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Sample records for charge exchange measurements

  1. Extraction of Poloidal Velocity from Charge Exchange Recombination Spectroscopy Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    W.M. Solomon; K.H. Burrell; P. Gohil; R.J. Groebner; L.R. Baylor

    2004-07-16

    A novel approach has been implemented on DIII-D to allow the correct determination of the plasma poloidal velocity from charge exchange spectroscopy measurements. Unlike usual techniques, the need for detailed atomic physics calculations to properly interpret the results is alleviated. Instead, the needed atomic physics corrections are self-consistently determined directly from the measurements, by making use of specially chosen viewing chords. Modeling results are presented that were used to determine a set of views capable of measuring the correction terms. We present the analysis of a quiescent H-mode discharge, illustrating that significant modifications to the velocity profiles are required in these high ion temperature conditions. We also present preliminary measurements providing the first direct comparison of the standard cross-section correction to the atomic physics calculations.

  2. Excitation and Charge Exchange Phenomena in Astronomical Objects: Measurement of Cross Sections and Lifetimes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, Ara; Smith, S.; Lozano, J.; Cadez, I.; Greewnood, J.; Mawhovter, R.; Williams, I.; Niimura, M.

    2003-01-01

    This document addresses extreme ultraviolet radiation and X-ray emissions from comets, planets and heliospheric gases focusing on the measurement of charge-exchange cross sections and radiative lifetimes. Highly-charged heavy ions present in the solar wind, and their abundance relative to the total oxygen-ion abundance are detailed. The plan for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory high-charge ion facility is outlined detailing its ability to measure absolute collisional excitation cross sections, absolute charge-exchange cross sections, lifetimes of metastable ion levels, and X-ray emission spectra following charge changes.

  3. Excitation and Charge Exchange Phenomena in Astronomical Objects: Measurement of Cross Sections and Lifetimes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, Ara; Smith, S.; Lozano, J.; Cadez, I.; Greewnood, J.; Mawhovter, R.; Williams, I.; Niimura, M.

    2003-01-01

    This document addresses extreme ultraviolet radiation and X-ray emissions from comets, planets and heliospheric gases focusing on the measurement of charge-exchange cross sections and radiative lifetimes. Highly-charged heavy ions present in the solar wind, and their abundance relative to the total oxygen-ion abundance are detailed. The plan for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory high-charge ion facility is outlined detailing its ability to measure absolute collisional excitation cross sections, absolute charge-exchange cross sections, lifetimes of metastable ion levels, and X-ray emission spectra following charge changes.

  4. Status of Charge Exchange Cross Section Measurements for Highly Charged Ions on Atomic Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Draganic, I. N.; Havener, C. C.; Schultz, D. R.; Seely, D. G.; Schultz, P. C.

    2011-05-01

    Total cross sections of charge exchange (CX) for C5+, N6+, and O7+ ions on ground state atomic hydrogen are measured in an extended collision energy range of 1 - 20,000 eV/u. Absolute CX measurements are performed using an improved merged-beams technique with intense highly charged ion beams extracted from a 14.5 GHz ECR ion source mounted on a high voltage platform. In order to improve the problematic H+ signal collection for these exoergic CX collisions at low relative energies, a new double focusing electrostatic analyzer was installed. Experimental CX data are in good agreement with all previous H-oven relative measurements at higher collision energies. We compare our results with the most recent molecular orbital close-coupling (MOCC) and atomic orbital close-coupling (AOCC) theoretical calculations. Work supported by the NASA Solar & Heliospheric Physics Program NNH07ZDA001N, the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences and the Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences, and the Office of Basic Energy Sciences of the U.S. DoE.

  5. Charge exchange system

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Oscar A.

    1978-01-01

    An improved charge exchange system for substantially reducing pumping requirements of excess gas in a controlled thermonuclear reactor high energy neutral beam injector. The charge exchange system utilizes a jet-type blanket which acts simultaneously as the charge exchange medium and as a shield for reflecting excess gas.

  6. Charge-exchange recombination spectroscopy measurements of ion temperature and plasma rotation in PBX

    SciTech Connect

    Jaehnig, K.P.; Fonck, R.J.; Ida, K.; Powell, E.T.

    1984-11-01

    The primary diagnostic on PBX for ion temperature measurements is charge-exchange recombination spectroscopy of low Z ions, wherein fast neutrals from the heating neutral beams excite spectral lines from highly excited states (n greater than or equal to 4) of hydrogenic 0, C, and He via charge-exchange collisions with the respective fully stripped ions. Since the neutral beams on PBX provide relatively low velocity neutrals (i.e., D/sup 0/ beams at 44 keV), the best signals are obtained using the near-uv lines of 0/sup 7 +/ (e.g., n = 8-7, 2976 A). Off-line analysis of the Doppler broadened and shifted line profiles includes non-linear least squares fitting to a model line profile, while a simplified on-line fast analysis code permits between-shot data analysis.

  7. Measurement of pion double charge exchange on carbon-13, carbon-14, magnesium-26, and iron-56

    SciTech Connect

    Seidl, P.A.

    1985-02-01

    Cross sections for the /sup 13,14/C,/sup 26/Mg,/sup 56/Fe(..pi../sup +/,..pi../sup -/)/sup 13,14/O,/sup 26/Si,/sup 56/Ni reactions were measured with the Energetic Pion Channel and Spectrometer at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility for 120 less than or equal to T/sub ..pi../ less than or equal to 292 MeV and 0 less than or equal to theta less than or equal to 50. The double isobaric analog states (DIAS) are of primary interest. In addition, cross sections for transitions to /sup 14/O(0/sup +/, 5.92 MeV), /sup 14/O(2/sup +/, 7.77 MeV), /sup 56/Ni(gs), /sup 13/O(gs), and /sup 13/O(4.21 MeV) are presented. The /sup 13/O(4.21 MeV) state is postulated to have J/sup ..pi../ = 1/2/sup -/. The data are compared to previously measured double-charge-exchange cross sections on other nuclei, and the systematics of double charge exchange on T greater than or equal to 1 target nuclei leading to the DIAS are studied. Near the ..delta../sub 33/ resonance, cross sections for the DIAS transitions are in disagreement with calculations in which the reaction is treated as sequential charge exchange through the free pion-nucleon amplitude, while for T/sub ..pi../ > 200 MeV the anomalous features of the 164 MeV data are not apparent. This is evidence for significant higher order contributions to the double-charge-exchange amplitude near the reasonable energy. Two theoretical approaches that include two nucleon processes are applied to the DIAS data. 64 references.

  8. Laser interferometric measurement of ion electrode shape and charge exchange erosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macrae, Gregory S.; Mercer, Carolyn R.

    1991-01-01

    A novel projected fringe profilometry system was applied to surface contour measurements of an accelerator electrode from an ion thruster. The system permitted noncontact, nondestructive evaluation of the fine and gross structure of the electrode. A 3D surface map of a dished electrode was generated without altering the electrode surface. The same system was used to examine charge exchange erosion pits near the periphery of the electrode to determine the depth, location, and volume of material lost. This electro-optical measurement system allowed rapid nondestructive digital data acquisition coupled with automated computer data-processing. In addition, variable sensitivity allowed both coarse and fine measurements of objects having various surface finishes.

  9. Laser interferometric measurement of ion electrode shape and charge exchange erosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macrae, Gregory S.; Mercer, Carolyn R.

    1991-01-01

    A projected fringe profilometry system was applied to surface contour measurements of an accelerator electrode from an ion thrustor. The system permitted noncontact, nondestructive evaluation of the fine and gross structure of the electrode. A 3-D surface map of a dished electrode was generated without altering the electrode surface. The same system was used to examine charge exchange erosion pits near the periphery of the electrode to determine the depth, location, and volume of material lost. This electro-optical measurement system allowed rapid, nondestructive, digital data acquisition coupled with automated computer data processing. In addition, variable sensitivity allowed both coarse and fine measurements of objects having various surface finishes.

  10. Fast time resolution charge-exchange measurements during the fishbone instability in the poloidal divertor experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Beiersdorfer, P.; Kaita, R.; Goldston, R.J.

    1984-01-01

    Measurements of fast ion losses due to the fishbone instability during high ..beta../sub T/q neutral beam heated discharges in the Poloidal Divertor Experiment have been made using two new vertical-viewing charge-exchange analyzers. The measurements show that the instability has an n=1 toroidal mode number, and that it ejects beam ions in a toroidally rotating beacon directed outward along a major radius. Observations of ejected ions with energies up to twice the beam injection energy at R approx. = R/sub 0/ + a indicate the presence of a non-..mu..-conserving acceleration mechanism.

  11. Digital processing of solid state detector signals in pellet charge exchange measurements on LHD

    SciTech Connect

    Goncharov, P.R.; Ozaki, T.; Sudo, S.; Tamura, N.; Isobe, M.; Sasao, M.; Saida, T.; Krasilnikov, A.V.; Sergeev, V.Yu.

    2004-10-01

    Radially resolved measurements of the plasma ion distribution function by detecting charge exchange neutrals from an impurity pellet ablation cloud require a fast operating energy analyzer working at high count rates to build several spectra during the pellet flight. Currently a solid state detector in the pulse height analysis (PHA) mode is used for such measurements on the Large Helical Device. Traditional PHA techniques cannot provide the operating speed required for a good spatial resolution. An algorithm has been proposed based on digital processing of noisy data series containing charge-sensitive preamplifier signals with discontinuities corresponding to incident particles. The algorithm employs the modified Tikhonov regularization and the successive detection-estimation of signal increments at discontinuity points. Such an approach allows one to realize an ultrafast particle energy spectroscopy by taking advantage of detector/preamplifier capabilities without limiting the system throughput by subsequent electronics.

  12. Charge exchange fast neutral measurement with natural diamond detectors in neon plasma on LHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saida, T.; Sasao, M.; Isobe, M.; Krasilnikov, A. V.

    2003-03-01

    Charge exchange (CX) fast neutral spectra produced by ion cyclotron resonance frequency hydrogen minority heating in neon and helium majority plasmas sustained by neutral beam injection were measured with perpendicular Natural Diamond Detectors during the fifth campaign in 2002 on large helical devices (LHDs). It was observed that there were differences between fast neutral spectra shapes in neon plasma and those in helium of the same discharge condition with similar plasma parameters. Dominant CX processes in neon and helium plasmas were studied for ionization components from outside of the last closed flux surface. High-energy proton spectra were obtained by taking account of each charge state distribution and responsible charge exchange cross sections. The high-energy proton tail formations in both plasmas were similar for the same heating regime. The relaxation time tendencies of the effective temperatures of a high-energy proton have also shown no differences, indicating that the acceleration and confinement of energetic ions in LHDs are similar in neon and helium plasmas.

  13. DXL: A sounding rocket mission measuring Solar Wind Charge eXchange properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galeazzi, Massimiliano

    2016-04-01

    Solar Wind interacts with the interstellar neutrals via charge exchange mechanism to produce spatially and temporally varying x-rays making it difficult to separate from other diffuse sources. The Diffuse X-rays from the Local Galaxy (DXL) mission measured the spatial signature of Solar Wind Charge eXchange (SWCX) emission due to the helium focusing cone. The mission used 2 large area proportional counters and was able to separate the SWCX contribution from Local Hot Bubble emission. The data from the mission provide a robust estimate of the SWCX contribution to the ROSAT maps, measuring the compound SWCX cross section with He in all ROSAT bands. The results showed that the total SWCX contribution in the ¼ keV band is, on average, ~27%. A new mission, DXL-2, was launched on December 4, 2015 with two new counters for a better understanding of the energy distribution of heliospheric SWCX photons, by using a multi-band approach. A dedicated scan to accurately measure the cone position and solve the IBEX controversy was also performed. The talk will discuss the DXL mission, the results from the first flight, and the preliminary results from the latest flight.Submitted for the DXL Collaboration

  14. Charge Exchange Contribution to the Decay of the Ring Current, Measured by Energetic Neutral Atoms (ENAs)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorgensen, A. M.; Henderson, M. G.; Roelof, E. C.; Reeves, G. D.; Spence, H. E.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper we calculate the contribution of charge exchange to the decay of the ring current. Past works have suggested that charge exchange of ring current protons is primarily responsible for the decay of the ring current during the late recovery phase, but there is still much debate about the fast decay of the early recovery phase. We use energetic neutral atom (ENA) measurements from Polar to calculate the total ENA energy escape. To get the total ENA escape we apply a forward modeling technique, and to estimate the total ring current energy escape we use the Dessler-Parker-Sckopke relationship. We find that during the late recovery phase of the March 10, 1998 storm ENAs with energies greater than 17.5 keV can account for 75% of the estimated energy loss from the ring current. During the fast recovery the measured ENAs can only account for a small portion of the total energy loss. We also find that the lifetime of the trapped ions is significantly shorter during the fast recovery phase than during the late recovery phase, suggesting that different processes are operating during the two phases.

  15. Charge Exchange Contribution to the Decay of the Ring Current, Measured by Energetic Neutral Atoms (ENAs)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorgensen, A. M.; Henderson, M. G.; Roelof, E. C.; Reeves, G. D.; Spence, H. E.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper we calculate the contribution of charge exchange to the decay of the ring current. Past works have suggested that charge exchange of ring current protons is primarily responsible for the decay of the ring current during the late recovery phase, but there is still much debate about the fast decay of the early recovery phase. We use energetic neutral atom (ENA) measurements from Polar to calculate the total ENA energy escape. To get the total ENA escape we apply a forward modeling technique, and to estimate the total ring current energy escape we use the Dessler-Parker-Sckopke relationship. We find that during the late recovery phase of the March 10, 1998 storm ENAs with energies greater than 17.5 keV can account for 75% of the estimated energy loss from the ring current. During the fast recovery the measured ENAs can only account for a small portion of the total energy loss. We also find that the lifetime of the trapped ions is significantly shorter during the fast recovery phase than during the late recovery phase, suggesting that different processes are operating during the two phases.

  16. Impact of calibration technique on measurement accuracy for the JET core charge-exchange system

    SciTech Connect

    Giroud, Carine; Meigs, A. G.; Negus, C. R.; Zastrow, K.-D.; Biewer, T. M.; Versloot, T. W.

    2008-10-15

    The core charge-exchange diagnostic at the Joint European Torus (JET) provides measurements of the impurity ion temperature T{sub i}, toroidal velocity V{sub {phi}}, and impurity ion densities n{sub imp}, across the whole minor radius. A contribution to the uncertainty of the measured quantities is the error resulting from the multi-Gaussian fit and photon statistics, usually quoted for each measured data. Absolute intensity calibration and especially alignment of the viewing directions can introduce an important systematic error. The technique adopted at JET to reduce this systematic contribution to the error is presented in this paper. The error in T{sub i}, V{sub {phi}}, and n{sub imp} is then discussed depending on their use.

  17. First measurement of the edge charge exchange recombination spectroscopy on EAST tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y. Y. Fu, J.; Jiang, D.; Lyu, B.; Hu, C. D.; Wan, B. N.; Yin, X. H.; Feng, S. Y.; Shi, Y. J.; Yi, Y.; Ye, M. Y.; Zhou, X. J.

    2016-11-15

    An edge toroidal charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (eCXRS) diagnostic, based on a heating neutral beam injection (NBI), has been deployed recently on the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST). The eCXRS, which aims to measure the plasma ion temperature and toroidal rotation velocity in the edge region simultaneously, is a complement to the exiting core CXRS (cCXRS). Two rows with 32 fiber channels each cover a radial range from ∼2.15 m to ∼2.32 m with a high spatial resolution of ∼5-7 mm. Charge exchange emission of Carbon VI CVI at 529.059 nm induced by the NBI is routinely observed, but can be tuned to any interested wavelength in the spectral range from 400 to 700 nm. Double-slit fiber bundles increase the number of channels, the fibers viewing the same radial position are binned on the CCD detector to improve the signal-to-noise ratio, enabling shorter exposure time down to 5 ms. One channel is connected to a neon lamp, which provides the real-time wavelength calibration on a shot-to-shot basis. In this paper, an overview of the eCXRS diagnostic on EAST is presented and the first results from the 2015 experimental campaign will be shown. Good agreements in ion temperature and toroidal rotation are obtained between the eCXRS and cCXRS systems.

  18. First measurement of the edge charge exchange recombination spectroscopy on EAST tokamak.

    PubMed

    Li, Y Y; Yin, X H; Fu, J; Jiang, D; Feng, S Y; Lyu, B; Shi, Y J; Yi, Y; Zhou, X J; Hu, C D; Ye, M Y; Wan, B N

    2016-11-01

    An edge toroidal charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (eCXRS) diagnostic, based on a heating neutral beam injection (NBI), has been deployed recently on the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST). The eCXRS, which aims to measure the plasma ion temperature and toroidal rotation velocity in the edge region simultaneously, is a complement to the exiting core CXRS (cCXRS). Two rows with 32 fiber channels each cover a radial range from ∼2.15 m to ∼2.32 m with a high spatial resolution of ∼5-7 mm. Charge exchange emission of Carbon VI CVI at 529.059 nm induced by the NBI is routinely observed, but can be tuned to any interested wavelength in the spectral range from 400 to 700 nm. Double-slit fiber bundles increase the number of channels, the fibers viewing the same radial position are binned on the CCD detector to improve the signal-to-noise ratio, enabling shorter exposure time down to 5 ms. One channel is connected to a neon lamp, which provides the real-time wavelength calibration on a shot-to-shot basis. In this paper, an overview of the eCXRS diagnostic on EAST is presented and the first results from the 2015 experimental campaign will be shown. Good agreements in ion temperature and toroidal rotation are obtained between the eCXRS and cCXRS systems.

  19. Measurement of charge exchange cross sections for highly charged xenon and thorium ions with molecular hydrogen in a Penning Ion Trap

    SciTech Connect

    Weinberg, G.M.

    1995-12-01

    Highly charged xenon (35+ to 46+) and thorium (72+ to 79+) ions were produced in an Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT). The ions were extracted from EBIT in a short pulse. Ions of one charge state were selected using an electromagnet. The ions were recaptured at low energy in a cryogenic Penning trap (RETRAP). As the ions captured electrons from molecular hydrogen, populations of the various charge states were obtained by measuring the image currents induced by the ions on the electrodes of the trap. Data on the number of ions in each charge state vs. time were compared to theoretical rate equations in order to determine the average charge exchange rates. These rates were compared to charge exchange rates of an ion with a known charge exchange cross section (Ar{sup 11+}) measured in a similar manner in order to determine the average charge exchange cross sections for the highly charged ions. The energy of interaction between the highly charged ions and hydrogen was estimated to be 4 eV in the center of mass frame. The mean charge exchange cross sections were 9 {times} 10{sup {minus}14} cm{sup 2} for Xe{sup 43+} to Xe{sup 46+} and 2 {times} 10{sup {minus}13} cm{sup 2} for Th{sup 73+} to Th{sup 79+}. Double capture was approximately 20--25% of the total for both xenon and thorium. A fit indicated that the cross sections were approximately proportional to q. This is consistent with a linear dependence of cross section on q within the measurement uncertainties.

  20. Corrections to charge exchange spectroscopic measurements in TFTR due to energy-dependent excitation rates

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, R.B.; Fonck, R.J.; Knize, R.J.; Jaehnig, K.P.

    1988-08-01

    The use of charge exchange spectrocopy to determine plasma rotation speeds and ion temperature is complicated by the energy dependence of the excitation cross sections. The Doppler-broadened spectral line shape is distorted by the relative velocity between the neutral hydrogen atoms of the injected beam and impurity ions. The asymmetric nature of the energy dependence of this cross section causes a non-motional shift of the line center and a non-thermal change in the line width. These effects vary with the angles between the beam direction, rotation velocity direction, and direction of the viewing sightline. When viewing two neutral beams at different angles on TFTR, the two measurements of v/sub phi/(r) show discrepancies about 20 to 30% with each other. The calculation of the spectral intensity profiles, using the excitation rates available, overcorrects these discrepancies and indicates the need for better excitation coefficients. 10 refs., 5 figs.

  1. Laboratory Measurements of Solar-Wind/Comet X-Ray Emission and Charge Exchange Cross Sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, A.; Cadez, I.; Greenwood, J. B.; Mawhorter, R. J.; Smith, S. J.; Lozano, J.

    2002-01-01

    The detection of X-rays from comets such as Hyakutake, Hale-Bopp, d Arrest, and Linear as they approach the Sun has been unexpected and exciting. This phenomenon, moreover, should be quite general, occurring wherever a fast solar or stellar wind interacts with neutrals in a comet, a planetary atmosphere, or a circumstellar cloud. The process is, O(+8) + H2O --> O(+7*) + H2O(+), where the excited O(+7*) ions are the source of the X-ray emissions. Detailed modeling has been carried out of X-ray emissions in charge-transfer collisions of heavy solar-wind Highly Charged Ions (HCIs) and interstellar/interplanetary neutral clouds. In the interplanetary medium the solar wind ions, including protons, can charge exchange with interstellar H and He. This can give rise to a soft X-ray background that could be correlated with the long-term enhancements seen in the low-energy X-ray spectrum of ROSAT. Approximately 40% of the soft X-ray background detected by Exosat, ROSAT, Chandra, etc. is due to Charge Exchange (CXE): our whole heliosphere is glowing in the soft X-ray due to CXE.

  2. Charge exchange molecular ion source

    DOEpatents

    Vella, Michael C.

    2003-06-03

    Ions, particularly molecular ions with multiple dopant nucleons per ion, are produced by charge exchange. An ion source contains a minimum of two regions separated by a physical barrier and utilizes charge exchange to enhance production of a desired ion species. The essential elements are a plasma chamber for production of ions of a first species, a physical separator, and a charge transfer chamber where ions of the first species from the plasma chamber undergo charge exchange or transfer with the reactant atom or molecules to produce ions of a second species. Molecular ions may be produced which are useful for ion implantation.

  3. Charge exchange in zinc-neon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, D. L.

    1975-01-01

    Excitation of the 4d and 5p levels of Zn+ by charge exchange bewteen Ne+ and Zn was investigated. From measured electron temperature and line intensity ratios it was concluded that charge exchange is the dominate mechanism for populating the 4d2D5/2 level of Zn+. Comparison of Zn-Ne and Zn-Ar results imply the same conclusion. No evidence for charge exchange as the dominant pumping mechanism for the 5p2Pl/2, 5p2P3/2, or 4d2D3/2 levels was obtained.

  4. Facility produced charge-exchange ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carruth, M. R., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    These facility produced ions are created by charge-exchange collisions between neutral atoms and energetic thruster beam ions. The result of the electron transfer is an energetic neutral atom and an ion of only thermal energy. There are true charge-exchange ions produced by collisions with neutrals escaping from the ion thruster and being charge-exchange ionized before the neutral intercepts the tank wall. The facility produced charge-exchange ions will not exist in space and therefore, represent a source of error where measurements involving ion thruster plasmas and their density are involved. The quantity of facility produced ions in a test chamber with a 30 cm mercury ion thruster was determined.

  5. Design and operation of the pellet charge exchange diagnostic for measurement of energetic confined alphas and tritons on TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Medley, S.S.; Duong, H.H.; Fisher, R.K.

    1996-05-01

    Radially-resolved energy and density distributions of the energetic confined alpha particles in D-T experiments on TFTR are being measured by active neutral particle analysis using low-Z impurity pellet injection. When injected into a high temperature plasma, an impurity pellet (e.g. Lithium or Boron) rapidly ablates forming an elongated cloud which is aligned with the magnetic field and moves with the pellet. This ablation cloud provides a dense target with which the alpha particles produced in D-T fusion reactions can charge exchange. A small fraction of the alpha particles incident on the pellet ablation cloud will be converted to helium neutrals whose energy is essentially unchanged by the charge transfer process. By measuring the resultant helium neutrals escaping from the plasma using a mass and energy resolving charge exchange analyzer, this technique offers a direct measurement of the energy distribution of the incident high-energy alpha particles. Other energetic ion species can be detected as well, such as tritons generated in D-D plasmas and H or He{sup 3} RF-driven minority ion tails. The diagnostic technique and its application on TFTR are described in detail.

  6. Measurement of derivative of ion temperature using high spatial resolution charge exchange spectroscopy with space modulation optics

    SciTech Connect

    Ida, K.; Yoshinuma, M.; Inagaki, S.; Kobuchi, T.; Sakamoto, Y.; Matsunaga, G.; Koide, Y.

    2008-05-15

    A new technique to measure the first and second derivatives of the ion temperature profile has been developed by using a charge exchange spectroscopy system with space modulation optics. The space observed is scanned up to {+-}3 cm with a cosine wave modulation frequency up to 30 Hz by shifting the object lens in front of the optical fiber bundle by 0.5 mm with a piezoelement. The first and second derivatives of ion temperature are derived from the modulation component of the ion temperature measured by using Fourier series expansion.

  7. Charge exchange lifetimes for ions in the magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, P. H.; Bewtra, N. K.

    1977-01-01

    Latest and best measurements of physical quantities involved in complete calculation of the charge exchange lifetime of mirroring magnetospheric ions are coalesced and summarized. It is critical that the charge exchange lifetimes for ions be known as accurately as possible in order to apply the charge exchange mechanism to ion phenomena within the earth's magnetosphere.

  8. A Cold Atom Measurement of Charge Exchange Collisions between Trapped Yb^+ and Yb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grier, Andrew; Cetina, Marko; Orucevic, Fedja; Vuletic, Vladan

    2008-05-01

    We measure the collisional cross-section and rate constant of the ^174Yb and ^172Yb^+ charge-transfer process. The neutral atoms are trapped in a magneto-optical trap (MOT) resonant with their 399 nm, ^1S0->^1P1 transition and are near the Doppler-limited temperature of 680 μK. The ions are confined in a planar Paul trap with a secular frequency of 39 kHz, Doppler cooled, and spatially overlapped with the neutral atoms. The collisional energy is varied from 4 meV to 100s of neV by varying the micromotion energy of the ions by displacement from the center of the Paul trap. We report the rate constant in comparison to that derived from the Langevin cross-section.

  9. Charge-exchange and fusion reaction measurements during compression experiments with neutral beam heating in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Kaita, R.; Heidbrink, W.W.; Hammett, G.W.; Chan, A.A.; England, A.C.; Hendel, H.W.; Medley, S.S.; Nieschmidt, E.; Roquemore, A.L.; Scott, S.D.

    1986-04-01

    Adiabatic toroidal compression experiments were performed in conjunction with high power neutral beam injection in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). Acceleration of beam ions to energies nearly twice the injection energy was measured with a charge-exchange neutral particle analyzer. Measurements were also made of 2.5 MeV neutrons and 15 MeV protons produced in fusion reactions between the deuterium beam ions and the thermal deuterium and /sup 3/He ions, respectively. When the plasma was compressed, the d(d,n)/sup 3/He fusion reaction rate increased a factor of five, and the /sup 3/He(d,p)/sup 4/He rate by a factor of twenty. These data were simulated with a bounce-averaged Fokker-Planck program, which assumed conservation of angular momentum and magnetic moment during compression. The results indicate that the beam ion acceleration was consistent with adiabatic scaling.

  10. Optimization and application of cooled avalanche photodiodes for spectroscopic fluctuation measurements with ultra-fast charge exchange recombination spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truong, D. D.; Fonck, R. J.; McKee, G. R.

    2016-11-01

    The Ultra-Fast Charge Exchange Recombination Spectroscopy (UF-CHERS) diagnostic is a highly specialized spectroscopic instrument with 2 spatial channels consisting of 8 spectral channels each and a resolution of ˜0.25 nm deployed at DIII-D to measure turbulent ion temperature fluctuations. Charge exchange emissions are obtained between 528 and 530 nm with 1 μs time resolution to study plasma instabilities. A primary challenge of extracting fluctuation measurements from raw UF-CHERS signals is photon and electronic noise. In order to reduce dark current, the Avalanche Photodiode (APD) detectors are thermo-electrically cooled. State-of-the-art components are used for the signal amplifiers and conditioners to minimize electronic noise. Due to the low incident photon power (≤1 nW), APDs with a gain of up to 300 are used to optimize the signal to noise ratio. Maximizing the APDs' gain while minimizing the excess noise factor (ENF) is essential since the total noise of the diagnostic sets a floor for the minimum level of detectable broadband fluctuations. The APDs' gain should be high enough that photon noise dominates electronic noise, but not excessive so that the ENF overwhelms plasma fluctuations. A new generation of cooled APDs and optimized preamplifiers exhibits significantly enhanced signal-to-noise compared to a previous generation. Experiments at DIII-D have allowed for characterization and optimization of the ENF vs. gain. A gain of ˜100 at 1700 V is found to be near optimal for most plasma conditions. Ion temperature and toroidal velocity fluctuations due to the edge harmonic oscillation in quiescent H-mode plasmas are presented to demonstrate UF-CHERS' capabilities.

  11. Optimization and application of cooled avalanche photodiodes for spectroscopic fluctuation measurements with ultra-fast charge exchange recombination spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Truong, D D; Fonck, R J; McKee, G R

    2016-11-01

    The Ultra-Fast Charge Exchange Recombination Spectroscopy (UF-CHERS) diagnostic is a highly specialized spectroscopic instrument with 2 spatial channels consisting of 8 spectral channels each and a resolution of ∼0.25 nm deployed at DIII-D to measure turbulent ion temperature fluctuations. Charge exchange emissions are obtained between 528 and 530 nm with 1 μs time resolution to study plasma instabilities. A primary challenge of extracting fluctuation measurements from raw UF-CHERS signals is photon and electronic noise. In order to reduce dark current, the Avalanche Photodiode (APD) detectors are thermo-electrically cooled. State-of-the-art components are used for the signal amplifiers and conditioners to minimize electronic noise. Due to the low incident photon power (≤1 nW), APDs with a gain of up to 300 are used to optimize the signal to noise ratio. Maximizing the APDs' gain while minimizing the excess noise factor (ENF) is essential since the total noise of the diagnostic sets a floor for the minimum level of detectable broadband fluctuations. The APDs' gain should be high enough that photon noise dominates electronic noise, but not excessive so that the ENF overwhelms plasma fluctuations. A new generation of cooled APDs and optimized preamplifiers exhibits significantly enhanced signal-to-noise compared to a previous generation. Experiments at DIII-D have allowed for characterization and optimization of the ENF vs. gain. A gain of ∼100 at 1700 V is found to be near optimal for most plasma conditions. Ion temperature and toroidal velocity fluctuations due to the edge harmonic oscillation in quiescent H-mode plasmas are presented to demonstrate UF-CHERS' capabilities.

  12. Inclusive measurement of (p,. pi. /sup -/xn) double charge exchange reactions on bismuth from threshold to 800 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Dombsky, M.; D'Auria, J.M.; Kelson, I.; Yavin, A.I.; Ward, T.E.; Clark, J.L.; Ruth, T.; Sheffer, G.

    1985-07-01

    The energy dependence of the total angle-integrated cross section for the production of astatine isotopes from (p,..pi../sup -/xn) double charge exchange reactions on bismuth (/sup 209/Bi) was measured from 120 to 800 MeV using activation and radiochemical techniques. Chemical yields were estimated by direct radioassaying of /sup 211/At activity in thin (approx.1 mg/cm/sup 2/), irradiated bismuth targets. Calculations of the contributions of secondary (two-step) reactions to these measured astatine yields were performed, based partially upon the observed /sup 211/At activity although even at the highest energies, the contribution to products lighter than /sup 207/At was negligible. These data for products with as many as seven neutrons removed from the doubly coherent product (/sup 210/At) display nearly Gaussian shapes for the mass distributions of the astatine residues, with the maximum occurring for about /sup 204/At. The most probable momentum transfer deduced from these distributions for the initial ..pi../sup -/ production step was 335 MeV/c. The observed excitation functions display a behavior similar to that observed for the yield of /sup 210/Po from a (p,..pi../sup 0/) reaction on /sup 209/Bi, but radically different from that observed for inclusive ..pi../sup -/ reactions on a heavy nucleus. These data are discussed in terms of recent theoretical approaches to negative pion production from bismuth. In addition, a simple, schematic model is developed to treat the rapidly decreasing percentage of the total inclusive ..pi../sup -/ emission which is observed for this double charge exchange reaction. This model reflects the opacity of a nucleus to a source of internal energetic protons.

  13. Optimization and application of cooled avalanche photodiodes for spectroscopic fluctuation measurements with ultra-fast charge exchange recombination spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Truong, D. D.; Fonck, R. J.; McKee, G. R.

    2016-09-23

    The Ultra Fast Charge Exchange Recombination Spectroscopy (UF-CHERS) diagnostic is a highly specialized spectroscopic instrument with 2 spatial channels consisting of 8 spectral channels each and a resolution of ~0.25 nm deployed at DIII-D to measure turbulent ion temperature fluctuations. Charge exchange emissions are obtained between 528-530 nm with 1 μs time resolution to study plasma instabilities. A primary challenge of extracting fluctuation measurements from raw UF-CHERS signals is photon and electronic noise. In order to reduce dark current, the Avalanche Photodiode (APD) detectors are thermoelectrically cooled. State-of-the-art components are used for the signal amplifiers and conditioners to minimize electronicmore » noise. Due to the low incident photon power (≤ 1 nW), APDs with a gain of up to 300 are used to optimize the signal to noise ratio. Maximizing the APDs’ gain while minimizing the excess noise factor (ENF) is essential since the total noise of the diagnostic sets a floor for the minimum level of detectable broadband fluctuations. The APDs’ gain should be high enough that photon noise dominates electronic noise, but not excessive so that the ENF overwhelms plasma fluctuations. A new generation of cooled APDs and optimized preamplifiers exhibits significantly enhanced signal-to-noise compared to a previous generation. Experiments at DIII-D have allowed for characterization and optimization of the ENF vs. gain. Here, a gain of ~100 at 1700 V is found to be near optimal for most plasma conditions. Ion temperature and toroidal velocity fluctuations due to the Edge Harmonic Oscillation (EHO) in Quiescent H-mode (QH) plasmas are presented to demonstrate UF-CHERS’ capabilities.« less

  14. Optimization and application of cooled avalanche photodiodes for spectroscopic fluctuation measurements with ultra-fast charge exchange recombination spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Truong, D. D.; Fonck, R. J.; McKee, G. R.

    2016-09-23

    The Ultra Fast Charge Exchange Recombination Spectroscopy (UF-CHERS) diagnostic is a highly specialized spectroscopic instrument with 2 spatial channels consisting of 8 spectral channels each and a resolution of ~0.25 nm deployed at DIII-D to measure turbulent ion temperature fluctuations. Charge exchange emissions are obtained between 528-530 nm with 1 μs time resolution to study plasma instabilities. A primary challenge of extracting fluctuation measurements from raw UF-CHERS signals is photon and electronic noise. In order to reduce dark current, the Avalanche Photodiode (APD) detectors are thermoelectrically cooled. State-of-the-art components are used for the signal amplifiers and conditioners to minimize electronic noise. Due to the low incident photon power (≤ 1 nW), APDs with a gain of up to 300 are used to optimize the signal to noise ratio. Maximizing the APDs’ gain while minimizing the excess noise factor (ENF) is essential since the total noise of the diagnostic sets a floor for the minimum level of detectable broadband fluctuations. The APDs’ gain should be high enough that photon noise dominates electronic noise, but not excessive so that the ENF overwhelms plasma fluctuations. A new generation of cooled APDs and optimized preamplifiers exhibits significantly enhanced signal-to-noise compared to a previous generation. Experiments at DIII-D have allowed for characterization and optimization of the ENF vs. gain. Here, a gain of ~100 at 1700 V is found to be near optimal for most plasma conditions. Ion temperature and toroidal velocity fluctuations due to the Edge Harmonic Oscillation (EHO) in Quiescent H-mode (QH) plasmas are presented to demonstrate UF-CHERS’ capabilities.

  15. Ultra-fast charge exchange spectroscopy for turbulent ion temperature fluctuation measurements on the DIII-D tokamak (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Uzun-Kaymak, I. U.; Fonck, R. J.; McKee, G. R.

    2012-10-15

    A novel two-channel, high throughput, high efficiency spectrometer system has been developed to measure impurity ion temperature and toroidal velocity fluctuations associated with long-wavelength turbulence and other plasma instabilities. The spectrometer observes the emission of the n= 8-7 hydrogenic transition of C{sup +5} ions ({lambda}{sub air}= 529.06 nm) resulting from charge exchange reactions between deuterium heating beams and intrinsic carbon. Novel features include a large, prism-coupled high-dispersion, volume-phase-holographic transmission grating and high-quantum efficiency, high-gain, low-noise avalanche photodiode detectors that sample emission at 1 MHz. This new diagnostic offers an order-of-magnitude increase in sensitivity compared to earlier ion thermal turbulence measurements. Increased sensitivity is crucial for obtaining enough photon statistics from plasmas with much less impurity content. The irreducible noise floor set by photon statistics sets the ultimate sensitivity to plasma fluctuations. Based on the measured photon flux levels for the entire spectral line, photon noise levels for T(tilde sign){sub i}/T{sub i} and V(tilde sign){sub i}/V{sub i} of {approx}1% are expected, while statistical averaging over long data records enables reduction in the detectable plasma fluctuation levels to values less than that. Broadband ion temperature fluctuations are observed to near 200 kHz in an L-mode discharge. Cross-correlation with the local beam emission spectroscopy measurements demonstrates a strong coupling of the density and temperature fields, and enables the cross-phase measurements between density and ion temperature fluctuations.

  16. Core-ion temperature measurement of the ADITYA tokamak using passive charge exchange neutral particle energy analyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Pandya, Santosh P.; Ajay, Kumar; Mishra, Priyanka; Dhingra, Rajani D.; Govindarajan, J.

    2013-02-15

    Core-ion temperature measurements have been carried out by the energy analysis of passive charge exchange (CX) neutrals escaping out of the ADITYA tokamak plasma (minor radius, a= 25 cm and major radius, R= 75 cm) using a 45 Degree-Sign parallel plate electrostatic energy analyzer. The neutral particle analyzer (NPA) uses a gas cell configuration for re-ionizing the CX-neutrals and channel electron multipliers (CEMs) as detectors. Energy calibration of the NPA has been carried out using ion-source and {Delta}E/E of high-energy channel has been found to be {approx}10%. Low signal to noise ratio (SNR) due to VUV reflections on the CEMs was identified during the operation of the NPA with ADITYA plasma discharges. This problem was rectified by upgrading the system by incorporating the additional components and arrangements to suppress VUV radiations and improve its VUV rejection capabilities. The noise rejection capability of the NPA was experimentally confirmed using a standard UV-source and also during the plasma discharges to get an adequate SNR (>30) at the energy channels. Core-ion temperature T{sub i}(0) during flattop of the plasma current has been measured to be up to 150 eV during ohmically heated plasma discharges which is nearly 40% of the average core-electron temperature (typically T{sub e}(0) {approx} 400 eV). The present paper describes the principle of tokamak ion temperature measurement, NPA's design, development, and calibration along with the modifications carried out for minimizing the interference of plasma radiations in the CX-spectrum. Performance of the NPA during plasma discharges and experimental results on the measurement of ion-temperature have also been reported here.

  17. Core-ion temperature measurement of the ADITYA tokamak using passive charge exchange neutral particle energy analyzer.

    PubMed

    Pandya, Santosh P; Ajay, Kumar; Mishra, Priyanka; Dhingra, Rajani D; Govindarajan, J

    2013-02-01

    Core-ion temperature measurements have been carried out by the energy analysis of passive charge exchange (CX) neutrals escaping out of the ADITYA tokamak plasma (minor radius, a = 25 cm and major radius, R = 75 cm) using a 45° parallel plate electrostatic energy analyzer. The neutral particle analyzer (NPA) uses a gas cell configuration for re-ionizing the CX-neutrals and channel electron multipliers (CEMs) as detectors. Energy calibration of the NPA has been carried out using ion-source and ΔE∕E of high-energy channel has been found to be ∼10%. Low signal to noise ratio (SNR) due to VUV reflections on the CEMs was identified during the operation of the NPA with ADITYA plasma discharges. This problem was rectified by upgrading the system by incorporating the additional components and arrangements to suppress VUV radiations and improve its VUV rejection capabilities. The noise rejection capability of the NPA was experimentally confirmed using a standard UV-source and also during the plasma discharges to get an adequate SNR (>30) at the energy channels. Core-ion temperature Ti(0) during flattop of the plasma current has been measured to be up to 150 eV during ohmically heated plasma discharges which is nearly 40% of the average core-electron temperature (typically Te(0) ∼ 400 eV). The present paper describes the principle of tokamak ion temperature measurement, NPA's design, development, and calibration along with the modifications carried out for minimizing the interference of plasma radiations in the CX-spectrum. Performance of the NPA during plasma discharges and experimental results on the measurement of ion-temperature have also been reported here.

  18. Compact multichannel neutral particle analyzer for measurement of energetic charge-exchanged neutrals in Alcator C-Mod

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, V.; Liptac, J.; Parker, R. R.; Bonoli, P. T.; Fiore, C. L.; Granetz, R. S.; Irby, J. H.; Lin, Y.; Wukitch, S. J.; Frenje, J. A.; Leiter, R.; Mcduffee, S.; Petrasso, R. D.

    2006-08-15

    A four-channel compact neutral particle analyzer (CNPA) based on operating small Si diode detectors in pulse-height analysis (PHA) mode is used to measure energetic hydrogen minority ions with energies between {approx}50 and 350 keV stemming from ion-cyclotron range-of-frequency heated D(H) Alcator C-Mod plasmas with both active and passive charge exchange (CX). First core minority ion distribution results from Alcator C-Mod discharges and a detailed description of the diagnostic are presented. The diagnostic employs integrated electronics and fast digitization of the shaping amplifier voltage. The digitized data are stored for postshot PHA, which removes the constraints of real-time PHA and allows for improved performance via elimination of base line shift effects and potentially relieving pileup through Gaussian fitting routines. The CNPA is insensitive to the large gamma and neutron background in Alcator C-Mod discharges but is susceptible to the plasma's soft x-ray flux. The soft x-ray flux limits the CNPA energy resolution to {approx}15-20 keV. A simple model is used to interpret the active CNPA data which permits rapid estimates of the core hydrogen minority temperatures and anisotropy with a time resolution of {approx}100 ms. Hydrogenlike boron is identified as an important electron donor for the CX signal.

  19. Charge Exchange with Highly Charged Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glick, Jeremy; Ferri, Kevin; Schmitt, Jaclyn; Hanson, Joshua; Marler, Joan

    2016-05-01

    A detailed study of the physics of highly charged ions (HCIs) is critical for a deep understanding of observed phenomena resulting from interactions of HCIs with neutral atoms in astrophysical and fusion environments. Specifically the charge transfer rates and spectroscopy of the subsequent decay fluorescence are of great interest to these communities. Results from a laboratory based investigation of these rates will be presented. The experiment takes advantage of an energy and charge state selected beam of HCIs from the recently on-line Clemson University EBIT (CUEBIT). Progress towards an experimental apparatus for retrapping HCIs towards precision spectroscopy of HCIs will also be presented.

  20. Ring current proton decay by charge exchange

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, P. H.; Hoffman, R. A.; Fritz, T.

    1975-01-01

    Explorer 45 measurements during the recovery phase of a moderate magnetic storm have confirmed that the charge exchange decay mechanism can account for the decay of the storm-time proton ring current. Data from the moderate magnetic storm of 24 February 1972 was selected for study since a symmetrical ring current had developed and effects due to asymmetric ring current losses could be eliminated. It was found that after the initial rapid decay of the proton flux, the equatorially mirroring protons in the energy range 5 to 30 keV decayed throughout the L-value range of 3.5 to 5.0 at the charge exchange decay rate calculated by Liemohn. After several days of decay, the proton fluxes reached a lower limit where an apparent equilibrium was maintained, between weak particle source mechanisms and the loss mechanisms, until fresh protons were injected into the ring current region during substorms. While other proton loss mechanisms may also be operating, the results indicate that charge exchange can entirely account for the storm-time proton ring current decay, and that this mechanism must be considered in all studies involving the loss of proton ring current particles.

  1. Charge exchange in H^+ + He^+ collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guevara Leon, Nicolais; Sabin, John R.; Deumens, Erik; Ohrn, Yngve

    2008-05-01

    Charge exchange in H^+ + He^+ collision are investigated theoretically at projectile energies below the ionization threshold at about 100 keV/amu. The electron nuclear dynamics (END) method is used to analyze the collision processes. Total charge exchange cross sections were calculated and compared with other theoretical and experimental data.

  2. New Charge Exchange Calculations for Lowly-Charged Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stancil, P. C.

    2005-05-01

    The process of charge exchange, which occurs during the collision of an ion with a neutral species, is important in a variety of astrophysical and atmospheric environments. It can have an influence on the ionization and thermal balances of the plasma and may also contribute to the emission spectrum. The charge exchange of multiply-charged ions (q>2) usually proceeds at a fast rate with rate coefficients typically of 10-10 to 10-9 cm3s-1. Therefore, highly-charged ions, which are created in UV or x-ray ionized gas, quickly recombine to smaller charges. However, the rate coefficients for singly- and doubly-charged ions can vary over five orders of magnitude depending on the ion species, the neutral target, and the temperature. In particular, the rate coefficients depend sensitively on the dominant mechanism which may be due to radial, rotational, radiative, or spin-orbit coupling and the corresponding quasi-molecular curves can be very complicated. Measurements of such processes are complicated by metastable contamination and uncertainties in target purity and estimates of empirical values inferred from astrophysical modeling are typically suspect. Therefore, the state of knowledge of lowly-charged electron transfer processes is generally poor, but these reactions can be critical in determining the state of the plasma. If, for example, the rate coefficient for a q=2 ion is very small, the process would result in a bottle-neck in the recombination cascade from higer charges. In an effort to address these problems, quantum-mechanical calculations have been carried out for a number of singly- and doubly-charged ions and benchmarked to measurements when available. I will present a summary of these results which reveal significant differences from values adopted in rate coefficient compilations used by various modeling packages. This work was performed in collaboration with L. B. Zhao, C. Y. Lin, J. P. Gu, H. P. Liebermann, R. J. Buenker, and M. Kimura. Support from NASA

  3. New Measurements of the Solar Wind Charge Exchange, Local Bubble, and Halo 3/4 keV Emission from XMM-Newton and Suzaku Shadowing Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelton, Robin L.; Henley, David

    2016-06-01

    We report on the analyses of XMM-Newton and/or Suzaku observations of 6 on-cloud and off-cloud shadowing pairs. This study provides the first analysis of two of these pairs and the first uniform analysis of the larger dataset. For every shadowing pair, we determined the foreground and halo components by simultaneously fitting the spectra from both members of the pair with a model that included a foreground component and an absorbed background component. In the past, foreground X-ray emission was thought to come from the Local Bubble of hot gas surrounding the solar neighborhood and so thermal spectral models were used. Now that solar wind charge exchange is recognized as a source of foreground X-ray photons, it is appropriate to consider charge exchange models as well. For this reason, we repeated the analyses using one of 3 possible foreground models: a charge exchange spectral model whose line ratios come from atomic physics calculations and are presented in Cumbee et al. (2014), a charge exchange model based on the AtomDB Charge Exchange code, or a thermal spectrum. The analyses of the larger dataset enabled us to place an upper limit on the Local Bubble's O VII contribution, provide measurements of the local and halo contributions in the 0.4 to 1.0 keV band, comment on the abilities of the various solar wind models to fit the data, and comment on the sensitivity of the fit parameters to the choice of foreground model, metal abundance tables, and X-ray observatory.

  4. X-ray emission from charge exchange of highly-charged ions in atoms and molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenwood, J. B.; Williams, I. D.; Smith, S. J.; Chutjian, A.

    2000-01-01

    Charge exchange followed by radiative stabilization are the main processes responsible for the recent observations of X-ray emission from comets in their approach to the Sun. A new apparatus was constructed to measure, in collisions of HCIs with atoms and molecules, (a) absolute cross sections for single and multiple charge exchange, and (b) normalized X-ray emission cross sections.

  5. Visible charge exchange recombination spectroscopy on TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Stratton, B.C.; Fonck, R.J.; Jaehnig, K.P.; Schechtman, N.; Synakowski, E.J.

    1991-03-01

    Visible charge exchange recombination spectroscopy is routinely used to measure the time evolution of the ion temperature (T{sub i}) and toroidal rotation velocity (v{sub {phi}}) profiles on TFTR. These measurements are made with the CHERS diagnostic, a fiber-optically coupled spectrometer equipped with a two-dimensional photodiode array detector which provides both spectral and spatial resolution. The instrumentation, data analysis techniques, and examples of T{sub i} and v{sub {phi}} measurements are described. Recently, CHERS has been used to perform impurity transport experiments: radial profiles of diffusivities and convective velocities for helium and iron have been deduced from measurements of the time evolutions of He{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 24+} profiles following impurity injection. Examples of these measurements are given. 12 refs., 8 figs.

  6. Charge-exchange collisions of C 60z+ : a probe of the ion charge distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron, Douglas B.; Parks, Joel H.

    1997-06-01

    We present Paul trap measurements of charge-exchange collisions of Li, Cs and C 60 with C 60z+ ions ( z = 1-3) at thermal energies. Surprisingly, the measured charge-exchange rates for each neutral species are not proportional to the ion charge z as would be expected for Langevin collisions involving a uniformly charged ion. The relative rates can be reproduced by a model based on a symmetric distribution of point charges that are free to move on the ion surface during the neutral trajectory. Such behavior can be attributed to static and possibly dynamic Jahn-Teller effects in C 60z+ ions.

  7. Laboratory Measurements Compellingly Support a Charge-exchange Mechanism for the ’Dark Matter’ ~3.5 keV X-Ray Line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Chintan; Dobrodey, Stepan; Bernitt, Sven; Steinbrügge, René; Crespo López-Urrutia, José R.; Gu, Liyi; Kaastra, Jelle

    2016-12-01

    The reported observations of an unidentified X-ray line feature at ∼3.5 keV have driven a lively discussion about its possible dark matter origin. Motivated by this, we have measured the K-shell X-ray spectra of highly ionized bare sulfur ions following charge exchange with gaseous molecules in an electron beam ion trap, as a source of or a contributor to this X-ray line. We produced S16+ and S15+ ions and let them capture electrons in collision with those molecules with the electron beam turned off while recording X-ray spectra. We observed a charge-exchange-induced X-ray feature at the Lyman series limit (3.47 ± 0.06 keV). The inferred X-ray energy is in full agreement with the reported astrophysical observations and supports the novel scenario proposed by Gu et al.

  8. Measurement of Anomalously Strong Emission from the 1s-9p Transition in the Spectrum of H-like Phosphorus Following Charge Exchange with Molecular Hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leutenegger, M. A.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Brown, G. V.; Kelley, R. L.; Porter, F. S.

    2010-01-01

    We have measured K-shell x-ray spectra of highly ionized argon and phosphorus following charge exchange with molecular hydrogen at low collision energy in an electron beam ion trap using an x-ray calorimeter array with approx.6 eV resolution. We find that the emission at the high-end of the Lyman series is greater by a factor of two for phosphorus than for argon, even though the measurement was performed concurrently and the atomic numbers are similar. This does not agree with current theoretical models and deviates from the trend observed in previous measurements.

  9. Ring current proton decay by charge exchange

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, P. H.; Hoffman, R. A.; Fritz, T. A.

    1976-01-01

    Explorer 45 (S3-A) measurements were made during the recovery phase of the moderate magnetic storm of February 24, 1972, in which a symmetric ring current had developed and effects due to asymmetric ring current losses could be eliminated. It was found that after the initial rapid decay of the proton flux, which is a consequence of the dissipation of the asymmetric ring current, the equatorially mirroring protons in the energy range 5-30 keV decayed throughout the L value range of 3.5-5.0 at the charge exchange decay rate calculated by Liemohn (1961). After several days of decay, the proton fluxes reached a lower limit where an apparent equilibrium was maintained, between weak particle source mechanisms and the loss mechanisms, until fresh protons were injected into the ring current region during substorms. While other proton loss mechanisms may also be operating, the results indicate that charge exchange is more than sufficient as a particle loss mechanism for the storm time proton ring current decay.

  10. Systematics of pion double charge exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Gilman, R.A.

    1985-10-01

    Differential cross sections have been measured for pion-induced double-charge-exchange (DCX) reactions leading to double-isobaric-analog states (DIAS) and low-lying nonanalog states in the residual nuclei. A description of the experimental details and data analysis is presented. The experimentally observed systematics of reactions leading to DIAS, to nonanalog ground states, and to low-lying 2 states are described. Lowest-order optical-model calculations of DIAS DCX are compared to the data. Efforts to understand the anomalies by invoking additional reaction-mechanism amplitudes and a higher-order optical potential are described. Calculations of nonanalog DCX reactions leading to J/sup / = 0 states were performed within a distorted-wave impulse-approximation framework. The sensitivities of these calculations to input parameters are discussed. 58 refs., 41 figs., 16 tabs.

  11. Laboratory measurements compellingly support a charge-exchange mechanism for the "Dark matter" ~3.5 keV X-ray line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Chintan; Bernitt, Sven; Dobrodey, Stepan; Steinbrügge, René; Gu, Liyi; Kaastra, Jelle S.; Crespo Lopez-Urrutia, José R.

    2017-08-01

    A mysterious X-ray signal at 3.5 keV from nearby galaxies and galaxy clusters recently sparked tremendous interest in the scientific community and has given rise to a tide of publications attempting to explain the origin of this line [1]. It has been hypothesized that the signal is the result of decaying sterile neutrinos - a potential dark matter particle candidate - presumably based on the fact that this X-ray line is not available in the standard spectral databases and models for thermal plasmas. Cautiously, Gu et al. [2] have pointed out an alternative explanation for this phenomenon: charge exchange between bare ions of sulfur and atomic hydrogen. Their model shows that X-rays should be emitted at 3.5 keV by a set of S15+ transitions from n ≥ 9 to the ground states, where n is the principle quantum number.We tested this hypothesis in the laboratory by measuring K-shell X-ray spectra of highly ionized sulfur ions following charge exchange with gaseous molecules in an electron beam ion trap. We produced bare S16+ and H-like S15+ ions and let them capture electrons in collisions with molecules while recording X-ray spectra. The 3.5 keV transition clearly shows up in the charge-exchange induced spectrum under a broad range of conditions. The inferred X-ray energy of 3.47 ± 0.06 keV is in full accord with both the astrophysical observations and theoretical calculations, and confirms the novel scenario proposed by Gu [2]. Taking the experimental uncertainties and inaccuracies of the astrophysical measurements into account, we conclude that the charge exchange between bare sulfur and hydrogen atoms can outstandingly explain the mysterious signal at around 3.5 keV [3].[1] E. Bulbul et al., Astrophys. J. 13, 789 (2014)[2] L. Gu et al., A & A L11, 584 (2015)[3] C. Shah et al., Astrophys. J. 833, 52 (2016)

  12. Measurement of absolute charge-exchange cross sections for He{sup 2+} collisions with He and H{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Mawhorter, R. J.; Greenwood, J. B.; Chutjian, A.; Simcic, J.; Haley, T.; Mitescu, C. D.

    2011-11-15

    Reported are total, absolute charge-exchange cross sections for collisions of {sup 3}He{sup 2+} ions with He and H{sub 2}. Measurements are reported at fixed energies between 0.33 and 4.67 keV/amu. Both the present results and earlier results of others are analyzed in terms of available experimental small-angle differential cross sections as a function of collision energy, and hence the geometry of the exit aperture of the gas-collision cells used by the various experimental groups. In addition, the effective length of gas-collision cells is studied using fluid dynamic and molecular flow simulations to address the density patterns near the cell entrance and exit apertures. When small acceptance-angle corrections were applied, the results of present and previous measurements for the single electron capture in these systems were brought into good accord in the relevant energy ranges. Taken in their entirety, the present data for {sup 3}He{sup 2+} with He and H{sub 2} lend themselves to new theoretical calculations of the multichannel charge-exchange cross sections.

  13. Pion double charge exchange and hadron dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, M.B.

    1991-01-01

    This paper will review theoretical results to show how pion double charge exchange is contributing to our understanding of hadron dynamics in nuclei. The exploitation of the nucleus as a filter is shown to be essential in facilitating the comparison between theory and experiment. 23 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Effects of proton-exchange membrane fuel-cell operating conditions on charge transfer resistances measured by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Aaron, Doug S; Yiacoumi, Sotira; Tsouris, Costas

    2008-01-01

    Proton-exchange-membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) are highly dependent on operating conditions, such as humidity and temperature. This study employs electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) to measure the effects of operating parameters on internal proton and electron transport resistance mechanisms in the PEMFC. Current-density experiments have been performed to measure the power production in a 25 cm{sup 2} Nafion 117 PEMFC at varying operating conditions. These experiments have shown that low humidity and low temperature contribute to decreased power production. EIS is currently employed to provide a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in power production by calculating the specific resistances at various regions in the PEMFC. Experiments are performed at temperatures ranging from 30 to 50 C, feed humidities from 20 to 98%, and air stoichiometric ratios from 1.33 to 2.67. In all experiments, the hydrogen feed stoichiometric ratio was approximately 4.0. EIS is used to identify which transport steps limit the power production of the PEMFC over these ranges of conditions. The experimental data are analyzed via comparison to equivalent circuit models (ECMs), a technique that uses an electrical circuit to represent the electrochemical and transport properties of the PEMFC. These studies will aid in designing fuel cells that are more tolerant to wide-ranging operating conditions. In addition, optimal operating conditions for PEMFC operation can be identified.

  15. Charge Exchange Spectra of Hydrogenic and He-like Iron

    SciTech Connect

    Wargelin, B J; Beiersdorfer, P; Neill, P A; Olson, R E; Scofield, J H

    2005-04-27

    We present H-like Fe XXVI and He-like Fe XXV charge-exchange spectra resulting from collisions of highly charged iron with N{sub 2} gas at an energy of {approx}10 eV amu{sup -1} in an electron beam ion trap. Although high-n emission lines are not resolved in our measurements, we observe that the most likely level for Fe{sup 25+} {yields} Fe{sup 24+} electron capture is n{sub max} {approx} 9, in line with expectations, while the most likely value for Fe{sup 26+} {yields} Fe{sup 25+} charge exchange is significantly higher. In the Fe XXV spectrum, the K{alpha} emission feature dominates, whether produced via charge exchange or collisional excitation. The K{alpha} energy centroid is lower in the former case than the latter (6666 versus 6685 eV, respectively), as expected because of the strong enhancement of emission from the forbidden and intercombination lines, relative to the resonance line, in charge-exchange spectra. In contrast, the Fe XXVI high-n Lyman lines have a summed intensity greater than that of Ly{alpha}, and are substantially stronger than predicted from theoretical calculations of charge exchange with atomic H. A discussion is presented of the relevance of our results to studies of diffuse Fe emission in the Galactic Center and Galactic Ridge, particularly with ASTRO-E2.

  16. Charge-exchange born He(+) ions in the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gruntman, Michael A.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of charge transfer between solar wind alpha-particles and hydrogen atoms of interstellar origin is revisited. Singly-charged helium ions born in the charge transfer carry important information on processes in the solar wind and the heliosphere. The velocity distribution of such He(+) ions is substantially different from that of He(+) pick-up ions due to ionization of the interstellar helium atoms. Estimates of the expected abundances of the charge-exchange born He(+) in the solar wind are presented, and the possibility of measuring this plasma component on deep space missions is discussed.

  17. Design and operation of the pellet charge exchange diagnostic for measurement of energetic confined α particles and tritons on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medley, S. S.; Mansfield, D. K.; Roquemore, A. L.; Fisher, R. K.; Duong, H. H.; McChesney, J. M.; Parks, P. B.; Petrov, M. P.; Khudoleev, A. V.; Gorelenkov, N. N.

    1996-09-01

    Radially resolved energy and density distributions of the confined α particles in D-T experiments on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) are being measured with the pellet charge exchange (PCX) diagnostic. Other energetic ion species can be detected as well, such as tritons produced in D-D plasmas and H, He3, or tritium rf-driven minority ion tails. The ablation cloud formed by injected low-Z impurity pellets provides the neutralization target for this active charge exchange technique. Because the cloud neutralization efficiency is uncertain, the PCX diagnostic is not absolutely calibrated so only relative density profiles are obtained. A mass and energy resolving E∥B neutral particle analyzer (NPA) is used which has eight energy channels covering the energy range of 0.3-3.7 MeV for α particles with energy resolution ranging from 5.8% to 11.3% and a spatial resolution of ˜5 cm. The PCX diagnostic views deeply trapped ions in a narrow pitch angle range around a mean value of v∥/v=-0.048±10-3. For D-T operation, the NPA was shielded by a polyethylene-lead enclosure providing 100× attenuation of ambient γ radiation and 14 MeV neutrons. The PCX diagnostic technique and its application on TFTR are described in detail.

  18. Measurement of deuterium density profiles in the H-mode steep gradient region using charge exchange recombination spectroscopy on DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haskey, S. R.; Grierson, B. A.; Burrell, K. H.; Chrystal, C.; Groebner, R. J.; Kaplan, D. H.; Pablant, N. A.; Stagner, L.

    2016-11-01

    Recent completion of a thirty two channel main-ion (deuterium) charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CER) diagnostic on the DIII-D tokamak [J. L. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)] enables detailed comparisons between impurity and main-ion temperature, density, and toroidal rotation. In a H-mode DIII-D discharge, these new measurement capabilities are used to provide the deuterium density profile, demonstrate the importance of profile alignment between Thomson scattering and CER diagnostics, and aid in determining the electron temperature at the separatrix. Sixteen sightlines cover the core of the plasma and another sixteen are densely packed towards the plasma edge, providing high resolution measurements across the pedestal and steep gradient region in H-mode plasmas. Extracting useful physical quantities such as deuterium density is challenging due to multiple photoemission processes. These challenges are overcome using a detailed fitting model and by forward modeling the photoemission using the FIDASIM code, which implements a comprehensive collisional radiative model.

  19. Measurement of deuterium density profiles in the H-mode steep gradient region using charge exchange recombination spectroscopy on DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Haskey, S. R.; Grierson, B. A.; Burrell, K. H.; Chrystal, C.; Groebner, R. J.; Kaplan, D. H.; Pablant, N. A.; Stagner, L.

    2016-09-26

    Recent completion of a thirty two channel main-ion (deuterium) charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CER) diagnostic on the DIII-D tokamak enables detailed comparisons between impurity and main-ion temperature, density, and toroidal rotation. In a H-mode DIII-D discharge, these new measurement capabilities are used to provide the deuterium density profile, demonstrate the importance of profile alignment between Thomson scattering and CER diagnostics, and aid in determining the electron temperature at the separatrix. Sixteen sightlines cover the core of the plasma and another sixteen are densely packed towards the plasma edge, providing high resolution measurements across the pedestal and steep gradient region in H-mode plasmas. Extracting useful physical quantities such as deuterium density is challenging due to multiple photoemission processes. Finally, these challenges are overcome using a detailed fitting model and by forward modeling the photoemission using the FIDASIM code, which implements a comprehensive collisional radiative model. Published by AIP Publishing.

  20. Measurement of deuterium density profiles in the H-mode steep gradient region using charge exchange recombination spectroscopy on DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Haskey, S. R.; Grierson, B. A.; Burrell, K. H.; Chrystal, C.; Groebner, R. J.; Kaplan, D. H.; Pablant, N. A.; Stagner, L.

    2016-09-26

    Recent completion of a thirty two channel main-ion (deuterium) charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CER) diagnostic on the DIII-D tokamak enables detailed comparisons between impurity and main-ion temperature, density, and toroidal rotation. In a H-mode DIII-D discharge, these new measurement capabilities are used to provide the deuterium density profile, demonstrate the importance of profile alignment between Thomson scattering and CER diagnostics, and aid in determining the electron temperature at the separatrix. Sixteen sightlines cover the core of the plasma and another sixteen are densely packed towards the plasma edge, providing high resolution measurements across the pedestal and steep gradient region in H-mode plasmas. Extracting useful physical quantities such as deuterium density is challenging due to multiple photoemission processes. Finally, these challenges are overcome using a detailed fitting model and by forward modeling the photoemission using the FIDASIM code, which implements a comprehensive collisional radiative model. Published by AIP Publishing.

  1. Measurement of radial profiles of density ratio of helium to hydrogen ion using charge exchange spectroscopy with two-wavelength spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ida, K.; Yoshinuma, M.; Wieland, B.; Goto, M.; Nakamura, Y.; Kobayashi, M.; Murakami, I.; Moon, C.

    2015-12-01

    Radial profiles of density ratio of helium to hydrogen ions are measured using the charge exchange spectroscopy technique with the two-wavelength spectrometer system in the large helical device. The two-wavelength spectrometer system consists of a dichroic mirror box, a spectrometer with two grating and two camera lenses, and one CCD detector. The dichroic mirror box is used to divide the light of one fiber from the plasma to two fibers, one for HeII (λ = 468.6 nm) and the other for Hα (λ = 656.3 nm), that are connected to the entrance slit of the spectrometer to eliminate the interference between the HeII and the Hα spectra on the CCD. This system provides a simultaneous measurement of helium and hydrogen ion density ratio at 8 exact same locations (8 spatial channels) with a time resolution of >40 ms in the wide range of the density ratio of 0.05-5.

  2. Charge exchange and energy loss of slow highly charged ions in 1 nm thick carbon nanomembranes.

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, Richard A; Gruber, Elisabeth; Ritter, Robert; Heller, René; Facsko, Stefan; Aumayr, Friedrich

    2014-04-18

    Experimental charge exchange and energy loss data for the transmission of slow highly charged Xe ions through ultrathin polymeric carbon membranes are presented. Surprisingly, two distinct exit charge state distributions accompanied by charge exchange dependent energy losses are observed. The energy loss for ions exhibiting large charge loss shows a quadratic dependency on the incident charge state indicating that equilibrium stopping force values do not apply in this case. Additional angle resolved transmission measurements point on a significant contribution of elastic energy loss. The observations show that regimes of different impact parameters can be separated and thus a particle's energy deposition in an ultrathin solid target may not be described in terms of an averaged energy loss per unit length.

  3. Charge exchange avalanche at the cometopause

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gombosi, Tamas I.

    1987-01-01

    A sharp transition from a solar wind proton dominated flow to a plasma population primarily consisting of relatively cold cometary heavy ions has been observed at a cometocentric distance of about 160,000 km by the VEGA and GIOTTO missions. This boundary (the cometopause) was thought to be related to charge transfer processes, but its location and thickness are inconsistent with conventionally estimated ion - neutral coupling boundaries. In this paper a two-fluid model is used to investigate the major physical processes at the cometopause. By adopting observed comet Halley parameters the model is able to reproduce the location and the thickness of this charge exchange boundary.

  4. Charge exchange avalanche at the cometopause

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gombosi, Tamas I.

    1987-01-01

    A sharp transition from a solar wind proton dominated flow to a plasma population primarily consisting of relatively cold cometary heavy ions has been observed at a cometocentric distance of about 160,000 km by the VEGA and GIOTTO missions. This boundary (the cometopause) was thought to be related to charge transfer processes, but its location and thickness are inconsistent with conventionally estimated ion - neutral coupling boundaries. In this paper a two-fluid model is used to investigate the major physical processes at the cometopause. By adopting observed comet Halley parameters the model is able to reproduce the location and the thickness of this charge exchange boundary.

