined serum-containing, feeder-dependent culture. Here, we describe non-integrative oriP/EBNA-1 episomal plasmid-based reprogramming of AFSC into iPSC and culture in fully chemically defined xeno-free conditions represented by vitronectin coating and E8 medium, a system that we found uniquely suited for this purpose. The derived AF-iPSC lines uniformly expressed a set of pluripotency markers Oct3/4, Nanog, Sox2, SSEA-1, SSEA-4, TRA-1-60, TRA-1-81 in a pattern typical for human primed PSC. Additionally, the cells formed teratomas, and were deemed pluripotent by PluriTest, a global expression microarray-based in-silico pluripotency assay. However, we found that the PluriTest scores were borderline, indicating a unique pluripotent signature in the defined condition. In the light of potential future clinical translation of iPSC technology, non-integrating reprogramming and chemically defined culture are more acceptable. PMID:26654216

  13. Non-integrating episomal plasmid-based reprogramming of human amniotic fluid stem cells into induced pluripotent stem cells in chemically defined conditions.

    PubMed

    Slamecka, Jaroslav; Salimova, Lilia; McClellan, Steven; van Kelle, Mathieu; Kehl, Debora; Laurini, Javier; Cinelli, Paolo; Owen, Laurie; Hoerstrup, Simon P; Weber, Benedikt

    2016-01-01

    Amniotic fluid stem cells (AFSC) represent an attractive potential cell source for fetal and pediatric cell-based therapies. However, upgrading them to pluripotency confers refractoriness toward senescence, higher proliferation rate and unlimited differentiation potential. AFSC were observed to rapidly and efficiently reacquire pluripotency which together with their easy recovery makes them an attractive cell source for reprogramming. The reprogramming process as well as the resulting iPSC epigenome could potentially benefit from the unspecialized nature of AFSC. iPSC derived from AFSC also have potential in disease modeling, such as Down syndrome or β-thalassemia. Previous experiments involving AFSC reprogramming have largely relied on integrative vector transgene delivery and undefined serum-containing, feeder-dependent culture. Here, we describe non-integrative oriP/EBNA-1 episomal plasmid-based reprogramming of AFSC into iPSC and culture in fully chemically defined xeno-free conditions represented by vitronectin coating and E8 medium, a system that we found uniquely suited for this purpose. The derived AF-iPSC lines uniformly expressed a set of pluripotency markers Oct3/4, Nanog, Sox2, SSEA-1, SSEA-4, TRA-1-60, TRA-1-81 in a pattern typical for human primed PSC. Additionally, the cells formed teratomas, and were deemed pluripotent by PluriTest, a global expression microarray-based in-silico pluripotency assay. However, we found that the PluriTest scores were borderline, indicating a unique pluripotent signature in the defined condition. In the light of potential future clinical translation of iPSC technology, non-integrating reprogramming and chemically defined culture are more acceptable.

  14. Antibody responses to defined epitopes in the Epstein-Barr virus BZLF1-encoded transactivator protein among human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients.

    PubMed Central

    Tedeschi, R; Dillner, J; De Paoli, P

    1996-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus BZLF1-encoded replication activator (ZEBRA) is a key mediator of reactivation from latency to the viral productive cycle. In the present study, the serum antibody responses against three defined ZEBRA epitopes (designated ZEBRA-1, -19, and -22) were determined for 50 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-seropositive patients and 100 matched healthy control subjects. The anti-ZEBRA responses were more commonly found among HIV-seropositive patients than among healthy controls for all the three ZEBRA epitopes tested (P < 0.0003, P < 0.003, and P < 0.001, respectively). Comparison of ZEBRA antibody levels with the degree of immunodeficiency (CD4 cell counts), CDC grouping, and HIV p24 antigen positivity showed little association, suggesting that induction of ZEBRA antibodies is an early event after HIV infection. PMID:8705686

  15. A novel chemical-defined medium with bFGF and N2B27 supplements supports undifferentiated growth in human embryonic stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Yanxia; Song Zhihua; Zhao Yang; Qin Han; Cai Jun; Zhang Hong; Yu Tianxin; Jiang Siming; Wang Guangwen; Ding Mingxiao; Deng Hongkui . E-mail: hongkui_deng@pku.edu.cn

    2006-07-21

    Traditionally, undifferentiated human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are maintained on mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cells or on matrigel with an MEF-conditioned medium (CM), which hampers the clinical applications of hESCs due to the contamination by animal pathogens. Here we report a novel chemical-defined medium using DMEM/F12 supplemented with N2, B27, and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) [termed NBF]. This medium can support prolonged self-renewal of hESCs. hESCs cultured in NBF maintain an undifferentiated state and normal karyotype, are able to form embryoid bodies in vitro, and differentiate into three germ layers and extraembryonic cells. Furthermore, we find that hESCs cultured in NBF possess a low apoptosis rate and a high proliferation rate compared with those cultured in MEF-CM. Our findings provide a novel, simplified chemical-defined culture medium suitable for further therapeutic applications and developmental studies of hESCs.

  16. Defining the optimal window for cranial transplantation of human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cells to ameliorate radiation-induced cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Munjal M; Martirosian, Vahan; Christie, Lori-Ann; Riparip, Lara; Strnadel, Jan; Parihar, Vipan K; Limoli, Charles L

    2015-01-01

    Past preclinical studies have demonstrated the capability of using human stem cell transplantation in the irradiated brain to ameliorate radiation-induced cognitive dysfunction. Intrahippocampal transplantation of human embryonic stem cells and human neural stem cells (hNSCs) was found to functionally restore cognition in rats 1 and 4 months after cranial irradiation. To optimize the potential therapeutic benefits of human stem cell transplantation, we have further defined optimal transplantation windows for maximizing cognitive benefits after irradiation and used induced pluripotent stem cell-derived hNSCs (iPSC-hNSCs) that may eventually help minimize graft rejection in the host brain. For these studies, animals given an acute head-only dose of 10 Gy were grafted with iPSC-hNSCs at 2 days, 2 weeks, or 4 weeks following irradiation. Animals receiving stem cell grafts showed improved hippocampal spatial memory and contextual fear-conditioning performance compared with irradiated sham-surgery controls when analyzed 1 month after transplantation surgery. Importantly, superior performance was evident when stem cell grafting was delayed by 4 weeks following irradiation compared with animals grafted at earlier times. Analysis of the 4-week cohort showed that the surviving grafted cells migrated throughout the CA1 and CA3 subfields of the host hippocampus and differentiated into neuronal (∼39%) and astroglial (∼14%) subtypes. Furthermore, radiation-induced inflammation was significantly attenuated across multiple hippocampal subfields in animals receiving iPSC-hNSCs at 4 weeks after irradiation. These studies expand our prior findings to demonstrate that protracted stem cell grafting provides improved cognitive benefits following irradiation that are associated with reduced neuroinflammation.

  17. Effects of defined mixtures of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) on multiple cellular responses in the human hepatocarcinoma cell line, HepG2, using high content analysis screening.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Jodie; Berntsen, Hanne Friis; Zimmer, Karin Elisabeth; Frizzell, Caroline; Verhaegen, Steven; Ropstad, Erik; Connolly, Lisa

    2016-03-01

    Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) are toxic substances, highly resistant to environmental degradation, which can bio-accumulate and have long-range atmospheric transport potential. Most studies focus on single compound effects, however as humans are exposed to several POPs simultaneously, investigating exposure effects of real life POP mixtures on human health is necessary. A defined mixture of POPs was used, where the compound concentration reflected its contribution to the levels seen in Scandinavian human serum (total mix). Several sub mixtures representing different classes of POPs were also constructed. The perfluorinated (PFC) mixture contained six perfluorinated compounds, brominated (Br) mixture contained seven brominated compounds, chlorinated (Cl) mixture contained polychlorinated biphenyls and also p,p'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene, hexachlorobenzene, three chlordanes, three hexachlorocyclohexanes and dieldrin. Human hepatocarcinoma (HepG2) cells were used for 2h and 48h exposures to the seven mixtures and analysis on a CellInsight™ NXT High Content Screening platform. Multiple cytotoxic endpoints were investigated: cell number, nuclear intensity and area, mitochondrial mass and membrane potential (MMP) and reactive oxygen species (ROS). Both the Br and Cl mixtures induced ROS production but did not lead to apoptosis. The PFC mixture induced ROS production and likely induced cell apoptosis accompanied by the dissipation of MMP. Synergistic effects were evident for ROS induction when cells were exposed to the PFC+Br mixture in comparison to the effects of the individual mixtures. No significant effects were detected in the Br+Cl, PFC+Cl or total mixtures, which contain the same concentrations of chlorinated compounds as the Cl mixture plus additional compounds; highlighting the need for further exploration of POP mixtures in risk assessment.

  18. Characterization of adenosine binding proteins in human placental membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchison, K.A.

    1989-01-01

    We have characterized two adenosine binding proteins in human placenta. In membranes, one site is detected with ({sup 3}H) -N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (({sup 3}H)NECA). This site is similar to the adenosine A{sub 2} receptor. We call this site the adenosine A{sub 2}-like binding site. In detergent extracts, the second site is detected and has the characteristics of an adenosine A{sub 1} receptor. The soluble adenosine A{sub 2}-like binding site cannot be detected without a rapid assay. Binding to the adenosine A{sub 1} receptor with ({sup 3}H)-2-chloroadenosine and ({sup 3}H)NECA is time dependent, saturable, and reversible. Equilibrium displacement analysis with adenosine agonists reveals an A{sub 1} specificity: 2-chloroadenosine > R-phenylisopropyladenosine > 5{prime}-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine. The antagonist potency order is 1,3-diethyl-8-phenylxanthine > isobutylmethylxanthine > theophylline. Competition analysis of membranes with the A,-selective ligands ({sup 3}H)-cyclohexyladenosine ({sup 3}H) cylopentylxanthine revealed adenosine A{sub 1} agonist and antagonist potency orders. We have purified the adenosine A{sub 2}-like binding site. The adenosine A{sub 2}-like binding site is an ubiquitous major cellular protein. It is glycosylated, highly asymmetric, and acidic. The native protein is an homodimer with a subunit molecular mass of 98 kDa. The sedimentation coefficient and partial specific volume of the binding complex are 6.9 s and 0.698 ml/g, respectively. The Stokes' radius is 70 {Angstrom}. The native molecular mass of the detergent-protein complex is 230 kDa. The adenosine A{sub 2}-like binding site has an agonist potency order of 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine > 2-chloroadenosine >> R-phenylisopropyladenosine and an antagonist potency order of isobutylmethylxanthine > theophylline >> 1,3-diethyl-8-phenylxanthine.

  19. Structural and Biochemical Characterization of the Human Cyclophilin Family of Peptidyl-Prolyl Isomerases

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Tara L.; Walker, John R.; Campagna-Slater, Valérie; Finerty, Jr., Patrick J.; Paramanathan, Ragika; Bernstein, Galina; MacKenzie, Farrell; Tempel, Wolfram; Ouyang, Hui; Lee, Wen Hwa; Eisenmesser, Elan Z.; Dhe-Paganon, Sirano

    2011-12-14

    Peptidyl-prolyl isomerases catalyze the conversion between cis and trans isomers of proline. The cyclophilin family of peptidyl-prolyl isomerases is well known for being the target of the immunosuppressive drug cyclosporin, used to combat organ transplant rejection. There is great interest in both the substrate specificity of these enzymes and the design of isoform-selective ligands for them. However, the dearth of available data for individual family members inhibits attempts to design drug specificity; additionally, in order to define physiological functions for the cyclophilins, definitive isoform characterization is required. In the current study, enzymatic activity was assayed for 15 of the 17 human cyclophilin isomerase domains, and binding to the cyclosporin scaffold was tested. In order to rationalize the observed isoform diversity, the high-resolution crystallographic structures of seven cyclophilin domains were determined. These models, combined with seven previously solved cyclophilin isoforms, provide the basis for a family-wide structure:function analysis. Detailed structural analysis of the human cyclophilin isomerase explains why cyclophilin activity against short peptides is correlated with an ability to ligate cyclosporin and why certain isoforms are not competent for either activity. In addition, we find that regions of the isomerase domain outside the proline-binding surface impart isoform specificity for both in vivo substrates and drug design. We hypothesize that there is a well-defined molecular surface corresponding to the substrate-binding S2 position that is a site of diversity in the cyclophilin family. Computational simulations of substrate binding in this region support our observations. Our data indicate that unique isoform determinants exist that may be exploited for development of selective ligands and suggest that the currently available small-molecule and peptide-based ligands for this class of enzyme are insufficient for isoform

  20. Simple and versatile synthetic polydopamine-based surface supports reprogramming of human somatic cells and long-term self-renewal of human pluripotent stem cells under defined conditions.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ping; Wu, Fujian; Zhou, Tiancheng; Cai, Xiujuan; Zhang, Siqi; Zhang, Xiaohong; Li, Qiuhong; Li, Yongliang; Zheng, Yunfei; Wang, Mengke; Lan, Feng; Pan, Guangjin; Pei, Duanqing; Wei, Shicheng

    2016-05-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) possess great value in the aspect of cellular therapies due to its self-renewal and potential to differentiate into all somatic cell types. A few defined synthetic surfaces such as polymers and adhesive biological materials conjugated substrata were established for the self-renewal of hPSCs. However, none of them was effective in the generation of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) and long-term maintenance of multiple hPSCs, and most of them required complicated manufacturing processes. Polydopamine has good biocompatibility, is able to form a stable film on nearly all solid substrates surface, and can immobilize adhesive biomolecules. In this manuscript, a polydopamine-mediated surface was developed, which not only supported the reprogramming of human somatic cells into hiPSCs under defined conditions, but also sustained the growth of hiPSCs on diverse substrates. Moreover, the proliferation and pluripotency of hPSCs cultured on the surface were comparable to Matrigel for more than 20 passages. Besides, hPSCs were able to differentiate to cardiomyocytes and neural cells on the surface. This polydopamine-based synthetic surface represents a chemically-defined surface extensively applicable both for fundamental research and cell therapies of hPSCs.

  1. Characterization of Evidence for Human System Risk Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinberg, S. L.; Van Baalen, M.; Rossi, M.; Riccio, G.; Romero, E.; Francisco, D.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the kinds of evidence available and using the best evidence to answer a question is critical to evidenced-based decision-making, and it requires synthesis of evidence from a variety of sources. Categorization of human system risks in spaceflight, in particular, focuses on how well the integration and interpretation of all available evidence informs the risk statement that describes the relationship between spaceflight hazards and an outcome of interest. A mature understanding and categorization of these risks requires: 1) sufficient characterization of risk, 2) sufficient knowledge to determine an acceptable level of risk (i.e., a standard), 3) development of mitigations to meet the acceptable level of risk, and 4) identification of factors affecting generalizability of the evidence to different design reference missions. In the medical research community, evidence is often ranked by increasing confidence in findings gleaned from observational and experimental research (e.g., "levels of evidence"). However, an approach based solely on aspects of experimental design is problematic in assessing human system risks for spaceflight. For spaceflight, the unique challenges and opportunities include: (1) The independent variables in most evidence are the hazards of spaceflight, such as space radiation or low gravity, which cannot be entirely duplicated in terrestrial (Earth-based) analogs, (2) Evidence is drawn from multiple sources including medical and mission operations, Lifetime Surveillance of Astronaut Health (LSAH), spaceflight research (LSDA), and relevant environmental & terrestrial databases, (3) Risk metrics based primarily on LSAH data are typically derived from available prevalence or incidence data, which may limit rigorous interpretation, (4) The timeframe for obtaining adequate spaceflight sample size (n) is very long, given the small population, (5) Randomized controlled trials are unattainable in spaceflight, (6) Collection of personal and

  2. Characterizing climate change impacts on human exposures to air pollutants

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human exposures to air pollutants such as ozone (O3) have the potential to be altered by changes in climate through multiple factors that drive population exposures, including: ambient pollutant concentrations, human activity patterns, population sizes and distributions, and hous...

  3. Cutting edge: epigenetic regulation of Foxp3 defines a stable population of CD4+ regulatory T cells in tumors from mice and humans.

    PubMed

    Waight, Jeremy D; Takai, Shinji; Marelli, Bo; Qin, Guozhong; Hance, Kenneth W; Zhang, Dong; Tighe, Robert; Lan, Yan; Lo, Kin-Ming; Sabzevari, Helen; Hofmeister, Robert; Wilson, Nicholas S

    2015-02-01

    CD4(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) are critical for maintaining self-tolerance and function to prevent autoimmune disease. High densities of intratumoral Tregs are generally associated with poor patient prognosis, a correlation attributed to their broad immune-suppressive features. Two major populations of Tregs have been defined, thymically derived natural Tregs (nTregs) and peripherally induced Tregs (iTregs). However, the relative contribution of nTregs versus iTregs to the intratumoral Treg compartment remains controversial. Demarcating the proportion of nTregs versus iTregs has important implications in the design of therapeutic strategies to overcome their antagonistic effects on antitumor immune responses. We used epigenetic, phenotypic, and functional parameters to evaluate the composition of nTregs versus iTregs isolated from mouse tumor models and primary human tumors. Our findings failed to find evidence for extensive intratumoral iTreg induction. Rather, we identified a population of Foxp3-stable nTregs in tumors from mice and humans.

  4. Coregistration of quantitative proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging with neuropathological and neurophysiological analyses defines the extent of neuronal impairments in murine human immunodeficiency virus type-1 encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Nelson, J A; Dou, H; Ellison, B; Uberti, M; Xiong, H; Anderson, E; Mellon, M; Gelbard, H A; Boska, M; Gendelman, H E

    2005-05-15

    Relatively few immune-activated and virus-infected mononuclear phagocytes (MP; perivascular macrophages and microglia) may affect widespread neuronal dysfunction during human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-associated dementia (HAD). Indeed, histopathological evidence of neuronal dropout often belies the extent of cognitive impairment. To define relationships between neuronal function and histopathology, proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (1H MRSI) and hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) were compared with neuronal and glial immunohistology in a murine model of HIV-1 encephalitis (HIVE). HIV-1(ADA)-infected human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) were stereotactically injected into the subcortex of severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice. Sham-operated and unmanipulated mice served as controls. Seven days after cell injection, brain histological analyses revealed a focal giant cell encephalitis, with reactive astrocytes, microgliosis, and neuronal dropout. Strikingly, significant reductions in N-acetyl aspartate concentration ([NAA]) and LTP levels in HIVE mice were in both injected and contralateral hemispheres and in brain subregions, including the hippocampus, where neuropathology was limited or absent. The data support the importance of 1H MRSI as a tool for assessing neuronal function for HAD. The data also demonstrate that a highly focal encephalitis can produce global deficits for neuronal function and metabolism. PMID:15825192

  5. Determination of human DNA polymerase utilization for the repair of a model ionizing radiation-induced DNA strand break lesion in a defined vector substrate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winters, T. A.; Russell, P. S.; Kohli, M.; Dar, M. E.; Neumann, R. D.; Jorgensen, T. J.

    1999-01-01

    Human DNA polymerase and DNA ligase utilization for the repair of a major class of ionizing radiation-induced DNA lesion [DNA single-strand breaks containing 3'-phosphoglycolate (3'-PG)] was examined using a novel, chemically defined vector substrate containing a single, site-specific 3'-PG single-strand break lesion. In addition, the major human AP endonuclease, HAP1 (also known as APE1, APEX, Ref-1), was tested to determine if it was involved in initiating repair of 3'-PG-containing single-strand break lesions. DNA polymerase beta was found to be the primary polymerase responsible for nucleotide incorporation at the lesion site following excision of the 3'-PG blocking group. However, DNA polymerase delta/straightepsilon was also capable of nucleotide incorporation at the lesion site following 3'-PG excision. In addition, repair reactions catalyzed by DNA polymerase beta were found to be most effective in the presence of DNA ligase III, while those catalyzed by DNA polymerase delta/straightepsilon appeared to be more effective in the presence of DNA ligase I. Also, it was demonstrated that the repair initiating 3'-PG excision reaction was not dependent upon HAP1 activity, as judged by inhibition of HAP1 with neutralizing HAP1-specific polyclonal antibody.

  6. Characterization of 58-kilodalton human neutrophil collagenase: Comparison with human fibroblast collagenase

    SciTech Connect

    Mallya, S.K.; Mookhtiar, K.A.; Gao, Y.; Dioszegi, M.; Wart, H.E.V. ); Brew, K. ); Birkedal-Hansen, H. )

    1990-11-01

    A series of experiments has been carried out to characterize 58-kDa human neutrophil collagenase (HNC) and compare it with human fibroblast collagenase (HFC). N-Terminal sequencing of latent and spontaneously activated HNC shows that it is a distinct collagenase that is homologous to HFC and other members of the matrix metalloproteinase gene family. Activation occurs autolytically by hydrolysis of an M-L bond at a locus homologous to the Q{sub 80}-F{sub 81}-V{sub 82}-L{sub 83} autolytic activation site of HFC. This releases a 16-residue propeptide believed to contain the cysteine switch residue required for latency. Polyclonal antibody raised against HNC cross-reacts with HFC but with none of the other major human matrix metalloproteinases examined. Treatment of HNC with endoglycosidase F or N-glycosidase F indicates that it is glycosylated at multiple sites. The deglycosylated latent and spontaneously activated enzymes have molecular weights of approximately 44K and 42K, respectively. Differences in the carbohydrate processing of HFC and HNC may determine why HFC is a secreted protein while HNC is stored in intracellular granules. The kinetic parameters K{sub cat} and K{sub M} for the hydrolysis of the interstitial collagen types I, II, and III in solution by both collagenases have been determined. The rates of hydrolysis of these peptides vary very little, indicating that it is the collagen conformation at the cleavage site and not the sequence specificity of the collagenases that determines their collagen specificities.

  7. Generation, affinity maturation, and characterization of a human anti-human NKG2D monoclonal antibody with dual antagonistic and agonistic activity

    PubMed Central

    Kwong, Ka Yin; Baskar, Sivasubramanian; Zhang, Hua; Mackall, Crystal L.; Rader, Christoph

    2008-01-01

    Summary In humans, NKG2D is an activating receptor on NK cells and a costimulatory receptor on certain T cells and plays a central role in mediating immune responses in autoimmune diseases, infectious diseases, and cancer. Monoclonal antibodies that antagonize or agonize immune responses mediated by human NKG2D are considered to be of broad and potent therapeutic utility. Nonetheless, monoclonal antibodies to NKG2D that are suitable for clinical investigations have not been published yet. Here we describe the generation, affinity maturation, and characterization of a fully human monoclonal antibody to human NKG2D. Using phage display technology based on a newly generated naïve human Fab library in phage display vector pC3C followed by a tandem chain shuffling process designed for minimal deviation from natural human antibody sequences, we selected a human Fab, designated KYK-2.0, with high specificity and affinity to human NKG2D. KYK-2.0 Fab blocked the binding of the natural human NKG2D ligands MICA, MICB, and ULBP2 as potently as a commercially available mouse anti-human NKG2D monoclonal antibody in IgG format. Conversion of KYK-2.0 Fab to IgG1 resulted in subnanomolar avidity for human NKG2D. KYK-2.0 IgG1 was found to selectively recognize defined subpopulations of human lymphocytes known to express NKG2D, i.e. the majority of human CD8+, CD16+, and CD56+ cells as well as a small fraction of human CD4+ cells. In solution, KYK-2.0 IgG1 interfered with the cytolytic activity of ex vivo expanded human NK cells. By contrast, immobilized KYK-2.0 IgG1 was found to strongly induce human NK cell activation. The dual antagonistic and agonistic activity promises a wide range of therapeutic applications for KYK-2.0 IgG1 and its derivatives. PMID:18809410

  8. Gene expression profiling of neurochemically-defined regions of the human brain by in situ hybridization-guided laser capture microdissection

    PubMed Central

    Bernard, René; Kerman, Ilan A.; Meng, Fan; Evans, Simon J.; Amrein, Irmgard; Jones, Edward G.; Bunney, William E.; Akil, Huda; Watson, Stanley J.; Thompson, Robert C.

