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Sample records for charge radius change

  1. Antiproton charge radius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crivelli, P.; Cooke, D.; Heiss, M. W.

    2016-09-01

    The upcoming operation of the extra low energy antiprotons ring at CERN, the upgrade of the antiproton decelerator (AD), and the installation in the AD hall of an intense slow positron beam with an expected flux of 1 08 e+ /s will open the possibility for new experiments with antihydrogen (H ¯). Here we propose a scheme to measure the Lamb shift of H ¯. For four months of data taking, we anticipate an uncertainty of 100 ppm. This will provide a test of C P T and the first determination of the antiproton charge radius at the level of 10%.

  2. Proton radius of 14Be from measurement of charge-changing cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terashima, S.; Tanihata, I.; Kanungo, R.; Estradé, A.; Horiuchi, W.; Ameil, F.; Atkinson, J.; Ayyad, Y.; Cortina-Gil, D.; Dillmann, I.; Evdokimov, A.; Farinon, F.; Geissel, H.; Guastalla, G.; Janik, R.; Kimura, M.; Knoebel, R.; Kurcewicz, J.; Litvinov, Yu. A.; Marta, M.; Mostazo, M.; Mukha, I.; Neff, T.; Nociforo, C.; Ong, H. J.; Pietri, S.; Prochazka, A.; Scheidenberger, C.; Sitar, B.; Suzuki, Y.; Takechi, M.; Tanaka, J.; Vargas, J.; Winfield, J. S.; Weick, H.

    2014-10-01

    The charge-changing cross sections of {}^{7,9-12,14}Be have been measured at 900AMeV on a carbon target. These cross sections are discussed both in terms of a geometrical and a Glauber model. From several different analyses of the cross sections, the proton distribution radius (proton radius) of {}^{14}Be is determined for the first time to be 2.41 ± 0.04 fm. A large difference in the proton and neutron radii is found. The proton radii are compared to the results of fermionic molecular dynamics (FMD) and antisymmetrized molecular dynamics (AMD) calculations.

  3. Proton Radius of 14Be from Measurement of Charge-Changing Cross Sections1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terashima, S.; Tanihata, I.; Kanungo, R.; Estradé, A.; Horiuchi, W.; Ameil, F.; Atkinson, J.; Ayyad, Y.; Cortina-Gil, D.; Dillmann, I.; Evdokimov, A.; Farinon, F.; Geissel, H.; Guastalla, G.; Janik, R.; Kimura, M.; Knoebel, R.; Kurcewicz, J.; Litvinov, Yu. A.; Marta, M.; Mostazo, M.; Mukha, I.; Neff, T.; Nociforo, C.; Ong, H. J.; Pietri, S.; Prochazka, A.; Scheidenberger, C.; Sitar, B.; Suzuki, Y.; Takeuchi, M.; Tanaka, J.; Vargas, J.; Winfield, J. S.; Weick, H.

    Charge-changing cross sections for 7,9-12,14Be have been measured at ˜900A MeV on a carbon target. These cross sections are discussed both in terms of a geometrical and a Glauber model. From several different analyses of the cross sections, the proton distribution radius (proton radius) of 14Be was determined for the first time to be 2.41 ± 0.04 fm. A large difference in the proton and neutron radii is found. The charge-changing cross sections and the proton distribution radii are compared to the results of fermionic molecular dynamics (FMD) and antisymmetrized molecular dynamics (AMD) under the Glauber model.

  4. Charge Radius Changes Of Even-even Neutron-Rich Tellurium Isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Sifi, R.; Le Blanc, F.; Barre, N.; Ducourtieux, M.; Essabaa, S.; Lau, C.; Oms, J.; Roussiere, B.; Sauvage, J.; Cabaret, L.; Pinard, J.; Crawford, J.; Lee, J. K. P.; Genevey, J.; Huber, G.; Kowalska, M.; Seliverstov, M.; Le Scornet, G.; Stroke, H.

    2006-04-26

    Laser spectroscopy based on resonant ionization of laser-desorbed atoms has been used to study the neutron-rich tellurium isotopes with the COMPLIS facility at ISOLDE-CERN. The isotope shift and the hyperfine structure of several neutron-rich Te isotopes: 120-136Te and 123m-133mTe have been measured. From the hyperfine structure and the isotope shift we can extract the magnetic and quadrupole moments and the change in the mean square charge radius respectively. The mean square charge radii of the even-even isotopes have been deduced and their comparison with the known data for the other elements near Z=50 is presented. The experimental {delta} is compared with that obtained from the relativistic mean field calculations.

  5. Charge radius of the neutrino

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernabéu, J.; Cabral-Rosetti, L. G.; Papavassiliou, J.; Vidal, J.

    2000-12-01

    Using the pinch technique we construct at one-loop order a neutrino charge radius, which is finite, depends neither on the gauge-fixing parameter nor on the gauge-fixing scheme employed, and is process independent. This definition stems solely from an effective proper photon-neutrino one-loop vertex, with no reference to box or self-energy contributions. The role of the WW box in this construction is critically examined. In particular it is shown that the exclusion of the effective WW box from the definition of the neutrino charge radius is not a matter of convention but is in fact dynamically realized when the target fermions are right-handedly polarized. In this way we obtain a unique decomposition of effective self-energies, vertices, and boxes, which separately respect electroweak gauge invariance. We elaborate on the tree-level origin of the mechanism which enforces at the one-loop level massive cancellations among the longitudinal momenta appearing in the Feynman diagrams, and in particular those associated with the non-Abelian character of the theory. Various issues related to the known connection between the pinch technique and the background field method are further clarified. Explicit closed expressions for the neutrino charge radius are reported.

  6. Measurement of solar radius changes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labonte, B. J.; Howard, R.

    1981-01-01

    Results of daily photometric measurements of the solar radius from Mt. Wilson over the past seven years are reported. Reduction of the full disk magnetograms yields a formal error of 0.1 arcsec in the boustrophedonic scans in the 5250.2 A FeI line. 150 scan lines comprise each observation; 1,412 observations were made from 1974-1981. Measurement procedures, determination of the scattered light of the optics and the atmosphere, and error calculations are described, noting that days of poor atmospheric visibility are omitted from the data. The horizontal diameter of the sun remains visually fixed while the vertical component changes due to atmospheric diffraction; error accounting for thermal effects, telescope aberrations, and instrument calibration are discussed, and results, within instrument accuracy, indicate no change in the solar radius over the last seven years.

  7. Proton Charge Radius (PRad) Experiment at Jefferson Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, C.; Gao, H.

    2016-03-01

    The puzzle of proton charge radius was recently raised by the measurement of muonic hydrogen Lamb shift at Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), whose results were seven standard deviations smaller than the CODATA recommended value. To investigate this discrepancy, the PRad experiment was proposed and approved at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab). The experiment will extract the proton charge radius with a sub-percent accuracy by measuring the cross-sections of unpolarized electronproton elastic scattering in an unprecedented low Q2 region (2×10-4 GeV2/c2).

  8. Simulation for Proton Charge Radius (PRad) Experiment at Jefferson Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Li; PRad Collaboration Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    The ``Proton Charge Radius Puzzle'' refers to 7 σ discrepancy between the proton charge radius extracted from muonic hydrogen Lamb shift measurements and that from the atomic hydrogen Lamb shift and e-p elastic scattering measurements. In order to get a better understanding of this puzzle, the PRad experiment (E12-11-106) was proposed and recently performed with 1.1 and 2.2 GeV unpolarized electron beam in Hall B at Jefferson Lab. The experiment aims to extract the electric form factor and the charge radius of proton by simultaneously measuring the e - p elastic scattering cross section and the Møller cross section at very low Q2(2 × 10-4 10-1(GeV / c) 2) region, with sub-percent precision. A windowless hydrogen gas flow target was used to better control the background. A high-efficiency and high-resolution calorimeter (HyCal) and a pair of Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) chambers were used in the experiment. This talk will focus on comparing the detailed simulation of PRad experiment and its background with preliminary spectra from the data. This work is supported in part by NSF MRI Award PHY-1229153, the U.S. Department of Energy under Contacts No. DE-FG02-07ER41528, Thomas Jefferson National Laboratory, Mississippi State University and PRad collaboration.

  9. Neutron charge radius and the neutron electric form factor

    SciTech Connect

    Gentile, T. R.; Crawford, C. B.

    2011-05-15

    For nearly forty years, the Galster parametrization has been employed to fit existing data for the neutron electric form factor, G{sub E}{sup n}, vs the square of the four-momentum transfer, Q{sup 2}. Typically this parametrization is constrained to be consistent with experimental data for the neutron charge radius. However, we find that the Galster form does not have sufficient freedom to accommodate reasonable values of the radius without constraining or compromising the fit. In addition, the G{sub E}{sup n} data are now at sufficient precision to motivate a two-parameter fit (or three parameters if we include thermal neutron data). Here we present a modified form of a two-dipole parametrization that allows this freedom and fits both G{sub E}{sup n} (including recent data at both low and high four-momentum transfer) and the charge radius well with simple, well-defined parameters. Analysis reveals that the Galster form is essentially a two-parameter approximation to the two-dipole form but becomes degenerate if we try to extend it naturally to three parameters.

  10. Solar radius change between 1925 and 1979

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sofia, S.; Dunham, D. W.; Dunham, J. B.; Fiala, A. D.

    1983-01-01

    From an analysis of numerous reports from different locations on the duration of totality of the solar eclipses on January 24, 1925, and February 26, 1979, it is found that the solar radius at the earlier date was 0.5 arcsec (or 375 km) larger than at the later date. The correction to the standard solar radius found for each eclipse is different when different subsets of the observations are used (for example, edge of path of totality timings compared with central timings). This is seen as suggesting the existence of systematic inaccuracies in our knowledge of the lunar figure. The differences between the corrections for both eclipses, however, are very similar for all subsets considered, indicating that changes of the solar size may be reliably inferred despite the existence of the lunar figure errors so long as there is proper consideration of the distribution of the observations. These results are regarded as strong evidence in support of the occurrence of solar radius changes on shorter than evolutionary time scales.

  11. Pion loop contribution to the electromagnetic pion charge radius

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, C.D.; Bender, A.; Alkofer, R.

    1995-08-01

    There is a widely held misconception, based on a misrepresentation of the application of chiral perturbation theory, that the electromagnetic structure of the pion is dominated by the pion`s own pion-cloud. To clarify this the Global Color-symmetry Model (GCM), was used to calculate the electromagnetic charge radius of the pion. In this calculation the contributions from the quark core and pion loop were identified and compared. It was shown explicitly that the divergence of the charge radius in the chiral limit is due solely to the pion loop and that, at the physical value of the pion mass, this loop contributes less than 15% {l_angle}r{sub {pi}}{sup 2}{r_angle}; i.e. the quark core is the dominant determining characteristic for the pion. This suggests that quark-based models that fail to reproduce the m{sub {pi}} divergence of {l_angle}{sub {pi}}{sup 2}{r_angle} nevertheless incorporate the dominant characteristic of the pion: its quark core. The result`s studylend further support to the contention that, away from resonances, the dominant determining characteristic of kinematic and dynamical properties of hadrons is their quark core. A paper describing this work was submitted for publication.

  12. GEM Detectors of Proton Charge Radius (PRad) Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Xinzhan; PRad Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The PRad experiment (E12-11-106) was recently performed at Jefferson Lab in Hall B. It was designed to measure the proton charge radius with high precision, through the elastic electron proton scattering process, using a non-magnetic-spectrometer method. PRad experiment reached very small ep scattering angles and thus it can see an unprecedented small four-momentum transfer squared region, Q2 from 2 ×10-4 to 0 . 1(GeV / c) 2 . This experiment measures the proton charge radius by extracting the electric form factor of proton with a sub-percent precision. A pair of world's largest GEM detectors, and a high resolution calorimeter(HyCal) were utilized in the experiment. In this talk, we will present the performance of GEM detectors achieved in the experiment, such as efficiency and other characteristics, and preliminary analysis results of the experimental data. This work is supported in part by NSF MRI award PHY-1229153, the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-FG02-07ER41528, University of Virginia under Contract No. DE-FG02-03ER41240 and Thomas Jefferson National Laboratory.

  13. Evaluation of the Proton Charge Radius from Electron–Proton Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Arrington, John; Sick, Ingo

    2015-09-15

    In light of the proton radius puzzle, the discrepancy between measurements of the proton charge radius from muonic hydrogen and those from electronic hydrogen and electron–proton (e–p) scattering measurements, we re-examine the charge radius extractions from electron scattering measurements. We provide a recommended value for the proton root-mean-square charge radius, r{sub E} = 0.879 ± 0.011 fm, based on a global examination of elastic e–p scattering data. The uncertainties include contributions to account for tension between different data sets and inconsistencies between radii using different extraction procedures.

  14. Weak charge form factor and radius of 208Pb through parity violation in electron scattering

    DOE PAGES

    Horowitz, C. J.; Ahmed, Z.; Jen, C. -M.; ...

    2012-03-26

    We use distorted wave electron scattering calculations to extract the weak charge form factor FW(more » $$\\bar{q}$$), the weak charge radius RW, and the point neutron radius Rn, of 208Pb from the PREX parity violating asymmetry measurement. The form factor is the Fourier transform of the weak charge density at the average momentum transfer $$\\bar{q}$$ = 0.475 fm-1. We find FW($$\\bar{q}$$) = 0.204 ± 0.028(exp) ± 0.001(model). We use the Helm model to infer the weak radius from FW($$\\bar{q}$$). We find RW = 5.826 ± 0.181(exp) ± 0.027(model) fm. Here the exp error includes PREX statistical and systematic errors, while the model error describes the uncertainty in RW from uncertainties in the surface thickness σ of the weak charge density. The weak radius is larger than the charge radius, implying a 'weak charge skin' where the surface region is relatively enriched in weak charges compared to (electromagnetic) charges. We extract the point neutron radius Rn = 5.751 ± 0.175 (exp) ± 0.026(model) ± 0.005(strange) fm, from RW. Here there is only a very small error (strange) from possible strange quark contributions. We find Rn to be slightly smaller than RW because of the nucleon's size. As a result, we find a neutron skin thickness of Rn-Rp = 0.302 ± 0.175 (exp) ± 0.026 (model) ± 0.005 (strange) fm, where Rp is the point proton radius.« less

  15. Proton Charge Radius (PRad) Experiment at Jefferson Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Weizhi; Peng, Chao; Prad Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    The PRad experiment (E12-11-106) was recently performed with 1.1 and 2.2 GeV unpolarized electron beam on a windowless H2 gas flow target in Hall B at Jefferson Lab. The experiment aims to investigate the proton radius puzzle by extracting the electric form factor of proton in an unprecedented low four-momentum transfer squared region, Q2 = 2 ×10-4 - 0 . 1(GeV / c) 2 , with a sub-percent precision. The PRad experiment utilizes a non-magnetic and calorimetric method with a high efficiency and high resolution calorimeter (HyCal) and two Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) chambers. Its systematics are well controlled by two main advantages of this experiment: (1) The scattered electrons from M øller and e - p elastic scattering are measured simultaneously, and the e - p cross section will be normalized to the well-known M øller process; (2) The windowless gas flow target has no cell windows at both up- and downstream, which was one of the primary background sources in the previous e - p elastic scattering experiments. Thus the PRad experiment has systematic uncertainties totally different from the previous magnetic spectrometric e - p elastic scattering experiments. In this talk, we will present the details of the experimental method and preliminary analysis of the data. This work is supported in part by the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-FG02-03ER41231, NSF MRI Award PHY-1229153, Thomas Jefferson National Laboratory and Duke University.

  16. High precision measurement of the proton charge radius: The PRad experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Meziane, Mehdi

    2013-11-01

    The recent high precision measurements of the proton charge radius performed at PSI from muonic hydrogen Lamb shift puzzled the hadronic physics community. A value of 0.8418 {+-} 0.0007 fm was extracted which is 7{sigma} smaller than the previous determinations obtained from electron-proton scattering experiments and based on precision spectroscopy of electronic hydrogen. An additional extraction of the proton charge radius from electron scattering at Mainz is also in good agreement with these "electronic" determinations. An independent measurement of the proton charge radius from unpolarized elastic ep scattering using a magnetic spectrometer free method was proposed and fully approved at Jefferson Laboratory in June 2012. This novel technique uses the high precision calorimeter HyCal and a windowless hydrogen gas target which makes possible the extraction of the charge radius at very forward angles and thus very low momentum transfer Q{sup 2} up to 10{sup -4} (GeV/c){sup 2} with an unprecedented sub-percent precision for this type of experiment. In this paper, after a review of the recent progress on the proton charge radius extraction and the new high precision experiment PRad will be presented.

  17. High precision measurement of the proton charge radius: The PRad experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Meziane, Mehdi; Collaboration: PRad Collaboration

    2013-11-07

    The recent high precision measurements of the proton charge radius performed at PSI from muonic hydrogen Lamb shift puzzled the hadronic physics community. A value of 0.8418 ± 0.0007 fm was extracted which is 7σ smaller than the previous determinations obtained from electron-proton scattering experiments and based on precision spectroscopy of electronic hydrogen. An additional extraction of the proton charge radius from electron scattering at Mainz is also in good agreement with these 'electronic' determinations. An independent measurement of the proton charge radius from unpolarized elastic ep scattering using a magnetic spectrometer free method was proposed and fully approved at Jefferson Laboratory in June 2012. This novel technique uses the high precision calorimeter HyCal and a windowless hydrogen gas target which makes possible the extraction of the charge radius at very forward angles and thus very low momentum transfer Q{sup 2} up to 10{sup −4} (GeV/c){sup 2} with an unprecedented sub-percent precision for this type of experiment. In this paper, after a review of the recent progress on the proton charge radius extraction and the new high precision experiment PRad will be presented.

  18. Deuteron charge radius and Rydberg constant from spectroscopy data in atomic deuterium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohl, Randolf; Nez, François; Udem, Thomas; Antognini, Aldo; Beyer, Axel; Fleurbaey, Hélène; Grinin, Alexey; Hänsch, Theodor W.; Julien, Lucile; Kottmann, Franz; Krauth, Julian J.; Maisenbacher, Lothar; Matveev, Arthur; Biraben, François

    2017-04-01

    We give a pedagogical description of the method to extract the charge radii and Rydberg constant from laser spectroscopy in regular hydrogen (H) and deuterium (D) atoms, that is part of the CODATA least-squares adjustment (LSA) of the fundamental physical constants. We give a deuteron charge radius {{r}\\text{d}} from D spectroscopy alone of 2.1415(45) fm. This value is independent of the measurements that lead to the proton charge radius, and five times more accurate than the value found in the CODATA Adjustment 10. The improvement is due to the use of a value for the 1S\\to 2S transition in atomic deuterium which can be inferred from published data or found in a PhD thesis.

  19. An Examination of Proton Charge Radius Extractions from e–p Scattering Data

    SciTech Connect

    Arrington, John

    2015-09-15

    A detailed examination of issues associated with proton radius extractions from elastic electron–proton scattering experiments is presented. Sources of systematic uncertainty and model dependence in the extractions are discussed, with an emphasis on how these may impact the proton charge and magnetic radii. A comparison of recent Mainz data to previous world data is presented, highlighting the difference in treatment of systematic uncertainties as well as tension between different data sets. We find several issues that suggest that larger uncertainties than previously quoted may be appropriate, but do not find any corrections which would resolve the proton radius puzzle.

  20. Link between diurnal stem radius changes and tree water relations.

    PubMed

    Zweifel, R; Item, H; Häsler, R

    2001-08-01

    Internal water reserves are depleted and replenished daily, not only in succulent plants, but also in trees. The significance of these changes in tissue water storage for tree water relations was investigated by monitoring diurnal fluctuations in stem radius. In 6-year-old potted Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) trees, whole-tree transpiration rate (T), sap flow at the stem base and fluctuations in stem radius were measured at 10-min intervals over eight successive weeks. The dynamics of diurnal water storage in relation to the daily course of water movement was simulated and the contribution of stored water to T quantified. The finding that, in P. abies, the course of bark water content is linearly coupled to stem radius fluctuations provided the basis for linking stem radius changes to a functional flow and storage model for tree water relations. This model, which consists of physical functions only and is driven by a single input variable (T), accurately simulates the diurnal course of changes in stem radius and water storage of the tree crown and stem. It was concluded that fluctuations were mainly determined by the course of transpiration. The availability of soil water and the degree to which storage tissues were saturated were also factors affecting the diurnal course of stem radius changes. Internally stored water contributed to daily transpiration even in well-watered trees, indicating that stored water plays an important role not only during periods of drought, but whenever water transport occurs within the tree. Needle and bark water reserves were most heavily depleted during transpiration. Together they supplied approximately 10% of daily T on sunny days, and up to 65% on cloudy days. On a daily basis, the crown (mainly needles) contributed approximately eight times more water to T than the stem (mainly bark). The depletion of the two storage pools and the water movements observed in the trees always occurred in the same sequence. In the morning

  1. Sharp Bounds on the Critical Stability Radius for Relativistic Charged Spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andréasson, Håkan

    2009-06-01

    In a recent paper by Giuliani and Rothman [17], the problem of finding a lower bound on the radius R of a charged sphere with mass M and charge Q < M is addressed. Such a bound is referred to as the critical stability radius. Equivalently, it can be formulated as the problem of finding an upper bound on M for given radius and charge. This problem has resulted in a number of papers in recent years but neither a transparent nor a general inequality similar to the case without charge, i.e., M ≤ 4 R/9, has been found. In this paper we derive the surprisingly transparent inequality sqrt{M}≤sqrt{R}/3+sqrt{R/9+Q^2/3R}. The inequality is shown to hold for any solution which satisfies p + 2 pT ≤ ρ, where p ≥ 0 and pT are the radial- and tangential pressures respectively and ρ ≥ 0 is the energy density. In addition we show that the inequality is sharp, in particular we show that sharpness is attained by infinitely thin shell solutions.

  2. Measurements of atomic splittings in atomic hydrogen and the proton charge radius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hessels, E. A.

    2016-09-01

    The proton charge radius can be determined from precise measurements of atomic hydrogen spectroscopy. A review of the relevant measurements will be given, including an update on our measurement of the n=2 Lamb shift. The values obtained from hydrogen will be compared to those obtained from muonic hydrogen and from electron-proton elastic scattering measurements. This work is funded by NSERC, CRC and CFI.

  3. GEM Detectors and Preliminary Analysis of Proton Charge Radius (PRad) Experiment at Jefferson Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Xinzhan; PRad Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    The PRad experiment (E12-11-106) was recently performed at Jefferson Lab in Hall B, it was designed to measure the proton charge radius through the elastic electron proton scattering process, using a non-magnetic-spectrometer method. The experiment reaches very low ep scattering angles and thus an unprecedented low four-momentum transfer squared region, Q2 from 2 ×10-4 to 0 . 1(GeV / c) 2 . The experiment measures the proton charge radius by extracting the electric form factor of proton with a sub-percent precision. Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) detectors have contributed to reach the experimental goal. A pair of world largest GEM detectors, and a high resolution calorimeter(HyCal) were utilized in the experiment. In this talk, we will present the performance of GEM detectors approached in the experiment, such as efficiency and other characteristics, and preliminary analysis of the experimental data. This work is supported in part by NSF MRI Award PHY-1229153, the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-FG02-07ER41528, Thomas Jefferson National Laboratory, and PRad Collaboration.

  4. Weak charge form factor and radius of 208Pb through parity violation in electron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Horowitz, C. J.; Ahmed, Z.; Jen, C. -M.; Rakhman, A.; Souder, P. A.; Dalton, M. M.; Liyanage, N.; Paschke, K. D.; Saenboonruang, K.; Silwal, R.; Franklin, G. B.; Friend, M.; Quinn, B.; Kumar, K. S.; McNulty, D.; Mercado, L.; Riordan, S.; Wexler, J.; Michaels, R. W.; Urciuoli, G. M.

    2012-03-26

    We use distorted wave electron scattering calculations to extract the weak charge form factor FW($\\bar{q}$), the weak charge radius RW, and the point neutron radius Rn, of 208Pb from the PREX parity violating asymmetry measurement. The form factor is the Fourier transform of the weak charge density at the average momentum transfer $\\bar{q}$ = 0.475 fm-1. We find FW($\\bar{q}$) = 0.204 ± 0.028(exp) ± 0.001(model). We use the Helm model to infer the weak radius from FW($\\bar{q}$). We find RW = 5.826 ± 0.181(exp) ± 0.027(model) fm. Here the exp error includes PREX statistical and systematic errors, while the model error describes the uncertainty in RW from uncertainties in the surface thickness σ of the weak charge density. The weak radius is larger than the charge radius, implying a 'weak charge skin' where the surface region is relatively enriched in weak charges compared to (electromagnetic) charges. We extract the point neutron radius Rn = 5.751 ± 0.175 (exp) ± 0.026(model) ± 0.005(strange) fm, from RW. Here there is only a very small error (strange) from possible strange quark contributions. We find Rn to be slightly smaller than RW because of the nucleon's size. As a result, we find a neutron skin thickness of Rn-Rp = 0.302 ± 0.175 (exp) ± 0.026 (model) ± 0.005 (strange) fm, where Rp is the point proton radius.

  5. Triton charge radius to next-to-next-to-leading order in pionless effective field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanasse, Jared

    2017-02-01

    The triton point charge radius is calculated to next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) in pionless effective field theory ( EFT (π / )) , yielding a prediction of 1.14 ±0.19 fm (leading order), 1.59 ±0.08 fm (next-to leading order), and 1.62 ±0.03 fm (NNLO) in agreement with the current experimental extraction of 1.5978 ±0.040 fm [Angeli and Marinova, At. Data Nucl. Data Tables 99, 69 (2013)], 10.1016/j.adt.2011.12.006. The error at NNLO is due to cutoff variation (˜1 % ) within a reasonable range of calculated cutoffs and from a EFT (π / ) error estimate (˜1.5 % ). In addition new techniques are introduced to add perturbative corrections to bound- and scattering state calculations for short-range effective field theories, but with a focus on their use in EFT (π / ) .

  6. Determination of the proton charge radius from elastic electron-proton scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horbatsch, Marko; Hessels, Eric A.

    2016-05-01

    Precisely measured electron-proton elastic scattering cross sections are reanalyzed to evaluate their strength for determining the rms charge radius (RE) of the proton. More than half of the cross sections at lowest Q2 are fit using two single-parameter form-factor models, with the first based on a dipole parametrization, and the second on a linear fit to a conformal-mapping variable. These low-Q2 fits extrapolate the slope of the form factor to Q2 = 0 and determine RE values of approximately 0.84 and 0.89 fm, respectively. Fits spanning all Q2, in which the single constants are replaced with cubic splines at larger Q2, lead to similar results for RE. We conclude that the scattering data are consistent with RE ranging from at least 0.84 to 0.89 fm, and therefore is consistent with both of the discrepant determinations of RE made using muonic and electronic hydrogen-atom spectroscopy. NSERC Canada, Canada Research Chair Program.

  7. Effects of physics beyond the standard model on the neutrino charge radius: An effective Lagrangian approach

    SciTech Connect

    Novales-Sanchez, H.; Rosado, A.; Santiago-Olan, V.; Toscano, J. J.

    2008-10-01

    In this work, we look for possible new physics effects on the electromagnetic charge and anapole form factors, f{sub Q}(q{sup 2}) and f{sub A}(q{sup 2}), for a massless Dirac neutrino, when these quantities are calculated in the context of an effective electroweak Yang-Mills theory, which induces the most general SU{sub L}(2)-invariant Lorentz tensor structure of nonrenormalizable type for the WW{gamma} vertex. It is found that in this context, besides the standard model contribution, the additional contribution to f{sub Q}(q{sup 2}) and f{sub A}(q{sup 2}) (f{sub Q}{sup O{sub W}}(q{sup 2}) and f{sub A}{sup O{sub W}}(q{sup 2}), respectively) are gauge independent and finite functions of q{sup 2} after adopting a renormalization scheme. These form factors, f{sub Q}{sup O{sub W}}(q{sup 2}) and f{sub A}{sup O{sub W}}(q{sup 2}), get contribution at the one-loop level only from the proper neutrino electromagnetic vertex. Besides, the relation f{sub Q}{sup eff}(q{sup 2})=q{sup 2}f{sub A}{sup eff}(q{sup 2}) (f{sub Q}{sup eff}(q{sup 2})=f{sub Q}{sup SM}(q{sup 2})+f{sub Q{sup O}}{sub W}(q{sup 2}), f{sub A}{sup eff}(q{sup 2})=f{sub A}{sup SM}(q{sup 2})+f{sub A}{sup O{sub W}}(q{sup 2})) is still fulfilled and hence the relation a{sub {nu}}{sup eff}={sup eff}/6 (a{sub {nu}}{sup eff}=a{sub {nu}}{sup SM}+a{sub {nu}}{sup O{sub W}}, {sup eff}={sup SM}+{sup O{sub W}}) is gotten, just as in the standard model (SM). Using the experimental constraint on the anomalous WW{gamma} vertex, a value for the additional contribution to the charge radius of |{sup O{sub W}}| < or approx. 10{sup -34} cm{sup 2} is obtained, which is 1 order of magnitude lower than the SM value.

  8. The neutrino charge radius as a probe of physics beyond the standard model

    SciTech Connect

    Novales-Sanchez, H.; Toscano, J. J.; Rosado, A.; Santiago-Olan, V.

    2013-06-12

    In this paper, we review the search of possible physics effects beyond the standard model on the electromagnetic charge and anapole form factors, f{sub Q}(q{sup 2}) and f{sub A}(q{sup 2}), for a no massive Dirac neutrino, when these quantities are calculated in the frame of an effective electroweak Yang-Mills theory, which induces the most general SU{sub L}(2)-invariant Lorentz tensor structure of nonrenormalizable type for the WW{gamma} vertex. We found that in this frame, besides the standard model contribution, the additional contribution to f{sub Q}(q{sup 2}) and f{sub A}(q{sup 2}) (f{sub Q}{sup O{sub W}}(q{sup 2}) and f{sub A}{sup O{sub W}}(q{sup 2}), respectively) are gauge independent and finite functions of q{sup 2} after adopting a renormalization scheme. These form factors, f{sub Q}{sup O{sub W}}(q{sup 2}) and f{sub A}{sup O{sub W}}(q{sup 2}), get contribution at the one loop level only from the proper neutrino electromagnetic vertex. Besides, the relation f{sub Q}{sup eff}(q{sup 2}) = q{sup 2}f{sub A}{sup eff}(q{sup 2})(f{sub Q}{sup eff}(q{sup 2}) = f{sub Q}{sup SM}(q{sup 2})+f{sub Q}{sup O{sub W}}(q{sup 2}),f{sub A}{sup eff}(q{sup 2}) = f{sub A}{sup SM}(q{sup 2})+f{sub A}{sup O{sub W}}(q{sup 2})) is still fulfilled and hence the relation a{sub v}{sup eff} = {sup eff}/6(a{sub v}{sup eff} = a{sub v}{sup SM}+a{sub v}{sup O{sub W}},{sup eff} = {sup SM}+{sup O{sub W}}) is obtained, just as in the SM. Using the experimental constraint on the anomalous WW{gamma} vertex, a value for the additional contribution to the charge radius of Double-Vertical-Line {sup O{sub W}} Double-Vertical-Line Less-Than-Or-Equivalent-To 10{sup -34} cm{sup 2} is gotten, which is one order of magnitude lower than the SM value.

  9. Effects of changes in convective efficiency on the solar radius and luminosity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sweigart, A. V.

    1981-01-01

    A sequence of solar models has been constructed in order to investigate the sensitivity of the solar radius and luminosity to small changes in the ratio alpha of the mixing length lambda to the pressure-scale height Hp throughout the solar convective envelope. The basic procedure for determining this sensitivity was to impose a perturbation in alpha within the convective envelope and then to follow the resulting changes in the solar radius delta R and luminosity delta L for the next 10 to the 6th power yrs. These calculations gave the following results. (1) A perturbation in alpha produces immediate changes in the solar radius and luminosity. Initially delta L and delta alpha are related by delta L/L = 0.30 delta alpha/alpha. (2) The value of the ratio w = delta log R/delta log L is strongly time dependent. Its value just after the perturbation in alpha is 6.5 x 10 to the minus 4th power. (3) The ratio H = (delta log L) d delta log R/dt is much less time dependent and is a more suitable means for relating the changes in the solar radius and luminosity. (4) Both of these ratios imply that for any reasonable change in the solar luminosity the corresponding change in the solar radius is negligible.

  10. The Data Quality and Analysis Status of the Proton Charge Radius (PRad) Experiment at JLab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Weizhi; PRad Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    In order to investigate the proton radius puzzle, the PRad experiment (E12-11-106) was performed in 2016 in Hall B at Jefferson Lab. The experiment aims to extract the electric form factor of proton in an unprecedented low Q2 region (2 ×10-4 - 0 . 1(GeV / c) 2), with a sub-percent precision. The PRad experiment utilizes a non-magnetic calorimetric method with a high efficiency and high resolution calorimeter (HyCal), and two Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) detectors. The systematic uncertainties are well controlled by two main advantages of the experiment: (1) The electron-proton (e - p) elastic scattering cross section is normalized to the well-known M øller scattering process, which is measured simultaneously during the experiment; (2) The H2 gas flow target has no cell windows at both ends, which created primary backgrounds in the previous e - p elastic scattering experiments. Thus the PRad experiment largely suppresses the two major systematic uncertainties in the previous magnetic spectrometric e - p elastic scattering experiments. In this talk, we will discuss the data quality and analysis status, and present the first preliminary results from the current analysis process. This work is supported in part by the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-FG02-03ER41231, NSF MRI award PHY-1229153, Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility and Duke University.

  11. Trace Element Partitioning under Crustal and Uppermost Mantle Conditions: The Influences of Ionic Radius, Cation Charge, Pressure, and Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, B. J.; Blundy, J. D.

    2003-12-01

    The controls on partitioning of trace elements between crystals and silicate melts were initially the subject of crystal-chemical, rather than petrogenetic interest. Goldschmidt (1937) systematized his observations of elemental concentrations in minerals as a means of understanding and predicting element behavior during crystallization from liquids or gases. Thus, he proposed his three "rules" of element partitioning, which may be summarized as follows: (i) Any two ions of the same charge and very similar ionic radius have essentially the same crystal-liquid partition coefficient (D=[i]xtl/[i]liq, where [i] refers to the concentration of element i). (ii) If there is a small difference of ionic radius, the smaller ion enters the crystal preferentially, e.g., DMg2+>DFe2+, DK+>DRb+>DCs+. (iii) For ions of similar radius but different charges, the ion with the higher charge enters the crystal preferentially, i.e., DSc3+>DMg2+>DLi+, DCa2+>DNa+, and DBa2+>DK+. These principles were taught to generations of students and, as we will show below, under certain circumstances, retain a degree of validity. They are neither, however, universally correct nor do they have any quantitative applicability. The aim of this chapter is to summarize the ways in which Goldschmidt's work has been amplified through a combination of theory and experimental measurement in order to quantify crystal-liquid partitioning behavior.Since the development of accurate methods of determining element concentration at the ppm level, the trace-element contents of igneous rocks have frequently been used to model their chemical evolution. These studies use estimated crystal-liquid partition coefficients together with solutions for the differential equations describing, e.g., fractional crystallization or fractional melting (Schilling and Winchester, 1967; Gast, 1968; Shaw, 1970) to model evolution of the melt during precipitation or dissolution of the crystalline phases. Generally, because of lack of data

  12. Anisotropic Charge Distribution and Anisotropic van der Waals Radius Leading to Intriguing Anisotropic Noncovalent Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hahn; Van Dung Doan; Cho, Woo Jong; Madhav, Miriyala Vijay; Kim, Kwang S.

    2014-01-01

    Although group (IV–VII) nonmetallic elements do not favor interacting with anionic species, there are counterexamples including the halogen bond. Such binding is known to be related to the charge deficiency because of the adjacent atom's electron withdrawing effect, which creates σ/π-holes at the bond-ends. However, a completely opposite behavior is exhibited by N2 and O2, which have electrostatically positive/negative character around cylindrical-bond-surface/bond-ends. Inspired by this, here we elucidate the unusual features and origin of the anisotropic noncovalent interactions in the ground and excited states of the 2nd and 3rd row elements belonging to groups IV–VII. The anisotropy in charge distributions and van der Waals radii of atoms in such molecular systems are scrutinized. This provides an understanding of their unusual molecular configuration, binding and recognition modes involved in new types of molecular assembling and engineering. This work would lead to the design of intriguing molecular systems exploiting anisotropic noncovalent interactions. PMID:25059645

  13. Motion of a Charged Particle in an Axisymmetric Magnetic Field Inversely Proportional to the Radius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabin, K.; Bonner, G.

    2014-12-01

    We discuss an exact solution of the Lorentz equations of motion of a charged particle in an axisymmetric magnetic field inversely proportional to the distance from the axis of symmetry. This solution involves only elementary mathematical functions, however, it requires finding a root of a transcendental equation numerically. The solution requires considering several distinct types of trajectories determined by the initial conditions as well as developing procedures for selecting the correct branches of the inverse trigonometric functions at multiple turning points. While this exact solution has been mentioned in the literature, and it appears to be relatively unknown and its detailed description has been lacking. We also discuss comparison of the exact solution with the guiding center approximation. The results are relevant to the motion of equatorially mirroring particles in dipole magnetic field.

  14. Diffraction of plane waves by finite-radius spiral phase plates of integer and fractional topological charge.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Gracia, Hipolito; Gutiérrez-Vega, Julio C

    2009-04-01

    A detailed analysis of the plane-wave diffraction by a finite-radius circular spiral phase plate (SPP) with integer and fractional topological charge and with variable transmission coefficients inside and outside of the plate edge is presented. We characterize the effect of varying the transmission coefficients and the parameters of the SPP on the propagated field. The vortex structure for integer and fractional phase step of the SPPs with and without phase apodization at the plate edge is also analyzed. The consideration of the interference between the light crossing the SPP and the light that undergoes no phase alteration at the aperture plane reveals new and interesting phenomena associated to this classical problem.

  15. Forward sum rule for the 2 γ -exchange correction to the charge-radius extraction from elastic electron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorchtein, Mikhail

    2014-11-01

    Two-photon-exchange (TPE) contributions to elastic electron-proton scattering in the forward regime in leading logarithmic ˜t ln|t | approximation in the momentum transfer t are considered. The imaginary part of the TPE amplitude in the forward kinematics is related to the total photoabsorption cross section. The real part of the TPE amplitude is obtained from an unsubtracted fixed-t dispersion relation. This allows a clean prediction of the real part of the TPE amplitude at forward angles with the leading term ˜t ln|t | . Numerical estimates are comparable with or exceed the experimental precision in extracting the charge radius from the experimental data.

  16. Mercury's radius change estimates revisited using high incidence angle MESSENGER data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Achille, G.; Popa, C.; Massironi, M.; Ferrari, S.; Mazzotta Epifani, E.; Zusi, M.; Cremonese, G.; Palumbo, P.

    2012-04-01

    Estimates of Mercury's radius decrease obtained using the amount of strain recorded by tectonics on the planet range from 0.5 km to 2 km. These latter figures appear too low with respect to the radius contraction (up to 5-6 km) predicted by the most accredited studies based on thermo-mechanical evolution models. For this reason, it has been suggested that there may be hidden strain accommodated by features yet unseen on Mercury. Indeed, as it has been already cautioned by previous studies, the identification of tectonic features on Mercury might be largely biased by the lighting geometry of the used basemaps. This limitation might have affected the results of the extrapolations for estimating the radius change. In this study, we mapped tectonic features at the terminator thus using images acquired at high sun incidence angle (>50°) that represents the optimal condition for their observation. In fact, images with long shadows enhance the topography and texture of the surface and are ideal to detect tectonic structures. This favorable illumination conditions allowed us to infer reliable measurements of spatial distribution (i.e. frequency, orientation, and areal density) of tectonic features which can be used to estimate the average contractional strain and planetary radius decrease. We digitized tectonic structures within a region extending for an area of about 12 million sq. km (~16% of planet's surface). More than 1300 tectonic lineaments were identified and interpreted to be compressional features (i.e. lobate scarps, wrinkle ridges, and high relief ridges) with a total length of more than 12300 km. Assuming that the extensional strain is negligible within the area, the average contractional strain calculated for the survey area is ~0.21-0.28% (~0.24% for θ=30°). This strain, extrapolated to the entire surface, corresponds to a contraction in radius of about 2.5-3.4 km (~2.9 km for θ=30°). Interestingly, the values of contractional strain and radius decrease

  17. Bone turnover predicts change in volumetric bone density and bone geometry at the radius in men.

    PubMed

    Pye, S R; Ward, K A; Cook, M J; Laurent, M R; Gielen, E; Borghs, H; Adams, J E; Boonen, S; Vanderschueren, D; Wu, F C; O'Neill, T W

    2017-03-01

    Peripheral quantitative computed tomography scans of the distal and midshaft radius were performed in 514 European men aged 40-79 years at baseline and a median of 4.3 years later. Age-related changes in volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD) and bone geometry were greater in men with higher biochemical markers of bone turnover at baseline. This study aimed to determine prospective change in bone density and geometry at the radius in men and examine the influence of bone turnover markers and sex hormones on that change. Men aged 40-79 years were recruited from population registers in Manchester (UK) and Leuven (Belgium). At baseline, markers of bone formation (P1NP and osteocalcin) and resorption (β-cTX and ICTP) were assessed. Total and bioavailable testosterone and oestradiol were also measured. Peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) was used to scan the radius at distal and midshaft sites at the baseline assessment and a median of 4.3 years later. Five hundred fourteen men, mean (SD) age of 59.6 (10.5) years, contributed to the data. At the midshaft site, there was a significant decrease in mean cortical vBMD (-0.04 %/year), bone mineral content (BMC) (-0.1 %/year) and cortical thickness (-0.4 %/year), while total and medullary area increased (+0.5 and +2.4 %/year respectively). At the distal radius, total vBMD declined (-0.5 %/year) and radial area increased (+0.6 %/year). Greater plasma concentrations of bone resorption and formation markers were associated with greater decline in BMC and cortical area at the midshaft and total vBMD at the distal site. Increased bone resorption was linked with an increase in total and medullary area and decrease in cortical thickness at the midshaft. Sex hormone levels were unrelated to change in pQCT parameters. Age-related changes in vBMD and bone geometry are greater in men with higher biochemical markers of bone turnover at baseline. Sex hormones have little influence on change in pQCT parameters.

  18. A Correlation Between Changes in Solar Luminosity and Differential Radius Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kroll, R. J.; Hill, H. A.; Beardsley, B. J.

    1990-01-01

    Solar luminosity variations occurring during solar cycle 21 can be attributed in large part to the presence of sunspots and faculae. Nevertheless, there remains a residual portion of the luminosity variation distinctly unaccounted for by these phenomena of solar activity. At the Santa Catalina Laboratory for Experimental Relativity by Astrometry (SCLERA), observations of the solar limb are capable of detecting changes in the solar limb darkening function by monitoring a quantity known as the differential radius. These observations are utilized in such a way that the effects of solar activity are minimized in order to reveal the more fundamental structure of the photosphere. The results of observations made during solar cycle 21 at various solar latitudes indicate that a measurable change did occur in the global photospheric limb darkening function. It is proposed that the residual luminosity change is associated in part with this change in limb darkening.

  19. Ionic charge, radius, and potential control root/soil concentration ratios of fifty cationic elements in the organic horizon of a beech (Fagus sylvatica) forest podzol.

    PubMed

    Tyler, Germund

    2004-08-15

    The root/organic soil concentration ratio; R/S) of 50 cationic mineral elements was related to their ionic properties, including ionic radius (r), ionic charge (z), and ionic potential (z/r or z2/r). The materials studied were ectomycorrhizal beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) roots and their almost purely organic soil substrate, the O-horizon (mor; raw humus) of a Podzol in South Sweden, developed in a site which has been untouched by forestry or other mechanical disturbance since at least 50 years and located in an area with no local sources of pollution. Elements determined by ICP-AES were aluminium, barium, calcium, iron, potassium, magnesium, manganese, sodium and strontium. Determined by ICP-MS were silver, beryllium, bismuth, cadmium, cerium, cobalt, chromium, caesium, copper, dysprosium, erbium, europium, gallium, gadolinium, hafnium, mercury, holmium, indium, lanthanum, lithium, lutetium, niobium, neodymium, nickel, lead, praseodymium, rubidium, scandium, samarium, tin, terbium, thorium, titanium, thallium, thulium, uranium, vanadium, yttrium, ytterbium, zinc and zirconium. The R/S ratios were most clearly related to the ionic potential of the cationic elements studied, which accounted for approximately 60% of the variability in R/S among elements. The ionic charge of an element was more important than the ionic radius. Elements with high ionic charge had low R/S ratios and vice versa. No clear differences in R/S between essential and non-essential plant nutrients were observed, especially when ions of similar charge were compared.

  20. Time course of changes in tear meniscus radius and blink rate after instillation of artificial tears.

    PubMed

    Bandlitz, Stefan; Purslow, Christine; Murphy, Paul J; Pult, Heiko

    2014-08-26

    Using a novel digital meniscometer (PDM), alterations in tear meniscus radius (TMR) were measured simultaneously with blink rate (BR) following the instillation of artificial tears. Central TMR and BR of 22 subjects (11 male and 11 female; mean age, 24.3 ± 2.6 SD years) were measured at baseline, and 0, 1, 5, 10, and 30 minutes after instillation of an artificial tear containing hydroxypropyl-guar and glycol (SYS) or saline (SAL). A dose of 35 μL was applied in one eye in a randomized order with a washout period between each drop. For SAL, compared to baseline TMR (0.33 ± 0.08 mm), TMR significantly increased with drop instillation (1.55 ± 0.69 mm) and at 1 minute (0.66 ± 0.36 mm; P < 0.05), but returned to baseline after 5 minutes. For SYS, TMR (0.32 ± 0.07 mm) remained significantly increased after application (1.62 ± 0.81 mm), and at 1 minute (0.81 ± 0.43 mm) and 5 minutes (0.39 ± 0.08 mm; P < 0.05). Compared to baseline BR with SAL (14.8 ± 7.7) and SYS (14.9 ± 9.4), values were significantly increased upon drop instillation (22.5 ± 11.8; 21.3 ± 11.8; P < 0.05), but returned to baseline after 1 minute. Dry eye symptoms were correlated with baseline BR (r = 0.550, P = 0.008). Results indicate that PDM can detect changes in TMR following instillation of artificial tears. Difference in residence time reflects the different viscosity of each drop. An overload with a large drop may result in an initially increased BR. Copyright 2014 The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Inc.

  1. Radius of curvature changes in spontaneous improvement of foveoschisis in highly myopic eyes.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Quan V; Chen, Ching-Lung; Garcia-Arumi, Jose; Sherwood, Pamela R; Chang, Stanley

    2016-02-01

    Myopic foveoschisis is the splitting of retinal layers overlying staphyloma in highly myopic patients that can lead to vision loss. We assess possible contributing mechanisms to the formation of foveoschisis by examining two cases of spontaneous improvement of myopic foveoschisis and employ a radius of curvature (ROC) measure to track posterior scleral curvature over time. A retrospective, non-comparative case series was performed and optical coherence tomography images were analysed. Retinal pigment epithelial layer ROC was calculated from manually segmented images through the posterior scleral curvature apex. Two cases of myopic foveoschisis with foveal detachments in the left eye (OS) were studied. Both patients had high myopia (either <-10 D or >30 mm in axial length). One case occurred in a treatment-naive patient who improved after 4 months of observation. On initial presentation, OS posterior scleral ROC was 12.35 mm and decreased to 12.15 mm at the time of resolution. The other case occurred in a patient who was followed for 7 years, had previously underwent pars plana vitrectomy and removal of epiretinal membrane, experienced recurrence of foveoschisis and then spontaneously improved without further posterior segment surgery. There was an uncomplicated cataract extraction in the interim. Posterior scleral ROC was 4.05 mm on presentation, 4.10 during recurrence, 3.55 mm after cataract extraction and 3.75 mm at resolution. Spontaneous improvement of myopic foveoschisis may be due to changes in tractional forces from the internal limiting membrane, cortical vitreous or staphyloma or, alternatively, from a delayed or fluctuant recovery course after intervention. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  2. Measurements of CP Violation and Neutral Kaon Charge Radius using K(L) → π+π-e+e- Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Golossanov, Alexander

    2005-05-01

    CP violation and K{sup 0} charge radius were measured using KL → π+π-e+e- decays. Specifically, a unique CP-violating decay-plane asymmetry was measured along with the parameters of individual contributions to the decay invariant amplitude: (1) CP-conserving magnetic dipole direct emission form factor, (2) CP-conserving K0 charge radius transition amplitude and (3) an upper limit for the CP-violating electric dipole direct emission amplitude. The measurements were obtained from the data sample accumulated by KTeV experiment at Fermilab. KTeV had two major goals: the measurement of direct CP violation parameter Re(ϵ'/ϵ) and the study of rare kaon decays. The state of the art detector was constructed, commissioned, operated and maintained by an international collaboration of scientists from fourteen institutions. The KL → π+π-e+e-L decays took place in the KTeV fiducial decay region.

  3. Muscle weakness, spasticity and disuse contribute to demineralization and geometric changes in the radius following chronic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Marco Y.C.; Ashe, Maureen C.; Eng, Janice J.

    2011-01-01

    Following a stroke, demineralization and geometric changes occur in bone as a result of disuse and residual impairments and these can contribute to an increased risk of fragility fractures. This study used peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) to evaluate volumetric bone mineral density and geometry at the midshaft radius in people living with chronic stroke. Older individuals with chronic stroke were recruited. Each subject underwent a pQCT scan of the midshaft radius at the 30% site on both upper limbs. Muscle strength, motor function, spasticity, and chronic disuse were also evaluated. Data from 47 subjects (19 women) were assessed. A significant difference was found between the two limbs for cortical bone mineral content, cortical bone mineral density, cortical thickness, and polar stress-strain index. There was no significant side-to-side difference in total bone area. Percent side-to-side difference in muscle strength, spasticity, and chronic disuse were significant determinants of percent side-to-side difference in cortical bone mineral content and cortical thickness. The findings suggest that following chronic stroke, endosteal resorption of the midshaft radius occurred with a preservation of total bone area. Muscle weakness, spasticity, chronic disuse significantly contributed to demineralization and geometric changes in the radius following chronic stroke. PMID:17401512

  4. 29 CFR 1917.157 - Battery charging and changing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Battery charging and changing. 1917.157 Section 1917.157..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) MARINE TERMINALS Related Terminal Operations and Equipment § 1917.157 Battery charging and changing. (a) Only designated persons shall change or charge batteries. (b) Battery...

  5. 29 CFR 1917.157 - Battery charging and changing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Battery charging and changing. 1917.157 Section 1917.157..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) MARINE TERMINALS Related Terminal Operations and Equipment § 1917.157 Battery charging and changing. (a) Only designated persons shall change or charge batteries. (b) Battery...

  6. 29 CFR 1917.157 - Battery charging and changing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Battery charging and changing. 1917.157 Section 1917.157..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) MARINE TERMINALS Related Terminal Operations and Equipment § 1917.157 Battery charging and changing. (a) Only designated persons shall change or charge batteries. (b) Battery...

  7. 47 CFR 76.980 - Charges for customer changes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Cable Rate Regulation § 76.980 Charges for customer changes. (a... charge for customer changes in service tiers effected solely by coded entry on a computer terminal or by... paragraph (c) of this section. (c) The charge for customers changes in service tiers or equipment that...

  8. 47 CFR 76.980 - Charges for customer changes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Cable Rate Regulation § 76.980 Charges for customer changes. (a... charge for customer changes in service tiers effected solely by coded entry on a computer terminal or by... paragraph (c) of this section. (c) The charge for customers changes in service tiers or equipment that...

  9. 47 CFR 76.980 - Charges for customer changes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Cable Rate Regulation § 76.980 Charges for customer changes. (a... charge for customer changes in service tiers effected solely by coded entry on a computer terminal or by... paragraph (c) of this section. (c) The charge for customers changes in service tiers or equipment...

  10. 47 CFR 76.980 - Charges for customer changes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Cable Rate Regulation § 76.980 Charges for customer changes. (a... charge for customer changes in service tiers effected solely by coded entry on a computer terminal or by... paragraph (c) of this section. (c) The charge for customers changes in service tiers or equipment...

  11. The Proton Radius Puzzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downie, E. J.

    2016-03-01

    The proton radius puzzle is the difference between the proton radius as measured with electron scattering and in the excitation spectrum of atomic hydrogen, and that measured with muonic hydrogen spectroscopy. Since the inception of the proton radius puzzle in 2010 by the measurement of Pohl et al.[1], many possible resolutions to the puzzle have been postulated, but, to date, none has been generally accepted. New data are therefore necessary to resolve the issue. We briefly review the puzzle, the proposed solutions, and the new electron scattering and spectroscopy experiments planned and underway. We then introduce the MUSE experiment, which seeks to resolve the puzzle by simultaneously measuring elastic electron and muon scattering on the proton, in both charge states, thereby providing new information to the puzzle. MUSE addresses issues of two-photon effects, lepton universality and, possibly, new physics, while providing simultaneous form factor, and therefore radius, measurements with both muons and electrons.

  12. Orientation illusions and heart-rate changes during short-radius centrifugation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hecht, H.; Kavelaars, J.; Cheung, C. C.; Young, L. R.

    2001-01-01

    Intermittent short-radius centrifugation is a promising countermeasure against the adverse effects of prolonged weightlessness. To assess the feasibility of this countermeasure, we need to understand the disturbing sensory effects that accompany some movements carried out during rotation. We tested 20 subjects who executed yaw and pitch head movements while rotating at constant angular velocity. They were supine with their main body axis perpendicular to earth gravity. The head was placed at the centrifuge's axis of rotation. Head movements produced a transient elevation of heart-rate. All observers reported head-contingent sensations of body tilt although their bodies remained supine. Mostly, the subjective sensations conform to a model based on semicircular canal responses to angular acceleration. However, some surprising deviations from the model were found. Also, large inter-individual differences in direction, magnitude, and quality of the illusory body tilt were observed. The results have implications for subject screening and prediction of subjective tolerance for centrifugation.

  13. Orientation illusions and heart-rate changes during short-radius centrifugation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hecht, H.; Kavelaars, J.; Cheung, C. C.; Young, L. R.

    2001-01-01

    Intermittent short-radius centrifugation is a promising countermeasure against the adverse effects of prolonged weightlessness. To assess the feasibility of this countermeasure, we need to understand the disturbing sensory effects that accompany some movements carried out during rotation. We tested 20 subjects who executed yaw and pitch head movements while rotating at constant angular velocity. They were supine with their main body axis perpendicular to earth gravity. The head was placed at the centrifuge's axis of rotation. Head movements produced a transient elevation of heart-rate. All observers reported head-contingent sensations of body tilt although their bodies remained supine. Mostly, the subjective sensations conform to a model based on semicircular canal responses to angular acceleration. However, some surprising deviations from the model were found. Also, large inter-individual differences in direction, magnitude, and quality of the illusory body tilt were observed. The results have implications for subject screening and prediction of subjective tolerance for centrifugation.

  14. Comprehensive Evaluation of Anterior Corneal Change in Asphericity Calculated by the Tangential Radius of Curvature after LASIK

    PubMed Central

    Ying, Jinglu; Cai, Jianqiu; Zhu, Leru

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the change in the anterior corneal asphericity (ΔQ) comprehensively calculated using the tangential radius (rt) after LASIK. Forty-two right eyes were evaluated using the Orbscan II corneal topographer. The pre- and postoperative Q-values of the flat principal semimeridians calculated by the sagittal radius were compared to those by the tangential radius. The Q-value of each semimeridian in the horizontal region was calculated by rt. Fourier fitting was used to model the 360-semimeridional variation of Q-values and to fit the Q-values in the vertical region before and after surgery. There were significant differences in Q-values between the two methods before (P < 0.001) and after surgery (P = 0.003). A significant increase in postoperative Q-value was detected compared to preoperative Q-value (P < 0.001) calculated by rt. The 360-semimeridional variation of the Q-values was well fitted with a third- and fourth-degree Fourier function before and after surgery. The ΔQ-value distribution presented double valley variation, with the amount of ΔQ being lowest in the near-vertical regions and highest in the near-horizontal regions. Calculating the Q-value with rt combined with Fourier fitting, we evaluated 360 ΔQ-values' variation of semimeridians of the entire anterior corneal surface and then displayed true and complete anterior corneal shape after LASIK. PMID:28265465

  15. Alpha particles diffusion due to charge changes

    SciTech Connect

    Clauser, C. F. Farengo, R.

    2015-12-15

    Alpha particles diffusion due to charge changes in a magnetized plasma is studied. Analytical calculations and numerical simulations are employed to show that this process can be very important in the pedestal-edge-SOL regions. This is the first study that presents clear evidence of the importance of atomic processes on the diffusion of alpha particles. A simple 1D model that includes inelastic collisions with plasma species, “cold” neutrals, and partially ionized species was employed. The code, which follows the exact particle orbits and includes the effect of inelastic collisions via a Monte Carlo type random process, runs on a graphic processor unit (GPU). The analytical and numerical results show excellent agreement when a uniform background (plasma and cold species) is assumed. The simulations also show that the gradients in the density of the plasma and cold species, which are large and opposite in the edge region, produce an inward flux of alpha particles. Calculations of the alpha particles flux reaching the walls or divertor plates should include these processes.

  16. 47 CFR 76.1604 - Charges for customer service changes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Charges for customer service changes. 76.1604 Section 76.1604 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Notices § 76.1604 Charges for customer service changes. If a...

  17. 47 CFR 76.1604 - Charges for customer service changes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Charges for customer service changes. 76.1604 Section 76.1604 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Notices § 76.1604 Charges for customer service changes. If a...

  18. 47 CFR 76.1604 - Charges for customer service changes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Charges for customer service changes. 76.1604 Section 76.1604 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Notices § 76.1604 Charges for customer service changes. If a...

  19. 47 CFR 76.1604 - Charges for customer service changes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Charges for customer service changes. 76.1604 Section 76.1604 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Notices § 76.1604 Charges for customer service changes. If a...

  20. 47 CFR 76.1604 - Charges for customer service changes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Charges for customer service changes. 76.1604 Section 76.1604 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Notices § 76.1604 Charges for customer service changes. If a...

  1. Thermally induced changes in the focal distance of composite mirrors - Composites with a zero coefficient of thermal expansion of the radius of curvature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolgin, Benjamin P.

    1992-01-01

    Calculations are presented of the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of the radius of curvature of the reflector face sheets made of a quasi-isotropic composite. It is shown that, upon cooling, the change of the CTE of the focal distance of the mirror is equal to that of the radius of the curvature of the reflector face sheet. The CTE of the radius of the curvature of a quasi-isotropic composite face sheet depends on both the in-plane and the out-of-plane CTEs. The zero in-plane CTE of a face sheet does not guarantee mirrors with no focal length changes.

  2. Thermally induced changes in the focal distance of composite mirrors - Composites with a zero coefficient of thermal expansion of the radius of curvature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolgin, Benjamin P.

    1992-01-01

    Calculations are presented of the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of the radius of curvature of the reflector face sheets made of a quasi-isotropic composite. It is shown that, upon cooling, the change of the CTE of the focal distance of the mirror is equal to that of the radius of the curvature of the reflector face sheet. The CTE of the radius of the curvature of a quasi-isotropic composite face sheet depends on both the in-plane and the out-of-plane CTEs. The zero in-plane CTE of a face sheet does not guarantee mirrors with no focal length changes.

  3. Research on the Distribution of Magnetic Particles by Changing The Rate of the Radius of the Pole and the Length between Two Poles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Xiao-Ye; Gong, Yong-Yong; Yang, Kai; Huang, Zhe-Yong; Pei, Ning

    2016-05-01

    We propose an innovate program in order to improve the distribution of magnetic particles aggregated in magnetic field by changing the radius of the pole(R) and the spacing between two poles(D). The finite element software ANSYS is used to research the changes in magnetic flux density and magnetic gradient in the experiment. The analysis by Origin indicates that the force along radius reduced to less than half of the original, improving the aggregation at the center greatly.

  4. Charge-induced conformational changes of PEG-(Na(+))(n) in a vacuum and aqueous nanodroplets.

    PubMed

    Consta, Styliani; Chung, Jun Kyung

    2011-09-08

    Charged-induced conformational changes of sodiated poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG-(Na(+))(n)) in a vacuum and water droplets were studied using molecular simulations. In a vacuum, compact and partially unwound conformations were identified by analyzing occupation probabilities on reaction surfaces defined by the accessible surface area of the macroion, the distance between the centers of mass of the PEG molecule and of the cations and radius of gyration of the macromolecule. The critical charge of the macromolecule for which there is coexistence of various conformations was estimated using the Rayleigh criterion for the breakdown of highly charged droplets and compared with that observed in the simulations. The simulation findings agreed well with the Rayleigh prediction. The properties of sodiated PEG macromolecules in the presence of solvent and ions were also investigated. It was found that the macroion becomes saturated with charge. The highly charged state leads to an extended conformation that is partially expelled by the droplet. However, a portion of the chain is still in contact with the solvent. Drying-out of the solvent leaves the macroion in a stretched necklace-like conformation. The mechanism of release of sodiated PEG from an aqueous droplet was shown to be distinctly different from that of a protonated polyhistidine in a water nanodroplet, demonstrating sensitivity of the disintegration mechanism of the nanodroplet to the degree of hydrophilicity of the macroion.

  5. Variable Radius Nacelle Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGowan, David M.

    2001-01-01

    An overview of the active shape control for a variable radius nacelle leading edge program is presented. The current technical plan and schedule will be discussed. Results from the structural shape change of curved plates demonstration will be presented, as well as the NASA LaRC concept for a variable radius nacelle leading edge. Results of a Boeing systems integration study of this concept will be discussed briefly. The status of the sensors, actuators, and computational design tools tasks will also be presented.

  6. Detonation Shock Radius Experiments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, David; Debes, Joshua; Stewart, Scott; Yoo, Sunhee

    2007-06-01

    A previous passover experiment [1] was designed to create a complex detonation transient used in validating a reduced, asymptotically derived description of detonation shock dynamics (DSD). An underlying question remained on determining the location of the initial detonation shock radius to start the DSD simulation with respect to the dynamical response of the initiation system coupling's to the main charge. This paper concentrates on determining the initial shock radius required of such DSD governed problems. `Cut-back' experiments of PBX-9501 were conducted using an initiation system that sought to optimize the transferred detonation to the desired constant radius, hemispherical shape. Streak camera techniques captured the breakout on three of the prism's surfaces for time-of-arrival data. The paper includes comparisons to simulations using constant volume explosion and high pressure hot spots. The results of the experiments and simulation efforts provide fundamental design considerations for actual explosive systems and verify necessary conditions from which the asymptotic theory of DSD may apply. [1] Lambert, D., Stewart, D. Scott and Yoo, S. and Wescott, B., ``Experimental Validation of Detonation Shock Dynamics in Condensed Explosives. J. of Fluid Mechs., Vol. 546, pp.227-253 (2006).

  7. 47 CFR 76.980 - Charges for customer changes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... other similarly simple methods shall be a nominal amount, not exceeding actual costs, as defined in.... The actual cost charge shall be either the HSC, as defined in Section 76.923 of the rules, multiplied by the number of persons hours needed to implement the change, or the HSC multiplied by the average...

  8. Correlated charge-changing ion-atom collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Tanis, J.A.

    1992-04-01

    This report summarizes the progress and accomplishments in accelerator atomic physics research supported by DOE grant DE-FG02-87ER13778 from March 16, 1991 through March 15, 1992. This work involves the experimental investigation of fundamental atomic processes in collisions of charged projectiles with neutral targets or electrons, with particular emphasis on two-electron interactions and electron correlation effects. Processes involving combinations of excitation, ionization, and charge transfer are investigated utilizing coincidence techniques in which projectiles charge-changing events are associated with x-ray emission, target recoil ions, or electron emission. New results have been obtained for studies involving (1) resonant recombination of atomic ions, (2) double ionization of helium, and (3) continuum electron emission. Experiments were conducted using accelerators at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Argonne National Laboratory, Michigan State University, Western Michigan University, and the Institute of Nuclear Research, Debrecen, Hungary. Brief summaries of work completed and work in progress are given in this report.

  9. Charge changing phosphorylated polymers: Proof of in situ mucoadhesive properties.

    PubMed

    Bonengel, Sonja; Jelkmann, Max; Oh, Sejin; Mahmood, Arshad; Ijaz, Muhammad; Bernkop-Schnürch, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study was to design a novel polyethylene glycol (PEG) derivative exhibiting mucus permeating and mucoadhesive properties. Therefore, the enzymatically degradable phosphate ester, phosphotyrosine (Ptyr) was covalently attached to PEG-diamine. The synthesized PEG-Ptyr was studied in terms of enzymatic degradability on Caco 2 cells and by isolated intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP). Furthermore, the influence of enzymatic degradation on charge distribution of the polymer as well as on mucus diffusion and mucoadhesion was investigated. Within this study, the phosphate ester in PEG-Ptyr could be cleaved on the cell monolayer and by the isolated IAP, whereby the degradation rate was 10-fold higher utilizing the isolated enzyme. Implementation of negative charges on PEG due to modification with Ptyr led to an increased electrophoretic mobility, which was reduced after enzymatic degradation of the phosphate ester, most likely due to the alterations in charge distribution on the polymeric backbone. Interactions with mucus components were determined within mucus diffusion studies and rheological investigations. Herein, PEG-Ptyr showed a 3-fold lower mucus diffusion, after incubation with IAP. Within rheological investigations, dynamic viscosities increased by the factor of 3, after the phosphate ester in PEG-Ptyr was degraded by IAP. Results obtained within these experiments provided evidence for the in situ mucoadhesive properties of charge changing phosphorylated polymers. The combination of mucus permeating and mucoadhesive features of phosphorylated PEGs could be a highly interesting tool for future applications, such as for coating nanoparticles.

  10. Dramatic changes in electronic structure revealed by fractionally charged nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Aron J.; Mori-Sánchez, Paula

    2014-01-01

    Discontinuous changes in the electronic structure upon infinitesimal changes to the Hamiltonian are demonstrated. These are revealed in one and two electron molecular systems by full configuration interaction (FCI) calculations when the realm of the nuclear charge is extended to be fractional. FCI electron densities in these systems show dramatic changes in real space and illustrate the transfer, hopping, and removal of electrons. This is due to the particle nature of electrons seen in stretched systems and is a manifestation of an energy derivative discontinuity at constant number of electrons. Dramatic errors of density functional theory densities are seen in real space as this physics is missing from currently used approximations. The movements of electrons in these simple systems encapsulate those in real physical processes, from chemical reactions to electron transport and pose a great challenge for the development of new electronic structure methods.

  11. Puzzling out the proton radius puzzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihovilovič, M.; Merkel, H.; Weber, A.

    2016-01-01

    The discrepancy between the proton charge radius extracted from the muonic hydrogen Lamb shift measurement and the best present value obtained from the elastic scattering experiments, remains unexplained and represents a burning problem of today's nuclear physics: after more than 50 years of research the radius of a basic constituent of matter is still not understood. This paper presents a summary of the best existing proton radius measurements, followed by an overview of the possible explanations for the observed inconsistency between the hydrogen and the muonic-hydrogen data. In the last part the upcoming experiments, dedicated to remeasuring the proton radius, are described.