  5. Pion Charge Exchange Cross Section on Liquid Argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Kevin; LArIAT (FNAL T-1034) Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The observation of neutrino oscillations allows charge parity violation to be probed in the neutrino sector. Detectors with high calorimetric energy resolution and high spatial resolution will provide precise measurements of neutrino oscillations. By measuring small π+/- cross sections for individual interaction channels, specifically charge exchange, we will make a measurement in the first of its kind on liquid Argon and demonstrate the physics capabilities of a relatively new detector technology: the Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber (LAr TPC). This analysis will report on the thin slab cross section measurement technique and the Monte Carlo cross section measurements in the energy range of 0.2 - 1.0 GeV. This analysis is the first iteration in classifying charge exchange events from a sample of incident pions, and it aims to identify events in which a π0 was produced without any charged pions leaving the interaction vertex. We will also report on the methodology and efficiency of this algorithm in identifying particles and their interactions in liquid argon. This analysis will inform a future measurement of the π+/- charge exchange cross section on liquid argon. This work was supported in part by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. PHY-1359364.

  6. X-ray Line Formation by Charge Exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beiersdorfer, Peter

    Existing X-ray telescopes have revealed charge exchange to be a key astrophysical process leading to X-ray emission when highly charged ions from such diverse sources as stellar winds, supernova remnants, or galactic super-winds interact with comets, planetary atmospheres, or the interstellar neutral gas. Charge exchange with bare sulfur ions, for example, was proposed as an alternative explanation of the 3.5 keV X-ray feature in the emission of galactic clusters that had been associated with the possible decay of sterile neutrinos. Fe XVII dominates the spectral emission of a large number of astrophysical X-ray sources and, thus, is of prime diagnostic importance, as illustrated in numerous measurements by Chandra and XMM-Newton. Although immense progress has been made in laboratory measurements and spectral calculations of collisional plasmas since the launch of these X-ray observatories, model calculations of the Fe XVII X-ray spectrum still do not yield agreement with astrophysical observations that is completely satisfactory. As a result, charge exchange has been invoked as an alternative explanation for the poor agreement between models and observations. Theoretically, line formation by charge exchange, however, is still only poorly understood both in the case of the rather 'simple'K-shell spectra of hydrogenlike or heliumlike ions, such as Fe XXV and Fe XXVI, and the more complex L-shell spectra of neonlike ions such as Fe XVII. Experimentally, there is only a small set of laboratory measurements involving X-rays from K-shell ions, and almost no measurements of the charge exchange produced X-ray emission involving L-shell ions. Moreover, the existing laboratory measurements have focused mostly on charge exchange processes pertaining to the solar wind interacting with complex (molecular) gases in cometary and planetary atmospheres. By contrast, we propose here to perform X-ray measurements pertaining to astrophysical exchange processes dominated by atomic

  7. O(+) charge exchange in the polar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barakat, A. R.; Schunk, R. W.

    1984-11-01

    O(+) density and flux profiles are calculated for a steady state polar wind flow of O(+) ions and electrons along geomagnetic field lines in the polar cap. Profiles are computed both with and without allowance for accidentally resonant charge exchange (ARCE) between O(+) and H. It is found that ARCE acts to reduce the limiting O(+) escape flux by less than 30 percent for typical atmospheric conditions and by only a factor of about 3.5 for atmospheres with low exospheric temperatures. Allowing for ARCE, the limiting O(+) escape flux is of the order of 5 x 10 to the 8th to 9th/cu cm/s, depending on the atmospheric conditions. This indicates that, contrary to previous predictions, there is no O(+) charge exchange barrier and it is therefore not necessary to have an acceleration mechanism at low altitudes in order to have an appreciable O(+) escape flux.

  8. Solar wind charge exchange during geomagnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, I. P.; Cravens, T. E.; Sibeck, D. G.; Collier, M. R.; Kuntz, K. D.

    2012-04-01

    On 2001 March 31 a coronal mass ejection pushed the subsolar magnetopause to the vicinity of geosynchronous orbit at 6.6 R_E. The NASA/GSFC Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) employed a global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model to simulate the solar wind-magnetosphere interaction during the peak of this geomagnetic storm. Robertson et al. then modeled the expected soft X-ray emission due to solar wind charge exchange with geocoronal neutrals in the dayside cusp and magnetosheath. The locations of the bow shock, magnetopause and cusps were clearly evident in their simulations. Another geomagnetic storm took place on 2000 July 14 (Bastille Day). We again modeled X-ray emission due to solar wind charge exchange, but this time as observed from a moving spacecraft. This paper discusses the impact of spacecraft location on observed X-ray emission and the degree to which the locations of the bow shock and magnetopause can be detected in images.

  9. Charge exchange neutral particle measurements with natural diamond detector under the deuterium-deuterium neutron field on JT-60U tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Ishikawa, M.; Kusama, Y.; Takechi, M.; Nishitani, T.; Morioka, A.; Sasao, M.; Isobe, M.; Krasilnikov, A.; Kaschuck, Yu. A.

    2004-10-01

    A natural diamond detector (NDD) has been installed on the JT-60U tokamak to measure the flux and the energy distribution of charge exchange (CX) fast neutral particles. A NDD has many important advantages to be used as a CX neutral particle analyzer, for example very compact size, high energy resolution, and high radiation hardness etc., while the neutrons and {gamma} rays are a large noise source in the deuterium plasma. The shield was set up around the NDD to reduce those noises. Time-resolved energy distribution of CX neutral particles corresponding to injected beam energy have been successfully obtained under high intensity neutron yield Y{sub n}>10{sup 15} n/s. Further enhanced neutral particle fluxes during sawtooth oscillation and Alfven eigenmodes were observed with the NDD. The performance of the NDD as CX neutral particle spectrometer under high intensity neutron yield was demonstrated for the first time on JT-60U in this work.

  10. Charge-exchange plasma environment for an ion drive spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, H. R.; Carruth, M. R., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    A model was reviewed which describes the propagation of the mercury charge-exchange plasma and extended to describe the flow of the molybdenum component of the charge-exchange plasma. The uncertainties in the models for various conditions are discussed. Such topics as current drain to the solar array, charge-exchange plasma material deposition, and the effects of space plasma on the charge-exchange plasma propagation are addressed.

  11. Charge-exchange plasma environment for an ion drive spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, H. R.; Carruth, M. R., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    A model was reviewed which describes the propagation of the mercury charge-exchange plasma and extended to describe the flow of the molybdenum component of the charge-exchange plasma. The uncertainties in the models for various conditions are discussed. Such topics as current drain to the solar array, charge-exchange plasma material deposition, and the effects of space plasma on the charge-exchange plasma propagation are addressed.

  12. Charge symmetry breaking two-pion exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Niskanen, J.A. )

    1992-06-01

    Two-pion exchange (TPE) contribution to the charge symmetry breaking class IV neutron-proton interaction is examined in a potential and coupled channels approach. Based on nonrelativistic {pi}{ital NN} and {pi}{ital N}{Delta} vertices, a TPE interaction is treated in two ways, as a potential or as a part calculable by the coupled channels method plus a residual potential interaction. A practical parametrization of the TPE potentials is given, which can also be used in the case of class III charge symmetry breaking (CSB) forces as well as for charge symmetric interactions. The results show that below 300 MeV the TPE contribution to CSB in elastic {ital np} scattering is insignificant, whereas at higher energies it should not be neglected.

  13. Measurement of the left-right asymmetry in pion-proton radiative exchange and charge exchange scattering from 301 to 625 MeV/c on a transversely polarized target

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, George Jung-Kwang

    1988-05-01

    The left-right asymmetry A/sub N/ in ..pi../sup /minus//p ..-->.. ..gamma..n has been measured at p/sub ..pi.. = 301, 316, 427, 471, 547, 586, and 625 MeV/c using a transversely polarized target. The final-state neutron and gamma were detected in coincidence by two states of matching neutron and gamma detectors at gamma angles centered around 90/degree and 110/degree/ c.m. A gamma detector consisted of an array of 15 counters, each was 15/times/15/times/25 cm/sup 3/ block of lead-glass. A neutron detector consisted of 15 counters also, each one was a cylindrical plastic scintillator 7.6 cm in diameter and 45.7 cm long. The A/sub N/ results are compared with the predictions from the most recent single-pion photoproduction partial-wave analysis by Arai and Fujii. The agreement is poor, casting doubt on the correctness of the value for the radiative-decay amplitude of the neutral Roper resonance now in use. A comparison is made with the 90/degree/recoil proton polarization data of the inverse reaction derived from ..gamma..d scattering, there are substantial discrepencies. Charge exchange (..pi../sup /minus/p/ ..-->.. ..gamma../degree/n) events were the major yield in this experiment. Very precise values of the charge exchange analyzing power were obtained with an error of typically 3%. The charge exchange results are compared with the predictions from recent ..gamma..n partial wave analyses. At the lower incident energies little difference is seen between the VPI, Karlsruhe-Helsinki, and CMU-LBL analyses, and there is excellent agreement with our experiment. From the onset of the Roper resonance the VPI solution is strongly favored.

  14. Krypton charge exchange cross sections for Hall effect thruster models

    SciTech Connect

    Hause, Michael L.; Prince, Benjamin D.; Bemish, Raymond J.

    2013-04-28

    Following discharge from a Hall effect thruster, charge exchange occurs between ions and un-ionized propellant atoms. The low-energy cations produced can disturb operation of onboard instrumentation or the thruster itself. Charge-exchange cross sections for both singly and doubly charged propellant atoms are required to model these interactions. While xenon is the most common propellant currently used in Hall effect thrusters, other propellants are being considered, in particular, krypton. We present here guided-ion beam measurements and comparisons to semiclassical calculations for Kr{sup +} + Kr and Kr{sup 2+} + Kr cross sections. The measurements of symmetric Kr{sup +} + Kr charge exchange are in good agreement with both the calculations including spin-orbit effects and previous measurements. For the symmetric Kr{sup 2+} + Kr reaction, we present cross section measurements for center-of-mass energies between 1 eV and 300 eV, which spans energies not previously examined experimentally. These cross section measurements compare well with a simple one-electron transfer model. Finally, cross sections for the asymmetric Kr{sup 2+} + Kr {yields} Kr{sup +} + Kr{sup +} reaction show an onset near 12 eV, reaching cross sections near constant value of 1.6 A{sup 2} with an exception near 70-80 eV.

  15. Ion thruster charge-exchange plasma flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carruth, M. R., Jr.; Gabriel, S. B.; Kitamura, S.

    1982-01-01

    The electron bombardment ion thruster has been under development for a number of years and during this time, studies of the plasmas produced by the thrusters and their interactions with spacecraft have been evaluated, based on available data. Due to diagnostic techniques used and facility effects, there is uncertainty as to the reliability of data from these early studies. This paper presents data on the flow of the charge-exchange plasma produced just downstream of the thruster's ion optics. The 'end-effect' of a cylindrical Langmuir probe is used to determine ion density and directed ion velocity. Results are compared with data obtained from a retarding potential analyzer-Faraday cup.

  16. Solar Wind Charge Exchange During Geomagnetic Storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Ina P.; Cravens, Thomas E.; Sibeck, David G.; Collier, Michael R.; Kuntz, K. D.

    2012-01-01

    On March 31st. 2001, a coronal mass ejection pushed the subsolar magnetopause to the vicinity of geosynchronous orbit at 6.6 RE. The NASA/GSFC Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMe) employed a global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model to simulate the solar wind-magnetosphere interaction during the peak of this geomagnetic storm. Robertson et aL then modeled the expected 50ft X-ray emission due to solar wind charge exchange with geocoronal neutrals in the dayside cusp and magnetosheath. The locations of the bow shock, magnetopause and cusps were clearly evident in their simulations. Another geomagnetic storm took place on July 14, 2000 (Bastille Day). We again modeled X-ray emission due to solar wind charge exchange, but this time as observed from a moving spacecraft. This paper discusses the impact of spacecraft location on observed X-ray emission and the degree to which the locations of the bow shock and magnetopause can be detected in images.

  17. Solar Wind Charge Exchange During Geomagnetic Storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Ina P.; Cravens, Thomas E.; Sibeck, David G.; Collier, Michael R.; Kuntz, K. D.

    2012-01-01

    On March 31st. 2001, a coronal mass ejection pushed the subsolar magnetopause to the vicinity of geosynchronous orbit at 6.6 RE. The NASA/GSFC Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMe) employed a global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model to simulate the solar wind-magnetosphere interaction during the peak of this geomagnetic storm. Robertson et aL then modeled the expected 50ft X-ray emission due to solar wind charge exchange with geocoronal neutrals in the dayside cusp and magnetosheath. The locations of the bow shock, magnetopause and cusps were clearly evident in their simulations. Another geomagnetic storm took place on July 14, 2000 (Bastille Day). We again modeled X-ray emission due to solar wind charge exchange, but this time as observed from a moving spacecraft. This paper discusses the impact of spacecraft location on observed X-ray emission and the degree to which the locations of the bow shock and magnetopause can be detected in images.

  18. Measurement of the analysing power and the differential cross section of the overlinepp charge-exchange reaction at LEAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birsa, R.; Bradamante, F.; Torre-Colautti, S. Dalla; Giorgi, M.; Lamanna, M.; Martin, A.; Penzo, A.; Schiavon, P.; Tessarotto, F.; Macciotta, M. P.; Masoni, A.; Puddu, G.; Serci, S.; Niinikoski, T.; Rijllart, A.; Ahmidouch, A.; Heer, E.; Hess, R.; Kunne, R. A.; Luc, C. Lechanoine-Le; Mascarini, C.; Rapin, D.; Arvieux, J.; Bertini, R.; Catz, H.; Faivre, J. C.; Perrot-Kunne, F.; Agnello, M.; Iazzi, F.; Minetti, B.; Bressani, T.; Chiavassa, E.; De Marco, N.; Musso, A.; Piccotti, A.

    1990-08-01

    As part of a programme to study the spin structure of the overlinepp→ overlinenn channel, we have measured the analysing power A0 n and the differential cross section at an incident antiproton beam momentum of 704 MeV/ c. The analysing power exhibits a remarkable angular dependence, which is poorly reproduced by the existing potential models.

  19. Measurement of deuterium density profiles in the H-mode steep gradient region using charge exchange recombination spectroscopy on DIII-D

    DOE PAGES

    Haskey, S. R.; Grierson, B. A.; Burrell, K. H.; ...

    2016-09-26

    Recent completion of a thirty two channel main-ion (deuterium) charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CER) diagnostic on the DIII-D tokamak enables detailed comparisons between impurity and main-ion temperature, density, and toroidal rotation. In a H-mode DIII-D discharge, these new measurement capabilities are used to provide the deuterium density profile, demonstrate the importance of profile alignment between Thomson scattering and CER diagnostics, and aid in determining the electron temperature at the separatrix. Sixteen sightlines cover the core of the plasma and another sixteen are densely packed towards the plasma edge, providing high resolution measurements across the pedestal and steep gradient region inmore » H-mode plasmas. Extracting useful physical quantities such as deuterium density is challenging due to multiple photoemission processes. Finally, these challenges are overcome using a detailed fitting model and by forward modeling the photoemission using the FIDASIM code, which implements a comprehensive collisional radiative model. Published by AIP Publishing.« less

  20. Charge exchange recombination spectroscopy on a diagnostic hydrogen beam—measuring impurity rotation and radial electric field at the tokamak TEXTOR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coenen, J. W.; Schweer, B.; Clever, M.; Freutel, S.; Schmitz, O.; Stoschus, H.; Samm, U.; Unterberg, B.

    2010-07-01

    In this work we present an overview on the charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CXRS) diagnostic operated with the modulated diagnostic hydrogen beam at the tokamak TEXTOR. The diagnostic setup combines two observation systems used for the measurement of the poloidal (vpol) and the toroidal (vtor) ion velocity component. At TEXTOR a differential Doppler spectroscopy approach (accurate absolute rotation scale) is combined with the high intensity and spatial resolution of a direct imaging system necessary for accurate poloidal rotation measurements on a shot-by-shot basis. This setup allows the full utilization of a 2D CCD detector in the spectral and radial direction. In the case of the poloidal system this allows spatial resolution in the range of mm to cm depending on the intensity requirements for the velocity. The toroidal system comprises a fibre-optic array. The combination of the two measurements with a low-power diagnostic beam can in principle be operated during any available heating scenario without interfering with the discharge. Time resolution is limited by the necessary averaging process; typically a stable plateau of 3 s during a TETXOR pulse is used. The TEXTOR tokamak has the ability to apply momentum input with two tangential neutral beam heating injectors, allowing for measurements under various heating and momentum input scenarios. With the presented diagnostic half the plasma minor radius at a spatial resolution of {\\sim} 1\\,\\rm cm is covered. With the CVI line at 529.053 nm an accuracy of 0.7\\, \\rm km\\,s^{-1} for the poloidal and ~5 \\rm km\\,s^{-1} for the toroidal system is given. The temperature is measured with an accuracy of a few eV. The presented work illustrates the capability of the system during a toroidal momentum scan, showing the self-consistent determination of the radial electric field from experimental CXRS data based on the radial force balance.

  1. Charge exchange in the Io torus and exosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. E.; Strobel, D. F.

    1982-01-01

    Charge-exchange cross sections and their velocity dependence have been estimated for the most important reactions in the Io torus and exosphere. The methods used for calculating the cross sections are given and discussed in some detail. For symmetric-resonant single and double charge exchange, the cross sections are slowly varying functions of velocity. For inelastic charge-exchange collisions, the transition probabilities into a given final state can depend critically on velocity. Models are described which can be used to estimate both the most rapid charge-exchange processes and those states which play an important role. Calculated cross sections are used to obtain reaction rates as a function of radial position, demonstrating the importance of charge exchange in the inner torus. Charge-exchange reactions of torus ions with molecular species in Io's exosphere may yield a net supply of neutrals and plasma to the torus.

  2. Dependence of the charge exchange lifetimes on mirror latitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, P. H.; Bewtra, N. K.

    1976-01-01

    The dependence of the charge exchange lifetimes on the mirror latitude for ions mirroring off the geomagnetic equator was re-computed using the improved hydrogen distribution models. The Chamberlain model was used to define the spatial distribution of the neutral hydrogen environment through which the ring current ions traverse. The resultant dependence of the charge exchange lifetime on mirror latitude is best fitted by the approximation that contains the charge exchange lifetime for equatorial particles.

  3. Pion double charge exchange scattering above the delta resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Burleson, G.R.

    1989-01-01

    Data are presented on pion-nucleus double-charge-exchange scattering at energies between 300 and 500 MeV, the highest energies measured so far, together with a review of results at lower energies. The small-angle excitation functions disagree with predictions based on a sex-quark cluster model and on an optical model consistent with single-charge-exchange scattering at these energies, but they are consistent with a distorted-wave calculation. Data on f{sub 7/2}-shell nuclei are in partial agreement with a two-amplitude model which is successful at lower energies. In order to achieve good understanding of this process at these energies, more work; both experimental and theoretical, is needed. 16 refs., 6 figs.

  4. Charge exchange of solar wind ions in the Comet Halley coma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shelley, E. G.; Ing-H. afgoldstein, B. E. AGGOLDSTEIN, R.; Ing-H. afgoldstein, B. E. AGGOLDSTEIN, R.

    1986-01-01

    The He(2+) and He(+) radial profiles measured by the Giotto mass spectrometer on the inbound trajectory to comet Halley are compared to a simple 1-dimensional charge exchange model. Results indicate that charge exchange alone cannot account for the observed radial profiles of He(2+) and He(+).

  5. Systematics of heavy-ion charge-exchange straggling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigmund, P.; Schinner, A.

    2016-10-01

    The dependence of heavy-ion charge-exchange straggling on the beam energy has been studied theoretically for several ion-target combinations. Our previous work addressed ions up to krypton, while the present study focuses on heavier ions, especially uranium. Particular attention has been paid to a multiple-peak structure which has been predicted theoretically in our previous work. For high-Z1 and high-Z2 systems, exemplified by U in Au, we identify three maxima in the energy dependence of charge-exchange straggling, while the overall magnitude is comparable with that of collisional straggling. Conversely, for U in C, charge-exchange straggling dominates, but only two peaks lie in the energy range where we presently are able to produce credible predictions. For U-Al we find good agreement with experiment in the energy range around the high-energy maximum. The position of the high-energy peak - which is related to processes in the projectile K shell - is found to scale as Z12, in contrast to the semi-empirical Z13/2 dependence proposed by Yang et al. Measurements for heavy ions in heavy targets are suggested in order to reconcile a major discrepancy between the present calculations and the frequently-used formula by Yang et al.

  6. Suzaku Observations of Charge Exchange Emission from Solar System Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ezoe, Y.; Fujimoto, R.; Yamasaki, N. Y.; Mitsuda, K.; Ohashi, T.; Ishikawa, K.; Oishi, S.; Miyoshi, Y; Terada, N.; Futaana, Y.; hide

    2012-01-01

    Recent results of charge exchange emission from solar system objects observed with the Japanese Suzaku satellite are reviewed. Suzaku is of great importance to investigate diffuse X-ray emission like the charge exchange from planetary exospheres and comets. The Suzaku studies of Earth's exosphere, Martian exosphere, Jupiter's aurorae, and comets are overviewed.

  7. 76 FR 10498 - Exchange Visitor Program-Fees and Charges

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-25

    ... Part 62 RIN 1400-AC67 Exchange Visitor Program--Fees and Charges AGENCY: Department of State. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Department of State is amending its regulations regarding fees and charges for Exchange Visitor Program services. The fees permit the Department to recoup the cost of providing...

  8. STUDIES OF X-RAY PRODUCTION FOLLOWING CHARGE EXCHANGE RECOMBINATION BETWEEN HIGHLY CHARGED IONS AND NEUTRAL ATOMS AND MOLECULES

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, G V; Beiersdorfer, P; Chen, H; Clementson, J; Frankel, M; Gu, M F; Kelley, R L; Kilbourne, C A; Porter, F S; Thorn, D B; Wargelin, B J

    2008-08-28

    We have used microcalorimeters built by the NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Electron Beam Ion Trap to measure X-ray emission produced by charge exchange reactions between highly charged ions colliding with neutral helium, hydrogen, and nitrogen gas. Our measurements show the spectral dependence on neutral species and also show the distinct differences between spectra produced by charge exchange reactions and those produced by direct impact excitation. These results are part of an ongoing experimental investigation at the LLNL EBIT facility of charge exchange spectral signatures and can be used to interpret X-ray spectra produced by a variety of laboratory and celestial sources including cometary and planetary atmospheres, the Earth's magnetosheath, the heliosphere, and tokamaks.

  9. Charge-Exchange Processes of Titanium-Doped Aluminate Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Wing Cheong

    1995-01-01

    Titanium exists in more than one charge state in the aluminate crystals: it is stable as Ti^ {3+} and Ti^{4+}. Other than the intense Ti^{4+ } absorption, a ubiquitous absorption/luminescence excitation band in the UV region is identified as a titanium -bound exciton in Al_2rm O_3, Y_3Al_5rm O_{12}, {rm YAlO}_3, MgAl_2O _4, and LaMgAl_{11} {rm O}_{19}. One -step and two-step photoconductivities of Ti^ {3+} are measured and compared. While the selectivity of the two-step process is demonstrated, its use in locating the energy threshold is hampered by the small Franck-Condon factor for the transition between the Ti^{3+} ^2{ rm E} excited state and Ti^ {4+}. The titanium-bound exciton band, together with the one-step photocurrent signal, makes it possible to determine the photoionization energy threshold accurately. The charge-transfer transition energy thresholds of Ti^{4+} are obtained from the emission and the luminescence excitation spectra. Locally and non-locally charge compensated Ti^{4+ } are found in Al_2{rm O}_3. The luminescence kinetics for the two kinds of Ti^{4+} are well explained by a three-level system with a lower triplet excited state and a higher singlet excited state. These charge-exchange threshold energies can be deduced from the Born-Haber thermodynamical cycle. The electrostatic site potentials are calculated and from it, the calculated photoionization and charge-transfer energy thresholds are found to be consistent with the experimental results. The deficiency of this model is pointed out and possible improvement is discussed. Quantitatively, the sum of the two charge-exchange energy thresholds is close to the band-gap energy of the host crystal. This offers a convenient way for material characterization. Provided that any two of the three quantities (band-gap energy, photoionization energy threshold, and charge-transfer transition energy threshold) have been found, the third quantity can be calculated. In addition, the trapping of charge

  10. High dynamic range charge measurements

    DOEpatents

    De Geronimo, Gianluigi

    2012-09-04

    A charge amplifier for use in radiation sensing includes an amplifier, at least one switch, and at least one capacitor. The switch selectively couples the input of the switch to one of at least two voltages. The capacitor is electrically coupled in series between the input of the amplifier and the input of the switch. The capacitor is electrically coupled to the input of the amplifier without a switch coupled therebetween. A method of measuring charge in radiation sensing includes selectively diverting charge from an input of an amplifier to an input of at least one capacitor by selectively coupling an output of the at least one capacitor to one of at least two voltages. The input of the at least one capacitor is operatively coupled to the input of the amplifier without a switch coupled therebetween. The method also includes calculating a total charge based on a sum of the amplified charge and the diverted charge.

  11. Solar Wind Charge Exchange Studies of Highly Charged Ions on Atomic Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Draganic, Ilija N; Seely, D. G.; McCammon, D; Havener, Charles C

    2011-01-01

    Accurate studies of low energy charge exchange (CX) are critical to understanding underlying soft X ray radiation processes in the interaction of highly charged ions from the solar wind with the neutral atoms and molecules in the heliosphere, cometary comas, planetary atmospheres, interstellar winds, etc.. Particularly important are the CX cross sections for bare, H like, and He like ions of C, N, O and Ne, which are the dominant charge states for these heavier elements in the solar wind. Absolute total cross sections for single electron capture by H like ions of C, N, O and fully stripped O ions from atomic hydrogen have been measured in an expanded range of relative collision energies (5 eV u 20 keV u) and compared to previous H oven measurements. The present measurements are performed using a merged beams technique with intense highly charged ion beams extracted from a 14.5 GHz ECR ion source installed on a high voltage platform at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. For the collision energy range of 0.3 keV u 3.3 keV u, which corresponds to typical ion velocities in the solar wind, the new measurements are in good agreement with previous H oven measurements. The experimental results are discussed in detail and compared with theoretical calculations where available.

  12. Solar Wind Charge Exchange Studies Of Highly Charged Ions On Atomic Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Draganic, I. N.; Havener, C. C.; Seely, D. G.; McCammon, D.

    2011-06-01

    Accurate studies of low-energy charge exchange (CX) are critical to understanding underlying soft X-ray radiation processes in the interaction of highly charged ions from the solar wind with the neutral atoms and molecules in the heliosphere, cometary comas, planetary atmospheres, interstellar winds, etc.. Particularly important are the CX cross sections for bare, H-like, and He-like ions of C, N, O and Ne, which are the dominant charge states for these heavier elements in the solar wind. Absolute total cross sections for single electron capture by H-like ions of C, N, O and fully-stripped O ions from atomic hydrogen have been measured in an expanded range of relative collision energies (5 eV/u-20 keV/u) and compared to previous H-oven measurements. The present measurements are performed using a merged-beams technique with intense highly charged ion beams extracted from a 14.5 GHz ECR ion source installed on a high voltage platform at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. For the collision energy range of 0.3 keV/u-3.3 keV/u, which corresponds to typical ion velocities in the solar wind, the new measurements are in good agreement with previous H-oven measurements. The experimental results are discussed in detail and compared with theoretical calculations where available.

  13. Charge-exchange plasma generated by an ion thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, H. R.

    1977-01-01

    The charge exchange plasma generated by an ion thruster was investigated experimentally using both 5 cm and 15 cm thrusters. Results are shown for wide ranges of radial distance from the thruster and angle from the beam direction. Considerations of test environment, as well as distance from the thruster, indicate that a valid simulation of a thruster on a spacecraft was obtained. A calculation procedure and a sample calculation of charge exchange plasma density and saturation electron current density are included.

  14. Recent Excitation, Charge Exchange, and Lifetime Results in Highly Charged Ions Relevant to Stellar, Interstellar, Solar and Comet Phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, A.; Hossain, S.; Mawhorter, R. J.; Smith, S. J.

    2006-01-01

    Recent JPL absolute excitation and charge exchange cross sections, and measurements of lifetimes of metastable levels in highly-charged ions (HCIs) are reported. These data provide benchmark comparisons to results of theoretical calculations. Theoretical approaches can then be used to calculate the vast array of data which cannot be measured due to experimental constraints. Applications to the X-ray emission from comets are given.

  15. Ion momentum and energy transfer rates for charge exchange collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horwitz, J.; Banks, P. M.

    1973-01-01

    The rates of momentum and energy transfer have been obtained for charge exchange collisions between ion and neutral gases having arbitrary Maxwellian temperatures and bulk transport velocities. The results are directly applicable to the F-region of the ionosphere where 0+ - 0 charge is the dominant mechanism affecting ion momentum and energy transfer.

  16. Impurity charge-exchange processes processes in Tokamak plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puiatti, M. E.; Breton, C.; Michelis, C.; Mattioll, M.

    1981-02-01

    Charge exchange reactions between multiply charged impurity ions and neutral hydrogen isotopes were considered. Ionization equilibrium and radiative losses were evaluated for oxygen and iron in the presence of either thermal or beam neutrals. The influence of thermal neutrals on recently reported results from chemically heated TFR discharges is also discussed.

  17. Charge exchange cooling in the tandem mirror plasma confinement apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Logan, B. Grant

    1978-01-01

    Method and apparatus for cooling a plasma of warm charged species confined in the center mirror cell of the tandem mirror apparatus by injecting cold neutral species of the plasma into at least one mirroring region of the center mirror cell, the cooling due to the loss of warm charged species through charge exchange with the cold neutral species with resulting diffusion of the warm neutral species out of the plasma.

  18. Characterization of an atomic hydrogen source for charge exchange experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Leutenegger, M. A.; Betancourt-Martinez, G. L.; Hell, N.; Kelley, R. L.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Porter, F. S.

    2016-11-15

    We characterized the dissociation fraction of a thermal dissociation atomic hydrogen source by injecting the mixed atomic and molecular output of the source into an electron beam ion trap containing highly charged ions and recording the x-ray spectrum generated by charge exchange using a high-resolution x-ray calorimeter spectrometer. We exploit the fact that the charge exchange state-selective capture cross sections are very different for atomic and molecular hydrogen incident on the same ions, enabling a clear spectroscopic diagnostic of the neutral species.

  19. Characterization of an atomic hydrogen source for charge exchange experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leutenegger, M. A.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Betancourt-Martinez, G. L.; Brown, G. V.; Hell, N.; Kelley, R. L.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Magee, E. W.; Porter, F. S.

    2016-11-01

    We characterized the dissociation fraction of a thermal dissociation atomic hydrogen source by injecting the mixed atomic and molecular output of the source into an electron beam ion trap containing highly charged ions and recording the x-ray spectrum generated by charge exchange using a high-resolution x-ray calorimeter spectrometer. We exploit the fact that the charge exchange state-selective capture cross sections are very different for atomic and molecular hydrogen incident on the same ions, enabling a clear spectroscopic diagnostic of the neutral species.

  20. Measurements of W Charge Asymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Holzbauer, J. L.

    2015-10-06

    We discuss W boson and lepton charge asymmetry measurements from W decays in the electron channel, which were made using 9.7 fb$^{-1}$ of RunII data collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The electron charge asymmetry is presented as a function of pseudo-rapidity out to |$\\eta$| $\\le$ 3.2, in five symmetric and asymmetric kinematic bins of electron transverse momentum and the missing transverse energy of the event. We also give the W charge asymmetry as a function of W boson rapidity. The asymmetries are compared with next-to-leading order perturbative quantum chromodynamics calculations. These charge asymmetry measurements will allow more accurate determinations of the proton parton distribution functions and are the most precise to date.

  1. Critical evaluation of dipolar, acid-base and charge interactions II. Charge exchange within electrolytes and electron exchange with semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Rosenholm, Jarl B

    2017-09-01

    Electron displacements may be considered as a general measure of semiconductor activity as well as of dipolar, acid-base and charge interactions. Electron transfers during reduction and oxidation reactions between dissolved cations and anions correspond to an extreme Lewis acid-base electron displacement. Brϕnsted proton release (protolysis) represents an extremely weakened hydrogen bond. The most common electrostatic (Born, PCM) and chemical (pKa matching) models for electron and proton exchange between dissolved species are reviewed using aluminium species as examples. Dissolution of ions from solids (salts) may be considered as a reversed precipitation reaction. For partly covalent solids dissociation is dependent on electron or vacancy (hole) transfers to the solid which connects oxidation and reduction reactions to electron displacements in semiconductors. The electron exchange is characterized by Femi energy of semiconductors and of electrolytes. The standard reduction potential may thus be converted to Fermi energy of connected electrochemical cells. In disconnected particle suspensions (sols) the electron activity is a more appropriate parameter which may be converted both to standard reduction potential of ions and to Fermi energy of semiconductors. Dissolution of potential determining cations and anions and hydrolysis of surface sites determines the charging (electron transfer to/from surface) of solids. Both electrostatic (MUSIC) and chemical equilibrium constant models are available for Brϕnsted equilibrium of surface hydroxyls. Point of zero charge is a result of positive and negative charge matching and it represents the optimal condition for condensation of polynuclear species by olation and oxolation. The capability of partial charge (PCM) model to predict condensation is evaluated. Acidity (pH), composition and temperature dependence of aluminium species is illustrated by solubility limits of contributing species and by phase diagrams. Influence

  2. Improved edge charge exchange recombination spectroscopy in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Chrystal, Colin; Burrell, K. H.; Grierson, Brian A.; Haskey, Shaun R.; Groebner, R. J.; Kaplan, David H.; Briesemeister, Alexis R.

    2016-08-02

    The charge exchange recombination spectroscopy diagnostic on the DIII-D tokamak has been upgraded with the addition of more high radial resolution view chords near the edge of the plasma (r/a > 0.8). The additional views are diagnosed with the same number of spectrometers by placing fiber optics side-by-side at the spectrometer entrance with a precise separation that avoids wavelength shifted crosstalk without the use of bandpass filters. The new views improve measurement of edge impurity parameters in steep gradient, H-mode plasmas with many different shapes. The number of edge view chords with 8 mm radial separation has increased from 16 to 38.As a result, new fused silica fibers have improved light throughput and clarify the observation of non-Gaussian spectra that suggest the ion distribution function can be non-Maxwellian in low collisionality plasmas.

  3. Improved edge charge exchange recombination spectroscopy in DIII-D

    DOE PAGES

    Chrystal, Colin; Burrell, K. H.; Grierson, Brian A.; ...

    2016-08-02

    The charge exchange recombination spectroscopy diagnostic on the DIII-D tokamak has been upgraded with the addition of more high radial resolution view chords near the edge of the plasma (r/a > 0.8). The additional views are diagnosed with the same number of spectrometers by placing fiber optics side-by-side at the spectrometer entrance with a precise separation that avoids wavelength shifted crosstalk without the use of bandpass filters. The new views improve measurement of edge impurity parameters in steep gradient, H-mode plasmas with many different shapes. The number of edge view chords with 8 mm radial separation has increased from 16more » to 38.As a result, new fused silica fibers have improved light throughput and clarify the observation of non-Gaussian spectra that suggest the ion distribution function can be non-Maxwellian in low collisionality plasmas.« less

  4. Improved edge charge exchange recombination spectroscopy in DIII-D

    DOE PAGES

    Chrystal, Colin; Burrell, K. H.; Grierson, Brian A.; ...

    2016-08-02

    The charge exchange recombination spectroscopy diagnostic on the DIII-D tokamak has been upgraded with the addition of more high radial resolution view chords near the edge of the plasma (r/a > 0.8). The additional views are diagnosed with the same number of spectrometers by placing fiber optics side-by-side at the spectrometer entrance with a precise separation that avoids wavelength shifted crosstalk without the use of bandpass filters. The new views improve measurement of edge impurity parameters in steep gradient, H-mode plasmas with many different shapes. The number of edge view chords with 8 mm radial separation has increased from 16more » to 38.As a result, new fused silica fibers have improved light throughput and clarify the observation of non-Gaussian spectra that suggest the ion distribution function can be non-Maxwellian in low collisionality plasmas.« less

  5. Improved edge charge exchange recombination spectroscopy in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Chrystal, Colin; Burrell, K. H.; Grierson, Brian A.; Haskey, Shaun R.; Groebner, R. J.; Kaplan, David H.; Briesemeister, Alexis R.

    2016-08-02

    The charge exchange recombination spectroscopy diagnostic on the DIII-D tokamak has been upgraded with the addition of more high radial resolution view chords near the edge of the plasma (r/a > 0.8). The additional views are diagnosed with the same number of spectrometers by placing fiber optics side-by-side at the spectrometer entrance with a precise separation that avoids wavelength shifted crosstalk without the use of bandpass filters. The new views improve measurement of edge impurity parameters in steep gradient, H-mode plasmas with many different shapes. The number of edge view chords with 8 mm radial separation has increased from 16 to 38.As a result, new fused silica fibers have improved light throughput and clarify the observation of non-Gaussian spectra that suggest the ion distribution function can be non-Maxwellian in low collisionality plasmas.

  6. Improved edge charge exchange recombination spectroscopy in DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrystal, C.; Burrell, K. H.; Grierson, B. A.; Haskey, S. R.; Groebner, R. J.; Kaplan, D. H.; Briesemeister, A.

    2016-11-01

    The charge exchange recombination spectroscopy diagnostic on the DIII-D tokamak has been upgraded with the addition of more high radial resolution view chords near the edge of the plasma (r/a > 0.8). The additional views are diagnosed with the same number of spectrometers by placing fiber optics side-by-side at the spectrometer entrance with a precise separation that avoids wavelength shifted crosstalk without the use of bandpass filters. The new views improve measurement of edge impurity parameters in steep gradient, H-mode plasmas with many different shapes. The number of edge view chords with 8 mm radial separation has increased from 16 to 38. New fused silica fibers have improved light throughput and clarify the observation of non-Gaussian spectra that suggest the ion distribution function can be non-Maxwellian in low collisionality plasmas.

  7. Atmosphere-surface exchange measurements.

    PubMed

    Dabberdt, W F; Lenschow, D H; Horst, T W; Zimmerman, P R; Oncley, S P; Delany, A C

    1993-06-04

    The exchange of various trace species and energy at the earth's surface plays an important role in climate, ecology, and human health and welfare. Surface exchange measurements can be difficult to obtain yet are important to understand physical processes, assess environmental and global change impacts, and develop robust parameterizations of atmospheric processes. The physics and turbulent structure of the atmospheric boundary layer are reviewed as they contribute to dry surface exchange rates (fluxes). Micrometeorological, budget, and enclosure techniques used to measure or estimate surface fluxes are described, along with their respective advantages and limitations. Various measurement issues (such as site characteristics, sampling considerations, sensor attributes, and flow distortion) impact on the ability to obtain representative surface-based and airborne flux data.

  8. Charge-exchange source terms in magnetohydrodynamic plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeStefano, Anthony M.; Heerikhuisen, Jacob

    2017-05-01

    In the modeling of space plasma environments, source terms are often used to couple separate species of particles and/or fluids. There have been many techniques developed over the years to make such coupling more tractable while maintaining maximum physical fidelity. In our current application we use the formalism of the Boltzmann collision integral to compute source terms due to charge-exchange events in the heliosphere. The charge-exchange cross sections often encountered in heliospheric interactions can be fit to laboratory data, but in most cases cannot be directly integrated over analytically. Therefore, researchers often employ various levels of approximation, either semi-analytic or numerical. We explore several assumptions to the charge-exchange source term integrals, namely using Maxwellian velocity spaces for like-mass species and either hard-sphere, power-law, or exact forms of the cross section.

  9. Proton elastic and charge-exchange scattering from exotic nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Arellano, H.F.; Love, W.G.; Brieva, F.A.

    1993-10-01

    Calculations of elastic and charge-exchange scattering of protons from exotic nuclei are made using density-dependent nucleon-nucleon interactions. These results are compared with similar calculations for nearby nuclei in order to identify signatures of the proposed neutron halos in these processes. In the case of elastic scattering we compare our results with available data. For charge/exchange scattering our calculations are intended to provide a guide of the sizes and shapes of cross sections to be expected for this process. Results over a range of projectile energies are presented and discussed.

  10. Measuring momentum for charged particle tomography

    DOEpatents

    Morris, Christopher; Fraser, Andrew Mcleod; Schultz, Larry Joe; Borozdin, Konstantin N.; Klimenko, Alexei Vasilievich; Sossong, Michael James; Blanpied, Gary

    2010-11-23

    Methods, apparatus and systems for detecting charged particles and obtaining tomography of a volume by measuring charged particles including measuring the momentum of a charged particle passing through a charged particle detector. Sets of position sensitive detectors measure scattering of the charged particle. The position sensitive detectors having sufficient mass to cause the charged particle passing through the position sensitive detectors to scatter in the position sensitive detectors. A controller can be adapted and arranged to receive scattering measurements of the charged particle from the charged particle detector, determine at least one trajectory of the charged particle from the measured scattering; and determine at least one momentum measurement of the charged particle from the at least one trajectory. The charged particle can be a cosmic ray-produced charged particle, such as a cosmic ray-produced muon. The position sensitive detectors can be drift cells, such as gas-filled drift tubes.

  11. Charge exchange processes involving highly charged ions and targets of interest in astrophysics and fusion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otranto, S.

    2012-11-01

    Renewed interest in charge exchange processes involving highly charged ions arises because of their crucial role in the planned ITER reactor as well as to recent X-ray observations in the astrophysical context. In this work, the classical trajectory Monte Carlo method (CTMC) is used to calculate state selective single charge exchange n-level cross sections and line emission cross sections pertinent to both fields. These are contrasted to recent laboratory data from KVI for the Xe18+ + Na(3s) collision system and NIST/BERLIN-EBIT data for the Ar18+ +Ar system.

  12. Charge exchange recombination spectroscopy on the T-10 tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Klyuchnikov, L. A. Krupin, V. A.; Nurgaliev, M. R.; Korobov, K. V.; Nemets, A. R.; Dnestrovskij, A. Yu.; Tugarinov, S. N.; Serov, S. V.; Naumenko, N. N.

    2016-05-15

    The charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CXRS) diagnostics on the T-10 tokamak is described. The system is based on a diagnostic neutral beam and includes three high etendue spectrometers designed for the ITER edge CXRS system. A combined two-channel spectrometer is developed for simultaneous measurements of two beam-induced spectral lines using the same lines of sight. A basic element of the combined spectrometer is a transmitting holographic grating designed for the narrow spectral region 5291 ± 100 Å. The whole CXRS system provides simultaneous measurements of two CXRS impurity spectra and H{sub α} beam line. Ion temperature measurements are routinely provided using the C{sup 6+} CXRS spectral line 5291 Å. Simultaneous measurements of carbon densities and one more impurity (oxygen, helium, lithium etc.) are carried out. Two light collecting systems with 9 lines of sight in each system are used in the diagnostics. Spatial resolution is up to 2.5 cm and temporal resolution of 1 ms is defined by the diagnostic neutral beam diameter and pulse duration, respectively. Experimental results are shown to demonstrate a wide range of the CXRS diagnostic capabilities on T-10 for investigation of impurity transport processes in tokamak plasma. Developed diagnostics provides necessary experimental data for studying of plasma electric fields, heat and particle transport processes, and for investigation of geodesic acoustic modes.

  13. Charge exchange recombination spectroscopy on the T-10 tokamak.

    PubMed

    Klyuchnikov, L A; Krupin, V A; Nurgaliev, M R; Korobov, K V; Nemets, A R; Dnestrovskij, A Yu; Tugarinov, S N; Serov, S V; Naumenko, N N

    2016-05-01

    The charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CXRS) diagnostics on the T-10 tokamak is described. The system is based on a diagnostic neutral beam and includes three high etendue spectrometers designed for the ITER edge CXRS system. A combined two-channel spectrometer is developed for simultaneous measurements of two beam-induced spectral lines using the same lines of sight. A basic element of the combined spectrometer is a transmitting holographic grating designed for the narrow spectral region 5291 ± 100 Å. The whole CXRS system provides simultaneous measurements of two CXRS impurity spectra and Hα beam line. Ion temperature measurements are routinely provided using the C(6+) CXRS spectral line 5291 Å. Simultaneous measurements of carbon densities and one more impurity (oxygen, helium, lithium etc.) are carried out. Two light collecting systems with 9 lines of sight in each system are used in the diagnostics. Spatial resolution is up to 2.5 cm and temporal resolution of 1 ms is defined by the diagnostic neutral beam diameter and pulse duration, respectively. Experimental results are shown to demonstrate a wide range of the CXRS diagnostic capabilities on T-10 for investigation of impurity transport processes in tokamak plasma. Developed diagnostics provides necessary experimental data for studying of plasma electric fields, heat and particle transport processes, and for investigation of geodesic acoustic modes.

  14. 78 FR 28137 - Exchange Visitor Program-Fees and Charges

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-14

    ... costs incurred by the Department's Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs associated with operating... Charges'') to increase fees to recover the costs of administrative processing of requests for program designation or redesignation, and certain services for exchange visitor benefits. These costs were...

  15. 76 FR 17027 - Exchange Visitor Program-Fees and Charges

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE 22 CFR Part 62 RIN 1400-AC67 Exchange Visitor Program--Fees and Charges Correction In rule document 2011-4276, appearing on pages 10498-10500 in the issue of Friday, February 25, 2011, make the following correction: On...

  16. Charge-Transfer Effects in Ligand Exchange Reactions of Au25 Monolayer-Protected Clusters.

    PubMed

    Carducci, Tessa M; Blackwell, Raymond E; Murray, Royce W

    2015-04-16

    Reported here are second-order rate constants of associative ligand exchanges of Au25L18 nanoparticles (L = phenylethanethiolate) of various charge states, measured by proton nuclear magnetic resonance at room temperature and below. Differences in second-order rate constants (M(-1) s(-1)) of ligand exchange (positive clusters ∼1.9 × 10(-5) versus negative ones ∼1.2 × 10(-4)) show that electron depletion retards ligand exchange. The ordering of rate constants between the ligands benzeneselenol > 4-bromobenzene thiol > benzenethiol reveals that exchange is accelerated by higher acidity and/or electron donation capability of the incoming ligand. Together, these observations indicate that partial charge transfer occurs between the nanoparticle and ligand during the exchange and that this is a rate-determining effect in the process.

  17. Charge exchange recombination spectroscopy measurements in the extreme ultraviolet region of central carbon concentrations during high power neutral beam heating in TFTR (Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor)

    SciTech Connect

    Stratton, B.C.; Fonck, R.J.; Ramsey, A.T.; Synakowski, E.J.; Grek, B.; Hill, K.W.; Johnson, D.W.; Mansfield, D.K.; Park, H.; Taylor, G.; Valanju, P.M. . Plasma Physics Lab.; Texas Univ., Austin, TX . Fusion Research Center)

    1989-09-01

    The carbon concentration in the central region of TFTR discharges with high power neutral beam heating has been measured by charge-extracted recombination spectroscopy (CXRS) of the C{sup +5} n = 3--4 transition in the extreme ultraviolet region. The carbon concentrations were deduced from absolute measurements of the line brightness using a calculation of the beam attenuation and the appropriate cascade-corrected line excitation rates. As a result of the high ion temperatures in most of the discharges, the contribution of beam halo neutrals to the line brightness was significant and therefore had to be included in the modeling of the data. Carbon concentrations have been measured in discharges with I{sub p} = 1.0-1.6 MA and beam power in the range of 2.6-30 MW, including a number of supershots. The results are in good agreement with carbon concentrations deduced from the visible bremsstrahlung Z{sub eff} and metallic impurity concentrations measured by x-ray pulse-height analysis, demonstrating the reliability of the atomic rates used in the beam attenuation and line excitation calculations. Carbon is the dominant impurity species in these discharges; the oxygen concentration measured via CXRS in a high beam power case was 0.0006 of n{sub e}, compard to 0.04 for carbon. Trends with I{sub p} and beam power in the carbon concentration and the inferred deuteron concentration are presented. The carbon concentration is independent of I{sub p} and decreases from 0.13 at 2.6 MW beam power to 0.04 at 30 MW, while the deuteron concentration increases from 0.25 to 0.75 over the same range of beam power. These changes are primarily the result of beam particle fueling, as the carbon density did not vary significantly with beam power. The time evolutions of the carbon and deuteron concentrations during two high power beam pulses, one which exhibited a carbon bloom and one which did not, are compared. 30 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Measurement of Neutrino Induced, Charged Current, Charged Pion Production

    SciTech Connect

    Wilking, Michael Joseph

    2009-05-01

    Neutrinos are among the least understood particles in the standard model of particle physics. At neutrino energies in the 1 GeV range, neutrino properties are typically determined by observing the outgoing charged lepton produced in a charged current quasi-elastic interactions. The largest charged current background to these measurements comes from charged current pion production interactions, for which there is very little available data.

  19. Visible charge exchange spectroscopy at JET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Hellermann, M. G.; Mandl, W.; Summers, H. P.; Weisen, H.; Boileau, A.; Morgan, P. D.; Morsi, H.; Koenig, R.; Stamp, M. F.; Wolf, R.

    1990-11-01

    Recent developments and results of the JET CXRS diagnostic are reported. The measurements of radial profiles of ion temperatures and densities are based on CXR spectra of fully stripped ions of either carbon or beryllium. Considerable effort has been expended in ensuring consistency between radial profiles of low Z impurity densities and those from other diagnostics. The contributions of the main light impurities are used to reconstruct radial profiles of Zeff which can be compared with Abel-inverted signals from visible bremsstrahlung or soft x-ray emission. Active Balmer-Alpha spectroscopy (ABAS) is being introduced as a diagnostic tool providing data on local magnetic fields, neutral beam densities, and dilution factors. The effects of collision-energy-dependent CXR cross sections on observed CXR spectra are calculated. Corrections for the values of deduced ion temperatures, toroidal velocities, and impurity densities are discussed for the case of plasmas with high ion temperatures and high toroidal rotation velocities. Some recent results of the JET 1989 operation illustrating the CXRS diagnostic potential are given.

  20. Visible charge exchange spectroscopy at JET (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Hellermann, M. G.; Mandl, W.; Summers, H. P.; Weisen, H.; Boileau, A.; Morgan, P. D.; Morsi, H.; Koenig, R.; Stamp, M. F.; Wolf, R.

    1990-10-01

    Recent developments and results of the JET CXRS diagnostic are reported. The measurements of radial profiles of ion temperatures and densities are based on CXR spectra of fully stripped ions of either carbon or beryllium. Considerable effort has been expended in ensuring consistency between radial profiles of low Z impurity densities and those from other diagnostics. The contributions of the main light impurities are used to reconstruct radial profiles of Zeffwhich can be compared with Abel-inverted signals from visible bremsstrahlung or soft x-ray emission. Active Balmer-Alpha spectroscopy (ABAS) is being introduced as a diagnostic tool providing data on local magnetic fields, neutral beam densities, and dilution factors. The effects of collision-energy-dependent CXR cross sections on observed CXR spectra are calculated. Corrections for the values of deduced ion temperatures, toroidal velocities, and impurity densities are discussed for the case of plasmas with high ion temperatures and high toroidal rotation velocities. Some recent results of the JET 1989 operation illustrating the CXRS diagnostic potential are given.

  1. XMM-Newton Observations of Solar Wind Charge Exchange Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snowden, S. L.; Collier, M. R.; Kuntz, K. D.

    2004-01-01

    We present an XMM-Newton spectrum of diffuse X-ray emission from within the solar system. The spectrum is dominated by O VII and O VIII lines at 0.57 keV and 0.65 keV, O VIII (and possibly Fe XVII) lines at approximately 0.8 keV, Ne IX lines at approximately 0.92 keV, and Mg XI lines at approximately 1.35 keV. This spectrum is consistent with what is expected from charge exchange emission between the highly ionized solar wind and either interstellar neutrals in the heliosphere or material from Earth's exosphere. The emission is clearly seen as a low-energy ( E less than 1.5 keV) spectral enhancement in one of a series of observations of the Hubble Deep Field North. The X-ray enhancement is concurrent with an enhancement in the solar wind measured by the ACE satellite. The solar wind enhancement reaches a flux level an order of magnitude more intense than typical fluxes at 1 AU, and has ion ratios with significantly enhanced higher ionization states. Whereas observations of the solar wind plasma made at a single point reflect only local conditions which may only be representative of solar wind properties with spatial scales ranging from less than half of an Earth radii (approximately 10 s) to 100 Earth radii, X-ray observations of solar wind charge exchange are remote sensing measurements which may provide observations which are significantly more global in character. Besides being of interest in its own right for studies of the solar system, this emission can have significant consequences for observations of more cosmological objects. It can provide emission lines at zero redshift which are of particular interest (e.g., O VII and O VIII) in studies of diffuse thermal emission, and which can therefore act as contamination in objects which cover the entire detector field of view. We propose the use of solar wind monitoring data, such as from the ACE and Wind spacecraft, as a diagnostic to screen for such possibilities.

  2. A time-resolved study on the interaction of oppositely charged bicelles--implications on the charged lipid exchange kinetics.

    PubMed

    Yang, Po-Wei; Lin, Tsang-Lang; Hu, Yuan; Jeng, U-Ser

    2015-03-21

    Time-resolved small-angle X-ray scattering was applied to study charged lipid exchange between oppositely charged disc-shaped bicelles. The exchange of charged lipids gradually reduces the surface charge density and weakens the electrostatic attraction between the oppositely charged bicelles which form alternately stacked aggregates upon mixing. Initially, at a high surface charge density with almost no free water layer between the stacked bicelles, fast exchange kinetics dominate the exchange process. At a later stage with a lower surface charge density and a larger water gap between the stacked bicelles, slow exchange kinetics take over. The fast exchange kinetics are correlated with the close contact of the bicelles when there is almost no free water layer between the tightly bound bicelles with a charged lipid exchange time constant as short as 20-40 min. When the water gap becomes large enough to have a free water layer between the stacked bicelles, the fast lipid exchange kinetics are taken over by slow lipid exchange kinetics with time constants around 200-300 min, which are comparable to the typical time constant of lipid exchange between vesicles in aqueous solution. These two kinds of exchange mode fit well with the lipid exchange models of transient hemifusion for the fast mode and monomer exchange for the slow mode.

  3. Atomic hydrogen escape rate due to charge exchange with hot plasmaspheric ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maher, L. J.; Tinsley, B. A.

    1977-01-01

    Data on ion and electron temperatures and concentrations to several thousand kilometers of altitude were obtained from the Atmosphere Explorer C satellite for 1974 and to 850 km from Arecibo incoherent scatter radar measurements. These data were used to normalize diffusive equilibrium profiles. From these profiles and by using the neutral atmospheric model of Jacchia (1971) and a new hydrogen model, the charge-exchange-induced neutral hydrogen escape fluxes for equatorial and middle latitudes were calculated. The data confirm earlier estimates that the charge exchange loss is more important than Jeans escape for the earth. It is also found that inside the plasmapause this charge exchange process with hot plasmapheric ions is the major production and loss process for the satellite population in the hydrogen geocorona.

  4. Design of Ultra-Fast Charge eXchange Recombination Spectroscopy diagnostic on EAST tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Y.; Li, Y.; Ye, M.; Wang, H.; Chen, Z.; Wu, Y.; Mao, S.; Lyu, B.; Wan, B.; EAST Team

    2017-08-01

    In this article, we present the design of a four-channel Ultra-Fast Charge eXchange Recombination Spectroscopy (UF-CXRS) diagnostic on the EAST tokamak. This diagnostic is based on the active charge exchange to measure ion temperature with a time resolution at the order of 1 μ s and a spatial resolution of 1 cm. The design of the main components is carefully discussed, including the dichroic mirror light path, the fiber, the spectrometer and the customized lens. The theoretical estimation of the emission photon flux has been carried out, proving the feasibility of the whole design.

  5. Charge exchange in solar wind-cometary interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gombosi, T. I.; Horanyi, M.; Kecskemety, K.; Cravens, T. E.; Nagy, A. F.

    1983-01-01

    A simple model of a cometary spherically symmetrical atmosphere and ionosphere is considered. An analytic solution of the governing equations describing the radial distribution of the neutral and ion densities is found. The new solution is compared to the well-known solution of the equations containing only ionization terms. Neglecting recombination causes a significant overestimate of the ion density in the vicinity of the comet. An axisymmetric model of the solar wind-cometary interaction is considered, taking into account the loss of solar wind ions due to charge exchange. The calculations predict that for active comets, solar wind absorption due to charge exchange becomes important at a few thousand kilometers from the nucleus, and a surface separating the shocked solar wind from the cometary ionosphere develops in this region. These calculations are in reasonable agreement with the few observations available for the ionopause location at comets.

  6. Significant enhancement of the charging efficiency in the cavities of ferroelectrets through gas exchange during charging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Xunlin

    2016-11-01

    Ferroelectrets are non-polar polymer foams or polymer systems with internally charged cavities. They are charged through a series of dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs) that are caused by the electrical breakdown of the gas inside the cavities. Thus, the breakdown strength of the gas strongly influences the charging process of ferroelectrets. A gas with a lower breakdown strength has a lower threshold voltage, thus decreasing the onset voltage for DBD charging. However, a lower threshold voltage also leads to a lower value for the remanent polarization, as back discharges that are caused by the electric field of the internally deposited charges can take place already at lower charge levels. On this basis, a charging strategy is proposed where the DBDs start in a gas with a lower breakdown strength (in the present example, helium) and are completed at a higher breakdown strength (e.g., nitrogen or atmospheric air). Thus, the exchange of the gas in the cavities during charging can significantly enhance the charging efficiency, i.e., yield much higher piezoelectric coefficients in ferroelectrets at significantly lower charging voltages.

  7. Momentum transfer in relativistic heavy ion charge-exchange reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, L. W.; Wilson, J. W.; Khan, F.; Khandelwal, G. S.

    1991-01-01

    Relativistic heavy ion charge-exchange reactions yield fragments (Delta-Z = + 1) whose longitudinal momentum distributions are downshifted by larger values than those associated with the remaining fragments (Delta-Z = 1, -2,...). Kinematics alone cannot account for the observed downshifts; therefore, an additional contribution from collision dynamics must be included. In this work, an optical model description of collision momentum transfer is used to estimate the additional dynamical momentum downshift. Good agreement between theoretical estimates and experimental data is obtained.

  8. PLASIM: A computer code for simulating charge exchange plasma propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, R. S.; Deininger, W. D.; Winder, D. R.; Kaufman, H. R.

    1982-01-01

    The propagation of the charge exchange plasma for an electrostatic ion thruster is crucial in determining the interaction of that plasma with the associated spacecraft. A model that describes this plasma and its propagation is described, together with a computer code based on this model. The structure and calling sequence of the code, named PLASIM, is described. An explanation of the program's input and output is included, together with samples of both. The code is written in ANSI Standard FORTRAN.

  9. Computer code for charge-exchange plasma propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, R. S.; Kaufman, H. R.

    1981-01-01

    The propagation of the charge-exchange plasma from an electrostatic ion thruster is crucial in determining the interaction of that plasma with the associated spacecraft. A model that describes this plasma and its propagation is described, together with a computer code based on this model. The structure and calling sequence of the code, named PLASIM, is described. An explanation of the program's input and output is included, together with samples of both. The code is written in ASNI Standard FORTRAN.

  10. Charge-exchange plasma generated by an ion thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, H. R.

    1975-01-01

    The use of high voltage solar arrays greatly reduces or eliminates power processing requirements in space electric propulsion systems. This use also requires substantial areas of solar array to be at high positive potential relative to space and most of the spacecraft. The charge exchange plasma conducts electrons from the ion beam to such positive surfaces, and thereby electrically load the high voltage solar array. To evaluate this problem, the charge-exchange plasma generated by an ion beam was investigated experimentally. Based upon the experimental data, a simple model was derived for the charge-exchange plasma. This model is conservative in the sense that both the electron/ion density and the electron current density should be equal to, or less than, the preducted value for all directions in the hemisphere upstream of the ion beam direction. Increasing the distance between a positive potential surface (such as a high voltage solar array) and the thruster is the simplest way to control interactions. Both densities and currents vary as the inverse square of this distance.

  11. X-Ray Emission Cross Sections following Charge Exchange by Multiply-Charged Ions of Astrophysical Interest

    SciTech Connect

    Otranto, S; Olson, R E; Beiersdorfer, P

    2007-03-12

    The CTMC method is used to calculate emission cross sections following charge exchange processes involving highly charged ions of astrophysical interest and typical cometary targets. Comparison is made to experimental data obtained on the EBIT-I machine at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory LLNL for O{sup 8+} projectiles impinging on different targets at a collision energy of 10 eV/amu. The theoretical cross sections are used together with ion abundances measured by the Advanced Composition Explorer to reproduce cometary spectra. Discrepancies due to different estimated delays of solar wind events between the comet and the Earth-orbiting satellite are discussed.

  12. Charged particle measurements on a 30-CM diameter mercury ion engine thrust beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellen, J. M., Jr.; Komatsu, G. K.; Hoffmaster, D. K.; Kemp, R. F.

    1974-01-01

    Measurements of both thrust ions and charge exchange ions were made in the beam of a 30 centimeter diameter electron bombardment mercury ion thruster. A qualitative model is presented which describes magnitudes of charge exchange ion formation and motions of these ions in the weak electric field structure of the neutralized thrust beam plasma. Areas of agreement and discrepancy between observed and modeled charge exchange properties are discussed.

  13. X-ray emission cross sections following charge exchange by multiply charged ions of astrophysical interest

    SciTech Connect

    Otranto, S.; Olson, R. E.; Beiersdorfer, P.

    2006-02-15

    State selective nl-electron capture cross sections are presented for highly charged ions with Z=6-10 colliding with atoms and molecules. The energy range investigated was from 1 eV/amu(v=0.006 a.u.)to 100 keV/amu(v=2.0 a.u.). The energy dependence of the l-level populations is investigated. The K shell x-ray emission cross sections are determined by using the calculated state-selective electron capture results as input and then applying hydrogenic branching and cascading values for the photon emission. A major shift in the line emission from being almost solely Lyman-{alpha} transitions at the highest collisions energies to strong high-n to 1s transitions at the lowest energies is observed. The calculated cross sections are in reasonable accord with measurements made by Greenwood et al. [Phys. Rev. A 63, 062707 (2001)], using O{sup 8+} and Ne{sup 10+} on various targets at 3 keV/amu. The calculations are also in accord with x-ray emission cross section data obtained on the EBIT machine at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) where O{sup 8+} and Ne{sup 10+} high resolution measurements were made at a temperature of 10 eV/amu for a series of targets with varying ionization potentials. The Ne{sup 10+} data clearly shows the contribution from multiple capture followed by Auger autoionization in the line emission spectra. Our calculated line emission cross sections are used to provide an ab initio determination of the soft x-ray spectrum of comet C/Linear 1999 S4 that was observed on the Chandra X-ray Observatory. The calculations show that the spectrum is due to the charge exchange of the neutral gases in the comet's coma with the ions of the slow solar wind.

  14. Neutral Collisions and Charge Exchange in Titan's Exosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sillanpää, I.; Johnson, R. E.

    2012-12-01

    Results from new hybrid simulations for Titan are presented. These simulations take into account the elastic collisions between ions and neutral gas as well as the charge exchange reactions for protons and oxygen ions. We used SRIM [1] cross sections for hydrogen and oxygen ions in nitrogen gas to calculate cross sections for the five ions species used in the HYB-Titan hybrid model [2, see also 3] (H+, H2+, O+, CH4+, and N2+). The N2 density profile used was from INMS measurements over a dozen flybys. In addition, we are studying the effect the charge transfer (CT) reactions for H+ and O+ leading to simple CT, dissociative CT and CT with ionization. All reaction cross sections are energy dependent. Neutral particles are not created, but the total ENA energy is recorded as well as the resulting reaction rates. The results show that both of neutral collisions and CT processes have a significant role in the development and shape of Titan's ionotail and wake structure. Results will be described in detail as well as the implications of the ion-neutral collisions for the heating of Titan's neutral corona and atmospheric escape [4]. References [1] Stopping and Range of Ions in Matter (SRIM), Monte Carlo software by James F. Ziegler (online at http://www.srim.org/ ) [2] Sillanpää, I., Hybrid Modelling of Titan's Interaction with the Magnetosphere of Saturn, Ph.D. dissertation, Finnish Meteorological Contributions, 68, Yliopistopaino, Helsinki, 2008. (online at http://urn.fi/URN:ISBN:978-951-697-660-3) [3] Sillanpää, I., D. Young, F. Crary, M. Thomsen, D. Reisenfeld, J-E.Wahlund, C. Bertucci, E. Kallio, R. Jarvinen, and P. Janhunen, Cassini Plasma Spectro:meter and Hybrid Model Study on Titan's Interaction: Effect of Oxygen Ions, J. Geophys. Res., doi:10.1029/2011JA016443, 2011. [4] Johnson, R.E., O.J. Tucker, M. Michael, E.C. Sittler, H.T. Smith, D.T. Young, and J.H. Waite, Mass Loss Processes in Titan's Upper Atmosphere, Chap. 15 in "Titan from Cassini-Huygens" (eds

  15. Measurement of the free neutron-proton analyzing power and spin transfer parameters in the charge exchange region at 790 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Ransome, R.D.

    1981-07-01

    The free neutron-proton analyzing power and the spin transfer parameters (K/sub NN/, K/sub SS/, K/sub SL/, and K/sub LL/) were measured at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility at 790 MeV between 165/sup 0/ and 180/sup 0/ center of mass. A 40% polarized neutron beam incident on a liquid hydrogen target was used. The recoil protons were momentum analyzed with a magnetic spectrometer to isolate elastic scatters. A large solid angle carbon polarimeter was used to measure the proton polarization. The measurements are the first at this energy and are in basic agreement with pre-existing phase shift solutions. The proton-carbon analyzing power was measured between 500 and 750 MeV. An empirical fit to the proton-carbon analyzing power between 100 and 750 MeV was done.

  16. The effects of counterion exchange on charge stabilization for anionic surfactants in nonpolar solvents.

    PubMed

    Smith, Gregory N; Brown, Paul; James, Craig; Kemp, Roger; Khan, Asad Muhammad; Plivelic, Tomás S; Rogers, Sarah E; Eastoe, Julian

    2016-03-01

    Sodium dioctylsulfosuccinate (Aerosol OT or NaAOT) is a well-studied charging agent for model poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) latexes dispersed in nonpolar alkane solvents. Despite this, few controlled variations have been made to the molecular structure. A series of counterion-exchanged analogs of NaAOT with other alkali metals (lithium, potassium, rubidium, and cesium) were prepared, and it was expected that this should influence the stabilization of charge on PMMA latexes and the properties of the inverse micelles. The electrophoretic mobilities of PMMA latexes were measured for all the counterion-exchanged AOT analogs, and these values were used to calculate the electrokinetic or ζ potentials. This enabled a comparison of the efficacy of the different surfactants as charging agents. Small-angle scattering measurements (using neutrons and X-rays) were performed to determine the structure of the inverse micelles, and electrical conductivity measurements were performed to determine the ionized fractions and Debye lengths. Sodium AOT is a much more effective charging agent than any of the other alkali metal AOTs. Despite this, the inverse micelle size and electrical conductivity of NaAOT are unremarkable. This shows a significant non-periodicity in the charging efficiency of these surfactants, and it emphasizes that charging particles in nonpolar solvents is a complex phenomenon. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Charge-exchange spectroscopic diagnostic for the TJ-II stellarator

    SciTech Connect

    Carmona, J. M.; McCarthy, K. J.; Balbin, R.; Petrov, S.