    2009-01-01

    Laser capture microdissection (LCM) permits isolation of specific cell types and cell groups based upon morphology, anatomical landmarks and histochemical properties. This powerful technique can be used for region-specific dissection if the target structure is clearly delineated. However, it is difficult to visualize anatomical boundaries in an unstained specimen, while histological staining can complicate the microdissection process and compromise downstream processing and analysis. We now introduce a novel method in which in situ hybridization (ISH) signal is used to guide LCM on adjacent unstained sections to collect tissue from neurochemically-defined regions of the human postmortem brain to minimize sample manipulation prior to analysis. This approach was validated in nuclei that provide monoaminergic inputs to the forebrain, and likely contribute to the pathophysiology of mood disorders. This method was used successfully to carry out gene expression profiling and quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) confirmation from the dissected material. When compared to traditional micropunch dissections, our ISH-guided LCM method provided enhanced signal intensity for mRNAs of specific monoaminergic marker genes as measured by genome-wide gene expression microarrays. Enriched expression of specific monoaminergic genes (as determined by microarrays and qPCR) was detected within appropriate anatomical locations validating the accuracy of microdissection. Together these results support the conclusion that ISH-guided LCM permits acquisition of enriched nucleus-specific RNA that can be successfully used for downstream gene expression investigations. Future studies will utilize this approach for gene expression profiling of neurochemically-defined regions of postmortem brains collected from mood disorder patients. PMID:19070632

  9. Isolation and characterization of Thy 1 homologue from human thymus.

    PubMed

    Bonewald, L F; Goust, J M; Sade, R M; Wang, A C

    1985-01-01

    A 40 000 M.W. glycoprotein was isolated from human thymus. This molecule binds lentil lectin, reacts with an antiserum made against the p25 antigen (the human Thy 1 homologue) and possesses almost identical amino acid composition as the p25 antigen and its 40 000 M.W. dimer. PMID:2864756

  10. Characterization of interleukin-8 receptors in non-human primates

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarez, V.; Coto, E.; Gonzalez-Roces, S.; Lopez-Larrea, C.

    1996-09-01

    Interleukin-8 is a chemokine with a potent neutrophil chemoatractant activity. In humans, two different cDNAs encoding human IL8 receptors designated IL8RA and IL8RB have been cloned. IL8RA binds IL8, while IL8RB binds IL8 as well as other {alpha}-chemokines. Both human IL8Rs are encoded by two genes physically linked on chromosome 2. The IL8RA and IL8RB genes have open reading frames (ORF) lacking introns. By direct sequencing of the polymerase chain reaction products, we sequenced the IL8R genes of cell lines from four non-human primates: chimpanzee, gorilla, orangutan, and macaca. The IL8RB encodes an ORF in the four non-human primates, showing 95%-99% similarity to the human IL8RB sequence. The IL8RA homologue in gorilla and chimpanzee consisted of two ORF 98%-99% identical to the human sequence. The macaca and orangutan IL8RA homologues are pseudogenes: a 2 base pair insertion generated a sequence with several stop codons. In addition, we describe the physical linkage of these genes in the four non-human primates and discuss the evolutionary implications of these findings. 25 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. A new human Duffy blood group specificity defined by a murine monoclonal antibody. Immunogenetics and association with susceptibility to Plasmodium vivax

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    A new Duffy specificity, Fy6, defined by a murine monoclonal antibody of the IgG1 kappa class, is related to susceptibility to malarial invasion. In humans, Fy6 is present on the red cells of all persons except those of the Fy(a-b-) type, a distribution resembling that of Fy3. However proteolytic enzyme treatment of red cells enhances the reactivity of Fy3, whereas Fy6, like Fya and Fyb, is susceptible to degradation by this process. The number of Fy6 sites on human red cells was found to be 12,200 per cell, in close agreement with earlier estimates of the number of Fya sites. Anti-Fy6 reacted in western blots with a membrane glycoprotein of approximately 46,000 Mr, not significantly different from that of a molecule known to bear the Fya determinant. The Fy6 epitope is shown to be present on the red cells of some but not all nonhuman primate species, where it has a distribution not only distinctly different from Fya, Fyb, and Fy3, but in close accordance with susceptibility to penetration by Plasmodium vivax. Thus, the red cells of two species of macaques (Macaca mulatta and M. fascicularis), which are invaded by Plasmodium knowlesi but not by P. vivax are shown to have other Duffy antigens but to be devoid of Fy6. It appears, therefore, that the red cell epitopes used by these closely related species are distinct, and that susceptibility to P. vivax merozoite penetration is dependent on the presence of Fy6. PMID:2442291

  12. Controlled Growth and the Maintenance of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells by Cultivation with Defined Medium on Extracellular Matrix-Coated Micropatterned Dishes.

    PubMed

    Takenaka, Chiemi; Miyajima, Hiroshi; Yoda, Yusuke; Imazato, Hideo; Yamamoto, Takako; Gomi, Shinichi; Ohshima, Yasuhiro; Kagawa, Kenichi; Sasaki, Tetsuji; Kawamata, Shin

    2015-01-01

    Here, we introduce a new serum-free defined medium (SPM) that supports the cultivation of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) on recombinant human vitronectin-N (rhVNT-N)-coated dishes after seeding with either cell clumps or single cells. With this system, there was no need for an intervening sequential adaptation process after moving hPSCs from feeder layer-dependent conditions. We also introduce a micropatterned dish that was coated with extracellular matrix by photolithographic technology. This procedure allowed the cultivation of hPSCs on 199 individual rhVNT-N-coated small round spots (1 mm in diameter) on each 35-mm polystyrene dish (termed "patterned culture"), permitting the simultaneous formation of 199 uniform high-density small-sized colonies. This culture system supported controlled cell growth and maintenance of undifferentiated hPSCs better than dishes in which the entire surface was coated with rhVNT-N (termed "non-patterned cultures"). Non-patterned cultures produced variable, unrestricted cell proliferation with non-uniform cell growth and uneven densities in which we observed downregulated expression of some self-renewal-related markers. Comparative flow cytometric studies of the expression of pluripotency-related molecules SSEA-3 and TRA-1-60 in hPSCs from non-patterned cultures and patterned cultures supported this concept. Patterned cultures of hPSCs allowed sequential visual inspection of every hPSC colony, giving an address and number in patterned culture dishes. Several spots could be sampled for quality control tests of production batches, thereby permitting the monitoring of hPSCs in a single culture dish. Our new patterned culture system utilizing photolithography provides a robust, reproducible and controllable cell culture system and demonstrates technological advantages for the mass production of hPSCs with process quality control. PMID:26115194

  13. Characterization of the Olfactory Receptors Expressed in Human Spermatozoa

    PubMed Central

    Flegel, Caroline; Vogel, Felix; Hofreuter, Adrian; Schreiner, Benjamin S. P.; Osthold, Sandra; Veitinger, Sophie; Becker, Christian; Brockmeyer, Norbert H.; Muschol, Michael; Wennemuth, Gunther; Altmüller, Janine; Hatt, Hanns; Gisselmann, Günter

    2016-01-01

    The detection of external cues is fundamental for human spermatozoa to locate the oocyte in the female reproductive tract. This task requires a specific chemoreceptor repertoire that is expressed on the surface of human spermatozoa, which is not fully identified to date. Olfactory receptors (ORs) are candidate molecules and have been attributed to be involved in sperm chemotaxis and chemokinesis, indicating an important role in mammalian spermatozoa. An increasing importance has been suggested for spermatozoal RNA, which led us to investigate the expression of all 387 OR genes. This study provides the first comprehensive analysis of OR transcripts in human spermatozoa of several individuals by RNA-Seq. We detected 91 different transcripts in the spermatozoa samples that could be aligned to annotated OR genes. Using stranded mRNA-Seq, we detected a class of these putative OR transcripts in an antisense orientation, indicating a different function, rather than coding for a functional OR protein. Nevertheless, we were able to detect OR proteins in various compartments of human spermatozoa, indicating distinct functions in human sperm. A panel of various OR ligands induced Ca2+ signals in human spermatozoa, which could be inhibited by mibefradil. This study indicates that a variety of ORs are expressed at the mRNA and protein level in human spermatozoa. PMID:26779489

  14. Identification and characterization of a human mitochondrial NAD kinase.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, Kazuto; Kawai, Shigeyuki; Murata, Kousaku

    2012-01-01

    NAD kinase is the sole NADP(+) biosynthetic enzyme. Despite the great significance of NADP(+), to date no mitochondrial NAD kinase has been identified in human, and the source of human mitochondrial NADP(+) remains elusive. Here we present evidence demonstrating that a human protein of unknown function, C5orf33, is a human mitochondrial NAD kinase; this protein likely represents the missing source of human mitochondrial NADP(+). The C5orf33 protein exhibits NAD kinase activity, utilizing ATP or inorganic polyphosphate, and is localized in the mitochondria of human HEK293A cells. C5orf33 mRNA is more abundant than human cytosolic NAD kinase mRNA in almost all tissues examined. We further show by database searches that some animals and protists carry C5orf33 homologues as their sole NADP(+) biosynthetic enzyme, whereas plants and fungi possess no C5orf33 homologue. These observations provide insights into eukaryotic NADP(+) biosynthesis, which has pivotal roles in cells and organelles.

  15. Scalable expansion of human induced pluripotent stem cells in the defined xeno-free E8 medium under adherent and suspension culture conditions☆

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying; Chou, Bin-Kuan; Dowey, Sarah; He, Chaoxia; Gerecht, Sharon; Cheng, Linzhao

    2015-01-01

    Large-scale production of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) by robust and economic methods has been one of the major challenges for translational realization of hiPSC technology. Here we demonstrate a scalable culture system for hiPSC expansion using the E8 chemically defined and xeno-free medium under either adherent or suspension conditions. To optimize suspension conditions guided by a computational simulation, we developed a method to efficiently expand hiPSCs as undifferentiated aggregates in spinner flasks. Serial passaging of two different hiPSC lines in the spinner flasks using the E8 medium preserved their normal karyotype and expression of undifferentiated state markers of TRA-1–60, SSEA4, OCT4, and NANOG. The hiPSCs cultured in spinner flasks for more than 10 passages not only could be remained pluripotent as indicated by in vitro and in vivo assays, but also could be efficiently induced toward mesodermal and hematopoietic differentiation. Furthermore, we established a xeno-free protocol of single-cell cryopreservation and recovery for the scalable production of hiPSCs in spinner flasks. This system is the first to enable an efficient scale-up bioprocess in completely xeno-free condition for the expansion and cryopreservation of hiPSCs with the quantity and quality compliant for clinical applications. PMID:23973800

  16. Defined Essential 8™ Medium and Vitronectin Efficiently Support Scalable Xeno-Free Expansion of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells in Stirred Microcarrier Culture Systems

    PubMed Central

    Badenes, Sara M.; Fernandes, Tiago G.; Cordeiro, Cláudia S. M.; Boucher, Shayne; Kuninger, David; Vemuri, Mohan C.; Diogo, Maria Margarida; Cabral, Joaquim M. S.

    2016-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem (hiPS) cell culture using Essential 8™ xeno-free medium and the defined xeno-free matrix vitronectin was successfully implemented under adherent conditions. This matrix was able to support hiPS cell expansion either in coated plates or on polystyrene-coated microcarriers, while maintaining hiPS cell functionality and pluripotency. Importantly, scale-up of the microcarrier-based system was accomplished using a 50 mL spinner flask, under dynamic conditions. A three-level factorial design experiment was performed to identify optimal conditions in terms of a) initial cell density b) agitation speed, and c) to maximize cell yield in spinner flask cultures. A maximum cell yield of 3.5 is achieved by inoculating 55,000 cells/cm2 of microcarrier surface area and using 44 rpm, which generates a cell density of 1.4x106 cells/mL after 10 days of culture. After dynamic culture, hiPS cells maintained their typical morphology upon re-plating, exhibited pluripotency-associated marker expression as well as tri-lineage differentiation capability, which was verified by inducing their spontaneous differentiation through embryoid body formation, and subsequent downstream differentiation to specific lineages such as neural and cardiac fates was successfully accomplished. In conclusion, a scalable, robust and cost-effective xeno-free culture system was successfully developed and implemented for the scale-up production of hiPS cells. PMID:26999816

  17. [A case of non-acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-defining lung adenocarcinoma in a multidrug-resistant human immunodeficiency virus-positive patient].

    PubMed

    Mori, Naoyoshi; Maeda, Hikaru; Fujiwara, Kentarou; Taniguchi, Haruki

    2013-10-01

    We report a case of non-acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-defining lung adenocarcinoma in a multidrug-resistant human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patient. The patient was a 47-year-old Japanese woman who received salvage combination anti-retroviral therapy with darunavir plus ritonavir plus raltegravir plus tenofovir/emtricitabine in May 2009. She was diagnosed with lung adenocarcinoma (T3N3M1, stage IV) in November 2010 and was not found to possess any activating mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor gene. Therefore, 6 courses of carboplatin plus pemetrexed and 3 courses of gemcitabine followed by erlotinib were administrated, and therapy was changed to home medical care. The only drug-related adverse event was grade 1 neutropenia, and drug interaction between the simultaneously administered anti-retroviral and chemotherapeutic agents was not confirmed. The patient battled lung adenocarcinoma for 1 year after the diagnosis and died of cancer progression in October 2011. Her performance status was stable and the CD4 (+) lymphocyte count and HIV load were well controlled throughout the course of treatment. In conclusion, the agents used for this patient show high tolerability and can be used as an effective treatment strategy for lung cancer occurring in HIV-positive patients.

  18. Defining the impact on yeast ATP synthase of two pathogenic human mitochondrial DNA mutations, T9185C and T9191C.

    PubMed

    Kabala, Anna Magdalena; Lasserre, Jean-Paul; Ackerman, Sharon H; di Rago, Jean-Paul; Kucharczyk, Roza

    2014-05-01

    Mutations in the human mitochondrial ATP6 gene encoding ATP synthase subunit a/6 (referred to as Atp6p in yeast) are at the base of neurodegenerative disorders like Neurogenic Ataxia and Retinitis Pigmentosa (NARP), Leigh syndrome (LS), Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT), and ataxia telangiectasia. In previous studies, using the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model we were able to better define how several of these mutations impact the ATP synthase. Here we report the construction of yeast models of two other ATP6 pathogenic mutations, T9185C and T9191C. The first one was reported as conferring a mild, sometimes reversible, CMT clinical phenotype; the second one has been described in a patient presenting with severe LS. We found that an equivalent of the T9185C mutation partially impaired the functioning of yeast ATP synthase, with only a 30% deficit in mitochondrial ATP production. An equivalent of the mutation T9191C had much more severe effects, with a nearly complete block in yeast Atp6p assembly and an >95% drop in the rate of ATP synthesis. These findings provide a molecular basis for the relative severities of the diseases induced by T9185C and T9191C.

  19. Characterization of cadmium uptake and cytotoxicity in human osteoblast-like MG-63 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Levesque, Martine; Martineau, Corine; Jumarie, Catherine; Moreau, Robert

    2008-09-15

    Since bone mass is maintained constant by the balance between osteoclastic bone resorption and osteoblastic bone formation, alterations in osteoblast proliferation and differentiation may disturb the equilibrium of bone remodeling. Exposure to cadmium (Cd) has been associated with the alteration of bone metabolism and the development of osteoporosis. Because little information is available about the direct effects of Cd on osteoblastic cells, we have characterized in vitro the cellular accumulation and cytotoxicity of Cd in human osteoblastic cells. Incubation of osteoblast-like MG-63 cells with increasing concentrations of Cd in serum-free culture medium reduced cell viability in a time- and concentration-dependent manner, suggesting that Cd accumulates in osteoblasts. Consequently, an uptake time-course could be characterized for the cellular accumulation of {sup 109}Cd in serum-free culture medium. In order to characterize the mechanisms of Cd uptake, experiments have been conducted under well-defined metal speciation conditions in chloride and nitrate transport media. The results revealed a preferential uptake of Cd{sup 2+} species. The cellular accumulation and cytotoxicity of Cd increased in the absence of extracellular calcium (Ca), suggesting that Cd may enter the cells in part through Ca channels. However, neither the cellular accumulation nor the cytotoxicity of Cd was modified by voltage-dependent Ca channel (VDCC) modulators or potassium-induced depolarization. Moreover, exposure conditions activating or inhibiting capacitative Ca entry (CCE) failed to modify the cellular accumulation and cytotoxicity of Cd, which excludes the involvement of canonical transient receptor potential (TRPC) channels. The cellular accumulation and cytotoxicity of Cd were reduced by 2-APB, a known inhibitor of the Mg and Ca channel TRPM7 and were increased in the absence of extracellular magnesium (Mg). The inhibition of Cd uptake by Mg and Ca was not additive, suggesting

  20. Evaluation and molecular characterization of human adenovirus in drinking water supplies: viral integrity and viability assays

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Human adenoviruses (HAdVs) are the second-leading cause of childhood gastroenteritis worldwide. This virus is commonly found in environmental waters and is very resistant to water disinfection and environmental stressors, especially UV light inactivation. Molecular techniques, such as PCR-based methods (Polymerase Chain Reaction), are commonly used to detect and identify viral contamination in water, although PCR alone does not allow the discrimination between infectious and non-infectious viral particles. A combination of cell culture and PCR has allowed detection of infectious viruses that grow slowly or fail to produce cytopathic effects (CPE) in cell culture. This study aimed to assess the integrity and viability of human adenovirus (HAdV) in environmental water and evaluate circulating strains by molecular characterization in three sites of the water supply in Florianópolis, Santa Catarina Island, Brazil: Peri Lagoon water, spring source water, and water from the public water supply system. Methods Water samples were collected, concentrated and HAdV quantified by real-time PCR. Viral integrity was evaluated by enzymatic assay (DNase I) and infectivity by plaque assay (PA) and integrated cell culture using transcribed mRNA (ICC-RT-qPCR). Samples containing particles of infectious HAdV were selected for sequencing and molecular characterization. Results The analyzed sites contained 83, 66 and 58% undamaged HAdV particles (defined as those in which the genetic material is protected by the viral capsid) at Peri Lagoon, spring source water and public supply system water, respectively. Of these, 66% of the particles (by PA) and 75% (by ICC-RT-qPCR) HAdV were shown to be infectious, due to being undamaged in Peri Lagoon, 33% (by PA) and 58% (by ICC-RT-qPCR) in spring source water and 8% (by PA) and 25% (by ICC-RT-qPCR) in the public water supply system. ICC-RT-qPCR, a very sensitive and rapid technique, was able to detect as low as 1 × 102 HAd

  1. Development and characterization of a new human hepatic cell line.

    PubMed

    Ramboer, Eva; De Craene, Bram; De Kock, Joey; Berx, Geert; Rogiers, Vera; Vanhaecke, Tamara; Vinken, Mathieu

    2015-01-01

    The increasing demand and hampered use of primary human hepatocytes for research purposes have urged scientists to search for alternative cell sources, such as immortalized hepatic cell lines. The aim of this study was to develop a human hepatic cell line using the combined overexpression of TERT and the cell cycle regulators cyclin D1 and mutant isoform CDK4R24C. Following transduction of adult human primary hepatocytes with the selected immortalization genes, cell growth was triggered and a cell line was established. When cultured under appropriate conditions, the cell line expressed several hepatocytic markers and liver-enriched transcription factors at the transcriptional and/or translational level, secreted liver-specific proteins and showed glycogen deposition. These results suggest that the immortalization strategy applied to primary human hepatocytes could generate a novel hepatic cell line that seems to retain some key hepatic characteristics. PMID:26869867

  2. Development and characterization of a new human hepatic cell line

    PubMed Central

    Ramboer, Eva; De Craene, Bram; De Kock, Joey; Berx, Geert; Rogiers, Vera; Vanhaecke, Tamara; Vinken, Mathieu

    2015-01-01

    The increasing demand and hampered use of primary human hepatocytes for research purposes have urged scientists to search for alternative cell sources, such as immortalized hepatic cell lines. The aim of this study was to develop a human hepatic cell line using the combined overexpression of TERT and the cell cycle regulators cyclin D1 and mutant isoform CDK4R24C. Following transduction of adult human primary hepatocytes with the selected immortalization genes, cell growth was triggered and a cell line was established. When cultured under appropriate conditions, the cell line expressed several hepatocytic markers and liver-enriched transcription factors at the transcriptional and/or translational level, secreted liver-specific proteins and showed glycogen deposition. These results suggest that the immortalization strategy applied to primary human hepatocytes could generate a novel hepatic cell line that seems to retain some key hepatic characteristics. PMID:26869867

  3. Cloning, characterization, and regulation of the human type II IMP dehydrogenase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Glesne, D.A.; Huberman, E. |

    1997-01-01

    Human type II inosine 5{prime}-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH, EC 1.1.1.205) is the rate-limiting enzyme in de novo guanine nucleotide biosynthesis. Regulated IMPDH activity is associated with cellular proliferation, transformation, and differentiation. The authors cloned and sequenced the entire gene for type II IMPDH and here provide details regarding the organization of the gene and the characterization of its promoter. The gene spans approximately 5 kb and is disrupted by 12 introns. The transcriptional start sites were determined by S1 nuclease mapping to be somewhat heterogeneous but predominated at 102 and 85 nucleotides from the translational initiation codon. Through the use of heterologous gene constructs and transient transfection assays, a minimal promoter from {minus}206 to {minus}85 was defined. This promoter is TATA-less and contains several transcription factor motifs including four potential Sp 1 binding sites. The minimal promoter is GC-rich (69%) and resembles a CpG island. Through the use of gel mobility shift assays, nuclear proteins were shown to specifically interact with this minimal promoter. Stable transfectants were used to demonstrate that the down-regulation of IMPDH gene expression in response to reduced cellular proliferation occurs by a transcriptional mechanism.

  4. Use of gene expression and pathway signatures to characterize the complexity of human melanoma.

    PubMed

    Freedman, Jennifer A; Tyler, Douglas S; Nevins, Joseph R; Augustine, Christina K

    2011-06-01

    A defining characteristic of most human cancers is heterogeneity, resulting from the somatic acquisition of a complex array of genetic and genomic alterations. Dissecting this heterogeneity is critical to developing an understanding of the underlying mechanisms of disease and to paving the way toward personalized treatments of the disease. We used gene expression data sets from the analysis of primary and metastatic melanomas to develop a molecular description of the heterogeneity that characterizes this disease. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering, gene set enrichment analyses, and pathway activity analyses were used to describe the genetic heterogeneity of melanomas. Patterns of gene expression that revealed two distinct classes of primary melanoma, two distinct classes of in-transit melanoma, and at least three subgroups of metastatic melanoma were identified. Expression signatures developed to predict the status of oncogenic signaling pathways were used to explore the biological basis underlying these differential patterns of expression. This analysis of activities revealed unique pathways that distinguished the primary and metastatic subgroups of melanoma. Distinct patterns of gene expression across primary, in-transit, and metastatic melanomas underline the genetic heterogeneity of this disease. This heterogeneity can be described in terms of deregulation of signaling pathways, thus increasing the knowledge of the biological features underlying individual melanomas and potentially directing therapeutic opportunities to individual patients with melanoma.

  5. Design and characterization of a novel human Granzyme B inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Marcet-Palacios, Marcelo; Ewen, Catherine; Pittman, Elliot; Duggan, Brenda; Carmine-Simmen, Katia; Fahlman, Richard P; Bleackley, R Chris

    2015-01-01

    The intracellular roles of Granzyme B (GrB) in immune-mediated cell killing have been extensively studied. Recent data also implicate GrB in extracellular pathways of inflammation, cytokine activation and autoimmunity. Targeting (GrB) provides a new pharmaceutical agent for various inflammatory disorders. Serpina3n is a mouse extracellular inhibitor of GrB. There is no apparent equivalent in humans. In this study, we used a novel applied genetics approach to engineer a new extracellular GrB serpin. A chimeric protein was generated in which the reactive center loop (RCL) of human extracellular antichymotrypsin (ACT) was replaced with that of serpina3n. This serpin contained 27 amino acid residues from the serpina3n RCL and the remaining 395 residues from human ACT. The insertion converted human ACT into a GrB-inhibitory serpin. Several critical residues were identified by scanning mutagenesis on the chimera and serpina3n. Targeted mutagenesis was conducted on wild-type human ACT by specifically substituting those critical residues, creating a novel inhibitor that contains 99.3% human ACT sequence with only three point mutations. Wild-type human ACT had a kass for GrB of 2.26 × 10(4) M(-1) s(-1), whereas the novel inhibitor binds GrB with a kass of 7.65 × 10(5) M(-1) s(-1). This new drug candidate can be developed in animal models and further tested in clinical trials to help us understand the role of GrB in numerous disorders.