  12. Puzzling out the proton radius puzzle

    SciTech Connect

    Mihovilovič, M.; Merkel, H.; Weber, A.

    2016-01-22

    The discrepancy between the proton charge radius extracted from the muonic hydrogen Lamb shift measurement and the best present value obtained from the elastic scattering experiments, remains unexplained and represents a burning problem of today’s nuclear physics: after more than 50 years of research the radius of a basic constituent of matter is still not understood. This paper presents a summary of the best existing proton radius measurements, followed by an overview of the possible explanations for the observed inconsistency between the hydrogen and the muonic-hydrogen data. In the last part the upcoming experiments, dedicated to remeasuring the proton radius, are described.

  13. Fundamentals of charged devices: Energy changes in a capacitor medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, J. S.; Baudry, L.

    2013-03-01

    Capacitors and derivative devices continue to be as relevant as ever, both at the frontiers of scientific and technological research and in the development of commercial products. Central to such pursuits is the essential requirement that all aspects of the work done in charging or discharging capacitors are clearly understood. Surprisingly, there is a very significant disagreement among standard texts and journal publications regarding this topic. The present work elaborates a thorough analysis of energy changes in a capacitor medium in terms of thermodynamic work and its extension to the more general, electrostatic energy change. Our conclusions agree, for example, with those of Volker Heine, but not with texts by Pippard or Callen. We also note that electric and magnetic analogues are not equivalent.

  14. Large mode radius resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Michael R.

    1987-01-01

    Resonator configurations permitting operation with large mode radius while maintaining good transverse mode discrimination are considered. Stable resonators incorporating an intracavity telescope and unstable resonator geometries utilizing an output coupler with a Gaussian reflectivity profile are shown to enable large radius single mode laser operation. Results of heterodyne studies of pulsed CO2 lasers with large (11mm e sup-2 radius) fundamental mode sizes are presented demonstrating minimal frequency sweeping in accordance with the theory of laser-induced medium perturbations.

  15. How to resolve the proton radius puzzle?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paz, Gil

    2016-09-01

    In 2010 the first measurement of the proton charge radius from spectroscopy of muonic hydrogen was found to be five standard deviations away from the regular hydrogen value. Six years later, this ``proton radius puzzle'' is still unresolved. One of the most promising avenues to test the muonic hydrogen result is a new muon-proton scattering experiment called MUSE. We describe how effective field theory methods will allow to directly connect muonic hydrogen spectroscopy to muon-proton scattering.

  16. Utilities Power Change: Engaging Commercial Customers in Workplace Charging

    SciTech Connect

    Lommele, Stephen; Dafoe, Wendy

    2016-06-01

    As stewards of an electric grid that is available almost anywhere people park, utilities that support workplace charging are uniquely positioned to help their commercial customers be a part of the rapidly expanding network of charging infrastructure. Utilities understand the distinctive challenges of their customers, have access to technical information about electrical infrastructure, and have deep experience modeling and managing demand for electricity. This case study highlights the experiences of two utilities with workplace charging programs.

  17. Mirror with thermally controlled radius of curvature

    DOEpatents

    Neil, George R.; Shinn, Michelle D.

    2010-06-22

    A radius of curvature controlled mirror for controlling precisely the focal point of a laser beam or other light beam. The radius of curvature controlled mirror provides nearly spherical distortion of the mirror in response to differential expansion between the front and rear surfaces of the mirror. The radius of curvature controlled mirror compensates for changes in other optical components due to heating or other physical changes. The radius of curvature controlled mirror includes an arrangement for adjusting the temperature of the front surface and separately adjusting the temperature of the rear surface to control the radius of curvature. The temperature adjustment arrangements can include cooling channels within the mirror body or convection of a gas upon the surface of the mirror. A control system controls the differential expansion between the front and rear surfaces to achieve the desired radius of curvature.

  18. Electric Vehicle Charging Stations as a Climate Change Mitigation Strategy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cave, Bridget; DeYoung, Russell J.

    2014-01-01

    In order to facilitate the use of electric vehicles at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC), charging stations should be made available to LaRC employees. The implementation of charging stations would decrease the need for gasoline thus decreasing CO2 emissions improving local air quality and providing a cost savings for LaRC employees. A charging station pilot program is described that would install stations as the need increased and also presents a business model that pays for the electricity used and installation at no cost to the government.

  19. Effective Cleaning Radius Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Churnetski, B.V.

    2001-10-15

    This report discusses results of testing done in the Savannah River Laboratory half tank and full tank mockup facilities using kaolin clay slurries and the relationship between cleaning radius and pump and slurry characteristics.

  20. Early changes in bone density, microarchitecture, bone resorption, and inflammation predict the clinical outcome 12 weeks after conservatively treated distal radius fractures: an exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Ursina; de Jong, Joost J; Bours, Sandrine G P; Keszei, András P; Arts, Jacobus J; Brink, Peter R G; Menheere, Paul; van Geel, Tineke A C M; van Rietbergen, Bert; van den Bergh, Joop P W; Geusens, Piet P; Willems, Paul C

    2014-09-01

    Fracture healing is an active process with early changes in bone and inflammation. We performed an exploratory study evaluating the association between early changes in densitometric, structural, biomechanical, and biochemical bone parameters during the first weeks of fracture healing and wrist-specific pain and disability at 12 weeks in postmenopausal women with a conservatively treated distal radius fracture. Eighteen patients (aged 64 ± 8 years) were evaluated at 1 to 2 and 3 to 4 weeks postfracture, using high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT), micro-finite element analysis, serum procollagen type-I N-terminal propeptide (P1NP), carboxy-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen (ICTP), and high-sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP). After 12 weeks, patients rated their pain and disability using Patient Rated Wrist Evaluation (PRWE) questionnaire. Additionally, Quick Disability of the Arm Shoulder and Hand (QuickDASH) questionnaire and active wrist range of motion was evaluated. Linear regression models were used to study the relationship between changes in bone parameters and in hsCRP from visit 1 to 2 and PRWE score after 12 weeks. A lower PRWE outcome, indicating better outcome, was significantly related to an early increase in trabecular bone mineral density (BMD) (β -0.96 [95% CI -1.75 to -0.16], R(2)  = 0.37), in torsional stiffness (-0.14 [-0.28 to -0.004], R(2)  = 0.31), and to an early decrease in trabecular separation (209 [15 to 402], R(2)  = 0.33) and in ICTP (12.1 [0.0 to 24.1], R(2)  = 0.34). Similar results were found for QuickDASH. Higher total dorsal and palmar flexion range of motion was significantly related to early increase in hsCRP (9.62 [3.90 to 15.34], R(2)  = 0.52). This exploratory study indicates that the assessment of early changes in trabecular BMD, trabecular separation, calculated torsional stiffness, bone resorption marker ICTP, and hsCRP after a distal radius fracture provides

  1. Charge-changing cross sections of Ne30, Na32,33 with a proton target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozawa, A.; Moriguchi, T.; Ohtsubo, T.; Aoi, N.; Fang, D. Q.; Fukuda, N.; Fukuda, M.; Geissel, H.; Hachiuma, I.; Inabe, N.; Ishibashi, Y.; Ishimoto, S.; Ito, Y.; Izumikawa, T.; Kameda, D.; Kubo, T.; Kuboki, T.; Kusaka, K.; Lantz, M.; Ma, Y. G.; Mihara, M.; Miyashita, Y.; Momota, S.; Nagae, D.; Namihira, K.; Nishimura, D.; Ooishi, H.; Ohkuma, Y.; Ohnishi, T.; Ohtake, M.; Ogawa, K.; Shimbara, Y.; Suda, T.; Sumikama, T.; Suzuki, H.; Suzuki, S.; Suzuki, T.; Takechi, M.; Takeda, H.; Tanaka, K.; Watanabe, R.; Winkler, M.; Yamaguchi, T.; Yanagisawa, Y.; Yasuda, Y.; Yoshinaga, K.; Yoshida, A.; Yoshida, K.

    2014-04-01

    The total charge-changing, charge pick-up, and partial charge-changing cross sections of very neutron-rich nuclei (Ne30, Na32,33) with a proton target have been measured at ˜240A MeV for the first time. We introduced the phenomenological correction factor in Glauber-model calculations for the total charge-changing cross sections with the proton target, and applied it to deduce the proton radii of these nuclei. For Ne30 and Na32, the neutron skin thicknesses of the nuclei were deduced by comparing the proton radii with the matter radii deduced from the interaction cross-section measurements. A significant thick neutron-skin has been observed for the nuclei. We also found that the charge pick-up cross sections are much larger than those in the systematics of stable nuclei.

  2. Response of Able-bodied Persons to Changes in Shoe Rocker Radius during Walking: Changes in Ankle Kinematics to Maintain a Consistent Roll-Over Shape

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Charles C.; Hansen, Andrew H.

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies have determined a seemingly consistent feature of able-bodied level ground walking termed the roll-over shape, which is the effective rocker (cam) shape that the lower limb system conforms to between heel contact and contralateral heel contact during walking (first half of the gait cycle). The roll-over shape has been found to be largely unaffected by changes in walking speed, load carriage, and shoe heel height. However, it is unclear from previous studies whether persons are controlling their lower limb systems to maintain a consistent roll-over shape or whether this finding is a byproduct of their attempt to keep ankle kinematic patterns similar during the first half of the gait cycle. We measured the ankle-foot roll-over shapes and ankle kinematics of eleven able-bodied subjects while walking on rocker shoes of different radii. We hypothesized that the ankle flexion patterns during single support would change to maintain a similar roll-over shape. We also hypothesized that with decreasing rocker shoe radii, the difference in ankle flexion between the end and beginning of single support would decrease. Our results supported these hypotheses. Ankle kinematics were changed significantly during walking with the different rocker shoe radii (p < 0.001), while ankle-foot roll-over shape radii (p = 0.146) and fore-aft position (p = 0.132) were not significantly affected. The results of this study have direct implications for designers of ankle-foot prostheses, orthoses, walking casts/boots, and rocker shoes. The results may also be relevant to researchers studying control of human movements. PMID:20483413

  3. Charge Transport in Polyaniline and Vapour Induced Structural Changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minto, C. D. G.; Vaughan, A. S.

    1996-03-01

    Camphor sulphonic acid protonation renders polyaniline soluble in both m-cresol and chloroform. Films cast from these solvents exhibit vastly differing transport properties. m-cresol cast films are metallic or lie on the metal/insulator transition, whereas those cast from chloroform are insulators. Similarly pellets of pressed doped polyaniline powder exhibit insulating characteristics. We present an investigation of such effects in polyaniline obtained from both insulating conditions (films and powders). We find that m-cresol -- vapour treatment of these materials causes a rapid increase both in the conductivity and the type of conduction, changing from an insulator to a material approaching the metal/insulator transition. Chloroform films actually take on characteristics of those cast from m-cresol, including a positive temperature coefficient of resistivity. Both starting materials exhibit similar X-ray scattering patterns, after exposure to vapour, the pattern becomes more similar to that which is found in m-cresol cast films. Conformational changes resulting from a strong polymer--interaction are discussed as the motivation for the improvements in transport properties.

  4. Adsorption free energy of variable-charge nanoparticles to a charged surface in relation to the change of the average chemical state of the particles.

    PubMed

    Weng, Liping; Van Riemsdijk, Willem H; Hiemstra, Tjisse

    2006-01-03

    Variable-charge nanoparticles such as proteins and humics can adsorb strongly to charged macroscopic surfaces such as silica and iron oxide minerals. To model the adsorption of variable-charge particles to charged surfaces, one has to be able to calculate the adsorption free energy involved. It has been shown that the change in the free energy of variable-charge particles is related to the change in their average chemical state upon adsorption, which is commonly described using surface complexation models. In this work, expressions for the free-energy change in variable-charge particles due to changes in chemical binding are derived for three ion-binding models (i.e., the Langmuir, Langmuir-Freundlich, and NICA models) and for changes due to nonspecific binding for the Donnan model. The expressions for the adsorption free energy of the variable-charge particles to a charged surface are derived on the basis of the equality of the (electro)chemical potential of the particles in the bulk solution and adsorption phase. The expressions derived are general in the sense that they account for the competition between charge-determining ions that bind chemically to the particles, and they also apply in case of the formation of chemical bonds between particle ligands and surface sites. The derived expressions can be applied in the future to model the adsorption of variable-charge nanoparticles to charged surfaces. The results obtained for the NICA-Donnan model make it possible to apply this advanced surface complexation model to describe the adsorption of humics to minerals.

  5. Solar Radius at Sub-Terahertz Frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menezes, Fabian; Valio, Adriana

    2017-10-01

    The visible surface of the Sun, or photosphere, is defined as the solar radius in the optical spectrum range located at 696,000 km (Cox et al. (Ed. 2015)). However, as the altitude increases, the dominant electromagnetic radiation is emitted at other frequencies. Our aim is to measure the solar radius at frequencies of 212 GHz and 405 GHz through out a solar cycle and, therefore, the altitude where these emissions are generated and that variation along the years. Also we tried to verify the the radius dependence on the solar activity cycle, which can be a good indicator of the changes that occur in the atmosphere structure. For this, we used data obtained by the Submillimetric Solar Telescope (SST) created from daily scans made by SST from 1990 to 2015. From these scans a 2D map of the solar disk was constructed. The solar radius is then determined by adjusting a circumference to the points where the brightness is half of the quiet Sun level, which is set as the most common temperature value in the solar map, i.e., the mode of the temperature distribution. Thus, we determined the solar radius at 212 and 405 GHz and the altitude of the emissions respectively. For 212 GHz, we obtained a radius of 976.5''+/-8'' (707+/-4 Mm), whereas for 405 GHz, we obtained 975.0''+/-8'' (707+/-5 Mm). optical spectrum range

  6. Multiple Weyl points and the sign change of their topological charges in woodpile photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Ming-Li; Xiao, Meng; Chen, Wen-Jie; Chan, C. T.

    2017-03-01

    We show that Weyl points with topological charges 1 and 2 can be found in very simple chiral woodpile photonic crystals and the distribution of the charges can be changed by changing the material parameters without altering space-group symmetry. The underlying physics can be understood through a tight-binding model. Gapless surface states and their backscattering immune properties also are demonstrated in these systems. Obtaining Weyl points in these easily fabricated woodpile photonic crystals will facilitate the realization of Weyl point physics in optical and IR frequencies.

  7. RADIUS: the government viewpoint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerson, Donald J.

    1992-04-01

    The Office of Research and Development, with major involvement and support from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), has begun a highly applications- oriented project intended to provide image understanding (IU) technology in a fully and semi- automated support system of human-machine interface interactive tools to the photo interpreter and imagery analyst (IA). The central concept of Research and Development for Image Understanding Systems (RADIUS) is that of model supported exploitation. Two- and/or three dimensional site models are developed and/or maintained by analysts using imagery source data, imagery-derived information, and appropriate non-imagery sourced information (often called collateral). IU technology and necessary non-IU technology are used where feasible to integrate this base of information which can be accessed spatially via the now-developed site model and displayed or rendered in support of the IA during the imagery exploitation and reporting process. As new imagery is obtained, it may be registered to the site model, or through the site model to other images, to support the specific exploitation tasks and applications which will be developed. The current effort is the concept definition phase. This phase will determine the viability of current technology to perform these tasks and will define future activities.

  8. Proton radius from electron scattering data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higinbotham, Douglas W.; Kabir, Al Amin; Lin, Vincent; Meekins, David; Norum, Blaine; Sawatzky, Brad

    2016-05-01

    Background: The proton charge radius extracted from recent muonic hydrogen Lamb shift measurements is significantly smaller than that extracted from atomic hydrogen and electron scattering measurements. The discrepancy has become known as the proton radius puzzle. Purpose: In an attempt to understand the discrepancy, we review high-precision electron scattering results from Mainz, Jefferson Lab, Saskatoon, and Stanford. Methods: We make use of stepwise regression techniques using the F test as well as the Akaike information criterion to systematically determine the predictive variables to use for a given set and range of electron scattering data as well as to provide multivariate error estimates. Results: Starting with the precision, low four-momentum transfer (Q2) data from Mainz (1980) and Saskatoon (1974), we find that a stepwise regression of the Maclaurin series using the F test as well as the Akaike information criterion justify using a linear extrapolation which yields a value for the proton radius that is consistent with the result obtained from muonic hydrogen measurements. Applying the same Maclaurin series and statistical criteria to the 2014 Rosenbluth results on GE from Mainz, we again find that the stepwise regression tends to favor a radius consistent with the muonic hydrogen radius but produces results that are extremely sensitive to the range of data included in the fit. Making use of the high-Q2 data on GE to select functions which extrapolate to high Q2, we find that a Padé (N =M =1 ) statistical model works remarkably well, as does a dipole function with a 0.84 fm radius, GE(Q2) =(1+Q2/0.66 GeV2) -2 . Conclusions: Rigorous applications of stepwise regression techniques and multivariate error estimates result in the extraction of a proton charge radius that is consistent with the muonic hydrogen result of 0.84 fm; either from linear extrapolation of the extremely-low-Q2 data or by use of the Padé approximant for extrapolation using a larger

  9. Proton radius from electron scattering data

    SciTech Connect

    Higinbotham, Douglas W.; Kabir, Al Amin; Lin, Vincent; Meekins, David; Norum, Blaine; Sawatzky, Brad

    2016-05-01

    Background: The proton charge radius extracted from recent muonic hydrogen Lamb shift measurements is significantly smaller than that extracted from atomic hydrogen and electron scattering measurements. The discrepancy has become known as the proton radius puzzle. Purpose: In an attempt to understand the discrepancy, we review high-precision electron scattering results from Mainz, Jefferson Lab, Saskatoon, and Stanford. Methods: We make use of stepwise regression techniques using the F test as well as the Akaike information criterion to systematically determine the predictive variables to use for a given set and range of electron scattering data as well as to provide multivariate error estimates. Results: Starting with the precision, low four-momentum transfer (Q2) data from Mainz (1980) and Saskatoon (1974), we find that a stepwise regression of the Maclaurin series using the F test as well as the Akaike information criterion justify using a linear extrapolation which yields a value for the proton radius that is consistent with the result obtained from muonic hydrogen measurements. Applying the same Maclaurin series and statistical criteria to the 2014 Rosenbluth results on GE from Mainz, we again find that the stepwise regression tends to favor a radius consistent with the muonic hydrogen radius but produces results that are extremely sensitive to the range of data included in the fit. Making use of the high-Q2 data on GE to select functions which extrapolate to high Q2, we find that a Padé (N=M=1) statistical model works remarkably well, as does a dipole function with a 0.84 fm radius, GE(Q2)=(1+Q2/0.66GeV2)−2. Conclusions: Rigorous applications of stepwise regression techniques and multivariate error estimates result in the extraction of a proton charge radius that is consistent with the muonic hydrogen result of 0.84 fm; either from linear extrapolation of the extremely-low-Q2 data or by use of the Padé approximant for extrapolation using a larger range of

  10. The innermost inner core of the earth: Evidence for a change in anisotropic behavior at the radius of about 300 km

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Miaki; Dziewoński, Adam M.

    2002-01-01

    Since the discovery of the inner core in 1936, no additional spherical subshell of the Earth has been observed. Based on an extensive seismic data set, we propose the existence of an innermost inner core, with a radius of ∼300 km, that exhibits a distinct transverse isotropy relative to the bulk inner core. Specifically, within the innermost inner core, the slowest direction of wave propagation is ∼45° from the east-west direction. In contrast, the direction of the slowest wave propagation in the overlying inner core is east-west. The distinct anisotropy at the center of the Earth may represent fossil evidence of a unique early history of inner-core evolution. PMID:12374869

  11. The innermost inner core of the earth: evidence for a change in anisotropic behavior at the radius of about 300 km.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Miaki; Dziewoński, Adam M

    2002-10-29

    Since the discovery of the inner core in 1936, no additional spherical subshell of the Earth has been observed. Based on an extensive seismic data set, we propose the existence of an innermost inner core, with a radius of approximately 300 km, that exhibits a distinct transverse isotropy relative to the bulk inner core. Specifically, within the innermost inner core, the slowest direction of wave propagation is approximately 45 degrees from the east-west direction. In contrast, the direction of the slowest wave propagation in the overlying inner core is east-west. The distinct anisotropy at the center of the Earth may represent fossil evidence of a unique early history of inner-core evolution.

  12. Structural change during charge-discharge for iron substituted lithium manganese oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabuchi, Mitsuharu; Kageyama, Hiroyuki; Kubota, Kei; Shibuya, Hideka; Doumae, Kyosuke; Kanno, Ryoji

    2016-06-01

    For this study, Fe-substituted Li2MnO3 (Li1+x(Fe0.25Mn0.75)1-xO2, 0 < x < 1/3) was prepared using coprecipitation-calcination. The change in the cation distribution was examined after charge-discharge using a monoclinic Li2MnO3 unit cell (C2/m). At the initial Li-extraction, Fe ion moved to the tetrahedral 8j site. At the end of charging, transition metals moved from 4g and 2b sites in (Mn, Fe)sbnd Li layer to 2c and 4h sites in the Li-layer via 4i and 8j sites. The cation random distribution was maintained after the end of discharging. The stability of layered rock-salt phase after cycle testing depended on the mode of charging; although the positive electrode decomposed to a mixture of layered rock-salt and spinel phases by typical galvanostatic charging, the positive electrode remained a single phase with a layered rock-salt structure by application of stepwise charging. Careful control of the charging mode at the initial cycle is important for Fe-substituted Li2MnO3 positive electrode material.

  13. Changes in Surface Charge Density of Blood Cells in Fatal Accidental Hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Szeremeta, Michał; Petelska, Aneta Dorota; Kotyńska, Joanna; Pepiński, Witold; Naumowicz, Monika; Figaszewski, Zbigniew Artur; Niemcunowicz-Janica, Anna

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this research was to evaluate postmortem changes concerning electric charge of human erythrocytes and thrombocytes in fatal accidental hypothermia. The surface charge density values were determined on the basis of the electrophoretic mobility measurements of the cells conducted at various pH values of electrolyte solution. The surface charge of erythrocyte membranes after fatal accidental hypothermia increased compared to the control group within whole range of experimental pH values. Moreover, a slight shift of the isoelectric point of erythrocyte membranes towards high pH values was observed. The surface charge of thrombocyte membranes in fatal accidental hypothermia decreased at low pH compared to the control group. However, at pH range 4-9, the values increased compared to the control group. The isoelectric point of thrombocyte membranes after fatal accidental hypothermia was slightly shifted towards low pH values compared to the control group. The observed changes are probably connected with the partial destruction and functional changes of the blood cell structure.

  14. Correlated charge-changing ion-atom collisions. Progress report, March 16, 1991--March 15, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Tanis, J.A.

    1992-04-01

    This report summarizes the progress and accomplishments in accelerator atomic physics research supported by DOE grant DE-FG02-87ER13778 from March 16, 1991 through March 15, 1992. This work involves the experimental investigation of fundamental atomic processes in collisions of charged projectiles with neutral targets or electrons, with particular emphasis on two-electron interactions and electron correlation effects. Processes involving combinations of excitation, ionization, and charge transfer are investigated utilizing coincidence techniques in which projectiles charge-changing events are associated with x-ray emission, target recoil ions, or electron emission. New results have been obtained for studies involving (1) resonant recombination of atomic ions, (2) double ionization of helium, and (3) continuum electron emission. Experiments were conducted using accelerators at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Argonne National Laboratory, Michigan State University, Western Michigan University, and the Institute of Nuclear Research, Debrecen, Hungary. Brief summaries of work completed and work in progress are given in this report.

  15. Interactions in hydrogen of relativistic neon to nickel projectiles: Total charge-changing cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C.-X.; Albergo, S.; Caccia, Z.; Costa, S.; Crawford, H. J.; Cronqvist, M.; Engelage, J.; Ferrando, P.; Fonte, R.; Greiner, L.; Guzik, T. G.; Insolia, A.; Jones, F. C.; Knott, C. N.; Lindstrom, P. J.; Mitchell, J. W.; Potenza, R.; Romanski, J.; Russo, G. V.; Soutoul, A.; Testard, O.; Tull, C. E.; Tuvé, C.; Waddington, C. J.; Webber, W. R.; Wefel, J. P.; Zhang, X.

    1994-06-01

    A liquid hydrogen target was used to study the nuclear fragmentation of beams of relativistic heavy ions, 22Ne to 58Ni, over an energy range 400 to 900 MeV/nucleon. The experiments were carried out at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Bevalac HISS facility, using the charge-velocity-rigidity method to identify the charged fragments. Here we describe the general concept of the experiment and present total charge-changing cross sections obtained from 17 separate runs. These new measured cross sections display an energy dependence which follows semiempirical model predictions. The mass dependence of the cross sections behaves as predicted by optical models, but within the experimental energy range, the optical model parameters display a clear energy dependence. The isospin of the projectile nuclei also appears to be an important factor in the interaction process.

  16. Interactions in hydrogen of relativistic neon to nickel projectiles: Total charge-changing cross sections

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.; Albergo, S.; Caccia, Z.; Costa, S.; Crawford, H.J.; Cronqvist, M.; Engelage, J.; Ferrando, P.; Fonte, R.; Greiner, L.; Guzik, T.G.; Insolia, A.; Jones, F.C.; Knott, C.N.; Lindstrom, P.J.; Mitchell, J.W.; Potenza, R.; Romanski, J.; Russo, G.V.; Soutoul, A.; Testard, O.; Tull, C.E.; Tuve, C.; Waddington, C.J.; Webber, W.R.; Wefel, J.P.; Zhang, X. Space Science Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 Service d'Astrophysique, Centre d'Etudes de Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette, Cedex Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Catania, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Catania, Corso Italia 57, I 95129-Catania NASA

    1994-06-01

    A liquid hydrogen target was used to study the nuclear fragmentation of beams of relativistic heavy ions, [sup 22]Ne to [sup 58]Ni, over an energy range 400 to 900 MeV/nucleon. The experiments were carried out at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Bevalac HISS facility, using the charge-velocity-rigidity method to identify the charged fragments. Here we describe the general concept of the experiment and present total charge-changing cross sections obtained from 17 separate runs. These new measured cross sections display an energy dependence which follows semiempirical model predictions. The mass dependence of the cross sections behaves as predicted by optical models, but within the experimental energy range, the optical model parameters display a clear energy dependence. The isospin of the projectile nuclei also appears to be an important factor in the interaction process.

  17. Conformational Changes Followed by Complete Unzipping of DNA Double Helix by Charge-Tuned Gold Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Bera, Subhas C; Sanyal, Kasturi; Senapati, Dulal; Mishra, Padmaja P

    2016-05-12

    The complete unzipping of DNA double helix by small size gold nanoparticles having weakly positive surface charge has been monitored using ensemble and single molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (smFRET) techniques. We believe, as the gold nanoparticles have positive charge on the surface, the DNA and nanoparticles were pulled together to form two single strands. The positively charged ligands on the nanoparticles attached to the DNA, and the hydrophobic ligands of the nanoparticles became tangled with each other, pulling the nanoparticles into clusters. At the same time, the nanoparticles pulled the DNA apart. The conformational changes followed by unzipping have been investigated for long DNA (calf thymus DNA) as well as for short DNA (∼40 base pair) using ensemble methods like circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, fluorescence intercalation assay, viscometric method, and single molecule FRET imaging. This observation not only reveals a new aspect in the field of nano-bio interface but also provides additional information about DNA dynamics.

  18. Adsorption properties of subtropical and tropical variable charge soils: Implications from climate change and biochar amendment

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Ren-Kou; Qafoku, Nikolla; Van Ranst, Eric; Li, Jiu-yu; Jiang, Jun

    2016-01-25

    This review paper attempts to summarize the progress made in research efforts conducted over the last years to study the surface chemical properties of the tropical and subtropical soils, usually called variable charge soils, and the way they response to different management practices. The paper is composed of an introductory section that provides a brief discussion on the surface chemical properties of these soils, and five other review sections. The focus of these sections is on the evolution of surface chemical properties during the development of the variable charge properties (second section), interactions between oppositely charged particles and the resulting effects on the soil properties and especially on soil acidity (third section), the surface effects of low molecular weight organic acids sorbed to mineral surfaces and the chemical behavior of aluminum (fourth section), and the crop straw derived biochar induced changes of the surface chemical properties of these soils (fifth section). A discussion on the effect of climate change variables on the properties of the variable charge soils is included at the end of this review paper (sixth section).

  19. 77 FR 58591 - Report on Waste Burial Charges: Changes in Decommissioning Waste Disposal Costs at Low-Level...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-21

    ... COMMISSION Report on Waste Burial Charges: Changes in Decommissioning Waste Disposal Costs at Low-Level Waste... document entitled: NUREG-1307 Revision 15, ``Report on Waste Burial Charges: Changes in Decommissioning Waste Disposal Costs at Low-Level Waste Burial Facilities.'' DATES: Please submit comments by October 22...

  20. 77 FR 64361 - Report on Waste Burial Charges: Changes in Decommissioning Waste Disposal Costs at Low-Level...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-19

    ... COMMISSION Report on Waste Burial Charges: Changes in Decommissioning Waste Disposal Costs at Low-Level Waste... Commission (NRC or the Commission) issued Draft NUREG-1307, Revision 15, ``Report on Waste Burial Charges: Changes in Decommissioning Waste Disposal Costs at Low-Level Waste Burial Facilities,'' in the Federal...

  1. Charging and Discharging Processes of Thermal Energy Storage System Using Phase change materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanimozhi, B., Dr.; Harish, Kasilanka; Sai Tarun, Bellamkonda; Saty Sainath Reddy, Pogaku; Sai Sujeeth, Padakandla

    2017-05-01

    The objective of the study is to investigate the thermal characteristics of charging and discharge processes of fabricated thermal energy storage system using Phase change materials. Experiments were performed with phase change materials in which a storage tank have designed and developed to enhance the heat transfer rate from the solar tank to the PCM storage tank. The enhancement of heat transfer can be done by using a number of copper tubes in the fabricated storage tank. This storage tank can hold or conserve heat energy for a much longer time than the conventional water storage system. Performance evaluations of experimental results during charging and discharging processes of paraffin wax have discussed. In which heat absorption and heat rejection have been calculated with various flow rate.

  2. Diagnosing Meteorological Conditions Associated with Sprites and Lightning with Large Charge Moment Changes (CMC) over Oklahoma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flores-Rivera, Lizxandra; Lang, Timothy J.

    2014-01-01

    Sprites are a category of Transient Luminous Events (TLEs) that occur in the upper atmosphere above the tops of Mesoscale Convective Systems (MCSs). They are commonly associated with lightning that produce large charge moment changes (CMCs). Synergistic use of satellite and radar-retrieved observations together with sounding data, forecasts, and lightning-detection networks allowed the diagnosis and analysis of the meteorological conditions associated with sprites as well as large-CMC lightning over Oklahoma.

  3. Human red blood cell aging: correlative changes in surface charge and cell properties.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yao-Xiong; Wu, Zheng-Jie; Mehrishi, Jitendra; Huang, Bao-Tian; Chen, Xing-Yao; Zheng, Xin-Jing; Liu, Wen-Jing; Luo, Man

    2011-12-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) during microcirculation, aging and storage, lose N-acetylneuraminic acid (NANA) and other biomaterials thereby altering cell structures, some properties and functions. Such cell damage very likely underlies the serious adverse effects of blood transfusion. However, a controversy has remained since 1961-1977 as to whether with aging, the RBCs, suffering loss of NANA, do have a decreased charge density. Any correlation between the changes in the cell properties with cell aging is also not clear. Therefore, to remove the ambiguity and uncertainty, we carried out multiparameteric studies on Percoll fractions of blood of 38 volunteers (lightest-young-Y-RBCs, densest-old-O-RBCs, two middle fractions).We found that there were striking differences between the properties of Y-RBCs and O-RBCs. The ζ-potential of Y-RBCs decreased gradually with aging. Studies in parallel on RBC fractions incubated with both positively charged quantum dots and Sambucus Nigra-fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) along with their ζ-potentials provide for the first time direct visual evidence about the lesser amount of charge density and NANA on O-RBCs, and a collinear decrease in their respective ζ-potentials. Close correlation was found between the surface charge on an aging RBC and its structure and functions, from the cell morphology, the membrane deformability to the intracellular Hb structure and oxidation ability. This quantitative approach not only clarifies the picture but also has implications in biology and medicine.

  4. Changes in average length of stay and average charges generated following institution of PSRO review.

    PubMed

    Westphal, M; Frazier, E; Miller, M C

    1979-01-01

    A five-year review of accounting data at a university hospital shows that immediately following institution of concurrent PSRO admission and length of stay review of Medicare-Medicaid patients, there was a significant decrease in length of stay and a fall in average charges generated per patient against the inflationary trend. Similar changes did not occur for the non-Medicare-Medicaid patients who were not reviewed. The observed changes occurred even though the review procedure rarely resulted in the denial of services to patients, suggesting an indirect effect of review.

  5. Correlating charge movements with local conformational changes of a Na(+)-coupled cotransporter.

    PubMed

    Patti, Monica; Forster, Ian C

    2014-04-15

    To gain insight into the steady-state and dynamic characteristics of structural rearrangements of an electrogenic secondary-active cotransporter during its transport cycle, two measures of conformational change (pre-steady-state current relaxations and intensity of fluorescence emitted from reporter fluorophores) were investigated as a function of membrane potential and external substrate. Cysteines were substituted at three believed-new sites in the type IIb Na(+)-coupled inorganic phosphate cotransporter (SLC34A2 flounder isoform) that were predicted to be involved in conformational changes. Labeling at one site resulted in substantial suppression of transport activity, whereas for the other sites, function remained comparable to the wild-type. For these mutants, the properties of the pre-steady-state charge relaxations were similar for each, whereas fluorescence intensity changes differed significantly. Fluorescence changes could be accounted for by simulations using a five-state model with a unique set of apparent fluorescence intensities assigned to each state according to the site of labeling. Fluorescence reported from one site was associated with inward and outward conformations, whereas for the other sites, including four previously indentified sites, emissions were associated principally with one or the other orientation of the transporter. The same membrane potential change induced complementary changes in fluorescence at some sites, which suggested that the microenvironments of the respective fluorophores experience concomitant changes in polarity. In response to step changes in voltage, the pre-steady-state current relaxation and the time course of change in fluorescence intensity were described by single exponentials. For one mutant the time constants matched well with and without external Na(+), providing direct evidence that this label reports conformational changes accompanying intrinsic charge movement and cation interactions.

  6. "Electrostructural Phase Changes" In Charged Particulate Clouds: Planetary and Astrophysical Implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, J. R.

    1999-01-01

    charge sign over another. The random charges of both sign derive from natural grain-to-grain interactions that produce triboelectrification via charge exchange every time grain surfaces make contact with one another. The conversion from a random distribution of grains (upon which there are randomly distributed charges) into an organization of electrostatically-ordered aggregates, can be regarded (within the framework of granular-material science) as an "electrical or Coulombic phase change" of the particulate cloud. It is not totally dissimilar from the more normal phase-change concept in which, for example, a gas with long free-path-molecules suddenly becomes a solid as a result of structural ordering of the molecules (notably, also the result of electronic forces, albeit at a different scale). In both the gas-to-solid case, and the aerosol-to-aggregate case, the same materials and charges are present before and after the phase change, but their arrangement now has a higher degree of order and a lower-energy configuration. An input of energy into the system is required to reverse the situation. The aggregates in the USML experiments were observed to undergo at least two phase changes as noted above. The point about phase changes, and by implication, the "electrostructural" reorganizations in particulate clouds, is the following: (a) they can occur very rapidly, almost spontaneously, above a critical cloud density, (b) in going from a higher energy state to a lower energy state, they convert to a denser system, (c) energy must be required to reverse the situation, implying that energy is released during the high-to-low energy phase change. In applying this information to natural particulate clouds, some inferences can be made (it is stressed that reference is still to dielectric materials attracted by dipole forces). There are several natural settings to which the USML observations apply, and to which the phase-change implications likewise apply. Dense clouds of

  7. "Electrostructural Phase Changes" In Charged Particulate Clouds: Planetary and Astrophysical Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, J. R.

    1999-09-01

    charge sign over another. The random charges of both sign derive from natural grain-to-grain interactions that produce triboelectrification via charge exchange every time grain surfaces make contact with one another. The conversion from a random distribution of grains (upon which there are randomly distributed charges) into an organization of electrostatically-ordered aggregates, can be regarded (within the framework of granular-material science) as an "electrical or Coulombic phase change" of the particulate cloud. It is not totally dissimilar from the more normal phase-change concept in which, for example, a gas with long free-path-molecules suddenly becomes a solid as a result of structural ordering of the molecules (notably, also the result of electronic forces, albeit at a different scale). In both the gas-to-solid case, and the aerosol-to-aggregate case, the same materials and charges are present before and after the phase change, but their arrangement now has a higher degree of order and a lower-energy configuration. An input of energy into the system is required to reverse the situation. The aggregates in the USML experiments were observed to undergo at least two phase changes as noted above. The point about phase changes, and by implication, the "electrostructural" reorganizations in particulate clouds, is the following: (a) they can occur very rapidly, almost spontaneously, above a critical cloud density, (b) in going from a higher energy state to a lower energy state, they convert to a denser system, (c) energy must be required to reverse the situation, implying that energy is released during the high-to-low energy phase change. In applying this information to natural particulate clouds, some inferences can be made (it is stressed that reference is still to dielectric materials attracted by dipole forces). There are several natural settings to which the USML observations apply, and to which the phase-change implications likewise apply. Dense clouds of

  8. "Electrostructural Phase Changes" In Charged Particulate Clouds: Planetary and Astrophysical Implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, J. R.

    1999-01-01

    charge sign over another. The random charges of both sign derive from natural grain-to-grain interactions that produce triboelectrification via charge exchange every time grain surfaces make contact with one another. The conversion from a random distribution of grains (upon which there are randomly distributed charges) into an organization of electrostatically-ordered aggregates, can be regarded (within the framework of granular-material science) as an "electrical or Coulombic phase change" of the particulate cloud. It is not totally dissimilar from the more normal phase-change concept in which, for example, a gas with long free-path-molecules suddenly becomes a solid as a result of structural ordering of the molecules (notably, also the result of electronic forces, albeit at a different scale). In both the gas-to-solid case, and the aerosol-to-aggregate case, the same materials and charges are present before and after the phase change, but their arrangement now has a higher degree of order and a lower-energy configuration. An input of energy into the system is required to reverse the situation. The aggregates in the USML experiments were observed to undergo at least two phase changes as noted above. The point about phase changes, and by implication, the "electrostructural" reorganizations in particulate clouds, is the following: (a) they can occur very rapidly, almost spontaneously, above a critical cloud density, (b) in going from a higher energy state to a lower energy state, they convert to a denser system, (c) energy must be required to reverse the situation, implying that energy is released during the high-to-low energy phase change. In applying this information to natural particulate clouds, some inferences can be made (it is stressed that reference is still to dielectric materials attracted by dipole forces). There are several natural settings to which the USML observations apply, and to which the phase-change implications likewise apply. Dense clouds of

  9. Applying Occam's Razor To The Proton Radius Puzzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higinbotham, Douglas

    2016-09-01

    Over the past five decades, ever more complex mathematical functions have been used to extract the radius of the proton from electron scattering data. For example, in 1963 the proton radius was extracted with linear and quadratic fits of low Q2 data (< 3 fm-2) and by 2014 a non-linear regression of two tenth order power series functions with thirty-one normalization parameters and data out to 25 fm-2 was used. But for electron scattering, the radius of the proton is determined by extracting the slope of the charge form factor at a Q2 of zero. By using higher precision data than was available in 1963 and focusing on the low Q2 data from 1974 to today, we find extrapolating functions consistently produce a proton radius of around 0.84 fm. A result that is in agreement with modern Lamb shift measurements.

  10. Fluorescent probe environment and the structural and charge changes in energy coupling of mitochondrial membranes.

    PubMed

    Chance, B

    1970-10-01

    The use of fluorescent probes to give continuous readouts of the structural states of mitochondrial membranes during energy coupling seems a logical extension of their use in the study of protein structural changes. A clear correlation of the probes' fluorescence characteristics with the acquisition of energy coupling can be demonstrated in fragmented and natural membrane using 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonate (ANS) and ethidium bromide respectively. The present contribution attempts to bring together contemporary viewpoints of this and other laboratories and the recent experimental data and give some detailed information on probe environment and on the structural or charge changes occurring upon energization. The energy-dependent region of the membrane is located at an aqueous interface between an outer layer of proteins (presumably cytochromes) and the membrane permeability barrier; the aromatic portion of ANS appears to be located in the lipid phase and the sulfonic acid group in the aqueous phase. The aqueous phase is probably a structured water region near paramagnetic membrane components such as cytochrome. Membrane energization arising from altered redox potential changes of cytochromes (b(T)) is communicated to the water structure through altered structural states of the hemoproteins, causing a decreased volume of the structured water region and increased interaction with the paramagnetic components in the energized state. Attendant alterations of protonic equilibria of membrane components induce both local and transmembrane changes in charge distribution, with consequent movements of ions, including the probe molecules themselves.

  11. On The Variability Of The Solar Radius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, Gary A.; Dobias, J.

    2007-05-01

    We have examined approximately 18 years of full-disk photometric images of the Sun (1986 through 2004) obtained at the San Fernando Observatory (SFO) looking for variations in the solar radius. The data are from the Cartesian Full Disk Telescope number 1 (CFDT1). This telescope produces images having 512 x 512 pixels with a pixel size of 5.12 arc-sec. We have only used red images obtained at a wavelength of 672.3 nm. Except for infrequent repairs or upgrades, the telescope is seldom modified. Operating at F/40, the focus of the telescope is not routinely adjusted. We have corrected for focal changes due to telescope modifications, differential atmospheric refraction, and temperature changes. We have compared observed image radii with those calculated from the ephemeris. The residuals are then fit by least squares to sinusoids of 10 and 11 year periods to look for a solar cycle signal. For the 11 year period we find that the apparent solar radius is greatest at cycle maximum for solar cycles 22 and 23. The peak-to-peak amplitude is 0.136 +/- 0.010 arc-sec with a multiple regression coefficient, squared, of 0.0404 which is significant at better than p = 0.02 level. The cause of the apparent radius change is under investigation. This work was partially supported by grants from NASA ( NAG5-12905) and NSF (ATM-0533511). Many CSUN students have contributed to this work.

  12. Thermal Charging Study of Compressed Expanded Natural Graphite/Phase Change Material Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Mallow, Anne M; Abdelaziz, Omar; Graham, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    The thermal charging performance of phase change materials, specifically paraffin wax, combined with compressed expanded natural graphite foam is studied under constant heat flux and constant temperature conditions. By varying the heat flux between 0.39 W/cm2 and 1.55 W/cm2 or maintaining a boundary temperature of 60 C for four graphite foam bulk densities, the impact on the rate of thermal energy storage is discussed. Thermal charging experiments indicate that thermal conductivity of the composite is an insufficient metric to compare the influence of graphite foam on the rate of thermal energy storage of the PCM composite. By dividing the latent heat of the composite by the time to melt for various boundary conditions and graphite foam bulk densities, it is determined that bulk density selection is dependent on the applied boundary condition. A greater bulk density is advantageous for samples exposed to a constant temperature near the melting temperature as compared to constant heat flux conditions where a lower bulk density is adequate. Furthermore, the anisotropic nature of graphite foam bulk densities greater than 50 kg/m3 is shown to have an insignificant impact on the rate of thermal charging. These experimental results are used to validate a computational model for future use in the design of thermal batteries for waste heat recovery.

  13. Ultrastructural changes in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus induced by positively charged silver nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Urbina, Dulce G; Lara, Humberto H; Velázquez-Salazar, J Jesús; Arellano-Jiménez, M Josefina; Larios, Eduardo; Srinivasan, Anand; Lopez-Ribot, Jose L

    2015-01-01

    Summary Silver nanoparticles offer a possible means of fighting antibacterial resistance. Most of their antibacterial properties are attributed to their silver ions. In the present work, we study the actions of positively charged silver nanoparticles against both methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. We use aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy to examine the bactericidal effects of silver nanoparticles and the ultrastructural changes in bacteria that are induced by silver nanoparticles. The study revealed that our 1 nm average size silver nanoparticles induced thinning and permeabilization of the cell wall, destabilization of the peptidoglycan layer, and subsequent leakage of intracellular content, causing bacterial cell lysis. We hypothesize that positively charged silver nanoparticles bind to the negatively charged polyanionic backbones of teichoic acids and the related cell wall glycopolymers of bacteria as a first target, consequently stressing the structure and permeability of the cell wall. This hypothesis provides a major mechanism to explain the antibacterial effects of silver nanoparticles on Staphylococcus aureus. Future research should focus on defining the related molecular mechanisms and their importance to the antimicrobial activity of silver nanoparticles. PMID:26734530

  14. Ultrastructural changes in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus induced by positively charged silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Romero-Urbina, Dulce G; Lara, Humberto H; Velázquez-Salazar, J Jesús; Arellano-Jiménez, M Josefina; Larios, Eduardo; Srinivasan, Anand; Lopez-Ribot, Jose L; Yacamán, Miguel José

    2015-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles offer a possible means of fighting antibacterial resistance. Most of their antibacterial properties are attributed to their silver ions. In the present work, we study the actions of positively charged silver nanoparticles against both methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. We use aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy to examine the bactericidal effects of silver nanoparticles and the ultrastructural changes in bacteria that are induced by silver nanoparticles. The study revealed that our 1 nm average size silver nanoparticles induced thinning and permeabilization of the cell wall, destabilization of the peptidoglycan layer, and subsequent leakage of intracellular content, causing bacterial cell lysis. We hypothesize that positively charged silver nanoparticles bind to the negatively charged polyanionic backbones of teichoic acids and the related cell wall glycopolymers of bacteria as a first target, consequently stressing the structure and permeability of the cell wall. This hypothesis provides a major mechanism to explain the antibacterial effects of silver nanoparticles on Staphylococcus aureus. Future research should focus on defining the related molecular mechanisms and their importance to the antimicrobial activity of silver nanoparticles.

  15. Large Charge Moment Change Lightning in an Oklahoma Mesoscale Convective System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, Timothy J.; Cummer, Steven; Petersen, Danyal; Flores-Rivera, Lizxandra; Lyons, Walt; MacGorman, Donald; Beasley, William

    2014-01-01

    On 31 May 2013, a line of severe thunderstorms developed during the local afternoon in central Oklahoma, USA. One of the supercells produced the El Reno tornado, which caused significant damage and killed several people. During the 2300 UTC hour (during the mature supercell stage and just after the tornado began), the storm produced several positive cloud-to-ground (+CG) lightning strokes that featured large (> 100 C km) impulse charge moment changes (iCMCs; charge moment during the first 2 ms after the return stroke). These discharges occurred mainly in convection, in contrast to the typical pattern of large-CMC and sprite-parent +CGs occurring mainly in stratiform precipitation regions. After this time, the line of thunderstorms evolved over several hours into a large mesoscale convective system (MCS). By the 0700 UTC hour on 1 June 2013, the large-CMC pattern had changed markedly. Large-CMC negative CGs, which were absent early in the storm's lifetime, occurred frequently within convection. Meanwhile, large-CMC +CGs had switched to occurring mainly within the broad stratiform region that had developed during the intervening period. The evolution of the large-CMC lightning in this case will be examined using a mix of national mosaics of radar reflectivity, the Oklahoma Lightning Mapping Array (OKLMA), the Charge Moment Change Network (CMCN), and the National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN). A major goal of this study is understanding how storm structure and evolution affected the production of large-CMC lightning. It is anticipated that this will lead to further insight into how and why storms produce the powerful lightning that commonly causes sprites in the upper atmosphere.

  16. Large Charge Moment Change Lightning in an Oklahoma Mesoscale Convective System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, Timothy J.; Cummer, Steven; Beasley, William; Flores-Rivera, Lizxandra; Lyons, Walt; MacGorman, Donald

    2014-01-01

    On 31 May 2013, a line of severe thunderstorms developed during the local afternoon in central Oklahoma, USA. One of the supercells produced the El Reno tornado, which caused significant damage and killed several people. During the 2300 UTC hour (during the mature supercell stage and just after the tornado began), the storm produced several positive cloud-to-ground (+CG) lightning strokes that featured large (> 75 C km) impulse charge moment changes (iCMCs - charge moment during the first 2 ms after the return stroke). These discharges occurred mainly in convection, in contrast to the typical pattern of large-CMC and sprite-parent +CGs occurring mainly in stratiform precipitation regions. After this time, the line of thunderstorms evolved over several hours into a large mesoscale convective system (MCS). By the 0700 UTC hour on 1 June 2013, the large- CMC pattern had changed markedly. Large-CMC negative CGs, which were absent early in the storm's lifetime, occurred frequently within convection. Meanwhile, large- CMC +CGs had switched to occurring mainly within the broad stratiform region that had developed during the intervening period. The evolution of the large-CMC lightning in this case will be examined using a mix of polarimetric data from individual radars, national mosaics of radar reflectivity, the Oklahoma Lightning Mapping Array (OKLMA), the Charge Moment Change Network (CMCN), and the National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN). A major goal of this study is understanding how storm structure and evolution affected the production of large-CMC lightning. It is anticipated that this will lead to further insight into how and why storms produce the powerful lightning that commonly causes sprites in the upper atmosphere.

  17. Age-related changes in rat dermal extracellular matrix composition affect the distribution of plasma proteins as a function of size and charge.

    PubMed

    Sagstad, Solfrid J; Oveland, Eystein; Karlsen, Tine V; Haslene-Hox, Hanne; Tenstad, Olav; Wiig, Helge

    2015-01-01

    Collagen and glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) constituting the ECM may limit the space available and thus exclude macromolecules from a fraction of the interstitial fluid (IF) phase. This exclusion phenomenon is of importance for transcapillary fluid and solute exchange. The purpose of the study was to examine the range of interstitial exclusion in rat skin by using probes within a span of molecular weights and electrical charge and also to test if a change in interstitial composition, occurring as a consequence of aging, affected exclusion. To this end, we used a novel approach, involving the exact determination of albumin concentration and mass in IF and tissue eluate by HPLC and thereafter, expressing the corresponding numbers relative to albumin for a set of probe proteins assessed by quantitative proteomics. Albumin was excluded from 55±4% (n=8) of the extracellular fluid phase. There was a highly significant, positive correlation between probe Stokes-Einstein (SE) radius and fractional excluded volume (VEF), described by VEF=0.078·SE radius+0.269 (P<0.001), and oppositely, a negative correlation between probe isoelectric point (pI) and exclusion for proteins with comparable size, VEF=-0.036·pI+0.719 (P=0.04). Aging resulted in a significant reduction in skin hydration and sulfated GAGs, a moderate increase in hyaluronan, and a corresponding, reduced VEF for albumin and the other macromolecular probes. Our findings suggest that the changes in the ECM in aged skin may result in delayed adjustments of fluid perturbations and reduced ability for salt storage. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  18. Discharge, Relaxation, and Charge Model for the Lithium Trivanadate Electrode: Reactions, Phase Change, and Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, Nicholas W.; Zhang, Qing; Knehr, K. W.; Liu, Ping; Marschilok, Amy C.; J. Takeuchi, Kenneth; Takeuchi, Esther S.; West, Alan C.

    2016-10-26

    The electrochemical behavior of lithium trivanadate (LiV3O8) during lithiation, delithiation, and voltage recovery experiments is simulated using a crystal-scale model that accounts for solid-state diffusion, charge-transfer kinetics, and phase transformations. The kinetic expression for phase change was modeled using an approach inspired by the Avrami formulation for nucleation and growth. Numerical results indicate that the solid-state diffusion coefficient of lithium in LiV3O8 is ~ 10-13 cm2 s-1 and the equilibrium compositions in the two phase region (~2.5 V) are Li2.5V3O8:Li4V3O8. Agreement between the simulated and experimental results is excellent. Relative to the lithiation curves, the experimental delithiation curves show significantly less overpotential and at low levels of lithiation (end of charge). Simulations are only able to capture this result by assuming that the solid-state mass-transfer resistance is less during delithiation. The proposed rationale for this difference is that the (100) face is inactive during lithiation, but active during delithiation. Finally, by assuming non-instantaneous phase-change kinetics, estimates are made for the overpotential due to imperfect phase change (supersaturation).

  19. Discharge, Relaxation, and Charge Model for the Lithium Trivanadate Electrode: Reactions, Phase Change, and Transport

    DOE PAGES

    Brady, Nicholas W.; Zhang, Qing; Knehr, K. W.; ...

    2016-10-26

    The electrochemical behavior of lithium trivanadate (LiV3O8) during lithiation, delithiation, and voltage recovery experiments is simulated using a crystal-scale model that accounts for solid-state diffusion, charge-transfer kinetics, and phase transformations. The kinetic expression for phase change was modeled using an approach inspired by the Avrami formulation for nucleation and growth. Numerical results indicate that the solid-state diffusion coefficient of lithium in LiV3O8 is ~ 10-13 cm2 s-1 and the equilibrium compositions in the two phase region (~2.5 V) are Li2.5V3O8:Li4V3O8. Agreement between the simulated and experimental results is excellent. Relative to the lithiation curves, the experimental delithiation curves show significantlymore » less overpotential and at low levels of lithiation (end of charge). Simulations are only able to capture this result by assuming that the solid-state mass-transfer resistance is less during delithiation. The proposed rationale for this difference is that the (100) face is inactive during lithiation, but active during delithiation. Finally, by assuming non-instantaneous phase-change kinetics, estimates are made for the overpotential due to imperfect phase change (supersaturation).« less

  20. Charge-transfer interactions induce surface dependent conformational changes in apolipoprotein biocorona.

    PubMed

    Raghavendra, Achyut J; Alsaleh, Nasser; Brown, Jared M; Podila, Ramakrishna

    2017-03-07

    Upon introduction into a biological system, engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) rapidly associate with a variety of biomolecules such as proteins and lipids to form a biocorona. The presence of "biocorona" influences nano-bio interactions considerably, and could ultimately result in altered biological responses. Apolipoprotein A-I (ApoA-I), the major constituent of high-density lipoprotein (HDL), is one of the most prevalent proteins found in ENM-biocorona irrespective of ENM nature, size, and shape. Given the importance of ApoA-I in HDL and cholesterol transport, it is necessary to understand the mechanisms of ApoA-I adsorption and the associated structural changes for assessing consequences of ENM exposure. Here, the authors used a comprehensive array of microscopic and spectroscopic tools to elucidate the interactions between ApoA-I and 100 nm Ag nanoparticles (AgNPs) with four different surface functional groups. The authors found that the protein adsorption and secondary structural changes are highly dependent on the surface functionality. Our electrochemical studies provided new evidence for charge transfer interactions that influence ApoA-I unfolding. While the unfolding of ApoA-I on AgNPs did not significantly change their uptake and short-term cytotoxicity, the authors observed that it strongly altered the ability of only some AgNPs to generate of reactive oxygen species. Our results shed new light on the importance of surface functionality and charge transfer interactions in biocorona formation.

  1. Comparison of the charge moment change calculated from electrostatic analysis and from ELF radio observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieckarz, Zenon; Baranski, Piotr; Mlynarczyk, Janusz; Kulak, Andrzej; Wiszniowski, Jan

    2015-01-01

    We compare the results of two methods of calculation of the charge moment change (CMC, also called the dipole moment change) of the cloud-to-ground lightning discharges. The first method uses multistation ground-based measurements of the E field change for the purpose of the lightning flash location and charge analysis. Our six stations, called the Local Lightning Detection Network (LLDN), were set up in the Warsaw region. The second method is based on measurements of the horizontal magnetic field component of electromagnetic waves generated by atmospheric discharges in the ELF (extremely low frequency) range. Our ELF station is equipped with two magnetic antennas, east-west and north-south and is located in a sparsely populated area of the Bieszczady Mountains in Poland (49.19°N, 22.55°E). We present and discuss the results obtained by both methods, focusing on the negative return stroke (RS) and the return stroke with continuing current (RS and CC) lightning discharges. Results show a good correlation between the CMC obtained by the two methods. For the negative RS and CC and RS the correlation coefficient is equal to +0.50 and +0.80, respectively.

  2. Synchrotron Small Angle X-Ray Scattering Quantitatively Detects Angstrom Level Changes in the Average Radius of Taxol-Stabilized Microtubules Decorated with the Microtubule-Associated-Protein Tau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Myung Chul; Raviv, Uri; Li, Youli; Miller, Herbert P.; Needleman, Daniel J.; Kim, Mahn Won; Wilson, Leslie; Feinstein, Stuart C.; Safinya, Cyrus R.

    2011-01-01

    With the emerging proteomics era the scientific community is beginning the daunting task of understanding the structures and functions of a large number of self-assembling proteins. Here, our study was concerned with the effect of the microtubule-associated-protein (MAP) tau on the assembled structure of taxol-stabilized microtubules. Significantly, the synchrotron small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) technique is able to quantitatively detect angstrom level changes in the average diameter of the microtubules modeled as a simple hollow nanotube with a fixed wall thickness. We show that the electrostatic binding of MAP tau isoforms to taxol-stabilized MTs leads to a controlled increase in the average radius of microtubules with increasing coverage of tau on the MT surface. The increase in the average diameter results from an increase in the distribution of protofilament numbers in MTs upon binding of MAP tau.

  3. Analysis of Charge Changing Cross Sections with the Glauber-Abrasion-Ablation Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akaishi, Tomohide; Hagino, Kouichi

    We calculate the charge changing cross sections (CCCS) for 28Si + 12C reaction using the Glauber-abrasion-ablation model, which considers a fragment-production in two stages, that is, a fragmentation and particle evaporations. We show that this model underestimates CCCS in a wide energy region if only the first stage is taken into account. This is the case both in the optical limit approximation (OLA) and in the beyond OLA calculation. This indicates that the second stage for the particle evaporation has to be taken into account in order to quantitatively estimate CCCS.

  4. Modeling the interferometric radius measurement using Gaussian beam propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Medicus, Katherine M.; Snyder, James J.; Davies, Angela

    2006-12-01

    We model the interferometric radius measurement using Gaussian beam propagation to identify biases in the measurement due to using a simple geometric ray-trace model instead of the more complex Gaussian model. The radius measurement is based on using an interferometer to identify the test part's position when it is at two null locations, and the distance between the positions is an estimate of the part's radius. The null condition is observed when there is no difference in curvature between the reflected reference and the test wavefronts, and a Gaussian model will provide a first-order estimate of curvature changes due to wave propagation and therefore changes to the radius measurement. We show that the geometric ray assumption leads to radius biases (errors) that are a strong function of the test part radius and increase as the radius of the part decreases. We tested for a bias for both microscaled(<1 mm) and macroscaled parts. The bias is of the order of parts in 105 for micro-optics with radii a small fraction of a millimeter and much smaller for macroscaled optics. The amount of bias depends on the interferometer configuration (numerical aperture, etc.), the nominal radius of the test part, and the distances in the interferometer.

  5. [Fractures of the distal radius].

    PubMed

    Rueger, J M; Hartel, M J; Ruecker, A H; Hoffmann, M

    2014-11-01

    The most prevalent fractures managed by trauma surgeons are those involving the distal radius. The injury occurs in two peaks of prevalence: the first peak around the age of 10 years and the second peak around the age of 60 years. Distal radius fracture management requires sensitive diagnostics and classification. The objectives of treatment are the reconstruction of a pain-free unlimited durable functioning of the wrist and avoidance of typical fracture complications. Non-operative conservative management is generally employed for stable non-displaced fractures of the distal radius with the expectation of a good functional outcome. Unstable comminuted fractures with intra-articular and extra-articular fragment zones are initially set in a closed operation and finally by osteosynthesis. An armament of surgical implants is available for instable fractures requiring fixation. Palmar locked plate osteosynthesis has been established in recent years as the gold standard for operative management of distal radius fractures. Complex Working Group on Osteosynthesis (AO) classification type 3 fractures require extensive preoperative diagnostics to identify and treat typical associated injuries around the wrist.

  6. Effects of DS-modified agarose gels on neurite extension in 3D scaffold through mechanisms other than changing the pore radius of the gels.

    PubMed

    Peng, Jin; Pan, Qian; Zhang, Wei; Yang, Hao; Zhou, Xue; Jiang, Hua

    2014-07-01

    Dermatan sulfate is widely distributed as glycosaminoglycan side chains of proteoglycans, which are the main components of glial scar and inhibit neurite regeneration after nerve injury. However its role in the inhibiting process is not clear. Understanding neurite extension in three-dimensional scaffolds is critical for neural tissue engineering. This study used agarose gels modified with dermatan sulfate as the three-dimensional culture scaffold. We explored structure-function relationship between the three-dimensional scaffold and neurite extension and examined the role of dermatan sulfate on neurite extension in the three-dimensional scaffold. A range of agarose concentrations was used to generate varied gel physical structures and the corresponding neurite extension of embryonic day (E9) chick dorsal root ganglia was examined. We measured gel stiffness and gel pore size to determine whether dermatan sulfate changed the gels' conformation. As gel concentration increased, neurite length and gel pore size decreased, and gel stiffness increased. At 1.00 and 1.25% (wt/vol) concentrations, dermatan sulfates both immobilized with agarose gels and dissolved in culture medium inhibit neurite extension. While at 1.50 and 1.75% (wt/vol) concentrations, only immobilized dermatan sulfate worked. Immobilized dermatan sulfate could modify molecular shape of agarose gels, decrease gel pore size statistically, but did not influence gel stiffness. We have proved that the decrease of gel pore size is insufficient to inhibit neurite extension. These results indicate that dermatan sulfate inhibits neurite extension not through forming a mechanical barrier. Maybe its interaction with neuron membrane is the key factor in neurite extension.

  7. Change of Electric Dipole Moment in Charge Transfer Transitions of Ferrocene Oligomers Studied by Ultrafast Two Photon Absorption (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-02-16

    AFRL-RX-WP-JA-2017-0313 CHANGE OF ELECTRIC DIPOLE MOMENT IN CHARGE TRANSFER TRANSITIONS OF FERROCENE OLIGOMERS STUDIED BY ULTRAFAST...collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. 1. REPORT...CHANGE OF ELECTRIC DIPOLE MOMENT IN CHARGE TRANSFER TRANSITIONS OF FERROCENE OLIGOMERS STUDIED BY ULTRAFAST TWO-PHOTON ABSORPTION (POSTPRINT) 5a

  8. Changes in nuclear structure along the Mn isotopic chain studied via charge radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heylen, H.; Babcock, C.; Beerwerth, R.; Billowes, J.; Bissell, M. L.; Blaum, K.; Bonnard, J.; Campbell, P.; Cheal, B.; Day Goodacre, T.; Fedorov, D.; Fritzsche, S.; Garcia Ruiz, R. F.; Geithner, W.; Geppert, Ch.; Gins, W.; Grob, L. K.; Kowalska, M.; Kreim, K.; Lenzi, S. M.; Moore, I. D.; Maass, B.; Malbrunot-Ettenauer, S.; Marsh, B.; Neugart, R.; Neyens, G.; Nörtershäuser, W.; Otsuka, T.; Papuga, J.; Rossel, R.; Rothe, S.; Sánchez, R.; Tsunoda, Y.; Wraith, C.; Xie, L.; Yang, X. F.; Yordanov, D. T.

    2016-11-01

    The hyperfine spectra of 51,53 -64Mn were measured in two experimental runs using collinear laser spectroscopy at ISOLDE, CERN. Laser spectroscopy was performed on the atomic 3 d54 s25/2 6S →3 d54 s 4 p 3/2 6P and ionic 3 d54 s 5S2→3 d54 p 5P3 transitions, yielding two sets of isotope shifts. The mass and field shift factors for both transitions have been calculated in the multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock framework and were combined with a King plot analysis in order to obtain a consistent set of mean-square charge radii which, together with earlier work on neutron-deficient Mn, allow the study of nuclear structure changes from N =25 across N =28 up to N =39 . A clear development of deformation is observed towards N =40 , confirming the conclusions of the nuclear moments studies. From a Monte Carlo shell-model study of the shape in the Mn isotopic chain, it is suggested that the observed development of deformation is not only due to an increase in static prolate deformation but also due to shape fluctuations and triaxiality. The changes in mean-square charge radii are well reproduced using the Duflo-Zuker formula except in the case of large deformation.

  9. Changes in the charged metabolite and sugar profiles of pasteurized and unpasteurized Japanese sake with storage.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Masahiro; Kaneko, Miku; Onuma, Hiromi; Sakaguchi, Yasuko; Mori, Masayo; Abe, Shinobu; Soga, Tomoyoshi; Tomita, Masaru

    2012-03-14

    Japanese sake (rice wine) is commonly heat treated (pasteurized) to maintain its quality. In this study, temporal changes in the metabolite profiles of pasteurized and unpasteurized sake were investigated during storage. Metabolomic analyses were conducted for eight sets of pasteurized and unpasteurized sake obtained from single process batches stored at 8 or 20 °C for 0, 1, 2, or 4 months. Capillary electrophoresis time-of-flight mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry were used to obtain charged metabolite and sugar profiles, respectively. The total amino acid concentration decreased with storage, and the decrease was faster in pasteurized sake than in unpasteurized. The organic acid concentrations were relatively constant in both types of sake. Peptide and glucose concentrations increased and polysaccharide concentrations decreased in unpasteurized sake, while they were relatively constant in pasteurized sake. Rather than stabilizing the sake metabolite profile during storage, pasteurization results in characteristic changes compared to unpasteurized sake.

  10. The Muon Scattering Experiment (MUSE) at PSI and the proton radius puzzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohl, Michael

    2014-11-01

    The unexplained large discrepancy of the proton charge radius measurements with muonic hydrogen Lamb shift and determinations from elastic electron scattering and Lamb shift in regular hydrogen of seven standard deviations is known as the proton radius puzzle. Suggested solutions of the puzzle range from possible errors in the experiments through unexpectedly large hadronic physics effects to new physics beyond the Standard Model. A new approach to verify the radius discrepancy in a systematic manner will be pursued with the Muon Scattering Experiment (MUSE) at PSI. The experiment aims to compare elastic cross sections, the proton elastic form factors, and the extracted proton charge radius with scattering of electrons and muons of either charge and under identical conditions. The difference in the observed radius will be probed with a high precision to verify the discrepancy. An overview of the experiment and the current status will be presented.

  11. [Distal radius fractures in children].

    PubMed

    Otayek, S; Ramanoudjame, M; Fitoussi, F

    2016-12-01

    Metaphyseal and physeal fractures of the distal radius are common in children. Most cases are best treated with closed reduction and cast immobilization. Long-term outcomes of these injuries are excellent when specific treatment principles of reduction and casting are followed. Surgical indications are limited and include open fractures, intra-articular fractures, non-reducible fractures, unstable fractures, and the presence of associated nerve injury. Closed reduction and percutaneous pin fixation is the most commonly used surgical option. The clinician should be aware of delayed complications such as growth disturbance of the distal radius, and understand how to manage these problems to ensure successful long-term outcomes. Epiphysiodesis is uncommon but growth plate injuries need to be followed for one year.