    2006-10-15

    A compact diagnostic neutral beam injector, designed for performing spatially resolved charge exchange recombination spectroscopy and neutral particle analysis measurements, has begun operation on the highly flexible TJ-II stellarator. The injector, an upgraded DINA-5 model, is supported on a mobile cradle that permits its path through the plasma to be varied by {+-}3 deg. poloidally. In parallel, a dedicated bidirectional (two vertical opposing views) multichannel spectroscopic diagnostic, incorporating fiber arrays, an f/1.8 spectrograph, and a back-illuminated charge-coupled device, has been installed to obtain Doppler line shifts and widths (around 529.2 nm) with {approx}1 cm spatial resolution. In this article, the principal aspects of the charge exchange recombination spectroscopy diagnostic system are summarized, its initial performance is evaluated, preliminary results are presented, and future upgrades are outlined.

  18. Charge-exchange spectroscopic diagnostic for the TJ-II stellarator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmona, J. M.; McCarthy, K. J.; Balbín, R.; Petrov, S.

    2006-10-01

    A compact diagnostic neutral beam injector, designed for performing spatially resolved charge exchange recombination spectroscopy and neutral particle analysis measurements, has begun operation on the highly flexible TJ-II stellarator. The injector, an upgraded DINA-5 model, is supported on a mobile cradle that permits its path through the plasma to be varied by ±3° poloidally. In parallel, a dedicated bidirectional (two vertical opposing views) multichannel spectroscopic diagnostic, incorporating fiber arrays, an f /1.8 spectrograph, and a back-illuminated charge-coupled device, has been installed to obtain Doppler line shifts and widths (around 529.2nm) with ˜1cm spatial resolution. In this article, the principal aspects of the charge exchange recombination spectroscopy diagnostic system are summarized, its initial performance is evaluated, preliminary results are presented, and future upgrades are outlined.

  19. The roles of charge exchange and dissociation in spreading Saturn's neutral clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleshman, B. L.; Delamere, P. A.; Bagenal, F.; Cassidy, T.

    2012-05-01

    Neutrals sourced directly from Enceladus's plumes are initially confined to a dense neutral torus in Enceladus's orbit around Saturn. This neutral torus is redistributed by charge exchange, impact/photodissociation, and neutral-neutral collisions to produce Saturn's neutral clouds. Here we consider the former processes in greater detail than in previous studies. In the case of dissociation, models have assumed that OH is produced with a single speed of 1 km s-1, whereas laboratory measurements suggest a range of speeds between 1 and 1.6 km s-1. We show that the high-speed case increases dissociation's range of influence from 9 to 15 RS. For charge exchange, we present a new modeling approach, where the ions are followed within a neutral background, whereas neutral cloud models are conventionally constructed from the neutrals' point of view. This approach allows us to comment on the significance of the ions' gyrophase at the moment charge exchange occurs. Accounting for gyrophase (1) has no consequence on the H2O cloud, (2) doubles the local density of OH at the orbit of Enceladus, and (3) decreases the oxygen densities at Enceladus's orbit by less than 10%. Finally, we consider velocity-dependent, as well as species-dependent cross sections and find that the oxygen cloud produced from charge exchange is spread out more than H2O, whereas the OH cloud is the most confined.

  20. Experimental study of π- double charge exchange with 7Li

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evseev, V. S.; Kurbatov, V. S.; Sidorov, V. M.; Belyaev, V. B.; Wrzecionko, J.; Daum, M.; Frosch, R.; McCulloch, J.; Steiner, E.

    1981-02-01

    We have observed 150 double charge exchange events, π - + 7Li → π + + anything, at an incident π- lab kinetic energy of 102 MeV. The π+ were recorded in an emulsion stack at 30° to the incident π- beam. No significant peak due to the hypothetical reaction π - + 7Li → π + + 7H(g.s.) was observed in the part of the π+ energy spectrum corresponding to a 7H binding energy between -5 MeV and +25 MeV. Our new upper limit for the corresponding differential cross section is 1.0 × 10 -31{cm 2}/{sr} (90% C.L.). The π+ spectrum was recorded down to low energies (20 MeV < Eπ+ < 100 MeV); its shape implies a strong final-state interaction among the π+, the proton and the six neutrons. The differential double charge exchange cross section integrated over all π+ energies was determined as ( {dσ}/{dΩ}) tot = (4.2 ± 1.7) × 10 -30{cm 2}/{sr}.

  1. Charge Exchange: Velocity Dependent X-ray Emission Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cumbee, Renata

    2017-06-01

    Atomic collisions play a fundamental role in astrophysics, plasma physics, and fusion physics. Here, we focus on charge exchange (CX) between hot ions and neutral atoms and molecules. Even though charge exchange calculations can provide vital information, including neutral and ion density distributions, ion temperatures, elemental abundances, and ion charge state distributions in the environments considered, both theoretical calculations and laboratory studies of these processes lack the necessary reliability and/or coverage. In order to better understand the spectra we observe in astrophysical environments in which both hot plasma and neutral gas are present, including comets, the heliosphere, supernova remnants, galaxy clusters, star forming galaxies, the outflows of starburst galaxies, and cooling flows of hot gas in the intracluster medium, a thorough CX X-ray model is needed. Included in this model should be a complete set of X-ray line ratios for relevant ion and neutral interactions for a range of energies.In this work, theoretical charge exchange emission spectra are produced using cross sections calculated with widely applied approaches including the quantum mechanical molecular orbital close coupling (QMOCC), atomic orbital close coupling (AOCC), classical trajectory Monte Carlo (CTMC), and the multichannel Landau-Zener (MCLZ) methods. When possible, theoretical data are benchmarked to experiments. Using a comprehensive, but still far from complete, CX database, new models are performed for a variety of X-ray emitting environments. In an attempt to describe the excess emission in X-rays of the starburst galaxy M82, Ne X CX line ratios are compared to line ratios observed in the region. A more complete XSPEC X-ray emission model is produced for H-like and He-like C-Al ions colliding with H and He for a range of energies; 200 to 5000 eV/u. This model is applied to the northeast rim of the Cygnus Loop supernova remnant in an attempt to determine the

  2. PRECISE CHARGE MEASUREMENT FOR LASER PLASMA ACCELERATORS

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Kei; Gonsalves, Anthony; Lin, Chen; Sokollik, Thomas; Shiraishi, Satomi; Tilborg, Jeroen van; Osterhoff, Jens; Donahue, Rich; Rodgers, David; Smith, Alan; Byrne, Warren; Leemans, Wim

    2011-07-19

    Cross-calibrations of charge diagnostics are conducted to verify their validity for measuring electron beams produced by laser plasma accelerators (LPAs). Employed diagnostics are a scintillating screen, activation based measurement, and integrating current transformer. The diagnostics agreed within {+-}8 %, showing that they can provide accurate charge measurements for LPAs provided they are used properly.

  3. Anion exchangers with negatively charged functionalities in hyperbranched ion-exchange layers for ion chromatography.

    PubMed

    Uzhel, Anna S; Zatirakha, Alexandra V; Smirnov, Konstantin N; Smolenkov, Alexandr D; Shpigun, Oleg A

    2017-01-27

    Novel pellicular poly(styrene-divinylbenzene)-based (PS-DVB) anion exchangers with covalently-bonded hyperbranched functional ion-exchange layers containing negatively charged functionalities are obtained and examined. The hyperbranched coating is created on the surface of aminated PS-DVB substrate by repeating the modification cycles including alkylation with 1,4-butanediol diglycidyl ether (1,4-BDDGE), and amination of the terminal epoxide rings with methylamine (MA) or glycine (Gly). The influence of the position and the number of the layers with glycine, as well as of the total number of the layers of amine in the coating on the chromatographic properties of the obtained stationary phases is investigated. Chromatographic performance of the obtained stationary phases is evaluated using the model mixtures of inorganic and organic anions with hydroxide eluent. It is shown that the best selectivity toward weakly retained organic acids and oxyhalides is possessed by the anion exchanger obtained after 5 modification cycles, with glycine being used in the first one. Such anion exchanger packed in 25-cm long column is capable of separating 22 anions in 58min including 7 standard anions, mono-, di- and trivalent organic acids, oxyhalides, and some other double- and triple-charged anions.

  4. Absolute Charge Exchange Cross Sections for ^3He^2+ Collisions with ^4He and H_2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mawhorter, R. J.; Greenwood, J.; Smith, S. J.; Chutjian, A.

    2002-05-01

    The JPL charge exchange beam-line(J.B. Greenwood, et al., Phys. Rev A 63), 062707 (2001) was modified to increase the forward acceptance angle and enable the measurement of total charge-exchange cross sections for slow, light, highly-charged ion collisions with neutral targets(R. E. Olson and M. Kimura, J. Phys. B 15), 4231 (1982). Data are presented for single charge exchange cross sections for ^3He^2+ nuclei scattered by ^4He and H2 in the energy range 0.33-4.67 keV/amu. For both targets there is good agreement with Kusakabe, et al.(T. Kusakabe, et al., J. Phys. Soc. Japan 59), 1218 (1990). Angular collection is studied by a comparison with differential measurements(D. Bordenave-Montesquieu and R. Dagnac, J. Phys. B 27), 543 (1994), as well as with earlier JPL results(J.B. Greenwood, et al., Ap. J. 533), L175 (2000), ibid. 529, 605 (2000) using heavier projectiles and targets. This work was carried out at JPL/Caltech, and was supported through contract with NASA. RJM thanks the NRC for a Senior Associateship at JPL.

  5. Charge exchange in slow collisions of Si3+ with H

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph, D. C.; Saha, B. C.

    2010-10-01

    Low energy electron capture from atomic hydrogen by multi-charged ions continues to be of interest and has wide applications including both magnetically confined^ fusion and astrophysical plasmas. The charge exchange process reported here, Si^3+ + H -- Si^2+ + H^+ is an important destruction mechanism of Si^3+ in photo-ionized gas. The soft X-ray emission from comets has been explained by charge transfer of solar wind ions, among them Si^3+, with neutrals in the cometary gas vapor. The state selective cross sections are evaluated using the semi-classical molecular orbital close coupling (MOCC) [1] methods. Adiabatic potentials and wave functions for a number of low-lying singlet and triplet states are calculated using the MRD-CI package [2]. Details will be presented at the conference. [1] M. Kimura and N. F. Lane, At. Mol. Opt. Phys 26, 79 (1990). [3] R. J. Buenker, ``Current Aspects of Quantum Chemistry'' 1981, Vol 21, edited by R. Carbo (Elsevier, Amsterdam) p 17.

  6. Apparatus for measuring charged particle beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, D. A.; Stocks, C. D. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    An apparatus to measure the incident charged particle beam flux while effectively eliminating losses to reflection and/or secondary emission of the charged particle beam being measured is described. It comprises a sense cup through which the charged particle beam enters. A sense cone forms the rear wall of the interior chamber with the cone apex adjacent the entry opening. An outer case surrounds the sense cup and is electrically insulated therefrom. Charged particles entering the interior chamber are trapped and are absorbed by the sense cup and cone and travel through a current measuring device to ground.

  7. Cometary X-ray emission: theoretical cross sections following charge exchange by multiply charged ions of astrophysical interest

    SciTech Connect

    Otranto, S; Olson, R E; Beiersdorfer, P

    2007-02-13

    The CTMC method is used to calculate emission cross sections following charge exchange collisions involving highly charged ions of astrophysical interest and typical cometary targets. Comparison is made to experimental data obtained on the EBIT machine at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for O{sup 8+} projectiles impinging on different targets at a collision energy of 10 eV/amu. The theoretical cross sections are used together with ion abundances measured by the Advanced Composition Explorer as well as those obtained by a fitting procedure using laboratory emission cross sections in order to reproduce the x-ray spectrum of comet C/LINEAR S4 measured on July 14th 2001.

  8. First Charge-Exchange Measurements with SHARAQ

    SciTech Connect

    Miki, K.; Sakai, H.

    2011-10-28

    The isovector spin monopole resonances (IVSMR) of the {beta}{sup +} type were observed for the first time in the {sup 208}Pb and {sup 90}Zr(t,{sup 3}He) reactions at 300 MeV/u. The experiment was performed at the RI Beam Factory (RIBF) at RIKEN by using the newly-constructed magnetic spectrometer SHARAQ. The double differential cross sections for the {sup 208}Pb and {sup 90}Zr(t,{sup 3}He) reactions were obtained at the excitation energy of 0{<=}E{sub x}{<=}70 MeV and the scattering angles of 0 deg. {<=}{theta}{<=}3 deg. The monopole component was identified by making a difference between the zero-degree and backward-angle spectra. The signatures of the IVSMR are observed at an excitation energy of 12 MeV(20 MeV) in {sup 208}Pb({sup 90}Zr)(t,{sup 3}He) reaction, which agrees fairly well with the theoretical predictions.

  9. Pionic charge exchange on the proton from 40 to 250 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breitschopf, J.; Bauer, M.; Clement, H.; Cröni, M.; Denz, H.; Friedman, E.; Gibson, E. F.; Meier, R.; Wagner, G. J.

    2006-08-01

    The total cross sections for pionic charge exchange on hydrogen were measured using a transmission technique on thin CH2 and C targets. Data were taken for π- lab energies from 39 to 247 MeV with total errors of typically 2% over the Δ-resonance and up to 10% at the lowest energies. Deviations from the predictions of the SAID phase shift analysis in the 60-80 MeV region are interpreted as evidence for isospin-symmetry breaking in the s-wave amplitudes. The charge dependence of the Δ-resonance properties appears to be smaller than previously reported.

  10. Kinetic theory for charge-exchange spectroscopy: Effects of magnetic and electric fields on the distribution function after charge-exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Burrell, K. H.; Munoz Burgos, J. M.

    2012-07-15

    In plasmas equipped with neutral beam injection, excitation of atomic spectral lines via charge-exchange with neutral atoms is the basis of one of the standard plasma diagnostic techniques for ion density, temperature, and velocity. In order to properly interpret the spectroscopic results, one must consider the effects of the energy dependence of the charge-exchange cross-section as well as the motion of the ion after charge-exchange during the period when it is still in the excited state. This motion is affected by the electric and magnetic fields in the plasma. The present paper gives results for the velocity distribution function of the excited state ions and considers in detail the cross-section and ion motion effects on the post charge-exchange velocity. The expression for this velocity in terms of the charge-exchange cross-section and the pre charge-exchange velocity allows that latter velocity to be determined. The present paper is the first to consider the effect of the electric as well as the magnetic field and demonstrates that electric field and diamagnetic terms appear in the expression for the inferred velocity. The present formulation also leads to a novel technique for assessing the effect of the energy dependence of the charge-exchange cross-section on the inferred ion temperature.

  11. Observations of solar wind ion charge exchange in the comet Halley coma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuselier, S. A.; Shelley, E. G.; Goldstein, B. E.; Goldstein, R.; Neugebauer, M.; Ip, W.-H.; Balsiger, H.; Reme, H.

    1991-01-01

    Giotto Ion Mass Spectrometer/High Energy Range Spectrometer (IMS/HERS) observations of solar wind ions show charge exchange effects and solar wind compositional changes in the coma of comet Halley. As the comet was approached, the He(++) to proton density ratio increased until about 1 hour before closest approach after which time it decreased. Abrupt increases in this ratio were also observed in the beginning and near the end of the so-called Mystery Region (8.6 - 5.5(10)(exp 5) km from the comet along the spacecraft trajectory). These abrupt increases in the density ratio were well correlated with enhanced fluxes of keV electrons as measured by the Giotto plasma electron spectrometer. The general increase and then decrease of the He(++) to proton density ratio is quantitatively consistent with a combination of the addition of protons of cometary origin to the plasma and loss of plasma through charge exchange of protons and He(++). In general agreement with the solar wind proton and He(++) observations, solar wind oxygen and carbon ions were observed to charge exchange from higher to lower charge states with decreasing distance to the comet. The more abrupt increases in the He(++) to proton and the He(++) to O(6+) density ratios in the mystery region require a change in the solar wind ion composition in this region while the correlation with energetic electrons indicates processes associated with the comet.

  12. Charge-exchange reactions with a radioactive triton beam

    SciTech Connect

    Jaenecke, J.

    1998-12-21

    A high-resolution (t, {sup 3}He) test experiment has been performed recently by making use of a secondary triton beam produced by fragmentation of {alpha}-particles. The purpose of this charge-exchange experiment was to achieve good energy resolution in an (n,p)-type reaction at intermediate bombarding energies. The experiment was carried out with the K1200 cyclotron at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory using the A1200 beam-analysis system and the S800 magnetic spectrometer. The beam-analysis system was used to transport the energy-dispersed radioactive triton beam from the production target to the target position, and the magnetic spectrometer was used to focus the dispersion-matched {sup 3}He particles from the (t, {sup 3}He) reaction at 0 degree sign onto the focal plane of the spectrometer. An energy resolution of 200-250 keV was achieved.

  13. Experiments with an ion-neutral hybrid trap: cold charge-exchange collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, W. W.; Goodman, D. S.; Sivarajah, I.; Wells, J. E.; Banerjee, S.; Côté, R.; Michels, H. H.; Mongtomery, J. A.; Narducci, F. A.

    2014-01-01

    Due to their large trap depths (˜1 eV or 10,000 K), versatility, and ease of construction, Paul traps have important uses in high-resolution spectroscopy, plasma physics, and precision measurements of fundamental constants. An ion-neutral hybrid trap consisting of two separate but spatially concentric traps [a magneto-optic trap (MOT) for the neutral species and a mass-selective linear Paul trap for the ionic species] is an ideal apparatus for sympathetic cooling. However, over the past few years, hybrid traps have proven most useful in measuring elastic and charge-exchange rate constants of ion-neutral collisions over a wide temperature range from kilo-Kelvin to nano-Kelvin. We report some initially surprising results from a hybrid trap system in our laboratory where we have loaded the Paul trap with Ca+ ions in the presence of a Na MOT (localized dense gas of cold Na atoms). We find a strong loss of Ca+ ions with MOT exposure, attributed to an exothermic, non-resonant ion-neutral charge-exchange process with an activation barrier, which leads to the formation of Na+ ions. We propose a detailed mechanism for this process. We obtain an estimated measure of the rate constant for this charge exchange of ˜2 × 10-11 cm3/s, much less than the Langevin rate, which suggests that the Langevin assumption of unit efficiency in the reaction region is not correct in this case.

  14. Line Ratios for Solar Wind Charge Exchange with Comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullen, P. D.; Cumbee, R. S.; Lyons, D.; Gu, L.; Kaastra, J.; Shelton, R. L.; Stancil, P. C.

    2017-07-01

    Charge exchange (CX) has emerged in X-ray emission modeling as a significant process that must be considered in many astrophysical environments—particularly comets. Comets host an interaction between solar wind ions and cometary neutrals to promote solar wind charge exchange (SWCX). X-ray observatories provide astronomers and astrophysicists with data for many X-ray emitting comets that are impossible to accurately model without reliable CX data. Here, we utilize a streamlined set of computer programs that incorporate the multi-channel Landau-Zener theory and a cascade model for X-ray emission to generate cross sections and X-ray line ratios for a variety of bare and non-bare ion single electron capture (SEC) collisions. Namely, we consider collisions between the solar wind constituent bare and H-like ions of C, N, O, Ne, Na, Mg, Al, and Si and the cometary neutrals H2O, CO, CO2, OH, and O. To exemplify the application of this data, we model the X-ray emission of Comet C/2000 WM1 (linear) using the CX package in SPEX and find excellent agreement with observations made with the XMM-Newton RGS detector. Our analyses show that the X-ray intensity is dominated by SWCX with H, while H2O plays a secondary role. This is the first time, to our knowledge, that CX cross sections have been implemented into a X-ray spectral fitting package to determine the H to H2O ratio in cometary atmospheres. The CX data sets are incorporated into the modeling packages SPEX and Kronos.

  15. Effect of albedo particles on charge measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, N.H.; Ahn, H.S.; Ganel, O.; Han, J.H.; Jeon, J.A.; Kim, C.H.; Kim, K.C.; Lee, M.H.; Lutz, L.; Malinin, A.; Nam, S.; Park, I.H.; Park, J.H.; Seo, E.S.; Walpole, P.; Wu, J.; Yang, J.; Yoo, J.H.; Yoon, Y.S.; Zinn, S.Y.

    The balloon-borne Cosmic Ray Energetics And Mass (CREAM) investigation is designed to make direct measurements of high energy cosmic-ray particles at the top of the atmosphere. The Silicon Charge Detector (SCD) provides charge measurements of all primary particles from protons to iron nuclei. As the SCD is mounted above the calorimeter, albedo particles backscattered from the calorimeter are one of the major background sources for charge measurements. The SCD with double layers of the silicon sensors in the calorimeter module was tested with high-energy electron and hadron beams at CERN in October 2006. The efficiency of the charge reconstruction is studied using the beam test data and GEANT based Monte Carlo simulation data. Effects of albedo particles on charge measurements will be discussed in this paper.

  16. Cometary X-Rays: Line Emission Cross Sections for Multiply Charged Solar Wind Ion Charge Exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Otranto, S; Olson, R E; Beiersdorfer, P

    2006-12-22

    Absolute line emission cross sections are presented for 1 keV/amu charge exchange collisions of multiply charged solar wind ions with H{sub 2}O, H, O, CO{sub 2}, and CO cometary targets. The present calculations are contrasted with available laboratory data. A parameter-free model is used to successfully predict the recently observed x-ray spectra of comet C/LINEAR 1999 S4. We show that the resulting spectrum is extremely sensitive to the time variations of the solar wind composition. Our results suggest that orbiting x-ray satellites may be a viable way to predict the solar wind intensities and composition on the Earth many hours before the ions reach the earth.

  17. High-throughput charge exchange recombination spectroscopy system on MAST

    SciTech Connect

    Conway, N. J.; Carolan, P. G.; McCone, J.; Walsh, M. J.; Wisse, M.

    2006-10-15

    A major upgrade to the charge exchange recombination spectroscopy system on MAST has recently been implemented. The new system consists of a high-throughput spectrometer coupled to a total of 224 spatial channels, including toroidal and poloidal views of both neutral heating beams on MAST. Radial resolution is {approx}1 cm, comparable to the ion Larmor radius. The toroidal views are configured with 64 channels per beam, while the poloidal views have 32 channels per beam. Background channels for both poloidal and toroidal views are also provided. A large transmission grating is at the heart of the new spectrometer, with high quality single lens reflex lenses providing excellent imaging performance and permitting the full exploitation of the available etendue of the camera sensor. The charge-coupled device camera chosen has four-tap readout at a maximum aggregate speed of 8.8 MHz, and it is capable of reading out the full set of 224 channels in less than 4 ms. The system normally operates at 529 nm, viewing the C{sup 5+} emission line, but can operate at any wavelength in the range of 400-700 nm. Results from operating the system on MAST are shown, including impurity ion temperature and velocity profiles. The system's excellent spatial resolution is ideal for the study of transport barrier phenomena on MAST, an activity which has already been advanced significantly by data from the new diagnostic.

  18. Numerical calculation of charge exchange cross sections for plasma diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendez, Luis

    2016-09-01

    The diagnostics of impurity density and temperature in the plasma core in tokamak plasmas is carried out by applying the charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CXRS) technique, where a fast beam of H atoms collides with the plasma particles leading to electron capture reactions with the impurity ions. The diagnostics is based on the emission of the excited ions formed in the electron capture. The application of the CXRS requires the knowledge of accurate state-selective cross sections, which in general are not accessible experimentally, and the calculation of cross sections for the high n capture levels, required for the diagnostics in the intermediate energy domain of the probe beam, is particularly difficult. In this work, we present a lattice numerical method to solve the time dependent Schrödinger equation. The method is based on the GridTDSE package, it is applicable in the wide energy range 1 - 500 keV/u and can be used to assess the accuracy of previous calculations. The application of the method will be illustrated with calculations for collisions of multiply charged ions with H. Work partially supported by project ENE2014-52432-R (Secretaria de Estado de I+D+i, Spain).

  19. Two-pion exchange contributions to nuclear charge asymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Coon, S.A.; Niskanen, J.A.

    1995-04-01

    An explicit 2{pi} exchange (TPE) potential based on non-relativistic {pi}NN and {pi}{Delta}N vertices with the baryon mass differences taken into account in the vertices is extended to the study of mirror nuclear systems. For the latter study, one must also include baryon mass differences in the intermediate state energy denominators. The TPE potential includes box and crossed box diagrams with two nucleons and those with one nucleon and one {Delta}. Nuclear charge asymmetry is characterized, in part, by a positive value for the difference {Delta}a = {vert_bar}a{sub nn}{vert_bar} {minus} {vert_bar}a{sub pp}{vert_bar} {approx} O(1 fm) and a positive value for the {sup 3}H - {sup 3}He binding energy difference {Delta}E {approx} O(100 keV). The charge asymmetry from baryon mass differences in the vertices is small on this scale and in the wrong direction compared to the empirical values. The contribution from baryon mass differences in the intermediate state energy denominators is positive and is of the order of the empirical scales, in contrast to the previous estimate of {Delta}a {approx} +0.3 fm obtained from an SU(2) symmetric covariant field theoretical potential. This discrepancy between models of TPE is being investigated.

  20. Charge exchange of low-energy ions in thin carbon foils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buergi, Alfred; Oetliker, Michael; Bochsler, Peter; Geiss, Johannes; Coplan, Michael A.

    1990-01-01

    In order to calibrate a time-of-flight mass spectrometer which is to be flown in the solar wind, the charge exchange properties of low-energy ions in thin carbon foils have been investigated. Incident ions of He, C, N, O, Ne, and Ar with energies in the range 0.5-2 keV/nucleon have been used to measure charge-state distribution, residual energy, and angular distribution after transmission through thin (1-6 microgram/sq cm) carbon foils. Within such foils, an equilibrium between ionization and recombination of the projectile is rapidly established, and, consequently, the charge state of the emerging particle depends essentially on its residual velocity. A comparison of the charge exchange properties of Ne-22 with Ne-20 demonstrates that indeed the velocity (and not the energy) of the emerging particle determines its final charge. A comparison of properties of different elements provides an indication of an electron shell effect. Predictions for the energy loss of ions within the carbon foils made with the TRIM code are in good agreement with the experimental results presented in this paper.

  1. Charge-exchange erosion studies of accelerator grids in ion thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peng, Xiaohang; Ruyten, Wilhelmus M.; Keefer, Dennis

    1993-01-01

    A particle simulation model is developed to study the charge-exchange grid erosion in ion thrusters for both ground-based and space-based operations. Because the neutral gas downstream from the accelerator grid is different for space and ground operation conditions, the charge-exchange erosion processes are also different. Based on an assumption of now electric potential hill downstream from the ion thruster, the calculations show that the accelerator grid erosion rate for space-based operating conditions should be significantly less than experimentally observed erosion rates from the ground-based tests conducted at NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) and NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). To resolve this erosion issue completely, we believe that it is necessary to accurately measure the entire electric potential field downstream from the thruster.

  2. Charge-exchange erosion studies of accelerator grids in ion thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peng, Xiaohang; Ruyten, Wilhelmus M.; Keefer, Dennis

    1993-01-01

    A particle simulation model is developed to study the charge-exchange grid erosion in ion thrusters for both ground-based and space-based operations. Because the neutral gas downstream from the accelerator grid is different for space and ground operation conditions, the charge-exchange erosion processes are also different. Based on an assumption of now electric potential hill downstream from the ion thruster, the calculations show that the accelerator grid erosion rate for space-based operating conditions should be significantly less than experimentally observed erosion rates from the ground-based tests conducted at NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) and NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). To resolve this erosion issue completely, we believe that it is necessary to accurately measure the entire electric potential field downstream from the thruster.

  3. Line ratios for soft-x-ray emission following charge exchange between O8 + and Kr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seely, D. G.; Andrianarijaona, V. M.; Wulf, D.; Morgan, K.; McCammon, D.; Fogle, M.; Stancil, P. C.; Zhang, R. T.; Havener, C. C.

    2017-05-01

    Lyman spectra and line ratios are reported for soft-x-ray emissions following the charge exchange process in 293, 414, 586, and 1256 km/s O8 + and Kr collisions. Lyman series from Ly-α to Ly-ɛ were resolved for the O7 + ion using a high-resolution x-ray quantum microcalorimeter detector. It is found that the observed line ratios are dependent on the n l distribution of the captured electron, and the Ly-α and Ly-β x-ray emissions are enhanced. Moreover, by comparing the measured line ratios to the constructed theoretical single charge exchange line ratios for O8 ++H , it is suggested that autoionizing double capture plays a significant role in the enhancement of Ly-α and Ly-β emissions for the present system.

  4. Charge exchange contamination of CRIT-II barium CIV experiment. [critical ionization velocity in ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swenson, G. R.; Mende, S. B.; Meyerott, R. E.; Rairden, R. L.

    1991-01-01

    Experiments have been recently performed which attempted to confirm critical ionization velocity (CIV) ionization by deploying chemicals at high velocity in the ionosphere. Specifically, the CRIT-II rocket performed a barium release in the ionosphere, where observations of Ba(+) resonant emissions following the release are believed to have resulted from the CIV process. Calculations are presented which suggest a significant fraction (if not all) of the Ba(+) observed likely resulted from charge exchange with the thermosphere ions and not through CIV processes. The results presented here are pertinent to other CIV experiments performed in the ionosphere. It is recommended that laboratory measurements should be made of the charge exchange cross section between O(+) and Ba as well as other metal vapors used in CIV experiments.

  5. Wavelength calibration of the charge exchange recombination spectroscopy system on the DIII-D tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Gohil, P.; Burrell, K.H.; Groebner, R.J.; Holtrop, K.; Kaplan, K.H.; Monier-Garbet, P.

    1998-06-01

    A wavelength calibration of all the detectors on the charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CER) system is performed after every plasma discharge on the DIII-D tokamak. This is done to insure that the rest wavelength position of the C VI 5290.5 {angstrom} charge exchange line on the detector is accurately known so that the Doppler shift of the spectral line emitted during the discharge can be used for measurements of plasma rotation. In addition, this calibration provides a check on the spectral dispersion needed to determine the ion temperature. The reference spectra for the calibration are Ne I lines created by neon capillary discharge lamps contained within specially designed, diffuse reflectors. The Ne I lines at 3520.4720 {angstrom}, 5274.0393 {angstrom}, 5280.0853 {angstrom}, 5298.1891 {angstrom}, and 5304.7580 {angstrom} are used in this work. The location of these lines on the linear detectors can be determined to an accuracy of 0.1 pixel, which corresponds to a plasma rotation accuracy of 1.2 km/s and 0.7 km/s for the central and edge rotation measurements, respectively. Use of oppositely directed views of the plasma at the same major radius have been used to verify that the nominal 5290.5 {angstrom} wavelength of the C VI (n = 8 {r_arrow} 7) multiplet is the correct wavelength for the line emitted owing to charge exchange excitation.

  6. 'Stutter timing' for charge decay time measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chubb, John; Harbour, John; Pavey, Ian

    2011-06-01

    The paper describes the approach of 'stutter timing' that has been developed to improve the accuracy of measuring charge decay times in the presence of noise in compact and portable charge decay test instrumentation. The approach involves starting and stopping the timing clock as the noisy signal rises above and falls below the target threshold voltage level.

  7. Charge exchange of Si ions with clean and I-covered Al(100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaojian

    2005-03-01

    Ion-surface charge exchange is a central process in many surface analysis and processing methods. Charge exchange of alkali, halogen and noble gas ions with surfaces has been investigated in previous ion scattering studies, while the interaction between a semiconductor atom and a metal surface has not been measured despite its importance. Si^+ ions were incident on an atomically clean Al (100) surface in ultra-high vacuum. The absolute ionization probability of scattered Si and recoiled Al were measured with time-of-flight, and detailed spectra of the ion yield were collected with an electrostatic analyzer. All of the scattered Si was neutralized, as expected for resonant charge transfer (RCT) of Si, which has a large ionization potential. Multi-charged recoiled Al ions were emitted, however. Surprisingly, Si scattered from iodine adatoms is partially ionized and the ionization changes little with respect to the coverage, energy and exit angle. This is in direct contrast to Li scattering from I/Fe*, and cannot be explained by RCT. * J.A. Yarmoff, Y. Yang and Z. Sroubek, Phys. Rev. Lett. 91, 086104/1-4 (2003).

  8. Measuring Heat-Exchanger Water Leakage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zampiceni, J.

    1986-01-01

    Water leakage in heat exchanger measured directly with help of electroytic hygrometer. In new technique, flow of nitrogen gas set up in one loop of heat exchanger. Other loop filled with water under pressure. Water concentration produced by leakage of water into nitrogen flow measured by hygrometer. New measurement method determines water concentrations up to 2,000 parts per million with accuracy of +/- 5 percent.

  9. Charge-exchange reaction by Reggeon exchange and W{sup +}W{sup −}-fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Schicker, R.

    2015-04-10

    Charge-exchange reactions at high energies are examined. The existing cross section data on the Reggeon induced reaction pp → n + Δ{sup ++} taken at the ZGS and ISR accelerators are extrapolated to the energies of the RHIC and LHC colliders. The interest in the charge-exchange reaction induced by W{sup ±}-fusion is presented, and the corresponding QCD-background is examined.

  10. Metal-ion-specific screening of charge effects in protein amide H/D exchange and the Hofmeister series.

    PubMed

    Abdolvahabi, Alireza; Gober, Jennifer L; Mowery, Richard A; Shi, Yunhua; Shaw, Bryan F

    2014-10-21

    In this study, protein charge ladders and mass spectrometry were used to quantify how metal cations in the Hofmeister series (Na(+), K(+), Li(+), Mg(2+), and Ca(2+)) permute the effects of lysine acetylation on the rate of amide H/D exchange in a representative protein (myoglobin, Mb). The successive acetylation of up to 18 Lys-ε-NH3(+) groups in Mb caused a linear decrease in its global rate of amide H/D exchange (as measured by mass spectrometry), despite also decreasing the thermostability of Mb by >10 °C. The ability of a metal cation to screen kinetic electrostatic effects during H/D exchange-and to abolish the protective effect of acetylation against H/D exchange-was found to depend on the position of the cation in the Hofmeister series. Na(+) and K(+) cations did not fully equalize the rates of H/D exchange among each "rung" of the charge ladder, whereas Mg(2+) and Ca(2+) did equalize rates without eliminating the hydrophobic core of the protein (i.e., without unfolding Mb); Li(+) exhibited intermediate effects. The ability of Mg(2+) and Ca(2+) to completely screen electrostatic effects associated with the H/D exchange of charge isomers of Mb suggests that Mg(2+) or Ca(2+) (but not Na(+) or K(+)) can be used to quantify the magnitude by which electrostatic charge contributes to the observed rates of amide H/D exchange in proteins.

  11. Charge exchange in a planetary corona - Its effect on the distribution and escape of hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlain, J. W.

    1977-01-01

    The theory for a spherical collisionless planetary corona is extended to include charge-exchange collisions between H(+) and H, which are assumed to constitute intermingled gases with different kinetic temperatures. The treatment is based on the conventional concept of a critical level (or exobase) above which the only collisions considered in the Boltzmann equation are those that resonantly exchange charge. Although the geometry treated is an oversimplification for a real planet, numerical examples are given for an idealized earth and Venus. For earth, an ion temperature of 4 times the neutral temperature, an ion density at the exobase of 14,000 per cu cm, and a plasmapause at 1.5 earth radii will raise the escape flux of H by a factor of 6. The total H above the exobase is changed by less than 1%. For Venus, conditions are examined that would account for the peculiar H distribution observed from Mariner 5. The plasma conditions required are not obviously outrageous by terrestrial standards, but the Mariner 5 ionosphere measurements did not show a high plasmapause at, say, 1.25 or 1.5 planetary radii, a fact that might argue against a charge-exchange model.

  12. Measuring vortex charge with a triangular aperture.

    PubMed

    de Araujo, Luís E E; Anderson, Matthew E

    2011-03-15

    A triangular aperture illuminated with a vortex beam creates a truncated lattice diffraction pattern that identifies the charge of the vortex. In this Letter, we demonstrate the measurement of vortex charge via this approach for vortex beams up to charge ±7. We also demonstrate the use of this technique for measuring femtosecond vortices and noninteger vortices, comparing these results with numerical modeling. It is shown that this technique is simple and reliable, but care must be taken when interpreting the results for the noninteger case.

  13. Double charge exchange on Te isotopes in the generalized seniority scheme

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, H.C. |; Ginocchio, J.N.; Dieperink, A.E.; Scholten, O.

    1996-09-01

    The pion double-charge-exchange reactions on the Te isotopes are discussed in the generalized seniority scheme. The elementary process of charge exchange is described in a double scattering process within the plane wave limit. The transition rates are calculated for double-isobaric-analog state as well as for ground-state reactions. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  14. Spin-Isospin responses via charge exchange reactions of RI beams at SHARAQ

    SciTech Connect

    Shimoura, Susumu

    2012-11-12

    Nuclear spectroscopy via direct reactions of RI beams is discussed focusing on characteristics of charge-exchange reactions of RI beams. Recent experiments using the SHARAQ spectrometer at the RIBF are presented, where isovector spin monopole and spin-non-flip monopole responses are studied by charge exchange reaction of RI beams. Some experimental plans and perspectives are also presented.

  15. Temperature dependence of the rate coefficient for charge exchange of metastable O/+//2D/ with N2. [in atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torr, M. R.; Torr, D. G.

    1980-01-01

    Using a data base of aeronomical parameters measured on board the Atmosphere Explorer-C satellite, temperature dependence of the reaction rate coefficient is deduced for the charge exchange of O(+)(2D) with N2. The results indicate the Explorer values determined over the temperature range from 700 to 1900 K are not in conflict with laboratory measurements made at higher temperatures.

  16. Charge Exchange, from the Laboratory to Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betancourt-Martinez, Gabriele; Beiersdorfer, Peter; Brown, Gregory; Hell, Natalie; Leutenegger, Maurice A.; Porter, Frederick S.; Reynolds, Christopher S.

    2016-04-01

    X-ray emission due to charge exchange (CX) between solar wind ions and neutrals in comets and planetary atmospheres is ubiquitous in the solar system, and is also a significant foreground in all observations from low-Earth orbit. It is also possible that CX is common astrophysically, in any environment where hot plasma and cold gas interact. A current challenge is that theoretical models of CX spectra do not always accurately describe observations, and require further experimental verification. This is especially important to focus on now, as the recent launch of Astro-H is providing us with the first high-resolution spectra of extended x-ray sources. In order to improve our understanding and modeling of CX spectra, we take advantage of the laboratory astrophysics program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and use an Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) to perform CX experiments, using the EBIT Calorimeter Spectrometer. We present experimental benchmarks that can be used to develop a more comprehensive and accurate CX theory. On the observational side, we also investigate the possibility of CX occurring in the filaments around the central galaxy of the Perseus cluster, NGC 1275. We use Chandra ACIS data, combined with what we know about laboratory CX spectra, to investigate the possibility of CX being a significant contributor to the x-ray emission.

  17. Instability of the heliopause driven by charge exchange interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Avinash, K.; Zank, G. P.; Dasgupta, B.; Bhadoria, Shikha

    2014-08-20

    The stability of the heliopause that separates the tenuous hot magnetized heliosheath plasma from the dense cool local interstellar magnetized plasma is examined using a fully general model that includes all the essential physical processes. Charge exchange coupling between plasma protons and primary interstellar neutral atoms provides an effective gravity that drives Rayleigh-Taylor (RT)-like instabilities. The velocity difference or shear between the heliosheath and interstellar flows, when coupled to energetic neutral atoms (ENAs), drives a Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH)-like instability on the heliopause. The shoulder region of the heliopause is unstable to a new instability that has characteristics of a mixed RT-KH-like mode. The instabilities are not stabilized by typical values of the magnetic fields in the inner and outer heliosheath (OHS). ENAs play an essential role in driving the KH-like instability, which is fully stabilized in their absence by magnetic fields. The nonlinear phase of these instabilities is briefly discussed. We also discuss the possibility that RT-like or mixed KH-RT-like instabilities drag outer heliosheath/very local interstellar medium (OHS/VLISM) magnetic field lines into the inner heliosheath (IHS) with the VLISM flow, and the possibility that IHS and VLISM magnetic field lines experience reconnection. Such reconnection may (1) greatly enhance the mixing of plasmas across the heliopause and (2) provide open magnetic field lines that allow easy ingress of galactic cosmic rays into the heliosphere and corresponding easy loss of anomalous cosmic rays from the heliosphere.

  18. Toward a predictive understanding of water and charge transport in proton exchange membranes.

    PubMed

    Selvan, Myvizhi Esai; Calvo-Muñoz, Elisa; Keffer, David J

    2011-03-31

    An analytical model for water and charge transport in highly acidic and highly confined systems such as proton exchange membranes of fuel cells is developed and compared to available experimental data. The model is based on observations from both experiment and multiscale simulation. The model accounts for three factors in the system including acidity, confinement, and connectivity. This model has its basis in the molecular-level mechanisms of water transport but has been coarse-grained to the extent that it can be expressed in an analytical form. The model uses the concentration of H(3)O(+) ion to characterize acidity, interfacial surface area per water molecule to characterize confinement, and percolation theory to describe connectivity. Several important results are presented. First, an integrated multiscale simulation approach including both molecular dynamics simulation and confined random walk theory is capable of quantitatively reproducing experimentally measured self-diffusivities of water in the perfluorinated sulfonic acid proton exchange membrane material, Nafion. The simulations, across a range of hydration conditions from minimally hydrated to fully saturated, have an average error for the self-diffusivity of water of 16% relative to experiment. Second, accounting for three factors-acidity, confinement, and connectivity-is necessary and sufficient to understand the self-diffusivity of water in proton exchange membranes. Third, an analytical model based on percolation theory is capable of quantitatively reproducing experimentally measured self-diffusivities of both water and charge in Nafion across a full range of hydration.

  19. Development of Laboratory Experimental System to Clarify Solar Wind Charge Exchange Mechanism with TES Microcalorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enoki, T.; Ishisaki, Y.; Akamatsu, H.; Ezoe, Y.; Ohashi, T.; Kanda, T.; Ishida, T.; Tanuma, H.; Ohashi, H.; Shinozaki, K.; Mitsuda, K.

    2012-06-01

    Significant fraction of the cosmic diffuse soft X-ray emission (0.1-1 keV) is caused by the Solar Wind Charge eXchange (SWCX) process between the solar wind ion (C q+, N q+, O q+ etc.) and the interplanetary neutral matter. It is difficult to identify spectral features of SWCX with the spectral resolution of existing X-ray astronomy satellites. We are developing a laboratory experimental system with transition edge sensor (TES) X-ray microcalorimeters, in order to clarify the SWCX mechanism. This experiment is designed to measure Charge eXchange (CX) X-rays using Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Source (ECRIS) that generates multi-charged ions. Emission lines (OVIII: 2p→1s; 654 eV) by CX between O8+ and neutral He atom is aimed to be measured with energy resolution better than 10 eV. The TES microcalorimeter is cooled by a double-stage adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (DADR), however, our TES microcalorimeter are not working potentially due to magnetic field contamination. This paper reports our experimental system, present results, and future prospects.

  20. Low energy alkali ion-surface charge exchange for Si(111) as a function of doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gann, Reuben D.; Yarmoff, Jory A.

    2011-03-01

    Alkali ion-surface charge exchange, which can be used to probe surface electronic states, is well understood within the context of the resonant charge transfer (RCT) model. Recent studies have extended the use of alkali ion scattering and the RCT model from metal surfaces to semiconductors and insulators. In the present work, we measure the effect of doping type and concentration on the neutralization probability of alkali ions scattered from semiconductors. Si(111) surfaces were prepared in UHV, and the neutralization probability of scattered Li + ions was measured for projectiles that were singly scattered from Si atomic sites. For the clean Si(111)- 7 × 7 surface, the neutralization is determined by the surface electronic states and is independent of doping. Samples were then dosed with atomic hydrogen in order to passivate the surface states and unpin the Fermi level. This affects the neutralization probabilities and reveals differences between n and p-type materials.

  1. A high etendue spectrometer suitable for core charge eXchange recombination spectroscopy on ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Jaspers, R. J. E.; Scheffer, M.; Kappatou, A.; Valk, N. C. J. van der; Durkut, M.; Snijders, B.; Marchuk, O.; Biel, W.; Pokol, G. I.; Erdei, G.; Zoletnik, S.; Dunai, D.

    2012-10-15

    A feasibility study for the use of core charge exchange recombination spectroscopy on ITER has shown that accurate measurements on the helium ash require a spectrometer with a high etendue of 1mm{sup 2}sr to comply with the measurement requirements [S. Tugarinov et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 74, 2075 (2003)]. To this purpose such an instrument has been developed consisting of three separate wavelength channels (to measure simultaneously He/Be, C/Ne, and H/D/T together with the Doppler shifted direct emission of the diagnostic neutral beam, the beam emission (BES) signal), combining high dispersion (0.02 nm/pixel), sufficient resolution (0.2 nm), high efficiency (55%), and extended wavelength range (14 nm) at high etendue. The combined measurement of the BES along the same sightline within a third wavelength range provides the possibility for in situ calibration of the charge eXchange recombination spectroscopy signals. In addition, the option is included to use the same instrument for measurements of the fast fluctuations of the beam emission intensity up to 2 MHz, with the aim to study MHD activity.

  2. Highly charged swelling mica-type clays for selective Cu exchange.

    PubMed

    Ravella, Ramesh; Komarneni, Sridhar; Martinez, Carmen Enid

    2008-01-01

    There is a need to develop highly CU2+ selective materials which can potentially remediate copper contaminated soils and water. Here we show that several highly charged synthetic swelling mica-type clays are highly selective for copper exchange. The synthetic micas have cation exchange capacities (CECs), which are close to their theoretical values. Both Na-saturated and Mg-saturated micas were investigated for Cu ion exchange selectivity. Ion exchange isotherms and Kielland plots were constructed using the equilibrated solution analyses. From these studies it was found that Na-4-mica and Na-3-mica could selectively exchange copper at lower concentrations from solution, whereas Na-2-mica sample performed better by showing Cu ion exchange selectively to almost its capacity. The EPR spectra of Cu-exchanged micas coincide with the mica's charge characteristics that predict increased binding strength of exchangeable Cu in Na-4-mica and Na-3-mica than in Na-2-mica.

  3. High resolution main-ion charge exchange spectroscopy in the DIII-D H-mode pedestal

    SciTech Connect

    Grierson, B. A.; Burrell, K. H.; Chrystal, C.; Groebner, R. J.; Haskey, S. R.; Kaplan, D. H.

    2016-09-12

    A new high spatial resolution main-ion (deuterium) charge-exchange spectroscopy system covering the tokamak boundary region has been installed on the DIII-D tokamak. Sixteen new edge main-ion charge-exchange recombination sightlines have been combined with nineteen impurity sightlines in a tangentially viewing geometry on the DIII-D midplane with an interleaving design that achieves 8 mm inter-channel radial resolution for detailed profiles of main-ion temperature, velocity, charge-exchange emission, and neutral beam emission. At the plasma boundary, we find a strong enhancement of the main-ion toroidal velocity that exceeds the impurity velocity by a factor of two. Furthermore, the unique combination of experimentally measured main-ion and impurity profiles provides a powerful quasi-neutrality constraint for reconstruction of tokamak H-mode pedestals.

  4. High resolution main-ion charge exchange spectroscopy in the DIII-D H-mode pedestal

    SciTech Connect

    Grierson, B. A.; Burrell, K. H.; Chrystal, C.; Groebner, R. J.; Haskey, S. R.; Kaplan, D. H.

    2016-09-12

    A new high spatial resolution main-ion (deuterium) charge-exchange spectroscopy system covering the tokamak boundary region has been installed on the DIII-D tokamak. Sixteen new edge main-ion charge-exchange recombination sightlines have been combined with nineteen impurity sightlines in a tangentially viewing geometry on the DIII-D midplane with an interleaving design that achieves 8 mm inter-channel radial resolution for detailed profiles of main-ion temperature, velocity, charge-exchange emission, and neutral beam emission. At the plasma boundary, we find a strong enhancement of the main-ion toroidal velocity that exceeds the impurity velocity by a factor of two. Furthermore, the unique combination of experimentally measured main-ion and impurity profiles provides a powerful quasi-neutrality constraint for reconstruction of tokamak H-mode pedestals.

  5. High resolution main-ion charge exchange spectroscopy in the DIII-D H-mode pedestal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grierson, B. A.; Burrell, K. H.; Chrystal, C.; Groebner, R. J.; Haskey, S. R.; Kaplan, D. H.

    2016-11-01

    A new high spatial resolution main-ion (deuterium) charge-exchange spectroscopy system covering the tokamak boundary region has been installed on the DIII-D tokamak. Sixteen new edge main-ion charge-exchange recombination sightlines have been combined with nineteen impurity sightlines in a tangentially viewing geometry on the DIII-D midplane with an interleaving design that achieves 8 mm inter-channel radial resolution for detailed profiles of main-ion temperature, velocity, charge-exchange emission, and neutral beam emission. At the plasma boundary, we find a strong enhancement of the main-ion toroidal velocity that exceeds the impurity velocity by a factor of two. The unique combination of experimentally measured main-ion and impurity profiles provides a powerful quasi-neutrality constraint for reconstruction of tokamak H-mode pedestals.

  6. The Solar Wind Charge-exchange Production Factor for Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuntz, K. D.; Collado-Vega, Y. M.; Collier, M. R.; Connor, H. K.; Cravens, T. E.; Koutroumpa, D.; Porter, F. S.; Robertson, I. P.; Sibeck, D. G.; Snowden, S. L.; Thomas, N. E.; Walsh, B. M.

    2015-08-01

    The mean production factor, or broadband averaged cross-section, for solar wind charge-exchange (SWCX) with hydrogen producing emission in the ROSAT \\frac{1}{4} keV (R12) band is (3.8+/- 0.2)× {10}-20 count degree-2 cm4. The production factor is expected to be temporally variable, and that variation is roughly 15%. These values are derived from a comparison of the long-term (background) enhancements in the ROSAT All-Sky Survey with magnetohysdrodynamic simulations of the magnetosheath. This value is 1.8-4.5 times higher than values derived from limited atomic data, suggesting that those values may be missing a large number of faint lines. This production factor is important for deriving the exact amount of \\frac{1}{4} keV band flux that is due to the Local Hot Bubble, for planning future observations in the \\frac{1}{4} keV band, and for evaluating proposals for remote sensing of the magnetosheath. The same method cannot be applied to the \\frac{3}{4} keV band as that band, being composed primarily of the oxygen lines, is far more sensitive to the detailed abundances and ionization balance in the solar wind. We also show, incidentally, that recent efforts to correlate XMM-Newton observing geometry with magnetosheath SWCX emission in the oxygen lines have been, quite literally, misguided. Simulations of the inner heliosphere show that broader efforts to correlate heliospheric SWCX with local solar wind parameters are unlikely to produce useful results.

  7. Submicron dust clouds for optical charge measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melzer, Andre; Krüger, Harald; Killer, Carsten

    2016-10-01

    Dusty plasmas consist of particles immersed in gaseous plasmas. The charge of the dust particles that they attain due to the inflow of plasma electrons and ions is a pivotal parameter: the particle charge determines the interaction with the plasma species and among the particles themselves. So far, charge measurements exploit the dust-plasma interaction or the analysis of wave-motion of the particles. Recently, a completely different, optical approach has been suggested, where the charge is extracted from the wavelength shift of the optical phonon resonance due to the charge-modified polarizability of the material. This ``detuning'' of the phonon resonance increases with particle charge and is prominent for nanometer-sized particles. In first experiments, we demonstrate the trapping of nanometric dust particles made of Al2O3. The dust is injected by a gas stream into the plasma. Clouds of particles with diameters around 100 nm can be trapped in the bulk plasma of the discharge. There, the phonon resonance of Al2O3 is measured in-situ in an FTIR spectrometer.

  8. Heliospheric x-rays due to solar wind charge exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Ina Piket

    X-ray emission due to charge transfer between heavy solar wind ions and interstellar and geocoronal neutrals has been predicted to exist in both the heliosphere and in the geocorona. The high charge state solar wind ions resulting from these collisions are left in highly excited states and emit extreme ultraviolet or soft x-ray photons. Models have been created to simulate this type of x-ray emission with interstellar and geocoronal neutrals. Time variations in the x-ray emissions were studied by using measured solar wind proton fluxes. The Fahr hot model was used to determine interstellar neutral densities. It was found that x-rays from interstellar hydrogen showed little variation in their intensities. The greatest variation was in geocoronal x-rays, although x-rays from interstellar helium can show considerable variation when the look direction is through the helium cone. Simulated images of Earth's geocorona as seen from an observation point outside the geocorona were created. The locations of the bow shock and magnetopause are evident in these images. Time independent maps were created that showed steady-state x-ray intensities due to the interaction between the solar wind and both interstellar neutrals and the geocoronal neutrals as a function of look direction and time of year. In all cases, the x-ray intensity is highest when the view direction is towards the Sun, but the intensity is also relatively high for view directions intersecting the gravitational focusing cone of interstellar helium. Measured solar wind proton fluxes are also directly compared with the LTE (long term enhancements) part of the soft x-ray background measured by the Rontgen satellite ROSAT. A significant positive correlation exists. We also show a heliospheric/geocoronal x-ray intensity map for the conditions used by Snowden in producing the 1/4 keV channel soft x-ray background map in galactic coordinates. Our preliminary conclusion is that very roughly 50% of the total background

  9. Oxygen ionization rates at Mars and Venus - Relative contributions of impact ionization and charge exchange

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, M. H. G.; Luhmann, J. G.; Nagy, A. F.; Spreiter, J. R.; Stahara, S. S.

    1993-01-01

    Oxygen ion production rates above the ionopauses of Venus and Mars are calculated for photoionization, charge exchange, and solar wind electron impact ionization processes. The latter two require the use of the Spreiter and Stahara (1980) gas dynamic model to estimate magnetosheath velocities, densities, and temperatures. The results indicate that impact ionization is the dominant mechanism for the production of O(+) ions at both Venus and Mars. This finding might explain both the high ion escape rates measured by Phobos 2 and the greater mass loading rate inferred for Venus from the bow shock positions.

  10. Inelastic pion double charge exchange on /sup 16/O at 240 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Mischke, R.E.; Blomberg, A.; Gram, P.A.M.; Jansen, J.; Zichy, J.; Bolger, J.; Boschitz, E.; Ingram, C.H.Q.; Proebstle, G.

    1980-05-05

    The deep-inelastic double-charge-exchange reaction /sup 16/O(..pi../sup +/,..pi../sup -/) has been measured at 50/sup 0/, 85/sup 0/, and 130/sup 0/ with 240-MeV incident pions. The doubly differential cross section is peaked at low outgoing pion energies, as is expected from a double-scattering process, and is nearly isotropic. The integrated cross section is 5.8 +- 0.9 mb. The shape of the differential cross section suggests that the low-energy tail in /sup 16/O(..pi../sup +/,..pi../sup +prime/) scattering at the same energy also arises from double scattering.

  11. Charge exchange in the ultraviolet: implication for interacting clouds in the core of NGC 1275

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Liyi; Mao, Junjie; O'Dea, Christopher P.; Baum, Stefi A.; Mehdipour, Missagh; Kaastra, Jelle S.

    2017-05-01

    Context. Charge exchange emission is known to provide a key diagnostic to the interface between hot and cold matter in many astrophysical environments. Most of the recent charge exchange studies focus on its emission in the X-ray band; only a few focus on the UV, even though it can also provide a powerful probe of the charge exchange process. Aims: An atomic calculation, as well as an application to observed data, are presented to explore and describe the potential use of the UV data for the study of cosmic charge exchange. Methods: Using the newest charge exchange model in the SPEX code v3.03, we reanalyse the archival Hubble/STIS data of the central region of NGC 1275. Results: The NGC 1275 spectrum shows hints of three possible weak lines at about 1223.6 Å, 1242.4 Å, and 1244.0 Å, each with a significance of about 2 - 3σ. The putative features are best explained by charge exchange between highly ionized hydrogen, neon, and sulfur with neutral matter. The wavelengths of the charge exchange lines are found robustly with uncertainties ≤0.3 Å. The possible charge exchange emission shows a line-of-sight velocity offset of about - 3400 km s-1 with respect to the NGC 1275 nucleus, which resembles a previously reported Lyα absorber. This indicates that the charge exchange lines might be emitted at the same position as the absorber, which could be ascribed to outflowing gas from the nucleus.

  12. First Demonstration of Laser-Assisted Charge Exchange for Microsecond Duration H- Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cousineau, Sarah; Rakhman, Abdurahim; Kay, Martin; Aleksandrov, Alexander; Danilov, Viatcheslav; Gorlov, Timofey; Liu, Yun; Plum, Michael; Shishlo, Andrei; Johnson, David

    2017-02-01

    This Letter reports on the first demonstration of laser-assisted H- charge exchange for microsecond duration H- beam pulses. Laser-assisted charge exchange injection is a breakthrough technology that overcomes long-standing limitations associated with the traditional method of producing high intensity, time structured beams of protons in accelerators via the use of carbon foils for charge exchange injection. The central theme of this experiment is the demonstration of novel techniques that reduce the laser power requirement to allow high efficiency stripping of microsecond duration beams with commercial laser technology.

  13. Analysis of the charge exchange between the human body and ground: evaluation of "earthing" from an electrical perspective.

    PubMed

    Chamberlin, Kent; Smith, Wayne; Chirgwin, Christopher; Appasani, Seshank; Rioux, Paul

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate "earthing" from an electrical perspective through measurement and analysis of the naturally occurring electron flow between the human body or a control and ground as this relates to the magnitude of the charge exchange, the relationship between the charge exchange and body functions (respiration and heart rate), and the detection of other information that might be contained in the charge exchange. Sensitive, low-noise instrumentation was designed and fabricated to measure low-level current flow at low frequencies. This instrumentation was used to record current flow between human subjects or a control and ground, and these measurements were performed approximately 40 times under varied circumstances. The results of these measurements were analyzed to determine if information was contained in the current exchange. The currents flowing between the human body and ground were small (nanoamperes), and they correlated with subject motion. There did not appear to be any information contained in this exchange except for information about subject motion. This study showed that currents flow between the environment (earth) and a grounded human body; however, these currents are small (nanoamperes) and do not appear to contain information other than information about subject motion.

  14. Analysis of the Charge Exchange Between the Human Body and Ground: Evaluation of “Earthing” From an Electrical Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Chamberlin, Kent; Smith, Wayne; Chirgwin, Christopher; Appasani, Seshank; Rioux, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate “earthing” from an electrical perspective through measurement and analysis of the naturally occurring electron flow between the human body or a control and ground as this relates to the magnitude of the charge exchange, the relationship between the charge exchange and body functions (respiration and heart rate), and the detection of other information that might be contained in the charge exchange. Methods Sensitive, low-noise instrumentation was designed and fabricated to measure low-level current flow at low frequencies. This instrumentation was used to record current flow between human subjects or a control and ground, and these measurements were performed approximately 40 times under varied circumstances. The results of these measurements were analyzed to determine if information was contained in the current exchange. Results The currents flowing between the human body and ground were small (nanoamperes), and they correlated with subject motion. There did not appear to be any information contained in this exchange except for information about subject motion. Conclusions This study showed that currents flow between the environment (earth) and a grounded human body; however, these currents are small (nanoamperes) and do not appear to contain information other than information about subject motion. PMID:25435837

  15. Charge-exchange recombination spectroscopy of the plasma ion temperature at the T-10 tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Krupin, V. A.; Tugarinov, S. N.; Barsukov, A. G.; Dnestrovskij, A. Yu.; Klyuchnikov, L. A.; Korobov, K. V.; Krasnyanskii, S. A.; Naumenko, N. N.; Nemets, A. R.; Sushkov, A. V.; Tilinin, G. N.

    2013-08-15

    Charge-exchange recombination spectroscopy (CXRS) based on a diagnostic neutral beam has been developed at the T-10 tokamak. The diagnostics allows one to measure the ion temperature profile in the cross section of the plasma column. In T-10 experiments, the measurement technique was adjusted and the elements of the CXRS diagnostics for ITER were tested. The used spectroscopic equipment makes it possible to reliably determine the ion temperature from the Doppler broadening of impurity lines (helium, carbon), as well as of the spectral lines of the working gas. The profiles of the plasma ion temperature in deuterium and helium discharges were measured at different plasma currents and densities, including with the use of active Doppler measurements of lines of different elements. The validity and reliability of ion temperature measurements performed by means of the developed CXRS diagnostics are analyzed.

  16. Impurity transport studies on Alcator C-Mod tokamak using Charge Exchange Recombination Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bespamyatnov, Igor Olegovich

    A Charge-Exchange Recombination Spectroscopy (CXRS) diagnostic has been installed on Alcator C-Mod to study the transport of light impurities in plasma. The system provides spatially (1 cm) and temporally (12.5 msec) resolved measurements of the impurity density, temperature and flow velocities of the particular impurity. Two optical arrays: poloidal (19 channels) and toroidal (10 channels), collect the light emitted from excited impurity ion populated by charge exchange process from the Diagnostic Neutral Beam (DNB) particle. The attention of this dissertation is focused on the B4+ (n = 7 → 6) spectral line emitted by B4+ ion formed in the following charge exchange reaction (H0 + B5+ → H+ + B4+*). A complex spectral model was developed to simulate emission. The high magnetic fields of C-Mod result in broad Zeeman patterns which must be taken into account for the interpretation of the line shift and broadening in terms of impurity ion velocity and temperature. After the spectral line fitting and careful identification of the charge exchange component, the calculated Doppler broadening and shifts of the spectral line profile yield information on the ion temperature and rotation. Together with the calculation of the beam density, the absolute calibration of the CXRS optical system provides us with B5+ density measurement capabilities. One of the main objectives of this work was to use the acquired impurity density, temperature and flow velocity profiles to investigate plasma transport behavior and infer the radial electric field ER from plasma force balance equation. The focus here was placed on the region of the Internal Transport Barrier (ITB) formation 0.35 < rho < 0.8. Radial electric field ER is readily calculated in the region of the ITB foot using measured B5+ profiles. ExB velocity shearing turbulence stabilization are believed to play an important role in the physics of the ITB formation. The computed ER profiles demonstrated the large difference between

  17. The charge exchange recombination diagnostic system on the DIII-D tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Gohil, P.; Burrell, K.H.; Groebner, R.J.; Kim, J.; Martin, W.C.; McKee, E.L.; Seraydarian, R.P.

    1991-11-01

    The charge exchange recombination (CER) diagnostic system on the DIII-D tokamak is used to make spatially and temporally resolved measurements of the ion temperature and toroidal and poloidal rotation velocities. This is performed through visible spectroscopic measurements of the Doppler broadened and Doppler shifted HE II 468.6 nm, the CVI 529.1 nm, and the BV 494.5 nm spectral lines which have been excited by charge exchange recombination interactions between the fully stripped ions and the neutral atoms from the heating beams. The plasma viewing optics comprises 32 viewing chords spanning a typical plasma minor radius of 63 cm across the midplane, of which 15 spatial chords span 4.2 cm at the plasma edge just within the separatrix and provide a chord-to-chord spatial resolution of 0.3 cm. Fast camera readout electronics can provide a temporal resolution of 260 {mu}s per time slice, but the effective minimum integration time, at present, is 1 ms which is limited by the detected photon flux from the plasma and the decay times of the phosphors used on the multichannel plate image intensifiers. Significant changes in the edge plasma radial electric field at the L-H transition have been observed, as determined from the CER measurements, and these results are being extensively compared to theories which consider the effects of sheared electric fields on plasma turbulence. 13 refs., 10 figs.

  18. EBIT in the Magnetic Trapping Mode: Mass Spectrometry, Atomic Lifetime Measurements, and Charge Transfer Reactions of Highly Charged Atomic Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Schweikhard, L; Beiersdorfer, P; Trabert, E

    2001-07-10

    Although it may sound like a contradiction in terms, the electron beam ion trap (EBIT) works as an ion trap even when the electron beam is switched off. We present various experiments that exploit the ''magnetic trapping mode'' for investigations of ion confinement, charge exchange processes, atomic lifetime and ion mass measurements.

  19. Charge exchange processes of high energy heavy ions channeled in crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andriamonje, S.; Chevallier, M.; Cohen, C.; Dural, J.; Genre, R.; Girard, Y.; Groeneveld, K. O.; Kemmler, J.; Kirsch, R.; L'Hoir, A.; Maier, R.; Poizat, J. C.; Quéré, Y.; Remillieux, J.; Schmaus, D.; Toulemonde, M.

    The interaction of moving ions with single crystals is very sensitive to the orientation of the incident beam with respect to the crystalline directions of the target. The experiments show that high energy heavy ion channeling deeply modifies the slowing down and charge exchange processes. In this review, we describe the opportunity offered by channeling conditions to study the charge exchange processes. Some aspects of the charge exchange processes with high energy channeled heavy ions are selected from the extensive literature published over the past few years on this subject. Special attention is given to the work performed at the GANIL facility on the study of Radiative Electron Capture (REC), Electron Impact Ionisation (EII), and convoy electron emission. Finally we emphasize the interest of studying resonant charge exchange processes such as Resonant Coherent Excitation (RCE), Resonant Transfer and Excitation (RTE) or Dielectronic Recombination (DR) and the recently proposed Nuclear Excitation by Electron Capture (NEEC).