  6. Identification and characterization of biomarkers of organophosphorus exposures in humans.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jerry H; Stevens, Richard C; MacCoss, Michael J; Goodlett, David R; Scherl, Alex; Richter, Rebecca J; Suzuki, Stephanie M; Furlong, Clement E

    2010-01-01

    Over 1 billion pounds of organophosphorus (OP) chemicals are manufactured worldwide each year, including 70 million pounds of pesticides sprayed in the US. Current methods to monitor environmental and occupational exposures to OPs such as chlorpyrifos (CPS) have limitations, including low specificity and sensitivity, and short time windows for detection. Biomarkers for the OP tricresyl phosphate (TCP), which can contaminate bleed air from jet engines and cause an occupational exposure of commercial airline pilots, crewmembers and passengers, have not been identified. The aim of our work has been to identify, purify, and characterize new biomarkers of OP exposure. Butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) inhibition has been a standard for monitoring OP exposure. By identifying and characterizing molecular biomarkers with longer half-lives, we should be able to clinically detect TCP and OP insecticide exposure after longer durations of time than are currently possible. Acylpeptide hydrolase (APH) is a red blood cell (RBC) cytosolic serine proteinase that removes N-acetylated amino acids from peptides and cleaves oxidized proteins. Due to its properties, it is an excellent candidate for a biomarker of exposure. We have been able to purify APH and detect inhibition by both CPS and metabolites of TCP. The 120-day lifetime of the RBC offers a much longer window for detecting exposure. The OP-modified serine conjugate in the active site tryptic peptide has been characterized by mass spectrometry. This research uses functional proteomics and enzyme activities to identify and characterize useful biomarkers of neurotoxic environmental and occupational OP exposures. PMID:20221871

  7. Measurements and Characterizations of Mechanical Properties of Human Skins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Han Wook; Park, Yon Kyu

    A skin is an indispensible organ for humans because it contributes to metabolism using its own biochemical functions and protects the human body from external stimuli. Recently, mechanical properties such as a thickness, a friction and an elastic coefficient have been used as a decision index in the skin physiology and in the skin care market due to the increased awareness of wellbeing issues. In addition, the use of mechanical properties is known to have good discrimination ability in the classification of human constitutions, which are used in the field of an alternative medicine. In this study, a system that measures mechanical properties such as a friction and an elastic coefficient is designed. The equipment consists of a load cell type (manufactured by the authors) for the measurements of a friction coefficient, a decompression tube for the measurement of an elastic coefficient. Using the proposed system, the mechanical properties of human skins from different constitutions were compared, and the relative repeatability error for measurements of mechanical properties was determined to be less than 2%. Combining the inspection results of medical doctors in the field of an alternative medicine, we could conclude that the proposed system might be applicable to a quantitative constitutional diagnosis between human constitutions within an acceptable level of uncertainty.

  8. Isolation and characterization of the human MRE11 homologue

    SciTech Connect

    Petrini, J.H.J.; Walsh, M.E.; DiMare, C.

    1995-09-01

    Mutation of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae RAD52 epistasis group gene, MRE11, blocks meiotic recombination, confers profound sensitivity to double-strand break damage, and has a hyperrecombinational phenotype in mitotic cells. We isolated a highly conserved human MRE11 homologue using a two-hybrid screen for DNA ligase I-interacting proteins. Human MRE11 shares approximately 50% identity with its yeast counterpart over the N-terminal half of the protein. MRE11 is expressed at the highest levels in proliferating tissues, but is also observed in other tissues. The MRE11 locus maps to human chromosome 11q21 in a region frequently associated with cancer-related chromosomal abnormalities. A MRE11-related locus was found on chromosome 7q11.2-q11.3. 60 refs., 4 figs.

  9. Characterization of the human p53 gene promoter

    SciTech Connect

    Tuck, S.P.; Crawford, L.

    1989-05-01

    Transcriptional deregulation of the p53 gene may play an important part in the genesis of some tumors. The authors report here an accurate determination of the transcriptional start sites of the human p53 gene and show that the majority of p53 mRNA molecules do not contain a postulated stem-loop structure at their 5' ends. Recombinant plasmids of the human p53 promoter-leader region fused to the bacterial chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene (cat) were constructed. After transfection into rodent or human cells, a 350-base-pair fragment spanning the promoter region conferred 4% of the CAT activity mediated by the simian virus 40 early promoter/enhancer. They monitored the efficiency with which 15 3' and 5' promoter deletion constructs initiated transcription. Their results show that an 85-base-pair fragment, previously thought to have resided in exon 1, is that is required for full promoter activity.

  10. Molecular Characterization of Cryptosporidium Isolates Obtained from Humans in France

    PubMed Central

    Guyot, K.; Follet-Dumoulin, A.; Lelièvre, E.; Sarfati, C.; Rabodonirina, M.; Nevez, G.; Cailliez, J. C.; Camus, D.; Dei-Cas, E.

    2001-01-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum is usually considered the agent of human cryptosporidiosis. However, only in the last few years, molecular biology-based methods have allowed the identification of Cryptosporidium species and genotypes, and only a few data are available from France. In the present work, we collected samples of whole feces from 57 patients from France (11 immunocompetent patients, 35 human immunodeficiency virus [HIV]-infected patients, 11 immunocompromised but non-HIV-infected patients) in whom Cryptosporidium oocysts were recognized by clinical laboratories. A fragment of the Cryptosporidium 18S rRNA gene encompassing the hypervariable region was amplified by PCR and sequenced. The results revealed that the majority of the patients were infected with cattle (29 of 57) or human (18 of 57) genotypes of Cryptosporidium parvum. However, a number of immunocompromised patients were infected with C. meleagridis (3 of 57), C. felis (6 of 57), or a new genotype of C. muris (1 of 57). This is the first report of the last three species of Cryptosporidium in humans in France. These results indicate that immunocompromised individuals are susceptible to a wide range of Cryptosporidium species and genotypes. PMID:11574558

  11. Characterization of the Gene Expression Profile of Human Bocavirus

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Aaron Yun; Cheng, Fang; Lou, Sai; Luo, Yong; Liu, Zhengwen; Delwart, Eric; Pintel, David; Qiu, Jianming

    2010-01-01

    We have generated a quantitative transcription profile of human bocavirus type 1 (HBoV1) by transfecting a nearly full-length clone in human lung epithelial A549 cells as well as in a replication competent system in 293 cells. The overall transcription profile of HBoV1 is similar to that of two other members of genus Bocavirus, minute virus of canines and bovine parvovirus 1. In particular, a spliced NS1-transcript that was not recognized previously expressed the large non-structural protein NS1 at approximately 100 kDa; and the NP1-encoding transcripts were expressed abundantly. In addition, the protein expression profile of human bocavirus type 2 (HBoV2) was examined in parallel by transfection of a nearly full-length clone in A549 cells, which is similar to that of HBoV1. Moreover, our results showed that, unlike human parvovirus B19 infection, expression of the HBoV1 proteins only does not induce cell cycle arrest and apoptosis of A549 cells. PMID:20457462

  12. Characterizing the radioresponse of pluripotent and multipotent human stem cells.

    PubMed

    Lan, Mary L; Acharya, Munjal M; Tran, Katherine K; Bahari-Kashani, Jessica; Patel, Neal H; Strnadel, Jan; Giedzinski, Erich; Limoli, Charles L

    2012-01-01

    The potential capability of stem cells to restore functionality to diseased or aged tissues has prompted a surge of research, but much work remains to elucidate the response of these cells to genotoxic agents. To more fully understand the impact of irradiation on different stem cell types, the present study has analyzed the radioresponse of human pluripotent and multipotent stem cells. Human embryonic stem (ES) cells, human induced pluripotent (iPS) cells, and iPS-derived human neural stem cells (iPS-hNSCs) cells were irradiated and analyzed for cell survival parameters, differentiation, DNA damage and repair and oxidative stress at various times after exposure. While irradiation led to dose-dependent reductions in survival, the fraction of surviving cells exhibited dose-dependent increases in metabolic activity. Irradiation did not preclude germ layer commitment of ES cells, but did promote neuronal differentiation. ES cells subjected to irradiation exhibited early apoptosis and inhibition of cell cycle progression, but otherwise showed normal repair of DNA double-strand breaks. Cells surviving irradiation also showed acute and persistent increases in reactive oxygen and nitrogen species that were significant at nearly all post-irradiation times analyzed. We suggest that stem cells alter their redox homeostasis to adapt to adverse conditions and that radiation-induced oxidative stress plays a role in regulating the function and fate of stem cells within tissues compromised by radiation injury.

  13. Outcomes of Interferon/Ribavirin Therapy in Patients with HCV Defined by Expression of Plasma Soluble Human Leukocyte Antigen-G but Not IL-37

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Shi-xiong; Ma, Jian-bo; Hu, Yao-ren; Hu, Ai-rong; Shen, Qiang; Gao, Guo-sheng

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection leads to life-threatening complications worldwide. Immunomodulation signals the response to virus clearance. The immune-suppressive molecule human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G) has been shown to function in inhibiting both innate and adaptive immune responses. The objective of this study was to investigate the expression of HLA-G and IL-37 in sustained virological response (SVR) and non-SVR HCV-positive patients before and after complete treatment with a combination of pegylated interferon (IFN) and ribavirin (RBV). Material/Methods Our study included 132 chronic hepatitis C patents who received combined therapy with IFN-α and RBV. Both SVR and non-SVR patients were included. The end-of-treatment response was defined as undetectable HCV RNA at week 48. Patients with end-of-treatment response were detected by HCV RNA at 24 weeks after therapy. The expression levels of HLA-G and IL-37 at the end and 24 weeks after treatment were detected by ELISA. Results Plasma HLA-G and IL-37 were significantly increased in HCV-infected patients compared with healthy individuals before treatment. Furthermore, HLA-G in SVR patients was noticeably decreased after treatment, while HLA-G in non-SVR patients had no changes after treatment. Additionally, both in SVR and non-SVR patients, the expression of IL-37 was remarkably reduced compared with baseline after treatment. Conclusions These findings suggest that elevation of HLA-G and IL-37 in HCV may play an important role in response to combined therapy with IFN-α and RBV. Monitoring the expression of HLA-G during therapy could contribute to adjusting the treatment program of HCV-infected patients. PMID:27112970

  14. Characterization of RNA isolated from eighteen different human tissues: results from a rapid human autopsy program.

    PubMed

    Walker, Douglas G; Whetzel, Alexis M; Serrano, Geidy; Sue, Lucia I; Lue, Lih-Fen; Beach, Thomas G

    2016-09-01

    Many factors affect the integrity of messenger RNA from human autopsy tissues including postmortem interval (PMI) between death and tissue preservation and the pre-mortem agonal and disease states. In this communication, we describe RNA isolation and characterization of 389 samples from 18 different tissues from elderly donors who were participants in a rapid whole-body autopsy program located in Sun City, Arizona ( www.brainandbodydonationprogram.org ). Most tissues were collected within a PMI of 2-6 h (median 3.15 h; N = 455), but for this study, tissue from cases with longer PMIs (1.25-29.25 h) were included. RNA quality was assessed by RNA integrity number (RIN) and total yield (ng RNA/mg tissue). RIN correlated with PMI for heart (r = -0.531, p = 0.009) and liver (r = -558, p = 0.0017), while RNA yield correlated with PMI for colon (r = -485, p = 0.016) and skin (r = -0.460, p = 0.031). RNAs with the lowest integrity were from skin and cervix where 22.7 and 31.4 % of samples respectively failed to produce intact RNA; by contrast all samples from esophagus, lymph node, jejunum, lung, stomach, submandibular gland and kidney produced RNA with measurable RINs. Expression levels in heart RNA of 4 common housekeeping normalization genes showed significant correlations of Ct values with RIN, but only one gene, glyceraldehyde-3 phosphate dehydrogenase, showed a correlation of Ct with PMI. There were no correlations between RIN values obtained for liver, adrenal, cervix, esophagus and lymph node and those obtained from corresponding brain samples. We show that high quality RNA can be produced from most human autopsy tissues, though with significant differences between tissues and donors. The RNA stability and yield did not depend solely on PMI; other undetermined factors are involved, but these do not include the age of the donor.

  15. Characterization of muscarinic receptor subtypes in human tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Giraldo, E.; Martos, F.; Gomez, A.; Garcia, A.; Vigano, M.A.; Ladinsky, H.; Sanchez de La Cuesta, F.

    1988-01-01

    The affinities of selective, pirenzepine and AF-DX 116, and classical, N-methylscopolamine and atropine, muscarinic cholinergic receptor antagonists were investigated in displacement binding experiments with (/sup 3/H)Pirenzepine and (/sup 3/H)N-methylscopolamine in membranes from human autoptic tissues (forebrain, cerebellum, atria, ventricle and submaxillary salivary glands). Affinity estimates of N-methylscopolamine and atropine indicated a non-selective profile. Pirenzepine showed differentiation between the M/sub 1/ neuronal receptor of the forebrain and the receptors in other tissues while AF-DX 116 clearly discriminated between muscarinic receptors of heart and glands. The results in human tissues confirm the previously described selectivity profiles of pirenzepine and AF-DX 116 in rat tissues. These findings thus reveal the presence also in man of three distinct muscarinic receptor subtypes: the neuronal M/sub 1/, the cardiac M/sub 2/ and the glandular M/sub 3/.

  16. Functional Characterization of Human Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kirsch, Authors Glenn E.; Obejero-Paz, Carlos A.; Bruening-Wright, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac toxicity is a leading contributor to late-stage attrition in the drug discovery process and to withdrawal of approved from the market. In vitro assays that enable earlier and more accurate testing for cardiac risk provide early stage predictive indicators that aid in mitigating risk. Human cardiomyocytes, the most relevant subjects for early stage testing, are severely limited in supply. But human stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (SC-hCM) are readily available from commercial sources and are increasingly used in academic research, drug discovery and safety pharmacology. As a result, SC-hCM electrophysiology has become a valuable tool to assess cardiac risk associated with drugs. This unit describes techniques for recording individual currents carried by sodium, calcium and potassium ions, as well as single cell action potentials, and impedance recordings from contracting syncytia of thousands of interconnected cells. PMID:25152802

  17. Isolation, characterization, and differentiation of human multipotent dermal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Ling; Fukunaga-Kalabis, Mizuho; Herlyn, Meenhard

    2013-01-01

    Skin, as the body's largest organ, has been extensively used to study adult stem cells. Most previous skin-related studies have focused on stem cells isolated from hair follicles and from keratinocytes. Here we present a protocol to isolate multipotent neural crest stem-like dermis-derived stem cells (termed dermal stem cells or DSCs) from human neonatal foreskins. DSCs grow like neural spheres in human embryonic stem cell medium and gain the ability to self-renew and differentiate into several cell lineages including melanocytes, neuronal cells, Schwann cells, smooth muscle cells, adipocytes, and chondrocytes. These cells express neural crest stem cell markers (NGFRp75 and nestin) as well as an embryonic stem cell marker (OCT4).

  18. Characterization of contractile adrenoceptors in the human umbilical artery.

    PubMed

    Bodelsson, G; Stjernquist, M

    1995-08-25

    Adrenoceptors mediating contraction in ring segments of human umbilical arteries from normal term pregnancies were investigated in vitro. Contraction was elicited by (order of potency indicated): noradrenaline = the alpha 2-adrenoceptor agonist oxymetazoline > the alpha 1-adrenoceptor agonist phenylephrine. The alpha 1-adrenoceptor antagonist prazosin antagonized the contraction elicited by noradrenaline and phenylephrine. The alpha 2-adrenoceptor antagonist rauwolscine antagonized the contraction elicited by noradrenaline and oxymetazoline. Oxymetazoline had an efficacy 5 times higher than that of noradrenaline and the 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor antagonist methysergide antagonized the contraction elicited by oxymetazoline. It is suggested that the contractile adrenoceptors in the human umbilical artery consist of both alpha 1 and alpha 2 subtypes. Furthermore, the contractile effect of oxymetazoline seems to be mediated via both alpha 2-adrenoceptors and 5-hydroxytryptamine receptors.

  19. Establishment and Characterization of Naïve Pluripotency in Human Embryonic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Warrier, Sharat; Popovic, Mina; Van der Jeught, Margot; Heindryckx, Björn

    2016-01-01

    Mouse embryonic stem cells are known to represent the naïve state of pluripotency, while human embryonic stem cells typically represented the primed state of pluripotency, characterized by a higher drift toward differentiation and some other disadvantages. Here we describe an efficient method for rapid, transgene free induction of the naïve pluripotent state in human by applying a novel combination of small molecules and growth factors in the culture medium (2i, LIF, basic fibroblast growth factor, ascorbic acid, and forskolin). Conversion of primed human embryonic stem cells towards the naive pluripotent state should be confirmed by a detailed characterization of the cells, as described in this chapter.

  20. Characterization of optimal resting tension in human pulmonary arteries

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Azar; Bennett, Robert T; Chaudhry, Mubarak A; Qadri, Syed S; Cowen, Mike; Morice, Alyn H; Loubani, Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    AIM To determine the optimum resting tension (ORT) for in vitro human pulmonary artery (PA) ring preparations. METHODS Pulmonary arteries were dissected from disease free sections of the resected lung in the operating theatre and tissue samples were directly sent to the laboratory in Krebs-Henseleit solution (Krebs). The pulmonary arteries were then cut into 2 mm long rings. PA rings were mounted in 25 mL organ baths or 8 mL myograph chambers containing Krebs compound (37 °C, bubbled with 21% O2: 5% CO2) to measure changes in isometric tension. The resting tension was set at 1-gram force (gf) with vessels being left static to equilibrate for duration of one hour. Baseline contractile reactions to 40 mmol/L KCl were obtained from a resting tension of 1 gf. Contractile reactions to 40 mmol/L KCl were then obtained from stepwise increases in resting tension (1.2, 1.4, 1.6, 1.8 and 2.0 gf). RESULTS Twenty PA rings of internal diameter between 2-4 mm were prepared from 4 patients. In human PA rings incrementing the tension during rest stance by 0.6 gf, up to 1.6 gf significantly augmented the 40 mmol/L KCl stimulated tension. Further enhancement of active tension by 0.4 gf, up to 2.0 gf mitigate the 40 mmol/L KCl stimulated reaction. Both Myograph and the organ bath demonstrated identical conclusions, supporting that the radial optimal resting tension for human PA ring was 1.61 g. CONCLUSION The radial optimal resting tension in our experiment is 1.61 gf (15.78 mN) for human PA rings. PMID:27721938

  1. Genetic Characterization of Simian Foamy Viruses Infecting Humans

    PubMed Central

    Rua, Réjane; Betsem, Edouard; Calattini, Sara; Saib, Ali

    2012-01-01

    Simian foamy viruses (SFVs) are retroviruses that are widespread among nonhuman primates (NHPs). SFVs actively replicate in their oral cavity and can be transmitted to humans after NHP bites, giving rise to a persistent infection even decades after primary infection. Very few data on the genetic structure of such SFVs found in humans are available. In the framework of ongoing studies searching for SFV-infected humans in south Cameroon rainforest villages, we studied 38 SFV-infected hunters whose times of infection had presumably been determined. By long-term cocultures of peripheral blood mononuclear cells with BHK-21 cells, we isolated five new SFV strains and obtained complete genomes of SFV strains from chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes troglodytes; strains BAD327 and AG15), monkey (Cercopithecus nictitans; strain AG16), and gorilla (Gorilla gorilla; strains BAK74 and BAD468). These zoonotic strains share a very high degree of similarity with their NHP counterparts and have a high degree of conservation of the genetic elements important for viral replication. Interestingly, analysis of FV DNA sequences obtained before cultivation revealed variants with deletions in both the U3 region and tas that may correlate with in vivo chronicity in humans. Genomic changes in bet (a premature stop codon) and gag were also observed. To determine if such changes were specific to zoonotic strains, we studied local SFV-infected chimpanzees and found the same genomic changes. Our study reveals that natural polymorphism of SFV strains does exist at both the intersubspecies level (gag, bet) and the intrasubspecies (U3, tas) levels but does not seem to reflect a viral adaptation specific to zoonotic SFV strains. PMID:23015714

  2. Functional characterization of genetic enzyme variations in human lipoxygenases☆

    PubMed Central

    Horn, Thomas; Reddy Kakularam, Kumar; Anton, Monika; Richter, Constanze; Reddanna, Pallu; Kuhn, Hartmut

    2013-01-01

    Mammalian lipoxygenases play a role in normal cell development and differentiation but they have also been implicated in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular, hyperproliferative and neurodegenerative diseases. As lipid peroxidizing enzymes they are involved in the regulation of cellular redox homeostasis since they produce lipid hydroperoxides, which serve as an efficient source for free radicals. There are various epidemiological correlation studies relating naturally occurring variations in the six human lipoxygenase genes (SNPs or rare mutations) to the frequency for various diseases in these individuals, but for most of the described variations no functional data are available. Employing a combined bioinformatical and enzymological strategy, which included structural modeling and experimental site-directed mutagenesis, we systematically explored the structural and functional consequences of non-synonymous genetic variations in four different human lipoxygenase genes (ALOX5, ALOX12, ALOX15, and ALOX15B) that have been identified in the human 1000 genome project. Due to a lack of a functional expression system we resigned to analyze the functionality of genetic variations in the hALOX12B and hALOXE3 gene. We found that most of the frequent non-synonymous coding SNPs are located at the enzyme surface and hardly alter the enzyme functionality. In contrast, genetic variations which affect functional important amino acid residues or lead to truncated enzyme variations (nonsense mutations) are usually rare with a global allele frequency<0.1%. This data suggest that there appears to be an evolutionary pressure on the coding regions of the lipoxygenase genes preventing the accumulation of loss-of-function variations in the human population. PMID:24282679

  3. Characterization of human kappa-casein purified by FPLC.

    PubMed

    Dev, B C; Sood, S M; DeWind, S; Slattery, C W

    1993-08-01

    Because previous purification procedures for human kappa-casein may have caused the loss of some carbohydrate, relatively gentle methods were used. The protein was isolated by a four-step procedure which included isoelectric precipitation of whole casein, gel chromatography on Sephadex G-200 in the presence of SDS, removal of the SDS with Extracti-Gel D, and FPLC chromatography on Mono Q with buffers containing 6 M urea. The purified protein was nearly identical in amino acid composition to that found earlier by amino acid analysis and peptide sequencing and a molar extinction coefficient of 11.2 +/- 0.1 was determined on the basis of amino acid analysis with a norleucine internal standard. Hydrolysis, acylation, and methylsilylation of the carbohydrate, followed by gas chromatographic analysis on a fused silica column, yielded approximately 5% fucose, 17% galactose, 18% N-acetylglucosamine, 8% N-acetylgalactosamine and 7% sialic acid, totaling almost 55% by weight. The percentages from two different donors were almost the same. About 1 mole phosphorus per mole of kappa-casein was also detected. Using low-speed sedimentation equilibrium methods, a molecular weight of only 33,400 was obtained for human kappa-casein, suggesting carbohydrate lability. Human beta-casein with four phosphoryls was stabilized against precipitation by 10 mM Ca+2 ions at a level greater than 95% when the molar ratio of kappa/beta exceeded 0.15. PMID:8361956

  4. Characterization and solubilization of the human platelet vasopressin receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Thibonnier, M.; Hinko, A.