  12. Thermal charging study of compressed expanded natural graphite/phase change material composites

    SciTech Connect

    Mallow, Anne; Abdelaziz, Omar; Graham, Jr., Samuel

    2016-08-12

    The thermal charging performance of paraffin wax combined with compressed expanded natural graphite foam was studied for different graphite bulk densities. Constant heat fluxes between 0.39 W/cm2 and 1.55 W/cm2 were applied, as well as a constant boundary temperature of 60 °C. Thermal charging experiments indicate that, in the design of thermal batteries, thermal conductivity of the composite alone is an insufficient metric to determine the influence of the graphite foam on the thermal energy storage. By dividing the latent heat of the composite by the time to end of melt for each applied boundary condition, the energy storage performance was calculated to show the effects of composite thermal conductivity, graphite bulk density, and latent heat capacity. For the experimental volume, the addition of graphite beyond a graphite bulk density of 100 kg/m3 showed limited benefit on the energy storage performance due to the decrease in latent heat storage capacity. These experimental results are used to validate a numerical model to predict the time to melt and for future use in the design of heat exchangers with graphite-foam based phase change material composites. As a result, size scale effects are explored parametrically with the validated model.

  13. Thermal charging study of compressed expanded natural graphite/phase change material composites

    SciTech Connect

    Mallow, Anne; Abdelaziz, Omar; Graham, Jr., Samuel

    2016-08-12

    The thermal charging performance of paraffin wax combined with compressed expanded natural graphite foam was studied for different graphite bulk densities. Constant heat fluxes between 0.39 W/cm2 and 1.55 W/cm2 were applied, as well as a constant boundary temperature of 60 °C. Thermal charging experiments indicate that, in the design of thermal batteries, thermal conductivity of the composite alone is an insufficient metric to determine the influence of the graphite foam on the thermal energy storage. By dividing the latent heat of the composite by the time to end of melt for each applied boundary condition, the energy storage performance was calculated to show the effects of composite thermal conductivity, graphite bulk density, and latent heat capacity. For the experimental volume, the addition of graphite beyond a graphite bulk density of 100 kg/m3 showed limited benefit on the energy storage performance due to the decrease in latent heat storage capacity. These experimental results are used to validate a numerical model to predict the time to melt and for future use in the design of heat exchangers with graphite-foam based phase change material composites. As a result, size scale effects are explored parametrically with the validated model.

  14. Thermal charging study of compressed expanded natural graphite/phase change material composites

    DOE PAGES

    Mallow, Anne; Abdelaziz, Omar; Graham, Jr., Samuel

    2016-08-12

    The thermal charging performance of paraffin wax combined with compressed expanded natural graphite foam was studied for different graphite bulk densities. Constant heat fluxes between 0.39 W/cm2 and 1.55 W/cm2 were applied, as well as a constant boundary temperature of 60 °C. Thermal charging experiments indicate that, in the design of thermal batteries, thermal conductivity of the composite alone is an insufficient metric to determine the influence of the graphite foam on the thermal energy storage. By dividing the latent heat of the composite by the time to end of melt for each applied boundary condition, the energy storage performancemore » was calculated to show the effects of composite thermal conductivity, graphite bulk density, and latent heat capacity. For the experimental volume, the addition of graphite beyond a graphite bulk density of 100 kg/m3 showed limited benefit on the energy storage performance due to the decrease in latent heat storage capacity. These experimental results are used to validate a numerical model to predict the time to melt and for future use in the design of heat exchangers with graphite-foam based phase change material composites. As a result, size scale effects are explored parametrically with the validated model.« less

  15. Observation of charge state and conformational change in immobilized protein using surface plasmon resonance sensor.

    PubMed

    Mannen, T; Yamaguchi, S; Honda, J; Sugimoto, S; Kitayama, A; Nagamune, T

    2001-06-15

    Behaviors of proteins immobilized on a solid surface were investigated using BIACORE, a biosensor utilizing surface plasmon resonance. This sensor is usually used for analyzing binding events during biomolecular interactions. Here we propose a novel use of this sensor to monitor two kinds of intramolecular changes in immobilized proteins. Several proteins were covalently attached to dextran chains on the sensor surface in the flow cell and were then exposed to a series of buffers with varying pH. Signal changes derived from changes of refractive index around the sensor surface were detected during and after the exposure to each of these buffers, which we denoted as in situ values and postvalues, respectively. The in situ value reflects the behavior of immobilized proteins in these buffers and was revealed to have a correlation with total charge state of the proteins, while the postvalue reflects how immobilized proteins react after the exposure and was suggested to represent the degree of conformational changes of the proteins. This method is expected to be applicable to various analyses and can provide us with new information about the behavior of proteins on solid phase.

  16. Changes in the mean square charge radii and electromagnetic moments of neutron-deficient Bi isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Barzakh, A. E. Batist, L. Kh.; Fedorov, D. V.; Ivanov, V. S.; Molkanov, P. L.; Moroz, F. V.; Orlov, S. Yu.; Panteleev, V. N.; Seliverstov, M. D.; Volkov, Yu. M.

    2015-10-15

    In-source laser spectroscopy experiments for neutron deficient bismuth isotopes at the 306.77 nm atomic transition were carried out at the IRIS (Investigation of Radioactive Isotopes on Synchrocyclotron) facility of Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute (PNPI). New data on isotope shifts and hyperfine structure for {sup 189–198,} {sup 211}Bi isotopes and isomers were obtained. The changes in the mean-square charge radii and the magnetic moment values were deduced. Marked deviation from the nearly spherical behavior for ground states of bismuth isotopes at N < 109 is demonstrated, in contrast to the lead and thallium isotopic chains. The big isomer shift between I = 1/2 (intruder) and I = 9/2 (normal) states for odd Bi isotopes (A = 193, 195, 197) was found.

  17. Changes in the mean square charge radii and electromagnetic moments of neutron-deficient Bi isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barzakh, A. E.; Batist, L. Kh.; Fedorov, D. V.; Ivanov, V. S.; Molkanov, P. L.; Moroz, F. V.; Orlov, S. Yu.; Panteleev, V. N.; Seliverstov, M. D.; Volkov, Yu. M.

    2015-10-01

    In-source laser spectroscopy experiments for neutron deficient bismuth isotopes at the 306.77 nm atomic transition were carried out at the IRIS (Investigation of Radioactive Isotopes on Synchrocyclotron) facility of Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute (PNPI). New data on isotope shifts and hyperfine structure for 189-198, 211Bi isotopes and isomers were obtained. The changes in the mean-square charge radii and the magnetic moment values were deduced. Marked deviation from the nearly spherical behavior for ground states of bismuth isotopes at N < 109 is demonstrated, in contrast to the lead and thallium isotopic chains. The big isomer shift between I = 1/2 (intruder) and I = 9/2 (normal) states for odd Bi isotopes (A = 193, 195, 197) was found.

  18. Diagnosing Meteorological Conditions Associated with Sprites and Lightning with Large Charge Moment Changes (CMC) over Oklahoma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivera, Lizxandra Flores; Lang, Timothy

    2014-01-01

    Sprites are a category of Transient Luminous Events (TLEs) that occur in the upper atmosphere above the tops of Mesoscale Convective Systems (MCSs). They are commonly associated with lightning strokes that produce large charge moment changes (CMCs). Synergistic use of satellite and radar-retrieved observations together with sounding data, forecasts, and lightning-detection networks allowed the diagnosis and analysis of the meteorological conditions associated with sprites as well as large-CMC lightning over Oklahoma. One goal of the NASA-funded effort reported herein is the investigation of the potential for sprite interference with aerospace activities in the 20- 100km altitude range, including research balloons, space missions and other aviation transports.

  19. Search for a Fourth Generation Charge -1/3 Quark via Flavor Changing Neutral Current Decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abachi, S.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B. S.; Adam, I.; Adams, D. L.; Adams, M.; Ahn, S.; Aihara, H.; Alves, G. A.; Amidi, E.; Amos, N.; Anderson, E. W.; Astur, R.; Baarmand, M. M.; Baden, A.; Balamurali, V.; Balderston, J.; Baldin, B.; Banerjee, S.; Bantly, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bazizi, K.; Belyaev, A.; Beri, S. B.; Bertram, I.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Bhattacharjee, M.; Biswas, N.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, P.; Boehnlein, A.; Bojko, N. I.; Borcherding, F.; Borders, J.; Boswell, C.; Brandt, A.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Buchholz, D.; Burtovoi, V. S.; Butler, J. M.; Carvalho, W.; Casey, D.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakraborty, D.; Chang, S.-M.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chen, L.-P.; Chen, W.; Choi, S.; Chopra, S.; Choudhary, B. C.; Christenson, J. H.; Chung, M.; Claes, D.; Clark, A. R.; Cobau, W. G.; Cochran, J.; Cooper, W. E.; Cretsinger, C.; Cullen-Vidal, D.; Cummings, M. A.; Cutts, D.; Dahl, O. I.; de, K.; del Signore, K.; Demarteau, M.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; di Loreto, G.; Draper, P.; Drinkard, J.; Ducros, Y.; Dudko, L. V.; Dugad, S. R.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Engelmann, R.; Eno, S.; Eppley, G.; Ermolov, P.; Eroshin, O. V.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Fahland, T.; Fatyga, M.; Fatyga, M. K.; Featherly, J.; Feher, S.; Fein, D.; Ferbel, T.; Finocchiaro, G.; Fisk, H. E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flattum, E.; Forden, G. E.; Fortner, M.; Frame, K. C.; Fuess, S.; Gallas, E.; Galyaev, A. N.; Gartung, P.; Geld, T. L.; Genik, R. J., II; Genser, K.; Gerber, C. E.; Gibbard, B.; Glenn, S.; Gobbi, B.; Goforth, M.; Goldschmidt, A.; Gómez, B.; Gomez, G.; Goncharov, P. I.; González Solís, J. L.; Gordon, H.; Goss, L. T.; Goussiou, A.; Graf, N.; Grannis, P. D.; Green, D. R.; Green, J.; Greenlee, H.; Grim, G.; Grossman, N.; Grudberg, P.; Grünendahl, S.; Guglielmo, G.; Guida, J. A.; Guida, J. M.; Gupta, A.; Gurzhiev, S. N.; Gutierrez, P.; Gutnikov, Y. E.; Hadley, N. J.; Haggerty, H.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Hahn, K. S.; Hall, R. E.; Hansen, S.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hedin, D.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hernández-Montoya, R.; Heuring, T.; Hirosky, R.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hoftun, J. S.; Hsieh, F.; Hu, Ting; Hu, Tong; Huehn, T.; Ito, A. S.; James, E.; Jaques, J.; Jerger, S. A.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, J. Z.-Y.; Joffe-Minor, T.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jones, M.; Jöstlein, H.; Jun, S. Y.; Jung, C. K.; Kahn, S.; Kalbfleisch, G.; Kang, J. S.; Kehoe, R.; Kelly, M. L.; Kim, C. L.; Kim, S. K.; Klatchko, A.; Klima, B.; Klopfenstein, C.; Klyukhin, V. I.; Kochetkov, V. I.; Kohli, J. M.; Koltick, D.; Kostritskiy, A. V.; Kotcher, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kourlas, J.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kozlovski, E. A.; Krane, J.; Krishnaswamy, M. R.; Krzywdzinski, S.; Kunori, S.; Lami, S.; Lan, H.; Lander, R.; Landry, F.; Landsberg, G.; Lauer, B.; Leflat, A.; Li, H.; Li, J.; Li-Demarteau, Q. Z.; Lima, J. G.; Lincoln, D.; Linn, S. L.; Linnemann, J.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Q.; Liu, Y. C.; Lobkowicz, F.; Loken, S. C.; Lökös, S.; Lueking, L.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K.; Madaras, R. J.; Madden, R.; Magaña-Mendoza, L.; Mani, S.; Mao, H. S.; Markeloff, R.; Markosky, L.; Marshall, T.; Martin, M. I.; May, B.; Mayorov, A. A.; McCarthy, R.; McDonald, J.; McKibben, T.; McKinley, J.; McMahon, T.; Melanson, H. L.; Merkin, M.; Merritt, K. W.; Miettinen, H.; Mincer, A.; de Miranda, J. M.; Mishra, C. S.; Mokhov, N.; Mondal, N. K.; Montgomery, H. E.; Mooney, P.; da Motta, H.; Murphy, C.; Nang, F.; Narain, M.; Narasimham, V. S.; Narayanan, A.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Nemethy, P.; Nes̆iĆ, D.; Nicola, M.; Norman, D.; Oesch, L.; Oguri, V.; Oltman, E.; Oshima, N.; Owen, D.; Padley, P.; Pang, M.; Para, A.; Park, Y. M.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Paterno, M.; Perkins, J.; Peters, M.; Piekarz, H.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Pope, B. G.; Prosper, H. B.; Protopopescu, S.; Pus̆eljić, D.; Qian, J.; Quintas, P. Z.; Raja, R.; Rajagopalan, S.; Ramirez, O.; Rapidis, P. A.; Rasmussen, L.; Reucroft, S.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rockwell, T.; Roe, N. A.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Rutherfoord, J.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Santoro, A.; Sawyer, L.; Schamberger, R. D.; Schellman, H.; Sculli, J.; Shabalina, E.; Shaffer, C.; Shankar, H. C.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Shupe, M.; Singh, H.; Singh, J. B.; Singh, P.; Sirotenko, V.; Smart, W.; Smith, A.; Smith, R. P.; Snihur, R.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Solomon, J.; Sood, P. M.; Sosebee, M.; Sotnikova, N.; Souza, M.; Spadafora, A. L.; Stephens, R. W.; Stevenson, M. L.; Stewart, D.; Stoianova, D. A.; Stoker, D.; Strauss, M.; Streets, K.; Strovink, M.; Sznajder, A.; Tamburello, P.; Tarazi, J.; Tartaglia, M.; Thomas, T. L.; Thompson, J.; Trippe, T. G.; Tuts, P. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vititoe, D.; Volkov, A. A.; Vorobiev, A. P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, G.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weerts, H.; White, A.; White, J. T.; Wightman, J. A.; Willis, S.; Wimpenny, S. J.; Wirjawan, J. V.; Womersley, J.; Won, E.; Wood, D. R.; Xu, H.; Yamada, R.; Yamin, P.; Yanagisawa, C.; Yang, J.; Yasuda, T.; Yepes, P.; Yoshikawa, C.; Youssef, S.; Yu, J.; Yu, Y.; Zhu, Q.; Zhu, Z. H.; Zieminska, D.; Zieminski, A.; Zverev, E. G.; Zylberstejn, A.

    1997-05-01

    We report on a search for pair production of a fourth generation charge -1/3 quark ( b') in pp¯ collisions at s = 1.8 TeV by the DØ experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron using an integrated luminosity of 93 pb-1. Both b' quarks are assumed to decay via flavor changing neutral currents (FCNC). The search uses the signatures γ+3 jets +μ-tag and 2γ+2 jets. We see no significant excess of events over the expected background. We place an upper limit on the production cross section times branching fraction that is well below theoretical expectations for a b' decaying exclusively via FCNC for b' masses up to mZ+mb.

  20. 41 CFR 301-52.24 - Does mandatory use of the Government contractor-issued travel charge card change my obligation to...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... the Government contractor-issued travel charge card change my obligation to pay my travel card bill by... Government contractor-issued travel charge card change my obligation to pay my travel card bill by the due date? No, mandatory use of the Government contractor-issued travel charge card does not relieve you of...

  1. Invariance of molecular charge transport upon changes of extended molecule size and several related issues

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Summary As a sanity test for the theoretical method employed, studies on (steady-state) charge transport through molecular devices usually confine themselves to check whether the method in question satisfies the charge conservation. Another important test of the theory’s correctness is to check that the computed current does not depend on the choice of the central region (also referred to as the “extended molecule”). This work addresses this issue and demonstrates that the relevant transport and transport-related properties are indeed invariant upon changing the size of the extended molecule, when the embedded molecule can be described within a general single-particle picture (namely, a second-quantized Hamiltonian bilinear in the creation and annihilation operators). It is also demonstrates that the invariance of nonequilibrium properties is exhibited by the exact results but not by those computed approximately within ubiquitous wide- and flat-band limits (WBL and FBL, respectively). To exemplify the limitations of the latter, the phenomenon of negative differential resistance (NDR) is considered. It is shown that the exactly computed current may exhibit a substantial NDR, while the NDR effect is absent or drastically suppressed within the WBL and FBL approximations. The analysis done in conjunction with the WBLs and FBLs reveals why general studies on nonequilibrium properties require a more elaborate theoretical than studies on linear response properties (e.g., ohmic conductance and thermopower) at zero temperature. Furthermore, examples are presented that demonstrate that treating parts of electrodes adjacent to the embedded molecule and the remaining semi-infinite electrodes at different levels of theory (which is exactly what most NEGF-DFT approaches do) is a procedure that yields spurious structures in nonlinear ranges of current–voltage curves. PMID:27335734

  2. Predictions of nuclear charge radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, M.; Lu, Y.; Zhao, Y. M.; Arima, A.

    2016-12-01

    The nuclear charge radius is a fundamental property of an atomic nucleus. In this article we study the predictive power of empirical relations for experimental nuclear charge radii of neighboring nuclei and predict the unknown charge radii of 1085 nuclei based on the experimental CR2013 database within an uncertainty of 0.03 fm.

  3. Void structure and density change of vanadium-base alloys irradiated in the dynamic helium charging experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H.M.; Nowicki, L.; Gazda, J.

    1995-04-01

    The objective of this work is to determine void structure, distribution, and density changes of several promising vanadium-base alloys irradiated in the Dynamic Helium Charging Experiment (DHCE). Combined effects of dynamically charged helium and neutron damage on density change, void distribution, and microstructural evolution of V-4Cr-4Ti alloy have been determined after irradiation to 18-31 dpa at 425-600{degree}C in the DHCE, and the results compared with those from a non-DHCE in which helium generation was negligible.

  4. Electrical charging changes the composition of sulfuric acid-ammonia/dimethylamine clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, I. K.; Olenius, T.; Kupiainen-Määttä, O.; Loukonen, V.; Kurtén, T.; Vehkamäki, H.

    2014-01-01

    Sulfuric acid clusters stabilized by base molecules are likely to have a significant role in atmospheric new particle formation. Recent advances in mass spectrometry techniques have permitted the detection of electrically charged clusters. However, direct measurement of electrically neutral clusters is not possible. Mass spectrometry instruments can be combined with a charger, but the possible effect of charging on the composition of neutral clusters must be addressed before the measured data can be linked to properties of neutral clusters. In the present work we have used formation free energies from quantum chemical methods to calculate the evaporation rates of electrically charged (both positive and negative) sulfuric acid-ammonia/dimethylamine clusters. To understand how charging will affect the composition of these clusters, we have compared the evaporation rates of charged clusters with those of the corresponding neutral clusters. We found that the only cluster studied in this paper which will retain its composition is H2SO4 · NH3 when charged positively; all other clusters will be altered by both positive and negative charging. In the case of charging clusters negatively, base molecules will completely evaporate from clusters with 1 to 3 sulfuric acid molecules in the case of ammonia, and from clusters with 1 or 2 sulfuric acid molecules in the case of dimethylamine. Larger clusters will maintain some base molecules, but the H2SO4 : base ratio will increase. In the case of positive charging, some of the acid molecules will evaporate, decreasing the H2SO4 : base ratio.

  5. Radius of curvature controlled mirror

    DOEpatents

    Neil, George R.; Rathke, John Wickham; Schultheiss, Thomas John; Shinn, Michelle D.; Dillon-Townes, Lawrence A.

    2006-01-17

    A controlled radius of curvature mirror assembly comprising: a distortable mirror having a reflective surface and a rear surface; and in descending order from the rear surface; a counter-distortion plate; a flow diverter having a flow diverter aperture at the center thereof; a flow return plate having a flow return aperture at the center thereof; a thermal isolation plate having a thermal isolation plate aperture at the center thereof and a flexible heater having a rear surface and a flexible heater aperture at the center thereof; a double walled tube defining a coolant feed chamber and a coolant return chamber; said coolant feed chamber extending to and through the flow diverter aperture and terminating at the counter-distortion plate and the coolant return chamber extending to and through the thermal isolation backplate and terminating at the flow diverter; and a coolant feed and a coolant return exit at the rear of said flexible heater.

  6. Short-time change of heavy-ion microbeams with different mass to charge ratios by scaling method for the JAEA AVF cyclotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurashima, Satoshi; Okumura, Susumu; Miyawaki, Nobumasa; Kashiwagi, Hirotsugu; Satoh, Takahiro; Kamiya, Tomihiro; Fukuda, Mitsuhiro; Yokota, Watalu

    2013-07-01

    The JAEA AVF cyclotron provides heavy-ion beams covering a wide range of linear-energy-transfers for microbeam formation. Two types of microbeam formation systems, one using a micro-aperture and the other focusing lenses, are installed on two vertical beam lines of the cyclotron. The average beam time for an experiment using the former system is usually less than 3 h, that is comparable to the time for cyclotron tuning. The time ratio between experiment and tuning determines the usage efficiency of the facility. In order to reduce the tuning time, a scaling method has been introduced to change the ion species with various mass to charge ratios (M/Q) in a shorter total time. The principle of the scaling method is to keep the magnetic rigidity of ion beams constant. This requirement is easily achieved by adjusting the extraction voltage of an ion source proportionally to the M/Q in the beam injection line. Although some cyclotron adjustments, other than the magnetic field strength at the extraction radius, are required, the tuning can be completed within 20 min, and no change is basically required in the beam transport line downstream of the cyclotron. Using the scaling method, 255 MeV 20Ne7+, 335 MeV 20Ne8+, and 440 MeV 40Ar13+ beams were extracted from the cyclotron in sequence after the usual tuning of a 220 MeV 12C5+. As a result, we have succeeded in changing the ion species of the heavy-ion microbeam within a total of 30 min.

  7. Electrical charging changes the composition of sulfuric acid-ammonia/dimethylamine clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, I. K.; Olenius, T.; Kupiainen-Määttä, O.; Loukonen, V.; Kurtén, T.; Vehkamäki, H.

    2014-08-01

    Sulfuric acid clusters stabilized by base molecules are likely to have a significant role in atmospheric new-particle formation. Recent advances in mass spectrometry techniques have permitted the detection of electrically charged clusters. However, direct measurement of electrically neutral clusters is not possible. Mass spectrometry instruments can be combined with a charger, but the possible effect of charging on the composition of neutral clusters must be addressed in order to interpret and understand the measured data. In the present work we have used formation free energies from quantum chemical methods to calculate the evaporation rates of electrically charged (both positive and negative) sulfuric acid-ammonia/dimethylamine clusters. To understand how charging will affect the composition of electrically neutral clusters, we have compared the evaporation rates of the most stable neutral clusters with those of the corresponding charged clusters. Based on the evaporation rates of different molecules from the charged clusters, we determined the most likely resulting cluster composition when a stable neutral cluster is charged and the molecules with the highest evaporation rates are lost from it. We found that all of the most stable neutral clusters will be altered by both positive and negative charging. In the case of charging clusters negatively, base molecules will completely evaporate from clusters with 1 to 3 sulfuric acid molecules in the case of ammonia, and from clusters with 1 or 2 sulfuric acid molecules in the case of dimethylamine. Larger clusters will maintain some base molecules, but the H2SO4 : base ratio will increase. In the case of positive charging, some of the acid molecules will evaporate, decreasing the H2SO4 : base ratio.

  8. Electronegativity Equalization and Partial Charge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanderson, R. T.

    1974-01-01

    This article elaborates the relationship between covalent radius, homonuclear bond energy, and electronegativity, and sets the background for bond energy calculation by discussing the nature of heteronuclear covalent bonding on the basis of electronegativity equalization and particle charge. (DT)

  9. Electronegativity Equalization and Partial Charge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanderson, R. T.

    1974-01-01

    This article elaborates the relationship between covalent radius, homonuclear bond energy, and electronegativity, and sets the background for bond energy calculation by discussing the nature of heteronuclear covalent bonding on the basis of electronegativity equalization and particle charge. (DT)

  10. Distal radius fracture after proximal row carpectomy

    PubMed Central

    Igeta, Yuka; Naito, Kiyohito; Sugiyama, Yoichi; Obata, Hiroyuki; Aritomi, Kentaro; Kaneko, Kazuo; Obayashi, Osamu

    2015-01-01

    Introduction We encountered a patient with distal radius fracture (DRF) after proximal row carpectomy (PRC). The mechanism of the DRF after PRC is discussed in this report. Presentation of case The patient was a 73-year-old female who had undergone PRC due to Kienböck disease before. The wrist range of motion was: 45° on dorsiflexion and 20° on flexion. DRF has occurred at 3 years after PRC. The fracture type was extra-articular fracture. Osteosynthesis was performed using a volar locking plate. No postoperative complication developed, the Mayo score was excellent at 6 months after surgery, and the daily living activity level recovered to that before injury. Discussion Since the wrist range of motion decreased and the lunate fitted into the joint surface after PRC, making the forearm join with the hand like a single structure, pressure may have been loaded on the weak distal end of the radius from the dorsal side, causing volar displacement and fracture. Conclusion The pressure distribution and range of motion of the radiocarpal joint after PRC are different from those of a normal joint, and the mechanism of fracture also changes due to PRC. PMID:25623755

  11. Accounting for changes in particle charge, dry mass and composition occurring during studies of single levitated particles.

    PubMed

    Haddrell, Allen E; Davies, James F; Yabushita, Akihiro; Reid, Jonathan P

    2012-10-11

    The most used instrument in single particle hygroscopic analysis over the past thirty years has been the electrodynamic balance (EDB). Two general assumptions are made in hygroscopic studies involving the EDB. First, it is assumed that the net charge on the droplet is invariant over the time scale required to record a hygroscopic growth cycle. Second, it is assumed that the composition of the droplet is constant (aside from the addition and removal of water). In this study, we demonstrate that these assumptions cannot always be made and may indeed prove incorrect. The presence of net charge in the humidified vapor phase reduces the total net charge retained by the droplet over prolonged levitation periods. The gradual reduction in charge limits the reproducibility of hygroscopicity measurements made on repeated RH cycles with a single particle, or prolonged experiments in which the particle is held at a high relative humidity. Further, two contrasting examples of the influence of changes in chemical composition changes are reported. In the first, simple acid-base chemistry in the droplet leads to the irreversible removal of gaseous ammonia from a droplet containing an ammonium salt on a time scale that is shorter than the hygroscopicity measurement. In the second example, the net charge on the droplet (<100 fC) is high enough to drive redox chemistry within the droplet. This is demonstrated by the reduction of iodic acid in a droplet made solely of iodic acid and water to form iodine and an iodate salt.

  12. Experimental study of finite Larmor radius effects

    SciTech Connect

    Struve, K.W.

    1980-08-01

    Linear Z-pinches in Ar, Kr, Xe, N/sub 2/, and He are experimentally studied in regimes where strong finite Larmor radius effects could provide a significant stabilizing effect. Scaling arguments show that for deuterium such a pinch has an electron line density of order 2 x 10/sup 15//cm. For higher Z plasmas a higher line density is allowed, the exact value of which depends on the average ion charge. The pinch is formed by puffing gas axially through the cathode towards the anode of an evacuated pinch chamber. When the gas reaches the anode, the pinch bank is fired. The pinch current rises in 2 to 3 ..mu..sec to a maximum of 100 to 200 kA. The pinch bank capacitance is 900 ..mu..F, and the external inductance is 100 nH. Additionally, the bank is fused to increase dI/dt. The primary diagnostics are a framing camera, a spatially resolved Mach-Zehnder interferometer, and X-ray absorption.

  13. New Physics and the Proton Radius Problem

    SciTech Connect

    Carl E. Carlson, Benjamin C. Rislow

    2012-08-01

    Background: The recent disagreement between the proton charge radius extracted from Lamb shift measurements of muonic and electronic hydrogen invites speculation that new physics may be to blame. Several proposals have been made for new particles that account for both the Lamb shift and the muon anomalous moment discrepancies. Purpose: We explore the possibility that new particles' couplings to the muon can be fine-tuned to account for all experimental constraints. Method: We consider two fine-tuned models, the first involving new particles with scalar and pseudoscalar couplings, and the second involving new particles with vector and axial couplings. The couplings are constrained by the Lamb shift and muon magnetic moments measurements while mass constraints are obtained by kaon decay rate data. Results: For the scalar-pseudoscalar model, masses between 100 to 200 MeV are not allowed. For the vector model, masses below about 200 MeV are not allowed. The strength of the couplings for both models approach that of electrodynamics for particle masses of about 2 GeV. Conclusions: New physics with fine tuned couplings may be entertained as a possible explanation for the Lamb shift discrepancy.

  14. Orbit-Attitude Changes of Objects in Near Earth Space Induced by Natural Charging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-05-02

    orbital evolution of near Earth space objects. Natural charging of all space objects occurs in the natural space plasma environment. The charging...Lorentz force on orbital evolution of standard low area to mass ratio (LAMR) objects and highly perturbation susceptible high area to mass ratio (HAMR...objects. Furthermore, it will shed light into effects of presence/absence of sunlight and orbit inclination on the evolution of orbital parameters. 2.0

  15. Net charge changes in the calculation of relative ligand-binding free energies via classical atomistic molecular dynamics simulation

    PubMed Central

    Reif, Maria M; Oostenbrink, Chris

    2014-01-01

    The calculation of binding free energies of charged species to a target molecule is a frequently encountered problem in molecular dynamics studies of (bio-)chemical thermodynamics. Many important endogenous receptor-binding molecules, enzyme substrates, or drug molecules have a nonzero net charge. Absolute binding free energies, as well as binding free energies relative to another molecule with a different net charge will be affected by artifacts due to the used effective electrostatic interaction function and associated parameters (e.g., size of the computational box). In the present study, charging contributions to binding free energies of small oligoatomic ions to a series of model host cavities functionalized with different chemical groups are calculated with classical atomistic molecular dynamics simulation. Electrostatic interactions are treated using a lattice-summation scheme or a cutoff-truncation scheme with Barker–Watts reaction-field correction, and the simulations are conducted in boxes of different edge lengths. It is illustrated that the charging free energies of the guest molecules in water and in the host strongly depend on the applied methodology and that neglect of correction terms for the artifacts introduced by the finite size of the simulated system and the use of an effective electrostatic interaction function considerably impairs the thermodynamic interpretation of guest-host interactions. Application of correction terms for the various artifacts yields consistent results for the charging contribution to binding free energies and is thus a prerequisite for the valid interpretation or prediction of experimental data via molecular dynamics simulation. Analysis and correction of electrostatic artifacts according to the scheme proposed in the present study should therefore be considered an integral part of careful free-energy calculation studies if changes in the net charge are involved. © 2013 The Authors Journal of Computational Chemistry

  16. Net charge changes in the calculation of relative ligand-binding free energies via classical atomistic molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Reif, Maria M; Oostenbrink, Chris

    2014-01-30

    The calculation of binding free energies of charged species to a target molecule is a frequently encountered problem in molecular dynamics studies of (bio-)chemical thermodynamics. Many important endogenous receptor-binding molecules, enzyme substrates, or drug molecules have a nonzero net charge. Absolute binding free energies, as well as binding free energies relative to another molecule with a different net charge will be affected by artifacts due to the used effective electrostatic interaction function and associated parameters (e.g., size of the computational box). In the present study, charging contributions to binding free energies of small oligoatomic ions to a series of model host cavities functionalized with different chemical groups are calculated with classical atomistic molecular dynamics simulation. Electrostatic interactions are treated using a lattice-summation scheme or a cutoff-truncation scheme with Barker-Watts reaction-field correction, and the simulations are conducted in boxes of different edge lengths. It is illustrated that the charging free energies of the guest molecules in water and in the host strongly depend on the applied methodology and that neglect of correction terms for the artifacts introduced by the finite size of the simulated system and the use of an effective electrostatic interaction function considerably impairs the thermodynamic interpretation of guest-host interactions. Application of correction terms for the various artifacts yields consistent results for the charging contribution to binding free energies and is thus a prerequisite for the valid interpretation or prediction of experimental data via molecular dynamics simulation. Analysis and correction of electrostatic artifacts according to the scheme proposed in the present study should therefore be considered an integral part of careful free-energy calculation studies if changes in the net charge are involved. © The Authors Journal of Computational Chemistry

  17. An analysis of small changes in environment which resulted in diverse charge structures on 4 June 2012 in West Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chmielewski, V.; Bruning, E. C.; Ancell, B. C.

    2016-12-01

    As part of the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry field campaign, the disorganized cellular convection throughout West Texas on 4 June 2012 provided a unique opportunity to sample a full variety of charge structures in contemporaneous storms within tens of kilometers through the use of the West Texas Lightning Mapping Array. The surface moisture and related surface variables, while varying across the region, did not correlate to the observed charge structures, implying an above-surface influence dominated even what appeared to be a synoptically benign environment. Due to the close proximity of these storms to each other, a WRF ensemble was used to estimate the range of the mid-level environmental differences which may have resulted in the different charging within the storms. Most significantly, the representation of the elevated mixed layer, the base of which was near 700 mb (below cloud base), varied across the domain with the deepest and driest midlevel layers in the areas dominated by anomalous storms. This suggests that the above-surface dry modification of cloud parcels could be encouraging the positive charging of graupel within the cloud by limiting the warm cloud depth and increasing the availability of liquid in the mixed phase region. Besides the anomalous charge structures, these storms also contained fewer cloud-to-ground flashes and were slower to organize than those with a greater depth of moisture, although storms of both polarities were long-lasting. The case allows for a very unique examination of how small changes in environment can impact the storm-scale electrical and morphological properties. The ability of a set of idealized WRF models, using standard parameterizations, to capture any of these resulting differences in the overall charge structures given the very small changes in the environmental moisture across the region as resolved by the ensemble will be discussed. As part of the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry field campaign, the

  18. Short radius drilling system improves directional control

    SciTech Connect

    Leazer, C.

    1995-08-01

    Horizontal drilling capabilities and applications have been dramatically increased with development of Becfield Drilling Services` Short Radius Horizontal Drilling System utilizing the Articulated Downhole Drilling Motor (ADM). The system gives precise directional control, predictability , and reliability not previously available in short-radius operations. Because of the unique, patented design of the ADM, the short-radius system can be rotated during lateral drilling operations. This is a significant development in short-radius horizontal drilling technology. This paper reviews the design and operation of this equipment.

  19. Ultrasound-Assisted Distal Radius Fracture Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Socransky, Steve; Skinner, Andrew; Bromley, Mark; Smith, Andrew; Anawati, Alexandre; Middaugh, Jeff; Ross, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Closed reduction of distal radius fractures (CRDRF) is a commonly performed emergency department (ED) procedure. The use of point-of-care ultrasound (PoCUS) to diagnose fractures and guide reduction has previously been described. The primary objective of this study was to determine if the addition of PoCUS to CRDRF changed the perception of successful initial reduction. This was measured by the rate of further reduction attempts based on PoCUS following the initial clinical determination of achievement of best possible reduction. Methods  We performed a multicenter prospective cohort study, using a convenience sample of adult ED patients presenting with a distal radius fracture to five Canadian EDs. All study physicians underwent standardized PoCUS training for fractures. Standard clinically-guided best possible fracture reduction was initially performed. PoCUS was then used to assess the reduction adequacy. Repeat reduction was performed if deemed indicated. A post-reduction radiograph was then performed. Clinician impression of reduction adequacy was scored on a 5 point Likert scale following the initial clinically-guided reduction and following each PoCUS scan and the post-reduction radiograph. Results  There were 131 patients with 132 distal radius fractures. Twelve cases were excluded prior to analysis. There was no significant difference in the assessment of the initial reduction status by PoCUS as compared to the clinical exam (mean score: 3.8 vs. 3.9; p = 0.370; OR 0.89; 95% CI 0.46 to 1.72; p = 0.87). Significantly fewer cases fell into the uncertain category with PoCUS than with clinical assessment (2 vs 12; p = 0.008). Repeat reduction was performed in 49 patients (41.2%). Repeat reduction led to a significant improvement (p < 0.001) in the PoCUS determined adequacy of reduction (mean score: 4.3 vs 3.1; p < 0.001). In this group, the odds ratio for adequate vs. uncertain or inadequate reduction assessment using PoCUS was 12.5 (95% CI 3

  20. Diagnosing the Meteorological Conditions Associated with Sprites and Lightning with Large Change Moment Charges (CMC) over Oklahoma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivera Lizxandra Flores; Lang, Timothy

    2013-01-01

    Sprites are a category of Transient Luminous Events (TLE's) that occur in the upper atmosphere above the tops of Mesoscale Convective Systems (MCSs). They are commonly associated with lightning strokes that produce large charge moment changes (CMCs). Synergistic use of satellite and radar-retrieved observations together with sounding data, forecasts, and lightning-detection-networks allowed the diagnosis and analysis of the meteorological conditions associated with sprites as well as large-CMC lightning over Oklahoma

  1. The radius distribution of planets around cool stars

    SciTech Connect

    Morton, Timothy D.; Swift, Jonathan

    2014-08-10

    We calculate an empirical, non-parametric estimate of the shape of the period-marginalized radius distribution of planets with periods less than 150 days using the small yet well-characterized sample of cool (T{sub eff} < 4000 K) dwarf stars in the Kepler catalog. In particular, we present and validate a new procedure, based on weighted kernel density estimation, to reconstruct the shape of the planet radius function down to radii smaller than the completeness limit of the survey at the longest periods. Under the assumption that the period distribution of planets does not change dramatically with planet radius, we show that the occurrence of planets around these stars continues to increase to below 1 R{sub ⊕}, and that there is no strong evidence for a turnover in the planet radius function. In fact, we demonstrate using many iterations of simulated data that a spurious turnover may be inferred from data even when the true distribution continues to rise toward smaller radii. Finally, the sharp rise in the radius distribution below ∼3 R{sub ⊕} implies that a large number of planets await discovery around cool dwarfs as the sensitivities of ground-based transit surveys increase.

  2. Optimal network modification for spectral radius dependent phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosen, Yonatan; Kirsch, Lior; Louzoun, Yoram

    2016-09-01

    The dynamics of contact processes on networks is often determined by the spectral radius of the networks adjacency matrices. A decrease of the spectral radius can prevent the outbreak of an epidemic, or impact the synchronization among systems of coupled oscillators. The spectral radius is thus tightly linked to network dynamics and function. As such, finding the minimal change in network structure necessary to reach the intended spectral radius is important theoretically and practically. Given contemporary big data resources such as large scale communication or social networks, this problem should be solved with a low runtime complexity. We introduce a novel method for the minimal decrease in weights of edges required to reach a given spectral radius. The problem is formulated as a convex optimization problem, where a global optimum is guaranteed. The method can be easily adjusted to an efficient discrete removal of edges. We introduce a variant of the method which finds optimal decrease with a focus on weights of vertices. The proposed algorithm is exceptionally scalable, solving the problem for real networks of tens of millions of edges in a short time.

  3. Correlation between radius and asphericity in surfaces fitted by conics.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Escudero, Alfonso; Dorronsoro, Carlos; Marcos, Susana

    2010-07-01

    The optical surfaces of the eye are often described in terms of their radius and asphericity. The variations caused by experimental noise in repeated measurements of radius and asphericity of the same surface are strongly correlated. We show this correlation in experimental corneal elevation data from videokeratoscopy and Scheimpflug topography, in non-contact profilometry data of artificial lenses, and in simulations. The effect is a characteristic of the fits to conic curves, and not restricted to any experimental device or fitting procedure. A separate analysis of radius and asphericity may estimate incorrectly the statistical significance of the changes in the ocular surfaces. We propose a MANOVA-based statistical analysis that increases sensitivity by a factor of 4.

  4. Cam radius of curvature modification for improved manufacturability

    SciTech Connect

    Doughty, S.

    1995-12-31

    The design of IC engine cams using the popular polynomial design techniques often results in very high accelerations (and associated high contact forces) as the follower approaches the base circle. In those same parts of the cam action, the cam radius of curvature is likely to change signs, going from convex to concave, and this leads to manufacturing difficulties. When the cam is concave, the radius of the grinding wheel that can be used in manufacture is controlled by the minimum concave radius of curvature of the cam, and this is often much smaller than the wheel size that would result in most economic production. Further, the arc of contact is extended, resulting in loss of coolant flow and rapid loss of wheel dress. A solution is presented, based on substituting a convex circular arc to replace a segment of the cam profile including the concavity. The ramifications of such a modification with regard to the follower motion is also presented.

  5. Radius of gyration and intrinsic viscosity of polyelectrolyte solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Milas, M.; Borsali, R.; Rinaudo, M.

    1993-12-31

    Relatively low molecular weights polyelectrolytes (10{sup 4}-10{sup 6}) behave as worm-like chain when electrostatic repulsions are assumed to govern the excluded volume parameter. Under such conditions, predictions of chain expansion and effect of polyelectrolyte concentrations are made assuming that unperturbed dimensions could be obtained at infinite salt content. Experimental studies of an ionic polysaccharide, namely the Na-hyaluronate, were done and the values obtained for the radius of gyration as well as the intrinsic viscosity at different charge densities are in good agreement with the predictions.

  6. Changes in charge density vs changes in formal oxidation states: The case of Sn halide perovskites and their ordered vacancy analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalpian, Gustavo M.; Liu, Qihang; Stoumpos, Constantinos C.; Douvalis, Alexios P.; Balasubramanian, Mahalingam; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G.; Zunger, Alex

    2017-07-01

    Shifting the Fermi energy in solids by doping, defect formation, or gating generally results in changes in the charge density distribution, which reflect the ability of the bonding pattern in solids to adjust to such external perturbations. In the traditional chemistry textbook, such changes are often described by the formal oxidation states (FOS) whereby a single atom type is presumed to absorb the full burden of the perturbation (change in charge) of the whole compound. In the present paper, we analyze the changes in the position-dependence charge density due to shifts of the Fermi energy on a general physical basis, comparing with the view of the FOS picture. We use the halide perovskites CsSn X3 (X =F , Cl, Br, I) as examples for studying the general principle. When the solar absorber CsSn I3 (termed 113) loses 50 % of its Sn atoms, thereby forming the ordered vacancy compound C s2Sn I6 (termed 216), the Sn is said in the FOS picture to change from Sn(II) to Sn(IV). To understand the electronic properties of these two groups we studied the 113 and 216 compound pairs CsSnC l3 and C s2SnC l6 , CsSnB r3 and C s2SnB r6 , and CsSn I3 and C s2Sn I6 , complementing them by CsSn F3 and C s2Sn F6 in the hypothetical cubic structure for completing the chemical trends. These materials were also synthesized by chemical routes and characterized by x-ray diffraction, 119Sn-Mössbauer spectroscopy, and K -edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy. We find that indeed in going from 113 to 216 (equivalent to the introduction of two holes per unit) there is a decrease in the s charge on Sn, in agreement with the FOS picture. However, at the same time, we observe an increase of the p charge via downshift of the otherwise unoccupied p level, an effect that tends to replenish much of the lost s charge. At the end, the change in the charge on the Sn site as a result of adding two holes to the unit cell is rather small. This effect is theoretically explained as a "self-regulating response

  7. Charge-changing collisions of argon ions on argon gas. One-electron capture

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, J.; Bliman, S.; Geller, R.; Jacquot, B.; Van Houtte, D.

    1980-12-01

    Single-electron-capture cross sections have been measured for argon ions with initial charges 2< or =q< or =12 incident on an argon-gas target. The cross sections show little dependence on the incident ion energy in the range 1q--10q keV. A remarkable oscillating feature is seen for cross sections sigma/sub q/,q-1 when q> or =7. Particularly, sigma/sub 8,7/ is smaller than sigma/sub 7,6/ and sigma/sub 9,8/, the Ar/sup 8 +/ electronic structure being Ne-like. Variation of the cross section is shown as function of the initial charge at constant energy.

  8. Total Charge Changing Cross-Sections of 300 MeV/A Fe26+ Ion Beam in Different Target Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Renu; Kumar, Ashavani

    Total charge changing cross-sections of 300 MeV/A Fe26+ ion beam in Al and combined media of CH2, CR39 and Al were calculated by CR39 track etch detectors using an image analysing system; DM6000 M optical microscope attached with a personal computer installed with Leica QWin Plus software. The CR39 nuclear track detectors were used to identify the incident charged particles and their fragments. Exposed CR39 detectors were etched in 6N NaOH solution + 1% ethyl alcohol at 70 ˚C to visualize the tracks produced by primary ion beam and its fragmentations under optical microscope. The temperature was kept constant throughout the etching within ± 0.1˚C. The present work shows better response of the CR39 track etch detector up to an improved threshold Z/β ˜ 4.6. The cone-diameter distributions were fitted by multiple Gaussians using ROOT software analysis toolkit. The numbers of incident and survived ions were determined within 99.7% confidence levels. The calculated values of total charge changing cross-section were (1663 ± 236) mb in Al target, (1219 ± 29) mb in combined target CH2+CR39+Al and (1020 ± 121) mb in combined target CH2+CR39.

  9. Masses and Charge Radii of {sup 17-22}Ne and the Two-Proton-Halo Candidate {sup 17}Ne

    SciTech Connect

    Geithner, W.; Kappertz, S.; Keim, M.; Neugart, R.; Wilbert, S.; Neff, T.; Feldmeier, H.; Herfurth, F.; Yazidjian, C.; Audi, G.; Guenaut, C.; Lunney, D.; Blaum, K.; George, S.; Delahaye, P.; Kellerbauer, A.; Kowalska, M.; Herlert, A.; Kluge, H.-J.; Lievens, P.

    2008-12-19

    High-precision mass and charge radius measurements on {sup 17-22}Ne, including the proton-halo candidate {sup 17}Ne, have been performed with Penning trap mass spectrometry and collinear laser spectroscopy. The {sup 17}Ne mass uncertainty is improved by factor 50, and the charge radii of {sup 17-19}Ne are determined for the first time. The fermionic molecular dynamics model explains the pronounced changes in the ground-state structure. It attributes the large charge radius of {sup 17}Ne to an extended proton configuration with an s{sup 2} component of about 40%. In {sup 18}Ne the smaller radius is due to a significantly smaller s{sup 2} component. The radii increase again for {sup 19-22}Ne due to cluster admixtures.

  10. Elbow dislocation with ipsilateral distal radius fracture

    PubMed Central

    Meena, Sanjay; Trikha, Vivek; Kumar, Rakesh; Saini, Pramod; Sambharia, Abhishek Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Elbow dislocation associated with ipsilateral distal radius fracture is a rare pattern of injury, although it is common for elbow dislocation and forearm fractures to occur separately. We report a rare case of a 20-year-old male who had a posterior elbow dislocation and ipsilateral distal radius fracture. Elbow dislocation was first reduced in extension and distal radius fracture was then reduced in flexion. Both the injuries were conservatively managed. At 6 months follow-up, the patient had no pain in his elbow and minimal pain in his wrist on heavy lifting and had resumed his work as a laborer. PMID:24082758

  11. Elbow dislocation with ipsilateral distal radius fracture.

    PubMed

    Meena, Sanjay; Trikha, Vivek; Kumar, Rakesh; Saini, Pramod; Sambharia, Abhishek Kumar

    2013-07-01

    Elbow dislocation associated with ipsilateral distal radius fracture is a rare pattern of injury, although it is common for elbow dislocation and forearm fractures to occur separately. We report a rare case of a 20-year-old male who had a posterior elbow dislocation and ipsilateral distal radius fracture. Elbow dislocation was first reduced in extension and distal radius fracture was then reduced in flexion. Both the injuries were conservatively managed. At 6 months follow-up, the patient had no pain in his elbow and minimal pain in his wrist on heavy lifting and had resumed his work as a laborer.

  12. Is the proton radius puzzle evidence of extra dimensions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahia, F.; Lemos, A. S.

    2016-08-01

    The proton charge radius inferred from muonic hydrogen spectroscopy is not compatible with the previous value given by CODATA-2010, which, on its turn, essentially relies on measurements of the electron-proton interaction. The proton's new size was extracted from the 2S-2P Lamb shift in the muonic hydrogen, which showed an energy excess of 0.3 meV in comparison to the theoretical prediction, evaluated with the CODATA radius. Higher-dimensional gravity is a candidate to explain this discrepancy, since the muon-proton gravitational interaction is stronger than the electron-proton interaction and, in the context of braneworld models, the gravitational potential can be hugely amplified in short distances when compared to the Newtonian potential. Motivated by these ideas, we study a muonic hydrogen confined in a thick brane. We show that the muon-proton gravitational interaction modified by extra dimensions can provide the additional separation of 0.3 meV between the 2S and 2P states. In this scenario, the gravitational energy depends on the higher-dimensional Planck mass and indirectly on the brane thickness. Studying the behavior of the gravitational energy with respect to the brane thickness in a realistic range, we find constraints for the fundamental Planck mass that solve the proton radius puzzle and are consistent with previous experimental bounds.

  13. About the horizontal variability of effective radius in stratocumulus clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magaritz-Ronen, L.; Khain, A.; Pinsky, M.

    2016-08-01

    The role of turbulent mixing in formation of low horizontal variability of effective radius near the top of nondrizzling stratocumulus clouds is investigated in simulations of clouds observed during the Second Dynamics and Chemistry of Marine Stratocumulus field experiment. The clouds are simulated using a spectral bin microphysics Lagrangian-Eulerian model consisting of ~2000 adjacent parcels moving in a turbulence-like field with observed correlation properties. The parcels interact through drop sedimentation and turbulent mixing. It was found that the effective radius variability in the horizontal direction near cloud top does not exceed ~10% of the averaged value. Three different types of cloud parcels are revealed to be differently influenced by mixing: ascending slightly diluted parcels, cloudy parcels experiencing intense mixing with parcels from inversion, and initially dry parcels. The evolution of droplet size distributions in parcels belonging to these types is investigated. It is shown that in parcels of the first two types the values of effective radii do not change or change only slightly remaining close to the adiabatic value. In initially droplet-free parcels effective radius rapidly reaches a value close to the adiabatic value, while liquid water content remains low. Therefore, turbulent mixing leads to establishing vertical profiles of effective radius, which are close to the adiabatic profile.

  14. Structural changes of active materials and failure mode of a valve-regulated lead-acid battery in rapid-charge and conventional-charge cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, T. G.; Jochim, D. M.

    Spirally wound 12-V valve-regulated lead-acid batteries were subjected to conventional-charge and rapid-charge cycling tests. The cycle life was 250 cycles for the conventional-charge regime and 1000 cycles for the rapid-charge regime. In conventional-charge cycling, the positive active material quickly expanded and developed a coralloid structure in association with lowered utilisation and integrity. In rapid-charge cycling, no coralloid structure developed and the expansion was smaller and much slower. Correspondingly, the particle size of the negative active material grew in both cycling tests, but at a much slower rate in rapid-charge cycling. With the expansion of the positive active material, the negative active material was compressed. In the failed batteries, about one-third of the negative active material in the centre of the electrode was compressed almost into a solid non-porous mass. This densification process also occurred at a much slower rate in rapid-charge cycling. At the point of failure, the discharge capacity of all test batteries was limited by the negative electrode, although it was limited by the positive electrode at the beginning of the cycling tests. The cause of failure for most of the batteries, regardless of the charging regime, was the occurrence of "soak-through" shorts caused by numerous minute lead dendrites formed in the separator. This might have been encouraged by the formation of shorter distances between the two electrodes, created by the compression of the separator as a result of the expansion of the positive active material.

  15. Distal radius fractures in the athlete.

    PubMed

    Beleckas, Casey; Calfee, Ryan

    2017-03-01

    Distal radius fractures are one of the most common upper extremity fractures. Athletes with distal radius fractures are treated according to the same principles as non-athletes but present several unique considerations. At all levels of sport, injured athletes desire to return to play as rapidly as possible. Earlier operative fixation may allow an athlete to return to play more quickly. Volar locking plates are most commonly used for operative treatment of distal radius fractures due to their stability and low incidence of complications. Although the majority of distal radius fractures in athletes are treated non-operatively, operative intervention is offered when required to restore and maintain acceptable skeletal alignment. Return to sport is individualized guided by fracture stability, athlete age, and wrist-specific demands for competition.

  16. Mass-radius relationships in icy satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lupo, M. J.; Lewis, J. S.

    1979-01-01

    Using published laboratory data for H2O ice, a modeling technique was developed by which the bulk density, density and temperature profile, rotational moment of inertia, central pressure, and location of the rock-ice interface can all be obtained as a function of the radius, the heliocentric distance, and the silicate composition. Models of the interiors of Callisto, Ganymede, Europa, Rhea, and Titan are given, consistent with present mass and radius data. The radius and mass of spheres of ice under self-gravitation for two different temperature classes are given (103 and 77 deg K). Measurements of mass, radius and I/MR2 by spacecraft can be interpreted by this model to yield substantial information about the internal structure and the ice/rock ratio of the icy satellites of Jupiter and Saturn.

  17. Perturbed Radius of Geosynchronous-Satellite Orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawase, Sei-Ichiro

    We analyze theoretically how the radius of geosynchronous orbits would vary owing to the perturbations due to the sun/moon gravity, solar radiation pressure, and the oblate earth. The analysis is simple, as it uses a diagrammatic method to solve near-circular orbital motions. Results are obtained in seven terms of corrections to the radius of non-perturbed ideal orbits. Each correction term is derived, with clear physical meaning, from each component of the perturbing forces.

  18. Quantum theory of atoms in molecules/charge-charge flux-dipole flux models for fundamental vibrational intensity changes on H-bond formation of water and hydrogen fluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, Arnaldo F.; Richter, Wagner E.; Bruns, Roy E.; Terrabuio, Luiz A.; Haiduke, Roberto L. A.

    2014-02-28

    The Quantum Theory of Atoms In Molecules/Charge-Charge Flux-Dipole Flux (QTAIM/CCFDF) model has been used to investigate the electronic structure variations associated with intensity changes on dimerization for the vibrations of the water and hydrogen fluoride dimers as well as in the water-hydrogen fluoride complex. QCISD/cc-pVTZ wave functions applied in the QTAIM/CCFDF model accurately provide the fundamental band intensities of water and its dimer predicting symmetric and antisymmetric stretching intensity increases for the donor unit of 159 and 47 km mol{sup −1} on H-bond formation compared with the experimental values of 141 and 53 km mol{sup −1}. The symmetric stretching of the proton donor water in the dimer has intensity contributions parallel and perpendicular to its C{sub 2v} axis. The largest calculated increase of 107 km mol{sup −1} is perpendicular to this axis and owes to equilibrium atomic charge displacements on vibration. Charge flux decreases occurring parallel and perpendicular to this axis result in 42 and 40 km mol{sup −1} total intensity increases for the symmetric and antisymmetric stretches, respectively. These decreases in charge flux result in intensity enhancements because of the interaction contributions to the intensities between charge flux and the other quantities. Even though dipole flux contributions are much smaller than the charge and charge flux ones in both monomer and dimer water they are important for calculating the total intensity values for their stretching vibrations since the charge-charge flux interaction term cancels the charge and charge flux contributions. The QTAIM/CCFDF hydrogen-bonded stretching intensity strengthening of 321 km mol{sup −1} on HF dimerization and 592 km mol{sup −1} on HF:H{sub 2}O complexation can essentially be explained by charge, charge flux and their interaction cross term. Atomic contributions to the intensities are also calculated. The bridge hydrogen atomic contributions alone

  19. Who's in Charge Here? Sources of Leadership for Change in Eight Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heller, Marjorie F.; Firestone, William A.

    1995-01-01

    Identifies a set of change leadership functions including sustaining a vision for change, encouraging staff, modifying standard operating procedures, and monitoring progress. Suggests that these functions do contribute to change, but are also performed redundantly by persons in a variety of overlapping roles, including central office personnel,…

  20. Large charge moment change lightning on 31 May to 1 June 2013, including the El Reno tornadic storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Timothy J.; Cummer, Steven A.; Petersen, Danyal; Flores-Rivera, Lizxandra; Lyons, Walter A.; MacGorman, Donald; Beasley, William

    2015-04-01

    On 31 May 2013, a line of severe tornadic thunderstorms (the El Reno event) developed during the local afternoon in central Oklahoma, USA. Within range of the Oklahoma Lightning Mapping Array, the evolution of the event can be separated into three distinct periods: an Early period (before 02:00 UTC on 1 June) when the storm consisted of discrete supercells, a Middle period (02:00-05:00 UTC) when the convection began merging into a linear feature and stratiform precipitation developed, and a Late period (after 05:00 UTC) featuring a mature mesoscale convective system (MCS). Each of these periods demonstrated distinct patterns in the large (>100 C km) charge moment change (CMC) lightning that was produced. During the Early period, large-CMC positive cloud-to-ground (+CG) lightning was produced in the convective cores of supercells. These flashes were small in area (typically <500 km2) and were commonly associated with a sloping midlevel positive charge region in the echo overhang on the storm's forward flank. The Middle period featured a population of larger +CMCs (>500 km2, >300 C km) in the developing stratiform, similar to typical sprite-parent lightning in MCSs. During the Late period, convective large CMC +CGs ceased and instead large-CMC negative CGs were produced in and near the MCS convection. These flashes neutralized charge both in convection as well as in adjacent stratiform and anvil precipitation. The results suggest that the CMC metric has potential applications for studying tropospheric weather.

  1. Changes in mean-squared charge radii and magnetic moments of Tl-184179 measured by in-source laser spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barzakh, A. E.; Andreyev, A. N.; Cocolios, T. E.; de Groote, R. P.; Fedorov, D. V.; Fedosseev, V. N.; Ferrer, R.; Fink, D. A.; Ghys, L.; Huyse, M.; Köster, U.; Lane, J.; Liberati, V.; Lynch, K. M.; Marsh, B. A.; Molkanov, P. L.; Procter, T. J.; Rapisarda, E.; Rothe, S.; Sandhu, K.; Seliverstov, M. D.; Sjödin, A. M.; Van Beveren, C.; Van Duppen, P.; Venhart, M.; Veselský, M.

    2017-01-01

    Hyperfine structure and isotope shifts have been measured for the ground and isomeric states in the neutron-deficient isotopes Tl-184179 using the 276.9-nm transition. The experiment has been performed at the CERN-Isotope Separator On-Line facility using the in-source resonance-ionization laser spectroscopy technique. Spins for the ground states in 179,181,183Tl have been determined as I =1 /2 . Magnetic moments and changes in the nuclear mean-square charge radii have been deduced. By applying the additivity relation for magnetic moments of the odd-odd Tl nuclei the leading configuration assignments were confirmed. A deviation of magnetic moments for isomeric states in Tl,184182 from the trend of the heavier Tl nuclei is observed. The charge radii of the ground states of the isotopes Tl-184179 follow the trend for isotonic (spherical) lead nuclei. The noticeable difference in charge radii for ground and isomeric states of Tl,184183 has been observed, suggesting a larger deformation for the intruder-based 9 /2- and 10- states compared to the ground states. An unexpected growth of the isomer shift for 183Tl has been found.

  2. The New Proton Radius Experiment at Jefferson Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasparian, Ashot H.

    The proton charge radius (rp) is one of the most fundamental quantities in physics. Precise knowledge of its value is critically important for both nuclear and atomic physics-especially for the spectroscopy of atomic hydrogen. Recent high precision measurements of (rp) using the muonic hydrogen atom demonstrated up to eight standard deviations smaller value than the accepted average from all previous experiments performed with different methods. This fact triggered the well-known "proton charge radius puzzle" in hadronic physics. The PRad collaboration at Jefferson Lab for the last five years developed a novel magnetic-spectrometer-free e-p scattering experiment to address this "puzzle". The PRad experiment was successfully performed in May and June of 2016 at Jefferson Lab in which a large statistical and high quality experimental data set was collected. The specifics of the method, the experimental characteristics of the setup together with the first preliminary results from the current initial data analysis process are presented in this talk.

  3. The New Proton Radius Experiment (PRad) at Jefferson Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasparian, Ashot; PRad Collaboration at JLab Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The proton charge radius (Rp) is one of the most fundamental quantities in physics. Precise knowledge of its value is critically important for both nuclear and atomic physics - especially for the spectroscopy of atomic hydrogen. Recent high precision measurements of Rp using the muonic hydrogen atom demonstrated up to eight standard deviations smaller value than the accepted average from all previous experiments performed with different methods. This fact triggered the well known ``proton charge radius puzzle'' in hadronic physics. The PRad collaboration at Jefferson Lab for the last four years developed a novel magnetic-spectrometer-free electron-proton scattering experiment to address this puzzle. The PRad experiment successfully performed in May and June of this year at Jefferson Lab collecting a large statistical and high quality experimental data set. The specifics of the method, the experimental characteristics of the setup together with the first preliminary results from the current data analysis process will be presented in this talk. This project is supported in part by the US NSF MRI award PHY-1229153, and US DOE awards: DE-FG02-03ER41240, DE-FG0203ER41231.

  4. Monitoring In Vivo Changes in Tonic Extracellular Dopamine Level by Charge-Balancing Multiple Waveform Fast-Scan Cyclic Voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Oh, Yoonbae; Park, Cheonho; Kim, Do Hyoung; Shin, Hojin; Kang, Yu Min; DeWaele, Mark; Lee, Jeyeon; Min, Hoon-Ki; Blaha, Charles D; Bennet, Kevin E; Kim, In Young; Lee, Kendall H; Jang, Dong Pyo

    2016-11-15

    Dopamine (DA) modulates central neuronal activity through both phasic (second to second) and tonic (minutes to hours) terminal release. Conventional fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV), in combination with carbon fiber microelectrodes, has been used to measure phasic DA release in vivo by adopting a background subtraction procedure to remove background capacitive currents. However, measuring tonic changes in DA concentrations using conventional FSCV has been difficult because background capacitive currents are inherently unstable over long recording periods. To measure tonic changes in DA concentrations over several hours, we applied a novel charge-balancing multiple waveform FSCV (CBM-FSCV), combined with a dual background subtraction technique, to minimize temporal variations in background capacitive currents. Using this method, in vitro, charge variations from a reference time point were nearly zero for 48 h, whereas with conventional background subtraction, charge variations progressively increased. CBM-FSCV also demonstrated a high selectivity against 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid and ascorbic acid, two major chemical interferents in the brain, yielding a sensitivity of 85.40 ± 14.30 nA/μM and limit of detection of 5.8 ± 0.9 nM for DA while maintaining selectivity. Recorded in vivo by CBM-FSCV, pharmacological inhibition of DA reuptake (nomifensine) resulted in a 235 ± 60 nM increase in tonic extracellular DA concentrations, while inhibition of DA synthesis (α-methyl-dl-tyrosine) resulted in a 72.5 ± 4.8 nM decrease in DA concentrations over a 2 h period. This study showed that CBM-FSCV may serve as a unique voltammetric technique to monitor relatively slow changes in tonic extracellular DA concentrations in vivo over a prolonged time period.

  5. Change in carrier type in high-k gate carbon nanotube field-effect transistors by interface fixed charges.

    PubMed

    Moriyama, N; Ohno, Y; Kitamura, T; Kishimoto, S; Mizutani, T

    2010-04-23

    We study the phenomenon of change in carrier type in carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNFETs) caused by the atomic layer deposition (ALD) of a HfO(2) gate insulator. When a HfO(2) layer is deposited on a CNFET, the type of carrier changes from p-type to n-type. The so-obtained n-type device has good performance and stability in air. The conductivity of such a device with a channel length of 0.7 microm is 11% of the quantum conductance 4e(2)/h. The contact resistance for electron current is estimated to be 14 kOmega. The n-type conduction of this CNFET is maintained for more than 100 days. The change in carrier type is attributed to positive fixed charges introduced at the interface between the HfO(2) and SiO(2) layers. We also propose a novel technique to control the type of conduction by utilizing interface fixed charges; this technique is compatible with Si CMOS process technology.

  6. Solution pH change in non-uniform alternating current electric fields at frequencies above the electrode charging frequency

    PubMed Central

    An, Ran; Massa, Katherine

    2014-01-01

    AC Faradaic reactions have been reported as a mechanism inducing non-ideal phenomena such as flow reversal and cell deformation in electrokinetic microfluidic systems. Prior published work described experiments in parallel electrode arrays below the electrode charging frequency (fc), the frequency for electrical double layer charging at the electrode. However, 2D spatially non-uniform AC electric fields are required for applications such as in plane AC electroosmosis, AC electrothermal pumps, and dielectrophoresis. Many microscale experimental applications utilize AC frequencies around or above fc. In this work, a pH sensitive fluorescein sodium salt dye was used to detect [H+] as an indicator of Faradaic reactions in aqueous solutions within non-uniform AC electric fields. Comparison experiments with (a) parallel (2D uniform fields) electrodes and (b) organic media were employed to deduce the electrode charging mechanism at 5 kHz (1.5fc). Time dependency analysis illustrated that Faradaic reactions exist above the theoretically predicted electrode charging frequency. Spatial analysis showed [H+] varied spatially due to electric field non-uniformities and local pH changed at length scales greater than 50 μm away from the electrode surface. Thus, non-uniform AC fields yielded spatially varied pH gradients as a direct consequence of ion path length differences while uniform fields did not yield pH gradients; the latter is consistent with prior published data. Frequency dependence was examined from 5 kHz to 12 kHz at 5.5 Vpp potential, and voltage dependency was explored from 3.5 to 7.5 Vpp at 5 kHz. Results suggest that Faradaic reactions can still proceed within electrochemical systems in the absence of well-established electrical double layers. This work also illustrates that in microfluidic systems, spatial medium variations must be considered as a function of experiment time, initial medium conditions, electric signal potential, frequency, and spatial

  7. Theory of the Color Change of NaxWO3 as a Function of Na-Charge Doping

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, P.

    2009-01-01

    We report theoretical investigations of the coloration of WO{sub 3} upon charge insertion using sodium tungsten bronze (Na{sub x}WO{sub 3}) as a model system. Our results explain well the systematic color change of Na{sub x}WO{sub 3} from dark blue to violet, red-orange, and finally to golden yellow as sodium concentration x increases from 0.3 to unity. Proper accounts for both the interband and the intraband contributions to the optical response are found to be very important for a detailed understanding of the coloration mechanism in this system.

  8. The climatology of lightning producing large impulse charge moment changes with an emphasis on mesoscale convective systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beavis, Nicholas

    The use of both total charge moment change (CMC) and impulse charge moment change (iCMC) magnitudes to assess the potential of a cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning stroke to induce a mesospheric sprite has been well described in literature. However, this work has primarily been carried out on a case study basis. To complement these previous case studies, climatologies of regional, seasonal, and diurnal observations of large-iCMC discharges are presented. In this study, large-iCMC discharges for thresholds > 100 and > 300 C km in both positive and negative polarities are analyzed on a seasonal basis using density maps of 2o by 2o resolution across the conterminous U.S. using data from the Charge Moment Change Network (CMCN). Also produced were local solar time diurnal distributions in eight different regions covering the lower 48 states as well as the Atlantic Ocean, including the Gulf Stream. In addition, National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN) cloud-to-ground (CG) flash diurnal distributions were included. The seasonal maps show the predisposition of large positive iCMCs to dominate across the Northern Great Plains, with large negative iCMCs favored in the Southeastern U.S. year-round. During summer, the highest frequency of large positive iCMCs across the Upper Midwest aligns closely with the preferred tracks of nocturnal mesoscale convective systems (MCSs). As iCMC values increase above 300 C km, the maximum shifts eastward of the 100 C km maximum in the Central Plains. The Southwestern U.S. also experiences significant numbers of large-iCMC discharges in summer, presumably due to convection associated with the North American Monsoon (NAM). The Gulf Stream is active year round, with a bias towards more large positive iCMCs in winter. Diurnal distributions in the eight regions support these conclusions, with a nocturnal peak in large-iCMC discharges in the Northern Great Plains and Great Lakes, an early- to mid-afternoon peak in the Intermountain West and the

  9. Neutrino-pair bremsstrahlung with generation change of the charged lepton

    SciTech Connect

    Pich, A.