  20. Possible Charge-Exchange X-Ray Emission in the Cygnus Loop Detected with Suzaku

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katsuda, Satoru; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Mori, Koji; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Kosugi, Hiroko; Kimura, Masashi; Nakajima, Hiroshi; Takakura, Satoru; Petre, Robert; Hewitt. John W.; Yamaguchi, Hiroya

    2011-01-01

    X-ray spectroscopic measurements of the Cygnus Loop supernova remnant indicate that metal abundances throughout most of the remnant s rim are depleted to approx.0.2 times the solar value. However, recent X-ray studies have revealed in some narrow regions along the outermost rim anomalously "enhanced" abundances (up to approx. 1 solar). The reason for these anomalous abundances is not understood. Here, we examine X-ray spectra in annular sectors covering nearly the entire rim of the Cygnus Loop using Suzaku (21 pointings) and XMM-Newton (1 pointing). We find that spectra in the "enhanced" abundance regions commonly show a strong emission feature at approx.0.7 keV. This feature is likely a complex of He-like O K(gamma + delta + epsilon), although other possibilities cannot be fully excluded. The intensity of this emission relative to He-like O K(alpha) appears to be too high to be explained as thermal emission. This fact, as well as the spatial concentration of the anomalous abundances in the outermost rim, leads us to propose an origin from charge-exchange processes between neutrals and H-like O. We show that the presence of charge-exchange emission could lead to the inference of apparently "enhanced" metal abundances using pure thermal emission models. Accounting for charge-exchange emission, the actual abundances could be uniformly low throughout the rim. The overall abundance depletion remains an open question. Subject headings: ISM: abundances ISM: individual objects (Cygnus Loop) ISM: supernova remnants X-rays: ISM atomic processes

  1. Upgrade of the Edge Charge Exchange Diagnostic on Alcator C-Mod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDermott, Rachael; Lipschultz, Bruce; Marr, Kenneth

    2006-10-01

    The current edge Charge Exchange Spectroscopy system is being upgraded to include both a beam viewing and a background viewing toroidal periscope. The beam viewing periscope will be focused on the center of the DNB and will cover a 4cm radial region at the edge of the plasma starting a few centimeters in from and extending up to 1centimeter outside of the last closed flux surface. The background periscope will view the same radial region but will be displaced toroidally by 36 degrees. Each periscope has 20 chordal views with a radial resolution of 2.5-3mm. The presence of a background periscope obviates the need for a chopped DNB by providing time synchronized background B^+4 spectral data that can be subtracted directly from the active beam-derived B^+4 line-shapes. This system has been designed to work in conjunction with the current poloidal Charge Exchange periscope which has 25 fibers focused in the same region with equivalent radial resolution. The new toroidal system will enable concurrent measurements of the poloidal and toroidal velocity as well as the temperature and density of the B^+5 ions in the edge pedestal region; a measurement that currently does not exist on C-Mod. This information will then be used to calculate radial electric field profiles and study edge physics phenomena.

  2. Pion single- and double-charge-exchange reactions at low energies

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, H.W.

    1987-01-01

    The general features of pion charge-exchange reactions at energies of 20 to 80 MeV leading to nuclear isobaric-analog states (IAS) and double-isobaric-analog states (DIAS) are reviewed. The recent progress achieved in understanding the role of short-range N-N correlations in the double-charge-exchange reactions is presented. 36 refs., 21 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Charge Noise Spectroscopy Using Coherent Exchange Oscillations in a Singlet-Triplet Qubit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dial, O. E.; Shulman, M. D.; Harvey, S. P.; Bluhm, H.; Umansky, V.; Yacoby, A.

    2013-04-01

    Two level systems that can be reliably controlled and measured hold promise as qubits both for metrology and for quantum information science. Since a fluctuating environment limits the performance of qubits in both capacities, understanding environmental coupling and dynamics is key to improving qubit performance. We show measurements of the level splitting and dephasing due to the voltage noise of a GaAs singlet-triplet qubit during exchange oscillations. Unexpectedly, the voltage fluctuations are non-Markovian even at high frequencies and exhibit a strong temperature dependence. This finding has impacts beyond singlet-triplet qubits since nearly all solid state qubits suffer from some kind of charge noise. The magnitude of the fluctuations allows the qubit to be used as a charge sensor with a sensitivity of 2×10-8e/Hz, 2 orders of magnitude better than a quantum-limited rf single electron transistor. Based on these measurements, we provide recommendations for improving qubit coherence, allowing for higher fidelity operations and improved charge sensitivity.

  4. Probe Measures Fouling As In Heat Exchangers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marner, Wilbur J.; Macdavid, Kenton S.

    1990-01-01

    Combustion deposits reduce transfer of heat. Instrument measures fouling like that on gas side of heat exchanger in direct-fired boiler or heat-recovery system. Heat-flux probe includes tube with embedded meter in outer shell. Combustion gases flow over probe, and fouling accumulates on it, just as fouling would on heat exchanger. Embedded heat-flow meter is sandwich structure in which thin Chromel layers and middle alloy form thermopile. Users determine when fouling approaches unacceptable levels so they schedule cleaning and avoid decreased transfer of heat and increased drop in pressure fouling causes. Avoids cost of premature, unnecessary maintenance.

  5. Probe Measures Fouling As In Heat Exchangers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marner, Wilbur J.; Macdavid, Kenton S.

    1990-01-01

    Combustion deposits reduce transfer of heat. Instrument measures fouling like that on gas side of heat exchanger in direct-fired boiler or heat-recovery system. Heat-flux probe includes tube with embedded meter in outer shell. Combustion gases flow over probe, and fouling accumulates on it, just as fouling would on heat exchanger. Embedded heat-flow meter is sandwich structure in which thin Chromel layers and middle alloy form thermopile. Users determine when fouling approaches unacceptable levels so they schedule cleaning and avoid decreased transfer of heat and increased drop in pressure fouling causes. Avoids cost of premature, unnecessary maintenance.

  6. Improving respiration measurements with gas exchange analyzers.

    PubMed

    Montero, R; Ribas-Carbó, M; Del Saz, N F; El Aou-Ouad, H; Berry, J A; Flexas, J; Bota, J

    2016-12-01

    Dark respiration measurements with open-flow gas exchange analyzers are often questioned for their low accuracy as their low values often reach the precision limit of the instrument. Respiration was measured in five species, two hypostomatous (Vitis Vinifera L. and Acanthus mollis) and three amphistomatous, one with similar amount of stomata in both sides (Eucalyptus citriodora) and two with different stomata density (Brassica oleracea and Vicia faba). CO2 differential (ΔCO2) increased two-fold with no change in apparent Rd, when the two leaves with higher stomatal density faced outside. These results showed a clear effect of the position of stomata on ΔCO2. Therefore, it can be concluded that leaf position is important to guarantee the improvement of respiration measurements increasing ΔCO2 without affecting the respiration results by leaf or mass units. This method will help to increase the accuracy of leaf respiration measurements using gas exchange analyzers.

  7. Neutral atomic oxygen beam produced by ion charge exchange for Low Earth Orbital (LEO) simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce; Rutledge, Sharon; Brdar, Marko; Olen, Carl; Stidham, Curt

    1987-01-01

    A low energy neutral atomic oxygen beam system was designed and is currently being assembled at the Lewis Research Center. The system utilizes a 15 cm diameter Kaufman ion source to produce positive oxygen ions which are charge exchange neutralized to produce low energy (variable from 5 to 150 eV) oxygen atoms at a flux simulating real time low Earth orbital conditions. An electromagnet is used to direct only the singly charged oxygen ions from the ion source into the charge exchange cell. A retarding potential grid is used to slow down the oxygen ions to desired energies prior to their charge exchange. Cryogenically cooled diatomic oxygen gas in the charge exchange cell is then used to transfer charge to the oxygen ions to produce a neutral atomic oxygen beam. Remaining non-charge exchanged oxygen ions are then swept from the beam by electromagnetic or electrostatic deflection depending upon the desired experiment configuration. The resulting neutral oxygen beam of 5 to 10 cm in diameter impinges upon target materials within a sample holder fixture that can also provide for simultaneous heating and UV exposure during the atomic oxygen bombardment.

  8. Lipid exchange between membranes: effects of membrane surface charge, composition, and curvature.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Tao; Jiang, Zhongying; Ma, Yuqiang

    2012-09-01

    Intermembrane lipid exchange is critical to membrane functions and pharmaceutical applications. The exchange process is not fully understood and it is explored by quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitor method in this research. It is found that intermembrane lipid exchange is accelerated with the decrease of vesicle size and the increase of charge and liquid crystalline lipid composition ratio. Vesicle adsorption rate, membrane lateral pressure gradient, and lipid lateral diffusion coefficient are inferred to be critical in deciding the lipid exchange kinetics between membranes. Besides that, the membrane contact situation during lipid exchange is also studied. The maximum total membrane contact area is found to increase with the decrease of vesicle size, charged and liquid crystalline lipid composition ratio. A competition mechanism between the vesicle adsorption rate and the intermembrane lipid exchange rate was proposed to control the maximum total membrane contact area.

  9. Measurement of heat and moisture exchanger efficiency.

    PubMed

    Chandler, M

    2013-09-01

    Deciding between a passive heat and moisture exchanger or active humidification depends upon the level of humidification that either will deliver. Published international standards dictate that active humidifiers should deliver a minimum humidity of 33 mg.l(-1); however, no such requirement exists, for heat and moisture exchangers. Anaesthetists instead have to rely on information provided by manufacturers, which may not allow comparison of different devices and their clinical effectiveness. I suggest that measurement of humidification efficiency, being the percentage moisture returned and determined by measuring the temperature of the respired gases, should be mandated, and report a modification of the standard method that will allow this to be easily measured. In this study, different types of heat and moisture exchangers for adults, children and patients with a tracheostomy were tested. Adult and paediatric models lost between 6.5 mg.l(-1) and 8.5 mg.l(-1) moisture (corresponding to an efficiency of around 80%); however, the models designed for patients with a tracheostomy lost between 16 mg.l(-1) and 18 mg.l(-1) (60% efficiency). I propose that all heat and moisture exchangers should be tested in this manner and percentage efficiency reported to allow an informed choice between different types and models.

  10. Characterization of an Atomic Hydrogen Source for Charge Exchange Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leutenegger, M. A.; Beierdorfer, P.; Betancourt-Martinez, G. L.; Brown, G. V.; Hell, N; Kelley, R. L.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Magee, E. W.; Porter, F. S.

    2016-01-01

    We characterized the dissociation fraction of a thermal dissociation atomic hydrogen source byinjecting the mixed atomic and molecular output of the source into an electron beam ion trapcontaining highly charged ions and recording the x-ray spectrum generated by charge exchangeusing a high-resolution x-ray calorimeter spectrometer. We exploit the fact that the charge exchangestate-selective capture cross sections are very different for atomic and molecular hydrogen incidenton the same ions, enabling a clear spectroscopic diagnostic of the neutral species.

  11. A measurement of the top quark's charge

    SciTech Connect

    Unalan, Zeynep Gunay

    2007-01-01

    The top quark was discovered in 1995 at the Fermilab National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab). One way to confirm if the observed top quark is really the top quark posited in the Standard Model (SM) is to measure its electric charge. In the Standard Model the top quark is the isospin partner of the bottom quark and is expected to have a charge of +2/3. However, an alternative 'exotic' model has been proposed with a fourth generation exotic quark that has the same characteristics, such as mass, as our observed top but with a charge of -4/3. This thesis presents the first CDF measurement of the top quark's charge via its decay products, a W boson and a bottom quark, using ~ 1 fb-1 of data. The data were collected by the CDF detector from proton anti-proton (p$\\bar{p}$) collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV at Fermilab. We classify events depending on the charges of the bottom quark and associated W boson and count the number of events which appear 'SM-like' or 'exotic-like' with a SM-like event decaying as t → W+b and an exotic event as t → W-b. We find the p-value under the Standard Model hypothesis to be 0.35 which is consistent with the Standard Model. We exclude the exotic quark hypothesis at an 81% confidence level, for which we have chosen a priori that the probability of incorrectly rejecting the SM would be 1%. The calculated Bayes Factor (BF) is 2 x Ln(BF)=8.54 which is interpreted as the data strongly favors the Standard Model over the exotic quark hypothesis.

  12. Observations of solar wind ion charge exchange in the Comet Halley coma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuselier, S. A.; Shelley, E. G.; Goldstein, B. E.; Goldstein, R.; Neugebauer, M.; Ip, W.-H.; Balsiger, H.; Reme, H.

    1991-01-01

    Giotto Ion Mass Spectrometer/High Energy Range Spectrometer (IMS/HERS) observations of solar wind ions show charge exchange effects and solar wind compositional changes in the coma of Comet Halley. As the comet was approached, the He(2+) to proton density ratio increased from 2.5 percent in the solar wind to about 4 percent about 1 hr before closest approach after which time it decreased to about 1 percent. Abrupt increases in this ratio from 2.5 to 4.5 percent were also observed in the beginning and near the end of the so-called Mystery Region. These abrupt increases in the density ratio were well correlated with enhanced fluxes of keV electrons as measured by the Giotto plasma electron spectrometer. The general increase and then decrease of the He(2+) to proton density ratio is quantitatively consistent with a combination of the addition of protons of Cometary origin to the plasma and loss of plasma through charge exchange of protons and He(2+).

  13. Observations of solar wind ion charge exchange in the Comet Halley coma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuselier, S. A.; Shelley, E. G.; Goldstein, B. E.; Goldstein, R.; Neugebauer, M.; Ip, W.-H.; Balsiger, H.; Reme, H.

    1991-01-01

    Giotto Ion Mass Spectrometer/High Energy Range Spectrometer (IMS/HERS) observations of solar wind ions show charge exchange effects and solar wind compositional changes in the coma of Comet Halley. As the comet was approached, the He(2+) to proton density ratio increased from 2.5 percent in the solar wind to about 4 percent about 1 hr before closest approach after which time it decreased to about 1 percent. Abrupt increases in this ratio from 2.5 to 4.5 percent were also observed in the beginning and near the end of the so-called Mystery Region. These abrupt increases in the density ratio were well correlated with enhanced fluxes of keV electrons as measured by the Giotto plasma electron spectrometer. The general increase and then decrease of the He(2+) to proton density ratio is quantitatively consistent with a combination of the addition of protons of Cometary origin to the plasma and loss of plasma through charge exchange of protons and He(2+).

  14. Influence of a wick lining on the evaporation rate of lithium from a charge exchange canal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thampi, N. S.; Berger, S.; Dworschak, F.

    1992-02-01

    A wick lining is used with a lithium charge exchange canal for reducing the consumption of lithium. The wick helps to condense the lithium vapour more effectively and to make it flow back to the main oven. For its efficient functioning, the temperature gradient along the wick has to be properly maintained. The present studies were carried out to assess the extent of reduction in lithium loss when using the wick and to determine the optimum temperature settings. The evaporation rate of lithium vapour from a charge exchange canal (General Ionex Model-712) has been investigated in the temperature range from 470 to 575° C. The measurements were carried out with and without a stainless steel wire mesh wick lining, inside the canal. A quartz crystal oscillator type rate meter was used for monitoring the evaporation rate. The results indicate that, when the wick lining is inserted, the reduction in evaporation rate of lithium is only 20%. This differs much from the result of Greenway [Report 85/11, Oxford University, Nuclear Physics Laboratory (1985)] who reported a reduction by a factor of 8. The evaporation rate is also found to depend on the canal end heater temperature, maintained high enough to keep the condensing vapour in liquid state. The optimum temperature settings for the end heaters have been found to be 300 ° C. The experimental arrangements and results are presented in this paper.

  15. Charge-exchange reactions on double-β decaying nuclei populating Jπ=2- states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frekers, D.; Alanssari, M.; Ejiri, H.; Holl, M.; Poves, A.; Suhonen, J.

    2017-03-01

    The (3He,t ) charge-exchange reaction populating Jπ=2- states has been examined at 420 MeV incident energy for a series of double-β decaying nuclei, i.e., 76Ge, 82Se, 96Zr, 100Mo, 128Te, 130Te, and 136Xe. The measurements were carried out at the Grand Raiden spectrometer of the Research Center for Nuclear Physics at the University Osaka with typical spectral resolution of 30-40 keV. It is found that the charge-exchange reaction leading to 2- spin-dipole states is selective to the σ τ part of the interaction much similar to the observed selectivity to Gamow-Teller transitions. In the present case, the Δ L =1 peak cross sections at finite momentum transfers are used to extract the spin-isospin part of the low-lying transition strength near the Fermi surface (i.e., Ex≤5 MeV). Relative strength values are confronted with various model calculations, i.e., the interacting shell model, the quasiparticle random-phase approximation, and the Fermi surface quasiparticle model. The impact on the nuclear matrix elements for the neutrinoless double-β decay is discussed.

  16. The formation of excited atoms during charge exchange between hydrogen ions and alkali atoms. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nieman, R. A.

    1971-01-01

    The charge exchange cross sections for protons and various alkali atoms are calculated using the classical approximation of Gryzinski. It is assumed that the hydrogen atoms resulting from charge exchange exist in all possible excited states. Charge transfer collisions between protons and potassium as well as protons and sodium atoms are studied. The energy range investigated is between 4 and 30 keV. The theoretical calculations of the capture cross section and the cross section for the creation of metastable 2S hydrogen are compared to experimental values. Good quantitative agreement is found for the capture cross section but only qualitative agreement for the metastable cross section. Analysis of the Lyman alpha window in molecular oxygen suggests that measured values of the metastable cross section may be in error. Thick alkali target data are also presented. This allows the determination of the total electron loss cross section. Finally, some work was done with H2(+).

  17. Gas exchange measurements in natural systems

    SciTech Connect

    Broecker, W.S.; Peng, T.H.

    1983-01-01

    Direct knowledge of the rates of gas exchange in lakes and the ocean is based almost entirely on measurements of the isotopes /sup 14/C, /sup 222/Rn and /sup 3/He. The distribution of natural radiocarbon has yielded the average rate of CO/sub 2/ exchange for the ocean and for several closed basin lakes. That of bomb produced radiocarbon has been used in the same systems. The /sup 222/Rn to /sup 226/Ra ratio in open ocean surface water has been used to give local short term gas exchange rates. The radon method generally cannot be used in lakes, rivers, estuaries or shelf areas because of the input of radon from sediments. A few attempts have been made to use the excess /sup 3/He produced by decay of bomb produced tritium in lakes to give gas transfer rates. The uncertainty in the molecular diffusivity of helium and in the diffusivity dependence of the rate of gas transfer holds back the application of this method. A few attempts have been made to enrich the surface waters of small lakes with /sup 226/Ra and /sup 3/H in order to allow the use of the /sup 222/Rn and /sup 3/He methods. While these studies give broadly concordant results, many questions remain unanswered. The wind velocity dependence of gas exchange rate has yet to be established in field studies. The dependence of gas exchange rate on molecular diffusivity also remains in limbo. Finally, the degree of enhancement of CO/sub 2/ exchange through chemical reactions has been only partially explored. 49 references, 2 figures, 2 tables.

  18. Laboratory simulation of charge exchange-produced X-ray emission from comets.

    PubMed

    Beiersdorfer, P; Boyce, K R; Brown, G V; Chen, H; Kahn, S M; Kelley, R L; May, M; Olson, R E; Porter, F S; Stahle, C K; Tillotson, W A

    2003-06-06

    In laboratory experiments using the engineering spare microcalorimeter detector from the ASTRO-E satellite mission, we recorded the x-ray emission of highly charged ions of carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen, which simulates charge exchange reactions between heavy ions in the solar wind and neutral gases in cometary comae. The spectra are complex and do not readily match predictions. We developed a charge exchange emission model that successfully reproduces the soft x-ray spectrum of comet Linear C/1999 S4, observed with the Chandra X-ray Observatory.

  19. X-ray Signature of Charge Exchange in the Spectra of L-shell Iron Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Beiersdorfer, P; Schweikhard, L; Liebisch, P; Brown, G V

    2007-01-05

    The X-ray signature of charge exchange between highly charged L-shell iron ions and neutral gas atoms was studied in the laboratory in order to assess its diagnostic utility. Significant differences with spectra formed by electron-impact excitation were observed. In particular, a strong enhancement was found of the emission corresponding to n {le} 4 {yields} n = 2 transitions relative to the n = 3 {yields} n = 2 emission. This enhancement was detectable even with relatively low-resolution X-ray instrumentation (E/{Delta}E {approx} 10) and may enable future identification of charge exchange as a line-formation mechanism in astrophysical spectra.

  20. Experimental comparison of exchange bias measurement methodologies

    SciTech Connect

    Hovorka, Ondrej; Berger, Andreas; Friedman, Gary

    2007-05-01

    Measurements performed on all-ferromagnetic bilayer systems and supported by model calculation results are used to compare different exchange bias characterization methods. We demonstrate that the accuracy of the conventional two-point technique based on measuring the sum of the coercive fields depends on the symmetry properties of hysteresis loops. On the other hand, the recently proposed center of mass method yields results independent of the hysteresis loop type and coincides with the two-point measurement only if the loops are symmetric. Our experimental and simulation results clearly demonstrate a strong correlation between loop asymmetry and the difference between these methods.

  1. Development of the charge exchange recombination spectroscopy and the beam emission spectroscopy on the EAST tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y. Y.; Fu, J.; Lyu, B.; Du, X. W.; Li, C. Y.; Yu, Y.; Wang, Q. P.; Zhang, Y.; Yin, X. H.; Ye, M. Y.; Wan, B. N.; Hellermann, M. von; Shi, Y. J.

    2014-11-15

    Charge eXchange Recombination Spectroscopy (CXRS) and Beam Emission Spectroscopy (BES) diagnostics based on a heating neutral beam have recently been installed on EAST to provide local measurements of ion temperature, velocity, and density. The system design features common light collection optics for CXRS and BES, background channels for the toroidal views, multi-chord viewing sightlines, and high throughput lens-based spectrometers with good signal to noise ratio for high time resolution measurements. Additionally, two spectrometers each has a tunable grating to observe any wavelength of interest are used for the CXRS and one utilizes a fixed-wavelength grating to achieve higher diffraction efficiency for the BES system. A real-time wavelength correction is implemented to achieve a high-accuracy wavelength calibration. Alignment and calibration are performed. Initial performance test results are presented.

  2. Inference of the ring current ion composition by means of charge exchange decay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, P. H.; Bewtra, N. K.; Hoffman, R. A.

    1978-01-01

    The analysis of the measured ion fluxes during the several day storm recovery period and the assumption that beside hydrogen other ions were present and that the decays were exponential in nature, it was possible to establish three separate lifetimes for the ions. These fitted decay lifetimes are in excellent agreement with the expected charge exchange decay lifetimes for H(+), O(+), and He(+) in the energy and L-value range of the data. This inference technique, thus, establishes the presence of measurable and appreciable quantities of oxygen and helium ions as well as protons in the storm-time ring current. Indications that He(+) may also be present under these same conditions were found.

  3. X-Ray Emission Cross Sections following Charge Exchange by Multiply-Charged Ions of Astrophysical Interest

    SciTech Connect

    Otranto, S; Olson, R E; Beiersdorfer, P

    2005-09-19

    State selective nl-electron capture cross sections are presented for highly charged ions with Z = 6-10 colliding with atoms and molecules. The energy range investigated was from 1 eV/amu (v = 0.006 a.u.) to 100 keV/amu (v =2.0 a.u.). The energy dependence of the l-level populations is investigated. The K-shell x-ray emission cross sections are determined by using the calculated state-selective electron capture results as input and then applying hydrogenic branching and cascading values for the photon emission. A major shift in the line emission from being almost solely Lyman-{alpha} transitions at the highest collisions energies to strong high-n to 1s transitions at the lowest energies is observed. The calculated cross sections are in reasonable accord with measurements made by Greenwood et al, Phys. Rev. A 63, 062707 (2001), using O{sup 8+} and Ne{sup 10+} on various targets at 3 keV/amu. The calculations are also in accord with x-ray emission cross section data obtained on the EBIT machine at LLNL where O{sup 8+} and Ne{sup 10+} high resolution measurements were made at a temperature of 10 eV/amu for a series of targets with varying ionization potentials. The Ne{sup 10+} data clearly shows the contribution from multiple capture followed by Auger autoionization in the line emission spectra. Our calculated line emission cross sections are used to provide an ab initio determination of the soft x-ray spectrum of comet C/Linear 1999 S4 that was observed on the Chandra X-ray Observatory. The calculations show that the spectrum is due to charge exchange of the neutral gases in the comet's coma with the ions of the slow solar wind.

  4. Local charge exchange of He+ ions at Aluminum surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riccardi, P.; Sindona, A.; Dukes, C. A.

    2017-04-01

    We report on experiments designed to observe the correlation between the autoionization of doubly excited helium atoms and the Auger decay of 2p vacancies in Al. The autoionizing states are formed when incident He+* and He++ are neutralized by resonant electron capture at the surface. 2p excitation in Al occurs in dielectronic charge transfer during the close encounter of an excited helium ion and an Al atom. These results clarify the mechanism for Al-2p excitation in the case of singly charged ground state He+(1s) ion impact, where the dielectronic transition occurs after promotion of the 1s electron of incoming ions.

  5. Colliding planetary and stellar winds: charge exchange and transit spectroscopy in neutral hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremblin, Pascal; Chiang, Eugene

    2013-01-01

    When transiting their host stars, hot Jupiters absorb about 10 per cent of the light in the wings of the stellar Lyman α emission line. The absorption occurs at wavelengths Doppler-shifted from line centre by ±100 km s-1 - larger than the thermal speeds with which partially neutral, ˜104 K hydrogen escapes from hot Jupiter atmospheres. It has been proposed that the absorption arises from ˜106 K hydrogen from the host stellar wind, made momentarily neutral by charge exchange with planetary H i. The ±100 km s-1 velocities would then be attributed to the typical velocity dispersions of protons in the stellar wind - as inferred from spacecraft measurements of the solar wind. To test this proposal, we perform 2D hydrodynamic simulations of colliding hot Jupiter and stellar winds, augmented by a chemistry module to compute the amount of hot neutral hydrogen produced by charge exchange. We observe the contact discontinuity where the two winds meet to be Kelvin-Helmholtz unstable. The Kelvin-Helmholtz instability mixes the two winds; in the mixing layer, charge exchange reactions establish, within tens of seconds, a chemical equilibrium in which the neutral fraction of hot stellar hydrogen equals the neutral fraction of cold planetary hydrogen (about 20 per cent). In our simulations, enough hot neutral hydrogen is generated to reproduce the transit observations, and the amount of absorption converges with both spatial resolution and time. Our calculations support the idea that charge transfer between colliding winds correctly explains the Lyman α transit observations - modulo the effects of magnetic fields, which we do not model but which may suppress mixing. Other neglected effects include, in order of decreasing importance, rotational forces related to orbital motion, gravity and stellar radiation pressure; we discuss quantitatively the errors introduced by our approximations. How hot stellar hydrogen cools when it collides with cold planetary hydrogen is also

  6. Use of the TFTR prototype charge exchange neutral analyzer for fast He/sub 3//sup + +/ diagnostics during ICRF heating on PLT

    SciTech Connect

    Medley, S.S.

    1981-07-01

    The Charge Exchange Neutral Analyzer (CENA) for TFTR is designed to measure singly charged ion species of atomic mass A = 1, 2, and 3 simultaneously with up to 75 energy channels per mass and an energy range of 0.5 < AE < 600, where AE is in units of AMU.keV. Plans to test the prototype analyzer on PLT prior to installation on TFTR are discussed. The capability of the analyzer to simultaneously measure singly reionized H, D, and He/sub 3/ charge exchange neutrals makes the analyzer of particular interest for recently proposed fast He/sub 3//sup + +/ diagnostics during ICRF heating on PLT.

  7. Methods for measuring exchangeable protons in glycosaminoglycans.

    PubMed

    Beecher, Consuelo N; Larive, Cynthia K

    2015-01-01

    Recent NMR studies of the exchangeable protons of GAGs in aqueous solution, including those of the amide, sulfamate, and hydroxyl moieties, have demonstrated potential for the detection of intramolecular hydrogen bonds, providing insights into secondary structure preferences. GAG amide protons are observable by NMR over wide pH and temperature ranges; however, specific solution conditions are required to reduce the exchange rate of the sulfamate and hydroxyl protons and allow their detection by NMR. Building on the vast body of knowledge on detection of hydrogen bonds in peptides and proteins, a variety of methods can be used to identify hydrogen bonds in GAGs including temperature coefficient measurements, evaluation of chemical shift differences between oligo- and monosaccharides, and relative exchange rates measured through line shape analysis and EXSY spectra. Emerging strategies to allow direct detection of hydrogen bonds through heteronuclear couplings offer promise for the future. Molecular dynamic simulations are important in this effort both to predict and confirm hydrogen bond donors and acceptors.

  8. A review of studies on ion thruster beam and charge-exchange plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carruth, M. R., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Various experimental and analytical studies of the primary beam and charge-exchange plasmas of ion thrusters are reviewed. The history of plasma beam research is recounted, emphasizing experiments on beam neutralization, expansion of the beam, and determination of beam parameters such as electron temperature, plasma density, and plasma potential. The development of modern electron bombardment ion thrusters is treated, detailing experimental results. Studies on charge-exchange plasma are discussed, showing results such as the relationship between neutralizer emission current and plasma beam potential, ion energies as a function of neutralizer bias, charge-exchange ion current collected by an axially moving Faraday cup-RPA for 8-cm and 30-cm ion thrusters, beam density and potential data from a 15-cm ion thruster, and charge-exchange ion flow around a 30-cm thruster. A 20-cm thruster electrical configuration is depicted and facility effects are discussed. Finally, plasma modeling is covered in detail for plasma beam and charge-exchange plasma.

  9. Propagation of charge-exchange plasma produced by an ion thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carruth, M. R., Jr.; Brady, M. E.

    1980-01-01

    A charge-exchange plasma is produced downstream of ion thrusters by collisions between energetic ions and neutrals escaping through the ion optics. The charge-exchange ions flow radially from the thruster beam due to electric fields produced by its density gradient. The propagation of the charge-exchange plasma after it leaves the thruster beam is the subject of this paper. Under the proper conditions there is an 'end-effect' of a long, cylindrical Langmuir probe which allows a significant increase in collected ion current when the probe is aligned with a flowing plasma. This effect is used to determine the charge-exchange plasma flow direction at various locations relative to the ion thruster. A portion of the charge-exchange plasma flows upstream of the ion thruster and can represent a contamination source to electrically propelled spacecraft. The ion current collected by the probe as a function of its angle with respect to the plasma flow allows determination of the plasma density and plasma flow velocity at the probe's location upstream of the ion thruster optics. The density value obtained from the ion current agree to within a factor of two of density values obtained by typical voltage-current Langmuir probe characteristics.

  10. Time-dependence ion charge state distributions of vacuum arcs: An interpretation involving atoms and charge exchange collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre

    2004-08-27

    Experimentally observed charge state distributions are known to be higher at the beginning of each arc discharge. Up to know, this has been attributed to cathode surface effects in terms of changes of temperature, chemical composition and spot mode. Here it is shown that the initial decay of charge states of cathodic arc plasmas may at least in part due to charge exchange collisions of ions with neutrals that gradually fill the discharge volume. Sources of neutrals may include evaporated atoms from macroparticles and still-hot craters of previously active arc spots. More importantly, atoms are also produced by energetic condensation of the cathodic arc plasma. Self-sputtering is significant when ions impact with near-normal angle of incidence, and ions have low sticking probability when impacting at oblique angle of incidence. Estimates show that the characteristic time for filling the near-cathode discharge volume agrees well with the charge state decay time, and the likelihood of charge exchange is reasonably large to be taken into account.

  11. The TFTR E Parallel B Spectrometer for Mass and Energy Resolved Multi-Ion Charge Exchange Diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    A.L. Roquemore; S.S. Medley

    1998-01-01

    The Charge Exchange Neutral Analyzer diagnostic for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor was designed to measure the energy distributions of both the thermal ions and the supra thermal populations arising from neutral-beam injection and ion cyclotron radio-frequency heating. These measurements yield the plasma ion temperature, as well as several other plasma parameters necessary to provide an understanding of the plasma condition and the performance of the auxiliary heating methods. For this application, a novel charge-exchange spectrometer using a dee-shaped region of parallel electric and magnetic fields was developed at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. The design and performance of this spectrometer is described in detail, including the effects of exposure of the microchannel plate detector to magnetic fields, neutrons, and tritium.

  12. Precision mass measurements of highly charged ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwiatkowski, A. A.; Bale, J. C.; Brunner, T.; Chaudhuri, A.; Chowdhury, U.; Ettenauer, S.; Frekers, D.; Gallant, A. T.; Grossheim, A.; Lennarz, A.; Mane, E.; MacDonald, T. D.; Schultz, B. E.; Simon, M. C.; Simon, V. V.; Dilling, J.

    2012-10-01

    The reputation of Penning trap mass spectrometry for accuracy and precision was established with singly charged ions (SCI); however, the achievable precision and resolving power can be extended by using highly charged ions (HCI). The TITAN facility has demonstrated these enhancements for long-lived (T1/2>=50 ms) isobars and low-lying isomers, including ^71Ge^21+, ^74Rb^8+, ^78Rb^8+, and ^98Rb^15+. The Q-value of ^71Ge enters into the neutrino cross section, and the use of HCI reduced the resolving power required to distinguish the isobars from 3 x 10^5 to 20. The precision achieved in the measurement of ^74Rb^8+, a superallowed β-emitter and candidate to test the CVC hypothesis, rivaled earlier measurements with SCI in a fraction of the time. The 111.19(22) keV isomeric state in ^78Rb was resolved from the ground state. Mass measurements of neutron-rich Rb and Sr isotopes near A = 100 aid in determining the r-process pathway. Advanced ion manipulation techniques and recent results will be presented.

  13. Inference of the ring current ion composition by means of charge exchange decay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, P. H.; Hoffman, R. A.; Bewtra, N. K.

    1981-01-01

    The analysis of data from the Explorer 45 (S3-A) electrostatic analyzer in the energy range 5-30 keV has provided some new results on the ring current ion composition. It has been well established that the storm time ring current has a decay time of several days, during which the particle fluxes decrease nearly monotonically. By analyzing the measured ion fluxes during the several day storm recovery period and assuming that beside hydrogen other ions were present and that the decays were exponential in nature, three separate lifetimes for the ions were established. These fitted decay lifetimes are in excellent agreement with the expected charge exchange decay lifetimes for H(+), O(+) and He(+) in the energy and L value range of the data.

  14. Observation of Solar Wind Charge Exchange Emission from Exospheric Material in and Outside Earth's Magnetosheath

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snowden, S. L.; Collier, M. R.; Cravens, T.; Kuntz, K. D.; Lepri, S. T.; Robertson, I.; Tomas, L.

    2008-01-01

    A long XMM-Newton exposure is used to observe solar wind charge exchange (SWCX) emission from exospheric material in and outside Earth s magnetosheath. The light curve of the O VII (0.5-0.62 keV) band is compared with a model for the expected emission, and while the emission is faint and the light curve has considerable scatter, the correlation is significant to better than 99.9%. This result demonstrates the validity of the geocoronal SWCX emission model for predicting a contribution to astrophysical observations to a scale factor of order unity (1.36). The results also demonstrate the potential utility of using X-ray observations to study global phenomena of the magnetosheath which currently are only investigated using in situ measurements.

  15. Optimization of a compact multicusp He+ ion source for double-charge-exchanged He- beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinto, K.; Sugawara, H.; Takenaga, M.; Takeuchi, S.; Tanaka, N.; Okamoto, A.; Kitajima, S.; Sasao, M.; Nishiura, M.; Wada, M.

    2006-03-01

    Preliminary test bench results to study the beam quality extracted from a compact multicusp He+ ion source for He- beam production are reported. The bench is a part of the beam diagnostic system equipped with energy analyzers, emittance meters, focusing beam optics, an alkali-metal charge-exchange cell, a neutral particle energy analyzer, a double focusing magnetic momentum analyzer, a postaccelerator, and a drift tube. Utilizing the front end of the bench, the transverse emittance and the energy distribution function of a He+ beam extracted from a multi-line-cusp magnetic-field ion source 8cm in diameter and 9cm in length were measured. The results indicated that improvements in both formation of the plasma meniscus and reinforcement of pumping in the extraction region are necessary to produce a higher brightness He+ beam.

  16. Production of vibrationally excited H(2)O from charge exchange of H(3)O(+) with cesium.

    PubMed

    Mann, Jennifer E; Xie, Zhen; Savee, John D; Bowman, Joel M; Continetti, Robert E

    2009-01-28

    The center-of-mass kinetic energy release for the dissociation of H(3)O following charge exchange of H(3)O(+) with cesium has been studied experimentally and modeled using quasiclassical trajectory calculations based on an ab initio potential energy surface for H(3)O(+) and "direct dynamics" for H(3)O. Branching fractions for the H(2)O+H and OH+H(2) dissociation channels have been measured and compared to the calculations. The dominant channel is found to be H(2)O+H and the experimental kinetic energy release spectrum reveals that H(2)O is formed with a vibrational inversion in stretching vibrations, coupled with low bending and rotational excitation.

  17. New Missions and the Future of Solar Wind Charge Exchange Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuntz, K. D.

    2016-04-01

    Several newly approved missions in astrophysics and heliophysics will study solar wind charge-exchange (SWCX) directly as either primary or secondary science goals. Of these, SMILE and CuPID will study the magnetosheath by means of the SWCX emission and will provide a direct measure of the magnetospheric emission from in both the 1/4 keV and 3/4 keV bands. HaloSAT observations will be designed to minimize the magnetospheric component for its observations of the Galactic Halo, but will make at least some dedicated observations of heliospheric SWCX. I will outline the simulation needs and observational strategies required to study SWCX for astrophysical purposes.

  18. Spin dipole nuclear matrix elements for double beta decay nuclei by charge-exchange reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ejiri, H.; Frekers, D.

    2016-11-01

    Spin dipole (SD) strengths for double beta-decay (DBD) nuclei were studied experimentally for the first time by using measured cross sections of (3He, t) charge-exchange reactions (CERs). Then SD nuclear matrix elements (NMEs) {M}α ({{SD}}) for low-lying 2- states were derived from the experimental SD strengths by referring to the experimental α = GT (Gamow-Teller) and α = F (Fermi) strengths. They are consistent with the empirical NMEs M({{SD}}) based on the quasi-particle model with the empirical effective SD coupling constant. The CERs are used to evaluate the SD NME, which is associated with one of the major components of the neutrino-less DBD NME.

  19. Design of charge exchange recombination spectroscopy for the joint Texas experimental tokamak.

    PubMed

    Chi, Y; Zhuang, G; Cheng, Z F; Hou, S Y; Cheng, C; Li, Z; Wang, J R; Wang, Z J

    2014-11-01

    The old diagnostic neutral beam injector first operated at the University of Texas at Austin is ready for rejoining the joint Texas experimental tokamak (J-TEXT). A new set of high voltage power supplies has been equipped and there is no limitation for beam modulation or beam pulse duration henceforth. Based on the spectra of fully striped impurity ions induced by the diagnostic beam the design work for toroidal charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CXRS) system is presented. The 529 nm carbon VI (n = 8 - 7 transition) line seems to be the best choice for ion temperature and plasma rotation measurements and the considered hardware is listed. The design work of the toroidal CXRS system is guided by essential simulation of expected spectral results under the J-TEXT tokamak operation conditions.

  20. Design of charge exchange recombination spectroscopy for the joint Texas experimental tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Chi, Y.; Zhuang, G. Cheng, Z. F.; Hou, S. Y.; Cheng, C.; Li, Z.; Wang, J. R.; Wang, Z. J.

    2014-11-15

    The old diagnostic neutral beam injector first operated at the University of Texas at Austin is ready for rejoining the joint Texas experimental tokamak (J-TEXT). A new set of high voltage power supplies has been equipped and there is no limitation for beam modulation or beam pulse duration henceforth. Based on the spectra of fully striped impurity ions induced by the diagnostic beam the design work for toroidal charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CXRS) system is presented. The 529 nm carbon VI (n = 8 − 7 transition) line seems to be the best choice for ion temperature and plasma rotation measurements and the considered hardware is listed. The design work of the toroidal CXRS system is guided by essential simulation of expected spectral results under the J-TEXT tokamak operation conditions.

  1. Design of charge exchange recombination spectroscopy for the joint Texas experimental tokamaka)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, Y.; Zhuang, G.; Cheng, Z. F.; Hou, S. Y.; Cheng, C.; Li, Z.; Wang, J. R.; Wang, Z. J.

    2014-11-01

    The old diagnostic neutral beam injector first operated at the University of Texas at Austin is ready for rejoining the joint Texas experimental tokamak (J-TEXT). A new set of high voltage power supplies has been equipped and there is no limitation for beam modulation or beam pulse duration henceforth. Based on the spectra of fully striped impurity ions induced by the diagnostic beam the design work for toroidal charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CXRS) system is presented. The 529 nm carbon VI (n = 8 - 7 transition) line seems to be the best choice for ion temperature and plasma rotation measurements and the considered hardware is listed. The design work of the toroidal CXRS system is guided by essential simulation of expected spectral results under the J-TEXT tokamak operation conditions.

  2. Removal of charged micropollutants from water by ion-exchange polymers -- effects of competing electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Bäuerlein, Patrick S; Ter Laak, Thomas L; Hofman-Caris, Roberta C H M; de Voogt, Pim; Droge, Steven T J

    2012-10-15

    A wide variety of environmental compounds of concern, e.g. pharmaceuticals or illicit drugs, are acids or bases that may predominantly be present as charged species in drinking water sources. These charged micropollutants may prove difficult to remove by currently used water treatment steps (e.g. UV/H(2)O(2), activated carbon (AC) or membranes). We studied the sorption affinity of some ionic organic compounds to both AC and different charged polymeric materials. Ion-exchange polymers may be effective as additional extraction phases in water treatment, because sorption of all charged compounds to oppositely charged polymers was stronger than to AC, especially for the double-charged cation metformin. Tested below 1% of the polymer ion-exchange capacity, the sorption affinity of charged micropollutants is nonlinear and depends on the composition of the aqueous medium. Whereas oppositely charged electrolytes do not impact sorption of organic ions, equally charged electrolytes do influence sorption indicating ion-exchange (IE) to be the main sorption mechanism. For the tested polymers, a tenfold increased salt concentration lowered the IE-sorption affinity by a factor two. Different electrolytes affect IE with organic ions in a similar way as inorganic ions on IE-resins, and no clear differences in this trend were observed between the sulphonated and the carboxylated cation-exchanger. Sorption of organic cations is five fold less in Ca(2+) solutions compared to similar concentrations of Na(+), while that of anionic compounds is three fold weaker in SO(4)(2-) solutions compared to equal concentrations of Cl(-).

  3. Neutron scattering cross sections for /sup 232/Th and /sup 238/U inferred from proton scattering and charge exchange measurements. [7 MeV, 26 and 27 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, L.F.; Grimes, S.M.; Pohl, B.A.; Poppe, C.H.; Wong, C.

    1980-01-01

    Differential cross sections for the (p,n) reactions to the isobaric analog states (IAS) of /sup 232/Th and /sup 238/U targets were measured at 26 and 27 MeV. The analysis of the data was done in conjunction with the proton elastic and inelastic (2/sup +/, 4/sup +/, 6/sup +/) differential cross sections measured at 26 MeV. Because collective effects are important in this mass region, deformed coupled-channels calculations were carried out for the simultaneous analysis of the proton and neutron outgoing channels. The sensitivity of the calculations was studied with respect to the optical model parameters used in the calculations, the shape of the nuclear charge distribution, the type of coupling scheme assumed among the levels, the magnitude of the deformation parameters, and the magnitude of the isovector potentials, V/sub 1/ and W/sub 1/. A Lane model-consistent analysis of the data was used to infer optical potential parameters for 6- to 7-MeV neutrons. The neutron elastic differential cross sections obtained from these calculations are compared with measurements available in the literature, and with results obtained using neutron parameters from global sets reported at these energies. 7 figures, 3 tables.

  4. Method for decomposing observed line shapes resulting from multiple causes - Application to plasma charge-exchange-neutral spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patch, R. W.

    1979-01-01

    A method is given for decomposing the widths of observed spectral lines resulting from unresolved line splitting, additive kinetic processes of different types, instrumental broadening (slit function), Doppler broadening, etc. all superimposed. The second moments are used as measures of the various widths involved. The method is not applicable if dispersion type (Lorentz) broadening occurs. Application is made to plasma charge-exchange-neutral spectra of hydrogen, deuterium, and helium.

  5. Ion temperature from tangential charge exchange neutral analysis on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Fiore, C.L.; Medley, S.S.; Hammett, G.W.; Kaita, R.; Roquemore, A.L.; Scott, S.D.

    1987-09-01

    Fokker-Planck simulations of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) energetic ion mode discharges were performed to evaluate the utility of deriving the central ion temperature, T/sub i/, from deuterium neutral beam charge exchange spectra above the neutral beam injection energy. The T/sub i/ values obtained from fitting the calculated spectra obtained from sightlines nearly tangent to the neutral beam injection radius reproduce the central ion temperature within +-10% over the full range of TFTR energetic ion mode parameters. The code simulations demonstrate that the ion temperature obtained from the high energy tangential deuterium charge exchange spectrum is insensitive to variations in the plasma density, Z/sub eff/, plasma current, loop voltage, and injected neutral beam power and energy. Use of this method to reduce charge exchange data from TFTR energetic ion mode plasmas is demonstrated. 17 refs., 22 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. The influence of charge exchange on the velocity distribution of hydrogen in the Venus exosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, Richard R., Jr.; Tinsley, Brian A.

    1986-01-01

    The simulation of the exosphere of Venus by a Monte Carlo technique has been extended to provide velocity distribution profiles that can be used with radiative transfer simulation to model the Lyman-alpha emission seen by spacecraft. The line profiles show a narrow core due to the exobase thermal source of hydrogen superimposed on the broad profile of hot hydrogen from charge exchange with hot ions in the nighttime ionosphere. Nightside radial profiles show long tails of upward flowing, escaping atoms. There are some downward and lateral superescape signatures, because the charge exchange source extends well above the exobase. At higher altitudes, flattening and even shallow central valleys appear in the transverse profiles. The planetary average escape rate due to charge exchange was found to be 2.8 x 10 to the 7th/sq cm per s, which is several times larger than escape rates for other candidate mechanisms.

  7. Charge exchange in C^6+ + H and C^6+ + H2 collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guevara-Leon, Nicolais; Saha, Bidhan; Sabin, John R.; Deumens, Erik; Ohrn, N. Y.

    2010-03-01

    In the solar wind, C^6+ ion is one of the most abundant ionic species and its interaction with comets as well as the atmosphere of planets of the solar system produces several interesting phenomena. The charge exchange reaction is one of the most relevant process as it may provide a possible explanation for the X-ray emission from these objects. Electron capture into a highly excited state of C^5+ ion usually generates radiation in the X-ray region of the spectrum. In the present work, charge exchange in C^6+ + H and C^6+ + H2 collisions are investigated theoretically using electron nuclear dynamics (END) [1] at projectile energies below the ionization threshold. For H2 the one- and two- electron charge exchange cross sections are calculated and compared with other theoretical and experimental data. Orientation effects for the collision with the hydrogen molecules will also be discussed at the conference.

  8. Ion temperatures in HIP-1 and SUMMA from charge-exchange neutral optical emission spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patch, R. W.; Lauver, M. R.

    1976-01-01

    Ion temperatures were obtained from observations of the H sub alpha, D sub alpha, and He 587.6 nm lines emitted from hydrogen, deuterium, and helium plasmas in the SUMMA and HIP-1 mirror devices at Lewis Research Center. Steady state discharges were formed by applying a radially inward dc electric field between cylindrical or annular anodes and hollow cathodes located at the peaks of the mirrors. The ion temperatures were found from the Doppler broadening of the charge-exchange components of spectral lines. A statistical method was developed for obtaining scaling relations of ion temperature as a function of current, voltage, and magnetic flux density. Derivations are given that take into account triangular monochromator slit functions, loss cones, and superimposed charge-exchange processes. In addition, the Doppler broadening was found to be sensitive to the influence of drift on charge-exchange cross section. The effects of finite ion-cyclotron radius, cascading, and delayed emission are reviewed.

  9. Pion single charge exchange in three body nuclei at intermediate energies

    SciTech Connect

    Dowell, Marla L.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to present new experimental information about modifications to the pion-nucleon single charge exchange interaction, π+n → π0 p or π- p → π0n, due to the presence of other nucleons. The results of two experimental studies of pion single charge exchange in the three nucleon system near the Δ-resonance are presented. Both of these experiments were performed at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF), a division of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Each explored different aspects of pion single charge exchange in three body nuclei--3He and 3H. Since the nuclear wavefunctions of the three nucleon systems are believed to be well understood, it should be possible to perform theoretical calculations of pion interactions with this system and compare their predictions with the experimental results.

  10. Charge Exchange Reaction in Dopant-Assisted Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization and Atmospheric Pressure Photoionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaikkinen, Anu; Kauppila, Tiina J.; Kostiainen, Risto

    2016-08-01

    The efficiencies of charge exchange reaction in dopant-assisted atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (DA-APCI) and dopant-assisted atmospheric pressure photoionization (DA-APPI) mass spectrometry (MS) were compared by flow injection analysis. Fourteen individual compounds and a commercial mixture of 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were chosen as model analytes to cover a wide range of polarities, gas-phase ionization energies, and proton affinities. Chlorobenzene was used as the dopant, and methanol/water (80/20) as the solvent. In both techniques, analytes formed the same ions (radical cations, protonated molecules, and/or fragments). However, in DA-APCI, the relative efficiency of charge exchange versus proton transfer was lower than in DA-APPI. This is suggested to be because in DA-APCI both dopant and solvent clusters can be ionized, and the formed reagent ions can react with the analytes via competing charge exchange and proton transfer reactions. In DA-APPI, on the other hand, the main reagents are dopant-derived radical cations, which favor ionization of analytes via charge exchange. The efficiency of charge exchange in both DA-APPI and DA-APCI was shown to depend heavily on the solvent flow rate, with best efficiency seen at lowest flow rates studied (0.05 and 0.1 mL/min). Both DA-APCI and DA-APPI showed the radical cation of chlorobenzene at 0.05-0.1 mL/min flow rate, but at increasing flow rate, the abundance of chlorobenzene M+. decreased and reagent ion populations deriving from different gas-phase chemistry were recorded. The formation of these reagent ions explains the decreasing ionization efficiency and the differences in charge exchange between the techniques.

  11. Charge Exchange Reaction in Dopant-Assisted Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization and Atmospheric Pressure Photoionization.

    PubMed

    Vaikkinen, Anu; Kauppila, Tiina J; Kostiainen, Risto

    2016-08-01

    The efficiencies of charge exchange reaction in dopant-assisted atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (DA-APCI) and dopant-assisted atmospheric pressure photoionization (DA-APPI) mass spectrometry (MS) were compared by flow injection analysis. Fourteen individual compounds and a commercial mixture of 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were chosen as model analytes to cover a wide range of polarities, gas-phase ionization energies, and proton affinities. Chlorobenzene was used as the dopant, and methanol/water (80/20) as the solvent. In both techniques, analytes formed the same ions (radical cations, protonated molecules, and/or fragments). However, in DA-APCI, the relative efficiency of charge exchange versus proton transfer was lower than in DA-APPI. This is suggested to be because in DA-APCI both dopant and solvent clusters can be ionized, and the formed reagent ions can react with the analytes via competing charge exchange and proton transfer reactions. In DA-APPI, on the other hand, the main reagents are dopant-derived radical cations, which favor ionization of analytes via charge exchange. The efficiency of charge exchange in both DA-APPI and DA-APCI was shown to depend heavily on the solvent flow rate, with best efficiency seen at lowest flow rates studied (0.05 and 0.1 mL/min). Both DA-APCI and DA-APPI showed the radical cation of chlorobenzene at 0.05-0.1 mL/min flow rate, but at increasing flow rate, the abundance of chlorobenzene M(+.) decreased and reagent ion populations deriving from different gas-phase chemistry were recorded. The formation of these reagent ions explains the decreasing ionization efficiency and the differences in charge exchange between the techniques. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  12. Weak interaction processes in supernovae: New probes using charge exchange reaction at intermediate energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frekers, Dieter

    2005-04-01

    Spin-isospin-flip excitations in nuclei at vanishing momentum transfer are generally referred to as Gamov-Teller (GT) transitions. They are being studied because the simplicity of the excitation makes them an ideal probe for testing nuclear structure models. In astrophysics, GT transitions provide an important input for model calculations and element formation during the explosive phase of a massive star at the end of its life-time. GT transitions in the β- direction (also referred to as isospin lowering T< transitions) have extensively been studied through (p,n) and (3He,t) charge-exchange reactions [B.D. Anderson et al., Phys. Rev. C 36 (1987) 2195, B.D. Anderson et al., Phys. Rev. C 43 (1991) 50, J. Rapaport et al., Phys. Rev. C 24 (1981) 335, H. Akimune et al., Nucl. Phys. A 569 (1994) 245c, Y. Fujita et al., Phys. Lett. B 365 (1996) 29]. The generally good resolution allows easy extraction of the GT distribution and the total B(GT-) strength in the final nucleus. On the other hand, determination of B(GT+) strength through a charge-exchange reaction in the T> direction were mostly done with secondary neutron beams, and as such, they come with significant experimental difficulties. TRIUMF has pioneered this field in the late 80's and early 90's with a rich and highly successful (n,p) program using a several hundred MeV neutron beam from a 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction [R. Helmer, Can. J. Phys. 65 (1987) 588]. In this paper we present the (d,2He) reaction at intermediate energies as another and potentially even more powerful tool for charge-exchange reactions in the T>, resp. β+ direction. The key issue here will be the high resolution of order 100 keV, which provides new and sometimes unexpected insight into nuclear structure phenomena. This program has been launched at the AGOR Superconducting Cyclotron Facility at the KVI Groningen. By now, it covers a wide field of physics questions ranging from few-body physics, the structure of halo-nuclei, to questions pertaining

  13. BOREAS TE-11 Leaf Gas Exchange Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Papagno, Andrea (Editor); Saugier, Bernard; Pontailler, J. Y.

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmospheric Study (BOREAS) TE-11 (Terrestrial Ecology) team collected several data sets in support of its efforts to characterize and interpret information on the sap flow, gas exchange, and lichen photosynthesis of boreal vegetation and meteorological data of the area studied. This data set contains measurements of assimilation and transpiration conducted at the Old Jack Pine (OJP) site during the growing seasons of 1993 and 1994. The data are stored in ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  14. Selective Cu{sup 2+} and Pb{sup 2+} exchange with highly charged cation exchanger of Na-4-mica

    SciTech Connect

    Kodama, Tatsuya; Komarneni, Sridhar

    1999-09-01

    Selective cation exchange for Cu and Pb has been demonstrated with the high-charge-density sodium fluorophlogopite mica, Na-4-mica. The 2Na{sup +} {yields} M{sup 2+} exchange reaction (M = Cu or Pb) was investigated with Na-4-micas prepared by two different synthetic processes. One was easily and economically prepared by crystallization from a mixture of NaF, MgO, and metakaolin, the latter serves as an inexpensive aluminosilicate source. Another was prepared by solution-sol-gel processing. Ion-exchange isotherms for Cu{sup 2+} and Pb{sup 2+} were obtained at room temperature. The thermodynamic functions for the initial ion-exchange reactions were calculated because the isotherms were not completed., High selectivities for both copper and lead exchange were found on the highly crystallized Na-4-mica prepared from metakaolin. Their ion-exchange capacities were 225 and 257 milliequivalents per 100 g of dry clay for Cu{sup 2+} and Pb{sup 2+}, respectively. This high level decontamination of copper and lead with the highly crystallized Na-4-mica from metakaolin will be a very important separation required for purification of drinking water as well as for wastewater treatment and disposal.

  15. Charge exchange and ionization in hydrogen atom-fully stripped ion collisions in Debye plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, H.; Wang, J. G.; He, B.; Qiu, Y. B.; Janev, R. K.

    2007-05-15

    The processes of charge exchange and ionization in collisions of ground state hydrogen atom with fully stripped ions in a weakly coupled plasma are studied by the classical trajectory Monte Carlo method in the collision energy range 10-900 keV/amu. The interparticle interactions are described by the Debye-Hueckel model with inclusion of dynamical effects associated with the projectile velocity. The microcanonical distribution of initial state electronic coordinates and momenta has been determined by inclusion of plasma screening effects. The cross section dependencies on plasma parameters and ion charge and velocity are investigated. It is shown that plasma effects on charge exchange and ionization cross sections are significant and particularly pronounced at low collision velocities. The results of systematic cross section calculations for different values of Debye screening length (in the range 1-50a{sub 0}) and ion charges (in the range 1-14) are presented.

  16. Simulation of charge exchange plasma propagation near an ion thruster propelled spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, R. S.; Kaufman, H. R.; Winder, D. R.

    1981-01-01

    A model describing the charge exchange plasma and its propagation is discussed, along with a computer code based on the model. The geometry of an idealized spacecraft having an ion thruster is outlined, with attention given to the assumptions used in modeling the ion beam. Also presented is the distribution function describing charge exchange production. The barometric equation is used in relating the variation in plasma potential to the variation in plasma density. The numerical methods and approximations employed in the calculations are discussed, and comparisons are made between the computer simulation and experimental data. An analytical solution of a simple configuration is also used in verifying the model.

  17. Interaction of a solar array with an ion thruster due to the charge-exchange plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, H. R.

    1976-01-01

    The generation of a charge exchange plasma by a thruster, the transport of this plasma to the solar array, and the interaction of the solar array with the plasma after it arrives are all described. The generation of this plasma is described accurately from thruster geometry and operating conditions. The transport of the charge exchange plasma was studied experimentally with a 15 cm thruster. A model was developed for simple thruster array configurations. A variety of experiments were surveyed for the interaction of the plasma at the solar array.

  18. Large Capacitance Measurement by Multiple Uses of MBL Charge Sensor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Jung Sook; Chae, Min; Kim, Jung Bog

    2010-01-01

    A recent article by Morse described interesting electrostatics experiments using an MBL charge sensor. In this application, the charge sensor has a large capacitance compared to the charged test object, so nearly all charges can be transferred to the sensor capacitor from the capacitor to be measured. However, the typical capacitance of commercial…

  19. Large Capacitance Measurement by Multiple Uses of MBL Charge Sensor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Jung Sook; Chae, Min; Kim, Jung Bog

    2010-01-01

    A recent article by Morse described interesting electrostatics experiments using an MBL charge sensor. In this application, the charge sensor has a large capacitance compared to the charged test object, so nearly all charges can be transferred to the sensor capacitor from the capacitor to be measured. However, the typical capacitance of commercial…

  20. High-resolution Crystal Spectroscopy of Charge-Exchange Produced K-shell X-ray Emission Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beiersdorfer, P.; Bitter, M.; Olson, R.; Marion, M.

    2005-05-01

    Charge-exchange spectral models needed to describe and predict the X-ray emission of cometary and planetary atmospheres interacting with solar wind heavy ions are under development and require laboratory data for guidance. The relative intensity of the four K-shell emission lines in heliumlike ions is particularly uncertain, as the individual lines have not yet been fully resolved in charge-exchange-produced spectra. Using a high-resolution crystal spectrometer, we have measured the charge exchange induced K-shell X-ray emission from Ar16+ following the interaction of Ar17+ ions with fast, 40 keV/amu deuterium atoms. The measurement was performed on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). The Ar17+ ions were constituents of the plasma, while deuterium was injected via a 80 keV neutral beam. During the brief, 20 ms neutral beam injection emission from electron-impact collisions ceases, and X-ray line emission is solely due to charge exchange. The measurement fully resolves the resonance, intercombination, and forbidden lines. We have constructed a complete radiative cascade model of Ar16+ that includes electron capture into levels as high as n=29 and all E1, M1, E2, and M2 radiative transitions. We find excellent agreement between the model and the NSTX crystyal spectrum. We will present these findings as well as our predictions of the emission in other spectral bands from the optical and extreme ultraviolet to the soft X-ray region. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. DOE by UC-LLNL under contract W-7405-Eng-48, by UMR under contract DE-FG02-84ER53175, and by PPPL under contract DE-AC02-76CHO3073.

  1. Solar-wind Ion-driven X-Ray Emission from Cometary and Planetary Atmospheres: Measurements and Theoretical Predictions of Charge-Exchange Cross-sections and Emission Spectra for O6+ + H2O, Co, Co2, Ch4, N2, NO, N2O, and Ar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machacek, J. R.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Schultz, D. R.; Ralchenko, Yu.; Moradmand, A.; El Ghazaly, M. O. A.; Chutjian, A.

    2015-08-01

    Relevant to modeling and understanding X-ray emission from cometary and planetary atmospheres, total cross-sections for 1.17 and 2.33 keV/u O6+ colliding with H2O, CO, CO2, CH4, N2, NO, N2O, and Ar have been measured for the processes of single, double, and triple charge exchanges. Using these measurements as benchmarks, synthetic emission spectra spanning the X-ray, UV, and visible range have been calculated based on theoretical treatment of the transfer of between one and six electrons from the target neutrals to the projectile ion, followed by radiative and non-radiative decay of the highly excited states produced in these collisions. The results help add to the base of knowledge required to simulate ion-neutral processes in astrophysical environments; refine the present understanding of these fundamental atomic processes; and guide future observations, laboratory measurements, and theoretical predictions.

  2. Spectral Diagnostics of Galactic and Stellar X-Ray Emission from Charge Exchange Recombination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wargelin, B.

    2003-01-01

    The proposed research uses the electron beam ion trap at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to study the X-ray emission from charge-exchange recombination of highly charged ions with neutral gases. The resulting data fill a void in the existing experimental and theoretical data and are needed to explain all or part of the observed X-ray emission from the Galactic Ridge, solar and stellar winds, the Galactic Center, supernova ejecta, and photoionized nebulae.

  3. X-Ray Emission Cross Sections following Charge Exchange by Multiply-Charged Ions of Astrophysical Interest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Ronald

    2006-05-01

    State selective nl-electron capture cross sections are presented for highly charged ions with Z = 6-10 colliding with molecules. The energy range investigated was from 1 eV/amu (v = 1.4x10^6 cm/s) to 100 keV/amu (v = 4.4x10^8 cm/s). The K-shell x-ray emission cross sections are determined by using the calculated state-selective electron capture results as input and then applying the branching and cascading values for the photon emission. A major shift in the line emission from being almost solely Lyman-alpha transitions at the highest collisions energies to strong high-n to 1s transitions at the lowest energies is observed. The calculated emission cross sections are in reasonable accord with measurements made by Greenwood et al^1 for O^8+ and Ne^10+ on various targets at 3 keV/amu. The calculations are also in accord with x-ray emission cross section data obtained on the EBIT machine at LLNL where O^8+ and Ne^10+ high resolution measurements were made at a temperature of 10 eV/amu for a series of targets with varying ionization potentials. The Ne^10+ data clearly show the contribution from multiple capture followed by Auger autoionization in the line emission spectra. Our calculated line emission cross sections are used to provide an ab initio determination of the soft x-ray spectrum of comet C/Linear 1999 S4 that was observed on the Chandra X-ray Observatory. The calculations reproduce the measured spectrum and show that it is due to charge exchange of the neutral gases in the comet's coma with the ions of the slow solar wind. Details of the calculations are presented in a recent paper by Otranto et al^2. 1. J. B. Greenwood, I. D. Williams, S. J. Smith and A. Chutjian, Phys. Rev. A 63, 062707 (2001). 2. S. Otranto, R. E. Olson, and P. Beiersdorfer, Phys. Rev. A (in press).

  4. Charge exchange between low energy Si ions and Cs adatoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X.; Sroubek, Z.; Yarmoff, J. A.

    Unexpectedly large yields of positive and negative ions are produced when 2 and 5 keV Si + is singly scattered from Cs adatoms on Al(1 0 0) and Si(1 1 1). This is in contrast with Li +, in which case the ions are almost completely neutralized. The Si + ions likely result from valence electron resonant charge transfer (RCT) enhanced by promotion of the ionization level as it interacts with the Cs 5p level, but incomplete resonance neutralization of the incoming Si + cannot be absolutely excluded. The experimental data are quantitatively compared to the model and values of the microscopic parameters are estimated. Negative Si - ions are produced when the surface work function is very small, presumably by direct RCT to the projectile affinity level as it is bent downward by the image potential and by the dipole formed by the adsorbed Cs.

  5. Method to obtain absolute impurity density profiles combining charge exchange and beam emission spectroscopy without absolute intensity calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Kappatou, A.; Delabie, E.; Jaspers, R. J. E.; Jakobs, M. A.; Marchuk, O.; Biel, W.

    2012-10-15

    Investigation of impurity transport properties in tokamak plasmas is essential and a diagnostic that can provide information on the impurity content is required. Combining charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CXRS) and beam emission spectroscopy (BES), absolute radial profiles of impurity densities can be obtained from the CXRS and BES intensities, electron density and CXRS and BES emission rates, without requiring any absolute calibration of the spectra. The technique is demonstrated here with absolute impurity density radial profiles obtained in TEXTOR plasmas, using a high efficiency charge exchange spectrometer with high etendue, that measures the CXRS and BES spectra along the same lines-of-sight, offering an additional advantage for the determination of absolute impurity densities.

  6. Heavy-ion double charge exchange reactions: A tool toward 0 νββ nuclear matrix elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappuzzello, F.; Cavallaro, M.; Agodi, C.; Bondì, M.; Carbone, D.; Cunsolo, A.; Foti, A.

    2015-11-01

    The knowledge of the nuclear matrix elements for the neutrinoless double beta decay is fundamental for neutrino physics. In this paper, an innovative technique to extract information on the nuclear matrix elements by measuring the cross section of a double charge exchange nuclear reaction is proposed. The basic point is that the initial- and final-state wave functions in the two processes are the same and the transition operators are similar. The double charge exchange cross sections can be factorized in a nuclear structure term containing the matrix elements and a nuclear reaction factor. First pioneering experimental results for the 40Ca(18O,18Ne)40Ar reaction at 270 MeV incident energy show that such cross section factorization reasonably holds for the crucial 0+ → 0+ transition to 40Args, at least at very forward angles.

  7. Charge exchange of metastable 2D oxygen ions with molecular oxygen - A new source of thermospheric O2/+/ ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torr, D. G.; Torr, M. R.; Rusch, D. W.; Nier, A. O.; Kayser, D.; Hanson, W. B.; Hoffman, J. H.; Donahue, K.

    1979-01-01

    Reactions involving metastable ions are difficult to study in the laboratory. Much new information on these reactions has been derived from satellite measurements of aeronomic parameters. In this paper, Atmosphere Explorer D data are used to study charge exchange of metastable O(+)(2D) ions with O2. Using direct measurements of the O2 at 200 km to compute O2 densities at 300 km and supporting ionic concentrations and temperature observations, we find the rate coefficient for this reaction to be 1 + or - 0.6 times 10 to the minus 9th cu cm/sec. The process constitutes a significant source of O2(+) ions in the F2 layer at times when the N2 and O2 densities are enhanced. This finding leads to the conclusion that charge exchange with O2 must be a major sink for O(+)(2D) and an important source of O2(+) ions in the E region, because of the increase in the O2 concentration/N2 concentration ratio with decreasing altitude. The results imply that 80% of all O(+) ions formed in the E region are converted to O2(+) and that only about 20% of the metastable O(+) ions are converted into N2(+) through charge exchange with N2.

  8. Charge-Exchange Excitation of the Isobaric Analog State and Implication for the Nuclear Symmetry Energy and Neutron Skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoa, Dao T.; Loc, Bui Minh; Zegers, R. G. T.