    1986-03-01

    The authors recently showed that human platelets bear specific vasopressin (AVP) V1-vascular receptors. They now present the identification of AVP intra-platelet messenger and solubilization of AVP receptors. AVP binding to its platelet receptors is modulated by divalent cations but not TP or Gpp(NH)p, (10 /sup 3/M). AVP-induced reduction of adenylate cyclase activity is blocked by a phospholipase C inhibitor. In the presence of calcium (1 mM), AVP stimulates the phosphorylation of two endogenous proteins (M.W. = 40,000 and 20,000 daltons) which are substrates for protein kinase C and calcium calmodulin-dependent kinase, respectively. Phosphorylation is also stimulated by a V1-vascular agonist but not V2-renal agonists and is more potently blocked by a V1-vascular antagonist than by a V2-renal antagonist. AVP platelet membrane receptor is solubilized with 3-((3-cholamidopropyl)-dimethylammonio)-1-propane sulfonate. Separation of free (/sub 3/H)AVP from solubilized receptor-hormone complexes is done by filtration through polyethylenimine-treated filters. The solubilized receptor retains its binding characteristics (Kd = 11.03 +/- 1.86 nM, Bmax 288 +/- 66 fmol/mg protein, n = 6). In human platelets, AVP intra-cellular messengers are diacylglycerol and calcium, not adenylate cyclase. Solubilization of AVP human receptor opens the way to its purification.

  5. Characterization of Leuconostoc lactis strains from human sources.

    PubMed Central

    Barreau, C; Wagener, G

    1990-01-01

    An examination of 23 vancomycin-resistant, streptococcuslike isolates of clinical origin revealed a group of 14 to be related to Leuconostoc lactis (type strain, CIP 102422) on the basis of chemotaxonomic studies. These isolates were initially shown to be atypical by classical biochemical tests. However, they were characterized in particular by their polar lipid patterns by thin-layer chromatography and, additionally, by whole-cell protein patterns by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. It is feasible, therefore, that common biochemical tests may continue to serve the purpose of routine identification, even though such isolates were formerly thought to be only of dairy origin. Images PMID:2394800

  6. Polysulfone membranes coated with polymerized 3,4-dihydroxy-l-phenylalanine are a versatile and cost-effective synthetic substrate for defined long-term cultures of human pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kandasamy, Karthikeyan; Narayanan, Karthikeyan; Ni, Ming; Du, Chan; Wan, Andrew C A; Zink, Daniele

    2014-06-01

    Clinical and industrial applications of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSC) require large amounts of cells that have been expanded under defined conditions. Labor-intensive techniques and ill-defined or expensive compounds and substrates are not applicable. Here we describe a chemically defined synthetic substrate consisting of polysulfone (PSF) membranes coated with polymerized 3,4-dihydroxy-l-phenylalanine (DOPA). DOPA/PSF is inexpensive and can be easily produced at various shapes and sizes. DOPA/PSF supports long-term self-renewal of undifferentiated human embryonic (hESC) and human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC) under defined conditions. Pluripotency is maintained for at least 10 passages. Adhesion of hPSC to DOPA/PSF is mainly mediated by a specific integrin heterodimer. Proliferation and gene expression patterns on DOPA/PSF and control substrates are comparable. Labor-intensive cultivation methods and use of serum or coating with proteins are not required. Together, these features make DOPA/PSF attractive for applications where large-scale expansion of human pluripotent stem cells under defined conditions is essential. PMID:24762265

  7. Expression and preliminary characterization of human MICU2

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dan; Wu, Wenping; Pei, Hairun; Wei, Qiang; Yang, Qingzhan; Zheng, Jimin

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT MICU2 has been reported to interact with MICU1 and participate in the regulation of mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake, although the molecular determinants underlying the function of MICU2 is unknown. In order to characterize MICU2 we screened a series of N-terminal and C-terminal truncations and obtained constructs which can be expressed in abundance, giving rise to soluble samples to enable subsequent characterizations. Size exclusion chromatography (SEC) and multi-angle laser light scattering (MALLS) revealed that MICU2 exists as a monomer in Ca2+-free conditions but forms a dimer in Ca2+-bound conditions. Unlike MICU1, the C-helix domain of MICU2 exhibits no influence on protein conformation in both Ca2+-free and Ca2+-bound forms. Furthermore, mutation of the first EF-hand abolishes the ability of MICU2 to switch to a dimer in the presence of Ca2+, indicating that the first EF-hand is not only involved in Ca2+ binding but also in conformational change. Our pull-down and co-immunoprecipitation assays suggest that, in addition to disulfide bonds, salt bridges also contribute to MICU1-MICU2 heterodimer formation. PMID:27334695

  8. Expression and preliminary characterization of human MICU2.

    PubMed

    Li, Dan; Wu, Wenping; Pei, Hairun; Wei, Qiang; Yang, Qingzhan; Zheng, Jimin; Jia, Zongchao

    2016-01-01

    MICU2 has been reported to interact with MICU1 and participate in the regulation of mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake, although the molecular determinants underlying the function of MICU2 is unknown. In order to characterize MICU2 we screened a series of N-terminal and C-terminal truncations and obtained constructs which can be expressed in abundance, giving rise to soluble samples to enable subsequent characterizations. Size exclusion chromatography (SEC) and multi-angle laser light scattering (MALLS) revealed that MICU2 exists as a monomer in Ca(2+)-free conditions but forms a dimer in Ca(2+)-bound conditions. Unlike MICU1, the C-helix domain of MICU2 exhibits no influence on protein conformation in both Ca(2+)-free and Ca(2+)-bound forms. Furthermore, mutation of the first EF-hand abolishes the ability of MICU2 to switch to a dimer in the presence of Ca(2+), indicating that the first EF-hand is not only involved in Ca(2+) binding but also in conformational change. Our pull-down and co-immunoprecipitation assays suggest that, in addition to disulfide bonds, salt bridges also contribute to MICU1-MICU2 heterodimer formation. PMID:27334695

  9. Characterization of human sperm surface antigens with monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Wolf, D P; Sokoloski, J E; Dandekar, P; Bechtol, K B

    1983-10-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (McAb) against human ejaculated sperm were developed from mice immunized with sperm membrane preparations. A solid-phase radioimmunoassay, with dried sperm as antigen, was employed in McAb screening. The tissue and species specificity of monoclonal antibodies HS 2, 4 and 6 were evaluated after absorption of antibody preparations with heterologous sperm, human serum or seminal plasma or cells from other human organs. The sensitivity of HS 2, 4 and 6 antigens to trypsin exposure was determined: HS 4 antigen was highly sensitive while HS 2 and 6 were not. The regional distribution of McAb 4 on intact sperm cells was determined by immunofluorescence staining. HS 4 may be a sperm-coating antigen based on its presence on sperm and in seminal plasma. This possibility led to an investigation of its role in sperm capacitation. HS 4 antibody binding was reduced when capacitated sperm were compared with noncapacitated cells. HS 4 antibody, when present during capacitation and insemination, was without effect on sperm motility or fusion with zona-free hamster eggs. Trypsin removal of as much as 60% of HS 4 antigen from the cell population also did not impact on sperm function. To identify the molecular correlate of HS 4 antigen, membrane components were extracted from washed sperm with Nonidet P-40, concentrated by acetone precipitation and analyzed electrophoretically in SDS-urea on 10% polyacrylamide slab gels. Immunoassays on protein blots with peroxidase-coupled second antibody identified a single reactive species in the molecular weight range of 130,000. Multiple reactive components were detected in blot transfers of seminal plasma.

  10. Generation and characterization of human heme oxygenase-1 transgenic pigs.

    PubMed

    Yeom, Hye-Jung; Koo, Ok Jae; Yang, Jaeseok; Cho, Bumrae; Hwang, Jong-Ik; Park, Sol Ji; Hurh, Sunghoon; Kim, Hwajung; Lee, Eun Mi; Ro, Han; Kang, Jung Taek; Kim, Su Jin; Won, Jae-Kyung; O'Connell, Philip J; Kim, Hyunil; Surh, Charles D; Lee, Byeong-Chun; Ahn, Curie

    2012-01-01

    Xenotransplantation using transgenic pigs as an organ source is a promising strategy to overcome shortage of human organ for transplantation. Various genetic modifications have been tried to ameliorate xenograft rejection. In the present study we assessed effect of transgenic expression of human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1), an inducible protein capable of cytoprotection by scavenging reactive oxygen species and preventing apoptosis caused by cellular stress during inflammatory processes, in neonatal porcine islet-like cluster cells (NPCCs). Transduction of NPCCs with adenovirus containing hHO-1 gene significantly reduced apoptosis compared with the GFP-expressing adenovirus control after treatment with either hydrogen peroxide or hTNF-α and cycloheximide. These protective effects were diminished by co-treatment of hHO-1 antagonist, Zinc protoporphyrin IX. We also generated transgenic pigs expressing hHO-1 and analyzed expression and function of the transgene. Human HO-1 was expressed in most tissues, including the heart, kidney, lung, pancreas, spleen and skin, however, expression levels and patterns of the hHO-1 gene are not consistent in each organ. We isolate fibroblast from transgenic pigs to analyze protective effect of the hHO-1. As expected, fibroblasts derived from the hHO-1 transgenic pigs were significantly resistant to both hydrogen peroxide damage and hTNF-α and cycloheximide-mediated apoptosis when compared with wild-type fibroblasts. Furthermore, induction of RANTES in response to hTNF-α or LPS was significantly decreased in fibroblasts obtained from the hHO-1 transgenic pigs. These findings suggest that transgenic expression of hHO-1 can protect xenografts when exposed to oxidative stresses, especially from ischemia/reperfusion injury, and/or acute rejection mediated by cytokines. Accordingly, hHO-1 could be an important candidate molecule in a multi-transgenic pig strategy for xenotransplantation.

  11. Generation and Characterization of Human Heme Oxygenase-1 Transgenic Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jaeseok; Cho, Bumrae; Hwang, Jong-Ik; Park, Sol Ji; Hurh, Sunghoon; Kim, Hwajung; Lee, Eun Mi; Ro, Han; Kang, Jung Taek; Kim, Su Jin; Won, Jae-Kyung; O'Connell, Philip J.; Kim, Hyunil; Surh, Charles D.; Lee, Byeong-Chun; Ahn, Curie

    2012-01-01

    Xenotransplantation using transgenic pigs as an organ source is a promising strategy to overcome shortage of human organ for transplantation. Various genetic modifications have been tried to ameliorate xenograft rejection. In the present study we assessed effect of transgenic expression of human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1), an inducible protein capable of cytoprotection by scavenging reactive oxygen species and preventing apoptosis caused by cellular stress during inflammatory processes, in neonatal porcine islet-like cluster cells (NPCCs). Transduction of NPCCs with adenovirus containing hHO-1 gene significantly reduced apoptosis compared with the GFP-expressing adenovirus control after treatment with either hydrogen peroxide or hTNF-α and cycloheximide. These protective effects were diminished by co-treatment of hHO-1 antagonist, Zinc protoporphyrin IX. We also generated transgenic pigs expressing hHO-1 and analyzed expression and function of the transgene. Human HO-1 was expressed in most tissues, including the heart, kidney, lung, pancreas, spleen and skin, however, expression levels and patterns of the hHO-1 gene are not consistent in each organ. We isolate fibroblast from transgenic pigs to analyze protective effect of the hHO-1. As expected, fibroblasts derived from the hHO-1 transgenic pigs were significantly resistant to both hydrogen peroxide damage and hTNF-α and cycloheximide-mediated apoptosis when compared with wild-type fibroblasts. Furthermore, induction of RANTES in response to hTNF-α or LPS was significantly decreased in fibroblasts obtained from the hHO-1 transgenic pigs. These findings suggest that transgenic expression of hHO-1 can protect xenografts when exposed to oxidative stresses, especially from ischemia/reperfusion injury, and/or acute rejection mediated by cytokines. Accordingly, hHO-1 could be an important candidate molecule in a multi-transgenic pig strategy for xenotransplantation. PMID:23071605

  12. Functional Characterization of Cholera Toxin Inhibitors Using Human Intestinal Organoids.

    PubMed

    Zomer-van Ommen, Domenique D; Pukin, Aliaksei V; Fu, Ou; Quarles van Ufford, Linda H C; Janssens, Hettie M; Beekman, Jeffrey M; Pieters, Roland J

    2016-07-28

    Preclinical drug testing in primary human cell models that recapitulate disease can significantly reduce animal experimentation and time-to-the-clinic. We used intestinal organoids to quantitatively study the potency of multivalent cholera toxin inhibitors. The method enabled the determination of IC50 values over a wide range of potencies (15 pM to 9 mM). The results indicate for the first time that an organoid-based swelling assay is a useful preclinical method to evaluate inhibitor potencies of drugs that target pathogen-derived toxins. PMID:27347611

  13. Defining the Anthropocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Simon; Maslin, Mark

    2016-04-01

    Time is divided by geologists according to marked shifts in Earth's state. Recent global environmental changes suggest that Earth may have entered a new human-dominated geological epoch, the Anthropocene. Should the Anthropocene - the idea that human activity is a force acting upon the Earth system in ways that mean that Earth will be altered for millions of years - be defined as a geological time-unit at the level of an Epoch? Here we appraise the data to assess such claims, first in terms of changes to the Earth system, with particular focus on very long-lived impacts, as Epochs typically last millions of years. Can Earth really be said to be in transition from one state to another? Secondly, we then consider the formal criteria used to define geological time-units and move forward through time examining whether currently available evidence passes typical geological time-unit evidence thresholds. We suggest two time periods likely fit the criteria (1) the aftermath of the interlinking of the Old and New Worlds, which moved species across continents and ocean basins worldwide, a geologically unprecedented and permanent change, which is also the globally synchronous coolest part of the Little Ice Age (in Earth system terms), and the beginning of global trade and a new socio-economic "world system" (in historical terms), marked as a golden spike by a temporary drop in atmospheric CO2, centred on 1610 CE; and (2) the aftermath of the Second World War, when many global environmental changes accelerated and novel long-lived materials were increasingly manufactured, known as the Great Acceleration (in Earth system terms) and the beginning of the Cold War (in historical terms), marked as a golden spike by the peak in radionuclide fallout in 1964. We finish by noting that the Anthropocene debate is politically loaded, thus transparency in the presentation of evidence is essential if a formal definition of the Anthropocene is to avoid becoming a debate about bias. The

  14. Characterization of Human Bone Alkaline Phosphatase in Pichia Pastoris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malone, Christine C.; Ciszak, Eva; Karr, Laurel J.

    1999-01-01

    A soluble form of human bone alkaline phosphatase has been expressed in a recombinant strain of the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris. We constructed a plasmid containing cDNA encoding for human bone alkaline phosphatase, with the hydrophobic carboxyl terminal portion deleted. Alkaline phosphatase was secreted into the medium to a level of 32mg/L when cultured in shake flasks, and enzyme activity was 12U/mg, as measured by a spectrophotometric assay. By conversion to a fermentation system, a yield of 880mg/L has been achieved with an enzyme activity of 968U/mg. By gel electrophoresis analysis, it appears that greater than 50% of the total protein in the fermentation media is alkaline phosphatase. Although purification procedures are not yet completely optimized, they are expected to include filtration, ion exchange and affinity chromatography. Our presentation will focus on the purification and crystallization results up to the time of the conference. Structural data should provide additional information on the role of alkaline phosphatase in normal bone mineralization and in certain bone mineralization anomalies.

  15. Identification and characterization of essential genes in the human genome

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tim; Birsoy, Kıvanç; Hughes, Nicholas W.; Krupczak, Kevin M.; Post, Yorick; Wei, Jenny J.; Lander, Eric S.; Sabatini, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Large-scale genetic analysis of lethal phenotypes has elucidated the molecular underpinnings of many biological processes. Using the bacterial clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) system, we constructed a genome-wide single-guide RNA (sgRNA) library to screen for genes required for proliferation and survival in a human cancer cell line. Our screen revealed the set of cell-essential genes, which was validated by an orthogonal gene-trap-based screen and comparison with yeast gene knockouts. This set is enriched for genes that encode components of fundamental pathways, are expressed at high levels, and contain few inactivating polymorphisms in the human population. We also uncovered a large group of uncharacterized genes involved in RNA processing, a number of whose products localize to the nucleolus. Lastly, screens in additional cell lines showed a high degree of overlap in gene essentiality, but also revealed differences specific to each cell line and cancer type that reflect the developmental origin, oncogenic drivers, paralogous gene expression pattern, and chromosomal structure of each line. These results demonstrate the power of CRISPR-based screens and suggest a general strategy for identifying liabilities in cancer cells. PMID:26472758

  16. Proteomic characterization of the human FTSJ3 preribosomal complexes.

    PubMed

    Simabuco, Fernando M; Morello, Luis G; Aragão, Annelize Zambon Barbosa; Paes Leme, Adriana Franco; Zanchin, Nilson I T

    2012-06-01

    In eukaryotes, ribosome biogenesis involves excision of transcribed spacer sequences from the preribosomal RNA, base and ribose covalent modification at specific sites, assembly of ribosomal proteins, and transport of subunits from the nucleolus to the cytoplasm where mature ribosomes engage in mRNA translation. The biochemical reactions throughout ribosome synthesis are mediated by factors that associate transiently to the preribosomal complexes. In this work, we describe the complexes containing the human protein FTSJ3. This protein functions in association with NIP7 in ribosome synthesis and contains a putative RNA-methyl-transferase domain (FtsJ) in the N-terminal region and two uncharacterized domains in the central (DUF3381) and C-terminal (Spb1_C) regions. FLAG-tagged FTSJ3 coimmunoprecipitates both RPS and RPL proteins, ribosome synthesis factors, and proteins whose function in ribosome synthesis has not been demonstrated yet. A similar set of proteins coimmunoprecipitates with the Spb1_C domain, suggesting that FTSJ3 interaction with the preribosome complexes is mediated by the Spb1_C domain. Approximately 50% of the components of FTSJ3 complexes are shared by complexes described for RPS19, Par14, nucleolin, and NOP56. A significant number of factors are also found in complexes described for nucleophosmin, SBDS, ISG20L2, and NIP7. These findings provide information on the dynamics of preribosome complexes in human cells.

  17. Characterization of ROP18 alleles in human toxoplasmosis.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Víctor; de-la-Torre, Alejandra; Gómez-Marín, Jorge Enrique

    2014-04-01

    The role of the virulent gene ROP18 polymorphisms is not known in human toxoplasmosis. A total of 320 clinical samples were analyzed. In samples positive for ROP18 gene, we determined by an allele specific PCR, if patients got the upstream insertion positive ROP18 sequence Toxoplasma strain (mouse avirulent strain) or the upstream insertion negative ROP18 sequence Toxoplasma strain (mouse virulent strain). We designed an ELISA assay for antibodies against ROP18 derived peptides from the three major clonal lineages of Toxoplasma. 20 clinical samples were of quality for ROP18 allele analysis. In patients with ocular toxoplasmosis, a higher inflammatory reaction on eye was associated to a PCR negative result for the upstream region of ROP18. 23.3%, 33% and 16.6% of serums from individuals with ocular toxoplasmosis were positive for type I, type II and type III ROP18 derived peptides, respectively but this assay was affected by cross reaction. The absence of Toxoplasma ROP18 promoter insertion sequence in ocular toxoplasmosis was correlated with severe ocular inflammatory response. Determination of antibodies against ROP18 protein was not useful for serotyping in human toxoplasmosis.

  18. Proteogenomic characterization of human colon and rectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Bing; Wang, Jing; Wang, Xiaojing; Zhu, Jing; Liu, Qi; Shi, Zhiao; Chambers, Matthew C.; Zimmerman, Lisa J.; Shaddox, Kent F.; Kim, Sangtae; Davies, Sherri; Wang, Sean; Wang, Pei; Kinsinger, Christopher; Rivers, Robert; Rodriguez, Henry; Townsend, Reid; Ellis, Matthew; Carr, Steven A.; Tabb, David L.; Coffey, Robert J.; Slebos, Robbert; Liebler, Daniel

    2014-09-18

    We analyzed proteomes of colon and rectal tumors previously characterized by the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and performed integrated proteogenomic analyses. Protein sequence variants encoded by somatic genomic variations displayed reduced expression compared to protein variants encoded by germline variations. mRNA transcript abundance did not reliably predict protein expression differences between tumors. Proteomics identified five protein expression subtypes, two of which were associated with the TCGA "MSI/CIMP" transcriptional subtype, but had distinct mutation and methylation patterns and associated with different clinical outcomes. Although CNAs showed strong cis- and trans-effects on mRNA expression, relatively few of these extend to the protein level. Thus, proteomics data enabled prioritization of candidate driver genes. Our analyses identified HNF4A, a novel candidate driver gene in tumors with chromosome 20q amplifications. Integrated proteogenomic analysis provides functional context to interpret genomic abnormalities and affords novel insights into cancer biology.

  19. Defining natural history: assessment of the ability of college students to aid in characterizing clinical progression of Niemann-Pick disease, type C.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jenny; Epperson, Katrina; Yanjanin, Nicole M; Albus, Jennifer; Borgenheimer, Laura; Bott, Natalie; Brennan, Erin; Castellanos, Daniel; Cheng, Melissa; Clark, Michael; Devany, Margaret; Ensslin, Courtney; Farivari, Nina; Fernando, Shanik; Gabriel, Lauren; Gallardo, Rani; Castleman, Moriah; Gutierrez, Olimpia; Herschel, Allison; Hodge, Sarah; Horst, Anne; Howard, Mary; James, Evan; Jones, Lindsey; Kearns, Mary; Kelly, Mary; Kim, Christine; Kiser, Kinzie; Klazura, Gregory; Knoedler, Chris; Kolbus, Emily; Lange, Lauren; Lee, Joan; Li, Eileena; Lu, Wei; Luttrell, Andrew; Ly, Emily; McKeough, Katherine; McSorley, Brianna; Miller, Catherine; Mitchell, Sean; Moon, Abbey; Moser, Kevin; O'Brien, Shane; Olivieri, Paula; Patzwahl, Aaron; Pereira, Marie; Pymento, Craig; Ramelb, Erin; Ramos, Bryce; Raya, Teresa; Riney, Stephen; Roberts, Geoff; Robertshaw, Mark; Rudolf, Frannie; Rund, Samuel; Sansone, Stephanie; Schwartz, Lindsay; Shay, Ryan; Siu, Edwin; Spear, Timothy; Tan, Catherine; Truong, Marisa; Uddin, Mairaj; Vantrieste, Jennifer; Veloz, Omar; White, Elizabeth; Porter, Forbes D; Haldar, Kasturi

    2011-01-01

    Niemann-Pick Disease, type C (NPC) is a fatal, neurodegenerative, lysosomal storage disorder. It is a rare disease with broad phenotypic spectrum and variable age of onset. These issues make it difficult to develop a universally accepted clinical outcome measure to assess urgently needed therapies. To this end, clinical investigators have defined emerging, disease severity scales. The average time from initial symptom to diagnosis is approximately 4 years. Further, some patients may not travel to specialized clinical centers even after diagnosis. We were therefore interested in investigating whether appropriately trained, community-based assessment of patient records could assist in defining disease progression using clinical severity scores. In this study we evolved a secure, step wise process to show that pre-existing medical records may be correctly assessed by non-clinical practitioners trained to quantify disease progression. Sixty-four undergraduate students at the University of Notre Dame were expertly trained in clinical disease assessment and recognition of major and minor symptoms of NPC. Seven clinical records, randomly selected from a total of thirty seven used to establish a leading clinical severity scale, were correctly assessed to show expected characteristics of linear disease progression. Student assessment of two new records donated by NPC families to our study also revealed linear progression of disease, but both showed accelerated disease progression, relative to the current severity scale, especially at the later stages. Together, these data suggest that college students may be trained in assessment of patient records, and thus provide insight into the natural history of a disease.