    1984-03-01

    The ratio R/sub nunu-bar/equivalentsigma(l /sup A/Z..-->..l /sup A/Z summation/sub ..nu../..nu..nu-bar)/sigma(l /sup A/Z..-->..l' /sup A/Z..nu../sub l/nu-bar/sub lprime/), where l and l' are distinct charged leptons, is evaluated in the framework of the standard theory. The dependences on the number of generations, the helicity of the incoming lepton, and the lepton masses are analyzed. It is shown that in spite of the high energies considered lepton-mass effects are important, modifying the R/sub nunu-bar/ estimate for vanishing lepton masses by a factor of about three.

  10. Natural Oxidation of Black Carbon in Soils: Changes in Molecular Form and Surface Charge along a Climosequence

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Chih-Hsin; Lehmann, Johannes C.; Engelhard, Mark H.

    2008-03-15

    The aim of this work was to investigate changes in molecular form and surface charge of black carbon (BC) due to longtermnatural oxidation and to examine how climatic and soil factors affect BC oxidation. Black C was collected from 11 historical charcoal blast furnace sites with a geographic distribution from Quebec, Canada, to Georgia, USA, and compared to BC that was newly produced (new BC) using rebuilt historical kilns. The results showed that the historical BC samples were substantially oxidized after 130 years in soils as compared to new BC or BC incubated for one year. The major alterations by natural oxidation of BC included: (1) changes in elemental composition with increases in oxygen (O) from 7.2% in new BC to 24.8% in historical BC and decreases in C from 90.8% to 70.5%; (2) formation of oxygen-containing functional groups, particularly carboxylic and phenolic functional groups, and (3) disappearance of surface positive charge and evolution of surface negative charge after 12 months of incubation. Although time of exposure significantly increased natural oxidation of BC, a significant positive relationship between mean annual temperature (MAT) and BC oxidation (O/C ratio with r = 0.83;P < 0.01) explained that BC oxidation was increased by 87 mmole kg C-1 per unit Celsius increase in MAT. This long-term oxidation was more pronounced on BC surfaces than for entire particles, and responded 7-fold stronger to increases in MAT. Our results also indicated that oxidation of BC was more important than adsorption of non-BC. Thus, natural oxidation of BC may play an important role in the effects of BC on soil biogeochemistry.

  11. Changes in the mean-square charge radii and magnetic moments of neutron-deficient Tl isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barzakh, A. E.; Batist, L. Kh.; Fedorov, D. V.; Ivanov, V. S.; Mezilev, K. A.; Molkanov, P. L.; Moroz, F. V.; Orlov, S. Yu.; Panteleev, V. N.; Volkov, Yu. M.

    2013-08-01

    In-source laser spectroscopy experiments for neutron-deficient thallium isotopes at the 276.9-nm atomic transition have been carried out at the Investigation of Radioactive Isotopes on Synchrocyclotron facility of Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute. New data on isotope shifts and the hyperfine structure for 183-207Tl isotopes and isomers are presented. The changes in the mean-square charge radii and magnetic-moment values are deduced. It is shown that nuclear properties of Tl isotopes and isomers smoothly change at the neutron midshell and beyond without development of strong deformation in contrast to the adjacent Hg nuclei. A rather great isomer shift between I = 1/2 and I = 9/2 states for odd Tl isotopes is preserved for both sides of the previously investigated mass range. For the first time, a similar isomer shift is found for the odd-odd isotope 186Tl. The close resemblance of the charge radii isotopic behavior for the Tl and Pb ground states is demonstrated.

  12. Correlated charge-changing ion-atom collisions. Progress report, February 16, 1990--February 15, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Tanis, J.A.

    1993-02-01

    This report summarizes the progress and accomplishments in accelerator atomic physics research supported by DOE grant DE-FG02-87ER13778 from February 16, 1990 through February 15, 1993. This work involves the experimental investigation of atomic interactions in collisions of charged projectiles with neutral targets or electrons, with particular emphasis on two-electron interactions and electron-correlation effects. The processes studied are of interest both from fundamental and applied points of view. In the latter case, results are obtained which are relevant to the understanding of laboratory and astrophysical plasmas, highly-excited (Rydberg) and continuum states of atoms and ions, atomic structure effects, the interaction of ions with surfaces, and the development of heavy-ion storage-rings. The results obtained have provided the basis for several M.A. thesis projects at Western Michigan and several Ph.D. dissertation projects are currently underway. Summaries of work completed and work in progress are given below in Section II. This research has resulted in 26 papers (in print and in press), 12 invited presentations at national and international meetings, and 28 contributed presentations as detailed in Section III.

  13. Understanding the proton radius puzzle: Nuclear structure effects in light muonic atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Chen; Hernandez, Oscar Javier; Nevo Dinur, Nir; Bacca, Sonia; Barnea, Nir

    2016-03-01

    We present calculations of nuclear structure effects to the Lamb shift in light muonic atoms. We adopt a modern ab-initio approach by combining state-of-the-art nuclear potentials with the hyperspherical harmonics method. Our calculations are instrumental to the determination of nuclear charge radii in the Lamb shift measurements, which will shed light on the proton radius puzzle.

  14. Operative treatment of distal radius fractures.

    PubMed

    Vasenius, J

    2008-01-01

    The incidence of distal radius fractures is increasing together with the average age of population. Intra-articular incongruity is the most probable cause of unsatisfactory outcome of distal radius fractures in younger and more active patients. Thus, the main goal in the treatment of distal radius fractures should be restoration of articular congruence. A computed tomography (CT) is recommended to help surgeon in preoperative planning in the treatment of comminuted intra-articular fractures. New implants have been designed to provide stable enough fixation for early mobilisation after surgery and to lower rather high complication rates related to conventional fixation methods such as external fixation and dorsal plating. The most common complications related to volar fixed angle plating such as flexor and extensor tendon problems, median nerve neuropathy, and screw diplacement into the radiocarpal joint are surgeon related and are avoidable with proper education. More randomized prospective studies are needed to prove superiority of any fixation method to another.

  15. Mass and radius of cosmic balloons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Yun

    1994-01-01

    Cosmic balloons are spherical domain walls with relativistic particles trapped inside. We derive the exact mass and radius relations for a static cosmic balloon using Gauss-Codazzi equations. The cosmic balloon mass as a function of its radius, M(R), is found to have a functional form similar to that of fermion soliton stars, with a fixed point at 2GM(R)/R approximately or equal to 0.486 which corresponds to the limit of infinite central density. We derive a simple analytical approximation for the mass density of a spherically symmetric relativistic gas star. When applied to the computation of the mass and radius of a cosmic balloon, the analytical approximation yields fairly good agreement with the exact numerical solutions.

  16. A Maximum Radius for Habitable Planets.

    PubMed

    Alibert, Yann

    2015-09-01

    We compute the maximum radius a planet can have in order to fulfill two constraints that are likely necessary conditions for habitability: 1- surface temperature and pressure compatible with the existence of liquid water, and 2- no ice layer at the bottom of a putative global ocean, that would prevent the operation of the geologic carbon cycle to operate. We demonstrate that, above a given radius, these two constraints cannot be met: in the Super-Earth mass range (1-12 Mearth), the overall maximum that a planet can have varies between 1.8 and 2.3 Rearth. This radius is reduced when considering planets with higher Fe/Si ratios, and taking into account irradiation effects on the structure of the gas envelope.

  17. Precision in stitches: Radius Surgical System.

    PubMed

    Waseda, M; Inaki, N; Torres Bermudez, J R; Manukyan, G; Gacek, I A; Schurr, M O; Braun, M; Buess, G F

    2007-11-01

    The Radius Surgical System is a manual manipulator with two additional degrees of freedom compared with conventional laparoscopic instruments (CLIs). This study aimed to compare the performance of laparoscopic suturing tasks with the use of the Radius Surgical System and CLIs, respectively. Five experienced laparoscopic surgeons performed laparoscopic surgical tasks in a training box. The tasks consisted of knot-tying, suturing, and needle control tasks. The needle control task was performed to evaluate the precision of the needle drive by analysis of the needle exit point on a suture pad. In the knot-tying and suturing tasks, required time and accuracy value were measured. Needle control tasks were performed on three different angulations of plane. The angles between the instrument plane and the target plane (AIT) were 30 degrees, 60 degrees, and 90 degrees. The distance of the exit point to the center of the target field, the number of actions needed to fulfill a single task, and the required time were recorded and analyzed. In the knot-tying and frontal suturing tasks, there were no significant differences between the two groups. In the sagittal suturing task, the required time in the Radius group was significantly shorter than in the CLI group. In the needle control tasks on 30 degree and 60 degree AIT, the distance was significantly shorter in the Radius group than in the CLI group. There were no significant differences in the number of actions or the required time. In the frontal and sagittal needle control task on 90 degree AIT, the distance was significantly shorter in the Radius group than in the CLI group. The number of actions and the required time were significantly less in the Radius group than in the CLI group. The two additional degrees of freedom contributed to accurate and controlled needle guidance, especially in difficult spatial situations.

  18. Ulnar Shortening Versus Distal Radius Corrective Osteotomy in the Management of Ulnar Impaction After Distal Radius Malunion.

    PubMed

    Aibinder, William R; Izadpanah, Ali; Elhassan, Bassem T

    2017-01-01

    Distal radius malunions lead to functional deficits. This study compares isolated ulnar shortening osteotomy (USO) to distal radius osteotomy (DRO) for the treatment of ulnar impaction syndrome following distal radius malunion. We retrospectively reviewed 11 patients with extra-articular distal radius malunions treated for ulnar impaction with isolated USO. This group was compared to a 1:1 age- and sex-matched cohort treated with isolated DRO for the same indication. Pain visual analog scale (VAS), wrist motion, grip strength, radiographic parameters, and perioperative complications were analyzed. Mean follow-up was 14.8 months. VAS scores improved. Wrist range of motion improved in both cohorts with the exception of radial deviation, pronation, and supination in the USO cohort, which decreased from a mean of 17°-16°, 67°-57°, and 54°-52°, respectively. There was no significant difference between groups in regard to change in pain or range of motion, with the exception of pronation and ulnar deviation. The mean tourniquet time was shorter in the USO group. The final ulnar variance was 1.8 mm negative in the USO group and 1.1 mm positive in the DRO group. There was 1 reoperation following USO for painful nonunion, while there were 2 reoperations following DRO for persistent ulnar impaction. An improvement in range of motion, grip strength, and VAS with restoration of the radioulnar length relationship was observed in both cohorts. USO is a simpler procedure with a shorter tourniquet time that can be an attractive alternative to DRO for ulnar impaction syndrome after distal radius malunions.

  19. Numerical study of the effect of the needle tip radius on the characteristics of Trichel pulses in negative corona discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yashuang; Wang, Lijun; Wang, Dan; Jia, Shenli

    2017-06-01

    This paper presents a numerical study of the impact of the needle tip radius on the electrical characteristics of Trichel pulses in negative corona discharges for a needle-plane configuration in atmospheric air. The radius of curvature of the needle tip varies from 20 μm to 45 μm. The first current pulse, subsequent pulse train is discussed here based on the distributions of charged species and electric field. Three species continuity equations along with Poisson's equation are solved by the hydrodynamic drift-diffusion approach, in which the role of photoionization is considered. The increasing needle tip radius reduces the peak of the first pulse significantly and delays the start of the first pulse, but almost keeps the duration of the first pulse constant. At the instant of the first pulse peak, both the magnitude of the charged species densities and the electric field decrease with the needle tip radius, and the electric field is strongly distorted by the space charge field. For the subsequent current pulses, the current magnitude is weakly related to the needle tip radius, whereas the pulse period is proportional to the needle tip radius. The increasing needle tip radius reduces the positive ion and electron densities but increases the negative ion density at the instant of the current pulse peak, which diminishes the difference of the electric field for different needle tip radii.

  20. Topographic matching of distal radius and proximal fibula articular surface for distal radius osteoarticular reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, H; Chen, S; Wang, Z; Guo, Y; Liu, B; Tong, D

    2016-07-01

    During osteoarticular reconstruction of the distal radius with the proximal fibula, congruity between the two articular surfaces is an important factor in determining the quality of the outcome. In this study, a three-dimensional model and a coordinate transformation algorithm were developed on computed tomography scanning. Articular surface matching was performed and parameters for the optimal position were determined quantitatively. The mean radii of best-fit spheres of the articular surfaces of the distal radius and proximal fibula were compared quantitatively. The radial inclination and volar tilt following reconstruction by an ipsilateral fibula graft, rather than the contralateral, best resembles the values of the native distal radius. Additionally, the ipsilateral fibula graft reconstructed a larger proportion of the distal radius articular surface than did the contralateral. The ipsilateral proximal fibula graft provides a better match for the reconstruction of the distal radius articular surface than the contralateral, and the optimal position for graft placement is quantitatively determined.

  1. Mass and Radius of Neutron Stars Constrained by Photospheric Radius Expansion X-ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Kyujin; Kim, Myungkuk; Kim, Young-Min; Lee, Chang-Hwan

    Simultaneous measurement of mass and radius of a neutron star is important because it provides strong constraint on the equation of state for nuclear matter inside a neutron star. Type I X-ray Bursts (XRBs) that have been observed in low-mass X-ray binaries sometimes show photospheric radius expansion (PRE). By combining observed fluxes, X-ray spectra, and distances of PRE XRBs and using a statistical analysis, it is possible to simultaneously constrain the mass and radius of a neutron star. However, the mass and radius of a neutron star estimated in this method depends on the opacity of accreted material. We investigate the effect of the opacity on the mass and radius estimation by taking into account the cases that the hydrogen mass fraction of accreted material has narrowly-distributed values. We present preliminary results that are investigated with three different values of hydrogen mass fraction and compare our results with previous studies.

  2. Minimization of first-turn losses by excited neutrals in charge-changing injection of accumulator rings

    SciTech Connect

    Jason, A.J.; Blind, B.; Channel, P.; Wang, Tai-Sen

    1994-07-01

    Substantial beam losses, due to production of excited neutrals by the foil stripper, have been observed to occur immediately after injection in accumulator rings that utilize charge-changing injection. A technique is proposed, based on experimental and theoretical results for excited-state production and stripping, that is potentially capable of reducing such losses by a factor greater than 10{sup 4}. In the technique, foil stripping occurs in a shaped magnetic field that resolves the excited atomic levels into immediately stripped states that are within ring acceptance and those that can be ejected from the ring. An added magnetic-mirror-field configuration is Proposed as an effective means of minimizing interactions between stripped electrons and the foil.

  3. Radius of the ρ meson determined from its decay constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krutov, A. F.; Polezhaev, R. G.; Troitsky, V. E.

    2016-02-01

    We present a unified model describing electroweak properties of the π and ρ mesons. Using a general method of the relativistic parametrization of matrix elements of local operators, adjusted for the nondiagonal in the total angular momentum case, we calculate the ρ -meson lepton-decay constant fρ using the same parameters of free constituent quarks that have ensured exclusively good results for the π meson previously. The only free parameter, characterizing quark interactions, which include an additional spin-spin contribution and hence differ from the π -meson case, is fixed by matching the decay constant to its experimental value. The mean square charge radius is calculated, ⟨rρ2⟩=(0.56 ±0.04 ) fm2 . This result confirms, for the ρ -meson case, the conjecture of equality between electromagnetic and strong radii of hadrons. This conjecture was tested previously for proton, π and K mesons.

  4. Membrane-potential-dependent changes in the stoichiometry of charge translocation by the mitochondrial electron transport chain.

    PubMed

    Murphy, M P; Brand, M D

    1988-05-02

    The charge/oxygen (q+/O) stoichiometry of mitochondria respiring on succinate was measured under conditions of high membrane potential (delta psi). The technique used was a variation of the steady-state method of Al-Shawi and Brand [(1981) Biochem. J. 200, 539-546]. We show that q+/O was about 2.7 at high values of delta psi (170 mV). As delta psi was lowered from 170 mV to 85 mV with the respiratory inhibitor malonate the q+/O stoichiometry increased to 6.0. A number of artefacts which could have led to an underestimation of the q+/O stoichiometry were eliminated. These included effects of any rapid change in mitochondrial volume, internal pH, activity of the endogenous K+/H+ exchanger or in H+ conductance due to changes in delta psi after the addition of inhibitor. The experiments presented here are the first direct demonstration that the stoichiometry of proton pumping by the mitochondrial respiratory chain changes as delta psi is varied.

  5. Charge shielding in magnetized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Shaojie; Stroth, Ulrich; Van Oost, Guido

    2010-11-15

    The shielding of a charge sheet in a magnetized plasma is investigated by taking account of the diamagnetic drift start-up current in addition to the polarization current. For a charge sheet with an infinitesimal width, the shielding is the same as the conventional Debye shielding if the charge sheet is perpendicular to the magnetic field; the shielding length is {radical}(2) times larger than the conventional one if the charge sheet is parallel to the magnetic field. When the scale length of the charge sheet is comparable or smaller than the ion Larmor radius, the electric field is significantly enhanced within the charge sheet, while far away from the charge sheet, the electric field is shielded to the usual 1/{epsilon}{sub r} level (where {epsilon}{sub r} is the diamagnetic coefficient of the magnetized plasma).

  6. MASS-RADIUS RELATIONSHIPS FOR EXOPLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Swift, D. C.; Eggert, J. H.; Hicks, D. G.; Hamel, S.; Caspersen, K.; Schwegler, E.; Collins, G. W.; Nettelmann, N.; Ackland, G. J.

    2012-01-01

    For planets other than Earth, particularly exoplanets, interpretation of the composition and structure depends largely on comparing the mass and radius with the composition expected given their distance from the parent star. The composition implies a mass-radius relation which relies heavily on equations of state calculated from electronic structure theory and measured experimentally on Earth. We lay out a method for deriving and testing equations of state, and deduce mass-radius and mass-pressure relations for key, relevant materials whose equation of state (EOS) is reasonably well established, and for differentiated Fe/rock. We find that variations in the EOS, such as may arise when extrapolating from low-pressure data, can have significant effects on predicted mass-radius relations and on planetary pressure profiles. The relations are compared with the observed masses and radii of planets and exoplanets, broadly supporting recent inferences about exoplanet structures. Kepler-10b is apparently 'Earth-like', likely with a proportionately larger core than Earth's, nominally 2/3 of the mass of the planet. CoRoT-7b is consistent with a rocky mantle over an Fe-based core which is likely to be proportionately smaller than Earth's. GJ 1214b lies between the mass-radius curves for H{sub 2}O and CH{sub 4}, suggesting an 'icy' composition with a relatively large core or a relatively large proportion of H{sub 2}O. CoRoT-2b is less dense than the hydrogen relation, which could be explained by an anomalously high degree of heating or by higher than assumed atmospheric opacity. HAT-P-2b is slightly denser than the mass-radius relation for hydrogen, suggesting the presence of a significant amount of matter of higher atomic number. CoRoT-3b lies close to the hydrogen relation. The pressure at the center of Kepler-10b is 1.5{sup +1.2}{sub -1.0} TPa. The central pressure in CoRoT-7b is probably close to 0.8 TPa, though may be up to 2 TPa. These pressures are accessible by planar

  7. Chiral structure of the Lamb shift and the definition of the proton radius

    SciTech Connect

    Pineda, Antonio

    2005-06-01

    The standard definition of the electromagnetic radius of a charged particle (in particular the proton) is ambiguous once electromagnetic corrections are considered. We argue that a natural definition can be given within an effective field theory framework in terms of a matching coefficient. The definition of the neutron radius is also discussed. We elaborate on the effective field theory relevant for hydrogen and muonic hydrogen, especially for the latter. We compute the hadronic corrections to the Lamb shift (for the polarizability effects only with logarithmic accuracy) within heavy-baryon effective theory. We find that they diverge in the inverse of the pion mass in the chiral limit.

  8. On the ππ continuum in the nucleon form factors and the proton radius puzzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoferichter, M.; Kubis, B.; Ruiz de Elvira, J.; Hammer, H.-W.; Meißner, U.-G.

    2016-11-01

    We present an improved determination of the ππ continuum contribution to the isovector spectral functions of the nucleon electromagnetic form factors. Our analysis includes the most up-to-date results for the ππ→bar{N} N partial waves extracted from Roy-Steiner equations, consistent input for the pion vector form factor, and a thorough discussion of isospin-violating effects and uncertainty estimates. As an application, we consider the ππ contribution to the isovector electric and magnetic radii by means of sum rules, which, in combination with the accurately known neutron electric radius, are found to slightly prefer a small proton charge radius.

  9. Changes in helical content or net charge of apolipoprotein C-I alter its affinity for lipid/water interfaces.

    PubMed

    Meyers, Nathan L; Wang, Libo; Gursky, Olga; Small, Donald M

    2013-07-01

    Amphipathic α-helices mediate binding of exchangeable apolipoproteins to lipoproteins. To probe the role of α-helical structure in protein-lipid interactions, we used oil-drop tensiometry to characterize the interfacial behavior of apolipoprotein C-I (apoC-I) variants at triolein/water (TO/W) and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoylphosphatidylcholine/triolein/water (POPC/TO/W) interfaces. ApoC-I, the smallest apolipoprotein, has two amphipathic α-helices. Mutants had single Pro or Ala substitutions that resulted in large differences in helical content in solution and on phospholipids. The ability of apoC-I to bind TO/W and POPC/TO/W interfaces correlated strongly with α-helical propensity. On binding these interfaces, peptides with higher helical propensity increased surface pressure to a greater extent. Likewise, peptide exclusion pressure at POPC/TO/W interfaces increased with greater helical propensity. ApoC-I retention on TO/W and POPC/TO/W interfaces correlated strongly with phospholipid-bound helical content. On compression of these interfaces, peptides with higher helical content were ejected at higher pressures. Substitution of Arg for Pro in the N-terminal α-helix altered net charge and reduced apoC-I affinity for POPC/TO/W interfaces. Our results suggest that peptide-lipid interactions drive α-helix binding to and retention on lipoproteins. Point mutations in small apolipoproteins could significantly change α-helical propensity or charge, thereby disrupting protein-lipid interactions and preventing the proteins from regulating lipoprotein catabolism at high surface pressures.

  10. The radius and albedo of Hyperion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruikshank, D. P.

    1979-01-01

    A measurement of the 20-micron thermal flux from Hyperion is reported, and the radius and surface geometric albedo of this outer satellite of Saturn are computed by the photometric/radiometric method. A corrected and normalized 20-micron thermal flux of 0.033 + or - 0.012 Jy is determined. A radius of 112 + or - 15 km and a surface geometric albedo of 0.47 + or - 0.11 are obtained by assuming values of unity for the phase integral, emissivity, and bolometric/visual geometric-albedo ratio. The sensitivity of the photometric/radiometric method to the assumed values of the parameters involved is discussed, and the results are compared with similar studies of Triton. It is concluded that neither Hyperion nor Triton appears to have a geometric albedo in the lower end of the distribution of small bodies in the solar system.

  11. Fractures of Distal Radius: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Meena, Sanjay; Sharma, Pankaj; Sambharia, Abhishek Kumar; Dawar, Ashok

    2014-01-01

    Fractures of distal radius account for up to 20% of all fractures treated in emergency department. Initial assessment includes a history of mechanism of injury, associated injury and appropriate radiological evaluation. Treatment options include conservative management, internal fixation with pins, bridging and non-bridging external fixation, dorsal or volar plating with/without arthroscopy assistance. However, many questions regarding these fractures remain unanswered and good prospective randomized trials are needed. PMID:25657938

  12. The effective pore radius of screen wicks

    SciTech Connect

    Imura, Hideaki; Kozai, Hiroaki; Ikeda, Yuji

    1994-10-01

    The effective pore radius in screen-wick heat pipes was investigated, which is very important for the prediction of maximum heat transfer rates due to capillary limitation. An equation for the effective pore radius of the screen wicks was derived based on the model of the screen geometry. The capillary height for stainless steel and phosphor bronze screens was measured using water, ethyl alcohol, and Freon 113 as the test liquids. The effect of surface treatment (acid cleaning and oxidation) on the capillary height was also examined. From the comparison of the experimental data for water and ethyl alcohol with those for Freon 113, it was indicated that the contact angle was 24.2{degree} for water and 16.9{degree} for ethyl alcohol. Consequently, it was found that the effective pore radius of the screen wicks could be predicted fairly well from the expression presented in this study, and that the contact angle should be taken into consideration to evaluate the maximum capillary pressure accurately.

  13. Charge-ordering transitions without charge differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quan, Yundi; Pardo, Victor; Pickett, Warren

    2013-03-01

    The distorted perovskite nickelate system RNiO3 (R=rare earth except La) undergoes a metal-insulator transition (MIT) at a temperature that varies smoothly with the R ionic radius. This MIT is accompanied by structural transition which leads to two inequivalent Ni sites in the cell, and has been explained by charge ordering (CO): charge is transferred between the Ni1 and Ni2 sites in a long-range ordered fashion. Experimental data on core binding energies, ionic radii, and Mossbauer shifts are interpreted in terms of Ni cation charges of 3 +/- δ with, for example, δ ~ 0.3 for YNiO3. Making use of first principles DFT results and a new approach not invoking integration of the charge density, we find[2] that the Ni 3 d occupation is identical (to high accuracy) for the two Ni sites. We also present results for other compounds (La2VCuO6, YNiO3, CaFeO3, AgNiO2, V4O7), all of which have distinct ``charge states'' that have identical 3 d occupation. This quantitative procedure will be discussed and some implications will be outlined. DOE Grant No. DE-FG02-04ER46111 and Ramon y Cajal Program

  14. Electrode radius predicts lesion radius during radiofrequency energy heating. Validation of a proposed thermodynamic model

    SciTech Connect

    Haines, D.E.; Watson, D.D.; Verow, A.F. )

    1990-07-01

    Myocardial heating by transcatheter delivery of radiofrequency (RF) energy has been proposed as an effective means of arrhythmia ablation. A thermodynamic model describing the radial temperature gradient at steady state during RF-induced heating is proposed. If one assumes that RF power output is adjusted to maintain a constant electrode-tissue interface temperature at all times, then this thermodynamic model predicts that the radius of the RF-induced lesion will be directly proportional to the electrode radius. A total of 76 RF-induced lesions were created in a model of isolated canine right ventricular free wall perfused and superfused with oxygenated Krebs-Henseleit buffer. Electrode radius was varied between 0.75 and 2.25 mm. RF energy (500 kHz) was delivered for 90 seconds, and the power output was adjusted to maintain a constant electrode-tissue interface temperature of 60 degrees C. A strong linear correlation was observed between electrode radius and lesion radius in two dimensions: transverse (p = 0.0001, r = 0.85) and transmural (p = 0.0001, r = 0.89). With these data, the temperature correlation with irreversible myocardial injury in this model was calculated at 46.6-48.8 degrees C. Therefore, the proposed thermodynamic model closely predicts the observed relation between electrode radius and lesion size during RF myocardial heating.

  15. Temperature effects on the hydrodynamic radius of the intrinsically disordered N-terminal region of the p53 protein.

    PubMed

    Langridge, Timothy D; Tarver, Micheal J; Whitten, Steven T

    2014-04-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) are often characterized in terms of the hydrodynamic radius, Rh . The Rh of IDPs are known to depend on fractional proline content and net charge, where increased numbers of proline residues and increased net charge cause larger Rh . Though sequence and charge effects on the Rh of IDPs have been studied, the temperature sensitivity has been noted only briefly. Reported here are Rh measurements in the temperature range of 5-75°C for the intrinsically disordered N-terminal region of the p53 protein, p53(1-93). Of note, the Rh of this protein fragment was highly sensitive to temperature, decreasing from 35 Å at 5°C to 26 Å at 75°C. Computer generated simulations of conformationally dynamic and disordered polypeptide chains were performed to provide a hypothesis for the heat-induced compaction of p53(1-93) structure, which was opposite to the heat-induced increase in Rh observed for a model folded protein. The simulations demonstrated that heat caused Rh to trend toward statistical coil values for both proteins, indicating that the effects of heat on p53(1-93) structure could be interpreted as thermal denaturation. The simulation data also predicted that proline content contributed minimally to the native Rh of p53(1-93), which was confirmed by measuring Rh for a substitution variant that had all 22 proline residues changed for glycine.

  16. Primary Combined Replacements for Treatment of Distal Radius Physeal Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Ingo

    2014-01-01

    This is a case report of a 59-year-old female patient with a posttraumatic growth arrest of the distal radius, leading to radioscaphoid osteoarthritis, carpal instability, and a symptomatic ulnocarpal impaction syndrome that was successfully treated with combined total wrist arthroplasty and ulnar head implant. One year postoperatively, there was no change in position without any signs of loosening of both implants. Both subjectively and functionally, all clinical parameters—Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH), visual analog scale (VAS), grip strength—had improved. Level of Evidence: IV PMID:25097815

  17. Predicting initial treatment failure of fiberglass casts in pediatric distal radius fractures: utility of the second metacarpal-radius angle.

    PubMed

    Edmonds, Eric W; Capelo, Roderick M; Stearns, Philip; Bastrom, Tracey P; Wallace, C Douglas; Newton, Peter O

    2009-10-01

    second metacarpal-radius angle, was a significant predictor of treatment success (odds ratio 1.6, P < 0.001). Also, the change in lateral view angulation post-reduction was a significant predictor of treatment failure based on regression (odds ratio 1.2, P = 0.004). The above-elbow cast group had a slightly greater cast index (0.80) compared to the below-elbow cast group (0.77) (P = 0.003). Whereas below-elbow fiberglass casts appear to be equally effective in immobilizing pediatric distal third forearm fractures as above-elbow fiberglass casts, it seems that they have an increased risk for poor molding, particularly with regards to ulnar deviation. We did not find an association between the treatment 'failure' and cast index, likely because the number of poor molds (cast index >0.8) was nearly equal in each group (above-elbow with 61 and below-elbow with 45). However, the mold seen on the AP radiograph as determined by the second metacarpal-radius angle was a reproducible radiographic predictor of treatment success. If molded with ulnar deviation (second metacarpal-radius angle >0 degrees ), the outcome was considered to be ideal in 86.7% of cases compared to only 74.4% when it was <0 degrees . We agree with prior studies suggesting the equal efficacy of below-elbow versus above-elbow casts in distal radius and ulna fracture treatment using either plaster or fiberglass, but wish to emphasize the importance of not only the cast index, but also the ulnar deviation mold (for most dorsally displaced fractures), as measured by the second metacarpal-radius angle.

  18. Electromagnetic charged and neutral kaon form factors

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, C.D.; Burden, C.J.; Thomson, M.J.

    1995-08-01

    The electromagnetic form factor of the charged and neutral kaon is calculated using the approach applied in the successful study of the pion form factor, described above. The charged kaon form factor will be measured in forthcoming experiments at CEBAF. Our calculation involves the dressed strange quark propagator, to which F{sub {pi}}(q{sup 2}) is not sensitive, and hence it provides us with constraints on the strange-quark sector of QCD. Our preliminary results are encouraging. We find that the strange and up/down quark propagators are not too different, once the change in the current-quark-mass is accounted for. However, the difference that remains is important since it allows {l_angle}{bar s}s{r_angle}<{l_angle}{bar u}u{r_angle}. This calculation is the first to yield a value of f{sub K}/f{sub {pi}} that is in good agreement with experiment and also yields r{sub K+}/r{sub {pi}} in good agreement with experiment. Our calculated charged kaon form factor provides a prediction that will be tested in the forthcoming CEBAF experiments. Our studies also show that K{sup 0} has a negative charge radius, as is to be expected. Our calculated value will be compared with that measured in K{sub s}{sup 0} regeneration from electrons.

  19. Structural Change of Carbon Anode in a Lithium-ion Battery Product Associated with Charging Process Observed by Neutron Transmission Bragg-edge Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamiyama, Takashi; Narita, Yuki; Sato, Hirotaka; Ohnuma, Masato; Kiyanagi, Yoshiaki

    Spectroscopic neutron Bragg-edge imaging was performed to study a lithium-ion battery (LIB) product. This non-destructive neutron imaging method is suitable for the evaluation of industrial products, but presents some difficulties for application to multicomponent products. The LIB includes a strong neutron scatterer and an absorber, and is thus a suitable test case for the use of neutron imaging in actual product measurement. In this study, we analyzed the variation of the graphite anode structure with changes in the battery charge level. The experiments were carried out using the compact neutron source at the Hokkaido University neutron source facility (HUNS). To eliminate the effect of scattered neutron contamination, we first determined the distance between the sample and detector required to reduce this effect to under 1%. Using this separation, the charge level dependence of the anode structure was measured. The graphite {002} Bragg-edge could be recognized on the neutron transmission spectra. The Bragg-edge was shifted and broadened with increasing battery charge. The edge was consistent with the existence of multiple graphite structural stages. The layer spacing distribution images for different charge levels showed the inhomogeneous fluctuation on the LIB lattice plane. Based on the images the fraction of the graphite structural stages were analyzed. The ratio of each stage varied with the charge level, and the ideal intercalation structure, in which the graphite layers are stuffed with Li-ions, was found to be minor in the final charging state.

  20. EGCG in Green Tea Induces Aggregation of HMGB1 Protein through Large Conformational Changes with Polarized Charge Redistribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Xuan-Yu; Li, Baoyu; Liu, Shengtang; Kang, Hongsuk; Zhao, Lin; Zhou, Ruhong

    2016-02-01

    As a major effective component in green tea, (‑)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG)’s potential benefits to human health have been widely investigated. Recent experimental evidences indicate that EGCG can induce the aggregation of HMGB1 protein, a late mediator of inflammation, which subsequently stimulates the autophagic degradation and thus provides protection from lethal endotoxemia and sepsis. In this study, we use molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to explore the underlying molecular mechanism of this aggregation of HMGB1 facilitated by EGCG. Our simulation results reveal that EGCG firmly binds to HMGB1 near Cys106, which supports previous preliminary experimental evidence. A large HMGB1 conformational change is observed, where Box A and Box B, two homogenous domains of HMGB1, are repositioned and packed together by EGCG. This new HMGB1 conformation has large molecular polarity and distinctive electrostatic potential surface. We suggest that the highly polarized charge distribution leads to the aggregation of HMGB1, which differs from the previous hypothesis that two HMGB1 monomers are linked by the dimer of EGCG. Possible aggregating modes have also been investigated with potential of mean force (PMF) calculations. Finally, we conclude that the conformation induced by EGCG is more aggregation-prone with higher binding free energies as compared to those without EGCG.

  1. Taking Exomoons to the (Radius) Limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinkel, Natalie R.; Kane, S. R.

    2014-01-01

    Moons around extrasolar planets are the next up-and-coming objects to be not only observed, but characterized for possible habitability. As with planets orbiting stars, exomoons have a limiting radius at which they are gravitationally bound, or the Hill radius. At a particular distance, they may also become tidally locked and therefore be in a synchronous rotation with the host-planet. We have examined the flux phase profile of a simulated, hypothetical moon orbiting at a distant radius around the confirmed exoplanets μ Ara b, HD 28185 b, BD +14 4559 b, and HD 73534 b. The irradiated flux on an exomoon at it's furthest, stable distance from the planet achieves its largest flux gradient, which places a limit on the flux ranges expected for subsequent (observed) moons closer in distance. We have also analyzed the effect of planetary eccentricity and time spent within the habitable zone on the flux on the moon. From stellar contributions alone, we find moons with host-planets fully within the habitable zone experience thermal equilibrium temperatures above the runaway greenhouse limit, requiring a small heat redistribution efficiency. In contrast, exomoons orbiting planets that only spend a fraction of their time within the habitable zone require a heat redistribution efficiency near 100% in order to achieve temperatures suitable for habitability. In other words, a planet might not need to spend its entire orbit within the habitable zone in order for the exomoon to be potentially habitable. In this way our findings separate exomoons and exoplanets, but it broadens the scope of worlds that may occupy a habitable zone.

  2. [Vascularized iliac crest and distal radius reconstruction].

    PubMed

    Pic Gomis, L; Gomis, R

    2010-12-01

    The authors relate their experience concerning the vascularized iliac crest flap. In the first chapter, they detail the anatomic vascularized osteocutaneous iliac crest. Blood supply arises from the deep and superficial circonflexe iliac artery. Many anastomoses connect the two systems. In the second chapter, they detail the operative technique of free and pedicule hone iliac crest flap. Composite cutaneous bone flaps are also detailed. In the third chapter, they detail informations about treatment of distal radius bone defects with associated skeen flap if necessary.

  3. 41 CFR 301-71.214 - Does mandatory use of the Government contractor-issued travel charge card change the employee's...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... the Government contractor-issued travel charge card change the employee's obligation to pay his/her travel card bill by the due date? 301-71.214 Section 301-71.214 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES AGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES...

  4. 41 CFR 301-71.214 - Does mandatory use of the Government contractor-issued travel charge card change the employee's...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES AGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES 71-AGENCY TRAVEL ACCOUNTABILITY REQUIREMENTS Travel Claims for Reimbursement § 301-71.214 Does mandatory use of the Government... Government contractor-issued travel charge card change the employee's obligation to pay his/her travel...

  5. 41 CFR 301-71.214 - Does mandatory use of the Government contractor-issued travel charge card change the employee's...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... the Government contractor-issued travel charge card change the employee's obligation to pay his/her travel card bill by the due date? 301-71.214 Section 301-71.214 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES AGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES...

  6. 41 CFR 301-71.214 - Does mandatory use of the Government contractor-issued travel charge card change the employee's...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... the Government contractor-issued travel charge card change the employee's obligation to pay his/her travel card bill by the due date? 301-71.214 Section 301-71.214 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES AGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES...

  7. 41 CFR 301-71.214 - Does mandatory use of the Government contractor-issued travel charge card change the employee's...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... the Government contractor-issued travel charge card change the employee's obligation to pay his/her travel card bill by the due date? 301-71.214 Section 301-71.214 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES AGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES...

  8. 46 CFR 401.428 - Basic rates and charges for carrying a U.S. pilot beyond normal change point or for boarding at...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Basic rates and charges for carrying a U.S. pilot beyond normal change point or for boarding at other than the normal boarding point. 401.428 Section 401.428 Shipping COAST GUARD (GREAT LAKES PILOTAGE), DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GREAT LAKES PILOTAGE...

  9. 46 CFR 401.428 - Basic rates and charges for carrying a U.S. pilot beyond normal change point or for boarding at...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Basic rates and charges for carrying a U.S. pilot beyond normal change point or for boarding at other than the normal boarding point. 401.428 Section 401.428 Shipping COAST GUARD (GREAT LAKES PILOTAGE), DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GREAT LAKES PILOTAGE...

  10. High-Rate Charging Induced Intermediate Phases and Structural Changes of Layer-Structured Cathode for Lithium-Ion Batteries

    DOE PAGES

    Zhou, Yong-Ning; Yue, Ji-Li; Hu, Enyuan; ...

    2016-08-08

    Using fast time-resolved in situ X-ray diffraction, charge-rate dependent phase transition processes of layer structured cathode material LiNi1/3Mn1/3Co1/3O2 for lithium-ion batteries are studied. During first charge, intermediate phases emerge at high rates of 10C, 30C, and 60C, but not at low rates of 0.1C and 1C. These intermediate phases can be continuously observed during relaxation after the charging current is switched off. After half-way charging at high rate, sample studied by scanning transmission electron microscopy shows Li-rich and Li-poor phases' coexistence with tetrahedral occupation of Li in Li-poor phase. Also, the high rate induced overpotential is thought to be themore » driving force for the formation of this intermediate Li-poor phase. The in situ quick X-ray absorption results show that the oxidation of Ni accelerates with increasing charging rate and the Ni4+ state can be reached at the end of charge with 30C rate. Finally, these results give new insights in the understanding of the layered cathodes during high-rate charging.« less

  11. High-Rate Charging Induced Intermediate Phases and Structural Changes of Layer-Structured Cathode for Lithium-Ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Yong-Ning; Yue, Ji-Li; Hu, Enyuan; Li, Hong; Gu, Lin; Nam, Kyung-Wan; Bak, Seong-Min; Yu, Xiqian; Liu, Jue; Bai, Jianming; Dooryhee, Eric; Fu, Zheng-Wen; Yang, Xiao-Qing

    2016-08-08

    Using fast time-resolved in situ X-ray diffraction, charge-rate dependent phase transition processes of layer structured cathode material LiNi1/3Mn1/3Co1/3O2 for lithium-ion batteries are studied. During first charge, intermediate phases emerge at high rates of 10C, 30C, and 60C, but not at low rates of 0.1C and 1C. These intermediate phases can be continuously observed during relaxation after the charging current is switched off. After half-way charging at high rate, sample studied by scanning transmission electron microscopy shows Li-rich and Li-poor phases' coexistence with tetrahedral occupation of Li in Li-poor phase. Also, the high rate induced overpotential is thought to be the driving force for the formation of this intermediate Li-poor phase. The in situ quick X-ray absorption results show that the oxidation of Ni accelerates with increasing charging rate and the Ni4+ state can be reached at the end of charge with 30C rate. Finally, these results give new insights in the understanding of the layered cathodes during high-rate charging.

  12. High-Rate Charging Induced Intermediate Phases and Structural Changes of Layer-Structured Cathode for Lithium-Ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Yong-Ning; Yue, Ji-Li; Hu, Enyuan; Li, Hong; Gu, Lin; Nam, Kyung-Wan; Bak, Seong-Min; Yu, Xiqian; Liu, Jue; Bai, Jianming; Dooryhee, Eric; Fu, Zheng-Wen; Yang, Xiao-Qing

    2016-08-08

    Using fast time-resolved in situ X-ray diffraction, charge-rate dependent phase transition processes of layer structured cathode material LiNi1/3Mn1/3Co1/3O2 for lithium-ion batteries are studied. During first charge, intermediate phases emerge at high rates of 10C, 30C, and 60C, but not at low rates of 0.1C and 1C. These intermediate phases can be continuously observed during relaxation after the charging current is switched off. After half-way charging at high rate, sample studied by scanning transmission electron microscopy shows Li-rich and Li-poor phases' coexistence with tetrahedral occupation of Li in Li-poor phase. Also, the high rate induced overpotential is thought to be the driving force for the formation of this intermediate Li-poor phase. The in situ quick X-ray absorption results show that the oxidation of Ni accelerates with increasing charging rate and the Ni4+ state can be reached at the end of charge with 30C rate. Finally, these results give new insights in the understanding of the layered cathodes during high-rate charging.

  13. An Exoplanet Radius and Transit Timing Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deming, Drake; Jennings, Jonald; Sada, Pedro

    2009-08-01

    Many exoplanet systems contain Jupiter-mass planets on close-in orbits. Theories of planetary system formation account for these hot Jupiters as being end states of inward migration. Variants of those theories also predict terrestrial planets to be captured in mean motion resonance with the hot Jupiters. A recent explosion of discoveries by transit surveys have given us a sample of 37 hot Jupiters transiting planets brighter than V=13. A transit timing survey of these systems could detect hot Earths in resonance, via the large (~ 180 second) perturbations they induce on the giant planet transits. Moreover, the discovery photometry for these systems usually provides only relatively coarse photometric precision, but larger-aperture follow-up can determine the giant planet radius to a precision limited only by knowledge of the stellar mass, and thereby reveal the diversity of giant exoplanet structure, such as the presence of heavy element cores. The relatively large sample now available means that a radius- and transit timing-survey is well matched to classical observing and telescope scheduling. We propose continued observations to perform transit photometry using FLAMINGOS on the 2.1-meter in the J-band, where stellar limb darkening is minimal and transit photometry has excellent sensitivity to planetary radii and shifts in transit time.

  14. An Exoplanet Radius and Transit Timing Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deming, Drake; Jennings, Jonald; Sada, Pedro

    2010-02-01

    Many exoplanet systems contain Jupiter-mass planets on close-in orbits. Theories of planetary system formation account for these hot Jupiters as being end states of inward migration. Variants of those theories also predict terrestrial planets to be captured in mean motion resonance with the hot Jupiters. A continuing explosion of discoveries by transit surveys have given us a sample of 45 hot Jupiters transiting planets brighter than V=13. A transit timing survey of these systems could detect hot Earths in resonance, via the large (~ 180 second) perturbations they induce on the giant planet transits. Moreover, the discovery photometry for these systems usually provides only relatively coarse photometric precision, but larger-aperture follow-up can determine the giant planet radius to a precision limited only by knowledge of the stellar mass, and thereby reveal the diversity of giant exoplanet structure, such as the presence of heavy element cores. The relatively large sample now available means that a radius- and transit timing-survey is well matched to classical observing and telescope scheduling. We propose continued observations to perform transit photometry using FLAMINGOS on the 2.1-meter in the J-band, where stellar limb darkening is minimal and transit photometry has excellent sensitivity to planetary radii and shifts in transit time.

  15. Triplane fracture of the distal radius.

    PubMed

    García-Mata, Serafín; Hidalgo-Ovejero, Angel

    2006-07-01

    A case of triplane fracture of the distal radius is reported in a 13-year-old boy. This exceptional fracture showed displacement, and was healed by closed reduction and 6 weeks of external immobilization. Eighteen months later, the patient showed complete physeal arrest of the distal radius, with radio-ulnar length discrepancy but without any repercussion on wrist mobility. The patient was declared asymptomatic 3 years after the injury. Prompt, physiological physeal arrest reduces the potential of growth deformity. These fractures must be treated conservatively by closed reduction (if displacement exists) and external immobilization, just like a normal one-plane fracture. We may suppose that final radio-ulnar discrepancy could lead to a painful and symptomatic ulno-carpal conflict in adult life. The following characteristics can be associated with this rare fracture: (1) occurrence close to the end of the growth period, as in other types of triplane fractures; (2) evolution towards partial or complete growth arrest of the physis, not requiring treatment and (3) stability of the fracture after closed reduction. In the present case, as in the other reported cases, it may also be added that orthopaedic treatment has been the rule, in contrast with triplane fractures occurring in the distal tibia, in which surgical treatment is indicated.

  16. Proton radius from electron-proton scattering and chiral perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horbatsch, Marko; Hessels, Eric A.; Pineda, Antonio

    2017-03-01

    We determine the root-mean-square proton charge radius, Rp, from a fit to low-Q2 electron-proton elastic-scattering cross-section data with the higher moments fixed (within uncertainties) to the values predicted by chiral perturbation theory. We obtain Rp=0.855 (11 ) fm. This number falls between the value obtained from muonic hydrogen analyses and the CODATA value (based upon atomic hydrogen spectroscopy and electron-proton scattering determinations).

  17. Measurements of Total and Partial Charge-changing Cross Sections for 200-400 MeV/nucleon 12C in Water and Polycarbonate

    SciTech Connect

    Toshito, T.; Kodama, K.; Sihver, L.; Yusa, K.; Ozaki, M.; Amako, K.; Kameoka, S.; Murakami, K.; Sasaki, T.; Aoki, S.; Ban, T.; Fukuda, T.; Komatsu, M.; Kubota, H.; Naganawa, N.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, T.; Natsume, M.; Niwa, K.; Takahashi, S.; Yoshida, J.; /Nagoya U. /Naruto U. of Education /NIRS, Chiba /SLAC /Toho U.

    2011-11-10

    We have studied charged nuclear fragments produced by 200 - 400 MeV/nucleon carbon ions, interacting with water and polycarbonate, using a newly developed emulsion detector. Total and partial charge-changing cross sections for the production of B, Be, and Li fragments were measured and compared with both previously published measurements, and model predictions. This study is of importance for validating and improving carbon ion therapy treatment planning systems, and for estimating the radiological risks for personnel on space missions, since carbon is a significant component of the Galactic Cosmic Rays.

  18. Stellar Initial Mass Function: Trends With Galaxy Mass And Radius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parikh, Taniya

    2017-06-01

    There is currently no consensus about the exact shape and, in particular, the universality of the stellar initial mass function (IMF). For massive galaxies, it has been found that near-infrared (NIR) absorption features, which are sensitive to the ratio of dwarf to giant stars, deviate from a Milky Way-like IMF; their modelling seems to require a larger fraction of low mass stars. There are now increasing results looking at whether the IMF varies not only with galaxy mass, but also radially within galaxies. The SDSS-IV/MaNGA integral-field survey will provide spatially resolved spectroscopy for 10,000 galaxies at R 2000 from 360-1000nm. Spectra of early-type galaxies were stacked to achieve high S/N which is particularly important for features in the NIR. Trends with galaxy radius and mass were compared to stellar population models for a range of absorption features in order to separate degeneracies due to changes in stellar population parameters, such as age, metallicity and element abundances, with potential changes in the IMF. Results for 611 galaxies show that we do not require an IMF steeper than Kroupa as a function of galaxy mass or radius based on the NaI index. The Wing-Ford band hints towards a steeper IMF at large radii however we do not have reliable measurements for the most massive galaxies.

  19. Determination of the root-mean-square radius of the deuteron from present-day experimental data on neutron-proton scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Babenko, V. A.; Petrov, N. M.

    2008-10-15

    The correlation between the root-mean-square matter radius of the deuteron, r{sub m}, and its effective radius, {rho}, is investigated. A parabolic relationship between these two quantities makes it possible to determine the root-mean-square radius r{sub m} to within 0.01% if the effective radius {rho} is known. The matter (r{sub m}), structural (r{sub d}), and charge (r{sub ch}) radii of the deuteron are found with the aid of modern experimental results for phase shifts from the SAID nucleon-nucleon database, and their values are fully consistent with their counterparts deduced by using the experimental value of the effective deuteron radius due to Borbely and his coauthors. The charge-radius value of 2.124(6) fm, which was obtained with the aid of the SAID nucleon-nucleon database, and the charge-radius value of 2.126(12) fm, which was obtained with the aid of the experimental value of the effective radius {rho}, are in very good agreement with the present-day chargeradius value of 2.128(11) fm, which was deduced by Sick and Trautmann by processing world-average experimental data on elastic electron scattering by deuterons with allowance for Coulomb distortions.

  20. Charge Influence on Mini Black Hole's Cross Section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caraça, R. S.; Malheiro, M.

    In this work we study the electric charge effect on the cross section production of charged mini black holes (MBH) in accelerators. We analyze the charged MBH solution using the fat brane approximation in the context of the ADD model. The maximum charge-mass ratio condition for the existence of a horizon radius is discussed. We show that the electric charge causes a decrease in this radius and, consequently, in the cross section. This reduction is negligible for protons and light-ions but can be important for heavy-ions.

  1. Changes in the net charge and subunit properties of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase--oxygenase during cold hardening of Puma rye.

    PubMed

    Huner, N P; Macdowall, F D

    1979-02-01

    Ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase--oxygenase (RUBPCase) from leaves of cold-hardened and unhardened Puma rye was purified by gel filtration and ion exchange chromatography. The specific activity of the hardened form was twice that of the unhardened form. A difference in charge between the two forms of this enzyme was proved by gel electrofocussing. The estimated isoelectric point (pI) values were 6.4 and 6.3 for the enzyme from the hardened and unhardened source respectively. The large subunit (55,000 molecular weight) of the enzyme from only the unhardened source formed at apparent dimer during sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) gel electrophoresis. At pH 6,8 it was also the source of an anomalous polypeptide with an apparent molecular weight of 47,000. This anomalous polypeptide appeared in both hardened and unhardened preparations after irreversible inactivation of RUBPCase activity by NaCl. It also appeared after preparation of the purified enzymes for SDS--PAGE in the absence of beta-mercaptoethanol, but this was reversible. The enzyme from the hardened source was less affected in the absence of reducing agent. Structural evidence was obtained for the previously reported cold hardening of the enzyme against freeze inactivation. A freeze-thaw cycle applied to the enzyme in vitro caused some polymerization of the large subunit and its anomalous polypeptide, in the absence of reducing agent, especially in the unhardened case. This increased with repeated cycles until the fifth cycle when the large subunit monomer and its satellite were abolished only in preparations from the unhardened source. These data indicate that the large subunit is a probable site of change that occurred in this enzyme during cold hardening.

  2. Cyanide anion sensing mechanism of 1,3,5,7-tetratolyl aza-BODIPY: Intramolecular charge transfer and partial configuration change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhat, Haamid R.; Jha, Prakash C.

    2017-02-01

    The cyanide anion sensing mechanism of 1,3,5,7-tetratolyl aza-BODIPY (1) has been rigorously investigated using density functional theory and time dependent-density functional theory methods. Mulliken charge distribution and Natural Bond Orbital analysis reveals that cyanide addition may occur at both electrophilic centers with equal probability. The molecular orbital analysis reveals that first excited state (S1) of 1 is a local excited state with π-π∗ transition, whereas for 2 (the cyano form of 1), S1 , a charge-separation state, is found to be responsible for the intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) process which in conjunction with partial configuration change induces fluorescence stimulation in 2.

  3. On the radius of convergence for multipole expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S. Y.

    1989-10-01

    Analytic evaluation of multipole expansion coefficients gives us a tool to study the validity and the radius of convergence for the multipole expansion of the magnetic field. We found that the multipoles (up to 18th terms) can accurately describe the magnetic field within 80% of the coil radius. Outside the radius of convergence, the multipole expansion deviates appreciably from the exact magnetic field.

  4. 21 CFR 886.1450 - Corneal radius measuring device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Corneal radius measuring device. 886.1450 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1450 Corneal radius measuring device. (a) Identification. A corneal radius measuring device is an AC-powered device intended to measure...

  5. 21 CFR 886.1450 - Corneal radius measuring device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Corneal radius measuring device. 886.1450 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1450 Corneal radius measuring device. (a) Identification. A corneal radius measuring device is an AC-powered device intended to measure...

  6. 21 CFR 886.1450 - Corneal radius measuring device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Corneal radius measuring device. 886.1450 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1450 Corneal radius measuring device. (a) Identification. A corneal radius measuring device is an AC-powered device intended to measure...

  7. 21 CFR 886.1450 - Corneal radius measuring device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Corneal radius measuring device. 886.1450 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1450 Corneal radius measuring device. (a) Identification. A corneal radius measuring device is an AC-powered device intended to measure...

  8. The optimum cut-off radius in Monte Carlo simulation of Yukawa potential point particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suwan, I.; Hussein, H.; Hussein, A.; Daragmeh, M.

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, infinite systems of point particles with Yukawa potential and periodic boundary conditions are simulated using Monte Carlo technique in three dimensions. Because of the short range nature of the Yukawa potential, cut-off radius rcut is considered in calculations (i.e, for each particle i, the effect of the other particles on it inside a sphere of radius rcut is taken into account). The cut-off radius used in Monte Carlo simulation affects the physical behavior of the system being simulated. A sequence of rcut values are used. When the change in the total potential energy becomes negligible, the optimum value of the cut-off radius is determined. This value is found to be independent of density and temperature in the NVT-ensemble case.

  9. Prediction of Colles' fracture load in human radius using cohesive finite element modeling.

    PubMed

    Ural, Ani

    2009-01-05

    Osteoporotic and age-related fractures are a significant public health problem. One of the most common osteoporotic fracture sites in the aging population is distal radius. There is evidence in the literature that distal radius fractures (Colles' fracture) are an indicative of increased risk of future spine and hip fractures. In this study, a nonlinear fracture mechanics-based finite element method is applied to human radius to assess its fracture load as a function of cortical bone geometry and material properties. Seven three-dimensional finite element models of radius were created and the fracture loads were determined by using cohesive finite element modeling which explicitly represents the crack and the fracture process zone behavior. The fracture loads found in the simulations (731-6793 N) were in the range of experimental values reported in the literature. The fracture loads predicted by the simulations decreased by 4-5% per decade based only on material level changes and by 6-20% per decade when geometrical changes were also included. Cortical polar moment of inertia at 15% distal radius showed the highest correlation to fracture load (r(2)=0.97). These findings demonstrate the strength of fracture mechanics-based finite element modeling and show that combining geometrical and material properties provides a better assessment of fracture risk in human radius.

  10. Pinned-to-sliding transition and structural crossovers for helically confined charges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zampetaki, A. V.; Stockhofe, J.; Schmelcher, P.

    2017-02-01

    We explore the nonequilibrium dissipative dynamics of a system of identical charged particles trapped on a closed helix. The particles are subject to an external force accelerating them along the underlying structure. The effective interactions between the charges induce a coupling of the center of mass to the relative motion which in turn gives rise to a pinned-to-sliding transition with increasing magnitude of the external force. In the sliding regime we observe an Ohmic behavior signified by a constant mobility. Within the same regime a structural transition of the helical particle chain takes place with increasing the helix radius leading to a global change of the crystalline arrangement. The resulting crystal is characterized by the existence of multiple defects whose number increases with the helix radius.

  11. Understanding the mass-radius relation for sub-Neptunes: radius as a proxy for composition

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, Eric D.; Fortney, Jonathan J.

    2014-09-01

    Transiting planet surveys like Kepler have provided a wealth of information on the distribution of planetary radii, particularly for the new populations of super-Earth- and sub-Neptune-sized planets. In order to aid in the physical interpretation of these radii, we compute model radii for low-mass rocky planets with hydrogen-helium envelopes. We provide model radii for planets 1-20 M {sub ⊕}, with envelope fractions 0.01%-20%, levels of irradiation 0.1-1000 times Earth's, and ages from 100 Myr to 10 Gyr. In addition we provide simple analytic fits that summarize how radius depends on each of these parameters. Most importantly, we show that at fixed H/He envelope fraction, radii show little dependence on mass for planets with more than ∼1% of their mass in their envelope. Consequently, planetary radius is to a first order a proxy for planetary composition, i.e., H/He envelope fraction, for Neptune- and sub-Neptune-sized planets. We recast the observed mass-radius relationship as a mass-composition relationship and discuss it in light of traditional core accretion theory. We discuss the transition from rocky super-Earths to sub-Neptune planets with large volatile envelopes. We suggest ∼1.75 R {sub ⊕} as a physically motivated dividing line between these two populations of planets. Finally, we discuss these results in light of the observed radius occurrence distribution found by Kepler.

  12. Physeal arrest of the distal radius.

    PubMed

    Abzug, Joshua M; Little, Kevin; Kozin, Scott H

    2014-06-01

    Fractures of the distal radius are among the most common pediatric fractures. Although most of these fractures heal without complication, some result in partial or complete physeal arrest. The risk of physeal arrest can be reduced by avoiding known risk factors during fracture management, including multiple attempts at fracture reduction. Athletes may place substantial compressive and shear forces across the distal radial physes, making them prone to growth arrest. Timely recognition of physeal arrest can allow for more predictable procedures to be performed, such as distal ulnar epiphysiodesis. In cases of partial arrest, physeal bar excision with interposition grafting can be performed. Once ulnar abutment is present, more invasive procedures may be required, including ulnar shortening osteotomy or radial lengthening.

  13. Study of photon emission by electron capture during solar nuclei acceleration, 1: Temperature-dependent cross section for charge changing processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez-Peraza, J.; Alvarez, M.; Laville, A.; Gallegos, A.

    1985-01-01

    The study of charge changing cross sections of fast ions colliding with matter provides the fundamental basis for the analysis of the charge states produced in such interactions. Given the high degree of complexity of the phenomena, there is no theoretical treatment able to give a comprehensive description. In fact, the involved processes are very dependent on the basic parameters of the projectile, such as velocity charge state, and atomic number, and on the target parameters, the physical state (molecular, atomic or ionized matter) and density. The target velocity, may have also incidence on the process, through the temperature of the traversed medium. In addition, multiple electron transfer in single collisions intrincates more the phenomena. Though, in simplified cases, such as protons moving through atomic hydrogen, considerable agreement has been obtained between theory and experiments However, in general the available theoretical approaches have only limited validity in restricted regions of the basic parameters. Since most measurements of charge changing cross sections are performed in atomic matter at ambient temperature, models are commonly based on the assumption of targets at rest, however at Astrophysical scales, temperature displays a wide range in atomic and ionized matter. Therefore, due to the lack of experimental data , an attempt is made here to quantify temperature dependent cross sections on basis to somewhat arbitrary, but physically reasonable assumptions.

  14. Reverberation measurements of the inner radius of the dust torus in 17 Seyfert galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Koshida, Shintaro; Minezaki, Takeo; Yoshii, Yuzuru; Sakata, Yu; Sugawara, Shota; Kobayashi, Yukiyasu; Suganuma, Masahiro; Enya, Keigo; Tomita, Hiroyuki; Aoki, Tsutomu; Peterson, Bruce A. E-mail: minezaki@ioa.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2014-06-20

    We present the results of a dust reverberation survey for 17 nearby Seyfert 1 galaxies, which provides the largest homogeneous data collection for the radius of the innermost dust torus. A delayed response of the K-band light curve after the V-band light curve was found for all targets, and 49 measurements of lag times between the flux variation of the dust emission in the K band and that of the optical continuum emission in the V band were obtained by the cross-correlation function analysis and also by an alternative method for estimating the maximum likelihood lag. The lag times strongly correlated with the optical luminosity in the luminosity range of M{sub V} = –16 to –22 mag, and the regression analysis was performed to obtain the correlation log Δt (days) = –2.11 – 0.2 M{sub V} assuming Δt∝L {sup 0.5}, which was theoretically expected. We discuss the possible origins of the intrinsic scatter of the dust lag-luminosity correlation, which was estimated to be approximately 0.13 dex, and we find that the difference of internal extinction and delayed response of changes in lag times to the flux variations could have partly contributed to intrinsic scatter. However, we could not detect any systematic change of the correlation with the subclass of the Seyfert type or the Eddington ratio. Finally, we compare the dust reverberation radius with the near-infrared interferometric radius of the dust torus and the reverberation radius of broad Balmer emission lines. The interferometric radius in the K band was found to be systematically larger than the dust reverberation radius in the same band by the about a factor of two, which could be interpreted by the difference between the flux-weighted radius and response-weighted radius of the innermost dust torus. The reverberation radius of the broad Balmer emission lines was found to be systematically smaller than the dust reverberation radius by about a factor of four to five, which strongly supports the unified

  15. The channel radius and energy of cloud-to-ground lightning discharge plasma with multiple return strokes

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xuejuan; Yuan, Ping; Cen, Jianyong; Liu, Jianguo; Li, Yajun

    2014-03-15

    Using the spectra of a cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning flash with multiple return strokes and combining with the synchronous radiated electrical field information, the linear charge density, the channel radius, the energy per unit length, the thermal energy, and the energy of dissociation and ionization in discharge channel are calculated with the aid of an electrodynamic model of lightning. The conclusion that the initial radius of discharge channel is determined by the duration of the discharge current is confirmed. Moreover, the correlativity of several parameters has been analyzed first. The results indicate that the total intensity of spectra is positive correlated to the channel initial radius. The ionization and thermal energies have a linear relationship, and the dissociation energy is correlated positively to the ionization and thermal energies, the energy per unit length is in direct proportion to the square of initial radius in different strokes of one CG lightning.

  16. Charge transfer on the metallic atom-pair bond, and the crystal structures adopted by intermetallic compounds.

    PubMed

    Rajasekharan, T; Seshubai, V

    2012-01-01

    It has been argued in our recent papers that the heat of formation of intermetallic compounds is mostly concentrated in the nearest neighbor unlike atom-pair bonds, and that the positive term in Miedema's equation is associated with charge transfer on the bond to maintain electroneutrality. In this paper, taking examples of some well populated crystal-structure types such as MgCu(2), AsNa(3), AuCu(3), MoSi(2) and SiCr(3) types, the effect of such charge transfer on the crystal structures adopted by intermetallic compounds is examined. It is shown that the correlation between the observed size changes of atoms on alloying and their electronegativity differences is supportive of the idea of charge transfer between atoms. It is argued that the electronegativity and valence differences need to be of the required magnitude and direction to alter, through charge transfer, the elemental radius ratios R(A)/R(B) to the internal radius ratios r(A)/r(B) allowed by the structure types. Since the size change of atoms on alloying is highly correlated to how different R(A)/R(B) is from the ideal radius ratio for a structure type, the lattice parameters of intermetallic compounds can be predicted with excellent accuracy knowing R(A)/R(B). A practical application of the approach developed in our recent papers to superalloy design is presented.

  17. Solid state cloaking for electrical charge carrier mobility control

    DOEpatents

    Zebarjadi, Mona; Liao, Bolin; Esfarjani, Keivan; Chen, Gang

    2015-07-07

    An electrical mobility-controlled material includes a solid state host material having a controllable Fermi energy level and electrical charge carriers with a charge carrier mobility. At least one Fermi level energy at which a peak in charge carrier mobility is to occur is prespecified for the host material. A plurality of particles are distributed in the host material, with at least one particle disposed with an effective mass and a radius that minimize scattering of the electrical charge carriers for the at least one prespecified Fermi level energy of peak charge carrier mobility. The minimized scattering of electrical charge carriers produces the peak charge carrier mobility only at the at least one prespecified Fermi level energy, set by the particle effective mass and radius, the charge carrier mobility being less than the peak charge carrier mobility at Fermi level energies other than the at least one prespecified Fermi level energy.

  18. Symmetry-related mutants in the quinone binding sites of the reaction center -- The effects of changes in charge distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, D.K.; Schiffer, M.

    1997-09-01

    To probe the structural elements that contribute to the functional asymmetries of the two ubiquinone{sub 10}binding pockets in the reaction center of Rhodobacter capsulatus, the authors targeted the L212Glu-L213Asp (near Q{sub B}) and the M246Ala-M247Ala (near Q{sub A}) pairs of symmetry-related residues for site-specific mutagenesis. They have constructed site-specific mutants that eliminate the sequence differences at these positions (L212Glu-L213Asp{yields}Ala-Ala or M246Ala-M247Ala{yields}Glu-Asp), and have reversed that asymmetry by constructing a quadruple-mutant strain, RQ (L212Glu-L213Asp-M246Ala-M247Ala{yields}Ala-Ala-Glu-Asp). The mutations were designed to change the charge distribution in the quinone-binding region of the reaction center; none of the strains is capable of photosynthetic growth. In photocomponent phenotypic revertants of the RQ strain, second-site mutations which affect Q{sub B} function are coupled to mutations in the Q{sub A} site which restore an Ala or substitute a Tyr at the M247 site; one strain carries an additional Met{yields}Glu substitution at M260 near Q{sub A}. All of the RQ revertants retain the engineered M246Ala{yields}Glu mutation in the Q{sub A} site as well as the L212Ala-L213Ala mutations in the Q{sub B} site. Kinetic characterization of the RQ revertants will give them an idea of what structural and functional elements are important for restoring efficiency to electron and proton transfer pathways in the RQRC, which is far from native. To date, these preliminary results underscore the importance of an asymmetric distribution of polar amino acids in the quinone binding pockets and its influence on the functional properties of the reaction center.

  19. Measurement of super large radius optics in the detection of gravitational waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Cheng; Han, Sen; Wu, Quanying; Liang, Binming; Hou, Changlun

    2015-10-01

    The existence of Gravitational Wave (GW) is one of the greatest predictions of Einstein's relative theory. It has played an important part in the radiation theory, black hole theory, space explore and so on. The GW detection has been an important aspect of modern physics. With the research proceeding further, there are still a lot of challenges existing in the interferometer which is the key instrument in GW detection especially the measurement of the super large radius optics. To solve this problem, one solution , Fizeau interference, for measuring the super large radius has been presented. We change the tradition that curved surface must be measured with a standard curved surface. We use a flat mirror as a reference flat and it can lower both the cost and the test requirement a lot. We select a concave mirror with the radius of 1600mm as a sample. After the precision measurement and analysis, the experimental results show that the relative error of radius is better than 3%, and it can fully meet the requirements of the measurement of super large radius optics. When calculating each pixel with standard cylinder, the edges are not sharp because of diffraction or some other reasons, we detect the edge and calculate the diameter of the cylinder automatically, and it can improve the precision a lot. In general, this method is simple, fast, non-traumatic, and highly precision, it can also provide us a new though in the measurement of super large radius optics.