    The charge-exchange (p, n) or (3He,t) reaction can be considered as elastic scattering of proton or 3He by the isovector term of the optical potential that flips the projectile isospin. Therefore, the accurately measured charge-exchange scattering cross section for the isobaric analog states can be a good probe of the isospin dependence of the optical potential, which is determined exclusively within the folding model by the difference between the neutron and proton densities and isospin dependence of the nucleon-nucleon interaction. On the other hand, the same isospin- and density-dependent nucleon-nucleon interaction can also be used in a Hartree-Fock calculation of asymmetric nuclear matter, to estimate the nuclear matter energy and its asymmetry part. As a result, the fine-tuning of the isospin dependence of the effective nucleon-nucleon interaction against the measured (p, n) or (3He,t) cross sections should allow us to make some realistic prediction of the nuclear symmetry energy and its density dependence. Moreover, given the neutron skin of the target related directly to the neutron-proton difference of the ground-state density, it can be well probed in the analysis of the charge-exchange (3He,t) reactions at medium energies when the two-step processes can be neglected and the t-matrix interaction can be used in the folding calculation.

  9. Modeling of stored charge in metallized biaxially oriented polypropylene film capacitors based on charging current measurement.

    PubMed

    Li, Hua; Wang, Bowen; Li, Zhiwei; Liu, De; Lin, Fuchang; Dai, Ling; Zhang, Qin; Chen, Yaohong

    2013-10-01

    Metallized biaxially oriented polypropylene film (BOPP) capacitors are widely used in pulsed power systems. When the capacitor is used as the energy storage equipment under high electric field, more charges should be provided to maintain the voltage of the capacitor. This should be ascribed to the completion of the slow polarization which may take several hours or even longer. This paper focuses on the stored charge in metallized BOPP film capacitors. The modeling of the stored charge by the equivalent conversion of circuits is conducted to analyse the slow polarization in the BOPP film. The 3-RC network is proposed to represent the time-dependent charge stored in the capacitor. A charging current measurement system is established to investigate the charge storage property of the capacitor. The measurement system can measure the long time charging current with a sampling rate of 300 Hz. The total charge calculated by the charging current indicates that the stored charge in the capacitor under the electric field of 400 V/μm is 13.5% larger than the product of the voltage and the capacitance measured by the AC bridge. The nonlinear effect of the electric field on the slow polarization charge is also demonstrated. And the simulation of charge storage based on the 3-RC network can match well with the trend of the stored charge increasing with the time.

  10. Modeling of stored charge in metallized biaxially oriented polypropylene film capacitors based on charging current measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hua; Wang, Bowen; Li, Zhiwei; Liu, De; Lin, Fuchang; Dai, Ling; Zhang, Qin; Chen, Yaohong

    2013-10-01

    Metallized biaxially oriented polypropylene film (BOPP) capacitors are widely used in pulsed power systems. When the capacitor is used as the energy storage equipment under high electric field, more charges should be provided to maintain the voltage of the capacitor. This should be ascribed to the completion of the slow polarization which may take several hours or even longer. This paper focuses on the stored charge in metallized BOPP film capacitors. The modeling of the stored charge by the equivalent conversion of circuits is conducted to analyse the slow polarization in the BOPP film. The 3-RC network is proposed to represent the time-dependent charge stored in the capacitor. A charging current measurement system is established to investigate the charge storage property of the capacitor. The measurement system can measure the long time charging current with a sampling rate of 300Hz. The total charge calculated by the charging current indicates that the stored charge in the capacitor under the electric field of 400 V/μm is 13.5% larger than the product of the voltage and the capacitance measured by the AC bridge. The nonlinear effect of the electric field on the slow polarization charge is also demonstrated. And the simulation of charge storage based on the 3-RC network can match well with the trend of the stored charge increasing with the time.

  11. Measurement of the Charged-Pion Polarizability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adolph, C.; Akhunzyanov, R.; Alexeev, M. G.; Alexeev, G. D.; Amoroso, A.; Andrieux, V.; Anosov, V.; Austregesilo, A.; Badełek, B.; Balestra, F.; Barth, J.; Baum, G.; Beck, R.; Bedfer, Y.; Berlin, A.; Bernhard, J.; Bicker, K.; Bieling, J.; Birsa, R.; Bisplinghoff, J.; Bodlak, M.; Boer, M.; Bordalo, P.; Bradamante, F.; Braun, C.; Bressan, A.; Büchele, M.; Burtin, E.; Capozza, L.; Chiosso, M.; Chung, S. U.; Cicuttin, A.; Colantoni, M.; Crespo, M. L.; Curiel, Q.; Dalla Torre, S.; Dasgupta, S. S.; Dasgupta, S.; Denisov, O. Yu.; Dinkelbach, A. M.; Donskov, S. V.; Doshita, N.; Duic, V.; Dünnweber, W.; Dziewiecki, M.; Efremov, A.; Elia, C.; Eversheim, P. D.; Eyrich, W.; Faessler, M.; Ferrero, A.; Filin, A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fischer, H.; Franco, C.; Du Fresne von Hohenesche, N.; Friedrich, J. M.; Frolov, V.; Gautheron, F.; Gavrichtchouk, O. P.; Gerassimov, S.; Geyer, R.; Gnesi, I.; Gobbo, B.; Goertz, S.; Gorzellik, M.; Grabmüller, S.; Grasso, A.; Grube, B.; Grussenmeyer, T.; Guskov, A.; Guthörl, T.; Haas, F.; von Harrach, D.; Hahne, D.; Hashimoto, R.; Heinsius, F. H.; Herrmann, F.; Hinterberger, F.; Höppner, Ch.; Horikawa, N.; D'Hose, N.; Huber, S.; Ishimoto, S.; Ivanov, A.; Ivanshin, Yu.; Iwata, T.; Jahn, R.; Jary, V.; Jasinski, P.; Jörg, P.; Joosten, R.; Kabuß, E.; Ketzer, B.; Khaustov, G. V.; Khokhlov, Yu. A.; Kisselev, Yu.; Klein, F.; Klimaszewski, K.; Koivuniemi, J. H.; Kolosov, V. N.; Kondo, K.; Königsmann, K.; Konorov, I.; Konstantinov, V. F.; Kotzinian, A. M.; Kouznetsov, O.; Krämer, M.; Kroumchtein, Z. V.; Kuchinski, N.; Kuhn, R.; Kunne, F.; Kurek, K.; Kurjata, R. P.; Lednev, A. A.; Lehmann, A.; Levillain, M.; Levorato, S.; Lichtenstadt, J.; Maggiora, A.; Magnon, A.; Makke, N.; Mallot, G. K.; Marchand, C.; Martin, A.; Marzec, J.; Matousek, J.; Matsuda, H.; Matsuda, T.; Meshcheryakov, G.; Meyer, W.; Michigami, T.; Mikhailov, Yu. V.; Miyachi, Y.; Moinester, M. A.; Nagaytsev, A.; Nagel, T.; Nerling, F.; Neubert, S.; Neyret, D.; Nikolaenko, V. I.; Novy, J.; Nowak, W.-D.; Nunes, A. S.; Olshevsky, A. G.; Orlov, I.; Ostrick, M.; Panknin, R.; Panzieri, D.; Parsamyan, B.; Paul, S.; Peshekhonov, D.; Platchkov, S.; Pochodzalla, J.; Polyakov, V. A.; Pretz, J.; Quaresma, M.; Quintans, C.; Ramos, S.; Regali, C.; Reicherz, G.; Rocco, E.; Rossiyskaya, N. S.; Ryabchikov, D. I.; Rychter, A.; Samoylenko, V. D.; Sandacz, A.; Sarkar, S.; Savin, I. A.; Sbrizzai, G.; Schiavon, P.; Schill, C.; Schlüter, T.; Schmidt, K.; Schmieden, H.; Schönning, K.; Schopferer, S.; Schott, M.; Shevchenko, O. Yu.; Silva, L.; Sinha, L.; Sirtl, S.; Slunecka, M.; Sosio, S.; Sozzi, F.; Srnka, A.; Steiger, L.; Stolarski, M.; Sulc, M.; Sulej, R.; Suzuki, H.; Szabelski, A.; Szameitat, T.; Sznajder, P.; Takekawa, S.; Ter Wolbeek, J.; Tessaro, S.; Tessarotto, F.; Thibaud, F.; Uhl, S.; Uman, I.; Virius, M.; Wang, L.; Weisrock, T.; Wilfert, M.; Windmolders, R.; Wollny, H.; Zaremba, K.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zemlyanichkina, E.; Ziembicki, M.; Zink, A.; Compass Collaboration

    2015-02-01

    The COMPASS collaboration at CERN has investigated pion Compton scattering, π-γ →π-γ , at center-of-mass energy below 3.5 pion masses. The process is embedded in the reaction π-Ni →π-γ Ni , which is initiated by 190 GeV pions impinging on a nickel target. The exchange of quasireal photons is selected by isolating the sharp Coulomb peak observed at smallest momentum transfers, Q2<0.0015 (GeV /c )2 . From a sample of 63 000 events, the pion electric polarizability is determined to be απ=(2.0 ±0. 6stat±0. 7syst)×1 0-4 fm3 under the assumption απ=-βπ, which relates the electric and magnetic dipole polarizabilities. It is the most precise measurement of this fundamental low-energy parameter of strong interaction that has been addressed since long by various methods with conflicting outcomes. While this result is in tension with previous dedicated measurements, it is found in agreement with the expectation from chiral perturbation theory. An additional measurement replacing pions by muons, for which the cross-section behavior is unambiguously known, was performed for an independent estimate of the systematic uncertainty.

  12. Short-range NN and N. Delta. correlations in pion double charge exchange (DCX)

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, M.B.

    1990-01-01

    I will review several important results related to the short-range nucleon-nucleon and delta-nucleon interaction that have been obtained from recent studies of pion double charge exchange in selected nuclei. 32 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Population inversion calculations using near resonant charge exchange as a pumping mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, D. L.; Rose, J. R.

    1972-01-01

    Near resonance charge exchange between ions of a large ionization potential gas such as helium or neon and vapors of metals such as zinc, cadmium, selenium, or tellurium has produced laser action in the metal ion gas. The possibility of obtaining population inversions in near resonant charge exchange systems (Xe-Ca, Xe-Mg, Xe-Sr, Xe-Ba, Ar-Mg, N-Ca) was investigated. The analysis is an initial value problem that utilizes rate equations for the densities of relevant levels of the laser gas (Ca, Ba, Mg, or Sr) and an electron energy equation. Electron excitation rates are calculated using the Bohr-Thomson approximation for the cross section. Approximations to experimental values of the electron ionization cross section and the ion-atom charge exchange cross section are used. Preliminary results have been obtained for the Ca-Xe system and show that it is possible to obtain gains greater than 10 to the 14th power/m with inversion times up to 8x10 to the minus 7th power second. A possible charge exchange laser system using a MPD arc plasma accelerator is also described.

  14. Effect of the disruptive instability on the flux of charge-exchange atoms in a tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Alabyad, A.M.; Ivanov, N.V.; Khudoleev, A.V.

    1984-01-01

    Experiments have been carried out on the spatial distribution of the flux of neutral charge-exchange atoms from a tokamak plasma and on the time evolution of this distribution during a disruptive instability. The experimental results are analyzed on the basis of the model of the tearing-mode instability.

  15. Observation and modeling of geocoronal charge exchange X-ray emission during solar wind gusts

    SciTech Connect

    Wargelin, B. J.; Kornbleuth, M.; Juda, M.; Martin, P. L.

    2014-11-20

    Solar wind charge exchange (SWCX) X-rays are emitted when highly charged solar wind ions such as O{sup 7{sup +}} collide with neutral gas, including the Earth's tenuous outer atmosphere (exosphere or geocorona) and hydrogen and helium from the local interstellar medium drifting through the heliosphere. This geocoronal and heliospheric emission comprises a significant and varying fraction of the soft X-ray background (SXRB) and is seen in every X-ray observation, with the intensity dependent on solar wind conditions and observation geometry. Under the right conditions, geocoronal emission can increase the apparent SXRB by roughly an order of magnitude for an hour or more. In this work, we study a dozen occasions when the near-Earth solar wind flux was exceptionally high. These gusts of wind lead to abrupt changes in SWCX X-ray emission around Earth, which may or may not be seen by X-ray observatories depending on their line of sight. Using detailed three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamical simulations of the solar wind's interaction with the Earth's magnetosphere, and element abundances and ionization states measured by ACE, we model the time-dependent brightness of major geocoronal SWCX emission lines during those gusts and compare with changes in the X-ray background measured by the Chandra X-ray Observatory. We find reasonably good agreement between model and observation, with measured geocoronal line brightnesses averaged over 1 hr of up to 136 photons s{sup –1} cm{sup –2} sr{sup –1} in the O VII Kα triplet around 564 eV.

  16. Transport, charge exchange and loss of energetic heavy ions in the earth's radiation belts - Applicability and limitations of theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spjeldvik, W. N.

    1981-01-01

    Computer simulations of processes which control the relative abundances of ions in the trapping regions of geospace are compared with observations from discriminating ion detectors. Energy losses due to Coulomb collisions between ions and exospheric neutrals are considered, along with charge exchange losses and internal charge exchanges. The time evolution of energetic ion fluxes of equatorially mirroring ions under radial diffusion is modelled to include geomagnetic and geoelectric fluctutations. Limits to the validity of diffusion transport theory are discussed, and the simulation is noted to contain provisions for six ionic charge states and the source effect on the radiation belt oxygen ion distributions. Comparisons are made with ion flux data gathered on Explorer 45 and ISEE-1 spacecraft and results indicate that internal charge exchanges cause the radiation belt ion charge state to be independent of source charge rate characteristics, and relative charge state distribution is independent of the radially diffusive transport rate below the charge state redistribution zone.

  17. Transport, charge exchange and loss of energetic heavy ions in the earth's radiation belts - Applicability and limitations of theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spjeldvik, W. N.

    1981-01-01

    Computer simulations of processes which control the relative abundances of ions in the trapping regions of geospace are compared with observations from discriminating ion detectors. Energy losses due to Coulomb collisions between ions and exospheric neutrals are considered, along with charge exchange losses and internal charge exchanges. The time evolution of energetic ion fluxes of equatorially mirroring ions under radial diffusion is modelled to include geomagnetic and geoelectric fluctutations. Limits to the validity of diffusion transport theory are discussed, and the simulation is noted to contain provisions for six ionic charge states and the source effect on the radiation belt oxygen ion distributions. Comparisons are made with ion flux data gathered on Explorer 45 and ISEE-1 spacecraft and results indicate that internal charge exchanges cause the radiation belt ion charge state to be independent of source charge rate characteristics, and relative charge state distribution is independent of the radially diffusive transport rate below the charge state redistribution zone.

  18. Charge-dependent many-body exchange and dispersion interactions in combined QM/MM simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuechler, Erich R.; Giese, Timothy J.; York, Darrin M.

    2015-12-01

    Accurate modeling of the molecular environment is critical in condensed phase simulations of chemical reactions. Conventional quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) simulations traditionally model non-electrostatic non-bonded interactions through an empirical Lennard-Jones (LJ) potential which, in violation of intuitive chemical principles, is bereft of any explicit coupling to an atom's local electronic structure. This oversight results in a model whereby short-ranged exchange-repulsion and long-ranged dispersion interactions are invariant to changes in the local atomic charge, leading to accuracy limitations for chemical reactions where significant atomic charge transfer can occur along the reaction coordinate. The present work presents a variational, charge-dependent exchange-repulsion and dispersion model, referred to as the charge-dependent exchange and dispersion (QXD) model, for hybrid QM/MM simulations. Analytic expressions for the energy and gradients are provided, as well as a description of the integration of the model into existing QM/MM frameworks, allowing QXD to replace traditional LJ interactions in simulations of reactive condensed phase systems. After initial validation against QM data, the method is demonstrated by capturing the solvation free energies of a series of small, chlorine-containing compounds that have varying charge on the chlorine atom. The model is further tested on the SN2 attack of a chloride anion on methylchloride. Results suggest that the QXD model, unlike the traditional LJ model, is able to simultaneously obtain accurate solvation free energies for a range of compounds while at the same time closely reproducing the experimental reaction free energy barrier. The QXD interaction model allows explicit coupling of atomic charge with many-body exchange and dispersion interactions that are related to atomic size and provides a more accurate and robust representation of non-electrostatic non-bonded QM/MM interactions.

  19. Anion Exchange Capacity As a Mechanism for Deep Soil Carbon Storage in Variable Charge Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietzen, C.; James, J. N.; Ciol, M.; Harrison, R. B.

    2014-12-01

    Soil is the most important long-term sink for carbon (C) in terrestrial ecosystems, containing more C than plant biomass and the atmosphere combined. However, soil has historically been under-represented in C cycling literature, especially in regards to information about subsurface (>1.0 m) layers and processes. Previous research has indicated that Andisols with large quantities of noncrystalline, variable-charge minerals, including allophane, imogolite, and ferrihydrite, contain more C both in total and at depth than other soil types in the Pacific Northwest. The electrostatic charge of variable-charge soils depends on pH and is sometimes net positive, particularly in acid conditions, such as those commonly developed under the coniferous forests of the Pacific Northwest. However, even soils with a net negative charge may contain a mixture of negative and positive exchange sites and can hold some nutrient anions through the anion exchange capacity. To increase our understanding of the effects of variable-charge on soil organic matter stabilization, deep sampling is under way at the Fall River Long-Term Soil Productivity Site in western Washington. This site has a deep, well-drained soil with few rocks, which developed from weathered basalt and is classified as an Andisol of the Boistfort Series. Samples have been taken to a depth of 3 m at eight depth intervals. In addition to analyzing total soil C, these soils will be analyzed to determine functional groups present, cation exchange capacity, anion exchange capacity, and non-crystalline mineral content. These data will be analyzed to determine any correlations that may exist between these mineralogical characteristics, total soil C, and types of functional groups stored at depth. The most abundant organic functional groups, including carboxylic and phenolic groups, are anionic in nature, and soil positive charge may play an important role in binding and stabilizing soil organic matter and sequestering C.

  20. Charge-dependent many-body exchange and dispersion interactions in combined QM/MM simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Kuechler, Erich R.; Giese, Timothy J.; York, Darrin M.

    2015-12-21

    Accurate modeling of the molecular environment is critical in condensed phase simulations of chemical reactions. Conventional quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) simulations traditionally model non-electrostatic non-bonded interactions through an empirical Lennard-Jones (LJ) potential which, in violation of intuitive chemical principles, is bereft of any explicit coupling to an atom’s local electronic structure. This oversight results in a model whereby short-ranged exchange-repulsion and long-ranged dispersion interactions are invariant to changes in the local atomic charge, leading to accuracy limitations for chemical reactions where significant atomic charge transfer can occur along the reaction coordinate. The present work presents a variational, charge-dependent exchange-repulsion and dispersion model, referred to as the charge-dependent exchange and dispersion (QXD) model, for hybrid QM/MM simulations. Analytic expressions for the energy and gradients are provided, as well as a description of the integration of the model into existing QM/MM frameworks, allowing QXD to replace traditional LJ interactions in simulations of reactive condensed phase systems. After initial validation against QM data, the method is demonstrated by capturing the solvation free energies of a series of small, chlorine-containing compounds that have varying charge on the chlorine atom. The model is further tested on the S{sub N}2 attack of a chloride anion on methylchloride. Results suggest that the QXD model, unlike the traditional LJ model, is able to simultaneously obtain accurate solvation free energies for a range of compounds while at the same time closely reproducing the experimental reaction free energy barrier. The QXD interaction model allows explicit coupling of atomic charge with many-body exchange and dispersion interactions that are related to atomic size and provides a more accurate and robust representation of non-electrostatic non-bonded QM

  1. Absolute Charge Exchange Cross Sections for O^5+, O^6+, and O^7+ Collisions with CO and CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mawhorter, Richard; Djuric, Nada; Macaskill, John; Smith, Steven J.; Chutjian, Ara; Williams, Ian D.

    2005-05-01

    Motivated by ongoing EUV and X-ray studies of comets, we have continued our experimental investigations of absolute charge exchange cross sections for highly-charged ions present in the solar wind incident on cometary gases. These are the first measurements on the JPL charge exchange beam-line using a new LabView data acquisition system combined with a larger gas cell exit aperture. Data for O^5+ & O^7+ on CO2 agree with earlier measurements [1], and are included in these new results for O^5+, O^6+, and O^7+ on CO and CO2. The ion beam accelerating potential was 7 kV, which yields ion velocities consistent with the fast component of the solar wind. Agreement with earlier, smaller exit aperture measurements is also significant in demonstrating an independence from angular collection issues for these fast, heavy ions and targets. This was verified by studying collection angle-cross section effects for slow ^3He^2+ ions on He and H2. This work was carried out at JPL/Caltech, and was supported through contract with NASA. N.Djuric also acknowledges support through the NASA-NRC program. [1] J.B. Greenwood, et al., Phys. Rev A 63, 062707 (2001).

  2. Measurements of charged precipitation in a New Mexico thunderstorm: Lower positive charge centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Thomas C.; Winn, William P.

    1982-08-01

    We designed an instrument to measure the charge and vertical velocity of individual precipitation particles inside thunderclouds. A balloon carried the particle charge instrument, an electric field meter, and a standard meteorological radiosonde upward into thunderclouds over Langmuir Laboratory in central New Mexico. During one balloon flight the instruments encountered two regions of positive charge below the main negative charge center. We identify these positive regions with the lower positive charge centers that have been described in the literature for many years. We find the following points: (1) One region had an estimated total charge of 0.4 C. The other had 2 C. (2) The charge resided on precipitation particles. The particles' charges typically ranged between 10 and 200 pC, but a few particles had charges up to 400 pC. Their diameters lay between an estimated 1-3 mm. The charges were too large to be explained by the polarization induction mechanism. We favor the hypothesis that lightning provided the positive charge in the lower positive charge centers. (3) The motion of the lower positive charge centers enhanced the electrical energy of the storm, but their contribution to the overall electrical budget was small. (4) The field excursions (at the ground) associated with precipitation (FEAWPs) described by C. B. Moore and B. Vonnegut are probably caused by lower positive charge centers descending on precipitation. The larger (2 C) lower positive charge center caused a FEAWP. Negatively charged precipitation particles passed through our instrument near the top of its trajectory just before the balloon was struck by lightning. The charge density on precipitation particles was substantial, but we do not have enough information to comment on the role the particles may have had in generating the main region of negative charge.

  3. Calculations and analysis of cross sections required for argon charge exchange recombination spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, D. R.; Lee, Teck-Ghee; Loch, S. D.

    2010-07-01

    A large set of calculations has been carried out providing a basis for diagnostics of fusion plasmas through emission resulting from radiative de-excitation following charge transfer between hydrogen and highly charged argon ions, so-called argon charge exchange recombination spectroscopy. These results have been obtained using the classical trajectory Monte Carlo (CTMC) method to treat charge transfer to states with principal quantum numbers up to 30 or more. Nine collision energies between 13.3333 and 250 keV/u pertinent to neutral beam injection have been considered for Arq+ (q = 15-18) colliding with atomic hydrogen in both the ground and metastable states. Atomic orbital close coupling calculations have also been undertaken in order to provide a fully quantum mechanical test of the CTMC results for Ar18+ + H(1s) collisions. The results of the calculations are discussed here and the full set of data is made available through a web posting.

  4. Charge Exchange Cross Sections for Multiply-Charged Ions Colliding with Water

    SciTech Connect

    Otranto, S.; Olson, R. E.

    2009-03-10

    The classical trajectory Monte Carlo method is used to calculate total and state selective nl-electron capture cross sections for highly charged ions Z = 4-10, 14, 18 and 26 colliding with water. The initialization for the 1B1 and 3A1 orbitals of the water molecule is based on a Slater orbital expansion. The Z-dependence of the calculated total cross sections is in reasonable agreement with recent data. The K-shell x-ray emission cross sections are determined from the calculated state-selective electron capture results.

  5. Temperatures of individual ion species and heating due to charge exchange in the ionosphere of Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Jhoon; Nagy, Andrew F.; Cravens, Thomas E.; Shinagawa, Hiroyuki

    1990-01-01

    The coupled electron and multispecies ion energy equations were solved for daytime conditions in the Venus ionosphere. The heating rates due to charge exchange between hot oxygen atoms and thermal oxygen ions were calculated and incorporated into the energy equations. The combination of the traditional EUV heating and this hot oxygen energy source leads to calculated electron and individual ion temperatures significantly lower than the measured values during solar cycle maximum conditions. Calculations were also carried out for solar cycle minimum conditions, which led to considerably lower temperatures; no data are available which would allow direct comparisons of these results with measurements. In order to obtain calculated temperature values consistent with the observed ones, for solar cycle maximum conditions, topside heat inflows into the ion and electron gases have to be introduced or the thermal conductivity must be reduced by considering the effect of steady and fluctuating magnetic fields, as was done in previous studies. The addition of hot oxygen heating leads to minor increases in the calculated ion temperatures except for the case of reduced thermal conductivities. Separate temperatures were calculated for each ion species for a number of different conditions and in general the differences were found to be relatively small.

  6. Inference of the ring current ion composition by means of charge exchange decay

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, P.H.; Bewtra, N.K.; Hoffman, R.A.

    1981-05-01

    The analysis of data from the Explorer 45 (S/sup 3/-A) electrostatic analyzer in the energy range 5--30 keV has provided some new results of the ring current ion composition. It has been well established that the storm time ring current has a decay time of several days, during which the particle fluxes decrease nearly monotonically. In the past, ring current studies have assumed or stated that hydrogen was the dominant ion in the earth's ring current. By analyzing the measured ion fluxes during the several day storm recovery period and assuming that beside hydrogen other ions were present and that the decays were exponential in nature, we were able to establish three separate lifetimes for the ions. These fitted decay lifetimes are in excellent agreement with the expected charge exchange decay lifetimes for H/sup +/, O/sup +/, and He/sup +/ in the energy and L value of the data. This inference technique thus establishes the presence of measureable and appreciable quantities of oxygen and helium ions as well as protons in the storm time ring current; we also find indicatons that He/sup + +/ may also be present under these same conditions. The existence of additional ions is not rules out by this technique.

  7. Extensions to the charge exchange recombination spectroscopy diagnostic suite at ASDEX Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDermott, R. M.; Lebschy, A.; Geiger, B.; Bruhn, C.; Cavedon, M.; Dunne, M.; Dux, R.; Fischer, R.; Kappatou, A.; Pütterich, T.; Viezzer, E.

    2017-07-01

    A new core charge exchange recombination spectroscopy diagnostic has been installed in the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak that is capable of measuring the impurity ion temperature, toroidal rotation, and density on both the low field side (LFS) and high field side (HFS) of the plasma. The new system features 48 lines-of-sight (LOS) with a radial resolution that varies from ±2 cm on the LFS down to ±0.75 cm on the HFS and has sufficient signal to run routinely at 10 ms and for special circumstances down to 2.5 ms integration time. The LFS-HFS ion temperature profiles provide an additional constraint on the magnetic equilibrium reconstruction, and the toroidal rotation frequency profiles are of sufficiently high quality that information on the poloidal velocity can be extracted from the LFS-HFS asymmetry. The diagnostic LOS are coupled to two flexible-wavelength spectrometers such that complete LFS-HFS profiles from two separate impurities can be imaged simultaneously, albeit with reduced radial coverage. More frequently, the systems measure the same impurity providing very detailed information on the chosen species. Care has been taken to calibrate the systems as accurately as possible and to include in the data analysis any effects that could lead to spurious temperatures or rotations.

  8. Temperatures of individual ion species and heating due to charge exchange in the ionosphere of Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Jhoon; Nagy, Andrew F.; Cravens, Thomas E.; Shinagawa, Hiroyuki

    1990-01-01

    The coupled electron and multispecies ion energy equations were solved for daytime conditions in the Venus ionosphere. The heating rates due to charge exchange between hot oxygen atoms and thermal oxygen ions were calculated and incorporated into the energy equations. The combination of the traditional EUV heating and this hot oxygen energy source leads to calculated electron and individual ion temperatures significantly lower than the measured values during solar cycle maximum conditions. Calculations were also carried out for solar cycle minimum conditions, which led to considerably lower temperatures; no data are available which would allow direct comparisons of these results with measurements. In order to obtain calculated temperature values consistent with the observed ones, for solar cycle maximum conditions, topside heat inflows into the ion and electron gases have to be introduced or the thermal conductivity must be reduced by considering the effect of steady and fluctuating magnetic fields, as was done in previous studies. The addition of hot oxygen heating leads to minor increases in the calculated ion temperatures except for the case of reduced thermal conductivities. Separate temperatures were calculated for each ion species for a number of different conditions and in general the differences were found to be relatively small.

  9. New Discrete Fibonacci Charge Pump Design, Evaluation and Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matoušek, David; Hospodka, Jiří; Šubrt, Ondřej

    2017-06-01

    This paper focuses on the practical aspects of the realisation of Dickson and Fibonacci charge pumps. Standard Dickson charge pump circuit solution and new Fibonacci charge pump implementation are compared. Both charge pumps were designed and then evaluated by LTspice XVII simulations and realised in a discrete form on printed circuit board (PCB). Finally, the key parameters as the output voltage, efficiency, rise time, variable power supply and clock frequency effects were measured.

  10. Resonant charge exchange involving electronically excited states of nitrogen atoms and ions

    SciTech Connect

    Kosarim, A. V.; Smirnov, B. M.; Laricchiuta, A.

    2006-12-15

    Within the framework of the asymptotic theory the matrices for the exchange interaction potentials of the nitrogen ion, with electron shell p{sup 2}, and nitrogen atom, with electron shell p{sup 3}, are constructed. The hierarchy of interactions in the nitrogen molecular ion at large internuclear distances is constructed for different electronic states. On the basis of these interaction potentials, the cross sections of resonant charge exchange in slow collisions are evaluated for different values of electron momentum projections and then averaged over these momentum projections. The mobilities of nitrogen ions in atomic nitrogen are also derived.

  11. Dynamics of the fully stripped ion-hydrogen atom charge exchange process in dense quantum plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Ling-yu; Wan, Jiang-feng; Zhao, Xiao-ying; Xiao, Guo-qing; Duan, Wen-shan; Qi, Xin; Yang, Lei

    2014-09-15

    The plasma screening effects of dense quantum plasmas on charge exchange processes of a fully stripped ion colliding with a hydrogen atom are studied by the classical trajectory Monte Carlo method. The inter-particle interactions are described by the exponential cosine-screened Coulomb potentials. It is found that in weak screening conditions, cross sections increase with the increase of the ionic charge Z. However, in strong screening conditions, the dependence of cross sections on the ionic charge is related to the incident particle energy. At high energies, cross sections show a linear increase with the increase of Z, whereas at low energies, cross sections for Z≥4 become approximately the same. The He{sup 2+} and C{sup 6+} impacting charge exchange cross sections in dense quantum plasmas are also compared with those in weakly coupled plasmas. The interactions are described by the static screened Coulomb potential. It is found that for both He{sup 2+} and C{sup 6+}, the oscillatory screening effects of dense quantum plasmas are almost negligible in weak screening conditions. However, in strong screening conditions, the oscillatory screening effects enhance the screening effects of dense quantum plasmas, and the enhancement becomes more and more significant with the increase of the screening parameter and the ionic charge.

  12. Spectral Diagnostics of Galactic and Stellar X-Ray Emission from Charge Exchange Recombination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wargelin, B.

    2002-01-01

    The proposed research uses the electron beam ion trap at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to study X-ray emission from charge-exchange recombination of highly charged ions with neutral gases. The resulting data fill a void in existing experimental and theoretical understanding of this atomic physics process, and are needed to explain all or part of the observed X-ray emission from the soft X-ray background, stellar winds, the Galactic Center, supernova ejecta, and photoionized nebulae. Progress made during the first year of the grant is described, as is work planned for the second year.

  13. ({sup 18}O,{sup 18}Ne) double charge-exchange with MAGNEX

    SciTech Connect

    Bondí, M.; Cappuzzello, F.; Nicolosi, D.; Tropea, S.; Agodi, C.; Carbone, D.; Cavallaro, M.; Cunsolo, A.; De Napoli, M.; Foti, A.

    2014-05-09

    An experimental study concerning Double Gamow-Teller (DGT) modes in ({sup 18}O,{sup 18}Ne) Double Charge-Exchange reactions has been very recently performed at INFN-LNS laboratory in Catania. The experiment was performed using a {sup 40}Ca solid target and a {sup 18}O Cyclotron beam at 270 MeV incident energy. Charged ejectiles produced in the reaction were momentum analyzed and identified by MAGNEX spectrometer at very forward angles. Preliminary results are presented in the present paper.

  14. On the semiclassical approach in the theory of ion-diatomic exchange interaction: its application to charge exchange reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoma, M. V.; Karbovanets, O. M.; Karbovanets, M. I.; Buenker, R. J.

    2008-12-01

    An analytic study is presented of asymptotic properties of the three-center quasimolecular system A2(Za- 1)++BZb+ consisting of a homonuclear diatomic molecule and a highly charged atomic ion. The potential of the one-electron exchange interaction of this system is calculated asymptotically correctly (for large distances R between interacting particles) in the framework of the non-perturbative semiclassical and the Landau-Herring approaches. The total and state-selective n- and ell-resolved cross sections of the electron capture in H2+Arq+ (q=6, 8, 14, 16) collisions in the energy region from 5.0 to 2×103 eV amu-1 were calculated and compared with available experimental and theoretical data. It is shown that with increasing projectile (atomic ion Arq+) charge, use of the semiclassical expression describing such an electron exchange interaction provides noticeably better (than with use of the Landau-Herring one) agreement between the calculated cross sections and experimental data.

  15. Measurement of two-photon exchange effect with CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Raue, Brian A

    2010-08-01

    The structure of the proton is one the most important and most studied topics in nuclear physics. However, discrepant measurements of the proton's electromagnetic form factor ratio, GE/GM, seriously jeopardize a definitive understanding of the proton's structure. Measurements of GEGM using the Rosenbluth separation technique disagree with those using polarization transfer methods by about a factor of three at Q2~5.6 GeV2. It has been hypothesized that this discrepancy is due to two-photon exchange (TPE) effects that are not part of the usual radiative corrections. Theoretical corrections for the TPE effect are difficult due to the fact that a large number of excited nucleon states can contribute to the process. However, the TPE effect can be directly determined by measuring the ratio of the positron-proton to electron-proton elastic scattering cross sections, R = sigma(e+)/sigma(e-), as the TPE effect changes sign with respect to the charge of the incident particle. A brief test run of a modified beamline and the CLAS detector at Jefferson Lab has resulted in the most precise measurements of the R to date. We will present results from the test run covering Q2<0.8 GeV2 and 0.78<=epsilon<=0.97. In addition, the test run demonstrated the feasibility of producing a mixed electron/positron beam of good quality so that the measurements can be extended up to Q2~3.0 GeV2.

  16. A comparison of experimental and computer model results on the charge-exchange plasma flow from a 30 cm mercury ion thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabriel, S. B.; Kaufman, H. R.

    1982-01-01

    Ion thrusters can be used in a variety of primary and auxiliary space-propulsion applications. A thruster produces a charge-exchange plasma which can interact with various systems on the spacecraft. The propagation of the charge-exchange plasma is crucial in determining the interaction of that plasma with the spacecraft. This paper compares experimental measurements with computer model predictions of the propagation of the charge-exchange plasma from a 30 cm mercury ion thruster. The plasma potentials, and ion densities, and directed energies are discussed. Good agreement is found in a region upstream of, and close to, the ion thruster optics. Outside of this region the agreement is reasonable in view of the modeling difficulties.

  17. Modulation of terrestrial ion escape flux composition /by low-altitude acceleration and charge exchange chemistry/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, T. E.

    1980-01-01

    Motivated by recent observations of highly variable hot plasma composition in the magnetosphere, control of the ionospheric escape flux composition by low-altitude particle dynamics and ion chemistry has been investigated for an e(-), H(+), O(+) ionosphere. It is found that the fraction of the steady state escape flux which is O(+) can be controlled very sensitively by the occurrence of parallel or transverse ion acceleration at altitudes below the altitude where the neutral oxygen density falls rapidly below the neutral hydrogen density and the ionospheric source of O(+) tends to be rapidly converted by charge exchange to H(+). The acceleration is required both to overcome the gravitational confinement of O(+) and to violate charge exchange equilibrium so that the neutral hydrogen atmosphere appears 'optically' thin to escaping O(+). Constraints are placed on the acceleration processes, and it is shown that O(+) escape is facilitated by observed ionospheric responses to magnetic activity.

  18. Charge exchange and ionization cross sections of H{sup +}+H collision in dense quantum plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Ling-yu; Qi, Xin; Zhao, Xiao-ying; Meng, Dong-yuan; Xiao, Guo-qing; Duan, Wen-shan; Yang, Lei

    2013-11-15

    The plasma screening effects of dense quantum plasmas on H{sup +}+H charge exchange and ionization cross sections are calculated by the classical trajectory Monte Carlo method. For charge exchange cross sections, it is found that the screening effects reduce cross sections slightly in weak screening conditions. However, cross sections are reduced substantially in strong screening conditions. For ionization cross sections, with the increase of screening effects, cross sections for low energies increase more rapidly than those for high energies. When the screening effects are strong enough, it is found that ionization cross sections decrease with the increase of incident H{sup +} energy. In addition, the cross sections have been compared with those in weakly coupled plasmas. It is found that in weak screening conditions, plasma screening effects in the two plasmas are approximately the same, while in strong screening conditions, screening effects of dense quantum plasmas are stronger than those of weakly coupled plasmas.

  19. Charge exchange processes in He+/Cu scattering at low energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalal-Kouache, K.; Bruckner, B.; Roth, D.; Goebl, D.; Bauer, P.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we present results on charge exchange of He+ ions at a polycrystalline Cu surface. Monte Carlo simulations were used to calculate the trajectories of projectiles scattered by an angle Θ = 136 ° . By including Auger neutralization and charge exchange in close collisions, energy spectra of the scattered ions as well as ion fraction values were calculated for primary energies in the range 0.5-5 keV and compared to experimental results. In the simulations, the Auger neutralization rate Γ and the probabilities of resonant neutralization (PRN) and reionization (PRI) are treated as free parameters. Using well accepted values from literature for these quantities very good agreement between simulations and experimental data was achieved.

  20. Tailoring of ion species composition in complex plasmas with charge exchange collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostrikov, K.

    2005-06-01

    A generic approach towards tailoring of ion species composition in reactive plasmas used for nanofabrication of various functional nanofilms and nanoassemblies, based on a simplified model of a parallel-plate rf discharge, is proposed. The model includes an idealized reactive plasma containing two neutral and two ionic species interacting via charge exchange collisions in the presence of a microdispersed solid component. It is shown that the number densities of the desired ionic species can be efficiently managed by adjusting the dilution of the working gas in a buffer gas, rates of electron impact ionization, losses of plasma species on the discharge walls, and surfaces of fine particles, charge exchange rates, and efficiency of three-body recombination processes in the plasma bulk. The results are relevant to the plasma-aided nanomanufacturing of ordered patterns of carbon nanotip and nanopyramid microemitters.

  1. ROSAT Observations of Solar Wind Charge Exchange with the Lunar Exosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collier, Michael R.; Snowden, S. L.; Benna, M.; Carter, J. A.; Cravens, T. E.; Hills, H. Kent; Hodges, R. R.; Kuntz, K. D.; Porter, F. Scott; Read, A.; Robertson, I. P.; Sembay, S. F.; Sibeck, D. G.; Stubbs, Timothy J.; Travnicek, P.

    2012-01-01

    We analyze the ROSAT PSPC soft X-ray image of the Moon taken on 29 June 1990 by examining the radial profile of the count rate in three wedges, two wedges (one north and one south) 13-32 degrees off (19 degrees wide) the terminator towards the dark side and one wedge 38 degrees wide centered on the anti-solar direction. The radial profiles of both the north and the south wedges show substantial limb brightening that is absent in the 38 degree wide antisolar wedge. An analysis of the count rate increase associated with the limb brightening shows that its magnitude is consistent with that expected due to solar wind charge exchange (SWCX) with the tenuous lunar atmosphere. Along with Mars, Venus, and Earth, the Moon represents another solar system body at which solar wind charge exchange has been observed. This technique can be used to explore the solar wind-lunar interaction.

  2. Experimental evidence of charge exchange recombination of highly ionized iron and titanium in Princeton Large Torus

    SciTech Connect

    Suckewer, S.; Hinnov, E.; Bitter, M.; Hulse, R.; Post, D.

    1980-02-01

    The observed behavior of the emissivitives of boron-like FeXXIII, lithium-like FeXXIV and TiXX, and the helium-like FeXXV ions in the PLT tokamak during highpower neutral (H/sup 0/ or D/sup 0/) beam heating is described. A substantial lowering of the dominant ionization state in the center of the discharge while the electron temperature is rising, is attributed primarily to increased recombination rate of the ions through charge exchange with neutral hydrogen. This interpretation is supported by the different space and time behavior of the lithium-like annd boron-like ions of comparable ionization potentials, and by comparisons of neutral beam heating of the plasma with ion cyclotron resonance heating, which does not appreciably change the neutral hydrogen concentration. The observations are compared with approximate zero-dimensional model calculations, using experimental plasma conditions and estimated charge exchange rates.

  3. OPTIMIZED SYSTEM FOR D- PRODUCTION FROM CHARGE EXCHANGE IN ALKALI METALS

    SciTech Connect

    Hooper Jr., E.B.; Poulsen, P.; Anderson, O.A.

    1980-08-01

    Negative ion production for neutral (deuteron) beam injectors is considered for a general system utilizing charge-exchange production in alkali metals. Experimental results provide parameters and show good correlation with calculations using known atomic cross sections, so that beam behavior can be predicted. It is found that coupling into the high voltage accelerator poses significant constraints on optimization of the system, e.g., to determine its minimum size. A typical design for 200-keV final energy provides D{sup -} at 1.5 keV from charge-exchange in rubidium, with an average current density of 23 mA/cm{sup 2} and a total current of 20 A.

  4. Solar wind/local interstellar medium interaction including charge exchange with neural hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pauls, H. Louis; Zank, Gary P.

    1995-01-01

    We present results from a hydrodynamic model of the interaction of the solar wind with the local interstellar medium (LISM), self-consistently taking into account the effects of charge exchange between the plasma component and the interstellar neutrals. The simulation is fully time dependent, and is carried out in two or three dimensions, depending on whether the helio-latitudinal dependence of the solar wind speed and number density (both giving rise to three dimensional effects) are included. As a first approximation it is assumed that the neutral component of the flow can be described by a single, isotropic fluid. Clearly, this is not the actual situation, since charge exchange with the supersonic solar wind plasma in the region of the nose results in a 'second' neutral fluid propagating in the opposite direction as that of the LISM neutrals.

  5. Competition between charge exchange and chemical reaction - The D2/+/ + H system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Preston, R. K.; Cross, R. J., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    Study of the special features of molecular charge exchange and its competition with chemical reaction in the case of the D2(+) + H system. The trajectory surface hopping (TSH) model proposed by Tully and Preston (1971) is used to study this competition for a number of reactions involving the above system. The diatomics-in-molecules zero-overlap approximation is used to calculate the three adiabatic surfaces - one triplet and two singlet - which are needed to describe this system. One of the significant results of this study is that the chemical reaction and charge exchange are strongly coupled. It is also found that the number of trajectories passing into the chemical regions of the three surfaces depends very strongly on the surface crossings.-

  6. Nuclear fragmentation and charge-exchange reactions induced by pions in the Δ -resonance region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Zhao-Qing

    2016-11-01

    The dynamics of the nuclear fragmentations and the charge exchange reactions in pion-nucleus collisions near the Δ (1232) resonance energies has been investigated within the Lanzhou quantum molecular dynamics transport model. An isospin-, momentum-, and density-dependent pion-nucleon potential is implemented in the model, which influences the pion dynamics, in particular the kinetic energy spectra, but weakly impacts the fragmentation mechanism. The absorption process in pion-nucleon collisions to form the Δ (1232) resonance dominates the heating mechanism of the target nucleus. The excitation energy transferred to the target nucleus increases with the pion kinetic energy and is similar for both π-- and π+-induced reactions. The magnitude of fragmentation of the target nucleus weakly depends on the pion energy. The isospin ratio in the pion double-charge exchange is influenced by the isospin ingredient of target nucleus.

  7. Influence of resonant charge exchange on the viscosity of partially ionized plasma in a magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Zhdanov, V. M. Stepanenko, A. A.

    2013-12-15

    The influence of resonant charge exchange for ion-atom interaction on the viscosity of partially ionized plasma embedded in the magnetic field is investigated. The general system of equations used to derive the viscosity coefficients for an arbitrary plasma component in the 21-moment approximation of Grad’s method is presented. The expressions for the coefficients of total and partial viscosities of a multicomponent partially ionized plasma in the magnetic field are obtained. As an example, the coefficients of the parallel and transverse viscosities for the ionic and neutral components of the partially ionized hydrogen plasma are calculated. It is shown that the account for resonant charge exchange can lead to a substantial change of the parallel and transverse viscosity of the plasma components in the region of low degrees of ionization on the order of 0.1.

  8. Ionic charge state measurements during He(+)-rich solar particle events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hovestadt, D.; Klecker, B.; Scholer, M.; Gloeckler, G.

    1984-01-01

    Ionic charge state measurements of carbon, oxygen, and iron in He(+)-rich energetic particle events are presented. The data have been obtained with the Max-Planck-Institut/University of Maryland sensor system on the ISEE 3 spacecraft. The ionic charge states cannot be explained in terms of a model in which the coronal temperature determines a charge equilibrium which is subsequently frozen-in nor in terms of charge exchange during transition through coronal matter after acceleration. It is concluded that the acceleration and probably also the injection process is biased against particles with high mass-to-charge ratios. The plasma injected into the acceleration process must consist of material of cold (not greater than 8.5 x 10 to the 4th K) as well as hot (2.5 x 10 to the 6th K) origin. The cold material must be more abundant than the hot material.

  9. Charge-exchange reactions and nuclear matrix elements for {beta}{beta} decay

    SciTech Connect

    Frekers, D.

    2009-11-09

    Charge-exchange reactions of (n, p) and (p, n) type at intermediate energies are a powerful tool for the study of nuclear matrix element in {beta}{beta} decay. The present paper reviews some of the most recent experiments in this context. Here, the (n, p) type reactions are realized through (d, {sup 2}He), where {sup 2}He refers to two protons in a singlet {sup 1}S{sub 0} state and where both of these are momentum analyzed and detected by the same spectrometer and detector. These reactions have been developed and performed exclusively at KVI, Groningen (NL), using an incident deuteron energy of 183 MeV. Final state resolutions of about 100 keV have routinely been available. On the other hand, the ({sup 3}He, t) reaction is of (p, n) type and was developed at the RCNP facility in Osaka (JP). Measurements with an unprecedented high resolution of 30 keV at incident energies of 420 MeV are now readily possible. Using both reaction types one can extract the Gamow-Teller transition strengths B(GT{sup +}) and B(GT{sup -}), which define the two ''legs'' of the {beta}{beta} decay matrix elements for the 2v{beta}{beta} decay The high resolution available in both reactions allows a detailed insight into the excitations of the intermediate odd-odd nuclei and, as will be shown, some unexpected features are being unveiled.

  10. Interaction of charge exchange neutrals with the main chamber walls of plasma machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verbeek, H.; Stober, J.; Coster, D. P.; Eckstein, W.; Schneider, R.

    1998-12-01

    The fluxes and energy distributions of the charge exchange (CX) neutrals as measured at specific locations at the tokamak ASDEX Upgrade (AUG) and the stellarator W7-AS at Garching are discussed as a function of the discharge conditions. For the evaluation of the plasma-wall interaction, knowledge of the energetic neutral fluxes and their energy and angular distributions at all poloidal and toroidal locations are required. For AUG these are obtained from B2-EIRENE computer simulations, taking the experimental results into account. The CX fluxes and the shapes of the spectra vary greatly around a poloidal cross-section. This has a strong effect on the wall erosion by sputtering and hydrogen isotope implantation into the vessel walls. The sputtering of the actual carbon wall, and the effect on possible wall materials, such as tungsten, beryllium, TiC and SiC, are discussed. The depth distribution of the CX neutrals implanted into the walls is calculated for two cases using the TRIMSP code. Saturation, release by glow discharges and permanent retention of the implanted hydrogen isotopes are discussed. This is important for the expected tritium content of the vessel walls of a future D-T fusion device.

  11. Energy-loss cross sections for inclusive charge-exchange reactions at intermediate energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Dubey, Rajendra R.

    1993-01-01

    Charge-exchange reactions for scattering to the continuum are considered in a high-energy multiple scattering model. Calculations for (p,n) and (He-3,H-3) reactions are made and compared with experimental results for C-12, O-16, and Al-27 targets. Coherent effects are shown to lead to an important role for inelastic multiple scattering terms when light projectiles are considered.

  12. USING KAPPA FUNCTIONS TO CHARACTERIZE OUTER HELIOSPHERE PROTON DISTRIBUTIONS IN THE PRESENCE OF CHARGE-EXCHANGE

    SciTech Connect

    Zirnstein, E. J.; McComas, D. J. E-mail: dmccomas@swri.edu

    2015-12-10

    Kappa functions have long been used in the analysis and modeling of suprathermal particles in various space plasmas. In situ observations of the supersonic solar wind show its distribution contains a cold ion core and power-law tail, which is well-represented by a kappa function. In situ plasma observations by Voyager, as well as observations of energetic neutral atom (ENA) spectra by the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX), showed that the compressed and heated inner heliosheath (IHS) plasma beyond the termination shock can also be represented by a kappa function. IBEX exposes the IHS plasma properties through the detection of ENAs generated by charge-exchange in the IHS. However, charge-exchange modifies the plasma as it flows through the IHS, and makes it difficult to ascertain the parent proton distribution. In this paper we investigate the evolution of proton distributions, initially represented by a kappa function, that experience losses due to charge-exchange in the IHS. In the absence of other processes, it is no longer representable by a single kappa function due to the energy-dependent, charge-exchange process. While one can still fit a kappa function to the evolving proton distribution over limited energy ranges, this yields fitting parameters (pseudo-density, pseudo-temperature, pseudo-kappa index) that depend on the energy range of the fit. We discuss the effects of fitting a kappa function to the IHS proton distribution over limited energy ranges, its dependence on the initial proton distribution properties at the termination shock, and implications for understanding the observations.

  13. Study of Charge-Exchange Neutrals Emission from Hot Plasma at the Multimirror Trap GOL-3

    SciTech Connect

    Burdakov, A.V.; Derevyankin, G.E.; Koidan, V.S.; Shoshin, A.A.; Trunev, Yu.A.

    2005-01-15

    Tentative experiments on registration of the energy spectrum of fast charge exchange (CX) neutrals emitted from the high-density hot plasma of the GOL-3 facility were carried out. Experimental data provided by used 5-channel CX neutrals analyzer are presented and the procedure of determining of the energy distribution of registered CX neutrals is discussed. From calculated data of the neutrals energy distribution the estimated temperature is 1.5 {+-} 0.5 keV.

  14. Charge Exchange and Ablation Rates of a Titanium Wire Plasma Corona

    SciTech Connect

    Terry, Robert E.

    2009-01-21

    Wire ablation rates are important features in any examination of precursors or transparent mode implosions of wire arrays. When ion temperatures in a Ti wire plasma corona exceed a few eV, the process of resonant charge exchange competes with elastic scattering. Ions pushed into the corona from an anode bias wire array can be expected to drive a fast neutral wind into the surrounding volume, while a cathode bias wire array would not show the strong neutral wind.

  15. Helium escape from the Earth's atmosphere - The charge exchange mechanism revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lie-Svendsen, O.; Rees, M. H.; Stamnes, K.

    1992-01-01

    We have studied the escape of neutral helium from the terrestrial atmosphere through exothermic charge exchange reactions between He(+) ions and the major atmospheric constituents N2, O2 and O. Elastic collisions with the neutral background particles were treated quantitatively using a recently developed kinetic theory approach. An interhemispheric plasma transport model was employed to provide a global distribution of He(+) ions as a function of altitude, latitude and local solar time and for different levels of solar ionization. Combining these ion densities with neutral densities from an MSIS model and best estimates for the reaction rate coefficients of the charge exchange reactions, we computed the global distribution of the neutral He escape flux. The escape rates show large diurnal and latitudinal variations, while the global average does not vary by more than a factor of three over a solar cycle. We find that this escape mechanism is potentially important for the overall balance of helium in the Earth's atmosphere. However, more accurate values for the reaction rate coefficients of the charge exchange reactions are required to make a definitive assessment of its importance.

  16. Modeling the Hydrogen-Proton Charge-Exchange Process in Global Heliospheric Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeStefano, A.; Heerikhuisen, J.

    2015-12-01

    The environment surrounding our Solar System has a vast and dynamic structure. As the Sun rounds the Milky Way galaxy, interstellar dust and gas interact with the Sun's outflow of solar wind. A bubble of hot plasma forms around the Sun due to this interaction, called the heliosphere. In order to understand the structure of the heliosphere, observations and simulations must work in tandem. Within the past decade or so, 3D models of the heliosphere have been developed exhibiting non- symmmetric as well as predicting structures such as the hydrogen wall and the IBEX ribbon. In this poster we explore new ways to compute charge-exchange source terms. The charge-exchange process is the coupling mechanism between the MHD and kinetic theories. The understanding of this process is crucial in order to make valuable predictions. Energy dependant cross section terms will aid in settling non-linear affects coupling the intestellar and solar particles. Through these new ways of computing source terms, resolving fine structures in the plasma in the heliopause may be possible. In addition, other non-trivial situations, such as charge-exchange mediated shocks, may be addressed.

  17. Coherent control of charge exchange in strong-field dissociation of LiF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, Greg; Esry, Brett

    2016-05-01

    The alkali-metal-halides family of molecules are useful prototypes in the study of laser-assisted charge exchange. Typically these molecules possess a field-free crossing between the ionic and covalent diabatic Born-Oppenheimer potential curves, leading to Li+ + F- and Li + F in LiF. These channels are energetically well-separated from higher-lying potentials, and may be easily distinguished experimentally. Moreover, charge exchange involves non-adiabatic transitions between the ionic and covalent channels, thereby allowing the investigation of physics beyond the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. The focus of this work is to control the preference between ionic and covalent dissociative products. We solve the time-dependent Schrödinger equation for the nuclear motion in full dimensionality, and investigate a pump-probe scheme for charge-exchange control. The degree of control is investigated by calculating the kinetic-energy release spectrum as a function of pump-probe delay for the ionic and covalent fragments. This work is supported by the Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences Division, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Office of Science, U.S. Department of Energy.

  18. The inconsistency between proton charge exchange and the observed ring current decay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyons, L. R.; Evans, D. S.

    1976-01-01

    The equatorial pitch-angle distributions of ring-current ions observed during a storm recovery phase at L values between 3 and 4 are compared with the pitch-angle distributions predicted by proton charge exchange with neutral hydrogen. Large disagreements are found, and three alternative explanations are explored. (1) A strong proton source acts to mask the effects of charge exchange. It is believed that the required strong continual source with a unique pitch-angle and energy dependence is unrealistic at these low L values. (2) Presently accepted neutral hydrogen density models have densities well over an order of magnitude too large for a storm recovery phase. No evidence is known to support the required large errors in the densities. (3) The ring current at particle energies not exceeding 50 keV was dominated by some ion species other than protons during the storm recovery phase. Such ions must have much longer lifetimes for charge exchange with hydrogen than do protons. This alternative is strongly favored, with He(+) being an attractive candidate.

  19. Helium escape from the Earth's atmosphere - The charge exchange mechanism revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lie-Svendsen, O.; Rees, M. H.; Stamnes, K.

    1992-01-01

    We have studied the escape of neutral helium from the terrestrial atmosphere through exothermic charge exchange reactions between He(+) ions and the major atmospheric constituents N2, O2 and O. Elastic collisions with the neutral background particles were treated quantitatively using a recently developed kinetic theory approach. An interhemispheric plasma transport model was employed to provide a global distribution of He(+) ions as a function of altitude, latitude and local solar time and for different levels of solar ionization. Combining these ion densities with neutral densities from an MSIS model and best estimates for the reaction rate coefficients of the charge exchange reactions, we computed the global distribution of the neutral He escape flux. The escape rates show large diurnal and latitudinal variations, while the global average does not vary by more than a factor of three over a solar cycle. We find that this escape mechanism is potentially important for the overall balance of helium in the Earth's atmosphere. However, more accurate values for the reaction rate coefficients of the charge exchange reactions are required to make a definitive assessment of its importance.

  20. Mechanistic modeling of ion-exchange process chromatography of charge variants of monoclonal antibody products.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vijesh; Leweke, Samuel; von Lieres, Eric; Rathore, Anurag S

    2015-12-24

    Ion-exchange chromatography (IEX) is universally accepted as the optimal method for achieving process scale separation of charge variants of a monoclonal antibody (mAb) therapeutic. These variants are closely related to the product and a baseline separation is rarely achieved. The general practice is to fractionate the eluate from the IEX column, analyze the fractions and then pool the desired fractions to obtain the targeted composition of variants. This is, however, a very cumbersome and time consuming exercise. A mechanistic model that is capable of simulating the peak profile will be a much more elegant and effective way to make a decision on the pooling strategy. This paper proposes a mechanistic model, based on the general rate model, to predict elution peak profile for separation of the main product from its variants. The proposed approach uses inverse fit of process scale chromatogram for estimation of model parameters using the initial values that are obtained from theoretical correlations. The packed bed column has been modeled along with the chromatographic system consisting of the mixer, tubing and detectors as a series of dispersed plug flow and continuous stirred tank reactors. The model uses loading ranges starting at 25% to a maximum of 70% of the loading capacity and hence is applicable to process scale separations. Langmuir model has been extended to include the effects of salt concentration and temperature on the model parameters. The extended Langmuir model that has been proposed uses one less parameter than the SMA model and this results in a significant ease of estimating the model parameters from inverse fitting. The proposed model has been validated with experimental data and has been shown to successfully predict peak profile for a range of load capacities (15-28mg/mL), gradient lengths (10-30CV), bed heights (6-20cm), and for three different resins with good accuracy (as measured by estimation of residuals). The model has been also

  1. Ultrafast spin exchange-coupling torque via photo-excited charge-transfer processes

    DOE PAGES

    Ma, X.; Fang, F.; Li, Q.; ...

    2015-10-28

    In this study, optical control of spin is of central importance in the research of ultrafast spintronic devices utilizing spin dynamics at short time scales. Recently developed optical approaches such as ultrafast demagnetization, spin-transfer and spin-orbit torques open new pathways to manipulate spin through its interaction with photon, orbit, charge or phonon. However, these processes are limited by either the long thermal recovery time or the low-temperature requirement. Here we experimentally demonstrate ultrafast coherent spin precession via optical charge-transfer processes in the exchange-coupled Fe/CoO system at room temperature. The efficiency of spin precession excitation is significantly higher and the recoverymore » time of the exchange-coupling torque is much shorter than for the demagnetization procedure, which is desirable for fast switching. The exchange coupling is a key issue in spin valves and tunnelling junctions, and hence our findings will help promote the development of exchange-coupled device concepts for ultrafast coherent spin manipulation.« less

  2. Ultrafast spin exchange-coupling torque via photo-excited charge-transfer processes

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, X.; Fang, F.; Li, Q.; Zhu, J.; Yang, Y.; Wu, Y. Z.; Zhao, H. B.; Lüpke, G.

    2015-10-28

    In this study, optical control of spin is of central importance in the research of ultrafast spintronic devices utilizing spin dynamics at short time scales. Recently developed optical approaches such as ultrafast demagnetization, spin-transfer and spin-orbit torques open new pathways to manipulate spin through its interaction with photon, orbit, charge or phonon. However, these processes are limited by either the long thermal recovery time or the low-temperature requirement. Here we experimentally demonstrate ultrafast coherent spin precession via optical charge-transfer processes in the exchange-coupled Fe/CoO system at room temperature. The efficiency of spin precession excitation is significantly higher and the recovery time of the exchange-coupling torque is much shorter than for the demagnetization procedure, which is desirable for fast switching. The exchange coupling is a key issue in spin valves and tunnelling junctions, and hence our findings will help promote the development of exchange-coupled device concepts for ultrafast coherent spin manipulation.

  3. Ultrafast spin exchange-coupling torque via photo-excited charge-transfer processes

    PubMed Central

    Ma, X.; Fang, F.; Li, Q.; Zhu, J.; Yang, Y.; Wu, Y. Z.; Zhao, H. B.; Lüpke, G.

    2015-01-01

    Optical control of spin is of central importance in the research of ultrafast spintronic devices utilizing spin dynamics at short time scales. Recently developed optical approaches such as ultrafast demagnetization, spin-transfer and spin-orbit torques open new pathways to manipulate spin through its interaction with photon, orbit, charge or phonon. However, these processes are limited by either the long thermal recovery time or the low-temperature requirement. Here we experimentally demonstrate ultrafast coherent spin precession via optical charge-transfer processes in the exchange-coupled Fe/CoO system at room temperature. The efficiency of spin precession excitation is significantly higher and the recovery time of the exchange-coupling torque is much shorter than for the demagnetization procedure, which is desirable for fast switching. The exchange coupling is a key issue in spin valves and tunnelling junctions, and hence our findings will help promote the development of exchange-coupled device concepts for ultrafast coherent spin manipulation. PMID:26508587

  4. A precise measurement of the two-photon exchange effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moteabbed, Maryam

    The two-photon exchange phenomenon is believed to be responsible for the discrepancy observed between the ratio of proton electric and magnetic form factors, measured by the Rosenbluth and polarization transfer methods. This disagreement is about a factor of three at Q 2 of 5.6 GeV2. The precise knowledge of the proton form factors is of critical importance in understanding the structure of this nucleon. The theoretical models that estimate the size of the two-photon exchange (TPE) radiative correction are poorly constrained. This factor was found to be directly measurable by taking the ratio of the electron-proton and positron-proton elastic scattering cross sections, as the TPE effect changes sign with respect to the charge of the incident particle. A test run of a modified beamline has been conducted with the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. This test run demonstrated the feasibility of producing a mixed electron/positron beam of good quality. Extensive simulations performed prior to the run were used to reduce the background rate that limits the production luminosity. A 3.3 GeV primary electron beam was used that resulted in an average secondary lepton beam of 1 GeV. As a result, the elastic scattering data of both lepton types were obtained at scattering angles up to 40 degrees for Q2 up to 1.5 GeV2. The cross section ratio displayed an epsilon dependence that was Q2 dependent at smaller Q2 limits. The magnitude of the average ratio as a function of epsilon was consistent with the previous measurements, and the elastic (Blunden) model to within the experimental uncertainties. Ultimately, higher luminosity is needed to extend the data range to lower epsilon where the TPE effect is predicted to be largest.

  5. Modeling of protein-anion exchange resin interaction for the human growth hormone charge variants.

    PubMed

    Lapelosa, Mauro; Patapoff, Thomas W; Zarraga, Isidro E

    2015-12-01

    Modeling ion exchange chromatography (IEC) behavior has generated significant interest because of the wide use of IEC as an analytical technique as well as a preparative protein purification process; indeed there is a need for better understanding of what drives the unique behavior of protein charge variants. We hypothesize that a complex protein molecule, which contains both hydrophobic and charged moieties, would interact strongly with an in silico designed resin through charged electrostatic patches on the surface of the protein. In the present work, variants of recombinant human growth hormone that mimic naturally-occurring deamidation products were produced and characterized in silico. The study included these four variants: rhGH, N149D, N152D, and N149D/N152D. Poisson-Boltzmann calculations were used to determine surface electrostatic potential. Metropolis Monte Carlo simulations were carried out with the resulting variants to simulate IEC systems, examining the free energy of the interaction of the protein with an in silico anion exchange column represented by polylysine polypeptide. The results show that the charge variants have different average binding energies and the free energy of interaction can be used to predict the retention time for the different variants.

  6. Charge exchange of medium energy H and He ions emerging from solid surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitsudo, Y.; Shibuya, K.; Nishimura, T.; Hoshino, Y.; Vickridge, I.; Kido, Y.

    2009-02-01

    Charge exchange of medium energy H and He ions emerging from clean solid surfaces is studied extensively using a toroidal electrostatic analyzer with an excellent energy resolution. The charge distributions of He ions scattered from sub-monolayers near a surface are non-equilibrated, resulting in a surface peak even for poly-crystal solids. By solving simultaneous rate equations numerically, we derive electron capture and loss cross sections for Ni and Au surfaces. Based on a free electron gas model, non-equilibrated He+ fractions dependent on emerging angle reveals uniform electronic surfaces for metals and corrugated surfaces for Si and graphite with covalent bonds. It is also found that equilibrium charge fractions of H+ are independent of surface materials (Z2) and in contrast equilibrium He+ fractions depend pronouncedly on Z2. The data obtained are compared with semi-empirical formulas.

  7. Charge detector for the measurement of ionic solutes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bingcheng; Chen, Yongjing; Mori, Masanobu; Ohira, Shin-Ichi; Azad, Abul K; Dasgupta, Purnendu K; Srinivasan, Kannan

    2010-02-01

    We describe a flow-through ionic charge detector in the form of a three-compartmented system. A central water channel is separated from two outer channels bearing water (or a dilute electrolyte) by a cation-exchange membrane (CEM) and an anion-exchange membrane (AEM). Independent fluid input/output ports address all channels. One platinum electrode is put in each outer channel. When the AEM-side electrode is positive with respect to the CEM-side electrode and voltage (approximately 1-10 V) is applied, the observed background current is from the transport of H(+)/OH(-) through the CEM/AEM to the negative/positive electrodes, respectively. The H(+) and OH(-) are generated by the ionization of water, in part aided by the electric field. If an electrolyte (X(+)Y(-)) is injected in to the central channel, X(+) and Y(-) migrate through the CEM and AEM to the negative and positive electrodes, respectively, and generate a current pulse. The integrated area of the current signal (coulombs) elicited by this electrolyte injection is dependent on a number of variables, the most important being the central channel residence time and the applied voltage (V(app)); these govern the transport of the injected electrolyte to/through the membranes. Other parameters include electrode placement, fluid composition, and outer channel flow rates. For strong electrolytes, depending on the operating conditions, the current peak area (hereinafter called the measured charge signal, Q(m)) can both be less or more than the charge represented by the electrolyte injected (Q(i)). Q(m) is less than Q(i) if transport to/through the membranes is subquantitative. Q(m) can be greater than Q(i) at higher V(app). At constant V(app) more voltage is dropped across the membranes as the central channel becomes more conductive and water dissociation at the membrane surface is enhanced. Effectively, the membranes experience a greater applied voltage as the central channel becomes more conductive. The resulting

  8. Analysis of Water Barrier Line Charge Plume Measurements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-01-01

    MEASUREMENTS BY CHARLES E. HIGDON NAVAL SURFACE WARFARE CENTER, DAHLGREN DIVISION WILLIAM G. SZYMCZAK NAVAL RESEARCH LABORATORY JOSEPH G. CONNOR...ofWater Barrier Line Charge Plume Measurements 6. AUTHOR(s) Charles E. Higdon, William G. Szymczak , Joseph G. Connor 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION...Maximum bubble diameter of line charge DET Distributed explosive technology DLVA Direct logarithmic video amplifier DTI Dynamic Testing

  9. Problems with Accurate Atomic Lfetime Measurements of Multiply Charged Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Trabert, E

    2009-02-19

    A number of recent atomic lifetime measurements on multiply charged ions have reported uncertainties lower than 1%. Such a level of accuracy challenges theory, which is a good thing. However, a few lessons learned from earlier precision lifetime measurements on atoms and singly charged ions suggest to remain cautious about the systematic errors of experimental techniques.