  20. Characterizing the human postural control system using detrended fluctuation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teresa Blázquez, M.; Anguiano, Marta; de Saavedra, Fernando Arias; Lallena, Antonio M.; Carpena, Pedro

    2010-01-01

    Detrended fluctuation analysis is used to study the behaviour of the time series of the position of the center of pressure, output from the activity of a human postural control system. The results suggest that these trajectories present a crossover in their scaling properties from persistent (for high frequencies, short-range time scale) to anti-persistent (for low frequencies, long-range time scale) behaviours. The values of the scaling exponent found for the persistent parts of the trajectories are very similar for all the cases analysed. The similarity of the results obtained for the measurements done with both eyes open and both eyes closed indicate either that the visual system may be disregarded by the postural control system, while maintaining quiet standing, or that the control mechanisms associated with each type of information (visual, vestibular and somatosensory) cannot be disentangled with this technique.

  1. Structural characterization of human heparanase reveals insights into substrate recognition

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Liang; Viola, Cristina M.; Brzozowski, Andrzej M.; Davies, Gideon J.

    2016-01-01

    Heparan Sulfate (HS) is a glycosaminoglycan (GAG) which forms a key component of the extracellular matrix (ECM). Breakdown of HS is carried out by heparanase (HPSE), an endo-β-glucuronidase of the glycoside hydrolase (GH)79 family. Overexpression of HPSE is strongly linked to cancer metastases - reflecting breakdown of extracellular HS and release of stored growth factors. Here we present crystal structures of human HPSE at 1.6-1.9 Å resolution reveal how an endo-acting binding cleft is exposed by proteolytic activation of latent proHPSE. Oligosaccharide complexes map the substrate-binding and sulfate recognition motifs. These data shed light on the structure and interactions for a key enzyme involved in ECM maintenance, and provide a starting point for design of HPSE inhibitors as biochemical tools and anti-cancer therapeutics. PMID:26575439

  2. In vitro characterization of patches of human mesenchymal stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Roux, Stephan; Bodivit, Gwellaouen; Bartis, Widy; Lebouvier, Angélique; Chevallier, Nathalie; Fialaire-Legendre, Anne; Bierling, Philippe; Rouard, Helene

    2015-02-01

    Stem cells may represent an excellent strategy to improve the healing of skin ulcers. Today the administration mode of stem cells to skin defects remains unsatisfactory. Delivering stem cells with topical treatments represents a new strategy and answering the patients' need. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) have been shown to improve wound healing of cutaneous lesions and amniotic membrane (AM) is known to represent a natural scaffold for cells. The aim of this study is to develop a tissue-engineered product combining MSC and AM for clinical use. In this work we investigated whether the stromal matrix of intact human AM could constitute a scaffold for human MSC derived from either bone marrow (BM) or adipose tissue (AT). For this purpose, clinical-grade AM, MSC, and culture medium were used. We performed experiments of short-term adherence and proliferation for 15 days after the seeding of the cells. Morphological aspects and secretion profiles of MSC onto AM were studied, respectively, by scanning electron microscopy and Luminex analysis. Results demonstrated that the stromal matrix allow the adherence in much greater amount of MSC from BM or AT compared to 2D material. Experiments of proliferation showed that both kinds of MSC could proliferate on the stromal matrix and remain viable 15 days after the seeding of the cells. The 3D analysis of MSC culture demonstrated that both types of MSC invaded the stromal matrix and grew in multiple layers while retaining their fibroblastic morphology. By studying the secretion profile of MSC onto the stromal matrix, we found that both kinds of MSC secrete important cytokines and growth factors for wound healing of cutaneous lesions, such as vascular endothelial growth factor, hepatocyte growth factor, and basic fibroblast growth factor. In conclusion, these results suggest that the stromal matrix of AM seeded with MSC represents a bioactive scaffold that should be evaluated in patients with a nonhealing cutaneous wound.

  3. Characterization of testis-specific isoenzyme of human pyruvate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Korotchkina, Lioubov G; Sidhu, Sukhdeep; Patel, Mulchand S

    2006-04-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH), the first component of the human pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, has two isoenzymes, somatic cell-specific PDH1 and testis-specific PDH2 with 87% sequence identity in the alpha subunit of alpha(2) beta(2) PDH. The presence of functional testis-specific PDH2 is important for sperm cells generating nearly all their energy from carbohydrates via pyruvate oxidation. Kinetic and regulatory properties of recombinant human PDH2 and PDH1 were compared in this study. Site-specific phosphorylation/dephosphorylation of the three phosphorylation sites by four PDH kinases (PDK1-4) and two PDH phosphatases (PDP1-2) were investigated by substituting serines with alanine or glutamate in PDHs. PDH2 was found to be very similar to PDH1 as follows: (i) in specific activities and kinetic parameters as determined by the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex assay; (ii) in thermostability at 37 degrees C; (iii) in the mechanism of inactivation by phosphorylation of three sites; and (iv) in the phosphorylation of sites 1 and 2 by PDK3. In contrast, the differences for PDH2 were indicated as follows: (i) by a 2.4-fold increase in binding affinity for the PDH-binding domain of dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase as measured by surface plasmon resonance; (ii) by possible involvement of Ser-264 (site 1) of PDH2 in catalysis as evident by its kinetic behavior; and (iii) by the lower activities of PDK1, PDK2, and PDK4 as well as PDP1 and PDP2 toward PDH2. These differences between PDH2 and PDH1 are less than expected from substitution of 47 amino acids in each PDH2 alpha subunit. The multiple substitutions may have compensated for any drastic alterations in PDH2 structure thereby preserving its kinetic and regulatory characteristics largely similar to that of PDH1. PMID:16436377

  4. In Vitro Characterization of Patches of Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Roux, Stephan; Bodivit, Gwellaouen; Bartis, Widy; Lebouvier, Angélique; Chevallier, Nathalie; Fialaire-Legendre, Anne; Bierling, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Stem cells may represent an excellent strategy to improve the healing of skin ulcers. Today the administration mode of stem cells to skin defects remains unsatisfactory. Delivering stem cells with topical treatments represents a new strategy and answering the patients' need. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) have been shown to improve wound healing of cutaneous lesions and amniotic membrane (AM) is known to represent a natural scaffold for cells. The aim of this study is to develop a tissue-engineered product combining MSC and AM for clinical use. In this work we investigated whether the stromal matrix of intact human AM could constitute a scaffold for human MSC derived from either bone marrow (BM) or adipose tissue (AT). For this purpose, clinical-grade AM, MSC, and culture medium were used. We performed experiments of short-term adherence and proliferation for 15 days after the seeding of the cells. Morphological aspects and secretion profiles of MSC onto AM were studied, respectively, by scanning electron microscopy and Luminex analysis. Results demonstrated that the stromal matrix allow the adherence in much greater amount of MSC from BM or AT compared to 2D material. Experiments of proliferation showed that both kinds of MSC could proliferate on the stromal matrix and remain viable 15 days after the seeding of the cells. The 3D analysis of MSC culture demonstrated that both types of MSC invaded the stromal matrix and grew in multiple layers while retaining their fibroblastic morphology. By studying the secretion profile of MSC onto the stromal matrix, we found that both kinds of MSC secrete important cytokines and growth factors for wound healing of cutaneous lesions, such as vascular endothelial growth factor, hepatocyte growth factor, and basic fibroblast growth factor. In conclusion, these results suggest that the stromal matrix of AM seeded with MSC represents a bioactive scaffold that should be evaluated in patients with a nonhealing cutaneous wound. PMID

  5. Characterization of the human ephrin-A4 promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Munthe, Else; Aasheim, Hans-Christian

    2002-01-01

    Expression of the ephrin-A4 ligand, a family member of ligands binding the Eph receptor tyrosine kinases, is induced after an antigen-receptor stimulation of lymphocytes. To understand the transcription regulation of the ephrin-A4 gene, its promoter was identified and regulating elements were characterized. The ephrin-A4 promoter contains cis elements directing the cell-specific expression. By deletion studies, three specific regions, which were contributing to the transcription activity in lymphoid cells, were localized. In one of these regions, an inverted CCAAT box was identified and shown to bind the transcription activator nuclear factor-Y (NF-Y). The importance of NF-Y binding for the ephrin-A4 promoter activity is shown by a total abrogation of promoter activity after destruction of its binding site. NF-Y binding and activity are also crucially dependent on the integrity of the surrounding sequence. In addition, electrophoretic mobility-shift assay and serial-mutation analysis of the two remaining regulating regions revealed cis regulatory elements contributing to the transcription activity of the ephrin-A4 promoter. PMID:12030849

  6. Development and characterization of a human orthotopic neuroblastoma xenograft

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Elizabeth; Shelat, Anang; Bradley, Cori; Chen, Xiang; Federico, Sara; Thiagarajan, Suresh; Shirinifard, Abbas; Bahrami, Armita; Pappo, Alberto; Qu, Chunxu; Finkelstein, David; Sablauer, Andras; Dyer, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is a pediatric cancer of the developing sympathoadrenal lineage. The tumors are known to develop from the adrenal gland or paraspinal ganglia and have molecular and cellular features of sympathetic neurons such as dense core vesicles and catecholamine production. Here we present the detailed molecular, cellular, genetic and epigenetic characterization of an orthotopic xenograft derived from a high-risk stage 4 neuroblastoma patient. Overall, the xenografted tumor retained the high risk features of the primary tumor and showed aggressive growth and metastasis in the mouse. Also, the genome was preserved with no additional copy number variations, structural variations or aneuploidy. There were 13 missense mutations identified in the xenograft that were not present in the patient’s primary tumor and there were no new nonsense mutations. None of the missense mutations acquired in the xenograft were in known cancer genes. We also demonstrate the feasibility of using the orthotopic neuroblastoma xenograft to test standard of care chemotherapy and molecular targeted therapeutics. Finally, we optimized a new approach to produce primary cultures of the neuroblastoma xenografts for high-throughput drug screening which can be used to test new combinations of therapeutic agents for neuroblastoma. PMID:25863122

  7. Human health risk characterization of petroleum coke calcining facility emissions.

    PubMed

    Singh, Davinderjit; Johnson, Giffe T; Harbison, Raymond D

    2015-12-01

    Calcining processes including handling and storage of raw petroleum coke may result in Particulate Matter (PM) and gaseous emissions. Concerns have been raised over the potential association between particulate and aerosol pollution and adverse respiratory health effects including decrements in lung function. This risk characterization evaluated the exposure concentrations of ambient air pollutants including PM10 and gaseous pollutants from a petroleum coke calciner facility. The ambient air pollutant levels were collected through monitors installed at multiple locations in the vicinity of the facility. The measured and modeled particulate levels in ambient air from the calciner facility were compared to standards protective of public health. The results indicated that exposure levels were, on occasions at sites farther from the facility, higher than the public health limit of 150 μg/m(3) 24-h average for PM10. However, the carbon fraction demonstrated that the contribution from the calciner facility was de minimis. Exposure levels of the modeled SO2, CO, NOx and PM10 concentrations were also below public health air quality standards. These results demonstrate that emissions from calcining processes involving petroleum coke, at facilities that are well controlled, are below regulatory standards and are not expected to produce a public health risk.

  8. Proteogenomic characterization of human colon and rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bing; Wang, Jing; Wang, Xiaojing; Zhu, Jing; Liu, Qi; Shi, Zhiao; Chambers, Matthew C.; Zimmerman, Lisa J.; Shaddox, Kent F.; Kim, Sangtae; Davies, Sherri R.; Wang, Sean; Wang, Pei; Kinsinger, Christopher R.; Rivers, Robert C.; Rodriguez, Henry; Townsend, R. Reid; Ellis, Matthew J.C.; Carr, Steven A.; Tabb, David L.; Coffey, Robert J.; Slebos, Robbert J.C.; Liebler, Daniel C.

    2014-01-01

    Summary We analyzed proteomes of colon and rectal tumors previously characterized by the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and performed integrated proteogenomic analyses. Somatic variants displayed reduced protein abundance compared to germline variants. mRNA transcript abundance did not reliably predict protein abundance differences between tumors. Proteomics identified five proteomic subtypes in the TCGA cohort, two of which overlapped with the TCGA “MSI/CIMP” transcriptomic subtype, but had distinct mutation, methylation, and protein expression patterns associated with different clinical outcomes. Although copy number alterations showed strong cis- and trans-effects on mRNA abundance, relatively few of these extend to the protein level. Thus, proteomics data enabled prioritization of candidate driver genes. The chromosome 20q amplicon was associated with the largest global changes at both mRNA and protein levels; proteomics data highlighted potential 20q candidates including HNF4A, TOMM34 and SRC. Integrated proteogenomic analysis provides functional context to interpret genomic abnormalities and affords a new paradigm for understanding cancer biology. PMID:25043054

  9. Molecular cytogenetic characterization of a human thyroid cancercell line

    SciTech Connect

    Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.; Tuton, Tiffany B.; Ito, Yuko; Chu, LisaW.; Lu, Chung-Mei; Baumgartner, Adolf; Zitzelsberger, Horst F.; Weier,Jingly F.

    2006-01-04

    The incidence of papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) increases significantly after exposure of the head and neck region to ionizing radiation, yet we know neither the steps involved in malignant transformation of thyroid epithelium nor the specific carcinogenic mode of action of radiation. Such increased tumor frequency became most evident in children after the 1986 nuclear accident in Chernobyl, Ukraine. In the twelve years following the accident, the average incidence of childhood PTCs (chPTC) increased over one hundred-fold compared to the rate of about 1 tumor incidence per 10{sup 6} children per year prior to 1986. To study the etiology of radiation-induced thyroid cancer, we formed an international consortium to investigate chromosomal changes and altered gene expression in cases of post-Chernobyl chPTC. Our approach is based on karyotyping of primary cultures established from chPTC specimens, establishment of cell lines and studies of genotype-phenotype relationships through high resolution chromosome analysis, DNA/cDNA micro-array studies, and mouse xenografts that test for tumorigenicity. Here, we report the application of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH)-based techniques for the molecular cytogenetic characterization of a highly tumorigenic chPTC cell line, S48TK, and its subclones. Using chromosome 9 rearrangements as an example, we describe a new approach termed ''BAC-FISH'' to rapidly delineate chromosomal breakpoints, an important step towards a better understanding of the formation of translocations and their functional consequences.

  10. Comprehensive molecular characterization of human colon and rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    2012-07-19

    To characterize somatic alterations in colorectal carcinoma, we conducted a genome-scale analysis of 276 samples, analysing exome sequence, DNA copy number, promoter methylation and messenger RNA and microRNA expression. A subset of these samples (97) underwent low-depth-of-coverage whole-genome sequencing. In total, 16% of colorectal carcinomas were found to be hypermutated: three-quarters of these had the expected high microsatellite instability, usually with hypermethylation and MLH1 silencing, and one-quarter had somatic mismatch-repair gene and polymerase ε (POLE) mutations. Excluding the hypermutated cancers, colon and rectum cancers were found to have considerably similar patterns of genomic alteration. Twenty-four genes were significantly mutated, and in addition to the expected APC, TP53, SMAD4, PIK3CA and KRAS mutations, we found frequent mutations in ARID1A, SOX9 and FAM123B. Recurrent copy-number alterations include potentially drug-targetable amplifications of ERBB2 and newly discovered amplification of IGF2. Recurrent chromosomal translocations include the fusion of NAV2 and WNT pathway member TCF7L1. Integrative analyses suggest new markers for aggressive colorectal carcinoma and an important role for MYC-directed transcriptional activation and repression. PMID:22810696

  11. Human health risk characterization of petroleum coke calcining facility emissions.

    PubMed

    Singh, Davinderjit; Johnson, Giffe T; Harbison, Raymond D

    2015-12-01

    Calcining processes including handling and storage of raw petroleum coke may result in Particulate Matter (PM) and gaseous emissions. Concerns have been raised over the potential association between particulate and aerosol pollution and adverse respiratory health effects including decrements in lung function. This risk characterization evaluated the exposure concentrations of ambient air pollutants including PM10 and gaseous pollutants from a petroleum coke calciner facility. The ambient air pollutant levels were collected through monitors installed at multiple locations in the vicinity of the facility. The measured and modeled particulate levels in ambient air from the calciner facility were compared to standards protective of public health. The results indicated that exposure levels were, on occasions at sites farther from the facility, higher than the public health limit of 150 μg/m(3) 24-h average for PM10. However, the carbon fraction demonstrated that the contribution from the calciner facility was de minimis. Exposure levels of the modeled SO2, CO, NOx and PM10 concentrations were also below public health air quality standards. These results demonstrate that emissions from calcining processes involving petroleum coke, at facilities that are well controlled, are below regulatory standards and are not expected to produce a public health risk. PMID:26520182

  12. Comprehensive Molecular Characterization of Human Colon and Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Summary To characterize somatic alterations in colorectal carcinoma (CRC), we conducted genome-scale analysis of 276 samples, analyzing exome sequence, DNA copy number, promoter methylation, mRNA and microRNA expression. A subset (97) underwent low-depth-of-coverage whole-genome sequencing. 16% of CRC have hypermutation, three quarters of which have the expected high microsatellite instability (MSI), usually with hypermethylation and MLH1 silencing, but one quarter has somatic mismatch repair gene mutations. Excluding hypermutated cancers, colon and rectum cancers have remarkably similar patterns of genomic alteration. Twenty-four genes are significantly mutated. In addition to the expected APC, TP53, SMAD4, PIK3CA and KRAS mutations, we found frequent mutations in ARID1A, SOX9, and FAM123B/WTX. Recurrent copy number alterations include potentially drug-targetable amplifications of ERBB2 and newly discovered amplification of IGF2. Recurrent chromosomal translocations include fusion of NAV2 and WNT pathway member TCF7L1. Integrative analyses suggest new markers for aggressive CRC and important role for MYC-directed transcriptional activation and repression. PMID:22810696

  13. Characterization of large structural genetic mosaicism in human autosomes.

    PubMed

    Machiela, Mitchell J; Zhou, Weiyin; Sampson, Joshua N; Dean, Michael C; Jacobs, Kevin B; Black, Amanda; Brinton, Louise A; Chang, I-Shou; Chen, Chu; Chen, Constance; Chen, Kexin; Cook, Linda S; Crous Bou, Marta; De Vivo, Immaculata; Doherty, Jennifer; Friedenreich, Christine M; Gaudet, Mia M; Haiman, Christopher A; Hankinson, Susan E; Hartge, Patricia; Henderson, Brian E; Hong, Yun-Chul; Hosgood, H Dean; Hsiung, Chao A; Hu, Wei; Hunter, David J; Jessop, Lea; Kim, Hee Nam; Kim, Yeul Hong; Kim, Young Tae; Klein, Robert; Kraft, Peter; Lan, Qing; Lin, Dongxin; Liu, Jianjun; Le Marchand, Loic; Liang, Xiaolin; Lissowska, Jolanta; Lu, Lingeng; Magliocco, Anthony M; Matsuo, Keitaro; Olson, Sara H; Orlow, Irene; Park, Jae Yong; Pooler, Loreall; Prescott, Jennifer; Rastogi, Radhai; Risch, Harvey A; Schumacher, Fredrick; Seow, Adeline; Setiawan, Veronica Wendy; Shen, Hongbing; Sheng, Xin; Shin, Min-Ho; Shu, Xiao-Ou; VanDen Berg, David; Wang, Jiu-Cun; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Wong, Maria Pik; Wu, Chen; Wu, Tangchun; Wu, Yi-Long; Xia, Lucy; Yang, Hannah P; Yang, Pan-Chyr; Zheng, Wei; Zhou, Baosen; Abnet, Christian C; Albanes, Demetrius; Aldrich, Melinda C; Amos, Christopher; Amundadottir, Laufey T; Berndt, Sonja I; Blot, William J; Bock, Cathryn H; Bracci, Paige M; Burdett, Laurie; Buring, Julie E; Butler, Mary A; Carreón, Tania; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Chung, Charles C; Cook, Michael B; Cullen, Michael; Davis, Faith G; Ding, Ti; Duell, Eric J; Epstein, Caroline G; Fan, Jin-Hu; Figueroa, Jonine D; Fraumeni, Joseph F; Freedman, Neal D; Fuchs, Charles S; Gao, Yu-Tang; Gapstur, Susan M; Patiño-Garcia, Ana; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Gaziano, J Michael; Giles, Graham G; Gillanders, Elizabeth M; Giovannucci, Edward L; Goldin, Lynn; Goldstein, Alisa M; Greene, Mark H; Hallmans, Goran; Harris, Curtis C; Henriksson, Roger; Holly, Elizabeth A; Hoover, Robert N; Hu, Nan; Hutchinson, Amy; Jenab, Mazda; Johansen, Christoffer; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Koh, Woon-Puay; Kolonel, Laurence N; Kooperberg, Charles; Krogh, Vittorio; Kurtz, Robert C; LaCroix, Andrea; Landgren, Annelie; Landi, Maria Teresa; Li, Donghui; Liao, Linda M; Malats, Nuria; McGlynn, Katherine A; McNeill, Lorna H; McWilliams, Robert R; Melin, Beatrice S; Mirabello, Lisa; Peplonska, Beata; Peters, Ulrike; Petersen, Gloria M; Prokunina-Olsson, Ludmila; Purdue, Mark; Qiao, You-Lin; Rabe, Kari G; Rajaraman, Preetha; Real, Francisco X; Riboli, Elio; Rodríguez-Santiago, Benjamín; Rothman, Nathaniel; Ruder, Avima M; Savage, Sharon A; Schwartz, Ann G; Schwartz, Kendra L; Sesso, Howard D; Severi, Gianluca; Silverman, Debra T; Spitz, Margaret R; Stevens, Victoria L; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael; Stram, Daniel; Tang, Ze-Zhong; Taylor, Philip R; Teras, Lauren R; Tobias, Geoffrey S; Viswanathan, Kala; Wacholder, Sholom; Wang, Zhaoming; Weinstein, Stephanie J; Wheeler, William; White, Emily; Wiencke, John K; Wolpin, Brian M; Wu, Xifeng; Wunder, Jay S; Yu, Kai; Zanetti, Krista A; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Ziegler, Regina G; de Andrade, Mariza; Barnes, Kathleen C; Beaty, Terri H; Bierut, Laura J; Desch, Karl C; Doheny, Kimberly F; Feenstra, Bjarke; Ginsburg, David; Heit, John A; Kang, Jae H; Laurie, Cecilia A; Li, Jun Z; Lowe, William L; Marazita, Mary L; Melbye, Mads; Mirel, Daniel B; Murray, Jeffrey C; Nelson, Sarah C; Pasquale, Louis R; Rice, Kenneth; Wiggs, Janey L; Wise, Anastasia; Tucker, Margaret; Pérez-Jurado, Luis A; Laurie, Cathy C; Caporaso, Neil E; Yeager, Meredith; Chanock, Stephen J

    2015-03-01

    Analyses of genome-wide association study (GWAS) data have revealed that detectable genetic mosaicism involving large (>2 Mb) structural autosomal alterations occurs in a fraction of individuals. We present results for a set of 24,849 genotyped individuals (total GWAS set II [TGSII]) in whom 341 large autosomal abnormalities were observed in 168 (0.68%) individuals. Merging data from the new TGSII set with data from two prior reports (the Gene-Environment Association Studies and the total GWAS set I) generated a large dataset of 127,179 individuals; we then conducted a meta-analysis to investigate the patterns of detectable autosomal mosaicism (n = 1,315 events in 925 [0.73%] individuals). Restricting to events >2 Mb in size, we observed an increase in event frequency as event size decreased. The combined results underscore that the rate of detectable mosaicism increases with age (p value = 5.5 × 10(-31)) and is higher in men (p value = 0.002) but lower in participants of African ancestry (p value = 0.003). In a subset of 47 individuals from whom serial samples were collected up to 6 years apart, complex changes were noted over time and showed an overall increase in the proportion of mosaic cells as age increased. Our large combined sample allowed for a unique ability to characterize detectable genetic mosaicism involving large structural events and strengthens the emerging evidence of non-random erosion of the genome in the aging population. PMID:25748358