  20. Replacing -CH2CH2- with -CONH- does not significantly change rates of charge transport through Ag(TS)-SAM//Ga2O3/EGaIn junctions.

    PubMed

    Thuo, Martin M; Reus, William F; Simeone, Felice C; Kim, Choongik; Schulz, Michael D; Yoon, Hyo Jae; Whitesides, George M

    2012-07-04

    This paper describes physical-organic studies of charge transport by tunneling through self-assembled monolayers (SAMs), based on systematic variations of the structure of the molecules constituting the SAM. Replacing a -CH(2)CH(2)- group with a -CONH- group changes the dipole moment and polarizability of a portion of the molecule and has, in principle, the potential to change the rate of charge transport through the SAM. In practice, this substitution produces no significant change in the rate of charge transport across junctions of the structure Ag(TS)-S(CH(2))(m)X(CH(2))(n)H//Ga(2)O(3)/EGaIn (TS = template stripped, X = -CH(2)CH(2)- or -CONH-, and EGaIn = eutectic alloy of gallium and indium). Incorporation of the amide group does, however, increase the yields of working (non-shorting) junctions (when compared to n-alkanethiolates of the same length). These results suggest that synthetic schemes that combine a thiol group on one end of a molecule with a group, R, to be tested, on the other (e.g., HS~CONH~R) using an amide-based coupling provide practical routes to molecules useful in studies of molecular electronics.

  1. Fragmentation of a jet with small radius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Lin; Kim, Chul; Leibovich, Adam K.

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we consider the fragmentation of a parton into a jet with small jet radius R . Perturbatively, logarithms of R can appear, which for narrow jets can lead to large corrections. Using soft-collinear effective theory, we introduce the fragmentation function to a jet (FFJ), which describes the fragmentation of a parton into a jet. We discuss how these objects are related to the standard jet functions. Calculating the FFJ to next-to-leading order, we show that these objects satisfy the standard Dokshitzer-Gribov-Lipatov-Altarelli-Parisi evolution equations, with a natural scale that depends upon R . By using the standard renormalization group evolution, we can therefore resum logarithms of R . We further use the soft-collinear effective theory to prove a factorization theorem where the FFJs naturally appear, for the fragmentation of a hadron within a jet with small R . Finally, we also show how this formalism can be used to resum the ratio of jet radii for a subjet to be emitted from within a fat jet.

  2. [Loco typico radius fractures--personal experience].

    PubMed

    Darabos, Nikica; Cesarec, Marijan

    2003-01-01

    Fractura radii loco typico (FRLT) is the fracture of the distal radius. That is the one of the most frequent fractures of locomotor system with the widest range of treatment in traumatology. Therapy depends on the stability of the fracture: nonoperative or operative. We analysed the five-year experience of our Department of Traumatology where more than 1500 patients with FRLT have been treated in the urgent surgery clinic and 126 of them were hospitalized. In our study we evaluated the results of the operative treatment and postoperative functional status of a treated wrist. According to the A-O classification, we hospitalized 36 patients with A type, 28 patients with B type, and 62 patients with C type of FRLT. We operated 80 patients. The postoperative functional status of a treated wrist was excellent or good in 64 patients and good in 16 patients. The treatment of FRLT depends on the type and the complications of the fracture and the age of the patients. Operative therapy is indicated in the unstable FRLT or after an inadequate nonoperative treatment.

  3. On Galaxy Mass-Radius Relationship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bindoni, D.; Secco, L.; Contini, E.; Caimmi, R.

    In the Clausius' virial maximum theory (TCV) [Secco and Bindoni, NewA 14, 567 (2009)] to explain the galaxy Fundamental Plane (FP) a natural explanation follows about the observed relationship between stellar mass and effective radius, M ∗ - r e , for early type galaxies (ETGs). The key of this correlation lies in the deep link which has to exist between cosmology and the existence of the FP. The general strategy consists in using the two-component tensor virial theorem to describe the virial configuration of the baryonic component of mass M B ≃ M ∗ embedded in a dark matter (DM) halo of mass M D at the end of relaxation phase. In a ΛCDM flat cosmology, starting from variance at equivalence epoch, we derive some preliminary theoretical relationships, M ∗ - r e , which are functions of mass ratio m = M D / M B . They appear to be in agreement with the trends extracted from the data of galaxy sample used by [Tortora et al., MNRAS 396, 1132 (2009)].

  4. Scale factor correction for Gaussian beam truncation in second moment beam radius measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofer, Lucas R.; Dragone, Rocco V.; MacGregor, Andrew D.

    2017-04-01

    Charged-couple devices (CCD) and complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) image sensors, in conjunction with the second moment radius analysis method, are effective tools for determining the radius of a laser beam. However, the second moment method heavily weights sensor noise, which must be dealt with using a thresholding algorithm and a software aperture. While these noise reduction methods lower the random error due to noise, they simultaneously generate systematic error by truncating the Gaussian beam's edges. A scale factor that is invariant to beam ellipticity and corrects for the truncation of the Gaussian beam due to thresholding and the software aperture has been derived. In particular, simulations showed an order of magnitude reduction in measured beam radius error when using the scale factor-irrespective of beam ellipticity-and further testing with real beam data demonstrated that radii corrected by the scale factor are independent of the noise reduction parameters. Thus, through use of the scale factor, the accuracy of beam radius measurements made with a CCD or CMOS sensor and the second moment are significantly improved.

  5. Understanding the ``Proton Radius Puzzle'': Nuclear Polarizability Correction in μD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, Oscar J.; Dinur, Nir Nevo; Ji, Chen; Bacca, Sonia; Barnea, Nir

    2016-09-01

    The accuracy of the proton radius was improved ten-fold by new spectroscopic measurements in muonic hydrogen but it differs by 7 σ from hydrogen determinations. This discrepancy, has been coined the ``proton radius puzzle''. The results of new high-precision experiments on muonic deuterium indicate a new deuterium radius puzzle. The accuracy of the nuclear charge radius determination from these measurements is limited by the uncertainty in the nuclear structure effects. We have calculated this correction in Ref. including the first estimate of the nuclear-model dependence. Due to the importance of constraining the uncertainty, we will determine the statistical and systematic uncertainties of the χEFT potentials by determining the co-variance matrices of our predictions. I will also discuss an alternate method that may reduce the theoretical uncertainty. TRIUMF receives federal funding via a contribution agreement with the National Research Council of Canada. This work was supported in parts by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (Grant Number SAPIN-2015-00031).

  6. [Manifestation of Dupuytren nodules following fracture of the distal radius].

    PubMed

    Wichelhaus, Alice; Wendt, M; Mielsch, N; Gradl, G; Mittlmeier, T

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the incidence of post-traumatic development of Dupuytren nodules in distal radius fractures treated operatively. In 2 prospective randomised studies for operative treatment of distal radius fractures, the formation of Dupuytren nodules was registered. One of the exclusion criteria was a pre-existing Dupuytren's disease at the date of trauma. In addition to the notification of the development of Dupuytren nodules, signs of a complex regional pain syndrome were registered as well as the wrist function, level of pain and grip strength. The Castaing and the Gartland and Werley scores were assessed. The clinical outcomes of patients with and without Dupuytren nodules were compared. 239 of 275 (87%) of the patients could be examined 1 year after the operation, consisting of 32 men and 207 women with a median age of 64.2 years. The patients with Dupuytren nodules were re-evaluated after 16-60 months (median 41.8) for progression of the disease. 21 patients (8.7%) developed changes of the palmar aponeurosis. In 20 patients nodules were stated, one patient showed a cord at the fourth ray of the injured hand. 19 out of 21 patients were female (90.5%). At re-evaluation after 41.8 months (16-60) progression could not be noted nor could similar changes be seen on the contralateral side. Patients with Dupuytren nodules were not handicapped in their hand function. 3 patients (14.3%) revealed a positive family history for Dupuytren's disease. Abuse of alcohol or diabetes was not present in any of the patients with Dupuytren nodules, 7 (33%) were smokers. The occurrence of Dupyutren nodules can be triggered by a trauma or operation. It may be speculated that these nodules are an entity of their own as no progression of the contracture could be seen during the follow-up period. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  7. The effects of thermal field in interferometric measurements of radius of curvature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Jie; Hou, Xi; Wu, Fan

    2014-09-01

    The radius of curvature is one of the most important parameters to determine the properties of spherical surfaces. Based on the interferometric method, the importance of thermal analysis of spherical optical elements is stated in the paper. And then using different material, such as K9 and fused silica, the change of the curvature radius of spherical elements in different static temperature field is calculated and analyzed theoretically in the change of sag and surface. Finally, the theoretic results and simulated results by ANSYS have been compared. It is found that the radius of curvature of spherical optical elements is not only connected with the magnitude and direction of the temperature gradient, but also directly connected with material and structural parameters.

  8. Tidal radius estimates for three open clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilov, V. M.; Loktin, A. V.

    2015-10-01

    A new method is developed for estimating tidal radii and masses of open star clusters (OCL) based on the sky-plane coordinates and proper motions and/or radial velocities of cluster member stars. To this end, we perform the correlation and spectral analysis of oscillations of absolute values of stellar velocity components relative to the cluster mass center along three coordinate planes and along each coordinate axis in five OCL models. Mutual correlation functions for fluctuations of absolute values of velocity field components are computed. The spatial Fourier transform of the mutual correlation functions in the case of zero time offset is used to compute wavenumber spectra of oscillations of absolute values of stellar velocity components. The oscillation spectra of these quantities contain series of local maxima at equidistant wavenumber k values. The ratio of the tidal radius of the cluster to the wavenumber difference Δ k of adjacent local maxima in the oscillation spectra of absolute values of velocity field components is found to be the same for all five OCL models. This ratio is used to estimate the tidal radii and masses of the Pleiades, Praesepe, and M67 based on the proper motions and sky-plane coordinates of the member stars of these clusters. The radial dependences of the absolute values of the tangential and radial projections of cluster star velocities computed using the proper motions relative to the cluster center are determined, along with the corresponding autocorrelation functions and wavenumber spectra of oscillations of absolute values of velocity field components. The Pleiades virial mass is estimated assuming that the cluster is either isolated or non-isolated. Also derived are the estimates of the Pleiades dynamical mass assuming that it is non-stationary and non-isolated. The inferred Pleiades tidal radii corresponding to these masses are reported.

  9. New concepts in the treatment of distal radius fractures.

    PubMed

    Taras, John S; Ladd, Amy L; Kalainov, David M; Ruch, David S; Ring, David C

    2010-01-01

    Fracture of the distal radius is the type of fracture most commonly seen in emergency departments. The understanding of nonsurgical and surgical care of distal radius fractures is evolving with recently developed methods of fixation. It is worthwhile to review some new methods of treatment, the role of bone grafting and synthetic substitutes, the principles of complex fracture management, and the treatment of common complications of distal radius fractures.

  10. Influence of image charge effect on impurity-related optical absorption coefficients and refractive index changes in a spherical quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vartanian, A. L.; Asatryan, A. L.; Vardanyan, L. A.

    2017-03-01

    We have investigated the influence of an image charge effect (ICE) on the energies of the ground and first few excited states of a hydrogen-like impurity in a spherical quantum dot (QD) in the presence of an external electric field. The oscillator strengths of transitions from the 1 s -like state to excited states of 2px and 2pz symmetries are calculated as the functions of the strengths of the confinement potential and the electric field. Also, we have studied the effect of image charges on linear and third-order nonlinear optical absorption coefficients and refractive index changes (RICs). The results show that image charges lead to the decrease of energies for all the hydrogen-like states, to the significant enhancement of the oscillator strengths of transitions between the impurity states, and to comparatively large blue shifts in linear, nonlinear, and total absorption coefficients and refractive index changes. Our results indicate that the total optical characteristics can be controlled by the strength of the confinement and the electric field.

  11. Improving optical bench radius measurements using stage error motion data.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, Tony L; Gardner, Neil; Vaughn, Matthew; Medicus, Kate; Davies, Angela

    2008-12-20

    We describe the application of a vector-based radius approach to optical bench radius measurements in the presence of imperfect stage motions. In this approach, the radius is defined using a vector equation and homogeneous transformation matrix formulism. This is in contrast to the typical technique, where the displacement between the confocal and cat's eye null positions alone is used to determine the test optic radius. An important aspect of the vector-based radius definition is the intrinsic correction for measurement biases, such as straightness errors in the stage motion and cosine misalignment between the stage and displacement gauge axis, which lead to an artificially small radius value if the traditional approach is employed. Measurement techniques and results are provided for the stage error motions, which are then combined with the setup geometry through the analysis to determine the radius of curvature for a spherical artifact. Comparisons are shown between the new vector-based radius calculation, traditional radius computation, and a low uncertainty mechanical measurement. Additionally, the measurement uncertainty for the vector-based approach is determined using Monte Carlo simulation and compared to experimental results.

  12. Atomic radii for atoms with the 6s shell outermost: The effective atomic radius and the van der Waals radius from {sub 55}Cs to {sub 80}Hg

    SciTech Connect

    Tatewaki, Hiroshi; Hatano, Yasuyo; Noro, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Shigeyoshi

    2015-06-15

    We consider, for atoms from {sub 55}Cs to {sub 80}Hg, the effective atomic radius (r{sub ear}), which is defined as the distance from the nucleus at which the magnitude of the electric field is equal to that in He at one half of the equilibrium bond length of He{sub 2}. The values of r{sub ear} are about 50% larger than the mean radius of the outermost occupied orbital of 6s, . The value of r{sub ear} decreases from {sub 55}Cs to {sub 56}Ba and undergoes increases and decreases with rising nuclear charge from {sub 57}La to {sub 70}Y b. In fact r{sub ear} is understood as comprising two interlaced sequences; one consists of {sub 57}La, {sub 58}Ce, and {sub 64}Gd, which have electronic configuration (4f{sup n−1})(5d{sup 1})(6s{sup 2}), and the remaining atoms have configuration (4f{sup n})(6s{sup 2}). The sphere defined by r{sub ear} contains 85%–90% of the 6s electrons. From {sub 71}Lu to {sub 80}Hg the radius r{sub ear} also involves two sequences, corresponding to the two configurations 5d{sup n+1}6s{sup 1} and 5d{sup n}6s{sup 2}. The radius r{sub ear} according to the present methodology is considerably larger than r{sub vdW} obtained by other investigators, some of who have found values of r{sub vdW} close to .

  13. Limits on the effective quark radius from inclusive ep scattering at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Antonelli, S.; Aushev, V.; Behnke, O.; Behrens, U.; Bertolin, A.; Bhadra, S.; Bloch, I.; Boos, E. G.; Brock, I.; Brook, N. H.; Brugnera, R.; Bruni, A.; Bussey, P. J.; Caldwell, A.; Capua, M.; Catterall, C. D.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Corradi, M.; Dementiev, R. K.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Dusini, S.; Foster, B.; Gach, G.; Gallo, E.; Garfagnini, A.; Geiser, A.; Gizhko, A.; Gladilin, L. K.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Grzelak, G.; Guzik, M.; Gwenlan, C.; Hain, W.; Hlushchenko, O.; Hochman, D.; Hori, R.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ishitsuka, M.; Januschek, F.; Jomhari, N. Z.; Kadenko, I.; Kananov, S.; Karshon, U.; Kaur, P.; Kisielewska, D.; Klanner, R.; Klein, U.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kotański, A.; Kötz, U.; Kovalchuk, N.; Kowalski, H.; Krupa, B.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Levchenko, B. B.; Levy, A.; Limentani, S.; Lisovyi, M.; Lobodzinska, E.; Löhr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Makarenko, I.; Malka, J.; Mastroberardino, A.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Mohammad Nasir, N.; Myronenko, V.; Nagano, K.; Nobe, T.; Nowak, R. J.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Paul, E.; Perlański, W.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Polini, A.; Przybycień, M.; Roloff, P.; Ruspa, M.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schneekloth, U.; Schörner-Sadenius, T.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shevchenko, R.; Shkola, O.; Shyrma, Yu.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Słomiński, W.; Solano, A.; Stanco, L.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stern, A.; Stopa, P.; Sukhonos, D.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Tassi, E.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomaszewska, J.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Turkot, O.; Tymieniecka, T.; Verbytskyi, A.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Wichmann, K.; Wing, M.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Zakharchuk, N.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Zawiejski, L.; Zenaiev, O.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zotkin, D. S.

    2016-06-01

    The high-precision HERA data allows searches up to TeV scales for beyond the Standard Model contributions to electron-quark scattering. Combined measurements of the inclusive deep inelastic cross sections in neutral and charged current ep scattering corresponding to a luminosity of around 1 fb-1 have been used in this analysis. A new approach to the beyond the Standard Model analysis of the inclusive ep data is presented; simultaneous fits of parton distribution functions together with contributions of "new physics" processes were performed. Results are presented considering a finite radius of quarks within the quark form-factor model. The resulting 95% C.L. upper limit on the effective quark radius is 0.43 ṡ10-16 cm.

  14. On the critical radius in generalized Ostwald ripening*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qin-bo; Robert, Finsy; Xu, Hai-bo; Li, Xi

    2005-01-01

    The relation between the critical radius and the particle size distribution for generalized Ostwald type ripening processes whereby the mass transfer coefficient is modelled by a power law was derived. The critical radius is determined by the growth rate, the mass transfer coefficient and the mass balance, and is independent of whether the limiting stationary growth regime has been obtained. PMID:16052700

  15. The Origin of the Ionic-Radius Ratio Rules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, William B.

    2010-01-01

    In response to a reader query, this article traces the origins of the ionic-radius ratio rules and their incorrect attribution to Linus Pauling in the chemical literature and to Victor Goldschmidt in the geochemical literature. In actual fact, the ionic-radius ratio rules were first proposed within the context of the coordination chemistry…

  16. bamr: Bayesian analysis of mass and radius observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steiner, Andrew W.

    2014-08-01

    bamr is an MPI implementation of a Bayesian analysis of neutron star mass and radius data that determines the mass versus radius curve and the equation of state of dense matter. Written in C++, bamr provides some EOS models. This code requires O2scl (ascl:1408.019) be installed before compilation.

  17. The Origin of the Ionic-Radius Ratio Rules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, William B.

    2010-01-01

    In response to a reader query, this article traces the origins of the ionic-radius ratio rules and their incorrect attribution to Linus Pauling in the chemical literature and to Victor Goldschmidt in the geochemical literature. In actual fact, the ionic-radius ratio rules were first proposed within the context of the coordination chemistry…

  18. Evidences of Changes in Surface Electrostatic Charge Distribution during Stabilization of HPV16 Virus-Like Particles

    PubMed Central

    Vega, Juan F.; Vicente-Alique, Ernesto; Núñez-Ramírez, Rafael; Wang, Yang; Martínez-Salazar, Javier

    2016-01-01

    The stabilization of human papillomavirus type 16 virus-like particles has been examined by means of different techniques including dynamic and static light scattering, transmission electron microscopy and electrophoretic mobility. All these techniques provide different and often complementary perspectives about the aggregation process and generation of stabilized virus-like particles after a period of time of 48 hours at a temperature of 298 K. Interestingly, static light scattering results point towards a clear colloidal instability in the initial systems, as suggested by a negative value of the second virial coefficient. This is likely related to small repulsive electrostatic interactions among the particles, and in agreement with relatively small absolute values of the electrophoretic mobility and, hence, of the net surface charges. At this initial stage the small repulsive interactions are not able to compensate binding interactions, which tend to aggregate the particles. As time proceeds, an increase of the size of the particles is accompanied by strong increases, in absolute values, of the electrophoretic mobility and net surface charge, suggesting enhanced repulsive electrostatic interactions and, consequently, a stabilized colloidal system. These results show that electrophoretic mobility is a useful methodology that can be applied to screen the stabilization factors for virus-like particles during vaccine development. PMID:26885635

  19. How photon pump fluence changes the charge carrier relaxation mechanism in an organic-inorganic hybrid lead triiodide perovskite.

    PubMed

    Piatkowski, Piotr; Cohen, Boiko; Kazim, Samrana; Ahmad, Shahzada; Douhal, Abderrazzak

    2016-10-21

    This study explores the excitation wavelength and fluence dependence of processes occurring in formamidinium lead triiodide (FAPbI3) film using time-resolved transient absorption and terahertz spectroscopies. The results indicate that second-order processes are responsible for charge carrier recombination at low fluences of the absorbed photons (below 8.4 × 10(12) ph per cm(2)). An increase in fluence leads to the appearance and successive reduction of the time component assigned to the Auger recombination of free charge carriers (240-120 ps). Simultaneously, the bimolecular recombination time decreases from ∼1400 to ∼700 ps. Further increasing the pump fluence produces an exciton population that recombines in 6 ps. The comparison of two characteristic bleaching bands located at 480 and 775 nm provides evidence for the validity of the two valence bands model. Excitation with higher fluences results in a marked difference in the probed dynamics at these bands, reflecting the action of two excited states at the conduction band. Our results demonstrate that a single model cannot be applied in characterizing the perovskite absorber transitions at all pump fluences. These findings are relevant in understanding their operating mechanism under specific experimental conditions, which should differ for perovskite based solar cells, lasing media or photon detectors.

  20. Subtle Change in the Charge Distribution of Surface Residues May Affect the Secondary Functions of Cytochrome c*

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Simanta Sarani; Sil, Pallabi; Haldar, Shubhasis; Mitra, Samaresh; Chattopadhyay, Krishnananda

    2015-01-01

    Although the primary function of cytochrome c (cyt c) is electron transfer, the protein caries out an additional secondary function involving its interaction with membrane cardiolipin (CDL), its peroxidase activity, and the initiation of apoptosis. Whereas the primary function of cyt c is essentially conserved, its secondary function varies depending on the source of the protein. We report here a detailed experimental and computational study, which aims to understand, at the molecular level, the difference in the secondary functions of cyt c obtained from horse heart (mammalian) and Saccharomyces cerevisiae (yeast). The conformational landscape of cyt c has been found to be heterogeneous, consisting of an equilibrium between the compact and extended conformers as well as the oligomeric species. Because the determination of relative populations of these conformers is difficult to obtain by ensemble measurements, we used fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), a method that offers single-molecule resolution. The population of different species is found to depend on multiple factors, including the protein source, the presence of CDL and urea, and their concentrations. The complex interplay between the conformational distribution and oligomerization plays a crucial role in the variation of the pre-apoptotic regulation of cyt c observed from different sources. Finally, computational studies reveal that the variation in the charge distribution at the surface and the charge reversal sites may be the key determinant of the conformational stability of cyt c. PMID:25873393

  1. Study of the critical radius influence on the cloud drops formation in the seeding operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, R.. C.

    2010-09-01

    In the seeding operations in order to mitigate the climatic changes or to intervene on the atmospherics process of the precipitations in order to can beneficent enhancement it; it is very important the roll that play the critical radius of the cloud formation drops. In the seeding operations is fundamental to determinate the critical radius in order to make more efficient its results; because if the size of the cloud drop formation nuclei in the heterogeneous nucleation is smaller than critical radius, then it is very possible that the precipitation amount decrease when the seeding take a place, and viceversa. So, we must take in account the critical radius that the boundary conditions determine, and with this data, it must to be established the seeding nuclei size to use, in order to get the results whit the wished efficiency. We had worked is in this way, searching and developed a methodology in order to get to calculate the critical radius to boundary atmospherics conditions, and with this data to can estimate the seeding nuclei size necessary. We had obtained approximate values that are enough to ours goals.

  2. Self-regulated radius of spontaneously formed GaN nanowires in molecular beam epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Garrido, Sergio; Kaganer, Vladimir M; Sabelfeld, Karl K; Gotschke, Tobias; Grandal, Javier; Calleja, Enrique; Geelhaar, Lutz; Brandt, Oliver

    2013-07-10

    We investigate the axial and radial growth of GaN nanowires upon a variation of the Ga flux during molecular beam epitaxial growth. An increase in the Ga flux promotes radial growth without affecting the axial growth rate. In contrast, a decrease in the Ga flux reduces the axial growth rate without any change in the radius. These results are explained by a kinetic growth model that accounts for both the diffusion of Ga adatoms along the side facets toward the nanowire tip and the finite amount of active N available for the growth. The model explains the formation of a new equilibrium nanowire radius after increasing the Ga flux and provides an explanation for two well-known but so far not understood experimental facts: the necessity of effectively N-rich conditions for the spontaneous growth of GaN nanowires and the increase in nanowire radius with increasing III/V flux ratio.

  3. Spatial charge cloud size of microchannel plates.

    PubMed

    Saito, M; Saito, Y; Asamura, K; Mukai, T

    2007-02-01

    We examine the spatial evolution of charge clouds emitted by microchannel plates (MCPs). A model of this evolution is presented, along with a comparison to experimental results. We also present an experimental method to measure the charge cloud radius in which the radial charge cloud distribution is assumed to be Gaussian. When a charge cloud is released from the MCP, its initial size is determined by the number and distribution of excited channels. The size of the charge cloud is examined as a function acceleration voltage, distance between MCP and anode, and MCP bias voltage. Since electrons released from the MCP have various initial energies and angular divergence, the charge cloud size increases as it travels away from the MCP. Space charge effects also contribute to the growth of the charge cloud. The experimental results are in close agreement with our model, which includes these effects. From experiment, we also derive an approximate expression for charge cloud radius as a function of acceleration voltage and distance between MCP and anode. This expression can be used for the practical design and optimization of a position sensing system comprised of multiple anodes.

  4. The effect of structural changes on charge transfer states in a light-harvesting carotenoid-diaryl-porphyrin-C{sub 60} molecular triad

    SciTech Connect

    Olguin, Marco; Basurto, Luis; Zope, Rajendra R.; Baruah, Tunna

    2014-05-28

    We present a detailed study of charge transfer (CT) excited states for a large number of configurations in a light-harvesting Carotenoid-diaryl-Porphyrin-C{sub 60} (CPC{sub 60}) molecular triad. The chain-like molecular triad undergoes photoinduced charge transfer process exhibiting a large excited state dipole moment, making it suitable for application to molecular-scale opto-electronic devices. An important consideration is that the structural flexibility of the CPC{sub 60} triad impacts its dynamics in solvents. Since experimentally measured dipole moments for the triad of ∼110 D and ∼160 D strongly indicate a range in structural variability in the excited state, studying the effect of structural changes on the CT excited state energetics furthers the understanding of its charge transfer states. We have calculated the variation in the lowest CT excited state energies by performing a scan of possible variation in the structure of the triad. Some of these configurations were generated by incrementally scanning a 360° torsional (dihedral) twist at the C{sub 60}-porhyrin linkage and the porphyrin-carotenoid linkage. Additionally, five different CPC{sub 60} conformations were studied to determine the effect of pi-conjugation and particle-hole Coulombic attraction on the CT excitation energies. Our calculations show that configurational changes in the triad induces a variation of ∼0.6 eV in CT excited state energies in the gas-phase. The corresponding calculated excited state dipoles show a range of 47 D–188 D. The absorption spectra and density of states of these structures show little variation except for the structures where the porphyrin and aryl conjugation is changed.

  5. The effect of structural changes on charge transfer states in a light-harvesting carotenoid-diaryl-porphyrin-C60 molecular triad

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olguin, Marco; Basurto, Luis; Zope, Rajendra R.; Baruah, Tunna

    2014-05-01

    We present a detailed study of charge transfer (CT) excited states for a large number of configurations in a light-harvesting Carotenoid-diaryl-Porphyrin-C60 (CPC60) molecular triad. The chain-like molecular triad undergoes photoinduced charge transfer process exhibiting a large excited state dipole moment, making it suitable for application to molecular-scale opto-electronic devices. An important consideration is that the structural flexibility of the CPC60 triad impacts its dynamics in solvents. Since experimentally measured dipole moments for the triad of ˜110 D and ˜160 D strongly indicate a range in structural variability in the excited state, studying the effect of structural changes on the CT excited state energetics furthers the understanding of its charge transfer states. We have calculated the variation in the lowest CT excited state energies by performing a scan of possible variation in the structure of the triad. Some of these configurations were generated by incrementally scanning a 360° torsional (dihedral) twist at the C60-porhyrin linkage and the porphyrin-carotenoid linkage. Additionally, five different CPC60 conformations were studied to determine the effect of pi-conjugation and particle-hole Coulombic attraction on the CT excitation energies. Our calculations show that configurational changes in the triad induces a variation of ˜0.6 eV in CT excited state energies in the gas-phase. The corresponding calculated excited state dipoles show a range of 47 D-188 D. The absorption spectra and density of states of these structures show little variation except for the structures where the porphyrin and aryl conjugation is changed.

  6. The effect of perturbations of convective energy transport on the luminosity and radius of the Sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Endal, A. S.; Twigg, L. W.

    1982-01-01

    The response of solar models to perturbations of the efficiency of convective energy transport is studied for a number of cases. Such perturbations primarily effect the shallow superadiabatic layer of the convective envelope (at depth of approx. 1000 km below the photosphere). Independent of the details of the perturbation scheme, the resulting change in the solar radius is always very small compared to the change in luminosity. This appears to be true for any physical mechanism of solar variability which operates in the outer layers of the convection zone. Changes of the solar radius have been inferred from historical observations of solar eclipses. Considering the constraints on concurrent luminosity changes, this type of solar variability must be indicative of changes in the solar structure at substantial depths below the superadiabatic layer of the convective envelope.

  7. The effect of perturbation of convective energy transport on the luminosity and radius of the sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Endal, A. S.; Twigg, L. W.

    1982-01-01

    The response of solar models to perturbations of the efficiency of convective energy transport is studied. Such perturbations primarily affect the shallow superadiabatic layer of the convective envelope. Independent of the details of the perturbation scheme, the resulting change in the solar radius is always very small compared to the change in luminosity. This appears to be true for any physical mechanism of solar variability which operates in the outer layers of the convection zone. Changes of the solar radius have been inferred from historical observations of solar eclipses in 1715 and 1925. Considering the constraints on concurrent luminosity changes, this type of solar variability must be indicative of changes in the solar structure at substantial depths below the superadiabatic layer of the convective envelope.

  8. Airblast environments from buried HE charges

    SciTech Connect

    Reichenbach, H.; Behrens, K.; Kuhl, A.

    1993-01-01

    Laboratory experiments were conducted to measure the airblast environment generated by the detonation of buried HE charges. Spherical 0.5-g charges of Nitropenta were used as the HE source. Three ground materials were used: (1) a porous, crushable grout (YTONG, {rho} = 0.4 g/cm{sup 3}); (2) a water-saturated grout ({rho} {approx_equal} 0.7 g/Cm{sup 3}) to investigate the effects of density increase; and (3) a clay-loam material ({rho} {approx_equal} 1.8 g/cm{sup 3}) to simulate some of the previous field tests conducted in clay. Diagnostics consisted of 13 flush-mounted pressure gauges, and single-frame schlieren photography. A special shock isolation system was used to eliminate the acceleration effects on the gauges that were induced by the cratering process. Analysis of the pressure measurements resulted in an experimental definition of the airblast environment as a function of ground range (GR) and depth-of-burst (DOB). Synthesis of these results allowed one to construct airblast DOB curves, similar to the airblast height-of-burst curves that we published previously for Nitropenta charges. Variables analyzed were: peak pressure, arrival time, positive phase duration and impulse. As in field tests, we found that the airblast waveforms changed character with increasing DOB. The crater characteristics (e.a., depth, radius and volume) were also measured. The cube-root-scaled crater volume was in qualitative agreement with data from field tests (e.g., charge weights up to 10{sup 4} lbs.). Since the present scaled results compare well with data from large-scale HE tests, we conclude that the present experimental technique provides a useful tool for parametric investigations of explosion effects in the laboratory.

  9. In situ characterization of charge rate dependent stress and structure changes in V2O5 cathode prepared by atomic layer deposition

    DOE PAGES

    Jung, Hyun; Gerasopoulos, Konstantinos; Talin, Albert Alec; ...

    2016-11-22

    Here, the insertion/extraction of lithium into/from various host materials is the basic process by which lithium-ion batteries reversible store charge. This process is generally accompanied by strain in the host material, inducing stress which can lead to capacity loss. Therefore, understanding of both the structural changes and the associated stress – investigated almost exclusively separate to date – is a critical factor for developing high-performance batteries. Here, we report an in situ method, which utilizes Raman spectroscopy in parallel with optical interferometry to study effects of varying charging rates (C-rates) on the structure and stress in a V2O5 thin filmmore » cathode. Abrupt stress changes at specific crystal phase transitions in the Li—V—O system are observed and the magnitude of the stress changes with the amount of lithium inserted into the electrode are correlated. A linear increase in the stress as a function of x in LixV2O5 is observed, indicating that C-rate does not directly contribute to larger intercalation stress. However, a more rapid increase in disorder within the LixV2O5 layers is correlated with higher C-rate. Ultimately, these experiments demonstrate how the simultaneous stress/Raman in situ approach can be utilized as a characterization platform for investigating various critical factors affecting lithium-ion battery performance.« less

  10. In situ characterization of charge rate dependent stress and structure changes in V2O5 cathode prepared by atomic layer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Hyun; Gerasopoulos, Konstantinos; Talin, A. Alec; Ghodssi, Reza

    2017-02-01

    The insertion/extraction of lithium into/from various host materials is the basic process by which lithium-ion batteries reversible store charge. This process is generally accompanied by strain in the host material, inducing stress which can lead to capacity loss. Therefore, understanding of both the structural changes and the associated stress - investigated almost exclusively separate to date - is a critical factor for developing high-performance batteries. Here, we report an in situ method, which utilizes Raman spectroscopy in parallel with optical interferometry to study effects of varying charging rates (C-rates) on the structure and stress in a V2O5 thin film cathode. Abrupt stress changes at specific crystal phase transitions in the Lisbnd Vsbnd O system are observed and the magnitude of the stress changes with the amount of lithium inserted into the electrode are correlated. A linear increase in the stress as a function of x in LixV2O5 is observed, indicating that C-rate does not directly contribute to larger intercalation stress. However, a more rapid increase in disorder within the LixV2O5 layers is correlated with higher C-rate. Ultimately, these experiments demonstrate how the simultaneous stress/Raman in situ approach can be utilized as a characterization platform for investigating various critical factors affecting lithium-ion battery performance.

  11. Quadriceps force after TKA with femoral single radius.

    PubMed

    Ostermeier, Sven; Stukenborg-Colsman, Christina

    2011-06-01

    New implant designs have incorporated a single radius instead of a multiple radius to the femoral component in order to improve the mechanical function after TKA. We investigated the amount of quadriceps force required to extend the knee during an isokinetic extension cycle of different total knee designs, focusing on the radius of the femoral component (single vs. multiple). Human knee specimens (n = 12, median patient age 68 (63-70) years) were tested in a kinematic knee-simulating machine untreated and after implantation of 2 types of knee prosthesis systems, one with a single femoral radius design and one with a multiple femoral radius design. During the test cycle, a hydraulic cylinder, which simulated the quadriceps muscle, applied sufficient force to the quadriceps tendon to produce a constant extension moment of 31 Nm. The quadriceps extension force was measured from 120° to full knee extension. The shape of the quadriceps force curve was typically sinusoidal before and after TKA, reaching a maximum value of 1,493 N at 110°. With the single femoral radius design, quadriceps force was similar to that of the normal knee: 1,509 N at 110° flexion (p = 0.4). In contrast, the multiple femoral radius design showed an increase in quadriceps extension force relative to the normal knee, with a maximum of 1,721 N at 90° flexion (p = 0.03). The single femoral radius design showed lower maximum extension forces than the multiple femoral radius design. In addition, with the single femoral radius design maximum quadriceps force needed to extend a constant extension force shifted to higher degrees of knee flexion, representing a more physiological quadriceps force pattern, which could have a positive effect on knee function after TKA.

  12. Potential charge transfer probe induced conformational changes of model plasma protein human serum albumin: Spectroscopic, molecular docking, and molecular dynamics simulation study.

    PubMed

    Jana, Sankar; Dalapati, Sasanka; Ghosh, Shalini; Guchhait, Nikhil

    2012-10-01

    The nature of binding of specially designed charge transfer (CT) fluorophore at the hydrophobic protein interior of human serum albumin (HSA) has been explored by massive blue-shift (82 nm) of the polarity sensitive probe emission accompanying increase in emission intensity, fluorescence anisotropy, red edge excitation shift, and average fluorescence lifetimes. Thermal unfolding of the intramolecular CT probe bound HSA produces almost opposite spectral changes. The spectral responses of the molecule reveal that it can be used as an extrinsic fluorescent reporter for similar biological systems. Circular dichrosim spectra, molecular docking, and molecular dynamics simulation studies scrutinize this binding process and stability of the protein probe complex more closely.

  13. Charged massive scalar field configurations supported by a spherically symmetric charged reflecting shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hod, Shahar

    2016-12-01

    The physical properties of bound-state charged massive scalar field configurations linearly coupled to a spherically symmetric charged reflecting shell are studied analytically. To that end, we solve the Klein-Gordon wave equation for a static scalar field of proper mass μ, charge coupling constant q, and spherical harmonic index l in the background of a charged shell of radius R and electric charge Q. It is proved that the dimensionless inequality μR <√{(qQ) 2 -(l + 1 / 2) 2 } provides an upper bound on the regime of existence of the composed charged-spherical-shell-charged-massive-scalar-field configurations. Interestingly, we explicitly show that the discrete spectrum of shell radii {Rn(μ,qQ,l)}n = 0 n = ∞ which can support the static bound-state charged massive scalar field configurations can be determined analytically. We confirm our analytical results by numerical computations.

  14. VARIATION OF INNER RADIUS OF DUST TORUS IN NGC4151

    SciTech Connect

    Koshida, Shintaro; Sakata, Yu; Sugawara, Shota; Yoshii, Yuzuru; Minezaki, Takeo; Tomita, Hiroyuki; Kobayashi, Yukiyasu; Suganuma, Masahiro; Enya, Keigo; Aoki, Tsutomu; Peterson, Bruce A.

    2009-08-01

    Long-term optical and near-infrared monitoring observations for a type 1 active galactic nucleus (AGN) NGC 4151 were carried out for six years from 2001 to 2006 by using the MAGNUM telescope, and delayed response of flux variations in the K(2.2 {mu}m) band to those in the V(0.55 {mu}m) band was clearly detected. Based on cross-correlation analysis, we precisely measured a lag time {delta}t for eight separate periods and we found that {delta}t is not constant, changing between 30 and 70 d during the monitoring period. Since {delta}t is the light travel time from the central energy source out to the surrounding dust torus, this is the first convincing evidence that the inner radius of the dust torus did change in an individual AGN. In order to relate such a change of {delta}t with a change of AGN luminosity L, we present a method of taking an average of the observed V-band fluxes that corresponds to the measured value of {delta}t, and we find that the time-changing track of NGC 4151 in the {delta}t versus L diagram during the monitoring period deviates from the relation {delta}t {proportional_to} L {sup 0.5} expected from dust reverberation. This result, combined with the elapsed time from period to period for which {delta}t was measured, indicates that the timescale of dust formation is about one year, which should be taken into account as a new constraint in future studies of dust evolution in AGNs.

  15. Correlated charge-changing ion-atom collisions. Progress report, 16 February 1993--15 April 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Tanis, J.A.

    1994-04-01

    This report summarizes the progress and accomplishments of research supported by DOE. This work involves the experimental investigation of fundamental atomic processes in collisions of few-electron, charged projectile ions with neutral gas targets or electrons. The major emphasis is the study of collision processes involving two active electrons, and particularly those in which the electron-electron interaction plays a role. New results have been obtained for studies involving (1) continuum-electron emission, (2) double ionization of helium and Li{sup +}, and (3) resonant recombination of atomic ions. Experiments were conducted using accelerators at Western Michigan University, Michigan State University, Indiana University, Lawrence Livermore Laboratory, and the Institute of Nuclear Research, Debrecen, Hungary. Brief summaries of work completed and work in progress are given.

  16. Measurement of kinetic energy release in CO fragmentation by charge-changing collisions of fast heavy ions

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuno, T.; Yamada, T.; Tsuchida, H.; Itoh, A.; Nakai, Y.

    2010-01-15

    We study ionization and fragmentation of CO in electron loss and capture collisions of B{sup 2+}, O{sup 2+}, and Si{sup 2+} ions at an energy of 71.4 keV/u (v=1.69 a.u.). Coincidence measurements of fragment ions from CO and charge-selected ions were performed by means of a momentum three-dimensional imaging technique. Production cross sections of CO{sup r+} and branching ratios into various fragmentation channels were obtained for r=1-4. We also measured kinetic energy release (KER) in individual fragmentation channels. The KER spectra for r<=2 are found to be different for electron loss and capture collisions, while the difference becomes small for r>=3. As a measure of the degree of molecular fragmentation, the magnitude of the binding energy of the relevant electronic states seems the important parameter both in loss and capture collisions.

  17. ON THE VARIATION OF SOLAR RADIUS IN ROTATION CYCLES

    SciTech Connect

    Qu, Z. N.; Kong, D. F.; Xiang, N. B.; Feng, W.

    2015-01-10

    The Date Compensated Discrete Fourier Transform and CLEANest algorithm are used to study the temporal variations of the solar radius observed at Rio de Janeiro Observatory from 1998 March 2 to 2009 November 6. The CLEANest spectra show several significant periodicities around 400, 312, 93.5, 86.2, 79.4, 70.9, 53.2, and 26.3 days. Then, combining the data on the daily solar radius measured at Calern Observatory and Rio de Janeiro Observatory and the corresponding daily sunspot areas, we study the short-term periodicity of the solar radius and the role of magnetic field in the variation of the solar radius. The rotation period of the daily solar radius is determined to be statistically significant. Moreover, its temporal evolution is anti-phase with that of sunspot activity, and it is found anti-phase with solar activity. Generally, the stronger solar activity is, the more obvious is the anti-phase relation of radius with solar activity. This indicates that strong magnetic fields have a greater inhibitive effect than weak magnetic fields on the variation of the radius.

  18. Thermoconvective vortices in a cylindrical annulus with varying inner radius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castaño, D.; Navarro, M. C.; Herrero, H.

    2014-12-01

    This paper shows the influence of the inner radius on the stability and intensity of vertical vortices, qualitatively similar to dust devils and cyclones, generated in a cylindrical annulus non-homogeneously heated from below. Little relation is found between the intensity of the vortex and the magnitude of the inner radius. Strong stable vortices can be found for both small and large values of the inner radius. The Rankine combined vortex structure, that characterizes the tangential velocity in dust devils, is clearly observed when small values of the inner radius and large values of the ratio between the horizontal and vertical temperature differences are considered. A contraction on the radius of maximum azimuthal velocity is observed when the vortex is intensified by thermal mechanisms. This radius becomes then nearly stationary when frictional force balances the radial inflow generated by the pressure drop in the center, despite the vortex keeps intensifying. These results connect with the behavior of the radius of the maximum tangential wind associated with a hurricane.

  19. Thermoconvective vortices in a cylindrical annulus with varying inner radius.

    PubMed

    Castaño, D; Navarro, M C; Herrero, H

    2014-12-01

    This paper shows the influence of the inner radius on the stability and intensity of vertical vortices, qualitatively similar to dust devils and cyclones, generated in a cylindrical annulus non-homogeneously heated from below. Little relation is found between the intensity of the vortex and the magnitude of the inner radius. Strong stable vortices can be found for both small and large values of the inner radius. The Rankine combined vortex structure, that characterizes the tangential velocity in dust devils, is clearly observed when small values of the inner radius and large values of the ratio between the horizontal and vertical temperature differences are considered. A contraction on the radius of maximum azimuthal velocity is observed when the vortex is intensified by thermal mechanisms. This radius becomes then nearly stationary when frictional force balances the radial inflow generated by the pressure drop in the center, despite the vortex keeps intensifying. These results connect with the behavior of the radius of the maximum tangential wind associated with a hurricane.

  20. Hydrophobic and electrostatic interaction chromatography for estimating changes in cell surface charge of Escherichia coli cells treated with pulsed electric fields.

    PubMed

    Ukuku, Dike O; Yuk, Hyun-Gyun; Zhang, Howard

    2011-10-01

    Pulsed electric field (PEF) treatments, a nonthermal process, have been reported to injure and inactivate bacteria in liquid foods. However, the effect of this treatment on bacterial cell surface charge and hydrophobicity has not been investigated. Apple juice (pH 3.8) purchased from a wholesale distributor was inoculated with cocktail of Escherichia coli O157:H7 at 7.4 log CFU/mL, processed with a PEF at a field strength of 18.4 kV/cm and 32.2 kV/cm at 25°C, 35°C, and 45°C with a treatment time of 160 μs and a flow rate of 120 mL/min. Bacterial cell surface charge and hydrophobicity of untreated and PEF-treated E. coli O157:H7 were determined immediately and after storage at 5°C and 23°C using hydrophobic and electrostatic interaction chromatography. Similarly, the populations surviving the PEF treatments including injured cells were determined by plating 0.1 mL of the sample on sorbitol MacConkey agar and tryptic soy agar (TSA) plates. The surviving populations of E. coli cells after PEF treatment varied depending on field strength and treatment temperature used. Percent injury in the surviving populations was high immediately after PEF treatment and varied among treatment temperatures. Cell surface charge of E. coli bacteria before PEF treatment averaged 32.10±8.12. PEF treatments at 25°C, 35°C, and 45°C reduced the above surface charge to 26.34±1.24, 14.24±3.30, and 6.72±2.82, respectively. Similarly, the surface hydrophobicity of untreated E. coli cells at 0.194±0.034 was increased to an average of 0.268±0.022, 0.320±0.124, and 0.586±0.123 after PEF treatments at 25°C, 35°C, and 45°C, respectively. The results of this study indicate that PEF treatment affects the outer cell envelope of E. coli bacteria as evidenced by the changes in surface hydrophobicity and cell surface charge leading to injury and subsequent inactivation of the cells.

  1. Charging machine

    DOEpatents

    Medlin, John B.

    1976-05-25

    A charging machine for loading fuel slugs into the process tubes of a nuclear reactor includes a tubular housing connected to the process tube, a charging trough connected to the other end of the tubular housing, a device for loading the charging trough with a group of fuel slugs, means for equalizing the coolant pressure in the charging trough with the pressure in the process tubes, means for pushing the group of fuel slugs into the process tube and a latch and a seal engaging the last object in the group of fuel slugs to prevent the fuel slugs from being ejected from the process tube when the pusher is removed and to prevent pressure liquid from entering the charging machine.

  2. Fracture of the distal radius: epidemiology and premanagement radiographic characterization.

    PubMed

    Porrino, Jack A; Maloney, Ezekiel; Scherer, Kurt; Mulcahy, Hyojeong; Ha, Alice S; Allan, Christopher

    2014-09-01

    Fractures of the distal radius are common and frequently encountered by the radiologist. We review the epidemiology, classification, as well as the concept of instability. Salient qualitative and quantitative features of the distal radius fracture identifiable on the routine radiography series are highlighted. We conclude with a synopsis of descriptors that are of greatest utility to the clinician for treatment planning and that should be addressed in the radiology report. A detailed understanding of the intricacies of the distal radius fracture is necessary for the radiologist to provide a clinically relevant description.

  3. An Asian Perspective on the Management of Distal Radius Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Sebastin, Sandeep J.; Chung, Kevin C.

    2012-01-01

    Synopsis There is little data with regards to the epidemiology, pathology, or management of distal radius fractures from centers in Asia. Asia includes five advanced economies, namely Hong Kong SAR, Japan, Korea, Singapore, and Taiwan and a number of emerging economies prominent among which are China, India, Malaysia, Philippines, and Thailand. This article examines the available epidemiological data from Asia, and compares the management of distal radius fractures in the advanced and emerging Asian economies and how they match up to the current management in the west. It concludes by offering solutions for improving outcomes of distal radius fractures in both the advanced and emerging economies of Asia. PMID:22554658

  4. Stable Charged Cosmic Strings

    SciTech Connect

    Weigel, H.; Quandt, M.; Graham, N.

    2011-03-11

    We study the quantum stabilization of a cosmic string by a heavy fermion doublet in a reduced version of the standard model. We show that charged strings, obtained by populating fermionic bound state levels, become stable if the electroweak bosons are coupled to a fermion that is less than twice as heavy as the top quark. This result suggests that extraordinarily large fermion masses or unrealistic couplings are not required to bind a cosmic string in the standard model. Numerically we find the most favorable string profile to be a simple trough in the Higgs vacuum expectation value of radius {approx_equal}10{sup -18} m. The vacuum remains stable in our model, because neutral strings are not energetically favored.

  5. Stable charged cosmic strings.

    PubMed

    Weigel, H; Quandt, M; Graham, N

    2011-03-11

    We study the quantum stabilization of a cosmic string by a heavy fermion doublet in a reduced version of the standard model. We show that charged strings, obtained by populating fermionic bound state levels, become stable if the electroweak bosons are coupled to a fermion that is less than twice as heavy as the top quark. This result suggests that extraordinarily large fermion masses or unrealistic couplings are not required to bind a cosmic string in the standard model. Numerically we find the most favorable string profile to be a simple trough in the Higgs vacuum expectation value of radius ≈10(-18)  m. The vacuum remains stable in our model, because neutral strings are not energetically favored.

  6. Charging time for dust grain on surface exposed to plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Sheridan, T. E.

    2013-04-14

    We consider the charging of a dust grain sitting on a surface exposed to plasma. The stochastic model of Sheridan and Hayes [Appl. Phys. Lett. 98, 091501 (2011)] is solved analytically for the charging time, which is found to be directly proportional to the square root of the electron temperature and inversely proportional to both the grain radius and plasma density.

  7. Charge selectivity of the glomerular filtration barrier in healthy and nephrotic humans.

    PubMed Central

    Guasch, A; Deen, W M; Myers, B D

    1993-01-01

    We used dextran sulfate (DS) to evaluate barrier charge selectivity in 11 nonproteinuric subjects and in 11 patients with the nephrotic syndrome due to either membranous nephropathy or minimal change nephropathy. The 3H-DS preparation spanned a molecular radius interval of 10-24 A and exhibited size-dependent protein binding in vitro. Urine and ultrafiltrates of plasma were separated by size into narrow fractions using gel permeation chromatography. The sieving coefficient (theta) for ultrafilterable DS of 15A radius averaged 0.68 +/- 0.03 in nonproteinuric vs. 0.95 +/- 0.05 in nephrotic subjects (P < 0.001). Uncharged dextrans of broad size distribution were used to evaluate barrier size-selectivity in separate groups of nonproteinuric subjects (n = 19) and nephrotic patients with either minimal change (n = 20) or membranous nephropathy (n = 27). The value of theta for an uncharged dextran of similarly small radius (approximately 18 A) was significantly larger than that observed for DS in nonproteinuric subjects, but was similar in nephrotic individuals. Further, impaired barrier size-selectivity, as assessed by the sieving profile for uncharged dextrans (18-60 A radius), failed to account fully for the observed level of albuminuria in almost half of the patients with either minimal change (9/20) or membranous nephropathy (12/27). Together these findings suggest that the human glomerular capillary wall normally provides an electrostatic barrier to filtration of negatively charged macromolecules such as albumin, and that impairment of this electrostatic barrier contributes to the magnitude of albuminuria in the nephrotic syndrome. Images PMID:8227342

  8. The Roles of Histidines and Charged Residues as Potential Triggers of a Conformational Change in the Fusion Loop of Ebola Virus Glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jinwoo; Gregory, Sonia M; Nelson, Elizabeth A; White, Judith M; Tamm, Lukas K

    2016-01-01

    Ebola virus (EBOV) enters cells from late endosomes/lysosomes under mildly acidic conditions. Entry by fusion with the endosomal membrane requires the fusion loop (FL, residues 507-560) of the EBOV surface glycoprotein to undergo a pH-dependent conformational change. To find the pH trigger for this reaction we mutated multiple conserved histidines and charged and uncharged hydrophilic residues in the FL and measured their activity by liposome fusion and cell entry of virus-like particles. The FL location in the membrane was assessed by NMR using soluble and lipid-bound paramagnetic relaxation agents. While we could not identify a single residue to be alone responsible for pH triggering, we propose that a distributed pH effect over multiple residues induces the conformational change that enhances membrane insertion and triggers the fusion activity of the EBOV FL.

  9. The Roles of Histidines and Charged Residues as Potential Triggers of a Conformational Change in the Fusion Loop of Ebola Virus Glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jinwoo; Gregory, Sonia M.; Nelson, Elizabeth A.; White, Judith M.; Tamm, Lukas K.

    2016-01-01

    Ebola virus (EBOV) enters cells from late endosomes/lysosomes under mildly acidic conditions. Entry by fusion with the endosomal membrane requires the fusion loop (FL, residues 507–560) of the EBOV surface glycoprotein to undergo a pH-dependent conformational change. To find the pH trigger for this reaction we mutated multiple conserved histidines and charged and uncharged hydrophilic residues in the FL and measured their activity by liposome fusion and cell entry of virus-like particles. The FL location in the membrane was assessed by NMR using soluble and lipid-bound paramagnetic relaxation agents. While we could not identify a single residue to be alone responsible for pH triggering, we propose that a distributed pH effect over multiple residues induces the conformational change that enhances membrane insertion and triggers the fusion activity of the EBOV FL. PMID:27023721

  10. Argon gas-puff radius optimiaztion for Saturn operating in the long-pulse mode.

    SciTech Connect

    Apruzese, John P.; Jackson, S. L.; Commisso, Robert J.; Weber, Bruce V.; Mosher, Daniel A.

    2010-06-01

    Argon gas puff experiments using the long pulse mode of Saturn (230-ns rise time) have promise to increase the coupled energy and simplify operations because the voltage is reduced in vacuum and the forward-going energy is higher for the same Marx charge. The issue addressed in this work is to determine if the 12-cm-diameter triple nozzle used in Saturn long-pulse-mode experiments to date provides maximum K-shell yield, or if a different-radius nozzle provides additional radiation. Long-pulse implosions are modeled by starting with measured density distributions from the existing 12-cm-diameter nozzle, and then varying the outer radius in an implosion-energy-conserving self-similar manner to predict the gas-puff diameter that results in the maximum K-shell yield. The snowplow-implosions and multi-zone radiation transport models used in the analysis are benchmarked against detailed measurements from the 12-cm-diameter experiments. These calculations indicate that the maximum K-shell emission is produced with very nearly the existing nozzle radius.

  11. Steroidal Surfactants: Detection of Premicellar Aggregation, Secondary Aggregation Changes in Micelles, and Hosting of a Highly Charged Negative Substance.

    PubMed

    Barnadas-Rodríguez, Ramon; Cladera, Josep

    2015-08-25

    CHAPSO and CHAPS are zwitterionic surfactants derived from bile salts which are usually employed in protein purification and for the preparation of liposomes and bicelles. Despite their spread use, there are significant discrepancies on the critical concentrations that determine their aggregation behavior. In this work, we study the interaction between these surfactants with the negative fluorescent dye pyranine (HPTS) by absorbance, fluorescence, and infrared spectrometry to establish their concentration-dependent aggregation. For the studied surfactants, we detect three critical concentrations showing their concentration-dependent presence as a monomeric form, premicellar aggregates, micelles, and a second type of micelle in aqueous medium. The nature of the interaction of HPTS with the surfactants was studied using analogues of their tails and the negative bile salt taurocholate (TC) as reference for the sterol ring. The results indicate that the chemical groups involved are the hydroxyl groups of the polar face of the sterol ring and the sulfonate groups of the dye. This interaction causes not only the incorporation of the negative dye in CHAPSO and CHAPS micelles but also its association with their premicellar aggregates. Surprisingly, this hosting behavior for a negative charged molecule was also detected for the negative bile salt TC, bypassing, in this way, the electrostatic repulsion between the guest and the host.

  12. Load/Strain Distribution between Ulna and Radius in the Mouse Forearm Compression Loading Model

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yunkai; Thiagarajan, Ganesh; Nicolella, Daniel P.; Johnson, Mark L.

    2011-01-01

    Finite element analysis (FEA) of the mouse forearm compression loading model is used to relate strain distributions with downstream changes in bone formation and responses of bone cells. The objective of this study was to develop two FEA models – the first one with the traditional ulna only and the second one in which both the ulna and radius are included, in order to examine the effect of the inclusion of the radius on the strain distributions in the ulna. The entire mouse forearm was scanned using microCT and images were converted into FEA tetrahedral meshes using a suite of software programs. The performance of both linear and quadratic tetrahedral elements and coarse and fine meshes were studied. A load of 2 N was applied to the ulna/radius model and a 1.3 N load (based on previous investigations of load sharing between the ulna and radius in rats) was applied to the ulna only model for subsequent simulations. The results showed differences in the cross sectional strain distributions and magnitude within the ulna for the combined ulna/radius model versus the ulna only model. The maximal strain in the combined model occurred about 4 mm towards the distal end from the ulna mid-shaft in both models. Results from the FEA model simulations were also compared to experimentally determined strain values. We conclude that inclusion of the radius in FE models to predict strains during in vivo forearm loading increases the magnitude of the estimated ulna strains compared to those predicted from a model of the ulna alone but the distribution was similar. This has important ramifications for future studies to understand strain thresholds needed to activate bone cell responses to mechanical loading. PMID:21903442

  13. Stability radius as a method for comparing the dynamics of neuromechanical systems.

    PubMed

    Bingham, Jeffrey T; Ting, Lena H

    2013-09-01

    Robust motor behaviors emerge from neuromechanical interactions that are nonlinear, have delays, and contain redundant neural and biomechanical components. For example, in standing balance a subject's muscle activity (neural control) decreases as stance width (biomechanics) increases when responding to a lateral perturbation, yet the center-of-mass motion (behavior) is nearly identical regardless of stance width. We present stability radius, a technique from robust control theory, to overcome the limitations of classical stability analysis tools, such as gain margin, which are insufficient for predicting how concurrent changes in both biomechanics (plant) and neural control (controller) affect system behavior. We first present the theory and then an application to a neuromechanical model of frontal-plane standing balance with delayed feedback. We show that stability radius can quantify differences in the sensitivity of system behavior to parameter changes, and predict that narrowing stance width increases system robustness. We further demonstrate that selecting combinations of stance width (biomechanics) and feedback gains (neural control) that have the same stability radius produce similar center-of-mass behavior in simulation. Therefore, stability radius may provide a useful tool for understanding neuromechanical interactions in movement and could aid in the design of devices and therapies for improving motor function.

  14. Stability Radius as a Method for Comparing the Dynamics of Neuromechanical Systems

    PubMed Central

    Bingham, Jeffrey T.; Ting, Lena H.

    2015-01-01

    Robust motor behaviors emerge from neuromechanical interactions that are nonlinear, have delays, and contain redundant neural and biomechanical components. For example, in standing balance a subject’s muscle activity (neural control) decreases as stance width (biomechanics) increases when responding to a lateral perturbation, yet the center-of-mass motion (behavior) is nearly identical regardless of stance width. We present stability radius, a technique from robust control theory, to overcome the limitations of classical stability analysis tools, such as gain margin, which are insufficient for predicting how concurrent changes in both biomechanics (plant) and neural control (controller) affect system behavior. We first present the theory and then an application to a neuromechanical model of frontal-plane standing balance with delayed feedback. We show that stability radius can quantify differences in the sensitivity of system behavior to parameter changes, and predict that narrowing stance width increases system robustness. We further demonstrate that selecting combinations of stance width (biomechanics) and feedback gains (neural control) that have the same stability radius produce similar center-of-mass behavior in simulation. Therefore, stability radius may provide a useful tool for understanding neuromechanical interactions in movement and could aid in the design of devices and therapies for improving motor function. PMID:23744699

  15. Charge transfer between fullerenes and highly charged noble gas ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narits, A. A.

    2008-07-01

    A semiclassical model for the description of charge-exchange processes in collisions between fullerenes and multiply charged ions is developed. It is based on the decay model combined with the impact-parameter representation for the heavy particles' relative motion. The charge-transfer process in our model is treated as a transition of the active electron over and under the quasistatic potential barrier formed by the electric fields of the target and projectile. Due to the high electron delocalization on the surface of fullerene we represent it as a perfectly conducting hard sphere, whose radius is determined by the dipole polarizability of C60. The energies of the active electrons are assumed to be equal to the corresponding ionization potentials including the Stark-shift effect. We have developed an efficient technique for the evaluation of the electron transmission coefficient through the asymmetric potential barrier. It is shown that our model provides a good agreement with the available experimental data on single-electron charge-exchange processes. Moreover, it allows us to get an adequate description of multi-electron transfer processes. The first theoretical results on charge exchange between the fullerene ions and highly charged ions have been obtained.

  16. Improved automatic optic nerve radius estimation from high resolution MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrigan, Robert L.; Smith, Alex K.; Mawn, Louise A.; Smith, Seth A.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2017-02-01

    The optic nerve (ON) is a vital structure in the human visual system and transports all visual information from the retina to the cortex for higher order processing. Due to the lack of redundancy in the visual pathway, measures of ON damage have been shown to correlate well with visual deficits. These measures are typically taken at an arbitrary anatomically defined point along the nerve and do not characterize changes along the length of the ON. We propose a fully automated, three-dimensionally consistent technique building upon a previous independent slice-wise technique to estimate the radius of the ON and surrounding cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) on high-resolution heavily T2-weighted isotropic MRI. We show that by constraining results to be three-dimensionally consistent this technique produces more anatomically viable results. We compare this technique with the previously published slice-wise technique using a short-term reproducibility data set, 10 subjects, follow-up <1 month, and show that the new method is more reproducible in the center of the ON. The center of the ON contains the most accurate imaging because it lacks confounders such as motion and frontal lobe interference. Long-term reproducibility, 5 subjects, follow-up of approximately 11 months, is also investigated with this new technique and shown to be similar to short-term reproducibility, indicating that the ON does not change substantially within 11 months. The increased accuracy of this new technique provides increased power when searching for anatomical changes in ON size amongst patient populations.

  17. To everything there is a season: impact of seasonal change on admissions, acuity of injury, length of stay, throughput, and charges at an accredited, regional burn center.

    PubMed

    Hultman, C Scott; Tong, Winnie T; Surrusco, Matthew; Roden, Katherine S; Kiser, Michelle; Cairns, Bruce A

    2012-07-01

    Although previous studies have investigated the impact of weather and temporal factors on incidence of trauma admissions, there is a paucity of data describing the effect of seasonal change on burn injury. The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of the changing seasons on admissions to and resource utilization at an accredited burn center, with the goal of optimizing patient throughput and matching supply with demand. We performed a retrospective review of all burn admissions to an accredited, regional burn center, from Summer 2009 through Spring 2010. Patients were segregated into the seasonal cohorts of Summer, Fall, Winter, and Spring, based on admission date. Patient demographics included age, gender, mechanism of injury, and total body surface area (TBSA) injured. Main outcome measures included length of intensive care unit (ICU) stay, length of stay (LOS), and hospital charges, which served as a proxy for resource utilization (nursing, wound, and critical care; access to operating room (OR); inpatient rehabilitation). Groups were compared by T tests, with statistical significance assigned to P values <0.05. Seven hundred thirty patients were admitted to the burn center during this annual period, with a mean age of 31.6 years and a TBSA of 8.9%. Although Spring had the greatest the number of admissions at 219 (30%), patients from Summer and Winter had the largest burns, longest length of ICU and hospital stays, and highest hospital charges (P < 0.05). Furthermore, variability of these parameters, as measured by standard deviation, was greatest during Summer and Winter, serving to reduce throughput via uneven demand on resources. Highest throughput occurred during the Spring, which had the highest admission-to-LOS ratio. No differences were observed in age, gender, and incidence of electrical injuries, across the 4 seasons. Summer and winter were the peak seasons of resource utilization at our burn center, in terms of length and variability of ICU

  18. Correlation between quarter-point angle and nuclear radius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Wei-Hu; Wang, Jian-Song; Mukherjee, S.; Wang, Qi; Patel, D.; Yang, Yan-Yun; Ma, Jun-Bing; Ma, Peng; Jin, Shi-Lun; Bai, Zhen; Liu, Xing-Quan

    2017-04-01

    The correlation between quarter-point angle of elastic scattering and nuclear matter radius is studied systematically. Various phenomenological formulae with parameters for nuclear radius are adopted and compared by fitting the experimental data of quarter point angle extracted from nuclear elastic scattering reaction systems. A parameterized formula related to binding energy is recommended, which gives a good reproduction of nuclear matter radii of halo nuclei. It indicates that the quarter-point angle of elastic scattering is quite sensitive to the nuclear matter radius and can be used to extract the nuclear matter radius. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (U1432247, 11575256), National Basic Research Program of China (973 Program)(2014CB845405 and 2013CB83440x) and (SM) Chinese Academy of Sciences President’s International Fellowship Initiative (2015-FX-04)

  19. Split radius-form blocks for tube benders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lange, D. R.; Seiple, C. W.

    1970-01-01

    Two-piece, radius-form block permits accurate forming and removing of parts with more than a 180 degree bend. Tube bender can shape flexible metal tubing in applications dealing with plumbing, heating, and pressure transmission lines.

  20. The changing nature of ICU charge nurses' decision making: from supervision of care delivery to unit resource management.

    PubMed

    Miller, Anne; Buerhaus, Peter I

    2013-01-01

    Recent findings that variations in nursing workload may affect inpatient outcomes now highlight nurse workload management and the need for an updated analysis of the role of the charge nurse (CN). Observational data for eight CNs, each at one of eight ICUs in a not-for-profit Level 1 Trauma Center, coded to capture interprofessional interactions, decision making, team coordination phases, and support tools. A researcher shadowed each participant for 12 hours. Each shift began and ended with a face-to-face handoff that included summaries of each patient's condition; the current bed census; anticipated admissions, discharges, and transfers; and the number of nurses available to work the current and coming two shifts. The researcher, using a notebook, recorded the substantive content of all work conversations initiated by or directed to the CN from physicians, staff nurses, allied health workers, other employees, and patients/families. The tools used to support conversations were collected as blank forms or computer screen prints and annotated to describe how they were used, when, and for what purpose. Statistically significant three-way interactions suggest that CNs' conversations with colleagues depend on the team coordination phase and the decision-making level, and that the support tools that CNs use when talking to colleagues depend on the decision-making level and the team coordination phase. The role of ICU CNs appears to be continuing to evolve, now encompassing unit resource management in addition to supervising care delivery. Effective support tools, together with education that would enhance communication and resource management skills, will be essential to CNs' ability to support unit resilience and adaptability in an increasingly complex environment.

  1. Radius of Curvature of Off-Axis Paraboloids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Brian; Reardon, Patrick; Hadaway, James; Geary, Joseph; Russell, Kevin (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We present several methods for measuring the vertex radius of curvature of off-axis paraboloidal mirrors. One is based on least-squares fitting of interferometer output, one on comparison of sagittal and tangential radii of curvature, and another on measurement of displacement of the nulled test article from the ideal reference wave. Each method defines radius of curvature differently and, as a consequence, produces its own sort of errors.