  10. Method and apparatus for non-contact charge measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Taylor G. (Inventor); Lin, Kuan-Chan (Inventor); Hightower, James C. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A method and apparatus for the accurate non-contact detection and measurement of static electric charge on an object using a reciprocating sensing probe that moves relative to the object. A monitor measures the signal generated as a result of this cyclical movement so as to detect the electrostatic charge on the object.

  11. Observed Limits on Charge Exchange Contributions to the Diffuse X-Ray Background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crowder, S. G.; Barger, K. A.; Brandl, D. E.; Eckart, M. E.; Galeazzi, M.; Kelley, R. L.; Kilbourne, C. A.; McCammon, D.; Pfendner, C. G.; Porter, F. S.; Rocks, L.; Szymkowiak, A. E.; Teplin, I. M.

    2012-01-01

    We present a high-resolution spectrum of the diffuse X-ray background from 0.1 to 1 keV for an approximately 1 sr region of the sky centered at l = 90 degrees b = +60 degrees using a 36 pixel array of microcalorimeters flown on a sounding rocket. With an energy resolution of 11 eV FWHM below 1 keV, the spectrum s observed line ratios help separate charge exchange contributions originating within the heliosphere from thermal emission of hot gas in the interstellar medium. The X-ray sensitivity below 1 keV was reduced by about a factor of four from contamination that occurred early in the flight, limiting the significance of the results. The observed centroid of helium-like O VII is 568 (sup +2 (sub -3) eV at 90% confidence. Since the centroid expected for thermal emission is 568.4 eV and for charge exchange is 564.2 eV, thermal emission appears to dominate for this line complex. The dominance of thermal emission is consistent with much of the high-latitude O VII emission originating in 2-3 x 10(exp 6) K gas in the Galactic halo. On the other hand, the observed ratio of C VI Lygamma to Lyalpha is 0.3 plus or minus 0.2. The expected ratios are 0.04 for thermal emission and 0.24 for charge exchange, indicating that charge exchange must contribute strongly to this line and therefore potentially to the rest of the ROSAT R12 band usually associated with 10(sup 6) K emission from the Local Hot Bubble. The limited statistics of this experiment and systematic uncertainties due to the contamination require only greater than 32% thermal emission for O VII and greater than 20% from charge exchange for C VI at the 90% confidence level. An experimental gold coating on the silicon substrate of the array greatly reduced extraneous signals induced on nearby pixels from cosmic rays passing through the substrate, reducing the triggered event rate by a factor of 15 from a previous flight of the instrument.

  12. Neutralizing positive charges at the surface of a protein lowers its rate of amide hydrogen exchange without altering its structure or increasing its thermostability.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Bryan F; Arthanari, Haribabu; Narovlyansky, Max; Durazo, Armando; Frueh, Dominique P; Pollastri, Michael P; Lee, Andrew; Bilgicer, Basar; Gygi, Steven P; Wagner, Gerhard; Whitesides, George M

    2010-12-15

    This paper combines two techniques--mass spectrometry and protein charge ladders--to examine the relationship between the surface charge and hydrophobicity of a representative globular protein (bovine carbonic anhydrase II; BCA II) and its rate of amide hydrogen-deuterium (H/D) exchange. Mass spectrometric analysis indicated that the sequential acetylation of surface lysine-ε-NH3(+) groups--a type of modification that increases the net negative charge and hydrophobicity of the surface of BCA II without affecting its secondary or tertiary structure--resulted in a linear decrease in the aggregate rate of amide H/D exchange at pD 7.4, 15 °C. According to analysis with MS, the acetylation of each additional lysine generated between 1.4 and 0.9 additional hydrogens that are protected from H/D exchange during the 2 h exchange experiment at 15 °C, pD 7.4. NMR spectroscopy demonstrated that none of the hydrogen atoms which became protected upon acetylation were located on the side chain of the acetylated lysine residues (i.e., lys-ε-NHCOCH3) but were instead located on amide NHCO moieties in the backbone. The decrease in rate of exchange associated with acetylation paralleled a decrease in thermostability: the most slowly exchanging rungs of the charge ladder were the least thermostable (as measured by differential scanning calorimetry). This observation--that faster rates of exchange are associated with slower rates of denaturation--is contrary to the usual assumptions in protein chemistry. The fact that the rates of H/D exchange were similar for perbutyrated BCA II (e.g., [lys-ε-NHCO(CH2)2CH3]18) and peracetylated BCA II (e.g., [lys-ε-NHCOCH3]18) suggests that the electrostatic charge is more important than the hydrophobicity of surface groups in determining the rate of H/D exchange. These electrostatic effects on the kinetics of H/D exchange could complicate (or aid) the interpretation of experiments in which H/D exchange methods are used to probe the structural

  13. Neutralizing positive charges at the surface of a protein lowers its rate of amide hydrogen exchange without altering its structure or increasing its thermostability

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Bryan F.; Arthanari, Haribabu; Narovlyansky, Max; Durazo, Armando; Frueh, Dominique P.; Pollastri, Michael P.; Lee, Andrew; Bilgicer, Basar; Gygi, Steven P.; Wagner, Gerhard; Whitesides, George M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper combines two techniques—mass spectrometry and protein charge ladders—to examine the relationship between the surface charge and hydrophobicity of a representative globular protein (bovine carbonic anhydrase II; BCA II) and its rate of amide hydrogen-deuterium (H/D) exchange. Mass spectrometric analysis indicated that the sequential acetylation of surface lysine-ε-NH3+ groups—a type of modification that increases the net negative charge and hydrophobicity of the surface of BCA II without affecting its 2° or 3° structure—resulted in a linear decrease in the aggregate rate of amide H/D exchange at pD 7.4, 15 °C. According to analysis with MS, the acetylation of each additional lysine generated between 1.4 and 0.9 additional hydrogens that are protected from H/D exchange during the 2 h exchange experiment at 15 °C, pD 7.4. NMR spectroscopy demonstrated that none of the hydrogen atoms which became protected upon acetylation were located on the side chain of the acetylated lysine residues (i.e., lys-ε-NHCOCH3) but were instead located on amide NHCO moieties in the backbone. The decrease in rate of exchange associated with acetylation paralleled a decrease in thermostability: the most slowly exchanging rungs of the charge ladder were the least thermostable (as measured by differential scanning calorimetry). This observation—that faster rates of exchange are associated with slower rates of denaturation—is contrary to the usual assumptions in protein chemistry. The fact that the rates of H/D exchange were similar for perbutyrated BCA II (e.g., [lys-ε-NHCO(CH2)2CH3]18) and peracetylated BCA II (e.g., [lys-ε-NHCOCH3]18) suggests that the electrostatic charge is more important than the hydrophobicity of surface groups in determining the rate of H/D exchange. These electrostatic effects on the kinetics of H/D exchange could complicate (or aid) the interpretation of experiments in which H/D exchange methods are used to probe the structural effects

  14. W charge asymmetry measurement in CDF Run2

    SciTech Connect

    C. Issever

    2003-02-06

    We present the status of the forward-backward charge asymmetry measurement for W boson production using early Run 2 data collected with the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF). Tracking for forward electrons is a critical component of this measurement, and we describe a new technique which combines the position and energy measurements from the calorimeter with position measurements in the silicon detector to provide tracking and charge determination for electron candidates. The performance of this algorithm is described and the sensitivity for the W charge asymmetry measurement with Run 2 data is quantified.

  15. Fast charge exchange ions in high power impulse magnetron sputtering of titanium as probes for the electrical potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breilmann, W.; Maszl, C.; von Keudell, A.

    2017-03-01

    High power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) plasmas exhibit a high ionization fraction of the sputtered material and ions with high kinetic energies, which produce thin films with superior quality. These ion energy distribution functions (IEDF) contain energetic peaks, which are believed to be linked to a distinct electrical potential hump {{Δ }}{{{Φ }}}{{ionization}{{zone}}} inside rotating localized ionization zones, so called spokes, at target power densities above 1 kW cm‑2. Any direct measurement of this electrical potential structure is, however, very difficult due to the dynamic nature of the spokes and the very high local power density, which hampers the use of conventional emissive probes. Instead, we use a careful analysis of the IEDFs for singly and doubly charged titanium ions from a HiPIMS plasma at varying target power density. The energy peaks in the IEDFs measured at the substrate depend on the point of ionization and any charge exchange collisions on the path between ionization and impact at the substrate. Thereby, the IEDFs contain a convoluted information about the electrical potential structure inside the plasma. The analysis of these IEDFs reveal that higher ionization states originate at high target power densities from the central part of the plasma spoke, whereas singly charged ions originate from the perimeter of the plasma spoke. Consequently, we observe different absolute ion energies with the energy of Ti2+ being slightly higher than two times the energy of Ti+. Additional peaks are observed in the IEDFs of Ti+ originating from charge exchange reactions from Ti2+ and Ti3+ with titanium neutrals. Based on this analysis of the IEDFs, the structure of the electrical potential inside a spoke is inferred yielding {{Δ }}{{{Φ }}}{{ionization}{{zone}}} = 25 V above the plasma potential, irrespective of target power density.

  16. Trace adsorption of positively charged proteins onto Sepharose FF and Sepharose FF-based anion exchangers.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lin-Ling; Sun, Yan

    2012-08-31

    Agarose-based matrices have been widely used in ion exchange chromatography (IEC). We have herein observed that positively charged proteins (lysozyme and cytochrome c) are adsorbed on the agarose-based anion-exchangers (Q and DEAE Sepharose FF gels) in a capacity of 10-40 μg/mL. In contrast, negatively charged protein (bovine serum albumin) is not adsorbed to Sepharose FF and SP Sepharose FF gels. Elemental analysis of the gel indicated that the residual anionic sulfate groups in agarose would have worked as the cation exchange groups for the positively charged proteins. The trace adsorption behavior of lysozyme onto Sepharose FF and Sepharose FF-based anion exchangers was studied and the effects of NaCl concentration and cation group density on the adsorption were examined for better understanding of the trace adsorption in chromatographic processes. At NaCl concentrations less than 0.05 mol/L, which is the normal adsorption condition in IEC, the trace adsorption kept at a high level, so this trace adsorption cannot be avoided in the ionic strength range of routine IEC operations. Grafting poly(ethylenimine) (PEI) chain of 60 kDa to a cation group density of 700 mmol/L could reduce the adsorption capacity to about 20 μg/mL, but further reduction was not possible by increasing the cation group density to 1200 mmol/L. Therefore, attentions need to be paid to the phenomenon in protein purification practice using agarose-based matrices. The research is expected to call attentions to the trace adsorption on agarose-based matrices and to the importance in the selection of the suitable solid matrices in the production of high-purity protein products in large-scale bioprocesses.

  17. SOLAR-WIND ION-DRIVEN X-RAY EMISSION FROM COMETARY AND PLANETARY ATMOSPHERES: MEASUREMENTS AND THEORETICAL PREDICTIONS OF CHARGE-EXCHANGE CROSS-SECTIONS AND EMISSION SPECTRA FOR O{sup 6+} + H{sub 2}O, CO, CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, N{sub 2}, NO, N{sub 2}O, AND Ar

    SciTech Connect

    Machacek, J. R.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Schultz, D. R.; Ralchenko, Yu.; Moradmand, A.; El Ghazaly, M. O. A.; Chutjian, A.

    2015-08-10

    Relevant to modeling and understanding X-ray emission from cometary and planetary atmospheres, total cross-sections for 1.17 and 2.33 keV/u O{sup 6+} colliding with H{sub 2}O, CO, CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, N{sub 2}, NO, N{sub 2}O, and Ar have been measured for the processes of single, double, and triple charge exchanges. Using these measurements as benchmarks, synthetic emission spectra spanning the X-ray, UV, and visible range have been calculated based on theoretical treatment of the transfer of between one and six electrons from the target neutrals to the projectile ion, followed by radiative and non-radiative decay of the highly excited states produced in these collisions. The results help add to the base of knowledge required to simulate ion-neutral processes in astrophysical environments; refine the present understanding of these fundamental atomic processes; and guide future observations, laboratory measurements, and theoretical predictions.

  18. Metering gun for dispensing precisely measured charges of fluid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, T. A.; Scheibe, H. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A cyclically operable fluid dispenser for use in dispensing precisely measured charges of potable water aboard spacecraft is described. The dispenser is characterized by (1) a sealed housing adapted to be held within a crewman's palm and coupled with a pressurized source of potable water; (2) a dispensing jet projected from the housing and configured to be received within a crewman's lips; (3) an expansible measuring chamber for measuring charges of drinking water received from the source; (4) and a dispenser actuator including a lever extended from the housing to be digitated for initiating operational cycles, whereby precisely measured charges of potable water selectively are delivered for drinking purposes in a weightless environment.

  19. Measurements of Lunar Dust Charging Properties by Electron Impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbas, Mian M.; Tankosic, Dragana; Craven, Paul D.; Schneider, Todd A.; Vaughn, Jason A.; LeClair, Andre; Spann, James F.; Norwood, Joseph K.

    2009-01-01

    Dust grains in the lunar environment are believed to be electrostatically charged predominantly by photoelectric emissions resulting from solar UV radiation on the dayside, and on the nightside by interaction with electrons in the solar wind plasma. In the high vacuum environment on the lunar surface with virtually no atmosphere, the positive and negative charge states of micron/submicron dust grains lead to some unusual physical and dynamical dust phenomena. Knowledge of the electrostatic charging properties of dust grains in the lunar environment is required for addressing their hazardous effect on the humans and mechanical systems. It is well recognized that the charging properties of individual small micron size dust grains are substantially different from the measurements on bulk materials. In this paper we present the results of measurements on charging of individual Apollo 11 and Apollo 17 dust grains by exposing them to mono-energetic electron beams in the 10-100 eV energy range. The charging/discharging rates of positively and negatively charged particles of approx. 0.1 to 5 micron radii are discussed in terms of the sticking efficiencies and secondary electron yields. The secondary electron emission process is found to be a complex and effective charging/discharging mechanism for incident electron energies as low as 10-25 eV, with a strong dependence on particle size. Implications of the laboratory measurements on the nature of dust grain charging in the lunar environment are discussed.

  20. Charge-exchange plasma environment for an ion drive spacecraft. [a model for describing mercury ion engines and its effect on spacecraft subsystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, H. R.; Carruth, M. R., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The charge exchange plasma environment around a spacecraft that uses mercury ion thrusters for propulsion is described. The interactions between the plasma environment and the spacecraft are determined and a model which describes the propagation of the mercury charge exchange plasma is discussed. The model is extended to describe the flow of the molybdenum component of the charge exchange plasma. The uncertainties in the models for various conditions are discussed and current drain to the solar array, charge exchange plasma material deposition, and the effects of space plasma on the charge exchange plasma propagation are addressed.

  1. A comprehensive model of ion diffusion and charge exchange in the cold Io torus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbosa, D. D.; Moreno, M. A.

    1988-01-01

    A comprehensive analytic model of radial diffusion in the cold Io torus is developed. The model involves a generalized molecular cloud theory of SO2 and its dissociation fragments SO, O2, S, and O, which are formed at a relatively large rate by solar UV photodissociation of SO2. The key component of the new theory is SO, which can react with S(+) through a near-resonant charge exchange process that is exothermic. This provides a mechanism for the rapid depletion of singly ionized sulfur in the cold torus and can account for the large decrease in the total flux tube content inward of Io's orbit. The model is used to demonstrate quantitatively the effects of radial diffusion in a charge exchange environment that acts as a combined source and sink for ions in various charge states. A detailed quantitative explanation for the O(2+) component of the cold torus is given, and insight is derived into the workings of the so-called plasma 'ribbon'.

  2. A comprehensive model of ion diffusion and charge exchange in the cold Io torus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbosa, D. D.; Moreno, M. A.

    1988-01-01

    A comprehensive analytic model of radial diffusion in the cold Io torus is developed. The model involves a generalized molecular cloud theory of SO2 and its dissociation fragments SO, O2, S, and O, which are formed at a relatively large rate by solar UV photodissociation of SO2. The key component of the new theory is SO, which can react with S(+) through a near-resonant charge exchange process that is exothermic. This provides a mechanism for the rapid depletion of singly ionized sulfur in the cold torus and can account for the large decrease in the total flux tube content inward of Io's orbit. The model is used to demonstrate quantitatively the effects of radial diffusion in a charge exchange environment that acts as a combined source and sink for ions in various charge states. A detailed quantitative explanation for the O(2+) component of the cold torus is given, and insight is derived into the workings of the so-called plasma 'ribbon'.

  3. X-RAY SIGNATURE OF CHARGE EXCHANGE IN L-SHELL SULFUR IONS

    SciTech Connect

    Frankel, M.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Brown, G. V.; Gu, M. F.; Kelley, R. L.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Porter, F. S. E-mail: beiersdorfer1@llnl.gov

    2009-09-01

    The X-ray signature of L-shell charge exchange in sulfur was studied in the laboratory. A comparison of the charge exchange (CX) spectra with those obtained under electron-impact excitation showed marked differences. In the CX spectra, an enhancement was observed in the transitions from levels with high principal quantum numbers, n = 4, 5, 6 {yields} n = 2 in comparison with the n = 3 {yields} n = 2 transitions that dominate the direct excitation spectra. An even greater enhancement was recorded in the transitions from the levels of electron capture to the ground states: n = 7, 8, 9 {yields} n = 2. The spectra mainly consist of emission from S XIV, but lower charge states such as S XIII, S XII, and S XI also contribute. The results have been compared with observations made by the Chandra and XMM-Newton X-ray Observatories of Jupiter's polar regions. The enhancement we noticed in transitions from the high-n levels is not seen in the Chandra spectra.

  4. Charge exchange collisions of slow C6 + with atomic and molecular H

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Bidhan C.; Guevara, Nicolais L.; Sabin, John R.; Deumens, Erik; Öhrn, Yngve

    2016-04-01

    Charge exchange in collisions of C6+ ions with H and H2 is investigated theoretically at projectile energies 0.1 < E < 10 keV/amu, using electron nuclear dynamics (END) - a semi-classical approximation which not only includes electron translation factors for avoiding spurious couplings but also employs full dynamical trajectories to treat nuclear motions. Both the total and partial cross sections are reported for the collision of C6+ ions with atomic and molecular hydrogen. A comparison with other theoretical and experimental results shows, in general good agreement except at very low energy, considered here. For H2, the one- and two-electron charge exchange cross sections are calculated and compared with other theoretical and experimental results. Small but non-negligible isotope effects are found at the lowest energy studied in the charge transfer of C6+ with H. In low energy region, it is observed that H2 has larger isotope effects than H atom due to the polarizability effect which is larger than the mass effect.

  5. Microscopic description of charge-exchange nuclear resonances excited in ( p,n) reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Gareev, F.A.; Ershov, S.N.; Pyatov, N.I.; Fayans, S.A.

    1984-06-01

    The charge-exchange excitations for the /sup 48/Ca..-->../sup 48/Sc, /sup 90/Zr..-->../sup 90/Nb, and /sup 208/Pb..-->../sup 208/Bi isobar pairs are calculated using the methods of the theory of finite Fermi systems with the single-particle continuum taken into account exactly. Transition densities for the isobar-analog states, Gamow-Teller resonances, dipole (L = 1, S = 0) resonances, and spin-dipole (L = 1, S = 1) resonances are calculated. Differential cross sections for the ( p,n) reactions which excite these resonances are calculated in the distorted-wave impulse approximation for proton energies E/sub p/ in the 100--200 MeV range. A detailed comparison with experimental data is performed in order to determine the nucleon-nucleon effective interaction in the charge-exchange channel as well as the local quasiparticle charge e/sub q/(sigmatau) that characterizes the quenching of low-energy spin-flip transitions. It is shown, in particular, that the theory gives a good description of experiment for the value g' = 1.1 (G/sup prime//sub 0/ = 330 MeVxfm/sup 3/) of the Landau-Migdal strength parameter and for e/sub q/(sigmatau)roughly-equal0.8.

  6. Measurement of two-photon exchange effect with CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Raue, Brian A.

    2010-08-05

    The structure of the proton is one the most important and most studied topics in nuclear physics. However, discrepant measurements of the proton's electromagnetic form factor ratio, G{sub E}/G{sub M}, seriously jeopardize a definitive understanding of the proton's structure. Measurements of G{sub E}G{sub M} using the Rosenbluth separation technique disagree with those using polarization transfer methods by about a factor of three at Q{sup 2{approx}}5.6 GeV{sup 2}. It has been hypothesized that this discrepancy is due to two-photon exchange (TPE) effects that are not part of the usual radiative corrections. Theoretical corrections for the TPE effect are difficult due to the fact that a large number of excited nucleon states can contribute to the process. However, the TPE effect can be directly determined by measuring the ratio of the positron-proton to electron-proton elastic scattering cross sections, R = {sigma}(e{sup +})/{sigma}(e{sup -}), as the TPE effect changes sign with respect to the charge of the incident particle. A brief test run of a modified beamline and the CLAS detector at Jefferson Lab has resulted in the most precise measurements of the R to date. We will present results from the test run covering Q{sup 2}<0.8 GeV{sup 2} and 0.78{<=}{epsilon}{<=}0.97. In addition, the test run demonstrated the feasibility of producing a mixed electron/positron beam of good quality so that the measurements can be extended up to Q{sup 2{approx}}3.0 GeV{sup 2}.

  7. Correlation between charge transfer and exchange coupling in carbon-based magnetic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Anh Tuan; Nguyen, Van Thanh; Nguyen, Huy Sinh; Pham, Thi Tuan Anh; Do, Viet Thang; Dam, Hieu Chi

    2015-10-15

    Several forms of carbon-based magnetic materials, i.e. single radicals, radical dimers, and alternating stacks of radicals and diamagnetic molecules, have been investigated using density-functional theory with dispersion correction and full geometry optimization. Our calculated results demonstrate that the C{sub 31}H{sub 15} (R{sub 4}) radical has a spin of ½. However, in its [R{sub 4}]{sub 2} dimer structure, the net spin becomes zero due to antiferromagnetic spin-exchange between radicals. To avoid antiferromagnetic spin-exchange of identical face-to-face radicals, eight alternating stacks, R{sub 4}/D{sub 2m}/R{sub 4} (with m = 3-10), were designed. Our calculated results show that charge transfer (Δn) between R{sub 4} radicals and the diamagnetic molecule D{sub 2m} occurs with a mechanism of spin exchange (J) in stacks. The more electrons that transfer from R{sub 4} to D{sub 2m}, the stronger the ferromagnetic spin-exchange in stacks. In addition, our calculated results show that Δn can be tailored by adjusting the electron affinity (E{sub a}) of D{sub 2m}. The correlation between Δn, E{sub a}, m, and J is discussed. These results give some hints for the design of new ferromagnetic carbon-based materials.

  8. Neutrino nuclear responses for double beta decays and astro neutrinos by charge exchange reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ejiri, Hiroyasu

    2014-09-01

    Neutrino nuclear responses are crucial for neutrino studies in nuclei. Charge exchange reactions (CER) are shown to be used to study charged current neutrino nuclear responses associated with double beta decays(DBD)and astro neutrino interactions. CERs to be used are high energy-resolution (He3 ,t) reactions at RCNP, photonuclear reactions via IAR at NewSUBARU and muon capture reactions at MUSIC RCNP and MLF J-PARC. The Gamow Teller (GT) strengths studied by CERs reproduce the observed 2 neutrino DBD matrix elements. The GT and spin dipole (SD) matrix elements are found to be reduced much due to the nucleon spin isospin correlations and the non-nucleonic (delta isobar) nuclear medium effects. Impacts of the reductions on the DBD matrix elements and astro neutrino interactions are discussed.

  9. Modeling the double charge exchange response function for a tetraneutron system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazauskas, R.; Carbonell, J.; Hiyama, E.

    2017-07-01

    This work is an attempt to model the 4 n response function of a recent RIKEN experimental study of the double charge exchange 4 He(8 He,8 Be)4n reaction in order to put in evidence an eventual enhancement mechanism of the zero-energy cross section, including a near-threshold resonance. This resonance can indeed be reproduced only by adding to the standard nuclear Hamiltonian an unphysically large T =3/2 attractive 3 n -force that destroys the neighboring nuclear chart. No other mechanisms, like cusps or related structures, were found.

  10. Search for Tetraneutron by Pion Double Charge Exchange Reaction at J-PARC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujioka, Hiroyuki; Fukuda, Tomokazu; Harada, Toru; Hiyama, Emiko; Itahashi, Kenta; Kanatsuki, Shunsuke; Nagae, Tomofumi; Nanamura, Takuya; Nishi, Takahiro

    Tetraneutron (4n) has come back in the limelight, because of recent observation of a candidate resonant state at RIBF. We propose to investigate the pion double charge exchange (DCX) reaction, i.e., 4He(π-, π+), as an alternative way to populate tetraneutron. An intense π- beam with the kinetic energy of ˜850 MeV, much higher than that in past experiments at LAMPF and TRIUMF, will open up a possibility to improve the experimental sensitivity of the formation cross section, which will be much smaller than hitherto known DCX cross sections such as 9Be(π-, π+)9He (g.s.).

  11. Resonant charge exchange and relevant transport cross sections for excited states of oxygen and nitrogen atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Eletskii, A.V.; Capitelli, M.; Celiberto, R.; Laricchiuta, A.

    2004-04-01

    Resonant charge-exchange cross sections and the relevant transport (diffusion) cross sections for excited states of nitrogen and oxygen atoms have been calculated. The calculation is performed using the asymptotic approach, based on the single-electron asymptotic representation of the electron wave function. The ground-state cross sections are in a good agreement with those calculated via comprehensive quantum chemical approach. The results of calculations demonstrate a reasonable accuracy and a high convenience of this approach in determination of cross sections for the manifold of excited states of atoms.

  12. Single-charge-exchange reactions and the neutron density at the surface of the nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loc, Bui Minh; Auerbach, Naftali; Khoa, Dao T.

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, we study the charge-exchange reaction to the isobaric analog state using two types of transition densities. One transition density is equal to the difference of the total neutron density minus the total proton density and the other one is the density of the excess neutrons only. We show that for projectiles that do not probe the interior of the nucleus but mostly the surface of this nucleus, distinct differences in the cross section arise when two types of transition densities are employed. We demonstrate this by considering the (3He,t ) reaction.

  13. Simulations of ion velocity distribution functions taking into account both elastic and charge exchange collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huihui; Sukhomlinov, Vladimir S.; Kaganovich, Igor D.; Mustafaev, Alexander S.

    2017-02-01

    Based on accurate representation of the He+-He angular differential scattering cross sections consisting of both elastic and charge exchange collisions, we performed detailed numerical simulations of the ion velocity distribution functions (IVDF) by Monte Carlo collision method (MCC). The results of simulations are validated by comparison with the experimental data of the ion mobility and the transverse diffusion. The IVDF simulation study shows that due to significant effect of scattering in elastic collisions IVDF cannot be separated into product of two independent IVDFs in the transverse and parallel to the electric field directions.

  14. Neutron skin thickness of {sup 90}Zr determined by charge exchange reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Yako, K.; Sakai, H.; Sagawa, H.

    2006-11-15

    Charge exchange spin-dipole (SD) excitations of {sup 90}Zr are studied by the {sup 90}Zr(p,n) and {sup 90}Zr(n,p) reactions at 300 MeV. A multipole decomposition technique is employed to obtain the SD strength distributions in the cross-section spectra. For the first time, a model-independent SD sum rule value is obtained: 148{+-}12 fm{sup 2}. The neutron skin thickness of {sup 90}Zr is determined to be 0.07{+-}0.04 fm from the SD sum rule value.

  15. Molecular (Feshbach) treatment of charge exchange Li/sup 3 +/+He collisions. II. Cross sections

    SciTech Connect

    Errea, L.F.; Martin, F.; Mendez, L.; Riera, A.; Yanez, M.

    1986-05-15

    Using the wave functions calculated in the preceding article, and a common translation factor, the charge exchange cross section for the Li/sup 3 +/+He(1s/sup 2/) reaction is calculated, and the mechanism of the process discussed. We show how small deviations from the Landau--Zener model, which are unrelated to Nikitin's conditions for its validity, lead to a minimum of the cross section at an impact energy Eapprox. =1 keV, and to larger values of sigma at intermediate nuclear velocities.

  16. Electronic excitations of slow ions in a free electron gas metal: evidence for charge exchange effects.

    PubMed

    Primetzhofer, D; Rund, S; Roth, D; Goebl, D; Bauer, P

    2011-10-14

    Electronic energy loss of light ions transmitted through nanometer films of Al has been studied at very low ion velocities. For hydrogen, the electronic stopping power S is found to be perfectly proportional to velocity, as expected for a free electron gas. For He, the same is anticipated, but S shows a transition between two distinct regimes, in both of which S is velocity proportional-however, with remarkably different slopes. This finding can be explained as a consequence of charge exchange in close encounters between He and Al atoms, which represents an additional energy loss channel.

  17. Method of measuring charge distribution of nanosized aerosols.

    PubMed

    Kim, S H; Woo, K S; Liu, B Y H; Zachariah, M R

    2005-02-01

    In this paper, we present the development of a method to accurately measure the positive and negative charge distribution of nanosized aerosols using a tandem differential mobility analyzer (TDMA) system. From the series of TDMA measurements, the charge fraction of nanosized aerosol particles was obtained as a function of equivalent mobility particle diameter ranging from 50 to 200 nm. The capability of this new approach was implemented by sampling from a laminar diffusion flame which provides a source of highly charged particles due to naturally occurring flame ionization process. The results from the TDMA measurement provide the charge distribution of nanosized aerosols which we found to be in reasonable agreement with Boltzmann equilibrium charge distribution theory and a theory based upon charge population balance equation (PBE) combined with Fuchs theory (N.A. Fuchs, Geofis. Pura Appl. 56 (1963) 185). The theoretically estimated charge distribution of aerosol particles based on the PBE provides insight into the charging processes of nanosized aerosols surrounded by bipolar ions and electrons, and agree well with the TDMA results.

  18. Contactless measurements of charge migration within single molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Nagaya, Kiyonobu; Iwayama, Hiroshi; Sugishima, Akinori; Ohmasa, Yoshinori; Yao, Makoto

    2010-06-07

    Contactless measurements of charge migration were carried out for three pi-conjugated molecules in each of which a bromine atom and an oxygen atom are located on the opposite sides of the aromatic ring. A core hole was generated selectively in the Br atom by x-ray absorption, followed by the Auger cascade, and the subsequent charge migration within the molecule was examined by detecting an O{sup +} ion by means of the coincidence momentum imaging measurements.

  19. Removing Spectral Diagnostics of Galactic and Stellar X-Ray Emission from Charged Exchange Recombination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wargelin, Brad

    2004-01-01

    Our research uses the electron beam ion trap (EBIT) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to study X-ray emission from the charge exchange (CX) of highly charged ions with neutral gases. The resulting data help to fill a void in existing experimental and theoretical understanding of this atomic physics process, and are needed to explain all or part of the observed X-ray emission from the soft X-ray background, stellar winds, the Galactic Center and Galactic Ridge, supernova ejecta, and photoionized nebulae. Appreciation of the astrophysical relevance of our work continues to grow with the publication of roughly a dozen papers in the past four years describing Chandra and XMM observations of geocoronal and heliospheric CX emission, the temporal variation of such emission and correlation with X-ray emission enhancements observed by ROSAT, the theoretical spatial distribution of that emission, and CX emission around other stars. A similar number of papers were also published during that time describing CX emission from planets and comets. We expect that the launch of ASTRSE2, with its second-generation XRS microcalo- (with 6-eV resolution), will reveal even more clearly the contributions of CX to astrophysical emission. In our EBIT work we collected CX spectra from such ions as H-like and He-like Ne, Ar, and Fe. Our early measurements were made with a high-purity Ge detector, but during the second year we began operation of the first-generation XRS microcalorimeter (a twin of the XRS on ASTRO-E) and greatly improved the resolution of our measurements from roughly 150 eV (FWHM) with the Ge detectors to 10 eV with the XRS. We found that saturation of the XRS counting apparatus, which we described in our proposal as a potential concern, is not a problem for studying CX. During the course of our research, we expanded the number of injection gases permitted by the LLNL safety team, purchased and eventually operated an atomic H source, and clearly demonstrated the

  20. Scaling leaf measurements to estimate cotton canopy gas exchange

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Diurnal leaf and canopy gas exchange of well watered field grown cotton were measured. Leaf measurements were made with a portable photosynthesis system and canopy measurements with open Canopy Evapo-Transpiration and Assimilation (CETA) systems. Leaf level measurements were arithmetically scaled to...

  1. Predicting Salt Permeability Coefficients in Highly Swollen, Highly Charged Ion Exchange Membranes.

    PubMed

    Kamcev, Jovan; Paul, Donald R; Manning, Gerald S; Freeman, Benny D

    2017-02-01

    This study presents a framework for predicting salt permeability coefficients in ion exchange membranes in contact with an aqueous salt solution. The model, based on the solution-diffusion mechanism, was tested using experimental salt permeability data for a series of commercial ion exchange membranes. Equilibrium salt partition coefficients were calculated using a thermodynamic framework (i.e., Donnan theory), incorporating Manning's counterion condensation theory to calculate ion activity coefficients in the membrane phase and the Pitzer model to calculate ion activity coefficients in the solution phase. The model predicted NaCl partition coefficients in a cation exchange membrane and two anion exchange membranes, as well as MgCl2 partition coefficients in a cation exchange membrane, remarkably well at higher external salt concentrations (>0.1 M) and reasonably well at lower external salt concentrations (<0.1 M) with no adjustable parameters. Membrane ion diffusion coefficients were calculated using a combination of the Mackie and Meares model, which assumes ion diffusion in water-swollen polymers is affected by a tortuosity factor, and a model developed by Manning to account for electrostatic effects. Agreement between experimental and predicted salt diffusion coefficients was good with no adjustable parameters. Calculated salt partition and diffusion coefficients were combined within the framework of the solution-diffusion model to predict salt permeability coefficients. Agreement between model and experimental data was remarkably good. Additionally, a simplified version of the model was used to elucidate connections between membrane structure (e.g., fixed charge group concentration) and salt transport properties.

  2. Exchange bias effect in Au-Fe3O4 dumbbell nanoparticles induced by the charge transfer from gold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feygenson, Mikhail; Bauer, John C.; Gai, Zheng; Marques, Carlos; Aronson, Meigan C.; Teng, Xiaowei; Su, Dong; Stanic, Vesna; Urban, Volker S.; Beyer, Kevin A.; Dai, Sheng

    2015-08-01

    We have studied the origin of the exchange bias effect in the Au-Fe3O4 dumbbell nanoparticles in two samples with different sizes of the Au seed nanoparticles (4.1 and 2.7 nm) and same size of Fe3O4 nanoparticles (9.8 nm). The magnetization, small-angle neutron-scattering, synchrotron x-ray diffraction, and scanning transmission electron microscope measurements determined the antiferromagnetic FeO wüstite phase within Fe3O4 nanoparticles, originating at the interface with the Au nanoparticles. The interface between antiferromagnetic FeO and ferrimagnetic Fe3O4 is giving rise to the exchange bias effect. The strength of the exchange bias fields depends on the interfacial area and lattice mismatch between both phases. We propose that the charge transfer from the Au nanoparticles is responsible for a partial reduction of the Fe3O4 into the FeO phase at the interface with Au nanoparticles. The Au-O bonds are formed, presumably across the interface to accommodate an excess of oxygen released during the reduction of magnetite.

  3. Exchange bias effect in Au-Fe3O4 dumbbell nanoparticles induced by the charge transfer from gold

    DOE PAGES

    Feygenson, Mikhail; Bauer, John C; Gai, Zheng; ...

    2015-08-10

    We have studied the origin of the exchange bias effect in the Au-Fe3O4 dumbbell nanoparticles in two samples with different sizes of the Au seed nanoparticles (4.1 and 2.7 nm) and same size of Fe3O4 nanoparticles (9.8 nm). The magnetization, small-angle neutron scattering, synchrotron x-ray diffraction and scanning transmission electron microscope measurements determined the antiferromagnetic FeO wüstite phase within Fe3O4 nanoparticles, originating at the interface with the Au nanoparticles. The interface between antiferromagnetic FeO and ferrimagnetic Fe3O4 is giving rise to the exchange bias effect. The strength of the exchange bias fields depends on the interfacial area and lattice mismatchmore » between both phases. We propose that the charge transfer from the Au nanoparticles is responsible for a partial reduction of the Fe3O4 into FeO phase at the interface with Au nanoparticles. The Au-O bonds are formed across the interface to accommodate an excess of oxygen released during the reduction of magnetite.« less

  4. Exchange bias effect in Au-Fe3O4 dumbbell nanoparticles induced by the charge transfer from gold

    SciTech Connect

    Feygenson, Mikhail; Bauer, John C.; Gai, Zheng; Marques, Carlos; Aronson, Meigan C.; Teng, Xiaowei; Su, Dong; Stanic, Vesna; Urban, Volker S.; Beyer, Kevin A.; Dai, Sheng

    2015-08-10

    We have studied the origin of the exchange bias effect in the Au-Fe3O4 dumbbell nanoparticles in two samples with different sizes of the Au seed nanoparticles (4.1 and 2.7 nm) and same size of Fe3O4 nanoparticles (9.8 nm). The magnetization, small-angle neutron-scattering, synchrotron x-ray diffraction, and scanning transmission electron microscope measurements determined the antiferromagnetic FeO wustite phase within Fe3O4 nanoparticles, originating at the interface with the Au nanoparticles. The interface between antiferromagnetic FeO and ferrimagnetic Fe3O4 is giving rise to the exchange bias effect. The strength of the exchange bias fields depends on the interfacial area and lattice mismatch between both phases. We propose that the charge transfer from the Au nanoparticles is responsible for a partial reduction of the Fe3O4 into the FeO phase at the interface with Au nanoparticles. The Au-O bonds are formed, presumably across the interface to accommodate an excess of oxygen released during the reduction of magnetite

  5. Empirical Correction for Differences in Chemical Exchange Rates in Hydrogen Exchange-Mass Spectrometry Measurements.

    PubMed

    Toth, Ronald T; Mills, Brittney J; Joshi, Sangeeta B; Esfandiary, Reza; Bishop, Steven M; Middaugh, C Russell; Volkin, David B; Weis, David D

    2017-09-05

    A barrier to the use of hydrogen exchange-mass spectrometry (HX-MS) in many contexts, especially analytical characterization of various protein therapeutic candidates, is that differences in temperature, pH, ionic strength, buffering agent, or other additives can alter chemical exchange rates, making HX data gathered under differing solution conditions difficult to compare. Here, we present data demonstrating that HX chemical exchange rates can be substantially altered not only by the well-established variables of temperature and pH but also by additives including arginine, guanidine, methionine, and thiocyanate. To compensate for these additive effects, we have developed an empirical method to correct the hydrogen-exchange data for these differences. First, differences in chemical exchange rates are measured by use of an unstructured reporter peptide, YPI. An empirical chemical exchange correction factor, determined by use of the HX data from the reporter peptide, is then applied to the HX measurements obtained from a protein of interest under different solution conditions. We demonstrate that the correction is experimentally sound through simulation and in a proof-of-concept experiment using unstructured peptides under slow-exchange conditions (pD 4.5 at ambient temperature). To illustrate its utility, we applied the correction to HX-MS excipient screening data collected for a pharmaceutically relevant IgG4 mAb being characterized to determine the effects of different formulations on backbone dynamics.

  6. Cold neutral atoms via charge exchange from excited state positronium: a proposal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertsche, W. A.; Charlton, M.; Eriksson, S.

    2017-05-01

    We present a method for generating cold neutral atoms via charge exchange reactions between trapped ions and Rydberg positronium. The high charge exchange reaction cross section leads to efficient neutralisation of the ions and since the positronium-ion mass ratio is small, the neutrals do not gain appreciable kinetic energy in the process. When the original ions are cold the reaction produces neutrals that can be trapped or further manipulated with electromagnetic fields. Because a wide range of species can be targeted we envisage that our scheme may enable experiments at low temperature that have been hitherto intractable due to a lack of cooling methods. We present an estimate for achievable temperatures, neutral number and density in an experiment where the neutrals are formed at a milli-Kelvin temperature from either directly or sympathetically cooled ions confined on an ion chip. The neutrals may then be confined by their magnetic moment in a co-located magnetic minimum well also formed on the chip. We discuss general experimental requirements.

  7. High spatial and temporal resolution charge exchange recombination spectroscopy on the HL-2A tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Y. L.; Yu, D. L.; Liu, L.; Ida, K.; von Hellermann, M.; Cao, J. Y.; Sun, A. P.; Ma, Q.; Chen, W. J.; Liu, Yi; Yan, L. W.; Yang, Q. W.; Duan, X. R.; Liu, Yong

    2014-10-01

    A 32/64-channel charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CXRS) diagnostic system is developed on the HL-2A tokamak (R = 1.65 m, a = 0.4 m), monitoring plasma ion temperature and toroidal rotation velocity simultaneously. A high throughput spectrometer (F/2.8) and a pitch-controlled fiber bundle enable the temporal resolution of the system up to 400 Hz. The observation geometry and an optimized optic system enable the highest radial resolution up to ˜1 cm at the plasma edge. The CXRS system monitors the carbon line emission (C VI, n = 8-7, 529.06 nm) whose Doppler broadening and Doppler shift provide ion temperature and plasma rotation velocity during the neutral beam injection. The composite CX spectral data are analyzed by the atomic data and analysis structure charge exchange spectroscopy fitting (ADAS CXSFIT) code. First experimental results are shown for the case of HL-2A plasmas with sawtooth oscillations, electron cyclotron resonance heating, and edge transport barrier during the high-confinement mode (H-mode).

  8. Development of Polarized Hydrogen Ion Source with Resonant Charge-Exchange Plasma Ionizer at INR, Moscow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belov, A. S.; Netchaeva, L. P.; Turbabin, A. V.; Vasil'Ev, G. A.

    2002-04-01

    Density of unpolarized negative ions in a charge-exchange region of a plasma ionizer of polarized ion source of INR, Moscow has been increased significantly due to development of a two-stage converter of plasma particles into negative ions. Unpolarized D- ion current with a peak intensity of 45 mA has been obtained from the plasma ionizer with the two-stage converter. Respectively, polarized H- ion current of 2.5 mA peak with pulse duration of 150 μs at 5 Hz rep. rate has been obtained. Further increase of unpolarized negative ion density in the charge-exchange region has been achieved due to improvements in the plasma source design. 90 mA of unpolarized D- ion current and 150 mA of unpolarized H- ion current have been extracted recently from the ionizer. Problems that are necessary to overcome for corresponding increase of polarized ion beam intensity are discussed. It is expected that 4 mA of polarized H- ion current will be obtained from the source after implementation of the improvements described.

  9. CHARGE-EXCHANGE LIMITS ON LOW-ENERGY {alpha}-PARTICLE FLUXES IN SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, H. S.; Fletcher, L.; MacKinnon, A. L.; Woods, T. N.

    2012-06-20

    This paper reports on a search for flare emission via charge-exchange radiation in the wings of the Ly{alpha} line of He II at 304 A, as originally suggested for hydrogen by Orrall and Zirker. Via this mechanism a primary {alpha} particle that penetrates into the neutral chromosphere can pick up an atomic electron and emit in the He II bound-bound spectrum before it stops. The Extreme-ultraviolet Variability Experiment on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory gives us our first chance to search for this effect systematically. The Orrall-Zirker mechanism has great importance for flare physics because of the essential roles that particle acceleration plays; this mechanism is one of the few proposed that would allow remote sensing of primary accelerated particles below a few MeV nucleon{sup -1}. We study 10 events in total, including the {gamma}-ray events SOL2010-06-12 (M2.0) and SOL2011-02-24 (M3.5) (the latter a limb flare), seven X-class flares, and one prominent M-class event that produced solar energetic particles. The absence of charge-exchange line wings may point to a need for more complete theoretical work. Some of the events do have broadband signatures, which could correspond to continua from other origins, but these do not have the spectral signatures expected from the Orrall-Zirker mechanism.

  10. High spatial and temporal resolution charge exchange recombination spectroscopy on the HL-2A tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Y. L.; Yu, D. L. Liu, L.; Cao, J. Y.; Sun, A. P.; Ma, Q.; Chen, W. J.; Liu, Yi; Yan, L. W.; Yang, Q. W.; Duan, X. R.; Liu, Yong; Ida, K.; Hellermann, M. von

    2014-10-01

    A 32/64-channel charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CXRS) diagnostic system is developed on the HL-2A tokamak (R = 1.65 m, a = 0.4 m), monitoring plasma ion temperature and toroidal rotation velocity simultaneously. A high throughput spectrometer (F/2.8) and a pitch-controlled fiber bundle enable the temporal resolution of the system up to 400 Hz. The observation geometry and an optimized optic system enable the highest radial resolution up to ~1 cm at the plasma edge. The CXRS system monitors the carbon line emission (C VI, n = 8–7, 529.06 nm) whose Doppler broadening and Doppler shift provide ion temperature and plasma rotation velocity during the neutral beam injection. The composite CX spectral data are analyzed by the atomic data and analysis structure charge exchange spectroscopy fitting (ADAS CXSFIT) code. First experimental results are shown for the case of HL-2A plasmas with sawtooth oscillations, electron cyclotron resonance heating, and edge transport barrier during the high-confinement mode (H-mode)

  11. Ionosphere-exosphere coupling through charge exchange and momentum transfer in hydrogen-proton collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, R. R., Jr.; Breig, E. L.

    1991-01-01

    The implications of a traditional assumption of exospheric physics, that collisions of hydrogen atoms and protons preferentially result in charge exchange with negligible momentum transfer are examined. Initially adopted as a necessary convenience to accommodate limited computer resources in exosphere model calculations, this approximation results in a direct transformation of the proton velocity distribution into a hot component of neutral hydrogen. With expanding computational facilities, the need for the approximation has passed. As the first step toward its replacement with a realistic, quantum mechanical model of the H - H(+) collision process, differential and cumulative cross sections were calculated for quantum elastic scattering of indistinguishable nuclei for a fine grid of encounter energies and scattering angles. These data are used to study the nature of ionosphere-exosphere coupling through H - H(+) collisions, and to demonstrate that the distribution of velocities of scattered H produced in the traditional exospheric charge exchange approximation, as well as that arising from an alternative, fluid dynamic approach, leads to unacceptable abundances of coronal atoms in long-term, highly elliptic trajectories.

  12. X-ray Magnetosheath Emission from Solar Wind Charge Exchange During Two CME Events in 2001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sembay, S.; Whittaker, I. C.; Read, A.; Carter, J. A.; Milan, S. E.; Palmroth, M.

    2016-12-01

    Using a combination of the GUMICS-4 MHD model and observed solar wind heavy ion abundances from ACE, we produce case studies looking at X-ray emission from charge exchange in the Earth's magnetosheath. We specifically look in the 0.5-0.7 keV range, which is dominated by highly ionised oxygen emission. Previous studies looking at solar wind charge exchange (SWCX) emission have verified our modelling process via comparison to the XMM-Newton X-ray observatory, and we use the same simulation process here. This study investigates the emission magnitude changes that occur during two coronal mass ejection (CME) events (31 March 2001 and 21 October 2001). As part of this work we also provide a novel masking technique to exclude the plasma of terrestrial origin in the MHD model. As expected the two CME cases examined provide an increased dynamic pressure which pushes the magnetopause closer to the Earth, with a high temporal variation. We show how these changes cause an increase in the peak SWCX emission signature by over an order of magnitude from the quiescent solar wind case. Imaging of this SWCX emission allows a global view of the magnetopause shape and position, a technique planned for future missions such as SMILE (Solar wind Magnetosphere Ionosphere Link Explorer).

  13. Ionosphere-exosphere coupling through charge exchange and momentum transfer in hydrogen-proton collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, R. R., Jr.; Breig, E. L.

    1991-01-01

    The implications of a traditional assumption of exospheric physics, that collisions of hydrogen atoms and protons preferentially result in charge exchange with negligible momentum transfer are examined. Initially adopted as a necessary convenience to accommodate limited computer resources in exosphere model calculations, this approximation results in a direct transformation of the proton velocity distribution into a hot component of neutral hydrogen. With expanding computational facilities, the need for the approximation has passed. As the first step toward its replacement with a realistic, quantum mechanical model of the H - H(+) collision process, differential and cumulative cross sections were calculated for quantum elastic scattering of indistinguishable nuclei for a fine grid of encounter energies and scattering angles. These data are used to study the nature of ionosphere-exosphere coupling through H - H(+) collisions, and to demonstrate that the distribution of velocities of scattered H produced in the traditional exospheric charge exchange approximation, as well as that arising from an alternative, fluid dynamic approach, leads to unacceptable abundances of coronal atoms in long-term, highly elliptic trajectories.

  14. High spatial and temporal resolution charge exchange recombination spectroscopy on the HL-2A tokamak.

    PubMed

    Wei, Y L; Yu, D L; Liu, L; Ida, K; von Hellermann, M; Cao, J Y; Sun, A P; Ma, Q; Chen, W J; Liu, Yi; Yan, L W; Yang, Q W; Duan, X R; Liu, Yong

    2014-10-01

    A 32/64-channel charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CXRS) diagnostic system is developed on the HL-2A tokamak (R = 1.65 m, a = 0.4 m), monitoring plasma ion temperature and toroidal rotation velocity simultaneously. A high throughput spectrometer (F/2.8) and a pitch-controlled fiber bundle enable the temporal resolution of the system up to 400 Hz. The observation geometry and an optimized optic system enable the highest radial resolution up to ∼1 cm at the plasma edge. The CXRS system monitors the carbon line emission (C VI, n = 8-7, 529.06 nm) whose Doppler broadening and Doppler shift provide ion temperature and plasma rotation velocity during the neutral beam injection. The composite CX spectral data are analyzed by the atomic data and analysis structure charge exchange spectroscopy fitting (ADAS CXSFIT) code. First experimental results are shown for the case of HL-2A plasmas with sawtooth oscillations, electron cyclotron resonance heating, and edge transport barrier during the high-confinement mode (H-mode).

  15. Ne X X-ray emission due to charge exchange in M82

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cumbee, R. S.; Liu, L.; Lyons, D.; Schultz, D. R.; Stancil, P. C.; Wang, J. G.; Ali, R.

    2016-06-01

    Recent X-ray observations of star-forming galaxies such as M82 have shown the Ly β/Ly α line ratio of Ne X to be in excess of predictions for thermal electron impact excitation. Here, we demonstrate that the observed line ratio may be due to charge exchange and can be used to constrain the ion kinetic energy to be ≲ 500 eV/u. This is accomplished by computing spectra and line ratios via a range of theoretical methods and comparing these to experiments with He over astrophysically relevant collision energies. The charge exchange emission spectra calculations were performed for Ne10++ H and Ne10++ He using widely applied approaches including the atomic orbital close coupling, classical trajectory Monte Carlo, and multichannel Landau-Zener (MCLZ) methods. A comparison of the results from these methods indicates that for the considered energy range and neutrals (H, He) the so-called low-energy ℓ-distribution MCLZ method provides the most likely reliable predictions.

  16. Pulsed electro-acoustic (PEA) measurements of embedded charge distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennison, J. R.; Pearson, Lee H.

    2013-09-01

    Knowledge of the spatial distribution and evolution of embedded charge in thin dielectric materials has important applications in semiconductor, high-power electronic device, high-voltage DC power cable insulation, high-energy and plasma physics apparatus, and spacecraft industries. Knowing how, where, and how much charge accumulates and how it redistributes and dissipates can predict destructive charging effects. Pulsed Electro-acoustic (PEA) measurements— and two closely related methods, Pressure Wave Propagation (PWP) and Laser Intensity Modulation (LIMM)— nondestructively probe such internal charge distributions. We review the instrumentation, methods, theory and signal processing of simple PEA experiments, as well as the related PPW and LIMM methods. We emphasize system improvements required to achieve high spatial resolution for in vacuo measurements of thin dielectrics charged using electron beam injection.

  17. A method for non-contact drop charge measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, K. C.; Wang, Taylor G.

    1992-01-01

    A new approach for detecting point type of charge has been developed. This system is based on the principle of reciprocal motion of a grounded conductor near a point charge. The current induced through such a process can then be used to determine the static field strength of the point charge, hence the quantity of the charge. Experiments were done to understand the characteristics of this new device. Test case indicates that the results are in good agreement with the theoretical prediction. This device shows extremely good linearity with respect to the strength of the input static field. The resolution of the system is better than 10 V/m, which is about two orders of magnitude in sensitivity higher than other types of field measuring apparatus. The high sensitivity of this system makes it possible to conduct charged drop experiments under microgravity conditions.

  18. Charge-state measurements of backscattered ions from Au films

    SciTech Connect

    Arafah, D.; Meyer, J.D.; Sharabati, H.; Mahmoud, A.

    1989-04-15

    A small electrostatic accelerator (65 kV) was built as a postaccelerator for measuring the charge-state fractions of ions backscattered from solid or gas targets. A new method is described in which the charge-state fractions of /sup 3/He, /sup 4/He, /sup 12/C, /sup 14/N, and /sup 16/O ions backscattered from gold films are determined simultaneously. The added features in this work are the facts that the method can be efficiently used for low-energy incident ions and that spectra could be measured, compared, and analyzed by minimizing uncertainties inherent in experimental parameters. The energy dependence of the charge-state fractions of /sup 3/He, /sup 4/He, and /sup 12/C ions are measured between 3 MeV and 150 keV. The /sup 12/C charge-state-fraction data nicely fit the Gaussian model but none of the chi/sup 2/ models. The mean ion charge i/sub m/ and the standard deviation s are also measured. Preliminary measurements of the dependence of the charge-state fractions on target thickness are also discussed.

  19. The Inclusive Neutrino Charged Current Cross Section Measured in NOMAD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godley, Andrew; Wu, Qun; Mishra, Sanjib

    2007-04-01

    The inclusive charged current cross section of muon neutrino interactions is measured as a function of energy using the NOMAD data. The significance of this measurement is its precision below 30 GeV, a region not previously well covered and of importance to current and proposed neutrino experiments. The procedure and results of the measurement will be presented.

  20. Recent Advances in Computational Studies of Charge Exchange X-ray Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cumbee, Renata

    2016-06-01

    Interest in astrophysical sources of charge exchange (CX) has grown since X-ray emission from comet Hyakutake was first observed, the origin of which is primarily due to CX processes between neutral species in the comet’s atmosphere and highly charged ions from the solar wind. More recent observations have shown that CX may have a significant contribution to the X-ray emission spectra of a wide variety of environments within our solar system including solar wind charge exchange (SWCX) with neutral gases in the heliosphere and in planetary atmospheres, as well as beyond the solar system in galaxy clusters, supernova remnants, and star forming galaxies.While the basic process of CX has been studied for many decades, the reliability of the existing data is not uniform, and the coverage of the astrophysically important projectile and target combinations and collisional velocities is insufficient. The need for reliable and robust CX X-ray emission models will only be amplified with the with the high resolution X-ray spectra expected from the soft X-ray imaging calorimeter spectrometer (SXS) onboard the Hitomi X-ray observatory. In this talk, I will discuss recent advances in theoretical CX cross sections and X-ray modeling with a focus on CX diagnostics. The need for experimental X-ray spectra and cross sections for benchmarking current theory will also be highlighted. This work was performed in collaboration with David Lyons, Patrick Mullen, David Schultz, Phillip Stancil, and Robin Shelton. Work at UGA was partially supported by NASA grant NNX09AC46G.

  1. In situ granular charge measurement by free-fall videography.

    PubMed

    Waitukaitis, S R; Jaeger, H M

    2013-02-01

    We present the design and performance characterization of a new experimental technique for measuring individual particle charges in large ensembles of macroscopic grains. The measurement principle is qualitatively similar to that used in determining the elementary charge by Millikan in that it follows individual particle trajectories. However, by taking advantage of new technology we are able to work with macroscopic grains and achieve several orders of magnitude better resolution in charge to mass ratios. By observing freely falling grains accelerated in a horizontal electric field with a co-falling, high-speed video camera, we dramatically increase particle tracking time and measurement precision. Keeping the granular medium under vacuum, we eliminate air drag, leaving the electrostatic force as the primary source of particle accelerations in the co-moving frame. Because the technique is based on direct imaging, we can distinguish between different particle types during the experiment, opening up the possibility of studying charge transfer processes between different particle species. For the ∼300 μm diameter grains reported here, we achieve an average acceleration resolution of ∼0.008 m/s(2), a force resolution of ∼500 pN, and a median charge resolution ∼6× 10(4) elementary charges per grain (corresponding to surface charge densities ∼1 elementary charges per μm(2)). The primary source of error is indeterminacy in the grain mass, but with higher resolution cameras and better optics this can be further improved. The high degree of resolution and the ability to visually identify particles of different species or sizes with direct imaging make this a powerful new tool to characterize charging processes in granular media.

  2. In situ granular charge measurement by free-fall videography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waitukaitis, S. R.; Jaeger, H. M.

    2013-02-01

    We present the design and performance characterization of a new experimental technique for measuring individual particle charges in large ensembles of macroscopic grains. The measurement principle is qualitatively similar to that used in determining the elementary charge by Millikan in that it follows individual particle trajectories. However, by taking advantage of new technology we are able to work with macroscopic grains and achieve several orders of magnitude better resolution in charge to mass ratios. By observing freely falling grains accelerated in a horizontal electric field with a co-falling, high-speed video camera, we dramatically increase particle tracking time and measurement precision. Keeping the granular medium under vacuum, we eliminate air drag, leaving the electrostatic force as the primary source of particle accelerations in the co-moving frame. Because the technique is based on direct imaging, we can distinguish between different particle types during the experiment, opening up the possibility of studying charge transfer processes between different particle species. For the ˜300 μm diameter grains reported here, we achieve an average acceleration resolution of ˜0.008 m/s2, a force resolution of ˜500 pN, and a median charge resolution ˜6× 104 elementary charges per grain (corresponding to surface charge densities ˜1 elementary charges per μm2). The primary source of error is indeterminacy in the grain mass, but with higher resolution cameras and better optics this can be further improved. The high degree of resolution and the ability to visually identify particles of different species or sizes with direct imaging make this a powerful new tool to characterize charging processes in granular media.

  3. Study of multi-electron ionization and charge exchange in HIBF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Linchun

    Beam ion stripping on background gases or plasma in a Heavy Ion Beam Fusion (HIBF) chamber increases the charge state of the beam and the diameter of the focus, complicating the final focusing on the focusing target. To model beam transport in the chamber, it is necessary to know the beam charge-state evolution, including both ionization and charge exchange dynamics. The main objective of this research is to explore theoretical approaches including scaling law. Improved models are developed to calculate multi-electron loss, especially ion stripping and charge exchange cross sections, for both near-term experiments and future power plant scale HIBF research. First, a new space-charge neutralization approach that uses electron injection is proposed for the ion beam transport in HIBF chamber. An analytical study was performed to illustrate the plasma dynamics and final neutralization effects with this technique. The results examine the effect of different injected electron profiles. Next, to improve the accuracy of such simulations, methods to improve cross sections of ionization and charge exchange are studied. Both classical and quantum mechanical approaches are examined. Attention is focused on the interaction by low-charge-state heavy ions. Multi-electron processes for dressed ions, including screening and anti-screening effects, internuclear forces, are given special attention, This analysis is complex and requires a combining several different theoretical approaches. Finally, a Classic Trajectory Monte Carlo (CTMC) model based on an improvement of Olson's n-body CTMC method is presented. This model solves the n-body ion-atom ionization problem in a regime of intent to HIBF. In the paper, a new and complete computational module for these interactions has been developed. The cross section data for Xe, Cs, and Bi ions colliding with various background gases (Xe, N2, Ar and Flibe) is presented. After the calculation of the cross section data, the predicted energy

  4. Design of a strong cation exchange methodology for the evaluation of charge heterogeneity in glatiramer acetate.

    PubMed

    Campos-García, Víctor R; López-Morales, Carlos A; Benites-Zaragoza, Eleuterio; Jiménez-Miranda, Armando; Espinosa-de la Garza, Carlos E; Herrera-Fernández, Daniel; Padilla-Calderón, Jesús; Pérez, Néstor O; Flores-Ortiz, Luis F; Medina-Rivero, E

    2017-01-05

    Complex pharmaceuticals are in demand of competent analytical methods able to analyze charge heterogeneity as a critical quality attribute (CQA), in compliance with current regulatory expectations. A notorious example is glatiramer acetate (GA), a complex polypeptide mixture useful for the treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. This pharmaceutical challenges the current state of analytical technology in terms of the capacity to study their constituent species. Thus, a strong cation exchange methodology was designed under the lifecycle approach to support the establishment of GA identity, trough the evaluation of its chromatographic profile, which acts as a charge heterogeneity fingerprint. In this regard, a maximum relative margin of error of 5% for relative retention time and symmetry factor were proposed for the analytical target profile. The methodology met the proposed requirements after precision and specificity tests results, the former comprised of sensitivity and selectivity. Subsequently, method validation was conducted and showed that the method is able to differentiate between intact GA and heterogeneity profiles coming from stressed, fractioned or process-modified samples. In summary, these results provide evidence that the method is adequate to assess charge heterogeneity as a CQA of this complex pharmaceutical. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. The velocity dependence of X-ray emission due to Charge Exchange in the Cygnus Loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cumbee, Renata; Lyons, David; Mullen, Patrick Dean; Shelton, Robin L.; Stancil, Phillip C.; Schultz, David R.

    2016-01-01

    The fundamental collisional process of charge exchange (CX) has been been established as a primary source of X-ray emission from the heliosphere [1], planetary exospheres [2], and supernova remnants [3,4]. In this process, X-ray emission results from the capture of an electron by a highly charged ion from a neutral atom or molecule, to form a highly-excited, high charge state ion. As the captured electron cascades down to the lowest energy level, photons are emitted, including X-rays.To provide reliable CX-induced X-ray spectral models to realistically simulate these environments, line ratios and spectra are computed using theoretical CX cross-sections obtained with the multi-channel Landau-Zener, atomic-orbital close-coupling, and classical-trajectory Monte Carlo methods for various collisional velocities relevant to astrophysics for collisions of bare and H-like C to Al ions with H, He, and H2. Using these line ratios, XSPEC models of CX emission in the northeast rim of the Cygnus Loop supernova remnant will be shown as an example with ion velocity dependence.[1] Henley, D. B. & Shelton, R. L. 2010, ApJSS, 187, 388[2] Dennerl, K. et al. 2002, A&A 386, 319[3] Katsuda, S. et al. 2011, ApJ 730 24[4] Cumbee, R. S. et al. 2014, ApJ 787 L31This work was partially supported by NASA grant NNX09AC46G.

  6. Laboratory Measurements of Dust Charging in Flowing Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeo, L. H.; Han, J.; Ulibarri, Z.; Wang, X.; Munsat, T.; Horanyi, M.

    2016-12-01

    The coupling of macroscopic charge carriers (dust) in plasmas to electric and magnetic fields plays a critical role in shaping the size and spatial distribution of these particles. Planetary rings, noctilucent clouds, and comets are all examples where dusty plasma effects have been suggested to explain a number of observations. In all of these environments, the charging of the dust particles plays a crucial role. Charging of dust particles in thermal plasmas has been studied both theoretically and experimentally. Here we describe a new experimental setup for the investigation of dust charging in both non-flowing and flowing plasmas, and present preliminary results. Dust particles with diameters of 100-120 μm are released via a dust dropper and exposed to plasma before being collected in a Faraday cup, where the charges of individual grains are measured. A new design in the non-flowing plasma experiment is applied to minimize sheath effects on the charge measurements at the chamber wall. Charging of dust particles in flowing plasma is carried out at the Colorado Solar Wind Experiment (CSWE) facility, which creates simulated solar wind flow with ion energies up to 1 keV. The effect of dust size, plasma composition, and flow speed will be discussed.

  7. WSN-Based Space Charge Density Measurement System

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Dawei; Yuan, Haiwen; Lv, Jianxun; Ju, Yong

    2017-01-01

    It is generally acknowledged that high voltage direct current (HVDC) transmission line endures the drawback of large area, because of which the utilization of cable for space charge density monitoring system is of inconvenience. Compared with the traditional communication network, wireless sensor network (WSN) shows advantages in small volume, high flexibility and strong self-organization, thereby presenting great potential in solving the problem. Additionally, WSN is more suitable for the construction of distributed space charge density monitoring system as it has longer distance and higher mobility. A distributed wireless system is designed for collecting and monitoring the space charge density under HVDC transmission lines, which has been widely applied in both Chinese state grid HVDC test base and power transmission projects. Experimental results of the measuring system demonstrated its adaptability in the complex electromagnetic environment under the transmission lines and the ability in realizing accurate, flexible, and stable demands for the measurement of space charge density. PMID:28052105

  8. WSN-Based Space Charge Density Measurement System.

    PubMed

    Deng, Dawei; Yuan, Haiwen; Lv, Jianxun; Ju, Yong

    2017-01-01

    It is generally acknowledged that high voltage direct current (HVDC) transmission line endures the drawback of large area, because of which the utilization of cable for space charge density monitoring system is of inconvenience. Compared with the traditional communication network, wireless sensor network (WSN) shows advantages in small volume, high flexibility and strong self-organization, thereby presenting great potential in solving the problem. Additionally, WSN is more suitable for the construction of distributed space charge density monitoring system as it has longer distance and higher mobility. A distributed wireless system is designed for collecting and monitoring the space charge density under HVDC transmission lines, which has been widely applied in both Chinese state grid HVDC test base and power transmission projects. Experimental results of the measuring system demonstrated its adaptability in the complex electromagnetic environment under the transmission lines and the ability in realizing accurate, flexible, and stable demands for the measurement of space charge density.

  9. Qweak: First Direct Measurement of the Proton's Weak Charge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Androic, D.; Armstrong, D. S.; Asaturyan, A.; Averett, T.; Balewski, J.; Bartlett, K.; Beaufait, J.; Beminiwattha, R. S.; Benesch, J.; Benmokhtar, F.; Birchall, J.; Carlini, R. D.; Cates, G. D.; Cornejo, J. C.; Covrig, S.; Dalton, M. M.; Davis, C. A.; Deconinck, W.; Diefenbach, J.; Dowd, J. F.; Dunne, J. A.; Dutta, D.; Duvall, W. S.; Elaasar, M.; Falk, W. R.; Finn, J. M.; Forest, T.; Gal, C.; Gaskell, D.; Gericke, M. T. W.; Grames, J.; Gray, V. M.; Grimm, K.; Guo, F.; Hoskins, J. R.; Johnston, K.; Jones, D.; Jones, M.; Jones, R.; Kargiantoulakis, M.; King, P. M.; Korkmaz, E.; Kowalski, S.; Leacock, J.; Leckey, J.; Lee, A. R.; Lee, J. H.; Lee, L.; MacEwan, S.; Mack, D.; Magee, J. A.; Mahurin, R.; Mammei, J.; Martin, J. W.; McHugh, M. J.; Meekins, D.; Mei, J.; Michaels, R.; Micherdzinska, A.; Mkrtchyan, A.; Mkrtchyan, H.; Morgan, N.; Myers, K. E.; Narayan, A.; Ndukum, L. Z.; Nelyubin, V.; Nuhait, H.; Nuruzzaman; van Oers, W. T. H.; Opper, A. K.; Page, S. A.; Pan, J.; Paschke, K. D.; Phillips, S. K.; Pitt, M. L.; Poelker, M.; Rajotte, J. F.; Ramsay, W. D.; Roche, J.; Sawatzky, B.; Seva, T.; Shabestari, M. H.; Silwal, R.; Simicevic, N.; Smith, G. R.; Solvignon, P.; Spayde, D. T.; Subedi, A.; Subedi, R.; Suleiman, R.; Tadevosyan, V.; Tobias, W. A.; Tvaskis, V.; Waidyawansa, B.; Wang, P.; Wells, S. P.; Wood, S. A.; Yang, S.; Young, R. D.; Zang, P.; Zhamkochyan, S.