  14. Characterization of large structural genetic mosaicism in human autosomes.

    PubMed

    Machiela, Mitchell J; Zhou, Weiyin; Sampson, Joshua N; Dean, Michael C; Jacobs, Kevin B; Black, Amanda; Brinton, Louise A; Chang, I-Shou; Chen, Chu; Chen, Constance; Chen, Kexin; Cook, Linda S; Crous Bou, Marta; De Vivo, Immaculata; Doherty, Jennifer; Friedenreich, Christine M; Gaudet, Mia M; Haiman, Christopher A; Hankinson, Susan E; Hartge, Patricia; Henderson, Brian E; Hong, Yun-Chul; Hosgood, H Dean; Hsiung, Chao A; Hu, Wei; Hunter, David J; Jessop, Lea; Kim, Hee Nam; Kim, Yeul Hong; Kim, Young Tae; Klein, Robert; Kraft, Peter; Lan, Qing; Lin, Dongxin; Liu, Jianjun; Le Marchand, Loic; Liang, Xiaolin; Lissowska, Jolanta; Lu, Lingeng; Magliocco, Anthony M; Matsuo, Keitaro; Olson, Sara H; Orlow, Irene; Park, Jae Yong; Pooler, Loreall; Prescott, Jennifer; Rastogi, Radhai; Risch, Harvey A; Schumacher, Fredrick; Seow, Adeline; Setiawan, Veronica Wendy; Shen, Hongbing; Sheng, Xin; Shin, Min-Ho; Shu, Xiao-Ou; VanDen Berg, David; Wang, Jiu-Cun; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Wong, Maria Pik; Wu, Chen; Wu, Tangchun; Wu, Yi-Long; Xia, Lucy; Yang, Hannah P; Yang, Pan-Chyr; Zheng, Wei; Zhou, Baosen; Abnet, Christian C; Albanes, Demetrius; Aldrich, Melinda C; Amos, Christopher; Amundadottir, Laufey T; Berndt, Sonja I; Blot, William J; Bock, Cathryn H; Bracci, Paige M; Burdett, Laurie; Buring, Julie E; Butler, Mary A; Carreón, Tania; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Chung, Charles C; Cook, Michael B; Cullen, Michael; Davis, Faith G; Ding, Ti; Duell, Eric J; Epstein, Caroline G; Fan, Jin-Hu; Figueroa, Jonine D; Fraumeni, Joseph F; Freedman, Neal D; Fuchs, Charles S; Gao, Yu-Tang; Gapstur, Susan M; Patiño-Garcia, Ana; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Gaziano, J Michael; Giles, Graham G; Gillanders, Elizabeth M; Giovannucci, Edward L; Goldin, Lynn; Goldstein, Alisa M; Greene, Mark H; Hallmans, Goran; Harris, Curtis C; Henriksson, Roger; Holly, Elizabeth A; Hoover, Robert N; Hu, Nan; Hutchinson, Amy; Jenab, Mazda; Johansen, Christoffer; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Koh, Woon-Puay; Kolonel, Laurence N; Kooperberg, Charles; Krogh, Vittorio; Kurtz, Robert C; LaCroix, Andrea; Landgren, Annelie; Landi, Maria Teresa; Li, Donghui; Liao, Linda M; Malats, Nuria; McGlynn, Katherine A; McNeill, Lorna H; McWilliams, Robert R; Melin, Beatrice S; Mirabello, Lisa; Peplonska, Beata; Peters, Ulrike; Petersen, Gloria M; Prokunina-Olsson, Ludmila; Purdue, Mark; Qiao, You-Lin; Rabe, Kari G; Rajaraman, Preetha; Real, Francisco X; Riboli, Elio; Rodríguez-Santiago, Benjamín; Rothman, Nathaniel; Ruder, Avima M; Savage, Sharon A; Schwartz, Ann G; Schwartz, Kendra L; Sesso, Howard D; Severi, Gianluca; Silverman, Debra T; Spitz, Margaret R; Stevens, Victoria L; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael; Stram, Daniel; Tang, Ze-Zhong; Taylor, Philip R; Teras, Lauren R; Tobias, Geoffrey S; Viswanathan, Kala; Wacholder, Sholom; Wang, Zhaoming; Weinstein, Stephanie J; Wheeler, William; White, Emily; Wiencke, John K; Wolpin, Brian M; Wu, Xifeng; Wunder, Jay S; Yu, Kai; Zanetti, Krista A; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Ziegler, Regina G; de Andrade, Mariza; Barnes, Kathleen C; Beaty, Terri H; Bierut, Laura J; Desch, Karl C; Doheny, Kimberly F; Feenstra, Bjarke; Ginsburg, David; Heit, John A; Kang, Jae H; Laurie, Cecilia A; Li, Jun Z; Lowe, William L; Marazita, Mary L; Melbye, Mads; Mirel, Daniel B; Murray, Jeffrey C; Nelson, Sarah C; Pasquale, Louis R; Rice, Kenneth; Wiggs, Janey L; Wise, Anastasia; Tucker, Margaret; Pérez-Jurado, Luis A; Laurie, Cathy C; Caporaso, Neil E; Yeager, Meredith; Chanock, Stephen J

    2015-03-01

    Analyses of genome-wide association study (GWAS) data have revealed that detectable genetic mosaicism involving large (>2 Mb) structural autosomal alterations occurs in a fraction of individuals. We present results for a set of 24,849 genotyped individuals (total GWAS set II [TGSII]) in whom 341 large autosomal abnormalities were observed in 168 (0.68%) individuals. Merging data from the new TGSII set with data from two prior reports (the Gene-Environment Association Studies and the total GWAS set I) generated a large dataset of 127,179 individuals; we then conducted a meta-analysis to investigate the patterns of detectable autosomal mosaicism (n = 1,315 events in 925 [0.73%] individuals). Restricting to events >2 Mb in size, we observed an increase in event frequency as event size decreased. The combined results underscore that the rate of detectable mosaicism increases with age (p value = 5.5 × 10(-31)) and is higher in men (p value = 0.002) but lower in participants of African ancestry (p value = 0.003). In a subset of 47 individuals from whom serial samples were collected up to 6 years apart, complex changes were noted over time and showed an overall increase in the proportion of mosaic cells as age increased. Our large combined sample allowed for a unique ability to characterize detectable genetic mosaicism involving large structural events and strengthens the emerging evidence of non-random erosion of the genome in the aging population.

  15. Molecular characterization of Chlamydia pneumoniae in animals and humans from Argentina: Genetic characterization of Chlamydia pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Frutos, María C; Monetti, Marina S; Mosmann, Jessica; Kiguen, Ana X; Venezuela, Fernando R; Ré, Viviana E; Cuffini, Cecilia G

    2016-10-01

    In this study, genetic diversity of Chlamydia pneumoniae was investigated and the relationships between sequences amplified of different sources, clinical conditions and geographical regions of central Argentina were established. Samples amplified were similar to human C. pneumoniae patterns and show the high clonality of the population.

  16. Molecular characterization of Chlamydia pneumoniae in animals and humans from Argentina: Genetic characterization of Chlamydia pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Frutos, María C; Monetti, Marina S; Mosmann, Jessica; Kiguen, Ana X; Venezuela, Fernando R; Ré, Viviana E; Cuffini, Cecilia G

    2016-10-01

    In this study, genetic diversity of Chlamydia pneumoniae was investigated and the relationships between sequences amplified of different sources, clinical conditions and geographical regions of central Argentina were established. Samples amplified were similar to human C. pneumoniae patterns and show the high clonality of the population. PMID:27328126

  17. Characterization of the 5'-flanking region and regulation of transcription of human BAFF-R gene.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Hongxiang; Wang, Yueguo; Wu, Xinhua; Wang, Huiming; Pu, Jiang; Ding, Weifeng; Wang, Mei; Shen, Xianjuan; Cong, Hui; Zhang, Lurong; Zhang, Mei; Ju, Shaoqing

    2010-03-01

    B-cell activating factor (BAFF) is critical for maintaining the development and homeostasis of B cells. Overexpression of BAFF is associated with autoimmune diseases and malignant B lymphoma. BAFF receptor (BAFF-R) was found to be a specific receptor of BAFF. It not only plays a significant role in splenic B-cell maturation but also works as a major mediator in BAFF-dependent costimulatory response in peripheral B and T cells. Previous studies have demonstrated that BAFF-R is related to several diseases; however, the molecular mechanism of BAFF-R genic transcription has not been clearly defined. The aim of this study was to investigate the transcriptional regulation of the BAFF-R gene. This study was designed to clone and characterize the 5'-regulatory region of the human BAFF-R gene and determine the mechanisms involved in its transcriptional regulation. In addition, the effects of interferon (IFN)-gamma and BAY11-7082 (inhibitor of nuclear factor [NF]-kappaB) on the expression and promoter activity of BAFF-R were examined. The results showed that the sequence between -1420 and +261 could be a core promoter region, and -1562 and -1420 bp harbored a transcriptive silencer. IFN-gamma promoted BAFF-R promoter activity and upregulated BAFF-R mRNA expression. BAY11-7082 (inhibitor of NF-kappaB) exhibited an inhibitory effect on BAFF-R promoter activity and downregulated BAFF-R mRNA expression. Our data provided novel evidence to clarify the mechanism of transcriptional regulation of BAFF-R and illustrated that IFN-gamma and NF-kappaB pathway were involved in regulating BAFF-R expression. Thus some BAFF-R-related diseases might be cured by blocking transcriptional regulation of BAFF-R and reducing its expression.

  18. 3D Human cartilage surface characterization by optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brill, Nicolai; Riedel, Jörn; Schmitt, Robert; Tingart, Markus; Truhn, Daniel; Pufe, Thomas; Jahr, Holger; Nebelung, Sven

    2015-10-01

    Early diagnosis and treatment of cartilage degeneration is of high clinical interest. Loss of surface integrity is considered one of the earliest and most reliable signs of degeneration, but cannot currently be evaluated objectively. Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is an arthroscopically available light-based non-destructive real-time imaging technology that allows imaging at micrometre resolutions to millimetre depths. As OCT-based surface evaluation standards remain to be defined, the present study investigated the diagnostic potential of 3D surface profile parameters in the comprehensive evaluation of cartilage degeneration. To this end, 45 cartilage samples of different degenerative grades were obtained from total knee replacements (2 males, 10 females; mean age 63.8 years), cut to standard size and imaged using a spectral-domain OCT device (Thorlabs, Germany). 3D OCT datasets of 8  ×  8, 4  ×  4 and 1  ×  1 mm (width  ×  length) were obtained and pre-processed (image adjustments, morphological filtering). Subsequent automated surface identification algorithms were used to obtain the 3D primary profiles, which were then filtered and processed using established algorithms employing ISO standards. The 3D surface profile thus obtained was used to calculate a set of 21 3D surface profile parameters, i.e. height (e.g. Sa), functional (e.g. Sk), hybrid (e.g. Sdq) and segmentation-related parameters (e.g. Spd). Samples underwent reference histological assessment according to the Degenerative Joint Disease classification. Statistical analyses included calculation of Spearman’s rho and assessment of inter-group differences using the Kruskal Wallis test. Overall, the majority of 3D surface profile parameters revealed significant degeneration-dependent differences and correlations with the exception of severe end-stage degeneration and were of distinct diagnostic value in the assessment of surface integrity. None of the 3D

  19. Fabrication and Characterization of Metal-Patterned SrCo0.9Nb0.1O3-δ Thin Film Cathodes with Well-defined Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abate, Iwnetim; Jung, Woochul; Haile, Sossina

    2013-04-01

    A major obstacle to the study of fundamental properties of candidate cathode materials is the morphological complexity of the electrode-electrolyte interface in fuel cells. This complexity prevents a true determination of the catalytic mechanisms. To address this challenge, photolithography patterning technique has been used to make considerably simplified and well-defined electrode geometries. However, the time required for such fabrication is extreme. In this work, we employ a simple shadow-mask-patterning method to fabricate a perovskite oxide-metal composite structure. First, a dense thin film of SrCo0.9Nb0.1O3(SCN) is grown on a Y0.16Zr0.84O1.92 (YSZ) single crystal substrate by pulsed laser deposition. Patterned metal layers are subsequently deposited by DC sputtering with a shadow mask. Thermal stability and electrochemical properties of the fabricated composite cathodes are investigated by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and AC impedance spectroscopy (ACIS).

  20. Fabrication and Characterization of Metal-Patterned SrCo0.9Nb0.1O3-δ Thin Film Cathodes with Well-defined Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abate, Iwnetim; Jung, Woochul; Haile, Sossina

    2014-03-01

    A major obstacle to the study of fundamental properties of candidate cathode materials is the morphological complexity of the electrode-electrolyte interface in fuel cells. This complexity prevents a true determination of the catalytic mechanisms. To address this challenge, photolithography patterning technique has been used to make considerably simplified and well-defined electrode geometries. However, the time required for such fabrication is extreme. In this work, we employ a simple shadow-mask-patterning method to fabricate a perovskite oxide-metal composite structure. First, a dense thin film of SrCo0.9Nb0.1O3(SCN) is grown on a Y0.16Zr0.84O1.92 (YSZ) single crystal substrate by pulsed laser deposition. Patterned metal layers are subsequently deposited by DC sputtering with a shadow mask. Thermal stability and electrochemical properties of the fabricated composite cathodes are investigated by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and AC impedance spectroscopy (ACIS).

  1. Fabrication and Characterization of Metal-Patterned SrCo0.9Nb0.1O3-δ Thin Film Cathodes with Well-defined Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abate, Iwnetim; Jung, Woochul; Haile, Sossina

    2013-04-01

    A major obstacle to the study of fundamental properties of candidate cathode materials is the morphological complexity of the electrode-electrolyte interface in fuel cells. This complexity prevents a true determination of the catalytic mechanisms. To address this challenge, photolithography patterning technique has been used to make considerably simplified and well-defined electrode geometries. However, the time required for such fabrication is extreme. In this work, we employ a simple shadow-mask-patterning method to fabricate a perovskite oxide-metal composite structure. First, a dense thin film of SrCo0.9Nb0.1O3(SCN) is grown on a Y0.16Zr0.84O1.92 (YSZ) single crystal substrate by pulsed laser deposition. Patterned metal layers are subsequently deposited by DC sputtering with a shadow mask. Thermal stability and electrochemical properties of the fabricated composite cathodes are investigated by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and AC impedance spectroscopy (ACIS). I would like to thank Dr.Sossina Haile,California Institute of Technology, and Minnesota State University Moorhead for giving me this opporunity.

  2. Characterization of the pivotal carbon metabolism of Streptococcus suis serotype 2 under ex vivo and chemically defined in vitro conditions by isotopologue profiling.

    PubMed

    Willenborg, Jörg; Huber, Claudia; Koczula, Anna; Lange, Birgit; Eisenreich, Wolfgang; Valentin-Weigand, Peter; Goethe, Ralph

    2015-02-27

    Streptococcus suis is a neglected zoonotic pathogen that has to adapt to the nutritional requirements in the different host niches encountered during infection and establishment of invasive diseases. To dissect the central metabolic activity of S. suis under different conditions of nutrient availability, we performed labeling experiments starting from [(13)C]glucose specimens and analyzed the resulting isotopologue patterns in amino acids of S. suis grown under in vitro and ex vivo conditions. In combination with classical growth experiments, we found that S. suis is auxotrophic for Arg, Gln/Glu, His, Leu, and Trp in chemically defined medium. De novo biosynthesis was shown for Ala, Asp, Ser, and Thr at high rates and for Gly, Lys, Phe, Tyr, and Val at moderate or low rates, respectively. Glucose degradation occurred mainly by glycolysis and to a minor extent by the pentose phosphate pathway. Furthermore, the exclusive formation of oxaloacetate by phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) carboxylation became evident from the patterns in de novo synthesized amino acids. Labeling experiments with S. suis grown ex vivo in blood or cerebrospinal fluid reflected the metabolic adaptation to these host niches with different nutrient availability; however, similar key metabolic activities were identified under these conditions. This points at the robustness of the core metabolic pathways in S. suis during the infection process. The crucial role of PEP carboxylation for growth of S. suis in the host was supported by experiments with a PEP carboxylase-deficient mutant strain in blood and cerebrospinal fluid.

  3. Iodide-mediated control of rhodium epitaxial growth on well-defined noble metal nanocrystals: synthesis, characterization, and structure-dependent catalytic properties.

    PubMed

    Sneed, Brian T; Kuo, Chun-Hong; Brodsky, Casey N; Tsung, Chia-Kuang

    2012-11-01

    Metal nanocrystals (NCs) comprising rhodium are heterogeneous catalysts for CO oxidation, NO reduction, hydrogenations, electro-oxidations, and hydroformylation reactions. It has been demonstrated that control of structure at the nanoscale can enhance the performance of a heterogeneous metal catalyst, such as Rh, but molecular-level control of NCs comprising this metal is less studied compared to gold, silver, platinum, and palladium. We report an iodide-mediated epitaxial overgrowth of Rh by using the surfaces of well-defined foreign metal crystals as substrates to direct the Rh surface structures. The epigrowth can be accomplished on different sizes, morphologies, and identities of metal substrates. The surface structures of the resulting bimetallic NCs were studied using electron microscopy, and their distinct catalytic behaviors were examined in CO stripping and the electro-oxidation of formic acid. Iodide was found to play a crucial role in the overgrowth mechanism. With the addition of iodide, the Rh epigrowth can even be achieved on gold substrates despite the rather large lattice mismatch of ~7%. Hollow Rh nanostructures have also been generated by selective etching of the core substrates. The new role of iodide in the overgrowth and the high level of control for Rh could hold the key to future nanoscale control of this important metal's architecture for use in heterogeneous catalysis.

  4. Characterization of chaotic dynamics in the human menstrual cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derry, Gregory; Derry, Paula

    2010-03-01

    The human menstrual cycle exhibits much unexplained variability, which is typically dismissed as random variation. Given the many delayed nonlinear feedbacks in the reproductive endocrine system, however, the menstrual cycle might well be a nonlinear dynamical system in a chaotic trajectory, and that this instead accounts for the observed variability. Here, we test this hypothesis by performing a time series analysis on data for 7438 menstrual cycles from 38 women in the 20-40 year age range, using the database maintained by the Tremin Research Program on Women's Health. Using phase space reconstruction techniques with a maximum embedding dimension of 6, we find appropriate scaling behavior in the correlation sums for this data, indicating low dimensional deterministic dynamics. A correlation dimension of 2.6 is measured in this scaling regime, and this result is confirmed by recalculation using the Takens estimator. These results may be interpreted as offering an approximation to the fractal dimension of a strange attractor governing the chaotic dynamics of the menstrual cycle.

  5. Quasi-linear viscoelastic characterization of human hip ligaments.

    PubMed

    Kemper, Andrew R; McNally, Craig; Smith, Byron; Duma, Stefan M

    2007-01-01

    The object of this study was to develop a quasi-linear viscoelastic model for the iliofemoral and ischiofemoral hip ligaments. In order to accomplish this, a total of 56 axial tension tests were performed on 8 bone-ligament-bone specimens prepared from 4 fresh frozen male cadavers. Each specimen went through a battery of 7 tests including a series of step-and-hold tests and load-and-unload ramp tests. The bone-ligament-bone specimens were situated so that the load from a servo-hydraulic Material Testing System would be applied on the long axis of each ligament. The reduced relaxation data was fit to a two exponential damping function while the instantaneous elastic response was fit to a power-law function. These two constituents were then combined to create a single constitutive equation for each ligament. The quasi-linear viscoelastic model presented in this study can be used to improve the biofidelity of computational models of the human hip. PMID:17487102

  6. Characterization of stress response in human retinal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Giansanti, Vincenzo; Villalpando Rodriguez, Gloria E; Savoldelli, Michelle; Gioia, Roberta; Forlino, Antonella; Mazzini, Giuliano; Pennati, Marzia; Zaffaroni, Nadia; Scovassi, Anna Ivana; Torriglia, Alicia

    2013-01-01

    The pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) involves demise of the retinal pigment epithelium and death of photoreceptors. In this article, we investigated the response of human adult retinal pigmented epithelial (ARPE-19) cells to 5-(N,N-hexamethylene)amiloride (HMA), an inhibitor of Na+/H+ exchangers. We observed that ARPE-19 cells treated with HMA are unable to activate ‘classical’ apoptosis but they succeed to activate autophagy. In the first 2 hrs of HMA exposure, autophagy is efficient in protecting cells from death. Thereafter, autophagy is impaired, as indicated by p62 accumulation, and this protective mechanism becomes the executioner of cell death. This switch in autophagy property as a function of time for a single stimulus is here shown for the first time. The activation of autophagy was observed, at a lesser extent, with etoposide, suggesting that this event might be a general response of ARPE cells to stress and the most important pathway involved in cell resistance to adverse conditions and toxic stimuli. PMID:23205553

  7. Human microbiota characterization in the course of renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Fricke, W F; Maddox, C; Song, Y; Bromberg, J S

    2014-02-01

    Recent studies demonstrate that the human microbiota, the collection of microorganisms growing on and in individuals, have numerous bidirectional interactions with the host, influencing immunity, resistance to infection, inflammation and metabolism. Little has been done to study the potential associations between microbiota composition and transplant outcome. Here, we investigated the longitudinal changes in the blood, urinary, oral and rectal microbiota of renal allograft recipients before and at 1 and 6 months after transplantation. The results showed major changes in microbiota composition as a result of the transplant episode and associated medications, and these changes persisted over time. The high interindividual variation as well as differences in response to transplantation suggested that it is unlikely that the same specific microbiota members can serve as universal diagnostic markers. Rather, longitudinal changes in each individual's microbiota have the potential to be indicative of health or disease. Use of sensitive nucleic acid-based testing showed that urine, irrespective of disease states, more often harbors a diverse microbiota than appreciated by conventional culture techniques. These results lay the groundwork to construct more comprehensive future investigations to identify microbiota characteristics that can serve as diagnostic markers for transplant health and to guide intervention strategies to improve transplant outcome.