  2. Dynamical instability of a charged gaseous cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharif, M.; Mumtaz, Saadia

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, we discuss dynamical instability of a charged dissipative cylinder under radial oscillations. For this purpose, we follow the Eulerian and Lagrangian approaches to evaluate linearized perturbed equation of motion. We formulate perturbed pressure in terms of adiabatic index by applying the conservation of baryon numbers. A variational principle is established to determine characteristic frequencies of oscillation which define stability criteria for a gaseous cylinder. We compute the ranges of radii as well as adiabatic index for both charged and uncharged cases in Newtonian and post-Newtonian limits. We conclude that dynamical instability occurs in the presence of charge if the gaseous cylinder contracts to the radius R*.

  3. Theory of water and charged liquid bridges.

    PubMed

    Morawetz, K

    2012-08-01

    The phenomenon of liquid bridge formation due to an applied electric field is investigated. A solution of a charged catenary is presented, which allows one to determine the static and dynamical stability conditions where charged liquid bridges are possible. The creeping height, the bridge radius and length, as well as the shape of the bridge are calculated showing an asymmetric profile, in agreement with observations. The flow profile is calculated from the Navier-Stokes equation leading to a mean velocity, which combines charge transport with neutral mass flow and which describes recent experiments on water bridges.

  4. Isolated Diaphyseal Fractures of the Radius in Skeletally Immature Patients

    PubMed Central

    Guitton, Thierry G.; Van Dijk, Niek C.; Raaymakers, Ernst L.

    2009-01-01

    Diaphyseal radius fractures without associated ulna fracture or radioulnar dislocation (isolated fracture of the radius) are recognized in adults but are rarely described in skeletally immature patients. A search of our database (1974–2002) identified 17 pediatric patients that had an isolated fracture of the radius. Among the 13 patients with at least 1 year follow-up, ten were treated with manipulative reduction and immobilization in an above elbow cast and three had initial operative treatment with plate and screw fixation. These 13 patients were evaluated for an average of 18 months (range, 12 to 45 months) after injury using the system of Price and colleagues. The incidence of isolated diaphyseal radius fractures in skeletally immature patients was 0.56 per year in our database and represented 27% of the 63 patients with a diaphyseal forearm fracture. All 13 patients, with at least 1 year follow-up, regained full elbow flexion and extension and full forearm rotation. According to the classification system of Price, all 13 patients (100%) had an excellent result. As in adults, isolated radius fractures seem to occur in children more frequently than previously appreciated. Treatment of isolated radius fractures in skeletally immature patients has a low complication rate, and excellent functional outcomes are the rule. PMID:19859772

  5. The seismic radius of the Sun, and structure inversions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takata, M.; Gough, D. O.

    2003-02-01

    It is known (Schou et al., 1997; Antia, 1998) that the effective radius of the Sun determined by f-mode frequencies is different by a few hundredths per cent from the photospheric radius determined by direct photometric measurement (Brown and Christensen-Dalsgaard 1998). It is fair to say that we still do not fully comprehend the implications of the difference, save that the two radii are rather different quantities: the radius inferred from f-mode frequencies is determined by the location of the maximum in the f-mode energy (Gough, 1993), whereas the photospheric radius is determined by extrapolation to some prescribed optical depth from a fiducial point in the limb-darkening function using a theoretical solar model. Both depend in particular on the structure of the upper superadiabatic convective boundary layer, the physics of which is not well understood. In this report we attempt to shed some light on the difference by determining a seismic radius from p-mode frequencies; the outcome depends predominantly on the variation of sound speed, and it is consistent with the f-mode value (Takata and Gough 2001). By considering the mathematical structure of an inversion process that does not explicitly distinguish f modes from p modes, we offer an interpretation of the seismic radius. This interpretation has led us to revise the method by which we carry out structure inversions.

  6. Controlling charge on levitating drops.

    PubMed

    Hilger, Ryan T; Westphall, Michael S; Smith, Lloyd M

    2007-08-01

    Levitation technologies are used in containerless processing of materials, as microscale manipulators and reactors, and in the study of single drops and particles. Presented here is a method for controlling the amount and polarity of charge on a levitating drop. The method uses single-axis acoustic levitation to trap and levitate a single, initially neutral drop with a diameter between 400 microm and 2 mm. This drop is then charged in a controllable manner using discrete packets of charge in the form of charged drops produced by a piezoelectric drop-on-demand dispenser equipped with a charging electrode. The magnitude of the charge on the dispensed drops can be adjusted by varying the voltage applied to the charging electrode. The polarity of the charge on the added drops can be changed allowing removal of charge from the trapped drop (by neutralization) and polarity reversal. The maximum amount of added charge is limited by repulsion of like charges between the drops in the trap. This charging scheme can aid in micromanipulation and the study of charged drops and particles using levitation.

  7. Characterisation of the protein corona using tunable resistive pulse sensing: determining the change and distribution of a particle's surface charge.

    PubMed

    Blundell, Emma L C J; Healey, Matthew J; Holton, Elizabeth; Sivakumaran, Muttuswamy; Manstana, Sarabjit; Platt, Mark

    2016-08-01

    The zeta potential of the protein corona around carboxyl particles has been measured using tunable resistive pulse sensing (TRPS). A simple and rapid assay for characterising zeta potentials within buffer, serum and plasma is presented monitoring the change, magnitude and distribution of proteins on the particle surface. First, we measure the change in zeta potential of carboxyl-functionalised nanoparticles in solutions that contain biologically relevant concentrations of individual proteins, typically constituted in plasma and serum, and observe a significant difference in distributions and zeta values between room temperature and 37 °C assays. The effect is protein dependent, and the largest difference between the two temperatures is recorded for the γ-globulin protein where the mean zeta potential changes from -16.7 to -9.0 mV for 25 and 37 °C, respectively. This method is further applied to monitor particles placed into serum and/or plasma. A temperature-dependent change is again observed with serum showing a 4.9 mV difference in zeta potential between samples incubated at 25 and 37 °C; this shift was larger than that observed for samples in plasma (0.4 mV). Finally, we monitor the kinetics of the corona reorientation for particles initially placed into serum and then adding 5 % (V/V) plasma. The technology presented offers an interesting insight into protein corona structure and kinetics of formation measured in biologically relevant solutions, i.e. high protein, high salt levels, and its particle-by-particle analysis gives a measure of the distribution of particle zeta potential that may offer a better understanding of the behaviour of nanoparticles in solution. Graphical Abstract The relative velocity of a nanoparticle as it traverses a nanopore can be used to determine its zeta potential. Monitoring the changes in translocation speeds can therefore be used to follow changes to the surface chemistry/composition of 210 nm particles that were placed

  8. Time-resolved absorption changes of the pheophytin Q{sub x} band in isolated photosystem II reaction centers at 7K : energy transfer and charge separation.

    SciTech Connect

    Greenfield, S. R.; Seibert, M.; Wasielewski, M. R.; Chemistry; LANL; NREL; Northwestern Univ.

    1999-09-30

    The pheophytin {alpha} Q{sub x} spectral region of the isolated photosystem II reaction center was investigated at 7 K using femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy. At this temperature, uphill energy transfer, which greatly complicates the interpretation of the kinetics at or near room temperature, should be essentially shut off. Low-energy ({approx}100 nJ) pulses at 661 and 683 nm were used to excite the short-wavelength and long-wavelength sides of the composite Q{sub y} band, providing preferential excitation of the accessory pigment pool and P680, respectively. The data analysis uses a background subtraction technique developed earlier (Greenfield et al. J. Phys. Chem. B 1997, 101, 2251-2255) to remove the kinetic components of the data that are due to the large time-dependent changes in the background that are present in this spectral region. The instantaneous amplitude of the bleach of the pheophytin {alpha} Q{sub x} band with 683 nm excitation is roughly two-thirds of its final amplitude, providing strong evidence of a multimer description of the reaction center core. The subsequent growth of the bleach shows biphasic kinetics, similar to our earlier results at 278 K. The rate constant of the faster component is (5 ps){sup -1} for 683 nm excitation (a factor of almost two faster than at 278 K), and represents the intrinsic rate constant for charge separation. The bleach growth with 661 nm excitation is also biphasic; however, the faster component appears to be a composite of a (5 ps){sup -1} component corresponding to charge separation following subpicosecond energy transfer to the long-wavelength pigments and a roughly (22 ps){sup -1} component corresponding to charge separation limited by slow energy transfer. The combined quantum yield for these two energy transfer processes is near unity. For both excitation wavelengths, there is also a roughly (100 ps){sup -1} component to the bleach growth. Exposure to high excitation energies ({>=}1 {mu}J) at

  9. Time-resolved absorption changes of the pheophytin Q{sub x} band in isolated photosystem II reaction centers at 7 K: Energy transfer and charge separation

    SciTech Connect

    Greenfield, S.R.; Seibert, M.; Wasielewski, M.R.

    1999-09-30

    The pheophytin a Q{sub x} spectral region of the isolated photosystem II reaction center was investigated at 7 K using femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy. At this temperature, uphill energy transfer, which greatly complicates the interpretation of the kinetics at or near room temperature, should be essentially shut off. Low-energy ({approximately}100 nJ) pulses at 661 and 683 nm were used to excite the short-wavelength and long-wavelength sides of the composite Q{sub y} band, providing preferential excitation of the accessory pigment pool and P680, respectively. The data analysis uses a background subtraction technique developed earlier (Greenfield et al. J. Phys. Chem. B 1997, 101, 2251--2255) to remove the kinetic components of the data that are due to the large time-dependent changes in the background that are present in this spectral region. The instantaneous amplitude of the bleach of the pheophytin a Q{sub x} band with 683 nm excitation is roughly two-thirds of its final amplitude, providing strong evidence of a multimer description of the reaction center core. The subsequent growth of the bleach shows biphasic kinetics, similar to the earlier results at 278 K. The rate constant of the faster component is (5 ps){sup {minus}1} for 683 nm excitation (a factor of almost two faster than at 278 K), and represents the intrinsic rate constant for charge separation. The bleach growth with 661 nm excitation is also biphasic; however, the faster component appears to be a composite of a (5 ps){sup {minus}1} component corresponding to charge separation following subpicosecond energy transfer to the long-wavelength pigments and a roughly (22 ps){sup {minus}1} component corresponding to charge separation limited by slow energy transfer. The combined quantum yield for these two energy transfer processes is near unity. For both excitation wavelengths, there is also a roughly (100 ps){sup {minus}1} component to the bleach growth. Exposure to high excitation

  10. Long-term biochemical and histological changes in the central nervous system of rats exposed to low fluences of high charge and high energy particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azzam, Edouard; Rabin, Bernard

    Accumulating evidence indicates that exposure of rodents to even low fluences of high charge (Z) and high energy (E) ions (HZE particles) can disrupt their cognitive and behavioral per-formance. Understanding the mechanisms underlying these effects has been considered critical for adequately estimating the risks to astronauts during and subsequent to prolonged space flights. To gain a greater understanding of the biochemical and molecular changes underlying radiation effects in the central nervous system, we targeted the head of male Sprague-Dawley rats with mean doses ranging from 0.1 to 50 cGy from titanium or oxygen ions of different energies. Molecular, biochemical and histological analyses in the different compartment of the central nervous system of rats sacrificed 20 months after irradiation will be reported. The effect of radiation dose, energy and quality will be highlighted. Particular focus will be on changes in protein level, protein oxidation, lipid peroxidation, mitochondrial function, the antioxidative network and apoptosis. The changes in brain tissues will be contrasted with biochemical and molecular changes in non-targeted tissues of the irradiated rats. Supported by grants from the US National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  11. Three-dimensional tool radius compensation for multi-axis peripheral milling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Youdong; Wang, Tianmiao

    2013-05-01

    Few function about 3D tool radius compensation is applied to generating executable motion control commands in the existing computer numerical control (CNC) systems. Once the tool radius is changed, especially in the case of tool size changing with tool wear in machining, a new NC program has to be recreated. A generic 3D tool radius compensation method for multi-axis peripheral milling in CNC systems is presented. The offset path is calculated by offsetting the tool path along the direction of the offset vector with a given distance. The offset vector is perpendicular to both the tangent vector of the tool path and the orientation vector of the tool axis relative to the workpiece. The orientation vector equations of the tool axis relative to the workpiece are obtained through homogeneous coordinate transformation matrix and forward kinematics of generalized kinematics model of multi-axis machine tools. To avoid cutting into the corner formed by the two adjacent tool paths, the coordinates of offset path at the intersection point have been calculated according to the transition type that is determined by the angle between the two tool path tangent vectors at the corner. Through the verification by the solid cutting simulation software VERICUT® with different tool radiuses on a table-tilting type five-axis machine tool, and by the real machining experiment of machining a soup spoon on a five-axis machine tool with the developed CNC system, the effectiveness of the proposed 3D tool radius compensation method is confirmed. The proposed compensation method can be suitable for all kinds of three- to five-axis machine tools as a general form.

  12. Space charges can significantly affect the dynamics of accelerator maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bountis, Tassos; Skokos, Charalampos

    2006-10-01

    Space charge effects can be very important for the dynamics of intense particle beams, as they repeatedly pass through nonlinear focusing elements, aiming to maximize the beam's luminosity properties in the storage rings of a high energy accelerator. In the case of hadron beams, whose charge distribution can be considered as “frozen” within a cylindrical core of small radius compared to the beam's dynamical aperture, analytical formulas have been recently derived [C. Benedetti, G. Turchetti, Phys. Lett. A 340 (2005) 461] for the contribution of space charges within first order Hamiltonian perturbation theory. These formulas involve distribution functions which, in general, do not lead to expressions that can be evaluated in closed form. In this Letter, we apply this theory to an example of a charge distribution, whose effect on the dynamics can be derived explicitly and in closed form, both in the case of 2-dimensional as well as 4-dimensional mapping models of hadron beams. We find that, even for very small values of the “perveance” (strength of the space charge effect) the long term stability of the dynamics changes considerably. In the flat beam case, the outer invariant “tori” surrounding the origin disappear, decreasing the size of the beam's dynamical aperture, while beyond a certain threshold the beam is almost entirely lost. Analogous results in mapping models of beams with 2-dimensional cross section demonstrate that in that case also, even for weak tune depressions, orbital diffusion is enhanced and many particles whose motion was bounded now escape to infinity, indicating that space charges can impose significant limitations on the beam's luminosity.

  13. Intramedullary nailing of adult isolated diaphyseal radius fractures.

    PubMed

    Köse, Ahmet; Aydın, Ali; Ezirmik, Naci; Topal, Murat; Can, Cahit Emre; Yılar, Sinan

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate functional and cosmetic outcomes of adult patients who underwent intramedullary nailing with newly designed intramedullary radius nails for isolated radius diaphyseal fractures. Seventeen adult patients who had undergone intramedullary nailing for radius diaphyseal fractures were retrospectively evaluated. Patients with isolated radius diaphyseal closed fractures were included. Closed reduction was achieved in all patients. Wrist and elbow ranges of movement were calculated at final follow-up. Grip strength was calculated using a hydraulic hand dynamometer. Maximum radial bowing (MRB) and maximum radial bowing localization (MRBL) were calculated for treated and uninjured arms. Functional evaluation was performed using Grace-Eversman evaluation criteria and Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) questionnaire score. Of the 17 patients with isolated radius diaphyseal fractures evaluated, 11 (64.7%) were male and 6 (35.3%) were female, with a mean age of 35.76 years (range: 23-61 years). Fractures were right-sided in 11 (64.7%) and left-sided in 6 (35.3%) patients. Mean time to bone union was 10.2 weeks (range: 8-20 weeks). Mean supination was 75.35º (range: 67º-80º), pronation was 85.18º (range: 74º-90º). According to Grace-Eversman evaluation criteria, results were excellent in 16 (94%) and good in 1 (6%) patient. Mean DASH score was 12.58 (3.3-32.5). The gold-standard treatment of adult isolated radius diaphyseal fractures is plate and screw osteosynthesis. However, intramedullary nailing of isolated radius fractures is a good alternative treatment method, with excellent functional results and union rates similar to those of plate and screw osteosynthesis.

  14. Predicting the failure load of the distal radius.

    PubMed

    Muller, Monique E; Webber, Colin E; Bouxsein, Mary L

    2003-06-01

    The distal radius is an important site for the early detection of patients at risk for fracture. Since measuring bone strength in vivo is not possible, we evaluated which bone assessment method of the forearm would best predict failure load of the distal radius and computed a factor of risk for wrist fracture (Phi wrist). Thirty-eight cadaveric forearm specimens were measured by five different techniques to assess bone density, bone mineral content, geometry and trabecular structure at the distal forearm. The bone assessment techniques included dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) of the radius, peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) of the 4% and 20% distal sites of the radius, DXA of the phalanges, digital X-ray radiogrammetry of the forearm (DXR-BMD), and quantitative ultrasound of the radius. The failure load of each excised radius was determined by simulating a fall on an outstretched hand. The pQCT measurements of polar stress-strain index and cortical content explained the greatest portion of variance in failure load (r2=0.82-0.85). Bone mineral content measures were generally better predictors of failure load (r2=0.53-0.85) than the corresponding volumetric or areal bone mineral density values (r2=0.22-0.69) measured by either pQCT or DXA. Multiple regression analysis showed that the addition of a bone geometry measure improved the ability of a bone density measure alone to predict failure load. There was high variability in the ability of different techniques and different variables within a given technique to predict failure load. Estimates of the factor of risk for wrist fracture (Phi wrist) revealed that the women in this study would have been likely to fracture their distal radius upon falling from a standing height (Phi wrist= 1.04), whereas the men would have likely withstood the impact without fracturing their wrist (Phi wrist= 0.79).

  15. Distance-Independent Charge Recombination Kinetics in Cytochrome c - Cytochrome c Peroxidase Complexes: Compensating Changes in the Electronic Coupling and Reorganization Energies

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Nan; Kuznetsov, Aleksey; Nocek, Judith M.; Hoffman, Brian M.; Crane, Brian R.; Hu, Xiangqian; Beratan, David N.

    2013-01-01

    Charge recombination rate constants vary no more than three-fold for inter-protein ET in the Zn-substituted wild type (WT) cytochrome c peroxidase (CcP):cytochrome c (Cc) complex and in complexes with four mutants of the Cc protein (i.e., F82S, F82W, F82Y and F82I), despite large differences in the ET distance. Theoretical analysis indicates that charge recombination for all complexes involves a combination of tunneling and hopping via Trp191. For three of the five structures (WT and F82S(W)), the protein favors hopping more than that in the other two structures that have longer heme→ZnP distances (F82Y(I)). Experimentally observed biexponential ET kinetics is explained by the complex locking in alternative coupling pathways, where the acceptor hole state is either primarily localized on ZnP (slow phase) or on Trp191 (fast phase). The large conformational differences between the CcP:Cc interface for the F82Y(I) mutants compared to the WT and F82S(W) complexes are predicted to change the reorganization energies for the CcP:Cc ET reactions because of changes in solvent exposure and inter-protein ET distances. Since the recombination reaction is likely to occur in the inverted Marcus regime, an increased reorganization energy compensates the decreased role for hopping recombination (and the longer transfer distance) in the F82Y(I) mutants. Taken together, coupling pathway and reorganization energy effects for the five protein complexes explains the observed insensitivity of recombination kinetics to donor-acceptor distance and docking pose and also reveals how hopping through aromatic residues can accelerate long-range ET. PMID:23895339

  16. Benchmark Airport Charges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deWit, A.; Cohn, N.

    1999-01-01

    The Netherlands Directorate General of Civil Aviation (DGCA) commissioned Hague Consulting Group (HCG) to complete a benchmark study of airport charges at twenty eight airports in Europe and around the world, based on 1996 charges. This study followed previous DGCA research on the topic but included more airports in much more detail. The main purpose of this new benchmark study was to provide insight into the levels and types of airport charges worldwide and into recent changes in airport charge policy and structure, This paper describes the 1996 analysis. It is intended that this work be repeated every year in order to follow developing trends and provide the most up-to-date information possible.

  17. Benchmark Airport Charges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    de Wit, A.; Cohn, N.

    1999-01-01

    The Netherlands Directorate General of Civil Aviation (DGCA) commissioned Hague Consulting Group (HCG) to complete a benchmark study of airport charges at twenty eight airports in Europe and around the world, based on 1996 charges. This study followed previous DGCA research on the topic but included more airports in much more detail. The main purpose of this new benchmark study was to provide insight into the levels and types of airport charges worldwide and into recent changes in airport charge policy and structure. This paper describes the 1996 analysis. It is intended that this work be repeated every year in order to follow developing trends and provide the most up-to-date information possible.

  18. Proton charge extensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stryker, Jesse R.; Miller, Gerald A.

    2016-01-01

    We examine how corrections to S -state energy levels En S in hydrogenic atoms due to the finite proton size are affected by moments of the proton charge distribution. The corrections to En S are computed moment by moment. The results demonstrate that the next-to-leading order term in the expansion is of order rp/aB times the size of the leading order term. Our analysis thus dispels any concern that the larger relative size of this term for muonic hydrogen versus electronic hydrogen might account for the current discrepancy of proton radius measurements extracted from the two systems. Furthermore, the next-to-leading order term in powers of rp/aB that we derive from a dipole proton form factor is proportional to , rather than , as would be expected from the scalar nature of the form factor. The dependence of the finite-size correction on and higher odd-power moments is shown to be a general result for any spherically symmetric proton charge distribution. A method for computing the moment expansion of the finite-size correction to arbitrary order is introduced and the results are tabulated for principal quantum numbers up to n =7 .

  19. Numerical study of superradiant instability for charged stringy black hole-mirror system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ran; Zhao, Junkun

    2015-01-01

    We numerically study the superradiant instability of charged massless scalar field in the background of charged stringy black hole with mirror-like boundary condition. We compare the numerical result with the previous analytical result and show the dependencies of this instability upon various values of black hole charge Q, scalar field charge q, and mirror radius rm. Especially, we have observed that imaginary part of BQN frequencies grows with the scalar field charge q rapidly.

  20. Correlation between obesity and severity of distal radius fractures.

    PubMed

    Acosta-Olivo, C; Gonzalez-Saldivar, J C; Villarreal-Villarreal, G; Torres-Botello, A; Gomez-Garcia, E; Tamez-Mata, Y; Peña-Martinez, V

    2017-04-01

    The incidence of obesity has increased significantly worldwide. Our hypothesis was that patients with obesity have a more severe distal radius fracture and we realized a study to evaluate this correlation between obesity and severity of distal radius fractures caused by low-energy injuries. A total of 114 patients with distal radius fracture were examined in a cross-sectional, observational study. Fractures were classified according to the international AO-Müller/Orthopedic Trauma Association (AO/OTA) classification in order to determine the severity. The patient's Body Mass Index (BMI) was calculated and a Pearson correlation was performed. The patients were predominantly female, and left side was more frequently affected. Most of the fractures were AO/OTA type A (71 patients). The majority of the involved patients in our study were overweighed or obese. We do not observe a direct correlation between grade of obesity and distal radius fracture severity. Based on the results of this study obesity and severity of distal radius fractures do not correlate. Prognostic. Level IV. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Distal Radius Radiographic Indices and Perilunate Fracture Dislocation

    PubMed Central

    Bagherifard, Abolfazl; Jafari, Davod; Keihan Shokouh, Hassan; Motavallian, Ebrahim; Najd Mazhar, Farid

    2016-01-01

    Background Distal radius radiographic indices may play a role as risk factors in pathogenesis of Kienbock’s disease, scaphoid fracture and nonunion. Perilunate fracture dislocations are devastating wrist injuries, and their relationship and distal radius indices have not been addressed in the literature. Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the possible role of distal radius radiographic indices including radial height, radial inclination, ulnar variance and volar tilt as risk factors in the perilunate fracture dislocation injury of the wrist. Patients and Methods We studied distal radius radiographic indices including radial height, radial inclination, ulnar variance and volar tilt in 43 patients with perilunate fracture dislocations and compared them with 44 wrists in the control group. Results The mean values of the radial height, radial inclination, ulnar variance and volar tilt were 12.74 (5 - 18), 24.20 (7 - 35), -0.73 (-5 - 4) and 12.28 (2 - 20) in the patient group. These values were 12.68 (9 - 22), 23.22 (17 - 30), -0.11 (-4 - 3) and 11.05 (-3 - 20), respectively in the control group. There was no statistically significant difference between the two groups. Conclusions This study did not show that distal radius anatomical indices including the radial height, radial inclination, ulnar variance and volar tilt influence perilunate fracture dislocation as risk factors. PMID:27626004

  2. Accuracy of distal radius positioning using an anatomical plate.

    PubMed

    Vroemen, Joy C; Dobbe, Johannes G G; Sierevelt, Inger N; Strackee, Simon D; Streekstra, Geert J

    2013-04-01

    Over the past decade, several anatomical plates have been introduced to improve the result of open reduction and internal fixation of the distal radius. Using 3-dimensional imaging techniques, the authors studied the accuracy and reproducibility of distal radius positioning using anatomical plates.Distal radius fractures and the correction of these fractures were simulated with plastic bone models of radii. The authors simulated a defect by removing an arbitrary wedge shape from the artificial radii. Two surgeons corrected these fractures by placing 2 anatomical plate types according to the plate manufacturers' instructions. The residual positioning errors of the distal segment in relation to the unaffected radii were determined using 3-dimensional imaging and were compared with naturally occurring bilateral radius differences in healthy individuals. In many cases, positioning does not agree with differences based on bilateral asymmetry in healthy patients.This study indicated the accuracy of anatomical plates. Positioning an anatomical plate may lead to considerable residual errors in individual patients. Volar distal radius plate shapes differ among plate manufacturers. Therefore, one plate may perform better than another in an individual.

  3. Evidence for a large radius of the 11Be projectile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    So, W. Y.; Choi, K. S.; Cheoun, Myung-Ki; Kim, K. S.

    2016-05-01

    We investigate ratios of the elastic scattering cross section to Rutherford cross section, PE, and angular distributions of breakup cross section by using an optical model which exploits various long-range dynamic polarization potentials as well as short-range nuclear bare potentials for the 11Be projectile. From these simultaneous analyses, we extract a large radius of a halo projectile from the experimental data for PE and the angular distribution of the breakup cross section of the 11Be + 64Zn and 11 + 120Sn systems. It results from the fact that a large radius for the long-range nuclear potential is more reasonable for properly explaining these data simultaneously. The extracted reduced interaction radius turns out to be r0=3.18 ˜3.61 fm for 11Be nucleus, which is larger than the conventional value of r0=1.1 ˜1.5 fm used in the standard radius form R =r0A1 /3 . Furthermore, the larger radius as well as the normalization constant N is shown to be important for understanding Coulomb dipole strength distribution.

  4. Charge dynamic characteristics in corona-charged polytetrafluoroethylene film electrets.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gang-Jin; Xiao, Hui-Ming; Zhu, Chun-Feng

    2004-08-01

    In this work, the charge dynamics characteristics of injection, transport and decay in porous and non-porous polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) film electrets were investigated by means of corona charging, isothermal and thermal stimulating surface-potential decay measurements. The results showed that the initial surface potential, whether positively or negatively charging, is much higher in non-porous PTFE than in porous PTFE. For porous film the value of initial surface potentials increases with increase of film thickness. Higher charging temperature can remarkably improve charge stability. The charge dynamics are correlated to materials microstructure according to their scanning electron micrographs. For non-porous PTFE films, polarizability change of C-F bonds is the main origin of electret charges; but for porous PTFE film a large number of bulk and interface type traps are expected because of the greater area of interface and higher crystallinity.

  5. Locking versus nonlocking palmar plate fixation of distal radius fractures.

    PubMed

    Osti, Michael; Mittler, Christoph; Zinnecker, Richard; Westreicher, Christoph; Allhoff, Clemens; Benedetto, Karl Peter

    2012-11-01

    This study compared functional and radiological outcomes after treatment of extension-type distal radius fractures with conventional titanium nonlocking T-plates or titanium 1.5-mm locking plates. A total of 60 patients were included and followed for 4 to 7 years after receiving nonlocking T-plates (group A; n=30) or locking plates (group B; n=30) with and without dorsal bone grafting. Bone grafting was significantly more often performed in the nonlocking group to increase dorsal fracture fixation and stability (P<.003). Pre- and postoperative and follow-up values for palmar tilt, radial inclination, radial shortening, and ulnar variance were recorded. Age, sex, and fracture type were similarly distributed between the 2 groups. Postoperative and follow-up evaluation revealed equal allocation of intra-articular step formation and osteoarthritic changes to both groups. The overall complication rate was 25%. Compared with the nonlocking system, patients undergoing locking plate fixation presented with statistically significantly better values for postoperative palmar tilt (5.53° vs 8.15°; P<.02) and radial inclination (22.13° vs 25.03°; P<.02). However, forearm pronation was significantly better in group A (P<.005). At follow-up, radial inclination tended to approach a statistically significant difference in favor of group B. All clinical assessment, including Mayo wrist score, Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand score, Green and O'Brien score, Gartland and Werley score, visual analog scale score, and grip strength, yielded no statistically significant difference between the 2 groups. Locking plates seem to provide benefits regarding surgical technique and comfort, improvement in implant anchorage (especially in osteoporotic bone), and reduce the necessity of additional bone grafting. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  6. Diagnosis and treatment of osteoporosis in postmenopausal women with distal radius fracture in Germany.

    PubMed

    Endres, Heinz G; Dasch, Burkhard; Maier, Christoph; Lungenhausen, Margitta; Smektala, Rüdiger; Trampisch, Hans J; Pientka, Ludger

    2007-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate osteoporosis diagnosis and treatment on the basis of medical history, at hospital discharge, and 6-12 months after discharge, as well as to assess the frequency of subsequent fractures in postmenopausal women with distal radius fracture. A prospective, observational study of hospitalized women aged 55 years and older with an isolated distal radius fracture from minimal trauma. Subjects were recruited in 242 acute care hospitals in Germany. Potential risk factors for osteoporosis, frequency of osteoporosis assessment, frequency of medication treatment and subsequent fractures 6-12 months after discharge. Among 2031 patients we identified 652 appropriate postmenopausal women. Less than one-third of patient histories contained any bone density parameters, and only a minority of subjects (33%, 217) underwent bone density assessment while in hospital. Of these, 55% (119) were diagnosed with low bone density, yet only 30% of those were prescribed supplements (calcium/vitamin D) and/or specific osteoporosis medication (mostly bisphosphonates) at discharge. Six to twelve months after hospital discharge, the low rate of treatment had not changed substantially. In the interval, 4.3% had sustained a subsequent fracture from minimal trauma: 1.4% a distal radius fracture (0.3% a refracture) and 2.9% a hip joint or other fracture (not specified). A significant age difference between those with and without subsequent distal radius fractures was found (p = 0.01) but not a significant difference between patients with or without osteoporosis medication (p = 0.79), primarily because the case numbers were too small. A substantial proportion of postmenopausal women hospitalized with distal radius fracture were not sufficiently evaluated or treated for their potential risk of osteoporosis.

  7. ACS imaging of star clusters in M 51. I. Identification and radius distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheepmaker, R. A.; Haas, M. R.; Gieles, M.; Bastian, N.; Larsen, S. S.; Lamers, H. J. G. L. M.

    2007-07-01

    Context: Size measurements of young star clusters are valuable tools to put constraints on the formation and early dynamical evolution of star clusters. Aims: We use HST/ACS observations of the spiral galaxy M 51 in F435W, F555W and F814W to select a large sample of star clusters with accurate effective radius measurements in an area covering the complete disc of M 51. We present the dataset and study the radius distribution and relations between radius, colour, arm/interarm region, galactocentric distance, mass and age. Methods: We select a sample of 7698 (F435W), 6846 (F555W) and 5024 (F814W) slightly resolved clusters and derive their effective radii (R_eff) by fitting the spatial profiles with analytical models convolved with the point spread function. The radii of 1284 clusters are studied in detail. Results: We find cluster radii between 0.5 and ~10 pc, and one exceptionally large cluster candidate with R_eff = 21.6 pc. The median R_eff is 2.1 pc. We find 70 clusters in our sample which have colours consistent with being old GC candidates and we find 6 new “faint fuzzy” clusters in, or projected onto, the disc of M 51. The radius distribution can not be fitted with a power law similar to the one for star-forming clouds. We find an increase in R_eff with colour as well as a higher fraction of clusters with B-V ⪆ 0.05 in the interarm regions. We find a correlation between R_eff and galactocentric distance (RG) of the form R_eff∝ RG0.12±0.02, which is considerably weaker than the observed correlation for old Milky Way GCs. We find weak relations between cluster luminosity and radius: R_eff∝ L0.15±0.02 for the interarm regions and R_eff∝ L-0.11±0.01 for the spiral arm regions, but we do not observe a correlation between cluster mass and radius. Conclusions: The observed radius distribution indicates that shortly after the formation of the clusters from a fractal gas, the radii of the clusters have changed in a non-uniform way. We find tentative

  8. Contact areas of the scaphoid and lunate with the distal radius in neutral and extension: correlation of falling strategies and distal radial anatomy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y R; Wu, Y F; Tang, J B; Giddins, G

    2014-05-01

    The functional neutral of wrist movement is about 10° extension yet the distal radius has a volar tilt. This has not previously been explained. Assuming that the contact area between the carpus and the distal radius increased in wrist extension this would also help stabilize the carpus on the distal radius in positions where typically there is greater loading. To test this hypothesis we reconstructed three-dimensional structures of the carpal bones and distal radius using computed tomography scans of 13 normal wrists. The contact areas of the scaphoid with the distal radius were measured and were found progressively increased from flexion 20°, neutral, extension 20°, to extension 40°. The maximal increases in the contact area of the scaphoid and the distal radius was at full wrist extension. No significant changes in the contact areas of the lunate with the distal radius were found between the different positions. The contact characteristics provide greater stability to the carpus on the distal radius, and to help spread forces from impact to the wrist reducing the transmitted peak forces and thus the risk of distal radius and carpal injuries.

  9. Optimizing hydraulic radius and acoustic field of the thermoacoustic engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Huifang; Li, Qing; Zhou, Gang

    2009-03-01

    It is well known that the acoustic field and the hydraulic radius of the regenerator play key roles in thermoacoustic processes. The optimization of hydraulic radius strongly depends on the acoustic field in the regenerator. This paper investigates the synthetical optimization of the hydraulic radius and the acoustic field which is characterized by the ratio of the traveling wave component over the standing wave component. In this paper, the normalized expressions of acoustic power gain and second law efficiency are derived and calculated, and then some useful calculated results are discussed. Some conclusions have been obtained, which are of significance to explain the optimum work conditions of existing engines and to guide the designs of new thermoacoustic devices. Finally, the operation factor of regenerator is discussed, which is a dimensionless parameter defined in this paper and highly relates to the working condition of the regenerator.

  10. Closed reduction of radius refracture: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Shahid, Mohammad; Yeo, Mildrid; Smibert, John Graham

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Refractures of the radius and ulna in the paediatric patient with flexible intramedullary nails in situ are known to occur. There are no formal guidelines currently in the literature to guide the management of such fractures. PRESENTATION OF CASE A 10-year-old Caucasian girl, sustained a closed refracture of the radius at the same level, with the flexible intramedullary nails in situ to treat her recent ulna and radius fractures. DISCUSSION We proposed a new non-invasive way of reducing and maintaining such fractures without removal of the bent nail completely. CONCLUSION This method does not significantly reduce the mechanical strength of the nail, as we do not advocate applying an external lateral force, which would compromise nail mechanical strength and eventually lead to breakage of the nail in situ. PMID:22096752

  11. SATELLITE FORMATION :spreading of rings beyond the Roche radius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crida, A.; Charnoz, S.

    2013-11-01

    When a disk of solid particles (like Saturn's rings) spreads beyond the Roche radius (inside which planetary tides prevent aggregation), satellites form and migrate away. After a quick derivation of the Roche radius, here we describe analytically this process. When the spreading is fast, only one large satellite forms, as was the case for Pluto and Earth. When the spreading is slow, a retinue of satellites appear with masses increasing with distance to the Roche radius, in excellent agreement with Saturn's, Uranus', and Neptune's satellite systems. This suggests that Uranus and Neptune used to have massive rings that disappeared to give birth to their regular satellites. Thus, we argue in Crida & Charnoz (2012) that most regular satellites in the Solar System probably formed in this way.

  12. Attractor radius, a new determination criterion of predictability limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Deqiang; Ding, Ruiqiang; Li, Jianping; Feng, Jie

    2014-05-01

    Firstly, the definition of the attractor radius was given and then the property of that the attractor radius (AR) in a given n-dimensional attractor A is a constant was proved in theory. Secondly, the SV of the square of the RMS difference was separated into two components - the systematic error and the attractor radius, and it was proved that the observed global climatological RMS (OCR) difference is not equal to 71% of the SV of the RMS difference when the systematic error is existed, however, it is always equal to 71% of the AR. Then the physical understanding of the AR and also the predictability limit determinated by it were discussed. Finally, the spatial distributions of the predictability limit calculated from CFSv2 data by different criterions were compared.

  13. A classical point charge model study of system size dependence of oxidation and reorganization free energies in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Ayala, Regla; Sprik, Michiel

    2008-01-17

    The response of water to a change of charge of a solvated ion is, to a good approximation, linear for the type of iron-like ions frequently used as a model system in classical force field studies of electron transfer. Free energies for such systems can be directly calculated from average vertical energy gaps. Exploiting this feature, we have computed the free energy and the reorganization energy of the M2+/M3+ and M1+/M2+ oxidations in a series of model systems all containing a single Mn+ ion and an increasing number of simple point charge water molecules. Long-range interactions are taken into account by Ewald summation methods. Our calculations confirm the observation made by Hummer, Pratt, and Garcia (J. Phys. Chem. 1996, 100, 1206) that the finite size correction to the estimate of solvation energy (and hence oxidation free energy) in such a setup is effectively proportional to the inverse third power (1/L3) of the length L of the periodic cell. The finite size correction to the reorganization energy is found to scale with 1/L. These simulation results are analyzed using a periodic generalization of the Born cavity model for solvation, yielding three different estimates of the cavity radius, namely, from the infinite system size extrapolation of oxidation free energy and reorganization energy, and from the slope of the linear dependence of oxidation free energy on 1/L3. The cavity radius for the reorganization energy is found to be significantly larger compared to the radius for the oxidation (solvation) free energy. The radius controlling the 1/L3 dependence of oxidation free energy is found to be comparable to the radius for reorganization. The implication of these results for density functional theory-based ab initio molecular dynamics calculation of redox potentials is discussed.

  14. Influence of π-conjugation structural changes on intramolecular charge transfer and photoinduced electron transfer in donor-π-acceptor dyads.

    PubMed

    Kim, So-Yoen; Cho, Yang-Jin; Lee, Ah-Rang; Son, Ho-Jin; Han, Won-Sik; Cho, Dae Won; Kang, Sang Ook

    2016-12-21

    The influence of π-conjugation structural changes on photoinduced electron transfer (PET) and intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) processes in π-conjugated donor (D)-acceptor (A) dyads (D-π-A) was investigated. Three types of D-π-A dyads were prepared through the modification of the structure of their π-conjugated linker, including D-π-A (1) and D-πtw-A (2) having a twisted π-conjugation, and D-π-Si-π-A (3) with a π-conjugation severed by a Si-atom. In these dyads, carbazole (Cz) and oxadiazole (Oz) moieties act as an electron donor and acceptor, respectively. The emission maxima of dyads 1 and 3 red-shifted with the increase in polarity, which could be attributed to the ICT process. The fluorescence lifetimes of dyads 1 and 3 were 2.64 and 4.29 ns in CH2Cl2, respectively. In contrast, dyad 2 showed dual emission at 350 and 470 nm in CH2Cl2. The emission of dyad 2 at 380 nm corresponded to the monomer fluorescence in the locally excited state. Moreover, the emission at 470 nm increased simultaneously with the diminishing of the fluorescence at 380 nm. This emission band can be assigned as the intramolecular exciplex emission, and showed a strong solvatochromic shift. The low emission quantum yield (<3%) of dyad 2 is due to the PET process. In dyad 2, the cationic and anionic radical species generated by the PET process were confirmed by femtosecond transient absorption (fs-TA) spectroscopy. Upon photoexcitation at 290 or 340 nm, the A or D moieties can be selectively excited. Upon excitation at 290 nm, the acceptor moiety can be excited to the (1)A* state, thus the photoinduced hole transfer (PHT) takes place from (1)A* to D through the HOMO levels within a few picoseconds. On the other hand, when the donor moiety is excited at 340 nm, the PET process occurs from (1)D* to A. Based on the fs-TA studies, it was found that the dynamics and mechanisms for the electron (or charge) transfer were strongly affected by the variation of the π-conjugation of the

  15. Future treatment and research directions in distal radius fracture.

    PubMed

    Jupiter, Jesse

    2012-05-01

    Whether or not they will have their lives dramatically extended in the next few decades, it is clear that people are living longer, healthier, and more active lives. The two peak incidences of distal radius fractures will remain within the pediatric and geriatric age groups, with the latter experiencing a substantial increase in the coming years. This article attempts to project future developments with regard to epidemiology, risk and prevention, fracture assessment, and treatment of distal radius fractures, and the ever increasing concern for the economic impact of this prevalent injury. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Defining the air sparging radius of influence for groundwater remediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCray, John E.; Falta, Ronald W.

    1996-10-01

    A theoretical study of air sparging for the removal of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from groundwater is presented. A simple relationship is developed between the observed subsurface pressure increase due to sparging and the gas saturation at that location, thus providing a quantitative measure of the sparging radius of influence. Multiphase numerical simulations using a radially symmetric cylindrical geometry are used to confirm this relation, and to relate the injected gas radius of influence to the zone of VOC cleanup during sparging. These simulations also illustrate the transient and steady-state behavior of air sparging systems in both homogeneous and heterogeneous systems.

  17. Radius Constants for Analytic Functions with Fixed Second Coefficient

    PubMed Central

    Nargesi, Mahnaz M.; Ali, Rosihan M.; Ravichandran, V.

    2014-01-01

    Let f(z) = z + ∑n=2∞anzn be analytic in the unit disk with the second coefficient a2 satisfying |a2 | = 2b, 0 ≤ b ≤ 1. Sharp radius of Janowski starlikeness is obtained for functions f whose nth coefficient satisfies |an | ≤ cn + d  (c, d ≥ 0) or |an | ≤ c/n  (c > 0  and  n ≥ 3). Other radius constants are also obtained for these functions, and connections with earlier results are made. PMID:25101327

  18. Exploring the entrance of proton pathways in cytochrome c oxidase from Paracoccus denitrificans: surface charge, buffer capacity and redox-dependent polarity changes at the internal surface.

    PubMed

    Kirchberg, Kristina; Michel, Hartmut; Alexiev, Ulrike

    2013-03-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase (CcO), the terminal oxidase of cellular respiration, reduces molecular oxygen to water. The mechanism of proton pumping as well as the coupling of proton and electron transfer is still not understood in this redox-linked proton pump. Eleven residues at the aqueous-exposed surfaces of CcO from Paracoccus denitrificans have been exchanged to cysteines in a two-subunit base variant to yield single reactive cysteine variants. These variants are designed to provide unique labeling sites for probes to be used in spectroscopic experiments investigating the mechanism of proton pumping in CcO. To this end we have shown that all cysteine variants are enzymatically active. Cysteine positions at the negative (N-) side of the membrane are located close to the entrance of the D- and K-proton transfer pathways that connect the N-side with the catalytic oxygen reduction site. Labeling of the pH-indicator dye fluorescein to these sites allowed us to determine the surface potential at the cytoplasmic CcO surface, which corresponds to a surface charge density of -0.5 elementary charge/1000Å(2). In addition, acid-base titrations revealed values of CcO buffer capacity. Polarity measurements of the label environment at the N-side provided (i) site-specific values indicative of a hydrophilic and a more hydrophobic environment dependent on the label position, and (ii) information on a global change to a more apolar environment upon reduction of the enzyme. Thus, the redox state of the copper and heme centers inside the hydrophobic interior of CcO affect the properties at the cytoplasmic surface. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Changes in helical content or net charge of apolipoprotein C-I alter its affinity for lipid/water interfaces[S

    PubMed Central

    Meyers, Nathan L.; Wang, Libo; Gursky, Olga; Small, Donald M.

    2013-01-01

    Amphipathic α-helices mediate binding of exchangeable apolipoproteins to lipoproteins. To probe the role of α-helical structure in protein-lipid interactions, we used oil-drop tensiometry to characterize the interfacial behavior of apolipoprotein C-I (apoC-I) variants at triolein/water (TO/W) and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoylphosphatidylcholine/triolein/water (POPC/TO/W) interfaces. ApoC-I, the smallest apolipoprotein, has two amphipathic α-helices. Mutants had single Pro or Ala substitutions that resulted in large differences in helical content in solution and on phospholipids. The ability of apoC-I to bind TO/W and POPC/TO/W interfaces correlated strongly with α-helical propensity. On binding these interfaces, peptides with higher helical propensity increased surface pressure to a greater extent. Likewise, peptide exclusion pressure at POPC/TO/W interfaces increased with greater helical propensity. ApoC-I retention on TO/W and POPC/TO/W interfaces correlated strongly with phospholipid-bound helical content. On compression of these interfaces, peptides with higher helical content were ejected at higher pressures. Substitution of Arg for Pro in the N-terminal α-helix altered net charge and reduced apoC-I affinity for POPC/TO/W interfaces. Our results suggest that peptide-lipid interactions drive α-helix binding to and retention on lipoproteins. Point mutations in small apolipoproteins could significantly change α-helical propensity or charge, thereby disrupting protein-lipid interactions and preventing the proteins from regulating lipoprotein catabolism at high surface pressures. PMID:23670531

  20. Switch between charge transfer and local excited states in 4-aminophenyl-substituted Hantzsch 1,4-dihydropyridine induced by pH change and transition metal ions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bin; Peng, Ming-Li; Wu, Li-Zhu; Zhang, Li-Ping; Tung, Chen-Ho

    2006-10-01

    The absorption and fluorescence spectra of a Hantzsch 1,4-dihydropyridine derivative bearing a N,N-dimethylaminophenyl group at 4-position (H(2)Py-PhN(CH(3))(2)) in aprotic solvents have been examined and compared to model compounds 4-phenyl- and 4-methyl-substituted Hantzsch 1,4-dihydropyridines (H(2)Py-Ph and H(2)Py-Me). While H(2)Py-Ph and H(2)Py-Me show fluorescence around 420 nm from the local excited state of the dihydropyridine chromophore, H(2)Py-PhN(CH(3))(2) exhibits fluorescence around 520 nm from the intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) state involving the aniline and dihydropyridine groups as donor and acceptor, respectively. Upon addition of an acid to the solution of H(2)Py-PhN(CH(3))(2), the amino group in the aniline is protonated. Thus, the photoinduced intramolecular charge transfer is prevented, and only the fluorescence from the local excited state of the dihydropyridine chromophore can be detected. These changes in the fluorescence behavior are fully reversible: subsequent addition of a base to the acidic solution leads to the recovery of the ICT fluorescence and the quenching of the local fluorescence. Transition metal ions also can switch the fluorescence of H(2)Py-PhN(CH(3))(2). Evidence for the interaction between transition metal ions and the amino group in the dimethylaniline have been provided by absorption and emission spectrum as well as NMR studies.

  1. Poynting flux in the neighbourhood of a point charge in arbitrary motion and radiative power losses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singal, Ashok K.

    2016-07-01

    We examine the electromagnetic fields in the neighbourhood of a ‘point charge’ in arbitrary motion and thereby determine the Poynting flux across a spherical surface of vanishingly small radius surrounding the charge. We show that the radiative power losses from a point charge turn out to be proportional to the scalar product of the instantaneous velocity and the first time-derivative of the acceleration of the charge. This may seem to be discordant with the familiar Larmor formula where the instantaneous power radiated from a charge is proportional to the square of acceleration. However, it seems that the root cause of the discrepancy actually lies in Larmor’s formula, which is derived using the acceleration fields but without due consideration for the Poynting flux associated with the velocity-dependent self-fields ‘co-moving’ with the charge. Further, while deriving Larmor’s formula, one equates the Poynting flux through a surface at some later time to the radiation loss by the enclosed charge at the retarded time. Poynting’s theorem, on the other hand, relates the outgoing radiation flux from a closed surface to the rate of energy decrease within the enclosed volume, all calculated for the same given instant only. Here we explicitly show the absence of any Poynting flux in the neighbourhood of an instantly stationary point charge, implying no radiative losses from such a charge, which is in complete conformity with energy conservation. We further show how Larmor’s formula is still able to serve our purpose in the vast majority of cases. It is further shown that Larmor’s formula in general violates momentum conservation and, in the case of synchrotron radiation, leads to a potentially incorrect conclusion about the pitch angle changes of the radiating charges, and that only the radiation reaction formula yields a correct result, consistent with special relativity.

  2. Valence-electron spectral change and charge transfer mechanism of CaSi 2 during CaSi 2H 2O reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, S.; Nakayama, H.; Nishino, T.; Iida, S.

    1997-04-01

    The changes in the valence electron states of CaSi 2 during the chemical reaction with H 2O have been investigated by Auger valence electron spectroscopy (AVES). The drastic changes in the valence electron spectra of 3s and 3p states, which are caused by the oxidization of the Si atoms in CaSi 2, were observed in Si[2s, 2p, V] spectra for CaSi 2 after the reaction. In particular, the Si[2s, 2p, V] spectra of CaSi 2 samples reacted with H 2O at 60 or 80°C for 3 h were almost similar to that of SiO 2. The peak shift of Ca[2p, 3p, 3p] Auger transition toward the lower energy side has been observed, suggesting the formation of bonds between Ca 3p and O orbitals. New peaks due to CaO or CaOH bonds also appeared in the valence electron region of Ca[2p, 3p, V] Auger transition. The charge transfer and the chemical-bond formation can be well demonstrated by AVES during the CaSi 2H 2O reaction.

  3. The image-charge correction for curved field emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Debabrata; Ramachandran, Rajasree

    2017-07-01

    The image-charge potential plays a key role in field emission by lowering the potential barrier, thereby leading to an increase in current density by orders of magnitude. The classical image-charge potential is however strictly applicable to planar emitters rather than the curved protrusions characteristic of field emission sites. Using recent results [Jensen et al., J. Vac. Sci. Technol. B 35, 02C101 (2017)] for a hyperboloid emitting surface, we show that for a charge close to the emitter surface, the image charge magnitude and location are well approximated by replacing the surface locally by a sphere having the same radius of curvature. Corrections to the image-charge potential under this approximation are calculated and found to be significant for field emission when the radius of curvature is in the nanometer regime. In such cases, there is reduced electron emission and the effect is more pronounced at lower external field strengths.

  4. Computational Analysis of Dual Radius Circulation Control Airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee-Rausch, E. M.; Vatsa, V. N.; Rumsey, C. L.

    2006-01-01

    The goal of the work is to use multiple codes and multiple configurations to provide an assessment of the capability of RANS solvers to predict circulation control dual radius airfoil performance and also to identify key issues associated with the computational predictions of these configurations that can result in discrepancies in the predicted solutions. Solutions were obtained for the Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI) dual radius circulation control airfoil and the General Aviation Circulation Control (GACC) dual radius airfoil. For the GTRI-DR airfoil, two-dimensional structured and unstructured grid computations predicted the experimental trend in sectional lift variation with blowing coefficient very well. Good code to code comparisons between the chordwise surface pressure coefficients and the solution streamtraces also indicated that the detailed flow characteristics were matched between the computations. For the GACC-DR airfoil, two-dimensional structured and unstructured grid computations predicted the sectional lift and chordwise pressure distributions accurately at the no blowing condition. However at a moderate blowing coefficient, although the code to code variation was small, the differences between the computations and experiment were significant. Computations were made to investigate the sensitivity of the sectional lift and pressure distributions to some of the experimental and computational parameters, but none of these could entirely account for the differences in the experimental and computational results. Thus, CFD may indeed be adequate as a prediction tool for dual radius CC flows, but limited and difficult to obtain two-dimensional experimental data prevents a confident assessment at this time.

  5. Finite Larmor radius flute mode theory with end loss

    SciTech Connect

    Kotelnikov, I.A.; Berk, H.L.

    1993-08-01

    The theory of flute mode stability is developed for a two-energy- component plasma partially terminated by a conducting limiter. The formalism is developed as a preliminary study of the effect of end-loss in open-ended mirror machines where large Larmor radius effects are important.

  6. Ultrasound-Guided Reduction of Distal Radius Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Sabzghabaei, Anita; Shojaee, Majid; Arhami Dolatabadi, Ali; Manouchehrifar, Mohammad; Asadi, Mahdi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Distal radius fractures are a common traumatic injury, particularly in the elderly population. In the present study we examined the effectiveness of ultrasound guidance in the reduction of distal radius fractures in adult patients presenting to emergency department (ED). Methods: In this prospective case control study, eligible patients were adults older than 18 years who presented to the ED with distal radius fractures. 130 consecutive patient consisted of two group of Sixty-Five patients were prospectively enrolled for around 1 years. The first group underwent ultrasound-guided reduction and the second (control group) underwent blind reduction. All procedures were performed by two trained emergency residents under supervision of senior emergency physicians. Results: Baseline characteristics between two groups were similar. The rate of repeat reduction was reduced in the ultrasound group (9.2% vs 24.6%; P = .019). The post reduction radiographic indices were similar between the two groups, although the ultrasound group had improved volar tilt (mean, 7.6° vs 3.7°; P = .000). The operative rate was reduced in the ultrasound groups (10.8% vs 27.7%; P = .014). Conclusion: Ultrasound guidance is effective and recommended for routine use in the reduction of distal radius fractures. PMID:27299141

  7. Intrafocal pinning for distal radius metaphyseal fractures in children.

    PubMed

    Parikh, Shital N; Jain, Viral V; Youngquist, Jeffrey

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this retrospective case control study was to evaluate the results of intrafocal pinning for distal radius metaphyseal fractures in children and to compare these results with conventional pinning. Data were collected from medical records and radiographs from patients who underwent closed reduction and percutaneous pinning for distal radius fracture in a Level I trauma center at the authors' institution between 2008 and 2010. Inclusion criteria included a dorsally angulated metaphyseal fracture without physeal involvement, an open distal radius physis, and a follow-up to radiographic union. A total of 10 patients with intrafocal pinning were compared to 26 patients with conventional pinning. Preoperatively, angulation was greater in patients who received intrafocal pinning than conventional pinning based on anteroposterior radiographs. Postoperatively, the 2 groups did not differ in angulation on either anteroposterior or lateral radiographs. One malunion and 2 pin-related complications occurred in the conventional pinning group, and 1 pin-related complication occurred in the intrafocal pinning group. The 2 groups did not differ by age, sex, side of injury, days to surgery, or initial shortening. This study affirms that the intrafocal pinning technique is an alternative to the conventional pinning technique for the stabilization of displaced metaphyseal distal radius fractures in children. Intrafocal pinning can also be used as a reduction tool for fractures that cannot be reduced by closed manipulation. The complications are comparable between the 2 techniques.

  8. Nonlinear buckling analyses of a small-radius carbon nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ning; Wang, Yong-Gang; Li, Min; Jia, Jiao

    2014-04-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) was first discovered by Sumio Iijima. It has aroused extensive attentions of scholars from all over the world. Over the past two decades, we have acquired a lot of methods to synthesize carbon nanotubes and learn their many incredible mechanical properties such as experimental methods, theoretical analyses, and computer simulations. However, the studies of experiments need lots of financial, material, and labor resources. The calculations will become difficult and time-consuming, and the calculations may be even beyond the realm of possibility when the scale of simulations is large, as for computer simulations. Therefore, it is necessary for us to explore a reasonable continuum model, which can be applied into nano-scale. This paper attempts to develop a mathematical model of a small-radius carbon nanotube based on continuum theory. An Isotropic circular cross-section, Timoshenko beam model is used as a simplified mechanical model for the small-radius carbon nanotube. Theoretical part is mainly based on modified couple stress theory to obtain the numerical solutions of buckling deformation. Meanwhile, the buckling behavior of the small radius carbon nanotube is simulated by Molecular Dynamics method. By comparing with the numerical results based on modified couple stress theory, the dependence of the small-radius carbon nanotube mechanical behaviors on its elasticity constants, small-size effect, geometric nonlinearity, and shear effect is further studied, and an estimation of the small-scale parameter of a CNT (5, 5) is obtained.

  9. [Complex regional pain syndrome following distal fractures of the radius : Epidemiology, pathophysiological models, diagnostics and therapy].

    PubMed

    Harhaus, L; Neubrech, F; Hirche, C; Schilling, T; Kohler, H; Mayr, A; Riesmeier, A; Bickert, B; Kneser, U

    2016-09-01

    The complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) still represents an incompletely etiologically understood complication following fractures of the distal radius. The incidence of CRPS following fractures of the distal radius varies between 1 % and 37 %. Pathophysiologically, a complex interaction of inflammatory, somatosensory, motor and autonomic changes is suspected, leading to a persistent maladaptive response and sensitization of the central and peripheral nervous systems with development of the corresponding symptoms. Decisive for the diagnostics are a detailed patient medical history and a clinical hand surgical, neurological and pain-related examination with confirmation of the Budapest criteria. Among the types of apparatus used for diagnostics, 3‑phase bone scintigraphy and temperature measurement have a certain importance. A multimodal therapy started as early as possible is the most promising approach for successful treatment. As part of a multimodal rehabilitation the main focus of therapy lies on pain relief and functional aspects.

  10. Two-dimensional positive column structure in a discharge tube with radius discontinuity

    SciTech Connect

    Zobnin, A. V. Usachev, A. D.; Petrov, O. F.; Fortov, V. E.

    2014-11-15

    The low-pressure (40 and 90 Pa) low-current (4 and 10 mA) direct current discharge in a tube with a sharp change of its radius is studied both numerically and experimentally. A fully self-consistent hybrid numerical model of a two-dimensional non-uniform positive column in neon is developed using a nonlocal approach. The model combines kinetic simulation of the electrons (under two-terms approach) and fluid description of the neon ions and permits to calculate the distribution of all plasma parameters in the direct current discharges in the cameras with cylindrical geometry and radius discontinuity. The simulation results are compared with the measured 585.3 nm neon spectral line absolute intensities and excited 1s{sub 3} metastable neon atom number densities. Non-local electron kinetics in the transition region and formation of standing strata are discussed.

  11. Electrical Charging of the Clouds of Titan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borucki, William J.; Whitten, R. C.; Bakes, E. L. O.

    2003-01-01

    We have used recent data on graphitic cloud particles in the atmosphere or Titan to compute the electrical charging of the particles (radii ranging from 0.01 microns to 0.26 microns). The charging on the nightside was rather similar to that obtained earlier (Borucki et al, Icarus, 72, 604-622, 1987) except that charge distributions on the particles are now computed and recently obtained cloud particle sizes and density distributions were employed. The negative charge on particles of 0.26 microns peaked at 9 at 150 km altitude. The computations were repeated for the dayside with the addition of photoelectron emission by the particles as a result of the absorption of solar UV radiation. Particles (except the very smallest) now became positively charged with particles of radius 0.26 microns being charged up to +47. Next, very small particles (radii approximately 3 x 10^-4 microns) of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were introduced and treated as sources of negative ions since they could be either neutral or carry one negative charge. Moreover, they are mobile so that they had to be treated like molecular size negative ions although much more massive. They had the effect of substantially reducing the electron densities in the altitude range 190 to 310 km to values less than the negative PAH densities and increasing the peak electron charge on the larger particles. Particles of radius 0.26 microns bore peak charges of plus or minus 47 at altitudes of approximately 250 km. The simulated effect of PAHs on the nightside proved to be much less pronounced; at the peak negative PAH density, it was less than the electron density. The physics governing these results will be discussed.

  12. Electrospinning: Distribution of charges in liquid jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornev, Konstantin G.

    2011-12-01

    An analysis of the radial distribution of charges in liquid jets is presented. Two cases where considered: (1) when the charges are uniformly distributed through the jet cross-section but are allowed to concentrate at the jet surface with time; (2) when the charges reach a steady state where the Coulomb repulsion and Brownian mixing are counterbalanced keeping the charges inside the jet. Using the first model, we showed that the charge adsorption in nonpolar fluids occurs much faster than that in polar fluids. This provides the basis for the consideration of the second model applicable for polar liquids. We examined this case and found that a steady state does exist, but the concentration of charges is limited from above by a critical concentration inversely proportional to the square of the jet radius. It was shown that above this critical concentration, the charges should accumulate at the jet surface producing an infinitely large surface charge. Using this analysis, we suggest the classification of different regimes of electrospinning when the jets are mostly carrying the volume or surface charges.

  13. Time dependent charging of layer clouds in the global electric circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Limin; Tinsley, Brian A.

    2012-09-01

    There is much observational data consistent with the hypothesis that the ionosphere-earth current density (Jz) in the global electric circuit, which is modulated by both solar activity and thunderstorm activity, affects atmospheric dynamics and cloud cover. One candidate mechanism involves Jz causing the accumulation of space charge on droplets and aerosol particles, that affects the rate of scavenging of the latter, notably those of Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN) and Ice Forming Nuclei (IFN) (Tinsley, 2008, 2010). Space charge is the difference, per unit volume, between total positive and total negative electrical charge that is on droplets, aerosol particles (including the CCN and IFN) and air ions. The cumulative effects of the scavenging in stratiform clouds and aerosol layers in an air mass over the lifetime of the aerosol particles of 1-10 days affects the concentration and size distribution of the CCN, so that in subsequent episodes of cloud formation (including deep convective clouds) there can be effects on droplet size distribution, coagulation, precipitation processes, and even storm dynamics.Because the time scales for charging for some clouds can be long compared to cloud lifetimes, the amount of charge at a given time, and its effect on scavenging, depend more on the charging rate than on the equilibrium charge that would eventually be attained. To evaluate this, a new time-dependent charging model has been developed. The results show that for typical altostratus clouds with typical droplet radii 10 μm and aerosol particles of radius of 0.04 μm, the time constant for charging in response to a change in Jz is about 800 s, which is comparable to cloud formation and dissipation timescales for some cloud situations. The charging timescale is found to be strong functions of altitude and aerosol concentration, with the time constant for droplet charging at 2 km in air with a high concentration of aerosols being about an hour, and for clouds at 10 km in

  14. OBSERVATIONAL CONSTRAINTS ON THE DEGENERATE MASS-RADIUS RELATION

    SciTech Connect

    Holberg, J. B.; Oswalt, T. D.; Barstow, M. A. E-mail: toswalt@fit.edu

    2012-03-15

    The white dwarf mass-radius relationship is fundamental to modern astrophysics. It is central to routine estimation of DA white dwarf masses derived from spectroscopic temperatures and gravities. It is also the basis for observational determinations of the white dwarf initial-final-mass relation. Nevertheless, definitive and detailed observational confirmations of the mass-radius relation (MRR) remain elusive owing to a lack of sufficiently accurate white dwarf masses and radii. Current best estimates of masses and radii allow only broad conclusions about the expected inverse relation between masses and radii in degenerate stars. In this paper, we examine a restricted set of 12 DA white dwarf binary systems for which accurate (1) trigonometric parallaxes, (2) spectroscopic effective temperatures and gravities, and (3) gravitational redshifts are available. We consider these three independent constraints on mass and radius in comparison with an appropriate evolved MRR for each star. For the best-determined systems it is found that the DA white dwarfs conform to evolve theoretical MRRs at the 1{sigma} to 2{sigma} level. For the white dwarf 40 Eri B (WD 0413-077) we find strong evidence for the existence of a 'thin' hydrogen envelope. For other stars improved parallaxes will be necessary before meaningful comparisons are possible. For several systems current parallaxes approach the precision required for the state-of-the-art mass and radius determinations that will be obtained routinely from the Gaia mission. It is demonstrated here how these anticipated results can be used to firmly constrain details of theoretical mass-radius determinations.

  15. Unstable Distal Radius Fractures Treated by Volar Locking Anatomical Plates

    PubMed Central

    Jose, Anto; Deniese, Pascal Noel; Babu, Abey Thomas; Rengasamy, Kanagasabai; Najimudeen, Syed

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Fracture of the distal end of radius represents the most common fracture of the upper extremity accounting for 16-20% of all fractures. Plating is now emerging as the gold standard for management of distal radius fractures due to increased rate of complications such as malunion, subluxation/dislocation of distal radio-ulnar joint or late collapse of fracture. Procedures such as closed reduction and cast immobilization, ligamentotaxis with external fixator and percutaneous pin fixation are no longer acceptable. Aim The purpose of the study was to evaluate the functional and radiological outcome of unstable distal radius fractures treated with the volar locking plate. Materials and Methods We reviewed 53 patients from January 2011 to December 2015, treated for unstable distal radius fractures using a volar locking compression plate. Standard radiographic and clinical assessment after 12 months (range 12-16 months) were measured and final functional and radiological outcome were assessed using the Modified Mayo wrist scoring system and Sarmiento’s modification of Lindstorm criteria respectively. Results There were 42 males and 11 females with an average age of 39.12±31.78 years (18-71 years). At the end of 12 months, 36 patients had an excellent radiological outcome and 10 patients had good radiological outcome as per Sarmiento’s modification of Lindstorm criteria. Eleven patients had an excellent functional outcome and 26 patients had a good functional outcome as per modified Mayo wrist scoring system. There was one case of superficial wound infection which subsided with intravenous antibiotics. Conclusion The volar locking plate fixation helps in early mobilization of the wrist, restores anatomy, allows early return to function, prevents secondary loss of reduction and hence is an effective treatment for unstable fractures of the distal radius. PMID:28274009

  16. GAMMASPHERE: Correction technique for detector charge trapping

    SciTech Connect

    Goulding, F.S.; Landis, D.A.

    1993-11-01

    GAMMASPHERE uses 110 very large germanium detectors. Such detectors exhibit charge trapping effects on energy resolution initially due to a native electron trap that is present in virtually all germanium. Furthermore, radiation damage is a serious problem in GAMMASPHERE experiments, producing hole traps that degrade resolution and eventually require annealing to restore the original performance. The technique discussed here uses the current pulse shape from a detector to develop a parameter related to the radius of the largest interaction in the ``track`` of a gamma ray in the detector. Since the charge trapping loss in a signal can be related to the distance carriers travel, the ``radius`` parameter can be used by software to apply a trap correction to the signal.

  17. All spherically symmetric charged anisotropic solutions for compact stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurya, S. K.; Gupta, Y. K.; Ray, Saibal

    2017-06-01

    In the present paper we develop an algorithm for all spherically symmetric anisotropic charged fluid distributions. Considering a new source function ν (r) we find a set of solutions which is physically well behaved and represents compact stellar models. A detailed study specifically shows that the models actually correspond to strange stars in terms of their mass and radius. In this connection we investigate several physical properties like energy conditions, stability, mass-radius ratio, electric charge content, anisotropic nature and surface redshift through graphical plots and mathematical calculations. All the features from these studies are in excellent agreement with the already available evidence in theory as well as observations.

  18. Energy and Charge Localization in Irradiated DNA

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-01

    suggested that fast heavy ions with lar stopping power result in Eawy god ap Loadhnou in DNXA (00)19 transient localized hewaid relion around the io tracks...isolated pair of oppositely charged geminae particles can be considered as an isolated system, was developed in the late 1930’s by Onsager /49,W0 and...refinement of replacing the original Onsager assumption of a point sink at the origin by a recombination sphere of finite radius and recombination velocity

  19. Exploring Changes in Interagency Collaboration Following AIDS United's Positive Charge: A Five-Site HIV Linkage and Retention in Care Program.