    2017-03-01

    The Qweak experiment, which took data at Jefferson Lab in the period 2010 - 2012, will precisely determine the weak charge of the proton by measuring the parity-violating asymmetry in elastic e-p scattering at 1.1 GeV using a longitudinally polarized electron beam and a liquid hydrogen target at a low momentum transfer of Q2 = 0.025 (GeV/c)2. The weak charge of the proton is predicted by the Standard Model and any significant deviation would indicate physics beyond the Standard Model. The technical challenges and experimental apparatus for measuring the weak charge of the proton will be discussed, as well as the method of extracting the weak charge of the proton. The results from a small subset of the data, that has been published, will also be presented. Furthermore an update will be given of the current status of the data analysis.

  10. Internal space charge measurement of materials in a space environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griseri, V.; Fukunaga, K.; Maeno, T.; Payan, D.; Laurent, C.; Levy, L.

    2003-09-01

    The charging/discharging effect produced by space environment on space vehicles are known but not fully identified yet. Experiments performed in laboratory in vacuum chamber that simulates spatial environment and the most realistic charge condition occurring in space have been developed in the last past forty years. A very small Pulse Electro-Acoustic space charge detection unit (mini-PEA) that can be mounted in a vacuum chamber, to measure internal space charges of materials in-situ during the irradiation has been developed. Several materials used in spatial environment such as Teflon®, and Kapton ® films on addition to PMMA films have been studied. The comparison and the good agreement between measured and calculated depth of penetration for electrons of given energy depending on the material nature contribute in the validation of the detection system and encourage us for further studies and development.

  11. Detection and Measurement of Charge in Water Vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, C. L.

    2015-12-01

    Abstract: Positive charge is found in newly formed water vapor. Two detection and two measurement experiments are presented. The detection experiments are simple; their purpose is only to show the existence of charge in water vapor. The first of these experiments places one exposed end of an insulated wire in the vapor space of a flask, which holds boiling water. The other end of this wire is connected to the input high of an electrometer. The input low, in all of the presented experiments, is grounded. The second experiment detects charge by capacitive induction. It uses a beaker with gold leaves gilded on its outside surface. When water boils inside the beaker, the vapor charge is detected by the gold layer without contacting the water or vapor. The two measurement experiments have sensors made of conducting fabric. The fabric is used to cover the opening of a flask, which holds boiling water, to collect the charge in the escaping vapor. These two experiments differ by the number of fabric layers --- four in one and six in the other. The results obtained from these two experiments are essentially the same, within the margin of error, 0.734 & 0.733 nC per gram of vapor. Since the added two layers of the six-layer sensor do not collect more charge than the four-layer sensor, the four-layer sensor must have collected all available charge. The escaping vapor exits into a chamber, which has only a small area opening connecting to the atmosphere. This chamber prevents direct contact between the sensor and the ambient air, which is necessary because air is found to affect the readings from the sensor. Readings taken in the surrounding area in all four experiments show no accumulation of negative charge. These experiments identify a source for the atmospheric electricity in a laboratory environment other than that has been discussed in the literature. However, they also raise the question about the missing negative charge that would be predicted by charge balance or the

  12. The role of spin exchange in charge transfer in low-bandgap polymer: Fullerene bulk heterojunctions

    SciTech Connect

    Krinichnyi, V. I. Yudanova, E. I.; Denisov, N. N.

    2014-07-28

    Formation, relaxation and dynamics of polarons and methanofullerene anion radicals photoinitiated in poly[N-9″-hepta-decanyl-2,7-carbazole-alt-5,5-(4′,7′-di-2-thienyl-2′,1′, 3′-benzothiadiazole)]:-[6,6]-phenyl-C{sub 61}-butyric acid methyl ester (PCDTBT:PC{sub 61}BM) bulk heterojunctions were studied mainly by light-induced EPR (LEPR) spectroscopy in wide photon energy and temperature ranges. Some polarons are pinned by spin traps whose number and depth are governed by the composite morphology and photon energy. The proximity of the photon energy and the polymer bandgap reduces the number of such traps, inhibits recombination of mobile charge carriers, and facilitates their mobility in polymer network. Spin relaxation and charge carrier dynamics were studied by the steady-state saturation method at wide range of temperature and photon energy. These processes were shown to be governed by spin exchange as well as by the photon energy. Charge transfer in the composite is governed by the polaron scattering on the lattice phonons of crystalline domains embedded into amorphous polymer matrix and its activation hopping between polymer layers. The energy barrier required for polaron interchain hopping exceeds that of its intrachain diffusion. Anisotropy of polaron dynamics in the PCDTBT:PC61BM composite is less than that of poly(3-alkylthiophenes)-based systems that evidences for better ordering of the former. Lorentzian shape of LEPR lines of both charge carriers, lower concentration of spin traps as well as behaviours of the main magnetic resonance parameters were explained by layer ordered morphology of polymer matrix.

  13. Measurement of Doubly Charged Ions in Ion Thruster Plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, George J., Jr.; Domonkos, Matthew T.; Chavez, Joy M.

    2002-01-01

    The ratio of doubly to singly charged ions was measured in the plumes of a 30 cm and of a 40 cm ion thruster. The measured ratio was correlated with observed erosion rates and thruster operating conditions. The measured and calculated erosion rates paralleled variation in the j(sup ++)/j(sup +) ratio and indicated that the erosion was dominated by Xe III. Simple models of cathode potential surfaces which were developed in support of this work were in agreement with this conclusion and provided a predictive capability of the erosion given the ratio of doubly to singly charged ion currents.

  14. Measurement of Metastable Lifetimes of Highly-Charged Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Steven J.; Chutjian, A.; Lozano, J.

    2002-01-01

    The present work is part of a series of measurements of metastable lifetimes of highly-charged ions (HCIs) which contribute to optical absorption, emission and energy balance in the Interstellar Medium (ISM), stellar atmospheres, etc. Measurements were carried out using the 14-GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) at the JPL HCI facility. The ECR provides useful currents of charge states such as C(sup(1-6)+), Mg(sup(1-6)+) and Fe(sup(1-17)+). In this work the HCI beam is focused into a Kingdon electrostatic ion trap for measuring lifetimes via optical decays.

  15. Optimization of a compact multicusp He{sup +} ion source for double-charge-exchanged He{sup -} beam

    SciTech Connect

    Shinto, K.; Sugawara, H.; Takenaga, M.; Takeuchi, S.; Tanaka, N.; Okamoto, A.; Kitajima, S.; Sasao, M.; Nishiura, M.; Wada, M.

    2006-03-15

    Preliminary test bench results to study the beam quality extracted from a compact multicusp He{sup +} ion source for He{sup -} beam production are reported. The bench is a part of the beam diagnostic system equipped with energy analyzers, emittance meters, focusing beam optics, an alkali-metal charge-exchange cell, a neutral particle energy analyzer, a double focusing magnetic momentum analyzer, a postaccelerator, and a drift tube. Utilizing the front end of the bench, the transverse emittance and the energy distribution function of a He{sup +} beam extracted from a multi-line-cusp magnetic-field ion source 8 cm in diameter and 9 cm in length were measured. The results indicated that improvements in both formation of the plasma meniscus and reinforcement of pumping in the extraction region are necessary to produce a higher brightness He{sup +} beam.

  16. Observation of Solar Wind Charge Exchange Emission From Exospheric Material in and Outside Earth's Magnetosheath 2008 September 25

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snowden, S. L.; Collier, M. R.; Cravens, T.; Kuntz, K. D.; Lepri, S. T.; Robertson, I.; Tomas, L.

    2009-01-01

    A long XMM-Newton exposure is used to observe solar wind charge exchange (SWCX) emission from exospheric material in and outside Earth's magnetosheath. The light curve of the O vii (0.5-0.62 keV) band is compared with a model for the expected emission, and while the emission is faint and the light curve has considerable scatter, the correlation is significant to better than 99.9%. This result demonstrates the validity of the geocoronal SWCX emission model for predicting a contribution to astrophysical observations to a scale factor of order unity (1.5). In addition, an average value of the SWCX O vii emission from the magnetosheath over the observation of 2.6 +/- 0.5 LU is derived. The results also demonstrate the potential utility of using X-ray observations to study global phenomena of the magnetosheath which currently are only investigated using in situ measurements.

  17. Observation of Solar Wind Charge Exchange Emission From Exospheric Material in and Outside Earth's Magnetosheath 2008 September 25

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snowden, S. L.; Collier, M. R.; Cravens, T.; Kuntz, K. D.; Lepri, S. T.; Robertson, I.; Tomas, L.

    2009-01-01

    A long XMM-Newton exposure is used to observe solar wind charge exchange (SWCX) emission from exospheric material in and outside Earth's magnetosheath. The light curve of the O vii (0.5-0.62 keV) band is compared with a model for the expected emission, and while the emission is faint and the light curve has considerable scatter, the correlation is significant to better than 99.9%. This result demonstrates the validity of the geocoronal SWCX emission model for predicting a contribution to astrophysical observations to a scale factor of order unity (1.5). In addition, an average value of the SWCX O vii emission from the magnetosheath over the observation of 2.6 +/- 0.5 LU is derived. The results also demonstrate the potential utility of using X-ray observations to study global phenomena of the magnetosheath which currently are only investigated using in situ measurements.

  18. Analysis of x-ray emission spectra in charge-exchange collisions of C6 + with He and H2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, Anthony C. K.; Kirchner, Tom

    2016-05-01

    Charge exchange in C6 +-He and -H2 collisions followed by x-ray emission is examined using the two-center basis generator method for low to intermediate projectile energies. Within the independent electron model, we calculate capture cross sections and perform a radiative cascade analysis to obtain Lyman line-emission ratios. Single capture is considered for the C6 +-He system, while both single capture and autoionizing double capture are considered for the C6 +-H2 system. Effects of a time-dependent screening potential that models target response on the l distribution of capture cross sections and the line-emission ratios are examined as well. Calculated line-emission ratios based on the no-response approximation are in satisfactory agreement with previous measurements.

  19. Scrape-off layer modeling with kinetic or diffusion description of charge-exchange atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokar, M. Z.

    2016-12-01

    Hydrogen isotope atoms, generated by charge-exchange (c-x) of neutral particles recycling from the first wall of a fusion reactor, are described either kinetically or in a diffusion approximation. In a one-dimensional (1-D) geometry, kinetic calculations are accelerated enormously by applying an approximate pass method for the assessment of integrals in the velocity space. This permits to perform an exhaustive comparison of calculations done with both approaches. The diffusion approximation is deduced directly from the velocity distribution function of c-x atoms in the limit of charge-exchanges with ions occurring much more frequently than ionization by electrons. The profiles across the flux surfaces of the plasma parameters averaged along the main part of the scrape-off layer (SOL), beyond the X-point and divertor regions, are calculated from the one-dimensional equations where parallel flows of charged particles and energy towards the divertor are taken into account as additional loss terms. It is demonstrated that the heat losses can be firmly estimated from the SOL averaged parameters only; for the particle loss the conditions in the divertor are of importance and the sensitivity of the results to the so-called "divertor impact factor" is investigated. The coupled 1-D models for neutral and charged species, with c-x atoms described either kinetically or in the diffusion approximation, are applied to assess the SOL conditions in a fusion reactor, with the input parameters from the European DEMO project. It is shown that the diffusion approximation provides practically the same profiles across the flux surfaces for the plasma density, electron, and ion temperatures, as those obtained with the kinetic description for c-x atoms. The main difference between the two approaches is observed in the characteristics of these species themselves. In particular, their energy flux onto the wall is underestimated in calculations with the diffusion approximation by 20 % - 30

  20. What can be Learned from X-Ray Spectroscopy Concerning Hot Gas in the Local Bubble and Charge Exchange Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snowden, Steven L.

    2007-01-01

    Solar wind charge exchange produces diffuse X-ray emission with a variable surface brightness comparable to that of the cosmic background. While the temporal variation of the charge exchange emission allows some separation of the components, there remains a great deal of uncertainty as to the zero level of both. Because the production mechanisms of the two components are considerably different, their spectra would provide critical diagnostics to the understanding of both. However, current X-ray observatories are very limited in both spectral resolution and sensitivity in the critical soft X-ray (less than 1.0 keV) energy range. Non-dispersive high-resolution spectrometers, such as the calorimeter proposed for the Spectrum Roentgen Gamma mission, will be extremely useful in distinguishing the cascade emission of charge exchange from the spectra of thermal bremsstrahlung cosmic plasmas.

  1. High resolution main-ion charge exchange spectroscopy in the DIII-D H-mode pedestal

    DOE PAGES

    Grierson, B. A.; Burrell, K. H.; Chrystal, C.; ...

    2016-09-12

    A new high spatial resolution main-ion (deuterium) charge-exchange spectroscopy system covering the tokamak boundary region has been installed on the DIII-D tokamak. Sixteen new edge main-ion charge-exchange recombination sightlines have been combined with nineteen impurity sightlines in a tangentially viewing geometry on the DIII-D midplane with an interleaving design that achieves 8 mm inter-channel radial resolution for detailed profiles of main-ion temperature, velocity, charge-exchange emission, and neutral beam emission. At the plasma boundary, we find a strong enhancement of the main-ion toroidal velocity that exceeds the impurity velocity by a factor of two. Furthermore, the unique combination of experimentally measuredmore » main-ion and impurity profiles provides a powerful quasi-neutrality constraint for reconstruction of tokamak H-mode pedestals.« less

  2. Using (18)O/(16)O exchange to probe an equilibrium space-charge layer at the surface of a crystalline oxide: method and application.

    PubMed

    De Souza, Roger A; Martin, Manfred

    2008-05-07

    The use of an (18)O/(16)O exchange experiment as a means for probing surface space-charge layers in oxides is examined theoretically and experimentally. On the basis of a theoretical treatment, isotope penetration profiles are calculated for (18)O/(16)O exchange across a gas-solid interface and subsequent diffusion of the labelled isotope through an equilibrium space-charge layer depleted of mobile oxygen vacancies and into a homogeneous bulk phase. Profiles calculated for a range of conditions all have a characteristic shape: a sharp drop in isotope fraction close to the surface followed by a normal bulk diffusion profile. Experimental (18)O profiles in an exchanged (001) oriented single crystal of Fe-doped SrTiO(3) were measured by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). By extracting the space-charge potential from such profiles, we demonstrate that this method allows the spatially resolved characterization of space-charge layers at the surfaces of crystalline oxides under thermodynamically well-defined conditions.

  3. High-resolution Studies of Charge Exchange in Supernova Remnants with Magellan, XMM-Newton, and Micro-X

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heine, Sarah N.; Figueroa-Feliciano, Enectali; Castro, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Charge exchange, the semi-resonant transfer of an electron from a neutral atom to an excited state in an energetic ion, can occur in plasmas where energetic ions are incident on a cold, at least partially neutral gas. Supernova remnants, especially in the immediate shock region, provide conditions conducive to charge exchange. The emission from post charge-exchange ions as the captured electron cascades down to the ground state, can shed light on the physical conditions of the shock and the immediate post-shock material, providing an important tool to understanding supernova explosions and their aftermath.I present a study of charge exchange in the galactic supernova remnant G296.1-0.5 in two bands: the optical and the X-ray. The optical study, performed using both imaging and spectroscopy from the IMACS instrument on the Magellan Baade Telescope at Las Companas Observatory, seeks to identify `Balmer-dominated shocks' in the remnant, which occur when charge exchange occurs between hot, post-shock protons and colder neutral hydrogen in the environment. The X-ray study probes line ratios in dispersed spectral data obtained with XMM-Newton RGS from an X-ray lobe in the NW of the remnant to hunt for signatures of charge exchange. The dispersed data are degraded by the extended nature of the source, blending many of the lines.We are working towards the future of spectroscopic studies in the X-ray for such extended sources with Micro-X: a sounding rocket-borne, high energy resolution X-ray telescope, utilizing an array of microcalorimeters to achieve high energy resolution for extended sources. I describe the design and commissioning of the payload and the steps toward launch, which is anticipated in the summer of 2015.

  4. Delta excitations and shell-model information in heavy-ion, charge-exchange reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deutchman, P. A.; Maung, K. M.; Norbury, J. W.; Rasmussen, J. O.; Townsend, L. W.

    1986-01-01

    We calculate total cross sections for coherent pion production using localized plane-wave approximations for the shell-structure of valence nucleons that are excited to delta particles in the intermediate state in the (12C, 12B) and (12C, 12N) charge-exchange, heavy-ion reactions. We find comparable agreement to projectile downshift data for 12C(12C, 12B)12N. Then we improve the formalism by replacing the localized plane wave bound states with harmonic oscillator states which are imbedded in a multipole expansion approach and calculate pion differential cross sections to test for the sensitivity of the spectra to the single-particle mass parameter.

  5. Propagation of charge-exchange plasma produced by an ion thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carruth, M. R., Jr.; Brady, M. E.

    1981-01-01

    Under the proper conditions there is an end-effect of a long, cylindrical Langmuir probe which allows a significant increase in collected ion current when the probe is aligned with a flowing plasma. This effect was used to determine the charge-exchange plasma flow direction at various locations relative to the ion thruster. The ion current collected by the probe as a function of its angle with respect to the plasma flow allows determination of the plasma density and plasma flow velocity at the probe's location upstream of the ion thruster optics. The density values obtained from the ion current agreed to within a factor of two of density values obtained by typical voltage-current Langmuir probe characteristics.

  6. Molecular (Feshbach) treatment of charge exchange Li/sup 3 +/+He collisions. I. Energies and couplings

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, F.; Riera, A.; Yanez, M.

    1986-05-15

    We point out a fundamental difference between the molecular treatment of charge exchange X/sup n/++H(1s) and X/sup n/++He(1s/sup 2/) collisions, which is that the latter process involves molecular states that are formally autoionizing. Then standard ab initio methods do not, in general, yield the relevant wave functions that are needed in the collision treatment, irrespective of whether quasimolecular autoionization be significant or not during the collision. We implement a particularly simple and useful form of the Feshbach formalism to calculate the energies of those two electron systems, and a method to evaluate the corresponding dynamical couplings is presented for the first time. Our implementation of this formalism together with the new computational techniques involved are presented in detail.

  7. Cobalt(II) and Nickel(II) Transfer through Charged Polysulfonated Cation Exchange Membranes.

    PubMed

    Ersoz; Kara

    2000-12-15

    The transport of Co(II) and Ni(II) ions through charged polysulfonated ion exchange membranes under Donnan dialysis conditions has been studied as a function of pH gradient at 25 degrees C. In the Donnan dialysis process, the membrane is bounded by two electrolyte solutions, the one side (donor phase) initially containing metal salts and the other H(2)SO(4) with no external potential field applied. The transport of metal ions through membranes was correlated with the flux data as well as with estimated diffusion coefficients and was found to depend on the interaction between the fixed groups in the membrane and the metal ions. It was observed that the pH gradient influences the transport of metals and the flux of ions increases with H ion concentration in the receiver phase. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  8. Correlation of Resonance Charge Exchange Cross-Section Data in the Low-Energy Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheldon, John W.

    1962-01-01

    During the course of a literature survey concerning resonance charge exchange, an unusual degree of agreement was noted between an extrapolation of the data reported by Kushnir, Palyukh, and Sena and the data reported by Ziegler. The data of Kushnir et al. are for ion-atom relative energies from 10 to 1000 ev, while the data of Ziegler are for a relative energy of about 1 ev. Extrapolation of the data of Kushnir et al. was made in accordance with Holstein's theory, 3 which is a combination of time-dependent perturbation methods and classical orbit theory. The results of this theory may be discussed in terms of a critical impact parameter b(sub c).

  9. PLASMA INSTABILITIES AS A RESULT OF CHARGE EXCHANGE IN THE DOWNSTREAM REGION OF SUPERNOVA REMNANT SHOCKS

    SciTech Connect

    Ohira, Yutaka; Takahara, Fumio; Terasawa, Toshio

    2009-09-20

    Halpha emission from supernova remnants (SNRs) implies the existence of neutral hydrogen in the circumstellar medium. Some of the neutral particles penetrating the shock are ionized by the charge-exchange process and make a cold ion beam in the shock downstream region. We perform linear analyses of collisionless plasma instabilities between the cold beam and the hot downstream plasma. We find that, under typical SNR conditions, either the resonant instability or the Weibel instability is the most unstable. This mechanism may amplify the magnetic field to more than 100 muG and changes the shock structure. As a result, the radio spectrum and the large magnetic field can be explained, apart from the widely discussed Bell's mechanism.

  10. Scaling for state-selective charge exchange due to collisions of multicharged ions with hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorge, A.; Illescas, Clara; Miraglia, J. E.; Gravielle, M. S.

    2015-12-01

    In this article we evaluate state-resolved charge exchange cross sections for Be{}4+, {{{B}}}5+, {{{C}}}6+, {{{N}}}7+, and {{{O}}}8+ projectiles colliding with atomic hydrogen employing two different methods: the classical trajectory Monte Carlo and the eikonal impulse approximations. These cross sections are used to extend previously derived scaling laws for n-, nl-, and nlm-distributions to highly excited final levels with 4≤slant n≤slant 9, covering energies in the range 50-2000 {{keV}}/ amu. Present total and partial capture cross sections are in agreement with available experimental and theoretical data for these collision systems. Besides, the proposed scaling rules are also verified by other theories, becoming a useful instrument for plasma research.

  11. Scaling for state-selective charge exchange due to collisions of multicharged ions with hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorge, A.; Illescas, Clara; Miraglia, J. E.; Gravielle, M. S.

    2014-12-01

    In this article we evaluate state-resolved charge exchange cross sections for Be{}4+, {{{B}}}5+, {{{C}}}6+, {{{N}}}7+, and {{{O}}}8+ projectiles colliding with atomic hydrogen employing two different methods: the classical trajectory Monte Carlo and the eikonal impulse approximations. These cross sections are used to extend previously derived scaling laws for n-, nl-, and nlm-distributions to highly excited final levels with 4≤slant n≤slant 9, covering energies in the range 50-2000 {{keV}}/ amu. Present total and partial capture cross sections are in agreement with available experimental and theoretical data for these collision systems. Besides, the proposed scaling rules are also verified by other theories, becoming a useful instrument for plasma research.

  12. Charge-exchange QRPA with the Gogny Force for Axially-symmetric Deformed Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Martini, M.; Goriely, S.; Péru, S.

    2014-06-15

    In recent years fully consistent quasiparticle random-phase approximation (QRPA) calculations using finite range Gogny force have been performed to study electromagnetic excitations of several axially-symmetric deformed nuclei up to the {sup 238}U. Here we present the extension of this approach to the charge-exchange nuclear excitations (pnQRPA). In particular we focus on the Isobaric Analog and Gamow-Teller resonances. A comparison of the predicted GT strength distribution with existing experimental data is presented. The role of nuclear deformation is shown. Special attention is paid to β-decay half-lives calculations for which experimental data exist and for specific isotone chains of relevance for the r-process nucleosynthesis.

  13. Localized description of surface energy gap effects in the resonant charge exchange between atoms and surfaces.

    PubMed

    Iglesias-García, A; García, Evelina A; Goldberg, E C

    2011-02-02

    The resonant charge exchange between atoms and surfaces is described by considering a localized atomistic view of the solid within the Anderson model. The presence of a surface energy gap is treated within a simplified tight-binding model of the solid, and a proper calculation of the Hamiltonian terms based on a LCAO expansion of the solid eigenstates is performed. It is found that interference terms jointly with a surface projected gap maximum at the Γ point and the Fermi level inside it, lead to hybridization widths negligible around the Fermi level. This result can explain experimental observations related to long-lived adsorbate states and anomalous neutral fractions of low energy ions in alkali/Cu(111) systems.

  14. Charge, energy, and LET spectra measurements of charged particles in P0006 experiment of LDEF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benton, E. V.; Csige, I.; Oda, K.; Henke, R. P.; Frank, A. L.; Benton, E. R.; Frigo, L. A.; Parnell, T. A.; Watts, J. W., Jr.; Derrickson, J. H.

    1992-01-01

    Measurements are under way of the charged particle radiation environment of the LDEF satellite using stacks of plastic nuclear track detectors (PNTDs) placed in different locations of the satellite. In the initial work, the charge, energy, and linear energy transfer (LET) spectra of charged particles were measured with CR-39 double layer PNTDs located on the west end of the satellite. Primary and secondary stopping heavy ions as well as relativistic galactic cosmic rays (mostly iron particles) were measured separately. The results will be compared with similar measurements in other locations on LDEF with different orientation and shielding conditions. The remarkably detailed study of the charged particle radiation environment of the LDEF satellite will lead to a better understanding of the radiation environment of the Space Station Freedom. It will enable more accurate prediction of single event upsets (SEUs) in microelectronics and, especially, more accurate assessment of the risk, contributed by the different components of the radiation field to the health and safety of crew members.

  15. The Contribution of Charge Exchange to the X-ray Spectrum of M82

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Ansley; Stancil, Phillip C.; Shelton, Robin L.; Cumbee, Renata; Mullen, Patrick Dean; Zhang, Shuinai; Foster, Adam; Smith, Randall K.

    2017-06-01

    As the resolution of space-based X-ray detectors improve, deducing the mechanism(s) responsible for the observed emission has in many cases proved to be problematic. Emission from most galactic and extragalactic sources are typically attributed to hot thermal plasmas driven by electron impact excitation (EIE). Other sources may be due to radiative recombination (RR) from a photoionized plasma. Charge exchange (CX) is another process that has more recently been ascribed to observed emission, particularly when unexplained by EIE or RR. However, laboratory astrophysics data on CX needed to accurately model X-ray emission has not generally been available. As a consequence a number of approximate CX models have been developed to ascertain the relative importance of CX (e.g., the AtomDB Charge eXchange model, ACX, Smith et al. 2012). Recently, Zhang et al. (2014) combined ACX with a thermal plasma model to study the X-ray emission from starburst galaxy M82, obtained with the XMM-Newton/reflection grating spectrometer (RGS). They deduced that for some emission lines the CX contribution could be a much as 87%. Here we revisit their M82 model,but replace ACX with explicitly computed and benchmarked CX cross sections from the Kronos database (Cumbee et al. 2017, Mullen et al. 2017).Cumbee R. S. et al. 2017, ApJ, submittedMullen, P. D. et al. 2017, ApJ, submittedSmith, R. K. et al. 2012, AN, 333, 301Zhang, S. et al. 2014, ApJ, 794, 61This work was partially supported by NASA grants NNX09AC46G and NNG09WF24I.

  16. What can be Learned from X-ray Spectroscopy Concerning Hot Gas in Local Bubble and Charge Exchange Processes?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snowden, Steve

    2007-01-01

    What can be learned from x-ray spectroscopy in observing hot gas in local bubble and charge exchange processes depends on spectral resolution, instrumental grasp, instrumental energy band, signal-to-nose, field of view, angular resolution and observatory location. Early attempts at x-ray spectroscopy include ROSAT; more recently, astronomers have used diffuse x-ray spectrometers, XMM Newton, sounding rocket calorimeters, and Suzaku. Future observations are expected with calorimeters on the Spectrum Roentgen Gamma mission, and the Solar Wind Charge Exchange (SWCX). The Geospheric SWCX may provide remote sensing of the solar wind and magnetosheath and remote observations of solar CMEs moving outward from the sun.

  17. Charge exchange and cluster formation in an rf Paul trap: interaction of alkali atoms with C +60

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollack, Stuart; Cameron, Douglas; Rokni, Mordechai; Hill, Winfield; Parks, J. H.

    1996-06-01

    A Paul ion trap was used to study the formation of clusters under controlled temperature and pressure conditions. Exposure of cold C +60 ions to Li flux leads to the formation of Li nC +60 clusters ( n = 1-18) occurring by the sequential association of Li atoms. Cluster formation dependence on He pressure displayed a competition between vibrational relaxation and unimolecular dissociation. Collisions with Na, K, Rb and Cs atoms resulted in dissociative charge exchange. Decay rates of C +60 ions resulting from these low-energy charge exchange collisions were consistent with Langevin capture rates.

  18. Exchangeable Random Measures in the Plane

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-09-01

    85 C Ol4. OWN 1 Distribution/ -, b Codes lAvail and/or-Dist Special 1. InM X’ 7 IC ANlD ?TIY RUMM A randan Teasure 4 defined on the product of tw...transformations f (or of their tensor products f x g or f x f) is not a group, simply because f is usually not invertible. lbreover, the-class of such...f: S’x S"-. S. Assume that, for every Te 7, there exist some T𔃻 ’ and sae family Te r", xeS’, such that TY is product measurable in (x,y) eS’ X S

  19. The effect of N2/+/ recombination on the aeronomic determination of the charge exchange rate coefficient of O/+//2D/ with N2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torr, D. G.; Orsini, N.

    1978-01-01

    The Atmosphere Explorer (AE) data are reexamined in the light of new laboratory measurements of the N2(+) recombination rate coefficient alpha. The new measurements support earlier measurements which yielded values of alpha significantly lower than the AE values. It is found that the values for alpha determined from the satellite data can be reconciled with the laboratory measurements, if the charge exchange rate coefficient for O(+)(2D) with N2 is less than one-quarter of that derived in the laboratory by Rutherford and Vroom (1971).

  20. High energy cosmic ray charge and energy spectra measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chappell, J. H.; Webber, W. R.

    1981-01-01

    In 1976, 1977, and 1978, a series of three balloon flights was conducted to measure the energy spectra of cosmic ray nuclei. A gas Cerenkov detector with different gas thresholds of 8.97, 13.12, and 17.94 GeV/n was employed to extend these measurements to high energies. The total collection factor for these flights is more than 20 sq m ster-hr. Individual charge resolution was achieved over the charge range Z equals 4-26, and overlapping differential spectra were obtained from the three flights up to approximately 100.0 GeV/n.

  1. Aspects of charge distribution measurement for 252Cf(sf)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Taofeng; Li, Guangwu; Zhu, Liping; Hen, Or; Zhang, Gaolong; Meng, Qinghua; Wang, Liming; Han, Hongyin; Xia, Haihong

    2017-09-01

    Measurements of charge distributions of fragments in the spontaneous fission of 252Cf have been performed using a unique detector setup consisting of a typical grid-ionization chamber coupled with a Δ E -E charged particle telescope. We find that the fragment mass dependency of the kinetic-energy-averaged width of the charge distribution shows a systematically decreasing trend with obvious fluctuations. The variation of the widths of the charge distribution with kinetic energy shows a pan-like shape. This is due to the large number of neutrons emitted at the high excitation energies and cold fragmentation at the low excitation energies. Deviation of the kinetic-energy-averaged most probable charge Zp from the unchanged charge distribution (UCD), Δ Z , as a function of the mass number of primary fragments, A*, changes from negative for mass asymmetric fission to positive near the symmetric fissions. Concerning the kinetic energy dependence of Zp given primary mass number A*, obvious increasing tendencies of Zp with increasing kinetic energy are observed.

  2. Measurements of charge state breeding efficiency at BNL test EBIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondrashev, S.; Alessi, J. G.; Beebe, E. N.; Dickerson, C.; Ostroumov, P. N.; Pikin, A.; Savard, G.

    2011-06-01

    Charge breeding of singly charged ions is required to efficiently accelerate rare isotope ion beams for nuclear and astrophysics experiments, and to enhance the accuracy of low-energy Penning trap-assisted spectroscopy. An efficient charge breeder for the Californium Rare Isotope Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) to the ANL Tandem Linear Accelerator System (ATLAS) facility is being developed using the BNL Test Electron Beam Ion Source (Test EBIS) as a prototype. Parameters of the CARIBU EBIS charge breeder are similar to those of the BNL Test EBIS except the electron beam current will be adjustable in the range from 1 to 2 A. The electron beam current density in the CARIBU EBIS trap will be significantly higher than in existing operational charge state breeders based on the EBIS concept. The charge state breeding efficiency is expected to be about 25% for the isotope ions extracted from the CARIBU. For the success of our EBIS project, it is essential to demonstrate high breeding efficiency at the BNL Test EBIS tuned to the regime close to the parameters of the CARIBU EBIS at ANL. The breeding efficiency optimization and measurements have been successfully carried out using a Cs + surface ionization ion source for externally pulsed injection into the BNL Test EBIS. A Cs + ion beam with a total number of ions of 5×10 8 and optimized pulse length of 70 μs has been injected into the Test EBIS and charge-bred for 5.3 ms for two different electron beam currents - 1 and 1.5 A. In these experiments we have achieved 70% injection/extraction efficiency and breeding efficiency into the most abundant charge state ˜17%.

  3. Measurements of charge state breeding efficiency at BNL test EBIS

    SciTech Connect

    Kondrashev, S.; Alessi, J.; Beebe, E.N.; Dickerson, C.; Ostroumov, P.N.; Pikin, A.; Savard, G.

    2011-04-02

    Charge breeding of singly charged ions is required to efficiently accelerate rare isotope ion beams for nuclear and astrophysics experiments, and to enhance the accuracy of low-energy Penning trap-assisted spectroscopy. An efficient charge breeder for the Californium Rare Isotope Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) to the ANL Tandem Linear Accelerator System (ATLAS) facility is being developed using the BNL Test Electron Beam Ion Source (Test EBIS) as a prototype. Parameters of the CARIBU EBIS charge breeder are similar to those of the BNL Test EBIS except the electron beam current will be adjustable in the range from 1 to 2 {angstrom}. The electron beam current density in the CARIBU EBIS trap will be significantly higher than in existing operational charge state breeders based on the EBIS concept. The charge state breeding efficiency is expected to be about 25% for the isotope ions extracted from the CARIBU. For the success of our EBIS project, it is essential to demonstrate high breeding efficiency at the BNL Test EBIS tuned to the regime close to the parameters of the CARIBU EBIS at ANL. The breeding efficiency optimization and measurements have been successfully carried out using a Cs{sup +} surface ionization ion source for externally pulsed injection into the BNL Test EBIS. A Cs{sup +} ion beam with a total number of ions of 5 x 10{sup 8} and optimized pulse length of 70 {mu}s has been injected into the Test EBIS and charge-bred for 5.3 ms for two different electron beam currents 1 and 1.5 {angstrom}. In these experiments we have achieved 70% injection/extraction efficiency and breeding efficiency into the most abundant charge state 17%.

  4. X-ray emission cross sections following Ar{sup 18+} charge-exchange collisions on neutral argon: The role of the multiple electron capture

    SciTech Connect

    Otranto, S.; Olson, R. E.

    2011-03-15

    X-ray emission originating in charge-exchange collisions between Ar{sup 18+} and neutral argon is studied at impact energies of 5-4000 eV/amu by means of the classical trajectory Monte Carlo method (CTMC). Line emission and charge-exchange cross sections obtained from different CTMC versions based on the one-active electron approximation are contrasted among themselves and against the results obtained by means of a three-active electron code that lets us infer the role of multiple electron capture. The present results are compared to the recent experimental data available from the EBIT groups operating at Livermore, NIST, and Berlin. We were not able to reconcile the major difference in x-ray emission cross sections obtained from in situ measurements made in EBIT, versus those made in an exterior, field-free collision chamber using ions extracted from the EBIT. Our calculations support the extracted beam results.

  5. Radiocarbon measurement with 1 MV AMS at charge state 1+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, K. H.; Hong, W.; Park, G.; Lee, J. G.

    2015-10-01

    A 1 MV AMS was installed at KIGAM (Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources) in 2007. We usually measure 14C at charge state 2+ because beam transmission yield reaches maximum value at a terminal voltage of 950 kV. However, this condition always has the possibility of interference by Li22+ molecules. To avoid the interference, samples with high Li contents need to be measured with charge states 1+ or 3+ because lithium ions only form the even charge states. Therefore, it was necessary to investigate the operating conditions of our AMS machine with charge state 1+ or 3+. The optimized condition for 1+ measurement was found to be 500 kV for terminal voltage and 2.5 × 10-2 mbar for stripper gas pressure. After setting up operating conditions for measurement with C1+, standard (IAEA C1, C7 and C8), blank, unknown wood and charcoal samples were measured and the results were compared with those obtained with a C2+ beam. The background level was determined to be as low as 2-5 × 10-15 for 14C1+.

  6. Experimental investigation of the reaction of helium ions with dimethyl ether: stereodynamics of the dissociative charge exchange process.

    PubMed

    Cernuto, Andrea; Tosi, Paolo; Martini, Luca Matteo; Pirani, Fernando; Ascenzi, Daniela

    2017-03-09

    The fate of dimethyl ether (DME, CH3OCH3) in collisions with He(+) ions is of high relevance for astrochemical models aimed at reproducing the abundances of complex organic molecules in the interstellar medium. Here we report an investigation on the reaction of He(+) ions with DME carried out using a Guided Ion Beam Mass Spectrometer (GIB-MS), which allows the measurement of reactive cross-sections and branching ratios (BRs) as a function of the collision energy. We obtain insights into the dissociative charge (electron) exchange mechanism by investigating the nature of the non-adiabatic transitions between the relevant potential energy surfaces (PESs) in an improved Landau-Zener approach. We find that the large interaction anisotropy could induce a pronounced orientation of the polar DME molecule in the electric field generated by He(+) so that at short distances the collision complex is confined within pendular states, a particular case of bending motion, which gives rise to intriguing stereodynamic effects. The positions of the intermolecular potential energy curve crossings indicate that He(+) captures an electron from an inner valence orbital of DME, thus causing its dissociation. In addition to the crossing positions, the symmetry of the electron density distribution of the involved DME orbitals turns out to be a further major point affecting the probability of electron transfer. Thus, the anisotropy of the intermolecular interaction and the electron densities of the orbitals involved in the reaction are the key "ingredients" for describing the dynamics of this dissociative charge transfer.

  7. X-ray Emission Cross Sections following Charge Exchange by Multiply-Charged Ions of Astrophysical Interest.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otranto, Sebastian; Olson, Ronald; Beiersdorfer, Peter

    2006-05-01

    State selective nl-electron capture cross sections calculated using the classical trajectory Monte Carlo (CTMC) model are presented for highly charged ions with Z = 6-10 colliding with atoms and molecules. The energy dependence of the l-level populations is investigated. The calculated cross sections are compared with measurements made by Greenwood et al [1], using O^8+ and Ne^10+ on various targets at 3 keV/amu, and with recent x-ray emission cross sections measured with the EBIT machine at LLNL using O^8+ and Ne^9+,10+ on different targets at 10 eV/amu. We use the calculated cross sections to present an ab initio determination of the soft x-ray spectrum of comet C/Linear 1999 S4 that was observed on the Chandra X-ray Observatory [2]. [1] J. B. Greenwood, I. D. Williams, S. J. Smith and A. Chutjian, Phys. Rev. A 63, 062707 (2001). [2] C. M. Lisse, D. J. Christian, K. Dennerl, K. J. Meech, R. Petre, H. A. Weaver and S. J. Wolk, Science 292, 1343 (2001).

  8. First measurement of the charged current cross section at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, T.; Andreev, V.; Andrieu, B.; Appuhn, R.-D.; Arpagaus, M.; Babaev, A.; Bán, J.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Barth, M.; Bassler, U.; Beck, H. P.; Behrend, H.-J.; Belousov, A.; Berger, Ch.; Bergstein, H.; Bernardi, G.; Bernet, R.; Bertrand-Coremans, G.; Besançon, M.; Biddulph, P.; Bizot, J. C.; Blobel, V.; Borras, K.; Boudry, V.; Braemer, A.; Brasse, F.; Braunschweig, W.; Brisson, V.; Bruncko, D.; Brune, C.; Büngener, L.; Bürger, J.; Büsser, F. W.; Buniatian, A.; Burke, S.; Buschhorn, G.; Campbell, A. J.; Carli, T.; Charles, F.; Clarke, D.; Clegg, A. B.; Colombo, M.; Coughlan, J. A.; Courau, A.; Coutures, Ch.; Cozzika, G.; Criegee, L.; Cussans, D. G.; Cvach, J.; Dagoret, S.; Dainton, J. B.; Danilov, M.; Dann, A. W. E.; Dau, W. D.; Daum, K.; David, M.; Deffur, E.; Delcourt, B.; Del Buono, L.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.; Dollfus, C.; Dowell, J. D.; Dreis, H. B.; Duboc, J.; Düllmann, D.; Dünger, O.; Duhm, H.; Ebert, J.; Ebert, T. R.; Eckerlin, G.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Ehrlichmann, H.; Eichenberger, S.; Eichler, R.; Eisele, F.; Eisenhandler, E.; Ellison, R. J.; Elsen, E.; Erdmann, M.; Evrard, E.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Feeken, D.; Felst, R.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Ferrarotto, F.; Flamm, K.; Flauger, W.; Fleischer, M.; Flieser, M.; Flügge, G.; Fomenko, A.; Fominykh, B.; Forbush, M.; Formánek, J.; Foster, J. M.; Franke, G.; Fretwurst, E.; Gabathuler, E.; Gamerdinger, K.; Garvey, J.; Gayler, J.; Gebauer, M.; Gellrich, A.; Genzel, H.; Gerhards, R.; Goerlach, U.; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Goldberg, M.; Goldner, D.; Goodall, A. M.; Gorelov, I.; Goritchev, P.; Grab, C.; Grässler, H.; Grässler, R.; Greenshaw, T.; Grindhammer, G.; Gruber, C.; Haack, J.; Haidt, D.; Hajduk, L.; Hamon, O.; Hampel, M.; Hanlon, E. M.; Hapke, M.; Haynes, W. J.; Heatherington, J.; Hedberg, V.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Henschel, H.; Herma, R.; Herynek, I.; Hildesheim, W.; Hill, P.; Hilton, C. D.; Hladký, J.; Hoeger, K. C.; Höppner, M.; Huet, Ph.; Hufnagel, H.; Ibbotson, M.; Itterbeck, H.; Jabiol, M.-A.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jacobsson, C.; Jaffre, M.; Janoth, J.; Jansen, T.; Jönsson, L.; Johannsen, K.; Johnson, D. P.; Johnson, L.; Jung, H.; Kalmus, P. I. P.; Kant, D.; Kazarian, S.; Kaschowitz, R.; Kasselmann, P.; Kathage, U.; Kaufmann, H. H.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kermiche, S.; Keuker, C.; Kiesling, C.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Knies, G.; Ko, W.; Köhler, T.; Kolanoski, H.; Kole, F.; Kolya, S. D.; Korbel, V.; Korn, M.; Kostka, P.; Kotelnikov, S. K.; Krasny, M. W.; Krehbiel, H.; Krücker, D.; Krüger, U.; Krüner-Marquis, M.; Kubenka, J. P.; Küster, H.; Kuhlen, M.; Kurča, T.; Kurzhöfer, J.; Kuznik, B.; Lacour, D.; Lamarche, F.; Lander, R.; Landon, M. P. J.; Lange, W.; Lanius, P.; Laporte, J. F.; Lebedev, A.; Leverenz, C.; Levonian, S.; Ley, Ch.; Lindner, A.; Lindström, G.; Linsel, F.; Lipinski, J.; Loch, P.; Lohmander, H.; Lopez, G. C.; Lüers, D.; Lüke, D.; Magnussen, N.; Malinovski, E.; Mani, S.; Marage, P.; Marshall, R.; Martens, J.; Martin, R.; Martyn, H.-U.; Martyniak, J.; Masson, S.; Mavroidis, A.; Maxfield, S. J.; McMahon, S. J.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Mercer, D.; Merz, T.; Meyer, C. A.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Mikocki, S.; Milone, V.; Milstead, D.; Moreau, F.; Morris, J. V.; Müller, G.; Murín, P.; Nagovizin, V.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, Th.; Nawrath, G.; Newman, P. R.; Newton, D.; Neyret, D.; Nguyen, H. K.; Niebergall, F.; Niebuhr, C.; Nisius, R.; Nowak, G.; Noyes, G. W.; Nyberg-Werther, M.; Oberlack, H.; Obrock, U.; Olsson, J. E.; Panitch, A.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G. D.; Peppel, E.; Perez, E.; Phillips, J. P.; Pichler, Ch.; Pitzl, D.; Pope, G.; Prell, S.; Prosi, R.; Rädel, G.; Raupach, F.; Reimer, P.; Reinshagen, S.; Ribarics, P.; Riech, V.; Riedlberger, J.; Riess, S.; Rietz, M.; Robertson, S. M.; Robmann, P.; Roosen, R.; Rosenbauer, K.; Rostovtsev, A.; Royon, C.; Rüter, K.; Ruffer, M.; Rusakov, S.; Rybicki, K.; Sahlmann, N.; Sanchez, E.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Savitsky, M.; Schacht, P.; Schleper, P.; von Schlippe, W.; Schmidt, C.; Schmidt, D.; Schöning, A.; Schröder, V.; Schulz, M.; Schwab, B.; Schwind, A.; Seehausen, U.; Sefkow, F.; Sell, R.; Semenov, A.; Shekelyan, V.; Sheviakov, I.; Shooshtari, H.; Shtarkov, L. N.; Siegmon, G.; Siewert, U.; Sirois, Y.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Smirnov, P.; Smith, J. R.; Soloviev, Y.; Spitzer, H.; Staroba, P.; Steenbock, M.; Steffen, P.; Steinberg, R.; Stella, B.; Stephens, K.; Stier, J.; Stiewe, J.; Stösslein, U.; Strachota, J.; Straumann, U.; Struczinski, W.; Sutton, J. P.; Tapprogge, S.; Taylor, R. E.; Tchernyshov, V.; Thiebaux, C.; Thompson, G.; Tichomirov, I.; Truöl, P.; Turnau, J.; Tutas, J.; Usik, A.; Valkar, S.; Valkarova, A.; Vallée, C.; Van Esch, P.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vartapetian, A.; Vazdik, Y.; Vecko, M.; Verrecchia, P.; Villet, G.; Wacker, K.; Wagener, A.; Walker, I. W.; Walther, A.; Weber, G.; Weber, M.; Weber, M.; Wegener, D.; Wegner, A.; Wellisch, H. P.; West, L. R.; Willard, S.; Winde, M.; Winter, G.-G.; Wolff, Th.; Wright, A. E.; Wünsch, E.; Wulff, N.; Yiou, T. P.; Žáček, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zimmer, M.; Zimmermann, W.; Zomer, F.; Zuber, K.; H1 Collaboration

    1994-03-01

    The cross section of the charged current process e-p → ve + hadrons is measured at HERA for transverse momenta of the hadron system larger than 25 GeV. The size of the cross section exhibits the W propagator.

  9. The Characteristic of Residual Charge for Water-tree Degraded XLPE and the Measurement Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebinuma, Yasumitsu; Masui, Noriaki

    Recently the measurement of residual charge has been studying as insulation deterioration diagnosis of XLPE insulated cables. Authors have studied the measurement process and the charge characteristic. The specimens are XLPE sheets of 1mm which are degraded with water-trees. There are four processes of charge removal, charge injection, ground and charge release in the measurement. The process of charge removal was introduced to measure a little charge successfully. In the process of charge injection, it was confirmed that the relation between the applied dc voltage and the charge was examined, and the higher dc voltage was, more the charge was. In addition, it has been showed that the applied process of the dc voltage greatly influences the measured charge. In the process of ground, the grounding period is changed and the charge is measured. It has been showed that the grounding period doesn't influence the measured charge greatly. In the process of charge release, the frequency and the period of applied ac voltage were changed and the charge was measured. It has been showed that neither the frequency nor the period of ac voltage greatly influence the charge measured. In addition, the dc voltage was superimposed to ac voltage, and the charge was measured. It has been showed that the charge measured changes greatly even if the dc voltage is low. The method of the insulation deterioration measurement of cable was examined from these results, and the measurement conditions and a newer method were suggested.

  10. Critical validity assessment of theoretical models: charge-exchange at intermediate and high energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belkić, Dževad

    1999-06-01

    Exact comprehensive computations are carried out by means of four leading second-order approximations yielding differential cross sections dQ/ dΩ for the basic charge exchange process H ++H(1s)→H(1s)+H + at intermediate and high energies. The obtained extensive set of results is thoroughly tested against all the existing experimental data with the purpose of critically assessing the validity of the boundary corrected second-Born (CB2), continuum-distorted wave (CDW), impulse approximation (IA) and the reformulated impulse approximation (RIA). The conclusion which emerges from this comparative study clearly indicates that the RIA agrees most favorably with the measurements available over a large energy range 25 keV-5 MeV. Such a finding reaffirms the few-particle quantum scattering theory which imposes several strict conditions on adequate second-order methods. These requirements satisfied by the RIA are: (i) normalisations of all the scattering wave functions, (ii) correct boundary conditions in both entrance and exit channels, (iii) introduction of a mathematically justified two-center continuum state for the sum of an attractive and a repulsive Coulomb potential with the same interaction strength, (iv) inclusion of the multiple scattering effects neglected in the IA, (v) a proper description of the Thomas double scattering in good agreement with the experiments and without any unobserved peak splittings. Nevertheless, the performed comparative analysis of the above four approximations indicates that none of the methods is free from some basic shortcomings. Despite its success, the RIA remains essentially a high-energy model like the other three methods under study. More importantly, their perturbative character leaves virtually no room for further systematic improvements, since the neglected higher-order terms are prohibitively tedious for practical purposes and have never been computed exactly. To bridge this gap, we presently introduce the variational Pad

  11. Charge-exchange reactions and electron-capture rates for presupernova stellar evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zegers, Remco

    2015-04-01

    Weak reaction rates such as electron captures and beta decays play major roles in a variety of astrophysical phenomena, such as core-collapse and thermonuclear supernovae and accreting neutron stars. Consequently, the use of accurate weak reaction rates in astrophysical simulations to understand these phenomena is important. Unfortunately, the number of relevant nuclei is typically very large, and, except for a few special cases, it is impossible to rely on experimental results only: theoretical models must be used to estimate the weak reaction rates. These models can then be benchmarked and improved on the basis of a limited number of experimental data. The most important nuclear structure input that is required for calculating weak reaction rates are Gamow-Teller transition strengths. Although these can be extracted from beta and electron-capture decay data, the energy window accessible by such experiments is limited, if accessible at all. However, at the high temperatures and densities that occur in massive stars prior to the cataclysmic demise, transitions to final states at high excitation energies are important. In addition, to properly test theory, full Gamow-Teller transition strength distributions are very valuable. Fortunately, nature is kind: charge-exchange experiments at intermediate energies can provide the relevant strength distributions over a wide energy window and a variety of charge-exchange probes, such as (p,n), (n,p), (d,2 He) and (t,3 He) have been used to extract strengths of relevance for astrophysics (and for other purposes). This presentation will focus on efforts to validate electron capture rates calculated based on nuclear structure models for nuclei with masses ranging from A ~ 40-65, and on studies aimed at testing astrophysical sensitivities to uncertainties/deviations in the theoretical rates. These efforts include experiments with unstable isotopes, and special gamma-ray coincidence techniques to localize very weak, but

  12. Control and Measurement of an Exchange-Only Spin Qubit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medford, James

    2015-03-01

    Gate-defined semiconductor quantum dots have proven to be a versatile testbed for exploring quantum systems and quantum information. We demonstrate the fast all-electrical control of a spin qubit using the two coherent exchange interactions in a triple quantum dot. Our measurements identify the role of nuclear spins from the host GaAs in this system as a mechanism for both dephasing and leakage out of the qubit subspace. We also show that by increasing both exchange interactions in a balanced fashion, we enter a second regime of operation. In this regime, leakage from the subspace has been suppressed, resulting in a spin qubit with a tunable electric dipole moment, which we refer to as the resonant exchange qubit.

  13. Multiproduct high-resolution monoclonal antibody charge variant separations by pH gradient ion-exchange chromatography.

    PubMed

    Farnan, Dell; Moreno, G Tony

    2009-11-01

    In the biotechnology industry, ion-exchange chromatography is widely used for profiling the charge heterogeneity of proteins, including monoclonal antibodies. Ionic strength based ion exchange separations, while having excellent resolving power and robustness, are product specific and time-consuming to develop. In the present work, a pH gradient based separation using a cation exchange column is described and shown to be a multiproduct charge sensitive separation method for monoclonal antibodies. Simple mixtures of defined buffer components were used to generate the pH-gradients that separate closely related antibody species. The form of the pH gradient was controlled and optimized by the pump as well as the buffer composition if necessary. During this work, the buffer compositions for the separation were optimized in parallel for several MAbs. The data shows that the multiproduct method is optimal for all of the MAbs studied. Operational aspects of the separation such as column chemistry, column length, and sample matrix indicate a very robust method. The pH gradient ion-exchange method is demonstrated to have significant resolving power and peak capacities far in excess of what we would expect for ionic strength elution ion-exchange. Data obtained demonstrates that the separation is relatively insensitive to column length. Direct analysis (no buffer exchange) of samples in matrixes consistent with in-process manufacturing pools is demonstrated. Such a capability is extremely useful for the high throughput evaluation of in-process and final product samples.

  14. The loss rates of O{sup +} in the inner magnetosphere caused by both magnetic field line curvature scattering and charge exchange reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Y.; Shen, C.

    2014-03-15

    With consideration of magnetic field line curvature (FLC) pitch angle scattering and charge exchange reactions, the O{sup +} (>300 keV) in the inner magnetosphere loss rates are investigated by using an eigenfunction analysis. The FLC scattering provides a mechanism for the ring current O{sup +} to enter the loss cone and influence the loss rates caused by charge exchange reactions. Assuming that the pitch angle change is small for each scattering event, the diffusion equation including a charge exchange term is constructed and solved; the eigenvalues of the equation are identified. The resultant loss rates of O{sup +} are approximately equal to the linear superposition of the loss rate without considering the charge exchange reactions and the loss rate associated with charge exchange reactions alone. The loss time is consistent with the observations from the early recovery phases of magnetic storms.

  15. Measuring and Modeling Component and Whole-System Carbon Exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Bolstad

    2006-11-01

    We measured ecosystem/atmospheric carbon exchange through a range of methods covering a range of scales. We measured carbon (C) pool and flux for a number of previously poorly quantified ecosystems, developed measurement and modeling methods, and applied these to substantially increase the accuracy and reduce uncertainty in ecosystem/atmospheric C exchange at a range of scales. It appears most upland forests are weak to strong carbon sinks, and status depends largely on disturbance history and age. Net flux from wetland ecosystems appears to be from weak sinks to moderate sources of C to the atmosphere. We found limited evidence for a positive feedback of warming/drying to increased ecosystem C emissions. We further developed multi-source integration and modeling methods, including multiple towers, to scale estimates to landscapes and larger regions.

  16. Charge transport measurements of vertically aligned carbon nanofibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lan

    2005-07-01

    Vertically aligned carbon nanofibers (VACNFs) have found a variety of electronic applications. To further realize these applications, a good understanding of the charge transport properties is essential. In this work, charge transport properties have been systematically measured for three types of VACNF forests with Ni as catalyst, namely VACNFs grown by direct current PECVD, and inductively coupled PECVD at both normal pressure and low pressure. The structure and composition of these nanofibers have also been investigated in detail prior to the charge transport measurements. Four-probe I-V measurements on individual nanofibers have been enabled by the fabrication of multiple metal ohmic contacts on individual fibers that exhibited resistance of only a few kO. An O2 plasma reactive ion etch method has been used to achieve ohmic contacts between the nanofibers and Ti/Au, Ag/Au, Cd/Au, and Cr/Au electrodes. Direct current VACNFs exhibit linear I-V behavior at room temperature, with a resistivity of approximately 4.2 x 10-3 O·cm. Our measurements are consistent with a dominant transport mechanism of electrons traveling through intergraphitic planes in the dc VACNFs. The resistivity of these fibers is almost independent of temperature, and the contact resistance decreases as temperature increases. Further studies reveal that the 10--15 nm thick graphitic outer layer dominates the charge transport properties of do VACNFs. This is demonstrated by comparison of charge transport properties of as-grown VACNFs and VACNFs with the outer layer partially removed by oxygen plasma reactive ion etch. The linear I-V behavior of the fibers does not vary as this outer layer becomes thinner, but displays a drastic shift to a rectifying behavior when this layer is completely stripped away from some regions of the nanofiber. This shift may be related with the compositional differences in the outer layer and the inner core of the nanofibers. Two-probe charge transport measurements on

  17. Suzaku and XMM-Newton observations of the North Polar Spur: Charge exchange or ISM absorption?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Liyi; Mao, Junjie; Costantini, Elisa; Kaastra, Jelle

    2016-10-01

    By revisiting the Suzaku and XMM-Newton data of the North Polar Spur, we discovered that the spectra are inconsistent with the traditional model consisting of pure thermal emission and neutral absorption. The most prominent discrepancies are the enhanced O vii and Ne ix forbidden-to-resonance ratios, and a high O viii Lyβ line relative to other Lyman series. A collisionally ionized absorption model can naturally explain both features, while a charge exchange component can only account for the former. By including the additional ionized absorption, the plasma in the North Polar Spur can be described by a single-phase collisional ionization equilibrium (CIE) component with a temperature of 0.25 keV, and nitrogen, oxygen, neon, magnesium, and iron abundances of 0.4-0.8 solar. The abundance pattern of the North Polar Spur is well in line with those of the Galactic halo stars. The high nitrogen-to-oxygen ratio reported in previous studies can be migrated to the large transmission of the O viii Lyα line. The ionized absorber is characterized by a balance temperature of 0.17-0.20 keV and a column density of 3-5 × 1019 cm-2. Based on the derived abundances and absorption, we speculate that the North Polar Spur is a structure in the Galactic halo, so that the emission is mostly absorbed by the Galactic interstellar medium in the line of sight.

  18. CAN CHARGE EXCHANGE EXPLAIN ANOMALOUS SOFT X-RAY EMISSION IN THE CYGNUS LOOP?

    SciTech Connect

    Cumbee, R. S.; Henley, D. B.; Stancil, P. C.; Shelton, R. L.; Nolte, J. L.; Wu, Y.; Schultz, D. R.

    2014-06-01

    Recent X-ray studies have shown that supernova shock models are unable to satisfactorily explain X-ray emission in the rim of the Cygnus Loop. In an attempt to account for this ''anomalously'' enhanced X-ray flux, we fit the region with a model including theoretical charge exchange (CX) data along with shock and background X-ray models. The model includes the CX collisions of O{sup 8} {sup +}, O{sup 7} {sup +}, N{sup 7} {sup +}, N{sup 6} {sup +}, C{sup 6} {sup +}, and C{sup 5} {sup +} with H with an energy of 1 keV u{sup –1} (438 km s{sup –1}). The observations reveal a strong emission feature near 0.7 keV that cannot fully be accounted for by a shock model, nor the current CX data. Inclusion of CX, specifically O{sup 7} {sup +} + H, does provide for a statistically significant improvement over a pure shock model.

  19. X-ray emission from the local hot bubble and solar wind charge exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uprety, Youaraj

    DXL (Diffuse X-rays from the Local galaxy) is a sounding rocket mission to quantify the Solar Wind Charge Exchange (SWCX) X-ray emission in the interplanetary medium, and separate its contribution from the Local Hot Bubble (LHB) emission. The first launch of DXL took place in December 2012. This thesis will describe the DXL instrumentation and calibrations, and discuss the results obtained. The mission uses two large area proportional counters to scan through the Helium Focusing Cone (HFC), a high helium density region in the solar system emitting excess X-rays due to SWCX. Using well determined models of the interplanetary neutral distribution and comparing the DXL results with data from the same region obtained by the ROSAT satellite away from the cone, we calculated that SWCX contributes at most 36% to the ¼ keV ROSAT band and 13% to the ¾ keV ROSAT band, in the galactic plane. This provides a firm proof for existence of a LHB which dominates the Diffuse X-ray Background (DXB) at ¼ keV, while raising new questions on the origin of the ¾ keV emission.

  20. Spectroscopic evidence of charge exchange X-ray emission from galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Q. D.; Liu, J.

    2012-04-01

    What are the origins of the soft X-ray line emission from non-AGN galaxies? XMM-Newton RGS spectra of nearby non-AGN galaxies (including starforming ones: M82, NGC 253, M51, M83, M61, NGC 4631, M94, NGC 2903, and the Antennae galaxies, as well as the inner bulge of M31) have been analyzed. In particular, the K\\alpha triplet of O VII shows that the resonance line is typically weaker than the forbidden and/or inter-combination lines. This suggests that a substantial fraction of the emission may not arise directly from optically thin thermal plasma, as commonly assumed, and may instead originate at its interface with neutral gas via charge exchange. This latter origin naturally explains the observed spatial correlation of the emission with various tracers of cool gas in some of the galaxies. However, alternative scenarios, such as the resonance scattering by the plasma and the relic photo-ionization by AGNs in the recent past, cannot be ruled out, at least in some cases, and are being examined. Such X-ray spectroscopic studies are important to the understanding of the relationship of the emission to various high-energy feedback processes in galaxies.

  1. On charge exchange and knock-on processes in the exosphere of Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ip, W.-H.

    1982-01-01

    One direct consequence of magnetospheric interaction of Io is the strong dynamical coupling of its neutral atmosphere with the corotating plasma. The absorption of the thermal ions and the associated neutral injection is an improtant issue not yet explored. As far as nonthermal escape of the neutral atmosphere is concerned, three processes stand out. That is, apart from sputtering, exospheric interactions like atom-ion knock-on collision and charge exchange recombination could be a significant source of the neutral clouds in the Jovian system. Using a current electrodynamic model of Io, both the absorption rate of the corotating thermal plasma and the production rates of new exospheric ions and the fast neutrals are considered. It is found that the source strength of the neutral atoms and molecules with speeds of about 100 km/sec could amount to 10 to the 26th/sec whereas exospheric neutrals emitted at lower speed (of about 10 km/sec) amounts to 4 x 10 to the 25th/sec. The generation of the new ions in connection with the streaming of the magnetospheric plasma around Io could also produce an asymmetric sputtering with a neutral flux of about 10 to the 27th/sec emitted from the region of Io which faces Jupiter. These results may be related to a number of sodium observations.

  2. Measurement of the charge asymmetry in semileptonic Bs0 decays.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Aguilo, E; Ahn, S H; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Anastasoaie, M; Ancu, L S; Andeen, T; Anderson, S; Andrieu, B; Anzelc, M S; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Askew, A; Asman, B; Assis Jesus, A C S; Atramentov, O; Autermann, C; Avila, C; Ay, C; Badaud, F; Baden, A; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, P; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barnes, C; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Beale, S; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Bellavance, A; Benitez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Berntzon, L; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Binder, M; Biscarat, C; Blackler, I; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Bloch, D; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Bolton, T A; Borissov, G; Bos, K; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Burdin, S; Burke, S; Burnett, T H; Busato, E; Buszello, C P; Butler, J M; Calfayan, P; Calvet, S; Cammin, J; Caron, S; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Cason, N M; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Charles, F; Cheu, E; Chevallier, F; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christofek, L; Claes, D; Clément, B; Clément, C; Coadou, Y; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Cox, B; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; da Motta, H; Das, A; Das, M; Davies, B; Davies, G; De, K; de Jong, P; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; De Oliveira Martins, C; Degenhardt, J D; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Doidge, M; Dominguez, A; Dong, H; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Feligioni, L; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Ford, M; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Gallas, E; Galyaev, E; Garcia, C; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, A; Gay, P; Geist, W; Gelé, D; Gelhaus, R; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Gollub, N; Gómez, B; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, F; Guo, J; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, L; Hanagaki, K; Hansson, P; Harder, K; Harel, A; Harrington, R; Hauptman, J M; Hauser, R; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinmiller, J M; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hoeth, H; Hohlfeld, M; Holubyev, K; Hong, S J; Hooper, R; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hubacek, Z; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jakobs, K; Jarvis, C; Jenkins, A; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Käfer, D; Kahn, S; Kajfasz, E; Kalinin, A M; Kalk, J M; Kalk, J R; Kappler, S; Karmanov, D; Kasper, J; Kasper, P; Katsanos, I; Kau, D; Kaur, R; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y M; Khatidze, D; Kim, H; Kim, T J; Kirby, M H; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Konrath, J-P; Kopal, M; Korablev, V M; Kotcher, J; Kothari, B; Koubarovsky, A; Kozelov, A V; Krop, D; Kryemadhi, A; Kuhl, T; Kumar, A; Kunori, S; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kvita, J; Lam, D; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lazoflores, J; Le Bihan, A-C; Lebrun, P; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lehner, F; Lesne, V; Leveque, J; Lewis, P; Li, J; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lietti, S M; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Z; Lobo, L; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Lounis, A; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Lynker, M; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Madaras, R J; Mättig, P; Magass, C; Magerkurth, A; Makovec, N; Mal, P K; Malbouisson, H B; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mao, H S; Maravin, Y; McCarthy, R; Melnitchouk, A; Mendes, A; Mendoza, L; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Michaut, M; Miettinen, H; Millet, T; Mitrevski, J; Molina, J; Mommsen, R K; Mondal, N K; Monk, J; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulders, M; Mulhearn, M; Mundal, O; Mundim, L; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Noeding, C; Nomerotski, A; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; O'Dell, V; O'Neil, D C; Obrant, G; Ochando, C; Oguri, V; Oliveira, N; Onoprienko, D; Oshima, N; Osta, J; Otec, R; Otero Y Garzón, G J; Owen, M; Padley, P; Pangilinan, M; Parashar, N; Park, S-J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Pawloski, G; Perea, P M; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Pétroff, P; Petteni, M; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pol, M-E; Pompos, A; Pope, B G; Popov, A V; Potter, C; Prado da Silva, W L; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rangel, M S; Rani, K J; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Renkel, P; Reucroft, S; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Robinson, S; Rodrigues, R F; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Santoro, A; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schieferdecker, P; Schmitt, C; Schwanenberger, C; Schwartzman, A; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Sengupta, S; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shivpuri, R K; Shpakov, D; Siccardi, V; Sidwell, R A; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smith, R P; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Song, X; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Souza, M; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Steele, J; Stolin, V; Stone, A; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strandberg, S; Strang, M A; Strauss, M; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Strovink, M; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Svoisky, P; Sznajder, A; Talby, M; Tamburello, P; Taylor, W; Telford, P; Temple, J; Tiller, B; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Tomoto, M; Toole, T; Torchiani, I; Trefzger, T; Trincaz-Duvoid, S; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Tuts, P M; Unalan, R; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Vachon, B; van den Berg, P J; van Eijk, B; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vartapetian, A; Vasilyev, I A; Vaupel, M; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Villeneuve-Seguier, F; Vint, P; Vlimant, J-R; Von Toerne, E; Voutilainen, M; Vreeswijk, M; Wahl, H D; Wang, L; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, G; Weber, M; Weerts, H; Wermes, N; Wetstein, M; White, A; Wicke, D; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wobisch, M; Womersley, J; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yan, M; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, C; Yu, J; Yurkewicz, A; Zatserklyaniy, A; Zeitnitz, C; Zhang, D; Zhao, T; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zieminski, A; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G

    2007-04-13

    We have performed the first direct measurement of the time-integrated flavor untagged charge asymmetry in semileptonic Bs0 decays ASLs,unt by comparing the decay rate of Bs0-->micro+Ds-nuX, where Ds- -->phipi- and phi-->K+K-, with the charge-conjugate Bs0 decay rate. This sample was selected from 1.3 fb-1 of data collected by the D0 experiment in run II of the Fermilab Tevatron collider. We obtain ASLs,unt=[1.23+/-0.97(stat)+/-0.17(syst)]x10(-2). Assuming that Deltam(s)/Gamma(s)>1, this result can be translated into a measurement of the CP-violating phase in Bs0 mixing: DeltaGamma(s)/Deltam(s)tanphi(s)=[2.45+/-1.93(stat)+/-0.35(syst)]x10(-2).