  8. Structure and functional characterization of the atypical human kinase haspin

    PubMed Central

    Eswaran, Jeyanthy; Patnaik, Debasis; Filippakopoulos, Panagis; Wang, Fangwei; Stein, Ross L.; Murray, James W.; Higgins, Jonathan M. G.; Knapp, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    The protein kinase haspin/Gsg2 plays an important role in mitosis, where it specifically phosphorylates Thr-3 in histone H3 (H3T3). Its protein sequence is only weakly homologous to other protein kinases and lacks the highly conserved motifs normally required for kinase activity. Here we report structures of human haspin in complex with ATP and the inhibitor iodotubercidin. These structures reveal a constitutively active kinase conformation, stabilized by haspin-specific inserts. Haspin also has a highly atypical activation segment well adapted for specific recognition of the basic histone tail. Despite the lack of a DFG motif, ATP binding to haspin is similar to that in classical kinases; however, the ATP γ-phosphate forms hydrogen bonds with the conserved catalytic loop residues Asp-649 and His-651, and a His651Ala haspin mutant is inactive, suggesting a direct role for the catalytic loop in ATP recognition. Enzyme kinetic data show that haspin phosphorylates substrate peptides through a rapid equilibrium random mechanism. A detailed analysis of histone modifications in the neighborhood of H3T3 reveals that increasing methylation at Lys-4 (H3K4) strongly decreases substrate recognition, suggesting a key role of H3K4 methylation in the regulation of haspin activity. PMID:19918057

  9. Structure and functional characterization of the atypical human kinase haspin.

    PubMed

    Eswaran, Jeyanthy; Patnaik, Debasis; Filippakopoulos, Panagis; Wang, Fangwei; Stein, Ross L; Murray, James W; Higgins, Jonathan M G; Knapp, Stefan

    2009-12-01

    The protein kinase haspin/Gsg2 plays an important role in mitosis, where it specifically phosphorylates Thr-3 in histone H3 (H3T3). Its protein sequence is only weakly homologous to other protein kinases and lacks the highly conserved motifs normally required for kinase activity. Here we report structures of human haspin in complex with ATP and the inhibitor iodotubercidin. These structures reveal a constitutively active kinase conformation, stabilized by haspin-specific inserts. Haspin also has a highly atypical activation segment well adapted for specific recognition of the basic histone tail. Despite the lack of a DFG motif, ATP binding to haspin is similar to that in classical kinases; however, the ATP gamma-phosphate forms hydrogen bonds with the conserved catalytic loop residues Asp-649 and His-651, and a His651Ala haspin mutant is inactive, suggesting a direct role for the catalytic loop in ATP recognition. Enzyme kinetic data show that haspin phosphorylates substrate peptides through a rapid equilibrium random mechanism. A detailed analysis of histone modifications in the neighborhood of H3T3 reveals that increasing methylation at Lys-4 (H3K4) strongly decreases substrate recognition, suggesting a key role of H3K4 methylation in the regulation of haspin activity. PMID:19918057

  10. Peptide Characterization of Mature Fluorotic and Control Human Enamel.

    PubMed

    Lelis, Isabel Maria Porto; Molina, Gabriela F; Souza, Cláudia; Perez, Walter B; Laure, Helen J; Rosa, José C; Gerlach, Raquel F

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to high fluoride levels during amelogenesis causes enamel fluorosis. This study aimed to determine and compare the amino acid sequences in the enamel of fluorotic and control teeth. This investigation included enamel samples obtained from erupted and non-erupted third molars with either TF grade 4-6 (n=7) fluorosis or no sign of fluorosis (controls, n=7). The samples were kept frozen at -20 °C until protein extraction. Samples were etched and processed with a cocktail of proteinase inhibitors and immediately analyzed. Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization-Time-Of-Flight/Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF) followed by MASCOT search aided the peptides analysis. The more abundant peptides bore the N-terminal amelogenin sequences WYQSIRPPYP (which is specific for the X-encoded amelogenin) and MPLPPHPGHPGYINF (which does not show sexual dimorphism) were not different in control or fluorotic enamel. There was no missing proteolytic cleavage in the fluorotic samples, which suggested that the increased amount of protein described in fluorotic enamel did not stem from the decreased ability of proteinases to cleave the proteins in humans. This study showed how to successfully obtain peptide from superficial enamel. A relatively low number of teeth was sufficient to provide good data on the actual peptides found in mature enamel. PMID:27007349

  11. Characterization of the endokinins: Human tachykinins with cardiovascular activity

    PubMed Central

    Page, Nigel M.; Bell, Nicola J.; Gardiner, Sheila M.; Manyonda, Isaac T.; Brayley, Kerensa J.; Strange, Philip G.; Lowry, Philip J.

    2003-01-01

    We report four human tachykinins, endokinins A, B, C, and D (EKA–D), encoded from a single tachykinin precursor 4 gene that generates four mRNAs (α, β, γ, and δ). Tachykinin 4 gene expression was detected primarily in adrenal gland and in the placenta, where, like neurokinin B, significant amounts of EKB-like immunoreactivity were detected. EKA/B 10-mers displayed equivalent affinity for the three tachykinin receptors as substance P (SP), whereas a 32-mer N-terminal extended form of EKB was significantly more potent than EKA/B or SP. EKC/D, which possess a previously uncharacterized tachykinin motif, FQGLL-NH2, displayed low potency. EKA/B displayed identical hemodynamic effects to SP in rats, causing short-lived falls in mean arterial blood pressure associated with tachycardia, mesenteric vasoconstriction, and marked hindquarter vasodilatation. Thus, EKA/B could be the endocrine/paracrine agonists at peripheral SP receptors and there may be as yet an unidentified receptor(s) for EKC/D. PMID:12716968

  12. Peptide Characterization of Mature Fluorotic and Control Human Enamel.

    PubMed

    Lelis, Isabel Maria Porto; Molina, Gabriela F; Souza, Cláudia; Perez, Walter B; Laure, Helen J; Rosa, José C; Gerlach, Raquel F

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to high fluoride levels during amelogenesis causes enamel fluorosis. This study aimed to determine and compare the amino acid sequences in the enamel of fluorotic and control teeth. This investigation included enamel samples obtained from erupted and non-erupted third molars with either TF grade 4-6 (n=7) fluorosis or no sign of fluorosis (controls, n=7). The samples were kept frozen at -20 °C until protein extraction. Samples were etched and processed with a cocktail of proteinase inhibitors and immediately analyzed. Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization-Time-Of-Flight/Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF) followed by MASCOT search aided the peptides analysis. The more abundant peptides bore the N-terminal amelogenin sequences WYQSIRPPYP (which is specific for the X-encoded amelogenin) and MPLPPHPGHPGYINF (which does not show sexual dimorphism) were not different in control or fluorotic enamel. There was no missing proteolytic cleavage in the fluorotic samples, which suggested that the increased amount of protein described in fluorotic enamel did not stem from the decreased ability of proteinases to cleave the proteins in humans. This study showed how to successfully obtain peptide from superficial enamel. A relatively low number of teeth was sufficient to provide good data on the actual peptides found in mature enamel.

  13. Characterization of proopiomelanocortin transcripts in human nonpituitary tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Lacaze-Masmonteil, T.; De Keyzer, Y.; Luton, J.P.; Kahn, A.; Bertagna, X.

    1987-10-01

    Proopiomelanocortin (POMC), the precursor to adrenocorticotropic hormone and other related peptides, was originally identified in the corticotropic cell. Recent evidence shows that POMC products are also normally present in a variety of nonpituitary tissues. To investigate this phenomenon in humans the authors looked for the presence and characteristics of POMC transcripts in various adult tissues. Blot hybridization analysis of normal adrenal, thymus, and testis RNAs revealed a small RNA species approximately 400 nucleotides shorter than the 1200-nucleotide pituitary species. Primer extension and S1 nuclease mapping studies showed that this small RNA lacked exon 1 and exon 2 of the gene, and it corresponded to a set of at least six molecules starting 41 to 162 nucleotides downstream from the 5' end of exon 3. These RNAs appear to result from heterogeneous transcription initiation sites presumably under the control of GC box promoter sequences located in the 3' end of intron 2. They cannot encode a complete POMC molecule, and the only truncated POMC molecules that could be translated would lack a signal peptide necessary for membrane translocation and precursor processing. The use of highly sensitive S1 nuclease mapping techniques with uniformly labeled single-stranded DNA probes allowed the detection of a small but definite amount of the normal, 1200-nucleotide, mRNA species. It is suggested that it is this POMC mRNA that is responsible for the local production of all the POMC peptides.

  14. Characterization of human urinary metabolites of the antimalarial piperaquine.

    PubMed

    Tarning, J; Bergqvist, Y; Day, N P; Bergquist, J; Arvidsson, B; White, N J; Ashton, M; Lindegårdh, N

    2006-12-01

    Five metabolites of the antimalarial piperaquine (PQ) (1,3-bis-[4-(7-chloroquinolyl-4)-piperazinyl-1]-propane) have been identified and their molecular structures characterized. After a p.o. dose of dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine, urine collected over 16 h from two healthy subjects was analyzed using liquid chromatography (LC)/UV, LC/tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS), Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR)/MS, and H NMR. Five different peaks were recognized as possible metabolites [M1, 320 m/z; M2, M3, and M4, 551 m/z (PQ + 16 m/z); and M5, 567 m/z (PQ + 32 m/z)] using LC/MS/MS with gradient elution. The proposed carboxylic M1 has a theoretical monoisotopic molecular mass of 320.1166 m/z, which is in accordance with the FTICR/MS (320.1168 m/z) findings. The LC/MS/MS results also showed a 551 m/z metabolite (M2) with a distinct difference both in polarity and fragmentation pattern compared with PQ, 7-hydroxypiperaquine, and the other 551 m/z metabolites. We suggest that this is caused by N-oxidation of PQ. The results showed two metabolites (M3 and M4) with a molecular ion at 551 m/z and similar fragmentation pattern as both PQ and 7-hydroxypiperaquine; therefore, they are likely to be hydroxylated PQ metabolites. The molecular structures of M1 and M2 were also confirmed using H NMR. Urinary excretion rate in one subject suggested a terminal elimination half-life of about 53 days for M1. Assuming formation rate-limiting kinetics, this would support recent findings that the terminal elimination half-life of PQ has been underestimated previously. PMID:16956956

  15. Molecular Characterization of Staphylococcus sciuri Strains Isolated from Humans

    PubMed Central

    Couto, Isabel; Sanches, Ilda Santos; Sá-Leão, Raquel; de Lencastre, Hermínia

    2000-01-01

    We previously characterized over 100 Staphylococcus sciuri isolates, mainly of animal origin, and found that they all carried a genetic element (S. sciuri mecA) closely related to the mecA gene of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains. We also found a few isolates that carried a second copy of the gene, identical to MRSA mecA. In this work, we analyzed a collection of 28 S. sciuri strains isolated from both healthy and hospitalized individuals. This was a relatively heterogeneous group, as inferred from the different sources, places, and dates of isolation and as confirmed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis. All strains carried the S. sciuri mecA copy, sustaining our previous proposal that this element belongs to the genetic background of S. sciuri. Moreover, 46% of the strains also carried the MRSA mecA copy. Only these strains showed significant levels of resistance to beta-lactams. Strikingly, the majority of the strains carrying the additional MRSA mecA copy were obtained from healthy individuals in an antibiotic-free environment. Most of the 28 strains were resistant to penicillin, intermediately resistant to clindamycin, and susceptible to tetracycline, erythromycin, and gentamicin. Resistance to these last three antibiotics was found in some strains only. The findings reported in this work confirmed the role of S. sciuri in the evolution of the mechanism of resistance to methicillin in staphylococci and suggested that this species (like the pathogenic staphylococci) may accumulate resistance markers for several classes of antibiotics. PMID:10699009

  16. Characterization of Large Structural Genetic Mosaicism in Human Autosomes

    PubMed Central

    Machiela, Mitchell J.; Zhou, Weiyin; Sampson, Joshua N.; Dean, Michael C.; Jacobs, Kevin B.; Black, Amanda; Brinton, Louise A.; Chang, I-Shou; Chen, Chu; Chen, Constance; Chen, Kexin; Cook, Linda S.; Crous Bou, Marta; De Vivo, Immaculata; Doherty, Jennifer; Friedenreich, Christine M.; Gaudet, Mia M.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Hankinson, Susan E.; Hartge, Patricia; Henderson, Brian E.; Hong, Yun-Chul; Hosgood, H. Dean; Hsiung, Chao A.; Hu, Wei; Hunter, David J.; Jessop, Lea; Kim, Hee Nam; Kim, Yeul Hong; Kim, Young Tae; Klein, Robert; Kraft, Peter; Lan, Qing; Lin, Dongxin; Liu, Jianjun; Le Marchand, Loic; Liang, Xiaolin; Lissowska, Jolanta; Lu, Lingeng; Magliocco, Anthony M.; Matsuo, Keitaro; Olson, Sara H.; Orlow, Irene; Park, Jae Yong; Pooler, Loreall; Prescott, Jennifer; Rastogi, Radhai; Risch, Harvey A.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Seow, Adeline; Setiawan, Veronica Wendy; Shen, Hongbing; Sheng, Xin; Shin, Min-Ho; Shu, Xiao-Ou; VanDen Berg, David; Wang, Jiu-Cun; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Wong, Maria Pik; Wu, Chen; Wu, Tangchun; Wu, Yi-Long; Xia, Lucy; Yang, Hannah P.; Yang, Pan-Chyr; Zheng, Wei; Zhou, Baosen; Abnet, Christian C.; Albanes, Demetrius; Aldrich, Melinda C.; Amos, Christopher; Amundadottir, Laufey T.; Berndt, Sonja I.; Blot, William J.; Bock, Cathryn H.; Bracci, Paige M.; Burdett, Laurie; Buring, Julie E.; Butler, Mary A.; Carreón, Tania; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Chung, Charles C.; Cook, Michael B.; Cullen, Michael; Davis, Faith G.; Ding, Ti; Duell, Eric J.; Epstein, Caroline G.; Fan, Jin-Hu; Figueroa, Jonine D.; Fraumeni, Joseph F.; Freedman, Neal D.; Fuchs, Charles S.; Gao, Yu-Tang; Gapstur, Susan M.; Patiño-Garcia, Ana; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Gaziano, J. Michael; Giles, Graham G.; Gillanders, Elizabeth M.; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Goldin, Lynn; Goldstein, Alisa M.; Greene, Mark H.; Hallmans, Goran; Harris, Curtis C.; Henriksson, Roger; Holly, Elizabeth A.; Hoover, Robert N.; Hu, Nan; Hutchinson, Amy; Jenab, Mazda; Johansen, Christoffer; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Koh, Woon-Puay; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Kooperberg, Charles; Krogh, Vittorio; Kurtz, Robert C.; LaCroix, Andrea; Landgren, Annelie; Landi, Maria Teresa; Li, Donghui; Liao, Linda M.; Malats, Nuria; McGlynn, Katherine A.; McNeill, Lorna H.; McWilliams, Robert R.; Melin, Beatrice S.; Mirabello, Lisa; Peplonska, Beata; Peters, Ulrike; Petersen, Gloria M.; Prokunina-Olsson, Ludmila; Purdue, Mark; Qiao, You-Lin; Rabe, Kari G.; Rajaraman, Preetha; Real, Francisco X.; Riboli, Elio; Rodríguez-Santiago, Benjamín; Rothman, Nathaniel; Ruder, Avima M.; Savage, Sharon A.; Schwartz, Ann G.; Schwartz, Kendra L.; Sesso, Howard D.; Severi, Gianluca; Silverman, Debra T.; Spitz, Margaret R.; Stevens, Victoria L.; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael; Stram, Daniel; Tang, Ze-Zhong; Taylor, Philip R.; Teras, Lauren R.; Tobias, Geoffrey S.; Viswanathan, Kala; Wacholder, Sholom; Wang, Zhaoming; Weinstein, Stephanie J.; Wheeler, William; White, Emily; Wiencke, John K.; Wolpin, Brian M.; Wu, Xifeng; Wunder, Jay S.; Yu, Kai; Zanetti, Krista A.; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Ziegler, Regina G.; de Andrade, Mariza; Barnes, Kathleen C.; Beaty, Terri H.; Bierut, Laura J.; Desch, Karl C.; Doheny, Kimberly F.; Feenstra, Bjarke; Ginsburg, David; Heit, John A.; Kang, Jae H.; Laurie, Cecilia A.; Li, Jun Z.; Lowe, William L.; Marazita, Mary L.; Melbye, Mads; Mirel, Daniel B.; Murray, Jeffrey C.; Nelson, Sarah C.; Pasquale, Louis R.; Rice, Kenneth; Wiggs, Janey L.; Wise, Anastasia; Tucker, Margaret; Pérez-Jurado, Luis A.; Laurie, Cathy C.; Caporaso, Neil E.; Yeager, Meredith; Chanock, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    Analyses of genome-wide association study (GWAS) data have revealed that detectable genetic mosaicism involving large (>2 Mb) structural autosomal alterations occurs in a fraction of individuals. We present results for a set of 24,849 genotyped individuals (total GWAS set II [TGSII]) in whom 341 large autosomal abnormalities were observed in 168 (0.68%) individuals. Merging data from the new TGSII set with data from two prior reports (the Gene-Environment Association Studies and the total GWAS set I) generated a large dataset of 127,179 individuals; we then conducted a meta-analysis to investigate the patterns of detectable autosomal mosaicism (n = 1,315 events in 925 [0.73%] individuals). Restricting to events >2 Mb in size, we observed an increase in event frequency as event size decreased. The combined results underscore that the rate of detectable mosaicism increases with age (p value = 5.5 × 10−31) and is higher in men (p value = 0.002) but lower in participants of African ancestry (p value = 0.003). In a subset of 47 individuals from whom serial samples were collected up to 6 years apart, complex changes were noted over time and showed an overall increase in the proportion of mosaic cells as age increased. Our large combined sample allowed for a unique ability to characterize detectable genetic mosaicism involving large structural events and strengthens the emerging evidence of non-random erosion of the genome in the aging population. PMID:25748358

  17. The Identification and Characterization of Human AP Endonuclease-1 Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Ajay; Wang, Lirong; Cline, Cari J.; Xie, Zhaojun; Sobol, Robert W.; Xie, Xiang-Qun; Gold, Barry

    2012-01-01

    The repair of abasic sites that arise in DNA from hydrolytic depurination/depyrimidination of the nitrogenous bases from the sugar-phosphate backbone and the action of DNA glycosylases on deaminated, oxidized and alkylated bases is critical to cell survival. Apurinic/Apyrimidinic Endonuclease-1/Redox Effector Factor-1 (APE-1; aka, APE1/Ref-1) is responsible for the initial removal of abasic lesions as part of the base excision repair pathway. Deletion of APE-1 activity is embryonic lethal in animals and is lethal in cells. Potential inhibitors of the repair function of APE-1 were identified based upon molecular modeling of the crystal structure of the APE-1 protein. We describe the characterization of several unique nM inhibitors using two complementary biochemical screens. The most active molecules all contain a 2-methyl-4-amino-6,7-dioxolo-quinoline structure that is predicted from the modeling to anchor the compounds in the endonuclease site of the protein. The mechanism of action of the selected compounds was probed by fluorescence and competition studies, which indicate, in a specific case, direct interaction between the inhibitor and the active site of the protein. It is demonstrated that the inhibitors induce time-dependent increases in the accumulation of abasic sites in cells at levels that correlate with their potency to inhibit APE-1 endonuclease excision. The inhibitor molecules also potentiate by 5-fold the toxicity of a DNA methylating agent that creates abasic sites. The molecules represent a new class of APE-1 inhibitors that can be used to probe the biology of this critical enzyme and to sensitize resistant tumor cells to the cytotoxicity of clinically used DNA damaging anticancer drugs. PMID:22788932

  18. Human liver glucuronate 2-sulphatase. Purification, characterization and catalytic properties.

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, C; Hopwood, J J

    1989-01-01

    Human glucuronate 2-sulphatase (GAS), which is involved in the degradation of the glycosaminoglycans heparan sulphate and chondroitin 6-sulphate, was purified almost 2,000,000-fold to homogeneity in 8% yield from liver with a four-step six-column procedure, which consists of a concanavalin A-Sepharose/Blue A-agarose coupled step, a DEAE-Sephacel/octyl-Sepharose coupled step, CM-Sepharose chromatography and gel-permeation chromatography. Although more than 90% of GAS activity had a pI of greater than 7.5, other forms with pI values of 5.8, 5.3, 4.7 and less than 4.0 were also present. The pI greater than 7.5 form of GAS had a native molecular mass of 63 kDa. SDS/polyacrylamide-gel-electrophoretic analysis resulted in two polypeptide subunits of molecular mass 47 and 19.5 kDa. GAS was active towards disaccharide substrates derived from heparin [O-(beta-glucuronic acid 2-sulphate)-(1----4)-O-(2,5)-anhydro[1-3H]mannitol 6-sulphate (GSMS)] and chondroitin 6-sulphate [O-(beta-glucuronic acid 2-sulphate-(1----3)-O-(2,5)-anhydro[1-3H]talitol 6-sulphate (GSTS)]. GAS activity towards GSMS and GSTS was at pH optima of 3.2 and 3.0 respectively with apparent Km values of 0.3 and 0.6 microM respectively and corresponding Vmax values of 12.8 and 13.7 mumol/min per mg of protein respectively. Sulphate and phosphate ions are potent inhibitors of enzyme activity. Cu2+ ions stimulated, whereas EDTA inhibited enzyme activity. It was concluded that GAS is required together with a series of other exoenzyme activities in the lysosomal degradation of glycosaminoglycans containing glucuronic acid 2-sulphate residues. Images Fig. 5. PMID:2497731

  19. Micro FT-IR Characterization Of Human Lung Tumor Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedetti, Enzo; Teodori, L.; Vergamini, Piergiorgio; Trinca, M. L.; Mauro, F.; Salvati, F.; Spremolla, Giuliano

    1989-12-01

    FT-IR spectroscopy has opened up a new approach to the analytical study of cell transformation. Investigations carried out in normal and leukemic lymphocytes have evidenced an increase in DNA with respect to proteic components in neoplastic cells.(1) The evaluation of the ratio of the integrated areas(A) of the bands at 1080 cm-1 (mainly DNA) and at 1540 cm-1 (proteic components) has allowed us to establish a parameter which indicates, for values above 1.5, the neoplastic nature of cells. Recently, this approach has been applied to the study of human lung tumor cells. Several monocellular suspension procedures of the tissue fragment (mechanical and/or chemical) were tested to obtain reproducible and reliable spectra able to differentiate clearly between normal and patological cells. Chemical treatment (EDTA, Pepsin, Collagenase, etc.) produced additional bands in the spectra of the cells causing distortion of the profiles of some absorptions, and as a result, mechanical treatment was preferred. The normal and neoplastic cells homogeneously distributed by cytospin preparation on BaF2 windows were examined by means of FT-IR microscopy. An examination of several microareas of each sample yielded reproducible spectra, with values of the A 1080 cm-1 / A 1540 cm-1 parameter within a very narrow range for each sample, even if certain differences still remained among the different cases, in good agreement with the results obtained for leukemic cells.(1) The value of this parameter was found to be lower for cells isolated from the normal area of lung, than in the case of those corresponding to the tumoral area, meaning that an increase occurs in DNA with respect to the proteic components. These insights, which provide a basis to obtain indications at the molecular level, can open up new possibilities in clinical practice, in order to obtain diagnosis confirmation, to detect early stages of disease and to offer additional indications in cases of dubious interpretation.

  20. Radioimmunoassay and characterization of atrial natriuretic peptide in human plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Yandle, T.G.; Espiner, E.A.; Nicholls, M.G.; Duff, H.

    1986-07-01

    A RIA for alpha-human atrial natriuretic peptide (alpha hANP) in plasma was developed and used to study the immunoreactive components secreted by the heart and circulating in peripheral venous plasma. The assay used (125I)diiodotyrosyl-alpha hANP, purified by high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC), and a C-terminal-specific antiserum purchased from Peninsula Laboratories. Serial dilution curves of coronary sinus plasma samples were parallel with the standard curve, but significant nonparallelism was found in peripheral plasma samples of low immunoreactivity. When plasma was extracted using C-18 Sep-Pak cartridges, serial dilution curves from both coronary sinus and peripheral plasma samples were parallel to the standard curve. Although values for plasma samples assayed before and after extraction agreed closely (r = 0.99; n = 76), immunoreactive ANP in unextracted plasma was consistently greater (70-79 pmol/liter) than in extracts of plasma, suggesting non-specific interference by a component in plasma when assayed without extraction. Mean plasma immunoreactive ANP in 19 normal subjects consuming a normal salt intake was 14 +/- 1 (+/- SE) pmol/liter. In 5 normal men, increasing dietary sodium intake from 10 to 200 mmol sodium/day was associated with a 2-fold increment in ANP levels, and similar changes accompanied acute sodium loading using iv saline. Elevated values were found in patients with congestive heart failure (mean, 58 pmol/liter; range, 0-200; n = 9), chronic renal failure (mean, 118 pmol/liter; range, 30-290; n = 8), and primary aldosteronism (range, 32-90 pmol/liter; n = 3). HPLC and gel chromatographic analysis of the immunoreactive material found in coronary sinus plasma extracts showed that a large amount of the material eluted in the position of alpha hANP.