    PubMed

    Jain, Kriti M; Maulsby, Cathy; Kinsky, Suzanne; Khosla, Nidhi; Charles, Vignetta; Riordan, Maura; Holtgrave, David R

    2016-12-01

    Many out-of-care people living with HIV have unmet basic needs and are served by loosely connected agencies. Prior research suggests that increasing agencies' coordination may lead to higher quality and better coordinated care. This study examines four U.S. interagency networks in AIDS United's HIV linkage and retention in care program. This study explores changes in the networks of implementing agencies. Each network included a lead agency and collaborators. One administrator and service provider per agency completed an online survey about collaboration prior to and during Positive Charge. We measured how many organizations were connected to one another through density, or the proportion of reported connections out of all possible connections between organizations. Network centralization was measured to investigate whether this network connectivity was due to one or more highly connected organizations or not. To compare collaboration by type, density and centralization were calculated for any collaboration and specific collaboration types: technical assistance, shared resources, information exchange, and boosting access. To characterize the frequency of collaboration, we examined how often organizations interacted by "monthly or greater" versus "less than monthly." Density increased in all networks. Density was highest for information exchange and referring clients. When results were restricted to "monthly or greater," the densities of all networks were lower. This study suggests that a targeted linkage to care initiative may increase some collaboration types among organizations serving people living with HIV. It also provides insights to policy makers about how such networks may evolve. © 2016 Society for Public Health Education.

  20. Variable radius cartography - History and perspectives of a new discipline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalera, Giancarlo

    2014-05-01

    The map that Toscanelli sent to Columbus was an unconscious application of cartography at a smaller radius than the real. The first really conscious attempts to represent the geography of Earth on globes of radius less than the current one occurred after the formulation of the concept of expanding Earth through geological time. The American chemist and geologist Richard Owen (1810-1890) in his book Key to the geology of the globe (1857) described the principles of what he himself called Anatomical Geology, with the Earth growing as a biological organism. The book contained a global paleogeographic map of the Earth that would have had a radius of about 4000 kilometers. In 1928 J.A.H. Kerkhoff (under the pseudonym Aero-dilettant) published a series of paleogeographic globes on which the modern oceans disappeared. With the same artisan methods of transfer continental outlines from a sphere to a smaller one, in 1933 O.C. Hilgenberg represented three different geological epochs, and, later, for the first time mapped paleopoles with their site-pole segments of meridian. Even today the traditional method of Hilgenberg is followed by senior researchers (Klaus Vogel, 2003) and younger geologists (James Maxlow). In England Hugh Owen applied the methods of traditional cartography to the variable radius one. His Atlas of Continental Displacement was in the 70s and 80s, for this discipline, a real milestone. While in the field of constant radius paleogeography the adherents to plate tectonics created many computer codes of automatic mapping (Bullard et al., 1965; Smith & Hallam, 1970; Scotese et al., 1979; and many others), in the variable radius field few tried to reach the same task. In 1972 in United States a first very simple attempt (but was not further developed) came from a private, R.B. Perry, followed by the still not-computerized Atlas of Owen, and both them constituted inspiration for the construction of a FORTRAN variable radius mapping code at INGV, with which it

  1. 21 CFR 886.1430 - Ophthalmic contact lens radius measuring device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ophthalmic contact lens radius measuring device... lens radius measuring device. (a) Identification. An ophthalmic contact lens radius measuring device is an AC-powered device that is a microscope and dial gauge intended to measure the radius of a...

  2. THE STELLAR HALOS OF MASSIVE ELLIPTICAL GALAXIES. II. DETAILED ABUNDANCE RATIOS AT LARGE RADIUS

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, Jenny E.; Murphy, Jeremy D.; Graves, Genevieve J.; Gunn, James E.; Raskutti, Sudhir; Comerford, Julia M.; Gebhardt, Karl

    2013-10-20

    We study the radial dependence in stellar populations of 33 nearby early-type galaxies with central stellar velocity dispersions σ{sub *} ∼> 150 km s{sup –1}. We measure stellar population properties in composite spectra, and use ratios of these composites to highlight the largest spectral changes as a function of radius. Based on stellar population modeling, the typical star at 2R{sub e} is old (∼10 Gyr), relatively metal-poor ([Fe/H] ≈ –0.5), and α-enhanced ([Mg/Fe] ≈ 0.3). The stars were made rapidly at z ≈ 1.5-2 in shallow potential wells. Declining radial gradients in [C/Fe], which follow [Fe/H], also arise from rapid star formation timescales due to declining carbon yields from low-metallicity massive stars. In contrast, [N/Fe] remains high at large radius. Stars at large radius have different abundance ratio patterns from stars in the center of any present-day galaxy, but are similar to average Milky Way thick disk stars. Our observations are thus consistent with a picture in which the stellar outskirts are built up through minor mergers with disky galaxies whose star formation is truncated early (z ≈ 1.5-2)

  3. Contact Modelling of Large Radius Air Bending with Geometrically Exact Contact Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorkov, V.; Konyukhov, A.; Vandepitte, D.; Duflou, J. R.

    2016-08-01

    Usage of high-strength steels in conventional air bending is restricted due to limited bendability of these metals. Large-radius punches provide a typical approach for decreasing deformations during the bending process. However, as deflection progresses the loading scheme changes gradually. Therefore, modelling of the contact interaction is essential for an accurate description of the loading scheme. In the current contribution, the authors implemented a plane frictional contact element based on the penalty method. The geometrically exact contact algorithm is used for the penetration determination. The implementation is done using the OOFEM - open source finite element solver. In order to verify the simulation results, experiments have been conducted on a bending press brake for 4 mm Weldox 1300 with a punch radius of 30 mm and a die opening of 80 mm. The maximum error for the springback calculation is 0.87° for the bending angle of 144°. The contact interaction is a crucial part of large radius bending simulation and the implementation leads to a reliable solution for the springback angle.

  4. Carpal Malalignment in Malunion of the Distal Radius and the Effect of Corrective Osteotomy

    PubMed Central

    De Smet, Luc; Verhaegen, Filip; Degreef, Ilse

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Malunions of the distal radius often induce carpal malalignment. Two different types can be distinguished: an adaptive midcarpal malalignment (so-called CIA wrist: carpal instability, adaptive) and a radiocarpal malalignment (dorsal translation of the whole carpus). The effect of distal radial osteotomy on the carpal alignment has hardly been studied. Material and Methods 31 wrists in 31 patients (mean age 44 years) with malunion of the distal radius after a Colles fracture were treated with a corrective osteotomy. The patients were divided on basis of effective radio-lunate flexion (ERLF) in the two patterns of carpal malalignment. The radiographic changes were evaluated. Results There were 20 patients with midcarpal malalignment (ERLF ≤ 25°) and 11 with radiocarpal malalignment (ERLF > 25°). There was a correction of radial tilt and ulnar variance in both groups. There was a significant improvement of the carpal alignment in the midcarpal malalignment group, up to normal parameters. Neither age nor delay between fracture and osteotomy correlated. In the radiocarpal malalignment group a significant effect on the ERLF was observed. In the patients with dorsal plating 70% of the hardware had to be removed. Conclusion Distal radial osteotomy is a reliable technique for correction of the deformity at the distal end of the radius and carpal malalignment. PMID:25097809

  5. [Management of Radius-Maumenee syndrome : Treatment with deep sclerectomy, viscocanalostomy and collagen matrix implantation].

    PubMed

    Kazerounian, S; Rickmann, A; Helaiwa, K; Waizel, M

    2016-09-01

    We describe the case of an 18-year-old female patient who presented with vasodilation of the episcleral vessels in both eyes. The dilated vessels were more prominent in the right eye and, furthermore, examination of the fundus oculi showed a glaucomatous excavation of the right optic disc. No underlying eye or systemic disease was found as the cause for the vasodilation, therefore, Radius-Maumenee syndrome (idiopathic dilated episcleral vessels with secondary open angle glaucoma) was diagnosed. Radius-Maumenee syndrome is a diagnosis by exclusion. If no underlying disease can be detected primary therapy of the glaucoma is required. Carotid cavernous fistulas as the most common cause for dilated episcleral vessels and elevated episcleral venous pressure should be ruled out. Due to the progression of the excavation and the pathologically elevated intraocular pressure in the right eye of our patient we decided to perform a deep sclerectomy in combination with viscocanalostomy and implantation of a collagen matrix. The operation and postoperative period were free from complications. Two months after the surgical procedure the right eye showed a normalized intraocular pressure of 7 mmHg but no morphological changes in terms of reduction of the vasodilation. In summary, deep sclerectomy in combination with viscocanalostomy and implantation of a collagen matrix showed good results in the reduction of intraocular eye pressure in Radius-Maumenee syndrome.

  6. Use of bone graft substitute in the treatment for distal radius fractures in elderly.

    PubMed

    Hegde, Chintan; Shetty, Vishvas; Wasnik, Sandeep; Ahammed, Imthiaz; Shetty, Vijay

    2013-08-01

    Fractures of the distal radius in elderly patients are often associated with metaphyseal defects that can lead to collapse, malunion and therefore decreased function. An alternative approach to simple reduction is to fill the defects with materials that can provide structural support. We used synthetic hydroxyapatite (HA) in unstable fractures of the distal radius in thirty-one elderly patients, of which four patients lost to follow-up, leaving twenty-seven patients for this study. All subjects underwent closed reduction with K-wire fixation and HA augmentation. They were followed up at 8- and 16-week intervals post-operatively to assess the functional outcome using patient-related wrist evaluation [PRWE], clinical outcome and radiological outcome. At mean 16 weeks, our results show that patients treated with this method showed no metaphyseal defect, no collapse and had satisfactory clinical outcome as assessed by PRWE. We believe that fixation with hydroxyapatite augmentation for fractures of the distal radius in elderly patients is an attractive therapeutic option. This experience has changed our clinical practice.

  7. Black hole tidal charge constrained by strong gravitational lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horváth, Zs.; Gergely, L. Á.

    2013-11-01

    Spherically symmetric brane black holes have tidal charge which modifies both weak and strong lensing characteristics. Even if lensing measurements are in agreement with a Schwarzschild lens, the margin of error of the detecting instrument allows for a certain tidal charge only. In this paper we derive the respective constraint on the tidal charge of the supermassive black hole (SMBH) in the center of our galaxy, based on the radius of the first relativistic Einstein ring due to strong lensing. We find that even if general relativistic predictions are confirmed by high precision strong lensing measurements, SMBHs could have a much larger tidal charge than the Sun or neutron stars.

  8. The Impact of Patient Activity Level on Wrist Disability after Distal Radius Malunion in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Gregory N.; Stepan, Jeffrey G.; Osei, Daniel A.; Calfee, Ryan P.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine if high-activity older adults are adversely affected by distal radius malunion. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting Hand clinics at a tertiary institution. Participants 96 patients ≥60 years old at time of fracture evaluated at least 1 year following distal radius fracture. Intervention Physical Activity Scale of the Elderly (PASE) scores stratified participants into high- and low-activity groups. Malunions were defined radiographically by change of ≥20° of lateral tilt, ≥15° radial inclination, ≥4 mm of ulnar variance, or ≥4 mm intra-articular gap or step-off, compared to the uninjured wrist. Main Outcome Measure Patient-rated disability of the upper-extremity was measured by the QuickDASH and Visual Analog Scales (VAS) for pain/function. Strength and motion measurements objectively quantified wrist function. Results High-activity participants with a distal radius malunion were compared to high-activity participants with well-aligned fractures. There was no significant difference in QuickDASH scores, VAS function, strength, and wrist motion despite statistically, but not clinically relevant, increases in VAS pain scores (difference 0.5, p=0.04) between the groups. Neither PASE score (β= 0.001, 95%CI: −0.002 to 0.004) nor malunion (β=0.133, 95%CI: −0.26 to 0.52) predicted QuickDASH scores in regression modeling after accounting for age, sex, and treatment. Operative management failed to improve outcomes and resulted in decreased grip strength (p=0.05) and more frequent complications (26% vs 7%, p=0.01) when compared to nonoperatively management. Conclusion Even among highly active older adults, distal radius malunion does not impact functional outcomes. Judicious use of operative management is warranted provided heightened complication rates. PMID:25233158

  9. Citation analysis of the 100 most common articles regarding distal radius fractures.

    PubMed

    Jones, Richard; Hughes, Travis; Lawson, Kevin; DeSilva, Gregory

    2017-01-01

    Bibliometric studies are increasingly being utilized as a tool for gauging the impact of different literature within a given field. The purpose of this study was to identify the most cited articles related to the management of distal radius fractures to better understand how the evidence of this topic has been shaped and changed over time. We utilized the ISI web of science database to conduct a search for the term "distal radius fracture" under the "orthopaedics" research area heading, and sorted the results by number of times cited. The 100 most cited articles published in orthopedic journals were then analyzed for number of citations, source journal, year of publication, number of authors, study type, level of evidence, and clinical outcomes utilized. The 100 most cited articles identified were published between 1951 and 2009. Total number of citations ranged between 525 and 67, and came from ten different orthopedic journals. The largest number of articles came from J Hand Surg Am and J Bone Joint Surg Am, each with 32. Consistent with previous analyses of orthopedic literature, the articles were primarily clinical, and of these, 53/76 were case series. The vast majority were evidence level IV. Only a small percentage of articles utilized patient reported outcome measures. These data show that despite distal radius fractures being a common fracture encountered by physicians, very few of the articles were high quality studies, and only a low proportion of the studies include patient reported outcome measures. Surgeons should take this lack of high-level evidence into consideration when referencing classic papers in this field. Analysis of the 100 most cited distal radius fracture articles allows for delineation of which articles are most common in the field and if a higher level of evidence correlates positively with citation quantity.

  10. Flute waves at the ion Larmor radius scales

    SciTech Connect

    Onishchenko, O. G.

    2010-12-14

    The theory of the magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) is discussed. Modified linear kinetic theory allows us to investigate RTI and flute waves with arbitrary perpendicular spatial scales compared to the ion Larmor radius. It is shown that in the linear limit a Fourier transform of these equations yields the dispersion relation which in the so-called Pade approximation corresponds to results of the kinetic theory. This analysis represents an extension of the previous study of the magnetic RTI obtained in the large wave scale approximation. It is shown that incorporation of the effects associated with wave scales of the order of the ion Larmor radius leads to a broader wave number range of the magnetic RTI.

  11. Core Deuterium Fusion and Radius Inflation in Hot Jupiters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaikumar, Prashanth; Rachid Ouyed

    2016-06-01

    Several laboratory-based studies have shown that the Deuterium fusion cross-section is enhanced in a solid deuterated target as compared to a gas target, attributable to enhanced mobility of deuterons in a metal lattice. As an application, we propose that, for core temperatures and compositions characterizing hot Jupiters, screened Deuterium fusion can occur deep in the interior, and show that the amount of radius inflation from this effect can be important if there is sufficient rock-ice in the core. The mechanism of screened Deuterium fusion, operating in the above temperature range, is generally consistent with the trend in radius anomaly with planetary equilibrium temperature. We also explore the trend with planetary mass using a simple analytic model.

  12. Equatorial radius of the earth: A dynamical determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khan, M. A.

    1972-01-01

    An interesting variation on the familiar method of determining the earth's equatorial radius a sub e, from a knowledge of the earth's equatorial gravity is suggested. The value of equatorial radius thus found is 6378,142 + or - 5 meters. The associated parameters are GM = 3,986008 + or - 4 X 1014 cu cm/sec/sec which includes the relative mass of atmosphere approximately 0.000001 x GM, the equatorial gravity gamma sub e = 978,030.9 milligals (constrained in this solution by the Potsdam Correction of 13.67 milligals as the Potsdam Correction is more directly, or less indirectly, measurable than the equatorial gravity) and an ellipsoidal flattening of f = 1/298.255.

  13. Predicting jet radius in electrospinning by superpositioning exponential functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widartiningsih, P. M.; Iskandar, F.; Munir, M. M.; Viridi, S.

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents an analytical study of the correlation between viscosity and fiber diameter in electrospinning. Control over fiber diameter in electrospinning process was important since it will determine the performance of resulting nanofiber. Theoretically, fiber diameter was determined by surface tension, solution concentration, flow rate, and electric current. But experimentally it had been proven that significantly viscosity had an influence to fiber diameter. Jet radius equation in electrospinning process was divided into three areas: near the nozzle, far from the nozzle, and at jet terminal. There was no correlation between these equations. Superposition of exponential series model provides the equations combined into one, thus the entire of working parameters on electrospinning take a contribution to fiber diameter. This method yields the value of solution viscosity has a linear relation to jet radius. However, this method works only for low viscosity.

  14. [Distal radius fractures: new concepts as basis for surgical treatment].

    PubMed

    Rikli, D A; Babst, R; Jupiter, J B

    2007-02-01

    New advances in the biomechanics and pathomechanics of distal radius fractures as well as new generations of plates and improved surgical approaches now make possible the stable management and early functional rehabilitation not only of simple but also of complicated distal radius fractures according to the principles for articular and juxta-articular fractures. Especially for complex articular fractures, the fracture patterns are so heterogeneous that an individual surgical treatment strategy must be developed for each case. The preoperative clarification of articular fractures with computed tomography is particularly useful for planning surgery. Mental exposition with the three-column model and pathomechanics is an important prerequisite for understanding this type of injury and the appropriate choice of operative technique. A decisive factor for success is the subtle surgical procedure in approaching and handling the fine plates.

  15. Error analysis for a laser differential confocal radius measurement system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xu; Qiu, Lirong; Zhao, Weiqian; Xiao, Yang; Wang, Zhongyu

    2015-02-10

    In order to further improve the measurement accuracy of the laser differential confocal radius measurement system (DCRMS) developed previously, a DCRMS error compensation model is established for the error sources, including laser source offset, test sphere position adjustment offset, test sphere figure, and motion error, based on analyzing the influences of these errors on the measurement accuracy of radius of curvature. Theoretical analyses and experiments indicate that the expanded uncertainty of the DCRMS is reduced to U=0.13  μm+0.9  ppm·R (k=2) through the error compensation model. The error analysis and compensation model established in this study can provide the theoretical foundation for improving the measurement accuracy of the DCRMS.

  16. Development of prediction models for radioactive caesium distribution within the 80-km radius of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant.

    PubMed

    Kinase, Sakae; Takahashi, Tomoyuki; Sato, Satoshi; Sakamoto, Ryuichi; Saito, Kimiaki

    2014-08-01

    Preliminary prediction models have been studied for the radioactive caesium distribution within the 80-km radius of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. The models were represented by exponential functions using ecological half-life of radioactive caesium in the environment. The ecological half-lives were derived from the changes in ambient dose equivalent rates through vehicle-borne surveys. It was found that the ecological half-lives of radioactive caesium were not constant within the 80-km radius of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. The ecological half-life of radioactive caesium in forest areas was found to be much larger than that in urban and water areas.

  17. Influence of beam wander on uplink of ground-to-satellite laser communication and optimization for transmitter beam radius.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hong; Luo, Bin; Ren, Yongxiong; Zhao, Sinan; Dang, Anhong

    2010-06-15

    We restudy the influence of beam wander on the uplink of ground-to-satellite laser communication, using the effective pointing error method, for a collimated untracked Gaussian beam under a weak atmospheric turbulence condition. It shows that the beam wander may cause significant increase in bit error rate (BER), and there exists an optimal transmitter radius for minimizing the value of BER. Further studies manifest that this optimal radius only changes with the laser wavelength and zenith angle, while independent on the satellite altitude and the fade threshold at the receiver. These results can be used in system design and optimization for the transmitter.

  18. Medical management of fragility fractures of the distal radius.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Emily N; Crawford, David A; Scully, William F; Noce, Nicholas J

    2014-12-01

    Fragility fractures of the distal radius represent an opportunity to diagnose and treat osteoporosis before further fractures occur. The goal of this study was to determine the prevalence of prescriptions for calcium/vitamin D supplementation and the prevalence of dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) scans in patients who sustained fragility fractures of the distal radius. A further goal was to determine the prevalence of patients who received prescriptions for the treatment of osteoporosis after DEXA scans. The authors performed a retrospective review of all patients 50 years and older who sustained a fragility fracture of the distal radius and were treated by the orthopedic surgery service at the authors' institution from 2004 to 2010. After a fragility fracture of the distal radius, fewer than 25% of previously unidentified at-risk patients received a prescription for vitamin supplementation and underwent a DEXA scan. Women were 7 times more likely than men to receive calcium/vitamin D supplementation, 14 times more likely to undergo a DEXA scan for the evaluation of osteoporosis, and 25 times more likely to receive a prescription for bisphosphonates. Patients who underwent a DEXA scan were 9 times more likely to receive pharmacologic treatment than those who did not undergo this scan. More than half of patients did not receive a prescription for calcium/vitamin D supplementation and did not undergo DEXA scanning as recommended by current National Osteoporosis Foundation guidelines. Most patients who received prescriptions or underwent DEXA scans did so before rather than after fracture, indicating poor compliance with National Osteoporosis Foundation guidelines. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  19. Radius fracture from an electrical injury involving an electric guitar.

    PubMed

    Pappano, Dante

    2010-03-01

    Electrical injury ranges widely from simple shock and mild burns to more extensive superficial injury, internal injury, and mortality. Bony fracture from electrically-induced tetanic muscle contraction is a rare but recognized injury. We report the case of a 14-year-old boy who suffered a minor burn and radius fracture related to an electrical injury involving his electric guitar. An interesting pattern is emerging from available case reports of similar injuries.

  20. Responsiveness of EQ-5D in Patients With a Distal Radius Fracture.

    PubMed

    Rundgren, Johanna; Enocson, Anders; Mellstrand Navarro, Cecilia; Bergström, Gunnar

    2017-08-01

    The EuroQol Group 5-Dimension (EQ-5D) questionnaire is frequently used as an outcome measure of general patient-reported health-related quality of life (HRQoL). We evaluated the internal and external responsiveness of EQ-5D (specifically EQ-5Dindex score) in patients with a surgically treated distal radius fracture. Within the context of a randomized controlled trial (RCT), 132 patients with a surgically treated distal radius fracture filled out EQ-5D and Patient-Rated Wrist Evaluation (PRWE-Swe) at baseline (preinjury state), and at 3 and 12 months. Internal responsiveness was evaluated by calculating mean change score and standardized response mean (SRM) of the EQ-5Dindex scores. External responsiveness was evaluated with PRWE-Swe as the external criterion. PRWE-Swe was used to define 4 subgroups of patients with different clinical outcomes. The ability of EQ-5Dindex change score to discriminate between these subgroups was analyzed with logistic regression, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves, and area under the ROC curves (AUROCs). Correlation analysis was made with Spearman's ρ test. The mean change in EQ-5Dindex score from baseline to the 3-month follow-up was -16.1 and from the 3- to the 12-month follow-up was 7.6. The corresponding SRMs were large (0.93) and small to moderate (0.47). Analysis of external responsiveness displayed odds ratios >1 and AUROCs between 0.70 and 0.76 in all 4 subgroups. The proportion of patients correctly classified into the 4 subgroups by the EQ-5Dindex change scores was 78% to 94%. Spearman's ρ was 0.35. EQ-5D displayed an overall acceptable to good responsiveness in patients with a distal radius fracture. It may thus be used as a measure of HRQoL in this patient group.

  1. Scaling Relations of Mass, Velocity, and Radius for Disk Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, Earl

    2017-02-01

    I demonstrate four tight correlations of total baryonic mass, velocity, and radius for a set of nearby disk galaxies: the mass–velocity relation {M}{{t}}\\propto {V}4; the mass–radius relation {M}{{t}}\\propto {R}2; the radius–velocity relation R\\propto {V}2; and the mass–radius–velocity relation {M}{{t}}\\propto {{RV}}2. The mass–velocity relation is the familiar Baryonic Tully–Fisher relation, and versions of the other three relations, using magnitude rather than baryonic mass, are also well known. These four observed correlations follow from a pair of more fundamental relations. First, the centripetal acceleration at the edge of the stellar disk is proportional to the acceleration predicted by Newtonian physics, and second, this acceleration is a constant that is related to Milgrom’s constant. The two primary relations can be manipulated algebraically to generate the four observed correlations and allow little room for dark matter inside the radius of the stellar disk. The primary relations do not explain the velocity of the outer gaseous disks of spiral galaxies, which do not trace the Newtonian gravitational field of the observed matter.

  2. Stokes radius determination of radioiodinated polypeptide hormones by gel filtration

    SciTech Connect

    Ribela, M.T.; Bartolini, P.

    1988-11-01

    A simple technique for determination of the molecular (Stokes) radius of radioiodinated proteins was developed using the same column and chromatographic conditions employed in routine radioimmunoassay tracer purification. The calibration curve for five radioiodinated standard proteins presented a highly significant correlation (r = -0.996; P less than 0.001) and allowed precise molecular radius determination for labeled human growth hormone (hGH), luteotropin (hLH), follicle-stimulating hormone (hFSH), thyrotropin (hTSH), prolactin (hPRL), and corticotropin (hACTH), enabling detection of differences of the order of +/- 3%. The validity of the method was verified by determining the molecular radius of hGH in both ''cold'' (unlabeled standards and unknowns) and ''hot'' (radioiodinated standards and unknowns) systems. The technique can be applied in a very simple manner, requiring just one simple additional calibration run before Sephadex G-100 tracer purification. Furthermore, it can be applied to any protein, even when only extremely limited amounts are available. Since the standards and unknowns are labeled and chromatographed under identical conditions, potential common alterations of the molecule due to oxidation, iodine incorporation, tracer-carrier interactions, etc., are automatically corrected for.

  3. Conversion of radius of curvature to power (and vice versa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wickenhagen, Sven; Endo, Kazumasa; Fuchs, Ulrike; Youngworth, Richard N.; Kiontke, Sven R.

    2015-09-01

    Manufacturing optical components relies on good measurements and specifications. One of the most precise measurements routinely required is the form accuracy. In practice, form deviation from the ideal surface is effectively low frequency errors, where the form error most often accounts for no more than a few undulations across a surface. These types of errors are measured in a variety of ways including interferometry and tactile methods like profilometry, with the latter often being employed for aspheres and general surface shapes such as freeforms. This paper provides a basis for a correct description of power and radius of curvature tolerances, including best practices and calculating the power value with respect to the radius deviation (and vice versa) of the surface form. A consistent definition of the sagitta is presented, along with different cases in manufacturing that are of interest to fabricators and designers. The results make clear how the definitions and results should be documented, for all measurement setups. Relationships between power and radius of curvature are shown that allow specifying the preferred metric based on final accuracy and measurement method. Results shown include all necessary equations for conversion to give optical designers and manufacturers a consistent and robust basis for decision-making. The paper also gives guidance on preferred methods for different scenarios for surface types, accuracy required, and metrology methods employed.

  4. Optimizing interconnections to maximize the spectral radius of interdependent networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Huashan; Zhao, Xiuyan; Liu, Feng; Xu, Shouhuai; Lu, Wenlian

    2017-03-01

    The spectral radius (i.e., the largest eigenvalue) of the adjacency matrices of complex networks is an important quantity that governs the behavior of many dynamic processes on the networks, such as synchronization and epidemics. Studies in the literature focused on bounding this quantity. In this paper, we investigate how to maximize the spectral radius of interdependent networks by optimally linking k internetwork connections (or interconnections for short). We derive formulas for the estimation of the spectral radius of interdependent networks and employ these results to develop a suite of algorithms that are applicable to different parameter regimes. In particular, a simple algorithm is to link the k nodes with the largest k eigenvector centralities in one network to the node in the other network with a certain property related to both networks. We demonstrate the applicability of our algorithms via extensive simulations. We discuss the physical implications of the results, including how the optimal interconnections can more effectively decrease the threshold of epidemic spreading in the susceptible-infected-susceptible model and the threshold of synchronization of coupled Kuramoto oscillators.

  5. Complications of pediatric distal radius and forearm fractures.

    PubMed

    Chia, Benjamin; Kozin, Scott H; Herman, Martin J; Safier, Shannon; Abzug, Joshua M

    2015-01-01

    Distal radius and forearm fractures represent a large percentage of pediatric fractures. The most common mechanism of injury is a fall onto an outstretched arm, which can lead to substantial rotational displacement. If this rotational displacement is not adequately addressed, there will be resultant loss of forearm motion and subsequent limitations in performing the activities of daily living. Good initial reductions and proper casting techniques are necessary when treating distal radius and forearm fractures nonsurgically; however, maintaining an acceptable reduction is not always possible. Atraumatic reduction of a displaced physeal fracture should occur within 7 days of the injury. If an impending malunion presents at 2 weeks or later after injury, observation is warranted because of concerns about physeal arrest with repeated attempts at manipulation, and it should be followed by a later assessment of functional limitations. Pediatric patients and their parents have higher expectations for recovery, which has contributed to an increase in the surgical management of pediatric distal radius and forearm fractures. In addition, surgical interventions, such as intramedullary nailing, have their own associated complications.

  6. Synthesis and Characterization of Polyelectrolyte Grafted Charged Colloidal Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanty, Priti Sundar; Harada, Tamotsu; Matsumoto, Kozo; Matsuoka, Hideki

    2006-05-01

    Novel polyelectrolyte grafted charged colloidal particles have been synthesized via emulsion polymerization method using block copolymer as an emulsifier and have been characterized by determining the surface charge number (Z), chain density (σ) using conductometric titration, the size distribution, hydrodynamic (Rh) radius by dynamic light scattering and the core radius (Rc) by atomic force microscopy. The structural ordering and dynamics have been investigated in a very dilute concentration and the effect of salt concentration (Cs) on hydrodynamic radius have also been studied using dynamic light scattering. The conductivity titration curve was found to show two equivalence points and the potentiometric titration curves are found to sensitive only after a critical salt concentrations. The corresponding measured hydrodynamic radius is also found to decrease after a critical salt concentration. At high salt concentration, the hydrodynamic radius shows a close agreement with that of the core radius measured by the atomic force microscope. These experimental results are in agreement with the recent theoretical prediction and experimental observation that most of the counterions are confined inside the brush region which led to stretching of the chains at low salt concentration.

  7. Is the proton radius a player in the redefinition of the International System of Units?

    PubMed

    Nez, F; Antognini, A; Amaro, F D; Biraben, F; Cardoso, J M R; Covita, D; Dax, A; Dhawan, S; Fernandes, L; Giesen, A; Graf, T; Hänsch, T W; Indelicato, P; Julien, L; Kao, C-Y; Knowles, P E; Le Bigot, E; Liu, Y-W; Lopes, J A M; Ludhova, L; Monteiro, C M B; Mulhauser, F; Nebel, T; Rabinowitz, P; dos Santos, J M F; Schaller, L; Schuhmann, K; Schwob, C; Taqqu, D; Veloso, J F C A; Kottmann, F; Pohl, R

    2011-10-28

    It is now recognized that the International System of Units (SI units) will be redefined in terms of fundamental constants, even if the date when this will occur is still under debate. Actually, the best estimate of fundamental constant values is given by a least-squares adjustment, carried out under the auspices of the Committee on Data for Science and Technology (CODATA) Task Group on Fundamental Constants. This adjustment provides a significant measure of the correctness and overall consistency of the basic theories and experimental methods of physics using the values of the constants obtained from widely differing experiments. The physical theories that underlie this adjustment are assumed to be valid, such as quantum electrodynamics (QED). Testing QED, one of the most precise theories is the aim of many accurate experiments. The calculations and the corresponding experiments can be carried out either on a boundless system, such as the electron magnetic moment anomaly, or on a bound system, such as atomic hydrogen. The value of fundamental constants can be deduced from the comparison of theory and experiment. For example, using QED calculations, the value of the fine structure constant given by the CODATA is mainly inferred from the measurement of the electron magnetic moment anomaly carried out by Gabrielse's group. (Hanneke et al. 2008 Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 120801) The value of the Rydberg constant is known from two-photon spectroscopy of hydrogen combined with accurate theoretical quantities. The Rydberg constant, determined by the comparison of theory and experiment using atomic hydrogen, is known with a relative uncertainty of 6.6×10(-12). It is one of the most accurate fundamental constants to date. A careful analysis shows that knowledge of the electrical size of the proton is nowadays a limitation in this comparison. The aim of muonic hydrogen spectroscopy was to obtain an accurate value of the proton charge radius. However, the value deduced from this

  8. Hummingbirds control turning velocity using body orientation and turning radius using asymmetrical wingbeat kinematics

    PubMed Central

    Read, Tyson J. G.; Segre, Paolo S.; Middleton, Kevin M.; Altshuler, Douglas L.

    2016-01-01

    Turning in flight requires reorientation of force, which birds, bats and insects accomplish either by shifting body position and total force in concert or by using left–right asymmetries in wingbeat kinematics. Although both mechanisms have been observed in multiple species, it is currently unknown how each is used to control changes in trajectory. We addressed this problem by measuring body and wingbeat kinematics as hummingbirds tracked a revolving feeder, and estimating aerodynamic forces using a quasi-steady model. During arcing turns, hummingbirds symmetrically banked the stroke plane of both wings, and the body, into turns, supporting a body-dependent mechanism. However, several wingbeat asymmetries were present during turning, including a higher and flatter outer wingtip path and a lower more deviated inner wingtip path. A quasi-steady analysis of arcing turns performed with different trajectories revealed that changes in radius were associated with asymmetrical kinematics and forces, and changes in velocity were associated with symmetrical kinematics and forces. Collectively, our results indicate that both body-dependent and -independent force orientation mechanisms are available to hummingbirds, and that these kinematic strategies are used to meet the separate aerodynamic challenges posed by changes in velocity and turning radius. PMID:27030042

  9. Determination of the ReA Electron Beam Ion Trap electron beam radius and current density with an X-ray pinhole camera.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Thomas M; Lapierre, Alain; Kittimanapun, Kritsada; Schwarz, Stefan; Leitner, Daniela; Bollen, Georg

    2014-07-01

    The Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) of the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory at Michigan State University is used as a charge booster and injector for the currently commissioned rare isotope re-accelerator facility ReA. This EBIT charge breeder is equipped with a unique superconducting magnet configuration, a combination of a solenoid and a pair of Helmholtz coils, allowing for a direct observation of the ion cloud while maintaining the advantages of a long ion trapping region. The current density of its electron beam is a key factor for efficient capture and fast charge breeding of continuously injected, short-lived isotope beams. It depends on the radius of the magnetically compressed electron beam. This radius is measured by imaging the highly charged ion cloud trapped within the electron beam with a pinhole camera, which is sensitive to X-rays emitted by the ions with photon energies between 2 keV and 10 keV. The 80%-radius of a cylindrical 800 mA electron beam with an energy of 15 keV is determined to be r(80%) = (212 ± 19)μm in a 4 T magnetic field. From this, a current density of j = (454 ± 83)A/cm(2) is derived. These results are in good agreement with electron beam trajectory simulations performed with TriComp and serve as a test for future electron gun design developments.

  10. Determination of the ReA Electron Beam Ion Trap electron beam radius and current density with an X-ray pinhole camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann, Thomas M.; Lapierre, Alain; Kittimanapun, Kritsada; Schwarz, Stefan; Leitner, Daniela; Bollen, Georg

    2014-07-01

    The Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) of the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory at Michigan State University is used as a charge booster and injector for the currently commissioned rare isotope re-accelerator facility ReA. This EBIT charge breeder is equipped with a unique superconducting magnet configuration, a combination of a solenoid and a pair of Helmholtz coils, allowing for a direct observation of the ion cloud while maintaining the advantages of a long ion trapping region. The current density of its electron beam is a key factor for efficient capture and fast charge breeding of continuously injected, short-lived isotope beams. It depends on the radius of the magnetically compressed electron beam. This radius is measured by imaging the highly charged ion cloud trapped within the electron beam with a pinhole camera, which is sensitive to X-rays emitted by the ions with photon energies between 2 keV and 10 keV. The 80%-radius of a cylindrical 800 mA electron beam with an energy of 15 keV is determined to be r_{80%}=(212± 19)μm in a 4 T magnetic field. From this, a current density of j = (454 ± 83)A/cm2 is derived. These results are in good agreement with electron beam trajectory simulations performed with TriComp and serve as a test for future electron gun design developments.

  11. Determination of the ReA Electron Beam Ion Trap electron beam radius and current density with an X-ray pinhole camera

    SciTech Connect

    Baumann, Thomas M. Lapierre, Alain Kittimanapun, Kritsada; Schwarz, Stefan; Leitner, Daniela; Bollen, Georg

    2014-07-15

    The Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) of the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory at Michigan State University is used as a charge booster and injector for the currently commissioned rare isotope re-accelerator facility ReA. This EBIT charge breeder is equipped with a unique superconducting magnet configuration, a combination of a solenoid and a pair of Helmholtz coils, allowing for a direct observation of the ion cloud while maintaining the advantages of a long ion trapping region. The current density of its electron beam is a key factor for efficient capture and fast charge breeding of continuously injected, short-lived isotope beams. It depends on the radius of the magnetically compressed electron beam. This radius is measured by imaging the highly charged ion cloud trapped within the electron beam with a pinhole camera, which is sensitive to X-rays emitted by the ions with photon energies between 2 keV and 10 keV. The 80%-radius of a cylindrical 800 mA electron beam with an energy of 15 keV is determined to be r{sub 80%}=(212±19)μm in a 4 T magnetic field. From this, a current density of j = (454 ± 83)A/cm{sup 2} is derived. These results are in good agreement with electron beam trajectory simulations performed with TriComp and serve as a test for future electron gun design developments.

  12. The effect of the charge density of microemulsion droplets on the bending elasticity of their amphiphilic film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farago, B.; Gradzielski, M.

    2001-06-01

    Oil-in-water (O/W) microemulsion droplets have been investigated with respect to the effect of the electric charge density on the bending elasticity of the amphiphilic film. For this an originally uncharged microemulsion system became charged by the substitution of the nonionic by an ionic surfactant (up to 5 mol %). The sum of the bending constants, 2κ+κ¯, has been determined from the polydispersity index p of the droplets and alternatively from the macroscopic interfacial tension γ together with the maximum particle radius Rm. p and Rm were measured by means of small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) experiments in the shell contrast. Neutron spin echo (NSE) has been employed to measure directly the dynamics of the shape fluctuations of the droplets. This method enables a separate determination of κ on its own. It is found that the effect of the increasing charge density leads only to a fairly small increase for the sum of the bending constants 2κ+κ¯. Also the change of the ionic strength for a charged microemulsion system has almost no influence on this sum. NSE measurements show no measurable difference in the dynamics of the charged and uncharged system leading to the conclusion that not only the sum but separately the two bending constants stay within experimental error unchanged. This experimental observation is in contrast to simple electrostatic theories that would predict a much more pronounced influence of the electric charge density on the bending properties of the amphiphilic film.

  13. Na(+) doping induced changes in the reduction and charge transport characteristics of Al2O3-stabilized, CuO-based materials for CO2 capture.

    PubMed

    Imtiaz, Q; Abdala, P M; Kierzkowska, A M; van Beek, W; Schweiger, S; Rupp, J L M; Müller, C R

    2016-04-28

    Chemical looping combustion (CLC) and chemical looping with oxygen uncoupling (CLOU) are emerging CO2 capture technologies that could reduce appreciably the costs associated with the capture of CO2. In CLC and CLOU, the oxygen required to combust a hydrocarbon is provided by a solid oxygen carrier. Among the transition metal oxides typically considered for CLC and CLOU, copper oxide (CuO) stands out owing to its high oxygen carrying capacity, exothermic reduction reactions and fast reduction kinetics. However, the low Tammann (sintering) temperature of CuO is a serious drawback. In this context, it has been proposed to support CuO on high Tammann temperature and low cost alumina (Al2O3), thus, reducing the morphological changes occurring over multiple CLC or CLOU redox cycles and stabilizing, in turn, the high activity of CuO. However, in CuO-Al2O3 systems, phase stabilization and avoiding the formation of the CuAl2O4 spinel is key to obtaining a material with a high redox stability and activity. Here, we report a Na(+) doping strategy to phase stabilize Al2O3-supported CuO, yielding in turn an inexpensive material with a high redox stability and CO2 capture efficiency. We also demonstrate that doping CuO-Al2O3 with Na(+) improves the oxygen uncoupling characteristics and coke resistance of the oxygen carriers. Utilizing in situ and ex situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), the local structure of Cu and the reduction pathways of CuO were determined as a function of the Na(+) content and cycle number. Finally, using 4-point conductivity measurements, we confirm that doping of Al2O3-supported CuO with Na(+) lowers the activation energy for charge transport explaining conclusively the improved redox characteristics of the new oxygen carriers developed.

  14. Charge radii of neon isotopes across the sd neutron shell

    SciTech Connect

    Marinova, K.; Geithner, W.; Kappertz, S.; Kloos, S.; Kotrotsios, G.; Neugart, R.; Wilbert, S.; Kowalska, M.; Keim, M.; Blaum, K.; Lievens, P.; Simon, H.

    2011-09-15

    We report on the changes in mean square charge radii of unstable neon nuclei relative to the stable {sup 20}Ne, based on the measurement of optical isotope shifts. The studies were carried out using collinear laser spectroscopy on a fast beam of neutral neon atoms. High sensitivity on short-lived isotopes was achieved thanks to nonoptical detection based on optical pumping and state-selective collisional ionization, which was complemented by an accurate determination of the beam kinetic energy. The new results provide information on the structural changes in the sequence of neon isotopes all across the neutron sd shell, ranging from the proton drip line nucleus and halo candidate {sup 17}Ne up to the neutron-rich {sup 28}Ne in the vicinity of the ''island of inversion.'' Within this range the charge radius is smallest for {sup 24}Ne with N=14 corresponding to the closure of the neutron d{sub 5/2} shell, while it increases toward both neutron shell closures, N=8 and N=20. The general trend of the charge radii correlates well with the deformation effects which are known to be large for several neon isotopes. In the neutron-deficient isotopes, structural changes arise from the onset of proton-halo formation for {sup 17}Ne, shell closure in {sup 18}Ne, and clustering effects in {sup 20,21}Ne. On the neutron-rich side the transition to the island of inversion plays an important role, with the radii in the upper part of the sd shell confirming the weakening of the N=20 magic number. The results add new information to the radii systematics of light nuclei where data are scarce because of the small contribution of nuclear-size effects to the isotope shifts which are dominated by the finite-mass effect.

  15. Maximum wind radius estimated by the 50 kt radius: improvement of storm surge forecasting over the Western North Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagi, H.; Wu, W.

    2015-10-01

    Even though the maximum wind radius (Rmax) is an important parameter in determining the intensity and size of tropical cyclones, it has been overlooked in previous storm surge studies. This research reviewed the existing estimation methods of Rmax based on the central pressure or maximum wind speed. These over or underestimated Rmax because of the substantial variety of the data, though an average radius could be moderately estimated. Alternatively, we proposed an Rmax estimation method based on the radius of the 50 knot wind (R50). The data obtained during the passage of strong typhoons by a meteorological station network in the Japanese archipelago enabled us to derive the following formula, Rmax = 0.23R50. Although this new method substantially improved the estimation of Rmax compared to the existing models, an estimation error was unavoidable because of fundamental uncertainties regarding the typhoon's structure or insufficient number of available typhoon data. In fact, a numerical simulation from 2013 Typhoon Haiyan demonstrated a substantial difference in the storm surge height for different Rmax. Therefore, the variability of Rmax should be taken into account in storm surge simulations, independently of the model used, to minimize the risk of over or underestimation of storm surges. The proposed method is expected to increase the reliability of storm surge prediction and contribute to disaster risk management, particularly in the Western North Pacific, including countries such as Japan, China, Taiwan, Philippines, and Vietnam.

  16. The geometry of nonmetal hydrides and the ligand radius of hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Robinson, E A; Gillespie, R J

    2004-04-05

    The aim of this paper was to investigate why the geometries of nonmetal hydrides are often not in accordance with the VSEPR model. From a consideration of interligand distances in a variety of BX(4), CX(4), and NX(4) molecules where X is a ligand or a lone pair and in which there are at least two H ligands we have shown that the hydrogen ligands are essentially close-packed. For each of the central atoms we have obtained a value for the ligand radius of hydrogen. These radii decrease with decreasing negative charge and increasing positive charge of the hydrogen ligand as the electronegativity of the central atom increases, as has been found previously for other ligands such as F and Cl. We show that ligand-ligand intractions are an important factor in determining bond angles in hydrides and that the ligand close-packing (LCP) model gives a better explanation of bond angles than the VSEPR model according to which bond angles depend on the electronegativity of the ligand rather than on its size. For example, although the very small angles in PH(3) and SH(2) are not in accord with the VSEPR model, they are consistent with the LCP model in that they are a consequence of the small size of hydrogen ligands which are pushed together by the lone pairs until they are almost close-packed.

  17. CHARGE Association.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Semanti; Chakraborty, Jayanta

    2012-12-01

    We present here a case of 17-year-old boy from Kolkata presenting with obesity, bilateral gynecomastia, mental retardation, and hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism. The patient weighed 70 kg and was of 153 cm height. Facial asymmetry (unilateral facial palsy), gynecomastia, decreased pubic and axillary hair, small penis, decreased right testicular volume, non-palpable left testis, and right-sided congenital inguinal hernia was present. The patient also had disc coloboma, convergent squint, microcornea, microphthalmia, pseudohypertelorism, low set ears, short neck, and choanalatresia. He had h/o VSD repaired with patch. Laboratory examination revealed haemoglobin 9.9 mg/dl, urea 24 mg/dl, creatinine 0.68 mg/dl. IGF1 77.80 ng/ml (decreased for age), GH <0.05 ng/ml, testosterone 0.25 ng/ml, FSH-0.95 μIU/ml, LH 0.60 ΅IU/ml. ACTH, 8:00 A.M cortisol, FT3, FT4, TSH, estradiol, DHEA-S, lipid profile, and LFT was within normal limits. Prolactin was elevated at 38.50 ng/ml. The patient's karyotype was 46XY. Echocardiography revealed ventricularseptal defect closed with patch, grade 1 aortic regurgitation, and ejection fraction 67%. Ultrasound testis showed small right testis within scrotal sac and undescended left testis within left inguinal canal. CT scan paranasal sinuses revealed choanalatresia and deviation of nasal septum to the right. Sonomammography revealed bilateral proliferation of fibroglandular elements predominantly in subareoalar region of breasts. MRI of brain and pituitary region revealed markedly atrophic pituitary gland parenchyma with preserved infundibulum and hypothalamus and widened suprasellar cistern. The CHARGE association is an increasingly recognized non-random pattern of congenital anomalies comprising of coloboma, heart defect, choanal atresia, retarded growth and development, genital hypoplasia, ear abnormalities, and/or deafness.[1] These anomalies have a higher probability of occurring together. In this report, we have described a boy with CHARGE

  18. Structural changes and thermal stability of charged LiNixMnyCozO2 cathode materials studied by combined in situ time-resolved XRD and mass spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Bak, Seong -Min; Hu, Enyuan; Zhou, Yongning; ...

    2014-11-24

    Thermal stability of charged LiNixMnyCozO2 (NMC, with x + y + z = 1, x:y:z = 4:3:3 (NMC433), 5:3:2 (NMC532), 6:2:2 (NMC622), and 8:1:1 (NMC811)) cathode materials is systematically studied using combined in situ time- resolved X-ray diffraction and mass spectroscopy (TR-XRD/MS) techniques upon heating up to 600 °C. The TR-XRD/MS results indicate that the content of Ni, Co, and Mn significantly affects both the structural changes and the oxygen release features during heating: the more Ni and less Co and Mn, the lower the onset temperature of the phase transition (i.e., thermal decomposition) and the larger amount of oxygenmore » release. Interestingly, the NMC532 seems to be the optimized composition to maintain a reasonably good thermal stability, comparable to the low-nickel-content materials (e.g., NMC333 and NMC433), while having a high capacity close to the high-nickel-content materials (e.g., NMC811 and NMC622). The origin of the thermal decomposition of NMC cathode materials was elucidated by the changes in the oxidation states of each transition metal (TM) cations (i.e., Ni, Co, and Mn) and their site preferences during thermal decomposition. It is revealed that Mn ions mainly occupy the 3a octahedral sites of a layered structure (R3¯m) but Co ions prefer to migrate to the 8a tetrahedral sites of a spinel structure (Fd3¯m) during the thermal decomposition. Such element-dependent cation migration plays a very important role in the thermal stability of NMC cathode materials. The reasonably good thermal stability and high capacity characteristics of the NMC532 composition is originated from the well-balanced ratio of nickel content to manganese and cobalt contents. As a result, this systematic study provides insight into the rational design of NMC-based cathode materials with a desired balance between thermal stability and high energy density.« less

  19. Influence of Surface Radius Curvature on Laser Plasma Propulsion with Ablation Water Propellant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Tian; Zheng, Zhiyuan; Zhang, Siqi; Tang, Weichong; Xiao, Ke; Liang, Wenfei; Gao, Lu; Gao, Hua

    2016-10-01

    The surface shape of liquid water is well controlled during nanosecond pulse laser ablation plasma propulsion. In this study, we measured the effect of the shape on the coupling coefficient and the specific impulse. We found that the coupling coefficient and specific impulse could be optimized by varying the surface convexity. Based on the analysis of the surface radius curvature, we demonstrate that the convex surface changes the laser focal positions to achieve high efficiency. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 10905049) and Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities of China (Nos. 53200859165, 2562010050)

  20. Quasi-3D space charge simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xi; /Fermilab

    2007-04-01

    The longitudinal space charge effect is simulated by binning the longitudinal beam profile in order to calculate the force on the bins using the binned particle distribution via FFT, and applying momentum kick based upon this space charge force to macro-particles. Usually, the longitudinal space charge kick is calculated once per turn since the longitudinal profile doesn't change much in a single turn. Besides, the longitudinal profile is used as a weighting factor for the transverse space charge force. The transverse space charge effect is simulated by projecting the 3-D beam to a 2-D Gaussian distribution in order to use the complex error function to compute the transverse space charge force, and applying this space charge force to macro-particles. One transverse space charge calculation per scale length of the beam shape variation requires at least ten transverse space charge force calculations per betatron oscillation.

  1. Charge separation in liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhelashvili, M. S.; Agam, O.

    2004-10-01

    The common theory of reversible charge transfer (RCT) at low donor system excitation power in liquids is examined. The space averaging procedures describing the kinetics of RCT in the liquid space are discussed. The reaction space is presented as a totality of independent subgroups with one excited donor and some group of acceptors effectively interacting only with the donor in the given “subgroup”. We have shown that the theory [3-5] gives questionable results for cation state probability for the usual parameters of this problem. If the acceptor concentration or the charge transfer rate constants are low, then the cation state probability behaves the same in the two theories [3-5] and [7, 8]. The correct account of the donor’s ground state change and charge back transfer in the RCT theory gives the new, not contradictory results, different from the behavior of the results in references [3-5], but near to results of [7, 8]. The molecules motion accelerates the ionization of donors and neutralization of ions. The influence of the motion of neutral and ionized molecules on charge transfer kinetics is different. The Coulomb interaction of ions is taken into account; the effect depends on the space averaging method used. The new approximation in this article in comparison with references [3-6,9] consists in the space averaging procedure of the donor cation state probability, which takes into account the donor’s ground state.

  2. Charge segregation in weakly ionized microgels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyatt, John S.; Douglas, Alison M.; Stanley, Chris; Do, Changwoo; Barker, Thomas H.; Fernández-Nieves, Alberto

    2017-01-01

    We investigate microgels synthesized from N -isopropylacrylamide (NIPAM) copolymerized with a large mol% of acrylic acid, finding that when the acid groups are partially ionized at high temperatures, competition between ion-induced swelling and hydrophobic deswelling of poly(NIPAM) chains results in microphase separation. In cross-linked microgels, this manifests as a dramatic decrease in the ratio between the radius of gyration and the hydrodynamic radius to ˜0.2 , indicating that almost all the mass of the microgel is concentrated near the particle center. We also observe a concurrent decrease of the polymer network length scale via small-angle neutron scattering, confirming the presence of a dense, deswollen core surrounded by a diffuse, charged periphery. We compare these results to those obtained for a system of charged ultralow-cross-linked microgels; the form factor shows a distinct peak at high q when the temperature exceeds a threshold value. We successfully fit the form factor to theory developed to describe scattering from weakly charged gels in poor solvents, and we tie this behavior to charge segregation in the case of the cross-linked microgels.

  3. Self-force on a charge outside a five-dimensional black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beach, Matthew J. S.; Poisson, Eric; Nickel, Bernhard G.

    2014-06-01

    We compute the electromagnetic self-force acting on a charged particle held in place at a fixed position r outside a five-dimensional black hole described by the Schwarzschild-Tangherlini metric. Using a spherical-harmonic decomposition of the electrostatic potential and a regularization prescription based on the Hadamard Green's function, we express the self-force as a convergent mode sum. The self-force is first evaluated numerically, and next presented as an analytical expansion in powers of R/r, with R denoting the event-horizon radius. The power series is then summed to yield a closed-form expression. Unlike its four-dimensional version, the self-force features a dependence on a regularization parameter s that can be interpreted as the particle's radius. The self-force is repulsive at large distances, and its behavior is related to a model according to which the force results from a gravitational interaction between the black hole and the distribution of electrostatic field energy attached to the particle. The model, however, is shown to become inadequate as r becomes comparable to R, where the self-force changes sign and becomes attractive. We also calculate the self-force acting on a particle with a scalar charge, which we find to be everywhere attractive. This is to be contrasted with its four-dimensional counterpart, which vanishes at any r.

  4. HABITABILITY OF EXOMOONS AT THE HILL OR TIDAL LOCKING RADIUS

    SciTech Connect

    Hinkel, Natalie R.; Kane, Stephen R.

    2013-09-01

    Moons orbiting extrasolar planets are the next class of object to be observed and characterized for possible habitability. Like the host-planets to their host-star, exomoons have a limiting radius at which they may be gravitationally bound, or the Hill radius. In addition, they also have a distance at which they will become tidally locked and therefore in synchronous rotation with the planet. We have examined the flux phase profile of a simulated, hypothetical moon orbiting at a distant radius around the confirmed exoplanets {mu} Ara b, HD 28185 b, BD +14 4559 b, and HD 73534 b. The irradiated flux on a moon at its furthest, stable distance from the planet achieves its largest flux gradient, which places a limit on the flux ranges expected for subsequent (observed) moons closer in orbit to the planet. We have also analyzed the effect of planetary eccentricity on the flux on the moon, examining planets that traverse the habitable zone either fully or partially during their orbit. Looking solely at the stellar contributions, we find that moons around planets that are totally within the habitable zone experience thermal equilibrium temperatures above the runaway greenhouse limit, requiring a small heat redistribution efficiency. In contrast, exomoons orbiting planets that only spend a fraction of their time within the habitable zone require a heat redistribution efficiency near 100% in order to achieve temperatures suitable for habitability. This means that a planet does not need to spend its entire orbit within the habitable zone in order for the exomoon to be habitable. Because the applied systems comprise giant planets around bright stars, we believe that the transit detection method is most likely to yield an exomoon discovery.

  5. Habitability of Exomoons at the Hill or Tidal Locking Radius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinkel, Natalie R.; Kane, Stephen R.

    2013-09-01

    Moons orbiting extrasolar planets are the next class of object to be observed and characterized for possible habitability. Like the host-planets to their host-star, exomoons have a limiting radius at which they may be gravitationally bound, or the Hill radius. In addition, they also have a distance at which they will become tidally locked and therefore in synchronous rotation with the planet. We have examined the flux phase profile of a simulated, hypothetical moon orbiting at a distant radius around the confirmed exoplanets μ Ara b, HD 28185 b, BD +14 4559 b, and HD 73534 b. The irradiated flux on a moon at its furthest, stable distance from the planet achieves its largest flux gradient, which places a limit on the flux ranges expected for subsequent (observed) moons closer in orbit to the planet. We have also analyzed the effect of planetary eccentricity on the flux on the moon, examining planets that traverse the habitable zone either fully or partially during their orbit. Looking solely at the stellar contributions, we find that moons around planets that are totally within the habitable zone experience thermal equilibrium temperatures above the runaway greenhouse limit, requiring a small heat redistribution efficiency. In contrast, exomoons orbiting planets that only spend a fraction of their time within the habitable zone require a heat redistribution efficiency near 100% in order to achieve temperatures suitable for habitability. This means that a planet does not need to spend its entire orbit within the habitable zone in order for the exomoon to be habitable. Because the applied systems comprise giant planets around bright stars, we believe that the transit detection method is most likely to yield an exomoon discovery.

  6. Radiographic Outcomes of Volar Locked Plating for Distal Radius Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Mignemi, Megan E.; Byram, Ian R.; Wolfe, Carmen C.; Fan, Kang-Hsien; Koehler, Elizabeth A.; Block, John J.; Jordanov, Martin I.; Watson, Jeffry T.; Weikert, Douglas R.; Lee, Donald H.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To assess the ability of volar locked plating to achieve and maintain normal radiographic parameters for articular stepoff, volar tilt, radial inclination, ulnar variance, and radial height in distal radius fractures. Methods We performed a retrospective review of 185 distal radius fractures that underwent volar locked plating with a single plate design over a 5-year period. We reviewed radiographs and recorded measurements for volar tilt, radial inclination, ulnar variance, radial height, and articular stepoff. We used logistic regression to determine the association between return to radiographic standard norms and fracture type. Results At the first and final postoperative follow-up visits, we observed articular congruence less than 2 mm in 92% of fractures at both times. Normal volar tilt (11°) was restored in 46% at the first follow-up and 48% at the final one. Radial inclination (22°) was achieved in 44% at the first follow-up and 43% at the final one, and ulnar variance (01 ± 2 mm) was achieved in 53% at the first follow-up and 53% at the final one. In addition, radial height (14 ± 1mm) was restored in 14% at the first follow-up and 12% at the final one. More complex, intra-articular fractures (AO class B and C and Frykman types 3, 4, 7, and 8) were less likely to be restored to normal radiographic parameters. However, because of the small sample size for some fracture types, it was difficult to discover significant associations between fracture type and radiographic outcome. Conclusions Volar locked plating for distal radius fractures achieved articular stepoff less than 2 mm in most fractures but only restored and maintained normal radiographic measurements for volar tilt, radial inclination, and ulnar variance in 50% of fractures. The ability of volar locked plating to restore and maintain ulnar variance and volar tilt decreased with more complex intra-articular fracture types. PMID:23218558

  7. [Radius fractures in children--causes and mechanisms of injury].

    PubMed

    Antabak, Anko; Stanić, Lana; Matković, Nikša; Papeš, Dino; Romić, Ivan; Fuchs, Nino; Luetić, Tomislav

    2015-01-01

    Radius fractures are the most common fractures in childhood. The main mechanism of injury is fall onto an outstretched hand. This retrospective study analyzed the data on 201 children admitted for radius fractures at KBC-Zagreb in the period 2011-2013. The study included 85 girls (42.3%) and 116 boys (57.7%) . The average age of the children was 9.6 years. Radius was injured in the distal segment in 79.1% of children. The sites of injuries were: park, campi and beach (24.9% of all children), playground, skate park and swimming pool (23.9%), kindergarten or school (20.9%), at home and around the house (17.9%), in the street (11.4%) and in the store or at a hotel (0.9%). The boys were mostly injured at playgrounds, during skating and at swimming pools (37.1% of all boys), while girls were mostly injured in parks, camps and at beach (42.4% girls). Fall was the major cause of the injury (49.3%), and children usually fell during ice skating and skating (32.3% of all falls). In 20.4% the injury was caused by pushing and hitting. The smallest percentage (9.5%) of children were injured in traffic accidents while riding a bike (only one child was hit by a car). Sport related activities caused injuries in 53.7% of the cases. Sport activities are the most important cause of the radial fractures in the pediatric population and falls during sports are the main mechanism of injury. The peak incidence is at 12 years for boys and at 10 years for girls, so intervention and/or prevention should be aimed at the age groups. Preventive actions should be focused on injuries that tend to occur in parks, schools and during sport activities.

  8. Measurement of Capillary Radius and Contact Angle within Porous Media.

    PubMed

    Ravi, Saitej; Dharmarajan, Ramanathan; Moghaddam, Saeed

    2015-12-01

    The pore radius (i.e., capillary radius) and contact angle determine the capillary pressure generated in a porous medium. The most common method to determine these two parameters is through measurement of the capillary pressure generated by a reference liquid (i.e., a liquid with near-zero contact angle) and a test liquid. The rate of rise technique, commonly used to determine the capillary pressure, results in significant uncertainties. In this study, we utilize a recently developed technique for independently measuring the capillary pressure and permeability to determine the equivalent minimum capillary radii and contact angle of water within micropillar wick structures. In this method, the experimentally measured dryout threshold of a wick structure at different wicking lengths is fit to Darcy's law to extract the maximum capillary pressure generated by the test liquid. The equivalent minimum capillary radii of different wick geometries are determined by measuring the maximum capillary pressures generated using n-hexane as the working fluid. It is found that the equivalent minimum capillary radius is dependent on the diameter of pillars and the spacing between pillars. The equivalent capillary radii of micropillar wicks determined using the new method are found to be up to 7 times greater than the current geometry-based first-order estimates. The contact angle subtended by water at the walls of the micropillars is determined by measuring the capillary pressure generated by water within the arrays and the measured capillary radii for the different geometries. This mean contact angle of water is determined to be 54.7°.

  9. Fractal analysis of bone architecture at distal radius.

    PubMed

    Tomomitsu, Tatsushi; Mimura, Hiroaki; Murase, Kenya; Sone, Teruki; Fukunaga, Masao

    2005-12-20

    Bone strength depends on bone quality (architecture, turnover, damage accumulation, and mineralization) as well as bone mass. In this study, human bone architecture was analyzed using fractal image analysis, and the clinical relevance of this method was evaluated. The subjects were 12 healthy female controls and 16 female patients suspected of having osteoporosis (age range, 22-70 years; mean age, 49.1 years). High-resolution CT images of the distal radius were acquired and analyzed using a peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) system. On the same day, bone mineral densities of the lumbar spine (L-BMD), proximal femur (F-BMD), and distal radius (R-BMD) were measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). We examined the correlation between the fractal dimension and six bone mass indices. Subjects diagnosed with osteopenia or osteoporosis were divided into two groups (with and without vertebral fracture), and we compared measured values between these two groups. The fractal dimension correlated most closely with L-BMD (r=0.744). The coefficient of correlation between the fractal dimension and L-BMD was very similar to the coefficient of correlation between L-BMD and F-BMD (r=0.783) and the coefficient of correlation between L-BMD and R-BMD (r=0.742). The fractal dimension was the only measured value that differed significantly between both the osteopenic and the osteoporotic subjects with and without vertebral fracture. The present results suggest that the fractal dimension of the distal radius can be reliably used as a bone strength index that reflects bone architecture as well as bone mass.

  10. Neutron Star Mass-Radius Constraints Using Evolutionary Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, A. L.; Fiege, J. D.; Leahy, D. A.; Morsink, S. M.

    2016-12-01

    The equation of state of cold supra-nuclear-density matter, such as in neutron stars, is an open question in astrophysics. A promising method for constraining the neutron star equation of state is modeling pulse profiles of thermonuclear X-ray burst oscillations from hot spots on accreting neutron stars. The pulse profiles, constructed using spherical and oblate neutron star models, are comparable to what would be observed by a next-generation X-ray timing instrument like ASTROSAT, NICER, or a mission similar to LOFT. In this paper, we showcase the use of an evolutionary optimization algorithm to fit pulse profiles to determine the best-fit masses and radii. By fitting synthetic data, we assess how well the optimization algorithm can recover the input parameters. Multiple Poisson realizations of the synthetic pulse profiles, constructed with 1.6 million counts and no background, were fitted with the Ferret algorithm to analyze both statistical and degeneracy-related uncertainty and to explore how the goodness of fit depends on the input parameters. For the regions of parameter space sampled by our tests, the best-determined parameter is the projected velocity of the spot along the observer’s line of sight, with an accuracy of ≤3% compared to the true value and with ≤5% statistical uncertainty. The next best determined are the mass and radius; for a neutron star with a spin frequency of 600 Hz, the best-fit mass and radius are accurate to ≤5%, with respective uncertainties of ≤7% and ≤10%. The accuracy and precision depend on the observer inclination and spot colatitude, with values of ˜1% achievable in mass and radius if both the inclination and colatitude are ≳60°.

  11. Heliumlike and lithiumlike ionic sequences: Critical charges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guevara, N. L.; Turbiner, A. V.

    2011-12-01

    In nonrelativistic quantum mechanics we study the Coulomb systems of infinitely massive center of charge Z and two-three electrons: (Z,e,e) and (Z,e,e,e). It is shown that in both cases the total energy curve in Z is smooth, without any visible irregularities. Thus, for both systems the physical integer charges Z=1,2,... do not play a distinguished role as would be associated with charge quantization. By definition, a critical charge Zcr is a charge which separates a domain of the existence of bound states from a domain of unbound ones (continuum). For both systems the critical charges are found, Zcr,2e=0.910850 and Zcr,3e=2.0090, respectively. Based on numerical analysis, the Puiseux expansion in fractional powers of (Z-Zcr) is constructed for both systems. Our results indicate the existence of a square-root branch point singularity at Zcr with exponent 3/2. A connection between the critical charge and the radius of convergence of 1/Z expansion is briefly discussed.

  12. The role of effective charges in the electrophoresis of highly charged colloids.

    PubMed

    Chatterji, Apratim; Horbach, Jürgen

    2010-12-15

    We study the variation of electrophoretic mobility μ of highly charged spherical colloidal macroions for varying surface charge density σ on the colloid using computer simulations of the primitive model for charged colloids. Hydrodynamic interactions between ions are incorporated by coupling the primitive model of charged colloids to the lattice Boltzmann model (LB) of the fluid. In the highly charged regime, the mobility μ of the colloid is known to decrease with the increase of bare charge Q of the colloid; the aim of this paper is to investigate the cause of this. We have identified that the two main factors contributing to the decrease of μ are counterion charge condensation on the highly charged colloid and an increase in effective friction of the macroion-counterion complex due to the condensed counterions. Thus the established O'Brien and White theory, which identified the dipolar force originating from distortion of the electric double layer as the cause of decreasing μ, seems to break down for the case of highly charged colloids with σ in the range of 30-400 µC cm (- 2). To arrive at our conclusions, we counted the number of counterions q0 moving along with the spherical macroion. We observe in our simulations that q0 increases with the increase of bare charge Q, such that the effective charge Qeff = Q - q0 remains approximately constant. Interestingly for our nanometer-sized charged colloid, we observe that, if surface charge density σ of the colloid is increased by decreasing the radius RM of the colloid but fixed bare charge Q, the effective charge Q - q0 decreases with the increase of σ. This behavior is qualitatively different when σ is increased by increasing Q keeping RM fixed. Our observations address a controversy about the effective charge of a strongly charged macroion: some studies claim that effective charge is independent of the bare charge (Alexander et al 1984 J. Chem. Phys. 80 5776; Trizac et al 2003 Langmuir 19 4027) whereas

  13. Trajectory Calculator for Finite-Radius Cutter on a Lathe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savchenkov, Anatoliy; Strekalov, Dmitry; Yu, Nan

    2009-01-01

    A computer program calculates the two-dimensional trajectory (radial vs. axial position) of a finite-radius-of-curvature cutting tool on a lathe so as to cut a workpiece to a piecewise-continuous, analytically defined surface of revolution. (In the original intended application, the tool is a diamond cutter, and the workpiece is made of a crystalline material and is to be formed into an optical resonator disk.) The program also calculates an optimum cutting speed as F/L, where F is a material-dependent empirical factor and L is the effective instantaneous length of the cutting edge.