  3. Symmetric Resonance Charge Exchange Cross Section Based on Impact Parameter Treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Omidvar, Kazem; Murphy, Kendrah; Atlas, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Using a two-state impact parameter approximation, a calculation has been carried out to obtain symmetric resonance charge transfer cross sections between nine ions and their parent atoms or molecules. Calculation is based on a two-dimensional numerical integration. The method is mostly suited for hydrogenic and some closed shell atoms. Good agreement has been obtained with the results of laboratory measurements for the ion-atom pairs H+-H, He+-He, and Ar+-Ar. Several approximations in a similar published calculation have been eliminated.

  4. Analysis of x-ray emission in charge-exchange collisions of C6+ ions with He and H2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, Anthony C. K.; Kirchner, T.

    2016-05-01

    Charge exchange in C6+-He and - H2 collisions followed by x-ray emission is examined using the two-center basis generator method within the independent electron model. The analysis examines the two collision systems for low to intermediate projectile energies. We perform capture cross section and radiative cascade calculations to obtain Lyman line emission ratios which can be compared to measurements that were carried out at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Multicharged Ion Research Facility. Single-electron capture is considered for the C6+-He system while both single and autoionizing double capture are considered for the C6+- H2 system. We also examine the effects of a time-dependent screening potential that models target response on the l distribution of the capture cross sections and the emission ratios. Calculated line emission ratios based on the no-response approximation are found to be in satisfactory agreement with the measurements. Work supported by SHARCNET, OGS, and NSERC, Canada

  5. Critical Test of Simulations of Charge-Exchange-Induced X-Ray Emission in the Solar System

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, R.; Neill, P. A.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Harris, C. L.; Schultz, David Robert; Stancil, Phillip C.

    2010-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical state-selective X-ray spectra resulting from single-electron capture in charge exchange (CX) collisions of Ne{sup 10+} with He, Ne, and Ar are presented for a collision velocity of 933 km s{sup -1} (4.54 keV nucleon{sup -1}), comparable to the highest velocity components of the fast solar wind. The experimental spectra were obtained by detecting scattered projectiles, target recoil ions, and X-rays in coincidence; with simultaneous determination of the recoil ion momenta. Use and interpretation of these spectra are free from the complications of non-coincident total X-ray measurements that do not differentiate between the primary reaction channels. The spectra offer the opportunity to critically test the ability of CX theories to describe such interactions at the quantum orbital angular momentum level of the final projectile ion. To this end, new classical trajectory Monte Carlo calculations are compared here with the measurements. The current work demonstrates that modeling of cometary, heliospheric, planetary, and laboratory X-ray emission based on approximate state-selective CX models may result in erroneous conclusions and deductions of relevant parameters.

  6. Charge-exchange X-ray emission of M82: Kα triplets of O VII, Ne IX and Mg XI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiren; Mao, Shude; Wang, Q. Daniel

    2011-07-01

    Starburst galaxies are primary feedback sources of mechanical energy and metals, which are generally measured from associated X-ray emission lines, assuming that they are from the thermal emission of the outflowing hot gas. Such line emission, however, can also arise from the charge-exchange X-ray emission (CXE) between highly ionized ions and neutral species. To understand the feedback of energy and metals, it is crucial to determine the origin of the X-ray emission lines and to distinguish the contributions from the CXE and the thermal emission. The origin of the lines can be diagnosed by the Kα triplets of He-like ions, because the CXE favours the intercombination and forbidden lines, while the thermal emission favours the resonance line. We analyse the triplets of O VII, Ne IX and Mg XI observed in the XMM-Newton reflection grating spectra of the starburst galaxy M82. The flux contribution of the CXE is 90, 50 and 30 per cent to the O VII, Ne IX and Mg XI triplets, respectively. Averaged over all the three triplets, the contribution of the CXE is ˜50 per cent of the total observed triplet flux. To correctly understand the hot outflow of starburst galaxies, it is necessary to include the CXE. Based on the measured CXE fluxes of the O VII, Ne IX and Mg XI triplets, we estimate the relative abundances of O, Ne and Mg of the outflow and find they are similar to the solar ratios.

  7. X-ray Measurements of Highly Charged Europium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widmann, K.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Brown, G. V.; Hell, N.; Magee, E. W.; Träbert, E.

    2015-01-01

    We present spectroscopic measurements of the M-shell emission of highly charged europium performed at the Livermore SuperEBIT electron beam ion trap facility using the EBIT Calorimeter Spectrometer (ECS). There is significant blending among the emission lines from the different charge states but despite the complexity of the observed spectra we have successfully identified the ten brightest n = 4 → 3 transitions from sodium-like Eu52+ utilizing the Flexible Atomic Code (FAC). We find that the difference between the calculated and measured transition energies for these ten Eu52+ lines does not exceed 3 eV. In fact, for four of the identified lines we find agreement within the measured uncertainties. Additional comparison with semi-empirical transition-energy predictions for sodium-like ions from laser-generated plasmas is included and shows that overall the semi-empirical predicted values for the transition energies are slightly higher than the measured values, while the FAC values that didnt agree with the measured transition energies are almost 1 eV lower than the measured values.

  8. Effect of charge regulation on steric mass-action equilibrium for the ion-exchange adsorption of proteins.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hong; Frey, Douglas D

    2005-06-24

    A thermodynamic formalism is developed for incorporating the effects of charge regulation on the ion-exchange adsorption of proteins under mass-overloaded conditions as described by the steric mass-action (SMA) isotherm. To accomplish this, the pH titration behavior of a protein and the associated adsorption equilibrium of the various charged forms of a protein are incorporated into a model which also accounts for the steric hindrance of salt counterions caused by protein adsorption. For the case where the protein is dilute, the new model reduces to the protein adsorption model described recently by the authors which accounts for charge regulation. Similarly, the new model reduces to the steric mass-action isotherm developed by Brooks and Cramer which applies to mass-overloaded conditions for the case where charge regulation is ignored so that the protein has a fixed charge. Calculations using the new model were found to agree with experimental data for the adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA) on an anion-exchange column packing when using reasonable physical properties. The new model was also used to develop an improved theoretical criterion for determining the conditions required for an adsorbed species to displace a protein in displacement chromatography when the pH is near the protein pI.

  9. Comparative assessment of the methods for exchangeable acidity measuring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanchikova, E. V.; Shamrikova, E. V.; Bespyatykh, N. V.; Zaboeva, G. A.; Bobrova, Yu. I.; Kyz"yurova, E. V.; Grishchenko, N. V.

    2016-05-01

    A comparative assessment of the results of measuring the exchangeable acidity and its components by different methods was performed for the main mineral genetic horizons of texturally-differentiated gleyed and nongleyed soddy-podzolic and gley-podzolic soils of the Komi Republic. It was shown that the contents of all the components of exchangeable soil acidity determined by the Russian method (with potassium chloride solution as extractant, c(KCl) = 1 mol/dm3) were significantly higher than those obtained by the international method (with barium chloride solution as extractant, c(BaCl2) = 0.1 mol/dm3). The error of the estimate of the concentration of H+ ions extracted with barium chloride solution equaled 100%, and this allowed only qualitative description of this component of the soil acidity. In the case of the extraction with potassium chloride, the error of measurements was 50%. It was also shown that the use of potentiometric titration suggested by the Russian method overestimates the results of soil acidity measurement caused by the exchangeable metal ions (Al(III), Fe(III), and Mn(II)) in comparison with the atomic emission method.

  10. Charge sign solar modulation measured with the PAMELA experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munini, Riccardo; Boezio, Mirko; Di Felice, Valeria; Potgieter, Marius; Vos, Etienne; Mikhailov, Vladimir

    2016-07-01

    The satellite-borne PAMELA experiment has been continuously collecting data since 15th June 2006, when it was launched from the Baikonur cosmodrome to detect the charged component of cosmic rays over a wide energy range and with an unprecedented statistics. The apparatus design is particularly suited for particle and antiparticle identification. Moreover, the PAMELA long flight duration allows to study the time variation of low energy (<30 GeV) cosmic rays, measuring the differential energy intensity of oppositely charged particles down to ˜70 MeV. We present preliminary results on the time-dependent electron, positron and proton fluxes measured at Earth between July 2006 and the end of 2014. This time period spans between the A<0 solar minimum of solar cycle 23 (2006-2009) till the middle of solar maximum of solar cycle 24. A direct comparison of electron, positron and proton spectra time variation and their differences allow a detailed study of charge-sign dependent solar modulation, both during solar minimum and at the polarity reversal of the heliospheric magnetic field.

  11. Measurement of the topological charge of mixed OAM states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shutova, Mariia; Zhdanova, Alexandra; Sokolov, Alexei

    2016-05-01

    In the current work, we investigate how the technique of measuring the topological charge of an optical vortex by using a tilted convex lens (tilted lens technique) works for optical vortices in mixed orbital angular momentum (OAM) states (i.e. the case when one beam contains several components with different values of topological charge). A mixed OAM state may occur, for example, because of perturbations in the optical devices used to generate the state, such as spatial light modulators or spiral phase plates. Hence, we present experimental results and theoretical simulations for the measurement of the topological charge of mixed states with variable amounts of each component contributing to the total beam intensity. We also investigate two different cases: first, when interference between components is present (coherent addition of component OAM states), and second, when interference is absent (incoherent addition). We conclude that in both cases the results of the tilted lens technique are valid for that component of light which is dominant (i.e. the component that contributes to more than 50% of the beam's total intensity). Presenter is supported by the Herman F. Heep and Minnie Belle Heep Texas A&M University Endowed Fund administered by the Texas A&M Foundation.

  12. Protein adsorption on ion exchange resins and monoclonal antibody charge variant modulation.

    PubMed

    Guélat, Bertrand; Khalaf, Rushd; Lattuada, Marco; Costioli, Matteo; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2016-05-20

    A novel multicomponent adsorption equilibrium model for proteins on ion-exchange resins is developed on a statistical thermodynamic basis including surface coverage effects and protein-resin and protein-protein interactions. The resulting model exhibits a general competitive Langmuirian behavior and was applied to the study and optimization of the separation of monoclonal antibody charge variants on two strong cation exchangers. The model accounts explicitly for the effect of both pH and salt concentration, and its parameters can be determined in diluted conditions, that is, through physically sound assumptions, all model parameters can be obtained using solely experiments in diluted conditions, and be used to make predictions in overloaded conditions. The parameterization of the model and optimization of the separation is based on a two-step approach. First, gradient experiments in diluted conditions are undertaken in order to determine the model parameters. Based on these experiments and on information about the proteins of interest and the stationary phase used, all the model parameters can be estimated. Second, using the parameterized model, an initial Pareto optimization is undertaken where overloaded operating conditions are investigated. Experiments from this Pareto set are then used to refine the estimation of the model parameters. A second Pareto optimization can then be undertaken, this time with the refined parameters. This can be repeated until a satisfactory set of model parameters is found. This iterative approach is shown to be extremely efficient and to provide large amounts of knowledge based on only a few experiments. It is shown that due to the strong physical foundation of the model and the very low number of adjustable parameters, the number of iterations is expected to be at most two or three. Furthermore, the model based tool is improved as more experimental knowledge is provided, allowing for better estimations of the chromatographic

  13. Noncontact charge measurement of moving microparticles contacting dielectric surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesterov, Alexander; Löffler, Felix; König, Kai; Trunk, Ulrich; Leibe, Klaus; Felgenhauer, Thomas; Stadler, Volker; Bischoff, Ralf; Breitling, Frank; Lindenstruth, Volker; Hausmann, Michael

    2007-07-01

    In this study examples for a noncontact procedure that allow the description of instant electric charging of moving microparticles that contact dielectric surfaces, for instance, of a flow hose are presented. The described principle is based on the measurement of induced currents in grounded metal wire probes, as moving particles pass close to the probe. The feasibility of the approach was tested with laser printer toner particles of a given size for different basic particle flow and charging conditions. An analytic description for the induced currents was developed and compared to observed effects in order to interpret the results qualitatively. The implementation of the presented procedure can be applied to transparent and nontransparent particle containers and flow lines of complex geometry which can be composed from the presented basic flow stream configurations.

  14. Measurement of $$K^{+}$$ production in charged-current $$\

    DOE PAGES

    Marshall, C. M.

    2016-07-14

    Production of K+ mesons in charged-current νμ interactions on plastic scintillator (CH) is measured using MINERvA exposed to the low-energy NuMI beam at Fermilab. Timing information is used to isolate a sample of 885 charged-current events containing a stopping K+ which decays at rest. The differential cross section in K+ kinetic energy, dσ/dTK, is observed to be relatively flat between 0 and 500 MeV. As a result, its shape is in good agreement with the prediction by the genie neutrino event generator when final-state interactions are included, however the data rate is lower than the prediction by 15%.

  15. Measurement of $K^{+}$ production in charged-current $\

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, C. M.

    2016-07-14

    Production of K+ mesons in charged-current νμ interactions on plastic scintillator (CH) is measured using MINERvA exposed to the low-energy NuMI beam at Fermilab. Timing information is used to isolate a sample of 885 charged-current events containing a stopping K+ which decays at rest. The differential cross section in K+ kinetic energy, dσ/dTK, is observed to be relatively flat between 0 and 500 MeV. As a result, its shape is in good agreement with the prediction by the genie neutrino event generator when final-state interactions are included, however the data rate is lower than the prediction by 15%.

  16. Measurement of $K^{+}$ production in charged-current $\

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, C. M.

    2016-07-14

    Production of K+ mesons in charged-current νμ interactions on plastic scintillator (CH) is measured using MINERvA exposed to the low-energy NuMI beam at Fermilab. Timing information is used to isolate a sample of 885 charged-current events containing a stopping K+ which decays at rest. The differential cross section in K+ kinetic energy, dσ/dTK, is observed to be relatively flat between 0 and 500 MeV. As a result, its shape is in good agreement with the prediction by the genie neutrino event generator when final-state interactions are included, however the data rate is lower than the prediction by 15%.

  17. Effects of exchanged cation and layer charge on the sorption of water and EGME vapors on montmorillonite clays

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chiou, C.T.; Rutherford, D.W.

    1997-01-01

    The effects of exchanged cation and layer charge on the sorption of water and ethylene glycol monoethyl ether (EGME) vapors on montmorillonite have been studied on SAz-1 and SWy-1 source clays, each exchanged respectively with Ca, Na, K, Cs and tetramethylammonium (TMA) cations. The corresponding lattice expansions were also determined, and the corresponding N2 adsorption data were provided for comparison. For clays exchanged with cations of low hydrating powers (such as K, Cs and TMA), water shows a notably lower uptake than does N2 at low relative pressures (P/P0). By contrast, EGME shows higher uptakes than N2 on all exchanged clays at all P/P0. The anomaly for water is attributed to its relatively low attraction for siloxane surfaces of montmorillonite because of its high cohesive energy density. In addition to solvating cations and expanding interlayers, water and EGME vapors condense into small clay pores and interlayer voids created by interlayer expansion. The initial (dry) interlayer separation varies more significantly with cation type than with layer charge; the water-saturated interlayer separation varies more with cation type than the EGME-saturated interlayer separation. Because of the differences in surface adsorption and interlayer expansion for water and EGME, no general correspondence is found between the isotherms of water and EGME on exchanged clays, nor is a simple relation observed between the overall uptake of either vapor and the cation solvating power. The excess interlayer capacities of water and of EGME that result from lattice expansion of the exchanged clays are estimated by correcting for amounts of vapor adsorption on planar clay surfaces and of vapor condensation into intrinsic clay pores. The resulting data follow more closely the relative solvating powers of the exchanged cations.

  18. Total Cross Section Measurements and Velocity Distributions of Hyperthermal Charge Transfer in Xe2+ + N2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hause, Michael; Prince, Benjamin; Bemish, Raymond

    Guided-ion beam measurements of the charge exchange (CEX) cross section for Xe2+ + N2 are reported for collision energies ranging from 0.3 to 100 eV in the center-of-mass frame. Measured total XS decrease from 69.5 +/-0.3 Angstroms2 (Angs.) at the lowest collision energies to 40 Angs.2at 100 eV. The product N2+CEX cross section is similar to the total CEX cross section while those of the dissociative product, N+, are less than 1Angs.2 for collision energies above 9 eV. The product N2+CEXcross section measured here are much larger than the total optical emission-excitation cross sections for the N2+(A) and (B) state products determined previously in the chemiluminescence study of Prince and Chiu suggesting that most of the N2+products are in the X state. Time-of-flight (TOF) spectra of both the Xe+ and N2+products suggest two different CEX product channels. The first leaves highly-vibrationally excited N2+products with forward scattered Xe+ (LAB frame) and releases between 0.35 to 0.6 eV translational energy for collisions below 17.6 eV. The second component decreases with collisional energy and leaves backscattered Xe+ and low-vibrational states of N2+.At collision energies above 17.6 eV, only charge exchange involving minimal momentum exchange remains in the TOF spectra. AFOSR 13RV07COR.

  19. Optical measurements of Na-Ca-K exchange currents in intact outer segments isolated from bovine retinal rods

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    The properties of Na-Ca-K exchange current through the plasma membrane of intact rod outer segments (ROS) isolated from bovine retinas were studied with the optical probe neutral red. Small cellular organelles such as bovine ROS do not offer an adequate collecting area to measure Na-Ca-K exchange currents with electrophysiological techniques. This study demonstrates that Na-Ca-K exchange current in bovine ROS can be measured with the dye neutral red and dual-wavelength spectrophotometry. The binding of neutral red is sensitive to transport of cations across the plasma membrane of ROS by the effect of the translocated cations on the surface potential of the intracellular disk membranes (1985. J. Membr. Biol. 88: 249-262). Electrogenic Na+ fluxes through the ROS plasma membrane were measured with a resolution of 10(5) Na+ ions/ROS per s, equivalent to a current of approximately 0.01 pA; maximal electrogenic Na-Ca-K exchange flux in bovine ROS was equivalent to a maximal exchange current of 1-2 pA. Electrogenic Na+ fluxes were identified as Na-Ca-K exchange current based on a comparison between electrogenic Na+ flux and Na(+)-stimulated Ca2+ release with respect to flux rate, Na+ dependence, and ion selectivity. Neutral red monitored the net entry of a single positive charge carried by Na+ for each Ca2+ ion released (i.e., monitored the Na-Ca-K exchange current). Na-Ca-K exchange in the plasma membrane of bovine ROS had the following properties: (a) Inward Na-Ca-K exchange current required internal Ca2+ (half-maximal stimulation at a free Ca2+ concentration of 0.9 microM), whereas outward Na-Ca-K exchange current required both external Ca2+ (half-maximal stimulation at a free Ca2+ concentration of 1.1 microM) and external K+. (b) Inward Na-Ca-K exchange current depended in a sigmoidal manner on the external Na+ concentration, identical to Na(+)-stimulated Ca2+ release measured with Ca(2+)- indicating dyes. (c) The neutral red method was modified to measure Ca(2

  20. Upper-limit charge exchange cross sections for mercury (plus) on molybdenum and cesium (plus) on aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dugan, J. V., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    Upper-limit charge exchange cross sections are calculated for Hg(+) on Mo and Cs(+) on Al. The cross sections are calculated from the polarization interaction at low ion energies (1 to 500 eV) and by assuming favorable curve crossings with a hard-core reaction radius at higher energies (500 eV to 10 keV). The cross sections for Hg(+) on Mo becomes greater than corresponding Hg Hg(+) resonance values at ion energies below 2 eV, whereas the Cs(+) Al values remain considerably lower than the Cs(+)Cs resonance value at all ion energies. It is also shown that charge exchange of slow Hg(+) with Mo may be important for spacecraft with electron bombardment thrusters.

  1. Spectral modeling of the charge-exchange X-ray emission from M82

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Shuinai; Ji, Li; Zhou, Xin; Wang, Q. Daniel; Smith, Randall K.; Foster, Adam R.

    2014-10-10

    It has been proposed that the charge-exchange (CX) process at the interface between hot and cool interstellar gases could contribute significantly to the observed soft X-ray emission in star-forming galaxies. We analyze the XMM-Newton/reflection grating spectrometer (RGS) spectrum of M82 using a newly developed CX model combined with a single-temperature thermal plasma to characterize the volume-filling hot gas. The CX process is largely responsible for not only the strongly enhanced forbidden lines of the Kα triplets of various He-like ions but also good fractions of the Lyα transitions of C VI (∼87%), O VIII, and N VII (≳50%) as well. In total about a quarter of the X-ray flux in the RGS 6-30 Å band originates in the CX. We infer an ion incident rate of 3 × 10{sup 51} s{sup –1} undergoing CX at the hot and cool gas interface and an effective area of the interface of ∼2 × 10{sup 45} cm{sup 2} that is one order of magnitude larger than the cross section of the global biconic outflow. With the CX contribution accounted for, the best-fit temperature of the hot gas is 0.6 keV, and the metal abundances are approximately solar. We further show that the same CX/thermal plasma model also gives an excellent description of the EPIC-pn spectrum of the outflow Cap, projected at 11.6 kpc away from the galactic disk of M82. This analysis demonstrates that the CX is potentially an important contributor to the X-ray emission from starburst galaxies and also an invaluable tool to probe the interface astrophysics.

  2. Solar Wind Charge Exchange Contribution to the ROSAT All Sky Survey Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uprety, Y.; Chiao, M.; Collier, M. R.; Cravens, T.; Galeazzi, M.; Koutroumpa, D.; Kuntz, K. D.; Lallement, R.; Lepri, S. T.; Liu, W.; McCammon, D.; Morgan, K.; Porter, F. S.; Prasai, K.; Snowden, S. L.; Thomas, N. E.; Ursino, E.; Walsh, B. M.

    2016-10-01

    DXL (Diffuse X-ray emission from the Local Galaxy) is a sounding rocket mission designed to estimate the contribution of solar wind charge eXchange (SWCX) to the diffuse X-ray background and to help determine the properties of the Local Hot Bubble. The detectors are large area thin-window proportional counters with a spectral response that is similar to that of the PSPC used in the ROSAT All Sky Survey (RASS). A direct comparison of DXL and RASS data for the same part of the sky viewed from quite different vantage points in the solar system, and the assumption of approximate isotropy for the solar wind, allowed us to quantify the SWCX contribution to all six RASS bands (R1-R7, excluding R3). We find that the SWCX contribution at l=140^\\circ ,b=0^\\circ , where the DXL path crosses the Galactic plane, is 33 % +/- 6 % ({statistical})+/- 12 % ({systematic}) for R1, 44 % +/- 6 % +/- 5 % for R2, 18 % +/- 12 % +/- 11 % for R4, 14 % +/- 11 % +/- 9 % for R5, and negligible for the R6 and R7 bands. Reliable models for the distribution of neutral H and He in the solar system permit estimation of the contribution of interplanetary SWCX emission over the the whole sky and correction of the RASS maps. We find that the average SWCX contribution in the whole sky is 26 % +/- 6 % +/- 13 % for R1, 30 % +/- 4 % +/- 4 % for R2, 8 % +/- 5 % +/- 5 % for R4, 6 % +/- 4 % +/- 4 % for R5, and negligible for R6 and R7.

  3. Semiautomated pH gradient ion-exchange chromatography of monoclonal antibody charge variants.

    PubMed

    Talebi, Mohammad; Shellie, Robert A; Hilder, Emily F; Lacher, Nathan A; Haddad, Paul R

    2014-10-07

    A new approach using a chromatography system equipped with isocratic pumps and an electrolytic eluent generator (EG) is introduced, replacing external pH gradient delivery using conventional gradient systems, in which bottled buffers with preadjusted pH are mixed using a gradient pump. The EG is capable of generating high purity base or acid required for online preparation of the buffer at the point of use, utilizing deionized water as the only carrier stream. Typically, the buffer was generated from online titration of a reagent composed of low molecular weight amines. The reagent was delivered isocratically into a static mixing tee, where it was titrated to the required pH with electrolytically generated base or acid. The required pH gradient was thus conveniently generated by electrically controlling the concentration of titrant. Also, since the pH was adjusted at the point of use, this approach offered enhanced throughput in terms of eluent preparation time and labor, and with a more reproducible pH profile. The performance of the system was demonstrated by running pH gradients ranging from pH 8.2 to 10.9 on a polymer monolith cation-exchange column for high throughput profiling of charge heterogeneity of intact, basic therapeutic monoclonal antibodies. A high degree of flexibility in modulating the key parameters of the pH gradient, including the buffer concentration, the pH gradient slope and the operating pH range was demonstrated. This enabled fine-tuning of the separation conditions for each individual antibody in order to enhance the chromatographic resolution.

  4. Molecular target and projectile angular scattering effects in stopping power and charge exchange at low-to-intermediate projectile energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrera-Trujillo, R.; Öhrn, Y.; Sabin, John R.; Deumens, E.

    2002-02-01

    We analyze the implications of the molecular structure of a target and the angular scattering effects on projectile-target collisions within the Electron-Nuclear Dynamics (END) approach. We show the suitability of the END method for the analysis of molecular scattering processes such as differential cross sections, charge exchange, and energy loss as required for the study of the stopping cross section. As a consequence of these effects, we show that the rovibronic energy loss becomes of greatest importance at low projectile energies. Furthermore, we find that the Bragg additivity rule and the linear-velocity dependence of the stopping cross section are not fulfilled at low projectile energies. Finally, we analyze the differences in the scattering processes for molecular and atomic targets, and show that in a transmission experiment with small exit window, the acceptance angle corresponds to different impact parameter selection for molecular targets than for atomic ones. Thus, the measured stopping cross section becomes a function of the acceptance angle of the experimental setup. We present results for hydrogen beams on H2 and N2 gas targets.

  5. Heavy-Ion Double-Charge Exchange Study via a 12C(18O,18Ne)12Be Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takaki, Motonobu; Matsubara, Hiroaki; Uesaka, Tomohiro; Aoi, Nori; Dozono, Masanori; Hashimoto, Takashi; Kawabata, Takahiro; Kawase, Shoichiro; Kisamori, Keiichi; Kubota, Yuki; Lee, Cheng Soo; Lee, Jenny; Maeda, Yukie; Michimasa, Shin'ichiro; Miki, Kenjiro; Ota, Shinsuke; Sasano, Masaki; Shimoura, Susumu; Suzuki, Tomokazu; Takahisa, Keiji; Tang, Tsz Leung; Tamii, Atsushi; Tokieda, Hiroshi; Yako, Kentaro; Yokoyama, Rin; Zenihiro, Juzo

    Heavy-ion double-charge exchange (HIDCX) reactions are a new promising spectroscopic tool for double spin-isospin flips excitation modes by taking an advantage of transferring isospin and/or spin quantum numbers by an amount of two to target nuclei. However, the data on HIDCX reactions is very scarce. A measurement of a (n,p)-type HIDCX reaction, 12C(18O,18Ne)12Be at 80 MeV/nucleon, was performed by employing the high-resolution spectrometer Grand Raiden at Research Center Nuclear Physics, Osaka University. The excitation energy spectrum of 12Be was obtained, and three clear peaks were observed at 0.0, 2.2, and 4.5 MeV, which are corresponding to ground and excited states of 12Be. The angular distributions of the cross sections for these peaks were obtained within the scattering angle range of 0.0°-4.0° in the center of mass system. We found that the angular distributions have characteristic shapes according to their mulpolarities.

  6. Voltage-dependent charge movement associated with activation of the CLC-5 2Cl−/1H+ exchanger

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Andrew J.; Lippiat, Jonathan D.

    2010-01-01

    The family of CLC proteins comprises both Cl− channels and Cl−/H+ exchange transporters with varying degrees of voltage dependence. The human CLC-5 is an electrogenic voltage-dependent 2Cl−/1H+ exchanger that gives rise to strongly outwardly rectifying currents when expressed. We conducted whole-cell recordings from HEK293 cells transiently transfected with either wild-type CLC-5 or a permeation-deficient mutant, E268A. With E268A CLC-5 we recorded transient voltage-dependent currents that represent the gating currents associated with CLC-5 activation and had kinetics that could be described by voltage-dependent forward and reverse transition rates. In extracellular solutions rich in Cl− or Br−, CLC-5 exhibited a gating charge of 1.3, but this was reduced to 0.9 in solutions comprising the impermeant anions aspartate, methanesulfonate, sulfate, or HEPES. Extracellular ion depletion by local perfusion with isotonic mannitol failed to reduce the gating charge further. Lowering intracellular pH from 7.4 to 5.4 did not shift the voltage-dependence of the gating currents, but reducing and increasing intracellular Cl− shifted the charge-voltage relationship to more negative and positive potentials, respectively. Our data suggest that voltage sensing is an intrinsic property of the CLC-5 protein and that permeant anions, particularly Cl−, modulate a voltage-dependent transition to an activated state from which Cl−/H+ exchange can occur.—Smith, A. J., Lippiat, J. D. Voltage-dependent charge movement associated with activation of the CLC-5 2Cl−/1H+ exchanger. PMID:20501796

  7. Charge exchange in cometary coma: Discovery of H− ions in the solar wind close to comet 67P/Churyumov‐Gerasimenko

    PubMed Central

    Cravens, T. E.; Llera, K.; Goldstein, R.; Mokashi, P.; Tzou, C.‐Y.; Broiles, T.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract As Rosetta was orbiting comet 67P/Churyumov‐Gerasimenko, the Ion and Electron Sensor detected negative particles with angular distributions like those of the concurrently measured solar wind protons but with fluxes of only about 10% of the proton fluxes and energies of about 90% of the proton energies. Using well‐known cross sections and energy‐loss data, it is determined that the fluxes and energies of the negative particles are consistent with the production of H− ions in the solar wind by double charge exchange with molecules in the coma. PMID:27656008

  8. Charge exchange in cometary coma: Discovery of H(-) ions in the solar wind close to comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko.

    PubMed

    Burch, J L; Cravens, T E; Llera, K; Goldstein, R; Mokashi, P; Tzou, C-Y; Broiles, T

    2015-07-16

    As Rosetta was orbiting comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, the Ion and Electron Sensor detected negative particles with angular distributions like those of the concurrently measured solar wind protons but with fluxes of only about 10% of the proton fluxes and energies of about 90% of the proton energies. Using well-known cross sections and energy-loss data, it is determined that the fluxes and energies of the negative particles are consistent with the production of H(-) ions in the solar wind by double charge exchange with molecules in the coma.

  9. Observation of lines above 2000 A in OVIII and CVI in the PLT tokamak due to charge-exchange processes: diagnostic applications

    SciTech Connect

    Suckewer, S; Skinner, C.H.; Stratton, B.; Bell, R.; Cavallo, A.; Hosea, J.; Hwang, D.; Schilling, G.

    1984-02-01

    Hydrogen-like oxygen and carbon lines from high-n transitions with wavelengths above 2000 A were observed as a result of charge-exchange processes during neutral beam injection of hydrogen atoms into the Princeton Large Torus (PLT) tokamak. The lines are: OVIII 2976 A (8 ..-->.. 7 transitions), CVI 3434 A (7 ..-->.. 6), and CVI 5291 A (8 ..-->.. 7). Application of these lines for Doppler ion temperature measurements and initial obeservations of neutral beam vertical and horizontal distributions in the plasma are presented.

  10. Boltzmann-BCA Analysis on the Role of Charge Exchange in Microscopic Erosion of Fusion-Relevant Plasma Facing Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keniley, Shane; Curreli, Davide

    2016-10-01

    Charge-exchange is expected to play an important role in microscopic erosion of plasma facing components under fusion-relevant conditions. In this work we present a set of detailed Boltzmann simulations of the near-wall plasma including surface response, with the goal of highlighting the relative role of charge exchange against ion-induced erosion. The simulations reveal that the charge-exchange processes occurring in the collisional presheath release energetic neutrals toward the wall with angular distributions ranging from grazing to normal incidence; the ions accelerated across the collisional and magnetic presheath acts as a dominant factor in affecting the initial phase of the neutral population reaching the wall, and ultimately its energy-angle distribution at the surface. The effect on erosion rates, plasma sheath/presheath structure, and moments of the distributions are highlighted. The study has been made possible thanks to a newly-developed dynamically-coupled Boltzmann-BCA model retaining the effects of both the plasma and the material erosion. Material based on work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research through the SciDAC project on Plasma-Surface Interactions, Award No. DE-SC0008875.

  11. Cross sections of charge exchange and ionization in O{sup 8+}+H collision in Debye plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Pandey, M. K.; Lin, Y.-C.; Ho, Y. K.

    2012-06-15

    Charge exchange and ionization processes in O{sup 8+}+H collision system in a Debye plasma are studied using the classical trajectory Monte Carlo (CTMC) method in the collision energy ranging from 1 keV/amu to 500 keV/amu. Total charge exchange and ionization cross sections have been determined in both screening and unscreening environments. In the unscreened case, partial cross sections for transfer into individual n shells of the projectile have also been determined. An interesting and remarkable feature of sudden increase in the ionization cross sections at lower velocities is discussed in terms of the CTMC framework. Results are analyzed in light of available theoretical and experimental results. The cross sections dependencies on Debye screening lengths have been investigated, and plasma screening effect on charge exchange and ionization cross sections has been found throughout the collision energies range, but is particularly pronounced at low projectile collision energies. The sudden rise in the ionization cross sections towards lower energies is explained qualitatively in terms of the multiple encounter model.

  12. Quantum-mechanical interference in charge exchange between hydrogen and graphene-like surfaces.

    PubMed

    Romero, M; Iglesias-García, A; Goldberg, E C

    2012-02-01

    The neutral to negative charge fluctuation of a hydrogen atom in front of a graphene surface is calculated by using the Anderson model within an infinite intra atomic Coulomb repulsion approximation. We perform an ab initio calculation of the Anderson hybridization function that allows investigation of the effect of quantum-mechanical interference related to the Berry phase inherent to the graphene band structure. We find that consideration of the interaction of hydrogen on top of many C atoms leads to a marked asymmetry of the imaginary part of the hybridization function with respect to the Fermi level. Consequently, Fano factors larger than one and strongly dependent on the energy around the Fermi level are predicted. Moreover, the suppression of the hybridization for energies above the Fermi level can explain the unexpected large negative ion formation measured in the scattering of protons by graphite-like surfaces.

  13. Charge exchange produced K-shell x-ray emission from Ar16+ in a tokamak plasma with neutral beam injection

    SciTech Connect

    Beiersdorfer, P; Bitter, M; Marion, M; Olson, R E

    2004-12-27

    High-resolution spectroscopy of hot tokamak plasma seeded with argon ions and interacting with an energetic, short-pulse neutral hydrogen beam was used to obtain the first high-resolution K-shell x-ray spectrum formed solely by charge exchange. The observed K-shell emission of Ar{sup 16+} is dominated by the intercombination and forbidden lines, providing clear signatures of charge exchange. Results from an ab initio atomic cascade model provide excellent agreement, validating a semiclassical approach for calculating charge exchange cross sections.

  14. Measurement of the Charged Pion Electromagnetic Form Factor

    SciTech Connect

    J. Volmer; David Abbott; H. Anklin; Chris Armstrong; John Arrington; K. Assamagan; Steven Avery; Oliver K. Baker; Henk Blok; C. Bochna; Ed Brash; Herbert Breuer; Nicholas Chant; Jim Dunne; Tom Eden; Rolf Ent; David Gaskell; Ron Gilman; Kenneth Gustafsson; Wendy Hinton; Garth Huber; Hal Jackson; Mark K. Jones; Cynthia Keppel; P.H. Kim; Wooyoung Kim; Andi Klein; Doug Koltenuk; Meme Liang; George Lolos; Allison Lung; David Mack; D. McKee; David Meekins; Joseph Mitchell; H. Mkrtchian; B. Mueller; Gabriel Niculescu; Ioana Niculescu; D. Pitz; D. Potterveld; Liming Qin; Juerg Reinhold; I.K. Shin; Stepan Stepanyan; V. Tadevosian; L.G. Tang; R.L.J. van der Meer; K. Vansyoc; D. Van Westrum; Bill Vulcan; Stephen Wood; Chen Yan; W.X. Zhao; Beni Zihlmann

    2001-02-26

    Separated longitudinal and transverse structure functions for the reaction 1H(e,eprime pi+)n were measured in the momentum transfer region Q2=0.6-1.6 (GeV/c)**2 at a value of the invariant mass W=1.95 GeV. New values for the pion charge form factor were extracted from the longitudinal cross section by using a recently developed Regge model. The results indicate that the pion form factor in this region is larger than previously assumed and is consistent with a monopole parameterization fitted to very low Q2 elastic data.

  15. Charged current inclusive measurements in MINERνA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurtado, Kenyi

    2015-05-01

    MINERvA is a neutrino scattering experiment stationed in the high intensity NuMI beam line at Fermilab, designed to measure neutrino cross sections, final states and nuclear effects on a variety of targets in the few-GeV region to reduce systematic uncertainties in oscillation experiments and provide new understanding of the nucleus. Here we present the current MINERvA results for inclusive charged current neutrino and anti-neutrino scattering in the active region of the detector and different neutrino cross section ratios with different nuclear targets.

  16. Charged current inclusive measurements in MINERνA

    SciTech Connect

    Hurtado, Kenyi

    2015-05-15

    MINERvA is a neutrino scattering experiment stationed in the high intensity NuMI beam line at Fermilab, designed to measure neutrino cross sections, final states and nuclear effects on a variety of targets in the few-GeV region to reduce systematic uncertainties in oscillation experiments and provide new understanding of the nucleus. Here we present the current MINERvA results for inclusive charged current neutrino and anti-neutrino scattering in the active region of the detector and different neutrino cross section ratios with different nuclear targets.

  17. Measurement of the charged kaon mass with the MIPP RICH

    SciTech Connect

    Graf, Nicholas J.

    2008-08-01

    The currently accepted value of the charged kaon mass is 493.677 ± 0.013 MeV (26 ppm). It is a weighted average of six measurements, most of which use kaonic atom X-ray energy techniques. The two most recent and precise results dominate the average but differ by 122 ppm. Inconsistency in the data set needs to be resolved, preferably using independent techniques. One possibility uses the Cherenkov effect. A measurement of the charged kaon mass using this technique is presented. The data was taken with the Main Injector Particle Production experiment at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory using a tagged beam of protons, kaons, and pions ranging in momentum from 37 GeV/c to 63 GeV/c. The measured value is 491.3 ± 1.7 MeV. This is within 1.4σ of the current value. An improvement in precision by a factor of 35 would make this technique competitive for resolving the ambiguity in the X-ray data.

  18. Charge measurements for an asteroid sample return mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macfaden, A.; Aplin, K. L.; Bowles, N. E.

    2013-09-01

    Photoelectric charging of asteroid regolith material influences particle motion and escape. Differing spacecraft and asteroid charges may also affect sample return on missions such as Marco Polo-R. To study this, bespoke 2D particle-in-cell code simulating the behaviour of photoelectrons trapped near a photoemitting surface (photosheath) has been written and implemented. The spacecraft- photosheath system reaches equilibrium in 1 ms, which is rapid compared to the descent timescale. Equilibria reached in simulations are therefore assumed representative of the dynamic spacecraft environment. Predicted potentials at different heightsand with different solar zenith angle are presented, so that an instrument to measure the potential difference across the spacecraft can be defined. The distorting effect of the spacecraft significantly modifies the potential difference and displacement currents during the terminal descent, by introducing an equipotential body, creating a shadow, and photoemitting itself. By considering the distortion from different parts of the spacecraft, optimal locations for a set of electrodes to measure the potential difference are suggested. Potential differences of about 100 mV are expected to be generated across the electrodes, which should be representative of the electrical environment. The results demonstrate that a simple set of electrodes can measure the asteroid's surface electric field during sample collection.

  19. Aircraft measurements of high average charges on cloud drops in layer clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beard, Kenneth V.; Ochs, Harry T.; Twohy, Cynthia H.

    2004-07-01

    The first reliable aircraft measurements of characteristic cloud drop charges were obtained by utilizing a counterflow virtual impactor to substantially increase charge sensitivity and eliminate spurious contact charging that contaminated previous aircraft measurements. We find average drop charges more than an order of magnitude larger than expected from mountain surface measurements in similar clouds. Our evaluation of the data indicates that the high average charges on cloud drops originate in charge layers at the cloud boundaries and are carried into the cloud layer by vertical motions. These initial aircraft results demonstrate that cloud drop charges in layer clouds may be high enough to influence microphysical processes that promote precipitation.

  20. Charge transfer-induced magnetic exchange bias and electron localization in (111)- and (001)-oriented LaNiO3/LaMnO3 superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Haoming; Barzola-Quiquia, Jose Luis; Yang, Chang; Patzig, Christian; Höche, Thomas; Esquinazi, Pablo; Grundmann, Marius; Lorenz, Michael

    2017-03-01

    High-quality lattice-matched LaNiO3/LaMnO3 superlattices with monolayer terrace structure have been grown on both (111)- and (001)-oriented SrTiO3 substrates by pulsed laser deposition. In contrast to the previously reported experiments, a magnetic exchange bias is observed that reproducibly occurs in both (111)- and (001)-oriented superlattices with the thin single layers of 5 and 7 unit cells, respectively. The exchange bias is theoretically explained by charge transfer-induced magnetic moments at Ni atoms. Furthermore, magnetization data at low temperature suggest two magnetic phases in the superlattices, with Néel temperature around 10 K. Electrical transport measurements reveal a metal-insulator transition with strong localization of electrons in the superlattices with the thin LaNiO3 layers of 4 unit cells, in which the electrical transport is dominated by two-dimensional variable range hopping.

  1. Transit time and charge storage measurements in heavily doped emitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neugroschel, A.; Park, J. S.; Hwang, B. Y.

    1986-01-01

    A first direct measurement of the minority-carrier transit time in a transparent heavily doped emitter layer is reported. The value was obtained by a high-frequency conductance method recently developed and used for low-doped Si. The transit time coupled with the steady-state current enables the determination of the quasi-static charge stored in the emitter and the quasi-static emitter capacitance. Using a transport model, from the measured transit time, the value for the minority-carrier diffusion coefficient and mobility is estimated. The measurements were done using a heavily doped emitter of the Si p(+)-n-p bipolar transistor. The new result indicates that the position-averaged minority-carrier diffusion coefficients may be much smaller than the corresponding majority-carrier values for emitters having a concentration ranging from about 3 x 10 to the 19th per cu cm to 10 to the 20th per cu cm.

  2. Transit time and charge storage measurements in heavily doped emitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neugroschel, A.; Park, J. S.; Hwang, B. Y.

    1986-01-01

    A first direct measurement of the minority-carrier transit time in a transparent heavily doped emitter layer is reported. The value was obtained by a high-frequency conductance method recently developed and used for low-doped Si. The transit time coupled with the steady-state current enables the determination of the quasi-static charge stored in the emitter and the quasi-static emitter capacitance. Using a transport model, from the measured transit time, the value for the minority-carrier diffusion coefficient and mobility is estimated. The measurements were done using a heavily doped emitter of the Si p(+)-n-p bipolar transistor. The new result indicates that the position-averaged minority-carrier diffusion coefficients may be much smaller than the corresponding majority-carrier values for emitters having a concentration ranging from about 3 x 10 to the 19th per cu cm to 10 to the 20th per cu cm.

  3. Charge Loss and Charge Sharing Measurements for Two Different Pixelated Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaskin, Jessica; Sharma, Dharma; Ramsey, Brian; Seller, Paul

    2003-01-01

    As part of ongoing research at Marshall Space Flight Center, Cadmium-Zinc- Telluride (CdZnTe) pixilated detectors are being developed for use at the focal plane of the High Energy Replicated Optics (HERO) telescope. HERO requires a 64x64 pixel array with a spatial resolution of around 200 microns (with a 6m focal length) and high energy resolution (< 2% at 60keV). We are currently testing smaller arrays as a necessary first step towards this goal. In this presentation, we compare charge sharing and charge loss measurements between two devices that differ both electronically and geometrically. The first device consists of a 1-mm-thick piece of CdZnTe that is sputtered with a 4x4 array of pixels with pixel pitch of 750 microns (inter-pixel gap is 100 microns). The signal is read out using discrete ultra-low-noise preamplifiers, one for each of the 16 pixels. The second detector consists of a 2-mm-thick piece of CdZnTe that is sputtered with a 16x16 array of pixels with a pixel pitch of 300 microns (inter-pixel gap is 50 microns). Instead of using discrete preamplifiers, the crystal is bonded to an ASIC that provides all of the front-end electronics to each of the 256 pixels. what degree the bias voltage (i.e. the electric field) and hence the drift and diffusion coefficients affect our measurements. Further, we compare the measured results with simulated results and discuss to

  4. Charge Loss and Charge Sharing Measurements for Two Different Pixelated Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaskin, Jessica; Sharma, Dharma; Ramsey, Brian; Seller, Paul

    2003-01-01

    As part of ongoing research at Marshall Space Flight Center, Cadmium-Zinc- Telluride (CdZnTe) pixilated detectors are being developed for use at the focal plane of the High Energy Replicated Optics (HERO) telescope. HERO requires a 64x64 pixel array with a spatial resolution of around 200 microns (with a 6m focal length) and high energy resolution (< 2% at 60keV). We are currently testing smaller arrays as a necessary first step towards this goal. In this presentation, we compare charge sharing and charge loss measurements between two devices that differ both electronically and geometrically. The first device consists of a 1-mm-thick piece of CdZnTe that is sputtered with a 4x4 array of pixels with pixel pitch of 750 microns (inter-pixel gap is 100 microns). The signal is read out using discrete ultra-low-noise preamplifiers, one for each of the 16 pixels. The second detector consists of a 2-mm-thick piece of CdZnTe that is sputtered with a 16x16 array of pixels with a pixel pitch of 300 microns (inter-pixel gap is 50 microns). Instead of using discrete preamplifiers, the crystal is bonded to an ASIC that provides all of the front-end electronics to each of the 256 pixels. what degree the bias voltage (i.e. the electric field) and hence the drift and diffusion coefficients affect our measurements. Further, we compare the measured results with simulated results and discuss to

  5. Charge Loss and Charge Sharing Measurements for Two Different Pixelated Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaskin, J. A.; Sharma, D. P.; Ramsey, B. D.; Seller, P.

    2003-05-01

    As part of ongoing research at Marshall Space Flight Center, Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride (CdZnTe) multi-pixel detectors are being developed for use at the focal plane of the High Energy Replicated Optics (HERO) telescope. HERO requires a 64x64 pixel array with a spatial resolution of around 200 microns (with a 6 meter focal length) and high energy resolution (< 2% at 60keV). We are currently testing smaller arrays as a necessary first step towards this goal. In this presentation, we compare charge sharing and charge loss measurements between two devices that differ both electronically and geometrically. The first device consists of a 1-mm-thick piece of CdZnTe that is sputtered with a 4x4 array of pixels with pixel pitch of 750 microns (inter-pixel gap is 100 microns). The signal is read out using discrete ultra-low-noise preamplifiers, one for each of the 16 pixels. The second detector consists of a 2-mm-thick piece of CdZnTe that is sputtered with a 16x16 array of pixels with a pixel pitch of 300 microns (inter-pixel gap is 50 microns). Instead of using discrete preamplifiers, the crystal is bonded to an ASIC that provides all of the front-end electronics to each of the 256 pixels. Further, we compare the measured results with simulated results and discuss to what degree the bias voltage (i.e. the electric field) and hence the drift and diffusion coefficients affect our measurements.

  6. Charge exchange spectroscopy of multiply charged ions for the development of the EUV light source for the next generation photo lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanuma, Hajime

    2015-09-01

    As a candidate of an extreme ultra-violet (EUV) light source for a next generation lithography, laser produced plasmas (LPP) of Xe and Sn have been investigated intensively in this decade because these plasmas have a strong emission around 13.5 nm which had been determined as the wavelength for the EUV lithography. This emission was considered to be due to multiply charged Xe and Sn ions in hot plasmas. However, the detail atomic spectroscopic data of these multiply charged heavy ions had not been reported yet. To provide atomic data for the understanding and development of the LPP as the EUV light source, we have observed the EUV emission spectra from individual charge states of Xe and Sn ions by means of a charge exchange spectroscopy method. Multiply charged Xeq+ (q = 7-23) and Snq+ (q = 5-21) ions were produced with a 14.25 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source, and a charge-selected ion beam was directed into a collision chamber, where the ion interact with a target gas of He and Xe. EUV emissions from the collision center were observed with a compact flat-field grazing-incident spectrometer equipped with a liquid nitrogen cooled CCD camera. In experiments using Xe ions, we have found only Xe XI has a strong UTA (unresolved transition array) around 13.5 nm. On the other hand, various charge states of Sn from VIII to XIV contribute to the 13.5 nm emission. Identification of the transition lines was carried out by calculations using the Hebrew university Livermore laboratory atomic physics code and the Cowan code. Most of the emissions in the EUV region are attributed to the 4p-4d and 4d- nl (nl = 4f, 5p, and 5f) transitions. However, the 4d-4f transitions have approximately constant differences of about 0.5 nm between the experimental and theoretical results. This can be explained by considering the strong configuration interactions in the n=4 subshells. Using the experimental transition wavelengths of multiply charged Sn ions, theoretical modeling of

  7. Qweak: A Precision Measurement of the Proton's Weak Charge

    SciTech Connect

    David Armstrong; Todd Averett; James Birchall; James Bowman; Roger Carlini; Swapan Chattopadhyay; Charles Davis; J. Doornbos; James Dunne; Rolf Ent; Jens Erler; Willie Falk; John Finn; Tony Forest; David Gaskell; Klaus Grimm; C. Hagner; F. Hersman; Maurik Holtrop; Kathleen Johnston; R.T. Jones; Kyungseon Joo; Cynthia Keppel; Elie Korkmaz; Stanley Kowalski; Lawrence Lee; Allison Lung; David Mack; Stanislaw Majewski; Gregory Mitchell; Hamlet Mkrtchyan; Norman Morgan; Allena Opper; Shelley Page; Seppo Penttila; Mark Pitt; Benard Poelker; Tracy Porcelli; William Ramsay; Michael Ramsey-musolf; Julie Roche; Neven Simicevic; Gregory Smith; Riad Suleiman; Simon Taylor; Willem Van Oers; Steven Wells; W.S. Wilburn; Stephen Wood; Carl Zorn

    2004-02-05

    The Qweak experiment at Jefferson Lab aims to make a 4% measurement of the parity-violating asymmetry in elastic scattering at very low Q{sup 2} of a longitudinally polarized electron beam on a proton target. The experiment will measure the weak charge of the proton, and thus the weak mixing angle at low energy scale, providing a precision test of the Standard Model. Since the value of the weak mixing angle is approximately 1/4, the weak charge of the proton Q{sub w}{sup p} = 1-4 sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub w} is suppressed in the Standard Model, making it especially sensitive to the value of the mixing angle and also to possible new physics. The experiment is approved to run at JLab, and the construction plan calls for the hardware to be ready to install in Hall C in 2007. The theoretical context of the experiment and the status of its design are discussed.

  8. Boron concentration measurement in biological tissues by charged particle spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bortolussi, S; Altieri, S

    2013-11-01

    Measurement of boron concentration in biological tissues is a fundamental aspect of boron neutron capture therapy, because the outcome of the therapy depends on the distribution of boron at a cellular level, besides on its overall concentration. This work describes a measurement technique based on the spectroscopy of the charged particles emitted in the reaction (10)B(n,α)(7)Li induced by thermal neutrons, allowing for a quantitative determination of the boron concentration in the different components that may be simultaneously present in a tissue sample, such as healthy cells, tumor cells and necrotic cells. Thin sections of tissue containing (10)B are cut at low temperatures and irradiated under vacuum in a thermal neutron field. The charged particles arising from the sample during the irradiation are collected by a thin silicon detector, and their spectrum is used to determine boron concentration through relatively easy calculations. The advantages and disadvantages of this technique are here described, and validation of the method using tissue standards with known boron concentrations is presented.

  9. Ultrafast charge and energy exchanges at hybrid interfaces involving 2D semiconductors (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulesbaa, Abdelaziz; Wang, Kai; Babicheva, Viktoriia E.; Kravchenko, Ivan I.; Lin, Ming-Wei; Mahjouri-Samani, Masoud; Tian, Mengkun; Puretzky, Alexander A.; Ivanov, Ilia N.; Rouleau, Christopher M.; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Geohegan, David B.

    2017-02-01

    Two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenide (2D-TMD) semiconductors are new class of functional materials with a great promise for optoelectronics. Despite their atomic thickness, they strongly interact with light. This allows 2D-TMDs to become suitable converters of photons into useful electric charges in heterostructures involving 2D-TMDs and metallic nano-plasmonics or semiconductor quantum dots (QDs). In this talk, I will illustrate how femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy can reveal a sub-45 fs charge transfer at a 2D/QDs heterostructure composed of tungsten disulfide monolayers (2D-WS2) and a single layer of cadmium selenide (CdSe)/zinc sulfide (ZnS) core/shell 0D-QDs. In another heterostructure involving 2D-TMDs and plasmonics, I will describe how plasmons of an array of aluminum (Al) nanoantennas are excited indirectly via energy transfer from photoexcited exciton of 2D-WS2 semiconductor. In particular, femtosecond spectroscopy measurements indicated that the lifetime of the resulting plasmon-induced hot electrons in the Al array continue as long as that of the 2D-WS2 excitons. Conversely, the presence of these excited plasmons almost triples the lifetime of the 2D-WS2 excitons from 15 to 44 ps. This exciton-plasmon coupling enabled by such hybrid nanostructures may open new opportunities for optoelectronic applications. This research was conducted at the Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, which is a DOE Office of Science User Facility. Synthesis of the two-dimensional materials was supported by the Materials Science and Engineering Division, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, U.S. Department of Energy.

  10. Solar Wind Charge Exchange Contribution To The ROSAT Sky Survey Maps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uprety, Y.; Chiao, M.; Collier, M. R.; Cravens, T.; Galeazzi, M.; Koutroumpa, D.; Kuntz, K. D.; Lallement, R.; Lepri, S. T.; Liu, W.; hide

    2016-01-01

    DXL (Diffuse X-ray emission from the Local Galaxy) is a sounding rocket mission designed to estimate the contribution of solar wind charge eXchange (SWCX) to the diffuse X-ray background and to help determine the properties of the Local Hot Bubble. The detectors are large area thin-window proportional counters with a spectral response that is similar to that of the PSPC (Position Sensitive Proportional Counters) used in the ROSAT All Sky Survey (RASS). A direct comparison of DXL and RASS data for the same part of the sky viewed from quite different vantage points in the solar system, and the assumption of approximate isotropy for the solar wind, allowed us to quantify the SWCX contribution to all six RASS bands (R1-R7, excluding R3). We find that the SWCX contribution at l = 140 degrees, b = 0 degrees, where the DXL path crosses the Galactic plane, is 33 percent plus or minus 6 percent (statistical) plus or minus 12 percent (systematic) for R1, 44 percent plus or minus 6 percent plus or minus 5 percent for R2, 18 percent plus or minus 12 percent plus or minus 11 percent for R4, 14 percent plus or minus 11 percent plus or minus 9 percent for R5, and negligible for the R6 and R7 bands. Reliable models for the distribution of neutral H and He in the solar system permit estimation of the contribution of interplanetary SWCX emission over the the whole sky and correction of the RASS maps. We find that the average SWCX contribution in the whole sky is 26 percent plus or minus 6 percent plus or minus 13 percent for R1, 30 percent plus or minus 4 percent plus or minus 4 percent for R2, 8 percent plus or minus 5 percent plus or minus 5 percent for R4, 6 percent plus or minus 4 percent plus or minus 4 percent for R5, and negligible for R6 and R7.

  11. Solar Wind Charge Exchange Contribution To The ROSAT Sky Survey Maps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uprety, Y.; Chiao, M.; Collier, M. R.; Cravens, T.; Galeazzi, M.; Koutroumpa, D.; Kuntz, K. D.; Lallement, R.; Lepri, S. T.; Liu, W.; McCammon, D.; Morgan, K.; Porter, F. S.; Prasai, K.; Snowden, S. L.; Thomas, N. E.; Ursino, E.; Walsh, B. M.

    2016-01-01

    DXL (Diffuse X-ray emission from the Local Galaxy) is a sounding rocket mission designed to estimate the contribution of solar wind charge eXchange (SWCX) to the diffuse X-ray background and to help determine the properties of the Local Hot Bubble. The detectors are large area thin-window proportional counters with a spectral response that is similar to that of the PSPC (Position Sensitive Proportional Counters) used in the ROSAT All Sky Survey (RASS). A direct comparison of DXL and RASS data for the same part of the sky viewed from quite different vantage points in the solar system, and the assumption of approximate isotropy for the solar wind, allowed us to quantify the SWCX contribution to all six RASS bands (R1-R7, excluding R3). We find that the SWCX contribution at l = 140 degrees, b = 0 degrees, where the DXL path crosses the Galactic plane, is 33 percent plus or minus 6 percent (statistical) plus or minus 12 percent (systematic) for R1, 44 percent plus or minus 6 percent plus or minus 5 percent for R2, 18 percent plus or minus 12 percent plus or minus 11 percent for R4, 14 percent plus or minus 11 percent plus or minus 9 percent for R5, and negligible for the R6 and R7 bands. Reliable models for the distribution of neutral H and He in the solar system permit estimation of the contribution of interplanetary SWCX emission over the the whole sky and correction of the RASS maps. We find that the average SWCX contribution in the whole sky is 26 percent plus or minus 6 percent plus or minus 13 percent for R1, 30 percent plus or minus 4 percent plus or minus 4 percent for R2, 8 percent plus or minus 5 percent plus or minus 5 percent for R4, 6 percent plus or minus 4 percent plus or minus 4 percent for R5, and negligible for R6 and R7.

  12. The Area Between Exchange Curves as a Measure of Conformational Differences in Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazur, Sharlyn J.; Weber, Daniel P.

    2017-02-01

    Hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) provides information about protein conformational mobility under native conditions. The area between exchange curves, A bec , a functional data analysis concept, was adapted to the interpretation of HDX-MS data and provides a useful measure of exchange curve dissimilarity for tests of significance. Importantly, for most globular proteins under native conditions, A bec values provide an estimate of the log ratio of exchange-competent fractions in the two states, and thus are related to differences in the free energy of microdomain unfolding.

  13. What should we measure? Conceptualizing usage in health information exchange

    PubMed Central

    Jasperson, Jon

    2010-01-01

    Under the provisions of the Health Information Technology for Economic & Clinical Health act providers need to demonstrate their ‘meaningful use’ of electronic health record systems' health information exchange (HIE) capability. HIE usage is not a simple construct, but the choice of its measurement must attend to the users, context, and objectives of the system being examined. This review examined how usage is reported in the existing literature and also what conceptualizations of usage might best reflect the nature and objectives of HIE. While existing literature on HIE usage included a diverse set of measures, most were theoretically weak, did not attend to the interplay of measure, level of analysis and architectural strategy, and did not reflect how HIE usage affected the actual process of care. Attention to these issues will provide greater insight into the effects of previously inaccessible information on medical decision-making and the process of care. PMID:20442148

  14. Measurement of two-photon exchange effects in CLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimal, Dipak; Raue, Brian; Adikaram, Dasuni; Weinstein, Lawrence

    2014-03-01

    There is a significant discrepancy between the Rosenbluth and the polarization transfer measurements of the proton's electric to magnetic form factor ratio GEp/GEp. One possible explanation of this discrepancy is the contribution from two-photon exchange (TPE) effects, which are not typically accounted for in standard radiative corrections. The ratio of positron-proton to electron-proton elastic scattering cross sections, R =σ/(e+ p) σ (e- p) , provides a model independent measurement of the TPE contribution to elastic electron-proton scattering. We measured this ratio at Jefferson Lab using a mixed electron-positron beam. Both electrons and positrons were elastically scattered from a liquid hydrogen target. The resulting scattered particles were detected in CLAS. The experimental details and results will be discussed. U.S. Dept. of Energy.

  15. What should we measure? Conceptualizing usage in health information exchange.

    PubMed

    Vest, Joshua R; Jasperson, Jon

    2010-01-01

    Under the provisions of the Health Information Technology for Economic & Clinical Health act providers need to demonstrate their 'meaningful use' of electronic health record systems' health information exchange (HIE) capability. HIE usage is not a simple construct, but the choice of its measurement must attend to the users, context, and objectives of the system being examined. This review examined how usage is reported in the existing literature and also what conceptualizations of usage might best reflect the nature and objectives of HIE. While existing literature on HIE usage included a diverse set of measures, most were theoretically weak, did not attend to the interplay of measure, level of analysis and architectural strategy, and did not reflect how HIE usage affected the actual process of care. Attention to these issues will provide greater insight into the effects of previously inaccessible information on medical decision-making and the process of care.

  16. A Controlled Environment System For Measuring Plant-Atmosphere Gas Exchange

    Treesearch

    James M. Brown

    1975-01-01

    Describes an inexpensive, efficient system for measuring plant-atmosphere gas exchange. Designed to measure transpiration from potted tree seedlings, it is readily adaptable for measuring other gas exchanges or gas exchange by plant parts. Light level, air and root temperature can be precisely controlled at minimum cost.

  17. Radiochemical study of the medium energy pion double charge exchange reactions: /sup 209/Bi(pi/sup +/pi/sup -/)/sup 209-x/At

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, J.L.

    1980-01-01

    Carrier-free radiochemical techniques have been used to measure cross sections for the double charge exchange reactions of the type /sup 209/Bi(pi/sup +/, pi/sup -/xn)/sup 209-x/At for 100, 180, and 300 MeV incident pions. The observed formation of astatine products with mass numbers ranging from 208 to 205 is interpreted as evidence of processes in which energy deposited in the initial double charge exchange interaction is subsequently dissipated through neutron evaporation. The excitation functions for these reactions are seen to rise rapidly with decreasing incident pion energy with the maximum results for this study at 100 MeV. The astatine production cross secions measured for these positive pion irradiations of thick bismuth targets must be corrected for secondary processes, particularly the pion induced production of fast alpha particles which can contribute to the total cross sections through reactions like /sup 209/Bi(alpha,xn)/sup 213-x/At. The importance of these secondary contributions was studied through a series of negative pion irradiations of bismuth in which secondary pathways furnish the only means of producing astatine. The failure of evaporation calculations to reproduce the astatine product mass yields observed in these secondary studies suggests that direct mechanisms for energetic complex particle formation are quite important. Values for the alpha decay branches of /sup 207/At, /sup 208/At, and /sup 209/At were determined through a study of the electron capture and alpha decay characteristics of chemically purified astatine fractions.

  18. Quantifying the intrinsic surface charge density and charge-transfer resistance of the graphene-solution interface through bias-free low-level charge measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ping, Jinglei; Johnson, A. T. Charlie

    2016-07-01

    Liquid-based bio-applications of graphene require a quantitative understanding of the graphene-liquid interface, with the surface charge density of adsorbed ions, the interfacial charge transfer resistance, and the interfacial charge noise being of particular importance. We quantified these properties through measurements of the zero-bias Faradaic charge-transfer between graphene electrodes and aqueous solutions of varying ionic strength using a reproducible, low-noise, minimally perturbative charge measurement technique. The measurements indicated that the adsorbed ions had a negative surface charge density of approximately -32.8 mC m-2 and that the specific charge transfer resistance was 6.5 ± 0.3 MΩ cm2. The normalized current noise power spectral density for all ionic concentrations tested collapsed onto a 1/fα characteristic with α = 1.1 ± 0.2. All the results are in excellent agreement with predictions of the theory for the graphene-solution interface. This minimally perturbative method for monitoring charge-transfer at the sub-pC scale exhibits low noise and ultra-low power consumption (˜fW), making it suitable for use in low-level bioelectronics in liquid environments.

  19. Charged-Particle Acceleration and Energy Loss Measurements on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, D. G.; Li, C. K.; Séguin, F. H.; Ram, A. K.; Frenje, J. A.; Petrasso, R. D.; Soures, J. M.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Roberts, S.; Sorce, C.; Stoeckl, C.; Sangster, T. C.; Phillips, T. W.

    2000-10-01

    Measurements have been made of charged fusion products produced in D ^3He-filled targets irradiated on OMEGA. Comparing the energy shifts of four particle types has probed two distinct physical processes: electrostatic acceleration in the low-density corona and energy loss in the high-density target. When the burn occurred during the laser pulse, particle energy shifts were dominated by acceleration effects. Using a simple mode, the time history of the target's electrostatic potential was found and shown to decay to zero soon after laser irradiation was complete. When the burn occurred after the pulse, particle energy shifts were dominated by energy losses in the target, allowing charged-particle stopping-power predictions to be tested. The results provide the first verification of the general form of stopping power theories over a wide velocity range. This work was supported by the U.S. DOE Office of ICF under Coop. Agreem. No. DE-FC03-92SF19460.

  20. A semi-interpenetrating network approach for dimensionally stabilizing highly-charged anion exchange membranes for alkaline fuel cells.

    PubMed

    He, Steve S; Strickler, Alaina L; Frank, Curtis W

    2015-04-24

    There is a delicate balance between ion exchange capacity (IEC), conductivity, and dimensional stability in anion exchange membranes as higher charge content can lead to increased water uptake, causing excessive swelling and charge dilution. Using highly-charged benzyltrimethylammonium polysulfone (IEC=2.99 mEq g(-1) ) as a benchmark (which ruptured in water even at room temperature), we report the ability to dramatically decrease water uptake using a semi-interpenetrating network wherein we reinforced the linear polyelectrolyte with a crosslinked poly(styrene-co-divinylbenzene) network. These membranes show enhanced dimensional stability as a result of lower water uptake (75 % vs. 301 % at 25 °C) while maintaining excellent hydroxide conductivity (up to 50 mS cm(-1) at 25 °C). These improvements produced an enhanced alkaline fuel cell capable of generating 236 mW cm(-2) peak power density at 80 °C. This method is easily adaptable and can be a viable strategy for stabilizing existing systems.