  1. Radiochemical Characterization of Algae Products Commercialized for Human Consumption.

    PubMed

    Desideri, Donatella; Cantaluppi, Chiara; Ceccotto, Federica; Meli, Maria Assunta; Roselli, Carla; Feduzi, Laura

    2016-09-01

    Natural radionuclides and Cs were determined by alpha (U, U, Th,Po,Th, and Th) and gamma spectrometry (Cs, K, Ra, Pb, and Ra via Ac) in 14 dried seaweeds commercialized for human nutrition in Italy. The study was carried out in order to provide information on the concentrations of natural and artificial radionuclides. Cesium-137 (Cs) concentrations in all analyzed samples were always <2.0 Bq kg (dry weight), while the naturally occurring radionuclide concentrations were detectable in all the samples and significantly different in the analyzed seaweeds. Potassium-40 (K) showed a mean activity of 894 Bq kg with a range of 14.1-3,256 Bq kg. The mean of activity for Po was 5.1 Bq kg with a range of 1.5-13.6 Bq kg. The mean of activity for Pb was 8.9 Bq kg with a range of 2.9-25.7 Bq kg. The mean of U and Ra activity concentration was 4.7 and 8.4 Bq kg with a range of 0.1-27.7 and 3.2-24.6 Bq kg, respectively. The mean activity concentrations for Th, Th, and Ra were 0.69, 3.0, and 6.6 Bq kg with ranges of 0.05-3.39, 0.24-15.7, and 0.5-35.6 Bq kg, respectively. Radionuclide activity concentrations were within ranges reported in the scientific literature. The committed effective dose due to all the radionuclides analyzed, from ingestion of 1 kg y of seaweeds, accounts for 0.66% of the natural radiation exposure in Italy. PMID:27472751

  2. Structural and Histone Binding Ability Characterizations of Human PWWP Domains

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Hong; Zeng, Hong; Lam, Robert; Tempel, Wolfram; Amaya, Maria F.; Xu, Chao; Dombrovski, Ludmila; Qiu, Wei; Wang, Yanming; Min, Jinrong

    2013-09-25

    The PWWP domain was first identified as a structural motif of 100-130 amino acids in the WHSC1 protein and predicted to be a protein-protein interaction domain. It belongs to the Tudor domain 'Royal Family', which consists of Tudor, chromodomain, MBT and PWWP domains. While Tudor, chromodomain and MBT domains have long been known to bind methylated histones, PWWP was shown to exhibit histone binding ability only until recently. The PWWP domain has been shown to be a DNA binding domain, but sequence analysis and previous structural studies show that the PWWP domain exhibits significant similarity to other 'Royal Family' members, implying that the PWWP domain has the potential to bind histones. In order to further explore the function of the PWWP domain, we used the protein family approach to determine the crystal structures of the PWWP domains from seven different human proteins. Our fluorescence polarization binding studies show that PWWP domains have weak histone binding ability, which is also confirmed by our NMR titration experiments. Furthermore, we determined the crystal structures of the BRPF1 PWWP domain in complex with H3K36me3, and HDGF2 PWWP domain in complex with H3K79me3 and H4K20me3. PWWP proteins constitute a new family of methyl lysine histone binders. The PWWP domain consists of three motifs: a canonical {beta}-barrel core, an insertion motif between the second and third {beta}-strands and a C-terminal {alpha}-helix bundle. Both the canonical {beta}-barrel core and the insertion motif are directly involved in histone binding. The PWWP domain has been previously shown to be a DNA binding domain. Therefore, the PWWP domain exhibits dual functions: binding both DNA and methyllysine histones.

  3. Functional characterization of EMSY gene amplification in human cancers.

    PubMed

    Wilkerson, Paul M; Dedes, Konstantin J; Wetterskog, Daniel; Mackay, Alan; Lambros, Maryou B; Mansour, Marthe; Frankum, Jessica; Lord, Christopher J; Natrajan, Rachael; Ashworth, Alan; Reis-Filho, Jorge S

    2011-09-01

    The 11q13-q14 locus is frequently amplified in human cancers, with a complex structure harbouring multiple potential oncogenic drivers. The EMSY gene has been proposed as a driver of the third core of the 11q13-q14 amplicon. This gene encodes a protein reported to be a BRCA2-binding partner, which when over-expressed would lead to impairment of BRCA2 functions and could constitute a mechanism for BRCA2 inactivation in non-hereditary breast and ovarian cancers. We hypothesized that if EMSY amplification abrogates BRCA2 functions, cells harbouring this aberration would be unable to elicit competent homologous recombination DNA repair and, therefore, may have increased sensitivity to genotoxic therapies and potent PARP inhibitors. Microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization of cell lines from distinct tumour sites, including breast, ovary, pancreas, oesophagus, lung and the oral cavity, led to the identification of 10 cell lines with EMSY amplification and 18 without. EMSY amplification was shown to correlate with EMSY mRNA levels, although not all cell lines harbouring EMSY amplification displayed EMSY mRNA or protein over-expression. RNA interference-mediated silencing of EMSY did not lead to a reduction in cell viability in tumour models harbouring EMSY amplification. Cell lines with and without EMSY amplification displayed a similar ability to elicit RAD51 foci in response to DNA damaging agents, and similar sensitivity to cisplatin and olaparib. Taken together, this suggests that EMSY is unlikely to be a driver of the 11q13-q14 amplicon and does not have a dominant role in modulating the response to agents targeting cells with defective homologous recombination.

  4. Characterization of the human gut microbiome during travelers' diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Youmans, Bonnie P; Ajami, Nadim J; Jiang, Zhi-Dong; Campbell, Frederick; Wadsworth, W Duncan; Petrosino, Joseph F; DuPont, Herbert L; Highlander, Sarah K

    2015-01-01

    Alterations in the gut microbiota are correlated with ailments such as obesity, inflammatory bowel disease, and diarrhea. Up to 60% of individuals traveling from industrialized to developing countries acquire a form of secretory diarrhea known as travelers' diarrhea (TD), and enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) and norovirus (NoV) are the leading causative pathogens. Presumably, TD alters the gut microbiome, however the effect of TD on gut communities has not been studied. We report the first analysis of bacterial gut populations associated with TD. We examined and compared the gut microbiomes of individuals who developed TD associated with ETEC, NoV, or mixed pathogens, and TD with no pathogen identified, to healthy travelers. We observed a signature dysbiotic gut microbiome profile of high Firmicutes:Bacteroidetes ratios in the travelers who developed diarrhea, regardless of etiologic agent or presence of a pathogen. There was no significant difference in α-diversity among travelers. The bacterial composition of the microbiota of the healthy travelers was similar to the diarrheal groups, however the β-diversity of the healthy travelers was significantly different than any pathogen-associated TD group. Further comparison of the healthy traveler microbiota to those from healthy subjects who were part of the Human Microbiome Project also revealed a significantly higher Firmicutes:Bacteriodetes ratio in the healthy travelers and significantly different β-diversity. Thus, the composition of the gut microbiome in healthy, diarrhea-free travelers has characteristics of a dysbiotic gut, suggesting that these alterations could be associated with factors such as travel.

  5. Dispersion measurement as a method of quantifying geologic characterization and defining reservoir heterogeneity. Annual report, July 12, 1990--September 12, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Menzie, D.E.

    1992-04-01

    Since reservoirs are heterogeneous, nonuniform, and anisotropic, the success or failure of many enhanced oil recovery techniques rests on our prediction of internal variability and the paths of fluid flow in the reservoir. The main objective of this project is to develop a greater understanding of reservoir heterogeneities through dispersion measurement. In this annual report, an approach to ways to estimate the dispersivities of reservoir rocks from well logs is presented. From a series of rock property measurements and dispersion tests the following studies have been made: A measure of rock heterogeneity is developed by using the effluent concentration at one pore volume injection in a matched viscosity miscible displacement. By this approach, a heterogeneity factor is determined from the measured S-shaped dispersion curve. The parameter f in the Coats-Smith capacitance model is redefined as the dispersion fraction f{sub d} (or mechanical mixing fraction). At the f{sub d} pore volume injection, the dynamic miscible displacement efficiency reaches maximum. Reflected on the dispersion curve, this number corresponds to the peak of the first derivative of concentration. With the concept of dispersion fraction, a unique solution to the capacitance model is obtained, and then an equivalent dispersivity is defined. Through experimental data on Berea and Brown sandstone samples, it has been found that the equivalent dispersivity is an exponential function of the heterogeneity factor and can be used as a reservoir characteristic. Through a key parameter of tortuosity, dispersivity is related to rock petrophysical properties. This semi-theoretical relationship forms the basis for determining dispersivities from well logs. The approach is validated through experimental studies on Berea and Brown sandstone samples. It has been found that the equivalent dispersivity is an exponential function of the heterogeneity factor and can be used as a reservoir characteristic.

  6. Differentiation of stem cells from human infrapatellar fat pad: characterization of cells undergoing chondrogenesis.

    PubMed

    Felimban, Raed; Ye, Ken; Traianedes, Kathy; Di Bella, Claudia; Crook, Jeremy; Wallace, Gordon G; Quigley, Anita; Choong, Peter F M; Myers, Damian E

    2014-08-01

    Hyaline cartilage repair is a significant challenge in orthopedics and current techniques result in formation of fibrocartilage. Human infrapatellar fat pad (hIPFP)-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are capable of differentiation into multiple tissue lineages, including cartilage and bone. Chondrogenesis is a crucial part of normal skeletal development but the molecular mechanisms are yet to be completely defined. In this study we sourced hIPFP-derived MSCs utilizing chondrogenic growth factors, transforming growth factor beta-3, and bone morphogenetic protein-6, to form hyaline-like cartilage in micromass cultures and we studied chondrogenic development of 7, 14, and 28 days. The purpose of this study was (1) to characterize chondrogenesis from MSCs derived from hIPFP tissue by conventional techniques and (2) to characterize temporal changes of key molecular components during chondrogenesis using microarray gene expression. Endpoints included histology, immunohistochemistry (IHC), gene expression profiles using a microarray technique, and changes in expression of specific genes using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Over 14-28 days, clusters of encapsulated chondrocytes formed surrounded by collagen type II and aggrecan in the extracellular matrix (ECM). Collagen type II and aggrecan production was confirmed using IHC and chondrogenic lineage markers were studied; SRY-related transcription factor (SOX9), collagen type II alpha 1 (COL2A1), and aggrecan gene expression increased significantly over the time course. Normalized microarray highlighted 608 differentially expressed genes; 10 chondrogenic genes were upregulated (2- to 87-fold), including COL2A1, COL10A1, COL9A1, COL11A1, COL9A2, COL11A2, COL1A1, COMP, SOX9, and COL3A1. We found that the upregulated genes (twofold or greater) represent significant level of expression (enrichment score) for the ECM structural constituent of the molecular functional at days 7, 14, and 28 during

  7. GEOPHYSICS AND SITE CHARACTERIZATION AT THE HANFORD SITE THE SUCCESSFUL USE OF ELECTRICAL RESISTIVITY TO POSITION BOREHOLES TO DEFINE DEEP VADOSE ZONE CONTAMINATION - 11509

    SciTech Connect

    GANDER MJ; LEARY KD; LEVITT MT; MILLER CW

    2011-01-14

    Historic boreholes confirmed the presence of nitrate and radionuclide contaminants at various intervals throughout a more than 60 m (200 ft) thick vadose zone, and a 2010 electrical resistivity survey mapped the known contamination and indicated areas of similar contaminants, both laterally and at depth; therefore, electrical resistivity mapping can be used to more accurately locate characterization boreholes. At the Hanford Nuclear Reservation in eastern Washington, production of uranium and plutonium resulted in the planned release of large quantities of contaminated wastewater to unlined excavations (cribs). From 1952 until 1960, the 216-U-8 Crib received approximately 379,000,000 L (100,000,000 gal) of wastewater containing 25,500 kg (56,218 lb) uranium; 1,029,000 kg (1,013 tons) of nitrate; 2.7 Ci of technetium-99; and other fission products including strontium-90 and cesium-137. The 216-U-8 Crib reportedly holds the largest inventory of waste uranium of any crib on the Hanford Site. Electrical resistivity is a geophysical technique capable of identifying contrasting physical properties; specifically, electrically conductive material, relative to resistive native soil, can be mapped in the subsurface. At the 216-U-8 Crib, high nitrate concentrations (from the release of nitric acid [HNO{sub 3}] and associated uranium and other fission products) were detected in 1994 and 2004 boreholes at various depths, such as at the base of the Crib at 9 m (30 ft) below ground surface (bgs) and sporadically to depths in excess of 60 m (200 ft) bgs. These contaminant concentrations were directly correlative with the presence of observed low electrical resistivity responses delineated during the summer 2010 geophysical survey. Based on this correlation and the recently completed mapping of the electrically conductive material, additional boreholes are planned for early 2011 to identify nitrate and radionuclide contamination: (a) throughout the entire vertical length of the

  8. Purification and characterization of diacylglycerol lipase from human platelets.

    PubMed

    Moriyama, T; Urade, R; Kito, M

    1999-06-01

    Diacylglycerol lipase (DGL) was solubilized from human platelet microsomes with heptyl-beta-D-thioglucoside, and purified to homogeneity on SDS-PAGE using a combination of chromatographic and electrophoretic methods. The molecular mass of the purified DGL was estimated to be 33 kDa. Its apparent pI was pH 6.0, as determined by Immobiline isoelectro-focusing. The enzymatic activity of the partially purified DGL was investigated in the presence of a variety of inhibitors and reagents, as well as its pH and calcium dependence. Thiol reagents such as p-chloromercurubenzoic acid (pCMB), N-ethylmaleimide (NEM), and HgCl2 inhibited the activity, while dithiothreitol (DTT) and reduced glutathione (GSH) enhanced it. In addition, the enzymatic activity was inhibited by two serine blockers, phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (PMSF) and diisopropyl fluorophosphate (DFP), and by a histidine modifying reagent, p-bromophenacyl bromide (pBPB). These results suggest that cysteine, serine and histidine residues are required for the enzymatic activity of DGL. DGL was optimally active in the pH range of 7-8 and its activity did not change significantly in the presence of various calcium concentrations, even in the presence of 2 mM EGTA. This indicates that DGL can hydrolyze substrates with a basal cytosolic free Ca2+ level in the physiological pH range. A DGL inhibitor, RHC-80267, inhibited DGL activity in a dose-dependent manner with an IC50 (the concentration required for 50% inhibition) of about 5 microM. Unexpectedly, several phospholipase A2 (PLA2) inhibitors were potent inhibitors of DGL activity (IC50<5 microM), suggesting that the catalytic mechanisms of DGL and PLA2 may be similar. Finally, we show that DGL activity was inhibited by 2-monoacylglycerols (2-MGs), the reaction products of this enzyme. Among the three 2-MGs tested (2-arachidonoyl glycerol, 2-stearoyl glycerol, and 2-oleoyl glycerol), 2-arachidonoyl glycerol was the most potent inhibitor.

  9. Characterization of two cloned human CB1 cannabinoid receptor isoforms.

    PubMed

    Rinaldi-Carmona, M; Calandra, B; Shire, D; Bouaboula, M; Oustric, D; Barth, F; Casellas, P; Ferrara, P; Le Fur, G

    1996-08-01

    We have investigated the pharmacology of two central human cannabinoid receptor isoforms, designated CB1 and CB1A, stably expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cell lines, designated as CHO-CB1 and CHO-CB1A, respectively. In direct binding assays on isolated membranes the agonist [3H]CP 55,940 bound in a saturable and highly specific manner to both cannabinoid receptor isoforms. Competition binding experiments performed with other commonly used receptor agonists showed the following rank order of potency: CP 55,940 > tetrahydrocannabinol > WIN 55212-2 > anandamide. Except for the endogenous ligand anandamide (CB1, Ki = 359.6 nM vs. CB1A, Ki = 298 nM), these agonists bound to CB1A (CP 55,940, WIN 55212-2 and delta 9-THC, Ki = 7.24,345 and 26.7 nM, respectively) with about 3-fold less affinity than to CB1 (CP 55,940, WIN 55212-2 and delta 9-THC, Ki = 2.26, 93 and 7.1 nM, respectively). The cannabinoid receptor antagonist SR 141716A also bound to CB1A (Ki = 43.3 nM) with slightly less affinity than to CB1 (Ki = 4.9 nM). Cannabinoid receptor-linked second messenger system studies performed in the CHO-CB1 and CHO-CB1A cells showed that both receptors mediated their action through the agonist-induced inhibition of forskolin-stimulated cAMP accumulation. This activity was totally blocked by pretreatment with PTX. Additionally, both isoforms activated mitogen-activated protein kinase. The selective antagonist SR 141716A was able to selectively block these responses in both cell lines, to an extent that reflected its binding characteristics. Our results show that the amino-truncated and -modified CB1 isoform CB1A exhibits all the properties of CB1 to a slightly attenuated extent.

  10. Establishment and Characterization of a Highly Tumourigenic and Cancer Stem Cell Enriched Pancreatic Cancer Cell Line as a Well Defined Model System

    PubMed Central

    Fredebohm, Johannes; Boettcher, Michael; Eisen, Christian; Gaida, Matthias M.; Heller, Anette; Keleg, Shereen; Tost, Jörg; Greulich-Bode, Karin M.; Hotz-Wagenblatt, Agnes; Lathrop, Mark; Giese, Nathalia A.; Hoheisel, Jörg D.

    2012-01-01

    Standard cancer cell lines do not model the intratumoural heterogeneity situation sufficiently. Clonal selection leads to a homogeneous population of cells by genetic drift. Heterogeneity of tumour cells, however, is particularly critical for therapeutically relevant studies, since it is a prerequisite for acquiring drug resistance and reoccurrence of tumours. Here, we report the isolation of a highly tumourigenic primary pancreatic cancer cell line, called JoPaca-1 and its detailed characterization at multiple levels. Implantation of as few as 100 JoPaca-1 cells into immunodeficient mice gave rise to tumours that were histologically very similar to the primary tumour. The high heterogeneity of JoPaca-1 was reflected by diverse cell morphology and a substantial number of chromosomal aberrations. Comparative whole-genome sequencing of JoPaca-1 and BxPC-3 revealed mutations in genes frequently altered in pancreatic cancer. Exceptionally high expression of cancer stem cell markers and a high clonogenic potential in vitro and in vivo was observed. All of these attributes make this cell line an extremely valuable model to study the biology of and pharmaceutical effects on pancreatic cancer. PMID:23152778

  11. Theoretical characterization of the potential energy surface for H + N2 yields HN2. II - Computed points to define a global potential

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walch, Stephen P.

    1990-01-01

    A previous calculation for H + N2 (Walch et al., 1989) focused on the minimum energy path (MEP) region of the potential energy surface and on estimates of the lifetime of the HN2 species. In this paper, energies computed at geometries selected to permit a global representation of the potential energy surface (PES) are reported. As in the previous work, the calculations were performed using the complete active space self-consistent field/externally contracted configuration interaction method. The surface was characterized using the same basis set as in the previous paper except that an improved contraction of the H s-basis is used. Calculations with a larger basis set were carried out along an approximate MEP obtained with the smaller basis set. The new PES exhibits a sharp curvature, which was not present in the previous calculations, and has a slightly narrower and smaller barrier to dissociation. Saddle points for H atom exchange via collinear and T shaped HN2 complexes are also reported.

  12. Biological characterization of human fibroblast-derived mitogenic factors for human melanocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Imokawa, G; Yada, Y; Morisaki, N; Kimura, M

    1998-01-01

    To clarify the paracrine linkage between human fibroblasts and melanocytes in cutaneous pigmentation, we studied the effects of human fibroblast-derived factors on the proliferation of human melanocytes. In medium conditioned for 4 days with human fibroblast culture, factors were produced that markedly stimulated DNA synthesis of human melanocytes. The stimulatory effect was higher in medium conditioned with fibroblasts from aged skin than in medium conditioned with fibroblasts from young skin, and was interrupted by inhibitors of tyrosine kinase, such as tyrphostin, genistein and herbimycin, but not by inhibitors of protein kinases C and A, such as H-7 and phloretin. The conditioned medium was also capable of activating mitogen-activated protein kinase of human melanocytes, with old fibroblasts being more effective than young ones. Analysis of factors released into the conditioned medium revealed that levels of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and stem cell factor (SCF) were increased in old-fibroblast-conditioned medium compared with young-fibroblast-conditioned medium. In contrast, levels of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) were similar in both media. When the conditioned medium was treated with HGF antibody with or without SCF antibody, the increase in DNA synthesis by human melanocytes was decreased to 20% of the elevated level, whereas antibodies to bFGF had no effect. Analysis of the medium conditioned for 4 days after cytokine application demonstrated that, of the cytokines tested, interleukin 1alpha and tumour necrosis factor alpha are highly effective in stimulating HGF secretion by old fibroblasts. HGF and SCF, but not bFGF, were markedly increased in culture medium in the presence of IL-1alpha, and this stimulatory effect was confined to young human fibroblasts. These findings suggest that SCF and HGF derived from human fibroblasts may play a part in regulating cutaneous pigmentation during inflammation and aging. PMID:9494091

  13. Defining microbiota for developing new probiotics.

    PubMed

    Collado, Maria Carmen; Bäuerl, Christine; Pérez-Martínez, Gaspar

    2012-01-01

    The human body harbors complex communities of microbes that play a prominent role in human health. Detailed characterization of the microbiota in the target population forms the basis of probiotic use. Probiotics are defined as live bacterial preparations with clinically documented health effects in humans, and independent of their genus and species, probiotic strains are unique and their beneficial properties on human health have to be assessed in a case-by-case manner. Understanding the mechanisms by which probiotics influence microbiota would facilitate the use of probiotics for both dietary management and reduction in risk of specific diseases. The development of high throughput sequencing methods has allowed metagenomic approaches to study the human microbiome. These efforts are starting to generate an inventory of bacterial taxons and functional features bound to particular health or disease status that allow inferring aspects of the microbiome's function. In the future, this information will allow the rational design of dietary interventions aimed to improve consumer's health via modulation of the microbiota.

  14. Defining microbiota for developing new probiotics

    PubMed Central

    Collado, Maria Carmen; Bäuerl, Christine; Pérez-Martínez, Gaspar

    2012-01-01

    The human body harbors complex communities of microbes that play a prominent role in human health. Detailed characterization of the microbiota in the target population forms the basis of probiotic use. Probiotics are defined as live bacterial preparations with clinically documented health effects in humans, and independent of their genus and species, probiotic strains are unique and their beneficial properties on human health have to be assessed in a case-by-case manner. Understanding the mechanisms by which probiotics influence microbiota would facilitate the use of probiotics for both dietary management and reduction in risk of specific diseases. The development of high throughput sequencing methods has allowed metagenomic approaches to study the human microbiome. These efforts are starting to generate an inventory of bacterial taxons and functional features bound to particular health or disease status that allow inferring aspects of the microbiome's function. In the future, this information will allow the rational design of dietary interventions aimed to improve consumer's health via modulation of the microbiota. PMID:23990820

  15. Microbial metaproteomics for characterizing the range of metabolic functions and activities of human gut microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Weili; Abraham, Paul; Li, Zhou; Pan, Chongle; Hettich, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    The human gastrointestinal (GI) tract is a complex, dynamic ecosystem that consists of a carefully tuned balance of human host and microbiota membership. The microbiome is not merely a collection of opportunistic parasites, but rather provides important functions to the host that are absolutely critical to many aspects of health, including nutrient transformation and absorption, drug metabolism, pathogen defense, and immune system development. Microbial metaproteomics provides the ability to characterize the human gut microbiota functions and metabolic activities at a remarkably deep level, revealing information about microbiome development and stability as well as their interactions with their human host. Generally, microbial and human proteins can be extracted and then measured by high performance mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics technology. Here we review the field of human gut microbiome metaproteomics, with a focus on the experimental and informatics considerations involved in characterizing systems ranging from low-complexity model gut microbiota in gnotobiotic mice, to the emerging gut microbiome in the GI tract of newborn human infants, and finally to an established gut microbiota in human adults. PMID:25914197

  16. Microbial metaproteomics for characterizing the range of metabolic functions and activities of human gut microbiota.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Weili; Abraham, Paul E; Li, Zhou; Pan, Chongle; Hettich, Robert L

    2015-10-01

    The human gastrointestinal tract is a complex, dynamic ecosystem that consists of a carefully tuned balance of human host and microbiota membership. The microbiome is not merely a collection of opportunistic parasites, but rather provides important functions to the host that are absolutely critical to many aspects of health, including nutrient transformation and absorption, drug metabolism, pathogen defense, and immune system development. Microbial metaproteomics provides the ability to characterize the human gut microbiota functions and metabolic activities at a rema