  14. Stabilisation of distal radius fractures: Lessons learned and future directions.

    PubMed

    Horst, Taylor A; Jupiter, Jesse B

    2016-02-01

    Our understanding of the diagnosis and management of distal radius fractures has been a long developed over centuries. There has been a shift in treatment of these very common injuries from closed reduction and casting to internal fixation. The answer to the best method of treatment has yet to be found. Today, we have a multitude of treatment options available with varying degrees of evidence to support their use. This review helps to illustrate the lessons we have learned and future directions for treatment.

  15. Method and apparatus for logging short radius horizontal drainholes

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, D.E.

    1991-04-30

    This patent describes an apparatus for use in logging a short radius horizontal drainhole. It comprises: a tubing string having a low portion; the lower portion of the tubing string including sensor support means therein; the lower portion of the tubing string containing openings communicating with the interior thereof in the vicinity of the sensor support means to thereby exposed the interior to the pressure and temperature conditions of the horizontal drainhole; and the lower portion of the tubing string including an end portion extending transversely of the tubing sting.

  16. Experimental Method for Microbubbles Dynamics Monitoring and Radius Sizing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fouan, Damien; Achaoui, Younes; Payan, Cedric; Mensah, Serge

    Rationale and aim: Within the context of divers' decompression illness prevention, ultrasonic detection and sizing of circulating microbubbles in blood is of great interest. In order to be representative of the divers gas tension level (supersaturation) and thus, to optimize decompression stages, the measurements (made in the right ventricle region) should be performed during a short period of time (ventricle filling <20 ms), efficient to detect a broad range of bubbles' radii population (radius from 20 to 200 _m) and harmless (Mechanical Index MI<0.3).

  17. [Skeletal tuberculosis of the distal radius during pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Sander, A L; Laurer, H; Sommer, K; Jakob, H; Lehnert, M; Marzi, I

    2012-02-01

    We present a case of a pregnant woman (32nd gestational week) that suffered from a chronic non-healing wound at the distal radius. Skeletal tuberculosis was finally diagnosed and treated successfully with staged surgical therapy combined with appropriate medication. One year after surgical treatment, the outcome of the mother was excellent and the baby did not suffer from any disease related to operative procedures or pharmacotherapy. Operative treatment of skeletal tuberculosis (especially osteoarticular and vertebral tuberculosis) in combination with tuberculostatic therapy during pregnancy and lactation seem to be the appropriate treatment with minimal risk for the child and excellent outcome for the mother.

  18. Mechanical consequences of different scenarios for simulated bone atrophy and recovery in the distal radius.

    PubMed

    Pistoia, W; van Rietbergen, B; Rüegsegger, P

    2003-12-01

    Metabolic bone diseases such as osteoporosis usually cause a decrease in bone mass and a deterioration of bone microarchitecture leading to a decline in bone strength. Methods to predict bone strength in patients are currently based on bone mass only. It has been suggested that an improved prediction of bone strength might be possible if structural changes are taken into account as well. In this study we evaluated which structural parameters (other than bone mass) are the best predictors for changes in bone mechanical properties of the human radius after different bone atrophy scenarios and whether the original strength of the affected bone can be recovered if bone loss is restored by thickening of the remaining structures. To answer these questions, a human radius was measured with a microcomputer tomography scanner to extract the full three-dimensional architecture of the distal radius at an isotropic resolution of 80 microm. Eight models with modified bone architecture were created and the mechanical variations due to these modifications were studied using microfinite element (micro-FE) simulations. In four models mass was lowered by 20%, either by reducing cortical thickness, trabecular thickness, or number of trabeculae or by overall thinning of structures. In the other four models bone mass was restored to the original value using a trabecular bone thickening procedure. The micro-FE analyses revealed that most load was carried by the cortical bone. For this reason, bone strength was affected most in the reduced cortical thickness model. For the same reason, the trabecular bone atrophy scenarios, all of which affected bone strength in a very similar way, resulted in less dramatic bone strength reduction. The restoration of bone mass did not recover the original bone strength. These findings demonstrate that the importance of different parameters for the prediction of bone strength also depends on the mechanical loading. This could explain why results of

  19. [Postoperative morbidity in surgically treated extension fractures of the distal radius. A comparative study of dorsal and volar approach].

    PubMed

    Zettl, R P; Ruchholtz, S; Taeger, G; Obertacke, U; Nast-Kolb, D

    2001-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate perioperative morbidity in operative interventions in distal radiusfractures, comparing the operative approach from volar and dorsal. Only problems, resulting from the operative approach towards the distal aspect of the radius, were examined. In a Case-Control-Study, we investigated patients with operative by plate-osteosynthesis treated distal radius-extensions-fractures. During 3 years we investigated 92 patients. 49 were operated with a volar approach, and after changing the operative management, consecutive 43 patients with a dorsal approach to the distal radius. Indications for operative treatment were not changed. The approach to the distal aspect of the radius corresponded to the recent guidelines. Further perioperative procedures were identical, including procedures in anesthesiology. Datas of patients have been investigated for epidemiology, kind of operations, point of time in treatment, duration of operation, X-Ray, immobilisation and time of inhospital stay as well as all documented complications. It has been shown, that in respect of all criterias, concerning length of operation (106 vs. 83 min), intraoperative X-Ray (3.0 vs. 1.65 min) as well as postoperative immobilisation (33 vs. 25 days), and documented incidences of complications like secondary wound-healing (19/49 vs. 0/43) or nerval irritations (13/49 vs. 1/43), the dorsal osteosynthesis is definitively to be favored.

  20. Grain charging in protoplanetary discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilgner, M.

    2012-02-01

    Context. Recent work identified a growth barrier for dust coagulation that originates in the electric repulsion between colliding particles. Depending on its charge state, dust material may have the potential to control key processes towards planet formation such as magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence and grain growth, which are coupled in a two-way process. Aims: We quantify the grain charging at different stages of disc evolution and differentiate between two very extreme cases: compact spherical grains and aggregates with fractal dimension Df = 2. Methods: Applying a simple chemical network that accounts for collisional charging of grains, we provide a semi-analytical solution. This allowed us to calculate the equilibrium population of grain charges and the ionisation fraction efficiently. The grain charging was evaluated for different dynamical environments ranging from static to non-stationary disc configurations. Results: The results show that the adsorption/desorption of neutral gas-phase heavy metals, such as magnesium, effects the charging state of grains. The greater the difference between the thermal velocities of the metal and the dominant molecular ion, the greater the change in the mean grain charge. Agglomerates have more negative excess charge on average than compact spherical particles of the same mass. The rise in the mean grain charge is proportional to N1/6 in the ion-dust limit. We find that grain charging in a non-stationary disc environment is expected to lead to similar results. Conclusions: The results indicate that the dust growth and settling in regions where the dust growth is limited by the so-called "electro-static barrier" do not prevent the dust material from remaining the dominant charge carrier.

  1. Effects of cytosine methylation on DNA charge transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hihath, Joshua; Guo, Shaoyin; Zhang, Peiming; Tao, Nongjian

    2012-04-01

    The methylation of cytosine bases in DNA commonly takes place in the human genome and its abnormality can be used as a biomarker in the diagnosis of genetic diseases. In this paper we explore the effects of cytosine methylation on the conductance of DNA. Although the methyl group is a small chemical modification, and has a van der Waals radius of only 2 Å, its presence significantly changes the duplex stability, and as such may also affect the conductance properties of DNA. To determine if charge transport through the DNA stack is sensitive to this important biological modification we perform multiple conductance measurements on a methylated DNA molecule with an alternating G:C sequence and its non-methylated counterpart. From these studies we find a measurable difference in the conductance between the two types of molecules, and demonstrate that this difference is statistically significant. The conductance values of these molecules are also compared with a similar sequence that has been previously studied to help elucidate the charge transport mechanisms involved in direct DNA conductance measurements.

  2. Adsorption and encapsulation of flexible polyelectrolytes in charged spherical vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shojaei, H. R.; Muthukumar, M.

    2017-06-01

    We present a theory of adsorption of flexible polyelectrolytes on the interior and exterior surfaces of a charged vesicle in an electrolyte solution. The criteria for adsorption and the density profiles of the adsorbed polymer chain are derived in terms of various characteristics of the polymer, vesicle, and medium, such as the charge density and length of the polymer, charge density and size of the vesicle, electrolyte concentration and dielectric constant of the medium. For adsorption inside the vesicle, the competition between the loss of conformational entropy and gain in adsorption energy results in two kinds of encapsulated states, depending on the strength of the polymer-vesicle interaction. By considering also the adsorption from outside the vesicle, we derive the entropic and energy contributions to the free energy change to transfer an adsorbed chain in the interior to an adsorbed chain on the exterior. In this paper, we have used the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB) method to solve the equation for the probability distribution function of the chain. The present WKB results are compared with the previous results based on variational methods. The WKB and variational results are in good agreement for both the interior and exterior states of adsorption, except in the zero-salt limit for adsorption in the exterior region. The adsorption criteria and density profiles for both the interior and exterior states are presented in terms of various experimentally controllable variables. Calculation of the dependencies of free energy change to transfer an adsorbed chain from the interior to the exterior surface on salt concentration and vesicle radius shows that the free energy penalty to expel a chain from a vesicle is only of the order of thermal energy.

  3. Biomechanical stability of four fixation constructs for distal radius fractures.

    PubMed

    Capo, John T; Kinchelow, Tosca; Brooks, Kenneth; Tan, Virak; Manigrasso, Michaele; Francisco, Kristin

    2009-09-01

    Implants available for distal radius fracture fixation include dorsal nonlocked plating (DNLP), volar locked plating (VLP), radial-ulnar dual-column locked plating (DCPs), and locked intramedullary fixation (IMN). This study examines the biomechanical properties of these four different fixation constructs. In 28 fresh-frozen radii, a wedge osteotomy was performed, creating an unstable fracture model and the four fixation constructs employed (DNLP, VLP, DCPs, and IMN). Dorsal bending loads were applied and bending stiffness, load to yield 5 mm displacement, and ultimate failure were measured. Bending stiffness for VLP (16.7 N/mm) was significantly higher than for DNLP (6.8 N/mm), while IMN (12.6 N/mm) and DCPs (11.8 N/mm) were similar. Ultimate load to failure occurred at 278.2 N for the VLP, 245.7 N for the IMN, and 52.0 N for the DNLP. The VLP was significantly stronger than the DNLP and DCPs, and the IMN and DCPs were stronger than the DNLP. The VLP has higher average bending stiffness, ultimate bending strength, and resistance to 5 mm displacement than the other constructs and significantly higher ultimate bending strength than the DCPs and DNLP. There was no statistically significant difference between the VLP and IMN. VLP and IMN fixation of distal radius fractures can achieve comparable stability.

  4. Complications of volar plating of distal radius fractures.

    PubMed

    Rampoldi, Michele; Marsico, Salvatore

    2007-12-01

    Open reduction and internal fixation has been shown to be effective in the treatment of unstable distal radius fractures. When a dorsal approach is used, extensor tendons rupture or irritation are frequent and well known complications. Complications associated with volar plate fixation have not been studied to the same extent. In this study a homogenous series of 90 patients treated by volar plate fixation were retrospectively evaluated, focusing on the complications observed. The overall rate of complications was 8% (7 cases). Tendon rupture or irritation of extensor (3 cases) and flexor tendons (2 cases) were the complications most frequently seen. All but one were clearly related to direct attritional damage of the tendon caused by the prominent edge of the plate or by protruding screw tips. Loss of reduction requiring repeat internal fixation was observed in one marginal shear fracture involving the lunate facet fragment. One patient had a carpal tunnel release owing to median nerve irritation. In this study, volar plate fixation appeared as a safe procedure in the management of unstable distal radius fractures, with a low rate of complications. Accurate placement of the plate and exact measurement of the screws may further minimize the incidence of complications. When radiographs reveal conditions that may predispose to tendon attritional lesions (prominent edge of the plate, dorsal protrusion of the screw tips) we strongly recommend early removal of the fixation device.

  5. Automated bone age assessment of older children using the radius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsao, Sinchai; Gertych, Arkadiusz; Zhang, Aifeng; Liu, Brent J.; Huang, Han K.

    2008-03-01

    The Digital Hand Atlas in Assessment of Skeletal Development is a large-scale Computer Aided Diagnosis (CAD) project for automating the process of grading Skeletal Development of children from 0-18 years of age. It includes a complete collection of 1,400 normal hand X-rays of children between the ages of 0-18 years of age. Bone Age Assessment is used as an index of skeletal development for detection of growth pathologies that can be related to endocrine, malnutrition and other disease types. Previous work at the Image Processing and Informatics Lab (IPILab) allowed the bone age CAD algorithm to accurately assess bone age of children from 1 to 16 (male) or 14 (female) years of age using the Phalanges as well as the Carpal Bones. At the older ages (16(male) or 14(female) -19 years of age) the Phalanges as well as the Carpal Bones are fully developed and do not provide well-defined features for accurate bone age assessment. Therefore integration of the Radius Bone as a region of interest (ROI) is greatly needed and will significantly improve the ability to accurately assess the bone age of older children. Preliminary studies show that an integrated Bone Age CAD that utilizes the Phalanges, Carpal Bones and Radius forms a robust method for automatic bone age assessment throughout the entire age range (1-19 years of age).

  6. Finite Larmor radius magnetohydrodynamics of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huba, J. D.

    1996-07-01

    The evolution of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability is studied using finite Larmor radius (FLR) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) theory. Finite Larmor radius effects are introduced in the momentum equation through an anisotropic ion stress tensor. Roberts and Taylor [Phys. Rev. Lett. 3, 197 (1962)], using fluid theory, demonstrated that FLR effects can stabilize the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in the short-wavelength limit (kLn≫1, where k is the wave number and Ln is the density gradient scale length). In this paper a linear mode equation is derived that is valid for arbitrary kLn. Analytic solutions are presented in both the short-wavelength (kLn≫1) and long-wavelength (kLn≪1) regimes, and numerical solutions are presented for the intermediate regime (kLn˜1). The long-wavelength modes are shown to be the most difficult to stabilize. More important, the nonlinear evolution of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability is studied using a newly developed two-dimensional (2-D) FLR MHD code. The FLR effects are shown to be a stabilizing influence on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability; the short-wavelength modes are the easiest to stabilize, consistent with linear theory. In the nonlinear regime, the FLR effects cause the ``bubbles and spikes'' that develop because of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability to convect along the density gradient and to tilt. Applications of this model to space and laboratory plasma phenomena are discussed.

  7. Two empirical regimes of the planetary mass-radius relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashi, Dolev; Helled, Ravit; Zucker, Shay; Mordasini, Christoph

    2017-08-01

    Today, with the large number of detected exoplanets and improved measurements, we can reach the next step of planetary characterization. Classifying different populations of planets is not only important for our understanding of the demographics of various planetary types in the galaxy, but also for our understanding of planet formation. We explore the nature of two regimes in the planetary mass-radius (M-R) relation. We suggest that the transition between the two regimes of "small" and "large" planets occurs at a mass of 124 ± 7M⊕ and a radius of 12.1 ± 0.5R⊕. Furthermore, the M-R relation is R ∝ M0.55 ± 0.02 and R ∝ M0.01 ± 0.02 for small and large planets, respectively. We suggest that the location of the breakpoint is linked to the onset of electron degeneracy in hydrogen, and therefore to the planetary bulk composition. Specifically, it is the characteristic minimal mass of a planet that consists of mostly hydrogen and helium, and therefore its M-R relation is determined by the equation of state of these materials. We compare the M-R relation from observational data with the relation derived by population synthesis calculations and show that there is a good qualitative agreement between the two samples.

  8. Artificial gravity: head movements during short-radius centrifugation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, L. R.; Hecht, H.; Lyne, L. E.; Sienko, K. H.; Cheung, C. C.; Kavelaars, J.

    2001-01-01

    Short-radius centrifugation is a potential countermeasure to long-term weightlessness. Unfortunately, head movements in a rotating environment induce serious discomfort, non-compensatory vestibulo-ocular reflexes, and subjective illusions of body tilt. In two experiments we investigated the effects of pitch and yaw head movements in participants placed supine on a rotating bed with their head at the center of rotation, feet at the rim. The vast majority of participants experienced motion sickness, inappropriate vertical nystagmus and illusory tilt and roll as predicted by a semicircular canal model. However, a small but significant number of the 28 participants experienced tilt in the predicted plane but in the opposite direction. Heart rate was elevated following one-second duration head turns. Significant adaptation occurred following a series of head turns in the light. Vertical nystagmus, motion sickness and illusory tilt all decreased with adaptation. Consequences for artificial gravity produced by short-radius centrifuges as a countermeasure are discussed. Grant numbers: NCC 9-58. c 2001. Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Drift-Alfven vortices at the ion Larmor radius scale

    SciTech Connect

    Onishchenko, O. G.; Krasnoselskikh, V. V.

    2008-02-15

    The theory of nonlinear drift-Alfven waves with the spatial scales comparable to the ion Larmor radius is developed. It is shown that the set of equations describing the nonlinear dynamics of drift-Alfven waves in a quasistationary regime admits a solution in the form of a solitary dipole vortex. The vortex structures propagating perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field faster than the diamagnetic ion drift velocity possess spatial scales larger than the ion Larmor radius, and vice versa. The variation of the vortex impedance and spatial scale as the function of the vortex velocity is analyzed. It is shown that incorporation of the finite electron temperature effects results in the appearance of a minimum in the dependence of the vortex impedance on the vortex velocity. This leads to the existence of the vortex structures with the smallest impedance. These structures are probably the most favorable energetically and can easily be excited in space plasmas. The relevance of theoretical results obtained to the Cluster observations in the magnetospheric cusp and magnetosheath is stressed.

  10. Artificial gravity: head movements during short-radius centrifugation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, L. R.; Hecht, H.; Lyne, L. E.; Sienko, K. H.; Cheung, C. C.; Kavelaars, J.

    2001-01-01

    Short-radius centrifugation is a potential countermeasure to long-term weightlessness. Unfortunately, head movements in a rotating environment induce serious discomfort, non-compensatory vestibulo-ocular reflexes, and subjective illusions of body tilt. In two experiments we investigated the effects of pitch and yaw head movements in participants placed supine on a rotating bed with their head at the center of rotation, feet at the rim. The vast majority of participants experienced motion sickness, inappropriate vertical nystagmus and illusory tilt and roll as predicted by a semicircular canal model. However, a small but significant number of the 28 participants experienced tilt in the predicted plane but in the opposite direction. Heart rate was elevated following one-second duration head turns. Significant adaptation occurred following a series of head turns in the light. Vertical nystagmus, motion sickness and illusory tilt all decreased with adaptation. Consequences for artificial gravity produced by short-radius centrifuges as a countermeasure are discussed. Grant numbers: NCC 9-58. c 2001. Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Corrective osteotomies of the radius: Grafting or not?

    PubMed Central

    Mugnai, Raffaele; Tarallo, Luigi; Lancellotti, Enrico; Zambianchi, Francesco; Di Giovine, Ettore; Catani, Fabio; Adani, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To review the current literature regarding corrective osteotomies to provide the best evidence of the rule of bone grafting. METHODS: Our MEDLINE literature search included 280 studies using the following key words “Malunited distal radius fracture” and 150 studies using key words “Corrective osteotomy of the distal radius”. Inclusion criteria were: Malunited distal radial, extra articular fracture, volar locking plate, use of iliac bone graft (cancellous or corticocancellous), non-use of bone graft. Twelve studies met the inclusion criteria. RESULTS: Seven of the 12 studies considered, described the use of a graft; the remaining five studies didn’t use any graft. Type of malunion was dorsal in most of the studies. The healing time was comparable using the graft or not (mean 12.5 wk), ranging from 7.5 to 16 wk. The mean disabilities of the arm, shoulder and hand score improvement was 23 points both in the studies that used the graft and in those not using the graft. CONCLUSION: This review demonstrated that corrective osteotomy of extra-articular malunited fractures of the distal radius treated by volar locking plate does not necessarily require bone graft. PMID:26925385

  12. On the signature of positively charged dust particles on plasma irregularities in the mesosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoudian, A.; Scales, W. A.

    2013-11-01

    Recent rocket payloads have studied the properties of aerosol particles within the ambient plasma environment in the polar mesopause region and measured the signature of the positively charged particles with number densities of (2000 cm-3) for particles of 0.5-1 nm in radius. The measurement of significant numbers of positively charged aerosol particles is unexpected from the standard theory of aerosol charging in plasma. Nucleation on the cluster ions is one of the most probable hypotheses for the positive charge on the smallest particles. This work attempts to study the correlation and anti-correlation of fluctuations in the electron and ion densities in the background plasma by adopting the proposed hypothesis of positive dust particle formation. The utility being that it may provide a test for determining the presence of positive dust particles. The results of the model described show good agreement with observed rocket data. As an application, the model is also applied to investigate the electron irregularity behavior during radiowave heating assuming the presence of positive dust particles. It is shown that the positive dust produces important changes in the behavior during Polar Mesospheric Summer Echo PMSE heating experiments that can be described by the fluctuation correlation and anti-correlation properties.

  13. Modeling of charged anisotropic compact stars in general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dayanandan, Baiju; Maurya, S. K.; T, Smitha T.

    2017-06-01

    A charged compact star model has been determined for anisotropic fluid distribution. We have solved the Einstein-Maxwell field equations to construct the charged compact star model by using the radial pressure, the metric function e^{λ} and the electric charge function. The generic charged anisotropic solution is verified by exploring different physical conditions like causality condition, mass-radius relation and stability of the solution (via the adiabatic index, TOV equations and the Herrera cracking concept). It is observed that the present charged anisotropic compact star model is compatible with the star PSR 1937+21. Moreover, we also presented the EOS ρ = f(p) for the present charged compact star model.

  14. RADIUS-DEPENDENT ANGULAR MOMENTUM EVOLUTION IN LOW-MASS STARS. I

    SciTech Connect

    Reiners, Ansgar; Mohanty, Subhanjoy

    2012-02-10

    Angular momentum evolution in low-mass stars is determined by initial conditions during star formation, stellar structure evolution, and the behavior of stellar magnetic fields. Here we show that the empirical picture of angular momentum evolution arises naturally if rotation is related to magnetic field strength instead of to magnetic flux and formulate a corrected braking law based on this. Angular momentum evolution then becomes a strong function of stellar radius, explaining the main trends observed in open clusters and field stars at a few Gyr: the steep transition in rotation at the boundary to full convection arises primarily from the large change in radius across this boundary and does not require changes in dynamo mode or field topology. Additionally, the data suggest transient core-envelope decoupling among solar-type stars and field saturation at longer periods in very low mass stars. For solar-type stars, our model is also in good agreement with the empirical Skumanich law. Finally, in further support of the theory, we show that the predicted age at which low-mass stars spin down from the saturated to unsaturated field regimes in our model corresponds remarkably well to the observed lifetime of magnetic activity in these stars.

  15. The Effects of the Flyer Plate's Radius of Curvature on the Performance of an Explosively Formed Projectile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulligan, Phillip; Baird, Jason; Hoffman, Joshua

    2011-06-01

    An explosively formed projectile (EFP) is known for its ability to penetrate vehicle armor effectively. Understanding how an EFP's physical parameters affect its performance is crucial to development of an armor capable of defeating such devices. The present study uses two flyer plate radii of curvature to identify the experimental effects the flyer plate's radius of curvature has on the measured projectile velocity, depth of penetration, and projectile shape of an EFP. The Gurney equation is an algebraic relationship for estimating the velocity imparted to a metal plate in contact with detonating explosives (1). In their attempts to calculate an EFP theoretical flyer plate velocity, the authors of this research used the open-faced-sandwich Gurney equation, whereby a semi-infinite slab of explosive is in intimate contact with a semi-infinite metal flyer plate. This equation uses the flyer-weight to charge-weight ratio and the specific explosive kinetic energy to calculate the theoretical flyer plate velocity. Two EFP designs that have two different flyer plate radii of curvature, but the same physical parameters and the same flyer-weight to charge-weight ratio should theoretically have the same velocity. Test results indicate the flyer plate's radius of curvature does not affect the projectile's velocity and that using a flat flyer plate negatively affects projectile penetration and formation.

  16. Measurement of the Neutron Radius of 208Pb Through Parity Violation in Electron Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Saenboonruang, Kiadtisak

    2013-05-01

    In contrast to the nuclear charge densities, which have been accurately measured with electron scattering, the knowledge of neutron densities still lack precision. Previous model-dependent hadron experiments suggest the difference between the neutron radius, Rn, of a heavy nucleus and the proton radius, Rp, to be in the order of several percent. To accurately obtain the difference, Rn-Rp, which is essentially a neutron skin, the Jefferson Lab Lead (208Pb) Radius Experiment (PREX) measured the parity-violating electroweak asymmetry in the elastic scattering of polarized electrons from 208Pb at an energy of 1.06 GeV and a scattering angle of 5° . Since Z0 boson couples mainly to neutrons, this asymmetry provides a clean measurement of Rn with respect to Rp. PREX was conducted at the Jefferson lab experimental Hall A, from March to June 2010. The experiment collected a final data sample of 2x 107 helicity-window quadruplets. The measured parity-violating electroweak asymmetry APV = 0.656 ± 0.060 (stat) ± 0.014 (syst) ppm corresponds to a difference between the radii of the neutron and proton distributions, Rn-Rp = 0.33+0.16-0.18 fm and provides the first electroweak observation of the neutron skin as expected in a heavy, neutron-rich nucleus. The value of the neutron radius of 208Pb has important implications for models of nuclear structure and their application in atomic physics and astrophysics such as atomic parity non-conservation (PNC) and neutron stars.

  17. Metallic charge stripes in cuprates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tranquada, J. M.

    2004-08-01

    Some recent evidence for the existence of dynamic, metallic stripes in the 214 family of cuprates is reviewed. The mechanism of stripe pinning is considered, and changes in the charge density within stripes between the pinned and dynamic phases is discussed. From a purely experimental perspective, dynamic charge stripes are fully compatible with nodal “quasiparticles” and other electronic properties common to all superconducting cuprates.

  18. Radius of Curvature Measurements: An Independent Look at Accuracy Using Novel Optical Metrology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Bryon; Kahan, Mark; Russell, Kevin (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The AMSD (Advanced Mirror System Demonstrator) program mirror specifications include the ability to manufacture the mirror to a radius of curvature of 10 m +/- 1 mm and to control its radius at 30K to the same specification. Therefore, it is necessary for the Government Team to be able to measure mirror radius of curvature to an accuracy of better than 0.5 mm. This presentation discusses a novel optical metrology system for measuring radius of curvature.

  19. Biomechanical comparison of osteoporotic distal radius fractures fixed by distal locking screws with different length.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiong; Wu, Wei-dong; Fang, Ya-feng; Zhang, Mei-chao; Huang, Wen-hua

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the postoperative stability of osteoporotic distal radius fractures fixed with distal locking screws with different length. A comminuted extra-articular dorsally unstable distal radius fracture, treated with volar locking plate system, was created. The 18 specimens were randomized into 3 groups based on distal locked screws with different length: Group A had unicortical screws with 50% length to the dorsal cortex. Group B had unicortical screws with 75% length to the dorsal cortex. Group C had bicortical screws. Axial compression and bending loads were imposed on the models before and after cycling testing as well as load to clinical and catastrophic failure. Minimum change in stiffness was observed before and after fatigue for all groups. The final stiffness to bending forces was statistically similar in all groups, but stiffness to axial compression was statistically significant different: Group A approached significance with respect to groups B and C (P = 0.017, 0.009), whereas stiffness in group B and C was statistically similar (P = 0.93). Load to clinical failure was significantly less for group A (456.54±78.59 N) compared with groups B (580.24±73.85 N) and C (591.07±38.40 N). Load to catastrophic failure was statistically similar between groups, but mean values for Group A were 18% less than means for Group C. The volar locking plate system fixed with unicortical locking screws with at least 75% length not only produced early stability for osteoporotic distal radius fractures, but also avoided extensor tendon complications due to dorsal screw protrusion.

  20. Biomechanical Comparison of Osteoporotic Distal Radius Fractures Fixed by Distal Locking Screws with Different Length

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiong; Wu, Wei-dong; Fang, Ya-feng; Zhang, Mei-chao; Huang, Wen-hua

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the postoperative stability of osteoporotic distal radius fractures fixed with distal locking screws with different length. Methods A comminuted extra-articular dorsally unstable distal radius fracture, treated with volar locking plate system, was created. The 18 specimens were randomized into 3 groups based on distal locked screws with different length: Group A had unicortical screws with 50% length to the dorsal cortex. Group B had unicortical screws with 75% length to the dorsal cortex. Group C had bicortical screws. Axial compression and bending loads were imposed on the models before and after cycling testing as well as load to clinical and catastrophic failure. Results Minimum change in stiffness was observed before and after fatigue for all groups. The final stiffness to bending forces was statistically similar in all groups, but stiffness to axial compression was statistically significant different: Group A approached significance with respect to groups B and C (P = 0.017, 0.009), whereas stiffness in group B and C was statistically similar (P = 0.93). Load to clinical failure was significantly less for group A (456.54±78.59 N) compared with groups B (580.24±73.85 N) and C (591.07±38.40 N). Load to catastrophic failure was statistically similar between groups, but mean values for Group A were 18% less than means for Group C. Conclusions The volar locking plate system fixed with unicortical locking screws with at least 75% length not only produced early stability for osteoporotic distal radius fractures, but also avoided extensor tendon complications due to dorsal screw protrusion. PMID:25080094

  1. Workplace Charging. Charging Up University Campuses

    SciTech Connect

    Giles, Carrie; Ryder, Carrie; Lommele, Stephen

    2016-03-01

    This case study features the experiences of university partners in the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Workplace Charging Challenge with the installation and management of plug-in electric vehicle (PEV) charging stations.

  2. Analysis of the interplay among charge, hydration and shape of proteins through the modeling of their CZE mobility data.

    PubMed

    Piaggio, Maria V; Peirotti, Marta B; Deiber, Julio A

    2009-07-01

    Electrophoretic mobility data of four proteins are analyzed and interpreted through a physicochemical CZE model, which provides estimates of quantities like equivalent hydrodynamic radius (size), effective charge number, shape orientation factor, hydration, actual pK values of ionizing groups, and pH near molecule, among others. Protein friction coefficients are simulated through the creeping flow theory of prolate spheroidal particles. The modeling of the effective electrophoretic mobility of proteins requires consideration of hydrodynamic size and shape coupled to hydration and effective charge. The model proposed predicts native protein hydration within the range of values obtained experimentally from other techniques. Therefore, this model provides consistently other physicochemical properties such as average friction and diffusion coefficients and packing fractal dimension. As the pH varies from native conditions to those that are denaturing the protein, hydration and packing fractal dimension change substantially. Needs for further research are also discussed and proposed.

  3. 21 CFR 886.1430 - Ophthalmic contact lens radius measuring device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ophthalmic contact lens radius measuring device... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1430 Ophthalmic contact lens radius measuring device. (a) Identification. An ophthalmic contact lens radius measuring device...

  4. 21 CFR 886.1430 - Ophthalmic contact lens radius measuring device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ophthalmic contact lens radius measuring device... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1430 Ophthalmic contact lens radius measuring device. (a) Identification. An ophthalmic contact lens radius measuring device...

  5. 21 CFR 886.1430 - Ophthalmic contact lens radius measuring device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ophthalmic contact lens radius measuring device... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1430 Ophthalmic contact lens radius measuring device. (a) Identification. An ophthalmic contact lens radius measuring device...

  6. 21 CFR 886.1430 - Ophthalmic contact lens radius measuring device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ophthalmic contact lens radius measuring device... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1430 Ophthalmic contact lens radius measuring device. (a) Identification. An ophthalmic contact lens radius measuring device...

  7. Post-traumatic osteonecrosis of the lunate after fracture of the distal radius.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Akito; Yajima, Hiroshi; Kisanuki, Osamu

    2014-12-01

    We present a case of post-traumatic osteonecrosis of the lunate after fracture of the distal radius. Post-traumatic osteonecrosis of the carpal lunate after a fracture of the distal radius has, to our knowledge, not been reported previously. We treated the patient with vascularised bone graft from the distal radius, with a satisfactory result.

  8. Permeability of cartilage to neutral and charged polysaccharides

    SciTech Connect

    Haselton, F.R.; Fishman, A.P.; Sampson, P.M.

    1986-05-01

    The authors investigated macromolecular transport through a negatively charged membrane made from articular cartilage. Sections (150-1000 ..mu..) of cartilage obtained at autopsy from a horse fetlock were clamped between two 15 ml chambers containing .15 M sodium chloride in pH 7.4, .004 M phosphate. Tracers were introduced into chamber A and transport was determined by radiolabel transferred to chamber B over time. Structural integrity was preserved as shown by histological staining. In three experiments, size selectivity was measured using polydisperse uncharged /sup 3/H-dextran. The authors determined the elution patterns from a calibrated Sephadex S300 column of samples from each chamber. The relative transport of molecules over the size range of 1.0 to 10.0 nm was determined by comparing the two elution patterns. They found a sharp cutoff at an effective molecular radius of 2.5 nm. In an additional three experiments, charge selectivity was investigated by comparing the simultaneous transport of /sup 3/H-inulin and /sup 14/C-carboxy inulin. Both tracers have an effective molecular radius of 1.1 nm. The negatively charged carboxy inulin was transferred 15% faster than the uncharged inulin. They conclude: a) there is a maximum effective radius for uncharged dextrans that can be transferred across this membrane which is smaller than that reported for proteins and b) negatively charged cartilagenous membranes do not retard the transport of negatively charged inulin.

  9. Charged compact stellar model in Finch-Skea spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratanpal, B. S.; Pandya, D. M.; Sharma, R.; Das, S.

    2017-04-01

    Making use of the Finch and Skea ansatz (Class. Quantum Gravity 6:467, 1989), we present a new class of solutions for a compact stellar object whose exterior space-time is described by the Riessner-Nordström metric. We generate the solution by assuming a specific charge distribution and show its relevance in the context of relativistic spherical objects possessing a net charge. In particular, we analyze the impact of charge on the mass-radius (M-R) relationship of compact stellar objects.

  10. Adsorption of polyelectrolytes onto oppositely charged cylindrical macroions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Carvalho, Sidney Jurado; Caetano, Daniel Lucas Zago

    2013-06-01

    In this work we investigate the adsorption of polyelectrolyte chains onto uniformly charged cylindrical macroions by means of the Metropolis Monte Carlo simulations and weighted histogram analysis method. Adopting a simplified model for macromolecules and treating the electrolytic solution in the Debye-Hückel level, conformational properties of the adsorbed chain, such as the radius of gyration and the thickness of the adsorbed layer, are provided as a function of ionic strength and macroion charge density. By analysis of the free energy profile as a function of the radius of gyration it was possible to identify first-order-like transitions between adsorbed and desorbed states and obtain a macroion charge density dependence of the critical ionic strength in good agreement with experiments.

  11. The role of charge transfer in the oxidation state change of Ce atoms in the TM13-CeO2(111) systems (TM = Pd, Ag, Pt, Au): a DFT + U investigation.

    PubMed

    Tereshchuk, Polina; Freire, Rafael L H; Ungureanu, Crina G; Seminovski, Yohanna; Kiejna, Adam; Da Silva, Juarez L F

    2015-05-28

    Despite extensive studies of transition metal (TM) clusters supported on ceria (CeO2), fundamental issues such as the role of the TM atoms in the change in the oxidation state of Ce atoms are still not well understood. In this work, we report a theoretical investigation based on static and ab initio molecular dynamics density functional theory calculations of the interaction of 13-atom TM clusters (TM = Pd, Ag, Pt, Au) with the unreduced CeO2(111) surface represented by a large surface unit cell and employing Hubbard corrections for the strong on-site Coulomb correlation in the Ce f-electrons. We found that the TM13 clusters form pyramidal-like structures on CeO2(111) in the lowest energy configurations with the following stacking sequence, TM/TM4/TM8/CeO2(111), while TM13 adopts two-dimensional structures at high energy structures. TM13 induces a change in the oxidation state of few Ce atoms (3 of 16) located in the topmost Ce layer from Ce(IV) (itinerant Ce f-states) to Ce(III) (localized Ce f-states). There is a charge flow from the TM atoms to the CeO2(111) surface, which can be explained by the electronegativity difference between the TM (Pd, Ag, Pt, Au) and O atoms, however, the charge is not uniformly distributed on the topmost O layer due to the pressure induced by the TM13 clusters on the underlying O ions, which yields a decrease in the ionic charge of the O ions located below the cluster and an increase in the remaining O ions. Due to the charge flow mainly from the TM8-layer to the topmost O-layer, the charge cannot flow from the Ce(IV) atoms to the O atoms with the same magnitude as in the clean CeO2(111) surface. Consequently, the effective cationic charge decreases mainly for the Ce atoms that have a bond with the O atoms not located below the cluster, and hence, those Ce atoms change their oxidation state from IV to III. This increases the size of the Ce(III) compared with the Ce(IV) cations, which builds-in a strain within the topmost Ce layer, and

  12. Inductive voltage adder (IVA) for submillimeter radius electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Mazarakis, M.G.; Poukey, J.W.; Maenchen, J.E.

    1996-12-31

    The authors have already demonstrated the utility of inductive voltage adder accelerators for production of small-size electron beams. In this approach, the inductive voltage adder drives a magnetically immersed foilless diode to produce high-energy (10--20 MeV), high-brightness pencil electron beams. This concept was first demonstrated with the successful experiments which converted the linear induction accelerator RADLAC II into an IVA fitted with a small 1-cm radius cathode magnetically immersed foilless diode (RADLAC II/SMILE). They present here first validations of extending this idea to mm-scale electron beams using the SABRE and HERMES-III inductive voltage adders as test beds. The SABRE experiments are already completed and have produced 30-kA, 9-MeV electron beams with envelope diameter of 1.5-mm FWHM. The HERMES-III experiments are currently underway.

  13. EFFECTIVE INNER RADIUS OF TILTED BLACK HOLE ACCRETION DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Fragile, P. Chris

    2009-12-01

    One of the primary means of determining the spin a of an astrophysical black hole is by actually measuring the inner radius r {sub in} of a surrounding accretion disk and using that to infer a. By comparing a number of different estimates of r {sub in} from simulations of tilted accretion disks with differing black hole spins, we show that such a procedure can give quite wrong answers. Over the range 0 <= a/M <= 0.9, we find that, for moderately thick disks (H/r approx 0.2) with modest tilt (15 deg.), r {sub in} is nearly independent of spin. This result is likely dependent on tilt, such that for larger tilts, it may even be that r {sub in} would increase with increasing spin. In the opposite limit, we confirm through numerical simulations of untilted disks that, in the limit of zero tilt, r {sub in} recovers approximately the expected dependence on a.

  14. Measuring the Radius and Mass of Planet Nine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, J.

    2017-10-01

    Batygin & Brown (2016) suggested the existence of a new planet in our solar system that is supposed to be responsible for the perturbation of eccentric orbits of small outer bodies. The main challenge now is to detect and characterize this putative body. Here, we investigate the principles of the determination of its physical parameters, mainly its mass and radius. For that purpose, we concentrate on two methods: stellar occultations and gravitational microlensing effects (amplification, deflection, and time delay). We estimate the main characteristics of a possible occultation or gravitational effects: flux variation of a background star, duration, and probability of occurrence. We also investigate the additional benefits of direct imaging and of an occultation.

  15. Evolution of neck radius and relaxation of coalescing nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, David N.; Brown, Simon A.

    2009-08-01

    We use kinetic Monte Carlo simulations to investigate the coalescence of fcc nanoparticles via lattice-based diffusion of surface atoms. The radius of the neck region connecting the two nanoparticles is found to develop with characteristic power laws rtilde ta with atilde (1)/(3) and atilde (1)/(6) for the early and intermediate stages of coalescence, respectively. For late coalescence stages, when the nucleation of new atomic layers on nanoparticle facets is required for further coalescence, the nanoparticle size, temperature, and nanoparticle orientation all influence the development of the neck. In contrast, classical theory predicts an approximately constant value of a(˜(1)/(6)) . We also examine the temperature dependence of the equilibration times for relaxing nanoparticles and distinguish the limiting processes to be nucleation of new germs on a facet and/or the detachment of atoms from atomic layers.

  16. Severely comminuted radius fracture presenting as a signature patterned injury

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Saurabh; Rajan, Sunil; Srivastava, Abhishek

    2016-01-01

    Dilemma still prevails, regarding the exact management of mangled extremity injuries between limb salvage versus amputation, each having there own set of complications. We here present a case of severely comminuted fractures of radius (bag of bones) along with the multiple criss-cross shaped lacerated wounds on the forearm and wrist presenting as a “signature pattern injury” caused by entrapment of the limb in the concrete mixer. MESS score of patient was 8, a score valid for amputation, but contrary, we successfully salvaged the patient's limb with use of radio-carpal distracter. Management of mangled injuries should be individualized, with due consideration to the mechanism and force of injury, associated injuries, and the patient profile. PMID:27053813

  17. Radius and limb darkening of Titan from speckle imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nisenson, P.; Apt, J.; Horowitz, P.; Goody, R.

    1981-11-01

    The radius R of Titan is determined from ground-based, visible light observations using a two-dimensional speckle imaging technique. The value of R is found to depend on the limb-darkening exponent alpha, which is used in modeling the observed disk, and it is determined that the probable range extends from R values of 2680 + or - 100 km for alpha of 0.6 to 2900 + or - 100 km for alpha of 1.3. This range is in agreement with Voyager 1 and Pioneer Saturn observations. It is suggested that spatial resolution may be doubled by using a grid of 256 x 256 pixels at the time the image is digitized, and that further improvements are possible with speckle-reduction techniques under development.

  18. Biomechanics and biology of plate fixation of distal radius fractures.

    PubMed

    Freeland, Alan E; Luber, Kurre T

    2005-08-01

    The fracture management principles of anatomic or near anatomic reduction, fracture stabilization, minimal operative trauma, and early joint motion are paramount in man-aging unstable distal radial fractures. The operative approach and plate selection should correlate with the fracture configuration. Plates have the advantages of providing secure fixation throughout the entire healing process without protruding wires or pins and allowing early and intensive forearm, wrist, and digital exercises. Disadvantages include additional operative trauma, including fragment devascularization; some additional risk of wrist stiffness; occasional tendon rupture; and at times, the need for plate removal. New developments in plate and screw design and operative strategies, fragment specific fixation, and plate strength have improved results with plate fixation. Fixed angle blades and locking screws and pegs enhance overall plate stability, support the articular surface of the distal radius, and are effective in fractures occurring in osteopenic bone.

  19. Severely comminuted radius fracture presenting as a signature patterned injury.

    PubMed

    Jain, Saurabh; Rajan, Sunil; Srivastava, Abhishek

    2016-01-01

    Dilemma still prevails, regarding the exact management of mangled extremity injuries between limb salvage versus amputation, each having there own set of complications. We here present a case of severely comminuted fractures of radius (bag of bones) along with the multiple criss-cross shaped lacerated wounds on the forearm and wrist presenting as a "signature pattern injury" caused by entrapment of the limb in the concrete mixer. MESS score of patient was 8, a score valid for amputation, but contrary, we successfully salvaged the patient's limb with use of radio-carpal distracter. Management of mangled injuries should be individualized, with due consideration to the mechanism and force of injury, associated injuries, and the patient profile.

  20. Massive radius-dependent flow slippage in carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siria, Alessandro; Secchi, Eleonora; Marbach, Sophie; Niguès, Antoine; Stein, Derek; Bocquet, Lydéric

    2016-11-01

    Nanofluidics is the frontier where the continuum picture of fluid mechanics confronts the atomic nature of matter. Recent reports indicate that carbon nanotubes exhibit exceptional water transport properties due to nearly frictionless interfaces and this has stimulated interest in nanotube-based membranes for desalination, nano-filtration, and energy harvesting. However, the fundamental mechanisms of water transport inside nanotubes and at water-carbon interfaces remain controversial, as existing theories fail to provide a satisfying explanation for the limited experimental results. We report a study of water jets emerging from single nanotubes made of carbon and boron-nitride materials. Our experiments reveal extensive and radius-dependent surface slippage in carbon nanotubes (CNT). In stark contrast, boron-nitride nanotubes (BNNT), which are crystallographically similar to CNTs but electronically different, exhibit no slippage. This shows that slippage originates in subtle atomic-scale details of the solid-liquid interface. ERC StG - NanoSOFT.

  1. Quick spacecraft charging primer

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, Brian Arthur

    2014-03-12

    This is a presentation in PDF format which is a quick spacecraft charging primer, meant to be used for program training. It goes into detail about charging physics, RBSP examples, and how to identify charging.

  2. Titanium elastic nailing radius and ulna fractures in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Wall, Lindley; O'Donnell, June C; Schoenecker, Perry L; Keeler, Kathryn A; Dobbs, Matthew B; Luhmann, Scott J; Gordon, J Eric

    2012-09-01

    Over the last 40 years, anatomic reduction with plate stabilization has become the standard in adult patients with diaphyseal fractures of the radius and ulna. When operative fixation has been indicated in skeletally immature patients with these fractures, a variety of techniques have been reported, with intramedullary fixation becoming increasingly accepted. There is currently significant variability in the treatment of adolescents with forearm fractures. The purpose of this study was to investigate the clinical and radiographic outcomes in the adolescent population after intramedullary fixation of both bone forearm fractures. A retrospective review identified 32 patients 12-18 years of age who had undergone intramedullary fixation of both forearm bones in the past 20 years at our institution. Galeazzi, Monteggia, radial head, and distal metaphyseal fractures were excluded. Radiographic evaluation was performed to determine union and postoperative radial bow. Clinical follow-up was carried out for postoperative complications and range of motion of the wrist, forearm, and elbow. The mean age of the patients was 14.1 years. A total of 19 fractures were closed injuries, nine were grade 1, three were grade 2, and one fracture was a grade 3b. Of the patients, 15.6% had limited postoperative range of motion. All patients in the older age group, 15-18 years of age, had a normal range of motion. A decrease in radial bow was not associated with limitation in motion. There was a 98% union rate, and all unions occurred by 7.5 months. Only three major complications occurred, two refractures and one ulnar hardware migration, and subsequent radius nonunion occurred in the one grade 3b injury. Flexible intramedullary nailing of both bone forearm fractures provides reliable bony union and excellent postoperative clinical results in adolescents. Level of evidence, IV.

  3. Maximum wind radius estimated by the 50 kt radius: improvement of storm surge forecasting over the western North Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagi, Hiroshi; Wu, Wenjie

    2016-03-01

    Even though the maximum wind radius (Rmax) is an important parameter in determining the intensity and size of tropical cyclones, it has been overlooked in previous storm surge studies. This study reviews the existing estimation methods for Rmax based on central pressure or maximum wind speed. These over- or underestimate Rmax because of substantial variations in the data, although an average radius can be estimated with moderate accuracy. As an alternative, we propose an Rmax estimation method based on the radius of the 50 kt wind (R50). Data obtained by a meteorological station network in the Japanese archipelago during the passage of strong typhoons, together with the JMA typhoon best track data for 1990-2013, enabled us to derive the following simple equation, Rmax = 0.23 R50. Application to a recent strong typhoon, the 2015 Typhoon Goni, confirms that the equation provides a good estimation of Rmax, particularly when the central pressure became considerably low. Although this new method substantially improves the estimation of Rmax compared to the existing models, estimation errors are unavoidable because of fundamental uncertainties regarding the typhoon's structure or insufficient number of available typhoon data. In fact, a numerical simulation for the 2013 Typhoon Haiyan as well as 2015 Typhoon Goni demonstrates a substantial difference in the storm surge height for different Rmax. Therefore, the variability of Rmax should be taken into account in storm surge simulations (e.g., Rmax = 0.15 R50-0.35 R50), independently of the model used, to minimize the risk of over- or underestimating storm surges. The proposed method is expected to increase the predictability of major storm surges and to contribute to disaster risk management, particularly in the western North Pacific, including countries such as Japan, China, Taiwan, the Philippines, and Vietnam.

  4. Evidence of enhanced radius of Hoyle rotational state in12C inelastic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, M.

    2017-06-01

    Nuclear radius of three α rotational state in12C with a life time of 10-21 second, which has been expected to have much more extended radius than the ground12C nucleus, is speculated from systematic analysis of the differential cross section of the α +12C inelastic scattering. Present analysis predicts about 0.6 ∼ 1.0 fm enhancement in the matter radius of the three α rotational state in comparison to the normal radius of the ground state. The spatial extension of the three α rotational state is comparable to the extended radius observed in the neutron halo phenomena.

  5. On Relativistic Space Charge Limited Current in Planar, Cylindrical, and Spherical Diodes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-07-01

    AFRL-RD-PS- AFRL-RD-PS- TP-2016-0015 TP-2016-0015 ON RELATIVISTIC SPACE CHARGE LIMITED CURRENT IN PLANAR, CYLINDRICAL, AND SPHERICAL DIODES...01-06-2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE On Relativistic Space Charge Limited Current in Planar, Cylindrical, and Spherical Diodes 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER IN...where ra and rc are, respectively, the anode and cathode radius. 15. SUBJECT TERMS space charge limit, emission, current, relativistic 16. SECURITY

  6. Quasilinear diffusion coefficients in a finite Larmor radius expansion for ion cyclotron heated plasmas

    DOE PAGES

    Lee, Jungpyo; Wright, John; Bertelli, Nicola; ...

    2017-04-24

    In this study, a reduced model of quasilinear velocity diffusion by a small Larmor radius approximation is derived to couple the Maxwell’s equations and the Fokker Planck equation self-consistently for the ion cyclotron range of frequency waves in a tokamak. The reduced model ensures the important properties of the full model by Kennel-Engelmann diffusion, such as diffusion directions, wave polarizations, and H-theorem. The kinetic energy change (Wdot ) is used to derive the reduced model diffusion coefficients for the fundamental damping (n = 1) and the second harmonic damping (n = 2) to the lowest order of the finite Larmormore » radius expansion. The quasilinear diffusion coefficients are implemented in a coupled code (TORIC-CQL3D) with the equivalent reduced model of the dielectric tensor. We also present the simulations of the ITER minority heating scenario, in which the reduced model is verified within the allowable errors from the full model results.« less

  7. Ulnar Shortening Osteotomy After Distal Radius Fracture Malunion: Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Barbaric, Katarina; Rujevcan, Gordan; Labas, Marko; Delimar, Domagoj; Bicanic, Goran

    2015-01-01

    Malunion of distal radius fracture is often complicated with shortening of the radius with disturbed radio- ulnar variance, frequently associated with lesions of triangular fibrocartilage complex and instability of the distal radioulnar joint. Positive ulnar variance may result in wrist pain located in ulnar part of the joint, limited ulnar deviation and forearm rotation with development of degenerative changes due to the overloading that occurs between the ulnar head and corresponding carpus. Ulnar shortening osteotomy (USO) is the standard procedure for correcting positive ulnar variance. Goal of this procedure is to minimize the symptoms by restoring the neutral radio - ulnar variance. In this paper we present a variety of surgical techniques available for ulnar shorthening osteotomy, their advantages and drawbacks. Methods of ulnar shortening osteotomies are divided into intraarticular and extraarticular. Intraarticular method of ulnar shortening can be performed arthroscopically or through open approach. Extraarticular methods include subcapital osteotomy and osteotomy of ulnar diaphysis, which depending on shape can be transverse, oblique, and step cut. All of those osteotomies can be performed along wrist arthroscopy in order to dispose and treat possibly existing triangular fibrocartilage complex injuries. At the end we described surgical procedures that can be done in case of ulnar shorthening osteotomy failure. PMID:26157524

  8. Double V-shaped cancellous osteotomy of the distal radius for Kienböck's disease.

    PubMed

    Aly, Tarek Ahmed

    2009-03-01

    Treatments of Kienböck's disease range from conservative measures-usually immobilization during the acute phase-to such procedures as joint leveling by radial shortening or ulnar lengthening, intercarpal fusion, silastic arthroplasty, and vascularized bone grafts. Joint-leveling procedures have many complications such as nonunion, hardware problems, and pain. In this study, 34 patients with Kienböck's disease, stage 1 through 3B in Lichtman's classification, were treated with a new technique: a double V-shaped metaphyseal osteotomy of the distal radius and dorsal tilt of the distal radius. The patients were evaluated clinically regarding pain, which decreased in 88% of patients; range of motion, which improved in all patients; and grip strength, which improved by 90%. Progression of the disease was assessed radiologically by determining the carpal height ratio and the carpal ulnar distance ratio. There were no cases with nonunion of the radial osteotomy at follow-up. This procedure is an effective treatment method for Kienböck's disease in wrists that do not have degenerative changes in the adjacent carpal joints.

  9. Solar cycle dependence of the sun's radius at lambda = 525.0 nm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulrich, Roger K.; Bertello, L.

    1995-01-01

    The Mount Wilson (California) synoptic program of solar magnetic observations scans the solar disk between 1 and 20 times per day. As part of this program, the radius is determined as an average distance between the image center and the point where the intensity in the FeI line at lambda = 525.0 nm drops to 25 percent of its value at the disk's center. The data base of information was analyzed and corrected for effects such as scattered light and atmospheric reflection. The solar variability and the measurement techniques are described. The observation data sets, the corrections made to the data, and the observed variations, are discussed. It is stated that similar spectral lines at lambda = 525.0 nm, which are common in the solar spectrum, probably exhibit similar radius changes. All portions of the sun are weighted equally so that it is concluded that, within spectral lines, the radiating area of the sun is increased at the solar maximum.

  10. Tomographical description of tennis-loaded radius: reciprocal relation between bone size and volumetric BMD.

    PubMed

    Ashizawa, N; Nonaka, K; Michikami, S; Mizuki, T; Amagai, H; Tokuyama, K; Suzuki, M

    1999-04-01

    Effects of long-term tennis loading on volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD) and geometric properties of playing-arm radius were examined. Paired forearms of 16 tennis players (10 women) and 12 healthy controls (7 women), aged 18-24 yr, were scanned at mid and distal site by using peripheral quantitative computerized tomography. Tomographic data at midradius showed that tennis playing led to a slight decrease in cortical vBMD (-0.8% vs. nonplaying arm, P < 0. 05) and increase both in periosteal and endocoritcal bone area (+15. 2% for periosteal bone, P < 0.001; and +18.8% for endocortical bone, P < 0.001). These data suggest that, together with an increase in cortical thickness (+6.4%, P < 0.01), cortical drift toward periosteal direction resulted in improvement of mechanical characteristics of the playing-arm midradius. Enlargement of periosteal bone area was also observed at distal radius (+6.8%, P < 0.01), and the relative side-to-side difference in periosteal bone area was inversely related to that in trabecular vBMD (r = -0.53, P < 0.05). We conclude that an improvement of mechanical properties of young adult bone in response to long-term exercise is related to geometric adaptation but less to changes in vBMD.

  11. Measurement of ulnar variance and radial inclination on X-rays of healed distal radius fractures. With the axis of the distal radius or ulna?

    PubMed

    Thuysbaert, Gilles; Ringburg, Akkie; Petronilia, Steven; Vanden Berghe, Alex; Hollevoet, Nadine

    2015-06-01

    Ulnar variance and radial inclination are radiological parameters frequently used to evaluate displacement of distal radius fractures. In most studies measurements are based on the long central axis of the distal radius, although the axis of the distal ulna can also be used. The purpose of this study was to determine which axis is more reliable. Four observers performed measurements on standard anteroposterior digital wrist X-rays of 20 patients taken 1 and 2 months after sustaining an extra-articular distal radius fracture. Intraobserver reliability was similar with both methods. No difference was found in interobserver reliability between both methods for ulnar variance, but for radial inclination it was better with the axis through the radius. Measurements on two X-rays of the same wrist taken at a different moment were similar with both methods. It can be concluded that the central axis of the distal radius can remain the basis to determine ulnar variance and radial inclination.

  12. Emittance Measurements of Space Charge Dominated Electron Beam.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    AD-AI8 693 EMITTANE KASUREMNIS OF SPACE CHARG DOMINATED I/S ELECIRON BEAI) NAVAL SURFACE WEAPONS CENTER SILVER SPRING N, NASUNG El AL. 01 JUN 65 NSW...UNIT NUMBERS 10901 New Hampshire Avenue Silver Spring, Maryland 20903-5000 I. CONTROLLING OFFICE NAME AND ADDRESS 12. REPORT DATE 1 June 1985 13. NUMBER...by a plate with a pinhole of radius rp which travels on the -axis, This system is commonly 8 NSWC TR 85-244 designed as L > a (beam radius) >> d > rp

  13. Stability of gravitating charged-scalar solitons in a cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponglertsakul, Supakchai; Dolan, Sam R.; Winstanley, Elizabeth

    2016-07-01

    We present new regular solutions of Einstein-charged-scalar-field theory in a cavity. The system is enclosed inside a reflecting mirrorlike boundary, on which the scalar field vanishes. The mirror is placed at the zero of the scalar field closest to the origin, and inside this boundary our solutions are regular. We study the stability of these solitons under linear, spherically symmetric perturbations of the metric, scalar and electromagnetic fields. If the radius of the mirror is sufficiently large, we present numerical evidence for the stability of the solitons. For small mirror radius, some of the solitons are unstable. We discuss the physical interpretation of this instability.

  14. Influence of the Si/SiO2 interface on the charge carrier density of Si nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, V.; Senz, S.; Gösele, U.

    2007-02-01

    The electrical properties of Si nanowires covered by a SiO2 shell are influenced by the properties of the Si/SiO2 interface. This interface can be characterized by the fixed oxide charge density Qf and the interface trap level density Dit. We derive expressions for the effective charge carrier density in silicon nanowires as a function of Qf, Dit, the nanowire radius, and the dopant density. It is found that a nanowire is fully depleted when its radius is smaller than a critical radius acrit. An analytic expression for acrit is derived.

  15. Radius of lunar core estimated by GRAIL results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, K.; Yamada, R.; Kikuchi, F.; Iwata, T.; Hanada, H.; Ishihara, Y.; Kamata, S.; Sasaki, S.

    2013-12-01

    Internal structure and composition of the Moon provide important clue and constraints on theories for how the Moon formed and evolved. The Apollo seismic network has contributed to the internal structure modeling. Efforts have been made to detect the lunar core from the noisy Apollo data (e.g., [1], [2]), but there is scant information about the structure below the deepest moonquakes at about 1000 km depth. On the other hand, there have been geodetic studies to infer the deep structure of the Moon. For example, LLR (Lunar Laser Ranging) data analyses detected a displacement of the lunar pole of rotation, indicating that dissipation is acting on the rotation arising from a fluid core [3]. Bayesian inversion using geodetic data (such as mass, moments of inertia, tidal Love numbers k2 and h2, and quality factor Q) also suggests a fluid core and partial melt in the lower mantle region [4]. Recent analyses of GRAIL data have achieved the improved k2 accuracy; JPL solution is 0.02405 × 0.00018 [5], and GSFC solution is 0.02427 × 0.00026 [6]. The two solutions are consistent with each other within their error bounds, and the accuracy of k2 is now about 1 %. Such an accurately-determined Love number will contribute to constrain the structure of the lunar deep interior, such as the radius of the possible liquid core. We used geodetic data of the mass, the mean moment of inertia, the Love numbers h2 and k2 to infer the size of liquid core. It is difficult to tightly constrain the internal structure from the geodetic data only because there are trade-offs among the structures of crust, mantle, and core. In our preliminary analysis we used a 5-layer model and the mantle structure was constrained by VPREMOON [2] with 5 % error for density and 10 % error for shear and bulk moduli being assumed. An inversion using Markov chain Monte Carlo method indicates that the core radius is 480 × 50 km, but the density values were sampled around the assumed lower limit of 3600 kg/m3. When

  16. CHANGES IN THE ELECTRICAL SURFACE CHARGE AND TRANSPLANTATION PROPERTIES OF TA3 ASCITES TUMOR CELLS DURING SHORT-TERM MAINTENANCE IN AN ISOTONIC SALT SOLUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Tenforde, T. S.; Richards, W. R.; Kelly, L. S.

    1980-12-01

    TA3 ascites tumor cells maintained in vitro as a dilute suspension in 0.9% NaCl solution (physiological saline) were found to undergo time-dependent degenerative processes leading to alterations in both membrane characteristics and tumor transplantation properties. A 30% decrease in the negative cellular surface charge density occurred within 2 hr. when TA3 cells were incubated in a 0.9% NaCl solution at 23 °C. A similar reduction in negative surface charge density occurred within 0.5 hr. when the medium was maintained at 37 °C. This time-dependent reduction in surface charge was prevented when cellular metabolism was blocked either by maintaining the medium at 4 °C. or by adding 1 mM cyanide ion to a 23 °C medium. TA3 cells incubated as a dilute suspension in 0.9% NaCl solution at 23 °C also exhibited a large 9 time-dependent reduction in proliferative capacity in isogeneic LAF1/J hosts, as indicated by an increase in the tumor dose for 50% mortality (TD50). Lowering the temperature of the medium to 4 °C was observed to slow the onset of the degenerative processes that lead to a decreased transplantability of TA3 cells. The modification in growth properties of TA3 cells maintained in vitro was found to be attributable in part to an alteration in tumor histocompatibility. This effect was demonstrated by comparing the tumor growth kinetics and TD50 values in normal hosts versus hosts that had been immunosuppressed by whole-body irradiation. Following the in vitro maintenance of TA3 cells, nigrosin dye exclusion tests were performed as a means of assessing cell viability. Evidence obtained in this series of experiments indicated that vital staining is an inadequate criterion for judging either the extent of cell membrane damage or the loss of cellular proliferative capacity.

  17. Charge of particles in plasmas under external UV-radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puttscher, M.; Melzer, A.

    2011-11-01

    In this experiment we investigate the charge of dust particles when they are exposed to external UV-radiation. The determination of the changes in charge of the dust particles is given by a combination of two methods to evaluate electrical charge: the resonance method and the normal mode analysis. This contribution describes the experimental setup and the determination of the charge differences.

  18. [Py-Desmanet pinning in distal radius fractures].

    PubMed

    Alexa, O; Popia, I

    2009-01-01

    Internal fixation by pinning is one of the most used methods of surgical treatment in fractures of the distal extremity of the radius. As in stable fractures a styloid pinning is satisfactory, in unstable fractures however we must resort to different patterns of pin insertion, in order to effectively prevent the secondary displacement of the fractured fragments. The elastic pinning described by Py and Desmanet is one of the possibilities of inserting the pins. The principle of this method is to use the bending-induced tension in the pins to counteract the postero-lateral displacing forces. The authors have treated by this technique five patients with distal radius fractures (3 women and 2 men) about 56 years of average age, all with good-quality bone, all with Colles' fracture pattern (2-4 cm above the radio-carpal articulation, no articular involvement, posterior displacement of the distal fragment). The reduction of the fractures was achieved by closed manipulation and controlled intraoperatively with the C-arm. We preferred to reduce the fractures before inserting the pins, although this is not compulsory, according to the authors of the technique. The approach was minimally-invasive, through two 1-cm long incisions. The pins, previously blunted and curved along the last centimeters, were introduced using a "T"-shaped handle. The potential complications, consisting of injuries of the many elements which cross the region, were avoided by sufficiently long incisions and identification and retraction of these elements (tendons, nervous branches) in order not to penetrate them with the pins. The aftertreatment consisted of immediate mobilization of the wrist in one patient, 21-day splinting in other two and 30-day splinting in the last two, depending on the intraoperative assessment of the stability of the fixation. The pins were removed at 45 days postoperatively in all cases. There were no complications such as loss of reduction or pin migration. In all cases

  19. What Is the Largest Einstein Radius in the Universe?

    SciTech Connect

    Oguri, Masamune; Blandford, Roger D.

    2008-08-05

    The Einstein radius plays a central role in lens studies as it characterizes the strength of gravitational lensing. In particular, the distribution of Einstein radii near the upper cutoff should probe the probability distribution of the largest mass concentrations in the universe. Adopting a triaxial halo model, we compute expected distributions of large Einstein radii. To assess the cosmic variance, we generate a number of Monte-Carlo realizations of all-sky catalogues of massive clusters. We find that the expected largest Einstein radius in the universe is sensitive to parameters characterizing the cosmological model, especially {sigma}{sub s}: for a source redshift of unity, they are 42{sub -7}{sup +9}, 35{sub -6}{sup +8}, and 54{sub -7}{sup +12} arcseconds (errors denote 1{sigma} cosmic variance), assuming best-fit cosmological parameters of the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe five-year (WMAP5), three-year (WMAP3) and one-year (WMAP1) data, respectively. These values are broadly consistent with current observations given their incompleteness. The mass of the largest lens cluster can be as small as {approx} 10{sup 15} M{sub {circle_dot}}. For the same source redshift, we expect in all-sky {approx} 35 (WMAP5), {approx} 15 (WMAP3), and {approx} 150 (WMAP1) clusters that have Einstein radii larger than 2000. For a larger source redshift of 7, the largest Einstein radii grow approximately twice as large. While the values of the largest Einstein radii are almost unaffected by the level of the primordial non-Gaussianity currently of interest, the measurement of the abundance of moderately large lens clusters should probe non-Gaussianity competitively with cosmic microwave background experiments, but only if other cosmological parameters are well-measured. These semi-analytic predictions are based on a rather simple representation of clusters, and hence calibrating them with N-body simulations will help to improve the accuracy. We also find that these 'superlens

  20. Failure of dual radius hydroxyapatite-coated acetabular cups

    PubMed Central

    D'Angelo, Fabio; Molina, Mauro; Riva, Giacomo; Zatti, Giovanni; Cherubino, Paolo

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Many kind of hydroxyapatite-coated cups were used, with favorable results in short term studies; it was supposed that its use could improve osteointegration of the cup, enhancing thus stability and survivorship. The purpose of this study is to analyze the long term behavior of the hemispheric HA coated, Dual Radius Osteonics cup and to discuss the way of failure through the exam of the revised components and of both periacetabular and osteolysis tissue. Materials and Methods Between 1994 and 1997, at the Department of Orthopedic Sciences of the Insubria University, using the posterolateral approach, were implanted 276 Dual Radius Osteonics® in 256 patients, with mean age of 63 years. Results At a mean follow-up of 10 years (range 8–12 years), 183 cups in 165 patients, were available for clinical and radiographical evaluation. 22 Cups among the 183 were revised (11%). The cause of revision was aseptic loosening in 17 cases, septic loosening in one case, periprosthetic fracture in another case, osteolysis and polyethylene wear in two cases and, finally, recurrent dislocations in the last one. In the remaining patients, mean HHS increased from a preoperative value of 50,15 to a postoperative value of 92,69. The mean polyethylene wear was 1,25 mm (min. 0,08, max. 3,9 mm), with a mean annual wear of 0,17 mm. The mean acetabular migration on the two axis was 1,6 mm and 1,8 mm. Peri-acetabular osteolysis were recorded in 89% of the implants (163 cases). The cumulative survivorship (revision as endpoint) at the time was 88,9%. Conclusion Our study confirms the bad behavior of this type of cup probably related to the design, to the method of HA fixation. The observations carried out on the revised cup confirm these hypotheses but did not clarify if the third body wear could be a further problem. Another interesting aspect is the high incidence of osteolysis, which are often asymptomatic becoming a problem for the surgeon as the patient refuses the